Science.gov

Sample records for aggressive adult t-cell

  1. Association of Childhood Chronic Physical Aggression with a DNA Methylation Signature in Adult Human T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Guillemin, Claire; Vitaro, Frank; Côté, Sylvana M.; Hallett, Michael; Tremblay, Richard E.; Szyf, Moshe

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic physical aggression (CPA) is characterized by frequent use of physical aggression from early childhood to adolescence. Observed in approximately 5% of males, CPA is associated with early childhood adverse environments and long-term negative consequences. Alterations in DNA methylation, a covalent modification of DNA that regulates genome function, have been associated with early childhood adversity. Aims To test the hypothesis that a trajectory of chronic physical aggression during childhood is associated with a distinct DNA methylation profile during adulthood. Methods We analyzed genome-wide promoter DNA methylation profiles of T cells from two groups of adult males assessed annually for frequency of physical aggression between 6 and 15 years of age: a group with CPA and a control group. Methylation profiles covering the promoter regions of 20 000 genes and 400 microRNAs were generated using MeDIP followed by hybridization to microarrays. Results In total, 448 distinct gene promoters were differentially methylated in CPA. Functionally, many of these genes have previously been shown to play a role in aggression and were enriched in biological pathways affected by behavior. Their locations in the genome tended to form clusters spanning millions of bases in the genome. Conclusions This study provides evidence of clustered and genome-wide variation in promoter DNA methylation in young adults that associates with a history of chronic physical aggression from 6 to 15 years of age. However, longitudinal studies of methylation during early childhood will be necessary to determine if and how this methylation variation in T cells DNA plays a role in early development of chronic physical aggression. PMID:24691403

  2. Aggressive adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma: the tip of the iceberg of the hidden human T cell lymphotropic virus type 1 infection burden in nonendemic countries.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Lerma, Ingrid; Caballero, Estrella; Palacio, Carlos; Garcia-Patos, Vicente

    2013-04-01

    Adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma has only rarely been reported in Europe. We aimed to determine the clinical characteristics and outcome of adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma patients in a nonendemic country. Cases of adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma managed at Hospital Universitari Vall d'Hebron, Barcelona, Spain were reviewed. Information on the foreign population living in Spain, according to country of origin, was obtained using official published data from the National Statistics Institute. Three patients were diagnosed with adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma between 2003 and 2010. Two cases were of the acute subtype and one case of the lymphoma subtype. Two patients were female and the mean age at presentation was 41.3 years. Patients originated from three different countries. The characteristics of the attended patients include widespread enlargement of the lymph nodes, a variety of multiple extranodal involvements, bone marrow infiltration, and a high incidence of infections including latent parasitic infections. Prototypic adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma presenting with high white cell counts, flower cells, and hypercalcemia was not observed. Regarding therapy, one patient received chemotherapy alone and two subjects combined first-line therapy including antiviral drugs. Of the three patients, two are dead (mean survival time 6 months) and one has been lost to follow-up. We estimate that at least 15,000 people living in Spain are infected with human T cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1). Adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma is a heterogeneous disease that often presents without distinguishing or prototypical features. A high index of clinical suspicion is essential for diagnosis. Several epidemiological differences have been observed in different countries. Today, HTLV-1 infection is highly underdiagnosed.

  3. Characterization of patients with aggressive adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma in Okinawa, Japan: a retrospective analysis of a large cohort.

    PubMed

    Nishi, Yukiko; Fukushima, Takuya; Nomura, Shogo; Tomoyose, Takeaki; Nakachi, Sawako; Morichika, Kazuho; Tedokon, Iori; Tamaki, Keita; Shimabukuro, Natsuki; Taira, Naoya; Miyagi, Takashi; Karimata, Kaori; Ohama, Masayo; Yamanoha, Atsushi; Tamaki, Kazumitsu; Hayashi, Masaki; Arakaki, Hitoshi; Uchihara, Jun-Nosuke; Ohshiro, Kazuiku; Asakura, Yoshitaka; Kuba-Miyara, Megumi; Karube, Kennosuke; Masuzaki, Hiroaki

    2016-10-01

    Okinawa Prefecture, located in the subtropics, is an area of endemic adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma (ATL) in Japan. We retrospectively analyzed 659 patients with aggressive ATL in seven institutions in Okinawa between 2002 and 2011. The median patient age was 68 years. More patients were aged ≥90 years (2.6 %), in this study, than in a nationwide survey (<1 %). The median survival time (MST) of the entire cohort was 6.5 months. Of the 217 patients who had a clinical status similar to that stated in the eligibility criteria of JCOG9801 (a randomized phase III study comparing VCAP-AMP-VECP with CHOP-14), 147 who received the CHOP regimen had a poorer MST than those in the CHOP-14 arm of JCOG9801 (8 vs 11 months). The prevalence of strongyloidiasis in the ATL patients was much higher (12.4 %) than in the historical cohort who visited the University of the Ryukyus Hospital (3.4 %). Furthermore, strongyloidiasis may be associated with ATL-related deaths. These findings suggest that, compared with other areas in Japan, in Okinawa, the proportion of patients aged ≥90 years with clinical features of aggressive ATL is higher, outcomes are poorer, and the disease is associated with a higher prevalence of strongyloidiasis.

  4. Development of a modified prognostic index of patients with aggressive adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma aged 70 years or younger: a possible risk-adapted management strategies including allogeneic transplantation.

    PubMed

    Fuji, Shigeo; Yamaguchi, Takuhiro; Inoue, Yoshitaka; Utsunomiya, Atae; Moriuchi, Yukiyoshi; Uchimaru, Kaoru; Owatari, Satsuki; Miyagi, Takashi; Taguchi, Jun; Choi, Ilseung; Otsuka, Eiichi; Nakachi, Sawako; Yamamoto, Hisashi; Kurosawa, Saiko; Tobinai, Kensei; Fukuda, Takahiro

    2017-03-24

    Adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma is a distinct type of peripheral T-cell lymphoma caused by human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I. Although allogeneic stem cell transplantation after chemotherapy is a recommended treatment option for patients with aggressive adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma, there is no consensus about indications for allogeneic stem cell transplantation because there is no established risk stratification system for transplant eligible patients. We conducted a nationwide survey of patients with aggressive adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma to construct a new large database that includes 1,792 patients aged 70 years or younger with aggressive adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma who were diagnosed between 2000 and 2013 and received intensive first-line chemotherapy. We randomly divided patients into two groups (training and validation sets). Acute type, poor performance status, high soluble interleukin-2 receptor level (> 5,000 U/mL), high adjusted calcium level (≥ 12 mg/dL), and high C-reactive protein level (≥ 2.5 mg/dL) were independent adverse prognostic factors using the training set. We used these five variables to divide patients into three risk groups. In the validation set, medial overall survival was 626 days, 322 days, and 197 days for the low-, intermediate-, and high-risk groups, respectively. In the intermediate- and high-risk groups, transplanted recipients had significantly better overall survival than non-transplanted patients. We developed a new promising risk stratification system to identify patients aged 70 years or younger with aggressive adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma who may benefit from upfront allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Prospective studies are warranted to confirm the benefit of this treatment strategy.

  5. Japan Clinical Oncology Group (JCOG) prognostic index and characterization of long-term survivors of aggressive adult T-cell leukaemia-lymphoma (JCOG0902A).

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Takuya; Nomura, Shogo; Shimoyama, Masanori; Shibata, Taro; Imaizumi, Yoshitaka; Moriuchi, Yoshiyuki; Tomoyose, Takeaki; Uozumi, Kimiharu; Kobayashi, Yukio; Fukushima, Noriyasu; Utsunomiya, Atae; Tara, Mitsutoshi; Nosaka, Kisato; Hidaka, Michihiro; Uike, Naokuni; Yoshida, Shinichiro; Tamura, Kazuo; Ishitsuka, Kenji; Kurosawa, Mitsutoshi; Nakata, Masanobu; Fukuda, Haruhiko; Hotta, Tomomitsu; Tobinai, Kensei; Tsukasaki, Kunihiro

    2014-09-01

    This study evaluated the clinical features of 276 patients with aggressive adult T-cell leukaemia-lymphoma (ATL) in 3 Japan Clinical Oncology Group (JCOG) trials. We assessed the long-term survivors who survived >5 years and constructed a prognostic index (PI), named the JCOG-PI, based on covariates obtained by Cox regression analysis. The median survival time (MST) of the entire cohort was 11 months. In 37 patients who survived >5 years, no disease-related deaths in 10 patients with lymphoma-type were observed in contrast to the 10 ATL-related deaths in other types. In multivariate analysis of 193 patients, the JCOG-PI based on corrected calcium levels and performance status identified moderate and high risk groups with an MST of 14 and 8 months respectively (hazard ratio, 1·926). The JCOG-PI was reproducible in an external validation. Patients with lymphoma-type who survived >5 years might have been cured. The JCOG-PI is valuable for identifying patients with extremely poor prognosis and will be useful for the design of future trials combining new drugs or investigational treatment strategies.

  6. Molecular Hallmarks of Adult T Cell Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Yamagishi, Makoto; Watanabe, Toshiki

    2012-01-01

    The molecular hallmarks of adult T cell leukemia (ATL) comprise outstanding deregulations of signaling pathways that control the cell cycle, resistance to apoptosis, and proliferation of leukemic cells, all of which have been identified by early excellent studies. Nevertheless, we are now confronted the therapeutic difficulties of ATL that is a most aggressive T cell leukemia/lymphoma. Using next-generation strategies, emerging molecular characteristics such as specific surface markers and an additional catalog of signals affecting the fate of leukemic cells have been added to the molecular hallmarks that constitute an organizing principle for rationalizing the complexities of ATL. Although human T cell leukemia virus type 1 is undoubtedly involved in ATL leukemogenesis, most leukemic cells do not express the viral protein Tax. Instead, cellular gene expression changes dominate homeostasis disorders of infected cells and characteristics of ATL. In this review, we summarize the state of the art of ATL molecular pathology, which supports the biological properties of leukemic cells. In addition, we discuss the recent discovery of two molecular hallmarks of potential generality; an abnormal microRNA pattern and epigenetic reprogramming, which strongly involve the imbalance of the molecular network of lymphocytes. Global analyses of ATL have revealed the functional impact of crosstalk between multifunctional pathways. Clinical and biological studies on signaling inhibitory agents have also revealed novel oncogenic drivers that can be targeted in future. ATL cells, by deregulation of such pathways and their interconnections, may become masters of their own destinies. Recognizing and understanding of the widespread molecular applicability of these concepts will increasingly affect the development of novel strategies for treating ATL. PMID:23060864

  7. Prognostic significance of T-cell phenotype in aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphomas. Groupe d'Etudes des Lymphomes de l'Adulte (GELA).

    PubMed

    Gisselbrecht, C; Gaulard, P; Lepage, E; Coiffier, B; Brière, J; Haioun, C; Cazals-Hatem, D; Bosly, A; Xerri, L; Tilly, H; Berger, F; Bouhabdallah, R; Diebold, J

    1998-07-01

    Peripheral T-cell lymphomas (PTCL) have been generally reported to have a worse prognosis than B-cell lymphomas (BCL). Because of their heterogeneity and scarcity, the outcomes of the different histological subtypes have not been compared. From October 1987 to March 1993, 1,883 patients with diffuse aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHL) included in the LNH87 protocol could be assessed for both morphology and immunophenotyping. Among them, 288 (15%) had PTCL and 1,595 (85%) had BCL. According to the Kiel classification, most PTCL were classified as angioimmunoblastic (AIL; 23%), pleomorphic medium and large T-cell (PML; 49%), or anaplastic large cell (ALCL; 20%) lymphomas. Comparing PTCL with BCL patients, the former had more disseminated disease (78% v 58%), B symptoms (57% v 40%), bone marrow involvement (31% v 17%), skin involvement (21% v 4%), and increased beta2-microglobulin (50% v 34%), whereas BCL patients had more bulky disease (41% v 26%). According to the International Prognostic Index (IPI), PTCL and BCL scores were, respectively: 0 factors, 13% and 15%; 1 factor, 17% and 22%; 2 factors, 24% and 25%; >/=3 factors, 45% and 37% (P = .09). For BCL and PTCL, respectively, complete remission rates were 63% and 54% (P = .004); the 5-year overall survival (OS) rates were 53% and 41% (P = .0004) and event-free survival (EFS) rates were 42% and 33% (P < . 0001). Comparison of the different histological subtypes of lymphoma showed that the 5-year OS rate for T-ALCL (64%) was superior to those of other PTCL (35%) as well as diffuse large B-cell (53%) NHL. When multivariate analysis was applied using the IPI score as one factor, nonanaplastic PTCL remained an independent parameter (P = . 0004). Although the poor prognosis of non-ALCL PTCL could be due in part to the presence of adverse prognostic factors at diagnosis, this study shows that the T-cell phenotype is an independent significant factor, which should be incorporated into the definition of prognostic

  8. DNA Methylation Signature of Childhood Chronic Physical Aggression in T Cells of Both Men and Women

    PubMed Central

    Guillemin, Claire; Provençal, Nadine; Suderman, Matthew; Côté, Sylvana M.; Vitaro, Frank; Hallett, Michael; Tremblay, Richard E.; Szyf, Moshe

    2014-01-01

    Background High frequency of physical aggression is the central feature of severe conduct disorder and is associated with a wide range of social, mental and physical health problems. We have previously tested the hypothesis that differential DNA methylation signatures in peripheral T cells are associated with a chronic aggression trajectory in males. Despite the fact that sex differences appear to play a pivotal role in determining the development, magnitude and frequency of aggression, most of previous studies focused on males, so little is known about female chronic physical aggression. We therefore tested here whether or not there is a signature of physical aggression in female DNA methylation and, if there is, how it relates to the signature observed in males. Methodology/Principal Findings Methylation profiles were created using the method of methylated DNA immunoprecipitation (MeDIP) followed by microarray hybridization and statistical and bioinformatic analyses on T cell DNA obtained from adult women who were found to be on a chronic physical aggression trajectory (CPA) between 6 and 12 years of age compared to women who followed a normal physical aggression trajectory. We confirmed the existence of a well-defined, genome-wide signature of DNA methylation associated with chronic physical aggression in the peripheral T cells of adult females that includes many of the genes similarly associated with physical aggression in the same cell types of adult males. Conclusions This study in a small number of women presents preliminary evidence for a genome-wide variation in promoter DNA methylation that associates with CPA in women that warrant larger studies for further verification. A significant proportion of these associations were previously observed in men with CPA supporting the hypothesis that the epigenetic signature of early life aggression in females is composed of a component specific to females and another common to both males and females. PMID:24475181

  9. Cord blood T cells mediate enhanced antitumor effects compared with adult peripheral blood T cells.

    PubMed

    Hiwarkar, Prashant; Qasim, Waseem; Ricciardelli, Ida; Gilmour, Kimberly; Quezada, Sergio; Saudemont, Aurore; Amrolia, Persis; Veys, Paul

    2015-12-24

    Unrelated cord blood transplantation (CBT) without in vivo T-cell depletion is increasingly used to treat high-risk hematologic malignancies. Following T-replete CBT, naïve CB T cells undergo rapid peripheral expansion with memory-effector differentiation. Emerging data suggest that unrelated CBT, particularly in the context of HLA mismatch and a T-replete graft, may reduce leukemic relapse. To study the role of CB T cells in mediating graft-versus-tumor responses and dissect the underlying immune mechanisms for this, we compared the ability of HLA-mismatched CB and adult peripheral blood (PB) T cells to eliminate Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-driven human B-cell lymphoma in a xenogeneic NOD/SCID/IL2rg(null) mouse model. CB T cells mediated enhanced tumor rejection compared with equal numbers of PB T cells, leading to improved survival in the CB group (P < .0003). Comparison of CB T cells that were autologous vs allogeneic to the lymphoma demonstrated that this antitumor effect was mediated by alloreactive rather than EBV-specific T cells. Analysis of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes demonstrated that CB T cells mediated this enhanced antitumor effect by rapid infiltration of the tumor with CCR7(+)CD8(+) T cells and prompt induction of cytotoxic CD8(+) and CD4(+) T-helper (Th1) T cells in the tumor microenvironment. In contrast, in the PB group, this antilymphoma effect is impaired because of delayed tumoral infiltration of PB T cells and a relative bias toward suppressive Th2 and T-regulatory cells. Our data suggest that, despite being naturally programmed toward tolerance, reconstituting T cells after unrelated T-replete CBT may provide superior Tc1-Th1 antitumor effects against high-risk hematologic malignancies.

  10. Adult T-cell leukemia: molecular basis for clonal expansion and transformation of HTLV-1–infected T cells

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) is an aggressive T-cell malignancy caused by human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) that develops through a multistep carcinogenesis process involving 5 or more genetic events. We provide a comprehensive overview of recently uncovered information on the molecular basis of leukemogenesis in ATL. Broadly, the landscape of genetic abnormalities in ATL that include alterations highly enriched in genes for T-cell receptor–NF-κB signaling such as PLCG1, PRKCB, and CARD11 and gain-of function mutations in CCR4 and CCR7. Conversely, the epigenetic landscape of ATL can be summarized as polycomb repressive complex 2 hyperactivation with genome-wide H3K27 me3 accumulation as the basis of the unique transcriptome of ATL cells. Expression of H3K27 methyltransferase enhancer of zeste 2 was shown to be induced by HTLV-1 Tax and NF-κB. Furthermore, provirus integration site analysis with high-throughput sequencing enabled the analysis of clonal composition and cell number of each clone in vivo, whereas multicolor flow cytometric analysis with CD7 and cell adhesion molecule 1 enabled the identification of HTLV-1–infected CD4+ T cells in vivo. Sorted immortalized but untransformed cells displayed epigenetic changes closely overlapping those observed in terminally transformed ATL cells, suggesting that epigenetic abnormalities are likely earlier events in leukemogenesis. These new findings broaden the scope of conceptualization of the molecular mechanisms of leukemogenesis, dissecting them into immortalization and clonal progression. These recent findings also open a new direction of drug development for ATL prevention and treatment because epigenetic marks can be reprogrammed. Mechanisms underlying initial immortalization and progressive accumulation of these abnormalities remain to be elucidated. PMID:28115366

  11. Adult T-cell leukemia: molecular basis for clonal expansion and transformation of HTLV-1-infected T cells.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Toshiki

    2017-03-02

    Adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) is an aggressive T-cell malignancy caused by human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) that develops through a multistep carcinogenesis process involving 5 or more genetic events. We provide a comprehensive overview of recently uncovered information on the molecular basis of leukemogenesis in ATL. Broadly, the landscape of genetic abnormalities in ATL that include alterations highly enriched in genes for T-cell receptor-NF-κB signaling such as PLCG1, PRKCB, and CARD11 and gain-of function mutations in CCR4 and CCR7 Conversely, the epigenetic landscape of ATL can be summarized as polycomb repressive complex 2 hyperactivation with genome-wide H3K27 me3 accumulation as the basis of the unique transcriptome of ATL cells. Expression of H3K27 methyltransferase enhancer of zeste 2 was shown to be induced by HTLV-1 Tax and NF-κB. Furthermore, provirus integration site analysis with high-throughput sequencing enabled the analysis of clonal composition and cell number of each clone in vivo, whereas multicolor flow cytometric analysis with CD7 and cell adhesion molecule 1 enabled the identification of HTLV-1-infected CD4(+) T cells in vivo. Sorted immortalized but untransformed cells displayed epigenetic changes closely overlapping those observed in terminally transformed ATL cells, suggesting that epigenetic abnormalities are likely earlier events in leukemogenesis. These new findings broaden the scope of conceptualization of the molecular mechanisms of leukemogenesis, dissecting them into immortalization and clonal progression. These recent findings also open a new direction of drug development for ATL prevention and treatment because epigenetic marks can be reprogrammed. Mechanisms underlying initial immortalization and progressive accumulation of these abnormalities remain to be elucidated.

  12. An animal model of adult T-cell leukemia: humanized mice with HTLV-1-specific immunity.

    PubMed

    Tezuka, Kenta; Xun, Runze; Tei, Mami; Ueno, Takaharu; Tanaka, Masakazu; Takenouchi, Norihiro; Fujisawa, Jun-ichi

    2014-01-16

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is causally associated with adult T-cell leukemia (ATL), an aggressive T-cell malignancy with a poor prognosis. To elucidate ATL pathogenesis in vivo, a variety of animal models have been established; however, the mechanisms driving this disorder remain poorly understood due to deficiencies in each of these animal models. Here, we report a novel HTLV-1-infected humanized mouse model generated by intra-bone marrow injection of human CD133(+) stem cells into NOD/Shi-scid/IL-2Rγc null (NOG) mice (IBMI-huNOG mice). Upon infection, the number of CD4(+) human T cells in the periphery increased rapidly, and atypical lymphocytes with lobulated nuclei resembling ATL-specific flower cells were observed 4 to 5 months after infection. Proliferation was seen in both CD25(-) and CD25(+) CD4 T cells with identical proviral integration sites; however, a limited number of CD25(+)-infected T-cell clones eventually dominated, indicating an association between clonal selection of infected T cells and expression of CD25. Additionally, HTLV-1-specific adaptive immune responses were induced in infected mice and might be involved in the control of HTLV-1-infected cells. Thus, the HTLV-1-infected IBMI-huNOG mouse model successfully recapitulated the development of ATL and may serve as an important tool for investigating in vivo mechanisms of ATL leukemogenesis and evaluating anti-ATL drug and vaccine candidates.

  13. Molecular Pathology of Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Ohshima, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) is a peripheral T-cell neoplasm of highly pleomorphic lymphoid cells. ATLL is usually widely disseminated, and it is caused by human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1). It is a disease with a long latency, and affected individuals are usually exposed to the virus very early in life. The cumulative incidence of ATLL is estimated to be 2.5% among HTLV-1 carriers. ATLL cells express CD2, CD3, CD5, CD4, and CD25, as well as CCR4 and FoxP3 of the regulatory T-cell marker. HTLV-1 is causally linked to ATLL, but infection alone is not sufficient to result in neoplastic transformation. A significant finding in this connection is that the Tax viral protein leads to transcriptional activation of many genes, while the HTLV-1 basic leucine zipper factor is thought to be important for T-cell proliferation and oncogenesis. Half of ATLL cases retain the ability to express HTLV-1 Tax, which is a target of HTLV-1-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). An increase in HTLV-1-specific CTL responses is observed in some asymptomatic HTLV-1 carriers. Although HTLV-1-specific CTL are also present in the peripheral blood of ATLL patients, they do not expand sufficiently. We investigated the clinicopathological features and analyzed the staining of Tax-specific CTL and FoxP3. Tax-specific CTL correlated inversely with FoxP3, an increase in the ratio of CD163+ tumor-associated macrophages was associated with worse clinical prognosis, and ATLL cell lines proliferated significantly following direct co-culture with M2 macrophages. Several clinical variants of ATLL have been identified: acute, lymphomatous, chronic, and smoldering. Oligo-array comparative genomic hybridization revealed that genomic loss of 9p21.3 was a significant characteristic of acute-type, but not of chronic-type ATLL. Furthermore, we found that genomic alteration of CD58, which is implicated in immune escape, is more frequently observed in acute than in chronic ATLL. Interestingly

  14. Peripheral T-cell lymphoma with progression to a clonally related, Epstein Barr virus+, cytotoxic aggressive T-cell lymphoma: evidence for secondary EBV infection of an established malignant T-cell clone.

    PubMed

    Langer, Rupert; Geissinger, Eva; Rüdiger, Thomas; von Schilling, Christoph; Ott, German; Mandl-Weber, Sonja; Quintanilla-Martinez, Leticia; Fend, Falko

    2010-09-01

    We report a case of primary Epstein Barr virus (EBV) negative peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL) NOS in a 56-year-old female who-after an initially indolent course - simultaneously developed an aggressive, EBV+ cytotoxic large T-cell lymphoma, clonally related to the primary PTCL, and an EBV+, clonal large B-cell lymphoproliferation. The initial, EBV-negative PTCL had shown some features of angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma and had responded well to steroid therapy. Two years later, rapidly fatal, progressive disease with multivisceral involvement developed. Histologically, extensive infiltrates of EBV+, CD8+ large cells were present, in addition to areas of the initial PTCL. Extensive comparative phenotypic and molecular analyses confirmed the presence of an identical CD8+ T-cell clone in the initial EBV-negative PTCL and the EBV+, CD8+ large cell lymphoma at the time of aggressive transformation. These results also justified the retrospective classification of PTCL, NOS for the initial lymphoma. This case shows that secondary EBV infection of an established malignant T-cell clone can occur and may contribute to aggressive transformation of PTCL.

  15. Optimizing Management of Patients with Adult T Cell Leukemia-Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Yared, Jean A.; Kimball, Amy S.

    2015-01-01

    Adult T cell leukemia-lymphoma is a rare disease with a high mortality rate, and is challenging for the clinician. Early allogeneic stem cell transplant can confer durable remission. As novel therapeutic agents become available to treat T cell malignancies, it is increasingly important that medical oncologists, hematologists, and hematopathologists recognize and accurately diagnose adult T cell leukemia-lymphoma. There is no uniform standard of treatment of adult T cell leukemia-lymphoma, and clinical trials remain critical to improving outcomes. Here we present one management approach based on the recent advances in treatment for adult T cell leukemia-lymphoma patients. PMID:26610571

  16. Transition of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma clones during clinical progression.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Sakura; Firouzi, Sanaz; López, Yosvany; Yamochi, Tadanori; Nakano, Kazumi; Uchimaru, Kaoru; Utusnomiya, Atae; Iwanaga, Masako; Watanabe, Toshiki

    2016-09-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) is a peripheral T-cell neoplasm caused by the transformation of HTLV-1-infected T cells. ATLL, especially its aggressive form, is known for its poor prognosis, even with intensive chemotherapy. ATLL cells are considered to be monoclonal; however, multiclonal proliferation or emergence of a new clone over time has been reported based on Southern blot analysis, although direct molecular evidence remains elusive. Furthermore, it is thought that clonal change may be a cause of early drug resistance in ATLL. To directly analyze potential clonal changes in ATLL during its clinical course, we used inverse PCR to detect integration sites in combination with a newly developed method using next-generation sequencing, and compared ATLL cell clonality at different time points. The results of inverse PCR indicated that the major clone was altered in three of 19 patients. Together with results from five patients, using this new method, we found direct evidence of clonal change occurring during the clinical course or in response to chemotherapy in ATLL. These results also highlight the importance of clonality analysis for understanding the mechanisms of ATLL development and drug resistance.

  17. Abacavir, an anti-HIV-1 drug, targets TDP1-deficient adult T cell leukemia.

    PubMed

    Tada, Kohei; Kobayashi, Masayuki; Takiuchi, Yoko; Iwai, Fumie; Sakamoto, Takashi; Nagata, Kayoko; Shinohara, Masanobu; Io, Katsuhiro; Shirakawa, Kotaro; Hishizawa, Masakatsu; Shindo, Keisuke; Kadowaki, Norimitsu; Hirota, Kouji; Yamamoto, Junpei; Iwai, Shigenori; Sasanuma, Hiroyuki; Takeda, Shunichi; Takaori-Kondo, Akifumi

    2015-04-01

    Adult T cell leukemia (ATL) is an aggressive T cell malignancy caused by human T cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) and has a poor prognosis. We analyzed the cytotoxic effects of various nucleoside analog reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) for HIV-1 on ATL cells and found that abacavir potently and selectively kills ATL cells. Although NRTIs have minimal genotoxicities on host cells, the therapeutic concentration of abacavir induced numerous DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in the chromosomal DNA of ATL cells. DSBs persisted over time in ATL cells but not in other cell lines, suggesting impaired DNA repair. We found that the reduced expression of tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase 1 (TDP1), a repair enzyme, is attributable to the cytotoxic effect of abacavir on ATL cells. We also showed that TDP1 removes abacavir from DNA ends in vitro. These results suggest a model in which ATL cells with reduced TDP1 expression are unable to excise abacavir incorporated into genomic DNA, leading to irreparable DSBs. On the basis of the above mechanism, we propose abacavir as a promising chemotherapeutic agent for ATL.

  18. Efficiency of AUY922 in mice with adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    ISHIKAWA, CHIE; SENBA, MASACHIKA; MORI, NAOKI

    2016-01-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) is an aggressive malignancy caused by human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1). ATLL is associated with poor prognosis mainly due to resistance to chemotherapy, which highlights the requirement for alternative therapies. The chaperone heat shock protein (HSP) 90 assist proteins involved in the onset and progression of ATLL. In the present study, the efficacy of a second generation HSP90 inhibitor termed AUY922 was investigated in ATLL. In vitro, AUY922 induced marked inhibition of cell viability in the HTLV-1-infected T-cell lines HUT-102 and MT-4. In immunodeficient mice bearing HUT-102 xenotransplants, AUY922 markedly retarded tumor growth, compared with the control group. Apoptosis was evident in hematoxylin and eosin stained- and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase deoxyuridine triphosphate nick end labeling-labeled tissue sections from AUY922-treated mice. In addition, AUY922 significantly reduced the serum levels of the surrogate tumor markers soluble interleukin-2 receptor and soluble cluster of differentiation 30. Overall, the present results demonstrate that AUY922 has potent anti-ATLL activity, thus providing a rationale for continuing the clinical development of HSP90 inhibitors in clinical trials for the treatment of patients with ATLL. PMID:27347156

  19. Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma (HTLV-1)

    MedlinePlus

    ... gentic material made of DNA, but instead carry RNA. These viruses selectively infect only T-cells. Only ... potential to inject its genetic material (DNA or RNA) into normal cells. Once inside the normal cells, ...

  20. Adult T-cell leukemia cells are characterized by abnormalities of Helios expression that promote T cell growth.

    PubMed

    Asanuma, Satomi; Yamagishi, Makoto; Kawanami, Katsuaki; Nakano, Kazumi; Sato-Otsubo, Aiko; Muto, Satsuki; Sanada, Masashi; Yamochi, Tadanori; Kobayashi, Seiichiro; Utsunomiya, Atae; Iwanaga, Masako; Yamaguchi, Kazunari; Uchimaru, Kaoru; Ogawa, Seishi; Watanabe, Toshiki

    2013-08-01

    Molecular abnormalities involved in the multistep leukemogenesis of adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) remain to be clarified. Based on our integrated database, we focused on the expression patterns and levels of Ikaros family genes, Ikaros, Helios, and Aiolos, in ATL patients and HTLV-1 carriers. The results revealed profound deregulation of Helios expression, a pivotal regulator in the control of T-cell differentiation and activation. The majority of ATL samples (32/37 cases) showed abnormal splicing of Helios expression, and four cases did not express Helios. In addition, novel genomic loss in Helios locus was observed in 17/168 cases. We identified four ATL-specific short Helios isoforms and revealed their dominant-negative function. Ectopic expression of ATL-type Helios isoform as well as knockdown of normal Helios or Ikaros promoted T-cell growth. Global mRNA profiling and pathway analysis showed activation of several signaling pathways important for lymphocyte proliferation and survival. These data provide new insights into the molecular involvement of Helios function in the leukemogenesis and phenotype of ATL cells, indicating that Helios deregulation is one of the novel molecular hallmarks of ATL.

  1. Preclinical targeting of aggressive T-cell malignancies using anti-CD5 chimeric antigen receptor.

    PubMed

    Chen, K H; Wada, M; Pinz, K G; Liu, H; Lin, K-W; Jares, A; Firor, A E; Shuai, X; Salman, H; Golightly, M; Lan, F; Senzel, L; Leung, E L; Jiang, X; Ma, Y

    2017-02-10

    The outlook for T-cell malignancies remain poor due to the lack of effective therapeutic options. Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) immunotherapy has recently shown promise in clinical trials for B-cell malignancies, however, designing CARs for T-cell based disease remain a challenge due to the shared surface antigen pool between normal and malignant T-cells. Normal T-cells express CD5 but NK (natural killer) cells do not, positioning NK cells as attractive cytotoxicity cells for CD5CAR design. Additionally, CD5 is highly expressed in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) and peripheral T-cell lymphomas (PTCLs). Here, we report a robust anti-CD5 CAR (CD5CAR) transduced into a human NK cell line NK-92 that can undergo stable expansion ex vivo. We found that CD5CAR NK-92 cells possessed consistent, specific, and potent anti-tumor activity against a variety of T-cell leukemia and lymphoma cell lines as well as primary tumor cells. Furthermore, we were able to demonstrate significant inhibition and control of disease progression in xenograft mouse models of T-ALL. The data suggest that CAR redirected targeting for T-cell malignancies using NK cells may be a viable method for new and complementary therapeutic approaches that could improve the current outcome for patients.Leukemia advance online publication, 10 February 2017; doi:10.1038/leu.2017.8.

  2. Self-Antigen Presentation by Keratinocytes in the Inflamed Adult Skin Modulates T-Cell Auto-Reactivity.

    PubMed

    Meister, Michael; Tounsi, Amel; Gaffal, Evelyn; Bald, Tobias; Papatriantafyllou, Maria; Ludwig, Julia; Pougialis, Georg; Bestvater, Felix; Klotz, Luisa; Moldenhauer, Gerhard; Tüting, Thomas; Hämmerling, Günter J; Arnold, Bernd; Oelert, Thilo

    2015-08-01

    Keratinocytes have a pivotal role in the regulation of immune responses, but the impact of antigen presentation by these cells is still poorly understood, particularly in a situation where the antigen will be presented only in adult life. Here, we generated a transgenic mouse model in which keratinocytes exclusively present a myelin basic protein (MBP) peptide covalently linked to the major histocompatibility complex class II β-chain, solely under inflammatory conditions. In these mice, inflammation caused by epicutaneous contact sensitizer treatment resulted in keratinocyte-mediated expansion of MBP-specific CD4(+) T cells in the skin. Moreover, repeated contact sensitizer application preceding a systemic MBP immunization reduced the reactivity of the respective CD4(+) T cells and lowered the symptoms of the resulting experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. This downregulation was CD4(+) T-cell-mediated and dependent on the presence of the immune modulator Dickkopf-3. Thus, presentation of a neo self-antigen by keratinocytes in the inflamed, adult skin can modulate CD4(+) T-cell auto-aggression at a distal organ.

  3. ESTABLISHING MEAN CD4+ T CELL VALUES AMONG HEALTHY JAVANESE ADULTS IN INDONESIA.

    PubMed

    Prasetyo, Afiono Agung; Zaini, Khilyat Ulin Nur

    2015-07-01

    The objective of this study was to establish mean CD4+ T cell values among healthy Javanese adults in Indonesia. Two hundred forty-one healthy adults (119 women and 122 men), aged 18-65 years, were enrolled in the study. CD4+ T cells were analyzed by immunophenotyping. The mean absolute CD4+ T cell count was 753.3 ± 270.3 cells/µl (median = 725.0 cells/µl) and the mean CD4+ T cell percentage was 32.6 ± 7.7%, (median = 31.0%). Women had a slightly higher mean absolute CD4+ T cell count and CD4+ T cell percentage (779.1 ± 271.0 cells/ µl; 33.4 ± 8.2%) than men (728.2 ± 268.3 cells/µl; 31.8 ± 7.1%), but the differences were not statistically significant (p = 0.126, p = 0.216, respectively). The mean absolute CD4+ T cell varied significantly by age group (p = 0.002). Sixty-one point seven percent of men studied (37/60) had a CD4+ T cell count less than 500 cells/µl (OR 1.8; 95% CI = 1.001-3.300). Absolute CD4+ T cell counts among Javanese Indonesians varied significantly by age.

  4. Primary cutaneous smoldering adult T-cell leukemia/ lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Gittler, Julia; Martires, Kathryn; Terushkin, Vitaly; Brinster, Nooshin; Ramsay, David

    2016-12-15

    HTLV-1 is a virus that is endemic in southwesternJapan and the Caribbean and has been implicatedin the development of ATLL. ATLL, which is anuncommon malignant condition of peripheralT-lymphocytes, is characterized by four clinicalsubtypes, which include acute, lymphomatous,chronic, and smoldering types, that are based onLDH levels, calcium levels, and extent of organinvolvement. We present a 52-year- old woman withpruritic patches with scale on the buttocks and withtender, hyperpigmented macules and papules oftwo-years duration. Histopathologic examinationwas suggestive of mycosis fungoides, laboratoryresults showed HTLV-I and II, and the patient wasdiagnosed with primary cutaneous ATLL. We reviewthe literature on HTLV-1 and ATLL and specifically theprognosis of cutaneous ATLL. The literature suggeststhat a diagnosis of ATLL should be considered amongpatients of Caribbean origin or other endemicareas with skin lesions that suggest a cutaneousT-cell lymphoma, with clinicopathologic features ofmycosis fungoides. Differentiation between ATLLand cutaneous T-cell lymphoma is imperative as theyhave different prognoses and treatment approaches.

  5. Cutaneous T-cell lymphoma with HTLV-I infection: clinical overlap with adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, F H; Colleoni, G W B; Teixeira, S P; Yamamoto, M; Michalany, N S; Almeida, F A; Chiba, A K; Petri, V; Fernandes, M A; Pombo-de-Oliveira, M S

    2006-04-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) is a malignant proliferation of mature helper T lymphocytes,(1) and is caused by human T-lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I);(2) an HTLV-I infection endemic in the Caribbean, south-western Japan, South America and Africa.(3,4) Seroepidemiological studies suggest that it is also endemic in Brazil.(5) Although carriers of HTLV-I show polyclonal integration of virus in T lymphocytes, only patients with ATLL of various subtypes show monoclonal integration of HTLV-I in tumor cells.(6,7) Cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCL) are a group of primary cutaneous lymphoproliferative diseases(8) with unknown etiology.(9) The two most common presentations of CTCL are mycosis fungoides (MF) and Sézary syndrome (SS).(10-13) However, both CTCL categories can easily resemble ATLL. Therefore, in HTLV-I endemic areas, differentiation between ATLL and CTCL must be performed, as they have different prognoses and treatment approaches.(14).

  6. Pathways to Relationship Aggression between Adult Partners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Busby, Dean M.; Holman, Thomas B.; Walker, Eric

    2008-01-01

    In this study, the pathways to adult aggression beginning in the family of origin (FOO) and continuing through adult relationships were investigated. With a sample of 30,600 individuals, a comprehensive model was evaluated that included the unique influences of violent victimization in the family, witnessing parental violence, perpetrating…

  7. T Cell Receptor Vβ Staining Identifies the Malignant Clone in Adult T cell Leukemia and Reveals Killing of Leukemia Cells by Autologous CD8+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Witkover, Aviva; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Fields, Paul; Bangham, Charles R. M.

    2016-01-01

    There is growing evidence that CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses can contribute to long-term remission of many malignancies. The etiological agent of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL), human T lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1), contains highly immunogenic CTL epitopes, but ATL patients typically have low frequencies of cytokine-producing HTLV-1-specific CD8+ cells in the circulation. It remains unclear whether patients with ATL possess CTLs that can kill the malignant HTLV-1 infected clone. Here we used flow cytometric staining of TCRVβ and cell adhesion molecule-1 (CADM1) to identify monoclonal populations of HTLV-1-infected T cells in the peripheral blood of patients with ATL. Thus, we quantified the rate of CD8+-mediated killing of the putative malignant clone in ex vivo blood samples. We observed that CD8+ cells from ATL patients were unable to lyse autologous ATL clones when tested directly ex vivo. However, short in vitro culture restored the ability of CD8+ cells to kill ex vivo ATL clones in some donors. The capacity of CD8+ cells to lyse HTLV-1 infected cells which expressed the viral sense strand gene products was significantly enhanced after in vitro culture, and donors with an ATL clone that expressed the HTLV-1 Tax gene were most likely to make a detectable lytic CD8+ response to the ATL cells. We conclude that some patients with ATL possess functional tumour-specific CTLs which could be exploited to contribute to control of the disease. PMID:27893842

  8. T Cell Receptor Vβ Staining Identifies the Malignant Clone in Adult T cell Leukemia and Reveals Killing of Leukemia Cells by Autologous CD8+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Rowan, Aileen G; Witkover, Aviva; Melamed, Anat; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Cook, Lucy B M; Fields, Paul; Taylor, Graham P; Bangham, Charles R M

    2016-11-01

    There is growing evidence that CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses can contribute to long-term remission of many malignancies. The etiological agent of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL), human T lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1), contains highly immunogenic CTL epitopes, but ATL patients typically have low frequencies of cytokine-producing HTLV-1-specific CD8+ cells in the circulation. It remains unclear whether patients with ATL possess CTLs that can kill the malignant HTLV-1 infected clone. Here we used flow cytometric staining of TCRVβ and cell adhesion molecule-1 (CADM1) to identify monoclonal populations of HTLV-1-infected T cells in the peripheral blood of patients with ATL. Thus, we quantified the rate of CD8+-mediated killing of the putative malignant clone in ex vivo blood samples. We observed that CD8+ cells from ATL patients were unable to lyse autologous ATL clones when tested directly ex vivo. However, short in vitro culture restored the ability of CD8+ cells to kill ex vivo ATL clones in some donors. The capacity of CD8+ cells to lyse HTLV-1 infected cells which expressed the viral sense strand gene products was significantly enhanced after in vitro culture, and donors with an ATL clone that expressed the HTLV-1 Tax gene were most likely to make a detectable lytic CD8+ response to the ATL cells. We conclude that some patients with ATL possess functional tumour-specific CTLs which could be exploited to contribute to control of the disease.

  9. T-cell suicide gene therapy prompts thymic renewal in adults after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Vago, Luca; Oliveira, Giacomo; Bondanza, Attilio; Noviello, Maddalena; Soldati, Corrado; Ghio, Domenico; Brigida, Immacolata; Greco, Raffaella; Lupo Stanghellini, Maria Teresa; Peccatori, Jacopo; Fracchia, Sergio; Del Fiacco, Matteo; Traversari, Catia; Aiuti, Alessandro; Del Maschio, Alessandro; Bordignon, Claudio; Ciceri, Fabio; Bonini, Chiara

    2012-08-30

    The genetic modification of T cells with a suicide gene grants a mechanism of control of adverse reactions, allowing safe infusion after partially incompatible hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). In the TK007 clinical trial, 22 adults with hematologic malignancies experienced a rapid and sustained immune recovery after T cell-depleted HSCT and serial infusions of purified donor T cells expressing the HSV thymidine kinase suicide gene (TK+ cells). After a first wave of circulating TK+ cells, the majority of T cells supporting long-term immune reconstitution did not carry the suicide gene and displayed high numbers of naive lymphocytes, suggesting the thymus-dependent development of T cells, occurring only upon TK+ -cell engraftment. Accordingly, after the infusions, we documented an increase in circulating TCR excision circles and CD31+ recent thymic emigrants and a substantial expansion of the active thymic tissue as shown by chest tomography scans. Interestingly, a peak in the serum level of IL-7 was observed after each infusion of TK+ cells, anticipating the appearance of newly generated T cells. The results of the present study show that the infusion of genetically modified donor T cells after HSCT can drive the recovery of thymic activity in adults, leading to immune reconstitution.

  10. Normative beliefs about aggression and cyber aggression among young adults: a longitudinal investigation.

    PubMed

    Wright, Michelle F; Li, Yan

    2013-01-01

    This longitudinal study examined normative beliefs about aggression (e.g., face-to-face, cyber) in relation to the engagement in cyber aggression 6 months later among 126 (69 women) young adults. Participants completed electronically administered measures assessing their normative beliefs, face-to-face and cyber aggression at Time 1, and cyber aggression 6 months later (Time 2). We found that men reported more cyber relational and verbal aggression when compared to women. After controlling for each other, Time 1 face-to-face relational aggression was positively related to Time 2 cyber relational aggression, whereas Time 1 face-to-face verbal aggression was positively related to Time 2 cyber verbal aggression. Normative beliefs regarding cyber aggression was positively related to both forms of cyber aggression 6 months later, after controlling for normative beliefs about face-to-face aggression. Furthermore, a significant two-way interaction between Time 1 cyber relational aggression and normative beliefs about cyber relational aggression was found. Follow-up analysis showed that Time 1 cyber relational aggression was more strongly related to Time 2 cyber relational aggression when young adults held higher normative beliefs about cyber relational aggression. A similar two-way interaction was found for cyber verbal aggression such that the association between Time 1 and Time 2 cyber verbal aggression was stronger at higher levels of normative beliefs about cyber verbal aggression. Results are discussed in terms of the social cognitive and behavioral mechanisms associated with the engagement of cyber aggression.

  11. Direct Ex-Vivo Evaluation of Pneumococcal Specific T-Cells in Healthy Adults

    PubMed Central

    Aslam, Aamir; Chapel, Helen; Ogg, Graham

    2011-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is an encapsulated bacterium that causes significant global morbidity and mortality. The nasopharynxes of children are believed to be the natural reservoir of pneumococcus and by adulthood nasopharyngeal carriage is infrequent; such infrequency may be due to demonstrable pneumococcal specific T and B-cell responses. HLA Class 2 tetrameric complexes have been used to characterise antigen specific T-cell responses in a variety of models of infection. We therefore sought to determine the frequency and phenotype of pneumococcal specific T-cells, using a novel HLA-DRB1*1501 tetramer complex incorporating a recently defined T-cell epitope derived from the conserved pneumococcal serine/threonine kinase (StkP). We were able to detect direct ex-vivo StkP446–60-tetramer binding in HLA-DRB1*1501 adults. These StkP446–60-tetramer binding T-cells had increased CD38 expression and were enriched in CCR7- CD45RA+ expression indicating recent and on-going activation and differentiation. Furthermore, these StkP446–60-tetramer binding T-cells demonstrated rapid effector function by secreting interferon-gamma on stimulation with recombinant StkP. This is the first study to directly enumerate and characterise pneumococcal specific T-cells using HLA class 2 tetrameric complexes. We found that ex-vivo pneumococcal-specific T cells were detectable in healthy adults and that they were enriched with cell surface markers associated with recent antigen exposure and later stages of antigen-driven differentiation. It is likely that these activated pneumococcal specific T-cells reflect recent immunostimulatory pneumococcal exposure in the nasopharynx and it is possible that they may be preventing subsequent colonisation and disease. PMID:22039412

  12. CD8 T cells protect adult naive mice from JEV-induced morbidity via lytic function

    PubMed Central

    Chawla, Amanpreet Singh; Agrawal, Tanvi; Biswas, Moanaro; Vrati, Sudhanshu; Rath, Satyajit; George, Anna; Medigeshi, Guruprasad R.

    2017-01-01

    Following Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) infection neutralizing antibodies are shown to provide protection in a significant proportion of cases, but not all, suggesting additional components of immune system might also contribute to elicit protective immune response. Here we have characterized the role of T cells in offering protection in adult mice infected with JEV. Mice lacking α/β–T cells (TCRβ–null) are highly susceptible and die over 10–18 day period as compared to the wild-type (WT) mice which are resistant. This is associated with high viral load, higher mRNA levels of proinflammatory cytokines and breach in the blood-brain-barrier (BBB). Infected WT mice do not show a breach in BBB; however, in contrast to TCRβ-null, they show the presence of T cells in the brain. Using adoptive transfer of cells with specific genetic deficiencies we see that neither the presence of CD4 T cells nor cytokines such as IL-4, IL-10 or interferon-gamma have any significant role in offering protection from primary infection. In contrast, we show that CD8 T cell deficiency is more critical as absence of CD8 T cells alone increases mortality in mice infected with JEV. Further, transfer of T cells from beige mice with defects in granular lytic function into TCRβ-null mice shows poor protection implicating granule-mediated target cell lysis as an essential component for survival. In addition, for the first time we report that γ/δ-T cells also make significant contribution to confer protection from JEV infection. Our data show that effector CD8 T cells play a protective role during primary infection possibly by preventing the breach in BBB and neuronal damage. PMID:28151989

  13. Current views in HTLV-I-associated adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Nicot, Christophe

    2005-03-01

    Epidemiological studies have demonstrated that the relative percentage of malignant lymphoid proliferations varies widely according to geographical location and ethnic populations. HTLV-I is the etiological agent of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) and is also associated with cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL). However, a definite role of HTLV-I in mycosis fungoides (MF) and/or Sezary syndrome (SS) remains controversial. While most HTLV-I-infected individuals remain asymptomatic carriers, 1-5% will develop ATLL, an invariably fatal expansion of virus-infected CD4+ T cells. This low incidence and the long latency period preceding occurrence of the disease suggest that additional factors are involved in development of ATLL. In this review, diagnosis, clinical features, and molecular pathogenesis of HTLV-I are discussed.

  14. Age-associated Epstein–Barr virus-specific T cell responses in seropositive healthy adults

    PubMed Central

    Cárdenas Sierra, D; Vélez Colmenares, G; Orfao de Matos, A; Fiorentino Gómez, S; Quijano Gómez, S M

    2014-01-01

    Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) is present in 95% of the world's adult population. The immune response participates in immune vigilance and persistent infection control, and this condition is maintained by both a good quality (functionality) and quantity of specific T cells throughout life. In the present study, we evaluated EBV-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocyte responses in seropositive healthy individuals younger and older than 50 years of age. The assessment comprised the frequency, phenotype, functionality and clonotypic distribution of T lymphocytes. We found that in both age groups a similar EBV-specific T cell response was found, with overlapping numbers of tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α+ T lymphocytes (CD4+ and CD8+) within the memory and effector cell compartments, in addition to monofunctional and multi-functional T cells producing interleukin (IL)-2 and/or interferon (IFN)-γ. However, individuals aged more than 50 years showed significantly higher frequencies of IL-2-producing CD4+ T lymphocytes in association with greater production of soluble IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-6 than subjects younger than 50 years. A polyclonal T cell receptor (TCR)-variable beta region (Vβ) repertoire exists in both age groups under basal conditions and in response to EBV; the major TCR families found in TNF-α+/CD4+ T lymphocytes were Vβ1, Vβ2, Vβ17 and Vβ22 in both age groups, and the major TCR family in TNF-α+/CD8+ T cells was Vβ13·1 for individuals younger than 50 years and Vβ9 for individuals aged more than 50 years. Our findings suggest that the EBV-specific T cell response (using a polyclonal stimulation model) is distributed throughout several T cell differentiation compartments in an age-independent manner and includes both monofunctional and multi-functional T lymphocytes. PMID:24666437

  15. New drugs for aggressive B-cell and T-cell lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Murawski, Niels; Pfreundschuh, Michael

    2010-11-01

    Over the past decade an unprecedented number of new drugs for lymphomas have been developed. Most of these new drugs target molecules or pathways that are important for the growth and proliferation of lymphomas. The introduction of the B-lymphoma specific monoclonal anti-CD20 antibody, rituximab, has improved the prognosis of patients with B-cell lymphomas more than any other drug in the past 50 years; today less than half of the patients with aggressive B-cell lymphomas die of their disease than in the pre-rituximab era. Many new drugs are now available for clinical testing in addition to new CD20 antibodies and antibodies directed against other surface molecules specifically or preferentially expressed on the lymphoma-cell surface. A prerequisite for the development of these drugs was the recognition of aberrant cell-signal transduction involved in lymphoma pathogenesis and progression. New therapeutic targets include receptor tyrosine and cyclin-dependent kinases, histone deacetylases, and molecules involved in the regulation of apoptosis. The definition of the role of these new drugs alone or in combination with established chemotherapy regimens in adequately designed prospective trials represents one of the major challenges in clinical lymphoma research.

