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Sample records for aggregation-induced emission aie

  1. Photostable fluorescent organic dots with aggregation-induced emission (AIE dots) for noninvasive long-term cell tracing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Kai; Qin, Wei; Ding, Dan; Tomczak, Nikodem; Geng, Junlong; Liu, Rongrong; Liu, Jianzhao; Zhang, Xinhai; Liu, Hongwei; Liu, Bin; Tang, Ben Zhong

    2013-01-01

    Long-term noninvasive cell tracing by fluorescent probes is of great importance to life science and biomedical engineering. For example, understanding genesis, development, invasion and metastasis of cancerous cells and monitoring tissue regeneration after stem cell transplantation require continual tracing of the biological processes by cytocompatible fluorescent probes over a long period of time. In this work, we successfully developed organic far-red/near-infrared dots with aggregation-induced emission (AIE dots) and demonstrated their utilities as long-term cell trackers. The high emission efficiency, large absorptivity, excellent biocompatibility, and strong photobleaching resistance of the AIE dots functionalized by cell penetrating peptides derived from transactivator of transcription proteins ensured outstanding long-term noninvasive in vitro and in vivo cell tracing. The organic AIE dots outperform their counterparts of inorganic quantum dots, opening a new avenue in the development of fluorescent probes for following biological processes such as carcinogenesis.

  2. Aggregation-induced emission (AIE) behavior and thermochromic luminescence properties of a new gold(I) complex.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jinhua; Chen, Zhao; Yin, Jun; Yu, Guang-Ao; Liu, Sheng Hua

    2013-05-04

    A new gold complex that shows the AIE effect as well as the thermochromic fluorescence switch is reported. This interesting phenomenon is attributed to changes in the intermolecular Au∙∙∙Au interactions and the formation of nano-aggregates.

  3. A new TPE-based tetrapodal ligand and its Ln(iii) complexes: multi-stimuli responsive AIE (aggregation-induced emission)/ILCT(intraligand charge transfer)-bifunctional photoluminescence and NIR emission sensitization.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yi-Xuan; Wei, Zhang-Wen; Pan, Mei; Wang, Hai-Ping; Zhang, Jian-Yong; Su, Cheng-Yong

    2016-01-21

    A tetrapodal zwitterionic-type ligand featuring both AIE (aggregation-induced emission) and ILCT (intraligand charge transfer) properties, namely 1,1',1'',1'''-(4,4',4'',4'''-(ethene-1,1,2,2-tetrayl)tetrakis(benzene-4,1-diyl))tetrakis(methylene)tetrapyridin-4(1H)-one (TPE-4PO) has been designed and applied to the assembly of lanthanide complexes LIFM-21(Ln) (Ln = Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb and Dy). Apart from sensitization of NIR emission of Sm(3+) and Dy(3+), the resulting ligand and lanthanide complexes show both AIE and ILCT-related photoluminescence behaviors. The photo-response of this system to different aggregation states, solvents' polarity and mechanical grinding was demonstrated by distinguishable emission intensities and colours.

  4. From Dark to Light to Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET): Polarity-Sensitive Aggregation-Induced Emission (AIE)-Active Tetraphenylethene-Fused BODIPY Dyes with a Very Large Pseudo-Stokes Shift.

    PubMed

    Şen, Esra; Meral, Kadem; Atılgan, Serdar

    2016-01-11

    The work presented herein is devoted to the fabrication of large Stokes shift dyes in both organic and aqueous media by combining dark resonance energy transfer (DRET) and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) in one donor-acceptor system. In this respect, a series of donor-acceptor architectures of 4,4-difluoro-4-bora-3a,4a-diaza-s-indacene (BODIPY) dyes substituted by one, two, or three tetraphenylethene (TPE) luminogens were designed and synthesised. The photophysical properties of these three chromophore systems were studied to provide insight into the nature of donor-acceptor interactions in both THF and aqueous media. Because the generation of emissive TPE donor(s) is strongly polarity dependent, due to its aggregation-induced emission (AIE) feature, one might expect the formation of appreciable fluorescence emission intensity with a very large pseudo-Stokes shift in aqueous media when considering FRET process. Interestingly, similar results were also recorded in THF for the chromophore systems, although the TPE fragment(s) of the dyes are non-emissive. The explanation for this photophysical behaviour lies in the DRET. This is the first report on combining two energy-transfer processes, namely, FRET and DRET, in one polarity-sensitive donor-acceptor pair system. The accuracy of the dark-emissive donor property of the TPE luminogen is also presented for the first time as a new feature for AIE phenomena.

  5. Aggregation-induced emission: phenomenon, mechanism and applications.

    PubMed

    Hong, Yuning; Lam, Jacky W Y; Tang, Ben Zhong

    2009-08-07

    It is textbook knowledge that chromophore aggregation generally quenches light emission. In this feature article, we give an account on how we observed an opposite phenomenon termed aggregation-induced emission (AIE) and identified the restriction of intramolecular rotation as a main cause for the AIE effect. Based on the mechanistic understanding, we developed a series of new fluorescent and phosphorescent AIE systems with emission colours covering the entire visible spectral region and luminescence quantum yields up to unity. We explored high-tech applications of the AIE luminogens as, for example, fluorescence sensors (for explosive, ion, pH, temperature, viscosity, pressure, etc.), biological probes (for protein, DNA, RNA, sugar, phospholipid, etc.), immunoassay markers, PAGE visualization agents, polarized light emitters, monitors for layer-by-layer assembly, reporters for micelle formation, multistimuli-responsive nanomaterials, and active layers in the fabrication of organic light-emitting diodes.

  6. Biocompatible and photostable AIE dots with red emission for in vivo two-photon bioimaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dan; Qian, Jun; Qin, Wei; Qin, Anjun; Tang, Ben Zhong; He, Sailing

    2014-03-17

    Bioimaging systems with cytocompatibility, photostability, red fluorescence, and optical nonlinearity are in great demand. Herein we report such a bioimaging system. Integration of tetraphenylethene (T), triphenylamine (T), and fumaronitrile (F) units yielded adduct TTF with aggregation-induced emission (AIE). Nanodots of the AIE fluorogen with efficient red emission were fabricated by encapsulating TTF with phospholipid. The AIE dots enabled three-dimensional dynamic imaging with high resolution in blood vessels of mouse brain under two-photon excitation.

  7. Biocompatible and Photostable AIE Dots with Red Emission for In Vivo Two-Photon Bioimaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dan; Qian, Jun; Qin, Wei; Qin, Anjun; Tang, Ben Zhong; He, Sailing

    2014-03-01

    Bioimaging systems with cytocompatibility, photostability, red fluorescence, and optical nonlinearity are in great demand. Herein we report such a bioimaging system. Integration of tetraphenylethene (T), triphenylamine (T), and fumaronitrile (F) units yielded adduct TTF with aggregation-induced emission (AIE). Nanodots of the AIE fluorogen with efficient red emission were fabricated by encapsulating TTF with phospholipid. The AIE dots enabled three-dimensional dynamic imaging with high resolution in blood vessels of mouse brain under two-photon excitation.

  8. Development of Functional Nanomaterials with Aggregation-Induced Emission Characteristics and Exploration of Their Biological Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Yuning

    2011-12-01

    The development of fluorescent biosensors with high sensitivity, selectivity, and biocompatibility is of critical importance to bioscience and biotechnology because it offers a direct visualization tool for the detection of biological macromolecules and the monitoring of biological events under real and living conditions. Most of the conventional organic fluorophores exhibit remarkably bright emission in their dilute solutions but become weakly or even nonemissive when aggregated or in solid state, which has greatly limited the scope of their applications. An opposite phenomenon has recently been discovered: a group of nonluminescent molecules are induced to emit efficiently by aggregate formation. "Aggregation-induced emission" (AIE) is coined for this novel effect. Attracted by the intriguing phenomenon and its fascinating perspectives, we have launched a new program directed towards the development of new AIE materials and exploration of their biological applications. A new class of water-soluble AIE luminogens are designed and synthesized. Hydrophilic groups such as hydroxyl, sulfonate, and amino groups are introduced to make the AIE molecules readily soluble in water. Being practically non-emissive in water, these AIE dyes are lightened up when bound to biomacromolecules, such as proteins and DNA, thus enabling the quantitation and visualization of biomacromolecules in aqueous solutions and in electrophoretic gels. The AIE luminogens are sensitive to microenvironment inside the biomolecules and their fluorescent intensity can readily reflect the global stability of the biomolecules. In this work, we employ the AIE luminogens as fluorescent reporters for the monitoring of G-quadruplex DNA folding, protein unfolding by denaturant and protein misfolding into amyloid fibrils. Thanks to the AIE characteristics, the delicate information on the conformational transition of the biomolecules can be revealed. In addition, lipophilic AIE luminogens form highly emissive

  9. Modulation of aggregation-induced emission and electroluminescence of silole derivatives by a covalent bonding pattern.

    PubMed

    Nie, Han; Chen, Bin; Quan, Changyun; Zhou, Jian; Qiu, Huayu; Hu, Rongrong; Su, Shi-Jian; Qin, Anjun; Zhao, Zujin; Tang, Ben Zhong

    2015-05-26

    The deciphering of structure-property relationships is of high importance to rational design of functional molecules and to explore their potential applications. In this work, a series of silole derivatives substituted with benzo[b]thiophene (BT) at the 2,5-positions of the silole ring are synthesized and characterized. The experimental investigation reveals that the covalent bonding through the 2-position of BT (2-BT) with silole ring allows a better conjugation of the backbone than that achieved though the 5-position of BT (5-BT), and results in totally different emission behaviors. The silole derivatives with 5-BT groups are weakly fluorescent in solutions, but are induced to emit intensely in aggregates, presenting excellent aggregation-induced emission (AIE) characteristics. Those with 2-BT groups can fluoresce more strongly in solutions, but no obvious emission enhancements are found in aggregates, suggesting they are not AIE-active. Theoretical calculations disclose that the good conjugation lowers the rotational motions of BT groups, which enables the molecules to emit more efficiently in solutions. But the well-conjugated planar backbone is prone to form strong intermoelcular interactions in aggregates, which decreases the emission efficiency. Non-doped organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) are fabricated by using these siloles as emitters. AIE-active silole derivatives show much better elecroluminescence properties than those without the AIE characterisic, demonstrating the advantage of AIE-active emitters in OLED applications.

  10. Fluorescence Aggregation-Caused Quenching versus Aggregation-Induced Emission: A Visual Teaching Technology for Undergraduate Chemistry Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ma, Xiaofeng; Sun, Rui; Cheng, Jinghui; Liu, Jiaoyan; Gou, Fei; Xiang, Haifeng; Zhou, Xiangge

    2016-01-01

    A laboratory experiment visually exploring two opposite basic principles of fluorescence of aggregation-caused quenching (ACQ) and aggregation-induced emission (AIE) is demonstrated. The students would prepared two salicylaldehyde-based Schiff bases through a simple one-pot condensation reaction of one equiv of 1,2-diamine with 2 equiv of…

  11. A novel aggregation-induced emission based fluorescent probe for an angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) assay and inhibitor screening.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haibo; Huang, Yi; Zhao, Xiaoping; Gong, Wan; Wang, Yi; Cheng, Yiyu

    2014-12-11

    A 'turn-on' fluorescent probe based on aggregation-induced emission (AIE) has been developed. It exhibits excellent selectivity and sensitivity for monitoring angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) activity both in solutions and in living cells as well as for screening ACE inhibitors in vitro.

  12. One-Pot Click Access to a Cyclodextrin Dimer-Based Novel Aggregation Induced Emission Sensor and Monomer-Based Chiral Stationary Phase

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaoli; Zhao, Rui; Tang, Xiaoying; Shi, Yanyan; Li, Chunyi; Wang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    A ‘two birds, one stone’ strategy was developed via a one-pot click reaction to simultaneously prepare a novel cyclodextrin (CD) dimer based aggregation induced emission (AIE) sensor (AIE-DCD) and a monomer based chiral stationary phase (CSP-MCD) for chiral high performance liquid chromatography (CHPLC). AIE-DCD was found to afford satisfactory AIE response for specific detection of Zn2+ with a detection limit of 50 nM. CSP-MCD exhibits excellent enantioseparation ability toward dansyl amino acids, where the resolution of dansyl amino leucine reaches 5.43. PMID:27886123

  13. Pyrene Schiff base: photophysics, aggregation induced emission, and antimicrobial properties.

    PubMed

    Kathiravan, Arunkumar; Sundaravel, Karuppasamy; Jaccob, Madhavan; Dhinagaran, Ganesan; Rameshkumar, Angappan; Arul Ananth, Devanesan; Sivasudha, Thilagar

    2014-11-26

    Pyrene containing Schiff base molecule, namely 4-[(pyren-1-ylmethylene)amino]phenol (KB-1), was successfully synthesized and well characterized by using (1)H, (13)C NMR, FT-IR, and EI-MS spectrometry. UV-visible absorption, steady-state fluorescence, time-resolved fluorescence, and transient absorption spectroscopic techniques have been employed to elucidate the photophysical processes of KB-1. It has been demonstrated that the absorption characteristics of KB-1 have been bathochromatically tuned to the visible region by extending the π-conjugation. The extended π-conjugation is evidently confirmed by DFT calculations and reveals that π→π* transition is the major factor responsible for electronic absorption of KB-1. The photophysical property of KB-1 was carefully examined in different organic solvents at different concentrations and the results show that the fluorescence of this molecule is completely quenched due to photoinduced electron transfer. Intriguingly, the fluorescence intensity of KB-1 increases enormously by the gradual addition of water up to 90% with concomitant increase in fluorescence lifetime. This clearly signifies that this molecule has aggregation-induced emission (AIE) property. The mechanism of AIE of this molecule is suppression of photoinduced electron transfer (PET) due to hydrogen bonding interaction of imine donor with water. A direct evidence of PET process has been presented by using nanosecond transient absorption measurements. Further, KB-1 was successfully used for antimicrobial and bioimaging studies. The antimicrobial studies were carried out through disc diffusion method. KB-1 is used against both Gram-positive (Rhodococcus rhodochrous and Staphylococcus aureus) and Gram-negative (Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) bacterial species and also fungal species (Candida albicans). The result shows KB-1 can act as an excellent antimicrobial agent and as a photolabeling agent. S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, and C. albicans

  14. Mitochondria-targeted cancer therapy using a light-up probe with aggregation-induced-emission characteristics.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qinglian; Gao, Meng; Feng, Guangxue; Liu, Bin

    2014-12-15

    Subcellular organelle-specific reagents for simultaneous tumor targeting, imaging, and treatment are of enormous interest in cancer therapy. Herein, we present a mitochondria-targeting probe (AIE-mito-TPP) by conjugating a triphenylphosphine (TPP) with a fluorogen which can undergo aggregation-induced emission (AIE). Owing to the more negative mitochondrial membrane potential of cancer cells than normal cells, the AIE-mito-TPP probe can selectively accumulate in cancer-cell mitochondria and light up its fluorescence. More importantly, the probe exhibits selective cytotoxicity for studied cancer cells over normal cells. The high potency of AIE-mito-TPP correlates with its strong ability to aggregate in mitochondria, which can efficiently decrease the mitochondria membrane potential and increase the level of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cancer cells. The mitochondrial light-up probe provides a unique strategy for potential image-guided therapy of cancer cells.

  15. Mapping live cell viscosity with an aggregation-induced emission fluorogen by means of two-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sijie; Hong, Yuning; Zeng, Yan; Sun, Qiqi; Liu, Yang; Zhao, Engui; Bai, Gongxun; Qu, Jianan; Hao, Jianhua; Tang, Ben Zhong

    2015-03-09

    Intracellular viscosity is a crucial parameter that indicates the functioning of cells. In this work, we demonstrate the utility of TPE-Cy, a cell-permeable dye with aggregation-induced emission (AIE) property, in mapping the viscosity inside live cells. Owing to the AIE characteristics, both the fluorescence intensity and lifetime of this dye are increased along with an increase in viscosity. Fluorescence lifetime imaging of live cells stained with TPE-Cy reveals that the lifetime in lipid droplets is much shorter than that from the general cytoplasmic region. The loose packing of the lipids in a lipid droplet results in low viscosity and thus shorter lifetime of TPE-Cy in this region. It demonstrates that the AIE dye could provide good resolution in intracellular viscosity sensing. This is also the first work in which AIE molecules are applied in fluorescence lifetime imaging and intracellular viscosity sensing.

  16. Facile preparation and biological imaging of luminescent polymeric nanoprobes with aggregation-induced emission characteristics through Michael addition reaction.

    PubMed

    Lv, Qiulan; Wang, Ke; Xu, Dazhuang; Liu, Meiying; Wan, Qing; Huang, Hongye; Liang, Shangdong; Zhang, Xiaoyong; Wei, Yen

    2016-09-01

    Water dispersion aggregation-induced emission (AIE) dyes based nanomaterials have recently attracted increasing attention in the biomedical fields because of their unique optical properties, outstanding performance as imaging and therapeutic agents. The methods to conjugate hydrophilic polymers with AIE dyes to solve the hydrophobic nature of AIE dyes and makeS them widely used in biomedicine, which have been extensively explored and paid great effort previously. Although great advance has been made in the fabrication and biomedical applications of AIE-active polymeric nanoprobes, facile and efficient strategies for fabrication of biodegradable AIE-active nanoprobes are still high desirable. In this work, amphiphilic biodegradable fluorescent organic nanoparticles (PLL-TPE-O-E FONs) have been fabricated for the first time by conjugation of AIE dye tetraphenylethene acrylate (TPE-O-E) with Poly-l-Lysine (PLL) through a facile one-step Michael addition reaction, which was carried out under rather mild conditions, included air atmosphere, near room temperature and absent of metal catalysts or hazardous reagents. Due to the unique AIE properties, these amphiphilic copolymers tend to self-assemble into high luminescent water dispersible nanoparticles with size range from 400 to 600nm. Laser scanning microscope and cytotoxicity results revealed that PLL-TPE-O-E FONs can be internalized into cytoplasm with negative cytotoxicity, which implied that PLL-TPE-O-E FONs are promising for biological applications.

  17. Aggregation-Induced Emission of Organogels Based on Self-Assembled 5-(4-Nonylphenyl)-7-azaindoles.

    PubMed

    López, Daniel; García-Frutos, Eva M

    2015-08-11

    A new self-assembled organogel based on 5-(4-nonylphenyl)-7-azaindole (1), possessing an aggregation-induced emission phenomenon (AIE), is described. The incorporation of phenyl alkyl chains improves processability of the platform to form a new class of gelator. The fluorescence spectrum of 1 suffers changes in the gelation process, and an AIE phenomenon is observed during the phase transition from sol to gel state. The fluorescence is decreased slowly by heating the gel, and no emission is detected in concentrated solutions of 1. The AIE effect is due to the formation of the supramolecular organogel, where a self-association of the 7-azaindole moieties by dual hydrogen-bonded dimers is present. Regarding the solid-state emission properties, the xerogel 1 exhibits blue emission as well as in its organogel form. Therefore, it could be considered as a promising blue emitter in the solid state.

  18. Highly sensitive dual-mode fluorescence detection of lead ion in water using aggregation-induced emissive polymers.

    PubMed

    Saha, Sukanta Kumar; Ghosh, Khama Rani; Gao, Jian Ping; Wang, Zhi Yuan

    2014-09-01

    A series of fluorene-based conjugated polymers containing the aggregation-induced emissive (AIE)-active tetraphenylethene and dicarboxylate pseudocrown as a receptor exhibits a unique dual-mode sensing ability for selective detection of lead ion in water. Fluorescence turn-off and turn-on detections are realized in 80%-90% and 20% water in tetrahydrofuran (THF), respectively, for lead ion with a concentration as low as 10(-8) m.

  19. Synthesis, Aggregation Induced Emission and Mechanochromic Luminescence of New β-Diketone Derivatives Bearing Tetraphenylene Moieties.

    PubMed

    Shi, Haijie; Liu, Rui; Zhu, Senqiang; Gong, Qiqi; Shi, Hong; Zhu, Xiaolin; Zhu, Hongjun

    2016-11-01

    A series of β-diketone derivatives bearing tetraphenylene (TPE) moieties were synthesized and characterized. Their photophysical properties were investigated systematically via spectroscopic and theoretical methods. All compounds exhibit broad absorption bands between 300 and 450 nm, which are assigned to the (1)π-π* transition of the conjugated system mixed intramolecular charge-transfer (ICT) transitions. Meanwhile, the emission of these compounds in solution at room temperature (λ em = 458 ~ 509 nm) can be attributed to the (1)π,π*/(1)ICT state. Introduction of freely rotatable TPE to conventional β-diketone luminophors quenches their light emissions in the solutions, but endows these molecules with aggregation-induced emission (AIE) characteristics in the condensed phase due to the restriction of intramolecular rotation. The spectroscopic studies and theoretical calculations indicate that the photophysical properties of these β-diketone derivatives can be tuned by the appended substituents, which would be useful for rational design of AIE compounds with high solid state luminescence performance. Furthermore, these AIE-active compounds exhibited distinct piezofluorochromic properties and switched reversibly upon grinding-fuming. Their photophysical properties have been investigated with the aim to provide a basis for elucidating the structure-property correlations and developing new multi-stimuli responsive luminescent materials.

  20. Design and application of anthracene derivative with aggregation-induced emission charateristics for visualization and monitoring of erythropoietin unfolding.

    PubMed

    Sun, Binjie; Yang, Xiaojun; Ma, Lin; Niu, Caixia; Wang, Fangfang; Na, Na; Wen, Jiying; Ouyang, Jin

    2013-02-12

    Erythropoietin (EPO) is an attractive protein-unfolding/folding model because of its high degree of unfolding and folding reversibility and intermediate size. Due to its function for regulating red blood cell production by stimulating late erythroid precursor cells, EPO presents obvious values to biological research. A nonemissive anthracene derivative, that is 9,10-bis[4-(3-sulfonatopropoxyl)-styryl]anthracene sodium salt (BSPSA), with aggregation-induced emission (AIE) charateristics shows a novel phenomenon of AIE when EPO is added. The AIE biosensor for EPO shows the limit of detection is 1 × 10(-9) M. Utilizing the AIE feature of BSPSA, the unfolding process of EPO using guanidine hydrochloride is monitored, which indicates three steps for the folding structures of EPO to transform to random coil. Computational modeling suggests that the BSPSA luminogens prefer docking in the hydrophobic cavity in the EPO folding structures, and the assembly of BSPSA in this cavity makes the AIE available, making the monitoring of unfolding of EPO possible.

  1. Multistimuli-Responsive Luminescence of Naphthalazine Based on Aggregation-Induced Emission

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Xiang; Ru, Jia-Xi; Xu, Cong; Liu, Ya-Ming; Dou, Wei; Tang, Xiao-Liang; Zhang, Guo-Lin; Liu, Wei-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Stimuli-responsive luminescent materials, which are dependent on changes in physical molecular packing modes, have attracted more and more interest over the past ten years. In this study, 2,2-dihydroxy-1,1-naphthalazine was synthesized and shown to exhibit different fluorescence emission in solution and solid states with characteristic aggregation-induced emission (AIE) properties. A remarkable change in the fluorescence of 2,2-dihydroxy-1,1-naphthalazine occurred upon mechanical grinding, heating, or exposure to solvents. According to the characterization by solid-state fluorescence spectroscopy, X-ray crystallography, differential scanning calorimetry, and X-ray powder diffraction, the fluorescence change could be attributed to transitions between two structurally different polymorphs. These significant properties could also give 2,2-dihydroxy-1,1-naphthalazine more potential applications as a multifunctional material. PMID:26478843

  2. Polyanils and Polyboranils: Synthesis, Optical Properties, and Aggregation-Induced Emission.

    PubMed

    Frath, Denis; Benelhadj, Karima; Munch, Maxime; Massue, Julien; Ulrich, Gilles

    2016-10-21

    A first series of polyanils were synthesized by a simple condensation between either isomers of phenylenediamine derivatives or 1,3,5-benzenetriamine and 4-(diethylamino)salicylaldehyde, while a second series resulted from the condensation between 4,6-dihydroxyisophthalaldehyde or 2,5-dihydroxyterephthalaldehyde and differently substituted anilines. All these polyanils showed good chelating abilities toward trivalent boron fragments such as BF2 or BPh2 to yield the corresponding boranils. The optical properties of these novel fluorophores have been studied both in solution and in the solid-state and show emission wavelengths covering the entire visible spectrum and near-infrared (NIR), depending on molecular structure, substitution, and environment. While faintly fluorescent in solution in their molecular state, some polyanils show typical aggregation-induced emission (AIE) behavior upon addition of increasing amounts of water in THF solution, leading to a sizable enhancement of fluorescence intensity.

  3. A Robust Damage-Reporting Strategy for Polymeric Materials Enabled by Aggregation-Induced Emission

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Microscopic damage inevitably leads to failure in polymers and composite materials, but it is difficult to detect without the aid of specialized equipment. The ability to enhance the detection of small-scale damage prior to catastrophic material failure is important for improving the safety and reliability of critical engineering components, while simultaneously reducing life cycle costs associated with regular maintenance and inspection. Here, we demonstrate a simple, robust, and sensitive fluorescence-based approach for autonomous detection of damage in polymeric materials and composites enabled by aggregation-induced emission (AIE). This simple, yet powerful system relies on a single active component, and the general mechanism delivers outstanding performance in a wide variety of materials with diverse chemical and mechanical properties. PMID:27725956

  4. A Robust Damage-Reporting Strategy for Polymeric Materials Enabled by Aggregation-Induced Emission.

    PubMed

    Robb, Maxwell J; Li, Wenle; Gergely, Ryan C R; Matthews, Christopher C; White, Scott R; Sottos, Nancy R; Moore, Jeffrey S

    2016-09-28

    Microscopic damage inevitably leads to failure in polymers and composite materials, but it is difficult to detect without the aid of specialized equipment. The ability to enhance the detection of small-scale damage prior to catastrophic material failure is important for improving the safety and reliability of critical engineering components, while simultaneously reducing life cycle costs associated with regular maintenance and inspection. Here, we demonstrate a simple, robust, and sensitive fluorescence-based approach for autonomous detection of damage in polymeric materials and composites enabled by aggregation-induced emission (AIE). This simple, yet powerful system relies on a single active component, and the general mechanism delivers outstanding performance in a wide variety of materials with diverse chemical and mechanical properties.

  5. Probing Proteins and Differentiating Their Native and Denatured States with Aggregation-Induced Emission Fluorogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, Chris Wai Tung; Hong, Yuning; Tang, Ben Zhong

    2013-06-01

    The tertiary 3D structures of proteins determine their unique functions. Perturbation of their native state including denaturation may cause loss of the protein functions. In this work, water-soluble tetraphenylethylene (TPE) fluorophore, sodium 1,2-bis[4-(3-sulfonatopropoxyl)phenyl]-1,2-diphenylethene (BSPOTPE), with aggregation-induced emission (AIE) characteristics is utilized as a fluorescent probe for protein detection and for differentiating their folding modes. Owing to hydrophobic interaction between the proteins and BSPOTPE, it provides a fast and simple method to differentiate the native and denatured states of the proteins through monitoring fluorescence change in solution and PAGE gels. Six proteins are chosen as model proteins in the study. Among them, cytochrome c shows distinctive behavior to other proteins due to the presence of heme group. A comprehensive study of cytochrome c and human serum albumin is carried out in this work.

  6. Single-probe multistate detection of DNA via aggregation-induced emission on a graphene oxide platform.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Abhishek; Chu, Kin Leung; Abidi, Irfan Haider; Cagang, Aldrine Abenoja; Zhang, Qicheng; Leung, Nelson L C; Zhao, Engui; Tang, Ben Zhong; Luo, Zhengtang

    2017-03-01

    Graphene and graphene oxides (GO), or their reduced forms, have been introduced in a variety of biosensing platforms and have exhibited enhanced performance levels in these forms. We herein report a DNA sensing platform consisting of aggregation-induced emission (AIE) molecules and complementary DNA (comDNA) adsorbed on GO. We experimentally turned the AIE molecule on and off by adjusting its distance, which correlates with DNA structures as shown in our computational results, from the GO sheet, which quenches depending on its distance from the graphene plane. The changes in florescence are reproducible, which demonstrates the probe's ability to identify the binding state of the DNA. Our molecular dynamics simulation results reveal strong π-π interactions between single-strand DNA (ssDNA) and GO, which enable the ssDNA molecule to move closer to the graphene oxide. This reduces the center of mass and binding free energies in the simulation. When hybridized with comDNA, the increased distance, evidenced by the reduced interaction, eliminates the quenching effect and turns on the AIE molecule. Our protocol use of the AIE molecule as a probe thus avoids the complicated steps involved in covalent functionalization and allows the rapid and label-free detection of DNA molecules.

  7. Quantum chemical insights into the aggregation induced emission phenomena: a QM/MM study for pyrazine derivatives.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qunyan; Deng, Chunmei; Peng, Qian; Niu, Yingli; Shuai, Zhigang

    2012-09-05

    There have been intensive studies on the newly discovered phenomena called aggregation induced emission (AIE), in contrast to the conventional aggregation quenching. Through combined quantum mechanics and molecular mechanics computations, we have investigated the aggregation effects on the excited state decays, both via radiative and nonradiative routes, for pyrazine derivatives 2,3-dicyano-5,6-diphenylpyrazine (DCDPP) and 2,3-dicyanopyrazino phenanthrene (DCPP) in condensed phase. We show that for DCDPP there appear AIE for all the temperature, because the phenyl ring torsional motions in gas phase can efficiently dissipate the electronic excited state energy, and get hindered in aggregate; while for its "locked"-phenyl counterpart, DCPP, theoretical calculation can only give the normal aggregation quenching. These first-principles based findings are consistent with recent experiment. The primary origin of the exotic AIE phenomena is due to the nonradiative decay effects. This is the first time that AIE is understood based on theoretical chemistry calculations for aggregates, which helps to resolve the present disputes over the mechanism.

  8. Aggregation-induced emission—fluorophores and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Yuning

    2016-06-01

    Aggregation-induced emission (AIE) is a novel photophysical phenomenon found in a group of luminogens that are not fluorescent in solution but are highly emissive in the aggregate or solid state. Since the first publication of AIE luminogens in 2001, AIE has become a hot research area in which the number of research papers regarding new AIE molecules and their applications has been increasing in an exponential manner. Thomson Reuters Essential Science Indicators ranked AIE no.3 among the Top 100 Research Frontiers in the field of Chemistry and Materials Science in 2013. In this review, I will give a general introduction of the AIE phenomenon, discuss the structure-property relationship of the AIE lumingens and summarize the recent progress in the applications including as light-emitting materials in optoelectronics, as chemosensors and bioprobes, and for bioimaging (total 69 references cited).

  9. Aggregation-induced emissive nanoparticles for fluorescence signaling in a low cost paper-based immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Engels, Jan F; Roose, Jesse; Zhai, Demi Shuang; Yip, Ka Man; Lee, Mei Suet; Tang, Ben Zhong; Renneberg, Reinhard

    2016-07-01

    Low cost paper based immunoassays are receiving interest due to their fast performance and small amounts of biomolecules needed for developing an immunoassay complex. In this work aggregation-induced emissive (AIE) nanoparticles, obtained from a diastereoisomeric mixture of 1,2-di-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-1,2-diphenylethene (TPEDH) in a one-step top-down method, are characterized through Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), and Zeta potential. By measuring the Zeta potential before and after labeling the nanoparticles with antibodies we demonstrate that the colloidal system is stable in a wide pH-range. The AIE-active nanoparticles are deposited on chitosan and glutaraldehyde modified paper pads overcoming the common aggregation-caused quenching (ACQ) effect. Analyte concentrations from 1000ng and below are applied in a model immunocomplex using Goat anti-Rabbit IgG and Rabbit IgG. In the range of 7.81ng-250ng, linear trends with a high R(2) are observed, which leads to a strong increase of the blue fluorescence from the TPEDH nanoparticles.

  10. Gadolinium-functionalized aggregation-induced emission dots as dual-modality probes for cancer metastasis study.

    PubMed

    Li, Kai; Ding, Dan; Prashant, Chandrasekharan; Qin, Wei; Yang, Chang-Tong; Tang, Ben Zhong; Liu, Bin

    2013-12-01

    Understanding the localization and engraftment of tumor cells at postintravasation stage of metastasis is of high importance in cancer diagnosis and treatment. Advanced fluorescent probes and facile methodologies for cell tracing play a key role in metastasis studies. In this work, we design and synthesize a dual-modality imaging dots with both optical and magnetic contrast through integration of a magnetic resonance imaging reagent, gadolinium(III), into a novel long-term cell tracing probe with aggregation-induced emission (AIE) in far-red/near-infrared region. The obtained fluorescent-magnetic AIE dots have both high fluorescence quantum yield (25%) and T1 relaxivity (7.91 mM(-1) s(-1) ) in aqueous suspension. After further conjugation with a cell membrane penetrating peptide, the dual-modality dots can be efficiently internalized into living cells. The gadolinium(III) allows accurate quantification of biodistribution of cancer cells via intraveneous injection, while the high fluorescence provides engraftment information of cells at single cellular level. The dual-modality AIE dots show obvious synergistic advantages over either single imaging modality and hold great promises in advanced biomedical studies.

  11. Far-red/near-infrared fluorescent bioprobes based on biocompatible nanoparticles with aggregation-induced emission characteristics for bioimaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Wei; Ding, Dan; Liu, Bin; Tang, Ben Zhong

    2013-09-01

    Light emission of 2-(2,6-bis((E)-4-(diphenylamino)styryl]-4H-pyran-4-ylidene}malononitrile (TPA-DCM) is weakened by aggregate formation. Attaching tetraphenylethene (TPE) units as terminals to TPA-DCM dramatically changes its emission behavior: the resulting fluorogen 2-(2,6-bis((E)-4-(phenyl(4'-(1,2,2-triphenylvinyl)-[1,1'-biphenyl]-4- yl)amino)styryl)-4H-pyran-4-ylidene)malononitrile (TPE-TPA-DCM) is more emissive in the aggregate state, showing a novel phenomenon of aggregation-induced emission (AIE). Formulation of TPE-TPA-DCM using bovine serum albumin (BSA) as the polymer matrix yields uniformly sized protein nanoparticles (NPs) with high brightness and low cytotoxicity. Applications of the fluorogen-loaded BSA NPs for in vitro and in vivo far-red/near-infrared (FR/NIR) bioimaging are successfully demonstrated using MCF-7 breast cancer cells and a murine hepatoma-22 (H22) tumorbearing mice model, respectively. The AIE-active fluorogen-loaded BSA NPs show excellent cancer cell uptake and prominent tumor targeting ability in vivo due to the enhanced permeability and retention effect.

  12. Near-infrared fluorescence amplified organic nanoparticles with aggregation-induced emission characteristics for in vivo imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Junlong; Zhu, Zhenshu; Qin, Wei; Ma, Lin; Hu, Yong; Gurzadyan, Gagik G.; Tang, Ben Zhong; Liu, Bin

    2013-12-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence signals are highly desirable to achieve high resolution in biological imaging. To obtain NIR emission with high brightness, fluorescent nanoparticles (NPs) are synthesized by co-encapsulation of 2,3-bis(4-(phenyl(4-(1,2,2-triphenylvinyl)phenylamino)phenyl)fumaronitrile (TPETPAFN), a luminogen with aggregation-induced emission (AIE) characteristics, and a NIR fluorogen of silicon 2,3-naphthalocyanine bis(trihexylsilyloxide) (NIR775) using 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N-[methoxy(polyethylene glycol)-2000] as the encapsulation matrix. The good spectral overlap between the emission of TPETPAFN and the absorption of NIR775 leads to efficient energy transfer, resulting in a 47-fold enhancement of the NIR775 emission intensity upon excitation of TPETPAFN at 510 nm as compared to that upon direct excitation of NIR775 at 760 nm. The obtained fluorescent NPs show sharp NIR emission with a band width of 20 nm, a large Stokes shift of 275 nm, good photostability and low cytotoxicity. In vivo imaging study reveals that the synthesized NPs are able to provide high fluorescence contrast in live animals. The Förster resonance energy transfer strategy overcomes the intrinsic limitation of broad emission spectra for AIE NPs, which opens new opportunities to synthesize organic NPs with high brightness and narrow emission for potential applications in multiplex sensing and imaging.Near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence signals are highly desirable to achieve high resolution in biological imaging. To obtain NIR emission with high brightness, fluorescent nanoparticles (NPs) are synthesized by co-encapsulation of 2,3-bis(4-(phenyl(4-(1,2,2-triphenylvinyl)phenylamino)phenyl)fumaronitrile (TPETPAFN), a luminogen with aggregation-induced emission (AIE) characteristics, and a NIR fluorogen of silicon 2,3-naphthalocyanine bis(trihexylsilyloxide) (NIR775) using 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N-[methoxy(polyethylene glycol)-2000

  13. Study on photophysical and aggregation induced emission recognition of 1,8-naphthalimide probe for casein by spectroscopic method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yang; Liu, Zhen; Liang, Xuhua; Fan, Jun; Han, Quan

    2013-05-01

    A novel water-soluble 1,8-naphthalimide derivative 1, bearing two acetic carboxylic groups, exhibited fluorescent turn-on recognition for casein based on the aggregation induced emission (AIE) character. The photophysical properties of 1 consisting of donor and acceptor units were investigated in different solutions. The fluorescence intensity decreased through taking advantage of twisted intramolecular charge transfer (TICT) and self-association emission with increasing solvent polarity. Moreover, the spectral red-shift and intensity quench in protic solvents were caused by the excited-state hydrogen bond strengthening effect. Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations revealed that 1 exhibited a strong TICT character. The AIE mechanism of 1 with casein was due to 1 docked in the hydrophobic cavity between sub-micelles and bound with Tyr and Trp residues, resulting in the aggregation of 1 on the casein surface and emission enhancement. Based on this, a novel casein assay method was developed. The proposed exhibited a good linear range from 0.1 to 22 μg mL-1, with the detection limit of 2.8 ng mL-1. Satisfactory reproducibility, reversibility and a short response time were realized. This method was applied to the determination of casein in milk powder samples and the results were in good agreement with the result of Biuret method.

  14. Reflective-emissive liquid-crystal displays constructed from AIE luminogens (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Ben Zhong; Zhao, Dongyu; Qin, Anjun

    2015-10-01

    The chiral nematic liquid crystal (N*-LC) has plenty of prospective applications in LC display (LCD) owing to the selective reflection and circular dichroism. The molecules in the N*-LC are aligned forming a helically twisted structure and the specific wavelength of incident light is reflected by the periodically varying refractive index in the N*-LC plane without the aid of a polarizer or color filter. However, N*-LC do not emit light which restricts its application in the dark environment. Moreover, the view angle of N*-LC display device was severe limited due to the strong viewing angle dependence of the structure color of the one dimensional photonic crystal of a N*-LC. In order to overcome these weaknesses, we have synthesized a luminescent liquid crystalline compound consisting of a tetraphenylethene (TPE) core, TPE-PPE, as a luminogen with mesogenic moieties. TPE-PPE exhibits both the aggregate-induced emission (AIE) and thermotropic liquid crystalline characteristics. By dissolving a little amount of TPE-PPE into N*-LC host, a circular polarized emission was obtained on the unidirectional orientated LC cell. Utilizing the circular polarized luminescence property of the LC mixture, we fabricated a photoluminescent liquid crystal display (PL-LCD) device which can work under both dark and sunlit conditions. This approach has simplified the device design, lowered the energy consumption and increased brightness and application of the LCD.

  15. Gelation process visualized by aggregation-induced emission fluorogens.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhengke; Nie, Jingyi; Qin, Wei; Hu, Qiaoling; Tang, Ben Zhong

    2016-06-23

    Alkaline-urea aqueous solvent system provides a novel and important approach for the utilization of polysaccharide. As one of the most important polysaccharide, chitosan can be well dissolved in this solvent system, and the resultant hydrogel material possesses unique and excellent properties. Thus the sound understanding of the gelation process is fundamentally important. However, current study of the gelation process is still limited due to the absence of direct observation and the lack of attention on the entire process. Here we show the entire gelation process of chitosan LiOH-urea aqueous system by aggregation-induced emission fluorescent imaging. Accompanied by other pseudo in situ investigations, we propose the mechanism of gelation process, focusing on the formation of junction points including hydrogen bonds and crystalline.

  16. Gelation process visualized by aggregation-induced emission fluorogens

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhengke; Nie, Jingyi; Qin, Wei; Hu, Qiaoling; Tang, Ben Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Alkaline-urea aqueous solvent system provides a novel and important approach for the utilization of polysaccharide. As one of the most important polysaccharide, chitosan can be well dissolved in this solvent system, and the resultant hydrogel material possesses unique and excellent properties. Thus the sound understanding of the gelation process is fundamentally important. However, current study of the gelation process is still limited due to the absence of direct observation and the lack of attention on the entire process. Here we show the entire gelation process of chitosan LiOH-urea aqueous system by aggregation-induced emission fluorescent imaging. Accompanied by other pseudo in situ investigations, we propose the mechanism of gelation process, focusing on the formation of junction points including hydrogen bonds and crystalline. PMID:27337500

  17. Gelation process visualized by aggregation-induced emission fluorogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhengke; Nie, Jingyi; Qin, Wei; Hu, Qiaoling; Tang, Ben Zhong

    2016-06-01

    Alkaline-urea aqueous solvent system provides a novel and important approach for the utilization of polysaccharide. As one of the most important polysaccharide, chitosan can be well dissolved in this solvent system, and the resultant hydrogel material possesses unique and excellent properties. Thus the sound understanding of the gelation process is fundamentally important. However, current study of the gelation process is still limited due to the absence of direct observation and the lack of attention on the entire process. Here we show the entire gelation process of chitosan LiOH-urea aqueous system by aggregation-induced emission fluorescent imaging. Accompanied by other pseudo in situ investigations, we propose the mechanism of gelation process, focusing on the formation of junction points including hydrogen bonds and crystalline.

  18. Dual-modal MRI contrast agent with aggregation-induced emission characteristic for liver specific imaging with long circulation lifetime.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yilong; Li, Min; Hong, Yuning; Lam, Jacky W Y; Zheng, Qichang; Tang, Ben Zhong

    2014-07-09

    We herein report a novel dual-modal MRI contrast agent, TPE-2Gd, for both magnetic and fluorescence imaging. TPE-2Gd consists of a hydrophobic tetraphenylethene (TPE) fluorophore and two hydrophilic gadolinium (Gd) diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid moieties. As an amphiphilic molecule, TPE-2Gd aggregates into micelles at a high concentration in aqueous medium. These aggregates are highly emissive, showing an aggregation-induced emission (AIE) characteristic. TPE-2Gd is used as a fluorescent agent for cell imaging, which demonstrates negligible cytotoxicity and excellent photostability owing to its AIE property. As a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent, TPE-2Gd exhibits similar longitudinal relaxivity in water (R1,TPE-2Gd = 3.36 ± 0.10 s(-1) per mM of Gd(3+)) as those commercial agents (e.g., Magnevist, R1,magnevist = 3.70 ± 0.02 s(-1) per mM of Gd(3+)). Compared with Magnevist, the circulation lifetime of TPE-2Gd nanoaggregates in living rats is extended from 10 min to 1 h. With relatively high specificity to the liver, the MR imaging could remain hyperintense in liver even after 150 min post injection. These TPE-2Gd nanoparticles can be excreted gradually via renal filtration due to the disassembly of the nanoparticles into small molecules during circulation. TPE-2Gd could thus potentially be used as a liver specific MRI contrast agent for clinical diagnosis.

  19. Detecting the Formation and Transformation of Oligomers during Insulin Fibrillation by a Dendrimer Conjugated with Aggregation-Induced Emission Molecule.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qin; Xie, Jing; Liu, Yanpeng; Zhou, Anna; Li, Jianshu

    2017-02-08

    The fibrillation of protein is harmful and impedes the use of protein drugs. It also relates to various debilitating diseases such as Alzheimer's diseases. Thus, investigating the protein fibrillation process is necessary. In this study, poly(amido amine) dendrimers (PAMAM) of generation 3 (G3) and generation 4 (G4) were synthesized and conjugated with 4-aminobiphenyl, an aggregation-induced emission (AIE) moiety, at varied grafting ratios. Among them, one fluorescence probe named G3-biph-3 that was grafted average 3.25 4-aminobiphenyl to the G3, can detect the transformations both from native insulin to oligomers and from oligomers to fibrils. The size difference of native insulin, oligomers, and fibrils was proposed to be the main factor leading to the detection of the above transformations. Different molecular weights of sodium polyacrylate (PAAS) were also applied as a model to interact with G3-biph-3 to further reveal the mechanism. The results indicated that PAMAM with a certain generation and grafted with appropriate AIE groups can detect the oligomer formation and transformation during the insulin fibrillation process.

  20. Stable and Size-Tunable Aggregation-Induced Emission Nanoparticles Encapsulated with Nanographene Oxide and Applications in Three-Photon Fluorescence Bioimaging.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhenfeng; Qian, Jun; Zhao, Xinyuan; Qin, Wei; Hu, Rongrong; Zhang, Hequn; Li, Dongyu; Xu, Zhengping; Tang, Ben Zhong; He, Sailing

    2016-01-26

    Organic fluorescent dyes with high quantum yield are widely applied in bioimaging and biosensing. However, most of them suffer from a severe effect called aggregation-caused quenching (ACQ), which means that their fluorescence is quenched at high molecular concentrations or in the aggregation state. Aggregation-induced emission (AIE) is a diametrically opposite phenomenon to ACQ, and luminogens with this feature can effectively solve this problem. Graphene oxide has been utilized as a quencher for many fluorescent dyes, based on which biosensing can be achieved. However, using graphene oxide as a surface modification agent of fluorescent nanoparticles is seldom reported. In this article, we used nanographene oxide (NGO) to encapsulate fluorescent nanoparticles, which consisted of a type of AIE dye named TPE-TPA-FN (TTF). NGO significantly improved the stability of nanoparticles in aqueous dispersion. In addition, this method could control the size of nanoparticles' flexibly as well as increase their emission efficiency. We then used the NGO-modified TTF nanoparticles to achieve three-photon fluorescence bioimaging. The architecture of ear blood vessels in mice and the distribution of nanoparticles in zebrafish could be observed clearly. Furthermore, we extended this method to other AIE luminogens and showed it was widely feasible.

  1. Phenyl Ring Dynamics in a Tetraphenylethylene-Bridged Metal-Organic Framework: Implications for the Mechanism of Aggregation-Induced Emission

    SciTech Connect

    Shustova, Natalia B; Ong, Ta-Chung; Cozzolino, Anthony F; Michaelis, Vladimir K; Griffin, Robert G; Dinc,; #259; Mircea,

    2013-03-12

    Molecules that exhibit emission in the solid state, especially those known as aggregation-induced emission (AIE) chromophores, have found applications in areas as varied as light-emitting diodes and biological sensors. Despite numerous studies, the mechanism of fluorescence quenching in AIE chromophores is still not completely understood. To this end, much interest has focused on understanding the low-frequency vibrational dynamics of prototypical systems, such as tetraphenylethylene (TPE), in the hope that such studies would provide more general principles toward the design of new sensors and electronic materials. We hereby show that a perdeuterated TPE-based metal–organic framework (MOF) serves as an excellent platform for studying the low-energy vibrational modes of AIE-type chromophores. In particular, we use solid-state 2H and 13C NMR experiments to investigate the phenyl ring dynamics of TPE cores that are coordinatively trapped inside a MOF and find a phenyl ring flipping energy barrier of 43(6) kJ/mol. DFT calculations are then used to deconvolute the electronic and steric contributions to this flipping barrier. Finally, we couple the NMR and DFT studies with variable-temperature X-ray diffraction experiments to propose that both the ethylenic C=C bond twist and the torsion of the phenyl rings are important for quenching emission in TPE, but that the former may gate the latter. To conclude, we use these findings to propose a set of design criteria for the development of tunable turn-on porous sensors constructed from AIE-type molecules, particularly as applied to the design of new multifunctional MOFs.

  2. Phenyl Ring Dynamics in a Tetraphenylethylene-Bridged Metal-Organic Framework: Implications for the Mechanism of Aggregation-Induced Emission

    PubMed Central

    Shustova, Natalia B.; Ong, Ta-Chung; Cozzolino, Anthony F.; Michaelis, Vladimir K.; Griffin, Robert G.; Dincã, Mircea

    2012-01-01

    Molecules that exhibit emission in the solid state, especially those known as aggregation-induced emission (AIE) chromophores, have found applications in areas as varied as light-emitting diodes and biological sensors. Despite numerous studies, the mechanism of fluorescence quenching in AIE chromophores is still not completely understood. To this end, much interest has focused on understanding the low frequency vibrational dynamics of prototypical systems such as tetraphenylethylene (TPE), in the hope that such studies would provide more general principles towards the design of new sensors and electronic materials. We hereby show that a perdeuterated TPE-based metal-organic framework (MOF) serves as an excellent platform for studying the low energy vibrational modes of AIE-type chromophores. In particular, we use solid-state 2H and 13C NMR experiments to investigate the phenyl ring dynamics of TPE cores that are coordinatively trapped inside a MOF and find a phenyl ring flipping energy barrier of 43(6) kJ/mol. DFT calculations are then used to deconvolute the electronic and steric contributions to this flipping barrier. Finally, we couple the NMR and DFT studies with variable temperature X-ray diffraction experiments to propose that both the ethylenic C=C bond twist and the torsion of the phenyl rings are important for quenching emission in TPE, but that the former may gate the latter. To conclude, we use these findings to propose a set of design criteria for the development of tunable turn-on porous sensors constructed from AIE-type molecules, particularly as applied to the design of new multifunctional MOFs. PMID:22889020

  3. Fabrication, Light Emission, and Magnetism of Silica Nanoparticles Hybridized with AIE Luminogens and Inorganic Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faisal, Mahtab

    Much research efforts have been devoted in developing new synthetic approaches for fluorescent silica nanoparticles (FSNPs) due to their potential high-technological applications. However, light emissions from most of the FSNPs prepared so far have been rather weak. This is due to the emission quenching caused by the aggregation of fluorophores in the solid state. We have observed a novel phenomenon of aggregation-induced emission (AIE): a series of propeller-shaped molecules such as tetraphenylethene (TPE) and silole are induced to emit efficiently by aggregate formation. Thus, they are ideal fluorophors for the construction of FSNPs and my thesis work focuses on the synthesis of silica nanoparticles containing these luminogens and magnetic nanostructures. Highly emissive FSNPs with core-shell structures are fabricated by surfactant-free sol-gel reactions of tetraphenylethene- (TPE) and silole-functionalized siloxanes followed by the reactions with tetraethoxysilane. The FSNPs are uniformly sized, surface-charged and colloidally stable. The diameters of the FSNPs are tunable in the range of 45--295 nm by changing the reaction conditions. Whereas their TPE and silole precursors are non-emissive, the FSNPs emit strong visible lights, thanks to the novel aggregation-induced emission characteristics of the TPE and silole aggregates in the hybrid nanoparticles. The FSNPs pose no toxicity to living cells and can be utilized to selectively image cytoplasm of HeLa cells. Applying the same tool in the presence of citrate-coated magnetite nanoparticles, uniform magnetic fluorescent silica nanoparticles (MFSNPs) with smooth surfaces are fabricated. These particles exhibit appreciable surface charges and hence good colloidal stability. They are superparamagnetic, exhibiting no hysteresis at room temperature. UV irradiation of a suspension of MFSNPs in ethanol gives strong blue and green emissions. The MFSNPs can selectively stain the cytoplasmic regions of the living cells

  4. Rational Design of a Red-Emissive Fluorophore with AIE and ESIPT Characteristics and Its Application in Light-Up Sensing of Esterase.

    PubMed

    Peng, Lu; Xu, Shidang; Zheng, Xiaokun; Cheng, Xiamin; Zhang, Ruoyu; Liu, Jie; Liu, Bin; Tong, Aijun

    2017-03-07

    The development of red fluorophores with efficient solid-state emission is still challenging. Herein, a red fluorophore 1 with aggregation-induced emission (AIE) and excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) characteristics is rationally designed and facilely synthesized by attaching an electron-donor diethylamine and an electron-acceptor maleonitrile group to salicyladazine. In contrast to many red fluorophores which undergo serious aggregation-caused quenching (ACQ), compound 1 emits bright red fluorescence (λem = 650 nm, ΦF = 24.3%) in the solid state with a large Stokes shift of 174 nm. Interestingly, control compounds 2 and 3, which have similar structures as 1, exhibit obvious aggregation-caused quenching (ACQ) characteristics. The difference in the crystal structures of 1, 2, and 3 reveals that the interplanar spacing among molecules plays a decisive role in realizing the AIE characteristics of 1. Moreover, when the hydroxyl group of 1 was substituted by an esterase reactive acetoxyl, a fluorescence light-up probe 4 was developed for sensing of esterase based on the selective reaction between 4 and esterase to generate the AIE and ESIPT active molecule 1. The linear range for in vitro quantification of esterase is 0.01-0.15 U/mL with a detection limit of 0.005 U/mL. Probe 4 was also successfully applied to image esterase in mitochondria of living cells.

