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Sample records for aggregation fibrinogen binding

  1. Effects of oral contraceptives, or lanosterol, on ADP-induced aggregation and binding of /sup 125/I-fibrinogen to rat platelets

    SciTech Connect

    McGregor, L.; Toor, B.; McGregor, J.L.; Renaud, S.; Clemetson, K.J.

    1984-03-01

    The aggregation to ADP and the binding of /sup 125/I-fibrinogen to platelets from rats treated with oral contraceptives or normal platelets treated in vitro with lanosterol were compared to their respective controls. Both types of platelets showed a significant increase in ADP-induced aggregation and in binding of fibrinogen, indicating that the effect of oral contraceptives could be partly due to increased levels of lanosterol in platelet membrane.

  2. Receptors for fibrinogen and aggregated beta 2-microglobulin detected in strains of group B streptococci.

    PubMed Central

    Schönbeck, C; Björck, L; Kronvall, G

    1981-01-01

    Binding of radiolabeled human fibrinogen and aggregated beta-microglobulin was measured in 60 strains of beta-hemolytic group B streptococci. Positive fibrinogen binding was detected in seven of the strains. Six of the group B strains showed an uptake of aggregated beta 2-microglobulin. Four individual strains carried both receptors, indicating a positive correlation between their occurrence. Inhibition studies showed that fibrinogen competed sterically with beta 2-microglobulin binding. Receptors for both proteins were trypsin sensitive. The presence of receptors did not correlate with the serological type of the 49 group B strains tested. However, all seven type II strains were negative. No uptake of fibrinogen was noted in any of 40 group D strains tested. Binding structures for fibrinogen and aggregated beta 2-microglobulin detected in group B streptococci were similar to receptors for the same proteins in group A, C, and G streptococci in terms of mutual correlation and steric interference of binding. The occasional occurrence of these receptors also in group B strains might reflect a common origin of some types of surface proteins in gram-positive cocci. PMID:6164650

  3. Characterization of the fibrinogen binding domain of bacteriophage lysin from Streptococcus mitis.

    PubMed

    Seo, Ho Seong; Sullam, Paul M

    2011-09-01

    The binding of bacteria to human platelets is a likely central mechanism in the pathogenesis of infective endocarditis. Platelet binding by Streptococcus mitis SF100 is mediated in part by a lysin encoded by the lysogenic bacteriophage SM1. In addition to its role in the phage life cycle, lysin mediates the binding of S. mitis to human platelets via its interaction with fibrinogen on the platelet surface. To better define the region of lysin mediating fibrinogen binding, we tested a series of purified lysin truncation variants for their abilities to bind this protein. These studies revealed that the fibrinogen binding domain of lysin is contained within the region spanned by amino acid residues 102 to 198 (lysin(102-198)). This region has no sequence homology to other known fibrinogen binding proteins. Lysin(102-198) bound fibrinogen comparably to full-length lysin and with the same selectivity for the fibrinogen Aα and Bβ chains. Lysin(102-198) also inhibited the binding in vitro of S. mitis to human fibrinogen and platelets. When assessed by platelet aggregometry, the disruption of the lysin gene in SF100 resulted in a significantly longer time to the onset of aggregation of human platelets than that of the parent strain. The preincubation of platelets with purified lysin(102-198) also delayed the onset of aggregation by SF100. These results indicate that the binding of lysin to fibrinogen is mediated by a specific domain of the phage protein and that this interaction is important for both platelet binding and aggregation by S. mitis. PMID:21690235

  4. Effects of Fibrinogen on RBC Aggregation and Rouleux Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedosov, Dmitry; Pan, Wenxiao; Caswell, Bruce; Gompper, Gerhard; Karniadakis, George

    2010-11-01

    We employ dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) to study human blood rheology. Specifically, using a multi-scale (MS-RBC) and low-dimensional model (LD-RBC) for modeling red blood cells (RBCs), we study the role of fibrinogen inter-cellular forces in the formation of rouleaux structures at low shear rates. In particular, both models verify that RBC aggregation into rouleaux determines non-Newtonian response and they also predict a non-zero yield stress whose value depends on the fibrinogen concentration.

  5. Multi-Step Fibrinogen Binding to the Integrin αIIbβ3 Detected Using Force Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Litvinov, Rustem I.; Bennett, Joel S.; Weisel, John W.; Shuman, Henry

    2005-01-01

    The regulated ability of integrin αIIbβ3 to bind fibrinogen plays a crucial role in platelet aggregation and hemostasis. We have developed a model system based on laser tweezers, enabling us to measure specific rupture forces needed to separate single receptor-ligand complexes. First of all, we performed a thorough and statistically representative analysis of nonspecific protein-protein binding versus specific αIIbβ3-fibrinogen interactions in combination with experimental evidence for single-molecule measurements. The rupture force distribution of purified αIIbβ3 and fibrinogen, covalently attached to underlying surfaces, ranged from ∼20 to 150 pN. This distribution could be fit with a sum of an exponential curve for weak to moderate (20–60 pN) forces, and a Gaussian curve for strong (>60 pN) rupture forces that peaked at 80–90 pN. The interactions corresponding to these rupture force regimes differed in their susceptibility to αIIbβ3 antagonists or Mn2+, an αIIbβ3 activator. Varying the surface density of fibrinogen changed the total binding probability linearly >3.5-fold but did not affect the shape of the rupture force distribution, indicating that the measurements represent single-molecule binding. The yield strength of αIIbβ3-fibrinogen interactions was independent of the loading rate (160–16,000 pN/s), whereas their binding probability markedly correlated with the duration of contact. The aggregate of data provides evidence for complex multi-step binding/unbinding pathways of αIIbβ3 and fibrinogen revealed at the single-molecule level. PMID:16040750

  6. C1q component of complement binds to fibrinogen and fibrin

    SciTech Connect

    Entwistle, R.A.; Furcht, L.T.

    1988-01-12

    The interaction of complement component C1q with fibrinogen and fibrin was studied by using a solid-phase direct binding assay. Scatchard analysis of radioiodinated fibrinogen binding to C1q indicated at least two high-affinity binding constants (Kd) calculated as 8.5 and 120 nM. In contrast, binding of radioiodinated fibrin to C1q showed only a single class of binding sites with a calculated Kd of 600 nM. Fibrinogen-C1q binding was shown to decrease as a function of increasing salt concentrations, indicating either the presence of charged amino acids in the binding sites or an ionic strength induced conformational dependency of the binding. In direct binding studies using isolated fragments of C1q, both the collagen-like domain of C1q and the globular domains of C1q were shown to bind fibrinogen, indicating at least one binding site for fibrinogen is located in each of the major domains of C1q. Addition of the thrombin-generated peptides of fibrinogen, fibrinopeptides A and B, enhanced C1q-fibrinogen binding, again indicating a complex binding interaction. These results indicate that C1q and fibrinogen are capable of high-affinity interactions that may serve to sequester these complexes in areas of tumors, immune complex deposition, or wounds.

  7. Specific cell components of Bacteroides gingivalis mediate binding and degradation of human fibrinogen.

    PubMed Central

    Lantz, M S; Allen, R D; Vail, T A; Switalski, L M; Hook, M

    1991-01-01

    Bacteroides (Porphyromonas) gingivalis, which has been implicated as an etiologic agent in human periodontal diseases, has been shown to bind and degrade human fibrinogen. B. gingivalis strains bind fibrinogen reversibly and with high affinity and bind to a specific region of the fibrinogen molecule that appears to be located between the D and E domains (M. S. Lantz, R. D. Allen, P. Bounelis, L. M. Switalski, and M. Hook, J. Bacteriol. 172:716-726, 1990). We now report that human fibrinogen is bound and then degraded by specific B. gingivalis components that appear to be localized at the cell surface. Fibrinogen binding to bacterial cells occurred at 4, 22, and 37 degrees C. A functional fibrinogen-binding component (Mr, 150,000) was identified when sodium dodecyl sulfate-solubilized bacteria were fractionated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, transferred to nitrocellulose membranes, and probed with 125I-fibrinogen. Fibrinogen degradation did not occur at 4 degrees C but did occur at 22 and 37 degrees C. When bacteria and iodinated fibrinogen were incubated at 37 degrees C, two major fibrinogen fragments (Mr, 97,000 and 50,000) accumulated in incubation mixture supernatant fractions. Two major fibrinogen-degrading components (Mr, 120,000 and 150,000) have been identified by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in substrate-containing gels. Fibrinogen degradation by the Mr-120,000 and -150,000 proteases was enhanced by reducing agents, completely inhibited by N-alpha-p-tosyl-L-lysyl chloromethyl ketone, and partially inhibited by n-ethyl maleimide, suggesting that these enzymes are thiol-dependent proteases with trypsinlike substrate specificity. The fibrinogen-binding component could be separated from the fibrinogen-degrading components by selective solubilization of bacteria in sodium deoxycholate. Images PMID:1987144

  8. Effect of Cordycepin-Enriched WIB801C from Cordyceps militaris Suppressing Fibrinogen Binding to Glycoprotein IIb/IIIa

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dong-Ha; Kim, Hyun-Hong; Lim, Deok Hwi; Kim, Jong-Lae; Park, Hwa-Jin

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the effects of cordycepin-enriched (CE)-WIB801C, a n-butanol extract of Cordyceps militaris-hypha on collagen-stimulated platelet aggregation. CE-WIB801C dose dependently inhibited collagen-induced platelet aggregation, and had a synergistic effect together with cordycepin (W-cordycepin) from CE-WIB801C on the inhibition of collagen-induced platelet aggregation. CE-WIB801C and cordycepin stimulated the phosphorylation of VASP (Ser157) and the dephosphorylation of PI3K and Akt, and inhibited the binding of fibrinogen to glycoprotein IIb/IIIa (αIIb/β3) and the release of ATP and serotonin in collagen-induced platelet aggregation. A-kinase inhibitor Rp-8-Br-cAMPS reduced CE-WIB801C-, and cordycepin-increased VASP (Ser157) phosphorylation, and increased CE-WIB801C-, and cordycepin-inhibited the fibrinogen binding to αIIb/β3. Therefore, we demonstrate that CE-WIB801C-, and cordycepin-inhibited fibrinogen binding to αIIb/β3 are due to stimulation of cAMP-dependent phosphorylation of VASP (Ser157), and inhibition of PI3K/Akt phosphorylation. These results strongly indicate that CE-WIB801C and cordycepin may have preventive or therapeutic potential for platelet aggregation-mediated diseases, such as thrombosis, myocardial infarction, atherosclerosis, and ischemic cerebrovascular disease. PMID:25593645

  9. Bacteriophage lysin mediates the binding of streptococcus mitis to human platelets through interaction with fibrinogen.

    PubMed

    Seo, Ho Seong; Xiong, Yan Q; Mitchell, Jennifer; Seepersaud, Ravin; Bayer, Arnold S; Sullam, Paul M

    2010-01-01

    The binding of bacteria to human platelets is a likely central mechanism in the pathogenesis of infective endocarditis. We have previously found that platelet binding by Streptococcus mitis SF100 is mediated by surface components encoded by a lysogenic bacteriophage, SM1. We now demonstrate that SM1-encoded lysin contributes to platelet binding via its direct interaction with fibrinogen. Far Western blotting of platelets revealed that fibrinogen was the major membrane-associated protein bound by lysin. Analysis of lysin binding with purified fibrinogen in vitro confirmed that these proteins could bind directly, and that this interaction was both saturable and inhibitable. Lysin bound both the Aalpha and Bbeta chains of fibrinogen, but not the gamma subunit. Binding of lysin to the Bbeta chain was further localized to a region within the fibrinogen D fragment. Disruption of the SF100 lysin gene resulted in an 83+/-3.1% reduction (mean +/- SD) in binding to immobilized fibrinogen by this mutant strain (PS1006). Preincubation of this isogenic mutant with purified lysin restored fibrinogen binding to wild type levels. When tested in a co-infection model of endocarditis, loss of lysin expression resulted in a significant reduction in virulence, as measured by achievable bacterial densities (CFU/g) within vegetations, kidneys, and spleens. These results indicate that bacteriophage-encoded lysin is a multifunctional protein, representing a new class of fibrinogen-binding proteins. Lysin appears to be cell wall-associated through its interaction with choline. Once on the bacterial surface, lysin can bind fibrinogen directly, which appears to be an important interaction for the pathogenesis of endocarditis. PMID:20714354

  10. Binding of Efb from Staphylococcus aureus to fibrinogen blocks neutrophil adherence

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In addition to its pivotal role in hemostasis, fibrinogen (Fg) and provisional fibrin matrices play important roles in inflammation and regulate innate immune responses by interacting with leukocytes. Efb (the extracellular fibrinogen-binding protein) is a secreted Staphylococcus aureus protein that...

  11. Aggregation efficiency of activated normal or fixed platelets in a simple shear field: effect of shear and fibrinogen occupancy.

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Z; Frojmovic, M M

    1994-01-01

    Shear rate can affect protein adsorption and platelet aggregation by regulating both the collision frequency and the capture efficiency (alpha). These effects were evaluated in well defined shear field in a micro-couette for shear rate G = 10 - 1000 s-1. The rate of protein binding was independent of G, shown for adsorption of albumin to latex beads and PAC1 to activated platelets. The initial aggregation rate for ADP-activated platelets in citrated platelet-rich plasma followed second order kinetics at the initial platelet concentrations between 20,000 and 60,000/microliters. alpha values, which dropped nearly fivefold for a 10-fold increase in G, were approximately proportional to G-1, contrary to a minor drop predicted by the theory that includes protein cross-bridging. Varying ADP concentration did not change alpha of maximally activated platelet subpopulations, suggesting that aggregation between unactivated and activated platelets is negligible. Directly blocking the unoccupied but activated GPIIb-IIIa receptors without affecting pre-bound Fg on "RGD"-activated, fixed platelets (AFP) by GRGDSP or Ro 43-5054 eliminated aggregation, suggesting that cross-bridging of GPIIb-IIIa on adjacent platelets by fibrinogen mediates aggregation. Alpha for AFP remained maximal (approximately 0.24) over 25-75% Fg occupancy, otherwise decreasing rapidly, with a half-maximum occurring at around 2% occupancy, suggesting that very few bound Fg were required to cause significant aggregation. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:8075353

  12. Identification of fibrinogen-binding proteins of Aspergillus fumigatus using proteomic approach.

    PubMed

    Upadhyay, Santosh Kumar; Gautam, Poonam; Pandit, Hrishikesh; Singh, Yogendra; Basir, Seemi Farhat; Madan, Taruna

    2012-03-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus, the main etiological agent for various forms of human aspergillosis, gets access to the respiratory system of human host by inhalation of airborne conidia. These conidia possibly adhere to extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. Among the ECM proteins involved in adherence, fibrinogen is thought to be crucial. Here, we studied whether A. fumigatus three-week culture filtrate (3wcf) proteins promote binding of A. fumigatus to ECM proteins and promote fungal growth. We observed that incubation of ECM with 3wcf proteins led to dose- and time-dependent increase in adherence of conidia to the ECM. In order to identify the catalogue of fibrinogen-binding A. fumigatus proteins, we carried out fibrinogen affinity blotting using two-dimensional gel electrophoresed 3wcf proteins. A total of 15 fibrinogen-binding protein spots corresponding to 7 unique proteins were identified in 3wcf using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF-TOF). Among these, 4 proteins, namely, beta-glucosidase, alpha-mannosidase, pectate lyase A and oryzin precursor were predicted to have cell wall or extracellular localization, whereas amidase family protein and two hypothetical proteins did not display the signal sequence. This study reports seven novel fibrinogen-binding proteins of A. fumigatus, some of which could be further explored for targeting the adhesion phenomenon as antifungal strategy. PMID:21870122

  13. Spatially selective surface platforms for binding fibrinogen prepared by particle lithography with organosilanes

    PubMed Central

    Englade-Franklin, Lauren E.; Saner, ChaMarra K.; Garno, Jayne C.

    2013-01-01

    We introduce an approach based on particle lithography to prepare spatially selective surface platforms of organosilanes that are suitable for nanoscale studies of protein binding. Particle lithography was applied for patterning fibrinogen, a plasma protein that has a major role in the clotting cascade for blood coagulation and wound healing. Surface nanopatterns of mercaptosilanes were designed as sites for the attachment of fibrinogen within a protein-resistant matrix of 2-[methoxy(polyethyleneoxy)propyl] trichlorosilane (PEG-silane). Preparing site-selective surfaces was problematic in our studies, because of the self-reactive properties of PEG-organosilanes. Certain organosilanes presenting hydroxyl head groups will cross react to form mixed surface multi-layers. We developed a clever strategy with particle lithography using masks of silica mesospheres to protect small, discrete regions of the surface from cross reactions. Images acquired with atomic force microscopy (AFM) disclose that fibrinogen attached primarily to the surface areas presenting thiol head groups, which were surrounded by PEG-silane. The activity for binding anti-fibrinogen was further evaluated using ex situ AFM studies, confirming that after immobilization the fibrinogen nanopatterns retained capacity for binding immunoglobulin G. Studies with AFM provide advantages of achieving nanoscale resolution for detecting surface changes during steps of biochemical surface reactions, without requiring chemical modification of proteins or fluorescent labels. PMID:24427541

  14. FbsC, a Novel Fibrinogen-binding Protein, Promotes Streptococcus agalactiae-Host Cell Interactions*

    PubMed Central

    Buscetta, Marco; Papasergi, Salvatore; Firon, Arnaud; Pietrocola, Giampiero; Biondo, Carmelo; Mancuso, Giuseppe; Midiri, Angelina; Romeo, Letizia; Teti, Giuseppe; Speziale, Pietro; Trieu-Cuot, Patrick; Beninati, Concetta

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (group B Streptococcus or GBS) is a common cause of invasive infections in newborn infants and adults. The ability of GBS to bind human fibrinogen is of crucial importance in promoting colonization and invasion of host barriers. We characterized here a novel fibrinogen-binding protein of GBS, designated FbsC (Gbs0791), which is encoded by the prototype GBS strain NEM316. FbsC, which bears two bacterial immunoglobulin-like tandem repeat domains and a C-terminal cell wall-anchoring motif (LPXTG), was found to be covalently linked to the cell wall by the housekeeping sortase A. Studies using recombinant FbsC indicated that it binds fibrinogen in a dose-dependent and saturable manner, and with moderate affinity. Expression of FbsC was detected in all clinical GBS isolates, except those belonging to the hypervirulent lineage ST17. Deletion of fbsC decreases NEM316 abilities to adhere to and invade human epithelial and endothelial cells, and to form biofilm in vitro. Notably, bacterial adhesion to fibrinogen and fibrinogen binding to bacterial cells were abolished following fbsC deletion in NEM316. Moreover, the virulence of the fbsC deletion mutant and its ability to colonize the brain were impaired in murine models of infection. Finally, immunization with recombinant FbsC significantly protected mice from lethal GBS challenge. In conclusion, FbsC is a novel fibrinogen-binding protein expressed by most GBS isolates that functions as a virulence factor by promoting invasion of epithelial and endothelial barriers. In addition, the protein has significant immunoprotective activity and may be a useful component of an anti-GBS vaccine. PMID:24904056

  15. Coagulase and Efb of Staphylococcus aureus Have a Common Fibrinogen Binding Motif

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Ya-Ping; Kang, Mingsong; Ganesh, Vannakambadi K.; Ravirajan, Dharmanand; Li, Bin

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Coagulase (Coa) and Efb, secreted Staphylococcus aureus proteins, are important virulence factors in staphylococcal infections. Coa interacts with fibrinogen (Fg) and induces the formation of fibrin(ogen) clots through activation of prothrombin. Efb attracts Fg to the bacterial surface and forms a shield to protect the bacteria from phagocytic clearance. This communication describes the use of an array of synthetic peptides to identify variants of a linear Fg binding motif present in Coa and Efb which are responsible for the Fg binding activities of these proteins. This motif represents the first Fg binding motif identified for any microbial protein. We initially located the Fg binding sites to Coa’s C-terminal disordered segment containing tandem repeats by using recombinant fragments of Coa in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay-type binding experiments. Sequence analyses revealed that this Coa region contained shorter segments with sequences similar to the Fg binding segments in Efb. An alanine scanning approach allowed us to identify the residues in Coa and Efb that are critical for Fg binding and to define the Fg binding motifs in the two proteins. In these motifs, the residues required for Fg binding are largely conserved, and they therefore constitute variants of a common Fg binding motif which binds to Fg with high affinity. Defining a specific motif also allowed us to identify a functional Fg binding register for the Coa repeats that is different from the repeat unit previously proposed. PMID:26733070

  16. The novel fibrinogen-binding protein FbsB promotes Streptococcus agalactiae invasion into epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Gutekunst, Heike; Eikmanns, Bernhard J; Reinscheid, Dieter J

    2004-06-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae is a major cause of bacterial sepsis and meningitis in human newborns. The interaction of S. agalactiae with host proteins and the entry into host cells thereby represent important virulence traits of these bacteria. The present report describes the identification of the fbsB gene, encoding a novel fibrinogen-binding protein that plays a crucial role in the invasion of S. agalactiae into human cells. In Western blots and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) experiments, the FbsB protein was demonstrated to interact with soluble and immobilized fibrinogen. Binding studies showed the N-terminal 388 residues of FbsB and the Aalpha-subunit of human fibrinogen to recognize each other. By reverse transcription (RT)-PCR, the fbsB gene was shown to be cotranscribed with the gbs0851 gene in S. agalactiae. Deletion of the fbsB gene in the genome of S. agalactiae did not influence the binding of the bacteria to fibrinogen, suggesting that FbsB does not participate in the attachment of S. agalactiae to fibrinogen. In tissue culture experiments, however, the fbsB deletion mutant was severely impaired in its invasion into lung epithelial cells. Bacterial invasion could be reestablished by introducing the fbsB gene on a shuttle plasmid into the fbsB deletion mutant. Furthermore, treatment of lung epithelial cells with FbsB fusion protein blocked S. agalactiae invasion of epithelial cells in a dose-dependent fashion. These results suggest an important role of the FbsB protein in the overall process of host cell entry by S. agalactiae. PMID:15155657

  17. Problems with nonspecific binding in radioimmunoassay for fibrinogen fragment D

    SciTech Connect

    Thornton, R.D.; Kulkarni, P.; Wilson, J.E.

    1982-07-01

    Because of problems associated with non-specific binding in the competetive inhibition radioimmunoassay, the author, in a letter, recommends running a blank (without the first antibody) for each dilution of the antigen. He adds, further, that normal human plasma can be used a diluent when preparing standard curves if non-specific binding is found. (JMT)

  18. Vascular pentraxin 3 controls arterial thrombosis by targeting collagen and fibrinogen induced platelets aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Bonacina, F.; Barbieri, S.S.; Cutuli, L.; Amadio, P.; Doni, A.; Sironi, M.; Tartari, S.; Mantovani, A.; Bottazzi, B.; Garlanda, C.; Tremoli, E.; Catapano, A.L.; Norata, G.D.

    2016-01-01

    Aim The long pentraxin PTX3 plays a non-redundant role during acute myocardial infarction, atherosclerosis and in the orchestration of tissue repair and remodeling during vascular injury, clotting and fibrin deposition. The aim of this work is to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying the protective role of PTX3 during arterial thrombosis. Methods and results PTX3 KO mice transplanted with bone marrow from WT or PTX3 KO mice presented a significant reduction in carotid artery blood flow following FeCl3 induced arterial thrombosis (− 80.36 ± 11.5% and − 95.53 ± 4.46%), while in WT mice transplanted with bone marrow from either WT or PTX3 KO mice, the reduction was less dramatic (− 45.55 ± 1.37% and − 53.39 ± 9.8%), thus pointing to a protective effect independent of a hematopoietic cell's derived PTX3. By using P-selectin/PTX3 double KO mice, we further excluded a role for P-selectin, a target of PTX3 released by neutrophils, in vascular protection played by PTX3. In agreement with a minor role for hematopoietic cell-derived PTX3, platelet activation (assessed by flow cytometric expression of markers of platelet activation) was similar in PTX3 KO and WT mice as were haemostatic properties. Histological analysis indicated that PTX3 localizes within the thrombus and the vessel wall, and specific experiments with the N-terminal and the C-terminal PTX3 domain showed the ability of PTX3 to selectively dampen either fibrinogen or collagen induced platelet adhesion and aggregation. Conclusion PTX3 interacts with fibrinogen and collagen and, by dampening their pro-thrombotic effects, plays a protective role during arterial thrombosis. PMID:26976330

  19. Identification and molecular characterisation of a fibrinogen binding protein from Streptococcus iniae.

    PubMed Central

    Baiano, Justice CF; Tumbol, Reiny A; Umapathy, Aarti; Barnes, Andrew C

    2008-01-01

    Background Binding of serum components by surface M-related proteins, encoded by the emm genes, in streptococci constitutes a major virulence factor in this important group of organisms. The present study demonstrates fibrinogen binding by S. iniae, a Lancefield non-typeable pathogen causing devastating fish losses in the aquaculture industry and an opportunistic pathogen of humans, and identifies the proteins involved and their encoding genes. Results Fibrinogen binding by S. iniae significantly reduced respiratory burst activity of barramundi peritoneal macrophages in primary cultures compared to BSA-treated or untreated controls, indicating a potentially important role for fibrinogen binding cell-surface proteins in avoiding phagocytic attack in fish. We describe a novel emm-like gene, simA, encoding a 57 kDa fibrinogen binding M-like protein in S. iniae. These SiM proteins and their corresponding tetrameric structures from some sequevar types (~230 kDa) bound fibrinogen in Western blots. simA was most closely related (32% identity) to the demA gene of S. dysgalactiae. Genome walking and sequencing determined the genetic organization of the simA region had similarities to the mgrC regulon in GCS and to S. uberis. Moreover, a putative multigene regulator, mgx was orientated in the opposite direction to the simA gene in common with S. uberis, but contrary to findings in GAS and GCS. In GAS, diversity among emm-genes and consequent diversity of their M-related proteins results in substantial antigenic variation. However, an extensive survey of S. iniae isolates from diverse geographic regions and hosts revealed only three variants of the gene, with one sequevar accounting for all but two of the 50 isolates analysed. Conclusion These proteins play a role in avoiding oxidative attack by phagocytic cells during infection of fish by S. iniae, but genetic diversity amongst these key surface proteins has not yet arisen. This lack of diversity coupled with a functional

  20. Exposure of fibrinogen receptors in human platelets by surface proteolysis with elastase.

    PubMed Central

    Kornecki, E; Ehrlich, Y H; De Mars, D D; Lenox, R H

    1986-01-01

    Human platelets that were preincubated with porcine elastase aggregated spontaneously upon the addition of fibrinogen. Maximal aggregation to fibrinogen was observed with platelets pretreated with an elastase concentration of 111 micrograms/ml, and half-maximal aggregation occurred after treatment with 11 micrograms/ml elastase. Binding of radiolabeled fibrinogen to elastase-treated platelets was specific, saturable, and showed a single class of 48,400 +/- 9,697 fibrinogen-binding sites per platelet with a dissociation constant of 6.30 +/- 1.48 X 10(-7) M. ATP, apyrase, and the stimulators of platelet adenylate cyclase forskolin, prostaglandin E1, prostacyclin, and N6, 2'-O-dibutyryl cyclic AMP did not inhibit the fibrinogen-induced aggregation of elastase-treated platelets. EDTA completely blocked the initiation of aggregation and reversed the fibrinogen-induced aggregation of elastase-treated platelets. Monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies directed against glycoproteins (GP) IIb and IIIa completely blocked the fibrinogen-induced aggregation of elastase-treated platelets. Immunoprecipitates with these antibodies obtained from detergent extracts of surface-radiolabeled, intact, and elastase-treated platelets contained the glycoproteins IIb and IIIa. We conclude that surface proteolysis by low concentrations of elastase can expose fibrinogen-binding sites associated with GPIIb and GPIIIa on the platelet surface, resulting in spontaneous aggregation upon the addition of fibrinogen. These findings may be relevant to hemostatic changes observed in patients with increased levels of circulating elastase. Images PMID:3005363

  1. Platelet-activating factor (PAF-acether) induces high- and low-affinity binding of fibrinogen to human platelets via independent mechanisms.

    PubMed Central

    Kloprogge, E; Akkerman, J W

    1986-01-01

    When human platelets are incubated with 500 nM-PAF-acether (platelet-activating factor. 1-O-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) under equilibrium conditions (60 min, 22 degrees C, non-stirred suspensions), two classes of fibrinogen binding sites are exposed: one class with a high affinity [Kd (7.2 +/- 2.1) X 10(-8) M, 2367 +/- 485 sites/platelet, n = 9] and one class with a low affinity [Kd (5.9 +/- 2.4) X 10(-7) M, 26972 +/- 8267 sites/platelet]. Preincubation with inhibitors of cyclo-oxygenase (acetylsalicylic acid, indomethacin) or thromboxane synthetase (UK 38.485) completely abolishes high-affinity binding, leaving low-affinity binding unchanged. In contrast, ADP scavengers (phosphocreatine/creatine kinase or phosphoenol pyruvate/pyruvate kinase) completely prevent low-affinity binding, leaving high-affinity binding unaltered. Initial binding studies (2-10 min incubation) confirm these findings with a major part of the binding being sensitive to ADP scavengers, a minor part sensitive to indomethacin and complete blockade with both inhibitors. Increasing the temperature to 37 degrees C decreases the number of low affinity-binding sites 6-fold without changing high-affinity binding. Aggregation, measured as the rate of single platelet disappearance, then depends on high-affinity binding at 10 nM-fibrinogen or less, whereas at 100 nM-fibrinogen or more low-affinity binding becomes predominant. These findings point at considerable platelet activation during binding experiments. However, arachidonate metabolism [( 3H]arachidonate mobilization and thromboxane synthesis) and secretion [( 14C]serotonin and beta-thromboglobulin) are about 10% or less of the amounts found under optimal conditions (5 units of thrombin/ml 37 degrees C, stirring). We conclude that PAF-acether induces little platelet activation under binding conditions. The amounts of thromboxane A2 and secreted ADP, however, are sufficient for initiating high- and low-affinity fibrinogen binding

  2. Evidence for Steric Regulation of Fibrinogen Binding to Staphylococcus aureus Fibronectin-binding Protein A (FnBPA)*

    PubMed Central

    Stemberk, Vaclav; Jones, Richard P. O.; Moroz, Olga; Atkin, Kate E.; Edwards, Andrew M.; Turkenburg, Johan P.; Leech, Andrew P.; Massey, Ruth C.; Potts, Jennifer R.

    2014-01-01

    The adjacent fibrinogen (Fg)- and fibronectin (Fn)-binding sites on Fn-binding protein A (FnBPA), a cell surface protein from Staphylococcus aureus, are implicated in the initiation and persistence of infection. FnBPA contains a single Fg-binding site (that also binds elastin) and multiple Fn-binding sites. Here, we solved the structure of the N2N3 domains containing the Fg-binding site of FnBPA in the apo form and in complex with a Fg peptide. The Fg binding mechanism is similar to that of homologous bacterial proteins but without the requirement for “latch” strand residues. We show that the Fg-binding sites and the most N-terminal Fn-binding sites are nonoverlapping but in close proximity. Although Fg and a subdomain of Fn can form a ternary complex on an FnBPA protein construct containing a Fg-binding site and single Fn-binding site, binding of intact Fn appears to inhibit Fg binding, suggesting steric regulation. Given the concentrations of Fn and Fg in the plasma, this mechanism might result in targeting of S. aureus to fibrin-rich thrombi or elastin-rich tissues. PMID:24627488

  3. Non-Covalent Interaction of α2-Antiplasmin with Fibrin(ogen): Localization of α2-Antiplasmin Binding Sites

    PubMed Central

    Tsurupa, Galina; Yakovlev, Sergiy; McKee, Patrick; Medved, Leonid

    2010-01-01

    Covalent incorporation (cross-linking) of plasmin inhibitor α2-antiplasmin (α2-AP) into fibrin clots increases their resistance to fibrinolysis. We hypothesized that α2-AP may also interact non-covalently with fibrin prior to its covalent cross-linking. To test this hypothesis, we studied binding of α2-AP to fibrin(ogen) and its fragments by ELISA and Surface Plasmon Resonance. The experiments revealed that α2-AP binds to polymeric fibrin and surface-adsorbed fibrin(ogen) while no binding was observed with fibrinogen in solution. To localize the α2-AP-binding sites, we studied the interaction of α2-AP with the fibrin(ogen)-derived D1, D-D and E3 fragments, and the recombinant αC region and its constituents, αC-connector and αC-domain and its sub-domains, which together encompass practically the whole fibrin(ogen) molecule. In ELISA, α2-AP bound to immobilized D1, D-D, αC region, αC-domain and its C-terminal sub-domain. The binding was Lys-independent and was not inhibited by plasminogen or tPA. Furthermore, the affinity of α2-AP to D-D was significantly increased in the presence of plasminogen while that to the αC-domain remained unaffected. Altogether, these results indicate that the fibrin(ogen) D region and the C-terminal sub-domain of the αC-domain contain high affinity α2-AP-binding sites that are cryptic in fibrinogen and exposed in fibrin or adsorbed fibrinogen, and the presence of plasminogen facilitates interaction of α2-AP with the D regions. The discovered non-covalent interaction of α2-AP with fibrin may contribute to regulation of the initial stage of fibrinolysis and provide proper orientation of the cross-linking sites to facilitate covalent cross-linking of α2-AP to the fibrin clot. PMID:20687529

  4. Characterization of nanobodies binding human fibrinogen selected by E. coli display.

    PubMed

    Salema, Valencio; López-Guajardo, Ana; Gutierrez, Carlos; Mencía, Mario; Fernández, Luis Ángel

    2016-09-20

    Abnormal levels of fibrinogen (Fib) in blood plasma are associated with several pathological conditions and hence methods for its detection in blood and body fluids are essential. Nanobodies (Nbs) or (VHHs) are single domain antibodies derived from camelids with excellent biophysical and antigen-binding properties, showing great promise in diagnostics and therapy. In this work, we select and characterize high affinity Nbs binding human Fib employing an E. coli cell surface display system based on the fusion of an immune library of VHH domains with the β-domain of Intimin. Bacteria displaying high-affinity Nbs against Fib were selected using magnetic cell sorting (MACS). Specific binding of the selected clones to Fib was confirmed by flow cytometry of E. coli bacteria, as well as by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) with the purified Nbs. E. coli display also provided an excellent estimation of the affinity of the selected Nbs by flow cytometry analysis under equilibrium conditions, with equilibrium constant (KD) values very similar to those obtained by SPR analysis. Finally, pairwise epitope-scouting studies revealed that the selected Nbs bound distinct epitopes on Fib. The selected Nbs are promising diagnostic tools for determination of human Fib levels. PMID:27485813

  5. Time-dependent association between platelet-bound fibrinogen and the Triton X-100 insoluble cytoskeleton

    SciTech Connect

    Peerschke, E.I. )

    1991-02-01

    Previous studies indicated a correlation between the formation of EDTA-resistant (irreversible) platelet-fibrinogen interactions and platelet cytoskeleton formation. The present study explored the direct association of membrane-bound fibrinogen with the Triton X-100 insoluble cytoskeleton of aspirin-treated, gel-filtered platelets, activated but not aggregated with 20 mumol/L adenosine diphosphate (ADP) or 150 mU/mL human thrombin (THR) when bound fibrinogen had become resistant to dissociation by EDTA. Conversion of exogenous 125I-fibrinogen to fibrin was prevented by adding Gly-Pro-Arg and neutralizing THR with hirudin before initiating binding studies. After 60 minutes at 22 degrees C, the cytoskeleton of ADP-treated platelets contained 20% +/- 12% (mean +/- SD, n = 14) of membrane-bound 125I-fibrinogen, representing 10% to 50% of EDTA-resistant fibrinogen binding. The THR-activated cytoskeleton contained 45% +/- 15% of platelet bound fibrinogen, comprising 80% to 100% of EDTA-resistant fibrinogen binding. 125I-fibrinogen was not recovered with platelet cytoskeletons if binding was inhibited by the RGDS peptide, excess unlabeled fibrinogen, or disruption of the glycoprotein (GP) IIb-IIIa complex by EDTA-treatment. Both development of EDTA-resistant fibrinogen binding and fibrinogen association with the cytoskeleton were time dependent and reached maxima 45 to 60 minutes after fibrinogen binding to stimulated platelets. Although a larger cytoskeleton formed after platelet stimulation with thrombin as compared with ADP, no change in cytoskeleton composition was noted with development of EDTA-resistant fibrinogen binding.

  6. Aggregation of intrinsically disordered fibrinogen as the influence of backbone conformation.

    PubMed

    Naeem, Aabgeena; Bhat, Sheraz Ahmad; Iram, Afshin; Khan, Rizwan Hasan

    2016-08-01

    Fib having intrinsically disordered αC domains is involved in coagulation cascade and thrombosis. Fib molecules forms prefibrillar oligomers at 30%, and associate in 40 and 50% TFE to proceed α to β transition, suggesting the formation of an intermolecular β-structure. AFM images confirmed the nature of Fib aggregates at 40 and 50% TFE to be prefibrillar and fibrillar respectively. These aggregates possess high thioflavin T fluorescence with a shifted Congo red absorbance. Kinetics of Fib aggregation data at 50% TFE supports nucleation-dependent polymerization mechanism. At 60 and 70% TFE, no aggregation was observed. The inhibition of protein aggregation appears due to weakening of the hydrophobic interactions that were initially stabilizing the intermolecular β-sheet structure in the protein aggregation. The loss of hydrophobic contacts seems to favor the formation of intramolecular hydrogen bonds over intermolecular hydrogen bonds leading to helix formation. To conclude, protein aggregation is accompanied by the formation of β-sheet conformation, and induction of non-native helical segments in the protein inhibits aggregation. The discrepancy of the secondary structures on aggregation is proposed to stem from the disparity in the nature of the hydrogen bonds and packing of hydrophobic residues of the side chains in the β-sheet and α-helix conformation. PMID:27150313

  7. Binding of Human Fibrinogen to MRP Enhances Streptococcus suis Survival in Host Blood in a αXβ2 Integrin-dependent Manner.

    PubMed

    Pian, Yaya; Li, Xueqin; Zheng, Yuling; Wu, Xiaohong; Yuan, Yuan; Jiang, Yongqiang

    2016-01-01

    The Gram-positive bacterium Streptococcus suis serotype 2 (S. suis 2), an important zoonotic pathogen, induces strong systemic infections in humans; sepsis and meningitis are the most common clinical manifestations and are often accompanied by bacteremia. However, the mechanisms of S. suis 2 survival in human blood are not well understood. In our previous study, we identified muramidase-released protein (MRP), a novel human fibrinogen (hFg)-binding protein (FBP) in S. suis 2 that is an important epidemic infection marker with an unknown mechanism in pathogenesis. The present study demonstrates that the N-terminus of MRP (a.a. 283-721) binds to both the Aα and Bβ chains of the D fragment of hFg. Strikingly, the hFg-MRP interaction improved the survival of S. suis 2 in human blood and led to the aggregation and exhaustion of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) via an αXβ2 integrin-dependent mechanism. Other Fg-binding proteins, such as M1 (GAS) and FOG (GGS), also induced PMNs aggregation; however, the mechanisms of these FBP-hFg complexes in the evasion of PMN-mediated innate immunity remain unclear. MRP is conserved across highly virulent strains in Europe and Asia, and these data shed new light on the function of MRP in S. suis pathogenesis. PMID:27231021

  8. Binding of Human Fibrinogen to MRP Enhances Streptococcus suis Survival in Host Blood in a αXβ2 Integrin-dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Pian, Yaya; Li, Xueqin; Zheng, Yuling; Wu, Xiaohong; Yuan, Yuan; Jiang, Yongqiang

    2016-01-01

    The Gram-positive bacterium Streptococcus suis serotype 2 (S. suis 2), an important zoonotic pathogen, induces strong systemic infections in humans; sepsis and meningitis are the most common clinical manifestations and are often accompanied by bacteremia. However, the mechanisms of S. suis 2 survival in human blood are not well understood. In our previous study, we identified muramidase-released protein (MRP), a novel human fibrinogen (hFg)-binding protein (FBP) in S. suis 2 that is an important epidemic infection marker with an unknown mechanism in pathogenesis. The present study demonstrates that the N-terminus of MRP (a.a. 283–721) binds to both the Aα and Bβ chains of the D fragment of hFg. Strikingly, the hFg-MRP interaction improved the survival of S. suis 2 in human blood and led to the aggregation and exhaustion of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) via an αXβ2 integrin-dependent mechanism. Other Fg-binding proteins, such as M1 (GAS) and FOG (GGS), also induced PMNs aggregation; however, the mechanisms of these FBP-hFg complexes in the evasion of PMN-mediated innate immunity remain unclear. MRP is conserved across highly virulent strains in Europe and Asia, and these data shed new light on the function of MRP in S. suis pathogenesis. PMID:27231021

  9. Cloning, sequencing, and expression of a fibronectin/fibrinogen-binding protein from group A streptococci.

    PubMed Central

    Courtney, H S; Li, Y; Dale, J B; Hasty, D L

    1994-01-01

    Lipoteichoic acid and several streptococcal proteins have been reported to bind fibronectin (Fn) or fibrinogen (Fgn), which may serve as host receptors. We searched for such proteins by screening a library of genes from M type 5 group A streptococci cloned into Escherichia coli. Lysates of clones were probed with biotinylated Fn and biotinylated Fgn. One clone expressed a 54-kDa protein that reacted with Fn and Fgn. The protein, termed FBP54, was purified and used to immunize rabbits. Anti-FBP54 serum reacted with purified, recombinant FBP54 and with a protein of similar electrophoretic mobility in extracts of M type 5, 6, and 24 streptococci. Anti-FBP54 serum also reacted with 5 of 15 strains of intact, live streptococci, suggesting that FBP54 may be a surface antigen. Southern blot analysis confirmed that the gene is found in group A streptococci but not in Staphylococcus aureus or E. coli. The cloned gene was sequenced and contained an open reading frame encoding a protein with a calculated molecular weight of 54,186. Partial amino acid sequencing of purified FBP54 confirmed that this open reading frame encoded the protein. As determined by utilizing fusion proteins containing truncated forms of FBP54, the primary Fn/Fgn-binding domain appears to be contained in residues 1 to 89. These data suggest that FBP54 may be a surface protein of streptococci that reacts with both Fn and Fgn and therefore may participate in the adhesion of group A streptococci to host cells. Images PMID:8063411

  10. Srr2, a multifaceted adhesin expressed by ST-17 hypervirulent Group B Streptococcus involved in binding to both fibrinogen and plasminogen.

    PubMed

    Six, Anne; Bellais, Samuel; Bouaboud, Abdelouhab; Fouet, Agnès; Gabriel, Christelle; Tazi, Asmaa; Dramsi, Shaynoor; Trieu-Cuot, Patrick; Poyart, Claire

    2015-09-01

    The Group B Streptococcus (GBS) 'hypervirulent' ST-17 clone is strongly associated with invasive neonatal meningitis. Comparative genome analyses revealed that the serine-rich repeat (Srr) glycoprotein Srr2 is a cell wall-anchored protein specific for ST-17 strains, the non-ST-17 isolates expressing Srr1. Here, we unravel the binding capacity of GBS Srr proteins to relevant components of the host fibrinolysis pathway. We demonstrate that: (i) Srr2 binds plasminogen and plasmin whereas Srr1 does not; (ii) the ability of ST-17 strains to bind fibrinogen reflects a high level surface display of Srr2 combined with a higher affinity of Srr2 than Srr1 to bind this ligand; and (iii) Srr2 binding to host plasma proteins results in the formation of bacterial aggregates that are efficiently endocytosed by phagocytes. Importantly, we show that Srr2 increased bacterial survival to phagocytic killing and bacterial persistence in a murine model of meningitis. We conclude that Srr2 is a multifaceted adhesin used by the ST-17 clone to hijack ligands of the host coagulation system, thereby contributing to bacterial dissemination and invasiveness, and ultimately to meningitis. PMID:26094503

  11. Fibrinogen gene regulation.

    PubMed

    Fish, Richard J; Neerman-Arbez, Marguerite

    2012-09-01

    The Aα, Bβ and γ polypeptide chains of fibrinogen are encoded by a three gene cluster on human chromosome four. The fibrinogen genes (FGB-FGA-FGG) are expressed almost exclusively in hepatocytes where their output is coordinated to ensure a sufficient mRNA pool for each chain and maintain an abundant plasma fibrinogen protein level. Fibrinogen gene expression is controlled by the activity of proximal promoters which contain binding sites for hepatocyte transcription factors, including proteins which influence fibrinogen transcription in response to acute-phase inflammatory stimuli. The fibrinogen gene cluster also contains cis regulatory elements; enhancer sequences with liver activities identified by sequence conservation and functional genomics. While the transcriptional control of this gene cluster is fascinating biology, the medical impetus to understand fibrinogen gene regulation stems from the association of cardiovascular disease risk with high level circulating fibrinogen. In the general population this level varies from about 1.5 to 3.5 g/l. This variation between individuals is influenced by genotype, suggesting there are genetic variants contributing to fibrinogen levels which reside in fibrinogen regulatory loci. A complete picture of how fibrinogen genes are regulated will therefore point towards novel sources of regulatory variants. In this review we discuss regulation of the fibrinogen genes from proximal promoters and enhancers, the influence of acute-phase stimulation, post-transcriptional regulation by miRNAs and functional regulatory variants identified in genetic studies. Finally, we discuss the fibrinogen locus in light of recent advances in understanding chromosomal architecture and suggest future directions for researching the mechanisms that control fibrinogen expression. PMID:22836683

  12. Localization of the equine IgG-binding domain in the fibrinogen-binding protein (FgBP) of Streptococcus equi subsp. equi.

    PubMed

    Meehan, Mary; Lewis, Melanie J; Byrne, Caroline; O'Hare, David; Woof, Jenny M; Owen, Peter

    2009-08-01

    Fibrinogen-binding protein (FgBP, also termed SeM) is a cell-wall-associated anti-phagocytic M-like protein of the equine pathogen Streptococcus equi subsp. equi, and binds fibrinogen (Fg) and IgG. FgBP binds Fg avidly through residues located at the extreme N terminus of the molecule, whereas the IgG-binding site is more centrally located between the A and B repeats. FgBP binds equine IgG4 and IgG7 subclasses through interaction with the CH2-CH3 interdomain region of IgG-Fc, and possesses overlapping Fc-binding sites with protein A and protein G. In this study, FgBP truncates containing defined internal deletions were used to identify a stretch of 14 aa (residues 335-348) critical for IgG binding. Protein chimeras consisting of the non-IgG-binding alpha-helical coiled-coil M5 protein fused to FgBP sequences were used to identify a minimal equine IgG-binding domain consisting of residues 329-360. Competition ELISA tests suggested that IgG does not compromise Fg binding and vice versa. PMID:19423628

  13. Equilibrium binding of thrombin to recombinant human thrombomodulin: Effect of hirudin, fibrinogen, factor Va, and peptide analogues

    SciTech Connect

    Tsiang, Manuel; Lentz, S.R.; Dittman, W.A.; Wen, D.; Scarpati, E.M.; Sadler, J.E. )

    1990-11-01

    Thrombomodulin is an endothelial cell surface receptor for thrombin that acts as a physiological anticoagulant. The properties of recombinant human thrombomodulin were studied in COS-7, CHO, CV-1, and K562 cell lines. Thrombomudlin was expressed on the cell surface as shown by the acquisition of thrombin-dependent protein C activation. Like native thrombomodulin, recombinant thrombomodulin contained N-linked oligosaccharides, had M{sub r} {approximately} 100 000, and was inhibited or immunoprecipitated by anti-thrombomodulin antibodies. Binding studies demonstrated that nonrecombinant thrombomodulin expressed by A549 carcinoma cells and recombinant thrombomodulin expressed by CV-1 and K562 cells had similar K{sub d}'s for thrombin of 1.3 nM, 3.3 nM, and 4.7 nM, respectively. The K{sub d} for DIP-thrombin binding to recombinant thrombomodulin on CV-1(18A) cells was identical with that of thrombin. Increasing concentrations of hirudin or fibrinogen progressively inhibited the binding of {sup 125}I-DIP-thrombin, while factor Va did not inhibit binding. Three synthetic peptides were tested for ability to inhibit DIP-thrombin, while factor Va did not inhibit binding. Three synthetic peptides were tested for ability to inhibit DIP-thrombin binding. Both the hirudin peptide Hir{sup 53-64} and the thrombomodulin fifth-EGF-domain peptide Tm{sup 426-444} displaced DIP-thrombin from thrombomodulin, but the factor V peptide FacV{sup 30-43} which is similar in composition and charge to Hir{sup 53-64} showed no binding inhibition. The data exclude the significant formation of a ternary complex consisting of thrombin, thrombomodulin, and hirudin. These studies are consistent with a model in which thrombomodulin, hirudin, and fibrinogen compete for binding to DIP-thrombin at the same site.

  14. Comparative study of the C3d receptor and 58-kilodalton fibrinogen-binding mannoproteins of Candida albicans.

    PubMed Central

    López-Ribot, J L; Martínez, J P; Chaffin, W L

    1995-01-01

    Using polyclonal antibodies (PAbs) raised against the Candida albicans C3d receptor (CR2; PAb anti-CR2) and the 58-kDa fibrinogen-binding mannoprotein (mp58; PAb anti-mp58) as well as ligand interactions, we have studied the relationship between these two receptors. In an indirect immunofluorescence assay with germ tubes, greater intensity was observed on the mother blastoconidium when PAb anti-CR2 was used, whereas greater intensity was localized to the hyphal extension when PAb anti-mp58 or binding of soluble fibrinogen was used. No competition or change in the fluorescence pattern was observed in dual-labeling experiments with PAb anti-CR2 and either fibrinogen or PAb anti-mp58. Binding competition also was not observed in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using the components present in a beta-mercaptoethanol extract from the cell wall of germ tubes. In immunoblots, PAb anti-CR2 recognized three different discrete bands with apparent molecular masses of 21, 40, and 66 kDa in the beta-mercaptoethanol extracts from the cell wall, whereas a different, single, broader band with an apparent molecular mass of 58 kDa was detected with PAb anti-mp58. However, when nondenaturing conditions were used to separate the materials present in the cell wall extracts, no reactivity could be detected on Western blots (immunoblots) with PAb anti-mp58. When PAb anti-CR2 was used for analysis, a single band migrating in the area corresponding to approximately 40 kDa was detected. These observations suggest a higher molecular weight for mp58 and one or more of the components detected with PAb anti-CR2 in their native state. PMID:7768591

  15. Molecular Interactions of Human Plasminogen with Fibronectin-binding Protein B (FnBPB), a Fibrinogen/Fibronectin-binding Protein from Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Pietrocola, Giampiero; Nobile, Giulia; Gianotti, Valentina; Zapotoczna, Marta; Foster, Timothy J; Geoghegan, Joan A; Speziale, Pietro

    2016-08-26

    Staphylococcus aureus is a commensal bacterium that has the ability to cause superficial and deep-seated infections. Like several other invasive pathogens, S. aureus can capture plasminogen from the human host where it can be converted to plasmin by host plasminogen activators or by endogenously expressed staphylokinase. This study demonstrates that sortase-anchored cell wall-associated proteins are responsible for capturing the bulk of bound plasminogen. Two cell wall-associated proteins, the fibrinogen- and fibronectin-binding proteins A and B, were found to bind plasminogen, and one of them, FnBPB, was studied in detail. Plasminogen captured on the surface of S. aureus- or Lactococcus lactis-expressing FnBPB could be activated to the potent serine protease plasmin by staphylokinase and tissue plasminogen activator. Plasminogen bound to recombinant FnBPB with a KD of 0.532 μm as determined by surface plasmon resonance. Plasminogen binding did not to occur by the same mechanism through which FnBPB binds to fibrinogen. Indeed, FnBPB could bind both ligands simultaneously indicating that their binding sites do not overlap. The N3 subdomain of FnBPB contains the full plasminogen-binding site, and this includes, at least in part, two conserved patches of surface-located lysine residues that were recognized by kringle 4 of the host protein. PMID:27387503

  16. Effect of stress hormones on the expression of fibrinogen-binding receptors in platelets.

    PubMed

    Lam, Nicole Y-L; Rainer, Timothy H; Ng, Margaret H-L; Leung, Yonna; Cocks, Robert A

    2002-12-01

    Acute coagulopathy is a common clinical complication after trauma, and contributes to posttraumatic multiple organ failure. The phenomenon may be due to the effect of stress hormones on platelet adhesion molecule expression after trauma. Catecholamine levels correlate with injury severity scores and changes of L-selectin expression on leucocytes, whilst adrenaline (ADR) (epinephrine) alone also activates platelets. This study thus investigates the effects of ADR and noradrenaline (NOR) (norepinephrine) on platelets, at doses similar to those found in the plasma of normal and trauma subjects. Blood was taken from 19 healthy subjects and placed in tubes containing sodium citrate. Anti-platelet-bound fibrinogen monoclonal antibody was used to identify the activated platelets while anti-CD41 was used to identify platelets with and without activation. Five increasing concentrations of ADR and NOR (1, 3, 5, 10, 30 nmol/l) as well as one negative control (0.9% normal saline) and one positive control (10 micromol/l adenosine diphosphate/ADP) were prepared for the stimulation. A whole blood protocol was used in order to minimize any activation artefacts, which might be created by centrifugation. The percentage of platelets expressing fibrinogen receptors increased significantly with ADR and NOR even at the lowest dose (1 nmol/l) and continued to increase in a dose-dependent manner. Although the effect of ADR was greater than NOR in stimulating platelets to express fibrinogen receptors, the average number of fibrinogen receptors on each platelet was constant. ADR and NOR activated platelets to express fibrinogen receptors at doses that are similar to those found in the plasma of trauma patients. PMID:12458065

  17. Fibrinogen variant B[beta]D432A has normal polymerization but does not bind knob 'B'

    SciTech Connect

    Bowley, Sheryl R.; Lord, Susan T.

    2009-10-23

    Fibrinogen residue B{beta}432Asp is part of hole 'b' that interacts with knob 'B,' whose sequence starts with Gly-His-Arg-Pro-amide (GHRP). Because previous studies showed B{beta}D432A has normal polymerization, we hypothesized that B{beta}432Asp is not critical for knob 'B' binding and that new knob-hole interactions would compensate for the loss of this Asp residue. To test this hypothesis, we solved the crystal structure of fragment D from B{beta}D432A. Surprisingly, the structure (rfD-B{beta}D432A+GH) showed the peptide GHRP was not bound to hole 'b.' We then re-evaluated the polymerization of this variant by examining clot turbidity, clot structure, and the rate of FXIIIa cross-linking. The turbidity and the rate of - dimer formation for B{beta}D432A were indistinguishable compared with normal fibrinogen. Scanning electron microscopy showed no significant differences between the clots of B{beta}D432A and normal, but the thrombin-derived clots had thicker fibers than clots obtained from batroxobin, suggesting that cleavage of FpB is more important than 'B:b' interactions. We conclude that hole 'b' and 'B:b' knob-hole binding per se have no influence on fibrin polymerization.

  18. IgG Conformer's Binding to Amyloidogenic Aggregates

    PubMed Central

    Phay, Monichan; Welzel, Alfred T.; Williams, Angela D.; McWilliams-Koeppen, Helen P.; Blinder, Veronika; O'Malley, Tiernan T.; Solomon, Alan; Walsh, Dominic M.; O'Nuallain, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Amyloid-reactive IgGs isolated from pooled blood of normal individuals (pAbs) have demonstrated clinical utility for amyloid diseases by in vivo targeting and clearing amyloidogenic proteins and peptides. We now report the following three novel findings on pAb conformer's binding to amyloidogenic aggregates: 1) pAb aggregates have greater activity than monomers (HMW species > dimers > monomers), 2) pAbs interactions with amyloidogenic aggregates at least partially involves unconventional (non-CDR) interactions of F(ab) regions, and 3) pAb's activity can be easily modulated by trace aggregates generated during sample processing. Specifically, we show that HMW aggregates and dimeric pAbs present in commercial preparations of pAbs, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg), had up to ~200- and ~7-fold stronger binding to aggregates of Aβ and transthyretin (TTR) than the monomeric antibody. Notably, HMW aggregates were primarily responsible for the enhanced anti-amyloid activities of Aβ- and Cibacron blue-isolated IVIg IgGs. Human pAb conformer's binding to amyloidogenic aggregates was retained in normal human sera, and mimicked by murine pAbs isolated from normal pooled plasmas. An unconventional (non-CDR) component to pAb's activity was indicated from control human mAbs, generated against non-amyloid targets, binding to aggregated Aβ and TTR. Similar to pAbs, HMW and dimeric mAb conformers bound stronger than their monomeric forms to amyloidogenic aggregates. However, mAbs had lower maximum binding signals, indicating that pAbs were required to saturate a diverse collection of binding sites. Taken together, our findings strongly support further investigations on the physiological function and clinical utility of the inherent anti-amyloid activities of monomeric but not aggregated IgGs. PMID:26367058

  19. Aggregation of human platelets by endotoxic glycolipid-bearing Salmonella minnesota Re595 is prevented by synthetic peptide analogs of cell adhesion sites of fibrinogen and fibronectin

    SciTech Connect

    Timmons, S.; Grabarek, J.; Kloczewiak, M.; Hawiger, J.

    1986-03-01

    Thrombocytopenia often accompanies sepsis due to endotoxin producing gram-negative bacteria. The authors have observed that mutant Re595 of S. minnesota induced aggregation of human platelets separated from plasma fibrinogen (Theta) and other proteins. This aggregation is dependent on ADP secreted from storage granules in response to mutant Re595. Platelet aggregation induced by mutant Re595 was prevented by simultaneously added EDTA and EGTA (5mM), whereas secretion of /sup 14/C-serotonin was maintained. Preincubation of platelets with chelators (1 hr, 37/sup 0/C), known to dissociate irreversibly the platelet membrane glycoprotein IIb x IIIa complex, abolished aggregation while serotonin secretion was decreased by only one fourth. Since the GPIIb x IIIa complex constitutes the receptor for Theta, its role was examined using synthetic peptide analogs of sites on gamma and alpha chains of Theta. Gamma 400-411 (225 ..mu..M) inhibited platelet aggregation induced by mutant Re595 while serotonin secretion was unaffected. Alpha 572-575 (RGDS; 100 ..mu..M), analogous to cell adhesion site of fibronectin, also prevented aggregation induced by mutant Re595. Thus, mutant Re595 causes platelet aggregation which is divalent cation-dependent and proceeds via receptor pathway for secreted adhesive macromolecules.

  20. Dissociation of bimolecular αIIbβ3-fibrinogen complex under a constant tensile force.

    PubMed

    Litvinov, Rustem I; Barsegov, Valeri; Schissler, Andrew J; Fisher, Andrew R; Bennett, Joel S; Weisel, John W; Shuman, Henry

    2011-01-01

    The regulated ability of integrin αIIbβ3 to bind fibrinogen plays a crucial role in platelet aggregation, adhesion, and hemostasis. Employing an optical-trap-based electronic force clamp, we studied the thermodynamics and kinetics of αIIbβ3-fibrinogen bond formation and dissociation under constant unbinding forces, mimicking the forces of physiologic blood shear on a thrombus. The distribution of bond lifetimes was bimodal, indicating that the αIIbβ3-fibrinogen complex exists in two bound states with different mechanical stability. The αIIbβ3 antagonist, abciximab, inhibited binding without affecting the unbinding kinetics, whereas Mn²(+) biased the αIIbβ3-fibrinogen complex to the strong bound state with reduced off-rate. The average bond lifetimes decreased exponentially with increasing pulling force from ∼5 pN to 50 pN, suggesting that in this force range the αIIbβ3-fibrinogen interactions are classical slip bonds. We found no evidence for catch bonds, which is consistent with the known lack of shear-enhanced platelet adhesion on fibrinogen-coated surfaces. Taken together, these data provide important quantitative and qualitative characteristics of αIIbβ3-fibrinogen binding and unbinding that underlie the dynamics of platelet adhesion and aggregation in blood flow. PMID:21190668

  1. Affinity purification and characterization of a fibrinogen-binding protein complex which protects mice against lethal challenge with Streptococcus equi subsp. equi.

    PubMed

    Meehan, M; Nowlan, P; Owen, P

    1998-04-01

    Cell-wall-associated proteins from Streptococcus equi subsp. equi, the causative agent of strangles, were analysed with a view to identifying a potential protective antigen. Preparations of these proteins, isolated from mutanolysin extracts of cell walls, were shown to contain one major high-M(r) protein species (apparent M(r) 220,000 and 550,000 when analysed by SDS-PAGE and gel-filtration chromatography, respectively). The high-M(r) protein bound horse fibrinogen and was purified under non-denaturing conditions using fibrinogen affinity chromatography. The fibrinogen-binding protein (FgBP) reacted with serum taken from horses recovering from strangles and protected mice against lethal challenge from S. equi subsp. equi. The sequence of the corresponding gene (fbp) was determined and shown to encode a mature protein (M(r) 54,597) with predicted coiled-coil structure. An FgBP truncate, lacking the C-terminal cell wall/membrane anchor domain, was overexpressed in and purified from Escherichia coli and was shown to behave in an analogous fashion to the wild-type product in terms of M(r) estimation, fibrinogen binding and seroreactivity. PMID:9579073

  2. The recombinant LIC10508 is a plasma fibronectin, plasminogen, fibrinogen and C4BP-binding protein of Leptospira interrogans.

    PubMed

    Siqueira, Gabriela H; Teixeira, Aline F; Fernandes, Luis G; de Souza, Gisele O; Kirchgatter, Karin; Romero, Eliete C; Vasconcellos, Silvio A; Vieira, Monica L; Nascimento, Ana Lucia T O

    2016-03-01

    Leptospirosis is a zoonosis caused by pathogenic Leptospira spp. In this study, we report that the recombinant proteins LIC10507, LIC10508 and LIC10509 are recognized by confirmed leptospirosis serum samples at both phases of the disease. The recombinant rLIC10508 and rLIC10507 are plasminogen (PLG)-binding proteins, capable of generating plasmin in the presence of a PLG activator. The proteins bind to PLG in a dose-dependent and saturable manner, fulfilling host-ligand interaction. Furthermore, rLIC10508 interacts with fibrinogen (Fg), plasma fibronectin and C4b binding protein (C4BP). The binding of rLIC10508 to Fg decreases the fibrin clotting in a thrombin-catalyzed reaction. The incubation with 4 μM of protein promoted 40% inhibition upon clotting formation. C4BP bound to rLIC10508 retained its cofactor activity for factor I promoting the cleavage of C4b protein, which may reduce the membrane attack complex formation. Although these proteins have high amino acid sequence similarity, rLIC10508 is the most talented of the three, a behavior that might be explained by its unique putative 3D structure, whereas structures of rLIC10507 and rLIC10509 are very similar. Plasmin generation (rLIC10507 and rLIC10508), together with decreasing fibrin clot formation (rLIC10508) and impairment of the complement system (rLIC10508) may help the bacteria to overcome host defense, facilitating the infection process. PMID:26657108

  3. An echistatin C-terminal peptide activates GPIIbIIIa binding to fibrinogen, fibronectin, vitronectin and collagen type I and type IV.

    PubMed Central

    Wright, P S; Saudek, V; Owen, T J; Harbeson, S L; Bitonti, A J

    1993-01-01

    Integrin binding to proteins often involves recognition of domains containing the arginine-glycine-aspartate (RGD) motif. Different binding affinities and specificities of the integrin-ligand protein interactions involve additional protein domains. The n.m.r. structure of the snake-venom protein echistatin suggested that the C-terminal portion of the molecule might be important, in addition to the RGD domain, in binding to the integrin glycoprotein IIbIIIa (GPIIbIIIa) [Saudek, Atkinson and Pelton (1991) Biochem. 30, 7369-7372]. The synthetic C-terminal peptide, echistatin-(40-49), PRNPHKGPAT, (1) inhibited binding of GPIIbIIIa to immobilized echistatin (IC50 3-6 mM), but did not inhibit binding of GPIIbIIIa to immobilized fibrinogen (up to 5 mM peptide), (2) activated GPIIbIIIa binding to fibronectin and vitronectin, usual ligands for the activated integrin, (3) activated binding of GPIIbIIIa to collagen type I and type IV, proteins not usually regarded as ligands for the integrin, and (4) stimulated 125I-fibrinogen binding by human platelets. These findings argue for an interaction of this non-RGD domain in echistatin with GPIIbIIIa, leading to activation of the integrin and extension of the ligand specificity to include immobilized collagen. PMID:7687129

  4. Different RBC aggregating properties of the Aalpha2Bbeta2gammaA2 and Aalpha2Bbeta2gammaAgamma' subpopulations of human fibrinogen.

    PubMed

    Musielak, Malgorzata; Kościelak, Jerzy

    2006-01-01

    Human fibrinogen (TF) has been separated into two fractions: F1 - homodimers with respect to the gamma chain, and F2 - heterodimers composed of gammaA and gamma' polypeptides. Their rouleaux-inducing properties were as follows: (1) both, at the same concentration of 0.8%, were less effective than TF; (2) F1 produced larger rouleaux even under static conditions of a hemocytometer where F2 was silent; (3) F2 induced the process when a suspension was gently sheared between microscopic slides. Since the synthetic peptide gamma'(414-427) inhibited the rouleau formation in a mixture with F2, the C-terminal amino acids of the gamma' polypeptide probably bind the molecule to the cell. The inhibition was feebly visible in the native ratio of F1/F2, implicating a compensatory effect of F1. PMID:16899947

  5. Platelets in hemostasis and thrombosis: Novel mechanisms of fibrinogen-independent platelet aggregation and fibronectin-mediated protein wave of hemostasis

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Yan; Carrim, Naadiya; Wang, Yiming; Gallant, Reid C.; Marshall, Alexandra; Ni, Heyu

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Platelets are small anucleate cells generated from megakaryocytes in the bone marrow. Although platelet generation, maturation, and clearance are still not fully understood, significant progress has been made in the last 1-2 decades. In blood circulation, platelets can quickly adhere and aggregate at sites of vascular injury, forming the platelet plug (i.e. the first wave of hemostasis). Activated platelets can also provide negatively charged phosphatidylserine-rich membrane surface that enhances cell-based thrombin generation, which facilitates blood coagulation (i.e. the second wave of hemostasis). Platelets therefore play central roles in hemostasis. However, the same process of hemostasis may also cause thrombosis and vessel occlusion, which are the most common mechanisms leading to heart attack and stroke following ruptured atherosclerotic lesions. In this review, we will introduce the classical mechanisms and newly discovered pathways of platelets in hemostasis and thrombosis, including fibrinogen-independent platelet aggregation and thrombosis, and the plasma fibronectin-mediated “protein wave” of hemostasis that precedes the classical first wave of hemostasis. Furthermore, we briefly discuss the roles of platelets in inflammation and atherosclerosis and the potential strategies to control atherothrombosis. PMID:26541706

  6. Fibrinogen Brescia

    PubMed Central

    Brennan, Stephen O.; Wyatt, Jane; Medicina, Daniela; Callea, Francesco; George, Peter M.

    2000-01-01

    The proposita suffered from liver cirrhosis and biopsy showed type 1 membrane-bound fiberglass inclusions. The hepatic inclusion bodies were weakly periodic acid-Schiff diastase-positive, and on immunoperoxidase staining reacted specifically with anti-fibrinogen antisera. Coagulation investigations revealed low functional and antigenic fibrinogen together with a prolonged thrombin time of 37 seconds (normal, 17 to 22 seconds) suggestive of a hypodysfibrinogenemia. DNA sequencing of all three fibrinogen genes showed a single heterozygous mutation of GGG (Gly)→CGG (Arg) at codon 284 of the γ-chain gene. However, examination of purified fibrinogen chains by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography, ion-exchange high-performance liquid chromatography, and isoelectric focusing, failed to show any evidence of the mutant γBr chain in plasma fibrinogen. This finding was substantiated by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, which showed only a normal γ (and Bβ) chain mass, but a large increase in the portion of their disialo isoforms. We speculate that misfolding of the variant protein causes hepatic retention and the subsequent hypofibrinogenemia, and that the functional defect (dysfibrinogenemia) results from hypersialylation of otherwise normal Bβ and γ chains consequent to the liver cirrhosis. These conclusions were supported by studies on six other family members with hypofibrinogenemia, and essentially normal clotting times, who were heterozygous for the γ284 Gly→Arg mutation. PMID:10880389

  7. Human immunoglobulin G recognizing fibrinogen-binding surface proteins is protective against both Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis infections in vivo.

    PubMed

    Vernachio, John H; Bayer, Arnold S; Ames, Brenda; Bryant, Dawn; Prater, Bradley D; Syribeys, Peter J; Gorovits, Elena L; Patti, Joseph M

    2006-02-01

    A human donor-selected immunoglobulin G for intravenous injection (IGIV) product with elevated titers against the staphylococcal fibrinogen-binding MSCRAMM proteins ClfA and SdrG (INH-A21) was tested in vitro and in vivo. INH-A21 contained a significantly increased ability to inhibit the fibrinogen-binding activity of recombinant forms of both ClfA and SdrG. Evaluation of the opsonizing potential of INH-A21 was evaluated using fluorescently labeled bacteria; this assay indicated an increase in phagocytic activity compared to normal IGIV. The prophylactic efficacy of INH-A21 against an intraperitoneal challenge of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis (MRSE) was evaluated in a neonatal rat model. INH-A21 was also evaluated for prophylactic and therapeutic efficacy in a rabbit model of catheter-induced aortic valve infective endocarditis caused by either MRSE or methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Results from the in vivo models demonstrated potent prophylactic and therapeutic efficacy against both MRSE and MRSA. These data suggest that INH-A21 may be an important tool for the prevention and treatment of staphylococcal infections, especially in high-risk populations. PMID:16436704

  8. Human Immunoglobulin G Recognizing Fibrinogen-Binding Surface Proteins Is Protective against both Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis Infections In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Vernachio, John H.; Bayer, Arnold S.; Ames, Brenda; Bryant, Dawn; Prater, Bradley D.; Syribeys, Peter J.; Gorovits, Elena L.; Patti, Joseph M.

    2006-01-01

    A human donor-selected immunoglobulin G for intravenous injection (IGIV) product with elevated titers against the staphylococcal fibrinogen-binding MSCRAMM proteins ClfA and SdrG (INH-A21) was tested in vitro and in vivo. INH-A21 contained a significantly increased ability to inhibit the fibrinogen-binding activity of recombinant forms of both ClfA and SdrG. Evaluation of the opsonizing potential of INH-A21 was evaluated using fluorescently labeled bacteria; this assay indicated an increase in phagocytic activity compared to normal IGIV. The prophylactic efficacy of INH-A21 against an intraperitoneal challenge of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis (MRSE) was evaluated in a neonatal rat model. INH-A21 was also evaluated for prophylactic and therapeutic efficacy in a rabbit model of catheter-induced aortic valve infective endocarditis caused by either MRSE or methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Results from the in vivo models demonstrated potent prophylactic and therapeutic efficacy against both MRSE and MRSA. These data suggest that INH-A21 may be an important tool for the prevention and treatment of staphylococcal infections, especially in high-risk populations. PMID:16436704

  9. Binding Interactions of Agents That Alter α-Synuclein Aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Sivanesam, K.; Byrne, A.; Bisaglia, M.; Bubacco, L.

    2015-01-01

    Further examination of peptides with well-folded antiparallel β strands as inhibitors of amyloid formation from α-synuclein has resulted in more potent inhibitors. Several of these had multiple Tyr residues and represent a new lead for inhibitor design by small peptides that do not divert α-synuclein to non-amyloid aggregate formation. The most potent inhibitor obtained in this study is a backbone cyclized version of a previously studied β hairpin, designated as WW2, with a cross-strand Trp/Trp cluster. The cyclization was accomplished by adding a d-Pro-l-Pro turn locus across strand termini. At a 2:1 peptide to α-synuclein ratio, cyclo-WW2 displays complete inhibition of β-structure formation. Trp-bearing antiparallel β-sheets held together by a disulphide bond are also potent inhibitors. 15N HSQC spectra of α-synuclein provided new mechanistic details. The time course of 15N HSQC spectral changes observed during β-oligomer formation has revealed which segments of the structure become part of the rigid core of an oligomer at early stages of amyloidogenesis and that the C-terminus remains fully flexible throughout the process. All of the effective peptide inhibitors display binding-associated titration shifts in 15N HSQC spectra of α-synuclein in the C-terminal Q109-E137 segment. Cyclo-WW2, the most potent inhibitor, also displays titration shifts in the G41-T54 span of α-synuclein, an additional binding site. The earliest aggregation event appears to be centered about H50 which is also a binding site for our most potent inhibitor. PMID:25705374

  10. Effect of specific binding of human albumin, fibrinogen, and immunoglobulin G on surface characteristics of bacterial strains as revealed by partition experiments in polymer phase systems.

    PubMed Central

    Miörner, H; Myhre, E; Björck, L; Kronvall, G

    1980-01-01

    Four strains of gram-positive cocci with different combinations of positive binding of human proteins were investigated with respect to changes in physicochemical surface properties after specific protein binding. Staphylococcus aureus Cowan I, two group A beta-hemolytic streptococci, and one group G streptococcal strain were studied; they represented three different combinations of reactivity for human serum albumin, human immunoglobulin G, and fibrinogen. Using single-tube partition of bacterial cells in a dextran-polyethylene glycol system of constant polymer concentration but varying ionic compositions, it was possible to detect changes in the partition of bacteria after specific protein binding. There was a correlation between the binding of radiolabled human proteins to the bacterial strains and the effect of human proteins on the partition of the bacteria in the phase systems. Thus, the specific binding of proteins to the bacteria changes their physicochemical surface properties. These types of bacteria-protein interactions may play an important role in modulating host-parasite relationships. PMID:7429636

  11. Expression of binding of plasminogen, thrombospondin, vitronectin, and fibrinogen, and adhesive properties by Escherichia coli strains isolated from patients with colonic diseases.

    PubMed Central

    Shen, W; Steinrück, H; Ljungh, A

    1995-01-01

    Escherichia coli strains isolated from patients with colonic disorders (n = 27) and strains isolated from the rectal mucosa of healthy subjects (n = 24) were compared with respect to expression of cell surface hydrophobicity, carriage of intestinal virulence factors, adhesion to tissue culture cells, and expression of binding of extracellular matrix proteins and plasma proteins. Strains isolated from patients with colonic disease did not express a more hydrophobic cell surface than strains from healthy subjects. Few strains from both groups carried genes encoding for recognised virulence factors of E coli. Only one strain, carrying the eae gene induced actin polymerisation in tissue culture cells. Strains from patients with colonic diseases adhered to HT29 cells, which are of intestinal origin, to a higher extent than E coli from healthy subjects. Significantly more strains from patients with colonic disorders than E coli from healthy subjects expressed binding of fibronectin, collagens, laminin, vitronectin, plasminogen, throbospondin, and fibrinogen. Expression of binding of these proteins may influence the pathogenesis of colonic disease by mediating binding to ulcerated tissue, preventing complement induced lysis of bacteria and by exerting proteolytic activity. There was no correlation between serotype, expression of cell surface hydrophobicity, and binding of extracellular matrix and plasma proteins. PMID:7535283

  12. The Internal Dynamics of Fibrinogen and Its Implications for Coagulation and Adsorption

    PubMed Central

    Köhler, Stephan; Schmid, Friederike; Settanni, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Fibrinogen is a serum multi-chain protein which, when activated, aggregates to form fibrin, one of the main components of a blood clot. Fibrinolysis controls blood clot dissolution through the action of the enzyme plasmin, which cleaves fibrin at specific locations. Although the main biochemical factors involved in fibrin formation and lysis have been identified, a clear mechanistic picture of how these processes take place is not available yet. This picture would be instrumental, for example, for the design of improved thrombolytic or anti-haemorrhagic strategies, as well as, materials with improved biocompatibility. Here, we present extensive molecular dynamics simulations of fibrinogen which reveal large bending motions centered at a hinge point in the coiled-coil regions of the molecule. This feature, likely conserved across vertebrates according to our analysis, suggests an explanation for the mechanism of exposure to lysis of the plasmin cleavage sites on fibrinogen coiled-coil region. It also explains the conformational variability of fibrinogen observed during its adsorption on inorganic surfaces and it is supposed to play a major role in the determination of the hydrodynamic properties of fibrinogen. In addition the simulations suggest how the dynamics of the D region of fibrinogen may contribute to the allosteric regulation of the blood coagulation cascade through a dynamic coupling between the a- and b-holes, important for fibrin polymerization, and the integrin binding site P1. PMID:26366880

  13. Oncocalyxone A inhibits human platelet aggregation by increasing cGMP and by binding to GP Ibα glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, M A D; do Nascimento, N R F; de Sousa, C M; Pessoa, O D L; de Lemos, T L G; Ventura, J S; Schattner, M; Chudzinski-Tavassi, A M

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: Oncocalyxone A (OncoA) has a concentration-dependent anti-platelet activity. The present study aimed to further understand the mechanisms related to this effect. Experimental approach: Human platelet aggregation was measured by means of a turbidimetric method. OncoA (32–256 μM) was tested against several platelet-aggregating agents, such as adenosine diphosphate (ADP), collagen, arachidonic acid (AA), ristocetin and thrombin. Key results: OncoA completely inhibited platelet aggregation with a calculated mean inhibitory concentration (IC50-μM) of 122 for ADP, 161 for collagen, 159 for AA, 169 for ristocetin and 85 for thrombin. The anti-aggregatory activity of OncoA was not inhibited by 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ). OncoA, at a concentration that caused no significant anti-aggregatory activity, potentiated sodium nitroprusside (SNP) anti-aggregatory activity (18.8±2.9%-SNP vs 85.0±8.2%-SNP+OncoA). The levels of nitric oxide (NO) or cAMP were not altered by OncoA while cGMP levels were increased more than 10-fold by OncoA in resting or ADP-activated platelets. Flow cytometry revealed that OncoA does not interact with receptors for fibrinogen, collagen or P-selectin. Nevertheless, OncoA decreased the binding of antibodies to GP Ibα, a glycoprotein that is related both to von Willebrand factor and to thrombin-induced platelet aggregation. Conclusion and implications: OncoA showed anti-aggregatory activity in platelets that was associated with increased cGMP levels, not dependent on NO and with blocking GP Ibα glycoprotein. This new mechanism has the prospect of leading to new anti-thrombotic drugs. PMID:18516074

  14. Fe(2+) binding on amyloid β-peptide promotes aggregation.

    PubMed

    Boopathi, Subramaniam; Kolandaivel, Ponmalai

    2016-09-01

    The metal ions Zn(2+) , Cu(2+) , and Fe(2+) play a significant role in the aggregation mechanism of Aβ peptides. However, the nature of binding between metal and peptide has remained elusive; the detailed information on this from the experimental study is very difficult. Density functional theory (dft) (M06-2X/6-311++G (2df,2pd) +LANL2DZ) has employed to determine the force field resulting due to metal and histidine interaction. We performed 200 ns molecular dynamics (MD) simulation on Aβ1-42 -Zn(2+) , Aβ1-42 -Cu(2+) , and Aβ1-42 -Fe(2+) systems in explicit water with different combination of coordinating residues including the three Histidine residues in the N-terminal. The present investigation, the Aβ1-42 -Zn(2+) system possess three turn conformations separated by coil structure. Zn(2+) binding caused the loss of the helical structure of N-terminal residues which transformed into the S-shaped conformation. Zn(2+) has reduced the coil and increases the turn content of the peptide compared with experimental study. On the other hand, the Cu(2+) binds with peptide, β sheet formation is observed at the N-terminal residues of the peptide. Fe(2+) binding is to promote the formation of Glu22-Lys28 salt-bridge which stabilized the turn conformation in the Phe19-Gly25 residues, subsequently β sheets were observed at His13-Lys18 and Gly29-Gly37 residues. The turn conformation facilitates the β sheets are arranged in parallel by enhancing the hydrophobic contact between Gly25 and Met35, Lys16 and Met35, Leu17 and Leu34, Val18 and Leu34 residues. The Fe(2+) binding reduced the helix structure and increases the β sheet content in the peptide, which suggested, Fe(2+) promotes the oligomerization by enhancing the peptide-peptide interaction. Proteins 2016; 84:1257-1274. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27214008

  15. Structural basis for distinctive recognition of fibrinogen [gamma]C peptide by the platelet integrin [alpha][subscript IIb][beta]3

    SciTech Connect

    Springer, Timothy A.; Zhu, Jianghai; Xiao, Tsan

    2009-01-12

    Hemostasis and thrombosis (blood clotting) involve fibrinogen binding to integrin {alpha}{sub IIb}{beta}{sub 3} on platelets, resulting in platelet aggregation. {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3} binding fibrinogen via an Arg-Asp-Gly (RGD) motif in fibrinogen's {alpha} subunit. {alpha}{sub IIb}{beta}{sub 3} also binds to fibrinogen; however, it does so via an unstructured RGD-lacking C-terminal region of the {gamma} subunit ({gamma}C peptide). These distinct modes of fibrinogen binding enable {alpha}{sub IIb}{beta}{sub 3} and {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3} to function cooperatively in hemostasis. In this study, crystal structures reveal the integrin {alpha}{sub IIb}{beta}{sub 3}-{gamma}C peptide interface, and, for comparison, integrin {alpha}{sub IIb}{beta}{sub 3} bound to a lamprey {gamma}C primordial RGD motif. Compared with RGD, the GAKQAGDV motif in {gamma}C adopts a different backbone configuration and binds over a more extended region. The integrin metal ion-dependent adhesion site (MIDAS) Mg{sup 2+} ion binds the {gamma}C Asp side chain. The adjacent to MIDAS (ADMIDAS) Ca{sup 2+} ion binds the {gamma}C C terminus, revealing a contribution for ADMIDAS in ligand binding. Structural data from this natively disordered {gamma}C peptide enhances our understanding of the involvement of {gamma}C peptide and integrin {alpha}{sub IIb}{beta}{sub 3} in hemostasis and thrombosis.

