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Sample records for aggregation cluster source

  1. Single target sputter deposition of alloy nanoparticles with adjustable composition via a gas aggregation cluster source.

    PubMed

    Vahl, Alexander; Strobel, Julian; Reichstein, Wiebke; Polonskyi, Oleksandr; Strunskus, Thomas; Kienle, Lorenz; Faupel, Franz

    2017-04-28

    Alloy nanoparticles with variable compositions add a new dimension to nanoscience and have many applications. Here we suggest a novel approach for the fabrication of variable composition alloy nanoparticles that is based on a Haberland type gas aggregation cluster source with a custom-made multicomponent target for magnetron sputtering. The approach, which was demonstrated here for gold-rich AgAu nanoparticles, combines a narrow nanoparticle size distribution with in operando variation of composition via the gas pressure as well as highly efficient usage of target material. The latter is particularly attractive for precious metals. Varying argon pressure during deposition, we achieved in operando changes of AgAu alloy nanoparticle composition of more than 13 at%. The alloy nanoparticles were characterized by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. The characteristic plasmon resonances of multilayer nanoparticle composites were analyzed by UV-vis spectroscopy. Tuning of the number of particles per unit area (particle densities) within individual layers showed an additional degree of freedom to tailor the optical properties of multilayer nanocomposites. By extension of this technique to more complex systems, the presented results are expected to encourage and simplify further research based on plasmonic multi-element nanoparticles. The present method is by no means restricted to plasmonics or nanoparticle based applications, but is also highly relevant for conventional magnetron sputtering of alloys and can be extended to in operando control of alloy concentration by magnetic field.

  2. Aggregation kinetics and structure of cryoimmunoglobulins clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spirito, M. De; Chiappini, R.; Bassi, F. Andreasi; Stasio, E. Di; Giardina, B.; Arcovito, G.

    2002-02-01

    Cryoimmunoglobulins are pathological antibodies characterized by a temperature-dependent reversible insolubility. Rheumatoid factors (RF) are immunoglobulins possessing anti-immunoglobulin activity and usually consist of an IgM antibody that recognizes IgG as antigen. These proteins are present in sera of patients affected by a large variety of different pathologies, such as HCV infection, neoplastic and autoimmune diseases. Aggregation and precipitation of cryoimmunoglobulins, leading to vasculiti, are physical phenomena behind such pathologies. A deep knowledge of the physico-chemical mechanisms regulating such phenomena plays a fundamental role in biological and clinical applications. In this work, a preliminary investigation of the aggregation kinetics and of the final macromolecular structure of the aggregates is presented. Through static light scattering techniques, the gyration radius Rg and the fractal dimension Dm of the growing clusters have been determined. However, while the initial aggregation mechanism could be described using the universal reaction-limited cluster-cluster aggregation (RLCCA) theory, at longest times from the beginning of the process, the RLCCA theory fails and a restructuring of clusters is observed together with an increase of the cluster fractal dimension Dm up to a value Dm∼3. The time tn, at which the restructuring takes place, and the final cluster size can be modulated by varying the quenching temperature.

  3. Formation and structure of stable aggregates in binary diffusion-limited cluster-cluster aggregation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-López, J. M.; Moncho-Jordá, A.; Schmitt, A.; Hidalgo-Álvarez, R.

    2005-09-01

    Binary diffusion-limited cluster-cluster aggregation processes are studied as a function of the relative concentration of the two species. Both, short and long time behaviors are investigated by means of three-dimensional off-lattice Brownian Dynamics simulations. At short aggregation times, the validity of the Hogg-Healy-Fuerstenau approximation is shown. At long times, a single large cluster containing all initial particles is found to be formed when the relative concentration of the minority particles lies above a critical value. Below that value, stable aggregates remain in the system. These stable aggregates are composed by a few minority particles that are highly covered by majority ones. Our off-lattice simulations reveal a value of approximately 0.15 for the critical relative concentration. A qualitative explanation scheme for the formation and growth of the stable aggregates is developed. The simulations also explain the phenomenon of monomer discrimination that was observed recently in single cluster light scattering experiments.

  4. Hierarchical Clustering and Visualization of Aggregate Cyber Data

    SciTech Connect

    Patton, Robert M; Beaver, Justin M; Steed, Chad A; Potok, Thomas E; Treadwell, Jim N

    2011-01-01

    Most commercial intrusion detections systems (IDS) can produce a very high volume of alerts, and are typically plagued by a high false positive rate. The approach described here uses Splunk to aggregate IDS alerts. The aggregated IDS alerts are retrieved from Splunk programmatically and are then clustered using text analysis and visualized using a sunburst diagram to provide an additional understanding of the data. The equivalent of what the cluster analysis and visualization provides would require numerous detailed queries using Splunk and considerable manual effort.

  5. Wind farms model aggregation using probabilistic clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, Paula Odete; Ferreira, Ángela Paula

    2013-10-01

    The main objective of this research is the identification of homogeneous groups within wind farms of a major operator playing in the energy sector in Portugal, based on two multivariate analyses: Hierarchical Cluster Analysis and Discriminant Analysis, by using two independent variables: annual liquid hours and net production. From the produced outputs there were identified three homogenous groups of wind farms: (1) medium Installed Capacity and Induction Generator based Technology, (2) high Installed Capacity and Synchronous Generator based Technology and (3) medium Installed Capacity and Synchronous Generator based Technology, which includes the wind farms with the higher annual liquid hours. It has been found that the results obtained by cluster analysis are well classified, with a total percentage of correct classification of 97,1%, which can be considered excellent.

  6. Cluster-cluster aggregations of superparamagnetic particles in a rotational magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Ukai, Tomofumi; Morimoto, Hisao; Maekawa, Toru

    2011-06-01

    We investigate the cluster-cluster aggregations of superparamagnetic particles in a rotational magnetic field numerically by the Brownian dynamics method, focusing on the cases of ϕ = 0.01 and 0.03 and Ma = 0, 0.001, 0.01, and 0.1, where ϕ is the area fraction of superparamagnetic particles and Ma is the Mason number, i.e., the ratio of viscous drag to magnetic force acting on a magnetic particle. We clarify the effect of ϕ and Ma on the cluster-cluster aggregation process from the point of view of dynamic scaling law.

  7. Data relationship degree-based clustering data aggregation for VANET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Rakesh; Dave, Mayank

    2016-03-01

    Data aggregation is one of the major needs of vehicular ad hoc networks (VANETs) due to the constraints of resources. Data aggregation in VANET can reduce the data redundancy in the process of data gathering and thus conserving the bandwidth. In realistic applications, it is always important to construct an effective route strategy that optimises not only communication cost but also the aggregation cost. Data aggregation at the cluster head by individual vehicle causes flooding of the data, which results in maximum latency and bandwidth consumption. Another approach of data aggregation in VANET is sending local representative data based on spatial correlation of sampled data. In this article, we emphasise on the problem that recent spatial correlation data models of vehicles in VANET are not appropriate for measuring the correlation in a complex and composite environment. Moreover, the data represented by these models is generally inaccurate when compared to the real data. To minimise this problem, we propose a group-based data aggregation method that uses data relationship degree (DRD). In the proposed approach, DRD is a spatial relationship measurement parameter that measures the correlation between a vehicle's data and its neighbouring vehicles' data. The DRD clustering method where grouping of vehicle's data is done based on the available data and its correlation is presented in detail. Results prove that the representative data using proposed approach have a low distortion and provides an improvement in packet delivery ratio and throughput (up to of 10.84% and 24.82% respectively) as compared to the other state-of-the-art solutions like Cluster-Based Accurate Syntactic Compression of Aggregated Data in VANETs.

  8. 200 North Aggregate Area source AAMS report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    This report presents the results of an aggregate area management study (AAMS) for the 200 North Aggregate Area in the 200 Areas of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site in Washington State. This scoping level study provides the basis for initiating Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) activities under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) or Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigations (RFI) and Corrective Measures Studies (CMS) under RCRA. This report also integrates select RCRA treatment, storage, or disposal (TSD) closure activities with CERCLA and RCRA past practice investigations.

  9. Synthesis of supramolecular iron (III) complexes by cluster aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seddon, Elisa Joy

    2000-12-01

    Biologically, iron is a ubiquitous and versatile metal, found in the active sites of proteins responsible for both oxygen and electron transport. Multinuclear iron-oxo proteins are either dinuclear, or contain many iron atoms; the [Fe2O] unit occurs in hemerythrin (Hr), ribonucleotide reductase, purple acid phosphatase (POP) and methane monooxygenase (MMO), whereas ferritin (Ft) can store up to 4500 iron atoms. Iron storage and transport are essential for protecting biological organisms from free iron, since free Fe(II) ions, will react with dioxygen to form destructive organic radicals, and free Fe(III) ions form insoluble iron hydroxide aggregates under physiological conditions. The tendency of iron to form molecular aggregates in systems containing water or alcohol, together with the fact that each iron atom possesses a large number of unpaired electrons (5 for high-spin FeIII) often results in products possessing large spin ground states (S). The current record-holder for iron is a Fe19 complex, with at least 33 unpaired electrons in the ground state (S = 33/2). Hence, iron is also important in the rapidly developing field of molecular magnetic materials. For these two reasons, the preparation of iron clusters with new topologies and properties has become a major goal of many synthetic inorganic groups, including our own. In this thesis work, synthetic and spectroscopic methods of inorganic coordination chemistry were used to achieve two different goals: firstly, to synthesize dinuclear iron complexes with the use of tetradentate ligands in order to study the magnetic interactions between the two metal centers; and secondly, to identify reactions and characterize the products whereby pre-formed iron oxide clusters undergo aggregation reactions to produce higher nuclearity products. The tetradentate ligands investigated were a bis-(beta-diketone) ligand L and a bis-bpy ligand L'. The reactions involving L and Fe(III) reagents produced complexes with a triple

  10. Study of Optical Properties on Fractal Aggregation Using the GMM Method by Different Cluster Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Kuo-En; Lin, Tang-Huang; Lien, Wei-Hung

    2015-04-01

    Anthropogenic pollutants or smoke from biomass burning contribute significantly to global particle aggregation emissions, yet their aggregate formation and resulting ensemble optical properties are poorly understood and parameterized in climate models. Particle aggregation refers to formation of clusters in a colloidal suspension. In clustering algorithms, many parameters, such as fractal dimension, number of monomers, radius of monomer, and refractive index real part and image part, will alter the geometries and characteristics of the fractal aggregation and change ensemble optical properties further. The cluster-cluster aggregation algorithm (CCA) is used to specify the geometries of soot and haze particles. In addition, the Generalized Multi-particle Mie (GMM) method is utilized to compute the Mie solution from a single particle to the multi particle case. This computer code for the calculation of the scattering by an aggregate of spheres in a fixed orientation and the experimental data have been made publicly available. This study for the model inputs of optical determination of the monomer radius, the number of monomers per cluster, and the fractal dimension is presented. The main aim in this study is to analyze and contrast several parameters of cluster aggregation aforementioned which demonstrate significant differences of optical properties using the GMM method finally. Keywords: optical properties, fractal aggregation, GMM, CCA

  11. Globular cluster x-ray sources.

    PubMed

    Pooley, David

    2010-04-20

    Globular clusters and x-ray astronomy have a long and fruitful history. Uhuru and OSO-7 revealed highly luminous (> 10(36) ergs(-1)) x-ray sources in globular clusters, and Einstein and ROSAT revealed a larger population of low-luminosity (< 10(33) ergs(-1)) x-ray sources. It was realized early on that the high-luminosity sources were low-mass x-ray binaries in outburst and that they were orders of magnitude more abundant per unit mass in globular clusters than in the rest of the galaxy. However, the low-luminosity sources proved difficult to classify. Many ideas were put forth--low-mass x-ray binaries in quiescence (qLMXBs), cataclysmic variables (CVs), active main-sequence binaries (ABs), and millisecond pulsars (MSPs)--but secure identifications were scarce. In ROSAT observations of 55 clusters, about 25 low-luminosity sources were found. Chandra has now observed over 80 Galactic globular clusters, and these observations have revealed over 1,500 x-ray sources. The superb angular resolution has allowed for many counterpart identifications, providing clues to the nature of this population. It is a heterogeneous mix of qLMXBs, CVs, ABs, and MSPs, and it has been shown that the qLMXBs and CVs are both, in part, overabundant like the luminous LMXBs. The number of x-ray sources in a cluster correlates very well with its encounter frequency. This points to dynamical formation scenarios for the x-ray sources and shows them to be excellent tracers of the complicated internal dynamics. The relation between the encounter frequency and the number of x-ray sources has been used to suggest that we have misunderstood the dynamical states of globular clusters.

  12. Low Fractal Dimension Cluster-Dilute Soot Aggregates from a Premixed Flame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarty, Rajan K.; Moosmüller, Hans; Arnott, W. Patrick; Garro, Mark A.; Tian, Guoxun; Slowik, Jay G.; Cross, Eben S.; Han, Jeong-Ho; Davidovits, Paul; Onasch, Timothy B.; Worsnop, Douglas R.

    2009-06-01

    Using a novel morphology segregation technique, we observed minority populations (≈3%) of submicron-sized, cluster-dilute fractal-like aggregates, formed in the soot-formation window (fuel-to-air equivalence ratio of 2.0-3.5) of a premixed flame, to have mass fractal dimensions between 1.2 and 1.51. Our observations disagree with previous observations of a universal mass fractal dimension of ≈1.8 for fractal-like aerosol aggregates formed in the dilute-limit via three-dimensional diffusion-limited cluster aggregation processes. A hypothesis is presented to explain this observation. Subject to verification of this hypothesis, it may be possible to control the fractal dimension and associated properties of aggregates in the cluster-dilute limit through application of a static electric field during the aggregation process.

  13. Cluster-cluster aggregation with particle replication and chemotaxy: a simple model for the growth of animal cells in culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, S. G.; Martins, M. L.

    2010-09-01

    Aggregation of animal cells in culture comprises a series of motility, collision and adhesion processes of basic relevance for tissue engineering, bioseparations, oncology research and in vitro drug testing. In the present paper, a cluster-cluster aggregation model with stochastic particle replication and chemotactically driven motility is investigated as a model for the growth of animal cells in culture. The focus is on the scaling laws governing the aggregation kinetics. Our simulations reveal that in the absence of chemotaxy the mean cluster size and the total number of clusters scale in time as stretched exponentials dependent on the particle replication rate. Also, the dynamical cluster size distribution functions are represented by a scaling relation in which the scaling function involves a stretched exponential of the time. The introduction of chemoattraction among the particles leads to distribution functions decaying as power laws with exponents that decrease in time. The fractal dimensions and size distributions of the simulated clusters are qualitatively discussed in terms of those determined experimentally for several normal and tumoral cell lines growing in culture. It is shown that particle replication and chemotaxy account for the simplest cluster size distributions of cellular aggregates observed in culture.

  14. Globular cluster X-ray sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pooley, D.

    We know from observations that globular clusters are very efficient catalysts in forming unusual binary systems, such as low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs), cataclysmic variables (CVs), and millisecond pulsars (MSPs), with formation rates per unit mass exceeding those in the Galactic disk by orders of magnitude. The high stellar densities in globular clusters trigger various dynamical interactions: exchange encounters, direct collisions, destruction of binaries, and tidal capture. This binary population is, in turn, critical to the stabilization of globular clusters against gravitational collapse; the long-term stability of a cluster is thought to depend on tapping into the gravitational binding energy of such close binaries. I will present an overview of the current state of globular cluster X-ray observations, as well as our work on deep Chandra observations of M4, where we reach some of the lowest X-ray luminosities in any globular cluster (comparable to the deep observations of 47 Tuc and NGC 6397). One of M4 X-ray sources previously classified as a white dwarf binary is likely a neutron star binary, and another X-ray source is a sub-subgiant, the nature of which is still unclear. skip=3pt

  15. A Game Theory Algorithm for Intra-Cluster Data Aggregation in a Vehicular Ad Hoc Network.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuzhong; Weng, Shining; Guo, Wenzhong; Xiong, Naixue

    2016-02-19

    Vehicular ad hoc networks (VANETs) have an important role in urban management and planning. The effective integration of vehicle information in VANETs is critical to traffic analysis, large-scale vehicle route planning and intelligent transportation scheduling. However, given the limitations in the precision of the output information of a single sensor and the difficulty of information sharing among various sensors in a highly dynamic VANET, effectively performing data aggregation in VANETs remains a challenge. Moreover, current studies have mainly focused on data aggregation in large-scale environments but have rarely discussed the issue of intra-cluster data aggregation in VANETs. In this study, we propose a multi-player game theory algorithm for intra-cluster data aggregation in VANETs by analyzing the competitive and cooperative relationships among sensor nodes. Several sensor-centric metrics are proposed to measure the data redundancy and stability of a cluster. We then study the utility function to achieve efficient intra-cluster data aggregation by considering both data redundancy and cluster stability. In particular, we prove the existence of a unique Nash equilibrium in the game model, and conduct extensive experiments to validate the proposed algorithm. Results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm has advantages over typical data aggregation algorithms in both accuracy and efficiency.

  16. A Game Theory Algorithm for Intra-Cluster Data Aggregation in a Vehicular Ad Hoc Network

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yuzhong; Weng, Shining; Guo, Wenzhong; Xiong, Naixue

    2016-01-01

    Vehicular ad hoc networks (VANETs) have an important role in urban management and planning. The effective integration of vehicle information in VANETs is critical to traffic analysis, large-scale vehicle route planning and intelligent transportation scheduling. However, given the limitations in the precision of the output information of a single sensor and the difficulty of information sharing among various sensors in a highly dynamic VANET, effectively performing data aggregation in VANETs remains a challenge. Moreover, current studies have mainly focused on data aggregation in large-scale environments but have rarely discussed the issue of intra-cluster data aggregation in VANETs. In this study, we propose a multi-player game theory algorithm for intra-cluster data aggregation in VANETs by analyzing the competitive and cooperative relationships among sensor nodes. Several sensor-centric metrics are proposed to measure the data redundancy and stability of a cluster. We then study the utility function to achieve efficient intra-cluster data aggregation by considering both data redundancy and cluster stability. In particular, we prove the existence of a unique Nash equilibrium in the game model, and conduct extensive experiments to validate the proposed algorithm. Results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm has advantages over typical data aggregation algorithms in both accuracy and efficiency. PMID:26907272

  17. Photoacoustic ultrasound sources from diffusion-limited aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Krutik; Brubaker, Morgan; Kotlerman, Alexander; Salazar, Robert; Wolf, Eli; Weld, David M.

    2016-10-01

    Metallic diffusion-limited aggregate (DLA) films are well-known to exhibit near-perfect broadband optical absorption. We demonstrate that such films also manifest a substantial and relatively material-independent photoacoustic response, as a consequence of their random nanostructure. We theoretically and experimentally analyze the photoacoustic phenomena in DLA films and show that they can be used to create broadband air-coupled acoustic sources. These sources are inexpensive and simple to fabricate and work into the ultrasonic regime. We illustrate the device possibilities by building and testing an optically addressed acoustic phased array capable of producing virtually arbitrary acoustic intensity patterns in air.

  18. Crossover from 2-dimensional to 3-dimensional aggregations of clusters on square lattice substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yi; Zhu, Yu-Hong; Pan, Qi-Fa; Yang, Bo; Tao, Xiang-Ming; Ye, Gao-Xiang

    2015-11-01

    A Monte Carlo study on the crossover from 2-dimensional to 3-dimensional aggregations of clusters is presented. Based on the traditional cluster-cluster aggregation (CCA) simulation, a modified growth model is proposed. The clusters (including single particles and their aggregates) diffuse with diffusion step length l (1 ≤ l ≤ 7) and aggregate on a square lattice substrate. If the number of particles contained in a cluster is larger than a critical size sc, the particles at the edge of the cluster have a possibility to jump onto the upper layer, which results in the crossover from 2-dimensional to 3-dimensional aggregations. Our simulation results are in good agreement with the experimental findings. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11374082 and 11074215), the Science Foundation of Zhejiang Province Department of Education, China (Grant No. Y201018280), the Fundamental Research Funds for Central Universities, China (Grant No. 2012QNA3010), and the Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (Grant No. 20100101110005).

  19. Surveillance of clustering near point sources.

    PubMed

    Le, N D; Petkau, A J; Rosychuk, R

    Health authorities are often alerted to suspected cancer clusters near the vicinity of potential point sources by members of the public. A surveillance system, where administrative regions around the potential point sources are regularly monitored for high disease rates, would allow for responses which are easier to obtain, timelier, and less expensive than individual thorough investigations. The monitoring could be done by using the so-called 'focused' tests for detecting disease clustering. However, these tests, generally designed to detect clusters of a fixed size around the foci, are not particularly effective when dealing with administrative regions with substantial differences in populations. In this work, an approach which overcomes the problem to a certain extent is described. Here the selected cluster sizes are based on the populations of the administrative regions under examination. The approach is used to investigate whether cancer clustering appears in the vicinity of the pulp and paper mills in British Columbia for the years 1983-1989. The results indicate that the approach performs reasonably well in identifying cancer sites for which elevated risks have also been suggested in the epidemiologic literature. Consequently, this methodology could be utilized to provide guidance for further investigation even in the absence of local reports. Similarly, it could be readily utilized to provide timely responses to local reports.

  20. Ultraviolet background fluctuations with clustered sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desjacques, Vincent; Dizgah, Azadeh Moradinezhad; Biagetti, Matteo

    2014-11-01

    We develop a count-in-cells approach to the distribution of ultraviolet background fluctuations that includes source clustering. We demonstrate that an exact expression can be obtained if the clustering of ionizing sources follows the hierarchical ansatz. In this case, the intensity distribution depends solely on their two-point correlation function. We show that the void scaling function of high-redshift mock quasars is consistent with the negative binomial form, before applying our formalism to the description of He II-ionizing fluctuations at the end of helium reionization. The model inputs are the observed quasar luminosity function and two-point correlation at z ˜ 3. We find that, for an (comoving) attenuation length ≲55 Mpc, quasar clustering contributes less than 30 per cent of the variance of intensity fluctuations so long as the quasar correlation length does not exceed ˜15 Mpc. We investigate also the dependence of the intensity distribution on the large-scale environment. Differences in the mean He II-ionizing intensity between low- and high-density regions could be a factor of few if the sources are highly clustered. An accurate description of quasar demographics and their correlation with strong absorption systems is required to make more precise predictions.

  1. Kinetics and cluster morphology evolution of shear-driven aggregation of well-stabilized colloids.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xia; Wu, Hua; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2015-01-27

    We investigate the shear-driven aggregation of polystyrene colloids that are stabilized by both fixed and surfactant charges, using a microchannel device, in various particle volume fractions. The objective is to understand how the primary particles evolve to clusters with shearing time, how the cluster morphology develops along the aggregation with the effect of breakage and restructuring, and whether non-Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) interactions are present, affecting the kinetics. The time evolution of the primary particle conversion to big clusters is characterized by an induction time, followed by an explosive increase when the cluster size reaches a certain critical value, which confirms the self-acceleration kinetics developed in the literature. The size of the critical clusters has been quantified for the first time, and its scaling with the shear rate follows the literature prediction well. Moreover, analysis of the shear-driven kinetics confirms the presence of substantial non-DLVO interactions in the given system.

  2. Steep Spectrum Radio Sources in Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, Tracy E.

    2012-05-01

    Steep spectrum radio emission associated with galaxy clusters comes from compact central active galactic nuclei (AGN) driven radio sources in dense cool core clusters as well as from large regions of diffuse (halo and relic) emission associated with dynamically complex merging systems. These radio halos and relics are best traced at low radio frequencies where details of their morphology, location and spectral index distribution can be used to probe the underlying acceleration mechanism(s) as well as important details of large scale structure formation. Low frequency radio observations also play an important role in the study of AGN feedback into the intracluster medium and the regulation of cooling cores. While spectacular results are coming from the current generation of low frequency instruments, there will soon be a new revolution in studies of steep spectrum sources with the upcoming generation of low frequency interferometers on Earth and ultimately the moon.

  3. On the formation of copper nanoparticles in nanocluster aggregation source

    SciTech Connect

    Dutka, Mikhail V.; Vainchtein, David I.; De Hosson, Jeff Th. M.; Turkin, Anatoliy A.

    2015-05-15

    The influence of pressure and type of inert gas (Ar and Kr) on the morphology and size distribution of nanoparticles produced in a nanocluster source is studied experimentally. The experimental data are used to validate the model of cluster formation from a supersaturated atomic vapor in an inert buffer gas, which has been developed in our previous paper. The model predictions are in accordance with the experimental findings.

  4. THE BRIGHTEST CLUSTER X-RAY SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    King, Andrew

    2011-05-10

    There have been several recent claims of black hole binaries in globular clusters. I show that these candidate systems could instead be ultracompact X-ray binaries (UCXBs) in which a neutron star accretes from a white dwarf. They would represent a slightly earlier evolutionary stage of known globular cluster UCXBs such as 4U 1820-30, with white dwarf masses {approx}0.2 M{sub sun} and orbital periods below 5 minutes. Accretion is slightly super-Eddington and makes these systems ultraluminous sources with rather mild beaming factors b {approx} 0.3. Their theoretical luminosity function flattens slightly just above L{sub Edd} and then steepens at {approx}3L{sub Edd}. It predicts of order two detections in elliptical galaxies such as NGC 4472, as observed. The very bright X-ray source HLX-1 lies off the plane of its host S0a galaxy. If this is an indication of globular cluster membership, it could conceivably be a more extreme example of a UCXB with white dwarf mass M{sub 2} {approx_equal} 0.34 M{sub sun}. The beaming here is tighter (b {approx} (2.5-9) x 10{sup -3}), but the system's distance of 95 Mpc easily eliminates any need to invoke improbable alignment of the beam for detection. If its position instead indicates membership of a satellite dwarf galaxy, HLX-1 could have a much higher accretor mass {approx}1000 M{sub sun}

  5. Collective behavior in two-dimensional biological systems: Receptor clustering and beta-sheet aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Chinlin

    We studied two particular biomedical systems which exhibit collective molecular behavior. One is clustering of tumor necrosis factor receptor I (TNFR1), and another is β-sheet folding and aggregation. Receptor clustering has been shown to be a crucial step in many signaling events but its biological meaning has not been adequately addressed. Here, via a simple lattice model, we show how cells use this clustering machinery to enhance sensitivity as well as robustness. On the other hand, intracellular deposition of aggregated protein rich in β-sheet is a prominent cytopathological feature of most neurodegenerative diseases. How this aggregation occurs and how it responds to therapy is not completely understood. Here, we started from a reconstruction of the H-bond potential and carry out a full investigation of β-sheet thermodynamics as well as kinetics. We show that β-sheet aggregation is most likely due to molecular stacking and found that the minimal length of an aggregate mutant polymer corresponds well with the number observed in adult Huntington's disease. We have also shown that molecular agents such as dendrimers might fail at high-dose therapy; instead, a potential therapy strategy is to block β-turn formation. Our predictions can be used for future experimental tests and clinical trials.

  6. Irreversible Growth Algorithm for Branched Polymers (Lattice Animals), and Their Relation to Colloidal Cluster-Cluster Aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, R. C.; Lee, J. R.

    1996-03-01

    We prove that a new, irreversible growth algorithm, Non-Deletion Reaction-Limited Cluster-cluster Aggregation (NDRLCA), produces equilibrium Branched Polymers, expected to exhibit Lattice Animal statistics [1]. We implement NDRLCA, off-lattice, as a computer simulation for embedding dimension d=2 and 3, obtaining values for critical exponents, fractal dimension D and cluster mass distribution exponent tau: d=2, D≈ 1.53± 0.05, tau = 1.09± 0.06; d=3, D=1.96± 0.04, tau =1.50± 0.04 in good agreement with theoretical LA values. The simulation results do not support recent suggestions [2] that BPs may be in the same universality class as percolation. We also obtain values for a model-dependent critical “fugacity”, z_c and investigate the finite-size effects of our simulation, quantifying notions of “inbreeding” that occur in this algorithm. Finally we use an extension of the NDRLCA proof to show that standard Reaction-Limited Cluster-cluster Aggregation is very unlikely to be in the same universality class as Branched Polymers/Lattice Animals unless the backnone dimension for the latter is considerably less than the published value.

  7. Dense Cluster Formation during Aggregation and Gelation of Attractive Slippery Nanoemulsion Droplets

    SciTech Connect

    Wilking, J.N.; Graves, S.M.; Chang, C.B.; Meleson, K.; Mason, T.G.; Lin, M.Y.

    2006-01-13

    Using time-resolved small angle neutron scattering, we have measured the wave-number-dependent structure factor S(q) of monodisperse nanoemulsions that aggregate and gel after we suddenly turn on a strong, short-range, slippery attraction between the droplets. At high q, peaks in S(q) appear as dense clusters of droplets form, and S(q) increases strongly toward low q, as these dense clusters become locked into a rigid gel network, despite the fluidity of the films between the droplets. The long-time high-q structure of nanoemulsion gels formed by slippery diffusion-limited cluster aggregation is universal in shape and remarkably independent of the droplet volume fraction, {phi}.

  8. Aggregation of Adenovirus 2 in Source Water and Impacts on Disinfection by Chlorine.

    PubMed

    Kahler, Amy M; Cromeans, Theresa L; Metcalfe, Maureen G; Humphrey, Charles D; Hill, Vincent R

    2016-06-01

    It is generally accepted that viral particles in source water are likely to be found as aggregates attached to other particles. For this reason, it is important to investigate the disinfection efficacy of chlorine on aggregated viruses. A method to produce adenovirus particle aggregation was developed for this study. Negative stain electron microscopy was used to measure aggregation before and after addition of virus particles to surface water at different pH and specific conductance levels. The impact of aggregation on the efficacy of chlorine disinfection was also examined. Disinfection experiments with human adenovirus 2 (HAdV2) in source water were conducted using 0.2 mg/L free chlorine at 5 °C. Aggregation of HAdV2 in source water (≥3 aggregated particles) remained higher at higher specific conductance and pH levels. However, aggregation was highly variable, with the percentage of particles present in aggregates ranging from 43 to 71 %. Upon addition into source water, the aggregation percentage dropped dramatically. On average, chlorination CT values (chlorine concentration in mg/L × time in min) for 3-log10 inactivation of aggregated HAdV2 were up to three times higher than those for dispersed HAdV2, indicating that aggregation reduced the disinfection rate. This information can be used by water utilities and regulators to guide decision making regarding disinfection of viruses in water.

  9. Aggregation of Adenovirus 2 in Source Water and Impacts on Disinfection by Chlorine

    PubMed Central

    Cromeans, Theresa L.; Metcalfe, Maureen G.; Humphrey, Charles D.; Hill, Vincent R.

    2016-01-01

    It is generally accepted that viral particles in source water are likely to be found as aggregates attached to other particles. For this reason, it is important to investigate the disinfection efficacy of chlorine on aggregated viruses. A method to produce adenovirus particle aggregation was developed for this study. Negative stain electron microscopy was used to measure aggregation before and after addition of virus particles to surface water at different pH and specific conductance levels. The impact of aggregation on the efficacy of chlorine disinfection was also examined. Disinfection experiments with human adenovirus 2 (HAdV2) in source water were conducted using 0.2 mg/L free chlorine at 5 °C. Aggregation of HAdV2 in source water (≥3 aggregated particles) remained higher at higher specific conductance and pH levels. However, aggregation was highly variable, with the percentage of particles present in aggregates ranging from 43 to 71 %. Upon addition into source water, the aggregation percentage dropped dramatically. On average, chlorination CT values (chlorine concentration in mg/L × time in min) for 3-log10 inactivation of aggregated HAdV2 were up to three times higher than those for dispersed HAdV2, indicating that aggregation reduced the disinfection rate. This information can be used by water utilities and regulators to guide decision making regarding disinfection of viruses in water. PMID:26910058

  10. Aggregates from natural and recycled sources; economic assessments for construction applications; a materials flow study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilburn, David R.; Goonan, Thomas G.

    1998-01-01

    Increased amounts of recycled materials are being used to supplement natural aggregates (derived from crushed stone, sand and gravel) in road construction. An understanding of the economics and factors affecting the level of aggregates recycling is useful in estimating the potential for recycling and in assessing the total supply picture of aggregates. This investigation includes a descriptive analysis of the supply sources, technology, costs, incentives, deterrents, and market relationships associated with the production of aggregates.

  11. Ion aggregation in high salt solutions: ion network versus ion cluster.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seongheun; Kim, Heejae; Choi, Jun-Ho; Cho, Minhaeng

    2014-09-28

    The critical aggregation phenomena are ubiquitous in many self-assembling systems. Ions in high salt solutions could also spontaneously form larger ion aggregates, but their effects on hydrogen-bond structures in water have long been controversial. Here, carrying out molecular dynamics (MD) simulation studies of high salt solutions and comparing the MD simulation results with infrared absorption and pump-probe spectroscopy of O-D stretch mode of HDO in highly concentrated salt solutions and (13)C-NMR chemical shift of S(13)CN(-) in KSCN solutions, we find evidence on the onset of ion aggregate and large-scale ion-ion network formation that concomitantly breaks water hydrogen-bond structure in certain salt solutions. Despite that these experimental results cannot provide direct evidence on the three-dimensional morphological structures of ion aggregates, they serve as reference data for verifying MD simulation methods. The MD results suggest that disrupted water hydrogen-bond network is intricately intertwined with ion-ion network. This further shows morphological variation of ion aggregate structures from ion cluster to ion network in high salt solutions that are interrelated to the onset of macroscopic aggregate formation and the water hydrogen-bond structure making and breaking processes induced by Hofmeister ions.

  12. Clustering of Radio Sources at High Redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magliocchetti, M.; Maddox, S. J.; Lahav, O.; Wall, J. V.

    1998-12-01

    We investigate the large-scale clustering of radio sources in the FIRST 1.4-GHz survey by analysing their distribution function. We estimate the angular two-point correlation function w(theta), the variance Psi_2, and skewness Psi_3 of the distribution; both w(theta) and Psi_2 show power-law behaviour with an amplitude corresponding a spatial correlation length of r_0 ~10 h^{-1}Mpc. We detect significant skewness in the distribution, the first such detection in radio surveys, consistent with the non-linear gravitational growth of perturbations from primordial Gaussian initial conditions. We also investigate how different theoretical predictions for the normalised variance sigma^2 can match our measurements.

  13. Infrared Spectroscopy of Naphthalene Aggregation and Cluster Formation in Argon Matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roser, J. E.; Allamondola, L. J.

    2011-01-01

    Fourier-transform mid-infrared absorption spectra of mixed argon/naphthalene matrices at 5 K are shown with ratios of argon-to-naphthalene that vary from 1000 to 0. These spectra show the changes as naphthalene clustering and aggregation occurs, with moderate spectral shifts affecting the C-H vibrational modes and relatively small or no shifts to the C-C and C-C-C vibrational modes. The possible contribution of homogeneous naphthalene clusters to the interstellar unidentified infrared bands is discussed. The contribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) clusters to the 7.7 micron emission plateau and the blue shading of the 12.7 micron emission band are identified as promising candidates for future research. In addition, since PAH clusters are model components of Jupiter and Titan's atmospheres, the information presented here may also be applicable to the spectroscopy of these objects.

  14. Density-Aware Clustering Based on Aggregated Heat Kernel and Its Transformation

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Hao; Yoo, Shinjae; Yu, Dantong; Qin, Hong

    2015-06-01

    Current spectral clustering algorithms suffer from the sensitivity to existing noise, and parameter scaling, and may not be aware of different density distributions across clusters. If these problems are left untreated, the consequent clustering results cannot accurately represent true data patterns, in particular, for complex real world datasets with heterogeneous densities. This paper aims to solve these problems by proposing a diffusion-based Aggregated Heat Kernel (AHK) to improve the clustering stability, and a Local Density Affinity Transformation (LDAT) to correct the bias originating from different cluster densities. AHK statistically\\ models the heat diffusion traces along the entire time scale, so it ensures robustness during clustering process, while LDAT probabilistically reveals local density of each instance and suppresses the local density bias in the affinity matrix. Our proposed framework integrates these two techniques systematically. As a result, not only does it provide an advanced noise-resisting and density-aware spectral mapping to the original dataset, but also demonstrates the stability during the processing of tuning the scaling parameter (which usually controls the range of neighborhood). Furthermore, our framework works well with the majority of similarity kernels, which ensures its applicability to many types of data and problem domains. The systematic experiments on different applications show that our proposed algorithms outperform state-of-the-art clustering algorithms for the data with heterogeneous density distributions, and achieve robust clustering performance with respect to tuning the scaling parameter and handling various levels and types of noise.

  15. Density-Aware Clustering Based on Aggregated Heat Kernel and Its Transformation

    DOE PAGES

    Huang, Hao; Yoo, Shinjae; Yu, Dantong; ...

    2015-06-01

    Current spectral clustering algorithms suffer from the sensitivity to existing noise, and parameter scaling, and may not be aware of different density distributions across clusters. If these problems are left untreated, the consequent clustering results cannot accurately represent true data patterns, in particular, for complex real world datasets with heterogeneous densities. This paper aims to solve these problems by proposing a diffusion-based Aggregated Heat Kernel (AHK) to improve the clustering stability, and a Local Density Affinity Transformation (LDAT) to correct the bias originating from different cluster densities. AHK statistically\\ models the heat diffusion traces along the entire time scale, somore » it ensures robustness during clustering process, while LDAT probabilistically reveals local density of each instance and suppresses the local density bias in the affinity matrix. Our proposed framework integrates these two techniques systematically. As a result, not only does it provide an advanced noise-resisting and density-aware spectral mapping to the original dataset, but also demonstrates the stability during the processing of tuning the scaling parameter (which usually controls the range of neighborhood). Furthermore, our framework works well with the majority of similarity kernels, which ensures its applicability to many types of data and problem domains. The systematic experiments on different applications show that our proposed algorithms outperform state-of-the-art clustering algorithms for the data with heterogeneous density distributions, and achieve robust clustering performance with respect to tuning the scaling parameter and handling various levels and types of noise.« less

  16. Monte Carlo simulation for morphology of nanoparticles and particle size distributions: comparison of the cluster-cluster aggregation model with the sectional method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Kiminori; Matsukawa, Yoshiya; Saito, Yasuhiro; Matsushita, Yohsuke; Aoki, Hideyuki; Era, Koki; Aoki, Takayuki; Yamaguchi, Togo

    2015-06-01

    This study presents the validity and ability of an aggregate mean free path cluster-cluster aggregation (AMP-CCA) model, which is a direct Monte Carlo simulation, to predict the aggregate morphology with diameters form about 15-200 nm by comparing the particle size distributions (PSDs) with the results of the previous stochastic approach. The PSDs calculated by the AMP-CCA model with the calculated aggregate as a coalesced spherical particle are in reasonable agreement with the results of the previous stochastic model regardless of the initial number concentration of particles. The shape analysis using two methods, perimeter fractal dimension and the shape categories, has demonstrated that the aggregate structures become complex with increasing the initial number concentration of particles. The AMP-CCA model provides a useful tool to calculate the aggregate morphology and PSD with reasonable accuracy.

  17. Scaling theory for the anisotropic behavior of generalized diffusion-limited aggregation clusters in two dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsushita, Mitsugu; Family, Fereydoon; Honda, Katsuya

    1987-10-01

    A scaling description of the crossover from isotropic to anisotropic cluster growth for ordinary diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) in two dimensions developed recently by Family and Hentschel is extended to the generalized DLA or η model. The dependence of various exponents necessary to characterize the anisotropic growth of the local-growth probability exponent η of the generalized DLA is obtained explicitly. The η dependence of the exponent β describing the variation of the crossover mass Nc on the degree of symmetry m,Nc~mβ, is derived. The results indicate that the anisotropic star-shaped clusters can be easily observed for η>1, while their appearance is much more difficult for η<1. All our results are consistent with those of computer simulations reported so far.

  18. A Comparative High-Resolution Electron Microscope Study of Ag Clusters Produced by a Sputter-Gas Aggregation and Ion Cluster Beam Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohl, Georg-Friedrich; Hihara, Takehiko; Sakurai, Masaki; Oishi, Takashi; Wakoh, Kimio; Sumiyama, Kenji; Suzuki, Kenji

    1994-03-01

    Ag clusters were formed by a sputter-gas-aggregation process [H. Haberland et al..: J. Vac. Sci. Technol. A 10 (1992) 3266] and the ionized cluster beam (ICB) [T. Takagi: Ionized-Cluster Beam Deposition and Epitaxy (Noyes, Park Ridge, 1988)] technique. The Ag clusters deposited on collodion-coated microgrids were investigated by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The diameter of those clusters, d, ranges from 1 nm up to about 10 nm for specimens produced by the sputter-gas aggregation technique, depending on the sputter condition and the deposition time. Comparable times of the ICB deposition lead to a broader distribution up to d≈20 nm, suggesting the formation of islands with extremely flat shapes. High percentages of crystalline particles obtained by both techniques are either single crystals or multiple twins with clear lattice images.

  19. U Plant source aggregate area management study report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site in Washington State is organized into numerically designated operational areas including the 100, 200, 300, 400, 600, and 1100 Areas. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in November 1989, included the 200 Areas of the Hanford Site on the National Priorities List (NPL) under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) of 1980. Inclusion on the NPL initiates the Remedial Investigation (RI) and Feasibility Study (FS) process for characterizing the nature and extent of contamination, assessing risks to human health and the environment, and selection of remedial actions. This report presents the results of an aggregate area management study (AAMS) for the U Plant Aggregate Area located in the 200 Areas. The study provides the basis for initiating RI/FS under CERCLA or under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigations (RFI) and Corrective Measures Studies (CMS). This report also integrates RCRA treatment, storage, or disposal (TSD) closure activities with CERCLA and RCRA past-practice investigations.

  20. B Plant source aggregate area management study report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-03-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site in Washington state is organized into numerically designated operational areas including the 100, 200, 300, 400, 600, and 100 Areas (Figure 1--1). The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in November 1989, included the 200 Areas of the Hanford KLSite on the National Priorities List (NPL), included the 200 Areas of the Hanford Site on the National Priorities List (NPL) under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act of Feasibility Study (FS) process for characterizing the nature and extent of contamination, assessing risks to human health and the environment, and selection of remedial actions. This report presents the results of an aggregate area management study (AIMS) for the B Plant Aggregate Area located in the 200 Areas. The study provides the basis for initiating RI/FS under CERCLA or under the Resource which contain reactor fuel processing and waste management Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigations (RFI) and Corrective Measures Studies (CMS). This report also integrates RCRA treatment, storage or disposal (TSD) closure activities with CERCLA and RCRA past-practice investigations.

  1. T Plant source aggregate area management study report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-11-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site in Washington State is organized into numerically designated operational areas including the 100, 200, 300, 400, 600, and 1100 Areas. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in November 1989, included the 200 Areas of the Hanford Site on the National Priorities List (NPL) under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) of 1980. Inclusion on the NPL initiates the Remedial Investigation (RI) and Feasibility Study (FS) process for characterizing the nature and extent of contamination, assessing risks to human health and the environment, and selection of remedial actions. This report presents the results of an aggregate area management study (AAMS) for the T Plant Aggregate Area located in the 200 Areas. The study provides the basis for initiating RI/FS under CERCLA or under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigations (RFI) and Corrective Measures Studies (CMS). This report also integrates RCRA treatment, storage, or disposal (TSD) closure activities with CERCLA and RCRA past-practice investigations.

  2. Z Plant source aggregate area management study report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-10-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site in Washington State is or into numerically designated operational areas including the 100, 200, 300, 400, 600, and 1100 Areas. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in November 1989, included the 200 Areas of the Hanford Site on the National Priorities List (NPL) under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) of 1980. Inclusion on the NPL initiates the Remedial Investigation (RI) and Feasibility Study (FS) process for characterizing the nature and extent of contamination, assessing risks to human health and the environment, and selection of remedial actions. This report presents the insults of an aggregate area management study (AAMS) for the Z Plant Aggregate Area located m the 200 Areas. The study provides the basis for initiating RIIFS under CERCLA or under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigations (RFI) and Corrective Measures Studies (CMS). This report also integrates RCRA treatment, storage, or disposed (TSD) closure activities with CERCLA and RCRA past-practice investigations.

  3. A Molecular Beam Source for Electron Spectroscopy of Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Marburger, Simon P.; Kugeler, Oliver; Hergenhahn, Uwe

    2004-05-12

    We describe the construction and testing of a supersonic jet apparatus to carry out electron spectroscopy on Van-der-Waals clusters using Synchrotron Radiation as an excitation source. The cluster source works with a conical nozzle that can be cooled with LHe as well as with LN2. The system has been optimized for mechanical and thermal stability, for low residual magnetic fields and is of a compact design.

  4. Radio Sources Toward Galaxy Clusters at 30 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coble, K.; Bonamente, M.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Dawson, K.; Hasler, N.; Holzapfel, W.; Joy, M.; LaRoque, S.; Marrone, D. P.; Reese, E. D.

    2007-01-01

    Extra-galactic radio sources are a significant contaminant in cosmic microwave background and Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect experiments. Deep interferometric observations with the BIMA and OVRO arrays are used to characterize the spatial, spectral, and flux distributions of radio sources toward massive galaxy clusters at 28.5 GHz. We compute counts of mJy source fluxes from 89 fields centered on known massive galaxy clusters and 8 non-cluster fields. We find that source counts in the inner regions of the cluster fields (within 0.5 arcmin of the cluster center) are a factor of 8.9 (+4.2 to -3.8) times higher than counts in the outer regions of the cluster fields (radius greater than 0.5 arcmin). Counts in the outer regions of the cluster fields are in turn a factor of 3.3 (+4.1 -1.8) greater than those in the noncluster fields. Counts in the non-cluster fields are consistent with extrapolations from the results of other surveys. We compute spectral indices of mJy sources in cluster fields between 1.4 and 28.5 GHz and find a mean spectral index of al[ja = 0.66 with an rms dispersion of 0.36, where flux S varies as upsilon(sup -alpha). The distribution is skewed, with a median spectral index of 0.72 and 25th and 75th percentiles of 0.51 and 0.92, respectively. This is steeper than the spectral indices of stronger field sources measured by other surveys.

  5. Size controlled deposition of Cu and Si nano-clusters by an ultra-high vacuum sputtering gas aggregation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, A. N.; Krishna, R.; Das, B.

    2008-02-01

    In this paper we have reported the syntheses of copper and silicon nano-clusters by a sputtering-gas-aggregation type growth technique. The process involves typical magnetron sputtering vaporization of target materials followed by an inert gas condensation to form clusters of varying sizes. The size-distributions of the clusters typically follow a normal-distribution and the peak cluster sizes of the distributions depends on several factors, which include gas-flow rate, length of the growth region, deposition pressure etc. We have observed a variation in the peak cluster size with the variation of the gas (argon) flow rates. The experimental values are compared with the existing models and the results are found to be in good agreement. The results are significant since it demonstrates that proper optimization of operation conditions can lead to desired cluster sizes as well as desired cluster-size distributions.

  6. [Profile distribution of soil aggregates organic carbon in primary forests in Karst cluster-peak depression region].

    PubMed

    Lu, Ling-Xiao; Song, Tong-Qing; Peng, Wan-Xia; Zeng, Fu-Ping; Wang, Ke-Lin; Xu, Yun-Lei; Yu, Zi; Liu, Yan

    2012-05-01

    Soil profiles were collected from three primary forests (Itoa orientalis, Platycladus orientalis, and Radermachera sinica) in Karst cluster-peak depression region to study the composition of soil aggregates, their organic carbon contents, and the profile distribution of the organic carbon. In the three forests, >2 mm soil aggregates were dominant, occupying about 76% of the total. The content of soil total organic carbon ranged from 12.73 to 68.66 g x kg(-1), with a significant difference among the forests. The organic carbon content in <1 mm soil aggregates was slightly higher than that in >2 mm soil aggregates, but most of soil organic carbon was stored in the soil aggregates with greater particle sizes. About 70% of soil organic carbon came from >2 mm soil aggregates. There was a significant positive relationship between the contents of 2-5 and 5-8 mm soil aggregates and the content of soil organic carbon. To increase the contents of 2-8 mm soil aggregates could effectively improve the soil carbon sequestration in Karst region. In Itoa orientalis forest, 2-8 mm soil aggregates accounted for 46% of the total, and the content of soil total organic carbon reached to 37.62 g x kg(-1), which implied that Itoa orientalis could be the suitable tree species for the ecological restoration in Karst region.

  7. Radio Point Sources Toward Galaxy Clusters at 30 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coble, K.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Bonamente, M.; Dawson, K.; Holzapfel, W.; Joy, M.; LaRoque, S.; Reese, E. D.

    2006-01-01

    Extra-galactic point sources are a significant contaminant in cosmic microwave background and Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect experiments. Deep interferometric observations with the BIMA and OVRO arrays are used to characterize the spatial, spectral, and flux distributions of radio point sources toward galaxy clusters at 28.5 GHz. We compute counts of mJy point source fluxes from 90 fields centered on known massive galaxy clusters and 8 non-cluster fields. Counts in the non-cluster fields are consistent with extrapolations from the results of other surveys. We also compute counts towards clusters as a function of luminosity in three redshift bins out to z = 1.0 and see no clear evidence for evolution with redshift. We compute spectral indices of mJy sources in cluster fields between 1.4 and 28.5 GHz. The distribution is skewed, with a median spectral index of 0.76 and 25th and 75th percentiles of 0.55 and 0.95, respectively. This is steeper than the spectral indices of brighter field point sources measured by other surveys.

  8. The Physics of Cooling Flow Clusters with Central Radio Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarazin, Craig L.

    2005-01-01

    Central galaxies in rich clusters are the sites of cluster cooling flows, with large masses of gas cooling through part of the X-ray band. Many of these galaxies host powerful radio sources. These sources can displace and compress the X-ray gas leading to enhanced cooling and star formation. We observed the bright cooling flow Abell 2626 with a strangely distorted central radio source. We wished to understand the interaction of radio and X-ray thermal plasma, and to determine the dynamical nature of this cluster. One aim was to constrain the source of additional pressure in radio "holes" in the X-ray emission needed to support overlying shells of X-ray gas. We also aimed to study the problem of the lack of kT < 1-2 keV gas in cooling flows by searching for abundance inhomogeneities, heating from the radio source, and excess absorption. We also have a Chandra observation of this cluster. There were problems with the pipeline processing of this data due to a telemetry dropout. We are publishing the Chandra and XMM data together. Delays with the Chandra data have slowed up the publication. At the center of the cluster, there is a complex interaction of the odd, Z-shaped radio source, and the X-ray plasma. However, there are no clear radio bubbles. Also, the cluster SO galaxy IC 5337, which is projected 1.5 arcmin west of the cluster center, has unusual tail-like structures in both the radio and X-ray. It appears to be falling into the cluster center. There is a hot, probably shocked region of gas to the southwest, which is apparently due to the merger of a subcluster in this part of the system. There is also a merging subcluster to the northeast. The axes of these two mergers agrees with a supercluster filament structure.

  9. Crossover from the coffee-ring effect to the uniform deposit caused by irreversible cluster-cluster aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crivoi, A.; Zhong, X.; Duan, Fei

    2015-09-01

    The coffee-ring effect for particle deposition near the three-phase line after drying a pinned sessile colloidal droplet has been suppressed or attenuated in many recent studies. However, there have been few attempts to simulate the mitigation of the effect in the presence of strong particle-particle attraction forces. We develop a three-dimensional stochastic model to investigate the drying process of a pinned colloidal sessile droplet by considering the sticking between particles, which was observed in the experiments. The Monte Carlo simulation results show that by solely promoting the particle-particle attraction in the model, the final deposit shape is transformed from the coffee ring to the uniform film deposition. This phenomenon is modeled using the colloidal aggregation technique and explained by the "Tetris principle," meaning that unevenly shaped or branched particle clusters rapidly build up a sparse structure spanning throughout the entire domain in the drying process. The influence of the controlled parameters is analyzed as well. The simulation is reflected by the drying patterns of the nanofluid droplets through the surfactant control in the experiments.

  10. Radio Sources toward Galaxy Clusters at 30 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coble, K.; Bonamente, M.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Dawson, K.; Hasler, N.; Holzapfel, W.; Joy, M.; LaRoque, S.; Marrone, D. P.; Reese, E. D.

    2007-01-01

    Extragalactic radio sources are a significant contaminant in cosmic microwave background and Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect experiments. Deep interferometric observations with the BIMA and OVRO arrays are used to characterize the spatial, spectral, and flux distributions of radio sources toward massive galaxy clusters at 28.5 GHz. We compute counts of millijansky source fluxes from 89 fields centered on known massive galaxy clusters and 8 noncluster fields. We find that source counts in the inner regions of the cluster fields (within 0.5' of the cluster center) are a factor of 8.9 (sup +4.3)(sub -2.8) times higher than counts in the outer regions of the cluster fields (radius greater than 0.5'). Counts in the outer regions of the cluster fields are, in turn, a factor of 3.3 (sup +4.1) (sub -1.8) greater than those in the noncluster fields. Counts in the noncluster fields are consistent with extrapolations from the results of other surveys. We compute the spectral indices of millijansky sources in the cluster fields between 1.4 and 28.5 GHz and find a mean spectral index of alpha = 0.66 with an rms dispersion of 0.36, where flux S proportional to nu(sup -alpha). The distribution is skewed, with a median spectral index of 0.72 and 25th and 75th percentiles of 0.51 and 0.92, respectively. This is steeper than the spectral indices of stronger field sources measured by other surveys.

  11. Stacking and Branching in Self-Aggregation of Caffeine in Aqueous Solution: From the Supramolecular to Atomic Scale Clustering.

    PubMed

    Tavagnacco, Letizia; Gerelli, Yuri; Cesàro, Attilio; Brady, John W

    2016-09-22

    The dynamical and structural properties of caffeine solutions at the solubility limit have been investigated as a function of temperature by means of MD simulations, static and dynamic light scattering, and small angle neutron scattering experiments. A clear picture unambiguously supported by both experiment and simulation emerges: caffeine self-aggregation promotes the formation of two distinct types of clusters: linear aggregates of stacked molecules, formed by 2-14 caffeine molecules depending on the thermodynamic conditions and disordered branched aggregates with a size in the range 1000-3000 Å. While the first type of association is well-known to occur under room temperature conditions for both caffeine and other purine systems, such as nucleotides, the presence of the supramolecular aggregates has not been reported previously. MD simulations indicate that branched structures are formed by caffeine molecules in a T-shaped arrangement. An increase of the solubility limit (higher temperature but also higher concentration) broadens the distribution of cluster sizes, promoting the formation of stacked aggregates composed by a larger number of caffeine molecules. Surprisingly, the effect on the branched aggregates is rather limited. Their internal structure and size do not change considerably in the range of solubility limits investigated.

  12. Chandra Observations of Dying Radio Sources in Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murgia, M.; Markevitch, M.; Govoni, F.; Parma, P.; Fanti, R.; de Ruiter, H. R.; Mack, K.-H.

    2012-01-01

    Context. The dying radio sources represent a very interesting and largely unexplored stage of the active galactic nucleus (AGN) evolution. They are considered to be very rare, and almost all of the few known ones were found in galaxy clusters. However, considering the small number detected so far, it has not been possible to draw any firm conclusions about their X-ray environment. Aims. We present X-ray observations performed with the Chandra satellite of the three galaxy clusters Abell 2276, ZwCl 1829.3+6912, and RX J1852.1+5711, which harbor at their center a dying radio source with an ultra-steep spectrum that we recently discovered. Methods. We analyzed the physical properties of the X-ray emitting gas surrounding these elusive radio sources. We determined the global X-ray properties of the clusters, derived the azimuthally averaged profiles of metal abundance, gas temperature, density, and pressure. Furthermore, we estimated the total mass profiles. Results. The large-scale X-ray emission is regular and spherical, suggesting a relaxed state for these systems. Indeed, we found that the three clusters are also characterized by significant enhancements in the metal abundance and declining temperature profiles toward the central region. For all these reasons, we classified RX J1852.1+5711, Abell 2276, and ZwCl 1829.3+6912 as cool-core galaxy clusters. Conclusions. We calculated the non-thermal pressure of the radio lobes assuming that the radio sources are in the minimum energy condition. For all dying sources we found that this is on average about one to two orders of magnitude lower than that of the external gas, as found for many other radio sources at the center of galaxy groups and clusters. We found marginal evidence for the presence of X-ray surface brightness depressions coincident with the fossil radio lobes of the dying sources in A2276 and ZwCl 1829.3+691. We estimated the outburst age and energy output for these two dying sources. The energy power from

  13. Chandra observations of dying radio sources in galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murgia, M.; Markevitch, M.; Govoni, F.; Parma, P.; Fanti, R.; de Ruiter, H. R.; Mack, K.-H.

    2012-12-01

    Context. The dying radio sources represent a very interesting and largely unexplored stage of the active galactic nucleus (AGN) evolution. They are considered to be very rare, and almost all of the few known ones were found in galaxy clusters. However, considering the small number detected so far, it has not been possible to draw any firm conclusions about their X-ray environment. Aims: We present X-ray observations performed with the Chandra satellite of the three galaxy clusters Abell 2276, ZwCl 1829.3+6912, and RX J1852.1+5711, which harbor at their center a dying radio source with an ultra-steep spectrum that we recently discovered. Methods: We analyzed the physical properties of the X-ray emitting gas surrounding these elusive radio sources. We determined the global X-ray properties of the clusters, derived the azimuthally averaged profiles of metal abundance, gas temperature, density, and pressure. Furthermore, we estimated the total mass profiles. Results: The large-scale X-ray emission is regular and spherical, suggesting a relaxed state for these systems. Indeed, we found that the three clusters are also characterized by significant enhancements in the metal abundance and declining temperature profiles toward the central region. For all these reasons, we classified RX J1852.1+5711, Abell 2276, and ZwCl 1829.3+6912 as cool-core galaxy clusters. Conclusions: We calculated the non-thermal pressure of the radio lobes assuming that the radio sources are in the minimum energy condition. For all dying sources we found that this is on average about one to two orders of magnitude lower than that of the external gas, as found for many other radio sources at the center of galaxy groups and clusters. We found marginal evidence for the presence of X-ray surface brightness depressions coincident with the fossil radio lobes of the dying sources in A2276 and ZwCl 1829.3+691. We estimated the outburst age and energy output for these two dying sources. The energy power from

  14. A Dynamical Gravitational Wave Source in a Dense Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurley, Jarrod R.; Sippel, Anna C.; Tout, Christopher A.; Aarseth, Sverre J.

    2016-08-01

    Making use of a new N-body model to describe the evolution of a moderate-size globular cluster, we investigate the characteristics of the population of black holes within such a cluster. This model reaches core-collapse and achieves a peak central density typical of the dense globular clusters of the Milky Way. Within this high-density environment, we see direct confirmation of the merging of two stellar remnant black holes in a dynamically formed binary, a gravitational wave source. We describe how the formation, evolution, and ultimate ejection/destruction of binary systems containing black holes impacts the evolution of the cluster core. Also, through comparison with previous models of lower density, we show that the period distribution of black hole binaries formed through dynamical interactions in this high-density model favours the production of gravitational wave sources. We confirm that the number of black holes remaining in a star cluster at late times and the characteristics of the binary black hole population depend on the nature of the star cluster, critically on the number density of stars and by extension the relaxation timescale.

  15. Real-Time MEG Source Localization Using Regional Clustering.

    PubMed

    Dinh, Christoph; Strohmeier, Daniel; Luessi, Martin; Güllmar, Daniel; Baumgarten, Daniel; Haueisen, Jens; Hämäläinen, Matti S

    2015-11-01

    With its millisecond temporal resolution, Magnetoencephalography (MEG) is well suited for real-time monitoring of brain activity. Real-time feedback allows the adaption of the experiment to the subject's reaction and increases time efficiency by shortening acquisition and off-line analysis. Two formidable challenges exist in real-time analysis: the low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and the limited time available for computations. Since the low SNR reduces the number of distinguishable sources, we propose an approach which downsizes the source space based on a cortical atlas and allows to discern the sources in the presence of noise. Each cortical region is represented by a small set of dipoles, which is obtained by a clustering algorithm. Using this approach, we adapted dynamic statistical parametric mapping for real-time source localization. In terms of point spread and crosstalk between regions the proposed clustering technique performs better than selecting spatially evenly distributed dipoles. We conducted real-time source localization on MEG data from an auditory experiment. The results demonstrate that the proposed real-time method localizes sources reliably in the superior temporal gyrus. We conclude that real-time source estimation based on MEG is a feasible, useful addition to the standard on-line processing methods, and enables feedback based on neural activity during the measurements.

  16. Real-Time MEG Source Localization using Regional Clustering

    PubMed Central

    Dinh, Christoph; Strohmeier, Daniel; Luessi, Martin; Güllmar, Daniel; Baumgarten, Daniel; Haueisen, Jens; Hämäläinen, Matti S.

    2015-01-01

    With its millisecond temporal resolution, Magnetoencephalography (MEG) is well suited for real-time monitoring of brain activity. Real-time feedback allows the adaption of the experiment to the subject’s reaction and increases time efficiency by shortening acquisition and offline analysis. Two formidable challenges exist in real-time analysis: the low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and the limited time available for computations. Since the low SNR reduces the number of distinguishable sources, we propose an approach which downsizes the source space based on a cortical atlas and allows to discern the sources in the presence of noise. Each cortical region is represented by a small set of dipoles, which is obtained by a clustering algorithm. Using this approach, we adapted dynamic statistical parametric mapping (dSPM) for real-time source localization. In terms of point spread and crosstalk between regions the proposed clustering technique performs better than selecting spatially evenly distributed dipoles. We conducted real-time source localization on MEG data from an auditory experiment. The results demonstrate that the proposed real-time method localizes sources reliably in the superior temporal gyrus. We conclude that real-time source estimation based on MEG is a feasible, useful addition to the standard on-line processing methods, and enables feedback based on neural activity during the measurements. PMID:25782980

  17. Diffusion and aggregation of Agn-clusters (n=2-9) on HOPG probed by fs-two-photon-photoemission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busolt, U.; Cottancin, E.; Socaciu, L.; Röhr, H.; Leisner, T.; Wöste, L.

    The diffusion and aggregation of preformed Agn-clusters (n = 2-9) deposited onto a highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) substrate is studied by two-photon-photoemission (2PPE). The sample is irradiated with ultrashort laser pulse pairs and the kinetic energy of the emitted photoelectrons is analyzed in a magnetic bottle type time-of-flight spectrometer. During annealing of the sample from 100 K up to room temperature, nanoparticles are formed on the surface by diffusion and aggregation of the silver clusters. A steep increase of the total photoelectron yield at a sample temperature of about 150 K is explained by the excitation of plasmons in the silver nanoparticles. From the kinetic energy distribution of the photoelectrons we deduce a strong variation of the work function of the sample during the formation of the nanoparticles, which is attributed to a quantum size effect.

  18. POWER-LAW TEMPLATE FOR INFRARED POINT-SOURCE CLUSTERING

    SciTech Connect

    Addison, Graeme E.; Dunkley, Joanna; Hajian, Amir; Das, Sudeep; Hincks, Adam D.; Page, Lyman A.; Staggs, Suzanne T.; Viero, Marco; Bond, J. Richard; Devlin, Mark J.; Reese, Erik D.; Halpern, Mark; Scott, Douglas; Hlozek, Renee; Marriage, Tobias A.; Spergel, David N.; Moodley, Kavilan; Wollack, Edward

    2012-06-20

    We perform a combined fit to angular power spectra of unresolved infrared (IR) point sources from the Planck satellite (at 217, 353, 545, and 857 GHz, over angular scales 100 {approx}< l {approx}< 2200), the Balloon-borne Large-Aperture Submillimeter Telescope (BLAST; 250, 350, and 500 {mu}m; 1000 {approx}< l {approx}< 9000), and from correlating BLAST and Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT; 148 and 218 GHz) maps. We find that the clustered power over the range of angular scales and frequencies considered is well fitted by a simple power law of the form C{sup clust}{sub l}{proportional_to}l{sup -n} with n = 1.25 {+-} 0.06. While the IR sources are understood to lie at a range of redshifts, with a variety of dust properties, we find that the frequency dependence of the clustering power can be described by the square of a modified blackbody, {nu}{sup {beta}} B({nu}, T{sub eff}), with a single emissivity index {beta} = 2.20 {+-} 0.07 and effective temperature T{sub eff} = 9.7 K. Our predictions for the clustering amplitude are consistent with existing ACT and South Pole Telescope results at around 150 and 220 GHz, as is our prediction for the effective dust spectral index, which we find to be {alpha}{sub 150-220} = 3.68 {+-} 0.07 between 150 and 220 GHz. Our constraints on the clustering shape and frequency dependence can be used to model the IR clustering as a contaminant in cosmic microwave background anisotropy measurements. The combined Planck and BLAST data also rule out a linear bias clustering model.

  19. Power-Law Template for IR Point Source Clustering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Addison, Graeme E.; Dunkley, Joanna; Hajian, Amir; Viero, Marco; Bond, J. Richard; Das, Sudeep; Devlin, Mark; Halpern, Mark; Hincks, Adam; Hlozek, Renee; Marriage, Tobias A.; Moodley, Kavilan; Page, Lyman A.; Reese, Erik D.; Scott, Douglass; Spergel, David N.; Staggs,Suzanne T.; Wollack, Edward

    2011-01-01

    We perform a combined fit to angular power spectra of unresolved infrared (IR) point sources from the Planck satellite (at 217,353,545 and 857 GHz, over angular scales 100 < I < 2200), the Balloonborne Large-Aperture Submillimeter Telescope (BLAST; 250, 350 and 500 microns; 1000 < I < 9000), and from correlating BLAST and Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT; 148 and 218 GHz) maps. We find that the clustered power over the range of angular scales and frequencies considered is well fit by a simple power law of the form C_l\\propto I(sup -n) with n = 1.25 +/- 0.06. While the IR sources are understood to lie at a range of redshifts, with a variety of dust properties, we find that the frequency dependence of the clustering power can be described by the square of a modified blackbody, nu(sup beta) B(nu,T_eff), with a single emissivity index beta = 2.20 +/- 0.07 and effective temperature T_eff= 9.7 K. Our predictions for the clustering amplitude are consistent with existing ACT and South Pole Telescope results at around 150 and 220 GHz, as is our prediction for the effective dust spectral index, which we find to be alpha_150-220 = 3.68 +/- 0.07 between 150 and 220 GHz. Our constraints on the clustering shape and frequency dependence can be used to model the IR clustering as a contaminant in Cosmic Microwave Background anisotropy measurements. The combined Planck and BLAST data also rule out a linear bias clustering model.

  20. Power-Law Template for Infrared Point-Source Clustering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Addison, Graeme E; Dunkley, Joanna; Hajian, Amir; Viero, Marco; Bond, J. Richard; Das, Sudeep; Devlin, Mark J.; Halpern, Mark; Hincks, Adam D; Hlozek, Renee; Marriage, Tobias A.; Moodley, Kavilan; Page, Lyman A.; Reese, Erik D.; Scott, Douglas; Spergel, David N.; Staggs, Suzanne T.; Wollack, Edward

    2012-01-01

    We perform a combined fit to angular power spectra of unresolved infrared (IR) point sources from the Planck satellite (at 217, 353, 545, and 857 GHz, over angular scales 100 approx < l approx < 2200), the Balloon-borne Large-Aperture Submillimeter Telescope (BLAST; 250, 350, and 500 micron; 1000 approx < l approx < 9000), and from correlating BLAST and Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT; 148 and 218 GHz) maps. We find that the clustered power over the range of angular scales and frequencies considered is well fitted by a simple power law of the form C(sup clust)(sub l) varies as l (sub -n) with n = 1.25 +/- 0.06. While the IR sources are understood to lie at a range of redshifts, with a variety of dust properties, we find that the frequency dependence of the clustering power can be described by the square of a modified blackbody, ?(sup Beta)B(?, T(sub eff) ), with a single emissivity index Beta = 2.20 +/- 0.07 and effective temperature T(sub eff) = 9.7 K. Our predictions for the clustering amplitude are consistent with existing ACT and South Pole Telescope results at around 150 and 220 GHz, as is our prediction for the effective dust spectral index, which we find to be alpha(sub 150-220) = 3.68 +/- 0.07 between 150 and 220 GHz. Our constraints on the clustering shape and frequency dependence can be used to model the IR clustering as a contaminant in cosmic microwave background anisotropy measurements. The combined Planck and BLAST data also rule out a linear bias clustering model.

  1. PAH Clusters as Sources of Interstellar Infrared Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roser, J. E.; Ricca, A.

    2015-03-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (or PAHs) have been the subject of astrochemical research for several decades as principal sources of the interstellar aromatic infrared emission bands. PAH clusters could possibly contribute to these emission bands, but a lack of data on their infrared properties has made this hypothesis difficult to evaluate. Here we investigate homogeneous neutral PAH clusters by measuring the mid-infrared absorption spectra of the five nonlinear PAH molecules phenanthrene, chrysene, pyrene, perylene, and benzo[ghi]perylene within solid argon ice at a fixed temperature of 5 K. We attribute observed spectral shifts in their principal absorption bands as a function of argon/PAH ratio to clustering of the PAH molecules within the argon matrix. These shifts are related to the cluster structures forming in the matrix and the topology of the monomer PAH molecule. We predict that interstellar PAH molecules that are relatively large (no fewer than 50 carbon atoms per molecule) and compact will have clusters that contribute to the asymmetrically red-shaded profile of the interstellar 11.2 μm emission band.