  5. Preparation of PEGylated polymeric nanoprobes with aggregation-induced emission feature through the combination of chain transfer free radical polymerization and multicomponent reaction: Self-assembly, characterization and biological imaging applications.

    PubMed

    Wan, Qing; Liu, Meiying; Mao, Liucheng; Jiang, Ruming; Xu, Dazhuang; Huang, Hongye; Dai, Yanfeng; Deng, Fengjie; Zhang, Xiaoyong; Wei, Yen

    2017-03-01

    Self-assembly of amphiphilic luminescent copolymers is a general route to fabricate fluorescent polymeric microparticles (FPMs). In this work, the FPMs with aggregation-induced emission (AIE) feature were fabricated via the combination of the chain transfer free radical polymerization and "one-pot" multicomponent reaction, which conjugated the aldehyde-containing AIE active dye AIE (CHO-An-CHO) and amino-terminated hydrophilic polymer (ATPPEGMA) using mercaptoacetic acid (MTA) as the "lock" molecule. The structure, chemical compositions, optical properties as well as biological properties of the PPEGMA-An-PPEGMA FPMs were characterized and investigated by means of a series of techniques and experiments in detail. We demonstrated the final copolymers showed amphiphilic properties, strong yellow fluorescence and high water dispersibility. Biological evaluation suggested that PPEGMA-An-PPEGMA FPMs possess low cytotoxicity and can be used for cell imaging. More importantly, many other AIE active FPMs are expected to be fabricated using the similar strategy because of the good substrate and monomer applicability of the multicomponent reaction and chain transfer living radical polymerization. Therefore, we could conclude that the strategy described in this work should be of great interest for fabrication of multifunctional AIE active nanoprobes for biomedical applications.

  6. Cellular and Mitochondrial Dual-Targeted Organic Dots with Aggregation-Induced Emission Characteristics for Image-Guided Photodynamic Therapy.

    PubMed

    Feng, Guangxue; Qin, Wei; Hu, Qinglian; Tang, Ben Zhong; Liu, Bin

    2015-12-09

    Targeted delivery of drugs toward mitochondria of specific cancer cells dramatically improves therapy efficiencies especially for photodynamic therapy (PDT), as reactive oxygen species (ROS) are short in lifetime and small in radius of action. Different from chemical modification, nanotechnology has been serving as a simple and nonchemical approach to deliver drugs to cells of interest or specific organelles, such as mitochondria, but there have been limited examples of dual-targeted delivery for both cells and mitochondria. Here, cellular and mitochondrial dual-targeted organic dots for image-guided PDT are reported based on a fluorogen with aggregation-induced emission (AIEgen) characteristics. The AIEgen possesses enhanced red fluorescence and efficient ROS production in aggregated states. The AIE dot surfaces are functionalized with folate and triphenylphosphine, which can selectively internalize into folate-receptor (FR) positive cancer cells, and subsequently accumulate at mitochondria. The direct ROS generation at mitochondria sites is found to depolarize mitochondrial membrane, affect cell migration, and lead to cell apoptosis and death with enhanced PDT effects as compared to ROS generated randomly in cytoplasm. This report demonstrates a simple and general nanocarrier approach for cellular and mitochondrial dual-targeted PDT, which opens new opportunities for dual-targeted delivery and therapy.

  7. Tuning of the selectivity of fluorescent peptidyl bioprobe using aggregation induced emission for heavy metal ions by buffering agents in 100% aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Neupane, Lok Nath; Hwang, Gi Won; Lee, Keun-Hyeung

    2017-02-03

    Smart fluorescent probes of which the detection of specific target molecules can be controlled are attracting remarkable interest. A fluorescent peptidyl bioprobe (1) was rationally synthesized by conjugating tetraphenylethylene, an aggregation-induced emission (AIE) fluorophore with a peptide receptor (AspHis) that acted as hard and intermediate bases. The selective detection of 1 for specific metal ion in 100% aqueous solutions was controlled by the buffering agents with the chelate effect without the change of pH. In distilled water and phosphate buffered aqueous solution at neutral pH, 1 exhibited a selective Off-On response to a soft metal ion, Hg(2+) among test metal ions by 100-fold enhancement of the emission at 470nm. 1 showed a selective Off-On response (180-fold enhancement) to a hard metal ion, Al(3+) ions among test metal ions in Tris buffered aqueous solution at neutral pH and Hexamine (hexamethylenetetramine) buffered aqueous solution at acidic pH. The detection limit of 0.46 ppb for Hg(2+) and 2.26 ppb for Al(3+) in each condition was lower than the maximum allowable level of the metal ions in drinking water by EPA. This research helps to understand how buffering agents participate in the complex formation and aggregation of fluorescent probes using an AIE process for the selective detection of specific metal ions in aqueous solutions.

  8. Aggregation-Induced Emission Active Metal-Free Chemosensing Platform for Highly Selective Turn-On Sensing and Bioimaging of Pyrophosphate Anion.

    PubMed

    Gogoi, Abhijit; Mukherjee, Sandipan; Ramesh, Aiyagari; Das, Gopal

    2015-07-07

    We report the synthesis of a metal-free chemosensor for highly selective sensing of pyrophosphate (PPi) anion in physiological medium. The novel phenylbenzimidazole functionalized imine containing chemosensor (L; [2,6-bis(((4-(1H-benzo[d]imidazol-2-yl)phenyl)imino) methyl)-4 methyl phenol]) could sense PPi anion through "turn-on" colorimetric and fluorimetric responses in a very competitive environment. The overall sensing mechanism is based on the aggregation-induced emission (AIE) phenomenon. Moreover, a real time in-field device application was demonstrated by sensing PPi in paper strips coated with L. Interestingly, detection of intracellular PPi ions in model human cells could also be possible by fluorescence microscopic studies without any toxicity to these cells.

  9. Red emissive AIE nanodots with high two-photon absorption efficiency at 1040 nm for deep-tissue in vivo imaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yalun; Hu, Rongrong; Xi, Wang; Cai, Fuhong; Wang, Shaowei; Zhu, Zhenfeng; Bai, Rongpan; Qian, Jun

    2015-10-01

    Deep-tissue penetration is highly required in in vivo optical bioimaging. We synthesized a type of red emissive fluorophore BT with aggregation-induced emission (AIE) property. BT molecules were then encapsulated with amphiphilic polymers to form nanodots, and a large two-photon absorption (2PA) cross-section of 2.9 × 10(6) GM at 1040 nm was observed from each BT nanodot, which was much larger than those at the wavelengths of 770 to 860 nm. In addition, 1040 nm light was found to have better penetration and focusing capability than 800 nm light in biological tissue, according to the Monte Carlo simulation. The toxicity and tissue distribution of BT nanodots were studied, and they were found to have good biocompatibility. BT nanodots were then utilized for in vivo imaging of mouse ear and brain, and an imaging depth of 700 μm was obtained with the femtosecond (fs) excitation of 1040 nm. The red emissive AIE nanodots with high 2PA efficiency at 1040 nm would be useful for deep-tissue functional bioimaging in the future.

  10. Red emissive AIE nanodots with high two-photon absorption efficiency at 1040 nm for deep-tissue in vivo imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yalun; Hu, Rongrong; Xi, Wang; Cai, Fuhong; Wang, Shaowei; Zhu, Zhenfeng; Bai, Rongpan; Qian, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Deep-tissue penetration is highly required in in vivo optical bioimaging. We synthesized a type of red emissive fluorophore BT with aggregation-induced emission (AIE) property. BT molecules were then encapsulated with amphiphilic polymers to form nanodots, and a large two-photon absorption (2PA) cross-section of 2.9 × 106 GM at 1040 nm was observed from each BT nanodot, which was much larger than those at the wavelengths of 770 to 860 nm. In addition, 1040 nm light was found to have better penetration and focusing capability than 800 nm light in biological tissue, according to the Monte Carlo simulation. The toxicity and tissue distribution of BT nanodots were studied, and they were found to have good biocompatibility. BT nanodots were then utilized for in vivo imaging of mouse ear and brain, and an imaging depth of 700 μm was obtained with the femtosecond (fs) excitation of 1040 nm. The red emissive AIE nanodots with high 2PA efficiency at 1040 nm would be useful for deep-tissue functional bioimaging in the future. PMID:26504629

  11. Polymeric AIE-based nanoprobes for biomedical applications: recent advances and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoyong; Wang, Ke; Liu, Meiying; Zhang, Xiqi; Tao, Lei; Chen, Yiwang; Wei, Yen

    2015-07-21

    The development of polymeric luminescent nanomaterials for biomedical applications has recently attracted a large amount of attention due to the remarkable advantages of these materials compared with small organic dyes and fluorescent inorganic nanomaterials. Among these polymeric luminescent nanomaterials, polymeric luminescent nanomaterials based on dyes with aggregation-induced emission (AIE) properties should be of great research interest due to their unique AIE properties, the designability of polymers and their multifunctional potential. In this review, the recent advances in the design and biomedical applications of polymeric luminescent nanomaterials based on AIE dyes is summarized. Various design strategies for incorporation of these AIE dyes into polymeric systems are included. The potential biomedical applications such as biological imaging, and use in biological sensors and theranostic systems of these polymeric AIE-based nanomaterials have also been highlighted. We trust this review will attract significant interest from scientists from different research fields in chemistry, materials, biology and interdisciplinary areas.

  12. A fluorescent light-up aggregation-induced emission probe for screening gefitinib-sensitive non-small cell lung carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yi; Shi, Leilei; Su, Yue; Zhang, Chuan; Jin, Xin; Zhu, Xinyuan

    2017-03-07

    Fluorescent light-up probes with aggregation-induced emission (AIE) characteristics have been focused on recently. In this report, a new fluorescent probe, namely, DEVD-TPE, which consisted of the substrate peptide Asp-Glu-Val-Asp (DEVD) and the AIE reporter group tetraphenylethene (TPE), was developed for detecting caspase-3 in living cells. In a slightly alkaline solution, the DEVD-TPE probe displayed almost no fluorescence owing to the dynamic rotation of the phenyl rings in solution. However, DEVD-TPE exhibited significant fluorescence when it was cleaved by caspase-3, as well as when the reporter group TPE underwent aggregation. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor gefitinib was used for determining the screening efficacy of the probe for different non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) cell lines, namely, HCC827, A549 and H1650 cells. Cell proliferation and apoptosis assays indicated that the three cell lines had different sensitivities to gefitinib. The results of analysis by living-cell fluorescence imaging and flow cytometry were consistent with those of the cell proliferation and apoptosis assays. This demonstrated that our probe could detect caspase-3 in living cells, which confirmed the apoptosis of NSCLC cells. Furthermore, our probe indicated that gefitinib was more efficient against HCC827 cells than against the other two NSCLC cell lines. This report proves that the fluorescent probe DEVD-TPE is highly sensitive to caspase-3 and has potential prospects in the rapid screening of NSCLC.

  13. Suppression of Kasha's rule as a mechanism for fluorescent molecular rotors and aggregation-induced emission.

    PubMed

    Qian, Hai; Cousins, Morgan E; Horak, Erik H; Wakefield, Audrey; Liptak, Matthew D; Aprahamian, Ivan

    2017-01-01

    Although there are some proposed explanations for aggregation-induced emission, a phenomenon with applications that range from biosensors to organic light-emitting diodes, current understanding of the quantum-mechanical origin of this photophysical behaviour is limited. To address this issue, we assessed the emission properties of a series of BF2-hydrazone-based dyes as a function of solvent viscosity. These molecules turned out to be highly efficient fluorescent molecular rotors. This property, in addition to them being aggregation-induced emission luminogens, enabled us to probe deeper into their emission mechanism. Time-dependent density functional theory calculations and experimental results showed that the emission is not from the S1 state, as predicted from Kasha's rule, but from a higher energy (>S1) state. Furthermore, we found that suppression of internal conversion to the dark S1 state by restricting the rotor rotation enhances fluorescence, which leads to the proposal that suppression of Kasha's rule is the photophysical mechanism responsible for emission in both viscous solution and the solid state.

  14. Suppression of Kasha's rule as a mechanism for fluorescent molecular rotors and aggregation-induced emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Hai; Cousins, Morgan E.; Horak, Erik H.; Wakefield, Audrey; Liptak, Matthew D.; Aprahamian, Ivan

    2017-01-01

    Although there are some proposed explanations for aggregation-induced emission, a phenomenon with applications that range from biosensors to organic light-emitting diodes, current understanding of the quantum-mechanical origin of this photophysical behaviour is limited. To address this issue, we assessed the emission properties of a series of BF2-hydrazone-based dyes as a function of solvent viscosity. These molecules turned out to be highly efficient fluorescent molecular rotors. This property, in addition to them being aggregation-induced emission luminogens, enabled us to probe deeper into their emission mechanism. Time-dependent density functional theory calculations and experimental results showed that the emission is not from the S1 state, as predicted from Kasha's rule, but from a higher energy (>S1) state. Furthermore, we found that suppression of internal conversion to the dark S1 state by restricting the rotor rotation enhances fluorescence, which leads to the proposal that suppression of Kasha's rule is the photophysical mechanism responsible for emission in both viscous solution and the solid state.

  15. A Red to Near-IR Fluorogen: Aggregation-Induced Emission, Large Stokes Shift, High Solid Efficiency and Application in Cell-Imaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi Jia; Shi, Yang; Wang, Zhaoyang; Zhu, Zhenfeng; Zhao, Xinyuan; Nie, Han; Qian, Jun; Qin, Anjun; Sun, Jing Zhi; Tang, Ben Zhong

    2016-07-04

    A tetraphenylethene (TPE) derivative modified with the strong electron acceptor 2-dicyano-methylene-3-cyano-4,5,5-trimethyl-2,5-dihydrofuran (TCF) was obtained in high yield by a simple two-step reaction. The resultant TPE-TCF showed evident aggregation-induced emission (AIE) features and pronounced solvatochromic behavior. Changing the solvent from apolar cyclohexane to highly polar acetonitrile, the emission peak shifted from 560 to 680 nm (120 nm redshift). In an acetonitrile solution and in the solid powder, the Stokes shifts are as large as 230 and 190 nm, respectively. The solid film emits red to near-IR (red-NIR) fluorescence with an emission peak at 670 nm and a quantum efficiency of 24.8 %. Taking the advantages of red-NIR emission and high efficiency, nanoparticles (NPs) of TPE-TCF were fabricated by using tat-modified 1,2-distearoylsn-glycero-3-phosphor-ethanol-amine-N-[methoxy-(polyethyl-eneglycol)-2000] as the encapsulation matrix. The obtained NPs showed perfect membrane penetrability and high fluorescent imaging quality of cell cytoplasm. Upon co-incubation with 4,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) in the presence of tritons, the capsulated TPE-TCF nanoparticles could enter into the nucleus and displayed similar staining properties to those of DAPI.

  16. Aggregation-induced emission active tetraphenylethene-based sensor for uranyl ion detection.

    PubMed

    Wen, Jun; Huang, Zeng; Hu, Sheng; Li, Shuo; Li, Weiyi; Wang, Xiaolin

    2016-11-15

    A novel tetraphenylethene-based fluorescent sensor, TPE-T, was developed for the detection of uranyl ions. The selective binding of TPE-T to uranyl ions resulted in a detectable signal owing to the quenching of its aggregation-induced emission. The developed sensor could be used to visually distinguish UO2(2+) from lanthanides, transition metals, and alkali metals under UV light; the presence of other metal ions did not interfere with the detection of uranyl ions. In addition, TPE-T was successfully used for the detection of uranyl ions in river water, illustrating its potential applications in environmental systems.

  17. Tetraphenylethene-based aggregation-induced emission fluorescent organic nanoparticles: facile preparation and cell imaging application.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiqi; Liu, Meiying; Yang, Bin; Zhang, Xiaoyong; Wei, Yen

    2013-12-01

    Tetraphenylethene-based (TPE) aggregation-induced emission fluorescent organic nanoparticles (FONs) were facilely prepared via Schiff base condensation with ɛ-polylysine (Ply) and subsequent reduction to form stable CN covalent bond. Thus obtained TPE-Ply FONs were characterized by a series of techniques including fluorescent spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Biocompatibility evaluation and cell uptake behavior of TPE-Ply FONs were further investigated to explore their potential biomedical application. We demonstrated that such FONs showed high water dispersibility, intense fluorescence, uniform morphology (100-200nm) and excellent biocompatibility, making them promising for cell imaging application.

  18. A 1,3-indandione-functionalized tetraphenylethene: aggregation-induced emission, solvatochromism, mechanochromism, and potential application as a multiresponsive fluorescent probe.

    PubMed

    Tong, Jiaqi; Wang, Yijia; Mei, Ju; Wang, Jian; Qin, Anjun; Sun, Jing Zhi; Tang, Ben Zhong

    2014-04-14

    A tetraphenylethene (TPE) derivative substituted with the electron-acceptor 1,3-indandione (IND) group was designed and prepared. The targeted IND-TPE reserves the intrinsic aggregation-induced emission (AIE) property of the TPE moiety. Meanwhile, owing to the decorated IND moiety, IND-TPE demonstrates intramolecular charge-transfer process and pronounced solvatochromic behavior. When the solvent is changed from apolar toluene to highly polar acetonitrile, the emission peak redshifts from 543 to 597 nm. IND-TPE solid samples show an evident mechanochromic process. Grinding of the as-prepared powder sample induces a redshift of emission from green (peak at 515 nm) to orange (peak at 570 nm). The mechanochromic process is reversible in multiple grinding-thermal annealing and grinding-solvent-fuming cycles, and the emission of the solid sample switches between orange (ground) and yellow (thermal/solvent-fuming-treated) colors. The mechanochromism is ascribed to the phase transition between amorphous and crystalline states. IND-TPE undergoes a hydrolysis reaction in basic aqueous solution, thus the red-orange emission can be quenched by OH(-) or other species that can induce the generation of sufficient OH(-). Accordingly, IND-TPE has been used to discriminatively detect arginine and lysine from other amino acids, due to their basic nature. The experimental data are satisfactory. Moreover, the hydrolyzation product of IND-TPE is weakly emissive in the resultant mixture but becomes highly blue-emissive after the illumination for a period by UV light. Thus IND-TPE can be used as a dual-responsive fluorescent probe, which may extend the application of TPE-based molecular probes in chemical and biological categories.

  19. Tetraphenylethene (TPE) modified polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (POSS): unadulterated monomer emission, aggregation-induced emission and nanostructural self-assembly modulated by the flexible spacer between POSS and TPE.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hui; Li, Jiesheng; Chua, Ming Hui; Yan, Hong; Ye, Qun; Song, Jing; Lin, Ting Ting; Tang, Ben Zhong; Xu, Jianwei

    2016-10-13

    Mono-TPE modified POSS molecules, in which the flexible spacers between TPE and POSS moieties control their self-assembly and aggregation, exhibit a unique unadulterated monomer emission in organic solvents as well as an AIE emission in THF/water.

  20. pH-Regulated Reversible Transition Between Polyion Complexes (PIC) and Hydrogen-Bonding Complexes (HBC) with Tunable Aggregation-Induced Emission.

    PubMed

    Tian, Sidan; Liu, Guhuan; Wang, Xiaorui; Wu, Tao; Yang, Jinxian; Ye, Xiaodong; Zhang, Guoying; Hu, Jinming; Liu, Shiyong

    2016-02-17

    The mimicking of biological supramolecular interactions and their mutual transitions to fabricate intelligent artificial systems has been of increasing interest. Herein, we report the fabrication of supramolecular micellar nanoparticles consisting of quaternized poly(ethylene oxide)-b-poly(2-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate) (PEO-b-PQDMA) and tetrakis(4-carboxylmethoxyphenyl)ethene (TPE-4COOH), which was capable of reversible transition between polyion complexes (PIC) and hydrogen bonding complexes (HBC) with tunable aggregation-induced emission (AIE) mediated by solution pH. At pH 8, TPE-4COOH chromophores can be directly dissolved in aqueous milieu without evident fluorescence emission. However, upon mixing with PEO-b-PQDMA, polyion complexes were formed by taking advantage of electrostatic interaction between carboxylate anions and quaternary ammonium cations and the most compact PIC micelles were achieved at the isoelectric point (i.e., [QDMA(+)]/[COO(-)] = 1), as confirmed by dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurement. Simultaneously, fluorescence spectroscopy revealed an evident emission turn-on and the maximum fluorescence intensity was observed near the isoelectric point due to the restriction of intramolecular rotation of TPE moieties within the PIC cores. The kinetic study supported a micelle fusion/fission mechanism on the formation of PIC micelles at varying charge ratios, exhibiting a quick time constant (τ1) relating to the formation of quasi-equilibrium micelles and a slow time constant (τ2) corresponding to the formation of final equilibrium micelles. Upon deceasing the pH of PIC micelles from 8 to 2 at the [QDMA(+)]/[COO(-)] molar ratio of 1, TPE-4COOH chromophores became gradually protonated and hydrophobic. The size of micellar nanoparticles underwent a remarkable decrease, whereas the fluorescence intensity exhibited a further increase by approximately 7.35-fold, presumably because of the formation of HBC micelles comprising cationic PQDMA

  1. Theoretical insight into the aggregation induced emission phenomena of diphenyldibenzofulvene: a nonadiabatic molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xing; Peng, Qian; Niu, Yingli; Wang, Dong; Shuai, Zhigang

    2012-11-07

    The diphenyldibenzofulvene (DPDBF) molecule appears in two forms: ring open and ring closed. The former fluoresces weakly in solution, but it becomes strongly emissive in the solid phase, exhibiting an exotic aggregation-induced emission phenomenon. The latter presents a normal aggregation quenching phenomenon, as is expected. We implement nonadiabatic molecular dynamics based on the combination of time-dependent Kohn-Sham (TDKS) and density functional tight binding (DFTB) methods with Tully's fewest switches surface hopping algorithm to investigate the excited state nonradiative decay processes. From the analysis of the nonadiabatic coupling vectors, it is found that the low frequency twisting motion in the ring open DPDBF couples strongly with the electronic excitation and dissipates the energy efficiently. While in the closed form, such motion is blocked by a chemical bond. This leads to the nonradiative decay rate for the open form (1.4 ps) becoming much faster than the closed form (24.5 ps). It is expected that, in the solid state, the low frequency motion of the open form will be hindered and the energy dissipation pathway by nonradiative decay will be slowed, presenting a remarkable aggregation enhanced emission phenomenon.

  2. Concentrating Aggregation-Induced Fluorescence in Planar Waveguides: A Proof-of-Principle

    PubMed Central

    Banal, James L.; White, Jonathan M.; Ghiggino, Kenneth P.; Wong, Wallace W. H.

    2014-01-01

    The photophysical properties of fluorescent dyes are key determinants in the performance of luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs). First-generation dyes – coumarin, perylenes, and rhodamines - used in LSCs suffer from both concentration quenching in the solid-state and small Stokes shifts which limit the current LSC efficiencies to below theoretical limits. Here we show that fluorophores that exhibit aggregation-induced emission (AIE) are promising materials for LSC applications. Experiments and Monte Carlo simulations show that the optical quantum efficiencies of LSCs with AIE fluorophores are at least comparable to those of LSCs with first-generation dyes as the active materials even without the use of any optical accessories to enhance the trapping efficiency of the LSCs. Our results demonstrate that AIE fluorophores can potentially solve some key limiting properties of first-generation LSC dyes. PMID:24844675

  3. Synthesis and Properties of Gelators Derived from Tetraphenylethylene and Gallic Acid with Aggregation-Induced Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Miao; Zhou, Xie; Chi, Zhenguo; Ma, Chunping; Zhang, Yi; Liu, Siwei; Xu, Jiarui

    2013-09-01

    Two novel organogelators (TEG and TAG) based on tetraphenylethylene and 3,4,5-tris(dodecyloxy) benzoic acid were synthesized through ester bond and amido bond linkages, respectively. Compounds TEG and TAG were able to induce gelation in ethanol. Aggregation-induced enhanced emission was observed in these organogelator molecules, with increased fluorescence intensity from the solutions to the gels. The completely thermoreversible gelation occurred due to the aggregation of the organogelators. In the process, a fibrous network was formed by a combination of intermolecular hydrogen bonding, π-π stacking and van der Waals interactions. These phenomena were observed in the xerogels by field-emission scanning electron microscopy and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. The results of differential scanning calorimetry and polarized optical microscopy indicated that compound TAG exhibited stable liquid crystalline phases over a wide temperature range. The linking groups have severe influence on the properties of the organogelators, which was mainly attributed to the hydrogen bonding interaction in compound TAG.

  4. Aggregation-induced blue shift of fluorescence emission due to suppression of TICT in a phenothiazine-based organogel.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xinchun; Lu, Ran; Zhou, Huipeng; Xue, Pengchong; Wang, Fengyong; Chen, Peng; Zhao, Yingying

    2009-11-15

    A new D-pi-A type gelator based on a phenothiazine derivative, which can gel cyclohexane, hexane, and ethanol/water under ultrasound treatment, has been synthesized. Because such gelators can act as twisted intermolecular charge transfer (TICT) probes, their emission in solution can be tuned by varying the polarity of the solvents. It is notable that an unusual aggregation-induced blue shift of the emission has been detected on account of the suppression of TICT in the gel phase.

  5. o-Amino Analogs of Green Fluorescence Protein Chromophore: Photoisomerization, Photodimerization and Aggregation-induced Emission.

    PubMed

    Huang, Guan-Jhih; Lin, Che-Jen; Liu, Yi-Hung; Peng, Shie-Ming; Yang, Jye-Shane

    2015-01-01

    The photochemical properties of three o-amino analogs of the green fluorescence protein chromophore O0, O1 and O8 (o-ABDIs) have been investigated and compared with those of the m- and p-amino isomers (m-ABDIs and p-ABDIs) in solutions, aggregates, and the solid state. In aprotic solvents, the fluorescence competes with the Z → E photoisomerization for all cases, and the o-ABDIs display a fluorescence quantum efficiency of 1-6%, lying between the m-ABDIs of 5-48% and the p-ABDIs of < 0.1%. The fluorescence of both the o- and m-ABDIs is nearly quenched in protic solvents, attributable to the solvent-solute hydrogen bonding (SSHB) interactions. The phenomenon of aggregation-induced emission observed for O8 in poor solvents resembles the behavior of M8 as a consequence of exclusion of the SSHB interactions and restriction of internal rotation for molecules located inside the aggregates. The occurrence of [2 + 2] photodimerization for O0 in the solid state is unique among the ABDIs, and the X-ray crystal structures of O0 and the photodimer OD reveal the head-to-tail syn-oriented stereochemistry. Analysis on the X-ray crystal structures of O0, O1, M0, M1 and P0 shows that not only the pairwise topochemical geometry but also the columnar packing mode is important in determining the photodimerization reactivity.

  6. Selectively lighting up two-photon photodynamic activity in mitochondria with AIE-active iridium(iii) complexes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiangping; Jin, Chengzhi; Yuan, Bo; Liu, Xingguo; Chen, Yu; Ji, Liangnian; Chao, Hui

    2017-02-07

    Herein a series of mitochondria-targeted AIE (aggregation-induced emission)-active Ir(iii) complexes were designed to selectively exert one-/two-photon photodynamic activities in mitochondria to address the issues which current PDT are confronted with (i.e., shallow penetration depth of routinely used irradiation; systematic toxicity associated with effective drug concentration; concentration-quenched photodynamic activity at the target, etc.).

  7. Luminescent AIE materials for high-performance sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, Chris Wai Tung; Tang, Ben Zhong

    2014-10-01

    Luminescent materials have been widely applied in chemo- and bio-sensing applications because these luminescent materials offer high signal-to-background ratio, superior sensitivity and broad dynamic ranges in various detections. Conventional luminogens suffer from aggregation-caused quenching (ACQ) effect due to strong π-π stacking interaction upon aggregate formation of the luminogens with analytes. Such ACQ effect limits the scope of practical sensing applications. Luminogens with aggregation-induced emission (AIE) characteristics enjoy high emission efficiency in solid or aggregated state while they are non-emissive in solution. AIE luminogens (AIEgens) tackle the lethal problem of ACQ materials in the sensing applications. Siloles and tetraphenylethene (TPE) are archetypal AIE cores and possess advantages of facile synthesis and readily functionalization. AIEgens have been utilized to develop various fluorescent chemosensors. For example, hyperbranched AIE polymers with different topologies can be worked as turn-off explosive sensor with high sensitivity. The explosive detections can be done in solid film, which facilitates practical usage. The AIEgens can also be used as sensors for volatile organic compounds and metal ions through alternating fluorescence on/off mechanisms. Besides chemosensor, the AIEgens have been applied in the fields of biology. Water-soluble AIEgens have been developed for quantifying nucleic acids and proteins. They can serve as bioprobes for real-time monitoring and studying the kinetic of protein conformational changes, making them promising for diagnostic and therapeutic applications. These demonstrations significantly expand the scope of analysis applications of AIEgens and offer new strategies to the design of new fluorescent chemo- and bio-sensors.

  8. pH-responsive drug delivery system based on AIE luminogen functionalized layered zirconium phosphate nano-platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Dongdong Zhang, Yuping; Zhou, Bingbing

    2015-05-15

    Aggregation-induced emission (AIE) luminogen, quaternary tetraphenylethene cation (TPEN), was successfully incorporated into layered α-zirconium phosphate (α-ZrP) by using co-precipitation method to form inorganic–organic hybrid materials. The obtained materials show the characteristic hexagonal platelet shape with the interlayer distance did not reveal significant difference compared with pure α-ZrP. In addition, the obtained hybrid materials emit strong blue emission centered at 476 nm in aqueous media due to the electrostatic interactions of TPEN with the anionic framework of α-ZrP, which largely restrict their intramolecular rotation. More importantly, the materials provide a pH dependent release of doxorubicin (DOX), suggesting that AIE luminogen functionalized α-ZrP may be used as an imaging guided and pH-responsive delivery system for targeting therapy. - Graphical abstract: AIE luminogen was successfully incorporated into layered α-zirconium phosphate by a co-precipitation method to form inorganic–organic hybrid materials, showing a pH dependent release of DOX. - Highlights: • AIE luminogen cation was incorporated into layered α-ZrP by co-precipitation method. • The obtained material emits strong blue emission upon UV irradiation. • The material exhibits pH dependent release of DOX. • The AIE functionalized α-ZrP has potential applications in imaging guided therapy.

  9. Self-assembly and aggregate-induced enhanced emission of amphiphilic fluorescence dyes in water and in the solid state.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Takashi; Higashiguchi, Kenji; Matsuda, Kenji

    2011-04-04

    1-Cyano-1,2-bis(biphenyl)ethene (CNBE) derivatives with a hexa(ethylene glycol) group as an amphiphilic side chain were synthesized and the self-assembling character and fluorescence behavior were investigated. The amphiphilic derivatives showed aggregate-induced enhanced emission (AIEE) in water and in the solid state. The fluorescence quantum yield increased as the rigidity of the aggregates increased (i.e., in ethyl acetateemission is suppression of the nonradiative decay process arising from restricted molecular motion. Additionally, the difference in the emission rate constant is not negligible and can be used to interpret the difference in fluorescence quantum yield in water and in the solid state.

  10. Monomer emission and aggregate emission of TPE derivatives in the presence of γ-cyclodextrin.

    PubMed

    Song, Song; Zheng, Hua-Fei; Li, Dong-Mi; Wang, Jin-Hua; Feng, Hai-Tao; Zhu, Zhi-Hua; Chen, Yi-Chang; Zheng, Yan-Song

    2014-04-18

    It was found for the first time that neutral amphiphilc tetraphenylethylene (TPE) derivatives showed an enhanced monomer emission and a decreased aggregate emission when they were included in the cavity of γ-cyclodextrin. This result provided a new insight into the aggregation-induced emission (AIE) effect.

  11. Long-term two-photon neuroimaging with a photostable AIE luminogen.

    PubMed

    Qian, Jun; Zhu, Zhenfeng; Leung, Chris Wai Tung; Xi, Wang; Su, Liling; Chen, Guangdi; Qin, Anjun; Tang, Ben Zhong; He, Sailing

    2015-04-01

    In neuroscience, fluorescence labeled two-photon microscopy is a promising tool to visualize ex vivo and in vivo tissue morphology, and track dynamic neural activities. Specific and highly photostable fluorescent probes are required in this technology. However, most fluorescent proteins and organic fluorophores suffer from photobleaching, so they are not suitable for long-term imaging and observation. To overcome this problem, we utilize tetraphenylethene-triphenylphosphonium (TPE-TPP), which possesses aggregation-induced emission (AIE) and two-photon fluorescence characteristics, for neuroimaging. The unique AIE feature of TPE-TPP makes its nanoaggregates resistant to photobleaching, which is useful to track neural cells and brain-microglia for a long period of time. Two-photon fluorescence of TPE-TPP facilitates its application in deep in vivo neuroimaging, as demonstrated in the present paper.

  12. Aggregation induced enhanced and exclusively highly Stokes shifted emission from an excited state intramolecular proton transfer exhibiting molecule.

    PubMed

    Behera, Santosh Kumar; Murkherjee, Anwesha; Sadhuragiri, G; Elumalai, Palani; Sathiyendiran, M; Kumar, Manishekhar; Mandal, Biman B; Krishnamoorthy, G

    2017-02-01

    The inner filter effect due to self-quenching dominates the normal emission of dyes at higher concentrations, which would limit their applications. Since normal emission was also observed with aggregation induced emission enhancement (AIEE) active excited state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) exhibiting molecules, two new molecules are synthesized and studied to obtain normal emission free AIEE. The molecules are 4-(3-(benzo[d]thiazol-2-yl)-5-tert-butyl-4-hydroxybenzyl)-2-(benzo[d]thiazol-2-yl)-6-tert-butyl phenol (bis-HPBT) and its oxazole analogue (bis-HPBO). Of these molecules, bis-HPBT, which is weakly fluorescent in tetrahydrofuran solution, shows a sudden high enhancement in fluorescence upon addition of 70% water due to the formation of aggregates. Though the normal emission is also observed in tetrahydrofuran, it is completely eliminated in the aggregates, and the aggregates display exclusive tautomer emission. However, bis-HPBO does not emit such an exclusive tautomer emission in the water/tetrahydrofuran mixture. The enhancement in the fluorescence quantum yield of bis-HPBT in 70% water is ∼300 times higher than that in tetrahydrofuran. The modulated molecular structure of bis-HPBT is the cause of this outstanding AIEE. The observation of almost exclusive tautomer emission is a new additional advantage of AIEE from bis-HPBT over other ESIPT molecules. Since the tautomer emission is highly Stokes shifted, no overlap with the absorption spectrum occurs and therefore, the inner filter effect is averted. The aggregated structure acts as a good fluorescence chemosensor for metal ions as well as anions. The aggregated structure is cell permeable and can be used for cell imaging.

  13. pH-responsive drug delivery system based on AIE luminogen functionalized layered zirconium phosphate nano-platelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dongdong; Zhang, Yuping; Zhou, Bingbing

    2015-05-01

    Aggregation-induced emission (AIE) luminogen, quaternary tetraphenylethene cation (TPEN), was successfully incorporated into layered α-zirconium phosphate (α-ZrP) by using co-precipitation method to form inorganic-organic hybrid materials. The obtained materials show the characteristic hexagonal platelet shape with the interlayer distance did not reveal significant difference compared with pure α-ZrP. In addition, the obtained hybrid materials emit strong blue emission centered at 476 nm in aqueous media due to the electrostatic interactions of TPEN with the anionic framework of α-ZrP, which largely restrict their intramolecular rotation. More importantly, the materials provide a pH dependent release of doxorubicin (DOX), suggesting that AIE luminogen functionalized α-ZrP may be used as an imaging guided and pH-responsive delivery system for targeting therapy.

  14. Solvatochromism, Reversible Chromism and Self-Assembly Effects of Heteroatom-Assisted Aggregation-Induced Enhanced Emission (AIEE) Compounds.

    PubMed

    Niu, Caixia; You, Ying; Zhao, Liu; He, Dacheng; Na, Na; Ouyang, Jin

    2015-09-28

    Two compounds, 9,10-bis[2-(quinolyl)vinyl]anthracene (BQVA) and 9,10-bis[2-(naphthalen-2-yl)vinyl]anthracene (BNVA), have been synthesised and investigated. Both of them have aggregation-induced enhanced emission (AIEE) properties. Heteroatom-assisted BQVA shows solvatochromism, reversible chromism properties and self-assembly effects. When increasing the solvent polarities, the green solution of BQVA turns to orange with a redshift of the fluorescence emission wavelengths from λ=527 to 565 nm. Notably, BQVA exhibits reversible chromism properties, including mechano- and thermochromism. The as-prepared BQVA powders show green fluorescence (λem=525 nm) and the colour can turn into orange (λem=573 nm) after grinding. Interestingly, the orange colour can return at high temperature. Based on these reversible chromism properties, a simple and convenient erasable board has been designed. Different from BQVA, non-heteroatom-assisted BNVA has no clear chromic processes. The results obtained from XRD, differential scanning calorimetry, single-crystal analysis and theoretical calculations indicate that the chromic processes depend on the heteroatoms in BQVA. Additionally, BQVA also exhibits excellent self-assembly effects in different solvents. Homogeneous nanospheres are formed in mixtures of tetrahydrofuran and water, which are then doped into silica nanoparticles and treated with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane to give amino-functionalised nanoparticles (BQVA-AFNPs). The BQVAAFNPs could be used to stain protein markers in polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis.

  15. Zwitterionic Phosphorylcholine-TPE Conjugate for pH-Responsive Drug Delivery and AIE Active Imaging.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yangjun; Han, Haijie; Tong, Hongxin; Chen, Tingting; Wang, Haibo; Ji, Jian; Jin, Qiao

    2016-08-24

    Polymeric micelles have emerged as a promising nanoplatform for cancer theranostics. Herein, we developed doxorubicin (DOX) encapsulated pH-responsive polymeric micelles for combined aggregation induced emission (AIE) imaging and chemotherapy. The novel zwitterionic copolymer poly(2-methacryloyloxyethylphosphorylcholine-co-2-(4-formylphenoxy)ethyl methacrylate) (poly(MPC-co-FPEMA)) was synthesized via RAFT polymerization and further converted to PMPC-hyd-TPE after conjugation of tetraphenylethene (TPE, a typical AIE chromophore) via acid-cleavable hydrazone bonds. The AIE activatable copolymer PMPC-hyd-TPE could self-assemble into spherical PC-hyd-TPE micelles, and DOX could be loaded through hydrophobic interactions. The zwitterionic micelles exhibited excellent physiological stability and low protein adsorption due to the stealthy phosphorylcholine (PC) shell. In addition, the cleavage of hydrophobic TPE molecules under acidic conditions could induce swelling of micelles, which was verified by size changes with time at pH 5.0. The in vitro DOX release profile also exhibited accelerated release rate with pH value decreasing from 7.4 to 5.0. Fluorescent microscopy and flow cytometry studies further demonstrated fast internalization and accumulation of drug loaded PC-hyd-TPE-DOX micelles in HepG2 cells, resulting in considerable time/dose-dependent cytotoxicity. Meanwhile, high-quality AIE imaging of PC-hyd-TPE micelles was confirmed in HepG2 cells. Notably, ex vivo imaging study exhibited efficient accumulation and drug release of PC-hyd-TPE-DOX micelles in the tumor tissue. Consequently, the multifunctional micelles with combined nonfouling surface, AIE active imaging, and pH-responsive drug delivery showed great potential as novel nanoplatforms for a new generation of cancer theranostics.

  16. Aggregation induced emission enhancement from Bathophenanthroline microstructures and its potential use as sensor of mercury ions in water.

    PubMed

    Mazumdar, Prativa; Das, Debasish; Sahoo, Gobinda Prasad; Salgado-Morán, Guillermo; Misra, Ajay

    2014-04-07

    Bathophenanthroline (BA) microstructures of various morphologies have been synthesized using a reprecipitation method. The morphologies of the particles are characterized using optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) methods. An aqueous dispersion of BA microstructures shows aggregation induced emission enhancement (AIEE) compared to BA in a good solvent, THF. This luminescent property of aggregated BA hydrosol is used for the selective detection of trace amounts of mercury ion (Hg(2+)) in water. It is observed that Hg(2+) ions can quench the photoluminescence (PL) intensity of BA aggregates even at very low concentrations, compared to other heavy metal ions e.g. nickel (Ni(2+)), manganese (Mn(2+)), cadmium (Cd(2+)), cobalt (Co(2+)), copper (Cu(2+)), ferrous (Fe(2+)) and zinc (Zn(2+)). This strong fluorescence quenching of aggregated BA in the presence of Hg(2+) ions has been explained as a complex interplay between the ground state complexation between BA and Hg(2+) ions and external heavy atom induced perturbation by Hg(2+) ions on the excited states of the fluorophore BA.

  17. Ultrasonic-assisted Kabachnik-Fields reaction for rapid fabrication of AIE-active fluorescent organic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Long, Zi; Liu, Meiying; Jiang, Ruming; Zeng, Guangjiang; Wan, Qing; Huang, Hongye; Deng, Fengjie; Wan, Yiqun; Zhang, Xiaoyong; Wei, Yen

    2017-03-01

    Aggregation-induced emission (AIE)-active fluorescent organic nanoparticles (FNPs) have been extensively explored for fluorescence "turn-on" bio-imaging applications with the unique advantages over conventional FNPs. Transformation of AIE-active molecules into FNPs can greatly expand their biomedical application potential. Here we reported a novel "one-pot" strategy for fabricating AIE-active FNPs through an ultrasonic-assisted, catalysts-free and solvent-free Kabachnik-Fields (KF) reaction for the first time. The KF reaction can be completed within 10min to generate AIE-active PTH-CHO-PEI-DEP FNPs through mixing polyethylenimine and aldehyde group containing AIE dyes and diethyl phosphate. These PTH-CHO-PEI-DEP FNPs were confirmed by proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR) spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and fluorescence spectroscopy etc. The cell uptake behavior as well as cell viability of PTH-CHO-PEI-DEP FNPs was examined to evaluate their potential for biomedical application. We demonstrated that the amphiphilic α-aminophosphonate polymers could self-assemble into PTH-CHO-PEI-DEP FNPs in aqueous solution and showed excellent water dispersibility. TEM image shows the size of PTH-CHO-PEI-DEP FNPs is 100-200nm. More importantly, the PTH-CHO-PEI-DEP FNPs emit strong green fluorescence and desirable biocompatibility, making them very suitable for biomedical applications. Finally, thus smart FNPs design together with their excellent performance will open a new avenue in the development of FNPs for following biological processes such as carcinogenesis.

  18. Using AIE Luminogen for Long-term and Low-background Three-Photon Microscopic Functional Bioimaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zhenfeng; Leung, Chris W. T.; Zhao, Xinyuan; Wang, Yalun; Qian, Jun; Tang, Ben Zhong; He, Sailing

    2015-10-01

    Fluorescent probes are one of the most popularly used bioimaging markers to monitor metabolic processes of living cells. However, long-term light excitation always leads to photobleaching of fluorescent probes, unavoidable autofluorescence as well as photodamage of cells. To overcome these limitations, we synthesized a type of photostable luminogen named TPE-TPP with an aggregation induced emission (AIE) characteristic, and achieved its three-photon imaging with femtosecond laser excitation of 1020 nm. By using TPE-TPP as fluorescent probes, three-photon microscopy under 1020 nm excitation showed little photo-damage, as well as low autofluorescence to HeLa cells. Due to the AIE effect, the TPE-TPP nanoaggregates uptaken by cells were resistant to photobleaching under three-photon excitation for an extended period of time. Furthermore, we demonstrated that for the present TPE-TPP AIE the three-photon microscopy (with 1020 nm excitation) had a better signal to noise ratio than the two-photon microscopy (with 810 nm excitation) in tissue imaging.

  19. Specific imaging and tracking of mitochondria in live cells by a photostable AIE luminogen.

    PubMed

    Leung, Chris W T; Hong, Yuning; Tang, Ben Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Tracking the dynamics of mitochondrial morphology has attracted much research interest because of its involvement in early stage apoptosis and degenerative conditions. To follow this process, highly specific and photostable fluorescent probes are in demand. Commercially available mitochondria trackers, however, suffer from poor photostability. To overcome this limitation, we have designed and synthesized a fluorescent agent, tetraphenylethene-triphenylphosphonium (TPE-TPP), for mitochondrial imaging. Inherent from the mitochondrial-targeting ability of TPP groups and the aggregation-induced emission (AIE) characteristics of the TPE core, TPE-TPP possesses high specificity to mitochondria, superior photostability, and appreciable tolerance to environmental change, allowing imaging and tracking of the mitochondrial morphological changes in a long period of time.

  20. A morphology and size-dependent ON-OFF switchable NIR-emitting naphthothiazolium cyanine dye: AIE-active CIEE effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wei; Liu, Chunlin; Gao, Qingyun; Du, Jinya; Shen, Ping; Liu, Yi; Yang, Changying

    2017-04-01

    A novel near-infrared (NIR) emitting cyanine dye, 2-[4-N,N-diphenylaminostyryl] -β-naphthothiazolium propylsulfonate (N3), has been newly developed. N3 exhibits striking size-dependent aggregation-induced emission (AIE) characteristic in DMSO/H2O mixtures with water fractions (fw) > 70%. The formation of nanoparticles is advantageous for fluorescence emission, while larger size agglomeration leads to a reduction. In solid, N3 shows crystal-induced emission enhancement (CIEE) and its NIR emissive behavior is morphology-dependent. The brightly emissive crystalline powder (λem = 687 nm) (ON state) is transformed into non-emissive amorphous state (OFF state) when grinding. The smart fluorescent ON-OFF properties can be reversibly tuned by grinding and heating or solvent fuming. Possible strategies to construct the physical sensor for pressure or temperature, chemosensor for volatile organic compounds (VOCs), as well as the technology for data storage are disclosed.

  1. Selective and Sensitive Detection of Heavy Metal Ions in 100% Aqueous Solution and Cells with a Fluorescence Chemosensor Based on Peptide Using Aggregation-Induced Emission.

    PubMed

    Neupane, Lok Nath; Oh, Eun-Taex; Park, Heon Joo; Lee, Keun-Hyeung

    2016-03-15

    A fluorescent peptidyl chemosensor for the detection of heavy metal ions in aqueous solution as well as in cells was synthesized on the basis of the peptide receptor for the metal ions using an aggregation-induced emission fluorophore. The peptidyl chemosensor (1) bearing tetraphenylethylene fluorophore showed an exclusively selective turn-on response to Hg(2+) among 16 metal ions in aqueous buffered solution containing NaCl. The peptidyl chemosensor complexed Hg(2+) ions and then aggregated in aqueous buffered solution, resulting in the significant enhancement (OFF-On) of emissions at around 470 nm. The fluorescent sensor showed a highly sensitive response to Hg(2+), and about 1.0 equiv of Hg(2+) was enough for the saturation of the emission intensity change. The detection limit (5.3 nM, R(2) = 0.99) of 1 for Hg(2+) ions was lower than the maximum allowable level of Hg(2+) in drinking water by EPA. Moreover, the peptidyl chemosensor penetrated live cells and detected intracellular Hg(2+) ions by the turn-on response.

  2. Aggregation-induced white-light emission from the triple-stranded dinuclear Sm(iii) complex.

    PubMed

    Leng, Jiaqi; Li, Hongfeng; Chen, Peng; Sun, Wenbin; Gao, Ting; Yan, Pengfei

    2014-08-28

    A novel bis-β-diketone ligand, 4,4'-bis(4,4,4-trifluoro-1,3-dioxobutyl)(phenoxy)-1,1'-binaphthalene (BTPB), is designed for synthesis of a white light emissive lanthanide complex. The ligand bears two benzoyl β-diketonate sites linked by a 1,1'-binaphthoxy spacer. Reaction of the doubly negatively charged bis-bidentate ligand with lanthanide ions forms triple-stranded dinuclear complexes Sm2(BTPB)3(H2O)4 () and Gd2(BTPB)3(H2O)4 (), which have been fully characterized by various spectroscopic techniques. UV-Vis absorption and emission spectroscopic techniques are used to investigate photophysical properties of the ligand and its complexes in THF and CHCl3. In some cases aggregation of the ligand results in the appearance of a new luminescence band at about 510 nm in addition to the monomer fluorescence. In complex , partial energy transfer from BTPB results in Sm(iii)-based red light emission in addition to the BTPB-based blue/green emission. With the variation of the excited wavelength and concentration of the solution, complex shows a tunable white light emission with the balance of three primary colors. This is an unusual case of observation of white light emission from a single molecule Sm(iii) complex.

  3. Porous polyurea network showing aggregation induced white light emission, applications as biosensor and scaffold for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Bhunia, Subhajit; Chatterjee, Nabanita; Das, Subhadip; Das Saha, Krishna; Bhaumik, Asim

    2014-12-24

    We have designed a urea functionalized novel nanoporous material, POP-PU, which showsaggregation induced white light emission in the presence of suitable polar solvents. This nanomaterial has been explored as a pseudowhite light emitter where the polymeric luminogen moiety can interact with the suitable polar solvent, leading to charge transfer. Thus, solvent assisted rotational freezing of nonrigid polymeric nanoparticles gives radiative emission and the whole solution emits white light with color temperature of 8533 K. This nanoporous material also holds the pockets (donor-donor-acceptor array) for specific biomolecular interaction. Among three pyrimidine based nucleotide bases, only cytosine can amplify the PL emission intensity of POP-PU and the other two bases cannot, suggesting its future potential as a biosensor. Further, this urea functionalized porous organic nanomaterial can be utilized as an efficient drug-delivery vehicle for liver cancer diagnostics and therapy based on the specific biomolecular interaction at its surface.

  4. Mulifunctional Dendritic Emitter: Aggregation-Induced Emission Enhanced, Thermally Activated Delayed Fluorescent Material for Solution-Processed Multilayered Organic Light-Emitting Diodes.

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, Kenichi; Albrecht, Ken; Yamamoto, Kimihisa; Fujita, Katsuhiko

    2017-01-31

    Thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF) materials emerged as promising light sources in third generation organic light-emitting diodes (OLED). Much effort has been invested for the development of small molecular TADF materials and vacuum process-based efficient TADF-OLEDs. In contrast, a limited number of solution processable high-molecular weight TADF materials toward low cost, large area, and scalable manufacturing of solution processed TADF-OLEDs have been reported so far. In this context, we report benzophenone-core carbazole dendrimers (GnB, n = generation) showing TADF and aggregation-induced emission enhancement (AIEE) properties along with alcohol resistance enabling further solution-based lamination of organic materials. The dendritic structure was found to play an important role for both TADF and AIEE activities in the neat films. By using these multifunctional dendritic emitters as non-doped emissive layers, OLED devices with fully solution processed organic multilayers were successfully fabricated and achieved maximum external quantum efficiency of 5.7%.

  5. Mulifunctional Dendritic Emitter: Aggregation-Induced Emission Enhanced, Thermally Activated Delayed Fluorescent Material for Solution-Processed Multilayered Organic Light-Emitting Diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuoka, Kenichi; Albrecht, Ken; Yamamoto, Kimihisa; Fujita, Katsuhiko

    2017-01-01

    Thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF) materials emerged as promising light sources in third generation organic light-emitting diodes (OLED). Much effort has been invested for the development of small molecular TADF materials and vacuum process-based efficient TADF-OLEDs. In contrast, a limited number of solution processable high-molecular weight TADF materials toward low cost, large area, and scalable manufacturing of solution processed TADF-OLEDs have been reported so far. In this context, we report benzophenone-core carbazole dendrimers (GnB, n = generation) showing TADF and aggregation-induced emission enhancement (AIEE) properties along with alcohol resistance enabling further solution-based lamination of organic materials. The dendritic structure was found to play an important role for both TADF and AIEE activities in the neat films. By using these multifunctional dendritic emitters as non-doped emissive layers, OLED devices with fully solution processed organic multilayers were successfully fabricated and achieved maximum external quantum efficiency of 5.7%.