  16. Control of Integrin αIIbβ3 Outside-In Signaling and Platelet Adhesion by Sensing the Physical Properties of Fibrin(ogen) Substrates†

    PubMed Central

    Podolnikova, Nataly P.; Yermolenko, Ivan S.; Fuhrmann, Alexander; Lishko, Valeryi K.; Magonov, Sergei; Bowen, Benjamin; Enderlein, Joerg; Podolnikov, Andriy V.; Ros, Robert; Ugarova, Tatiana P.

    2015-01-01

    The physical properties of substrates are known to control cell adhesion via integrin-mediated signaling. Fibrin and fibrinogen, the principal components of hemostatic and pathological thrombi, may represent biologically relevant substrates whose variable physical properties control adhesion of leukocytes and platelets. In our previous work, we have shown that binding of fibrinogen to the surface of fibrin clot prevents cell adhesion by creating an antiadhesive fibrinogen layer. Furthermore, fibrinogen immobilized on various surfaces at high density supports weak cell adhesion whereas at low density it is highly adhesive. To explore the mechanism underlying differential cell adhesion, we examined the structural and physical properties of surfaces prepared by deposition of various concentrations of fibrinogen using atomic force microscopy and force spectroscopy. Fibrinogen deposition at high density resulted in an aggregated multilayered material characterized by low adhesion forces. In contrast, immobilization of fibrinogen at low density produced a single layer in which molecules were directly attached to the solid surface, resulting in higher adhesion forces. Consistent with their distinct physical properties, low- but not high-density fibrinogen induced strong αIIbβ3-mediated outside-in signaling in platelets, resulting in their spreading. Moreover, while intact fibrin gels induced strong signaling in platelets, deposition of fibrinogen on the surface of fibrin resulted in diminished cell signaling. The data suggest that deposition of a multilayered fibrinogen matrix prevents stable cell adhesion by modifying the physical properties of surfaces, which results in reduced force generation and insufficient signaling. The mechanism whereby circulating fibrinogen alters adhesive properties of fibrin clots may have important implications for control of thrombus formation and thrombogenicity of biomaterials. PMID:19929007

  17. A comparison of the fibrinogen receptor distribution on adherent platelets using both soluble fibrinogen and fibrinogen immobilized on gold beads.

    PubMed

    Estry, D W; Mattson, J C; Mahoney, G J; Oesterle, J R

    1991-04-01

    The distribution of fibrinogen receptors was determined on the surface of adherent platelets using both direct labeling with the ligand fibrinogen which was immobilized on gold particles (Fg-Au) and indirect immunogold (Ig-Au) labeling of bound soluble fibrinogen identified with a rabbit polyclonal anti-fibrinogen antibody. Two distinctly different patterns of labeling were obtained and appeared to depend on whether solid phase fibrinogen (Fg-Au) or soluble phase released fibrinogen were bound to the membrane receptor. The membrane-bound Fg-Au reorganized in patterns that closely mimicked the organization of the underlying cytoskeleton. In approximately 18% of the adherent platelets, Fg-Au was seen in channels or vesicle-like structures lying deep to the platelet surface suggesting internalization into the open canalicular system and/or endocytosis. The labeling pattern obtained when identifying the location of membrane-bound soluble released fibrinogen by Ig-Au was diffuse and lacked the organizational patterns characteristic of Fg-Au. Unlike the Fg-Au probe, early dendritic platelets were heavily labeled by the soluble phase fibrinogen using the Ig-Au technique. Although the label covered the entire exposed platelet membrane in fully spread platelets, labeling over the peripheral web was more dense than that over the intermediate or granulomere zone. The diffuse organization and heavier peripheral distributional pattern of the glycoprotein IIb-IIIa (GP IIb-IIIa) receptor in fixed, adherent platelets, was also seen with the GP IIb-IIIa receptor-specific antibody AP-2. The binding of both the Fg-Au and Ig-Au were inhibited using the tetrapeptide Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser (RGDS) (93% and 98% inhibition, respectively), AP-2 (98% and 97%, respectively) and platelets from patients with Glanzmann's thrombasthenia (GT) (99% and 98%, respectively). The data presented provides the first report that receptor reorganization, following binding of fibrinogen, appears to be related to

  18. F-actin binding regions on the androgen receptor and huntingtin increase aggregation and alter aggregate characteristics.

    PubMed

    Angeli, Suzanne; Shao, Jieya; Diamond, Marc I

    2010-01-01

    Protein aggregation is associated with neurodegeneration. Polyglutamine expansion diseases such as spinobulbar muscular atrophy and Huntington disease feature proteins that are destabilized by an expanded polyglutamine tract in their N-termini. It has previously been reported that intracellular aggregation of these target proteins, the androgen receptor (AR) and huntingtin (Htt), is modulated by actin-regulatory pathways. Sequences that flank the polyglutamine tract of AR and Htt might influence protein aggregation and toxicity through protein-protein interactions, but this has not been studied in detail. Here we have evaluated an N-terminal 127 amino acid fragment of AR and Htt exon 1. The first 50 amino acids of ARN127 and the first 14 amino acids of Htt exon 1 mediate binding to filamentous actin in vitro. Deletion of these actin-binding regions renders the polyglutamine-expanded forms of ARN127 and Htt exon 1 less aggregation-prone, and increases the SDS-solubility of aggregates that do form. These regions thus appear to alter the aggregation frequency and type of polyglutamine-induced aggregation. These findings highlight the importance of flanking sequences in determining the propensity of unstable proteins to misfold. PMID:20140226

  19. Thrombin-induced conversion of fibrinogen to fibrin results in rapid platelet trapping which is not dependent on platelet activation or GPIb

    PubMed Central

    Jarvis, Gavin E; Atkinson, Ben T; Frampton, Jon; Watson, Steve P

    2003-01-01

    Activation of human platelets by thrombin is mediated by the proteolytic cleavage of two G-protein coupled protease-activated receptors, PAR-1 and PAR-4. However, thrombin also binds specifically to the platelet surface glycoprotein GPIb. It has been claimed that thrombin can induce aggregation of platelets via a novel GPIb-mediated pathway, which is independent of PAR activation and fibrinogen binding to αIIbβ3 integrin, but dependent upon polymerizing fibrin and the generation of intracellular signals. In the presence of both fibrinogen and the αIIbβ3 receptor antagonist lotrafiban, thrombin induced a biphasic platelet aggregation response. The initial primary response was small but consistent and associated with the release of platelet granules. The delayed secondary response was more substantial and was abolished by the fibrin polymerization blocking peptide GPRP. Cleavage of the extracellular portion of GPIb by mocarhagin partially inhibited thrombin-induced αIIbβ3-dependent aggregation and release, but had no effect on the secondary fibrin-dependent response. Fixing of the platelets abolished αIIbβ3-dependent aggregation and release of adenine nucleotides, whereas the fibrin-dependent response remained, indicating that platelet activation and intracellular signalling are not necessary for this secondary ‘aggregation'. In conclusion, the secondary fibrin-dependent ‘aggregation' response observed in the presence of fibrinogen and lotrafiban is a platelet trapping phenomenon dependent primarily on the conversion of soluble fibrinogen to polymerizing fibrin by thrombin. PMID:12598411

  20. Variations on Fibrinogen-Erythrocyte Interactions during Cell Aging

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Filomena A.; de Oliveira, Sofia; Freitas, Teresa; Gonçalves, Sónia; Santos, Nuno C.

    2011-01-01

    Erythrocyte hyperaggregation, a cardiovascular risk factor, is considered to be caused by an increase in plasma adhesion proteins, particularly fibrinogen. We have recently reported a specific binding between fibrinogen and an erythrocyte integrin receptor with a β3 or β3-like subunit. In this study we evaluate the influence of erythrocyte aging on the fibrinogen binding. By atomic force microscopy-based force spectroscopy measurements we found that increasing erythrocyte age, there is a decrease of the binding to fibrinogen by decreasing the frequency of its occurrence but not its force. This observation is reinforced by zeta-potential and fluorescence spectroscopy measurements. We conclude that upon erythrocyte aging the number of fibrinogen molecules bound to each cell decreases significantly, due to the progressive impairment of the specific fibrinogen-erythrocyte receptor interaction. Knowing that younger erythrocytes bind more to fibrinogen, we could presume that this population is the main contributor to the cardiovascular diseases associated with increased fibrinogen content in blood, which could disturb the blood flow. Our data also show that the sialic acids exposed on the erythrocyte membrane contribute for the interaction with fibrinogen, possibly by facilitating its binding to the erythrocyte membrane receptor. PMID:21464904

  1. The peptide LSARLAF causes platelet secretion and aggregation by directly activating the integrin alphaIIbbeta3.

    PubMed Central

    Derrick, J M; Taylor, D B; Loudon, R G; Gartner, T K

    1997-01-01

    A novel peptide (designed to bind to alphaIIbbeta3) caused platelet aggregation and aggregation-independent secretion of the contents of alpha-granules in an alphaIIbbeta3-dependent fashion. The agonist peptide induced secretion in the presence of prostaglandin E1. In cell-free assays, alphaIIbbeta3 bound specifically to immobilized agonist peptide and the peptide enhanced the binding of fibrinogen to immobilized alphaIIbbeta3. The agonist peptide apparently activates alphaIIbbeta3 by directly inducing a conformational change in the receptor. This change activates the platelets and causes secretion in a manner independent of fibrinogen binding. PMID:9230107

  2. Bacteroides gingivalis and Bacteroides intermedius recognize different sites on human fibrinogen

    SciTech Connect

    Lantz, M.S.; Allen, R.D.; Bounelis, P.; Switalski, L.M.; Hook, M. )

    1990-02-01

    Bacteroides (Porphyromonas) gingivalis and Bacteroides (Porphyromonas) intermedius have been implicated in the etiology of human periodontal diseases. These organisms are able to bind and degrade human fibrinogen, and these interactions may play a role in the pathogenesis of periodontal disease. In attempts to map the bacterial binding sites along the fibrinogen molecule, we have found that strains of B. gingivalis and B. intermedius, respectively, recognize spatially distant and distinct sites on the fibrinogen molecule. Isolated reduced and alkylated alpha-, beta-, and gamma-fibrinogen chains inhibited binding of 125I-fibrinogen to both Bacteroides species in a concentration-dependent manner. Plasmin fragments D and to some extent fragment E, however, produced a concentration-dependent inhibition of 125I-fibrinogen binding to B. intermedius strains but did not affect binding of 125I-fibrinogen to B. gingivalis strains. Radiolabeled fibrinogen chains and fragments were compared with 125I-fibrinogen with respect to specificity and reversibility of binding to bacteria. According to these criteria, gamma chain most closely resembled the native fibrinogen molecule in behavior toward B. gingivalis strains and fragments D most closely resembled fibrinogen in behavior toward B. intermedius strains. The ability of anti-human fibrinogen immunoglobulin G (IgG) to inhibit binding of 125I-fibrinogen to B. intermedius strains was greatly reduced by absorbing the IgG with fragments D. Absorbing the IgG with fragments D had no effect on the ability of the antibody to inhibit binding of 125I-fibrinogen to B. gingivalis strains. A purified staphylococcal fibrinogen-binding protein blocked binding of 125I-fibrinogen to B. intermedius strains but not to B. gingivalis strains.

  3. Platelet-collagen adhesion enhances platelet aggregation induced by binding of VWF to platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Laduca, F.M.; Bell, W.R.; Bettigole, R.E. State Univ. of New York, Buffalo )

    1987-11-01

    Ristocetin-induced platelet aggregation (RIPA) was evaluated in the presence of platelet-collagen adhesion. RIPA of normal donor platelet-rich plasma (PRP) demonstrated a primary wave of aggregation mediated by the binding of von Willebrand factor (VWF) to platelets and a secondary aggregation wave, due to a platelet-release reaction, initiated by VWF-platelet binding and inhibitable by acetylsalicylic acid (ASA). An enhanced RIPA was observed in PRP samples to which collagen had been previously added. These subthreshold concentrations of collagen, which by themselves were insufficient to induce aggregation, caused measurable platelet-collagen adhesion. Subthreshold collagen did not cause microplatelet aggregation, platelet release of ({sup 3}H)serotonin, or alter the dose-responsive binding of {sup 125}I-labeled VWF to platelets, which occurred with increasing ristocetin concentrations. However, ASA inhibition of the platelet release reaction prevented collagen-enhanced RIPA. These results demonstrate that platelet-collagen adhesion altered the platelet-release reaction induced by the binding of VWF to platelets causing a platelet-release reaction at a level of VWF-platelet binding not normally initiating a secondary aggregation. These findings suggest that platelet-collagen adhesion enhances platelet function mediated by VWF.

  4. Electrostatic binding and hydrophobic collapse of peptide-nucleic acid aggregates quantified using force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Camunas-Soler, Joan; Frutos, Silvia; Bizarro, Cristiano V; de Lorenzo, Sara; Fuentes-Perez, Maria Eugenia; Ramsch, Roland; Vilchez, Susana; Solans, Conxita; Moreno-Herrero, Fernando; Albericio, Fernando; Eritja, Ramón; Giralt, Ernest; Dev, Sukhendu B; Ritort, Felix

    2013-06-25

    Knowledge of the mechanisms of interaction between self-aggregating peptides and nucleic acids or other polyanions is key to the understanding of many aggregation processes underlying several human diseases (e.g., Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases). Determining the affinity and kinetic steps of such interactions is challenging due to the competition between hydrophobic self-aggregating forces and electrostatic binding forces. Kahalalide F (KF) is an anticancer hydrophobic peptide that contains a single positive charge that confers strong aggregative properties with polyanions. This makes KF an ideal model to elucidate the mechanisms by which self-aggregation competes with binding to a strongly charged polyelectrolyte such as DNA. We use optical tweezers to apply mechanical forces to single DNA molecules and show that KF and DNA interact in a two-step kinetic process promoted by the electrostatic binding of DNA to the aggregate surface followed by the stabilization of the complex due to hydrophobic interactions. From the measured pulling curves we determine the spectrum of binding affinities, kinetic barriers, and lengths of DNA segments sequestered within the KF-DNA complex. We find there is a capture distance beyond which the complex collapses into compact aggregates stabilized by strong hydrophobic forces and discuss how the bending rigidity of the nucleic acid affects this process. We hypothesize that within an in vivo context, the enhanced electrostatic interaction of KF due to its aggregation might mediate the binding to other polyanions. The proposed methodology should be useful to quantitatively characterize other compounds or proteins in which the formation of aggregates is relevant. PMID:23706043

  5. An amino-terminal domain of Enterococcus faecalis aggregation substance is required for aggregation, bacterial internalization by epithelial cells and binding to lipoteichoic acid.

    PubMed

    Waters, Christopher M; Hirt, Helmut; McCormick, John K; Schlievert, Patrick M; Wells, Carol L; Dunny, G M

    2004-05-01

    Aggregation substance (AS), a plasmid-encoded surface protein of Enterococcus faecalis, plays important roles in virulence and antibiotic resistance transfer. Previous studies have suggested that AS-mediated aggregation of enterococcal cells could involve the binding of this protein to cell wall lipoteichoic acid (LTA). Here, a method to purify an undegraded form of Asc10, the AS of the plasmid pCF10, is described. Using this purified protein, direct binding of Asc10 to purified E. faecalis LTA was demonstrated. Equivalent binding of Asc10 to LTA purified from INY3000, an E. faecalis strain that is incapable of aggregation, was also observed. Surprisingly, mutations in a previously identified aggregation domain from amino acids 473 to 683 that abolished aggregation had no effect on LTA binding. In frame deletion analysis of Asc10 was used to identify a second aggregation domain located in the N-terminus of the protein from amino acids 156 to 358. A purified Asc10 mutant protein lacking this domain showed reduced LTA binding, while a purified N-terminal fragment from amino acids 44-331 had high LTA binding. Like the previously described aggregation domain, the newly identified Asc10((156-358)) aggregation domain was also required for efficient internalization of E. faecalis into HT-29 enterocytes. Thus, Asc10 possess two distinct domains required for aggregation and eukaryotic cell internalization: an N-terminal domain that promotes binding to LTA and a second domain located near the middle of the protein. PMID:15130132

  6. Mechanisms of fibrinogen-induced microvascular dysfunction during cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Lominadze, D.; Dean, W. L.; Tyagi, S. C.; Roberts, A. M.

    2009-01-01

    Fibrinogen (Fg) is a high molecular weight plasma adhesion protein and a biomarker of inflammation. Many cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disorders are accompanied by increased blood content of Fg. Increased levels of Fg result in changes in blood rheological properties such as increases in plasma viscosity, erythrocyte aggregation, platelet thrombogenesis, alterations in vascular reactivity and compromises in endothelial layer integrity. These alterations exacerbate the complications in peripheral blood circulation during cardiovascular diseases such as hypertension, diabetes and stroke. In addition to affecting blood viscosity by altering plasma viscosity and erythrocyte aggregation, growing experimental evidence suggests that Fg alters vascular reactivity and impairs endothelial cell layer integrity by binding to its endothelial cell membrane receptors and activating signalling mechanisms. The purpose of this review is to discuss experimental data, which demonstrate the effects of Fg causing vascular dysfunction and to offer possible mechanisms for these effects, which could exacerbate microcirculatory complications during cardiovascular diseases accompanied by increased Fg content. PMID:19723026

  7. Energetics of thrombin-fibrinogen interaction.

    PubMed

    Hopfner, K P; Di Cera, E

    1992-11-24

    The kinetic mechanism of thrombin-fibrinogen interaction has been elucidated by steady-state measurements of synthetic substrate hydrolysis by human alpha-thrombin in the presence of human fibrinogen used as a competitive inhibitor and sucrose used as a viscogenic agent. Sucrose greatly affects the FKm for thrombin-fibrinogen interaction, without altering the intrinsic properties of the system. Under conditions of pH 7.5 and 0.1 M NaCl, fibrinogen behaves like a sticky substrate for thrombin, with acylation being comparable to dissociation in the temperature range 20-37 degrees C. In the same temperature range, deacylation is much faster than acylation. The van't Hoff enthalpy of binding for thrombin-fibrinogen interaction is -24 +/- 3 kcal/mol and the entropy is -55 +/- 11 cal mol-1 deg-1. A chemical compensation effect is present in the binding of fibrinogen and synthetic amide substrates to thrombin, with the delta H and delta G values being linked through a linear relationship. PMID:1445891

  8. Effect of protein aggregates on characterization of FcRn binding of Fc-fusion therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Bajardi-Taccioli, Adriana; Blum, Andrew; Xu, Chongfeng; Sosic, Zoran; Bergelson, Svetlana; Feschenko, Marina

    2015-10-01

    Recycling of antibodies and Fc containing therapeutic proteins by the neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) is known to prolong their persistence in the bloodstream. Fusion of Fc fragment of IgG1 to other proteins is one of the strategies to improve their pharmacokinetic properties. Accurate measurement of Fc-FcRn binding provides information about the strength of this interaction, which in most cases correlates with serum half-life of the protein. It can also offer insight into functional integrity of Fc region. We investigated FcRn binding activity of a large set of Fc-fusion samples after thermal stress by the method based on AlphaScreen technology. An unexpected significant increase in FcR binding was found to correlate with formation of aggregates in these samples. Monomer purified from a thermally-stressed sample had normal FcRn binding, confirming that its Fc portion was intact. Experiments with aggregates spiked into a sample with low initial aggregation level, demonstrated strong correlation between the level of aggregates and FcRn binding. This correlation varied significantly in different methods. By introducing modifications to the assay format we were able to minimize the effects of aggregated species on FcRn binding, which should prevent masking functional changes of Fc-fusion protein. Biolayer interferometry (BLI) was used as an alternative method to measure FcRn binding. Both optimized AlphaScreen- and BLI-based assays were sensitive to structural changes in Fc portion of the molecule, such as oxidation of methionines 252 and 428, and therefore suitable for characterization of FcRn binding. PMID:26254986

  9. Calcium-dependence of synexin binding may determine aggregation and fusion of lamellar bodies.

    PubMed Central

    Sen, N; Spitzer, A R; Chander, A

    1997-01-01

    Synexin (annexin VII) is a member of the annexin family of calcium and phospholipid binding proteins that promote calcium-dependent aggregation and fusion of lipid vesicles or secretory granules. We have previously suggested that synexin may be involved in membrane fusion processes during exocytosis of lung surfactant since it promotes fusion in vitro of lamellar bodies with plasma membranes. In this study, we characterized calcium-dependency of synexin binding to lamellar bodies and plasma membranes, since such binding is the initial, and, therefore, may be the rate-limiting step in membrane aggregation and fusion. The binding of biotinylated synexin to lamellar bodies and plasma membranes increased in a calcium-dependent manner reaching a maximum at approx. 200 microM Ca2+. Binding to lamellar bodies was completely inhibited by unlabelled synexin. Gel-overlay analysis showed that synexin bound to an approx. 76 kDa protein in the lamellar body and plasma membrane fractions. The calcium kinetics were noticeably similar for synexin binding to lamellar bodies and plasma membranes, aggregation of lamellar bodies, and fusion of lamellar bodies with lipid vesicles. At low calcium concentrations, aggregation of lamellar bodies could be increased with increasing synexin concentration, and arachidonic acid increased all three parameters (binding, aggregation, and fusion) in a similar manner. The effects of calcium and arachidonic acid on these three parameters suggest that synexin binding to lamellar bodies may be a rate-determining step for fusion during surfactant secretion. Furthermore, at near physiological calcium levels, the membrane fusion may be enhanced by elevated concentrations of synexin and polyunsaturated fatty acids. PMID:9078249

  10. Arginine-glycine-aspartic acid- and fibrinogen gamma-chain carboxyterminal peptides inhibit platelet adherence to arterial subendothelium at high wall shear rates. An effect dissociable from interference with adhesive protein binding.

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, J B; Kramer, W S; McKeown, L P; Williams, S B; Gralnick, H R

    1990-01-01

    Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD)- and fibrinogen gamma-chain carboxyterminal (GQQHHLGGAKQAGDV) peptides inhibit fibrinogen, fibronectin (Fn), vitronectin, and von Willebrand factor (vWF) binding to the platelet glycoprotein IIb-IIIa complex (GP IIb-IIIa). GP IIb-IIIa, vWF, and Fn are essential for normal platelet adherence to subendothelium. We added peptides to normal citrated whole blood before perfusion over human umbilical artery subendothelium and evaluated platelet adherence morphometrically at high (2,600 s-1) and low (800 s-1) wall shear rates. We also examined the effects of the peptides on platelet adhesion to collagen in a static system. At the high wall shear rate, RGDS and GQQHHLGGAKQAGDV caused dose-dependent reduction in the surface coverage with spread and adherent platelets. Amino acid transposition and conservative substitutions of RGD peptides and the AGDV peptide significantly inhibited platelet adherence at 2,600 s-1. By contrast, the modified RGD peptides and AGDV do not affect adhesive protein binding to platelets. None of the native or modified RGD- or fibrinogen gamma-chain peptides significantly inhibited either platelet adherence to subendothelium at 800 s-1 or platelet adhesion to collagen. Our findings demonstrate that peptides that interfere with adhesive protein binding to GP IIb-IIIa inhibit platelet adherence to vascular subendothelium with flowing blood only at high wall shear rates. Platelet adherence to subendothelium at high wall shear rates appears to be mediated by different recognition specificities from those required for fluid-phase adhesive protein binding or static platelet adhesion. PMID:2243140

  11. Requirement of aggregation propensity of Alzheimer amyloid peptides for neuronal cell surface binding

    PubMed Central

    Bateman, David A; McLaurin, JoAnne; Chakrabartty, Avijit

    2007-01-01

    Background Aggregation of the amyloid peptides, Aβ40 and Aβ42, is known to be involved in the pathology of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Here we investigate the relationship between peptide aggregation and cell surface binding of three forms of Aβ (Aβ40, Aβ42, and an Aβ mutant). Results Using confocal microscopy and flow cytometry with fluorescently labelled Aβ, we demonstrate a correlation between the aggregation propensity of the Alzheimer amyloid peptides and their neuronal cell surface association. We find that the highly aggregation prone Aβ42 associates with the surface of neuronal cells within one hour, while the less aggregation prone Aβ40 associates over 24 hours. We show that a double mutation in Aβ42 that reduces its aggregation propensity also reduces its association with the cell surface. Furthermore, we find that a cell line that is resistant to Aβ cytotoxicity, the non-neuronal human lymphoma cell line U937, does not bind either Aβ40 or Aβ42. Conclusion Taken together, our findings reveal that amyloid peptide aggregation propensity is an essential determinant of neuronal cell surface association. We anticipate that our approach, involving Aβ imaging in live cells, will be highly useful for evaluating the efficacy of therapeutic drugs that prevent toxic Aβ association with neuronal cells. PMID:17475015

  12. Evaluation of Fibrinogen Self-assembly: Role of its alphaC Region

    SciTech Connect

    J Koo; M Rafailovich; L Medved; G Tsurupa; B Kudryk; y Liu; D Galanakis

    2011-12-31

    Background: Exposure of cryptic, functional sites on fibrinogen upon its adsorption to hydrophobic surfaces of biomaterials has been linked to an inflammatory response and fibrosis. Such adsorption also induces ordered fibrinogen aggregation which is poorly understood. Objective: To investigate hydrophobic surface-induced fibrinogen aggregation. Methods: Contact and lateral force scanning probe microscopy, yielding topography, image dimensions and fiber elastic modulus measurements were used along with transmission and scanning electron microscopy. Fibrinogen aggregation was induced under non-enzymatic conditions by adsorption on a trioctyl-surface monolayer (trioctylmethylamine) grafted onto silica clay plates. Results: A more than one molecule thick coating was generated by adsorption on the plate from 100 to 200 {mu}g mL{sup -1} fibrinogen solutions, and three-dimensional networks formed from 4 mg mL{sup -1} fibrinogen incubated with uncoated or fibrinogen-coated plates. Fibrils appeared laterally assembled into branching and overlapping fibers whose heights from the surface ranged from approximately 3 to 740 nm. The elastic modulus of fibrinogen fibers was 1.55 MPa. No fibrils formed when fibrinogen lacking {alpha}C-domains was used as a coating or was incubated with intact fibrinogen-coated plates, or when the latter plates were sequentially incubated with anti-A{alpha}529-539 mAb and intact fibrinogen. When an anti-A{alpha}241-476 mAb was used instead, fine, long fibers formed. Similarly, sequential incubations of fibrinogen-coated plates with recombinant {alpha}C-domain (A{alpha}392-610 fragment) or {alpha}C-connector (A{alpha}221-372 fragment) and fibrinogen resulted in distinctly fine fiber networks. Conclusions: Adsorption-induced fibrinogen self-assembly is initiated by a more than one molecule-thick surface layer and eventuates in three-dimensional networks whose formation requires fibrinogen with intact {alpha}C-domains.

  13. Kinetics of heme interaction with heme-binding proteins: the effect of heme aggregation state.

    PubMed

    Kuzelová, K; Mrhalová, M; Hrkal, Z

    1997-10-20

    The kinetics of the interaction of heme with hemopexin and albumin was monitored by measuring the time dependence of changes in the Soret absorption spectra. Since the protein binding sites can only bind heme monomers, the binding kinetics apparently reflected the slow dissociation of heme dimers, resulting from dimer/monomer equilibria in aqueous heme solutions. The dissociation of heme dimers is characterized by the rate constant of (3-4) x 10(-3) s(-1). The measurements further revealed significant differences in the kinetic profiles (slowing down the binding interaction) that were dependent on the storage time of heme solutions at room temperature. These presumably responded to the gradual formation of higher aggregates of heme, which cannot dissociate into dimers/monomers. Alternatively, partial autooxidation of heme molecules could increase the stability of heme dimers and obstruct specific binding of heme to the proteins. PMID:9367177

  14. Anion binding and controlled aggregation of human interleukin-1 receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Raibekas, Andrei A; Bures, Edward J; Siska, Christine C; Kohno, Tadahiko; Latypov, Ramil F; Kerwin, Bruce A

    2005-07-26

    Highly concentrated human recombinant interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra) aggregates at elevated temperature without perturbation in its secondary structure. The protein aggregation can be suppressed depending on the buffer ionic strength and the type of anion present in the sample solution. Phosphate is an approximately 4-fold weaker suppressant than either citrate or pyrophosphate on the basis of the measured protein aggregation rates. This is in agreement with the strength of protein-anion interactions at the IL-1ra single anion-binding site as judged by the estimated dissociation constant values of 2.9 mM, 3.8 mM, and 13.7 mM for pyrophosphate, citrate, and phosphate, respectively. The strength of binding also correlates with the anion size and with the number of ionized groups available per molecule at a given pH. Affinity probing of IL-1ra with methyl acetyl phosphate (MAP) in combination with proteolytic digestion and mass spectral analysis show that an anion-binding site location on the IL-1ra surface is contributed by lysine-93 and lysine-96 of the loop 84-98 as well as by lysine-6 of the unstructured N-terminal region 1-7. The replacement of lysine-93 with alanine by site-directed mutagenesis results in dramatically suppressed IL-1ra aggregation. Furthermore, when the unstructured N-terminal region of IL-1ra is removed by limited proteolysis, a 2-fold increase in the time course of the aggregation lag phase is observed for the truncated protein. An anion-controlled mechanism of IL-1ra aggregation is proposed by which the anion competition for the protein cationic site prevents formation of intermolecular cation-pi interactions and, thus, interferes with the protein asymmetric self-association pathway. PMID:16026159

  15. Aggregation of ALS-linked FUS mutant sequesters RNA binding proteins and impairs RNA granules formation

    SciTech Connect

    Takanashi, Keisuke; Yamaguchi, Atsushi

    2014-09-26

    Highlights: • Aggregation of ALS-linked FUS mutant sequesters ALS-associated RNA-binding proteins (FUS wt, hnRNP A1, and hnRNP A2). • Aggregation of ALS-linked FUS mutant sequesters SMN1 in the detergent-insoluble fraction. • Aggregation of ALS-linked FUS mutant reduced the number of speckles in the nucleus. • Overproduced ALS-linked FUS mutant reduced the number of processing-bodies (PBs). - Abstract: Protein aggregate/inclusion is one of hallmarks for neurodegenerative disorders including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). FUS/TLS, one of causative genes for familial ALS, encodes a multifunctional DNA/RNA binding protein predominantly localized in the nucleus. C-terminal mutations in FUS/TLS cause the retention and the inclusion of FUS/TLS mutants in the cytoplasm. In the present study, we examined the effects of ALS-linked FUS mutants on ALS-associated RNA binding proteins and RNA granules. FUS C-terminal mutants were diffusely mislocalized in the cytoplasm as small granules in transiently transfected SH-SY5Y cells, whereas large aggregates were spontaneously formed in ∼10% of those cells. hnRNP A1, hnRNP A2, and SMN1 as well as FUS wild type were assembled into stress granules under stress conditions, and these were also recruited to FUS mutant-derived spontaneous aggregates in the cytoplasm. These aggregates stalled poly(A) mRNAs and sequestered SMN1 in the detergent insoluble fraction, which also reduced the number of nuclear oligo(dT)-positive foci (speckles) in FISH (fluorescence in situ hybridization) assay. In addition, the number of P-bodies was decreased in cells harboring cytoplasmic granules of FUS P525L. These findings raise the possibility that ALS-linked C-terminal FUS mutants could sequester a variety of RNA binding proteins and mRNAs in the cytoplasmic aggregates, which could disrupt various aspects of RNA equilibrium and biogenesis.

  16. Ultrastructural and biochemical analysis of fibrinogen receptors on activated thrombocytes

    SciTech Connect

    O'Toole, E.T.

    1989-01-01

    The present studies have been concerned with the role of fibrinogen and its receptor, GP IIb/IIIa, during the activation and early aggregation of pigeon thrombocytes. Thrombocytes were surface labeled with {sup 125}I then separated on SDS-PAGE. Analysis by gel autoradiography revealed major bands at MW 145 kd and 98 kd, which corresponded to human GPIIb and GPIIIa. Immunologic similarity of the pigeon and human receptor components was established by dot blot analysis using polyclonal antibodies directed against human GPIIb and GPIIIa. Pigeon fibrinogen, isolated by plasma precipitation with PEG-1000 and purified over Sepharose 4B, was used to study receptor-ligand interaction. Separation of pigeon fibrinogen on SDS-PAGE resulted in three peptides having apparent MW of 62kd, 55kd, and 47kd which are comparable to human fibrinogen. Further similarity of human and pigeon fibrinogen was verified by immonodiffusion against an antibody specific for the human protein. The role of fibrinogen and its receptor in thrombocyte function was established by turbidimetric aggregation using thrombin as an agonist under conditions requiring Ca++ and fibrinogen.

  17. Binding and aggregation of pro-atrial natriuretic factor by calcium.

    PubMed

    Thibault, G; Doubell, A F

    1992-04-01

    Analysis of atrial secretory granule content by sodium dodecyl sulfate-gel electrophoresis followed by a 45Ca2+ overlay assay indicates that a 17,000 protein binds 45Ca2+. This protein, which can be immunostained by atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) antiserum, corresponds to proANF. Ca2+ binding is proportional to the amount of proANF and pH dependent. Generation of ANF-(1-98) by thrombin digestion of proANF does not affect Ca2+ binding. Blocking the carboxyl groups of proANF and the use of NH2-terminal fragments bearing those carboxyl groups demonstrated that the Ca(2+)-interaction site is probably located within the highly acidic portion (11-30) of the propeptide. Ca2+ binding to proANF induces its aggregation that can be verified by sedimentation. ProANF aggregation is Ca2+ dependent, being optimal at 10 mM, partially pH dependent, and greatly increased by high concentrations of proANF. However, because of its relatively low-binding affinity, Ca2+ can be substituted by other divalent cations such as Sr2+, Ba2+, or Mg2+. The high level of Ca2+ in atrial secretory granules and the aggregation of proANF in the presence of Ca2+ suggest a possible involvement of these physicochemical properties in the condensed state of the matrix of secretory granules. Indeed, detergent solubilization of the membrane of the secretory granules in presence of Ca2+ resulted only in a partial dissolution of the dense core matrix. We therefore postulate that, in the Golgi complex, proANF and Ca2+ associate to form a condensed aggregate that helps package secretory material into secretory vesicles. PMID:1533094

  18. Inhibition of aggregation of amyloid peptides by beta-sheet breaker peptides and their binding affinity.

    PubMed

    Viet, Man Hoang; Ngo, Son Tung; Lam, Nguyen Sy; Li, Mai Suan

    2011-06-01

    The effects of beta-sheet breaker peptides KLVFF and LPFFD on the oligomerization of amyloid peptides were studied by all-atom simulations. It was found that LPFFD interferes the aggregation of Aβ(16-22) peptides to a greater extent than does KLVFF. Using the molecular mechanics-Poisson-Boltzmann surface area (MM-PBSA) method, we found that the former binds more strongly to Aβ(16-22). Therefore, by simulations, we have clarified the relationship between aggregation rates and binding affinity: the stronger the ligand binding, the slower the oligomerization process. The binding affinity of pentapeptides to full-length peptide Aβ(1-40) and its mature fibrils has been considered using the Autodock and MM-PBSA methods. The hydrophobic interaction between ligands and receptors plays a more important role for association than does hydrogen bonding. The influence of beta-sheet breaker peptides on the secondary structures of monomer Aβ(1-40) was studied in detail, and it turns out that, in their presence, the total beta-sheet content can be enhanced. However, the aggregation can be slowed because the beta-content is reduced in fibril-prone regions. Both pentapeptides strongly bind to monomer Aβ(1-40), as well as to mature fibrils, but KLVFF displays a lower binding affinity than LPFFD. Our findings are in accord with earlier experiments that both of these peptides can serve as prominent inhibitors. In addition, we predict that LPFFD inhibits/degrades the fibrillogenesis of full-length amyloid peptides better than KLVFF. This is probably related to a difference in their total hydrophobicities in that the higher the hydrophobicity, the lower the inhibitory capacity. The GROMOS96 43a1 force field with explicit water and the force field proposed by Morris et al. (Morris et al. J. Comput. Chem. 1998, 19, 1639 ) were employed for all-atom molecular dynamics simulations and Autodock experiments, respectively. PMID:21563780

  19. Crystal structure of the tetrameric fibrinogen-like recognition domain of fibrinogen C domain containing 1 (FIBCD1) protein.

    PubMed

    Shrive, Annette K; Moeller, Jesper B; Burns, Ian; Paterson, Jenny M; Shaw, Amy J; Schlosser, Anders; Sorensen, Grith L; Greenhough, Trevor J; Holmskov, Uffe

    2014-01-31

    The high resolution crystal structures of a recombinant fragment of the C-terminal fibrinogen-like recognition domain of FIBCD1, a vertebrate receptor that binds chitin, have been determined. The overall tetrameric structure shows similarity in structure and aggregation to the horseshoe crab innate immune protein tachylectin 5A. The high affinity ligand N-acetylmannosamine (ManNAc) binds in the S1 site, predominantly via the acetyl group with the oxygen and acetamide nitrogen hydrogen-bonded to the protein and the methyl group inserted into a hydrophobic pocket. The binding of the ManNAc pyranose ring differs markedly between the two independent subunits, but in all structures the binding of the N-acetyl group is conserved. In the native structure, a crystal contact results in one of the independent protomers binding the first GlcNAc of the Asn(340) N-linked glycan on the other independent protomer. In the ligand-bound structure this GlcNAc is replaced by the higher affinity ligand ManNAc. In addition, a sulfate ion has been modeled into the electron density at a location similar to the S3 binding site in L-ficolin, whereas in the native structure an acetate ion has been placed in the S1 N-acetyl binding site, and a sulfate ion has been placed adjacent to this site. These ion binding sites are ideally placed to receive the N-acetyl and sulfate groups of sulfated GalNAc residues of glycosaminoglycans such as chondroitin and dermatan sulfate. Together, these structures give insight into important determinants of ligand selectivity, demonstrating versatility in recognition and binding while maintaining conservation in N-acetyl and calcium binding. PMID:24293368

  20. Acetylation within the First 17 Residues of Huntingtin Exon 1 Alters Aggregation and Lipid Binding.

    PubMed

    Chaibva, Maxmore; Jawahery, Sudi; Pilkington, Albert W; Arndt, James R; Sarver, Olivia; Valentine, Stephen; Matysiak, Silvina; Legleiter, Justin

    2016-07-26

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a genetic neurodegenerative disorder caused by an expanded polyglutamine (polyQ) domain near the N-terminus of the huntingtin (htt) protein. Expanded polyQ leads to htt aggregation. The first 17 amino acids (Nt(17)) in htt comprise a lipid-binding domain that undergoes a number of posttranslational modifications that can modulate htt toxicity and subcellular localization. As there are three lysines within Nt(17), we evaluated the impact of lysine acetylation on htt aggregation in solution and on model lipid bilayers. Acetylation of htt-exon1(51Q) and synthetic truncated htt-exon 1 mimicking peptides (Nt(17)-Q35-P10-KK) was achieved using a selective covalent label, sulfo-N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHSA). With this treatment, all three lysine residues (K6, K9, and K15) in Nt(17) were significantly acetylated. N-terminal htt acetylation retarded fibril formation in solution and promoted the formation of larger globular aggregates. Acetylated htt also bound lipid membranes and disrupted the lipid bilayer morphology less aggressively compared with the wild-type. Computational studies provided mechanistic insights into how acetylation alters the interaction of Nt(17) with lipid membranes. Our results highlight that N-terminal acetylation influences the aggregation of htt and its interaction with lipid bilayers. PMID:27463137

  1. Homocysteine influences blood clot properties alone and in combination with total fibrinogen but not with fibrinogen γ' in Africans.

    PubMed

    Nienaber-Rousseau, Cornelie; de Lange, Zelda; Pieters, Marlien

    2015-06-01

    Simultaneously increased fibrinogen and homocysteine (Hcy) in blood are believed to elevate the risk of cardiovascular disease mortality. However, the pathophysiological mechanisms involved are unknown. We sought to determine whether Hcy or its genetic determinants influence blood clot properties alone or in combination with fibrinogen. In addition, we investigated, for the first time, the gamma prime (γ') isoform of fibrinogen with Hcy in relation to clot architecture and lysis. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms, Hcy and hemostatic variables, including clot lysis, determined with a global fibrinolytic assay [giving lag time, slope, maximum absorbance and clot lysis time (CLT)], were measured in 1867 healthy black South Africans and cross-sectionally analyzed. Increasing Hcy did not affect fiber cross-sectional area (maximum absorbance). However, it decreased the time needed to initiate the coagulation cascade and for fibrin fibers to grow (lag time), it increased the tempo of lateral aggregation (slope) and reduced CLT. None of the single-nucleotide polymorphisms measured had effects on clot properties. Combined effects were observed between Hcy and total fibrinogen in predicting CLT. Fibrinogen γ', which affected markers of the fibrinolytic assay, did not have conjoint effects with Hcy. We believe that there is value in recognizing the combined effects of Hcy and fibrinogen, but not its γ' isoform in relation to clot structure and lysis. The enhanced fibrinolysis rate observed in patients with low fibrinogen and high Hcy may have adverse consequences for health if it disturbs hemostasis and results in a bleeding tendency. PMID:25688462

  2. Binding of Folic Acid Induces Specific Self-Aggregation of Lactoferrin: Thermodynamic Characterization.

    PubMed

    Tavares, Guilherme M; Croguennec, Thomas; Lê, Sébastien; Lerideau, Olivia; Hamon, Pascaline; Carvalho, Antônio F; Bouhallab, Saïd

    2015-11-17

    In the study presented here, we investigated the interaction at pH 5.5 between folic acid (FA) and lactoferrin (LF), a positively charged protein. We found a binding constant Ka of 10(5) M(-1) and a high stoichiometry of 10 mol of FA/mol of LF. The size and charge of the complexes formed evolved during titration experiments. Increasing the ionic strength to 50 mM completely abolished the isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) signal, suggesting the predominance of electrostatic interactions in the exothermic binding obtained. We developed a theoretical model that explains the complex triphasic ITC profile. Our results revealed a two-step mechanism: FA/LF interaction followed by self-association of the complexes thus formed. We suggest that 10 FA molecules bind to LF to form saturated reactive complexes (FA10/LF) that further self-associate into aggregates with a finite size of around 15 nm. There is thus a critical saturation degree of the protein, above which the self-association can take place. We present here the first results that provide comprehensive details of the thermodynamics of FA/LF complexation-association. Given the high stoichiometry, allowing a load of 55 mg of FA/g of LF, we suggest that FA/LF aggregates would be an effective vehicle for FA in fortified drinks. PMID:26488446

  3. Fibrinogen induces endothelial cell permeability

    PubMed Central

    Tyagi, Neetu; Roberts, Andrew M.; Dean, William L.; Tyagi, Suresh C.

    2010-01-01

    Many cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disorders are accompanied by an increased blood content of fibrinogen (Fg), a high molecular weight plasma adhesion protein. Fg is a biomarker of inflammation and its degradation products have been associated with microvascular leakage. We tested the hypothesis that at pathologically high levels, Fg increases endothelial cell (EC) permeability through extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) signaling and by inducing F-actin formation. In cultured ECs, Fg binding to intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and to α5β1 integrin, caused phosphorylation of ERK. Subsequently, F-actin formation increased and coincided with formation of gaps between ECs, which corresponded with increased permeability of ECs to albumin. Our data suggest that formation of F-actin and gaps may be the mechanism for increased albumin leakage through the EC monolayer. The present study indicates that elevated un-degraded Fg may be a factor causing microvascular permeability that typically accompanies cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disorders. PMID:17849175

  4. Weak Glycolipid Binding of a Microdomain-Tracer Peptide Correlates with Aggregation and Slow Diffusion on Cell Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Lauterbach, Tim; Manna, Manoj; Ruhnow, Maria; Wisantoso, Yudi; Wang, Yaofeng; Matysik, Artur; Oglęcka, Kamila; Mu, Yuguang; Geifman-Shochat, Susana; Wohland, Thorsten; Kraut, Rachel

    2012-01-01

    Organized assembly or aggregation of sphingolipid-binding ligands, such as certain toxins and pathogens, has been suggested to increase binding affinity of the ligand to the cell membrane and cause membrane reorganization or distortion. Here we show that the diffusion behavior of the fluorescently tagged sphingolipid-interacting peptide probe SBD (Sphingolipid Binding Domain) is altered by modifications in the construction of the peptide sequence that both result in a reduction in binding to ganglioside-containing supported lipid membranes, and at the same time increase aggregation on the cell plasma membrane, but that do not change relative amounts of secondary structural features. We tested the effects of modifying the overall charge and construction of the SBD probe on its binding and diffusion behavior, by Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR; Biacore) analysis on lipid surfaces, and by Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS) on live cells, respectively. SBD binds preferentially to membranes containing the highly sialylated gangliosides GT1b and GD1a. However, simple charge interactions of the peptide with the negative ganglioside do not appear to be a critical determinant of binding. Rather, an aggregation-suppressing amino acid composition and linker between the fluorophore and the peptide are required for optimum binding of the SBD to ganglioside-containing supported lipid bilayer surfaces, as well as for interaction with the membrane. Interestingly, the strength of interactions with ganglioside-containing artificial membranes is mirrored in the diffusion behavior by FCS on cell membranes, with stronger binders displaying similar characteristic diffusion profiles. Our findings indicate that for aggregation-prone peptides, aggregation occurs upon contact with the cell membrane, and rather than giving a stronger interaction with the membrane, aggregation is accompanied by weaker binding and complex diffusion profiles indicative of heterogeneous diffusion

  5. Structure-activity relationships of alphaIIb 313-320 derived peptide inhibitors of human platelet aggregation.

    PubMed

    Stanica, Ruxandra Maria; Benaki, Dimitra; Rodis, Foteini I; Mikros, Emmanuel; Tsoukatos, Dimokritos; Tselepis, Alexandros; Tsikaris, Vasilios

    2008-11-01

    The alphaIIbbeta3 receptor, which is the most abundant receptor on the surface of platelets, can interact with a variety of adhesive proteins including fibrinogen, fibronectin and the von Willebrand factor. Fibrinogen binding on alphaIIbbeta3 is an event essential for platelet aggregation and thrombus formation. Mapping of the fibrinogen-binding domains on alphaIIb subunit suggested the sequence 313-332 as a possible binding site. This region was restricted to sequence alphaIIb 313-320 (Y313MESRADR320) using synthetic octapeptides overlapping by six residues. The YMESRADR octapeptide inhibits ADP-stimulated human platelets aggregation and binds to immobilized fibrinogen. In this study, we used the Ala scanning methodology within the sequence 313-320 aiming to evaluate the contribution of each amino acid in inhibiting platelet aggregation. It was found that the substitution of Y313, M314, E315 or S316 by A does not affect the activity of the parent octapeptide. The-RADR-motif seems to be the most essential for the biological activity of the alphaIIb 313-320 site. The conformational analysis of the YAESRADR, YMESAADR and YMESRAAR analogs by using NMR spectroscopy and distance geometry calculations revealed significant differences in their conformational states in DMSO-d6. PMID:18646252

  6. Contribution of the Interaction of Streptococcus mutans Serotype k Strains with Fibrinogen to the Pathogenicity of Infective Endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Nomura, Ryota; Otsugu, Masatoshi; Naka, Shuhei; Teramoto, Noboru; Kojima, Ayuchi; Muranaka, Yoshinori; Matsumoto-Nakano, Michiyo; Ooshima, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans, a pathogen responsible for dental caries, is occasionally isolated from the blood of patients with bacteremia and infective endocarditis (IE). Our previous study demonstrated that serotype k-specific bacterial DNA is frequently detected in S. mutans-positive heart valve specimens extirpated from IE patients. However, the reason for this frequent detection remains unknown. In the present study, we analyzed the virulence of IE from S. mutans strains, focusing on the characterization of serotype k strains, most of which are positive for the 120-kDa cell surface collagen-binding protein Cbm and negative for the 190-kDa protein antigen (PA) known as SpaP, P1, antigen I/II, and other designations. Fibrinogen-binding assays were performed with 85 clinical strains classified by Cbm and PA expression levels. The Cbm+/PA− group strains had significantly higher fibrinogen-binding rates than the other groups. Analysis of platelet aggregation revealed that SA31, a Cbm+/PA− strain, induced an increased level of aggregation in the presence of fibrinogen, while negligible aggregation was induced by the Cbm-defective isogenic mutant SA31CBD. A rat IE model with an artificial impairment of the aortic valve created using a catheter showed that extirpated heart valves in the SA31 group displayed a prominent vegetation mass not seen in those in the SA31CBD group. These findings could explain why Cbm+/PA− strains are highly virulent and are related to the development of IE, and the findings could also explain the frequent detection of serotype k DNA in S. mutans-positive heart valve clinical specimens. PMID:25287921

  7. [Mechanism of cooked blanched garlic leaves against platelet aggregation].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin-Hua; Di, Yan-Hui

    2014-06-01

    This study was purposed to explore the mechanism of cooked blanched garlic leave juice against platelet aggregation. The juice of blanched garlic leaves was mixed with platelet rich plasma (PRP), the human platelet aggregation, the activation of human platelets induced by adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and collagen were observed; the expression levels of the activated platelets (Fib-R) and P-selectin (CD62P), and the amount of platelet fibrinogen binding were detected by flow cytometry; 10 rabbits were randomly divided into two groups, in addition to the normal diet, they were fed with physiologic saline and cooked blanched garlic leave juice respectively. After 1, 3, 5 , 8 weeks, the maximum ratio of rabbit platelet aggregation induced by ADP and collagen were observed . The results showed that the cooked blanched garlic leave juice could significantly inhibit human platelet aggregation induced by ADP and collagen (P < 0.05), the inhibitory ratio were 87.37% and 86.24% respectively; the juice could not inhibit activated platelets Fib-R and CD62P expression levels (P > 0.05), but was able to inhibit platelet fibrinogen binding capacity (P < 0.05); the rabbit platelet aggregation rate in the group given cooked blanched garlic leave juice was significantly lower than that in control group (P < 0.05). It is concluded that the cooked blanched garlic leave juice can inhibit platelet aggregation in vitro and in vivo, the inhibition of aggregation pathway mainly is blocking the combination of fibrinogen with Fib-R, which finally results in the inhibition of platelet aggregation. Therefore, regular consumption of cooked blanched garlic leaves may prevent cardiovascular thrombotic diseases. PMID:24989289

  8. Cholesterol Modifies Huntingtin Binding to, Disruption of, and Aggregation on Lipid Membranes.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiang; Campbell, Warren A; Chaibva, Maxmore; Jain, Pranav; Leslie, Ashley E; Frey, Shelli L; Legleiter, Justin

    2016-01-12

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an inherited neurodegenerative disease caused by abnormally long CAG-repeats in the huntingtin gene that encode an expanded polyglutamine (polyQ) domain near the N-terminus of the huntingtin (htt) protein. Expanded polyQ domains are directly correlated to disease-related htt aggregation. Htt is found highly associated with a variety of cellular and subcellular membranes that are predominantly comprised of lipids. Since cholesterol homeostasis is altered in HD, we investigated how varying cholesterol content modifies the interactions between htt and lipid membranes. A combination of Langmuir trough monolayer techniques, vesicle permeability and binding assays, and in situ atomic force microscopy were used to directly monitor the interaction of a model, synthetic htt peptide and a full-length htt-exon1 recombinant protein with model membranes comprised of total brain lipid extract (TBLE) and varying amounts of exogenously added cholesterol. As the cholesterol content of the membrane increased, the extent of htt insertion decreased. Vesicles containing extra cholesterol were resistant to htt-induced permeabilization. Morphological and mechanical changes in the bilayer associated with exposure to htt were also drastically altered by the presence of cholesterol. Disrupted regions of pure TBLE bilayers were grainy in appearance and associated with a large number of globular aggregates. In contrast, morphological changes induced by htt in bilayers enriched in cholesterol were plateau-like with a smooth appearance. Collectively, these observations suggest that the presence and amount of cholesterol in lipid membranes play a critical role in htt binding and aggregation on lipid membranes. PMID:26652744

  9. Pyocyanin facilitates extracellular DNA binding to Pseudomonas aeruginosa influencing cell surface properties and aggregation.

    PubMed

    Das, Theerthankar; Kutty, Samuel K; Kumar, Naresh; Manefield, Mike

    2013-01-01

    Pyocyanin is an electrochemically active metabolite produced by the human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. It is a recognized virulence factor and is involved in a variety of significant biological activities including gene expression, maintaining fitness of bacterial cells and biofilm formation. It is also recognized as an electron shuttle for bacterial respiration and as an antibacterial and antifungal agent. eDNA has also been demonstrated to be a major component in establishing P. aeruginosa biofilms. In this study we discovered that production of pyocyanin influences the binding of eDNA to P. aeruginosa PA14 cells, mediated through intercalation of pyocyanin with eDNA. P. aeruginosa cell surface properties including cell size (hydrodynamic diameter), hydrophobicity and attractive surface energies were influenced by eDNA in the presence of pyocyanin, affecting physico-chemical interactions and promoting aggregation. A ΔphzA-G PA14 mutant, deficient in pyocynain production, could not bind with eDNA resulting in a reduction in hydrodynamic diameter, a decrease in hydrophobicity, repulsive physico-chemical interactions and reduction in aggregation in comparison to the wildtype strain. Removal of eDNA by DNase I treatment on the PA14 wildtype strain resulted in significant reduction in aggregation, cell surface hydrophobicity and size and an increase in repulsive physico-chemical interactions, similar to the level of the ΔphzA-G mutant. The cell surface properties of the ΔphzA-G mutant were not affected by DNase I treatment. Based on these findings we propose that pyocyanin intercalation with eDNA promotes cell-to-cell interactions in P. aeruginosa cells by influencing their cell surface properties and physico-chemical interactions. PMID:23505483

  10. Leptospira Immunoglobulin-Like Protein B (LigB) Binds to Both the C-Terminal 23 Amino Acids of Fibrinogen αC Domain and Factor XIII: Insight into the Mechanism of LigB-Mediated Blockage of Fibrinogen α Chain Cross-Linking.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Ching-Lin; Chang, Eric; Tseng, Andrew; Ptak, Christopher; Wu, Li-Chen; Su, Chun-Li; McDonough, Sean P; Lin, Yi-Pin; Chang, Yung-Fu

    2016-09-01

    The coagulation system provides a primitive but effective defense against hemorrhage. Soluble fibrinogen (Fg) monomers, composed of α, β and γ chains, are recruited to provide structural support for the formation of a hemostatic plug. Fg binds to platelets and is processed into a cross-linked fibrin polymer by the enzymatic clotting factors, thrombin and Factor XIII (FXIII). The newly formed fibrin-platelet clot can act as barrier to protect against pathogens from entering the bloodstream. Further, injuries caused by bacterial infections can be confined to the initial wound site. Many pathogenic bacteria have Fg-binding adhesins that can circumvent the coagulation pathway and allow the bacteria to sidestep containment. Fg expression is upregulated during lung infection providing an attachment surface for bacteria with the ability to produce Fg-binding adhesins. Fg binding by leptospira might play a crucial factor in Leptospira-associated pulmonary hemorrhage, the main factor contributing to lethality in severe cases of leptospirosis. The 12th domain of Leptospira immunoglobulin-like protein B (LigB12), a leptospiral adhesin, interacts with the C-terminus of FgαC (FgαCC). In this study, the binding site for LigB12 was mapped to the final 23 amino acids at the C-terminal end of FgαCC (FgαCC8). The association of FgαCC8 with LigB12 (ELISA, KD = 0.76 μM; SPR, KD = 0.96 μM) was reduced by mutations of both charged residues (R608, R611 and H614 from FgαCC8; D1061 from LigB12) and hydrophobic residues (I613 from FgαCC8; F1054 and A1065 from LigB12). Additionally, LigB12 bound strongly to FXIII and also inhibited fibrin formation, suggesting that LigB can disrupt coagulation by suppressing FXIII activity. Here, the detailed binding mechanism of a leptospiral adhesin to a host hemostatic factor is characterized for the first time and should provide better insight into the pathogenesis of leptospirosis. PMID:27622634

  11. Biochemical and structural analysis of the interaction between β-amyloid and fibrinogen.

    PubMed

    Zamolodchikov, Daria; Berk-Rauch, Hanna E; Oren, Deena A; Stor, Daniel S; Singh, Pradeep K; Kawasaki, Masanori; Aso, Kazuyoshi; Strickland, Sidney; Ahn, Hyung Jin

    2016-08-25

    The majority of patients with Alzheimer disease (AD) suffer from impaired cerebral circulation. Accumulating evidence suggests that fibrinogen, the main protein component of blood clots, plays an important role in this circulatory dysfunction in AD. Fibrinogen interacts with β-amyloid (Aβ), forming plasmin-resistant abnormal blood clots, and increased fibrin deposition is found in the brains of AD patients and mouse models. In this study, we investigated the biochemical and structural details of the Aβ-fibrinogen interaction. We identified the central region of Aβ42 as the most critical region for the interaction, which can be inhibited by specific antibodies against the central region of Aβ and by naturally occurring p3 peptides, Aβ17-40 and Aβ17-42. X-ray crystallographic analysis revealed that Aβ42 binding to fragment D of fibrinogen induced a structural change in the C-terminal region of the fibrinogen β-chain (β384-393). Furthermore, we identified an additional Aβ-binding site within the αC region of fibrinogen. Aβ binding to this αC region blocked plasmin-mediated fibrin cleavage at this site, resulting in the generation of increased levels of a plasmin-resistant fibrin degradation fragment. Overall, our study elucidates the Aβ-fibrinogen interaction and clarifies the mechanism by which Aβ-fibrinogen binding delays fibrinolysis by plasmin. These results may facilitate the development of effective therapeutics against the Aβ-fibrinogen interaction to treat cerebrovascular abnormalities in AD. PMID:27389717

  12. Effects of fibrinogens on phase transitions in lipid model membrane systems.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, B A; Küçük, O; Kwaan, H C; Westerman, M P; Tracy, D; Lis, L J

    1994-06-24

    An abnormal fibrinogen that caused aggregation of red blood cells (RBC) in a patient with gangrene was examined by real-time X-ray diffraction to determine its effects on dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoylphosphatidylethanolamine (POPE) phase transitions. Similar studies were done with normal fibrinogen and results were compared. Both types of fibrinogen slightly increased the L alpha-->HII phase transition temperature and the HII phase parameters for POPE, while neither fibrinogen significantly affected the order-disordered acyl chain transitions in the lipid bilayer phase. However, fibrinogen differentially influenced the bilayer unit cell parameter of the gel and disordered bilayer and the gel state ripple phase. These results can be interpreted as indicating that fibrinogen has little effect on the balance of gel and disordered acyl chains in the lipid bilayer, but may influence membrane functions dependent on non-bilayer phases. PMID:7923477

  13. Cryptic splice site usage in exon 7 of the human fibrinogen Bβ-chain gene is regulated by a naturally silent SF2/ASF binding site within this exon

    PubMed Central

    Spena, Silvia; Tenchini, Maria Luisa; Buratti, Emanuele

    2006-01-01

    In this work we report the identification of a strong SF2/ASF binding site within exon 7 of the human fibrinogen Bβ-chain gene (FGB). Its disruption in the wild-type context has no effect on exon recognition. However, when the mutation IVS7 + 1G>T—initially described in a patient suffering from congenital afibrinogenemia—is present, this SF2/ASF binding site is critical for cryptic 5′ss (splice site) definition. These findings, besides confirming and extending previous results regarding the effect of SF2/ASF on cryptic splice site activation, identify for the first time an enhancer sequence in the FGB gene specific for cryptic splice site usage. Taken together, they suggest the existence of a splicing-regulatory network that is normally silent in the FGB natural splicing environment but which can nonetheless influence splicing decisions when local contexts allow. On a more general note, our conclusions have implications for the evolution of alternative splicing processes and for the development of methods to control aberrant splicing in the context of disease-causing mutations. PMID:16611940

  14. Effects of class I heparin binding growth factor and fibronectin on platelet adhesion and aggregation

    SciTech Connect

    Greisler, H.P.; Klosak, J.J.; Steinam, S.J.; Lam, T.M.; Burgess, W.H.; Kim, D.U. )

    1990-05-01

    Fibronectin and heparin binding growth factor-type 1 have been affixed to vascular graft surfaces to enhance the attachment and the proliferation of transplanted endothelial cells, respectively. The current study examines the effect of fibronectin and heparin binding growth factor-type 1 on platelet adhesion and activation in vivo and on platelet aggregation in vitro. Expanded polytetrafluoroethylene prostheses (5 cm x 4 mm internal diameter) were treated either with fibronectin (n = 9), fibronectin/heparin/heparin binding growth factor-type 1/heparin (n = 12), or neither (n = 13) and were interposed into canine aortoiliac systems bilaterally. Autogenous radiolabeled (Indium 111 oxine, 650 microCi) platelets were injected intravenously before reestablishment of circulation. Perfusion was maintained for 30 minutes, and prostheses were removed with segments of native aorta and distal iliac arteries bilaterally. Specimens were examined for thrombus-free surface area, by gamma well counting for adherent radiolabeled platelets, and by light microscopy and transmission and scanning electron microscopic techniques. Results showed that both the fibronectin and fibronectin/heparin/heparin binding growth factor-type 1/heparin pretreated prostheses contained significantly greater numbers of platelets and adherent radioactivity than did control graft segments when normalized to their ipsilateral iliac arteries. Fibronectin/heparin/heparin binding growth factor-type 1/heparin pretreated prostheses contained 27 +/- 16 times more radioactivity per square millimeter than ipsilateral iliac arteries, fibronectin pretreated prostheses had 13 +/- 8 times more radioactivity per square millimeter than ipsilateral iliac arteries, and untreated expanded polytetrafluoroethylene had 4 +/- 3 times more radioactivity per square millimeter than ipsilateral iliac arteries.

  15. Two cell surface proteins bind the sponge Microciona prolifera aggregation factor.

    PubMed

    Varner, J A; Burger, M M; Kaufman, J F

    1988-06-15

    Two extracellular matrix cell surface proteins which bind the proteoglycan-like aggregation factor from the marine sponge Microciona prolifera (MAF) and which may function as physiological receptors for MAF were identified and characterized for the first time. By probing nitrocellulose blots of nonreducing sodium dodecyl sulfate gels containing whole sponge cell protein with iodinated MAF, a 210- and a 68-kDa protein, which have native molecular masses of approximately 200-400 and 70 kDa, were identified. MAF binding to blots is species-specific. It is also sensitive to reduction and is completely abolished by pretreatment of live cells with proteases, as was cellular aggregation, indicating that the 210- and 68-kDa proteins may be located on the cell surface. The additional observations that the 68 kDa is an endoglycosidase F-sensitive glycoprotein and that antisera against whole sponge cells or membranes can immunoprecipitate the 210 kDa when prebound to intact cells are consistent with a cell surface location. Both proteins can be isolated from sponge cell membranes and from the sponge skeleton (insoluble extracellular matrix), but the 210-kDa MAF-binding protein can also be found in the soluble extracellular matrix (buffer washes of cells and skeleton) as well. A third MAF-binding protein of molecular mass 95 kDa was also found in the sponge extracellular matrix but rarely on cells. Both of the cell-associated 210- and 68-kDa proteins are nonintegral membrane proteins, based on Triton X-114 phase separation, flotation of liposomes containing sponge membrane lysates, and their extraction from membranes by buffer washes. Both proteins bind MAF affinity resins, indicating that they each exhibit a moderate affinity for MAF under native conditions. They can also be separated from each other and from the bulk of the protein in an octylpolyoxyethylene extract of membranes by fast protein liquid chromatography Mono Q anion exchange chromatography, as assessed by native

  16. Effect of the structure of bile salt aggregates on the binding of aromatic guests and the accessibility of anions.

    PubMed

    Li, Rui; Carpentier, Eric; Newell, Edward D; Olague, Lana M; Heafey, Eve; Yihwa, Chang; Bohne, Cornelia

    2009-12-15

    The binding of naphthalene (Np), 1-ethylnaphthalene (EtNp), acenaphthene (AcN), and 1-naphthyl-1-ethanol (NpOH) as guests to the aggregates of sodium cholate (NaCh), taurocholate (NaTC), deoxycholate (NaDC), and deoxytaurocholate (NaTDC) was studied with the objective of determining how the structure of the bile salts affects the binding dynamics of guests and quenchers with the bile salt aggregates. Time-resolved and steady-state fluorescence experiments were used to determine the binding efficiency of the guests with the aggregates and were also employed to investigate the quenching of the singlet excited state of the guests by iodide anions. Quenching studies of the triplet excited states using laser flash photolysis were employed to determine the accessibility to the aggregate of nitrite anions, used as quenchers, and the dissociation rate constants of the guests from the bile salt aggregates. The binding efficiency of the guests to NaDC and NaTDC is higher than for NaCh and NaTC, and the protection efficiency is also higher for NaDC and NaTDC, in line with the larger aggregates formed for the latter bile salts. The formation of aggregates is in part driven by the structure of the guest, where an increased protection efficiency and residence time can be achieved by the introduction of short alkyl substituents (AcN or EtNp vs Np). NpOH was shown to be located in a very different environment in all four bile salts when compared to AcN, EtNp, and Np, suggesting that hydrogen bonding plays an important role in the formation of the aggregate around NpOH. PMID:19606836

  17. FbsA-Driven Fibrinogen Polymerization: A Bacterial ``Deceiving Strategy''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierno, Matteo; Maravigna, Laura; Piazza, Roberto; Visai, Livia; Speziale, Pietro

    2006-01-01

    We show that FbsA, a cell wall protein of the bacterium Streptococcus agalactiae, promotes large-scale aggregation of human plasma fibrinogen, leading to the formation of a semiflexible polymerlike network. This extensive aggregation process takes place not only in solution, but also on FbsA-functionalized colloidal particles, and leads to the formation of a thick layer on the bacterial cell wall itself, which becomes an efficient mask against phagocytosis.

  18. Nucleobases bind to and stabilize aggregates of a prebiotic amphiphile, providing a viable mechanism for the emergence of protocells.

    PubMed

    Black, Roy A; Blosser, Matthew C; Stottrup, Benjamin L; Tavakley, Ravi; Deamer, David W; Keller, Sarah L

    2013-08-13

    Primordial cells presumably combined RNAs, which functioned as catalysts and carriers of genetic information, with an encapsulating membrane of aggregated amphiphilic molecules. Major questions regarding this hypothesis include how the four bases and the sugar in RNA were selected from a mixture of prebiotic compounds and colocalized with such membranes, and how the membranes were stabilized against flocculation in salt water. To address these questions, we explored the possibility that aggregates of decanoic acid, a prebiotic amphiphile, interact with the bases and sugar found in RNA. We found that these bases, as well as some but not all related bases, bind to decanoic acid aggregates. Moreover, both the bases and ribose inhibit flocculation of decanoic acid by salt. The extent of inhibition by the bases correlates with the extent of their binding, and ribose inhibits to a greater extent than three similar sugars. Finally, the stabilizing effects of a base and ribose are additive. Thus, aggregates of a prebiotic amphiphile bind certain heterocyclic bases and sugars, including those found in RNA, and this binding stabilizes the aggregates against salt. These mutually reinforcing mechanisms might have driven the emergence of protocells. PMID:23901105

  19. Nucleobases bind to and stabilize aggregates of a prebiotic amphiphile, providing a viable mechanism for the emergence of protocells

    PubMed Central

    Black, Roy A.; Blosser, Matthew C.; Stottrup, Benjamin L.; Tavakley, Ravi; Deamer, David W.; Keller, Sarah L.

    2013-01-01

    Primordial cells presumably combined RNAs, which functioned as catalysts and carriers of genetic information, with an encapsulating membrane of aggregated amphiphilic molecules. Major questions regarding this hypothesis include how the four bases and the sugar in RNA were selected from a mixture of prebiotic compounds and colocalized with such membranes, and how the membranes were stabilized against flocculation in salt water. To address these questions, we explored the possibility that aggregates of decanoic acid, a prebiotic amphiphile, interact with the bases and sugar found in RNA. We found that these bases, as well as some but not all related bases, bind to decanoic acid aggregates. Moreover, both the bases and ribose inhibit flocculation of decanoic acid by salt. The extent of inhibition by the bases correlates with the extent of their binding, and ribose inhibits to a greater extent than three similar sugars. Finally, the stabilizing effects of a base and ribose are additive. Thus, aggregates of a prebiotic amphiphile bind certain heterocyclic bases and sugars, including those found in RNA, and this binding stabilizes the aggregates against salt. These mutually reinforcing mechanisms might have driven the emergence of protocells. PMID:23901105

  20. Degradation versus aggregation of misfolded maltose-binding protein in the periplasm of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Betton, J M; Sassoon, N; Hofnung, M; Laurent, M

    1998-04-10

    The periplasmic fates of misfolded MalE31, a defective folding mutant of the maltose-binding protein, were determined by manipulating two cellular activities affecting the protein folding pathway in host cells: (i) the malEp promoter activity, which is controlled by the transcriptional activator MalT, and (ii) the DegP and Protease III periplasmic proteolytic activity. At a low level of expression, the degradation of misfolded MalE31 was partially impaired in cells lacking DegP or Protease III. At a high level of expression, misfolded MalE31 rapidly formed periplasmic inclusion bodies and thus escaped degradation. However, the manipulated host cell activities did not enhance the production of periplasmic, soluble MalE31. A kinetic competition between folding, aggregation, and degradation is proposed as a general model for the biogenesis of periplasmic proteins. PMID:9535871

  1. Interfacial binding and aggregation of lamin A tail domains associated with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kalinowski, Agnieszka; Yaron, Peter N.; Qin, Zhao; Shenoy, Siddharth; Buehler, Markus J.; Lösche, Mathias; Dahl, Kris Noel

    2014-01-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome is a premature aging disorder associated with the expression of Δ50 lamin A (Δ50LA), a mutant form of the nuclear structural protein lamin A (LA). Δ50LA is missing 50 amino acids from the tail domain and retains a C-terminal farnesyl group that is cleaved from the wild-type LA. Many of the cellular pathologies of HGPS are thought to be a consequence of protein-membrane association mediated by the retained farnesyl group. To better characterize the protein-membrane interface, we quantified binding of purified recombinant Δ50LA tail domain (Δ50LA-TD) to tethered bilayer membranes composed of phosphatidylserine and phosphocholine using surface plasmon resonance. Farnesylated Δ50LATD binds to the membrane interface only in the presence of Ca2+ or Mg2+ at physiological ionic strength. At extremely low ionic strength, both the farnesylated and non-farnesylated forms of Δ50LA-TD bind to the membrane surface in amounts that exceed those expected for a densely packed protein monolayer. Interestingly, the wild-type LA-TD with no farnesylation also associates with membranes at low ionic strength but forms only a single layer. We suggest that electrostatic interactions are mediated by charge clusters with a net positive charge that we calculate on the surface of the LA-TDs. These studies suggest that the accumulation of Δ50LA at the inner nuclear membrane observed in cells is due to a combination of aggregation and membrane association rather than simple membrane binding; electrostatics plays an important role in mediating this association. PMID:25194277

  2. Effect of zinc on the interaction between fibrinogen and platelet glycoprotein IIb/IIIa (GPIIb/IIIa)

    SciTech Connect

    Trybulec, M.; Cook, J.J.; Niewiarowski, S. )

    1991-03-11

    In the present study, the authors tested the effect of Zn++ on the interaction between fibrinogen (Fg) and its platelet membrane receptor in three different systems. (1) Fg binding to ADP-stimulated platelets showed a pronounced elevation in the presence of 1 mM zinc. Scatchard analysis of this data revealed a significant increase in the number of Fg binding sites, however, binding affinity was not changed. This increase was only partially blocked by a GPIIb/IIIa complex-specific monoclonal antibody (A{sub 2}A{sub 9}). (2) Zn++ enhanced Fg-induced aggregation of chymotrypsin-treated platelets. (3) Zn++ but not Mn++ or MG++, increased binding of purified GPIIb/IIIa to Fg immobilized on the ELISA plate in the presence of 0.5 mM calcium. The same extent of binding occurred even in the absence of calcium provided that Zn++ was present. A{sub 2}A{sub 9} antibody only partially blocked this reaction. The authors propose that zinc-induced changes in the structure of GPIIb/IIIa complex make the receptor more available to fibrinogen.

  3. Fibrinogen stability under surfactant interaction.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Natalia; Barbosa, Leandro R S; Itri, Rosangela; Ruso, Juan M

    2011-10-01

    Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), circular dichroism (CD), difference spectroscopy (UV-vis), Raman spectroscopy, and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) measurements have been performed in the present work to provide a quantitatively comprehensive physicochemical description of the complexation between bovine fibrinogen and the sodium perfluorooctanoate, sodium octanoate, and sodium dodecanoate in glycine buffer (pH 8.5). It has been found that sodium octanoate and dodecanoate act as fibrinogen destabilizer. Meanwhile, sodium perfluorooctanoate acts as a structure stabilizer at low molar concentration and as a destabilizer at high molar concentration. Fibrinogen's secondary structure is affected by all three studied surfactants (decrease in α-helix and an increase in β-sheet content) to a different extent. DSC and UV-vis revealed the existence of intermediate states in the thermal unfolding process of fibrinogen. In addition, SAXS data analysis showed that pure fibrinogen adopts a paired-dimer structure in solution. Such a structure is unaltered by sodium octanoate and perfluoroctanoate. However, interaction of sodium dodecanoate with the fibrinogen affects the protein conformation leading to a complex formation. Taken together, all results evidence that both surfactant hydrophobicity and tail length mediate the fibrinogen stability upon interaction. PMID:21722913

  4. O-GlcNAcylation modulates the self-aggregation ability of the fourth microtubule-binding repeat of tau

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, C.-H.; Si Tong; Wu Weihui; Hu Jia; Du Jintang; Zhao Yufen; Li Yanmei

    2008-10-10

    In Alzheimer's disease (AD), tau protein is abnormally hyperphosphorylated and aggregated into paired helical filaments (PHFs). It was discovered recently that tau is also O-GlcNAcylated in human brains. And O-GlcNAcylation may regulate phosphorylation of tau in a site-specific manner. In this work, we focused on the fourth microtubule-binding repeat (R4) of tau, which has an O-GlcNAcylation site-Ser356. The aggregation behavior of this repeat and its O-GlcNAcylated form was investigated by turbidity, precipitation assay and electron microscopy. In addition, conformations of these two peptides were analyzed with circular dichroism (CD). Our results revealed that O-GlcNAcylation at Ser356 could greatly slow down the aggregation speed of R4 peptide. This modulation of O-GlcNAcylation on tau aggregation implies a new perspective of tau pathology.

  5. Aronia melanocarpa as a protector against nitration of fibrinogen.

    PubMed

    Bijak, Michał; Saluk, Joanna; Antosik, Adam; Ponczek, Michał B; Żbikowska, Halina M; Borowiecka, Marta; Nowak, Paweł

    2013-04-01

    Fibrinogen (Fg) also known as coagulation factor I represents about 4% of the total human plasma proteins. The main function of Fg is its involvement in last phase of blood coagulation cascade, when thrombin-induced conversion of dissolved plasma fibrinogen into an insoluble fibrin clot occurs. The reaction of fibrinogen with peroxynitrite causes both structural modifications and changes of the biological properties of this plasma glycoprotein. Recently, there is an increased interest in the screening of natural products present in fruits, vegetables and herbs for their possible antioxidative activities. Therefore, the aim of our study was to estimate the effect of extract from berries of Aronia melanocarpa against nitrative and oxidative damage induced by peroxynitrite. The extract from A. melanocarpa (0.5-50 μg/ml) added to Fg 10 min before peroxynitrite (100 μM) significantly inhibited both the formation of the high molecular weight protein aggregates and nitration of Fg molecule. The extract also abolished peroxynitrite-induced inhibition of fibrinogen polymerization (by 95% at 50 μg/ml). The obtained results indicate that natural extract from berries of A. melanocarpa has protective effects against peroxynitrite-induced nitrative damage of plasma fibrinogen, and therefore may contribute in the prevention of peroxynitrite-related cardiovascular or inflammatory diseases. PMID:23357800

  6. "Fibrinogen Tokyo II". An abnormal fibrinogen with an impaired polymerization site on the aligned DD domain of fibrin molecules.

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, M; Baba, M; Morimoto, K; Nakamikawa, C

    1983-01-01

    A hereditary dysfibrinogenemia associated with defective aggregation of fibrin monomers was found in a 39-yr-old female and in the members of her immediate family, who had all been asymptomatic. The abnormality was probably due to an impaired polymerization site exposed in the DD domain of two adjacent fibrin molecules, because plasmic fragment DD derived from the propositus' cross-linked fibrin bound far less tightly to insolubilized normal fragment E than that from the normal one. Its complementary polymerization site in the E domain of fibrin, which was exposed by thrombin cleavage, and the polymerization site in the D domain of fibrinogen, which was available without activation by thrombin, were both found to be normal. More anodal migration of the abnormal fragment DD than the normal one, as shown by immunoelectrophoresis, seemed to support our concept that the mutation most likely resides in the D domain of the abnormal fibrinogen molecule at or near a region closely related to the polymerization site that is exposed when two fibrin molecules are linearly aligned. The work of others on the polymerization of normal fibrin with different techniques yielded results consistent with our conclusions. We tentatively designate this type of abnormal fibrinogen "fibrinogen Tokyo II," but its possible identity with other abnormalities of fibrinogen reported heretofore is not excluded. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 7 PMID:6886002

  7. Developmentally Regulated RNA-binding Protein 1 (Drb1)/RNA-binding Motif Protein 45 (RBM45), a Nuclear-Cytoplasmic Trafficking Protein, Forms TAR DNA-binding Protein 43 (TDP-43)-mediated Cytoplasmic Aggregates.

    PubMed

    Mashiko, Takafumi; Sakashita, Eiji; Kasashima, Katsumi; Tominaga, Kaoru; Kuroiwa, Kenji; Nozaki, Yasuyuki; Matsuura, Tohru; Hamamoto, Toshiro; Endo, Hitoshi

    2016-07-15

    Cytoplasmic protein aggregates are one of the pathological hallmarks of neurodegenerative disorders, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). Several RNA-binding proteins have been identified as components of inclusion bodies. Developmentally regulated RNA-binding protein 1 (Drb1)/RNA-binding motif protein 45 is an RNA-binding protein that was recently described as a component in ALS- and FTLD-related inclusion bodies. However, the molecular mechanism underlying cytoplasmic Drb1 aggregation remains unclear. Here, using an in vitro cellular model, we demonstrated that Drb1 co-localizes with cytoplasmic aggregates mediated by TAR DNA-binding protein 43, a major component of ALS and FTLD-related inclusion bodies. We also defined the domains involved in the subcellular localization of Drb1 to clarify the role of Drb1 in the formation of cytoplasmic aggregates in ALS and FTLD. Drb1 predominantly localized in the nucleus via a classical nuclear localization signal in its carboxyl terminus and is a shuttling protein between the nucleus and cytoplasm. Furthermore, we identify a double leucine motif serving as a nuclear export signal. The Drb1 mutant, presenting mutations in both nuclear localization signal and nuclear export signal, is prone to aggregate in the cytoplasm. The mutant Drb1-induced cytoplasmic aggregates not only recruit TAR DNA-binding protein 43 but also decrease the mitochondrial membrane potential. Taken together, these results indicate that perturbation of Drb1 nuclear-cytoplasmic trafficking induces toxic cytoplasmic aggregates, suggesting that mislocalization of Drb1 is involved in the cause of cytotoxicity in neuronal cells. PMID:27226551

  8. Molecular interaction studies of hemostasis: fibrinogen ligand-human platelet receptor interactions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Imshik; Marchant, Roger E

    2003-01-01

    The interactions between fibrinogen ligands and platelet receptor alpha(IIb)beta(3) were studied under physiological conditions by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Two linear peptide sequences in fibrinogen, RGD and HHLGGAKQAGDV, play central roles in the regulation of hemostasis and thrombosis by facilitating adhesion and aggregation of platelets. In order to measure the interactions (i.e., debonding force), oligopeptides, GSSSGaaa, where aaa is -RGDSPA or -HHLGGAKQAGDV, were synthesized and grafted on to the surface of AFM probe tips. The interaction forces between a peptide-modified AFM probe tip and platelet surface were determined from pN to nN levels using AFM force measurements. Our results show that the zero kinetic off-rate, K(off)(0), for RGDSPA is significantly smaller than that for HHLGGAKQAGDV, under the consideration of flexible receptor surfaces. From our analysis, the K(off)(0), the single molecular binding energy E(b), and the transition state x(b), were extracted from the data, and estimated to be 1.53s(-1), -2.64x10(-20)J and 1.03A for the RGD-alpha(IIb)beta(3) system, and 47.58s(-1), 2.67x10(-20), 1.09A for the HHLGGAKQAGDV-alpha(IIb)beta(3) system, respectively. PMID:12801687

  9. Bioactive polyphenol interactions with β amyloid: a comparison of binding modelling, effects on fibril and aggregate formation and neuroprotective capacity.