  16. Universal cytotoxic activity of a HTLV-1 Tax-specific T cell clone from an HLA-A*24:02⁺ patient with adult T-cell leukemia against a variety of HTLV-I-infected T-cells.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yukie; Yamazaki, Rie; Terasako-Saito, Kiriko; Nakasone, Hideki; Akahoshi, Yu; Nakano, Hirofumi; Ugai, Tomotaka; Wada, Hidenori; Yamasaki, Ryoko; Ishihara, Yuko; Kawamura, Koji; Sakamoto, Kana; Ashizawa, Masahiro; Sato, Miki; Kimura, Shun-ichi; Kikuchi, Misato; Kako, Shinichi; Kanda, Junya; Tanihara, Aki; Nishida, Junji; Kanda, Yoshinobu

    2014-01-01

    Adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) is an aggressive mature T cell malignancy that is causally associated with human T cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) infection. The HTLV-1 regulatory protein Tax aggressively accelerates the proliferation of host cells and is also an important target antigen for CD8(+) cytotoxic T cells (CTLs). We previously reported that several predominant HLA-A*24:02-restricted HTLV-1 Tax301-309-specific CTL clones commonly expressed a particular amino acid sequence motif (P-D-R) in complementarity-determining region 3 of T-cell receptor (TCR)-β chain among unrelated ATL patients who underwent allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT). Furthermore, a PDR-motif(+) CTL clone persistently existed in a long-term survivor as a central CTL clone with strong CTL activities after HSCT. Although a larger analysis of the relationship between PDR-motif(+) CTLs and the clinical course is required, the expression of PDR-motif(+) TCR on CD8(+) T cells may play a critical role in the management of anti-HTLV-1 activities for HLA-A24:02(+) ATL patients. Therefore, in this study, we prepared an HTLV-1 Tax301-309 peptide-specific CTL clone (HT-9) expressing PDR-motif(+) TCR isolated from a long-term survivor after HSCT, and evaluated its CTL activity against a variety of HTLV-1-infected T-cells from HLA-A*24:02(+) ATL patients. Before the assay of CTL function, we confirmed that HT-9 expressed less-differentiated effector-memory phenotypes (CD45RA(-)CCR7(-)CD27(+)CD28(+/-)CD57(+/-)) and T-cell exhaustion marker PD-1(+). In assays of CTL function, HT-9 recognized HTLV-1 Tax in an HLA-restricted fashion and demonstrated strong CTL activities against a variety of HTLV-1-infected T-cells from HLA-A*24:02(+) ATL patients regardless of whether the sources were autologous or allogeneic, but not normal cells. These data indicate that PDR-motif(+) TCR could be an important TCR candidate for TCR-gene immunotherapy for HLA-A24:02(+) ATL patients, provided

  17. T cell subset profile in healthy Zambian adults at the University Teaching Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Chisenga, Caroline Cleopatra; Kelly, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Symptom-free human immunodeficiency virus antibody-negative Zambian adults (51 subjects, aged 20 to 62 years, 33.3% women and 66.7% men) were studied to establish T cell subset reference ranges. Methods We carried out across sectional study at the University Teaching Hospital, Lusaka. Blood samples were collected from healthy donor volunteers from hospital health care staff, between February and March 2015. Immunopheno typing was undertaken to characterize Tcell subsets using the markers CD3, CD4, CD8, α4β7, Ki67, CD25, CCR7, CD54RA, CD57, CD28, CD27 and HLA-DR. Results Among 51 volunteers, Women had significantly higher absolute CD4 count (median 1042; IQR 864, 1270) than in men (671; 545, 899) (p=0.003). Women also had more CD4 cells expressing homing, naïve, effector and effector memory T cell subsets compared to men. However, in the CD8 population, only the effector cells were significantly different with women expressing more than the males. Conclusion We provide early reference range for T cell subsets in Zambian adults and conclude that among the African women some T cell subsets are higher than men. PMID:27231509

  18. Virus-specific CD4+ memory phenotype T cells are abundant in unexposed adults

    PubMed Central

    Su, Laura F.; Kidd, Brian A.; Han, Arnold; Kotzin, Jonathan J.; Davis, Mark M.

    2013-01-01

    While T cell memory is generally thought to require direct antigen exposure, we find an abundance of memory phenotype cells (20–90%, averaging over 50%) of CD4+ T cells specific for viral antigens in adults that have never been infected. These cells express the appropriate memory markers and genes, rapidly produce cytokines, and have clonally expanded. This contrasts with newborns where the same T cell receptor (TCR) specificities are almost entirely naïve, which may explain the vulnerability of young children to infections. One mechanism for this phenomenon is TCR cross-reactivity to environmental antigens and in support of this we find extensive cross-recognition by HIV-1 and influenza-reactive T lymphocytes to other microbial peptides and the expansion of one of these following influenza vaccination. Thus the presence of these memory phenotype T cells has significant implications for immunity to novel pathogens, child and adult health, and the influence of pathogen-rich versus hygienic environments. PMID:23395677

  19. TIM-3 expression in lymphoma cells predicts chemoresistance in patients with adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Horlad, Hasita; Ohnishi, Koji; Ma, Chaoya; Fujiwara, Yukio; Niino, Daisuke; Ohshima, Koichi; Jinushi, Masahisa; Matsuoka, Masao; Takeya, Motohiro; Komohara, Yoshihiro

    2016-08-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL), an aggressive type of malignant lymphoma, is highly resistant to chemotherapy. However, the detailed mechanisms of the chemoresistance of ATLL have never been elucidated. We previously demonstrated that direct cell-cell interaction between macrophages and lymphoma cells was significantly associated with lymphoma progression in patients with ATLL. The present study aimed to further analyze the effects of cell-cell interaction between macrophages and ATLL cells by means of cell culture studies and immunohistochemical analysis using human ATLL samples. It was found that direct co-culture with macrophages induced chemoresistance in the ATLL ATN-1 cell line, but not in other cell lines, including TL-Mor, ED and ATL-2S. It was also found that expression of the T cell Ig and mucin domain-containing molecule-3 (TIM-3) was induced in ATN-1 cells by their long-term co-culture with macrophages. TIM-3 gene transfection induced chemoresistance in the ATN-1 cells. Immunostaining of ATLL tissues showed TIM-3 expression in 25 out of 58 ATLL cases. Although TIM-3 expression was not associated with overall survival or T classification, it was associated with resistance to chemotherapy. TIM-3 expression is therefore considered to be a marker for predicting the efficacy of chemotherapy, and TIM-3-associated signals may be a therapeutic target for patients with ATLL.

  20. Mouse Models of Human T Lymphotropic Virus Type-1–Associated Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, B.; Niewiesk, S.; Lairmore, M. D.

    2011-01-01

    Human T-lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1), the first human retrovirus discovered, is the causative agent of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) and a number of lymphocyte-mediated inflammatory conditions including HTLV-1–associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis. Development of animal models to study the pathogenesis of HTLV-1–associated diseases has been problematic. Mechanisms of early infection and cell-to-cell transmission can be studied in rabbits and nonhuman primates, but lesion development and reagents are limited in these species. The mouse provides a cost-effective, highly reproducible model in which to study factors related to lymphoma development and the preclinical efficacy of potential therapies against ATL. The ability to manipulate transgenic mice has provided important insight into viral genes responsible for lymphocyte transformation. Expansion of various strains of immunodeficient mice has accelerated the testing of drugs and targeted therapy against ATL. This review compares various mouse models to illustrate recent advances in the understanding of HTLV-1–associated ATL development and how improvements in these models are critical to the future development of targeted therapies against this aggressive T-cell lymphoma. PMID:20442421

  1. TIM-3 expression in lymphoma cells predicts chemoresistance in patients with adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Horlad, Hasita; Ohnishi, Koji; Ma, Chaoya; Fujiwara, Yukio; Niino, Daisuke; Ohshima, Koichi; Jinushi, Masahisa; Matsuoka, Masao; Takeya, Motohiro; Komohara, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL), an aggressive type of malignant lymphoma, is highly resistant to chemotherapy. However, the detailed mechanisms of the chemoresistance of ATLL have never been elucidated. We previously demonstrated that direct cell-cell interaction between macrophages and lymphoma cells was significantly associated with lymphoma progression in patients with ATLL. The present study aimed to further analyze the effects of cell-cell interaction between macrophages and ATLL cells by means of cell culture studies and immunohistochemical analysis using human ATLL samples. It was found that direct co-culture with macrophages induced chemoresistance in the ATLL ATN-1 cell line, but not in other cell lines, including TL-Mor, ED and ATL-2S. It was also found that expression of the T cell Ig and mucin domain-containing molecule-3 (TIM-3) was induced in ATN-1 cells by their long-term co-culture with macrophages. TIM-3 gene transfection induced chemoresistance in the ATN-1 cells. Immunostaining of ATLL tissues showed TIM-3 expression in 25 out of 58 ATLL cases. Although TIM-3 expression was not associated with overall survival or T classification, it was associated with resistance to chemotherapy. TIM-3 expression is therefore considered to be a marker for predicting the efficacy of chemotherapy, and TIM-3-associated signals may be a therapeutic target for patients with ATLL. PMID:27446463

  2. T-Cell Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... are extremely rare. T-cell lymphomas can be aggressive (fast-growing) or indolent (slow-growing). Lymphomas are ... also be involved. This group of PTCLs is aggressive and requires combination chemotherapy upon diagnosis. For more ...

  3. Norovirus-Specific Memory T Cell Responses in Adult Human Donors

    PubMed Central

    Malm, Maria; Tamminen, Kirsi; Vesikari, Timo; Blazevic, Vesna

    2016-01-01

    Norovirus (NoV) is a leading cause of acute gastroenteritis in people of all ages worldwide. NoV-specific serum antibodies which block the binding of NoV virus-like particles (VLPs) to the cell receptors have been thoroughly investigated. In contrast, only a few publications are available on the NoV capsid VP1 protein-specific T cell responses in humans naturally infected with the virus. Freshly isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells of eight healthy adult human donors previously exposed to NoV were stimulated with purified VLPs derived from NoV GII.4-1999, GII.4-2012 (Sydney), and GI.3, and IFN-γ production was measured by an ELISPOT assay. In addition, 76 overlapping synthetic peptides spanning the entire 539-amino acid sequence of GII.4 VP1 were pooled into two-dimensional matrices and used to identify putative T cell epitopes. Seven of the eight subjects produced IFN-γ in response to the peptides and five subjects produced IFN-γ in response to the VLPs of the same origin. In general, stronger T cell responses were induced with the peptides in each donor compared to the VLPs. A CD8+ T cell epitope in the shell domain of the VP1 (134SPSQVTMFPHIIVDVRQL151) was identified in two subjects, both having human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A∗02:01 allele. To our knowledge, this is the first report using synthetic peptides to study NoV-specific T cell responses in human subjects and identify T cell epitopes. PMID:27752254

  4. Therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome in a case of cutaneous adult T-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Naofumi; Shinohara, Kenji; Ota, Ituro; Muraki, Kazuhiko; Shimohakamada, Yoko

    2002-01-01

    We report a case of therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome (t-MDS) in adult T-cell lymphoma. A 69-year-old man suffered from cutaneous adult T-cell lymphoma, which was treated with radiation to the skin and combination chemotherapy of CHOP-V-MMV and VEPA-B. After 14 months of these therapies, anemia and thrombocytopenia appeared, and bone marrow aspiration smears showed immature myeloblasts, dysplastic erythroblasts, and micromegakaryocytes. Therapy-related MDS of refractory anemia with an excess of blasts was diagnosed. Cytogenetic study of the bone marrow cells showed 5q- and additional abnormalities. Rearrangement of the MLL gene was observed in the bone marrow cells. Mutations of N-ras codons at 12,13, and 61, p53 tumor suppressor gene, and monoclonal integration of human T-lymphotrophic virus -1 provirus DNA were not observed in the bone marrow cells. The patient died of pneumonia 21 months after diagnosis of cutaneous adult T-cell lymphoma.

  5. Susceptibility of neonatal T cells and adult thymocytes to peripheral tolerance to allogeneic stimuli

    PubMed Central

    do Canto, Fábio B; Lima, Celso; Teixeira, Ivan A; Bellio, Maria; Nóbrega, Alberto; Fucs, Rita

    2008-01-01

    We studied the tolerization of neonatal thymocytes (NT), neonatal splenocytes (NS) and adult thymocytes (AT), transferred to syngeneic nude (nu/nu) hosts previously injected with semi-allogeneic splenocytes, without any supportive immunosuppressive treatment. This protocol allows the study of peripheral tolerance in the absence of the thymus. BALB/c neonatal T cells and ATs were able to expand in syngeneic BALB/c nu/nu mice and functionally reconstituted an allogeneic response, rejecting (BALB/c × B6.Ba) F1 splenocytes transferred 3–4 weeks after injection of BALB/c cells. However, if (BALB/c × B6.Ba) F1 cells were injected into BALB/c nude hosts 30 days before transfer of NT, NS or AT cells, the F1 population was preserved and specific tolerance to B6 allografts was established. Furthermore, transfer to lymphopenic F1 nu/nu showed that tolerance could be established only for neonatal populations, showing that unique properties of neonatal T cells allow their tolerization in both lymphopenic and non-lymphopenic conditions, in the absence of suppressive immunotherapy. These results bring empirical support to the possibility of T-cell engraftment in immunodeficient patients showing partial identity with donor major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes; the manipulation of immunological maturity of donor T cells may be the key for successful reconstitution of immunocompetence without induction of graft-versus-host disease. PMID:18462348

  6. [T-cell lymphoma-leukemia caused by HTLV-1 in adults: two lymphomatous forms].

    PubMed

    Gning, S B; Fall, F; Ba-Fall, K; Thiam, M; Ndoye, B; Gueye, P M; Mbaye, P S

    2003-01-01

    The adult T-cells lymphoma-leukemia is a serious complication by the HTLV-1 infection. It is a rarely described diseases in Africa, in spite of the frequency of the infection by this virus. We report two clinical observations of lymphomatous forms. The first observation concerned a 43 year old Senegalese woman, admitted for a deep alteration of her general status and peripheral polyadenopathies. The adenopathy biopsy set up the diagnosis of pleiomorph T lymphoma with great and medium cells. The HTLV-1 serology was positive. She had benefited of six polychemotherapy cures (cyclophosphamide, farmarubicine, oncovin, prednisone) within which she died in a cachectic presentation. The second observation concerned a 44 year old Senegalese man, admitted for peripheral polyadenopathies, ulcerated lesions of sole of the foot, and deep alteration of the general status. He presented a moderate hypercalcemia by 117 mg/l. The histological examination of a ganglionar biopsy concluded to a diffuse T lymphoma with great cells. The HTLV-1 serology was positive. The cutaneous lesions were due to a phaeohyphomycosis of Exophiala jeanselmei. The symptomatic therapeutic measures had been applied and he died within four weeks in a septicemic clinical manifestation. The adult T-cells lymphoma leukemia due to the HTLV-1 ought to be researched before any lymphomatous and leucemic manifestation by T-cells through a serological research. The prognostic stays very bad.

  7. Fetal and adult hematopoietic stem cells give rise to distinct T cell lineages in humans.

    PubMed

    Mold, Jeff E; Venkatasubrahmanyam, Shivkumar; Burt, Trevor D; Michaëlsson, Jakob; Rivera, Jose M; Galkina, Sofiya A; Weinberg, Kenneth; Stoddart, Cheryl A; McCune, Joseph M

    2010-12-17

    Although the mammalian immune system is generally thought to develop in a linear fashion, findings in avian and murine species argue instead for the developmentally ordered appearance (or "layering") of distinct hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) that give rise to distinct lymphocyte lineages at different stages of development. Here we provide evidence of an analogous layered immune system in humans. Our results suggest that fetal and adult T cells are distinct populations that arise from different populations of HSCs that are present at different stages of development. We also provide evidence that the fetal T cell lineage is biased toward immune tolerance. These observations offer a mechanistic explanation for the tolerogenic properties of the developing fetus and for variable degrees of immune responsiveness at birth.

  8. CD19 CAR–T cells of defined CD4+:CD8+ composition in adult B cell ALL patients

    PubMed Central

    Turtle, Cameron J.; Hanafi, Laïla-Aïcha; Berger, Carolina; Gooley, Theodore A.; Cherian, Sindhu; Hudecek, Michael; Sommermeyer, Daniel; Melville, Katherine; Pender, Barbara; Budiarto, Tanya M.; Robinson, Emily; Steevens, Natalia N.; Chaney, Colette; Soma, Lorinda; Chen, Xueyan; Li, Daniel; Cao, Jianhong; Heimfeld, Shelly; Jensen, Michael C.; Riddell, Stanley R.; Maloney, David G.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND. T cells that have been modified to express a CD19-specific chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) have antitumor activity in B cell malignancies; however, identification of the factors that determine toxicity and efficacy of these T cells has been challenging in prior studies in which phenotypically heterogeneous CAR–T cell products were prepared from unselected T cells. METHODS. We conducted a clinical trial to evaluate CD19 CAR–T cells that were manufactured from defined CD4+ and CD8+ T cell subsets and administered in a defined CD4+:CD8+ composition to adults with B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia after lymphodepletion chemotherapy. RESULTS. The defined composition product was remarkably potent, as 27 of 29 patients (93%) achieved BM remission, as determined by flow cytometry. We established that high CAR–T cell doses and tumor burden increase the risks of severe cytokine release syndrome and neurotoxicity. Moreover, we identified serum biomarkers that allow testing of early intervention strategies in patients at the highest risk of toxicity. Risk-stratified CAR–T cell dosing based on BM disease burden decreased toxicity. CD8+ T cell–mediated anti-CAR transgene product immune responses developed after CAR–T cell infusion in some patients, limited CAR–T cell persistence, and increased relapse risk. Addition of fludarabine to the lymphodepletion regimen improved CAR–T cell persistence and disease-free survival. CONCLUSION. Immunotherapy with a CAR–T cell product of defined composition enabled identification of factors that correlated with CAR–T cell expansion, persistence, and toxicity and facilitated design of lymphodepletion and CAR–T cell dosing strategies that mitigated toxicity and improved disease-free survival. TRIAL REGISTRATION. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01865617. FUNDING. R01-CA136551; Life Science Development Fund; Juno Therapeutics; Bezos Family Foundation. PMID:27111235

  9. T-cell lymphomas, a challenging disease: types, treatments, and future.

    PubMed

    Ma, Helen; Abdul-Hay, Maher

    2017-02-01

    T-cell lymphomas are rare and aggressive malignancies associated with poor outcome, often because of the development of resistance in the lymphoma against chemotherapy as well as intolerance in patients to the established and toxic chemotherapy regimens. In this review article, we discuss the epidemiology, pathophysiology, current standard of care, and future treatments of common types of T-cell lymphomas, including adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma, angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma, anaplastic large-cell lymphoma, aggressive NK/T-cell lymphoma, and cutaneous T-cell lymphoma.

  10. Media depictions of physical and relational aggression: connections with aggression in young adults' romantic relationships.

    PubMed

    Coyne, Sarah M; Nelson, David A; Graham-Kevan, Nicola; Tew, Emily; Meng, K Nathan; Olsen, Joseph A

    2011-01-01

    Various studies have found that viewing physical or relational aggression in the media can impact subsequent engagement in aggressive behavior. However, this has rarely been examined in the context of relationships. Accordingly, the aim of this study was to examine the connection between viewing various types of aggression in the media and perpetration of aggression against a romantic partner. A total of 369 young adults completed a variety of questionnaires asking for their perpetration of various forms of relationship aggression. Participants' exposure to both physical and relational aggression in the media was also assessed. As a whole, we found a relationship between viewing aggression in the media and perpetration of aggression; however, this depended on the sex of the participant and the type of aggression measured. Specifically, exposure to physical violence in the media was related to engagement in physical aggression against their partner only for men. However, exposure to relational aggression in the media was related to romantic relational aggression for both men and women.

  11. Chronic exposure to asbestos enhances TGF-β1 production in the human adult T cell leukemia virus-immortalized T cell line MT-2.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Megumi; Chen, Ying; Hayashi, Hiroaki; Kumagai-Takei, Naoko; Matsuzaki, Hidenori; Lee, Suni; Nishimura, Yasumitsu; Otsuki, Takemi

    2014-12-01

    Asbestos exposure causes various tumors such as lung cancer and malignant mesothelioma. To elucidate the immunological alteration in asbestos-related tumors, an asbestos-induced apoptosis-resistant subline (MT-2Rst) was established from a human adult T cell leukemia virus-immortalized T cell line (MT-2Org) by long-term exposure to asbestos chrysotile-B (CB). In this study, transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) knockdown using lentiviral vector-mediated RNA interference showed that MT-2Rst cells secreted increased levels of TGF-β1, and acquired resistance to TGF-β1-mediated growth inhibition. We showed that exposure of MT-2Org cells to CB activated the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), ERK1/2, p38 and JNK1. Furthermore, TGF-β1-knockdown cells and treatment with MAPK inhibitors revealed that MT-2Rst cells secreted a high level of TGF-β1 mainly through phosphorylation of p38. However, an Annexin V assay indicated that TGF-β1 resistance in MT-2Rst cells was not directly involved in the acquisition of resistance to apoptosis that is triggered by CB exposure. The overall results demonstrate that long-term exposure of MT-2Org cells to CB induces a regulatory T cell-like phenotype, suggesting that chronic exposure to asbestos leads to a state of immune suppression.

  12. T cell ontogeny. Organ location of maturing populations as defined by surface antigen markers is similar in neonates and adults

    PubMed Central

    1981-01-01

    Earlier studies have suggested that splenic T cell populations in nursling mice (less than 18 d of age) have Lyt cell surface antigens that identify them as less mature than their adult counterparts. Studies presented here, however, demonstrate that the expression of the Thy-1, Lyt-1, Lyt-2, and Lyt-3 T cell antigens is virtually identical in 14-d-old and adult T cell populations even though at 14 d, T cells constitute less than 10% of the total spleen cell population. Because the expression of these antigens on the immature (cortical) thymocyte population differs substantially from their expression on peripheral T cells, the maturity of splenic T cells as judged by these criteria is similar in nurslings and adults. Very few cells in the neonatal thymus 4 h after birth correspond, in terms of antigen expression, to the more mature (medullary) thymocyte population of adults, but such cells develop rapidly during the first few days of life. They are present, therefore, sufficiently early to serve as the immediate source of peripheral T cells, as they apparently do in the adult. This then suggests that the locations for the major T cell maturational events are established within the first 2 wk of life of the mouse and maintained as such thereafter. The use of monoclonal antibodies and quantitative immunofluorescence analysis in our studies probably explains the differences between our findings and those reported previously, which relied on cytotoxic depletion by alloantisera and complement to estimate the frequencies of cells carrying the Lyt differentiation antigens in nurslings. PMID:6972987

  13. T cell ontogeny. Organ location of maturing populations as defined by surface antigen markers is similar in neonates and adults.

    PubMed

    Haaijman, J J; Micklem, H S; Ledbetter, J A; Dangl, J L; Herzenberg, L A; Herzenberg, L A

    1981-03-01

    Earlier studies have suggested that splenic T cell populations in nursling mice (less than 18 d of age) have Lyt cell surface antigens that identify them as less mature than their adult counterparts. Studies presented here, however, demonstrate that the expression of the Thy-1, Lyt-1, Lyt-2, and Lyt-3 T cell antigens is virtually identical in 14-d-old and adult T cell populations even though at 14 d, T cells constitute less than 10% of the total spleen cell population. Because the expression of these antigens on the immature (cortical) thymocyte population differs substantially from their expression on peripheral T cells, the maturity of splenic T cells as judged by these criteria is similar in nurslings and adults. Very few cells in the neonatal thymus 4 h after birth correspond, in terms of antigen expression, to the more mature (medullary) thymocyte population of adults, but such cells develop rapidly during the first few days of life. They are present, therefore, sufficiently early to serve as the immediate source of peripheral T cells, as they apparently do in the adult. This then suggests that the locations for the major T cell maturational events are established within the first 2 wk of life of the mouse and maintained as such thereafter. The use of monoclonal antibodies and quantitative immunofluorescence analysis in our studies probably explains the differences between our findings and those reported previously, which relied on cytotoxic depletion by alloantisera and complement to estimate the frequencies of cells carrying the Lyt differentiation antigens in nurslings.

  14. Establishment and characterization of 10 cell lines derived from patients with adult T-cell leukemia.

    PubMed Central

    Hoshino, H; Esumi, H; Miwa, M; Shimoyama, M; Minato, K; Tobinai, K; Hirose, M; Watanabe, S; Inada, N; Kinoshita, K; Kamihira, S; Ichimaru, M; Sugimura, T

    1983-01-01

    By using human T-cell growth factor (TCGF), 10 cell lines were established from tissue samples of 10 patients with adult T-cell leukemia (ATL). Three cell lines were adapted to growth in medium lacking TCGF. The surface markers of all cell lines were characteristic of inducer/helper T cells, i.e., OKT3+, OKT4+, OKT6-, OKT8-, OKIa1+, and human Lyt2+ and Lyt3+, except that one cell line was OKT3-. The expression of the viral antigen was examined during establishment of 8 of the 10 cell lines. The viral antigen was not expressed in leukemic cells before cultivation. In 5 lines, the viral antigen was detected by immunofluorescent staining after a short period of cultivation. However, 3 cell lines, ATL-6A, ATL-9Y, and ATL-1K did not express the viral antigen during short-term culture: the ATL-6A and ATL-9Y cell lines became positive for the viral antigen after 5 and 2 months of cultivation, respectively; the ATL-1K cell line remained antigen-negative throughout a culture period of 13 months. Southern blot hybridization assay showed that all of the cell lines, including the viral antigen-negative ATL-1K cell line, contained the viral genome. Thus, the retrovirus was associated with all 10 cell lines established from ATL patients, but there was a heterogeneity in the expression time of the retroviral antigen in leukemic cells maintained in vitro. Our findings suggested that the expression of the viral antigen was not required for maintenance of the leukemic state in vivo and for growth of leukemic cells in vitro. Images PMID:6193528

  15. Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma in Jujuy, north-west Argentina.

    PubMed

    Marin, Oscar; Hasui, Kazuhisa; Remondegui, Carlos; Sato, Eiichi; Aye, Moe Moe; Takenouchi, Norihiro; Izumo, Shuji; Tajima, Kazuo

    2002-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) infection is prevalent in native Americans living in the Andes. Some of their malignant lymphomas (ML) show a peculiar histology suggestive of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL). To determine whether ML resembling ATLL are indeed ATLL, re-analysis of 34 cases occurring in Jujuy, a province of Argentina, was conducted, concentrating on immunological phenotype, integration of HTLV-1 proviral DNA, expression of HTLV-1 p40Tax and p27Rex, and infection of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). The ML were 22 cases of mature peripheral T-cell and natural killer (NK)-cell neoplasm (mT/NKN), 11 B-cell malignant neoplasms and one Hodgkin's lymphoma. Polymerase chain reaction against the HTLV-1 proviral DNA, using DNA extracted from paraffin sections, indicated integration of the HTLV-1 proviral DNA in three cases of eight mT/NKN. Two other cases of mT/NKN were positive for anti-HTLV-1 antibodies. Expression of p40Tax and p27Rex was detected in all five of these mT/NKN cases associated with HTLV-1. As such, these five mT/NKN were rediagnosed as ATLL. In situ hybridization signals for EBV-encoded small nuclear early region-1 were detected in nine cases of mT/NKN, of which five cases of NK-cell lymphoma were found to have cytoplasmic CD3 expression, a CD56 phenotype and positivity of TIA1. According to the new World Health Organization classification, the mT/NKN class includes five cases of ATLL and five cases of NK-cell lymphomas. The five cases of ATLL were of native American extraction from an HTLV-1-endemic area around Jujuy, north-west Argentina.

  16. Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma: a case report of primary cutaneous tumoral type

    PubMed Central

    Lyra-da-Silva, Julia Ocampo; de Mello Gonzaga, Yung Bruno; de Melo Espíndola, Otávio; de Andrada-Serpa, Maria José; Dib, Cassio; Jeunon, Thiago

    2012-01-01

    Background: Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) is a distinctive peripheral T- lymphocytic malignancy associated with human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1). It may closely resemble other skin lymphomas, particularly mycosis fungoides (MF). Case report: A 38-year-old woman presented some ellipsoid scaling patches lasting 18 months and developed a large tumoral lesion in the abdomen, which were previously diagnosed as MF. Although histopathologic and immunohistochemistry findings were in consonance with this diagnosis, the fast progression of the disease raised the suspicion that it could represent another type of T-cell lymphoma. The work-up revealed a positive anti-HTLV-1 serology and molecular studies confirmed the monoclonal integration of HTLV-1 provirus into neoplastic cells of the skin, but not into circulating lymphocytes. Extensive investigations were unable to demonstrate any systemic involvement. The final diagnosis was of primary cutaneous type of ATLL. The patient was submitted to a chemotherapy regimen with cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine and prednisone, later to conjugated dexamethasone and surgical cytoreduction and then to a second line treatment with gemcitabine, resulting in partial response. A bone marrow heterologous transplantation was performed, but failed to achieve a sustained remission. Discussion: ATLL is a rare lymphoid malignancy in non-endemic HTLV-1 areas, the diagnosis of which could be missed if not highly suspected. In addition to the four subtypes of Shimoyama classification (acute, lymphomatous, chronic and smoldering), a fifth one denominated primary cutaneous and characterized by presence of lesions only in the skin had been proposed and is herein exemplified. PMID:23785591

  17. Variegated RHOA mutations in adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Nagata, Yasunobu; Kontani, Kenji; Enami, Terukazu; Kataoka, Keisuke; Ishii, Ryohei; Totoki, Yasushi; Kataoka, Tatsuki R.; Hirata, Masahiro; Aoki, Kazuhiro; Nakano, Kazumi; Kitanaka, Akira; Sakata-Yanagimoto, Mamiko; Egami, Sachiko; Shiraishi, Yuichi; Chiba, Kenichi; Tanaka, Hiroko; Shiozawa, Yusuke; Yoshizato, Tetsuichi; Suzuki, Hiromichi; Kon, Ayana; Yoshida, Kenichi; Sato, Yusuke; Sato-Otsubo, Aiko; Sanada, Masashi; Munakata, Wataru; Nakamura, Hiromi; Hama, Natsuko; Miyano, Satoru; Nureki, Osamu; Shibata, Tatsuhiro; Haga, Hironori; Shimoda, Kazuya; Katada, Toshiaki; Chiba, Shigeru; Watanabe, Toshiki

    2016-01-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) is a distinct form of peripheral T-cell lymphoma with poor prognosis, which is caused by the human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1). In contrast to the unequivocal importance of HTLV-1 infection in the pathogenesis of ATLL, the role of acquired mutations in HTLV-1 infected T cells has not been fully elucidated, with a handful of genes known to be recurrently mutated. In this study, we identified unique RHOA mutations in ATLL through whole genome sequencing of an index case, followed by deep sequencing of 203 ATLL samples. RHOA mutations showed distinct distribution and function from those found in other cancers. Involving 15% (30/203) of ATLL cases, RHOA mutations were widely distributed across the entire coding sequence but almost invariably located at the guanosine triphosphate (GTP)-binding pocket, with Cys16Arg being most frequently observed. Unexpectedly, depending on mutation types and positions, these RHOA mutants showed different or even opposite functional consequences in terms of GTP/guanosine diphosphate (GDP)-binding kinetics, regulation of actin fibers, and transcriptional activation. The Gly17Val mutant did not bind GTP/GDP and act as a dominant negative molecule, whereas other mutants (Cys16Arg and Ala161Pro) showed fast GTP/GDP cycling with enhanced transcriptional activation. These findings suggest that both loss- and gain-of-RHOA functions could be involved in ATLL leukemogenesis. In summary, our study not only provides a novel insight into the molecular pathogenesis of ATLL but also highlights a unique role of variegation of heterologous RHOA mutations in human cancers. PMID:26574607

  18. Epigenetic deregulation of Ellis Van Creveld confers robust Hedgehog signaling in adult T-cell leukemia.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Ryutaro; Yamagishi, Makoto; Nakano, Kazumi; Yamochi, Toshiko; Yamochi, Tadanori; Fujikawa, Dai; Nakashima, Makoto; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Uchimaru, Kaoru; Utsunomiya, Atae; Watanabe, Toshiki

    2014-09-01

    One of the hallmarks of cancer, global gene expression alteration, is closely associated with the development and malignant characteristics associated with adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) as well as other cancers. Here, we show that aberrant overexpression of the Ellis Van Creveld (EVC) family is responsible for cellular Hedgehog (HH) activation, which provides the pro-survival ability of ATL cells. Using microarray, quantitative RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry we have demonstrated that EVC is significantly upregulated in ATL and human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-1)-infected cells. Epigenetic marks, including histone H3 acetylation and Lys4 trimethylation, are specifically accumulated at the EVC locus in ATL samples. The HTLV-1 Tax participates in the coordination of EVC expression in an epigenetic fashion. The treatment of shRNA targeting EVC, as well as the transcription factors for HH signaling, diminishes the HH activation and leads to apoptotic death in ATL cell lines. We also showed that a HH signaling inhibitor, GANT61, induces strong apoptosis in the established ATL cell lines and patient-derived primary ATL cells. Therefore, our data indicate that HH activation is involved in the regulation of leukemic cell survival. The epigenetically deregulated EVC appears to play an important role for HH activation. The possible use of EVC as a specific cell marker and a novel drug target for HTLV-1-infected T-cells is implicated by these findings. The HH inhibitors are suggested as drug candidates for ATL therapy. Our findings also suggest chromatin rearrangement associated with active histone markers in ATL.

  19. Suppression of IL-7-dependent Effector T-cell Expansion by Multipotent Adult Progenitor Cells and PGE2

    PubMed Central

    Reading, James L; Vaes, Bart; Hull, Caroline; Sabbah, Shereen; Hayday, Thomas; Wang, Nancy S; DiPiero, Anthony; Lehman, Nicholas A; Taggart, Jen M; Carty, Fiona; English, Karen; Pinxteren, Jef; Deans, Robert; Ting, Anthony E; Tree, Timothy I M

    2015-01-01

    T-cell depletion therapy is used to prevent acute allograft rejection, treat autoimmunity and create space for bone marrow or hematopoietic cell transplantation. The evolved response to T-cell loss is a transient increase in IL-7 that drives compensatory homeostatic proliferation (HP) of mature T cells. Paradoxically, the exaggerated form of this process that occurs following lymphodepletion expands effector T-cells, often causing loss of immunological tolerance that results in rapid graft rejection, autoimmunity, and exacerbated graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). While standard immune suppression is unable to treat these pathologies, growing evidence suggests that manipulating the incipient process of HP increases allograft survival, prevents autoimmunity, and markedly reduces GVHD. Multipotent adult progenitor cells (MAPC) are a clinical grade immunomodulatory cell therapy known to alter γ-chain cytokine responses in T-cells. Herein, we demonstrate that MAPC regulate HP of human T-cells, prevent the expansion of Th1, Th17, and Th22 effectors, and block the development of pathogenic allograft responses. This occurs via IL-1β-primed secretion of PGE2 and activates T-cell intrinsic regulatory mechanisms (SOCS2, GADD45A). These data provide proof-of-principle that HP of human T-cells can be targeted by cellular and molecular therapies and lays a basis for the development of novel strategies to prevent immunopathology in lymphodepleted patients. PMID:26216515

  20. HTLV-1 and associated adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Mahieux, Renaud; Gessain, Antoine

    2003-12-01

    Human T-cell leukemia/lymphoma virus type 1 (HTLV-1) infects 15-20 millions individuals worldwide. This oncoretrovirus can be transmitted through 3 ways: horizontally, vertically (mother to child) and via blood transfusion. HTLV-1 causes 2 major diseases: adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) and tropical spastic paraparesis/HTLV-1-associated myelopathy. Tax is a 40-kDa phosphoprotein that is encoded by the pX region of the virus. Several lines of evidence have demonstrated a central role for this protein in the immortalization or transformation of the HTLV-1 infected cells. Apart from its ability to drive transcription from the viral promoter, it also deregulates the cell cycle, inhibits apoptosis, has an effect on the maintenance of the genomic stability and induces the production of several cytokines. In addition, several arguments strongly suggest the existence of host genetic factors, that could be involved in the HTLV-1 infection as well as in the development of ATLL among HTLV-1 infected individuals. ATLL can be classified into 4 major subtypes: a smoldering type, a chronic type, a lymphoma type and a leukemic type. The demonstration by Southern blot analysis of the clonal integration of an HTLV-1 provirus in the tumoral cells represents the gold-standard to define biologically ATLL. The survival rate of ATLL patients, especially those who develop the acute leukemic or lymphomas forms, is very poor, and such clonal malignant CD4 expansion remains one of the most severe lymphoproliferations.

  1. Identification of a Bioactive Compound against Adult T-cell Leukaemia from Bitter Gourd Seeds.

    PubMed

    Kai, Hisahiro; Akamatsu, Ena; Torii, Eri; Kodama, Hiroko; Yukizaki, Chizuko; Akagi, Isao; Ino, Hisatoshi; Sakakibara, Yoichi; Suiko, Masahito; Yamamoto, Ikuo; Okayama, Akihiko; Morishita, Kazuhiro; Kataoka, Hiroaki; Matsuno, Koji

    2013-12-27

    In our previous report, an 80% ethanol bitter gourd seed extract (BGSE) was found to suppress proliferation of adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) cell lines. The present study aimed to identify the bioactive compounds from BGSE specific against ATL. From the result of an HPLC-MS analysis, α-eleostearic acid (α-ESA) was present in BGSE at 0.68% ± 0.0022% (±SD, n = 5). In the cell proliferation test, α-ESA potently suppressed proliferation of two ATL cell lines (ED and Su9T01; IC50 = 8.9 and 29.3 µM, respectively) more than several other octadecanoic acids. However, α-ESA moderately inhibited phytohemagglutinin-activated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC; IC50 = 31.0 µM). These results suggest that BGSE-derived α-ESA has potential as a functional food constituent because of its activity against ATL, particularly against ED cells. Moreover, α-ESA might be effective for the prevention of moderate adverse effects of ATL on normal T cells.

  2. Role for protein geranylgeranylation in adult T-cell leukemia cell survival

    SciTech Connect

    Nonaka, Mizuho; Uota, Shin; Saitoh, Yasunori; Takahashi, Mayumi; Sugimoto, Haruyo; Amet, Tohti; Arai, Ayako; Miura, Osamu; Yamamoto, Naoki; Yamaoka, Shoji

    2009-01-15

    Adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) is a fatal lymphoproliferative disease that develops in human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I)-infected individuals. Despite the accumulating knowledge of the molecular biology of HTLV-I-infected cells, effective therapeutic strategies remain to be established. Recent reports showed that the hydroxyl-3-methylglutaryl (HMG)-CoA reductase inhibitor statins have anti-proliferative and apoptotic effects on certain tumor cells through inhibition of protein prenylation. Here, we report that statins hinder the survival of ATL cells and induce apoptotic cell death. Inhibition of protein geranylgeranylation is responsible for these effects, since simultaneous treatment with isoprenoid precursors, geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate or farnesyl pyrophosphate, but not a cholesterol precursor squalene, restored the viability of ATL cells. Simvastatin inhibited geranylgeranylation of small GTPases Rab5B and Rac1 in ATL cells, and a geranylgeranyl transferase inhibitor GGTI-298 reduced ATL cell viability more efficiently than a farnesyl transferase inhibitor FTI-277. These results not only unveil an important role for protein geranylgeranylation in ATL cell survival, but also implicate therapeutic potentials of statins in the treatment of ATL.

  3. HTLV-I infection and adult T-cell leukemia in Brazil: an overview.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, M do S; Hamerschlak, N; Chiattone, C; Loureiro, P

    1996-01-01

    Human T-cell lymphotropic Virus Type I (HTLV-I) is the etiologic factor for adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL). HTLV-I infection can also lead to other diseases, such as HTLV-I-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP), uveitis, arthropathy and infectious dermatitis. Studies of the infectious mode of transmission of HTLV-I and risk factors for HTLV-I-related diseases have been conducted in several countries, and differences in the prevalence, age patterns, ethnic groups and clinical presentation of the related diseases have been described worldwide. Based on the geographical characteristics of Brazil and data from the literature, we have summarized the distribution of seroprevalence in blood donors in different states around the country, as well as the incidence of ATL in regards to the endemic foci. ATL in Brazil has the same characteristics as those described elsewhere, but is reported more frequently at a younger age. In order to better evaluate ATL in Brazil, a registry has been established at the several hematologic centers under the sponsorship of the instituto Nacional de Cancer and the Brazilian Society of Hematology and Hemotherapy, for the purpose of recording all cases originally diagnosed in Brazil.

  4. Anti-thymocyte globulin could improve the outcome of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in patients with highly aggressive T-cell tumors

    PubMed Central

    Yang, J; Cai, Y; Jiang, J L; Wan, L P; Yan, S K; Wang, C

    2015-01-01

    The early experiment result in our hospital showed that anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG) inhibited the proliferation of lymphoid tumor cells in the T-cell tumors. We used the ATG as the part of the conditioning regimen and to evaluate the long-term anti-leukemia effect, the safety and complication in the patients with highly aggressive T-cell lymphomas. Twenty-three patients were enrolled into this study. At the time of transplant, six patients reached first or subsequent complete response, three patients had a partial remission and 14 patients had relapsed or primary refractory disease. The conditioning regimen consisted of ATG, total body irradiation, toposide and cyclophosphamide. The complete remission rate after transplant was 95.7%. At a median follow-up time of 25 months, 16 (69.6%) patients are alive and free from diseases, including nine patients in refractory and progressive disease. Seven patients died after transplant, five from relapse and two from treatment-related complications. The incidence of grades II–IV acute graft-vs-host disease (GvHD) was 39.1%. The maximum cumulative incidence of chronic GvHD was 30%. The most frequent and severe conditioning-related toxicities observed in 8 out of 23 patients were grades III/IV infections during cytopenia. Thus, ATG-based conditioning is a feasible and effective alternative for patients with highly aggressive T-cell tumors. PMID:26230956

  5. Predominance of heterosubtypic IFN-γ-only-secreting effector memory T cells in pandemic H1N1 naive adults

    PubMed Central

    Sridhar, Saranya; Begom, Shaima; Bermingham, Alison; Ziegler, Thedi; Roberts, Kim L.; Barclay, Wendy S.; Openshaw, Peter; Lalvani, Ajit

    2015-01-01

    The 2009/10 pandemic (pH1N1) highlighted the need for vaccines conferring heterosubtypic immunity against antigenically shifted influenza strains. Although cross-reactive T cells are strong candidates for mediating heterosubtypic immunity, little is known about the population-level prevalence, frequency, and cytokine-secretion profile of heterosubtypic T cells to pH1N1. To assess this, pH1N1 sero-negative adults were recruited. Single-cell IFN-γ and IL-2 cytokine-secretion profiles to internal proteins of pH1N1 or live virus were enumerated and characterised. Heterosubtypic T cells recognising pH1N1 core proteins were widely prevalent, being detected in 90% (30 of 33) of pH1N1-näive individuals. Although the last exposure to influenza was greater than 6 months ago, the frequency and proportion of the IFN-γ-only-secreting T-cell subset was significantly higher than the IL-2-only-secreting subset. CD8+ IFN-γ-only-secreting heterosubtypic T cells were predominantly CCR7−CD45RA− effector-memory phenotype, expressing the tissue-homing receptor CXCR3 and degranulation marker CD107. Receipt of the 2008–09 influenza vaccine did not alter the frequency of these heterosubtypic T cells, highlighting the inability of current vaccines to maintain this heterosubtypic T-cell pool. The surprisingly high prevalence of pre-existing circulating pH1N1-specific CD8+ IFN-γ-only-secreting effector memory T cells with cytotoxic and lung-homing potential in pH1N1-seronegative adults may partly explain the low case fatality rate despite high rates of infection of the pandemic in young adults. PMID:22777887

  6. Transient Treg-cell depletion in adult mice results in persistent self-reactive CD4(+) T-cell responses.

    PubMed

    Nyström, Sofia N; Bourges, Dorothée; Garry, Sarah; Ross, Ellen M; van Driel, Ian R; Gleeson, Paul A

    2014-12-01

    Depletion of Foxp3(+) CD4(+) regulatory T cells (Treg) in adults results in chronic inflammation and autoimmune disease. However, the impact of transient Treg-cell depletion on self-reactive responses is poorly defined. Here, we studied the effect of transient depletion of Treg cells on CD4(+) T-cell responses to endogenous self-antigens. Short-term ablation of Treg cells in mice resulted in rapid activation of CD4(+) T cells, increased percentage of IFN-γ(+) and Th17 cells in lymphoid organs, and development of autoimmune gastritis. To track self-reactive responses, we analyzed the activation of naïve gastric-specific CD4(+) T cells. There was a dramatic increase in proliferation and acquisition of effector function of gastric-specific T cells in the stomach draining LNs of Treg-cell-depleted mice, compared with untreated mice, either during Treg-cell depletion or after Treg-cell reconstitution. Moreover, the hyperproliferation of gastric-specific T cells in the Treg-cell-ablated mice was predominantly antigen-dependent. Transient depletion of Treg cells resulted in a shift in the ratio of peripheral:thymic Treg cells in the reemerged Treg-cell population, indicating an altered composition of Treg cells. These findings indicate that transient Treg-cell depletion results in ongoing antigen-driven self-reactive T-cell responses and emphasize the continual requirement for an intact Treg-cell population.

  7. Functional deficits of pertussis-specific CD4+ T cells in infants compared to adults following DTaP vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, S K; Pichichero, M E

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the immune responses that explain why infants require multiple doses of pertussis vaccine to achieve protection against infection is a high priority. The objective of this study was to compare the function and phenotypes of antigen-specific CD4+ T cells in adults (n = 12), compared to infants (n = 20), following vaccination with acellular pertussis (DTaP) vaccine. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were stimulated with pertussis toxoid (PT), pertactin (PRN) and filamentous haemagglutinin (FHA). Multi-parameter flow cytometry was used to delineate CD4+ T cell populations and phenotypes producing interferon (IFN)-γ, interleukin (IL)-2, tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α and IL-4. Based on surface CD69 expression, infants demonstrated activation of vaccine antigen-specific CD4+ T cells similar to adults. However, among infants, Boolean combinations of gates suggested that type 1 (Th-1) CD4+ T cell responses were confined largely to TNF-α+IL-2+IFN-γ- or TNF-α+IL-2-IFN-γ-. A significantly lower percentage of polyfunctional T helper type 1 (Th1) responses (TNF-α+IFN-γ+IL-2+) and type 2 (Th2) responses (IL-4) were present in the infants compared to adults. Moreover, a significantly higher percentage of infants' functional CD4+ T cells were restricted to CD45RA-CCR7+CD27+ phenotype, consistent with early-stage differentiated pertussis-specific memory CD4+ T cells. We show for the first time that DTaP vaccination-induced CD4+ T cells in infants are functionally and phenotypically dissimilar from those of adults. PMID:22861368

  8. Definition, prognostic factors, treatment, and response criteria of adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma: a proposal from an international consensus meeting.

    PubMed

    Tsukasaki, Kunihiro; Hermine, Olivier; Bazarbachi, Ali; Ratner, Lee; Ramos, Juan Carlos; Harrington, William; O'Mahony, Deirdre; Janik, John E; Bittencourt, Achiléa L; Taylor, Graham P; Yamaguchi, Kazunari; Utsunomiya, Atae; Tobinai, Kensei; Watanabe, Toshiki

    2009-01-20

    Adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma (ATL) is a distinct peripheral T-lymphocytic malignancy associated with a retrovirus designated human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-1). The diversity in clinical features and prognosis of patients with this disease has led to its subclassification into the following four categories: acute, lymphoma, chronic, and smoldering types. The chronic and smoldering subtypes are considered indolent and are usually managed with watchful waiting until disease progression, analogous to the management of some patients with chronic lymphoid leukemia (CLL) or other indolent histology lymphomas. Patients with aggressive ATL generally have a poor prognosis because of multidrug resistance of malignant cells, a large tumor burden with multiorgan failure, hypercalcemia, and/or frequent infectious complications as a result of a profound T-cell immunodeficiency. Under the sponsorship of the 13th International Conference on Human Retrovirology: HTLV, a group of ATL researchers joined to form a consensus statement based on established data to define prognostic factors, clinical subclassifications, and treatment strategies. A set of response criteria specific for ATL reflecting a combination of those for lymphoma and CLL was proposed. Clinical subclassification is useful but is limited because of the diverse prognosis among each subtype. Molecular abnormalities within the host genome, such as tumor suppressor genes, may account for these diversities. A treatment strategy based on the clinical subclassification and prognostic factors is suggested, including watchful waiting approach, chemotherapy, antiviral therapy, allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (alloHSCT), and targeted therapies.

  9. [Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma in HTLV-1 infected patients: report of two cases in Colombia].

    PubMed

    Medina, Edwin Abraham; Orduz, Rocío; Morales, Olga Lucía; Martínez, Óscar; Baldión, Margarita; Isaza, Mario Arturo

    2013-01-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) is a malignant neoplasia of mature CD4+ T lymphocytes,resulting from infection with human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1), with several systemic and cutaneous manifestations. We present two cases of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma, in patients from the Colombian Southwestern region, whose diagnoses were confirmed by histology, immunohistochemistry, flow cytometry, ELISA and Western blot tests. We also discuss about the virus and how to make this diagnosis in countries like Colombia.

  10. Site-specific differences in T cell frequencies and phenotypes in the blood and gut of HIV-uninfected and ART-treated HIV+ adults.

    PubMed

    Yukl, Steven A; Shergill, Amandeep K; Girling, Valerie; Li, Qingsheng; Killian, Maudi; Epling, Lorrie; Li, Peilin; Kaiser, Philipp; Haase, Ashley; Havlir, Diane V; McQuaid, Kenneth; Sinclair, Elizabeth; Wong, Joseph K

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal T lymphocytes are critical for mucosal immunity and HIV pathogenesis, yet little is known about normal T cell numbers and phenotypes in different regions of the gut, or the degree to which ART can restore levels to those of HIV-uninfected individuals. To investigate these questions, we measured T cell frequencies and markers of memory, activation, anergy, and homing in the blood, ileum, and rectum of HIV- and ART-suppressed HIV+ adults. In HIV- individuals, T cell frequencies and phenotypes differed significantly between sites. Compared to HIV- adults, HIV+ adults had lower absolute CD4+T cell counts in the ileal lamina propria and lower relative CD4+T cell counts in the blood and ileum. In the gut, HIV+ adults had a higher proportion of CD38+ CD4+T cells, a lower proportion of terminally-differentiated effector cells, and, in the rectum, a higher proportion of CTLA-4+ CD4+T cells. In HIV+ individuals, relative CD4+T cell numbers in the ileum correlated with the proportion of CTLA-4+ CD4+T cells, whereas in the rectum, they tended to correlate with the proportion of circulating CD4+T cells expressing α4β7 or CCR6. Mechanisms of T cell reconstitution may differ throughout the gut, with homing contributing more in the rectum while ileal reconstitution is associated with mucosal CD4+T cell anergy.

  11. Site-Specific Differences in T Cell Frequencies and Phenotypes in the Blood and Gut of HIV-Uninfected and ART-Treated HIV+ Adults

    PubMed Central

    Yukl, Steven A.; Shergill, Amandeep K.; Girling, Valerie; Li, Qingsheng; Killian, Maudi; Epling, Lorrie; Li, Peilin; Kaiser, Philipp; Haase, Ashley; Havlir, Diane V.; McQuaid, Kenneth; Sinclair, Elizabeth; Wong, Joseph K.

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal T lymphocytes are critical for mucosal immunity and HIV pathogenesis, yet little is known about normal T cell numbers and phenotypes in different regions of the gut, or the degree to which ART can restore levels to those of HIV-uninfected individuals. To investigate these questions, we measured T cell frequencies and markers of memory, activation, anergy, and homing in the blood, ileum, and rectum of HIV- and ART-suppressed HIV+ adults. In HIV- individuals, T cell frequencies and phenotypes differed significantly between sites. Compared to HIV- adults, HIV+ adults had lower absolute CD4+T cell counts in the ileal lamina propria and lower relative CD4+T cell counts in the blood and ileum. In the gut, HIV+ adults had a higher proportion of CD38+ CD4+T cells, a lower proportion of terminally-differentiated effector cells, and, in the rectum, a higher proportion of CTLA-4+ CD4+T cells. In HIV+ individuals, relative CD4+T cell numbers in the ileum correlated with the proportion of CTLA-4+ CD4+T cells, whereas in the rectum, they tended to correlate with the proportion of circulating CD4+T cells expressing α4β7 or CCR6. Mechanisms of T cell reconstitution may differ throughout the gut, with homing contributing more in the rectum while ileal reconstitution is associated with mucosal CD4+T cell anergy. PMID:25811360

  12. Absence of gain-of-function JAK1 and JAK3 mutations in adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Kameda, T; Shide, K; Shimoda, H K; Hidaka, T; Kubuki, Y; Katayose, K; Taniguchi, Y; Sekine, M; Kamiunntenn, A; Maeda, K; Nagata, K; Matsunaga, T; Shimoda, K

    2010-09-01

    Janus kinase 1 (JAK1) and JAK3 plays a critical role in lymphocyte proliferation and differentiation. Somatic JAK1 mutations are found in 18% of adult precursor T acute lymphoblastic leukemias and somatic JAK3 mutations are found in 3.3% of cutaneous T cell lymphomas. Some of the mutations are confirmed as a gain-of-function mutation and are assumed to be involved in leukemogenesis. Adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) is a type of T cell neoplasm, and activation of JAK/STAT pathways is sometimes observed in them. We investigated JAK1 and JAK3 mutations in 20 ATLL patients. No JAK1 mutations were found, and five types of single nucleotide polymorphisms were observed in 12 cases, whose frequencies almost match those in Asian populations. As for JAK3, a synonymous mutation was found in one case. JAK1 and JAK3 mutations are unlikely involved in the leukemogenesis of ATLL.

  13. Fathers' Trait Verbal Aggressiveness and Argumentativeness as Predictors of Adult Sons' Perceptions of Fathers' Sarcasm, Criticism, and Verbal Aggressiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beatty, Michael J.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Finds that approximately 40% of the variance in adult sons' reports of fathers' messages (sarcasm, criticism, and verbal aggressiveness) was attributable to fathers' self-reported argumentativeness and verbal aggression. (SR)

  14. A dyshidrosis-like variant of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma with clinicopathological aspects of mycosis fungoides. A case report.

    PubMed

    Bittencourt, Achiléa L; Mota, Karla; Oliveira, Rodrigo F; Farré, Lourdes

    2009-12-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) is an aggressive type of leukemia/lymphoma associated with the human T-cell lymphotropic virus (HTLV-I). We describe an adult male patient clinically and pathologically diagnosed as mycosis fungoides and treated with chemotherapy after which complete involution of the lesions occurred. The disease relapsed with confluent dyshidrosis-like vesicles on the palmoplantar regions, followed by disseminated vesiculopapules and associated lymphocytosis. A serological test performed at this time revealed HTLV-I infection, and a diagnosis of chronic ATL was made. Monoclonal integration of HTLV-I was detected in peripheral blood mononuclear cells by inverse long polymerase chain reaction. A skin biopsy revealed spongiosis, Pautrier abscesses, and intraepidermal vesicles with atypical lymphocytes and an infiltration of small and atypical CD4 lymphocytes in the superficial dermis. Proliferative index (Ki-67) was 70%. This is the first reported vesicular cutaneous ATL with confirmation of HTLV-I proviral integration. The delay that occurred in diagnosing ATL was due to the fact that mycosis fungoides and ATL may present the same clinical, histopathological, and immunohistochemical features.