  6. Mulifunctional Dendritic Emitter: Aggregation-Induced Emission Enhanced, Thermally Activated Delayed Fluorescent Material for Solution-Processed Multilayered Organic Light-Emitting Diodes

    PubMed Central

    Matsuoka, Kenichi; Albrecht, Ken; Yamamoto, Kimihisa; Fujita, Katsuhiko

    2017-01-01

    Thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF) materials emerged as promising light sources in third generation organic light-emitting diodes (OLED). Much effort has been invested for the development of small molecular TADF materials and vacuum process-based efficient TADF-OLEDs. In contrast, a limited number of solution processable high-molecular weight TADF materials toward low cost, large area, and scalable manufacturing of solution processed TADF-OLEDs have been reported so far. In this context, we report benzophenone-core carbazole dendrimers (GnB, n = generation) showing TADF and aggregation-induced emission enhancement (AIEE) properties along with alcohol resistance enabling further solution-based lamination of organic materials. The dendritic structure was found to play an important role for both TADF and AIEE activities in the neat films. By using these multifunctional dendritic emitters as non-doped emissive layers, OLED devices with fully solution processed organic multilayers were successfully fabricated and achieved maximum external quantum efficiency of 5.7%. PMID:28139768

  7. Thiophene functionalized silicon-containing aggregation-induced emission enhancement materials: applications as fluorescent probes for the detection of nitroaromatic explosives in aqueous-based solutions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuefeng; Bian, Jiangyan; Xu, Lichao; Wang, Hua; Feng, Shengyu

    2015-12-28

    Two novel aggregation-induced emission enhancement (AIEE) molecules, namely, 3,4-diphenyl-2,5-di(2-thienyl)phenyltrimethylsilane (DPTB-TMS) and bis[3,4-diphenyl- 2,5-di(2-thienyl)phenyl]methylphenylsilane (DPTB-TMS) were designed and synthesized. The optical properties of the two silanes were completely opposite to the traditional luminescent materials. Unlike the aggregation caused quenching, they all emit faint fluorescence in the dispersed state, while emission intensity increased sharply in aggregate states. Fluorescence spectra showed that the two compounds exhibited AIEE properties and that is due to the weak π-π stacking caused by the restriction of intramolecular rotations of dye segments, particularly the -SiMe3 and thienyl groups in the aggregate state. As fluorescent (FL) probes, the fluorescence quenching behavior was further investigated. Thanks to the richer-electron thiophene groups, both compounds showed good performance in detecting nitroaromatics, especially picric acid (PA). The two AIEE FL probes exhibited better quenching efficiency in aqueous-based than in organic-based solutions. For DPTB-MPS, the addition of 80 μM nitrobenzene, 60 μM m-nitrobenzene and 40 μM PA resulted in about 50% quenching in aqueous solutions. The quenching mechanism would be electron transfer from silanes to nitroaromatics. This work provides a basis for designing organic-silanes with "abnormal" but useful optical properties and FL probes with AIEE properties for the detection of nitroaromatics.

  8. Efficient light harvesting of a luminescent solar concentrator using excitation energy transfer from an aggregation-induced emitter.

    PubMed

    Banal, James L; Ghiggino, Kenneth P; Wong, Wallace W H

    2014-12-14

    The compromise between light absorption and reabsorption losses limits the potential light conversion efficiency of luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs). Current approaches do not fully address both issues. By using the excitation energy transfer (EET) strategy with a donor chromophore that exhibits aggregation-induced emission (AIE) behaviour, it is shown that both transmission and reabsorption losses can be minimized in a LSC device achieving high light collection and concentration efficiencies. The light harvesting performance of the LSC developed has been characterized using fluorescence quantum yield measurements and Monte Carlo ray tracing simulations. Comparative incident photon conversion efficiency and short-circuit current data based on the LSC coupled to a silicon solar cell provide additional evidence for improved performance.

  9. A Photoactivatable AIE Polymer for Light-Controlled Gene Delivery: Concurrent Endo/Lysosomal Escape and DNA Unpacking.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Youyong; Zhang, Chong-Jing; Liu, Bin

    2015-09-21

    Endo/lysosomal escape of gene vectors and the subsequent unpacking of nucleic acids in cytosol are two major challenges for efficient gene delivery. Herein, we report a polymeric gene delivery vector, which consists of a photosensitizer (PS) with aggregation-induced emission (AIE) characteristics and oligoethylenimine (OEI) conjugated via an aminoacrylate (AA) linker that can be cleaved by reactive oxygen species (ROS). In aqueous media, the polymer could self-assemble into bright red fluorescent nanoparticles (NPs), which can efficiently bind to DNA through electrostatic interaction for gene delivery. Upon visible light irradiation, the generated ROS can break the endo/lysosomal membrane and the polymer, resulting in light-controlled endo/lysosomal escape and unpacking of DNA for efficient gene delivery. The smart polymer represents the first successful gene vector to simultaneously address both challenges with a single light excitation process.

  10. A cationic iridium(III) complex showing aggregation-induced phosphorescent emission (AIPE) in the solid state: synthesis, characterization and properties.

    PubMed

    Shan, Guo-Gang; Zhang, Ling-Yu; Li, Hai-Bin; Wang, Shuang; Zhu, Dong-Xia; Li, Peng; Wang, Chun-Gang; Su, Zhong-Min; Liao, Yi

    2012-01-14

    We report the synthesis and characterization of two cationic iridium(III) complexes with dendritic carbazole ligands as ancillary ligands, namely, [Ir(ppy)(2)L3]PF(6) (1) and [Ir(ppy)(2)L4]PF(6) (2), where L3 and L4 represent 3,8-bis(3,6-di-tert-butyl-9H-carbazol-9-yl)-1,10-phenanthroline and 3,8-bis(3',6'-di-tert-butyl-6-(3,6-di-tert-butyl-9H-carbazol-9-yl)-3,9'-bi(9H-carbazol)-9-yl)-1,10-phenanthroline, respectively. Their photophysical properties have been investigated and compared. The results have shown that complex 2 is aggregation-induced phosphorescent emission (AIPE) active and exhibits the highest photoluminescent quantum yield (PLQY) of 16.2% in neat film among the reported cationic Ir(III) complexes with AIPE activity. In addition, it also enjoys redox reversibility, good film-forming ability, excellent thermal stability as well as off/on luminescence switching properties, revealing its potential application as a candidate for light-emitting electrochemical cells and organic vapor sensing. To explore applications in biology, 2 was used to image cells.

  11. Light-Up Probes Based on Fluorogens with Aggregation-Induced Emission Characteristics for Monoamine Oxidase-A Activity Study in Solution and in Living Cells.

    PubMed

    Shen, Wei; Yu, Jiajun; Ge, Jingyan; Zhang, Ruoyu; Cheng, Feng; Li, Xuefeng; Fan, Yong; Yu, Shian; Liu, Bin; Zhu, Qing

    2016-01-13

    Fluorogens with aggregation-induced emission (AIEgens) have emerged as a powerful and versatile platform for the development of novel biosensors. In this study, a series of water-soluble fluorescent probes based on tetraphenylethylene (TPE) were designed and synthesized for the detection of monoamine oxidases (MAOs) based on specific interactions between the probes and the proteins. Among the six probes developed, t-TPEM displays a significant fluorescence increase upon introduction of MAOs. Of particular significance is that the fluorescence of t-TPEM in the presence of MAO-A is 21-fold higher than other proteins including MAO-B. Lineweaver-Burk plots reveal that t-TPEM acts as an uncompetitive inhibitor of MAO-A with Ki = 17.1 μM, which confirms its good binding affinity toward MAO-A. Furthermore, a cell imaging experiment reveals that t-TPEM is able to selectively monitor the activity of MAO-A which is localized in mitochondria of MCF-7 cells.

  12. Rational design of aggregation-induced emission luminogen with weak electron donor-acceptor interaction to achieve highly efficient undoped bilayer OLEDs.

    PubMed

    Chen, Long; Jiang, Yibin; Nie, Han; Hu, Rongrong; Kwok, Hoi Sing; Huang, Fei; Qin, Anjun; Zhao, Zujin; Tang, Ben Zhong

    2014-10-08

    In this work, two tailored luminogens (TPE-NB and TPE-PNPB) consisting of tetraphenylethene (TPE), diphenylamino, and dimesitylboryl as a π-conjugated linkage, electron donor, and electron acceptor, respectively, are synthesized and characterized. Their thermal stabilities, photophysical properties, solvachromism, fluorescence decays, electronic structures, electrochemical behaviors, and electroluminescence (EL) properties are investigated systematically, and the impacts of electron donor-acceptor (D-A) interaction on optoelectronic properties are discussed. Due to the presence of a TPE unit, both luminogens show aggregation-induced emission, but strong D-A interaction causes a decrease in emission efficiency and red-shifts in photoluminescence and EL emissions. The luminogen, TPE-PNPB, with a weak D-A interaction fluoresces strongly in solid film with a high fluorescence quantum yield of 94%. The trilayer OLED [ITO/NPB (60 nm)/TPE-PNPB (20 nm)/TPBi (40 nm)/LiF (1 nm)/Al (100 nm)] utilizing TPE-PNPB as a light emitter shows a peak luminance of 49 993 cd m(-2) and high EL efficiencies up to 15.7 cd A(-1), 12.9 lm W(-1), and 5.12%. The bilayer OLED [ITO/TPE-PNPB (80 nm)/TPBi (40 nm)/LiF (1 nm)/Al (100 nm)] adopting TPE-PNPB as a light emitter and hole transporter simultaneously affords even better EL efficiencies of 16.2 cd A(-1), 14.4 lm W(-1), and 5.35% in ambient air, revealing that TPE-PNPB is an eximious p-type light emitter.

  13. Fluorescent turn-on detection and assay of water based on 4-(2-dimethylaminoethyloxy)-N-octadecyl-1,8-naphthalimide with aggregation-induced emission enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yang; Liang, Xuhua; Wei, Song; Fan, Jun; Yang, Xiaohui

    2012-11-01

    The photophysical properties of 4-(2-dimethylaminoethyloxy)-N-octadecyl-1,8-naphthalimide (DON) consisting of donor and acceptor units were investigated in different solutions. Changing from a non-polar to a polar solvent increased the solvent interaction and both the excitation and emission spectra were shifted to longer wavelength and intensity decreased through taking advantage of twisted intramolecular charge transfer (TICT). Density functional theory (DFT) calculations and spectral analyses revealed that such fluorophores were capable of sensing protons by intramolecular charge transfer (ICT). Empirical and quantum mechanical calculations showed that the electron donating effect of the dimethylamino group decreased the change in dipole moment on excitation which resulted in a fluorescence quantum yield remarkably enhanced as the solvent polarity increased. In alkaline media the fluorescence of DON was quenched owing to photoinduced electron transfer being disabled in acidic media. The pKa of the 1,8-naphthailimide dye was 6.70, which defines the dye as a highly efficient "off-on" switch. DON exhibited a typical aggregation-induced emission enhancement (AIEE) behavior that it is virtually nonemissive in organic solvent but highly luminescent in water, as a result of the restriction of free intramolecular rotation of a C-N bond and the non-planar configuration in the aggregate state. The hydrophobicity of octadecyl group provided DON with a fluorescent response to water based on AIEE and the water-dependent spectral characteristics of DON, and the AIEE of DON caused by the effect of water and formation of J-aggregation states. In the range of 0-79.8% (v/v), the fluorescence intensity of DON in acetone solution increased as a linear function of the water content. The optimum detection limits were of 0.011%, 0.0021%, and 0.0033% of water in acetone, ethanol, and acetonitrile, respectively. Satisfactory reproducibility, reversibility and a short response time were

  14. Light-emitting liquid-crystal displays constructed from AIE luminogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Dongyu; Qin, Anjun; Tang, Ben Zhong; Leung, Chris Wai Tung

    2014-10-01

    Liquid crystal displays (LCDs) are widely used for diverse purposes in many aspects in daily life from handle personal devices to professional applications and large-panel LCD televisions. Since LCD is a passive emission display device, it usually shows narrow viewing angle and reduced brightness. Nowadays, LCDs with light-emitting properties is suggested as a less energy consuming displays. To date, fluorescent materials with dichroic properties and strong fluorescence emission are required. However, many molecular emitters, which are highly efficient in solution, will suffer from heavy aggregation-caused quenching (ACQ) effect in the aggregate state, which has greatly limited their applications. In order to overcome these weaknesses, we have designed and synthesized a novel luminescent liquid crystalline compound consisting of a tetraphenylethene (TPE) core, TPE-PPE, as a luminogen with mesogenic moieties. As a result, the TPE-PPE exhibits both the aggregate-induced emission (AIE) and thermotropic liquid crystalline characteristics. By dissolving 1 weight% (wt%) of TPE-PPE into the nematic LC host PA0182, a linearly polarized emission was obtained on the unidirectional orientated LC cell. The photoluminescence polarization ratio of the LC cell has reached to 4.16 between the directions perpendicular and parallel to the rubbing direction. Utilizing the emissive anisotropic TPE-PPE, we have fabricated the photoluminescent liquid crystal display (PL-LCD). This approach has simplified the device design, lowered the energy consumption and increased brightness of the LCD.

  15. Cyclometalated Iridium(III) Complexes as AIE Phosphorescent Probes for Real-Time Monitoring of Mitophagy in Living Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Chengzhi; Liu, Jiangping; Chen, Yu; Guan, Ruilin; Ouyang, Cheng; Zhu, Yanjiao; Ji, Liangnian; Chao, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Mitophagy, which is a special autophagy that removes damaging mitochondria to maintain sufficient healthy mitochondria, provides an alternative path for addressing dysfunctional mitochondria and avoiding cellular death. In the present study, by coupling the triphenylamine group with 2-phenylimidazo[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthroline derivatives, we synthesized five Ir(III) complexes with an AIE property that are expected to fulfill requirements for real-time monitoring of mitophagy. Ir1-Ir5 were exploited to image mitochondria with a short incubation time by confocal microscopy and inductive coupled plasma–mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Due to aggregation-induced emission (AIE), Ir1-Ir5 exhibited excellent photostability compared to MitoTracker Green (MTG). Moreover, Ir1-Ir5 manifested satisfactory photostability in the mitochondrial physiological pH range. In addition, the uptake mechanism of Ir1 was investigated using confocal microscopy and flow cytometry analysis. Finally, using both Ir1 and LysoTracker Green, we were able to achieve real-time monitoring of mitophagy. PMID:26907559

  16. Cyclometalated Iridium(III) Complexes as AIE Phosphorescent Probes for Real-Time Monitoring of Mitophagy in Living Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Chengzhi; Liu, Jiangping; Chen, Yu; Guan, Ruilin; Ouyang, Cheng; Zhu, Yanjiao; Ji, Liangnian; Chao, Hui

    2016-02-01

    Mitophagy, which is a special autophagy that removes damaging mitochondria to maintain sufficient healthy mitochondria, provides an alternative path for addressing dysfunctional mitochondria and avoiding cellular death. In the present study, by coupling the triphenylamine group with 2-phenylimidazo[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthroline derivatives, we synthesized five Ir(III) complexes with an AIE property that are expected to fulfill requirements for real-time monitoring of mitophagy. Ir1-Ir5 were exploited to image mitochondria with a short incubation time by confocal microscopy and inductive coupled plasma–mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Due to aggregation-induced emission (AIE), Ir1-Ir5 exhibited excellent photostability compared to MitoTracker Green (MTG). Moreover, Ir1-Ir5 manifested satisfactory photostability in the mitochondrial physiological pH range. In addition, the uptake mechanism of Ir1 was investigated using confocal microscopy and flow cytometry analysis. Finally, using both Ir1 and LysoTracker Green, we were able to achieve real-time monitoring of mitophagy.

  17. Switchable sensitizers stepwise lighting up lanthanide emissions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Jiao, Peng-Chong; Xu, Hai-Bing; Tang, Ming-Jing; Yang, Xiao-Ping; Huang, Shaoming; Deng, Jian-Guo

    2015-03-20

    Analagous to a long-ranged rocket equipped with multi-stage engines, a luminescent compound with consistent emission signals across a large range of concentrations from two stages of sensitizers can be designed. In this approach, ACQ, aggregation-caused quenching effect of sensitizers, would stimulate lanthanide emission below 10(-4) M, and then at concentrations higher than 10(-3) M, the "aggregation-induced emission" (AIE) effect of luminophores would be activated with the next set of sensitizers for lanthanide emission. Simultaneously, the concentration of the molecules could be monitored digitally by the maximal excitation wavelengths, due to the good linear relationship between the maximal excitation wavelengths and the concentrations {lg(M)}. This model, wherein molecules are assembled with two stages (both AIE and ACQ effect) of sensitizers, may provide a practicable strategy for design and construction of smart lanthanide bioprobes, which are suitable in complicated bioassay systems in which concentration is variable.

  18. Organic nanostructure-based probes for two-photon imaging of mitochondria and microbes with emission between 430 nm and 640 nm.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xinglong; Wang, Nuoxin; Zhang, Lingmin; Dai, Luru; Shao, Huawu; Jiang, Xingyu

    2017-03-24

    Multi-photon excitation and versatile fluorescent probes are in high need for biological imaging, since one probe can satisfy many needs as a biosensor. Herein we synthesize a series of two-photon excited probes based on tetraphenylethene (TPE) structures (TPE-Acr, TPE-Py, and TPE-Quino), which can image both mammalian cells and bacteria based on aggregation-induced emission (AIE) without washing them. Because of cationic moieties, the fluorescent molecules can aggregate into nanoscale fluorescent organic nanoscale dots to image mitochondria and bacteria with tunable emissions using both one-photon and two-photon excitation. Our research demonstrates that these AIE-dots expand the functions of luminescent organic dots to construct efficient fluorescent sensors applicable to both one-photon and two-photon excitation for bio-imaging of bacteria and mammalian cells.

  19. Giving Eyesight to the Blind: Towards Attention-Aware AIED

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Mello, Sidney K.

    2016-01-01

    There is an inextricable link between attention and learning, yet AIED systems in 2015 are largely blind to learners' attentional states. We argue that next-generation AIED systems should have the ability to monitor and dynamically (re)direct attention in order to optimize allocation of sparse attentional resources. We present some initial ideas…

  20. Switchable sensitizers stepwise lighting up lanthanide emissions

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan; Jiao, Peng-Chong; Xu, Hai-Bing; Tang, Ming-Jing; Yang, Xiao-Ping; Huang, Shaoming; Deng, Jian-Guo

    2015-01-01

    Analagous to a long-ranged rocket equipped with multi-stage engines, a luminescent compound with consistent emission signals across a large range of concentrations from two stages of sensitizers can be designed. In this approach, ACQ, aggregation-caused quenching effect of sensitizers, would stimulate lanthanide emission below 10−4 M, and then at concentrations higher than 10−3 M, the “aggregation-induced emission” (AIE) effect of luminophores would be activated with the next set of sensitizers for lanthanide emission. Simultaneously, the concentration of the molecules could be monitored digitally by the maximal excitation wavelengths, due to the good linear relationship between the maximal excitation wavelengths and the concentrations {lg(M)}. This model, wherein molecules are assembled with two stages (both AIE and ACQ effect) of sensitizers, may provide a practicable strategy for design and construction of smart lanthanide bioprobes, which are suitable in complicated bioassay systems in which concentration is variable. PMID:25791467

  1. Combined AIE/EBE/GMRES approach to incompressible flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liou, J.; Tezduyar, T. E.

    Adaptive implicit-explicit (AIE), grouped element-by-element (GEBE), and generalized minimum residuals (GMRES) solution techniques for incompressible flows are combined. In this approach, the GEBE and GMRES iteration methods are employed to solve the equation systems resulting from the implicitly treated elements, and therefore no direct solution effort is involved. The benchmarking results demonstrate that this approach can substantially reduce the CPU time and memory requirements in large-scale flow problems. Although the description of the concepts and the numerical demonstration are based on the incompressible flows, the approach presented here is applicable to larger class of problems in computational mechanics.

  2. The design of the AIE: An object-oriented application development system

    SciTech Connect

    Fuja, R.S.; Widing, M.A.

    1992-02-27

    Three years ago, in response to our challenging development context, the Advanced Modeling and Analysis Section designed and implemented an object-oriented environment -- the Application Interface Engine (AIE). Our prototyping requirements forced existing application development systems beyond their capabilities. Programmers at AMAS and its contractors have developed over twenty applications using AIE. Our initial experience has been very positive. AIE extends an object-oriented programming language with syntax and classes to support applications specification. This extended system improves all stages of the application engineering life cycle, from rapid prototyping to long term maintenance.

  3. Light-enhanced bacterial killing and wash-free imaging based on AIE fluorogen.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Engui; Chen, Yilong; Wang, Hong; Chen, Sijie; Lam, Jacky W Y; Leung, Chris W T; Hong, Yuning; Tang, Ben Zhong

    2015-04-08

    The rapid acquisition of antibiotic resistance poses difficulties in the development of effective methods to eliminate pathogenic bacteria. New bactericides, especially those do not induce the emergence of resistance, are thus in great demand. In this work, we report an aggregation-induced emission fluorogen, TPE-Bac, for bacterial imaging and elimination. TPE-Bac can be readily dissolved in aqueous solution with weak emission. The presence of bacteria can turn on its emission, and thus no washing step is required in the imaging process. Meanwhile, TPE-Bac can be applied as a bactericide for elimination of bacteria. The amphiphilic TPE-Bac bearing two long alkyl chains and two positively charged amines can intercalate into the membrane of bacteria, increase membrane permeability and lead to dark toxicity. The efficiency of bacteria killing is greatly enhanced under light irradiation. TPE-Bac can serve as a photosensitizer to induce reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, which ensures the efficient killing of bacteria. The TPE-Bac-containing agar plates can be continuously used for bacteria killing by applying light to induce ROS generation.

  4. ITS, The End of the World as We Know It: Transitioning AIED into a Service-Oriented Ecosystem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nye, Benjamin D.

    2016-01-01

    Advanced learning technologies are reaching a new phase of their evolution where they are finally entering mainstream educational contexts, with persistent user bases. However, as AIED scales, it will need to follow recent trends in service-oriented and ubiquitous computing: breaking AIED platforms into distinct services that can be composed for…

  5. Another 25 Years of AIED? Challenges and Opportunities for Intelligent Educational Technologies of the Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinkwart, Niels

    2016-01-01

    This paper attempts an analysis of some current trends and future developments in computer science, education, and educational technology. Based on these trends, two possible future predictions of AIED are presented in the form of a utopian vision and a dystopian vision. A comparison of these two visions leads to seven challenges that AIED might…

  6. Selective Host-Guest Co-crystallization of Pyridine-Functionalized Tetraphenylethylenes with Phthalic Acids and Multicolor Emission of the Co-crystals.

    PubMed

    Feng, Hai-Tao; Xiong, Jia-Bin; Luo, Jun; Feng, Wen-Fang; Yang, Desuo; Zheng, Yan-Song

    2017-01-12

    Tetraphenylethylene (TPE) and its derivatives are the most typical and most widely studied organic compounds showing aggregation-induced emission (AIE). Due to their propeller-like structures, V-like clefts exist between the aryl rings, which make them promising host compounds. However, such a possibility is seldom explored. Herein, it is reported that TPE derivatives bearing two or four pyridine rings at the para positions of the phenyl rings (TPE-Pys) can selectively include triangular (Δ-like) m-phthalic acid from a mixture of o-, m-, and p-phthalic acids due to their shape complementary to form host-guest co-crystals, which showed redder emission than the TPE-Pys themselves. The emission of co-crystals 1-5 could be reversibly switched between yellow and red by alternating exposure to HCl and ammonia vapor. The host-guest co-crystals not only exhibited great potential for selectively recognizing and separating m-phthalic acid and as multicolor emission materials, but are also suitable for use as secret ink due to their reversible color change on varying the host-guest interactions.

  7. Training the Body: The Potential of AIED to Support Personalized Motor Skills Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santos, Olga C.

    2016-01-01

    This paper argues that the research field of Artificial Intelligence in Education (AIED) can benefit from integrating recent technological advances (e.g., wearable devices, big data processing, 3D modelling, 3D printing, ambient intelligence) and design methodologies, such as TORMES, when developing systems that address the psychomotor learning…

  8. Socio-Cultural Imbalances in AIED Research: Investigations, Implications and Opportunities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blanchard, Emmanuel G.

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates international representations in the Artificial Intelligence in Education (AIED) research field. Its methodological and theoretical groundings are inspired by Arnett (2008) and Henrich et al. (2010a) who addressed the same issue in psychology, and respectively a) discovered massive imbalances in representation in top-tier…

  9. Using Ontological Engineering to Overcome AI-ED Problems: Contribution, Impact and Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mizoguchi, Riichiro; Bourdeau, Jacqueline

    2016-01-01

    This article reflects on the ontology engineering methodology discussed by the paper entitled "Using Ontological Engineering to Overcome AI-ED Problems" published in this journal in 2000. We discuss the achievements obtained in the last 10 years, the impact of our work as well as recent trends and perspectives in ontology engineering for…

  10. Emissive Molecular Aggregates and Energy Migration in Luminescent Solar Concentrators.

    PubMed

    Banal, James L; Zhang, Bolong; Jones, David J; Ghiggino, Kenneth P; Wong, Wallace W H

    2017-01-17

    of chromophores exhibiting aggregation-induced emission (AIE) behavior are attractive candidates for LSC applications. Strategic application of AIE chromophores has led to the development of the first organic-based transparent solar concentrator that harvests UV light as well as the demonstration of reabsorption reduction by taking advantage of energy migration processes between chromophores. Further developments led us to the application of perylene diimides using an energy migration/energy transfer approach. To prevent concentration quenching, a molecularly insulated perylene diimide with bulky substituents attached to the imide positions was designed and synthesized. By combining the insulated perylene diimide with a commercial perylene dye as an energy donor-acceptor emitter pair, detrimental luminescence reabsorption was reduced while achieving a high chromophore concentration for efficient light absorption. This Account reviews and reinspects some of our recent work and the improvements in the field of LSCs.

  11. Recurrent autoimmune inner ear disease (AIED) and polyarteritis nodosa in a patient with large cell lung carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Liao, Hsien-Tzung; Chien, Chih-Hung; Chen, Chung-Hsiung; Wang, Hon-Pin; Huang, De-Feng

    2007-06-01

    Autoimmune inner ear disease (AIED) is a very rare disorder with distinct clinical features and can occur in patients with malignancy or autoimmune diseases. We report a 72-year-old male patient with polyarteritis nodosa treated continuously for 5 years with aggressive immunosuppressive drugs, including cyclophosphamide, who experienced three episodes of acute hearing loss during treatment. Organic lesions of the external and middle ear were excluded by repeated examinations, and if one subscribes to McCabe's (Ann Otol Rhinol Laryngol 88:585-589, 1979) definition of AIED, this condition must be considered as the likely cause of the hearing loss. During the period of treatment, three episodes of AIED occurred, and eventually, lung cancer developed. From the time relationship and clinical manifestations of neuropathy and livedo reticularis, the first episode of hearing loss was more likely to be related to vasculitis itself, while the third episode may well have been associated with the development of lung cancer given the dramatic improvement in the clinical condition following treatment of the tumor by excision and cancer chemotherapy. Coexistence of AIED, vasculitis, and malignancy in the same patient has only been reported infrequently, and our case suggests that this coexistence may not be coincidental. For those patients with autoimmune disease who are on long-term immunosuppressive drug therapy, active surveillance for a nascent malignant tumor should be exercised if AIED recurs or persists.

  12. Functionalization of boron diiminates with unique optical properties: multicolor tuning of crystallization-induced emission and introduction into the main chain of conjugated polymers.

    PubMed

    Yoshii, Ryousuke; Hirose, Amane; Tanaka, Kazuo; Chujo, Yoshiki

    2014-12-31

    In this article, we report the unique optical characteristics of boron diiminates in the solid states. We synthesized the boron diiminates exhibiting aggregation-induced emission (AIE). From the series of optical measurements, it was revealed that the optical properties in the solid state should be originated from the suppression of the molecular motions of the boron diiminate units. The emission colors were modulated by the substitution effects (λ(PL,crystal) = 448-602 nm, λ(PL,amorphous) = 478-645 nm). Strong phosphorescence was observed from some boron diiminates deriving from the effects of two imine groups. Notably, we found some of boron diiminates showed crystallization-induced emission (CIE) properties derived from the packing differences from crystalline to amorphous states. The 15-fold emission enhancement was observed by the crystallization (Φ(PL,crystal) = 0.59, Φ(PL,amorphous) = 0.04). Next, we conjugated boron diiminates with fluorene. The synthesized polymers showed good solubility in the common solvents, film formability, and thermal stability. In addition, because of the expansion of main-chain conjugation, the peak shifts to longer wavelength regions were observed in the absorption/emission spectra of the polymers comparing to those of the corresponding boron diiminate monomers (λ(abs) = 374-407 nm, λ(PL) = 509-628 nm). Furthermore, the absorption and the emission intensities were enhanced via the light-harvesting effect by the conjugation with fluorene. Finally, we also demonstrated the dynamic reversible alterations of the optical properties of the polymer thin films by exposing to acidic or basic vapors.

  13. A Selective Glutathione Probe based on AIE Fluorogen and its Application in Enzymatic Activity Assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lou, Xiaoding; Hong, Yuning; Chen, Sijie; Leung, Chris Wai Tung; Zhao, Na; Situ, Bo; Lam, Jacky Wing Yip; Tang, Ben Zhong

    2014-03-01

    In this work, we design and synthesize a malonitrile-functionalized TPE derivative (TPE-DCV), which can react with thiol group through thiol-ene click reaction, leading to the fluorescence change of the system. Combined with the unique AIE property, TPE-DCV can selectively detect glutathione (GSH) but not cysteine or homocysteine. As the cleavage of GSSG with the aid of glutathione reductase produces GSH, which turns on the fluorescence of TPE-DCV, the ensemble of TPE-DCV and GSSG can thus serve as a label-free sensor for enzymatic activity assay of glutathione reductase. We also apply TPE-DCV for the detection of intracellular GSH in living cells.

  14. The influence of the crystal structure on aggregation-induced luminescence of derivatives of aminobenzoic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nosova, D. A.; Zarochentseva, E. P.; Vysotskaya, S. O.; Klemesheva, N. A.; Korotkov, V. I.

    2014-12-01

    The luminescence of three derivatives of 2-(phenylamino)-benzoic acid (N-phenylanthranilic, mefenamic, and niflumic acids) in benzene solution, in the polycrystalline state, and in the hexamethylbenzene matrix is studied. In the crystalline state, these compounds exhibit intense aggregation-induced luminescence. An increase in luminescence is also observed in the impurity crystal. The hexamethylbenzene crystal lattice restricts the mobility of molecules, thus ensuring the rigidity of the molecular structure of acids, which decreases the efficiency of nonradiative electron energy degradation. The main reason for the increase in the luminescence intensity in the case of fixation in a crystalline matrix is the formation of intramolecular hydrogen bonds and dimers of acid molecules.

  15. Flower-like superstructures of AIE-active tetraphenylethylene through solvophobic controlled self-assembly

    PubMed Central

    Salimimarand, Mina; La, Duong Duc; Kobaisi, Mohammad Al; Bhosale, Sheshanath V.

    2017-01-01

    The development of well-organized structures with high luminescent properties in the solid and aggregated states is of both scientific and technological interest due to their applications in nanotechnology. In this paper we described the synthesis of amphiphilic and dumbbell shaped AIE-active tetraphenylethylene (TPE) derivatives and studied their self-assembly with solvophobic control. Interestingly, both TPE derivatives form a 3D flower-shape supramolecular structure from THF/water solutions at varying water fractions. SEM microscopy was used to visualise step-wise growth of flower-shape assembly. TPE derivatives also show good mechanochromic properties which can be observed in the process of grinding, fuming and heating. These TPE derivative self-assemblies are formed due to two main important properties: (i) the TPE-core along with alkyl chains, optimizing the dispersive interactions within a construct, and (ii) amide-linkage through molecular recognition. We believe such arrangements prevent crystallization and favour the directional growth of flower-shape nanostructures in a 3D fashion. PMID:28230060

  16. Flower-like superstructures of AIE-active tetraphenylethylene through solvophobic controlled self-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salimimarand, Mina; La, Duong Duc; Kobaisi, Mohammad Al; Bhosale, Sheshanath V.

    2017-02-01

    The development of well-organized structures with high luminescent properties in the solid and aggregated states is of both scientific and technological interest due to their applications in nanotechnology. In this paper we described the synthesis of amphiphilic and dumbbell shaped AIE-active tetraphenylethylene (TPE) derivatives and studied their self-assembly with solvophobic control. Interestingly, both TPE derivatives form a 3D flower-shape supramolecular structure from THF/water solutions at varying water fractions. SEM microscopy was used to visualise step-wise growth of flower-shape assembly. TPE derivatives also show good mechanochromic properties which can be observed in the process of grinding, fuming and heating. These TPE derivative self-assemblies are formed due to two main important properties: (i) the TPE-core along with alkyl chains, optimizing the dispersive interactions within a construct, and (ii) amide-linkage through molecular recognition. We believe such arrangements prevent crystallization and favour the directional growth of flower-shape nanostructures in a 3D fashion.

  17. Bipolar AIE-active luminogens comprised of an oxadiazole core and terminal TPE moieties as a new type of host for doped electroluminescence.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jing; Yang, Xiao; Li, Xianjie; Chen, Pengyu; Tang, Runli; Li, Feng; Lu, Ping; Ma, Yuguang; Wang, Lei; Qin, Jingui; Li, Qianqian; Li, Zhen

    2012-10-07

    For the first time, two bipolar AIE-active luminogens (Oxa-pTPE and Oxa-mTPE) constructed from tetraphenylethene and oxadiazole were utilized as fluorescence host materials in sky-blue doped OLEDs and exhibited high efficiencies with L(max), η(C,max), η(P,max) and η(ext,max) of 10,070 cd m(-2), 9.79 cd A(-1), 9.92 Im W(-1) and 5.0%, respectively, broadening the scope for the utilization of AIE materials in the optoelectronic field.

  18. Alternate Splicing of Interleukin-1 Receptor Type II (IL1R2) In Vitro Correlates with Clinical Glucocorticoid Responsiveness in Patients with AIED

    PubMed Central

    Vambutas, Andrea; DeVoti, James; Goldofsky, Elliot; Gordon, Michael; Lesser, Martin; Bonagura, Vincent

    2009-01-01

    Autoimmune Inner Ear Disease (AIED) is poorly characterized clinically, with no definitive laboratory test. All patients suspected of having AIED are given glucocorticoids during periods of acute hearing loss, however, only half initially respond, and still fewer respond over time. We hypothesized that AIED is a systemic autoimmune disease characterized by dysfunctional peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) responses to a unique cochlear antigen(s). To test this hypothesis, we examined end-stage AIED patients undergoing cochlear implant surgery and compared autologous perilymph stimulated PBMC from AIED patients to controls. We determined that autologous perilymph from AIED patients was unable to induce expression of a long membrane-bound Interleukin-1 Receptor Type II (mIL1R2) transcript in PBMC as compared with controls, despite similar expression of the short soluble IL1R2 (sIL1R2) transcript (p<0.05). IL1R2 is a molecular decoy that traps interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and does not initiate subsequent signaling events, thereby suppressing an inflammatory response. IL1R2 transcript length is regulated by alternate splicing, and the major inhibitory function is attributed to the full-length mIL1R2. In addition, IL1R2 expression is induced by dexamethasone. Separately, we prospectively examined patients with newer onset glucocorticoid-responsive AIED. Immediately prior to clinical treatment for acute deterioration of hearing thresholds, their PBMC demonstrated a robust induction of mIL1R2 in PBMC in response to dexamethasone in vitro that correlated with a clinical response to prednisone in vivo (p<0.0001) as measured by hearing restoration. In contrast, clinically steroid unresponsive patients demonstrated high basal levels of mIL1R2 in their PBMC and only minimally augmented expression in response to dexamethasone. Thus, induced expression of mIL1R2 appears to be a protective mechanism in hearing homeostasis and warrants further investigation in a large

  19. Facile Approaches for Constructing Deep-Blue Tpe-Based Solid Emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jing; Li, Qianqian; Li, Zhen

    2013-10-01

    The intriguing phenomenon of aggregation-induced emission (AIE), first reported by Tang et al. in 2001, has been demonstrated as an effective way to tackle the notorious aggregation-caused quenching (ACQ) effect and aroused a new research topic of AIE materials as promising candidates for OLEDs and bioprobes. Among the archetypal AIE molecules, tetraphenylethene (TPE) enjoys the advantages of facile synthesis and outstanding AIE effect. Although lots of TPE-based luminogens with excellent electroluminescence performance have been developed, blue AIE luminogens are still scarce for the intrinsic extension of intramolecular conjugation. In this paper, we mainly review our recent work on the construction of blue- or deep-blue TPE-based solid emitters for OLEDs. The facile synthetic approaches and the device performance of the resulting materials are well demonstrated.

  20. Two-Photon Optical Properties of AIE-active D-TPE-A Molecules: Aggregation Enhancement and Structure-Property Relationships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yilin; Li, Jie; Tang, Ben Zhong; Wong, Kam Sing

    We present an aggregation enhancement in two-photon-excited fluorescence (TPEF) of about two orders of magnitude in a series of novel non-centrosymmetric D- π-A molecules. Aggregation-induced emission characteristics are introduced into these D- π-A molecules via tetraphenylethylene (TPE), which is used as their π-bridge. Detailed analysis shows that the TPEF of these molecules are enhanced in aggregation environment with both fluorescence quantum efficiency and two-photon absorptivity concomitantly. The two-photon absorption (TPA) transition bands of these branched- or butterfly-configured molecules are similar to those in their linear absorption. The molecular TPA cross sections in aggregation environment reach around 50-130 GM, and peak within the available wavelength ranges of a Ti:Sapphire femtosecond oscillator. We also observe that two-photon absorptivity increases progressively with the addition of donor/acceptor moieties on the TPE backbone. This phenomenon is presumably attributed to the improved conjugation length and enhanced intramolecular charge transfer, hence better delocalization of π-electrons. For each compound, the aggregation enhancement in TPA may also offers clues of aggregation effect on the molecular electronic structure.

  1. A neutral dinuclear Ir(iii) complex for anti-counterfeiting and data encryption.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yang; Li, Guangfu; Che, Weilong; Liu, Yingjie; Xu, Bin; Shan, Guogang; Zhu, Dongxia; Su, Zhongmin; Bryce, Martin R

    2017-03-09

    A neutral dinuclear Ir(iii) Schiff base complex PIBIP has been synthesized and shown to exhibit both piezochromic luminescence (PCL) and aggregation induced emission (AIE) behaviour. An efficient second-level anti-counterfeit trademark and a data encryption device were fabricated using PIBIP as the active material.

  2. Computer Program Development Specification for Ada Integrated Environment: KAPSE (Kernel Ada Programming Support Environment)/Database, Type B5, B5-AIE(1).KAPSE(1).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-11-12

    Control and Categorization of Database Objects, and the Manipulation of User-Defined Attributes. 3, NUL22=0 Invocation of and Commnication Between...area + ...............- -+ - .-.-.. local storage area 4-------- -........ subprogram commnication area The fields in a call frame contain the...Implementation DefTned; end DIRUC*TIO; 167 IN1’IRMUTRtCS IN~ CORPORATED 733 CONCORD AVENUE * CAMBRIDGE. MSSACHUSETTS 02133 1 617) 661.1840 35-AIE(l).KAPSE(l) with

  3. Aggregation-induced near-infrared absorption of squaraine dye in an albumin nanocomplex for photoacoustic tomography in vivo.

    PubMed

    An, Fei-Fei; Deng, Zi-Jian; Ye, Jun; Zhang, Jin-Feng; Yang, Yin-Long; Li, Chang-Hui; Zheng, Cai-Jun; Zhang, Xiao-Hong

    2014-10-22

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) is a newly emerging noninvasive imaging modality that could be further enhanced using near-infrared (NIR)-absorbing materials as contrast agents. To date, the most extensively studied photoacoustic imaging agents are inorganic nanomaterials because organic materials with NIR-absorption capabilities are limited. In this study, a NIR-absorbing nanocomplex composed of a squaraine dye (SQ) and albumin was prepared based on the aggregation-induced NIR absorption of SQ. Through aggregation, the absorption spectrum of SQ was widened from the visible-light region to the NIR region, which facilitated photoacoustic signal generation in the tissue-transparent NIR optical window (700-900 nm). Blood analysis and histology measurements revealed that the nanocomplex can be used for PAT applications in vivo without obvious toxicity to living mice.

  4. Milk protein suspensions enriched with three essential minerals: Physicochemical characterization and aggregation induced by a novel enzymatic pool.

    PubMed

    Lombardi, Julia; Spelzini, Darío; Corrêa, Ana Paula Folmer; Brandelli, Adriano; Risso, Patricia; Boeris, Valeria

    2016-04-01

    Structural changes of casein micelles and their aggregation induced by a novel enzymatic pool isolated from Bacillus spp. in the presence of calcium, magnesium or zinc were investigated. The effect of cations on milk protein structure was studied using fluorescence and dynamic light scattering. In the presence of cations, milk protein structure rearrangements and larger casein micelle size were observed. The interaction of milk proteins with zinc appears to be of a different nature than that with calcium or magnesium. Under the experimental conditions assayed, the affinity of each cation for some groups present in milk proteins seems to play an important role, besides electrostatic interaction. On the other hand, the lowest aggregation times were achieved at the highest calcium and zinc concentrations (15 mM and 0.25 mM, respectively). The study found that the faster the aggregation of casein micelles, the less compact the gel matrix obtained. Cation concentrations affected milk protein aggregation kinetics and the structure of the aggregates formed.

  5. Pre-resonance enhancement of exceptional intensity in Aggregation-Induced Raman Optical Activity (AIROA) spectra of lutein derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zajac, G.; Lasota, J.; Dudek, M.; Kaczor, A.; Baranska, M.

    2017-02-01

    Recently reported new phenomenon of Aggregation-Induced Raman Optical Activity is demonstrated here for the first time in the pre-resonance conditions for lutein diacetate and 3‧-epi-lutein supramolecular self-assembles. We demonstrate that minor alterations in the lutein structure (e.g. acetylation of hydroxyl groups or different configuration at one of the chiral center) can lead to definitely different spectral profiles and optical properties due to formation of aggregates of different structure and type. Lutein forms only H-aggregates, lutein diacetate only J-aggregates, while 3‧-epi-lutein can occur in both forms simultaneously. Variety of aggregates' structures is so large that not only the type of aggregation is different, but also their chirality. It is remarkable that even in the pre-resonance conditions, aggregation of lutein derivatives can lead to the intense ROA signal, and moreover, 3‧-epi-lutein demonstrated the highest resonance ROA CID ratio that has ever been reported.

  6. Boron-doped graphene quantum dots for selective glucose sensing based on the "abnormal" aggregation-induced photoluminescence enhancement.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Zhang, Zhi-Yi; Liang, Ru-Ping; Li, Ya-Hua; Qiu, Jian-Ding

    2014-05-06

    A hydrothermal approach for the cutting of boron-doped graphene (BG) into boron-doped graphene quantum dots (BGQDs) has been proposed. Various characterizations reveal that the boron atoms have been successfully doped into graphene structures with the atomic percentage of 3.45%. The generation of boronic acid groups on the BGQDs surfaces facilitates their application as a new photoluminescence (PL) probe for label free glucose sensing. It is postulated that the reaction of the two cis-diol units in glucose with the two boronic acid groups on the BGQDs surfaces creates structurally rigid BGQDs-glucose aggregates, restricting the intramolecular rotations and thus resulting in a great boost in the PL intensity. The present unusual "aggregation-induced PL increasing" sensing process excludes any saccharide with only one cis-diol unit, as manifested by the high specificity of BGQDs for glucose over its close isomeric cousins fructose, galactose, and mannose. It is believed that the doping of boron can introduce the GQDs to a new kind of surface state and offer great scientific insights to the PL enhancement mechanism with treatment of glucose.

  7. AIE-Active Tetraphenylethylene Cross-Linked N-Isopropylacrylamide Polymer: A Long-Term Fluorescent Cellular Tracker.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hengchang; Qi, Chunxuan; Cheng, Chao; Yang, Zengming; Cao, Haiying; Yang, Zhiwang; Tong, Jinhui; Yao, Xiaoqiang; Lei, Ziqiang

    2016-04-06

    There is a great demand to understand cell transplantation, migration, division, fusion, and lysis. Correspondingly, illuminant object-labeled bioprobes have been employed as long-term cellular tracers, which could provide valuable insights into detecting these biological processes. In this work, we designed and synthesized a fluorescent polymer, which was comprised of hydrophilic N-isopropylacrylamide polymers as matrix and a hydrophobic tetraphenylethene (TPE) unit as AIE-active cross-linkers (DDBV). It was found that when the feed molar ratio of N-isopropylacrylamides to cross-linkers was 22:1, the produced polymers demonstrated the desirable LCST at 37.5 °C. And also, the temperature sensitivity of polymers could induce phase transfer within a narrow window (32-38 °C). Meanwhile, phase transfer was able to lead the florescent response. And thus, we concluded that two responses occur when one stimulus is input. Therefore, the new cross-linker of DDBV rendered a new performance from PNIPAm and a new chance to create new materials. Moreover, the resulted polymers demonstrated very good biocompatibility with living A549 human lung adenocarcinoma cells and L929 mouse fibroblast cells, respectively. Both of these cells retained very active viabilities in the concentration range of 7.8-125 μL/mg of polymers. Notably, P[(NIPAm)22-(DDBV)1] (P6) could be readily internalized by living cells with a noninvasive manner. The cellular staining by the fluorescent polymer is so indelible that it enables cell tracing for at least 10 passages.

  8. Combined AIE/EBE/GMRES approach to incompressible flows. [Adaptive Implicit-Explicit/Grouped Element-by-Element/Generalized Minimum Residuals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, J.; Tezduyar, T. E.

    1990-01-01

    Adaptive implicit-explicit (AIE), grouped element-by-element (GEBE), and generalized minimum residuals (GMRES) solution techniques for incompressible flows are combined. In this approach, the GEBE and GMRES iteration methods are employed to solve the equation systems resulting from the implicitly treated elements, and therefore no direct solution effort is involved. The benchmarking results demonstrate that this approach can substantially reduce the CPU time and memory requirements in large-scale flow problems. Although the description of the concepts and the numerical demonstration are based on the incompressible flows, the approach presented here is applicable to larger class of problems in computational mechanics.

  9. Probing the nature of peripheral boryl groups within luminescent tellurophenes.

    PubMed

    Braun, Christina A; Zomerman, Derek; de Aguiar, Inara; Qi, Yanyu; Delgado, William Torres; Ferguson, Michael J; McDonald, Robert; de Souza, Gabriel L C; He, Gang; Brown, Alex; Rivard, Eric

    2017-02-01

    In this article our attempts to tune the color of luminescence within a new class of aggregation-induced emission (AIE) active tellurophenes is reported along with computational details that include spin-orbit coupling effects so as to better understand the nature of emission in the phosphorescent tellurophene (B-Te-6-B). Despite not meeting some of the initial synthetic targets, the emission within a borylated tellurophene can be altered with the addition of an N-heterocyclic carbene.

  10. In Vitro and in Vivo Demonstration of Photodynamic Activity and Cytoplasm Imaging through TPE Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Jayaram, Dhanya T; Ramos-Romero, Sara; Shankar, Balaraman H; Garrido, Cristina; Rubio, Nuria; Sanchez-Cid, Lourdes; Gómez, Salvador Borros; Blanco, Jeronimo; Ramaiah, Danaboyina

    2016-01-15

    We synthesized novel tetraphenylethene (TPE) conjugates, which undergo unique self-assembly to form spherical nanoparticles that exhibited aggregation induced emission (AIE) in the near-infrared region. These nanoparticles showed significant singlet oxygen generation efficiency, negligible dark toxicity, rapid cellular uptake, efficient localization in cytoplasm, and high in vitro photocytotoxicity as well as in vivo photodynamic activity against a human prostate tumor animal model. This study demonstrates, for the first time, the power of the self-assembled AIE active tetraphenylethene conjugates in aqueous media as a nanoplatform for future therapeutic applications.

  11. Fluorescence Turn-on Enantioselective Recognition of both Chiral Acidic Compounds and α-Amino Acids by a Chiral Tetraphenylethylene Macrocycle Amine.

    PubMed

    Feng, Hai-Tao; Zhang, Xing; Zheng, Yan-Song

    2015-08-21

    New chiral tetraphenylethylene (TPE) macrocycles bearing optically pure amine groups were synthesized and found to have a discriminating ability between the two enantiomers of not only chiral acidic compounds but also α-amino acids by enantioselective aggregation and aggregation-induced emission (AIE) effects. NMR spectra, including 2D-NOESY, disclosed that the host-guest interaction of the macrocycle receptor played a key role in addition to the acid-base interactions.

  12. Effect of polymer aggregation on the open circuit voltage in organic photovoltaic cells: aggregation-induced conjugated polymer gel and its application for preventing open circuit voltage drop.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bong-Gi; Jeong, Eun Jeong; Park, Hui Joon; Bilby, David; Guo, L Jay; Kim, Jinsang

    2011-03-01

    To investigate the structure-dependent aggregation behavior of conjugated polymers and the effect of aggregation on the device performance of conjugated polymer photovoltaic cells, new conjugated polymers (PVTT and CN-PVTT) having the same regioregularity but different intermolecular packing were prepared and characterized by means of UV-vis spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Photovoltaic devices were prepared with these polymers under different polymer-aggregate conditions. Polymer aggregation induced by thermal annealing increases the short circuit current but provides no advantage in the overall power conversion efficiency because of a decrease in the open circuit voltage. The device fabricated from a pre-aggregated polymer suspension, acquired from ultrasonic agitation of a conjugated polymer gel, showed enhanced performance because of better phase separation and reduced recombination between polymer/PCBM.

  13. Alterations in the extracellular catabolism of nucleotides and platelet aggregation induced by high-fat diet in rats: effects of α-tocopherol.

    PubMed

    Gutierres, Jessié M; Carvalho, Fabiano B; Schetinger, Maria Rosa C; Rodrigues, Marília V; Vieira, Juliano M; Maldonado, Paula; Araújo, Maria do Carmo S; Schmatz, Roberta; Stefanello, Naiara; Jaques, Jeandre A S; Costa, Marcio; Morsch, Vera; Mazzanti, Cinthia M; Pimentel, Victor; Lopes, Sonia Terezinha A; Spanevello, Roselia M

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess whether α-tocopherol administration prevented alterations in the ectonucleotidase activities and platelet aggregation induced by high-fat diet in rats. Thus, we examined four groups of male rats which received standard diet, high-fat diet (HFD), α-tocopherol (α-Toc), and high-fat diet plus α-tocopherol. HFD was administered ad libitum and α-Toc by gavage using a dose of 50 mg/kg. After 3 months of treatment, animals were submitted to euthanasia, and blood samples were collected for biochemical assays. Results demonstrate that NTPDase, ectonucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase, and 5'-nucleotidase activities were significantly decreased in platelets of HFD group, while that adenosine deaminase (ADA) activity was significantly increased in this group in comparison to the other groups (P < 0.05). When rats that received HFD were treated with α-Toc, the activities of these enzymes were similar to the control, but ADA activity was significantly increased in relation to the control and α-Toc group (P < 0.05). HFD group showed an increased in platelet aggregation in comparison to the other groups, and treatment with α-Toc significantly reduced platelet aggregation in this group. These findings demonstrated that HFD alters platelet aggregation and purinergic signaling in the platelets and that treatment with α-Toc was capable of modulating the adenine nucleotide hydrolysis in this experimental condition.

  14. Tuning the singlet-triplet energy gap of AIE luminogens: crystallization-induced room temperature phosphorescence and delay fluorescence, tunable temperature response, highly efficient non-doped organic light-emitting diodes.