    PubMed

    Das, Sukanya; Stark, Lina; Musgrave, Ian F; Pukala, Tara; Smid, Scott D

    2016-02-01

    In this study we compared the effects of a diverse set of natural polyphenolics ligands on in silico interactive modelling, in vitro anti-aggregative properties and neuronal toxicity of β amyloid. The β amyloid-binding characteristics of optimised structural conformations of polyphenols with ascribed neuroprotective actions including punicalagin, myricetin, luteolin and honokiol were determined in silico. Thioflavin T and transmission electron microscopy were used to assess in vitro inhibitory effects of these polyphenols on Aβ1-42 fibril and aggregation formation. Phaeochromocytoma (PC12) cells were exposed to Aβ1-42, alone and in combination with test concentrations of each polyphenol (100 μM) and viability measured using MTT assay. Aβ1-42 evoked a concentration-dependent loss of cell viability in PC12 cells, in which all four polyphenols demonstrated significant inhibition of neurotoxicity. While all compounds variably altered the morphology of Aβ aggregation, the flavonoids luteolin and myricetin and the lignan honokiol all bound in a similar hydrophobic region of the amyloid pentamer and exerted the most pronounced inhibition of Aβ1-42 aggregation. Each of the polyphenols demonstrated neuroprotective effects in PC12 cells exposed to Aβ1-42, including punicalagin. These findings highlight some structure-activity insights that can be gleaned into the anti-aggregatory properties of bioactive polyphenols based on modelling of their binding to β-amyloid, but also serve to highlight the more general cellular neuroprotective nature of such compounds. PMID:26815043

  10. Heparin binding by murine recombinant prion protein leads to transient aggregation and formation of RNA-resistant species.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Tuane C R G; Reynaldo, Daniel P; Gomes, Mariana P B; Almeida, Marcius S; Cordeiro, Yraima; Silva, Jerson L

    2011-01-19

    The conversion of cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) into the pathological conformer PrP(Sc) requires contact between both isoforms and probably also requires a cellular factor, such as a nucleic acid or a glycosaminoglycan (GAG). Little is known about the structural features implicit in the GAG-PrP interaction. In the present work, light scattering, fluorescence, circular dichroism, and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy were used to describe the chemical and physical properties of the murine recombinant PrP 23-231 interaction with low molecular weight heparin (LMWHep) at pH 7.4 and 5.5. LMWHep interacts with rPrP 23-231, thereby inducing transient aggregation. The interaction between murine rPrP and heparin at pH 5.5 had a stoichiometry of 2:1 (LMWHep:rPrP 23-231), in contrast to a 1:1 binding ratio at pH 7.4. At binding equilibrium, NMR spectra showed that rPrP complexed with LMWHep had the same general fold as that of the free protein, even though the binding can be indicated by significant changes in few residues of the C-terminal domain, especially at pH 5.5. Notably, the soluble LMWHep:rPrP complex prevented RNA-induced aggregation. We also investigated the interaction between LMWHep and the deletion mutants rPrP Δ51-90 and Δ32-121. Heparin did not bind these constructs at pH 7.4 but was able to interact at pH 5.5, indicating that this glycosaminoglycan binds the octapeptide repeat region at pH 7.4 but can also bind other regions of the protein at pH 5.5. The interaction at pH 5.5 was dependent on histidine residues of the murine rPrP 23-231. Depending on the cellular milieu, the PrP may expose different regions that can bind GAG. These results shed light on the role of GAGs in PrP conversion. The transient aggregation of PrP may explain why some GAGs have been reported to induce the conversion into the misfolded, scrapie conformation, whereas others are thought to protect against conversion. The acquired resistance of the complex against RNA

  11. Aggregation and Binding Substances Enhance Pathogenicity in Rabbit Models of Enterococcus faecalis Endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Schlievert, Patrick M.; Gahr, Pamala J.; Assimacopoulos, Aris P.; Dinges, Martin M.; Stoehr, Jennifer A.; Harmala, John W.; Hirt, Helmut; Dunny, Gary M.

    1998-01-01

    We investigated the importance of enterococcal aggregation substance (AS) and enterococcal binding substance (EBS) in rabbit models of Enterococcus faecalis cardiac infections. First, American Dutch belted rabbits were injected intraventricularly with 108 CFU and observed for 2 days. No clinical signs of illness developed in animals given AS− EBS− organisms, and all survived. All rabbits given AS− EBS+ organisms developed signs of illness, including significant pericardial inflammation, but only one of six died. All animals given AS+ EBS− organisms developed signs of illness, including pericardial inflammation, and survived. All rabbits given AS+ EBS+ organisms developed signs of illness and died. None of the rabbits receiving AS+ EBS+ organisms showed gross pericardial inflammation. The lethality and lack of inflammation are consistent with the presence of a superantigen. Rabbit and human lymphocytes were highly stimulated in vitro by cell extracts, but not cell-free culture fluids, of AS+ EBS+ organisms. In contrast, cell extracts from AS− EBS− organisms weakly stimulated lymphocyte proliferation. Culture fluids from human lymphocytes stimulated with AS+/EBS+ enterococci contained high levels of gamma interferon and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and TNF-β, which is consistent with functional stimulation of T-lymphocyte proliferation and macrophage activation. Subsequent experiments examined the abilities of the same strains to cause endocarditis in a catheterization model. New Zealand White rabbits underwent transaortic catheterization for 2 h, at which time catheters were removed and animals were injected with 2 × 109 CFU of test organisms. None of the animals given AS− EBS− organisms developed vegetations or showed autopsy evidence of tissue damage. Rabbits given AS− EBS+ or AS+ EBS− organisms developed small vegetations and had splenomegaly at autopsy. All rabbits given AS+ EBS+ organisms developed large vegetations and had

  12. Fibrinogen-Induced Streptococcus mutans Biofilm Formation and Adherence to Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lombardo Bedran, Telma Blanca; Azelmat, Jabrane; Palomari Spolidorio, Denise

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans, the predominant bacterial species associated with dental caries, can enter the bloodstream and cause infective endocarditis. The aim of this study was to investigate S. mutans biofilm formation and adherence to endothelial cells induced by human fibrinogen. The putative mechanism by which biofilm formation is induced as well as the impact of fibrinogen on S. mutans resistance to penicillin was also evaluated. Bovine plasma dose dependently induced biofilm formation by S. mutans. Of the various plasma proteins tested, only fibrinogen promoted the formation of biofilm in a dose-dependent manner. Scanning electron microscopy observations revealed the presence of complex aggregates of bacterial cells firmly attached to the polystyrene support. S. mutans in biofilms induced by the presence of fibrinogen was markedly resistant to the bactericidal effect of penicillin. Fibrinogen also significantly increased the adherence of S. mutans to endothelial cells. Neither S. mutans cells nor culture supernatants converted fibrinogen into fibrin. However, fibrinogen is specifically bound to the cell surface of S. mutans and may act as a bridging molecule to mediate biofilm formation. In conclusion, our study identified a new mechanism promoting S. mutans biofilm formation and adherence to endothelial cells which may contribute to infective endocarditis. PMID:24222906

  13. Venous ulceration, fibrinogen and fibrinolysis.

    PubMed Central

    Leach, R. D.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of long and short-term venous hypertension upon lymph fibrinogen concentrations was studied in an attempt to explain the peri-capillary deposition of fibrin reported in patients with post-phlebitic syndromes. The clearance of radioactive fibrinogen/thrombin clots from the subcutaneous tissues of rats and human volunteers was also studied. Both long- and short-term venous hypertension were found to increase fibrinogen transport across the interstitial space by more than 600%. Not only was there evidence of fibrinolytic activity in the lymph but after long-term venous hypertension alpha 2 antiplasmin activity was also detectable. Skin biopsies from the venous hypertensive ankles showed deposition of interstitial fibrin. The clearance of radioactive fibrinogen/thrombin clots from the subcutaneous tissues of the rat was found to be delayed if the rats were given epsilon amino caproic acid but it could not be increased with stanozolol. In human subjects it was found that patients with lipodermatosclerosis had delayed clot clearance and retarded blood fibrinolytic activity when compared with normal volunteers and patients with uncomplicated varicose veins. The principle cause why tall men are more subject to ulcers than short men, Dr Young conceived to be then length of the column of blood in their veins; which by its pressure, renders the legs less able to recover when hurt by any violence. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 5 PMID:6742738

  14. Electrolyte Cations Binding with Extracellular Polymeric Substances Enhanced Microcystis Aggregation: Implication for Microcystis Bloom Formation in Eutrophic Freshwater Lakes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Huacheng; Lv, Hua; Liu, Xin; Wang, Peifang; Jiang, Helong

    2016-09-01

    The hydrodynamic and structural properties of Microcystis extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in electrolytes with different valences and ionic strengths were investigated via using dynamic light scattering, the fluorescence excitation emission matrix coupled with parallel factor (EEM-PARAFAC) analysis, two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy (2D-COS), and cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (Cryo-TEM). The hydrodynamic diameters of EPS colloids exhibited no variation for monovalent NaCl but a substantial increase for divalent CaCl2 and MgCl2. However, the negative electrophoretic mobilities for all complexes indicated that charge neutralization would not be the main mechanism for EPS aggregation. Application of EEM-PARAFAC and 2D-Fourier transform infrared (FTIR)-COS revealed obvious electrolyte binding potential with both fluorescent phenolic and aromatic compounds and nonfluorescent polysaccharides. The complexation model showed that divalent Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) exhibited a strong binding capability with phenolic -OH, aromatic C═C, and polysaccharide C-O groups, while the monovalent electrolyte exhibited negligible association with these groups. Such a strong complexation can bridge each individual biomolecule together to form EPS aggregates and Microcystis colonies, as supported by in situ Cryo-TEM and light microscope observation, respectively. Given the increased concentration in natural ecosystems, electrolyte cations, especially divalent cations, would play increased roles in Microcystis bloom formation and thus should be considered. PMID:27502019

  15. Fibrinogen Is at the Interface of Host Defense and Pathogen Virulence in Staphylococcus aureus Infection.

    PubMed

    Ko, Ya-Ping; Flick, Matthew J

    2016-06-01

    Fibrinogen not only plays a pivotal role in hemostasis but also serves key roles in antimicrobial host defense. As a rapidly assembled provisional matrix protein, fibrin(ogen) can function as an early line of host protection by limiting bacterial growth, suppressing dissemination of microbes to distant sites, and mediating host bacterial killing. Fibrinogen-mediated host antimicrobial activity occurs predominantly through two general mechanisms, namely, fibrin matrices functioning as a protective barrier and fibrin(ogen) directly or indirectly driving host protective immune function. The potential of fibrin to limit bacterial infection and disease has been countered by numerous bacterial species evolving and maintaining virulence factors that engage hemostatic system components within vertebrate hosts. Bacterial factors have been isolated that simply bind fibrinogen or fibrin, promote fibrin polymer formation, or promote fibrin dissolution. Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic gram-positive bacterium, the causative agent of a wide range of human infectious diseases, and a prime example of a pathogen exquisitely sensitive to host fibrinogen. Indeed, current data suggest fibrinogen serves as a context-dependent determinant of host defense or pathogen virulence in Staphylococcus infection whose ultimate contribution is dictated by the expression of S. aureus virulence factors, the path of infection, and the tissue microenvironment. PMID:27056151

  16. Mice expressing a mutant form of fibrinogen that cannot support fibrin formation exhibit compromised antimicrobial host defense

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Joni M.; Gorkun, Oleg V.; Raghu, Harini; Thornton, Sherry; Mullins, Eric S.; Palumbo, Joseph S.; Ko, Ya-Ping; Höök, Magnus; David, Tovo; Coughlin, Shaun R.; Degen, Jay L.

    2015-01-01

    Fibrin(ogen) is central to hemostasis and thrombosis and also contributes to multiple physiologic and pathologic processes beyond coagulation. However, the precise contribution of soluble fibrinogen vs insoluble fibrin matrices to vascular integrity, tissue repair, inflammation, and disease has been undefined and unapproachable. To establish the means to distinguish fibrinogen- and fibrin-dependent processes in vivo, FibAEK mice were generated that carry normal levels of circulating fibrinogen but lack the capacity for fibrin polymer formation due to a germ-line mutation in the Aα chain thrombin cleavage site. Homozygous FibAEK mice developed to term and exhibited postnatal survival superior to that of fibrinogen-deficient mice. Unlike fibrinogen-deficient mice, platelet-rich plasma from FibAEK mice supported normal platelet aggregation in vitro, highlighting that fibrinogenAEK retains the functional capacity to support interactions with platelets. Thrombin failed to release fibrinopeptide-A from fibrinogenAEK and failed to induce polymer formation with FibAEK plasma or purified fibrinogenAEK in 37°C mixtures regardless of incubation time. FibAEK mice displayed both an absence of fibrin polymer formation following liver injury, as assessed by electron microscopy, and a failure to generate stable occlusive thrombi following FeCl3 injury of carotid arteries. FibAEK mice exhibited a profound impediment in Staphylococcus aureus clearance following intraperitoneal infection similar to fibrinogen-deficient mice, yet FibAEK mice displayed a significant infection dose-dependent survival advantage over fibrinogen-deficient mice following peritonitis challenge. Collectively, these findings establish for the first time that fibrin polymer is the molecular form critical for antimicrobial mechanisms while simultaneously highlighting biologically meaningful contributions and functions of the soluble molecule. PMID:26228483

  17. Mice expressing a mutant form of fibrinogen that cannot support fibrin formation exhibit compromised antimicrobial host defense.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Joni M; Gorkun, Oleg V; Raghu, Harini; Thornton, Sherry; Mullins, Eric S; Palumbo, Joseph S; Ko, Ya-Ping; Höök, Magnus; David, Tovo; Coughlin, Shaun R; Degen, Jay L; Flick, Matthew J

    2015-10-22

    Fibrin(ogen) is central to hemostasis and thrombosis and also contributes to multiple physiologic and pathologic processes beyond coagulation. However, the precise contribution of soluble fibrinogen vs insoluble fibrin matrices to vascular integrity, tissue repair, inflammation, and disease has been undefined and unapproachable. To establish the means to distinguish fibrinogen- and fibrin-dependent processes in vivo, Fib(AEK) mice were generated that carry normal levels of circulating fibrinogen but lack the capacity for fibrin polymer formation due to a germ-line mutation in the Aα chain thrombin cleavage site. Homozygous Fib(AEK) mice developed to term and exhibited postnatal survival superior to that of fibrinogen-deficient mice. Unlike fibrinogen-deficient mice, platelet-rich plasma from Fib(AEK) mice supported normal platelet aggregation in vitro, highlighting that fibrinogen(AEK) retains the functional capacity to support interactions with platelets. Thrombin failed to release fibrinopeptide-A from fibrinogen(AEK) and failed to induce polymer formation with Fib(AEK) plasma or purified fibrinogen(AEK) in 37°C mixtures regardless of incubation time. Fib(AEK) mice displayed both an absence of fibrin polymer formation following liver injury, as assessed by electron microscopy, and a failure to generate stable occlusive thrombi following FeCl3 injury of carotid arteries. Fib(AEK) mice exhibited a profound impediment in Staphylococcus aureus clearance following intraperitoneal infection similar to fibrinogen-deficient mice, yet Fib(AEK) mice displayed a significant infection dose-dependent survival advantage over fibrinogen-deficient mice following peritonitis challenge. Collectively, these findings establish for the first time that fibrin polymer is the molecular form critical for antimicrobial mechanisms while simultaneously highlighting biologically meaningful contributions and functions of the soluble molecule. PMID:26228483

  18. Endocannabinoids Control Platelet Activation and Limit Aggregate Formation under Flow

    PubMed Central

    De Angelis, Valentina; Koekman, Arnold C.; Weeterings, Cees; Roest, Mark; de Groot, Philip G.; Herczenik, Eszter; Maas, Coen

    2014-01-01

    Background The endocannabinoid system has previously been implicated in the regulation of neurons and inflammatory cells. Additionally, it has been reported that endocannabinoid receptors are present on circulating platelets, but there has been conflicting evidence on their contribution to platelet function. Objectives Our aim was to examine the role of endocannabinoids in platelet function in vitro and in vivo. Methods and Results We studied the effects of the well-characterized endogenous endocannabinoid anandamide on platelet aggregation in suspension, α-granule release, calcium mobilization, Syk phosphorylation, as well as platelet spreading and aggregate formation under flow. Anandamide inhibits platelet aggregation and α-granule release by collagen, collagen-derived peptide CRP-XL, ADP, arachidonic acid and thromboxane A2 analogue U46619. However, activation via thrombin receptor PAR-1 stays largely unaffected. Calcium mobilization is significantly impaired when platelets are stimulated with collagen or CRP-XL, but remains normal in the presence of the other agonists. In line with this finding, we found that anandamide prevents collagen-induced Syk phosphorylation. Furthermore, anandamide-treated platelets exhibit reduced spreading on immobilized fibrinogen, have a decreased capacity for binding fibrinogen in solution and show perturbed platelet aggregate formation under flow over collagen. Finally, we investigated the influence of Cannabis sativa consumption by human volunteers on platelet activation. Similar to our in vitro findings with anandamide, ex vivo collagen-induced platelet aggregation and aggregate formation on immobilized collagen under flow were impaired in whole blood of donors that had consumed Cannabis sativa. Conclusions Endocannabinoid receptor agonists reduce platelet activation and aggregate formation both in vitro and ex vivo after Cannabis sativa consumption. Further elucidation of this novel regulatory mechanism for platelet function

  19. Hydrodynamic effects and receptor interactions of platelets and their aggregates in linear shear flow.

    PubMed Central

    Tandon, P; Diamond, S L

    1997-01-01

    We have modeled platelet aggregation in a linear shear flow by accounting for two body collision hydrodynamics, platelet activation and receptor biology. Considering platelets and their aggregates as unequal-sized spheres with DLVO interactions (psi(platelet) = -15 mV, Hamaker constant = 10(-19) J), detailed hydrodynamics provided the flow field around the colliding platelets. Trajectory calculations were performed to obtain the far upstream cross-sectional area and the particle flux through this area provided the collision frequency. Only a fraction of platelets brought together by a shearing fluid flow were held together if successfully bound by fibrinogen cross-bridging GPIIb/IIIa receptors on the platelet surfaces. This fraction was calculated by modeling receptor-mediated aggregation using the formalism of Bell (Bell, G. I. 1979. A theoretical model for adhesion between cells mediated by multivalent ligands. Cell Biophys. 1:133-147) where the forward rate of bond formation dictated aggregation during collision and was estimated from the diffusional limited rate of lateral association of receptors multiplied by an effectiveness factor, eta, to give an apparent rate. For a value of eta = 0.0178, we calculated the overall efficiency (including both receptor binding and hydrodynamics effects) for equal-sized platelets with 50,000 receptors/platelet to be 0.206 for G = 41.9 s(-1), 0.05 for G = 335 s(-1), and 0.0086 for G = 1920 s(-1), values which are in agreement with efficiencies determined from initial platelet singlet consumption rates in flow through a tube. From our analysis, we predict that bond formation proceeds at a rate of approximately 0.1925 bonds/microm2 per ms, which is approximately 50-fold slower than the diffusion limited rate of association. This value of eta is also consistent with a colloidal stability of unactivated platelets at low shear rates. Fibrinogen was calculated to mediate aggregation quite efficiently at low shear rates but not at

  20. The Interaction of Integrin αIIbβ3 with Fibrin Occurs through Multiple Binding Sites in the αIIb β-Propeller Domain*

    PubMed Central

    Podolnikova, Nataly P.; Yakovlev, Sergiy; Yakubenko, Valentin P.; Wang, Xu; Gorkun, Oleg V.; Ugarova, Tatiana P.

    2014-01-01

    The currently available antithrombotic agents target the interaction of platelet integrin αIIbβ3 (GPIIb-IIIa) with fibrinogen during platelet aggregation. Platelets also bind fibrin formed early during thrombus growth. It was proposed that inhibition of platelet-fibrin interactions may be a necessary and important property of αIIbβ3 antagonists; however, the mechanisms by which αIIbβ3 binds fibrin are uncertain. We have previously identified the γ370–381 sequence (P3) in the γC domain of fibrinogen as the fibrin-specific binding site for αIIbβ3 involved in platelet adhesion and platelet-mediated fibrin clot retraction. In the present study, we have demonstrated that P3 can bind to several discontinuous segments within the αIIb β-propeller domain of αIIbβ3 enriched with negatively charged and aromatic residues. By screening peptide libraries spanning the sequence of the αIIb β-propeller, several sequences were identified as candidate contact sites for P3. Synthetic peptides duplicating these segments inhibited platelet adhesion and clot retraction but not platelet aggregation, supporting the role of these regions in fibrin recognition. Mutant αIIbβ3 receptors in which residues identified as critical for P3 binding were substituted for homologous residues in the I-less integrin αMβ2 exhibited reduced cell adhesion and clot retraction. These residues are different from those that are involved in the coordination of the fibrinogen γ404–411 sequence and from auxiliary sites implicated in binding of soluble fibrinogen. These results map the binding of fibrin to multiple sites in the αIIb β-propeller and further indicate that recognition specificity of αIIbβ3 for fibrin differs from that for soluble fibrinogen. PMID:24338009

  1. [The equation for platelet aggregation rate].

    PubMed

    Vrzheshch, P V; Verkhusha, V V; Varfolomeev, S D

    1990-01-01

    A platelet aggregation model in shear flow taking into account the kinetics of intercellular fibrinogen bond formation limited by aggregated platelets rotation time was considered. For this consideration the average duration of platelets interaction in flow with shear rate value G is shown to be pi/4G. One fibrinogen bond is sufficient to form a solid aggregate between two platelets. The equation for single platelets disappearance rate concerned with intercellular fibrinogen bond formation, stochastic character of bond distribution in collided platelets and hydrodynamically controlled interaction time was obtained. The Hill's approximation for the obtained aggregation rate dependences was suggested and appropriate constants were determined. The qualitative criterion of platelets aggregating systems behavior was introduced. PMID:2245229

  2. Fibrinogen and catheter-directed thrombolysis.

    PubMed

    Ross, Reagan L; Beck, Adam W

    2014-12-01

    Fibrinogen is a complex glycoprotein that is known to play a significant role in the process of thrombus formation and evolution, and has been linked to the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis. Given the importance of fibrinogen in these processes, it has been evaluated as a biomarker for atherosclerotic disease and as a marker during treatment for venous and arterial thrombosis. Here we describe the expansive role that fibrinogen plays in human physiology. PMID:26073829

  3. Over 50 Years of Fibrinogen Concentrate.

    PubMed

    Costa-Filho, Rubens; Hochleitner, Gerald; Wendt, Michael; Teruya, Alexandre; Spahn, Donat R

    2016-03-01

    March 2013 represented the 50th anniversary of the first license granted for a fibrinogen concentrate. In this review, we look at the history of bleeding management that led to the development of fibrinogen concentrate, discuss its current use, and consider future developments for this product. PMID:26294722

  4. Over 50 Years of Fibrinogen Concentrate

    PubMed Central

    Hochleitner, Gerald; Wendt, Michael; Teruya, Alexandre; Spahn, Donat R.

    2015-01-01

    March 2013 represented the 50th anniversary of the first license granted for a fibrinogen concentrate. In this review, we look at the history of bleeding management that led to the development of fibrinogen concentrate, discuss its current use, and consider future developments for this product. PMID:26294722

  5. Templated Aggregation of TAR DNA-binding Protein of 43 kDa (TDP-43) by Seeding with TDP-43 Peptide Fibrils.

    PubMed

    Shimonaka, Shotaro; Nonaka, Takashi; Suzuki, Genjiro; Hisanaga, Shin-Ichi; Hasegawa, Masato

    2016-04-22

    TAR DNA-binding protein of 43 kDa (TDP-43) has been identified as the major component of ubiquitin-positive neuronal and glial inclusions in frontotemporal lobar degeneration and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Aggregation of TDP-43 to amyloid-like fibrils and spreading of the aggregates are suggested to account for the pathogenesis and progression of these diseases. To investigate the molecular mechanisms of TDP-43 aggregation, we attempted to identify the amino acid sequence required for the aggregation. By expressing a series of deletion mutants lacking 20 amino acid residues in the C-terminal region in SH-SY5Y cells, we established that residues 274-313 in the glycine-rich region are essential for aggregation. In vitro aggregation experiments using synthetic peptides of 40 amino acids from this sequence and adjacent regions showed that peptides 274-313 and 314-353 formed amyloid-like fibrils. Transduction of these fibrils induced seed-dependent aggregation of TDP-43 in cells expressing wild-type TDP-43 or TDP-43 lacking nuclear localization signal. These cells showed different phosphorylated C-terminal fragments of TDP-43 and different trypsin-resistant bands. These results suggest that residues 274-353 are responsible for the conversion of TDP-43 to amyloid-like fibrils and that templated aggregation of TDP-43 by seeding with different peptides induces various types of TDP-43 pathologies, i.e. the peptides appear to act like prion strains. PMID:26887947

  6. Selection of DNA nanoparticles with preferential binding to aggregated protein target.

    PubMed

    Ruff, Laura E; Sapre, Ajay A; Plaut, Justin S; De Maere, Elisabeth; Mortier, Charlotte; Nguyen, Valerie; Separa, Kevin; Vandenbogaerde, Sofie; Vandewalle, Laura; Esener, Sadik C; Messmer, Bradley T

    2016-06-01

    High affinity and specificity are considered essential for affinity reagents and molecularly-targeted therapeutics, such as monoclonal antibodies. However, life's own molecular and cellular machinery consists of lower affinity, highly multivalent interactions that are metastable, but easily reversible or displaceable. With this inspiration, we have developed a DNA-based reagent platform that uses massive avidity to achieve stable, but reversible specific recognition of polyvalent targets. We have previously selected these DNA reagents, termed DeNAno, against various cells and now we demonstrate that DeNAno specific for protein targets can also be selected. DeNAno were selected against streptavidin-, rituximab- and bevacizumab-coated beads. Binding was stable for weeks and unaffected by the presence of soluble target proteins, yet readily competed by natural or synthetic ligands of the target proteins. Thus DeNAno particles are a novel biomolecular recognition agent whose orthogonal use of avidity over affinity results in uniquely stable yet reversible binding interactions. PMID:26969734

  7. Selection of DNA nanoparticles with preferential binding to aggregated protein target

    PubMed Central

    Ruff, Laura E.; Sapre, Ajay A.; Plaut, Justin S.; De Maere, Elisabeth; Mortier, Charlotte; Nguyen, Valerie; Separa, Kevin; Vandenbogaerde, Sofie; Vandewalle, Laura; Esener, Sadik C.; Messmer, Bradley T.

    2016-01-01

    High affinity and specificity are considered essential for affinity reagents and molecularly-targeted therapeutics, such as monoclonal antibodies. However, life's own molecular and cellular machinery consists of lower affinity, highly multivalent interactions that are metastable, but easily reversible or displaceable. With this inspiration, we have developed a DNA-based reagent platform that uses massive avidity to achieve stable, but reversible specific recognition of polyvalent targets. We have previously selected these DNA reagents, termed DeNAno, against various cells and now we demonstrate that DeNAno specific for protein targets can also be selected. DeNAno were selected against streptavidin-, rituximab- and bevacizumab-coated beads. Binding was stable for weeks and unaffected by the presence of soluble target proteins, yet readily competed by natural or synthetic ligands of the target proteins. Thus DeNAno particles are a novel biomolecular recognition agent whose orthogonal use of avidity over affinity results in uniquely stable yet reversible binding interactions. PMID:26969734

  8. Analysis of aggregation of platelets in thrombosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahuja, Suresh

    Platelets are key players in thrombus formation by first rolling over collagen bound von Willebrand factor followed by formation of a stable interaction with collagen. The first adhered platelets bind additional platelets until the whole injury is sealed off by a platelet aggregate. The coagulation system stabilizes the formed platelet plug by creating a tight fibrin network, and then wound contraction takes place because of morphological changes in platelets. Coagulation takes place by platelet activation and aggregation mainly through fibrinogen polymerization into fibrin fibers. The process includes multiple factors, such as thrombin, plasmin, and local shear-rate which regulate and control the process. Coagulation can be divided into two pathways: the intrinsic pathway and the extrinsic pathway. The intrinsic pathway is initiated by the exposure of a negatively charged. It is able to activate factor XII, using a complex reaction that includes prekallikrein and high-molecular-weight kininogen as cofactors.. Thrombin is the final enzyme that is needed to convert fibrinogen into fibrin. The extrinsic pathway starts with the exposure of tissue factor to the circulating blood, which is the major initiator of coagulation. There are several feedback loops that reinforce the coagulation cascade, resulting in large amounts of thrombin. It is dependent on the presence of pro-coagulant surfaces of cells expressing negatively charged phospholipids--which include phosphatidylserine (PS)--on their outer membrane. PS-bearing surfaces are able to increase the efficiency of the reactions by concentrating and co-localizing coagulation factors.. Aggregation of platelets are analyzed and compared to adhesion of platelet to erythrocyte and to endothelial cells. This abstract is replacing MAR16-2015-020003.

  9. Fibrinogen

    MedlinePlus

    ... or secondary Hemophilia A Hemophilia B Placenta abruption - definition Update Date 1/27/2015 Updated by: Yi- ... M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health ...

  10. Strain-specific diversity of mucus-binding proteins in the adhesion and aggregation properties of Lactobacillus reuteri.

    PubMed

    Mackenzie, Donald A; Jeffers, Faye; Parker, Mary L; Vibert-Vallet, Amandine; Bongaerts, Roy J; Roos, Stefan; Walter, Jens; Juge, Nathalie

    2010-11-01

    Mucus-binding proteins (MUBs) have been revealed as one of the effector molecules involved in mechanisms of the adherence of lactobacilli to the host; mub, or mub-like, genes are found in all of the six genomes of Lactobacillus reuteri that are available. We recently reported the crystal structure of a Mub repeat from L. reuteri ATCC 53608 (also designated strain 1063), revealing an unexpected recognition of immunoglobulins. In the current study, we explored the diversity of the ATCC 53608 mub gene, and MUB expression levels in a large collection of L. reuteri strains isolated from a range of vertebrate hosts. This analysis revealed that the MUB was only detectable on the cell surface of two highly related isolates when using antibodies that were raised against the protein. There was considerable variation in quantitative mucus adhesion in vitro among L. reuteri strains, and mucus binding showed excellent correlation with the presence of cell-surface ATCC 53608 MUB. ATCC 53608 MUB presence was further highly associated with the autoaggregation of L. reuteri strains in washed cell suspensions, suggesting a novel role of this surface protein in cell aggregation. We also characterized MUB expression in representative L. reuteri strains. This analysis revealed that one derivative of strain 1063 was a spontaneous mutant that expressed a C-terminally truncated version of MUB. This frameshift mutation was caused by the insertion of a duplicated 13 nt sequence at position 4867 nt in the mub gene, producing a truncated MUB also lacking the C-terminal LPxTG region, and thus unable to anchor to the cell wall. This mutant, designated 1063N (mub-4867(i)), displayed low mucus-binding and aggregation capacities, further providing evidence for the contribution of cell-wall-anchored MUB to such phenotypes. In conclusion, this study provided novel information on the functional attributes of MUB in L. reuteri, and further demonstrated that MUB and MUB-like proteins

  11. Dipetalodipin, a Novel Multifunctional Salivary Lipocalin That Inhibits Platelet Aggregation, Vasoconstriction, and Angiogenesis through Unique Binding Specificity for TXA2, PGF2α, and 15(S)-HETE*

    PubMed Central

    Assumpção, Teresa C. F.; Alvarenga, Patricia H.; Ribeiro, José M. C.; Andersen, John F.; Francischetti, Ivo M. B.

    2010-01-01

    Dipetalodipin (DPTL) is an 18 kDa protein cloned from salivary glands of the triatomine Dipetalogaster maxima. DPTL belongs to the lipocalin superfamily and has strong sequence similarity to pallidipin, a salivary inhibitor of collagen-induced platelet aggregation. DPTL expressed in Escherichia coli was found to inhibit platelet aggregation by collagen, U-46619, or arachidonic acid without affecting aggregation induced by ADP, convulxin, PMA, and ristocetin. An assay based on incubation of DPTL with small molecules (e.g. prostanoids, leukotrienes, lipids, biogenic amines) followed by chromatography, mass spectrometry, and isothermal titration calorimetry showed that DPTL binds with high affinity to carbocyclic TXA2, TXA2 mimetic (U-46619), TXB2, PGH2 mimetic (U-51605), PGD2, PGJ2, and PGF2α. It also interacts with 15(S)-HETE, being the first lipocalin described to date to bind to a derivative of 15-lipoxygenase. Binding was not observed to other prostaglandins (e.g. PGE1, PGE2, 8-iso-PGF2α, prostacyclin), leukotrienes (e.g,. LTB4, LTC4, LTD4, LTE4), HETEs (e.g. 5(S)-HETE, 12(S)-HETE, 20-HETE), lipids (e.g. arachidonic acid, PAF), and biogenic amines (e.g. ADP, serotonin, epinephrine, norepinephrine, histamine). Consistent with its binding specificity, DPTL prevents contraction of rat uterus stimulated by PGF2α and induces relaxation of aorta previously contracted with U-46619. Moreover, it inhibits angiogenesis mediated by 15(S)-HETE and did not enhance inhibition of collagen-induced platelet aggregation by SQ29548 (TXA2 antagonist) and indomethacin. A 3-D model for DPTL and pallidipin is presented that indicates the presence of a conserved Arg39 and Gln135 in the binding pocket of both lipocalins. Results suggest that DPTL blocks platelet aggregation, vasoconstriction, and angiogenesis through binding to distinct eicosanoids involved in inflammation. PMID:20889972

  12. Effect of Fibrinogen on Platelet Reactivity Measured by the VerifyNow P2Y12 Assay.

    PubMed

    Dobrovolsky, A B; Laguta, P S; Guskova, E V; Yarovaya, E B; Titaeva, E V; Storozhilova, A N; Panchenko, E P

    2016-05-01

    The VerifyNow assay is based upon the ability of activated platelets to cross-link beads coated with fibrinogen. However, fibrinogen is an abundant protein of blood, and therefore it may affect test results by competing with fibrinogen of beads for binding to platelets. To test this assumption, we assessed the influence of artificial alteration of fibrinogen level in blood samples obtained from donors (n = 9) and patients on clopidogrel therapy (n = 8) on the results of the VerifyNow P2Y12 assay. Fibrinogen level was altered by adding to blood samples 1/10 volume of fibrinogen solution (10.56 g/liter) or corresponding buffer. Relative to baseline, addition of buffer significantly increased platelet reactivity, whereas addition of fibrinogen decreased it. Analysis of the relationship between change in platelet reactivity values (dBase and dPRU) and change in fibrinogen concentration (dFg) revealed strong negative correlations: dBase = -63.3 × dFg - 27.1 (r = -0.924, p < 0.0005) and dPRU = -54.4 × dFg - 21.8 (r = -0.764, p < 0.0005). Thus, the results of our experiments suggest that: (i) blood fibrinogen strongly influences results of the VerifyNow P2Y12 assay, and (ii) correcting for fibrinogen effect may be needed to improve the accuracy of the test in the measuring of antiplatelet effect of clopidogrel therapy. PMID:27297894

  13. Echistatin. A potent platelet aggregation inhibitor from the venom of the viper, Echis carinatus.

    PubMed

    Gan, Z R; Gould, R J; Jacobs, J W; Friedman, P A; Polokoff, M A

    1988-12-25

    A 49-residue protein, echistatin, which inhibits platelet aggregation, was purified from the venom of the saw-scaled viper Echis carinatus. The purification procedure included gel filtration on Sephadex G-50, cation-exchange chromatography on Mono S, and C18 reverse-phase high pressure liquid chromatography. The purified protein was homogeneous as judged by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, isoelectric focusing, reverse-phase high pressure liquid chromatography, and NH2-terminal sequence analysis. Echistatin is a single-chain polypeptide with a molecular weight of 5400 and a native isoelectric point of 8.3. The most abundant amino acid, cysteine, accounts for 8 of the 49 residues in the protein. A 10-residue segment of echistatin shows 90% identity to a portion of the sequence of trigramin, a platelet aggregation inhibitor from the green tree viper Trimereserus gramineus (Huang, T.-F., Holt, J. C., Lukasiewicz, H., and Niewiarowski, S. (1987) J. Biol. Chem. 262, 16157-16163). Echistatin contains the sequence arginine-glycine-aspartic acid, which is common to proteins which bind to the glycoprotein IIb/IIIa complex. It also contains the sequence proline-arginine-asparagine-proline, which is found in the A alpha chain of human fibrinogen at position 267-270. The purified protein inhibits fibrinogen-dependent platelet aggregation initiated by ADP with an IC50 of 3 x 10(-8) M and also prevents aggregation initiated by thrombin, epinephrine, collagen, or platelet-activating factor. Reduction of echistatin abolished its inhibitory activity. PMID:3198653

  14. The lateral diffusion and fibrinogen induced clustering of platelet integrin αIIbβ3 reconstituted into physiologically mimetic GUVs.

    PubMed

    Gaul, Vinnie; Lopez, Sergio G; Lentz, Barry R; Moran, Niamh; Forster, Robert J; Keyes, Tia E

    2015-04-01

    Platelet integrin αIIbβ3 is a key mediator of platelet activation and thrombosis. Upon activation αIIbβ3 undergoes significant conformational rearrangement, inducing complex bidirectional signalling and protein recruitment leading to platelet activation. Reconstituted lipid models of the integrin can enhance our understanding of the structural and mechanistic details of αIIbβ3 behaviour away from the complexity of the platelet machinery. Here, a novel method of αIIbβ3 insertion into Giant Unilamellar Vesicles (GUVs) is described that allows for effective integrin reconstitution unrestricted by lipid composition. αIIbβ3 was inserted into two GUV lipid compositions that seek to better mimic the platelet membrane. First, "nature's own", comprising 32% DOPC, 25% DOPE, 20% CH, 15% SM and 8% DOPS, intended to mimic the platelet cell membrane. Fluorescence Lifetime Correlation Spectroscopy (FLCS) reveals that exposure of the integrin to the activators Mn(2+) or DTT does not influence the diffusion coefficient of αIIbβ3. Similarly, exposure to αIIbβ3's primary ligand fibrinogen (Fg) alone does not affect αIIbβ3's diffusion coefficient. However, addition of Fg with either activator reduces the integrin diffusion coefficient from 2.52 ± 0.29 to μm(2) s(-1) to 1.56 ± 0.26 (Mn(2+)) or 1.49 ± 0.41 μm(2) s(-1) (DTT) which is consistent with aggregation of activated αIIbβ3 induced by fibrinogen binding. The Multichannel Scaler (MCS) trace shows that the integrin-Fg complex diffuses through the confocal volume in clusters. Using the Saffman-Delbrück model as a first approximation, the diffusion coefficient of the complex suggests at least a 20-fold increase in the radius of membrane bound protein, consistent with integrin clustering. Second, αIIbβ3 was also reconstituted into a "raft forming" GUV with well defined liquid disordered (Ld) and liquid ordered (Lo) phases. Using confocal microscopy and lipid partitioning dyes, αIIbβ3 showed an affinity for

  15. An antagonistic activity of etizolam on platelet-activating factor (PAF). In vitro effects on platelet aggregation and PAF receptor binding.

    PubMed

    Mikashima, H; Takehara, S; Muramoto, Y; Khomaru, T; Terasawa, M; Tahara, T; Maruyama, Y

    1987-08-01

    The antagonistic effect of etizolam, an anti-anxiety drug, on platelet-activating factor (PAF) was investigated in rabbit platelets in vitro. Etizolam inhibited PAF-induced aggregation in a dose-dependent manner, with an IC50 of 3.8 microM, about one tenth that of triazolam (IC50 = 30 microM). At 300 microM, it inhibited both ADP and arachidonic acid-induced aggregation only slightly, while the other anti-anxiety drugs tested had no effect on PAF-induced aggregation even at this concentration. Etizolam and triazolam inhibited the specific binding of 3H-PAF to PAF receptor sites on washed rabbit platelets with IC50 values of 22 nM and 320 nM, respectively. Diazepam and estazolam were inactive even at 1 microM. These results indicate that etizolam is a specific antagonist of PAF. PMID:2890779

  16. Fibrinogen-induced perivascular microglial clustering is required for the development of axonal damage in neuroinflammation

    PubMed Central

    Davalos, Dimitrios; Kyu Ryu, Jae; Merlini, Mario; Baeten, Kim M.; Le Moan, Natacha; Petersen, Mark A.; Deerinck, Thomas J.; Smirnoff, Dimitri S.; Bedard, Catherine; Hakozaki, Hiroyuki; Gonias Murray, Sara; Ling, Jennie B.; Lassmann, Hans; Degen, Jay L.; Ellisman, Mark H.; Akassoglou, Katerina

    2012-01-01

    Blood-brain barrier disruption, microglial activation and neurodegeneration are hallmarks of multiple sclerosis. However, the initial triggers that activate innate immune responses and their role in axonal damage remain unknown. Here we show that the blood protein fibrinogen induces rapid microglial responses toward the vasculature and is required for axonal damage in neuroinflammation. Using in vivo two-photon microscopy, we demonstrate that microglia form perivascular clusters before myelin loss or paralysis onset and that, of the plasma proteins, fibrinogen specifically induces rapid and sustained microglial responses in vivo. Fibrinogen leakage correlates with areas of axonal damage and induces reactive oxygen species release in microglia. Blocking fibrin formation with anticoagulant treatment or genetically eliminating the fibrinogen binding motif recognized by the microglial integrin receptor CD11b/CD18 inhibits perivascular microglial clustering and axonal damage. Thus, early and progressive perivascular microglial clustering triggered by fibrinogen leakage upon blood-brain barrier disruption contributes to axonal damage in neuroinflammatory disease. PMID:23187627

  17. Total saponin from Korean Red Ginseng inhibits binding of adhesive proteins to glycoprotein IIb/IIIa via phosphorylation of VASP (Ser157) and dephosphorylation of PI3K and Akt

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Hyuk-Woo; Shin, Jung-Hae; Cho, Hyun-Jeong; Rhee, Man Hee; Park, Hwa-Jin

    2015-01-01

    Background Binding of adhesive proteins (i.e., fibrinogen, fibronectin, vitronectin) to platelet integrin glycoprotein IIb/IIIa (αIIb/β3) by various agonists (thrombin, collagen, adenosine diphosphate) involve in strength of thrombus. This study was carried out to evaluate the antiplatelet effect of total saponin from Korean Red Ginseng (KRG-TS) by investigating whether KRG-TS inhibits thrombin-induced binding of fibrinogen and fibronectin to αIIb/β3. Methods We investigated the effect of KRG-TS on phosphorylation of vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) and dephosphorylation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and Akt, affecting binding of fibrinogen and fibronectin to αIIb/β3, and clot retraction. Results KRG-TS had an antiplatelet effect by inhibiting the binding of fibrinogen and fibronectin to αIIb/β3 via phosphorylation of VASP (Ser157), and dephosphorylation of PI3K and Akt on thrombin-induced platelet aggregation. Moreover, A-kinase inhibitor Rp-8-Br-cyclic adenosine monophosphates (cAMPs) reduced KRG-TS-increased VASP (Ser157) phosphorylation, and increased KRG-TS-inhibited fibrinogen-, and fibronectin-binding to αIIb/β3. These findings indicate that KRG-TS interferes with the binding of fibrinogen and fibronectin to αIIb/β3 via cAMP-dependent phosphorylation of VASP (Ser157). In addition, KRG-TS decreased the rate of clot retraction, reflecting inhibition of αIIb/β3 activation. In this study, we clarified ginsenoside Ro (G-Ro) in KRG-TS inhibited thrombin-induced platelet aggregation via both inhibition of [Ca2+]i mobilization and increase of cAMP production. Conclusion These results strongly indicate that KRG-TS is a beneficial herbal substance inhibiting fibrinogen-, and fibronectin-binding to αIIb/β3, and clot retraction, and may prevent platelet αIIb/β3-mediated thrombotic disease. In addition, we demonstrate that G-Ro is a novel compound with antiplatelet characteristics of KRG-TS. PMID:26843825

  18. Plasma Fibrinogen Is a Natural Deterrent to Amyloid β–Induced Platelet Activation and Neuronal Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Sonkar, Vijay K; Kulkarni, Paresh P; Chaurasia, Susheel N; Dash, Ayusman; Jauhari, Abhishek; Parmar, Devendra; Yadav, Sanjay; Dash, Debabrata

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a devastating neurodegenerative disorder, characterized by extensive loss of neurons and deposition of amyloid β (Aβ) in the form of extracellular plaques. Aβ is considered to have a critical role in synaptic loss and neuronal death underlying cognitive decline. Platelets contribute to 95% of circulating amyloid precursor protein that releases Aβ into circulation. We have recently demonstrated that the Aβ active fragment containing amino acid sequence 25–35 (Aβ25–35) is highly thrombogenic in nature and elicits strong aggregation of washed human platelets in a RhoA-dependent manner. In this study, we evaluated the influence of fibrinogen on Aβ-induced platelet activation. Intriguingly, Aβ failed to induce aggregation of platelets suspended in plasma but not in buffer. Fibrinogen brought about dose-dependent decline in aggregatory response of washed human platelets elicited by Aβ25–35, which could be reversed by increasing doses of Aβ. Fibrinogen also attenuated Aβ-induced platelet responses such as secretion, clot retraction, rise in cytosolic Ca+2 and reactive oxygen species. Fibrinogen prevented intracellular accumulation of full-length Aβ peptide (Aβ42) in platelets as well as neuronal cells. We conclude that fibrinogen serves as a physiological check against the adverse effects of Aβ by preventing its interaction with cells. PMID:27262026

  19. Nitric oxide releasing material adsorbs more fibrinogen.

    PubMed

    Lantvit, Sarah M; Barrett, Brittany J; Reynolds, Melissa M

    2013-11-01

    One mechanism of the failure of blood-contacting devices is clotting. Nitric oxide (NO) releasing materials are seen as a viable solution to the mediation of surface clotting by preventing platelet activation; however, NO's involvement in preventing clot formation extends beyond controlling platelet function. In this study, we evaluate NO's effect on factor XII (fibrinogen) adsorption and activation, which causes the initiation of the intrinsic arm of the coagulation cascade. This is done by utilizing a model plasticized poly(vinyl) chloride (PVC), N-diazeniumdiolate system and looking at the adsorption of fibrinogen, an important clotting protein, to these surfaces. The materials have been prepared in such a way to eliminate changes in surface properties between the control (plasticized PVC) and composite (NO-releasing) materials. This allows us to isolate NO release and determine the effect on the adsorption of fibrinogen, to the material surface. Surprisingly, it was found that an NO releasing material with a surface flux of 17.4 ± 0.5 × 10(-10) mol NO cm(-2) min(-1) showed a significant increase in the amount of fibrinogen adsorbed to the material surface compared to one with a flux of 13.0 ± 1.6 × 10(-10) mol NO cm(-2) min(-1) and the control (2334 ± 496, 226 ± 99, and 103 ±31% fibrinogen adsorbed of control, respectively). This study suggests that NO's role in controlling clotting is extended beyond platelet activation. PMID:23554300

  20. The plasma protein fibrinogen stabilizes clusters of red blood cells in microcapillary flows

    PubMed Central

    Brust, M.; Aouane, O.; Thiébaud, M.; Flormann, D.; Verdier, C.; Kaestner, L.; Laschke, M. W.; Selmi, H.; Benyoussef, A.; Podgorski, T.; Coupier, G.; Misbah, C.; Wagner, C.

    2014-01-01

    The supply of oxygen and nutrients and the disposal of metabolic waste in the organs depend strongly on how blood, especially red blood cells, flow through the microvascular network. Macromolecular plasma proteins such as fibrinogen cause red blood cells to form large aggregates, called rouleaux, which are usually assumed to be disaggregated in the circulation due to the shear forces present in bulk flow. This leads to the assumption that rouleaux formation is only relevant in the venule network and in arterioles at low shear rates or stasis. Thanks to an excellent agreement between combined experimental and numerical approaches, we show that despite the large shear rates present in microcapillaries, the presence of either fibrinogen or the synthetic polymer dextran leads to an enhanced formation of robust clusters of red blood cells, even at haematocrits as low as 1%. Robust aggregates are shown to exist in microcapillaries even for fibrinogen concentrations within the healthy physiological range. These persistent aggregates should strongly affect cell distribution and blood perfusion in the microvasculature, with putative implications for blood disorders even within apparently asymptomatic subjects. PMID:24614613

  1. The plasma protein fibrinogen stabilizes clusters of red blood cells in microcapillary flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brust, M.; Aouane, O.; Thiébaud, M.; Flormann, D.; Verdier, C.; Kaestner, L.; Laschke, M. W.; Selmi, H.; Benyoussef, A.; Podgorski, T.; Coupier, G.; Misbah, C.; Wagner, C.

    2014-03-01

    The supply of oxygen and nutrients and the disposal of metabolic waste in the organs depend strongly on how blood, especially red blood cells, flow through the microvascular network. Macromolecular plasma proteins such as fibrinogen cause red blood cells to form large aggregates, called rouleaux, which are usually assumed to be disaggregated in the circulation due to the shear forces present in bulk flow. This leads to the assumption that rouleaux formation is only relevant in the venule network and in arterioles at low shear rates or stasis. Thanks to an excellent agreement between combined experimental and numerical approaches, we show that despite the large shear rates present in microcapillaries, the presence of either fibrinogen or the synthetic polymer dextran leads to an enhanced formation of robust clusters of red blood cells, even at haematocrits as low as 1%. Robust aggregates are shown to exist in microcapillaries even for fibrinogen concentrations within the healthy physiological range. These persistent aggregates should strongly affect cell distribution and blood perfusion in the microvasculature, with putative implications for blood disorders even within apparently asymptomatic subjects.

  2. The plasma protein fibrinogen stabilizes clusters of red blood cells in microcapillary flows.

    PubMed

    Brust, M; Aouane, O; Thiébaud, M; Flormann, D; Verdier, C; Kaestner, L; Laschke, M W; Selmi, H; Benyoussef, A; Podgorski, T; Coupier, G; Misbah, C; Wagner, C

    2014-01-01

    The supply of oxygen and nutrients and the disposal of metabolic waste in the organs depend strongly on how blood, especially red blood cells, flow through the microvascular network. Macromolecular plasma proteins such as fibrinogen cause red blood cells to form large aggregates, called rouleaux, which are usually assumed to be disaggregated in the circulation due to the shear forces present in bulk flow. This leads to the assumption that rouleaux formation is only relevant in the venule network and in arterioles at low shear rates or stasis. Thanks to an excellent agreement between combined experimental and numerical approaches, we show that despite the large shear rates present in microcapillaries, the presence of either fibrinogen or the synthetic polymer dextran leads to an enhanced formation of robust clusters of red blood cells, even at haematocrits as low as 1%. Robust aggregates are shown to exist in microcapillaries even for fibrinogen concentrations within the healthy physiological range. These persistent aggregates should strongly affect cell distribution and blood perfusion in the microvasculature, with putative implications for blood disorders even within apparently asymptomatic subjects. PMID:24614613

  3. Platelet Proteome Analysis Reveals Integrin-dependent Aggregation Defects in Patients with Myelodysplastic Syndromes*

    PubMed Central

    Fröbel, Julia; Cadeddu, Ron-Patrick; Hartwig, Sonja; Bruns, Ingmar; Wilk, Christian M.; Kündgen, Andrea; Fischer, Johannes C.; Schroeder, Thomas; Steidl, Ulrich G.; Germing, Ulrich; Lehr, Stefan; Haas, Rainer; Czibere, Akos

    2013-01-01

    Bleeding complications are a significant clinical problem in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes even at sufficient platelet counts (>50,000/μl). However, the underlying pathology of this hemorrhagic diathesis is still unknown. Here, we analyzed the platelet proteome of patients with myelodysplastic syndromes by quantitative two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis followed by mass spectrometric protein identification. Proteins identified with lower concentrations, such as Talin-1, Vinculin, Myosin-9, Filmain-A, and Actin play critical roles in integrin αIIbβ3 signaling and thus platelet aggregation. Despite normal agonist receptor expression, calcium flux, and granule release upon activation, the activation capacity of integrin αIIbβ3 was diminished in myelodysplastic syndrome platelets. Förster resonance energy transfer analysis showed a reduced co-localization of Talin-1 to the integrin's β3-subunit, which is required for receptor activation and fibrinogen binding. In addition, platelet spreading on immobilized fibrinogen was incomplete, and platelet aggregation assays confirmed a general defect in integrin-dependent platelet aggregation in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes. Our data provide novel aspects on the molecular pathology of impaired platelet function in myelodysplastic syndromes and suggest a mechanism of defective integrin αIIbβ3 signaling that may contribute to the hemorrhagic diathesis observed in these patients. PMID:23382103

  4. Staphylococcus aureus Aggregation and Coagulation Mechanisms, and Their Function in Host-Pathogen Interactions.

    PubMed

    Crosby, H A; Kwiecinski, J; Horswill, A R

    2016-01-01

    The human commensal bacterium Staphylococcus aureus can cause a wide range of infections ranging from skin and soft tissue infections to invasive diseases like septicemia, endocarditis, and pneumonia. Muticellular organization almost certainly contributes to S. aureus pathogenesis mechanisms. While there has been considerable focus on biofilm formation and its role in colonizing prosthetic joints and indwelling devices, less attention has been paid to nonsurface-attached group behavior like aggregation and clumping. S. aureus is unique in its ability to coagulate blood, and it also produces multiple fibrinogen-binding proteins that facilitate clumping. Formation of clumps, which are large, tightly packed groups of cells held together by fibrin(ogen), has been demonstrated to be important for S. aureus virulence and immune evasion. Clumps of cells are able to avoid detection by the host's immune system due to a fibrin(ogen) coat that acts as a shield, and the size of the clumps facilitates evasion of phagocytosis. In addition, clumping could be an important early step in establishing infections that involve tight clusters of cells embedded in host matrix proteins, such as soft tissue abscesses and endocarditis. In this review, we discuss clumping mechanisms and regulation, as well as what is known about how clumping contributes to immune evasion. PMID:27565579

  5. Stimulation of fibrinogen synthesis in cultured rat hepatocytes by fibrinogen degradation product fragment D.

    PubMed Central

    LaDuca, F M; Tinsley, L A; Dang, C V; Bell, W R

    1989-01-01

    The direct stimulation of fibrinogen biosynthesis by fibrinogen degradation produces (FDPs) was studied in rat hepatocyte cultures. Pure rat FDP fragment D (FDP-D) (Mr 90,000) and FDP fragment E (FDP-E) (Mr 40,000) and mixtures of the two (FDP-DE) were added to rat hepatocytes cultured in serum-free hormonally defined medium. Hydrocortisone (20 microM) significantly increased synthesis of fibrinogen, as determined by incorporation of [35S]methionine. FDP-D and FDP-E did not increase fibrinogen synthesis in the presence of hydrocortisone. However, hepatocytes cultured without hydrocortisone displayed increased fibrinogen synthesis (2.0- to 2.8-fold) with FDP-D (2.6-6.7 microM) but not with FDP-E (5.7 microM). At these FDP concentrations the synthesis of albumin, haptoglobin, and transferrin was not increased. FDP-D-induced fibrinogen synthesis was inhibited (greater than 90%) by actinomycin D and cycloheximide, indicating that the increase in [35S]methionine incorporation was from de novo protein synthesis. The role of FDP-D was further substantiated by showing that FDP-D, but not FDP-E, bound to the hepatocytes. These data indicate that FDP-D, but not FDP-E, directly and specifically stimulates fibrinogen synthesis in rat hepatocytes; this stimulation does not require any additional serum or protein cofactors. Images PMID:2813424

  6. Iron modulates the alpha chain of fibrinogen.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Vance G; Jacobsen, Wayne K

    2016-04-01

    Iron-bound fibrinogen has been noted to accelerate plasmatic coagulation in patients with divergent conditions involving upregulation of heme oxygenase activity, including hemodialysis, Alzheimer's disease, sickle cell anemia, and chronic migraine. Our goal was to determine if a site of iron-fibrinogen interaction was on the alpha chain. Using thrombelastography, we compared the coagulation kinetic profiles of plasma exposed to 0-10 µM ferric chloride after activation of coagulation with thrombin generated by contact activation of plasma with the plastic sample cup or by exposure to 1 µg/ml of Calloselasma rhodostoma venom (rich in ancrod activity), which causes coagulation via polymerization of alpha chain monomers. Venom mediated coagulation always occurred before thrombin activated thrombus formation, and ferric chloride always diminished the time of onset of coagulation and increased the velocity of clot growth. Iron enhances plasmatic coagulation kinetics by modulating the alpha chain of fibrinogen. PMID:26782808

  7. THE CONVERSION OF FIBRINOGEN TO FIBRIN

    PubMed Central

    Shulman, Sidney; Katz, Sidney; Ferry, John D.

    1953-01-01

    1. Fibrin clots prepared in the absence of calcium can be dissolved in solutions of lithium chloride and bromide and sodium bromide and iodide, as well as of guanidine hydrochloride and urea. These salts do not denature fibrinogen under the same conditions of concentration, temperature, and time. Sedimentation experiments on the fibrin solutions show in each case a single sharp peak with a sedimentation constant close to that of fibrinogen. 2. At lower concentrations, these salts inhibit the clotting of fibrinogen by thrombin, but in the case of lithium bromide and sodium iodide, at least, allow an intermediate polymer to accumulate whose sedimentation constant is close to that of the polymer observed in systems inhibited by hexamethylene glycol or urea. PMID:13069679

  8. Myofibrillar disruption and RNA-binding protein aggregation in a mouse model of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 1D.

    PubMed

    Bengoechea, Rocio; Pittman, Sara K; Tuck, Elizabeth P; True, Heather L; Weihl, Conrad C

    2015-12-01

    Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 1D (LGMD1D) is caused by dominantly inherited missense mutations in DNAJB6, an Hsp40 co-chaperone. LGMD1D muscle has rimmed vacuoles and inclusion bodies containing DNAJB6, Z-disc proteins and TDP-43. DNAJB6 is expressed as two isoforms; DNAJB6a and DNAJB6b. Both isoforms contain LGMD1D mutant residues and are expressed in human muscle. To identify which mutant isoform confers disease pathogenesis and generate a mouse model of LGMD1D, we evaluated DNAJB6 expression and localization in skeletal muscle as well as generating DNAJB6 isoform specific expressing transgenic mice. DNAJB6a localized to myonuclei while DNAJB6b was sarcoplasmic. LGMD1D mutations in DNAJB6a or DNAJB6b did not alter this localization in mouse muscle. Transgenic mice expressing the LGMD1D mutant, F93L, in DNAJB6b under a muscle-specific promoter became weak, had early lethality and developed muscle pathology consistent with myopathy after 2 months; whereas mice expressing the same F93L mutation in DNAJB6a or overexpressing DNAJB6a or DNAJB6b wild-type transgenes remained unaffected after 1 year. DNAJB6b localized to the Z-disc and DNAJB6b-F93L expressing mouse muscle had myofibrillar disorganization and desmin inclusions. Consistent with DNAJB6 dysfunction, keratin 8/18, a DNAJB6 client also accumulated in DNAJB6b-F93L expressing mouse muscle. The RNA-binding proteins hnRNPA1 and hnRNPA2/B1 accumulated and co-localized with DNAJB6 at sarcoplasmic stress granules suggesting that these proteins maybe novel DNAJB6b clients. Similarly, hnRNPA1 and hnRNPA2/B1 formed sarcoplasmic aggregates in patients with LGMD1D. Our data support that LGMD1D mutations in DNAJB6 disrupt its sarcoplasmic function suggesting a role for DNAJB6b in Z-disc organization and stress granule kinetics. PMID:26362252

  9. Group B Streptococcal Serine-Rich Repeat Proteins Promote Interaction With Fibrinogen and Vaginal Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Nai-Yu; Patras, Kathryn A.; Seo, Ho Seong; Cavaco, Courtney K.; Rösler, Berenice; Neely, Melody N.; Sullam, Paul M.; Doran, Kelly S.

    2014-01-01

    Group B streptococcus (GBS) can cause severe disease in susceptible hosts, including newborns, pregnant women, and the elderly. GBS serine-rich repeat (Srr) surface glycoproteins are important adhesins/invasins in multiple host tissues, including the vagina. However, exact molecular mechanisms contributing to their importance in colonization are unknown. We have recently determined that Srr proteins contain a fibrinogen-binding region (BR) and hypothesize that Srr-mediated fibrinogen binding may contribute to GBS cervicovaginal colonization. In this study, we observed that fibrinogen enhanced wild-type GBS attachment to cervical and vaginal epithelium, and that this was dependent on Srr1. Moreover, purified Srr1-BR peptide bound directly to host cells, and peptide administration in vivo reduced GBS recovery from the vaginal tract. Furthermore, a GBS mutant strain lacking only the Srr1 “latching” domain exhibited decreased adherence in vitro and decreased persistence in a mouse model of GBS vaginal colonization, suggesting the importance of Srr–fibrinogen interactions in the female reproductive tract. PMID:24620021

  10. Role of fibrinogen in acute ischemic kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Sörensen-Zender, I; Rong, S; Susnik, N; Lange, J; Gueler, F; Degen, J L; Melk, A; Haller, H; Schmitt, R

    2013-09-01

    Renal ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) is associated with activation of the coagulation system and accumulation of blood clotting factors in the kidney. The aim of the present study was to examine the functional impact of fibrinogen on renal inflammation, damage, and repair in the context of I/R injury. In this study, we found that I/R was associated with a significant increase in the renal deposition of circulating fibrinogen. In parallel, I/R stress induced the de novo expression of fibrinogen in tubular epithelial cells, as reflected by RT-PCR, immunofluorescence, and in situ hybridization. In vitro, fibrinogen expression was induced by oncostatin M and hyper-IL-6 in primary tubular epithelial cells, and fibrinogen-containing medium had an inhibitory effect on tubular epithelial cell adhesion and migration. Fibrinogen(+/-) mice showed similar survival as wild-type mice but better preservation in early postischemic renal function. In fibrinogen(-/-) mice, renal function and survival were significantly worse than in fibrinogen(+/-) mice. Renal transplant experiments revealed reduced expression of tubular damage markers and attenuated proinflammatory cytokine expression but increased inflammatory cell infiltrates and transforming growth factor-β expression in fibrinogen(-/-) isografts. These data point to heterogeneous effects of fibrinogen in renal I/R injury. While a complete lack of fibrinogen may be detrimental, partial reduction of fibrinogen in heterozygous mice can improve renal function and overall outcome. PMID:23804451

  11. The Non-native Helical Intermediate State May Accumulate at Low pH in the Folding and Aggregation Landscape of the Intestinal Fatty Acid Binding Protein.

    PubMed

    Sarkar-Banerjee, Suparna; Chowdhury, Sourav; Paul, Simanta Sarani; Dutta, Debashis; Ghosh, Anisa; Chattopadhyay, Krishnananda

    2016-08-16

    There has been widespread interest in studying early intermediate states and their roles in protein folding. The interest in intermediate states has been further emphasized in the recent literature because of their implications for protein aggregation. Unfortunately, direct kinetic characterization of intermediates has been difficult because of the limited time resolutions offered by the kinetic techniques and the heterogeneity of the folding and aggregation landscape. Even in equilibrium experiments, the characterization of intermediate states could be difficult because (a) their populations in equilibrium could be low and/or (b) they lack any specific biochemical or biophysical signatures for their identification. In this paper, we have used fluorescence correlation spectroscopy to study the nature of a low-pH intermediate state of the intestinal fatty acid binding protein, a small protein with predominantly β-sheet structure. Our results have shown that the pH 3 intermediate diffuses faster than the folded protein and has strong helix forming propensity. These behaviors support Lim's hypothesis according to which even an entirely β-sheet protein would form helical bundles at the early stage. Using dynamic light scattering and thioflavin T binding measurements, we have observed that the pH 3 intermediate is prone to aggregation. We believe that early helix formation is the result of a local effect, which originates from the interaction of the neighboring amino acids around the hydrophobic core residues. This early intermediate reorganizes subsequently, and this structural reorganization is initiated by the destabilizing interactions induced by the distant residues, unfavorable entropic costs, and steric constraints of the hydrophobic side chains. Mutational analyses show further that the increase in the hydrophobicity in the hydrophobic core region increases the population of the α-helical intermediate, enhancing the aggregation propensity of the protein

  12. The fibrinogen γA/γ’ isoform does not promote acute arterial thrombosis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Walton, Bethany L; Getz, Todd M; Bergmeier, Wolfgang; Lin, Feng-Chang; de Willige, Shirley Uitte; Wolberg, Alisa S

    2014-01-01

    Background Elevated plasma fibrinogen associates with arterial thrombosis in humans and promotes thrombosis in mice by increasing fibrin formation and thrombus fibrin content. Fibrinogen is composed of six polypeptide chains: (Aα, Bβ, and γ)2. Alternative splicing of the γ chain leads to a dominant form (γA/γA) and a minor species (γA/γ’). Epidemiologic studies have detected elevated γA/γ’ fibrinogen in patients with arterial thrombosis, suggesting this isoform promotes thrombosis. However, in vitro data show that γA/γ’ is anticoagulant due to its ability to sequester thrombin, and suggest its expression is upregulated in response to inflammatory processes. Objective To determine whether γA/γ’ fibrinogen is prothrombotic in vivo. Methods We separated γA/γA and γA/γ’ fibrinogen from human plasma-purified fibrinogen and determined effects on in vitro plasma clot formation, and in vivo thrombus formation and circulating thrombin-antithrombin complexes in mice. Results and Conclusions Both γA/γA and γA/γ’ fibrinogen were cleaved by murine and human thrombin and were incorporated into murine and human clots. When γA/γA or γA/γ’ was spiked into plasma, γA/γA increased the fibrin formation rate to a greater extent than γA/γ’. In mice, compared to controls, γA/γA infusion shortened the time to carotid artery occlusion, whereas γA/γ’ infusion did not. Additionally, γA/γ’ infusion led to lower levels of plasma thrombin-antithrombin complexes following arterial injury, whereas γA/γA infusion did not. These data suggest that γA/γ’ binds thrombin in vivo, and decreases prothrombotic activity. Together, these findings indicate that elevated levels of γA/γA fibrinogen promote arterial thrombosis in vivo, whereas γA/γ’ does not. PMID:24916154

  13. Fibrinogen reduction and coagulation in cardiac surgery: an investigational study.

    PubMed

    Gielen, Chantal L I; Grimbergen, Jos; Klautz, Robert J M; Koopman, Jaap; Quax, Paul H A

    2015-09-01

    Fibrinogen as precursor of fibrin plays an essential role in clot formation. There are three main mechanisms associated with a reduction in fibrinogen concentration during cardiac surgery: hemodilution, consumption, and degradation. Moreover, early fibrinogen degradation products (FgDPs) can interfere with normal fibrin formation of intact fibrinogen. The aim of this study was to determine the relative contributions of hemodilution, consumption, and degradation to fibrinogen loss in cardiac surgery and to evaluate the effects fibrinogen degradation products on blood clot formation in vitro. First, fibrin and fibrinogen concentrations, their degradation products, hematocrit, and albumin concentrations were compared in 10 patients before and after isolated coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass. Second, ex-vivo fibrinogen supplementation experiments were performed. Finally, the effects of purified FgDPs on clotting time and clot firmness were established in vitro in whole blood by ROTEM. Fibrinogen plasma concentration decreased 30% during surgery. This drop appears to be mainly caused by hemodilution, as both hematocrit and albumin levels decreased and no relevant increase in D-dimer levels and FgDPs was observed. Furthermore, the coagulation profile normalized after addition of purified fibrinogen. Early FgDPs demonstrated a significant impact on in-vitro whole blood clotting. Although early FgDPs have a pronounced effect on blood clot formation in vitro and therefore may induce or enhance in vivo coagulopathy, the drop of fibrinogen concentration seen after CABG surgery (using tranexamic acid) is primarily caused by hemodilution. PMID:26083991

  14. Influence of fibrinogen and haematocrit on erythrocyte sedimentation kinetics.

    PubMed

    Holley, L; Woodland, N; Hung, W T; Cordatos, K; Reuben, A

    1999-01-01

    This study investigates the influence of haematocrit, fibrinogen concentration and fibrinogen availability (amount of fibrinogen per red blood cell) on erythrocyte sedimentation. The Westergren technique was applied to blood samples from 36 subjects and to their blood manipulated to haematocrits of 10, 20, 30 and 40%. Readings were taken every 10 minutes for 300 minutes. Previous studies indicate that erythrocyte sedimentation occurs in three phases. In this study, we show that haematocrit has little influence on either the rate of fall of particles in the first phase (m1) or the duration of the first phase. This is also true for fibrinogen availability and for fibrinogen concentration at low haematocrits. At high haematocrits m1 increases with fibrinogen concentration. The rate of fall of rouleaux during phase 2 (m2) and ESR60 both decrease exponentially with haematocrit and increase linearly with fibrinogen concentration. While m2 is more closely correlated to fibrinogen availability than to fibrinogen concentration or to haematocrit, this is not the case for ESR60. Thus haematocrit, fibrinogen concentration and fibrinogen availability are more important to the velocity of sedimentation in the second phase than to the sedimenting velocity during phase 1 or to the duration of phase 1. PMID:10690265

  15. Correlation of amyloid PET ligand florbetapir F 18 (18F-AV-45) binding with β-amyloid aggregation and neuritic plaque deposition in postmortem brain tissue

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Seok Rye; Schneider, Julie A.; Bennett, David A.; Beach, Thomas G.; Bedell, Barry J.; Zehntner, Simone P.; Krautkramer, Michael; Kung, Hank F.; Skovronsky, Daniel M.; Hefti, Franz; Clark, Christopher M.

    2011-01-01

    Background Florbetapir F 18 (18F-AV-45) is a positron emission tomography (PET) imaging ligand for the detection of amyloid aggregation associated with Alzheimer’s disease. Earlier data showed that florbetapir F 18 binds with high affinity to β-amyloid plaques in human brain homogenates (Kd = 3.7 nM) and has favorable imaging pharmacokinetic properties, including rapid brain penetration and washout. The present study used human autopsy brain tissue to evaluate the correlation between in vitro florbetapir F 18 binding and β-amyloid density measured by established neuropathological methods. Methods The localization and density of florbetapir F 18 binding in frozen and formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded sections of postmortem brain tissue from 40 subjects with a varying degree of neurodegenerative pathology was assessed by standard florbetapir F 18 autoradiography and correlated with the localization and density of β-amyloid identified by silver staining, thioflavin S staining, and immunohistochemistry. Results There were strong quantitative correlations between florbetapir F 18 tissue binding and both β-amyloid plaques identified by light microscopy (sliver staining and thioflavin S fluorescence) and by immunohistochemical measurements of β-amyloid using three antibodies recognizing different epitopes of the β-amyloid peptide (Aβ). Florbetapir F 18 did not bind to neurofibrillary tangles. Conclusion Florbetapir F 18 selectively binds β-amyloid in human brain tissue. The binding intensity was quantitatively correlated with the density of β-amyloid plaques identified by standard neuropathological techniques and correlated with the density of Aβ measured by immunohistochemistry. Since β-amyloid plaques are a defining neuropathological feature for Alzheimer’s disease, these results support the use of florbetapir F 18 as an amyloid PET ligand to identify the presence of AD pathology in patients with signs and symptoms of progressive late-life cognitive

  16. Signal transduction pathways in erythrocyte nitric oxide metabolism under high fibrinogen levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saldanha, Carlota; Freitas, T.; Lopez de Almeida, J. P.; Silva-Herdade, A.

    2014-05-01

    Previous studies show that the fibrinogen molecule modulates the metabolism of nitric oxide (NO) in erythrocyte. The in vitro induced hiperfibrinogenemia interferes in the metabolism of the NO in the erythrocyte in dependence of the phosphorylation degree of the band 3. The soluble form of fibrinogen binds into CD47 protein present in the erythrocyte membrane. The soluble thrombomodulin is an inflammatory marker that binds to the erythrocyte CD47 in a site with a sequence peptide known as 4N1K. A study done in vitro shows that when hiperfibrinogenemia was induced in the presence of the peptide 4N1K agonist of CD47 it were observed variations in the efflux of NO from erythrocyte and an increase in the concentrations of GSNO, peroxinitrite, nitrite and nitrate of the erythrocytes. The aim of this work was to study the influence of the peptide 4N1K, on the metabolism of NO in the erythrocyte under high fibrinogen concentration and in the presence of inhibitors of the status of phosphorylation of protein band 3. In this in vitro study, whole blood samples were harvested from healthy subjects and NO, peroxynitrite, nitrite, nitrate and S-nitro-glutathione (GSNO) were determined in presence of 4N1K, calpeptine, Syk inhibitor and under high fibrinogen concentrations. The results obtained in erythrocytes under high fibrinogen levels when 4N1K is present with the Syk inhibitor or with calpeptine, showed in relation to the control samples increased significant concentrations of efflux of NO and of peroxynitrite, nitrite, nitrate and GSNO. In conclusion it was verified that in the in vitro model of hiperfibrinogenemia the peptide 4N1K, agonist of CD47, induces mobilization of NO in the erythrocyte in dependence of the status of phosphorylation of protein band 3.

  17. Interaction of fibrinogen and albumin with titanium dioxide nanoparticles of different crystalline phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marucco, Arianna; Fenoglio, Ivana; Turci, Francesco; Fubini, Bice

    2013-04-01

    TiO2 nanoparticles (NPs) are contained in different kinds of industrial products including paints, self-cleaning glasses, sunscreens. TiO2 is also employed in photocatalysis and it has been proposed for waste water treatment. Micrometric TiO2 is generally considered a safe material, while there is concern on the possible health effects of nanometric titania. Due to their small size NPs may migrate within the human body possibly entering in the blood stream. Therefore studies on the interaction of NPs with plasma proteins are needed. In fact, the interaction with proteins is believed to ultimately influences the NPs biological fate. Fibrinogen and albumin are two of the most abundant plasma proteins. They are involved in several important physiological functions. Furthermore, fibrinogen is known to trigger platelet adhesion and inflammation. For these reasons the study of the interaction between these protein and nanoparticles is an important step toward the understanding of the behavior of NPs in the body. In this study we investigated the interaction of albumin and fibrinogen with TiO2 nanoparticles of different crystal phases (rutile and anatase) using an integrated set of techniques. The amount of adsorbed fibrinogen and albumin for each TiO2 surface was investigated by using the bicinchoninic acid assay (BCA). The variation of the surface charge of the NP-protein conjugates respect to the naked NPs was used to indirectly estimate both surface coverage and reversibility of the adsorption upon dilution. Surface charge was monitored by measuring the ζ potential with a conventional electrophoretic light scattering (ELS) system. The extent of protein deformation was evaluated by Raman Spectroscopy. We found that both proteins adsorb irreversibly against electrostatic repulsion, likely undergoing conformational changes or selective orientation upon adsorption. The size of primary particles and the particles aggregation rather than the crystal phase modulate the

  18. Calcium Binding to Beta-2-Microglobulin at Physiological Ph Drives the Occurrence of Conformational Changes Which Cause the Protein to Precipitate into Amorphous Forms That Subsequently Transform into Amyloid Aggregates

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sukhdeep; Sharma, Prerna; Arora, Kanika; Raje, Manoj; Guptasarma, Purnananda

    2014-01-01

    Using spectroscopic, calorimetric and microscopic methods, we demonstrate that calcium binds to beta-2-microglobulin (β2m) under physiological conditions of pH and ionic strength, in biological buffers, causing a conformational change associated with the binding of up to four calcium atoms per β2m molecule, with a marked transformation of some random coil structure into beta sheet structure, and culminating in the aggregation of the protein at physiological (serum) concentrations of calcium and β2m. We draw attention to the fact that the sequence of β2m contains several potential calcium-binding motifs of the DXD and DXDXD (or DXEXD) varieties. We establish (a) that the microscopic aggregation seen at physiological concentrations of β2m and calcium turns into actual turbidity and visible precipitation at higher concentrations of protein and β2m, (b) that this initial aggregation/precipitation leads to the formation of amorphous aggregates, (c) that the formation of the amorphous aggregates can be partially reversed through the addition of the divalent ion chelating agent, EDTA, and (d) that upon incubation for a few weeks, the amorphous aggregates appear to support the formation of amyloid aggregates that bind to the dye, thioflavin T (ThT), resulting in increase in the dye's fluorescence. We speculate that β2m exists in the form of microscopic aggregates in vivo and that these don't progress to form larger amyloid aggregates because protein concentrations remain low under normal conditions of kidney function and β2m degradation. However, when kidney function is compromised and especially when dialysis is performed, β2m concentrations probably transiently rise to yield large aggregates that deposit in bone joints and transform into amyloids during dialysis related amyloidosis. PMID:24755626

  19. Interactions between human serum proteins and oral streptococci reveal occurrence of receptors for aggregated beta 2-microglobulin.

    PubMed Central

    Ericson, D; Bratthall, D; Björck, L; Myhre, E; Kronvall, G

    1979-01-01

    A total of 31 strains of oral streptococci representing Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus sanguis, Streptococcus mitior, Streptococcus salivarius, and Streptococcus milleri were tested for possible binding of human immunoglobulins G, G1, G2, G3, G4, A1, A2, M1, and M2 and haptoglobin, hemoglobin, fibrinogen, and aggregated beta 2-microglobulin. Radiolabeled beta 2-microglobulin in aggregated form showed affinity for 20 of the 31 strains tested. Binding activity for the protein was found in strains belonging to all five species. The bacterial receptor was resistant to trypsin. Monomeric, unlabeled beta 2-microglobulin did not interfere with the binding of the aggregated form. Of the other proteins tested, only the immunoglobulin A1 protein showed positive binding, and that was only with a single strain of S. milleri. beta 2-Microglobulin is present on all nucleated cell membranes in vivo. The reaction between aggregated beta 2-microglobulin and oral streptococci is a new type of human-bacterium interaction which should be considered in studies of bacterial adherence. PMID:90015

  20. Post-translational oxidative modification of fibrinogen is associated with coagulopathy after traumatic injury.

    PubMed

    White, Nathan J; Wang, Yi; Fu, Xiaoyun; Cardenas, Jessica C; Martin, Erika J; Brophy, Donald F; Wade, Charles E; Wang, Xu; St John, Alexander E; Lim, Esther B; Stern, Susan A; Ward, Kevin R; López, José A; Chung, Dominic

    2016-07-01

    Victims of trauma often develop impaired blood clot formation (coagulopathy) that contributes to bleeding and mortality. Fibrin polymerization is one critical component of clot formation that can be impacted by post-translational oxidative modifications of fibrinogen after exposure to oxidants. In vitro evidence suggests that Aα-C domain methionine sulfoxide formation, in particular, can induce conformational changes that prevent lateral aggregation of fibrin protofibrils during polymerization. We used mass spectrometry of plasma from trauma patients to find that fibrinogen Aα-C domain methionine sulfoxide content was selectively-increased in patients with coagulopathy vs. those without coagulopathy. This evidence supports a novel linkage between oxidative stress, coagulopathy, and bleeding after injury. PMID:27105953

  1. Fibrin Clot Structure and Mechanics Associated with Specific Oxidation of Methionine Residues in Fibrinogen

    PubMed Central

    Weigandt, Katie M.; White, Nathan; Chung, Dominic; Ellingson, Erica; Wang, Yi; Fu, Xiaoyun; Pozzo, Danilo C.

    2012-01-01

    Using a combination of structural and mechanical characterization, we examine the effect of fibrinogen oxidation on the formation of fibrin clots. We find that treatment with hypochlorous acid preferentially oxidizes specific methionine residues on the α, β, and γ chains of fibrinogen. Oxidation is associated with the formation of a dense network of thin fibers after activation by thrombin. Additionally, both the linear and nonlinear mechanical properties of oxidized fibrin gels are found to be altered with oxidation. Finally, the structural modifications induced by oxidation are associated with delayed fibrin lysis via plasminogen and tissue plasminogen activator. Based on these results, we speculate that methionine oxidation of specific residues may be related to hindered lateral aggregation of protofibrils in fibrin gels. PMID:23283239

  2. Studies of activated GPIIb/IIIa receptors on the luminal surface of adherent platelets. Paradoxical loss of luminal receptors when platelets adhere to high density fibrinogen.