  2. The Galaxy Cluster Environments of Wide Angle Tail Radio Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglass, Edmund; Blanton, Elizabeth L.; Randall, Scott W.; Clarke, Tracy E.; Wing, Joshua

    2016-01-01

    Generally found in the centers of galaxy clusters, Wide Angle Tail radio sources (WATs) are defined by their characteristic jet-hotspot-lobe transition and intermediate radio power. They are typically associated with the luminous central galaxy within the cluster and often appear bent due to interaction with the hot, X-ray bright intracluster medium (ICM). Their linear extent (r > 100 kpc) and radio luminosity make them good tracers of high redshift systems where X-ray and optical observations are more difficult. In an effort to characterize the global X-ray properties of WAT clusters, we have assembled a sample of WAT systems from the Chandra archive. We have examined the distribution of substructure, temperature, abundance, density and pressure within the ICM. We find the majority of WAT clusters display some merger signatures and many show evidence of cool/high metallicity gas within 100 kpc of the WAT host galaxy. Most notably, we observe that clusters with the highest central densities and pressures host WATs with the shortest flare radii.

  3. POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON CLUSTERS AS SOURCES OF INTERSTELLAR INFRARED EMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Roser, J. E.; Ricca, A.

    2015-03-10

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (or PAHs) have been the subject of astrochemical research for several decades as principal sources of the interstellar aromatic infrared emission bands. PAH clusters could possibly contribute to these emission bands, but a lack of data on their infrared properties has made this hypothesis difficult to evaluate. Here we investigate homogeneous neutral PAH clusters by measuring the mid-infrared absorption spectra of the five nonlinear PAH molecules phenanthrene, chrysene, pyrene, perylene, and benzo[ghi]perylene within solid argon ice at a fixed temperature of 5 K. We attribute observed spectral shifts in their principal absorption bands as a function of argon/PAH ratio to clustering of the PAH molecules within the argon matrix. These shifts are related to the cluster structures forming in the matrix and the topology of the monomer PAH molecule. We predict that interstellar PAH molecules that are relatively large (no fewer than 50 carbon atoms per molecule) and compact will have clusters that contribute to the asymmetrically red-shaded profile of the interstellar 11.2 μm emission band.

  4. Floating mucus aggregates derived from benthic microorganisms on rocky intertidal reefs: Potential as food sources for benthic animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, Y.; Tsuchiya, M.

    2011-09-01

    Mucus films, flocs or foams consisting of fine sand, algae and detritus frequently occur in the surface waters of rocky intertidal reef flats during incoming tide. These masses are referred to as mucus aggregates. We examined the developmental process of mucus aggregates and their abundance, distribution, migration and trophic composition. The trophic composition of mucus aggregates was then compared to those of sediments to evaluate their potential nutritional value for benthic animals. The organic matter content, chlorophyll a concentration, microalgal density and bacteria-derived fatty acid contents of mucus aggregates were higher than those observed in sediment, suggesting that mucus aggregates contain not only high levels of organic matter but also dense concentrations of microalgae and bacteria; therefore, mucus aggregates may serve as a qualitatively more energetic food source for benthic fauna compared to sediments. Benthic diatoms were the most abundant organisms in mucus aggregates. Large numbers of diatoms were trapped in fine mineral particles and mucilage-like strings, suggesting that a portion of the mucus is secreted by these benthic microalgae. Mucus aggregate accounted for only 0.01-3.9% of the daily feeding requirements of the dominant detritivore, Ophiocoma scolopendrina (Echinodermata: Ophiuroidea) over the entire sampling area. In contrast, for the species population on the back reef, where mucus aggregates ultimately accumulate, mucus aggregates provided from 0.4 to 113.3% of food for this species. These results suggest that mucus aggregate availability varies spatiotemporally and that they do not always provide adequate food sources for O. scolopendrina populations.

  5. Do Staphylococcus epidermidis Genetic Clusters Predict Isolation Sources?

    PubMed Central

    Tolo, Isaiah; Thomas, Jonathan C.; Fischer, Rebecca S. B.; Brown, Eric L.; Gray, Barry M.

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis is a ubiquitous colonizer of human skin and a common cause of medical device-associated infections. The extent to which the population genetic structure of S. epidermidis distinguishes commensal from pathogenic isolates is unclear. Previously, Bayesian clustering of 437 multilocus sequence types (STs) in the international database revealed a population structure of six genetic clusters (GCs) that may reflect the species' ecology. Here, we first verified the presence of six GCs, including two (GC3 and GC5) with significant admixture, in an updated database of 578 STs. Next, a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) assay was developed that accurately assigned 545 (94%) of 578 STs to GCs. Finally, the hypothesis that GCs could distinguish isolation sources was tested by SNP typing and GC assignment of 154 isolates from hospital patients with bacteremia and those with blood culture contaminants and from nonhospital carriage. GC5 was isolated almost exclusively from hospital sources. GC1 and GC6 were isolated from all sources but were overrepresented in isolates from nonhospital and infection sources, respectively. GC2, GC3, and GC4 were relatively rare in this collection. No association was detected between fdh-positive isolates (GC2 and GC4) and nonhospital sources. Using a machine learning algorithm, GCs predicted hospital and nonhospital sources with 80% accuracy and predicted infection and contaminant sources with 45% accuracy, which was comparable to the results seen with a combination of five genetic markers (icaA, IS256, sesD [bhp], mecA, and arginine catabolic mobile element [ACME]). Thus, analysis of population structure with subgenomic data shows the distinction of hospital and nonhospital sources and the near-inseparability of sources within a hospital. PMID:27076664

  6. The Herschel Virgo Cluster Survey. XV. Planck submillimetre sources in the Virgo Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baes, M.; Herranz, D.; Bianchi, S.; Ciesla, L.; Clemens, M.; De Zotti, G.; Allaert, F.; Auld, R.; Bendo, G. J.; Boquien, M.; Boselli, A.; Clements, D. L.; Cortese, L.; Davies, J. I.; De Looze, I.; di Serego Alighieri, S.; Fritz, J.; Gentile, G.; González-Nuevo, J.; Hughes, T.; Smith, M. W. L.; Verstappen, J.; Viaene, S.; Vlahakis, C.

    2014-02-01

    We cross-correlate the Planck Catalogue of Compact Sources (PCCS) with the fully sampled 84 deg2Herschel Virgo Cluster Survey (HeViCS) fields. We search for and identify the 857 and 545 GHz PCCS sources in the HeViCS fields by studying their FIR/submm and optical counterparts. We find 84 and 48 compact Planck sources in the HeViCS fields at 857 and 545 GHz, respectively. Almost all sources correspond to individual bright Virgo Cluster galaxies. The vast majority of the Planck detected galaxies are late-type spirals, with the Sc class dominating the numbers, while early-type galaxies are virtually absent from the sample, especially at 545 GHz. We compare the HeViCS SPIRE flux densities for the detected galaxies with the four different PCCS flux density estimators and find an excellent correlation with the aperture photometry flux densities, even at the highest flux density levels. We find only seven PCCS sources in the HeViCS fields without a nearby galaxy as obvious counterpart, and conclude that all of these are dominated by Galactic cirrus features or are spurious detections. No Planck sources in the HeViCS fields seem to be associated to high-redshift proto-clusters of dusty galaxies or strongly lensed submm sources. Finally, our study is the first empirical confirmation of the simulation-based estimated completeness of the PCCS, and provides a strong support of the internal PCCS validation procedure. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.Tables 1 and 2 are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  7. [Bi12Ni7(CO)4](4-): Aggregation of Intermetalloid Clusters by Their Thermal Deligation and Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Perla, Luis G; Sevov, Slavi C

    2015-09-08

    Reported are the synthesis and structure of the anionic intermetalloid cluster [Bi12Ni7(CO)4](4-). It was synthesized from the known smaller clusters Bi3Ni4(CO)6(3-), Bi3Ni6(CO)9(3-), and Ni@Bi6Ni6(CO)8(4-) by their aggregation as a result of thermal deligation and oxidation. The new cluster is structurally characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction in the compound (K[crypt])4[Bi12Ni7(CO)4] (1), and its presence in solution is confirmed by electrospray mass spectrometry. It can be viewed as composed of a Ni-centered icosahedral core of Bi6Ni6(CO)4 where two diametrically opposed Ni atoms are capped by Bi3 triangles. However, its electron count is rationalized based on a structure made of fused tetrahedra.

  8. Simulating feedback from nuclear clusters: the impact of multiple sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourne, Martin A.; Power, Chris

    2016-02-01

    Nuclear star clusters (NCs) are found to exist in the centres of many galaxies and appear to follow scaling relations similar to those of supermassive black holes. Previous analytical work has suggested that such relations are a consequence of feedback-regulated growth. We explore this idea using high-resolution hydrodynamical simulations, focusing on the validity of the simplifying assumptions made in analytical models. In particular, we investigate feedback emanating from multiple stellar sources rather than from a single source, as is usually assumed, and show that collisions between shells of gas swept up by feedback leads to momentum cancellation and the formation of high-density clumps and filaments. This high-density material is resistant both to expulsion from the galaxy potential and to disruption by feedback; if it falls back on to the NC, we expect the gas to be available for further star formation or for feeding a central black hole. We also note that our results may have implications for the evolution of globular clusters and stellar clusters in high-redshift dark matter haloes.

  9. Clustering Properties of Radio Sources in the FIRST Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magliocchetti, M.; Maddox, S. J.; Lahav, O.; Wall, J. V.

    We investigate the large-scale clustering of radio sources in the FIRST 1.4 GHz survey by analysing the distribution function (Counts in Cells) of this sample. We select a reliable galaxy sample from the the FIRST catalogue, paying particular attention to the problem of how to define single radio sources from the multiple components listed in the FIRST catalogue. We also consider the incompleteness of the catalogue. We estimate angular two-point correlation function w(theta), the variance, Psi_2, and skewness, Psi_3, of the distribution for the galaxy subsample. Both w(theta) and Psi_2 show power-law behaviour with an amplitude corresponding a spatial correlation length of r_0 ~10 h^{-1} Mpc. We detect significant skewness in the distribution, and find that it is related to the variance through the relation Psi_3 = S_3(Psi_2)alpha with alpha = 1.9 +- 0.1 consistent with the non-linear growth of perturbations from primordial Gaussian initial conditions. We show that the amplitude of clustering (corresponding to a spatial correlation length of r_0 ~10 h^{-1} Mpc) and skewness are consistent with realistic models of galaxy clustering.

  10. Exploring Sources of Gravitational Waves From Star Cluster Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuhrman, Joshua; Geller, Aaron M.; Rodriguez, Carl L.; Rasio, Frederic A.

    2017-01-01

    The recent detection of ripples in space-time by the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) has ushered in the age of gravitational wave astronomy. Binary black hole systems formed in the center of modest star clusters offer a possible gravitational wave source detectable by the LIGO or Laser Interferometer Space Antennae (LISA) collaborations. We simulate clusters containing 1-40K objects using direct integration from a customized version of NBODY6++GPU. We identify Binary Black Hole (BBH) objects of interest by an inspiral time sufficiently less than the age of the universe such that their coalescence might be detectable. Such objects are tracked through time within our N-body simulations to characterize the role of dynamics in the evolution of the BBH system using member exchanges and large orbital eccentricity changes as indicators of dynamic’s influence. We produce 41 BBH system candidates for detection by LIGO, all of which are dynamically formed. We observe several trends in the production of these potential BBH LIGO sources: a low-N cutoff in initial cluster size between 1-5K objects, high eccentricity oscillations, and the frequent formation of stable triple systems with the BBH as the inner binary.

  11. Spatially sparse source cluster modeling by compressive neuromagnetic tomography.

    PubMed

    Chang, Wei-Tang; Nummenmaa, Aapo; Hsieh, Jen-Chuen; Lin, Fa-Hsuan

    2010-10-15

    Magnetoencephalography enables non-invasive detection of weak cerebral magnetic fields by utilizing super-conducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs). Solving the MEG inverse problem requires reconstructing the locations and orientations of the underlying neuronal current sources based on the extracranial measurements. Most inverse problem solvers explicitly favor either spatially more focal or diffuse current source patterns. Naturally, in a situation where both focal and spatially extended sources are present, such reconstruction methods may yield inaccurate estimates. To address this problem, we propose a novel ComprEssive Neuromagnetic Tomography (CENT) method based on the assumption that the current sources are compressible. The compressibility is quantified by the joint sparsity of the source representation in the standard source space and in a transformed domain. The purpose of the transformation sparsity constraint is to incorporate local spatial structure adaptively by exploiting the natural redundancy of the source configurations in the transform domain. By combining these complementary constraints of standard and transformed domain sparsity we obtain source estimates, which are not only locally smooth and regular but also form globally separable clusters. In this work, we use the l(1)-norm as a measure of sparsity and convex optimization to yield compressive estimates in a computationally tractable manner. We study the Laplacian matrix (CENT(L)) and spherical wavelets (CENT(W)) as alternatives for the transformation in the compression constraint. In addition to the two prior constraints on the sources, we control the discrepancy between the modeled and measured data by restricting the power of residual error below a specified value. The results show that both CENT(L) and CENT(W) are capable of producing robust spatially regular source estimates with high computational efficiency. For simulated sources of focal, diffuse, or combined types, the CENT

  12. A spatial model to aggregate point-source and nonpoint-source water-quality data for large areas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    White, D.A.; Smith, R.A.; Price, C.V.; Alexander, R.B.; Robinson, K.W.

    1992-01-01

    More objective and consistent methods are needed to assess water quality for large areas. A spatial model, one that capitalizes on the topologic relationships among spatial entities, to aggregate pollution sources from upstream drainage areas is described that can be implemented on land surfaces having heterogeneous water-pollution effects. An infrastructure of stream networks and drainage basins, derived from 1:250,000-scale digital-elevation models, define the hydrologic system in this spatial model. The spatial relationships between point- and nonpoint pollution sources and measurement locations are referenced to the hydrologic infrastructure with the aid of a geographic information system. A maximum-branching algorithm has been developed to simulate the effects of distance from a pollutant source to an arbitrary downstream location, a function traditionally employed in deterministic water quality models. ?? 1992.

  13. High-efficiency cluster laser vaporization sources based on Ti: sapphire lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellarin, M.; Cottancin, E.; Lerme, J.; Vialle, J.L.; Wolf, J.P.; Broyer, M.; Paillard, V.; Dupuis, V.; Perez, A.; Perez, J.P.; Tuaillon, J.; Melinon, P.

    1994-07-01

    A new laser vaporization source based on a flashlamp-pumped Ti:sapphire laser has been used to produce cluster beams. The performance is compared to the standard cluster sources based on neodyme YAG lasers. We show that the Ti:sapphire source is much more efficient: the clusters deposition rate are about 30 times higher, and larger clusters are produced. Finally the quality of nanostructured films is comparable to those obtained by the standard source, but the time deposition is 30 times shorter. This opens new possibilites for film growth by cluster deposition.

  14. Vibronic coupling in molecular crystals: A Franck-Condon Herzberg-Teller model of H-aggregate fluorescence based on quantum chemical cluster calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Wykes, M. Parambil, R.; Gierschner, J.; Beljonne, D.

    2015-09-21

    Here, we present a general approach to treating vibronic coupling in molecular crystals based on atomistic simulations of large clusters. Such clusters comprise model aggregates treated at the quantum chemical level embedded within a realistic environment treated at the molecular mechanics level. As we calculate ground and excited state equilibrium geometries and vibrational modes of model aggregates, our approach is able to capture effects arising from coupling to intermolecular degrees of freedom, absent from existing models relying on geometries and normal modes of single molecules. Using the geometries and vibrational modes of clusters, we are able to simulate the fluorescence spectra of aggregates for which the lowest excited state bears negligible oscillator strength (as is the case, e.g., ideal H-aggregates) by including both Franck-Condon (FC) and Herzberg-Teller (HT) vibronic transitions. The latter terms allow the adiabatic excited state of the cluster to couple with vibrations in a perturbative fashion via derivatives of the transition dipole moment along nuclear coordinates. While vibronic coupling simulations employing FC and HT terms are well established for single-molecules, to our knowledge this is the first time they are applied to molecular aggregates. Here, we apply this approach to the simulation of the low-temperature fluorescence spectrum of para-distyrylbenzene single-crystal H-aggregates and draw comparisons with coarse-grained Frenkel-Holstein approaches previously extensively applied to such systems.

  15. Vibronic coupling in molecular crystals: A Franck-Condon Herzberg-Teller model of H-aggregate fluorescence based on quantum chemical cluster calculations.

    PubMed

    Wykes, M; Parambil, R; Beljonne, D; Gierschner, J

    2015-09-21

    Here, we present a general approach to treating vibronic coupling in molecular crystals based on atomistic simulations of large clusters. Such clusters comprise model aggregates treated at the quantum chemical level embedded within a realistic environment treated at the molecular mechanics level. As we calculate ground and excited state equilibrium geometries and vibrational modes of model aggregates, our approach is able to capture effects arising from coupling to intermolecular degrees of freedom, absent from existing models relying on geometries and normal modes of single molecules. Using the geometries and vibrational modes of clusters, we are able to simulate the fluorescence spectra of aggregates for which the lowest excited state bears negligible oscillator strength (as is the case, e.g., ideal H-aggregates) by including both Franck-Condon (FC) and Herzberg-Teller (HT) vibronic transitions. The latter terms allow the adiabatic excited state of the cluster to couple with vibrations in a perturbative fashion via derivatives of the transition dipole moment along nuclear coordinates. While vibronic coupling simulations employing FC and HT terms are well established for single-molecules, to our knowledge this is the first time they are applied to molecular aggregates. Here, we apply this approach to the simulation of the low-temperature fluorescence spectrum of para-distyrylbenzene single-crystal H-aggregates and draw comparisons with coarse-grained Frenkel-Holstein approaches previously extensively applied to such systems.

  16. Vibronic coupling in molecular crystals: A Franck-Condon Herzberg-Teller model of H-aggregate fluorescence based on quantum chemical cluster calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wykes, M.; Parambil, R.; Beljonne, D.; Gierschner, J.

    2015-09-01

    Here, we present a general approach to treating vibronic coupling in molecular crystals based on atomistic simulations of large clusters. Such clusters comprise model aggregates treated at the quantum chemical level embedded within a realistic environment treated at the molecular mechanics level. As we calculate ground and excited state equilibrium geometries and vibrational modes of model aggregates, our approach is able to capture effects arising from coupling to intermolecular degrees of freedom, absent from existing models relying on geometries and normal modes of single molecules. Using the geometries and vibrational modes of clusters, we are able to simulate the fluorescence spectra of aggregates for which the lowest excited state bears negligible oscillator strength (as is the case, e.g., ideal H-aggregates) by including both Franck-Condon (FC) and Herzberg-Teller (HT) vibronic transitions. The latter terms allow the adiabatic excited state of the cluster to couple with vibrations in a perturbative fashion via derivatives of the transition dipole moment along nuclear coordinates. While vibronic coupling simulations employing FC and HT terms are well established for single-molecules, to our knowledge this is the first time they are applied to molecular aggregates. Here, we apply this approach to the simulation of the low-temperature fluorescence spectrum of para-distyrylbenzene single-crystal H-aggregates and draw comparisons with coarse-grained Frenkel-Holstein approaches previously extensively applied to such systems.

  17. Identification and Characterization of a Gene Cluster Mediating Enteroaggregative Escherichia Coli Aggregative Adherence Fimbria I Biogenesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-08-01

    adherent E. coli ( DAEC ). respectively. The LA ties to other known fimbrial biogenesis systems of pathogenic pattern is typified by the formation of...agg gene cluster is configured similarly to 60 to 80% of DAEC strains share relatedness with F1845 the determinants of members of the Dr adhesin

  18. Probing cluster potentials through gravitational lensing of background X-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Refregier, A.; Loeb, A.

    1996-01-01

    The gravitational lensing effect of a foreground galaxy cluster, on the number count statistics of background X-ray sources, was examined. The lensing produces a deficit in the number of resolved sources in a ring close to the critical radius of the cluster. The cluster lens can be used as a natural telescope to study the faint end of the (log N)-(log S) relation for the sources which account for the X-ray background.

  19. AunHgm Clusters: Mercury Aurides, Gold Amalgams, or van der Waals Aggregates?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaleski-Ejgierd, Patryk; Pyykkö, Pekka

    2009-02-01

    The class of bimetallic clusters, AunMm (M = Zn, Cd, Hg), is calculated at the ab initio level using the DFT, RI-MP2, and CCSD(T) methods. For the triatomic Au2M (M = Zn, Cd), the auride-type linear Au-M-Au structures are preferred; for Au2Hg, the linear Au-Au-Hg "amalgam" is preferred. The mixed cation [HgAuHg]+, an analog of the known solid-state species Hg32+, is predicted. For larger AunHgm clusters, the results are similar to the isoelectronic AunM- anions. Several local minima and transition states are identified. All are found to be planar.

  20. Reconnaissance of alluvial fans as potential sources of gravel aggregate, Santa Cruz River valley, Southeast Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lindsey, David A.; Melick, Roger

    2002-01-01

    This investigation was conducted to provide information on the aggregate potential of alluvial fan sediments in the Santa Cruz River valley. Pebble lithology, roundness, and particle size were determined in the field, and structures and textures of alluvial fan sediments were photographed and described. Additional measurements of particle size on digital photographs were made on a computer screen. Digital elevation models were acquired and compiled for viewing the areal extent of selected fans. Alluvial fan gravel in the Santa Cruz River valley reflects the lithology of its source. Gravel derived from granitic and gneissic terrane of the Tortolita, Santa Catalina, and Rincon Mountains weathers to grus and is generally inferior for use as aggregate. Gravel derived from the Tucson, Sierrita, and Tumacacori Mountains is composed mostly of angular particles of volcanic rock, much of it felsic in composition. This angular volcanic gravel should be suitable for use in asphalt but may require treatment for alkali-silica reaction prior to use in concrete. Gravel derived from the Santa Rita Mountains is of mixed plutonic (mostly granitic rocks), volcanic (mostly felsic rocks), and sedimentary (sandstone and carbonate rock) composition. The sedimentary component tends to make gravel derived from the Santa Rita Mountains slightly more rounded than other fan gravel. The coarsest (pebble, cobble, and boulder) gravel is found near the heads (proximal part) of alluvial fans. At the foot (distal part) of alluvial fans, most gravel is pebble-sized and interbedded with sand and silt. Some of the coarsest gravel was observed near the head of the Madera Canyon, Montosa Canyon, and Esperanza Wash fans. The large Cienega Creek fan, located immediately south and southeast of Tucson, consists entirely of distal-fan pebble gravel, sand, and silt.

  1. AN EXAMINATION OF THE OPTICAL SUBSTRUCTURE OF GALAXY CLUSTERS HOSTING RADIO SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Wing, Joshua D.; Blanton, Elizabeth L.

    2013-04-20

    Using radio sources from the Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-cm survey, and optical counterparts in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, we have identified a large number of galaxy clusters. The radio sources within these clusters are driven by active galactic nuclei, and our cluster samples include clusters with bent, and straight, double-lobed radio sources. We also included a single-radio-component comparison sample. We examine these galaxy clusters for evidence of optical substructure, testing the possibility that bent double-lobed radio sources are formed as a result of large-scale cluster mergers. We use a suite of substructure analysis tools to determine the location and extent of substructure visible in the optical distribution of cluster galaxies, and compare the rates of substructure in clusters with different types of radio sources. We found no preference for significant substructure in clusters hosting bent double-lobed radio sources compared to those with other types of radio sources.

  2. Effect of carbon sources on the aggregation of photo fermentative bacteria induced by L-cysteine for enhancing hydrogen production.

    PubMed

    Xie, Guo-Jun; Liu, Bing-Feng; Ding, Jie; Wang, Qilin; Ma, Chao; Zhou, Xu; Ren, Nan-Qi

    2016-12-01

    Poor flocculation of photo fermentative bacteria resulting in continuous biomass washout from photobioreactor is a critical challenge to achieve rapid and stable hydrogen production. In this work, the aggregation of Rhodopseudomonas faecalis RLD-53 was successfully developed in a photobioreactor and the effects of different carbon sources on hydrogen production and aggregation ability were investigated. Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) production by R. faecalis RLD-53 cultivated using different carbon sources were stimulated by addition of L-cysteine. The absolute ζ potentials of R. faecalis RLD-53 were considerably decreased with addition of L-cysteine, and aggregation barriers based on DLVO dropped to 15-43 % of that in control groups. Thus, R. faecalis RLD-53 flocculated effectively, and aggregation abilities of strain RLD-53 cultivated with acetate, propionate, lactate and malate reached 29.35, 32.34, 26.07 and 24.86 %, respectively. In the continuous test, hydrogen-producing activity was also promoted and reached 2.45 mol H2/mol lactate, 3.87 mol H2/mol propionate and 5.10 mol H2/mol malate, respectively. Therefore, the aggregation of R. faecalis RLD-53 induced by L-cysteine is independent on the substrate types, which ensures the wide application of this technology to enhance hydrogen recovery from wastewater dominated by different organic substrates.

  3. Information diffusion, Facebook clusters, and the simplicial model of social aggregation: a computational simulation of simplicial diffusers for community health interventions.

    PubMed

    Kee, Kerk F; Sparks, Lisa; Struppa, Daniele C; Mannucci, Mirco A; Damiano, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    By integrating the simplicial model of social aggregation with existing research on opinion leadership and diffusion networks, this article introduces the constructs of simplicial diffusers (mathematically defined as nodes embedded in simplexes; a simplex is a socially bonded cluster) and simplicial diffusing sets (mathematically defined as minimal covers of a simplicial complex; a simplicial complex is a social aggregation in which socially bonded clusters are embedded) to propose a strategic approach for information diffusion of cancer screenings as a health intervention on Facebook for community cancer prevention and control. This approach is novel in its incorporation of interpersonally bonded clusters, culturally distinct subgroups, and different united social entities that coexist within a larger community into a computational simulation to select sets of simplicial diffusers with the highest degree of information diffusion for health intervention dissemination. The unique contributions of the article also include seven propositions and five algorithmic steps for computationally modeling the simplicial model with Facebook data.

  4. JMS: An Open Source Workflow Management System and Web-Based Cluster Front-End for High Performance Computing.

    PubMed

    Brown, David K; Penkler, David L; Musyoka, Thommas M; Bishop, Özlem Tastan

    2015-01-01

    Complex computational pipelines are becoming a staple of modern scientific research. Often these pipelines are resource intensive and require days of computing time. In such cases, it makes sense to run them over high performance computing (HPC) clusters where they can take advantage of the aggregated resources of many powerful computers. In addition to this, researchers often want to integrate their workflows into their own web servers. In these cases, software is needed to manage the submission of jobs from the web interface to the cluster and then return the results once the job has finished executing. We have developed the Job Management System (JMS), a workflow management system and web interface for high performance computing (HPC). JMS provides users with a user-friendly web interface for creating complex workflows with multiple stages. It integrates this workflow functionality with the resource manager, a tool that is used to control and manage batch jobs on HPC clusters. As such, JMS combines workflow management functionality with cluster administration functionality. In addition, JMS provides developer tools including a code editor and the ability to version tools and scripts. JMS can be used by researchers from any field to build and run complex computational pipelines and provides functionality to include these pipelines in external interfaces. JMS is currently being used to house a number of bioinformatics pipelines at the Research Unit in Bioinformatics (RUBi) at Rhodes University. JMS is an open-source project and is freely available at https://github.com/RUBi-ZA/JMS.

  5. JMS: An Open Source Workflow Management System and Web-Based Cluster Front-End for High Performance Computing

    PubMed Central

    Brown, David K.; Penkler, David L.; Musyoka, Thommas M.; Bishop, Özlem Tastan

    2015-01-01

    Complex computational pipelines are becoming a staple of modern scientific research. Often these pipelines are resource intensive and require days of computing time. In such cases, it makes sense to run them over high performance computing (HPC) clusters where they can take advantage of the aggregated resources of many powerful computers. In addition to this, researchers often want to integrate their workflows into their own web servers. In these cases, software is needed to manage the submission of jobs from the web interface to the cluster and then return the results once the job has finished executing. We have developed the Job Management System (JMS), a workflow management system and web interface for high performance computing (HPC). JMS provides users with a user-friendly web interface for creating complex workflows with multiple stages. It integrates this workflow functionality with the resource manager, a tool that is used to control and manage batch jobs on HPC clusters. As such, JMS combines workflow management functionality with cluster administration functionality. In addition, JMS provides developer tools including a code editor and the ability to version tools and scripts. JMS can be used by researchers from any field to build and run complex computational pipelines and provides functionality to include these pipelines in external interfaces. JMS is currently being used to house a number of bioinformatics pipelines at the Research Unit in Bioinformatics (RUBi) at Rhodes University. JMS is an open-source project and is freely available at https://github.com/RUBi-ZA/JMS. PMID:26280450

  6. Impacts of input parameter spatial aggregation on an agricultural nonpoint source pollution model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    FitzHugh, T. W.; Mackay, D. S.

    2000-09-01

    The accuracy of agricultural nonpoint source pollution models depends in part on how well model input parameters describe the relevant characteristics of the watershed. The spatial extent of input parameter aggregation has previously been shown to have a substantial impact on model output. This study investigates this problem using the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT), a distributed-parameter agricultural nonpoint source pollution model. The primary question addressed here is: how does the size or number of subwatersheds used to partition the watershed affect model output, and what are the processes responsible for model behavior? SWAT was run on the Pheasant Branch watershed in Dane County, WI, using eight watershed delineations, each with a different number of subwatersheds. Model runs were conducted for the period 1990-1996. Streamflow and outlet sediment predictions were not seriously affected by changes in subwatershed size. The lack of change in outlet sediment is due to the transport-limited nature of the Pheasant Branch watershed and the stable transport capacity of the lower part of the channel network. This research identifies the importance of channel parameters in determining the behavior of SWAT's outlet sediment predictions. Sediment generation estimates do change substantially, dropping by 44% between the coarsest and the finest watershed delineations. This change is primarily due to the sensitivity of the runoff term in the Modified Universal Soil Loss Equation to the area of hydrologic response units (HRUs). This sensitivity likely occurs because SWAT was implemented in this study with a very detailed set of HRUs. In order to provide some insight on the scaling behavior of the model two indexes were derived using the mathematics of the model. The indexes predicted SWAT scaling behavior from the data inputs without a need for running the model. Such indexes could be useful for model users by providing a direct way to evaluate alternative models

  7. Narrow-angle tail radio sources and the distribution of galaxy orbits in Abell clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Dea, Christopher P.; Sarazin, Craig L.; Owen, Frazer N.

    1987-01-01

    The present data on the orientations of the tails with respect to the cluster centers of a sample of 70 narrow-angle-tail (NAT) radio sources in Abell clusters show the distribution of tail angles to be inconsistent with purely radial or circular orbits in all the samples, while being consistent with isotropic orbits in (1) the whole sample, (2) the sample of NATs far from the cluster center, and (3) the samples of morphologically regular Abell clusters. Evidence for very radial orbits is found, however, in the sample of NATs near the cluster center. If these results can be generalized to all cluster galaxies, then the presence of radial orbits near the center of Abell clusters suggests that violent relaxation may not have been fully effective even within the cores of the regular clusters.

  8. Interpretation of data on the aggregate composition of typical chernozems under different land use by cluster and principal component analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kholodov, V. A.; Yaroslavtseva, N. V.; Lazarev, V. I.; Frid, A. S.

    2016-09-01

    Cluster analysis and principal component analysis (PCA) have been used for the interpretation of dry sieving data. Chernozems from the treatments of long-term field experiments with different land-use patterns— annually mowed steppe, continuous potato culture, permanent black fallow, and untilled fallow since 1998 after permanent black fallow—have been used. Analysis of dry sieving data by PCA has shown that the treatments of untilled fallow after black fallow and annually mowed steppe differ most in the series considered; the content of dry aggregates of 10-7 mm makes the largest contribution to the distribution of objects along the first principal component. This fraction has been sieved in water and analyzed by PCA. In contrast to dry sieving data, the wet sieving data showed the closest mathematical distance between the treatment of untilled fallow after black fallow and the undisturbed treatment of annually mowed steppe, while the untilled fallow after black fallow and the permanent black fallow were the most distant treatments. Thus, it may be suggested that the water stability of structure is first restored after the removal of destructive anthropogenic load. However, the restoration of the distribution of structural separates to the parameters characteristic of native soils is a significantly longer process.

  9. The Counterparts of the Luminous, Bursting X-ray Sources in Globular Clusters-LTSA98

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Scott F.

    2003-01-01

    Under the fifth year of the LTSA, we have extended our HST and Chandra work to a number of additional globular clusters. The remarkable sensitivity and positional accuracy of the Chandra observations are enabling us to maximally exploit HST for UV/optical identifications for X-ray binaries in the cores of multiple globular clusters. The dozens of lower-luminosity X-ray sources in each globular cluster deeply examined thus far have moved us firmly into the era of studies which encompass populations of close; the large range of cluster properties we are studying have, for the first tine, established a firm empirical confirmation of the (long-suspected theoretically) high importance that close binaries play in the dynamical stability and evolution of globular clusters. The LTSA support has been a cornerstone of our success over the past 5 years in studies of globular cluster X-ray sources and their counterparts.

  10. GALAXY CLUSTERS IN THE IRAC DARK FIELD. II. MID-INFRARED SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Krick, J. E.; Surace, J. A.; Yan, L.; Thompson, D.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Hora, J. L.; Gorjian, V.

    2009-07-20

    We present infrared (IR) luminosities, star formation rates (SFR), colors, morphologies, locations, and active galactic nuclei (AGNs) properties of 24 {mu}m detected sources in photometrically detected high-redshift clusters in order to understand the impact of environment on star formation (SF) and AGN evolution in cluster galaxies. We use three newly identified z = 1 clusters selected from the IRAC dark field; the deepest ever mid-IR survey with accompanying, 14 band multiwavelength data including deep Hubble Space Telescope imaging and deep wide-area Spitzer MIPS 24 {mu}m imaging. We find 90 cluster members with MIPS detections within two virial radii of the cluster centers, of which 17 appear to have spectral energy distributions dominated by AGNs and the rest dominated by SF. We find that 43% of the star-forming sample have IR luminosities L{sub IR} > 10{sup 11} L{sub sun} (luminous IR galaxies). The majority of sources (81%) are spirals or irregulars. A large fraction (at least 25%) show obvious signs of interactions. The MIPS-detected member galaxies have varied spatial distributions as compared to the MIPS-undetected members with one of the three clusters showing SF galaxies being preferentially located on the cluster outskirts, while the other two clusters show no such trend. Both the AGN fraction and the summed SFR of cluster galaxies increase from redshift zero to one, at a rate that is a few times faster in clusters than over the same redshift range in the field. Cluster environment does have an effect on the evolution of both AGN fraction and SFR from redshift one to the present, but does not affect the IR luminosities or morphologies of the MIPS sample. SF happens in the same way regardless of environment making MIPS sources look the same in the cluster and field, however the cluster environment does encourage a more rapid evolution with time as compared to the field.

  11. Identification of Hard X-ray Sources in Galactic Globular Clusters: Simbol-X Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Servillat, M.

    2009-05-01

    Globular clusters harbour an excess of X-ray sources compared to the number of X-ray sources in the Galactic plane. It has been proposed that many of these X-ray sources are cataclysmic variables that have an intermediate magnetic field, i.e. intermediate polars, which remains to be confirmed and understood. We present here several methods to identify intermediate polars in globular clusters from multiwavelength analysis. First, we report on XMM-Newton, Chandra and HST observations of the very dense Galactic globular cluster NGC 2808. By comparing UV and X-ray properties of the cataclysmic variable candidates, the fraction of intermediate polars in this cluster can be estimated. We also present the optical spectra of two cataclysmic variables in the globular cluster M 22. The HeII (4868 Å) emission line in these spectra could be related to the presence of a magnetic field in these objects. Simulations of Simbol-X observations indicate that the angular resolution is sufficient to study X-ray sources in the core of close, less dense globular clusters, such as M 22. The sensitivity of Simbol-X in an extended energy band up to 80 keV will allow us to discriminate between hard X-ray sources (such as magnetic cataclysmic variables) and soft X-ray sources (such as chromospherically active binaries).

  12. Exploring Evidence Aggregation Methods and External Expansion Sources for Medical Record Search

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-11-01

    retrieving indexing visits ranking III RbM VRM baseline/MRF/MRM models ICD, NEG MbR Figure 1: Merging results from two different...aggregation strategy Merging-before-Retrieval ( MbR ). The merging process involved in MbR corresponds to “merging II” in Figure 1. Top-level Evidence...RbM and MbR as described above are two different strategies for aggregating evidence and ranking visits. RbM and MbR complement each other in that the

  13. Determination of the mass of globular cluster X-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grindlay, J. E.; Hertz, P.; Steiner, J. E.; Murray, S. S.; Lightman, A. P.

    1984-01-01

    The precise positions of the luminous X-ray sources in eight globular clusters have been measured with the Einstein X-Ray Observatory. When combined with similarly precise measurements of the dynamical centers and core radii of the globular clusters, the distribution of the X-ray source mass is determined to be in the range 0.9-1.9 solar mass. The X-ray source positions and the detailed optical studies indicate that (1) the sources are probably all of similar mass, (2) the gravitational potentials in these high-central density clusters are relatively smooth and isothermal, and (3) the X-ray sources are compact binaries and are probably formed by tidal capture.

  14. Galactic bulge X-ray burst sources from disrupted globular clusters?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grindlay, J. E.; Hertz, P.

    1985-01-01

    The origin of the bright galactic bulge X-ray sources, or GX sources, is unclear despite intensive study for the past 15 years. It is suggested that the fact that many (or most) of the GX sources are X-ray burst sources (GXRBS) and are otherwise apparently identical to the luminous X-ray sources found in globular cluster cores implies that they too may have a globular cluster origin. The possibility that the compact X-ray binaries found in globulars are ejected is constrained by observations of CVs in and out of clusters. The GXRBS are instead hypothesized to have been formed by capture processes in globular clusters which have now largely been disrupted by repeated tidal stripping and shocking in the galactic plane. A statistical analysis of the 12 GXRBS which have precise positions from Einstein and/or optical (or radio) observations indicate that it is probably significant that a bright, of less than about 19, G or K star is found within the error circle (3 arcmin radius) in four cases. These may be surviving giants in a disrupted globular cluster core. Implications for globular cluster evolution and the GXRBS themselves are discussed.

  15. Extrinsic Sources of Scatter in the Richness-Mass Relation of Galaxy Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Rozo, Eduardo; Rykoff, Eli; Koester, Benjamin; Nord, Brian; Wu, Hao-Yi; Evrard, August; Wechsler, Risa; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2012-03-27

    Maximizing the utility of upcoming photometric cluster surveys requires a thorough understanding of the richness-mass relation of galaxy clusters. We use Monte Carlo simulations to study the impact of various sources of observational scatter on this relation. Cluster ellipticity, photometric errors, photometric redshift errors, and cluster-to-cluster variations in the properties of red-sequence galaxies contribute negligible noise. Miscentering, however, can be important, and likely contributes to the scatter in the richness - mass relation of galaxy maxBCG clusters at the low mass end, where centering is more difficult. We also investigate the impact of projection effects under several empirically motivated assumptions about cluster environments. Using SDSS data and the maxBCG cluster catalog, we demonstrate that variations in cluster environments can rarely ({approx} 1%-5% of the time) result in significant richness boosts. Due to the steepness of the mass/richness function, the corresponding fraction of optically selected clusters that suffer from these projection effects is {approx} 5%-15%. We expect these numbers to be generic in magnitude, but a precise determination requires detailed, survey-specific modeling.

  16. Simple source for large linear cluster photonic states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilnyak, Y.; Aharon, N.; Istrati, D.; Megidish, E.; Retzker, A.; Eisenberg, H. S.

    2017-02-01

    The experimental realization of many-body entangled states is one of the main goals of quantum technology as these states are a key resource for quantum computation and quantum sensing. However, increasing the number of photons in an entangled state has been proved to be a painstakingly hard task. This is a result of the nondeterministic emission of current photon sources and the distinguishability between photons from different sources. Moreover, the generation rate and the complexity of the optical setups hinder scalability. Here we present a scheme that is compact, requires a very modest number of components, and avoids the distinguishability issues by using only one single-photon source. States of any number of photons are generated with the same configuration, with no need for increasing the optical setup. The basic operation of this scheme is experimentally demonstrated, and its sensitivity to imperfections is considered.

  17. Groundwater source contamination mechanisms: Physicochemical profile clustering, risk factor analysis and multivariate modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hynds, Paul; Misstear, Bruce D.; Gill, Laurence W.; Murphy, Heather M.

    2014-04-01

    An integrated domestic well sampling and "susceptibility assessment" programme was undertaken in the Republic of Ireland from April 2008 to November 2010. Overall, 211 domestic wells were sampled, assessed and collated with local climate data. Based upon groundwater physicochemical profile, three clusters have been identified and characterised by source type (borehole or hand-dug well) and local geological setting. Statistical analysis indicates that cluster membership is significantly associated with the prevalence of bacteria (p = 0.001), with mean Escherichia coli presence within clusters ranging from 15.4% (Cluster-1) to 47.6% (Cluster-3). Bivariate risk factor analysis shows that on-site septic tank presence was the only risk factor significantly associated (p < 0.05) with bacterial presence within all clusters. Point agriculture adjacency was significantly associated with both borehole-related clusters. Well design criteria were associated with hand-dug wells and boreholes in areas characterised by high permeability subsoils, while local geological setting was significant for hand-dug wells and boreholes in areas dominated by low/moderate permeability subsoils. Multivariate susceptibility models were developed for all clusters, with predictive accuracies of 84% (Cluster-1) to 91% (Cluster-2) achieved. Septic tank setback was a common variable within all multivariate models, while agricultural sources were also significant, albeit to a lesser degree. Furthermore, well liner clearance was a significant factor in all models, indicating that direct surface ingress is a significant well contamination mechanism. Identification and elucidation of cluster-specific contamination mechanisms may be used to develop improved overall risk management and wellhead protection strategies, while also informing future remediation and maintenance efforts.

  18. Groundwater source contamination mechanisms: physicochemical profile clustering, risk factor analysis and multivariate modelling.

    PubMed

    Hynds, Paul; Misstear, Bruce D; Gill, Laurence W; Murphy, Heather M

    2014-04-01

    An integrated domestic well sampling and "susceptibility assessment" programme was undertaken in the Republic of Ireland from April 2008 to November 2010. Overall, 211 domestic wells were sampled, assessed and collated with local climate data. Based upon groundwater physicochemical profile, three clusters have been identified and characterised by source type (borehole or hand-dug well) and local geological setting. Statistical analysis indicates that cluster membership is significantly associated with the prevalence of bacteria (p=0.001), with mean Escherichia coli presence within clusters ranging from 15.4% (Cluster-1) to 47.6% (Cluster-3). Bivariate risk factor analysis shows that on-site septic tank presence was the only risk factor significantly associated (p<0.05) with bacterial presence within all clusters. Point agriculture adjacency was significantly associated with both borehole-related clusters. Well design criteria were associated with hand-dug wells and boreholes in areas characterised by high permeability subsoils, while local geological setting was significant for hand-dug wells and boreholes in areas dominated by low/moderate permeability subsoils. Multivariate susceptibility models were developed for all clusters, with predictive accuracies of 84% (Cluster-1) to 91% (Cluster-2) achieved. Septic tank setback was a common variable within all multivariate models, while agricultural sources were also significant, albeit to a lesser degree. Furthermore, well liner clearance was a significant factor in all models, indicating that direct surface ingress is a significant well contamination mechanism. Identification and elucidation of cluster-specific contamination mechanisms may be used to develop improved overall risk management and wellhead protection strategies, while also informing future remediation and maintenance efforts.

  19. Open-Source Sequence Clustering Methods Improve the State Of the Art.

    PubMed

    Kopylova, Evguenia; Navas-Molina, Jose A; Mercier, Céline; Xu, Zhenjiang Zech; Mahé, Frédéric; He, Yan; Zhou, Hong-Wei; Rognes, Torbjørn; Caporaso, J Gregory; Knight, Rob

    2016-01-01

    Sequence clustering is a common early step in amplicon-based microbial community analysis, when raw sequencing reads are clustered into operational taxonomic units (OTUs) to reduce the run time of subsequent analysis steps. Here, we evaluated the performance of recently released state-of-the-art open-source clustering software products, namely, OTUCLUST, Swarm, SUMACLUST, and SortMeRNA, against current principal options (UCLUST and USEARCH) in QIIME, hierarchical clustering methods in mothur, and USEARCH's most recent clustering algorithm, UPARSE. All the latest open-source tools showed promising results, reporting up to 60% fewer spurious OTUs than UCLUST, indicating that the underlying clustering algorithm can vastly reduce the number of these derived OTUs. Furthermore, we observed that stringent quality filtering, such as is done in UPARSE, can cause a significant underestimation of species abundance and diversity, leading to incorrect biological results. Swarm, SUMACLUST, and SortMeRNA have been included in the QIIME 1.9.0 release. IMPORTANCE Massive collections of next-generation sequencing data call for fast, accurate, and easily accessible bioinformatics algorithms to perform sequence clustering. A comprehensive benchmark is presented, including open-source tools and the popular USEARCH suite. Simulated, mock, and environmental communities were used to analyze sensitivity, selectivity, species diversity (alpha and beta), and taxonomic composition. The results demonstrate that recent clustering algorithms can significantly improve accuracy and preserve estimated diversity without the application of aggressive filtering. Moreover, these tools are all open source, apply multiple levels of multithreading, and scale to the demands of modern next-generation sequencing data, which is essential for the analysis of massive multidisciplinary studies such as the Earth Microbiome Project (EMP) (J. A. Gilbert, J. K. Jansson, and R. Knight, BMC Biol 12:69, 2014, http

  20. Compton Observatory observations of clusters of galaxies and extragalactic radio sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This task involved the investigation of the emission of clusters of galaxies, particularly those which contain extended radio emission, in the gamma-ray region of the spectrum. Observations were made of several clusters using the Compton Observatory EGRET instrument. For each cluster a measured flux or upper limit on the gamma-ray flux was obtained. In only one case, Abell 2199, was there a significant measured flux. This source is spatially confused with a know blazar in the field of view. The observation is consistent with all emissions being from the blazar.

  1. SOURCE AGGREGATION IN STABLE ISOTOPE MIXING MODELS: LUMP IT OR LEAVE IT?

    EPA Science Inventory

    A common situation when stable isotope mixing models are used to estimate source contributions to a mixture is that there are too many sources to allow a unique solution. To resolve this problem one option is to combine sources with similar signatures such that the number of sou...

  2. AGGREGATING FOOD SOURCES IN STABLE ISOTOPE DIETARY STUDIES: LUMP IT OR LEAVE IT?

    EPA Science Inventory

    A common situation when stable isotope mixing models are used to estimate food source dietary contributions is that there are too many sources to allow a unique solution. To resolve this problem one option is to combine sources with similar signatures such that the number of sou...

  3. Petro-chemical features and source areas of volcanic aggregates used in ancient Roman maritime concretes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marra, F.; Anzidei, M.; Benini, A.; D'Ambrosio, E.; Gaeta, M.; Ventura, G.; Cavallo, A.

    2016-12-01

    We present and discuss data from petrographic observation at the optical microscope, electron microprobe analyses on selected glass shards, and trace-element analyses on 14 mortar aggregates collected at the ancient harbors and other maritime structures of Latium and Campania, spanning the third century BCE through the second CE, aimed at identify the volcanic products employed in the concretes and their area of exploitation. According to Latin author Vitruvius assertion about the ubiquitous use of Campanian pozzolan in the ancient Roman sea-water concretes, results of this study show a very selective and homogeneous choice in the material employed to produce the concretes for the different investigated maritime structures, evidencing three main pumice compositions, all corresponding to those of the products of the post-Neapolitan Yellow Tuff activity of the Phlegraean Fields, and a systematic use of the local Neapolitan Yellow Tuff to produce the coarse aggregate of these concretes. However, mixing with local products of the Colli Albani volcanic district, located 20 km east of Rome, has been evidenced at two fishponds of Latium, in Punta della Vipera and Torre Astura. Based on these petrographic and geochemical data, we conclude that the selective use of pozzolan from Campania, rather than of unproved different chemical properties, was the consequence of a series of logistic, economic, industrial and historical reasons.

  4. Straight to the Source: Detecting Aggregate Objects in Astronomical Images with Proper Error Control

    PubMed Central

    Friedenberg, David A.; Genovese, Christopher R.

    2013-01-01

    The next generation of telescopes, coming on-line in the next decade, will acquire terabytes of image data each night. Collectively, these large images will contain billions of interesting objects, which astronomers call sources. One critical task for astronomers is to construct from the image data a detailed source catalog that gives the sky coordinates and other properties of all detected sources. The source catalog is the primary data product produced by most telescopes and serves as an important input for studies that build and test new astrophysical theories. To construct an accurate catalog, the sources must first be detected in the image. A variety of effective source detection algorithms exist in the astronomical literature, but few if any provide rigorous statistical control of error rates. A variety of multiple testing procedures exist in the statistical literature that can provide rigorous error control over pixelwise errors, but these do not provide control over errors at the level of sources, which is what astronomers need. In this paper, we propose a technique that is effective at source detection while providing rigorous control on source-wise error rates. We demonstrate our approach with data from the Chandra X-ray Observatory Satellite. Our method is competitive with existing astronomical methods, even finding two new sources that were missed by previous studies, while providing stronger performance guarantees and without requiring costly follow up studies that are commonly required with current techniques. PMID:24068849

  5. Source clustering in the Hi-GAL survey determined using a minimum spanning tree method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beuret, M.; Billot, N.; Cambrésy, L.; Eden, D. J.; Elia, D.; Molinari, S.; Pezzuto, S.; Schisano, E.

    2017-01-01

    Aims: The aims are to investigate the clustering of the far-infrared sources from the Herschel infrared Galactic Plane Survey (Hi-GAL) in the Galactic longitude range of -71 to 67 deg. These clumps, and their spatial distribution, are an imprint of the original conditions within a molecular cloud. This will produce a catalogue of over-densities. Methods: The minimum spanning tree (MST) method was used to identify the over-densities in two dimensions. The catalogue was further refined by folding in heliocentric distances, resulting in more reliable over-densities, which are cluster candidates. Results: We found 1633 over-densities with more than ten members. Of these, 496 are defined as cluster candidates because of the reliability of the distances, with a further 1137 potential cluster candidates. The spatial distributions of the cluster candidates are different in the first and fourth quadrants, with all clusters following the spiral structure of the Milky Way. The cluster candidates are fractal. The clump mass functions of the clustered and isolated are statistically indistinguishable from each other and are consistent with Kroupa's initial mass function. Hi-GAL is a key-project of the Herschel Space Observatory survey (Pilbratt et al. 2010) and uses the PACS (Poglitsch et al. 2010) and SPIRE (Griffin et al. 2010) cameras in parallel mode.The catalogues of cluster candidates and potential clusters are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/597/A114

  6. A study of diffuse radio sources and X-ray emission in six massive clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parekh, V.; Dwarakanath, K. S.; Kale, R.; Intema, H.

    2017-01-01

    The goal of this study is to extend our current knowledge of the diffuse radio source (halo and relic) populations to z > 0.3. Here, we report GMRT and EVLA radio observations of six galaxy clusters taken from the MAssive Cluster Survey (MACS) catalogue to detect diffuse radio emission. We used archival GMRT (150, 235, and 610 MHz) and EVLA (L band) data and made images at multiple radio frequencies of the following six clusters - MACSJ0417.5-1154, MACSJ1131.8-1955, MACSJ0308.9+2645, MACSJ2243.3-0935, MACSJ2228.5+2036, and MACSJ0358.8-2955. We detect diffuse radio emission (halo or relic, or both) in the first four clusters. In the last two clusters, we do not detect any diffuse radio emission but we put stringent upper limits on their radio powers. We also use archival Chandra X-ray data to carry out morphology and substructure analysis of these clusters. We find that based on X-ray data, these MACS clusters are non-relaxed and show substructures in their temperature distribution. The radio powers of the first four MACS clusters are consistent with their expected values in the LX-P1.4 GHz plot. However, we found ultrasteep spectrum radio halo in the MACSJ0417.5-1154 cluster whose rest-frame cut-off frequency is at ˜900 MHz. The remaining two clusters whose radio powers are ˜11 times below the expected values are most likely to be in the `off-state' as has been postulated in some of the models of radio halo formation.

  7. Narrow-angle tail radio sources and evidence for radial orbits in Abell clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Dea, Christopher P.; Owen, Frazer N.; Sarazin, Craig L.

    1986-01-01

    Published observational data on the tail orientations (TOs) of 60 narrow-angle-tail (NAT) radio sources in Abell clusters of galaxies are analyzed statistically using a maximum-likelihood approach. The results are presented in a table, and it is found that the observed TO distributions in the whole sample and in subsamples of morphologically regular NATs and NATs with pericentric distances d greater than 500 kpc are consistent with isotropic orbits, whereas the TOs for NATs with d less than 500 kpc are consistent with highly radial orbits. If radial orbits were observed near the centers of other types of cluster galaxies as well, it could be inferred that violent relaxation during cluster formation was incomplete, and that clusters form by spherical collapse and secondary infall, as proposed by Gunn (1977).

  8. Interactions between radio sources and X-ray gas at the centers of cooling core clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarazin, C. L.; Blanton, E. L.; Clarke, T. E.

    Recent Chandra and XMM observations of the interaction of central radio sources and cooling cores in clusters of galaxies will be presented. The clusters studied include A262, A2052, A2626, A113, A2029, A2597, and A4059. The radio sources blow "bubbles" in the X-ray gas, displacing the gas and compressing it into shells around the radio lobes. At the same time, the radio sources are confined by the X-ray gas. At larger radii, "ghost bubbles" are seen which are weak in radio emission except at low frequencies. These may be evidence of previous eruptions of the radio sources. In some cases, buoyantly rising bubbles may entrain cooler X-ray gas from the centers of the cooling cores. Some radio sources previously classified as cluster merger radio relics may actually be displaced radio bubbles from the central radio sources. The relation between the radio bubbles, and cooler gas (<~10e4 K) and star formation in cooling cores will be described. The implications for the energetics of radio jets and the cooling of the X-ray gas are discussed. The minimum-energy or equipartition pressures of the radio plasma in the radio lobes are generally much lower than is required to inflate the bubbles. The nature of the primary form of energy and pressure in the bubbles will be discussed, and arguments will be given suggesting that the lobes are dominated by thermal pressure from very hot gas (>10 keV).

  9. Nano-sized clusters of a teicoplanin ψ-aglycon-fullerene conjugate. Synthesis, antibacterial activity and aggregation studies.

    PubMed

    Tollas, Szilvia; Bereczki, Ilona; Sipos, Attila; Rőth, Erzsébet; Batta, Gyula; Daróczi, Lajos; Kéki, Sándor; Ostorházi, Eszter; Rozgonyi, Ferenc; Herczegh, Pál

    2012-08-01

    Glycopeptide antibiotic derivative teicoplanin ψ-aglycone has been bound covalently to a fullerenopyrrolidine derivative using azide-alkyne 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction. The aggregation of the antibiotic-fullerene conjugate in aqueous solution has been studied. The conjugate exhibited antibacterial activity against enterococci resistant to teicoplanin.

  10. Mass concentrations associated with extended X-ray sources in the core of the Coma cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vikhlinin, A.; Forman, W.; Jones, C.

    1994-01-01

    Using a deep (approx. 20,200 s) ROSAT Position Sensitive Proportional Counter (PSPC) image we have examined the central region of the Coma cluster. Two extended regions of enhanced X-ray emission are found, centered at the positions of the brightest elliptical galaxies in the cluster: NGC 4874 and NGC 4889. Spectral analysis of the sources reveals no evidence of any difference between the spectra of these sources and that of the surrounding cluster emission. We assume that the enhancement in the X-ray surface brightness results from gas density enhancements and also that the underlying mass concentrations lie either at the cluster center or 1 core radius out of the center (420 kpc). With these assumptions, we derive total masses of 1.2 x 10(exp 13) - 1.6 x 10(exp 13), and 0.9 x 10(exp 13) - 1.8 x 10(exp 13) Solar mass within 2 min (80 kpc) of NGC 4874 and NGC 4889, respectively, assuming a Hubble constant H(sub 0) = 50 km/s/Mpc. Corresponding mass-to-light ratios for the galaxies are 30-40 and 25-50 in solar units, increasing at larger radii and approaching the values derived for the entire cluster at distances of more than approximately 150 kpc from the galaxies.

  11. A carbon-cluster laser ion source for TRIGA-TRAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smorra, C.; Blaum, K.; Eberhardt, K.; Eibach, M.; Ketelaer, J.; Ketter, J.; Knuth, K.; Nagy, Sz

    2009-08-01

    A new laser ablation ion source was developed and tested for the Penning trap mass spectrometer TRIGA-TRAP in order to provide carbon-cluster ions for absolute mass calibration. Ions of different cluster sizes up to C+24 were successfully produced, covering the mass range up to the heavy actinide elements. The ions were captured in a Penning trap, and their time-of-flight cyclotron resonances recorded in order to determine their cyclotron frequency. Furthermore, the same ion source was used to produce GdO+ ions from a gadolinium target in sufficient amount for mass spectrometry purposes. The design of the source and its characteristics are presented. This paper comprises partly the PhD theses of J Ketelaer and C Smorra.

  12. A supersoft variable low-luminosity X-ray source in the globular cluster M3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hertz, P.; Grindlay, J. E.; Bailyn, C. D.

    1993-01-01

    The globular cluster M3 (NGC 5272) was observed twice with the ROSAT high-resolution imager in order to study the low-luminosity X-ray source 1E 1339.8 + 2837. In 1992 January 1E 1339.8 + 2837 had an X-ray luminosity of 2 x 10 exp 35 ergs/s over an order of magnitude brighter than it was when observed with the Einstein Observatory. The source was unresolved and very soft; such supersoft outbursts would be difficult to detect in the vast majority of globular clusters which are more heavily absorbed than M3. In 1992 June the source was too faint to be detected. The soft outburst luminosity and the blackbody radius suggest that 1E 1339.8 + 2837 is a cataclysmic variable in which much of the luminosity is generated by steady nuclear burning of accreted material on the surface of the white dwarf primary.

  13. VLA observations of radio sources in interacting galaxy pairs in poor clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batuski, David J.; Hanisch, Robert J.; Burns, Jack O.

    1992-01-01

    Observations of 16 radio sources in interacting galaxies in 14 poor clusters were made using the Very Large Array in the B configuration at lambda of 6 and 2 cm. These sources had been unresolved in earlier observations at lambda of 21 cm, and were chosen as a sample to determine which of three models for radio source formation actually pertains in interacting galaxies. From the analysis of this sample, the starburst model appears most successful, but the 'central monster' model could pertain in some cases.

  14. Formation of atomic clusters through the laser ablation of refractory materials in a supersonic molecular beam source

    SciTech Connect

    Haufler, R.E.; Compton, R.N.; Puretzky, A.A. |

    1993-12-31

    Concepts which guide the design of atomic cluster supersonic beam sources have been developed. These ideas are founded on the knowledge of laser ablation dynamics and are structured in order to take advantage of certain features of the ablation event. Some of the drawbacks of previous cluster source designs become apparent when the sequence of events following laser ablation are clarified. Key features of the new cluster source design include control of the cluster size distribution, uniform performance with a variety of solid materials and elements, high beam intensity, and significant removal of internal energy during the supersonic expansion.

  15. Dispersion and Functionalization of Nanoparticles Synthesized by Gas Aggregation Source: Opening New Routes Toward the Fabrication of Nanoparticles for Biomedicine.

    PubMed

    Oprea, B; Martínez, L; Román, E; Vanea, E; Simon, S; Huttel, Y

    2015-12-29

    The need to find new nanoparticles for biomedical applications is pushing the limits of the fabrication methods. New techniques with versatilities beyond the extended chemical routes can provide new insight in the field. In particular, gas aggregation sources offer the possibility to fabricate nanoparticles with controlled size, composition, and structure out of thermodynamics. In this context, the milestone is the optimization of the dispersion and functionalization processes of nanoparticles once fabricated by these routes as they are generated in the gas phase and deposited on substrates in vacuum or ultra-high vacuum conditions. In the present work we propose a fabrication route in ultra-high vacuum that is compatible with the subsequent dispersion and functionalization of nanoparticles in aqueous media and, which is more remarkable, in one single step. In particular, we will present the fabrication of nanoparticles with a sputter gas aggregation source using a Fe50B50 target and their further dispersion and functionalization with polyethyleneglycol (PEG). Characterization of these nanoparticles is carried out before and after PEG functionalization. During functionalization, significant boron dissolution occurs, which facilitates nanoparticle dispersion in the aqueous solution. The use of different complementary techniques allows us to prove the PEG attachment onto the surface of the nanoparticles, creating a shell to make them biocompatible. The result is the formation of nanoparticles with a structure mainly composed by a metallic Fe core and an iron oxide shell, surrounded by a second PEG shell dispersed in aqueous solution. Relaxivity measurements of these PEG-functionalized nanoparticles assessed their effectiveness as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) analysis. Therefore, this new fabrication route is a reliable alternative for the synthesis of nanoparticles for biomedicine.

  16. CHANDRA AND HST STUDIES OF THE X-RAY SOURCES IN GALACTIC GLOBULAR CLUSTER M92

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Ting-Ni; Kong, Albert K. H.; Verbunt, Frank; Lewin, Walter H. G.; Anderson, Scott F.; Pooley, David

    2011-08-01

    We present the analysis of two observations of M92 taken with the Chandra X-Ray Observatory. We combined the two data sets with a total exposure of {approx}52 ks. With the combined observation, we detected 10 X-ray sources inside the half-mass radius (1.'02), five of which are inside the core radius (0.'26) of M92. The luminosities of the 10 sources are roughly within the range of 10{sup 30}-10{sup 32} erg s{sup -1} assuming cluster memberships. The background estimation suggests 7-8 cluster members and 2-3 background galaxies in M92. We identified the 10 sources by using Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys observations of M92. Based on the X-ray and optical characteristics, we classified 4-5 possible candidates for cataclysmic variables within the half-mass radius. We discussed the possible formation mechanisms of the X-ray sources in M92 by comparing the predicted X-ray source number and observational results. Under the assumption that the number of X-ray sources scales with the encounter rate and the mass of the globular cluster, we expected eight X-ray sources formed from dynamical interactions and four from primordial binaries inside M92, which is consistent with the background estimation and comparable with the observational results. We therefore suggest that the X-ray sources in M92 may be contributed from both dynamical origin and primordial binaries.

  17. The Interaction of Radio Sources and X-ray-Emitting Gas in Cluster Cooling Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanton, Elizabeth L.

    2001-10-01

    Recent Chandra observations of cooling flow clusters containing central radio sources reveal an anti-correlation between radio and X-ray emission. Abell 2052 is one such cluster that exhibits this morphology. The cD galaxy at the center of Abell 2052 is host to the powerful radio source 3C 317. "Holes" in the X-ray emission are coincident with the radio lobes which are surrounded by bright "shells" of X-ray emission. Heating by central radio sources has been proposed as one solution to the "missing gas" in cooling flows -- there is a lack of gas detected in the X-ray at temperatures at or below approximately 1 keV. However, the gas surrounding the radio source in Abell 2052 is cool. The data are consistent with the radio source displacing and compressing, and at the same time being confined by, the X-ray gas. The compression of the X-ray shells appears to have been relatively gentle and, at most, slightly transonic. The pressure in the X-ray gas (the shells and surrounding cooler gas) is approximately an order of magnitude higher than the minimum pressure derived for the radio source, suggesting that an additional source of pressure is needed to support the radio plasma. The compression of the X-ray shells has speeded up the cooling of the shells, and optical emission line filaments are found coincident with the brightest regions of the shells.

  18. Response to Request for Guidance in Defining Adjacent with Respect to Source Aggregation

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document may be of assistance in applying the New Source Review (NSR) air permitting regulations including the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) requirements. This document is part of the NSR Policy and Guidance Database. Some documents in the database are a scanned or retyped version of a paper photocopy of the original. Although we have taken considerable effort to quality assure the documents, some may contain typographical errors. Contact the office that issued the document if you need a copy of the original.

  19. Clustering properties of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays and the search for their astrophysical sources

    SciTech Connect

    Cuoco, Alessandro; Hannestad, Steen; Haugboelle, Troels; Kachelriess, Michael; Serpico, Pasquale D.; /Fermilab

    2007-09-01

    The arrival directions of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) may show anisotropies on all scales, from just above the experimental angular resolution up to medium scales and dipole anisotropies. We find that a global comparison of the two-point auto-correlation function of the data with the one of catalogues of potential sources is a powerful diagnostic tool. In particular, this method is far less sensitive to unknown deflections in magnetic fields than cross-correlation studies while keeping a strong discrimination power among source candidates. We illustrate these advantages by considering ordinary galaxies, gamma ray bursts and active galactic nuclei as possible sources. Already the sparse publicly available data suggest that the sources of UHECRs may be a strongly clustered sub-sample of galaxies or of active galactic nuclei. We present forecasts for various cases of source distributions which can be checked soon by the Pierre Auger Observatory.

  20. Kinetics of Aggregation with Choice

    DOE PAGES

    Ben-Naim, Eli; Krapivsky, Paul

    2016-12-01

    Here we generalize the ordinary aggregation process to allow for choice. In ordinary aggregation, two random clusters merge and form a larger aggregate. In our implementation of choice, a target cluster and two candidate clusters are randomly selected and the target cluster merges with the larger of the two candidate clusters.We study the long-time asymptotic behavior and find that as in ordinary aggregation, the size density adheres to the standard scaling form. However, aggregation with choice exhibits a number of different features. First, the density of the smallest clusters exhibits anomalous scaling. Second, both the small-size and the large-size tailsmore » of the density are overpopulated, at the expense of the density of moderate-size clusters. Finally, we also study the complementary case where the smaller candidate cluster participates in the aggregation process and find an abundance of moderate clusters at the expense of small and large clusters. Additionally, we investigate aggregation processes with choice among multiple candidate clusters and a symmetric implementation where the choice is between two pairs of clusters.« less

  1. Kinetics of Aggregation with Choice

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Naim, Eli; Krapivsky, Paul

    2016-12-01

    Here we generalize the ordinary aggregation process to allow for choice. In ordinary aggregation, two random clusters merge and form a larger aggregate. In our implementation of choice, a target cluster and two candidate clusters are randomly selected and the target cluster merges with the larger of the two candidate clusters.We study the long-time asymptotic behavior and find that as in ordinary aggregation, the size density adheres to the standard scaling form. However, aggregation with choice exhibits a number of different features. First, the density of the smallest clusters exhibits anomalous scaling. Second, both the small-size and the large-size tails of the density are overpopulated, at the expense of the density of moderate-size clusters. Finally, we also study the complementary case where the smaller candidate cluster participates in the aggregation process and find an abundance of moderate clusters at the expense of small and large clusters. Additionally, we investigate aggregation processes with choice among multiple candidate clusters and a symmetric implementation where the choice is between two pairs of clusters.

  2. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Planck submillimetre sources in Virgo Cluster (Baes+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baes, M.; Herranz, D.; Bianchi, S.; Ciesla, L.; Clemens, M.; de Zotti, G.; Allaert, F.; Auld, R.; Bendo, G. J.; Boquien, M.; Boselli, A.; Clements, D. L.; Cortese, L.; Davies, J. I.; de Looze, I.; di Serego Alighieri, S.; Fritz, J.; Gentile, G.; Gonzalez-Nuevo, J.; Hughes, T.; Smith, M. W. L.; Verstappen, J.; Viaene, S.; Vlahakis, C.

    2014-04-01

    We cross-correlate the Planck Catalogue of Compact Sources (PCCS) with the fully sampled 84deg2 Herschel Virgo Cluster Survey (HeViCS) fields. We search for and identify the 857 and 545GHz PCCS sources in the HeViCS fields by studying their FIR/submm and optical counterparts. We find 84 and 48 compact Planck sources in the HeViCS fields at 857 and 545GHz, respectively. Almost all sources correspond to individual bright Virgo Cluster galaxies. The vast majority of the Planck detected galaxies are late-type spirals, with the Sc class dominating the numbers, while early-type galaxies are virtually absent from the sample, especially at 545GHz. We compare the HeViCS SPIRE flux densities for the detected galaxies with the four different PCCS flux density estimators and find an excellent correlation with the aperture photometry flux densities, even at the highest flux density levels. We find only seven PCCS sources in the HeViCS fields without a nearby galaxy as obvious counterpart, and conclude that all of these are dominated by Galactic cirrus features or are spurious detections. No Planck sources in the HeViCS fields seem to be associated to high-redshift proto-clusters of dusty galaxies or strongly lensed submm sources. Finally, our study is the first empirical confirmation of the simulation-based estimated completeness of the PCCS, and provides a strong support of the internal PCCS validation procedure. (2 data files).