    PubMed

    Li, Jie; Jiang, Yibin; Cheng, Juan; Zhang, Yilin; Su, Huimin; Lam, Jacky W Y; Sung, Herman H Y; Wong, Kam Sing; Kwok, Hoi Sing; Tang, Ben Zhong

    2015-01-14

    In this contribution, we finely tuned the singlet-triplet energy gap (ΔEST) of AIE-active materials to modulate their fluorescence, phosphorescence and delay fluorescence via rational molecular design and investigated the possible ways to harvest their triplet energy in OLEDs. Noteworthily, two molecules o-TPA-3TPE-o-PhCN and o-TPA-3TPE-p-PhCN with larger ΔEST values (0.59 eV and 0.45 eV, respectively) emitted efficient long-lived low temperature phosphorescence in their glassy solutions and exhibited efficient crystallization-induced room temperature phosphorescence (RTP). Meanwhile, it was the first time to observe a novel crystallization-induced delay fluorescence phenomenon in another AIE-active molecule p-TPA-3TPE-p-PhCN owing to its very small ΔEST value (0.21 eV). It was also found that molecules with various ΔEST values showed significantly different temperature sensitivity. Non-doped electroluminescent (EL) devices using these molecules as light-emitting layers were fabricated, exhibiting external quantum efficiencies (EQE) higher than theoretical values of purely singlet emitter type devices. Particularly, p-TPA-3TPE-p-PhCN showed outstanding device performances with high luminance and efficiencies up to 36,900 cd m(-2), 11.2 lm W(-1), 12.8 cd A(-1) and 4.37%, respectively, considering that its solid-state quantum yield was only 42%. All the above observations suggested that tuning the ΔEST values of AIE materials is a powerful methodology to generate many more interesting and meaningful optoelectronic properties.

  15. Peptide-Induced AIEgen Self-Assembly: A New Strategy to Realize Highly Sensitive Fluorescent Light-Up Probes.

    PubMed

    Han, Aitian; Wang, Huaimin; Kwok, Ryan T K; Ji, Shenglu; Li, Jun; Kong, Deling; Tang, Ben Zhong; Liu, Bin; Yang, Zhimou; Ding, Dan

    2016-04-05

    Fluorescent light-up probes with aggregation-induced emission (AIE) characteristics have recently attracted great research interest due to their intelligent fluorescence activation mechanism and excellent photobleaching resistance. In this work, we report a new, simple, and generic strategy to design and prepare highly sensitive AIE fluorescent light-up bioprobe through facile incorporation of a self-assembling peptide sequence GFFY between the recognition element and the AIE luminogen (AIEgen). After the bioprobes respond to the targets, the peptide GFFY is capable of inducing the ordered self-assembly of AIEgens, yielding close and tight intermolecular steric interactions to restrict the intramolecular motions of AIEgens for excellent signal output. Using two proof-of-concepts, we have demonstrated that self-assembling peptide-incorporating AIE light-up probes show much higher sensitivity in sensing the corresponding targets in both solutions and cancer cells as compared to those without GFFY induced self-assembly. Taking the probe TPE-GFFYK(DVEDEE-Ac), for example, a detection limit as low as 0.54 pM can be achieved for TPE-GFFYK(DVEDEE-Ac) in caspase-3 detection, which is much lower than that of TPE-K(DVED-Ac) (3.50 pM). This study may inspire new insights into the design of advanced fluorescent molecular probes.

  16. Bright Solid-State Emission of Disilane-Bridged Donor-Acceptor-Donor and Acceptor-Donor-Acceptor Chromophores.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Masaki; Tsuchiya, Mizuho; Sakamoto, Ryota; Yamanoi, Yoshinori; Nishibori, Eiji; Sugimoto, Kunihisa; Nishihara, Hiroshi

    2016-02-24

    The development of disilane-bridged donor-acceptor-donor (D-Si-Si-A-Si-Si-D) and acceptor-donor-acceptor (A-Si-Si-D-Si-Si-A) compounds is described. Both types of compound showed strong emission (λem =ca. 500 and ca. 400 nm, respectively) in the solid state with high quantum yields (Φ: up to 0.85). Compound 4 exhibited aggregation-induced emission enhancement in solution. X-ray diffraction revealed that the crystal structures of 2, 4, and 12 had no intermolecular π-π interactions to suppress the nonradiative transition in the solid state.

  17. Smart Cu(II)-aptamer complexes based gold nanoplatform for tumor micro-environment triggered programmable intracellular prodrug release, photodynamic treatment and aggregation induced photothermal therapy of hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Da; Zheng, Aixian; Li, Juan; Wu, Ming; Wu, Lingjie; Wei, Zuwu; Liao, Naishun; Zhang, Xiaolong; Cai, Zhixiong; Yang, Huanghao; Liu, Gang; Liu, Xiaolong; Liu, Jingfeng

    2017-01-01

    This study describes smart Cu(II)-aptamer complexes based gold nanoplatform for tumor micro-environment triggered programmable prodrug release, in demand photodynamic therapy and aggregation induced photothermal ablation of hepatocellular carcinoma. The nanoplatform is consist of monodispersed gold nanoparticle (GNP) that is binding to HCC cell specific targeting aptamers (TLS11a) through Au-S bond; the aptamer is labeled with Ce6 at the 5'end and coordinated with Cu(II) through (GA)10 repeating bases to load AQ4N at the 3' end. In normal physiological conditions, the fluorescence and ROS generation ability of Ce6 are quenched by GNPs via RET; but in cancerous cells, the fluorescence and the ROS generation of Ce6 could be recovered by cleavage of Au-S bond through high level of intracellular GSH for real-time imaging and in demand PDT. Meanwhile, the prodrug AQ4N release could be triggered by acid-cleavage of coordination bonds, then accompanied by a release of Cu(II) that would induce the electrostatic aggregation of GNPs for photo-thermal ablation; furthermore, the significantly enhanced chemotherapy efficiency could be achieved by PDT produced hypoxia to convert AQ4N into AQ4. In summary, here described nanoplatform with tumor cell specific responsive properties and programmable PDT/PTT/chemotherapy functions, might be an interesting synergistic strategy for HCC treatment. PMID:28042325

  18. Real-time naked-eye multiplex detection of toxins and bacteria using AIEgens with the assistance of graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ruoyu; Cai, Xiaolei; Feng, Guangxue; Liu, Bin

    2017-02-01

    Toxins and bacteria in water or food pose a threat to human life and could potentially be exploited for bioterrorism. Real-time naked-eye detection of these contaminants is highly desirable to provide a direct and simple analytical method and address the challenges of the existing strategies. Using the detection of ricin and B. subtilis as an example, a naked-eye multiplex detection model is established. In this work, a green fluorogen with aggregation-induced emission (AIE) characteristics was encapsulated in silica nanoshells. The resulting green AIE nanoparticles (NPs) were further functionalized with ricin binding aptamers (RBA), which were used together with graphene oxide (GO) to provide a fluorescence turn-on approach recognizable by naked eye for the specific sensing of ricin. The platform is compatible with a red emissive fluorescent light-up probe (AIE-2Van) for B. subtilis detection. The success of the multiplex is validated by different colours, that is, green for ricin and red for B. subtilis, which are clearly recognizable by naked eye in the same solution.

  19. All-or-none switching of photon upconversion in self-assembled organogel systems.

    PubMed

    Duan, Pengfei; Asthana, Deepak; Nakashima, Takuya; Kawai, Tsuyoshi; Yanai, Nobuhiro; Kimizuka, Nobuo

    2017-02-22

    Aggregation-induced photon upconversion (iPUC) based on a triplet-triplet annihilation (TTA) process is successfully developed via controlled self-assembly of donor-acceptor pairs in organogel nanoassemblies. Although segregation of donor from acceptor assemblies has been an outstanding problem in TTA-based UC and iPUC, we resolved this issue by modifying both the triplet donor and aggregation induced emission (AIE)-type acceptor with glutamate-based self-assembling moieties. These donors and acceptors co-assemble to form organogels without segregation. Interestingly, these donor-acceptor binary gels show upconversion at room temperature but the upconversion phenomena were lost upon dissolution of the gels on heating. The observed changes in TTA-UC emission were thermally reversible, reflecting the controlled assembly/disassembly of the binary molecular systems. The observed on/off ratio of UC emission was much higher than that of the aggregation-induced fluorescence of the acceptor, which highlights the important role of iPUC, i.e., multi-exciton TTA for photoluminescence switching. This work bridges iPUC and supramolecular chemistry and provides a new strategy for designing stimuli-responsive upconversion systems.

  20. Emissions Inventory

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This page describes the role of emission inventories in the air quality management process, a description of how emission inventories are developed, and where U.S. emission inventory information can be found.

  1. Highly solid-state emissive pyridinium-substituted tetraphenylethylene salts: emission color-tuning with counter anions and application for optical waveguides.

    PubMed

    Hu, Fang; Zhang, Guanxin; Zhan, Chi; Zhang, Wei; Yan, Yongli; Zhao, Yongsheng; Fu, Hongbing; Zhang, Deqing

    2015-03-18

    In this paper seven salts of pyridinium-substituted tetraphenylethylene with different anions are reported. They show typical aggregation-induced emission. Crystal structures of three of the salts with (CF(3)SO(2))(2) N(-), CF(3) SO(3)(-), and SbF(6)(-) as the respective counter anions, are determined. The emission behavior of their amorphous and crystalline solids is investigated. Both amorphous and crystalline solids, except for the one with I(-), are highly emissive. Certain amorphous solids are red-emissive with almost the same quantum yields and fluorescence life-times. However, some crystalline solids are found to show different emission colors varying from green to yellow. Thus, their emission colors can be tuned by the counter anions. Furthermore, certain crystalline solids are highly emissive compared to the respective amorphous solids. Such solid-state emission behavior of these pyridinium-substituted tetraphenylethylene salts is interpreted on the basis of their crystal structures. In addition, optical waveguiding behavior of fabricated microrods is presented.

  2. Exploration of Energy Modulations in Novel RhB-TPE-Based Bichromophoric Materials via Interactions of Cu(2+) Ion under Various Semiaqueous and Micellar Conditions.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ravinder; Dwivedi, Atul Kumar; Singh, Ashutosh; Lin, Chien-Min; Arumugaperumal, Reguram; Wei, Kung-Hwa; Lin, Hong-Cheu

    2016-03-01

    Novel bichromophoric materials TR-A and TR-B consisting of an entirely new combination of TPE and RhB units were developed to explore the optimum conditions of energy modulations via pH variation and Cu(2+) interaction at various water contents of CH3CN. Interestingly, TR-A and TR-B, at 60 and 70% water contents, respectively, favored the optimum Cu(2+)-mediated energy modulations from TPE to RhB and thus achieve the brightest orange emissions of free RhB with complete disappearance of aggregation-induced emission (AIE) from TPE. Furthermore, various micellar conditions of triton-X-100, SDS, and CTAB were employed to adjust energy modulations of TR-A and TR-B at high water contents (at 80 and 90%, respectively). The incorporation of RhB into triton-X-100 micellar cavities disrupted AIE from TPE; thus, none of the energy modulations from TPE to RhB occurred even in the presence of Cu(2+) ion. Interestingly, the micellar conditions of anionic surfactant (SDS) favored the increased local concentration of Cu(2+) ions in the vicinity of scavangable RhB and facilitated the generation of noncyclic free RhB in situ via bright-orange emissions.

  3. AIEgens-Functionalized Inorganic-Organic Hybrid Materials: Fabrications and Applications.

    PubMed

    Li, Dongdong; Yu, Jihong

    2016-12-01

    Inorganic materials functionalized with organic fluorescent molecules combine advantages of them both, showing potential applications in biomedicine, chemosensors, light-emitting, and so on. However, when more traditional organic dyes are doped into the inorganic materials, the emission of resulting hybrid materials may be quenched, which is not conducive to the efficiency and sensitivity of detection. In contrast to the aggregation-caused quenching (ACQ) system, the aggregation-induced emission luminogens (AIEgens) with high solid quantum efficiency, offer new potential for developing highly efficient inorganic-organic hybrid luminescent materials. So far, many AIEgens have been incorporated into inorganic materials through either physical doping caused by aggregation induced emission (AIE) or chemical bonding (e.g., covalent bonding, ionic bonding, and coordination bonding) caused by bonding induced emission (BIE) strategy. The hybrid materials exhibit excellent photoactive properties due to the intramolecular motion of AIEgens is restricted by inorganic matrix. Recent advances in the fabrication of AIEgens-functionalized inorganic-organic hybrid materials and their applications in biomedicine, chemical sensing, and solid-state light emitting are presented.

  4. Exploring the Intrinsic Piezofluorochromic Mechanism of TPE-An by STS Technique.

    PubMed

    Jin, Shunyu; Tian, Yan; Liu, Fei; Deng, Shaozhi; Chen, Jun; Xu, Ningsheng

    2015-12-01

    9,10-bis(4-(1,2,2-triphenylvinyl)styryl)anthracene (TPE-An) materials have attracted considerable attention in recent years because they have high luminescence efficiency and excellent piezofluorochromic properties, which have potential applications in organic light-emitting display (OLED) area. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) technique was used to study the piezofluorochromic mechanism of aggregation-induced emission (AIE) materials for the first time. Photoluminescence (PL) experiments revealed that the emission peak of TPE-An is observed to exhibit a red-shift with the increase of the grinding time. A theoretical calculation was carried out to find the relationship between the bandgap of TPE-An and the external force by combination of the classical tunneling theory and STS results. It is found that when the pressure variation on the surface of TPE-An film was increased to be over 4.38 × 10(4) Pa, the shrink of the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO)-lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) gap can arrive at 1.1 eV. It is concluded that the piezofluorochromic behaviors of TPE-An should originate from the shrinking effect of the bandgap under external force. Moreover, this research method may shed light on comprehending and adjusting the piezofluorochromic characters of other AIE materials.

  5. Fluorescence microscopy as an alternative to electron microscopy for microscale dispersion evaluation of organic-inorganic composites.

    PubMed

    Guan, Weijiang; Wang, Si; Lu, Chao; Tang, Ben Zhong

    2016-06-02

    Inorganic dispersion is of great importance for actual implementation of advanced properties of organic-inorganic composites. Currently, electron microscopy is the most conventional approach for observing dispersion of inorganic fillers from ultrathin sections of organic-inorganic composites at the nanoscale by professional technicians. However, direct visualization of macrodispersion of inorganic fillers in organic-inorganic composites using high-contrast fluorescent imaging method is hampered. Here we design and synthesize a unique fluorescent surfactant, which combines the properties of the aggregation-induced emission (AIE) and amphiphilicity, to image macrodispersion of montmorillonite and layered double hydroxide fillers in polymer matrix. The proposed fluorescence imaging provides a number of important advantages over electron microscope imaging, and opens a new avenue in the development of direct three-dimensional observation of inorganic filler macrodispersion in organic-inorganic composites.

  6. Nanomolar pyrophosphate detection and nucleus staining in living cells with simple terpyridine–Zn(II) complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Duobin; Ni, Shitan

    2016-05-01

    Great efforts have been made to develop fluorescent probes for pyrophosphate (PPi) detection. Nucleus staining with fluorescence microscopy has been also widely investigated. But fluorescent probes for PPi detection with high sensitivity in water medium and nucleus staining with low–cost non–precious metal complexes in living cells are still challenging. Herein, we report simple terpyridine–Zn(II) complexes for selective nanomolar PPi detection over ATP and ADP in water based on aggregation induced emission (AIE) and intramolecular charge transfer (ICT). In addition, these terpyridine–Zn(II) complexes were successfully employed for nucleus staining in living cells. These results demonstrated simply obtained terpyridine–Zn(II) complexes are powerful tool for PPi detection and the development of PPi–related studies.

  7. Fluorescence microscopy as an alternative to electron microscopy for microscale dispersion evaluation of organic-inorganic composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Weijiang; Wang, Si; Lu, Chao; Tang, Ben Zhong

    2016-06-01

    Inorganic dispersion is of great importance for actual implementation of advanced properties of organic-inorganic composites. Currently, electron microscopy is the most conventional approach for observing dispersion of inorganic fillers from ultrathin sections of organic-inorganic composites at the nanoscale by professional technicians. However, direct visualization of macrodispersion of inorganic fillers in organic-inorganic composites using high-contrast fluorescent imaging method is hampered. Here we design and synthesize a unique fluorescent surfactant, which combines the properties of the aggregation-induced emission (AIE) and amphiphilicity, to image macrodispersion of montmorillonite and layered double hydroxide fillers in polymer matrix. The proposed fluorescence imaging provides a number of important advantages over electron microscope imaging, and opens a new avenue in the development of direct three-dimensional observation of inorganic filler macrodispersion in organic-inorganic composites.

  8. Nanomolar pyrophosphate detection and nucleus staining in living cells with simple terpyridine–Zn(II) complexes

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Duobin; Ni, Shitan

    2016-01-01

    Great efforts have been made to develop fluorescent probes for pyrophosphate (PPi) detection. Nucleus staining with fluorescence microscopy has been also widely investigated. But fluorescent probes for PPi detection with high sensitivity in water medium and nucleus staining with low–cost non–precious metal complexes in living cells are still challenging. Herein, we report simple terpyridine–Zn(II) complexes for selective nanomolar PPi detection over ATP and ADP in water based on aggregation induced emission (AIE) and intramolecular charge transfer (ICT). In addition, these terpyridine–Zn(II) complexes were successfully employed for nucleus staining in living cells. These results demonstrated simply obtained terpyridine–Zn(II) complexes are powerful tool for PPi detection and the development of PPi–related studies. PMID:27198968

  9. Fluorescence microscopy as an alternative to electron microscopy for microscale dispersion evaluation of organic–inorganic composites

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Weijiang; Wang, Si; Lu, Chao; Tang, Ben Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Inorganic dispersion is of great importance for actual implementation of advanced properties of organic–inorganic composites. Currently, electron microscopy is the most conventional approach for observing dispersion of inorganic fillers from ultrathin sections of organic–inorganic composites at the nanoscale by professional technicians. However, direct visualization of macrodispersion of inorganic fillers in organic–inorganic composites using high-contrast fluorescent imaging method is hampered. Here we design and synthesize a unique fluorescent surfactant, which combines the properties of the aggregation-induced emission (AIE) and amphiphilicity, to image macrodispersion of montmorillonite and layered double hydroxide fillers in polymer matrix. The proposed fluorescence imaging provides a number of important advantages over electron microscope imaging, and opens a new avenue in the development of direct three-dimensional observation of inorganic filler macrodispersion in organic–inorganic composites. PMID:27251015

  10. Future climate change under RCP emission scenarios with GISS ModelE2

    SciTech Connect

    Nazarenko, L.; Schmidt, G. A.; Miller, R. L.; Tausnev, N.; Kelley, M.; Ruedy, R.; Russell, G. L.; Aleinov, I.; Bauer, M.; Bauer, S.; Bleck, R.; Canuto, V.; Cheng, Y.; Clune, T. L.; Del Genio, A. D.; Faluvegi, G.; Hansen, J. E.; Healy, R. J.; Kiang, N. Y.; Koch, D.; Lacis, A. A.; LeGrande, A. N.; Lerner, J.; Lo, K. K.; Menon, S.; Oinas, V.; Perlwitz, J.; Puma, M. J.; Rind, D.; Romanou, A.; Sato, M.; Shindell, D. T.; Sun, S.; Tsigaridis, K.; Unger, N.; Voulgarakis, A.; Yao, M. -S.; Zhang, Jinlun

    2015-02-24

    We examine the anthropogenically forced climate response for the 21st century representative concentration pathway (RCP) emission scenarios and their extensions for the period 2101–2500. The experiments were performed with ModelE2, a new version of the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Sciences (GISS) coupled general circulation model that includes three different versions for the atmospheric composition components: a noninteractive version (NINT) with prescribed composition and a tuned aerosol indirect effect (AIE), the TCAD version with fully interactive aerosols, whole-atmosphere chemistry, and the tuned AIE, and the TCADI version which further includes a parameterized first indirect aerosol effect on clouds. Each atmospheric version is coupled to two different ocean general circulation models: the Russell ocean model (GISS-E2-R) and HYCOM (GISS-E2-H). By 2100, global mean warming in the RCP scenarios ranges from 1.0 to 4.5° C relative to 1850–1860 mean temperature in the historical simulations. In the RCP2.6 scenario, the surface warming in all simulations stays below a 2 °C threshold at the end of the 21st century. For RCP8.5, the range is 3.5–4.5° C at 2100. Decadally averaged sea ice area changes are highly correlated to global mean surface air temperature anomalies and show steep declines in both hemispheres, with a larger sensitivity during winter months. By the year 2500, there are complete recoveries of the globally averaged surface air temperature for all versions of the GISS climate model in the low-forcing scenario RCP2.6. TCADI simulations show enhanced warming due to greater sensitivity to CO₂, aerosol effects, and greater methane feedbacks, and recovery is much slower in RCP2.6 than with the NINT and TCAD versions. All coupled models have decreases in the Atlantic overturning stream function by 2100. In RCP2.6, there is a complete recovery of the Atlantic overturning stream function by the year 2500 while with scenario RCP8.5, the E2-R

  11. Future climate change under RCP emission scenarios with GISS ModelE2

    DOE PAGES

    Nazarenko, L.; Schmidt, G. A.; Miller, R. L.; ...

    2015-02-24

    We examine the anthropogenically forced climate response for the 21st century representative concentration pathway (RCP) emission scenarios and their extensions for the period 2101–2500. The experiments were performed with ModelE2, a new version of the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Sciences (GISS) coupled general circulation model that includes three different versions for the atmospheric composition components: a noninteractive version (NINT) with prescribed composition and a tuned aerosol indirect effect (AIE), the TCAD version with fully interactive aerosols, whole-atmosphere chemistry, and the tuned AIE, and the TCADI version which further includes a parameterized first indirect aerosol effect on clouds. Each atmosphericmore » version is coupled to two different ocean general circulation models: the Russell ocean model (GISS-E2-R) and HYCOM (GISS-E2-H). By 2100, global mean warming in the RCP scenarios ranges from 1.0 to 4.5° C relative to 1850–1860 mean temperature in the historical simulations. In the RCP2.6 scenario, the surface warming in all simulations stays below a 2 °C threshold at the end of the 21st century. For RCP8.5, the range is 3.5–4.5° C at 2100. Decadally averaged sea ice area changes are highly correlated to global mean surface air temperature anomalies and show steep declines in both hemispheres, with a larger sensitivity during winter months. By the year 2500, there are complete recoveries of the globally averaged surface air temperature for all versions of the GISS climate model in the low-forcing scenario RCP2.6. TCADI simulations show enhanced warming due to greater sensitivity to CO₂, aerosol effects, and greater methane feedbacks, and recovery is much slower in RCP2.6 than with the NINT and TCAD versions. All coupled models have decreases in the Atlantic overturning stream function by 2100. In RCP2.6, there is a complete recovery of the Atlantic overturning stream function by the year 2500 while with scenario RCP8.5, the

  12. Excited-State Decay Paths in Tetraphenylethene Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yuan-Jun; Chang, Xue-Ping; Liu, Xiang-Yang; Li, Quan-Song; Cui, Ganglong; Thiel, Walter

    2017-04-06

    The photophysical properties of tetraphenylethene (TPE) compounds may differ widely depending on the substitution pattern, for example, with regard to the fluorescence quantum yield ϕf and the propensity to exhibit aggregation-induced emission (AIE). We report combined electronic structure calculations and nonadiabatic dynamics simulations to study the excited-state decay mechanisms of two TPE derivatives with four methyl substituents, either in the meta position (TPE-4mM, ϕf = 0.1%) or in the ortho position (TPE-4oM, ϕf = 64.3%). In both cases, two excited-state decay pathways may be relevant, namely, photoisomerization around the central ethylenic double bond and photocyclization involving two adjacent phenyl rings. In TPE-4mM, the barrierless S1 cyclization is favored; it is responsible for the ultralow fluorescence quantum yield observed experimentally. In TPE-4oM, both the S1 photocyclization and photoisomerization paths are blocked by non-negligible barriers, and fluorescence is thus feasible. Nonadiabatic dynamics simulations with more than 1000 surface hopping trajectories show ultrafast cyclization upon photoexcitation of TPE-4mM, whereas TPE-4oM remains unreactive during the 1 ps simulations. We discuss the chances for spectroscopic detection of the postulated cyclic photoproduct of TPE-4mM and the relevance of our findings for the AIE process.

  13. Bimetallic Au2 Cu6 Nanoclusters: Strong Luminescence Induced by the Aggregation of Copper(I) Complexes with Gold(0) Species.

    PubMed

    Kang, Xi; Wang, Shuxin; Song, Yongbo; Jin, Shan; Sun, Guodong; Yu, Haizhu; Zhu, Manzhou

    2016-03-07

    The concept of aggregation-induced emission (AIE) has been exploited to render non-luminescent Cu(I) SR complexes strongly luminescent. The Cu(I) SR complexes underwent controlled aggregation with Au(0) . Unlike previous AIE methods, our strategy does not require insoluble solutions or cations. X-ray crystallography validated the structure of this highly fluorescent nanocluster: Six thiolated Cu atoms are aggregated by two Au atoms (Au2 Cu6 nanoclusters). The quantum yield of this nanocluster is 11.7 %. DFT calculations imply that the fluorescence originates from ligand (aryl groups on the phosphine) to metal (Cu(I) ) charge transfer (LMCT). Furthermore, the aggregation is affected by the restriction of intramolecular rotation (RIR), and the high rigidity of the outer ligands enhances the fluorescence of the Au2 Cu6 nanoclusters. This study thus presents a novel strategy for enhancing the luminescence of metal nanoclusters (by the aggregation of active metal complexes with inert metal atoms), and also provides fundamental insights into the controllable synthesis of highly luminescent metal nanoclusters.

  14. Excited-State Decay Paths in Tetraphenylethene Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    The photophysical properties of tetraphenylethene (TPE) compounds may differ widely depending on the substitution pattern, for example, with regard to the fluorescence quantum yield ϕf and the propensity to exhibit aggregation-induced emission (AIE). We report combined electronic structure calculations and nonadiabatic dynamics simulations to study the excited-state decay mechanisms of two TPE derivatives with four methyl substituents, either in the meta position (TPE-4mM, ϕf = 0.1%) or in the ortho position (TPE-4oM, ϕf = 64.3%). In both cases, two excited-state decay pathways may be relevant, namely, photoisomerization around the central ethylenic double bond and photocyclization involving two adjacent phenyl rings. In TPE-4mM, the barrierless S1 cyclization is favored; it is responsible for the ultralow fluorescence quantum yield observed experimentally. In TPE-4oM, both the S1 photocyclization and photoisomerization paths are blocked by non-negligible barriers, and fluorescence is thus feasible. Nonadiabatic dynamics simulations with more than 1000 surface hopping trajectories show ultrafast cyclization upon photoexcitation of TPE-4mM, whereas TPE-4oM remains unreactive during the 1 ps simulations. We discuss the chances for spectroscopic detection of the postulated cyclic photoproduct of TPE-4mM and the relevance of our findings for the AIE process. PMID:28318255

  15. Polymer-encapsulated organic nanoparticles for fluorescence and photoacoustic imaging.

    PubMed

    Li, Kai; Liu, Bin

    2014-09-21

    Polymer encapsulated organic nanoparticles have recently attracted increasing attention in the biomedical field because of their unique optical properties, easy fabrication and outstanding performance as imaging and therapeutic agents. Of particular importance is the polymer encapsulated nanoparticles containing conjugated polymers (CP) or fluorogens with aggregation induced emission (AIE) characteristics as the core, which have shown significant advantages in terms of tunable brightness, superb photo- and physical stability, good biocompatibility, potential biodegradability and facile surface functionalization. In this review, we summarize the latest advances in the development of polymer encapsulated CP and AIE fluorogen nanoparticles, including preparation methods, material design and matrix selection, nanoparticle fabrication and surface functionalization for fluorescence and photoacoustic imaging. We also discuss their specific applications in cell labeling, targeted in vitro and in vivo imaging, blood vessel imaging, cell tracing, inflammation monitoring and molecular imaging. We specially focus on strategies to fine-tune the nanoparticle property (e.g. size and fluorescence quantum yield) through precise engineering of the organic cores and careful selection of polymer matrices. The review also highlights the merits and limitations of these nanoparticles as well as strategies used to overcome the limitations. The challenges and perspectives for the future development of polymer encapsulated organic nanoparticles are also discussed.

  16. Strong fluorescence of poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone) and its oxidized hydrolyzate.

    PubMed

    Song, Guoshan; Lin, Yannan; Zhu, Zhongcheng; Zheng, Heying; Qiao, Jinping; He, Changcheng; Wang, Huiliang

    2015-02-01

    Discovering fluorescence of existing compounds, which are generally regarded as non-fluorescent, is of important academic and technical significance. This article reports the fluorescence of common compounds containing pyrrolidone ring(s) and their oxidized hydrolyzates. Poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP), polymerized from a very weak fluorescent monomer N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone (NVP), exhibits strong intrinsic fluorescence. Moreover, the fluorescence of its "hydrolyzate" is dramatically enhanced by about 1000 times. The "hydrolyzate" of N-methyl-pyrrolidone (NMP) also exhibits significantly enhanced fluorescence. By studying the chemical structures and fluorescence of the hydrolyzates, the enhanced fluorescence is attributed to the formation of secondary amine oxide. The much stronger fluorescence of the polymers compared to the corresponding small molecular compounds is ascribed to the "aggregation-induced emission" (AIE) effect of the luminophores. PVP and its oxidized hydrolyzate also show some phenomena different to the common AIE effect. The fluorescence of PVP and its oxidized hydrolyzate shows stimuli response to metal ions and pH values. This study introduces novel fluorescent materials for various potential applications.

  17. Benzimidazole acrylonitriles as multifunctional push-pull chromophores: Spectral characterisation, protonation equilibria and nanoaggregation in aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Horak, Ema; Vianello, Robert; Hranjec, Marijana; Krištafor, Svjetlana; Zamola, Grace Karminski; Steinberg, Ivana Murković

    2017-05-05

    Heterocyclic donor-π-acceptor molecular systems based on an N,N-dimethylamino phenylacrylonitrile benzimidazole skeleton have been characterised and are proposed for potential use in sensing applications. The benzimidazole moiety introduces a broad spectrum of useful multifunctional properties to the system including electron accepting ability, pH sensitivity and compatibility with biomolecules. The photophysical characterisation of the prototropic forms of these chromophores has been carried out in both solution and on immobilisation in polymer films. The experimental results are further supported by computational determination of pKa values. It is noticed that compound 3 forms nanoaggregates in aqueous solutions with aggregation-induced emission (AIE) at 600nm. All the systems demonstrate spectral pH sensitivity in acidic media which shifts towards near-neutral values upon immobilisation in polymer films or upon aggregation in an aqueous environment (compound 3). The structure-property relationships of these functional chromophores, involving their spectral characteristics, acid-base equilibria, pKa values and aggregation effects have been determined. Potential applications of the molecules as pH and biomolecular sensors are proposed based on their pH sensitivity and AIE properties.

  18. Developing high mobility emissive organic semiconductors towards integrated optoelectronic devices (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Huanli; Hu, Wenping; Heeger, Alan J.

    2016-09-01

    The achievement of organic semiconductors with both high mobility and strong fluorescence emission remains a challenge. High mobility requires molecules which pack densely and periodically, while serious fluorescence quenching typically occurs when fluorescent materials begin to aggregate (aggregation-induced quenching (AIQ)). Indeed, classical materials with strong fluorescent emission always exhibit low mobility, for example, tris(8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminium (ALQ) and phenylenevinylene-based polymers with mobility only 10-6-10-5 cm2V-1s-1, and benchmark organic semiconductors with high mobility demonstrate very weak emission, for example, rubrene exhibits a quantum yield 1% in crystalline state and pentacene shows very weak fluorescence in the solid state. However, organic semiconductors with high mobility and strong fluorescence are necessary for the achievement of high efficiency organic light-emitting transistors (OLETs) and electrically pumped organic lasers. Therefore, it is necessary for developing high mobility emissive organic/polymeric semiconductors towards a fast mover for the organic optoelectronic integrated devices and circuits.

  19. Emissions Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohde, John

    2001-01-01

    The Emissions Reduction Project is working in close partnership with the U.S. aircraft engine manufacturers and academia to develop technologies to reduce NO, emissions by 70 percent over the LTO cycle from 1996 ICAO standards with no increase in other emission constituents (carbon monoxide, smoke, and unburned hydrocarbons) and with comparable NO, reduction during cruise operations. These technologies cannot impact the overall combustor and fuel delivery system operability, affordability or maintainability. These new combustion concepts and technologies will include lean burning combustors with higher operating gas temperatures and pressures, fuel staging, ceramic matrix composite material liners with reduced cooling air and possibly advanced controls. Improved physics-based analysis tool will be developed and validated and some longer term technologies that are more revolutionary will be assessed. These improved computational codes will provide improved design tools to increase design confidence and cut the development time to achieve major reductions in NO, emissions. Longer term, revolutionary technologies like active combustion controls, combustion from a large array of micro-injectors, electrostatic fuel injectors, fuel additives and others will be investigated and assessed through proof-of-concept testing.

  20. Modelling cellular aggregation induced by chemotaxis and phototaxis.

    PubMed

    Fatehi, Hasnaa; Meyer-Hermann, Michael; Figge, Marc Thilo

    2010-12-01

    We use a generic agent-based model to investigate cellular aggregation in response to cell-cell interactions. Cells secrete soluble chemokines that are detected by other cells which carry specific receptors for this chemokine. In a process termed 'chemotaxis' the direction of motility of cells is determined by the concentration gradient of chemokines. 'Phototaxis' relies on the detection of light by intracellular receptors. In particular, we consider the case where intercellular signalling is induced by light that is emitted by the cells themselves. While chemotaxis is a frequently analysed and modelled intercellular communication path, phototaxis is only rarely investigated. We characterize and compare the collective response of cells to these mechanisms and show that chemotaxis and phototaxis can be distinguished by the emerging aggregation profile. This result provides a guideline to differentiate between these cell-cell interactions under specific circumstances in experiment.

  1. Chaotic dynamics in cardiac aggregates induced by potassium channel block

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quail, Thomas; McVicar, Nevin; Aguilar, Martin; Kim, Min-Young; Hodge, Alex; Glass, Leon; Shrier, Alvin

    2012-09-01

    Chaotic rhythms in deterministic models can arise as a consequence of changes in model parameters. We carried out experimental studies in which we induced a variety of complex rhythms in aggregates of embryonic chick cardiac cells using E-4031 (1.0-2.5 μM), a drug that blocks the hERG potassium channel. Following the addition of the drug, the regular rhythm evolved to display a spectrum of complex dynamics: irregular rhythms, bursting oscillations, doublets, and accelerated rhythms. The interbeat intervals of the irregular rhythms can be described by one-dimensional return maps consistent with chaotic dynamics. A Hodgkin-Huxley-style cardiac ionic model captured the different types of complex dynamics following blockage of the hERG mediated potassium current.

  2. Raman studies of gluten proteins aggregation induced by dietary fibres.

    PubMed

    Nawrocka, Agnieszka; Szymańska-Chargot, Monika; Miś, Antoni; Kowalski, Radosław; Gruszecki, Wiesław I

    2016-03-01

    Interactions between gluten proteins and dietary fibre preparations are crucial in the baking industry. The addition of dietary fibre to bread causes significant reduction in its quality which is influenced by changes in the structure of gluten proteins. Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy was applied to determine changes in the structure of gluten proteins modified by seven dietary fibres. The commercially available gluten proteins without starch were mixed with the fibres in three concentrations: 3%, 6% and 9%. The obtained results showed that all fibres, regardless of their origin, caused the same kind of changes i.e. decrease in the α-helix content with a simultaneous increase in the content of antiparallel-β-sheet. The results indicated that presence of cellulose was the probable cause of these changes, and lead to aggregation or abnormal folding of the gluten proteins. Other changes observed in the gluten structure concerning β-structures, conformation of disulphide bridges, and aromatic amino acid environment, depended on the fibres chemical composition.

  3. Morphology Tuning of Self-Assembled Perylene Monoimide from Nanoparticles to Colloidosomes with Enhanced Excimeric NIR Emission for Bioimaging.

    PubMed

    Jana, Avijit; Bai, Linyi; Li, Xin; Ågren, Hans; Zhao, Yanli

    2016-01-27

    Organic near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent probes have been recognized as an emerging class of materials exhibiting a great potential in advanced bioanalytical applications. However, synthesizing such organic probes that could simultaneously work in the NIR spectral range and have large Stokes shift, high stability in biological systems, and high photostability have been proven challenging. In this work, aggregation induced excimeric NIR emission in aqueous media was observed from a suitably substituted perylene monoimide (PeIm) dye. Controlled entrapment of the dye into pluronic F127 micellar system to preserve its monomeric green emission in aqueous media was also established. The aggregation process of the PeIm dye to form organic nanoparticles (NPs) was evaluated experimentally by the means of transmission electron microscope imaging as well as theoretically by the molecular dynamics simulation studies. Tuning the morphology along with the formation of colloidosomes by the controlled self-aggregation of PeIm NPs in aqueous suspension was demonstrated successfully. Finally, both excimeric and monomeric emissive PeIm NPs as well as PeIm colloidosomes were employed for the bioimaging in vitro.

  4. Optically active red-emitting Cu nanoclusters originating from complexation and redox reaction between copper(ii) and d/l-penicillamine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Tengfei; Guo, Yanjia; Lin, Min; Yuan, Mengke; Liu, Zhongde; Huang, Chengzhi

    2016-05-01

    Despite a significant surge in the number of investigations into both optically active Au and Ag nanostructures, there is currently only limited knowledge about optically active Cu nanoclusters (CuNCs) and their potential applications. Here, we have succeeded in preparing a pair of optically active red-emitting CuNCs on the basis of complexation and redox reaction between copper(ii) and penicillamine (Pen) enantiomers, in which Pen serves as both a reducing agent and a stabilizing ligand. Significantly, the CuNCs feature unique aggregation induced emission (AIE) characteristics and therefore can serve as pH stimuli-responsive functional materials. Impressively, the ligand chirality plays a dramatic role for the creation of brightly emissive CuNCs, attributed to the conformation of racemic Pen being unfavorable for the electrostatic interaction, and thus suppressing the formation of cluster aggregates. In addition, the clusters display potential toward cytoplasmic staining and labelling due to the high photoluminescence (PL) quantum yields (QYs) and remarkable cellular uptake, in spite that no chirality-dependent effects in autophagy and subcellular localization are observed in the application of chiral cluster enantiomer-based cell imaging.Despite a significant surge in the number of investigations into both optically active Au and Ag nanostructures, there is currently only limited knowledge about optically active Cu nanoclusters (CuNCs) and their potential applications. Here, we have succeeded in preparing a pair of optically active red-emitting CuNCs on the basis of complexation and redox reaction between copper(ii) and penicillamine (Pen) enantiomers, in which Pen serves as both a reducing agent and a stabilizing ligand. Significantly, the CuNCs feature unique aggregation induced emission (AIE) characteristics and therefore can serve as pH stimuli-responsive functional materials. Impressively, the ligand chirality plays a dramatic role for the creation of

  5. Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer and Airborne Emission Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavich, T.; Beer, R.

    1996-01-01

    The Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) is an instrument being developed for the NASA Earth Observing System Chemistry Platform. TES will measure the distribution of ozone and its precursors in the lower atmosphere. The Airborne Emission Spectrometer (AES) is an aircraft precursor to TES. Applicable descriptions are given of instrument design, technology challenges, implementation and operations for both.

  6. Biodiesel Emissions Analysis Program

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Using existing data, the EPA's biodiesel emissions analysis program sought to quantify the air pollution emission effects of biodiesel for diesel engines that have not been specifically modified to operate on biodiesel.

  7. NARSTO EMISSION INVENTORY ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The NARSTO Ozone and Particulate Matter Assessments emphasized that emission inventories are critical to the success of air quality management programs and that emissions inventories in Canada, Mexico, and the United States need improvement to meet expectations for quality, timel...

  8. Control of Emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Clyde F. (Inventor); Chung, Landy (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Methods and apparatus utilizing chlorine dioxide and hydrogen peroxide are useful to reduce NOx emissions, as well as SOx and mercury (or other heavy metal) emissions, from combustion flue gas streams.

  9. What Is Emissions Trading?

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Learn the basics about how emissions trading uses a market-based policy tool used to control large amounts of pollution emissions from a group of sources in order to protect human health and the environment.

  10. Emissions & Measurements - Black Carbon

    EPA Science Inventory

    Emissions and Measurement (EM) research activities performed within the National Risk Management Research Lab NRMRL) of EPA's Office of Research and Development (ORD) support measurement and laboratory analysis approaches to accurately characterize source emissions, and near sour...

  11. Emissions Trading Resources

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Learn about emissions trading programs, also known as cap and trade programs, which are market-based policy tools for protecting human health and the environment by controlling emissions from a group of sources.

  12. Emission scenarios: Explaining differences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyer, Gokul; Edmonds, James

    2017-01-01

    Carbon dioxide emission scenarios rely on a number of assumptions about how societies will develop in the future, creating uncertainty in projections. Now, research reveals the sensitivity of emission estimates to some of these assumptions.

  13. Acoustic emission frequency discrimination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sugg, Frank E. (Inventor); Graham, Lloyd J. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    In acoustic emission nondestructive testing, broadband frequency noise is distinguished from narrow banded acoustic emission signals, since the latter are valid events indicative of structural flaws in the material being examined. This is accomplished by separating out those signals which contain frequency components both within and beyond (either above or below) the range of valid acoustic emission events. Application to acoustic emission monitoring during nondestructive bond verification and proof loading of undensified tiles on the Space Shuttle Orbiter is considered.

  14. Air Emissions Factors and Quantification

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Emissions factors are used in developing air emissions inventories for air quality management decisions and in developing emissions control strategies. This area provides technical information on and support for the use of emissions factors.

  15. Low Emissions Aftertreatment and Diesel Emissions Reduction

    SciTech Connect

    2005-05-27

    Detroit Diesel Corporation (DDC) has successfully completed a five-year Low Emissions Aftertreatment and Diesel Emissions Reduction (LEADER) program under a DOE project entitled: ''Research and Development for Compression-Ignition Direct-Injection Engines (CIDI) and Aftertreatment Sub-Systems''. The objectives of the LEADER Program were to: Demonstrate technologies that will achieve future federal Tier 2 emissions targets; and Demonstrate production-viable technical targets for engine out emissions, efficiency, power density, noise, durability, production cost, aftertreatment volume and weight. These objectives were successfully met during the course of the LEADER program The most noteworthy achievements in this program are listed below: (1) Demonstrated Tier 2 Bin 3 emissions target over the FTP75 cycle on a PNGV-mule Neon passenger car, utilizing a CSF + SCR system These aggressive emissions were obtained with no ammonia (NH{sub 3}) slip and a combined fuel economy of 63 miles per gallon, integrating FTP75 and highway fuel economy transient cycle test results. Demonstrated feasibility to achieve Tier 2 Bin 8 emissions levels without active NOx aftertreatment. (2) Demonstrated Tier 2 Bin 3 emissions target over the FTP75 cycle on a light-duty truck utilizing a CSF + SCR system, synergizing efforts with the DOE-DDC DELTA program. This aggressive reduction in tailpipe out emissions was achieved with no ammonia slip and a 41% fuel economy improvement, compared to the equivalent gasoline engine-equipped vehicle. (3) Demonstrated Tier 2 near-Bin 9 emissions compliance on a light-duty truck, without active NOx aftertreatment devices, in synergy with the DOE-DDC DELTA program. (4) Developed and applied advanced combustion technologies such as ''CLEAN Combustion{copyright}'', which yields simultaneous reduction in engine out NOx and PM emissions while also improving engine and aftertreatment integration by providing favorable exhaust species and temperature

  16. Global Seabird Ammonia Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riddick, S. N.; Blackall, T. D.; Dragosits, U.; Daunt, F. H.; Braban, C. F.; Tang, Y. S.; Trathan, P.; Wanless, S.; Sutton, M. A.

    2010-12-01

    Seabird colonies represent a major source of atmospheric ammonia (NH3) in remote coastal and marine systems in temperate, tropical and polar regions. Previous studies have shown that NH3 emissions from Scottish seabird colonies were substantial - of similar magnitude to the most intensive agricultural point source emissions. The UK data were used to model global seabird NH3 emissions and suggested that penguins are a major source of emissions on and around the Antarctic continent. The largest seabird colonies are in the order of millions of seabirds. Due to the isolation of these colonies from anthropogenic nitrogen sources, they may play a major role in the nitrogen cycle within these ecosystems. A global seabird database was constructed and used in conjunction with a species-specific seabird bioenergetics model to map the locations of NH3 emissions from seabird colonies. The accuracy of the modelled emissions was validated with field data of NH3 emissions measured at key seabird colonies in different climatic regions of the world: temperate (Isle of May, Scotland), tropical (Ascension Island) and polar (Signy Island, South Georgia). The field data indicated good agreement between modelled and measured NH3 emissions. The measured NH3 emissions also showed the variability of emission with climate. Climate dependence of seabird NH3 emissions may have further implications under a changing global climate. Seabird colonies represent NH3 emission ‘hotspots’, often far from anthropogenic sources, and are likely to be the major source of nitrogen input to these remote coastal ecosystems. The direct manuring by seabirds at colony locations may strongly influence species richness and biodiversity. The subsequent volatilisation and deposition of NH3 increases the spatial extent of seabird influence on nitrogen cycling in their local ecosystem. As many seabird populations are fluctuating due to changing food supply, climate change or anthropogenic pressures, these factors

  17. Modeling of Particulate Emissions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-01

    coagulation oxidation.... carbonization 14 Modeling Particulate Emissions Soot Formation Kinetics 2 1016 1 ]HC[kdt dS = Inception: Dimerization of...simulated with peak size for surface growth Sectional Conservation Equation 16 Modeling Particulate Emissions Soot Kinetics Based on OH, O2 and...and empirical tuning to NOx, CO emissionsFuel-spray shear layer Recirculation zones Quench zones Burn-out zones Full set of reaction kinetics and

  18. Identification and characterization of multiple emissive species in aggregated minor antenna complexes.

    PubMed

    Wahadoszamen, Md; Belgio, Erica; Rahman, Md Ashiqur; Ara, Anjue Mane; Ruban, Alexander V; van Grondelle, Rienk

    2016-12-01

    Aggregation induced conformational change of light harvesting antenna complexes is believed to constitute one of the pathways through which photosynthetic organisms can safely dissipate the surplus of energy while exposed to saturating light. In this study, Stark fluorescence (SF) spectroscopy is applied to minor antenna complexes (CP24, CP26 and CP29) both in their light-harvesting and energy-dissipating states to trace and characterize different species generated upon energy dissipation through aggregation (in-vitro) induced conformational change. SF spectroscopy could identify three spectral species in the dissipative state of CP24, two in CP26 and only one in CP29. The comprehensive analysis of the SF spectra yielded different sets of molecular parameters for the multiple spectral species identified in CP24 or CP26, indicating the involvement of different pigments in their formation. Interestingly, a species giving emission around the 730nm spectral region is found to form in both CP24 and CP26 following transition to the energy dissipative state, but not in CP29. The SF analyses revealed that the far red species has exceptionally large charge transfer (CT) character in the excited state. Moreover, the far red species was found to be formed invariably in both Zeaxanthin (Z)- and Violaxathin (V)-enriched CP24 and CP26 antennas with identical CT character but with larger emission yield in Z-enriched ones. This suggests that the carotenoid Z is not directly involved but only confers an allosteric effect on the formation of the far red species. Similar far red species with remarkably large CT character were also observed in the dissipative state of the major light harvesting antenna (LHCII) of plants [Wahadoszamen et al. PCCP, 2012], the fucoxanthin-chlorophyll protein (FCP) of brown algae [Wahadoszamen et al. BBA, 2014] and cyanobacterial IsiA [Wahadoszamen et al. BBA, 2015], thus pointing to identical sites and pigments active in the formation of the far red

  19. Toluene emissions from plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heiden, A. C.; Kobel, K.; Komenda, M.; Koppmann, R.; Shao, M.; Wildt, J.

    The emission of toluene from different plants was observed in continuously stirred tank reactors and in field measurements. For plants growing without stress, emission rates were low and ranged from the detection limit up to 2·10-16 mol·cm-2·s-1. Under conditions of stress, the emission rates exceeded 10-14 mol·cm-2·s-1. Exposure of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L. cv. Gigantheus) to 13CO2 resulted in 13C-labeling of the emitted toluene on a time scale of hours. Although no biochemical pathway for the production of toluene is known, these results indicate that toluene is synthesized by the plants. The emission rates of toluene from sunflower are dependent on nutrient supply and wounding. Since α-pinene emission rates are also influenced by these factors, toluene and α-pinene emissions show a high correlation. During pathogen attack on Scots pines (Pinus sylvestris L.) significant toluene emissions were observed. In this case emissions of toluene and α-pinene also show a good correlation. Toluene emissions were also found in field experiments with pines using branch enclosures.

  20. Planetary foreshock radio emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuncic, Zdenka; Cairns, Iver H.

    2005-07-01

    The electron foreshock regions upstream of Earth's bow shock and upstream of traveling interplanetary shocks are known to be propitious sites for a variety of energetic particle and plasma wave phenomena, including radio emissions. A quantitative theoretical model has been developed for radio emissions associated with the terrestrial foreshock and for type II radio bursts associated with interplanetary shocks. Here, we generalize this model and apply it to other planetary foreshocks. We present predictions for the levels of planetary foreshock radio emissions and compare these with observations by past and present space missions. One key result is that Mercury can be a strong source of foreshock radio emissions, and this prediction may be testable with the anticipated BepiColombo space mission. Although the terrestrial foreshock radio emissions are the most detectable with existing instruments, our results predict that they are the second strongest in absolute terms, following the Jovian foreshock emissions. Indeed, we predict that the radio instrument on board Ulysses should have detected Jovian foreshock radio emissions, and we suggest that there is some evidence in the data to support this. We also suggest that Cassini was potentially capable of detecting foreshock emissions from Venus during its gravity-assist flybys and may possibly be capable of detecting foreshock emissions from Saturn under favorable solar wind conditions.

  1. Field emission chemical sensor

    DOEpatents

    Panitz, J.A.

    1983-11-22

    A field emission chemical sensor for specific detection of a chemical entity in a sample includes a closed chamber enclosing two field emission electrode sets, each field emission electrode set comprising (a) an electron emitter electrode from which field emission electrons can be emitted when an effective voltage is connected to the electrode set; and (b) a collector electrode which will capture said electrons emitted from said emitter electrode. One of the electrode sets is passive to the chemical entity and the other is active thereto and has an active emitter electrode which will bind the chemical entity when contacted therewith.

  2. Managing Refrigerant Emissions

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Access information on EPA's efforts to address ozone layer depletion by reducing emissions of refrigerants from stationary refrigeration and air conditioning systems and motor vehicle air conditioning systems.

  3. Synthesis, optical properties, and helical self-assembly of a bivaline-containing tetraphenylethene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hongkun; Zheng, Xiaoyan; Su, Huimin; Lam, Jacky W. Y.; Sing Wong, Kam; Xue, Shan; Huang, Xuejiao; Huang, Xuhui; Li, Bing Shi; Tang, Ben Zhong

    2016-01-01

    A chiral tetraphenylethene derivative with two valine-containing attachments (TPE-DVAL), was synthesized by Cu(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne “click” reaction. The optical properties and self-assembling behaviours of TPE-DVAL were investigated. The molecule is non-emissive and circular dichroism (CD)-silent in solution, but shows strong fluorescence and Cotton effects in the aggregation state, demonstrating aggregation-induced emission (AIE) and CD (AICD) characteristics. TPE-DVAL exhibits good circularly polarized luminescence (CPL) when depositing on the surface of quartz to allow the evaporation of its 1,2-dichloroethane solution. SEM and TEM images of the molecule show that the molecule readily self-assembles into right-handed helical nanofibers upon the evaporation of its solvent of DCE. The molecular alignments and interactions in assembling process are further explored through XRD analysis and computational simulation. The driving forces for the formation of the helical fibers were from the cooperative effects of intermolecular hydrogen bonding, π-π interactions and steric effect.

  4. Outsourcing CO2 Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, S. J.; Caldeira, K. G.

    2009-12-01

    CO2 emissions from the burning of fossil fuels are the primary cause of global warming. Much attention has been focused on the CO2 directly emitted by each country, but relatively little attention has been paid to the amount of emissions associated with consumption of goods and services in each country. This consumption-based emissions inventory differs from the production-based inventory because of imports and exports of goods and services that, either directly or indirectly, involved CO2 emissions. Using the latest available data and reasonable assumptions regarding trans-shipment of embodied carbon through third-party countries, we developed a global consumption-based CO2 emissions inventory and have calculated associated consumption-based energy and carbon intensities. We find that, in 2004, 24% of CO2 emissions are effectively outsourced to other countries, with much of the developed world outsourcing CO2 emissions to emerging markets, principally China. Some wealthy countries, including Switzerland and Sweden, outsource over half of their consumption-based emissions, with many northern Europeans outsourcing more than three tons of emissions per person per year. The United States is both a big importer and exporter of emissions embodied in trade, outsourcing >2.6 tons of CO2 per person and at the same time as >2.0 tons of CO2 per person are outsourced to the United States. These large flows indicate that CO2 emissions embodied in trade must be taken into consideration when considering responsibility for increasing atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations.