    PubMed Central

    Coller, B S; Kutok, J L; Scudder, L E; Galanakis, D K; West, S M; Rudomen, G S; Springer, K T

    1993-01-01

    The accessibility of activated GPIIb/IIIa receptors on the luminal surface of platelets adherent to damaged blood vessels or atherosclerotic plaques is likely to play a crucial role in subsequent platelet recruitment. To define better the factors involved in this process, we developed a functional assay to assess the presence of activated, luminal GPIIb/IIIa receptors, based on their ability to bind erythrocytes containing a high density of covalently coupled RGD-containing peptides (thromboerythrocytes). Platelets readily adhered to wells coated with purified type I rat skin collagen and the adherent platelets bound a dense lawn of thromboerythrocytes. With fibrinogen-coated wells, platelet adhesion increased as the fibrinogen-coating concentration increased, reaching a plateau at about 11 micrograms/ml. Thromboerythrocyte binding to the platelets adherent to fibrinogen showed a paradoxical response, increasing at fibrinogen coating concentrations up to approximately 4-6 micrograms/ml and then dramatically decreasing at higher fibrinogen-coating concentrations. Scanning electron microscopy demonstrated that the morphology of platelets adherent to collagen was similar to that of platelets adherent to low density fibrinogen, with extensive filopodia formation and ruffling. In contrast, platelets adherent to high density fibrinogen showed a bland, flattened appearance. Immunogold staining of GPIIb/IIIa receptors demonstrated concentration of the receptors on the filopodia, and depletion of receptors on the flattened portion of the platelets. Thus, there is a paradoxical loss of accessible, activated GPIIb/IIIa receptors on the luminal surface of platelets adherent to high density fibrinogen. Two factors may contribute to this result: engagement of GPIIb/IIIa receptors with fibrinogen on the abluminal surface leading to the loss of luminal receptors, and loss of luminal filopodia that interact with thromboerythrocytes. These data provide insight into the differences

  3. Identification of a novel platelet antagonist that binds to CLEC-2 and suppresses podoplanin-induced platelet aggregation and cancer metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yu-Tsui; Lu, Meng-Hong; Huang, Tur-Fu; Chong, Kowit-Yu; Liao, Hsiang-Ruei; Cheng, Ju-Chien; Tseng, Ching-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Podoplanin (PDPN) enhances tumor metastases by eliciting tumor cell-induced platelet aggregation (TCIPA) through activation of platelet C-type lectin-like receptor 2 (CLEC-2). A novel and non-cytotoxic 5-nitrobenzoate compound 2CP was synthesized that specifically inhibited the PDPN/CLEC-2 interaction and TCIPA with no effect on platelet aggregation stimulated by other platelet agonists. 2CP possessed anti-cancer metastatic activity in vivo and augmented the therapeutic efficacy of cisplatin in the experimental animal model without causing a bleeding risk. Analysis of the molecular action of 2CP further revealed that Akt1/PDK1 and PKCμ were two alternative CLEC-2 signaling pathways mediating PDPN-induced platelet activation. 2CP directly bound to CLEC-2 and, by competing with the same binding pocket of PDPN in CLEC-2, inhibited PDPN-mediated platelet activation. This study provides evidence that 2CP is the first defined platelet antagonist with CLEC-2 binding activity. The augmentation in the therapeutic efficacy of cisplatin by 2CP suggests that a combination of a chemotherapeutic agent and a drug with anti-TCIPA activity such as 2CP may prove clinically effective. PMID:26528756

  4. Disease causing mutants of TDP-43 nucleic acid binding domains are resistant to aggregation and have increased stability and half-life

    PubMed Central

    Austin, James A.; Wright, Gareth S. A.; Watanabe, Seiji; Grossmann, J. Günter; Antonyuk, Svetlana V.; Yamanaka, Koji; Hasnain, S. Samar

    2014-01-01

    Over the last two decades many secrets of the age-related human neural proteinopathies have been revealed. A common feature of these diseases is abnormal, and possibly pathogenic, aggregation of specific proteins in the effected tissue often resulting from inherent or decreased structural stability. An archetype example of this is superoxide dismutase-1, the first genetic factor to be linked with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Mutant or posttranslationally modified TAR DNA binding protein-32 (TDP-43) is also strongly associated with ALS and an increasingly large number of other neurodegenerative diseases, including frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). Cytoplasmic mislocalization and elevated half-life is a characteristic of mutant TDP-43. Furthermore, patient age at the onset of disease symptoms shows a good inverse correlation with mutant TDP-43 half-life. Here we show that ALS and FTLD-associated TDP-43 mutations in the central nucleic acid binding domains lead to elevated half-life and this is commensurate with increased thermal stability and inhibition of aggregation. It is achieved without impact on secondary, tertiary, or quaternary structure. We propose that tighter structural cohesion contributes to reduced protein turnover, increasingly abnormal proteostasis and, ultimately, faster onset of disease symptoms. These results contrast our perception of neurodegenerative diseases as misfolded proteinopathies and delineate a novel path from the molecular characteristics of mutant TDP-43 to aberrant cellular effects and patient phenotype. PMID:24591609

  5. Identification of a novel platelet antagonist that binds to CLEC-2 and suppresses podoplanin-induced platelet aggregation and cancer metastasis.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yao-Wen; Hsieh, Pei-Wen; Chang, Yu-Tsui; Lu, Meng-Hong; Huang, Tur-Fu; Chong, Kowit-Yu; Liao, Hsiang-Ruei; Cheng, Ju-Chien; Tseng, Ching-Ping

    2015-12-15

    Podoplanin (PDPN) enhances tumor metastases by eliciting tumor cell-induced platelet aggregation (TCIPA) through activation of platelet C-type lectin-like receptor 2 (CLEC-2). A novel and non-cytotoxic 5-nitrobenzoate compound 2CP was synthesized that specifically inhibited the PDPN/CLEC-2 interaction and TCIPA with no effect on platelet aggregation stimulated by other platelet agonists. 2CP possessed anti-cancer metastatic activity in vivo and augmented the therapeutic efficacy of cisplatin in the experimental animal model without causing a bleeding risk. Analysis of the molecular action of 2CP further revealed that Akt1/PDK1 and PKCμ were two alternative CLEC-2 signaling pathways mediating PDPN-induced platelet activation. 2CP directly bound to CLEC-2 and, by competing with the same binding pocket of PDPN in CLEC-2, inhibited PDPN-mediated platelet activation. This study provides evidence that 2CP is the first defined platelet antagonist with CLEC-2 binding activity. The augmentation in the therapeutic efficacy of cisplatin by 2CP suggests that a combination of a chemotherapeutic agent and a drug with anti-TCIPA activity such as 2CP may prove clinically effective. PMID:26528756

  6. Functional evaluation of an inherited abnormal fibrinogen: fibrinogen “Baltimore”

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Eugene A.; Shainoff, John R.; Vogel, Alfred; Jackson, Dudley P.

    1971-01-01

    The rate of clotting and the rate of development and degree of turbidity after addition of thrombin to plasma or purified fibrinogen from a patient with fibrinogen Baltimore was delayed when compared with normal, especially in the presence of low concentrations of thrombin. Optimal coagulation and development of translucent, rather than opaque, clots occurred at a lower pH with the abnormal fibrinogen than with normal. Development of turbidity during clotting of the abnormal plasma or fibrinogen was less than normal at each pH tested, but was maximal in both at approximately pH 6.4. The physical quality of clots formed from fibrinogen Baltimore was abnormal, as demonstrated by a decreased amplitude on thromboelastography. The morphologic appearance of fibrin strands formed from fibrinogen Baltimore by thrombin at pH 7.4 was abnormal when examined by phase contrast or electron microscopy, but those formed by thrombin at pH 6.4 or by thrombin and calcium chloride were similar to, though less compact, than normal fibrin. The periodicity of fibrin formed from fibrinogen Baltimore was similar to normal and was 231-233 Å. A study of the release of the fibrinopeptides from the patient's fibrinogen and its chromatographic subfractions verified the existence of both a normally behaving and a defective form of fibrinogen in the patient's plasma. The defective form differed from normal in three functionally different ways: (a) the rate of release of fibrinopeptides A and AP was slower than normal; (b) no visible clot formation accompanied either partial or complete release of the fibrinopeptides from the defective form in 0.3 M NaCl at pH 7.4; and (c) the defective component possessed a high proportion of phosphorylated, relative to nonphosphorylated, fibrinopeptide A, while the coagulable component contained very little of the phosphorylated peptide (AP). The high phosphate content of the defective component did not appear to be the cause of the abnormality, but may be the

  7. Antiadhesive effect of fibrinogen: a safeguard for thrombus stability

    PubMed Central

    Lishko, Valeryi K.; Burke, Timothy; Ugarova, Tatiana

    2007-01-01

    The recruitment of phagocytic leukocytes to sites of vessel wall injury plays an important role in thrombus dissolution by proteases elaborated on their adhesion. However, leukocyte adhesion to the fibrin clot can be detrimental at the early stages of wound healing when hemostatic plug integrity is critical for preventing blood loss. Adhesion of circulating leukocytes to the insoluble fibrin(ogen) matrix is mediated by integrins and occurs in the presence of a high concentration of plasma fibrinogen. In this study, the possibility that soluble fibrinogen could protect fibrin from excessive adhesion of leukocytes was examined. Fibrinogen was a potent inhibitor of adhesion of U937 monocytoid cells and neutrophils to fibrin gel and immobilized fibrin(ogen). An investigation of the mechanism by which soluble fibrinogen exerts its influence on leukocyte adhesion indicated that it did not block integrins but rather associated with the fibrin(ogen) substrate. Consequently, leukocytes that engage fibrinogen molecules loosely bound to the surface of fibrin(ogen) matrix are not able to consolidate their grip on the substrate; subsequently, cells detach. This conclusion is based on the evidence obtained in adhesion studies using various cells and performed under static and flow conditions. These findings reveal a new role of fibrinogen in integrin-mediated leukocyte adhesion and suggest that this mechanism may protect the thrombus from premature dissolution. PMID:16849640

  8. Association Between γ′ Fibrinogen Levels and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Kristine S.; Madden, Theresa E.; Farrell, David H.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The γ′ fibrinogen isoform produces clots that are stiffer and more resistant to breakdown than the more common fibrinogen isoform, γA. Increased levels of γ′ fibrinogen are associated with several forms of cardiovascular disease. The purpose of this cross-sectional study is to investigate the relationship between γ′ fibrinogen, an emerging risk factor for cardiovascular disease, and inflammatory markers in subjects with a chronic inflammatory state. The 284 subjects for this study came from the Periodontitis and Vascular Events study, and γ′ fibrinogen and total fibrinogen in plasma were measured by ELISA. Information on patient demographics and health status, as well as levels of C-reactive protein, an inflammatory marker, have previously been collected for this study. The mean (SE) γ′ fibrinogen level in the subjects was 0.622 (0.017) mg/ml. Levels of γ′ fibrinogen were correlated with C-reactive protein (p = 0.006), with a one unit increase in C-reactive protein associated with a 1.9% increase in γ′ fibrinogen, after adjustment for potential confounders. Total fibrinogen was not correlated with γ′ fibrinogen in these subjects. The number of dental sites with evidence of tissue inflammation was also significantly associated with γ′ fibrinogen levels. These results provide an important step in the evolution of γ′ fibrinogen not only as a general risk factor for cardiovascular disease, but as a potentially useful biomarker for assessing a patient's inflammatory state and associated cardiovascular disease risk. PMID:21174007

  9. Exposure of the lysine in the gamma chain dodecapeptide of human fibrinogen is not enhanced by adsorption to poly(ethylene terephthalate) as measured by biotinylation and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ovod, Vitaliy; Scott, Evan A; Flake, Megan M; Parker, Stanley R; Bateman, Randall J; Elbert, Donald L

    2012-03-01

    Conformational changes in adsorbed fibrinogen may enhance the exposure of platelet adhesive sites that are inaccessible in solution. To test this hypothesis, mass spectrometric methods were developed to quantify chemical modification of lysine residues following adsorption of fibrinogen to biomaterials. The quantitative method used an internal standard consisting of isotope-labeled fibrinogen secreted by human HepG2 cells in culture. Lysine residues in the internal standard were partially reacted with NHS-biotin. For the experimental samples, normal human fibrinogen was adsorbed to poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) particles. The adsorbed fibrinogen was reacted with NHS-biotin and then eluted from the particles. Constant amounts of internal standard were added to sample fibrinogen and analyzed by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. Biotinylation of the lysine residue in the platelet-adhesive gamma chain dodecapeptide (GCDP) was quantified by comparison with the internal standard. Approximately 80% of the GCDP peptides were biotinylated when fibrinogen was reacted with NHS-biotin in solution or adsorbed onto PET. These results are generally consistent with previous antibody binding studies and suggest that other regions of fibrinogen may be crucial in promoting platelet adhesion to materials. The results do not directly address but are consistent with the hypothesis that only activated platelets adhere to adsorbed fibrinogen. PMID:22213354

  10. Quantification of the Binding Properties of Cu2+ to the Amyloid-Beta Peptide: Coordination Spheres for Human and Rat Peptides and Implication on Cu2+-Induced Aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Lian; Carducci, Tessa M.; Bush, William D.; Dudzik, Christopher G.; Millhauser, Glenn L.; Simon, John D.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY There is no consensus on the coordinating ligands for Cu2+ by A β. Yet the differences in peptide sequence between human and rat have been hypothesized to alter metal ion binding in a manner that alters Cu2+-induced aggregation of A β. Herein, we employ isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), circular dichroism (CD) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy to examine the Cu2+ coordination spheres to human and rat A β and an extensive set of A β(16) mutants. EPR of the mutant peptides is consistent with a 3N1O binding geometry, like the native human peptide at pH 7.4. The thermodynamic data reveal an equilibrium between three coordination spheres, {NH2, O-, NIm His6, amide N−}, {NH2, O-, NIm His6, NIm His13} and {NH2, O-, NIm His6, NIm His14} for human A β(16) but only one for rat A β(16), { NH2, O-, NIm His6, N−}, at pH 7.4 -6.5. ITC and CD data establish that the mutation R5G is sufficient for reproducing this difference in Cu2+ binding properties at pH 7.4. The substitution of bulky and positively charged Arg by Gly is proposed to stabilize the coordination {NH2, O-, NIm His6, amide N−} that then results in one dominating coordination sphere for the case of the rat peptide. The differences in the coordination geometries for Cu2+ by the human and rat A β are proposed to contribute to the variation in the ability of Cu2+ to induce aggregation of A β peptides. PMID:20690669

  11. [Mathematical depiction of the kinetics of thrombocyte aggregation].

    PubMed

    Verkhusha, V V; Vrzheshch, P V; Varfolomeev, S D

    1991-01-01

    A study was made of a model of platelet aggregation in shear flow taking into account the kinetics of intercellular fibrinogen bond formation limited by the turning time of the doublet of collided platelets. The energy curve for two platelets was calculated. One fibrinogen bond was sufficient to form a doublet stable in the flow. The equation for the rate of single platelet disappearance with regard to the kinetics of intercellular fibrinogen bond formation, the stochastic character of bond distribution on the contacts of collided platelets, hydrodynamically controlled time of their interaction was derived. Approximation of the obtained dependencies for the platelet aggregation rate by Hill's equation was suggested and its parameters were determined. A qualitative criterion for kinetic behavior of the system of aggregating platelets was introduced. PMID:1801457

  12. Fibrinogen is degraded and internalized during incubation with neutrophils, and fibrinogen products localize to electron lucent vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Kirsch, Richard; Jaffer, Mohamed A; Woodburne, Vivienne E; Sewell, Trevor; Kelly, Sharon L; Kirsch, Ralph E; Shephard, Enid G

    2002-01-01

    A biologically relevant relationship exists between neutrophils and coagulation processes. Several studies have focused on the ability of neutrophil proteases (both intracellular and membrane-associated) to degrade fibrinogen. The present study investigates the events following the interaction of activated neutrophils with soluble fibrinogen. During incubation of PMA-stimulated neutrophils with fibrinogen at 37 degrees C, fibrinogenolysis occurred, and degraded fibrinogen became associated with the neutrophil. Immunoelectron microscopy identified these fibrinogen products to be located within electron lucent vesicles, and not on the surface of the cell, suggesting that they are internalized. Although a specific interaction between fibrinogen and the neutrophil membrane might assist uptake, in the presence of physiological concentrations of fibrinogen, internalization occurred largely via a non-specific pinocytic process. Studies at low temperature revealed that both intact and degraded forms of fibrinogen can associate with neutrophils. The fibrinogen products detected intracellularly in experiments performed at 37 degrees C might represent uptake of degraded as well as intact forms of fibrinogen, the latter being rapidly degraded intracellularly. This route of fibrinogenolysis contributes minimally to the overall extent of the degradation process, the majority occurring extracellularly. Neutrophils thus possess a proteolytic mechanism for preventing accumulation of surface ligand, perhaps allowing them to evade the immunomodulatory effects of such ligands during inflammation. PMID:12023883

  13. Binding of heavy metal ions in aggregates of microbial cells, EPS and biogenic iron minerals measured in-situ using metal- and glycoconjugates-specific fluorophores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Likai; Guo, Yuan; Byrne, James M.; Zeitvogel, Fabian; Schmid, Gregor; Ingino, Pablo; Li, Jianli; Neu, Thomas R.; Swanner, Elizabeth D.; Kappler, Andreas; Obst, Martin

    2016-05-01

    Aggregates consisting of bacterial cells, extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and Fe(III) minerals formed by Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria are common at bulk or microscale chemical interfaces where Fe cycling occurs. The high sorption capacity and binding capacity of cells, EPS, and minerals controls the mobility and fate of heavy metals. However, it remains unclear to which of these component(s) the metals will bind in complex aggregates. To clarify this question, the present study focuses on 3D mapping of heavy metals sorbed to cells, glycoconjugates that comprise the majority of EPS constituents, and Fe(III) mineral aggregates formed by the phototrophic Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria Rhodobacter ferrooxidans SW2 using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) in combination with metal- and glycoconjugates-specific fluorophores. The present study evaluated the influence of glycoconjugates, microbial cell surfaces, and (biogenic) Fe(III) minerals, and the availability of ferrous and ferric iron on heavy metal sorption. Analyses in this study provide detailed knowledge on the spatial distribution of metal ions in the aggregates at the sub-μm scale, which is essential to understand the underlying mechanisms of microbe-mineral-metal interactions. The heavy metals (Au3+, Cd2+, Cr3+, CrO42-, Cu2+, Hg2+, Ni2+, Pd2+, tributyltin (TBT) and Zn2+) were found mainly sorbed to cell surfaces, present within the glycoconjugates matrix, and bound to the mineral surfaces, but not incorporated into the biogenic Fe(III) minerals. Statistical analysis revealed that all ten heavy metals tested showed relatively similar sorption behavior that was affected by the presence of sorbed ferrous and ferric iron. Results in this study showed that in addition to the mineral surfaces, both bacterial cell surfaces and the glycoconjugates provided most of sorption sites for heavy metals. Simultaneously, ferrous and ferric iron ions competed with the heavy metals for sorption sites on the organic

  14. Regulation of fibrinogen synthesis by plasmin-derived fragments of fibrinogen and fibrin: an indirect feedback pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Ritchie, D G; Levy, B A; Adams, M A; Fuller, G M

    1982-01-01

    The effect of plasmin-derived fibrinogen fragments on the biosynthesis of fibrinogen was investigated in cultured monolayers of rat hepatocytes. Incubating the cells with several concentrations of either fibrinogen or fibrin fragment D or E had no effect on the synthesis and secretion of fibrinogen by these cells. However, if the fragments were incubated with isolated peripheral blood leukocytes, they caused these cells to secrete a factor that when added to the hepatocytes caused an increase in fibrinogen synthesis 4- to 6-fold over controls. Moreover, the hepatocyte-stimulating factor also affected the production of several other proteins produced by the hepatocyte. These results demonstrate that both fragments D and E can stimulate hepatic fibrinogen synthesis via an indirect leukocyte-mediated pathway. Images PMID:6461860

  15. Autophagy-enhancing drug carbamazepine diminishes hepatocellular death in fibrinogen storage disease.

    PubMed

    Puls, Florian; Goldschmidt, Imeke; Bantel, Heike; Agne, Clemens; Bröcker, Verena; Dämmrich, Maximilian; Lehmann, Ulrich; Berrang, Jens; Pfister, Eva-Doreen; Kreipe, Hans Heinrich; Baumann, Ulrich

    2013-09-01

    Fibrinogen storage disease (FSD) is a rare autosomal-dominant hereditary disorder characterized by hypofibrinogenemia and accumulation of fibrinogen aggregates within the hepatocellular endoplasmatic reticulum (ER). Some FSD patients present with elevated amino-transferases and fibrosis/cirrhosis similar to alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency (ATD), also an ER storage disease. Pharmacological stimulation of autophagy has been shown to mediate clearance of protein aggregates and halt progression of liver fibrosis in in vivo models of ATD. Our aim was to evaluate the presence of autophagy and a possible response to autophagy-enhancing therapy in patients with FSD. Hepatic fibrosis was assessed by transient elastography in 2 newly identified FSD families with fibrinogen Aguadilla and Brescia mutations, encompassing 8 affected members. Available liver biopsies were assessed for autophagy. Two patients, who had had elevated alanine amino-transaminase levels (2-5 above upper limit of normal), were treated with the autophagy enhancer carbamazepine (CBZ). Transient elastography did not show evidence of significant fibrosis in any affected family members. Quantitative electron microscopy of one patient showed a 5.15-fold increase of late stage autophagocytic vacuoles compared to control livers. CBZ at low anticonvulsive treatment levels led to rapid normalization of alanine-aminotransferase and decrease of caspase-cleaved and uncleaved cytokeratin-18 fragments (M30 and M65). These effects reversed after discontinuation of treatment. Response to CBZ may be mediated by pharmacologically enhanced autophagy resulting in reduction of aggregate-related toxicity in FSD. These results suggest clinical applicability of pharmacological stimulation of autophagy in FSD, but potentially also in other related disorders. PMID:23707368

  16. DNA binding and adduct formation of 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)-anthracene by rat mammary epithelial cell aggregates in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Singletary, K.W.; Milner, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    Freshly isolated mammary epithelial cell aggregates from female Sprague-Dawley rats metabolized 7,12-dimethylbenz-(a)anthracene (DMBA) to bay-region anti- and syn-dihydrodiolepoxides that bound to deoxyguanosine and deoxyadenosine residues in cellular DNA. After 24 h of incubation 68% of the DMBA (0.4 micrograms/ml) was metabolized and 58% of the extracellular metabolites were water-soluble. DMBA-DNA binding increased rapidly during the initial 24 h of incubation. Formation of the bay-region syn-dihydrodiolepoxide:deoxyadenosine adduct increased linearly throughout the 24 h, whereas formation of deoxyadenosine and deoxyguanosine adducts with the bay-region anti-dihydrodiolepoxide increased rapidly following a delay of 12 h.

  17. Modification of fibrin network ultrastructure by Fab fragments specific for different domain of fibrinogen.

    PubMed

    Cierniewski, C S; Janiak, A; Wyroba, E

    1986-01-01

    Kinetics of inhibition of fibrin monomer polymerization produced by Fab fragments prepared from immunochemically purified monospecific antibodies to the surface epitopes of different domains of fibrinogen molecule has been correlated with electron microscopic observations of resulting specimens. Fab fragments prepared from anti FgD antisera were the most efficient inhibitors of thrombin-catalysed conversion of fibrinogen to fibrin; polymerization of fibrin monomers as detected spectrophotometrically was abolished at 2:1 molar ratio of anti FgD Fab fragments to fibra monomer. These Fab fragments acting as a steric hindrance of polymerization sites inhibited the first stage of fibrin monomer aggregation. Interaction of Fab fragments derived from antibodies specific for alpha 239-476 with corresponding segment of fibrinogen molecule resulted in a weak inhibition of fibrin monomer polymerization. However, fibrin obtained in the presence of these Fab fragments was significantly modified and showed no periodicity. This observation may suggest that anti alpha 239-476 Fab impaired the course of the second stage of fibrin monomer polymerization, i.e. lateral association of fibrin fibrils. PMID:2433859

  18. The role of plasma membrane STIM1 and Ca2 +entry in platelet aggregation. STIM1 binds to novel proteins in human platelets

    PubMed Central

    Ambily, A.; Kaiser, W.J.; Pierro, C.; Chamberlain, E.V.; Li, Z.; Jones, C.I.; Kassouf, N.; Gibbins, J.M.; Authi, K.S.

    2014-01-01

    Ca2 + elevation is essential to platelet activation. STIM1 senses Ca2 + in the endoplasmic reticulum and activates Orai channels allowing store-operated Ca2 + entry (SOCE). STIM1 has also been reported to be present in the plasma membrane (PM) with its N-terminal region exposed to the outside medium but its role is not fully understood. We have examined the effects of the antibody GOK/STIM1, which recognises the N-terminal region of STIM1, on SOCE, agonist-stimulated Ca2 + entry, surface exposure, in vitro thrombus formation and aggregation in human platelets. We also determined novel binding partners of STIM1 using proteomics. The dialysed GOK/STIM1 antibody failed to reduced thapsigargin- and agonist-mediated Ca2 + entry in Fura2-labelled cells. Using flow cytometry we detect a portion of STIM1 to be surface-exposed. The dialysed GOK/STIM1 antibody reduced thrombus formation by whole blood on collagen-coated capillaries under flow and platelet aggregation induced by collagen. In immunoprecipitation experiments followed by proteomic analysis, STIM1 was found to extract a number of proteins including myosin, DOCK10, thrombospondin-1 and actin. These studies suggest that PM STIM1 may facilitate platelet activation by collagen through novel interactions at the plasma membrane while the essential Ca2 +-sensing role of STIM1 is served by the protein in the ER. PMID:24308967

  19. The effect of cytochalasin B and vinca alkaloids on EA- and EAC-rosette formation and on the binding of heat-aggregated human IgG by human lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez, Carmen; Papamichail, M.; Faulk, W. Page

    1976-01-01

    We report the effect of cytochalasin B and vinca alkaloids on EA- and EAC-rosette formation and on the binding of heat-aggregated human IgG by human lymphocytes. Cytochalasin B inhibits EA- but not EAC-rosette formation, and neither colchicine nor vinblastine have a measurable effect on either reaction. Also, cytochalasin B inhibits the binding of heat-aggregated IgG by human lymphocytes. The inhibition caused by cytochalasin B is reversible, and the cells recover to normal values within 30 min.

  20. Interfacial adsorption of fibrinogen and its inhibition by RGD peptide: a combined physical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, Johanna; Salacinski, Henryk J.; Mu, Qingshan; Seifalian, Alex M.; Peel, Louise; Freeman, Neville; Holt, Cathy M.; Lu, Jian R.

    2004-07-01

    The Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) peptide sequence is known as a cell recognition site for numerous adhesive proteins present in the extracellular matrix (ECM) and in blood. Whilst surface immobilized RGD groups enhance cell attachment, RGD components present in solution can effectively inhibit cell attachment by competing with endogenous ligands for the same recognition site. In contrast to the widely reported binding to cell integrin, this study demonstrates a new RGD feature: its inhibitive effect on fibrinogen adsorption. Through a combined analysis of spectroscopic ellipsometry, neutron reflection and dual polarization interferometry, we show that the kinetic process of fibrinogen adsorption as a model pro-coagulant at the silica/solution interface and in the absence of any cells can be substantially reduced by the addition of RGD in solution and that the extent of the reduction is dependent on the relative concentration of RGD.

  1. Indications and Risks of Fibrinogen in Surgery and Trauma.

    PubMed

    Spahn, Donat R; Spahn, Gabriela H; Stein, Philipp

    2016-03-01

    Fibrinogen has a central role in coagulation. Following trauma and perioperatively, low fibrinogen levels have been found to be risk factors for exaggerated bleeding, transfusion needs, and adverse outcome. Conversely, treatment with exogenous fibrinogen in critically bleeding patients with low fibrinogen levels has been shown to decrease transfusion needs. Because following trauma and in many perioperative situations fibrinogen is the first coagulation "element" to become critically low, it appears reasonable to target fibrinogen in clinical coagulation algorithms aiming at early specific and goal-directed treatment. A low fibrinogen can be a low plasma concentration or a low functional fibrinogen as assessed by point-of-care techniques such as thromboelastography (TEG) or thromboelastometry (ROTEM). This review summarizes the evidence base for perioperative algorithm-based fibrinogen administration, including the exact thresholds for fibrinogen administration used in the different algorithms. Algorithm-based individualized goal-directed use of fibrinogen resulted in highly significant reduction in transfusion needs, adverse outcomes, in certain studies even mortality, and where investigated reduced costs, with high safety levels at the same time. Best evidence exists in cardiac surgery, followed by trauma, postpartum hemorrhage, and liver transplantation. The introduction of these concepts is highly demanding and requires a tremendous educational effort to familiarize all health care workers with the necessary knowledge and the skills of how to run TEG/ROTEM tests. Future research is needed to compare the efficacy, safety, and costs of different algorithms. This, however, should not prevent us from introducing these expedient point-of-care-based algorithms clinically today. PMID:26716503

  2. Chemical synthesis of echistatin, a potent inhibitor of platelet aggregation from Echis carinatus: synthesis and biological activity of selected analogs.

    PubMed

    Garsky, V M; Lumma, P K; Freidinger, R M; Pitzenberger, S M; Randall, W C; Veber, D F; Gould, R J; Friedman, P A

    1989-06-01

    Echistatin, a polypeptide from the venom of the saw-scaled viper, Echis carinatus, containing 49 amino acids and 4 cystine bridges was synthesized by solid-phase methodology in 4% yield. In the final step, air oxidation of the octahydroderivative was found to be optimal at pH 8. The synthetic product was shown to be physically and biologically indistinguishable from native material. It inhibits fibrinogen-dependent platelet aggregation stimulated by ADP with IC50 = 3.3 x 10(-8) M and also prevents aggregation initiated by thrombin, epinephrine, collagen, or platelet-activating factor. Reduction of purified synthetic echistatin to octahydroechistatin with dithiothreitol followed by air oxidation regenerated homogeneous echistatin in quantitative yield. This highly specific refolding strongly suggests that the linear sequence of octahydroechistatin contains all of the information that is required for the proper folding of the peptide. The sequence Arg24-Gly-Asp of echistatin occurs also in adhesive glycoproteins that bind to the platelet fibrinogen receptor--a heterodimeric complex composed of glycoproteins IIb and IIIa. In an effort to evaluate the role of this putative binding site we have synthesized analogs of echistatin with substitution of Arg-24. Replacement with ornithine-24 (Orn-24) resulted in an analog having a platelet aggregation inhibitory activity with IC50 = 1.05 x 10(-7) M. Substitution with Ala-24 gave IC50 = 6.1 x 10(-7) M. The inhibitory activity of the corresponding short sequence analogs Arg-Gly-Asp-Phe (IC50 = 6 x 10(-6) M), Orn-Gly-Asp-Phe (IC50 = 1.3 x 10(-4) M), and Ala-Gly-Asp-Phe (IC50 = 5.0 x 10(-4) M) was also determined. These results suggest that arginine plays a more important role in the binding of the tetrapeptide than in that of echistatin. PMID:2726764

  3. Fibrinogen Substrate Recognition by Staphylocoagulase·(Pro)thrombin Complexes*

    PubMed Central

    Panizzi, Peter; Friedrich, Rainer; Fuentes-Prior, Pablo; Richter, Klaus; Bock, Paul E.; Bode, Wolfram

    2008-01-01

    Thrombin generation and fibrinogen (Fbg) clotting are the ultimate proteolytic reactions in the blood coagulation pathway. Staphylocoagulase (SC), a protein secreted by the human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus, activates prothrombin (ProT) without proteolysis. The SC·(pro)thrombin complex recognizes Fbg as a specific substrate, converting it directly into fibrin. The crystal structure of a fully active SC fragment containing residues 1–325 (SC-(1–325)) bound to human prethrombin 2 showed previously that SC inserts its Ile1-Val2 N terminus into the Ile16 pocket of prethrombin 2, inducing a functional active site in the cognate zymogen conformationally. Exosite I of α-thrombin, the Fbg recognition site, and proexosite I on ProT are blocked by domain 2 of SC-(1–325). In the present studies, active site-labeled fluorescent ProT analogs were used to quantitate Fbg binding to the SC-(1–325)·ProT complex. Fbg binding and cleavage are mediated by expression of a new Fbg-binding exosite on the SC-(1–325)·ProT complex, resulting in formation of an (SC-(1–325)·ProT)2·Fbg pentameric complex with a dissociation constant of 8–34 nM. In both crystal structures, the SC-(1–325)·(pre)thrombin complexes form dimers, with both pro-teinases/zymogens facing each other over a large U-shaped cleft, through which the Fbg substrate could thread. On this basis, a molecular model of the pentameric (SC-(1–325)·thrombin)2·Fbg encounter complex was generated, which explains the coagulant properties and efficient Fbg conversion. The results provide new insight into the mechanism that mediates high affinity Fbg binding and cleavage as a substrate of SC·(pro)thrombin complexes, a process that is central to the molecular pathology of S. aureus endocarditis. PMID:16230339

  4. 21 CFR 864.7340 - Fibrinogen determination system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Fibrinogen determination system. 864.7340 Section 864.7340 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7340 Fibrinogen determination system. (a) Identification....

  5. 21 CFR 864.7340 - Fibrinogen determination system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Fibrinogen determination system. 864.7340 Section 864.7340 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7340 Fibrinogen determination system. (a) Identification....

  6. Fibrinogen adsorption onto 316L stainless steel, Nitinol and titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Zhijun; Filiaggi, M. J.; Dahn, J. R.

    2009-03-01

    Fibrinogen adsorption onto mechanically polished biomedical grade 316L stainless steel (316LSS), nickel titanium alloy (Nitinol) and commercially pure titanium (CpTi) surfaces were studied by measurements of adsorption isotherms and adsorption kinetics using an ex-situ wavelength dispersive spectroscopy technique (WDS). Surface composition, roughness and wettability of these materials were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and water contact angle (WCA) measurements. Adsorption isotherm results showed that surface protein concentration on these materials increased with increasing concentration of fibrinogen in phosphate buffer solution. The fibrinogen adsorption isotherms were modeled by both the monolayer Langmuir isotherm and the multilayer Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) isotherm. The results strongly suggest that fibrinogen forms multilayer structures on these materials when the concentration in solution is high. Complementary measurements on the absorbed fibrinogen films by spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) support this view.

  7. Conformational changes of fibrinogen in dispersed carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sung Jean; Khang, Dongwoo

    2012-01-01

    The conformational changes of plasma protein structures in response to carbon nanotubes are critical for determining the nanotoxicity and blood coagulation effects of carbon nanotubes. In this study, we identified that the functional intensity of carboxyl groups on carbon nanotubes, which correspond to the water dispersity or hydrophilicity of carbon nanotubes, can induce conformational changes in the fibrinogen domains. Also, elevation of carbon nanotube density can alter the secondary structures (ie, helices and beta sheets) of fibrinogen. Furthermore, fibrinogen that had been in contact with the nanoparticle material demonstrated a different pattern of heat denaturation compared with free fibrinogen as a result of a variation in hydrophilicity and concentration of carbon nanotubes. Considering the importance of interactions between carbon nanotubes and plasma proteins in the drug delivery system, this study elucidated the correlation between nanoscale physiochemical material properties of carbon nanotubes and associated structural changes in fibrinogen. PMID:22915854

  8. Fibrinogen-independent platelet adhesion and thrombus formation on subendothelium mediated by glycoprotein IIb-IIIa complex at high shear rate.

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, H J; Hawiger, J; Ruggeri, Z M; Turitto, V T; Thiagarajan, P; Hoffmann, T

    1989-01-01

    Platelet adhesion and thrombus formation on subendothelium, studied at a shear rate of 2,600 s-1, were inhibited by two synthetic peptides known to interact with GPIIb-IIIa. One peptide (HHLGGAKQAGDV) corresponds to the carboxyl terminal segment of the fibrinogen gamma-chain (gamma 400-411) and the other (RGDS) contains the amino acid sequence Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) common to fibronectin, von Willebrand factor, vitronectin and the alpha-chain of fibrinogen. Neither platelet adhesion nor thrombus formation were decreased in a patient with severe congenital fibrinogen deficiency and this was equally true when his blood was further depleted of the small amounts of fibrinogen present utilizing an anti-fibrinogen antibody. In normal subjects, adhesion and thrombus formation were inhibited by the Fab' fragments of a monoclonal anti-GPIIb-IIIa antibody (LJ-CP8), which interferes with the interaction of platelets with all four adhesive proteins in both the fluid and solid phase. However, another anti-GPIIb-IIIa antibody (LJ-P5) that had minimal effects on the interaction of platelets with fibrinogen, but inhibited to varying degrees platelet interaction with other adhesive proteins, was equally effective. The findings demonstrate that, at a shear rate of 2,600 s-1, adhesive proteins other than fibrinogen are involved in GPIIb-IIIa-mediated platelet adhesion and thrombus formation on subendothelium. In addition, since LJ-P5 inhibited the binding of soluble von Willebrand factor and vitronectin, these adhesive proteins may be involved in platelet thrombus formation. In contrast to the results obtained at a shear rate of 2,600 s-1, fibrinogen could play a role in mediating platelet-platelet interactions with weak agonists or lower shear rates. PMID:2910912

  9. Overexpression, purification and preliminary crystallographic analysis of human M-ficolin fibrinogen-like domain

    SciTech Connect

    Tanio, Michikazu; Kondo, Shin; Sugio, Shigetoshi; Kohno, Toshiyuki

    2006-07-01

    Human M-ficolin fibrinogen-like domain has been overexpressed in P. pastoris, purified and crystallized. Diffraction data have been collected to 1.9 Å. Ficolins, which are comprised of a collagen-like domain and a fibrinogen-like domain, are a kind of pattern-recognition molecule for pathogens in the innate immunity system. To investigate the molecular mechanism of the discrimination between self and non-self by ficolins, human M-ficolin fibrinogen-like domain (FD1), which contains the ligand-binding site, was overexpressed in Pichia pastoris, purified and crystallized using the vapour-diffusion method at 293 K. The crystals belong to the monoclinic space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 55.16, b = 117.45, c = 55.19 Å, β = 99.88°, and contain three molecules per asymmetric unit. An X-ray data set was collected to 1.9 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation at beamline BL24XU at the SPring-8 facility in Japan.

  10. Can the Viscoelastic Parameter α-Angle Distinguish Fibrinogen from Platelet Deficiency and Guide Fibrinogen Supplementation?

    PubMed

    Solomon, Cristina; Schöchl, Herbert; Ranucci, Marco; Schlimp, Christoph J

    2015-08-01

    Viscoelastic tests such as thrombelastography (TEG, Haemoscope Inc., Niles, IL) and thromboelastometry (ROTEM, Tem International GmbH, Munich, Germany), performed in whole blood, are increasingly used at the point-of-care to characterize coagulopathic states and guide hemostatic therapy. An algorithm, based on a mono-analysis (kaolin-activated assay) approach, was proposed in the TEG patent (issued in 2004) where the α-angle and the maximum amplitude parameters are used to guide fibrinogen supplementation and platelet administration, respectively. Although multiple assays for both the TEG and ROTEM devices are now available, algorithms based on TEG mono-analysis are still used in many institutions. In light of more recent findings, we discuss here the limitations and inaccuracies of the mono-analysis approach. Research shows that both α-angle and maximum amplitude parameters reflect the combined contribution of fibrinogen and platelets to clot strength. Therefore, although TEG mono-analysis is useful for identifying a coagulopathic state, it cannot be used to discriminate between fibrin/fibrinogen and/or platelet deficits, respectively. Conversely, the use of viscoelastic methods where 2 assays can be run simultaneously, one with platelet inhibitors and one without, can effectively allow for the identification of specific coagulopathic states, such as insufficient fibrin formation or an insufficient contribution of platelets to clot strength. Such information is critical for making the appropriate choice of hemostatic therapy. PMID:26197367

  11. Optical tweezers study of red blood cell aggregation and disaggregation in plasma and protein solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kisung; Kinnunen, Matti; Khokhlova, Maria D.; Lyubin, Evgeny V.; Priezzhev, Alexander V.; Meglinski, Igor; Fedyanin, Andrey A.

    2016-03-01

    Kinetics of optical tweezers (OT)-induced spontaneous aggregation and disaggregation of red blood cells (RBCs) were studied at the level of cell doublets to assess RBC interaction mechanics. Measurements were performed under in vitro conditions in plasma and fibrinogen and fibrinogen + albumin solutions. The RBC spontaneous aggregation kinetics was found to exhibit different behavior depending on the cell environment. In contrast, the RBC disaggregation kinetics was similar in all solutions qualitatively and quantitatively, demonstrating a significant contribution of the studied proteins to the process. The impact of the study on assessing RBC interaction mechanics and the protein contribution to the reversible RBC aggregation process is discussed.

  12. Thromboembolic events in patients with severe inherited fibrinogen deficiency.

    PubMed

    Rottenstreich, Amihai; Lask, Avigal; Schliamser, Lilliana; Zivelin, Ariella; Seligsohn, Uri; Kalish, Yosef

    2016-08-01

    Inherited afibrinogenemia and hypofibrinogenemia are rare bleeding disorders characterized by markedly reduced levels of fibrinogen in blood. Thrombotic complications in these disorders have been rarely described. We performed a multicenter retrospective study and reviewed the occurrence of thrombotic complications among patients with inherited fibrinogen deficiency. Cases were identified during a review of medical records of all patients with inherited fibrinogen deficiency followed at three different university hospitals in Israel. Nine patients were included in this study: five were afibrinogenemic and four hypofibrinogenemic. There were seven thrombotic events, mostly venous, that occurred in four out of nine patients (44 %). All thrombotic events occurred in afibrinogenemic patients. Mean age at the time of thrombosis was 45 (range 28-61) years. Thrombophilic evaluation performed was negative in all cases. At the time of thrombosis in five out of seven (71.4 %) events, fibrinogen replacement therapy was concurrently given. Therapeutic approach was different among patients ranging from supportive therapy alone, antiplatelet agents and anticoagulant therapy with the concurrent administration of fibrinogen replacement therapy. This study discloses a high rate of thrombosis in patients with afibrinogenemia. Events were both venous and arterial and may be recurrent. Management is highly problematic due to the precarious balance between bleeding and thrombotic risk in these patients. Fibrinogen replacement therapy should be cautiously used in these patients as most thrombotic events followed the administration of fibrinogen replacement therapy. Larger cohorts are warranted to better characterize the best management strategy in these paradoxical events. PMID:26712130

  13. Binding of the Three-Repeat Domain of Tau to Phospholipid Membranes induces an Aggregated-Like State of the Protein

    PubMed Central

    Künze, Georg; Barré, Patrick; Scheidt, Holger A.; Thomas, Lars; Eliezer, David; Huster, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    In patients with Alzheimer’s disease, the microtubule-associated protein tau is found aggregated into paired helical filaments (PHFs) in neurofibrillary deposits. In solution, tau is intrinsically unstructured. However, the tubulin binding domain consisting of three or four 31–32 amino acid repeat regions exhibits both helical and β-structure propensity and makes up the proteolysis resistant core of PHFs. Here, we studied the structure and dynamics of the three-repeat domain of tau (i.e. K19) when bound to membranes consisting of a phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylserine mixture or phosphatidylserine alone. Tau K19 binds to phospholipid vesicles with submicromolar affinity as measured by fluorescence spectroscopy. The interaction is driven by electrostatic forces between the positively charged protein and the phospholipid head groups. The structure of the membrane-bound state of K19 was studied using CD spectroscopy and solid-state magic-angle spinning NMR spectroscopy. To this end, the protein was selectively 13C-labeled at all valine and leucine residues. Isotropic chemical shift values of tau K19 were consistent with a β-structure. In addition, motionally averaged 1H-13C dipolar couplings indicated a high rigidity of the protein backbone. The structure formation of K19 was also shown to depend on the charge density of the membrane. Phosphatidylserine membranes induced a gain in the α-helix structure along with an immersion of K19 into the phospholipid bilayer as indicated by a reduction of the lipid chain 2H NMR order parameter. Our results provide structural insights into the membrane-bound state of tau K19 and support a potential role of phospholipid membranes in mediating the physiological and pathological functions of tau. PMID:22521809

  14. Acetylation and glycation of fibrinogen in vitro occur at specific lysine residues in a concentration dependent manner: A mass spectrometric and isotope labeling study

    SciTech Connect

    Svensson, Jan; Bergman, Ann-Charlotte; Adamson, Ulf; Blombaeck, Margareta; Wallen, Hakan; Joerneskog, Gun

    2012-05-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fibrinogen was incubated in vitro with glucose or aspirin. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Acetylations and glycations were found at twelve lysine sites by mass spectrometry. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The labeling by aspirin and glucose occurred dose-dependently. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer No competition between glucose and aspirin for binding to fibrinogen was found. -- Abstract: Aspirin may exert part of its antithrombotic effects through platelet-independent mechanisms. Diabetes is a condition in which the beneficial effects of aspirin are less prominent or absent - a phenomenon called 'aspirin resistance'. We investigated whether acetylation and glycation occur at specific sites in fibrinogen and if competition between glucose and aspirin in binding to fibrinogen occurs. Our hypothesis was that such competition might be one explanation to 'aspirin resistance' in diabetes. After incubation of fibrinogen in vitro with aspirin (0.8 mM, 24 h) or glucose (100 mM, 5-10 days), we found 12 modified sites with mass spectrometric techniques. Acetylations in the {alpha}-chain: {alpha}K191, {alpha}K208, {alpha}K224, {alpha}K429, {alpha}K457, {alpha}K539, {alpha}K562, in the {beta}-chain: {beta}K233, and in the {gamma}-chain: {gamma}K170 and {gamma}K273. Glycations were found at {beta}K133 and {gamma}K75, alternatively {gamma}K85. Notably, the lysine 539 is a site involved in FXIII-mediated cross-linking of fibrin. With isotope labeling in vitro, using [{sup 14}C-acetyl]salicylic acid and [{sup 14}C]glucose, a labeling of 0.013-0.084 and 0.12-0.5 mol of acetylated and glycated adduct/mol fibrinogen, respectively, was found for clinically (12.9-100 {mu}M aspirin) and physiologically (2-8 mM glucose) relevant plasma concentrations. No competition between acetylation and glycation could be demonstrated. Thus, fibrinogen is acetylated at several lysine residues, some of which are involved in the cross-linking of fibrinogen. This may

  15. Platelet-Monocyte Aggregates and C-Reactive Protein are Associated with VTE in Older Surgical Patients

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Lauren; Kaplan, David; Kraiss, Larry W.; Casper, T. Charles; Pendleton, Robert C.; Peters, Christopher L.; Supiano, Mark A.; Zimmerman, Guy A.; Weyrich, Andrew S.; Rondina, Matthew T.

    2016-01-01

    Emerging evidence implicates platelets as key mediators of venous thromboembolism (VTE). Nevertheless, the pathways by which platelets and circulating procoagulant proteins synergistically orchestrate VTE remain incompletely understood. We prospectively determined whether activated platelets and systemic procoagulant factors were associated with VTE in 32 older orthopedic surgery patients. Circulating platelet-monocyte aggregates (PMAs), p-selectin expression (P-SEL), and integrin αIIbβ3 activation (PAC-1 binding) were assessed pre-operatively and 24 hours post-operatively. The proinflammatory and procoagulant molecule C-reactive protein (CRP), which induces PMA formation in vitro, along with plasma d-dimer and fibrinogen levels were also measured. The primary outcome was VTE occurring within 30 days post-operatively. Overall, 40.6% of patients developed VTE. Patients with VTE had a significant increase in circulating PMAs and CRP post-operatively, compared to those without VTE. Changes in PMA and CRP in VTE patients were significantly correlated (r2 = 0.536, p = 0.004). In contrast, P-SEL expression and PAC-1 binding, fibrinogen levels, and d-dimers were not associated with VTE. This is the first study to identify that increased circulating PMAs and CRP levels are early markers associated with post-surgical VTE. Our findings also provide new clinical evidence supporting the interplay between PMAs and CRP in patients with VTE. PMID:27270163

  16. Amyloid fibril formation in vitro from halophilic metal binding protein: Its high solubility and reversibility minimized formation of amorphous protein aggregations

    PubMed Central

    Tokunaga, Yuhei; Matsumoto, Mitsuharu; Tokunaga, Masao; Arakawa, Tsutomu; Sugimoto, Yasushi

    2013-01-01

    Halophilic proteins are characterized by high net negative charges and relatively small fraction of hydrophobic amino acids, rendering them aggregation resistant. These properties are also shared by histidine-rich metal binding protein (HP) from moderate halophile, Chromohalobacter salexigens, used in this study. Here, we examined how halophilic proteins form amyloid fibrils in vitro. His-tagged HP, incubated at pH 2.0 and 58°C, readily formed amyloid fibrils, as observed by thioflavin fluorescence, CD spectra, and transmission or atomic force microscopies. Under these low-pH harsh conditions, however, His-HP was promptly hydrolyzed to smaller peptides most likely responsible for rapid formation of amyloid fibril. Three major acid-hydrolyzed peptides were isolated from fibrils and turned out to readily form fibrils. The synthetic peptides predicted to form fibrils in these peptide sequences by Waltz software also formed fibrils. Amyloid fibril was also readily formed from full-length His-HP when incubated with 10–20% 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol at pH 7.8 and 25°C without peptide bond cleavage. PMID:24038709

  17. Influence of fibrinogen degradation products on thrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time and prothrombin time of canine plasma.

    PubMed

    Mischke, R; Wolling, H

    2000-01-01

    To investigate how thrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) and prothrombin time are influenced by fibrinogen degradation products (FDP), different concentrations (0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4, 0.5, 0.6, 0.8 and 1.0 mg/ml) of the purified FDP X, Y, D and E were added to the plasma of healthy dogs. If fragment Y was added to the plasma a considerable inhibitory effect could be demonstrated for all three test systems. A significant prolongation (p < 0.05) was found for concentrations of > or =0.1 mg/ml (thrombin time, APTT) and > or =0.2 mg/ml (prothrombin time). With FDP Y concentrations from >0.185 mg/ml (prothrombin time) to >0.24 mg/ml (APTT) coagulation time was prolonged beyond the respective reference range. As regards the other fragments, a comparable inhibitory effect could only be shown for fragment X added to the thrombin time test system. This effect can most probably be explained by the competition of the FDP X and fibrinogen for the fibrinogen binding sites of thrombin, rather than by a fibrin polymerization disorder. The results demonstrate that for plasma with normal fibrinogen concentration the group tests are only prolonged beyond the reference range at FDP concentrations very rarely found in spontaneous hyperfibrinolysis. PMID:11014962

  18. Human fibrinogen adsorption on positively charged latex particles.

    PubMed

    Zeliszewska, Paulina; Bratek-Skicki, Anna; Adamczyk, Zbigniew; Cieśla, Michał

    2014-09-23

    Fibrinogen (Fb) adsorption on positively charged latex particles (average diameter of 800 nm) was studied using the microelectrophoretic and the concentration depletion methods based on AFM imaging. Monolayers on latex were adsorbed from diluted bulk solutions at pH 7.4 and an ionic strength in the range of 10(-3) to 0.15 M where fibrinogen molecules exhibited an average negative charge. The electrophoretic mobility of the latex after controlled fibrinogen adsorption was systematically measured. A monotonic decrease in the electrophoretic mobility of fibrinogen-covered latex was observed for all ionic strengths. The results of these experiments were interpreted according to the three-dimensional electrokinetic model. It was also determined using the concentration depletion method that fibrinogen adsorption was irreversible and the maximum coverage was equal to 0.6 mg m(-2) for ionic strength 10(-3) M and 1.3 mg m(-2) for ionic strength 0.15 M. The increase of the maximum coverage was confirmed by theoretical modeling based on the random sequential adsorption approach. Paradoxically, the maximum coverage of fibrinogen on positively charged latex particles was more than two times lower than the maximum coverage obtained for negative latex particles (3.2 mg m(-2)) at pH 7.4 and ionic strength of 0.15 M. This was interpreted as a result of the side-on adsorption of fibrinogen molecules with their negatively charged core attached to the positively charged latex surface. The stability and acid base properties of fibrinogen monolayers on latex were also determined in pH cycling experiments where it was observed that there were no irreversible conformational changes in the fibrinogen monolayers. Additionally, the zeta potential of monolayers was more positive than the zeta potential of fibrinogen in the bulk, which proves a heterogeneous charge distribution. These experimental data reveal a new, side-on adsorption mechanism of fibrinogen on positively charged surfaces and

  19. Targeting the coagulation factor fibrinogen for arthritis therapy.

    PubMed

    Raghu, Harini; Flick, Matthew J

    2011-09-01

    Fibrinogen is a provisional matrix protein of the coagulation system that following proteolytic cleavage by the protease thrombin polymerizes to form fibrin, the structural basis of the blood clot. Fibrin polymer formation at sites of vessel injury is critical to normal hemostasis. However, fibrin deposition within damaged tissues is also a common pathological feature of inflammatory diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis. Fibrin deposition has been readily detected along articular surfaces, within inflamed hyperplastic synovial tissue, and as a component of insoluble "rice bodies" within the synovial fluid of arthritic joints. Recent data has suggested that fibrin deposition within inflamed tissues is not simply a reflection of a disease process but rather actively contributes to disease pathogenesis. One mechanism that has been demonstrated to directly link fibrin(ogen) to the regulation of inflammation is the ability of fibrin(ogen) to serve as a ligand for cell-surface receptors, particularly integrins. Indeed, engagement of fibrin(ogen) by the leukocyte integrin receptor αMβ2 appears to be a common and fundamental event driving local inflammation. Recent studies have demonstrated that eliminating fibrin(ogen)-αMβ2 interactions can significantly limit the progression of multiple inflammatory diseases, including arthritis, without compromising the ability of fibrinogen to function in coagulation. These exciting findings have opened the door to new opportunities for targeting fibrinogen as an inflammatory mediator while leaving intact its hemostatic properties. PMID:21401516

  20. Hormonal regulation of fibrinogen synthesis in cultured hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Grieninger, G; Plant, P W; Liang, T J; Kalb, R G; Amrani, D; Mosesson, M W; Hertzberg, K M; Pindyck, J

    1983-06-27

    Most of what was originally known of the effects of hormones on fibrinogen synthesis was based, as noted above, on experiments involving surgical removal of endocrine glands. Some caution should be exercised when using such in vivo experiments to derive the hormonal requirements of fibrinogen synthesis, however, since multiple hormonal alterations often occur in these animals. The development of a variety of ex vivo systems has allowed investigators to more carefully control the hepatocellular environment. The work of several laboratories, including our own, has now made it clear that hormones and other agents directly stimulate hepatocellular synthesis of fibrinogen. From the studies summarized here, using chick embryo hepatocytes as a model, several generalizations emerge: Fibrinogen synthesis may be considered to be a "constitutive" liver function, since hepatocytes cultured without serum, hormones or other macromolecular supplements synthesize this protein at a basal rate for several days. Addition of certain hormones (e.g. T3, dexamethasone, insulin), individually and in physiological concentrations, elicits an increase in fibrinogen production, varying with each agent in onset, dose, minimum exposure required and accompanying effects on the synthesis of other plasma proteins. Glucocorticoids and thyroid hormones are similar in the selectivity of their stimulation (neither affects albumin or transferrin synthesis) but differ in that thyroid hormones need to be present for just a short "triggering" period. The stimulation of fibrinogen synthesis by insulin occurs only following prolonged exposure to concentrations 10-times higher than the very low doses to which albumin synthesis responds rapidly. PMID:6307104

  1. Fibrinogen degradation by two neutral granulocyte proteinases. Influence of calcium on the generation of fibrinogen degradation products with anticlotting properties.

    PubMed

    Bingenhkeimer, C; Gramse, M; Egbring, R; Havemann, K

    1981-07-01

    Degradation of human fibrinogen by elastase-like proteinase, chymotrypsin-like proteinase and plasmin, was done in the presence and absence of calcium ions, respectively. The resulting fibrinogen degradation products were tested for their coagulant and anti-coagulant properties. The results show that 1. fibrinogenolysis is delayed in the presence of calcium ions. Higher enzyme concentrations are required to get unclottable split products when calcium ions are present. 2. The fibrinogen fragments obtained in the presence of calcium are different in their molecular weights and anticoagulant activities compared to those obtained in the absence of calcium ions. This effect of calcium is most striking during fibrinogen cleavage by chymotrypsin-like proteinase. Elastase and plasmin-induced fibrinogenolysis was substantially influenced by calcium only at a late degradation stage. PMID:6456216

  2. Generation of Soluble Advanced Glycation End Products Receptor (sRAGE)-Binding Ligands during Extensive Heat Treatment of Whey Protein/Lactose Mixtures Is Dependent on Glycation and Aggregation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fahui; Teodorowicz, Małgorzata; Wichers, Harry J; van Boekel, Martinus A J S; Hettinga, Kasper A

    2016-08-24

    Heating of protein- and sugar-containing materials is considered the primary factor affecting the formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs). This study aimed to investigate the influence of heating conditions, digestion, and aggregation on the binding capacity of AGEs to the soluble AGE receptor (sRAGE). Samples consisting of mixtures of whey protein and lactose were heated at 130 °C. An in vitro infant digestion model was used to study the influence of heat treatment on the digestibility of whey proteins. The amount of sRAGE-binding ligands before and after digestion was measured by an ELISA-based sRAGE-binding assay. Water activity did not significantly affect the extent of digestibility of whey proteins dry heated at pH 5 (ranging from 3.3 ± 0.2 to 3.6 ± 0.1% for gastric digestion and from 53.5 ± 1.5 to 64.7 ± 1.1% for duodenal digestion), but there were differences in cleavage patterns of peptides among the samples heated at different pH values. Formation of sRAGE-binding ligands depended on the formation of aggregates and was limited in the samples heated at pH 5. Moreover, the sRAGE-binding activity of digested sample was changed by protease degradation and correlated with the digestibility of samples. In conclusion, generation of sRAGE-binding ligands during extensive heat treatment of whey protein/lactose mixtures is limited in acidic heating condition and dependent on glycation and aggregation. PMID:27460534

  3. Characterization of a myeloma patient with a life-threatening hemorrhagic diathesis: presence of a lambda dimer protein inhibiting shear-induced platelet aggregation by binding to the A1 domain of von Willebrand factor.

    PubMed

    Shinagawa, Atsushi; Kojima, Hiroshi; Berndt, Michael C; Kaneko, Shin; Suzukawa, Kazumi; Hasegawa, Yuichi; Shigeta, Osamu; Nagasawa, Toshiro

    2005-05-01

    We have identified a patient with IgD lambda-type multiple myeloma who was characterized by a severe bleeding tendency, especially after puncture of arterial vessels. Both the bleeding time (>25 min) and activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) were prolonged. To clarify the underlying pathogenesis, we purified the APTT-prolonging activity from the patient's serum. The purified protein was a highly negatively-charged homodimer of the lambda light chain. The lambda dimer protein (M-protein) inhibited ristocetinand high shear-induced platelet aggregation, dependent on platelet glycoprotein Ibalpha (GPIbalpha), but not epinephrine-, collagen-, ADP-, thrombin-, or botrocetin-induced platelet aggregation. The lambda dimer protein inhibited the binding of platelets to immobilized or ristocetin-treated von Willebrand factor (VWF). Furthermore, a 39/34 kD fragment of VWF encompassing the A1 domain specifically bound to the immobilized lambda dimer protein in the presence of ristocetin, suggesting that the lambda dimer protein directly binds to the A1 domain of VWF. To help elucidate the binding site within the A1 domain, binding of ristocetin-treated VWF to the immobilized lambda dimer protein was assayed in the presence of various anti-A1 domain monoclonal antibodies. Based on these data, we conclude that the lambda dimer protein binds to the region of the A1 domain composed of helices alpha3 and alpha4 and thus interferes with VWF-GPIbalpha interaction. The existence of a protein that inhibits high shear-induced platelet aggregation in acquired von Willebrand disease (VWD) has only rarely been reported. The results suggest that the hemostatic function in arteries with high shear force is profoundly disrupted if the binding of GPIbalpha to VWF is abrogated, supporting the relevance of shear-induced VWF interaction with GPIbalpha in the initiation of the hemostatic process. PMID:15886805

  4. A fibrinogen-related protein identified from hepatopancreas of crayfish is a potential pattern recognition receptor.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qiming; Bai, Suhua; Dong, Chaohua

    2016-09-01

    Fibrinogen-related protein (FREP) family is a large group of proteins containing fibrinogen-like (FBG) domain and plays multiple physiological roles in animals. However, their immune functions in crayfish are not fully explored. In the present study, a novel fibrinogen-like protein (designated as PcFBN1) was identified and characterized from hepatopancreas of red swamp crayfish Procambarus clarkii. The cDNA sequence of PcFBN1 contains an open reading frame (ORF) of 1353 bp encoding a protein of 450 amino acids. Sequence and structural analysis indicated that PcFBN1 contains an FBG domain in C-terminal and a putative signal peptide of 19 amino acids in N-terminal. Semi-quantitative PCR revealed that the main expression of PcFBN1 was observed in hepatopancreas and hemocyte. Temporal expression analysis exhibited that PcFBN1 expression could be significantly induced by heat-killed Aeromonas hydrophila. Tissue distribution and temporal change of PcFBN1 suggested that PcFBN1 may be involved in immune responses of red swamp crayfish. Recombinant PcFBN1 protein binds and agglutinates both gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli and gram-positive bacteria Micrococcus lysodeikticus. Moreover, binding and agglutination is Ca(2+) dependent. Further analysis indicated that PcFBN1 recognizes some acetyl group-containing substance LPS and PGN. RNAi experiment revealed that PcFBN1 is required for bacterial clearance and survival from A. hydrophila infection. Reduction of PcFBN1 expression significantly decreased the survival and enhanced the number of A. hydrophila in the hemolymph. These results indicated that PcFBN1 plays an important role in the innate immunity of red swamp crayfish as a potential pattern recognition receptor. PMID:27417229

  5. The – 148 C/T fibrinogen gene polymorphism and fibrinogen levels in ischaemic stroke: a case–control study

    PubMed Central

    van Goor, M P J; Gomez-Garcia, E; Leebeek, F; Brouwers, G; Koudstaal, P; Dippel, D

    2005-01-01

    Design: A case–control study of patients with first ever ischaemic stroke, confirmed by computed tomography. Methods: Venous blood samples were collected for fibrinogen and routine coagulation tests one week after the stroke, and after three months in about half the patients. Population controls were age and sex matched. –148 C/T fibrinogen polymorphism was determined by polymerase chain reaction followed by digestion with restriction enzymes HindIII/AluI. Results: There were 124 patients and 125 controls, mean age 56 years (range 18 to 75); 34 patients (27%) and 41 controls (33%) were heterozygous for –148 C/T fibrinogen polymorphism; six patients (5%) and five controls (4%) had the T/T genotype. The odds ratio of ischaemic stroke associated with CC homozygotes v T carriers was 0.8 (95% confidence interval, 0.5 to 1.4). Relative risk for ischaemic stroke associated with fibrinogen levels in the highest quartile was 3.9 (1.9 to 8.4) at one week, decreasing to 1.4 (0.6 to 3.3) at three months. Conclusions: –148 C/T fibrinogen gene polymorphism was not a strong risk factor for ischaemic stroke. High fibrinogen levels early after acute stroke probably represent an acute phase response. PMID:15608011

  6. Modulation of Dental Pulp Stem Cell Odontogenesis in a Tunable PEG-Fibrinogen Hydrogel System

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Qiqi; Pandya, Mirali; Rufaihah, Abdul Jalil; Rosa, Vinicius; Tong, Huei Jinn; Seliktar, Dror; Toh, Wei Seong

    2015-01-01

    Injectable hydrogels have the great potential for clinical translation of dental pulp regeneration. A recently developed PEG-fibrinogen (PF) hydrogel, which comprises a bioactive fibrinogen backbone conjugated to polyethylene glycol (PEG) side chains, can be cross-linked after injection by photopolymerization. The objective of this study was to investigate the use of this hydrogel, which allows tuning of its mechanical properties, as a scaffold for dental pulp tissue engineering. The cross-linking degree of PF hydrogels could be controlled by varying the amounts of PEG-diacrylate (PEG-DA) cross-linker. PF hydrogels are generally cytocompatible with the encapsulated dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs), yielding >85% cell viability in all hydrogels. It was found that the cell morphology of encapsulated DPSCs, odontogenic gene expression, and mineralization were strongly modulated by the hydrogel cross-linking degree and matrix stiffness. Notably, DPSCs cultured within the highest cross-linked hydrogel remained mostly rounded in aggregates and demonstrated the greatest enhancement in odontogenic gene expression. Consistently, the highest degree of mineralization was observed in the highest cross-linked hydrogel. Collectively, our results indicate that PF hydrogels can be used as a scaffold for DPSCs and offers the possibility of influencing DPSCs in ways that may be beneficial for applications in regenerative endodontics. PMID:26124841

  7. The S. aureus polysaccharide capsule and Efb-dependent fibrinogen shield act in concert to protect against phagocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Kuipers, Annemarie; Stapels, Daphne A. C.; Weerwind, Lleroy T.; Ko, Ya-Ping; Ruyken, Maartje; Lee, Jean C.; van Kessel, Kok P.M.; Rooijakkers, Suzan H. M.

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus has developed many mechanisms to escape from human immune responses. In order to resist phagocytic clearance, S. aureus expresses a polysaccharide capsule, which effectively masks the bacterial surface and surface-associated proteins, such as opsonins, from recognition by phagocytic cells. Additionally, secretion of the Extracellular fibrinogen binding protein (Efb) potently blocks phagocytic uptake of the pathogen. Efb creates a fibrinogen shield surrounding the bacteria by simultaneously binding complement C3b and fibrinogen at the bacterial surface. By means of neutrophil phagocytosis assays with fluorescently labeled encapsulated serotype 5 (CP5) and serotype 8 (CP8) strains we now compare the immune-modulating function of these shielding mechanisms. Our data indicate that, in highly encapsulated S. aureus strains, the polysaccharide capsule is able to prevent phagocytic uptake at plasma concentrations <10%, but loses its protective ability at higher concentrations of plasma. Interestingly, Efb shows a strong inhibitory effect on both capsule-negative as well as encapsulated strains at all tested plasma concentrations. Furthermore our results suggest that both shielding mechanisms can exist simultaneously and collaborate to provide optimal protection against phagocytosis at a broad range of plasma concentrations. Since opsonizing antibodies will be shielded from recognition by either mechanism, incorporating both capsular polysaccharides and Efb in future vaccines could be of great importance. PMID:27112346

  8. Prognostic significance of preoperative fibrinogen in patients with colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhen-Qiang; Han, Xiao-Na; Wang, Hai-Jiang; Tang, Yong; Zhao, Ze-Liang; Qu, Yan-Li; Xu, Rui-Wei; Liu, Yan-Yan; Yu, Xian-Bo

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the prognostic significance of preoperative fibrinogen levels in colon cancer patients. METHODS: A total of 255 colon cancer patients treated at the Affiliated Tumor Hospital of Xinjiang Medical University from June 1st 2005 to June 1st 2008 were enrolled in the study. All patients received radical surgery as their primary treatment method. Preoperative fibrinogen was detected by the Clauss method, and all patients were followed up after surgery. Preoperative fibrinogen measurements were correlated with a number of clinicopathological parameters using the Student t test and analysis of variance. Survival analyses were performed by the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox regression modeling to measure 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). RESULTS: The mean preoperative fibrinogen concentration of all colon cancer patients was 3.17 ± 0.88 g/L. Statistically significant differences were found between preoperative fibrinogen levels and the clinicopathological parameters of age, smoking status, tumor size, tumor location, tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) stage, modified Glasgow prognostic scores (mGPS), white blood cell (WBC) count, neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio (NLR), platelet-lymphocyte ratio (PLR), and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) levels. Univariate survival analysis showed that TNM stage, tumor cell differentiation grade, vascular invasion, mGPS score, preoperative fibrinogen, WBC, NLR, PLR and CEA all correlated with both OS and DFS. Alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) and body mass index correlated only with OS. Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed that both OS and DFS of the total cohort, as well as of the stage II and III patients, were higher in the hypofibrinogen group compared to the hyperfibrinogen group (all P < 0.05). In contrast, there was no significant difference between OS and DFS in stage I patients with low or high fibrinogen levels. Cox regression analysis indicated preoperative fibrinogen levels, TNM stage, mGPS score, CEA, and

  9. Recombinant human fibrinogen and sulfation of the. gamma. prime chain

    SciTech Connect

    Farrell, D.H.; Huang, S.; Chung, D.W.; Davie, E.W. ); Mulvihill, E.R. )

    1991-10-01

    Human fibrinogen and the homodimeric {gamma}{prime}-chain-containing variant have been expressed in BHK cells using cDNAs coding for the {alpha},{beta}, and {gamma} (or {gamma}{prime}) chains. The fibrinogens were secreted at levels greater than 4 {mu}g (mg of total cell protein){sup {minus}1}day{sup {minus}1} and were biologically active in clotting assays. Recombinant fibrinogen containing the {gamma}' chain incorporated {sup 35}SO{sub 4} into its chains during biosynthesis, while no incorporation occurred in the protein containing the {gamma} chain. The identity of the sulfated {gamma}{prime} chain was verified by its ability to form dimers during clotting. In addition, carboxypeptidase {Upsilon} digestion of the recombinant fibrinogen containing the {gamma}{prime} chain released 96% of the {sup 35}S label from the sulfated chain, and the radioactive material was identified as tyrosine O-sulfate. These results clarify previous findings of the sulfation of tyrosine in human fibrinogen.

  10. Evaluation of a rapid method of determination of plasma fibrinogen.

    PubMed

    Thomson, G W; McSherry, B J; Valli, V E

    1974-07-01

    An evaluation was made of a rapid semiautomated method of determining fibrinogen levels in bovine plasma. This method, the fibrometer method of Morse, Panek and Menga (8), is based on the principle that when thrombin is added to suitably diluted plasma the time of clotting is linearly related to the fibrinogen concentration. A standard curve prepared using bovine plasma had an r value of .9987 and analysis of variance showed there was no significant deviation from regression. A comparison of the fibrometer method and the biuret method of Ware, Guest and Seegers done on 158 bovine plasma samples showed good correlation between the two methods. It was concluded that the fibrometer method does measure bovine fibrinogen and has considerable merit for use in clinical diseases of cattle. PMID:4277474

  11. The proteolytic action of Arvin on human fibrinogen

    PubMed Central

    Ewart, M. R.; Hatton, M. W. C.; Basford, J. M.; Dodgson, K. S.

    1970-01-01

    1. Human fibrinogen was subjected to proteolysis by enzyme preparations (clinical Arvin and IRC-50 Arvin) from the venom of Agkistrodon rhodostoma. 2. IRC-50 Arvin releases three peptides from fibrinogen, and these were identified as fibrinopeptides AP, AY and A. 3. The less purified `clinical' Arvin releases, in addition to fibrinopeptides AP, AY and A, small amounts of two heptapeptides derived from fibrinopeptides AP and A, probably because it contains another enzyme as well as Arvin. 4. No fibrinopeptide B is released by either Arvin preparation. 5. Thus, although Arvin is known to differ from `reptilase' from Bothrops jararaca in that it does not activate the enzyme that cross-links fibrin (fibrin-stabilizing factor), it is identical with reptilase with respect to the peptides that it liberates from fibrinogen. PMID:5529716

  12. Biosynthesis, assembly and secretion of fibrinogen in cultured rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Hirose, S; Oda, K; Ikehara, Y

    1988-01-01

    The biosynthesis, assembly and secretion of fibrinogen were investigated in cultured rat hepatocytes which were incubated with [35S]methionine. When initial rates of the synthesis of three fibrinogen subunits were compared, the A alpha-subunit was found to be synthesized significantly slower than the B beta- and gamma-subunits. Pulse-chase experiments revealed that the secreted fibrinogen contained different proportions of the newly synthesized subunits, depending upon the chase times. Radioactivity in the A alpha subunit, which initially had the highest level of the three, was rapidly decreased in parallel with the chase time. The gamma-subunit had an increasing amount of the radioactivity in the secreted molecule during the chase periods, whereas that in the B beta-subunit was gradually decreased at the later stages of chase. Analysis of intracellular components of fibrinogen confirmed that the nascent A alpha-subunit was most rapidly exhausted, and the gamma-subunit occupied the largest proportion among the non-assembled subunits at later stages of chase. Taken together, these results suggest that the synthesis of A alpha-subunit, which has the lowest rate, could be the rate-limiting step in the production and secretion of fibrinogen in cultured rat hepatocytes, in contrast with what has been proposed for human and rabbit fibrinogen, namely that the synthesis of B beta-subunit is the rate-limiting step. The results also indicate that there is a large intracellular pool of gamma-subunit. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:3401211

  13. Extraction, radioiodination, and in vivo catabolism of equine fibrinogen

    SciTech Connect

    Coyne, C.P.; Hornof, W.J.; Kelly, A.B.; O'Brien, T.R.; DeNardo, S.J.

    1985-12-01

    Equine fibrinogen was isolated and aliquots were stored frozen at -70 C before radiolabeling with 125I (half-life = 60.2 days; gamma = 35 keV, using monochloroiodine reagent. Radioiodination efficiencies were 49% to 53%, resulting in a labeled product with 98% protein-bound activity and 91% clottable radioactivity. In 6 equine in vivo investigations, plasma half-lives of 125I-labeled fibrinogen were from 4.1 to 5.2 days, corresponding to a mean daily plasma elimination rate of approximately 15%.

  14. Fibrinogen and cellular adherability on differently treated titanium as implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fojt, Lukáš; Klapetek, Petr; Strašák, Luděk; Vetterl, Vladimír

    2012-02-01

    Adsorption of human plasma fibrinogen, osteoblasts, and fibroblasts on differently treated titanium samples as implants were examined in this study. Titanium samples were mechanically polished, chemically etched (with and without surface material loss), and grinded. The main goal of this study is to find the best surface treatment of titanium for its possible use as implants. Atomic force microscopy was used to evaluate the adsorption of human plasma fibrinogen onto the titanium samples. Cell counting was used to determine the adherability of osteoblasts and fibroblasts on the titanium samples. Our preliminary results show that the etched titanium surface with surface material loss is the best surface treatment used in our experiments.

  15. Extraction, radiolabeling, and in vivo catabolism of autologous-origin equine fibrinogen and platelets in the healthy and exercise-stressed horse

    SciTech Connect

    Coyne, C.P.

    1986-01-01

    Three separate techniques were evaluated for the extraction of autologous-origin fibrinogen from whole equine plasma. Rapid extraction of equine fibrinogen with ammonium sulfate-sodium phosphate buffer, in combination with saturated glycine buffer, provided the most practical means of obtaining a protein extract with the highest degree of biological activity and sufficiently high iodine-125 (/sup 125/I) radiolabeling efficiencies using monochloroiodine reagent (ICI). A technique was developed for the in vitro radiolabeling of equine platelets suspended in plasma. This entailed the use of the isotope, indium-111 (/sup 111/In), together with the lipophilic ligand, 2-(mercaptopyridine-N-oxide). This labeling technique achieved labeling efficiencies between 75% and 96%, and in vitro aggregability of /sup 111/In-merc radiolabeled platelets was comparable to that of unlabeled cell isolates. In the final phase of the investigation, autologous-origin /sup 125/I-labeled fibrinogen and /sup 111/In-labeled platelets were applied in a series of equine exercise physiology studies. Elimination of these two radiobiologicals was evaluated in the resting and exercise-stressed horse. Results from these investigations revealed no long-term influence of exercise conditioning on the in vivo kinetics of radiolabeled fibrinogen or platelets.

  16. Influence of a constant magnetic field on the fibrinogen-fibrin system. [in blood coagulation process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matskevichene, V. B.; Platonova, A. T.

    1974-01-01

    The effect of a constant magnetic field with a strength of 2500 oersteds on the fibrinogen-fibrin system was studied in the organism of healthy rabbits with exposure times of 1 and 5 hours. The results obtained indicate disruptions in the stage of conversion of fibrinogen to fibrin and an increase in the amount of fibrinogen.

  17. Cellular model of TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43) aggregation based on its C-terminal Gln/Asn-rich region.

    PubMed

    Budini, Mauricio; Buratti, Emanuele; Stuani, Cristiana; Guarnaccia, Corrado; Romano, Valentina; De Conti, Laura; Baralle, Francisco E

    2012-03-01

    TDP-43 is one of the major components of the neuronal and glial inclusions observed in several neurodegenerative diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal lobar degeneration. These characteristic aggregates are a "landmark" of the disease, but their role in the pathogenesis is still obscure. In previous works, we have shown that the C-terminal Gln/Asn-rich region (residues 321-366) of TDP-43 is involved in the interaction of this protein with other members of the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein protein family. Furthermore, we have shown that the interaction through this region is important for TDP-43 splicing inhibition of cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator exon 9, and there were indications that it was involved in the aggregation process. Our experiments show that in cell lines and primary rat neuronal cultures, the introduction of tandem repeats carrying the 331-369-residue Gln/Asn region from TDP-43 can trigger the formation of phosphorylated and ubiquitinated aggregates that recapitulate many but not all the characteristics observed in patients. These results establish a much needed cell-based TDP-43 aggregation model useful to investigate the mechanisms involved in the formation of inclusions and the gain- and loss-of-function consequences of TDP-43 aggregation within cells. In addition, it will be a powerful tool to test novel therapeutic strategies/effectors aimed at preventing/reducing this phenomenon. PMID:22235134

  18. Construction aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tepordei, V.V.

    1995-01-01

    Part of the 1994 Industrial Minerals Review. The production, consumption, and applications of construction aggregates are reviewed. In 1994, the production of construction aggregates, which includes crushed stone and construction sand and gravel combined, increased 7.7 percent to 2.14 Gt compared with the previous year. These record production levels are mostly a result of funding for highway construction work provided by the Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991. Demand is expected to increase for construction aggregates in 1995.

  19. Molecular modeling to investigate the binding of Congo red toward GNNQQNY protofibril and in silico virtual screening for the identification of new aggregation inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jian-Hua; Liu, Hsuan-Liang; Elumalai, Pavadai; Chen, Wei-Hsi; Men, Lee-Chung; Liu, Kung-Tien

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the nature of the recognition between amyloid protofibrils and dye molecules at the molecular level is essential to improving instructive guides for designing novel molecular probes or new inhibitors. However, the atomic details of the binding between dyes and amyloid fibrils are still not fully understood. In this study, molecular docking, consensus scoring, molecular dynamics (MD), and molecular mechanics Poisson-Boltzmann surface area (MM-PBSA) analyses were integrated to investigate the binding between Congo red (CR) and the GNNQQNY protofibril from yeast prion protein Sup35 and to further evaluate their binding stabilities and affinities. Our results reveal that there are four CR binding sites located on GNNQQNY protofibril surface. These four CR binding sites adopt dual binding modes by which CR binding with its long axis parallel and perpendicular to the long axis of the protofibril. In addition, CR was also found to bind to the edge of the protofibril via hydrophobic/aromatic and hydrogen-bonding interactions, which is inferred as the possible inhibition mechanism to prevent the elongation of the protofibril from the addition of incoming peptides. Virtual screening from National Cancer Institute (NCI) database obtained three hit compounds with higher binding affinity than CR to the edge of the protofibril due to the fact that the central parts of these compounds are able to form additional hydrogen bonds with the protofibril. The results of the study could be useful for the development of new molecular probes or inhibitors for clinical applications. PMID:22836831

  20. Fibrinogen-related protein from amphioxus Branchiostoma belcheri is a multivalent pattern recognition receptor with a bacteriolytic activity.

    PubMed

    Fan, Chunxin; Zhang, Shicui; Li, Lei; Chao, Yeqing

    2008-07-01

    Fibrinogen-related proteins (FREPs) containing fibrinogen-like (FBG) domain have been shown to be involved in immune responses in both invertebrates and vertebrates, but the underlying mechanisms remain ill-defined. In this study we isolated a cDNA encoding amphioxus (Branchiostoma belcheri) FREP homolog, BbFREP. BbFREP encoded a protein of 286 amino acids, which included a C-terminal FBG domain and clustered together with human fibrinogen beta and gamma chains. Quantitative real time PCR revealed that the expression of BbFREP was significantly up-regulated following challenge with lipopolysaccharides (LPS) or lipoteichoic acid (LTA). The recombinant BbFREP expressed in Pichia pastoris was able to specifically recognize the pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) on the bacterial surfaces including LPS, peptidoglycan (PGN) and LTA, and displayed strong bacteriolytic activities against both Gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli and Gram-positive bacterium Staphylococcus aureus. BbFREP was also able to bind to both E. coli and S. aureus. In situ hybridization indicated that BbFREP was mainly expressed in the hepatic caecum and hind-gut, agreeing basically with the primary expression of vertebrate FREP genes in the liver. All these suggest that BbFREP can function as a pattern recognition receptor with a bacteriolytic activity via interaction with LPS, LTA and PGN. It also bolsters the notion that the hepatic caecum of amphioxus is equivalent to the vertebrate liver, acting as a major tissue in acute phase response. PMID:18533266

  1. Influence of matrix metalloproteinase-12 on fibrinogen level.

    PubMed

    Motterle, Anna; Xiao, Qingzhong; Kiechl, Stefan; Pender, Sylvia L F; Morris, Gareth E; Willeit, Johann; Caulfield, Mark J; Ye, Shu

    2012-02-01

    In vitro studies have shown that matrix metalloproteinase-12 (MMP12) can degrade fibrinogen, a clotting factor whose level predicts risk of advanced atherosclerosis and myocardial infarction. In this study, we found that mean plasma fibrinogen level was approximately 10-fold higher in MMP12 knockout mice than wildtype mice (p=0.0006). Differential allelic expression analysis of human MMP12 gene polymorphism rs17368582 in human vascular tissues showed an allele-specific effect on MMP12 expression, with one allele (T) having 1.6 fold higher expression level than the other allele (C) (p=0.0006). In a population cohort, we found that individuals homozygous for the MMP12 low expression allele had higher plasma fibrinogen levels (2.95 mg/mL compared with 2.61 mg/mL in other individuals, p=0.029) and increased risk of advanced atherosclerosis [odds ratio 6.3 (95% CI 1.9-20.8), p=0.003] and myocardial infarction [hazard ratio 5.6 (95% CI 1.7-18.3), p=0.005]. In summary, our study in mouse and humans provides in vivo evidence of an effect of MMP12 on fibrinogen level. PMID:22119538

  2. Fibrinogen and red blood cells in venous thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Aleman, Maria M.; Walton, Bethany L.; Byrnes, James R.; Wolberg, Alisa S.

    2014-01-01

    Deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, collectively termed venous thromboembolism (VTE), affect over 1 million Americans each year. VTE is triggered by inflammation and blood stasis leading to the formation of thrombi rich in fibrin and red blood cells (RBCs). However, little is known about mechanisms regulating fibrin and RBC incorporation into venous thrombi, or how these components mediate thrombus size or resolution. Both elevated circulating fibrinogen (hyperfibrinogenemia) and abnormal fibrin(ogen) structure and function, including increased fibrin network density and resistance to fibrinolysis, have been observed in plasmas from patients with VTE. Abnormalities in RBC number and/or function have also been associated with VTE risk. RBC contributions to VTE are thought to stem from their effects on blood viscosity and margination of platelets to the vessel wall. More recent studies suggest RBCs also express phosphatidylserine, support thrombin generation, and decrease fibrinolysis. RBC interactions with fibrin(ogen) and cells, including platelets and endothelial cells, may also promote thrombus formation. The contributions of fibrin(ogen) and RBCs to the pathophysiology of VTE warrants further investigation. PMID:24759140

  3. Structural analysis of fibrinogen synthesized by cultured chicken hepatocytes in the presence or absence of dexamethasone.