  3. M31 Globular Cluster X-Ray Sources: XMM-Newton and Chandra Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trudolyubov, Sergey; Priedhorsky, William

    2004-12-01

    We present the results of an M31 globular cluster (GC) X-ray source survey, based on the data of XMM-Newton and Chandra observations covering ~6100 arcmin2 of M31. We detected 43 X-ray sources coincident with GC candidates from various optical surveys. The inferred isotropic X-ray luminosities of GC sources lie between ~1035 and ~1039 ergs s-1 in the 0.3-10 keV energy band. The spectral properties of the 31 brightest sources in our sample were found to be similar to those of the low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) located in the bulge and the GCs of the Milky Way. The spectral distribution of the M31 GC X-ray sources is consistent with that derived for the bulge of M31 and other nearby galaxies of different morphological type. Several sources demonstrate a correlation between the level of X-ray flux and the hardness of their energy spectrum reminiscent of the Galactic Z and atoll sources. We found that ~80% of the M31 GC sources with multiple flux measurements available show significant variability on timescales from days to years. The X-ray source RX J0043.2+4127, coincident with GC Bo 163, has been found to show recurrent transient outbursts with peak luminosities of ~1038 ergs s-1. Several sources in our sample show significant variability on a timescale of individual observations, ranging from aperiodic fluctuations to regular dipping. The X-ray luminosity function of GC sources is found to be significantly different from that of the point sources in the bulge and disk of M31. The luminosity distribution of M31 GC sources has ~10 times higher peak luminosity and a much higher fraction of bright sources than the Milky Way GC distribution. Six persistent sources in our sample (or ~14% of the total number) have luminosities exceeding 1038 ergs s-1 during all observations, and three other sources occasionally exceed that luminosity level. Our observations indicate that GC sources make the dominant contribution to the bright source counts in the areas of M31 covered by

  4. AGN Feedback And Evolution of Radio Sources: Discovery of An X-Ray Cluster Associated With Z=1 Quasar

    SciTech Connect

    Siemiginowska, Aneta; Cheung, C.C.; LaMassa, S.; Burke, D.; Aldcroft, T.L.; Bechtold, J.; Elvis, M.; Worrall, D.M.; /Bristol U.

    2006-01-11

    We report the first significant detection of an X-ray cluster associated with a powerful (L{sub bol} {approx} 10{sup 47} erg sec{sup -1}) radio-loud quasar at high redshift (z=1.06). Diffuse X-ray emission is detected out to {approx} 120 kpc from the CSS quasar 3C 186. A strong Fe-line emission at the z{sub rest} = 1.06 confirms its thermal nature. We find that the CSS radio source is highly overpressured with respect to the thermal cluster medium by 2-3 orders of magnitude. This provides direct observational evidence that the radio source is not thermally confined as posited in the ''frustrated'' scenario for CSS sources. Instead, the radio source may be young and at an early stage of its evolution. This source provides the first detection of the AGN in outburst in the center of a cooling flow cluster. Powerful radio sources are thought to be triggered by the cooling flows. The evidence for the AGN activity and intermittent outbursts comes from the X-ray morphology of low redshift clusters, which usually do not harbour quasars. 3C186 is a young active radio source which can supply the energy into the cluster and potentially prevent its cooling. We discuss energetics related to the quasar activity and the cluster cooling flow, and possible feedback between the evolving radio source and the cluster.

  5. Clustering of Color Sources and the Equation of State of the QGP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Brijesh K.

    2014-04-01

    Possible phase transition of strongly interacting matter from hadron to a quark-gluon plasma state have in the past received considerable interest. It has been suggested that this problem might be treated by percolation theory. The clustering of color sources with percolation (CSPM) is used to determine the equation of state (EOS) and the transport coefficient of the Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP) produced in central A-A collisions at RHIC and LHC energies.

  6. Explanation of temporal clustering of tsunami sources using the epidemic-type aftershock sequence model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Geist, Eric L.

    2014-01-01

    Temporal clustering of tsunami sources is examined in terms of a branching process model. It previously was observed that there are more short interevent times between consecutive tsunami sources than expected from a stationary Poisson process. The epidemic‐type aftershock sequence (ETAS) branching process model is fitted to tsunami catalog events, using the earthquake magnitude of the causative event from the Centennial and Global Centroid Moment Tensor (CMT) catalogs and tsunami sizes above a completeness level as a mark to indicate that a tsunami was generated. The ETAS parameters are estimated using the maximum‐likelihood method. The interevent distribution associated with the ETAS model provides a better fit to the data than the Poisson model or other temporal clustering models. When tsunamigenic conditions (magnitude threshold, submarine location, dip‐slip mechanism) are applied to the Global CMT catalog, ETAS parameters are obtained that are consistent with those estimated from the tsunami catalog. In particular, the dip‐slip condition appears to result in a near zero magnitude effect for triggered tsunami sources. The overall consistency between results from the tsunami catalog and that from the earthquake catalog under tsunamigenic conditions indicates that ETAS models based on seismicity can provide the structure for understanding patterns of tsunami source occurrence. The fractional rate of triggered tsunami sources on a global basis is approximately 14%.

  7. Deep Galex Observations of the Coma Cluster: Source Catalog and Galaxy Counts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammer, D.; Hornschemeier, A. E.; Mobasher, B.; Miller, N.; Smith, R.; Arnouts, S.; Milliard, B.; Jenkins, L.

    2010-01-01

    We present a source catalog from deep 26 ks GALEX observations of the Coma cluster in the far-UV (FUV; 1530 Angstroms) and near-UV (NUV; 2310 Angstroms) wavebands. The observed field is centered 0.9 deg. (1.6 Mpc) south-west of the Coma core, and has full optical photometric coverage by SDSS and spectroscopic coverage to r-21. The catalog consists of 9700 galaxies with GALEX and SDSS photometry, including 242 spectroscopically-confirmed Coma member galaxies that range from giant spirals and elliptical galaxies to dwarf irregular and early-type galaxies. The full multi-wavelength catalog (cluster plus background galaxies) is 80% complete to NUV=23 and FUV=23.5, and has a limiting depth at NUV=24.5 and FUV=25.0 which corresponds to a star formation rate of 10(exp -3) solar mass yr(sup -1) at the distance of Coma. The GALEX images presented here are very deep and include detections of many resolved cluster members superposed on a dense field of unresolved background galaxies. This required a two-fold approach to generating a source catalog: we used a Bayesian deblending algorithm to measure faint and compact sources (using SDSS coordinates as a position prior), and used the GALEX pipeline catalog for bright and/or extended objects. We performed simulations to assess the importance of systematic effects (e.g. object blends, source confusion, Eddington Bias) that influence source detection and photometry when using both methods. The Bayesian deblending method roughly doubles the number of source detections and provides reliable photometry to a few magnitudes deeper than the GALEX pipeline catalog. This method is also free from source confusion over the UV magnitude range studied here: conversely, we estimate that the GALEX pipeline catalogs are confusion limited at NUV approximately 23 and FUV approximately 24. We have measured the total UV galaxy counts using our catalog and report a 50% excess of counts across FUV=22-23.5 and NUV=21.5-23 relative to previous GALEX

  8. The nature of X-ray sources associated to young clusters around Sh2-296

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregorio-Hetem, J.; Fernandes, B.; Montmerle, T.

    2014-10-01

    Aiming to unravel the star formation activity in the Canis Major R1 (CMaR1), we have studied the young (< 5 Myr) clusters associated to the arc-shaped ionized nebula Sh2-296. Based on our X-ray data complemented by optical and near-IR data, we discovered, near to GU CMa, a stellar cluster that is older by at least a few Myr than the previously known cluster, around Z CMa, where star formation is still very active. Multi-object optical spectroscopy of our X-ray sources nearby Z CMa was performed with Gemini telescopes to confirm the existence of a mixed population from both older and younger clusters around the edge of Sh2-296. In the present work we show the results for optical counterparts candidates of 45 X-ray sources. Spectral type determination was based on comparison with standard spectra library and fitting the continuum and TiO bands. Typical features of young stars were inspected to confirm the nature of the sample that is mainly classified as T Tauri stars (TTs), since their spectra show the Li I line, one of the indicators of youth. The equivalent width of Hα measured at 10% of the total flux was used to separate Classical TTs (CTTs) from weak-line TTs (WTTs). Among 51 optical counterparts candidates, 38 are young stars: 24% of them are classified as CTTs and 76% are WTTs. However the present results correspond to a small fraction (˜ 15%) of the entire sample of X-ray sources we have detected. Aiming a more representative set of spectra, additional GMOS observations have been performed, as well as another ongoing project (see Santos-Silva et al.) dedicated to studying of the X-ray properties.

  9. Another Shock for the Bullet Cluster, and the Source of Seed Electrons for Radio Relics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shimwell, Timothy W,; Markevitch, Maxim; Brown, Shea; Feretti, Luigina; Gaensler, B. M.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Lage, Craig; Srinivasan, Raghav

    2015-01-01

    With Australia Telescope Compact Array observations, we detect a highly elongated Mpc-scale diffuse radio source on the eastern periphery of the Bullet cluster 1E 0657-55.8, which we argue has the positional, spectral and polarimetric characteristics of a radio relic. This powerful relic (2:30:11025 WHz(exp -1) consists of a bright northern bulb and a faint linear tail. The bulb emits 94% of the observed radio flux and has the highest surface brightness of any known relic. Exactly coincident with the linear tail we find a sharp X-ray surface brightness edge in the deep Chandra image of the cluster - a signature of a shock front in the hot intracluster medium (ICM), located on the opposite side of the cluster to the famous bow shock. This new example of an X-ray shock coincident with a relic further supports the hypothesis that shocks in the outer regions of clusters can form relics via diffusive shock (re- )acceleration. Intriguingly, our new relic suggests that seed electrons for reacceleration are coming from a local remnant of a radio galaxy, which we are lucky to catch before its complete disruption. If this scenario, in which a relic forms when a shock crosses a well-defined region of the ICM polluted with aged relativistic plasma - as opposed to the usual assumption that seeds are uniformly mixed in the ICM - is also the case for other relics, this may explain a number of peculiar properties of peripheral relics.

  10. Encapsulated discrete octameric water cluster, 1D water tape, and 3D water aggregate network in diverse MOFs based on bisimidazolium ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Ruo-Bing; Pi, Min; Jiang, Shuang-Shuang; Wang, Yuan-Yuan; Jin, Chuan-Ming

    2014-08-01

    Four new metal-organic frameworks, [Zn(2-mBIM)2(SO3CF3)2·(H2O)4] (1), [Zn(BMIE)(1,4-BDC)]·(H2O)3 (2), [Cd(BIM)2(OH)(H2O)2(PF6)]·(H2O)4 (3), and [Cd(PA-BIM)2 (ClO4)2]·11.33H2O (4) (2-mBIM = bis(2-methylimidazol-1-yl)methane, BMIE = 1,2-bis[1-(2-methylimidazole)-diethoxy]ethane, BIM = bis(imidazol-1-yl)methane, and PA-BIM = 1,1-bis [(2-phenylazo)imidazol-1-yl]methane) have been prepared and structurally characterized. Complex 1 exhibits an infinite 1D cationic beaded-chain structure, which encapsulated discrete octameric water clusters that are comprised of a chair-like hexameric water cluster with two extra water molecules dangling on two diagonal vertices of the chair. Complex 2 forms a 1D infinite zigzag metal-organic chain structure with a 1D T4(0)A(4) water tape. Complexes 3 show a 2D grid-like sheet structure with the 1D water tape T4(0)A(0)2(0) motif. Complex 4 is a porous 3D MOF with tetrahedron-coordinated Cd(II) centers and trans-conformation PA-BIM ligands. These holes are occupied by a fascinating three-dimensional water clathrate network, which consists of cage-shaped structural tetradecameric water cluster (H2O)14 units and six independent bridged water molecules. The results suggest that the bisimidazolium ligands and anions play crucial roles in the formation of the different host structures and different guest water aggregations. Additionally, the thermal stabilities and photoluminescence spectra of the complexes have been discussed.

  11. Cluster beam targets for laser plasma extreme ultraviolet and soft x-ray sources

    DOEpatents

    Kublak, Glenn D.; Richardson, Martin C. (CREOL

    1996-01-01

    Method and apparatus for producing extreme ultra violet (EUV) and soft x-ray radiation from an ultra-low debris plasma source are disclosed. Targets are produced by the free jet expansion of various gases through a temperature controlled nozzle to form molecular clusters. These target clusters are subsequently irradiated with commercially available lasers of moderate intensity (10.sup.11 -10.sup.12 watts/cm.sup.2) to produce a plasma radiating in the region of 0.5 to 100 nanometers. By appropriate adjustment of the experimental conditions the laser focus can be moved 10-30 mm from the nozzle thereby eliminating debris produced by plasma erosion of the nozzle.

  12. Cluster beam targets for laser plasma extreme ultraviolet and soft x-ray sources

    DOEpatents

    Kublak, G.D.; Richardson, M.C.

    1996-11-19

    Method and apparatus for producing extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and soft x-ray radiation from an ultra-low debris plasma source are disclosed. Targets are produced by the free jet expansion of various gases through a temperature controlled nozzle to form molecular clusters. These target clusters are subsequently irradiated with commercially available lasers of moderate intensity (10{sup 11}--10{sup 12} watts/cm{sup 2}) to produce a plasma radiating in the region of 0.5 to 100 nanometers. By appropriate adjustment of the experimental conditions the laser focus can be moved 10--30 mm from the nozzle thereby eliminating debris produced by plasma erosion of the nozzle. 5 figs.

  13. The HST/ACS Coma Cluster Survey. II. Data Description and Source Catalogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, Derek; Verdoes Kleijn, Gijs; Hoyos, Carlos; den Brok, Mark; Balcells, Marc; Ferguson, Henry C.; Goudfrooij, Paul; Carter, David; Guzmán, Rafael; Peletier, Reynier F.; Smith, Russell J.; Graham, Alister W.; Trentham, Neil; Peng, Eric; Puzia, Thomas H.; Lucey, John R.; Jogee, Shardha; Aguerri, Alfonso L.; Batcheldor, Dan; Bridges, Terry J.; Chiboucas, Kristin; Davies, Jonathan I.; del Burgo, Carlos; Erwin, Peter; Hornschemeier, Ann; Hudson, Michael J.; Huxor, Avon; Jenkins, Leigh; Karick, Arna; Khosroshahi, Habib; Kourkchi, Ehsan; Komiyama, Yutaka; Lotz, Jennifer; Marzke, Ronald O.; Marinova, Irina; Matkovic, Ana; Merritt, David; Miller, Bryan W.; Miller, Neal A.; Mobasher, Bahram; Mouhcine, Mustapha; Okamura, Sadanori; Percival, Sue; Phillipps, Steven; Poggianti, Bianca M.; Price, James; Sharples, Ray M.; Tully, R. Brent; Valentijn, Edwin

    2010-11-01

    The Coma cluster, Abell 1656, was the target of an HST-ACS Treasury program designed for deep imaging in the F475W and F814W passbands. Although our survey was interrupted by the ACS instrument failure in early 2007, the partially completed survey still covers ~50% of the core high-density region in Coma. Observations were performed for 25 fields that extend over a wide range of cluster-centric radii (~1.75 Mpc or 1°) with a total coverage area of 274 arcmin2. The majority of the fields are located near the core region of Coma (19/25 pointings) with six additional fields in the southwest region of the cluster. In this paper, we present reprocessed images and SEXTRACTOR source catalogs for our survey fields, including a detailed description of the methodology used for object detection and photometry, the subtraction of bright galaxies to measure faint underlying objects, and the use of simulations to assess the photometric accuracy and completeness of our catalogs. We also use simulations to perform aperture corrections for the SEXTRACTOR Kron magnitudes based only on the measured source flux and its half-light radius. We have performed photometry for ~73,000 unique objects; approximately one-half of our detections are brighter than the 10σ point-source detection limit at F814W = 25.8 mag (AB). The slight majority of objects (60%) are unresolved or only marginally resolved by ACS. We estimate that Coma members are 5%-10% of all source detections, which consist of a large population of unresolved compact sources (primarily globular clusters but also ultra-compact dwarf galaxies) and a wide variety of extended galaxies from a cD galaxy to dwarf low surface brightness galaxies. The red sequence of Coma member galaxies has a color-magnitude relation with a constant slope and dispersion over 9 mag (-21 < M F814W < -13). The initial data release for the HST-ACS Coma Treasury program was made available to the public in 2008 August. The images and catalogs described in

  14. A VLA Survey for Faint Compact Radio Sources in the Orion Nebula Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheehan, Patrick D.; Eisner, Josh A.; Mann, Rita K.; Williams, Jonathan P.

    2016-11-01

    We present Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array 1.3, 3.6, and 6 cm continuum maps of compact radio sources in the Orion Nebular Cluster (ONC). We mosaicked 34 arcmin2 at 1.3 cm, 70 arcmin2 at 3.6 cm and 109 arcmin2 at 6 cm, containing 778 near-infrared detected young stellar objects and 190 Hubble Space Telescope-identified proplyds (with significant overlap between those characterizations). We detected radio emission from 175 compact radio sources in the ONC, including 26 sources that were detected for the first time at these wavelengths. For each detected source, we fitted a simple free-free and dust emission model to characterize the radio emission. We extrapolate the free-free emission spectrum model for each source to ALMA bands to illustrate how these measurements could be used to correctly measure protoplanetary disk dust masses from submillimeter flux measurements. Finally, we compare the fluxes measured in this survey with previously measured fluxes for our targets, as well as four separate epochs of 1.3 cm data, to search for and quantify the variability of our sources.

  15. Observation of soft X-rays from extended sources. [such as Perseus star cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Catura, R. C.; Acton, L. W.

    1974-01-01

    Efforts were directed toward surveying several supernova remnants for the emission of soft X-rays. Rather than attempt to detect such faint X-ray emission, the program was redirected to observe the spectrum and angular structure of the extended X-ray source in the Perseus cluster of galaxies and the super-nova remnant Puppis A. An attempt was made to detect X-ray line emission from Puppis A with a Bragg crystal spectrometer. Observations provide evidence for the presence of X-ray line emission in the spectrum of Puppis A near .65 keV.

  16. Collinear Cluster Tripartition as a Neutron Source--Evaluation of the Setup Parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Kamanin, D. V.; Kuznetsova, E. A.; Aleksandrov, A. A.; Aleksandrova, I. A.; Borzakov, S. B.; Chelnokov, M. L.; Pham Minh, D.; Kondratyev, N. A.; Kopach, Yu. N.; Panteleev, Ts.; Penionzhkevich, Yu. E.; Svirikhin, A. I.; Sokol, E. A.; Testov, D. A.; Zhuchko, V. E.; Yeremin, A. V.; Pyatkov, Yu. V.; Jacobs, N.; Ryabov, Yu. V.

    2010-04-30

    Forthcoming experiments aimed at studying the mechanism of collinear cluster tripartition are planning to be performed with the new facility. Charged products will be registered with the double arm time-of-flight spectrometer composed of mosaics of PIN -diodes and MCP (micro channel plates) based timing detectors. Several tens of {sup 3}He-filled counters will be gathered round the {sup 252}Cf source. In order to choose an optimal configuration of the neutron detector and other parameters of the experiment special modeling has performed using both 'neutron barrel' and known MCNP code. The first test run of the new facility is in progress also its 'neutron skin' in under construction.

  17. X-ray illumination of globular cluster puzzles. [globular cluster X ray sources as clues to Milky Way Galaxy age and evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lightman, A. P.; Grindlay, J. E.

    1982-01-01

    Globular clusters are thought to be among the oldest objects in the Galaxy, and provide, in this connection, important clues for determining the age and process of formation of the Galaxy. The present investigation is concerned with puzzles relating to the X-ray emission of globular clusters, taking into account questions regarding the location of X-ray emitting clusters (XEGC) unusually near the galactic plane and/or galactic center. An adopted model is discussed for the nature, formation, and lifetime of X-ray sources in globular clusters. An analysis of the available data is conducted in connection with a search for correlations between binary formation time scales, central relaxation times, galactic locations, and X-ray emission. The positive correlation found between distance from galactic center and two-body binary formation time for globular clusters, explanations for this correlation, and the hypothesis that X-ray sources in globular clusters require binary star systems provide a possible explanation of the considered puzzles.

  18. On the effect of spatial aggregation of source regions on the stability of greenhouse gas emission estimates calculated by an inverse Lagrangian box model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pieterse, G.; Vermeulen, A.

    2005-12-01

    Estimation of emission rates from atmospheric concentration observations has proven to remain a big challenge. In this paper, a new approach is chosen for the source strength estimation algorithm based on Source Receptor Matrices (SRM's) as derived for the COMET trajectory model for methane (Vermeulen et al., 2001). In the new approach, source regions are identified automatically by calculation of the Potential Source Region Contribution (PSRC) to measurements performed at multiple sites and spatial aggregation of these regions to achieve uniform PSRC in the aggregated Source-Receptor Matrix (aSRM). The emission strengths are then estimated using Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) of the aSRM. The SVD procedure also yields a Covariance Matrix (CM), which describes the statistical accuracies and mutual dependencies of the solutions. A recursive algorithm is implemented to further accumulate source regions in order to improve covariance and accuracy for the source strength estimates. The aSRM of Europe was constructed using the influence functions for the year 2002 for the locations of the CHIOTTO Tall Tower sites. Measurement data was not available for all sites. The results indicate that the new approach will enable accurate and stable methane budget calculations for the monitored region. As expected, the spatial distribution of the aggregated source regions will not be uniform, because the individual sources are not represented uniformly in the measured signals. Currently, the method is also evaluated for estimation of other greenhouse gas budgets of Europe, like CO2, SF6 and N2O. In principle, the aSRM method can be applied to SRM's of any transport model and component, provided that the forward performance of the model is adequate and that matching observations exist.

  19. The Population of Compact Radio Sources in the Orion Nebula Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbrich, J.; Rivilla, V. M.; Menten, K. M.; Reid, M. J.; Chandler, C. J.; Rau, U.; Bhatnagar, S.; Wolk, S. J.; Meingast, S.

    2016-05-01

    We present a deep centimeter-wavelength catalog of the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC), based on a 30 hr single-pointing observation with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array in its high-resolution A-configuration using two 1 GHz bands centered at 4.7 and 7.3 GHz. A total of 556 compact sources were detected in a map with a nominal rms noise of 3 μJy bm-1, limited by complex source structure and the primary beam response. Compared to previous catalogs, our detections increase the sample of known compact radio sources in the ONC by more than a factor of seven. The new data show complex emission on a wide range of spatial scales. Following a preliminary correction for the wideband primary-beam response, we determine radio spectral indices for 170 sources whose index uncertainties are less than ±0.5. We compare the radio to the X-ray and near-infrared point-source populations, noting similarities and differences.

  20. The Nature of the brightest Submm Source behind the Bullet Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Cruz, Omar; Bertoldi, Frank; Bremer, Malcolm; Birkinshaw, Mark; Johansson, Daniel; Muller, Sebastien; Black, John; Papadopoulos, Padelis; Horellou, Cathy; Wall, William; Ibarra-Medel, Hector Javier; Castillo, Edgar

    2010-10-01

    We prose to conduct C0 (J=1-0) and CO(J=3-2) observations of the brightest submm source behind the Bullet Cluster, hereafter Source #1. This highly magnified (>50 time) source at z=2.79.is, most likely, a low-mass starforming galaxy. The aim of the proposed observations is twofold. First, by resolving the Source #1 into its brightest components A and B, which has not been resolved inany the previous submm and mm observations, we will be able to impose tighter constraints on the Bullet's lens model. Second, we will use the CO observations to to derive physical parameters and improve upon the results derived from spectral observations of PAH and H2 using Spitzer IRS reported by Gonzalez et al. (2010). By modeling all the available observation using the synthesis code GRASIL we will be able to establish categorically the nature of Source #1. These observations will allow us to probe stellar formation in, probably, the most common galaxies at z~3. Our proposed observations will enable ATCA to make a pioneering contribution to the study of galaxy evolution before ALMA goes into operation.

  1. Partial discharge source recognition by means of clustering of spectral power ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Tarifa, J. M.; Ardila-Rey, J. A.; Robles, G.

    2013-12-01

    Partial discharge (PD) detection can give useful information for the diagnosis of electrical apparatus, but data interpretation can be impossible if several sources are simultaneously active. Pulse characterization can be used to identify the source origin in PD measurements. The distribution of energy at different frequencies helps in distinguishing several types of discharges. The parameterization of pulses by means of spectral power ratios (PR) has been studied as a reliable technique to represent different characteristics in high-frequency current pulses in high-voltage tests. In this study, the separation of PD sources by means of PR maps is proposed. This approach has proven to be effective in the identification of PD sources when two electrical insulation systems are simultaneously subjected to discharge activity in controlled experiments where internal, surface and corona discharges were occurring. The flexibility of the system to improve cluster separation is shown, and measurements are also made on a real insulated power cable, where two simultaneous PD sources were successfully identified.

  2. Radio jet propagation and wide-angle tailed radio sources in merging galaxy cluster environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loken, Chris; Roettiger, Kurt; Burns, Jack O.; Norman, Michael

    1995-01-01

    The intracluster medium (ICM) within merging clusters of galaxies is likely to be in a violent or turbulent dynamical state which may have a significant effect on the evolution of cluster radio sources. We present results from a recent gas + N-body simulation of a cluster merger, suggesting that mergers can result in long-lived, supersonic bulk flows, as well as shocks, within a few hundred kiloparsecs of the core of the dominant cluster. These results have motivated our new two-dimensional and three-dimensional simulations of jet propagation in such environments. The first set of simulations models the ISM/ICM transition as a contact discontinuity with a strong velocity shear. A supersonic (M(sub j) = 6) jet crossing this discontinuity into an ICM with a transverse, supersonic wind bends continuously, becomes 'naked' on the upwind side, and forms a distended cocoon on the downwind side. In the case of a mildly supersonic jet (M(sub j) = 3), however, a shock is driven into the ISM and ISM material is pulled along with the jet into the ICM. Instabilities excited at the ISM/ICM interface result in the jet repeatedly pinching off and reestablishing itself in a series of 'disconnection events.' The second set of simulations deals with a jet encountering a shock in the merging cluster environment. A series of relatively high-resolution two-dimensional calculations is used to confirm earlier analysis predicting that the jet will not disrupt when the jet Mach number is greater than the shock Mach number. A jet which survives the encounter with the shock will decrease in radius and disrupt shortly thereafter as a result of the growth of Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities. We also find, in disagreement with predictions, that the jet flaring angle decreases with increasing jet density. Finally, a three-dimensional simulation of a jet crossing an oblique shock gives rise to a morphology which resembles a wide-angle tailed radio source with the jet flaring at the shock and

  3. Remote sensing of a NTC radio source from a Cluster tilted spacecraft pair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Décréau, P. M. E.; Kougblénou, S.; Lointier, G.; Rauch, J.-L.; Trotignon, J.-G.; Vallières, X.; Canu, P.; Rochel Grimald, S.; El-Lemdani Mazouz, F.; Darrouzet, F.

    2013-11-01

    The Cluster mission operated a "tilt campaign" during the month of May 2008. Two of the four identical Cluster spacecraft were placed at a close distance (~50 km) from each other and the spin axis of one of the spacecraft pair was tilted by an angle of ~46°. This gave the opportunity, for the first time in space, to measure global characteristics of AC electric field, at the sensitivity available with long boom (88 m) antennas, simultaneously from the specific configuration of the tilted pair of satellites and from the available base of three satellites placed at a large characteristic separation (~1 RE). This paper describes how global characteristics of radio waves, in this case the configuration of the electric field polarization ellipse in 3-D-space, are identified from in situ measurements of spin modulation features by the tilted pair, validating a novel experimental concept. In the event selected for analysis, non-thermal continuum (NTC) waves in the 15-25 kHz frequency range are observed from the Cluster constellation placed above the polar cap. The observed intensity variations with spin angle are those of plane waves, with an electric field polarization close to circular, at an ellipticity ratio e = 0.87. We derive the source position in 3-D by two different methods. The first one uses ray path orientation (measured by the tilted pair) combined with spectral signature of magnetic field magnitude at source. The second one is obtained via triangulation from the three spacecraft baseline, using estimation of directivity angles under assumption of circular polarization. The two results are not compatible, placing sources widely apart. We present a general study of the level of systematic errors due to the assumption of circular polarization, linked to the second approach, and show how this approach can lead to poor triangulation and wrong source positioning. The estimation derived from the first method places the NTC source region in the dawn sector, at a

  4. Localization of the X-ray source in the globular cluster G1 with Chandra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, A. K. H.; Heinke, C. O.; di Stefano, R.; Cohn, H. N.; Lugger, P. M.; Barmby, P.; Lewin, W. H. G.; Primini, F. A.

    2010-09-01

    We report the most accurate X-ray position of the X-ray source in the giant globular cluster G1 in M31 by using the Chandra X-ray Observatory, Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT). G1 is clearly detected with Chandra and by cross-registering with HST and CFHT images, we derive a 1σ error radius of 0.15arcsec, significantly smaller than the previous measurement by XMM-Newton. We conclude that the X-ray emission of G1 is likely to come from within the core radius of the cluster. We have considered a number of possibilities for the origin of the X-ray emission but can rule all but two scenarios out: it could be due to either accretion on to a central intermediate-mass black hole (IMBH) or an ordinary low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB). Based on the X-ray luminosity and the Bondi accretion rate, an IMBH accreting from the cluster gas seems unlikely and we suggest that the X-rays are due to accretion from a companion. Alternatively, the probability that a 1.5 Msolar cluster LMXB lies within the 95 per cent X-ray error circle is about 0.7. Therefore we cannot rule out a single LMXB as the origin of the X-ray emission. While we cannot distinguish between different models with current observations, future high-resolution and high-sensitivity radio imaging observations will reveal whether there is an IMBH at the centre of G1.

  5. Another shock for the Bullet cluster, and the source of seed electrons for radio relics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimwell, Timothy W.; Markevitch, Maxim; Brown, Shea; Feretti, Luigina; Gaensler, B. M.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Lage, Craig; Srinivasan, Raghav

    2015-05-01

    With Australia Telescope Compact Array observations, we detect a highly elongated Mpc-scale diffuse radio source on the eastern periphery of the Bullet cluster 1E 0657-55.8, which we argue has the positional, spectral and polarimetric characteristics of a radio relic. This powerful relic (2.3 ± 0.1 × 1025 W Hz-1) consists of a bright northern bulb and a faint linear tail. The bulb emits 94 per cent of the observed radio flux and has the highest surface brightness of any known relic. Exactly coincident with the linear tail, we find a sharp X-ray surface brightness edge in the deep Chandra image of the cluster - a signature of a shock front in the hot intracluster medium (ICM), located on the opposite side of the cluster to the famous bow shock. This new example of an X-ray shock coincident with a relic further supports the hypothesis that shocks in the outer regions of clusters can form relics via diffusive shock (re-)acceleration. Intriguingly, our new relic suggests that seed electrons for reacceleration are coming from a local remnant of a radio galaxy, which we are lucky to catch before its complete disruption. If this scenario, in which a relic forms when a shock crosses a well-defined region of the ICM polluted with aged relativistic plasma - as opposed to the usual assumption that seeds are uniformly mixed in the ICM - is also the case for other relics, this may explain a number of peculiar properties of peripheral relics.

  6. Climatological analyses of LMA data with an open-source lightning flash-clustering algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, Brody R.; Bruning, Eric C.; Rutledge, Steven A.; Carey, Lawrence D.; Krehbiel, Paul R.; Rison, William

    2016-07-01

    Approximately 63 million lightning flashes have been identified and analyzed from multiple years of Washington, D. C., northern Alabama, and northeast Colorado lightning mapping array (LMA) data using an open-source flash-clustering algorithm. LMA networks detect radiation produced by lightning breakdown processes, allowing for high-resolution mapping of lightning flashes. Similar to other existing clustering algorithms, the algorithm described herein groups lightning-produced radiation sources by space and time to estimate total flash counts and information about each detected flash. Various flash characteristics and their sensitivity to detection efficiency are investigated to elucidate biases in the algorithm, detail detection efficiencies of various LMAs, and guide future improvements. Furthermore, flash density values in each region are compared to corresponding satellite estimates. While total flash density values produced by the algorithm in Washington, D. C. ( 20 flashes km-2 yr-1), and Alabama ( 35 flashes km-2 yr-1) are within 50% of satellite estimates, LMA-based estimates are approximately a factor of 3 larger (50 flashes km-2 yr-1) than satellite estimates in northeast Colorado. Accordingly, estimates of the ratio of in-cloud to cloud-to-ground flashes near the LMA network ( 20) are approximately a factor of 3 larger than satellite estimates in Colorado. These large differences between estimates may be related to the distinct environment conducive to intense convection, low-altitude flashes, and unique charge structures in northeast Colorado.

  7. Mixed clusters from the coexpansion of C2F6 and n2 in a pulsed, supersonic expansion cluster ion source and beam deflection time-of-flight mass spectrometer: A first application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Steven D.

    The following topics are discussed: (1) cluster ion genesis; (2) cluster ion detection; (3) Ion source; (4) pulse valve; (5) e-gun; (6) Ion optics; (7) a first order model; and (8) a modified Bakker's model.

  8. The HST/ACS Coma Cluster Survey. II. Data Description and Source Catalogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammer, Derek; Kleijn, Gijs Verdoes; Hoyos, Carlos; Den Brok, Mark; Balcells, Marc; Ferguson, Henry C.; Goudfrooij, Paul; Carter, David; Guzman, Rafael; Peletier, Reynier F.; Smith, Russell J.; Graham, Alister W.; Trentham, Neil; Peng, Eric; Puzia, Thomas H.; Lucey, John R.; Jogee, Shardha; Aguerri, Alfonso L.; Batcheldor, Dan; Bridges, Terry J.; Davies, Jonathan I.; Del Burgo, Carlos; Erwin, Peter; Hornschemeier, Ann; Hudson, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    The Coma cluster, Abell 1656, was the target of a HST-ACS Treasury program designed for deep imaging in the F475W and F814W passbands. Although our survey was interrupted by the ACS instrument failure in early 2007, the partially-completed survey still covers approximately 50% of the core high density region in Coma. Observations were performed for twenty-five fields with a total coverage area of 274 aremin(sup 2), and extend over a wide range of cluster-centric radii (approximately 1.75 Mpe or 1 deg). The majority of the fields are located near the core region of Coma (19/25 pointings) with six additional fields in the south-west region of the cluster. In this paper we present SEXTRACTOR source catalogs generated from the processed images, including a detailed description of the methodology used for object detection and photometry, the subtraction of bright galaxies to measure faint underlying objects, and the use of simulations to assess the photometric accuracy and completeness of our catalogs. We also use simulations to perform aperture corrections for the SEXTRACTOR Kron magnitudes based only on the measured source flux and its half-light radius. We have performed photometry for 76,000 objects that consist of roughly equal numbers of extended galaxies and unresolved objects. Approximately two-thirds of all detections are brighter than F814W=26.5 mag (AB), which corresponds to the 10sigma, point-source detection limit. We estimate that Coma members are 5-10% of the source detections, including a large population of compact objects (primarily GCs, but also cEs and UCDs), and a wide variety of extended galaxies from cD galaxies to dwarf low surface brightness galaxies. The initial data release for the HST-ACS Coma Treasury program was made available to the public in August 2008. The images and catalogs described in this study relate to our second data release.

  9. The Herschel Virgo Cluster Survey. XVII. SPIRE point-source catalogs and number counts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappalardo, Ciro; Bendo, George J.; Bianchi, Simone; Hunt, Leslie; Zibetti, Stefano; Corbelli, Edvige; di Serego Alighieri, Sperello; Grossi, Marco; Davies, Jonathan; Baes, Maarten; De Looze, Ilse; Fritz, Jacopo; Pohlen, Michael; Smith, Matthew W. L.; Verstappen, Joris; Boquien, Médéric; Boselli, Alessandro; Cortese, Luca; Hughes, Thomas; Viaene, Sebastien; Bizzocchi, Luca; Clemens, Marcel

    2015-01-01

    Aims: We present three independent catalogs of point-sources extracted from SPIRE images at 250, 350, and 500 μm, acquired with the Herschel Space Observatory as a part of the Herschel Virgo Cluster Survey (HeViCS). The catalogs have been cross-correlated to consistently extract the photometry at SPIRE wavelengths for each object. Methods: Sources have been detected using an iterative loop. The source positions are determined by estimating the likelihood to be a real source for each peak on the maps, according to the criterion defined in the sourceExtractorSussextractor task. The flux densities are estimated using the sourceExtractorTimeline, a timeline-based point source fitter that also determines the fitting procedure with the width of the Gaussian that best reproduces the source considered. Afterwards, each source is subtracted from the maps, removing a Gaussian function in every position with the full width half maximum equal to that estimated in sourceExtractorTimeline. This procedure improves the robustness of our algorithm in terms of source identification. We calculate the completeness and the flux accuracy by injecting artificial sources in the timeline and estimate the reliability of the catalog using a permutation method. Results: The HeViCS catalogs contain about 52 000, 42 200, and 18 700 sources selected at 250, 350, and 500 μm above 3σ and are ~75%, 62%, and 50% complete at flux densities of 20 mJy at 250, 350, 500 μm, respectively. We then measured source number counts at 250, 350, and 500 μm and compare them with previous data and semi-analytical models. We also cross-correlated the catalogs with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to investigate the redshift distribution of the nearby sources. From this cross-correlation, we select ~2000 sources with reliable fluxes and a high signal-to-noise ratio, finding an average redshift z ~ 0.3 ± 0.22 and 0.25 (16-84 percentile). Conclusions: The number counts at 250, 350, and 500 μm show an increase in

  10. Femtosecond-Laser-Driven Cluster-Based Plasma Source for High-Resolution Ionography

    SciTech Connect

    Faenov, A. Ya.; Pikuz, T. A.; Fukuda, Y.; Kando, M.; Kotaki, H.; Homma, T.; Kawase, K.; Kameshima, T.; Mori, M.; Sakaki, H.; Hayashi, Y.; Nakamura, T.; Pirozhkov, A.; Yogo, A.; Tampo, M.; Bolton, P.; Daido, H.; Tajima, T.; Pikuz, S. A. Jr.; Kartashev, V.

    2009-07-25

    The intense isotropic source of multicharged ions, with energy above 300 keV, was produced by femtosecond Ti:Sa laser pulses irradiation (intensity of approx4x10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2}) of the He and CO{sub 2} gases mixture expanded in supersonic jet. High contrast ionography images have been obtained for 2000 dpi metal mesh, 1 mum polypropylene and 100 nm Zr foils, as well as for different biological objects. Images were recorded on 1 mm thick CR-39 ion detector placed in contact with back surface of the imaged samples, at the distances 140-160 mm from the plasma source. The obtained spatial resolution of the image was approx600 nm. A 100 nm object thickness difference was resolved very well for both Zr and polymer foils. The multicharged ion energy for Carbon and Oxygen ions passing through the 1 mum polypropylene foil is estimated to give the energy of more than 300 keV. An almost equal number of ions were measured with total number of about 10{sup 8} per shot at a different direction from plasma source. Easy production of different sub-MeV ions in wide space angle, recognizes femtosecond-laser-driven-cluster-based plasma as a well-suited bright source for novel type of submicron ionography to image different media, including nanofoils, membranes, and other low-contrast objects.

  11. Potential emission flux to aerosol pollutants over Bengal Gangetic plain through combined trajectory clustering and aerosol source fields analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, D. Bharath; Verma, S.

    2016-09-01

    A hybrid source-receptor analysis was carried out to evaluate the potential emission flux to winter monsoon (WinMon) aerosols over Bengal Gangetic plain urban (Kolkata, Kol) and semi-urban atmospheres (Kharagpur, Kgp). This was done through application of fuzzy c-mean clustering to back-trajectory data combined with emission flux and residence time weighted aerosols analysis. WinMon mean aerosol optical depth (AOD) and angstrom exponent (AE) at Kol (AOD: 0.77; AE: 1.17) were respectively slightly higher than and nearly equal to that at Kgp (AOD: 0.71; AE: 1.18). Out of six source region clusters over Indian subcontinent and two over Indian oceanic region, the cluster mean AOD was the highest when associated with the mean path of air mass originating from the Bay of Bengal and the Arabian sea clusters at Kol and that from the Indo-Gangetic plain (IGP) cluster at Kgp. Spatial distribution of weighted AOD fields showed the highest potential source of aerosols over the IGP, primarily over upper IGP (e.g. Punjab, Haryana), lower IGP (e.g. Uttarpradesh) and eastern region (e.g. west Bengal, Bihar, northeast India) clusters. The emission flux contribution potential (EFCP) of fossil fuel (FF) emissions at surface (SL) of Kol/Kgp, elevated layer (EL) of Kol, and of biomass burning (BB) emissions at SL of Kol were primarily from upper, lower, upper/lower IGP clusters respectively. The EFCP of FF/BB emissions at Kgp-EL/SL, and that of BB at EL of Kol/Kgp were mainly from eastern region and Africa (AFR) clusters respectively. Though the AFR cluster was constituted of significantly high emission flux source potential of dust emissions, the EFCP of dust from northwest India (NWI) was comparable to that from AFR at Kol SL/EL.

  12. De-confinement and clustering of color sources in nuclear collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, M. A.; Dias de Deus, J.; Hirsch, A. S.; Pajares, C.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Srivastava, B. K.

    2015-10-01

    A brief introduction of the relationship of string percolation to the Quantum Chromo Dynamics (QCD) phase diagram is presented. The behavior of the Polyakov loop close to the critical temperature is studied in terms of the color fields inside the clusters of overlapping strings, which are produced in high energy hadronic collisions. The non-Abelian nature of the color fields implies an enhancement of the transverse momentum and a suppression of the multiplicities relative to the non overlapping case. The prediction of this framework is compared with experimental results from the SPS, RHIC and LHC for pp and AA collisions. Rapidity distributions, probability distributions of transverse momentum and multiplicities, Bose-Einstein correlations, elliptic flow and ridge structures are used to evaluate these comparison. The thermodynamical quantities, the temperature, and energy density derived from RHIC and LHC data and Color String Percolation Model (CSPM) are used to obtain the shear viscosity to entropy density ratio (η / s). It was observed that the inverse of (η / s) represents the trace anomaly Δ =(ε - 3 P) /T4. Thus the percolation approach within CSPM can be successfully used to describe the initial stages in high energy heavy ion collisions in the soft region in high energy heavy ion collisions. The thermodynamical quantities, temperature and the equation of state are in agreement with the lattice QCD calculations. Thus the clustering of color sources has a clear physical basis although it cannot be deduced directly from QCD.

  13. Soft x-ray source for nanostructure imaging using femtosecond-laser-irradiated clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, Y.; Faenov, A. Ya.; Pikuz, T.; Kando, M.; Kotaki, H.; Daito, I.; Ma, J.; Chen, L. M.; Homma, T.; Kawase, K.; Kameshima, T.; Kawachi, T.; Daido, H.; Kimura, T.; Tajima, T.; Kato, Y.; Bulanov, S. V.

    2008-03-01

    The intense soft x-ray light source using the supersonic expansion of the mixed gas of He and CO2, when irradiated by a femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser pulse, is observed to enhance the radiation of soft x-rays from the CO2 clusters. Using this soft x-ray emissions, nanostructure images of 100-nm-thick Mo foils in a wide field of view (mm2 scale) with high spatial resolution (800nm ) are obtained with high dynamic range LiF crystal detectors. The local inhomogeneities of soft x-ray absorption by the nanometer-thick foils is measured with an accuracy of less than ±3%.

  14. Soft x-ray source for nanostructure imaging using femtosecond-laser-irradiated clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuda, Y.; Kando, M.; Kotaki, H.; Daito, I.; Ma, J.; Chen, L. M.; Homma, T.; Kawase, K.; Kameshima, T.; Kawachi, T.; Daido, H.; Kimura, T.; Tajima, T.; Kato, Y.; Bulanov, S. V.; Faenov, A. Ya.; Pikuz, T.

    2008-03-24

    The intense soft x-ray light source using the supersonic expansion of the mixed gas of He and CO{sub 2}, when irradiated by a femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser pulse, is observed to enhance the radiation of soft x-rays from the CO{sub 2} clusters. Using this soft x-ray emissions, nanostructure images of 100-nm-thick Mo foils in a wide field of view (mm{sup 2} scale) with high spatial resolution (800 nm) are obtained with high dynamic range LiF crystal detectors. The local inhomogeneities of soft x-ray absorption by the nanometer-thick foils is measured with an accuracy of less than {+-}3%.

  15. Constraints on the clustering, biasing and redshift distribution of radio sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magliocchetti, M.; Maddox, S. J.; Lahav, O.; Wall, J. V.

    1999-07-01

    We discuss how different theoretical predictions for the variance sigma^2 of the counts-in-cells distribution of radio sources can be matched to measurements from the FIRST survey at different flux limits. The predictions are given by the integration of models for the angular correlation function w(theta) for three different functional forms of the redshift distribution N(z), different spatial correlation functions that match the observed present-day shape and by different evolutions of the bias b(z) with redshift. We also consider the two cases of open and flat universes. Although the predicted w(theta) show substantial differences because of differences in the values of N(z), these differences are not significant compared to the uncertainties in the current observations. It turns out that, independent of the geometry of the universe and the flux limit, the best fit is provided by models with constant biasing at all times, although the difference between models with epoch-independent bias and models with bias that evolves linearly with redshift is not very large. All models with strong evolution of bias with epoch are ruled out, as they grossly overestimate the amplitude of the variance over the whole range of angular scales sampled by the counts-in-cells analysis. As a further step we directly calculated w_obs(theta) at 3mJy from the catalogue and matched it with our models for the angular correlation function, in the hypothesis that the clustering signal comes from two different populations, namely AGN-powered sources and starbursting galaxies. The results are consistent with a scenario for hierarchical clustering where the fainter starbursting galaxies trace the mass at all epochs, while the brighter AGNs are strongly biased, with b(z) evolving linearly with redshift, as suggested by some theories of galaxy formation and evolution.

  16. An Improved Source-Scanning Algorithm for Locating Earthquake Clusters or Aftershock Sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Y.; Kao, H.; Hsu, S.

    2010-12-01

    The Source-scanning Algorithm (SSA) was originally introduced in 2004 to locate non-volcanic tremors. Its application was later expanded to the identification of earthquake rupture planes and the near-real-time detection and monitoring of landslides and mud/debris flows. In this study, we further improve SSA for the purpose of locating earthquake clusters or aftershock sequences when only a limited number of waveform observations are available. The main improvements include the application of a ground motion analyzer to separate P and S waves, the automatic determination of resolution based on the grid size and time step of the scanning process, and a modified brightness function to utilize constraints from multiple phases. Specifically, the improved SSA (named as ISSA) addresses two major issues related to locating earthquake clusters/aftershocks. The first one is the massive amount of both time and labour to locate a large number of seismic events manually. And the second one is to efficiently and correctly identify the same phase across the entire recording array when multiple events occur closely in time and space. To test the robustness of ISSA, we generate synthetic waveforms consisting of 3 separated events such that individual P and S phases arrive at different stations in different order, thus making correct phase picking nearly impossible. Using these very complicated waveforms as the input, the ISSA scans all model space for possible combination of time and location for the existence of seismic sources. The scanning results successfully associate various phases from each event at all stations, and correctly recover the input. To further demonstrate the advantage of ISSA, we apply it to the waveform data collected by a temporary OBS array for the aftershock sequence of an offshore earthquake southwest of Taiwan. The overall signal-to-noise ratio is inadequate for locating small events; and the precise arrival times of P and S phases are difficult to

  17. An Ultraviolet-Excess Optical Candidate for the Luminous Globular Cluster X-Ray Source in NGC 1851

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deutsch, Eric W.; Anderson, Scott F.; Margon, Bruce; Downes, Ronald A.

    1996-01-01

    The intense, bursting X-ray source in the globular cluster NGC 1851 was one of the first cluster sources discovered, but has remained optically unidentified for 25 years. We report here on results from Hubble Space Telescope WFPC2 multicolor images in NGC 1851. Our high spatial resolution images resolve approximately 200 objects in the 3 minute radius Einstein X-ray error circle, 40 times as many as in previous ground-based work. A color-magnitude diagram of the cluster clearly reveals a markedly UV-excess object with B approximately 21, (U - B) approximately -0.9, only 2 minutes from the X-ray position. The UV-excess candidate is 0.12 minutes distant from a second, unremarkable star that is 0.5 mag brighter in B; thus ground-based studies of this field are probably impractical. Three other UV-excess objects are also present among the approximately 16,000 objects in the surveyed region of the cluster, leaving an approximately 5% probability that a UV-excess object has fallen in the X-ray error circle by chance. No variability of the candidate is seen in these data, although a more complete study is required. If this object is in fact the counterpart of the X-ray source, previous inferences that some globular cluster X-ray sources are optically subluminous with respect to low-mass X-ray binaries in the field are now strengthened.

  18. X-RAY SOURCES AND THEIR OPTICAL COUNTERPARTS IN THE GALACTIC GLOBULAR CLUSTER M12 (NGC 6218)

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, T.-N.; Kong, Albert K. H.; Bassa, Cees; Verbunt, Frank; Lewin, Walter H. G.; Anderson, Scott F.; Pooley, David

    2009-11-01

    We study a Chandra X-ray Observatory ACIS-S observation of the Galactic globular cluster M12. With a 26 ks exposure time, we detect six X-ray sources inside the half-mass radius (2.'16) of which two are inside the core radius (0.'72) of the cluster. If we assume that these sources are all associated with globular cluster M12, the luminosity L {sub X} among these sources between 0.3 and 7.0 keV varies roughly from 10{sup 30} to 10{sup 32} erg s{sup -1}. For identification, we also analyzed the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) and Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) data and identified the optical counterparts to five X-ray sources inside the HST ACS field of view. According to the X-ray and optical features, we found 2-5 candidate active binaries (ABs) or cataclysmic variables (CVs) and 0-3 background galaxies within the HST ACS field of view. Based on the assumption that the number of X-ray sources scales with the encounter rate and the mass of the globular cluster, we expect two X-ray sources inside M12, and the expectation is consistent with our observational results. Therefore, the existence of identified X-ray sources (possible CVs or ABs) in M12 suggests the primordial origin of X-ray sources in globular clusters which is in agreement with previous studies.

  19. A VARIABLE ULTRALUMINOUS X-RAY SOURCE IN A GLOBULAR CLUSTER IN NGC 4649

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, T. P.; Middleton, M. J.; Fabbiano, G.; Luo, B.; Kim, D.-W.; Strader, J.; Fragos, T.; Brodie, J. P.; Kalogera, V.; King, A. R.; Zezas, A.

    2012-12-01

    We report the discovery of a new ultraluminous X-ray source associated with a globular cluster in the elliptical galaxy NGC 4649. The X-ray source was initially detected with a luminosity below 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 38} erg s{sup -1}, but in subsequent observations 7 and 11 years later it had brightened substantially to 2-3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 39} erg s{sup -1}. Over the course of six separate observations it displayed significant spectral variability, in both continuum slope and absorption column. Short-term variability in the X-ray flux was also present in at least one observation. The properties of this object appear consistent with a stellar-mass black hole accreting at super-Eddington rates (i.e., in the ultraluminous accretion state), although a highly super-Eddington neutron star cannot be excluded. The coincidence of an increase in absorption column with a possible enhancement in short-term variability in at least one observation is suggestive of a clumpy, radiatively driven wind crossing our line of sight to the object.

  20. Connectivity of a large embayment and coastal fishery: spawning aggregations in one bay source local and broad-scale fishery replenishment.

    PubMed

    Hamer, P A; Acevedo, S; Jenkins, G P; Newman, A

    2011-04-01

    Ichthyoplankton sampling and otolith chemistry were used to determine the importance of transient spawning aggregations of snapper Chrysophrys auratus (Sparidae) in a large embayment, Port Phillip Bay (PPB), Australia, as a source of local and broad-scale fishery replenishment. Ichthyoplankton sampling across five spawning seasons within PPB, across the narrow entrance to the bay and in adjacent coastal waters, indicated that although spawning may occur in coastal waters, the spawning aggregations within the bay were the primary source of larval recruitment to the bay. Otolith chemical signatures previously characterized for 0+ year C. auratus of two cohorts (2000 and 2001) were used as the baseline signatures to quantify the contribution that fish derived from reproduction in PPB make to fishery replenishment. Sampling of these cohorts over a 5 year period at various widely dispersed fishery regions, combined with maximum likelihood analyses of the chemistry of the 0+ year otolith portions of these older fish, indicated that C. auratus of 1 to 3+ years of age displayed both local residency and broad-scale emigration from PPB to populate coastal waters and an adjacent bay (Western Port). While the PPB fishery was consistently dominated (>70%) by locally derived fish irrespective of cohort or age, the contribution of fish that had originated from PPB to distant populations increased with age. At 4 to 5+ years of age, when C. auratus mature and fully recruit to the fishery, populations of both cohorts across the entire central and western Victorian fishery, including two major embayments and c. 800 km of coastal waters, were dominated (>70%) by fish that had originated from the spawning aggregations and nursery habitat within PPB. Dependence of this broadly dispersed fishery on replenishment from heavily targeted spawning aggregations within one embayment has significant implications for management and monitoring programmes.

  1. The fractal aggregation of asphaltenes.

    PubMed

    Hoepfner, Michael P; Fávero, Cláudio Vilas Bôas; Haji-Akbari, Nasim; Fogler, H Scott

    2013-07-16

    This paper discusses time-resolved small-angle neutron scattering results that were used to investigate asphaltene structure and stability with and without a precipitant added in both crude oil and model oil. A novel approach was used to isolate the scattering from asphaltenes that are insoluble and in the process of aggregating from those that are soluble. It was found that both soluble and insoluble asphaltenes form fractal clusters in crude oil and the fractal dimension of the insoluble asphaltene clusters is higher than that of the soluble clusters. Adding heptane also increases the size of soluble asphaltene clusters without modifying the fractal dimension. Understanding the process of insoluble asphaltenes forming fractals with higher fractal dimensions will potentially reveal the microscopic asphaltene destabilization mechanism (i.e., how a precipitant modifies asphaltene-asphaltene interactions). It was concluded that because of the polydisperse nature of asphaltenes, no well-defined asphaltene phase stability envelope exists and small amounts of asphaltenes precipitated even at dilute precipitant concentrations. Asphaltenes that are stable in a crude oil-precipitant mixture are dispersed on the nanometer length scale. An asphaltene precipitation mechanism is proposed that is consistent with the experimental findings. Additionally, it was found that the heptane-insoluble asphaltene fraction is the dominant source of small-angle scattering in crude oil and the previously unobtainable asphaltene solubility at low heptane concentrations was measured.

  2. THE NEXT GENERATION VIRGO CLUSTER SURVEY. XV. THE PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFT ESTIMATION FOR BACKGROUND SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Raichoor, A.; Mei, S.; Huertas-Company, M.; Licitra, R.; Erben, T.; Hildebrandt, H.; Ilbert, O.; Boissier, S.; Boselli, A.; Ball, N. M.; Côté, P.; Ferrarese, L.; Gwyn, S. D. J.; Kavelaars, J. J.; Chen, Y.-T.; Cuillandre, J.-C.; Duc, P. A.; Guhathakurta, P.; and others

    2014-12-20

    The Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey (NGVS) is an optical imaging survey covering 104 deg{sup 2} centered on the Virgo cluster. Currently, the complete survey area has been observed in the u*giz bands and one third in the r band. We present the photometric redshift estimation for the NGVS background sources. After a dedicated data reduction, we perform accurate photometry, with special attention to precise color measurements through point-spread function homogenization. We then estimate the photometric redshifts with the Le Phare and BPZ codes. We add a new prior that extends to i {sub AB} = 12.5 mag. When using the u* griz bands, our photometric redshifts for 15.5 mag ≤ i ≲ 23 mag or z {sub phot} ≲ 1 galaxies have a bias |Δz| < 0.02, less than 5% outliers, a scatter σ{sub outl.rej.}, and an individual error on z {sub phot} that increases with magnitude (from 0.02 to 0.05 and from 0.03 to 0.10, respectively). When using the u*giz bands over the same magnitude and redshift range, the lack of the r band increases the uncertainties in the 0.3 ≲ z {sub phot} ≲ 0.8 range (–0.05 < Δz < –0.02, σ{sub outl.rej} ∼ 0.06, 10%-15% outliers, and z {sub phot.err.} ∼ 0.15). We also present a joint analysis of the photometric redshift accuracy as a function of redshift and magnitude. We assess the quality of our photometric redshifts by comparison to spectroscopic samples and by verifying that the angular auto- and cross-correlation function w(θ) of the entire NGVS photometric redshift sample across redshift bins is in agreement with the expectations.

  3. The Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey. XV. The Photometric Redshift Estimation for Background Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raichoor, A.; Mei, S.; Erben, T.; Hildebrandt, H.; Huertas-Company, M.; Ilbert, O.; Licitra, R.; Ball, N. M.; Boissier, S.; Boselli, A.; Chen, Y.-T.; Côté, P.; Cuillandre, J.-C.; Duc, P. A.; Durrell, P. R.; Ferrarese, L.; Guhathakurta, P.; Gwyn, S. D. J.; Kavelaars, J. J.; Lançon, A.; Liu, C.; MacArthur, L. A.; Muller, M.; Muñoz, R. P.; Peng, E. W.; Puzia, T. H.; Sawicki, M.; Toloba, E.; Van Waerbeke, L.; Woods, D.; Zhang, H.

    2014-12-01

    The Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey (NGVS) is an optical imaging survey covering 104 deg2 centered on the Virgo cluster. Currently, the complete survey area has been observed in the u*giz bands and one third in the r band. We present the photometric redshift estimation for the NGVS background sources. After a dedicated data reduction, we perform accurate photometry, with special attention to precise color measurements through point-spread function homogenization. We then estimate the photometric redshifts with the Le Phare and BPZ codes. We add a new prior that extends to i AB = 12.5 mag. When using the u* griz bands, our photometric redshifts for 15.5 mag <= i <~ 23 mag or z phot <~ 1 galaxies have a bias |Δz| < 0.02, less than 5% outliers, a scatter σoutl.rej., and an individual error on z phot that increases with magnitude (from 0.02 to 0.05 and from 0.03 to 0.10, respectively). When using the u*giz bands over the same magnitude and redshift range, the lack of the r band increases the uncertainties in the 0.3 <~ z phot <~ 0.8 range (-0.05 < Δz < -0.02, σoutl.rej ~ 0.06, 10%-15% outliers, and z phot.err. ~ 0.15). We also present a joint analysis of the photometric redshift accuracy as a function of redshift and magnitude. We assess the quality of our photometric redshifts by comparison to spectroscopic samples and by verifying that the angular auto- and cross-correlation function w(θ) of the entire NGVS photometric redshift sample across redshift bins is in agreement with the expectations.

  4. A high-significance measurement of correlation between unresolved IRAS sources and optically-selected galaxy clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Hincks, Adam D.; Hajian, Amir; Addison, Graeme E. E-mail: ahajian@cita.utoronto.ca

    2013-05-01

    We cross-correlate the 100 μm Improved Reprocessing of the IRAS Survey (IRIS) map and galaxy clusters at 0.1 < z < 0.3 in the maxBCG catalogue taken from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, measuring an angular cross-power spectrum over multipole moments 150 < l < 3000 at a total significance of over 40σ. The cross-spectrum, which arises from the spatial correlation between unresolved dusty galaxies that make up the cosmic infrared background (CIB) in the IRIS map and the galaxy clusters, is well-fit by a single power law with an index of −1.28±0.12, similar to the clustering of unresolved galaxies from cross-correlating far-infrared and submillimetre maps at longer wavelengths. Using a recent, phenomenological model for the spectral and clustering properties of the IRIS galaxies, we constrain the large-scale bias of the maxBCG clusters to be 2.6±1.4, consistent with existing analyses of the real-space cluster correlation function. The success of our method suggests that future CIB-optical cross-correlations using Planck and Herschel data will significantly improve our understanding of the clustering and redshift distribution of the faint CIB sources.

  5. X-Ray source populations in old open clusters: Collinder 261

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vats, Smriti; van den Berg, Maureen; Wijnands, Rudy

    2014-09-01

    We are carrying out an X-ray survey of old open clusters with the Chandra X-ray Observatory. Single old stars, being slow rotators, are very faint in X-rays (L_X < 1×10^27 erg/s). Hence, X-rays produced by mass transfer in cataclysmic variables (CVs) or by rapid rotation of the stars in tidally locked, detached binaries (active binaries; ABs) can be detected, without contamination from single stars. By comparing the properties of various types of interacting binaries in different environments (the Galactic field, old open clusters, globular clusters), we aim to study binary evolution and how it may be affected by dynamical encounters with other cluster stars. Stellar clusters are good targets to study binaries, as age, distance, chemical composition, are well constrained. Collinder (Cr) 261 is an old open cluster (age ~ 7 Gyr), with one of the richest populations inferred of close binaries and blue stragglers of all open clusters and is therefore an obvious target to study the products of close encounters in open clusters. We will present the first results of this study, detailing the low-luminosity X-ray population of Cr 261, in conjunction with other open clusters in our survey (NGC 188, Berkeley 17, NGC 6253, M67, NGC 6791) and in comparison with populations in globular clusters.

  6. Unveiling the X-ray point source population of the Young Massive Cluster Westerlund 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, J. S.; Muno, M. P.; Negueruela, I.; Dougherty, S. M.; Crowther, P. A.; Goodwin, S. P.; de Grijs, R.

    2008-01-01

    Aims:We investigate the nature of the X-ray point source population within the Young Massive Cluster Westerlund 1. Methods: Chandra observations of 18 ks and 42 ks were used to determine the X-ray properties of emitters within Wd 1, while a comprehensive multiwavelength dataset was employed to constrain their nature. Results: We find X-ray emission from a multitude of different stellar sources within Wd 1, including both evolved high mass and low mass pre-MS stars. We attribute the X-ray emission from the high mass component to both single stars and colliding wind binaries on the basis of their observed flux and spectral properties, with binaries being systematically harder and more luminous than single stars. We are able to infer a high binary fraction for both WN (10/16) and WC stars (7/8), resulting in a combined Wolf Rayet binary fraction of ⪆70%. These represent the most stringent limits currently placed on the binary fraction of very massive (>45 M⊙) stars. We place the first observational constraints on X-ray emission from stars transitioning between the Main Sequence and Wolf Rayet phases, finding that both hot (B hypergiants) and cool (yellow hypergiants and red supergiants) spectral types appear to be intrinsically X-ray faint. The B[e] star W9 is found to be X-ray bright and shows similarities to both the X-ray binary SS433 and the Luminous Blue Variable η Carinae. Globally, we find the point source population to be systematically fainter than those found in younger massive star forming regions such as NGC 3603 and R136/30 Doradus, consistent with a loss of the most massive stars to SNe and a reduction in emissivity from the low mass pre-Main Sequence stars. No unambiguous evidence for X-ray emission due to accretion onto relativistic objects of any mass is found, although the current data do not exclude the presence of either a High Mass X-ray Binary or an Intermediate Mass Black Hole accreting at a low rate. Finally, we suggest the progenitor mass

  7. A BRIGHT SUBMILLIMETER SOURCE IN THE BULLET CLUSTER (1E0657-56) FIELD DETECTED WITH BLAST

    SciTech Connect

    Rex, Marie; Devlin, Mark J.; Dicker, Simon R.; Klein, Jeff; Ade, Peter A. R.; Griffin, Matthew; Hargrave, Peter C.; Mauskopf, Philip; Pascale, Enzo; Aretxaga, Itziar; Hughes, David H.; Montana, Alfredo; Bock, James J.; Chapin, Edward L.; Halpern, Mark; Marsden, Gaelen; Gundersen, Joshua O.; Martin, Peter G.; Netterfield, Calvin B.; Olmi, Luca

    2009-09-20

    We present the 250, 350, and 500 {mu}m detection of bright submillimeter emission in the direction of the Bullet Cluster measured by the Balloon-borne Large-Aperture Submillimeter Telescope (BLAST). The 500 {mu}m centroid is coincident with an AzTEC 1.1 mm point-source detection at a position close to the peak lensing magnification produced by the cluster. However, the 250 {mu}m and 350 {mu}m centroids are elongated and shifted toward the south with a differential shift between bands that cannot be explained by pointing uncertainties. We therefore conclude that the BLAST detection is likely contaminated by emission from foreground galaxies associated with the Bullet Cluster. The submillimeter redshift estimate based on 250-1100 {mu}m photometry at the position of the AzTEC source is z{sub phot} = 2.9{sup +0.6}{sub -0.3}, consistent with the infrared color redshift estimation of the most likely Infrared Array Camera counterpart. These flux densities indicate an apparent far-infrared (FIR) luminosity of L{sub FIR} = 2 x 10{sup 13} L {sub sun}. When the amplification due to the gravitational lensing of the cluster is removed, the intrinsic FIR luminosity of the source is found to be L{sub FIR} <= 10{sup 12} L{sub sun}, consistent with typical luminous infrared galaxies.

  8. Construction aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tepordei, V.V.

    1995-01-01

    Part of the 1994 Industrial Minerals Review. The production, consumption, and applications of construction aggregates are reviewed. In 1994, the production of construction aggregates, which includes crushed stone and construction sand and gravel combined, increased 7.7 percent to 2.14 Gt compared with the previous year. These record production levels are mostly a result of funding for highway construction work provided by the Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991. Demand is expected to increase for construction aggregates in 1995.

  9. The plasma focus as a source of collimated beams of negative ion clusters and of neutral deuterium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nardi, V.; Powell, C.

    1984-03-01

    We report the space anisotropy and brightness B4 (i.e., the momentum normalized density in four dimensional transverse phase space) of a high-intensity pulsed source of neutral-atom and negative-ion-cluster beams with energy/atom E≳0.2 Mev, ion clusters with m/Z (a.u.) ≳200. The source is formed in an 0.5 MA plasma focus-PF-discharge. The energy spectrum of different particle species is obtained from a 12.2 kG magnetic analyzer, energy filters and time resolved detectors. Collimated particle beams are ejected within a <6° cone along the discharge axis inside a ≳3 mm diameter plasma channel (neutral atoms, ion clusters, impurity heavy ions at 0°, electron beams, clusters and negatively-charged ion clumps at 180°). Pulsed kA currents of ions (and neutral fluence of comparable intensity at 180°) are detected in the 6° cone at 0° with B4˜107 (mA/cm2rad2) for particle energies E≳200 KeV. In the 180° direction the soruce ejects multiple pulses of electron and ion beams in alternating sequency (typical pulse duration ˜10 ns) with a net negative charge which provide charge neutralization for ion and ion cluster beams. The source which can operate—in principle—at a high repetition rate has a scaling law in which the particle-intensity increases without a detectable increase of the angular dispersion.

  10. Condensed Matter Cluster Reactions in LENR Power Cells for a Radical New Type of Space Power Source

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Xiaoling; Miley, George H.; Hora, Heinz

    2009-03-16

    This paper reviews previous theoretical and experimental study on the possibility of nuclear events in multilayer thin film electrodes (Lipson et al., 2004 and 2005; Miley et al., 2007), including the correlation between excess heat and transmutations (Miley and Shrestha, 2003) and the cluster theory that predicts it. As a result of this added understanding of cluster reactions, a new class of electrodes is under development at the University of Illinois. These electrodes are designed to enhance cluster formation and subsequent reactions. Two approaches are under development. The first employs improved loading-unloading techniques, intending to obtain a higher volumetric density of sites favoring cluster formation. The second is designed to create nanostructures on the electrode where the cluster state is formed by electroless deposition of palladium on nickel micro structures. Power units employing these electrodes should offer unique advantages for space applications. This is a fundamental new nuclear energy source that is environmentally compatible with a minimum of radiation involvement, high specific power, very long lifetime, and scalable from micro power to kilowatts.

  11. Dimerization of pentanuclear clusters [Fe3Q(AsMe)(CO)9] (Q = Se, Te) as a conversion pathway to novel cubane-like aggregates.

    PubMed

    Pushkarevsky, Nikolay A; Konchenko, Sergey N; Zabel, Manfred; Bodensteiner, Michael; Scheer, Manfred

    2011-03-07

    The first examples of carbonyl heterocubane-type clusters, [Fe(4)(μ(3)-Q)(2)(μ(3)-AsMe)(2)(CO)(12)] (2, Q = Se (a), Te (b)), which simultaneously contain elements of group 15 and 16, were obtained by thermolysis of [Fe(3)(μ(3)-Q)(μ(3)-AsMe)(CO)(9)] (1) in acetonitrile. The clusters 2 possess a cubic Fe(4)Q(2)As(2) core with alternating Fe and Q/As atoms. The coordination environment of the Fe atoms is close to octahedral, and those of Q or As atoms are tetrahedral, which determines the distorted cubic cluster core geometry. The second main products of thermolysis are the clusters [Fe(6)(μ(3)-Q)(μ(4)-Q)(μ(4)-AsMe)(2)(CO)(12)] (3a,b), whose core contains double the elemental composition of the initial cluster 1. In the case of the Se-containing cluster two other minor products [Fe(4)(μ(4)-Se)(μ(4)-SeAsMe)(CO)(12)] (4) and [Fe(3)(μ(3)-AsMe)(2)(CO)(9)] (5) are formed. Based on the structures and properties of the products, a reaction route for the conversion of 1 into 2 is proposed, which includes the associative formation of the clusters 3 as intermediates, unlike the dissociative pathways previously known for the transformations of similar clusters of the type [Fe(3)Q(2)(CO)(9)].