  5. Air Emission Inventory for the INEEL -- 1999 Emission Report

    SciTech Connect

    Zohner, Steven K

    2000-05-01

    This report presents the 1999 calendar year update of the Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The INEEL Air Emission Inventory documents sources and emissions of nonradionuclide pollutants from operations at the INEEL. The report describes the emission inventory process and all of the sources at the INEEL, and provides nonradionuclide emissions estimates for stationary sources.

  6. Emission properties of explosive field emission cathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Amitava; Patel, Ankur; Menon, Rakhee; Sharma, Archana; Chakravarthy, D. P.; Patil, D. S.

    2011-10-15

    The research results of the explosive field emission cathode plasma expansion velocity and the initial emission area in the planar diode configuration with cathodes made of graphite, stainless steel, polymer velvet, carbon coated, and carbon fiber (needle type) cathodes are presented. The experiments have been performed at the electron accelerator LIA-200 (200 kV, 100 ns, and 4 kA). The diode voltage has been varied from 28-225 kV, whereas the current density has been varied from 86-928 A/cm{sup 2} with 100 ns pulse duration. The experimentally obtained electron beam diode perveance has been compared with the 1 dimensional Child-Langmuir- law. It was found that initially only a part of the cathode take part in the emission process. The plasma expands at 1.7-5.2 cm/{mu}s for 4 mm anode-cathode gap for various cathode materials. It was found that the plasma expansion velocity increases with the decrease in the cathode diameter. At the beginning of the accelerating pulse, the entire cathode area participates in the electron emission process only for the multiple needle type carbon fiber cathode.

  7. Database of emission lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binette, L.; Ortiz, P.; Joguet, B.; Rola, C.

    1998-11-01

    A widely accessible data bank (available through Netscape) and consiting of all (or most) of the emission lines reported in the litterature is being built. It will comprise objects as diverse as HII regions, PN, AGN, HHO. One of its use will be to define/refine existing diagnostic emission line diagrams.

  8. Emission Standards for Particulates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, George W.

    1974-01-01

    Promulgation of standards of performance under Section 111 and national emission standards for hazardous pollutants under Section 112 of the Clean Air Act is the responsibility of the Emission Standards and Engineering Division of the Environmental Protection Agency. The problems encountered and the bases used are examined. (Author/BT)

  9. Diesel Emissions Quantifier (DEQ)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    .The Diesel Emissions Quantifier (Quantifier) is an interactive tool to estimate emission reductions and cost effectiveness. Publications EPA-420-F-13-008a (420f13008a), EPA-420-B-10-035 (420b10023), EPA-420-B-10-034 (420b10034)

  10. Observed Barium Emission Rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenbaek-Nielsen, H. C.; Wescott, E. M.; Hallinan, T. J.

    1993-01-01

    The barium releases from the CRRES satellite have provided an opportunity for verifying theoretically calculated barium ion and neutral emission rates. Spectra of the five Caribbean releases in the summer of 1991 were taken with a spectrograph on board a U.S. Air Force jet aircraft. Because the line of sight release densities are not known, only relative rates could be obtained. The observed relative rates agree well with the theoretically calculated rates and, together with other observations, confirm the earlier detailed theoretical emission rates. The calculated emission rates can thus with good accuracy be used with photometric observations. It has been postulated that charge exchange between neutral barium and oxygen ions represents a significant source for ionization. If so. it should be associated with emissions at 4957.15 A and 5013.00 A, but these emissions were not detected.

  11. Graphene field emission devices

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, S. Raghavan, S.; Duesberg, G. S.; Pratap, R.

    2014-09-08

    Graphene field emission devices are fabricated using a scalable process. The field enhancement factors, determined from the Fowler-Nordheim plots, are within few hundreds and match the theoretical predictions. The devices show high emission current density of ∼10 nA μm{sup −1} at modest voltages of tens of volts. The emission is stable with time and repeatable over long term, whereas the noise in the emission current is comparable to that from individual carbon nanotubes emitting under similar conditions. We demonstrate a power law dependence of emission current on pressure which can be utilized for sensing. The excellent characteristics and relative ease of making the devices promise their great potential for sensing and electronic applications.

  12. Vehicle and Fuel Emissions Testing

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA's National Vehicle and Fuel Emissions Laboratory's primary responsibilities include: evaluating emission control technology; testing vehicles, engines and fuels; and determining compliance with federal emissions and fuel economy standards.

  13. MOVES2014: Evaporative Emissions Report

    EPA Science Inventory

    Vehicle evaporative emissions are now modeled in EPA’s MOVES according to physical processes, permeation, tank vapor venting, liquid leaks, and refueling emissions. With this update, the following improvements are being incorporated into MOVES evaporative emissions methodology, a...

  14. Biogenic Emission Inventory System (BEIS)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Biogenic Emission Inventory System (BEIS) estimates volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from vegetation and nitric oxide (NO) emission from soils. Recent BEIS development has been restricted to the SMOKE system

  15. Locating the Vehicle Emissions Label

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The EPA vehicle emissions label is entitled Vehicle Emission Control Information and contains the name and trademark of the manufacturer and an unconditional statement of compliance with EPA emission regulations.

  16. Emission Abatement System

    DOEpatents

    Bromberg, Leslie; Cohn, Daniel R.; Rabinovich, Alexander

    2003-05-13

    Emission abatement system. The system includes a source of emissions and a catalyst for receiving the emissions. Suitable catalysts are absorber catalysts and selective catalytic reduction catalysts. A plasma fuel converter generates a reducing gas from a fuel source and is connected to deliver the reducing gas into contact with the absorber catalyst for regenerating the catalyst. A preferred reducing gas is a hydrogen rich gas and a preferred plasma fuel converter is a plasmatron. It is also preferred that the absorber catalyst be adapted for absorbing NO.sub.x.

  17. ROANOKE WOODSTOVE EMISSION TESTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report discusses a project, part of the Integrated Air Cancer Project Roanoke study, that characterizes and quantifies emissions generated by burning authentic Roanoke cordwood. The burning occurred in a controlled laboratory setting using two woodstoves, each operated at two...

  18. Fugitive emissions monitoring trends

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, K.H.

    1997-02-01

    New Clean Air Act requirements are pushing facilities to reevaluate their monitoring programs. A description of the fugitive emission guidelines is included in this article, along with ideas about monitoring.

  19. Photon enhanced thermionic emission

    SciTech Connect

    Schwede, Jared; Melosh, Nicholas; Shen, Zhixun

    2014-10-07

    Photon Enhanced Thermionic Emission (PETE) is exploited to provide improved efficiency for radiant energy conversion. A hot (greater than 200.degree. C.) semiconductor cathode is illuminated such that it emits electrons. Because the cathode is hot, significantly more electrons are emitted than would be emitted from a room temperature (or colder) cathode under the same illumination conditions. As a result of this increased electron emission, the energy conversion efficiency can be significantly increased relative to a conventional photovoltaic device. In PETE, the cathode electrons can be (and typically are) thermalized with respect to the cathode. As a result, PETE does not rely on emission of non-thermalized electrons, and is significantly easier to implement than hot-carrier emission approaches.

  20. Aircraft Engine Emissions. [conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A conference on a aircraft engine emissions was held to present the results of recent and current work. Such diverse areas as components, controls, energy efficient engine designs, and noise and pollution reduction are discussed.

  1. IR Plasma Emissions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-04-01

    a current mailing list. Do not return copies of this report unless contractural obligations or notices on a specific document requires that it be...of the relatively cold 0? gas surrounding the fireball (i.e. 02(cold) + hv --> 20*) and the broad emission arises from shock heating of the emission...experimental data and calculations 14 and 0 data from other work35 ,36. Experimental spectra were acquired by Assous 33 in an inductively- heated

  2. Field emission electron source

    DOEpatents

    Zettl, Alexander Karlwalter; Cohen, Marvin Lou

    2000-01-01

    A novel field emitter material, field emission electron source, and commercially feasible fabrication method is described. The inventive field emission electron source produces reliable electron currents of up to 400 mA/cm.sup.2 at 200 volts. The emitter is robust and the current it produces is not sensitive to variability of vacuum or the distance between the emitter tip and the cathode. The novel emitter has a sharp turn-on near 100 volts.

  3. Emission Characterization and Emission Inventories for the 21st Century

    EPA Science Inventory

    Emission inventories are the foundation of cost-effective air quality management strategies. A goal of the emissions community is to develop the ultimate emission inventory which would include all significant emissions from all sources, time periods and areas, with quantified un...

  4. 47 CFR 78.103 - Emissions and emission limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... CABLE TELEVISION RELAY SERVICE Technical Regulations § 78.103 Emissions and emission limitations. (a) A... television signals. (b) Any emission appearing on a frequency outside of the channel authorized for a...: At least 25 decibels below the mean power of the emission; (ii) On any frequency above the...

  5. 47 CFR 78.103 - Emissions and emission limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Emissions and emission limitations. 78.103 Section 78.103 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES CABLE TELEVISION RELAY SERVICE Technical Regulations § 78.103 Emissions and emission limitations. (a)...

  6. 47 CFR 78.103 - Emissions and emission limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Emissions and emission limitations. 78.103 Section 78.103 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES CABLE TELEVISION RELAY SERVICE Technical Regulations § 78.103 Emissions and emission limitations. (a)...

  7. 47 CFR 78.103 - Emissions and emission limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Emissions and emission limitations. 78.103 Section 78.103 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES CABLE TELEVISION RELAY SERVICE Technical Regulations § 78.103 Emissions and emission limitations. (a)...

  8. 47 CFR 78.103 - Emissions and emission limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Emissions and emission limitations. 78.103 Section 78.103 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES CABLE TELEVISION RELAY SERVICE Technical Regulations § 78.103 Emissions and emission limitations. (a)...

  9. New Insight of Tetraphenylethylene-based Raman Signatures for Targeted SERS Nanoprobe Construction Toward Prostate Cancer Cell Detection.

    PubMed

    Ramya, Adukkadan N; Joseph, Manu M; Nair, Jyothi B; Karunakaran, Varsha; Narayanan, Nisha; Maiti, Kaustabh Kumar

    2016-04-27

    We have designed and synthesized novel tetraphenylethylene (TPE) appended organic fluorogens and unfold their unique Raman fingerprinting reflected by surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) upon adsorption on nanoroughened gold surface as a new insight in addition to their prevalent aggregation-induced emission (AIE) and aggregation-caused quenching (ACQ) phenomena. A series of five TPE analogues has been synthesized consisting of different electron donors such as (1) indoline with propyl (TPE-In), (2) indoline with lipoic acid (TPE-In-L), (3) indoline with Boc-protected propyl amine (TPE-In-Boc), (4) benzothaizole (TPE-B), and (5) quinaldine (TPE-Q). Interestingly, all five TPE analogues produced multiplexing Raman signal pattern, out of which TPE-In-Boc showed a significant increase in signal intensity in the fingerprint region. An efficient SERS nanoprobe has been constructed using gold nanoparticles as SERS substrate, and the TPE-In as the Raman reporter, which conjugated with a specific peptide substrate, Cys-Ser-Lys-Leu-Gln-OH, well-known for the recognition of prostate-specific antigen (PSA). The designated nanoprobe TPE-In-PSA@Au acted as SERS "ON/OFF" probe in peace with the vicinity of PSA protease, which distinctly recognizes PSA expression with a limit of detection of 0.5 ng in SERS platform. Furthermore, TPE-In-PSA@Au nanoprobe was efficiently recognized the overexpressed PSA in human LNCaP cells, which can be visualized through SERS spectral analysis and SERS mapping.

  10. Rational design of tetraphenylethylene-based luminescent down-shifting molecules: photophysical studies and photovoltaic applications in a CdTe solar cell from small to large units.

    PubMed

    Li, Yilin; Li, Zhipeng; Ablekim, Tursunjan; Ren, Tianhui; Dong, Wen-Ji

    2014-12-21

    A rational design strategy of novel fluorophores for luminescent down-shifting (LDS) application was proposed and tested in this paper. Three new fluorophores (1a-c) with specific intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) and aggregation-induced emission (AIE) characteristics were synthesized as LDS molecules for increasing the output short circuit current density (Jsc) of a CdTe solar cell. Photophysical studies of their solution and solid states, and photovoltaic measurements of their PMMA solid films applied on a CdTe solar cell suggested that the specific spectroscopic properties and Jsc enhancement effects of these molecules were highly related to their chemical structures. The Jsc enhancement effects of these fluorophores were measured on both a CdTe small cell and a large panel. An increase in the output Jsc by as high as 5.69% for a small cell and 8.88% for a large panel was observed. Compared to a traditional LDS molecule, Y083, these fluorophores exhibited more superior capabilities of LDS.

  11. Sins of emission

    SciTech Connect

    Keough, J.

    1986-01-01

    Air pollution from the burning of wood fuels has become a concern to the wood stove industry and to the EPA. Wood smoke contains a mixture of carbon monoxide, volatile organic gases, and polycyclic organic matter which reduces the air quality and exposes increasing numbers of residential neighborhoods to heavy levels of these hazardous pollutants. Two states and numerous municipalities have developed emission standards for new stoves or have banned wood-burning during certain weather conditions. The EPA plans to propose national emission standards during January 1987 and promulgate final rules by January 1988. Catalytic converters for wood stoves have been tested with good results: reduction of particulate emissions by as much as 86%; increase in thermal efficiency of 20 to 30%; and elimination of 85 to 90% of the creosote accumulation in the flue.

  12. Emission control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Clyde F. (Inventor); Chung, J. Landy (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Methods and apparatus utilizing hydrogen peroxide are useful to reduce SOx and mercury (or other heavy metal) emissions from combustion flue gas streams. The methods and apparatus may further be modified to reduce NOx emissions. Continuous concentration of hydrogen peroxide to levels approaching or exceeding propellant-grade hydrogen peroxide facilitates increased system efficiency. In this manner, combustion flue gas streams can be treated for the removal of SOx and heavy metals, while isolating useful by-products streams of sulfuric acid as well as solids for the recovery of the heavy metals. Where removal of NOx emissions is included, nitric acid may also be isolated for use in fertilizer or other industrial applications.

  13. Sensors reduce car emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Paula, G.

    1996-11-01

    Advanced control and diagnostic sensors play a key role in antipollution devices such as catalytic converters, electronic fuel injection, and exhaust-gas recirculation systems. Technologies such as catalytic converters, electronic fuel injection, and exhaust-gas recirculation (EGR) systems have decreased automobile emissions approximately 90 percent from their 1960 levels. The cornerstone of many of these emissions-control technologies are sensors that provide feedback and control. Any sensor--particularly those installed under an automobile hood--must withstand harsh conditions, such as intense heat, shock, continual vibration, corrosive gases, and electromagnetic fields. As a result microelectromechanical-system sensors, though widely used in automobiles, have not been applied to emissions monitoring and pollution control because they are not rugged enough to survive inside an engine. Most automobile sensors use mature technologies, but newer technologies such as fiber-optic sensors will be installed in vehicles within the next few years.

  14. Ultraviolet atomic emission detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, W.; Peterson, N. C.; Bass, A. M.; Kurylo, M. J., III (Inventor)

    1972-01-01

    A device and method are provided for performing qualitative and quantitative elemental analysis through the utilization of a vacuum UV chromatographic detector. The method involves the use of a carrier gas at low pressure. The gas carries a sample to a gas chromatograph column; the column output is directed to a microwave cavity. In this cavity, a low pressure microwave discharge produces fragmentation of the compounds present and generates intense atomic emissions in the vacuum ultraviolet. These emissions are isolated by a monochromator and measured by photometer to establish absolute concentration for the elements.

  15. Coke oven emissions

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Coke oven emissions ; CASRN NA Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effects

  16. Automotive Emission Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Billy D.; Ragazzi, Ronald

    This guide designed to assist teachers in improving instruction in the area of automotive emission control curriculum includes four areas. Each area consists of one or more units of instruction, with each instructional unit including some or all of the following basic components: Performance objectives, suggested activities for teacher and…

  17. Automotive Emission Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Billy D.; And Others

    This publication contains instructional materials for both teachers and students for a course in automotive emission control. Instructional materials in this publication are written in terms of student performance using measurable objectives. The course includes 16 units. Each instructional unit includes some or all of the basic components of a…

  18. Emissions versus climate change

    EPA Science Inventory

    Climate change is likely to offset some of the improvements in air quality expected from reductions in pollutant emissions. A comprehensive analysis of future air quality over North America suggests that, on balance, the air will still be cleaner in coming decades.

  19. Diesel emissions in Vienna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horvath, H.; Kreiner, I.; Norek, C.; Preining, O.; Georgi, B.

    The aerosol in a non-industrial town normally is dominated by emissions from vehicles. Whereas gasoline-powered cars normally only emit a small amount of particulates, the emission by diesel-powered cars is considerable. The aerosol particles produced by diesel engines consist of graphitic carbon (GC) with attached hydrocarbons (HCs) including also polyaromatic HCs. Therefore the diesel particles can be carcinogenic. Besides diesel vehicles, all other combustion processes are also a source for GC; thus source apportionment of diesel emissions to the GC in the town is difficult. A direct apportionment of diesel emissions has been made possible by marking all the diesel fuel used by the vehicles in Vienna by a normally not occurring and easily detectable substance. All emitted diesel particles thus were marked with the tracer and by analyzing the atmospheric samples for the marking substance we found that the mass concentrations of diesel particles in the atmosphere varied between 5 and 23 μg m -3. Busy streets and calm residential areas show less difference in mass concentration than expected. The deposition of diesel particles on the ground has been determined by collecting samples from the road surface. The concentration of the marking substance was below the detection limit before the marking period and a year after the period. During the period when marked diesel fuel was used, the concentrations of the diesel particles settling to the ground was 0.012-0.07 g g -1 of collected dust. A positive correlation between the diesel vehicle density and the sampled mass of diesel vehicles exists. In Vienna we have a background diesel particle concentration of 11 μg m -3. This value increases by 5.5 μg m -3 per 500 diesel vehicles h -1 passing near the sampling location. The mass fraction of diesel particles of the total aerosol mass varied between 12.2 and 33%; the higher values were found in more remote areas, since diesel particles apparently diffuse easily

  20. The Berlin Emissivity Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helbert, Jorn

    Remote sensing infrared spectroscopy is the principal field of investigation for planetary surfaces composition. Past, present and future missions to the solar system bodies include in their payload instruments measuring the emerging radiation in the infrared range. TES on Mars Global Surveyor and THEMIS on Mars Odyssey have in many ways changed our views of Mars. The PFS instrument on the ESA Mars Express mission has collected spectra since the beginning of 2004. In spring 2006 the VIRTIS experiment started its operation on the ESA Venus Express mission, allowing for the first time to map the surface of Venus using the 1 µm emission from the surface. The MERTIS spectrometer is included in the payload of the ESA BepiColombo mission to Mercury, scheduled for 2013. For the interpretation of the measured data an emissivity spectral library of planetary analogue materials is needed. The Berlin Emissivity Database (BED) presented here is focused on relatively fine-grained size separates, providing a realistic basis for interpretation of thermal emission spectra of planetary regoliths. The BED is therefore complimentary to existing thermal emission libraries, like the ASU library for example. The BED contains currently entries for plagioclase and potassium feldspars, low Ca and high Ca pyroxenes, olivine, elemental sulphur, common martian analogues (JSC Mars-1, Salten Skov, palagonites, montmorillonite) and a lunar highland soil sample measured in the wavelength range from 3 to 50 µm as a function of particle size. For each sample, the spectra of four well defined particle size separates (¡25 µm , 25-63 µm, 63-125 µm, 125-250 µm) are measured with a 4 cm-1 spectral resolution. These size separates have been selected as typical representations for most of the planetary surfaces. Following an ongoing upgrade of the Planetary Emmissivity Laboratory (PEL) at DLR in Berlin measurements can be obtained at temperatures up to 500° C - realistic for the dayside conditions

  1. Methane Emission by Camelids

    PubMed Central

    Dittmann, Marie T.; Runge, Ullrich; Lang, Richard A.; Moser, Dario; Galeffi, Cordula; Kreuzer, Michael; Clauss, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    Methane emissions from ruminant livestock have been intensively studied in order to reduce contribution to the greenhouse effect. Ruminants were found to produce more enteric methane than other mammalian herbivores. As camelids share some features of their digestive anatomy and physiology with ruminants, it has been proposed that they produce similar amounts of methane per unit of body mass. This is of special relevance for countrywide greenhouse gas budgets of countries that harbor large populations of camelids like Australia. However, hardly any quantitative methane emission measurements have been performed in camelids. In order to fill this gap, we carried out respiration chamber measurements with three camelid species (Vicugna pacos, Lama glama, Camelus bactrianus; n = 16 in total), all kept on a diet consisting of food produced from alfalfa only. The camelids produced less methane expressed on the basis of body mass (0.32±0.11 L kg−1 d−1) when compared to literature data on domestic ruminants fed on roughage diets (0.58±0.16 L kg−1 d−1). However, there was no significant difference between the two suborders when methane emission was expressed on the basis of digestible neutral detergent fiber intake (92.7±33.9 L kg−1 in camelids vs. 86.2±12.1 L kg−1 in ruminants). This implies that the pathways of methanogenesis forming part of the microbial digestion of fiber in the foregut are similar between the groups, and that the lower methane emission of camelids can be explained by their generally lower relative food intake. Our results suggest that the methane emission of Australia's feral camels corresponds only to 1 to 2% of the methane amount produced by the countries' domestic ruminants and that calculations of greenhouse gas budgets of countries with large camelid populations based on equations developed for ruminants are generally overestimating the actual levels. PMID:24718604

  2. Negative Emissions Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, Danny

    2006-04-01

    Although `negative emissions' of carbon dioxide need not, in principle, involve use of biological processes to draw carbon out of the atmosphere, such `agricultural' sequestration' is the only known way to remove carbon from the atmosphere on time scales comparable to the time scale for anthropogenic increases in carbon emissions. In order to maintain the `negative emissions' the biomass must be used in such a way that the resulting carbon dioxide is separated and permanently sequestered. Two options for sequestration are in the topsoil and via geologic carbon sequestration. The former has multiple benefits, but the latter also is needed. Thus, although geologic carbon sequestration is viewed skeptically by some environmentalists as simply a way to keep using fossil fuels---it may be a key part of reversing accelerating climate forcing if rapid climate change is beginning to occur. I will first review the general approach of agricultural sequestration combined with use of resulting biofuels in a way that permits carbon separation and then geologic sequestration as a negative emissions technology. Then I discuss the process that is the focus of my company---the EPRIDA cycle. If deployed at a sufficiently large scale, it could reverse the increase in CO2 concentrations. I also estimate of benefits --carbon and other---of large scale deployment of negative emissions technologies. For example, using the EPRIDA cycle by planting and soil sequestering carbon in an area abut In 3X the size of Texas would remove the amount of carbon that is being accumulated worldwide each year. In addition to the atmospheric carbon removal, the EPRIDA approach also counters the depletion of carbon in the soil---increasing topsoil and its fertility; reduces the excess nitrogen in the water by eliminating the need for ammonium nitrate fertilizer and reduces fossil fuel reliance by providing biofuel and avoiding natural gas based fertilizer production.

  3. Methane emission by camelids.

    PubMed

    Dittmann, Marie T; Runge, Ullrich; Lang, Richard A; Moser, Dario; Galeffi, Cordula; Kreuzer, Michael; Clauss, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    Methane emissions from ruminant livestock have been intensively studied in order to reduce contribution to the greenhouse effect. Ruminants were found to produce more enteric methane than other mammalian herbivores. As camelids share some features of their digestive anatomy and physiology with ruminants, it has been proposed that they produce similar amounts of methane per unit of body mass. This is of special relevance for countrywide greenhouse gas budgets of countries that harbor large populations of camelids like Australia. However, hardly any quantitative methane emission measurements have been performed in camelids. In order to fill this gap, we carried out respiration chamber measurements with three camelid species (Vicugna pacos, Lama glama, Camelus bactrianus; n = 16 in total), all kept on a diet consisting of food produced from alfalfa only. The camelids produced less methane expressed on the basis of body mass (0.32±0.11 L kg⁻¹ d⁻¹) when compared to literature data on domestic ruminants fed on roughage diets (0.58±0.16 L kg⁻¹ d⁻¹). However, there was no significant difference between the two suborders when methane emission was expressed on the basis of digestible neutral detergent fiber intake (92.7±33.9 L kg⁻¹ in camelids vs. 86.2±12.1 L kg⁻¹ in ruminants). This implies that the pathways of methanogenesis forming part of the microbial digestion of fiber in the foregut are similar between the groups, and that the lower methane emission of camelids can be explained by their generally lower relative food intake. Our results suggest that the methane emission of Australia's feral camels corresponds only to 1 to 2% of the methane amount produced by the countries' domestic ruminants and that calculations of greenhouse gas budgets of countries with large camelid populations based on equations developed for ruminants are generally overestimating the actual levels.

  4. Emissions Models and Other Methods to Produce Emission Inventories

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    An emissions inventory is a summary or forecast of the emissions produced by a group of sources in a given time period. Inventories of air pollution from mobile sources are often produced by models such as the MOtor Vehicle Emission Simulator (MOVES).

  5. Zero Emission Coal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziock, H.; Guthrie, G. D.; Lackner, K. S.; Harrison, D. P.; Johnson, A. A.

    2002-05-01

    Unless the economic development of the majority of the world's population is prohibited, thereby forcing thereby forcing them to remain in poverty, world energy consumption and therefore carbon dioxide greenhouse gas emission rates could easily increase by an order of magnitude during this century. Given that we have already increased global atmospheric concentrations by 30% compared to their pre-industrial age level, without massive intervention, we will completely overwhelm Nature's ability to cope. In order to stabilize atmospheric CO2 levels, while allowing desired world economic development, the future allowable US per capita CO2 emissions are only 3 % of today's value. This is effectively zero, and thus what is required is the development of technologies that aim for emission of zero CO2 as well as other pollutants. If we continue to rely on our lowest cost, readily available, and dominant energy source, this will involve both a separation of the energy from the fossil fuel carbon followed by a permanent disposal of the CO2. To set the scale, today's yearly global emissions are approaching 25 cubic kilometers of CO2 at liquid densities, and these could grow by an order of magnitude by the end of the century. We describe a zero emission coal technology that would be able to deal with both the scope of the problem and the emission goal. The energy production process is a chemical conversion of coal to electricity or hydrogen, which involves no combustion and thus no smoke stack. The process provides a pure stream of CO2 for disposal while simultaneously achieving fuel to electricity conversion efficiencies that are two times better than today's value. This high efficiency by itself extends cuts pollutant production by a factor of two while also extending the lifetime of our fossil fuel reserves by a factor of two to many hundreds of years. By concentrating on coal, we also lay the groundwork for energy security and complete independence for the US, given the

  6. Air Emissions Monitoring for Permits

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Operating permits document how air pollution sources will demonstrate compliance with emission limits and also how air pollution sources will monitor, either periodically or continuously, their compliance with emission limits and all other requirements.

  7. CHARACTERIZATION OF TRANSIENT PUFF EMISSIONS ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Symposium Paper Transient puff emissions were characterized from burning carpet charges that were fed to a pilotscale rotary kiln combustor to assess the potential impact on emissions of using post-consumer carpet as an alternative fuel in cement kilns.

  8. Tanks Emissions for TRI Reporting

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    A presentation on overcoming the challenges of TRI reporting for and monitoring the hazardous air emissions from storage tanks, including a discussion on the most accurate and feasible methods of correctly reporting tank emissions to the TRI Program.

  9. Forecasting carbon dioxide emissions.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiaobing; Du, Ding

    2015-09-01

    This study extends the literature on forecasting carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions by applying the reduced-form econometrics approach of Schmalensee et al. (1998) to a more recent sample period, the post-1997 period. Using the post-1997 period is motivated by the observation that the strengthening pace of global climate policy may have been accelerated since 1997. Based on our parameter estimates, we project 25% reduction in CO2 emissions by 2050 according to an economic and population growth scenario that is more consistent with recent global trends. Our forecasts are conservative due to that we do not have sufficient data to fully take into account recent developments in the global economy.

  10. Global emissions inventories

    SciTech Connect

    Dignon, J.

    1995-07-01

    Atmospheric chemistry determines the concentrations of most of the important greenhouse gases except for carbon dioxide. The rate of removal of the greenhouse gases from the atmosphere is also controlled by atmospheric chemistry. The indirect effects of chemical forcing resulting from the chemical interactions of other species can also affect the concentrations of radiatively important gases such as ozone. In order to establish the contribution of any possible climatic change attributable to individual greenhouse gases, spatially and temporally resolved estimates of their emissions need to be established. Unfortunately, for most of the radiatively important species the global magnitudes of their individual fluxes are not known to better than a factor of two and their spatial distributions are even more poorly characterized. Efforts to estimate future projections of potential impacts and to monitor international agreements will require continued research to narrow the uncertainties of magnitude and geographical distribution of emissions.

  11. ELECTRON EMISSION REGULATING MEANS

    DOEpatents

    Brenholdt, I.R.

    1957-11-19

    >An electronic regulating system is described for controlling the electron emission of a cathode, for example, the cathode in a mass spectrometer. The system incorporates a transformer having a first secondary winding for the above-mentioned cathode and a second secondary winding for the above-mentioned cathode and a second secondary winding load by grid controlled vacuum tubes. A portion of the electron current emitted by the cathode is passed through a network which develops a feedback signal. The system arrangement is completed by using the feedback signal to control the vacuum tubes in the second secondary winding through a regulator tube. When a change in cathode emission occurs, the feedback signal acts to correct this change by adjusting the load on the transformer.

  12. Low emissions diesel fuel

    DOEpatents

    Compere, Alicia L.; Griffith, William L.; Dorsey, George F.; West, Brian H.

    1998-01-01

    A method and matter of composition for controlling NO.sub.x emissions from existing diesel engines. The method is achieved by adding a small amount of material to the diesel fuel to decrease the amount of NO.sub.x produced during combustion. Specifically, small amounts, less than about 1%, of urea or a triazine compound (methylol melamines) are added to diesel fuel. Because urea and triazine compounds are generally insoluble in diesel fuel, microemulsion technology is used to suspend or dissolve the urea or triazine compound in the diesel fuel. A typical fuel formulation includes 5% t-butyl alcohol, 4.5% water, 0.5% urea or triazine compound, 9% oleic acid, and 1% ethanolamine. The subject invention provides improved emissions in heavy diesel engines without the need for major modifications.

  13. Low emissions diesel fuel

    DOEpatents

    Compere, A.L.; Griffith, W.L.; Dorsey, G.F.; West, B.H.

    1998-05-05

    A method and matter of composition for controlling NO{sub x} emissions from existing diesel engines. The method is achieved by adding a small amount of material to the diesel fuel to decrease the amount of NO{sub x} produced during combustion. Specifically, small amounts, less than about 1%, of urea or a triazine compound (methylol melamines) are added to diesel fuel. Because urea and triazine compounds are generally insoluble in diesel fuel, microemulsion technology is used to suspend or dissolve the urea or triazine compound in the diesel fuel. A typical fuel formulation includes 5% t-butyl alcohol, 4.5% water, 0.5% urea or triazine compound, 9% oleic acid, and 1% ethanolamine. The subject invention provides improved emissions in heavy diesel engines without the need for major modifications.

  14. Noise Emission Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hübner, G.; Schorer, E.

    The acoustical efficiency of machines varies in the range of 10-9 to 10-5. This means even high power machines generate sound powers of a few Watts only. Due to the high sensitivity of the human ear however, such low sound powers create close to the machine loudnesses higher than 100 phon (64 sone). Consequently, the assessment of machinery noise emission requires relations to these subjective properties.

  15. Ionizing Emissions and Electronics,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-05-22

    TRANSLATION DIVISION OR OPINION OF THE FOREIGN TECHNOLOGY DI- FOREIGN TECHNOLOGY DIVISION VISION. WP.AFS, OHIO. FTI,- ID(RS)T-1675-83 Date 22 May 1984 M...8217’. .- ,- ,. -.. - -, - - -. -. , . . . ., . ). . .- . I- - - .-Z.’ DOC - 83167501 PAGE -3 Page 003. Introduction. In recent years, considerable attention is paid...emissions, which call considerable changes in the properties of radio engineering materials, it is accepted to at present carry the following forms of ’ 9

  16. Power plant emissions reduction

    DOEpatents

    Anand, Ashok Kumar; Nagarjuna Reddy, Thirumala Reddy

    2015-10-20

    A system for improved emissions performance of a power plant generally includes an exhaust gas recirculation system having an exhaust gas compressor disposed downstream from the combustor, a condensation collection system at least partially disposed upstream from the exhaust gas compressor, and a mixing chamber in fluid communication with the exhaust gas compressor and the condensation collection system, where the mixing chamber is in fluid communication with the combustor.

  17. Quantification of Emission Factor Uncertainty

    EPA Science Inventory

    Emissions factors are important for estimating and characterizing emissions from sources of air pollution. There is no quantitative indication of uncertainty for these emission factors, most factors do not have an adequate data set to compute uncertainty, and it is very difficult...

  18. Acoustic emission monitoring system

    DOEpatents

    Romrell, Delwin M.

    1977-07-05

    Methods and apparatus for identifying the source location of acoustic emissions generated within an acoustically conductive medium. A plurality of acoustic receivers are communicably coupled to the surface of the medium at a corresponding number of spaced locations. The differences in the reception time of the respective sensors in response to a given acoustic event are measured among various sensor combinations prescribed by the monitoring mode employed. Acoustic reception response encountered subsequent to the reception by a predetermined number of the prescribed sensor combinations are inhibited from being communicated to the processing circuitry, while the time measurements obtained from the prescribed sensor combinations are translated into a position measurement representative of the location on the surface most proximate the source of the emission. The apparatus is programmable to function in six separate and five distinct operating modes employing either two, three or four sensory locations. In its preferred arrangement the apparatus of this invention will re-initiate a monitoring interval if the predetermined number of sensors do not respond to a particular emission within a given time period.

  19. Infrared Atmospheric Emission. I.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-03-01

    contract. They are (i) "The 5g Levels of Atomic Nitrogen" AO)YA ii Edward S. Chang and Hajime Sakai J. Phys. B 14, L391 (1981) (ii) "Infrared Emission...At. Idol. Phys. 14 (1981) L391 -L395. printed in Great Bjritain LETTER TO THE EDITOR INC 5g levels of atomic nitrogent Edward S Chang and Hajime Sakai...81/120391 +05$01.30 C) 1981 The Institute of Physics L391 The U.S. Qovermnt is authoried to repoduce and sem tns report. Parmb@a- or ur Uther

  20. Positron Emission Tomography (PET)

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Welch, M. J.

    1990-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) assesses biochemical processes in the living subject, producing images of function rather than form. Using PET, physicians are able to obtain not the anatomical information provided by other medical imaging techniques, but pictures of physiological activity. In metaphoric terms, traditional imaging methods supply a map of the body's roadways, its, anatomy; PET shows the traffic along those paths, its biochemistry. This document discusses the principles of PET, the radiopharmaceuticals in PET, PET research, clinical applications of PET, the cost of PET, training of individuals for PET, the role of the United States Department of Energy in PET, and the futures of PET.

  1. Emission control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Clyde F. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    Methods and apparatus utilizing hydrogen peroxide are useful to reduce NOx, SOx and mercury (or other heavy metal) emissions from combustion flue gas streams. Continuous concentration of hydrogen peroxide to levels approaching or exceeding propellant-grade hydrogen peroxide facilitates increased system efficiency. In this manner, combustion flue gas streams can be treated for the removal of NOx, SOx and heavy metals, while isolating useful by-products streams of sulfuric acid and nitric acid as well as solids for the recovery of the heavy metals.

  2. Acoustic emission intrusion detector

    DOEpatents

    Carver, Donald W.; Whittaker, Jerry W.

    1980-01-01

    An intrusion detector is provided for detecting a forcible entry into a secured structure while minimizing false alarms. The detector uses a piezoelectric crystal transducer to sense acoustic emissions. The transducer output is amplified by a selectable gain amplifier to control the sensitivity. The rectified output of the amplifier is applied to a Schmitt trigger circuit having a preselected threshold level to provide amplitude discrimination. Timing circuitry is provided which is activated by successive pulses from the Schmitt trigger which lie within a selected time frame for frequency discrimination. Detected signals having proper amplitude and frequency trigger an alarm within the first complete cycle time of a detected acoustical disturbance signal.

  3. Improve emissions monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Vining, S.K.

    1998-01-01

    Marathon`s Texas City refinery was subject to five separate EPA regulations in addition to a state program for monitoring and repairing fugitive leaks. In this case history, the refinery sought an organizational solution that reduced monitoring costs and kept the facility fully compliant with current state and federal regulations. Equally important, the new monitoring program incorporated flexibility for future emission-reduction requirements. The paper describes the solution, regulatory background, the previous system, leak-threshold consolidation, operator ownership, and projects benefits.

  4. Solar radio emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldman, M. V.; Smith, D. F.

    1981-01-01

    Active areas of both observational and theoretical research in which rapid progress is being made are discussed. These include: (1) the dynamic spectrum or frequency versus time plot; (2) physical mechanisms in the development of various types of bursts; (3) microwave type 1, 2, 3, and moving type 4 bursts; (4) bursts caused by trapped electrons; (5) physics of type 3bursts; (6) the physics of type 2 bursts and their related shocks; (7) the physics of both stationary and moving traps and associated type 1 and moving type 4 bursts; and (8) the status of the field of solar radio emission.

  5. Positron Emission Tomography (PET)

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, M.J.

    1990-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) assesses biochemical processes in the living subject, producing images of function rather than form. Using PET, physicians are able to obtain not the anatomical information provided by other medical imaging techniques, but pictures of physiological activity. In metaphoric terms, traditional imaging methods supply a map of the body's roadways, its, anatomy; PET shows the traffic along those paths, its biochemistry. This document discusses the principles of PET, the radiopharmaceuticals in PET, PET research, clinical applications of PET, the cost of PET, training of individuals for PET, the role of the United States Department of Energy in PET, and the futures of PET. 22 figs.

  6. Emissions From the Terrestrial Biosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedinmyer, C.; Guenther, A.; Belote, A.; Klos, K.

    2004-12-01

    The terrestrial biosphere plays a critical role in the functioning of the earth system. Vegetation emits significant amounts of volatile organic compounds (VOC) and aerosols to the atmosphere through several pathways that include physiological and biochemical processes and disturbances such as wildfire and herbivory. Biogenic VOC emissions can affect chemical processes that determine air quality and control the lifetimes of longer lived chemical species. Direct aerosol emissions from vegetation and wildfires and secondary aerosols formed by biogenic VOC can impact public health, change cloud properties, and control climate processes. Biogenic emissions play a critical role in many atmospheric and biogeochemical processes. Therefore, to realistically simulate the earth system, including air quality and climate, reasonable estimates of biogenic emissions must be included in those simulations. This paper presents an overview of biogenic emissions from undisturbed vegetation and from wildfire. Models that simulate these emissions have been developed to create inputs for regional and global chemical transport models and for climate models. Despite the success in biogenic emission model development, technical challenges for such modeling still exist. Biogenic emission models use a variety of input information, including satellite data, field observations, and output from other models (e.g. NCEP, MM5, WRF). These inputs have a variety of spatial and temporal resolutions and are available in many different formats. Several of the challenges encountered when modeling biogenic emissions will be addressed, including difficulties in applying different input datasets due to format, size, and spatial resolution and limitations in software that hinder the processing of emission estimates.

  7. Acoustical emission from bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longuet-Higgins, Michael S.

    1991-12-01

    The scientific objectives of this report are to investigate the dynamics of bubbles formed from a free surface (particularly the upper surface of the ocean) by breaking waves, and the resulting emission of underwater sound. The chief natural source of underwater sound in the ocean at frequencies from 0.5 to 50 kHz is known to be the acoustical emission from newly-formed bubbles and bubble clouds, particularly those created by breaking waves and rain. Attention has been drawn to the occurrence of high-speed jets directed into the bubble just after bubble closure. They have been observed both in rain-drop impacts and in the release of bubbles from an underwater nozzle. Qualitatively they are similar to the inward jets seen in the collapse of a cavitation bubble. There is also a similarity to the highly-accelerated upward jets in standing water waves (accelerations greater than 20g) or in bubbles bursting at a free surface. We have adopted a theoretical approach based on the dynamics of incompressible fluids with a free surface.

  8. Elastic emission polishing

    SciTech Connect

    Loewenthal, M.; Loseke, K.; Dow, T.A.; Scattergood, R.O.

    1988-12-01

    Elastic emission polishing, also called elastic emission machining (EEM), is a process where a stream of abrasive slurry is used to remove material from a substrate and produce damage free surfaces with controlled surface form. It is a noncontacting method utilizing a thick elasto-hydrodynamic film formed between a soft rotating ball and the workpiece to control the flow of the abrasive. An apparatus was built in the Center, which consists of a stationary spindle, a two-axis table for the workpiece, and a pump to circulate the working fluid. The process is controlled by a programmable computer numerical controller (CNC), which presently can operate the spindle speed and movement of the workpiece in one axis only. This apparatus has been used to determine material removal rates on different material samples as a function of time, utilizing zirconium oxide (ZrO{sub 2}) particles suspended in distilled water as the working fluid. By continuing a study of removal rates the process should become predictable, and thus create a new, effective, yet simple tool for ultra-precision mechanical machining of surfaces.

  9. Zero emission coal

    SciTech Connect

    Ziock, H.; Lackner, K.

    2000-08-01

    We discuss a novel, emission-free process for producing hydrogen or electricity from coal. Even though we focus on coal, the basic design is compatible with any carbonaceous fuel. The process uses cyclical carbonation of calcium oxide to promote the production of hydrogen from carbon and water. The carbonation of the calcium oxide removes carbon dioxide from the reaction products and provides the additional energy necessary to complete hydrogen production without additional combustion of carbon. The calcination of the resulting calcium carbonate is accomplished using the high temperature waste heat from solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC), which generate electricity from hydrogen fuel. Converting waste heat back to useful chemical energy allows the process to achieve very high conversion efficiency from fuel energy to electrical energy. As the process is essentially closed-loop, the process is able to achieve zero emissions if the concentrated exhaust stream of CO{sub 2} is sequestered. Carbon dioxide disposal is accomplished by the production of magnesium carbonate from ultramafic rock. The end products of the sequestration process are stable naturally occurring minerals. Sufficient rich ultramafic deposits exist to easily handle all the world's coal.

  10. Ion photon emission microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, P.; Doyle, B. L.; Banks, J. C.; Battistella, A.; Gennaro, G.; McDaniel, F. D.; Mellon, M.; Vittone, E.; Vizkelethy, G.; Wing, N. D.

    2003-09-01

    A new ion-induced emission microscopy has been invented and demonstrated, which is called ion photon emission microscopy (IPEM). It employs a low current, broad ion beam impinging on a sample, previously coated or simply covered with a few microns of a fast, highly efficient phosphor layer. The light produced at the single ion impact point is collected with an optical microscope and projected at high magnification onto a single photon position sensitive detector (PSD). This allows maps of the ion strike effects to be produced, effectively removing the need for a microbeam. Irradiation in air and even the use of alpha particle sources with no accelerator are possible. Potential applications include ion beam induced charge collection studies of semiconducting and insulating materials, single event upset studies on microchips and even biological cells in radiobiological effectiveness experiments. We describe the IPEM setup, including a 60× OM-40 microscope with a 1.5 mm hole for the beam transmission and a Quantar PSD with 60 μm pixel. Bicron plastic scintillator blades of 10 μm were chosen as a phosphor for their nanosecond time resolution, homogeneity, utility and commercial availability. The results given in this paper are for a prototype IPEM system. They indicate a resolution of ˜12 μm, the presence of a spatial halo and a He-ion efficiency of ˜20%. This marks the first time that nuclear microscopy has been performed with a radioactive source.

  11. Biomass burning - Combustion emissions, satellite imagery, and biogenic emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, Joel S.; Cofer, Wesley R., III; Winstead, Edward L.; Rhinehart, Robert P.; Cahoon, Donald R., Jr.; Sebacher, Daniel I.; Sebacher, Shirley; Stocks, Brian J.

    1991-01-01

    After detailing a technique for the estimation of the instantaneous emission of trace gases produced by biomass burning, using satellite imagery, attention is given to the recent discovery that burning results in significant enhancement of biogenic emissions of N2O, NO, and CH4. Biomass burning accordingly has an immediate and long-term impact on the production of atmospheric trace gases. It is presently demonstrated that satellite imagery of fires may be used to estimate combustion emissions, and could be used to estimate long-term postburn biogenic emission of trace gases to the atmosphere.

  12. A Community Emissions Data System (CEDS) for Historical Emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Steven J.; Zhou, Yuyu; Kyle, G. Page; Wang, Hailong; Yu, Hongbin

    2015-04-21

    Historical emission estimates for anthropogenic aerosol and precursor compounds are key data needed for Earth system models, climate models, and atmospheric chemistry and transport models; both for general analysis and assessment and also for model validation through comparisons with observations. Current global emission data sets have a number of shortcomings, including timeliness and transparency. Satellite and other earth-system data are increasingly available in near real-time, but global emission estimates lag by 5-10 years. The CEDS project will construct a data-driven, open source framework to produce annually updated emission estimates. The basic methodologies to be used for this system have been used for SO2 (Smith et al. 2011, Klimont, Smith and Cofala 2013), and are designed to complement existing inventory efforts. The goal of this system is to consistently extend current emission estimates both forward in time to recent years and also back over the entire industrial era. The project will produce improved datasets for global and (potentially) regional model, allow analysis of trends across time, countries, and sectors of emissions and emission factors, and facilitate improved scientific analysis in general. Consistent estimation of uncertainty will be an integral part of this system. This effort will facilitate community evaluation of emissions and further emission-related research more generally.

  13. Emission impacts of electric vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Quanlu Wang; DeLuchi, M.A.; Sperling, D. )

    1990-09-01

    Alternative vehicular fuels are proposed as a strategy to reduce urban air pollution. In this paper, the authors analyze the emission impacts of electric vehicles in California for two target years, 1995 and 2010. They consider a range of assumptions regarding electricity consumption of electric vehicles, emission control technologies for power plants, and the mix of primary energy sources for electricity generation. They find that, relative to continued use of gasoline-powered vehicles, the use of electric vehicles would dramatically and unequivocally reduce carbon monoxide and hydrocarbons. Under most conditions, nitrogen oxide emissions would decrease moderately. Sulfur oxide and particulate emissions would increase or slightly decrease. Because other areas of the United States tend to use more coal in electricity generation and have less stringent emission controls on power plants, electric vehicles may have less emission reduction benefits outside California.

  14. Emission impacts of electric vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Q.; DeLuchi, M.A.; Sperling, D. )

    1990-08-01

    Alternative vehicular fuels are proposed as a strategy to reduce urban air pollution. In this paper, we analyze the emission impacts of electric vehicles in Califormia for two target years, 1995 and 2010. We consider a range of assumptions regarding electricity consumption of electric vehicles, emission control technologies for power plants, and the mix of primary energy sources for electricity generation. We find that, relative to continued use of gasoline-powered vehicles, the use of electric vehicles would dramatically and unequivocally reduce carbon monoxide and hydrocarbons. Under most conditions, nitrogen oxide emissions would decrease moderately. Sulfur oxide and particulate emissions would increase or slightly decrease. Because other areas of the US tend to use more coal in electricity generation and have less stringent emission controls on power plants, electric vehicles may have less emission reduction benefits outside California.

  15. Carbon Emission Flow in Networks

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Chongqing; Zhou, Tianrui; Chen, Qixin; Xu, Qianyao; Xia, Qing; Ji, Zhen

    2012-01-01

    As the human population increases and production expands, energy demand and anthropogenic carbon emission rates have been growing rapidly, and the need to decrease carbon emission levels has drawn increasing attention. The link between energy production and consumption has required the large-scale transport of energy within energy transmission networks. Within this energy flow, there is a virtual circulation of carbon emissions. To understand this circulation and account for the relationship between energy consumption and carbon emissions, this paper introduces the concept of “carbon emission flow in networks” and establishes a method to calculate carbon emission flow in networks. Using an actual analysis of China's energy pattern, the authors discuss the significance of this new concept, not only as a feasible approach but also as an innovative theoretical perspective. PMID:22761988

  16. Facile metalation of Hbzq by [cis-Pt(C6F5)2(thf)2]: a route to a pentafluorophenyl benzoquinolate solvate complex that easily coordinates terminal alkynes. Spectroscopic and optical properties.

    PubMed

    Berenguer, Jesús R; Lalinde, Elena; Moreno, M Teresa; Sánchez, Sergio; Torroba, Javier

    2012-11-05

    A new neutral cyclometalated platinum(II) solvate complex [cis-Pt(bzq)(C(6)F(5))(acetone)] (1) has been prepared by easy C-H activation of 7,8-benzo[h]quinoline on the coordination sphere of [cis-Pt(C(6)F(5))(2)(thf)(2)] (thf = tetrahydrofuran). The study of the reaction pathway has led us to the preparation of the bis(Hbzq) product [cis-Pt(C(6)F(5))(2)(Hbzq)(2)] (2) and the benzoquinoline-benzoquinolate derivative [Pt(bzq)(C(6)F(5))(Hbzq)] (3). This latter complex has been characterized by X-ray diffraction, showing the occurrence of π···π intermolecular stacking interactions associated to the deprotonated bzq units. The acetone molecule in [cis-Pt(bzq)(C(6)F(5))(acetone)] can be easily displaced by alkynes, allowing the synthesis of the first reported η(2)-alkyne-cycloplatinate complexes [Pt(bzq)(C(6)F(5))(η(2)-RC≡CR')] (R = H, R' = Ph 4, (t)Bu 5, Fc 6; R = R' = Ph 7), which have been fully characterized spectroscopically and by DFT studies. These alkyne complexes are only moderately stable in solution, and all attempts to obtain crystals suitable for X-ray diffraction were fruitless. Nevertheless, in the case of the ferrocenyl derivative, crystals of complex [Pt(κN:η(2)-bzq-C≡CFc)(C(6)F(5))(μ-κC(α):η(2)-C≡CFc)Pt(bzq)(C(6)F(5))] (8), containing an unusual alkynyl-functionalized benzoquinoline chelate ligand, were systematically obtained. All complexes (except those containing the ferrocenyl fragment) present emissive properties in solution and solid state (77 K), related, in general, with intraligand (bzq) excited states with some mixing (3)MLCT character, as supported by theoretical calculations. In solid state at room temperature, aggregation induced emission (AIE) is observed likely generated by intermolecular π···π stacking, as supporting by DFT calculations on 3(2). Interestingly, both types of excited states ((3)IL/(3)MLCT and AIE) seem to be close in energy in complexes 1 and 3, which show a significant luminescent thermochromism

  17. Extragalactic diffuse (C II) emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madden, Suzanne C.; Geis, Norbert; Townes, Charles H.; Genzel, R.; Herrmann, F.; Poglitsch, Albrecht; Stacey, G. J.

    1995-01-01

    The 158 micro m (CII) line has been mapped in the galaxies Centaurus A, M83, NGC 6946, and NGC 891. The emission exists over very large scales, peaking in the nuclei and extending beyond the spiral arms and molecular disks. While most of the (CII) emission from the nuclei and spiral arms originates in photodissociated gas, the diffuse atomic gas can account for much of the (CII) emission in the extended regions.

  18. Advanced Emissions Control Development Program

    SciTech Connect

    G. A. Farthing; G. T. Amrhein; G. A. Kudlac; D. A. Yurchison; D. K. McDonald; M. G. Milobowski

    2001-03-31

    The primary objective of the Advanced Emissions Control Development Program (AECDP) is to develop practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs, or air toxics) from coal-fired boilers. This objective is being met by identifying ways to effectively control air toxic emissions through the use of conventional flue gas cleanup equipment such as electrostatic precipitators (ESPs), fabric filters (fabric filters), and wet flue gas desulfurization (wet FGD) systems. Development work initially concentrated on the capture of trace metals, hydrogen chloride, and hydrogen fluoride. Recent work has focused almost exclusively on the control of mercury emissions.

  19. ADVANCED EMISSIONS CONTROL DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    G.A. Farthing

    2001-02-06

    The primary objective of the Advanced Emissions Control Development Program (AECDP) is to develop practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs, or air toxics) from coal-fired boilers. The project goal is to effectively control air toxic emissions through the use of conventional flue gas cleanup equipment such as electrostatic precipitators (ESPs), fabric filters (baghouses), and wet flue gas desulfurization (WFGD) systems. Development work initially concentrated on the capture of trace metals, fine particulate, hydrogen chloride, and hydrogen fluoride. Recent work has focused almost exclusively on the control of mercury emissions.