  15. Cutaneous type of adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma in a French West Indian woman. Clonal rearrangement of T-cell receptor beta and gamma genes and monoclonal integration of HTLV-I proviral DNA in the skin infiltrate.

    PubMed

    Gessain, A; Moulonguet, I; Flageul, B; Perrin, P; Capesius, C; D'Agay, M F; Gisselbrecht, C; Sigaux, F; Civatte, J

    1990-11-01

    A 45-year-old woman, a native of the French West Indies who had lived in France since 1973, developed multiple cutaneous plaques and nodules in 1987. Histopathologic studies revealed dermal infiltration with mature activated T cells (CD4+, CD25+, DR+) with nuclear convolutions and epidermatotropisim. High titers of specific human T lymphotropic virus (HTLV)-I antibodies were detected in the serum. Molecular analysis of DNA extracted from the skin tumor biopsy specimen showed a clonal integration of an HTLV-I provirus and a T-cell clonal population as demonstrated by T-cell receptor beta and gamma gene rearrangement studies. Neither HTLV-I provirus nor T-cell receptor rearrangements were detected in peripheral blood mononuclear cells DNA despite the presence of rare adult T cell leukemia cells (less than 1%) and a small excess of DR-expressing cells, and detection of HTLV-I Pol and Px sequences by in vitro gene amplification. In this case only gene analysis of the skin lesions made possible an early diagnosis of a cutaneous adult T cell leukemia. This illustrates the need for such molecular studies to differentiate, in HTLV-I seropositive patients from endemic areas, a HTLV-I-induced T cell lymphoma from HTLV-I-nonrelated cutaneous T cell lymphomas.

  16. CD19-targeted T cells rapidly induce molecular remissions in adults with chemotherapy-refractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Brentjens, Renier; Davila, Marco L; Riviere, Isabelle; Park, Jae; Wang, Xiuyan; Cowell, Lindsay G; Bartido, Shirley; Stefanski, Jolanta; Taylor, Clare; Olszewska, Malgorzata; Borquez-Ojeda, Oriana; Qu, Jinrong; Wasielewska, Teresa; He, Qing; Bernal, Yvette; Rijo, Ivelise V; Hedvat, Cyrus; Kobos, Rachel; Curran, Kevin; Steinherz, Peter; Jurcic, Joseph; Rosenblat, Todd; Maslak, Peter; Frattini, Mark; Sadelain, Michel

    2013-01-01

    Adults with relapsed B-acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) have a dismal prognosis. Only those patients able to achieve a second remission with no minimal residual disease (MRD−) have a hope for long-term survival in the context of a subsequent allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT). We have treated 5 relapsed B-ALL subjects with autologous T cells expressing a CD19-specific CD28/CD3ζ second generation dual-signaling chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) termed 19-28z. All patients with persistent morphological disease or MRD+ disease upon T cell infusion demonstrated rapid tumor eradication and achieved MRD-negative complete remissions as assessed by deep sequencing PCR. Therapy was well tolerated although significant cytokine elevations, specifically observed in those patients with morphologic evidence of disease at the time of treatment, required lymphotoxic steroid therapy to ameliorate cytokine-mediated toxicities. Significantly, cytokine elevations directly correlated to tumor burden at the time of CAR modified T cell infusions. Tumor cells from one patient with relapsed disease after CAR modified T cell therapy, ineligible for additional allo-HSCT therapy, exhibited persistent expression of CD19 and sensitivity to autologous 19-28z T cell mediated cytotoxicity suggesting potential clinical benefit of additional CAR modified T cell infusions. These results demonstrate the marked anti-tumor efficacy of 19-28z CAR modified T cells in patients with relapsed/refractory B-ALL and the reliability of this novel therapy to induce profound molecular remissions, an ideal bridge to potentially curative therapy with subsequent allo-HSCT. PMID:23515080

  17. CCR4 frameshift mutation identifies a distinct group of adult T cell leukaemia/lymphoma with poor prognosis.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Noriaki; Miyoshi, Hiroaki; Kato, Takeharu; Sakata-Yanagimoto, Mamiko; Niino, Daisuke; Taniguchi, Hiroaki; Moriuchi, Yukiyoshi; Miyahara, Masaharu; Kurita, Daisuke; Sasaki, Yuya; Shimono, Joji; Kawamoto, Keisuke; Utsunomiya, Atae; Imaizumi, Yoshitaka; Seto, Masao; Ohshima, Koichi

    2016-04-01

    Adult T cell leukaemia/lymphoma (ATLL) is an intractable T cell neoplasm caused by human T cell leukaemia virus type 1. Next-generation sequencing-based comprehensive mutation studies have revealed recurrent somatic CCR4 mutations in ATLL, although clinicopathological findings associated with CCR4 mutations remain to be delineated. In the current study, 184 cases of peripheral T cell lymphoma, including 113 cases of ATLL, were subjected to CCR4 mutation analysis. This sequence analysis identified mutations in 27% (30/113) of cases of ATLL and 9% (4/44) of cases of peripheral T cell lymphoma not otherwise specified. Identified mutations included nonsense (NS) and frameshift (FS) mutations. No significant differences in clinicopathological findings were observed between ATLL cases stratified by presence of CCR4 mutation. All ATLL cases with CCR4 mutations exhibited cell-surface CCR4 positivity. Semi-quantitative CCR4 protein analysis of immunohistochemical sections revealed higher CCR4 expression in cases with NS mutations of CCR4 than in cases with wild-type (WT) CCR4. Furthermore, among ATLL cases, FS mutation was significantly associated with a poor prognosis, compared with NS mutation and WT CCR4. These results suggest that CCR4 mutation is an important determinant of the clinical course in ATLL cases, and that NS and FS mutations of CCR4 behave differently with respect to ATLL pathophysiology.

  18. Broad HIV-1 inhibition in vitro by vaccine-elicited CD8+ T cells in African adults

    PubMed Central

    Mutua, Gaudensia; Farah, Bashir; Langat, Robert; Indangasi, Jackton; Ogola, Simon; Onsembe, Brian; Kopycinski, Jakub T; Hayes, Peter; Borthwick, Nicola J; Ashraf, Ambreen; Dally, Len; Barin, Burc; Tillander, Annika; Gilmour, Jill; De Bont, Jan; Crook, Alison; Hannaman, Drew; Cox, Josephine H; Anzala, Omu; Fast, Patricia E; Reilly, Marie; Chinyenze, Kundai; Jaoko, Walter; Hanke, Tomáš; HIV-CORE 004 study group, the

    2016-01-01

    We are developing a pan-clade HIV-1 T-cell vaccine HIVconsv, which could complement Env vaccines for prophylaxis and be a key to HIV cure. Our strategy focuses vaccine-elicited effector T-cells on functionally and structurally conserved regions (not full-length proteins and not only epitopes) of the HIV-1 proteome, which are common to most global variants and which, if mutated, cause a replicative fitness loss. Our first clinical trial in low risk HIV-1-negative adults in Oxford demonstrated the principle that naturally mostly subdominant epitopes, when taken out of the context of full-length proteins/virus and delivered by potent regimens involving combinations of simian adenovirus and poxvirus modified vaccinia virus Ankara, can induce robust CD8+ T cells of broad specificities and functions capable of inhibiting in vitro HIV-1 replication. Here and for the first time, we tested this strategy in low risk HIV-1-negative adults in Africa. We showed that the vaccines were well tolerated and induced high frequencies of broadly HIVconsv-specific plurifunctional T cells, which inhibited in vitro viruses from four major clades A, B, C, and D. Because sub-Saharan Africa is globally the region most affected by HIV-1/AIDS, trial HIV-CORE 004 represents an important stage in the path toward efficacy evaluation of this highly rational and promising vaccine strategy. PMID:27617268

  19. Current and future aggressive peripheral T-cell lymphoma treatment paradigms, biological features and therapeutic molecular targets.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, J; Gutiérrez, A; Martínez-Delgado, B; Perez-Manga, G

    2009-09-01

    Prognosis of PTCL is generally poor when treated with conventional chemotherapy regimens used in B-cell aggressive lymphomas. Recent advances in genomic and molecular profiling of PTCL have allowed to further insight this heterogeneous group of neoplasias and their main prognostic factors. This review will try to summarize the main clinical problems related to standard frontline and salvage therapy, including the use of conventional chemotherapy and high-dose, dose-dense and immunotherapeutic strategies, as well as new approaches based on biological knowledge and the use of new drugs or immunotherapy.

  20. Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma in the Caribbean cohort is a distinct clinical entity with dismal response to conventional chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Derman, Olga; Kornblum, Noah; Battini, Ramakrishna; Wang, Yanhua; Narasimhulu, Deepa M.; Mantzaris, Ioannis; Shastri, Aditi; Verma, Amit; Ye, Hilda; Braunschweig, Ira; Janakiram, Murali

    2016-01-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) is a rare and aggressive disease caused by human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 that predominantly affects Japanese and Caribbean populations. Most studies have focused on Japanese cohorts. We conducted a retrospective analysis of 53 cases of ATLL who presented to our institution between 2003-2014. ATLL in the Caribbean population presents more often as the acute and lymphomatous subtypes, is associated with complex cytogenetics, and has a high rate of CNS involvement. The overall response rate to first-line therapies with anthracycline-based regimens was poor (32%), with a median survival of only 6.9 months. A complete or partial response to first-line regimens was associated with better survival. There was no difference in survival between patients who received chemotherapy alone versus chemotherapy with antiviral agents. Allogeneic transplantation was performed in five patients, two of whom achieved complete remission despite residual or refractory disease. Recipients of allogeneic transplantation had significantly improved overall survival compared to non-transplanted patients. This is the first analysis to describe ATLL pathological features, cytogenetics, and response to standard therapy and transplantation in the Caribbean cohort. PMID:27341021

  1. Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma associated with HTLV-1 infection in a Brazilian adolescent.

    PubMed

    do Valle, A C; Galhardo, M C; Leite, A C; Araújo, A Q; Cuzzi-Maya, T; Maceira, J P; de Ameida Dobbin, J

    2001-01-01

    We present the case of a 15-year-old patient infected with HTLV-1 who developed a cutaneous T-cell lymphoma, confirmed by histopathological and immunohistochemical examination, as well as clinically and hematologically confirmed leukemia. The patient died 3 months after initial presentation of the disease. The rarity of the disease in this age group justifies the present report.

  2. Interleukin 12 exerts a differential effect on the maturation of neonatal and adult human CD45R0- CD4 T cells.

    PubMed Central

    Shu, U; Demeure, C E; Byun, D G; Podlaski, F; Stern, A S; Delespesse, G

    1994-01-01

    It is now recognized that IL-12 plays a predominant role in protective immunity against intracellular pathogens by promoting the development of T helper type 1 (Th1) responses. We here report the unexpected observations that IL-12 exerts differential effects on the maturation of "native" human CD4 T cells isolated from umbilical cord blood or from the blood of healthy adults. After priming in the presence of IL-12, naive cells of adult donors, defined as CD45R0- CD4+ T cells, acquire a Th1 phenotype whereas neonatal cells develop into effector cells producing high levels of IL-4 in addition to IFN-gamma. This effect of IL-12 on neonatal T cells is direct inasmuch as it is observed on highly purified CD4 T cells, however, it is not inhibited by CD8 T cells and natural killer cells. Unstimulated neonatal T cells which have been preincubated with IL-12 before the priming behave like adult T cells and acquire a Th1 phenotype after stimulation in the presence of IL-12. Given that IL-4 is a potent antagonist of Th1 responses, the finding that IL-12 promotes the maturation of neonatal T cells into IL-4 producers may explain the increased susceptibility of neonates to intracellular pathogens and should be taken into account for the development of vaccines to be used in the perinatal period. Images PMID:7929809

  3. Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma in South and Central America and the Caribbean: systematic search and review.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Pedro D; de Carvalho, Rebeca F; Bittencourt, Achiléa L

    2017-03-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) is caused by the human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) which is endemic in countries of Caribbean and Central and South America. We performed a systematic search and review to identify publications on ATL in these countries to verify if this disease was getting recognition in these regions as well as the characteristics of the observed cases. The median age of 49.4 years was lower than that referred to in Japan. According to our findings in most Brazilian states and in some other countries, ATL is not being recognized and should be strongly considered in the differential diagnosis of T-cell leukemias/lymphomas. Failure to identify these cases may be due to the unsystematic realization of serology for HTLV-1 and phenotypic identification of non-Hodgkin lymphomas that may result from lack of resources. Detection of ATL cases has been more feasible with cooperation from foreign research centers. A huge effort should be made to improve the surveillance system for ATL diagnosis in most of the South- and Central-American and Caribbean countries, and this attitude should be embraced by public organs to support health professionals in this important task.

  4. Cancer/testis antigens are novel targets of immunotherapy for adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, Hiroyoshi; Maeda, Yuka; Ishida, Takashi; Gnjatic, Sacha; Sato, Eiichi; Mori, Fumiko; Sugiyama, Daisuke; Ito, Asahi; Fukumori, Yasuo; Utsunomiya, Atae; Inagaki, Hiroshi; Old, Lloyd J; Ueda, Ryuzo; Sakaguchi, Shimon

    2012-03-29

    Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) is an intractable hematologic malignancy caused by human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1), which infects approximately 20 million people worldwide. Here, we have explored the possible expression of cancer/testis (CT) antigens by ATLL cells, as CT antigens are widely recognized as ideal targets of cancer immunotherapy against solid tumors. A high percentage (87.7%) of ATLL cases (n = 57) expressed CT antigens at the mRNA level: NY-ESO-1 (61.4%), MAGE-A3 (31.6%), and MAGE-A4 (61.4%). CT antigen expression was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. This contrasts with other types of lymphoma or leukemia, which scarcely express these CT antigens. Humoral immune responses, particularly against NY-ESO-1, were detected in 11.6% (5 of 43) and NY-ESO-1-specific CD8(+) T-cell responses were observed in 55.6% (5 of 9) of ATLL patients. NY-ESO-1-specific CD8(+) T cells recognized autologous ATLL cells and produced effector cytokines. Thus, ATLL cells characteristically express CT antigens and therefore vaccination with CT antigens can be an effective immunotherapy of ATLL.

  5. Extranodal NK/T cell lymphoma and aggressive NK cell leukaemia: evidence for their origin on CD56+bright CD16-/+dim NK cells.

    PubMed

    Lima, Margarida

    2015-10-01

    Mature natural killer (NK) cell neoplasms are classified by the World Health Organization into extranodal NK/T cell lymphoma, nasal type (ENKTL) and aggressive NK cell leukaemia (ANKL). In order to propose their normal NK cell counterparts, we reviewed the literature on the phenotype of the neoplastic NK cells from five series of patients with ENKTL (n = 411) and seven series of patients with ANKL (n = 114) and compared with that of the normal and activated mature CD56 NK cell subsets. The tumour NK cells usually express brightly the CD56 adhesion molecule and CD94 lectin type killer receptor, and have an activation-related (cytoplasmic CD3ε, CD7, CD45RO, HLA-DR) phenotype; in contrast, CD16 and killer immunoglobulin-like receptors are frequently negative, and CD57 expression is almost never observed. These phenotypic features would suggest that ENKTL and ANKL cells do represent the neoplastic counterpart of the mature CD56 NK cells, which undergo activation and malignant transformation after Epstein-Barr virus infection.

  6. Anti-CD19 chimeric antigen receptor T-cell therapy for adult Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yang-min; Wu, Zhao; Tan, You-ping; Du, Yuan-yuan; Liu, Zhi; Ou, Rui-ming; Liu, Shuang; Pu, Cheng-fei; Jiang, Jing; Wang, Jin-ping; Xiao, Lei; Zhang, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: The presence of the Philadelphia chromosome (Ph) in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) has been associated with a high risk of disease relapse and a poor prognosis. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is an established treatment for adults with Ph-positive ALL, but relapse remains the primary cause of treatment failure, and is associated with an extremely poor prognosis. The emergence of resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) poses a challenge for patients with disease relapses after initial treatment with TKI-containing regimens. Patient concerns: Two patients with TKI-resistant recurrent Ph-positive ALL. Diagnoses: Ph-positive ALL. Interventions: Anti-CD19 CAR T-cell infusion. Outcomes: One patient's bone marrow blasts decreased significantly, and the other reached negative minimal residual disease (MRD). However, we first recorded the development of new-onset acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) after anti-CD19 CAR T-cell infusion in a patient who received allogeneic HSCT. Our 2 case reports also demonstrate the efficacy of anti-CD19 CAR T-cell therapy in the treatment of TKI-resistant Ph-positive ALL. Lessons: Our report suggests that anti-CD19 CAR T-cell therapy may be a promising option for the treatment of relapsed Ph-positive ALL after conventional chemotherapy or allogeneic HSCT. However, caution is due given the possibility of the adverse effects of cytokine release syndrome (CRS)-induced aGVHD for patients receiving allogeneic HSCT. PMID:28002337

  7. Screening of promising chemotherapeutic candidates from plants against human adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (III).

    PubMed

    Nakano, Daisuke; Ishitsuka, Kenji; Kamikawa, Mio; Matsuda, Michika; Tsuchihashi, Ryota; Okawa, Masafumi; Okabe, Hikaru; Tamura, Kazuo; Kinjo, Junei

    2013-10-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) is a malignancy of mature peripheral T lymphocytes caused by human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I). In our previous paper, 214 extracts from 162 plants were screened to elucidate the anti-proliferative principles against HTLV-I-infected T-cell lines. In this study, 245 extracts from 182 plants belonging to 61 families were further tested against two HTLV-I-infected T-cell lines (MT-1 and MT-2). Potent anti-proliferative effects were exhibited against MT-1 and MT-2 cells by 52 and 60 of the 245 extracts tested, respectively. Of these, two extracts showed strong inhibitory activity (EC₅₀ values 0.1-1 μg/mL; +++) against both cells, 7 extracts showed moderate inhibitory activity (EC5₅₀ values 1-10 μg/mL; ++), and 43 extracts showed weak inhibitory activity (EC₅₀ values 10-100 μg/mL; +), whereas the remaining extracts did not show any activity (EC₅₀ values >100 μg/mL; -) against MT-1 cells. On the other hand, 10 extracts showed moderate inhibitory activit and, 48 extracts showed weak inhibitory activity, whereas the remaining extracts did not show any activity against MT-2 cells. Extracts from the aerial parts of Annona reticulata and A. squamosa showed the most potent inhibitory activity and three aporphine alkaloids were isolated from their extracts as the active principles by activity-guided fractionation.

  8. Human T-lymphotropic virus 1 (HTLV-1)-associated lichenoid dermatitis induced by CD8+ T cells in HTLV-1 carrier, HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis and adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Tokura, Yoshiki; Ito, Taisuke; Kawakami, Chika; Sugita, Kazunari; Kasuya, Akira; Tatsuno, Kazuki; Sawada, Yu; Nakamura, Motonobu; Shimauchi, Takatoshi

    2015-10-01

    Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) induces adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL), HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP) and carrier. ATLL is a mature CD4+ CD25+ CCR4+ T-cell neoplasm, and approximately half of patients have direct skin involvement manifesting patch, plaque, tumor, multiple papules, erythroderma and purpura. However, there exist secondary eruptions without tumor cell infiltration in patients with ATLL or HAM/TSP and carriers of HTLV-1. To clarify the presence of reactive skin eruptions in HTLV-1-infected individuals, we reviewed our patients with HTLV-1-associated diseases. In 2002-2012, we saw 50 ATLL or HAM/TSP patients and HTLV-1 carriers presenting with skin lesions. We retrospectively selected cases that histologically showed lichenoid tissue reactions with predominant infiltration of CD8+ T cells, but not CD4+ tumor cells. The cases included erythroderma (HTLV-1 carrier), lichen planus (HTLV-1 carrier), alopecia areata (HAM/TSP), chronic actinic dermatitis (HTLV-1 carrier to acute ATLL conversion) and discoid lupus erythematosus (smoldering ATLL). They were graft-versus-host disease-like, major secondary lesions and seen in HTLV-1 carriers and patients with HAM/TSP and smoldering ATLL. We coin the term HTLV-1-associated lichenoid dermatitis (HALD) to encompass the conditions. HALD may occur in association with the elevated immunity toward HTLV-1-infected CD4+ T cells, thus sharing the pathogenetic role of cytotoxic T cells with HAM/TSP.

  9. Differential requirement for CCR4 and CCR7 during the development of innate and adaptive αβT cells in the adult thymus.

    PubMed

    Cowan, Jennifer E; McCarthy, Nicholas I; Parnell, Sonia M; White, Andrea J; Bacon, Andrea; Serge, Arnauld; Irla, Magali; Lane, Peter J L; Jenkinson, Eric J; Jenkinson, William E; Anderson, Graham

    2014-08-01

    αβT cell development depends upon serial migration of thymocyte precursors through cortical and medullary microenvironments, enabling specialized stromal cells to provide important signals at specific stages of their development. Although conventional αβT cells are subject to clonal deletion in the medulla, entry into the thymus medulla also fosters αβT cell differentiation. For example, during postnatal periods, the medulla is involved in the intrathymic generation of multiple αβT cell lineages, notably the induction of Foxp3(+) regulatory T cell development and the completion of invariant NKT cell development. Although migration of conventional αβT cells to the medulla is mediated by the chemokine receptor CCR7, how other T cell subsets gain access to medullary areas during their normal development is not clear. In this study, we show that combining a panel of thymocyte maturation markers with cell surface analysis of CCR7 and CCR4 identifies distinct stages in the development of multiple αβT cell lineages in the thymus. Although Aire regulates expression of the CCR4 ligands CCL17 and CCL22, we show that CCR4 is dispensable for thymocyte migration and development in the adult thymus, demonstrating defective T cell development in Aire(-/-) mice is not because of a loss of CCR4-mediated migration. Moreover, we reveal that CCR7 controls the development of invariant NKT cells by enabling their access to IL-15 trans-presentation in the thymic medulla and influences the balance of early and late intrathymic stages of Foxp3(+) regulatory T cell development. Collectively, our data identify novel roles for CCR7 during intrathymic T cell development, highlighting its importance in enabling multiple αβT cell lineages to access the thymic medulla.

  10. Xenotransplantation elicits salient tumorigenicity of adult T-cell leukemia-derived cells via aberrant AKT activation.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Kazunori; Takanashi, Tomoka; Nasu, Kentaro; Tamai, Keiichi; Mochizuki, Mai; Satoh, Ikuro; Ine, Shoji; Sasaki, Osamu; Satoh, Kennichi; Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Harigae, Hideo; Sugamura, Kazuo

    2016-05-01

    The transplantation of human cancer cells into immunodeficient NOD/SCID/IL-2Rγc(null) (NOG) mice often causes highly malignant cell populations like cancer stem cells to emerge. Here, by serial transplantation in NOG mice, we established two highly tumorigenic adult T-cell leukemia-derived cell lines, ST1-N6 and TL-Om1-N8. When transplanted s.c., these cells formed tumors significantly earlier and from fewer initial cells than their parental lines ST1 and TL-Om1. We found that protein kinase B (AKT) signaling was upregulated in ST1-N6 and TL-Om1-N8 cells, and that this upregulation was due to the decreased expression of a negative regulator, INPP5D. Furthermore, the introduction of a constitutively active AKT mutant expression vector into ST1 cells augmented the tumorigenicity of the cells, whereas treatment with the AKT inhibitor MK-2206 attenuated the progression of tumors induced by ST1-N6 cells. Collectively, our results reveal that the AKT signaling pathway plays a critical role in the malignancy of adult T-cell leukemia-derived cells.

  11. Effects of Violent-Video-Game Exposure on Aggressive Behavior, Aggressive-Thought Accessibility, and Aggressive Affect Among Adults With and Without Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    PubMed

    Engelhardt, Christopher R; Mazurek, Micah O; Hilgard, Joseph; Rouder, Jeffrey N; Bartholow, Bruce D

    2015-08-01

    Recent mass shootings have prompted the idea among some members of the public that exposure to violent video games can have a pronounced effect on individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Empirical evidence for or against this claim has been missing, however. To address this issue, we assigned adults with and without ASD to play a violent or nonviolent version of a customized first-person shooter video game. After they played the game, we assessed three aggression-related outcome variables (aggressive behavior, aggressive-thought accessibility, and aggressive affect). Results showed strong evidence that adults with ASD, compared with typically developing adults, are not differentially affected by acute exposure to violent video games. Moreover, model comparisons provided modest evidence against any effect of violent game content whatsoever. Findings from this experiment suggest that societal concerns that exposure to violent games may have a unique effect on adults with autism are not supported by evidence.

  12. HTLV-1 Infection and Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma-A Tale of Two Proteins: Tax and HBZ.

    PubMed

    Giam, Chou-Zen; Semmes, Oliver John

    2016-06-16

    HTLV-1 (Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1) is a complex human delta retrovirus that currently infects 10-20 million people worldwide. While HTLV-1 infection is generally asymptomatic, 3%-5% of infected individuals develop a highly malignant and intractable T-cell neoplasm known as adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) decades after infection. How HTLV-1 infection progresses to ATL is not well understood. Two viral regulatory proteins, Tax and HTLV-1 basic zipper protein (HBZ), encoded by the sense and antisense viral transcripts, respectively, are thought to play indispensable roles in the oncogenic process of ATL. This review focuses on the roles of Tax and HBZ in viral replication, persistence, and oncogenesis. Special emphasis is directed towards recent literature on the mechanisms of action of these two proteins and the roles of Tax and HBZ in influencing the outcomes of HTLV-1 infection including senescence induction, viral latency and persistence, genome instability, cell proliferation, and ATL development. Attempts are made to integrate results from cell-based studies of HTLV-1 infection and studies of HTLV-1 proviral integration site preference, clonality, and clonal expansion based on high throughput DNA sequencing. Recent data showing that Tax hijacks key mediators of DNA double-strand break repair signaling-the ubiquitin E3 ligase, ring finger protein 8 (RNF8) and the ubiquitin E2 conjugating enzyme (UBC13)-to activate the canonical nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B-cells (NF-κB) and other signaling pathways will be discussed. A perspective on how the Tax-RNF8 signaling axis might impact genomic instability and how Tax may collaborate with HBZ to drive oncogenesis is provided.

  13. HTLV-1 Infection and Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma—A Tale of Two Proteins: Tax and HBZ

    PubMed Central

    Giam, Chou-Zen; Semmes, Oliver John

    2016-01-01

    HTLV-1 (Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1) is a complex human delta retrovirus that currently infects 10–20 million people worldwide. While HTLV-1 infection is generally asymptomatic, 3%–5% of infected individuals develop a highly malignant and intractable T-cell neoplasm known as adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) decades after infection. How HTLV-1 infection progresses to ATL is not well understood. Two viral regulatory proteins, Tax and HTLV-1 basic zipper protein (HBZ), encoded by the sense and antisense viral transcripts, respectively, are thought to play indispensable roles in the oncogenic process of ATL. This review focuses on the roles of Tax and HBZ in viral replication, persistence, and oncogenesis. Special emphasis is directed towards recent literature on the mechanisms of action of these two proteins and the roles of Tax and HBZ in influencing the outcomes of HTLV-1 infection including senescence induction, viral latency and persistence, genome instability, cell proliferation, and ATL development. Attempts are made to integrate results from cell-based studies of HTLV-1 infection and studies of HTLV-1 proviral integration site preference, clonality, and clonal expansion based on high throughput DNA sequencing. Recent data showing that Tax hijacks key mediators of DNA double-strand break repair signaling—the ubiquitin E3 ligase, ring finger protein 8 (RNF8) and the ubiquitin E2 conjugating enzyme (UBC13)—to activate the canonical nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B-cells (NF-κB) and other signaling pathways will be discussed. A perspective on how the Tax-RNF8 signaling axis might impact genomic instability and how Tax may collaborate with HBZ to drive oncogenesis is provided. PMID:27322308

  14. Radiation therapy for the management of patients with HTLV-1-associated adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Simone, Charles B; Morris, John C; Stewart, Donn M; Urquhart, Nicole E; Janik, John E; Kreitman, Robert J; Lita, Elena; Conlon, Kevin; Wharfe, Gilian; Waldmann, Thomas A; Kaushal, Aradhana

    2012-08-30

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1-associated adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) typically has survivals measured in months with chemotherapy. One prior published series (1983-1991) assessed local radiotherapy for ATL. Ten consecutive patients with pathologically confirmed ATL treated with radiotherapy were reviewed. Subtypes included acute (n = 7), smoldering (n = 2), and lymphomatous (n = 1). Patients received an average of 2.5 systemic therapy regimens before radiotherapy. Twenty lesions (cutaneous = 10, nodal = 8, extranodal = 2) were treated to a mean of 35.4 Gy/2-3 Gy (range, 12-60 Gy). At 9.0-month mean follow-up (range, 0.1-42.0 months), all lesions symptomatically and radiographically responded, with in-field complete responses in 40.0% (nodal 37.5% vs. cutaneous 50.0%; P = .62). No patient experienced in-field progression. Nine patients developed new/progressive out-of-field disease. Median survival was 17.0 months (3-year survival, 30.0%). No Radiation Therapy Oncology Group acute grade ≥ 3 or any late toxicity was noted. This report is the first to use modern radiotherapy techniques and finds effective local control across ATL subtypes. Radiotherapy should be considered for symptomatic local progression of ATL.

  15. Quantitative PCR for HTLV-1 provirus in adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma using paraffin tumor sections.

    PubMed

    Kato, Junki; Masaki, Ayako; Fujii, Keiichiro; Takino, Hisashi; Murase, Takayuki; Yonekura, Kentaro; Utsunomiya, Atae; Ishida, Takashi; Iida, Shinsuke; Inagaki, Hiroshi

    2016-11-01

    Detection of HTLV-1 provirus using paraffin tumor sections may assist the diagnosis of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL). For the detection, non-quantitative PCR assay has been reported, but its usefulness and limitations remain unclear. To our knowledge, quantitative PCR assay using paraffin tumor sections has not been reported. Using paraffin sections from ATLLs and non-ATLL T-cell lymphomas, we first performed non-quantitative PCR for HTLV-1 provirus. Next, we determined tumor ratios and carried out quantitative PCR to obtain provirus copy numbers. The results were analyzed with a simple regression model and a novel criterion, cut-off using 95 % rejection limits. Our quantitative PCR assay showed an excellent association between tumor ratios and the copy numbers (r = 0.89, P < 0.0001). The 95 % rejection limits provided a statistical basis for the range for the determination of HTLV-1 involvement. Its application suggested that results of non-quantitative PCR assay should be interpreted very carefully and that our quantitative PCR assay is useful to estimate the status of HTLV-1 involvement in the tumor cases. In conclusion, our quantitative PCR assay using paraffin tumor sections may be useful for the screening of ATLL cases, especially in HTLV-1 non-endemic areas where easy access to serological testing for HTLV-1 infection is limited.

  16. EAPB0203, a member of the imidazoquinoxaline family, inhibits growth and induces caspase-dependent apoptosis in T-cell lymphomas and HTLV-I-associated adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Moarbess, Georges; El-Hajj, Hiba; Kfoury, Youmna; El-Sabban, Marwan E; Lepelletier, Yves; Hermine, Olivier; Deleuze-Masquéfa, Carine; Bonnet, Pierre-Antoine; Bazarbachi, Ali

    2008-04-01

    Imiquimod is an immune response modifier currently used as a topical treatment of genital warts, basal cell carcinoma, cutaneous metastasis of malignant melanoma, and vascular tumors. We developed more efficient killers from the same family of compounds that can induce apoptosis without the prominent pro-inflammatory response associated with imiquimod. Among these new products, tk;4EAPB0203, a member of the imidazo[1,2-a]quinoxalines, exhibits an important cytotoxic activity in vitro. HTLV-I-associated adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) and HTLV-I-negative peripheral T-cell lymphomas are associated with poor prognosis. Using potentially achievable concentrations of EAPB0203, we demonstrate inhibition of cell proliferation, G2/M cell- cycle arrest, and induction of apoptosis in HTLV-I-transformed and HTLV-I-negative malignant T cells and fresh ATL cells, whereas normal resting or activated T lymphocytes were resistant. EAPB0203 treatment significantly down-regulated the antiapoptotic proteins c-IAP-1 and Bcl-XL and resulted in a significant loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, cytoplasmic release of cytochrome c, and caspase-dependent apoptosis. Moreover, in HTLV-I-transformed cells only, EAPB0203 treatment stabilized p21 and p53 proteins but had no effect on NF-kappaB activation. These results support a potential therapeutic role for EAPB0203 in ATL and HTLV-I-negative T-cell lymphomas, either as a systemic or topical therapy for skin lesions.

  17. Epidermodysplasia-verruciformis-like eruption associated with gamma-papillomavirus infection in a patient with adult T-cell leukemia.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Kazuhiro; Egawa, Nagayasu; Kiyono, Tohru; Kanekura, Takuro

    2009-01-01

    Epidermodysplasia verruciformis (EV) is a genodermatosis characterized by widespread and persistent cutaneous lesions caused by beta-papillomaviruses. Rare cases of acquired EV-like eruption associated with beta-papillomavirus infection have been reported in immunosuppressed patients. We report a case of acquired EV-like eruption in an immunosuppressed patient with adult T-cell leukemia. The cutaneous lesions clinically resembled pityriasis versicolor and exhibited the typical histological features of EV, but in some areas of the same biopsy specimen characteristic homogeneous intracytoplasmic inclusion bodies were observed. Although beta-papillomavirus was not detected by highly sensitive polymerase chain reaction, a putative novel type of gamma-papillomavirus was identified. This is the first documentation of an association between EV-like eruption and gamma-papillomavirus infection.

  18. Crusted scabies in an adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma patient successfully treated with oral ivermectin.

    PubMed

    Yonekura, Kentaro; Kanekura, Takuro; Kanzaki, Tamotsu; Utsunomiya, Atae

    2006-02-01

    We report an adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) patient whose crusted scabies was successfully treated with oral ivermectin. This 63-year-old man had previously been treated with oral prednisolone, sobuzoxane and etoposide for approximately 1 year. When he developed crusted scabies, he received two doses of oral ivermectin (200 microg/kg) 10 days apart and the concomitant topical application of crotamiton containing 30% benzyl benzoate. This produced remarkable results, suggesting that oral ivermectin should be considered for the treatment of crusted scabies even in immunocompromised patients. While ivermectin may be useful for treating intractable scabies, attention must be paid to the possible appearance of ivermectin-resistant mites.

  19. Co-existence of PHF6 and NOTCH1 mutations in adult T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    LI, MIN; XIAO, LICHAN; XU, JINGYAN; ZHANG, RUN; GUO, JINGJING; OLSON, JUSTIN; WU, YUJIE; LI, JIANYONG; SONG, CHUNHUA; GE, ZHENG

    2016-01-01

    T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) results from the collaboration of multiple genetic abnormalities in the transformation of T-cell progenitors. Plant homeodomain finger protein 6 (PHF6) has recently been established as a key tumor suppressor, which is mutated in T-ALL; however, the clinical significance of PHF6 mutations has not been fully determined in adult T-ALL. In the present study, amplification of the PHF6 exons was performed, followed by DNA sequencing to identify the genomic mutations and examine the expression of PHF6 in adult patients with T-ALL. The correlation between PHF6 mutations and clinical features was also analyzed using a χ2 test, and between PHF6 mutations and survival curve using the Kaplan-Meier methods. PHF6 mutations were detected in 27.1% of the Chinese adults with T-ALL (16/59), 10 of which were found to be novel mutations. A significantly lower expression level of PHF6 was observed in T-ALL patients with PHF6 mutations compared with those without mutations. Of the observed mutations in PHF6, 6/16 were frame-shift mutations, indicating a PHF6 dysfunction in those patients. Of note, PHF6 mutations were found to be significantly associated with older age, lower hemoglobin levels, higher frequency of CD13 positivity and higher incidence of splenomegaly or lymphadenopathy. Furthermore, PHF6 mutations were found to be significantly correlated with Notch homolog 1, translocation-associated (Drosophila) (NOTCH1) mutations. The patients with T-ALL with co-existence of the two mutations had a significantly shorter event-free survival and a poor prognosis. The present results indicated that PHF6 is inactivated in adult T-ALL, due to its low expression and mutations. The present data indicated the synergistic effect of PHF6 and NOTCH1 mutations, as well as their co-existence, on the oncogenesis of adult T-ALL, and their potential as a prognostic marker for the disease. PMID:27347093

  20. Co-existence of PHF6 and NOTCH1 mutations in adult T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Li, Min; Xiao, Lichan; Xu, Jingyan; Zhang, Run; Guo, Jingjing; Olson, Justin; Wu, Yujie; Li, Jianyong; Song, Chunhua; Ge, Zheng

    2016-07-01

    T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) results from the collaboration of multiple genetic abnormalities in the transformation of T-cell progenitors. Plant homeodomain finger protein 6 (PHF6) has recently been established as a key tumor suppressor, which is mutated in T-ALL; however, the clinical significance of PHF6 mutations has not been fully determined in adult T-ALL. In the present study, amplification of the PHF6 exons was performed, followed by DNA sequencing to identify the genomic mutations and examine the expression of PHF6 in adult patients with T-ALL. The correlation between PHF6 mutations and clinical features was also analyzed using a χ(2) test, and between PHF6 mutations and survival curve using the Kaplan-Meier methods. PHF6 mutations were detected in 27.1% of the Chinese adults with T-ALL (16/59), 10 of which were found to be novel mutations. A significantly lower expression level of PHF6 was observed in T-ALL patients with PHF6 mutations compared with those without mutations. Of the observed mutations in PHF6, 6/16 were frame-shift mutations, indicating a PHF6 dysfunction in those patients. Of note, PHF6 mutations were found to be significantly associated with older age, lower hemoglobin levels, higher frequency of CD13 positivity and higher incidence of splenomegaly or lymphadenopathy. Furthermore, PHF6 mutations were found to be significantly correlated with Notch homolog 1, translocation-associated (Drosophila) (NOTCH1) mutations. The patients with T-ALL with co-existence of the two mutations had a significantly shorter event-free survival and a poor prognosis. The present results indicated that PHF6 is inactivated in adult T-ALL, due to its low expression and mutations. The present data indicated the synergistic effect of PHF6 and NOTCH1 mutations, as well as their co-existence, on the oncogenesis of adult T-ALL, and their potential as a prognostic marker for the disease.

  1. Suppressor T-cell population induced by Junin virus in adult mice.

    PubMed Central

    Campetella, O E; Barrios, H A; Galassi, N V

    1988-01-01

    Intracerebral (i.c.) Junin virus (JV) infection of adult BALB/c mice is characterized by the absence of morbidity and a low mortality (barely 8-10%). In contrast, the suckling mouse model exhibits almost 100% mortality following central nervous system (CNS) alterations consistent with a delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH)-like immune response. Besides, JV infection of adult (resistant) mice leads to immunosuppression of DTH to unrelated antigens. Here we present evidence demonstrating that such suppression is mediated by JV-induced cells present in spleen from 24 hr to 24 days post-infection, bearing the Thy-1+, Ly-1+2- phenotype and reactive to an unrelated antigen such as sheep red blood cells (SRBC). No evidence of suppressor factors was found. A relatively low number of total splenic cells (5 x 10(6) cells/mouse) was enough to transfer suppression. Therefore, this cell population may be involved in adult mouse survival to JV infection. PMID:2970429

  2. T Cells

    MedlinePlus

    ... Definition of MS Myelin Immune-Mediated Disease T Cells d What Causes MS? Disproved Theories Viruses Clusters d Who Gets MS? Pediatric MS ... the progression of MS, without harming any immune cells that are not involved in the process of myelin destruction. Share Smaller ... More Immune-Mediated Disease Learn More Myelin ...

  3. Transformed aggressive γδ-variant T-cell large granular lymphocytic leukemia with acquired copy neutral loss of heterozygosity at 17q11.2q25.3 and additional aberrations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ling; Ramchandren, Radhakrishnan; Papenhausen, Peter; Loughran, Thomas P; Sokol, Lubomir

    2014-09-01

    T-cell large granular lymphocytic leukemia (T-LGLL) is a rare indolent lymphoproliferative disorder characterized by cytopenias, splenomegaly, and various degrees of T-cell lymphocytosis, due to a clonal expansion of CD8-positive cytotoxic T-cells. Phenotypic variants of T-LGLL include CD4(+) /CD8(-) T-cells, with dual CD4(-) /CD8(-) /γδ(+) T-cells being even rarer. Cytogenetic abnormalities in T-LGLL have rarely been reported, and there is scientific debate regarding the existence of aggressive or transformed variants of T-LGLL. We report a patient with T-LGLL, γδ variant, with nearly 20-year-long duration of cytopenias before transformation to an unusual clinical scenario, manifesting with marked lymphocytosis >100 × 10(9) /L and infiltration of lymph nodes, tonsils, and subcutaneous tissue. Single-nucleotide polymorphism assays revealed acquired copy neutral loss of heterozygosity at 17q and deletion of 3p21.31, in addition to trisomy 5, monosomy X, and monosomy 21. These genetic abnormalities provided a better understanding of the molecular nature and the potentiality of disease transformation.

  4. Effect of Raltegravir-containing Intensification on HIV Burden and T Cell Activation in Multiple Gut Sites of HIV+ Adults on Suppressive Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Yukl, Steven A.; Shergill, Amandeep; McQuaid, Kenneth; Gianella, Sara; Lampiris, Harry; Hare, C. Bradley; Pandori, Mark; Sinclair, Elizabeth; Günthard, Huldrych F.; Fischer, Marek; Wong, Joseph K.; Havlir, Diane V.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To determine whether raltegravir-containing antiretroviral therapy (ART) intensification reduces HIV levels in the gut. Design Open-label study in HIV+ adults on ART with plasma HIV RNA<40 copies/ml. Methods Seven HIV+ adults received 12 weeks of ART intensification with raltegravir alone or in combination with efavirenz or darunavir. Gut cells were obtained by upper and lower endoscopy with biopsies from duodenum, ileum, colon, and rectum at baseline and 12 weeks. Study outcomes included plasma HIV RNA, HIV DNA and RNA from PBMC and 4 gut sites, T cell subsets, and activation markers. Results Intensification produced no consistent decrease in HIV RNA in the plasma, PBMC, duodenum, colon, or rectum. However, 5 of 7 participants had a decrease in unspliced HIV RNA per 106 CD4+ T cells in the ileum. There was a trend towards decreased T cell activation in all sites, which was greatest for CD8+ T cells in the ileum and PBMC, and a trend towards increased CD4+ T cells in the ileum. Conclusion Most HIV RNA and DNA in the blood and gut is not the result of ongoing replication that can be impacted by short-term intensification with raltegravir. However, the ileum may support ongoing productive infection in some patients on ART, even if the contribution to plasma RNA is not discernible. PMID:20827162

  5. Nivolumab in Treating Patients With HTLV-Associated T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-20

    Acute Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; CD3 Positive; CD4-Positive Neoplastic Cells Present; Chronic Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; HTLV-1 Infection; Hypercalcemia; Lymphomatous Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Smoldering Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma

  6. HTLV-1-associated adult T cell leukemia is highly susceptible to Navitoclax due to enhanced Bax expression.

    PubMed

    Witzens-Harig, Mathias; Giaisi, Marco; Köhler, Rebecca; Krammer, Peter H; Li-Weber, Min

    2016-01-15

    Over-expression of Bcl-2, Bcl-xL and Bcl-w is frequently associated with cancer resistance to chemotherapy. Navitoclax (ABT-263), an orally bio-available small-molecule mimetic of the Bcl-2 homology domain 3, specifically inhibits Bcl-2, Bcl-xL and Bcl-w. Despite promising results obtained from the clinical trials, the use of Navitoclax in patients is dose-limited due to induction of death of platelets via inhibition of Bcl-xL and subsequent thrombocytopenia. This side effect limits the use of Navitoclax in low doses and to very sensitive tumors. In this study, we show that HTLV-1-associated adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) cells, which over-express Bcl-2, Bcl-xL and Bcl-w, show a 10- to 20-fold higher sensitivity (EC50 = ∼ 25-50 nM) to Navitoclax compared to non-HTLV-1-associated leukemic cells (EC50 = ∼ 1 μM). Investigation of the molecular mechanisms revealed that the HTLV-1 oncogenic protein Tax up-regulates expression of the pro-apoptotic protein Bax which enhances the therapeutic efficacy of Navitoclax. In addition, we show that agents that inhibit the transcription elongation or translation initiation such as Wogonin and Roc-A can further decrease the effective dose of Navitoclax. Our study suggests that HTLV-1 ATL may be a good candidate disease for low dose Navitoclax therapy and probably with less risk of thrombocytopenia.

  7. Detection of HTLV-1 by polymerase chain reaction in situ hybridization in adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Setoyama, M; Kerdel, F A; Elgart, G; Kanzaki, T; Byrnes, J J

    1998-03-01

    A method for nonradioactive polymerase chain reaction in situ hybridization was developed and used to determine the distribution of human T-lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) proviral DNA in paraffin-embedded surgical specimens of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL). As controls, we used biopsy samples of five cases of mycosis fungoides, cells of an HTLV-I-infected cell line (MT2), as well as HTLV-1-negative cells (YAS). We successfully detected the amplicon of the HTLV-1 tax sequence in the nuclei of the cutaneous infiltrating lymphoid cells in 90% (9/10) of ATLL cases. Studies also revealed the existence of HTLV-1 provirus DNA in nuclei of sweat gland epithelial cells and vascular endothelial cells as well as lymphoid cells in ATLL patients. Mycosis fungoides and YAS cells were negative for the HTLV-I tax sequence, but MT2 cells were strongly positive. The results indicated that this technique was more sensitive in detecting intracellular amplicons than was the previous in situ hybridization method. Through its use, we were able to easily determine the distribution of HTLV-I-positive cells among the various cells and tissues of paraffin-embedded archival materials.

  8. In Vitro T-Cell Generation From Adult, Embryonic, and Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells: Many Roads to One Destination.

    PubMed

    Smith, Michelle J; Webber, Beau R; Mohtashami, Mahmood; Stefanski, Heather E; Zúñiga-Pflücker, Juan Carlos; Blazar, Bruce R

    2015-11-01

    T lymphocytes are critical mediators of the adaptive immune system and have the capacity to serve as therapeutic agents in the areas of transplant and cancer immunotherapy. While T cells can be isolated and expanded from patients, T cells derived in vitro from both hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) and human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) offer great potential advantages in generating a self-renewing source of T cells that can be readily genetically modified. T-cell differentiation in vivo is a complex process requiring tightly regulated signals; providing the correct signals in vitro to induce T-cell lineage commitment followed by their development into mature, functional, single positive T cells, is similarly complex. In this review, we discuss current methods for the in vitro derivation of T cells from murine and human HSPCs and hPSCs that use feeder-cell and feeder-cell-free systems. Furthermore, we explore their potential for adoption for use in T-cell-based therapies.

  9. Thymic hyperplasia after chemotherapy in adults with mature B cell lymphoma and its influence on thymic output and CD4+ T cells repopulation

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Dao-Ping; Jin, Hui; Ding, Chong-Yang; Liang, Jin-Hua; Wang, Li; Fan, Lei; Wu, Yu-Jie; Xu, Wei; Li, Jian-Yong

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT To investigate the thymic regenerative potential in adults accepting chemotherapy for lymphoma. The dynamics of thymic activity in 54 adults from baseline to 12 mo post-chemotherapy was analyzed by assessing thymic structural changes with serial computed tomography (CT) scans, and correlating these with measurements of thymic output by concurrent analysis of single-joint (sj) T-cell receptor excision circles (sjTREC) and CD31+ recent thymic emigrants (RTE) in peripheral blood. Furthermore, the consequence of thymic renewal on peripheral CD4+ T cell recovery after chemotherapy was evaluated. Time-dependent changes of thymic size and thymic output assessed by both sjTREC levels and CD31+ RTE counts in peripheral blood were observed during and after chemotherapy. Enlargement of thymus over baseline following chemotherapy regarded as rebound thymic hyperplasia (TH) was identified in 20 patients aged 18−53 y (median 33 y). By general linear models repeated measure analysis, it was found that, patients with TH (n = 20) had a faster recovery of sjTREC levels and CD31+ RTE counts after chemotherapy than patients with comparable age, gender, diagnosis, disease stage, thymic volume and output function at baseline but without TH (n = 18) (p = 0.035, 0.047); besides, patients with TH had a faster repopulation of both naïve CD4+ T cell and natural regulatory CD4+ T cell subsets than those without TH (p = 0.042, 0.038). These data suggested that adult thymus retains the capacity of regeneration after chemotherapy, especially in young adults. The presence of TH could contribute to the renewal of thymopoiesis and the replenishment of peripheral CD4+ T cell pool following chemotherapy in adults. PMID:27467956

  10. Cutaneous T cell lymphomas: mycosis fungoides, Sezary syndrome and HTLV-I-associated adult T cell leukemia (ATL) in Mali, West Africa: a clinical, pathological and immunovirological study of 14 cases and a review of the African ATL cases.

    PubMed

    Fouchard, N; Mahe, A; Huerre, M; Fraitag, S; Valensi, F; Macintyre, E; Sanou, F; de The, G; Gessain, A

    1998-04-01

    Cutaneous T cell lymphomas (CTCL) are rare lymphoproliferative diseases, which are frequently suspected to be of viral origin. As very few data were available concerning cutaneous T cell lymphomas in tropical Africa, we undertook a clinical, histopathological, immunological and viro-molecular study of patients with a clinical diagnosis of cutaneous lymphoma, in Bamako, Mali. While prior to this study, no case of CTCL had been reported in this country, 14 patients (five women, nine men; mean age 58 years) with a diagnosis of cutaneous lymphoma were seen over a period of 30 months (1992-1994) in the only dermatological department in Mali. Clinically, the most frequent pattern was an infiltrated erythrodermia similar to Sezary syndrome. Nodular lesions and/or plaques were rarely observed. All these cutaneous tumors were T cell lymphoproliferations, only one expressing the CD8+ antigen. A comprehensive analysis of all the available data permitted characterization of three cases of adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) associated with HTLV-I (one definitive case, of leukemic type, with demonstration of clonal integration of HTLV-I proviral genome and two probable ATL cases), three cases of Sezary syndrome (SS), two cases of mycosis fungoides (MF) and five cases of pleomorphic cutaneous lymphoma. In one case, the differentiation between MF and pleomorphic cutaneous lymphoma could not be established. HTLV-I serological and/or molecular markers were restricted to the three ATL cases. From the unique definitive ATL case, a T cell line was established from culture of peripheral blood mononuclear cells and sequence analysis of the env gene and the U3-LTR region demonstrated that the virus present in this patient belonged to the cosmopolitan subtype A. Thus, we report here the first evidence of HTLV-I infection and associated ATL in Mali. This is the second ATL case described for the whole Sahelian region (one ATL of the lymphoma type was reported previously in a Mauritanian

  11. The relationship between young adults' beliefs about anonymity and subsequent cyber aggression.

    PubMed

    Wright, Michelle F

    2013-12-01

    Anonymity is considered a key motivator for cyber aggression, but few investigations have focused on the connection between anonymity and the subsequent engagement in aggression through the cyber context. The present longitudinal study utilized structural equation modeling to reveal indirect associations between two types of anonymity (i.e., punishment by authority figures and retaliation from the target) and later cyber aggression among 130 young adults. These relationships were examined through the influence of beliefs about not getting caught and not believing in the permanency of online content. Findings indicated that both forms of anonymity were related to cyber aggression 6 months later through two explanatory mechanisms (i.e., confidence with not getting caught and believing online content is not permanent), after controlling for gender and cyber aggression at Time 1. The implications of these findings are discussed, and an appeal for additional research investigating cyber aggression among young adults is given.

  12. Early life vaccination: Generation of adult-quality memory CD8+ T cells in infant mice using non-replicating adenoviral vectors

    PubMed Central

    Nazerai, Loulieta; Bassi, Maria R.; Uddback, Ida E. M.; Holst, Peter J.; Christensen, Jan P.; Thomsen, Allan R.