  12. Subtyping of Children with Developmental Dyslexia via Bootstrap Aggregated Clustering and the Gap Statistic: Comparison with the Double-Deficit Hypothesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Wayne M.; Giess, Sally A.; Lombardino, Linda J.

    2007-01-01

    Background: The marked degree of heterogeneity in persons with developmental dyslexia has motivated the investigation of possible subtypes. Attempts have proceeded both from theoretical models of reading and the application of unsupervised learning (clustering) methods. Previous cluster analyses of data obtained from persons with reading…

  13. Young Stellar Cluster in the Vicinity of the IRAS 05137+3919 Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikoghosyan, E. H.; Azatyan, N.

    2014-09-01

    84 PMS stellar objects are identified in a cluster located in the vicinity of IRAS 05137+3919 using the UKIDSS data base and Spitzer telescope (IRAC) images. The age of the cluster is 1.5-2.0 million years. Young stars are distributed nonuniformly in the cluster and form two subgroups. One is localized around the YSO CPM, which is a binary star, and the second contains a substantial number of objects with early spectral classes surrounded by gas-dust nebulae. The K luminosity functions of the PMS stars indicate that the cluster is at a distance of ~4.5 kpc. One of the components of CPM 15 appears to have Sp B3-B5 and is an Ae/Be Herbig star.

  14. Assessing the similarity of antimicrobial resistance phenotypes among fecal Escherichia coli isolates from two aggregated occupational cohorts of humans versus swine using cluster analysis and multivariate statistics.

    PubMed

    Alali, W Q; Scott, H M; Norby, B

    2010-04-01

    Statistical methods employed to analyze antimicrobial resistance (AR) phenotypic data have largely focused on multiple individual antimicrobial resistance outcomes without considering the pharmacologic and biological dependence among these data. In our 3-year longitudinal study, the relationship between AR phenotype of E. coli isolates from integrated multi-site group cohorts of humans and swine and the following risk factors: host-species (human versus swine) and human vocation (swine-workers versus non-workers) was assessed; first, by using cluster analysis techniques and then multivariate generalized estimating equation (GEE) models. Human sewage wastewater draining from occupation-specific housing and swine fecal E. coli isolates (n=3,113 and 3,428, respectively) were tested for antimicrobial susceptibility to 15 agents on the 2003 NARMS panel using the Sensititre system (Trek Diagnostics, Cleveland, OH). The MIC values for each isolate were interpreted according to standardized breakpoints into resistant or susceptible. The phenotypic data (n=6,541) were cluster-analyzed using Ward's minimum variance with Jaccard's distance measure. The multivariate relationships of E. coli cluster membership with the risk factors in the study were assessed using a multivariate GEE model in a SAS((R)) macro to adjust for the multiple cluster dependencies as well as adjusting for response dependencies within each unit location. The cluster solution that best described our entire dataset and where the multivariate GEE model converged was 14. In general, the adjusted odds-ratios of the multiple clusters (i.e., 14 clusters) for human isolates were significantly (P<0.05) at a higher odds of being in the pansusceptible cluster (OR=12.8), and also in clusters that contained high levels of resistance to amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, ampicillin, cefoxitin, nalidixic acid, sulfisoxazole, and/or trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, when compared to swine isolates. The adjusted odds-ratios of

  15. Analysis of earthquake clustering and source spectra in the Salton Sea Geothermal Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Y.; Chen, X.

    2015-12-01

    The Salton Sea Geothermal field is located within the tectonic step-over between San Andreas Fault and Imperial Fault. Since the 1980s, geothermal energy exploration has resulted with step-like increase of microearthquake activities, which mirror the expansion of geothermal field. Distinguishing naturally occurred and induced seismicity, and their corresponding characteristics (e.g., energy release) is important for hazard assessment. Between 2008 and 2014, seismic data recorded by a local borehole array were provided public access from CalEnergy through SCEC data center; and the high quality local recording of over 7000 microearthquakes provides unique opportunity to sort out characteristics of induced versus natural activities. We obtain high-resolution earthquake location using improved S-wave picks, waveform cross-correlation and a new 3D velocity model. We then develop method to identify spatial-temporally isolated earthquake clusters. These clusters are classified into aftershock-type, swarm-type, and mixed-type (aftershock-like, with low skew, low magnitude and shorter duration), based on the relative timing of largest earthquakes and moment-release. The mixed-type clusters are mostly located at 3 - 4 km depth near injection well; while aftershock-type clusters and swarm-type clusters also occur further from injection well. By counting number of aftershocks within 1day following mainshock in each cluster, we find that the mixed-type clusters have much higher aftershock productivity compared with other types and historic M4 earthquakes. We analyze detailed spatial variation of 'b-value'. We find that the mixed-type clusters are mostly located within high b-value patches, while large (M>3) earthquakes and other types of clusters are located within low b-value patches. We are currently processing P and S-wave spectra to analyze the spatial-temporal correlation of earthquake stress parameter and seismicity characteristics. Preliminary results suggest that the

  16. Population balance modeling of antibodies aggregation kinetics.

    PubMed

    Arosio, Paolo; Rima, Simonetta; Lattuada, Marco; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2012-06-21

    The aggregates morphology and the aggregation kinetics of a model monoclonal antibody under acidic conditions have been investigated. Growth occurs via irreversible cluster-cluster coagulation forming compact, fractal aggregates with fractal dimension of 2.6. We measured the time evolution of the average radius of gyration, , and the average hydrodynamic radius, , by in situ light scattering, and simulated the aggregation kinetics by a modified Smoluchowski's population balance equations. The analysis indicates that aggregation does not occur under diffusive control, and allows quantification of effective intermolecular interactions, expressed in terms of the Fuchs stability ratio (W). In particular, by introducing a dimensionless time weighed on W, the time evolutions of measured under various operating conditions (temperature, pH, type and concentration of salt) collapse on a single master curve. The analysis applies also to data reported in the literature when growth by cluster-cluster coagulation dominates, showing a certain level of generality in the antibodies aggregation behavior. The quantification of the stability ratio gives important physical insights into the process, including the Arrhenius dependence of the aggregation rate constant and the relationship between monomer-monomer and cluster-cluster interactions. Particularly, it is found that the reactivity of non-native monomers is larger than that of non-native aggregates, likely due to the reduction of the number of available hydrophobic patches during aggregation.

  17. Dispersion and functionalization of nanoparticles synthesized by gas aggregation source: Opening new routes towards the fabrication of nanoparticles for bio-medicine

    PubMed Central

    Oprea, B.; Martínez, L.; Román, E.; Vanea, E.; Simon, S.; Huttel, Y.

    2015-01-01

    The need to find new nanoparticles for biomedical applications is pushing the limits of the fabrication methods. New techniques with versatilities beyond the extended chemical routes can provide new insight in the field. In particular gas aggregation sources offer the possibility to fabricate nanoparticles with controlled size, composition and structure out of thermodynamics. In this context, the milestone is the optimization of the dispersion and functionalization processes of nanoparticles once fabricated by these routes as they are generated in the gas phase and deposited on substrates in vacuum or ultra-high vacuum conditions. In the present work we propose a fabrication route in ultra-high vacuum that is compatible with the subsequent dispersion and functionalization of nanoparticles in aqueous media and, that is more remarkable, in one single step. In particular, we will present the fabrication of nanoparticles with a sputter gas aggregation source, using a Fe50B50 target, and their further dispersion and functionalization with polyethileneglycol (PEG). A characterization of these nanoparticles is carried out before and after PEG functionalization. During functionalization, significant boron dissolution occurs, which facilitates nanoparticle dispersion in the aqueous solution. The use of different complementary techniques allows us to prove the PEG attachment onto the surface of the nanoparticles creating a shell to make them biocompatible. The result is the formation of nanoparticles with a structure mainly composed by a metallic Fe core and an iron oxide shell, surrounded by a second PEG shell dispersed in aqueous solution. Relaxivitiy measurements of these PEG functionalized nanoparticles assessed their effectiveness as contrast agents for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) analysis. Therefore, this new fabrication route is a reliable alternative for the synthesis of nanoparticles for biomedicine. PMID:26640032

  18. X-ray Source Populations in Old Open Clusters - Collinder 261

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vats, Smriti

    2014-11-01

    We are carrying out an X-ray survey of old open clusters (OCs) with the Chandra X-ray Observatory. Single old stars emit very faint X-rays, making X-rays produced by mass transfer in CVs, or by rapid rotation of the stars in tidally-locked, detached binaries detectable, without contamination from single stars. By comparing properties of interacting binaries in different environments, we aim to study binary evolution, and how dynamical encounters with other cluster members affect it. Collinder (Cr) 261 is an old OC(~7Gyr), with one of the richest populations inferred, of close binary populations and blue stragglers of all OCs. We will present the first results, detailing the X-ray population of Cr 261, in conjugation with other OCs, and in comparison with populations in globular clusters.

  19. Surface fractals in liposome aggregation.

    PubMed

    Roldán-Vargas, Sándalo; Barnadas-Rodríguez, Ramon; Quesada-Pérez, Manuel; Estelrich, Joan; Callejas-Fernández, José

    2009-01-01

    In this work, the aggregation of charged liposomes induced by magnesium is investigated. Static and dynamic light scattering, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, and cryotransmission electron microscopy are used as experimental techniques. In particular, multiple intracluster scattering is reduced to a negligible amount using a cross-correlation light scattering scheme. The analysis of the cluster structure, probed by means of static light scattering, reveals an evolution from surface fractals to mass fractals with increasing magnesium concentration. Cryotransmission electron microscopy micrographs of the aggregates are consistent with this interpretation. In addition, a comparative analysis of these results with those previously reported in the presence of calcium suggests that the different hydration energy between lipid vesicles when these divalent cations are present plays a fundamental role in the cluster morphology. This suggestion is also supported by infrared spectroscopy data. The kinetics of the aggregation processes is also analyzed through the time evolution of the mean diffusion coefficient of the aggregates.

  20. A multiwavelength view of the galaxy cluster Abell 523 and its peculiar diffuse radio source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girardi, M.; Boschin, W.; Gastaldello, F.; Giovannini, G.; Govoni, F.; Murgia, M.; Barrena, R.; Ettori, S.; Trasatti, M.; Vacca, V.

    2016-03-01

    We study the structure of the galaxy cluster Abell 523 (A523) at z = 0.104 using new spectroscopic data for 132 galaxies acquired at the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo, new photometric data from the Isaac Newton Telescope, and X-ray and radio data from the Chandra and Very Large Array archives. We estimate the velocity dispersion of the galaxy population, σ _V=949_{-60}^{+80} km s-1, and the X-ray temperature of the hot intracluster medium, kT = 5.3 ± 0.3 keV. We infer that A523 is a massive system: M200 ˜ 7-9 × 1014 M⊙. The analysis of the optical data confirms the presence of two subclusters, 0.75 Mpc apart, tracing the SSW-NNE direction and dominated by the two brightest cluster galaxies (BCG1 and BCG2). The X-ray surface brightness is strongly elongated towards the NNE direction, and its peak is clearly offset from both the brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs). We confirm the presence of a 1.3 Mpc large radio halo, elongated in the ESE-WNW direction and perpendicular to the optical/X-ray elongation. We detect a significant radio/X-ray offset and radio polarization, two features which might be the result of a magnetic field energy spread on large spatial scales. A523 is found consistent with most scaling relations followed by clusters hosting radio haloes, but quite peculiar in the Pradio-LX relation: it is underluminous in the X-rays or overluminous in radio. A523 can be described as a binary head-on merger caught after a collision along the SSW-NNE direction. However, minor optical and radio features suggest a more complex cluster structure, with A523 forming at the crossing of two filaments along the SSW-NNE and ESE-WNW directions.

  1. THE PHYSICS OF PROTOPLANETESIMAL DUST AGGLOMERATES. VI. EROSION OF LARGE AGGREGATES AS A SOURCE OF MICROMETER-SIZED PARTICLES

    SciTech Connect

    Schraepler, Rainer; Blum, Juergen

    2011-06-20

    Observed protoplanetary disks consist of a large amount of micrometer-sized particles. Dullemond and Dominik pointed out for the first time the difficulty in explaining the strong mid-infrared excess of classical T Tauri stars without any dust-retention mechanisms. Because high relative velocities in between micrometer-sized and macroscopic particles exist in protoplanetary disks, we present experimental results on the erosion of macroscopic agglomerates consisting of micrometer-sized spherical particles via the impact of micrometer-sized particles. We find that after an initial phase, in which an impacting particle erodes up to 10 particles of an agglomerate, the impacting particles compress the agglomerate's surface, which partly passivates the agglomerates against erosion. Due to this effect, the erosion halts for impact velocities up to {approx}30 m s{sup -1} within our error bars. For higher velocities, the erosion is reduced by an order of magnitude. This outcome is explained and confirmed by a numerical model. In a next step, we build an analytical disk model and implement the experimentally found erosive effect. The model shows that erosion is a strong source of micrometer-sized particles in a protoplanetary disk. Finally, we use the stationary solution of this model to explain the amount of micrometer-sized particles in the observational infrared data of Furlan et al.

  2. Dirty H2 Molecular Clusters as the DIB Sources: Spectroscopic and Physical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernstein, L. S.; Clark, F. O.; Lynch, D. K.

    2014-02-01

    We propose that the diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) arise from absorption lines of electronic transitions in molecular clusters primarily composed of a single molecule, atom, or ion (``seed''), embedded in a single-layer shell of H2 molecules (Bernstein et al. 2013). Less abundant variants of the cluster, including two seed molecules and/or a two-layer shell of H2 molecules may also occur. The lines are broadened, blended, and wavelength-shifted by interactions between the seed and surrounding H2 shell. We refer to these clusters as CHCs (Contaminated H2 Clusters). CHC spectroscopy matches the diversity of observed DIB spectral profiles, and provides good fits to several DIB profiles based on a rotational temperature of 10 K. CHCs arise from ~cm-sized, dirty H2 ice balls, called CHIMPs (Contaminated H2 Ice Macro-Particles), formed in cold, dense, Giant Molecular Clouds (GMCs), and later released into the interstellar medium (ISM) upon GMC disruption. Attractive interactions, arising from Van der Waals and ion-induced dipole potentials, between the seeds and H2 molecules enable CHIMPs to attain cm-sized dimensions. When an ultraviolet (UV) photon is absorbed in the outer layer of a CHIMP, it heats the icy matrix and expels CHCs into the ISM. While CHCs are quickly destroyed by absorbing UV photons, they are replenished by the slowly eroding CHIMPs. Since CHCs require UV photons for their release, they are most abundant at, but not limited to, the edges of UV-opaque molecular clouds, consistent with the observed, preferred location of DIBs. An inherent property of CHCs, which can be characterized as nanometer size, spinning, dipolar dust grains, is that they emit in the radio-frequency region. Thus, CHCs offer a natural explanation to the anomalous microwave emission (AME) feature in the ~10-100 GHz spectral region.

  3. Fractal aggregates in Titan's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabane, M.; Rannou, P.; Chassefiere, E.; Israel, G.

    1993-04-01

    The cluster structure of Titan's atmosphere was modeled by using an Eulerian microphysical model with the specific formulation of microphysical laws applying to fractal particles. The growth of aggregates in the settling phase was treated by introducing the fractal dimension as a parameter of the model. The model was used to obtain a vertical distribution of size and number density of the aggregates for different production altitudes. Results confirm previous estimates of the formation altitude of photochemical aerosols. The vertical profile of the effective radius of aggregates was calculated as a function of the visible optical depth.

  4. VizieR Online Data Catalog: AGES sources in Virgo cluster (Taylor+, 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, R.; Davies, J. I.; Auld, R.; Minchin, R. F.

    2013-04-01

    Two areas of the Virgo cluster have been selected for study with AGES, VC1 and VC2. This paper examines the VC1 area while Paper II (2013MNRAS.428..459T) will consider VC2 and compare the results of the two areas. Observations were taken in 2008 January-June, 2009 February-June, 2010 January-June and 2011 January, using the Arecibo L-band Feed Array (ALFA) instrument on the Arecibo telescope in spectral line mode. (4 data files).

  5. CLASH: Extending galaxy strong lensing to small physical scales with distant sources highly magnified by galaxy cluster members

    SciTech Connect

    Grillo, C.; Christensen, L.; Gobat, R.; Balestra, I.; Nonino, M.; Biviano, A.; Mercurio, A.; Rosati, P.; Vanzella, E.; Graves, G.; Lemze, D.; Ford, H.; Bartelmann, M.; Benitez, N.; Bradley, L.; Coe, D.; Broadhurst, T.; Donahue, M.; and others

    2014-05-01

    We present a complex strong lensing system in which a double source is imaged five times by two early-type galaxies. We take advantage in this target of the extraordinary multi-band photometric data set obtained as part of the Cluster Lensing And Supernova survey with Hubble (CLASH) program, complemented by the spectroscopic measurements of the VLT/VIMOS and FORS2 follow-up campaign. We use a photometric redshift value of 3.7 for the source and confirm spectroscopically the membership of the two lenses to the galaxy cluster MACS J1206.2–0847 at redshift 0.44. We exploit the excellent angular resolution of the HST/ACS images to model the two lenses in terms of singular isothermal sphere profiles and derive robust effective velocity dispersion values of 97 ± 3 and 240 ± 6 km s{sup –1}. Interestingly, the total mass distribution of the cluster is also well characterized by using only the local information contained in this lensing system, which is located at a projected distance of more than 300 kpc from the cluster luminosity center. According to our best-fitting lensing and composite stellar population models, the source is magnified by a total factor of 50 and has a luminous mass of approximately (1.0 ± 0.5) × 10{sup 9} M {sub ☉} (assuming a Salpeter stellar initial mass function). By combining the total and luminous mass estimates of the two lenses, we measure luminous over total mass fractions projected within the effective radii of 0.51 ± 0.21 and 0.80 ± 0.32. Remarkably, with these lenses we can extend the analysis of the mass properties of lens early-type galaxies by factors that are approximately two and three times smaller than previously done with regard to, respectively, velocity dispersion and luminous mass. The comparison of the total and luminous quantities of our lenses with those of astrophysical objects with different physical scales, like massive early-type galaxies and dwarf spheroidals, reveals the potential of studies of this kind for

  6. Clustering Properties of Far-infrared Sources in the Herschel infrared GALactic Survey (Hi-Gal) Science Demonstration Phase Fields.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billot, Nicolas; Schisano, E.; Molinari, S.; Pestalozzi, M.; Hi-GAL Team

    2011-01-01

    While the study of star forming activity usually relies on fitting spectral energy distributions to probe the physical properties of forming stars, we explore an alternative method to complement this multi-wavelength strategy: we use a Minimum Spanning Tree (MST) algorithm to characterize the spatial distribution of Galactic Far-IR sources and derive their clustering properties. We aim at revealing the spatial imprint of different types of star forming processes, e.g. isolated spontaneous fragmentation of dense molecular clouds, or events of triggered star formation around Hii regions, and evidence global properties of star formation in the Galaxy. We plan on exploiting the entire HiGAL survey of the inner Galactic plane (270 square degrees observed in 5 bands between 70 and 500 microns, P.I. Sergio Molinari) to gather significant statistics on the clustering properties of star forming regions, and to look for possible correlations with source properties such as mass, temperature or evolutionary stage. In this poster we present a pilot study of our project on two 2×2 square degrees fields centered at longitudes l=30 and 59 degrees obtained during the Science Demonstration Phase (SDP) of the Herschel mission.

  7. Timing and nature of volcanic particle clusters based on field and numerical investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagheri, Gholamhossein; Rossi, Eduardo; Biass, Sébastien; Bonadonna, Costanza

    2016-11-01

    Aggregation processes are known to play an important role in volcanic particle dispersal and sedimentation. They are also a primary source of uncertainty in ash dispersal forecasting since fundamental questions, such as the timing and deposition dynamics of volcanic aggregates, still remain unanswered. Here, we applied a state-of-the-art combination of field and numerical strategies to characterize volcanic aggregates. We introduce a new category of aggregates observed with high-speed-high-resolution videos, namely cored clusters. Cored clusters are mostly sub-spherical fragile aggregates that have never been observed in the deposits nor on adhesive tape as they typically break at impact with the ground. They consist of a core particle (200-500μm) fully covered by a thick shell of particles < 90μm. The low preservation potential of cored clusters in ash deposits explains the poor documentation in the literature and the low consideration attributed so far. Cored clusters can also better explain the deposition of fine ash in proximal and medial regions and the polymodality observed in many ash deposits. In addition, numerical inversions show how cored clusters can rapidly form within 175s from eruption onset. Finally, our observations represent the first field-based evidence of the so-called rafting effect, in which the sedimentation of coarse ash in cored clusters is delayed due to aggregation.

  8. Adaptive cluster detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedenberg, David

    2010-10-01

    The next generation of telescopes will acquire terabytes of image data on a nightly basis. Collectively, these large images will contain billions of interesting objects, which astronomers call sources . The astronomers' task is to construct a catalog detailing the coordinates and other properties of the sources. The source catalog is the primary data product for most telescopes and is an important input for testing new astrophysical theories, but to construct the catalog one must first detect the sources. Existing algorithms for catalog creation are effective at detecting sources, but do not have rigorous statistical error control. At the same time, there are several multiple testing procedures that provide rigorous error control, but they are not designed to detect sources that are aggregated over several pixels. We propose a family of techniques that do both, by providing rigorous statistical error control on the aggregate objects themselves rather than the pixels. We demonstrate the effectiveness of this approach on data from the Chandra X-ray Observatory Satellite. Our techniques effectively controls the rate of false sources, yet still detect almost all of the sources detected by procedures that do not have such rigorous error control and have the advantage of additional data in the form of follow up observations, which may not be available for upcoming large telescopes. In fact, we even detect two new sources that were missed by previous studies. The statistical methods we develop can be extended to problems beyond Astronomy, as we will illustrate with examples from Neuroimaging. We examine a series of high-resolution function Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) experiments in which the goal is to detect bands of neural activity in response to visual stimuli presented to subjects in an fMRI scanner. We extend the methods developed for Astronomy problems so that we can detect two distinct types of activation regions in the brain with a probabilistic guarantee on

  9. Method of using deuterium-cluster foils for an intense pulsed neutron source

    DOEpatents

    Miley, George H.; Yang, Xiaoling

    2013-09-03

    A method is provided for producing neutrons, comprising: providing a converter foil comprising deuterium clusters; focusing a laser on the foil with power and energy sufficient to cause deuteron ions to separate from the foil; and striking a surface of a target with the deuteron ions from the converter foil with energy sufficient to cause neutron production by a reaction selected from the group consisting of D-D fusion, D-T fusion, D-metal nuclear spallation, and p-metal. A further method is provided for assembling a plurality of target assemblies for a target injector to be used in the previously mentioned manner. A further method is provided for producing neutrons, comprising: splitting a laser beam into a first beam and a second beam; striking a first surface of a target with the first beam, and an opposite second surface of the target with the second beam with energy sufficient to cause neutron production.

  10. Demonstrating the Likely Neutron Star Nature of Five M31 Globular Cluster Sources with Swift-NuSTAR Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maccarone, Thomas J.; Yukita, Mihoko; Hornschemeier, Ann; Lehmer, Bret D.; Antoniou, Vallia; Ptak, Andrew; Wik, Daniel R.; Zezas, Andreas; Boyd, Padi; Kennea, Jamie; Stern, Daniel; Zhang, William W.

    2016-01-01

    We present the results of a joint Swift-NuSTAR spectroscopy campaign on M31. We focus on the five brightest globular cluster X-ray sources in our fields. Two of these had previously been argued to be black hole candidates on the basis of apparent hard-state spectra at luminosities above those for which neutron stars are in hard states. We show that these two sources are likely to be Z-sources (i.e. low magnetic field neutron stars accreting near their Eddington limits), or perhaps bright atoll sources (low magnetic field neutron stars which are just a bit fainter than this level) on the basis of simultaneous Swift and NuSTAR spectra which cover a broader range of energies. These new observations reveal spectral curvature above 6-8 keV that would be hard to detect without the broader energy coverage the NuSTAR data provide relative to Chandra and XMM-Newton. We show that the other three sources are also likely to be bright neutron star X-ray binaries, rather than black hole X-ray binaries. We discuss why it should already have been realized that it was unlikely that these objects were black holes on the basis of their being persistent sources, and we re-examine past work which suggested that tidal capture products would be persistently bright X-ray emitters. We discuss how this problem is likely due to neglecting disc winds in older work that predict which systems will be persistent and which will be transient.

  11. Demonstrating the likely neutron star nature of five M31 globular cluster sources with Swift-NuSTAR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maccarone, Thomas J.; Yukita, Mihoko; Hornschemeier, Ann; Lehmer, Bret D.; Antoniou, Vallia; Ptak, Andrew; Wik, Daniel R.; Zezas, Andreas; Boyd, Padi; Kennea, Jamie; Page, Kim L.; Eracleous, Mike; Williams, Benjamin F.; Boggs, Steven E.; Christensen, Finn E.; Craig, William W.; Hailey, Charles J.; Harrison, Fiona A.; Stern, Daniel; Zhang, William W.

    2016-06-01

    We present the results of a joint Swift-NuSTAR spectroscopy campaign on M31. We focus on the five brightest globular cluster X-ray sources in our fields. Two of these had previously been argued to be black hole candidates on the basis of apparent hard-state spectra at luminosities above those for which neutron stars are in hard states. We show that these two sources are likely to be Z-sources (i.e. low magnetic field neutron stars accreting near their Eddington limits), or perhaps bright atoll sources (low magnetic field neutron stars which are just a bit fainter than this level) on the basis of simultaneous Swift and NuSTAR spectra which cover a broader range of energies. These new observations reveal spectral curvature above 6-8 keV that would be hard to detect without the broader energy coverage the NuSTAR data provide relative to Chandra and XMM-Newton. We show that the other three sources are also likely to be bright neutron star X-ray binaries, rather than black hole X-ray binaries. We discuss why it should already have been realized that it was unlikely that these objects were black holes on the basis of their being persistent sources, and we re-examine past work which suggested that tidal capture products would be persistently bright X-ray emitters. We discuss how this problem is likely due to neglecting disc winds in older work that predict which systems will be persistent and which will be transient.

  12. Household disaster preparedness and information sources: Rapid cluster survey after a storm in New South Wales, Australia

    PubMed Central

    Cretikos, Michelle; Eastwood, Keith; Dalton, Craig; Merritt, Tony; Tuyl, Frank; Winn, Linda; Durrheim, David

    2008-01-01

    Background A storm-related disaster in New South Wales, Australia in June 2007 caused infrastructure damage, interrupted essential services, and presented major public health risks. We investigated household disaster preparedness and information sources used before and during the disaster. Methods Rapid cluster survey of 320 randomly selected households in Newcastle and Lake Macquarie, New South Wales, Australia. Results 227 households (71%) responded to the survey. By the day before the storm, 48% (95%CI 40–57%) of households were aware of a storm warning, principally through television (67%; 58–75%) and radio (57%; 49–66%) announcements. Storm preparations were made by 42% (28–56%) of these households. Storm information sources included: radio (78%; 68–88%); family, friends, colleagues and neighbours (50%; 40–60%); and television (41%; 30–52%). Radio was considered more useful than television (62%; 51–73% vs. 29%; 18–40%), even in households where electricity supply was uninterrupted (52%; 31–73% vs. 41%; 20–63%). Only 23% (16–30%) of households were aware that the local government-operated radio network has a designated communication role during disasters. A battery-operated household radio and appropriate batteries were available in 42% (34–50%) of households, while only 23% (16–29%) had all of: a torch, battery-operated radio, appropriate batteries, mobile phone, emergency contact list and first aid equipment. Conclusion Broadcast media are important information sources immediately before and during disasters. Health services should promote awareness of broadcast networks' disaster role, especially the role of radio, and encourage general household disaster preparedness. A rapid cluster survey conducted shortly after a natural disaster provided practical, robust information for disaster planning. PMID:18533010

  13. Size and number density of precrystalline aggregates in lysozyme crystallization process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Shinpei; Ito, Kohzo; Hayakawa, Reinosuke; Ataka, Mitsuo

    1999-12-01

    Using dynamic light scattering, we investigated supersaturated aqueous solutions of hen egg white lysozyme. We could observe the formation of aggregates only in solutions, from which crystals grew within a few days. The aggregates were grouped into smaller "units" and larger "clusters." The units consisted of a few molecules, whereas the clusters grew from about 100 nm to 1 μm. At the beginning of aggregation, the number density of the units decreased, while that of the clusters increased. At this stage, unit-cluster aggregation proceeded. At the next stage, the number density of the units became constant, while that of the clusters began to decrease, which means that the units stopped aggregating and cluster-cluster aggregation started. The aggregation mechanism for the clusters fit well with the diffusion limited cluster aggregation model, but this model alone could not explain that the aggregates separated into two groups, corresponding to units and clusters, and that the units stopped aggregating during the aggregation process. We find that the observed aggregation process has several similarities to the liquid-liquid phase separation process, which occurs metastably in protein solution. Furthermore, using both models for diffusion limited aggregation and the liquid-liquid phase separation together, we could naturally explain the process of the cluster formation.

  14. Conditions for self-consistent aggregation by chemotactic particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Masayo; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2008-04-01

    We have numerically studied chemotactic aggregation of microorganisms by introducing a model consisting of elements with intracellular dynamics, random walks with a state-dependent turnover rate, and secretion of attractant. Three phases with and without aggregation, as well as partial aggregation, were obtained as to the diffusion and degradation rates of the attractant, and conditions for cellular aggregation were analyzed. The size of aggregated clusters was shown to be independent of cell density, as is consistent with experiment.

  15. Construction aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, T.I.; Bolen, W.P.

    2007-01-01

    Construction aggregates, primarily stone, sand and gravel, are recovered from widespread naturally occurring mineral deposits and processed for use primarily in the construction industry. They are mined, crushed, sorted by size and sold loose or combined with portland cement or asphaltic cement to make concrete products to build roads, houses, buildings, and other structures. Much smaller quantities are used in agriculture, cement manufacture, chemical and metallurgical processes, glass production and many other products.

  16. Construction aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tepordei, V.V.

    1996-01-01

    Part of the Annual Commodities Review 1995. Production of construction aggregates such as crushed stone and construction sand and gravel showed a marginal increase in 1995. Most of the 1995 increases were due to funding for highway construction work. The major areas of concern to the industry included issues relating to wetlands classification and the classification of crystalline silica as a probable human carcinogen. Despite this, an increase in demand is anticipated for 1996.

  17. Joint source-channel rate allocation and client clustering for scalable multistream IPTV.

    PubMed

    Chakareski, Jacob

    2015-08-01

    We design a system framework for streaming scalable internet protocol television (IPTV) content to heterogenous clients. The backbone bandwidth is optimally allocated between source and parity data layers that are delivered to the client population. The assignment of stream layers to clients is done based on their access link data rate and packet loss characteristics, and is part of the optimization. We design three techniques for jointly computing the optimal number of multicast sessions, their respective source and parity rates, and client membership, either exactly or approximatively, at lower complexity. The latter is achieved via an iterative coordinate descent algorithm that only marginally underperforms relative to the exact analytic solution. Through experiments, we study the advantages of our framework over common IPTV systems that deliver the same source and parity streams to every client. We observe substantial gains in video quality in terms of both its average value and standard deviation over the client population. In addition, for energy efficiency, we propose to move the parity data generation part to the edge of the backbone network, where each client connects to its IPTV stream. We analytically study the conditions under which such an approach delivers energy savings relative to the conventional case of source and parity data generation at the IPTV streaming server. Finally, we demonstrate that our system enables more consistent streaming performance, when the clients' access link packet loss distribution is varied, relative to the two baseline methods used in our investigation, and maintains the same performance as an ideal system that serves each client independently.

  18. SUBMILLIMETER SOURCES BEHIND THE MASSIVE LENSING CLUSTERS A370 AND A2390

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Chian-Chou; Cowie, Lennox L.; Barger, Amy J.; Williams, Jonathan P.; Wang, Wei-Hao

    2011-05-20

    We report 850 {mu}m Submillimeter Array (SMA) observations of four gravitationally lensed submillimeter galaxies (SMGs), A370-2, A2390-1, A2390-3, and A2390-4, which were originally discovered with the Submillimeter Common-User Bolometer Array (SCUBA). Our SMA detection of A370-2 with a submillimeter flux of 7.95 {+-} 0.60 mJy unambiguously identifies the counterparts to this source at optical and radio wavelengths. A2390-1 is an ultraluminous infrared galaxy with a submillimeter flux of 5.55 {+-} 0.92 mJy and a redshift of 1.8 {+-} 0.2 computed from submillimeter/radio flux ratio analysis. We resolve A2390-3 into two components, A2390-3a and A2390-3b, with fluxes of 3.15 {+-} 0.63 mJy and 1.92 {+-} 0.60 mJy, respectively. The structure of the system could be consistent with morphological distortion by gravitational lensing. The lack of counterparts in the optical and infrared indicates a heavily dust-enshrouded nature, and a non-detection in the radio implies that these two sources probably lie at z > 4.7, which would make them among the most distant SMGs known to date. Our non-detection of A2390-4 suggests either that there are multiple fainter submillimeter sources within the SCUBA beam or that the SCUBA detection may have been false. Our precise positions allow us to determine accurate amplifications and fluxes for all of our detected sources. Our new results give a shallower power-law fit (-1.10) to the faint-end 850 {mu}m cumulative number counts than previous work. We emphasize the need for high-resolution observations of single dish detected SMGs in order to measure accurately the faint end of the 850 {mu}m counts.

  19. Variable aggregation rates in colloidal gold: Kernel homogeneity dependence on aggregant concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivier, B. J.; Sorensen, C. M.

    1990-02-01

    Dynamic light scattering is used to study the dependence of the aggregation kernel homogeneity λ on the aggregant concentration [HCl] for aqueous gold sols. We find the cluster growth kinetics are well described by a powerlaw, Rapp~tz/D, where Rapp is the measured apparent radius, D the cluster fractal dimension, and z=1/(1-λ) for all aggregant concentrations. The values for the dynamic exponent z, and hence the homogeneity λ, are functions of HCl concentration. We find the larger HCl concentrations yield a fast-aggregation regime characterized by λ~=-0.6. Smaller HCl concentrations yield a continuum of aggregation regimes characterized by homogeneities evolving from λ~=-0.6 towards 1.0. Our results do not support the view that aggregation in gold colloids is based on two limiting regimes, diffusion-limited and reaction-limited aggregation.

  20. Short-range order and fractal cluster structure of aggregates of barium titanate microparticles in a composite based on cyano-ethyl ester of polyvinyl alcohol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasovskii, A. N.; Novikov, D. V.; Vasina, E. S.; Matveichikova, P. V.; Sychev, M. M.; Rozhkova, N. N.

    2015-12-01

    The distribution of barium titanate (BaTiO3) microparticles in the matrix of cyano-ethyl ester of polyvinyl alcohol and the change in the surface energy upon introduction of shungite carbon nanoclusters into the dielectric composite have been investigated using the methods of scanning electron microscopy and contact angles. The computer processing of the electron microscopy data has demonstrated that the introduction of 0.04% shungite carbon nanoparticles into the composite leads to a decrease in the spatial homogeneity of the quasi-lattice and to an increase in the local density distribution of BaTiO3 microparticles, as well as in the correlation length corresponding to the formation of an infinite cluster of BaTiO3 particles. It has been found that, in this case, the surface energy and dielectric permittivity of the composite extremely increase.

  1. Hidden Gems: A Multiwavelength Survey of X-ray Sources in Galactic Globular Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, David C.; Dhuga, K.; Parke, W.; Eskandarian, A.

    2010-01-01

    Quiescent low mass X-ray binaries (qLMXBs) in Milky Way globular clusters (MWGCs) are an excellent diagnostic tool for studying several fundamental questions in astrophysics, including the nature of the equation of state (EoS) of neutron stars (NSs), the mechanism of binary system formation, the internal dynamics of compact stellar systems and the accretion process. Due to their accurately known distances and reddening/NH measures, the luminosity of GC XBs can be calculated far more precisely than that of XBs found in the field. The 12(13) luminous (L>1x1036 erg/s) XBs in MWGCs have been known for several (many) years but qLMXBs in MWGCs have only recently begun to be identified thanks to the advances in sensitivity and spatial resolution of the Chandra and XMM-Newton observatories. While low luminosity XB searches of MWGCs using these two great observatories now constitute an active field of research, there remain dozens of MWGCs for which the most sensitive previous X-ray observation is that of the ROSAT all-sky survey (RASS; hereafter RASS-MWGCs). For many RASS-MWGCs, the lower sensitivity threshold of the qLMXB population can be reached with relatively short exposures of the X-ray Telescope on-board the Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Observatory (Swift). I will discuss a systematic survey of unobserved nearby MWGCs, with Swift, which is creating a pathway to identifying their qLMXB populations, allowing follow-up observations with larger observatories. I will present statistics of the candidate qLMXBs identified in the Swift observing campaign, discuss follow-up measurements with XMM-Newton and Chandra and present prospects for answering vital questions about both the evolution of GCs and neutron stars themselves.

  2. Argon Cluster Sputtering Source for ToF-SIMS Depth Profiling of Insulating Materials: High Sputter Rate and Accurate Interfacial Information.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhaoying; Liu, Bingwen; Zhao, Evan W; Jin, Ke; Du, Yingge; Neeway, James J; Ryan, Joseph V; Hu, Dehong; Zhang, Kelvin H L; Hong, Mina; Le Guernic, Solenne; Thevuthasan, Suntharampilai; Wang, Fuyi; Zhu, Zihua

    2015-08-01

    The use of an argon cluster ion sputtering source has been demonstrated to perform superiorly relative to traditional oxygen and cesium ion sputtering sources for ToF-SIMS depth profiling of insulating materials. The superior performance has been attributed to effective alleviation of surface charging. A simulated nuclear waste glass (SON68) and layered hole-perovskite oxide thin films were selected as model systems because of their fundamental and practical significance. Our results show that high sputter rates and accurate interfacial information can be achieved simultaneously for argon cluster sputtering, whereas this is not the case for cesium and oxygen sputtering. Therefore, the implementation of an argon cluster sputtering source can significantly improve the analysis efficiency of insulating materials and, thus, can expand its applications to the study of glass corrosion, perovskite oxide thin film characterization, and many other systems of interest.

  3. From static micrographs to particle aggregation dynamics in three dimensions.

    PubMed

    Häbel, H; Särkkä, A; Rudemo, M; Hamngren Blomqvist, C; Olsson, E; Abrahamsson, C; Nordin, M

    2016-04-01

    Studies on colloidal aggregation have brought forth theories on stability of colloidal gels and models for aggregation dynamics. Still, a complete link between developed frameworks and obtained laboratory observations has to be found. In this work, aggregates of silica nanoparticles (20 nm) are studied using diffusion limited cluster aggregation (DLCA) and reaction limited cluster aggregation (RLCA) models. These processes are driven by the probability of particles to aggregate upon collision. This probability of aggregation is one in the DLCA and close to zero in the RLCA process. We show how to study the probability of aggregation from static micrographs on the example of a silica nanoparticle gel at 9 wt%. The analysis includes common summary functions from spatial statistics, namely the empty space function and Ripley's K-function, as well as two newly developed summary functions for cluster analysis based on graph theory. One of the new cluster analysis functions is related to the clustering coefficient in communication networks and the other to the size of a cluster. All four topological summary statistics are used to quantitatively compare in plots and in a least-square approach experimental data to cluster aggregation simulations with decreasing probabilities of aggregation. We study scanning transmission electron micrographs and utilize the intensity-mass thickness relation present in such images to create comparable micrographs from three-dimensional simulations. Finally, a characterization of colloidal silica aggregates and simulated structures is obtained, which allows for an evaluation of the cluster aggregation process for different aggregation scenarios. As a result, we find that the RLCA process fits the experimental data better than the DLCA process.

  4. A radio survey of clusters of galaxies. V - 11.1 CM maps of 18 Abell Clusters and observations of selected sources at 6.3 and 2.8 CM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andernach, H.; Sievers, A.; Kus, A.; Schnaubelt, J.

    1986-09-01

    Thirteen areas containing eighteen rich clusters of galaxies have been mapped in radio continuum at λ11.1 cm with the 100-m Effelsberg telescope. The angular resolution is 4arcmin.4. Linear polarization was also recorded for some of the fields, which in most cases extend to the full Abell radius of the clusters. A few of the more complex sources in these fields have been additionally observed at λ6.3 cm and, for the first time in this series of papers, also at λ2.8 cm to study their structure and spectral variations. A total of 142 sources are reported here. Optical identifications are proposed for nearly half of the detected sources.

  5. Quantifying the Earthquake Clustering that Independent Sources with Stationary Rates (as Included in Current Risk Models) Can Produce.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzenz, D. D.; Nyst, M.; Apel, E. V.; Muir-Wood, R.

    2014-12-01

    The recent Canterbury earthquake sequence (CES) renewed public and academic awareness concerning the clustered nature of seismicity. Multiple event occurrence in short time and space intervals is reminiscent of aftershock sequences, but aftershock is a statistical definition, not a label one can give an earthquake in real-time. Aftershocks are defined collectively as what creates the Omori event rate decay after a large event or are defined as what is taken away as "dependent events" using a declustering method. It is noteworthy that depending on the declustering method used on the Canterbury earthquake sequence, the number of independent events varies a lot. This lack of unambiguous definition of aftershocks leads to the need to investigate the amount of clustering inherent in "declustered" risk models. This is the task we concentrate on in this contribution. We start from a background source model for the Canterbury region, in which 1) centroids of events of given magnitude are distributed using a latin-hypercube lattice, 2) following the range of preferential orientations determined from stress maps and focal mechanism, 3) with length determined using the local scaling relationship and 4) rates from a and b values derived from the declustered pre-2010 catalog. We then proceed to create tens of thousands of realizations of 6 to 20 year periods, and we define criteria to identify which successions of events in the region would be perceived as a sequence. Note that the spatial clustering expected is a lower end compared to a fully uniform distribution of events. Then we perform the same exercise with rates and b-values determined from the catalog including the CES. If the pre-2010 catalog was long (or rich) enough, then the computed "stationary" rates calculated from it would include the CES declustered events (by construction, regardless of the physical meaning of or relationship between those events). In regions of low seismicity rate (e.g., Canterbury before

  6. The Discovery of Lensed Radio and X-Ray Sources behind the Frontier Fields Cluster MACS J0717.5+3745 with the JVLA and Chandra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Weeren, R. J.; Ogrean, G. A.; Jones, C.; Forman, W. R.; Andrade-Santos, F.; Bonafede, A.; Brüggen, M.; Bulbul, E.; Clarke, T. E.; Churazov, E.; David, L.; Dawson, W. A.; Donahue, M.; Goulding, A.; Kraft, R. P.; Mason, B.; Merten, J.; Mroczkowski, T.; Murray, S. S.; Nulsen, P. E. J.; Rosati, P.; Roediger, E.; Randall, S. W.; Sayers, J.; Umetsu, K.; Vikhlinin, A.; Zitrin, A.

    2016-02-01

    We report on high-resolution JVLA and Chandra observations of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Frontier Cluster MACS J0717.5+3745. MACS J0717.5+3745 offers the largest contiguous magnified area of any known cluster, making it a promising target to search for lensed radio and X-ray sources. With the high-resolution 1.0-6.5 GHz JVLA imaging in A and B configuration, we detect a total of 51 compact radio sources within the area covered by the HST imaging. Within this sample, we find seven lensed sources with amplification factors larger than two. None of these sources are identified as multiply lensed. Based on the radio luminosities, the majority of these sources are likely star-forming galaxies with star-formation rates (SFRs) of 10-50 {M}⊙ yr-1 located at 1≲ z≲ 2. Two of the lensed radio sources are also detected in the Chandra image of the cluster. These two sources are likely active galactic nuclei, given their 2-10 keV X-ray luminosities of ˜1043-44 erg s-1. From the derived radio luminosity function, we find evidence for an increase in the number density of radio sources at 0.6\\lt z\\lt 2.0, compared to a z\\lt 0.3 sample. Our observations indicate that deep radio imaging of lensing clusters can be used to study star-forming galaxies, with SFRs as low as ˜10 M⊙ yr-1, at the peak of cosmic star formation history.

  7. Familial aggregation analysis of gene expressions

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Shao-Qi; Xu, Liang-De; Zhang, Guang-Mei; Li, Xia; Li, Lin; Shen, Gong-Qing; Jiang, Yang; Yang, Yue-Ying; Gong, Bin-Sheng; Jiang, Wei; Zhang, Fan; Xiao, Yun; Wang, Qing K

    2007-01-01

    Traditional studies of familial aggregation are aimed at defining the genetic (and non-genetic) causes of a disease from physiological or clinical traits. However, there has been little attempt to use genome-wide gene expressions, the direct phenotypic measures of genes, as the traits to investigate several extended issues regarding the distributions of familially aggregated genes on chromosomes or in functions. In this study we conducted a genome-wide familial aggregation analysis by using the in vitro cell gene expressions of 3300 human autosome genes (Problem 1 data provided to Genetic Analysis Workshop 15) in order to answer three basic genetics questions. First, we investigated how gene expressions aggregate among different types (degrees) of relative pairs. Second, we conducted a bioinformatics analysis of highly familially aggregated genes to see how they are distributed on chromosomes. Third, we performed a gene ontology enrichment test of familially aggregated genes to find evidence to support their functional consensus. The results indicated that 1) gene expressions did aggregate in families, especially between sibs. Of 3300 human genes analyzed, there were a total of 1105 genes with one or more significant (empirical p < 0.05) familial correlation; 2) there were several genomic hot spots where highly familially aggregated genes (e.g., the chromosome 6 HLA genes cluster) were clustered; 3) as we expected, gene ontology enrichment tests revealed that the 1105 genes were aggregating not only in families but also in functional categories. PMID:18466548

  8. Argon Cluster Sputtering Source for ToF-SIMS Depth Profiling of Insulating Materials: High Sputter Rate and Accurate Interfacial Information

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhaoying; Liu, Bingwen; Zhao, Evan; Jin, Ke; Du, Yingge; Neeway, James J.; Ryan, Joseph V.; Hu, Dehong; Zhang, Hongliang; Hong, Mina; Le Guernic, Solenne; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Wang, Fuyi; Zhu, Zihua

    2015-08-01

    For the first time, the use of an argon cluster ion sputtering source has been demonstrated to perform superiorly relative to traditional oxygen and cesium ion sputtering sources for ToF-SIMS depth profiling of insulating materials. The superior performance has been attributed to effective alleviation of surface charging. A simulated nuclear waste glass, SON68, and layered hole-perovskite oxide thin films were selected as model systems due to their fundamental and practical significance. Our study shows that if the size of analysis areas is same, the highest sputter rate of argon cluster sputtering can be 2-3 times faster than the highest sputter rates of oxygen or cesium sputtering. More importantly, high quality data and high sputter rates can be achieved simultaneously for argon cluster sputtering while this is not the case for cesium and oxygen sputtering. Therefore, for deep depth profiling of insulating samples, the measurement efficiency of argon cluster sputtering can be about 6-15 times better than traditional cesium and oxygen sputtering. Moreover, for a SrTiO3/SrCrO3 bi-layer thin film on a SrTiO3 substrate, the true 18O/16O isotopic distribution at the interface is better revealed when using the argon cluster sputtering source. Therefore, the implementation of an argon cluster sputtering source can significantly improve the measurement efficiency of insulating materials, and thus can expand the application of ToF-SIMS to the study of glass corrosion, perovskite oxide thin films, and many other potential systems.

  9. Effect of Dust Coagulation Dynamics on the Geometry of Aggregates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, R.

    1996-01-01

    Master equation gives a more fundamental description of stochastic coagulation processes rather than popular Smoluchowski's equation. In order to examine the effect of the dynamics on the geometry of resulting aggregates, we study Master equation with a rigorous Monte Carlo algorithm. It is found that Cluster-Cluster aggregation model is a good approximation of orderly growth and the aggregates have fluffy structures with a fractal dimension approx. 2. A scaling analysis of Smoluchowski's equation also supports this conclusion.

  10. Cluster randomised controlled trial to examine medical mask use as source control for people with respiratory illness

    PubMed Central

    MacIntyre, Chandini Raina; Zhang, Yi; Chughtai, Abrar Ahmad; Seale, Holly; Zhang, Daitao; Chu, Yanhui; Zhang, Haiyan; Rahman, Bayzidur; Wang, Quanyi

    2016-01-01

    Rationale Medical masks are commonly used by sick individuals with influenza-like illness (ILI) to prevent spread of infections to others, but clinical efficacy data are absent. Objective Determine whether medical mask use by sick individuals with ILI protects well contacts from related respiratory infections. Setting 6 major hospitals in 2 districts of Beijing, China. Design Cluster randomised controlled trial. Participants 245 index cases with ILI. Intervention Index cases with ILI were randomly allocated to medical mask (n=123) and control arms (n=122). Since 43 index cases in the control arm also used a mask during the study period, an as-treated post hoc analysis was performed by comparing outcomes among household members of index cases who used a mask (mask group) with household members of index cases who did not use a mask (no-mask group). Main outcome measure Primary outcomes measured in household members were clinical respiratory illness, ILI and laboratory-confirmed viral respiratory infection. Results In an intention-to-treat analysis, rates of clinical respiratory illness (relative risk (RR) 0.61, 95% CI 0.18 to 2.13), ILI (RR 0.32, 95% CI 0.03 to 3.13) and laboratory-confirmed viral infections (RR 0.97, 95% CI 0.06 to 15.54) were consistently lower in the mask arm compared with control, although not statistically significant. A post hoc comparison between the mask versus no-mask groups showed a protective effect against clinical respiratory illness, but not against ILI and laboratory-confirmed viral respiratory infections. Conclusions The study indicates a potential benefit of medical masks for source control, but is limited by small sample size and low secondary attack rates. Larger trials are needed to confirm efficacy of medical masks as source control. Trial registration number ACTRN12613000852752; Results. PMID:28039289

  11. Spatially Extended 21 cm Signal from Strongly Clustered Uv and X-Ray Sources in the Early Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Kyungjin; Xu, Hao; Norman, Michael L.; Alvarez, Marcelo A.; Wise, John H.

    2015-03-01

    We present our prediction for the local 21 cm differential brightness temperature (δTb) from a set of strongly clustered sources of Population III (Pop III) and II (Pop II) objects in the early universe, by a numerical simulation of their formation and radiative feedback. These objects are located inside a highly biased environment, which is a rare, high-density peak (“Rarepeak”) extending to ∼7 comoving Mpc. We study the impact of ultraviolet and X-ray photons on the intergalactic medium (IGM) and the resulting δTb, when Pop III stars are assumed to emit X-ray photons by forming X-ray binaries very efficiently. We parameterize the rest-frame spectral energy distribution of X-ray photons, which regulates X-ray photon-trapping, IGM-heating, secondary Lyα pumping and the resulting morphology of δTb. A combination of emission (δTb > 0) and absorption (δTb < 0) regions appears in varying amplitudes and angular scales. The boost of the signal by the high-density environment (δ ∼ 0.64) and on a relatively large scale combines to make Rarepeak a discernible, spatially extended (θ ∼ 10‧) object for 21 cm observation at 13 ≲ z ≲ 17, which is found to be detectable as a single object by SKA with integration time of ∼1000 hr. Power spectrum analysis by some of the SKA precursors (Low Frequency Array, Murchison Widefield Array, Precision Array for Probing the Epoch of Reionization) of such rare peaks is found to be difficult due to the rarity of these peaks, and the contribution only by these rare peaks to the total power spectrum remains subdominant compared to that by all astrophysical sources.

  12. Archean Earth Atmosphere Fractal Haze Aggregates: Light Scattering Calculations and the Faint Young Sun Paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boness, D. A.; Terrell-Martinez, B.

    2010-12-01

    As part of an ongoing undergraduate research project of light scattering calculations involving fractal carbonaceous soot aggregates relevant to current anthropogenic and natural sources in Earth's atmosphere, we have read with interest a recent paper [E.T. Wolf and O.B Toon,Science 328, 1266 (2010)] claiming that the Faint Young Sun paradox discussed four decades ago by Carl Sagan and others can be resolved without invoking heavy CO2 concentrations as a greenhouse gas warming the early Earth enough to sustain liquid water and hence allow the origin of life. Wolf and Toon report that a Titan-like Archean Earth haze, with a fractal haze aggregate nature due to nitrogen-methane photochemistry at high altitudes, should block enough UV light to protect the warming greenhouse gas NH3 while allowing enough visible light to reach the surface of the Earth. To test this hypothesis, we have employed a rigorous T-Matrix arbitrary-particle light scattering technique, to avoid the simplifications inherent in Mie-sphere scattering, on haze fractal aggregates at UV and visible wavelenths of incident light. We generate these model aggregates using diffusion-limited cluster aggregation (DLCA) algorithms, which much more closely fit actual haze fractal aggregates than do diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) algorithms.

  13. Light-scattering properties of random-oriented aggregates: Do they represent the properties of an ensemble of aggregates?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolokolova, Ludmilla; Kimura, Hiroshi; Ziegler, Klaus; Mann, Ingrid

    2006-07-01

    We question a common assumption that orientation-averaged light-scattering properties of a single aggregate represent the properties of an ensemble of random aggregates which have the same number of the same constituent particles. Using the T-matrix code for calculation of light scattering by aggregates of spheres, we obtain efficiencies and scattering-angle dependences of intensity and polarization for several samples of aggregates. The aggregates are built using ballistic particle cluster and cluster cluster aggregation procedures. Their constituent particles have the same size and the same properties but their arrangement (i.e. specific positions) in the aggregates are different. We have found that the random-oriented efficiencies and asymmetry parameter, as well as the angular dependence of the intensity, vary significantly from one aggregate to another. Linear polarization appears to be not very sensitive to the arrangement of particles within the aggregate, whereas circular polarization has been found the most affected characteristics, which can be zero, positive or negative for the aggregates that differ only in the arrangement of their constituents. This effect originates from the violation of mirror symmetry in aggregates, which reveals itself even at random orientation. Thus, the correct description of light scattering by an ensemble of aggregates requires a realistic averaging over a variety of random aggregates. Such an averaging can be provided by the random-matrix approach.

  14. Mesoscale Simulation of Asphaltene Aggregation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiang; Ferguson, Andrew L

    2016-08-18

    Asphaltenes constitute a heavy aromatic crude oil fraction with a propensity to aggregate and precipitate out of solution during petroleum processing. Aggregation is thought to proceed according to the Yen-Mullins hierarchy, but the molecular mechanisms underlying mesoscopic assembly remain poorly understood. By combining coarse-grained molecular models parametrized using all-atom data with high-performance GPU hardware, we have performed molecular dynamics simulations of the aggregation of hundreds of asphaltenes over microsecond time scales. Our simulations reveal a hierarchical self-assembly mechanism consistent with the Yen-Mullins model, but the details are sensitive and depend on asphaltene chemistry and environment. At low concentrations asphaltenes exist predominantly as dispersed monomers. Upon increasing concentration, we first observe parallel stacking into 1D rod-like nanoaggregates, followed by the formation of clusters of nanoaggregates associated by offset, T-shaped, and edge-edge stacking. Asphaltenes possessing long aliphatic side chains cannot form nanoaggregate clusters due to steric repulsions between their aliphatic coronae. At very high concentrations, we observe a porous percolating network of rod-like nanoaggregates suspended in a sea of interpenetrating aliphatic side chains with a fractal dimension of ∼2. The lifetime of the rod-like aggregates is described by an exponential distribution reflecting a dynamic equilibrium between coagulation and fragmentation.

  15. Correlation of the physicochemical properties of natural organic matter samples from different sources to their effects on gold nanoparticle aggregation in monovalent electrolyte.

    PubMed

    Louie, Stacey M; Spielman-Sun, Eleanor R; Small, Mitchell J; Tilton, Robert D; Lowry, Gregory V

    2015-02-17

    Engineered nanoparticles (NPs) released into natural environments will interact with natural organic matter (NOM) or humic substances, which will change their fate and transport behavior. Quantitative predictions of the effects of NOM are difficult because of its heterogeneity and variability. Here, the effects of six types of NOM and molecular weight fractions of each on the aggregation of citrate-stabilized gold NPs are investigated. Correlations of NP aggregation rates with electrophoretic mobility and the molecular weight distribution and chemical attributes of NOM (including UV absorptivity or aromaticity, functional group content, and fluorescence) are assessed. In general, the >100 kg/mol components provide better stability than lower molecular weight components for each type of NOM, and they contribute to the stabilizing effect of the unfractionated NOM even in small proportions. In many cases, unfractionated NOM provided better stability than its separated components, indicating a synergistic effect between the high and low molecular weight fractions for NP stabilization. Weight-averaged molecular weight was the best single explanatory variable for NP aggregation rates across all NOM types and molecular weight fractions. NP aggregation showed poorer correlation with UV absorptivity, but the exponential slope of the UV-vis absorbance spectrum was a better surrogate for molecular weight. Functional group data (including reduced sulfur and total nitrogen content) were explored as possible secondary parameters to explain the strong stabilizing effect of a low molecular weight Pony Lake fulvic acid sample to the gold NPs. These results can inform future correlations and measurement requirements to predict NP attachment in the presence of NOM.

  16. Light scattering of fractal aerosol aggregates using T-matrix method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Kung-Hau

    1992-08-01

    The aerosols in atmosphere are often random cluster of small primary particles with disordered appearance. They are considered to be fractal aggregates with a noninteger dimensions and have the important property of invariance under scale transformation. The essential fractal morphology are included in this study of scattering properties for aggregated aerosol particles. The fractal aggregates are simulated by using the growth model of hierarchical cluster-cluster aggregation. The T-matrix approach together with the translation addition theorem for vector spherical waves is employed to solve the aggregate scattering problem. Numerical results for scattering cross sections are illustrated for fractal clusters.

  17. Experimental study of cluster formation in binary mixture of H2O and H2SO4 vapors in the presence of an ionizing radiation source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.; Smith, A. C.; Yue, G. K.

    1980-01-01

    Molecular clusters formed in pure nitrogen containing H2O and H2SO4 vapors and exposed to a 3 mCi Ni63 beta source were studied in the mass range 50 to 780 amu using a quadrupole mass spectrometer. Measurements were made under several combinations of relative humidity and relative acidity ranging from 0.7 to 7.5 percent and 0.00047 to 0.06333 percent, respectively. The number of H2SO4 molecules in the clusters observed ranged from 1 to 7 whereas the number of H2O molecules ranged from 1 to 16. The experimental cluster spectra differ considerably from those calculated using the classical nucleation theory. First order calculations using modified surface tension values and including the effects of multipole moments of the nucleating molecules indicate that these effects may be enough to explain the difference between the measured and the calculated spectra.

  18. Live Cell Characterization of DNA Aggregation Delivered through Lipofection

    PubMed Central

    Mieruszynski, Stephen; Briggs, Candida; Digman, Michelle A.; Gratton, Enrico; Jones, Mark R

    2015-01-01

    DNA trafficking phenomena, such as information on where and to what extent DNA aggregation occurs, have yet to be fully characterised in the live cell. Here we characterise the aggregation of DNA when delivered through lipofection by applying the Number and Brightness (N&B) approach. The N&B analysis demonstrates extensive aggregation throughout the live cell with DNA clusters in the extremity of the cell and peri-nuclear areas. Once within the nucleus aggregation had decreased 3-fold. In addition, we show that increasing serum concentration of cell media results in greater cytoplasmic aggregation. Further, the effects of the DNA fragment size on aggregation was explored, where larger DNA constructs exhibited less aggregation. This study demonstrates the first quantification of DNA aggregation when delivered through lipofection in live cells. In addition, this study has presents a model for alternative uses of this imaging approach, which was originally developed to study protein oligomerization and aggregation. PMID:26013547

  19. Numerical Simulation of Bubble Cluster Induced Flow by Three-Dimensional Vortex-in-Cell Method.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bin; Wang, Zhiwei; Uchiyama, Tomomi

    2014-08-01

    The behavior of air bubble clusters rising in water and the induced flow field are numerically studied using a three-dimensional two-way coupling algorithm based on a vortex-in-cell (VIC) method. In this method, vortex elements are convected in the Lagrangian frame and the liquid velocity field is solved from the Poisson equation of potential on the Eulerian grid. Two-way coupling is implemented by introducing a vorticity source term induced by the gradient of void fraction. Present simulation results are favorably compared with the measured results of bubble plume, which verifies the validity of the proposed VIC method. The rising of a single bubble cluster as well as two tandem bubble clusters are simulated. The mechanism of the aggregation effect in the rising process of bubble cluster is revealed and the transient processes of the generation, rising, strengthening, and separation of a vortex ring structure with bubble clusters are illustrated and analyzed in detail. Due to the aggregation, the average rising velocity increases with void fraction and is larger than the terminal rising velocity of single bubble. For the two tandem bubble cluster cases, the aggregation effect is stronger for smaller initial cluster distance, and both the strength of the induced vortex structure and the average bubble rising velocity are larger. For the 20 mm cluster distance case, the peak velocity of the lower cluster is about 2.7 times that of the terminal velocity of the single bubble and the peak average velocity of two clusters is about 2 times larger. While for the 30 mm cluster distance case, both the peak velocity of the lower cluster and two clusters are about 1.7 times that of the terminal velocity of the single bubble.

  20. Single molecule force spectroscopy of asphaltene aggregates.

    PubMed

    Long, Jun; Xu, Zhenghe; Masliyah, Jacob H

    2007-05-22

    Asphaltene aggregation and deposition cause severe problems in nearly all phases of petroleum processing. To resolve those problems, understanding the aggregation mechanisms is a prerequisite and has attracted the interest of a great number of investigators. However, to date, the nature and extent of asphaltene aggregation remain widely debated. In the present study, we attempt to investigate asphaltene aggregation from a completely new perspective. The technique of single molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) was used to investigate the response of single asphaltene aggregates under an external pulling force. Force curves representing the stretching of single asphaltene aggregates were obtained in simple electrolyte solutions (KCl and calcium) and organic solvents (toluene and heptane). These force curves were well-fitted by the modified worm-like chain model, indicating that those asphaltene aggregates acted like long-chain polymers under pulling by an external force. It was found that lower solution pH values and the presence of divalent cations resulted in a lower bending rigidity of the formed aggregates. The information retrieved from the force curves suggests that asphaltene molecules with a structure featuring small aromatic clusters connected by aliphatic chains do exist and that asphaltene aggregation could occur through a linear polymerization mechanism. The current study extends the application scope of SMFS.

  1. Copper(I) diselenocarbamate clusters: synthesis, structures and single-source precursors for Cu and Se composite materials.

    PubMed

    Dhayal, Rajendra S; Liao, Jian-Hong; Hou, Hsing-Nan; Ervilita, Ria; Liao, Ping-Kuei; Liu, C W

    2015-03-28

    Neutral tetrahedral [Cu4(Se2CNnPr2)4] (1), monocationic hydride-centered tetracapped tetrahedral [Cu8(H){Se2CNR2}6]+ (R = nPr, 2H; Et, 3H) and neutral hydride-centered tricapped tetrahedral [Cu7(H){Se2CNR2}6] (R = nPr, 4H; Et, 5H) clusters were formed. They are the first Cu(I) complexes supported by dialkyl diselenocarbamates. The as-synthesized complexes 2H and 3H, formed from a reaction mixture of Cu(I) salts, diselenocarbamates, and [BH4]− in an 8:6:1 ratio, can be further reduced to 4H and 5H, respectively, in the presence of one equiv. of [BH4]−. Replacement of [BH4]− with [BD4]− afforded the deuteride analogues [Cu8(D){Se2CNR2}6]+ (R = nPr, 2D; Et, 3D) and [Cu7(D){Se2CNR2}6] (R = nPr, 4D; Et, 5D), which confirm the presence of hydride in the corresponding (2H, 3H, 4H and 5H) compounds. These complexes were fully characterized by elemental analysis, ESI-MS, and 1H, 2H and 77Se NMR spectroscopy, and their molecular structures were unequivocally established by single crystal X-ray crystallographic analyses (1, 2H–5H). The hydride-encapsulated copper frameworks of (2H, 3H) and (4H, 5H) reveal a tetracapped tetrahedral cage of Cu8 and a tricapped tetrahedral cage of Cu7, respectively, which are enclosed within a Se12 icosahedron constituted by six dialkyl diselenocarbamate ligands. Compounds 2H and 3H display orange emission in both the solid and solution state under UV irradiation at 77 K. In addition, the thermolysis behaviors of 2H were studied to demonstrate the potential of these compounds as single-source precursors for copper selenide nanocomposites, which were analyzed by XRD, EDX, and SEM techniques.

  2. PDMS embedded Ag clusters: Coalescence and cluster-matrix interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roese, S.; Engemann, D.; Hoffmann, S.; Latussek, K.; Sternemann, C.; Hövel, H.

    2016-05-01

    Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) has proven to be a suitable embedding medium for silver clusters to prevent aggregation. In order to investigate the influence of the PDMS on the electronic and local atomic structure of the clusters the measurement of x-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectra for different coverages of silver clusters in PDMS and calculations of corresponding XANES spectra have been performed. The coalescence process and the cluster-PDMS interaction were investigated with XANES.

  3. Cluster pattern analysis of energy deposition sites for the brachytherapy sources 103Pd, 125I, 192Ir, 137Cs, and 60Co

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villegas, Fernanda; Tilly, Nina; Bäckström, Gloria; Ahnesjö, Anders

    2014-09-01

    Analysing the pattern of energy depositions may help elucidate differences in the severity of radiation-induced DNA strand breakage for different radiation qualities. It is often claimed that energy deposition (ED) sites from photon radiation form a uniform random pattern, but there is indication of differences in RBE values among different photon sources used in brachytherapy. The aim of this work is to analyse the spatial patterns of EDs from 103Pd, 125I, 192Ir, 137Cs sources commonly used in brachytherapy and a 60Co source as a reference radiation. The results suggest that there is both a non-uniform and a uniform random component to the frequency distribution of distances to the nearest neighbour ED. The closest neighbouring EDs show high spatial correlation for all investigated radiation qualities, whilst the uniform random component dominates for neighbours with longer distances for the three higher mean photon energy sources (192Ir, 137Cs, and 60Co). The two lower energy photon emitters (103Pd and 125I) present a very small uniform random component. The ratio of frequencies of clusters with respect to 60Co differs up to 15% for the lower energy sources and less than 2% for the higher energy sources when the maximum distance between each pair of EDs is 2 nm. At distances relevant to DNA damage, cluster patterns can be differentiated between the lower and higher energy sources. This may be part of the explanation to the reported difference in RBE values with initial DSB yields as an endpoint for these brachytherapy sources.

  4. Cluster pattern analysis of energy deposition sites for the brachytherapy sources 103Pd, 125I, 192Ir, 137Cs, and 60Co.

    PubMed

    Villegas, Fernanda; Tilly, Nina; Bäckström, Gloria; Ahnesjö, Anders

    2014-09-21

    Analysing the pattern of energy depositions may help elucidate differences in the severity of radiation-induced DNA strand breakage for different radiation qualities. It is often claimed that energy deposition (ED) sites from photon radiation form a uniform random pattern, but there is indication of differences in RBE values among different photon sources used in brachytherapy. The aim of this work is to analyse the spatial patterns of EDs from 103Pd, 125I, 192Ir, 137Cs sources commonly used in brachytherapy and a 60Co source as a reference radiation. The results suggest that there is both a non-uniform and a uniform random component to the frequency distribution of distances to the nearest neighbour ED. The closest neighbouring EDs show high spatial correlation for all investigated radiation qualities, whilst the uniform random component dominates for neighbours with longer distances for the three higher mean photon energy sources (192Ir, 137Cs, and 60Co). The two lower energy photon emitters (103Pd and 125I) present a very small uniform random component. The ratio of frequencies of clusters with respect to 60Co differs up to 15% for the lower energy sources and less than 2% for the higher energy sources when the maximum distance between each pair of EDs is 2 nm. At distances relevant to DNA damage, cluster patterns can be differentiated between the lower and higher energy sources. This may be part of the explanation to the reported difference in RBE values with initial DSB yields as an endpoint for these brachytherapy sources.

  5. Map showing potential sources of gravel and crushed-rock aggregate in the greater Denver area, Front Range urban corridor, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Trimble, D.E.; Fitch, H.R.