  20. Tritium Emissions Reduction Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Wieneke, R.E.; Bowser, R.P.; Hedley, W.H.; Kissner, T.J.; Lamberger, P.H.; Morgan, F.G.; Van Patten, J.F.; Williams, M.A.

    1988-01-01

    The Tritium Emissions Reduction Facility (TERF) will be a system for the continuous processing of tritium containing gases collected from various operations at Mound. The basis of the system operation will be the oxidation of elemental hydrogen isotopes and organic molecules at elevated temperatures on precious metal catalyst beds, and the adsorption of the resulting oxide (water) on molecular sieve dryers. The TERF will be expected to handle from 400,000 to 1,000,000 curies of tritium per year in the process gas stream and release no more than 200 curies per year to the atmosphere. Consequently, the TERF will need to convert and capture tritium at low concentrations in gas efficiently and reliably. 5 refs., 2 figs.

  1. Thermoluminescence emission spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Prescott, J R; Fox, P J; Akber, R A; Jensen, H E

    1988-08-15

    A sensitive thermoluminescence (TL) emission spectrometer based on Fourier transform spectroscopy is described. It employs a modified scanning Twyman-Green interferometer with photomultiplier detection in a photon-counting mode. The etendue is 180pi mm(2), and it covers the 350-600-nm wavelength range. The output can be displayed either as a 3-D isometric plot of intensity vs temperature and wavelength, as a contour diagram, or as a conventional TL glow curve of intensity vs temperature. It is sufficiently sensitive to record thermoluminescence spectra of dosimeter phosphors and minerals for thermoluminescence dating at levels corresponding to those found during actual use as radiation monitors or in dating. Examples of actual spectra are given.

  2. Aviation Particle Emissions Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wey, Chowen C. (Editor)

    2004-01-01

    The Aviation Particle Emissions Workshop was held on November 18 19, 2003, in Cleveland, Ohio. It was sponsored by the National Aeronautic and Space Administration (NASA) under the Vehicle Systems Program (VSP) and the Ultra- Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) Project. The objectives were to build a sound foundation for a comprehensive particulate research roadmap and to provide a forum for discussion among U.S. stakeholders and researchers. Presentations included perspectives from the Federal Aviation Administration, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, NASA, and United States airports. There were five interactive technical sessions: sampling methodology, measurement methodology, particle modeling, database, inventory and test venue, and air quality. Each group presented technical issues which generated excellent discussion. The five session leads collaborated with their members to present summaries and conclusions to each content area.

  3. Positron emission mammography imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, William W.

    2003-10-02

    This paper examines current trends in Positron Emission Mammography (PEM) instrumentation and the performance tradeoffs inherent in them. The most common geometry is a pair of parallel planes of detector modules. They subtend a larger solid angle around the breast than conventional PET cameras, and so have both higher efficiency and lower cost. Extensions to this geometry include encircling the breast, measuring the depth of interaction (DOI), and dual-modality imaging (PEM and x-ray mammography, as well as PEM and x-ray guided biopsy). The ultimate utility of PEM may not be decided by instrument performance, but by biological and medical factors, such as the patient to patient variation in radiotracer uptake or the as yet undetermined role of PEM in breast cancer diagnosis and treatment.

  4. Acoustic emission signature analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buck, O.; Pardee, J. W.

    1981-03-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) in plate glass and steel was studied as a function of angle. The low frequency AE in glass was studied in detail, and contributions from P, S, and Rayleigh waves identified. These results were isotropic, as expected theoretically. Limited high frequency (5 to 20 MHz) results were obtained in glass. The measurement of AE on transgranular crack growth in steel during fatigue crack growth was accomplished by use of a low noise manual hydraulic loading system and an electronic gate to reject grip noise. The concept of the wave momentum of an AE was elaborated and a measurement technique suggested. The theoretical study of this problem led to the discovery of an infinite family of elastic surface (Rayleigh-like) waves, and to further cylindrical, radially propagating plate waves.

  5. PEARS Emission Line Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pirzkal, Nor; Rothberg, Barry; Ly, Chun; Rhoads, James E.; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Grogin, Norman A.; Dahlen, Tomas; Meurer, Gerhardt R.; Walsh, Jeremy; Hathi, Nimish P.; Cohen, Seth; Belini, Andrea; Holwerda, Benne W.; Straughn, Amber; Mechtley, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    We present a full analysis of the Probing Evolution And Reionization Spectroscopically (PEARS) slitless grism spectroscopic data obtained vl'ith the Advanced Camera for Surveys on HST. PEARS covers fields within both the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS) North and South fields, making it ideal as a random surveY of galaxies, as well as the availability of a wide variety of ancillary observations to support the spectroscopic results. Using the PEARS data we are able to identify star forming galaxies within the redshift volume 0 < z < 1.5. Star forming regions in the PEARS survey are pinpointed independently of the host galaxy. This method allOW8 us to detect the presence of multiple emission line regions (ELRs) within a single galaxy. 1162 [OII], [OIII] and/or H-alpha emission lines have been identified in the PEARS sample of approx 906 galaxies down to a limiting flux of approx 10 - 18 erg/s/sq cm . The ELRs have also been compared to the properties of the host galaxy, including morphology, luminosity, and mass. From this analysis we find three key results: 1) The computed line luminosities show evidence of a flattening in the luminosity function with increasing redshift; 2) The star forming systems show evidence of disturbed morphologies, with star formation occurring predominantly within one effective (half-light) radius. However, the morphologies show no correlation with host stellar mass; and 3) The number density of star forming galaxies with M(*) >= 10(exp 9) Solar M decreases by an order of magnitude at z<=0.5 relative to the number at 0.5 < z < 0.9 in support of the argument for galaxy downsizing.

  6. Seismic Resonant Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korneev, V. A.

    2007-12-01

    There are several classes of underground objects which can produce resonant emission after being hit by incident seismic waves. Those objects include tunnels, pipes, buried containers, ground-filled excavations, unexploded ordinances, fluid-filled fractures, mine shafts, and the like. Being high contrast scatterers, these objects are capable of generating strong scattered waves where primary PP, PS, SS waves carry away most of the energy which was brought by incident waves. For both high- and low- velocity objects the primary scattered waves have the same order of magnitude as incident waves. The main difference between these groups of objects is in later arrivals of multiple scattered waves. While high-velocity objects effectively radiate most of the energy soon after impact, the low-velocity objects trap some fraction of incident wave energy in the form of circumferential waves which propagate rotating along the interface between the object and the embedding medium. Circumferential waves include surface Rayleigh-type waves (propagating mostly in the embedding medium), Stoneley waves (propagating mostly in the fluid, if present), and Frantz waves (body waves trapped in the object because of its curvature). Strong impedance contrast ensures small radiation loss for circumferential waves and they slowly decay in amplitude while rotating inside/around the object. Some circumferential waves exist in the high-velocity objects but their amplitudes decay very fast because of strong radiation in outer medium. Most of the secondary (multiply reflected from an object's boundaries or multiply circled around the object) resonant-scattered energy radiates in the embedding medium as shear waves. The possibility of neglecting P- waves in late scattering arrivals simplifies imaging as is demonstrated for the field and modeled data of the example. Resonant emission phenomenon provides an effective tool for active monitoring for a number of applications such as tunnel detection

  7. UPDATE OF EPA'S EMISSION FACTORS FOR LANDFILL GAS EMISSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper describes an effort to collect updated data and determine if changes are needed to AP-42, a document that provides emission factors characterizing landfill gas (LFG) emissions from sites with and without LFG controls. The work underway includes the types of measurement ...

  8. Quantification of alginate by aggregation induced by calcium ions and fluorescent polycations.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hewen; Korendovych, Ivan V; Luk, Yan-Yeung

    2016-01-01

    For quantification of polysaccharides, including heparins and alginates, the commonly used carbazole assay involves hydrolysis of the polysaccharide to form a mixture of UV-active dye conjugate products. Here, we describe two efficient detection and quantification methods that make use of the negative charges of the alginate polymer and do not involve degradation of the targeted polysaccharide. The first method utilizes calcium ions to induce formation of hydrogel-like aggregates with alginate polymer; the aggregates can be quantified readily by staining with a crystal violet dye. This method does not require purification of alginate from the culture medium and can measure the large amount of alginate that is produced by a mucoid Pseudomonas aeruginosa culture. The second method employs polycations tethering a fluorescent dye to form suspension aggregates with the alginate polyanion. Encasing the fluorescent dye in the aggregates provides an increased scattering intensity with a sensitivity comparable to that of the conventional carbazole assay. Both approaches provide efficient methods for monitoring alginate production by mucoid P. aeruginosa.

  9. Aggregation-induced reversal of transport distances of soil organic matter: are our balances correct?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yaxian; Kuhn, Nikolaus

    2014-05-01

    The effect of soil erosion on global carbon cycling, especially as a source or sink of green-house gases (GHGs), is the subject of intense debate. The controversy arises mostly from the lack of information on the fate of eroded soil organic carbon (SOC) as it moves from the site of erosion to the site of longer-term deposition. This requires improved understanding the transport distances of eroded SOC, which is principally related to the settling velocities of sediment fractions that carry the eroded SOC. For aggregated soils, settling velocities are affected by their actual aggregate size rather than the mineral grain size distribution. Aggregate stability is, in turn, strongly influenced by soil organic matter. This study aims at identifying the effect of aggregation on the transport distances of eroded SOC and its susceptibility to mineralization after transport and deposition. A rainfall simulation was carried out on a silty loam soil. The eroded sediments were fractionated by a settling tube apparatus into six different size classes according to their settling velocities and likely transport distances. Weight, SOC concentration and instantaneous respiration rates of the fractions of the six classes were measured. Our results show that: 1) 41% of the eroded SOC was transported with coarse aggregates that would be likely re-distributed across landscapes; 2) erosion was prone to accelerate the mineralization of eroded organic carbon immediately after erosion, compared to undisturbed aggregates; 3) erosion might make a higher contribution to atmospheric CO2 than the estimation made without considering the effects of aggregation and extra SOC mineralization during transport.

  10. Amyloid-β peptide (1-42) aggregation induced by copper ions under acidic conditions.

    PubMed

    Bin, Yannan; Li, Xia; He, Yonghui; Chen, Shu; Xiang, Juan

    2013-07-01

    It is well known that the aggregation of amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) induced by Cu²⁺ is related to incubation time, solution pH, and temperature. In this work, the aggregation of Aβ₁₋₄₂ in the presence of Cu²⁺ under acidic conditions was studied at different incubation time and temperature (e.g. 25 and 37°C). Incubation temperature, pH, and the presence of Cu²⁺ in Aβ solution were confirmed to alter the morphology of aggregation (fibrils or amorphous aggregates), and the morphology is pivotal for Aβ neurotoxicity and Alzheimer disease (AD) development. The results of atomic force microscopy (AFM) indicated that the formation of Aβ fibrous morphology is preferred at lower pH, but Cu²⁺ induced the formation of amorphous aggregates. The aggregation rate of Aβ was increased with the elevation of temperature. These results were further confirmed by fluorescence spectroscopy and circular dichroism spectroscopy and it was found that the formation of β-sheet structure was inhibited by Cu²⁺ binding to Aβ. The result was consistent with AFM observation and the fibrillation process was restrained. We believe that the local charge state in hydrophilic domain of Aβ may play a dominant role in the aggregate morphology due to the strong steric hindrance. This research will be valuable for understanding of Aβ toxicity in AD.

  11. Platelet-collagen adhesion enhances platelet aggregation induced by binding of VWF to platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Laduca, F.M.; Bell, W.R.; Bettigole, R.E. State Univ. of New York, Buffalo )

    1987-11-01

    Ristocetin-induced platelet aggregation (RIPA) was evaluated in the presence of platelet-collagen adhesion. RIPA of normal donor platelet-rich plasma (PRP) demonstrated a primary wave of aggregation mediated by the binding of von Willebrand factor (VWF) to platelets and a secondary aggregation wave, due to a platelet-release reaction, initiated by VWF-platelet binding and inhibitable by acetylsalicylic acid (ASA). An enhanced RIPA was observed in PRP samples to which collagen had been previously added. These subthreshold concentrations of collagen, which by themselves were insufficient to induce aggregation, caused measurable platelet-collagen adhesion. Subthreshold collagen did not cause microplatelet aggregation, platelet release of ({sup 3}H)serotonin, or alter the dose-responsive binding of {sup 125}I-labeled VWF to platelets, which occurred with increasing ristocetin concentrations. However, ASA inhibition of the platelet release reaction prevented collagen-enhanced RIPA. These results demonstrate that platelet-collagen adhesion altered the platelet-release reaction induced by the binding of VWF to platelets causing a platelet-release reaction at a level of VWF-platelet binding not normally initiating a secondary aggregation. These findings suggest that platelet-collagen adhesion enhances platelet function mediated by VWF.

  12. Nontronite Particle Aggregation Induced by Microbial Fe(III) Reduction and Exopolysaccharide Production

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    R., Bressollier, P. and Urdaci, M.C. (2003) Isolation capsules of Shewanella spp. Applied and Environmental and characterization of two...clay-particle aggregation. Microbial Fe(l1I) reduction experiments were conducted with Shewanella putrefaciens CN32 in bicarbonate buffer with...reduction, and pure EPS isolated from CN32 cells was used to examine the effect of EPS. The data showed that both Fe(lII) reduction and EPS were

  13. Human myocytes are protected from titin aggregation-induced stiffening by small heat shock proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kötter, Sebastian; Unger, Andreas; Hamdani, Nazha; Lang, Patrick; Vorgerd, Matthias; Nagel-Steger, Luitgard

    2014-01-01

    In myocytes, small heat shock proteins (sHSPs) are preferentially translocated under stress to the sarcomeres. The functional implications of this translocation are poorly understood. We show here that HSP27 and αB-crystallin associated with immunoglobulin-like (Ig) domain-containing regions, but not the disordered PEVK domain (titin region rich in proline, glutamate, valine, and lysine), of the titin springs. In sarcomeres, sHSP binding to titin was actin filament independent and promoted by factors that increased titin Ig unfolding, including sarcomere stretch and the expression of stiff titin isoforms. Titin spring elements behaved predominantly as monomers in vitro. However, unfolded Ig segments aggregated, preferentially under acidic conditions, and αB-crystallin prevented this aggregation. Disordered regions did not aggregate. Promoting titin Ig unfolding in cardiomyocytes caused elevated stiffness under acidic stress, but HSP27 or αB-crystallin suppressed this stiffening. In diseased human muscle and heart, both sHSPs associated with the titin springs, in contrast to the cytosolic/Z-disk localization seen in healthy muscle/heart. We conclude that aggregation of unfolded titin Ig domains stiffens myocytes and that sHSPs translocate to these domains to prevent this aggregation. PMID:24421331

  14. Enhanced two-photon absorption property of silver nanoparticle aggregates induced by a thioether derivative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yun; Wang, Xiao-lan; Wei, Meng-qing; Wang, Hui; Tian, Yu-peng; Li, Sheng-li; Xue, Zhao-ming; Yang, Jia-xiang; Kong, Lin

    2016-12-01

    A novel thioether derivative with two-photon absorption activity, 4,4'-((4-(dimethylamino)phenyl)methylene)bis (sulfanediyl)dianiline (abbreviated as L), was designed and synthesized, which was used to couple with Ag nanoparticles (Ag NPs, ∼6 nm) to construct L-Ag hybrid particles with L uniformly dispersed on the surface of Ag NPs. The newly-formed hybrid particles self-assembled through L-L interactions between L molecules in one hybrid particle and adjacent particle to from Ag NPs aggregates (100 nm in diameter). By Raman and XPS analysis, the interfacial interaction 'hot spot' was determined, which was between thioether group and primary amino group of L molecule and Ag+ ion on the surface of pure Ag NPs. The interfacial interactions between the two components brought about changeable linear optical properties and enhanced nonlinear optical properties, two-photon absorption cross section and two-photon absorption coefficient included. Furthermore, the optical power limiting application of Ag NPs aggregates was also optimized by this means.

  15. Aggregation-induced changes in the chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) signals of proteins.

    PubMed

    Goerke, Steffen; Milde, Katharina S; Bukowiecki, Raul; Kunz, Patrick; Klika, Karel D; Wiglenda, Thomas; Mogk, Axel; Wanker, Erich E; Bukau, Bernd; Ladd, Mark E; Bachert, Peter; Zaiss, Moritz

    2017-01-01

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) is an MRI technique that allows mapping of biomolecules (small metabolites, proteins) with nearly the sensitivity of conventional water proton MRI. In living organisms, several tissue-specific CEST effects have been observed and successfully applied to diagnostic imaging. In these studies, particularly the signals of proteins showed a distinct correlation with pathological changes. However, as CEST effects depend on various properties that determine and affect the chemical exchange processes, the origins of the observed signal changes remain to be understood. In this study, protein aggregation was identified as an additional process that is encoded in the CEST signals of proteins. Investigation of distinct proteins that are involved in pathological disorders, namely amyloid beta and huntingtin, revealed a significant decrease of all protein CEST signals upon controlled aggregation. This finding is of particular interest with regard to diagnostic imaging of patients with neurodegenerative diseases that involve amyloidogenesis, such as Alzheimer's or Huntington's disease. To investigate whether the observed CEST signal decrease also occurs in heterogeneous mixtures of aggregated cellular proteins, and thus prospectively in tissue, heat-shocked yeast cell lysates were employed. Additionally, investigation of different cell compartments verified the assignment of the protein CEST signals to the soluble part of the proteome. The results of in vitro experiments demonstrate that aggregation affects the CEST signals of proteins. This observation can enable hypotheses for CEST imaging as a non-invasive diagnostic tool for monitoring pathological alterations of the proteome in vivo.

  16. GLOBAL ORGANIC EMISSIONS FROM VEGETATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The book chapter discusses several aspects of biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emissions from vegetation. It begins with a section on emission measurements that includes a brief history of enclosure and above-canopy flux measurements as well as a discussion of existing d...

  17. Climate policy: Reforming emissions trading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edenhofer, Ottmar

    2014-08-01

    Courageous steps are required to reform the European Union Emissions Trading Scheme. To this end, an independent carbon authority has been proposed -- this is a move in the right direction, but should be part of a much broader discussion about reforming emissions trading.

  18. Tactical Vehicle Engine Emissions Investigations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-12-01

    diesel fuel (DF-2) were examined and tabulated (2). 3. Groupings for Army wheeled and tracked vehicles were made to which a single emission...Investigation of Possible Test Cycles for Determining Army Diesel Engine Emission Factors...4 2. High Density Army Diesel Equipment .................................................................... 6 3. Information on on the Steady

  19. NARSTO EMISSION INVENTORY WORKSHOP & ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation summarizes the NARSTO activities related to emission inventories in 2003-2005. The NARSTO Particulate Matter Assessment, issued in 2003, identified emission inventories as one of the critical elements of the air quality program which needs improvement if it i...

  20. Tropospheric and Airborne Emission Spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavich, Thomas; Beer, Reinhard

    1996-01-01

    X This paper describes the development of two related instruments, the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) and the Airborne Emission Spectrometer (AES). Both instruments are infrared imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometers, used for measuring the state of the lower atmosphere, and in particular the measurement of ozone and ozone sources and sinks.

  1. Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Pasture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, and methane are the primary greenhouse gases associated with global climate change. Livestock production’s contribution to carbon dioxide emissions is minimal, but it is a substantial contributor to both nitrous oxide and methane emissions. In both grazing and confin...

  2. Hormesis, hotspots and emissions trading.

    PubMed

    Wiener, Jonathan B

    2004-06-01

    Instrument choice--the comparison of technology standards, performance standards, taxes and tradable permits--has been a major topic in environmental law and environmental economics. Most analyses assume that emissions and health effects are positively and linearly related. If they are not, this complicates the instrument choice analysis. This article analyses the effects of a nonlinear dose-response function on instrument choice. In particular, it examines the effects of hormesis (high-dose harm but low-dose benefit) on the choice between fixed performance standards and tradable emissions permits. First, the article distinguishes the effects of hormesis from the effects of local emissions. Hormesis is an attribute of the dose-response or exposure-response relationship. Hotspots are an attribute of the emissions-exposure relationship. Some pollutants may be hormetic and cause local emissions-exposure effects; others may be hormetic without causing local emissions-exposure effects. It is only the local exposure effects of emissions that pose a problem for emissions trading. Secondly, the article shows that the conditions under which emissions trading would perform less well or even perversely under hormesis, depend on how stringent a level of protection is set. Only when the regulatory standard is set at the nadir of the hormetic curve would emissions trading be seriously perverse (assuming other restrictive conditions as well), and such a standard is unlikely. Moreover, the benefits of the overall programme may justify the risk of small perverse effects around this nadir. Thirdly, the article argues that hotspots can be of concern for two distinct reasons, harmfulness and fairness. Lastly, the paper argues that the solution to these problems may not be to abandon market-based incentive instruments and their cost-effectiveness gains, but to improve them further by moving from emissions trading and emissions taxes to risk trading and risk taxes. In short, the article

  3. Emissions of decamethylcyclopentasiloxane from Chicago.

    PubMed

    Buser, Andreas M; Bogdal, Christian; MacLeod, Matthew; Scheringer, Martin

    2014-07-01

    Decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D5) is a high-production-volume chemical that is emitted to air in tens of thousands of tonnes each year globally. However, specific information about emission rates to air is still limited. Here we present an estimate of D5 emissions from the city of Chicago based on measurements that have recently been published. We used a multimedia environmental fate model parameterized for Chicago to back-calculate the emission rate of D5 from the measurements. Our estimated average emission rate for D5 is 500 (2.5-to-97.5-percentile interval: 260-1100) kg d(-1). The corresponding per-capita emissions of 190 (100-420) mg capita(-1)d(-1) agree well with previous estimates for Europe and North America.

  4. Toxic emissions from open burning.

    PubMed

    Estrellan, Carl Renan; Iino, Fukuya

    2010-06-01

    This review compiled the data from recent actual and simulation studies on toxic emissions from open burning and categorized into sources, broadly as biomass and anthropogenic fuels. Emission factors, in mass of pollutant per mass of material being burned, and actual concentrations, in mass of pollutant per unit volume have been compared based on source classifications. In addition to gaseous emissions, this review presents the updated data on emissions to air in the form of particulate matter, and emissions to soil and water environment. Data from forest fires, accidental fires such as vehicle fires, house fires, and unintentional landfill fires are included in this review as well as combustion involving traditional and recreational activities.

  5. Update on CO2 emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Friedingstein, P.; Houghton, R.A.; Marland, Gregg; Hackler, J.; Boden, Thomas A; Conway, T.J.; Canadell, J.G.; Raupach, Mike; Ciais, Philippe; Le Quere, Corrine

    2010-12-01

    Emissions of CO2 are the main contributor to anthropogenic climate change. Here we present updated information on their present and near-future estimates. We calculate that global CO2 emissions from fossil fuel burning decreased by 1.3% in 2009 owing to the global financial and economic crisis that started in 2008; this is half the decrease anticipated a year ago1. If economic growth proceeds as expected2, emissions are projected to increase by more than 3% in 2010, approaching the high emissions growth rates that were observed from 2000 to 20081, 3, 4. We estimate that recent CO2 emissions from deforestation and other land-use changes (LUCs) have declined compared with the 1990s, primarily because of reduced rates of deforestation in the tropics5 and a smaller contribution owing to forest regrowth elsewhere.

  6. Seals cap rotary kiln emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Gunkle, D.W. )

    1993-09-01

    The possibility of producing fugitive emissions is one of the most critical aspects of an incineration system. Whether such a system processes hazardous, medical, mixed or municipal waste, fugitive emissions are of special concern to system operators and the public alike. Effectively designed rotary-kiln seals can reduce fugitive emissions to acceptable, minimal levels. Modern air monitoring systems track incineration site emissions. Possible emissions sources include excavation and transfer sites, storage areas, material-feed systems, rotary kiln seals, and exhaust stacks. Several options are available for rotary-kiln seals. Six are discussed here: labyrinth; overlapping spring plate; graphite block; pneumatic; shrouded; and overpressure. Kiln seals are used to prevent process gases from escaping or ambient air from entering a rotary kiln uncontrolled. They are not designed to function as material seals, or prevent spills of solids or liquids. Seal design involves considering differential pressure produced by a kiln's internal-to-external temperature, pressure excursions (explosions) and material spills.

  7. The Venus Emissivity Mapper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helbert, Joern; Marcq, Emmanuel; Widemann, Thomas; Mueller, Nils; Kappel, David; Tsang, Constantine; Maturilli, Alessandro; Ferrari, Sabrina; D'Amore, Mario; Dyar, Melinda; Smrekar, Suzanne

    2016-10-01

    The permanent cloud cover of Venus prohibits observations of the surface with traditional imaging techniques over the entire visible spectral range. Fortunately, Venus' atmospheric gases are largely transparent in narrow spectral windows near 1 mm. Ground observers were the first to successfully use these windows, followed by spacecraft observations during the flyby of the Galileo mission on its way to Jupiter and most recently from Venus orbit by ESA's Venus Express with the VMC and VIRTIS instruments. Analyses of VIRTIS measurements have successfully demonstrated that surface information can be extracted from these windows, but the design of the instrument limited its use for more in-depth surface investigations.Based on experience gained from using VIRTIS to observe the surface of Venus and new high temperature laboratory experiments currently performed at the Planetary Spectroscopy Laboratory of DLR, we have designed the multi-spectral Venus Emissivity Mapper (VEM). Observations from VIRTIS have revealed surface emissivity variations correlated with geological features, but existing data sets contain only three spectral channels. VEM is optimized to map the surface composition and texture, and to search for active volcanism using the narrow atmospheric windows, building on lessons from prior instrumentation and methodology. It offers an opportunity to gain important information about surface mineralogy and texture by virtue of having six different channels for surface mapping.VEM is focused mainly on observing the surface, mapping in all near-IR atmospheric windows using filters with spectral characteristics optimized for the wavelengths and widths of those windows. It also observes bands necessary for correcting atmospheric effects; these bands also provide valuable scientific data on composition as well as altitude and size distribution of the cloud particles, and on H2O vapor abundance variations in the lowest 15 km of the atmosphere.In combination with a

  8. Photophysics of fullerenes: Thermionic emission

    SciTech Connect

    Compton, R.N. |; Tuinman, A.A.; Huang, J.

    1996-09-01

    Multiphoton ionization of fullerenes using long-pulse length lasers occurs mainly through vibrational autoionization. In many cases the laser ionization can be described as thermionic in analogy to the boiling off of electrons from a filament. Thermionic emission manifests itself as a delayed emission of electrons following pulsed laser excitation. Klots has employed quasiequilibrium theory to calculate rate constants for thermionic emission from fullerenes which seem to quantitatively account for the observed delayed emission times and the measured electron energy distributions. The theory of Klots also accounts for the thermionic emission of C{sub 60} excited by a low power CW Argon Ion laser. Recently Klots and Compton have reviewed the evidence for thermionic emission from small aggregates where mention was also made of experiments designed to determine the effects of externally applied electric fields on thermionic emission rates. The authors have measured the fullerene ion intensity as a function of the applied electric field and normalized this signal to that produced by single photon ionization of an atom in order to correct for all collection efficiency artifacts. The increase in fullerene ion signal relative to that of Cs{sup +} is attributed to field enhanced thermionic emission. From the slope of the Schottky plot they obtain a temperature of approximately 1,000 K. This temperature is comparable to but smaller than that estimated from measurements of the electron kinetic energies. This result for field enhanced thermionic emission is discussed further by Klots and Compton. Thermionic emission from neutral clusters has long been known for autodetachment from highly excited negative ions. Similarly, electron attachment to C{sub 60} in the energy range from 8 to 12 eV results in C{sub 60} anions with lifetimes in the range of microseconds. Quasiequilibrium theory (QET) calculations are in reasonable accord with these measurements.

  9. A Mechanofluorochromic Push-Pull Small Molecule with Aggregation-Controlled Linear and Nonlinear Optical Properties.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yue; Gindre, Denis; Allain, Magali; Liu, Ping; Cabanetos, Clément; Roncali, Jean

    2015-08-05

    A small push-pull molecule involving a diphenylamine substituted by an oligo-oxyethylene chain is described. The compound exhibits aggregation-induced emission with solvent-dependent emission wavelength. Spin-cast deep-red amorphous films rapidly self-reorganize into colorless crystalline films which exhibit mechanofluorochromism and aggregation-induced second-harmonic generation.

  10. 40 CFR 61.122 - Emission standard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Emissions From Elemental Phosphorus Plants § 61.122 Emission standard. Emissions of polonium-210 to the... kilns at the plant, and (d) Total emissions of polonium-210 from the plant do not exceed 4.5 curies per... emissions of polonium-210 which is equal to or greater than the efficiency which would be achieved under...

  11. 40 CFR 61.183 - Emission monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS National Emission Standard for Inorganic Arsenic Emissions From Arsenic Trioxide and Metallic Arsenic Production Facilities § 61.183 Emission monitoring. (a... arsenic trioxide and metallic arsenic process emission stream that exits from a control device. (b)...

  12. 40 CFR 61.162 - Emission limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS National Emission Standard for Inorganic Arsenic Emissions... total arsenic emissions from the glass melting furnace shall be less than 2.5 Mg (2.7 ton) per year, or (2) Total arsenic emissions from the glass melting furnace shall be conveyed to a control device...

  13. 40 CFR 61.162 - Emission limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS National Emission Standard for Inorganic Arsenic Emissions... total arsenic emissions from the glass melting furnace shall be less than 2.5 Mg (2.7 ton) per year, or (2) Total arsenic emissions from the glass melting furnace shall be conveyed to a control device...

  14. 40 CFR 61.162 - Emission limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS National Emission Standard for Inorganic Arsenic Emissions... total arsenic emissions from the glass melting furnace shall be less than 2.5 Mg (2.7 ton) per year, or (2) Total arsenic emissions from the glass melting furnace shall be conveyed to a control device...

  15. 40 CFR 61.183 - Emission monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS National Emission Standard for Inorganic Arsenic Emissions From Arsenic Trioxide and Metallic Arsenic Production Facilities § 61.183 Emission monitoring. (a... arsenic trioxide and metallic arsenic process emission stream that exits from a control device. (b)...

  16. 40 CFR 61.162 - Emission limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS National Emission Standard for Inorganic Arsenic Emissions... total arsenic emissions from the glass melting furnace shall be less than 2.5 Mg (2.7 ton) per year, or (2) Total arsenic emissions from the glass melting furnace shall be conveyed to a control device...

  17. 40 CFR 61.183 - Emission monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS National Emission Standard for Inorganic Arsenic Emissions From Arsenic Trioxide and Metallic Arsenic Production Facilities § 61.183 Emission monitoring. (a... arsenic trioxide and metallic arsenic process emission stream that exits from a control device. (b)...

  18. 40 CFR 61.162 - Emission limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS National Emission Standard for Inorganic Arsenic Emissions... total arsenic emissions from the glass melting furnace shall be less than 2.5 Mg (2.7 ton) per year, or (2) Total arsenic emissions from the glass melting furnace shall be conveyed to a control device...

  19. 40 CFR 61.183 - Emission monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS National Emission Standard for Inorganic Arsenic Emissions From Arsenic Trioxide and Metallic Arsenic Production Facilities § 61.183 Emission monitoring. (a... arsenic trioxide and metallic arsenic process emission stream that exits from a control device. (b)...

  20. 40 CFR 61.183 - Emission monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS National Emission Standard for Inorganic Arsenic Emissions From Arsenic Trioxide and Metallic Arsenic Production Facilities § 61.183 Emission monitoring. (a... arsenic trioxide and metallic arsenic process emission stream that exits from a control device. (b)...

  1. 40 CFR 63.1313 - Emission standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Emission standards. 63.1313 Section 63...) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutant Emissions: Group IV Polymers and Resins § 63.1313 Emission standards....

  2. 40 CFR 63.483 - Emission standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Emission standards. 63.483 Section 63...) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutant Emissions: Group I Polymers and Resins § 63.483 Emission standards. (a)...

  3. 40 CFR 63.1313 - Emission standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Emission standards. 63.1313 Section 63...) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutant Emissions: Group IV Polymers and Resins § 63.1313 Emission standards....

  4. 40 CFR 63.483 - Emission standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Emission standards. 63.483 Section 63...) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutant Emissions: Group I Polymers and Resins § 63.483 Emission standards. (a)...

  5. 40 CFR 63.1424 - Emission standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Emission standards. 63.1424 Section 63...) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutant Emissions for Polyether Polyols Production § 63.1424 Emission...

  6. 40 CFR 63.1424 - Emission standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Emission standards. 63.1424 Section 63...) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutant Emissions for Polyether Polyols Production § 63.1424 Emission...

  7. 40 CFR 63.483 - Emission standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Emission standards. 63.483 Section 63...) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutant Emissions: Group I Polymers and Resins § 63.483 Emission standards. (a)...

  8. 40 CFR 63.483 - Emission standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Emission standards. 63.483 Section 63...) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutant Emissions: Group I Polymers and Resins § 63.483 Emission standards....

  9. 40 CFR 63.483 - Emission standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Emission standards. 63.483 Section 63...) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutant Emissions: Group I Polymers and Resins § 63.483 Emission standards. (a)...

  10. 40 CFR 63.1313 - Emission standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Emission standards. 63.1313 Section 63...) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutant Emissions: Group IV Polymers and Resins § 63.1313 Emission standards....

  11. 40 CFR 63.1424 - Emission standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Emission standards. 63.1424 Section 63...) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutant Emissions for Polyether Polyols Production § 63.1424 Emission...

  12. 40 CFR 61.52 - Emission standard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS National Emission Standard for Mercury § 61.52 Emission standard. (a) Emissions to the atmosphere from mercury ore processing facilities and mercury cell chlor-alkali plants shall not exceed 2.3 kg (5.1 lb) of mercury per 24-hour period. (b) Emissions to...

  13. 40 CFR 61.52 - Emission standard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS National Emission Standard for Mercury § 61.52 Emission standard. (a) Emissions to the atmosphere from mercury ore processing facilities and mercury cell chlor-alkali plants shall not exceed 2.3 kg (5.1 lb) of mercury per 24-hour period. (b) Emissions to...

  14. Emission Inventories and Projections

    SciTech Connect

    Streets, D. G.; van Aardenne, John; Battye, Bill; Garivait, Savitri; Grano, D.; Guenther, Alex; Klimont, Z.; Lamarque, Jean-Francois; Lu, Zifeng; Maenhout, Greet; Ohara, Toshimasa; Parrish, David J.; Smith, Steven J.; Vallack, Harry

    2011-04-21

    When the Executive Body to the Convention on Long-range Transboundary Air Pollution took the decision to establish the Task Force on Hemispheric Transport of Air Pollution (TF HTAP) in December 2004, it was on the basis of a growing understanding of the issues surrounding the hemispheric and intercontinental transport of air pollutants. It was recognised that whilst current regional emissions on their own created pollution levels that exceeded internationally-agreed air quality objectives, hemispheric transport could exacerbate local and regional air quality problems.Two particular pollutants of concern, and the focus of this report, are ozone and particulate matter (PM), known for their detrimental impacts on human health (these impacts and others are described in Chapter 5). There was well-documented evidence for the intercontinental transport of ozone and PM but, at that time, the significance of this intercontinental influence on the design of air pollution control policies was not well understood. The European Union, in drawing up its Thematic Strategy on Clean Air for Europe during 2004, became aware of the significance of intercontinental transport and the importance of sources of pollution beyond its borders and sphere of influence, in meeting its air quality goals.

  15. Generalized local emission tomography

    DOEpatents

    Katsevich, Alexander J.

    1998-01-01

    Emission tomography enables locations and values of internal isotope density distributions to be determined from radiation emitted from the whole object. In the method for locating the values of discontinuities, the intensities of radiation emitted from either the whole object or a region of the object containing the discontinuities are inputted to a local tomography function .function..sub..LAMBDA..sup.(.PHI.) to define the location S of the isotope density discontinuity. The asymptotic behavior of .function..sub..LAMBDA..sup.(.PHI.) is determined in a neighborhood of S, and the value for the discontinuity is estimated from the asymptotic behavior of .function..sub..LAMBDA..sup.(.PHI.) knowing pointwise values of the attenuation coefficient within the object. In the method for determining the location of the discontinuity, the intensities of radiation emitted from an object are inputted to a local tomography function .function..sub..LAMBDA..sup.(.PHI.) to define the location S of the density discontinuity and the location .GAMMA. of the attenuation coefficient discontinuity. Pointwise values of the attenuation coefficient within the object need not be known in this case.

  16. Methane emission from sewers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yiwen; Ni, Bing-Jie; Sharma, Keshab R; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2015-08-15

    Recent studies have shown that sewer systems produce and emit a significant amount of methane. Methanogens produce methane under anaerobic conditions in sewer biofilms and sediments, and the stratification of methanogens and sulfate-reducing bacteria may explain the simultaneous production of methane and sulfide in sewers. No significant methane sinks or methanotrophic activities have been identified in sewers to date. Therefore, most of the methane would be emitted at the interface between sewage and atmosphere in gravity sewers, pumping stations, and inlets of wastewater treatment plants, although oxidation of methane in the aeration basin of a wastewater treatment plant has been reported recently. Online measurements have also revealed highly dynamic temporal and spatial variations in methane production caused by factors such as hydraulic retention time, area-to-volume ratio, temperature, and concentration of organic matter in sewage. Both mechanistic and empirical models have been proposed to predict methane production in sewers. Due to the sensitivity of methanogens to environmental conditions, most of the chemicals effective in controlling sulfide in sewers also suppress or diminish methane production. In this paper, we review the recent studies on methane emission from sewers, including the production mechanisms, quantification, modeling, and mitigation.

  17. Smoothed Emission for IMC

    SciTech Connect

    Gentile, N A

    2011-01-24

    Here is a review of the current way we handle source photons in Implicit Monte Carlo (IMC). A source photon is created with a randomly sampled position x{sub p} in the zone, a direction {Omega}{sub p}, a frequency v{sub p} sampled from the appropriate distribution, and a time t{sub p} uniformly sampled from [t{sup n}, t{sup n+1}]. The source photons each have an energy E{sub p}. The sum of E{sub p} over all of the photons equals the energy of the source for that time step. In the case of thermal emission in a zone with Volume V, they would have {Sigma}{sub p=1}{sup N} E{sub p} = {sigma} {sub p}acT{sup 4}V{Delta}t, where N is the number of thermal source photons for that time step, and {sigma}{sub p} is the Planck mean opacity. Census photons do not differ from source photons in any way, except that they all start the time step with t{sub p} = t{sup n}. Then they advance each photon until it reaches the end of the time step. When they are done with all of the photons, they update the matter temperature using the difference between the emitted and absorbed energy, and proceed to the next time step.

  18. Endocrine disrupting chemical emissions from combustion sources: diesel particulate emissions and domestic waste open burn emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidhu, Sukh; Gullett, Brian; Striebich, Richard; Klosterman, Joy; Contreras, Jesse; DeVito, Michael

    Emissions of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) from combustion sources are poorly characterized due to the large number of compounds present in the emissions, the complexity of the analytical separations required, and the uncertainty regarding identification of chemicals with endocrine effects. In this work, multidimensional gas chromatographic-mass spectrometry (MDGC-MS) was used to characterize emissions from both controlled (diesel engine) and uncontrolled (open burning of domestic waste) combustion sources. The results of this study suggest that, by using MDGC-MS, one can resolve a much greater percentage of the chromatogram and identify about 84% of these resolved compounds. This increase in resolution helped to identify and quantify various classes of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the combustion emissions that had not been identified previously. Significant emissions (when compared to industrial sources) of known EDCs, dioctyl phthalate (over ˜2,500,000 kg year -1) and bisphenol A (over ˜75,000 kg year -1) were estimated from uncontrolled domestic waste burning. Emissions of several suspected EDCs (oxygenated PAHs) were observed in both diesel soot and the uncontrolled domestic waste burn samples. The emission rates of known and suspected EDCs estimated in this study suggest that combustion emissions need to be characterized for EDCs to further assess its importance as a source of EDC exposure.

  19. Advanced Collaborative Emissions Study (ACES)

    SciTech Connect

    Greenbaum, Daniel; Costantini, Maria; Van Erp, Annemoon; Shaikh, Rashid; Bailey, Brent; Tennant, Chris; Khalek, Imad; Mauderly, Joe; McDonald, Jacob; Zielinska, Barbara; Bemis, Jeffrey; Storey, John; Hallberg, Lance; Clark, Nigel

    2013-12-31

    The objective of the Advanced Collaborative Emissions Study (ACES) was to determine before widespread commercial deployment whether or not the new, energy-efficient, heavy duty diesel engines (2007 and 2010 EPA Emissions Standards Compliant) may generate anticipated toxic emissions that could adversely affect the environment and human health. ACES was planned to take place in three phases. In Phase 1, extensive emissions characterization of four production-intent prototype engine and control systems designed to meet 2007 standards for nitrogen oxides (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) was conducted at an existing emissions characterization facility: Southwest Research Institute (SwRI). One of the tested engines was selected (at random, after careful comparison of results) for health testing in Phase 3. In Phase 2, extensive emission characterization of three production-intent prototype engine and control systems meeting the 2010 standards (including more advanced NOx controls to meet the more stringent 2010 NOx standards) was conducted at the same test facility. In Phase 3, one engine/aftertreatment system selected from Phase 1 was further characterized during health effects studies (at an existing inhalation toxicology laboratory: Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, [LRRI]) to form the basis of the ACES safety assessment. The Department of Energy (DOE) award provided funding for emissions characterization in Phases 1 and 2 as well as exposure characterization in Phase 3. The main health analyses in Phase 3 were funded separately and are not reported here.

  20. Optical antenna enhanced spontaneous emission

    PubMed Central

    Eggleston, Michael S.; Messer, Kevin; Zhang, Liming; Yablonovitch, Eli; Wu, Ming C.

    2015-01-01

    Atoms and molecules are too small to act as efficient antennas for their own emission wavelengths. By providing an external optical antenna, the balance can be shifted; spontaneous emission could become faster than stimulated emission, which is handicapped by practically achievable pump intensities. In our experiments, InGaAsP nanorods emitting at ∼200 THz optical frequency show a spontaneous emission intensity enhancement of 35× corresponding to a spontaneous emission rate speedup ∼115×, for antenna gap spacing, d = 40 nm. Classical antenna theory predicts ∼2,500× spontaneous emission speedup at d ∼ 10 nm, proportional to 1/d2. Unfortunately, at d < 10 nm, antenna efficiency drops below 50%, owing to optical spreading resistance, exacerbated by the anomalous skin effect (electron surface collisions). Quantum dipole oscillations in the emitter excited state produce an optical ac equivalent circuit current, Io = qω|xo|/d, feeding the antenna-enhanced spontaneous emission, where q|xo| is the dipole matrix element. Despite the quantum-mechanical origin of the drive current, antenna theory makes no reference to the Purcell effect nor to local density of states models. Moreover, plasmonic effects are minor at 200 THz, producing only a small shift of antenna resonance frequency. PMID:25624503

  1. Updated emissions from ocean shipping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbett, James J.; Koehler, Horst W.

    2003-10-01

    Marine vessel inventories demonstrate that ship emissions cannot be neglected in assessing environmental impacts of air pollution, although significant uncertainty in these inventories remains. We address this uncertainty by employing a bottom-up estimate of fuel consumption and vessel activity for internationally registered fleets, including cargo vessels, other commercial vessels, and military vessels. We identify model bias in previous work, which assumed internationally registered ships primarily consume international marine fuels. Updated results suggest fuel consumption is ˜289 million metric tons per year, more than twice the quantity reported as international fuel. According to our analysis, fuel used by internationally registered fleets is apparently allocated to both international and domestic fuel statistics; this implies either that ships operate along domestic routes much of the time or that marine fuel sales to these ships may be misassigned. If the former is true, then allocation of emissions to international shipping routes may underestimate near-coastal emissions from ships. Our updated inventories increases previous ship emissions inventories for all pollutants; for example, global NOx emissions (˜6.87 Tg N) are more than doubled. This work also produces detailed sensitivity analyses of inputs to these estimates, identifying uncertainty in vessel duty-cycle as critical to overall emissions estimates. We discuss implications for assessing ship emissions impacts.

  2. Monoterpene emission from ponderosa pine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lerdau, Manual; Dilts, Stephen B.; Westberg, Hal; Lamb, Brian K.; Allwine, Eugene J.

    1994-01-01

    We explore the variability in monoterpene emissions from ponderosa pine beyond that which can be explained by temperature alone. Specifically, we examine the roles that photosynthesis and needle monoterpene concentrations play in controlling emissions. We measure monoterpene concentrations and emissions, photosynthesis, temperature, and light availability in the late spring and late summer in a ponderosa pine forest in central Oregon. We use a combination of measurements from cuvettes and Teflon bag enclosures to show that photosynthesis is not correlated with emissions in the short term. We also show that needle monoterpene concentrations are highly correlated with emissions for two compounds, alpha-pinene and beta-pinene, but that Delta-carene concentrations are not correlated with emissions. We suggest that direct effects of light and photosynthesis do not need to be included in emission algorithms. Our results indicate that the role of needle concentration bears further investigation; our results for alpha-pinene and beta-pinene are explainable by a Raoult's law relationship, but we cannot yet explain the cause of our results with Delta-carene.

  3. Optical antenna enhanced spontaneous emission.

    PubMed

    Eggleston, Michael S; Messer, Kevin; Zhang, Liming; Yablonovitch, Eli; Wu, Ming C

    2015-02-10

    Atoms and molecules are too small to act as efficient antennas for their own emission wavelengths. By providing an external optical antenna, the balance can be shifted; spontaneous emission could become faster than stimulated emission, which is handicapped by practically achievable pump intensities. In our experiments, InGaAsP nanorods emitting at ∼ 200 THz optical frequency show a spontaneous emission intensity enhancement of 35 × corresponding to a spontaneous emission rate speedup ∼ 115 ×, for antenna gap spacing, d = 40 nm. Classical antenna theory predicts ∼ 2,500 × spontaneous emission speedup at d ∼ 10 nm, proportional to 1/d(2). Unfortunately, at d < 10 nm, antenna efficiency drops below 50%, owing to optical spreading resistance, exacerbated by the anomalous skin effect (electron surface collisions). Quantum dipole oscillations in the emitter excited state produce an optical ac equivalent circuit current, I(o) = qω|x(o)|/d, feeding the antenna-enhanced spontaneous emission, where q|x(o)| is the dipole matrix element. Despite the quantum-mechanical origin of the drive current, antenna theory makes no reference to the Purcell effect nor to local density of states models. Moreover, plasmonic effects are minor at 200 THz, producing only a small shift of antenna resonance frequency.

  4. ADVANCED EMISSIONS CONTROL DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    M.J. Holmes

    1998-07-01

    The objective of this project is to develop practical strategies and systems for the simultaneous control of SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, particulate matter, and air toxics emissions from coal-fired boilers in such a way as to keep coal economically and environmentally competitive as a utility boiler fuel. Of particular interest is the control of air toxics emissions through the cost-effective use of conventional flue gas clean-up equipment such as electrostatic precipitators (ESP's), fabric filters (baghouses), and SO{sub 2} removal systems such as wet scrubbers and various clean coal technologies. This objective will be achieved through extensive development testing in the state-of-the art, 10 MW{sub e} equivalent, Clean Environment Development Facility (CEDF). The project has extended the capabilities of the CEDF to facilitate air toxics emissions control development work on backend flue gas cleanup equipment. Specifically, an ESP, a baghouse, and a wet scrubber for SO{sub 2} (and air toxics) control were added--all designed to yield air toxics emissions data under controlled conditions, and with proven predictability to commercial systems. A schematic of the CEDF and the project test equipment is shown in Figure 1. The specific objectives of the project are to: (1) Measure and understand production and partitioning of air toxics species in coal-fired power plant systems; (2) Optimize the air toxics removal performance of conventional flue gas cleanup systems; (3) Quantify the impacts of coal cleaning on air toxics emissions; (4) Identify and/or develop advanced air toxics emissions control concepts; (5) Develop and validate air toxics emissions measurement and monitoring techniques; (6) Establish an air toxics data library to facilitate studies of the impacts of coal selection, coal cleaning, and emissions control strategies on the emissions of coal-fired power plants.

  5. ADVANCED EMISSIONS CONTROL DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    M.J. Holmes

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this project is to develop practical strategies and systems for the simultaneous control of SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, particulate matter, and air toxics emissions from coal-fired boilers in such a way as to keep coal economically and environmentally competitive as a utility boiler fuel. Of particular interest is the control of air toxics emissions through the cost-effective use of conventional flue gas clean-up equipment such as electrostatic precipitators (ESP's), fabric filters (baghouses), and SO{sub 2} removal systems such as wet scrubbers and various clean coal technologies. This objective will be achieved through extensive development testing in the state-of-the art, 10 MW{sub e} equivalent, Clean Environment Development Facility (CEDF). The project has extended the capabilities of the CEDF to facilitate air toxics emissions control development work on backend flue gas cleanup equipment. Specifically, an ESP, a baghouse, and a wet scrubber for SO{sub 2} (and air toxics) control were added--all designed to yield air toxics emissions data under controlled conditions, and with proven predictability to commercial systems. A schematic of the CEDF and the project test equipment is shown in Figure 1. The specific objectives of the project are to: (1) Measure and understand production and partitioning of air toxics species in coal-fired power plant systems; (2) Optimize the air toxics removal performance of conventional flue gas cleanup systems; (3) Quantify the impacts of coal cleaning on air toxics emissions; (4) Identify and/or develop advanced air toxics emissions control concepts; (5) Develop and validate air toxics emissions measurement and monitoring techniques; (6) Establish an air toxics data library to facilitate studies of the impacts of coal selection, coal cleaning, and emissions control strategies on the emissions of coal-fired power plants.

  6. ADVANCED EMISSIONS CONTROL DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    M.J. Holmes

    1998-10-01

    The objective of this project is to develop practical strategies and systems for the simultaneous control of SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, particulate matter, and air toxics emissions from coal-fired boilers in such a way as to keep coal economically and environmentally competitive as a utility boiler fuel. Of particular interest is the control of air toxics emissions through the cost-effective use of conventional flue gas clean-up equipment such as electrostatic precipitators (ESP's), fabric filters (baghouses), and SO{sub 2} removal systems such as wet scrubbers and various clean coal technologies. This objective will be achieved through extensive development testing in the state-of-the art, 10 MW{sub e} equivalent, Clean Environment Development Facility (CEDF). The project has extended the capabilities of the CEDF to facilitate air toxics emissions control development work on backend flue gas cleanup equipment. Specifically, an ESP, a baghouse, and a wet scrubber for SO{sub 2} (and air toxics) control were added--all designed to yield air toxics emissions data under controlled conditions, and with proven predictability to commercial systems. A schematic of the CEDF and the project test equipment is shown in Figure 1. The specific objectives of the project are to: (1) Measure and understand production and partitioning of air toxics species in coal-fired power plant systems; (2) Optimize the air toxics removal performance of conventional flue gas cleanup systems; (3) Quantify the impacts of coal cleaning on air toxics emissions; (4) Identify and/or develop advanced air toxics emissions control concepts; (5) Develop and validate air toxics emissions measurement and monitoring techniques; (6) Establish an air toxics data library to facilitate studies of the impacts of coal selection, coal cleaning, and emissions control strategies on the emissions of coal-fired power plants.

  7. Radio emission in Mercury magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varela, J.; Reville, V.; Brun, A. S.; Pantellini, F.; Zarka, P.

    2016-10-01

    Context. Active stars possess magnetized wind that has a direct impact on planets that can lead to radio emission. Mercury is a good test case to study the effect of the solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) on radio emission driven in the planet magnetosphere. Such studies could be used as proxies to characterize the magnetic field topology and intensity of exoplanets. Aims: The aim of this study is to quantify the radio emission in the Hermean magnetosphere. Methods: We use the magnetohydrodynamic code PLUTO in spherical coordinates with an axisymmetric multipolar expansion for the Hermean magnetic field, to analyze the effect of the IMF orientation and intensity, as well as the hydrodynamic parameters of the solar wind (velocity, density and temperature), on the net power dissipated on the Hermean day and night side. We apply the formalism derived by Zarka et al. (2001, Astrophys. Space Sci., 277, 293), Zarka (2007, Planet. Space Sci., 55, 598) to infer the radio emission level from the net dissipated power. We perform a set of simulations with different hydrodynamic parameters of the solar wind, IMF orientations and intensities, that allow us to calculate the dissipated power distribution and infer the existence of radio emission hot spots on the planet day side, and to calculate the integrated radio emission of the Hermean magnetosphere. Results: The obtained radio emission distribution of dissipated power is determined by the IMF orientation (associated with the reconnection regions in the magnetosphere), although the radio emission strength is dependent on the IMF intensity and solar wind hydro parameters. The calculated total radio emission level is in agreement with the one estimated in Zarka et al. (2001, Astrophys. Space Sci., 277, 293) , between 5 × 105 and 2 × 106 W.