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular pathogens represent a serious threat during early life. Importantly, even though the immune system of newborns may be characterized as developmentally immature, with a propensity to develop Th2 immunity, significant CD8+ T-cell responses may still be elicited in the context of optimal priming. Replication deficient adenoviral vectors have been demonstrated to induce potent CD8+ T-cell response in mice, primates and humans. The aim of the present study was therefore to assess whether replication-deficient adenovectors could overcome the risk of overwhelming antigen stimulation during the first period of life and provide a pertinent alternative in infant vaccinology. To address this, infant mice were vaccinated with three different adenoviral vectors and the CD8+ T-cell response after early life vaccination was explored. We assessed the frequency, polyfunctionality and in vivo cytotoxicity of the elicited memory CD8+ T cells, as well as the potential of these cells to respond to secondary infections and confer protection. We further tested the impact of maternal immunity against our replication-deficient adenoviral vector during early life vaccination. Overall, our results indicate that memory CD8+ T cells induced by adenoviral vectors in infant mice are of good quality and match those elicited in the adult host. PMID:27929135

  13. Screening of promising chemotherapeutic candidates against human adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma from plants: active principles from Physalis pruinosa and structure-activity relationships with withanolides.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Daisuke; Ishitsuka, Kenji; Hatsuse, Takahiro; Tsuchihashi, Ryota; Okawa, Masafumi; Okabe, Hikaru; Tamura, Kazuo; Kinjo, Junei

    2011-07-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) is a peripheral T-cell malignancy caused by human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-1). Clinical manifestations of ATL range from smoldering to chronic, lymphoma and acute subtypes. Patients with acute and lymphoma-type ATL require therapeutic intervention. Conventional chemotherapeutic regimens used against other malignant lymphoma have been administered to ATL patients, but the therapeutic outcomes of acute and lymphoma-type ATL remain very poor. In this study, 214 extracts from 162 plants belonging to 65 families were screened for the purpose of elucidating the anti-proliferative effect against HTLV-1-infected T-cell lines. Extracts from aerial parts of Physalis pruinosa showed potent inhibitory effect. We isolated five withanolides from the extracts by activity-guided fractionation and examined the structure-activity relationships. The presence of a 5β,6β-epoxy function is suggested to be essential for the activity, and the most active principle showed selective toxicity to HTLV-1-infected T-cell lines.

  14. Early life vaccination: Generation of adult-quality memory CD8+ T cells in infant mice using non-replicating adenoviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Nazerai, Loulieta; Bassi, Maria R; Uddback, Ida E M; Holst, Peter J; Christensen, Jan P; Thomsen, Allan R

    2016-12-08

    Intracellular pathogens represent a serious threat during early life. Importantly, even though the immune system of newborns may be characterized as developmentally immature, with a propensity to develop Th2 immunity, significant CD8+ T-cell responses may still be elicited in the context of optimal priming. Replication deficient adenoviral vectors have been demonstrated to induce potent CD8+ T-cell response in mice, primates and humans. The aim of the present study was therefore to assess whether replication-deficient adenovectors could overcome the risk of overwhelming antigen stimulation during the first period of life and provide a pertinent alternative in infant vaccinology. To address this, infant mice were vaccinated with three different adenoviral vectors and the CD8+ T-cell response after early life vaccination was explored. We assessed the frequency, polyfunctionality and in vivo cytotoxicity of the elicited memory CD8+ T cells, as well as the potential of these cells to respond to secondary infections and confer protection. We further tested the impact of maternal immunity against our replication-deficient adenoviral vector during early life vaccination. Overall, our results indicate that memory CD8+ T cells induced by adenoviral vectors in infant mice are of good quality and match those elicited in the adult host.

  15. Effects of oxytocin on aggressive responding in healthy adult males

    PubMed Central

    Alcorn, Joseph L.; Green, Charles E.; Schmitz, Joy; Lane, Scott D.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the acute effects of oxytocin (OT) on human aggression using a well-established laboratory measure of state (reactive) aggression to test the hypothesis that OT would decrease the frequency of aggressive responding. In a within-subject design, 17 healthy male volunteers received placebo or 24 international units of intranasal OT. Aggression was measured via the Point Subtraction Aggression Paradigm at 30 min prior and 30, 60 and 90 min post-dose. Acute OT did not produce a significant main effect on aggressive behavior. OT attenuated the expected rise in diastolic blood pressure from morning to early afternoon observed under placebo, providing a possible indicator of biological activity. Examination of individual differences showed that aggressive responding following OT dosing (but not placebo) was positively correlated with psychometric measures of interpersonal manipulation and anger (Pearson’s r = 0.57), indicating that higher scores on these antisocial personality traits were related to increased aggressive behavior following OT administration. These preliminary results stand in contrast to previous work on the prosocial effects of OT and highlight the need for further understanding of individual differences in aggression following OT administration. Such individual differences may have implications for the therapeutic use of OT in individuals with psychiatric disorders and dysfunctional social behavior. PMID:26241153

  16. T-cell-replete haploidentical transplantation versus autologous stem cell transplantation in adult acute leukemia: a matched pair analysis.

    PubMed

    Gorin, Norbert-Claude; Labopin, Myriam; Piemontese, Simona; Arcese, William; Santarone, Stella; Huang, He; Meloni, Giovanna; Ferrara, Felicetto; Beelen, Dietrich; Sanz, Miguel; Bacigalupo, Andrea; Ciceri, Fabio; Mailhol, Audrey; Nagler, Arnon; Mohty, Mohamad

    2015-04-01

    Adult patients with acute leukemia in need of a transplant but without a genoidentical donor are usually considered upfront for transplantation with stem cells from any other allogeneic source, rather than autologous stem cell transplantation. We used data from the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation and performed a matched pair analysis on 188 T-cell-replete haploidentical and 356 autologous transplants done from January 2007 to December 2012, using age, diagnosis, disease status, cytogenetics, and interval from diagnosis to transplant as matching factors. "Haploidentical expert" centers were defined as having reported more than five haploidentical transplants for acute leukemia (median value for the study period). The median follow-up was 28 months. Multivariate analyses, including type of transplant categorized into three classes ("haploidentical regular", "haploidentical expert" and autologous), conditioning intensity (reduced intensity versus myeloablative conditioning) and the random effect taking into account associations related to matching, showed that non-relapse mortality was higher following haploidentical transplants in expert (HR: 4.7; P=0.00004) and regular (HR: 8.98; P<10(-5)) centers. Relapse incidence for haploidentical transplants was lower in expert centers (HR:0.39; P=0.0003) but in regular centers was similar to that for autologous transplants. Leukemia-free survival and overall survival rates were higher following autologous transplantation than haploidentical transplants in regular centers (HR: 1.63; P=0.008 and HR: 2.31; P=0.0002 respectively) but similar to those following haploidentical transplants in expert centers. We conclude that autologous stem cell transplantation should presently be considered as a possible alternative to haploidentical transplantation in regular centers that have not developed a specific expert program.

  17. The T-cell Receptor Repertoire Influences the Tumor Microenvironment and Is Associated with Survival in Aggressive B-cell Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Keane, Colm; Gould, Clare; Jones, Kimberley; Hamm, David; Talaulikar, Dipti; Ellis, Jonathan; Vari, Frank; Birch, Simone; Han, Erica; Wood, Peter; Le-Cao, Kim-Anh; Green, Michael R; Crooks, Pauline; Jain, Sanjiv; Tobin, Josh; Steptoe, Raymond J; Gandhi, Maher K

    2017-04-01

    Purpose: To investigate the relationship between the intra-tumoral T-cell receptor (TCR) repertoire and the tumor microenvironment (TME) in de novo diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and the impact of TCR on survival.Experimental Design: We performed high-throughput unbiased TCRβ sequencing on a population-based cohort of 92 patients with DLBCL treated with conventional (i.e., non-checkpoint blockade) frontline "R-CHOP" therapy. Key immune checkpoint genes within the TME were digitally quantified by nanoString. The primary endpoints were 4-year overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS).Results: The TCR repertoire within DLBCL nodes was abnormally narrow relative to non-diseased nodal tissues (P < 0.0001). In DLBCL, a highly dominant single T-cell clone was associated with inferior 4-year OS rate of 60.0% [95% confidence interval (CI), 31.7%-79.6%], compared with 79.8% in patients with a low dominant clone (95% CI, 66.7%-88.5%; P = 0.005). A highly dominant clone also predicted inferior 4-year PFS rate of 46.6% (95% CI, 22.5%-76.6%) versus 72.6% (95% CI, 58.8%-82.4%, P = 0.008) for a low dominant clone. In keeping, clonal expansions were most pronounced in the EBV(+) DLBCL subtype that is known to express immunogenic viral antigens and is associated with particularly poor outcome. Increased T-cell diversity was associated with significantly elevated PD-1, PD-L1, and PD-L2 immune checkpoint molecules.Conclusions: Put together, these findings suggest that the TCR repertoire is a key determinant of the TME. Highly dominant T-cell clonal expansions within the TME are associated with poor outcome in DLBCL treated with conventional frontline therapy. Clin Cancer Res; 23(7); 1820-8. ©2016 AACR.

  18. Family Caregiver Uplift and Burden: Associations with Aggressive Behavior in Adults with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Unwin, Gemma; Deb, Shoumitro

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the experience of family caregivers caring for adults with intellectual disabilities (ID) who display aggressive behavior in terms of associations with caregiver burden and uplift. The family caregivers of 44 people with ID and aggressive behavior were interviewed using a suite of questionnaires and…

  19. Aggressive Challenging Behaviour in Adults with Intellectual Disability Following Community Resettlement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhaumik, S.; Watson, J. M.; Devapriam, J.; Raju, L. B.; Tin, N. N.; Kiani, R.; Talbott, L.; Parker, R.; Moore, L.; Majumdar, S. K.; Ganghadaran, S. K.; Dixon, K.; Gupta, A. Das; Barrett, M.; Tyrer, F.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Aggressive challenging behaviour is common in adults with intellectual disability (ID) in long-term care facilities. The government's commitment to the closure of all facilities in England has led to concerns over how to manage this behaviour in the community. The aim of this study was to assess changes in aggressive challenging…

  20. Profiles and Correlates of Relational Aggression in Young Adults' Romantic Relationships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldstein, Sara E.; Chesir-Teran, Daniel; McFaul, Adrienne

    2008-01-01

    The present study examines prevalence and correlates of experiencing and perpetrating relational aggression in the context of young adults' romantic relationships. We assess correlates of relational aggression in four domains of risk: (1) Social-cognitive, (2) Relationship, (3) Trait/dispositional, and (4) Mental health. Results indicate that…

  1. Alterations in Activation, Cytotoxic Capacity and Trafficking Profile of Peripheral CD8 T Cells in Young Adult Binge Drinkers

    PubMed Central

    Zaldivar Fujigaki, José Luis; Arroyo Valerio, América Guadalupe; López Alvarenga, Juan Carlos; Gutiérrez Reyes, Esperanza Gabriela; Kershenobich, David; Hernández Ruiz, Joselin

    2015-01-01

    Background Excess of alcohol consumption is a public health problem and has documented effects on the immune system of humans and animals. Animal and in vitro studies suggest that alcohol abuse changes CD8 T cell (CD8) characteristics, however it remains unknown if the CD8 profile of binge drinkers is different in terms of activation, trafficking and cytotoxic capacity. Aim To analyze the peripheral CD8 cytotoxic capacity, activation and trafficking phenotypic profile of Mexican young adults with regard to alcohol consumption pattern. Methods 55 Mexican young adults were stratified as Light (20), Intermediate (18) or Binge drinkers (17) according to their reported alcohol consumption pattern. Blood samples were obtained and hematic biometry and liver enzyme analysis were performed. Peripheral CD8 profile was established by expression of Granzyme B (GB), CD137, CD127, CD69, TLR4, PD1, CCR2, CCR4, CCR5 and CXCR4 by FACS. Data was analyzed by ANOVA, posthoc DMS and Tamhane, and principal component analysis (PCA) with varimax rotation, p<0.05. Results The Binge drinking group showed increased γGT together with increased expression of CD69 and reduced expression of TLR4, PD1, CCR2 and CXCR4 in peripheral CD8 cells. Other parameters were also specific to Binge drinkers. PCA established 3 factors associated with alcohol consumption: “Early Activation” represented by CD69 and TLR4 expression in the CD8 population; “Effector Activation” by CD69 expression in CD8 CD127+CD137+ and CD8 CD25+ CD137+; and Trafficking by CXCR4 expression on total CD8 and CD8 GB+CXCR4+, and CCR2 expression on total CD8. Binge drinking pattern showed low expression of Early Activation and Trafficking factors while Light drinking pattern exhibited high expression of Effector Activation factor. Conclusions Alcohol consumption affects the immune phenotype of CD8 cells since binge drinking pattern was found to be associated with high CD69 and low TLR4, CXCR4 and CCR2 expression, which suggest

  2. Kicking the digital dog: a longitudinal investigation of young adults' victimization and cyber-displaced aggression.

    PubMed

    Wright, Michelle F; Li, Yan

    2012-09-01

    Using the general strain theory as a theoretical framework, the present longitudinal study investigated both face-to-face and cyber victimization in relation to cyber-displaced aggression. Longitudinal data were collected from 130 (70 women) young adults who completed measures assessing their victimization (face-to-face and cyber), cyber aggression, and both face-to-face and cyber-displaced aggression. Findings indicated that victimization in both social contexts (face-to-face and cyber) contributed to cyber-displaced aggression 6 months later (Time 2), after controlling for gender, cyber aggression, face-to-face displaced aggression, and cyber-displaced aggression at Time 1. A significant two-way interaction revealed that Time 1 cyber victimization was more strongly related to Time 2 cyber-displaced aggression when young adults had higher levels of face-to-face victimization at Time 1. Implications of these findings are discussed as well as a call for more research investigating displaced aggression in the cyber context.

  3. Effect of Nadir CD4+ T Cell Count on Clinical Measures of Periodontal Disease in HIV+ Adults before and during Immune Reconstitution on HAART

    PubMed Central

    Vernon, Lance T.; Demko, Catherine A.; Babineau, Denise C.; Wang, Xuelei; Toossi, Zahra; Weinberg, Aaron; Rodriguez, Benigno

    2013-01-01

    Background The contribution of HIV-infection to periodontal disease (PD) is poorly understood.  We proposed that immunological markers would be associated with improved clinical measures of PD. Methods We performed a longitudinal cohort study of HIV-infected adults who had started highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) <2 years. PD was characterized clinically as the percent of teeth with ≥1 site with periodontal probing depth (PPD) ≥5.0mm, recession (REC) >0mm, clinical attachment level (CAL) ≥4.0mm, and bleeding on probing (BOP) at ≥4 sites/tooth and microbiologically as specific periodontopathogen concentration. Linear mixed-effects models were used to assess the associations between immune function and PD. Results Forty (40) subjects with median 2.7 months on HAART and median nadir CD4+ T-cell count of 212 cells/μl completed a median 3 visits. Over 24 months, CD4+ T-cell count increased by a mean 173 cells/µl (p<0.001) and HIV RNA decreased by 0.5 log10 copies/ml (p<0.001); concurrently, PPD, CAL and BOP decreased by a mean 11.7%, 12.1%, and 14.7% respectively (all p<0.001). Lower nadir CD4+ T-cell count was associated with worse baseline REC (-6.72%; p=0.04) and CAL (9.06%; p<0.001). Further, lower nadir CD4+ T-cell count was associated with a greater relative longitudinal improvement in PPD in subjects with higher baseline levels of Porphyromonas gingivalis (p=0.027), and BOP in subjects with higher baseline levels of Porphyromonas gingivalis or Treponema denticola (p=0.001 and p=0.006 respectively). Longitudinal changes from baseline in CD4+ T-cell count and level of HIV RNA were not independently associated with longitudinal changes in any clinical markers of PD. Conclusion Degree of immunosuppression was associated with baseline gingival recession. After HAART initiation, measures of active PD improved most in those with lower nadir CD4+ T-cell counts and higher baseline levels of specific periodontopathogens. Nadir CD4+ T-cell count

  4. The role of T cells in the enhancement of respiratory syncytial virus infection severity during adult reinfection of neonatally sensitized mice.

    PubMed

    Tregoning, John S; Yamaguchi, Yuko; Harker, James; Wang, Belinda; Openshaw, Peter J M

    2008-04-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the major cause of infantile bronchiolitis and hospitalization. Severe RSV disease is associated with the development of wheezing in later life. In a mouse model of the delayed effects of RSV, the age at primary infection determines responses to reinfection in adulthood. During primary RSV infection, neonatal BALB/c mice developed only mild disease and recruited CD8 cells that were defective in gamma interferon production. Secondary reinfection of neonatally primed mice caused enhanced inflammation and profuse lung T-cell recruitment. CD4 cell depletion during secondary RSV challenge attenuated disease (measured by weight loss); depletion of CD8 cells also markedly attenuated disease severity but enhanced lung eosinophilia, and depletion of both CD4 and CD8 cells together completely abrogated weight loss. Depletion of CD8 (but not CD4) cells during primary neonatal infection was protective against weight loss during adult challenge. Therefore, T cells, in particular CD8 T cells, play a central role in the outcome of neonatal infection by enhancing disease during secondary challenge. These findings demonstrate a crucial role for T cells in the regulation of immune responses after neonatal infection.

  5. Nelfinavir monotherapy increases naïve T-cell numbers in HIV-negative healthy young adults.

    PubMed

    Rizza, Stacey R; Tangalos, Eric G; McClees, Mark D; Strausbauch, Michael A; Targonski, Paul V; McKean, David J; Wettstein, Peter J; Badley, Andrew D

    2008-01-01

    Although patients treated with HIV protease inhibitor (PI) containing regimens manifest increases in naïve T cell number, it is unclear whether this is due to reduction in viral replication or a direct drug effect. We questioned whether Nelfinavir monotherapy directly impacted naïve T-cell number in HIV-negative individuals. HIV-negative volunteers received Nelfinavir, 1250 mg orally, BID for 3 weeks, and T-cell receptor recombination excision circles (TREC) content in peripheral blood were assessed. Whereas TREC copies did not change over 3 weeks in untreated controls, TREC copies/copies CCR5 increased following Nelfinavir monotherapy in 8 patients (p < 0.02), and did not change in 7 patients (p = NS). Those patients who responded were younger than those who did not with a median age of 55 years for responders and 71 years for non-responders (p < 0.03). The increase in TREC was most pronounced in those patients less than 40-years old (p < 0.01). Moreover, the patients who did not increase TREC levels were more likely to have suffered a medical illness previously shown to reduce thymic function. In HIV-negative patients, monotherapy with the HIV PI Nelfinavir for 21 days increases TREC-positive naïve T cell number, particularly in individuals who are healthy and young.

  6. Humoral hypercalcemia of malignancy: severe combined immunodeficient/beige mouse model of adult T-cell lymphoma independent of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type-1 tax expression.

    PubMed

    Richard, V; Lairmore, M D; Green, P L; Feuer, G; Erbe, R S; Albrecht, B; D'Souza, C; Keller, E T; Dai, J; Rosol, T J

    2001-06-01

    The majority of patients with adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) resulting from human T-cell lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1) infection develop humoral hypercalcemia of malignancy (HHM). We used an animal model using severe combined immunodeficient (SCID)/beige mice to study the pathogenesis of HHM. SCID/beige mice were inoculated intraperitoneally with a human ATL line (RV-ATL) and were euthanized 20 to 32 days after inoculation. SCID/beige mice with engrafted RV-ATL cells developed lymphoma in the mesentery, liver, thymus, lungs, and spleen. The lymphomas stained positively for human CD45RO surface receptor and normal mouse lymphocytes stained negatively confirming the human origin of the tumors. The ATL cells were immunohistochemically positive for parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP). In addition, PTHrP mRNA was highly expressed in lymphomas when compared to MT-2 cells (HTLV-1-positive cell line). Mice with lymphoma developed severe hypercalcemia. Plasma PTHrP concentrations were markedly increased in mice with hypercalcemia, and correlated with the increase in plasma calcium concentrations. Bone densitometry and histomorphometry in lymphoma-bearing mice revealed significant bone loss because of a marked increase in osteoclastic bone resorption. RV-ATL cells contained 1.5 HTLV-1 proviral copies of the tax gene as determined by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). However, tax expression was not detected by Western blot or reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR in RV-ATL cells, which suggests that factors other than Tax are modulators of PTHrP gene expression. The SCID/beige mouse model mimics HHM as it occurs in ATL patients, and will be useful to investigate the regulation of PTHrP expression by ATL cells in vivo.

  7. Transcriptional regulation of parathyroid hormone-related protein promoter P3 by ETS-1 in adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Richard, V; Nadella, M V P; Green, P L; Lairmore, M D; Feuer, G; Foley, J G; Rosol, T J

    2005-07-01

    Parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) plays a primary role in the development of humoral hypercalcemia of malignancy seen in the majority of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) patients with human T-cell lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1) infection. HTLV-1 Tax has been shown to complex with ETS-1 and SP1 to transactivate the PTHrP P3 promoter. Previously, we established a SCID/bg mouse model of human ATL with RV-ATL cells and showed that PTHrP expression was independent of Tax. In this study, we report an inverse correlation of PTHrP with tax/rex mRNA in multiple HTLV-1-positive cell lines and RV-ATL cells. Stimulation of Jurkat T cells with PMA/ionomycin upregulated the PTHrP P3 promoter by a previously characterized Ets binding site and also induced protein/DNA complex formation identical to that observed in RV-ATL cells. Further, we provide evidence that cotransfection with Ets-1 and constitutively active Mek-1 in HTLV-1-negative transformed T cells with stimulation by PMA/ionomycin not only resulted in a robust induction of PTHrP P3 but also formed a complex with ETS-1/P3 EBS similar to that in ATLL cells. Our data demonstrate that transcriptional regulation of PTHrP in ATLL cells can be controlled by T-cell receptor signaling and the ETS and MAPK ERK pathway in a Tax-independent manner.

  8. A comparison of murine T-cell-depleted adult bone marrow and full-term fetal blood cells in hematopoietic engraftment and immune reconstitution.

    PubMed

    Chen, Benny J; Cui, Xiuyu; Sempowski, Gregory D; Gooding, Maria E; Liu, Congxiao; Haynes, Barton F; Chao, Nelson J

    2002-01-01

    Umbilical cord blood has been increasingly used as a source of hematopoietic stem cells. A major area of concern for the use of cord blood transplantation is the delay in myeloid and lymphoid recovery. To directly compare myeloid and lymphoid recovery using an animal model of bone marrow and cord blood as sources of stem cells, hematopoietic engraftment and immune recovery were studied following infusion of T-cell-depleted adult bone marrow or full-term fetal blood cells, as a model of cord blood in a murine allogeneic transplantation model (C57BL/6 [H-2(b)] --> BALB/c [H-2(d)]). Allogeneic full-term fetal blood has poorer radioprotective capacity but greater long-term engraftment potential on a cell-to-cell basis compared with T-cell-depleted bone marrow. Allogeneic full-term fetal blood recipients had decreased absolute numbers of T, B, and dendritic cells compared with bone marrow recipients. Splenic T cells in allogeneic full-term fetal blood recipients proliferated poorly, were unable to generate cytotoxic effectors against third-party alloantigens in vitro, and failed to generate alloantigen-specific cytotoxic antibodies in vivo. In addition, reconstituting T cells in fetal blood recipients had decreased mouse T-cell receptor delta single-joint excision circles compared with bone marrow recipients. At a per-cell level, B cells from fetal blood recipients did not proliferate as well as those found in bone marrow recipients. These results suggest that full-term fetal blood can engraft allogeneic hosts across the major histocompatibility barrier with slower hematopoietic engraftment and impaired immune reconstitution.

  9. White matter microstructure in the executive network associated with aggression in healthy adolescents and young adults

    PubMed Central

    Bato, Angelica A.; Blair, Melanie A.; DeRosse, Pamela; Szeszko, Philip R.; Malhotra, Anil K.

    2015-01-01

    Predicting which individuals may engage in aggressive behavior is of interest in today’s society; however, there is little data on the neural basis of aggression in healthy individuals. Here, we tested whether regional differences in white matter (WM) microstructure were associated with later reports of aggressive tendencies. We recontacted healthy young adults an average of 3 years after they underwent research MRI scans. Via electronic survey, we administered the Buss Perry Aggression Questionnaire. We divided aggression into Aggressive Thoughts (Anger and Hostility subscales) and Aggressive Acts (Verbal and Physical subscales) and used Tract-Based Spatial Statistics to test the relationship of those measures to WM microstructure. In 45 individuals age 15–30 at baseline, we observed significant relationships between Aggressive Acts and fractional anisotropy (FA) in a parietal region consistent with the superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF). As the SLF has an established relationship to executive function, we performed an exploratory analysis in a subset of individuals with working memory data. Decreased FA in executive network regions, as well as working memory performance, were associated with later self-reported aggressive tendencies. This has implications for our healthy behavior understanding of as well as that of patient populations known to have executive dysfunction. PMID:25691778

  10. Adults with Intellectual Disabilities: Prevalence, Incidence and Remission of Aggressive Behaviour and Related Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, S.-A.; Smiley, E.; Jackson, A.; Finlayson, J.; Allan, L.; Mantry, D.; Morrison, J.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Aggressive behaviours can be disabling for adults with intellectual disabilities (ID), with negative consequences for the adult, their family and paid carers. It is surprising how little research has been conducted into the epidemiology of these needs, given the impact they can have. This study investigates point prevalence, 2-year…

  11. Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 Tax oncoprotein represses the expression of the BCL11B tumor suppressor in T-cells.

    PubMed

    Takachi, Takayuki; Takahashi, Masahiko; Takahashi-Yoshita, Manami; Higuchi, Masaya; Obata, Miki; Mishima, Yukio; Okuda, Shujiro; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Matsuoka, Masao; Saitoh, Akihiko; Green, Patrick L; Fujii, Masahiro

    2015-04-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is the etiological agent of adult T cell leukemia (ATL), which is an aggressive form of T-cell malignancy. HTLV-1 oncoproteins, Tax and HBZ, play crucial roles in the immortalization of T-cells and/or leukemogenesis by dysregulating the cellular functions in the host. Recent studies show that HTLV-1-infected T-cells have reduced expression of the BCL11B tumor suppressor protein. In the present study, we explored whether Tax and/or HBZ play a role in downregulating BCL11B in HTLV-1-infected T-cells. Lentiviral transduction of Tax in a human T-cell line repressed the expression of BCL11B at both the protein and mRNA levels, whereas the transduction of HBZ had little effect on the expression. Tax mutants with a decreased activity for the NF-κB, CREB or PDZ protein pathways still showed a reduced expression of the BCL11B protein, thereby implicating a different function of Tax in BCL11B downregulation. In addition, the HTLV-2 Tax2 protein reduced the BCL11B protein expression in T-cells. Seven HTLV-1-infected T-cell lines, including three ATL-derived cell lines, showed reduced BCL11B mRNA and protein expression relative to an uninfected T-cell line, and the greatest reductions were in the cells expressing Tax. Collectively, these results indicate that Tax is responsible for suppressing BCL11B protein expression in HTLV-1-infected T-cells; Tax-mediated repression of BCL11B is another mechanism that Tax uses to promote oncogenesis of HTLV-1-infected T-cells.

  12. Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 Tax oncoprotein represses the expression of the BCL11B tumor suppressor in T-cells

    PubMed Central

    Takachi, Takayuki; Takahashi, Masahiko; Takahashi-Yoshita, Manami; Higuchi, Masaya; Obata, Miki; Mishima, Yukio; Okuda, Shujiro; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Matsuoka, Masao; Saitoh, Akihiko; Green, Patrick L; Fujii, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is the etiological agent of adult T cell leukemia (ATL), which is an aggressive form of T-cell malignancy. HTLV-1 oncoproteins, Tax and HBZ, play crucial roles in the immortalization of T-cells and/or leukemogenesis by dysregulating the cellular functions in the host. Recent studies show that HTLV-1-infected T-cells have reduced expression of the BCL11B tumor suppressor protein. In the present study, we explored whether Tax and/or HBZ play a role in downregulating BCL11B in HTLV-1-infected T-cells. Lentiviral transduction of Tax in a human T-cell line repressed the expression of BCL11B at both the protein and mRNA levels, whereas the transduction of HBZ had little effect on the expression. Tax mutants with a decreased activity for the NF-κB, CREB or PDZ protein pathways still showed a reduced expression of the BCL11B protein, thereby implicating a different function of Tax in BCL11B downregulation. In addition, the HTLV-2 Tax2 protein reduced the BCL11B protein expression in T-cells. Seven HTLV-1-infected T-cell lines, including three ATL-derived cell lines, showed reduced BCL11B mRNA and protein expression relative to an uninfected T-cell line, and the greatest reductions were in the cells expressing Tax. Collectively, these results indicate that Tax is responsible for suppressing BCL11B protein expression in HTLV-1-infected T-cells; Tax-mediated repression of BCL11B is another mechanism that Tax uses to promote oncogenesis of HTLV-1-infected T-cells. PMID:25613934

  13. Parental Physical and Psychological Aggression: Psychological Symptoms in Young Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller-Perrin, Cindy L.; Perrin, Robin D.; Kocur, Jodie L.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the relationship between various levels of parent-child physical violence and psychological symptoms reported by college students, while controlling for demographic variables, severity and frequency of violence, and co-occurrence of parental psychological aggression. Method: Participants…

  14. Early Language Impairment and Young Adult Delinquent and Aggressive Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brownlie, E.B.; Beitchman, Joseph H.; Escobar, Michael; Young, Arlene; Atkinson, Leslie; Johnson, Carla; Wilson, Beth; Douglas, Lori

    2004-01-01

    Clinic and forensic studies have reported high rates of language impairments in conduct- disordered and incarcerated youth. In community samples followed to early adolescence, speech and language impairments have been linked to attention deficits and internalizing problems, rather than conduct problems, delinquency, or aggression. This study…

  15. Evidence for aggressive mimicry in an adult brood parasitic bird, and generalized defences in its host.

    PubMed

    Feeney, W E; Troscianko, J; Langmore, N E; Spottiswoode, C N

    2015-07-07

    Mimicry of a harmless model (aggressive mimicry) is used by egg, chick and fledgling brood parasites that resemble the host's own eggs, chicks and fledglings. However, aggressive mimicry may also evolve in adult brood parasites, to avoid attack from hosts and/or manipulate their perception of parasitism risk. We tested the hypothesis that female cuckoo finches (Anomalospiza imberbis) are aggressive mimics of female Euplectes weavers, such as the harmless, abundant and sympatric southern red bishop (Euplectes orix). We show that female cuckoo finch plumage colour and pattern more closely resembled those of Euplectes weavers (putative models) than Vidua finches (closest relatives); that their tawny-flanked prinia (Prinia subflava) hosts were equally aggressive towards female cuckoo finches and southern red bishops, and more aggressive to both than to their male counterparts; and that prinias were equally likely to reject an egg after seeing a female cuckoo finch or bishop, and more likely to do so than after seeing a male bishop near their nest. This is, to our knowledge, the first quantitative evidence for aggressive mimicry in an adult bird, and suggests that host-parasite coevolution can select for aggressive mimicry by avian brood parasites, and counter-defences by hosts, at all stages of the reproductive cycle.

  16. Evidence for aggressive mimicry in an adult brood parasitic bird, and generalized defences in its host

    PubMed Central

    Feeney, W. E.; Troscianko, J.; Langmore, N. E.; Spottiswoode, C. N.

    2015-01-01

    Mimicry of a harmless model (aggressive mimicry) is used by egg, chick and fledgling brood parasites that resemble the host's own eggs, chicks and fledglings. However, aggressive mimicry may also evolve in adult brood parasites, to avoid attack from hosts and/or manipulate their perception of parasitism risk. We tested the hypothesis that female cuckoo finches (Anomalospiza imberbis) are aggressive mimics of female Euplectes weavers, such as the harmless, abundant and sympatric southern red bishop (Euplectes orix). We show that female cuckoo finch plumage colour and pattern more closely resembled those of Euplectes weavers (putative models) than Vidua finches (closest relatives); that their tawny-flanked prinia (Prinia subflava) hosts were equally aggressive towards female cuckoo finches and southern red bishops, and more aggressive to both than to their male counterparts; and that prinias were equally likely to reject an egg after seeing a female cuckoo finch or bishop, and more likely to do so than after seeing a male bishop near their nest. This is, to our knowledge, the first quantitative evidence for aggressive mimicry in an adult bird, and suggests that host–parasite coevolution can select for aggressive mimicry by avian brood parasites, and counter-defences by hosts, at all stages of the reproductive cycle. PMID:26063850

  17. Baseline heart rate, sensation seeking, and aggression in young adult women: a two-sample examination.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Laura C; Scarpa, Angela

    2013-01-01

    Although substantial literature discusses sensation seeking as playing a role in the relationship between baseline heart rate and aggression, few published studies have tested the relationships among these variables. Furthermore, most prior studies have focused on risk factors of aggression in men and have largely ignored this issue in women. Two samples (n = 104; n = 99) of young adult women completed measures of resting heart rate, sensation seeking, and aggression. Across the two samples of females there was no evidence for the relationships of baseline heart rate with sensation seeking or with aggression that has been consistently shown in males. Boredom susceptibility and disinhibition subscales of sensation seeking were consistently significantly correlated with aggression. The lack of significance and the small effect sizes indicate that other mechanisms are also at work in affecting aggression in young adult women. Finally, it is important to consider the type of sensation seeking in relation to aggression, as only boredom susceptibility and disinhibition were consistently replicated across samples.

  18. Witnessing interparental psychological aggression in childhood: implications for daily conflict in adult intimate relationships.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Janet Krone; Bolger, Niall; Shrout, Patrick E

    2002-12-01

    We examined the consequences of witnessing interparental psychological aggression in childhood for daily conflict processes in adult intimate relationships. Both partners in 73 heterosexual couples provided daily diary reports of relationship conflict over a 28-day period. Partners' reports of witnessing mother-to-father and father-to-mother psychological aggression were used to predict exposure to daily relationship conflicts and reactivity to those conflicts (as reflected in end-of-day anger). Results showed no evidence of exposure effects: Witnessing interparental psychological aggression was unrelated to the number of conflict days reported by either partner. Reactivity effects emerged for males only, with father's aggression predicting increased reactivity and mother's aggression predicting the opposite. However, we found evidence of direct or unmediated effects of interparental conflict on daily anger for both males and females. Mirroring the reactivity pattern, the same-sex parent's psychological aggression predicted greater daily anger, whereas the opposite-sex parent's aggression predicted less daily anger. These effects emerged independently of Big Five measures of personality; moreover, Big Five measures did not predict outcomes independently of interparental aggression.

  19. Clinical outcomes of a novel therapeutic vaccine with Tax peptide-pulsed dendritic cells for adult T cell leukaemia/lymphoma in a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Suehiro, Youko; Hasegawa, Atsuhiko; Iino, Tadafumi; Sasada, Amane; Watanabe, Nobukazu; Matsuoka, Masao; Takamori, Ayako; Tanosaki, Ryuji; Utsunomiya, Atae; Choi, Ilseung; Fukuda, Tetsuya; Miura, Osamu; Takaishi, Shigeo; Teshima, Takanori; Akashi, Koichi; Kannagi, Mari; Uike, Naokuni; Okamura, Jun

    2015-05-01

    Adult T cell leukaemia/lymphoma (ATL) is a human T cell leukaemia virus type-I (HTLV-I)-infected T cell malignancy with poor prognosis. We herein developed a novel therapeutic vaccine designed to augment an HTLV-I Tax-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response that has been implicated in anti-ATL effects, and conducted a pilot study to investigate its safety and efficacy. Three previously treated ATL patients, classified as intermediate- to high-risk, were subcutaneously administered with the vaccine, consisting of autologous dendritic cells (DCs) pulsed with Tax peptides corresponding to the CTL epitopes. In all patients, the performance status improved after vaccination without severe adverse events, and Tax-specific CTL responses were observed with peaks at 16-20 weeks. Two patients achieved partial remission in the first 8 weeks, one of whom later achieved complete remission, maintaining their remission status without any additional chemotherapy 24 and 19 months after vaccination, respectively. The third patient, whose tumour cells lacked the ability to express Tax at biopsy, obtained stable disease in the first 8 weeks and later developed slowly progressive disease although additional therapy was not required for 14 months. The clinical outcomes of this pilot study indicate that the Tax peptide-pulsed DC vaccine is a safe and promising immunotherapy for ATL.

  20. Establishment of hybridomas producing cancer specific human antibodies from B cell line derived from PBL of a patient with adult T cell leukemia.

    PubMed

    Kawahara, T; Ichikawa, A; Katakura, Y; Teruya, K; Yoshida, T; Kikuchi, M; Kamei, M; Hashizume, S; Shirahata, S

    2001-07-01

    Adult T cell leukemia (ATL) is a malignant disease characterized by tumorous proliferation of CD4(+) T cells infected with retrovirus human T cell leukemia virus Type-I (HTLV-I) and concurs with an autoimmune disease and cancer due to attenuated immune response. In this study, we established ATL patient derived B-cell line TM-1 producing cancer-specific IgM antibodies, and further characterized its antigen specificity by establishing hybridomas fused with human-mouse origin hetero-myeloma cell line RF-S1. We established three hybridoma cell lines termed 2E12, 3E9, and 3E10, which continuously secreted human IgM antibodies. Immunohistochemical staining of formalin-fixed tissue section using antibodies secreted from these hybridomas showed that these antibodies specifically recognized tumor sites of human colon adenocarcinomas. Antibody produced from hybridoma 3E9 bound to some of leukemic cell lines, but not to normal human PBL, which was evidenced by the flow cytometric analysis, indicating that antibody produced from 3E9 recognizes cell surface antigen specifically expressed in the leukemic cells.

  1. Passive immunization with myelin basic protein activated T cells suppresses axonal dieback but does not promote axonal regeneration following spinal cord hemisection in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong-Ju; Hu, Jian-Guo; Shen, Lin; Wang, Rui; Wang, Qi-Yi; Zhang, Chen; Xi, Jin; Zhou, Jian-Sheng; Lü, He-Zuo

    2012-08-01

    The previous studies suggested that some subpopulations of T lymphocytes against central nervous system (CNS) antigens, such as myelin basic protein (MBP), are neuroprotective. But there were few reports about the effect of these T cells on axon regeneration. In this study, the neonatally thymectomied (Tx) adult rats which contain few T lymphocytes were subjected to spinal cord hemisection and then passively immunized with MBP-activated T cells (MBP-T). The regeneration and dieback of transected axons of cortico-spinal tract (CST) were detected by biotin dextran amine (BDA) tracing. The behavioral assessments were performed using the Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan locomotor rating scale. We found that passive transferring of MBP-T could attenuate axonal dieback. However, no significant axon regeneration and behavioral differences were observed among the normal, Tx and sham-Tx (sTx) rats with or without MBP-T passive immunization. These results indicate that passive transferring of MBP-T cells can attenuate axonal dieback and promote neuroprotection following spinal cord injury (SCI), but may not promote axon regeneration.

  2. Methotrexate-Loaded Four-Arm Star Amphiphilic Block Copolymer Elicits CD8+ T Cell Response against a Highly Aggressive and Metastatic Experimental Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Hira, Sumit Kumar; Ramesh, Kalyan; Gupta, Uttam; Mitra, Kheyanath; Misra, Nira; Ray, Biswajit; Manna, Partha Pratim

    2015-09-16

    We have synthesized a well-defined four-arm star amphiphilic block copolymer [poly(DLLA)-b-poly(NVP)]4 [star-(PDLLA-b-PNVP)4] that consists of D,L-lactide (DLLA) and N-vinylpyrrolidone (NVP) via the combination of ring-opening polymerization (ROP) and xanthate-mediated reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization. Synthesis of the polymer was verified by 1H NMR spectroscopy and gel permeation chromatography (GPC). The amphiphilic four-arm star block copolymer forms spherical micelles in water as demonstrated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and 1H NMR spectroscopy. Pyrene acts as a probe to ascertain the critical micellar concentration (cmc) by using fluorescence spectroscopy. Methotrexate (MTX)-loaded polymeric micelles of star-(PDLLA15-b-PNVP10)4 amphiphilic block copolymer were prepared and characterized by fluorescence and TEM studies. Star-(PDLLA15-b-PNVP10)4 copolymer was found to be significantly effective with respect to inhibition of proliferation and lysis of human and murine lymphoma cells. The amphiphilic block copolymer causes cell death in parental and MTX-resistant Dalton lymphoma (DL) and Raji cells. The formulation does not cause hemolysis in red blood cells and is tolerant to lymphocytes compared to free MTX. Therapy with MTX-loaded star-(PDLLA15-b-PNVP10)4 amphiphilic block copolymer micelles prolongs the life span of animals with neoplasia by reducing the tumor load, preventing metastasis and augmenting CD8+ T cell-mediated adaptive immune responses.

  3. Case of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma with rapid progression of pulmonary areas of ground-glass attenuation and multiple nodules.

    PubMed

    Hanaka, Minako; Yatera, Kazuhiro; Itoh, Chiyo; Kawanami, Toshinori; Nakanishi, Tsukasa; Katsuragi, Takefumi; Shimajiri, Shohei; Ishimoto, Hiroshi; Tsukada, Junichi; Mukae, Hiroshi

    2013-03-01

    We report a case of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) with rapidly progressive pulmonary areas of ground-glass attenuation (GGA) and nodules resulting from acute transformation of chronic ATL. A 48-year-old Japanese man was admitted for progressive dyspnea. Chest computed tomography showed rapidly progressive bilateral pulmonary areas of GGA and nodules. Flow cytometry of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and immunohistochemical examination of lung biopsy specimens revealed invasion of ATL cells. Systemic chemotherapy improved the pulmonary findings. Rapidly expanding areas of GGA and nodules are a rare manifestation of pulmonary invasion of ATL that clinicians should nevertheless keep in mind.

  4. TCR variable gene involvement in chromosome inversion between 14q11 and 14q24 in adult T-cell leukemia.

    PubMed

    Haider, Shawkat; Hayakawa, Kousuke; Itoyama, Takahiro; Sadamori, Naoki; Kurosawa, Nobuyuki; Isobe, Masaharu

    2006-01-01

    Chromosomal translocations in T-cell malignancies frequently involve the T-cell receptor (TCR)alpha/delta locus at chromosome 14q11. Although 14q11 abnormalities are found in about 10% of adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) cases, until now there has been no direct evidence showing involvement of the TCR locus in ATL-a malignancy closely associated with HTLV-1 infection. The breakpoints of T-cell malignancies most commonly occur within the Jalpha or Jdelta region of the TCR locus. In ATL, however, despite extensive searching no breakpoint has yet been found in that region. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization with a panel of cosmid and bacterial artificial chromosome probes derived from chromosome 14, including the variable region of the TCRalpha locus, comprehensive analysis of an ATL patient carrying inv(14)(q11q32) revealed that the TCR locus was indeed involved in this inversion. Molecular cloning of the breakpoint revealed the juxtaposition of TCR Valpha to the 14q24 region as a result of two consecutive inversions: inv(14)(q11q32) and inv(14)(q11q24). We also found a gene near the breakpoint at the 14q24 region that is downregulated in this ATL patient and is assigned in the database as a pseudogene of ADAM21 (a disintegrin and metalloproteinase domain 21). Our expression analysis, however, showed that this pseudogene was actually expressed and was capable of encoding a protein similar to ADAM21; thus we have named this gene ADAM21-like (ADAM21-L).

  5. [Panniculitic T-cell lymphoma].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Vázquez, María; García-Arpa, Mónica; Martín, Francisco; Calle, Carmen; Marchán, Enrique; Romero, Guillermo; Cortina, Pilar

    2005-03-01

    Panniculitic T-cell lymphoma is a rare, aggressive variant of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma, with fewer than 100 cases described. The main problem is its diagnosis, as both the clinical and the histological features may simulate benign panniculitis. We present the case of a 34-year-old male patient, who had presented with an indurated plaque, sclerodermiform in appearance, on the front of the right thigh for 4 months, later accompanied by fever and constitutional symptoms. The initial diagnosis was cellulitis, but no clinical improvement was seen despite systemic antibiotic therapy. After two skin biopsies, the patient was diagnosed with panniculitic cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. The patient was treated with 8 cycles of CHOP chemotherapy, with resolution of the symptoms.

  6. Nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFATc4) is required for BDNF-dependent survival of adult-born neurons and spatial memory formation in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Quadrato, Giorgia; Benevento, Marco; Alber, Stefanie; Jacob, Carolin; Floriddia, Elisa M; Nguyen, Tuan; Elnaggar, Mohamed Y; Pedroarena, Christine M; Molkentin, Jeffrey D; Di Giovanni, Simone

    2012-06-05

    New neurons generated in the adult dentate gyrus are constantly integrated into the hippocampal circuitry and activated during encoding and recall of new memories. Despite identification of extracellular signals that regulate survival and integration of adult-born neurons such as neurotrophins and neurotransmitters, the nature of the intracellular modulators required to transduce those signals remains elusive. Here, we provide evidence of the expression and transcriptional activity of nuclear factor of activated T cell c4 (NFATc4) in hippocampal progenitor cells. We show that NFATc4 calcineurin-dependent activity is required selectively for survival of adult-born neurons in response to BDNF signaling. Indeed, cyclosporin A injection and stereotaxic delivery of the BDNF scavenger TrkB-Fc in the mouse dentate gyrus reduce the survival of hippocampal adult-born neurons in wild-type but not in NFATc4(-/-) mice and do not affect the net rate of neural precursor proliferation and their fate commitment. Furthermore, associated with the reduced survival of adult-born neurons, the absence of NFATc4 leads to selective defects in LTP and in the encoding of hippocampal-dependent spatial memories. Thus, our data demonstrate that NFATc4 is essential in the regulation of adult hippocampal neurogenesis and identify NFATc4 as a central player of BDNF-driven prosurvival signaling in hippocampal adult-born neurons.

  7. Achievement of disease control with donor-derived EB virus-specific cytotoxic T cells after allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation for aggressive NK-cell leukemia.

    PubMed

    Haji, Shojiro; Shiratsuchi, Motoaki; Matsushima, Takamitsu; Takamatsu, Akiko; Tsuda, Mariko; Tsukamoto, Yasuhiro; Tanaka, Emi; Ohno, Hirofumi; Fujioka, Eriko; Ishikawa, Yuriko; Imadome, Ken-Ichi; Ogawa, Yoshihiro

    2017-04-01

    Aggressive NK-cell leukemia (ANKL) is characterized by systemic infiltration of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated natural killer cells and poor prognosis. We report a case of ANKL in which EBV-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) were induced. A 41-year-old male suffered from fever, pancytopenia, and hepatosplenomegaly. The number of abnormal large granular lymphocytes in the bone marrow was increased and the cells were positive for CD56 and EBV-encoded small nuclear RNAs. The patient was diagnosed with ANKL and achieved a complete response following intensive chemotherapy. He then underwent allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation from his sister. Conditioning therapy consisted of total body irradiation and cyclophosphamide. Graft-versus-host disease prophylaxis consisted of cyclosporine and methotrexate. On day 31, complete donor chimerism was achieved and no acute graft-versus-host disease developed. The ANKL relapsed on day 80, and cyclosporine was rapidly tapered and chemotherapy was started. During hematopoietic recovery, the number of atypical lymphocytes increased, but they were donor-derived EBV-specific CTLs. The patient achieved a partial response and EBV viral load decreased to normal range. Unfortunately, ANKL worsen again when the CTLs disappeared from his blood. This is the first case report of ANKL in which induced EBV-specific CTLs may have contributed to disease control.

  8. Predicting commitment in young adults' physically aggressive and sexually coercive dating relationships.

    PubMed

    Young, Brennan J; Furman, Wyndol

    2013-11-01

    Intimate partner violence often begins during the courtship stage of romantic relationships. Although some relationships dissolve as a result of aggression, other relationships remain intact, increasing the risk for escalated violence. The present study identified factors predictive of individual differences in emerging adults' commitment to physically aggressive or sexually coercive dating relationships. Specifically, Rusbult's Investment Model of romantic relationships (e.g., investment, satisfaction, quality of alternatives, and commitment) was applied to a longitudinal sample of 148 young adult women who reported experiencing aggression or coercion from their current partners. To further explain commitment within aggressive or coercive dating relationships, rejection sensitivity and anxious and avoidant romantic relational styles were included as predictors of the Investment Model variables. A more avoidant romantic style indirectly predicted commitment through relationship satisfaction and investment. Both commitment and rejection sensitivity significantly predicted continuing an aggressive or coercive relationship 6 months later. The present study improves our understanding of the processes involved in relationship commitment. Continuing to understand these processes will inform interventions that seek to help women who have decided to end aggressive or coercive dating relationships.

  9. Spectrum of Epstein-Barr virus-associated T-cell lymphoproliferative disorder in adolescents and young adults in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ren-Ching; Chang, Sheng-Tsung; Hsieh, Yen-Chuan; Huang, Wan-Ting; Hsu, Jeng-Dong; Tseng, Chih-En; Wang, Ming-Chung; Hwang, Wei-Shou; Wang, John; Chuang, Shih-Sung

    2014-01-01

    Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) is a herpesvirus usually infecting B-cells but may occasionally infect T- or natural killer (NK)-cells. EBV-associated T- or NK-cell lymphoproliferations represent a continuous spectrum of diseases ranging from asymptomatic infection, infectious mononucleosis (IM), to clonal and malignant lymphoproliferations including systemic EBV-positive T/NK-cell lymphoproliferative disease (EBV-T/NK-LPD) of childhood and hydroa-vacciniforme-like lymphoma of the skin. The clonal diseases are more prevalent in East Asia and exhibit overlapping clinical and pathological features with chronic active EBV infection. Here we report our experience on 10 cases of EBV-associated T-cell lymphoproliferation from Taiwan including five males and five females with a median age of 18 years old (range, 15-28). The most common clinical symptoms were fever, neck mass and hepatosplenomegaly. Eight of these patients showed elevated lactate dehydrogenase level and half of the patients had cytopenia. All patients had either elevated EBV antibody titers or increased serum EBV DNA levels. Five cases were clinically IM-like with polyclonal (3 cases) or clonal (2 cases) T-cell lymphoproliferation. Two patients each had chronic active EBV infection (CAEBV) and hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH). One patient had both CAEBV and HLH. One of the HLH patients with marrow infiltration by intra-sinusoidal large atypical lymphocytes experienced a fulminant course. In a median follow-up time of 21.5 months, seven patients were free of disease, one was alive with disease, and two died of disease in 31 and 3 months, respectively, despite chemotherapy. We confirmed a wide clinicopathological range of EVB-associated T-cell lymphoproliferation in Taiwan. Furthermore, monomorphic LPD and the single case with fulminant course as defined by Ohshima et al (Pathol Int 2018) as categories A3 and B, respectively, died of disease despite chemotherapy. Our report, the largest series in the recent

  10. Spectrum of Epstein-Barr virus-associated T-cell lymphoproliferative disorder in adolescents and young adults in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ren-Ching; Chang, Sheng-Tsung; Hsieh, Yen-Chuan; Huang, Wan-Ting; Hsu, Jeng-Dong; Tseng, Chih-En; Wang, Ming-Chung; Hwang, Wei-Shou; Wang, John; Chuang, Shih-Sung

    2014-01-01

    Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) is a herpesvirus usually infecting B-cells but may occasionally infect T- or natural killer (NK)-cells. EBV-associated T- or NK-cell lymphoproliferations represent a continuous spectrum of diseases ranging from asymptomatic infection, infectious mononucleosis (IM), to clonal and malignant lymphoproliferations including systemic EBV-positive T/NK-cell lymphoproliferative disease (EBV-T/NK-LPD) of childhood and hydroa-vacciniforme-like lymphoma of the skin. The clonal diseases are more prevalent in East Asia and exhibit overlapping clinical and pathological features with chronic active EBV infection. Here we report our experience on 10 cases of EBV-associated T-cell lymphoproliferation from Taiwan including five males and five females with a median age of 18 years old (range, 15-28). The most common clinical symptoms were fever, neck mass and hepatosplenomegaly. Eight of these patients showed elevated lactate dehydrogenase level and half of the patients had cytopenia. All patients had either elevated EBV antibody titers or increased serum EBV DNA levels. Five cases were clinically IM-like with polyclonal (3 cases) or clonal (2 cases) T-cell lymphoproliferation. Two patients each had chronic active EBV infection (CAEBV) and hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH). One patient had both CAEBV and HLH. One of the HLH patients with marrow infiltration by intra-sinusoidal large atypical lymphocytes experienced a fulminant course. In a median follow-up time of 21.5 months, seven patients were free of disease, one was alive with disease, and two died of disease in 31 and 3 months, respectively, despite chemotherapy. We confirmed a wide clinicopathological range of EVB-associated T-cell lymphoproliferation in Taiwan. Furthermore, monomorphic LPD and the single case with fulminant course as defined by Ohshima et al (Pathol Int 2018) as categories A3 and B, respectively, died of disease despite chemotherapy. Our report, the largest series in the recent

  11. A Phase II Study of Single Agent Brentuximab Vedotin in Relapsed/Refractory CD30 Low (<10%) Mature T Cell Lymphoma (TCL)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-23

    T-cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Hepato-splenic T-cell Lymphoma; Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Enteropathy Associated T-cell Lymphoma; NK T-cell Lymphoma; Transformed Mycosis Fungoides

  12. Lenalidomide Therapy for Patients With Relapsed and/or Refractory, Peripheral T-Cell Lymphomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-04-18

    Peripheral T-cell Lymphomas; Adult T-cell Leukemia; Adult T-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma Unspecified; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; T/Null Cell Systemic Type; Cutaneous t-Cell Lymphoma With Nodal/Visceral Disease

  13. Risperidone for Aggression and Self-Injurious Behavior in Adults with Mental Retardation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Seth A.; Ihrig, Kristin; Lott, Rex S.; Kerrick, Jill M.