    1974-01-01

    Gravel and (or) crushed-rock aggregates are essential commodities for urban development, but supplies in many places are exhausted or otherwise eliminated by urban growth. Gravel resources may be exhausted by exploitation, covered by urban spread, or eliminated from production by zoning. this conflict between a growing need and a progressively reduced supply can be forestalled by informed land-use planning. Fundamental to intelligent decisions on land use is knowledge of the physical character, distribution, and quantity of the gravel resources of an area, and of the alternative resource of rock suitable for crushing. This map has been prepared to supply data basic to land-use planning in the Front Range Urban Corridor.

  6. Non-Trivial Feature Derivation for Intensifying Feature Detection Using LIDAR Datasets Through Allometric Aggregation Data Analysis Applying Diffused Hierarchical Clustering for Discriminating Agricultural Land Cover in Portions of Northern Mindanao, Philippines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villar, Ricardo G.; Pelayo, Jigg L.; Mozo, Ray Mari N.; Salig, James B., Jr.; Bantugan, Jojemar

    2016-06-01

    Leaning on the derived results conducted by Central Mindanao University Phil-LiDAR 2.B.11 Image Processing Component, the paper attempts to provides the application of the Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) derived products in arriving quality Landcover classification considering the theoretical approach of data analysis principles to minimize the common problems in image classification. These are misclassification of objects and the non-distinguishable interpretation of pixelated features that results to confusion of class objects due to their closely-related spectral resemblance, unbalance saturation of RGB information is a challenged at the same time. Only low density LiDAR point cloud data is exploited in the research denotes as 2 pts/m2 of accuracy which bring forth essential derived information such as textures and matrices (number of returns, intensity textures, nDSM, etc.) in the intention of pursuing the conditions for selection characteristic. A novel approach that takes gain of the idea of object-based image analysis and the principle of allometric relation of two or more observables which are aggregated for each acquisition of datasets for establishing a proportionality function for data-partioning. In separating two or more data sets in distinct regions in a feature space of distributions, non-trivial computations for fitting distribution were employed to formulate the ideal hyperplane. Achieving the distribution computations, allometric relations were evaluated and match with the necessary rotation, scaling and transformation techniques to find applicable border conditions. Thus, a customized hybrid feature was developed and embedded in every object class feature to be used as classifier with employed hierarchical clustering strategy for cross-examining and filtering features. This features are boost using machine learning algorithms as trainable sets of information for a more competent feature detection. The product classification in this

  7. Constraints on the physical mechanism of intermediate-depth earthquake rupture in the Cauca Cluster, Colombia, through a source parameter analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chango, Robert

    Earthquakes are the result of the sudden release of elastic energy by brittle failure. Such frictional processes are controlled by temperature and pressure. Temperature and pressure within the Earth increase with depth, which should make the rock flow. Even in subduction zones, where temperatures are lower than expected, the high confining pressure should prevent ordinary brittle failure. Therefore earthquakes deeper than 60 km are not expected. In fact, 25% of worldwide seismicity occurs deeper than 60 km. Deep seismicity usually occurs within the subducting slab in subduction zones. In this study, we estimate the source parameters of intermediate-depth earthquakes (60-300 km) in the Cauca cluster ( 4° N, 76.5° W) in Colombia to understand the physical mechanism responsible for these earthquakes. A cluster is a volume of high seismic activity surrounded by a zone of low activity rates. Source parameters are quantitative estimations of the size, strength and dynamics of the earthquakes. The source parameters can be estimated from the energy spectra of earthquakes by fitting a theoretical model. To obtain the spectra we use a multitaper technique. Because the spectra is the convolution of source, receiver and attenuation, we isolate the source and receiver by iteratively stacking the spectra. The stacking is a reasonable approach since the Colombian seismic network has a dense distribution of stations recording right above the cluster. We fit our observed spectra with the theoretical Brune model to obtain corner frequencies. P-wave corner frequencies range from 5.9 to 9.1 Hz for events with ML between 2.6-4.7. S-wave corner frequencies range from 5.2 to 9.1 Hz for events with ML between 2.5-4.5. Earthquakes with larger ML seem to follow the Brune model trend for large stress drops. Even though we have inconclusive results, our small corner frequencies and high stress drops for larger magnitudes would support thermal shear instability as the physical mechanism

  8. Oxygen limitation within a bacterial aggregate.

    PubMed

    Wessel, Aimee K; Arshad, Talha A; Fitzpatrick, Mignon; Connell, Jodi L; Bonnecaze, Roger T; Shear, Jason B; Whiteley, Marvin

    2014-04-15

    ABSTRACT Cells within biofilms exhibit physiological heterogeneity, in part because of chemical gradients existing within these spatially structured communities. Previous work has examined how chemical gradients develop in large biofilms containing >10(8) cells. However, many bacterial communities in nature are composed of small, densely packed aggregates of cells (≤ 10(5) bacteria). Using a gelatin-based three-dimensional (3D) printing strategy, we confined the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa within picoliter-sized 3D "microtraps" that are permeable to nutrients, waste products, and other bioactive small molecules. We show that as a single bacterium grows into a maximally dense (10(12) cells ml(-1)) clonal population, a localized depletion of oxygen develops when it reaches a critical aggregate size of ~55 pl. Collectively, these data demonstrate that chemical and phenotypic heterogeneity exists on the micrometer scale within small aggregate populations. IMPORTANCE Before developing into large, complex communities, microbes initially cluster into aggregates, and it is unclear if chemical heterogeneity exists in these ubiquitous micrometer-scale aggregates. We chose to examine oxygen availability within an aggregate since oxygen concentration impacts a number of important bacterial processes, including metabolism, social behaviors, virulence, and antibiotic resistance. By determining that oxygen availability can vary within aggregates containing ≤ 10(5) bacteria, we establish that physiological heterogeneity exists within P. aeruginosa aggregates, suggesting that such heterogeneity frequently exists in many naturally occurring small populations.

  9. A multi purpose source chamber at the PLEIADES beamline at SOLEIL for spectroscopic studies of isolated species: Cold molecules, clusters, and nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindblad, Andreas; Söderström, Johan; Nicolas, Christophe; Robert, Emmanuel; Miron, Catalin

    2013-11-01

    This paper describes the philosophy and design goals regarding the construction of a versatile sample environment: a source capable of producing beams of atoms, molecules, clusters, and nanoparticles in view of studying their interaction with short wavelength (vacuum ultraviolet and x-ray) synchrotron radiation. In the design, specific care has been taken of (a) the use standard components, (b) ensuring modularity, i.e., that swiftly switching between different experimental configurations was possible. To demonstrate the efficiency of the design, proof-of-principle experiments have been conducted by recording x-ray absorption and photoelectron spectra from isolated nanoparticles (SiO2) and free mixed clusters (Ar/Xe). The results from those experiments are showcased and briefly discussed.

  10. A multi purpose source chamber at the PLEIADES beamline at SOLEIL for spectroscopic studies of isolated species: Cold molecules, clusters, and nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Lindblad, Andreas; Söderström, Johan; Nicolas, Christophe; Robert, Emmanuel; Miron, Catalin

    2013-11-15

    This paper describes the philosophy and design goals regarding the construction of a versatile sample environment: a source capable of producing beams of atoms, molecules, clusters, and nanoparticles in view of studying their interaction with short wavelength (vacuum ultraviolet and x-ray) synchrotron radiation. In the design, specific care has been taken of (a) the use standard components, (b) ensuring modularity, i.e., that swiftly switching between different experimental configurations was possible. To demonstrate the efficiency of the design, proof-of-principle experiments have been conducted by recording x-ray absorption and photoelectron spectra from isolated nanoparticles (SiO{sub 2}) and free mixed clusters (Ar/Xe). The results from those experiments are showcased and briefly discussed.

  11. A multi purpose source chamber at the PLEIADES beamline at SOLEIL for spectroscopic studies of isolated species: cold molecules, clusters, and nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Lindblad, Andreas; Söderström, Johan; Nicolas, Christophe; Robert, Emmanuel; Miron, Catalin

    2013-11-01

    This paper describes the philosophy and design goals regarding the construction of a versatile sample environment: a source capable of producing beams of atoms, molecules, clusters, and nanoparticles in view of studying their interaction with short wavelength (vacuum ultraviolet and x-ray) synchrotron radiation. In the design, specific care has been taken of (a) the use standard components, (b) ensuring modularity, i.e., that swiftly switching between different experimental configurations was possible. To demonstrate the efficiency of the design, proof-of-principle experiments have been conducted by recording x-ray absorption and photoelectron spectra from isolated nanoparticles (SiO2) and free mixed clusters (Ar/Xe). The results from those experiments are showcased and briefly discussed.

  12. Natural aggregates of the conterminous United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langer, William H.

    1988-01-01

    Crushed stone and sand and gravel are the two main sources of natural aggregates. These materials are commonly used construction materials and frequently can be interchanged with one another. They are widely used throughout the United States, with every State except two producing crushed stone. Together they amount to about half the mining volume in the United States. Approximately 96 percent of sand and gravel and 77 percent of the crushed stone produced in the United States are used in the construction industry. Natural aggregates are widely distributed throughout the United States in a variety of geologic environments. Sand and gravel deposits commonly are the results of the weathering of bedrock and subsequent transportation and deposition of the material by water or ice (glaciers). As such, they commonly occur as river or stream deposits or in glaciated areas as glaciofluvial and other deposits. Crushed stone aggregates are derived from a wide variety of parent bedrock materials. Limestone and other carbonates account for approximately three quarters of the rocks used for crushed stone, with granite and other igneous rocks making up the bulk of the remainder. Limestone deposits are widespread throughout the Central and Eastern United States and are scattered in the West. Granites are widely distributed in the Eastern and Western United States, with few exposures in the Midwest. Igneous rocks (excluding granites) are largely concentrated in the Western United States and in a few isolated localities in the East. Even though natural aggregates are widely distributed throughout the United States, they are not universally available for consumptive use. Some areas are devoid of sand and gravel, and potential sources of crushed stone may be covered with sufficient unconsolidated material to make surface mining impractical. In some areas many aggregates do not meet the physical property requirements for certain uses, or they may contain mineral constituents that react

  13. Aggregation kinetics of coalescing polymer colloids.

    PubMed

    Gauer, Cornelius; Jia, Zichen; Wu, Hua; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2009-09-01

    The aggregation behavior of a soft, rubbery colloidal system with a relatively low glass transition temperature, T(g) approximately -20 degrees C, has been investigated. It is found that the average gyration and hydrodynamic radii, R(g) and R(h), measured by light scattering techniques, evolve in time in parallel, without exhibiting the crossover typical of rigid particle aggregation. Cryogenic scanning electron microscopy (cryo-SEM) images reveal sphere-like clusters, indicating that complete coalescence between particles occurs during aggregation. Since coalescence leads to a reduction in the total colloidal surface area, the surfactant adsorption equilibrium, and thus the colloidal stability, change in the course of aggregation. It is found that to simulate the observed kinetic behavior based on the population balance equations, it is necessary to assume that all the clusters are spherical and to account for variations in the colloidal stability of each aggregating particle pair with time. This indicates that, for the given system, the coalescence is very fast, i.e., its time scale is much smaller than that of the aggregation.

  14. Structure and kinetics of shear aggregation in turbulent flows. I. Early stage of aggregation.

    PubMed

    Bäbler, Matthäus U; Moussa, Amgad S; Soos, Miroslav; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2010-08-17

    Aggregation of rigid colloidal particles leads to fractal-like structures that are characterized by a fractal dimension d(f) which is a key parameter for describing aggregation processes. This is particularly true in shear aggregation where d(f) strongly influences aggregation kinetics. Direct measurement of d(f) in the early stages of shear aggregation is however difficult, as the aggregates are small and few in number. An alternative method for determining d(f) is to use an aggregation model that when fitted to the time evolution of the cluster mass distribution allows for estimating d(f). Here, we explore three such models, two of which are based on an effective collision sphere and one which directly incorporates the permeable structure of the aggregates, and we apply them for interpreting the initial aggregate growth measured experimentally in a turbulent stirred tank reactor. For the latter, three polystyrene latexes were used that differed only in the size of the primary particles (d(p) = 420, 600, and 810 nm). It was found that all three models describe initial aggregation kinetics reasonably well using, however, substantially different values for d(f). To discriminate among the models, we therefore also studied the regrowth of preformed aggregates where d(f) was experimentally accessible. It was found that only the model that directly incorporates the permeable structure of the aggregates is able to predict correctly this second type of experiments. Applying this model to the initial aggregation kinetics, we conclude that the actual initial fractal dimension is d(f) = 2.07 +/- 0.04 as found from this model.

  15. Thermodynamics of Protein Aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osborne, Kenneth L.; Barz, Bogdan; Bachmann, Michael; Strodel, Birgit

    Amyloid protein aggregation characterizes many neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Creutz- feldt-Jakob disease. Evidence suggests that amyloid aggregates may share similar aggregation pathways, implying simulation of full-length amyloid proteins is not necessary for understanding amyloid formation. In this study we simulate GNNQQNY, the N-terminal prion-determining domain of the yeast protein Sup35 to investigate the thermodynamics of structural transitions during aggregation. We use a coarse-grained model with replica-exchange molecular dynamics to investigate the association of 3-, 6-, and 12-chain GNNQQNY systems and we determine the aggregation pathway by studying aggregation states of GN- NQQNY. We find that the aggregation of the hydrophilic GNNQQNY sequence is mainly driven by H-bond formation, leading to the formation of /3-sheets from the very beginning of the assembly process. Condensation (aggregation) and ordering take place simultaneously, which is underpinned by the occurrence of a single heat capacity peak only.

  16. Chandra X-Ray Observations of the Hydra A Cluster: An Interaction between the Radio Source and the X-Ray-emitting Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNamara, B. R.; Wise, M.; Nulsen, P. E. J.; David, L. P.; Sarazin, C. L.; Bautz, M.; Markevitch, M.; Vikhlinin, A.; Forman, W. R.; Jones, C.; Harris, D. E.

    2000-05-01

    We present Chandra X-ray observations of the Hydra A cluster of galaxies, and we report the discovery of structure in the central 80 kpc of the cluster's X-ray-emitting gas. The most remarkable structures are depressions in the X-ray surface brightness, ~25-35 kpc in diameter, that are coincident with Hydra A's radio lobes. The depressions are nearly devoid of X-ray-emitting gas, and there is no evidence for shock-heated gas surrounding the radio lobes. We suggest that the gas within the surface brightness depressions was displaced as the radio lobes expanded subsonically, leaving cavities in the hot atmosphere. The gas temperature declines from 4 keV at 70 kpc to 3 keV in the inner 20 kpc of the brightest cluster galaxy (BCG), and the cooling time of the gas is ~600 Myr in the inner 10 kpc. These properties are consistent with the presence of an ~34 Msolar yr-1 cooling flow within a 70 kpc radius. Bright X-ray emission is present in the BCG surrounding a recently accreted disk of nebular emission and young stars. The star formation rate is commensurate with the cooling rate of the hot gas within the volume of the disk, although the sink for the material that may be cooling at larger radii remains elusive. A bright, unresolved X-ray source is present in the BCG's nucleus, coincident with the radio core. Its X-ray spectrum is consistent with a power law absorbed by a foreground NH~=4×1022 cm-2 column of hydrogen. This column is roughly consistent with the hydrogen column seen in absorption toward the <~24 pc diameter VLBA radio source. Apart from the point source, no evidence for excess X-ray absorption above the Galactic column is found.

  17. An acetylsalicylic acid-sensitive aggregation phenomenon in Dipodascopsis uninucleata.

    PubMed

    Kock, J L; van Wyk, P W; Venter, P; Coetzee, D J; Smith, D P; Viljoen, B C; Nigam, S

    1999-04-01

    Aggregation of ascospores has been discovered in the yeast Dipodascopsis uninucleata. When this yeast is cultivated to reach the sexual reproductive stage, small ascospores are individually released from the tip of a sac-like ascus which then aggregate in orderly clusters. Acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) inhibited ascospore release and subsequent ordered aggregation process. We suggest that novel ASA-sensitive oxidised fatty acids (3R-hydroxy-oxylipins) and small hooks located on the surface of these ascospores, are involved.

  18. H2 Molecular Clusters with Embedded Molecules and Atoms as the Source of the Diffuse Interstellar Bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernstein, L. S.; Clark, F. O.; Lynch, D. K.

    2013-05-01

    We suggest that the diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) arise from absorption lines of electronic transitions in molecular clusters primarily composed of a single molecule, atom, or ion ("seed"), embedded in a single-layer shell of H2 molecules. Less abundant variants of the cluster, including two seed molecules and/or a two-layer shell of H2 molecules, may also occur. The lines are broadened, blended, and wavelength-shifted by interactions between the seed and surrounding H2 shell. We refer to these clusters as contaminated H2 clusters (CHCs). We show that CHC spectroscopy matches the diversity of observed DIB spectral profiles and provides good fits to several DIB profiles based on a rotational temperature of 10 K. CHCs arise from ~centimeter-sized, dirty H2 ice balls, called contaminated H2 ice macro-particles (CHIMPs), formed in cold, dense, giant molecular clouds (GMCs), and later released into the interstellar medium (ISM) upon GMC disruption. Attractive interactions, arising from Van der Waals and ion-induced dipole potentials, between the seeds and H2 molecules enable CHIMPs to attain centimeter-sized dimensions. When an ultraviolet (UV) photon is absorbed in the outer layer of a CHIMP, it heats the icy matrix and expels CHCs into the ISM. While CHCs are quickly destroyed by absorbing UV photons, they are replenished by the slowly eroding CHIMPs. Since CHCs require UV photons for their release, they are most abundant at, but not limited to, the edges of UV-opaque molecular clouds, consistent with the observed, preferred location of DIBs. An inherent property of CHCs, which can be characterized as nanometer size, spinning, dipolar dust grains, is that they emit in the radio-frequency region. We also show that the CHCs offer a natural explanation for the anomalous microwave emission feature in the ~10-100 GHz spectral region.

  19. Peptide Fragmentation and Surface Structural Analysis by Means of ToF-SIMS Using Large Cluster Ion Sources.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Yuta; Aoyagi, Satoka; Fujii, Makiko; Matsuo, Jiro; Fletcher, John S; Lockyer, Nicholas P; Vickerman, John C; Passarelli, Melissa K; Havelund, Rasmus; Seah, Martin P

    2016-04-05

    Peptide or protein structural analysis is crucial for the evaluation of biochips and biodevices, therefore an analytical technique with the ability to detect and identify protein and peptide species directly from surfaces with high lateral resolution is required. In this report, the efficacy of ToF-SIMS to analyze and identify proteins directly from surfaces is evaluated. Although the physics governing the SIMS bombardment process precludes the ability for researchers to detect intact protein or larger peptides of greater than a few thousand mass unit directly, it is possible to obtain information on the partial structures of peptides or proteins using low energy per atom argon cluster ion beams. Large cluster ion beams, such as Ar clusters and C60 ion beams, produce spectra similar to those generated by tandem MS. The SIMS bombardment process also produces peptide fragment ions not detected by conventional MS/MS techniques. In order to clarify appropriate measurement conditions for peptide structural analysis, peptide fragmentation dependency on the energy of a primary ion beam and ToF-SIMS specific fragment ions are evaluated. It was found that the energy range approximately 6 ≤ E/n ≤ 10 eV/atom is most effective for peptide analysis based on peptide fragments and [M + H] ions. We also observed the cleaving of side chain moieties at extremely low-energy E/n ≤ 4 eV/atom.

  20. 40 CFR 63.1408 - Aggregate batch vent stream provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Aggregate batch vent stream provisions... § 63.1408 Aggregate batch vent stream provisions. (a) Emission standards. Owners or operators of aggregate batch vent streams at a new or existing affected source shall comply with either paragraph...

  1. 40 CFR 63.1408 - Aggregate batch vent stream provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Aggregate batch vent stream provisions... § 63.1408 Aggregate batch vent stream provisions. (a) Emission standards. Owners or operators of aggregate batch vent streams at a new or existing affected source shall comply with either paragraph...

  2. Salt-induced aggregation of stiff polyelectrolytes.

    PubMed

    Fazli, Hossein; Mohammadinejad, Sarah; Golestanian, Ramin

    2009-10-21

    Molecular dynamics simulation techniques are used to study the process of aggregation of highly charged stiff polyelectrolytes due to the presence of multivalent salt. The dominant kinetic mode of aggregation is found to be the case of one end of one polyelectrolyte meeting others at right angles, and the kinetic pathway to bundle formation is found to be similar to that of flocculation dynamics of colloids as described by Smoluchowski. The aggregation process is found to favor the formation of finite bundles of 10-11 filaments at long times. Comparing the distribution of the cluster sizes with the Smoluchowski formula suggests that the energy barrier for the aggregation process is negligible. Also, the formation of long-lived metastable structures with similarities to the raft-like structures of actin filaments is observed within a range of salt concentration.

  3. On mean type aggregation.

    PubMed

    Yager, R R

    1996-01-01

    We introduce and define the concept of mean aggregation of a collection of n numbers. We point out that the lack of associativity of this operation compounds the problem of the extending mean of n numbers to n+1 numbers. The closely related concepts of self identity and the centering property are introduced as one imperative for extending mean aggregation operators. The problem of weighted mean aggregation is studied. A new concept of prioritized mean aggregation is then introduced. We next show that the technique of selecting an element based upon the performance of a random experiment can be considered as a mean aggregation operation.

  4. Aggregate breakup in a contracting nozzle.

    PubMed

    Soos, Miroslav; Ehrl, Lyonel; Bäbler, Matthäus U; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2010-01-05

    The breakup of dense aggregates in an extensional flow was investigated experimentally. The flow was realized by pumping the suspension containing the aggregates through a contracting nozzle. Variation of the cluster mass distribution during the breakage process was measured by small-angle light scattering. Because of the large size of primary particles and the dense aggregate structure image analysis was used to determine the shape and structure of the produced fragments. It was found, that neither aggregate structure, characterized by a fractal dimension d(f) = 2.7, nor shape, characterized by an average aspect ratio equal to 1.5, was affected by breakage. Several passes through the nozzle were required to reach the steady state. This is explained by the radial variation of the hydrodynamic stresses at the nozzle entrance, characterized through computational fluid dynamics, which implies that only the fraction of aggregates whose strength is smaller than the local hydrodynamic stress is broken during one pass through the nozzle. Scaling of the steady-state aggregate size as a function of the hydrodynamic stress was used to determine the aggregate strength.

  5. Clustered long-range transport routes and potential sources of PM2.5 and their chemical characteristics around the Taiwan Strait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tsung-Chang; Yuan, Chung-Shin; Huang, Hu-Ching; Lee, Chon-Lin; Wu, Shui-Ping; Tong, Chuan

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the spatiotemporal variation, chemical characteristics, source apportionment, and their contribution for clustered transport routes of atmospheric fine particle (PM2.5) around the Taiwan Strait. Atmospheric PM2.5 was simultaneously collected at three selected sampling sites around the Taiwan Strait in the years of 2013-2015. Field sampling results showed that atmospheric PM2.5 concentrations varied with the clustered transport routes. Backward trajectory analyses suggested that PM2.5 concentrations under the northerly wind conditions were generally higher than those under the southerly wind conditions. Chemical analysis results showed that the most abundant chemical composition were secondary inorganic aerosols (SO42-, NO3-, and NH4+), natural crustal materials (Mg, Ca, AL, K, and Fe), and anthropogenic metals (Pb, Ni, and Zn). Moreover, high OC/EC ratios of PM2.5 were commonly observed at the west-side site located at the downwind of major stationary sources. Furthermore, primary organic carbons (POC) were always higher than secondary organic carbons (SOC) on both sides of the Taiwan Strait. The concentrations of chemical species from the trajectory NWW (southern China) were much higher than other trajectories. Integrating the results obtained from receptor modeling and backward trajectory simulation indicated that high PM2.5 concentrations were transported from North China, the eastern coast of China, Korea Peninsula, and South Japan. It was mainly attributed to the combination of the relatively elevated emissions from coal burning for space heating, and long-range transport (LONG-RANGE TRANSPORT) of PM2.5 from upwind sources. The source apportionment of secondary aerosols were in order of east-side site > offshore site > west-side site, suggesting that aged secondary particles could be formed during the transportation process by longer range and duration toward the east-side site of Taiwan Strait and the offshore site.

  6. A refined mass distribution of the cluster MACS J0416.1-2403 from a new large set of spectroscopic multiply lensed sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caminha, G. B.; Grillo, C.; Rosati, P.; Balestra, I.; Mercurio, A.; Vanzella, E.; Biviano, A.; Caputi, K. I.; Delgado-Correal, C.; Karman, W.; Lombardi, M.; Meneghetti, M.; Sartoris, B.; Tozzi, P.

    2017-04-01

    We report the spectroscopic confirmation of 22 new multiply lensed sources behind the Hubble Frontier Field (HFF) galaxy cluster MACS J0416.1-2403 (MACS 0416), using archival data from the Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE) on the VLT. Combining with previous spectroscopic measurements of 15 other multiply imaged sources, we have obtained a sample of 102 secure multiple images with measured redshifts, the largest to date in a single strong lensing system. The newly confirmed sources are largely low-luminosity Lyman-α emitters with redshift in the range [ 3.08-6.15 ]. With such a large number of secure constraints, and a significantly improved sample of galaxy members in the cluster core, we have improved our previous strong lensing model and obtained a robust determination of the projected total mass distribution of MACS 0416. We find evidence of three cored dark-matter halos, adding to the known complexity of this merging system. The total mass density profile, as well as the sub-halo population, are found to be in good agreement with previous works. We update and make public the redshift catalog of MACS 0416 from our previous spectroscopic campaign with the new MUSE redshifts. We also release lensing maps (convergence, shear, magnification) in the standard HFF format. Source catalog (full Table A.2) is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/600/A90

  7. Three Candidate Clusters Around High Redshift Radio-loud Sources: MG1 J04426+0202, 3C 068.2, and MS 1426.9+1052

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franck, J. R.; McGaugh, S. S.; Schombert, J. M.

    2015-08-01

    We present near-infrared observations of the environments around three radio-loud sources (MG1 J0442+0202, 3C 068.2, and MS 1426.9+1052) at redshifts z = 1.10, 1.57, and 1.83 (respectively) that are surrounded by near-infrared galaxy overdensities. Overdensities with respect to field counts were found to be significant up to 19σ, with 12 times the expected number of galaxies within the inner regions of the densest proto-cluster. Color-magnitude relations are constructed in Ks, J - Ks, with each candidate cluster exhibiting a feature consistent with the beginnings of a red sequence (RS). Galaxy models based on the redshift of the radio source are used to compare expected CMRs for a given formation epoch with the observed RS of each candidate, and are found to be consistent with an old ({z}f \\gt 5) formation epoch for a few bright, red galaxies on the RS.

  8. Aggregation of Heterogeneously Charged Colloids.

    PubMed

    Dempster, Joshua M; Olvera de la Cruz, Monica

    2016-06-28

    Patchy colloids are attractive as programmable building blocks for metamaterials. Inverse patchy colloids, in which a charged surface is decorated with patches of the opposite charge, are additionally noteworthy as models for heterogeneously charged biological materials such as proteins. We study the phases and aggregation behavior of a single charged patch in an oppositely charged colloid with a single-site model. This single-patch inverse patchy colloid model shows a large number of phases when varying patch size. For large patch sizes we find ferroelectric crystals, while small patch sizes produce cross-linked gels. Intermediate values produce monodisperse clusters and unusual worm structures that preserve finite ratios of area to volume. The polarization observed at large patch sizes is robust under extreme disorder in patch size and shape. We examine phase-temperature dependence and coexistence curves and find that large patch sizes produce polarized liquids, in contrast to mean-field predictions. Finally, we introduce small numbers of unpatched charged colloids. These can either suppress or encourage aggregation depending on their concentration and the size of the patches on the patched colloids. These effects can be exploited to control aggregation and to measure effective patch size.

  9. Colloidal aggregation and dynamics in anisotropic fluids

    PubMed Central

    Mondiot, Frédéric; Botet, Robert; Snabre, Patrick; Mondain-Monval, Olivier; Loudet, Jean-Christophe

    2014-01-01

    We present experiments and numerical simulations to investigate the collective behavior of submicrometer-sized particles immersed in a nematic micellar solution. We use latex spheres with diameters ranging from 190 to 780 nm and study their aggregation properties due to the interplay of the various colloidal forces at work in the system. We found that the morphology of aggregates strongly depends on the particle size, with evidence for two distinct regimes: the biggest inclusions clump together within minutes into either compact clusters or V-like structures that are completely consistent with attractive elastic interactions. On the contrary, the smallest particles form chains elongated along the nematic axis, within comparable timescales. In this regime, Monte Carlo simulations, based on a modified diffusion-limited cluster aggregation model, strongly suggest that the anisotropic rotational Brownian motion of the clusters combined with short-range depletion interactions dominate the system coarsening; elastic interactions no longer prevail. The simulations reproduce the sharp transition between the two regimes on increasing the particle size. We provide reasonable estimates to interpret our data and propose a likely scenario for colloidal aggregation. These results emphasize the growing importance of the diffusion of species at suboptical-wavelength scales and raise a number of fundamental issues. PMID:24715727

  10. Secure data aggregation in wireless sensor networks using homomorphic encryption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Manish; Verma, Shekhar; Lata, Kusum

    2015-04-01

    In a Wireless Sensor Network (WSN), aggregation exploits the correlation between spatially and temporally proximate sensor data to reduce the total data volume to be transmitted to the sink. Mobile agents (MAs) fit into this paradigm, and data can be aggregated and collected by an MA from different sensor nodes using context specific codes. The MA-based data collection suffers due to large size of a typical WSN and is prone to security problems. In this article, homomorphic encryption in a clustered WSN has been proposed for secure and efficient data collection using MAs. The nodes keep encrypted data that are given to an MA for data aggregation tasks. The MA performs all the data aggregation operations upon encrypted data as it migrates between nodes in a tree-like structure in which the nodes are leafs and the cluster head is the root of the tree. It returns and deposits the encrypted aggregated data to the cluster head after traversing through all the intra cluster nodes over a shortest path route. The homomorphic encryption and aggregation processing in encrypted domain makes the data collection process secure. Simulation results confirm the effectiveness of the proposed secure data aggregation mechanism. In addition to security, MA-based mechanism leads to lesser delay and bandwidth requirements.

  11. Dynamics of proteins aggregation. I. Universal scaling in unbounded media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Size; Javidpour, Leili; Shing, Katherine S.; Sahimi, Muhammad

    2016-10-01

    It is well understood that in some cases proteins do not fold correctly and, depending on their environment, even properly-folded proteins change their conformation spontaneously, taking on a misfolded state that leads to protein aggregation and formation of large aggregates. An important factor that contributes to the aggregation is the interactions between the misfolded proteins. Depending on the aggregation environment, the aggregates may take on various shapes forming larger structures, such as protein plaques that are often toxic. Their deposition in tissues is a major contributing factor to many neuro-degenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and prion. This paper represents the first part in a series devoted to molecular simulation of protein aggregation. We use the PRIME, a meso-scale model of proteins, together with extensive discontinuous molecular dynamics simulation to study the aggregation process in an unbounded fluid system, as the first step toward MD simulation of the same phenomenon in crowded cellular environments. Various properties of the aggregates have been computed, including dynamic evolution of aggregate-size distribution, mean aggregate size, number of peptides that contribute to the formation of β sheets, number of various types of hydrogen bonds formed in the system, radius of gyration of the aggregates, and the aggregates' diffusivity. We show that many of such quantities follow dynamic scaling, similar to those for aggregation of colloidal clusters. In particular, at long times the mean aggregate size S(t) grows with time as, S(t) ˜ tz, where z is the dynamic exponent. To our knowledge, this is the first time that the qualitative similarity between aggregation of proteins and colloidal aggregates has been pointed out.

  12. Morphological properties of atmospheric aerosol aggregates

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, C.; Friedlander, S. K.

    2001-01-01

    Ultrafine particles (smaller than about 0.1 μm) are often emitted from combustion and other high-temperature processes in the form of fractal-like aggregates composed of solid nanoparticles. Results of a study of atmospheric aggregates are reported. Particles were collected on transmission electron microscope grids fitted on the last two stages of a single-jet eight-stage low-pressure impactor for periods of a few minutes. Photomicrographs of transmission electron microscope grids from the impactor stages were analyzed to obtain the fractal dimension (Df) and prefactor (A) for aggregates. Df increased from near 1 to above 2 as the number of primary particles making up the aggregates increased from 10 to 180. Total particle concentrations in size ranges roughly equivalent to the low-pressure impactor stages were measured with a mobility analyzer and condensation particle counter. In one set of measurements, the fraction of the particles present as aggregates was about 60% for particles with aerodynamic diameters between 50 and 75 nm and 34% for the range 75 to 120 nm. The total aggregate concentration in the 50- to 120-nm size range was about 400 ml−1. The primary particles that make up atmospheric aggregates are more polydisperse than soot aggregates generated from a single laboratory source, an ethane/oxygen flame. Most measurements were made in the Los Angeles area, where the aggregates may represent a signature for diesel emissions. Rural aggregate concentrations in the size range 50 to 120 nm were less than 1% of the concentrations at urban sites. The data will permit better estimates of atmospheric aggregate residence times, transport, and deposition in the lung, optical extinction, and heterogenous nucleation. PMID:11592995

  13. Morphological properties of atmospheric aerosol aggregates.

    PubMed

    Xiong, C; Friedlander, S K

    2001-10-09

    Ultrafine particles (smaller than about 0.1 microm) are often emitted from combustion and other high-temperature processes in the form of fractal-like aggregates composed of solid nanoparticles. Results of a study of atmospheric aggregates are reported. Particles were collected on transmission electron microscope grids fitted on the last two stages of a single-jet eight-stage low-pressure impactor for periods of a few minutes. Photomicrographs of transmission electron microscope grids from the impactor stages were analyzed to obtain the fractal dimension (D(f)) and prefactor (A) for aggregates. D(f) increased from near 1 to above 2 as the number of primary particles making up the aggregates increased from 10 to 180. Total particle concentrations in size ranges roughly equivalent to the low-pressure impactor stages were measured with a mobility analyzer and condensation particle counter. In one set of measurements, the fraction of the particles present as aggregates was about 60% for particles with aerodynamic diameters between 50 and 75 nm and 34% for the range 75 to 120 nm. The total aggregate concentration in the 50- to 120-nm size range was about 400 ml(-1). The primary particles that make up atmospheric aggregates are more polydisperse than soot aggregates generated from a single laboratory source, an ethane/oxygen flame. Most measurements were made in the Los Angeles area, where the aggregates may represent a signature for diesel emissions. Rural aggregate concentrations in the size range 50 to 120 nm were less than 1% of the concentrations at urban sites. The data will permit better estimates of atmospheric aggregate residence times, transport, and deposition in the lung, optical extinction, and heterogeneous nucleation.

  14. Three-dimensional chemotaxis-driven aggregation of tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Puliafito, Alberto; De Simone, Alessandro; Seano, Giorgio; Gagliardi, Paolo Armando; Di Blasio, Laura; Chianale, Federica; Gamba, Andrea; Primo, Luca; Celani, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    One of the most important steps in tumor progression involves the transformation from a differentiated epithelial phenotype to an aggressive, highly motile phenotype, where tumor cells invade neighboring tissues. Invasion can occur either by isolated mesenchymal cells or by aggregates that migrate collectively and do not lose completely the epithelial phenotype. Here, we show that, in a three-dimensional cancer cell culture, collective migration of cells eventually leads to aggregation in large clusters. We present quantitative measurements of cluster velocity, coalescence rates, and proliferation rates. These results cannot be explained in terms of random aggregation. Instead, a model of chemotaxis-driven aggregation – mediated by a diffusible attractant – is able to capture several quantitative aspects of our results. Experimental assays of chemotaxis towards culture conditioned media confirm this hypothesis. Theoretical and numerical results further suggest an important role for chemotactic-driven aggregation in spreading and survival of tumor cells. PMID:26471876

  15. A comparison of thermal zone aggregation methods

    SciTech Connect

    Dobbs, Justin R.; Hencey, Brandon M.

    2012-12-10

    The impact of increasing energy prices on building operation budgets has fueled demand for more energy-efficient structures. Existing building energy simulation tools generate an immense amount of data yet comparatively little knowledge. This paper introduces a framework that allows aggregation-based model reduction to operate on geometric building information models. The resulting aggregation sequence provides designers with faster simulations and affords insight into complex multi-scale thermal interactions. A comparison of the trade-off between simulation speed and accuracy for three hierarchical cluster partitioning methods concludes the discussion.

  16. Model-free data analysis for source separation based on Non-Negative Matrix Factorization and k-means clustering (NMFk)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vesselinov, V. V.; Alexandrov, B.

    2014-12-01

    The identification of the physical sources causing spatial and temporal fluctuations of state variables such as river stage levels and aquifer hydraulic heads is challenging. The fluctuations can be caused by variations in natural and anthropogenic sources such as precipitation events, infiltration, groundwater pumping, barometric pressures, etc. The source identification and separation can be crucial for conceptualization of the hydrological conditions and characterization of system properties. If the original signals that cause the observed state-variable transients can be successfully "unmixed", decoupled physics models may then be applied to analyze the propagation of each signal independently. We propose a new model-free inverse analysis of transient data based on Non-negative Matrix Factorization (NMF) method for Blind Source Separation (BSS) coupled with k-means clustering algorithm, which we call NMFk. NMFk is capable of identifying a set of unique sources from a set of experimentally measured mixed signals, without any information about the sources, their transients, and the physical mechanisms and properties controlling the signal propagation through the system. A classical BSS conundrum is the so-called "cocktail-party" problem where several microphones are recording the sounds in a ballroom (music, conversations, noise, etc.). Each of the microphones is recording a mixture of the sounds. The goal of BSS is to "unmix'" and reconstruct the original sounds from the microphone records. Similarly to the "cocktail-party" problem, our model-freee analysis only requires information about state-variable transients at a number of observation points, m, where m > r, and r is the number of unknown unique sources causing the observed fluctuations. We apply the analysis on a dataset from the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) site. We identify and estimate the impact and sources are barometric pressure and water-supply pumping effects. We also estimate the

  17. An Ultraviolet X-Ray Laser Source for Core Level Spectroscopy and Dynamics of Metal Cluster/Ceramic Chemistry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    TYPE AND DATES COVERED Final Rpnnrt. 3/1/97 - 5/31/98 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE An Ultraviolet X-ray Laser Source for Core Level Spectroscopy and...DISTRIBUTION CODE 13. ABSTRACT (Maximum 200 words) A99B0722 A titanium sapphire ultrafast laser system was procured and merged with a high repetition rate...pulsed valve to produce higher harmonic light output in a rare gas jet. The ultrafast laser system consists of a seed laser , a regenerative amplifier

  18. Supra-operonic clusters of functionally related genes (SOCs) are a source of horizontal gene co-transfers

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Tin Yau; Lercher, Martin J.

    2017-01-01

    Adaptation of bacteria occurs predominantly via horizontal gene transfer (HGT). While it is widely recognized that horizontal acquisitions frequently encompass multiple genes, it is unclear what the size distribution of successfully transferred DNA segments looks like and what evolutionary forces shape this distribution. Here, we identified 1790 gene family pairs that were consistently co-gained on the same branches across a phylogeny of 53 E. coli strains. We estimated a lower limit of their genomic distances at the time they were transferred to their host genomes; this distribution shows a sharp upper bound at 30 kb. The same gene-pairs can have larger distances (up to 70 kb) in other genomes. These more distant pairs likely represent recent acquisitions via transduction that involve the co-transfer of excised prophage genes, as they are almost always associated with intervening phage-associated genes. The observed distribution of genomic distances of co-transferred genes is much broader than expected from a model based on the co-transfer of genes within operons; instead, this distribution is highly consistent with the size distribution of supra-operonic clusters (SOCs), groups of co-occurring and co-functioning genes that extend beyond operons. Thus, we propose that SOCs form a basic unit of horizontal gene transfer. PMID:28067311

  19. a Chirped Pulse Fourier Transform Microwave Cp-Ftmw Spectrometer with Laser Ablation Source to Search for Actinide-Containing Molecules and Noble Metal Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Frank E.; Gillcrist, David Joseph; Persinger, Thomas D.; Moon, Nicole; Grubbs, G. S., II

    2016-06-01

    Microwave spectroscopic techniques have traditionally been part of the foundation of molecular structure and this conference. Instrumental developments by Brooks Pate and sourcing developments by Steve Cooke on these instruments have allowed for the dawning of a new era in modern microwave spectroscopic techniques. With these advances and the growth of powerful computational approaches, microwave spectroscopists can now search for molecules and/or cluster systems of actinide and noble metal-containing species with increasing certainty in molecular assignment even with the difficulties presented with spin-orbit coupling and relativistic effects. Spectrometer and ablation design will be presented along with any preliminary results on actinide-containing molecules or noble metal clusters or interactions. G. G. Brown, B. C. Dian, K. O. Douglass, S. M. Geyer, S. T. Shipman, B. H. Pate, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79 (2008) 053103-1 - 053103-13 G. S. Grubbs II, C. T. Dewberry, K. C. Etchison, K. E. Kerr, S. A. Cooke, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 78 (2007) 096106-1 - 096106-3

  20. Characterizing treated wastewaters of different industries using clustered fluorescence EEM-PARAFAC and FT-IR spectroscopy: implications for downstream impact and source identification.

    PubMed

    Yang, Liyang; Han, Dae Ho; Lee, Bo-Mi; Hur, Jin

    2015-05-01

    The quantity and spectroscopic features of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in treated wastewaters were studied for up to 57 facilities across 12 industrial categories to evaluate the potential influences of the effluents on downstream ecosystems and the feasibility of spectroscopic techniques in discriminating pollution sources. The average dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration was 3.30±0.70-73.4±14.0 mg L(-1) for each category, high enough to pollute downstream waterbodies. The average specific UV absorbance at 254 nm (SUVA) for each category spanned a broad range between 0.79±0.24 and 5.35±1.41 L(mg m)(-1), suggesting a variable aromaticity of DOM. Fluorescence excitation emission matrix-parallel factor analysis (EEM-PARAFAC) identified four humic-like and two protein-like components. The EEMs were grouped into seven clusters, five of which were dominated by a single PARAFAC component in each cluster. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy revealed notable variations in relative intensities of several characteristic absorbance bands among different wastewaters. The large variability in SUVA, PARAFAC and FT-IR features indicated that the chemical composition of DOM greatly differ among industrial wastewaters, and further implied variable biogeochemical reactivity in downstream waterbodies. The results also suggested the potential of DOM features in discriminating different wastewaters, although the variations within each industrial category were also significant.

  1. Importance of molecular typing in confirmation of the source of a national hepatitis A virus outbreak in Norway and the detection of a related cluster in Germany.

    PubMed

    Guzman-Herrador, Bernardo R; Panning, Marcus; Stene-Johansen, Kathrine; Borgen, Katrine; Einöder-Moreno, Margot; Huzly, Daniela; Jensvoll, Laila; Lange, Heidi; Maassen, Sigrid; Myking, Solveig; Myrmel, Mette; Neumann-Haefelin, Christoph; Nygård, Karin; Wenzel, Jürgen J; Øye, Ann Kristin; Vold, Line

    2015-11-01

    In March 2014, after an increase of notifications of domestically acquired hepatitis A virus infections, an outbreak investigation was launched in Norway. Sequenced-based typing results showed that these cases were associated with a strain that was identical to one causing an ongoing multinational outbreak in Europe linked to frozen mixed berries. Thirty-three confirmed cases with the outbreak strain were notified in Norway from November 2013 to June 2014. Epidemiological evidence and trace-back investigations linked the outbreak to the consumption of a berry mix cake. Identification of the hepatitis A virus outbreak strain in berries from one of the implicated cakes confirmed the cake to be the source. Subsequently, a cluster in Germany linked to the cake was also identified.

  2. Aggregations in Flatworms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liffen, C. L.; Hunter, M.

    1980-01-01

    Described is a school project to investigate aggregations in flatworms which may be influenced by light intensity, temperature, and some form of chemical stimulus released by already aggregating flatworms. Such investigations could be adopted to suit many educational levels of science laboratory activities. (DS)

  3. Unbonded Aggregate Surface Roads

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-01

    are sufficiently angular and rough in texture, thus ensuring mixture stability. A popular asphalt mixture design method called Superpave Level 1...would not pass either of the Superpave aggregate requirements. Table 18 Additional Characteristics for the Fine Fraction Abbreviated Common Name...CBR values when compacted wet of optimum. This is likely attributable to their relatively high permeabilities . For soaked CBR tests, the aggregates

  4. Erosion of dust aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seizinger, A.; Krijt, S.; Kley, W.

    2013-12-01

    Aims: The aim of this work is to gain a deeper insight into how much different aggregate types are affected by erosion. Especially, it is important to study the influence of the velocity of the impacting projectiles. We also want to provide models for dust growth in protoplanetary disks with simple recipes to account for erosion effects. Methods: To study the erosion of dust aggregates we employed a molecular dynamics approach that features a detailed micro-physical model of the interaction of spherical grains. For the first time, the model has been extended by introducing a new visco-elastic damping force, which requires a proper calibration. Afterwards, different sample generation methods were used to cover a wide range of aggregate types. Results: The visco-elastic damping force introduced in this work turns out to be crucial to reproduce results obtained from laboratory experiments. After proper calibration, we find that erosion occurs for impact velocities of 5 ms-1 and above. Though fractal aggregates as formed during the first growth phase are most susceptible to erosion, we observe erosion of aggregates with rather compact surfaces as well. Conclusions: We find that bombarding a larger target aggregate with small projectiles results in erosion for impact velocities as low as a few ms-1. More compact aggregates suffer less from erosion. With increasing projectile size the transition from accretion to erosion is shifted to higher velocities. This allows larger bodies to grow through high velocity collisions with smaller aggregates.

  5. Global optimization of cholic acid aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jójárt, Balázs; Viskolcz, Béla; Poša, Mihalj; Fejer, Szilard N.

    2014-04-01

    In spite of recent investigations into the potential pharmaceutical importance of bile acids as drug carriers, the structure of bile acid aggregates is largely unknown. Here, we used global optimization techniques to find the lowest energy configurations for clusters composed between 2 and 10 cholate molecules, and evaluated the relative stabilities of the global minima. We found that the energetically most preferred geometries for small aggregates are in fact reverse micellar arrangements, and the classical micellar behaviour (efficient burial of hydrophobic parts) is achieved only in systems containing more than five cholate units. Hydrogen bonding plays a very important part in keeping together the monomers, and among the size range considered, the most stable structure was found to be the decamer, having 17 hydrogen bonds. Molecular dynamics simulations showed that the decamer has the lowest dissociation propensity among the studied aggregation numbers.

  6. The Herschel Virgo Cluster Survey. XIX. Physical properties of low luminosity FIR sources at z < 0.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappalardo, Ciro; Bizzocchi, Luca; Fritz, Jacopo; Boselli, Alessandro; Boquien, Mederic; Boissier, Samuel; Baes, Maarten; Ciesla, Laure; Bianchi, Simone; Clemens, Marcel; Viaene, Sebastien; Bendo, George J.; De Looze, Ilse; Smith, Matthew W. L.; Davies, Jonathan

    2016-05-01

    Context. The star formation rate is a crucial parameter for the investigation galaxy evolution. At low redshift the cosmic star formation rate density declines smoothly, and massive active galaxies become passive, reducing their star formation activity. This implies that the bulk of the star formation rate density at low redshift is mainly driven by low mass objects. Aims: We investigate the properties of a sample of low luminosity far-infrared sources selected at 250 μm. We have collected data from ultraviolet to far-infrared in order to perform a multiwavelengths analysis. The main goal is to investigate the correlation between star formation rate, stellar mass, and dust mass for a galaxy population with a wide range in dust content and stellar mass, including the low mass regime that most probably dominates the star formation rate density at low redshift. Methods: We define a main sample of ~800 sources with full spectral energy distribution coverage between 0.15 <λ< 500 μm and an extended sample with ~5000 sources in which we remove the constraints on the ultraviolet and near-infrared bands. We analyze both samples with two different spectral energy distribution fitting methods: MAGPHYS and CIGALE, which interpret a galaxy spectral energy distribution as a combination of different simple stellar population libraries and dust emission templates. Results: In the star formation rate versus stellar mass plane our samples occupy a region included between local spirals and higher redshift star forming galaxies. These galaxies represent the population that at z< 0.5 quenches their star formation activity and reduces their contribution to the cosmic star formation rate density. The subsample of galaxies with the higher masses (M∗> 3 × 1010 M⊙) do not lie on the main sequence, but show a small offset as a consequence of the decreased star formation. Low mass galaxies (M∗< 1 × 1010 M⊙) settle in the main sequence with star formation rate and stellar mass

  7. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in wetland soils under different land uses in a coastal estuary: toxic levels, sources and relationships with soil organic matter and water-stable aggregates.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Rong; Bai, Junhong; Wang, Junjing; Lu, Qiongqiong; Zhao, Qingqing; Cui, Baoshan; Liu, Xinhui

    2014-09-01

    The concentrations of 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were determined in the soils from industrial, wharf, cropland, milldam and natural wetland sites to characterize their distributions, toxic levels and possible sources in the Pearl River Estuary and identify their relationships with soil organic matter (SOM) and water-stable aggregates (WSAs). Our results indicate that the average concentration of total PAHs in this region reached a moderate pollution level, which was higher than that in other larger estuaries in Asia. The average level of total PAHs in industrial soils was 1.2, 1.5, 1.6 and 2.3 times higher than those in soils from wharf, cropland, milldam and natural wetland sites, respectively. Greater accumulation of PAHs occurred in the middle and/or bottom soil layers where 3-ring PAHs were dominant. Industrial soils also exhibited the highest toxic levels with the highest toxic equivalent concentrations of PAHs, followed by wharf and milldam soils, and the cropland and wetland soils had the lowest toxicity. The diagnostic ratios suggested that PAHs primarily originated from biomass and coal combustion at industrial and milldam sites, and petroleum combustion was determined to be the primary source of PAHs at the wharf, cropland and wetland sites. Both 3-ring and 4-ring PAHs in the milldam and wharf soils were significantly positively correlated with the SOM, whereas the 4,5,6-ring PAHs and total PAHs in industrial soils and the 2-ring PAHs in cropland soils were significantly negatively correlated with the SOM. In addition, large WSAs also exhibited a significant positive correlation with PAHs.

  8. Electronic structure transformation in small bare Au clusters as seen by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, T.; Zhang, C.; Björneholm, O.; Mikkelä, M.-H.; Jänkälä, K.; Anin, D.; Urpelainen, S.; Huttula, M.; Tchaplyguine, M.

    2017-01-01

    Free bare gold clusters in the size range from few tens to few hundred atoms (≤1 nm dimensions) have been produced in a beam, and the size-dependent development of their full valence band including the 5d and 6s parts has been mapped ‘on the fly’ by synchrotron-based photoelectron spectroscopy. The Au 4f core level has been also probed, and the cluster-specific Au 4f ionization energies have been used to estimate the cluster size. The recorded in the present work valence spectra of the small clusters are compared with the spectra of the large clusters ( N ∼ 103) created by us using a magnetron-based gas aggregation source. The comparison shows a substantially narrower 5d valence band and the decrease in its splitting for gold clusters in the size range of few hundred atoms and below. Our DFT calculations involving the pseudopotential method show that the 5d band width of the ground state increases with the cluster size and by the size N = 20 becomes comparable with the experimental width of the valence photoelectron spectrum. Similar to the earlier observations on supported clusters we interpret our experimental and theoretical results as due to the undercoordination of a large fraction of atoms in the clusters with N ∼ 102 and below. The consequences of such electronic structure of small gold clusters are discussed in connection with their specific physical and chemical properties related to nanoplasmonics and nanocatalysis.

  9. Cluster Headache

    MedlinePlus

    Cluster headache Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Cluster headaches, which occur in cyclical patterns or clusters, are one of the most painful types of headache. A cluster headache commonly awakens you ...

  10. Collisional Aggregation Due to Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pumir, Alain; Wilkinson, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Collisions between particles suspended in a fluid play an important role in many physical processes. As an example, collisions of microscopic water droplets in clouds are a necessary step in the production of macroscopic raindrops. Collisions of dust grains are also conjectured to be important for planet formation in the gas surrounding young stars and to play a role in the dynamics of sand storms. In these processes, collisions are favored by fast turbulent motions. Here we review recent advances in the understanding of collisional aggregation due to turbulence. We discuss the role of fractal clustering of particles and caustic singularities of their velocities. We also discuss limitations of the Smoluchowski equation for modeling such processes. These advances lead to a semiquantitative understanding on the influence of turbulence on collision rates and point to deficiencies in the current understanding of rainfall and planet formation.

  11. Charged Dust Aggregate Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Lorin; Hyde, Truell

    2015-11-01

    A proper understanding of the behavior of dust particle aggregates immersed in a complex plasma first requires a knowledge of the basic properties of the system. Among the most important of these are the net electrostatic charge and higher multipole moments on the dust aggregate as well as the manner in which the aggregate interacts with the local electrostatic fields. The formation of elongated, fractal-like aggregates levitating in the sheath electric field of a weakly ionized RF generated plasma discharge has recently been observed experimentally. The resulting data has shown that as aggregates approach one another, they can both accelerate and rotate. At equilibrium, aggregates are observed to levitate with regular spacing, rotating about their long axis aligned parallel to the sheath electric field. Since gas drag tends to slow any such rotation, energy must be constantly fed into the system in order to sustain it. A numerical model designed to analyze this motion provides both the electrostatic charge and higher multipole moments of the aggregate while including the forces due to thermophoresis, neutral gas drag, and the ion wakefield. This model will be used to investigate the ambient conditions leading to the observed interactions. This research is funded by NSF Grant 1414523.

  12. Cluster growth modeling of plateau erosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stark, Colin P.

    1994-01-01

    The pattern of erosion of a plateau along an escarpment may be modeled usng cluster growth techniques, recently popularized in models of drainage network evolution. If erosion on the scarp takes place in discrete events at rates subject to local substrate strength, the whole range of behavior is described by a combination of three cluster growth mechanisms: invasion percolation, Eden growth and diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA). These model the relative importance of preexisting substrate strength, background weathering, and seepage weathering and erosion respectively. The rate of seepage processes is determined by the efflux of groundwater at the plateau margin, which in turn is determined by the pressure field in the plateau aquifer. If this process acted alone, it would produce erosion patterns in the form of Laplacian fractals, with groundwater recharge from a distant source, or Poissionian fractals, with groundwater recharge uniform over the plateau. DLA is used to mimic the Laplacian or Poissonian potential field and the corresponding seepage growth process. The scaling structure of clusters grown by pure DLA, invasion percolation, or Eden growth is well known; this study presents a model which combines all three growth mechanisms for the first time. Mixed growth processes create clusters with different scaling properties and morphologies over distinct length scale ranges, and this is demonstrable in natural examples of plateau erosion.

  13. Aggregate and the environment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langer, William H.; Drew, Lawrence J.; Sachs, J.S.

    2004-01-01

    This book is designed to help you understand our aggregate resources-their importance, where they come from, how they are processed for our use, the environmental concerns related to their mining and processing, how those concerns are addressed, and the policies and regulations designed to safeguard workers, neighbors, and the environment from the negative impacts of aggregate mining. We hope this understanding will help prepare you to be involved in decisions that need to be made-individually and as a society-to be good stewards of our aggregate resources and our living planet.

  14. Aggregation kinetics of latex microspheres in alcohol-water media.

    PubMed

    Odriozola, G; Schmitt, A; Callejas-Fernández, J; Hidalgo-Alvarez, R

    2007-06-15

    We report zeta potential and aggregation kinetics data on colloidal latex particles immersed in water-alcohol media. Zeta potential values show absolute maxima for volume fractions of alcohol of 0.10 and 0.05 for ethanol and 1-propanol, respectively. For methanol, no maximum of the absolute value of the zeta potential was found. Aggregation kinetics was studied by means of a single-cluster optical sizing equipment and for alcohol volume fractions ranging from 0 to 0.1. The aggregation processes are induced by adding different potassium bromide concentrations to the samples. We expected to find a slowdown of the overall aggregation kinetics for ethanol and 1-propanol, and no significant effect for methanol, as compared with pure water data. That is, we expected the zeta potential to govern the overall aggregation rate. However, we obtained a general enhancement of the aggregation kinetics for methanol and 1-propanol and a general slowdown of the aggregation rate for ethanol. In addition, aggregation data under ethanol show a slower kinetics for large electrolyte concentration than that obtained for intermediate electrolyte concentration. We think that these anomalous behaviors are linked to layering, changes in hydrophobicity of particle surfaces due to alcohol adsorption, complex ion-water-alcohol-surface structuring, and competition between alcohol-surface adsorption and alcohol-alcohol clustering.

  15. Marine aggregate dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The direction and scope of the Office of Naval Research's Marine Aggregate Dynamics Accelerated Research Initiative will be the topic of an open-house style meeting February 14, 7:30-10:00 P.M. in Ballroom D of the Hyatt Regency New Orleans at the Louisiana Superdome. This meeting is scheduled during the AGU/American Society of Limnology and Oceanography Ocean Sciences Meeting February 12-16 in New Orleans.The critical focus of the ARI is the measurement and modeling of the dynamics of the biological, physical, chemical and molecular processes that drive aggregation and produce aggregates. This new ARI will provide funding in Fiscal Years 1991-1995 to identify and quantify mechanisms that determine the distribution, abundance and size spectrum of aggregated particulate matter in the ocean.

  16. Protein Colloidal Aggregation Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliva-Buisson, Yvette J. (Compiler)

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the pathways and kinetics of protein aggregation to allow accurate predictive modeling of the process and evaluation of potential inhibitors to prevalent diseases including cataract formation, chronic traumatic encephalopathy, Alzheimer's Disease, Parkinson's Disease and others.

  17. Aggregation and Averaging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegel, Irving H.

    The arithmetic processes of aggregation and averaging are basic to quantitative investigations of employment, unemployment, and related concepts. In explaining these concepts, this report stresses need for accuracy and consistency in measurements, and describes tools for analyzing alternative measures. (BH)

  18. Transient shear viscosity of weakly aggregating polystyrene latex dispersions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Rooij, R.; Potanin, A. A.; van den Ende, D.; Mellema, J.

    1994-04-01

    The transient behavior of the viscosity (stress growth) of a weakly aggregating polystyrene latex dispersion after a step from a high shear rate to a lower shear rate has been measured and modeled. Single particles cluster together into spherical fractal aggregates. The steady state size of these aggregates is determined by the shear stresses exerted on the latter by the flow field. The restructuring process taking place when going from a starting situation with monodisperse spherical aggregates to larger monodisperse spherical aggregates is described by the capture of primary fractal aggregates by growing aggregates until a new steady state is reached. It is assumed that the aggregation mechanism is diffusion limited. The model is valid if the radii of primary aggregates Rprim are much smaller than the radii of the growing aggregates. Fitting the model to experimental data at two volume fractions and a number of step sizes in shear rate yielded physically reasonable values of Rprim at fractal dimensions 2.1≤df≤2.2. The latter range is in good agreement with the range 2.0≤df≤2.3 obtained from steady shear results. The experimental data have also been fitted to a numerical solution of the diffusion equation for primary aggregates for a cell model with moving boundary, also yielding 2.1≤df≤2.2. The range for df found from both approaches agrees well with the range df≊2.1-2.2 determined from computer simulations on diffusion-limited aggregation including restructuring or thermal breakup after formation of bonds. Thus a simple model has been put forward which may capture the basic features of the aggregating model dispersion on a microstructural level and leads to physically acceptable parameter values.

  19. A Novel Method to Quantify Soil Aggregate Stability by Measuring Aggregate Bond Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efrat, Rachel; Rawlins, Barry G.; Quinton, John N.; Watts, Chris W.; Whitmore, Andy P.

    2016-04-01

    Soil aggregate stability is a key indicator of soil quality because it controls physical, biological and chemical functions important in cultivated soils. Micro-aggregates are responsible for the long term sequestration of carbon in soil, therefore determine soils role in the carbon cycle. It is thus vital that techniques to measure aggregate stability are accurate, consistent and reliable, in order to appropriately manage and monitor soil quality, and to develop our understanding and estimates of soil as a carbon store to appropriately incorporate in carbon cycle models. Practices used to assess the stability of aggregates vary in sample preparation, operational technique and unit of results. They use proxies and lack quantification. Conflicting results are therefore drawn between projects that do not provide methodological or resultant comparability. Typical modern stability tests suspend aggregates in water and monitor fragmentation upon exposure to an un-quantified amount of ultrasonic energy, utilising a laser granulometer to measure the change in mean weight diameter. In this project a novel approach has been developed based on that of Zhu et al., (2009), to accurately quantify the stability of aggregates by specifically measuring their bond energies. The bond energies are measured operating a combination of calorimetry and a high powered ultrasonic probe, with computable output function. Temperature change during sonication is monitored by an array of probes which enables calculation of the energy spent heating the system (Ph). Our novel technique suspends aggregates in heavy liquid lithium heteropolytungstate, as opposed to water, to avoid exposing aggregates to an immeasurable disruptive energy source, due to cavitation, collisions and clay swelling. Mean weight diameter is measured by a laser granulometer to monitor aggregate breakdown after successive periods of calculated ultrasonic energy input (Pi), until complete dispersion is achieved and bond

  20. Social aggregation as a cooperative game

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilone, Daniele; Guazzini, Andrea

    2011-07-01

    A new approach for the description of phenomena of social aggregation is suggested. On the basis of psychological concepts (as for instance social norms and cultural coordinates), we deduce a general mechanism for social aggregation in which different clusters of individuals can merge according to cooperation among the agents. In their turn, the agents can cooperate or defect according to the clusters' distribution inside the system. The fitness of an individual increases with the size of its cluster, but decreases with the work the individual had to do in order to join it. In order to test the reliability of such a new approach, we introduce a couple of simple toy models with the features illustrated above. We see, from this preliminary study, how cooperation is the most convenient strategy only in the presence of very large clusters, while on the other hand it is not necessary to have one hundred percent of cooperators for reaching a totally ordered configuration with only one megacluster filling the whole system.

  1. Photoionization of molecular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andres, R. P.; Calo, J. M.

    1981-12-01

    An experimental apparatus consisting of a novel multiple expansion cluster source coupled with a molecular beam system and photoionization mass spectrometer has been designed and constructed. This apparatus has been thoroughly tested and preliminary measurements of the growth kinetics of water clusters and the photoionization cross section of the water dimer have been carried out.

  2. Fibronectin Aggregation and Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Ohashi, Tomoo; Erickson, Harold P.

    2011-01-01

    The mechanism of fibronectin (FN) assembly and the self-association sites are still unclear and contradictory, although the N-terminal 70-kDa region (I1–9) is commonly accepted as one of the assembly sites. We previously found that I1–9 binds to superfibronectin, which is an artificial FN aggregate induced by anastellin. In the present study, we found that I1–9 bound to the aggregate formed by anastellin and a small FN fragment, III1–2. An engineered disulfide bond in III2, which stabilizes folding, inhibited aggregation, but a disulfide bond in III1 did not. A gelatin precipitation assay showed that I1–9 did not interact with anastellin, III1, III2, III1–2, or several III1–2 mutants including III1–2KADA. (In contrast to previous studies, we found that the III1–2KADA mutant was identical in conformation to wild-type III1–2.) Because I1–9 only bound to the aggregate and the unfolding of III2 played a role in aggregation, we generated a III2 domain that was destabilized by deletion of the G strand. This mutant bound I1–9 as shown by the gelatin precipitation assay and fluorescence resonance energy transfer analysis, and it inhibited FN matrix assembly when added to cell culture. Next, we introduced disulfide mutations into full-length FN. Three disulfide locks in III2, III3, and III11 were required to dramatically reduce anastellin-induced aggregation. When we tested the disulfide mutants in cell culture, only the disulfide bond in III2 reduced the FN matrix. These results suggest that the unfolding of III2 is one of the key factors for FN aggregation and assembly. PMID:21949131

  3. Household trends in access to improved water sources and sanitation facilities in Vietnam and associated factors: findings from the Multiple Indicator Cluster Surveys, 2000-2011.

    PubMed

    Tuyet-Hanh, Tran Thi; Lee, Jong-Koo; Oh, Juhwan; Van Minh, Hoang; Ou Lee, Chul; Hoan, Le Thi; Nam, You-Seon; Long, Tran Khanh

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite progress made by the Millennium Development Goal (MDG) number 7.C, Vietnam still faces challenges with regard to the provision of access to safe drinking water and basic sanitation. Objective This paper describes household trends in access to improved water sources and sanitation facilities separately, and analyses factors associated with access to improved water sources and sanitation facilities in combination. Design Secondary data from the Vietnam Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey in 2000, 2006, and 2011 were analyzed. Descriptive statistics and tests of significance describe trends over time in access to water and sanitation by location, demographic and socio-economic factors. Binary logistic regressions (2000, 2006, and 2011) describe associations between access to water and sanitation, and geographic, demographic, and socio-economic factors. Results There have been some outstanding developments in access to improved water sources and sanitation facilities from 2000 to 2011. In 2011, the proportion of households with access to improved water sources and sanitation facilities reached 90% and 77%, respectively, meeting the 2015 MDG targets for safe drinking water and basic sanitation set at 88% and 75%, respectively. However, despite these achievements, in 2011, only 74% of households overall had access to combined improved drinking water and sanitation facilities. There were also stark differences between regions. In 2011, only 47% of households had access to both improved water and sanitation facilities in the Mekong River Delta compared with 94% in the Red River Delta. In 2011, households in urban compared to rural areas were more than twice as likely (odds ratio [OR]: 2.2; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.9-2.5) to have access to improved water and sanitation facilities in combination, and households in the highest compared with the lowest wealth quintile were over 40 times more likely (OR: 42.3; 95% CI: 29.8-60.0). Conclusions More efforts

  4. Elevated silver, barium and strontium in antlers, vegetation and soils sourced from CWD cluster areas: do Ag/Ba/Sr piezoelectric crystals represent the transmissible pathogenic agent in TSEs?

    PubMed

    Purdey, Mark

    2004-01-01

    High levels of Silver (Ag), Barium (Ba) and Strontium (Sr) and low levels of copper (Cu) have been measured in the antlers, soils and pastures of the deer that are thriving in the chronic wasting disease (CWD) cluster zones in North America in relation to the areas where CWD and other transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) have not been reported. The elevations of Ag, Ba and Sr were thought to originate from both natural geochemical and artificial pollutant sources--stemming from the common practise of aerial spraying with 'cloud seeding' Ag or Ba crystal nuclei for rain making in these drought prone areas of North America, the atmospheric spraying with Ba based aerosols for enhancing/refracting radar and radio signal communications as well as the spreading of waste Ba drilling mud from the local oil/gas well industry across pastureland. These metals have subsequently bioconcentrated up the foodchain and into the mammals who are dependent upon the local Cu deficient ecosystems. A dual eco-prerequisite theory is proposed on the aetiology of TSEs which is based upon an Ag, Ba, Sr or Mn replacement binding at the vacant Cu/Zn domains on the cellular prion protein (PrP)/sulphated proteoglycan molecules which impairs the capacities of the brain to protect itself against incoming shockbursts of sound and light energy. Ag/Ba/Sr chelation of free sulphur within the biosystem inhibits the viable synthesis of the sulphur dependent proteoglycans, which results in the overall collapse of the Cu mediated conduction of electric signals along the PrP-proteoglycan signalling pathways; ultimately disrupting GABA type inhibitory currents at the synapses/end plates of the auditory/circadian regulated circuitry, as well as disrupting proteoglycan co-regulation of the growth factor signalling systems which maintain the structural integrity of the nervous system. The resulting Ag, Ba, Sr or Mn based compounds seed piezoelectric crystals which incorporate PrP and ferritin into

  5. A new cluster-ion-beam source for secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) using the electrospray of a pure ionic liquid under high vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, Yukio; Saito, Naoaki; Nonaka, Hidehiko; Nakanaga, Taisuke; Ichimura, Shingo

    2010-06-01

    Electrospray characteristics were studied using a pure room-temperature molten salt (i.e., an ionic liquid) at pressures around 10 -5 Pa as well as at atmospheric pressure. The ionic liquid N,N-diethyl-N-methyl-N-(2-methoxyethyl)ammonium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide was tested, which has negligible vapor pressure and high conductivity. During electrospray, the ionic liquid was introduced at a constant flow rate into a stainless-steel capillary (i.d. 30 μm). It was demonstrated that stable electrosprayed currents exceeding ±1 μΑ were continuously produced in both positive and negative modes. The electrosprayed currents in a high vacuum were twice those at atmospheric pressure. It was found that gas pressure rose slightly with increasing electrosprayed currents. Residual gas analysis revealed that gas component at negative mode was different from that at positive mode. Experimental results indicate that vacuum electrospray of pure ionic liquids is applicable to a massive-cluster beam source for SIMS.

  6. De-Confinement in small systems: Clustering of color sources in high multiplicity p¯p collisions at √s = 1.8 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutay, L. J.