    PubMed

    Amrani, D L; Plant, P W; Pindyck, J; Mosesson, M W; Grieninger, G

    1983-03-30

    Hepatocyte monolayers, derived from chick embryos and cultured in chemically defined medium without hormones, synthesize and secrete fibrinogen that resembles chicken plasma fibrinogen immunochemically and structurally. Addition of a synthetic glucocorticoid, dexamethasone, to the cultured cells resulted in an appreciable and relatively selective increase in fibrinogen synthesis. Autoradiography of fibrinogen that had been metabolically labelled with [35S]methionine and then subjected to SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, unreduced or under disulfide-reducing conditions, revealed that only dimeric forms of fibrinogen, containing undegraded A alpha, B beta, and gamma chains, were secreted under stimulated and unstimulated culture conditions. PMID:6830818

  4. Introduction of the mec Element (Methicillin Resistance) into Staphylococcus aureus Alters In Vitro Functional Activities of Fibrinogen and Fibronectin Adhesins

    PubMed Central

    Vaudaux, Pierre E.; Monzillo, Vincenza; Francois, Patrice; Lew, Daniel P.; Foster, Tim J.; Berger-Bächi, Brigitte

    1998-01-01

    Some methicillin-resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus are defective in the production of major surface components such as protein A, clumping factor, or other important adhesins to extracellular matrix components which may play a role in bacterial colonization and infection. To evaluate the impact of methicillin resistance (mec) determinants on bacterial adhesion mediated by fibrinogen or fibronectin adhesins, we compared the in vitro attachment of two genetically distinct susceptible strains (NCTC8325 and Newman) to protein-coated surfaces with that of isogenic methicillin-resistant derivatives. All strains containing an intact mec element in their chromosomes were found to be defective in adhesion to fibrinogen and fibronectin immobilized on polymethylmethacrylate coverslips, regardless of the presence or absence of additional mutations in the femA, femB, or femC gene, known to decrease expression of methicillin resistance in S. aureus. Western ligand affinity blotting or immunoblotting of cell wall-associated adhesins revealed similar contents of fibrinogen- or fibronectin-binding proteins in methicillin-resistant strains compared to those of their methicillin-susceptible counterparts. In contrast to methicillin-resistant strains carrying a mec element in their genomes, methicillin-resistant strains constructed in vitro, by introducing the mecA gene on a plasmid, retained their adhesion phenotypes. In conclusion, the chromosomal insertion of the mec element into genetically defined strains of S. aureus impairs the in vitro functional activities of fibrinogen or fibronectin adhesins without altering their production. This effect is unrelated to the activity of the mecA gene. PMID:9517933

  5. Weighted aggregation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feiveson, A. H. (Principal Investigator)

    1979-01-01

    The use of a weighted aggregation technique to improve the precision of the overall LACIE estimate is considered. The manner in which a weighted aggregation technique is implemented given a set of weights is described. The problem of variance estimation is discussed and the question of how to obtain the weights in an operational environment is addressed.

  6. A factor VIII-derived peptide enables von Willebrand factor (VWF)-binding of artificial platelet nanoconstructs without interfering with VWF-adhesion of natural platelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haji-Valizadeh, Hassan; Modery-Pawlowski, Christa L.; Sen Gupta, Anirban

    2014-04-01

    There is substantial clinical interest in synthetic platelet analogs for potential application in transfusion medicine. To this end, our research is focused on self-assembled peptide-lipid nanoconstructs that can undergo injury site-selective adhesion and subsequently promote site-directed active platelet aggregation, thus mimicking platelet's primary hemostatic actions. For injury site-selective adhesion, we have utilized a coagulation factor FVIII-derived VWF-binding peptide (VBP). FVIII binds to VWF's D'-D3 domain while natural platelet GPIbα binds to VWF's A1 domain. Therefore, we hypothesized that the VBP-decorated nanoconstructs will adhere to VWF without mutual competition with natural platelets. We further hypothesized that the adherent VBP-decorated constructs can enhance platelet aggregation when co-decorated with a fibrinogen-mimetic peptide (FMP). To test these hypotheses, we used glycocalicin to selectively block VWF's A1 domain and, using fluorescence microscopy, studied the binding of fluorescently labeled VBP-decorated nanoconstructs versus platelets to ristocetin-treated VWF. Subsequently, we co-decorated the nanoconstructs with VBP and FMP and incubated them with human platelets to study construct-mediated enhancement of platelet aggregation. Decoration with VBP resulted in substantial construct adhesion to ristocetin-treated VWF even if the A1-domain was blocked by glycocalicin. In comparison, such A1-blocking resulted in significant reduction of platelet adhesion. Without A1-blocking, the VBP-decorated constructs and natural platelets could adhere to VWF concomitantly. Furthermore, the constructs co-decorated with VBP and FMP enhanced active platelet aggregation. The results indicate significant promise in utilizing the FVIII-derived VBP in developing synthetic platelet analogs that do not interfere with VWF-binding of natural platelets but allow site-directed enhancement of platelet aggregation when combined with FMP.There is substantial

  7. Characterization of the 5'-flanking region of the gene for the alpha chain of human fibrinogen.

    PubMed

    Hu, C H; Harris, J E; Davie, E W; Chung, D W

    1995-11-24

    The 5'-flanking region of the gene coding for the alpha chain of human fibrinogen was isolated, sequenced, and characterized. The principal site of transcription initiation was determined by primer extension analysis and the RNase protection assay and shown to be at an adenine residue located 55 nucleotides upstream from the initiator methionine codon, or 13,399 nucleotides down-stream from the polyadenylation site of the gene coding for the gamma chain. Transient expression of constructs containing sequentially deleted 5'-flanking sequences of the alpha chain gene fused to the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter gene showed that the promoter was liver-specific and inducible by interleukin 6 (IL-6). The shortest DNA fragment with significant promoter activity and full response to IL-6 stimulation encompassed the region from -217 to +1 base pairs (bp). Although six potential IL-6 responsive sequences homologous to the type II IL-6 responsive element were present, a single sequence of CTGGGA localized from -122 to -127 bp was shown to be a functional element in IL-6 induction. A hepatocyte nuclear factor 1 (HNF-1) binding site, present from -47 to -59 bp, in combination with other upstream elements, was essential for liver-specific expression of the gene. A functional CCAAT/enhancer binding protein site (C/EBP, -134 to -142 bp) was also identified within 217 bp from the transcription initiation site. An additional positive element (-1393 to -1133 bp) and a negative element (-1133 to -749 bp) were also found in the upstream region of the alpha-fibrinogen gene. PMID:7499335

  8. A Bovine Fibrinogen-Enriched Fraction as a Source of Peptides with in Vitro Renin and Angiotensin-I-Converting Enzyme Inhibitory Activities.

    PubMed

    Lafarga, Tomas; Rai, Dilip K; O'Connor, Paula; Hayes, Maria

    2015-10-01

    Bovine fibrinogen is currently used in the food industry as a binding agent in restructured meat products. However, this protein is underused as a source of bioactive peptides. In this study, a number of novel angiotensin-I-converting enzyme (ACE-I) and renin inhibitory peptides were identified and enriched from a bovine fibrinogen fraction. Fibrinogen was isolated and enriched from bovine blood and hydrolyzed with the food-grade enzyme papain, which was selected for use using in silico analysis. The generated hydrolysate was subjected to ultrafiltration and its peptide profile characterized by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. A number of peptides were identified and chemically synthesized to confirm their bioactivity in vitro. Identified peptides included the multifunctional tripeptide SLR, corresponding to f(35-37) of the β-chain of bovine fibrinogen with ACE-I and renin IC50 values of 0.17 and 7.2 mM, respectively. Moreover, the resistance of identified peptides to gastrointestinal degradation and their bitterness were predicted using in silico methods. PMID:26373334

  9. A factor VIII-derived peptide enables von Willebrand factor (VWF)-binding of artificial platelet nanoconstructs without interfering with VWF-adhesion of natural platelets†

    PubMed Central

    Haji-Valizadeh, Hassa n; Modery-Pawlowski, Christa L.

    2015-01-01

    There is substantial clinical interest in synthetic platelet analogs for potential application in transfusion medicine. To this end, our research is focused on self-assembled peptide–lipid nanoconstructs that can undergo injury site-selective adhesion and subsequently promote site-directed active platelet aggregation, thus mimicking platelet’s primary hemostatic actions. For injury site-selective adhesion, we have utilized a coagulation factor FVIII-derived VWF-binding peptide (VBP). FVIII binds to VWF’s D′–D3 domain while natural platelet GPIbα binds to VWF’s A1 domain. Therefore, we hypothesized that the VBP-decorated nanoconstructs will adhere to VWF without mutual competition with natural platelets. We further hypothesized that the adherent VBP-decorated constructs can enhance platelet aggregation when co-decorated with a fibrinogen-mimetic peptide (FMP). To test these hypotheses, we used glycocalicin to selectively block VWF’s A1 domain and, using fluorescence microscopy, studied the binding of fluorescently labeled VBP-decorated nanoconstructs versus platelets to ristocetin-treated VWF. Subsequently, we co-decorated the nanoconstructs with VBP and FMP and incubated them with human platelets to study construct-mediated enhancement of platelet aggregation. Decoration with VBP resulted in substantial construct adhesion to ristocetin-treated VWF even if the A1-domain was blocked by glycocalicin. In comparison, such A1-blocking resulted in significant reduction of platelet adhesion. Without A1-blocking, the VBP-decorated constructs and natural platelets could adhere to VWF concomitantly. Furthermore, the constructs co-decorated with VBP and FMP enhanced active platelet aggregation. The results indicate significant promise in utilizing the FVIII-derived VBP in developing synthetic platelet analogs that do not interfere with VWF-binding of natural platelets but allow site-directed enhancement of platelet aggregation when combined with FMP. PMID

  10. Construction aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langer, W.H.; Tepordei, V.V.; Bolen, W.P.

    2000-01-01

    Construction aggregates consist primarily of crushed stone and construction sand and gravel. Total estimated production of construction aggregates increased in 1999 by about 2% to 2.39 Gt (2.64 billion st) compared with 1998. This record production level continued an expansion that began in 1992. By commodities, crushed stone production increased 3.3%, while sand and gravel production increased by about 0.5%.

  11. Construction aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tepordei, V.V.

    1994-01-01

    Part of a special section on industrial minerals in 1993. The 1993 production of construction aggregates increased 6.3 percent over the 1992 figure, to reach 2.01 Gt. This represents the highest estimated annual production of combined crushed stone and construction sand and gravel ever recorded in the U.S. The outlook for construction aggregates and the issues facing the industry are discussed.

  12. Rapid in vitro biocompatibility assay of endovascular stents by flow cytometry using platelet activation and platelet-leukocyte aggregation.

    PubMed

    Tárnok, A; Mahnke, A; Müller, M; Zotz, R J

    1999-02-15

    Clinical studies suggest that stent design and surface texture are responsible for differences in biocompatibility of metallic endovascular stents. A simple in vitro experimental setup was established to test stent-induced degree of platelet and leukocyte activation and platelet-leukocyte aggregation by flow cytometry. Heparin-coated tantalum stents and gold-coated and uncoated stainless steel stents were tested. Stents were implanted into silicone tubes and exposed to blood from healthy volunteers. Platelet and leukocyte activation and percentage of leukocyte-platelet aggregates were determined in a whole-blood assay by subsequent staining for activation-associated antigens (CD41a, CD42b, CD62p, and fibrinogen binding) and leukocyte antigens (CD14 and CD45) and flow cytometric analysis. Blood taken directly after venous puncture or exposed to the silicone tube alone was used as negative controls. Positive control was in vitro stimulation with thrombin receptor activating peptide (TRAP-6). Low degree of platelet activation and significant increase in monocyte- and neutrophil-platelet aggregation were observed in blood exposed to stents (P < 0.05). In addition, leukocyte activation was induced as measured by increased CD45 and CD14 expression. Heparin coated stents continuously induced less platelet activation and leukocyte-platelet aggregation than uncoated stainless steel stents of the same length and shorter stents of the same structure. Stent surface coating and texture plays a role in platelet and leukocyte activation and leukocyte-platelet aggregation. Using this simple in vitro assay and whole blood and flow cytometry, it seems possible to differentiate stents by their potency to activate platelets and/or leukocytes. This assay could be applied for improving the biocompatibility of coronary stents. PMID:10088974

  13. Prognostic Impact of Pretreatment Plasma Fibrinogen in Patients with Locally Advanced Oral and Oropharyngeal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Holzinger, Daniel; Danilovic, Ivan; Seemann, Rudolf; Kornek, Gabriela; Engelmann, Johannes; Pillerstorff, Robert; Holawe, Simone; Psyrri, Amanda; Erovic, Boban M.; Farwell, Gregory; Perisanidis, Christos

    2016-01-01

    Background We aimed to determine the prognostic significance of pretreatment plasma fibrinigen in patients with oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OOSCC). Methods A cohort of 183 patients with locally advanced OOSCC receiving preoperative chemoradiotherapy was retrospectively examined. Using ROC curve analysis, a pretreatment plasma fibrinogen cutoff value of 447mg/dL was determined. The primary endpoints were overall survival and recurrence-free survival. A secondary endpoint was to determine whether pretreatment plasma fibrinogen could predict treatment response to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. Cox regression models and Kaplan–Meier curves were used for survival analyses. Results Seventy-one patients had an elevated pretreatment plasma fibrinogen (fibrinogen >447mg/dL). Patients with high fibrinogen showed significantly higher pathologic stages after neoadjuvant treatment than those with low fibrinogen (p = 0.037). In univariate analysis, elevated fibrinogen was associated with poor overall survival (p = 0.005) and recurrence-free survival (p = 0.008) Multivariate analysis revealed that elevated fibrinogen remained an independent risk factor for death (hazard ratio 1.78, 95% CI 1.09–2.90, p = 0.021) and relapse (hazard ratio 1.78, 95% CI 1.11–2.86, p = 0.016). Conclusion Elevated pretreatment plasma fibrinogen is associated with lack of response to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy and reduced OS and RFS in patients with OOSCC. Thus, plasma fibrinogen may emerge as a novel prognostic indicator and a potential therapeutic target in OOSCC. PMID:27362659

  14. Association between Plasma Fibrinogen Levels and Mortality in Acute-on-Chronic Hepatitis B Liver Failure

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Zhexin; Zhao, Ying; Feng, Limin; Feng, Guofang; Zhang, Juanwen; Zhang, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Acute-on-chronic liver failure (AoCLF) is the most common type of liver failure and is associated with high mortality. Fibrinogen is critical in maintaining primary and secondary hemostasis. Therefore, we prospectively analyzed the association between fibrinogen and outcomes in AoCLF patients. Plasma fibrinogen was measured in 169 AoCLF, 173 chronic hepatitis B (CHB), and 171 healthy patients using a coagulation method. The predictive ability of fibrinogen for 3-month mortality in AoCLF patients was assessed using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve and multivariable logistic regression analyses. Plasma fibrinogen was significantly lower in nonsurvivor AoCLF patients compared with survivor AoCLF, CHB, and control patients. The sensitivity, specificity, and area under the ROC curve of 1/fibrinogen predicting mortality in AoCLF patients were 66.7%, 72.5%, and 0.746 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.672–0.820, P < 0.001), and the fibrinogen cutoff value was 0.90 g/L. On multivariate logistic regression analysis, low fibrinogen was an independent factor predicting mortality (odds ratio: 0.304; 95% CI: 0.094–0.983; P = 0.047). Nonsurvivor AoCLF patients had significantly decreased fibrinogen levels, suggesting that low plasma fibrinogen may be a useful predictor of poor prognosis in AoCLF patients. PMID:25960593

  15. Surface characterization and AFM imaging of mixed fibrinogen-surfactant films.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Natalia; Maldonado-Valderrama, Julia; Gunning, A Patrick; Morris, Victor J; Ruso, Juan M

    2011-05-19

    This study describes the adsorption behavior of mixed protein/surfactant systems at the air-water interface: specifically fibrinogen and the fluorinated and hydrogenated surfactants (C(8)FONa, C(8)HONa, and C(12)HONa). Surface tension techniques and atomic force microscopy (AFM) have been combined to investigate the adsorption behavior of these mixed systems. Interfacial rheology showed that fibrinogen has a low dilatational modulus at the air-water interface when compared to other proteins, suggesting the formation of a weak surface network. Fluorinated and hydrogenated surfactants severely decreased the dilatational modulus of the adsorbed fibrinogen film at the air-water interface. These measurements suggest the progressive displacement of fibrinogen from the air-water interface by both types of surfactants. However, in the case of fibrinogen/fluorinated surfactant systems, surface tension and dilatational rheology measurements suggest the formation of complexes with improved surface activity. AFM imaging of fibrinogen in the presence and absence of surfactants provided new information on the structure of mixed surface films, and revealed new features of the interaction of fibrinogen with hydrogenated and fluorinated surfactants. These studies suggest complexes formed between fibrinogen and fluorinated surfactants which are more surface active than fibrinogen, while the absence of interaction between fibrinogen and hydrogenated surfactants (C(8)HONa and C(12)HONa) results in compaction of the surface layer. PMID:21491854

  16. Fibrinogen and rhegmatogenous retinal detachment: a pilot prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Theocharis, IP

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the correlation, if any, between fibrinogen plasma levels (FPL) and the clinical features of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD). Methods: FPL were measured preoperatively in 33 patients with primary RRD. Patient characteristics and detachment features such as the numbers of breaks and the extent of the detachment were recorded; Results: No statistically significant correlation was found between FPL and the number of breaks. A statistically significant correlation was found between FPL and the extent of the RRD, even if the influence of the number of breaks was excluded. Conclusions: FPL correlate with retinal detachment extent, which implicates an acute inflammatory response to detachment traumatic phenomenon or a role of the fibrinogen molecule in retinal adhesiveness. PMID:20186280

  17. Analysis of the safety and pharmacodynamics of human fibrinogen concentrate in animals

    SciTech Connect

    Beyerle, Andrea; Nolte, Marc W.; Solomon, Cristina; Herzog, Eva; Dickneite, Gerhard

    2014-10-01

    Fibrinogen, a soluble 340 kDa plasma glycoprotein, is critical in achieving and maintaining hemostasis. Reduced fibrinogen levels are associated with an increased risk of bleeding and recent research has investigated the efficacy of fibrinogen concentrate for controlling perioperative bleeding. European guidelines on the management of perioperative bleeding recommend the use of fibrinogen concentrate if significant bleeding is accompanied by plasma fibrinogen levels less than 1.5–2.0 g/l. Plasma-derived human fibrinogen concentrate has been available for therapeutic use since 1956. The overall aim of the comprehensive series of non-clinical investigations presented was to evaluate i) the pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic characteristics and ii) the safety and tolerability profile of human fibrinogen concentrate Haemocomplettan P® (RiaSTAP®). Pharmacodynamic characteristics were assessed in rabbits, pharmacokinetic parameters were determined in rabbits and rats and a safety pharmacology study was performed in beagle dogs. Additional toxicology tests included: single-dose toxicity tests in mice and rats; local tolerance tests in rabbits; and neoantigenicity tests in rabbits and guinea pigs following the introduction of pasteurization in the manufacturing process. Human fibrinogen concentrate was shown to be pharmacodynamically active in rabbits and dogs and well tolerated, with no adverse events and no influence on circulation, respiration or hematological parameters in rabbits, mice, rats and dogs. In these non-clinical investigations, human fibrinogen concentrate showed a good safety profile. This data adds to the safety information available to date, strengthening the current body of knowledge regarding this hemostatic agent. - Highlights: • A comprehensive series of pre-clinical investigations of human fibrinogen concentrate. • Human fibrinogen concentrate was shown to be pharmacodynamically active. • Human fibrinogen concentrate was well tolerated

  18. Neprilysin Inhibits Coagulation through Proteolytic Inactivation of Fibrinogen.

    PubMed

    Burrell, Matthew; Henderson, Simon J; Ravnefjord, Anna; Schweikart, Fritz; Fowler, Susan B; Witt, Susanne; Hansson, Kenny M; Webster, Carl I

    2016-01-01

    Neprilysin (NEP) is an endogenous protease that degrades a wide range of peptides including amyloid beta (Aβ), the main pathological component of Alzheimer's disease (AD). We have engineered NEP as a potential therapeutic for AD but found in pre-clinical safety testing that this variant increased prothrombin time (PT) and activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT). The objective of the current study was to investigate the effect of wild type NEP and the engineered variant on coagulation and define the mechanism by which this effect is mediated. PT and APTT were measured in cynomolgus monkeys and rats dosed with a human serum albumin fusion with an engineered variant of NEP (HSA-NEPv) as well as in control plasma spiked with wild type or variant enzyme. The coagulation factor targeted by NEP was determined using in vitro prothrombinase, calibrated automated thrombogram (CAT) and fibrin formation assays as well as N-terminal sequencing of fibrinogen treated with the enzyme. We demonstrate that HSA-NEP wild type and HSA-NEPv unexpectedly impaired coagulation, increasing PT and APTT in plasma samples and abolishing fibrin formation from fibrinogen. This effect was mediated through cleavage of the N-termini of the Aα- and Bβ-chains of fibrinogen thereby significantly impairing initiation of fibrin formation by thrombin. Fibrinogen has therefore been identified for the first time as a substrate for NEP wild type suggesting that the enzyme may have a role in regulating fibrin formation. Reductions in NEP levels observed in AD and cerebral amyloid angiopathy may contribute to neurovascular degeneration observed in these conditions. PMID:27437944

  19. Neprilysin Inhibits Coagulation through Proteolytic Inactivation of Fibrinogen

    PubMed Central

    Burrell, Matthew; Henderson, Simon J.; Ravnefjord, Anna; Schweikart, Fritz; Fowler, Susan B.; Witt, Susanne; Hansson, Kenny M.; Webster, Carl I.

    2016-01-01

    Neprilysin (NEP) is an endogenous protease that degrades a wide range of peptides including amyloid beta (Aβ), the main pathological component of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). We have engineered NEP as a potential therapeutic for AD but found in pre-clinical safety testing that this variant increased prothrombin time (PT) and activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT). The objective of the current study was to investigate the effect of wild type NEP and the engineered variant on coagulation and define the mechanism by which this effect is mediated. PT and APTT were measured in cynomolgus monkeys and rats dosed with a human serum albumin fusion with an engineered variant of NEP (HSA-NEPv) as well as in control plasma spiked with wild type or variant enzyme. The coagulation factor targeted by NEP was determined using in vitro prothrombinase, calibrated automated thrombogram (CAT) and fibrin formation assays as well as N-terminal sequencing of fibrinogen treated with the enzyme. We demonstrate that HSA-NEP wild type and HSA-NEPv unexpectedly impaired coagulation, increasing PT and APTT in plasma samples and abolishing fibrin formation from fibrinogen. This effect was mediated through cleavage of the N-termini of the Aα- and Bβ-chains of fibrinogen thereby significantly impairing initiation of fibrin formation by thrombin. Fibrinogen has therefore been identified for the first time as a substrate for NEP wild type suggesting that the enzyme may have a role in regulating fibrin formation. Reductions in NEP levels observed in AD and cerebral amyloid angiopathy may contribute to neurovascular degeneration observed in these conditions. PMID:27437944

  20. Comparison of different methods to measure fibrinogen concentration in canine plasma with respect to their sensitivity towards the fibrinogen degradation products X, Y and D.

    PubMed

    Mischke, R; Menzel, D; Wolling, H

    2000-01-01

    In this study, fibrinogen measurements according to the Clauss method, photometric method and Jacobsson method have been investigated to find out how they are influenced by adding in vitro the purified canine fibrinogen degradation products (FDP) X, Y and D. Test results according to the Clauss method were found to be underestimated if the fragments X, Y and D were added while measurements according to the Jacobsson method turned out to underestimate the real fibrinogen concentration if the FDP Y and D were added. The Clauss method was particularly sensitive towards FDP. Results were considerably underestimated even with a quantity as little as 0.05 g FDP Y or FDP D/g fibrinogen (p < 0.05). The photometric method was only affected by FDP X leading to false high results. If FDP X was added, fibrinogen values were also overestimated with the Jacobsson method. Our results demonstrate that the photometric method is the most accurate. PMID:11014963

  1. Fibrinogen Degradation Products and Periodontitis: Deciphering the Connection

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Fibrinogen degradation products (e.g. D-dimer) arise from digested fibrin clots and fibrinogen. Elevated concentrations accompany activation of coagulation and fibrinolysis and indicate chronic inflammatory diseases. D-Dimer tests are a quick, noninvasive method to rule out abnormal clotting. Periodontitis strongly affects the haemostatic system and evokes a procoagulant state. Correlation of chronic periodontitis with early indicators of disease (biomarkers) might be useful. Aim The aim of the study was to examine whether the plasma D-dimer concentration reflects the progression of chronic periodontitis and the beneficial effect of periodontal therapy. Materials and Methods Forty randomly selected subjects were divided into four groups, Group I: 10 healthy subjects, Group II: 10 with mild periodontitis, Group III: 10 with moderate periodontitis, Group IV: 10 with severe periodontitis. After thorough dental and periodontal examination, 3 mL of venous blood was collected for measurement of fibrinogen degradation products. Results The patients with moderate and chronic periodontitis exhibited high concentrations of D-dimer (mean value 434.98–535.52 mcg/mL), whereas subjects with mild or no periodontitis exhibited values of 329.78–211.29 mcg/mL. Concentrations of D-dimer were significantly reduced after therapy of all classes of periodontitis. Conclusion Periodontal treatment can reduce amount of D-dimer in the plasma. A higher than normal concentration is observed in chronic periodontitis. PMID:26816985

  2. Familial mutations in fibrinogen Aα (FGA) chain identified in renal amyloidosis increase in vitro amyloidogenicity of FGA fragment.

    PubMed

    Sivalingam, Vishwanath; Patel, Basant K

    2016-08-01

    Amyloidoses are clinical disorders where deposition of β-sheet rich, misfolded protein aggregates called amyloid occurs in vital organs like brain, kidney, liver or heart etc. Aggregation of several proteins such as immunoglobulin light chain, fibrinogen Aα chain (FGA) and lysozyme have been found to be associated with renal amyloidosis. Fibrinogen amyloidosis (AFib) is predominantly familial and is associated with the deposition of mutant FGA amyloid, primarily in kidneys. Over ten substitution and frame-shift mutations in FGA have been identified from AFib patients. Whether wild-type FGA is also involved in AFib is yet unknown. The affected tissues from AFib patients usually show ∼10 kDA peptide from C-terminal 80 amino acid residues of mutant FGA. Notably, this region also encompasses all known disease-related mutations. Whether these point mutations increase the amyloidogenicity of FGA leading to disease progression, have not been studied yet. Here, we have investigated the role of two disease-related mutations in affecting amyloidogenic propensity of an FGA(496-581) fragment. We found that at physiological pH, the wild-type FGA(496-581) fragment remains monomeric, whereas its E540V mutant forms amyloid-like fibrils as observed by AFM. Also, FGA(496-581) harbouring another familial mutation, R554L, converts in vitro into globular, β-sheet rich aggregates, showing amyloid-like properties. These findings suggest that familial mutations in FGA may have role in renal amyloidosis via enhanced amyloid formation. PMID:27126074

  3. Identification of gene-gene and gene-environment interactions within the fibrinogen gene cluster for fibrinogen levels in three ethnically diverse populations.

    PubMed

    Jeff, Janina M; Brown-Gentry, Kristin; Crawford, Dana C

    2015-01-01

    Elevated levels of plasma fibrinogen are associated with clot formation in the absence of inflammation or injury and is a biomarker for arterial clotting, the leading cause of cardiovascular disease. Fibrinogen levels are heritable with >50% attributed to genetic factors, however little is known about possible genetic modifiers that might explain the missing heritability. The fibrinogen gene cluster is comprised of three genes (FGA, FGB, and FGG) that make up the fibrinogen polypeptide essential for fibrinogen production in the blood. Given the known interaction with these genes, we tested 25 variants in the fibrinogen gene cluster for gene x gene and gene x environment interactions in 620 non-Hispanic blacks, 1,385 non-Hispanic whites, and 664 Mexican Americans from a cross-sectional dataset enriched with environmental data, the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III). Using a multiplicative approach, we added cross product terms (gene x gene or gene x environment) to a linear regression model and declared significance at p < 0.05. We identified 19 unique gene x gene and 13 unique gene x environment interactions that impact fibrinogen levels in at least one population at p < 0.05. Over 90% of the gene x gene interactions identified include a variant in the rate-limiting gene, FGB that is essential for the formation of the fibrinogen polypeptide. We also detected gene x environment interactions with fibrinogen variants and sex, smoking, and body mass index. These findings highlight the potential for the discovery of genetic modifiers for complex phenotypes in multiple populations and give a better understanding of the interaction between genes and/or the environment for fibrinogen levels. The need for more powerful and robust methods to identify genetic modifiers is still warranted. PMID:25592583

  4. IDENTIFICATION OF GENE-GENE AND GENE-ENVIRONMENT INTERACTIONS WITHIN THE FIBRINOGEN GENE CLUSTER FOR FIBRINOGEN LEVELS IN THREE ETHNICALLY DIVERSE POPULATIONS

    PubMed Central

    Jeff, Janina M.; Brown-Gentry, Kristin; Crawford, Dana C.

    2014-01-01

    Elevated levels of plasma fibrinogen are associated with clot formation in the absence of inflammation or injury and is a biomarker for arterial clotting, the leading cause of cardiovascular disease. Fibrinogen levels are heritable with >50% attributed to genetic factors, however little is known about possible genetic modifiers that might explain the missing heritability. The fibrinogen gene cluster is comprised of three genes (FGA, FGB, and FGG) that make up the fibrinogen polypeptide essential for fibrinogen production in the blood. Given the known interaction with these genes, we tested 25 variants in the fibrinogen gene cluster for gene × gene and gene × environment interactions in 620 non-Hispanic blacks, 1,385 non-Hispanic whites, and 664 Mexican Americans from a cross-sectional dataset enriched with environmental data, the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III). Using a multiplicative approach, we added cross product terms (gene × gene or gene × environment) to a linear regression model and declared significance at p < 0.05. We identified 19 unique gene × gene and 13 unique gene × environment interactions that impact fibrinogen levels in at least one population at p <0.05. Over 90% of the gene × gene interactions identified include a variant in the rate-limiting gene, FGB that is essential for the formation of the fibrinogen polypeptide. We also detected gene × environment interactions with fibrinogen variants and sex, smoking, and body mass index. These findings highlight the potential for the discovery of genetic modifiers for complex phenotypes in multiple populations and give a better understanding of the interaction between genes and/or the environment for fibrinogen levels. The need for more powerful and robust methods to identify genetic modifiers is still warranted. PMID:25592583

  5. Correlating structure and function during the evolution of fibrinogen-related domains.

    PubMed

    Doolittle, Russell F; McNamara, Kyle; Lin, Kevin

    2012-12-01

    Fibrinogen-related domains (FReDs) are found in a variety of animal proteins with widely different functions, ranging from non-self recognition to clot formation. All appear to have a common surface where binding of one sort or other occurs. An examination of 19 completed animal genomes--including a sponge and sea anemone, six protostomes, and 11 deuterostomes--has allowed phylogenies to be constructed that show where various types of FReP (proteins containing FReDs) first made their appearance. Comparisons of sequences and structures also reveal particular features that correlate with function, including the influence of neighbor-domains. A particular set of insertions in the carboxyl-terminal subdomain was involved in the transition from structures known to bind sugars to those known to bind amino-terminal peptides. Perhaps not unexpectedly, FReDs with different functions have changed at different rates, with ficolins by far the fastest changing group. Significantly, the greatest amount of change in ficolin FReDs occurs in the third subdomain ("P domain"), the very opposite of the situation in most other vertebrate FReDs. The unbalanced style of change was also observed in FReDs from non-chordates, many of which have been implicated in innate immunity. PMID:23076991

  6. Linkage study of fibrinogen levels: the Strong Heart Family Study

    PubMed Central

    Best, Lyle G; North, Kari E; Li, Xia; Palmieri, Vittorio; Umans, Jason G; MacCluer, Jean; Laston, Sandy; Haack, Karin; Goring, Harald; Diego, Vincent P; Almasy, Laura; Lee, Elisa T; Tracy, Russell P; Cole, Shelley

    2008-01-01

    Background The pathogenesis of atherosclerosis involves both hemostatic and inflammatory mechanisms. Fibrinogen is associated with both risk of thrombosis and inflammation. A recent meta-analysis showed that risk of coronary heart disease may increase 1.8 fold for 1 g/L of increased fibrinogen, independent of traditional risk factors. It is known that fibrinogen levels may be influenced by demographic, environmental and genetic factors. Epidemiologic and candidate gene studies are available; but few genome-wide linkage studies have been conducted, particularly in minority populations. The Strong Heart Study has demonstrated an increased incidence of cardiovascular disease in the American Indian population, and therefore represents an important source for genetic-epidemiological investigations. Methods The Strong Heart Family Study enrolled over 3,600 American Indian participants in large, multi-generational families, ascertained from an ongoing population-based study in the same communities. Fibrinogen was determined using standard technique in a central laboratory and extensive additional phenotypic measures were obtained. Participants were genotyped for 382 short tandem repeat markers distributed throughout the genome; and results were analyzed using a variance decomposition method, as implemented in the SOLAR 2.0 program. Results Data from 3535 participants were included and after step-wise, linear regression analysis, two models were selected for investigation. Basic demographic adjustments constituted model 1, while model 2 considered waist circumference, diabetes mellitus and postmenopausal status as additional covariates. Five LOD scores between 1.82 and 3.02 were identified, with the maximally adjusted model showing the highest score on chromosome 7 at 28 cM. Genes for two key components of the inflammatory response, i.e. interleukin-6 and "signal transducer and activator of transcription 3" (STAT3), were identified within 2 and 8 Mb of this 1 LOD drop

  7. Influence of spacer length on heparin coupling efficiency and fibrinogen adsorption of modified titanium surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Tebbe, David; Thull, Roger; Gbureck, Uwe

    2007-01-01

    Background Chemical bonding of the drug onto surfaces by means of spacer molecules is accompanied with a reduction of the biological activity of the drug due to a constricted mobility since normally only short spacer molecule like aminopropyltrimethoxysilane (APMS) are used for drug coupling. This work aimed to study covalent attachment of heparin to titanium(oxide) surfaces by varying the length of the silane coupling agent, which should affect the biological potency of the drug due to a higher mobility with longer spacer chains. Methods Covalent attachment of heparin to titanium metal and TiO2 powder was carried out using the coupling agents 3-(Trimethoxysilyl)-propylamine (APMS), N- [3-(Trimethoxysilyl)propyl]ethylenediamine (Diamino-APMS) and N1- [3-(Trimethoxy-silyl)-propyl]diethylenetriamine (Triamino-APMS). The amount of bound coupling agent and heparin was quantified photometrically by the ninhydrin reaction and the tolidine-blue test. The biological potency of heparin was determined photometrically by the chromogenic substrate Chromozym TH and fibrinogen adsorption to the modified surfaces was researched using the QCM-D (Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation Monitoring) technique. Results Zeta-potential measurements confirmed the successful coupling reaction; the potential of the unmodified anatase surface (approx. -26 mV) shifted into the positive range (> + 40 mV) after silanisation. Binding of heparin results in a strongly negatively charged surface with zeta-potentials of approx. -39 mV. The retaining biological activity of heparin was highest for the spacer molecule Triamino-APMS. QCM-D measurements showed a lower viscosity for adsorbed fibrinogen films on heparinised surfaces by means of Triamino-APMS. Conclusion The remaining activity of heparin was found to be highest for the covalent attachment with Triamino-APMS as coupling agent due to the long chain of this spacer molecule and therefore the highest mobility of the drug. Furthermore, the

  8. Potential basis for regulation of the coordinately expressed fibrinogen genes: homology in the 5' flanking regions.

    PubMed Central

    Fowlkes, D M; Mullis, N T; Comeau, C M; Crabtree, G R

    1984-01-01

    The three chains of fibrinogen are encoded by three separate genes whose transcription is coordinately regulated. The breakdown of fibrinogen during the acute-phase reaction leads to a simultaneous increase in alpha-, beta-, and gamma-fibrinogen mRNA in the liver. In a search for the basis of this coordinate increase in transcription, we have determined the sequences of the regions surrounding the points of transcriptional initiation of the three rat fibrinogen genes, 1490 nucleotides upstream and 730 nucleotides downstream. Two unique regions of homology have been found. One region consists of 15 nucleotides that have a common 6-nucleotide core lying between -116 and -160; the other is approximately equal to 100 nucleotides long and is in the -165 to -472 region. In this region, the beta- and gamma-fibrinogen genes are approximately equal to 65% homologous. alpha-Fibrinogen has somewhat less homology with both beta- and gamma-fibrinogen. In addition, the beta-fibrinogen gene has 22 nucleotides at position -480 that are homologous to sequences that have been noted to occur in glucocorticosteroid-regulated genes in a similar position. We feel that these areas of conserved sequences play a role in the regulation of the transcription of fibrinogen. The fibrinogen chains are synthesized as precursor peptides, and the amino-terminal portion, the so-called signal peptide, is removed during the translocation of the peptide chain across the endoplasmic reticulum. We have determined those sequences that encode the signal peptides. Homology in the amino acid sequence between the rat and human signal peptides varies between 52% for alpha-fibrinogen and 66% for beta-fibrinogen. This homology implies that there has been strong selective pressure on this portion of these genes. PMID:6232608

  9. Nutritional status influences plasma fibrinogen concentration: evidence from the THUSA survey.

    PubMed

    James, S; Vorster, H H; Venter, C S; Kruger, H S; Nell, T A; Veldman, F J; Ubbink, J B

    2000-06-01

    Nutritional status and risk factors for chronic diseases, including plasma fibrinogen and its determinants, of Africans in the Northwest Province of South Africa, have been studied in a cross-sectional survey. A representative sample of 1854 "apparently healthy" African men and women volunteers aged 15 years and older was recruited from 37 randomly selected sites throughout the Province and stratified for level of urbanisation. Information was collected using validated and culture-sensitive questionnaires. Fasting blood samples were drawn, and all measurements were done with standardised methodology using appropriate equipment, procedures, and controls. Fibrinogen concentration was measured in citrated plasma with the method of Clauss, using the ACL200 automated system and the international fibrinogen standard. The results revealed a population with a high mean plasma fibrinogen (3.17+/-1.10 g/L for HIV-negative men and 3. 64+/-1.12 g/L for HIV-negative women). Factors known to influence plasma fibrinogen, such as age, gender, smoking habit, and physical activity, were also observed in this population. Young rural men and women had the lowest fibrinogen level. Nasal snuff taking and HIV infection did not influence fibrinogen concentration. Multivariate analyses revealed that lower plasma fibrinogen was associated with low to normal body mass index in women, and with dietary intakes compatible with prudent dietary guidelines in men and women (low intakes of animal protein; trans fatty acids and higher intakes of plant protein; dietary fibre, vitamin E, and iron, and a high dietary P/S ratio). Subjects in the higher quartiles of plasma fibrinogen had significantly lower iron, vitamin E, and vitamin B6 (women) status. Increases in fibrinogen were associated with significant increases in serum lipids. Both under- and overnutrition seem to be associated with high plasma fibrinogen. It is concluded that overall nutritional status, possibly in addition to specific

  10. The novel Parkinson's disease linked mutation G51D attenuates in vitro aggregation and membrane binding of α-synuclein, and enhances its secretion and nuclear localization in cells.

    PubMed

    Fares, Mohamed-Bilal; Ait-Bouziad, Nadine; Dikiy, Igor; Mbefo, Martial K; Jovičić, Ana; Kiely, Aoife; Holton, Janice L; Lee, Seung-Jae; Gitler, Aaron D; Eliezer, David; Lashuel, Hilal A

    2014-09-01

    A novel mutation in the α-Synuclein (α-Syn) gene "G51D" was recently identified in two familial cases exhibiting features of Parkinson's disease (PD) and multiple system atrophy (MSA). In this study, we explored the impact of this novel mutation on the aggregation, cellular and biophysical properties of α-Syn, in an attempt to unravel how this mutant contributes to PD/MSA. Our results show that the G51D mutation significantly attenuates α-Syn aggregation in vitro. Moreover, it disrupts local helix formation in the presence of SDS, decreases binding to lipid vesicles C-terminal to the site of mutation and severely inhibits helical folding in the presence of acidic vesicles. When expressed in yeast, α-Syn(G51D) behaves similarly to α-Syn(A30P), as both exhibit impaired membrane association, form few inclusions and are non-toxic. In contrast, enhanced secreted and nuclear levels of the G51D mutant were observed in mammalian cells, as well as in primary neurons, where α-Syn(G51D) was enriched in the nuclear compartment, was hyper-phosphorylated at S129 and exacerbated α-Syn-induced mitochondrial fragmentation. Finally, post-mortem human brain tissues of α-Syn(G51D) cases were examined, and revealed only partial colocalization with nuclear membrane markers, probably due to post-mortem tissue delay and fixation. These findings suggest that the PD-linked mutations may cause neurodegeneration via different mechanisms, some of which may be independent of α-Syn aggregation. PMID:24728187

  11. Clusterin Binds to Aβ1-42 Oligomers with High Affinity and Interferes with Peptide Aggregation by Inhibiting Primary and Secondary Nucleation.

    PubMed

    Beeg, Marten; Stravalaci, Matteo; Romeo, Margherita; Carrá, Arianna Dorotea; Cagnotto, Alfredo; Rossi, Alessandro; Diomede, Luisa; Salmona, Mario; Gobbi, Marco

    2016-03-25

    The aggregation of amyloid β protein (Aβ) is a fundamental pathogenic mechanism leading to the neuronal damage present in Alzheimer disease, and soluble Aβ oligomers are thought to be a major toxic culprit. Thus, better knowledge and specific targeting of the pathways that lead to these noxious species may result in valuable therapeutic strategies. We characterized some effects of the molecular chaperone clusterin, providing new and more detailed evidence of its potential neuroprotective effects. Using a classical thioflavin T assay, we observed a dose-dependent inhibition of the aggregation process. The global analysis of time courses under different conditions demonstrated that clusterin has no effect on the elongation rate but mainly interferes with the nucleation processes (both primary and secondary), reducing the number of nuclei available for further fibril growth. Then, using a recently developed immunoassay based on surface plasmon resonance, we obtained direct evidence of a high-affinity (KD= 1 nm) interaction of clusterin with biologically relevant Aβ1-42oligomers, selectively captured on the sensor chip. Moreover, with the same technology, we observed that substoichiometric concentrations of clusterin prevent oligomer interaction with the antibody 4G8, suggesting that the chaperone shields hydrophobic residues exposed on the oligomeric assemblies. Finally, we found that preincubation with clusterin antagonizes the toxic effects of Aβ1-42oligomers, as evaluated in a recently developedin vivomodel inCaenorhabditis elegans.These data substantiate the interaction of clusterin with biologically active regions exposed on nuclei/oligomers of Aβ1-42, providing a molecular basis for the neuroprotective effects of the chaperone. PMID:26884339

  12. Validation and Characterization of a Novel Peptide That Binds Monomeric and Aggregated β-Amyloid and Inhibits the Formation of Neurotoxic Oligomers.

    PubMed

    Barr, Renae K; Verdile, Giuseppe; Wijaya, Linda K; Morici, Michael; Taddei, Kevin; Gupta, Veer B; Pedrini, Steve; Jin, Liang; Nicolazzo, Joseph A; Knock, Erin; Fraser, Paul E; Martins, Ralph N

    2016-01-01

    Although the formation of β-amyloid (Aβ) deposits in the brain is a hallmark of Alzheimer disease (AD), the soluble oligomers rather than the mature amyloid fibrils most likely contribute to Aβ toxicity and neurodegeneration. Thus, the discovery of agents targeting soluble Aβ oligomers is highly desirable for early diagnosis prior to the manifestation of a clinical AD phenotype and also more effective therapies. We have previously reported that a novel 15-amino acid peptide (15-mer), isolated via phage display screening, targeted Aβ and attenuated its neurotoxicity (Taddei, K., Laws, S. M., Verdile, G., Munns, S., D'Costa, K., Harvey, A. R., Martins, I. J., Hill, F., Levy, E., Shaw, J. E., and Martins, R. N. (2010) Neurobiol. Aging 31, 203-214). The aim of the current study was to generate and biochemically characterize analogues of this peptide with improved stability and therapeutic potential. We demonstrated that a stable analogue of the 15-amino acid peptide (15M S.A.) retained the activity and potency of the parent peptide and demonstrated improved proteolytic resistance in vitro (stable to t = 300 min, c.f. t = 30 min for the parent peptide). This candidate reduced the formation of soluble Aβ42 oligomers, with the concurrent generation of non-toxic, insoluble aggregates measuring up to 25-30 nm diameter as determined by atomic force microscopy. The 15M S.A. candidate directly interacted with oligomeric Aβ42, as shown by coimmunoprecipitation and surface plasmon resonance/Biacore analysis, with an affinity in the low micromolar range. Furthermore, this peptide bound fibrillar Aβ42 and also stained plaques ex vivo in brain tissue from AD model mice. Given its multifaceted ability to target monomeric and aggregated Aβ42 species, this candidate holds promise for novel preclinical AD imaging and therapeutic strategies. PMID:26538562

  13. Interactions between Eph kinases and ephrins provide a mechanism to support platelet aggregation once cell-to-cell contact has occurred

    PubMed Central

    Prevost, Nicolas; Woulfe, Donna; Tanaka, Takako; Brass, Lawrence F.

    2002-01-01

    Eph kinases are receptor tyrosine kinases whose ligands, the ephrins, are also expressed on the surface of cells. Interactions between Eph kinases and ephrins on adjacent cells play a central role in neuronal patterning and vasculogenesis. Here we examine the expression of ephrins and Eph kinases on human blood platelets and explore their role in the formation of the hemostatic plug. The results show that human platelets express EphA4 and EphB1, and the ligand, ephrinB1. Forced clustering of EphA4 or ephrinB1 led to cytoskeletal reorganization, adhesion to fibrinogen, and α-granule secretion. Clustering of ephrinB1 also caused activation of the Ras family member, Rap1B. In platelets that had been activated by ADP and allowed to aggregate, EphA4 formed complexes with two tyrosine kinases, Fyn and Lyn, and the cell adhesion molecule, L1. Blockade of Eph/ephrin interactions prevented the formation of these complexes and caused platelet aggregation at low ADP concentrations to become more readily reversible. We propose that when sustained contacts between platelets have occurred in response to agonists such as collagen, ADP, and thrombin, the binding of ephrins to Eph kinases on adjacent platelets provides a mechanism to perpetuate signaling and promote stable platelet aggregation. PMID:12084815

  14. Ligands to the platelet fibrinogen receptor glycoprotein IIb-IIIa do not affect agonist-induced second messengers Ca2+ or cyclic AMP.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, J A; Ashby, B; Daniel, J L

    1990-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that the platelet glycoprotein complex GPIIb-IIIa, which is the putative fibrinogen receptor, regulates Ca2+ influx into platelets, possibly operating as a Ca2+ channel. We have used RGD-peptides (peptides containing the sequence Arg-Gly-Asp; disintegrins), isolated from snake venoms, that have a high affinity and specificity for the fibrinogen-binding site of GPIIb-IIIa to address the question of whether blocking this site inhibits Ca2+ movement from the extracellular medium to the cytosol. Using fura-2-loaded human platelets, we found that neither disintegrins nor a monoclonal antibody (M148) to the GPIIb-IIIa complex altered the level of cytosolic Ca2+ obtained when the cells were stimulated with various agonists in the presence of either nominal or 1 mM extracellular Ca2+. In the presence of Mn2+, an ion that quenches fura-2 fluorescence, fura-2-loaded platelets were stimulated with thrombin or ADP. Neither disintegrins nor the monoclonal antibody altered the kinetics or the amount of quenching of fura-2 fluorescence by Mn2+. These data indicate that the binding of ligands to the fibrinogen receptor is not associated with an inhibition of Ca2+ movement through a receptor-operated channel. Furthermore, the disintegrins have no effect on platelet cyclic AMP metabolism in either the presence or the absence of phosphodiesterase inhibitors. PMID:2168700

  15. The Arg-Gly-Asp-containing peptide, rhodostomin, inhibits in vitro cell adhesion to extracellular matrices and platelet aggregation caused by saos-2 human osteosarcoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, H. S.; Yang, R. S.; Huang, T. F.

    1995-01-01

    Saos-2 cells, derived from a primary human osteosarcoma, caused dose-dependent platelet aggregation in heparinised human platelet-rich plasma. Saos-2 tumour cell-induced platelet aggregation (TCIPA) was completely inhibited by hirudin but unaffected by apyrase. The cell suspension shortened the plasma recalcification times of normal, factor VIII-deficient and factor IX-deficient human plasmas in a dose-dependent manner. However, the cell suspension did not affect the recalcification time of factor VII-deficient plasma. Moreover, a monoclonal antibody (MAb) against human tissue factor completely abolished TCIPA. Flow cytometric analysis using anti-integrin MAbs as the primary binding ligands demonstrated that the integrin receptors alpha v beta 3, alpha 5 beta 1 and alpha 6 beta 1 were present of Saos-2 cells, which might mediate tumour cell adhesion to extracellular matrix. Rhodostomin, an Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD)-containing snake venom peptide which antagonises the binding of fibrinogen to platelet membrane glycoprotein IIb/IIIa, prevented Saos-2 TCIPA as well as tumour cell adhesion to vitronectin, fibronectin and collagen type I. Likewise, the synthetic peptide Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser (GRGDS) showed a similar effect. On a molar basis, rhodostomin was about 18,000 and 1000 times, respectively, more potent than GRGDS in inhibiting TCIPA and tumour cell adhesion. PMID:7841039

  16. Clotting of mammalian fibrinogens by papain: a re-examination.

    PubMed

    Doolittle, Russell F

    2014-10-28

    Papain has long been known to cause the gelation of mammalian fibrinogens. It has also been reported that papain-fibrin is insoluble in dispersing solvents like strong urea or sodium bromide solutions, similar to what is observed with thrombin-generated clots in the presence of factor XIIIa and calcium. In those old studies, both the gelation and subsequent clot stabilization were attributed to papain, although the possibility that the second step might be due to contaminating factor XIII in fibrinogen preparations was considered. I have revisited this problem in light of knowledge acquired over the past half-century about thiol proteases like papain, which mostly cleave peptide bonds, and transglutaminases like factor XIIIa that catalyze the formation of ε-lysyl-γ-glutamyl cross-links. Recombinant fibrinogen, inherently free of factor XIII and other plasma proteins, formed a stable gel when treated with papain alone. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed that the intermolecular cross-linking in papain-fibrin leads to γ-chain dimers, trimers, and tetramers, just as is the case with thrombin-factor XIIIa-stabilized fibrin. Mass spectrometry of bands excised from gels showed that the cross-linked material is quite different from what occurs with factor XIIIa, however. With papain, the cross-linking occurs between γ chains in neighboring protofibrils becoming covalently linked in a "head-to-tail" fashion by a transpeptidation reaction involving the α-amino group of γ-Tyr1 and a papain cleavage site at γ-Gly403 near the carboxy terminus, rather than by the (reciprocal) "tail-to-tail" manner that occurs with factor XIIIa and that depends on cross-links between γ-Lys406 and γ-Gln398. PMID:25283163

  17. Combined single cell AFM manipulation and TIRFM for probing the molecular stability of multilayer fibrinogen matrices

    PubMed Central

    Christenson, W.; Yermolenko, I.; Plochberger, B.; Camacho-Alanis, F.; Ros, A.; Ugarova, T.P.; Ros, R.

    2014-01-01

    Adsorption of fibrinogen on various surfaces produces a nanoscale multilayer matrix, which strongly reduces the adhesion of platelets and leukocytes with implications for hemostasis and blood compatibility of biomaterials. The nonadhesive properties of fibrinogen matrices are based on their extensibility, ensuing the inability to transduce strong mechanical forces via cellular integrins and resulting in weak intracellular signaling. In addition, reduced cell adhesion may arise from the weaker associations between fibrinogen molecules in the superficial layers of the matrix. Such reduced stability would allow integrins to pull fibrinogen molecules out of the matrix with comparable or smaller forces than required to break integrin–fibrinogen bonds. To examine this possibility, we developed a method based on the combination of total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, single cell manipulation with an atomic force microscope and microcontact printing to study the transfer of fibrinogen molecules out of a matrix onto cells. We calculated the average fluorescence intensities per pixel for wild-type HEK 293 (HEK WT) and HEK 293 cells expressing leukocyte integrin Mac-1 (HEK Mac-1) before and after contact with multilayered matrices of fluorescently labeled fibrinogen. For contact times of 500 s, HEK Mac-1 cells show a median increase of 57% of the fluorescence intensity compared to 6% for HEKWT cells. The results suggest that the integrin Mac-1-fibrinogen interactions are stronger than the intermolecular fibrinogen interactions in the superficial layer of the matrix. The low mechanical stability of the multilayer fibrinogen surface may contribute to the reduced cell adhesive properties of fibrinogen-coated substrates. We anticipate that the described method can be applied to various cell types to examine their integrin-mediated adhesion to the extracellular matrices with a variable protein composition. PMID:24239757

  18. Rapid measurement of fibrinogen concentration in whole blood using a steel ball coagulometer

    PubMed Central

    Schlimp, Christoph J.; Khadem, Anna; Klotz, Anton; Solomon, Cristina; Hochleitner, Gerald; Ponschab, Martin; Redl, Heinz; Schöchl, Herbert

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Fibrinogen plays a key role in hemostasis and is the first coagulation factor to reach critical levels in bleeding patients. Current European guidelines on the management of traumatic or perioperative bleeding recommend fibrinogen supplementation at specific threshold levels. Whole blood viscoelastic tests provide fast evaluation of fibrin deficits. Fast measurement of plasma fibrinogen concentration is not yet available. We investigated a method to rapidly determine whole blood fibrinogen concentration using standard Clauss assays and a steel ball coagulometer and provide an estimate of the “plasma-equivalent” fibrinogen concentration within minutes by adjustment of the measured whole blood fibrinogen concentration with a quickly measureable hemoglobin-derived hematocrit. METHODS The feasibility of this approach was tested with a Clauss assay using multiple porcine fresh blood samples obtained during in vivo bleeding, hemodilution, and after treatment with hemostatic therapy. Two different Clauss assays were then tested using multiple human volunteers’ blood samples diluted in vitro and supplemented with fibrinogen concentrate. Comparative measurements with fibrin-based thromboelastometry tests were performed. RESULTS Regression and Bland-Altman analyses of derived “plasma-equivalent” fibrinogen and measured plasma fibrinogen concentration was excellent in porcine and human blood samples, especially in the ranges relevant to traumatic or perioperative bleeding. CONCLUSION Fast whole blood fibrinogen measurements could be considered as an alternative to plasma fibrinogen measurement for acute bleeding management in trauma and perioperative care settings. Further studies are needed to prove this concept and determine the turnaround times for its clinical application in emergency departments and operating theaters. PMID:25742256

  19. Interactions between segmented polyurethane surfaces and the plasma protein fibrinogen.

    PubMed

    Stupp, S I; Kauffman, J W; Carr, S H

    1977-03-01

    Surfaces of a segmented polyurethane were varied by casting on poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) and glass substrates, and were characterized through infrared-attenuated total-reflection spectroscopy (ATR). Surfaces cast on glass substrates showed a higher content of polyether segments, whereas those cast on PET contained a higher relative concentration of aromatic segments. Adsorption, and possible conformational changes of fibrinogen, were found to be more substantial on polymer surfaces having a higher content of polyether segments. It is concluded that the relatively good blood compatibility of segmented polyurethanes is partly due to the presence of peptide-like bonds on aromatic segments. PMID:140169

  20. Fibrinogen cleavage by the Streptococcus pyogenes extracellular cysteine protease and generation of antibodies that inhibit enzyme proteolytic activity.

    PubMed

    Matsuka, Y V; Pillai, S; Gubba, S; Musser, J M; Olmsted, S B

    1999-09-01

    The extracellular cysteine protease from Streptococcus pyogenes is a virulence factor that plays a significant role in host-pathogen interaction. Streptococcal protease is expressed as an inactive 40-kDa precursor that is autocatalytically converted into a 28-kDa mature (active) enzyme. Replacement of the single cysteine residue involved in formation of the enzyme active site with serine (C192S mutation) abolished detectable proteolytic activity and eliminated autocatalytic processing of zymogen to the mature form. In the present study, we investigated activity of the wild-type (wt) streptococcal protease toward human fibrinogen and bovine casein. The former is involved in blood coagulation, wound healing, and other aspects of hemostasis. Treatment with streptococcal protease resulted in degradation of the COOH-terminal region of fibrinogen alpha chain, indicating that fibrinogen may serve as an important substrate for this enzyme during the course of human infection. Polyclonal antibodies generated against recombinant 40- and 28-kDa (r40- and r28-kDa) forms of the C192S streptococcal protease mutant exhibited high enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay titers but demonstrated different inhibition activities toward proteolytic action of the wt enzyme. Activity of the wt protease was readily inhibited when the reaction was carried out in the presence of antibodies generated against r28-kDa C192S mutant. Antibodies produced against r40-kDa C192S mutant had no significant effect on proteolysis. These data suggest that the presence of the NH(2)-terminal prosegment prevents generation of functionally active antibodies and indicate that inhibition activity of antibodies most likely depends on their ability to bind the active-site region epitope(s) of the protein. PMID:10456870

  1. Fibrinogen Cleavage by the Streptococcus pyogenes Extracellular Cysteine Protease and Generation of Antibodies That Inhibit Enzyme Proteolytic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Matsuka, Yury V.; Pillai, Subramonia; Gubba, Siddeswar; Musser, James M.; Olmsted, Stephen B.

    1999-01-01

    The extracellular cysteine protease from Streptococcus pyogenes is a virulence factor that plays a significant role in host-pathogen interaction. Streptococcal protease is expressed as an inactive 40-kDa precursor that is autocatalytically converted into a 28-kDa mature (active) enzyme. Replacement of the single cysteine residue involved in formation of the enzyme active site with serine (C192S mutation) abolished detectable proteolytic activity and eliminated autocatalytic processing of zymogen to the mature form. In the present study, we investigated activity of the wild-type (wt) streptococcal protease toward human fibrinogen and bovine casein. The former is involved in blood coagulation, wound healing, and other aspects of hemostasis. Treatment with streptococcal protease resulted in degradation of the COOH-terminal region of fibrinogen α chain, indicating that fibrinogen may serve as an important substrate for this enzyme during the course of human infection. Polyclonal antibodies generated against recombinant 40- and 28-kDa (r40- and r28-kDa) forms of the C192S streptococcal protease mutant exhibited high enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay titers but demonstrated different inhibition activities toward proteolytic action of the wt enzyme. Activity of the wt protease was readily inhibited when the reaction was carried out in the presence of antibodies generated against r28-kDa C192S mutant. Antibodies produced against r40-kDa C192S mutant had no significant effect on proteolysis. These data suggest that the presence of the NH2-terminal prosegment prevents generation of functionally active antibodies and indicate that inhibition activity of antibodies most likely depends on their ability to bind the active-site region epitope(s) of the protein. PMID:10456870

  2. Specific Effects of Fibrinogen and the γA and γ′-Chain Fibrinogen Variants on Angiogenesis and Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Elim Y.L.; Weijers, Ester M.; Tuk, Bastiaan; Scheffer, Reinilde; Leebeek, Frank W.; van Neck, Johan W.; Koolwijk, Pieter

    2015-01-01

    In a newly formed wound, the natural fibrin network provides the first temporary matrix for tissue repair. Topical application of fibrin to a new wound may improve wound healing. A matrix of the common natural γ′ fibrin variant may further improve wound healing because it is expected to have a different architecture and this will influence angiogenesis, because it possesses increased thrombin and factor XIII binding and decreased platelet binding, when compared with the common γA fibrin matrix. Our objective was to determine the effect of fibrinogen and its γA and γ′ variants on angiogenesis and wound healing. We used in vitro angiogenesis models and an in vivo rat full-thickness excisional wound healing model. When comparing γA and γ′ fibrin in vitro, more tube-like structures were formed on day 7 in γA fibrin than in γ′ fibrin (13.83±6.12 AU vs. 6.1±1.46 AU). Wounds treated with fibrin demonstrated improved healing in vivo with more perfusion (47%±3% vs. 26%±4%, p<0.01 in placebo) and higher CD34 density score (2.0±0.4 vs. 2.8±0.1, p<0.01) on day 21 with fibrin matrices when compared with placebo-treated wounds. Increased perfusion was observed in γA fibrin-treated wounds on day 21 (53%±10% vs. 41%±7% for γ′ fibrin). The other parameters showed slightly improved (not significant) wound healing with γA fibrin compared with γ′ fibrin matrices. In conclusion, the use of fibrin and fibrin variant matrices offers an interesting methodology to stimulate the wound healing process. PMID:24974891

  3. Construction aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tepordei, V.V.

    1993-01-01

    Part of a special section on the market performance of industrial minerals in 1992. Production of construction aggregates increased by 4.6 percent in 1992. This increase was due, in part, to the increased funding for transportation and infrastructure projects. The U.S. produced about 1.05 Gt of crushed stone and an estimated 734 Mt of construction sand and gravel in 1992. Demand is expected to increase by about 5 percent in 1993.

  4. Construction aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tepordei, V.V.

    1996-01-01

    Part of the Annual Commodities Review 1995. Production of construction aggregates such as crushed stone and construction sand and gravel showed a marginal increase in 1995. Most of the 1995 increases were due to funding for highway construction work. The major areas of concern to the industry included issues relating to wetlands classification and the classification of crystalline silica as a probable human carcinogen. Despite this, an increase in demand is anticipated for 1996.

  5. Construction aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, T.I.; Bolen, W.P.

    2007-01-01

    Construction aggregates, primarily stone, sand and gravel, are recovered from widespread naturally occurring mineral deposits and processed for use primarily in the construction industry. They are mined, crushed, sorted by size and sold loose or combined with portland cement or asphaltic cement to make concrete products to build roads, houses, buildings, and other structures. Much smaller quantities are used in agriculture, cement manufacture, chemical and metallurgical processes, glass production and many other products.

  6. Bubble-induced aggregation of platelets: effects of gas species, proteins, and decompression.

    PubMed

    Thorsen, T; Klausen, H; Lie, R T; Holmsen, H

    1993-06-01

    We show that bubbles containing different gases (N2, He, Ne, Ar, or an O2-CO2-N2 mixture) are equally potent platelet agonists. The synergistic effect of different platelet antagonists does not seem to be affected by the type of gas in the bubbles. In contrast to aggregation in platelet-rich plasma (PRP), bubbles cause only a weak response in gel-filtered platelets (GFP), i.e., comparison of aggregation in protein-rich and protein-poor platelet suspensions may shed light on the role of different plasma proteins. Extracellular fibrinogen promotes bubble-induced platelet aggregation similar to known physiologic agonists, whereas albumin counteracts this aggregation. Bubble-induced aggregation is inhibited in GFP-fibrinogen by 2-deoxy-D-glucose plus antimycin A, suggesting dependency on ATP generation in the platelets and evidence for direct exposure of the "cryptic" fibrinogen receptor by bubbles. Hyperbaric compression and subsequent rapid, inadequate decompression of PRP caused little change in the aggregation response to gas bubbles and epinephrine at 1 bar, but reduced the response to ADP. Bubbles tended not to form before the surface film was broken. Pressure-induced aggregation was apparently metabolically active and not due to passive agglutination; electron microscopic studies and PRP with added glutaraldehyde did not show platelet activation, clumping, or reduced platelet count. In contrast to aggregation caused by pressure, bubble-induced aggregation in PRP at 1 bar (after treatment in the pressure chamber) was nearly completely inhibited by theophylline, a phosphodiesterase inhibitor that increases intracellular platelet cyclic AMP. PMID:8392414

  7. 21 CFR 864.7320 - Fibrinogen/fibrin degradation products assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Fibrinogen/fibrin degradation products assay. 864.7320 Section 864.7320 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7320 Fibrinogen/fibrin degradation...

  8. 21 CFR 864.7320 - Fibrinogen/fibrin degradation products assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Fibrinogen/fibrin degradation products assay. 864.7320 Section 864.7320 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7320 Fibrinogen/fibrin degradation...

  9. Development of Ga-67 labeled DFO-DAS-fibrinogen conjugate as a thrombus imaging agent.

    PubMed

    Yamaoka, S

    1987-01-01

    A cluster method developed for labeling large molecular proteins with radioactive metal was applied for 67Ga-labeled fibrinogen. A large number of deferoxamine (DFO) was introduced to human fibrinogen using dialdehyde strarch (DAS) as a spacer-functional polymer. The synthesized DFO-DAS-fibrinogen mentioned above was easily labeled with GaCl3 (67Ga) solution (2 mCi/5 mg). The basic investigations found that 67Ga-DFO-DAS-fibrinogen was applicable to the diagnosis of thrombus, and clinical trials were carried out under the physician-sponsored IND. In our further investigation, improvement of the 67Ga-DFO-DAS-fibrinogen reagent was attempted to obtain high specific radioactivity. This was accomplished with the more familiar 67Ga citrate. From the results of a series of experiments, 67Ga-DFO-DAS-fibrinogen of a new composition labeled using 67Ga citrate with high specific radioactivity (2 mCi/3 mg) was prepared, and both reagents were evaluated as thrombus imaging agents from the chemical and biological aspects. The labeling efficiency and clottability of both 67Ga-DFO-DAS-fibrinogen conjugates were satisfactorily high, more than 95% and 80%, respectively. The biodistribution in rats showed that both 67Ga-DFO-DAS-fibrinogen conjugates were essentially the same. These results suggest that there are no significant differences between reagents. At present, the improved reagents are being supplied for the second clinical trials under physician-sponsored IND. PMID:3438481

  10. Fibrinogen synthesis in serum-free hepatocyte cultures: Stimulation by glucocorticoids

    PubMed Central

    Grieninger, Gerd; Hertzberg, Kathe M.; Pindyck, Johanna

    1978-01-01

    Fibrinogen synthesis was investigated in cultures of chicken embryo hepatocytes initiated and maintained in chemically defined, serum-free medium. 11-Hydroxy glucocorticoids caused a 3-fold stimulation of fibrinogen synthesis. Half-maximal stimulation was achieved with 1 nM corticosterone or hydrocortisone, as compared with only 0.1 nM dexamethasone. Increased fibrinogen production in the presence of these glucocorticoids was characterized by a 4-hr delay in onset, a sensitivity to actinomycin D, and a requirement for the continuous presence of the steroid. Crossed immunoelectrophoresis permitted analysis of the simultaneous effects of glucocorticoids on the synthesis of more than 20 plasma proteins secreted in culture. The absence of an effect on the synthesis of most of these proteins was in sharp contrast to the 3-fold increase in fibrinogen production. Sera from a variety of animals also stimulated an increase in fibrinogen synthesis that was similar in degree but less specific than that due to glucocorticoids and that partially masked the response of the cells to the steroid hormones. The presence of an anticoagulant in the medium was found to be necessary for detection of the fibrinogen secreted in culture. Although insulin was routinely included in the chemically defined medium, the cells synthesized fibrinogen and responded to glucocorticoids in the absence of hormonal supplementation of the medium. These findings are consistent with the thesis that variations in glucocorticoid levels contribute to the regulation of fibrinogen production in the intact animal. Images PMID:281699

  11. Fibrinogen synthesis in serum-free hepatocyte cultures: stimulation by glucocorticoids.

    PubMed

    Grieninger, G; Hertzberg, K M; Pindyck, J

    1978-11-01

    Fibrinogen synthesis was investigated in cultures of chicken embryo hepatocytes initiated and maintained in chemically defined, serum-free medium. 11-Hydroxy glucocorticoids caused a 3-fold stimulation of fibrinogen synthesis. Half-maximal stimulation was achieved with 1 nM corticosterone or hydrocortisone, as compared with only 0.1 nM dexamethasone. Increased fibrinogen production in the presence of these glucocorticoids was characterized by a 4-hr delay in onset, a sensitivity to actinomycin D, and a requirement for the continuous presence of the steroid. Crossed immunoelectrophoresis permitted analysis of the simultaneous effects of glucocorticoids on the synthesis of more than 20 plasma proteins secreted in culture. The absence of an effect on the synthesis of most of these proteins was in sharp contrast to the 3-fold increase in fibrinogen production. Sera from a variety of animals also stimulated an increase in fibrinogen synthesis that was similar in degree but less specific than that due to glucocorticoids and that partially masked the response of the cells to the steroid hormones. The presence of an anticoagulant in the medium was found to be necessary for detection of the fibrinogen secreted in culture. Although insulin was routinely included in the chemically defined medium, the cells synthesized fibrinogen and responded to glucocorticoids in the absence of hormonal supplementation of the medium. These findings are consistent with the thesis that variations in glucocorticoid levels contribute to the regulation of fibrinogen production in the intact animal. PMID:281699

  12. A study on human serum albumin influence on glycation of fibrinogen

    SciTech Connect

    Kielmas, Martyna; Szewczuk, Zbigniew; Stefanowicz, Piotr

    2013-09-13

    Highlights: •The glycation of fibrinogen was investigated by isotopic labeling method. •The potential glycation sites in fibrinogen were identified. •Human serum albumin (HSA) inhibits the glycation of fibrinogen. •The effect of HSA on fibrinogen glycation is sequence-dependent. -- Abstract: Although in vivo glycation proceeds in complex mixture of proteins, previous studies did not take in consideration the influence of protein–protein interaction on Maillard reaction. The aim of our study was to test the influence of human serum albumin (HSA) on glycation of fibrinogen. The isotopic labeling using [{sup 13}C{sub 6}] glucose combined with LC-MS were applied as tool for identification possible glycation sites in fibrinogen and for evaluation the effect of HSA on the glycation level of selected amino acids in fibrinogen. The obtained data indicate that the addition of HSA protects the fibrinogen from glycation. The level of glycation in presence of HSA is reduced by 30–60% and depends on the location of glycated residue in sequence of protein.

  13. Fibrinogen adsorption mechanisms at the gold substrate revealed by QCM-D measurements and RSA modeling.

    PubMed

    Kubiak, Katarzyna; Adamczyk, Zbigniew; Cieśla, Michał

    2016-03-01

    Adsorption kinetics of fibrinogen at a gold substrate at various pHs was thoroughly studied using the QCM-D method. The experimental were interpreted in terms of theoretical calculations performed according to the random sequential adsorption model (RSA). In this way, the hydration functions and water factors of fibrinogen monolayers were quantitatively evaluated at various pHs. It was revealed that for the lower range of fibrinogen coverage the hydration function were considerably lower than previously obtained for the silica sensor [33]. The lower hydration of fibrinogen monolayers on the gold sensor was attributed to its higher roughness. However, for higher fibrinogen coverage the hydration functions for both sensors became identical exhibiting an universal behavior. By using the hydration functions, the fibrinogen adsorption/desorption runs derived from QCM-D measurements were converted to the Γd vs. the time relationships. This allowed to precisely determine the maximum coverage that varied between 1.6mgm(-2) at pH 3.5 and 4.5mgm(-2) at pH 7.4 (for ionic strength of 0.15M). These results agree with theoretical eRSA modeling and previous experimental data derived by using ellipsometry, OWLS and TIRF. Various fibrinogen adsorption mechanisms were revealed by exploiting the maximum coverage data. These results allow one to develop a method for preparing fibrinogen monolayers of well-controlled coverage and molecule orientation. PMID:26705826

  14. Introduction of an algorithm for ROTEM-guided fibrinogen concentrate administration in major obstetric haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Mallaiah, S; Barclay, P; Harrod, I; Chevannes, C; Bhalla, A

    2015-02-01

    We compared blood component requirements during major obstetric haemorrhage, following the introduction of fibrinogen concentrate. A prospective study of transfusion requirements and patient outcomes was performed for 12 months to evaluate the major obstetric haemorrhage pathway using shock packs (Shock Pack phase). The study was repeated after the pathway was amended to include fibrinogen concentrate (Fibrinogen phase). The median (IQR [range]) number of blood components given was 8.0 (3.0-14.5 [0-32]) during the Shock Pack phase, and 3.0 (2.0-5.0 [0-26]) during the Fibrinogen phase (p = 0.0004). The median (IQR [range]) quantity of fibrinogen administered was significantly greater in the Shock Pack phase, 3.2 (0-7.1 [0-20.4]) g, than in the Fibrinogen phase, 0 (0-3.0 [0-12.4]) g, p = 0.0005. Four (9.5%) of 42 patients in the Shock Pack phase developed transfusion associated circulatory overload compared with none of 51 patients in the Fibrinogen phase (p = 0.038). Fibrinogen concentrate allows prompt correction of coagulation deficits associated with major obstetric haemorrhage, reducing the requirement for blood component therapy and the attendant risks of complications. PMID:25289791

  15. Implications of epidermal growth factor (EGF) induced egf receptor aggregation.

    PubMed Central

    Wofsy, C; Goldstein, B; Lund, K; Wiley, H S

    1992-01-01

    To investigate the role of receptor aggregation in EGF binding, we construct a mathematical model describing receptor dimerization (and higher levels of aggregation) that permits an analysis of the influence of receptor aggregation on ligand binding. We answer two questions: (a) Can Scatchard plots of EGF binding data be analyzed productively in terms of two noninteracting receptor populations with different affinities if EGF induced receptor aggregation occurs? No. If two affinities characterize aggregated and monomeric EGF receptors, we show that the Scatchard plot should have curvature characteristic of positively cooperative binding, the opposite of that observed. Thus, the interpretation that the high affinity population represents aggregated receptors and the low affinity population nonaggregated receptors is wrong. If the two populations are interpreted without reference to receptor aggregation, an important determinant of Scatchard plot shape is ignored. (b) Can a model for EGF receptor aggregation and EGF binding be consistent with the "negative curvature" (i.e., curvature characteristic of negatively cooperative binding) observed in most Scatchard plots of EGF binding data? Yes. In addition, the restrictions on the model parameters required to obtain negatively curved Scatchard plots provide new information about binding and aggregation. In particular, EGF binding to aggregated receptors must be negatively cooperative, i.e., binding to a receptor in a dimer (or higher oligomer) having one receptor already bound occurs with lower affinity than the initial binding event. A third question we consider is whether the model we present can be used to detect the presence of mechanisms other than receptor aggregation that are contributing to Scatchard plot curvature. For the membrane and cell binding data we analyzed, the best least squares fits of the model to each of the four data sets deviate systematically from the data, indicating that additional factors are

  16. Tigecycline Treatment Causes a Decrease in Fibrinogen Levels

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qian; Zhou, Suming

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the impact of tigecycline treatment on coagulation parameters, specifically fibrinogen, in patients with severe infections. We examined 20 cases of tigecycline-treated patients with severe infections, including hospital-acquired pneumonia, complicated intra-abdominal infections, complicated skin and soft tissue infections, and bloodstream infections. We monitored the relative markers of coagulation and renal and liver function before, during, and after treatment. Fibrinogen (FIB) levels decreased significantly after the use of tigecycline and normalized after the cessation of treatment. FIB levels significantly decreased in the patients treated with the recommended dose or a higher treatment dose. The FIB levels decreased more in the higher-treatment-dose group. There was no difference in the decrease in FIB levels or the FIB level recovery by age. Prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), and thrombin time (TT) were prolonged after tigecycline use. The TT decreased after the cessation of treatment, and the PT and APTT also decreased but not to a significant level. There was no change in platelet, alanine aminotransferase (ALT), or creatinine (Cr) levels associated with treatment. The use of tigecycline was associated with decreased FIB levels, which returned to normal after the cessation of treatment. A high-dose treatment group showed greater decreases in FIB levels than did patients treated with the recommended dose. The decline in FIB was not related to patient age. The use of tigecycline was associated with prolonged PT, APTT, and TT. PMID:25547356

  17. Utility of plasma fibrinogen in the differential diagnosis of thyrotoxicosis

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jie; Liu, Rui; Wu, Di; Miao, Wei; Chen, Qian; Li, Yushu; Guan, Haixia

    2015-01-01

    Background: A study had reported that a low TSH level is associated with elevated plasma fibrinogen (FIB) levels. Our purpose was to investigate the role of FIB in the differential diagnosis of thyrotoxicosis. Methods: The data of 104 patients with primary thyrotoxicosis at the First Hospital of China Medical University from July 2010 to March 2011 were analyzed and divided into three groups: 45 cases of subacute thyroiditis, 50 cases of Graves’ disease, and 9 cases of toxic multinodular goiter. The patients with subacute thyroiditis were followed up before and after the treatment. FIB levels of the three groups were compared. Results: There was no significant difference in serum TSH, FT3 and FT4 between the patients with three different causes of thyrotoxicosis (P > 0.05). The proportion of hyperfibrinogenemia in patients with subacute thyroiditis was 98%. The FIB levels of patients with subacute thyroiditis were significantly higher than those with Graves’ disease and toxic multinodular goiter (P < 0.05). Levels of ESR show a similar tendency. The FIB levels returned to normal with the remission of subacute thyroiditis. Conclusions: Elevated plasma fibrinogen is a common manifestation of the active phase of subacute thyroiditis. A FIB test can be used for the differential diagnosis of thyrotoxicosis. We can anticipate the outcome of subacute thyroiditis through the dynamic changes of FIB. PMID:25785116

  18. Sensitive Immunoassays of Nitrated Fibrinogen in Human Biofluids

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Zhiwen; Wu, Hong; Du, Dan; Wang, Jun; Wang, Hua; Qian, Weijun; Bigelow, Diana J.; Pounds, Joel G.; Smith, Richard D.; Lin, Yuehe

    2010-05-05

    Three new sandwich immunoassays for detection of nitrated biomarker have been established with potential applications in biomedical studies and clinical practice. In this study, nitrated human fibrinogen, a potential oxidative stress biomarker for several pathologies, was chosen as the target. To improve the sensitivity and overcome the interference caused by the complexity of human biofluids, we developed three sandwich strategies using various combinations of primary antibody and secondary antibody. All three strategies demonstrated high sensitivity and selectivity towards nitrated forms of fibrinogen in buffer, but their performances were dramatically reduced when tested with human plasma and serum samples. Systematically optimizations were carried out to investigate the effects of numerous factors, including sampling, coating, blocking, and immunoreactions. Our final optimization results indicate that two of these strategies retain sufficient sensitivity and selectivity for use as assays in human physiological samples. Specifically, detection limits reached the pM level and the linear response ranges were up to nM level with a correlation coefficient > 0.99. To our best knowledge, this is the first example of using an electrochemical immunoassay for a nitrated biomarker in a physiological fluid. This novel approach provides a rapid, sensitive, selective, cost efficient and robust bioassay for detection of oxidative stress in pathology and for clinical applications. Moreover, the sandwich strategies developed in this paper can be readily used to establish effective methods targeting other nitration biomarkers.

  19. Bipartite mRNA for chicken alpha-fibrinogen potentially encodes an amino acid sequence homologous to beta- and gamma-fibrinogens.

    PubMed Central

    Weissbach, L; Grieninger, G

    1990-01-01

    Overlapping cDNAs derived from the chicken alpha-fibrinogen mRNA have been sequenced, beginning from within the coding region for the signal peptide of this subunit and terminating within the poly(A) extension. The predicted size of chicken alpha-fibrinogen is 54,187 daltons, which is the smallest of any alpha chain reported; the oligopeptide repeats that characterize the central regions of the other alpha subunits were conspicuously absent. A further unexpected finding was the presence on the mRNA of a separate, long open reading frame (752 nucleotides), beginning 312 nucleotides downstream from the alpha-fibrinogen coding sequence and containing intron-like features near its 5' end. The protein sequence predicted from this second open reading frame lacks an initiating methionine but is homologous to the C-terminal regions of all known beta- and gamma-fibrinogens as well as the C termini of two nonfibrinogen proteins: cytotactin (tenascin), an extracellular matrix protein, and pT49, a putative protein specific to cytotoxic T cells. The intron-like features of the second open reading frame immediately precede the region of common homology, and the beginnings of the corresponding homologous segments in the beta- and gamma-fibrinogen sequences are marked by aligned intron positions. Based on these findings, it is proposed that fibrinogen gene evolution included a fusion of two distinct ancestral genes. PMID:2367530

  20. Adsorption and functionality of fibrinogen on triblock copolymer-coated surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, Stephen Moss

    To assess the influence of the surface microenvironment on the adsorption and biologic activity of fibrinogen, a series of poly(ethylene oxide)/poly(propylene oxide) triblock copolymers were adsorbed to solid, hydrophobic polystyrene-divinylbenzene beads. The copolymers, which were of the form PEOsb{b}PPOsb{a}PEOsb{b}, varied in their hydrophile/lipophile balances (HLB) due only to differences in their PEO chain length (5 to 129 EO units) as the hydrophobic PPO core segment was of fixed length (56 or 69 PO units). The surface coverage of copolymers was determined first and after exposing the beads to fibrinogen or to human plasma, the total amount of protein adsorbed to their surface was measured. The functionality of fibrinogen bound to copolymer-modified beads was assessed in terms of fibrin clot formation and by the adherence of macrophages (THP-1 tumor cells). Enzymatic processing was used to probe the surface orientation of fibrinogen. The copolymers appear to adsorb in an expanded fashion, a conclusion supported by surface pressure-area isotherms of the copolymers spread at the air-water interface. As compared to copolymer-free surfaces, protein adsorption decreases by up to 90% as the PEO chain length of the copolymers increases. The copolymer coatings appear to lower fibrinogen adsorption by limiting the available surface area. On surfaces coated with the hydrophobic versions of the copolymers, the biologic assays demonstrate that fibrinogen is as reactive/coagulable as for surfaces with saturated coverages of fibrin despite that these copolymer-coated surfaces have 60% less fibrinogen adsorbed to them. When adsorbed at the same low surface concentration in the absence of copolymer, fibrinogen is not active. Enzymatic processing of bound fibrinogen suggests that the presence of the copolymers promote the adsorption of the protein in end-on fashion. It is proposed here, that when adsorbed end-on, fibrinogen is functional because its reactive sites are

  1. Construction aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bolen, W.P.; Tepordei, V.V.

    2001-01-01

    The estimated production during 2000 of construction aggregates, crushed stone, and construction sand and gravel increased by about 2.6% to 2.7 Gt (3 billion st), compared with 1999. The expansion that started in 1992 continued with record production levels for the ninth consecutive year. By commodity, construction sand and gravel production increased by 4.5% to 1.16 Gt (1.28 billion st), while crushed stone production increased by 1.3% to 1.56 Gt (1.72 billion st).