    1998-01-01

    Describes the use of risperidone in eight adult patients with moderate to profound mental retardation and markedly aberrant behaviors. Risperidone in these individuals was associated with significant reduction in aggression and self-injurious behavior. Side effects were primarily those of sedation and restlessness. (Author/CR)

  14. Relaxation Training with Aggressive Mentally Retarded Adults: A Failure to Observe Carry-Over Effects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frankenberger, William

    The study was designed to determine whether 16 aggressive mentally retarded adults could reduce their resting electromyographic (EMG) levels through relaxation training techniques. Ss were selected from a large state institution. Ss were divided into two groups--the experimental group received six training sessions which included whole body…

  15. Antiviral Innate Immune Activation in HIV-Infected Adults Negatively Affects H1/IC31-Induced Vaccine-Specific Memory CD4+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schindler, Tobias; Kagina, Benjamin M.; Zhang, Jitao David; Lukindo, Tedson; Mpina, Maxmillian; Bang, Peter; Kromann, Ingrid; Hoff, Søren T.; Andersen, Peter; Reither, Klaus; Churchyard, Gavin J.; Certa, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a global health problem, with vaccination being a necessary strategy for disease containment and elimination. A TB vaccine should be safe and immunogenic as well as efficacious in all affected populations, including HIV-infected individuals. We investigated the induction and maintenance of vaccine-induced memory CD4+ T cells following vaccination with the subunit vaccine H1/IC31. H1/IC31 was inoculated twice on study days 0 and 56 among HIV-infected adults with CD4+ lymphocyte counts of >350 cells/mm3. Whole venous blood stimulation was conducted with the H1 protein, and memory CD4+ T cells were analyzed using intracellular cytokine staining and polychromatic flow cytometry. We identified high responders, intermediate responders, and nonresponders based on detection of interleukin-2 (IL-2), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), and gamma interferon (IFN-γ) expressing central (TCM) and effector memory CD4+ T cells (TEM) 182 days after the first immunization. Amplicon-based transcript quantification using next-generation sequencing was performed to identify differentially expressed genes that correlated with vaccine-induced immune responses. Genes implicated in resolution of inflammation discriminated the responders from the nonresponders 3 days after the first inoculation. The volunteers with higher expression levels of genes involved in antiviral innate immunity at baseline showed impaired H1-specific TCM and TEM maintenance 6 months after vaccination. Our study showed that in HIV-infected volunteers, expression levels of genes involved in the antiviral innate immune response affected long-term maintenance of H1/IC31 vaccine-induced cellular immunity. (The clinical trial was registered in the Pan African Clinical Trials Registry [PACTR] with the identifier PACTR201105000289276.) PMID:25924764

  16. Lymphoma-type adult T-cell leukaemia-lymphoma with a bulky cutaneous tumour showing multiple human T-lymphotropic virus-1 DNA integration.

    PubMed

    Kato, N; Sugawara, H; Aoyagi, S; Mayuzumi, M

    2001-06-01

    Human T-lymphotropic virus-1 (HTLV-1) is considered to be the cause of adult T-cell leukaemia-lymphoma (ATL). Monoclonal integration of HTLV-1 proviral DNA, as is analysed by Southern blotting, has been demonstrated in ATL patients. Unusual integration patterns of HTLV-1 proviral DNA have occasionally been described, and it is suggested that the patterns have clinical implications for ATL pathophysiology. Multiple, complete and defective types of integration patterns, in that order, are apparently associated with prognoses from good to poor. We report a 73-year-old Japanese woman with lymphoma-type ATL and a bulky cutaneous tumour on the left thigh. Four bands of slightly differing intensity were seen after EcoRI digestion of skin and lymph node samples on Southern blot analysis of HTLV-1 proviral DNA. Analysis for T-cell receptor-beta gene revealed five novel bands after restriction enzyme digestion with HindIII, indicating that the patient has four separate tumour cell clones, each of which carries one copy of the provirus. She was treated with chemotherapy and radiation and remains under reasonable control despite some relapsing cutaneous nodules. The indolent course in this present case could be related to the multiple integration pattern of HTLV-1 proviral DNA detected.

  17. Risk factors for aggressive recurrent respiratory papillomatosis in adults and juveniles.

    PubMed

    Omland, Turid; Akre, Harriet; Lie, Kathrine A; Jebsen, Peter; Sandvik, Leiv; Brøndbo, Kjell

    2014-01-01

    In this cohort study we examined whether gender, age at onset, observation time or human papillomavirus (HPV) genotype are risk factors for an aggressive clinical course in Recurrent Respiratory Papillomatosis (RRP). Clinical data from patient records comprised gender, age at onset, date of first endolaryngeal procedure with biopsy, date of last follow-up, total number of endolaryngeal procedures, and complications during the observation period. Disease was defined as juvenile (JoRRP) or adult onset (AoRRP) according to whether the disease was acquired before or after the age of 18. Aggressive disease was defined as distal spread, tracheostomy, four surgical operations annually or >10 surgeries in total. DNA was extracted from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue. HPV genotyping was performed by quantitative PCR assay identifying 15 HPV genotypes. The study included 224 patients. The majority were males (141/174 in AoRRPs and 31/50 in JoRRPs; p = 0.005). The median follow-up from initial diagnosis was 12.0 years (IQR 3.7-32.9) for JoRRPs and 4.0 years (IQR 0.8-11.7) for AoRRPs. The disease was more aggressive in juveniles than adults (p<0.001), a difference that disappeared after 10 years' observation. JoRRPs with aggressive disease were younger at onset (mean difference 4.6 years, 95%CI [2.4, 6.8], p = 0.009). HPV6 or -11 was present in all HPV-positive papillomas. HPV11 was more prevalent in aggressive disease, and HPV6 in non-aggressive disease (p<0.001). Multiple logistic regression revealed that only age at onset (OR = 0.69, 95% CI [0.53, 0.88], p = 0.003) was associated with aggressive disease in juveniles, while HPV11 (OR = 3.74, 95% CI [1.40, 9.97], p = 0.008) and observation time >10 years (OR = 13.41, 95% CI [5.46, 32.99[, p<001) were risk factors in adults. In conclusion, the only significant risk factor for developing aggressive disease in JoRRPs was age at onset, but both HPV11 and observation time >10 years were risk factors for an aggressive

  18. Alisertib in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Peripheral T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-09

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-Cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-Cell Lymphoma; Hepatosplenic T-Cell Lymphoma; Mature T-Cell and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma

  19. The 10-year course of adult aggression toward others in patients with borderline personality disorder and axis II comparison subjects.

    PubMed

    Zanarini, Mary C; Temes, Christina M; Ivey, Alexandra M; Cohn, Danielle M; Conkey, Lindsey C; Frankenburg, Frances R; Fitzmaurice, Garrett M

    2017-02-27

    This study had two aims. The first was to assess and compare various types of aggressive behavior toward others reported by borderline patients and axis II comparison subjects over time. The second was to determine the best baseline and time-varying predictors of aggressive behavior in these borderline patients. At baseline, a series of interviews and self-report measures were administered to 290 borderline patients and 72 axis II comparison subjects. Measures assessing aggression toward others, axis I and II disorders as well as adult adversity were re-administered every two years over the course of ten years. It was found that borderline patients reported significantly higher rates of verbal, emotional, and physical aggression toward others than comparison subjects but the rates of these forms of aggression toward others declined significantly for those in both study groups. Multivariate analyses indicated that the strongest predictors of adult aggression towards others were severity of adult adversity and a substance use disorder. Taken together, these results suggest that borderline patients commonly report aggression toward others but that this aggression declines significantly over time. These results also suggest that this aggression toward others is most strongly associated with adult experiences of adversity and concurrent substance abuse.

  20. T cell-derived B cell growth and differentiation factors. Dichotomy between the responsiveness of B cells from adult and neonatal mice

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    In these studies we have determined the molecular weights of B cell growth factor (BCGF) (less than 20,000), and B cell differentiation factors (BCDF) that induce immunoglobulin M (IgM) secretion (BCDF mu) (30-60,000) and IgG secretion (BCDF gamma) (less than 20,000). Thus, the molecular weight of BCDF mu is distinct from that of BCGF and BCDF gamma; BCGF and BCDF gamma cannot be distinguished. In addition, BCGF, BCDF mu, and BCDF gamma are distinguishable by their presence or absence in different supernatants from a panel of mitogen-induced T cell clones. These results suggest that the three lymphokines are different. This conclusion is supported by their differential biological effect on B cells from adult and neonatal mice. Thus, treatment with anti-Ig induces B cells from adult mice to proliferate and this proliferation is sustained by BCGF. In contrast, even in the presence of BCGF, anti-Ig does not induce B cells from neonatal mice to proliferate. However, BCDF mu and BCDF gamma induce IgM and IgG secretion in B cells, respectively, from both adult and neonatal mice. Thus, mature B cells can both clonally expand and differentiate in response to anti-Ig, BCGF, and BCDF, whereas immature B cells can only differentiate. The poor response of neonatal B cells to anti-Ig and BCGF may partially explain the relative immunoincompetence of immature B cells. PMID:6600488

  1. Detection of mRNA for the tax sub 1 /rex sub 1 gene of human T-cell leukemia virus type I in fresh peripheral blood mononuclear cells of adult T-cell leukemia patients and viral carriers by using the polymerase chain reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Kinoshita, Tomohiro; Shimoyama, Masanori; Tobinai, Kensei; Ito, Mizuko; Ito, Shinichiro; Ikeda, Shuichi; Tajima, Kazuo; Shimotohno, Kunitada; Shugimura, Takashi )

    1989-07-01

    Expression of human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) is not detectable by immunofluorescence analysis or RNA blot analysis in most fresh peripheral blood mononuclear cells of patients with adult T-cell leukemia or of asymptomatic HTLV-I carriers. However, in this work, mRNA for the HTLV-I tax{sub 1}/rex{sub 1} genes was detected in fresh peripheral blood mononuclear cells of adult T-cell leukemia patients and asymptomatic HTLV-I carriers by using reverse transcription followed by the polymerase chain reaction. By using fresh peripheral blood mononuclear cells, the expression of tax{sub 1}/rex{sub 1} mRNA was detected in five of the six adult T-cell leukemia patients and four of the eight HTLV-I carriers examined. The amounts of tax{sub 1}/rex{sub 1} mRNA detected corresponded to {approx} 10{sup 5} to 10{sup 6} times less than that in the HTLV-I-infected MT-2 cell line. These results indicate that, in some individuals infected with HTLV-I, the provirus in circulating blood cells is transcribed in vivo. Thus the expression of viral antigens in circulating blood cells in vivo is suggested.

  2. Development of T cell lymphoma in HTLV-1 bZIP factor and Tax double transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Tiejun; Satou, Yorifumi; Matsuoka, Masao

    2014-07-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) is an aggressive T-cell malignancy caused by human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1). ATL cells possess a CD4+ CD25+ phenotype, similar to that of regulatory T cells (Tregs). Tax has been reported to play a crucial role in the leukemogenesis of HTLV-1. The HTLV-1 bZIP factor (HBZ), which is encoded by the minus strand of the viral genomic RNA, is expressed in all ATL cases and induces neoplastic and inflammatory disease in vivo. To test whether HBZ and Tax are both required for T cell malignancy, we generated HBZ/Tax double transgenic mice in which HBZ and Tax are expressed exclusively in CD4+ T cells. Survival was much reduced in HBZ/Tax double-transgenic mice compared with wild type littermates. Transgenic expression of HBZ and Tax induced skin lesions and T-cell lymphoma in mice, resembling diseases observed in HTLV-1 infected individuals. However, Tax single transgenic mice did not develop major health problems. In addition, memory CD4+ T cells and Foxp3+ Treg cells counts were increased in HBZ/Tax double transgenic mice, and their proliferation was enhanced. There was very little difference between HBZ single and HBZ/Tax double transgenic mice. Taken together, these results show that HBZ, in addition to Tax, plays a critical role in T-cell lymphoma arising from HTLV-1 infection.

  3. Innate Memory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Jameson, Stephen C.; Lee, You Jeong; Hogquist, Kristin A.

    2015-01-01

    Memory T cells are usually considered to be a feature of a successful immune response against a foreign antigen, and such cells can mediate potent immunity. However, in mice, alternative pathways have been described, through which naïve T cells can acquire the characteristics and functions of memory T cells without encountering specific foreign antigen or the typical signals required for conventional T cell differentiation. Such cells reflect a response to the internal rather the external environment, and hence such cells are called innate memory T cells. In this review, we describe how innate memory subsets were identified, the signals that induce their generation and their functional properties and potential role in the normal immune response. The existence of innate memory T cells in mice raises questions about whether parallel populations exist in humans, and we discuss the evidence for such populations during human T cell development and differentiation. PMID:25727290

  4. Selective targeting of JAK/STAT signaling is potentiated by Bcl-xL blockade in IL-2–dependent adult T-cell leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Meili; Mathews Griner, Lesley A.; Ju, Wei; Duveau, Damien Y.; Guha, Rajarshi; Petrus, Michael N.; Wen, Bernard; Maeda, Michiyuki; Shinn, Paul; Ferrer, Marc; Conlon, Kevin D.; Bamford, Richard N.; O’Shea, John J.; Thomas, Craig J.; Waldmann, Thomas A.

    2015-01-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) develops in individuals infected with human T-cell lymphotropic virus-1 (HTLV-1). Presently there is no curative therapy for ATL. HTLV-1–encoded protein Tax (transactivator from the X-gene region) up-regulates Bcl-xL (B-cell lymphoma-extra large) expression and activates interleukin-2 (IL-2), IL-9, and IL-15 autocrine/paracrine systems, resulting in amplified JAK/STAT signaling. Inhibition of JAK signaling reduces cytokine-dependent ex vivo proliferation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from ATL patients in smoldering/chronic stages. Currently, two JAK inhibitors are approved for human use. In this study, we examined activity of multiple JAK inhibitors in ATL cell lines. The selective JAK inhibitor ruxolitinib was examined in a high-throughput matrix screen combined with >450 potential therapeutic agents, and Bcl-2/Bcl-xL inhibitor navitoclax was identified as a strong candidate for multicomponent therapy. The combination was noted to strongly activate BAX (Bcl-2-associated X protein), effect mitochondrial depolarization, and increase caspase 3/7 activities that lead to cleavage of PARP (poly ADP ribose polymerase) and Mcl-1 (myeloid cell leukemia 1). Ruxolitinib and navitoclax independently demonstrated modest antitumor efficacy, whereas the combination dramatically lowered tumor burden and prolonged survival in an ATL murine model. This combination strongly blocked ex vivo proliferation of five ATL patients’ PBMCs. These studies provide support for a therapeutic trial in patients with smoldering/chronic ATL using a drug combination that inhibits JAK signaling and antiapoptotic protein Bcl-xL. PMID:26396258

  5. Exposure to Client Aggression and Burnout among Community Staff Who Support Adults with Intellectual Disabilities in Ontario, Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hensel, J. M.; Lunsky, Y.; Dewa, C. S.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Studies have shown that staff who support adults with intellectual disabilities (ID) are exposed to challenging behaviour in their work including client aggression. Exposure to aggressive behaviour has been associated with staff stress and burnout. Study samples have been small however, and there has been very little data exploring…

  6. Production of serum immunoglobulins and T cell antigen binding molecules specific for cow's milk antigens in adults intolerant to cow's milk.

    PubMed

    Little, C H; Georgiou, G M; Shelton, M J; Cone, R E

    1998-11-01

    The immune response to three cow's milk antigens, beta-lactoglobulin (BLG), alpha-lactalbumin (AL), and casein (CA) was studied in 15 milk-intolerant adult patients and 11 adult controls. IgG, IgE, and IgG subclasses (IgG1, IgG2, IgG3, IgG4) and T cell-derived antigen-binding molecules (TABM) specific for each antigen were measured in both groups. In the patient group, a significant elevation of total IgG and TABM against each of the milk antigens was found as well as raised levels of IgG1 to BLG and CA, IgG4 to BLG, and IgE to CA. TABM specific for BLG were isolated by affinity for BLG and found to be Mr 28,000-46,000 polypeptides functionally and physically associated with TGF-beta1 and TGF-beta2. These results indicate a Th2-type immune response to the milk antigens in milk-intolerant individuals compared with the control group which shows a pattern typical of anergy or deletion.

  7. Histologically Benign, Clinically Aggressive: Progressive Non-Optic Pathway Pilocytic Astrocytomas in Adults with NF1

    PubMed Central

    Strowd, Roy E.; Rodriguez, Fausto J.; McLendon, Roger E.; Vredenburgh, James J.; Chance, Aaron B.; Jallo, George; Olivi, Alessandro; Ahn, Edward S.; Blakeley, Jaishri O.

    2016-01-01

    Although optic pathway gliomas are the most common brain tumors associated with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), extra-optic gliomas occur and may behave more aggressively with outcomes that differ by age. A retrospective case-control study was designed to describe the clinical course of adult NF1 patients with progressive extra-optic pilocytic astrocytomas (PAs) and compare to a pediatric cohort. Data for patients treated at the Johns Hopkins Comprehensive Neurofibromatosis Center from 2003 to 2013 were reviewed to identify cases (adults, age >18) and controls (pediatric, age <18) with clinically or radiographically progressive extra-optic PAs. Demographic, clinical, histologic, and radiographic data were collected. Three adult NF1 cases and four pediatric NF1 controls were identified. Mean age was 32.3 ± 9.5 years, 66% male (cases); 12.8±4.2 years, 100% male (controls). Symptomatic progression occurred in two-of-three adults (67%) while the majority of pediatric patients presented with isolated radiographic progression (n=3, 75%). Onset tended to be more rapid in adults (4±1 vs. 14±8.3 months, P=0.10). Subtotal resection was the treatment for all pediatric patients. Radiotherapy (n=2), chemotherapy (n=2), and targeted, biologic agents (n=2) were administered in adults. Although all pediatric patients are living, outcomes were universally poor in adults with progression to death in all (median survival 17.1 months, range 6.6–30.3). In conclusion, despite grade I histology, all three adult NF1 patients with progressive extra-optic PAs suffered an aggressive clinical course which was not seen in pediatric patients. Clinicians should be aware of this clinico-histologic discrepancy when counseling and managing adult NF1 patients with progressive extra-optic PAs. PMID:26992069

  8. Histologically benign, clinically aggressive: Progressive non-optic pathway pilocytic astrocytomas in adults with NF1.

    PubMed

    Strowd, Roy E; Rodriguez, Fausto J; McLendon, Roger E; Vredenburgh, James J; Chance, Aaron B; Jallo, George; Olivi, Alessandro; Ahn, Edward S; Blakeley, Jaishri O

    2016-06-01

    Although optic pathway gliomas are the most common brain tumors associated with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), extra-optic gliomas occur and may behave more aggressively with outcomes that differ by age. A retrospective case-control study was designed to describe the clinical course of adult NF1 patients with progressive extra-optic pilocytic astrocytomas (PAs) and compare to a pediatric cohort. Data for patients treated at the Johns Hopkins Comprehensive Neurofibromatosis Center from 2003 to 2013 were reviewed to identify cases (adults, age >18) and controls (pediatric, age <18) with clinically or radiographically progressive extra-optic PAs. Demographic, clinical, histologic, and radiographic data were collected. Three adult NF1 cases and four pediatric NF1 controls were identified. Mean age was 32.3 ± 9.5 years, 66% male (cases); 12.8 ± 4.2 years, 100% male (controls). Symptomatic progression occurred in two-of-three adults (67%) while the majority of pediatric patients presented with isolated radiographic progression (n = 3, 75%). Onset tended to be more rapid in adults (4 ± 1 vs. 14 ± 8.3 months, P = 0.10). Subtotal resection was the treatment for all pediatric patients. Radiotherapy (n = 2), chemotherapy (n = 2), and targeted, biologic agents (n = 2) were administered in adults. Although all pediatric patients are living, outcomes were universally poor in adults with progression to death in all (median survival 17.1 months, range 6.6-30.3). In conclusion, despite grade I histology, all three adult NF1 patients with progressive extra-optic PAs suffered an aggressive clinical course which was not seen in pediatric patients. Clinicians should be aware of this clinico-histologic discrepancy when counseling and managing adult NF1 patients with progressive extra-optic PAs. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Bortezomib and Azacitidine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory T-Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-12-02

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Small Intestine Lymphoma; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia

  10. Epidermal T cells and wound healing.

    PubMed

    Havran, Wendy L; Jameson, Julie M

    2010-05-15

    The murine epidermis contains resident T cells that express a canonical gammadelta TCR. These cells arise from fetal thymic precursors and use a TCR that is restricted to the skin in adult animals. These cells assume a dendritic morphology in normal skin and constitutively produce low levels of cytokines that contribute to epidermal homeostasis. When skin is wounded, an unknown Ag is expressed on damaged keratinocytes. Neighboring gammadelta T cells then round up and contribute to wound healing by local production of epithelial growth factors and inflammatory cytokines. In the absence of skin gammadelta T cells, wound healing is impaired. Similarly, epidermal T cells from patients with healing wounds are activated and secreting growth factors. Patients with nonhealing wounds have a defective epidermal T cell response. Information gained on the role of epidermal-resident T cells in the mouse may provide information for development of new therapeutic approaches to wound healing.

  11. KLRG1 and PD-1 expression are increased on T-cells following tuberculosis-treatment and identify cells with different proliferative capacities in BCG-vaccinated adults.

    PubMed

    Boer, Mardi C; van Meijgaarden, Krista E; Goletti, Delia; Vanini, Valentina; Prins, Corine; Ottenhoff, Tom H M; Joosten, Simone A

    2016-03-01

    In cancer and chronic infectious diseases, immune checkpoint-blockade of inhibitory receptors can enhance T-cell immunity. In tuberculosis (TB), a chronic infectious disease, prolonged antigen exposure can potentially drive terminal T-cell differentiation towards functional 'exhaustion': in human TB T-cells express PD-1 (programmed cell death protein-1) and CTLA-4 (cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated protein-4). However, in murine TB not PD-1 but rather killer cell lectin-like receptor subfamily-G1 (KLRG1) was a superior indicator of terminal T-cell differentiation. We therefore compared expression of KLRG1, PD-1 and CTLA-4 on T-cells in different stages of human TB, and also analysed their induction following BCG-vaccination. KLRG1, PD-1 and CTLA-4-expression were highest on in vitro BCG-stimulated CD4(+) T-cells following recent TB-treatment; KLRG1 and PD-1-expression on CD4(+) T-cells in active--but not latent--TB were only slightly increased compared to healthy donors. BCG-vaccination induced KLRG1-expression on BCG-stimulated CD8(+) but not CD4(+) T-cells, while neither PD-1 nor CTLA-4-expression increased. KLRG1-expressing CD8(+) T-cells exhibited markedly decreased proliferation, whereas PD-1(+) T-cells proliferated after in vitro BCG-stimulation. Thus, we demonstrate the presence of increased KLRG1-expressing T-cells in TB-treated individuals, and present KLRG1 as a marker of decreased human T-cell proliferation following BCG-vaccination. These results expand our understanding of cell-mediated immune control of mycobacterial infections.

  12. The relationship between adult reactive and proactive aggression, hostile interpretation bias, and antisocial personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Lobbestael, Jill; Cima, Maaike; Arntz, Arnoud

    2013-02-01

    Reactive aggression (RA) refers to angry responses to provocation or frustration, while proactive aggression (PA) denotes nonemotional, instrumental, and unprovoked aggression. The current study examined personality-related and cognitive correlates of both aggressive types. Respectively, the predictive values of antisocial personality disorder (ASPD), and of hostile interpretation bias, which is the tendency to interpret ambiguous stimuli in a hostile manner, were studied. The sample consisted of n = 37 male adult patients with mixed diagnoses and n = 29 male nonpatients that responded to vignettes and pictures of ambiguous situations, using both open and closed answer formats. ASPD was assessed by means of the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis II disorders (SCID-II), and the Reactive Proactive Questionnaire (RPQ) measured RA and PA. Results showed that although both RA and PA types were predicted by ASPD traits, RA was additionally predicted by a hostile interpretation bias. These findings suggest that reducing hostile bias is a promising avenue for clinical treatment of ASPD-patients high in RA.

  13. Examination of HTLV-I integration in the skin lesions of various types of adult T-cell leukemia (ATL): independence of cutaneous-type ATL confirmed by Southern blot analysis.

    PubMed

    Dosaka, N; Tanaka, T; Miyachi, Y; Imamura, S; Kakizuka, A

    1991-02-01

    The various clinical features of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) are frequently accompanied by skin eruptions. Recently, a cutaneous type of ATL has been proposed by clinical studies. We analyzed the viral integration of human T-cell leukemia virus-I (HTLV-I) and monoclonal rearrangement of T-cell receptor (TCR) gene in blood lymphocytes and the cutaneous infiltrated cells of nine ATL patients with various clinical features and skin eruptions. We classified them by the results of Southern blot analysis and propose a cutaneous-type ATL accordingly. In two of them, we could detect the monoclonal integration of HTLV-I and T-cell monoclonality only in the skin but not in the peripheral lymphocytes. We also demonstrated the time course study in one patient. Clinicians should be aware of the HTLV-I positive cutaneous T cell lymphoma that can be named cutaneous-type ATL. Examination of viral integration and T-cell monoclonality in skin lesions is required to make an exact diagnosis of cutaneous ATL.

  14. Prevalence of physical and verbal aggressive behaviours and associated factors among older adults in long-term care facilities

    PubMed Central

    Voyer, Philippe; Verreault, René; Azizah, Ginette M; Desrosiers, Johanne; Champoux, Nathalie; Bédard, Annick

    2005-01-01

    Background Verbal and physical aggressive behaviours are among the most disturbing and distressing behaviours displayed by older patients in long-term care facilities. Aggressive behaviour (AB) is often the reason for using physical or chemical restraints with nursing home residents and is a major concern for caregivers. AB is associated with increased health care costs due to staff turnover and absenteeism. Methods The goals of this secondary analysis of a cross-sectional study are to determine the prevalence of verbal and physical aggressive behaviours and to identify associated factors among older adults in long-term care facilities in the Quebec City area (n = 2 332). Results The same percentage of older adults displayed physical aggressive behaviour (21.2%) or verbal aggressive behaviour (21.5%), whereas 11.2% displayed both types of aggressive behaviour. Factors associated with aggressive behaviour (both verbal and physical) were male gender, neuroleptic drug use, mild and severe cognitive impairment, insomnia, psychological distress, and physical restraints. Factors associated with physical aggressive behaviour were older age, male gender, neuroleptic drug use, mild or severe cognitive impairment, insomnia and psychological distress. Finally, factors associated with verbal aggressive behaviour were benzodiazepine and neuroleptic drug use, functional dependency, mild or severe cognitive impairment and insomnia. Conclusion Cognitive impairment severity is the most significant predisposing factor for aggressive behaviour among older adults in long-term care facilities in the Quebec City area. Physical and chemical restraints were also significantly associated with AB. Based on these results, we suggest that caregivers should provide care to older adults with AB using approaches such as the progressively lowered stress threshold model and reactance theory which stress the importance of paying attention to the severity of cognitive impairment and avoiding the use

  15. T Cells in Fish

    PubMed Central

    Nakanishi, Teruyuki; Shibasaki, Yasuhiro; Matsuura, Yuta

    2015-01-01

    Cartilaginous and bony fish are the most primitive vertebrates with a thymus, and possess T cells equivalent to those in mammals. There are a number of studies in fish demonstrating that the thymus is the essential organ for development of T lymphocytes from early thymocyte progenitors to functionally competent T cells. A high number of T cells in the intestine and gills has been reported in several fish species. Involvement of CD4+ and CD8α+ T cells in allograft rejection and graft-versus-host reaction (GVHR) has been demonstrated using monoclonal antibodies. Conservation of CD4+ helper T cell functions among teleost fishes has been suggested in a number studies employing mixed leukocyte culture (MLC) and hapten/carrier effect. Alloantigen- and virus-specific cytotoxicity has also been demonstrated in ginbuna and rainbow trout. Furthermore, the important role of cell-mediated immunity rather than humoral immunity has been reported in the protection against intracellular bacterial infection. Recently, the direct antibacterial activity of CD8α+, CD4+ T-cells and sIgM+ cells in fish has been reported. In this review, we summarize the recent progress in T cell research focusing on the tissue distribution and function of fish T cells. PMID:26426066

  16. Minimal Residual Disease (MRD) Detection with Translocations and T-Cell Receptor and Immunoglobulin Gene Rearrangements in Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia Patients: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Sayitoğlu, Müge; Ar, M Cem; Hatırnaz, Özden; Öngören, Şeniz; Üre, Ümit; Başlar, Zafer; Sırma, Sema; Aydın, Yıldız; Özbek, Uğur; Ferhanoğlu, Burhan

    2008-09-05

    Monitoring minimal residual disease has become increasingly important in clinical practice of ALL management. Break-point fusion regions of leukaemia related chromosomal aberrations and rearranged immunoglobulin (Ig) and T cell-receptor (TCR) genes, which can be detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), are used as leukaemia specific markers in genetic studies of MRD. A total of 31 consecutive patients with newly diagnosed ALL were screened for eligibility criteria. Of those 26 were included in the study. One patient with partial response following induction therapy and four patients who were lost to follow-up after induction were excluded from the study; thus 21 patients were evaluated for MRD. Chromosomal aberrations were detected in 5 (24%) of the patients and were used for MRD monitoring. Three patients had t(9;22) translocation, the other 2 had t(4;11) and t(1;19). MRD-based risk stratification of the 16 patients analysed for Ig/TCR rearrangements revealed 3 low-risk, 11 intermediate-risk and 2 high-risk patients. MRD monitoring is progressively getting to be a more important predictive factor in adult ALL patients. As reported by others confirmed by our limited data there is a good correlation between MRD status and clinical outcome in patients receiving chemotherapy. The pilot-study presented here is the first that systematically and consecutively performs a molecular MRD monitoring of ALL patients in Turkey.

  17. Concomitant use of radiotherapy and two topoisomerase inhibitors to treat adult T-cell leukemia with a radiotherapy-resistant bulky disease: a case series.

    PubMed

    Obama, Kosuke

    2014-01-01

    Concomitant chemoradiotherapy is established as the standard treatment to improve the prognosis of several types of solid tumor, but has not been the general practice for hematological malignancies. Here, I report two cases of adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) with a radiotherapy-resistant bulky disease treated with concomitant radiotherapy and two topoisomerase inhibitors: etoposide (VP-16) and irinotecan (CPT-11). Patient 1 was a 78-year-old man with chemotherapy-resistant inguinal bulky mass. Radiotherapy (total 40 Gy) for this inguinal lesion was started; however, the bulky disease was found to be resistant to radiotherapy and progressed. VP-16 and CPT-11 were administered in addition to radiotherapy (after a total of 20 Gy of radiotherapy). Patient 2 was a 71-year-old man with a solitary bulky mass in left cervical lesion. Various previous chemotherapy and radiotherapy approaches had not been able to control the disease. Six months after first radiotherapy, the bulky disease rapidly progressed with the occurrence of pain. Second radiotherapy (30 Gy) was started with simultaneous administration of CPT-11 and VP-16. In both cases, the bulky disease gradually regressed and completely disappeared by the end of radiotherapy. Thus, flexible adaptation of concomitant chemoradiotherapy including two topoisomerase inhibitors may offer a potential therapeutic option for radiotherapy-resistant bulky diseases, even in hematological malignancies.

  18. The role of serotonin in impulsive aggression, suicide, and homicide in adolescents and adults: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Glick, Amy R

    2015-05-01

    This is a literature review discussing previous studies on the associations between impulsive aggression and the serotonergic system in adults, adolescents, and children. The review demonstrates that there is a clear association between low cerebrospinal fluid serotonin and impulsive aggression. However, studies on neurotransmitter receptor profiles, functional imaging, genetics, and epigenetics reviewed in this article suggest a more complicated picture that includes consideration of gene vs. environment in the evaluation of risk. Serotonin supplementation studies suggest that selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors may reduce impulsive aggression in some adults but are less effective in adults with pathological aggression and also in children and adolescents. Child and adolescent studies are less conclusive, in part due to the heterogeneous physiologic and psychosocial changes occurring over the course of development. The author thus concludes that psychiatrists can reduce risk in these special patient populations by creating safer environments in the form of changes in policy and increased support services.

  19. Regulatory T cell memory

    PubMed Central

    Rosenblum, Michael D.; Way, Sing Sing; Abbas, Abul K.

    2016-01-01

    Memory for antigen is a defining feature of adaptive immunity. Antigen-specific lymphocyte populations show an increase in number and function after antigen encounter and more rapidly re-expand upon subsequent antigen exposure. Studies of immune memory have primarily focused on effector B cells and T cells with microbial specificity, using prime challenge models of infection. However, recent work has also identified persistently expanded populations of antigen-specific regulatory T cells that protect against aberrant immune responses. In this Review, we consider the parallels between memory effector T cells and memory regulatory T cells, along with the functional implications of regulatory memory in autoimmunity, antimicrobial host defence and maternal fetal tolerance. In addition, we discuss emerging evidence for regulatory T cell memory in humans and key unanswered questions in this rapidly evolving field. PMID:26688349

  20. Alloreactive T cell clones.

    PubMed

    Fitch, F W

    1984-01-01

    T cell clones are useful models for studying lymphocyte function both at the level of the individual cell and in interacting systems. Murine cytolytic and non- cytolyic T cell clones have been obtained with relative ease, and the particular procedure used to derive and maintain T cell clones may influence profoundly the characteristics of the resulting cells. The method of choice depends on the specific question to be asked. Although some clones have characteristics that would have been expected on the basis of results observed with bulk cell populations, other clones have rather unexpected properties. Although most T cell clones appear to be either cytolytic or non-cytolytic, this distinction is not always absolute. A high proportion of both cytolytic and non-cytolytic T cell clones have dual reactivity. This is true for cells which by other criteria appear to be true clones. The frequency of such cells is high enough to suggest that most if not all T cells may have reactivity for more than one antigenic determinant or that antigenic determinants recognized by T cells are shared widely and unexpectedly. It is not clear whether one or two different antigen receptors account for such dual reactivity. The nature of the T cell receptor for antigen remains obscure. T cell clones, because of their homogeneous nature, should make it easier to answer these important immunological questions. Although it remains to be determined how many distinct molecules account for the numerous biological activities found in the culture supernatants from antigen-stimulated T cell clones, it is clear that these factors influence several different types of cells that are involved directly and indirectly in immune responses. IL-2 stimulates both cytolytic and non-cytolytic T cells to proliferate. BCSF causes polyclonal activation of B cells, and there may be other factors which influence B cell responses to antigenic stimulation. IL-3 apparently stimulates maturation of immature T cells

  1. T cells in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Piccinni, Marie-Pierre

    2005-01-01

    Maternal tolerance of the fetal allograft could be the result of the integration of numerous mechanisms promoted by different cells present in the decidua. Decidual macrophages and dendritic cells, which are found in close association with T lymphocytes are the most potent activators of T lymphocyte responses and could play a sentinel function for the immune system, initiating antigen-specific T cell responses to fetal antigens. T cell cytokines produced in response to fetal molecules could have a role in the maintenance or in the failure of pregnancy. The levels of LIF, IL-4, IL-10 and M-CSF produced by decidual T cells of women suffering from unexplained spontaneous abortion are lower than those of normal pregnant women indicating that these cytokines may contribute to the maintenance of pregnancy. T cells from the cumulus oophorus surrounding the preimplantation embryo produce LIF and IL-4. These findings suggest that cytokines produced by maternal T cells create a suitable microenvironment for preimplantation embryo development and maintenance of pregnancy. T cell cytokine profile could be modulated by the hormones present in the microenvironment of T cells: high doses of progesterone present at fetomaternal interface and in the cumulus induce the production of IL-4 and LIF, whereas relaxin induces IFN-gamma production.

  2. Study of Alisertib (MLN8237) in Adults With Aggressive Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-11-15

    Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma; Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Burkitt's Lymphoma; Precursor B-lymphoblastic Leukemia/Lymphoma; T-cell Lymphoma, Excluding Primary Cutaneous T-cell Lymphoma; Transformed Follicular Lymphoma With ≥ 50% Diffuse Large Cell Component

  3. Nivolumab in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-06

    Blastic Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell Neoplasm; Hepatosplenic T-Cell Lymphoma; HTLV-1 Infection; NK-Cell Lymphoma, Unclassifiable; Primary Systemic Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma, ALK-Negative; Recurrent Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Enteropathy-Associated T-Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides; Refractory Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Refractory Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Refractory Enteropathy-Associated T-Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Mycosis Fungoides; Refractory Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma, Not Otherwise Specified

  4. Targeted Manipulation of Serotonergic Neurotransmission Affects the Escalation of Aggression in Adult Male Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Alekseyenko, Olga V.; Lee, Carol; Kravitz, Edward A.

    2010-01-01

    Dopamine (DA) and serotonin (5HT) are reported to serve important roles in aggression in a wide variety of animals. Previous investigations of 5HT function in adult Drosophila behavior have relied on pharmacological manipulations, or on combinations of genetic tools that simultaneously target both DA and 5HT neurons. Here, we generated a transgenic line that allows selective, direct manipulation of serotonergic neurons and asked whether DA and 5HT have separable effects on aggression. Quantitative morphological examination demonstrated that our newly generated tryptophan hydroxylase (TRH)-Gal4 driver line was highly selective for 5HT-containing neurons. This line was used in conjunction with already available Gal4 driver lines that target DA or both DA and 5HT neurons to acutely alter the function of aminergic systems. First, we showed that acute impairment of DA and 5HT neurotransmission using expression of a temperature sensitive form of dynamin completely abolished mid- and high-level aggression. These flies did not escalate fights beyond brief low-intensity interactions and therefore did not yield dominance relationships. We showed next that manipulation of either 5HT or DA neurotransmission failed to duplicate this phenotype. Selective disruption of 5HT neurotransmission yielded flies that fought, but with reduced ability to escalate fights, leading to fewer dominance relationships. Acute activation of 5HT neurons using temperature sensitive dTrpA1 channel expression, in contrast, resulted in flies that escalated fights faster and that fought at higher intensities. Finally, acute disruption of DA neurotransmission produced hyperactive flies that moved faster than controls, and rarely engaged in any social interactions. By separately manipulating 5HT- and DA- neuron systems, we collected evidence demonstrating a direct role for 5HT in the escalation of aggression in Drosophila. PMID:20520823

  5. Hydroa Vacciniforme-Like EBV-Positive Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma, First Report of 2 Cases in Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Montalvo, Nelson; Redrobán, Ligia

    2016-05-01

    Hydroa vacciniforme-like cutaneous lymphoma is a very rare Epstein-Barr virus positive peripheral T-cell lymphoma affecting Asian and Hispanic children and young adults with a defective cytotoxic immune response to EBV predisposing to the development of the disease. We report on 2 Ecuadorian patients with papulovesicular and ulcerated crusted lesions on the face, upper and lower extremities and abdomen, with aggressive clinical course and, in one case, a fatal outcome. The histological and molecular profiles (immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization) established a diagnosis of hydroa vacciniforme-like Epstein-Barr virus-encoded small RNAs + cutaneous T-cell lymphoma in both cases.

  6. Human T-lymphotropic virus type I proviral loads in patients with adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma: Comparison between cutaneous type and other subtypes.

    PubMed

    Yonekura, Kentaro; Utsunomiya, Atae; Seto, Masao; Takatsuka, Yoshifusa; Takeuchi, Shogo; Tokunaga, Masahito; Kubota, Ayumu; Takeda, Koichiro; Kanzaki, Tamotsu; Uchida, Youhei; Kawai, Kazuhiro; Kanekura, Takuro

    2015-12-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma (ATL), characterized by various clinicopathological features, is divided into four clinical subtypes, namely, acute, lymphoma, chronic and smoldering types, and the treatment strategy differs according to the clinical subtype. The designation cutaneous type ATL has been proposed to describe a peculiar subgroup of smoldering type ATL in which the skin is predominantly affected. However, diagnostic criteria and prognostic factors for cutaneous type ATL remain to be determined. Therefore, we performed a retrospective study to obtain a precise method for subtype classification and to clearly define cutaneous type ATL. A total of 87 ATL patients (acute, n = 31; lymphoma, n = 6; chronic, n = 24; smoldering, n = 26) were enrolled. The human T-lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-1) proviral load in peripheral blood and the serum soluble interleukin-2 receptor (sIL-2R) level were evaluated with respect to the clinical features of the different types of ATL. The HTLV-1 proviral load was significantly increased in the acute and chronic type and the serum sIL-2R level was increased in the acute and lymphoma type. The HTLV-1 proviral load was significantly lower in cutaneous than other smoldering types of ATL without skin lesions. The clinical findings of cutaneous type ATL were also different from other subtypes. These results indicate that, in combination, determination of the HTLV-1 proviral load and the serum sIL-2R level is useful for distinguishing among the different types of ATL, and strongly suggest that cutaneous type ATL is a distinct clinical entity.

  7. Activation of p53 by Nutlin-3a, an antagonist of MDM2, induces apoptosis and cellular senescence in adult T-cell leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, H; Yamada, Y; Iha, H; Tsukasaki, K; Nagai, K; Atogami, S; Sugahara, K; Tsuruda, K; Ishizaki, A; Kamihira, S

    2009-11-01

    It has been reported that the induction of cellular senescence through p53 activation is an effective strategy in tumor regression. Unfortunately, however, tumors including adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) have disadvantages such as p53 mutations and a lack of p16(INK4a) and/or p14(ARF). In this study we characterized Nutlin-3a-induced cell death in 16 leukemia/lymphoma cell lines. Eight cell lines, including six ATL-related cell lines, had wild-type p53 and Nutlin-3a-activated p53, and the cell lines underwent apoptosis or cell-cycle arrest, whereas eight cell lines with mutated p53 were resistant. Interestingly, senescence-associated-beta-galactosidase (SA-beta-gal) staining revealed that only ATL-related cell lines with wild-type p53 showed cellular senescence, although they lack both p16(INK4a) and p14(ARF). These results indicate that cellular senescence is an important event in p53-dependent cell death in ATL cells and is inducible without p16(INK4a) and p14(ARF). Furthermore, knockdown of Tp53-induced glycolysis and apoptosis regulator (TIGAR), a novel target gene of p53, by small interfering RNA(siRNA) indicated its important role in the induction of cellular senescence. As many patients with ATL carry wild-type p53, our study suggests that p53 activation by Nutlin-3a is a promising strategy in ATL. We also found synergism with a combination of Nutlin-3a and tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL), suggesting the application of Nutlin-3a-based therapy to be broader than expected.

  8. Impaired expression of DICER and some microRNAs in HBZ expressing cells from acute adult T-cell leukemia patients

    PubMed Central

    Gazon, Hélène; Belrose, Gildas; Terol, Marie; Meniane, Jean-Come; Mesnard, Jean-Michel; Césaire, Raymond; Peloponese, Jean-Marie

    2016-01-01

    Global dysregulation of microRNAs (miRNAs), a class of non-coding RNAs that regulate genes expression, is a common feature of human tumors. Profiling of cellular miRNAs on Adult T cell Leukemia (ATL) cells by Yamagishi et al. showed a strong decrease in expression for 96.7% of cellular miRNAs in ATL cells. However, the mechanisms that regulate the expression of miRNAs in ATL cells are still largely unknown. In this study, we compared the expression of 12 miRs previously described for being overexpress by Tax and the expression of several key components of the miRNAs biogenesis pathways in different HBZ expressing cell lines as well as in primary CD4 (+) cells from acute ATL patients. We showed that the expression of miRNAs and Dicer1 were downregulated in cells lines expressing HBZ as well as in fresh CD4 (+) cells from acute ATL patients. Using qRT-PCR, western blotting analysis and Chromatin Immunoprecipitation, we showed that dicer transcription was regulated by c-Jun and JunD, two AP-1 transcription factors. We also demonstrated that HBZ affects the expression of Dicer by removing JunD from the proximal promoter. Furthermore, we showed that at therapeutic concentration of 1mM, Valproate (VPA) an HDAC inhibitors often used in cancer treatment, rescue Dicer expression and miRNAs maturation. These results might offer a rationale for clinical studies of new combined therapy in an effort to improve the outcome of patients with acute ATL. PMID:26849145

  9. Chronic social instability in adult female rats alters social behavior, maternal aggression and offspring development.

    PubMed

    Pittet, Florent; Babb, Jessica A; Carini, Lindsay; Nephew, Benjamin C

    2017-04-01

    We investigated the consequences of chronic social instability (CSI) during adulthood on social and maternal behavior in females and social behavior of their offspring in a rat model. CSI consisted of changing the social partners of adult females every 2-3 days for 28 days, 2 weeks prior to mating. Females exposed to CSI behaved less aggressively and more pro-socially towards unfamiliar female intruders. Maternal care was not affected by CSI in a standard testing environment, but maternal behavior of CSI females was less disrupted by a male intruder. CSI females were quicker to attack prey and did not differ from control females in their saccharin consumption indicating, respectively, no stress-induced sensory-motor or reward system impairments. Offspring of CSI females exhibited slower growth and expressed more anxiety in social encounters. This study demonstrates continued adult vulnerability to social challenges with an impact specific to social situations for mothers and offspring.

  10. Oral Cyclosporin A Inhibits CD4 T cell P-glycoprotein Activity in HIV-Infected Adults Initiating Treatment with Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Hulgan, Todd; Donahue, John P.; Smeaton, Laura; Pu, Minya; Wang, Hongying; Lederman, Michael M.; Smith, Kimberly; Valdez, Hernan; Pilcher, Christopher; Haas, David W.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose P-glycoprotein limits tissue penetration of many antiretroviral drugs. We characterized effects of the P-glycoprotein substrate cyclosporin A on T cell P-glycoprotein activity in HIV-infected AIDS Clinical Trials Group study A5138 participants. Methods We studied P-glycoprotein activity on CD4 and CD8 T cells in 16 participants randomized to receive oral cyclosporin A (n=9) or not (n=7) during initiation antiretroviral therapy (ART) that did not include protease or non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors. Results CD4 T cell P-glycoprotein activity decreased by a median of 8 percentage points with cyclosporin A/ART (difference between cyclosporin A/ART versus ART only P=0.001). Plasma trough cyclosporin A concentrations correlated with change in P-glycoprotein activity in several T cell subsets. Conclusions Oral cyclosporin A can inhibit peripheral blood CD4 T cell P-glycoprotein activity. Targeted P-glycoprotein inhibition might enhance delivery of ART to T cells. PMID:19779705

  11. An early thymic precursor phenotype predicts outcome exclusively in HOXA-overexpressing adult T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a Group for Research in Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia study

    PubMed Central

    Bond, Jonathan; Marchand, Tony; Touzart, Aurore; Cieslak, Agata; Trinquand, Amélie; Sutton, Laurent; Radford-Weiss, Isabelle; Lhermitte, Ludovic; Spicuglia, Salvatore; Dombret, Hervé; Macintyre, Elizabeth; Ifrah, Norbert; Hamel, Jean-François; Asnafi, Vahid

    2016-01-01

    Gene expression studies have consistently identified a HOXA-overexpressing cluster of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemias, but it is unclear whether these constitute a homogeneous clinical entity, and the biological consequences of HOXA overexpression have not been systematically examined. We characterized the biology and outcome of 55 HOXA-positive cases among 209 patients with adult T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia uniformly treated during the Group for Research on Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (GRAALL)-2003 and -2005 studies. HOXA-positive patients had markedly higher rates of an early thymic precursor-like immunophenotype (40.8% versus 14.5%, P=0.0004), chemoresistance (59.3% versus 40.8%, P=0.026) and positivity for minimal residual disease (48.5% versus 23.5%, P=0.01) than the HOXA-negative group. These differences were due to particularly high frequencies of chemoresistant early thymic precursor-like acute lymphoblastic leukemia in HOXA-positive cases harboring fusion oncoproteins that transactivate HOXA. Strikingly, the presence of an early thymic precursor-like immunophenotype was associated with marked outcome differences within the HOXA-positive group (5-year overall survival 31.2% in HOXA-positive early thymic precursor versus 66.7% in HOXA-positive non-early thymic precursor, P=0.03), but not in HOXA-negative cases (5-year overall survival 74.2% in HOXA-negative early thymic precursor versus 57.2% in HOXA-negative non-early thymic precursor, P=0.44). Multivariate analysis further revealed that HOXA positivity independently affected event-free survival (P=0.053) and relapse risk (P=0.039) of chemoresistant T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. These results show that the underlying mechanism of HOXA deregulation dictates the clinico-biological phenotype, and that the negative prognosis of early thymic precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia is exclusive to HOXA-positive patients, suggesting that early treatment intensification is currently

  12. T cell activation.

    PubMed

    Smith-Garvin, Jennifer E; Koretzky, Gary A; Jordan, Martha S

    2009-01-01

    This year marks the 25th anniversary of the first Annual Review of Immunology article to describe features of the T cell antigen receptor (TCR). In celebration of this anniversary, we begin with a brief introduction outlining the chronology of the earliest studies that established the basic paradigm for how the engaged TCR transduces its signals. This review continues with a description of the current state of our understanding of TCR signaling, as well as a summary of recent findings examining other key aspects of T cell activation, including cross talk between the TCR and integrins, the role of costimulatory molecules, and how signals may negatively regulate T cell function.Acronyms and DefinitionsAdapter protein: cellular protein that functions to bridge molecular interactions via characteristic domains able to mediate protein/protein or protein/lipid interactions Costimulation: signals delivered to T cells by cell surface receptors other than the TCR itself that potentiate T cell activation cSMAC: central supramolecular activation cluster Immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM): a short peptide sequence in the cytoplasmic tails of key surface receptors on hematopoietic cells that is characterized by tyrosine residues that are phosphorylated by Src family PTKs, enabling the ITAM to recruit activated Syk family kinases Inside-out signaling: signals initiated by engagement of immunoreceptors that lead to conformational changes and clustering of integrins, thereby increasing the affinity and avidity of the integrins for their ligands NFAT: nuclear factor of activated T cells PI3K: phosphoinositide 3-kinase PKC: protein kinase C PLC: phospholipase C pMHC: peptide major histocompatibility complex (MHC) complex pSMAC: peripheral supramolecular activation cluster PTK: protein tyrosine kinase Signal transduction: biochemical events linking surface receptor engagement to cellular responses TCR: T cell antigen receptor

  13. Multifunctional cytomegalovirus (CMV)-specific CD8(+) T cells are not restricted by telomere-related senescence in young or old adults.

    PubMed

    Riddell, Natalie E; Griffiths, Stephen J; Rivino, Laura; King, David C B; Teo, Guo H; Henson, Sian M; Cantisan, Sara; Solana, Rafael; Kemeny, David M; MacAry, Paul A; Larbi, Anis; Akbar, Arne N

    2015-04-01

    Antigen-specific multifunctional T cells that secrete interferon-γ, interleukin-2 and tumour necrosis factor-α simultaneously after activation are important for the control of many infections. It is unclear if these CD8(+) T cells are at an early or late stage of differentiation and whether telomere erosion restricts their replicative capacity. We developed a multi-parameter flow cytometric method for investigating the relationship between differentiation (CD45RA and CD27 surface phenotype), function (cytokine production) and replicative capacity (telomere length) in individual cytomegalovirus (CMV) antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells. This involves surface and intracellular cell staining coupled to fluorescence in situ hybridization to detect telomeres (flow-FISH). The end-stage/senescent CD8(+)  CD45RA(+)  CD27(-) T-cell subset increases significantly during ageing and this is exaggerated in CMV immune-responsive subjects. However, these end-stage cells do not have the shortest telomeres, implicating additional non-telomere-related mechanisms in inducing their senescence. The telomere lengths in total and CMV (NLV)-specific CD8(+) T cells in all four subsets defined by CD45RA and CD27 expression were significantly shorter in old compared with young individuals in both a Caucasian and an Asian cohort. Following stimulation by anti-CD3 or NLV peptide, similar proportions of triple-cytokine-producing cells are found in CD8(+) T cells at all stages of differentiation in both age groups. Furthermore, these multi-functional cells had intermediate telomere lengths compared with cells producing only one or two cytokines after activation. Therefore, global and CMV (NLV)-specific CD8(+) T cells that secrete interferon-γ, interleukin-2 and tumour necrosis factor-α are at an intermediate stage of differentiation and are not restricted by excessive telomere erosion.

  14. New Targeted Treatments for Cutaneous T-cell Lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Bagot, Martine

    2017-01-01

    Cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCLs) represent a group of rare and heterogeneous diseases that are very difficult to treat at advanced stages. The development of monoclonal antibodies is a new hope for the treatment of these diseases. Alemtuzumab (Campath) is a humanized IgG1 kappa monoclonal antibody specific for CD52, an antigen expressed by most T and B lymphocytes. Alemtuzumab may frequently induce long-term remissions in patients with Sezary syndrome but high-dose treatments lead to severe cytopenia, immune depletion, and opportunistic infections. This treatment is less efficient in mycosis fungoides (MF). Brentuximab vedotin is a chimeric anti-CD30 monoclonal antibody conjugated to monomethyl auristatin E, a cytotoxic antitubulin agent. Brentuximab vedotin is a very interesting new treatment for advanced tumor MF, Sezary syndrome, and primary cutaneous CD30+ lymphoproliferative disorders. The main limiting adverse event is neurosensitive peripheral neuropathy. Mogamulizumab is a humanized anti-C-C chemokine receptor Type 4 monoclonal antibody with a defucosylated Fc region leading to increased antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. Mogamulizumab is very efficient on aggressive peripheral T-cell lymphomas, particularly adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma and CTCLs, especially on the blood component of tumor cells. The main limiting events are related to the concomitant depletion of regulatory T-cells. IPH4102 is a humanized monoclonal antibody that targets the immune receptor KIR3DL2/CD158k. Preclinical results with this antibody offer proofs of concept for the clinical development of IPH4102 to treat patients with advanced CTCL.