    2016-07-01

    It is shown that de-confinement can be achieved in high multiplicity non jet p¯p collisions at √s = 1.8 TeV Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory(FNAL- E735) experiment. In this paper we have analyzed the transverse momentum spectrum in the framework of the clustering of color sources. This frame-work naturally predicts the reduction in the charged particle multiplicity with respect to the value expected from the number of independent strings. Results are presented for both thermodynamic and transport properties. The initial temperature and energy density are obtained from the data via the color reduction factor F(ξ) and the associated string density parameter ξ. The results for he trace anomaly Δ and shear viscosity to entropy density ratio(η/s) are presented. These results confirm our earlier observation that the de-confined state of matter was created in high multiplicity events in p¯p collisions at √s = 1.8 TeV.

  7. Aggregates and Superaggregates of Soot with Four Distinct Fractal Morphologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorensen, C. M.; Kim, W.; Fry, D.; Chakrabarti, A.

    2004-01-01

    Soot formed in laminar diffusion flames of heavily sooting fuels evolves through four distinct growth stages which give rise to four distinct aggregate fractal morphologies. These results were inferred from large and small angle static light scattering from the flames, microphotography of the flames, and analysis of soot sampled from the flames. The growth stages occur approximately over four successive orders of magnitude in aggregate size. Comparison to computer simulations suggests that these four growth stages involve either diffusion limited cluster aggregation or percolation in either three or two dimensions.

  8. Space-Time Clustering of Childhood Leukemia: Evidence of an Association with ETV6-RUNX1 (TEL-AML1) Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Lupatsch, Judith E.; Niggli, Felix; Egger, Matthias; Kuehni, Claudia E.; Spycher, Ben D.

    2017-01-01

    Background Many studies have observed space-time clustering of childhood leukemia (CL) yet few have attempted to elicit etiological clues from such clustering. We recently reported space-time clustering of CL around birth, and now aim to generate etiological hypotheses by comparing clustered and nonclustered cases. We also investigated whether the clustering resulted from many small aggregations of cases or from a few larger clusters. Methods We identified cases of persons born and diagnosed between 1985 and 2014 at age 0–15 years from the Swiss Childhood Cancer Registry. We determined spatial and temporal lags that maximized evidence of clustering based on the Knox test and classified cases born within these lags from another case as clustered. Using logistic regression adjusted for child population density, we determined whether clustering status was associated with age at diagnosis, immunophenotype, cytogenetic subtype, perinatal and socioeconomic characteristics, and pollution sources. Results Analyses included 1,282 cases of which 242 were clustered (born within 1 km and 2 years from another case). Of all investigated characteristics only the t(12;21)(p13;q22) translocation (resulting in ETV6-RUNX1 fusion) differed significantly in prevalence between clustered and nonclustered cases (40% and 25%, respectively; adjusted OR 2.54 [1.52–4.23]; p = 0.003). Spatio-temporal clustering was driven by an excess of aggregations of two or three children rather than by a few large clusters. Conclusion Our findings suggest ETV6-RUNX1 is associated with space-time clustering of CL and are consistent with an infection interacting with that oncogene in early life leading to clinical leukemia. PMID:28129329

  9. Technology meets aggregate

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, C.; Swan, C.

    2007-07-01

    New technology carried out at Tufts University and the University of Massachusetts on synthetic lightweight aggregate has created material from various qualities of fly ash from coal-fired power plants for use in different engineered applications. In pilot scale manufacturing tests an 'SLA' containing 80% fly ash and 20% mixed plastic waste from packaging was produced by 'dry blending' mixed plastic with high carbon fly ash. A trial run was completed to produce concrete masonry unit (CMU) blocks at a full-scale facility. It has been shown that SLA can be used as a partial substitution of a traditional stone aggregate in hot asphalt mix. 1 fig., 2 photos.

  10. CLUSTER CHEMISTRY

    SciTech Connect

    Muetterties, Earl L.

    1980-05-01

    Metal cluster chemistry is one of the most rapidly developing areas of inorganic and organometallic chemistry. Prior to 1960 only a few metal clusters were well characterized. However, shortly after the early development of boron cluster chemistry, the field of metal cluster chemistry began to grow at a very rapid rate and a structural and a qualitative theoretical understanding of clusters came quickly. Analyzed here is the chemistry and the general significance of clusters with particular emphasis on the cluster research within my group. The importance of coordinately unsaturated, very reactive metal clusters is the major subject of discussion.

  11. Aggregates, broccoli and cauliflower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grey, Francois; Kjems, Jørgen K.

    1989-09-01

    Naturally grown structures with fractal characters like broccoli and cauliflower are discussed and compared with DLA-type aggregates. It is suggested that the branching density can be used to characterize the growth process and an experimental method to determine this parameter is proposed.

  12. Simulations of cm-wavelength Sunyaev-Zel'dovich galaxy cluster and point source blind sky surveys and predictions for the RT32/OCRA-f and the Hevelius 100-m radio telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Lew, Bartosz; Kus, Andrzej; Birkinshaw, Mark; Wilkinson, Peter E-mail: Mark.Birkinshaw@bristol.ac.uk E-mail: ajk@astro.uni.torun.pl

    2015-02-01

    We investigate the effectiveness of blind surveys for radio sources and galaxy cluster thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effects (TSZEs) using the four-pair, beam-switched OCRA-f radiometer on the 32-m radio telescope in Poland. The predictions are based on mock maps that include the cosmic microwave background, TSZEs from hydrodynamical simulations of large scale structure formation, and unresolved radio sources. We validate the mock maps against observational data, and examine the limitations imposed by simplified physics. We estimate the effects of source clustering towards galaxy clusters from NVSS source counts around Planck-selected cluster candidates, and include appropriate correlations in our mock maps. The study allows us to quantify the effects of halo line-of-sight alignments, source confusion, and telescope angular resolution on the detections of TSZEs. We perform a similar analysis for the planned 100-m Hevelius radio telescope (RTH) equipped with a 49-beam radio camera and operating at frequencies up to 22 GHz.We find that RT32/OCRA-f will be suitable for small-field blind radio source surveys, and will detect 33{sup +17}{sub −11} new radio sources brighter than 0.87 mJy at 30 GHz in a 1 deg{sup 2} field at > 5σ CL during a one-year, non-continuous, observing campaign, taking account of Polish weather conditions. It is unlikely that any galaxy cluster will be detected at 3σ CL in such a survey. A 60-deg{sup 2} survey, with field coverage of 2{sup 2} beams per pixel, at 15 GHz with the RTH, would find <1.5 galaxy clusters per year brighter than 60 μJy (at 3σ CL), and would detect about 3.4 × 10{sup 4} point sources brighter than 1 mJy at 5σ CL, with confusion causing flux density errors ∼< 2% (20%) in 68% (95%) of the detected sources.A primary goal of the planned RTH will be a wide-area (π sr) radio source survey at 15 GHz. This survey will detect nearly 3 × 10{sup 5} radio sources at 5σ CL down to 1.3 mJy, and tens of galaxy clusters

  13. 12. Interior view of cement and aggregate batch plant showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Interior view of cement and aggregate batch plant showing storage bins. Photographer unknown, c. 1926. Source: Ralph Pleasant. - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  14. Monitoring computational clusters with OVIS.

    SciTech Connect

    Gentile, Ann C.; Brandt, James M.; Wong, M. H.; Pebay, Philippe Pierre

    2006-12-01

    Traditional cluster monitoring approaches consider nodes in singleton, using manufacturer-specified extreme limits as thresholds for failure ''prediction''. We have developed a tool, OVIS, for monitoring and analysis of large computational platforms which, instead, uses a statistical approach to characterize single device behaviors from those of a large number of statistically similar devices. Baseline capabilities of OVIS include the visual display of deterministic information about state variables (e.g., temperature, CPU utilization, fan speed) and their aggregate statistics. Visual consideration of the cluster as a comparative ensemble, rather than as singleton nodes, is an easy and useful method for tuning cluster configuration and determining effects of real-time changes.

  15. De-confinement in small systems: Clustering of color sources in high multiplicity p¯p collisions at s = 1.8TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutay, L. J.; Hirsch, A. S.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Srivastava, B. K.; Pajares, C.

    2015-12-01

    It is shown that de-confinement can be achieved in high multiplicity nonjet p¯p collisions at s = 1.8TeV Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL- E735) experiment. Previously, the evidence for de-confinement was demonstrated by the constant freeze out energy density in high multiplicity events. In this paper, we use the same but analyze the transverse momentum spectrum in the framework of the clustering of color sources. This frame work naturally predicts the reduction in the charged particle multiplicity with respect to the value expected from the number of independent strings. The charged particle pseudorapidity densities in the range 7.0 ≤≤ 26.0 are considered. Results are presented for both thermodynamic and transport properties. The initial temperature and energy density are obtained from the data via the color reduction factor F(ξ) and the associated string density parameter ξ. The Bjorken ideal fluid description of the QGP, when modified by the color reduction factor and the trace anomaly Δ is in remarkable agreement with the lattice quantum chromo dynamics (LQCD) simulations. The energy density (ɛ/T4) ˜ 11.5 for ˜ 25.0 is close to the value for 0-10% central events in Au+Au collisions at sNN = 200GeV. The shear viscosity to entropy density ratio (η/s) is ˜0.2 at the transition temperature of 167MeV. The result for the trace anomaly Δ is in excellent agreement with LQCD simulations. These results confirm our earlier observation that the de-confined state of matter was created in high multiplicity events in p¯p collisions at s = 1.8TeV.

  16. Animal source foods have a positive impact on the primary school test scores of Kenyan schoolchildren in a cluster-randomised, controlled feeding intervention trial.

    PubMed

    Hulett, Judie L; Weiss, Robert E; Bwibo, Nimrod O; Galal, Osman M; Drorbaugh, Natalie; Neumann, Charlotte G

    2014-03-14

    Micronutrient deficiencies and suboptimal energy intake are widespread in rural Kenya, with detrimental effects on child growth and development. Sporadic school feeding programmes rarely include animal source foods (ASF). In the present study, a cluster-randomised feeding trial was undertaken to determine the impact of snacks containing ASF on district-wide, end-term standardised school test scores and nutrient intake. A total of twelve primary schools were randomly assigned to one of three isoenergetic feeding groups (a local plant-based stew (githeri) with meat, githeri plus whole milk or githeri with added oil) or a control group receiving no intervention feeding. After the initial term that served as baseline, children were fed at school for five consecutive terms over two school years from 1999 to 2001. Longitudinal analysis was used controlling for average energy intake, school attendance, and baseline socio-economic status, age, sex and maternal literacy. Children in the Meat group showed significantly greater improvements in test scores than those in all the other groups, and the Milk group showed significantly greater improvements in test scores than the Plain Githeri (githeri+oil) and Control groups. Compared with the Control group, the Meat group showed significant improvements in test scores in Arithmetic, English, Kiembu, Kiswahili and Geography. The Milk group showed significant improvements compared with the Control group in test scores in English, Kiswahili, Geography and Science. Folate, Fe, available Fe, energy per body weight, vitamin B₁₂, Zn and riboflavin intake were significant contributors to the change in test scores. The greater improvements in test scores of children receiving ASF indicate improved academic performance, which can result in greater academic achievement.

  17. Data analysis as a source of variability of the HLA-peptide multimer assay: from manual gating to automated recognition of cell clusters.

    PubMed

    Gouttefangeas, Cécile; Chan, Cliburn; Attig, Sebastian; Køllgaard, Tania T; Rammensee, Hans-Georg; Stevanović, Stefan; Wernet, Dorothee; thor Straten, Per; Welters, Marij J P; Ottensmeier, Christian; van der Burg, Sjoerd H; Britten, Cedrik M

    2015-05-01

    Multiparameter flow cytometry is an indispensable method for assessing antigen-specific T cells in basic research and cancer immunotherapy. Proficiency panels have shown that cell sample processing, test protocols and data analysis may all contribute to the variability of the results obtained by laboratories performing ex vivo T cell immune monitoring. In particular, analysis currently relies on a manual, step-by-step strategy employing serial gating decisions based on visual inspection of one- or two-dimensional plots. It is therefore operator dependent and subjective. In the context of continuing efforts to support inter-laboratory T cell assay harmonization, the CIMT Immunoguiding Program organized its third proficiency panel dedicated to the detection of antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells by HLA-peptide multimer staining. We first assessed the contribution of manual data analysis to the variability of reported T cell frequencies within a group of laboratories staining and analyzing the same cell samples with their own reagents and protocols. The results show that data analysis is a source of variation in the multimer assay outcome. To evaluate whether an automated analysis approach can reduce variability of proficiency panel data, we used a hierarchical statistical mixture model to identify cell clusters. Challenges for automated analysis were the need to process non-standardized data sets from multiple centers, and the fact that the antigen-specific cell frequencies were very low in most samples. We show that this automated method can circumvent difficulties inherent to manual gating strategies and is broadly applicable for experiments performed with heterogeneous protocols and reagents.

  18. Synchrony, aggregation and multi-area eigenanalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ramaswamy, G.N.; Verghese, G.C.; Rouco, L.; DeMarco, C.L.; Vialas, C.

    1995-11-01

    This paper explores synchrony, a recently introduced generalization of the concept of slow-coherency, and outlines how it can form the basis for efficient construction of dynamic equivalents by aggregation. The authors describe a novel approach for selecting the inter-area modes that are to be represented by the aggregate model. A clustering algorithm for recognizing approximately synchrony is presented, and improvements over the standard slow-coherency recognition algorithm are noted. Using for illustrate a 23-generator power system model with 325 state variables, the paper demonstrates the effectiveness of a synchrony-based approach to decomposing the eigenanalysis of the electromechanical modes, separating the computation of inter-area and intra-area modes in the style of multi-area Selective Modal Analysis.

  19. Tau protein and tau aggregation inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Bulic, Bruno; Pickhardt, Marcus; Mandelkow, Eva-Maria; Mandelkow, Eckhard

    2010-01-01

    Alzheimer disease is characterized by pathological aggregation of two proteins, tau and Abeta-amyloid, both of which are considered to be toxic to neurons. In this review we summarize recent advances on small molecule inhibitors of protein aggregation with emphasis on tau, with activities mediated by the direct interference of self-assembly. The inhibitors can be clustered in several compound classes according to their chemical structure, with subsequent description of the structure-activity relationships, showing that hydrophobic interactions are prevailing. The description is extended to the pharmacological profile of the compounds in order to evaluate their drug-likeness, with special attention to toxicity and bioavailability. The collected data indicate that following the improvements of the in vitro inhibitory potencies, the consideration of the in vivo pharmacokinetics is an absolute prerequisite for the development of compounds suitable for a transfer from bench to bedside.

  20. Aggregation of phospholipid vesicles by water-soluble polymers.

    PubMed Central

    Meyuhas, D; Nir, S; Lichtenberg, D

    1996-01-01

    Water-soluble polymers such as dextran and polyethylene glycol are known to induce aggregation and size growth of phospholipid vesicles. The present study addresses the dependence of these processes on vesicle size and concentration, polymer molecular weight, temperature, and compartmentalization of the vesicles and polymers, using static and dynamic light scattering. Increasing the molecular weight of the polymers resulted in a reduction of the concentration of polymer needed for induction of aggregation of small unilamellar vesicles. The aggregation was fully reversible (by dilution), within a few seconds, up to a polymer concentration of at least 20 wt %. At relatively low phosphatidylcholine (PC) concentrations (up to approximately 1 mM), increasing the PC concentration resulted in faster kinetics of aggregation and reduced the threshold concentration of polymer required for rapid aggregation (CA). At higher PC concentrations, CA was only slightly dependent on the concentration of PC and was approximately equal to the overlapping concentration of the polymer (C*). The extent of aggregation was similar at 37 and 4 degrees C. Aggregation of large unilamellar vesicles required a lower polymer concentration, probably because aggregation occurs in a secondary minimum (without surface contact). In contrast to experiments in which the polymers were added directly to the vesicles, dialysis of the vesicles against polymer-containing solutions did not induce aggregation. Based on this result, it appears that exclusion of polymer from the hydration sphere of vesicles and the consequent depletion of polymer molecules from clusters of aggregated vesicles play the central role in the induction of reversible vesicle aggregation. The results of all the other experiments are consistent with this conclusion. PMID:8913598

  1. Gene clusters reflecting macrodomain structure respond to nucleoid perturbations.

    PubMed

    Scolari, Vittore F; Bassetti, Bruno; Sclavi, Bianca; Lagomarsino, Marco Cosentino

    2011-03-01

    Focusing on the DNA-bridging nucleoid proteins Fis and H-NS, and integrating several independent experimental and bioinformatic data sources, we investigate the links between chromosomal spatial organization and global transcriptional regulation. By means of a novel multi-scale spatial aggregation analysis, we uncover the existence of contiguous clusters of nucleoid-perturbation sensitive genes along the genome, whose expression is affected by a combination of topological DNA state and nucleoid-shaping protein occupancy. The clusters correlate well with the macrodomain structure of the genome. The most significant of them lay symmetrically at the edges of the Ter macrodomain and involve all of the flagellar and chemotaxis machinery, in addition to key regulators of biofilm formation, suggesting that the regulation of the physical state of the chromosome by the nucleoid proteins plays an important role in coordinating the transcriptional response leading to the switch between a motile and a biofilm lifestyle.

  2. Structure and dynamic properties of colloidal asphaltene aggregates.

    PubMed

    Eyssautier, Joëlle; Frot, Didier; Barré, Loïc

    2012-08-21

    The abundant literature involving asphaltene often contrasts dynamic measurements of asphaltene solutions, highlighting the presence of small particle sizes between 1 and 3 nm, with static scattering measurements, revealing larger aggregates with a radius of gyration around 7 nm. This work demonstrates the complementary use of the two techniques: a homemade dynamic light scattering setup adapted to dark and fluorescent solutions, and small-angle X-ray and neutron scattering. Asphaltene solutions in toluene are prepared by a centrifugation separation to investigate asphaltene polydispersity. These experiments demonstrate that asphaltene solutions are made of Brownian colloidal aggregates. The hydrodynamic radii of asphaltene aggregates are between 5 and 10 nm, while their radii of gyration are roughly comparable, between 3.7 and 7.7 nm. A small fraction of asphaltenes with hydrodynamic and gyration radii around 40 nm is found in the pellet of the centrifugation tube. The fractal character of the largest clusters is observed from small angle scattering nearly on a decade length scale. Previous results on aggregation mechanisms are confirmed ( Eyssautier, J., et al. J. Phys. Chem. B 2011 , 115 , 6827 ): nanoaggregates of 3 nm radius, and with hydrodynamic properties also frequently illustrated in the literature, aggregate to form fractal clusters with a dispersity of aggregation number.

  3. Applied Electric Fields and the Aggregation of Highly Charged Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemzer, Louis; Flanders, Bret; Sorensen, Christopher

    2011-03-01

    The abnormal aggregation of misfolded proteins is associated with the onset of Alzheimer's disease, along with other neurodegenerative disorders, and there is increasing evidence that prefibrillar clusters, rather than fully-formed amyloid plaques, are primarily responsible. Therefore, weakly invasive methods, such as dynamic light scattering, which can probe the size distribution and structure factor of early nuclei and proto-aggregate clusters, can serve an important role in understanding this process, and may lead to insights regarding future therapeutic interventions. Here we study a highly charged model protein, lysozyme, under the influence of applied AC and DC fields in an effort to evaluate general models of protein aggregation, including the coarse-grained ``patchy protein'' method of visualizing charge heterogeneity. This anisotropy in the interprotein interaction can lead to frustrated crystalline order, resulting in low density phases. Dynamic measurements of the size distribution and structure factor can reveal local ordering, hierarchical clustering, and fractal properties of the aggregates. Early results show that applied fields affect early cluster growth by modulating local protein and counterion concentrations, in addition to their influence on protein alignment.

  4. Simulation on the aggregation process of spherical particle confined in a spherical shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Xu, J. J.; Zhang, L.

    2016-04-01

    The aggregation process of spherical particles confined in a spherical shell was studied by using a diffusion-limited cluster-cluster aggregation (DLCA) model. The influence of geometrical confinement and wetting-like properties of the spherical shell walls on the particle concentration profile, aggregate structure and aggregation kinetics had been explored. The results show that there will be either depletion or absorption particles near the shell walls depending on the wall properties. It is observed that there are four different types of density distribution which can be realized by modifying the property of the inner or outer spherical shell wall. In addition, the aggregate structure will become more compact in the confined spherical shell comparing to bulk system with the same particle volume fraction. The analysis on the aggregation kinetics indicates that geometrical confinement will promote the aggregation process by reducing the invalid movement of the small aggregates and by constraining the movement of those large aggregates. Due to the concave geometrical characteristic of the outer wall of the spherical shell, its effects on the aggregating kinetics and the structure of the formed aggregates are more evident than those of the inner wall. This study will provide some instructive information of controlling the density distribution of low-density porous polymer hollow spherical shells and helps to predict gel structures developed in confined geometries.

  5. Fractality à la carte: a general particle aggregation model.

    PubMed

    Nicolás-Carlock, J R; Carrillo-Estrada, J L; Dossetti, V

    2016-01-19

    In nature, fractal structures emerge in a wide variety of systems as a local optimization of entropic and energetic distributions. The fractality of these systems determines many of their physical, chemical and/or biological properties. Thus, to comprehend the mechanisms that originate and control the fractality is highly relevant in many areas of science and technology. In studying clusters grown by aggregation phenomena, simple models have contributed to unveil some of the basic elements that give origin to fractality, however, the specific contribution from each of these elements to fractality has remained hidden in the complex dynamics. Here, we propose a simple and versatile model of particle aggregation that is, on the one hand, able to reveal the specific entropic and energetic contributions to the clusters' fractality and morphology, and, on the other, capable to generate an ample assortment of rich natural-looking aggregates with any prescribed fractal dimension.

  6. Study of interstellar extinction by aggregate dust model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharjee, C.; Das, H. S.; Sen, A. K.

    Extinction generally occurs whenever electromagnetic radiation propagates through a medium containing small particles. The spectral dependence of extinction, or extinction curve, is a function of the composition, structure and size distribution of the particles. The study of interstellar extinction is important because they provide essential information for understanding the properties of the dust. In this work we have considered the aggregate dust model to interpret the extinction efficiency (Qext) of interstellar dust in the wavelength range 0.11-3.4 µm. Using Superposition T-matrix code with Ballistic Cluster-Cluster Aggregate (BCCA) aggregate having 64 number of monomers with graphite, astronomical silicates and amorphous carbon, the normalized extinction efficiency has been calculated for a well defined size distribution within a size range 0.001 to 0.077 micron of extinction near wavelength 2175 Å. The calculated normalized extinction efficiency curve is well matched with observed extinction efficiency.

  7. Sans study of asphaltene aggregation

    SciTech Connect

    Overfield, R.E.; Sheu, E.Y.; Sinha, S.K.; Liang, K.S. )

    1988-06-01

    The colloidal properties of asphaltenes have long been recognized from peculiarities in their solubility and colligative properties. A layered micellar model or asphaltenes was proposed by others in which a highly condensed alkyl aromatic formed the central part, and molecules of decreasingly aromatic character (resins) clustered around them. Numerous studies, based on a variety of techniques such as ultracentrifugation and electron microscopy indicated a particulate nature for asphaltenes with size 20-40 A diameter. Others have proposed a refined model based on x-ray diffraction and small angle scattering. In this model, interactions between flat sheets of condensed aromatic rings form the central ''crystallite'' part of a spherical particle with the outer part being comprised of the aliphatic positions of the same molecules. These particles are bunched together with some degree of entanglement into ''micelles''. Concentration and solvent dependent radii of gyration, ranging from 30-50 A were reported. The aggregation creates a good deal of uncertainty as to the true molecular size or weight of asphaltenes. Neutron scattering offers novel contrast relative to light scattering (refractive index) and x-ray scattering (electron density). This is because the scattering length of proton is negative, whereas that from deuterium and other nuclei such as C, S, O, and N are positive. Thus by replacing hydrogen with deuterium in either the solvent or the scatterer the contrast can be varied, and different parts of the molecule can be highlighted.

  8. Microbial properties of soil aggregates created by earthworms and other factors: spherical and prismatic soil aggregates from unreclaimed post-mining sites.

    PubMed

    Frouz, J; Krištůfek, V; Livečková, M; van Loo, D; Jacobs, P; Van Hoorebeke, L

    2011-01-01

    Soil aggregates between 2 and 5 mm from 35- and 45-year-old unreclaimed post-mining sites near Sokolov (Czech Republic) were divided into two groups: spherical and prismatic. X-ray tomography indicated that prismatic aggregates consisted of fragments of claystone bonded together by amorphous clay and roots while spherical aggregates consisted of a clay matrix and organic fragments of various sizes. Prismatic aggregates were presumed to be formed by plant roots and physical processes during weathering of Tertiary mudstone, while earthworms were presumed to contribute to the formation of spherical aggregates. The effects of drying and rewetting and glucose addition on microbial respiration, microbial biomass, and counts of bacteria in these aggregates were determined. Spherical aggregates contained a greater percentage of C and N and a higher C-to-N ratio than prismatic ones. The C content of the particulate organic matter was also higher in the spherical than in the prismatic aggregates. Although spherical aggregates had a higher microbial respiration and biomass, the growth of microbial biomass in spherical aggregates was negatively correlated with initial microbial biomass, indicating competition between bacteria. Specific respiration was negatively correlated with microbial biomass. Direct counts of bacteria were higher in spherical than in prismatic aggregates. Bacterial numbers were more stable in the center than in the surface layers of the aggregates. Transmission electron microscopy indicated that bacteria often occurred as individual cells in prismatic aggregates but as small clusters of cells in spherical aggregates. Ratios of colony forming units (cultivatable bacteria) to direct counts were higher in spherical than in prismatic aggregates. Spherical aggregates also contained faster growing bacteria.

  9. Tracking protein aggregate interactions

    PubMed Central

    Bartz, Jason C; Nilsson, K Peter R

    2011-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils share a structural motif consisting of highly ordered β-sheets aligned perpendicular to the fibril axis.1, 2 At each fibril end, β-sheets provide a template for recruiting and converting monomers.3 Different amyloid fibrils often co-occur in the same individual, yet whether a protein aggregate aids or inhibits the assembly of a heterologous protein is unclear. In prion disease, diverse prion aggregate structures, known as strains, are thought to be the basis of disparate disease phenotypes in the same species expressing identical prion protein sequences.4–7 Here we explore the interactions reported to occur when two distinct prion strains occur together in the central nervous system. PMID:21597336

  10. Zooplankton Aggregations Near Sills

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-09-30

    frequency echo-sounder system. This data were supplemented with multi-net (BIONESS) trawls, bongo nets, and otter trawls (operated by D. Mackas and group...side. The general composition of the zooplankton aggregations can be deduced from the relative levels of the three echo-sounder frequencies; krill ...Nov. 20th, 2002. Krill layer is evident at 66 – 90 m, coincident with BIONESS trawl through the region. 3 Figure 2 shows a comparison between

  11. GSFC Contributions to the NATO X-ray Astronomy Institute, Erice, July 1979. [X-ray spectra of supernova remants, galactic X-ray sources, active galactic nuclei, and clusters of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, S. S.; Mushotzky, R. F.

    1979-01-01

    An overview of X-ray astronomical spectroscopy in general is presented and results obtained by HEAO 1 and 2 as well as earlier spacecraft are examined. Particular emphasis is given to the spectra of supernova remnants; galactic binary X-ray sources, cataclysmic variables, bulges, pulsars, and stars; the active nuclei of Seyfert 1 galaxy, BL Lac, and quasars; the diffuse X-ray background; and galactic clusters.

  12. Proteins aggregation and human diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Chin-Kun

    2015-04-01

    Many human diseases and the death of most supercentenarians are related to protein aggregation. Neurodegenerative diseases include Alzheimer's disease (AD), Huntington's disease (HD), Parkinson's disease (PD), frontotemporallobar degeneration, etc. Such diseases are due to progressive loss of structure or function of neurons caused by protein aggregation. For example, AD is considered to be related to aggregation of Aβ40 (peptide with 40 amino acids) and Aβ42 (peptide with 42 amino acids) and HD is considered to be related to aggregation of polyQ (polyglutamine) peptides. In this paper, we briefly review our recent discovery of key factors for protein aggregation. We used a lattice model to study the aggregation rates of proteins and found that the probability for a protein sequence to appear in the conformation of the aggregated state can be used to determine the temperature at which proteins can aggregate most quickly. We used molecular dynamics and simple models of polymer chains to study relaxation and aggregation of proteins under various conditions and found that when the bending-angle dependent and torsion-angle dependent interactions are zero or very small, then protein chains tend to aggregate at lower temperatures. All atom models were used to identify a key peptide chain for the aggregation of insulin chains and to find that two polyQ chains prefer anti-parallel conformation. It is pointed out that in many cases, protein aggregation does not result from protein mis-folding. A potential drug from Chinese medicine was found for Alzheimer's disease.

  13. Ion aggregation in high salt solutions. II. Spectral graph analysis of water hydrogen-bonding network and ion aggregate structures.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jun-Ho; Cho, Minhaeng

    2014-10-21

    Graph theory in mathematics and computer science is the study of graphs that are structures with pairwise connections between any objects. Here, the spectral graph theory and molecular dynamics simulation method are used to describe both morphological variation of ion aggregates in high salt solutions and ion effects on water hydrogen-bonding network structure. From the characteristic value analysis of the adjacency matrices that are graph theoretical representations of ion clusters, ion networks, and water H-bond structures, we obtained the ensemble average eigenvalue spectra revealing intricate connectivity and topology of ion aggregate structure that can be classified as either ion cluster or ion network. We further show that there is an isospectral relationship between the eigenvalue spectra of ion networks in high KSCN solutions and those of water H-bonding networks. This reveals the isomorphic relationship between water H-bond structure and ion-ion network structure in KSCN solution. On the other hand, the ion clusters formed in high NaCl solutions are shown to be graph-theoretically and morphologically different from the ion network structures in KSCN solutions. These observations support the bifurcation hypothesis on large ion aggregate growth mechanism via either ion cluster or ion network formation. We thus anticipate that the present spectral graph analyses of ion aggregate structures and their effects on water H-bonding network structures in high salt solutions can provide important information on the specific ion effects on water structures and possibly protein stability resulting from protein-water interactions.

  14. Self-aggregation in scaled principal component space

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Chris H.Q.; He, Xiaofeng; Zha, Hongyuan; Simon, Horst D.

    2001-10-05

    Automatic grouping of voluminous data into meaningful structures is a challenging task frequently encountered in broad areas of science, engineering and information processing. These data clustering tasks are frequently performed in Euclidean space or a subspace chosen from principal component analysis (PCA). Here we describe a space obtained by a nonlinear scaling of PCA in which data objects self-aggregate automatically into clusters. Projection into this space gives sharp distinctions among clusters. Gene expression profiles of cancer tissue subtypes, Web hyperlink structure and Internet newsgroups are analyzed to illustrate interesting properties of the space.

  15. Aggregation-fragmentation model of robust concentration gradient formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saunders, Timothy E.

    2015-02-01

    Concentration gradients of signaling molecules are essential for patterning during development and they have been observed in both unicellular and multicellular systems. In subcellular systems, clustering of the signaling molecule has been observed. We develop a theoretical model of cluster-mediated concentration gradient formation based on the Becker-Döring equations of aggregation-fragmentation processes. We show that such a mechanism produces robust concentration gradients on realistic time and spatial scales so long as the process of clustering does not significantly stabilize the signaling molecule. Finally, we demonstrate that such a model is applicable to the pom1p subcellular gradient in fission yeast.

  16. Generic model for tunable colloidal aggregation in multidirectional fields.

    PubMed

    Kogler, Florian; Velev, Orlin D; Hall, Carol K; Klapp, Sabine H L

    2015-10-07

    Based on Brownian Dynamics computer simulations in two dimensions we investigate aggregation scenarios of colloidal particles with directional interactions induced by multiple external fields. To this end we propose a model which allows continuous change in the particle interactions from point-dipole-like to patchy-like (with four patches). We show that, as a result of this change, the non-equilibrium aggregation occurring at low densities and temperatures transforms from conventional diffusion-limited cluster aggregation (DLCA) to slippery DLCA involving rotating bonds; this is accompanied by a pronounced change of the underlying lattice structure of the aggregates from square-like to hexagonal ordering. Increasing the temperature we find a transformation to a fluid phase, consistent with results of a simple mean-field density functional theory.

  17. Convective Self-Aggregation in Numerical Simulations: A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wing, Allison A.; Emanuel, Kerry; Holloway, Christopher E.; Muller, Caroline

    2017-02-01

    Organized convection in the tropics occurs across a range of spatial and temporal scales and strongly influences cloud cover and humidity. One mode of organization found is "self-aggregation," in which moist convection spontaneously organizes into one or several isolated clusters despite spatially homogeneous boundary conditions and forcing. Self-aggregation is driven by interactions between clouds, moisture, radiation, surface fluxes, and circulation, and occurs in a wide variety of idealized simulations of radiative-convective equilibrium. Here we provide a review of convective self-aggregation in numerical simulations, including its character, causes, and effects. We describe the evolution of self-aggregation including its time and length scales and the physical mechanisms leading to its triggering and maintenance, and we also discuss possible links to climate and climate change.

  18. Multivalent scaffolds induce galectin-3 aggregation into nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Candace K; Wolfenden, Mark L; Nangia-Makker, Pratima; Michel, Anna K; Raz, Avraham

    2014-01-01

    Summary Galectin-3 meditates cell surface glycoprotein clustering, cross linking, and lattice formation. In cancer biology, galectin-3 has been reported to play a role in aggregation processes that lead to tumor embolization and survival. Here, we show that lactose-functionalized dendrimers interact with galectin-3 in a multivalent fashion to form aggregates. The glycodendrimer–galectin aggregates were characterized by dynamic light scattering and fluorescence microscopy methodologies and were found to be discrete particles that increased in size as the dendrimer generation was increased. These results show that nucleated aggregation of galectin-3 can be regulated by the nucleating polymer and provide insights that improve the general understanding of the binding and function of sugar-binding proteins. PMID:25161713

  19. Determination of the dynamic elastic constants of recycled aggregate concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsoumani, A. A.; Barkoula, N.-M.; Matikas, T. E.

    2015-03-01

    Nowadays, construction and demolition waste constitutes a major portion of the total solid waste production in the world. Due to both environmental and economical reasons, an increasing interest concerning the use of recycled aggregate to replace aggregate from natural sources is generated. This paper presents an investigation on the properties of recycled aggregate concrete. Concrete mixes are prepared using recycled aggregates at a substitution level between 0 and 100% of the total coarse aggregate. The influence of this replacement on strengthened concrete's properties is being investigated. The properties estimated are: density and dynamic modulus of elasticity at the age of both 7 and 28 days. Also, flexural strength of 28 days specimens is estimated. The determination of the dynamic elastic modulus was made using the ultrasonic pulse velocity method. The results reveal that the existence of recycled aggregates affects the properties of concrete negatively; however, in low levels of substitution the influence of using recycled aggregates is almost negligible. Concluding, the controlled use of recycled aggregates in concrete production may help solve a vital environmental issue apart from being a solution to the problem of inadequate concrete aggregates.

  20. Ion aggregation in high salt solutions. V. Graph entropy analyses of ion aggregate structure and water hydrogen bonding network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jun-Ho; Cho, Minhaeng

    2016-05-01

    Dissolved ions in water tend to form polydisperse ion aggregates such as ion pairs, relatively compact ion clusters, and even spatially extended ion networks with increasing salt concentration. Combining molecular dynamics simulation and graph theoretical analysis methods, we recently studied morphological structures of ion aggregates with distinctively different characteristics. They can be distinguished from each other by calculating various spectral graph theoretical properties such as eigenvalues and eigenvectors of adjacency matrices of ion aggregates and water hydrogen-bonding networks, minimum path lengths, clustering coefficients, and degree distributions. Here, we focus on percolation and graph entropic properties of ion aggregates and water hydrogen-bonding networks in high salt solutions. Ion network-forming K+ and SCN- ions at high concentrations show a percolating behavior in their aqueous solutions, but ion cluster-forming ions in NaCl solutions do not show such a transition from isolated ion aggregates to percolating ion-water mixture morphology. Despite that the ion aggregate structures are strikingly different for either cluster- or network-forming ions in high salt solutions, it is interesting that the water structures remain insensitive to the electrostatic properties, such as charge densities and polydentate properties, of dissolved ions, and morphological structures of water H-bonding networks appear to be highly robust regardless of the nature and concentration of salt. We anticipate that the present graph entropy analysis results would be of use in understanding a variety of anomalous behaviors of interfacial water around biomolecules as well as electric conductivities of high electrolyte solutions.

  1. Copper-triggered aggregation of ubiquitin.

    PubMed

    Arnesano, Fabio; Scintilla, Simone; Calò, Vincenza; Bonfrate, Elena; Ingrosso, Chiara; Losacco, Maurizio; Pellegrino, Teresa; Rizzarelli, Enrico; Natile, Giovanni

    2009-09-16

    Neurodegenerative disorders share common features comprising aggregation of misfolded proteins, failure of the ubiquitin-proteasome system, and increased levels of metal ions in the brain. Protein aggregates within affected cells often contain ubiquitin, however no report has focused on the aggregation propensity of this protein. Recently it was shown that copper, differently from zinc, nickel, aluminum, or cadmium, compromises ubiquitin stability and binds to the N-terminus with 0.1 micromolar affinity. This paper addresses the role of copper upon ubiquitin aggregation. In water, incubation with Cu(II) leads to formation of spherical particles that can progress from dimers to larger conglomerates. These spherical oligomers are SDS-resistant and are destroyed upon Cu(II) chelation or reduction to Cu(I). In water/trifluoroethanol (80:20, v/v), a mimic of the local decrease in dielectric constant experienced in proximity to a membrane surface, ubiquitin incubation with Cu(II) causes time-dependent changes in circular dichroism and Fourier-transform infrared spectra, indicative of increasing beta-sheet content. Analysis by atomic force and transmission electron microscopy reveals, in the given order, formation of spherical particles consistent with the size of early oligomers detected by gel electrophoresis, clustering of these particles in straight and curved chains, formation of ring structures, growth of trigonal branches from the rings, coalescence of the trigonal branched structures in a network. Notably, none of these ubiquitin aggregates was positive to tests for amyloid and Cu(II) chelation or reduction produced aggregate disassembly. The early formed Cu(II)-stabilized spherical oligomers, when reconstituted in 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) liposomes and in POPC planar bilayers, form annular and pore-like structures, respectively, which are common to several neurodegenerative disorders including Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, amyotrophic

  2. Exact solutions for mass-dependent irreversible aggregations.

    PubMed

    Son, Seung-Woo; Christensen, Claire; Bizhani, Golnoosh; Grassberger, Peter; Paczuski, Maya

    2011-10-01

    We consider the mass-dependent aggregation process (k+1)X→X, given a fixed number of unit mass particles in the initial state. One cluster is chosen proportional to its mass and is merged into one, either with k neighbors in one dimension, or--in the well-mixed case--with k other clusters picked randomly. We find the same combinatorial exact solutions for the probability to find any given configuration of particles on a ring or line, and in the well-mixed case. The mass distribution of a single cluster exhibits scaling laws and the finite-size scaling form is given. The relation to the classical sum kernel of irreversible aggregation is discussed.

  3. Refining aggregate exposure: example using parabens.

    PubMed

    Cowan-Ellsberry, Christina E; Robison, Steven H

    2009-12-01

    The need to understand and estimate quantitatively the aggregate exposure to ingredients used broadly in a variety of product types continues to grow. Currently aggregate exposure is most commonly estimated by using a very simplistic approach of adding or summing the exposures from all the individual product types in which the chemical is used. However, the more broadly the ingredient is used in related consumer products, the more likely this summation will result in an unrealistic estimate of exposure because individuals in the population vary in their patterns of product use including co-use and non-use. Furthermore the ingredient may not be used in all products of a given type. An approach is described for refining this aggregate exposure using data on (1) co-use and non-use patterns of product use, (2) extent of products in which the ingredient is used and (3) dermal penetration and metabolism. This approach and the relative refinement in the aggregate exposure from incorporating these data is illustrated using methyl, n-propyl, n-butyl and ethyl parabens, the most widely used preservative system in personal care and cosmetic products. When these refining factors were used, the aggregate exposure compared to the simple addition approach was reduced by 51%, 58%, 90% and 92% for methyl, n-propyl, n-butyl and ethyl parabens, respectively. Since biomonitoring integrates all sources and routes of exposure, the estimates using this approach were compared to available paraben biomonitoring data. Comparison to the 95th percentile of these data showed that these refined estimates were still conservative by factors of 2-92. All of our refined estimates of aggregate exposure are less than the ADI of 10mg/kg/day for parabens.

  4. The effect of recycled concrete aggregate properties on the bond strength between RCA concrete and steel reinforcement

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, L. West, J.S.; Tighe, S.L.

    2011-10-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence that replacing natural coarse aggregate with recycled concrete aggregate (RCA) has on concrete bond strength with reinforcing steel. Two sources of RCA were used along with one natural aggregate source. Numerous aggregate properties were measured for all aggregate sources. Two types of concrete mixture proportions were developed replacing 100% of the natural aggregate with RCA. The first type maintained the same water-cement ratios while the second type was designed to achieve the same compressive strengths. Beam-end specimens were tested to determine the relative bond strength of RCA and natural aggregate concrete. On average, natural aggregate concrete specimens had bond strengths that were 9 to 19% higher than the equivalent RCA specimens. Bond strength and the aggregate crushing value seemed to correlate well for all concrete types.

  5. Cluster headache

    MedlinePlus

    Histamine headache; Headache - histamine; Migrainous neuralgia; Headache - cluster; Horton's headache; Vascular headache - cluster ... be related to the body's sudden release of histamine (chemical in the body released during an allergic ...

  6. The influence of erythrocyte aggregation on induced platelet aggregation.

    PubMed

    Ott, C; Lardi, E; Schulzki, T; Reinhart, W H

    2010-01-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) affect platelet aggregation in flowing blood (primary hemostasis). We tested the hypothesis that RBC aggregation could influence platelet aggregation. RBC aggregation was altered in vitro by: (i) changing plasma aggregatory properties with 3.7 g% dextran 40 (D40), 3.0 g% dextran 70 (D70) or 1.55 g% dextran 500 (D500); (ii) changing RBC aggregatory properties by incubating RBCs in 50 mU/ml neuraminidase for 60 min (reduction of the surface sialic acid content, thus reducing electrostatic repulsion) and subsequent RBC resuspension in platelet rich plasma (PRP) containing 1 g% dextran 70. RBC aggregation was assessed with the sedimentation rate (ESR). Platelet aggregation was measured: (i) in flowing whole blood with a platelet function analyzer PFA-100(R), which simulates in vivo conditions with RBCs flowing in the center and platelets along the wall, where they adhere to collagen and aggregate; and (ii) in a Chrono-log 700 Aggregometer, which measures changes of impedance by platelet aggregation in whole blood or changes in light transmission in PRP. We found that RBC aggregation increased with increasing molecular weight of dextran (ESR: 4 +/- 3 mm/h, 34 +/- 14 mm/h and 89 +/- 23 mm/hfor D40, D70 and D500, respectively, p < 0.0001) and with neuraminidase-treated RBCs (76 +/- 27 mm/h vs 27 +/- 8 mm/h, respectively, p < 0.0001). Platelet aggregation measured in whole blood under flow conditions (PFA-100) and without flow (Chronolog Aggregometer) was not affected by RBC aggregation. Our data suggest that RBC aggregation does not affect platelet aggregation in vitro and plays no role in primary hemostasis.

  7. The Thermal Structural Transition of α-Crystallin Inhibits the Heat Induced Self-Aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Maulucci, Giuseppe; Papi, Massimiliano; Arcovito, Giuseppe; De Spirito, Marco

    2011-01-01

    -crystallin, the major constituent of human lens, is a member of the heat-shock proteins family and it is known to have a quaternary structural transition at . The presence of calcium ions and/or temperature changes induce supramolecular self-aggregation, a process of relevance in the cataractogenesis. Here we investigate the potential effect of the bovine -crystallin's structural transition on the self-aggregation process. Along all the temperatures investigated, aggregation proceeds by forming intermediate molecular assemblies that successively aggregate in clusters. The final morphology of the aggregates, above and below , is similar, but the aggregation kinetics are completely different. The size of the intermediate molecular assemblies, and their repulsive energy barrier show a marked increase while crossing . Our results highlight the key role of heat modified form of -crystallin in protecting from aggregation and preserving the transparency of the lens under hyperthermic conditions. PMID:21573059

  8. Structure of Viral Aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barr, Stephen; Luijten, Erik

    2010-03-01

    The aggregation of virus particles is a particular form of colloidal self-assembly, since viruses of a give type are monodisperse and have identical, anisotropic surface charge distributions. In small-angle X-ray scattering experiments, the Qbeta virus was found to organize in different crystal structures in the presence of divalent salt and non-adsorbing polymer. Since a simple isotropic potential cannot explain the occurrence of all observed phases, we employ computer simulations to investigate how the surface charge distribution affects the virus interactions. Using a detailed model of the virus particle, we find an asymmetric ion distribution around the virus which gives rise to the different phases observed.

  9. Meaningful Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Sanfilippo, Antonio P.; Calapristi, Augustin J.; Crow, Vernon L.; Hetzler, Elizabeth G.; Turner, Alan E.

    2004-05-26

    We present an approach to the disambiguation of cluster labels that capitalizes on the notion of semantic similarity to assign WordNet senses to cluster labels. The approach provides interesting insights on how document clustering can provide the basis for developing a novel approach to word sense disambiguation.

  10. Frequency, size, and localization of bacterial aggregates on bean leaf surfaces.

    PubMed

    Monier, J-M; Lindow, S E

    2004-01-01

    Using epifluorescence microscopy and image analysis, we have quantitatively described the frequency, size, and spatial distribution of bacterial aggregates on leaf surfaces of greenhouse-grown bean plants inoculated with the plant-pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae strain B728a. Bacterial cells were not randomly distributed on the leaf surface but occurred in a wide range of cluster sizes, ranging from single cells to over 10(4) cells per aggregate. The average cluster size increased through time, and aggregates were more numerous and larger when plants were maintained under conditions of high relative humidity levels than under dry conditions. The large majority of aggregates observed were small (less than 100 cells), and aggregate sizes exhibited a strong right-hand-skewed frequency distribution. While large aggregates are not frequent on a given leaf, they often accounted for the majority of cells present. We observed that up to 50% of cells present on a leaf were located in aggregates containing 10(3) cells or more. Aggregates were associated with several different anatomical features of the leaf surface but not with stomates. Aggregates were preferentially associated with glandular trichomes and veins. The biological and ecological significance of aggregate formation by epiphytic bacteria is discussed.

  11. HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE Near-infrared and Optical Imaging of Faint Radio Sources in the Distant Cluster CL 0939+4713

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smail, Ian; Morrison, G.; Gray, M. E.; Owen, F. N.; Ivison, R. J.; Kneib, J.-P.; Ellis, R. S.

    1999-11-01

    We present deep Hubble Space Telescope Near-Infrared Camera and Multiobject Spectrograph (NICMOS) and Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) optical imaging of a small region in the core of the distant rich cluster Cl 0939+4713 (z=0.41). We compare the optical and near-infrared morphologies of cluster members and find apparent small-scale optical structures within the galaxies that are absent in the near-infrared. We conclude that strong dust obscuration is a common feature in the late-type galaxies in distant clusters. We then concentrate on a sample of 10 faint radio galaxies lying within our NICMOS field and selected from a very deep 1.4 GHz VLA map of the cluster with a 1 σ flux limit of 9 μJy. Using published data we focus on the spectral properties of the eight radio-selected cluster members and show that these comprise a large fraction of the poststarburst population in the cluster. The simplest interpretation of the radio emission from these galaxies is that they are currently forming massive stars, contradicting their classification as poststarburst systems based on the optical spectra. We suggest that this star formation is hidden from view in the optical by the same obscuring dust that is apparent in our comparison on the optical and near-infrared morphologies of these galaxies. We caution that even in the rest-frame optical the effects of dust cannot be ignored when comparing samples of distant galaxies to low-redshift systems, particularly if dust is as prevalent in distant galaxies as appears to be the case in our study.

  12. Ion aggregation in high salt solutions. IV. Graph-theoretical analyses of ion aggregate structure and water hydrogen bonding network.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jun-Ho; Cho, Minhaeng

    2015-09-14

    Ions in high salt solutions form a variety of ion aggregates, from ion pairs to clusters and networks. Their influences on water hydrogen bonding (H-bonding) network structures have long been of great interest. Recently, we have shown that the morphological structures of ion aggregates can be analyzed by using a spectral graph analysis theory, where each ion cluster or ion network is represented by a properly defined graph with edges and vertices. Here, to further examine the network properties of ion aggregates and water H-bonding networks in high salt solutions, we consider a few representative graph-theoretical descriptors: clustering coefficient, minimum path length, global efficiency, and degree distribution of ion aggregates. From the molecular dynamics trajectories, these graph theoretical properties of ion aggregates and water structures in NaCl and kosmotropic solutions are calculated and shown to be strongly dependent on the two types of ion aggregate structures, i.e., ion cluster and ion network. Ion clusters in high NaCl solutions exhibit typical behaviors of scale free network. The corresponding graph theoretical properties of ion networks in high KSCN solutions are notably different from those of NaCl ion clusters and furthermore they are very similar to those of water hydrogen-bonding network. The present graph-theoretical analysis results indicate that the high solubility limits of KSCN and other ion-network-forming salts might originate from their ability to form a large scale morphological network that can be intertwined with co-existing water H-bonding network. Furthermore, it is shown that the graph-theoretical properties of water H-bonding network structures do not strongly depend on the nature of dissolved ions nor on the morphological structures of ion aggregates, indicating that water's H-bonding interaction and network-forming capability are highly robust. We anticipate that the present graph-theoretical analysis results of high salt

  13. Ion aggregation in high salt solutions. IV. Graph-theoretical analyses of ion aggregate structure and water hydrogen bonding network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jun-Ho; Cho, Minhaeng

    2015-09-01

    Ions in high salt solutions form a variety of ion aggregates, from ion pairs to clusters and networks. Their influences on water hydrogen bonding (H-bonding) network structures have long been of great interest. Recently, we have shown that the morphological structures of ion aggregates can be analyzed by using a spectral graph analysis theory, where each ion cluster or ion network is represented by a properly defined graph with edges and vertices. Here, to further examine the network properties of ion aggregates and water H-bonding networks in high salt solutions, we consider a few representative graph-theoretical descriptors: clustering coefficient, minimum path length, global efficiency, and degree distribution of ion aggregates. From the molecular dynamics trajectories, these graph theoretical properties of ion aggregates and water structures in NaCl and kosmotropic solutions are calculated and shown to be strongly dependent on the two types of ion aggregate structures, i.e., ion cluster and ion network. Ion clusters in high NaCl solutions exhibit typical behaviors of scale free network. The corresponding graph theoretical properties of ion networks in high KSCN solutions are notably different from those of NaCl ion clusters and furthermore they are very similar to those of water hydrogen-bonding network. The present graph-theoretical analysis results indicate that the high solubility limits of KSCN and other ion-network-forming salts might originate from their ability to form a large scale morphological network that can be intertwined with co-existing water H-bonding network. Furthermore, it is shown that the graph-theoretical properties of water H-bonding network structures do not strongly depend on the nature of dissolved ions nor on the morphological structures of ion aggregates, indicating that water's H-bonding interaction and network-forming capability are highly robust. We anticipate that the present graph-theoretical analysis results of high salt

  14. Stormy weather in galaxy clusters

    PubMed

    Burns

    1998-04-17

    Recent x-ray, optical, and radio observations coupled with particle and gas dynamics numerical simulations reveal an unexpectedly complex environment within clusters of galaxies, driven by ongoing accretion of matter from large-scale supercluster filaments. Mergers between clusters and continuous infall of dark matter and baryons from the cluster periphery produce long-lived "stormy weather" within the gaseous cluster atmosphere-shocks, turbulence, and winds of more than 1000 kilometers per second. This weather may be responsible for shaping a rich variety of extended radio sources, which in turn act as "barometers" and "anemometers" of cluster weather.

  15. About the Clusters Program

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Environmental Technology Innovation Clusters Program advises cluster organizations, encourages collaboration between clusters, tracks U.S. environmental technology clusters, and connects EPA programs to cluster needs.

  16. An Extensive Census of Hubble Space Telescope Counterparts to Chandra X-Ray Sources in the Globular Cluster 47 Tucanae. II. Time Series and Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmonds, Peter D.; Gilliland, Ronald L.; Heinke, Craig O.; Grindlay, Jonathan E.

    2003-10-01

    We report time series and variability information for the optical identifications of X-ray sources in 47 Tucanae reported in Paper I (at least 22 cataclysmic variables [CVs] and 29 active binaries). The radial distribution of the CVs is indistinguishable from that of the millisecond pulsars (MSPs) detected by Freire et al. A study of the eight CVs with secure orbital periods (two obtained from the Chandra study of Grindlay et al.) shows that the 47 Tuc CVs have fainter accretion disks, in the V band, than field CVs with similar periods. These faint disks and the faint absolute magnitudes (MV) of the 47 Tuc CVs suggests they have low accretion rates. One possible explanation is that the 47 Tuc objects may be a more representative sample of CVs, down to our detection threshold, than the CVs found in the field (where many low accretion rate systems are believed to be undiscovered), showing the advantages of deep globular cluster observations. The median FX/Fopt value for the 47 Tuc CVs is higher than that of all known classes of field CV, partly because of the faint MV values and partly because of the relatively high X-ray luminosities (LX). The latter are only seen in DQ Her systems in the field, but the 47 Tuc CVs are much fainter optically than most field DQ Her's. Previous work by Edmonds et al. has shown that the four brightest CVs in NGC 6397 have optical spectra and broadband colors that are consistent with DQ Her's having lower than average accretion rates. Some combination of magnetic behavior and low accretion rates may be able to explain our observations, but the results at present are ambiguous, since no class of field CV has distributions of both LX and MV that are consistent with those of the 47 Tuc CVs. The radial distribution of the X-ray detected active binaries is indistinguishable from that of the much larger sample of optical variables (eclipsing and contact binaries and BY Dra variables) detected in previous Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2

  17. Aggregated Indexing of Biomedical Time Series Data.

    PubMed

    Woodbridge, Jonathan; Mortazavi, Bobak; Sarrafzadeh, Majid; Bui, Alex A T

    2012-09-01

    Remote and wearable medical sensing has the potential to create very large and high dimensional datasets. Medical time series databases must be able to efficiently store, index, and mine these datasets to enable medical professionals to effectively analyze data collected from their patients. Conventional high dimensional indexing methods are a two stage process. First, a superset of the true matches is efficiently extracted from the database. Second, supersets are pruned by comparing each of their objects to the query object and rejecting any objects falling outside a predetermined radius. This pruning stage heavily dominates the computational complexity of most conventional search algorithms. Therefore, indexing algorithms can be significantly improved by reducing the amount of pruning. This paper presents an online algorithm to aggregate biomedical times series data to significantly reduce the search space (index size) without compromising the quality of search results. This algorithm is built on the observation that biomedical time series signals are composed of cyclical and often similar patterns. This algorithm takes in a stream of segments and groups them to highly concentrated collections. Locality Sensitive Hashing (LSH) is used to reduce the overall complexity of the algorithm, allowing it to run online. The output of this aggregation is used to populate an index. The proposed algorithm yields logarithmic growth of the index (with respect to the total number of objects) while keeping sensitivity and specificity simultaneously above 98%. Both memory and runtime complexities of time series search are improved when using aggregated indexes. In addition, data mining tasks, such as clustering, exhibit runtimes that are orders of magnitudes faster when run on aggregated indexes.

  18. Characterization of Aggregate Size in Taxus Suspension Cell Culture

    PubMed Central

    Kolewe, Martin E.; Henson, Michael A.; Roberts, Susan C.

    2015-01-01

    Plant cells grow as aggregates in suspension culture, but little is known about the dynamics of aggregation, and no routine methodology exists to measure aggregate size. In this study, we evaluate several different methods to characterize aggregate size in Taxus suspension cultures, in which aggregate diameters range from 50 μm to 2000 μm, including filtration and image analysis, and develop a novel method using a specially equipped Coulter counter system. We demonstrate the suitability of this technology to measure plant cell culture aggregates, and show that it can be reliably used to measure total biomass accumulation compared to standard methods such as dry weight. Furthermore, we demonstrate that all three methods can be used to measure an aggregate size distribution, but that the Coulter counter is more reliable and much faster, and also provides far better resolution. While absolute measurements of aggregate size differ based on the three evaluation techniques, we show that linear correlations are sufficient to account for these differences (R2 > 0.99). We then demonstrate the utility of the novel Coulter counter methodology by monitoring the dynamics of a batch process and find that the mean aggregate size increases by 55% during the exponential growth phase, but decreases during stationary phase. The results indicate that the Coulter counter method can be routinely used for advanced process characterization, particularly to study the relationship between aggregate size and secondary metabolite production, as well as a source of reliable experimental data for modeling aggregation dynamics in plant cell culture. PMID:20217417

  19. Holographic characterization of protein aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chen; Zhong, Xiao; Ruffner, David; Stutt, Alexandra; Philips, Laura; Ward, Michael; Grier, David

    Holographic characterization directly measures the size distribution of subvisible protein aggregates in suspension and offers insights into their morphology. Based on holographic video microscopy, this analytical technique records and interprets holograms of individual aggregates in protein solutions as they flow down a microfluidic channel, without requiring labeling or other exceptional sample preparation. The hologram of an individual protein aggregate is analyzed in real time with the Lorenz-Mie theory of light scattering to measure that aggregate's size and optical properties. Detecting, counting and characterizing subvisible aggregates proceeds fast enough for time-resolved studies, and lends itself to tracking trends in protein aggregation arising from changing environmental factors. No other analytical technique provides such a wealth of particle-resolved characterization data in situ. Holographic characterization promises accelerated development of therapeutic protein formulations, improved process control during manufacturing, and streamlined quality assurance during storage and at the point of use. Mrsec and MRI program of the NSF, Spheryx Inc.

  20. Confinement-dependent localization of diffusing aggregates in cellular geometries.

    PubMed

    Keramati, Mahdi Rezaei; Wasnik, Vaihbav; Ping, Liyan; Das, Dibyendu; Emberly, Eldon

    2015-01-01

    Confinement has a strong influence on diffusing nano-sized clusters. In particular, biomolecular aggregates within the shell-like confining space of a bacterial cell have been shown to display a variety of localization patterns, from being midcell to the poles. How does the confining space determine where the aggregate will localize? Here, using Monte Carlo simulations we have calculated the equilibrium spatial distribution of fixed-sized clusters diffusing in spherocylindrical shells. We find that localization to the poles depends strongly on shell thickness and the size of the cluster. Compared to being at midcell, polar clusters can be more bent and hence have higher energy, but they also can have a greater number of defects and hence have more entropy. Under certain conditions this can lead to polar clusters having a lower free energy than at midcell, favoring localization to the poles. Our findings suggest possible localization selection mechanisms within shell-like geometries that can arise purely from cluster confinement.

  1. Effect of surface properties of elastomer colloids on their coalescence and aggregation kinetics.

    PubMed

    Gauer, Cornelius; Wu, Hua; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2009-10-20

    We study the aggregation kinetics of two elastomer colloids with similar bulk polymer properties but with different surface charge groups in order to understand the role of the surface properties in particle coalescence during aggregation. It is confirmed that clusters of the elastomer particles stabilized purely by ionic surfactants coalesce in both reaction-limited and diffusion-limited aggregation (RLCA and DLCA) regimes and that the coalescence is independent of the coagulant type. On the other hand, clusters formed by elastomer particles stabilized by charged polymer end groups, which are fixed on the particle surface, are fractal objects with a fractal dimension of 1.7 in the DLCA and 2.1 in the RLCA regime. This indicates insignificant cluster coalescence during aggregation, most likely due to a hindrance effect of the fixed charges.

  2. Aggregate model of cometary dust: an application to comet Levy 1990XX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, H. S.; Das, S. R.; Paul, T.; Suklabaidya, A.; Sen, A. K.

    2008-09-01

    In the present work, the light-scattering properties of comet Levy 1990XX are studied through simulations using Ballistic Particle-Cluster Aggregation (BPCA) or Ballistic Cluster-Cluster Aggregation (BCCA) aggregates of up to 128 spherical monomers of different compositions (e.g. silicates, carbonaceous materials etc.) and the best-fitting theoretical polarization curve is generated using the SUPERPOSITION T-MATRIX code. The best-fitting refractive indices coming out from the present analysis show silicate behaviour when monomer radius is am = 0.12μm and provide excellent results on the maximum and negative degrees of linear polarization at a single wavelength λ = 0.485μm for BCCA aggregates.

  3. Floating ice-algal aggregates below melting arctic sea ice.

    PubMed

    Assmy, Philipp; Ehn, Jens K; Fernández-Méndez, Mar; Hop, Haakon; Katlein, Christian; Sundfjord, Arild; Bluhm, Katrin; Daase, Malin; Engel, Anja; Fransson, Agneta; Granskog, Mats A; Hudson, Stephen R; Kristiansen, Svein; Nicolaus, Marcel; Peeken, Ilka; Renner, Angelika H H; Spreen, Gunnar; Tatarek, Agnieszka; Wiktor, Jozef

    2013-01-01

    During two consecutive cruises to the Eastern Central Arctic in late summer 2012, we observed floating algal aggregates in the melt-water layer below and between melting ice floes of first-year pack ice. The macroscopic (1-15 cm in diameter) aggregates had a mucous consistency and were dominated by typical ice-associated pennate diatoms embedded within the mucous matrix. Aggregates maintained buoyancy and accumulated just above a strong pycnocline that separated meltwater and seawater layers. We were able, for the first time, to obtain quantitative abundance and biomass estimates of these aggregates. Although their biomass and production on a square metre basis was small compared to ice-algal blooms, the floating ice-algal aggregates supported high levels of biological activity on the scale of the individual aggregate. In addition they constituted a food source for the ice-associated fauna as revealed by pigments indicative of zooplankton grazing, high abundance of naked ciliates, and ice amphipods associated with them. During the Arctic melt season, these floating aggregates likely play an important ecological role in an otherwise impoverished near-surface sea ice environment. Our findings provide important observations and measurements of a unique aggregate-based habitat during the 2012 record sea ice minimum year.

  4. Reduction in soil aggregation in response to dust emission processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swet, Nitzan; Katra, Itzhak

    2016-09-01

    Dust emission by aeolian (wind) soil erosion depends on the topsoil properties of the source area, especially on the nature of the aggregates where most dust particles are held. Although the key role of soil aggregates in dust emission, the response of soil aggregation to aeolian processes and its implications for dust emission remain unknown. This study focuses on aggregate size distribution (ASD) analyses before and after in-situ aeolian experiments in semiarid loess soils that are associated with dust emission. Wind tunnel simulations show that particulate matter (PM) emission and saltation rates depend on the initial ASD and shear velocity. Under all initial ASD conditions, the content of saltator-sized aggregates (63-250 μm) increased by 10-34% due to erosion of macro-aggregates (> 500 μm), resulting in a higher size ratio (SR) between the saltators and macro-aggregates following the aeolian erosion. The results revealed that the saltator production increases significantly for soils that are subjected to short-term (anthropogenic) disturbance of the topsoil. The findings highlight a decrease in soil aggregation for all initial ASD's in response to aeolian erosion, and consequently its influence on the dust emission potential. Changes in ASD should be considered as a key parameter in dust emission models of complex surfaces.

  5. Stem Cells in Aggregate Form to Enhance Chondrogenesis in Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Sridharan, BanuPriya; Lin, Staphany M.; Hwu, Alexander T.; Laflin, Amy D.; Detamore, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    There are a variety of exciting hydrogel technologies being explored for cartilage regenerative medicine. Our overall goal is to explore whether using stem cells in an aggregate form may be advantageous in these applications. 3D stem cell aggregates hold great promise as they may recapitulate the in vivo skeletal tissue condensation, a property that is not typically observed in 2D culture. We considered two different stem cell sources, human umbilical cord Wharton’s jelly cells (hWJCs, currently being used in clinical trials) and rat bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (rBMSCs). The objective of the current study was to compare the influence of cell phenotype, aggregate size, and aggregate number on chondrogenic differentiation in a generic hydrogel (agarose) platform. Despite being differing cell sources, both rBMSC and hWJC aggregates were consistent in outperforming cell suspension control groups in biosynthesis and chondrogenesis. Higher cell density impacted biosynthesis favorably, and the number of aggregates positively influenced chondrogenesis. Therefore, we recommend that investigators employing hydrogels consider using cells in an aggregate form for enhanced chondrogenic performance. PMID:26719986

  6. A source-attractor approach to network detection of radiation sources

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Qishi; Barry, M. L..; Grieme, M.; Sen, Satyabrata; Rao, Nageswara S; Brooks, Richard R

    2016-01-01

    Radiation source detection using a network of detectors is an active field of research for homeland security and defense applications. We propose Source-attractor Radiation Detection (SRD) method to aggregate measurements from a network of detectors for radiation source detection. SRD method models a potential radiation source as a magnet -like attractor that pulls in pre-computed virtual points from the detector locations. A detection decision is made if a sufficient level of attraction, quantified by the increase in the clustering of the shifted virtual points, is observed. Compared with traditional methods, SRD has the following advantages: i) it does not require an accurate estimate of the source location from limited and noise-corrupted sensor readings, unlike the localizationbased methods, and ii) its virtual point shifting and clustering calculation involve simple arithmetic operations based on the number of detectors, avoiding the high computational complexity of grid-based likelihood estimation methods. We evaluate its detection performance using canonical datasets from Domestic Nuclear Detection Office s (DNDO) Intelligence Radiation Sensors Systems (IRSS) tests. SRD achieves both lower false alarm rate and false negative rate compared to three existing algorithms for network source detection.

  7. Fractal structure of asphaltene aggregates.

    PubMed

    Rahmani, Nazmul H G; Dabros, Tadeusz; Masliyah, Jacob H

    2005-05-15

    A photographic technique coupled with image analysis was used to measure the size and fractal dimension of asphaltene aggregates formed in toluene-heptane solvent mixtures. First, asphaltene aggregates were examined in a Couette device and the fractal-like aggregate structures were quantified using boundary fractal dimension. The evolution of the floc structure with time was monitored. The relative rates of shear-induced aggregation and fragmentation/restructuring determine the steady-state floc structure. The average floc structure became more compact or more organized as the floc size distribution attained steady state. Moreover, the higher the shear rate is, the more compact the floc structure is at steady state. Second, the fractal dimensions of asphaltene aggregates were also determined in a free-settling test. The experimentally determined terminal settling velocities and characteristic lengths of the aggregates were utilized to estimate the 2D and 3D fractal dimensions. The size-density fractal dimension (D(3)) of the asphaltene aggregates was estimated to be in the range from 1.06 to 1.41. This relatively low fractal dimension suggests that the asphaltene aggregates are highly porous and very tenuous. The aggregates have a structure with extremely low space-filling capacity.

  8. Aggregation dynamics of rigid polyelectrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tom, Anvy Moly; Rajesh, R.; Vemparala, Satyavani

    2016-01-01

    Similarly charged polyelectrolytes are known to attract each other and aggregate into bundles when the charge density of the polymers exceeds a critical value that depends on the valency of the counterions. The dynamics of aggregation of such rigid polyelectrolytes are studied using large scale molecular dynamics simulations. We find that the morphology of the aggregates depends on the value of the charge density of the polymers. For values close to the critical value, the shape of the aggregates is cylindrical with height equal to the length of a single polyelectrolyte chain. However, for larger values of charge, the linear extent of the aggregates increases as more and more polymers aggregate. In both the cases, we show that the number of aggregates decrease with time as power laws with exponents that are not numerically distinguishable from each other and are independent of charge density of the polymers, valency of the counterions, density, and length of the polyelectrolyte chain. We model the aggregation dynamics using the Smoluchowski coagulation equation with kernels determined from the molecular dynamics simulations and justify the numerically obtained value of the exponent. Our results suggest that once counterions condense, effective interactions between polyelectrolyte chains short-ranged and the aggregation of polyelectrolytes are diffusion-limited.