  2. Stabilized sulfur binding using activated fillers

    DOEpatents

    Kalb, Paul D.; Vagin, Vyacheslav P.; Vagin, Sergey P.

    2015-07-21

    A method of making a stable, sulfur binding composite comprising impregnating a solid aggregate with an organic modifier comprising unsaturated hydrocarbons with at least one double or triple covalent bond between adjacent carbon atoms to create a modifier-impregnated aggregate; heating and drying the modifier-impregnated aggregate to activate the surface of the modifier-impregnated aggregate for reaction with sulfur.

  3. Effects of tau domain-specific antibodies and intravenous immunoglobulin on tau aggregation and aggregate degradation.

    PubMed

    Esteves-Villanueva, Jose O; Trzeciakiewicz, Hanna; Loeffler, David A; Martić, Sanela

    2015-01-20

    Tau pathology, including neurofibrillary tangles, develops in Alzheimer's disease (AD). The aggregation and hyperphosphorylation of tau are potential therapeutic targets for AD. Administration of anti-tau antibodies reduces tau pathology in transgenic "tauopathy" mice; however, the optimal tau epitopes and conformations to target are unclear. Also unknown is whether intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) products, currently being evaluated in AD trials, exert effects on pathological tau. This study examined the effects of anti-tau antibodies targeting different tau epitopes and the IVIG Gammagard on tau aggregation and preformed tau aggregates. Tau aggregation was assessed by transmission electron microscopy and fluorescence spectroscopy, and the binding affinity of the anti-tau antibodies for tau was evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Antibodies used were anti-tau 1-150 ("D-8"), anti-tau 259-266 ("Paired-262"), anti-tau 341-360 ("A-10"), and anti-tau 404-441 ("Tau-46"), which bind to tau's N-terminus, microtubule binding domain (MBD) repeat sequences R1 and R4, and the C-terminus, respectively. The antibodies Paired-262 and A-10, but not D-8 and Tau-46, reduced tau fibrillization and degraded preformed tau aggregates, whereas the IVIG reduced tau aggregation but did not alter preformed aggregates. The binding affinities of the antibodies for the epitope for which they were specific did not appear to be related to their effects on tau aggregation. These results confirm that antibody binding to tau's MBD repeat sequences may inhibit tau aggregation and indicate that such antibodies may also degrade preformed tau aggregates. In the presence of anti-tau antibodies, the resulting tau morphologies were antigen-dependent. The results also suggested the possibility of different pathways regulating antibody-mediated inhibition of tau aggregation and antibody-mediated degradation of preformed tau aggregates. PMID:25545358

  4. Localization of the chaperone binding site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyle, D.; Gopalakrishnan, S.; Takemoto, L.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    The hypothesis derived from models of the multi-oligomeric chaperone complex suggests that partially denatured proteins bind in a central cavity in the aggregate. To test this hypothesis, the molecular chaperone, alpha crystallin, was bound to partially denatured forms of gamma crystallin, and the binding site was visualized by immunogold localization. In an alternative approach, gold particles were directly complexed with gamma crystallin, followed by binding to the alpha crystallin aggregate. In both cases, binding was localized to the central region of the aggregate, confirming for the first time that partially denatured proteins do indeed bind to a central region of the molecular chaperone aggregate.

  5. Adsorption Studies with AFM of Human Plasma Fibrinogen on Silicon Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gause, Sheena; Kong, Wendy; Rowe

    2007-11-01

    Fibrinogen (FGN) plays an important role in the clotting of blood. Human plasma fibrinogen (HPF) is a protein that readily adsorbs on biomaterial surfaces. The purpose of this experiment was to use the Atomic Force Microscope to study the adsorption of HPF molecules or FGN onto several silicon surfaces with different orientations and resistivities. The size of the FGN molecules found to be somewhat different of Si(111), (100) and (110) were compared to the size of the FGN molecules in solution (45 nm in length, the end dynodes measures to be 6.5 nm in diameter, and the middle dynode measures to be 5 nm in diameter. For this study, the CPR (Thermo-microscope) Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) was used to observe the amount of fibrinogen molecules adsorbed by Si (111) with a resistance of .0281-.0261 φ cm, Si (111) with a resistance of 1 φ cm, Si (100), and Si (110) surfaces. In finding any single fibrinogen molecules, the appropriate image scans and measurements were taken. After collection and analysis of the data, it was found from AFM that the fibrinogen molecules found on Si (110) mostly resembled fibrinogen molecules found in solution. The other images showed that the fibrinogen molecules adsorbed on Silicon substrates is significantly greater (˜10-20 %) than those in solution.

  6. The Primary Role of Fibrinogen-Related Proteins in Invertebrates Is Defense, Not Coagulation

    PubMed Central

    Hanington, Patrick C.; Zhang, Si-Ming

    2010-01-01

    In vertebrates, the conversion of fibrinogen into fibrin is an essential process that underlies the establishment of the supporting protein framework required for coagulation. In invertebrates, fibrinogen-domain-containing proteins play a role in the defense response generated against pathogens; however, they do not function in coagulation, suggesting that this role has been recently acquired. Molecules containing fibrinogen motifs have been identified in numerous invertebrate organisms, and most of these molecules known to date have been linked to defense. Moreover, recent genome projects of invertebrate animals have revealed surprisingly high numbers of fibrinogen-like loci in their genomes, suggesting important and perhaps diverse functions of fibrinogen-like proteins in invertebrates. The ancestral role of molecules containing fibrinogen-related domains (FReDs) with immunity is the focus of this review, with emphasis on specific FReDs called fibrinogen-related proteins (FREPs) identified from the schistosome-transmitting mollusc Biomphalaria glabrata. Herein, we outline the range of invertebrate organisms FREPs can be found in, and detail the roles these molecules play in defense and protection against infection. PMID:21063081

  7. Quantitative Determination of Fibrinogen of Patients with Coronary Heart Diseases through Piezoelectric Agglutination Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qinghai; Hua, Xing; Fu, Weiling; Liu, Dongbo; Chen, Ming; Cai, Guoru

    2010-01-01

    Fibrinogen can transform fibrin through an agglutination reaction, finally forming fibrin polymer with grid structure. The density and viscosity of the reaction system changes drastically during the course of agglutination. In this research, we apply an independently-developed piezoelectric agglutination sensor to detect the fibrinogen agglutination reaction in patients with coronary heart diseases. The terminal judgment method of determining plasma agglutination reaction through piezoelectric agglutination sensor was established. In addition, the standard curve between plasma agglutination time and fibrinogen concentration was established to determinate fibrinogen content quantitatively. The results indicate the close correlation between the STAGO paramagnetic particle method and the method of piezoelectric agglutination sensor for the detection of Fibrinogen. The correlation coefficient was 0.91 (γ = 0.91). The determination can be completed within 10 minutes. The fibrinogen concentration in the coronary heart disease group was significantly higher than that of the healthy control group (P < 0.05). The results reveal that high fibrinogen concentration is closely correlated to the incurrence, development and prognosis of coronary heart diseases. Compared with other traditional methods, the method of piezoelectric agglutination sensor has some merits such as operation convenience, small size, low cost, quick detecting, good precision and the common reacting agents with paramagnetic particle method. PMID:22294917

  8. Thrombin and fibrinogen γ' impact clot structure by marked effects on intrafibrillar structure and protofibril packing.

    PubMed

    Domingues, Marco M; Macrae, Fraser L; Duval, Cédric; McPherson, Helen R; Bridge, Katherine I; Ajjan, Ramzi A; Ridger, Victoria C; Connell, Simon D; Philippou, Helen; Ariëns, Robert A S

    2016-01-28

    Previous studies have shown effects of thrombin and fibrinogen γ' on clot structure. However, structural information was obtained using electron microscopy, which requires sample dehydration. Our aim was to investigate the role of thrombin and fibrinogen γ' in modulating fibrin structure under fully hydrated conditions. Fibrin fibers were studied using turbidimetry, atomic force microscopy, electron microscopy, and magnetic tweezers in purified and plasma solutions. Increased thrombin induced a pronounced decrease in average protofibril content per fiber, with a relatively minor decrease in fiber size, leading to the formation of less compact fiber structures. Atomic force microscopy under fully hydrated conditions confirmed that fiber diameter was only marginally decreased. Decreased protofibril content of the fibers produced by high thrombin resulted in weakened clot architecture as analyzed by magnetic tweezers in purified systems and by thromboelastometry in plasma and whole blood. Fibers produced with fibrinogen γ' showed reduced protofibril packing over a range of thrombin concentrations. High-magnification electron microscopy demonstrated reduced protofibril packing in γ' fibers and unraveling of fibers into separate protofibrils. Decreased protofibril packing was confirmed in plasma for high thrombin concentrations and fibrinogen-deficient plasma reconstituted with γ' fibrinogen. These findings demonstrate that, in fully hydrated conditions, thrombin and fibrinogen γ' have dramatic effects on protofibril content and that protein density within fibers correlates with strength of the fibrin network. We conclude that regulation of protofibril content of fibers is an important mechanism by which thrombin and fibrinogen γ' modulate fibrin clot structure and strength. PMID:26608329

  9. Streptococcal M1 protein constructs a pathological host fibrinogen network

    PubMed Central

    Macheboeuf, Pauline; Buffalo, Cosmo; Fu, Chi-yu; Zinkernagel, Annelies S.; Cole, Jason N.; Johnson, John E.; Nizet, Victor; Ghosh, Partho

    2012-01-01

    M1 protein, a major virulence factor of the leading invasive strain of group A Streptococcus, is sufficient to induce toxic shock-like vascular leakage and tissue injury. These events are triggered by the formation of a complex between M1 and fibrinogen (Fg) that, unlike M1 or Fg alone, leads to neutrophil activation. Here we provide a structural explanation for the pathological properties of the M1-Fg complex. A conformationally dynamic coiled-coil dimer of M1 was found to organize four Fg molecules into a specific cross-like pattern. This pattern supported the construction of a supramolecular network that was required for neutrophil activation but was distinct from a fibrin clot. Disruption of this network into other supramolecular assemblies was not tolerated. These results have bearing on the pathophysiology of streptococcal toxic shock. PMID:21475196

  10. [Nerve anastomoses. Sutures or fibrinogenic glue? Preliminary results].

    PubMed

    Boedts, D; Bouckaert, J I

    1984-01-01

    A comparative animal experiment was set up between two nerve anastomosis techniques, one by sealing nerve ends with a fibrinogen-thrombine glue and the other by classical perineural suturing. It was concluded that glueing nerve ends, from the surgical-technical point of view is a better method than suturing. It is an easy, time-sparing method which allows excellent coaptation of the severed nerves with minimal iatrogenic trauma. On the long run however some questions remain. There is the problem of induced fibrosis by using high doses of aprotinine and factor XIII at the site of the nerve junctions and on the other hand the influence of fibrinolysis in traumatized tissues, with early decrease of tensile strength at the junctions before nerve healing. So glued nerve ends should be completely free of tension, protected against secondary shearing forces, and also immobilization of the region is required. PMID:6385609

  11. 5-fluorouracil loaded fibrinogen nanoparticles for cancer drug delivery applications.

    PubMed

    Rejinold, N Sanoj; Muthunarayanan, M; Chennazhi, K P; Nair, S V; Jayakumar, R

    2011-01-01

    In this study, 5-flurouracil loaded fibrinogen nanoparticles (5-FU-FNPs) were prepared by two step coacervation method using calcium chloride as cross-linker. The prepared nanoparticles were characterized using DLS, SEM, AFM, FT-IR, TG/DTA and XRD studies. Particle size of 5-FU-FNPs was found to be 150-200 nm. The loading efficiency (LE) and in vitro drug release was studied using UV spectrophotometer. The LE of FNPs was found to be ∼90%. The cytotoxicity studies showed 5-FU-FNPs were toxic to MCF7, PC3 and KB cells while they are comparatively non toxic to L929 cells. Cellular uptake of Rhodamine 123 conjugated 5-FU-FNPs was also studied. Cell uptake studies demonstrated that the nanoparticles are inside the cells. These results indicated that FNPs could be useful for cancer drug delivery. PMID:20951162

  12. Influence of Ficoll on urea induced denaturation of fibrinogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankaranarayanan, Kamatchi; Meenakshisundaram, N.

    2016-03-01

    Ficoll is a neutral, highly branched polymer used as a molecular crowder in the study of proteins. Ficoll is also part of Ficoll-Paque used in biology laboratories to separate blood to its components (erythrocytes, leukocytes etc.,). Role of Ficoll in the urea induced denaturation of protein Fibrinogen (Fg) has been analyzed using fluorescence, circular dichroism, molecular docking and interfacial studies. Fluorescence studies show that Ficoll prevents quenching of Fg in the presence of urea. From the circular dichroism spectra, Fg shows conformational transition to random coil with urea of 6 M concentration. Ficoll helps to shift this denaturation concentration to 8 M and thus constraints by shielding Fg during the process. Molecular docking studies indicate that Ficoll interacts favorably with the protein than urea. The surface tension and shear viscosity analysis shows clearly that the protein is shielded by Ficoll.

  13. Fibrinogen-induced increased pial venular permeability in mice

    PubMed Central

    Muradashvili, Nino; Qipshidze, Natia; Munjal, Charu; Givvimani, Srikanth; Benton, Richard L; Roberts, Andrew M; Tyagi, Suresh C; Lominadze, David

    2012-01-01

    Elevated blood level of Fibrinogen (Fg) is commonly associated with vascular dysfunction. We tested the hypothesis that at pathologically high levels, Fg increases cerebrovascular permeability by activating matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Fibrinogen (4 mg/mL blood concentration) or equal volume of phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) was infused into male wild-type (WT; C57BL/6J) or MMP-9 gene knockout (MMP9−/−) mice. Pial venular leakage of fluorescein isothiocyanate-bovine serum albumin to Fg or PBS alone and to topically applied histamine (10−5 mol/L) were assessed. Intravital fluorescence microscopy and image analysis were used to assess cerebrovascular protein leakage. Pial venular macromolecular leakage increased more after Fg infusion than after infusion of PBS in both (WT and MMP9−/−) mice but was more pronounced in WT compared with MMP9−/− mice. Expression of vascular endothelial cadherin (VE-cadherin) was less and plasmalemmal vesicle-associated protein-1 (PV-1) was greater in Fg-infused than in PBS-infused both mice groups. However, in MMP9−/− mice, VE-cadherin expression was greater and PV-1 expression was less than in WT mice. These data indicate that at higher levels, Fg compromises microvascular integrity through activation of MMP-9 and downregulation of VE-cadherin and upregulation of PV-1. Our results suggest that elevated blood level of Fg could have a significant role in cerebrovascular dysfunction and remodeling. PMID:21989482

  14. Autoimmune Responses to Soluble Aggregates of Amyloidogenic Proteins Involved in Neurodegenerative Diseases: Overlapping Aggregation Prone and Autoimmunogenic regions

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sandeep; Thangakani, A. Mary; Nagarajan, R.; Singh, Satish K.; Velmurugan, D.; Gromiha, M. Michael

    2016-01-01

    Why do patients suffering from neurodegenerative diseases generate autoantibodies that selectively bind soluble aggregates of amyloidogenic proteins? Presently, molecular basis of interactions between the soluble aggregates and human immune system is unknown. By analyzing sequences of experimentally validated T-cell autoimmune epitopes, aggregating peptides, amyloidogenic proteins and randomly generated peptides, here we report overlapping regions that likely drive aggregation as well as generate autoantibodies against the aggregates. Sequence features, that make short peptides susceptible to aggregation, increase their incidence in human T-cell autoimmune epitopes by 4–6 times. Many epitopes are predicted to be significantly aggregation prone (aggregation propensities ≥10%) and the ones containing experimentally validated aggregating regions are enriched in hydrophobicity by 10–20%. Aggregate morphologies also influence Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) - types recognized by the aggregating regions containing epitopes. Most (88%) epitopes that contain amyloid fibril forming regions bind HLA-DR, while majority (63%) of those containing amorphous β-aggregating regions bind HLA-DQ. More than two-thirds (70%) of human amyloidogenic proteins contain overlapping regions that are simultaneously aggregation prone and auto-immunogenic. Such regions help clear soluble aggregates by generating selective autoantibodies against them. This can be harnessed for early diagnosis of proteinopathies and for drug/vaccine design against them. PMID:26924748

  15. Interaction of fibrinogen and muramidase-released protein promotes the development of Streptococcus suis meningitis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junping; Kong, Decong; Zhang, Shengwei; Jiang, Hua; Zheng, Yuling; Zang, Yating; Hao, Huaijie; Jiang, Yongqiang

    2015-01-01

    Muramidase-released protein (MRP) is as an important virulence marker of Streptococcus suis (S. suis) serotype 2. Our previous works have shown that MRP can bind human fibrinogen (hFg); however, the function of this interaction in S. suis meningitis is not known. In this study, we found that the deletion of mrp significantly impairs the hFg-mediated adherence and traversal ability of S. suis across human cerebral microvascular endothelial cells (hCMEC/D3). Measurement of the permeability to Lucifer yellow in vitro and Evans blue extravasation in vivo show that the MRP-hFg interaction significantly increases the permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). In the mouse meningitis model, wild type S. suis caused higher bacterial loads in the brain and more severe histopathological signs of meningitis than the mrp mutant at day 3 post-infection. Western blot analysis and immunofluorescence observations reveal that the MRP-hFg interaction can destroy the cell adherens junction protein p120-catenin of hCMEC/D3. These results indicate that the MRP-hFg interaction is important in the development of S. suis meningitis. PMID:26441928

  16. αVβ3 Integrin Regulation of Respiratory Burst in Fibrinogen Adherent Human Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hye-Yeong; Skokos, Eleni A.; Myer, Deborah J.; Agaba, Perez; Gonzalez, Anjelica L.

    2015-01-01

    In response to inflammatory stimuli, microvascular endothelial cells become activated, initiating the capture and exit of neutrophils from the blood vessel and into the extravascular extracellular matrix (ECM). In the extravascular space, neutrophils bind to ECM proteins, regulating cellular functions via signaling through adhesion molecules known as integrins. The αVβ3 integrin is an important mediator of neutrophil adhesion to ECM proteins containing the Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) peptide sequence, including fibrinogen and fibronectin. Despite the abundance of RGD sequence in the ECM, adhesion molecule-mediated neutrophil activity has been focused on the β2 (Mac-1, CD11b/CD18) and β1 integrin response to matrix proteins. Here we investigated αVβ3 integrin-mediated reactive oxidant suppression as a consequence of human neutrophil adhesion to RGD containing proteins. Using integrin ligand-modified (poly)ethylene glycol hydrogels and reactive oxygen species (ROS) sensitive fluorescent probes (dihydrotetramethylrhosamine, H2TMRos), we evaluated integrin–peptide interactions that effectively regulate ROS generation. This study demonstrates that neutrophil adhesion suppresses ROS production in an αVβ3-dependent manner. Additionally, we determine that p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase in the respiratory burst signaling pathway is interrupted by integrin-mediated adhesion. These data indicate that ECM/integrin interactions can induce αVβ3-mediated adhesion dependent downstream signaling of ROS regulation via a Mac-1 independent mechanism. PMID:25632307

  17. Biocompatible and biodegradable fibrinogen microspheres for tumor-targeted doxorubicin delivery

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Jae Yeon; Park, Gil Yong; An, Seong Soo A

    2015-01-01

    In the development of effective drug delivery carriers, many researchers have focused on the usage of nontoxic and biocompatible materials and surface modification with targeting molecules for tumor-specific drug delivery. Fibrinogen (Fbg), an abundant glycoprotein in plasma, could be a potential candidate for developing drug carriers because of its biocompatibility and tumor-targeting property via arginine–glycine–aspartate (RGD) peptide sequences. Doxorubicin (DOX), a chemotherapeutic agent, was covalently conjugated to Fbg, and the microspheres were prepared. Acid-labile and non-cleavable linkers were used for the conjugation of DOX to Fbg, resulting in an acid-triggered drug release under a mild acidic condition and a slow-controlled drug release, respectively. In vitro cytotoxicity tests confirmed low cytotoxicity in normal cells and high antitumor effect toward cancer cells. In addition, it was discovered that a longer linker could make the binding of cells to Fbg drug carriers easier. Therefore, DOX–linker–Fbg microspheres could be a suitable drug carrier for safer and effective drug delivery. PMID:26366073

  18. [Effect of fibrinogen on corrosion behavior of stainless steel in artificial blood solution].

    PubMed

    Guo, L; Liang, C; Guo, H; Chen, W

    2001-12-01

    The effect of fibrinogen on corrosion behavior of SUS316L and SUS317L stainless steel in artificial blood PBS solution has been investigated with electrochemical technology. The results showed that the corrosion potential (Ec) of stainless steel shifted negatively, the passivated current (ip) became less and the pitting corrosion potential (Eb) shifted negatively with the existence of fibrinogen in PBS. These indicate that samples become more sensitive to corrosion under this circumstance. SEM pictures demonstrated that stainless steel adsorbed fibrinogen on its surface. PMID:11791309

  19. Rapid extraction, radioiodination, and in vivo catabolism of 125I-labeled fibrinogen in the horse

    SciTech Connect

    Coyne, C.P.; Hornof, W.J.; Kelly, A.B.; O'Brien, T.R.; DeNardo, S.J.

    1985-12-01

    Two methods were analyzed for the rapid extraction of equine fibrinogen from fresh plasma, using ammonium sulfate-sodium phosphate buffer. Fibrinogen from each of these 2 methods was then radiolabeled with 125I (half-life = 60.2 days, gamma = 35 keV), using monochloroiodine reagent. Mean protein-bound activity was 98.5% and mean clottable radioactivity was 94.1%. Radiolabeled fibrinogen administered IV to 15 horses had an overall mean (+/- SD) plasma half-life of 4.95 +/- 0.44 days.

  20. Adhesins of Leptospira interrogans Mediate the Interaction to Fibrinogen and Inhibit Fibrin Clot Formation In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Rosane; Domingos, Renan F.; Siqueira, Gabriela H.; Fernandes, Luis G.; Souza, Natalie M.; Vieira, Monica L.; de Morais, Zenaide M.; Vasconcellos, Silvio A.; Nascimento, Ana L. T. O.

    2013-01-01

    We report in this work that Leptospira strains, virulent L. interrogans serovar Copenhageni, attenuated L. interrogans serovar Copenhageni and saprophytic L. biflexa serovar Patoc are capable of binding fibrinogen (Fg). The interaction of leptospires with Fg inhibits thrombin- induced fibrin clot formation that may affect the haemostatic equilibrium. Additionally, we show that plasminogen (PLG)/plasmin (PLA) generation on the surface of Leptospira causes degradation of human Fg. The data suggest that PLA-coated leptospires were capable to employ their proteolytic activity to decrease one substrate of the coagulation cascade. We also present six leptospiral adhesins and PLG- interacting proteins, rLIC12238, Lsa33, Lsa30, OmpL1, rLIC11360 and rLIC11975, as novel Fg-binding proteins. The recombinant proteins interact with Fg in a dose-dependent and saturable fashion when increasing protein concentration was set to react to a fix human Fg concentration. The calculated dissociation equilibrium constants (KD) of these reactions ranged from 733.3±276.8 to 128±89.9 nM for rLIC12238 and Lsa33, respectively. The interaction of recombinant proteins with human Fg resulted in inhibition of fibrin clot by thrombin-catalyzed reaction, suggesting that these versatile proteins could mediate Fg interaction in Leptospira. Our data reveal for the first time the inhibition of fibrin clot by Leptospira spp. and presents adhesins that could mediate these interactions. Decreasing fibrin clot would cause an imbalance of the coagulation cascade that may facilitate bleeding and help bacteria dissemination PMID:24009788

  1. Preparation and biocompatibility of electrospun poly( L-lactide-co-ɛ-caprolactone)/fibrinogen blended nanofibrous scaffolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Zhengdong; Fu, Weiguo; Dong, Zhihui; Zhang, Xiangman; Gao, Bin; Guo, Daqiao; He, Hongbing; Wang, Yuqi

    2011-02-01

    Electrospun blended nanofibrous scaffolds were fabricated from an synthetic biodegradable polymer (poly(L-lactide-co-ɛ-caprolactone): PLCL; 8% solution) and a natural protein (fibrinogen; 100 mg/ml solution) with different volume ratios. Results showed that the blended scaffolds consisted of nanoscale fibers with mean diameters ranging from 224 to 450 nm. The deposition of the fibrinogen amino groups on the surfaces of the blended scaffolds was confirmed by XPS. The hydrophilicity of the blended scaffolds were improved with the fibrinogen content increasing in the blended system. Cell viability assay and SEM results showed that human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) had progressive growth and well spread morphology on the blended scaffolds. This study demonstrated that electrospun PLCL/fibrinogen blended scaffolds have potential application in tissue engineering.

  2. Phosphorylation in vitro of human fibrinogen with casein kinase TS and characterization of phosphorylated sites

    SciTech Connect

    Heldin, P.

    1987-09-01

    Human fibrinogen was phosphorylated by casein kinase TS. The (/sup 32/P)phosphate incorporated varied between 0.5 and 1 mol of phosphate per mole of fibrinogen. The phosphate was localized to Ser523 and Ser590 and serine and threonine residues between amino acids 259 and 268 in the A alpha-chain. In addition, Thr416 and Ser420 were phosphorylated in the gamma'-chain, which is a variant of the gamma-chain, constituting 7-10% of the gamma-chain population. The functional significance of casein kinase TS-induced phosphorylation of fibrinogen remains unknown; however, a slight but consistent increase of the turbidity in a gelation assay was observed for phosphorylated compared to unphosphorylated fibrinogen.

  3. Higher Fibrinogen Levels Predict Progression of Coronary Artery Calcification in Adults with Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, T.C.; Snell-Bergeon, J.K.; Maahs, D.M; Kinney, G.L.; Rewers, M.

    2010-01-01

    Aim To determine whether fibrinogen levels predict independently progression of coronary artery calcification (CAC) in adults with type 1 diabetes. Methods Data from a prospective cohort - the Coronary Artery Calcification in Type 1 Diabetes Study - were evaluated. Fibrinogen levels at baseline were separated into quartiles. CAC was measured twice and averaged at baseline and at follow-up 2.4 ± 0.4 years later. CAC progressors were defined as participants whose square-root transformed CAC volume increased by ≥ 2.53 or development mm of clinical coronary artery disease during the follow-up period. Results Fibrinogen levels were higher in progressors than in non-progressors (276 ± 61 mg/dl versus 259 ± 61 mg/dl, p = 0.0003). CAC progression, adjusted for known cardiovascular risk factors, increased in the highest quartile. Conclusions Higher fibrinogen levels predict CAC progression in type 1 diabetes subjects, independent of standard cardiovascular risk factors. PMID:20079495

  4. Gallium nitrate induces fibrinogen flocculation: an explanation for its hemostatic effect?

    PubMed

    Bauters, A; Holt, D J; Zerbib, P; Rogosnitzky, M

    2013-12-01

    A novel hemostatic effect of gallium nitrate has recently been discovered. Our aim was to perform a preliminary investigation into its mode of action. Thromboelastography® showed no effect on coagulation but pointed instead to changes in fibrinogen concentration. We measured functional fibrinogen in whole blood after addition of gallium nitrate and nitric acid. We found that gallium nitrate induces fibrinogen precipitation in whole blood to a significantly higher degree than solutions of nitric acid alone. This precipitate is not primarily pH driven, and appears to occur via flocculation. This behavior is in line with the generally observed ability of metals to induce fibrinogen precipitation. Further investigation is required into this novel phenomenon. PMID:23959335

  5. Free oscillation rheometry monitoring of haemodilution and hypothermia and correction with fibrinogen and factor XIII concentrates

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Haemodilution and hypothermia induce coagulopathy separately, but their combined effect on coagulation has not been widely studied. Fibrinogen concentrate can correct dilutional coagulopathy and has an additional effect when combined with factor XIII concentrate. However, their effect on dilutional coagulopathy concomitant with hypothermia has not been studied previously. Free oscillation rheometry – FOR (Reorox®) – is a novel viscoelastic haemostatic assay that has not been studied in this context before. Methods Blood from 10 healthy volunteers was diluted by 33% with hydroxyethyl starch or Ringer’s acetate solutions. Effects of fibrinogen added in vitro with and without factor XIII were studied at 33°C and 37°C. Coagulation velocity (coagulation time) and clot strength (elasticity) were assessed with FOR. Coagulation was initiated in vitro with thromboplastin alone, or thromboplastin plus a platelet inhibitor. Results Hydroxyethyl starch increased the coagulation time and decreased clot strength significantly more than Ringer’s acetate solution, both in the presence and absence of a platelet inhibitor. There was a significant interaction between haemodilution with hydroxyethyl starch and hypothermia, resulting in increased coagulation time. After addition of fibrinogen, coagulation time shortened and elasticity increased, with the exception of fibrinogen-dependent clot strength (i.e., elasticity in the presence of a platelet inhibitor) after hydroxyethyl starch haemodilution. Factor XIII had an additional effect with fibrinogen on fibrinogen-dependent clot strength in blood diluted with Ringer’s acetate solution. Hypothermia did not influence any of the coagulation factor effects. Conclusions Both haemodilution and mild hypothermia impaired coagulation. Coagulopathy was more pronounced after haemodilution with hydroxyethyl starch than with Ringer’s acetate. Addition of fibrinogen with factor XIII was unable to reverse hydroxyethyl

  6. Crystal aggregation in kidney stones; a polymer aggregation problem?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesson, J.; Beshensky, A.; Viswanathan, P.; Zachowicz, W.; Kleinman, J.

    2008-03-01

    Kidney stones most frequently form as aggregates of calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) crystals with organic layers between them, and the organic layers contain principally proteins. The pathway leading to the formation of these crystal aggregates in affected people has not been identified, but stone forming patients are thought to have a defect in the structure or distribution of urinary proteins, which normally protect against stone formation. We have developed two polyelectrolyte models that will induce COM crystal aggregation in vitro, and both are consistent with possible urinary protein compositions. The first model was based on mixing polyanionic and polycationic proteins, in portions such that the combined protein charge is near zero. The second model was based on reducing the charge density on partially charged polyanionic proteins, specifically Tamm-Horsfall protein, the second most abundant protein in urine. Both models demonstrated polymer phase separation at solution conditions where COM crystal aggregation was observed. Correlation with data from other bulk crystallization measurements suggest that the anionic side chains form critical binding interactions with COM surfaces that are necessary along with the phase separation process to induce COM crystal aggregation.

  7. Evaluation of the viability of /sup 111/In-abeled DTPA coupled to fibrinogen

    SciTech Connect

    Layne, W.W.; Hnatowich, D.J.; Doherty, P.W.; Childs, R.L.; Lanteigne, D.; Ansell, J.

    1982-07-01

    In earlier work, DTPA has been covalently coupled to albumin via the cyclic anhydride of DTPA. Using fibrinogen, we have studied the effect of such coupling on protein viability by both an in vitro and an in vivo assay. Clotting time remained identical to that of the native protein whether the anhydride-to-protein molar ratio was 1:1 or 5:1. In vivo studies were done in dogs, with human fibrinogen labeled with /sup 125/I and /sup 111/In. Throughout 130 hr, blood clearances for the two tracers agreed whether with 1:1 or 5:1 coupling. In a dog model with a thrombogenic catheter, the clot-to-blood ratios for the two radiotracers agreed within experimental error. Finally, 1:1-coupled canine fibrinogen, labeled with /sup 111/In, was administered to dogs with a catheter in a jugular vein, and scintigrams at 24 hr clearly showed clotting along the length of the catheter. We conclude that fibrinogen, coupled to DTPA, retains its viability, behaving like radioiodinated fibrinogen in vivo, and /sup 111/In labeled fibrinogen looks promising as a clinical diagnostic agent.

  8. Electrospun fibrinogen: feasibility as a tissue engineering scaffold in a rat cell culture model.

    PubMed

    McManus, Michael C; Boland, Eugene D; Simpson, David G; Barnes, Catherine P; Bowlin, Gary L

    2007-05-01

    Fibrinogen has a well-established tissue engineering track record because of its ability to induce improved cellular interaction and scaffold remodeling compared to synthetic scaffolds. While the feasibility of electrospinning fibrinogen scaffolds of submicron diameter fibers and their mechanical properties have been demonstrated, in vitro cellular interaction has not yet been evaluated. The goal of this study was to demonstrate, based on cellular interaction and scaffold remodeling, that electrospun fibrinogen can be used successfully as a tissue engineering scaffold. Electrospun fibrinogen scaffolds were disinfected, seeded with neonatal rat cardiac fibroblasts, and cultured for 2, 7, and 14 days. Cultures were treated to regulate scaffold degradation by either supplementing serum-containing media with aprotinin or crosslinking the scaffolds with glutaraldehyde vapor. Biocompatibility was assessed through a WST-1 cell proliferation assay. Postculture scaffolds were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy and histology. Cell culture demonstrated that fibroblasts readily migrate into and remodel electrospun fibrinogen scaffolds with deposition of native collagen. Supplementation of culture media with different concentrations of aprotinin-modulated scaffold degradation in a predictable fashion, but glutaraldehyde vapor fixation was less reliable. Based on the observed cellular interactions, there is tremendous potential for electrospun fibrinogen as a tissue engineering scaffold. PMID:17120217

  9. How to Assess Fibrinogen Levels and Fibrin Clot Properties in Clinical Practice?

    PubMed

    Undas, Anetta

    2016-06-01

    Fibrin formed from fibrinogen is the main component of thrombi. Clot structure is characterized by fiber thickness and pore size, which differs within a given clot and between individuals. Plasma clot architecture is largely determined by the quantity and quality of fibrinogen. Plasma fibrinogen concentrations are most commonly measured in citrated plasma using the Clauss method. However, several factors, including instrument type and reagent, may affect results. Other approaches to express the ability of fibrinogen to clot involve prothrombin time-derived or clottable protein assays, while fibrinogen antigen levels in clinical settings are measured using immunological or precipitation assays. Fibrin clot permeability (reflected by the Darcy constant, K s) being proportional to a buffer volume percolating through a clot under a given hydrostatic pressure is now the most commonly used measure of clot structure. Low K s values indicating tightly packed fibrin structure have been shown to be associated with venous and arterial thrombotic complications, while high K s might contribute to bleeding disorders. The measurement of K s, however, is not standardized and validated. This review summarizes the current knowledge on practical aspects of the measurement of fibrinogen levels and K s in patients. PMID:27071050

  10. Role of Serum Fibrinogen Levels in Patients with Rotator Cuff Tears

    PubMed Central

    Longo, Umile Giuseppe; Petrillo, Stefano; Berton, Alessandra; Spiezia, Filippo; Loppini, Mattia; Maffulli, Nicola; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    Although rotator cuff (RC) tendinopathy is a frequent pathology of the shoulder, the real understanding of its aetiopathogenesis is still unclear. Several studies showed that RC tendinopathy is more frequent in patients with hyperglycemia, diabetes, obesity, or metabolic syndrome. This paper aims to evaluate the serum concentration of fibrinogen in patients with RC tears. Metabolic disorders have been related to high concentration of serum fibrinogen and the activity of fibrinogen has been proven to be crucial in the development of microvascular damage. Thus, it may produce progression of RC degeneration by reducing the vascular supply of tendons. We report the results of a cross-sectional frequency-matched case-control study comparing the serum concentration of fibrinogen of patients with RC tears with that of a control group of patients without history of RC tears who underwent arthroscopic meniscectomy. We choose to enrol in the control group patients with pathology of the lower limb with a likely mechanic, not metabolic, cause, different from tendon pathology. We found no statistically significant differences in serum concentration of fibrinogen when comparing patients with RC tears and patients who underwent arthroscopic meniscectomy (P = 0.5). Further studies are necessary to clarify the role of fibrinogen in RC disease. PMID:24817887

  11. Protein adsorption to polyethylene glycol modified liposomes from fibrinogen solution and from plasma.

    PubMed

    Price, M E; Cornelius, R M; Brash, J L

    2001-06-01

    Unmodified and polyethylene glycol (PEG) modified neutral and negatively charged liposomes were prepared by freeze-thaw and extrusion followed by chromatographic purification. The effects of PEG molecular weight (PEG 550, 2000, 5000), PEG loading (0-15 mol%), and liposome surface charge on fibrinogen adsorption were quantified using radiolabeling techniques. All adsorption isotherms increased monotonically over the concentration range 0-3 mg/ml and adsorption levels were low. Negatively charged liposomes adsorbed significantly more fibrinogen than neutral liposomes. PEG modification had no effect on fibrinogen adsorption to neutral liposomes. An inverse relationship was found between PEG loading of negatively charged liposomes and fibrinogen adsorption. PEGs of all three molecular weights at a loading of 5 mol% reduced fibrinogen adsorption to negatively charged liposomes. Protein adsorption from diluted plasma (10% normal strength) to four different liposome types (neutral, PEG-neutral, negatively charged, and PEG-negatively charged) was investigated using gel electrophoresis and immunoblotting. The profiles of adsorbed proteins were similar on all four liposome types, but distinctly different from the profile of plasma itself, indicating a partitioning effect of the lipid surfaces. alpha2-macroglobulin and fibronectin were significantly enriched on the liposomes whereas albumin, transferrin, and fibrinogen were depleted compared to plasma. Apolipoprotein AI was a major component of the adsorbed protein layers. The blot of complement protein C3 adsorbed on the liposomes suggested that the complement system was activated. PMID:11406096

  12. Comparing the Effects of Lovastatin and Cornus Mas Fruit on Fibrinogen Level in Hypercholesterolemic Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Asgary, Sedigheh; Rafieian-Kopaei, Mahmoud; Adelnia, Azadeh; Kazemi, Somayeh; Shamsi, Fatemeh

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Atherosclerosis, which is a result of gradual deposition of lipids in the lower part of blood vessel endothelium, is the leading cause of mortality and morbidity around the world. It has been proved that some inflammatory blood markers such as fibrinogen can predict the risk for cardiovascular disease conditions, not only in cardiovascular patients, but also in those who do not have any manifestations of the atherosclerotic development. In this study, the effect of cornus mas l. was evaluated on fibrinogen of hypercholesterolemic rabbits and it was also compared with lovastatin drug. METHODS In this study, 25 New Zealand adult male rabbits were randomly divided into five groups of five. They were treated for 60 days by 5 different diets, namely basic, high cholesterol, regular plus 1 g/kgBW cornus mas L. powder, high cholesterol plus 1 g/kgBW cornus mas L. powder, and high cholesterol plus 10 mg/kgBW lovastatin. At the beginning and at the end of this period, blood samples were collected from the rabbits and their serum fibrinogen levels were measured. RESULTS Cornus mas L. powder and lovastatin significantly decreased fibrinogen levels in comparison with high cholesterol group (P < 0.05). Furthermore cornus mas L. powder could reduce the fibrinogen level more than lovastatin (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION The results indicated that consumption of cornus mas L. might be beneficial in atherosclerotic patients due to its reducing effects on fibrinogen. PMID:22577405

  13. The development of radioimmunoassays for fibrinogen degradation products: fragments D and E.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Y B; Martin, M J; Landon, J; Chard, T

    1975-01-01

    Fibrinogen degradation products, fragment D (FgD) and fragment E (FgE) have been measured in human serum by specific radioimmunoassays. In addition, the appearance of a neoantigenic determinant on FgD, revealed when fibrinogen is degraded by plasmin has been utilized to develop a specific radioimmunoassay for FgD in plasma (FgDneo). The reagents and conditions used in each assay are described in detail. The mean specific activity was 144 muCi/mug for 125I-labelled FgE and 82 muCi/mug for 125I-labelled FgD. Separation of antibody bound and free antigen was achieved using second antibody. The detection limits of the FgE, FgD and FgDneo assays were 0.8, 1.0 and 6.2 ng/ml respectively. The specificity of each assay with respect to fibrinogen and its degradation fragments has been assessed. Fibrinogen and fragment X cross-reacted markedly in both the FgE and FgD assays, whereas the cross-reaction of fibrinogen was abolished in the FgDneo assay, while the cross-reaction of fragment X was 10%, indicating gradual emergence of the neoantigenic site during digestion of fibriogen. The sensitivity, precision, and specificity of the radioimmunoassay systems described have major advantages over the existing procedures for the measurement of fibrinogen degradation products. PMID:1201195

  14. Control of Fibrinogen Assembly by Changing a Polarity of Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, Jaseung; Liu, Ying; Snow, Sara; Rambhia, Pooja; Koga, Tadanori; Rafailovich, Miriam; Galanakis, Dennis

    2009-03-01

    Thrombogenesis causes various problems associated with an interruption in the blood flow (e.g., myocardial and cerebral infarction), and a hindrance to use of blood-contact vascular biomaterials (e.g., hemodialysis and cardiopulmonary bypass) with long-term patency since undesired adsorption of blood components occurs on vessels or biomaterials, such as surface-induced thrombosis. we showed that this clotting procedure can be occurred on hydrophobic polymeric surfaces without thrombin cleavage. However, the fibrinogen fibers were not formed on the polar surface such as spun-cast polymer film with pyridine and phenol groups. We also found that αC domains play an important role in initiation of polymerization on surface. Therefore, molecular association was inhibited on the polar surfaces due to confinement of αC chains on the surfaces. These findings were directly applied to stent surface modification. The commercial stent consist of Co-Cr alloy forms undesired fiber formation. However, PS-r-PVPh (13% phenol) coated stent surfaces completely prevent fiber formation.

  15. Platelet Glycoproteins and Fibrinogen in Recovery from Idiopathic Sudden Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Gorzelniak, Kerstin; Bremer, Alexis; Rudack, Claudia; Walter, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Background The pathomechanism and location of idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (ISSHL) is unclear. In a previous case-control study, we found elevated fibrinogen concentrations and a higher prevalence of T allele carriers of the glycoprotein (Gp) Ia C807T polymorphism in ISSHL patients. Methodology 127 patients with ISSHL (mean age 53.3 years, 48.8% females), who underwent a standard therapy with high dose steroids, pentoxifyllin and sterofundine over 8 days were included. We examined the influence of GpIa genotype and fibrinogen (BclI-, A312-, HaeIII-) genotype and fibrinogen plasma levels on hearing recovery after 8 weeks (change from baseline: 0 dB  =  no recovery, >0 to 10 dB = moderate recovery, >10 dB = good recovery). In a subsample of 59 patients with ISSHL, we further studied the association of platelet glycoprotein GpIa, Ib and IIIa densities on hearing recovery as well as the possible effect-modification of platelet glycoproteins on hearing recovery by plasma fibrinogen. Results In univariate analysis, neither the GpIa genotype nor fibrinogen genotype (all p>0.1) but lower fibrinogen levels (p = 0.029), less vertigo (p = 0.002) and lower GpIIIa receptor density (p = 0.037, n = 59) were associated with hearing recovery. In multivariate analysis, fibrinogen significantly modified the effect of GPIa receptor density on good hearing recovery (effect-modification on multiplicative scale OR = 0.45 (95% confidence interval (0.21–0.94)), p = 0.03). GPIb receptor density below the mean was associated with a 2-fold increase in good hearing recovery both in patients with fibrinogen levels above (p = 0.04) as well as in patients with fibrinogen levels below the mean (p = 0.06). There was no indication for an effect-modification (p = 0.97). Conclusions The findings suggest a vascular/rheological origin of ISSHL with unique features of thrombosis in the inner ear artery that may include complex

  16. Erythrocyte deformability and aggregation in homozygous sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Vayá, Amparo; Collado, Susana; Dasí, Maria Angeles; Pérez, Maria Luz; Hernandez, Jose Luis; Barragán, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Rheological properties of homozygous sickle cell anaemia (SCA) show marked heterogeneity, which may be explained in part by the concomitance of alpha genotypes or beta haplotypes, along with hydroxurea (HU) treatment. To further clarify this issue, in 11 homozygous patients with SCA in the steady state and in 16 healthy controls, we analysed erythrocyte deformability (ED) in a Rheodyn SSD by means of the Elongation Index (EI) at 12, 30 and 60 Pa, and erythrocyte aggregation at stasis (EA0) and at 3 sec-1 (EA1) in a Myrenne aggregometer along with fibrinogen, biochemical and haematological parameters. When compared with controls, homozygous (SS) patients showed a lower EI at all the shear stresses tested (p < 0.01) and higher EA0 (p < 0.014), but not higher EA1 (p = 0.076). Fibrinogen did not show statistical differences (p = 0.642). In the Spearman's correlation IE60 correlated inversely with Hb S (p < 0.05) and directly with MCV, MCH and Hb F levels (p < 0.01). EA0 correlated inversely with MCV, MCH, Hb F (p < 0.01) and directly with Hb S (p < 0.05). HU treatment improved EI and EA0, but not EA1. This paradoxical behaviour of HU on erythrocyte aggregation merits further research to be clarified. PMID:23603322

  17. Ranking reactive glutamines in the fibrinogen αC region that are targeted by blood coagulant factor XIII.

    PubMed

    Mouapi, Kelly Njine; Bell, Jacob D; Smith, Kerrie A; Ariëns, Robert A S; Philippou, Helen; Maurer, Muriel C

    2016-05-01

    Factor XIIIa (FXIIIa) introduces covalent γ-glutamyl-ε-lysyl crosslinks into the blood clot network. These crosslinks involve both the γ and α chains of fibrin. The C-terminal portion of the fibrin α chain extends into the αC region (210-610). Crosslinks within this region help generate a stiffer clot, which is more resistant to fibrinolysis. Fibrinogen αC (233-425) contains a binding site for FXIIIa and three glutamines Q237, Q328, and Q366 that each participate in physiological crosslinking reactions. Although these glutamines were previously identified, their reactivities toward FXIIIa have not been ranked. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods were thus used to directly characterize these three glutamines and probe for sources of FXIIIa substrate specificity. Glycine ethyl ester (GEE) and ammonium chloride served as replacements for lysine. Mass spectrometry and 2D heteronuclear single quantum coherence NMR revealed that Q237 is rapidly crosslinked first by FXIIIa followed by Q366 and Q328. Both (15)NH4Cl and (15)N-GEE could be crosslinked to the three glutamines in αC (233-425) with a similar order of reactivity as observed with the MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry assay. NMR studies using the single αC mutants Q237N, Q328N, and Q366N demonstrated that no glutamine is dependent on another to react first in the series. Moreover, the remaining two glutamines of each mutant were both still reactive. Further characterization of Q237, Q328, and Q366 is important because they are located in a fibrinogen region susceptible to physiological truncations and mutation. The current results suggest that these glutamines play distinct roles in fibrin crosslinking and clot architecture. PMID:26951791

  18. Zinc significantly changes the aggregation pathway and the conformation of aggregates of human prion protein.

    PubMed

    Pan, Kai; Yi, Chuan-Wei; Chen, Jie; Liang, Yi

    2015-08-01

    Prion diseases are caused by the conformational change of cellular prion protein PrP(C) into pathological prion protein PrP(Sc). Here we study the effect of zinc on the aggregation and conformational change of human prion protein (PrP). As revealed by thioflavin T binding assays, Sarkosyl-soluble SDS-PAGE, and transmission electron microscopy, aggregation of wild-type PrP in the absence of Zn(2+) undergoes four steps: amorphous aggregates, profibrils, mature fibrils, and fragmented fibrils. When the molar ratio of Zn(2+) to PrP was 9:1, however, aggregation of wild-type PrP undergoes another pathway in which wild-type PrP forms oligomers quickly and then forms short-rod aggregates. Unlike wild-type PrP, the octarepeats deletion mutant PrPΔocta forms typical mature fibrils either with or without zinc. As evidenced by isothermal titration calorimetry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and proteinase K digestion assays, Zn(2+) strongly binds to wild-type PrP monomers with the first binding constant exceeding 10(7)M(-1) under denaturing conditions, and changes the conformation of wild-type PrP aggregates remarkably, but weakly binds to PrPΔocta with binding affinity around 10(4)M(-1) and has no obvious effects on the conformation of PrPΔocta aggregates. Our data demonstrate that zinc significantly changes the aggregation pathway and the conformation of wild-type PrP aggregates mainly via interaction with its octarepeat region. Our findings could explain how zinc modifies pathological PrP conformation associated with prion diseases. PMID:25922234

  19. Hydroxyl density affects the interaction of fibrinogen with silica nanoparticles at physiological concentration.

    PubMed

    Marucco, Arianna; Turci, Francesco; O'Neill, Luke; Byrne, Hugh J; Fubini, Bice; Fenoglio, Ivana

    2014-04-01

    An increasing interest in the interaction between blood serum proteins and nanoparticles has emerged over the last years. In fact, this process plays a key role in the biological response to nanoparticles. The behavior of proteins at the biofluid/material interface is driven by the physico-chemical properties of the surface. However, much research is still needed to gain insight into the process at a molecular level. In this study, the effect of silanol density on the interaction of fibrinogen at physiological concentrations with silica nanoparticle/flat surfaces has been studied. Silica nanoparticles and silica wafers were modified and characterized to obtain a set of samples with different silanols density. The interaction with fibrinogen has been studied by evaluating the extent of coverage (bicinchoninic acid assay) and the irreversibility of adsorption (shift of the ζ potential). To clarify the molecular mechanism of fibrinogen/surface interactions, confocal micro-Raman spectroscopy (nanoparticles) and atomic force microscopy (wafers) were used. Finally the effect of fibrinogen on the agglomeration of nanoparticles has been evaluated by Flow Particle Image Analysis. The data reported here show that a minimal variation in the state of the silica surface modifies the adsorption behavior of fibrinogen, which appears mediated by a competition between protein/protein and protein/surface interactions. By comparing the data obtained on nanoparticles and silicon-supported silica layers, we found that hydrophilicity increases the tendency of fibrinogen molecules to interact with the surface rather than with other molecules, thus inhibiting fibrinogen self-assembly. This study contributes to the knowledge of the processes occurring at the surface/biological fluids interface, needed for the design of new biocompatible materials. PMID:24491335

  20. Reduced Transfusion During OLT by POC Coagulation Management and TEG Functional Fibrinogen: A Retrospective Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    De Pietri, Lesley; Ragusa, Francesca; Deleuterio, Annalisa; Begliomini, Bruno; Serra, Valentina

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients undergoing orthotopic liver transplantation are at high risk of bleeding complications. Several Authors have shown that thromboelastography (TEG)-based coagulation management and the administration of fibrinogen concentrate reduce the need for blood transfusion. Methods We conducted a single-center, retrospective cohort observational study (Modena Polyclinic, Italy) on 386 consecutive patients undergoing liver transplantation. We assessed the impact on resource consumption and patient survival after the introduction of a new TEG-based transfusion algorithm, requiring also the introduction of the fibrinogen functional thromboelastography test and a maximum amplitude of functional fibrinogen thromboelastography transfusion cutoff (7 mm) to direct in administering fibrinogen (2012-2014, n = 118) compared with a purely TEG-based algorithm previously used (2005-2011, n = 268). Results After 2012, there was a significant decrease in the use of homologous blood (1502 ± 1376 vs 794 ± 717 mL, P < 0.001), fresh frozen plasma (537 ± 798 vs 98 ± 375 mL, P < 0.001), and platelets (158 ± 280 vs 75 ± 148 mL, P < 0.005), whereas the use of fibrinogen increased (0.1 ± 0.5 vs 1.4 ± 1.8 g, P < 0.001). There were no significant differences in 30-day and 6-month survival between the 2 groups. Conclusions The implementation of a new coagulation management method featuring the addition of the fibrinogen functional thromboelastography test to the TEG test according to an algorithm which provides for the administration of fibrinogen has helped in reducing the need for transfusion in patients undergoing liver transplantation with no impact on their survival. PMID:27500243

  1. Feeding acutely stimulates fibrinogen synthesis in healthy young and elderly adults.

    PubMed

    Caso, Giuseppe; Mileva, Izolda; Kelly, Patricia; Ahn, Hongshik; Gelato, Marie C; McNurlan, Margaret A

    2009-11-01

    Fibrinogen is a positive acute-phase protein and its hepatic synthesis is enhanced following inflammation and injury. However, it is not clear whether fibrinogen synthesis is also responsive to oral nutrients and whether the response to a meal may be affected by age. Our aim in this study was to investigate the acute effect of oral feeding on fibrinogen synthesis in both young and elderly men and women. Fibrinogen synthesis was determined in 3 separate occasions from the incorporation of l[(2)H(5)]phenylalanine (43 mg/kg body weight) in 8 young (21-35 y) and 8 elderly (>60 y) participants following the ingestion of water (control), a complete liquid meal (15% protein, 30% fat, and 55% carbohydrate), or only the protein component of the meal. The ingestion of the complete meal enhanced fibrinogen fractional synthesis rates (FSR) by 17 +/- 6% in the young and by 38 +/- 10% in the elderly participants compared with the water meal (P < 0.02). A comparable stimulation of FSR occurred with only the protein component of the meal in both young (29 +/- 7%) and elderly participants (41 +/- 9%) compared with the water meal (P < 0.005). Similar results were obtained when fibrinogen synthesis was expressed as absolute synthesis rates (i.e. mg.kg(-1).d(-1)). The results demonstrate that fibrinogen synthesis is acutely stimulated after ingestion of a meal and that this effect can be reproduced by the protein component of the meal alone, both in young and elderly adults. PMID:19759246

  2. Quantitative evaluation of interaction force of fibrinogen at well-defined surfaces with various structures.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weixin; Inoue, Yuuki; Ishihara, Kazuhiko

    2014-01-01

    The effects of functional groups and structures at the surface of biomaterials on protein adsorption were examined using direct interaction force measurements. Three kinds of surface structures were evaluated: polymer brushes, self-assembled monolayers with low molecular weight compounds, and surfaces with conventional polymer coatings. These surfaces had various functional groups including phosphorylcholine (PC) group. The surface characterization demonstrated that surface wettability and flexibility depended on both the structure of the surface and the functional groups at the surface. The interactions of protein with these surfaces were evaluated by a force vs. distance curve using an atomic force microscope (AFM). We used fibrinogen as the protein, and the fibrinogen was immobilized on the surface of the AFM cantilever by a conventional technique. It was observed that the interaction force of fibrinogen was strongly related to surface hydrophobic nature and flexibility. That is, the interaction force increased with the increasing hydrophobic nature of the surface. The relationship between the amount of fibrinogen adsorbed on the surface and the interaction force showed good correlation in the range of fibrinogen adsorption from 0 to 250 ng/cm(2), that is, in a monolayered adsorption region. The interaction force decreased with increasing surface viscoelasticity. The most effective surface for preventing fibrinogen adsorption was the polymer brush surface with phosphorylcholine (PC) groups, that is, poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine) brush. The interaction force of this sample was less than 0.1 nN and the amount of fibrinogen adsorbed on the surface was minimal. It was found that the evaluation of protein adsorption based on the interaction force measurement is useful for low-protein adsorption surfaces. It was demonstrated that an extremely hydrophilic and flexible surface could weaken the protein interactions at the surface, resulting in

  3. Association of serum calcium concentrations with fibrinogen and homocysteine in nondiabetic Korean subjects

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hyun Sun; Lee, Sung Won; Shin, Juyoung; Moon, Sung Dae; Han, Je Ho; Cha, Bong Yun; Kim, Eun Sook

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Considerable evidence shows that increased serum calcium levels are associated with metabolic disorders, cardiovascular disease, and increased mortality. This study investigated whether serum calcium, within a normal range, is significantly associated with serum fibrinogen and homocysteine, markers of increased cardiovascular disease risk in nondiabetic Korean subjects. A cross-sectional analysis was performed on 1096 subjects (mean age, 55.1 ± 11.1 years; 36.1% women) undergoing a general health checkup. Serum biochemistry was analyzed including serum albumin-corrected calcium (Cac), insulin resistance (IR, using homeostasis model assessment [HOMA]), fibrinogen, and homocysteine. Compared with patients within the lowest Cac quartile, those with higher Cac levels had increased fibrinogen and homocysteine levels as well as an increased proportion of smoking, dyslipidemia, and HOMA-IR. Correlation analyses revealed linear relationships for Cac with fibrinogen and homocysteine in both genders. After adjustment for confounding factors, serum Cac was significantly associated with high fibrinogen (odds ratio [OR] for the highest vs the lowest quartile = 1.76, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.09–2.83, P = 0.02) and homocysteine (OR = 1.83, 95% CI = 1.07–3.11, P = 0.027). Multivariate regression models showed that Cac was linearly associated with fibrinogen (standardized β = 0.14, P < 0.001) and homocysteine (standardized β = 0.07, P = 0.009). High normal calcium concentrations were independently associated with increased levels of fibrinogen and homocysteine. Further investigation is needed to validate whether slightly increased calcium levels within the normal range indicate a higher risk of cardiovascular disease. PMID:27310988

  4. Feeding Acutely Stimulates Fibrinogen Synthesis in Healthy Young and Elderly Adults12

    PubMed Central

    Caso, Giuseppe; Mileva, Izolda; Kelly, Patricia; Ahn, Hongshik; Gelato, Marie C.; McNurlan, Margaret A.

    2009-01-01

    Fibrinogen is a positive acute-phase protein and its hepatic synthesis is enhanced following inflammation and injury. However, it is not clear whether fibrinogen synthesis is also responsive to oral nutrients and whether the response to a meal may be affected by age. Our aim in this study was to investigate the acute effect of oral feeding on fibrinogen synthesis in both young and elderly men and women. Fibrinogen synthesis was determined in 3 separate occasions from the incorporation of l[2H5]phenylalanine (43 mg/kg body weight) in 8 young (21–35 y) and 8 elderly (>60 y) participants following the ingestion of water (control), a complete liquid meal (15% protein, 30% fat, and 55% carbohydrate), or only the protein component of the meal. The ingestion of the complete meal enhanced fibrinogen fractional synthesis rates (FSR) by 17 ± 6% in the young and by 38 ± 10% in the elderly participants compared with the water meal (P < 0.02). A comparable stimulation of FSR occurred with only the protein component of the meal in both young (29 ± 7%) and elderly participants (41 ± 9%) compared with the water meal (P < 0.005). Similar results were obtained when fibrinogen synthesis was expressed as absolute synthesis rates (i.e. mg·kg−1·d−1). The results demonstrate that fibrinogen synthesis is acutely stimulated after ingestion of a meal and that this effect can be reproduced by the protein component of the meal alone, both in young and elderly adults. PMID:19759246

  5. Quantitation of platelet and fibrinogen-fibrin deposition on components of tissue valves (Ionescu-Shiley) in calves

    SciTech Connect

    Dewanjee, M.K.; Solis, E.; Lenker, J.; Tidwell, C.; Mackey, S.; Didisheim, P.; Kaye, M.P.

    1986-07-01

    With /sup 111/In-labeled platelets and /sup 125/I-labeled bovine fibrinogen, regional mapping of platelet and fibrinogen deposition on leaflets and sewing rings was obtained. Ten Holstein calves received 25-mm mitral valves (ISLM) and were killed 1, 14, and 30 days after implantation. Twenty-four hours before the calves were killed, 350 to 450 microCi of /sup 111/In-labeled platelets and 200 to 250 microCi of /sup 125/I-labeled bovine fibrinogen were administered intravenously. The components of the tissue valves, i.e., three leaflets and sewing rings, were separated. Each leaflet was cut into four sections: free edge, central zone, flexion zone, and attachment zone. From the radioactivity in blood, leaflet zones, sewing rings, area of leaflet zones, platelet count, and fibrinogen level in blood, the mean regional density of adherent platelets, fibrinogen-fibrin, and fibrinogen/platelet were calculated. The density of platelets and fibrinogen deposited on the components of the valves decreases with time postimplantation. The number of fibrinogen molecules per platelet is fivefold to 20-fold higher than that of the receptor concentration on platelets on leaflet zones, suggesting the heterogeneity of fibrinogen-fibrin in thrombus and components of the valve.

  6. Protein aggregates stimulate macropinocytosis facilitating their propagation.

    PubMed

    Yerbury, Justin J

    2016-03-01

    Temporal and spatial patterns of pathological changes such as loss of neurons and presence of pathological protein aggregates are characteristic of neurodegenerative diseases such as Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, Frontotemporal Dementia, Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. These patterns are consistent with the propagation of protein misfolding and aggregation reminiscent of the prion diseases. There is a surge of evidence that suggests that large protein aggregates of a range of proteins are able to enter cells via macropinocytosis. Our recent work suggests that this process is activated by the binding of aggregates to the neuron cell surface. The current review considers the potential role of cell surface receptors in the triggering of macropinocytosis by protein aggregates and the possibility of utilizing macropinocytosis pathways as a therapeutic target. PMID:26963158

  7. Mineralization Potential of Electrospun PDO-Hydroxyapatite-Fibrinogen Blended Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Isaac A.; Madurantakam, Parthasarathy A.; McCool, Jennifer M.; Sell, Scott A.; Yang, Hu; Moon, Peter C.; Bowlin, Gary L.

    2012-01-01

    The current bone autograft procedure for cleft palate repair presents several disadvantages such as limited availability, additional invasive surgery, and donor site morbidity. The present preliminary study evaluates the mineralization potential of electrospun polydioxanone:nano-hydroxyapatite : fibrinogen (PDO : nHA : Fg) blended scaffolds in different simulated body fluids (SBF). Scaffolds were fabricated by blending PDO : nHA : Fg in the following percent by weight ratios: 100 : 0 : 0, 50 : 25 : 25, 50 : 50 : 0, 50 : 0 : 50, 0 : 0 : 100, and 0 : 50 : 50. Samples were immersed in (conventional (c), revised (r), ionic (i), and modified (m)) SBF for 5 and 14 days to induce mineralization. Scaffolds were characterized before and after mineralization via scanning electron microscopy, Alizarin Red-based assay, and modified burnout test. The addition of Fg resulted in scaffolds with smaller fiber diameters. Fg containing scaffolds also induced sheet-like mineralization while individual fiber mineralization was noticed in its absence. Mineralized electrospun Fg scaffolds without PDO were not mechanically stable after 5 days in SBF, but had superior mineralization capabilities which produced a thick bone-like mineral (BLM) layer throughout the scaffolds. 50 : 50 : 0 scaffolds incubated in either r-SBF for 5 days or c-SBF for 14 days produced scaffolds with high mineral content and individual-mineralized fibers. These mineralized scaffolds were still porous and will be further optimized as an effective bone substitute in future studies. PMID:22956956

  8. Fibrinogen {alpha} genes: Conservation of bipartite transcripts and carboxy-terminal-extended {alpha} subunits in vertebrates

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Y.; Cao, Y.; Hertzberg, K.M.; Grieninger, G.

    1995-11-01

    All three well-studied subunits of the clotting protein fibrinogen ({alpha}, {beta}, {gamma}) share N-terminal structural homologies, but until recently only the {beta} and {gamma} chains were recognized as having similar globular C-termini. With the discovery of an extra exon in the human fibrinogen {alpha} gene (exon VI), a minor form of the {alpha} subunit ({alpha}{sub E}) with an extended {beta}- and {gamma}-like C-terminus has been identified. In the present study, the polymerase chain reaction has been used to identify sequences that encode counterparts to {alpha}{sub E} in chicken, rabbit, rat, and baboon. The basic six-exon structure of the fibrinogen {alpha} genes is shown to be conserved among mammals and birds, as are the intron positions. Bipartite transcripts - still bearing an intron prior to the last exon - are found among the products of the various vertebrate fibrinogen {alpha} genes. The last exon represents the largest conserved segment of the gene and, in each species examined, encodes exactly 236 amino acids. The C-termini of these {alpha}{sub E} chains align without a single gap and are between 76 and 99% identical. Since the exon VI-encoded domain of {alpha}{sub E} is as well conserved as the corresponding regions of the {beta} and {gamma} chains, it follows that it is equally important and that {alpha}{sub E}-fibrinogen plays a vital, if as-yet unrecognized physiological role. 21 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Blood coagulation protein fibrinogen promotes autoimmunity and demyelination via chemokine release and antigen presentation

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Jae Kyu; Petersen, Mark A.; Murray, Sara G.; Baeten, Kim M.; Meyer-Franke, Anke; Chan, Justin P.; Vagena, Eirini; Bedard, Catherine; Machado, Michael R.; Coronado, Pamela E. Rios; Prod'homme, Thomas; Charo, Israel F.; Lassmann, Hans; Degen, Jay L.; Zamvil, Scott S.; Akassoglou, Katerina

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmunity and macrophage recruitment into the central nervous system (CNS) are critical determinants of neuroinflammatory diseases. However, the mechanisms that drive immunological responses targeted to the CNS remain largely unknown. Here we show that fibrinogen, a central blood coagulation protein deposited in the CNS after blood–brain barrier disruption, induces encephalitogenic adaptive immune responses and peripheral macrophage recruitment into the CNS leading to demyelination. Fibrinogen stimulates a unique transcriptional signature in CD11b+ antigen-presenting cells inducing the recruitment and local CNS activation of myelin antigen-specific Th1 cells. Fibrinogen depletion reduces Th1 cells in the multiple sclerosis model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) II-dependent antigen presentation, CXCL10- and CCL2-mediated recruitment of T cells and macrophages, respectively, are required for fibrinogen-induced encephalomyelitis. Inhibition of the fibrinogen receptor CD11b/CD18 protects from all immune and neuropathologic effects. Our results show that the final product of the coagulation cascade is a key determinant of CNS autoimmunity. PMID:26353940

  10. Importance of fibrinogen in dilutional coagulopathy after neurosurgical procedures: A descriptive study

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Shalini; Nair, Bijesh Ravindran; Vidyasagar, Ajay; Joseph, Mathew

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: The routine management of coagulopathy during surgery involves assessing haemoglobin, prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) and platelets. Correction of these parameters involves administration of blood, fresh frozen plasma and platelet concentrates. The study was aimed at identifying the most common coagulation abnormality during neurosurgical procedures and the treatment of dilutional coagulopathy with blood components. Methods: During 2 years period, all adult patients undergoing neurosurgical procedures who were transfused two or more units of red cells were prospectively evaluated for the presence of a coagulopathy. PT, aPTT, platelet count and fibrinogen levels were estimated before starting a component therapy. Results: After assessing PT, aPTT, platelet count and fibrinogen levels following two or more blood transfusions, thirty patients were found to have at least one abnormal parameter that required administration of a blood product. The most common abnormality was a low fibrinogen level, seen in 26 patients; this was the only abnormality in three patients. No patient was found to have an abnormal PT or aPTT without either the fibrinogen concentration or platelet count or both being low. Conclusion: Low fibrinogen concentration was the most common coagulation abnormality found after blood transfusions for neurosurgical procedures. PMID:27601735

  11. Increased concentration of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 and fibrinogen in individuals with metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Palomo, Iván G; Gutiérrez, César L; Alarcón, Marcelo L; Jaramillo, Julio C; Segovia, Fabián M; Leiva, Elba M; Mujica, Verónica E; Icaza, Gloria N; Díaz, Nora S; Moore-Carrasco, Rodrigo

    2009-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MS) is closely linked to a generalized metabolic disorder referred to as insulin resistance. Disturbances in the hemostasis and fibrinolytic systems are a feature of MS. The aim of this study was to determine the concentration levels of fibrinogen and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) in a group of patients with MS with respect to a non-MS group, and to evaluate their possible relation with other risk factors in MS. The study was carried out in a total of 186 male and female non-smoking individuals aged 45-64 years, 93 with MS (ATP III criteria) and 93 without MS. Plasmatic levels of PAI-1 were measured by ELISA, and those of fibrinogen by the Claus method. The plasmatic levels of PAI-1 (men 49.2±19.8 vs. 35.0±12.2 ng/ml and women 42.0±19.7 vs. 31.6±14.6 ng/ml; p=0.0026) and fibrinogen (274.0±82.1 vs. 232.7±66.6 ng/ml; p=0.0002) were significantly higher in the MS group than in the non-MS group. PAI-1 was significantly associated with diastolic blood pressure, triglycerides and waist circumference. Fibrinogen was negatively associated with HDL-c. High plasmatic levels of PAI-1 and fibrinogen contribute to the cardiovascular risk that characterizes individuals with MS. PMID:21475821

  12. Leg scanning with radioisotope-labeled fibrinogen in patients undergoing hip surgery

    SciTech Connect

    LeMoine, J.R.; Moser, K.M.

    1980-05-01

    To establish whether radioisotope-labeled fibrinogen leg scanning is of value in the context of hip surgery, we propsectively studied 21 consectuvie patients undergoing either total hip replacement (14) or open repair of a hip fracture (seven) with leg scans, contrast phlebography, and ventilation and perfusion lung scans. We found that in eight patients (38%), venous thromboembolism developed postoperatively. Agreement between phlebographic and leg scanning results was excellent. In no patient as venous thrombosis limited to the thigh on the operated-on side, a vital consideration in application of fibrinogen leg scanning to this patient population. Two patients had lung scan changes indicative of embolism; both had thrombi extending into thigh veins. Leg scanning with radioisotope-labeled fibrinogen appears to be a useful method for monitoring patients undergoing hip surgery, if the upper three counting points on the operated-on side are excluded.

  13. Cleavage of fibrinogen by proteinases elicits allergic responses through Toll-like receptor 4.

    PubMed

    Millien, Valentine Ongeri; Lu, Wen; Shaw, Joanne; Yuan, Xiaoyi; Mak, Garbo; Roberts, Luz; Song, Li-Zhen; Knight, J Morgan; Creighton, Chad J; Luong, Amber; Kheradmand, Farrah; Corry, David B

    2013-08-16

    Proteinases and the innate immune receptor Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) are essential for expression of allergic inflammation and diseases such as asthma. A mechanism that links these inflammatory mediators is essential for explaining the fundamental basis of allergic disease but has been elusive. Here, we demonstrate that TLR4 is activated by airway proteinase activity to initiate both allergic airway disease and antifungal immunity. These outcomes were induced by proteinase cleavage of the clotting protein fibrinogen, yielding fibrinogen cleavage products that acted as TLR4 ligands on airway epithelial cells and macrophages. Thus, allergic airway inflammation represents an antifungal defensive strategy that is driven by fibrinogen cleavage and TLR4 activation. These findings clarify the molecular basis of allergic disease and suggest new therapeutic strategies. PMID:23950537

  14. Surface Induced Self-Assembly of Fibrinogen Fibers in the Absence of Thrombin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, Jaseung; Rafailovich, Miriam; Galanakis, Dennis

    2009-03-01

    Wound healing is a complex process imitated by the formation of fibrin fibers that are involved in clot formation and fibroblast migration. Normally this process is triggered by thrombin cleavage of the E domain on the fibrinogen molecules, which allows them to spontaneously self-assemble into the fibers. Here we demonstrate that this process can also be initiated in the absence of thrombin. We show that by simply placing the proteins in contact with hydrocarbon functionalized clay surfaces, molecular reorientation occurs which allows fibers to form from the intact fibrinogen protein. Furthermore, using monoclonal antibodies, we determined which regions on the αC domains are involved in the formation of the new fibrinogen fibers. This allowed us to extend these findings to general hydrophobic surfaces, such as those presented by most hydrocarbon polymers. On the other hand, the carboxyl terminal part of the Aα chain, can interact with amine containing polymers, and suppress formation of the fibers.

  15. Social connectedness is associated with fibrinogen level in a human social network.

    PubMed

    Kim, David A; Benjamin, Emelia J; Fowler, James H; Christakis, Nicholas A

    2016-08-31

    Socially isolated individuals face elevated rates of illness and death. Conventional measures of social connectedness reflect an individual's perceived network and can be subject to bias and variation in reporting. In this study of a large human social network, we find that greater indegree, a sociocentric measure of friendship and familial ties identified by a subject's social connections rather than by the subject, predicts significantly lower concentrations of fibrinogen (a biomarker of inflammation and cardiac risk), after adjusting for demographics, education, medical history and known predictors of cardiac risk. The association between fibrinogen and social isolation, as measured by low indegree, is comparable to the effect of smoking, and greater than that of low education, a conventional measure of socioeconomic disadvantage. By contrast, outdegree, which reflects an individual's perceived connectedness, displays a significantly weaker association with fibrinogen concentrations. PMID:27559060

  16. Plasma Fibrinogen as a Biomarker for Mortality and Hospitalized Exacerbations in People with COPD

    PubMed Central

    Mannino, David M; Tal-Singer, Ruth; Lomas, David A.; Vestbo, Jorgen; Graham Barr, R.; Tetzlaff, Kay; Lowings, Michael; Rennard, Stephen I.; Snyder, Jeffrey; Goldman, Mitchell; Martin, Ubaldo J.; Merrill, Deborah; Martin, Amber L.; Simeone, Jason C.; Fahrbach, Kyle; Murphy, Brian; Leidy, Nancy; Miller, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    Background In 2010 the COPD Foundation established the COPD Biomarkers Qualification Consortium (CBQC) as a partnership between the Foundation, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and the pharmaceutical industry to pool publicly-funded and industry data to develop innovative tools to facilitate the development and approval of new therapies for COPD. We present data from the initial project seeking regulatory qualification of fibrinogen as a biomarker for the stratification of COPD patients into clinical trials. Methods This analysis pooled data from 4 publicly-funded studies and 1 industry study into a common database resulting in 6376 individuals with spirometric evidence of COPD. We used a threshold of 350 mg/dL to determine high vs. low fibrinogen, and determined the subsequent risk of hospitalizations from exacerbations and death using Cox proportional hazards models. Results High fibrinogen levels at baseline were present in 2853 (44.7%) of individuals with COPD. High fibrinogen was associated with an increased risk of hospitalized COPD exacerbations within 12 months (hazard ratio [HR]: 1.64; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.39–1.93) among participants in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study (ARIC), the Cardiovascular Health Study (CHS), and the Evaluation of COPD Longitudinally to Identify Predictive Surrogate Endpoints (ECLIPSE) study. High fibrinogen was associated with an increased risk of death within 36 months (HR: 1.94; 95% CI: 1.62–2.31) among all participants. Conclusions Fibrinogen levels ≥ 350 mg/dL identify COPD individuals at an increased risk of exacerbations and death and could be a useful biomarker for enriching clinical trials in the COPD population. PMID:25685850

  17. Histamine release and fibrinogen adsorption mediate acute inflammatory responses to biomaterial implants in humans

    PubMed Central

    Zdolsek, Johann; Eaton, John W; Tang, Liping

    2007-01-01

    Background Medical implants often fail as a result of so-called foreign body reactions during which inflammatory cells are recruited to implant surfaces. Despite the clinical importance of this phenomenon, the mechanisms involved in these reactions to biomedical implants in humans are not well understood. The results from animal studies suggest that both fibrinogen adsorption to the implant surface and histamine release by local mast cells are involved in biomaterial-mediated acute inflammatory responses. The purpose of this study was to test this hypothesis in humans. Methods Thirteen male medical student volunteers (Caucasian, 21–30 years of age) were employed for this study. To assess the importance of fibrinogen adsorption, six volunteers were implanted with polyethylene teraphthalate disks pre-coated with their own (fibrinogen-containing) plasma or (fibrinogen-free) serum. To evaluate the importance of histamine, seven volunteers were implanted with uncoated disks with or without prior oral administration of histamine receptor antagonists. The acute inflammatory response was estimated 24 hours later by measuring the activities of implant-associated phagocyte-specific enzymes. Results Plasma coated implants accumulated significantly more phagocytes than did serum coated implants and the recruited cells were predominantly macrophage/monocytes. Administration of both H1 and H2 histamine receptor antagonists greatly reduced the recruitment of macrophages/monocytes and neutrophils on implant surfaces. Conclusion In humans – as in rodents – biomaterial-mediated inflammatory responses involve at least two crucial events: histamine-mediated phagocyte recruitment and phagocyte accumulation on implant surfaces engendered by spontaneously adsorbed host fibrinogen. Based on these results, we conclude that reducing fibrinogen:surface interactions should enhance biocompatibility and that administration of histamine receptor antagonists prior to, and shortly after

  18. Protein aggregation in salt solutions

    PubMed Central

    Kastelic, Miha; Kalyuzhnyi, Yurij V.; Hribar-Lee, Barbara; Dill, Ken A.; Vlachy, Vojko

    2015-01-01

    Protein aggregation is broadly important in diseases and in formulations of biological drugs. Here, we develop a theoretical model for reversible protein–protein aggregation in salt solutions. We treat proteins as hard spheres having square-well-energy binding sites, using Wertheim’s thermodynamic perturbation theory. The necessary condition required for such modeling to be realistic is that proteins in solution during the experiment remain in their compact form. Within this limitation our model gives accurate liquid–liquid coexistence curves for lysozyme and γ IIIa-crystallin solutions in respective buffers. It provides good fits to the cloud-point curves of lysozyme in buffer–salt mixtures as a function of the type and concentration of salt. It than predicts full coexistence curves, osmotic compressibilities, and second virial coefficients under such conditions. This treatment may also be relevant to protein crystallization. PMID:25964322

  19. An alternative pathway for fibrinolysis. I. The cleavage of fibrinogen by leukocyte proteases at physiologic pH.

    PubMed Central

    Plow, E F; Edgington, T S

    1975-01-01

    An alternative fibrinolytic system, active at physiological pH, is present in peripheral blood leukocytes. The fibrinolytic proteases localized predominantly in the leukocyte granules are capable of degrading both fibrinogen and fibrin, and plasmin activity does not contribute significantly to this proteolytic event. The specificity of the alternative fibrinolytic proteases for fibrinogen and the characteristics of the derivative cleavage fragments are clearly distinguishable from the classical plasmin system. The high molecular weight derivatives of fibrinogen, generated by the alternative system, under physiological conditions, are larger than the plasmin-generated X fragment, exhibit immunoelectrophoretic mobility comparable to native fibrinogen, and are not coagulable by thrombin. Analysis of the constituent polypeptide chains of the fragments reveals cleavage of the Aalpha, Bbeta, and gamma chains of fibrinogen. The lower molecular weight derivatives of fibrinogen, generated by the alternative system, are structurally distinct from previously described fibrinogen degradation products and exhibit potent anticoagulant activity. This anticoagulant activity can be attributed to interference with normal fibrin polymerization. The proteases of the alternative fibrinolytic systems are actively secreted by leukocytes when stimulated to undergo a nonlytic release reaction. These results provide direct evidence for a fibrinolytic system resident in leukocyte granules that is associated with the leukocyte release reaction and is capable of generating unique fibrinogen cleavage fragments. Images PMID:237938

  20. Changes in the fibrinogen-fibrin system following a 20-hour exposure of rabbits to a magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matskevichene, V. B.; Vitenson, T. M.

    1974-01-01

    Prolonged exposure of animals to a constant magnetic field resulted in a sharp increase in the amount of fibrinogen. The addition of EACA to the plasma of experimental rabbits as well as protamine sulfate caused an additional increase in the amount of fibrinogen. A 20-hour exposure was accompanied by phenomena of paralysis of the pelvic limbs and death of some of the animals.

  1. Preliminary studies of the effects of a Peruvian snake Bothrops pictus (jergon of the coast) venom upon fibrinogen.

    PubMed

    Olascoaga, M E; Zavaleta, A; Marsh, N A

    1988-01-01

    Bothrops pictus (jergon of the coast) venom has a coagulant effect in vitro on both canine fibrinogen and on human and canine plasma, with a greater affinity for canine plasma. In vivo a single dose of venom produced partial defibrinogenation in conscious dogs, plasma fibrinogen being reduced to about 60% of control values after 6 hr. PMID:3188056

  2. Platelet aggregation test

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003669.htm Platelet aggregation test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The platelet aggregation blood test checks how well platelets , a ...

  3. Thermodynamics of Protein Aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osborne, Kenneth L.; Barz, Bogdan; Bachmann, Michael; Strodel, Birgit

    Amyloid protein aggregation characterizes many neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Creutz- feldt-Jakob disease. Evidence suggests that amyloid aggregates may share similar aggregation pathways, implying simulation of full-length amyloid proteins is not necessary for understanding amyloid formation. In this study we simulate GNNQQNY, the N-terminal prion-determining domain of the yeast protein Sup35 to investigate the thermodynamics of structural transitions during aggregation. We use a coarse-grained model with replica-exchange molecular dynamics to investigate the association of 3-, 6-, and 12-chain GNNQQNY systems and we determine the aggregation pathway by studying aggregation states of GN- NQQNY. We find that the aggregation of the hydrophilic GNNQQNY sequence is mainly driven by H-bond formation, leading to the formation of /3-sheets from the very beginning of the assembly process. Condensation (aggregation) and ordering take place simultaneously, which is underpinned by the occurrence of a single heat capacity peak only.

  4. Platelet aggregation test

    MedlinePlus

    The platelet aggregation blood test checks how well platelets , a part of blood, clump together and cause blood to clot. ... Decreased platelet aggregation may be due to: Autoimmune ... Fibrin degradation products Inherited platelet function defects ...

  5. Decrease in erythrocyte glycophorin sialic acid content is associated with increased erythrocyte aggregation in human diabetes.