  8. 40 CFR 76.11 - Emissions averaging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) ACID RAIN NITROGEN OXIDES EMISSION REDUCTION PROGRAM § 76.11 Emissions averaging. (a) General... averaging plan is in compliance with the Acid Rain emission limitation for NOX under the plan only if...

  9. 40 CFR 76.11 - Emissions averaging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) ACID RAIN NITROGEN OXIDES EMISSION REDUCTION PROGRAM § 76.11 Emissions averaging. (a) General... compliance with the Acid Rain emission limitation for NOX under the plan only if the following...

  10. 40 CFR 76.11 - Emissions averaging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) ACID RAIN NITROGEN OXIDES EMISSION REDUCTION PROGRAM § 76.11 Emissions averaging. (a) General... compliance with the Acid Rain emission limitation for NOX under the plan only if the following...

  11. 40 CFR 76.11 - Emissions averaging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) ACID RAIN NITROGEN OXIDES EMISSION REDUCTION PROGRAM § 76.11 Emissions averaging. (a) General... compliance with the Acid Rain emission limitation for NOX under the plan only if the following...

  12. 40 CFR 76.11 - Emissions averaging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) ACID RAIN NITROGEN OXIDES EMISSION REDUCTION PROGRAM § 76.11 Emissions averaging. (a) General... averaging plan is in compliance with the Acid Rain emission limitation for NOX under the plan only if...

  13. Setting Emissions Standards Based on Technology Performance

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    In setting national emissions standards, EPA sets emissions performance levels rather than mandating use of a particular technology. The law mandates that EPA use numerical performance standards whenever feasible in setting national emissions standards.

  14. Turbojet emissions, hydrogen versus JP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grobman, J.; Norgren, C. T.; Anderson, D.

    1973-01-01

    Preliminary data from an experimental combustor show that the NOx emission index, g(NO2)/Kg fuel, is about three times greater for hydrogen than for JP at simulated cruise conditions. However, if these results are applied to aircraft designed for a given mission, hydrogen's higher heating value enables the aircraft to have a lower gross weight and a lower fuel flow rate so that the NOx emission rate, Kg (NO2)/hr may be reduced about 30 percent compared to JP. Theoretical kinetics calculations indicate that combustors may be designed for hydrogen that could further decrease NOx emissions by taking advantage of hydrogen's wide flammable limits and high burning velocity.

  15. Microwave emission and crop residues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Thomas J.; O'Neill, Peggy E.

    1991-01-01

    A series of controlled experiments were conducted to determine the significance of crop residues or stubble in estimating the emission of the underlying soil. Observations using truck-mounted L and C band passive microwave radiometers showed that for dry wheat and soybeans the dry residue caused negligible attenuation of the background emission. Green residues, with water contents typical of standing crops, did have a significant effect on the background emission. Results for these green residues also indicated that extremes in plant structure, as created using parallel and perpendicular stalk orientations, can cause very large differences in the degree of attenuation.

  16. Infrared emission from interstellar PAHs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allamandola, L. J.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Barker, J. R.

    1987-01-01

    The mid-IR absorption and Raman spectra of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and the mechanisms determining them are reviewed, and the implications for observations of similar emission spectra in interstellar clouds are considered. Topics addressed include the relationship between PAHs and amorphous C, the vibrational spectroscopy of PAHs, the molecular emission process, molecular anharmonicity, and the vibrational quasi-continuum. Extensive graphs, diagrams, and sample spectra are provided, and the interstellar emission bands are attributed to PAHs with 20-30 C atoms on the basis of the observed 3.3/3.4-micron intensity ratios.

  17. Ratiometric fluorescent response of electrospun fibrous strips for real-time sensing of alkaline phosphatase in serum.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Long; Xie, Songzhi; Song, Xiaojie; Wei, Jiaojun; Zhang, Zhao; Li, Xiaohong

    2017-05-15

    The development of rapid, convenient and reliable assays for monitoring alkaline phosphatase (ALP) levels is valuable for clinical diagnoses and biomedical research. In the current study, a ratiometric assay of ALP activity has been realized by covalent immobilization of fluorescein onto polyethylene terephthalate (PET) fibers, followed by electrostatic adsorption of bisquaternary ammonium salt of tetraphenylethene (TPE-2N(+)). In the absence of ALP, the complex formation between phosphorylated fluorescein and TPE-2N(+) results in the aggregation-induced emission (AIE) of TPE at 471nm. While in the presence of ALP, the hydrolysis of phosphoesters leads to a gradual removal of TPE-2N(+) and the restoration of fluorescein emission at 514nm. Fibers with surface amine densities of 30 nmol/mg show the most significant and almost linear increases in I514/I471 ratios from 0.73 to 3.05 with increasing ALP concentrations from 0 to 100 mU/mL. The ratiometric fluorescence responses result in color changes of fibrous strips from blue (TPE-2N(+)) to green (fluorescein) under an ultraviolet lamp in a matter of minutes. The color changes are more suitable for an eyeball detection of ALP levels ranging from 0 to 80 mU/mL, which is included in the concentration range of ALP in human serum considering the dilution factor if necessary. The ALP detection indicates no apparent interference by serum components and good agreement with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Thus, this is the first study on ratiometric fluorescent assay of serum ALP levels by fibrous strips, which offers a capacity to exploit electrospun fibrous mats and ratiometric responses for real-time assays of bioactive substances as self-test devices.

  18. 40 CFR 65.102 - Alternative means of emission limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... means of emission limitation. (ii) The Administrator will compare test data for the means of emission... of emission limitation. (iii) The Administrator will compare the demonstrated emission reduction...

  19. We're in This Together: Intentional Design of Social Relationships with AIED Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Erin; Ogan, Amy

    2016-01-01

    Students' relationships with their peers, teachers, and communities influence the ways in which they approach learning activities and the degree to which they benefit from them. Learning technologies, ranging from humanoid robots to text-based prompts on a computer screen, have a similar social influence on students. We envision a future in which…

  20. Basic Information about Air Emissions Monitoring

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This site is about types of air emissions monitoring and the Clean Air Act regulations, including Ambient Air Quality Monitoring, Stationary Source Emissions Monitoring, and Continuous Monitoring Systems.

  1. Analysis of Carbon Emission Characteristics of China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lifeng

    Since the opening-up, our economy develops fastly with the energy consume and the carbon emission increasing year by year. At present, China is the biggest country of the carbon emission in the world. We face the huge pressure to control the green house gases emissions. So, the text analyses the feature of carbon emission applying the indexs of the carbon emission aggregate, per captial carbon emission and the carbon emission elasticity efficient, and puts forward the countermeasures of lessoning the carbon emission.

  2. Mercury Emissions: The Global Context

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Mercury emissions are a global problem that knows no national or continental boundaries. Mercury that is emitted to the air can travel thousands of miles in the atmosphere before it is eventually deposited back to the earth.

  3. Photon upconversion with directed emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Börjesson, K.; Rudquist, P.; Gray, V.; Moth-Poulsen, K.

    2016-08-01

    Photon upconversion has the potential to increase the efficiency of single bandgap solar cells beyond the Shockley Queisser limit. Efficient light management is an important point in this context. Here we demonstrate that the direction of upconverted emission can be controlled in a reversible way, by embedding anthracene derivatives together with palladium porphyrin in a liquid crystalline matrix. The system is employed in a triplet-triplet annihilation photon upconversion scheme demonstrating controlled switching of directional anti Stokes emission. Using this approach an emission ratio of 0.37 between the axial and longitudinal emission directions and a directivity of 1.52 is achieved, reasonably close to the theoretical maximal value of 2 obtained from a perfectly oriented sample. The system can be switched for multiple cycles without any visible degradation and the speed of switching is only limited by the intrinsic rate of alignment of the liquid crystalline matrix.

  4. Stratospheric emissions effects database development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baughcum, Steven L.; Henderson, Stephen C.; Hertel, Peter S.; Maggiora, Debra R.; Oncina, Carlos A.

    1994-01-01

    This report describes the development of a stratospheric emissions effects database (SEED) of aircraft fuel burn and emissions from projected Year 2015 subsonic aircraft fleets and from projected fleets of high-speed civil transports (HSCT's). This report also describes the development of a similar database of emissions from Year 1990 scheduled commercial passenger airline and air cargo traffic. The objective of this work was to initiate, develop, and maintain an engineering database for use by atmospheric scientists conducting the Atmospheric Effects of Stratospheric Aircraft (AESA) modeling studies. Fuel burn and emissions of nitrogen oxides (NO(x) as NO2), carbon monoxide, and hydrocarbons (as CH4) have been calculated on a 1-degree latitude x 1-degree longitude x 1-kilometer altitude grid and delivered to NASA as electronic files. This report describes the assumptions and methodology for the calculations and summarizes the results of these calculations.

  5. Emission tomography of the kidney

    SciTech Connect

    Teates, C.D.; Croft, B.Y.; Brenbridge, N.A.; Bray, S.T.; Williamson, B.R.

    1983-12-01

    Single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) was done on two patients with suspected renal masses. Nuclear scintigraphy was equivocal on two tumors readily identified by SPECT. Single photon tomography is cost effective and increases the reliability of nuclear scintigraphy.

  6. Energy and Emissions at EPA

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    To demonstrate its leadership in energy and environmental stewardship, EPA is committed to managing its own facilities and operations in a way that minimizes greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and energy use.

  7. Advanced Emissions Control Development Program

    SciTech Connect

    A.P.Evans; K.E. Redinger; M.J. Holmes

    1998-04-01

    The objective of the Advanced Emissions Control Development Program (AECDP) is to develop practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of air toxics from coal-fired boilers. Ideally, the project aim is to effectively control air toxic emissions through the use of conventional flue gas cleanup equipment such as electrostatic precipitators (ESPS), fabric filters (baghouse), and wet flue gas desulfurization. Development work to date has concentrated on the capture of mercury, other trace metals, fine particulate and hydrogen chloride. Following the construction and evaluation of a representative air toxics test facility in Phase I, Phase II focused on the evaluation of mercury and several other air toxics emissions. The AECDP is jointly funded by the United States Department of Energy's Federal Energy Technology Center (DOE), the Ohio Coal Development Office within the Ohio Department of Development (oCDO), and Babcock& Wilcox-a McDermott company (B&W).

  8. Photon upconversion with directed emission

    PubMed Central

    Börjesson, K.; Rudquist, P.; Gray, V.; Moth-Poulsen, K.

    2016-01-01

    Photon upconversion has the potential to increase the efficiency of single bandgap solar cells beyond the Shockley Queisser limit. Efficient light management is an important point in this context. Here we demonstrate that the direction of upconverted emission can be controlled in a reversible way, by embedding anthracene derivatives together with palladium porphyrin in a liquid crystalline matrix. The system is employed in a triplet-triplet annihilation photon upconversion scheme demonstrating controlled switching of directional anti Stokes emission. Using this approach an emission ratio of 0.37 between the axial and longitudinal emission directions and a directivity of 1.52 is achieved, reasonably close to the theoretical maximal value of 2 obtained from a perfectly oriented sample. The system can be switched for multiple cycles without any visible degradation and the speed of switching is only limited by the intrinsic rate of alignment of the liquid crystalline matrix. PMID:27573539

  9. Acoustic emission linear pulse holography

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, H.D.; Busse, L.J.; Lemon, D.K.

    1983-10-25

    This device relates to the concept of and means for performing Acoustic Emission Linear Pulse Holography, which combines the advantages of linear holographic imaging and Acoustic Emission into a single non-destructive inspection system. This unique system produces a chronological, linear holographic image of a flaw by utilizing the acoustic energy emitted during crack growth. The innovation is the concept of utilizing the crack-generated acoustic emission energy to generate a chronological series of images of a growing crack by applying linear, pulse holographic processing to the acoustic emission data. The process is implemented by placing on a structure an array of piezoelectric sensors (typically 16 or 32 of them) near the defect location. A reference sensor is placed between the defect and the array.

  10. Nonthermal Emission from Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storm, Emma

    Galaxy clusters are the most massive gravitationally-bound objects in the universe. The bulk of the mass in a cluster is dark matter, while the dominant baryonic component is a thermal, X-ray emitting plasma. Radio observations of diffuse synchrotron emission indicate that galaxy clusters host a population of cosmic rays; however, the nature of this nonthermal component is not well-understood. In this dissertation, I investigate three sources of nonthermal emission in galaxy clusters. The first is star formation in galaxies, which is correlated to gamma-ray emission. I derive lower limits on the gamma-ray emission for nearby clusters by considering the emission from star formation in cluster galaxies. These lower limits sit about an order of magnitude below current upper limits on gamma rays in clusters and will be an important contributor to gamma-ray emission as upper limits improve over time. Dark matter annihilation, which produces relativistic particles that can result in a broad spectrum of emission in cluster environments, is another source of nonthermal emission. I use nondetections and marginal detections of diffuse radio emission in clusters to constrain dark matter annihilation. I derive limits on the annihilation cross section that are competitive with limits from the nondetection of gamma rays in clusters and show that the best objects for study in the radio are different than those in gamma rays, indicating that dark matter searches in the radio can be complementary to searches in other energy bands. I also investigate the cosmic ray population in the merging cluster A2319, which hosts a previously detected radio halo. I present new observations which reveal a two-component radio halo: a 2 Mpc region that extends far past the observable X-ray emission, and an 800 kpc "core" that is bounded by the X-ray cold front. I speculate on the origins of this structure, and show that a hadronic origin for this radio halo is disfavored. Finally, I discuss current

  11. Thermal emissivity of avian eggshells.

    PubMed

    Björn, Lars Olof; Bengtson, Sven-Axel; Li, Shaoshan; Hecker, Christoph; Ullah, Saleem; Roos, Arne; Nilsson, Annica M

    2016-04-01

    The hypothesis has been tested that evolution has resulted in lower thermal emissivity of eggs of birds breeding openly in cold climates than of eggs of birds that nest under protective covering or in warmer climates. Directional thermal emissivity has been estimated from directional-hemispherical reflectance spectra. Due to several methodological difficulties the absolute emissivity is not accurately determined, but differences between species are obvious. Most notably, small waders of the genus Calidris, breeding in cold climates on the tundra, and in most cases with uniparental nest attendance, have low directional emissivity of their eggshells, about 0.92 when integration is carried out for wavelengths up to 16μm. Species belonging to Galloanserinae have the highest directional emissivity, about 0.96, of their eggs. No differences due to climate or breeding conditions were found within this group. Eggs of most other birds tested possess intermediate emissivity, but the values for Pica pica and Corvus corone cornix are as low as for Calidris. Large species-dependent differences in spectral reflectance were found at specific wavelengths. For instance, at 4.259μm the directional-hemispherical reflectance for galliforms range from 0.05 to 0.09, while for Fratercula arctica and Fulmarus glacialis it is about 0.3. The reflection peaks at 6.5 and 11.3μm due to calcite are differentially attenuated in different species. In conclusion, the hypothesis that evolution has resulted in lower thermal emissivity of bird eggs being exposed in cold climates is not supported by our results. The emissivity is not clearly related to nesting habits or climate, and it is unlikely that the small differences observed are ecologically important. The spectral differences between eggs that nevertheless exist should be taken into account when using infrared thermometers for estimating the surface temperature of avian eggs.

  12. Magnetomechanical Acoustic Emission - A Review

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-09-01

    Nickel Alloys Ferromagnetic Materials LA Acoustic Emission Barkhausen noise O-A Residual Stress ’~20 ABSTWA 7- ontinue reverse ad. Ii nedceeory and...also called magneto-acoustic emission [13], or acoustic Barkhausen effect [1]. When a ferromagnetic sample is placed in an alternating magnetic field...transducer, which should be insensitive to a magnetic field, was attached to a sample. A flux sensing coil and a Barkhausen noise (BN) probe are also

  13. Methane Emissions from Upland Forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Megonigal, Patrick; Pitz, Scott; Wang, Zhi-Ping

    2016-04-01

    Global budgets ascribe 4-10% of atmospheric methane sinks to upland soils and assume that soils are the sole surface for methane exchange between upland forests and the atmosphere. The dogma that upland forests are uniformly atmospheric methane sinks was challenged a decade ago by the discovery of abiotic methane production from plant tissue. Subsequently a variety of relatively cryptic microbial and non-microbial methane sources have been proposed that have the potential to emit methane in upland forests. Despite the accumulating evidence of potential methane sources, there are few data demonstrating actual emissions of methane from a plant surface in an upland forest. We report direct observations of methane emissions from upland tree stems in two temperate forests. Stem methane emissions were observed from several tree species that dominate a forest located on the mid-Atlantic coast of North America (Maryland, USA). Stem emissions occurred throughout the growing season while soils adjacent to the trees simultaneously consumed methane. Scaling fluxes by stem surface area suggested the forest was a net methane source during a wet period in June, and that stem emissions offset 5% of the soil methane sink on an annual basis. High frequency measurements revealed diurnal cycles in stem methane emission rates, pointing to soils as the methane source and transpiration as the most likely pathway for gas transport. Similar observations were made in an upland forest in Beijing, China. However, in this case the evidence suggested the methane was not produced in soils, but in the heartwood by microbial or non-microbial processes. These data challenge the concept that forests are uniform sinks of methane, and suggest that upland forests are smaller methane sinks than previously estimated due to stem emissions. Tree emissions may be particularly important in upland tropical forests characterized by high rainfall and transpiration.

  14. Offsetting Ongoing Methane Emissions --- An Alternative to Emission Equivalence Metrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clisby, N.; Enting, I. G.; Lauder, A.; Carter, J.; Cowie, A.; Henry, B.; Raupach, M. R.

    2012-12-01

    The Global Warming Potential (GWP) has been widely adopted as a metric for comparing the climate impact of different greenhouse gases. As has been frequently noted, there are many problems with using GWPs to define emission equivalence in spite of the use of GWPs for this purpose in contexts such as the Kyoto Protocol. We propose that for methane, rather than define emission equivalence, the appropriate comparison is between ongoing emissions of 0.9 to 1.0 kg of CH4 per year and one-off emissions of 1 tonne of carbon. This approach represents an approximate solution to the inverse problem of defining a forcing equivalent index (FEI) that gives exact equivalence of radiative forcing over a range of timescales. In our approach, if ongoing methane emissions are offset by a one-off carbon removal that is built up with 40-year e-folding time, then the result is close to radiatively neutral over periods from years to centuries. In contrast, the GWP provides radiative equivalence (in integrated terms) only at a single time, with large discrepancies at other times. Our approach also follows from consideration of greenhouse gas stabilisation, since stabilising atmospheric CO2 requires an approximate cap on total emissions, while stabilising methane requires stabilisation of ongoing emissions. Our quantitative treatment recognises that, on time scales of centuries, removal of 1 tonne of carbon only lowers the atmospheric carbon content by 0.3 to 0.35 tonnes. We discuss the implications for rangeland grazing systems. In the absence of effective mitigation techniques for methane from rangeland systems, this approach may provide an attractive offset mechanism in spite of requiring that woody vegetation be established and maintained over about 15% of the landscape, or an equivalent amount of carbon storage in soil.

  15. Martian Analogues Emissivity Spectra From the Berlin Emissivity Database (BED)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maturilli, A.; Helbert, J.; Moroz, L.

    2006-12-01

    Remote sensing infrared spectroscopy is the principal field of investigation for planetary surfaces composition. Past, present and future missions to bodies in the solar system include in their payload instruments measuring the emerging radiation in the infrared range. For the interpretation of the measured data an emissivity spectral library of planetary analog materials is needed. The Berlin Emissivity Database (BED) currently contains emissivity spectra of plagioclase and potassium feldspars, low Ca and high Ca pyroxenes, olivine, elemental sulphur, and Martian analogue minerals, measured in the wavelength range from 7 to 22 microns as a function of particle size. For each sample we measured the spectra of four particle size separates ranging from 0 to 250 microns. The device we used is built at DLR (Berlin) and is coupled to a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (Bruker IFS 88), purged with dry air and equipped with a cooled detector (MCT). All spectra were acquired with a spectral resolution of 4 cm-1. We present here the results of our analysis on well knew and characterized Martian analogue minerals: JSC Mars-1, Salten Skov, and Palagonite from Mauna Kea, Hawaii. We are currently working to upgrade our emissivity facility. A new spectrometer (Bruker VERTEX 80v) and new detectors will allow us to measure the emissivity of samples in the wavelength range from 1 to 50 microns, even in a vacuum environment.

  16. Particulate emissions from construction activities.

    PubMed

    Muleski, Gregory E; Cowherd, Chatten; Kinsey, John S

    2005-06-01

    Although it has long been recognized that road and building construction activity constitutes an important source of particulate matter (PM) emissions throughout the United States, until recently only limited research has been directed to its characterization. This paper presents the results of PM10 and PM2.5 (particles < or = 10 microm and < or = 2.5 microm in aerodynamic diameter, respectively) emission factor development from the onsite testing of component operations at actual construction sites during the period 1998-2001. Much of the testing effort was directed at earthmoving operations with scrapers, because earthmoving is the most important contributor of PM emissions across the construction industry. Other sources tested were truck loading and dumping of crushed rock and mud and dirt carryout from construction site access points onto adjacent public paved roads. Also tested were the effects of watering for control of scraper travel routes and the use of paved and graveled aprons at construction site access points for reducing mud and dirt carryout. The PM10 emissions from earthmoving were found to be up to an order of magnitude greater than predicted by AP-42 emission factors drawn from other industries. As expected, the observed PM2.5:PM10 emission factor ratios reflected the relative importance of the vehicle exhaust and the resuspended dust components of each type of construction activity. An unexpected finding was that PM2.5 emissions from mud and dirt carryout were much less than anticipated. Finally, the control efficiency of watering of scraper travel routes was found to closely follow a bilinear moisture model.

  17. The Berlin emissivity database (BED)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maturilli, A.; Helbert, J.; Moroz, L.

    2008-03-01

    Remote-sensing infrared spectroscopy is the principal field of investigation for planetary surfaces composition. Past, present and future missions to the solar system bodies include in their payload, instruments measuring the emerging radiation in the infrared range. Apart from measuring the reflected radiance, more and more spacecrafts are equipped with instruments measuring directly the emitted radiation from the planetary surface. The emitted radiation is not only a function of the composition of the material but also of its texture and especially the grain size distribution. For the interpretation of the measured data an emissivity spectral library of planetary analogue materials in grain size fractions appropriate for planetary surfaces is needed. The Berlin emissivity database (BED) presented here is focused on relatively fine-grained size separates, providing thereby a realistic basis for the interpretation of thermal emission spectra of planetary regoliths. The BED is therefore complimentary to existing thermal emission libraries, like the ASU library for example. BED currently contains emissivity spectra of plagioclase and potassium feldspars, low Ca and high Ca pyroxenes, olivine, elemental sulfur, Martian analogue minerals and volcanic soils, and a lunar highland soil sample measured in the wavelength range from 7 to 22 μm as a function of particle size. For each sample we measured the spectra of four particle size separates ranging from <25 to 250 μm. The device we used is built at DLR (Berlin) and is coupled to a Fourier-transform infrared spectrometer Bruker IFS 88 purged with dry air and equipped with a nitrogen-cooled MCT detector. All spectra were acquired with a spectral resolution of 4 cm -1. We are currently working on upgrading our emissivity facility. A new spectrometer (Bruker VERTEX 80 V) and new detectors will allow us to measure the emissivity of samples in the wavelength range from 1 to 50 μm in a vacuum environment. This will be

  18. Gaseous Emissions from Aircraft Engines. A Handbook for the Calculation of Emission Indexes and Gaseous Emissions from Aircraft Engines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-09-01

    corresponded to intervals of stable engine operation, as specified by the operators of the engine. Each laboratory reported emission indexes for the read ...period. The test established 50 read periods for gaseous emissions. Tabl, 5-1 gives the emission indexes at idle, high idle, approach, cruise and...emission indexes from a T58-GE-8F engine Test Cell - 12 Location - Naval Air Rework Facility, North Island IDLE Date Time Reading Prior Emission index

  19. Pisces field chemical emissions monitoring project: Site 117 emissions report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-01

    This report is one of a series sponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute in the area of trace substance emissions from fossil-fuel power plants. This report presents the results of a sampling and analytical study to characterize trace substances emissions at Site 117. Site 117 is a 1 MW selective catalytic reduction (SCR) pilot plant. The host boiler is an 850 MW boiler which burned a residual fuel oil. The objective of this report is to transmit the detailed data to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to assist the Agency in evaluating utility trace chemical emissions as well as the associated health risk impacts - as mandated in Title III of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments. This report does not attempt to compare the results with other sites. An assessment of data from all plants that have been tested is presented in the Electric Utility Trace Substances Synthesis Report.

  20. 40 CFR 61.123 - Emission testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... computing the emission rate for the test. The annual polonium-210 emission rate from a calciner or nodulizing kiln shall be determined by multiplying the measured polonium-210 emission rate in curies per Mg... operator changes his operation in such a way as to increase his emissions of polonium-210, such as...

  1. 40 CFR 61.271 - Emission standard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS National Emission Standard for Benzene Emissions From Benzene Storage Vessels § 61.271 Emission standard. The owner or operator of each storage vessel... vent system shall be designed to collect all benzene vapors and gases discharged from the...

  2. 40 CFR 61.271 - Emission standard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS National Emission Standard for Benzene Emissions From Benzene Storage Vessels § 61.271 Emission standard. The owner or operator of each storage vessel... vent system shall be designed to collect all benzene vapors and gases discharged from the...

  3. 40 CFR 61.271 - Emission standard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS National Emission Standard for Benzene Emissions From Benzene Storage Vessels § 61.271 Emission standard. The owner or operator of each storage vessel... vent system shall be designed to collect all benzene vapors and gases discharged from the...

  4. 40 CFR 61.271 - Emission standard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS National Emission Standard for Benzene Emissions From Benzene Storage Vessels § 61.271 Emission standard. The owner or operator of each storage vessel... vent system shall be designed to collect all benzene vapors and gases discharged from the...

  5. 40 CFR 61.271 - Emission standard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS National Emission Standard for Benzene Emissions From Benzene Storage Vessels § 61.271 Emission standard. The owner or operator of each storage vessel... vent system shall be designed to collect all benzene vapors and gases discharged from the...

  6. 40 CFR 61.68 - Emission monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Emission monitoring. 61.68 Section 61...) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS National Emission Standard for Vinyl Chloride § 61.68 Emission monitoring. (a) A vinyl chloride monitoring system is to be used to monitor on...

  7. 40 CFR 63.1313 - Emission standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Emission standards. 63.1313 Section 63...) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES (CONTINUED) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutant Emissions: Group IV Polymers and Resins § 63.1313...

  8. 40 CFR 63.1403 - Emission standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Emission standards. 63.1403 Section 63...) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutant Emissions: Manufacture of Amino/Phenolic Resins § 63.1403...

  9. 40 CFR 60.73 - Emission monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Emission monitoring. 60.73 Section 60... Emission monitoring. (a) The source owner or operator shall install, calibrate, maintain, and operate a... measuring emissions with the continuous monitoring system concurrent with measuring emissions with...

  10. 47 CFR 80.211 - Emission limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Emission limitations. 80.211 Section 80.211... MARITIME SERVICES General Technical Standards § 80.211 Emission limitations. The emissions must be attenuated according to the following schedule. (a) The mean power when using emissions H3E, J3E and R3E:...

  11. 40 CFR 63.802 - Emission limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Emission limits. 63.802 Section 63.802... EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES (CONTINUED) National Emission Standards for Wood Furniture Manufacturing Operations § 63.802 Emission limits. (a) Each owner or...

  12. 40 CFR 63.1382 - Emission standards

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Emission standards 63.1382 Section 63...) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Wool Fiberglass Manufacturing § 63.1382 Emission standards...

  13. 40 CFR 63.1403 - Emission standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Emission standards. 63.1403 Section 63...) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES (CONTINUED) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutant Emissions: Manufacture of Amino/Phenolic Resins §...

  14. 40 CFR 1065.940 - Emission calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Emission calculations. 1065.940... CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Field Testing and Portable Emission Measurement Systems § 1065.940 Emission calculations. (a) Perform emission calculations as described in § 1065.650 to calculate...

  15. 47 CFR 80.211 - Emission limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Emission limitations. 80.211 Section 80.211... MARITIME SERVICES General Technical Standards § 80.211 Emission limitations. The emissions must be attenuated according to the following schedule. (a) The mean power when using emissions H3E, J3E and R3E:...

  16. 47 CFR 24.133 - Emission limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Emission limits. 24.133 Section 24.133... SERVICES Narrowband PCS § 24.133 Emission limits. (a) The power of any emission shall be attenuated below... the lesser attenuation. (b) The measurements of emission power can be expressed in peak or...

  17. 47 CFR 24.133 - Emission limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Emission limits. 24.133 Section 24.133... SERVICES Narrowband PCS § 24.133 Emission limits. (a) The power of any emission shall be attenuated below... the lesser attenuation. (b) The measurements of emission power can be expressed in peak or...

  18. 40 CFR 63.1652 - Emission standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Emission standards. 63.1652 Section 63...) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES National Emission Standards... Emission standards. (a) New and reconstructed submerged arc furnaces. No owner or operator shall cause...

  19. 47 CFR 24.133 - Emission limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Emission limits. 24.133 Section 24.133... SERVICES Narrowband PCS § 24.133 Emission limits. (a) The power of any emission shall be attenuated below... the lesser attenuation. (b) The measurements of emission power can be expressed in peak or...

  20. 40 CFR 63.1424 - Emission standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Emission standards. 63.1424 Section 63...) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES (CONTINUED) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutant Emissions for Polyether Polyols Production §...

  1. 40 CFR 1065.940 - Emission calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Emission calculations. 1065.940... CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Field Testing and Portable Emission Measurement Systems § 1065.940 Emission calculations. (a) Perform emission calculations as described in § 1065.650 to calculate...

  2. 40 CFR 61.107 - Emission determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 8 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Emission determination. 61.107 Section...) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS National Emission Standards for Radionuclide Emissions From Federal Facilities Other Than Nuclear Regulatory Commission Licensees and Not Covered...

  3. 47 CFR 80.211 - Emission limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Emission limitations. 80.211 Section 80.211... MARITIME SERVICES General Technical Standards § 80.211 Emission limitations. The emissions must be attenuated according to the following schedule. (a) The mean power when using emissions H3E, J3E and R3E:...

  4. 40 CFR 60.73 - Emission monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Emission monitoring. 60.73 Section 60... Emission monitoring. (a) The source owner or operator shall install, calibrate, maintain, and operate a... measuring emissions with the continuous monitoring system concurrent with measuring emissions with...

  5. 40 CFR 60.73 - Emission monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Emission monitoring. 60.73 Section 60... Emission monitoring. (a) The source owner or operator shall install, calibrate, maintain, and operate a... measuring emissions with the continuous monitoring system concurrent with measuring emissions with...

  6. 40 CFR 1065.940 - Emission calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Emission calculations. 1065.940... CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Field Testing and Portable Emission Measurement Systems § 1065.940 Emission calculations. (a) Perform emission calculations as described in § 1065.650 to calculate...

  7. 47 CFR 80.211 - Emission limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Emission limitations. 80.211 Section 80.211... MARITIME SERVICES General Technical Standards § 80.211 Emission limitations. The emissions must be attenuated according to the following schedule. (a) The mean power when using emissions H3E, J3E and R3E:...

  8. 40 CFR 63.1403 - Emission standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Emission standards. 63.1403 Section 63...) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES (CONTINUED) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutant Emissions: Manufacture of Amino/Phenolic Resins §...

  9. 40 CFR 89.119 - Emission tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Emission tests. 89.119 Section 89.119... EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE NONROAD COMPRESSION-IGNITION ENGINES Emission Standards and Certification Provisions § 89.119 Emission tests. (a) Manufacturer testing. (1) Upon completion of service...

  10. 40 CFR 89.119 - Emission tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Emission tests. 89.119 Section 89.119... EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE NONROAD COMPRESSION-IGNITION ENGINES Emission Standards and Certification Provisions § 89.119 Emission tests. (a) Manufacturer testing. (1) Upon completion of service...

  11. 40 CFR 63.802 - Emission limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Emission limits. 63.802 Section 63.802... EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES (CONTINUED) National Emission Standards for Wood Furniture Manufacturing Operations § 63.802 Emission limits. (a) Each owner or...

  12. 47 CFR 24.133 - Emission limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Emission limits. 24.133 Section 24.133... SERVICES Narrowband PCS § 24.133 Emission limits. (a) The power of any emission shall be attenuated below... the lesser attenuation. (b) The measurements of emission power can be expressed in peak or...

  13. 47 CFR 80.211 - Emission limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Emission limitations. 80.211 Section 80.211... MARITIME SERVICES General Technical Standards § 80.211 Emission limitations. The emissions must be attenuated according to the following schedule. (a) The mean power when using emissions H3E, J3E and R3E:...

  14. 40 CFR 63.1403 - Emission standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Emission standards. 63.1403 Section 63...) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutant Emissions: Manufacture of Amino/Phenolic Resins § 63.1403...

  15. 40 CFR 63.112 - Emission standard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Emission standard. 63.112 Section 63...) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES National Emission Standards... Process Vents, Storage Vessels, Transfer Operations, and Wastewater § 63.112 Emission standard. (a)...

  16. 40 CFR 63.112 - Emission standard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Emission standard. 63.112 Section 63...) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES National Emission Standards... Process Vents, Storage Vessels, Transfer Operations, and Wastewater § 63.112 Emission standard. (a)...

  17. 40 CFR 61.68 - Emission monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 8 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Emission monitoring. 61.68 Section 61...) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS National Emission Standard for Vinyl Chloride § 61.68 Emission monitoring. (a) A vinyl chloride monitoring system is to be used to monitor on...

  18. 40 CFR 63.1424 - Emission standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Emission standards. 63.1424 Section 63...) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES (CONTINUED) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutant Emissions for Polyether Polyols Production §...

  19. 40 CFR 61.68 - Emission monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Emission monitoring. 61.68 Section 61...) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS National Emission Standard for Vinyl Chloride § 61.68 Emission monitoring. (a) A vinyl chloride monitoring system is to be used to monitor on...

  20. 40 CFR 63.1403 - Emission standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Emission standards. 63.1403 Section 63...) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutant Emissions: Manufacture of Amino/Phenolic Resins § 63.1403...

  1. 40 CFR 60.73 - Emission monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Emission monitoring. 60.73 Section 60... Emission monitoring. (a) The source owner or operator shall install, calibrate, maintain, and operate a... measuring emissions with the continuous monitoring system concurrent with measuring emissions with...

  2. 40 CFR 61.107 - Emission determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Emission determination. 61.107 Section...) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS National Emission Standards for Radionuclide Emissions From Federal Facilities Other Than Nuclear Regulatory Commission Licensees and Not Covered...

  3. 40 CFR 63.1382 - Emission standards

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Emission standards 63.1382 Section 63...) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Wool Fiberglass Manufacturing § 63.1382 Emission standards...

  4. 40 CFR 61.68 - Emission monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Emission monitoring. 61.68 Section 61...) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS National Emission Standard for Vinyl Chloride § 61.68 Emission monitoring. (a) A vinyl chloride monitoring system is to be used to monitor on...

  5. 40 CFR 61.107 - Emission determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Emission determination. 61.107 Section...) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS National Emission Standards for Radionuclide Emissions From Federal Facilities Other Than Nuclear Regulatory Commission Licensees and Not Covered...

  6. 47 CFR 24.133 - Emission limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Emission limits. 24.133 Section 24.133... SERVICES Narrowband PCS § 24.133 Emission limits. (a) The power of any emission shall be attenuated below... the lesser attenuation. (b) The measurements of emission power can be expressed in peak or...

  7. 40 CFR 89.119 - Emission tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Emission tests. 89.119 Section 89.119... EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE NONROAD COMPRESSION-IGNITION ENGINES Emission Standards and Certification Provisions § 89.119 Emission tests. (a) Manufacturer testing. (1) Upon completion of service...

  8. 40 CFR 60.73 - Emission monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Emission monitoring. 60.73 Section 60... Emission monitoring. (a) The source owner or operator shall install, calibrate, maintain, and operate a... measuring emissions with the continuous monitoring system concurrent with measuring emissions with...

  9. 40 CFR 1065.940 - Emission calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Emission calculations. 1065.940... CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Field Testing and Portable Emission Measurement Systems § 1065.940 Emission calculations. (a) Perform emission calculations as described in § 1065.650 to calculate...

  10. 40 CFR 63.1313 - Emission standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Emission standards. 63.1313 Section 63...) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES (CONTINUED) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutant Emissions: Group IV Polymers and Resins § 63.1313...

  11. 40 CFR 61.67 - Emission tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Emission tests. 61.67 Section 61.67... Emission tests. (a) Unless a waiver of emission testing is obtained under § 61.13, the owner or operator of a source to which this subpart applies shall test emissions from the source, (1) Within 90 days...

  12. 40 CFR 61.67 - Emission tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Emission tests. 61.67 Section 61.67... Emission tests. (a) Unless a waiver of emission testing is obtained under § 61.13, the owner or operator of a source to which this subpart applies shall test emissions from the source, (1) Within 90 days...

  13. Measurement of In-Flight Aircraft Emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sokoloski, M.; Arnold, C.; Rider, D.; Beer, R.; Worden, H.; Glavich, T.

    1995-01-01

    Aircraft engine emission and their chemical and physical evolution can be measured in flight using high resolution infrared spectroscopy. The Airborne Emission Spectrometer (AES), designed for remote measure- ments of atmosphere emissions from an airborne platform, is an ideal tool for the evaluation of aircraft emissions and their evolution. Capabilities of AES will be discussed. Ground data will be given.

  14. Thermodynamic Laws of Neutrino and Photon Emission.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, P. J.; Gallo, C. F.

    1980-01-01

    Compares neutrino and photon emissions, develops the thermodynamic blackbody laws of neutrino emission analogous to laws governing photon emission, points out that combined radiation from a "true blackbody" consists of both photon and neutrino emissions of comparable magnitude, and speculates upon the existence of blackbody neutrino…

  15. 40 CFR 61.123 - Emission testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., at its option, observe the test. (c) An emission test shall be conducted at each operational calciner or nodulizing kiln. If emissions from a calciner or nodulizing kiln are discharged through more than... calciner or kiln shall be the sum of the emission rates from each of the stacks. (d) Each emission...

  16. 40 CFR 61.123 - Emission testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., at its option, observe the test. (c) An emission test shall be conducted at each operational calciner or nodulizing kiln. If emissions from a calciner or nodulizing kiln are discharged through more than... calciner or kiln shall be the sum of the emission rates from each of the stacks. (d) Each emission...

  17. 40 CFR 61.123 - Emission testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., at its option, observe the test. (c) An emission test shall be conducted at each operational calciner or nodulizing kiln. If emissions from a calciner or nodulizing kiln are discharged through more than... calciner or kiln shall be the sum of the emission rates from each of the stacks. (d) Each emission...

  18. 40 CFR 61.123 - Emission testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., at its option, observe the test. (c) An emission test shall be conducted at each operational calciner or nodulizing kiln. If emissions from a calciner or nodulizing kiln are discharged through more than... calciner or kiln shall be the sum of the emission rates from each of the stacks. (d) Each emission...

  19. Advanced Emissions Control Development Program

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, A P

    1998-12-03

    Babcock & Wilcox (B&W) is conducting a five-year project aimed at the development of practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of hazardous air pollutants (commonly called air toxics) from coal-fired electric utility plants. The need for air toxic emissions controls may arise as the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency proceeds with implementation of Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) of 1990. Data generated during the program will provide utilities with the technical and economic information necessary to reliably evaluate various air toxics emissions compliance options such as fuel switching, coal cleaning, and flue gas treatment. The development work is being carried out using B&W's new Clean Environment Development Facility (CEDF) wherein air toxics emissions control strategies can be developed under controlled conditions, and with proven predictability to commercial systems. Tests conducted in the CEDF provide high quality, repeatable, comparable data over a wide range of coal properties, operating conditions, and emissions control systems. Development work to date has concentrated on the capture of mercury, other trace metals, fine particulate, and the inorganic species hydrogen chloride and hydrogen fluoride.

  20. Advanced Emission Control Development Program.

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, A.P.

    1997-12-31

    Babcock & Wilcox (B&W) is conducting a five-year project aimed at the development of practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of hazardous air pollutants (commonly called air toxics) from coal-fired electric utility plants. The need for air toxic emissions controls may arise as the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency proceeds with implementation of Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) of 1990. Data generated during the program will provide utilities with the technical and economic information necessary to reliably evaluate various air toxics emissions compliance options such as fuel switching, coal cleaning, and flue gas treatment. The development work is being carried out using B&W`s new Clean Environment Development Facility (CEDF) wherein air toxics emissions control strategies can be developed under controlled conditions, and with proven predictability to commercial systems. Tests conducted in the CEDF provide high quality, repeatable, comparable data over a wide range of coal properties, operating conditions, and emissions control systems. Development work to date has concentrated on the capture of mercury, other trace metals, fine particulate, and the inorganic species hydrogen chloride and hydrogen fluoride.

  1. Advanced Emissions Control Development Program

    SciTech Connect

    M. J. Holmes

    1998-12-03

    McDermott Technology, Inc. (MTI) is conducting a five-year project aimed at the development of practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of hazardous air pollutants (commonly called air toxics) from coal-fired electric utility plants. The need for air toxic emissions controls may arise as the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency proceeds with implementation of Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) of 1990. Data generated during the program will provide utilities with the technical and economic information necessary to reliably evaluate various air toxics emissions compliance options such as fuel switching, coal cleaning, and flue gas treatment. The development work is being carried out using the Clean Environment Development Facility (CEDF) wherein air toxics emissions control strategies can be developed under controlled conditions, and with proven predictability to commercial systems. Tests conducted in the CEDF provide high quality, repeatable, comparable data over a wide range of coal properties, operating conditions, and emissions control systems. Development work to date has concentrated on the capture of mercury, other trace metals, fine particulate, and hydrogen chloride and hydrogen fluoride.

  2. Advanced Emissions Control Development Program

    SciTech Connect

    A. P. Evans

    1998-12-03

    McDermott Technology, Inc. (MTI) is conducting a five-year project aimed at the development of practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of hazardous air pollutants (commonly called air toxics) from coal-fired electric utility plants. The need for air toxic emissions controls may arise as the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency proceeds with implementation of Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) of 1990. Data generated during the program will provide utilities with the technical and economic information necessary to reliably evaluate various air toxics emissions compliance options such as fuel switching, coal cleaning, and flue gas treatment. The development work is being carried out using the Clean Environment Development Facility (CEDF) wherein air toxics emissions control strategies can be developed under controlled conditions, and with proven predictability to commercial systems. Tests conducted in the CEDF provide high quality, repeatable, comparable data over a wide range of coal properties, operating conditions, and emissions control systems. Development work to date has concentrated on the capture of mercury, other trace metals, fine particulate, and the inorganic species, hydrogen chloride and hydrogen fluoride.

  3. PAHFIT: Properties of PAH Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, J. D.; Draine, Bruce

    2012-10-01

    PAHFIT is an IDL tool for decomposing Spitzer IRS spectra of PAH emission sources, with a special emphasis on the careful recovery of ambiguous silicate absorption, and weak, blended dust emission features. PAHFIT is primarily designed for use with full 5-35 micron Spitzer low-resolution IRS spectra. PAHFIT is a flexible tool for fitting spectra, and you can add or disable features, compute combined flux bands, change fitting limits, etc., without changing the code. PAHFIT uses a simple, physically-motivated model, consisting of starlight, thermal dust continuum in a small number of fixed temperature bins, resolved dust features and feature blends, prominent emission lines (which themselves can be blended with dust features), as well as simple fully-mixed or screen dust extinction, dominated by the silicate absorption bands at 9.7 and 18 microns. Most model components are held fixed or are tightly constrained. PAHFIT uses Drude profiles to recover the full strength of dust emission features and blends, including the significant power in the wings of the broad emission profiles. This means the resulting feature strengths are larger (by factors of 2-4) than are recovered by methods which estimate the underlying continuum using line segments or spline curves fit through fiducial wavelength anchors.

  4. New double soft emission theorems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cachazo, Freddy; He, Song; Yuan, Ellis Ye

    2015-09-01

    We study the behavior of the tree-level S-matrix of a variety of theories as two particles become soft. By analogy with the recently found subleading soft theorems for gravitons and gluons, we explore subleading terms in double soft emissions. We first consider double soft scalar emissions and find subleading terms that are controlled by the angular momentum operator acting on hard particles. The order of the subleading theorems depends on the presence or not of color structures. Next we obtain a compact formula for the leading term in a double soft photon emission. The theories studied are a special Galileon, Dirac-Born-Infeld, Einstein-Maxwell-Scalar, nonlinear sigma model and Yang-Mills-Scalar. We use the recently found Cachazo-He-Yuan representation of these theories in order to give a simple proof of the leading order part of all these theorems.

  5. Diffuse Interstellar Bands in Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, T. B.; Sarre, P.; Marshall, C. C. M.; Spekkens, K.; de Naray, R. Kuzio

    Recent Fabry-Pérot observations towards the galaxy NGC 1325 with the Southern African Large Telescope (SALT) led to the serendipitous discovery of an emission feature centered at 661.3 nm arising from material in the interstellar medium (ISM) of our Galaxy; this emission feature lies at the wavelength of one of the sharper and stronger diffuse bands normally seen in absorption. The flux of the feature is 4.2 +/- 0.5 × 10-18 es-1 cm-2 arcsec-2. It appears that this is the first observation of emission from a diffuse band carrier in the ISM, excited in this case by the interstellar radiation field. We present the discovery spectra and describe follow-up measurements proposed for SALT.

  6. Spontaneous emission and absorber theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pegg, David T.

    1997-01-01

    One of the long term interests of George Series was the construction of a theory of spontaneous emission which does not involve field quantisation. His approach was written in terms of atomic operators only and he drew a parallel with the Wheeler-Feynman absorber theory of radiation. By making a particular extra postulate, he was able to obtain the correct spontaneous emission rate and the Lamb shift reasonably simply and directly. An examination of his approach indicates that this postulate is physically reasonable and the need for it arises because quantisation in his theory occurs after the response of the absorber has been accounted for by means of the radiative reaction field. We review briefly an alternative absorber theory approach to spontaneous emission based on the direct action between the emitting atom and a quantised absorber, and outline some applications to more recent effects of interest in quantum optics.

  7. Air emission inventory for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory: 1994 emissions report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-01

    This report Presents the 1994 update of the Air Emission inventory for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The INEL Air Emission Inventory documents sources and emissions of non-radionuclide pollutants from operations at the INEL. The report describes the emission inventory process and all of the sources at the INEL, and provides non-radionuclide emissions estimates for stationary sources.

  8. Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory - Calendar Year 1998 Emissions Report

    SciTech Connect

    S. K. Zohner

    1999-10-01

    This report presents the 1998 calendar year update of the Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The INEEL Air Emission Inventory documents sources and emissions of nonradionuclide pollutants from operations at the INEEL. The report describes the emission inventory process and all of the sources at the INEEL, and provides nonradiological emissions estimates for stationary sources.

  9. Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory - Calendar Year 1999 Emission Report

    SciTech Connect

    Zohner, S.K.

    2000-05-30

    This report presents the 1999 calendar year update of the Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The INEEL Air Emission Inventory documents sources and emissions of nonradionuclide pollutants from operations at the INEEL. The report describes the emission inventory process and all of the sources at the INEEL, and provides nonradionuclide emissions estimates for stationary sources.

  10. Methane Emissions from Upland Trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitz, S.; Megonigal, P.; Schile, L. M.; Szlavecz, K. A.; King, K.

    2013-12-01

    Most work on methane (CH4) emissions from natural ecosystems has focused on wetlands and wetland soils because they are predictable emitters and relatively simple to quantify. Less attention has been directed toward upland ecosystems that cover far larger areas, but are assumed to be too dry to emit CH4. There is abundant evidence that upland ecosystems emit small amounts of CH4 during hot moments that collectively constitute a significant source in the global budget of this potent greenhouse gas. We have established two transects across natural moisture gradients in two forests near Annapolis, Maryland. Both tree and soil methane fluxes were measured using chamber methods. Each tree chamber was custom fit to the stem near the base. In addition, porewater methane concentrations were collected at multiple depths near trees. Abiotic parameters such as soil temperature, soil moisture, water potential, and depth to groundwater were monitored using a wireless sensor network. Upland emissions from tree stems were as high as 14.6 umoles CH4 m-2 hr-1 while the soil uptake was -1.5 umoles CH4 m-2 hr-1. These results demonstrate that tree methane emissions and soil methane uptake can occur simultaneously in a mesic forest. Factors controlling methane emissions were soil temperature, soil moisture, and depth to groundwater. Based on our preliminary data, tree mediated methane emissions may be offsetting the soil methane sink of upland forests by 20 to 30%. Future methane budgets and climate models will need to include tree fluxes and the parameters that control methane emissions for accurate accounting and predictions.

  11. Isoprene emission from Indian trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varshney, C. K.; Singh, Abhai Pratap

    2003-12-01

    Isoprene is the most dominant non-methane volatile organic compound (NMVOC) emitted by plants. NMVOCs play an important role in regulating the composition of atmospheric trace gases including global concentration of tropospheric ozone. Our present knowledge about NMVOCs emission is mainly from studies on temperate tree species. So far information on biogenic NMVOCs emission from tropical tree species is limited. In this study, isoprene emission rates from 40 tropical Indian tree species belonging to 33 genera and 17 families were measured for the first time using a dynamic flow through enclosure chamber technique. The isoprene emission rate from plants (30°C and PAR 1000 μmolm-2s-1) ranged from undetectable to 81.5 μg g-1 h-1 and values were found to be comparable with other studies on tropical tree species. Tree species screened for isoprene emission in the present study may be grouped into the four categories, proposed by [2001], namely, 18 species were negligible or BDL isoprene emitting (<1 μg g-1 h-1), 6 species were low emitting (1 ≤ to <10 μg g-1 h-1), 5 species were moderate emitting (10≤ to <25 μg g-1 h-1), and 11 species were high isoprene emitting (≥25 μg g-1 h-1). Maximum isoprene emission rate (81.5 μg g-1 h-1) was observed in the case of Dalbergia sissoo Linn. It was interesting to find that Citrus limon Linn., Citrus reticulata Linn., Citrus sinensis Linn., Grevillea robusta A. Cunn., and Morus alba Linn., which were earlier reported as BDL or non isoprene emitters in US [, 1998; , 2001] were found to be appreciably high isoprene emitters (0.61-21.60 μg g-1 h-1) in the present study.

  12. Isoprene emission from wetland sedges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekberg, A.; Arneth, A.; Hakola, H.; Hayward, S.; Holst, T.

    2009-04-01

    High latitude wetlands play an important role for the surface-atmosphere exchange of carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4), but fluxes of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC) in these ecosystems have to date not been extensively studied. This is despite BVOC representing a measurable proportion of the total gaseous C fluxes at northern locations and in the face of the high temperature sensitivity of these systems that requires a much improved process understanding to interpret and project possible changes in response to climate warming. We measured emission of isoprene and photosynthetic gas exchange over two growing seasons (2005-2006) in a subarctic wetland in northern Sweden with the objective to identify the physiological and environmental controls of these fluxes on the leaf scale. The sedge species Eriophorum angustifolium and Carex rostrata were both emitters of isoprene. Springtime emissions were first detected after an accumulated diurnal mean temperature above 0°C of about 100 degree days. Maximum measured growing season standardized (basal) emission rates (20°C, 1000 μmol m-2 s-1) were 1075 (2005) and 1118 (2006) μg C m-2 (leaf area) h-1 in E. angustifolium, and 489 (2005) and 396 (2006) μg C m-2 h-1 in C. rostrata. Over the growing season, basal isoprene emission varied in response to the temperature history of the last 48 h. Seasonal basal isoprene emission rates decreased with leaf nitrogen (N), which may be explained by the typical growth and resource allocation pattern of clonal sedges as the leaves age. The observations were used to model emissions over the growing season, accounting for effects of temperature history, links to leaf assimilation rate and the light and temperature dependencies of the cold-adapted sedges.