  9. Data Clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagstaff, Kiri L.

    2012-03-01

    On obtaining a new data set, the researcher is immediately faced with the challenge of obtaining a high-level understanding from the observations. What does a typical item look like? What are the dominant trends? How many distinct groups are included in the data set, and how is each one characterized? Which observable values are common, and which rarely occur? Which items stand out as anomalies or outliers from the rest of the data? This challenge is exacerbated by the steady growth in data set size [11] as new instruments push into new frontiers of parameter space, via improvements in temporal, spatial, and spectral resolution, or by the desire to "fuse" observations from different modalities and instruments into a larger-picture understanding of the same underlying phenomenon. Data clustering algorithms provide a variety of solutions for this task. They can generate summaries, locate outliers, compress data, identify dense or sparse regions of feature space, and build data models. It is useful to note up front that "clusters" in this context refer to groups of items within some descriptive feature space, not (necessarily) to "galaxy clusters" which are dense regions in physical space. The goal of this chapter is to survey a variety of data clustering methods, with an eye toward their applicability to astronomical data analysis. In addition to improving the individual researcher’s understanding of a given data set, clustering has led directly to scientific advances, such as the discovery of new subclasses of stars [14] and gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) [38]. All clustering algorithms seek to identify groups within a data set that reflect some observed, quantifiable structure. Clustering is traditionally an unsupervised approach to data analysis, in the sense that it operates without any direct guidance about which items should be assigned to which clusters. There has been a recent trend in the clustering literature toward supporting semisupervised or constrained

  10. Evaluation of Fracture in Concrete with Recycled Aggregate by Acoustic Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishibata, Sayaka; Watanabe, Takeshi; Hashimoro, Chikanori; Kohno, Kiyoshi

    This research revealed fracture behavior of concrete in using recycled aggregates by Acoustic Emission as one of the Non-destructive Inspection. The phenomenon of acoustic emission (AE) is the propagation of elastic waves generated from a source, known as a micro-crack in an elastic material. There were taken to use low-treated recycled aggregate, crushed returned ready mixed concrete for aggregate and normal aggregate. Examination measured AE under the uniaxial compression test. The condition of load is repeated loading. As a result, fracture behavior due to low treated recycled aggregate was detected by AE. It is clarified that AE of concrete with low treated recycled aggregate appeared in low stress level. It has been understood that difference of aggregates becomes clear from Kaiser effect in repeated loading. In relation between RA value and average frequency, it has been understood the adhesion properties of the cement paste in recycled aggregate are appreciable.

  11. Generalized quantum kinetic expansion: Time scale separation between intra-cluster and inter-cluster kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Zhoufei; Gong, Zhihao; Wu, Jianlan

    2015-09-14

    For a general two-cluster network, a new methodology of the cluster-based generalized quantum kinetic expansion (GQKE) is developed in the matrix formalism under two initial conditions: the local cluster equilibrium and system-bath factorized states. For each initial condition, the site population evolution follows exactly a distinct closed equation, where all the four terms involved are systematically expanded over inter-cluster couplings. For the system-bath factorized initial state, the numerical investigation of the two models, a biased (2, 1)-site system and an unbiased (2, 2)-site system, verifies the reliability of the GQKE and the relevance of higher-order corrections. The time-integrated site-to-site rates and the time evolution of site population reveal the time scale separation between intra-cluster and inter-cluster kinetics. The population evolution of aggregated clusters can be quantitatively described by the approximate cluster Markovian kinetics.

  12. Subtyping Salmonella enterica serovar enteritidis isolates from different sources by using sequence typing based on virulence genes and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs).

    PubMed

    Liu, Fenyun; Kariyawasam, Subhashinie; Jayarao, Bhushan M; Barrangou, Rodolphe; Gerner-Smidt, Peter; Ribot, Efrain M; Knabel, Stephen J; Dudley, Edward G

    2011-07-01

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Enteritidis is a major cause of food-borne salmonellosis in the United States. Two major food vehicles for S. Enteritidis are contaminated eggs and chicken meat. Improved subtyping methods are needed to accurately track specific strains of S. Enteritidis related to human salmonellosis throughout the chicken and egg food system. A sequence typing scheme based on virulence genes (fimH and sseL) and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs)-CRISPR-including multi-virulence-locus sequence typing (designated CRISPR-MVLST)-was used to characterize 35 human clinical isolates, 46 chicken isolates, 24 egg isolates, and 63 hen house environment isolates of S. Enteritidis. A total of 27 sequence types (STs) were identified among the 167 isolates. CRISPR-MVLST identified three persistent and predominate STs circulating among U.S. human clinical isolates and chicken, egg, and hen house environmental isolates in Pennsylvania, and an ST that was found only in eggs and humans. It also identified a potential environment-specific sequence type. Moreover, cluster analysis based on fimH and sseL identified a number of clusters, of which several were found in more than one outbreak, as well as 11 singletons. Further research is needed to determine if CRISPR-MVLST might help identify the ecological origins of S. Enteritidis strains that contaminate chickens and eggs.

  13. Simulation of the optical properties of plate aggregates for application to the remote sensing of cirrus clouds.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yu; Yang, Ping; Kattawar, George W; Baum, Bryan A; Hu, Yongxiang

    2011-03-10

    In regions of deep tropical convection, ice particles often undergo aggregation and form complex chains. To investigate the effect of the representation of aggregates on electromagnetic scattering calculations, we developed an algorithm to efficiently specify the geometries of aggregates and to compute some of their geometric parameters, such as the projected area. Based on in situ observations, ice aggregates are defined as clusters of hexagonal plates with a chainlike overall shape, which may have smooth or roughened surfaces. An aggregate representation is developed with 10 ensemble members, each consisting of between 4-12 hexagonal plates. The scattering properties of an individual aggregate ice particle are computed using either the discrete dipole approximation or an improved geometric optics method, depending upon the size parameters. Subsequently, the aggregate properties are averaged over all geometries. The scattering properties of the aggregate representation closely agree with those computed from 1000 different aggregate geometries. As a result, the aggregate representation provides an accurate and computationally efficient way to represent all aggregates occurring within ice clouds. Furthermore, the aggregate representation can be used to study the influence of these complex ice particles on the satellite-based remote sensing of ice clouds. The computed cloud reflectances for aggregates are different from those associated with randomly oriented individual hexagonal plates. When aggregates are neglected, simulated cloud reflectances are generally lower at visible and shortwave-infrared wavelengths, resulting in smaller effective particle sizes but larger optical thicknesses.

  14. Small-scale fluctuations and angular correlations of the X-ray background in the HEAO 1 A-2 energy band - Constraints on clustering of X-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin-Mirones, J. M.; De Zotti, G.; Franceschini, A.; Boldt, E. A.; Marshall, F. E.; Danese, L.; Persic, M.

    1991-01-01

    HEAO 1 A-2 all-sky survey data have been used to determine the amplitude of intensity fluctuations of the extragalactic 2-10 keV X-ray background (XRB) over an effective solid angle of 1.84 sq deg and their angular correlation function on angular scales of less than 3 deg. A good empirical fit to the data is obtained assuming that the integral counts in the A-2 band have a slope of 1.65 + 0.06 or - 0.07. Alternatively, the data may imply a significant clustering of extragalactic X-ray sources.

  15. Aggregation in ecosystem models and model stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giricheva, Evgeniya

    2015-05-01

    Using a multimodal approach to research ecosystems improves usage of available information on an object. This study presents several models of the Bering Sea ecosystem. The ecosystem is considered as a closed object, that is, the influence of the environment is not provided. We then add the links with the external medium in the models. The models differ in terms of the degree and method of grouping components. Our method is based on the differences in habitat and food source of groups, which allows us to determine the grouping of species with a greater effect on system dynamics. In particular, we determine whether benthic fish aggregation or pelagic fish aggregation can change the consumption structure of some groups of species, and consequently, the behavior of the entire model system.

  16. Photoionization of rare gas clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Huaizhen

    This thesis concentrates on the study of photoionization of van der Waals clusters with different cluster sizes. The goal of the experimental investigation is to understand the electronic structure of van der Waals clusters and the electronic dynamics. These studies are fundamental to understand the interaction between UV-X rays and clusters. The experiments were performed at the Advanced Light Source at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The experimental method employs angle-resolved time-of-flight photoelectron spectrometry, one of the most powerful methods for probing the electronic structure of atoms, molecules, clusters and solids. The van der Waals cluster photoionization studies are focused on probing the evolution of the photoelectron angular distribution parameter as a function of photon energy and cluster size. The angular distribution has been known to be a sensitive probe of the electronic structure in atoms and molecules. However, it has not been used in the case of van der Waals clusters. We carried out outer-valence levels, inner-valence levels and core-levels cluster photoionization experiments. Specifically, this work reports on the first quantitative measurements of the angular distribution parameters of rare gas clusters as a function of average cluster sizes. Our findings for xenon clusters is that the overall photon-energy-dependent behavior of the photoelectrons from the clusters is very similar to that of the corresponding free atoms. However, distinct differences in the angular distribution point at cluster-size-dependent effects were found. For krypton clusters, in the photon energy range where atomic photoelectrons have a high angular anisotropy, our measurements show considerably more isotropic angular distributions for the cluster photoelectrons, especially right above the 3d and 4p thresholds. For the valence electrons, a surprising difference between the two spin-orbit components was found. For argon clusters, we found that the

  17. Spherical TiO2 aggregates with different building units for dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhaohui; Su, Xunjia; Hou, Genliang; Bi, Song; Xiao, Zhou; Jia, Haipeng

    2013-09-07

    Tailoring the architectures of spherical TiO2 aggregates is crucial to obtain superior photovoltaic properties and promote their application in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). Herein, we synthesized spherical TiO2 aggregates using different building units, including nanocrystallites, nanorods, nanosheets, and nanotubes, via a hydrothermal method, and studied the effect of the building units on the performances of DSSCs. The aggregates assembled by uniform nanosheet and nanotube building units were synthesized with the use of spherical TiO2 nanorod aggregates as titanium sources in an alkaline hydrothermal reaction. Compared with TiO2 nanoparticles, the spherical TiO2 aggregates possess higher surface area, more efficient light scattering ability, and better electron transport properties. Among the four types of spherical TiO2 aggregates; the nanorod, nanotube, and nanosheet aggregates demonstrate better electron transport properties than the nanocrystallite aggregates; the nanotube and nanosheet aggregates exhibit more efficient light scattering than the nanocrystallite and nanorod aggregates; and the nanotube aggregates show the highest surface area. Thus the DSSC based on nanotube aggregates exhibited the highest energy conversion efficiency of 7.48%, which is 16.0%, 9.7%, and 19.5% higher than those of the DSSCs based on the nanosheet, nanorod, and nanocrystallite aggregates, respectively.

  18. Topics in Probabilistic Judgment Aggregation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Guanchun

    2011-01-01

    This dissertation is a compilation of several studies that are united by their relevance to probabilistic judgment aggregation. In the face of complex and uncertain events, panels of judges are frequently consulted to provide probabilistic forecasts, and aggregation of such estimates in groups often yield better results than could have been made…

  19. Mineral of the month: aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tepordei, Valentin V.

    2005-01-01

    Natural aggregates, consisting of crushed stone, and sand and gravel, are a major contributor to economic health, and have an amazing variety of uses. Aggregates are among the most abundant mineral resources and are major basic raw materials used by construction, agriculture and other industries that employ complex chemical and metallurgical processes.

  20. Ensemble Clustering for Result Diversification

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-11-01

    different clustering methods for a par- ticular data source. He et al. [8] proposed a framework to combine clusters of external resources to...representations for result diversification. In Proceedings of SIGIR, 2012. [9] D. Hiemstra and C. Hauff. Mapreduce for information retrieval evaluation: ‘let’s

  1. Components of Torpedo electric organ and muscle that cause aggregation of acetylcholine receptors on cultured muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    The synaptic portion of a muscle fiber's basal lamina sheath has molecules tightly bound to it that cause aggregation of acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) on regenerating myofibers. Since basal lamina and other extracellular matrix constituents are insoluble in isotonic saline and detergent solutions, insoluble detergent-extracted fractions of tissues receiving cholinergic input may provide an enriched source of the AChR-aggregating molecules for detailed characterization. Here we demonstrate that such an insoluble fraction from Torpedo electric organ, a tissue with a high concentration of cholinergic synapses, causes AChRs on cultured chick muscle cells to aggregate. We have partially characterized the insoluble fraction, examined the response of muscle cells to it, and devised ways of extracting the active components with a view toward purifying them and learning whether they are similar to those in the basal lamina at the neuromuscular junction. The insoluble fraction from the electric organ was rich in extracellular matrix constituents; it contained structures resembling basal lamina sheaths and had a high density of collagen fibrils. It caused a 3- to 20-fold increase in the number of AChR clusters on cultured myotubes without significantly affecting the number or size of the myotubes. The increase was first seen 2-4 h after the fraction was added to cultures and it was maximal by 24 h. The AChR-aggregating effect was dose dependent and was due, at least in part, to lateral migration of AChRs present in the muscle cell plasma membrane at the time the fraction was applied. Activity was destroyed by heat and by trypsin. The active component(s) was extracted from the insoluble fraction with high ionic strength or pH 5.5 buffers. The extracts increased the number of AChR clusters on cultured myotubes without affecting the number or degradation rate of surface AChRs. Antiserum against the solubilized material blocked its effect on AChR distribution and bound to the

  2. Aggregation of Kanamycin A: dimer formation with physiological cations.

    PubMed

    Dieterich, Johannes M; Gerstel, Ulrich; Schröder, Jens-Michael; Hartke, Bernd

    2011-12-01

    Global cluster geometry optimization has focused so far on clusters of atoms or of compact molecules. We are demonstrating here that present-day techniques also allow to globally optimize clusters of extended, flexible molecules, and that such studies have immediate relevance to experiment. For example, recent experimental findings point to production of larger clusters of an aminoglycoside closely related to Kanamycin A (KA), together with certain preferred physiological cations, by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The present study provides first theoretical support for KA clustering, with a close examination of the monomer, the bare dimer, and dimers with sodium and potassium cations, employing global cluster structure optimization, in conjunction with force fields, semiempirical methods, DFT and ab-initio approaches. Interestingly, already at this stage the theoretical findings support the experimental observation that sodium cations are preferred over potassium cations in KA clusters, due to fundamentally different cationic embedding. Theoretically predicted NMR and IR spectra for these species indicate that it should be possible to experimentally detect the aggregation state and even the cationic embedding mode in such clusters.

  3. Molecular aggregation of humic substances

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wershaw, R. L.

    1999-01-01

    Humic substances (HS) form molecular aggregates in solution and on mineral surfaces. Elucidation of the mechanism of formation of these aggregates is important for an understanding of the interactions of HS in soils arid natural waters. The HS are formed mainly by enzymatic depolymerization and oxidation of plant biopolymers. These reactions transform the aromatic and lipid plant components into amphiphilic molecules, that is, molecules that consist of separate hydrophobic (nonpolar) and hydrophilic (polar) parts. The nonpolar parts of the molecules are composed of relatively unaltered segments of plant polymers and the polar parts of carboxylic acid groups. These amphiphiles form membrane-like aggregates on mineral surfaces and micelle-like aggregates in solution. The exterior surfaces of these aggregates are hydrophilic, and the interiors constitute separate hydrophobic liquid-like phases.

  4. Particle aggregation in microgravity: Informal experiments on the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Love, Stanley G.; Pettit, Donald R.; Messenger, Scott R.

    2014-05-01

    We conducted experiments in space to investigate the aggregation of millimeter- and submillimeter-sized particles in microgravity, an important early step in planet formation. Particulate materials included salt (NaCl), sugar (sucrose), coffee, mica, ice, Bjurböle chondrules, ordinary and carbonaceous chondrite meteorite fragments, and acrylic and glass beads, all triply confined in clear plastic containers. Angular submillimeter particles rapidly and spontaneously formed clusters strong enough to survive turbulence in a protoplanetary nebula. Smaller particles generally aggregated more strongly and quickly than larger ones. We observed only a weak dependence of aggregation time on particle number density. We observed no strong dependence on composition. Round, smooth particles aggregated weakly or not at all. In a mixture of particle types, some phases aggregated more readily than others, creating selection effects that controlled the composition of the growing clumps. The physical process of aggregation appears to be electrostatic in nature.

  5. Premature red blood cells have decreased aggregation and enhanced aggregability.

    PubMed

    Arbell, D; Orkin, B; Bar-Oz, B; Barshtein, G; Yedgar, S

    2008-06-01

    Preterm infants are highly susceptible to ischemic damage. This damage is most obvious in the brain, retina, and gastrointestinal tract. Studies focusing on the rheological properties of premature red blood cells (pRBCs) have consistently shown minimal or no RBC aggregation. Previously, measurements of pRBC aggregation kinetics indicated that specific plasma properties are responsible for the decreased RBC aggregation observed in the neonates, but that their specific RBC properties do not affect it. However, the strength of interaction in the pRBC aggregates as a function of medium composition has not been tested. In our previous research, we described clinically relevant parameters, that is, the aggregate resistance to disaggregation by flow. With the help of a cell flow property analyzer (CFA), we can monitor RBC aggregation by direct visualization of its dynamics during flow. We used the CFA to examine pRBC (from 9 premature babies) in the natural plasma and in PBS buffer supplemented with dextran (500 kDa) to distinguish between RBC intrinsic-cellular and plasma factors. pRBCs suspended in the native plasma showed minimal or no aggregation in comparison to normal adult RBC. When we transferred pRBCs from the same sample to the dextran solution, enhanced resistance to disaggregation by flow was apparent.

  6. Orthogonal flexible Rydberg aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonhardt, K.; Wüster, S.; Rost, J. M.

    2016-02-01

    We study the link between atomic motion and exciton transport in flexible Rydberg aggregates, assemblies of highly excited light alkali-metal atoms, for which motion due to dipole-dipole interaction becomes relevant. In two one-dimensional atom chains crossing at a right angle adiabatic exciton transport is affected by a conical intersection of excitonic energy surfaces, which induces controllable nonadiabatic effects. A joint exciton-motion pulse that is initially governed by a single energy surface is coherently split into two modes after crossing the intersection. The modes induce strongly different atomic motion, leading to clear signatures of nonadiabatic effects in atomic density profiles. We have shown how this scenario can be exploited as an exciton switch, controlling direction and coherence properties of the joint pulse on the second of the chains [K. Leonhardt et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 223001 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.113.223001]. In this article we discuss the underlying complex dynamics in detail, characterize the switch, and derive our isotropic interaction model from a realistic anisotropic one with the addition of a magnetic bias field.

  7. Fractality à la carte: a general particle aggregation model

    PubMed Central

    Nicolás-Carlock, J. R.; Carrillo-Estrada, J. L.; Dossetti, V.

    2016-01-01

    In nature, fractal structures emerge in a wide variety of systems as a local optimization of entropic and energetic distributions. The fractality of these systems determines many of their physical, chemical and/or biological properties. Thus, to comprehend the mechanisms that originate and control the fractality is highly relevant in many areas of science and technology. In studying clusters grown by aggregation phenomena, simple models have contributed to unveil some of the basic elements that give origin to fractality, however, the specific contribution from each of these elements to fractality has remained hidden in the complex dynamics. Here, we propose a simple and versatile model of particle aggregation that is, on the one hand, able to reveal the specific entropic and energetic contributions to the clusters’ fractality and morphology, and, on the other, capable to generate an ample assortment of rich natural-looking aggregates with any prescribed fractal dimension. PMID:26781204

  8. Fractality à la carte: a general particle aggregation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolás-Carlock, J. R.; Carrillo-Estrada, J. L.; Dossetti, V.

    2016-01-01

    In nature, fractal structures emerge in a wide variety of systems as a local optimization of entropic and energetic distributions. The fractality of these systems determines many of their physical, chemical and/or biological properties. Thus, to comprehend the mechanisms that originate and control the fractality is highly relevant in many areas of science and technology. In studying clusters grown by aggregation phenomena, simple models have contributed to unveil some of the basic elements that give origin to fractality, however, the specific contribution from each of these elements to fractality has remained hidden in the complex dynamics. Here, we propose a simple and versatile model of particle aggregation that is, on the one hand, able to reveal the specific entropic and energetic contributions to the clusters’ fractality and morphology, and, on the other, capable to generate an ample assortment of rich natural-looking aggregates with any prescribed fractal dimension.

  9. Fractal dimension of alumina aggregates grown in two dimensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larosa, Judith L.; Cawley, James D.

    1992-01-01

    The concepts of fractal geometry are applied to the analysis of 0.4-micron alumina constrained to agglomerate in two dimensions. Particles were trapped at the bottom surface of a drop of a dilute suspension, and the agglomeration process was directly observed, using an inverted optical microscope. Photographs were digitized and analyzed, using three distinct approaches. The results indicate that the agglomerates are fractal, having a dimension of approximately 1.5, which agrees well with the predictions of the diffusion-limited cluster-cluster aggregation model.

  10. Computer simulation of electrical conductivity of colloidal dispersions during aggregation.

    PubMed

    Lebovka, N I; Tarafdar, S; Vygornitskii, N V

    2006-03-01

    The computation approach to the simulation of electrical conductivity of colloidal dispersions during aggregation is considered. We use the two-dimensional diffusion-limited aggregation model with multiple-seed growth. The particles execute a random walk, but lose their mobility after contact with the growing clusters or seeds. The two parameters that control the aggregation are the initial concentration of free particles in the system p and the concentration of seeds psi. The case of psi=1, when all the particles are the immobile seeds, corresponds with the usual random percolation problem. The other limiting case of psi=0, when all the particles walk randomly, corresponds to the dynamical percolation problem. The calculation of electrical conductivity and cluster analysis were done with the help of the algorithms of Frank-Lobb and Hoshen-Kopelman. It is shown that the percolation concentration phi c decreases from 0.5927 at psi=1 to 0 at psi --> 0. Scaling analysis was applied to study exponents of correlation length v and of conductivity t. For all psi>0 this model shows universal behavior of classical 2d random percolation with v approximately t approximately 4/3. The electrical conductivity sigma of the system increases during aggregation reaching up to a maximum at the final stage. The concentration dependence of conductivity sigma(phi) obeys the general effective medium equation with apparent exponent ta(psi) that exceeds t. The kinetics of electrical conductivity changes during the aggregation is discussed. In the range of concentration Pc(phi)cluster formation pi c decreases with increasing phi.

  11. Voting-based consensus clustering for combining multiple clusterings of chemical structures

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Although many consensus clustering methods have been successfully used for combining multiple classifiers in many areas such as machine learning, applied statistics, pattern recognition and bioinformatics, few consensus clustering methods have been applied for combining multiple clusterings of chemical structures. It is known that any individual clustering method will not always give the best results for all types of applications. So, in this paper, three voting and graph-based consensus clusterings were used for combining multiple clusterings of chemical structures to enhance the ability of separating biologically active molecules from inactive ones in each cluster. Results The cumulative voting-based aggregation algorithm (CVAA), cluster-based similarity partitioning algorithm (CSPA) and hyper-graph partitioning algorithm (HGPA) were examined. The F-measure and Quality Partition Index method (QPI) were used to evaluate the clusterings and the results were compared to the Ward’s clustering method. The MDL Drug Data Report (MDDR) dataset was used for experiments and was represented by two 2D fingerprints, ALOGP and ECFP_4. The performance of voting-based consensus clustering method outperformed the Ward’s method using F-measure and QPI method for both ALOGP and ECFP_4 fingerprints, while the graph-based consensus clustering methods outperformed the Ward’s method only for ALOGP using QPI. The Jaccard and Euclidean distance measures were the methods of choice to generate the ensembles, which give the highest values for both criteria. Conclusions The results of the experiments show that consensus clustering methods can improve the effectiveness of chemical structures clusterings. The cumulative voting-based aggregation algorithm (CVAA) was the method of choice among consensus clustering methods. PMID:23244782

  12. Thermoregulation and aggregation in neonatal bearded dragons (Pogona vitticeps).

    PubMed

    Khan, Jameel J; Richardson, Jean M L; Tattersall, Glenn J

    2010-05-11

    Ectothermic vertebrates, such as reptiles, thermoregulate behaviorally by choosing from available temperatures in their environment. As neonates, bearded dragons (Pogona vitticeps) are often observed to aggregate in vertical strata. A proximate mechanism for this behavior is the thermal advantage of heat storage (i.e., grouped lizards benefit through a decreased surface area to volume ratio), although competition for limited thermal resources, or aggregation for social reasons are alternative explanations. This study was designed to gain an understanding of how aggregation and thermoregulation interact. We observed that both isolated and grouped individuals achieved a similar level of thermoregulation (mean T(b) over trial) within a thermal gradient, but that individuals within a group had lower thermoregulatory precision. An experimental design in which light and ambient temperature (T(a)) (20 versus 30 degrees C) were altered established that a light bulb (source of heat) was a limited and valuable resource to both isolated and grouped neonatal lizards. Lizards aggregated more when the light was on at both temperatures, suggesting that individuals were equally attracted to or repelled from the heat source, depending on the ambient temperature. These data suggest aggregation occurs in neonatal bearded dragons through mutual attraction to a common resource. Further, increased variability in thermal preference occurs in groups, demonstrating the potential for agonistic behaviors to compromise optimal thermoregulation in competitive situations, potentially leading to segregation, rather than aggregation.

  13. Aggregation in yellow mealworms,Tenebrio molitor L. (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) larvae : II. Observations and analyses of behavioral parameters in aggregation.

    PubMed

    Weaver, D K; McFarlane, J E

    1989-05-01

    Evaluation of the lactic acid attraction of individual and grouped larvalTenebrio molitor L. in an olfactometer indicated that olfaction is unlikely to be the chemoreceptive mode governing substrate choice or aggregation of these insects. High-magnification videotaped sequences of mealworms on treated and control filter papers indicated that larvae sample the substrate by rapidly probing with mouthpart palpi in a manner similar to the leaf sampling of certain caterpillars. The reception of lactic acid stimuli may therefore involve contact chemoreceptors. The larvae frequently touch each other in a similar manner. Bioassays comparing the cumulative frequencies of distributions of mealworms on control and lactic acid-treated filter papers indicated significant differences, with higher density clusters being found on the treated papers. Comparison of the control distribution with the expected distribution revealed an innate tendency to aggregate. The implications of these results are discussed with regard to the formation of mealworm clusters in the environment.

  14. Quintuplet Cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Penetrating 25,000 light-years of obscuring dust and myriad stars, NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has provided the clearest view yet of one of the largest young clusters of stars inside our Milky Way galaxy, located less than 100 light-years from the very center of the Galaxy. Having the equivalent mass greater than 10,000 stars like our sun, the monster cluster is ten times larger than typical young star clusters scattered throughout our Milky Way. It is destined to be ripped apart in just a few million years by gravitational tidal forces in the galaxy's core. But in its brief lifetime it shines more brightly than any other star cluster in the Galaxy. Quintuplet Cluster is 4 million years old. It has stars on the verge of blowing up as supernovae. It is the home of the brightest star seen in the galaxy, called the Pistol star. This image was taken in infrared light by Hubble's NICMOS camera in September 1997. The false colors correspond to infrared wavelengths. The galactic center stars are white, the red stars are enshrouded in dust or behind dust, and the blue stars are foreground stars between us and the Milky Way's center. The cluster is hidden from direct view behind black dust clouds in the constellation Sagittarius. If the cluster could be seen from earth it would appear to the naked eye as a 3rd magnitude star, 1/6th of a full moon's diameter apart.

  15. A SPECTROSCOPICALLY CONFIRMED EXCESS OF 24 mum SOURCES IN A SUPER GALAXY GROUP AT z = 0.37: ENHANCED DUSTY STAR FORMATION RELATIVE TO THE CLUSTER AND FIELD ENVIRONMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Tran, Kim-Vy H.; Saintonge, Amelie; Moustakas, John; Bai, Lei; Zaritsky, Dennis; Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Kautsch, Stefan J.; Holden, Bradford P.

    2009-11-01

    To trace how dust-obscured star formation varies with environment, we compare the fraction of 24 mum sources in a super galaxy group to the field and a rich galaxy cluster at z approx 0.35. We draw on multi-wavelength observations{sup 9}Based on observations made with (1) The ESO telescopes at Paranal Observatories under program IDs 072.A-0367, 076.B-0362, 078.B-0409; (2) the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope (GO-10499); STScI is operated by the association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc. under the NASA contract NAS 5-26555; (3) the Spitzer Space Telescope, which is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology under a contract with NASA; support for this work was provided by NASA through an award issued by JPL/Caltech (GO-20683); (4) the Chandra X-ray Observatory Center, which is operated by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory for and on behalf of the National Aeronautics Space Administration under contract NAS8-03060; and (5) the Magellan 6.5 m telescope operated by OCIW. that combine Hubble, Chandra, and Spitzer imaging with extensive optical spectroscopy (>1800 redshifts) to isolate galaxies in each environment and thus ensure a uniform analysis. We focus on the four galaxy groups (sigma{sub 1D} = 303-580 km s{sup -1}) in supergroup 1120-12 that will merge to form a galaxy cluster comparable in mass to Coma. We find that (1) the fraction of supergroup galaxies with SFR{sub IR} >= 3 M {sub sun} yr{sup -1} is 4 times higher than in the cluster (32% +- 5% versus 7% +- 2%); (2) the supergroup's infrared luminosity function confirms that it has a higher density of IR members compared to the cluster and includes bright IR sources (log(L {sub IR})[erg s{sup -1}] >45) not found in galaxy clusters at z approx< 0.35; and (3) there is a strong trend of decreasing 24 mum fraction with increasing galaxy density, i.e., an infrared-density relation, not observed in the cluster. These dramatic differences are surprising

  16. The Effect of Aggregation in Nonlinear Regression.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-04-01

    This truncation is the source of the nonlinearity in the model (1.1). Physically, the intercept a represents baseload con- sumption, such as for...BIAS b FOR 75 AGGREGATE DATA SETS FIT TO THE ENERGY MODEL Bias Smoothing Error Standard Error A A Parameter e b = E(8 - 63) e - e s.e.(e BASELOAD a...s.e. ) e BASELOAD a -0.037 -0.30 1.35 (Th/cu-d) HEAT RATE 6 0.0033 0.44 0.224 (Th/cu-OFd) REFERENCE TEMPERATURE T -0.28 -0.25 64.1 (OF) NORMALIZED

  17. Spitzer Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krick, Kessica

    This proposal is a specific response to the strategic goal of NASA's research program to "discover how the universe works and explore how the universe evolved into its present form." Towards this goal, we propose to mine the Spitzer archive for all observations of galaxy groups and clusters for the purpose of studying galaxy evolution in clusters, contamination rates for Sunyaev Zeldovich cluster surveys, and to provide a database of Spitzer observed clusters to the broader community. Funding from this proposal will go towards two years of support for a Postdoc to do this work. After searching the Spitzer Heritage Archive, we have found 194 unique galaxy groups and clusters that have data from both the Infrared array camera (IRAC; Fazio et al. 2004) at 3.6 - 8 microns and the multiband imaging photometer for Spitzer (MIPS; Rieke et al. 2004) at 24microns. This large sample will add value beyond the individual datasets because it will be a larger sample of IR clusters than ever before and will have sufficient diversity in mass, redshift, and dynamical state to allow us to differentiate amongst the effects of these cluster properties. An infrared sample is important because it is unaffected by dust extinction while at the same time is an excellent measure of both stellar mass (IRAC wavelengths) and star formation rate (MIPS wavelengths). Additionally, IRAC can be used to differentiate star forming galaxies (SFG) from active galactic nuclei (AGN), due to their different spectral shapes in this wavelength regime. Specifically, we intend to identify SFG and AGN in galaxy groups and clusters. Groups and clusters differ from the field because the galaxy densities are higher, there is a large potential well due mainly to the mass of the dark matter, and there is hot X-ray gas (the intracluster medium; ICM). We will examine the impact of these differences in environment on galaxy formation by comparing cluster properties of AGN and SFG to those in the field. Also, we will

  18. Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Christopher J. Miller

    2012-03-01

    There are many examples of clustering in astronomy. Stars in our own galaxy are often seen as being gravitationally bound into tight globular or open clusters. The Solar System's Trojan asteroids cluster at the gravitational Langrangian in front of Jupiter’s orbit. On the largest of scales, we find gravitationally bound clusters of galaxies, the Virgo cluster (in the constellation of Virgo at a distance of ˜50 million light years) being a prime nearby example. The Virgo cluster subtends an angle of nearly 8◦ on the sky and is known to contain over a thousand member galaxies. Galaxy clusters play an important role in our understanding of theUniverse. Clusters exist at peaks in the three-dimensional large-scale matter density field. Their sky (2D) locations are easy to detect in astronomical imaging data and their mean galaxy redshifts (redshift is related to the third spatial dimension: distance) are often better (spectroscopically) and cheaper (photometrically) when compared with the entire galaxy population in large sky surveys. Photometric redshift (z) [Photometric techniques use the broad band filter magnitudes of a galaxy to estimate the redshift. Spectroscopic techniques use the galaxy spectra and emission/absorption line features to measure the redshift] determinations of galaxies within clusters are accurate to better than delta_z = 0.05 [7] and when studied as a cluster population, the central galaxies form a line in color-magnitude space (called the the E/S0 ridgeline and visible in Figure 16.3) that contains galaxies with similar stellar populations [15]. The shape of this E/S0 ridgeline enables astronomers to measure the cluster redshift to within delta_z = 0.01 [23]. The most accurate cluster redshift determinations come from spectroscopy of the member galaxies, where only a fraction of the members need to be spectroscopically observed [25,42] to get an accurate redshift to the whole system. If light traces mass in the Universe, then the locations

  19. Star clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labhardt, Lukas; Binggeli, Bruno

    Star clusters are at the heart of astronomy, being key objects for our understanding of stellar evolution and galactic structure. Observations with the Hubble Space Telescope and other modern equipment have revealed fascinating new facts about these galactic building blocks. This book provides two comprehensive and up-to-date, pedagogically designed reviews on star clusters by two well-known experts in the field. Bruce Carney presents our current knowledge of the relative and absolute ages of globular clusters and the chemical history of our Galaxy. Bill Harris addresses globular clusters in external galaxies and their use as tracers of galaxy formation and cosmic distance indicators. The book is written for graduate students as well as professionals in astronomy and astrophysics.

  20. Occupational Clusters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pottawattamie County School System, Council Bluffs, IA.

    The 15 occupational clusters (transportation, fine arts and humanities, communications and media, personal service occupations, construction, hospitality and recreation, health occupations, marine science occupations, consumer and homemaking-related occupations, agribusiness and natural resources, environment, public service, business and office…

  1. Cell aggregation: Packing soft grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Åström, J. A.; Karttunen, M.

    2006-06-01

    Cellular aggregates may be considered as collections of membrane enclosed units with a pressure difference between the internal and external liquid phases. Cells are kept together by membrane adhesion and/or confined space compression. Pattern formation and, in particular, intercellular spacing have important roles in controlling solvent diffusion within such aggregates. A physical approach is used to study generic aspects of cellular packings in a confined space. Average material properties are derived from the free energy. The appearance of penetrating intercellular void channels is found to be critically governed by the cell wall adhesion mechanisms during the formation of dense aggregates. A fully relaxed aggregate efficiently hinders solvent diffusion at high hydrostatic pressures, while a small fraction (˜0.1) of adhesion related packing frustration is sufficient for breaking such a blockage even at high a pressure.

  2. Cluster generator

    DOEpatents

    Donchev, Todor I.; Petrov, Ivan G.

    2011-05-31

    Described herein is an apparatus and a method for producing atom clusters based on a gas discharge within a hollow cathode. The hollow cathode includes one or more walls. The one or more walls define a sputtering chamber within the hollow cathode and include a material to be sputtered. A hollow anode is positioned at an end of the sputtering chamber, and atom clusters are formed when a gas discharge is generated between the hollow anode and the hollow cathode.

  3. Aggregate breakdown of nanoparticulate titania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venugopal, Navin

    Six nanosized titanium dioxide powders synthesized from a sulfate process were investigated. The targeted end-use of this powder was for a de-NOx catalyst honeycomb monolith. Alteration of synthesis parameters had resulted principally in differences in soluble ion level and specific surface area of the powders. The goal of this investigation was to understand the role of synthesis parameters in the aggregation behavior of these powders. Investigation via scanning electron microscopy of the powders revealed three different aggregation iterations at specific length scales. Secondary and higher order aggregate strength was investigated via oscillatory stress rheometry as a means of simulating shear conditions encountered during extrusion. G' and G'' were measured as a function of the applied oscillatory stress. Oscillatory rheometry indicated a strong variation as a function of the sulfate level of the particles in the viscoelastic yield strengths. Powder yield stresses ranged from 3.0 Pa to 24.0 Pa of oscillatory stress. Compaction curves to 750 MPa found strong similarities in extrapolated yield point of stage I and II compaction for each of the powders (at approximately 500 MPa) suggesting that the variation in sulfate was greatest above the primary aggregate level. Scanning electron microscopy of samples at different states of shear in oscillatory rheometry confirmed the variation in the linear elastic region and the viscous flow regime. A technique of this investigation was to approach aggregation via a novel perspective: aggregates are distinguished as being loose open structures that are highly disordered and stochastic in nature. The methodology used was to investigate the shear stresses required to rupture the various aggregation stages encountered and investigate the attempt to realign the now free-flowing constituents comprising the aggregate into a denser configuration. Mercury porosimetry was utilized to measure the pore size of the compact resulting from

  4. Atomic clusters with addressable complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wales, David J.

    2017-02-01

    A general formulation for constructing addressable atomic clusters is introduced, based on one or more reference structures. By modifying the well depths in a given interatomic potential in favour of nearest-neighbour interactions that are defined in the reference(s), the potential energy landscape can be biased to make a particular permutational isomer the global minimum. The magnitude of the bias changes the resulting potential energy landscape systematically, providing a framework to produce clusters that should self-organise efficiently into the target structure. These features are illustrated for small systems, where all the relevant local minima and transition states can be identified, and for the low-energy regions of the landscape for larger clusters. For a 55-particle cluster, it is possible to design a target structure from a transition state of the original potential and to retain this structure in a doubly addressable landscape. Disconnectivity graphs based on local minima that have no direct connections to a lower minimum provide a helpful way to visualise the larger databases. These minima correspond to the termini of monotonic sequences, which always proceed downhill in terms of potential energy, and we identify them as a class of biminimum. Multiple copies of the target cluster are treated by adding a repulsive term between particles with the same address to maintain distinguishable targets upon aggregation. By tuning the magnitude of this term, it is possible to create assemblies of the target cluster corresponding to a variety of structures, including rings and chains.

  5. High Resolution X-Ray Astronomy with the Chandra Observatory Stellar Point Sources and Extended Gaseous Emission of Cen Chandra X-Ray Observations of Clusters of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dong-Woo

    2000-02-01

    I will introduce the Chandra Observatory and new results obtained during the Chandra OAC phase. These include the newly discovered X-ray jet in PKS 0637-752; X-ray jet, characteristics of point sources and extended emission in Cen A; and contact discontinuities and merger evidence of A2142.

  6. Glycation precedes lens crystallin aggregation

    SciTech Connect

    Swamy, M.S.; Perry, R.E.; Abraham, E.C.

    1987-05-01

    Non-enzymatic glycosylation (glycation) seems to have the potential to alter the structure of crystallins and make them susceptible to thiol oxidation leading to disulfide-linked high molecular weight (HMW) aggregate formation. They used streptozotocin diabetic rats during precataract and cataract stages and long-term cell-free glycation of bovine lens crystallins to study the relationship between glycation and lens crystallin aggregation. HMW aggregates and other protein components of the water-soluble (WS) and urea-soluble (US) fractions were separated by molecular sieve high performance liquid chromatography. Glycation was estimated by both (/sup 3/H)NaBH/sub 4/ reduction and phenylboronate agarose affinity chromatography. Levels of total glycated protein (GP) in the US fractions were about 2-fold higher than in the WS fractions and there was a linear increase in GP in both WS and US fractions. This increase was parallelled by a corresponding increase in HMW aggregates. Total GP extracted by the affinity method from the US fraction showed a predominance of HMW aggregates and vice versa. Cell-free glycation studies with bovine crystallins confirmed the results of the animals studies. Increasing glycation caused a corresponding increase in protein insolubilization and the insoluble fraction thus formed also contained more glycated protein. It appears that lens protein glycation, HMW aggregate formation, and protein insolubilization are interrelated.

  7. Model for amorphous aggregation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stranks, Samuel D.; Ecroyd, Heath; van Sluyter, Steven; Waters, Elizabeth J.; Carver, John A.; von Smekal, Lorenz

    2009-11-01

    The amorphous aggregation of proteins is associated with many phenomena, ranging from the formation of protein wine haze to the development of cataract in the eye lens and the precipitation of recombinant proteins during their expression and purification. While much literature exists describing models for linear protein aggregation, such as amyloid fibril formation, there are few reports of models which address amorphous aggregation. Here, we propose a model to describe the amorphous aggregation of proteins which is also more widely applicable to other situations where a similar process occurs, such as in the formation of colloids and nanoclusters. As first applications of the model, we have tested it against experimental turbidimetry data of three proteins relevant to the wine industry and biochemistry, namely, thaumatin, a thaumatinlike protein, and α -lactalbumin. The model is very robust and describes amorphous experimental data to a high degree of accuracy. Details about the aggregation process, such as shape parameters of the aggregates and rate constants, can also be extracted.

  8. Nonequilibrium clustering of self-propelled rods.

    PubMed

    Peruani, Fernando; Deutsch, Andreas; Bär, Markus

    2006-09-01

    Motivated by aggregation phenomena in gliding bacteria, we study collective motion in a two-dimensional model of active, self-propelled rods interacting through volume exclusion. In simulations with individual particles, we find that particle clustering is facilitated by a sufficiently large packing fraction eta or length-to-width ratio kappa . The transition to clustering in simulations is well captured by a mean-field model for the cluster size distribution, which predicts that the transition values kappac of the aspect ratio for a fixed packing fraction eta are given by kappac=Ceta-1 where C is a constant.

  9. Processes of conversion of a hot metal particle into aerogel through clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Smirnov, B. M.

    2015-10-15

    Processes are considered for conversion into a fractal structure of a hot metal micron-size particle that is located in a buffer gas or a gas flow and is heated by an external electric or electromagnetic source or by a plasma. The parameter of this heating is the particle temperature, which is the same in the entire particle volume because of its small size and high conductivity. Three processes determine the particle heat balance: particle radiation, evaporation of metal atoms from the particle surface, and heat transport to the surrounding gas due to its thermal conductivity. The particle heat balance is analyzed based on these processes, which are analogous to those for bulk metals with the small particle size, and its high temperature taken into account. Outside the particle, where the gas temperature is lower than on its surface, the formed metal vapor in a buffer gas flow is converted into clusters. Clusters grow as a result of coagulation until they become liquid, and then clusters form fractal aggregates if they are removed form the gas flow. Subsequently, associations of fractal aggregates join into a fractal structure. The rate of this process increases in medium electric fields, and the formed fractal structure has features of aerogels and fractal fibers. As a result of a chain of the above processes, a porous metal film may be manufactured for use as a filter or catalyst for gas flows.

  10. Ash Aggregates in Proximal Settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porritt, L. A.; Russell, K.

    2012-12-01

    Ash aggregates are thought to have formed within and been deposited by the eruption column and plume and dilute density currents and their associated ash clouds. Moist, turbulent ash clouds are considered critical to ash aggregate formation by facilitating both collision and adhesion of particles. Consequently, they are most commonly found in distal deposits. Proximal deposits containing ash aggregates are less commonly observed but do occur. Here we describe two occurrences of vent proximal ash aggregate-rich deposits; the first within a kimberlite pipe where coated ash pellets and accretionary lapilli are found within the intra-vent sequence; and the second in a glaciovolcanic setting where cored pellets (armoured lapilli) occur within <1 km of the vent. The deposits within the A418 pipe, Diavik Diamond Mine, Canada, are the residual deposits within the conduit and vent of the volcano and are characterised by an abundance of ash aggregates. Coated ash pellets are dominant but are followed in abundance by ash pellets, accretionary lapilli and rare cored pellets. The coated ash pellets typically range from 1 - 5 mm in diameter and have core to rim ratios of approximately 10:1. The formation and preservation of these aggregates elucidates the style and nature of the explosive phase of kimberlite eruption at A418 (and other pipes?). First, these pyroclasts dictate the intensity of the kimberlite eruption; it must be energetic enough to cause intense fragmentation of the kimberlite to produce a substantial volume of very fine ash (<62 μm). Secondly, the ash aggregates indicate the involvement of moisture coupled with the presence of dilute expanded eruption clouds. The structure and distribution of these deposits throughout the kimberlite conduit demand that aggregation and deposition operate entirely within the confines of the vent; this indicates that aggregation is a rapid process. Ash aggregates within glaciovolcanic sequences are also rarely documented. The

  11. Aggregate resource availability in the conterminous United States, including suggestions for addressing shortages, quality, and environmental concerns

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langer, William H.

    2011-01-01

    Although potential sources of aggregate are widespread throughout the United States, many sources may not meet certain physical property requirements, such as soundness, hardness, strength, porosity, and specific gravity, or they may contain contaminants or deleterious materials that render them unusable. Encroachment by conflicting land uses, permitting considerations, environmental issues, and societal pressures can prevent or limit development of otherwise suitable aggregate. The use of sustainable aggregate resource management can help ensure an economically viable supply of aggregate. Sustainable aggregate resource management techniques that have successfully been used include (1) protecting potential resources from encroachment; (2) using marginal-quality local aggregate for applications that do not demand a high-quality resource; (3) using substitute materials such as clinker, scoria, and recycled asphalt and concrete; and (4) using rail and water to transport aggregates from remote sources.

  12. Directional clustering in highest energy cosmic rays

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, Haim; Weiler, Thomas J.

    2001-09-01

    An unexpected degree of small-scale clustering is observed in highest-energy cosmic ray events. Some directional clustering can be expected due to purely statistical fluctuations for sources distributed randomly in the sky. This creates a background for events originating in clustered sources. We derive analytic formulas to estimate the probability of random cluster configurations, and use these formulas to study the strong potential of the HiRes, Auger, Telescope Array and EUSO-OWL-AirWatch facilities for deciding whether any observed clustering is most likely due to nonrandom sources. For a detailed comparison to data, our analytical approach cannot compete with Monte Carlo simulations, including experimental systematics. However, our derived formulas do offer two advantages: (i) easy assessment of the significance of any observed clustering, and most importantly, (ii) an explicit dependence of cluster probabilities on the chosen angular bin size.

  13. Thermal activation in statistical clusters of magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hovorka, O.

    2017-02-01

    This article presents a kinetic Monte-Carlo study of thermally activated magnetisation dynamics in clusters of statistically distributed magnetic nanoparticles. The structure of clusters is assumed to be of fractal nature, consistently with recent observations of magnetic particle aggregation in cellular environments. The computed magnetisation relaxation decay and frequency-dependent hysteresis loops are seen to significantly depend on the fractal dimension of aggregates, leading to accelerated magnetisation relaxation and reduction in the size of hysteresis loops as the fractal dimension increases from one-dimensional-like to three-dimensional-like clusters. Discussed are implications for applications in nanomedicine, such as magnetic hyperthermia or magnetic particle imaging.

  14. An in-situ phosphorus source for the synthesis of Cu3P and the subsequent conversion to Cu3PS4 nanoparticle clusters

    DOE PAGES

    Sheets, Erik J.; Stach, Eric A.; Yang, Wei -Chang; ...

    2015-09-20

    The search for alternative earth abundant semiconducting nanocrystals for sustainable energy applications has brought forth the need for nanoscale syntheses beyond bulk synthesis routes. Of particular interest are metal phosphides and derivative I-V-VI chalcogenides including copper phosphide (Cu3P) and copper thiophosphate (Cu3PS4). Herein, we report a one-pot, solution-based synthesis of Cu3P nanocrystals utilizing an in-situ phosphorus source: phosphorus pentasulfide (P2S5) in trioctylphosphine (TOP). By injecting this phosphorus source into a copper solution in oleylamine (OLA), uniform and size controlled Cu3P nanocrystals with a phosphorous-rich surface are synthesized. The subsequent reaction of the Cu3P nanocrystals with decomposing thiourea forms nanoscale Cu3PS4more » particles having p-type conductivity and an effective optical band gap of 2.36 eV.« less

  15. Labile aggregation stimulating substance, free fatty acids, and platelet aggregation.

    PubMed

    Gerrard, J M; White, J G; Krivit, W

    1976-01-01

    Labile aggregation stimulating substance (LASS), an intermediate produced during platelet biosynthesis of PGE2 and PGF2alpha, acts as a physiologic intercellular messenger to promote platelet aggregation and the release reaction. The activity is formed by intact cells after physiologic stimulation or can be generated from platelet membrane fractions after combination with arachidonate. In the present investigation, small amounts of polyunsaturated fatty acids added to an incubation mixture of platelet microsomes and arachidonate were found to significantly inhibit subsequent platelet aggregation. Saturated and mono-unsaturated fatty acids in the same concentrations were without effect. However, in higher concentrations mono-unsaturated fatty acids were found to be inhibitory and stearic acid was found to enhance subsequent platelet aggregation. The inhibition caused by the polyunsaturated fatty acid, linoleate, was shown to be the result of an effect on the production of LASS through an interaction with the platelet enzyme responsible for conversion of arachidonate to LASS. In contrast, stearic acid was found to enhance platelet aggregation by acting on the platelets and not directly on LASS production. The results suggest that small changes in the fatty acid composition of platelet phospholipids could significantly influence platelet reactivity.

  16. The Self-energy Of Growing Aggregates: "Strength Regime"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guimaraes, Ana H. F.; Spahn, F.; Seiss, M.; Brilliantov, N. V.

    2009-09-01

    The vivid appearance of the outer regions of Saturn's rings points to a balance of ongoing fragmentation and coagulation processes. This idea finds support especially in the F-ring, where collisional processes occur on an almost daily basis stirred by perturbations of the satellites Prometheus and Pandora, and in addition due the presence of putative moonlets. In order to quantify this balance in a kinetic theory we propose to calculate the resistivity of small agglomerates ("dynamic ephemeral bodies") against rupture due collisional processes and tidal pull. Earlies studies have shown that the resistivity of an aggregate is divided into two phases: "strength regime" and "gravitational regime". Early in their formation, small agglomerates are supported basically by their "glue" between the particles (adhesion) - "strength regime". For larger agglomerates the "gravitational regime" takes over provided their sizes to be bigger than a threshold in which the self-gravitational energy exceeds the adhesive binding energy, in this case the cluster's constituents are held together gravitationally. We calculated the self-energy caused by adhesion and gravity of ring's aggregates which has been considered as the threshold of impact energy or of tidal work to disrupt the agglomerate. Using a Ballistic Particle Cluster Aggregate Model (BPCA) we varied the densities of the aggregates and the size distribution of their constituents (1-10cm), calculated their self-energy and identified the transition between the "strength" to "gravitational regime". The transition between the regimes occurs at house-size aggregates (diameter of approximately 20m), a fact, that fits to the cut-off on the dense rings' main population (cm - 5m in size). Acknowledgments: A.H.F.G. thanks Dr. E. Vieira-Neto for the discussions, and also the DAAD and Uni-Potsdam for the financial support of this project.

  17. Mechanism of Algal Aggregation by Bacillus sp. Strain RP1137

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Ryan J.

    2014-01-01

    Alga-derived biofuels are one of the best alternatives for economically replacing liquid fossil fuels with a fungible renewable energy source. Production of fuel from algae is technically feasible but not yet economically viable. Harvest of dilute algal biomass from the surrounding water remains one of the largest barriers to economic production of algal biofuel. We identified Bacillus sp. strain RP1137 in a previous study and showed that this strain can rapidly aggregate several biofuel-producing algae in a pH- and divalent-cation-dependent manner. In this study, we further characterized the mechanism of algal aggregation by RP1137. We show that aggregation of both algae and bacteria is optimal in the exponential phase of growth and that the density of ionizable residues on the RP1137 cell surface changes with growth stage. Aggregation likely occurs via charge neutralization with calcium ions at the cell surface of both algae and bacteria. We show that charge neutralization occurs at least in part through binding of calcium to negatively charged teichoic acid residues. The addition of calcium also renders both algae and bacteria more able to bind to hydrophobic beads, suggesting that aggregation may occur through hydrophobic interactions. Knowledge of the aggregation mechanism may enable engineering of RP1137 to obtain more efficient algal harvesting. PMID:24771029

  18. The history of aggregate development in the denver, Co area

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langer, W.H.

    2009-01-01

    At the start of the 20th century Denver's population was 203,795. Most streets were unpaved. Buildings were constructed of wood frame or masonry. Transport was by horse-drawn-wagon or rail. Statewide, aggregate consumption was less than 0.25 metric tons per person per year. One hundred years later Denver had a population of 2,365,345. Today Denver is a major metropolitan area at the crossroads of two interstates, home to a new international airport, and in the process of expanding its light rail transit system. The skyline is punctuated with skyscrapers. The urban center is surrounded with edge cities. These changes required huge amounts of aggregate. Statewide, aggregate consumption increased 50 fold to over 13 metric tons per person per year. Denver has a large potential supply of aggregate, but sand and gravel quality decreases downstream from the mountain front and potential sources of crushed stone occur in areas prized for their scenic beauty. These issues, along with urban encroachment and citizen opposition, have complicated aggregate development and have paved a new path for future aggregate development including sustainable resource management and reclamation techniques.

  19. Mechanism of algal aggregation by Bacillus sp. strain RP1137.

    PubMed

    Powell, Ryan J; Hill, Russell T

    2014-07-01

    Alga-derived biofuels are one of the best alternatives for economically replacing liquid fossil fuels with a fungible renewable energy source. Production of fuel from algae is technically feasible but not yet economically viable. Harvest of dilute algal biomass from the surrounding water remains one of the largest barriers to economic production of algal biofuel. We identified Bacillus sp. strain RP1137 in a previous study and showed that this strain can rapidly aggregate several biofuel-producing algae in a pH- and divalent-cation-dependent manner. In this study, we further characterized the mechanism of algal aggregation by RP1137. We show that aggregation of both algae and bacteria is optimal in the exponential phase of growth and that the density of ionizable residues on the RP1137 cell surface changes with growth stage. Aggregation likely occurs via charge neutralization with calcium ions at the cell surface of both algae and bacteria. We show that charge neutralization occurs at least in part through binding of calcium to negatively charged teichoic acid residues. The addition of calcium also renders both algae and bacteria more able to bind to hydrophobic beads, suggesting that aggregation may occur through hydrophobic interactions. Knowledge of the aggregation mechanism may enable engineering of RP1137 to obtain more efficient algal harvesting.

  20. Anatomical localization and stereoisomeric composition of Tribolium castaneum aggregation pheromones

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We report that the abdomen and associated tissues are the predominant sources of male-produced pheromones in the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum, and for the first time describe the stereoisomeric composition of the natural blend of isomers of the aggregation pheromone 4,8-dimethyldecanal (DMD...

  1. 40 CFR 60.692-4 - Standards: Aggregate facility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standards: Aggregate facility. 60.692-4 Section 60.692-4 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STANDARDS OF PERFORMANCE FOR NEW STATIONARY SOURCES Standards of Performance for VOC...

  2. 40 CFR 60.692-4 - Standards: Aggregate facility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Standards: Aggregate facility. 60.692-4 Section 60.692-4 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STANDARDS OF PERFORMANCE FOR NEW STATIONARY SOURCES Standards of Performance for VOC...

  3. 40 CFR 60.692-4 - Standards: Aggregate facility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Standards: Aggregate facility. 60.692-4 Section 60.692-4 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STANDARDS OF PERFORMANCE FOR NEW STATIONARY SOURCES Standards of Performance for VOC...

  4. 40 CFR 60.692-4 - Standards: Aggregate facility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Standards: Aggregate facility. 60.692-4 Section 60.692-4 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STANDARDS OF PERFORMANCE FOR NEW STATIONARY SOURCES Standards of Performance for VOC...

  5. 40 CFR 60.692-4 - Standards: Aggregate facility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Standards: Aggregate facility. 60.692-4 Section 60.692-4 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STANDARDS OF PERFORMANCE FOR NEW STATIONARY SOURCES Standards of Performance for VOC...

  6. ACToR: Aggregated Computational Toxicology Resource (T)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The EPA Aggregated Computational Toxicology Resource (ACToR) is a set of databases compiling information on chemicals in the environment from a large number of public and in-house EPA sources. ACToR has 3 main goals: (1) The serve as a repository of public toxicology information ...

  7. Sources of Variation in a Two-Step Monitoring Protocol for Species Clustered in Conspicuous Points: Dolichotis patagonum as a Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Alonso Roldán, Virginia; Bossio, Luisina; Galván, David E.

    2015-01-01

    In species showing distributions attached to particular features of the landscape or conspicuous signs, counts are commonly made by making focal observations where animals concentrate. However, to obtain density estimates for a given area, independent searching for signs and occupancy rates of suitable sites is needed. In both cases, it is important to estimate detection probability and other possible sources of variation to avoid confounding effects on measurements of abundance variation. Our objective was to assess possible bias and sources of variation in a two-step protocol in which random designs were applied to search for signs while continuously recording video cameras were used to perform abundance counts where animals are concentrated, using mara (Dolichotis patagonum) as a case study. The protocol was successfully applied to maras within the Península Valdés protected area, given that the protocol was logistically suitable, allowed warrens to be found, the associated adults to be counted, and the detection probability to be estimated. Variability was documented in both components of the two-step protocol. These sources of variation should be taken into account when applying this protocol. Warren detectability was approximately 80% with little variation. Factors related to false positive detection were more important than imperfect detection. The detectability for individuals was approximately 90% using the entire day of observations. The shortest sampling period with a similar detection capacity than a day was approximately 10 hours, and during this period, the visiting dynamic did not show trends. For individual mara, the detection capacity of the camera was not significantly different from the observer during fieldwork. The presence of the camera did not affect the visiting behavior of adults to the warren. Application of this protocol will allow monitoring of the near-threatened mara providing a minimum local population size and a baseline for

  8. Investigating the sources and potential health risks of environmental contaminants in the soils and drinking waters from the rural clusters in Thiva area (Greece).

    PubMed

    Kelepertzis, Efstratios

    2014-02-01

    The present study investigates the possible influence of human activities on metal loadings of topsoil in a typical small rural city in central Greece and the chemical quality of tap water in surrounding villages. Furthermore, the study aimed to examine potential health risks of naturally enriched heavy metals to exposed population taking into account the soil and drinking water as exposure pathways. The mean concentrations of Ni, Cr, Co, Mn, Pb, Cu, Zn and Cd in the soil were 1777, 285, 99, 946, 30, 26, 78 and 0.67 mg/kg respectively. Combination of pollution indexes based on local reference background soils and statistical analyses (correlation analysis, cluster analysis and principal component analysis) revealed that anthropogenic activities have not modified the natural soil chemistry at least in a large scale. High Hazard Quotient (HQ) values for children were estimated for Ni, Cr and Co based on total metal concentrations for the soil ingestion route (9.26E-01, 9.75E-01 and 3.45E+00 respectively). However, evaluation of HQs based on published bioaccessible concentrations suggested that the population groups would not likely experience potential health risks as a result of exposure to contaminated soils. Concentrations of Cr(VI) in tap waters were within the allowable limits. However, the risk assessment model revealed that local residents (adults) of Eleonas and Neochori villages are at some carcinogenic risks considering lifetime ingestion of water (potential cancer risks 2.05E-04 and 1.29E-04 respectively). Despite the uncertainties accompanying these procedures and the great deal of debate regarding the human carcinogenicity of Cr(VI) by the oral route, results of this study drive attention to remediation measures that should include epidemiological studies for the local population.

  9. Fractal Aggregates in Tennis Ball Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sabin, J.; Bandin, M.; Prieto, G.; Sarmiento, F.

    2009-01-01

    We present a new practical exercise to explain the mechanisms of aggregation of some colloids which are otherwise not easy to understand. We have used tennis balls to simulate, in a visual way, the aggregation of colloids under reaction-limited colloid aggregation (RLCA) and diffusion-limited colloid aggregation (DLCA) regimes. We have used the…

  10. Aggregate size and structure determination of nanomaterials in physiological media: importance of dynamic evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afrooz, A. R. M. Nabiul; Hussain, Saber M.; Saleh, Navid B.

    2014-12-01

    Most in vitro nanotoxicological assays are performed after 24 h exposure. However, in determining size and shape effect of nanoparticles in toxicity assays, initial characterization data are generally used to describe experimental outcome. The dynamic size and structure of aggregates are typically ignored in these studies. This brief communication reports dynamic evolution of aggregation characteristics of gold nanoparticles. The study finds that gradual increase in aggregate size of gold nanospheres (AuNS) occurs up to 6 h duration; beyond this time period, the aggregation process deviates from gradual to a more abrupt behavior as large networks are formed. Results of the study also show that aggregated clusters possess unique structural conformation depending on nominal diameter of the nanoparticles. The differences in fractal dimensions of the AuNS samples likely occurred due to geometric differences, causing larger packing propensities for smaller sized particles. Both such observations can have profound influence on dosimetry for in vitro nanotoxicity analyses.

  11. Formation and Growth of Stacking Fault Tetrahedra in Ni via Vacancy Aggregation Mechanism

    DOE PAGES

    Aidhy, Dilpuneet S.; Lu, Chenyang; Jin, Ke; ...

    2015-12-29

    Using molecular dynamics simulations, the formation and growth of stacking fault tetrahedra (SFT) are captured by vacancy cluster diffusion and aggregation mechanisms in Ni. The vacancytetrahedron acts as a nucleation point for SFT formation. Simulations show that perfect SFT can grow to the next size perfect SFT via a vacancy aggregation mechanism. The stopping and range of ions in matter (SRIM) calculations and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations reveal that SFT can form farther away from the initial cascade-event locations, indicating the operation of diffusion-based vacancy-aggregation mechanism.

  12. Thermodynamic modeling of asphaltene aggregation.

    PubMed

    Rogel, E

    2004-02-03

    A new molecular thermodynamic model for the description of the aggregation behavior of asphaltenes in different solvents is presented. This new model is relatively simple and strictly predictive and does not use any experimental information from asphaltene solutions. In this model, asphaltene aggregates are described as composed of an aromatic core formed by stacked aromatic sheets surrounded by aliphatic chains. The proposed model qualitatively predicts the asphaltene aggregation behavior in a series of different solvents. In particular, the experimental trends observed for the variation of aggregate size with (1) asphaltene molecular characteristics (condensation index, aromaticity, and chain length), (2) asphaltene concentration, (3) solvent characteristics, and (4) temperature have been successfully reproduced by the proposed model. The model also provides a plausible explanation for the existence or absence of a critical micelle concentration (cmc) for asphaltene solutions. Specifically, the model predicted that the asphaltenes with low aromaticities and low aromatic condensations do not exhibit cmc behavior. Finally, the obtained results clearly support the classical model for asphaltene aggregates.

  13. Spatial aggregation: Language and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey-Kellogg, C.; Zhao, F.; Yip, K.

    1996-12-31

    Spatial aggregation is a framework for organizing computations around image-like, analogue representations of physical processes in data interpretation and control tasks. It conceptualizes common computational structures in a class of implemented problem solvers for difficult scientific and engineering problems. It comprises a mechanism, a language, and a programming style. The spatial aggregation mechanism transforms a numerical input field to successively higher-level descriptions by applying a small, identical set of operators to each layer given a metric, neighborhood relation and equivalence relation. This paper describes the spatial aggregation language and its applications. The spatial aggregation language provides two abstract data types - neighborhood graph and field - and a set of interface operators for constructing the transformations of the field, together with a library of component implementations from which a user can mix-and-match and specialize for a particular application. The language allows users to isolate and express important computational ideas in different problem domains while hiding low-level details. We illustrate the use of the language with examples ranging from trajectory grouping in dynamics interpretation to region growing in image analysis. Programs for these different task domains can be written in a modular, concise fashion in the spatial aggregation language.

  14. Leaching behaviour of synthetic aggregates.

    PubMed

    van der Sloot, H A; Hoede, D; Cresswell, D J; Barton, J R

    2001-01-01

    In the framework of EU project "Utilising innovative kiln technology to recycle waste into synthetic aggregate" (BRST-CT98-5234), the leaching behaviour of synthetic aggregates has been studied to assess its environmental compatibility in the various stages of its use. Since the conditions are very different for the different uses, the assessment calls for a variety of different leaching conditions. The pH dependence test is used to cover important differences in pH environment to which the materials are exposed to as well as for an assessment of the buffering capacity of the material. Synthetic aggregate features a low buffer capacity, which makes it sensitive to externally imposed pH conditions. Utilisation and storage exposed to acidic conditions needs to be avoided. The results of the pH dependence test and column leaching test are mutually consistent. The CEN TC 154 method appears to provide systematically low values due to the arbitrary selection of test conditions. Synthetic aggregate studied to date will not adversely affect the concrete in its service life. The main issue for aggregate use is the recycling and the "end of life" condition, when the material becomes construction debris. Not metals, but oxyanions, such as Cr VI and Mo are most relevant under these conditions. A concise test has been applied to assess crucial aspects of leaching for different production mixes.

  15. Novel insights into amylin aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Pillay, Karen; Govender, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Amylin is a peptide that aggregates into species that are toxic to pancreatic beta cells, leading to type II diabetes. This study has for the first time quantified amylin association and dissociation kinetics (association constant (ka) = 28.7 ± 5.1 L mol−1 s−1 and dissociation constant (kd) = 2.8 ± 0.6 ×10−4 s−1) using surface plasmon resonance (SPR). Thus far, techniques used for the sizing of amylin aggregates do not cater for the real-time monitoring of unconstrained amylin in solution. In this regard we evaluated recently innovated nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA). In addition, both SPR and NTA were used to study the effect of previously synthesized amylin derivatives on amylin aggregation and to evaluate their potential as a cell-free system for screening potential inhibitors of amylin-mediated cytotoxicity. Results obtained from NTA highlighted a predominance of 100–300 nm amylin aggregates and correlation to previously published cytotoxicity results suggests the toxic species of amylin to be 200–300 nm in size. The results seem to indicate that NTA has potential as a new technique to monitor the aggregation potential of amyloid peptides in solution and also to screen potential inhibitors of amylin-mediated cytotoxicity. PMID:26019498

  16. Aggregated Recommendation through Random Forests

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Aggregated recommendation refers to the process of suggesting one kind of items to a group of users. Compared to user-oriented or item-oriented approaches, it is more general and, therefore, more appropriate for cold-start recommendation. In this paper, we propose a random forest approach to create aggregated recommender systems. The approach is used to predict the rating of a group of users to a kind of items. In the preprocessing stage, we merge user, item, and rating information to construct an aggregated decision table, where rating information serves as the decision attribute. We also model the data conversion process corresponding to the new user, new item, and both new problems. In the training stage, a forest is built for the aggregated training set, where each leaf is assigned a distribution of discrete rating. In the testing stage, we present four predicting approaches to compute evaluation values based on the distribution of each tree. Experiments results on the well-known MovieLens dataset show that the aggregated approach maintains an acceptable level of accuracy. PMID:25180204

  17. Fine Ash Aggregation Processes Observed In Volcanic Plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinkleff, P. G.

    2012-12-01

    Fine airborne volcanic ash was collected during the eruptions of Augustine in 2006, Pavlof in 2007, and Redoubt in 2009 using Davis Rotating Unit for Measurement (DRUM) inertial cascade impactors to observe atmospheric volcanic ash aggregation. Aerosol ash collection by DRUM sampler preserved particle morphologies and compositions that are altered or destroyed by deposition. DRUM samples were analyzed by Scanning Electron Microscopy with Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy to determine particle size, shape, and composition. Ash particles were observed as single grains, ash aggregates, and hybrid ash/marine aerosol aggregates. Single grain ash occurred as single angular silicate shards and likely formed under ash and marine aerosol limited conditions. Ash aggregates occurred as loosely consolidated silicate ash clumps in pyroclastic flow elutriation plumes and were found in a discrete aerodynamic size range between 2.5-1.15 μm. Ash aggregates likely formed in fine ash-rich conditions which resulted from clast milling in flows that also generated abundant electrostatic particle charge. Hybrid ash/marine aerosol aggregates were composed of silicate ash and sea salt with non-sea salt sulfates. The mass concentration of sulfate did not vary systematically with ash which indicated that the sulfate source was not necessarily volcanic. Hybrid ash was common in all samples and likely formed when downward mixing ash mingled with upward mixing sea salt and non-sea salt sulfate aerosol.EM image of ash aggregates with individual ash grains. EM image with EDS element maps of hybrid ash/marine aerosol aggregates. Si is present with marine Cl and S.

  18. PHAT Stellar Cluster Survey. II. Andromeda Project Cluster Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, L. Clifton; Seth, Anil C.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Wallace, Matthew L.; Simpson, Robert J.; Lintott, Chris J.; Kapadia, Amit; Skillman, Evan D.; Caldwell, Nelson; Fouesneau, Morgan; Weisz, Daniel R.; Williams, Benjamin F.; Beerman, Lori C.; Gouliermis, Dimitrios A.; Sarajedini, Ata

    2015-04-01

    We construct a stellar cluster catalog for the Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury (PHAT) survey using image classifications collected from the Andromeda Project citizen science website. We identify 2753 clusters and 2270 background galaxies within ˜0.5 deg2 of PHAT imaging searched, or ˜400 kpc2 in deprojected area at the distance of the Andromeda Galaxy (M31). These identifications result from 1.82 million classifications of ˜20,000 individual images (totaling ˜7 gigapixels) by tens of thousands of volunteers. We show that our crowd-sourced approach, which collects >80 classifications per image, provides a robust, repeatable method of cluster identification. The high spatial resolution Hubble Space Telescope images resolve individual stars in each cluster and are instrumental in the factor of ˜6 increase in the number of clusters known within the survey footprint. We measure integrated photometry in six filter passbands, ranging from the near-UV to the near-IR. PHAT clusters span a range of ˜8 magnitudes in F475W (g-band) luminosity, equivalent to ˜4 decades in cluster mass. We perform catalog completeness analysis using >3000 synthetic cluster simulations to determine robust detection limits and demonstrate that the catalog is 50% complete down to ˜500 {{M}⊙ } for ages <100 Myr. We include catalogs of clusters, background galaxies, remaining unselected candidates, and synthetic cluster simulations, making all information publicly available to the community. The catalog published here serves as the definitive base data product for PHAT cluster science, providing a census of star clusters in an {{L}\\star } spiral galaxy with unmatched sensitivity and quality.