    PubMed

    Rogers, M E; Williams, D T; Niththyananthan, R; Rampling, M W; Heslop, K E; Johnston, D G

    1992-03-01

    1. Sialic acid moieties of erythrocyte membrane glycoproteins are the principal determinants of the negative charge on the cell surface. The resultant electrostatic repulsion between the cells reduces erythrocyte aggregation and hence the low shear rate viscosity and yield stress of blood. 2. Using g.c.-m.s., a decrease in sialic acid content has been observed in the major erythrocyte membrane glycoprotein, glycophorin A, obtained from nine diabetic patients compared with that from seven normal control subjects [median (range): 3.30 (0.01-11.90) versus 18.60 (3.20-32.60) micrograms/100 micrograms of protein, P less than 0.02]. 3. Erythrocyte aggregation, measured by viscometry as the ratio of suspension viscosity to supernatant viscosity (LS/S) in fibrinogen solution, was increased in ten diabetic patients compared with ten normal control subjects (mean +/- SEM, 37.6 +/- 1.3 versus 33.8 +/- 0.6, P less than 0.02). 4. In the patients in whom both viscometry and carbohydrate analysis were performed, the decrease in erythrocyte glycophorin sialylation and the increase in erythrocyte aggregation in fibrinogen solution were related statistically (LS/S correlated negatively with glycophorin sialic acid content, r = 0.73, P less than 0.05). 5. Decreased glycophorin sialylation provides an explanation at the molecular level for increased erythrocyte aggregation and it may be important in the pathogenesis of vascular disease in diabetes. PMID:1312416

  6. Inhibition of αIIbβ3 Ligand Binding by an αIIb Peptide that Clasps the Hybrid Domain to the βI Domain of β3

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wen Hwa; Schaffner-Reckinger, Elisabeth; Tsoukatos, Demokritos C.; Aylward, Kelly; Moussis, Vassilios; Tsikaris, Vassilios; Trypou, Paraskevi; Egot, Marion; Baruch, Dominique; Kieffer, Nelly; Bachelot-Loza, Christilla

    2015-01-01

    Agonist-stimulated platelet activation triggers conformational changes of integrin αIIbβ3, allowing fibrinogen binding and platelet aggregation. We have previously shown that an octapeptide, p1YMESRADR8, corresponding to amino acids 313–320 of the β-ribbon extending from the β-propeller domain of αIIb, acts as a potent inhibitor of platelet aggregation. Here we have performed in silico modelling analysis of the interaction of this peptide with αIIbβ3 in its bent and closed (not swing-out) conformation and show that the peptide is able to act as a substitute for the β-ribbon by forming a clasp restraining the β3 hybrid and βI domains in a closed conformation. The involvement of species-specific residues of the β3 hybrid domain (E356 and K384) and the β1 domain (E297) as well as an intrapeptide bond (pE315-pR317) were confirmed as important for this interaction by mutagenesis studies of αIIbβ3 expressed in CHO cells and native or substituted peptide inhibitory studies on platelet functions. Furthermore, NMR data corroborate the above results. Our findings provide insight into the important functional role of the αIIb β-ribbon in preventing integrin αIIbβ3 head piece opening, and highlight a potential new therapeutic approach to prevent integrin ligand binding. PMID:26332040

  7. Impact of Preemptive Fibrinogen Concentrate on Transfusion Requirements in Liver Transplantation: A Multicenter, Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Sabate, A; Gutierrez, R; Beltran, J; Mellado, P; Blasi, A; Acosta, F; Costa, M; Reyes, R; Torres, F

    2016-08-01

    We hypothesized that preemptive fibrinogen administration to obtain an initial plasma level of 2.9 g/L would reduce transfusion requirements in liver transplantation. A randomized, multicenter, hemoglobin-stratified, double-blind, fibrinogen-versus-saline-controlled trial was conducted. The primary end point was the percentage of patients requiring red blood cells. We evaluated 51 patients allocated to fibrinogen and 48 allocated to saline; the primary end point was assessed using data for 92 patients because the electronic record forms were offline for three patients in the fibrinogen group and four in the saline group. We injected a median of 3.54 g fibrinogen preemptively in the fibrinogen group. Nine patients in the saline group (20.9%) required fibrinogen at graft reperfusion (compared with one patient [2.1%] in the fibrinogen group; p = 0.005). Blood was transfused to 52.9% (95% confidence interval [CI] 42.5-63.3%) in the fibrinogen group and 42.74% (95% CI 28.3-57.2%) in the saline group (p = 0.217). Relative risk for blood transfusion was 0.80 (95% CI 0.57-1.13). Thrombotic events occurred in one patient (2.1%) and five patients (11.4%) in the fibrinogen and saline groups, respectively. Seven patients (14.6%) in the fibrinogen group and nine (20.3%) in the saline group required reoperation. Preemptive administration of fibrinogen concentrate did not influence transfusion requirements. PMID:26880105

  8. Recovery of fibrinogen concentrate after intraosseous application is equivalent to the intravenous route in a porcine model of hemodilution

    PubMed Central

    Schlimp, Christoph J.; Solomon, Cristina; Keibl, Claudia; Zipperle, Johannes; Nürnberger, Sylvia; Öhlinger, Wolfgang; Redl, Heinz; Schöchl, Herbert

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Fibrinogen concentrate is increasingly considered as a hemostatic agent for trauma patients experiencing bleeding. Placing a venous access is sometimes challenging during severe hemorrhage. Intraosseous access may be considered instead. Studies of intraosseous infusion of coagulation factor concentrates are limited. We investigated in vivo recovery following intraosseous administration of fibrinogen concentrate and compared the results with intravenous administration. METHODS This study was performed on 12 pigs (mean [SD] body weight, 34.1 [2.8] kg). Following controlled blood loss (35 mL/kg) and fluid replacement with balanced crystalloid solution, intraosseous (n = 6) administration of fibrinogen concentrate (80 mg per kilogram of bodyweight) in the proximal tibia was compared with intravenous (n = 6) administration of the same dose (fibrinogen infusion time approximately 5 minutes in both groups). The following laboratory parameters were assessed: blood cell count, prothrombin time index, activated partial thromboplastin time, and plasma fibrinogen concentration (Clauss assay). Coagulation status was also assessed by thromboelastometry. RESULTS All tested laboratory parameters were comparable between the intraosseous and intravenous groups at baseline, hemodilution, and 30 minutes after fibrinogen concentrate administration. In vivo recovery of fibrinogen was also similar in the two groups (89% [23%] and 91% [22%], respectively). There were no significant between-group differences in any of the thromboelastometric parameters. Histologic examination indicated no adverse effects on the tissue surrounding the intraosseous administration site. CONCLUSION This study suggests that intraosseous administration of fibrinogen concentrate results in a recovery of fibrinogen similar to that of intravenous administration. The intraosseous route of fibrinogen concentrate could be a valuable alternative in situations where intravenous access is not feasible or would

  9. Detection and characterization of red blood cell (RBC) aggregation with photoacoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hysi, Eno; Saha, Ratan K.; Rui, Min; Kolios, Michael C.

    2012-02-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) aggregate in the presence of increased plasma fibrinogen and low shear forces during blood flow. RBC aggregation has been observed in deep vein thrombosis, sepsis and diabetes. We propose using photoacoustics (PA) as a non-invasive imaging modality to detect RBC aggregation. The theoretical and experimental feasibility of PA for detecting and characterizing aggregation was assessed. A simulation study was performed to generate PA signals from non-aggregated and aggregated RBCs using a frequency domain approach and to study the PA signals' dependence on hematocrit and aggregate size. The effect of the finite bandwidth nature of transducers on the PA power spectra was also investigated. Experimental confirmation of theoretical results was conducted using porcine RBC samples exposed to 1064 nm optical wavelength using the Imagio Small Animal PA imaging system (Seno Medical Instruments, Inc., San Antonio, TX). Aggregation was induced with Dextran-70 (Sigma-Aldrich, St. Louis, MO) and the effect of hematocrit and aggregation level was investigated. The theoretical and experimental PA signal amplitude increased linearly with increasing hematocrit. The theoretical dominant frequency content of PA signals shifted towards lower frequencies (<30 MHz) and 9 dB enhancements in spectral power were observed as the size of aggregates increased compared to non-aggregating RBCs. Calibration of the PA spectra with the transducer response obtained from a 200 nm gold film was performed to remove system dependencies. Analysis of the spectral parameters from the calibrated spectra suggested that PA can assess the degree of aggregation at multiple hematocrit and aggregation levels.

  10. Silt-clay aggregates on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, R.

    1979-01-01

    Viking observations suggest abundant silt and clay particles on Mars. It is proposed that some of these particles agglomerate to form sand size aggregates that are redeposited as sandlike features such as drifts and dunes. Although the binding for the aggregates could include salt cementation or other mechanisms, electrostatic bonding is considered to be a primary force holding the aggregates together. Various laboratory experiments conducted since the 19th century, and as reported here for simulated Martian conditions, show that both the magnitude and sign of electrical charges on windblown particles are functions of particle velocity, shape and composition, atmospheric pressure, atmospheric composition and other factors. Electrical charges have been measured for saltating particles in the wind tunnel and in the field, on the surfaces of sand dunes, and within dust clouds on earth. Similar, and perhaps even greater, charges are proposed to occur on Mars, which could form aggregates of silt and clay size particles

  11. Aggregated Gas Molecules: Toxic to Protein?

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Meng; Zuo, Guanghong; Chen, Jixiu; Gao, Yi; Fang, Haiping

    2013-01-01

    The biological toxicity of high levels of breathing gases has been known for centuries, but the mechanism remains elusive. Earlier work mainly focused on the influences of dispersed gas molecules dissolved in water on biomolecules. However, recent studies confirmed the existence of aggregated gas molecules at the water-solid interface. In this paper, we have investigated the binding preference of aggregated gas molecules on proteins with molecular dynamics simulations, using nitrogen (N2) gas and the Src-homology 3 (SH3) domain as the model system. Aggregated N2 molecules were strongly bound by the active sites of the SH3 domain, which could impair the activity of the protein. In contrast, dispersed N2 molecules did not specifically interact with the SH3 domain. These observations extend our understanding of the possible toxicity of aggregates of gas molecules in the function of proteins. PMID:23588597

  12. Oleic acid-induced lung injury in rabbits: effect of fibrinogen depletion with Arvin

    SciTech Connect

    Allard, M.F.; Doerschuk, C.M.; Brumwell, M.L.; Belzberg, A.; Hogg, J.C.

    1988-03-01

    The role of fibrinogen in the evolution of the increased permeability after oleic acid-induced lung injury was studied in New Zealand White rabbits. Animals depleted of fibrinogen by treatment with Malayan pit viper venom were compared with untreated rabbits immediately and at 1 and 24 h after injury. The increased permeability to albumin and elevated extravascular lung water (EVLW) associated with lung injury returned to control values by 24 h in untreated animals. Fibrinogen-depleted animals had a higher mortality (10/25 vs. 2/17, P less than 0.02) and showed a greater immediate increase in permeability to albumin that returned to control values at 1 and 24 h after injury, as well as trends toward elevated blood-free dry lung weight and larger increases in EVLW that persisted for 24 h. These findings indicate that fibrinogen-related proteins play an important role in controlling the microvascular injury that is produced by oleic acid. However, when these proteins are depleted, other mechanisms partially control the leak at later stages of the repair process.

  13. Immunological Identification of Fibrinogen in Dual-Component Protein Films by AFM Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Soman, Pranav; Rice, Zachary; Siedlecki, Christopher A.

    2009-01-01

    The success of long-term blood-contacting implanted devices is largely dependent upon the interaction of the blood components with the device biomaterial surface. The ability to study these interactions has been hindered by a lack of methods to measure single-molecule interactions in complex multi-protein environments similar to the environment found in-vivo. In this paper, we demonstrate the use of atomic force microscopy (AFM) in conjunction with gold nanolabels to detect the protein fibrinogen under aqueous conditions without the topographical clues usually necessary for high resolution visualization. BSA was patterned onto both muscovite mica and plasma-treated polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrates and these test substrates were subsequently backfilled with fibrinogen to yield a featureless protein layer. The fibrinogen in this dual protein layer was detected using high resolution AFM imaging following infusion of anti-fibrinogen conjugated with nanogold particles. This AFM immuno-detection technique will potentially be applicable to complex multi-component protein films adsorbed on clinically-relevant polymers used in medical devices. PMID:18294855

  14. Forced Unfolding of the Coiled-Coils of Fibrinogen by Single-Molecule AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Andre; Litvinov, Rustem; Discher, Dennis; Weisel, John

    2007-03-01

    A blood clot needs to have the right degree of stiffness and plasticity for hemostasis, but the origin of these mechanical properties is unknown. Here we report the first measurements using single molecule atomic force microscopy (AFM) to study the forced unfolding of fibrinogen to begin addressing this problem. To generate longer reproducible curves than are possible using monomer, factor XIIIa cross-linked, single chain fibrinogen oligomers were used. When extended under force, these oligomers showed sawtooth shaped force-extension patterns characteristic of unfolding proteins with a peak-to-peak separation of approximately 26 nm, consistent with the independent unfolding of the coiled-coils. These results were then reproduced using a Monte Carlo simulation with parameters in the same range as those previously used for unfolding globular domains. In particular, we found that the refolding time was negligible on experimental time and force scales in contrast to previous work on simpler coiled-coils. We suggest that this difference may be due to fibrinogen's structurally and topologically more complex coiled-coils and that an interaction between the alpha C and central domains may be involved. These results suggest a new functional property of fibrinogen and that the coiled-coil is more than a passive structural element of this molecule.

  15. [Fixing of osteochondral fragments with fibrinogen glue. Clinical experiences (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Zilch, H; Friedebold, G

    1981-08-01

    Small osteochondral fragments are well fixed with the fibrinogen glue. This method is really a progress in comparison with the traditional fixation by screws or K-wires. The fragments were revascularized early. This is demonstrated by 31 glued osteochondral fragments which healed well. The joints must be immobilized during a period of 3 weeks. PMID:6118021

  16. Dextran-mediated interbacterial aggregation between dextran-synthesizing streptococci and Actinomyces viscosus.

    PubMed Central

    Bourgeau, G; McBride, B C

    1976-01-01

    Streptococcus sanguis and Streptococcus mutans bind to the surface of Actinomyces viscosus, producing large microbial aggregates. Aggregates form rapidly and are not easily dissociated by vigorous mixing. The binding is mediated by dextran. Glucose-grown streptococci will not aggregate unless they are first mixed with high-molecular-weight dextran. Aggregation is induced with dextrans isolated from Leuconostoc, S. sanguis, or S. mutans. Sucrose-grown streptococci will adhere to A. viscosus without the addition of an exogenous source of dextran. A. viscosus will bind dextran and then bind glucose-grown streptococci. Aggregation occurs over a wide pH range and is dependent on cations. The aggregating activity of A. viscosus is both protease and heat sensitive. The aggregating activity of S. sanguis is heat stable but sensitive to dextranase. Images PMID:1279004

  17. Clinical and Prognostic Significance of Preoperative Plasma Fibrinogen Levels in Patients with Operable Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xiaofei; Liu, Haixia; Li, Xiangyi; Ma, Rong

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Elevated plasma fibrinogen levels are associated with tumor progression and poor outcomes in different cancer patients. The objective of this study was to investigate the clinical and prognostic value of preoperative plasma fibrinogen levels in patients with operable breast cancer. Methods Two hundred and twenty-three patients diagnosed with breast cancer were retrospectively evaluated in this study. Plasma fibrinogen levels were examined before treatment and analyzed along with patient clinicopathological parameters, disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival(OS). Both univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify the clinicopathological parameters associated with DFS and OS. Results Elevated preoperative plasma fibrinogen levels were directly associated with age of diagnose (≤47 vs. >47, p<0.001), menopause (yes vs. no, p<0.001), tumor size (T1&T2 vs.T3&T4, p = 0.033), tumor stage (Ⅰvs.Ⅱvs.Ⅲ, p = 0.034) and lymph node involvement (N = 0 vs. 1≤N≤3 vs. N≥4, p<0.001), but not with histological grade, molecular type and other Immunohistochemical parameters(ER, PR, HER2 and Ki-67). In a univariate survival analysis, tumor stage, tumor size, lymph node involvement (p<0.001/ p<0.001)and plasma fibrinogen (p<0.001/ p<0.001) levels were associated with disease-free and overall survival, but just lymph nodes involvement (p<0.001, hazard ratio [HR] = 2.9, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.6–5.3/ p = 0.006, HR = 3.2, 95% CI = 1.4–7.3) and plasma fibrinogen levels (p = 0.006, HR = 3.4, 95% CI = 1.4–8.3/ p = 0.002, HR = 10.1, 95% CI = 2.3–44.6) were associated with disease-free and overall survival in a multivariate survival analysis, respectively. Conclusions This study demonstrates that elevated preoperative plasma fibrinogen levels are associated with breast cancer progression and are independently associated with a poor prognosis in patients with operable breast cancer. PMID:26799214

  18. Single-molecule surface studies of fibrinogen and DNA on semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Xianhua

    Understanding of protein adsorption onto non-biological substrates is of fundamental interest in science, but also has great potential technological applications in medical devices and biosensors. This study explores the non-specific interaction, at the single molecule level, of a blood protein and DNA with semiconductor surfaces through the use of a custom built, non rastering electron emission microscope and a scanning probe microscope. The specifics and history of electron emission are described as well as the equipment used in this study. The protein examined in this study is human plasma fibrinogen, which plays an important role in haemostatis and thrombosis, and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is also studied. A novel technique for determining the photothreshold of biomolecules on single molecule level is developed and applied to fibrinogen molecules adsorbed on oxidized silicon surfaces, using photo-electron emission microscopy (PEEM). Three theoretical models are employed and compared to analyze the experimental photothreshold data. The non-specific adsorption of human plasma fibrinogen on oxidized p- and n- type silicon (100) surfaces is investigated to characterize both hydrophobic interactions and electrostatic forces. The experimental results indicate that hydrophobic interactions are one of the driving forces for protein adsorption and the electrostatic interactions also play a role in the height of the fibrinogen molecules adsorbed on the surface. PEEM images establish a photo threshold of 5.0 +/- 0.2 eV for fibrinogen on both n-type and p-type Si (100) surfaces. We suggest that the photothreshold results from surface state associated Fermi level (EF) pinning and there exists negative charge transfer from the adsorbed fibrinogen onto the p-type silicon substrates, while on n-type silicon substrates negative charge is transferred in the opposite direction. The adsorption of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) on mica and silicon is studied in liquid and ambient

  19. Cleavage of fibrinogen by the human neutrophil neutral peptide-generating protease.

    PubMed Central

    Wintroub, B U; Coblyn, J S; Kaempfer, C E; Austen, K F

    1980-01-01

    The human neutrophil peptide-generating protease, which generates a low molecular weight vasoactive peptide from a plasma protein substrate, is directly fibrinolytic and cleaves human fibrinogen in a manner distinct from plasmin. Fibrinogen was reduced from 340,000 Mr to derivatives of 270,000-325,000 Mr during interaction with the protease at enzyme-to-substrate ratios of 0.3 or 1.0 microgram/1.0 mg. The 310,000-325,000 Mr cleavage fragments exhibited prolonged thrombin-induced clotting activity but were able to be coagulated, whereas the 270,000-290,000 Mr fragments were not able to be coagulated. Anticoagulants were not generated at either enzyme dose. As analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in 4-30% gradient gels and 10% gels stained for protein and carbohydrate, the diminution to 310,000-325,000 Mr and the prolongation of thrombin-induced clotting time resulted from cleavage of the fibrinogen A alpha chain. The further decrease in size to 270,000-290,000 Mr was associated with B beta-chain and gamma-chain cleavage and an inability to form gamma-gamma dimers. The neutral peptide-generating protease, a distinct human neutrophil neutral protease with fibrinolytic and fibrinogenolytic activities comparable to those of plasmin on a weight basis, cleaves fibrinogen in a manner that is distinct from the action of plasmin, leukocyte elastase, and leukocyte granule extracts. It may be that the concerted action of this neutrophil protease to generate a vasoactive peptide and to digest fibrinogen and fibrin facilitates neutrophil movement through vascular and extravascular sites. Images PMID:7001479

  20. Relationship between Physical Activity and Plasma Fibrinogen Concentrations in Adults without Chronic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Marcos, Manuel A.; Recio-Rodríguez, José I.; Patino-Alonso, Maria C.; Martinez-Vizcaino, Vicente; Martin-Borras, Carme; de-la-Cal-dela-Fuente, Aventina; Sauras-Llera, Ines; Sanchez-Perez, Alvaro; Agudo-Conde, Cristina; García-Ortiz, Luis

    2014-01-01

    Objective To analyze the relationship between regular physical activity, as assessed by accelerometer and 7-day physical activity recall (PAR), and plasma fibrinogen concentrations. Methods A cross-sectional study in a previously established cohort of healthy subjects was performed. This study analyzed 1284 subjects who were included in the EVIDENT study (mean age 55.0±13.6 years; 60.90% women). Fibrinogen concentrations were measured in blood plasma. Physical activity was assessed with a 7-day PAR (metabolic equivalents (METs)/hour/week) and GT3X ActiGraph accelerometer (counts/minute) for 7 days. Results Physical exercise, which was evaluated with both an accelerometer (Median: 237.28 counts/minute) and 7-day PAR (Median: 8 METs/hour/week). Physical activity was negatively correlated with plasma fibrinogen concentrations, which was evaluated by counts/min (r = −0.100; p<0.001) and METs/hour/week (r = −0.162; p<0.001). In a multiple linear regression analysis, fibrinogen concentrations of the subjects who performed more physical activity (third tertile of count/minute and METs/hour/week) respect to subjects who performed less (first tertile), maintained statistical significance after adjustments for age and others confounders (β = −0.03; p = 0.046 and β = −0.06; p<0.001, respectively). Conclusions Physical activity, as assessed by accelerometer and 7-day PAR, was negatively associated with plasma fibrinogen concentrations. This relation is maintained in subjects who performed more exercise even after adjusting for age and other confounders. PMID:24498413

  1. Revealing fibrinogen monolayer conformations at different pHs: electrokinetic and colloid deposition studies.

    PubMed

    Nattich-Rak, Małgorzata; Adamczyk, Zbigniew; Wasilewska, Monika; Sadowska, Marta

    2015-07-01

    Adsorption mechanism of human fibrinogen on mica at different pHs is studied using the streaming potential and colloid deposition measurements. The fibrinogen monolayers are produced by a controlled adsorption under diffusion transport at pH of 3.5 and 7.4. Initially, the electrokinetic properties of these monolayers and their stability for various ionic strength are determined. It is shown that at pH 3.5 fibrinogen adsorbs irreversibly on mica for ionic strength range of 4×10(-4) to 0.15 M. At pH 7.4, a partial desorption is observed for ionic strength below 10(-2) M. This is attributed to the desorption of the end-on oriented molecules whereas the side-on adsorbed molecules remain irreversibly bound at all ionic strengths. The orientation of molecules and monolayer structure is evaluated by the colloid deposition measurements involving negatively charged polystyrene latex microspheres, 820 nm in diameter. An anomalous deposition of negative latex particles on substrates exhibiting a negative zeta potential is observed. At pH 3.5 measurable deposition of latex is observed even at low ionic strength where the approach distance of latex particles exceeded 70 nm. At pH 7.4 this critical distance is 23 nm. This confirms that fibrinogen monolayers formed at both pHs are characterized by the presence of the side-on and end-on oriented molecules that prevail at higher coverage range. It is also shown that positive charge is located at the end parts of the αA chains of the adsorbed fibrinogen molecules. Therefore, it is concluded that the colloid deposition method is an efficient tool for revealing protein adsorption mechanisms at solid/electrolyte interfaces. PMID:25453169

  2. Fibrinogen Availability and Coagulation Function after Hemorrhage and Resuscitation in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Martini, Wenjun Z

    2011-01-01

    Hemorrhagic coagulopathy (without neurological injuries) constitutes 40% of injury-related death in civilian hospitals and on the battlefield, and the underlying contributing mechanisms remain unclear. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of fibrinogen availability on coagulation function after hemorrhage in pigs. Sixteen crossbred commercial Yorkshire swine were randomized into the control group (group C) (n = 8) and hemorrhage group (group H) (n = 8). Hemorrhage was induced in group H by bleeding 35% of the estimated total blood volume, followed by resuscitation with lactated Ringer solution at three times the bled volume. Pigs in group C were not hemorrhaged or resuscitated. Blood samples were withdrawn at baseline, 15 min, 3 h, 6 h, and 24 h after hemorrhage and lactated Ringer (LR) resuscitation (H–LR). Coagulation was assessed by using thrombelastography. All baseline measurements were similar between groups C and H. Hemorrhage caused a decrease in mean arterial pressure and an increase in heart rate in group H, but LR resuscitation corrected these changes within 1 h. Compared to baseline values, fibrinogen concentrations in group H decreased at 15 min, 3 h and 6 h after H–LR, but increased to double that of the baseline value at 24 h; platelet counts decreased throughout the study; clot strength was decreased at 15 min, 3 h and 6 h, but returned to baseline value at 24 h after H–LR. Hemorrhage caused decreases in fibrinogen and platelets, and compromised clot strength. The rebound of fibrinogen at 24 h restored clot strength despite platelet deficit. These data suggest the potential compensatory role of fibrinogen in restoring coagulation function in vivo after hemorrhagic shock. PMID:21327301

  3. Changes in fibrinogen availability and utilization in an animal model of traumatic coagulopathy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Impaired haemostasis following shock and tissue trauma is frequently detected in the trauma setting. These changes occur early, and are associated with increased mortality. The mechanism behind trauma-induced coagulopathy (TIC) is not clear. Several studies highlight the crucial role of fibrinogen in posttraumatic haemorrhage. This study explores the coagulation changes in a swine model of early TIC, with emphasis on fibrinogen levels and utilization of fibrinogen. Methods A total of 18 landrace pigs were anaesthetized and divided into four groups. The Trauma-Shock group (TS) were inflicted bilateral blast femoral fractures with concomitant soft tissue injury by a high-energy rifle shot to both hind legs, followed by controlled exsanguination. The Shock group (S) was exposed to shock by exsanguination, whereas a third group was exposed to trauma only (T). A fourth group (C) served as control. Physiological data, haematological measurements, blood gas analyses and conventional coagulation assays were recorded at baseline and repeatedly over 60 minutes. Thrombelastometry were performed by means of the tissue factor activated ExTEM assay and the platelet inhibiting FibTEM assay. Data were statistically analysed by repeated measurements analyses method. Results A significant reduction of fibrinogen concentration was observed in both the TS and S groups. INR increased significantly in the S group and differed significantly from the TS group. Maximum clot firmness (MCF) of the ExTEM assay was significantly reduced over time in both TS and S groups. In the FibTEM assay a significant shortening of the clotting time and an increase in MCF was observed in the TS group compared to the S group. Conclusion Despite a reduction in clotting capability measured by ExTEM MCF and a reduced fibrinogen concentration, extensive tissue trauma may induce an increased fibrin based clotting activity that attenuates the hypocoagulable tendency in exsanguinated animals. PMID

  4. Can Plasma Fibrinogen Levels Predict Bleeding After Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting?

    PubMed Central

    Jalali, Alireza; Ghiasi, Mohammadsaeid; Aghaei, Aghdas; Khaleghparast, Shiva; Ghanbari, Behrooz; Bakhshandeh, Hooman

    2014-01-01

    Background: Fibrinogen is the main biomarker for bleeding. To prevent excessive postoperative bleeding, it would be useful to identify high-risk patients before coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). Objectives: In order to predicating bleeding after CABG, we sought to determine whether preoperative fibrinogen concentration was associated with the amount of bleeding following CABG. Patients and Methods: A total of 144 patients (mean age = 61.50 ± 9.42 years; 65.7% men), undergoing elective and isolated CABG, were included in this case-series study. The same anesthesia technique and medicines were selected for all the patients. In the ICU, the patients were assessed in terms of bleeding at 12 and 24 hours post-operation, amount of contingent blood products received, and relevant tests. Statistical tests were subsequently conducted to analyze the correlation between preoperative fibrinogen concentration and the amount of post-CABG bleeding. Results: The mean ± standard deviation of bleeding at 12 and 24 hours post-operation was 285.37 ± 280.27 and 499.31 ± 355.57 mL, respectively. The results showed that postoperative bleeding was associated with different factors whereas pre-anesthesia fibrinogen was not correlated with bleeding at 12 (P = 0.856) and 24 hours (P = 0.936) post-operation. There were correlations between the extra-corporal circulation time and bleeding at 12 hours post-operation (ρ = 0.231, P = 0.007) and bleeding at 24 hours post-operation (ρ = 0.218, P = 0.013). Conclusions: Preoperative assessment of plasma fibrinogen levels failed to predict post-CABG bleeding. PMID:25478546

  5. Immunohistochemical evaluation of tissue factor, fibrin/fibrinogen and D-dimers in canine gliomas.

    PubMed

    de la Fuente, Cristian; Pumarola, Martí; Blasco, Ester; Fernández, Francisco; Viu, Judit; Añor, Sònia

    2014-06-01

    In human gliomas, tissue factor (TF) is overexpressed, associated with the grade of malignancy and influences tumour biology. Intra-tumoural fibrin/fibrinogen deposition and activation of the fibrinolytic system also play a role in tumour cell proliferation and angiogenesis. The first aim of the present study was to investigate TF expression and the presence of fibrin/fibrinogen and D-dimers in canine glioma biopsies, graded according to the World Health Organization (WHO) classification of tumours of the central nervous system. The second aim was to investigate the occurrence of intravascular thrombosis (IVT) in canine gliomas, as a potential histological marker of glioma type or grade of malignancy. An immunohistochemical study using antibodies against TF, fibrin/fibrinogen and D-dimers was performed with 24 glioma samples, including 15 oligodendrogliomas, 6 astrocytomas and 3 mixed gliomas. Immunohistochemical data were statistically analysed to determine whether there was any relationship between glioma type and grade of malignancy. All gliomas were moderate to strongly positive for TF and the staining score was significantly higher (P = 0.04) in high-grade (III or IV) than in low-grade (II) gliomas. Intra-tumoural fibrin/fibrinogen deposition was detected in all tumour biopsies assessed, and D-dimers were detected in 17/24 gliomas. IVT was a frequent finding, but was not linked to a specific glioma type or malignancy grade. TF expression, fibrin/fibrinogen deposition, extravascular fibrinolytic system activation and IVT occur in canine gliomas. Canine glioma might be a suitable model for studying coagulation and fibrinolysis as potential therapeutic targets for human gliomas. PMID:24745770

  6. Fibrinogen and thrombin concentrations are critical for fibrin glue adherence in rat high-risk colon anastomoses

    PubMed Central

    Buen, Eliseo Portilla-de; Orozco-Mosqueda, Abel; Leal-Cortés, Caridad; Vázquez-Camacho, Gonzalo; Fuentes-Orozco, Clotilde; Alvarez-Villaseñor, Andrea Socorro; Macías-Amezcua, Michel Dassaejv; González-Ojeda, Alejandro

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Fibrin glues have not been consistently successful in preventing the dehiscence of high-risk colonic anastomoses. Fibrinogen and thrombin concentrations in glues determine their ability to function as sealants, healers, and/or adhesives. The objective of the current study was to compare the effects of different concentrations of fibrinogen and thrombin on bursting pressure, leaks, dehiscence, and morphology of high-risk ischemic colonic anastomoses using fibrin glue in rats. METHODS: Colonic anastomoses in adult female Sprague-Dawley rats (weight, 250-350 g) treated with fibrin glue containing different concentrations of fibrinogen and thrombin were evaluated at post-operative day 5. The interventions were low-risk (normal) or high-risk (ischemic) end-to-end colonic anastomoses using polypropylene sutures and topical application of fibrinogen at high (120 mg/mL) or low (40 mg/mL) concentrations and thrombin at high (1000 IU/mL) or low (500 IU/mL) concentrations. RESULTS: Ischemia alone, anastomosis alone, or both together reduced the bursting pressure. Glues containing a low fibrinogen concentration improved this parameter in all cases. High thrombin in combination with low fibrinogen also improved adherence exclusively in low-risk anastomoses. No differences were detected with respect to macroscopic parameters, histopathology, or hydroxyproline content at 5 days post-anastomosis. CONCLUSIONS: Fibrin glue with a low fibrinogen content normalizes the bursting pressure of high-risk ischemic left-colon anastomoses in rats at day 5 after surgery. PMID:24714834

  7. Association of Fibrinogen with Severity of Stable Coronary Artery Disease in Patients with Type 2 Diabetic Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Li-Feng; Li, Xiao-Lin; Luo, Song-Hui; Guo, Yuan-Lin; Zhu, Cheng-Gang; Qing, Ping; Wu, Na-Qiong; Li, Jian-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Background. Some studies have suggested a relation of plasma fibrinogen to the severity of coronary artery disease (CAD). However, whether plasma fibrinogen can predict the presence and severity of CAD in patients with diabetes mellitus has not been determined. Methods. A total of consecutive 373 diabetic patients with typical angina pectoris who received coronary angiography were enrolled and classified into three groups by tertiles of Gensini score (GS, low group <8; intermediate group 8~28; high group >28). The relationship between fibrinogen and GS was evaluated. Results. There were correlations of fibrinogen with hemoglobin A1c, C-reactive protein, and GS (r = 0.17, r = 0.52, and r = 0.21, resp.; all P < 0.001). Area under the receivers operating characteristic curve of fibrinogen was 0.62 (95% CI 0.56–0.68, P < 0.001) for predicting a high GS. Multivariate analysis suggested that plasma fibrinogen was an independent predictor of a high GS for diabetic patients (OR = 1.40, 95% CI 1.04–1.88, and P = 0.026) after adjusting for traditional risk factors of CAD. Conclusions. The present data indicated that plasma fibrinogen, a readily measurable systematic inflammatory marker, appeared to be an independent predictor for the severity of CAD in diabetic patients. PMID:24803720

  8. Retinoids stimulate fibrinogen production both in vitro (hepatocytes) and in vivo. Induction requires activation of the retinoid X receptor.

    PubMed

    Nicodeme, E; Nicaud, M; Issandou, M

    1995-10-01

    The in vitro effects of retinoids on fibrinogen synthesis were investigated in HepG2 cells and primary human hepatocytes. In vivo effects were studied in the rat. In HepG2 cells, maximal stimulation (twofold) of fibrinogen secretion was obtained when cells were incubated in the presence of 1 mumol/L all-trans retinoic acid (T-RA) for 24 hours. A comparable increase was observed for both de novo fibrinogen synthesis and fibrinogen beta chain mRNA level. In primary cultures of human hepatocytes, treatment with 1 mumol/L T-RA for 72 hours also gave a twofold increase in fibrinogen production. Furthermore, rats treated for 6 days with 100 mg.kg-1.d-1 T-RA presented increased fibrinogen plasma levels (110%). A selective retinoic X receptor (RXR) agonist, 4-[1-3,5,5,8,8-pentamethyl-5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-2-naphthyl)-ethenyl]benzoi c acid (3-methyl TTNEB), as well as 9-cis retinoic acid, a natural RXR ligand, mimicked the effects of T-RA on fibrinogen synthesis in vitro at lower concentrations. In contrast, a selective retinoic A receptor alpha (RAR alpha) agonist was a poor activator. The ED50 of the different retinoids on fibrinogen secretion by HepG2 cells was 25 nmol/L for T-RA, 4 nmol/L for 9-cis retinoic acid, 11 nmol/L for the synthetic RXR agonist, and > 500 nmol/L for the RAR alpha agonist. However, incubation of HepG2 cells with RXR agonist together with RAR alpha agonist resulted in a further increase in fibrinogen production. The secretion of two other acute-phase proteins, alpha-antichymotrypsin and caeruloplasmin, was also stimulated by retinoids in HepG2 cells but by a different regulatory mechanism.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7583541

  9. The use of fibrinogen uptake test in screening for deep vein thrombosis in patients with hip fracture

    SciTech Connect

    Fauno, P.; Suomalainen, O.; Bergqvist, D.; Fredin, H.; Kettunen, K.; Soimakallio, S.; Cederholm, C.; Karjalainen, P.; Vissinger, H.; Justesen, T. )

    1990-11-01

    255 hip fracture patients were studied by {sup 125}I-fibrinogen uptake test and bilateral phlebography. We found the sensitivity of fibrinogen scanning to be 44% for the non-operated limb and 50% for the calves. The predictive value of a negative result was found to be 92% and 93% respectively. We conclude that the use of fibrinogen uptake test as single diagnosticum is not valid and can only be recommended in combination with phlebography when studying patient where the frequency of DVT is expected to be low.

  10. The Dual Role of Fibrinogen as Inhibitor and Nucleator of Calcium Phosphate Phases: The Importance of Structure.

    PubMed

    Tsortos; Ohki; Zieba; Baier; Nancollas

    1996-01-15

    Constant composition and free drift methods have been used to investigate the abilities of human serum albumin (HSA) and fibrinogen to influence calcium phosphate precipitation. Both molecules inhibit hydroxyapatite (HAP) crystal growth when present in the solution phase. Fibrinogen, when immobilized at hydrophobicized germanium or silica surfaces, is able to nucleate calcium phosphate phases; at clean germanium or silica surfaces, it appears to be inactive. The apparent configuration of fibrinogen molecules at germanium or silica surfaces on which octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) was deposited probably exposes more negative sites for participation in nucleation. PMID:10479440

  11. Mechanisms of carbon nanotube aggregation and the reversion of carbon nanotube aggregates in aqueous medium.

    PubMed

    Koh, Byumseok; Cheng, Wei

    2014-09-16

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) dispersed in aqueous medium have many potential applications in chemistry, biology, and medicine. Reversible aggregation of SWCNTs dispersed in water has been frequently reported, but the mechanisms behind are not well understood. Here we show that SWCNTs dispersed into aqueous medium assisted by various charged molecules can be reversibly aggregated by a variety of electrolytes with two distinct mechanisms. Direct binding of counterions to SWCNTs leads to aggregation when the surface charge is neutralized from 74 to 86%. This aggregation is driven by electrostatic instead of van der Waals interactions, thus showing similarity to that of DNA condensation induced by multivalent cations. Sequestration of counterions by chelating reagents leads to the redispersion of SWCNT aggregates. In contrast to various metal ions, polyelectrolytes have the unique ability to induce SWCNT aggregation by bridging between individual SWCNTs. Aggregation through the latter mechanism can be engineered to be reversible by exploiting various mechanisms of chain breaking, including reduction of disulfide bond in the polymer chain, and the cleavage action of proteolytic enzymes. These findings clarify the mechanisms of SWCNT aggregation, and have broad implications in various applications of SWCNTs in water. PMID:25144606

  12. Design and development of in situ albumin binding surfaces: Evaluation in the paradigm of blood-biomaterial compatibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guha Thakurta, Sanjukta

    Biocompatibility of natural and synthetic implant materials as blood contacting devices is crucial to host response. Implantation often raises complications from thrombotic and thromboembolic events. The aspect of hemocompatibility concentrates on minimizing thrombotic and thromboembolic response of foreign materials in contact with blood. The initial layer of surface adsorbed proteins plays a pivotal role in the adhesion and subsequent aggregation of platelets and in the activation of the coagulation cascade. Therefore, an improved surface architecture is required to gain control over the initial protein adsorption events, thereby extending the sustainability of an implantable device. In general, surfaces with an ability to bind endogenous albumin has been known to minimize platelet adhesion and activation. While the scope of applicability is broad, in this study silicon-based surfaces were selected as model surfaces. A densely packed uniformly distributed silane monolayer was achieved on silicon based surfaces with -- NH2 functionality, upon a careful optimization of hydroxylation and the subsequent silanization with 2 vol% of 3-Aminopropyltriethoxy Silane (APTES). Two linear peptides with affinity for albumin over other serum proteins were selected to create affinity surfaces. Silanized surfaces covalently immobilized with albumin binding peptides were evaluated in the paradigm of blood-biomaterial compatibility. When compared to control surfaces, albumin binding surfaces prepared in this study: (a) possessed 2.0 to 3.0 mug/cm2 of surface bound albumin with minimal surface adsorbed fibrinogen, (b) depicted low levels of adhered platelets and supported a rounded platelet morphology, (c) displayed delayed clotting, (d) showed reduced platelet adhesion and activation under shearing, and (f) exhibited faster adsorption kinetics. Conclusively, in-situ albumin binding surfaces selectively and specifically interacted with albumin without being severely displaced by

  13. [Efficacy of clopidogrel as ADP-dependent platelet aggregation inhibitor. Study on individuals with coronary artery disease].

    PubMed

    Izaguirre Avila, R; de la Peña, A; González Pacheco, H; Ramírez Gutiérrez, A; González Valdez, H; Quiroz, A; Cortina, E; Huerta, M; Lupi, E

    2000-01-01

    Acetyl-salicylic acid inhibits thromboxane A2 production and reduces the risk of vascular occlusive events by 20 to 25%. Ticlopidine inhibits ADP-dependent platelet aggregation and reduces the same risk by 30 to 35%, but produces some adverse effects. Clopidogrel is a ticlopidin-derived antiplatelet-drug, with the same mechanism of action; reduces the expression of the glycoprotein IIb/IIIa, the fibrinogen receptor on the platelet surface. Clopidogrel has the same clinical efficacy of ticlopidin and lowers the incidence of adverse effects. In this study, we evaluated the effects of one daily dosis of 75 mg of clopidogrel on platelet function in 33 subjects with coronary artery disease. Before treatment and after the 6th and 12th week, the following parameters were evaluated: 5 microM-ADP and 20 micrograms/mL collagen-induced platelet aggregation, bleeding time and fibrinogen concentration. In basal and in the 6th and 12th week samples, ADP-induced platelet aggregation was 90.7% +/- 13.2, 54.6% +/- 23.2 and 49.2% +/- 23.7 respectively, that represents a significant reduction of 38.6% and 44.4%. Reduction of collagen-induced platelet aggregation was not significative. Plasmatic fibrinogen did not suffer variation during treatment. Bleeding time was significant prolonged from 4.1 minutes to 15.4 and 14.6 minutes (3.7-3.5 times compared with the test before treatment). There were no haemorrhagic complications, only digestive discomfort in fewer than 3% of patients. We concluded that clopidogrel is a safe and efficacious drug for patients, it efficiently reduces ADP-induced platelet aggregation and prolongs bleeding time. PMID:11534098

  14. A Multi-Ethnic Meta-Analysis of Genome-Wide Association Studies in Over 100,000 Subjects Identifies 23 Fibrinogen-Associated Loci but no Strong Evidence of a Causal Association between Circulating Fibrinogen and Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sabater-Lleal, Maria; Huang, Jie; Chasman, Daniel; Naitza, Silvia; Dehghan, Abbas; Johnson, Andrew D; Teumer, Alexander; Reiner, Alex P; Folkersen, Lasse; Basu, Saonli; Rudnicka, Alicja R; Trompet, Stella; Mälarstig, Anders; Baumert, Jens; Bis, Joshua C.; Guo, Xiuqing; Hottenga, Jouke J; Shin, So-Youn; Lopez, Lorna M; Lahti, Jari; Tanaka, Toshiko; Yanek, Lisa R; Oudot-Mellakh, Tiphaine; Wilson, James F; Navarro, Pau; Huffman, Jennifer E; Zemunik, Tatijana; Redline, Susan; Mehra, Reena; Pulanic, Drazen; Rudan, Igor; Wright, Alan F; Kolcic, Ivana; Polasek, Ozren; Wild, Sarah H; Campbell, Harry; Curb, J David; Wallace, Robert; Liu, Simin; Eaton, Charles B.; Becker, Diane M.; Becker, Lewis C.; Bandinelli, Stefania; Räikkönen, Katri; Widen, Elisabeth; Palotie, Aarno; Fornage, Myriam; Green, David; Gross, Myron; Davies, Gail; Harris, Sarah E; Liewald, David C; Starr, John M; Williams, Frances M.K.; Grant, P.J.; Spector, Timothy D.; Strawbridge, Rona J; Silveira, Angela; Sennblad, Bengt; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Franco, Oscar H; Hofman, Albert; van Dongen, Jenny; Willemsen, G; Boomsma, Dorret I; Yao, Jie; Jenny, Nancy Swords; Haritunians, Talin; McKnight, Barbara; Lumley, Thomas; Taylor, Kent D; Rotter, Jerome I; Psaty, Bruce M; Peters, Annette; Gieger, Christian; Illig, Thomas; Grotevendt, Anne; Homuth, Georg; Völzke, Henry; Kocher, Thomas; Goel, Anuj; Franzosi, Maria Grazia; Seedorf, Udo; Clarke, Robert; Steri, Maristella; Tarasov, Kirill V; Sanna, Serena; Schlessinger, David; Stott, David J; Sattar, Naveed; Buckley, Brendan M; Rumley, Ann; Lowe, Gordon D; McArdle, Wendy L; Chen, Ming-Huei; Tofler, Geoffrey H; Song, Jaejoon; Boerwinkle, Eric; Folsom, Aaron R.; Rose, Lynda M.; Franco-Cereceda, Anders; Teichert, Martina; Ikram, M Arfan; Mosley, Thomas H; Bevan, Steve; Dichgans, Martin; Rothwell, Peter M.; Sudlow, Cathie L M; Hopewell, Jemma C.; Chambers, John C.; Saleheen, Danish; Kooner, Jaspal S.; Danesh, John; Nelson, Christopher P; Erdmann, Jeanette; Reilly, Muredach P.; Kathiresan, Sekar; Schunkert, Heribert; Morange, Pierre-Emmanuel; Ferrucci, Luigi; Eriksson, Johan G; Jacobs, David; Deary, Ian J; Soranzo, Nicole; Witteman, Jacqueline CM; de Geus, Eco JC; Tracy, Russell P.; Hayward, Caroline; Koenig, Wolfgang; Cucca, Francesco; Jukema, J Wouter; Eriksson, Per; Seshadri, Sudha; Markus, Hugh S.; Watkins, Hugh; Samani, Nilesh J; Wallaschofski, Henri; Smith, Nicholas L.; Tregouet, David; Ridker, Paul M.; Tang, Weihong; Strachan, David P.; Hamsten, Anders; O’Donnell, Christopher J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Estimates of the heritability of plasma fibrinogen concentration, an established predictor of cardiovascular disease (CVD), range from 34 to 50%. Genetic variants so far identified by genome-wide association (GWA) studies only explain a small proportion (< 2%) of its variation. Methods and Results We conducted a meta-analysis of 28 GWA studies, including more than 90,000 subjects of European ancestry, the first GWA meta-analysis of fibrinogen levels in 7 African Americans studies totaling 8,289 samples, and a GWA study in Hispanic-Americans totaling 1,366 samples. Evaluation for association of SNPs with clinical outcomes included a total of 40,695 cases and 85,582 controls for coronary artery disease (CAD), 4,752 cases and 24,030 controls for stroke, and 3,208 cases and 46,167 controls for venous thromboembolism (VTE). Overall, we identified 24 genome-wide significant (P<5×10−8) independent signals in 23 loci, including 15 novel associations, together accounting for 3.7% of plasma fibrinogen variation. Gene-set enrichment analysis highlighted key roles in fibrinogen regulation for the three structural fibrinogen genes and pathways related to inflammation, adipocytokines and thyrotrophin-releasing hormone signaling. Whereas lead SNPs in a few loci were significantly associated with CAD, the combined effect of all 24 fibrinogen-associated lead SNPs was not significant for CAD, stroke or VTE. Conclusion We identify 23 robustly associated fibrinogen loci, 15 of which are new. Clinical outcome analysis of these loci does not support a causal relationship between circulating levels of fibrinogen and CAD, stroke or VTE. PMID:23969696

  15. Aggregations in Flatworms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liffen, C. L.; Hunter, M.

    1980-01-01

    Described is a school project to investigate aggregations in flatworms which may be influenced by light intensity, temperature, and some form of chemical stimulus released by already aggregating flatworms. Such investigations could be adopted to suit many educational levels of science laboratory activities. (DS)

  16. [Fibrinogen/fibrin-specific enzymes from copperhead (Agkistrodon halys halys) and cobra (Naja oxiana eichwald) snake venoms].

    PubMed

    Yunusova, E S; Sadykov, E S; Sultanalieva, N M; Shkinev, A V

    2016-03-01

    Ability of fractions of cobra's (Naja oxiana Eichwald) and copperhead snake's (Agkistrodon halys halys) venoms to hydrolyze fibrinogen/fibrin was studied. In cobra's snake a component with molecular mass of nearly 60 kDa was found to hydrolyze a-chain of fibrinogen but failed to hydrolyze casein/azocasein and fibrin. A fibrinogen-specific metalloproteinase, the enzyme was inhibited by EDTA. Cobra's venom reduced the mass of donor's fresh blood clots. The copperhead snake's venom and the fractions obtained by gel-filtration (HW-50) and ion exchange chromatography (DEAE-650) were found to hydrolyze casein/azocasein, a- and b-chains of fibrinogen/fibrin and donor's blood clots. The results from the study of the venom and proteolytically active fractions are the evidence for a thrombolytic potential in a copperhead snake's venom. PMID:27420616

  17. Associations of plasma fibrinogen levels with established cardiovascular disease risk factors, inflammatory markers, and other characteristics: individual participant meta-analysis of 154,211 adults in 31 prospective studies: the fibrinogen studies collaboration.

    PubMed

    Kaptoge, S; White, I R; Thompson, S G; Wood, A M; Lewington, S; Lowe, G D O; Danesh, J

    2007-10-15

    Long-term increases in plasma fibrinogen levels of 1 g/liter are associated with an approximate doubling of risk of major cardiovascular disease outcomes, but causality remains uncertain. To quantify cross-sectional associations of fibrinogen levels with established risk factors and other characteristics, the investigators combined individual data on 154,211 apparently healthy adults from 31 prospective studies conducted between 1967 and 2003, using a linear mixed model that included random effects at the cohort level. Fibrinogen levels increased with age and showed continuous, approximately linear relations with several risk markers and slightly curvilinear associations with log triglycerides, albumin, and tobacco and alcohol consumption. Female sex, Black ethnicity, lower socioeconomic status, and alcohol abstinence were each associated with modestly higher fibrinogen levels. Approximately one third of the variation in fibrinogen levels was explained by cohort, age, and sex. An additional 7% was explained by established risk factors (notably, positive associations with smoking and body mass index and an inverse association with high density lipoprotein cholesterol), and a further 10% was explained by inflammatory markers (notably, a positive association with C-reactive protein). The association with body mass index was twice as strong in women as in men, whereas the association with smoking was much stronger in men. These findings substantially advance understanding of the correlates and possible determinants of fibrinogen levels. PMID:17785713

  18. The association between fibrinogen reactivity to mental stress and high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T in healthy adults

    PubMed Central

    Lazzarino, Antonio Ivan; Hamer, Mark; Gaze, David; Collinson, Paul; Rumley, Ann; Lowe, Gordon; Steptoe, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Plasma fibrinogen is considered as a positive mediator between mental stress and cardiovascular disease because it is an acute-phase protein released in response to mental stress and a coagulation factor. However those three factors have never been studied together within a single integrated framework, using cardiac troponin T as a marker of cardiovascular risk. Methods 491 disease-free men and women aged 53–76 were tested for fibrinogen levels before, immediately after, and following recovery from standardized mental stress tasks. We measured plasma cardiac troponin T using a high-sensitivity assay (HS-CTnT) and coronary calcification using electron-beam dual-source computed tomography. Results The average fibrinogen concentration increased by 5.1% (s.d. = 7.3) in response to stress and then tended to return to baseline values. People with higher baseline fibrinogen values had smaller increases (blunted responses) following the stress task (P = 0.001), and people with higher stress responses showed better recovery (P < 0.001). In unadjusted analyses, higher baseline fibrinogen was associated with higher chances of having detectable HS-CTnT (P = 0.072) but, conversely, higher fibrinogen response was associated with lower chances of having detectable HS-CTnT (P = 0.007). The adjustment for clinical, inflammatory, and haemostatic factors, as well as for coronary calcification eliminated the effect of baseline fibrinogen, whereas the negative association between fibrinogen response and HS-CTnT remained robust: the odds of detectable HS-CTnT halved for each 10% increase in fibrinogen concentration due to stress (OR = 0.49, P = 0.007, 95% CI = 0.30–0.82). Conclusions Greater fibrinogen responses to mental stress are associated with lower likelihood of detectable high-sensitivity troponin T plasma concentration. A more dynamic fibrinogen response appears to be advantageous for cardiovascular health. PMID:26010862

  19. Evaluation of a rapid method of determination of plasma fibrinogen in swine.

    PubMed

    Fontaine, M; McSherry, B J; Valli, V E

    1977-04-01

    An evaluation was made of a rapid semiautomated method for determining fibrinogen level in swine plasma. This method, referred to as thrombin time method or fibrometer method, is based on the principle that when thrombin is added to suitably diluted plasma, the time of clotting is linearly related to the fibrinogen concentration. The linear regression model for the standard curve prepared using swine plasma had an r value of 0.998. A comparison between the fibrometer and the Grannis methods done on 189 swine plasma samples showed good correlation between these two mehtods (r value 0.847). It was concluded that although the fibrometer method may not be as precise as the Grannis method, it would still be acceptable for clinical use in swine. PMID:861838

  20. Canine intracranial meningiomas: Immunohistochemical evaluation of tissue factor, fibrin/fibrinogen and D-dimers.

    PubMed

    Font, Cristina; de la Fuente, Cristian; Pumarola, Martí; Blasco, Ester; Fernández, Francisco; Viu, Judit; Añor, Sònia

    2015-12-01

    The haemostatic system influences angiogenesis, cell growth and metastasis in solid tumours. The aim of this study was to investigate tissue factor (TF) expression, fibrin/fibrinogen and D-dimer deposition, as well as the occurrence of intravascular thrombosis (IVT) in canine intracranial meningiomas using immunohistochemistry. All but three (26/29) meningiomas expressed TF. TF immunolabelling was significantly higher in high-grade (grades II and III) than in low-grade (grade I) meningiomas. Fibrin/fibrinogen and D-dimer deposits were detected in all meningiomas and staining scores were statistically different between different meningioma grades. IVT was detected in 19/29 specimens, but no statistical differences were observed between different malignancy grades. In conclusion, the haemostatic system may be involved in meningioma pathobiology and may be a potential therapeutic target for canine meningiomas, as also suggested for human meningiomas. PMID:26526524

  1. Apolipoprotein A-I mimetic peptide 4F blocks sphingomyelinase-induced LDL aggregation[S

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Su Duy; Javanainen, Matti; Rissanen, Sami; Zhao, Hongxia; Huusko, Jenni; Kivelä, Annukka M.; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo; Navab, Mohamad; Fogelman, Alan M.; Vattulainen, Ilpo; Kovanen, Petri T.; Öörni, Katariina

    2015-01-01

    Lipolytic modification of LDL particles by SMase generates LDL aggregates with a strong affinity for human arterial proteoglycans and may so enhance LDL retention in the arterial wall. Here, we evaluated the effects of apoA-I mimetic peptide 4F on structural and functional properties of the SMase-modified LDL particles. LDL particles with and without 4F were incubated with SMase, after which their aggregation, structure, and proteoglycan binding were analyzed. At a molar ratio of L-4F to apoB-100 of 2.5 to 20:1, 4F dose-dependently inhibited SMase-induced LDL aggregation. At a molar ratio of 20:1, SMase-induced aggregation was fully blocked. Binding of 4F to LDL particles inhibited SMase-induced hydrolysis of LDL by 10% and prevented SMase-induced LDL aggregation. In addition, the binding of the SMase-modified LDL particles to human aortic proteoglycans was dose-dependently inhibited by pretreating LDL with 4F. The 4F stabilized apoB-100 conformation and inhibited SMase-induced conformational changes of apoB-100. Molecular dynamic simulations showed that upon binding to protein-free LDL surface, 4F locally alters membrane order and fluidity and induces structural changes to the lipid layer. Collectively, 4F stabilizes LDL particles by preventing the SMase-induced conformational changes in apoB-100 and so blocks SMase-induced LDL aggregation and the resulting increase in LDL retention. PMID:25861792

  2. Label-Free Quantitative Immunoassay of Fibrinogen in Alzheimer Disease Patient Plasma Using Fiber Optical Surface Plasmon Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jisoo; Kim, SeJin; Nguyen, Tan Tai; Lee, Renee; Li, Tiehua; Yun, Changhyun; Ham, Youngeun; An, Seong Soo A.; Ju, Heongkyu

    2016-05-01

    We present a real-time quantitative immunoassay to detect fibrinogen in the blood plasma of Alzheimer's disease patients using multimode fiber optical sensors in which surface plasmon resonance (SPR) was employed. Nanometer-thick bimetals including silver and aluminum were coated onto the core surface of the clad-free part (5 cm long) of the fiber for SPR excitation at the He-Ne laser wavelength of 632.8 nm. The histidine-tagged peptide was then coated on the metal surface to immobilize the fibrinogen antibody for the selective capture of fibrinogen among the proteins in the patient blood plasma. The SPR fiber optical sensor enabled quantitative detection of concentrations of fibrinogen from the different human patient blood at a detection limit of ˜20 ng/ml. We also observed a correlation in the fibrinogen concentration measurement between enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and our SPR fiber-based sensors. This suggests that the presented SPR fiber-based sensors that do not rely on the use of labels such as fluorophores can be used for a real-time quantitative assay of a specific protein such as fibrinogen in a human blood that is known to contain many other kinds of proteins together.

  3. The influence of glucocorticoid on the fibrinogen messenger RNA content of rat liver in vivo and in hepatocyte suspension culture.

    PubMed Central

    Princen, H M; Moshage, H J; de Haard, H J; van Gemert, P J; Yap, S H

    1984-01-01

    The plasma concentration of fibrinogen, one of the major acute-phase proteins produced by the liver, increases during the acute-phase response as a result of enhanced synthesis in liver. Since adrenal-cortical hormones have been thought to have a key role in the regulation of the fibrinogen synthesis, fibrinogen-polypeptide mRNA sequences were determined in the present study, by using a specific complementary-DNA probe, in RNA fractions obtained from rat hepatocytes exposed to glucocorticoids in vitro (hepatocyte suspension cultures) and in vivo. Maximal induction of the fibrinogen-polypeptide mRNA (to 400% of the control value) was found in vitro at 0.1 microM-dexamethasone after 9 h of incubation. The same magnitude of induction was obtained with 20 microM-cortisol or 60 microM-corticosterone. In contrast with the findings in vitro, no induction of the fibrinogen-polypeptide mRNA was observed in the liver at various times after injection of different doses of glucocorticoids into rats. These results suggest that more complex regulatory mechanisms are involved and that glucocorticoids are not the sole regulatory factors in vivo in the enhanced synthesis of fibrinogen during the acute-phase response. PMID:6547834

  4. Fibrinogen Concentrate Improves Survival During Limited Resuscitation of Uncontrolled Hemorrhagic Shock in a Swine Model

    PubMed Central

    White, Nathan J.; Wang, Xu; Liles, W. Conrad; Stern, Susan

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of fibrinogen concentrate, as a hemostatic agent, on limited resuscitation of uncontrolled hemorrhagic shock. We use a swine model of hemorrhagic shock with free bleeding from a 4mm aortic tear to test the effect of adding a one-time dose of fibrinogen concentrate given at the onset of limited fluid resuscitation. Immature female swine were anesthetized and subjected to catheter hemorrhage and aortic tear to induce uniform hemorrhagic shock. Animals (N=7 per group) were then randomized to receive either; 1. No fluid resuscitation (Neg Control), 2. Limited resuscitation in the form of two boluses of 10ml/kg of 6% hydroxyethyl starch solution (HEX) given 30 minutes apart, or 3. The same fluid regimen with one dose of 120mg/kg fibrinogen concentrate given with the first HEX bolus (FBG). Animals were then observed for a total of 6 hours with aortic repair and aggressive resuscitation with shed blood taking place at 3 hours. Survival to 6 hours was significantly increased with FBG (7/8, 86%) vs. HEX (2/7, 29%), and Neg Control (0/7, 0%) (FBG vs. HEX, Kaplan Meier LR p=0.035). Intraperitoneal blood loss adjusted for survival time was increased in HEX (0.4ml/kg/min) when compared to FBG (0.1mg/kg/min, p=0.047) and Neg Control (0.1ml/kg/min, p=0.041). Systemic and cerebral hemodynamics also showed improvement with FBG vs. HEX. Fibrinogen concentrate may be a useful adjunct to decrease blood loss, improve hemodynamics, and prolong survival during limited resuscitation of uncontrolled hemorrhagic shock. PMID:25337778

  5. The influence of residual water on the secondary structure and crystallinity of freeze-dried fibrinogen.

    PubMed

    Wahl, Verena; Scheibelhofer, Otto; Roessl, Ulrich; Leitgeb, Stefan; De Beer, Thomas; Khinast, Johannes

    2015-04-30

    The purpose of this work was to investigate the influence of water content on the secondary structure of a freeze-dried protein (fibrinogen) after a storage period of two weeks. To that end, attenuated reflectance Fourier transformed infrared (ATR-FTIR) and Raman spectra were generated and evaluated and the crystalline state of the fibrinogen bulks was determined via X-ray diffraction. First, a PCA (principal component analysis) of the spectral data was performed. While the α-helix and β-turn contents were increasing with the increasing water content, the β-sheet content was decreasing. A partial least squares (PLS) model was developed to correlate the mid-infrared and Raman spectral changes with the degree of crystallinity. The obtained R(2) value of 0.953 confirmed a correlation between changes in the secondary structure and crystallinity of the samples. The results demonstrated that the combined ATR-FTIR and Raman approach could be used to predict the crystalline state in freeze-dried fibrinogen products. PMID:25701629

  6. Characterization of the 5'-flanking region for the human fibrinogen beta gene.

    PubMed Central

    Huber, P; Dalmon, J; Courtois, G; Laurent, M; Assouline, Z; Marguerie, G

    1987-01-01

    To identify the possible regulatory sequences in the genetic expression of fibrinogen, a human genomic DNA library raised in lambda EMBL 4 phage was screened using cDNA probes coding for the A alpha, B beta and gamma chains of human fibrinogen. The entire fibrinogen locus was characterized and its organization analysed by means of hybridization and restriction mapping. Among the clones identified, a single recombinant lambda phage contained the beta gene and its 5'- and 3'-flanking regions. A 1.5 kb fragment of the immediate 5'-flanking region was sequenced and S1 mapping experiments revealed three transcription start points. Comparison of this sequence with that previously reported for the same region upstream from the human gamma gene revealed no significant homology which suggests that the potential promoting sequences of these genes are different. In contrast, comparison of the 5'-flanking regions of human and rat beta genes revealed a 142 bp sequence of 80% homology situated 16 bp upstream from the human beta gene. This highly conserved region may well represents a potential candidate for a regulatory sequence of the human beta gene. Images PMID:3029722

  7. A meta-analysis of 120 246 individuals identifies 18 new loci for fibrinogen concentration.

    PubMed

    de Vries, Paul S; Chasman, Daniel I; Sabater-Lleal, Maria; Chen, Ming-Huei; Huffman, Jennifer E; Steri, Maristella; Tang, Weihong; Teumer, Alexander; Marioni, Riccardo E; Grossmann, Vera; Hottenga, Jouke J; Trompet, Stella; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Zhao, Jing Hua; Brody, Jennifer A; Kleber, Marcus E; Guo, Xiuqing; Wang, Jie Jin; Auer, Paul L; Attia, John R; Yanek, Lisa R; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer S; Lahti, Jari; Venturini, Cristina; Tanaka, Toshiko; Bielak, Lawrence F; Joshi, Peter K; Rocanin-Arjo, Ares; Kolcic, Ivana; Navarro, Pau; Rose, Lynda M; Oldmeadow, Christopher; Riess, Helene; Mazur, Johanna; Basu, Saonli; Goel, Anuj; Yang, Qiong; Ghanbari, Mohsen; Willemsen, Gonneke; Rumley, Ann; Fiorillo, Edoardo; de Craen, Anton J M; Grotevendt, Anne; Scott, Robert; Taylor, Kent D; Delgado, Graciela E; Yao, Jie; Kifley, Annette; Kooperberg, Charles; Qayyum, Rehan; Lopez, Lorna M; Berentzen, Tina L; Räikkönen, Katri; Mangino, Massimo; Bandinelli, Stefania; Peyser, Patricia A; Wild, Sarah; Trégouët, David-Alexandre; Wright, Alan F; Marten, Jonathan; Zemunik, Tatijana; Morrison, Alanna C; Sennblad, Bengt; Tofler, Geoffrey; de Maat, Moniek P M; de Geus, Eco J C; Lowe, Gordon D; Zoledziewska, Magdalena; Sattar, Naveed; Binder, Harald; Völker, Uwe; Waldenberger, Melanie; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Mcknight, Barbara; Huang, Jie; Jenny, Nancy S; Holliday, Elizabeth G; Qi, Lihong; Mcevoy, Mark G; Becker, Diane M; Starr, John M; Sarin, Antti-Pekka; Hysi, Pirro G; Hernandez, Dena G; Jhun, Min A; Campbell, Harry; Hamsten, Anders; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Mcardle, Wendy L; Slagboom, P Eline; Zeller, Tanja; Koenig, Wolfgang; Psaty, Bruce M; Haritunians, Talin; Liu, Jingmin; Palotie, Aarno; Uitterlinden, André G; Stott, David J; Hofman, Albert; Franco, Oscar H; Polasek, Ozren; Rudan, Igor; Morange, Pierre-Emmanuel; Wilson, James F; Kardia, Sharon L R; Ferrucci, Luigi; Spector, Tim D; Eriksson, Johan G; Hansen, Torben; Deary, Ian J; Becker, Lewis C; Scott, Rodney J; Mitchell, Paul; März, Winfried; Wareham, Nick J; Peters, Annette; Greinacher, Andreas; Wild, Philipp S; Jukema, J Wouter; Boomsma, Dorret I; Hayward, Caroline; Cucca, Francesco; Tracy, Russell; Watkins, Hugh; Reiner, Alex P; Folsom, Aaron R; Ridker, Paul M; O'Donnell, Christopher J; Smith, Nicholas L; Strachan, David P; Dehghan, Abbas

    2016-01-15

    Genome-wide association studies have previously identified 23 genetic loci associated with circulating fibrinogen concentration. These studies used HapMap imputation and did not examine the X-chromosome. 1000 Genomes imputation provides better coverage of uncommon variants, and includes indels. We conducted a genome-wide association analysis of 34 studies imputed to the 1000 Genomes Project reference panel and including ∼120 000 participants of European ancestry (95 806 participants with data on the X-chromosome). Approximately 10.7 million single-nucleotide polymorphisms and 1.2 million indels were examined. We identified 41 genome-wide significant fibrinogen loci; of which, 18 were newly identified. There were no genome-wide significant signals on the X-chromosome. The lead variants of five significant loci were indels. We further identified six additional independent signals, including three rare variants, at two previously characterized loci: FGB and IRF1. Together the 41 loci explain 3% of the variance in plasma fibrinogen concentration. PMID:26561523

  8. An in vitro evaluation of fibrinogen and gelatin containing cryogels as dermal regeneration scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Allan, I U; Tolhurst, B A; Shevchenko, R V; Dainiak, M B; Illsley, M; Ivanov, A; Jungvid, H; Galaev, I Y; James, S L; Mikhalovsky, S V; James, S E

    2016-06-24

    Macroporous cryogels containing mixtures of two key components of the dermal extracellular matrix, fibrinogen and collagen-derived gelatin, were evaluated for use as dermal tissue regeneration scaffolds. The infiltration of human dermal fibroblasts into these matrices was quantitatively assessed in vitro using a combination of cell culture and confocal laser scanning microscopy. The extent of cellular infiltration, as measured by the number of cells per distance travelled versus time, was found to be positively correlated with the fibrinogen concentration of the cryogel scaffolds; a known potentiator of cell migration and angiogenesis within regenerating tissue. An analysis of the proteins expressed by infiltrating fibroblasts revealed that the cells that had migrated into the interior portion of the scaffolds expressed predominantly F-actin along their cytoplasmic stress fibres, whereas those present on the periphery of the scaffolds expressed predominantly α-smooth muscle actin, indicative of a nonmotile, myofibroblast phenotype associated with wound contraction. In conclusion, the cryogels produced in this study were found to be biocompatible and, by alteration of the fibrinogen content, could be rendered more amenable to cellular infiltration. PMID:27138753

  9. Inflammation Induces TDP-43 Mislocalization and Aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Correia, Ana Sofia; Patel, Priyanka; Dutta, Kallol; Julien, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43) is a major component in aggregates of ubiquitinated proteins in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). Here we report that lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammation can promote TDP-43 mislocalization and aggregation. In culture, microglia and astrocytes exhibited TDP-43 mislocalization after exposure to LPS. Likewise, treatment of the motoneuron-like NSC-34 cells with TNF-alpha (TNF-α) increased the cytoplasmic levels of TDP-43. In addition, the chronic intraperitoneal injection of LPS at a dose of 1mg/kg in TDP-43A315T transgenic mice exacerbated the pathological TDP-43 accumulation in the cytoplasm of spinal motor neurons and it enhanced the levels of TDP-43 aggregation. These results suggest that inflammation may contribute to development or exacerbation of TDP-43 proteinopathies in neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:26444430

  10. [Intracellular seeded aggregation of TDP-43].

    PubMed

    Nonaka, Takashi; Hasegawa, Masato

    2012-01-01

    TAR-DNA binding protein of 43kDa(TDP-43) is the component protein of inclusions in brains of patients with frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD-TDP) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Here we report a seed-dependent TDP-43 aggregation model using SH-SY5Y cells into which detergent-insoluble TDP-43 from diseased brains is introduced to provide seeds for aggregation. When these seeds were introduced into cells expressing HA-tagged TDP-43, round aggregates composed of phosphorylated and ubiquitinated HA-tagged TDP-43 were formed. Biochemical fractionation revealed the presence of Sarkosyl-insoluble phosphorylated full-length TDP-43 as well as its C-terminal fragments. Cells bearing TDP-43 inclusions exhibited increased levels of cell death and proteasome dysfunction. This seeding model reproduces characteristic features of affected neurons in brains with TDP-43 proteinopathy. PMID:23196514

  11. Inflammation Induces TDP-43 Mislocalization and Aggregation.

    PubMed

    Correia, Ana Sofia; Patel, Priyanka; Dutta, Kallol; Julien, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43) is a major component in aggregates of ubiquitinated proteins in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). Here we report that lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammation can promote TDP-43 mislocalization and aggregation. In culture, microglia and astrocytes exhibited TDP-43 mislocalization after exposure to LPS. Likewise, treatment of the motoneuron-like NSC-34 cells with TNF-alpha (TNF-α) increased the cytoplasmic levels of TDP-43. In addition, the chronic intraperitoneal injection of LPS at a dose of 1mg/kg in TDP-43(A315T) transgenic mice exacerbated the pathological TDP-43 accumulation in the cytoplasm of spinal motor neurons and it enhanced the levels of TDP-43 aggregation. These results suggest that inflammation may contribute to development or exacerbation of TDP-43 proteinopathies in neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:26444430

  12. Charged Dust Aggregate Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Lorin; Hyde, Truell

    2015-11-01

    A proper understanding of the behavior of dust particle aggregates immersed in a complex plasma first requires a knowledge of the basic properties of the system. Among the most important of these are the net electrostatic charge and higher multipole moments on the dust aggregate as well as the manner in which the aggregate interacts with the local electrostatic fields. The formation of elongated, fractal-like aggregates levitating in the sheath electric field of a weakly ionized RF generated plasma discharge has recently been observed experimentally. The resulting data has shown that as aggregates approach one another, they can both accelerate and rotate. At equilibrium, aggregates are observed to levitate with regular spacing, rotating about their long axis aligned parallel to the sheath electric field. Since gas drag tends to slow any such rotation, energy must be constantly fed into the system in order to sustain it. A numerical model designed to analyze this motion provides both the electrostatic charge and higher multipole moments of the aggregate while including the forces due to thermophoresis, neutral gas drag, and the ion wakefield. This model will be used to investigate the ambient conditions leading to the observed interactions. This research is funded by NSF Grant 1414523.

  13. Aggregate and the environment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langer, William H.; Drew, Lawrence J.; Sachs, J.S.

    2004-01-01

    This book is designed to help you understand our aggregate resources-their importance, where they come from, how they are processed for our use, the environmental concerns related to their mining and processing, how those concerns are addressed, and the policies and regulations designed to safeguard workers, neighbors, and the environment from the negative impacts of aggregate mining. We hope this understanding will help prepare you to be involved in decisions that need to be made-individually and as a society-to be good stewards of our aggregate resources and our living planet.

  14. The multifunctional LigB adhesin binds homeostatic proteins with potential roles in cutaneous infection by pathogenic Leptospira interrogans.

    PubMed

    Choy, Henry A; Kelley, Melissa M; Croda, Julio; Matsunaga, James; Babbitt, Jane T; Ko, Albert I; Picardeau, Mathieu; Haake, David A

    2011-01-01

    Leptospirosis is a potentially fatal zoonotic disease in humans and animals caused by pathogenic spirochetes, such as Leptospira interrogans. The mode of transmission is commonly limited to the exposure of mucous membrane or damaged skin to water contaminated by leptospires shed in the urine of carriers, such as rats. Infection occurs during seasonal flooding of impoverished tropical urban habitats with large rat populations, but also during recreational activity in open water, suggesting it is very efficient. LigA and LigB are surface localized proteins in pathogenic Leptospira strains with properties that could facilitate the infection of damaged skin. Their expression is rapidly induced by the increase in osmolarity encountered by leptospires upon transition from water to host. In addition, the immunoglobulin-like repeats of the Lig proteins bind proteins that mediate attachment to host tissue, such as fibronectin, fibrinogen, collagens, laminin, and elastin, some of which are important in cutaneous wound healing and repair. Hemostasis is critical in a fresh injury, where fibrinogen from damaged vasculature mediates coagulation. We show that fibrinogen binding by recombinant LigB inhibits fibrin formation, which could aid leptospiral entry into the circulation, dissemination, and further infection by impairing healing. LigB also binds fibroblast fibronectin and type III collagen, two proteins prevalent in wound repair, thus potentially enhancing leptospiral adhesion to skin openings. LigA or LigB expression by transformation of a nonpathogenic saprophyte, L. biflexa, enhances bacterial adhesion to fibrinogen. Our results suggest that by binding homeostatic proteins found in cutaneous wounds, LigB could facilitate leptospirosis transmission. Both fibronectin and fibrinogen binding have been mapped to an overlapping domain in LigB comprising repeats 9-11, with repeat 11 possibly enhancing binding by a conformational effect. Leptospirosis patient antibodies react

  15. Mesoscale simulation of asphaltene aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiang; Ferguson, Andrew

    Asphaltenes constitute a heavy aromatic crude oil fraction that can aggregate and precipitate out of solution. Association is thought to proceed hierarchically according to the Yen-Mullins model, but the molecular mechanisms and pathways remain poorly understood. In this study, we perform molecular dynamics simulations of the aggregation of hundreds of asphaltenes over microseconds using the coarse-grained Martini force field. We identified a hierarchical self-assembly mechanism consistent with Yen-Mullins model, but the details of which are strongly dependent on asphaltene molecular structure. Monomeric asphaltenes first self-assemble into 1-D rod-like nanoaggregates, followed by the formation of clusters of nanoaggregates. At high concentrations, asphaltenes with short aliphatic side chains assemble into a percolating network with the binding of 1-D rods. Conversely, molecules with more and longer side chains cannot efficiently stack, producing a fractal network of 1-D rods suspended in a sea of interpenetrating aliphatic side chains. Our results provide the first molecularly-detailed validation of the full Yen-Mullins hierarchy, and are in good agreement with recent computational and experimental studies. ACS Petroleum Research Fund.

  16. Protein Colloidal Aggregation Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliva-Buisson, Yvette J. (Compiler)

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the pathways and kinetics of protein aggregation to allow accurate predictive modeling of the process and evaluation of potential inhibitors to prevalent diseases including cataract formation, chronic traumatic encephalopathy, Alzheimer's Disease, Parkinson's Disease and others.

  17. Paclitaxel loaded fibrinogen coated CdTe/ZnTe core shell nanoparticles for targeted imaging and drug delivery to breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Rejinold, N Sanoj; Baby, Thejus; Nair, Shantikumar V; Jayakumar, R

    2013-10-01

    The study aims at the targeted imaging using CdTe/ZnTe core shell QDs and delivery of paclitaxel (PTX) loaded fibrinogen coated yellow-QDs (PTX-fib-yellow-QDs) towards breast cancer cells via the alpha5Beta1-integrins. We developed fibrinogen coated different sized CdTe/ZnTe core shell quantum dots of 2-10 nm size, which have been prepared by one-pot aqueous-phase approach. The fib-coated-QDs (fib-coated-QDs) and PTX-fib-yellow-QDs were prepared by two-step coacervation technique using CaCl2 as cross-linker. Particle size of fib-coated-QDs was in between 60-220 nm while PTX-fib-yellow-QDs showed 180 +/- 40 nm. The MTT assay confirmed cytocompatibility of fib-coated-QDs on L929 and MCF-7 than bare QDs, whereas significant toxicity toward MCF-7 by PTX-fib-yellow-QDs was observed. The hemocompatible fib-coated-QDs showed enhanced localization and retention toward alpha5beta1-integrins +ve MCF-7 compared to alpha5beta1-integrins -ve L929 cells. The specific binding of fib-coated-yellow-QDs was further confirmed with alpha5beta1-integrins +ve HeLa and alpha5/beta1-integrins -ve HT29 cells. Cellular uptake studies revealed localization of PTX-fib-coated-yellow-QDs inside MCF-7 cells compared to the normal L929 cells. These results indicated that fib-coated-QDs could be used for targeted imaging and as a suitable "nanocarrier" aiming breast cancer cells. PMID:24015495

  18. Plasma fibrinogen is associated with cognitive decline and risk for dementia in patients with mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Xu, G; Zhang, H; Zhang, S; Fan, X; Liu, X

    2008-07-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the relationship between plasma fibrinogen level and risk for cognitive decline and dementia in patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Elderly patients with suspected cognitive impairment were screened and evaluated periodically. One hundred and eighty-five patients who met the criteria for MCI were enrolled. Blood coagulation functions and plasma fibrinogen levels were measured at baseline. Hyperfibrinogenaemia was defined as plasma fibrinogen > or =3.0 g/l. Global cognitive function was assessed serially with Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE). The enrolled patients were followed for 2 years to observe if dementia was developed. There were 185 patients diagnosed as MCI, of which 17 (9.2%) deceased, 15 (8.1%) lost to follow-up, and 68 (36.8%) developed dementia during follow-up. Mean of MMSE score of the enrolled patients declined significantly during follow-up (22.0 +/- 3.0 vs. 18.1 +/- 5.8, p < 0.001). Patients with hyperfibrinogenaemia at baseline had greater MMSE decrement during follow-up than patients with normal fibrinogen level (-5.4 +/- 5.4 vs. -3.5 +/- 4.5, p < 0.05). Linear regression indicated that plasma fibrinogen level was associated with cognitive decline (R = 0.17, p < 0.05). Patients with hyperfibrinogenaemia had an increased risk for dementia and vascular dementia compared with patients with normal level of plasma fibrinogen (log rank test, p < 0.05). There was a trend that hyperfibrinogenaemia also increased risk for dementia of Alzheimer's type (p = 0.061). It can be concluded that plasma fibrinogen level may be associated with cognitive decline, and hyperfibrinogenaemia may increase risk for dementia in patients with MCI. PMID:17916180

  19. Preoperative Plasma Fibrinogen Level Represents an Independent Prognostic Factor in a Chinese Cohort of Patients with Upper Tract Urothelial Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Jie; Zhou, Li-Qun; He, Zhi-Song; Shen, Cheng; He, Qun; Li, Jun; Liu, Li-Bo; Wang, Cong; Chen, Xiao-Yu; Fan, Yu; Hu, Shuai; Zhang, Lei; Yu, Wei; Han, Wen-Ke

    2016-01-01

    Background Increased plasma fibrinogen is thought to contribute to tumor progression and metastasis. The association of plasma fibrinogen with clinicopathological characteristics, and the optimal cutoff with an ideal predictive value has not been fully determined in patients with upper tract urothelial carcinoma (UTUC). We aimed to investigate the clinical significance of this parameter in a Chinese cohort of patients with UTUC. Methods A retrospective study was conducted to analyze the clinical data of 184 operable UTUC patients in a Chinese cohort with a high incidence of chronic kidney disease (CKD). An optimal cutoff was set for further analysis according to validated web-based software. The associations of plasma fibrinogen with clinicopathological characteristics and survival were assessed. Multivariate analyses were performed to determine the independent prognostic factors. Results Elevated plasma fibrinogen was significantly associated with tumor necrosis, lymph node involvement, and a higher preoperative CKD stage, pathological tumor stage and grade (all P < 0.05). Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that plasma fibrinogen ≥ 3.54 g/L predicted a poorer overall and cancer-specific survival than < 3.54 g/L (P < 0.001 for both). Multivariate analyses revealed that elevated preoperative plasma fibrinogen was an independent negative prognostic factor for overall survival (HR = 2.026; 95% CI: 1.226–3.349; P = 0.006) and cancer-specific survival (HR = 1.886; 95% CI: 1.019–3.490; P = 0.043). Conclusions Increased plasma fibrinogen was an independent prognostic risk factor for poor outcomes in UTUC. This parameter may serve as an effective biomarker with easy accessibility for evaluating prognosis for patients with UTUC. PMID:26930207

  20. Associations of the β-Fibrinogen Hae III and Factor XIII Val34Leu Gene Variants with Venous Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Cushman, Mary; Cornell, Alexandra; Folsom, Aaron R.; Wang, Lu; Tsai, Michael Y.; Polak, Joseph; Tang, Zhonghua

    2008-01-01

    Introduction The factor XIII Val34Leu (100 G→T) and β-fibrinogen Hae III (-455 G→A) gene variants have been associated with reduced risk of venous thrombosis, but not in all studies. Methods We investigated the associations of these polymorphisms with risk of venous thrombosis in a prospective, population-based study of 21,680 men and women aged 45–100 years at enrollment. Factor XIII 100 G/T and β-fibrinogen -455 G/A were analyzed on stored DNA from 511 thrombosis cases and 1028 control subjects without thrombosis during follow up. Results The β-fibrinogen A allele was present in 24.4% of cases and 32.3% of controls. Compared to GG subjects, the age, race, and sex adjusted odds ratio (OR) of venous thrombosis was 0.77 (95% CI 0.59–0.99) for GA subjects, and 0.60 (95% CI 0.31–1.16) for AA subjects. The adjusted OR of thrombosis associated with factor XIII 100 G/T was 1.01 (95% CI 0.81–1.26) for GT subjects and 0.45 (95% CI 0.44–1.19) for TT subjects, compared to GG. For both genotypes, ORs of thrombosis were similar in whites and non-whites, although there were no non-white fibrinogen AA cases. β-Fibrinogen -455GA or AA attenuated the thrombosis risk associated with obesity (from 2.14 to 1.25) and factor V Leiden (from 3.89 to 2.36). Conclusions β-fibrinogen -455 G/A, but not factor XIII 100 G/T, was associated with a lower risk of venous thrombosis in this general population sample. β-Fibrinogen -455A may attenuate the increased thrombosis risk associated with obesity or factor V Leiden. PMID:17582472

  1. Entrapment of Aβ1-40 peptide in unstructured aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corsale, C.; Carrotta, R.; Mangione, M. R.; Vilasi, S.; Provenzano, A.; Cavallaro, G.; Bulone, D.; San Biagio, P. L.