  15. Treatment of both native and deamidated gluten peptides with an endo-peptidase from Aspergillus niger prevents stimulation of gut-derived gluten-reactive T cells from either children or adults with celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Toft-Hansen, Henrik; Rasmussen, Karina S; Staal, Anne; Roggen, Erwin L; Sollid, Ludvig M; Lillevang, Søren T; Barington, Torben; Husby, Steffen

    2014-08-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is characterized by an inappropriate immunological reaction against gluten driven by gluten-specific CD4+ T cells. We screened 25 proteases and tested 10 for their potential to degrade gluten in vitro. Five proteases were further tested for their ability to prevent the proliferative response by a gluten-specific CD4+ T cell clone and seven gluten-reactive T cell lines to protease-digested gluten peptides. A proline-specific endo-peptidase from Aspergillus niger (AnP2) was particularly efficient at diminishing proliferation after stimulation with cleaved antigen, and could completely block the response against both native and deamidated gluten peptides. We found that AnP2 was efficient down to a 1:64 protease:substrate ratio (w:w). When AnP2 was tested in assays using seven gluten-reactive T cell lines from individual CD patients (three adults and four children), the response to gluten was diminished in all cases. Our study indicates a therapeutic benefit of AnP2 to CD patients.

  16. The relational context of aggression in borderline personality disorder: using adult attachment style to predict forms of hostility.

    PubMed

    Critchfield, Kenneth L; Levy, Kenneth N; Clarkin, John F; Kernberg, Otto F

    2008-01-01

    Attachment theory provides a framework for understanding and predicting critical aspects of aggression in the personality disorders. An association between borderline personality disorder (BPD) and insecure forms of adult attachment marked by high relationship anxiety has been repeatedly observed in the empirical literature. Aggression also has been linked to insecure attachment. The present study extends previous work by exploring the degree to which the underlying attachment dimensions of relationship anxiety and avoidance are associated in BPD with the following forms of hostility: (a) direct aggression (verbal or physical) initiated towards others, (b) expectation/perception of aggression from others (including "reactive" counteraggression when/if provoked), (c) aggression directed towards the self in the form of suicidality or parasuicidality, and (d) affective experience of irritability or anger. The issue was studied in a sample of 92 patients diagnosed with BPD. Results show significant association between more fearful forms of attachment (simultaneous presence of relationship anxiety and avoidance) and the more reactive form of aggression involving expectation of hostility from others. Self-harm was significantly associated only with relational avoidance while anger and irritability were associated only with relational anxiety. Implications for understanding relational aspects of BPD aggression in research and clinical work are discussed.

  17. Measurement of agitation and aggression in adult and aged neuropsychiatric patients: review of definitions and frequently used measurement scales.

    PubMed

    Volicer, Ladislav; Citrome, Leslie; Volavka, Jan

    2017-02-09

    Agitation and aggression in adult psychiatric patients with psychoses and in persons with dementia increase the burden of disease and frequently cause hospitalization. The implementation of currently available management strategies and the development of new ones is hindered by inconsistent terminology that confuses agitation with aggression. This confusion is maintained by many rating scales that fail to distinguish between these two syndromes. We review the frequently used rating scales with a particular focus on their ability to separate agitation from aggression. Agitation and aggression are two different syndromes. For example, reactive aggression is often precipitated by rejection of care and may not be associated with agitation per se. We propose, in treatment studies of behavioral symptoms of dementia and challenging behaviors in psychoses, that outcomes should be evaluated separately for agitation and aggression. This is important for investigation of drug effectiveness since the medication may be effective against one syndrome but not the other. Separate assessments of agitation and aggression should be a general principle of trial design with particular salience for registration studies of medications proposed for approval by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and other regulatory bodies.

  18. PHF6 mutations in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Van Vlierberghe, Pieter; Palomero, Teresa; Khiabanian, Hossein; Van der Meulen, Joni; Castillo, Mireia; Van Roy, Nadine; De Moerloose, Barbara; Philippé, Jan; González-García, Sara; Toribio, María L; Taghon, Tom; Zuurbier, Linda; Cauwelier, Barbara; Harrison, Christine J; Schwab, Claire; Pisecker, Markus; Strehl, Sabine; Langerak, Anton W; Gecz, Jozef; Sonneveld, Edwin; Pieters, Rob; Paietta, Elisabeth; Rowe, Jacob M; Wiernik, Peter H; Benoit, Yves; Soulier, Jean; Poppe, Bruce; Yao, Xiaopan; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Meijerink, Jules; Rabadan, Raul; Speleman, Frank; Ferrando, Adolfo

    2010-04-01

    Tumor suppressor genes on the X chromosome may skew the gender distribution of specific types of cancer. T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is an aggressive hematological malignancy with an increased incidence in males. In this study, we report the identification of inactivating mutations and deletions in the X-linked plant homeodomain finger 6 (PHF6) gene in 16% of pediatric and 38% of adult primary T-ALL samples. Notably, PHF6 mutations are almost exclusively found in T-ALL samples from male subjects. Mutational loss of PHF6 is importantly associated with leukemias driven by aberrant expression of the homeobox transcription factor oncogenes TLX1 and TLX3. Overall, these results identify PHF6 as a new X-linked tumor suppressor in T-ALL and point to a strong genetic interaction between PHF6 loss and aberrant expression of TLX transcription factors in the pathogenesis of this disease.

  19. High Fetal Estrogen Concentrations: Correlation with Increased Adult Sexual Activity and Decreased Aggression in Male Mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vom Saal, Frederick S.; Grant, William M.; McMullen, Carol W.; Laves, Kurt S.

    1983-06-01

    In the house mouse (Mus musculus), fetuses may develop in utero next to siblings of the same or opposite sex. The amniotic fluid of the female fetuses contains higher concentrations of estradiol than that of male fetuses. Male fetuses that developed in utero between female fetuses had higher concentrations of estradiol in their amniotic fluid than males that were located between other male fetusesw during intrauterine development. They were also more sexually active as adults, less aggressive, and had smaller seminal vesicles than males that had developed between other male fetuses in utero. These findings raise the possibility that during fetal life circulating estrogens may interact with circulating androgens both in regulating the development of sex differences between males and females and in producing variation in phenotype among males and among females.

  20. Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells from Adult and Neonatal Sources: A Comparative In Vitro Analysis of Their Immunosuppressive Properties Against T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Castro-Manrreza, Marta E.; Mayani, Hector; Monroy-García, Alberto; Flores-Figueroa, Eugenia; Chávez-Rueda, Karina; Legorreta-Haquet, Victoria; Santiago-Osorio, Edelmiro

    2014-01-01

    Bone marrow-mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSCs) have immunosuppressive properties and have been used in cell therapies as immune regulators for the treatment of graft-versus-host disease. We have previously characterized several biological properties of MSCs from placenta (PL) and umbilical cord blood (UCB), and compared them to those of BM—the gold standard. In the present study, we have compared MSCs from BM, UCB, and PL in terms of their immunosuppressive properties against lymphoid cell populations enriched for CD3+ T cells. Our results confirm the immunosuppressive potential of BM-MSCs, and demonstrate that MSCs from UCB and, to a lesser extent PL, also have immunosuppressive potential. In contrast to PL-MSCs, BM-MSCs and UCB-MSCs significantly inhibited the proliferation of both CD4+ and CD8+ activated T cells in a cell–cell contact-dependent manner. Such a reduced proliferation in cell cocultures correlated with upregulation of programmed death ligand 1 on MSCs and cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated Ag-4 (CTLA-4) on T cells, and increased production of interferon-γ, interleukin-10, and prostaglandin E2. Importantly, and in contrast to PL-MSCs, both BM-MSCs and UCB-MSCs favored the generation of T-cell subsets displaying a regulatory phenotype CD4+CD25+CTLA-4+. Our results indicate that, besides BM-MSCs, UCB-MSCs might be a potent and reliable candidate for future therapeutic applications. PMID:24428376

  1. CPI-613 and Bendamustine Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma or Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-13

    Adult Lymphocyte Depletion Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Mixed Cellularity Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Adult Nodular Sclerosis Hodgkin Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia

  2. Trajectories of Adolescent Hostile-Aggressive Behavior and Family Climate: Longitudinal Implications for Young Adult Romantic Relationship Competence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fosco, Gregory M.; Van Ryzin, Mark J.; Xia, Mengya; Feinberg, Mark E.

    2016-01-01

    The formation and maintenance of young adult romantic relationships that are free from violence and are characterized by love, connection, and effective problem-solving have important implications for later well-being and family functioning. In this study, we examined adolescent hostile-aggressive behavior (HAB) and family relationship quality as…

  3. Brain Serotonin Synthesis in Adult Males Characterized by Physical Aggression during Childhood: A 21-Year Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    Booij, Linda; Tremblay, Richard E.; Leyton, Marco; Séguin, Jean R.; Vitaro, Frank; Gravel, Paul; Perreau-Linck, Elisabeth; Lévesque, Mélissa L.; Durand, France; Diksic, Mirko; Turecki, Gustavo; Benkelfat, Chawki

    2010-01-01

    Background Adults exhibiting severe impulsive and aggressive behaviors have multiple indices of low serotonin (5-HT) neurotransmission. It remains unclear though whether low 5-HT mediates the behavior or instead reflects a pre-existing vulnerability trait. Methodology/Principal Findings In the present study, positron emission tomography with the tracer alpha-[11C]methyl-L-tryptophan (11C-AMT) was used to compare 5-HT synthesis capacity in two groups of adult males from a 21-year longitudinal study (mean age ± SD: 27.1±0.7): individuals with a history of childhood-limited high physical aggression (C-LHPA; N = 8) and individuals with normal (low) patterns of physical aggression (LPA; N = 18). The C-LHPA males had significantly lower trapping of 11C-AMT bilaterally in the orbitofrontal cortex and self-reported more impulsiveness. Despite this, in adulthood there were no group differences in plasma tryptophan levels, genotyping, aggression, emotional intelligence, working memory, computerized measures of impulsivity, psychosocial functioning/adjustment, and personal and family history of mood and substance abuse disorders. Conclusions/Significance These results force a re-examination of the low 5-HT hypothesis as central in the biology of violence. They suggest that low 5-HT does not mediate current behavior and should be considered a vulnerability factor for impulsive-aggressive behavior that may or may not be expressed depending on other biological factors, experience, and environmental support during development. PMID:20582306

  4. Olanzapine vs. Risperidone in Treating Aggressive Behaviours in Adults with Intellectual Disability: A Single Blind Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amore, M.; Bertelli, M.; Villani, D.; Tamborini, S.; Rossi, M.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Aggressive behaviour represents a frequent symptom in people with intellectual disability (PWID). Despite uncertain evidence of effectiveness, the use of antipsychotics (APs) drugs to treat aggressive behaviour is very common. Antipsychotic medication of aggressivity in PWID has recently become one of the most debated issues in mental…

  5. Lethal cutaneous disease in transgenic mice conditionally expressing type I human T cell leukemia virus Tax.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Hakju; Ogle, Louise; Benitez, Bobby; Bohuslav, Jan; Montano, Mauricio; Felsher, Dean W; Greene, Warner C

    2005-10-21

    Type I human T cell leukemia virus (HTLV-I) is etiologically linked with adult T cell leukemia, an aggressive and usually fatal expansion of activated CD4+ T lymphocytes that frequently traffic to skin. T cell transformation induced by HTLV-I involves the action of the 40-kDa viral Tax transactivator protein. Tax both stimulates the HTLV-I long terminal repeat and deregulates the expression of select cellular genes by altering the activity of specific host transcription factors, including cyclic AMP-responsive element-binding protein (CREB)/activating transcription factor, NF-kappaB/Rel, and serum response factor. To study initiating events involved in HTLV-I Tax-induced T cell transformation, we generated "Tet-off" transgenic mice conditionally expressing in a lymphocyte-restricted manner (EmuSR alpha promoter-enhancer) either wild-type Tax or mutant forms of Tax that selectively compromise the NF-kappaB (M22) or CREB/activating transcription factor (M47) activation pathways. Wild-type Tax and M47 Tax-expressing mice, but not M22-Tax expressing mice, developed progressive alopecia, hyperkeratosis, and skin lesions containing profuse activated CD4 T cell infiltrates with evidence of deregulated inflammatory cytokine production. In addition, these animals displayed systemic lymphadenopathy and splenomegaly. These findings suggest that Tax-mediated activation of NF-kappaB plays a key role in the development of this aggressive skin disease that shares several features in common with the skin disease occurring during the preleukemic stage in HTLV-I-infected patients. Of note, this skin disease completely resolved when Tax transgene expression was suppressed by administration of doxycycline, emphasizing the key role played by this viral oncoprotein in the observed pathology.

  6. A direct relationship between aggressive behavior in the resident/intruder test and cell oxidative status in adult male mice.

    PubMed

    Rammal, Hassan; Bouayed, Jaouad; Soulimani, Rachid

    2010-02-10

    Disturbances in oxidative metabolism are involved in many acute and chronic diseases, as well as in several other conditions. The objective of the present study was to examine the relationship between the level of intracellular reactive oxygen species in the peripheral blood granulocytes of mice, as evaluated by 2',7'-dichlorofluorescin diacetate (DCFH-DA), a sensor of reactive oxygen species, and the aggressive behavior of these mice, as estimated by the resident/intruder test. Our results showed a significant, linear and positive relationship (P<0.001) between the intracellular redox status of peripheral blood granulocytes and the aggressive behavior levels of adult male mice (correlation coefficients (R(2)) ranging from 0.75 to 0.77). This suggests that the granulocytes of aggressively behaving mice have high levels of oxidative stress.

  7. Screening of promising chemotherapeutic candidates from plants against human adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (V): coumarins and alkaloids from Boenninghausenia japonica and Ruta graveolens.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Daisuke; Ishitsuka, Kenji; Matsuda, Narumi; Kouguchi, Ai; Tsuchihashi, Ryota; Okawa, Masafumi; Okabe, Hikaru; Tamura, Kazuo; Kinjo, Junei

    2017-01-01

    During the course of our studies towards the identification of promising chemotherapeutic candidates from plants against two human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I-infected T-cell lines (MT-1 and MT-2), we screened 17 extracts from 9 rutaceous plants against MT-1 and MT-2 cells. The extracts from the aerial parts and roots of Boenninghausenia japonica, as well as the leaves and roots of Ruta graveolens showed potent antiproliferative effects. After activity-guided fractionation, we isolated 44 compounds from two rutaceous plants, including three new compounds (1-3), which were classified into 26 coumarin analogs (13 coumarins, 8 furanocoumarins, 4 dihydrofuranocoumarins and one dihydropyranocoumarin), 15 alkaloid analogs (7 quinolone alkaloids, 4 acridone alkaloids, 3 furanoquinoline alkaloids and one tetrahydroacridone alkaloid) and 3 flavonoid glycosides. Structure-activity relationship studies were also evaluated. The coumarin compounds (2, 3 and 7-9) bearing a 3-dimethylallyl moiety showed potent activity. Similarly, of all the furanocoumarins evaluated in the current study, compound 17 bearing a 3-dimethylallyl group also showed potent activity. A dihydrofuranocoumarin (27) bearing a 3-dimethylallyl moiety showed the most potent activity. Following 27, compound 28 showed potent activity. These results therefore suggested that the presence of a 3-dimethylallyl moiety was important to the antiproliferative activity of these coumarin analogs.

  8. Social emotional information processing in adults: Development and psychometrics of a computerized video assessment in healthy controls and aggressive individuals.

    PubMed

    Coccaro, Emil F; Fanning, Jennifer R; Fisher, Eliana; Couture, Laurel; Lee, Royce J

    2017-02-01

    A computerized version of an assessment of Social-Emotional Information Processing (SEIP) using audio-video film stimuli instead of written narrative vignettes was developed for use in adult participants. This task allows for an assessment of encoding or relevant/irrelevant social-emotional information, attribution bias, and endorsement of appropriate, physically aggressive, and relationally aggressive responses to aversive social-emotional stimuli. The psychometric properties of this Video-SEIP (V-SEIP) assessment were examined in 75 healthy controls (HC) and in 75 individuals with DSM-5 Intermittent Explosive Disorder (IED) and were also compared with the original questionnaire (SEIP-Q) version of the task (HC=26; IED=26). Internal consistency, inter-rater reliability, and test-retest properties of the V-SEIP were good to excellent. In addition, IED participants displayed reduced encoding of relevant information from the film clips, elevated hostile attribution bias, elevated negative emotional response, and elevated endorsement of physically aggressive and relationally aggressive responses to the ambiguous social-emotional stimuli presented in the V-SEIP. These data indicate that the V-SEIP represents a valid and comprehensive alternative to the paper-and-pencil assessment of social-emotional information processing biases in adults.

  9. Zuclopenthixol in adults with intellectual disabilities and aggressive behaviours: discontinuation study.

    PubMed

    Haessler, Frank; Glaser, Thomas; Beneke, Manfred; Pap, Akos F; Bodenschatz, Ralf; Reis, Olaf

    2007-05-01

    We investigated the effects of zuclopenthixol on aggressive behaviour in patients with intellectual disabilities by randomly withdrawing it after a 6-week period of open treatment. Of the 49 patients responding to the treatment, 39 took part in a randomised withdrawal trial. The placebo subgroup (n=20) showed more aggressive behaviour as indicated by outcomes observed by external raters on the Modified Overt Aggression Scale than did the continuing subgroup (n=19). The results indicate that discontinuation of zuclopenthixolin this population leads to an increase in aggressive behaviour.

  10. An overview of cutaneous T cell lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Bagherani, Nooshin; Smoller, Bruce R.

    2016-01-01

    Cutaneous T cell lymphomas (CTCLs) are a heterogeneous group of extranodal non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas that are characterized by a cutaneous infiltration of malignant monoclonal T lymphocytes. They typically afflict adults with a median age of 55 to 60 years, and the annual incidence is about 0.5 per 100,000. Mycosis fungoides, Sézary syndrome, and primary cutaneous peripheral T cell lymphomas not otherwise specified are the most important subtypes of CTCL. CTCL is a complicated concept in terms of etiopathogenesis, diagnosis, therapy, and prognosis. Herein, we summarize advances which have been achieved in these fields. PMID:27540476

  11. Treatment of T cell lymphoma in dogs.

    PubMed

    Moore, Antony S

    2016-09-17

    Overall, canine lymphoma remains one of the most chemotherapy-responsive cancers in the dog. In addition to the stage and the substage of disease, T cell phenotype is the most consistently important prognostic factor. T cell lymphoma (TCL) in dogs is a heterogeneous disease; dogs with a separate entity of indolent TCL can have a considerably better prognosis than dogs with other forms of lymphoma, and indolent TCL may not always require immediate treatment. In contrast, high-grade TCL is an aggressive disease, and when treated with CHOP-based protocols, dogs with this high-grade TCL have a complete remission rate as low as 40 per cent, relapse earlier and have shorter survival time than dogs with a comparable stage, high-grade B cell lymphoma. This review describes the different disease entities that comprise canine TCL, discusses prognosis for each and treatment options that appear to give the best outcomes.

  12. Persistent conditioned place preference to aggression experience in adult male sexually-experienced CD-1 mice.

    PubMed

    Golden, S A; Aleyasin, H; Heins, R; Flanigan, M; Heshmati, M; Takahashi, A; Russo, S J; Shaham, Y

    2017-01-01

    We recently developed a conditioned place preference (CPP) procedure, commonly used to study rewarding drug effects, to demonstrate that dominant sexually-experienced CD-1 male mice form CPP to contexts previously associated with defeating subordinate male C57BL/6J mice. Here we further characterized conditioned and unconditioned aggression behavior in CD-1 mice. In Exp. 1 we used CD-1 mice that displayed a variable spectrum of unconditioned aggressive behavior toward younger subordinate C57BL/6J intruder mice. We then trained the CD-1 mice in the CPP procedure where one context was intruder-paired, while a different context was not. We then tested for aggression CPP 1 day after training. In Exp. 2, we tested CD-1 mice for aggression CPP 1 day and 18 days after training. In Exp. 3-4, we trained the CD-1 mice to lever-press for palatable food and tested them for footshock punishment-induced suppression of food-reinforced responding. In Exp. 5, we characterized unconditioned aggression in hybrid CD-1 × C57BL/6J D1-Cre or D2-Cre F1 generation crosses. Persistent aggression CPP was observed in CD-1 mice that either immediately attacked C57BL/6J mice during all screening sessions or mice that gradually developed aggressive behavior during the screening phase. In contrast, CD-1 mice that did not attack the C57BL/6J mice during screening did not develop CPP to contexts previously paired with C57BL/6J mice. The aggressive phenotype did not predict resistance to punishment-induced suppression of food-reinforced responding. CD-1 × D1-Cre or D2-Cre F1 transgenic mice showed strong unconditioned aggression. Our study demonstrates that aggression experience causes persistent CPP and introduces transgenic mice for circuit studies of aggression.

  13. Role of memory T cell subsets for adoptive immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Busch, Dirk H; Fräßle, Simon P; Sommermeyer, Daniel; Buchholz, Veit R; Riddell, Stanley R

    2016-02-01

    Adoptive transfer of primary (unmodified) or genetically engineered antigen-specific T cells has demonstrated astonishing clinical results in the treatment of infections and some malignancies. Besides the definition of optimal targets and antigen receptors, the differentiation status of transferred T cells is emerging as a crucial parameter for generating cell products with optimal efficacy and safety profiles. Long-living memory T cells subdivide into phenotypically as well as functionally different subsets (e.g. central memory, effector memory, tissue-resident memory T cells). This diversification process is crucial for effective immune protection, with probably distinct dependencies on the presence of individual subsets dependent on the disease to which the immune response is directed as well as its organ location. Adoptive T cell therapy intends to therapeutically transfer defined T cell immunity into patients. Efficacy of this approach often requires long-term maintenance of transferred cells, which depends on the presence and persistence of memory T cells. However, engraftment and survival of highly differentiated memory T cell subsets upon adoptive transfer is still difficult to achieve. Therefore, the recent observation that a distinct subset of weakly differentiated memory T cells shows all characteristics of adult tissue stem cells and can reconstitute all types of effector and memory T cell subsets, became highly relevant. We here review our current understanding of memory subset formation and T cell subset purification, and its implications for adoptive immunotherapy.

  14. huJCAR014 CAR-T Cells in Treating Adult Patients With Relapsed or Refractory B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-31

    Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; CD19 Positive; Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Mediastinal (Thymic) Large B-Cell Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Refractory B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Mediastinal (Thymic) Large B-Cell Cell Lymphoma; Transformed Recurrent Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

  15. Regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Claire; Powrie, Fiona

    2004-08-01

    Regulatory T (TR) cells are a subset of T cells that function to control immune responses. Different populations of TR cells have been described, including thymically derived CD4(+)CD25+ TR cells and Tr1 cells induced in the periphery through exposure to antigen. A transcription factor, Foxp3, has been identified that is essential for CD4(+)CD25+ TR cell development and function. There is now evidence that transforming growth factor-beta might play a role in this pathway. CD4(+)CD25+ TR cells proliferate extensively in vivo in an antigen-specific manner, and can respond to both self and foreign peptides. By suppressing excessive immune responses, TR cells play a key role in the maintenance of self-tolerance, thus preventing autoimmune disease, as well as inhibiting harmful inflammatory diseases such as asthma and inflammatory bowel disease.

  16. Effects of social conditions during adolescence on courtship and aggressive behavior are not abolished by adult social experience.

    PubMed

    Ruploh, Tim; Henning, Miriam; Bischof, Hans-Joachim; von Engelhardt, Nikolaus

    2015-01-01

    Social experience during adolescence has long-lasting consequences for adult social behavior in many species. In zebra finches, individuals reared in pairs during adolescence start to court females faster, sing more courtship motifs to females and are more aggressive compared with group-reared males. We investigated whether such differences are stable during adulthood or can be abolished by novel social experience after adolescence by giving all birds extensive experience with group life during adulthood. Courtship and aggressiveness increased in all males, but pair-reared males still had a higher motif rate and were more aggressive than group-reared males. Males no longer differed in courtship latency. In addition to the stable treatment differences, individual differences in behavior remained stable over time. Our results show that differences in behavior acquired during adolescence are preserved into adulthood, although adults still change their social behavior. Adolescence can thus be seen as a sensitive period during which social conditions have a lasting effect on adult behavior.

  17. Profiles and Correlates of Aggressive Behaviour among Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crocker, A. G.; Mercier, C.; Allaire, J.-F.; Roy, M.-E.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Despite the heterogeneity in aggressive behaviours observed among individuals with intellectual disabilities (ID), little attention has been paid to the identification of typologies of aggression among individuals with mild or moderate ID and their associated factors. Objective: The goal of the present study was to identify profiles of…

  18. Childhood Psychological Abuse and Adult Aggression: The Mediating Role of Self-Capacities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Brian

    2011-01-01

    The current study examines the utility of self-trauma theory for explaining the long-term impact of childhood psychological abuse on aggression. Specifically, the self-capacities of interpersonal relatedness, identity, and affect regulation are tested as mediators of the impact of psychological abuse on various types of aggression in adulthood.…

  19. Curcumin induces growth-arrest and apoptosis in association with the inhibition of constitutively active JAK-STAT pathway in T cell leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Rajasingh, Johnson; Raikwar, Himanshu P.; Muthian, Gladson; Johnson, Caroline; Bright, John J. . E-mail: jbright1@clarian.org

    2006-02-10

    Adult T cell leukemia is an aggressive and frequently fatal malignancy that expressess constitutively activated growth-signaling pathways in association with deregulated growth and resistance to apoptosis. Curcumin (diferuloylmethane) is a naturally occurring yellow pigment, isolated from the rhizomes of the plant Curcuma longa that has traditionally been used in the treatment of injury and inflammation. But the effect and mechanism of action of curcumin on T cell leukemia is not known. To investigate the antitumor activity of curcumin in T cell leukemia, we examined its effect on constitutive phosphorylation of JAK and STAT proteins, proliferation, and apoptosis in HTLV-I-transformed T cell lines. HTLV-I-transformed T cell leukemia lines, MT-2, HuT-102, and SLB-1, express constitutively phosphorylated JAK3, TYK2, STAT3, and STAT5 signaling proteins. In vitro treatment with curcumin induced a dose-dependent decrease in JAK and STAT phosphorylation resulting in the induction of growth-arrest and apoptosis in T cell leukemia. The induction of growth-arrest and apoptosis in association with the blockade of constitutively active JAK-STAT pathway suggests this be a mechanism by which curcumin induces antitumor activity in T cell leukemia.

  20. Effector Vγ9Vδ2 T cells dominate the human fetal γδ T-cell repertoire.

    PubMed

    Dimova, Tanya; Brouwer, Margreet; Gosselin, Françoise; Tassignon, Joël; Leo, Oberdan; Donner, Catherine; Marchant, Arnaud; Vermijlen, David

    2015-02-10

    γδ T cells are unconventional T cells recognizing antigens via their γδ T-cell receptor (TCR) in a way that is fundamentally different from conventional αβ T cells. γδ T cells usually are divided into subsets according the type of Vγ and/or Vδ chain they express in their TCR. T cells expressing the TCR containing the γ-chain variable region 9 and the δ-chain variable region 2 (Vγ9Vδ2 T cells) are the predominant γδ T-cell subset in human adult peripheral blood. The current thought is that this predominance is the result of the postnatal expansion of cells expressing particular complementary-determining region 3 (CDR3) in response to encounters with microbes, especially those generating phosphoantigens derived from the 2-C-methyl-d-erythritol 4-phosphate pathway of isoprenoid synthesis. However, here we show that, rather than requiring postnatal microbial exposure, Vγ9Vδ2 T cells are the predominant blood subset in the second-trimester fetus, whereas Vδ1(+) and Vδ3(+) γδ T cells are present only at low frequencies at this gestational time. Fetal blood Vγ9Vδ2 T cells are phosphoantigen responsive and display very limited diversity in the CDR3 of the Vγ9 chain gene, where a germline-encoded sequence accounts for >50% of all sequences, in association with a prototypic CDR3δ2. Furthermore, these fetal blood Vγ9Vδ2 T cells are functionally preprogrammed (e.g., IFN-γ and granzymes-A/K), with properties of rapidly activatable innatelike T cells. Thus, enrichment for phosphoantigen-responsive effector T cells has occurred within the fetus before postnatal microbial exposure. These various characteristics have been linked in the mouse to the action of selecting elements and would establish a much stronger parallel between human and murine γδ T cells than is usually articulated.

  1. T Cell Receptor-Engineered T Cells to Treat Solid Tumors: T Cell Processing Toward Optimal T Cell Fitness

    PubMed Central

    van Steenbergen-Langeveld, Sabine; van Brakel, Mandy; Groot-van Ruijven, Corrien M.; van Elzakker, Pascal M.M.L.; van Krimpen, Brigitte; Sleijfer, Stefan; Debets, Reno

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Therapy with autologous T cells that have been gene-engineered to express chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) or T cell receptors (TCR) provides a feasible and broadly applicable treatment for cancer patients. In a clinical study in advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC) patients with CAR T cells specific for carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX), we observed toxicities that (most likely) indicated in vivo function of CAR T cells as well as low T cell persistence and clinical response rates. The latter observations were confirmed by later clinical trials in other solid tumor types and other gene-modified T cells. To improve the efficacy of T cell therapy, we have redefined in vitro conditions to generate T cells with young phenotype, a key correlate with clinical outcome. For their impact on gene-modified T cell phenotype and function, we have tested various anti-CD3/CD28 mAb-based T cell activation and expansion conditions as well as several cytokines prior to and/or after gene transfer using two different receptors: CAIX CAR and MAGE-C2(ALK)/HLA-A2 TCR. In a total set of 16 healthy donors, we observed that T cell activation with soluble anti-CD3/CD28 mAbs in the presence of both IL15 and IL21 prior to TCR gene transfer resulted in enhanced proportions of gene-modified T cells with a preferred in vitro phenotype and better function. T cells generated according to these processing methods demonstrated enhanced binding of pMHC, and an enhanced proportion of CD8+, CD27+, CD62L+, CD45RA+T cells. These new conditions will be translated into a GMP protocol in preparation of a clinical adoptive therapy trial to treat patients with MAGE-C2-positive tumors. PMID:25423330

  2. Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients With Newly Diagnosed T-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or T-cell Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-04

    Adult T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Stage II Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage II Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage II Contiguous Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage II Non-Contiguous Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage IV Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  3. The architects of B and T cell immune responses.

    PubMed

    Lane, Peter J L

    2008-08-15

    Published work links adult lymphoid tissue-inducer cells (LTi) with T cell-dependent antibody responses. In this issue of Immunity, Tsuji et al. (2008) associate LTi with T cell-independent IgA antibody responses in the gut.

  4. Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cells for Sustained Remissions in Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Maude, Shannon L.; Frey, Noelle; Shaw, Pamela A.; Aplenc, Richard; Barrett, David M.; Bunin, Nancy J.; Chew, Anne; Gonzalez, Vanessa E.; Zheng, Zhaohui; Lacey, Simon F.; Mahnke, Yolanda D.; Melenhorst, Jan J.; Rheingold, Susan R.; Shen, Angela; Teachey, David T.; Levine, Bruce L.; June, Carl H.; Porter, David L.; Grupp, Stephan A.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is difficult to treat despite the availability of aggressive therapies. Chimeric antigen receptor–modified T cells targeting CD19 may overcome many limitations of conventional therapies and induce remission in patients with refractory disease. METHODS We infused autologous T cells transduced with a CD19-directed chimeric antigen receptor (CTL019) lentiviral vector in patients with relapsed or refractory ALL at doses of 0.76×106 to 20.6×106 CTL019 cells per kilogram of body weight. Patients were monitored for a response, toxic effects, and the expansion and persistence of circulating CTL019 T cells. RESULTS A total of 30 children and adults received CTL019. Complete remission was achieved in 27 patients (90%), including 2 patients with blinatumomab-refractory disease and 15 who had undergone stem-cell transplantation. CTL019 cells proliferated in vivo and were detectable in the blood, bone marrow, and cerebrospinal fluid of patients who had a response. Sustained remission was achieved with a 6-month event-free survival rate of 67% (95% confidence interval [CI], 51 to 88) and an overall survival rate of 78% (95% CI, 65 to 95). At 6 months, the probability that a patient would have persistence of CTL019 was 68% (95% CI, 50 to 92) and the probability that a patient would have relapse-free B-cell aplasia was 73% (95% CI, 57 to 94). All the patients had the cytokine-release syndrome. Severe cytokine-release syndrome, which developed in 27% of the patients, was associated with a higher disease burden before infusion and was effectively treated with the anti–interleukin-6 receptor antibody tocilizumab. CONCLUSIONS Chimeric antigen receptor–modified T-cell therapy against CD19 was effective in treating relapsed and refractory ALL. CTL019 was associated with a high remission rate, even among patients for whom stem-cell transplantation had failed, and durable remissions up to 24 months were observed. (Funded by

  5. Prognostic significance of Epstein-Barr virus in nodal peripheral T-cell lymphoma, unspecified: A Groupe d'Etude des Lymphomes de l'Adulte (GELA) study.

    PubMed

    Dupuis, Jehan; Emile, Jean-François; Mounier, Nicolas; Gisselbrecht, Christian; Martin-Garcia, Nadine; Petrella, Tony; Bouabdallah, Reda; Berger, Françoise; Delmer, Alain; Coiffier, Bertrand; Reyes, Félix; Gaulard, Philippe

    2006-12-15

    Peripheral T-cell lymphomas (PTCLs) are rare and have a dismal prognosis. The most frequent subtype is PTCL, unspecified. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) has been detected in around 40% of cases, but its prognostic significance is not fully established. Lymph node samples from 110 patients with PTCL, unspecified included in LNH87 and LNH93 trials were available. EBV status was studied by EBV-encoded small RNA in situ hybridization (EBER-ISH). EBER-ISH showed positive cells in 45 (41%) of 110 patients. Pretreatment characteristics were comparable between positive and negative cases, except for male sex (80% versus 60%, respectively, P = .02). Only 50% of patients achieved complete remission with a 5-year event-free survival (EFS) and overall survival (OS) of 21% and 30%, respectively. EBER-ISH positivity was the sole factor linked with worse EFS, with a 5-year probability of 11% for positive patients. In univariate analysis, factors affecting OS were EBER-ISH positivity, high LDH level, and age older than 60 years. In multivariate analysis, EBER-ISH was associated with a worse OS in the elderly population. Time-dependent analysis showed that the negative impact of EBV was essentially seen in the first 2 years following diagnosis. These results warrant further studies regarding pathogenesis and specific treatment approaches for EBV-associated PTCL patients.

  6. Altered Hippocampal Neurogenesis and Amygdalar Neuronal Activity in Adult Mice with Repeated Experience of Aggression

    PubMed Central

    Smagin, Dmitry A.; Park, June-Hee; Michurina, Tatyana V.; Peunova, Natalia; Glass, Zachary; Sayed, Kasim; Bondar, Natalya P.; Kovalenko, Irina N.; Kudryavtseva, Natalia N.; Enikolopov, Grigori

    2015-01-01

    Repeated experience of winning in a social conflict setting elevates levels of aggression and may lead to violent behavioral patterns. Here, we use a paradigm of repeated aggression and fighting deprivation to examine changes in behavior, neurogenesis, and neuronal activity in mice with positive fighting experience. We show that for males, repeated positive fighting experience induces persistent demonstration of aggression and stereotypic behaviors in daily agonistic interactions, enhances aggressive motivation, and elevates levels of anxiety. When winning males are deprived of opportunities to engage in further fights, they demonstrate increased levels of aggressiveness. Positive fighting experience results in increased levels of progenitor cell proliferation and production of young neurons in the hippocampus. This increase is not diminished after a fighting deprivation period. Furthermore, repeated winning experience decreases the number of activated (c-fos-positive) cells in the basolateral amygdala and increases the number of activated cells in the hippocampus; a subsequent no-fight period restores the number of c-fos-positive cells. Our results indicate that extended positive fighting experience in a social conflict heightens aggression, increases proliferation of neuronal progenitors and production of young neurons in the hippocampus, and decreases neuronal activity in the amygdala; these changes can be modified by depriving the winners of the opportunity for further fights. PMID:26648838

  7. Neonatal respiratory syncytial virus infection has an effect on lung inflammation and the CD4(+) CD25(+) T cell subpopulation during ovalbumin sensitization in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Comas-García, A; López-Pacheco, C P; García-Zepeda, E A; Soldevila, G; Ramos-Martínez, P; Ramos-Castañeda, J

    2016-08-01

    In BALB/c adult mice, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection enhances the degree of lung inflammation before and/or after ovalbumin (OVA) respiratory sensitization. However, it is unclear whether RSV infection in newborn mice has an effect on the immune response to OVA respiratory sensitization in adult mice. The aim of this study was to determine if RSV neonatal infection alters T CD4(+) population and lung inflammation during OVA respiratory sensitization in adult mice. BALB/c mice were infected with RSV on the fourth day of life and challenged by OVA 4 weeks later. We found that in adult mice, RSV neonatal infection prior to OVA sensitization reduces the CD4(+) CD25(+) and CD4(+) CD25(+) forkhead protein 3 (FoxP3)(+) cell populations in the lungs and bronchoalveolar lavage. Furthermore, it also attenuates the inflammatory infiltrate and cytokine/chemokine expression levels in the mouse airways. In conclusion, the magnitude of the immune response to a non-viral respiratory perturbation in adult mice is not enhanced by a neonatal RSV infection.

  8. The comparison of expression of cutaneous lymphocyte-associated antigen (CLA), and Th1- and Th2-associated antigens in mycosis fungoides and cutaneous lesions of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Takahiro; Ohshima, Koichi; Tsuchiya, Takeshi; Suehuji, Hiroaki; Karube, Kennosuke; Nakayama, Juichiro; Suzumiya, Junji; Yoshino, Tadashi; Kikuchi, Masahiro

    2003-01-01

    Mycosis fungoides (MF) is morphologically similar to cutaneous lesions of adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) of human T-cell lymphotropic virus-type I (HTLV-1). In addition, the Th1 or Th2 characteristic of MF and ATLL is still controversial. In the present study, to discriminate MF and cutaneous lesion of ATLL using immunohistochemical markers, and to elucidate Th1 or Th2 dominancy in both disorders, CLA (cutaneous lymphocyte associated antigen) was expressed on epidermotrophic lymphoma cells in all early stage MF. In contrast, all ATLL were negative for CLA. CXCR3 was especially expressed in epidermotropic small lymphoma cells of MF. CCR5 was expressed in both disorders with variable sized lymphoma cells. ST2 was expressed on large transformed lymphoma cells with ATLL, but not in any MF cases. OX40 was expressed in the large transformed cell population in both disorders. These findings suggest that CLA and ST2 could be potentially useful immunohistochemical markers for discrimination of mycosis fungoides and cutaneous lesions of ATLL. And OX40 could be a useful immunohistochemical marker for the histopathological progression of both disorders.

  9. New entity, definition and diagnostic criteria of cutaneous adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma: human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 proviral DNA load can distinguish between cutaneous and smoldering types.

    PubMed

    Amano, Masahiro; Kurokawa, Motoki; Ogata, Katsumi; Itoh, Hiroshi; Kataoka, Hiroaki; Setoyama, Mitsuru

    2008-05-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) has been divided into four subtypes up to now: (i) acute; (ii) lymphoma; (iii) chronic; and (iv) smoldering. Skin lesion(s) may be present and the cases showing less than 5% abnormal T-lymphocytes in peripheral blood without involvement of other organs, have been classified as smoldering ATLL. However, this type of ATLL with skin manifestations had a worse prognosis than that without skin lesions. This study aimed to define and distinguish cutaneous ATLL lacking nodal lymphoma and leukemic change from smoldering ATLL. We propose an entity of cutaneous ATLL, which has less than 5% abnormal T lymphocyte in peripheral blood, a normal lymphocyte count (i.e. <4 x 10(9)/L), no hypercalcemia and lactate dehydrogenase values of up to 1.5 times the normal upper limit. At least one of the histologically proven skin lesions should be present accompanying monoclonal integration of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) proviral DNA in the skin lesion. Blood samples were collected from 41 HTLV-1-infected patients, 21 asymptomatic carriers, 16 patients with cutaneous ATLL and four patients with smoldering ATLL. HTLV-1 proviral loads, soluble interleukin-2 receptors and other parameters were examined in each case. HTLV-1 proviral DNA loads in smoldering ATLL group are significantly higher than those in asymptomatic carrier and cutaneous ATLL group. Cutaneous ATLL may be a distinct entity that should be separated from smoldering ATLL clinically and virologically.

  10. B cell depletion in HIV-1 subtype A infected Ugandan adults: relationship to CD4 T cell count, viral load and humoral immune responses.

    PubMed

    Oballah, Peter; Flach, Britta; Eller, Leigh A; Eller, Michael A; Ouma, Benson; de Souza, Mark; Kibuuka, Hannah N; Wabwire-Mangen, Fred; Brown, Bruce K; Michael, Nelson L; Robb, Merlin L; Montefiori, David; Polonis, Victoria R

    2011-01-01

    To better understand the nature of B cell dysfunctions in subjects infected with HIV-1 subtype A, a rural cohort of 50 treatment-naïve Ugandan patients chronically infected with HIV-1 subtype A was studied, and the relationship between B cell depletion and HIV disease was assessed. B cell absolute counts were found to be significantly lower in HIV-1+ patients, when compared to community matched negative controls (p<0.0001). HIV-1-infected patients displayed variable functional and binding antibody titers that showed no correlation with viral load or CD4+ T cell count. However, B cell absolute counts were found to correlate inversely with neutralizing antibody (NAb) titers against subtype A (p = 0.05) and subtype CRF02_AG (p = 0.02) viruses. A positive correlation was observed between subtype A gp120 binding antibody titers and NAb breadth (p = 0.02) and mean titer against the 10 viruses (p = 0.0002). In addition, HIV-1 subtype A sera showed preferential neutralization of the 5 subtype A or CRF02_AG pseudoviruses, as compared with 5 pseudoviruses from subtypes B, C or D (p<0.001). These data demonstrate that in patients with chronic HIV-1 subtype A infection, significant B cell depletion can be observed, the degree of which does not appear to be associated with a decrease in functional antibodies. These findings also highlight the potential importance of subtype in the specificity of cross-clade neutralization in HIV-1 infection.

  11. Identification of Two New HLA-A*1101-Restricted Tax Epitopes Recognized by Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes in an Adult T-Cell Leukemia Patient after Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Harashima, Nanae; Tanosaki, Ryuji; Shimizu, Yukiko; Kurihara, Kiyoshi; Masuda, Takao; Okamura, Jun; Kannagi, Mari

    2005-01-01

    We previously reported that Tax-specific CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs), directed to single epitopes restricted by HLA-A2 or A24, expanded in vitro and in vivo in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from some adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) patients after but not before allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Here, we demonstrated similar Tax-specific CTL expansion in PBMC from another post-HSCT ATL patient without HLA-A2 or A24, whose CTLs equally recognized two newly identified epitopes, Tax88-96 and Tax272-280, restricted by HLA-A11, suggesting that these immunodominant Tax epitopes are present in the ATL patient in vivo. PMID:16014972

  12. Identification of two new HLA-A*1101-restricted tax epitopes recognized by cytotoxic T lymphocytes in an adult T-cell leukemia patient after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Harashima, Nanae; Tanosaki, Ryuji; Shimizu, Yukiko; Kurihara, Kiyoshi; Masuda, Takao; Okamura, Jun; Kannagi, Mari

    2005-08-01

    We previously reported that Tax-specific CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs), directed to single epitopes restricted by HLA-A2 or A24, expanded in vitro and in vivo in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from some adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) patients after but not before allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Here, we demonstrated similar Tax-specific CTL expansion in PBMC from another post-HSCT ATL patient without HLA-A2 or A24, whose CTLs equally recognized two newly identified epitopes, Tax88-96 and Tax272-280, restricted by HLA-A11, suggesting that these immunodominant Tax epitopes are present in the ATL patient in vivo.

  13. Do predisposing and family background characteristics modify or confound the relationship between drinking frequency and alcohol-related aggression? A study of late adolescent and young adult drinkers.

    PubMed

    Wells, Samantha; Graham, Kathryn; Speechley, Mark; Koval, John J

    2006-04-01

    The present study examined whether predisposing and family background characteristics confounded (common cause/general deviance theory) or modified (conditional/interactive theory) the association between drinking frequency and alcohol-related aggression. A secondary analysis of the US National Longitudinal Survey of Youth was conducted using a composite sample of drinkers, ages 17 to 21, from the 1994, 1996, and 1998 Young Adult surveys (n=602). No evidence of confounding of the relationship between drinking frequency and alcohol-related aggression was found. In addition, predisposing characteristics did not modify the association between drinking frequency and alcohol-related aggression. However, family background variables (mother's education and any poverty) were important explanatory variables for alcohol-related aggression among males, whereas recent aggression (fights at school or work) was an important predictor for females. Overall, lack of support for the conditional/interactive and common cause theories of the alcohol and aggression relationship suggests that alcohol has an independent explanatory role in alcohol-related aggression. In addition, the gender differences found in the present study highlight the need for more gender-focussed research on predictors of alcohol-related aggression, especially among adolescents and young adults.

  14. Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... consists of a group of rare and usually aggressive (fast-growing) NHLs that develop from mature T- ... also be involved. This group of PTCLs is aggressive and requires combination chemotherapy upon diagnosis. Anaplastic Large ...

  15. Impact of Virtual Reality on Young Adults' Physiological Arousal and Aggressive Thoughts: Interaction versus Observation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calvert, Sandra L.; Tan, Siu-Lan

    1994-01-01

    Compared to college students who only watched a violent virtual reality game, those who played the game exhibited a higher heart rate after the game, reported more dizziness and nausea during the game, and exhibited more aggressive thoughts on a posttest questionnaire. Results suggest support for arousal and cognitive, but not psychoanalytic,…

  16. Atypical Antipsychotic Medication Improves Aggression, but Not Self-Injurious Behaviour, in Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruedrich, S. L.; Swales, T. P.; Rossvanes, C.; Diana, L.; Arkadiev, V.; Lim, K.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Atypical antipsychotic medications have largely supplanted their typical counterparts, both for psychosis and for the treatment of aggression and/or self-injurious behaviour (SIB), in persons with intellectual disabilities (ID). However, with the exception of risperidone, little systematic research supports their use in such persons.…

  17. Influence of Conflict between Adults on the Emotions and Aggression of Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cummings, E. Mark; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Influence of others' emotions on the emotions and aggression of 2-year-olds was examined. Dyads of familiar peers were exposed during play to a sequence of experimental manipulations of background emotions of warmth and anger. Theoretical and practical implications of sensitivity to others' conflicts and interpersonal problems in toddlers are also…

  18. Young adults' media use and attitudes toward interpersonal and institutional forms of aggression.

    PubMed

    Brady, Sonya S

    2007-01-01

    Links between media violence exposure and favorable attitudes toward interpersonal violence are well established, but few studies have examined whether associations extend to include favorable attitudes toward institutional forms of aggression. Studies on this topic have not assessed multiple forms of media use and statistically controlled for individual characteristics likely to influence attitudes beyond sociodemographic information. In this study, undergraduate students (N=319) aged 18-20 years (56% male) completed a survey assessing media use (number of hours per week spent playing videogames, watching movies/TV shows, watching TV sports) and attitudes toward interpersonal violence, punitive criminal justice policies, and different types of military activities (preparedness/defense and aggressive intervention). Greater number of hours spent watching TV contact sports was associated with more favorable attitudes toward military preparedness/defense, aggressive military intervention, and punitive criminal justice policies among men independently of parental education, lifetime violence exposure within the home and community, aggressive personality, and constrained problem solving style. Greater number of hours spent watching violent movies/TV was associated with more favorable attitudes toward military preparedness/defense among men and with more favorable attitudes toward interpersonal violence and punitive criminal justice policies among women, but these associations became non-significant when adjusting for covariates.

  19. T-Cell Receptor-Transduced T Cells: Clinical Experience.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Paul F

    2015-01-01

    The large number of T-cell epitopes that have been found to be processed and presented on human tumors, now numbering in the hundreds, provides a rich source of targets for therapeutic interventions aimed at inducing durable tumor regression. Vaccination strategies aimed at inducing responses to these antigens have been largely ineffective, and it has been challenging to generate large numbers of T cells with the functional capacity to mediate durable tumor regressions in adoptive immunotherapy strategies in patients who have common epithelial malignancies. The ability to generate T-cell receptors that recognize shared as well as unique antigens expressed in a wide variety of common tumor types that include lung, breast, ovarian, gastrointestinal, urothelial, and genitourinary cancers provides an opportunity to develop widely applicable therapies based on the adoptive transfer of autologous T cells transduced with those receptors.

  20. Regulatory T cells and COPD.

    PubMed

    Dancer, Rachel; Sansom, David M

    2013-12-01

    While the innate immune system has long been implicated in the pathogenesis of COPD, a role for the acquired immune system is less well studied. The increasing recognition that COPD shares features with autoimmune disease has led to interest in a potential role for regulatory T cells, which are intimately involved in the control of autoimmunity. The suggestion that regulatory T cell numbers are increased in patients with COPD may indicate their dysfunction or resistance to suppression by target cells. Investigation of regulatory T cells may therefore be of importance in understanding the inflammation and tissue damage that occurs in patients with COPD who cease smoking.

  1. Changing T cell specificity by retroviral T cell receptor display

    PubMed Central

    Kessels, Helmut W. H. G.; van den Boom, Marly D.; Spits, Hergen; Hooijberg, Erik; Schumacher, Ton N. M.

    2000-01-01

    The diversity of the T cell receptor (TCR) repertoire is limited, because of the processes of positive and negative T cell selection. To obtain T cells with specificities beyond the immune system's capacity, we have developed a strategy for retroviral TCR display. In this approach, a library of T cell variants is generated in vitro and introduced into a TCR-negative murine T cell line by retroviral transfer. We document the value of TCR display by the creation of a library of an influenza A-specific TCR and the subsequent in vitro selection of TCRs that either recognize the parental influenza epitope or that have acquired a specificity for a different influenza A strain. The resulting in vitro selected TCRs induce efficient T cell activation after ligand recognition and are of equal or higher potency than the in vivo generated parent receptor. TCR display should prove a useful strategy for the generation of high-affinity tumor-specific TCRs for gene transfer purposes. PMID:11121060

  2. Bortezomib-based chemotherapy to treat refractory angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    DU, HUA-PING; YANG, QIAN-QIAN; ZHANG, YE

    2016-01-01

    The peripheral T-cell lymphomas (PTCLs) are a heterogeneous group of aggressive neoplasms that account for <15% of all non-Hodgkin's lymphoma cases in adults. Angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma (AITL) is a specific subtype of PTCL. The tumor is frequently aggressive and there is currently no general consensus regarding an effective treatment strategy. The present study reports a case in which bortezomib combined with dexamethasone was used to treat refractory AITL. A 63-year-old woman was admitted to Sir Run Run Shaw Hospital, Zhejiang University School of Medicine (Zhejiang, China) on August 17, 2013. The patient had been diagnosed with AITL for 4 months and had experienced a relapse of symptoms for the 4 days prior to admission. The patient demonstrated fever and dyspnea, accompanied by severe edema in the face and lower limbs, which later spread to the right upper limb. The patient was treated with bortezomib plus dexamethasone, which rapidly relieved the symptoms. The patient was subsequently administered an additional 2 cycles of bortezomib-based chemotherapy and survived for an additional 4 months, prior to succumbing to the disease. Only a small number of studies have reported the use of bortezomib in the treatment of T-cell lymphoma. The present study suggested that bortezomib-based treatment may be a reliable, safe and effective alternative for the treatment of relapsed/refractory PTCL. The efficacy of bortezomib as a treatment for PTCL requires additional evaluation in future studies. PMID:26998168

  3. Autologous Tax-specific CTL therapy in a primary adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma cell-bearing NOD/Shi-scid, IL-2Rγnull mouse model.

    PubMed

    Masaki, Ayako; Ishida, Takashi; Suzuki, Susumu; Ito, Asahi; Mori, Fumiko; Sato, Fumihiko; Narita, Tomoko; Yamada, Tomiko; Ri, Masaki; Kusumoto, Shigeru; Komatsu, Hirokazu; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Niimi, Akio; Inagaki, Hiroshi; Iida, Shinsuke; Ueda, Ryuzo

    2013-07-01

    We expanded human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 Tax-specific CTL in vitro from PBMC of three individual adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) patients and assessed their therapeutic potential in an in vivo model using NOG mice bearing primary ATL cells from the respective three patients (ATL/NOG). In these mice established with cells from a chronic-type patient, treatment by i.p. injection of autologous Tax-CTL resulted in greater infiltration of CD8-positive T cells into each ATL lesion. This was associated with a significant decrease of ATL cell infiltration into blood, spleen, and liver. Tax-CTL treatment also significantly decreased human soluble IL-2R concentrations in the sera. In another group of ATL/NOG mice, Tax-CTL treatment led to a significant prolongation of survival time. These findings show that Tax-CTL can infiltrate the tumor site, recognize, and kill autologous ATL cells in mice in vivo. In ATL/NOG mice with cells from an acute-type patient, whose postchemotherapeutic remission continued for >18 mo, antitumor efficacy of adoptive Tax-CTL therapy was also observed. However, in ATL/NOG mice from a different acute-type patient, whose ATL relapsed after 6 mo of remission, no efficacy was observed. Thus, although the therapeutic effects were different for different ATL patients, to the best of our knowledge, this is the first report that adoptive therapy with Ag-specific CTL expanded from a cancer patient confers antitumor effects, leading to significant survival benefit for autologous primary cancer cell-bearing mice in vivo. The present study contributes to research on adoptive CTL therapy, which should be applicable to several types of cancer.