  19. IP Profiling via Service Cluster Membership Vectors

    SciTech Connect

    Bartoletti, A

    2009-02-23

    This study investigates the feasibility of establishing and maintaining a system of compact IP behavioral profiles as a robust means of computer anomaly definition and detection. These profiles are based upon the degree to which a system's (IP's) network traffic is distributed among stable characteristic clusters derived of the aggregate session traffic generated by each of the major network services. In short, an IP's profile represents its degree of membership in these derived service clusters. The goal is to quantify and rank behaviors that are outside of the statistical norm for the services in question, or present significant deviation from profile for individual client IPs. Herein, we establish stable clusters for accessible features of common session traffic, migrate these clusters over time, define IP behavior profiles with respect to these clusters, migrate individual IP profiles over time, and demonstrate the detection of IP behavioral changes in terms of deviation from profile.

  20. A microwell cell culture platform for the aggregation of pancreatic β-cells.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Abigail B; Lin, Chien-Chi; Anseth, Kristi S

    2012-08-01

    Cell-cell contact between pancreatic β-cells is important for maintaining survival and normal insulin secretion. Various techniques have been developed to promote cell-cell contact between β-cells, but a simple yet robust method that affords precise control over three-dimensional (3D) β-cell cluster size has not been demonstrated. To address this need, we developed a poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogel microwell platform using photolithography. This microwell cell-culture platform promotes the formation of 3D β-cell aggregates of defined sizes from 25 to 210 μm in diameter. Using this platform, mouse insulinoma 6 (MIN6) β-cells formed aggregates with cell-cell adherin junctions. These naturally formed cell aggregates with controllable sizes can be removed from the microwells for macroencapsulation, implantation, or other biological assays. When removed and subsequently encapsulated in PEG hydrogels, the aggregated cell clusters demonstrated improved cellular viability (>90%) over 7 days in culture, while the β-cells encapsulated as single cells maintained only 20% viability. Aggregated MIN6 cells also exhibited more than fourfold higher insulin secretion in response to a glucose challenge compared with encapsulated single β-cells. Further, the cell aggregates stained positively for E-cadherin, indicative of the formation of cell junctions. Using this hydrogel microwell cell-culture method, viable and functional β-cell aggregates of specific sizes were created, providing a platform from which other biologically relevant questions may be answered.

  1. The Kinetics of Dislocation Loop Formation in Ferritic Alloys Through the Aggregation of Irradiation Induced Defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohnert, Aaron Anthony

    The mechanical properties of materials are often degraded over time by exposure to irradiation environments, a phenomenon that has hindered the development of multiple nuclear reactor design concepts. Such property changes are the result of microstructural changes induced by the collision of high energy particles with the atoms in a material. The lattice defects generated in these recoil events migrate and interact to form extended damage structures. This study has used theoretical models based on the mean field chemical reaction rate theory to analyze the aggregation of isolated lattice defects into larger microstructural features that are responsible for long term property changes, focusing on the development of black dot damage in ferritic iron based alloys. The purpose of such endeavors is two-fold. Primarily, such models explain and quantify the processes through which these microstructures form. Additionally, models provide insight into the behavior and properties of the point defects and defect clusters which drive general microstructural evolution processes. The modeling effort presented in this work has focused on physical fidelity, drawing from a variety of sources of information to characterize the unobservable defect generation and agglomeration processes that give rise to the observable features reported in experimental data. As such, the models are based not solely on isolated point defect creation, as is the case with many older rate theory approaches, but instead on realistic estimates of the defect cluster population produced in high energy cascade damage events. Experimental assessments of the microstructural changes evident in transmission electron microscopy studies provide a means to measure the efficacy of the kinetic models. Using common assumptions of the mobility of defect clusters generated in cascade damage conditions, an unphysically high density of damage features develops at the temperatures of interest with a temperature dependence

  2. Aggregate Resources Report Department of Defense and Bureau of Land Management Lands, Southwestern United States.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-02-10

    commercial production of aggregate from the Santa Fe Formation comes from stream- channel deposits, younger river -terrace deposits, and alluvial fans...3). It includes portions of Yuma, Mohave, Pima , Pinal, Yavapai, and Maricopa counties , Arizona , and Impe- rial, Riverside, and San Bernardino counties ...Phoenix, Arizona , and Santa Fe, Albuquerque, and Socorro, New Mexico. Principal sources of data directly pertaining to concrete aggregate or related

  3. shiftNMFk 1.1: Robust Nonnegative matrix factorization with kmeans clustering and signal shift, for allocation of unknown physical sources, toy version for open sourcing with publications

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandrov, Boian S.; Lliev, Filip L.; Stanev, Valentin G.; Vesselinov, Velimir V.

    2016-07-19

    This code is a toy (short) version of CODE-2016-83. From a general perspective, the code represents an unsupervised adaptive machine learning algorithm that allows efficient and high performance de-mixing and feature extraction of a multitude of non-negative signals mixed and recorded by a network of uncorrelated sensor arrays. The code identifies the number of the mixed original signals and their locations. Further, the code also allows deciphering of signals that have been delayed in regards to the mixing process in each sensor. This code is high customizable and it can be efficiently used for a fast macro-analyses of data. The code is applicable to a plethora of distinct problems: chemical decomposition, pressure transient decomposition, unknown sources/signal allocation, EM signal decomposition. An additional procedure for allocation of the unknown sources is incorporated in the code.

  4. Customer Aggregation: An Opportunity for Green Power?

    SciTech Connect

    Holt, E.; Bird, L.

    2001-02-26

    We undertook research into the experience of aggregation groups to determine whether customer aggregation offers an opportunity to bring green power choices to more customers. The objectives of this report, therefore, are to (1) identify the different types of aggregation that are occurring today, (2) learn whether aggregation offers an opportunity to advance sales of green power, and (3) share these concepts and approaches with potential aggregators and green power advocates.

  5. Fractal structure and the dynamics of aggregation of synthetic melanin in low pH aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, J.S.; Sung, J.; Eisner, M.; Moss, S.C.; Gallas, J.

    1989-01-01

    We have used static and dynamic light scattering to study the dynamics of aggregation of synthetic melanin, an amorphous biopolymeric substance, in low pH aqueous solution. We have found that, depending on the final pH value of the solutions, there existed two regimes of the aggregation kinetics, one corresponding to diffusion limited aggregation (DLA), and the other corresponding to reaction limited aggregation (RLA). The precipitates formed in these two regimes can be characterized by fractal structures. We have found fractal dimensions of d/sub f/ = 1.8 for the DLA clusters and d/sub f/ = 2.2 for the RLA clusters. These results agree well with the proposed limits of the fractal dimensions of the gold aggregates formed in aqueous solutions by Weitz et al.

  6. The fractal structure and the dynamics of aggregation of synthetic melanin in low pH aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, J. S.; Sung, J.; Eisner, M.; Moss, S. C.; Gallas, J.

    1989-01-01

    We have used static and dynamic light scattering to study the dynamics of aggregation of synthetic melanin, an amorphous biopolymeric substance, in low pH aqueous solution. We have found that, depending on the final pH value of the solutions, there existed two regimes of the aggregation kinetics, one corresponding to diffusion limited aggregation (DLA), and the other corresponding to reaction limited aggregation (RLA). The precipitates formed in these two regimes can be characterized by fractal structures. We have found fractal dimensions of df =1.8 for the DLA clusters and df =2.2 for the RLA clusters. These results agree well with the proposed limits of the fractal dimensions of the gold aggregates formed in aqueous solutions by Weitz et al.

  7. Equilibrium structure of ferrofluid aggregates.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Mina; Tománek, David

    2010-11-17

    We study the equilibrium structure of large but finite aggregates of magnetic dipoles, representing a colloidal suspension of magnetite particles in a ferrofluid. With increasing system size, the structural motif evolves from chains and rings to multi-chain and multi-ring assemblies. Very large systems form single- and multi-wall coils, tubes and scrolls. These structural changes result from a competition between various energy terms, which can be approximated analytically within a continuum model. We also study the effect of external parameters such as magnetic field on the relative stability of these structures. Our results may give insight into experimental data obtained during solidification of ferrofluid aggregates at temperatures where thermal fluctuations become negligible in comparison to inter-particle interactions. These data may also help to experimentally control the aggregation of magnetic particles.

  8. Equilibrium structure of ferrofluid aggregates

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Mina; Tomanek, David

    2010-01-01

    We study the equilibrium structure of large but finite aggregates of magnetic dipoles, representing a colloidal suspension of magnetite particles in a ferrofluid. With increasing system size, the structural motif evolves from chains and rings to multi-chain and multi-ring assemblies. Very large systems form single- and multi-wall coils, tubes and scrolls. These structural changes result from a competition between various energy terms, which can be approximated analytically within a continuum model. We also study the effect of external parameters such as magnetic field on the relative stability of these structures. Our results may give insight into experimental data obtained during solidification of ferrofluid aggregates at temperatures where thermal fluctuations become negligible in comparison to inter-particle interactions. These data may also help to experimentally control the aggregation of magnetic particles.

  9. Structure and dynamics of cationic van-der-Waals clusters. II. Dynamics of protonated argon clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritschel, T.; Zuhrt, Ch.; Zülicke, L.; Kuntz, P. J.

    2007-01-01

    A diatomics-in-molecules (DIM) model with ab-initio input data, which in part I successfully described the structure and bonding properties of protonated argon clusters ArnH+, is used here to investigate some aspects of the dynamics of such aggregates for n up to 30. The simple triatomic ionic fragment, Ar2H+, is studied in some detail with respect to normal vibrations, characteristics of classical intramolecular dynamics as reflected in the Fourier spectra of dynamical variables, and accurate quantum states of the vibrational motion. For larger clusters ArnH+ (n ≤30), the normal vibrational frequencies (and displacement eigenvectors) are calculated and related to the cluster structure. In addition, the Fourier spectra are analyzed with respect to their variation with changing internal energy and cluster size. As expected, the clusters show some floppy character. Even a little vibrational excitation can lead to internal rearrangement and to Ar-atom evaporation from the clusters; this is studied in more detail for one small complex (n = 3). Electronic excitation to one of the low-lying excited states, which are all globally repulsive, leads to complete fragmentation (atomization) of the clusters. A variety of conceivable elementary collision processes involving protonated argon clusters are discussed. Some of these may play a role in the gas-phase formation of medium-sized ArnH+ aggregates.

  10. Effect of Organic Inputs on Strength and Stability of Soil Aggregates Under Rice-Wheat Rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Bappa; Chakraborty, Debashis; Singh, Vinod K.; Aggarwal, Pramila; Singh, Ravender; Dwivedi, Brahm S.

    2014-04-01

    The study aims to elucidate the impact of organic inputs on strength and structural stability of aggregates in a sandy loam soil. Tensile strength, friability and water stability of aggregates, and the carbon contents in bulk soil and in large macro (>2 mm), small macro (0.25-2 mm), micro (0.053-0.25 mm) and silt+clay size (<0.053) aggregates were evaluated in soils from a long-term experiment with rice-wheat rotation at Modipuram, India, with different sources and amounts of organic C inputs as partial substitution of N fertilizer. Addition of organic substrates significantly improved soil organic C contents, but the type and source of inputs had different impacts. Tensile strength of aggregates decreased and friability increased through organic inputs, with a maximum effect under green gram residue (rice)-farmyard manure (wheat) substitution. Higher macroaggregates in the crop residue- and farmyard manure-treated soils resulted in a higher aggregate mean weight diameter, which also had higher soil organic C contents. The bulk soil organic C had a strong relation with the mean weight diameter of aggregates, but the soil organic C content in all aggregate fractions was not necessarily effective for aggregate stability. The soil organic C content in large macroaggregates (2-8 mm) had a significant positive effect on aggregate stability, although a reverse effect was observed for aggregates <0.25 mm. Partial substitution of nitrogen by organic substrates improved aggregate properties and the soil organic C content in bulk soil and aggregate fractions, although the relative effect varied with the source and amount of the organic inputs.

  11. Experimental aggregation of volcanic ash: the role of liquid bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, S.; Kueppers, U.; Jacob, M.; Ayris, P. M.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2015-12-01

    Explosive volcanic eruptions may release vast quantities of ash. Because of its size, it has the greatest dispersal potential and can be distributed globally. Ash may pose severe risks for 1) air traffic, 2) human and animal health, 3) agriculture and 4) infrastructure. Such ash particles can however cluster and form ash aggregates that range in size from millimeters to centimeters. During their growth, weight and aerodynamic properties change. This leads to significantly changed transport and settling behavior. The physico-chemical processes involved in aggregation are quantitatively poorly constrained. We have performed laboratory ash aggregation experiments using the ProCell Lab System® of Glatt Ingenieurtechnik GmbH. Solid particles are set into motion in a fluidized bed over a range of well-controlled boundary conditions (e.g., air flow rate, gas temperature, humidity, liquid composition). In this manner we simulate the variable gas-particle flow conditions expected in eruption plumes and pyroclastic density currents. We have used 1) soda-lime glass beads as an analogue material and 2) natural volcanic ash from Laacher See Volcano (Germany). In order to influence form, size, stability and the production rate of aggregates, a range of experimental conditions (e.g., particle concentration, degree of turbulence, temperature and moisture in the process chamber and the composition of the liquid phase) have been employed. We have successfully reproduced several features of natural ash aggregates, including round, internally structured ash pellets up to 3 mm in diameter. These experimental results help to constrain the boundary conditions required for the generation of spherical, internally-structured ash aggregates that survive deposition and are preserved in the volcanological record. These results should also serve as input parameters for models of ash transport and ash mass distribution.

  12. A specialist's audit of aggregated occurrence records: An 'aggregator's' perspective.

    PubMed

    Belbin, Lee; Daly, Joanne; Hirsch, Tim; Hobern, Donald; Salle, John La

    2013-01-01

    A recent ZooKeys' paper (Mesibov, 2013: http://www.pensoft.net/journal_home_page.php?journal_id=1&page=article&SESID=df7bcb35b02603283dcb83ee0e0af0c9&type=show&article_id=5111) has highlighted data quality issues in aggregated data sets, but did not provide a realistic way to address these issues. This paper provides an aggregator's perspective including ways that the whole community can help to address data quality issues. The establishment of GBIF and national nodes (national aggregators) such as the Atlas of Living Australia (ALA) have integrated and exposed a huge diversity of biological observations along with many associated issues. Much of the admirable work by Mesibov (2013) was enabled by having the data exposed. Data quality, one of the highest priorities for GBIF, the national nodes and other aggregators, depends on both automatic methods and community experts to detect and correct data issues. Not all issues can however be automatically detected or corrected, so community assistance is needed to help improve the quality of exposed biological data. We do need to improve the infrastructure and associated processes to more easily identify data issues and document all changes to ensure a full record is permanently and publicly available.

  13. Environmentalism and natural aggregate mining

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Drew, L.J.; Langer, W.H.; Sachs, J.S.

    2002-01-01

    Sustaining a developed economy and expanding a developing one require the use of large volumes of natural aggregate. Almost all human activity (commercial, recreational, or leisure) is transacted in or on facilities constructed from natural aggregate. In our urban and suburban worlds, we are almost totally dependent on supplies of water collected behind dams and transported through aqueducts made from concrete. Natural aggregate is essential to the facilities that produce energy-hydroelectric dams and coal-fired powerplants. Ironically, the utility created for mankind by the use of natural aggregate is rarely compared favorably with the environmental impacts of mining it. Instead, the empty quarries and pits are seen as large negative environmental consequences. At the root of this disassociation is the philosophy of environmentalism, which flavors our perceptions of the excavation, processing, and distribution of natural aggregate. The two end-member ideas in this philosophy are ecocentrism and anthropocentrism. Ecocentrism takes the position that the natural world is a organism whose arteries are the rivers-their flow must not be altered. The soil is another vital organ and must not be covered with concrete and asphalt. The motto of the ecocentrist is "man must live more lightly on the land." The anthropocentrist wants clean water and air and an uncluttered landscape for human use. Mining is allowed and even encouraged, but dust and noise from quarry and pit operations must be minimized. The large volume of truck traffic is viewed as a real menace to human life and should be regulated and isolated. The environmental problems that the producers of natural aggregate (crushed stone and sand and gravel) face today are mostly difficult social and political concerns associated with the large holes dug in the ground and the large volume of heavy truck traffic associated with quarry and pit operations. These concerns have increased in recent years as society's demand for

  14. Hydrodynamic behavior of fractal aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiltzius, Pierre

    1987-02-01

    Measurements of the radius of gyration RG and the hydrodynamic radius RH of colloidal silica aggregates are reported. These aggregates have fractal geometry and RH is proportional to RG for 500 Å<=RH<=7000 Å, with a ratio RH/RG=0.72+/-0.02. The results are compared with predictions for macromolecules of various shapes. The proportionality of the two radii can be understood with use of the pair correlation function of fractal objects and hydrodynamic interactions on the Oseen level. The value of the ratio remains to be explained.

  15. Aggregation kinetics of stiff polyelectrolytes in the presence of multivalent salt.

    PubMed

    Fazli, Hossein; Golestanian, Ramin

    2007-10-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulations, the kinetics of bundle formation for stiff polyelectrolytes such as actin is studied in the solution of multivalent salt. The dominant kinetic mode of aggregation is found to be the case of one end of one rod meeting others at a right angle due to electrostatic interactions. The kinetic pathway to bundle formation involves a hierarchical structure of small clusters forming initially and then feeding into larger clusters, which is reminiscent of the flocculation dynamics of colloids. For the first few cluster sizes, the Smoluchowski formula for the time evolution of the cluster size gives a reasonable account of the results of our simulation without a single fitting parameter. The description using the Smoluchowski formula provides evidence for the aggregation time scale to be controlled by diffusion, with no appreciable energy barrier to overcome.

  16. Privacy-preserving data aggregation protocols for wireless sensor networks: a survey.

    PubMed

    Bista, Rabindra; Chang, Jae-Woo

    2010-01-01

    Many wireless sensor network (WSN) applications require privacy-preserving aggregation of sensor data during transmission from the source nodes to the sink node. In this paper, we explore several existing privacy-preserving data aggregation (PPDA) protocols for WSNs in order to provide some insights on their current status. For this, we evaluate the PPDA protocols on the basis of such metrics as communication and computation costs in order to demonstrate their potential for supporting privacy-preserving data aggregation in WSNs. In addition, based on the existing research, we enumerate some important future research directions in the field of privacy-preserving data aggregation for WSNs.

  17. Privacy-Preserving Data Aggregation Protocols for Wireless Sensor Networks: A Survey

    PubMed Central

    Bista, Rabindra; Chang, Jae-Woo

    2010-01-01

    Many wireless sensor network (WSN) applications require privacy-preserving aggregation of sensor data during transmission from the source nodes to the sink node. In this paper, we explore several existing privacy-preserving data aggregation (PPDA) protocols for WSNs in order to provide some insights on their current status. For this, we evaluate the PPDA protocols on the basis of such metrics as communication and computation costs in order to demonstrate their potential for supporting privacy-preserving data aggregation in WSNs. In addition, based on the existing research, we enumerate some important future research directions in the field of privacy-preserving data aggregation for WSNs. PMID:22399893

  18. CLAG: an unsupervised non hierarchical clustering algorithm handling biological data

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Searching for similarities in a set of biological data is intrinsically difficult due to possible data points that should not be clustered, or that should group within several clusters. Under these hypotheses, hierarchical agglomerative clustering is not appropriate. Moreover, if the dataset is not known enough, like often is the case, supervised classification is not appropriate either. Results CLAG (for CLusters AGgregation) is an unsupervised non hierarchical clustering algorithm designed to cluster a large variety of biological data and to provide a clustered matrix and numerical values indicating cluster strength. CLAG clusterizes correlation matrices for residues in protein families, gene-expression and miRNA data related to various cancer types, sets of species described by multidimensional vectors of characters, binary matrices. It does not ask to all data points to cluster and it converges yielding the same result at each run. Its simplicity and speed allows it to run on reasonably large datasets. Conclusions CLAG can be used to investigate the cluster structure present in biological datasets and to identify its underlying graph. It showed to be more informative and accurate than several known clustering methods, as hierarchical agglomerative clustering, k-means, fuzzy c-means, model-based clustering, affinity propagation clustering, and not to suffer of the convergence problem proper to this latter. PMID:23216858

  19. Deep RGS Observations of Clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R.; Mushotzky, R.; Loewenstein, M.

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the Reflection Grating Spectrometers (RGS) observations of clusters. It includes charts detailing the resolution difference between the European Photon Imaging Camera (EPIC) and the RGS and a partial review of existing observations, in graphic format, and as a table. Other sources show up in the ROSAT observations. The presentation reviews possible results that could be achieved in the event that 300 ks of time were allocated for the observations of clusters.

  20. Balancing aggregation and smoothing errors in inverse models

    DOE PAGES

    Turner, A. J.; Jacob, D. J.

    2015-06-30

    Inverse models use observations of a system (observation vector) to quantify the variables driving that system (state vector) by statistical optimization. When the observation vector is large, such as with satellite data, selecting a suitable dimension for the state vector is a challenge. A state vector that is too large cannot be effectively constrained by the observations, leading to smoothing error. However, reducing the dimension of the state vector leads to aggregation error as prior relationships between state vector elements are imposed rather than optimized. Here we present a method for quantifying aggregation and smoothing errors as a function ofmore » state vector dimension, so that a suitable dimension can be selected by minimizing the combined error. Reducing the state vector within the aggregation error constraints can have the added advantage of enabling analytical solution to the inverse problem with full error characterization. We compare three methods for reducing the dimension of the state vector from its native resolution: (1) merging adjacent elements (grid coarsening), (2) clustering with principal component analysis (PCA), and (3) applying a Gaussian mixture model (GMM) with Gaussian pdfs as state vector elements on which the native-resolution state vector elements are projected using radial basis functions (RBFs). The GMM method leads to somewhat lower aggregation error than the other methods, but more importantly it retains resolution of major local features in the state vector while smoothing weak and broad features.« less

  1. Familial aggregation and coaggregation of history of hypertension and stroke.

    PubMed

    Kondo, T; Toyoshima, H; Tsuzuki, Y; Hori, Y; Yatsuya, H; Tamakoshi, K; Tamakoshi, A; Ohno, Y

    2005-02-01

    We attempted to evaluate familial aggregation and coaggregation of history of hypertension and stroke. Past and family history of hypertension and stroke for 83 089 probands and their relatives were obtained from a data set for the Japan Collaborative Cohort Study for Evaluation of Cancer Risk sponsored by the Ministry of Education (JACC Study), which was initiated from 1988 to 1990. First, evaluation was performed for familial aggregation of each of two disorders using ordinal logistic regression of the generalized estimation equations (GEE) to account for dependence of observations within families. Secondly, in order to evaluate the familial congregation of the history of hypertension and stroke, a GEE-based multivariate probed predictive model was applied. After adjusting for the proband's age, level of obesity, smoking status, drinking status, habitation area, and the gender and type of the relatives, the estimated odds ratios for the intraindividual clustering and familial aggregation of the disease history showed statistically significant relationships. In addition, the history of the two disorders showed a significant relationship in terms of familial coaggregation independently of the aggregation of each disorder itself. Our results confirmed that hypertension and stroke coaggregate strongly within families through possible effects of genetic factors, which, alone or in conjunction with environmental factors, influence susceptibility to both hypertension and stroke.

  2. A survey of natural aggregate properties and characteristics important in remote sensing and airborne geophysics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knepper, D.H.; Langer, W.H.; Miller, S.

    1995-01-01

    Natural aggregate is vital to the construction industry. Although natural aggregate is a high volume/low value commodity that is abundant, new sources are becoming increasingly difficult to find and develop because of rigid industry specifications, political considerations, development and transportation costs, and environmental concerns. There are two primary sources of natural aggregate: (1) exposed or near-surface bedrock that can be crushed, and (2) deposits of sand and gravel. Remote sensing and airborne geophysics detect surface and near-surface phenomena, and may be useful for detecting and mapping potential aggregate sources; however, before a methodology for applying these techniques can be developed, it is necessary to understand the type, distribution, physical properties, and characteristics of natural aggregate deposits. The distribution of potential aggregate sources is closely tied to local geologic history. Conventional exploration for natural aggregate deposits has been largely a ground-based operation, although aerial photographs and topographic maps have been extensively used to target possible deposits. Today, the exploration process also considers factors such as the availability of the land, space and water supply for processing, political and environmental factors, and distance from the market; exploration and planning cannot be separated. There are many physical properties and characteristics by which to judge aggregate material for specific applications; most of these properties and characteristics pertain only to individual aggregate particles. The application of remote sensing and airborne geophysical measurements to detecting and mapping potential aggregate sources, however, is based on intrinsic bulk physical properties and extrinsic characteristics of the deposits that can be directly measured, mathematically derived from measurement, or interpreted with remote sensing and geophysical data. ?? 1995 Oxford UniversityPress.

  3. Studies on recycled aggregates-based concrete.

    PubMed

    Rakshvir, Major; Barai, Sudhirkumar V

    2006-06-01

    Reduced extraction of raw materials, reduced transportation cost, improved profits, reduced environmental impact and fast-depleting reserves of conventional natural aggregates has necessitated the use of recycling, in order to be able to conserve conventional natural aggregate. In this study various physical and mechanical properties of recycled concrete aggregates were examined. Recycled concrete aggregates are different from natural aggregates and concrete made from them has specific properties. The percentages of recycled concrete aggregates were varied and it was observed that properties such as compressive strength showed a decrease of up to 10% as the percentage of recycled concrete aggregates increased. Water absorption of recycled aggregates was found to be greater than natural aggregates, and this needs to be compensated during mix design.

  4. RAGG - R EPISODIC AGGREGATION PACKAGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The RAGG package is an R implementation of the CMAQ episodic model aggregation method developed by Constella Group and the Environmental Protection Agency. RAGG is a tool to provide climatological seasonal and annual deposition of sulphur and nitrogen for multimedia management. ...

  5. Sequence-dependent internalization of aggregating peptides.

    PubMed

    Couceiro, José R; Gallardo, Rodrigo; De Smet, Frederik; De Baets, Greet; Baatsen, Pieter; Annaert, Wim; Roose, Kenny; Saelens, Xavier; Schymkowitz, Joost; Rousseau, Frederic

    2015-01-02

    Recently, a number of aggregation disease polypeptides have been shown to spread from cell to cell, thereby displaying prionoid behavior. Studying aggregate internalization, however, is often hampered by the complex kinetics of the aggregation process, resulting in the concomitant uptake of aggregates of different sizes by competing mechanisms, which makes it difficult to isolate pathway-specific responses to aggregates. We designed synthetic aggregating peptides bearing different aggregation propensities with the aim of producing modes of uptake that are sufficiently distinct to differentially analyze the cellular response to internalization. We found that small acidic aggregates (≤500 nm in diameter) were taken up by nonspecific endocytosis as part of the fluid phase and traveled through the endosomal compartment to lysosomes. By contrast, bigger basic aggregates (>1 μm) were taken up through a mechanism dependent on cytoskeletal reorganization and membrane remodeling with the morphological hallmarks of phagocytosis. Importantly, the properties of these aggregates determined not only the mechanism of internalization but also the involvement of the proteostatic machinery (the assembly of interconnected networks that control the biogenesis, folding, trafficking, and degradation of proteins) in the process; whereas the internalization of small acidic aggregates is HSF1-independent, the uptake of larger basic aggregates was HSF1-dependent, requiring Hsp70. Our results show that the biophysical properties of aggregates determine both their mechanism of internalization and proteostatic response. It remains to be seen whether these differences in cellular response contribute to the particular role of specific aggregated proteins in disease.

  6. The infrared spectral transmittance of Aspergillus niger spore aggregated particle swarm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xinying; Hu, Yihua; Gu, Youlin; Li, Le

    2015-10-01

    Microorganism aggregated particle swarm, which is quite an important composition of complex media environment, can be developed as a new kind of infrared functional materials. Current researches mainly focus on the optical properties of single microorganism particle. As for the swarm, especially the microorganism aggregated particle swarm, a more accurate simulation model should be proposed to calculate its extinction effect. At the same time, certain parameters deserve to be discussed, which helps to better develop the microorganism aggregated particle swarm as a new kind of infrared functional materials. In this paper, take Aspergillus Niger spore as an example. On the one hand, a new calculation model is established. Firstly, the cluster-cluster aggregation (CCA) model is used to simulate the structure of Aspergillus Niger spore aggregated particle. Secondly, the single scattering extinction parameters for Aspergillus Niger spore aggregated particle are calculated by using the discrete dipole approximation (DDA) method. Thirdly, the transmittance of Aspergillus Niger spore aggregated particle swarm is simulated by using Monte Carlo method. On the other hand, based on the model proposed above, what influences can wavelength causes has been studied, including the spectral distribution of scattering intensity of Aspergillus Niger spore aggregated particle and the infrared spectral transmittance of the aggregated particle swarm within the range of 8~14μm incident infrared wavelengths. Numerical results indicate that the scattering intensity of Aspergillus Niger spore aggregated particle reduces with the increase of incident wavelengths at each scattering angle. Scattering energy mainly concentrates on the scattering angle between 0~40°, forward scattering has an obvious effect. In addition, the infrared transmittance of Aspergillus Niger spore aggregated particle swarm goes up with the increase of incident wavelengths. However, some turning points of the trend

  7. Observations of Distant Clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donahue, Megan

    2004-01-01

    The is the proceedings and papers supported by the LTSA grant: Homer, D. J.\\& Donahue, M. 2003, in "The Emergence of Cosmic Structure": 13'h Astrophysics Conference Proceedings, Vol. 666,3 1 1-3 14, (AIP). Baumgartner, W. H., Loewenstein, M., Horner, D. J., Mushotzky, R. F. 2003, HEAD- AAS, 35.3503. Homer, D. J. , Donahue, M., Voit G. M. 2003, HEAD-AAS, 35.1309. Nowak, M. A., Smith, B., Donahue, M., Stocke, J. 2003, HEAD-AAS, 35.1316. Scott, D., Borys, C., Chapman, S. C., Donahue, M., Fahlman, G. G., Halpem, M. Newbury, P. 2002, AAS, 128.01. Jones, L. R. et al. 2002, A new era in cosmology, ASP Conference Proceedings, Vol. 283, p. 223 Donahue, M., Daly, R. A., Homer, D. J. 2003, ApJ, 584, 643, Constraints on the Cluster Environments and Hotspot magnetic field strengths for radio sources 3280 and 3254. Donahue, M., et al. 2003, ApJ, 598, 190. The mass, baryonic fraction, and x-ray temperature of the luminous, high-redshift cluster of galaxies MS045 1.6-0305 Perlman, E. S. et al. 2002, ApJS, 140, 256. Smith, B. J., Nowak, M., Donahue, M., Stocke, J. 2003, AJ, 126, 1763. Chandra Observations of the Interacting NGC44 10 Group of Galaxies. Postman, M., Lauer, T. R., Oegerle, W., Donahue, M. 2002, ApJ, 579, 93. The KPNO/deep-range cluster survey I. The catalog and space density of intermediate-redshift clusters. Molnar, S. M., Hughes, J. P., Donahue, M., Joy, M. 2002, ApJ, 573, L91, Chandra Observations of Unresolved X-Ray Sources around Two Clusters of Galaxies. Donahue, M., Mack, J., 2002 NewAR, 46, 155, HST NIcmos and WFPC2 observations of molecular hydrogen and dust around cooling flows. Koekemoer, A. M. et al. 2002 NewAR, 46, 149, Interactions between the A2597 central radio source and dense gas host galaxy. Donahue, M. et al. 2002 ApJ, 569,689, Distant cluster hunting II.

  8. Wavelength selection in measuring red blood cell aggregation based on light transmittance.

    PubMed

    Uyuklu, Mehmet; Canpolat, Murat; Meiselman, Herbert J; Baskurt, Oguz K

    2011-11-01

    The reversible aggregation of red blood cells (RBC) is of current basic science and clinical interest. Using a flow channel and light transmittance (LT) through RBC suspensions, we have examined the effects of wavelength (500 to 900 nm) on the static and dynamic aspects of RBC aggregation for normal blood and suspensions with reduced or enhanced aggregation; the effects of oxygenation were also explored. Salient observations include: 1. significant effects of wavelength on aggregation parameters reflecting the extent of aggregation (i.e., number of RBC per aggregate); 2. no significant effects of wavelength on parameters reflecting the time course of RBC aggregation; 3. a prominent influence of hemoglobin oxygen saturation on both extent and time-course related aggregation parameters measured at wavelengths less than 700 nm, but only on the time-course at 800 nm; and 4. the power of parameters in detecting a given alteration of RBC aggregation is affected by wavelength, in general being greater at higher wavelengths. It is recommended that light sources with wavelengths around 800 nm be used in instruments for measuring RBC aggregation via LT.

  9. Wavelength selection in measuring red blood cell aggregation based on light transmittance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uyuklu, Mehmet; Canpolat, Murat; Meiselman, Herbert J.; Baskurt, Oguz K.

    2011-11-01

    The reversible aggregation of red blood cells (RBC) is of current basic science and clinical interest. Using a flow channel and light transmittance (LT) through RBC suspensions, we have examined the effects of wavelength (500 to 900 nm) on the static and dynamic aspects of RBC aggregation for normal blood and suspensions with reduced or enhanced aggregation; the effects of oxygenation were also explored. Salient observations include: 1. significant effects of wavelength on aggregation parameters reflecting the extent of aggregation (i.e., number of RBC per aggregate); 2. no significant effects of wavelength on parameters reflecting the time course of RBC aggregation; 3. a prominent influence of hemoglobin oxygen saturation on both extent and time-course related aggregation parameters measured at wavelengths less than 700 nm, but only on the time-course at 800 nm; and 4. the power of parameters in detecting a given alteration of RBC aggregation is affected by wavelength, in general being greater at higher wavelengths. It is recommended that light sources with wavelengths around 800 nm be used in instruments for measuring RBC aggregation via LT.

  10. Hierarchical Rank Aggregation with Applications to Nanotoxicology

    PubMed Central

    Telesca, Donatello; Rallo, Robert; George, Saji; Xia, Tian; Nel, André E.

    2014-01-01

    The development of high throughput screening (HTS) assays in the field of nanotoxicology provide new opportunities for the hazard assessment and ranking of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs). It is often necessary to rank lists of materials based on multiple risk assessment parameters, often aggregated across several measures of toxicity and possibly spanning an array of experimental platforms. Bayesian models coupled with the optimization of loss functions have been shown to provide an effective framework for conducting inference on ranks. In this article we present various loss-function-based ranking approaches for comparing ENM within experiments and toxicity parameters. Additionally, we propose a framework for the aggregation of ranks across different sources of evidence while allowing for differential weighting of this evidence based on its reliability and importance in risk ranking. We apply these methods to high throughput toxicity data on two human cell-lines, exposed to eight different nanomaterials, and measured in relation to four cytotoxicity outcomes. This article has supplementary material online. PMID:24839387

  11. Platelet aggregation Inhibitors from Hametophagous Animals

    PubMed Central

    Francischetti, Ivo M. B.

    2010-01-01

    Salivary glands from blood-sucking animals (e.g., mosquitoes, bugs, sandflies, fleas, ticks, leeches, hookworms, bats) are a rich source of bioactive molecules that counteract hemostasis in a redundant and synergistic manner. This review discusses recent progress in the identification of salivary inhibitors of platelet aggregation, their molecular characterization, and detailed mechanism of action. Diversity of inhibitors is remarkable, with distinct families of proteins characterized as apyrases that enzymatically degrade ADP or as collagen-binding proteins that prevent its interaction with vWF, or platelet integrin α2β1 or GPVI. Molecules that bind ADP, TXA2, epinephrine, or serotonin with high affinity have also been cloned, expressed, and their structure determined. In addition, a repertoire of antithrombins and an increasingly number of RGD and non-RGD disintegrins targeting platelet αIIbβ3 have been reported. Moreover, metalloproteases with fibrinogen(olytic) activity and PAF phosphorylcholine hydrolase are enzymes that have been recruited to the salivary gland to block platelet aggregation. Platelet inhibitory prostaglandins, lysophosphatydilcholine, adenosine, and nitric oxide (NO)-carrying proteins are other notable examples of molecules from hematophagous salivary secretions (herein named sialogenins) with antihemostatic properties. Sialogenins have been employed as tools in biochemistry and cell biology and also display potential therapeutic applications. PMID:20035779

  12. cluster-in-a-box: Statistical model of sub-millimeter emission from embedded protostellar clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristensen, Lars E.; Bergin, Edwin A.

    2016-10-01

    Cluster-in-a-box provides a statistical model of sub-millimeter emission from embedded protostellar clusters and consists of three modules grouped in two scripts. The first (cluster_distribution) generates the cluster based on the number of stars, input initial mass function, spatial distribution and age distribution. The second (cluster_emission) takes an input file of observations, determines the mass-intensity correlation and generates outflow emission for all low-mass Class 0 and I sources. The output is stored as a FITS image where the flux density is determined by the desired resolution, pixel scale and cluster distance.

  13. Color-selective photocurrent enhancement in coupled J-aggregate/nanowires formed in solution.

    PubMed

    Walker, Brian J; Dorn, August; Bulović, Vladimir; Bawendi, Moungi G

    2011-07-13

    J-aggregates are ordered clusters of coherently coupled molecular dyes, (1) and they have been used as light sensitizers in film photography due to their intense absorptions. Hybrid structures containing J-aggregates may also have applications in devices that require spectral specificity, such as color imaging or optical signaling. (2) However the use of J-aggregates in optoelectronic devices has posed a long-standing challenge (3, 4) due to the difficulty of controlling aggregate formation and the low charge carrier mobility of many J-aggregates in solid state. In this paper, we demonstrate a modular method to assemble three different cyanine J-aggregates onto CdSe nanowires, resulting in a photodetector that is color-sensitized in three specific, narrow absorption bands. Both the J-aggregate and nanowire device components are fabricated from solution and the sensitizing wavelength is switched from blue to red to green, using only solution-phase exchange of the J-aggregates on the same underlying device.

  14. Soluble Amyloid-beta Aggregates from Human Alzheimer’s Disease Brains

    PubMed Central

    Esparza, Thomas J.; Wildburger, Norelle C.; Jiang, Hao; Gangolli, Mihika; Cairns, Nigel J.; Bateman, Randall J.; Brody, David L.

    2016-01-01

    Soluble amyloid-beta (Aβ) aggregates likely contribute substantially to the dementia that characterizes Alzheimer’s disease. However, despite intensive study of in vitro preparations and animal models, little is known about the characteristics of soluble Aβ aggregates in the human Alzheimer’s disease brain. Here we present a new method for extracting soluble Aβ aggregates from human brains, separating them from insoluble aggregates and Aβ monomers using differential ultracentrifugation, and purifying them >6000 fold by dual antibody immunoprecipitation. The method resulted in <40% loss of starting material, no detectible ex vivo aggregation of monomeric Aβ, and no apparent ex vivo alterations in soluble aggregate sizes. By immunoelectron microscopy, soluble Aβ aggregates typically appear as clusters of 10–20 nanometer diameter ovoid structures with 2-3 amino-terminal Aβ antibody binding sites, distinct from previously characterized structures. This approach may facilitate investigation into the characteristics of native soluble Aβ aggregates, and deepen our understanding of Alzheimer’s dementia. PMID:27917876

  15. Cluster bulleticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massey, Richard; Kitching, Thomas; Nagai, Daisuke

    2011-05-01

    The unique properties of dark matter are revealed during collisions between clusters of galaxies, such as the bullet cluster (1E 0657-56) and baby bullet (MACS J0025-12). These systems provide evidence for an additional, invisible mass in the separation between the distributions of their total mass, measured via gravitational lensing, and their ordinary 'baryonic' matter, measured via its X-ray emission. Unfortunately, the information available from these systems is limited by their rarity. Constraints on the properties of dark matter, such as its interaction cross-section, are therefore restricted by uncertainties in the individual systems' impact velocity, impact parameter and orientation with respect to the line of sight. Here we develop a complementary, statistical measurement in which every piece of substructure falling into every massive cluster is treated as a bullet. We define 'bulleticity' as the mean separation between dark matter and ordinary matter, and we measure the signal in hydrodynamical simulations. The phase space of substructure orbits also exhibits symmetries that provide an equivalent control test. Any detection of bulleticity in real data would indicate a difference in the interaction cross-sections of baryonic and dark matter that may rule out hypotheses of non-particulate dark matter that are otherwise able to model individual systems. A subsequent measurement of bulleticity could constrain the dark matter cross-section. Even with conservative estimates, the existing Hubble Space Telescope archive should yield an independent constraint tighter than that from the bullet cluster. This technique is then trivially extendable to and benefits enormously from larger, future surveys.

  16. Synchronous Firefly Algorithm for Cluster Head Selection in WSN

    PubMed Central

    Baskaran, Madhusudhanan; Sadagopan, Chitra

    2015-01-01

    Wireless Sensor Network (WSN) consists of small low-cost, low-power multifunctional nodes interconnected to efficiently aggregate and transmit data to sink. Cluster-based approaches use some nodes as Cluster Heads (CHs) and organize WSNs efficiently for aggregation of data and energy saving. A CH conveys information gathered by cluster nodes and aggregates/compresses data before transmitting it to a sink. However, this additional responsibility of the node results in a higher energy drain leading to uneven network degradation. Low Energy Adaptive Clustering Hierarchy (LEACH) offsets this by probabilistically rotating cluster heads role among nodes with energy above a set threshold. CH selection in WSN is NP-Hard as optimal data aggregation with efficient energy savings cannot be solved in polynomial time. In this work, a modified firefly heuristic, synchronous firefly algorithm, is proposed to improve the network performance. Extensive simulation shows the proposed technique to perform well compared to LEACH and energy-efficient hierarchical clustering. Simulations show the effectiveness of the proposed method in decreasing the packet loss ratio by an average of 9.63% and improving the energy efficiency of the network when compared to LEACH and EEHC. PMID:26495431

  17. Photodynamic treatment of red blood cell concentrates for virus inactivation enhances red blood cell aggregation: protection with antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Ben-Hur, E; Barshtein, G; Chen, S; Yedgar, S

    1997-10-01

    Photodynamic treatment (PDT) using phthalocyanines and red light appears to be a promising procedure for decontamination of red blood cell (RBC) concentrates for transfusion. A possible complication of this treatment may be induced aggregation of RBC. The production of RBC aggregates was measured with a novel computerized cell flow properties analyzer (CFA). The PDT of RBC concentrates with sulfonated aluminum phthalocyanine (AIPcS4) and the silicon phthalocyanine Pc 4 under virucidal conditions markedly enhanced RBC aggregation and higher shear stress was required to disperse these aggregates. The clusters of cells were huge and abnormally shaped, unlike the rouleaux formed by untreated RBC. This aggregation was prevented when a mixture of antioxidants was included during PDT. Addition of the antioxidants after PDT reduced aggregation only partially. It is concluded that inclusion of antioxidants during PDT of RBC concentrates prior to transfusion may reduce or eliminate the hemodynamic risk that the virucidal treatment may present to the recipient.

  18. The breakup mechanism of biomolecular and colloidal aggregates in a shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ó Conchúir, Breanndán; Zaccone, Alessio

    2014-03-01

    The theory of self-assembly of colloidal particles in shear flow is incomplete. Previous analytical approaches have failed to capture the microscopic interplay between diffusion, shear and intermolecular interactions which controls the aggregates fate in shear. In this work we analytically solved the drift-diffusion equation for the breakup rate of a dimer in flow. Then applying rigidity percolation theory, we found that the lifetime of a generic cluster formed under shear is controlled by the typical lifetime of a single bond in its interior, which in turn depends on the efficiency of the stress transmitted from other bonds in the cluster. We showed that aggregate breakup is a thermally-activated process where the activation energy is controlled by the interplay between intermolecular forces and the shear drift, and where structural parameters determine whether cluster fragmentation or surface erosion prevails. In our latest work, we analyzed floppy modes and nonaffine deformations to derive a lower bound on the fractal dimension df below which aggregates are mechanically unstable, ie. for large aggregates df ~= 2.4. This theoretical framework is in quantitative agreement with experiments and can be used for population balance modeling of colloidal and protein aggregation.

  19. Hail formation triggers rapid ash aggregation in volcanic plumes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van Eaton, Alexa R.; Mastin, Larry G.; Herzog, M.; Schwaiger, Hans F.; Schneider, David J.; Wallace, Kristi; Clarke, Amanda B

    2015-01-01

    During explosive eruptions, airborne particles collide and stick together, accelerating the fallout of volcanic ash and climate-forcing aerosols. This aggregation process remains a major source of uncertainty both in ash dispersal forecasting and interpretation of eruptions from the geological record. Here we illuminate the mechanisms and timescales of particle aggregation from a well-characterized ‘wet’ eruption. The 2009 eruption of Redoubt Volcano in Alaska incorporated water from the surface (in this case, a glacier), which is a common occurrence during explosive volcanism worldwide. Observations from C-band weather radar, fall deposits, and numerical modeling demonstrate that volcanic hail formed rapidly in the eruption plume, leading to mixed-phase aggregation of ~95% of the fine ash and stripping much of the cloud out of the atmosphere within 30 minutes. Based on these findings, we propose a mechanism of hail-like aggregation that contributes to the anomalously rapid fallout of fine ash and the occurrence of concentrically-layered aggregates in volcanic deposits.

  20. Hail formation triggers rapid ash aggregation in volcanic plumes

    PubMed Central

    Van Eaton, Alexa R.; Mastin, Larry G.; Herzog, Michael; Schwaiger, Hans F.; Schneider, David J.; Wallace, Kristi L.; Clarke, Amanda B.

    2015-01-01

    During explosive eruptions, airborne particles collide and stick together, accelerating the fallout of volcanic ash and climate-forcing aerosols. This aggregation process remains a major source of uncertainty both in ash dispersal forecasting and interpretation of eruptions from the geological record. Here we illuminate the mechanisms and timescales of particle aggregation from a well-characterized ‘wet' eruption. The 2009 eruption of Redoubt Volcano, Alaska, incorporated water from the surface (in this case, a glacier), which is a common occurrence during explosive volcanism worldwide. Observations from C-band weather radar, fall deposits and numerical modelling demonstrate that hail-forming processes in the eruption plume triggered aggregation of ∼95% of the fine ash and stripped much of the erupted mass out of the atmosphere within 30 min. Based on these findings, we propose a mechanism of hail-like ash aggregation that contributes to the anomalously rapid fallout of fine ash and occurrence of concentrically layered aggregates in volcanic deposits. PMID:26235052

  1. Hail formation triggers rapid ash aggregation in volcanic plumes.

    PubMed

    Van Eaton, Alexa R; Mastin, Larry G; Herzog, Michael; Schwaiger, Hans F; Schneider, David J; Wallace, Kristi L; Clarke, Amanda B

    2015-08-03

    During explosive eruptions, airborne particles collide and stick together, accelerating the fallout of volcanic ash and climate-forcing aerosols. This aggregation process remains a major source of uncertainty both in ash dispersal forecasting and interpretation of eruptions from the geological record. Here we illuminate the mechanisms and timescales of particle aggregation from a well-characterized 'wet' eruption. The 2009 eruption of Redoubt Volcano, Alaska, incorporated water from the surface (in this case, a glacier), which is a common occurrence during explosive volcanism worldwide. Observations from C-band weather radar, fall deposits and numerical modelling demonstrate that hail-forming processes in the eruption plume triggered aggregation of ∼95% of the fine ash and stripped much of the erupted mass out of the atmosphere within 30 min. Based on these findings, we propose a mechanism of hail-like ash aggregation that contributes to the anomalously rapid fallout of fine ash and occurrence of concentrically layered aggregates in volcanic deposits.

  2. Role of streams in myxobacteria aggregate formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiskowski, Maria A.; Jiang, Yi; Alber, Mark S.

    2004-10-01

    Cell contact, movement and directionality are important factors in biological development (morphogenesis), and myxobacteria are a model system for studying cell-cell interaction and cell organization preceding differentiation. When starved, thousands of myxobacteria cells align, stream and form aggregates which later develop into round, non-motile spores. Canonically, cell aggregation has been attributed to attractive chemotaxis, a long range interaction, but there is growing evidence that myxobacteria organization depends on contact-mediated cell-cell communication. We present a discrete stochastic model based on contact-mediated signaling that suggests an explanation for the initialization of early aggregates, aggregation dynamics and final aggregate distribution. Our model qualitatively reproduces the unique structures of myxobacteria aggregates and detailed stages which occur during myxobacteria aggregation: first, aggregates initialize in random positions and cells join aggregates by random walk; second, cells redistribute by moving within transient streams connecting aggregates. Streams play a critical role in final aggregate size distribution by redistributing cells among fewer, larger aggregates. The mechanism by which streams redistribute cells depends on aggregate sizes and is enhanced by noise. Our model predicts that with increased internal noise, more streams would form and streams would last longer. Simulation results suggest a series of new experiments.

  3. Scattering properties of dense clusters of colloidal nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Lattuada, Marco; Ehrl, Lyonel

    2009-04-30

    In this work, we present a new methodology to accurately calculate scattering properties of fractal clusters with arbitrary large fractal dimension, d(f) (up to 3), and arbitrary primary particle size and material optical properties. Our approach is based on a combination of Monte Carlo simulations to generate cluster structures and mean-field T-matrix theory for the calculation of scattering properties. We have used a conventional cluster-cluster aggregation algorithm to generate clusters with d(f) up to 2.1, a tunable cluster-cluster aggregation algorithm for clusters with d(f) up to 2.5 and a newly developed Voronoi tessellation-based densification algorithm for clusters with d(f) up to 3. The scattering properties of clusters have been computed by means of mean-field T-matrix code (proposed by Botet; et al. Appl. Opt. 1997, 36 , 8791 - 8797 ), which can account for intracluster multiple scattering at a very low computational cost, thus overcoming the major limitations of commonly used Rayleigh-Debye-Gans (RDG) theory. The results of the calculations show significant deviations of the scattering cross sections and zero-angle intensities as compared to RDG theory for large primary particle sizes and high d(f). Good accuracies of the method have been confirmed by comparisons with full T-matrix calculations. The proposed approach is an ideal compromise between accuracy and high computational efficiency, and is suitable for inversion of experimental scattering data.

  4. Reconstructing the fractal dimension of granular aggregates from light intensity spectra.

    PubMed

    Tang, Fiona H M; Maggi, Federico

    2015-12-21

    There has been growing interest in using the fractal dimension to study the hierarchical structures of soft materials after realising that fractality is an important property of natural and engineered materials. This work presents a method to quantify the internal architecture and the space-filling capacity of granular fractal aggregates by reconstructing the three-dimensional capacity dimension from their two-dimensional optical projections. Use is made of the light intensity of the two-dimensional aggregate images to describe the aggregate surface asperities (quantified by the perimeter-based fractal dimension) and the internal architecture (quantified by the capacity dimension) within a mathematical framework. This method was tested on control aggregates of diffusion-limited (DLA), cluster-cluster (CCA) and self-correlated (SCA) types, stereolithographically-fabricated aggregates, and experimentally-acquired natural sedimentary aggregates. Statistics of the reconstructed capacity dimension featured correlation coefficients R ≥ 98%, residuals NRMSE ≤ 10% and percent errors PE ≤ 4% as compared to controls, and improved earlier approaches by up to 50%.

  5. CaSPA - an algorithm for calculation of the size of percolating aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magee, James E.; Dutton, Helen; Siperstein, Flor R.

    2009-09-01

    We present an algorithm (CaSPA) which accounts for the effects of periodic boundary conditions in the calculation of size of percolating aggregated clusters. The algorithm calculates the gyration tensor, allowing for a mixture of infinite (macroscale) and finite (microscale) principle moments. Equilibration of a triblock copolymer system from a disordered initial configuration to a hexagonal phase is examined using the algorithm.

  6. AN AGGREGATION AND EPISODE SELECTION SCHEME FOR EPA'S MODELS-3 CMAQ

    EPA Science Inventory

    The development of an episode selection and aggregation approach, designed to support distributional estimation for use with the Models-3 Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model, is described. The approach utilized cluster analysis of the 700 hPa u and v wind field compo...

  7. Ion aggregation in high salt solutions. VI. Spectral graph analysis of chaotropic ion aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jun-Ho; Cho, Minhaeng

    2016-11-01

    Carrying out molecular dynamics simulations and graph theoretical analyses of high salt solutions, and comparing numerically calculated vibrational spectroscopic properties of water with femtosecond IR pump-probe experimental data, we have recently found that ions in high salt solutions can form two morphologically different ion aggregate structures. In the cases of NaCl solutions, Na+ and Cl- tend to form compact cluster-like ion aggregate in high NaCl solutions. In contrast, K+ and SCN- form spatially extended network-like ion aggregates that also exhibit a percolating network behavior. Interestingly, a variety of graph theoretical properties of ion network in high KSCN solutions were found to be very similar to those of water H-bonding network. It was shown that spatially extended ion networks in high KSCN solutions are completely intertwined with water H-bonding networks, which might be the key to understand the high solubility of thiocyanate salts in water. Here, we further consider two salts that have been extensively studied experimentally by using femtosecond IR pump-probe technique, which are NaClO4 and NaBF4. Note that ClO4 - and BF4 - are well-known chaotropic ions that have been believed to behave as water structure breaker. To understand how such chaotropic ions affect water H-bonding structure, we carried out spectral graph analyses of molecular dynamics simulation data of these aqueous solutions. Graph spectra and degree distribution of ion aggregates formed in high NaBF4 and NaClO4 solutions show that these chaotropic anions also have a strong propensity to form ion networks. The fact that salts containing chaotropic ions like SCN-, BF4 - , and ClO4 - have very high solubility limits in water could then be related to our observation that these chaotropic anions with counter cations in high salt solutions are capable of forming intricate ion networks intertwined with water H-bonding networks. We anticipate that the present graph theoretical analysis

  8. Oligomeric baroeffect and gas aggregation states

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noever, David A.

    1992-01-01

    The baroeffect is analyzed to include a gas that aggregates into higher-order polymers or oligomers. The resulting pressure change is found to vary independently of the molecular weight of the gas components and to depend only on the aggregation or oligomeric order of the gas. With increasing aggregation, diffusive slip velocities are found to increase. The calculations are extended to include general counterdiffusion of two distinct aggregation states (k-, j-mer) for the gas, and the pressure change is derived as a function that is independent of both molecular weight and the absolute aggregation. The only parameter that determines the baroeffect is the ratio of aggregated states, beta = k/j. For gases that reversibly aggregate, possible oscillatory behavior and complex dynamics for pressure are discussed. Gas aggregation may play a role for low-temperature crystal-growth conditions in which vapor concentrations of one (or more) species are high.

  9. Virus-induced aggregates in infected cells.

    PubMed

    Moshe, Adi; Gorovits, Rena

    2012-10-17

    During infection, many viruses induce cellular remodeling, resulting in the formation of insoluble aggregates/inclusions, usually containing viral structural proteins. Identification of aggregates has become a useful diagnostic tool for certain viral infections. There is wide variety of viral aggregates, which differ by their location, size, content and putative function. The role of aggregation in the context of a specific virus is often poorly understood, especially in the case of plant viruses. The aggregates are utilized by viruses to house a large complex of proteins of both viral and host origin to promote virus replication, translation, intra- and intercellular transportation. Aggregated structures may protect viral functional complexes from the cellular degradation machinery. Alternatively, the activation of host defense mechanisms may involve sequestration of virus components in aggregates, followed by their neutralization as toxic for the host cell. The diversity of virus-induced aggregates in mammalian and plant cells is the subject of this review.

  10. Generating nanoscale aggregates from colloidal nanoparticles by various aerosol spray techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Mahurin, Shannon Mark; Cheng, Mengdawn

    2007-01-01

    Growing interest in the environmental and health effects of engineered nanostructured materials requires accurate control of cluster morphology and size in order to make valid interpretations of nanomaterial toxicity. We report the comparison of three methods for the generation of aggregated uniform polystyrene latex (PSL) nanospheres from a colloidal suspension. Atomization, ultrasonic generation and electrospray, which utilize distinct mechanisms for the formation of liquid droplets from a PSL colloidal suspension, are explored as potential methods for nanostructured material synthesis. Electrospray produced isolated PSL particles most suited for use in experiments involving exposure to non-aggregated nanoparticles. Though producing the largest cluster size, ultrasonic generation proved to be a relatively straightforward process for reproducibly generating nanoparticle aggregates. Further advantages and disadvantages of each method are presented in relation to future toxicology experiments.

  11. Kinetic and hydrodynamic models of chemotactic aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavanis, Pierre-Henri; Sire, Clément

    2007-10-01

    We derive general kinetic and hydrodynamic models of chemotactic aggregation that describe certain features of the morphogenesis of biological colonies (like bacteria, amoebae, endothelial cells or social insects). Starting from a stochastic model defined in terms of N coupled Langevin equations, we derive a nonlinear mean-field Fokker-Planck equation governing the evolution of the distribution function of the system in phase space. By taking the successive moments of this kinetic equation and using a local thermodynamic equilibrium condition, we derive a set of hydrodynamic equations involving a damping term. In the limit of small frictions, we obtain a hyperbolic model describing the formation of network patterns (filaments) and in the limit of strong frictions we obtain a parabolic model which is a generalization of the standard Keller-Segel model describing the formation of clusters (clumps). Our approach connects and generalizes several models introduced in the chemotactic literature. We discuss the analogy between bacterial colonies and self-gravitating systems and between the chemotactic collapse and the gravitational collapse (Jeans instability). We also show that the basic equations of chemotaxis are similar to nonlinear mean-field Fokker-Planck equations so that a notion of effective generalized thermodynamics can be developed.

  12. Cluster Ions and Atmospheric Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Auria, R.; Turco, R. P.

    We investigate the properties and possible roles of naturally occurring ions under at- mospheric conditions. Among other things, the formation of stable charged molecular clusters represents the initial stages of aerosol nucleation [e.g., Keesee and Castle- man, 1982], while the conversion of vapor to aggregates is the first step in certain atmospheric phase transitions [e.g. Hamill and Turco, 2000]. We analyze the stability and size distributions of common ionic clusters by solving the differential equations describing their growth and loss. The necessary reaction rate coefficients are deter- mined using kinetic and thermodynamic data. The latter are derived from direct labo- ratory measurements of equilibrium constants, from the classical charged liquid drop model applied to large aggregates (i.e., the Thomson model [Thomson, 1906]), and from quantum mechanical calculations of the thermodynamic potentials associated with the cluster structures. This approach allows us to characterize molecular clusters across the entire size range from true molecular species to larger aggregates exhibiting macroscopic behavior [D'Auria, 2001]. Cluster systems discussed in this talk include the proton hydrates (PHs) and nitrate-water and nitrate-nitric acid series [D'Auria and Turco, 2001]. These ions have frequently been detected in the stratosphere and tropo- sphere [e.g., Arnold et al., 1977; Viggiano and Arnold, 1981]. We show how the pro- posed hybrid cluster model can be extended to a wide range of ion systems, including non-proton hydrates (NPHs), mixed-ligand clusters such as nitrate-water-nitric acid and sulfate-sulfuric acid-water, as well as more exotic species containing ammonia, pyridine and other organic compounds found on ions [e.g., Eisele, 1988; Tanner and Eisele, 1991]. References: Arnold, F., D. Krankowsky and K. H. Marien, First mass spectrometric measurements of posi- tive ions in the stratosphere, Nature, 267, 30-32, 1977. D'Auria, R., A study of ionic

  13. Protein aggregation in salt solutions

    PubMed Central

    Kastelic, Miha; Kalyuzhnyi, Yurij V.; Hribar-Lee, Barbara; Dill, Ken A.; Vlachy, Vojko

    2015-01-01

    Protein aggregation is broadly important in diseases and in formulations of biological drugs. Here, we develop a theoretical model for reversible protein–protein aggregation in salt solutions. We treat proteins as hard spheres having square-well-energy binding sites, using Wertheim’s thermodynamic perturbation theory. The necessary condition required for such modeling to be realistic is that proteins in solution during the experiment remain in their compact form. Within this limitation our model gives accurate liquid–liquid coexistence curves for lysozyme and γ IIIa-crystallin solutions in respective buffers. It provides good fits to the cloud-point curves of lysozyme in buffer–salt mixtures as a function of the type and concentration of salt. It than predicts full coexistence curves, osmotic compressibilities, and second virial coefficients under such conditions. This treatment may also be relevant to protein crystallization. PMID:25964322

  14. Properties of small Ar sub N-1 K/+/ ionic clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Etters, R. D.; Danilowicz, R.; Dugan, J.

    1977-01-01

    A self-consistent formalism is developed that, based upon a many-body potential, dynamically determines the thermodynamic properties of ionic clusters without an a priori designation of the equilibrium structures. Aggregates consisting of a single closed shell K(+) ion and N-1 isoelectronic argon atoms were studied. The clusters form crystallites at low temperatures, and melting transitions and spontaneous dissociations are indicated. The results confirm experimental evidence that shows that ionic clusters become less stable with increasing N. The crystallite structures formed by four different clusters are isosceles triangle, skewed form, octahedron with ion in the middle, and icosahedron with the ion in the middle.

  15. Chirality affects aggregation kinetics of single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Khan, Iftheker A; Afrooz, A R M Nabiul; Flora, Joseph R V; Schierz, P Ariette; Ferguson, P Lee; Sabo-Attwood, Tara; Saleh, Navid B

    2013-02-19

    Aggregation kinetics of chiral-specific semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) was systematically studied through time-resolved dynamic light scattering. Varied monovalent (NaCl) and divalent (CaCl(2)) electrolyte composition was used as background solution chemistry. Suwannee River humic acid (SRHA) was used to study the effects of natural organic matter on chirally separated SWNT aggregation. Increasing salt concentration and introduction of divalent cations caused aggregation of SWNT clusters by suppressing the electrostatic repulsive interaction from the oxidized surfaces. The (6,5) SWNTs, i.e., SG65, with relatively lower diameter tubes compared to (7,6), i.e., SG76, showed substantially higher stability (7- and 5-fold for NaCl and CaCl(2), respectively). The critical coagulation concentration (CCC) values were 96 and 13 mM NaCl in the case of NaCl and 2.8 and 0.6 mM CaCl(2) for SG65 and SG76, respectively. The increased tube diameter for (7,6) armchair SWNTs likely presented with higher van der Waals interaction and thus increased the aggregation propensity substantially. The presence of SRHA enhanced SWNT stability in divalent CaCl(2) environment through steric interaction from adsorbed humic molecules; however showed little or no effects for monovalent NaCl. The mechanism of aggregation-describing favorable interaction tendencies for (7,6) SWNTs-is probed through ab initio molecular modeling. The results suggest that SWNT stability can be chirality dependent in typical aquatic environment.

  16. An Assessment of Spontaneous Vegetation Recovery in Aggregate Quarries in Coastal Sand Dunes in Buenos Aires Province, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández Montoni, María Victoria; Fernández Honaine, Mariana; del Río, Julio Luis

    2014-08-01

    Sand dune quarries are a location of common aggregate mining activity developed in coastal areas, especially in the southeast Buenos Aires province, Argentina. In this article, spontaneous plant development after extraction activity ceased was evaluated. Five areas (three quarried and two natural/conservation areas) were sampled for plant cover and composition as well as sediment characterization. Different indexes, principal component analysis, and cluster analyses were applied to compare the areas. The dominant families observed in four of the five areas were Asteraceae, Poaceae, and Cyperaceae, and most of the species are commonly found in sandy and humid soils and/or modified/anthropized ones. Percentages of plant cover increased with time because of the cessation of active aggregate extraction. Indexes and multivariate analyses showed that it was possible to distinguish quarried and natural areas based on composition and vegetation cover. The distribution of plant species among the four areas responded to the presence of mining activity, but it also responded to the topographical position and consequently the depth of the groundwater level. Besides these differences, the four areas shared many native species. The results might indicate that once the activity has ceased, quarried areas may spontaneously and quickly develop a plant community with some similarities to those present in the nonquarried areas. However, given that the extracting activity involves the removal of the soil, revegetation of this type of environment depends on the presence of natural areas in the surroundings, which can serve as a source of seeds and propagules for plant regeneration.

  17. Foam and cluster structure formation by latex particles at the air/water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Garcia, Jaime; Gámez-Corrales, Rogelio; Ivlev, Boris I.

    1997-02-01

    We report the formation of two-dimensional foam and cluster structures by spherical polystyrene particles trapped at the air/water interface. The colloidal foam is a transient structure that evolves to the formation of clusters, but clusters can also be formed after deposition of the sample. We also observed the formation of small aggregates, whose formation along with the cluster stabilization can be explained in terms of a balance between electrostatic repulsive and van der Waals attractive interactions.

  18. 24 CFR 58.32 - Project aggregation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Project aggregation. 58.32 Section... Environmental Review Process: Documentation, Range of Activities, Project Aggregation and Classification § 58.32 Project aggregation. (a) A responsible entity must group together and evaluate as a single project...

  19. 24 CFR 58.32 - Project aggregation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Project aggregation. 58.32 Section... Environmental Review Process: Documentation, Range of Activities, Project Aggregation and Classification § 58.32 Project aggregation. (a) A responsible entity must group together and evaluate as a single project...

  20. 24 CFR 58.32 - Project aggregation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Project aggregation. 58.32 Section... Environmental Review Process: Documentation, Range of Activities, Project Aggregation and Classification § 58.32 Project aggregation. (a) A responsible entity must group together and evaluate as a single project...

  1. 24 CFR 58.32 - Project aggregation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Project aggregation. 58.32 Section... Environmental Review Process: Documentation, Range of Activities, Project Aggregation and Classification § 58.32 Project aggregation. (a) A responsible entity must group together and evaluate as a single project...

  2. Mineral resource of the month: aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Willett, Jason C.

    2012-01-01

    Crushed stone and construction sand and gravel, the two major types of natural aggregates, are among the most abundant and accessible natural resources on the planet. The earliest civilizations used aggregates for various purposes, mainly construction. Today aggregates provide the basic raw materials for the foundation of modern society.

  3. 78 FR 68945 - Aggregation of Positions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-15

    ... the aggregation provisions of part 150 of the Commission's regulations that are substantially similar... modifications proposed here to the aggregation provisions of part 150 would apply to the position limits regimes... position limits because it believes that these proposed amendments regarding aggregation of...

  4. Assessment of accuracy of the structure-factor-size-estimator method in determining red blood cell aggregate size from ultrasound spectral backscatter coefficient.

    PubMed

    Saha, Ratan K; Franceschini, Emilie; Cloutier, Guy

    2011-04-01

    A computer simulation study to produce ultrasonic backscatter coefficients (BSCs) from red blood cell (RBC) clusters is discussed. The simulation algorithm is suitable for generating non-overlapping, isotropic, and fairly identical RBC clusters. RBCs were stacked following the hexagonal close packing (HCP) structure to form a compact spherical aggregate. Such an aggregate was repeated and placed randomly under non-overlapping condition in the three-dimensional space to mimic an aggregated blood sample. BSCs were computed between 750 KHz and 200 MHz for samples of various cluster sizes at different hematocrits. Magnitudes of BSCs increased with mean aggregate sizes at low frequencies (<20 MHz). The accuracy of the structure-factor-size-estimator (SFSE) method in determining mean aggregate size and packing factor was also examined. A good correlation (R(2) ≥ 0.94) between the mean size of aggregates predicted by the SFSE and true size was found for each hematocrit. This study shows that for spherical aggregates there exists a region for each hematocrit where SFSE works most accurately. Typically, error of SFSE in estimating mean cluster size was <20% for dimensions between 14 and 17 μm at 40% hematocrit. This study suggests that the theoretical framework of SFSE is valid under the assumption of isotropic aggregates.

  5. Optical protein detection based on magnetic clusters rotation.

    PubMed

    Ramiandrisoa, Donatien; Brient-Litzler, Elodie; Daynes, Aurélien; Compain, Eric; Bibette, Jérôme; Baudry, Jean

    2015-09-25

    In this paper we present a simple method to quantify aggregates of 200nm magnetic particles. This method relies on the optical and magnetic anisotropy of particle aggregates, whereas dispersed particles are optically isotropic. We orientate aggregates by applying short pulses of a magnetic field, and we measure optical density variation directly linked to this reorientation. By computing the scattering efficiency of doublets and singlets, we demonstrate the absolute quantification of a few % of doublets in a well dispersed suspension. More generally, these optical variations are related to the aggregation state of the sample. This method can be easily applied to an agglutination assay, where target proteins induce aggregation of colloidal particles. By observing only aligned cluster