    2012-06-01

    Recognizing the complexity of the fibrillogenesis process provides a solid ground for the development of therapeutic strategies aimed at preventing or inhibiting protein-protein aggregation. Under this perspective, it is meaningful to identify the possible aggregation pathways and their relative products. We found that Aβ-peptide dissolved in a pH 7.4 solution at small peptide concentration and low ionic strength forms globular aggregates without typical amyloid β-conformation. ThT binding kinetics was used to monitor aggregate formation. Circular dichroism spectroscopy, AFM imaging, static and dynamic light scattering were used for structural and morphological characterization of the aggregates. They appear stable or at least metastable with respect to fiber growth, therefore appearing as an incidental product in the pathway of fibrillogenesis.

  2. Nattokinase decreases plasma levels of fibrinogen, factor VII, and factor VIII in human subjects.

    PubMed

    Hsia, Chien-Hsun; Shen, Ming-Ching; Lin, Jen-Shiou; Wen, Yao-Ke; Hwang, Kai-Lin; Cham, Thau-Ming; Yang, Nae-Cherng

    2009-03-01

    Nattokinase, a serine proteinase from Bacillus subtilis, is considered to be one of the most active functional ingredients found in natto. In this study, we hypothesized that nattokinase could reduce certain factors of blood clotting and lipids that are associated with an increase risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Thus, an open-label, self-controlled clinical trial was conducted on subjects of the following groups: healthy volunteers (Healthy Group), patients with cardiovascular risk factors (Cardiovascular Group), and patients undergoing dialysis (Dialysis Group). All subjects ingested 2 capsules of nattokinase (2000 fibrinolysis units per capsule) daily orally for 2 months. The laboratory measurements were performed on the screening visit and, subsequently, regularly after the initiation of the study. The intent-to-treat analysis was performed on all 45 enrolled subjects. By use of mixed model analysis, a significant time effect, but not group effect, was observed in the change from baseline of fibrinogen (P = .003), factor VII (P < .001), and factor VIII (P < .001), suggesting that the plasma levels of the 3 coagulation factors continuously declined during intake; also, the extents of decrease were similar between groups. After 2 months of administration, fibrinogen, factor VII, and factor VIII decreased 9%, 14%, and 17%, respectively, for the Healthy Group; 7%, 13%, and 19%, respectively, for the Cardiovascular Group; and 10%, 7%, and 19%, respectively, for the Dialysis Group, whereas blood lipids were unaffected by nattokinase. No significant changes of uric acid or notable adverse events were observed in any of the subjects. In summary, this study showed that oral administration of nattokinase could be considered as a CVD nutraceutical by decreasing plasma levels of fibrinogen, factor VII, and factor VIII. PMID:19358933

  3. Reduced plasma fibrinogen, serum peroxides, lipids, and apolipoproteins after a 3-week vegetarian diet.

    PubMed

    Høstmark, A T; Lystad, E; Vellar, O D; Hovi, K; Berg, J E

    1993-01-01

    The influence of a 3-week vegetarian diet and fasting on serum concentration of peroxides, lipids, apolipoproteins, and plasma fibrinogen was studied in ten middle-aged fibromyalgia/fibrositis patients (eight women, two men). Mean serum peroxide concentration (estimated as thiobarbituric acid reacting substances) was reduced from 3.60 +/- 0.14 to 2.82 +/- 0.15 umol/l (p = 0.01) and plasma fibrinogen from 3.33 +/- 0.25 to 2.74 +/- 0.15 g/l (p = 0.02). Serum total cholesterol fell from 6.61 +/- 0.50 to 4.83 +/- 0.35 mmol/l (p < 0.0001), apolipoprotein B from 1.77 +/- 0.14 to 1.31 +/- 0.11 g/l (p < 0.0001), and apolipoprotein A from 1.41 +/- 0.09 to 1.23 +/- 0.05 g/l (p = 0.03). High density lipoprotein cholesterol concentration also decreased somewhat (from 1.26 +/- 0.09 to 1.07 +/- 0.04 mmol/l, p = 0.03) An atherogenic index, reflecting the balance between low and high density lipoproteins, was reduced by 31% (from 5.74 +/- 0.79 to 3.97 +/- 0.60, p = 0.02). The results suggest that vegetarian diet/fasting may have a beneficial influence on the concentration of serum peroxides and plasma fibrinogen concentration, and on the serum level of several lipoprotein-related coronary risk factors. PMID:8464845

  4. A family of cell-adhering peptides homologous to fibrinogen C-termini

    SciTech Connect

    Levy-Beladev, Liron; Levdansky, Lilia; Gaberman, Elena; Friedler, Assaf; Gorodetsky, Raphael

    2010-10-08

    Research highlights: {yields} Cell-adhesive sequences homologous to fibrinogen C-termini exist in other proteins. {yields} The extended homologous cell-adhesive C-termini peptides family is termed Haptides. {yields} In membrane-like environment random coiled Haptides adopt a helical conformation. {yields} Replacing positively charged residues with alanine reduces Haptides activity. -- Abstract: A family of cell-adhesive peptides homologous to sequences on different chains of fibrinogen was investigated. These homologous peptides, termed Haptides, include the peptides C{beta}, preC{gamma}, and C{alpha}E, corresponding to sequences on the C-termini of fibrinogen chains {beta}, {gamma}, and {alpha}E, respectively. Haptides do not affect cell survival and rate of proliferation of the normal cell types tested. The use of new sensitive assays of cell adhesion clearly demonstrated the ability of Haptides, bound to inert matrices, to mediate attachment of different matrix-dependent cell types including normal fibroblasts, endothelial, and smooth muscle cells. Here we present new active Haptides bearing homologous sequences derived from the C-termini of other proteins, such as angiopoietin 1 and 2, tenascins C and X, and microfibril-associated glycoprotein-4. The cell adhesion properties of all the Haptides were found to be associated mainly with their 11 N-terminal residues. Mutated preC{gamma} peptides revealed that positively charged residues account for their attachment effect. These results suggest a mechanism of direct electrostatic interaction of Haptides with the cell membrane. The extended Haptides family may be applied in modulating adhesion of cells to scaffolds for tissue regeneration and for enhancement of nanoparticulate transfection into cells.

  5. Characterization of peptides cleaved by plasmin from the C-terminal polymerization domain of human fibrinogen.

    PubMed

    Southan, C; Thompson, E; Panico, M; Etienne, T; Morris, H R; Lane, D A

    1985-10-25

    The C-terminal region of the fibrinogen gamma chain is known to participate in several functional interactions including fibrin polymerization. This part of the molecule is retained on the gamma chain of fragment D (FgD) when fibrinogen is digested by plasmin in the presence of calcium to produce the fragment D-fragment E (FgD X FgE) complex but is lost if FgD is prepared in the absence of calcium. In an attempt to characterize the C-terminal polymerization domain we have used three techniques to examine this further degradation of FgD following the addition of EDTA and plasmin. Analysis of the digestion by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed a progressive cleavage of the gamma chain to two small remnants. The polymerization-inhibitory activity of the whole digest was studied using acid-solubilized fibrin. A progressive loss of inhibitory activity was associated with gamma chain shortening, reaching greater than a 120-fold reduction at the end of digestion. The cleavage of peptides was followed by reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography and the release of a characteristic peptide triplet was associated with gamma chain cleavage. Manual sequencing, amino acid analysis, and fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry established the three peptides as gamma 303-356, 357-373, and 374-405. These peptides have sequences in common with those peptides recently reported by other investigators to be potent polymerization inhibitors. However, when a mixture of the three peptides was added in a 200-fold molar excess to polymerizing fibrin, no inhibitory activity could be demonstrated. It is concluded that the C-terminal polymerization domain of fibrinogen may be an extended region which includes the sequence gamma 303-405, when this is contiguous with the remainder of the gamma chain. PMID:2932434

  6. Differential effects of insulin deficiency on albumin and fibrinogen synthesis in humans.

    PubMed Central

    De Feo, P; Gaisano, M G; Haymond, M W

    1991-01-01

    Insulin deficiency decreases tissue protein synthesis, albumin mRNA concentration, and albumin synthesis in rats. In contrast, insulin deficiency does not change, or, paradoxically, increases estimates of whole body protein synthesis in humans. To determine if such estimates of whole body protein synthesis could obscure potential differential effects of insulin on the synthetic rates of individual proteins, we determined whole body protein synthesis and albumin and fibrinogen fractional synthetic rates using 5-h simultaneous infusions of [14C]leucine and [13C]bicarbonate, in six type 1 diabetics during a continuous i.v. insulin infusion (to maintain euglycemia) and after short-term insulin withdrawal (12 +/- 2 h). Insulin withdrawal increased (P less than 0.03) whole body proteolysis by approximately 35% and leucine oxidation by approximately 100%, but did not change 13CO2 recovery from NaH13CO3 or estimates of whole body protein synthesis (P = 0.21). Insulin deficiency was associated with a 29% decrease (P less than 0.03) in the albumin fractional synthetic rate but a 50% increase (P less than 0.03) in that of fibrinogen. These data provide strong evidence that albumin synthesis in humans is an insulin-sensitive process, a conclusion consistent with observations in rats. The increase in fibrinogen synthesis during insulin deficiency most likely reflects an acute phase protein response due to metabolic stress. These data suggest that the absence of changes in whole body protein synthesis after insulin withdrawal is the result of the summation of differential effects of insulin deficiency on the synthesis of specific body proteins. PMID:1909352

  7. Human cardiomyocyte interaction with electrospun fibrinogen/gelatin nanofibers for myocardial regeneration.

    PubMed

    Balasubramanian, Preethi; Prabhakaran, Molamma P; Kai, Dan; Ramakrishna, Seeram

    2013-01-01

    Myocardial infarction is the major cause of death in many industrialized nations as it leads to end-stage heart failure. Tissue engineering (TE) approaches for treatment of the infarcted tissue have gained huge attention over the recent years and research in this direction mainly aims for the optimization of a biomaterial scaffold with suitable cell source for tissue regeneration. In this regard, we fabricated completely natural polymeric scaffolds using fibrinogen and gelatin in two different weight ratios and performed cross-linking [Fib/Gel(1:4)-CL; Fib/Gel(2:3)-CL] while cross-linked fibrinogen scaffolds were used as the control. The fiber diameters of the fabricated scaffolds were obtained in the range of 150-300 nm. Chemical characterization of the scaffolds confirmed the presence of both the proteins and showed the absence of any chemical reactions between them. The tensile strength and the stiffness values of Fib/Gel(1:4)-CL matrices were found to be 0.0125 and 0.46 MPa, respectively, which were much similar to the innate properties of the native myocardium. Cell culture studies using human cardiomyocytes revealed higher cell proliferation on Fib/Gel(1:4)-CL scaffolds compared to cell proliferation on Fib/Gel(2:3)-CL scaffolds, which was even higher than the cell proliferation on cross-linked fibrinogen scaffolds. Moreover, the cardiomyocytes seeded on composite substrates expressed the typical functional cardiac proteins such as alpha-actinin, troponin I, connexin-43, and myosin heavy chain, and could be potential for application in cardiac TE. PMID:23611504

  8. Air Pollution and Inflammation (Interleukin-6, C-Reactive Protein, Fibrinogen) in Myocardial Infarction Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Rückerl, Regina; Greven, Sonja; Ljungman, Petter; Aalto, Pasi; Antoniades, Charalambos; Bellander, Tom; Berglind, Niklas; Chrysohoou, Christina; Forastiere, Francesco; Jacquemin, Bénédicte; von Klot, Stephanie; Koenig, Wolfgang; Küchenhoff, Helmut; Lanki, Timo; Pekkanen, Juha; Perucci, Carlo A.; Schneider, Alexandra; Sunyer, Jordi; Peters, Annette

    2007-01-01

    Background Numerous studies have found that ambient air pollution has been associated with cardiovascular disease exacerbation. Objectives Given previous findings, we hypothesized that particulate air pollution might induce systemic inflammation in myocardial infarction (MI) survivors, contributing to an increased vulnerability to elevated concentrations of ambient particles. Methods A prospective longitudinal study of 1,003 MI survivors was performed in six European cities between May 2003 and July 2004. We compared repeated measurements of interleukin 6 (IL-6), fibrinogen, and C-reactive protein (CRP) with concurrent levels of air pollution. We collected hourly data on particle number concentrations (PNC), mass concentrations of particulate matter (PM) < 10 μm (PM10) and < 2.5 μm (PM2.5), gaseous pollutants, and meteorologic data at central monitoring sites in each city. City-specific confounder models were built for each blood marker separately, adjusting for meteorology and time-varying and time-invariant covariates. Data were analyzed with mixed-effects models. Results Pooled results show an increase in IL-6 when concentrations of PNC were elevated 12–17 hr before blood withdrawal [percent change of geometric mean, 2.7; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.0–4.6]. Five day cumulative exposure to PM10 was associated with increased fibrinogen concentrations (percent change of arithmetic mean, 0.6; 95% CI, 0.1–1.1). Results remained stable for smokers, diabetics, and patients with heart failure. No consistent associations were found for CRP. Conclusions Results indicate an immediate response to PNC on the IL-6 level, possibly leading to the production of acute-phase proteins, as seen in increased fibrinogen levels. This might provide a link between air pollution and adverse cardiac events. PMID:17637925

  9. [Fibrinogen--acute phase protein as a marker of immunological process as atherosclerosis].

    PubMed

    Rajtari, Renata; Kloch, Małgorzata; Kiec-Wilk, Beata; Kolasińska-Kloch, Władysława

    2005-01-01

    The most important CAD risk factors are: smoking, high level of LDL-cholesterol and low level of HDL-cholesterol, hypertriglyceridemia, diabetes, obesity, hypertension, men sex, age over 45 in men and over 55 in women. Carl von Rokitański was the first who suggested the role of thrombosis and fibrynolisis in the development of atherosclerosis and was the author of thrombolic theory. The recently studies show that atherosclerosis is an immuno-inflamatory process. Fibrinogen as an acute phase protein is a new marker of ischemic heart disease and its role in atherosclerosis needs further investigations. PMID:17037285

  10. Mechanisms of fibrinogen adsorption at the silica substrate determined by QCM-D measurements.

    PubMed

    Kubiak, Katarzyna; Adamczyk, Zbigniew; Wasilewska, Monika

    2015-11-01

    Adsorption kinetics of fibrinogen at a silica substrate was thoroughly studied in situ using the QCM-D method. Because of low dissipation, the Sauerbrey's equation was used for calculating the wet mass per unit area (wet coverage of the protein). Measurements were done for various bulk suspension concentrations, flow rates and pHs. These experimental data were compared with the theoretical dry coverage data derived from the solution of the mass transfer equation. In this way, the hydration functions and water factors of fibrinogen monolayers were quantitatively evaluated for various pHs. In the case of pH 7.4 and ionic strength of 0.15 M, the hydration function changed from 0.75 to 0.6 for the dry coverage Γ(d) equal to 0 and 4 mg m(-2), respectively. Interestingly, for pH 7.4 and 4.5 (ionic strength of 10(-2) M) a minimum of the hydration function appeared at Γ(d) ca. 2 mg m(-2). Analytical polynomial expressions were formulated for the interpolation of the experimental results. By using the hydration functions, the fibrinogen adsorption/desorption runs derived from QCM-D measurements were converted to the Γ(d) vs. the time relationships. This allowed to precisely determine the maximum coverage that varied between 1.2 mg m(-2) at pH 3.5 and 4.2 mg m(-2) at pH 7.4 for ionic strength of 0.15 M. These results agree with theoretical modeling and previous experimental data derived by using ellipsometry, OWLS and TIRF. Various fibrinogen adsorption mechanisms were revealed by exploiting the maximum coverage data whose validity was also confirmed by the dissipation vs. the dry mass relationships. Beside significance to basic science, these results enable to develop a robust technique, based on the QCM-D measurements, suitable for precisely determining the dry mass of protein monolayers adsorbed under various physicochemical conditions. PMID:26209759

  11. Thermodynamics of native protein/foreign surface interactions. IV. Calorimetric and microelectrophoretic study of human fibrinogen sorption onto glass and LTI-carbon.

    PubMed

    Chiu, T H; Nyilas, E; Lederman, D M

    1976-01-01

    isotherms of fibrinogen obtained for both the glass and LTI-carbon powder adsorbents are not amenable to Langmuir type analysis but indicate multilayer sorption with a possible change in binding mechanism after the completion of the first sorbed monolayer. The adsorptivities attained at first monolayer coverage were slightly greater on glass (approximately 0.76 mug/cm2) than on LTI-carbon (approximately 0.52 mug/cm2). 4. Using a custom-built, thermistorized, isothermal-jacketed microcalorimeter routinely capable of resolving temperature changes of 0.00001 degrees C in 100 ml of aqueous sample volume, the "intensity" of interaction between fibrinogen and each of the microparticulate adsorbents was studied by the direct measurement of the net overall enthalpy changes, hI(SLP)25 arising as a result of protein adsorption. From these values, the net heat of protein sorption has been determined... PMID:951870

  12. Technology meets aggregate

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, C.; Swan, C.

    2007-07-01

    New technology carried out at Tufts University and the University of Massachusetts on synthetic lightweight aggregate has created material from various qualities of fly ash from coal-fired power plants for use in different engineered applications. In pilot scale manufacturing tests an 'SLA' containing 80% fly ash and 20% mixed plastic waste from packaging was produced by 'dry blending' mixed plastic with high carbon fly ash. A trial run was completed to produce concrete masonry unit (CMU) blocks at a full-scale facility. It has been shown that SLA can be used as a partial substitution of a traditional stone aggregate in hot asphalt mix. 1 fig., 2 photos.

  13. The conversion of fibrinogen to fibrin. XIII. Dissolution of fibrin and inhibition of clotting by various neutral salts.

    PubMed

    SHULMAN, S; KATZ, S; FERRY, J D

    1953-07-01

    1. Fibrin clots prepared in the absence of calcium can be dissolved in solutions of lithium chloride and bromide and sodium bromide and iodide, as well as of guanidine hydrochloride and urea. These salts do not denature fibrinogen under the same conditions of concentration, temperature, and time. Sedimentation experiments on the fibrin solutions show in each case a single sharp peak with a sedimentation constant close to that of fibrinogen. 2. At lower concentrations, these salts inhibit the clotting of fibrinogen by thrombin, but in the case of lithium bromide and sodium iodide, at least, allow an intermediate polymer to accumulate whose sedimentation constant is close to that of the polymer observed in systems inhibited by hexamethylene glycol or urea. PMID:13069679

  14. /sup 111/In-platelet and /sup 125/I-fibrinogen deposition in the lungs in experimental acute pancreatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Goulbourne, I.A.; Watson, H.; Davies, G.C.

    1987-12-01

    An experimental model of acute pancreatitis in rats has been used to study intrapulmonary /sup 125/I-fibrinogen and /sup 111/In-platelet deposition. Pancreatitis caused a significant increase in wet lung weight compared to normal, and this could be abolished by heparin or aspirin pretreatment. /sup 125/I-fibrinogen was deposited in the lungs of animals to a significantly greater degree than in controls (P less than 0.01). /sup 125/I-fibrinogen deposition was reduced to control levels by pretreatment with aspirin or heparin (P less than 0.05). The uptake of radiolabeled platelets was greater in pancreatitis than in controls (P less than 0.001). Pancreatitis appears to be responsible for platelet entrapment in the lungs. Platelet uptake was reduced by heparin treatment but unaffected by aspirin therapy.

  15. Surveillance of deep vein thrombosis in asymptomatic total hip replacement patients. Impedance phlebography and fibrinogen scanning versus roentgenographic phlebography

    SciTech Connect

    Paiement, G.; Wessinger, S.J.; Waltman, A.C.; Harris, W.H.

    1988-03-01

    Nine hundred thirty-seven limbs in 537 patients over the age of 39 years who underwent total hip replacement were studied by roentgenographic phlebography, cuff-impedance phlebography, and iodine-125 fibrinogen scanning. Cuff-impedance phlebography had a sensitivity of only 12.3 percent for thigh thrombi. Fibrinogen scanning had a sensitivity of only 59.1 percent for calf thrombi and 13.7 percent for thigh thrombi. The combined use of the two methods resulted in only a 23.2 percent sensitivity for thigh thrombi and an overall sensitivity of 47.4 percent. We have concluded that in asymptomatic patients, in contrast with symptomatic patients, the combination of cuff-impedance phlebography and fibrinogen scanning is not an effective screening method.

  16. Effects of fibrinogen concentrate after shock/resuscitation – A comparison between in vivo microvascular clot formation and thromboelastometry

    PubMed Central

    Martini, Judith; Cabrales, Pedro; Fries, Dietmar; Intaglietta, Marcos; Tsai, Amy G.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Dilutional coagulopathy after resuscitation with crystalloids/colloids clinically often appears as diffuse microvascular bleeding. Administration of fibrinogen reduces bleeding and increases maximum clot firmness (MCF), measured by thromboelastometry. Study objective was to implement a model where microvascular bleeding can be directly assessed by visualizing clot formation in microvessels, and correlations can be made to thromboelastometry. Design Randomized animal study. Setting University research laboratory. Subjects Male Syrian Golden hamsters. Interventions Microvessels of Syrian Golden hamsters fitted with a dorsal window chamber were studied using videomicroscopy. After 50% hemorrhage followed by 1 hr of hypovolemia resuscitation with 35% of blood volume using a high molecular weight (MW) HES solution (Hextend®, Hospira, MW 670 kD) occurred. Animals were then treated with 250 mg/kg fibrinogen iv (Laboratoire français du Fractionnement et des Biotechnologies (LFB), Paris, France) or an equal volume of saline before venular vessel wall injuries were made by directed laser irradiation and the ability of microthrombus formation was assessed. Measurements and main results Thromboelastometric measurements of MCF were performed at the beginning and at the end of the experiment. Resuscitation with HES and sham treatment significantly decreased FIBTEM MCF from 32 ± 9 at baseline vs. 13 ± 5 mm after sham treatment (p < 0.001). Infusion of fibrinogen concentrate significantly increased MCF, restoring baseline levels (baseline 32 ± 9 mm; after fibrinogen administration 29 ± 2 mm). In vivo microthrombus formation in laser injured vessels significantly increased in fibrinogen treated animals compared with sham (77% vs. 18%). Conclusions Fibrinogen treatment leads to increased clot firmness in dilutional coagulopathy as measured with thromboelastometry. At the microvascular level this increased clot strength, corresponds to an increased incidence of

  17. Fibrinogen and inflammatory cytokines in spontaneous sputum of sulfur-mustard-exposed civilians--Sardasht-Iran Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Yaraee, Roya; Hassan, Zuhair Mohammad; Pourfarzam, Shahryar; Rezaei, Abbas; Faghihzadeh, Soghrat; Ebtekar, Massoumeh; Soroush, Mohammad-Reza; Ardestani, Sussan K; Kazemi, Hadi; Mahmoudi, Mahmoud; Ghazanfari, Zeinab; Foroutan, Abbas; Jalaie, Shohreh; Ghazanfari, Tooba

    2013-11-01

    Sulfur mustard (SM) causes late complications in respiratory system of exposed individuals. In this preliminary study, the levels of IL-1α and β, TNF, IL-1Ra, IL-6 and fibrinogen in the spontaneous sputum of SM-exposed individuals were examined 20 years after exposure and the correlation with pulmonary function was tested. The participants were categorized into two major subgroups (hospitalized and non-hospitalized) based on the severity of the clinical complications immediately after exposure. Every participant was visited by a physician; the respiratory functions were checked using spirometry and were categorized as normal, mild, moderate or severe pulmonary complications. The levels of cytokines in the sputum and serum samples were measured using ELISA method. The mean values of TNF, IL-1α and IL-1β were 524.15, 115.15, 1951.33 pg/ml respectively, and the mean levels of IL-1Ra and IL-6 were 6410.52 and 124.44 pg/ml respectively; fibrinogen was 71.59 ng/ml and index of IL-Ra/IL-1β was 7.78. There was more TNF-α and IL-1β and less IL-1Ra and fibrinogen in the sputum of the hospitalized subgroup. The level of TNF-α and IL-1β also increased in moderate and severe pulmonary status comparing with the group with mild disorders, while fibrinogen was lower or decreased significantly in problematic patients. IL-1β and TNF showed positive correlation (r=0.5, and r=0.59, respectively); fibrinogen and IL1Ra/IL-1β have negative correlation with lung function according to the GOLD classification (r=-0.4, and r=-0.61, respectively). It is concluded that sputum cytokines and fibrinogen, reflect the degree of the severity of airway inflammation and the cytokine levels in the sputum might be completely different from the serum fluctuations. PMID:23375935

  18. Combination of recombinant factor VIIa and fibrinogen corrects clot formation in primary immune thrombocytopenia at very low platelet counts.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Ole H; Stentoft, Jesper; Radia, Deepti; Ingerslev, Jørgen; Sørensen, Benny

    2013-01-01

    Haemostatic treatment modalities alternative to platelet transfusion are desirable to control serious acute bleeds in primary immune thrombocytopenia (ITP). This study challenged the hypothesis that recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa) combined with fibrinogen concentrate may correct whole blood (WB) clot formation in ITP. Blood from ITP patients (n = 12) was drawn into tubes containing 3·2% citrate and corn trypsin inhibitor 18·3 μg/ml. WB [mean platelet count 22 × 10(9) /l (range 0-42)] was spiked in vitro with buffer, donor platelets (+40 × 10(9) /l), rFVIIa (1 or 4 μg/ml), fibrinogen (1 or 3 mg/ml), or combinations of rFVIIa and fibrinogen. Coagulation profiles were recorded by tissue factor (0·03 pmol/l) activated thromboelastometry. Coagulation in ITP was characterized by a prolonged clotting time (CT, 1490 s (mean)) and a low maximum velocity (MaxVel, 3·4 mm × 100/s) and maximum clot firmness (MCF, 38·2 mm). Fibrinogen showed no haemostatic effect, whereas rFVIIa reduced the CT and increased the MaxVel. The combination of fibrinogen and rFVIIa revealed a significant synergistic effect, improving all parameters (CT 794 s, MaxVel 7·9 mm × 100/s, MCF 50·7 mm) even at very low platelet counts. These data suggest that rFVIIa combined with fibrinogen corrects the coagulopathy of ITP even at very low platelet counts, and may represent an alternative to platelet transfusion. PMID:23151086

  19. Distinct Adsorption Configurations and Self-Assembly Characteristics of Fibrinogen on Chemically Uniform and Alternating Surfaces including Block Copolymer Nanodomains

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Understanding protein–surface interactions is crucial to solid-state biomedical applications whose functionality is directly correlated with the precise control of the adsorption configuration, surface packing, loading density, and bioactivity of protein molecules. Because of the small dimensions and highly amphiphilic nature of proteins, investigation of protein adsorption performed on nanoscale topology can shed light on subprotein-level interaction preferences. In this study, we examine the adsorption and assembly behavior of a highly elongated protein, fibrinogen, on both chemically uniform (as-is and buffered HF-treated SiO2/Si, and homopolymers of polystyrene and poly(methyl methacrylate)) and varying (polystyrene-block-poly(methyl methacrylate)) surfaces. By focusing on high-resolution imaging of individual protein molecules whose configurations are influenced by protein–surface rather than protein–protein interactions, fibrinogen conformations characteristic to each surface are identified and statistically analyzed for structural similarities/differences in key protein domains. By exploiting block copolymer nanodomains whose repeat distance is commensurate with the length of the individual protein, we determine that fibrinogen exhibits a more neutral tendency for interaction with both polystyrene and poly(methyl methacrylate) blocks relative to the case of common globular proteins. Factors affecting fibrinogen–polymer interactions are discussed in terms of hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions. In addition, assembly and packing attributes of fibrinogen are determined at different loading conditions. Primary orientations of fibrinogen and its rearrangements with respect to the underlying diblock nanodomains associated with different surface coverage are explained by pertinent protein interaction mechanisms. On the basis of two-dimensional stacking behavior, a protein assembly model is proposed for the formation of an extended fibrinogen network

  20. Aggregates, broccoli and cauliflower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grey, Francois; Kjems, Jørgen K.

    1989-09-01

    Naturally grown structures with fractal characters like broccoli and cauliflower are discussed and compared with DLA-type aggregates. It is suggested that the branching density can be used to characterize the growth process and an experimental method to determine this parameter is proposed.

  1. Simulation of aggregating particles in complex flows by the lattice kinetic Monte Carlo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flamm, Matthew H.; Sinno, Talid; Diamond, Scott L.

    2011-01-01

    We develop and validate an efficient lattice kinetic Monte Carlo (LKMC) method for simulating particle aggregation in laminar flows with spatially varying shear rate, such as parabolic flow or flows with standing vortices. A contact time model was developed to describe the particle-particle collision efficiency as a function of the local shear rate, G, and approach angle, θ. This model effectively accounts for the hydrodynamic interactions between approaching particles, which is not explicitly considered in the LKMC framework. For imperfect collisions, the derived collision efficiency [\\varepsilon = 1 - int_0^{{π {π /2} {sin θ exp ( { - 2\\cot θ {{Γ _{agg} }/ { Γ _{agg} } G} )} dθ] was found to depend only on Γagg/G, where Γagg is the specified aggregation rate. For aggregating platelets in tube flow, Γ _{agg} = 0.683 s-1 predicts the experimentally measured ɛ across a physiological range (G = 40-1000 s-1) and is consistent with α2bβ3-fibrinogen bond dynamics. Aggregation in parabolic flow resulted in the largest aggregates forming near the wall where shear rate and residence time were maximal, however intermediate regions between the wall and the center exhibited the highest aggregation rate due to depletion of reactants nearest the wall. Then, motivated by stenotic or valvular flows, we employed the LKMC simulation developed here for baffled geometries that exhibit regions of squeezing flow and standing recirculation zones. In these calculations, the largest aggregates were formed within the vortices (maximal residence time), while squeezing flow regions corresponded to zones of highest aggregation rate.

  2. The FIB-PPH trial: fibrinogen concentrate as initial treatment for postpartum haemorrhage: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Postpartum haemorrhage (PPH) remains a leading cause of maternal mortality worldwide. In Denmark 2% of parturients receive blood transfusion. During the course of bleeding fibrinogen (coagulation factor I) may be depleted and fall to critically low levels, impairing haemostasis and thus worsening the ongoing bleeding. A plasma level of fibrinogen below 2 g/L in the early phase of postpartum haemorrhage is associated with subsequent development of severe haemorrhage. Use of fibrinogen concentrate allows high-dose substitution without the need for blood type crossmatch. So far no publications of randomised controlled trials involving acutely bleeding patients in the obstetrical setting have been published. This trial aims to investigate if early treatment with fibrinogen concentrate reduces the need for blood transfusion in women suffering severe PPH. Methods/Design In this randomised placebo-controlled double-blind multicentre trial, parturients with primary PPH are eligible following vaginal delivery in case of: manual removal of placenta (blood loss ≥ 500 ml) or manual exploration of the uterus after the birth of placenta (blood loss ≥ 1000 ml). Caesarean sections are also eligible in case of perioperative blood loss ≥ 1000 ml. The exclusion criteria are known inherited haemostatic deficiencies, prepartum treatment with antithrombotics, pre-pregnancy weight <45 kg or refusal to receive blood transfusion. Following informed consent, patients are randomly allocated to either early treatment with 2 g fibrinogen concentrate or 100 ml isotonic saline (placebo). Haemostatic monitoring with standard laboratory coagulation tests and thromboelastography (TEG, functional fibrinogen and Rapid TEG) is performed during the initial 24 hours. Primary outcome is the need for blood transfusion. To investigate a 33% reduction in the need for blood transfusion, a total of 245 patients will be included. Four university-affiliated public

  3. TGFβ2 differentially modulates smooth muscle cell proliferation and migration in electrospun gelatin-fibrinogen constructs.

    PubMed

    Ardila, Diana C; Tamimi, Ehab; Danford, Forest L; Haskett, Darren G; Kellar, Robert S; Doetschman, Tom; Vande Geest, Jonathan P

    2015-01-01

    A main goal of tissue engineering is the development of scaffolds that replace, restore and improve injured tissue. These scaffolds have to mimic natural tissue, constituted by an extracellular matrix (ECM) support, cells attached to the ECM, and signaling molecules such as growth factors that regulate cell function. In this study we created electrospun flat sheet scaffolds using different compositions of gelatin and fibrinogen. Smooth muscle cells (SMCs) were seeded on the scaffolds, and proliferation and infiltration were evaluated. Additionally, different concentrations of Transforming Growth Factor-beta2 (TGFβ2) were added to the medium with the aim of elucidating its effect on cell proliferation, migration and collagen production. Our results demonstrated that a scaffold with a composition of 80% gelatin-20% fibrinogen is suitable for tissue engineering applications since it promotes cell growth and migration. The addition of TGFβ2 at low concentrations (≤ 1 ng/ml) to the culture medium resulted in an increase in SMC proliferation and scaffold infiltration, and in the reduction of collagen production. In contrast, TGFβ2 at concentrations >1 ng/ml inhibited cell proliferation and migration while stimulating collagen production. According to our results TGFβ2 concentration has a differential effect on SMC function and thus can be used as a biochemical modulator that can be beneficial for tissue engineering applications. PMID:25453947

  4. Combined fibrinogen concentration and neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio as a prognostic marker of gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    ARIGAMI, TAKAAKI; UENOSONO, YOSHIKAZU; MATSUSHITA, DAISUKE; YANAGITA, SHIGEHIRO; UCHIKADO, YASUTO; KITA, YOSHIAKI; MORI, SHINICHIRO; KIJIMA, YUKO; OKUMURA, HIROSHI; MAEMURA, KOSEI; ISHIGAMI, SUMIYA; NATSUGOE, SHOJI

    2016-01-01

    Certain patients with early gastric cancer succumb to recurrent disease and cancer-associated complications. The key cause of recurrence is challenging to determine, since clinical blood markers that are able to predict the tumor properties of gastric cancer are limited. The present study investigated the fibrinogen concentration and neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) in blood specimens from patients with gastric cancer, and assessed the clinical applicability of combining the fibrinogen concentration with the NLR (CFS-NLR) as a prognostic marker of gastric cancer. The present study consisted of 275 patients with gastric cancer, who were divided into three groups: Those possessing hyperfibrinogenemia (≥305 mg/dl) and a high NLR (≥2.34; CFS-NLR 2 group); those possessing either hyperfibrinogenemia or a high NLR (CFS-NLR 1 group); or those that possessed neither abnormality (CFS-NLR 0 group). The CFS-NLR was significantly associated with the depth of tumor invasion, lymph node metastasis, lymphovascular invasion and tumor stage (P<0.0001). The prognostic differences among the three groups were significant (P=0.0016). Therefore, the CFS-NLR may be a potentially useful blood marker for predicting tumor progression and the prognosis of patients with gastric cancer. PMID:26893776

  5. The significance of fibrinogen derivatives in plasma in human renal failure.

    PubMed

    Lane, D A; Ireland, H; Knight, I; Wolff, S; Kyle, P; Curtis, J R

    1984-02-01

    The concentrations in plasma of fibrinogen derivatives fibrinopeptide A (FPA), beta 15-42 antigen and fragment E (FgE) antigen have been determined in patients with renal failure and compared to the concentrations of the platelet release products, beta-thromboglobulin (beta TG) and platelet factor 4 (PF4). In 'partial renal failure' (51Cr-EDTA clearance rate 4-60 ml/min) FPA, beta 15-42 antigen, FgE antigen and beta TG levels were significantly raised above a normal laboratory control group. These levels were further raised in a group of patients whose disease required regular maintenance haemodialysis (51Cr-EDTA clearance rate less than 4 ml/min). PF4 levels were not significantly raised in either group. A statistical analysis of all patient results revealed that FPA, beta 15-42 antigen and FgE antigen levels all correlated with beta TG levels but not with PF4 levels. It is known that beta TG is catabolized by the kidney but PF4 is not and that elevated beta TG levels in renal failure are caused by impaired elimination rather than increased production. These results suggest that the plasma levels of these three fibrinogen derivatives are elevated in renal disease at least in part by decreased elimination rather than by increased thrombin and plasmin activities alone. PMID:6229269

  6. Novel locus for fibrinogen in 3' region of LEPR gene in island population of Vis (Croatia).

    PubMed

    Tomas, Željka; Petranović, Matea Zajc; Škarić-Jurić, Tatjana; Barešić, Ana; Salihović, Marijana Peričić; Narančić, Nina Smolej

    2014-11-01

    Leptin, a possible mediator between energy homeostasis, inflammation and cardiovascular disease (CVD), acts via leptin receptors. We investigated association of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and haplotypes of the leptin receptor gene (LEPR) with several CVD risk factors: body mass index, waist circumference (WC), serum lipids, fibrinogen and C-reactive protein levels. Thirty-one SNPs in and near LEPR gene were analyzed in 986 inhabitants of the island of Vis, Croatia and 29 SNPs in the inland sample (N=499). We assessed linkage disequilibrium (LD), SNP and haplotype associations with the selected phenotypes. rs4291477 significantly associated with fibrinogen (P=0.003) and rs7539471 marginally significantly with high-density lipoprotein (P=0.004), but only in the Vis sample, while rs10493384 marginally significantly associated with triglyceride levels (P=0.006) in the inland sample. SNPs were grouped into eight LD blocks in Vis and in seven blocks in the inland population. Haplotype A-C-A-A-G-A in block 5 in Vis (rs1782754, rs1171269, rs1022981, rs6673324, rs3790426, rs10493380) and haplotype A-A-A-A in block 4 in the inland data (rs1782754, rs1022981, rs6673324, rs1137100) were nominally associated with WC, P=7.085 × 10(-22) (adjusted P=0.0979) and P=5.496 × 10(-144) (adjusted P=0.1062), respectively. PMID:25296580

  7. Tracheal anastomosis using indocyanine green dye enhanced fibrinogen with a near-infrared diode laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auteri, Joseph S.; Jeevanandam, Valluvan; Oz, Mehmet C.; Libutti, Steven K.; Kirby, Thomas J.; Smith, Craig R.; Treat, Michael R.

    1990-06-01

    A major obstacle to lung transplantation and combined heart- lung transplantation is dehiscence of the tracheobronchial anastomosis. We explored the possibility of laser welded anastomoses in canine tracheas in vivo. Laser anastomoses were performed on three-quarter circumferential anterior tracheotomies. A continous wave diode laser (808 +1 nm) at a power density of 9.6 watts/cm was used. Human fibrinogen was mixed with indocyanine green dye (ICG, max absorbance 805 nm) and applied to the anastomosis site prior to laser exposure. Animals were sacrificed at 0, 21 and 28 days post-operatively. At sacrifice weld bursting pressures were measured by raising intratracheal pressure using forced ventilation via an endotracheal tube. Sutured and laser welded anastomoses had similar bursting pressures, and exhibited satisfactory histologic evidence of healing. However, compared to polypropylene sutured controls, the laser welded anastomoses exhibited less peritracheal inflammatory reaction and showed visibly smoother luminal surfaces at 21 and 28 days post- operatively. Tracheal anastomosis using ICG dye enhanced fibrinogen combined with the near-infrared diode laser is a promising extension of the technology of laser tissue fusion and deserves further study.

  8. [A preemptive combined liver-kidney transplantation in Aalpha fibrinogen chain renal amyloidosis].

    PubMed

    Delabre, Jean-Philippe; Pageaux, Georges-Philippe; Le Quellec, Alain; Raynaud, Pierre; Grateau, Gilles; Mourad, Georges

    2009-04-01

    The predominant cause of hereditary renal amyloidosis is a mutation of the fibrinogen Aalpha chain (AFib), the most common being the E526V mutation. The evolution towards terminal renal insufficiency is constant and raises the question of renal transplantation and the risk of recurrence. We describe the case of a Portuguese woman with the E526V mutation without any renal or hepatic history in her family which developed a nephrotic syndrome at the age of 35, followed by stage 5 renal insufficiency. Because of the risk of recurrence of amyloidosis on its transplant, we carried out a combined transplantation liver-kidney despite the absence of clinical or biological hepatic abnormalities. Four years later, the result is excellent and there is no sign of the disease on the new organs. This successful experience as well as the five other published cases of combined liver-kidney transplantation in Aalpha fibrinogen chain amyloidosis, demonstrates the feasibility and efficacy of this treatment in AFib amyloidosis. PMID:19013120

  9. A detailed consideration of a principal domain of vertebrate fibrinogen and its relatives.

    PubMed Central

    Doolittle, R. F.

    1992-01-01

    Vertebrate fibrinogen is a complex multidomained protein, the structure of which has been inferred mainly from electron microscopy and amino acid sequence studies. Among its most prominent features are two terminal globules, moieties that are mostly composed of the carboxyl-terminal two-thirds of the beta and gamma chains. Sequences homologous to the latter segments are found in several other animal proteins, always as the carboxyl-terminal contributions. An alignment of 15 amino acid sequences from various fibrinogens and related proteins has been used to make judgments about secondary structure. The nature of amino acids at each position in the alignment was used to distinguish alpha helices and beta structure on the one hand from loops and turns on the other, and the resulting assignments compared with predictions of secondary structure by other methods. Additionally, constraints imposed by the locations of cystines, carbohydrate attachment residues, and proteinase-sensitive points provided further insights into the general organization of the postulated secondary structures. Other ancillary data, including the effects of bound calcium and the locations of labeled or variant residues, were also considered. An intriguing similarity to a portion of the recently reported structure of a calcium-dependent lectin is noted. PMID:1304888

  10. Tumor response and survival in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer: the predictive value of chemotherapy-induced changes in fibrinogen

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Hyperfibrinogenemia is a common problem associated with various carcinomas, and is accompanied by hypercoagulablity. In advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) it remains unclear whether or not chemotherapy-induced changes in fibrinogen level relate to chemotherapeutic response and prognosis. The purposes of this study were to: 1) analyze the association between chemotherapy-induced changes in plasma fibrinogen level and the chemotherapeutic response after the first two courses of standard first-line platinum-based chemotherapy; and 2) evaluate the prognostic significance of the basal plasma fibrinogen level in patients with advanced NSCLC. Methods In this retrospective study, the data from 160 patients with advanced NSCLC were collected. The association between the changes in fibrinogen and the response to chemotherapy, or between the pre-and post-chemotherapy fibrinogen levels and patient clinical characteristics, were analyzed using SPSS software. In addition, the prognostic value of pre-chemotherapy fibrinogen levels was assessed. Results The median pre-chemotherapy plasma fibrinogen level was 4.4 g/L. Pre-chemotherapy plasma fibrinogen levels correlated significantly with gender (p = 0.041). Post-chemotherapy plasma fibrinogen levels correlated with gender (p = 0.023), age (p = 0.018), ECOG (p = 0.002) and tumor response (p = 0.049). Plasma fibrinogen levels markedly decreased after chemotherapy in 98 (61.25 %) patients with pre-chemotherapy hyperfibrinogenemia (p = 0.008); and in this population there was a significant link between the decrease in fibrinogen level, and initial partial response (PR; p = 0.017) and stable disease (SD; p = 0.031). Univariate and multivariate analysis revealed that higher levels of fibrinogen (≥4.4 g/L) and ECOG 1 were positively associated with shorter overall survival (OS). CEA and CA125 also decreased significantly (p =0.015, p =0.000) in DCR group after chemotherapy. Conclusions This study showed that the

  11. Fibrinogen Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... Related tests: PT and INR , PTT , D-dimer , Coagulation Factors , Thrombin Time , hs-CRP At a Glance ... and D-dimer to help diagnose disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) or abnormal fibrinolysis Occasionally to help monitor ...

  12. A delicate balance between functionally required flexibility and aggregation risk in a β-rich protein

    PubMed Central

    Ferrolino, Mylene C.; Zhuravleva, Anastasia; Budyak, Ivan L.; Krishnan, Beena; Gierasch, Lila M.

    2014-01-01

    Susceptibility to aggregation is general to proteins because of the potential for intermolecular interactions between hydrophobic stretches in their amino acid sequences. Protein aggregation has been implicated in several catastrophic diseases, yet we still lack in-depth understanding about how proteins are channeled to this state. Using a predominantly β-sheet protein whose folding has been explored in detail: cellular retinoic acid-binding protein 1 (CRABP1), as a model, we have tackled the challenge of understanding the links between a protein’s natural tendency to fold, ‘breathe’, and function with its propensity to misfold and aggregate. We identified near-native dynamic species that lead to aggregation and found that inherent structural fluctuations in the native protein, resulting in opening of the ligand entry portal, expose hydrophobic residues on the most vulnerable aggregation-prone sequences in CRABP1. CRABP1 and related intracellullar lipid-binding proteins have not been reported to aggregate inside cells, and we speculate that the cellular concentration of their open, aggregation-prone conformations is sufficient for ligand binding but below the critical concentration for aggregation. Our finding provides an example of how nature fine-tunes a delicate balance between protein function, conformational variability, and aggregation vulnerability, and implies that with the evolutionary requirement for proteins to fold and function, aggregation becomes an unavoidable but controllable risk. PMID:24236614

  13. High molecular weight kininogen binds to unstimulated platelets.

    PubMed Central

    Gustafson, E J; Schutsky, D; Knight, L C; Schmaier, A H

    1986-01-01

    Studies were performed to determine if the unstimulated platelet membrane has a site for high molecular weight kininogen (HMWK) binding. 125I-HMWK bound to unstimulated platelets. Zn++ was required for 125I-HMWK binding to unstimulated platelets and binding was maximal at 50 microM Zn++. Neither Mg++ nor Ca++ substituted for Zn++ in supporting 125I-HMWK binding to unstimulated platelets, and neither ion potentiated binding in the presence of 50 microM zinc. 125I-HMWK competed with equal affinity with HMWK for binding, and excess HMWK inhibited 125I-HMWK-platelet binding. Only HMWK, not prekallikrein, Factor XII, Factor XI, Factor V, fibrinogen, or fibronectin inhibited 125I-HMWK-platelet binding. 125I-HMWK binding to unstimulated platelets was 89% reversible within 10 min with a 50-fold molar excess of HMWK. Unstimulated platelets contained a single set of saturable, high affinity binding sites for 125I-HMWK with an apparent dissociation constant of 0.99 nM +/- 0.35 and 3,313 molecules/platelet +/- 843. These studies indicate that the unstimulated external platelet membrane has a binding site for HMWK that could serve as a surface to modulate contact phase activation. Images PMID:3722381

  14. TDP-43 Aggregation In Neurodegeneration: Are Stress Granules The Key?

    PubMed Central

    Dewey, Colleen M.; Cenik, Basar; Sephton, Chantelle F.; Johnson, Brett A.; Herz, Joachim; Yu, Gang

    2012-01-01

    The RNA-binding protein TDP-43 is strongly linked to neurodegeneration. Not only are mutations in the gene encoding TDP-43 associated with ALS and FTLD, but this protein is also a major constituent of pathological intracellular inclusions in these diseases. Recent studies have significantly expanded our understanding of TDP-43 physiology. TDP-43 is now known to play important roles in neuronal RNA metabolism. It binds to and regulates the splicing and stability of numerous RNAs encoding proteins involved in neuronal development, synaptic function and neurodegeneration. Thus, a loss of these essential functions is an attractive hypothesis regarding the role of TDP-43 in neurodegeneration. Moreover, TDP-43 is an aggregation-prone protein and, given the role of toxic protein aggregates in neurodegeneration, a toxic gain-of-function mechanism is another rational hypothesis. Importantly, ALS related mutations modulate the propensity of TDP-43 to aggregate in cell culture. Several recent studies have documented that cytoplasmic TDP-43 aggregates co-localize with stress granule markers. Stress granules are cytoplasmic inclusions that repress translation of a subset of RNAs in times of cellular stress, and several proteins implicated in neurodegeneration (i.e. Ataxin-2 and SMN) interact with stress granules. Thus, understanding the interplay between TDP-43 aggregation, stress granules and the effect of ALS-associated TDP-43 mutations may be the key to understanding the role of TDP-43 in neurodegeneration. We propose two models of TDP-43 aggregate formation. The “independent model” stipulates that TDP-43 aggregation is independent of stress granule formation, in contrast to the “precursor model” which presents the idea that stress granule formation contributes to a TDP-43 aggregate “seed” and that chronic stress leads to concentration-dependent TDP-43 aggregation. PMID:22405725

  15. Photophoretic force on aggregate grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Lorin S.; Kimery, Jesse B.; Wurm, Gerhard; de Beule, Caroline; Kuepper, Markus; Hyde, Truell W.

    2016-01-01

    The photophoretic force may impact planetary formation by selectively moving solid particles based on their composition and structure. This generates collision velocities between grains of different sizes and sorts the dust in protoplanetary discs by composition. This numerical simulation studied the photophoretic force acting on fractal dust aggregates of μm-scale radii. Results show that aggregates tend to have greater photophoretic drift velocities than spheres of similar mass or radii, though with a greater spread in the velocity. While the drift velocities of compact aggregates continue to increase as the aggregates grow larger in size, fluffy aggregates have drift velocities which are relatively constant with size. Aggregates formed from an initially polydisperse size distribution of dust grains behave differently from aggregates formed from a monodisperse population, having smaller drift velocities with directions which deviate substantially from the direction of illumination. Results agree with microgravity experiments which show the difference of photophoretic forces with aggregation state.

  16. NADH fluorescence lifetime is an endogenous reporter of α-synuclein aggregation in live cells

    PubMed Central

    Plotegher, Nicoletta; Stringari, Chiara; Jahid, Sohail; Veronesi, Marina; Girotto, Stefania; Gratton, Enrico; Bubacco, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    α-Synuclein (aS) aggregation has been amply investigated for its involvement in Parkinson’s disease because its amyloid fibrils are the main constituent of Lewy bodies, one of the hallmarks of the disease. aS aggregation was studied here in vitro and in cellular models to correlate aggregation products with toxicity mechanisms. Independent results published elsewhere suggested that aS overexpression and/or aggregation may impair cellular metabolism and cause mitochondrial damage. In this context, we report the characterization of changes in NADH fluorescence properties in vitro and in human embryonic kidney 293 cells upon aS aggregation. The application of the phasor approach to study NADH fluorescence lifetime and emission allowed us to identify changes that correlate with aS aggregation. In particular, the fraction of bound NADH, characterized by longer lifetimes in comparison to free NADH, is increased, and the maximum of the NADH emission is shifted toward shorter wavelengths in the presence of aggregating aS both in vitro and in cells. These data suggest that NADH binds to aggregated aS. NMR experiments in vitro substantiate such binding, which occurs during aggregation. NADH fluorescence is thus useful to detect aS aggregation and by extension the associated oxidative stress.—Plotegher, N., Stringari, C., Jahid, S., Veronesi, M., Girotto, S., Gratton, E., Bubacco, L. NADH fluorescence lifetime is an endogenous reporter of α-synuclein aggregation in live cells. PMID:25713058

  17. Proteins aggregation and human diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Chin-Kun

    2015-04-01

    Many human diseases and the death of most supercentenarians are related to protein aggregation. Neurodegenerative diseases include Alzheimer's disease (AD), Huntington's disease (HD), Parkinson's disease (PD), frontotemporallobar degeneration, etc. Such diseases are due to progressive loss of structure or function of neurons caused by protein aggregation. For example, AD is considered to be related to aggregation of Aβ40 (peptide with 40 amino acids) and Aβ42 (peptide with 42 amino acids) and HD is considered to be related to aggregation of polyQ (polyglutamine) peptides. In this paper, we briefly review our recent discovery of key factors for protein aggregation. We used a lattice model to study the aggregation rates of proteins and found that the probability for a protein sequence to appear in the conformation of the aggregated state can be used to determine the temperature at which proteins can aggregate most quickly. We used molecular dynamics and simple models of polymer chains to study relaxation and aggregation of proteins under various conditions and found that when the bending-angle dependent and torsion-angle dependent interactions are zero or very small, then protein chains tend to aggregate at lower temperatures. All atom models were used to identify a key peptide chain for the aggregation of insulin chains and to find that two polyQ chains prefer anti-parallel conformation. It is pointed out that in many cases, protein aggregation does not result from protein mis-folding. A potential drug from Chinese medicine was found for Alzheimer's disease.

  18. Inhibition of amyloid-β aggregation in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiuming; Yu, Xiang; Li, Lingyan; Zheng, Jie

    2014-01-01

    The assembly of naturally occurring amyloid peptides into cytotoxic oligomeric and fibrillar aggregates is believed to be a major pathologic event in over 25 human diseases. Blocking of or interfering with the aggregation of amyloid peptides such as amyloid-β (Aβ) using small organic molecules, peptides and peptidomimetics, and nanoparticles that selectively bind or inhibit Aβ aggregates is a promising strategy for the development of novel pharmaceutical approaches and agents to treat Alzheimer's disease (AD). In a broad sense, considering many common features in structure, kinetics, and biological activity of amyloid peptides, potent inhibitors and associated inhibition strategies that are developed for targeting Aβ aggregation could also be generally applied to other amyloid-forming peptides in "protein-aggregation diseases". Due to the complex nature of Aβ self-assembly process, increasing knowledge in high-resolution structures of Aβ oligomers, atomic-level Aβ-inhibitor binding information, and cost-effective high-throughput screening method will improve our fundamental understanding of amyloid formation and inhibition mechanisms, as well as practical design of pharmaceutical strategies and drugs to treat AD. This review summarizes major findings, recent advances, and future challenges for the development of new Aβ-aggregation inhibitors, mainly focusing on three major classes of Aβ inhibitors with associated inhibition mechanisms and practical. examples. PMID:23713775

  19. Mechanism of algal aggregation by Bacillus sp. strain RP1137.

    PubMed

    Powell, Ryan J; Hill, Russell T

    2014-07-01

    Alga-derived biofuels are one of the best alternatives for economically replacing liquid fossil fuels with a fungible renewable energy source. Production of fuel from algae is technically feasible but not yet economically viable. Harvest of dilute algal biomass from the surrounding water remains one of the largest barriers to economic production of algal biofuel. We identified Bacillus sp. strain RP1137 in a previous study and showed that this strain can rapidly aggregate several biofuel-producing algae in a pH- and divalent-cation-dependent manner. In this study, we further characterized the mechanism of algal aggregation by RP1137. We show that aggregation of both algae and bacteria is optimal in the exponential phase of growth and that the density of ionizable residues on the RP1137 cell surface changes with growth stage. Aggregation likely occurs via charge neutralization with calcium ions at the cell surface of both algae and bacteria. We show that charge neutralization occurs at least in part through binding of calcium to negatively charged teichoic acid residues. The addition of calcium also renders both algae and bacteria more able to bind to hydrophobic beads, suggesting that aggregation may occur through hydrophobic interactions. Knowledge of the aggregation mechanism may enable engineering of RP1137 to obtain more efficient algal harvesting. PMID:24771029

  20. Mechanism of Algal Aggregation by Bacillus sp. Strain RP1137

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Ryan J.

    2014-01-01

    Alga-derived biofuels are one of the best alternatives for economically replacing liquid fossil fuels with a fungible renewable energy source. Production of fuel from algae is technically feasible but not yet economically viable. Harvest of dilute algal biomass from the surrounding water remains one of the largest barriers to economic production of algal biofuel. We identified Bacillus sp. strain RP1137 in a previous study and showed that this strain can rapidly aggregate several biofuel-producing algae in a pH- and divalent-cation-dependent manner. In this study, we further characterized the mechanism of algal aggregation by RP1137. We show that aggregation of both algae and bacteria is optimal in the exponential phase of growth and that the density of ionizable residues on the RP1137 cell surface changes with growth stage. Aggregation likely occurs via charge neutralization with calcium ions at the cell surface of both algae and bacteria. We show that charge neutralization occurs at least in part through binding of calcium to negatively charged teichoic acid residues. The addition of calcium also renders both algae and bacteria more able to bind to hydrophobic beads, suggesting that aggregation may occur through hydrophobic interactions. Knowledge of the aggregation mechanism may enable engineering of RP1137 to obtain more efficient algal harvesting. PMID:24771029

  1. [Dysfibrinogenemia developed in a pregnant woman who has fibrinogen AαThr312Ala (ACT/GCT) polymorphism].

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Ayaka; Taga, Atsuko; Kamei, Saori; Wada, Michiko; Fujita, Yohta; Wada, Hideo; Fujita, Kohei

    2016-01-01

    Blood coagulation factors play an essential role in pregnancy. We describe a 30-year-old pregnant woman whose course was complicated by dysfibrinogenemia with polymorphism of fibrinogen AαThr312Ala (rs6050) GG genotype. She was admitted to our hospital for genital bleeding and a huge subchorionic hematoma at 6 gestational weeks. Her first pregnancy and delivery had been uneventful, whereas her second and third pregnancies had resulted in spontaneous abortions with massive subchorionic hematomas. Her fibrinogen activity level was 125 mg/dl and this was lower than her fibrinogen antigen level. We administered tranexamic acid early in the pregnancy, and the subchorionic hematoma diminished in size in accordance with the increase of her fibrinogen level. At 16 gestational weeks, her D-dimer levels were elevated, and heparin treatment was initiated as an alternative. A male infant was delivered at 36 gestational weeks. Intrapartum hemorrhage was 600 g. Patients with coagulation abnormalities are often asymptomatic in the absence of pregnancy. However, when they become pregnant, the spontaneous abortion rate is high. Careful observation and effective management of coagulation abnormalities are essential for such patients to carry their pregnancies to term. PMID:26861101

  2. Macrophage-derived IL-18 and increased fibrinogen deposition are age-related inflammatory signatures of vascular remodeling.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Menocal, Luis; Faridi, Mohd Hafeez; Martinez, Laisel; Shehadeh, Lina A; Duque, Juan C; Wei, Yuntao; Mesa, Annia; Pena, Angela; Gupta, Vineet; Pham, Si M; Vazquez-Padron, Roberto I

    2014-03-01

    Aging has been associated with pathological vascular remodeling and increased neointimal hyperplasia. The understanding of how aging exacerbates this process is fundamental to prevent cardiovascular complications in the elderly. This study proposes a mechanism by which aging sustains leukocyte adhesion, vascular inflammation, and increased neointimal thickness after injury. The effect of aging on vascular remodeling was assessed in the rat balloon injury model using microarray analysis, immunohistochemistry, and LINCOplex assays. The injured arteries in aging rats developed thicker neointimas than those in younger animals, and this significantly correlated with a higher number of tissue macrophages and increased vascular IL-18. Indeed, IL-18 was 23-fold more abundant in the injured vasculature of aged animals compared with young rats, while circulating levels were similar in both groups of animals. The depletion of macrophages in aged rats with clodronate liposomes ameliorated vascular accumulation of IL-18 and significantly decreased neointimal formation. IL-18 was found to inhibit apoptosis of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) and macrophages, thus favoring both the formation and inflammation of the neointima. In addition, injured arteries of aged rats accumulated 18-fold more fibrinogen-γ than those of young animals. Incubation of rat peritoneal macrophages with immobilized IL-18 increased leukocyte adhesion to fibrinogen and suggested a proinflammatory positive feedback loop among macrophages, VSMC, and the deposition of fibrinogen during neointimal hyperplasia. In conclusion, our data reveal that concentration changes in vascular cytokine and fibrinogen following injury in aging rats contribute to local inflammation and postinjury neointima formation. PMID:24414074

  3. Macrophage-derived IL-18 and increased fibrinogen deposition are age-related inflammatory signatures of vascular remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Menocal, Luis; Faridi, Mohd Hafeez; Martinez, Laisel; Shehadeh, Lina A.; Duque, Juan C.; Wei, Yuntao; Mesa, Annia; Pena, Angela; Gupta, Vineet; Pham, Si M.

    2014-01-01

    Aging has been associated with pathological vascular remodeling and increased neointimal hyperplasia. The understanding of how aging exacerbates this process is fundamental to prevent cardiovascular complications in the elderly. This study proposes a mechanism by which aging sustains leukocyte adhesion, vascular inflammation, and increased neointimal thickness after injury. The effect of aging on vascular remodeling was assessed in the rat balloon injury model using microarray analysis, immunohistochemistry, and LINCOplex assays. The injured arteries in aging rats developed thicker neointimas than those in younger animals, and this significantly correlated with a higher number of tissue macrophages and increased vascular IL-18. Indeed, IL-18 was 23-fold more abundant in the injured vasculature of aged animals compared with young rats, while circulating levels were similar in both groups of animals. The depletion of macrophages in aged rats with clodronate liposomes ameliorated vascular accumulation of IL-18 and significantly decreased neointimal formation. IL-18 was found to inhibit apoptosis of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) and macrophages, thus favoring both the formation and inflammation of the neointima. In addition, injured arteries of aged rats accumulated 18-fold more fibrinogen-γ than those of young animals. Incubation of rat peritoneal macrophages with immobilized IL-18 increased leukocyte adhesion to fibrinogen and suggested a proinflammatory positive feedback loop among macrophages, VSMC, and the deposition of fibrinogen during neointimal hyperplasia. In conclusion, our data reveal that concentration changes in vascular cytokine and fibrinogen following injury in aging rats contribute to local inflammation and postinjury neointima formation. PMID:24414074

  4. Expression of four mutant fibrinogen gammaC domains in Pichia pastoris confirms them as causes of hypofibrinogenaemia.

    PubMed

    Sheen, Campbell R; Dear, Amy; Brennan, Stephen O

    2010-10-01

    Mutations in the fibrinogen gene cluster can cause low plasma fibrinogen concentrations, known as hypofibrinogenaemia. It is important to verify whether a detected sequence variant in this cluster is deleterious or benign and this can be accomplished using protein expression systems. In this study, four mutations in the fibrinogen gammaC domain that had previously been described in patients with hypofibrinogenaemia were introduced into a gammaC construct and expressed in a Pichia pastoris yeast system to investigate their effects on protein stability and secretion. These experiments showed that the fibrinogen Middlemore (N230D), Dorfen (A289V), Mannheim II (H307Y), and Muncie (T371I) mutations were not secreted, supporting their causative role in hypofibrinogenaemia. Overexpression of the N230D, A289V and H307Y mutants revealed that the majority of the synthesised protein was retained in the endoplasmic reticulum, with only a minor proportion reaching the trans-Golgi network. Regardless, none of this protein was secreted which confirms that the four mutations investigated are indeed responsible for hypofibrinogenaemia. PMID:20580674

  5. Monitoring the effects of fibrinogen concentration on blood coagulation using quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) and its comparison with thromboelastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakshmanan, Ramji S.; Efremov, Vitaly; Cullen, Sinéad; Byrne, Barry; Killard, Anthony J.

    2013-05-01

    Fibrinogen has been identified as a major risk factor in cardiovascular disorders. Fibrinogen (340 kDa) is a soluble dimeric glycoprotein found in plasma and is a major component of the coagulation cascade. It has been identified as a major risk factor in cardiovascular disorders. The time taken for its conversion to fibrin is usually used as an "endpoint" in most clot-based assays, without any information on dynamic changes in physical properties or kinetics of a forming clot. A global coagulation profile as measured by Thromboelastography® (TEG®) provides information on both the time and kinetics of changes in physical property of the forming clot. In this work, Quartz crystal microbalance (QCM), which is a piezoelectric resonator has been used to study coagulation of plasma and compared with TEG. The changes in resonant frequency (Δf) and half width at half maximum (HWHM or ΔΓ) were used to evaluate effect of fibrinogen concentration. It has been shown that TEG is less sensitive to low concentrations of fibrinogen and dilution while QCM is able to monitor clot formation in both the circumstances.

  6. Insulin counter-regulatory factors, fibrinogen and C-reactive protein during olanzapine administration: effects of the antidiabetic metformin.

    PubMed

    Baptista, Trino; Sandia, Ignacio; Lacruz, Anny; Rangel, Nairy; de Mendoza, Soaira; Beaulieu, Serge; Contreras, Quilianio; Galeazzi, Tatiana; Vargas, Doritza

    2007-03-01

    In this study, the Authors assessed some insulin counter-regulatory factors, fibrinogen and C-reactive protein after olanzapine administration, and the effect of metformin on these variables, 37 patients with chronic schizophrenia were given olanzapine (10 mg/day for 14 weeks). Nineteen patients received metformin (850-2550 mg/day) and 18 received placebo in a randomized, double-blind protocol. The following variables were quantified before and after olanzapine: cortisol, leptin, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, glucagon, growth hormone, fibrinogen and C-reactive protein. Results were correlated with the changes in body weight and the insulin resistance index. We have reported elsewhere that metformin did not prevent olanzapine-induced weight gain, and the insulin resistance index significantly decreased after metformin and placebo; Baptista T, et al. Can J Psychiatry 2006; 51: 192-196. Cortisol, tumor necrosis factor-alpha and fibrinogen levels significantly decreased in both groups. Glucagon significantly increased after metformin (P=0.03). Leptin tended to increase after placebo (P=0.1) and displayed a small nonsignificant reduction after metformin. The C-reactive protein did not change significantly in any group. Contrarily to most published studies, olanzapine was associated with decreased insulin resistance. Decrements in cortisol, fibrinogen and tumor necrosis factor-alpha levels point to an improvement in the metabolic profile. The trend for leptin to increase after placebo, but not after metformin in spite of similar weight gain suggests a beneficial effect of this antidiabetic agent. PMID:17293706

  7. In Vitro Adhesion and Platelet Aggregation Properties of Bacteremia-Associated Lactobacilli

    PubMed Central

    Kirjavainen, Pirkka V.; Tuomola, Elina M.; Crittenden, Ross G.; Ouwehand, Arthur C.; Harty, Derek W. S.; Morris, Leone F.; Rautelin, Hilpi; Playne, Martin J.; Donohue, Diana C.; Salminen, Seppo J.

    1999-01-01

    Eight bacteremia-associated Lactobacillus strains were evaluated in vitro for the ability to adhere to human intestinal mucosa and to aggregate platelets. Adherence varied significantly among the strains, and platelet aggregation was induced by three strains. In conclusion, strong binding ability does not appear to be a prerequisite for the involvement of lactobacilli in bacteremia or to their ability to aggregate platelets. PMID:10225937

  8. Sensitivity of the ultrasonic interferometry method (Echo-Cell) to changes of red cell aggregation: application to diabetes.

    PubMed

    Khodabandehlou, T; Boynard, M; Guillet, R; Devehat, C Le

    2002-01-01

    The sensitivity of the ultrasonic interferometry method (Echo-Cell) to changes in red blood cell (RBC) aggregation was investigated in comparison to the Regulest erythroaggregometry known as a reference method. In experiments where different concentrations of dextrans of 40 or 70 kD molecular weights were added to normal RBCs, the Echo-Cell was proved as sensitive as erythroaggregometry. A comparative study using RBC samples from normal and diabetic subjects showed that the Echo-Cell was much more sensitive when aggregation was measured in diluted than undiluted plasma. The sensitivity of Echo-Cell measurements in diluted plasma was similar to that of erythroaggregometry. Further analysis revealed that RBC aggregation was underestimated by Echo-Cell when measurements were made in undiluted plasma containing high fibrinogen levels, implying that in that case an elevated plasma viscosity might indirectly affect the sensitivity of the Echo-Cell. The low sensitivity of the Echo-Cell to detect an abnormal RBC aggregation when suspensions were prepared in undiluted plasma, is likely related to a relatively high shear stress exerted on RBC aggregates by the suspending medium. In conclusion, the sensitivity of the Echo-Cell to detect abnormal changes in RBC aggregation can be optimized by diluting the plasma. PMID:12454379

  9. An Enzyme from Aristolochia indica Destabilizes Fibrin-β Amyloid Co-Aggregate: Implication in Cerebrovascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharjee, Payel; Bhattacharyya, Debasish

    2015-01-01

    Fibrinogen and β-amyloid (Aβ) peptide independently form ordered aggregates but in combination, they form disordered structures which are resistant to fibrinolytic enzymes like plasmin and cause severity in cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA). A novel enzyme of 31.3 kDa has been isolated from the root of the medicinal plant Aristolochia indica that showed fibrinolytic as well as fibrin-Aβ co-aggregate destabilizing properties. This enzyme is functionally distinct from plasmin. Thrombolytic action of the enzyme was demonstrated in rat model. The potency of the plant enzyme in degrading fibrin and fibrin-plasma protein (Aβ, human serum albumin, lysozyme, transthyretin and fibronectin) co-aggregates was demonstrated by atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and confocal microscopy that showed better potency of the plant enzyme as compared to plasmin. Moreover, the plant enzyme inhibited localization of the co-aggregate inside SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells and also co-aggregate induced cytotoxicity. Plasmin was inefficient in this respect. In the background of limited options for fragmentation of these co-aggregates, the plant enzyme may appear as a potential proteolytic enzyme. PMID:26545113

  10. Dynamics of fire ant aggregations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tennenbaum, Michael; Hu, David; Fernandez-Nieves, Alberto

    Fire ant aggregations are an inherently active system. Each ant harvests its own energy and can convert it into motion. The motion of individual ants contributes non-trivially to the bulk material properties of the aggregation. We have measured some of these properties using plate-plate rheology, where the response to an applied external force or deformation is measured. In this talk, we will present data pertaining to the aggregation behavior in the absence of any external force. We quantify the aggregation dynamics by monitoring the rotation of the top plate and by measuring the normal force. We then compare the results with visualizations of 2D aggregations.

  11. Hypodysfibrinogenaemia due to production of mutant fibrinogen alpha-chains lacking fibrinopeptide A and polymerisation knob ‘A’

    PubMed Central

    Vorjohann, Silja; Fish, Richard J.; Biron-Andreani, Christine; Nagaswami, Chandrasekaran; Weisel, John W.; Boulot, Pierre; Reyftmann, Lionel; de Moerloose, Philippe; Neerman-Arbez, Marguerite

    2011-01-01

    Summary Inherited disorders of fibrinogen are rare and affect either the quantity (hypofibrinogenaemia and afibrinogenaemia) or the quality of the circulating fibrinogen (dysfibrinogenaemia) or both (hypodysfibrinogenaemia). Extensive allelic heterogeneity has been found for all these disorders: in congenital afibrinogenaemia for example more than 40 mutations, the majority in FGA, have been identified in homozygosity or in compound heterozygosity. Numerous mutations have also been identified in patients with hypofibrinogenaemia, many of these patients are in fact heterozygous carriers of afibrinogenaemia mutations. Despite the number of genetic analyses performed, the study of additional patients still allows the identification of novel mutations. Here we describe the characterization of a novel FGA intron 2 donor splice-site mutation (Fibrinogen Montpellier II) identified in three siblings with hypodysfibrinogenaemia. Functional analysis of RNA produced by the mutant minigene in COS-7 cells revealed that the mutation led to the in-frame skipping of exon 2. Western blot analysis of COS-7 cells expressing an exon 2 deleted FGA cDNA revealed that an alpha-chain lacking exon 2, which codes in particular for fibrinopeptide A and polymerisation knob ‘A’, has the potential to be assembled into a hexamer and secreted. Analysis of precipitated fibrinogen from patient plasma showed that the defect leads to the presence in the circulation of alpha-chains lacking knob ‘A’ which is essential for the early stages of fibrin polymerisation. Fibrin made from purified patient fibrinogen clotted with thrombin displayed thinner fibers with frequent ends and large pores. PMID:20806111

  12. Interaction of platelets, fibrinogen and endothelial cells with plasma deposited PEO-like films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhilu; Wang, Jin; Li, Xin; Tu, Qiufen; Sun, Hong; Huang, Nan

    2012-02-01

    For blood-contacting biomedical implants like retrievable vena cava filters, surface-based diagnostic devices or in vivo sensors, limiting thrombosis and cell adhesion is paramount, due to a decrease even failure in performance. Plasma deposited PEO-like films were investigated as surface modifications. In this work, mixed gas composed of tetraethylene glycol dimethyl ether (tetraglyme) vapor and oxygen was used as precursor. It was revealed that plasma polymerization under high ratio of oxygen/tetraglyme led to deposition of the films that had high content of ether groups. This kind of PEO-like films had good stability in phosphate buffer solution. In vitro hemocompatibility and endothelial cell (EC) adhesion revealed low platelet adhesion, platelet activation, fibrinogen adhesion, EC adhesion and proliferation on such plasma deposited PEO-like films. This made it a potential candidate for the applications in anti-fouling surfaces of blood-contacting biomedical devices.

  13. The reduced soluble fibrinogen-like protein 2 and regulatory T cells in acute coronary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kun; Li, Ting; Huang, Shiyuan; Long, Rui; You, Ya; Liu, Jinping; Wang, Zhaohui

    2016-02-01

    Soluble fibrinogen-like protein 2, sfgl2, is the new effector of CD4(+)CD25(+)FOXP3(+) regulatory T cell (Treg) and exerts immunosuppressive activity. We design this study to investigate the possible role of sfgl2 in atherosclerosis. A total of 58 acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients, together with 22 stable angina (SA) patients and 31 normal coronary artery (NCA) people were enrolled in our study. Serum level of sfgl2 and plasma level of Treg were respectively measured. In line with the change of Treg, serum level of sfgl2 in ACS (8.70 ng/mL) was significantly decreased (P = 0.003), compared with that in SA (11.86 ng/mL) and NCA (17.55 ng/mL). Both sfgl2 and Treg level were obviously decreased in ACS; Sfgl2 may play a protective role in atherosclerosis. PMID:26515143

  14. Characterization of the gene encoding a fibrinogen-related protein expressed in Crassostrea gigas hemocytes.

    PubMed

    Skazina, M A; Gorbushin, A M

    2016-07-01

    Four exons of the CgFrep1 gene (3333 bp long) encode a putative fibrinogen-related protein (324 aa) bearing a single C-terminal FBG domain. Transcripts of the gene obtained from hemocytes of different Pacific oysters show prominent individual variation based on SNP and indels of tandem repeats resulted in polymorphism of N-terminus of the putative CgFrep1 polypeptide. The polypeptide chain bears N-terminal coiled-coil region potentially acting as inter-subunit interface in the protein oligomerization. It is suggested that CgFrep1 gene encodes the oligomeric lectin composed of at least two subunits. PMID:27189918

  15. Identification of carboxyl terminal peptide of Fibrinogen as a potential serum biomarker for gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Wu, Cheng; Luo, Zhiwen; Tang, Dan; Liu, Lijie; Yao, Dingkang; Zhu, Liang; Wang, Zhiqiang

    2016-05-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is a very common disease worldwide where new serum biomarkers are urgently needed to improve their early diagnosis. In this study, we aim to search for the potential serum protein/peptide biomarkers of GC by using surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (SELDI-TOF-MS). We first obtained the serum protein/peptide profiles from a training dataset including 30 patients with GC, 16 cases with chronic benign gastric disease (CGD), and 30 normal controls (CON) where 15 protein peaks were identified to exhibit the obvious deviation (P < 0.001, Wilcoxon rank sum test) among GC, CGD, and CON analyzed by Biomarker Wizard 3.1 software with three protein peaks with mass-to-charge (m/z) ratio 5910, 5342, and 6439 further confirmed in the validation dataset. Among the three protein peaks, peak 5910 displayed the most significantly different which could distinguish GC patients from CGD and CON with a sensitivity of 86.3 %, a specificity of 91.3 %, and the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of 0.89 by using the optimal cutoff value of 17.3. We further identified peak 5910 as the carboxyl terminal fraction of Fibrinogen α by LC-MS and validated its identity by antiserum-mediated SELDI-based immunodepletion assays. In sum, SELDI-TOF-MS method could effectively generate serum peptidome in cancer patients and provide a new approach to identify potentially diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers for cancer. The carboxyl terminal fraction of Fibrinogen α may be a potential serological biomarker for GC diagnosis. PMID:26662807

  16. Estimation of plasma fibrinogen degradation products in oral submucous fibrosis: A clinico-pathological study

    PubMed Central

    Reshma, V. J; Anwar, A Shihab; Mufeed, Abdulla; Roshni, A

    2015-01-01

    Background: Oral submucous fibrosis (OSF) is a disease of the oral mucosa characterized by excessive accumulation of subepithelial collagen, thereby resulting in severe limitation of mouth opening. In OSF, in response to inflammation, the body produces more fibrinogen and its degradation products. The plasma fibrinogen degradation products (FDP) have been reported to be early indicators of fibrin deposition. The present study was intended to ascertain the role of FDP in OSF. Materials and Methods: A total of 40 subjects were included in the study. The subjects for the present study were selected from the Department of Oral Medicine and Radiology. The subjects were divided into two groups. The study group comprised 24 subjects diagnosed clinically and histopathologically as OSF and were further divided into three clinical and histological stages of OSF. The control group comprised 16 age- and gender-matched healthy individuals. Five milliliters of venous blood was drawn from the antecubital fossa of all the participants. The blood samples were centrifuged at 1000 rpm for 5 min to separate plasma, and the plasma FDP levels were assessed. Results and Conclusion: There was a significant difference in the plasma FDP levels between the study group and the control group. There was a significant linear increase of plasma FDP levels with an increase in severity of the clinical stage of OSF. Comparison with the histopathological grades of OSF also showed an increase in FDP levels with higher grades of OSF and there was a good correlation between the clinical staging and the histopathological grading of OSF. PMID:26312231

  17. Fibrinogen blocks the autoactivation and thrombin-mediated activation of factor XI on dextran sulfate.

    PubMed Central

    Scott, C F; Colman, R W

    1992-01-01

    The intrinsic pathway of blood coagulation is activated when factor XIa, one of the three contact-system enzymes, is generated and then activates factor IX. Factor XI has been shown to be efficiently activated in vitro by surface-bound factor XIIa after factor XI is transported to the surface by its cofactor, high molecular weight kininogen (HK). However, individuals lacking any of the three contact-system proteins--namely, factor XII, prekallikrein, and HK--do not suffer from bleeding abnormalities. This mystery has led several investigators to search for an "alternate" activation pathway for factor XI. Recently, factor XI has been reported to be autoactivated on the soluble "surface" dextran sulfate, and thrombin was shown to accelerate the autoactivation. However, it was also reported that HK, the cofactor for factor XIIa-mediated activation of factor XI, actually diminishes the thrombin-catalyzed activation rate of factor XI. Nonetheless, it was suggested that thrombin was a more efficient activator than factor XIIa. In this report we investigated the effect of fibrinogen, the major coagulation protein in plasma, on the activation rate of factor XI. Fibrinogen, the preferred substrate for thrombin in plasma, virtually prevented autoactivation of factor XI as well as the thrombin-mediated activation of factor XI, while having no effect on factor XIIa-catalyzed activation. HK dramatically curtailed the autoactivation of factor XI in addition to the thrombin-mediated activation. These data indicate that factor XI would not be autoactivated in a plasma environment, and thrombin would, therefore, be unlikely to potentiate the activation. We believe that the "missing pathway" for factor XI activation remains an enigma that warrants further investigation. PMID:1454798

  18. The polymerization and thrombin-binding properties of des-(B beta 1-42)-fibrin.

    PubMed

    Siebenlist, K R; DiOrio, J P; Budzynski, A Z; Mosesson, M W

    1990-10-25

    Multiple factors affect the thrombin-catalyzed conversion of fibrinogen to fibrin, including: fibrinopeptide (FPA and FPB) release leading to exposure of two types of polymerization domains ("A" and "B," respectively) in the central portion of the molecule, and exposure of a noncatalytic "secondary" thrombin-binding site in fibrin. Fibrinogen containing the FPA sequence but lacking the B beta 1-42 sequence ("des-(B beta 1-42)-fibrinogen"), was compared to native fibrinogen (containing both FPA and FPB) to investigate the role played by B beta 1-42 in the polymerization of alpha-fibrin (i.e. fibrin lacking FPA), to compare reptilase and thrombin cleavage of FPA from fibrinogen, and to explore the location and function of the secondary thrombin-binding site. Electron microscopy of evolving polymer structures (mu, 0.14; pH 7.4) plus turbidity measurements, showed that early thin fibril formation as well as subsequent lateral fibril associations were impaired in des-(B beta 1-42)-alpha-fibrin, thus indicating that the B beta 1-42 sequence contributes to the A polymerization site. Reptilase-activated des-