  4. Immunophenotypic and antigen receptor gene rearrangement analysis in T cell neoplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Knowles, D. M.

    1989-01-01

    The author reviews the immunophenotypic profiles displayed by the major clinicopathologic categories of T cell neoplasia, the immunophenotypic criteria useful in the immunodiagnosis of T cell neoplasia, and the contributions made by antigen receptor gene rearrangement analysis to the understanding of T cell neoplasia. Neoplasms belonging to distinct clinicopathologic categories of T cell neoplasia often exhibit characteristic immunophenotypic profiles. Approximately 80% of lymphoblastic lymphomas and 20% of acute lymphoblastic leukemias express phenotypes consistent with prethymic and intrathymic stages of T cell differentiation, including intranuclear terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase. Cutaneous T cell lymphomas of mycosis fungoides type usually express pan-T cell antigens CD2, CD5, and CD3, often lack the pan-T cell antigen CD7, and usually express the mature, peripheral helper subset phenotype, CD4+ CD8-. Cutaneous T cell lymphomas of nonmycosis fungoides type and peripheral T cell lymphomas often lack one or more pan-T cell antigens and, in addition, occasionally express the anomalous CD4+ CD8+ or CD4- CD8- phenotypes. T gamma-lymphoproliferative disease is divisable into two broad categories: those cases that are CD3 antigen positive and exhibit clonal T cell receptor beta chain (TCR-beta) gene rearrangements and those cases that are CD3 antigen negative and exhibit the TCR-beta gene germline configuration. Human T cell lymphotropic virus-I (HTLV-I) associated Japanese, Carribean, and sporadic adult T cell leukemia/lymphomas usually express pan-T cell antigens, the CD4+ CD8- phenotype, and various T cell-associated activation antigens, including the interleukin-2 receptor (CD25). Immunophenotypic criteria useful in the immunodiagnosis of T cell neoplasia include, in increasing order of utility, T cell predominance, T cell subset antigen restriction, anomalous T cell subset antigen expression, and deletion of one or more pan-T cell antigens. Only in

  5. B and T cell screen

    MedlinePlus

    Direct immunofluorescence; E-rosetting; T and B lymphocyte assays; B and T lymphocyte assays ... identifiers are added to distinguish between T and B cells. The E-rosetting test identifies T cells ...

  6. Minimal residual disease (MRD) monitoring using rearrangement of T-cell receptor and immunoglobulin H gene in the treatment of adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients.

    PubMed

    Toubai, Tomomi; Tanaka, Junji; Ota, Shuichi; Fukuhara, Takashi; Hashino, Satoshi; Kondo, Takeshi; Kasai, Masaharu; Kakinoki, Yasutaka; Masauzi, Nobuo; Morioka, Masanobu; Kawamura, Tsugumichi; Iwasaki, Hiroshi; Asaka, Masahiro; Imamura, Masahiro

    2005-11-01

    We evaluate whether molecular monitoring of minimal residual disease (MRD) using TCR delta (TCRD), TCR gamma (TCRG), and immunoglobulin H (IgH) gene rearrangements in the bone marrow (BM) is correlated with clinical events in ALL patients. The 14 patients enrolled in this study included 6 males and 8 females with a median age of 53 years (range, 25-79 years), and the median duration of follow-up was 417 days (range, 57-617 days). The median WBC count was 11.3 x 10(9)/L at diagnosis. All patients had L2 type ALL. Eleven patients had a monoclonal pattern of IgH (7), TCRD (3) and TCRG (1), and 3 patients had two clonal patterns. Eleven of the 14 patients achieved the first complete remission (CR) after the first induction chemotherapy. We analyzed 9 of 11 CR patients who could be examined immediately after induction chemotherapy (including re-induction therapy). Event-free survival (EFS, 0%) and disease-free survival (DFS, 0%) at 1 year in CR patients with MRD level >or=10(-3) (n = 3) were significantly lower than those in CR patients with MRD level <10(-3) (n = 6) (log-rank test, P = 0.013, 0.013). A lower MRD in BM value after induction chemotherapy was associated significantly with longer survival in the log-rank test. Our data provide evidence that molecular MRD status of BM is a strong predictor of outcome in adult ALL.

  7. T Cell Fate at the Single-Cell Level.

    PubMed

    Buchholz, Veit R; Schumacher, Ton N M; Busch, Dirk H

    2016-05-20

    T cell responses display two key characteristics. First, a small population of epitope-specific naive T cells expands by several orders of magnitude. Second, the T cells within this proliferating population take on diverse functional and phenotypic properties that determine their ability to exert effector functions and contribute to T cell memory. Recent technological advances in lineage tracing allow us for the first time to study these processes in vivo at single-cell resolution. Here, we summarize resulting data demonstrating that although epitope-specific T cell responses are reproducibly similar at the population level, expansion potential and diversification patterns of the offspring derived from individual T cells are highly variable during both primary and recall immune responses. In spite of this stochastic response variation, individual memory T cells can serve as adult stem cells that provide robust regeneration of an epitope-specific tissue through population averaging. We discuss the relevance of these findings for T cell memory formation and clinical immunotherapy.

  8. Predictors of Late HIV Diagnosis among Adult People Living with HIV/AIDS Who Undertake an Initial CD4 T Cell Evaluation, Northern Ethiopia: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Beyene, Melkamu Bedimo; Beyene, Habtamu Bedimo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Early HIV testing and timely initiation of ART is critical for the improved quality of life of PLWHIV. Having identified a higher rates of Late HIV diagnosis, this study was aimed to determine Determinants of late diagnosis of HIV among adult HIV patients in Bahir Dar, Northern Ethiopia. Methods A case control study was conducted between January 2010 to December 2011 at Bahir Dar Felege Hiwot Referral Hospital. The study subjects consisted of 267 cases and 267 controls. Cases were adult people living with HIV/AIDS whose initial CD4 T cell count was < 200/μl of blood. Controls were those with a CD4 T cell count of greater than 200/ μl. Trained staff nurses were involved in data collection using a semi-structured questionnaire. Data was entered and analyzed using SPSS version 20. Descriptive statistics and Binary logistic regression were performed. Results Subjects who hold a certificate and above (AOR = 0.26; 95% CI = 0.13. 0.54), being initiated by friends, families and other socials to undertake HIV testing (AOR = 0.65; 95% CI = 0.29, 1.48), who reported a medium and high knowledge score about HIV/AIDS and who undertake HIV testing while visiting a clinic for ANC (AOR = 0.40; 95% CI = 0.19, 0.83) were less likely to be diagnosed late. Subjects who undertake HIV testing due to providers’ initiation (AOR = 1.70; 95%CI = 1.08, 2.68), who reported a medium internalized stigma (AOR = 4.94; 95% CI = 3.13, 7.80) and who reported a high internalized stigma score towards HIV/AIDS (AOR = 16.64; 95% CI = 8.29, 33.4) had a high odds of being diagnosed late compared to their counterparts. Conclusion Internalized stigma, low knowledge level about HIV/AIDS, not to have attended formal education and failure to undertake HIV testing by own initiation were significant determinant factors associated with Late HIV diagnosis. Education about HIV/AIDS, promotion of general education, and encouraging people to motivate their social mates to undertake HIV testing are

  9. Anti-regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Mads Hald

    2017-04-01

    Our initial understanding of immune-regulatory cells was based on the discovery of suppressor cells that assure peripheral T-cell tolerance and promote immune homeostasis. Research has particularly focused on the importance of regulatory T cells (Tregs) for immune modulation, e.g. directing host responses to tumours or inhibiting autoimmunity development. However, recent studies report the discovery of self-reactive pro-inflammatory T cells-termed anti-regulatory T cells (anti-Tregs)-that target immune-suppressive cells. Thus, regulatory cells can now be defined as both cells that suppress immune reactions as well as effector cells that counteract the effects of suppressor cells and support immune reactions. Self-reactive anti-Tregs have been described that specifically recognize human leukocyte antigen-restricted epitopes derived from proteins that are normally expressed by regulatory immune cells, including indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), tryptophan 2,6-dioxygenase (TDO), programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1), and forkhead box P3 (Foxp3). These proteins are highly expressed in professional antigen-presenting cells under various physiological conditions, such as inflammation and stress. Therefore, self-reactive T cells that recognize such targets may be activated due to the strong activation signal given by their cognate targets. The current review describes the existing knowledge regarding these self-reactive anti-Tregs, providing examples of antigen-specific anti-Tregs and discussing their possible roles in immune homeostasis and their potential future clinical applications.

  10. Effector Vγ9Vδ2 T cells dominate the human fetal γδ T-cell repertoire

    PubMed Central

    Dimova, Tanya; Brouwer, Margreet; Gosselin, Françoise; Tassignon, Joël; Leo, Oberdan; Donner, Catherine; Marchant, Arnaud; Vermijlen, David

    2015-01-01

    γδ T cells are unconventional T cells recognizing antigens via their γδ T-cell receptor (TCR) in a way that is fundamentally different from conventional αβ T cells. γδ T cells usually are divided into subsets according the type of Vγ and/or Vδ chain they express in their TCR. T cells expressing the TCR containing the γ-chain variable region 9 and the δ-chain variable region 2 (Vγ9Vδ2 T cells) are the predominant γδ T-cell subset in human adult peripheral blood. The current thought is that this predominance is the result of the postnatal expansion of cells expressing particular complementary-determining region 3 (CDR3) in response to encounters with microbes, especially those generating phosphoantigens derived from the 2-C-methyl-d-erythritol 4-phosphate pathway of isoprenoid synthesis. However, here we show that, rather than requiring postnatal microbial exposure, Vγ9Vδ2 T cells are the predominant blood subset in the second-trimester fetus, whereas Vδ1+ and Vδ3+ γδ T cells are present only at low frequencies at this gestational time. Fetal blood Vγ9Vδ2 T cells are phosphoantigen responsive and display very limited diversity in the CDR3 of the Vγ9 chain gene, where a germline-encoded sequence accounts for >50% of all sequences, in association with a prototypic CDR3δ2. Furthermore, these fetal blood Vγ9Vδ2 T cells are functionally preprogrammed (e.g., IFN-γ and granzymes-A/K), with properties of rapidly activatable innatelike T cells. Thus, enrichment for phosphoantigen-responsive effector T cells has occurred within the fetus before postnatal microbial exposure. These various characteristics have been linked in the mouse to the action of selecting elements and would establish a much stronger parallel between human and murine γδ T cells than is usually articulated. PMID:25617367

  11. A case of T cell prolymphocytic leukemia involving blast transformation.

    PubMed

    Ichikawa, Kunimoto; Noguchi, Masaaki; Imai, Hidenori; Sekiguchi, Yasunobu; Wakabayashi, Mutsumi; Sawada, Tomohiro; Komatsu, Norio

    2011-05-01

    We report a case of T cell prolymphocytic leukemia (T-PLL) involving blast transformation. At the initial diagnosis, most peripheral blood cells demonstrated proliferation of indolent T cell small cell variants, i.e., small to medium prolymphocytes with inconspicuous nucleoli and a normal karyotype. These cells were positive for surface CD4, CD5, and CD7, and cytoplasmic CD3, but negative for surface CD3 and CD8 and cytoplasmic terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT). The T cell receptor (TCR) Cβ1 gene was rearranged in the cells. Large prolymphocytes with prominent nucleoli, irregular nuclei, and cytoplasmic vacuoles that exhibited chromosome 8 trisomy were observed about 1.5 years later. The CD4+CD8- single positive effector memory T cells transformed into surface CD4+CD8+ double positive precursor T cells. The clonal TCR gene rearrangement patterns of these cells were identical throughout the clinical course, suggesting clonal blast transformation. The CD4+CD8+ cells demonstrated increased chromosome 8 trisomy combined with complex chromosome abnormalities with t(14;14)(q11.2;q32) containing a 14q32 chromosome after transformation. T cell leukemia 1a (TCL1a) (14q32.1) may be implicated in this case. The TCL1a oncoprotein is expressed in approximately 70% of T-PLL cases. The disease gradually developed resistance to chemotherapy, and the patient died of the disease. It is known that indolent T-PLL can become aggressive. Therefore, similar transformations may occur in other aggressive T-PLL cases, particularly those involving trisomy 8 and TCL1a.

  12. The Effect of Arthrospira platensis Capsules on CD4 T-Cells and Antioxidative Capacity in a Randomized Pilot Study of Adult Women Infected with Human Immunodeficiency Virus Not under HAART in Yaoundé, Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Frank Stéphane; Emakam, Francois; Kfutwah, Anfumbom; Hermann, Johannes; Azabji-Kenfack, Marcel; Krawinkel, Michael B.

    2014-01-01

    Dietary supplements are often used to improve the nutritional status of people living with HIV/AIDS (PLHIV). Arthrospira platensis (Asp), also known as Spirulina, is a cyanobacterium rich in proteins and micronutrients. Cell and animal trials described immune-modulating, antiretroviral and antioxidant activities. This pilot study describes the effects of the supplementation of 5 g/day of Asp on a pre-highly-active antiretroviral therapy (pre-HAART), HIV-infected, adult female population. It was conducted as a three-month randomized controlled trial (RCT) that compared a cup supplementation of five grams/day of Asp with a placebo of equal protein content and energy. The study included 73 HIV-infected women. The immediate outcome variables were CD4 T-cells, viral load and immune activation by CD8 T-cells expressing CD38. The antioxidant status was assessed by way of the total antioxidant capacity of the serum (TAOS). The renal function was documented by way of creatinine, urea and the calculated glomerular filtration rate. Statistical analyses were carried out with non-parametric tests, and the effect size of each interaction was calculated. No differences in the immunological and virological markers between the Asp and the placebo group could be observed. In the placebo group, 21 of 30 patients (70%) developed concomitant events, while in the Asp group, only 12 of 28 patients (43%) did. Both groups registered a significant weight increase; 0.5 kg (p < 0.05) in the Asp group and 0.65 kg (p < 0.05) in the placebo group. The antioxidant capacity increase of 56 (1–98) µM for Asp was significantly different from the decrease observed in the placebo group (p < 0.001). A slight increase in the creatinine level of 0.1 g/dL (p < 0.001) was observed in the Asp group, and no effect was observed in the urea levels. The improvement of the antioxidant capacity under Asp, shown for the first time on PLHIV, could become a focus for future research on the nutritional and health

  13. A Comparison of DRO to Movement Suppression Time-Out and DRO with Two Self-Injurious and Aggressive Mentally Retarded Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matson, Johnny L.; Keyes, Joseph B.

    1990-01-01

    The study compared the effectiveness of (1) reinforcement of other behavior, (2) verbal reprimands, and (3) movement suppression time-out in eliminating self injury and aggressive behaviors in two severely mentally retarded adult males. Improvements were only apparent when movement suppression was paired with either or both of the other…

  14. Liposomes as immune adjuvants: T cell dependence.

    PubMed

    Beatty, J D; Beatty, B G; Paraskevas, F; Froese, E

    1984-08-01

    The T cell dependence of the immune adjuvant action of liposomes containing the soluble antigens bovine serum albumin (BSA) and chicken immunoglobulin (CIgG) was studied with use of a quantitative enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to measure serum antibody levels. Normal BALB/c mice, adult thymectomized mice, and congenitally athymic (nu+/nu+) mice were intravenously inoculated with liposomes containing BSA (Lip-BSA). The high levels of serum anti-BSA antibody that were seen in the normal group were decreased in the adult thymectomized group and were almost completely abrogated in the nu+/nu+ group. Reconstitution of nu+/nu+ mice with normal thymocytes and cortisone-resistant thymocytes led to a partial restoration of the anti-BSA antibody production after Lip-BSA immunization. Examination of the class of immunoglobulin produced in normal mice, immunized with Lip-BSA, showed an early low IgM response and a sustained higher IgG response that was primarily due to the IgG1 subclass. Trypsin removal of BSA exposed on the liposome surface decreased the resulting serum anti-BSA antibody level by 30% to 50%. Animals could be primed equally with a very low dose (0.2 micrograms) of Lip-BSA or with peritoneal macrophages that had phagocytosed the same dose of Lip-BSA. The adjuvant effect of liposomes containing CIgG on the number and type of specific anti-CIgG antibody-producing cells in the spleen was an early increase in IgM-producing cells followed by a substantially higher increase in IgG-producing cells. These observations suggest that liposome encapsulation of a soluble T-dependent antigen stimulates the helper T cell, not the suppressor T cell population, and that this stimulation involves uptake by macrophages.

  15. Romidepsin and Lenalidomide in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-03

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Stage I Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IA Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IB Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage II Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IIA Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IIB Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IIIA Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IIIB Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IVA Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IVB Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome

  16. Epigenetics in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Peirs, Sofie; Van der Meulen, Joni; Van de Walle, Inge; Taghon, Tom; Speleman, Frank; Poppe, Bruce; Van Vlierberghe, Pieter

    2015-01-01

    Normal T-cell development is a strictly regulated process in which hematopoietic progenitor cells migrate from the bone marrow to the thymus and differentiate from early T-cell progenitors toward mature and functional T cells. During this maturation process, cooperation between a variety of oncogenes and tumor suppressors can drive immature thymocytes into uncontrolled clonal expansion and cause T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). Despite improved insights in T-ALL disease biology and comprehensive characterization of its genetic landscape, clinical care remained largely similar over the past decades and still consists of high-dose multi-agent chemotherapy potentially followed by hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Even with such aggressive treatment regimens, which are often associated with considerable side effects, clinical outcome is still extremely poor in a significant subset of T-ALL patients as a result of therapy resistance or hematological relapses. Recent genetic studies have identified recurrent somatic alterations in genes involved in DNA methylation and post-translational histone modifications in T-ALL, suggesting that epigenetic homeostasis is critically required in restraining tumor development in the T-cell lineage. In this review, we provide an overview of the epigenetic regulators that could be implicated in T-ALL disease biology and speculate how the epigenetic landscape of T-ALL could trigger the development of epigenetic-based therapies to further improve the treatment of human T-ALL.

  17. Parent-child aggression, adult-partner violence, and child outcomes: A prospective, population-based study.

    PubMed

    Maneta, E K; White, M; Mezzacappa, E

    2017-04-04

    Parent-child physical aggression (PCPA) and adult intimate partner violence (IPV) are common forms of family violence that often co-occur. Their deleterious effects on children and adolescents have been well documented. However, important questions remain regarding whether the type of violence exposure, the experience of one or both forms, the chronicity of violent experiences, and the age, gender, and SES of the child, differentially influence developmental outcomes. Data on 2810 children from the Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods were analyzed. Children aged 3-9 at the outset were assessed three times, at 3-year intervals. Primary caregivers reported on IPV, PCPA, and children's externalizing and internalizing symptoms. Children's externalizing and internalizing symptoms were examined as a function of time, age, gender, socioeconomic status (SES), and the time-varying effects of cumulative IPV and PCPA exposure. Cumulative experiences of IPV and PCPA each adversely affected the developmental trajectories of both externalizing and internalizing symptoms, but in different ways; and they did so independently of participants' age, gender, or SES, which all functioned as significant, independent predictors of child outcomes. PCPA was by far the more potent of the two forms of violence; and when both forms occurred, they worked additively to affect outcomes. Important questions remain regarding the reasons for the differential potency of these two forms of family violence on childhood symptoms, and related implications for interventions, as well as for later adult behavior.

  18. Fish T cells: recent advances through genomics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laing, Kerry J.; Hansen, John D.

    2011-01-01

    This brief review is intended to provide a concise overview of the current literature concerning T cells, advances in identifying distinct T cell functional subsets, and in distinguishing effector cells from memory cells. We compare and contrast a wealth of recent progress made in T cell immunology of teleost, elasmobranch, and agnathan fish, to knowledge derived from mammalian T cell studies. From genome studies, fish clearly have most components associated with T cell function and we can speculate on the presence of putative T cell subsets, and the ability to detect their differentiation to form memory cells. Some recombinant proteins for T cell associated cytokines and antibodies for T cell surface receptors have been generated that will facilitate studying the functional roles of teleost T cells during immune responses. Although there is still a long way to go, major advances have occurred in recent years for investigating T cell responses, thus phenotypic and functional characterization is on the near horizon.

  19. Long-term consumption of sugar-sweetened beverage during the growth period promotes social aggression in adult mice with proinflammatory responses in the brain.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jung-Yun; Park, Mi-Na; Kim, Chong-Su; Lee, Young-Kwan; Choi, Eun Young; Chun, Woo Young; Shin, Dong-Mi

    2017-04-10

    Overconsumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) is known to be a key contributor to the obesity epidemic; however, its effects on behavioral changes are yet to be fully studied. In the present study, we examined the long-term effects of SSB on social aggression in mice. Three-week-old weaned mice started to drink either a 30 w/v% sucrose solution (S30), plain water (CT), or an aspartame solution with sweetness equivalent to the sucrose solution (A30) and continued to drink until they were 11-week-old adults. Aggressive behaviors were assessed by the resident-intruder test. We found that SSB significantly promoted social aggression, accompanied by heightened serum corticosterone and reduced body weight. To understand the underlying mechanism, we performed transcriptome analyses of brain. The profiles of mice on S30 were dramatically different from those on CT or A30. Transcriptional networks related to immunological function were significantly dysregulated by SSB. FACS analysis of mice on S30 revealed increased numbers of inflammatory cells in peripheral blood. Interestingly, the artificial sweetener failed to mimic the effects of sugar on social aggression and inflammatory responses. These results demonstrate that SSB promotes aggressive behaviors and provide evidence that sugar reduction strategies may be useful in efforts to prevent social aggression.

  20. Long-term consumption of sugar-sweetened beverage during the growth period promotes social aggression in adult mice with proinflammatory responses in the brain

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jung-Yun; Park, Mi-Na; Kim, Chong-Su; Lee, Young-Kwan; Choi, Eun Young; Chun, Woo Young; Shin, Dong-Mi

    2017-01-01

    Overconsumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) is known to be a key contributor to the obesity epidemic; however, its effects on behavioral changes are yet to be fully studied. In the present study, we examined the long-term effects of SSB on social aggression in mice. Three-week-old weaned mice started to drink either a 30 w/v% sucrose solution (S30), plain water (CT), or an aspartame solution with sweetness equivalent to the sucrose solution (A30) and continued to drink until they were 11-week-old adults. Aggressive behaviors were assessed by the resident-intruder test. We found that SSB significantly promoted social aggression, accompanied by heightened serum corticosterone and reduced body weight. To understand the underlying mechanism, we performed transcriptome analyses of brain. The profiles of mice on S30 were dramatically different from those on CT or A30. Transcriptional networks related to immunological function were significantly dysregulated by SSB. FACS analysis of mice on S30 revealed increased numbers of inflammatory cells in peripheral blood. Interestingly, the artificial sweetener failed to mimic the effects of sugar on social aggression and inflammatory responses. These results demonstrate that SSB promotes aggressive behaviors and provide evidence that sugar reduction strategies may be useful in efforts to prevent social aggression. PMID:28393871

  1. Prevalence of Premilitary Adult Sexual Victimization and Aggression in a Navy Basic Trainee Sample.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-03-13

    U.S. Navy recruits (n = 3,776) were surveyed for premilitary histories of adult sexual assault. They were administered an instrument designed to...this study reported histories of sexual assault. Female victims of sexual assault are at high risk incurring somatic and/or psychological problems that...require treatment by health-care professionals. Male perpetrators of sexual assault are at high risk of repeating their behavior. The results of this

  2. Associations between childhood abuse and interpersonal aggression and suicide attempt among U.S. adults in a national study.

    PubMed

    Harford, Thomas C; Yi, Hsiao-ye; Grant, Bridget F

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study is to examine associations among childhood physical, emotional, or sexual abuse and violence toward self (suicide attempts [SA]) and others (interpersonal aggression [IA]). Data were obtained from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions Waves 1 and 2 (n=34,653). Multinomial logistic regression examined associations between type of childhood abuse and violence categories, adjusting for demographic variables, other childhood adversity, and DSM-IV psychiatric disorders. The prevalence of reported childhood abuse was 4.60% for physical abuse, 7.83% for emotional abuse, and 10.20% for sexual abuse. Approximately 18% of adults reported some form of violent behavior, distributed as follows: IA, 13.37%; SA, 2.64%; and SA with IA, 1.85%. After adjusting for demographic variables, other childhood adversity, and psychiatric disorders, each type of childhood abuse was significantly related to increased risk for each violence category as compared with the no violence category. Furthermore, the odds ratio of childhood physical abuse was significantly higher for SA with IA when compared with IA, and the odds ratio of childhood sexual abuse was significantly higher for SA and SA with IA when compared with IA. Childhood physical, emotional, and sexual abuse is directly related to the risk for violent behaviors to self and others. Both internalizing and externalizing psychiatric disorders impact the association between childhood abuse and violence. The inclusion of suicidal behaviors and interpersonal aggression and internalizing/externalizing psychiatric disorders within an integrated conceptual framework will facilitate more effective interventions for long-lasting effects of child abuse.

  3. Cutaneous EBV-positive γδ T-cell lymphoma vs. extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Yu, Wei-Wen; Hsieh, Pin-Pen; Chuang, Shih-Sung

    2013-03-01

    Primary cutaneous γδ T-cell lymphoma and extranodal natural killer (NK)/T-cell lymphoma (ENKTL), nasal type are two distinct lymphoma entities in the World Health Organization (WHO) classification. We report the case of an aggressive cutaneous lymphoma of γδ T-cell origin showing overlapping features of both lymphomas. A 78-year-old female presented with confluent erythematous plaques with ulcerations over her right thigh. Microscopically, section of the skin showed a diffuse dermal and subcutaneous lymphocytic infiltration with tumor necrosis and angioinvasion. The medium- to large-sized tumor cells expressed CD3, CD8, cytotoxic molecules and T-cell receptor (TCR)-γ but not CD4, CD20, CD30, CD56 or βF1. In situ hybridization for Epstein-Barr virus-encoded mRNA (EBER) was diffusely positive. Polymerase chain reaction-based clonality assay showed a clonal TCR-γ chain gene rearrangement. The features compatible with γδ T-cell lymphoma include dermal and subcutaneous involvements, cytotoxic phenotype, expression of TCR-γ, as well as an aggressive course. On the other hand, the diffuse EBER positivity, angioinvasion, tumor necrosis and cytotoxic phenotype may also fit in the diagnosis of an ENKTL of T-cell lineage. We review the literature on EBER-positive γδ T-cell lymphoma and discuss the diagnostic dilemma using the current WHO classification system.

  4. Long-term maintenance combination chemotherapy with OPEC/MPEC (vincristine or methotrexate, prednisolone, etoposide and cyclophosphamide) or with daily oral etoposide and prednisolone can improve survival and quality of life in adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, K; Matsumoto, T; Ohtsubo, H; Fujiwara, H; Imamura, N; Hidaka, S; Kukita, T; Tei, C; Matsumoto, M; Arima, N

    1999-12-01

    Acute leukemia and lymphoma varieties of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) usually carry a poor prognosis. While etoposide is generally useful for treating ATL, especially as a daily oral maintenance regimen, etoposide has not proven effective in severe types of ATL efficient in some patients. Of 87 ATL patients whom we have treated, 51 had acute leukemia, 22 lymphoma and 14 progressive chronic leukemia. Seventy-nine patients were treated with a long term maintenance combination protocol, OPEC/MPEC (weekly doses of vincristine, 0.7 mg/m2 or methotrexate, 14 mg/m2; prednisolone, 20 mg/m2; etoposide, 70 mg/m2 and cyclophosphamide, 200 mg/m2). The other 8 patients, 3 with acute leukemia, 2 with lymphoma and 3 with progressive chronic leukemia, were treated with daily oral administration of 25 mg of etoposide and 10 mg of prednisolone (DOEP). The dose administered was modified in individual cases to maintain the granulocyte count and reduce the number of ATL cells. Considering both protocols, a complete response and a partial response were achieved in 31.0% and 58.6% patients, respectively. Median survival times (MST) of all patients and, acute leukemia, lymphoma and progressive chronic leukemia types were 7.5, 6.7, 9.6 and 12.4 months, respectively. Respective MST of patients treated with OPEC/MPEC or DOEP protocols were 7.1 and 18.0 months. Relatively normal WBC counts, lower lactate dehydrogenase concentration and normal calcium concentration, limited numbers of anatomic sites involved, good performance status and good response to chemotherapy were significantly associated with long survival time. Drug toxicity was not apparent, and about half of patients were treated in an outpatient setting.

  5. T cell recognition of beryllium.

    PubMed

    Dai, Shaodong; Falta, Michael T; Bowerman, Natalie A; McKee, Amy S; Fontenot, Andrew P

    2013-12-01

    Chronic beryllium disease (CBD) is a granulomatous lung disorder caused by a hypersensitivity to beryllium and characterized by the accumulation of beryllium-specific CD4(+) T cells in the lung. Genetic susceptibility to beryllium-induced disease is strongly associated with HLA-DP alleles possessing a glutamic acid at the 69th position of the β-chain (βGlu69). The structure of HLA-DP2, the most prevalent βGlu69-containing molecule, revealed a unique solvent-exposed acidic pocket that includes βGlu69 and represents the putative beryllium-binding site. The delineation of mimotopes and endogenous self-peptides that complete the αβTCR ligand for beryllium-specific CD4(+) T cells suggests a unique role of these peptides in metal ion coordination and the generation of altered self-peptides, blurring the distinction between hypersensitivity and autoimmunity.

  6. Adoptive T-cell Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Gottschalk, Stephen; Rooney, Cliona

    2015-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is associated with a range of malignancies involving B-cells, T-cells, natural killer (NK)-cells, epithelial cells and smooth muscle. All of these are associated with the latent life cycles of EBV, but the pattern of latency-associated viral antigens expressed in tumor cells depends on the type of tumor. EBV-specific T cells (EBVSTs) have been explored as prophylaxis and therapy for EBV-associated malignancies for more than two decades. EBVSTs have been most successful as prophylaxis and therapy for post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD), which expresses the full array of latent EBV antigens (type 3 latency), in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients. While less effective, clinical studies have also demonstrated their therapeutic potential for PTLD post solid organ transplant, and for EBV-associated malignancies such as Hodgkin’s Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma, and nasopharyngeal carcinoma that express a limited array of latent EBV antigens (type 2 latency),. Several approaches are actively being pursued to improve the antitumor activity of EBVSTs including activation and expansion of T cells specific for the EBV antigens expressed in type 2 latency, genetic approaches to render EBVSTs resistant to the immunosuppressive tumor environment and combination approaches with other immune-modulating modalities. Given the recent advances and renewed interest in cell therapy, we hope that EBVSTs will become an integral part of our treatment armamentarium against EBV-positive malignancies in the near future. PMID:26428384

  7. Control of Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis by T Cells Responding to Activated T Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohse, Ansgar W.; Mor, Felix; Karin, Nathan; Cohen, Irun R.

    1989-05-01

    T cell vaccination against experimental autoimmune disease is herein shown to be mediated in part by anti-ergotypic T cells, T cells that recognize and respond to the state of activation of other T cells. The anti-ergotypic response thus combines with the previously shown anti-idiotypic T cell response to regulate autoimmunity.

  8. Expanded CD8 T-cell sharing between periphery and CNS in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Salou, Marion; Garcia, Alexandra; Michel, Laure; Gainche-Salmon, Anne; Loussouarn, Delphine; Nicol, Bryan; Guillot, Flora; Hulin, Philippe; Nedellec, Steven; Baron, Daniel; Ramstein, Gérard; Soulillou, Jean-Paul; Brouard, Sophie; Nicot, Arnaud B; Degauque, Nicolas; Laplaud, David A

    2015-01-01

    Objective In multiple sclerosis (MS), central nervous system (CNS), cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and blood display TCR clonal expansions of CD8+ T cells. These clones have been assumed – but never demonstrated – to be similar in the three compartments. Addressing this key question is essential to infer the implication of peripheral clonally expanded CD8+ T cells in the disease. Methods For the first time, TCR Vβ repertoire from paired blood (purified CD8+ and CD4+ T cells), CSF and CNS (22 lesions, various inflammatory and demyelination statuses) samples from three MS patients was studied using complementary determining region 3 (CDR3) spectratyping and high-throughput sequencing. In parallel, blood and CNS clonally expanded CD8+ T cells were characterized by fluorescent staining. Results TCR Vβ repertoire analysis revealed strong sharing of predominant T-cell clones between CNS lesions, CSF, and blood CD8+ T cells. In parallel, we showed that blood oligoclonal CD8+ T cells exhibit characteristics of pathogenic cells, as they displayed a bias toward a memory phenotype in MS patients, with increased expression of CCR5, CD11a and Granzyme B (GZM-B) compared to non oligoclonal counterparts. CNS-infiltrating T cells were mainly CD8 expressing CD11a and GZM-B. Interpretation This study highlights the predominant implication of CD8+ T cells in MS pathophysiology and demonstrates that potentially aggressive CD8+ T cells can be easily identified and characterized from blood and CSF samples. PMID:26125037

  9. Proposed therapeutic strategy for adult low-grade glioma based on aggressive tumor resection.

    PubMed

    Nitta, Masayuki; Muragaki, Yoshihiro; Maruyama, Takashi; Ikuta, Soko; Komori, Takashi; Maebayashi, Katsuya; Iseki, Hiroshi; Tamura, Manabu; Saito, Taiichi; Okamoto, Saori; Chernov, Mikhail; Hayashi, Motohiro; Okada, Yoshikazu

    2015-01-01

    significantly correlated with patient survival; thus, one should aim for maximum tumor resection. In addition, patients with a higher EOR can be safely observed without adjuvant therapy. For patients with partial resection, postoperative chemotherapy should be administered for those with oligodendroglial subtypes, and repeat resection should be considered for those with astrocytic tumors. More aggressive treatment with RT and chemotherapy may be required for patients with a poor prognosis, such as those with diffuse astrocytoma, 1p/19q nondeleted tumors, or IDH1 wild-type oligodendroglial tumors with partial resection.

  10. Patient-derived glioblastoma stem cells are killed by CD133-specific CAR T cells but induce the T cell aging marker CD57.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xuekai; Prasad, Shruthi; Gaedicke, Simone; Hettich, Michael; Firat, Elke; Niedermann, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    The AC133 epitope of CD133 is a cancer stem cell (CSC) marker for many tumor entities, including the highly malignant glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). We have developed an AC133-specific chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) and show that AC133-CAR T cells kill AC133+ GBM stem cells (GBM-SCs) both in vitro and in an orthotopic tumor model in vivo. Direct contact with patient-derived GBM-SCs caused rapid upregulation of CD57 on the CAR T cells, a molecule known to mark terminally or near-terminally differentiated T cells. However, other changes associated with terminal T cell differentiation could not be readily detected. CD57 is also expressed on tumor cells of neural crest origin and has been preferentially found on highly aggressive, undifferentiated, multipotent CSC-like cells. We found that CD57 was upregulated on activated T cells only upon contact with CD57+ patient-derived GBM-SCs, but not with conventional CD57-negative glioma lines. However, CD57 was not downregulated on the GBM-SCs upon their differentiation, indicating that this molecule is not a bona fide CSC marker for GBM. Differentiated GBM cells still induced CD57 on CAR T cells and other activated T cells. Therefore, CD57 can apparently be upregulated on activated human T cells by mere contact with CD57+ target cells.

  11. Chidamide in the treatment of peripheral T-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Thomas S; Tse, Eric; Kwong, Yok-Lam

    2017-01-01

    Mature T-cell lymphomas are aggressive malignancies. Treatment outcome is poor with conventional chemotherapy. They are about twice as common in Asia as compared with other non-Asian countries. Histone proteins form the basic structure of chromatin, and their acetylation at lysine residues relaxes chromatin structure, facilitating gene transcription. Conversely, histone deacetylation, catalyzed by histone deacetylases, compacts chromatin and represses gene transcription. Histone deacetylase inhibitors are an important class of antineoplastic agents. Chidamide is a novel orally active benzamide-type histone deacetylase inhibitor that has shown in vitro activities against a wide array of neoplasms. In Phase I trials, chidamide showed preferential efficacy in mature T-cell lymphomas. In a pivotal Phase II trial of chidamide in 79 patients with relapsed or refractory mature T-cell lymphomas, an overall response rate of 28% (complete remission/complete remission unconfirmed: 14%) was achieved, with most responses occurring within the first 6 weeks of treatment. The median duration of response (DOR) was 9.9 (1.1–40.8) months. Of 22 responders, 19 patients (86%) had a DOR of ≥3 months and eight patients (36%) had a DOR of >12 months. Angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma and anaplastic large cell lymphoma (anaplastic lymphoma kinase-negative) showed better response rates, with the most durable responses observed in angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma patients. Safety profile was favorable, with very few cases of grade 3/4 toxicities observed. Chidamide is approved by the China Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of relapsed and refractory peripheral T-cell lymphomas. PMID:28138258

  12. Modulation of innate immune responses during human T-cell leukemia virus (HTLV-1) pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Olière, Stéphanie; Douville, Renée; Sze, Alexandre; Belgnaoui, S Mehdi; Hiscott, John

    2011-08-01

    Infection with the Human T-cell Leukemia virus type I (HTLV-1) retrovirus results in a number of diverse pathologies, including the aggressive, fatal T-cell malignancy adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) and the chronic, progressive neurologic disorder termed HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). Worldwide, it is estimated there are 15-20 million HTLV-1-infected individuals; although the majority of HTLV-1-infected individuals remain asymptomatic carriers (AC) during their lifetime, 2-5% of AC develops either ATL or HAM/TSP, but never both. Regardless of asymptomatic status or clinical outcome, HTLV-1 carriers are at high risk of opportunistic infection. The progression to pathological HTLV-1 disease is in part attributed to the failure of the innate and adaptive immune system to control virus spread. The innate immune response against retroviral infection requires recognition of viral pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) through pattern-recognition receptors (PRR) dependent pathways, leading to the induction of host antiviral and inflammatory responses. Recent studies have begun to characterize the interplay between HTLV-1 infection and the innate immune response and have identified distinct gene expression profiles in patients with ATL or HAM/TSP--upregulation of growth regulatory pathways in ATL and constitutive activation of antiviral and inflammatory pathways in HAM/STP. In this review, we provide an overview of the replicative lifecycle of HTLV-1 and the distinct pathologies associated with HTLV-1 infection. We also explore the innate immune mechanisms that respond to HTLV-1 infection, the strategies used by HTLV-1 to subvert these defenses and their contribution to HTLV-1-associated diseases.

  13. Identification and clinical relevance of naturally occurring human CD8+HLA-DR+ regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Arruvito, Lourdes; Payaslián, Florencia; Baz, Plácida; Podhorzer, Ariel; Billordo, Ariel; Pandolfi, Julieta; Semeniuk, Guillermo; Arribalzaga, Eduardo; Fainboim, Leonardo

    2014-11-01

    The lack of responsiveness to self and non-self Ags is normally maintained by multiple mechanisms, including the suppressive activities of several T cell subsets. In this study, we show that CD8(+) T cells from both adult peripheral blood and umbilical cord blood mononuclear cells constitutively expressing HLA-DR represent a natural human CD8(+) regulatory T cell subset. Their suppressive effect appears to be cell-to-cell contact dependent and may involve CTLA-4 signaling between neighboring T cells. These regulatory T cells can be expanded in vitro and exhibit a suppressive capacity similar to that observed in ex vivo CD8(+)HLA-DR(+) T cells. The high frequency of CD8(+)HLA-DR(+) T cells that we detected in patients with non-small cell lung cancer deserves further work to confirm their putative suppressor effect within the tumor.

  14. T Cell Responses to Arenavirus Infections.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-11-01

    FIELD GROUP SUB-GROUP T cells; Arenaviruses ; Hemorrhagic fevers, Lassa fever, 06 13 LCMV Lassa fever virus; Synthetic peptides; Vaccine; I Recombinant...virus-specific effector T cells and that some of the T cell determinants they recognize are conserved among O.W. arenaviruses . For example, Jahrling...specific T cells were not represented by these peptides. fl4AM17.817073 (MFBM24) CONCLUSIONS Our knowledge of the immune response to arenaviruses is

  15. Self and peer perceptions of childhood aggression, social withdrawal and likeability predict adult substance abuse and dependence in men and women: a 30-year prospective longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Martin-Storey, Alexa; Serbin, Lisa A; Stack, Dale M; Ledingham, Jane E; Schwartzman, Alex E

    2011-12-01

    While childhood behaviors such as aggression, social withdrawal and likeability have been linked to substance abuse outcomes in adolescence and adulthood, the mechanisms by which these variables relate are not yet well established. Self and peer perceptions of childhood behaviors in men and women were compared to assess the role of context in the prediction of drug and alcohol abuse and dependence. Participants (N=676) in an ongoing longitudinal project examining the relation between childhood behavior and adult mental health outcomes completed the Structured Clinical Interview for the DSM IV regarding their histories of substance abuse in mid-adulthood (mean age=34, SD=2). In women, higher levels of both self and peer reported aggression were associated with drug and alcohol abuse and dependence, and higher levels of peer reported aggression were associated with higher levels of alcohol abuse and dependence. As well, higher levels of self-perceived likeability were protective regarding substance abuse and dependence outcomes. In men, higher levels of peer perceived social withdrawal were protective regarding substance abuse and dependence outcomes. Findings support the comparison of self and peer perceptions of childhood behavior as a method of assessing the mechanisms by which childhood behaviors impact adult outcomes, and suggest the importance of gender in the relation between childhood behaviors and adult substance abuse and dependence.

  16. A Large Scale Study of the Psychometric Characteristics of the IBR Modified Overt Aggression Scale: Findings and Evidence for Increased Self-Destructive Behaviors in Adult Females with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Ira L.; Tsiouris, John A.; Flory, Michael J.; Kim, Soh-Yule; Freedland, Robert; Heaney, Glenn; Pettinger, Jill; Brown, W. Ted

    2010-01-01

    The psychometric characteristics of the IBR Modified Overt Aggression Scale were studied in over 2,000 people with Intellectual Disability (ID). Reliability ranged from good to excellent. Aggression toward others and objects was highest in the youngest adults, in those in the moderate to severe range of ID, and in those with an autism spectrum…

  17. Incidence, Types and Characteristics of Aggressive Behaviour in Treatment Facilities for Adults with Mild Intellectual Disability and Severe Challenging Behaviour

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tenneij, N. H.; Koot, H. M.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Inpatient aggression in treatment facilities for persons with intellectual disability (ID) can have aversive consequences, for co-clients and staff, but also for the aggressors themselves. To manage and eventually prevent inpatient aggressive incidents, more knowledge about their types and characteristics is necessary. Method: In four…

  18. Adult Attachment and Male Aggression in Couple Relationships: The Demand-Withdraw Communication Pattern and Relationship Satisfaction as Mediators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fournier, Benoit; Brassard, Audrey; Shaver, Phillip R.

    2011-01-01

    This study examines men's domestic aggression as a function of attachment insecurities, considering the mediating roles of the demand-withdraw communication pattern and relationship satisfaction. The sample included 55 Canadian men undergoing counseling for relationship difficulties including aggression. The men completed questionnaires assessing…

  19. Relation between aggression exposure in adolescence and adult posttraumatic stress symptoms: Moderating role of the parasympathetic nervous system.

    PubMed

    Barry, Samantha A; Rabkin, Ari N; Olezeski, Christy L; Rivers, Alison J; Gordis, Elana B

    2015-03-15

    The present study examines the impact of the parasympathetic nervous system (PNS), as measured by respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA), on the link between family aggression experienced during adolescence and posttraumatic stress symptoms during young adulthood. Participants completed retrospective self-report measures of interparental aggression and harsh parenting exposure during adolescence and measures of current posttraumatic stress symptoms. RSA indexed PNS activity. Among females, the three-way interaction between harsh parenting, interparental aggression, and resting RSA was significant in accounting for young adulthood PTSD symptoms. At higher values of resting RSA and higher levels of interparental aggression exposure, harsh parenting experienced during adolescence was positively associated with adulthood PTSD symptoms. Among males, adolescent aggression exposure and resting RSA did not significantly account for variation in adulthood PTSD symptoms. Thus, this study suggests that resting PNS activity may play an important role in the relationship between stressors during adolescence and later PTSD in females.

  20. T Cell Trafficking through Lymphatic Vessels

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Morgan C.; Teijeira, Alvaro; Halin, Cornelia

    2016-01-01

    T cell migration within and between peripheral tissues and secondary lymphoid organs is essential for proper functioning of adaptive immunity. While active T cell migration within a tissue is fairly slow, blood vessels and lymphatic vessels (LVs) serve as speedy highways that enable T cells to travel rapidly over long distances. The molecular and cellular mechanisms of T cell migration out of blood vessels have been intensively studied over the past 30 years. By contrast, less is known about T cell trafficking through the lymphatic vasculature. This migratory process occurs in one manner within lymph nodes (LNs), where recirculating T cells continuously exit into efferent lymphatics to return to the blood circulation. In another manner, T cell trafficking through lymphatics also occurs in peripheral tissues, where T cells exit the tissue by means of afferent lymphatics, to migrate to draining LNs and back into blood. In this review, we highlight how the anatomy of the lymphatic vasculature supports T cell trafficking and review current knowledge regarding the molecular and cellular requirements of T cell migration through LVs. Finally, we summarize and discuss recent insights regarding the presumed relevance of T cell trafficking through afferent lymphatics. PMID:28066423

  1. Immunometabolism of regulatory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Newton, Ryan; Priyadharshini, Bhavana; Turka, Laurence A

    2016-01-01

    The bidirectional interaction between the immune system and whole-body metabolism has been well recognized for many years. Via effects on adipocytes and hepatocytes, immune cells can modulate whole-body metabolism (in metabolic syndromes such as type 2 diabetes and obesity) and, reciprocally, host nutrition and commensal-microbiota-derived metabolites modulate immunological homeostasis. Studies demonstrating the metabolic similarities of proliferating immune cells and cancer cells have helped give birth to the new field of immunometabolism, which focuses on how the cell-intrinsic metabolic properties of lymphocytes and macrophages can themselves dictate the fate and function of the cells and eventually shape an immune response. We focus on this aspect here, particularly as it relates to regulatory T cells. PMID:27196520

  2. T cell activation requires force generation

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Kenneth H.

    2016-01-01

    Triggering of the T cell receptor (TCR) integrates both binding kinetics and mechanical forces. To understand the contribution of the T cell cytoskeleton to these forces, we triggered T cells using a novel application of atomic force microscopy (AFM). We presented antigenic stimulation using the AFM cantilever while simultaneously imaging with optical microscopy and measuring forces on the cantilever. T cells respond forcefully to antigen after calcium flux. All forces and calcium responses were abrogated upon treatment with an F-actin inhibitor. When we emulated the forces of the T cell using the AFM cantilever, even these actin-inhibited T cells became activated. Purely mechanical stimulation was not sufficient; the exogenous forces had to couple through the TCR. These studies suggest a mechanical–chemical feedback loop in which TCR-triggered T cells generate forceful contacts with antigen-presenting cells to improve access to antigen. PMID:27241914

  3. Involvement of autophagy in T cell biology.

    PubMed

    Oral, Ozlem; Yedier, Ozlem; Kilic, Seval; Gozuacik, Devrim

    2017-01-01

    Autophagy is an essential cellular pathway that sequesters various cytoplasmic components, including accumulated proteins, damaged organelles or invading microorganisms and delivers them to lysosomes for degradation. The function of autophagy has been reported in various tissues and systems, including its role in the regulation of cellular immunity. Autophagy plays a fundamental role at various stages of T cell maturation. It regulates the thymocyte selection and the generation of T cell repertoire by presenting intracellular antigens to MHC class molecules. Autophagy is crucial for metabolic regulation of T cells, and therefore supports cell survival and homeostasis, particularly in activated mature T cells. Furthermore, deletion of specific autophagy-related genes induces several immunological alterations including differentiation of activated T cells into regulatory, memory or natural killer T cells. In this review, we emphasize the impact of autophagy on T cell development, activation and differentiation, which is pivotal for the adaptive immune system.

  4. CD4+ regulatory T cell responses induced by T cell vaccination in patients with multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jian; Zang, Ying C. Q.; Nie, Hong; Zhang, Jingwu Z.

    2006-01-01

    Immunization with irradiated autologous T cells (T cell vaccination) is shown to induce regulatory T cell responses that are poorly understood. In this study, CD4+ regulatory T cell lines were generated from patients with multiple sclerosis that received immunization with irradiated autologous myelin basic protein-reactive T cells. The resulting CD4+ regulatory T cell lines had marked inhibition on autologous myelin basic protein-reactive T cells and displayed two distinctive patterns distinguishable by the expression of transcription factor Foxp3 and cytokine profile. The majority of the T cell lines had high Foxp3 expression and secreted both IFN-γ and IL-10 as compared with the other pattern characteristic of low Foxp3 expression and predominant production of IL-10 but not IFN-γ. CD4+ regulatory T cell lines of both patterns expressed CD25 and reacted with activated autologous T cells but not resting T cells, irrespective of antigen specificity of the target T cells. It was evident that they recognized preferentially a synthetic peptide corresponding to residues 61–73 of the IL-2 receptor α chain. T cell vaccination correlated with increased Foxp3 expression and T cell reactivity to peptide 61–73. The findings have important implications in the understanding of the role of CD4+ regulatory T cell response induced by T cell vaccination. PMID:16547138

  5. Clinical trials for human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I-associated peripheral T-cell lymphoma in Japan.

    PubMed

    Tobinai, Kensei

    2010-04-01

    The most common subtype of T-/natural killer (NK) cell lymphoma in Japan is adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma (ATL), which is associated with the human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-1). The investigators in Japan have conducted several clinical trials on multi-agent chemotherapy and stem cell transplantation for patients with ATL. They have also initiated several new clinical trials with a number of agents: an anti-CCR4 antibody, KW-0761; forodesine, a purine nucleoside phosphorylase inhibitor; and lenalidomide, an immunomodulatory agent. Clinical trials with pralatrexate, a folate analog, and denileukin diftitox, an immunoconjugate, are under discussion for patients with ATL and peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL).

  6. Regulatory T cells and autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Paust, Silke; Cantor, Harvey

    2005-04-01

    Although T-cell clones bearing T-cell receptors with high affinity for self-peptide major histocompatibility complex (MHC) products are generally eliminated in the thymus (recessive tolerance), the peripheral T-cell repertoire remains strongly biased toward self-peptide MHC complexes and includes autoreactive T cells. A search for peripheral T cells that might exert dominant inhibitory effects on autoreactivity has implicated a subpopulation of CD4(+)CD25(+) T cells called regulatory T cells (Tregs). Here, we discuss the role of cytokines and costimulatory molecules in the generation, maintenance, and function of Tregs. We also summarize evidence for the involvement of Tregs in controlling autoimmune diseases, including type 1 diabetes, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, and inflammatory bowel disease. Last, we discuss our recent definition of the potential role of B7 expressed on activated T-effector cells as a target molecule for Treg-dependent suppression. These observations suggest that the engagement of B7 on effector T cells transmits an inhibitory signal that blocks or attenuates effector T-cell function. We restrict our comments to the suppression mediated by cells within the CD4 lineage; the impact of the cells within the CD8 lineage that may suppress via engagement of Qa-1 on effector T cells is not addressed in this review.

  7. Premature T Cell Senescence in Pediatric CKD.

    PubMed

    George, Roshan P; Mehta, Aneesh K; Perez, Sebastian D; Winterberg, Pamela; Cheeseman, Jennifer; Johnson, Brandi; Kwun, Jean; Monday, Stephanie; Stempora, Linda; Warshaw, Barry; Kirk, Allan D

    2017-01-01

    An individual's immune function, susceptibility to infection, and response to immunosuppressive therapy are influenced in part by his/her T cell maturation state. Although childhood is the most dynamic period of immune maturation, scant information regarding the variability of T cell maturation in children with renal disease is available. In this study, we compared the T cell phenotype in children with renal failure (n=80) with that in healthy children (n=20) using multiparameter flow cytometry to detect markers of T cell maturation, exhaustion, and senescence known to influence immune function. We correlated data with the degree of renal failure (dialysis or nondialysis), prior immunosuppression use, and markers of inflammation (C-reactive protein and inflammatory cytokines) to assess the influence of these factors on T cell phenotype. Children with renal disease had highly variable and often markedly skewed maturation phenotypes, including CD4/CD8 ratio reversal, increased terminal effector differentiation in CD8(+) T cells, reduction in the proportion of naïve T cells, evidence of T cell exhaustion and senescence, and variable loss of T cell CD28 expression. These findings were most significant in patients who had experienced major immune insults, particularly prior immunosuppressive drug exposure. In conclusion, children with renal disease have exceptional heterogeneity in the T cell repertoire. Cognizance of this heterogeneity might inform risk stratification with regard to the balance between infectious risk and response to immunosuppressive therapy, such as that required for autoimmune disease and transplantation.