  13. Emission current from a single micropoint of explosive emission cathode

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Ping; Sun, Jun

    2016-01-15

    Explosive emission cathodes (EECs) are widely used due to their large current. There has been much research on the explosive electron emission mechanism demonstrating that a current density of 10{sup 8}–10{sup 9 }A/cm{sup 2} is necessary for a micropoint to explode in several nanoseconds and the micropoint size is in micron-scale according to the observation of the cathode surface. This paper, however, makes an effort to research the current density and the micropoint size in another way which considers the space charge screening effect. Our model demonstrates that the relativistic effect is insignificant for the micropoint emission due to the small size of the micropoint and uncovers that the micron-scale size is an intrinsic demand for the micropoint to reach a space charge limited current density of 10{sup 8}–10{sup 9 }A/cm{sup 2}. Meanwhile, our analysis shows that as the voltage increases, the micropoint emission will turn from a field limited state to a space charge limited state, which makes the steady-state micropoint current density independent of the cathode work function and much less dependent on the electric field and the field enhancement factor than that predicted by the Fowler-Nordheim formula.

  14. Measurement of Fugitive Dust Emissions and Visible Emissions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKee, Herbert C.

    The method of measuring fugitive dust emission utilized by the Texas Air Control Board is described in this presentation for the 12th Conference on Methods in Air Pollution and Industrial Hygiene Studies, University of Southern California, April, 1971. The measuring procedure, precautions, expected results, and legal acceptance of the method are…

  15. WOODSTOVE EMISSION MEASUREMENT METHODS COMPARISON AND EMISSION FACTORS UPDATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper compares various field and laboratory woodstove emission measurement methods. n 1988, the U.S. EPA promulgated performance standards for residential wood heaters (woodstoves). ver the past several years, a number of field studies have been undertaken to determine the a...

  16. Transportable Emissions Testing Laboratory for Alternative Vehicles Emissions Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Nigel

    2012-01-31

    The overall objective of this project was to perform research to quantify and improve the energy efficiency and the exhaust emissions reduction from advanced technology vehicles using clean, renewable and alternative fuels. Advanced vehicle and alternative fuel fleets were to be identified, and selected vehicles characterized for emissions and efficiency. Target vehicles were to include transit buses, school buses, vocational trucks, delivery trucks, and tractor-trailers. Gaseous species measured were to include carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, oxides of nitrogen, hydrocarbons, and particulate matter. An objective was to characterize particulate matter more deeply than by mass. Accurate characterization of efficiency and emissions was to be accomplished using a state-of-the-art portable emissions measurement system and an accompanying chassis dynamometer available at West Virginia University. These two units, combined, are termed the Transportable Laboratory. An objective was to load the vehicles in a real-world fashion, using coast down data to establish rolling resistance and wind drag, and to apply the coast down data to the dynamometer control. Test schedules created from actual vehicle operation were to be employed, and a specific objective of the research was to assess the effect of choosing a test schedule which the subject vehicle either cannot follow or can substantially outperform. In addition the vehicle loading objective was to be met better with an improved flywheel system.

  17. Emission current from a single micropoint of explosive emission cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ping; Sun, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Explosive emission cathodes (EECs) are widely used due to their large current. There has been much research on the explosive electron emission mechanism demonstrating that a current density of 108-109 A/cm2 is necessary for a micropoint to explode in several nanoseconds and the micropoint size is in micron-scale according to the observation of the cathode surface. This paper, however, makes an effort to research the current density and the micropoint size in another way which considers the space charge screening effect. Our model demonstrates that the relativistic effect is insignificant for the micropoint emission due to the small size of the micropoint and uncovers that the micron-scale size is an intrinsic demand for the micropoint to reach a space charge limited current density of 108-109 A/cm2. Meanwhile, our analysis shows that as the voltage increases, the micropoint emission will turn from a field limited state to a space charge limited state, which makes the steady-state micropoint current density independent of the cathode work function and much less dependent on the electric field and the field enhancement factor than that predicted by the Fowler-Nordheim formula.

  18. Infrared emission spectroscopy of HBr

    SciTech Connect

    Braun, V. . Centre for Molecular Beams and Laser Chemistry); Bernath, P.F. . Centre for Molecular Beams and Laser Chemistry Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ . Dept. of Chemistry)

    1994-10-01

    The vibration-rotation emission spectrum of HBr was recorded with a Fourier transform spectrometer. Line positions for the 1-0 and 2-1 bands were measured for both H[sup 79]Br and H[sup 81]Br. A pure rotation emission spectrum of HBr was also obtained, and rotational lines for v = 0 were measured. The two sets of data, when combined with previously measured submillimeter-wave pure rotational transitions, yielded a set of improved rotational constants for H[sup 79]Br and H[sup 81]Br.

  19. Search of Uranian decametric emission

    SciTech Connect

    Lebo, G.R.; Roth, L.T.

    1985-02-01

    An experiment to detect decametric radiation from Uranus is described. It is argued that in light of recent discoveries of a magnetic field on Uranus, it may be possible to detect low-frequency radio emission similar to the decametric emission from Jupiter. The experiment consisted of 106 hours of monitoring using the 26.3 MHz array of the University of Florida Dixie County Radio Observatory. No radiation from Uranus was detected. An upper flux density limit of 400 Jy was obtained. 19 references.

  20. Low emission internal combustion engine

    DOEpatents

    Karaba, Albert M.

    1979-01-01

    A low emission, internal combustion compression ignition engine having a cylinder, a piston movable in the cylinder and a pre-combustion chamber communicating with the cylinder near the top thereof and in which low emissions of NO.sub.x are achieved by constructing the pre-combustion chamber to have a volume of between 70% and 85% of the combined pre-chamber and main combustion chamber volume when the piston is at top dead center and by variably controlling the initiation of fuel injection into the pre-combustion chamber.

  1. Hot Electron Emission in Semiconductors.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    Second Interim Report Hot Electron Emission in Semiconductors Jan. 85 - June 85 6. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER 7. AUTHOR(s) 6. CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMBER(a...KEY WORDS (Continue on reverse side Jf necessary and identify by block number) " -novel tunable FIR sources) • hot electron emission in GaAs/GaAlAs...heterostructures)" -,/ " streaming of hot carriers in crossed electric and magnetic fields ABST’AACr C-rrhmus- m .wr. efe it rewo-- .rv d identify by

  2. Ordering Multiple Soft Gluon Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ángeles Martínez, René; Forshaw, Jeffrey R.; Seymour, Michael H.

    2016-05-01

    We present an expression for the QCD amplitude for a general hard scattering process with any number of soft gluon emissions, to one-loop accuracy. The amplitude is written in two different but equivalent ways: as a product of operators ordered in dipole transverse momentum and as a product of loop-expanded currents. We hope that these results will help in the development of an all-orders algorithm for multiple emissions that includes the full color structure and both the real and imaginary contributions to the amplitude.

  3. Sonification of acoustic emission data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raith, Manuel; Große, Christian

    2014-05-01

    While loading different specimens, acoustic emissions appear due to micro crack formation or friction of already existing crack edges. These acoustic emissions can be recorded using suitable ultrasonic transducers and transient recorders. The analysis of acoustic emissions can be used to investigate the mechanical behavior of different specimens under load. Our working group has undertaken several experiments, monitored with acoustic emission techniques. Different materials such as natural stone, concrete, wood, steel, carbon composites and bone were investigated. Also the experimental setup has been varied. Fire-spalling experiments on ultrahigh performance concrete and pullout experiments on bonded anchors have been carried out. Furthermore uniaxial compression tests on natural stone and animal bone had been conducted. The analysis tools include not only the counting of events but the analysis of full waveforms. Powerful localization algorithms and automatic onset picking techniques (based on Akaikes Information Criterion) were established to handle the huge amount of data. Up to several thousand events were recorded during experiments of a few minutes. More sophisticated techniques like moment tensor inversion have been established on this relatively small scale as well. Problems are related to the amount of data but also to signal-to-noise quality, boundary conditions (reflections) sensor characteristics and unknown and changing Greens functions of the media. Some of the acoustic emissions recorded during these experiments had been transferred into audio range. The transformation into the audio range was done using Matlab. It is the aim of the sonification to establish a tool that is on one hand able to help controlling the experiment in-situ and probably adjust the load parameters according to the number and intensity of the acoustic emissions. On the other hand sonification can help to improve the understanding of acoustic emission techniques for training

  4. The Role of Global Emission Inventory of Carbonaceous Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatima, H.; Sharma, O. P.; Updhyaya, H.

    2010-12-01

    Aerosols - liquid or solid particles suspended in the air - are important constituents of the global atmosphere. They have a direct effect on climate by scattering and/or absorbing solar radiation modifying the radiative balance of the atmosphere and indirect effect by acting as condensation nuclei, their increase in number concentration may give rise to increased number of cloud condensation nuclei, which might increase the droplet concentration with relatively smaller size droplets for fixed liquid water content, making clouds more reflective (Twomey, 1977). Recent measurements show that atmospheric black carbon (BC) and organic carbon (OC) aerosol particles frequently contribute significantly to the total aerosol mass (Novakov et al. 1997). BC is emitted as primary particles from incomplete combustion process, such as fossil fuel and biomass burning, and therefore much atmospheric BC is of anthropogenic origin. OC is emitted as both primary particles and by secondary production from gaseous compounds via condensation or gas phase oxidation of hydrocarbons. Primary organic aerosols come from both anthropogenic sources (fossil fuel and biomass burning) and from natural sources (such as debris, pollen, spores, and algae). Carbonaceous aerosols make up a large but highly variable fraction of the atmospheric aerosol. Black carbon aerosols absorb the solar radiation and induce positive forcing whereas organic matter aerosols reflect solar radiation and produce negative forcing. Various emission inventories have been developed for carbonaceous aerosols. Detailed emission inventories for both BC and OC have been developed (e.g., Penner et al., 1993; Cooke and Wilson, 1996; Liousse et al., 1996; Cooke et al., 1999, Bond et al. 2004) that consider both fossil fuel and biomass components. The inventories of biomass- burning BC and OC particles are more difficult to constrain than fossil fuel emissions, owing to the paucity of data. In the present study we have compared the

  5. Electrospun fibrous mats with conjugated tetraphenylethylene and mannose for sensitive turn-on fluorescent sensing of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Long; Chen, Yufei; Yuan, Jiang; Chen, Maohua; Zhang, Hong; Li, Xiaohong

    2015-03-11

    A rapid and sensitive detection of microbes in water and biological fluids is a key requirement in water and food safety, environmental monitoring, and clinical diagnosis and treatment. In the current study, electrospun polystyrene-co-maleic anhydride (PSMA) fibers with conjugated mannose and tetraphenylethylene (TPE) were developed for Escherichia coli (E. coli) detection, taking advantage of the high grafting capabilities of ultrafine fibers and the highly porous structure of the fibrous mat to entrap bacterial cells. The specific binding between mannose grafts on PSMA fibers and FimH proteins from the fimbriae of E. coli led to an efficient "turn-on" profile of TPE due to the aggregation-induced emission (AIE) effect. Poly(ethylene glycol) diamine was used as hydrophilic tethers to increase the conformational mobility of mannose grafts, indicating a more sensitive change in the fluorescence intensity against bacteria concentrations, a lower fluorescence background of fibers without bacteria incubation, and a sufficient space for bacteria binding, compared with the use of hexamethylenediamine or poly(ethylene imine) as spacers for mannose grafting. The addition of bovine serum albumin, glucose, or both of them into bacteria suspensions showed no significant changes in the fluorescence intensity of fibrous mats, indicating the anti-interference capability against these proteins and saccharides. An equation was drafted of the fluorescence intensities of fibrous mats against E. coli concentrations ranging from 10(2) to 10(5) CFU/mL. The test strip format was established on mannose-conjugated PSMA fibers after exposure to E. coli of different concentrations, providing a potential tool with a visual sensitivity of bacteria concentrations as low as 10(2) CFU/mL in a matter of minutes. This strategy may offer a capacity to be expanded to exploit electrospun fibrous mats and other carbohydrate-cell interactions for bioanalysis and biosensing of pathogenic bacteria.

  6. Paper-based fluorescent sensor for rapid naked-eye detection of acetylcholinesterase activity and organophosphorus pesticides with high sensitivity and selectivity.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jiafu; Li, Haiyin; Hou, Ting; Li, Feng

    2016-12-15

    Various strategies have been proposed for the sensing of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity and organophosphorus pesticides (OPs). However, the practical application of most methods is restricted by their intrinsic drawbacks such as complexity, long analysis time, and high cost. Thus, it is highly desirable to develop simple, fast and sensitive approaches for AChE activity and OPs detection. Herein, we reported a simple paper-based fluorescent sensor (PFS) based on the aggregation induced emission (AIE) effect of tetraphenylethylene (TPE) and the addition reaction capability of maleimide, which has been used as a powerful tool for rapid naked-eye detection of AChE activity and OPs. The introduction of TPE provides the probe with unique fluorescence property in solid state and is of great importance for improving the sensitivity of PFS. The hydrolysis product of acetylthiocholine catalyzed by AChE induced the maleimide ring destruction and activated the fluorescence performance of TPE. Given that AChE activity can be specifically inhibited by OPs, the as-proposed PFS can also be utilized for sensitive detection of OPs. Meanwhile, the variation of fluorescence signal can be readily detected by naked eyes, and low detection limits of 2.5mUmL(-1) and 0.5ngmL(-1) for AChE activity and OPs are obtained, respectively. Moreover, it has been successfully applied for AChE activity and OPs detection in diluted human serum samples, showing its great potential to be applied in real samples. Thus, this strategy possesses considerable advantages of simplicity, rapid detection, portability, cost efficiency and visualization.

  7. Models of Uranium continuum radio emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romig, Joseph H.; Evans, David R.; Sawyer, Constance B.; Schweitzer, Andrea E.; Warwick, James W.

    1987-01-01

    Uranium continuum radio emission detected by the Voyager 2 Planetary Radio Astronomy experiment during the January 1986 encounter is considered. The continuum emissions comprised four components (equatorial emissions, anomaly emissions, strong nightside emissions, and weak nightside emissions) associated with different sources. The equatorial emissions appeared most prominently during the days before closest approach and extended from 40 kHz or below to about 120 kHz. The anomaly emissions were seen about 12 hours before closest approach and extended to about 250 kHz. The agreement found between Miranda's phase and strong radio emission at 20.4 kHz, just after closest approach, suggests intense dynamic activity on the Miranda L shell.

  8. DEVELOPMENT AND SELECTION OF AMMONIA EMISSION FACTORS FOR THE 1985 NAPAP EMISSIONS INVENTORY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report, prepared for the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP), identifies the most appropriate ammonia (NH3) emission factors available for inclusion in the 1985 NAPAP Emissions Inventory. H3 emission factors developed for several new NAPAP source categories...

  9. Fiber optics spectrochemical emission sensors

    DOEpatents

    Griffin, Jeffrey W.; Olsen, Khris B.

    1992-01-01

    A method of in situ monitoring of a body of a fluid stored in a tank or groundwater or vadose zone gases in a well for the presence of selected chemical species uses a probe insertable into the well or tank via a cable and having electrical apparatus for exciting selected chemical species in the body of fluid. The probe can have a pair of electrodes for initiating a spark or a plasma cell for maintaining a plasma to excite the selected chemical species. The probe also has optical apparatus for receiving optical emissions emitted by the excited species and optically transmitting the emissions via the cable to an analysis location outside the well. The analysis includes detecting a selected wavelength in the emissions indicative of the presence of the selected chemical species. A plurality of probes can be suspended at an end of a respective cable, with the transmitting and analyzing steps for each probe being synchronized sequentially for one set of support equipment and instrumentation to monitor at multiple test points. The optical apparatus is arranged about the light guide axis so that the selected chemical species are excited the fluid in alignment with the light guide axis and optical emissions are received from the excited chemical species along such axis.

  10. Fiber optics spectrochemical emission sensors

    DOEpatents

    Griffin, J.W.; Olsen, K.B.

    1992-02-04

    A method is described of in situ monitoring of a body of a fluid stored in a tank or groundwater or vadose zone gases in a well for the presence of selected chemical species. The method uses a probe insertable into the well or tank via a cable and having an electrical apparatus for exciting selected chemical species in the body of fluid. The probe can have a pair of electrodes for initiating a spark or a plasma cell for maintaining a plasma to excite the selected chemical species. The probe also has an optical apparatus for receiving optical emissions emitted by the excited species and optically transmitting the emissions via the cable to an analysis location outside the well. The analysis includes detecting a selected wavelength in the emissions indicative of the presence of the selected chemical species. A plurality of probes can be suspended at an end of a respective cable, with the transmitting and analyzing steps for each probe being synchronized sequentially for one set of support equipment and instrumentation to monitor at multiple test points. The optical apparatus is arranged about the light guide axis so that the selected chemical species are excited in the fluid in alignment with the light guide axis. Optical emissions are received from the excited chemical species along such axis. 18 figs.

  11. Primary particles in ship emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fridell, Erik; Steen, Erica; Peterson, Kjell

    There is not much data available regarding particle emissions from ships. In this study the size distributions of particles in ship exhaust from three different ships in normal operational conditions were studied using a cascade impactor. The ships were equipped with slow- or medium-speed main engines and medium-speed auxiliary engines. The fuel was residual oil except for the auxiliary engines on one ship which used marine diesel. Large emissions and a dependence of the sulfur content in the fuel were observed. High amounts of relatively large particles (around 8 μm) were observed. These are attributed to re-entrained soot particles from walls in the engine systems. A strong variation between different ships was observed for the particle-size distribution and for the dependence on engine load. The particle emissions were found to be reduced to about half, over the whole size range, by an SCR system. The total particle emission, measured after dilution, varied between 0.3 and 3 g kW h -1 depending on load, fuel and engine.

  12. Temporal Characteristics of Otoacoustic Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Withnell, R. H.; Dhar, S.; Talmadge, C. L.; Shaffer, L. A.; de Boer, E.; Roberts, R.; McPherson, D.

    2003-02-01

    The recent work of Talmadge et al. [1] and Shera and Guinan [2] argues for two distinct mechanisms for the production of otoacoustic emissions: i) a retrograde traveling wave produced by the amplifier induced pressure gradient across the basilar membrane due primarily to the nonlinearities inherent in the amplifier, and ii) linear coherent reflections encompassing intracochlear standing waves. It would appear that for emissions arising from their characteristic frequency (CF) place, the dominant mechanism of production is one of reflection [2,3]. Inherent in a reflection mechanism is that the incident energy propagates to the CF place and then is reflected back to the stapes (i.e., two distinct delays, an anterograde delay and a retrograde delay). For emissions arising significantly basal to the CF place the dominant mechanism of production is non-linear, but it is not clear if such emissions are a result of reflection or energy injected into the basilar membrane by the active process. Estimates of delay to date have been largely based on phase-gradients of steady-state signals and not true time delays [4]. In this study, we report signal-front delays measured in the human from DPOAEs (2f1-f2) using a pulsed-tone paradigm. In particular, we examine whether all DPOAEs arise from reflection, albeit via different mechanisms.

  13. Exploiting dual otoacoustic emission sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdala, Carolina; Kalluri, Radha

    2015-12-01

    Two distinct processes generate otoacoustic emissions (OAEs). Reflection-source emissions, here recorded as stimulus frequency OAEs, are optimally informative at low sound levels and are more sensitive to slight hearing loss; they have been linked to cochlear amplifier gain and tuning. Distortion-source emissions are strongest at moderate-high sound levels and persist despite mild hearing loss; they likely originate in the nonlinear process of hair cell transduction. In this preliminary study, we exploit the unique features of each by generating a combined reflection-distortion OAE profile in normal hearing and hearing-impaired ears. Distortion-product (DP) and stimulus-frequency (SF) OAEs were recorded over a broad range of stimulus levels and frequencies. Individual I/O and transfer functions were generated for both emission types in each ear, and OAE peak strength, compression threshold, and rate of compression were calculated. These combined SFOAE and DPOAE features in normal and hearing-impaired ears may provide a potentially informative and novel index of hearing loss. This is an initial step toward utilizing OAE source in characterizing cochlear function and dysfunction.

  14. INDOOR EMISSIONS FROM CONVERSION VARNISHES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Conversion varnishes are two-component, acid-catalyzed varnishes that are commonly used to finish cabinets. They are valued for their water- and stain-resistance, as well as their appearance. They have been found, however, to contribute to indoor emissions of organic compounds. F...

  15. Methane emissions from Carex rostrata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yelverton, C. A.; Varner, R. K.; Roddy, S.; Noyce, G. L.

    2013-12-01

    Peatlands, especially in northern regions, are known for their contribution to the increase of methane (CH4) in the atmosphere. Methane emissions from peatlands are strongly correlated with water table, temperature, and species composition. Sedges, in particular, are a conduit for the release of CH4 directly to the atmosphere. This study examines the impact of clipping and sealing sedges (Carex rostrata) on CH4 emissions from a temperate peatland (Sallie's Fen, Barrington, NH, USA). Measurements of CH4 fluxes, dissolved CH4, and environmental conditions were made over a six-year period. Data from 2008 to 2013 show that the presence of Carex rostrata in this peatland increases CH4 emissions. Clipped plots have both lower seasonal and annual CH4 emissions, compared to control plots. By studying the type of environment associated with C. rostrata through measurements of water-table depth, pore water characteristics, and the peat, surface, and air temperature of each surrounding location, further studies will show how these factors affect the rate at which CH4 is emitted into the atmosphere.

  16. Model assessment of fumigant emissions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Simulation models are useful for estimating the environmental fate and transport of pesticides. Soil fumigants such as methyl bromide are a special group of pesticides with high vapor pressure values. A main concern with fumigants is the large potential for atmospheric emissions. Because of the l...

  17. Carbon emissions of infrastructure development.

    PubMed

    Müller, Daniel B; Liu, Gang; Løvik, Amund N; Modaresi, Roja; Pauliuk, Stefan; Steinhoff, Franciska S; Brattebø, Helge

    2013-10-15

    Identifying strategies for reconciling human development and climate change mitigation requires an adequate understanding of how infrastructures contribute to well-being and greenhouse gas emissions. While direct emissions from infrastructure use are well-known, information about indirect emissions from their construction is highly fragmented. Here, we estimated the carbon footprint of the existing global infrastructure stock in 2008, assuming current technologies, to be 122 (-20/+15) Gt CO2. The average per-capita carbon footprint of infrastructures in industrialized countries (53 (± 6) t CO2) was approximately 5 times larger that that of developing countries (10 (± 1) t CO2). A globalization of Western infrastructure stocks using current technologies would cause approximately 350 Gt CO2 from materials production, which corresponds to about 35-60% of the remaining carbon budget available until 2050 if the average temperature increase is to be limited to 2 °C, and could thus compromise the 2 °C target. A promising but poorly explored mitigation option is to build new settlements using less emissions-intensive materials, for example by urban design; however, this strategy is constrained by a lack of bottom-up data on material stocks in infrastructures. Infrastructure development must be considered in post-Kyoto climate change agreements if developing countries are to participate on a fair basis.

  18. PARTICULATE EMISSIONS FROM CONSTRUCTION ACTIVITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although it has long been recognized that road and building construction activity constitutes an important source of PM emissions throughout the United States, until recently only limited research has been directed to its characterization. This paper presents the results of PM10...

  19. National emissions report, 1981: national emissions data system of the aerometric and emissions reporting system

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    This report summarizes annual cumulative estimates of source emissions of five criteria pollutants: particulates, sulfur oxides, nitrogen oxides, volatile organic compounds, and carbon monoxide. Source emissions data are reported to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency under provisions of Section 110 of the Clean Air Act, as amended in 1977, and of EPA Regulations, Title 40. Code of Federal Regulations, Part 51.321. Summary data are presented for the nation as a whole, for individual states, for intrastate and individual interstate portions of Air Quality Control Regions, and for total interstate Air Quality Control Regions.

  20. Variable Emissivity Through MEMS Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darrin, Ann Garrison; Osiander, Robert; Champion, John; Swanson, Ted; Douglas, Donya; Grob, Lisa M.; Powers, Edward I. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    This paper discusses a new technology for variable emissivity (vari-e) radiator surfaces, which has significant advantages over traditional radiators and promises an alternative design technique for future spacecraft thermal control systems. All spacecraft rely on radiative surfaces to dissipate waste heat. These radiators have special coatings, typically with a low solar absorptivity and a high infrared-red emissivity, that are intended to optimize performance under the expected heat load and thermal sink environment. The dynamics of the heat loads and thermal environment make it a challenge to properly size the radiator and often require some means of regulating the heat rejection rate of the radiators in order to achieve proper thermal balance. Specialized thermal control coatings, which can passively or actively adjust their emissivity offer an attractive solution to these design challenges. Such systems would allow intelligent control of the rate of heat loss from a radiator in response to heat load and thermal environmental variations. Intelligent thermal control through variable emissivity systems is well suited for nano and pico spacecraft applications where large thermal fluctuations are expected due to the small thermal mass and limited electric resources. Presently there are three different types of vari-e technologies under development: Micro ElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS) louvers, Electrochromic devices, and Electrophoretic devices. This paper will describe several prototypes of micromachined (MEMS) louvers and experimental results for the emissivity variations measured on theses prototypes. It will further discuss possible actuation mechanisms and space reliability aspects for different designs. Finally, for comparison parametric evaluations of the thermal performances of the new vari-e technology and standard thermal control systems are presented in this paper.

  1. Emissions by Uncontrolled Coal Fires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terschure, A. F.; Engle, M.; Heffern, E.; Hower, J.; Kolker, A.; Prakash, A.; Radke, L.

    2010-12-01

    Thousands of self-ignited coal fires, naturally occurring coal fires, and coal fires resulting from human activities persist for decades in underground coal mines, coal waste piles, and un-mined coal beds. These uncontrolled coal fires occur in all coal-bearing parts of the world and pose multiple threats to the global environment due to emission of greenhouse gases (GHG) such as CO2, CO, CH4, and other toxic substances such as mercury (Hg). Estimates of the amount of coal that is involved globally range between 20 and 600 Mt sing simple calculations, the only published peer-reviewed estimate of CO2 and Hg emissions from coal-fires in the United States (U.S.) are between 14 to 290 Mt/yr and 0.1 to 11.5 t/yr, respectively. In comparison, the U.S. coal-fired power plant fleet -the largest known anthropogenic source of CO2 and Hg to the atmosphere in the U.S.- emits ~2.4 Gt, and ~45 t annually, respectively. This paper builds on these results and will present result of a first-of-a-kind U.S.-based field campaign combining airborne remote sensing using thermal infrared technique and ground based measurements as a first step to constraining and scaling-up the emission factors, nature and extent of coal-fire emissions of CO2 and Hg to a global scale, which will allow for these emission sources to be better accounted for in global atmospheric models.

  2. Carbon emission from farm operations.

    PubMed

    Lal, R

    2004-09-01

    This manuscript is a synthesis of the available information on energy use in farm operations, and its conversion into carbon equivalent (CE). A principal advantage of expressing energy use in terms of carbon (C) emission as kg CE lies in its direct relation to the rate of enrichment of atmospheric concentration of CO2. Synthesis of the data shows that estimates of emissions in kg CE/ha are 2-20 for different tillage operations, 1-1.4 for spraying chemicals, 2-4 for drilling or seeding and 6-12 for combine harvesting. Similarly, estimates of C emissions in kg CE/kg for different fertilizer nutrients are 0.9-1.8 for N, 0.1-0.3 for P2O5, 0.1-0.2 for K20 and 0.03-0.23 for lime. Estimates of C emission in kg CE/kg of active ingredient (a.i.) of different pesticides are 6.3 for herbicides, 5.1 for insecticides and 3.9 for fungicides. Irrigation, lifting water from deep wells and using sprinkling systems, emits 129+/-98 kg CE for applying 25 cm of water and 258+/-195 for 50 cm of water. Emission for different tillage methods are 35.3 kg CE/ha for conventional till, 7.9 kg CE/ha for chisel till or minimum till, and 5.8 kg CE/ha for no-till method of seedbed preparation. In view of the high C costs of major inputs, sustainable management of agricultural ecosystems implies that an output/input ratio, expressed either as gross or net output of C, must be >1 and has an increasing trend over time.

  3. Modeling line emission in PDRs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Bourlot, J.

    2000-11-01

    The formation of emission lines in a diluted medium results from a large number of conspiring physical processes. When trying to compute a line intensity or (harder) a line profile from first principles, one has to take into account at least three different kind of processes: Atomic or molecular physics data. An accurate knowledge of radiative and collisional transition probabilities is required to determine the population of excited levels which rules the formation of emission lines. Thermodynamical equilibrium is almost never established, so that detailed balance equations need to be solved. Unfortunately many important data are still badly known. Structure and dynamics of the emitting medium. Local emissivities at a specific point depend at least on the local temperature and density of the gas, but often also on other less accessible parameters such as the turbulence state of the gas, a magnetic field or the existence of rapidly evolving transients such as shocks. Self consistent models which would include all relevant processes are out of reach numerically, and choices must be made among the more relevant physical processes to include. Radiative transfer effects. For a few relevant interstellar lines, the opacity is small enough that the emergent emissivity is just the sum of all local emissivities along the line of sight. Unfortunately, most lines are not so easy to cope with and a minimal radiative transfer formalism must be included. Various degrees of sophistication are possible, from a simple escape probability theory to full wavelength dependent line transfer. On the whole, line modelling is still more an art than a science. One should be well aware of the various assumptions made in a model before applying it to some particular observational result.

  4. Output tube emission characteristics of operational radars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matheson, R. J.; Smilley, J. D.; Falcon, G. D.; Lawrence, V. S.

    1982-01-01

    Measurement of the emission spectra and other characteristics of many radars operating in the government frequency bands is described. The emission spectra of 19 different types of radars, selected to show the different emission spectrum characteristics produced by a variety of radar output tube technologies are presented. The radars include examples of ground based search, airport surveillance, weather, and height finding radars operating in L band, S band, or C band. The RSMS, contained within a mobile van, is described, along with the measurement techniques used for obtaining radar emission characteristics. The emission limits imposed by the Radar Spectrum Engineering Criteria (RSEC) are displayed with each emission spectrum.

  5. Junction-based field emission structure for field emission display

    DOEpatents

    Dinh, Long N.; Balooch, Mehdi; McLean, II, William; Schildbach, Marcus A.

    2002-01-01

    A junction-based field emission display, wherein the junctions are formed by depositing a semiconducting or dielectric, low work function, negative electron affinity (NEA) silicon-based compound film (SBCF) onto a metal or n-type semiconductor substrate. The SBCF can be doped to become a p-type semiconductor. A small forward bias voltage is applied across the junction so that electron transport is from the substrate into the SBCF region. Upon entering into this NEA region, many electrons are released into the vacuum level above the SBCF surface and accelerated toward a positively biased phosphor screen anode, hence lighting up the phosphor screen for display. To turn off, simply switch off the applied potential across the SBCF/substrate. May be used for field emission flat panel displays.

  6. Photo Field Emission and Field Emission Energy Distributions from Silicon.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herman, Michael H.

    Electron field emission from semiconductors is investigated both theoretically and experimentally. The theoretical predictions of the general Stratton theory are calculated specifically for silicon, in the {100 }, {110}, and {111} directions. A method of simplifying the calculation of the energy distribution for arbitrary semiconductor bands is obtained, utilizing the effective mass approximation. Experimental field emission energy distributions (FEEDs) are reported for both n- and p-type samples of low resistivity. The experimental distributions are characterized by a high intensity single peak, of energy 0.4 eV or more below the Fermi level, with subsidiary peak of lower intensity, rising from just below the Fermi level. The larger peak drops in energy with increasing field. Presented data demonstrates that this peak lowering is not attributable to sample resistance. Observation of the subsidiary peak is linked to either low sample temperature or low doping, implying that the carrier concentration affects its presence. Experimental FEEDs are compared to those expected theoretically. It is concluded that they are not similar. Comparison with photoemission work indicates that the large peak is due to a band of surface acceptor states. The subsidiary peak is tentatively ascribed to conduction band electrons. Finally, a phenomenological model of photo-field emission (PFE) is proposed. Based upon both FEED and PFE experiments, this model assumes that emission occurs primarily from surface states. A second component of the current is due to tunnelling of photogenerated electrons. In addition to photoconductivity, a self-regulating breakdown mechanism is necessary for qualitative agreement with experimental data. One such mechanism, avalanche, is investigated for the dielectric emitter model. Qualitative agreement is obtained with the characteristic non-linear Fowler-Nordheim behavior observed experimentally.

  7. Nanophotonic Devices - Spontaneous Emission Faster than Stimulated Emission

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-11-04

    emission, light emitting diode . 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT UU 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE...important threshold is 200× enhancement, in which case a light emitting diode becomes faster than a directly modulated semiconductor laser. 200...131109. 25. Fattal D, et al. (2008) Design of an efficient light - emitting diode with 10 GHz modulation bandwidth. Applied Physics Letters 93(24

  8. Nanophotonic Devices; Spontaneous Emission Faster than Stimulated Emission

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-02-02

    antenna enhanced Light Emitting Diodes , can enable short distance optical communication, including possibly on-chip optical interconnect. One of the...approved for public release We believe that these new types of spontaneous emission optical sources, acting as antenna enhanced Light Emitting Diodes ...Conferences, San Jose, CA, October 2015 3. Royal Swedish Academy at the Light in the Service of Mankind conference, Lund, Sweden, October 2015

  9. PISCES field chemical emissions monitoring project: Site 112 emissions report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-01

    This report is one of a series sponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute in the area of trace substance emissions from fossil-fuel power plants. This report presents the results of a sampling and analytical study to characterize trace substances emissions at Site 112. Site 112 is a tangentially fired boiler firing residual oil. Site 112 employs electrostatic precipitators and a flue gas desulfurization system for particulate and SO{sub 2} control. Sampling at Site 112 was performed in July and August of 1992 for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and mercury. The objective of this report is to transmit the detailed data to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to assist the Agency in evaluating utility trace chemical emissions as well as the associated health risk impacts - as mandated in Title III of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments. This report does not attempt to compare the results with other sites. An assessment of data from all plants that have been tested is presented in the Electric Utility Trace Substances Synthesis Report (EPRI TR-104614).

  10. PISCES field chemical emissions monitoring project: Site 21 emissions report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-01

    This report is one of a series sponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute in the area of trace substance emissions from fossil-fuel power plants. This report presents the results of a sampling and analytical study to characterize trace substances emissions at Site 21. Site 21 is a pilot-scale electrostatic precipitator and wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system. The flue gas for the pilot unit is provided by an adjacent power plant boiler which bums a medium-sulfur bituminous, coal. The primary objective in the Site 21 sampling and analytical program was to quantify the various components of variance in the measurement of trace chemical species. In addition to the replicate sample trains typically conducted at previous PISCES field measurements, duplicate analyses and duplicate (simultaneous) sample trains were also conducted. This enabled the variance due to sampling, analytical, and process conditions to be estimated. The objective of this report is to transmit the detailed data to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to assist the Agency in evaluating utility trace chemical emissions as well as the associated health risk impacts - as mandated in Title III of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments. This report does not attempt to compare the results with other sites. An assessment of data from all plants that have been tested is presented in the Electric Utility Trace Substances Synthesis Report.

  11. Methane emissions from MBT landfills

    SciTech Connect

    Heyer, K.-U. Hupe, K.; Stegmann, R.

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: • Compilation of methane generation potential of mechanical biological treated (MBT) municipal solid waste. • Impacts and kinetics of landfill gas production of MBT landfills, approach with differentiated half-lives. • Methane oxidation in the waste itself and in soil covers. • Estimation of methane emissions from MBT landfills in Germany. - Abstract: Within the scope of an investigation for the German Federal Environment Agency (“Umweltbundesamt”), the basics for the estimation of the methane emissions from the landfilling of mechanically and biologically treated waste (MBT) were developed. For this purpose, topical research including monitoring results regarding the gas balance at MBT landfills was evaluated. For waste treated to the required German standards, a methane formation potential of approximately 18–24 m{sup 3} CH{sub 4}/t of total dry solids may be expected. Monitoring results from MBT landfills show that a three-phase model with differentiated half-lives describes the degradation kinetics in the best way. This is due to the fact that during the first years of disposal, the anaerobic degradation processes still proceed relatively intensively. In addition in the long term (decades), a residual gas production at a low level is still to be expected. Most of the soils used in recultivation layer systems at German landfills show a relatively high methane oxidation capacity up to 5 l CH{sub 4}/(m{sup 2} h). However, measurements at MBT disposal sites indicate that the majority of the landfill gas (in particular at non-covered areas), leaves the landfill body via preferred gas emission zones (hot spots) without significant methane oxidation. Therefore, rather low methane oxidation factors are recommended for open and temporarily covered MBT landfills. Higher methane oxidation rates can be achieved when the soil/recultivation layer is adequately designed and operated. Based on the elaborated default values, the First Order Decay (FOD

  12. Light emission from porous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penczek, John

    The continuous evolution of silicon microelectronics has produced significant gains in electronic information processing. However, greater improvements in performance are expected by utilizing optoelectronic techniques. But these techniques have been severely limited in silicon- based optoelectronics due to the lack of an efficient silicon light emitter. The recent observation of efficient light emission from porous silicon offer a promising opportunity to develop a suitable silicon light source that is compatible with silicon microelectronics. This dissertation examined the porous silicon emission mechanism via photoluminescence, and by a novel device structure for porous silicon emitters. The investigation first examined the correlation between porous silicon formation conditions (and subsequent morphology) with the resulting photoluminescence properties. The quantum confinement theory for porous silicon light emission contends that the morphology changes induced by the different formation conditions determine the optical properties of porous silicon. The photoluminescence spectral shifts measured in this study, in conjunction with TEM analysis and published morphological data, lend support to this theory. However, the photoluminescence spectral broadening was attributed to electronic wavefunction coupling between adjacent silicon nanocrystals. An novel device structure was also investigated in an effort to improve current injection into the porous silicon layer. The selective etching properties of porous silicon were used to create a p-i-n structure with crystalline silicon contacts to the porous silicon layer. The resulting device was found to have unique characteristics, with a negative differential resistance region and current-induced emission that spanned from 400 nm to 5500 nm. The negative differential resistance was correlated to resistive heating effects in the device. A numerical analysis of thermal emission spectra from silicon films, in addition to

  13. FIR Emission From Rich Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Caroline

    1994-12-01

    Previous searches for far infrared (FIR) emission from dominant cluster galaxies using small, X-ray selected samples have found 20% to 50% of clusters to have significant FIR emission. In a new study, I have analyzed the 60microns and 100microns emission properties of cD galaxies in a complete sample of 163 Abell Clusters. For comparison, a control sample of 207 blank fields was analyzed to determine the distribution of spurious detections, which is greater than expected from Gaussian statistics. The contribution of Galactic cirrus at 60 microns and 100 microns to non-Gaussian noise is clearly demonstrated by the correspondence of a 98% confidence level to a signal to noise of 4 or 4.5 rather than to a signal to noise of 2 as expected from Gaussian statistics. After correcting for contaminated fields and spurious signals, I find that about 10% of cD galaxies in rich clusters are sources of FIR emission. Typical detected cDs have FIR luminosities of about 3 times 10(44) erg sec(-1) , which is comparable to the blue luminosities from these objects and an order of magnitude greater than the X-ray luminosities produced in the cores of clusters. Dust masses derived from the 60microns and 100 microns fluxes are ~ 10(7) M _sun. Because only about 10% of the clusters have high FIR luminosities, such strong emission is probably a transient state for an individual cluster. It has been suggested that this FIR emission is due to dust heated by electron collisions from the hot gas that dominates the intra-cluster medium. Study of the optical and X-ray properties of these clusters allows us to test models for the heating process of the dust, the origin of the dust, and its importance as a mechanism for cooling the hot gas. The central electron density and the temperature distribution for the hot gas are determined from analysis of ROSAT PSPC observations of four of these clusters. My program of UBVI imaging is designed to identify dust lanes and morphology that might indicate

  14. Ports Primer: 7.2 Air Emissions

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Near-port communities are often disproportionately impacted by air emissions due to port operations, goods movement operations and other industries that may be co-located with ports. Air emissions at ports also impact regional air quality.

  15. PARTICULATE EMISSION MEASUREMENTS FROM CONTROLLED CONSTRUCTION ACTIVITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report summarized the results of field testing of the effectiveness of control measures for sources of fugitive particulate emissions found at construction sites. The effectiveness of watering temporary, unpaved travel surfaces on emissions of particulate matter with aerodyna...

  16. CHP Energy and Emissions Savings Calculator

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Download the CHP Emissions Calculator, a tool that calculates the difference between the anticipated carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, sulfur dioxide, and nitrogen oxide emissions from a CHP system to those of a separate heat and power system.

  17. IMPROVING BIOGENIC EMISSION ESTIMATES WITH SATELLITE IMAGERY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation will review how existing and future applications of satellite imagery can improve the accuracy of biogenic emission estimates. Existing applications of satellite imagery to biogenic emission estimates have focused on characterizing land cover. Vegetation dat...

  18. Development of Evaporative Emissions Calculations for ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Describes methodology for developing evaporative emissions calculations for MOVES2009 Model. To describe development of inputs and calculations used in the MOVES2009 model to calculate on-highway emissions inventories.

  19. National Vehicle and Fuel Emissions Laboratory (NVFEL)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    NVFEL is the primary EPA research laboratory used for fuel and emissions testing. The laboratory supports emission standards for motor vehicles, engines, and fuels, as well as the development of automotive technology.

  20. Dust Emission from the Perseus Molecular Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnee, S.; Li, J.; Goodman, A. A.; Sargent, A. I.

    2008-09-01

    Using far-infrared emission maps taken by IRAS and Spitzer and a near-infrared extinction map derived from 2MASS data, we have made dust temperature and column density maps of the Perseus molecular cloud. We show that the emission from transiently heated very small grains (VSGs) and the big grain dust emissivity vary as a function of extinction and dust temperature, with higher dust emissivities for colder grains. This variable emissivity cannot be explained by temperature gradients along the line of sight or by noise in the emission maps, but it is consistent with grain growth in the higher density and lower temperature regions. By accounting for the variations in the dust emissivity and VSG emission, we are able to map the temperature and column density of a nearby molecular cloud with better accuracy than has previously been possible.

  1. Other Production Emissions Sources- September 2012 Workshop

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    View a presentation on other production emissions sources, presented at the Stakeholder Workshop on Natural Gas in the Inventory of U.S. Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Emissions and Sinks on Thursday September, 13, 2012.

  2. MOVES (MOTOR VEHICLE EMISSION SIMULATOR) MODEL ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    A computer model, intended to eventually replace the MOBILE model and to incorporate the NONROAD model, that will provide the ability to estimate criteria and toxic air pollutant emission factors and emission inventories that are specific to the areas and time periods of interest, at scales ranging from local to national. Development of a new emission factor and inventory model for mobile source emissions. The model will be used by air pollution modelers within EPA, and at the State and local levels.

  3. The evolution of automobile exhaust emission control

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, K.C.

    1993-12-31

    Automobile catalytic converters have progressed from oxidation-only systems in the mid 1970`s to the current three-way catalytic converters which control emissions of carbon monoxide, hydrocarbons, and nitrogen oxide to very low levels. New exhaust emission regulations adopted Federally and in California which come into effect during the 1990`s once again demand new emission control system technology. A new generation of catalytic converter systems coupled with attention to fuel composition characterizes this third phase of exhaust emission control.

  4. Microwave emission of sonoluminescing bubbles.

    PubMed

    Hammer, Dominik; Frommhold, Lothar

    2002-07-01

    Kordomenos et al. have attempted to measure single bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) emission in the microwave window of water in a band of frequencies ranging from 1.65 GHz to 2.35 GHz [Phys. Rev. E 59, 1781 (1999)]. The sensitivity of the experiment was such that signals greater than 1 nW would have been detected. We show here that this upper bound is compatible with the radiation processes that we think generate significant emission at optical frequencies, electron-neutral and electron-ion bremsstrahlung. In fact, we argue that, almost independently of the specific assumptions concerning the hydrodynamics or the nature of the radiative processes, SBSL intensities exceeding that upper bound can hardly be expected.

  5. Integrated Emissivity And Temperature Measurement

    DOEpatents

    Poulsen, Peter

    2005-11-08

    A multi-channel spectrometer and a light source are used to measure both the emitted and the reflected light from a surface which is at an elevated temperature relative to its environment. In a first method, the temperature of the surface and emissivity in each wavelength is calculated from a knowledge of the spectrum and the measurement of the incident and reflected light. In the second method, the reflected light is measured from a reference surface having a known reflectivity and the same geometry as the surface of interest and the emitted and the reflected light are measured for the surface of interest. These measurements permit the computation of the emissivity in each channel of the spectrometer and the temperature of the surface of interest.

  6. Laser cooling without spontaneous emission.

    PubMed

    Corder, Christopher; Arnold, Brian; Metcalf, Harold

    2015-01-30

    This Letter reports the demonstration of laser cooling without spontaneous emission, and thereby addresses a significant controversy. It works by restricting the atom-light interaction to a time short compared to a cycle of absorption followed by natural decay. It is achieved by using the bichromatic force on an atomic transition with a relatively long excited state lifetime and a relatively short cooling time so that spontaneous emission effects are minimized. The observed width of the one-dimensional velocity distribution is reduced by ×2 thereby reducing the "temperature" by ×4. Moreover, our results comprise a compression in phase space because the spatial expansion of the atomic sample is limited. This accomplishment is of interest to direct laser cooling of molecules or in experiments where working space or time is limited.

  7. Spectral emission of corona discharges.

    PubMed

    Grum, F; Costa, L F

    1976-01-01

    Corona-discharge devices are commonly used in a variety of research and development applications. They are known to produce a considerable amount of electromagnetic radiation, mainly in the uv region of the spectrum. The mechanism involved is presumed to be the ionization and radiative recombination of the gases surrounding the high-voltage terminal of the device. A series of high-resolution emission spectra of corona discharge has been measured in atmospheres of nitrogen, helium, and air. (The nitrogen and helium are Air Products 99.995% purity, total hydrocarbons less than 0.5 ppm.) These data are presented here and are compared with published spectroscopic reference data. All the emission lines reported in the spectroscopic reference literature were detected, as well as other lines, which may conceivably be due to impurities.

  8. Fracto-Emission from Polymers.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-06-01

    ways serves as a probe of the electronic and chemical activity of the fracture surfaces . The work described in this report represents the results of...evidence from fracture experiments, we present results from studies of electron bombardment of a polymer surface . t -9- I. INTRODUCTION Fracto-emission (FE...RE has been detected previously by Derjaguin , et al. (8) during the separation of polymer films from dielectric surfaces at pressures considerably

  9. Fracto-Emission from Polymers.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-07-15

    filled with gas molecules and a localized electric field exists. The possibility of these particles leading to the " avalanche effect " 8- 1 is quite likely...field. Obviously, if this response is a surface current it is not leading to a surface avalanche current. Instead we observe breakdown at 1.5 ms after...emission) which subsequently contributes to an avalanche in the voltage gap. The time relations between dynamic crack propagation (catastrophic failure

  10. Modeling Ultraviolet Emissions Near Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linker, Jon A.

    2000-01-01

    In this report, we describe work awarded to Science Applications International Corporation, for the period 6/l/99 to 5/31/00. During this time period, we have investigated the interaction of Io, Jupiter's innermost Galilean satellite, with the Io plasma torus, and the role this interaction plays in producing ultraviolet (UV) emissions from neutral oxygen and sulfur. Io, the innermost of Jupiter's Galilean satellites, plays a unique role in the jovian magnetosphere. Neutral material that escapes from Io is ionized to form the lo torus, a dense, heavy-ion plasma that corotates with Jupiter and interacts with Io. Io supplies not only the torus, but is a major source of plasma for the entire magnetosphere. Ionization and charge-exchange of neutrals near lo strongly influences the plasma interaction, and Io's neutral atmosphere plays an important role in the generation of currents that couple Io to Jupiter. There have been no in situ measurements of the neutral density near Io, but remote observations of neutrals near lo have been performed for many years. Recent observations from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) have shown detailed structure in UV emissions from neutral species near Io. Electron-impact of the neutrals by the Io torus plasma is the primary mechanism responsible for exciting these emissions. Previously, we have modeled the Io plasma environment using three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations, and we have shown that the interaction between Io and the plasma torus plays an important role in producing the morphology of the observed emissions. In the past year, we have extended these studies to use both UV observations and Galileo particle and field measurements to investigate the Io interaction.

  11. Radio Emission from Binary Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hjellming, R.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Stellar radio emission is most common in double star systems where each star provides something essential in producing the large amounts of radio radiation needed for it to be detectable by RADIO TELESCOPES. They transfer mass, supply energy or, when one of the stars is a NEUTRON STAR or BLACK HOLE, have the strong gravitational fields needed for the energetic particles and magnetic fields needed...

  12. Anisotropic Lyman-alpha emission

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Zheng; Wallace, Joshua

    2014-10-20

    As a result of resonant scatterings off hydrogen atoms, Lyα emission from star-forming galaxies provides a probe of the (hardly isotropic) neutral gas environment around them. We study the effect of the environmental anisotropy on the observed Lyα emission by performing radiative transfer calculations for models of neutral hydrogen clouds with prescriptions of spatial and kinematic anisotropies. The environmental anisotropy leads to corresponding anisotropy in the Lyα flux and spectral properties and induces correlations among them. The Lyα flux (or observed luminosity) depends on the viewing angle and shows an approximate correlation with the initial Lyα optical depth in the viewing direction relative to those in all other directions. The distribution of Lyα flux from a set of randomly oriented clouds is skewed to high values, providing a natural contribution to the Lyα equivalent width (EW) distribution seen in observation. A narrower EW distribution is found at a larger peak offset of the Lyα line, similar to the trend suggested in observation. The peak offset appears to correlate with the line shape (full width at half-maximum and asymmetry), pointing to a possibility of using Lyα line features alone to determine the systemic redshifts of galaxies. The study suggests that anisotropies in the spatial and kinematic distributions of neutral hydrogen can be an important ingredient in shaping the observed properties of Lyα emission from star-forming galaxies. We discuss the implications of using Lyα emission to probe the circumgalactic and intergalactic environments of galaxies.

  13. Measurement of gas and aerosol agricultural emissions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Studies of air quality indicate that agricultural emissions may impact particulate mass concentrations through both primary and secondary processes. Agriculture impacts can include primary dust emission, on-facility combustion from vehicles or seasonal field burning, and gaseous emissions from waste...

  14. Nitrogen management to reduce nitrous oxide emissions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from agricultural soils represent a complex interaction between the inputs of nitrogen into the soil and the soil environment. Mitigating these emissions will have a positive impact on greenhouse gases. Agriculture is the primary source of N2O emissions and must develop...

  15. 40 CFR 63.846 - Emission averaging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... operator may average TF emissions from potlines and demonstrate compliance with the limits in Table 1 of... operator also may average POM emissions from potlines and demonstrate compliance with the limits in Table 2... limit in Table 1 of this subpart (for TF emissions) and/or Table 2 of this subpart (for POM...

  16. 40 CFR 63.846 - Emission averaging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... operator may average TF emissions from potlines and demonstrate compliance with the limits in Table 1 of... operator also may average POM emissions from potlines and demonstrate compliance with the limits in Table 2... limit in Table 1 of this subpart (for TF emissions) and/or Table 2 of this subpart (for POM...

  17. 40 CFR 63.846 - Emission averaging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... operator may average TF emissions from potlines and demonstrate compliance with the limits in Table 1 of... operator also may average POM emissions from potlines and demonstrate compliance with the limits in Table 2... limit in Table 1 of this subpart (for TF emissions) and/or Table 2 of this subpart (for POM...

  18. Emission coordinates in Minkowski space-time

    SciTech Connect

    Coll, Bartolome; Ferrando, Joan J.; Morales, Juan A.

    2009-05-01

    The theory of relativistic positioning systems and their natural associated emission coordinates are essential ingredients in the analysis of navigation systems and astrometry. Here we study emission coordinates in Minkowski space-time. For any choice of the four emitters (arbitrary space-time trajectories) the relation between the corresponding emission coordinates and the inertial ones are explicitly given.

  19. 40 CFR 61.163 - Emission monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Emission monitoring. 61.163 Section 61.163 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS National Emission Standard for Inorganic...

  20. 40 CFR 61.163 - Emission monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Emission monitoring. 61.163 Section 61.163 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS National Emission Standard for Inorganic...