  8. TCR Signaling in T Cell Memory.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Mark A; Teixeiro, Emma

    2015-01-01

    T cell memory plays a critical role in our protection against pathogens and tumors. The antigen and its interaction with the T cell receptor (TCR) is one of the initiating elements that shape T cell memory together with inflammation and costimulation. Over the last decade, several transcription factors and signaling pathways that support memory programing have been identified. However, how TCR signals regulate them is still poorly understood. Recent studies have shown that the biochemical rules that govern T cell memory, strikingly, change depending on the TCR signal strength. Furthermore, TCR signal strength regulates the input of cytokine signaling, including pro-inflammatory cytokines. These highlight how tailoring antigenic signals can improve immune therapeutics. In this review, we focus on how TCR signaling regulates T cell memory and how the quantity and quality of TCR-peptide-MHC interactions impact the multiple fates a T cell can adopt in the memory pool.

  9. Heterogeneity assessment of functional T cell avidity

    PubMed Central

    Ioannidou, Kalliopi; Baumgaertner, Petra; Gannon, Philippe O.; Speiser, Michel F.; Allard, Mathilde; Hebeisen, Michael; Rufer, Nathalie; Speiser, Daniel E.

    2017-01-01

    The potency of cellular immune responses strongly depends on T cell avidity to antigen. Yet, functional avidity measurements are rarely performed in patients, mainly due to the technical challenges of characterizing heterogeneous T cells. The mean functional T cell avidity can be determined by the IFN-γ Elispot assay, with titrated amounts of peptide. Using this assay, we developed a method revealing the heterogeneity of functional avidity, represented by the steepness/hillslope of the peptide titration curve, documented by proof of principle experiments and mathematical modeling. Our data show that not only natural polyclonal CD8 T cell populations from cancer patients, but also monoclonal T cells differ strongly in their heterogeneity of functional avidity. Interestingly, clones and polyclonal cells displayed comparable ranges of heterogeneity. We conclude that besides the mean functional avidity, it is feasible and useful to determine its heterogeneity (hillslope) for characterizing T cell responses in basic research and patient investigation. PMID:28287160

  10. T cell migration, search strategies and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Krummel, Matthew F; Bartumeus, Frederic; Gérard, Audrey

    2016-03-01

    T cell migration is essential for T cell responses; it allows for the detection of cognate antigen at the surface of antigen-presenting cells and for interactions with other cells involved in the immune response. Although appearing random, growing evidence suggests that T cell motility patterns are strategic and governed by mechanisms that are optimized for both the activation stage of the cell and for environment-specific cues. In this Opinion article, we discuss how the combined effects of T cell-intrinsic and -extrinsic forces influence T cell motility patterns in the context of highly complex tissues that are filled with other cells involved in parallel motility. In particular, we examine how insights from 'search theory' can be used to describe T cell movement across an 'exploitation-exploration trade-off' in the context of activation versus effector function and lymph nodes versus peripheral tissues.

  11. TCR Signaling in T Cell Memory

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, Mark A.; Teixeiro, Emma

    2015-01-01

    T cell memory plays a critical role in our protection against pathogens and tumors. The antigen and its interaction with the T cell receptor (TCR) is one of the initiating elements that shape T cell memory together with inflammation and costimulation. Over the last decade, several transcription factors and signaling pathways that support memory programing have been identified. However, how TCR signals regulate them is still poorly understood. Recent studies have shown that the biochemical rules that govern T cell memory, strikingly, change depending on the TCR signal strength. Furthermore, TCR signal strength regulates the input of cytokine signaling, including pro-inflammatory cytokines. These highlight how tailoring antigenic signals can improve immune therapeutics. In this review, we focus on how TCR signaling regulates T cell memory and how the quantity and quality of TCR–peptide–MHC interactions impact the multiple fates a T cell can adopt in the memory pool. PMID:26697013

  12. T cell metabolic fitness in antitumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Siska, Peter J; Rathmell, Jeffrey C

    2015-04-01

    T cell metabolism has a central role in supporting and shaping immune responses and may have a key role in antitumor immunity. T cell metabolism is normally held under tight regulation in an immune response of glycolysis to promote effector T cell expansion and function. However, tumors may deplete nutrients, generate toxic products, or stimulate conserved negative feedback mechanisms, such as through Programmed Cell Death 1 (PD-1), to impair effector T cell nutrient uptake and metabolic fitness. In addition, regulatory T cells are favored in low glucose conditions and may inhibit antitumor immune responses. Here, we review how the tumor microenvironment modifies metabolic and functional pathways in T cells and how these changes may uncover new targets and challenges for cancer immunotherapy and treatment.

  13. Genetically Modified T Cells to Target Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Krebs, Simone; Rodríguez-Cruz, Tania G.; DeRenzo, Christopher; Gottschalk, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Despite advances in surgical procedures, radiation, and chemotherapy the outcome for patients with glioblastoma (GBM) remains poor. While GBM cells express antigens that are potentially recognized by T cells, GBMs prevent the induction of GBM-specific immune responses by creating an immunosuppressive microenvironment. The advent of gene transfer has allowed the rapid generation of antigen-specific T cells as well as T cells with enhanced effector function. Here we review recent advances in the field of cell therapy with genetically modified T cells and how these advances might improve outcomes for patients with GBM in the future. PMID:24427741

  14. CAR-T cells are serial killers.

    PubMed

    Davenport, Alexander J; Jenkins, Misty R; Ritchie, David S; Prince, H Miles; Trapani, Joseph A; Kershaw, Michael H; Darcy, Phillip K; Neeson, Paul J

    2015-12-01

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells have enjoyed unprecedented clinical success against haematological malignancies in recent years. However, several aspects of CAR T cell biology remain unknown. We recently compared CAR and T cell receptor (TCR)-based killing in the same effector cell and showed that CAR T cells can not only efficiently kill single tumor targets, they can also kill multiple tumor targets in a sequential manner. Single and serial killing events were not sustained long term due to CAR down-regulation after 20 hours.

  15. VSV-hIFNbeta-NIS in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Multiple Myeloma, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, or T-cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-10

    Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides; Recurrent Plasma Cell Myeloma; Recurrent T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Refractory Cutaneous T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Mycosis Fungoides; Refractory Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Refractory Plasma Cell Myeloma; Refractory T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

  16. Psychopathic traits as predictors of future criminality, intimate partner aggression, and substance use in young adult men.

    PubMed

    Colins, Olivier F; Andershed, Henrik; Pardini, Dustin A

    2015-12-01

    This study examined the prospective relation between Youth Psychopathic Traits Inventory (YPI) scores and various negative outcomes in a community sample of young men. Official criminal records and self-reported outcomes, including criminality, physical and relational aggression against intimate partners, and excessive substance use, were obtained on average 5.4 years (records) and 3.5 years (self-reports) after the YPI assessment. Results showed that psychopathic traits measured with the YPI (approximately at age 25) did not significantly contribute to the prediction of future official criminal charges and self-reported crime, physical aggression against intimate partners, and excessive alcohol and marijuana use, after controlling for several covariates. However, results also showed that men with higher scores on the YPI were more likely to commit future acts of relational aggression against their partner, even after controlling for prior relational aggression. This novel finding needs replication, though, and-for now-does not jeopardize the overall conclusion that psychopathic traits as measured with the YPI hardly predict over and above prior criminality and aggression. Altogether, the findings of the present study and their consistency with past research suggest that one should rethink the role of psychopathy measures for risk assessment purposes, at least when these measures do not index prior criminality.

  17. Psychopathic Traits as Predictors of Future Criminality, Intimate Partner Aggression and Substance Use in Young Adult Men

    PubMed Central

    Colins, Olivier F.; Andershed, Henrik; Pardini, Dustin A.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the prospective relation between Youth Psychopathic Traits Inventory (YPI) scores and various negative outcomes in a community sample of young men. Official criminal records and self-reported outcomes, including criminality, physical and relational aggression against intimate partners and excessive substance use, were obtained on average 5.4 years (records) and 3.5 years (self-reports) after the YPI assessment. Results showed that psychopathic traits measured with the YPI (approximately at age 25) did not significantly contribute to the prediction of future official criminal charges and self-reported crime, physical aggression against intimate partners, and excessive alcohol and marijuana use, after controlling for several covariates. However, results also showed that men with higher scores on the YPI were more likely to commit future acts of relational aggression against their partner, even after controlling for prior relational aggression. This novel finding needs replication, though, and -for now- does not jeopardize the overall conclusion that psychopathic traits as measured with the YPI hardly predict over and above prior criminality and aggression. Altogether, the findings of the present study and their consistency with past research suggest that one should rethink the role of psychopathy measures for risk assessment purposes, at least when these measures do not index prior criminality. PMID:26301710

  18. Invariant natural killer T cells and mucosal-associated invariant T cells in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Bianchini, Elena; De Biasi, Sara; Simone, Anna Maria; Ferraro, Diana; Sola, Patrizia; Cossarizza, Andrea; Pinti, Marcello

    2017-03-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic progressive inflammatory demyelinating disorder of the central nervous system, and in several countries is a leading cause of permanent neurological disability in young adults, particularly women. MS is considered an autoimmune disease, caused by an aberrant immune response to environmental triggers in genetically susceptible subjects. However, the contribution of the innate or of the adaptive immune system to the development and progression of the disease has not yet been fully elucidated. Innate-like T lymphocytes are unconventional T cells that bridge the innate and adaptive arms of the immune system, because they use a T cell receptor to sense external ligands, but behave like innate cells when they rapidly respond to stimuli. These cells could play an important role in the pathogenesis of MS. Here, we focus on invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells and mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells, and we review the current knowledge on their biology and possible involvement in MS. Although several studies have evaluated the frequency and functions of iNKT and MAIT cells both in MS patients and in experimental mouse models, contradictory observations have been reported, and it is not clear whether they exert a protective or a pro-inflammatory and harmful role. A better understanding of how immune cells are involved in MS, and of their interactions could be of great interest for the development of new therapeutic strategies.

  19. Regulatory T cells and vasectomy.

    PubMed

    Rival, Claudia; Wheeler, Karen; Jeffrey, Sarah; Qiao, Hui; Luu, Brian; Tewalt, Eric F; Engelhard, Victor H; Tardif, Stephen; Hardy, Daniel; del Rio, Roxana; Teuscher, Cory; Tung, Kenneth

    2013-11-01

    CD4+ CD25+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) strongly influence the early and late autoimmune responses to meiotic germ cell antigens (MGCA) and the gonadal immunopathology in vasectomized mice. This is supported by the published and recently acquired information presented here. Within 24h of unilateral vasectomy (uni-vx) the ipsilateral epididymis undergoes epithelial cell apoptosis followed by necrosis, severe inflammation, and granuloma formation. Unexpectedly, vasectomy alone induced MGCA-specific tolerance. In contrast, uni-vx plus simultaneous Treg depletion resulted in MGCA-specific autoimmune response and bilateral autoimmune orchitis. Both tolerance and autoimmunity were strictly linked to the early epididymal injury. We now discovered that testicular autoimmunity in uni-vx mice did not occur when Treg depletion was delayed by one week. Remarkably, this delayed Treg depletion also prevented tolerance induction. Therefore, tolerance depends on a rapid de novo Treg response to MGCA exposed after vasectomy. Moreover, tolerance was blunted in mice genetically deficient in PD-1 ligand, suggesting the involvement of induced Treg. We conclude that pre-existing natural Treg prevents post-vasectomy autoimmunity, whereas vasectomy-induced Treg maintains post-vasectomy tolerance. We further discovered that vasectomized mice were still resistant to autoimmune orchitis induction for at least 12-16 months; thus, tolerance is long-lasting. Although significant sperm autoantibodies of low titers became detectable in uni-vx mice at 7 months, the antibody titers fluctuated over time, suggesting a dynamic "balance" between the autoimmune and tolerance states. Finally, we observed severe epididymal fibrosis and hypo-spermatogenesis at 12 months after uni-vx: findings of highly critical clinical significance.

  20. Differential DNA Methylation Regions in Cytokine and Transcription Factor Genomic Loci Associate with Childhood Physical Aggression

    PubMed Central

    Provençal, Nadine; Suderman, Matthew J.; Caramaschi, Doretta; Wang, Dongsha; Hallett, Michael; Vitaro, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Background Animal and human studies suggest that inflammation is associated with behavioral disorders including aggression. We have recently shown that physical aggression of boys during childhood is strongly associated with reduced plasma levels of cytokines IL-1α, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8 and IL-10, later in early adulthood. This study tests the hypothesis that there is an association between differential DNA methylation regions in cytokine genes in T cells and monocytes DNA in adult subjects and a trajectory of physical aggression from childhood to adolescence. Methodology/Principal Findings We compared the methylation profiles of the entire genomic loci encompassing the IL-1α, IL-6, IL-4, IL-10 and IL-8 and three of their regulatory transcription factors (TF) NFkB1, NFAT5 and STAT6 genes in adult males on a chronic physical aggression trajectory (CPA) and males with the same background who followed a normal physical aggression trajectory (control group) from childhood to adolescence. We used the method of methylated DNA immunoprecipitation with comprehensive cytokine gene loci and TF loci microarray hybridization, statistical analysis and false discovery rate correction. We found differentially methylated regions to associate with CPA in both the cytokine loci as well as in their transcription factors loci analyzed. Some of these differentially methylated regions were located in known regulatory regions whereas others, to our knowledge, were previously unknown as regulatory areas. However, using the ENCODE database, we were able to identify key regulatory elements in many of these regions that indicate that they might be involved in the regulation of cytokine expression. Conclusions We provide here the first evidence for an association between differential DNA methylation in cytokines and their regulators in T cells and monocytes and male physical aggression. PMID:23977113

  1. T Cells: Soldiers and Spies--The Surveillance and Control of Effector T Cells by Regulatory T Cells.

    PubMed

    Hall, Bruce M

    2015-11-06

    Traditionally, T cells were CD4+ helper or CD8+ cytotoxic T cells, and with antibodies, they were the soldiers of immunity. Now, many functionally distinct subsets of activated CD4+ and CD8+ T cells have been described, each with distinct cytokine and transcription factor expression. For CD4+ T cells, these include Th1 cells expressing the transcription factor T-bet and cytokines IL-2, IFN-γ, and TNF-β; Th2 cells expressing GATA-3 and the cytokines IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13; and Th17 cells expressing RORγt and cytokines IL-17A, IL-17F, IL-21, and IL-22. The cytokines produced determine the immune inflammation that they mediate. T cells of the effector lineage can be naïve T cells, recently activated T cells, or memory T cells that can be distinguished by cell surface markers. T regulatory cells or spies were characterized as CD8+ T cells expressing I-J in the 1970s. In the 1980s, suppressor cells fell into disrepute when the gene for I-J was not present in the mouse MHC I region. At that time, a CD4+ T cell expressing CD25, the IL-2 receptor-α, was identified to transfer transplant tolerance. This was the same phenotype of activated CD4+ CD25+ T cells that mediated rejection. Thus, the cells that could induce tolerance and undermine rejection had similar badges and uniforms as the cells effecting rejection. Later, FOXP3, a transcription factor that confers suppressor function, was described and distinguishes T regulatory cells from effector T cells. Many subtypes of T regulatory cells can be characterized by different expressions of cytokines and receptors for cytokines or chemokines. In intense immune inflammation, T regulatory cells express cytokines characteristic of effector cells; for example, Th1-like T regulatory cells express T-bet, and IFN-γ-like Th1 cells and effector T cells can change sides by converting to T regulatory cells. Effector T cells and T regulatory cells use similar molecules to be activated and mediate their function, and thus, it can be

  2. Improve T Cell Therapy in Neuroblastoma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-10-1-0425 TITLE: Improve T Cell Therapy in Neuroblastoma ...2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Improve T Cell Therapy in Neuroblastoma 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-10-1-0425 5c. PROGRAM...AVAILABILITY STATEMENT Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Neuroblastoma (NB) is

  3. CRISPR Meets CAR T-cell Therapy.

    PubMed

    2017-03-21

    Using CRISPR/Cas9 technology, researchers have devised a method to deliver a CAR gene to a specific locus, TRAC, in T cells. This targeted approach yielded therapeutic cells that were more potent even at low doses; in a mouse model of acute lymphoblastic leukemia, they outperformed CAR T cells created with a randomly integrating retroviral vector.

  4. T cell senescence and cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hee Tae; Park, Sungha; Shin, Eui-Cheol; Lee, Won-Woo

    2016-08-01

    Age-related changes in the immune system, commonly termed "immunosenescence," contribute to deterioration of the immune response and fundamentally impact the health and survival of elderly individuals. Immunosenescence affects both the innate and adaptive immune systems; however, the most notable changes are in T cell immunity and include thymic involution, the collapse of T cell receptor (TCR) diversity, an imbalance in T cell populations, and the clonal expansion of senescent T cells. Senescent T cells have the ability to produce large quantities of proinflammatory cytokines and cytotoxic mediators; thus, they have been implicated in the pathogenesis of many chronic inflammatory diseases. Recently, an increasing body of evidence has suggested that senescent T cells also have pathogenic potential in cardiovascular diseases, such as hypertension, atherosclerosis, and myocardial infarction, underscoring the detrimental roles of these cells in various chronic inflammatory responses. Given that cardiovascular disease is the number one cause of death worldwide, there is great interest in understanding the contribution of age-related immunological changes to its pathogenesis. In this review, we discuss general features of age-related alterations in T cell immunity and the possible roles of senescent T cells in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease.

  5. Kinetic discrimination in T-cell activation.

    PubMed Central

    Rabinowitz, J D; Beeson, C; Lyons, D S; Davis, M M; McConnell, H M

    1996-01-01

    We propose a quantitative model for T-cell activation in which the rate of dissociation of ligand from T-cell receptors determines the agonist and antagonist properties of the ligand. The ligands are molecular complexes between antigenic peptides and proteins of the major histocompatibility complex on the surfaces of antigen-presenting cells. Binding of ligand to receptor triggers a series of biochemical reactions in the T cell. If the ligand dissociates after these reactions are complete, the T cell receives a positive activation signal. However, dissociation of ligand after completion of the first reaction but prior to generation of the final products results in partial T-cell activation, which acts to suppress a positive response. Such a negative signal is brought about by T-cell ligands containing the variants of antigenic peptides referred to as T-cell receptor antagonists. Results of recent experiments with altered peptide ligands compare favorably with T-cell responses predicted by this model. PMID:8643643

  6. Carbohydrates and T cells: a sweet twosome.

    PubMed

    Avci, Fikri Y; Li, Xiangming; Tsuji, Moriya; Kasper, Dennis L

    2013-04-01

    Carbohydrates as T cell-activating antigens have been generating significant interest. For many years, carbohydrates were thought of as T-independent antigens, however, more recent research had demonstrated that mono- or oligosaccharides glycosidically linked to peptides can be recognized by T cells. T cell recognition of these glycopeptides depends on the structure of both peptide and glycan portions of the antigen. Subsequently, it was discovered that natural killer T cells recognized glycolipids when presented by the antigen presenting molecule CD1d. A transformative insight into glycan-recognition by T cells occurred when zwitterionic polysaccharides were discovered to bind to and be presented by MHCII to CD4+ T cells. Based on this latter observation, the role that carbohydrate epitopes generated from glycoconjugate vaccines had in activating helper T cells was explored and it was found that these epitopes are presented to specific carbohydrate recognizing T cells through a unique mechanism. Here we review the key interactions between carbohydrate antigens and the adaptive immune system at the molecular, cellular and systems levels exploring the significant biological implications in health and disease.

  7. Challenges and opportunities for checkpoint blockade in T-cell lymphoproliferative disorders.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Tycel; Devata, Sumana; Wilcox, Ryan A

    2016-01-01

    The T-cell lymphoproliferative disorders are a heterogeneous group of non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHL) for which current therapeutic strategies are inadequate, as most patients afflicted with these NHL will succumb to disease progression within 2 years of diagnosis. Appreciation of the genetic and immunologic landscape of these aggressive NHL, including PD-L1 (B7-H1, CD274) expression by malignant T cells and within the tumor microenvironment, provides a strong rationale for therapeutic targeting this immune checkpoint. While further studies are needed, the available data suggests that responses with PD-1 checkpoint blockade alone will unlikely approach those achieved in other lymphoproliferative disorders. Herein, we review the unique challenges posed by the T-cell lymphoproliferative disorders and discuss potential strategies to optimize checkpoint blockade in these T-cell derived malignancies.

  8. T-cell post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorders after cardiac transplantation: a single institutional experience.

    PubMed

    Draoua, H Y; Tsao, Lawrence; Mancini, Donna M; Addonizio, Linda J; Bhagat, Govind; Alobeid, Bachir

    2004-11-01

    Post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLDs) are a well-recognized and potentially life-threatening complication of solid organ transplantation. While the vast majority of PTLDs are B-cell lymphoproliferations, T-cell PTLDs are rarely seen. Among 898 patients receiving cardiac transplants between 1990 and 2003, 34 patients (3.8%) developed PTLDs with two (0.2%) T-cell PTLDs, 31 (3.5%) B-cell PTLDs and one (0.1%) natural killer cell PTLD. An additional three cases of T-cell PTLD were identified among all cardiac transplant patients followed at our institution. These T-cell PTLDs comprised a heterogeneous group of Epstein-Barr virus negative lymphoproliferations that developed late after transplantation and followed an aggressive course.

  9. T-Cell Proliferation Assay: Determination of Immunodominant T-Cell Epitopes of Food Allergens.

    PubMed

    Masilamani, Madhan; Pascal, Mariona; Sampson, Hugh A

    2017-01-01

    Characterization of allergen-specific T cells is critical to understand their contribution to disease pathogenesis. The identification of immunodominant T-cell epitopes is crucial for development of T-cell-based vaccines. Peptide-specific T-cell proliferation studies are usually performed in a library of short synthetic peptides (15mer or 20mer) with 3 or 5 offset spanning the entire length of the allergen. T-cell peptide epitopes lack the primary and tertiary structure of the native protein to cross-link IgE, but retain the ability to stimulate T cells. The peptides sequences can also be obtained either by in silico approaches and in vitro binding assays. The efficacy of T-cell epitope-based peptide immunotherapy has been proven in certain allergies. The present methodology describes T-cell proliferation assays using whole blood sample from allergic subjects.

  10. T cell immunity using transgenic B lymphocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerloni, Mara; Rizzi, Marta; Castiglioni, Paola; Zanetti, Maurizio

    2004-03-01

    Adaptive immunity exists in all vertebrates and plays a defense role against microbial pathogens and tumors. T cell responses begin when precursor T cells recognize antigen on specialized antigen-presenting cells and differentiate into effector cells. Currently, dendritic cells are considered the only cells capable of stimulating T lymphocytes. Here, we show that mature naïve B lymphocytes can be genetically programmed by using nonviral DNA and turned into powerful antigen-presenting cells with a dual capacity of synthesis and presentation of antigen to T cells in vivo. A single i.v. injection of transgenic lymphocytes activates T cell responses reproducibly and specifically even at very low cell doses (102). We also demonstrate that T cell priming can occur in the absence of dendritic cells and results in immunological memory with protective effector functions. These findings disclose aspects in the regulation of adaptive immunity and indicate possibilities for vaccination against viruses and cancer in humans.

  11. Clinical, biologic, and pathologic features in 157 patients with angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma treated within the Groupe d'Etude des Lymphomes de l'Adulte (GELA) trials.

    PubMed

    Mourad, Nathalie; Mounier, Nicolas; Brière, Josette; Raffoux, Emmanuel; Delmer, Alain; Feller, Alfred; Meijer, Chris J L M; Emile, Jean-François; Bouabdallah, Réda; Bosly, André; Diebold, Jacques; Haioun, Corinne; Coiffier, Bertrand; Gisselbrecht, Christian; Gaulard, Philippe

    2008-05-01

    To evaluate the prognostic significance of clinicobiologic and pathological features in angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma (AITL), 157 AITL patients were retrieved from the GELA LNH87-LNH93 randomized clinical trials. One hundred forty-seven patients received a cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (CHOP)-like regimen with intensified courses in half of them. Histologically, 41 cases were classified as "rich in large cells" and 116 as "classic" (including 19 rich in epithelioid cells, 14 rich in clear cells, and 4 with hyperplastic germinal centers). Sixty-two cases were scored for CD10 and CXCL13 expression according to the abundance of positive lymphoid cells. Median age was 62 years, with 81% advanced stage, 72% B symptoms, 65% anemia, 50% hypergammaglobulinemia, and 66% elevated LDH. Overall 7-year survival was 30%. In multivariate analysis, only male sex (P = .004), mediastinal lymphadenopathy (P = .041), and anemia (P = .042) adversely affected overall survival. Increase in large cells and high level of CD10 and CXCL13 did not affect survival. Intensive regimen did not improve survival. In conclusion, AITL is a morphologically heterogeneous T-cell lymphoma commonly expressing CXCL13 and CD10 and carrying few prognostic factors. It portends a poor prognosis even when treated intensively. However, AITL is not always lethal with 30% of patients alive at 7 years.

  12. Overcoming the Barriers Experienced in Conducting a Medication Trial in Adults with Aggressive Challenging Behaviour and Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliver-Africano, P.; Dickens, S.; Ahmed, Z.; Bouras, N.; Cooray, S.; Deb, S.; Knapp, M.; Hare, M.; Meade, M.; Reece, B.; Bhaumik, S.; Harley, D.; Piachaud, J.; Regan, A.; Ade Thomas, D.; Karatela, S.; Rao, B.; Dzendrowskyj, T.; Lenotre, L.; Watson, J.; Tyrer, P.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Aggressive challenging behaviour in people with intellectual disability (ID) is frequently treated with antipsychotic drugs, despite a limited evidence base. Method: A multi-centre randomised controlled trial was undertaken to investigate the efficacy, adverse effects and costs of two commonly prescribed antipsychotic drugs…

  13. A Comparison of Girls' and Boys' Aggressive-Disruptive Behavior Trajectories across Elementary School: Prediction to Young Adult Antisocial Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaeffer, Cindy M.; Petras, Hanno; Ialongo, Nicholas; Masyn, Katherine E.; Hubbard, Scott; Poduska, Jeanne; Kellam, Sheppard

    2006-01-01

    Multiple group analysis and general growth mixture modeling was used to determine whether aggressive-disruptive behavior trajectories during elementary school, and their association with young adulthood antisocial outcomes, vary by gender. Participants were assessed longitudinally beginning at age 6 as part of an evaluation of 2 school-based…

  14. Human Th17 cells share major trafficking receptors with both polarized effector T cells and FOXP3+ regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hyung W; Lee, Jeeho; Hillsamer, Peter; Kim, Chang H

    2008-01-01

    It is a question of interest whether Th17 cells express trafficking receptors unique to this Th cell lineage and migrate specifically to certain tissue sites. We found several Th17 cell subsets at different developing stages in a human secondary lymphoid organ (tonsils) and adult, but not in neonatal, blood. These Th17 cell subsets include a novel in vivo-stimulated tonsil IL17+ T cell subset detected without any artificial stimulation in vitro. We investigated in depth the trafficking receptor phenotype of the Th17 cell subsets in tonsils and adult blood. The developing Th17 cells in tonsils highly expressed both Th1- (CCR2, CXCR3, CCR5, and CXCR6) and Th2-associated (CCR4) trafficking receptors. Moreover, Th17 cells share major non-lymphoid tissue trafficking receptors, such as CCR4, CCR5, CCR6, CXCR3, and CXCR6, with FOXP3+ T regulatory cells. In addition, many Th17 cells express homeostatic chemokine receptors (CD62L, CCR6, CCR7, CXCR4, and CXCR5) implicated in T cell migration to and within lymphoid tissues. Expression of CCR6 and CCR4 by some Th17 cells is not a feature unique to Th17 cells but shared with FOXP3+ T cells. Interestingly, the IL17+IFN-gamma+ Th17 cells have the features of both IL17-IFN-gamma+ Th1 and IL17+IFN-gamma- Th17 cells in expression of trafficking receptors. Taken together, our results revealed that Th17 cells are highly heterogeneous, in terms of trafficking receptors, and programmed to share major trafficking receptors with other T cell lineages. These findings have important implications in their distribution in the human body in relation to other regulatory T cell subsets.

  15. Donor T Cells After Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Hematologic Malignancies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-20

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood

  16. Circulating CLA(+) T cells in atopic dermatitis and their possible role as peripheral biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Czarnowicki, T; Santamaria-Babí, L F; Guttman-Yassky, E

    2017-03-01

    Cutaneous lymphocyte-associated antigen (CLA(+) ) T cells are specialized for skin homing and represent the main T-cell population in atopic dermatitis (AD) lesions. CLA(+) is expressed on the surface of circulating CD45RO(+) memory T cells and most skin-infiltrating T cells. Mechanistic studies and thus treatment advancements are limited by the need of large number of skin biopsies. Circulating CLA(+) T cells may be a reliable surrogate marker of the inflammatory events occurring in the skin, and thus, the evaluation of CLA(+) T cells in the blood may eliminate the need for skin biopsies. Preliminary work in AD has established that disease-associated T-cell abnormalities can be approached by either a study of skin lesions or activated CLA(+) T-cell subsets in peripheral blood. Future studies in adults and children, across different skin disorders, correlating blood and skin phenotypes and determining skin-homing T-cell functional properties are needed to establish whether CLA(+) memory subsets can be used as biomarkers and a substitute for skin biopsies. This review summarizes the latest advancements reached on circulating CLA(+) in AD and the great potential they harbor in understanding AD mechanisms.

  17. Immune activation induces immortalization of HTLV-1 LTR-Tax transgenic CD4+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Swaims, Alison Y.; Khani, Francesca; Zhang, Yingyu; Roberts, Arthur I.; Devadas, Satish

    2010-01-01

    Infection with the human T-cell leukemia virus-1 (HTLV-1) results in a variety of diseases including adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL). Although the pathogenesis of these disorders is poorly understood, it involves complex interactions with the host immune system. Activation of infected T cells may play an important role in disease pathogenesis through induction of the oncogenic HTLV-1 Tax transactivator protein. To test this hypothesis, we employed transgenic mice in which Tax is regulated by the HTLV-1 LTR. T-cell receptor stimulation of LTR-Tax CD4+ T cells induced Tax expression, hyper-proliferation, and immortalization in culture. The transition to cellular immortalization was accompanied by markedly increased expression of the antiapoptotic gene, mcl-1, previously implicated as important in T-cell survival. Immortalized cells exhibited a CD4+CD25+CD3− phenotype commonly observed in ATL. Engraftment of activated LTR-Tax CD4+ T cells into NOD/Shi-scid/IL-2Rγ null mice resulted in a leukemia-like phenotype with expansion and tissue infiltration of Tax+, CD4+ lymphocytes. We suggest that immune activation of infected CD4+ T cells plays an important role in the induction of Tax expression, T-cell proliferation, and pathogenesis of ATL in HTLV-1–infected individuals. PMID:20634377

  18. Clinicopathologic Characteristics of Angioimmunoblastic T-Cell Lymphoma: Analysis of the International Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma Project

    PubMed Central

    Federico, Massimo; Rudiger, Thomas; Bellei, Monica; Nathwani, Bharat N.; Luminari, Stefano; Coiffier, Bertrand; Harris, Nancy L.; Jaffe, Elaine S.; Pileri, Stefano A.; Savage, Kerry J.; Weisenburger, Dennis D.; Armitage, James O.; Mounier, Nicholas; Vose, Julie M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The International Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma Project was undertaken to better understand the subtypes of T-cell and natural killer (NK) –cell lymphomas. Patients and Methods Angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma (AITL) was diagnosed according to the 2001 WHO criteria by a central review process consisting of panels of expert hematopathologists. Clinical, pathologic, immunophenotyping, treatment, and survival data were correlated. Results Of 1,314 patients, 243 (18.5%) were diagnosed with AITL. At presentation, generalized lymphadenopathy was noted in 76% of patients, and 89% had stages III to IV disease. Skin rash was observed in 21% of patients. Hemolytic anemia and hypergammoglobulinemia occurred in 13% and 30% of patients, respectively. Five-year overall and failure-free survivals were 33% and 18%, respectively. At presentation, prognostic models were evaluated, including the standard International Prognostic Index, which comprised the following factors: age ≥ 60 years, stages III to IV disease, lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) > normal, extranodal sites (ENSs) > one, and performance status (PS) ≥ 2; the Prognostic Index for Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma, comprising: age ≥ 60 years, PS ≥ 2, LDH > normal, and bone marrow involvement; and the alternative Prognostic Index for AITL (PIAI), comprising: age > 60 years, PS ≥ 2, ENSs > one, B symptoms, and platelet count < 150 × 109/L. The simplified PIAI had a low-risk group (zero to one factors), with 5-year survival of 44%, and a high-risk group (two to five factors), with 5-year survival of 24% (P = .0065). Conclusion AITL is a rare clinicopathologic entity characterized by an aggressive course and dismal outcome with current therapies. PMID:22869878

  19. T CELL REPLICATIVE SENESCENCE IN HUMAN AGING

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Jennifer P.; Effros, Rita B.

    2013-01-01

    The decline of the immune system appears to be an intractable consequence of aging, leading to increased susceptibility to infections, reduced effectiveness of vaccination and higher incidences of many diseases including osteoporosis and cancer in the elderly. These outcomes can be attributed, at least in part, to a phenomenon known as T cell replicative senescence, a terminal state characterized by dysregulated immune function, loss of the CD28 costimulatory molecule, shortened telomeres and elevated production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Senescent CD8 T cells, which accumulate in the elderly, have been shown to frequently bear antigen specificity against cytomegalovirus (CMV), suggesting that this common and persistent infection may drive immune senescence and result in functional and phenotypic changes to the T cell repertoire. Senescent T cells have also been identified in patients with certain cancers, autoimmune diseases and chronic infections, such as HIV. This review discusses the in vivo and in vitro evidence for the contribution of CD8 T cell replicative senescence to a plethora of age-related pathologies and a few possible therapeutic avenues to delay or prevent this differentiative end-state in T cells. The age-associated remodeling of the immune system, through accumulation of senescent T cells has far-reaching consequences on the individual and society alike, for the current healthcare system needs to meet the urgent demands of the increasing proportions of the elderly in the US and abroad. PMID:23061726

  20. Television viewing, aggression, and ethnicity.

    PubMed

    Harris, M B

    1992-02-01

    For 416 college students, questioned about their experiences with aggression and television viewing, only very weak correlations between preference for violent shows and aggression were observed. Black males watched significantly more television than other respondents. These findings suggest that the frequently reported correlation between viewing televised violence and aggression may not appear when sex, ethnicity, and education are controlled in a sample of young adults.

  1. Bovine γδ T Cells Are a Major Regulatory T Cell Subset

    PubMed Central

    Hope, Jayne; Taylor, Geraldine; Smith, Adrian L.; Cubillos-Zapata, Carolina; Charleston, Bryan

    2014-01-01

    In humans and mice, γδ T cells represent <5% of the total circulating lymphocytes. In contrast, the γδ T cell compartment in ruminants accounts for 15–60% of the total circulating mononuclear lymphocytes. Despite the existence of CD4+CD25high Foxp3+ T cells in the bovine system, these are neither anergic nor suppressive. We present evidence showing that bovine γδ T cells are the major regulatory T cell subset in peripheral blood. These γδ T cells spontaneously secrete IL-10 and proliferate in response to IL-10, TGF-β, and contact with APCs. IL-10–expressing γδ T cells inhibit Ag-specific and nonspecific proliferation of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in vitro. APC subsets expressing IL-10 and TFG-β regulate proliferation of γδ T cells producing IL-10. We propose that γδ T cells are a major regulatory T cell population in the bovine system. PMID:24890724

  2. Developmental exposure to trichloroethylene promotes CD4{sup +} T cell differentiation and hyperactivity in association with oxidative stress and neurobehavioral deficits in MRL+/+ mice

    SciTech Connect

    Blossom, Sarah J. Doss, Jason C.; Hennings, Leah J.; Jernigan, Stefanie; Melnyk, Stepan; James, S. Jill

    2008-09-15

    The non adult immune system is particularly sensitive to perinatal and early life exposures to environmental toxicants. The common environmental toxicant, trichloroethylene (TCE), was shown to increase CD4+ T cell production of the proinflammatory cytokine IFN-{gamma} following a period of prenatal and lifetime exposure in autoimmune-prone MRL+/+ mice. In the current study, MRL+/+ mice were used to further examine the impact of TCE on the immune system in the thymus and periphery. Since there is considerable cross-talk between the immune system and the brain during development, the potential relationship between TCE and neurobehavioral endpoints were also examined. MRL+/+ mice were exposed to 0.1 mg/ml TCE ({approx} 31 mg/kg/day) via maternal drinking water or direct exposure via the drinking water from gestation day 1 until postnatal day (PD) 42. TCE exposure did not impact gross motor skills but instead significantly altered social behaviors and promoted aggression associated with indicators of oxidative stress in brain tissues in male mice. The immunoregulatory effects of TCE involved a redox-associated promotion of T cell differentiation in the thymus that preceded the production of proinflammatory cytokines, IL-2, TNF-{alpha}, and IFN-{gamma} by mature CD4+ T cells. The results demonstrated that developmental and early life TCE exposure modulated immune function and may have important implications for neurodevelopmental disorders.

  3. Developmental exposure to trichloroethylene promotes CD4+ T cell differentiation and hyperactivity in association with oxidative stress and neurobehavioral deficits in MRL+/+ mice.

    PubMed

    Blossom, Sarah J; Doss, Jason C; Hennings, Leah J; Jernigan, Stefanie; Melnyk, Stepan; James, S Jill

    2008-09-15

    The non adult immune system is particularly sensitive to perinatal and early life exposures to environmental toxicants. The common environmental toxicant, trichloroethylene (TCE), was shown to increase CD4+ T cell production of the proinflammatory cytokine IFN-gamma following a period of prenatal and lifetime exposure in autoimmune-prone MRL+/+ mice. In the current study, MRL+/+ mice were used to further examine the impact of TCE on the immune system in the thymus and periphery. Since there is considerable cross-talk between the immune system and the brain during development, the potential relationship between TCE and neurobehavioral endpoints were also examined. MRL+/+ mice were exposed to 0.1 mg/ml TCE (~ 31 mg/kg/day) via maternal drinking water or direct exposure via the drinking water from gestation day 1 until postnatal day (PD) 42. TCE exposure did not impact gross motor skills but instead significantly altered social behaviors and promoted aggression associated with indicators of oxidative stress in brain tissues in male mice. The immunoregulatory effects of TCE involved a redox-associated promotion of T cell differentiation in the thymus that preceded the production of proinflammatory cytokines, IL-2, TNF-alpha, and IFN-gamma by mature CD4+ T cells. The results demonstrated that developmental and early life TCE exposure modulated immune function and may have important implications for neurodevelopmental disorders.

  4. Self-reported attachment, interpersonal aggression, and personality disorder in a prospective community sample of adolescents and adults.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Thomas N; Shaver, Phillip R; Cohen, Patricia; Pilkonis, Paul A; Gillath, Omri; Kasen, Stephanie

    2006-08-01

    Anxious and avoidant attachment were assessed in the Children in the Community (CIC) Study during adolescence and adulthood using self-report scales developed for this prospective study. The convergent and discriminant validity of the new CIC attachment scales were evaluated and their stability was assessed across a 17-year interval. Attachment scales predicted DSM-IV personality disorders in theoretically coherent and clinically meaningful ways, especially when supplemented with a separate measure of interpersonal aggression. Cluster B and C personality disorder symptoms were associated with elevated anxious attachment. Avoidant attachment was positively associated with Cluster A symptoms and inversely associated with Cluster B and C symptoms. Interpersonal aggression was higher in Cluster B symptoms and lower in Cluster C symptoms, thus differentiating between these symptom clusters.

  5. CD8{sup +}CD25{sup +} T cells reduce atherosclerosis in apoE(−/−) mice

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Jianchang; Dimayuga, Paul C.; Zhao, Xiaoning; Yano, Juliana; Lio, Wai Man; Trinidad, Portia; Honjo, Tomoyuki; Cercek, Bojan; Shah, Prediman K.; Chyu, Kuang-Yuh

    2014-01-17

    Highlights: •The role of a sub-population of CD8{sup +} T cells with suppressor functions was investigated in atherosclerosis. •CD8{sup +}CD25{sup +} T cells from adult apoE(−/−) mice had phenotype characteristics of T suppressor cells. •These CD8{sup +}CD25{sup +} T cells reduced CD4{sup +} T cell proliferation and CD8{sup +} cytotoxic activity in vitro. •Adoptive transfer of CD8{sup +}CD25{sup +} T cells significantly reduced atherosclerosis. •CD8{sup +}CD25{sup +} T cells have a suppressive function in atherosclerosis. -- Abstract: Background: It is increasingly evident that CD8{sup +} T cells are involved in atherosclerosis but the specific subtypes have yet to be defined. CD8{sup +}CD25{sup +} T cells exert suppressive effects on immune signaling and modulate experimental autoimmune disorders but their role in atherosclerosis remains to be determined. The phenotype and functional role of CD8{sup +}CD25{sup +} T cells in experimental atherosclerosis were investigated in this study. Methods and results: CD8{sup +}CD25{sup +} T cells were observed in atherosclerotic plaques of apoE(−/−) mice fed hypercholesterolemic diet. Characterization by flow cytometric analysis and functional evaluation using a CFSE-based proliferation assays revealed a suppressive phenotype and function of splenic CD8{sup +}CD25{sup +} T cells from apoE(−/−) mice. Depletion of CD8{sup +}CD25{sup +} from total CD8{sup +} T cells rendered higher cytolytic activity of the remaining CD8{sup +}CD25{sup −} T cells. Adoptive transfer of CD8{sup +}CD25{sup +} T cells into apoE(−/−) mice suppressed the proliferation of splenic CD4{sup +} T cells and significantly reduced atherosclerosis in recipient mice. Conclusions: Our study has identified an athero-protective role for CD8{sup +}CD25{sup +} T cells in experimental atherosclerosis.

  6. Differential T cell receptor-mediated signaling in naive and memory CD4 T cells.

    PubMed

    Farber, D L; Acuto, O; Bottomly, K

    1997-08-01

    Naive and memory CD4 T cells differ in cell surface phenotype, function, activation requirements, and modes of regulation. To investigate the molecular bases for the dichotomies between naive and memory CD4 T cells and to understand how the T cell receptor (TCR) directs diverse functional outcomes, we investigated proximal signaling events triggered through the TCR/CD3 complex in naive and memory CD4 T cell subsets isolated on the basis of CD45 isoform expression. Naive CD4 T cells signal through TCR/CD3 similar to unseparated CD4 T cells, producing multiple tyrosine-phosphorylated protein species overall and phosphorylating the T cell-specific ZAP-70 tyrosine kinase which is recruited to the CD3zeta subunit of the TCR. Memory CD4 T cells, however, exhibit a unique pattern of signaling through TCR/CD3. Following stimulation through TCR/CD3, memory CD4 T cells produce fewer species of tyrosine-phosphorylated substrates and fail to phosphorylate ZAP-70, yet unphosphorylated ZAP-70 can associate with the TCR/CD3 complex. Moreover, a 26/28-kDa phosphorylated doublet is associated with CD3zeta in resting and activated memory but not in naive CD4 T cells. Despite these differences in the phosphorylation of ZAP-70 and CD3-associated proteins, the ZAP-70-related kinase, p72syk, exhibits similar phosphorylation in naive and memory T cell subsets, suggesting that this kinase could function in place of ZAP-70 in memory CD4 T cells. These results indicate that proximal signals are differentially coupled to the TCR in naive versus memory CD4 T cells, potentially leading to distinct downstream signaling events and ultimately to the diverse functions elicited by these two CD4 T cell subsets.

  7. Reprogramming T cell Lymphocytes to Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bared, Kalia

    The discovery of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) provided a novel technology for the study of development and pharmacology and complement embryonic stem cells (ES) for cell therapy applications. Though iPSC are derived from adult tissue they are comparable to ES cells in their behavior; multi-lineage differentiation and self-renewal. This makes iPSC research appealing because they can be studied in great detail and expanded in culture broadly. Fibroblasts were the first cell type reprogrammed to an iPSC using a retrovirus vector, since then alternative cell types including lymphocytes have been used to generate iPSC. Different types of vectors have also been developed to enhance iPSC formation and quality. However, specific T lymphocyte subsets have not been shown to reprogram to a pluripotent state to date. Here, we proposed to derive iPSC from peripheral blood effector and central memory T cells, reasoning that the resultant iPSC will maintain the epigenetic memory of a T lymphocyte, including the T cell receptor (TCR) gene rearrangement. This epigenetic memory will enable the differentiation and expansion of T cell iPSC into professional T cells containing a specific TCR. These could then be used for cell therapy to target specific antigens, as well as to improve culture techniques to expand T cells in vitro. We studied different gene delivery methods to derive iPSC from different types of T lymphocytes. We assessed the viability of viral transduction using flow cytometry to detect green fluorescent marker contained in the viral construct and quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) to detect Oct4, Klf4, Sox2, and c-Myc gene expression. Our results demonstrate that the Sendai virus construct is the most feasible platform to reprogram T lymphocytes. We anticipate that this platform will provide an efficient and safe approach to derive iPSC from different T cell subsets, including memory T cells.

  8. Chimeric Antigen Receptor- and TCR-Modified T Cells Enter Main Street and Wall Street.

    PubMed

    Barrett, David M; Grupp, Stephan A; June, Carl H

    2015-08-01

    The field of adoptive cell transfer (ACT) is currently comprised of chimeric Ag receptor (CAR)- and TCR-engineered T cells and has emerged from principles of basic immunology to paradigm-shifting clinical immunotherapy. ACT of T cells engineered to express artificial receptors that target cells of choice is an exciting new approach for cancer, and it holds equal promise for chronic infection and autoimmunity. Using principles of synthetic biology, advances in immunology, and genetic engineering have made it possible to generate human T cells that display desired specificities and enhanced functionalities. Clinical trials in patients with advanced B cell leukemias and lymphomas treated with CD19-specific CAR T cells have induced durable remissions in adults and children. The prospects for the widespread availability of engineered T cells have changed dramatically given the recent entry of the pharmaceutical industry to this arena. In this overview, we discuss some of the challenges and opportunities that face the field of ACT.

  9. Choreography of MAGUKs during T cell activation.

    PubMed

    Rincón, Mercedes; Davis, Roger J

    2007-02-01

    T cell receptor activation requires the membrane-associated guanylate kinase CARMA1. A new study finds that a second such kinase, Dlgh1, is also required specifically for activation of the alternative p38 kinase pathway.

  10. Dopamine, T cells and multiple sclerosis (MS).

    PubMed

    Levite, Mia; Marino, Franca; Cosentino, Marco

    2017-03-10

    Dopamine is a key neurotransmitter that induces critical effects in the nervous system and in many peripheral organs, via 5 dopamine receptors (DRs): D1R-D5R. Dopamine also induces many direct and very potent effects on many DR-expressing immune cells, primarily T cells and dendritic cells. In this review, we focus only on dopamine receptors, effects and production in T cells. Dopamine by itself (at an optimal concentration of~0.1 nM) induces multiple function of resting normal human T cells, among them: T cell adhesion, chemotactic migration, homing, cytokine secretion and others. Interestingly, dopamine activates resting effector T cells (Teffs), but suppresses regulatory T cells (Tregs), and both effects lead eventually to Teff activation. Dopamine-induced effects on T cells are dynamic, context-sensitive and determined by the: T cell activation state, T cell type, DR type, and dopamine concentration. Dopamine itself, and also few dopaminergic molecules/ drugs that are in clinical use for cardiac, neurological and other non-immune indications, have direct effects on human T cells (summarized in this review). These dopaminergic drugs include: dopamine = intropin, L-DOPA, bromocriptine, pramipexole, pergolide, haloperidol, pimozide, and amantadine. Other dopaminergic drugs were not yet tested for their direct effects on T cells. Extensive evidence in multiple sclerosis (MS) and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) show dopaminergic dysregulations in T cells in these diseases: D1-like DRs are decreased in Teffs of MS patients, and dopamine does not affect these cells. In contrast, D1-like DRs are increased in Tregs of MS patients, possibly causing functional Treg impairment in MS. Treatment of MS patients with interferon β (IFN-β) increases D1-like DRs and decreases D2-like DRs in Teffs, decreases D1-like DRs in Tregs, and most important: restores responsiveness of patient's Teffs to dopamine. DR agonists and antagonists confer some benefits in

  11. The two-faced T cell epitope

    PubMed Central

    Moise, Leonard; Gutierrez, Andres H.; Bailey-Kellogg, Chris; Terry, Frances; Leng, Qibin; Abdel Hady, Karim M.; VerBerkmoes, Nathan C.; Sztein, Marcelo B.; Losikoff, Phyllis T.; Martin, William D.; Rothman, Alan L; De Groot, Anne S.

    2013-01-01

    Advances in the field of T cell immunology have contributed to the understanding that cross-reactivity is an intrinsic characteristic of the T cell receptor (TCR), and that each TCR can potentially interact with many different T cell epitopes. To better define the potential for TCR cross-reactivity between epitopes derived from the human genome, the human microbiome, and human pathogens, we developed a new immunoinformatics tool, JanusMatrix, that represents an extension of the validated T cell epitope mapping tool, EpiMatrix. Initial explorations, summarized in this synopsis, have uncovered what appear to be important differences in the TCR cross-reactivity of selected regulatory and effector T cell epitopes with other epitopes in the human genome, human microbiome, and selected human pathogens. In addition to exploring the T cell epitope relationships between human self, commensal and pathogen, JanusMatrix may also be useful to explore some aspects of heterologous immunity and to examine T cell epitope relatedness between pathogens to which humans are exposed (Dengue serotypes, or HCV and Influenza, for example). In Hand-Foot-Mouth disease (HFMD) for example, extensive enterovirus and human microbiome cross-reactivity (and limited cross-reactivity with the human genome) seemingly predicts immunodominance. In contrast, more extensive cross-reactivity with proteins contained in the human genome as compared to the human microbiome was observed for selected Treg epitopes. While it may be impossible to predict all immune response influences, the availability of sequence data from the human genome, the human microbiome, and an array of human pathogens and vaccines has made computationally–driven exploration of the effects of T cell epitope cross-reactivity now possible. This is the first description of JanusMatrix, an algorithm that assesses TCR cross-reactivity that may contribute to a means of predicting the phenotype of T cells responding to selected T cell

  12. T-cell epitope peptide vaccines.

    PubMed

    Elsawa, Sherine F; Rodeberg, David A; Celis, Esteban

    2004-10-01

    T-cell immunotherapy is a promising treatment option for cancer. The identification of tumor antigens that are recognized by the immune system has allowed for the generation of vaccines for various malignancies. Due to the ease of manufacturing and characterizating peptide-based vaccines they have been used to stimulate antitumor T-cells. This article will review the use of peptide-based vaccines for the treatment of cancer by inducing antitumor T-lymphocyte responses.

  13. Preselection Thymocytes Are More Sensitive to T Cell Receptor Stimulation Than Mature T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Davey, Gayle M.; Schober, Sonya L.; Endrizzi, Bart T.; Dutcher, Angela K.; Jameson, Stephen C.; Hogquist, Kristin A.

    1998-01-01

    During T cell development, thymocytes which are tolerant to self-peptides but reactive to foreign peptides are selected. The current model for thymocyte selection proposes that self-peptide–major histocompatibility complex (MHC) complexes that bind the T cell receptor with low affinity will promote positive selection while those with high affinity will result in negative selection. Upon thymocyte maturation, such low affinity self-peptide–MHC ligands no longer provoke a response, but foreign peptides can incidentally be high affinity ligands and can therefore stimulate T cells. For this model to work, thymocytes must be more sensitive to ligand than mature T cells. Contrary to this expectation, several groups have shown that thymocytes are less responsive than mature T cells to anti-T cell receptor for antigen (TCR)/CD3 mAb stimulation. Additionally, the lower TCR levels on thymocytes, compared with T cells, would potentially correlate with decreased thymocyte sensitivity. Here we compared preselection thymocytes and mature T cells for early activation events in response to peptide–MHC ligands. Remarkably, the preselection thymocytes were more responsive than mature T cells when stimulated with low affinity peptide variants, while both populations responded equally well to the antigenic peptide. This directly demonstrates the increased sensitivity of thymocytes compared with T cells for TCR engagement by peptide–MHC complexes. PMID:9815264

  14. γδ T Cells Support Pancreatic Oncogenesis by Restraining αβ T Cell Activation.

    PubMed

    Daley, Donnele; Zambirinis, Constantinos Pantelis; Seifert, Lena; Akkad, Neha; Mohan, Navyatha; Werba, Gregor; Barilla, Rocky; Torres-Hernandez, Alejandro; Hundeyin, Mautin; Mani, Vishnu Raj Kumar; Avanzi, Antonina; Tippens, Daniel; Narayanan, Rajkishen; Jang, Jung-Eun; Newman, Elliot; Pillarisetty, Venu Gopal; Dustin, Michael Loran; Bar-Sagi, Dafna; Hajdu, Cristina; Miller, George

    2016-09-08

    Inflammation is paramount in pancreatic oncogenesis. We identified a uniquely activated γδT cell population, which constituted ∼40% of tumor-infiltrating T cells in human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA). Recruitment and activation of γδT cells was contingent on diverse chemokine signals. Deletion, depletion, or blockade of γδT cell recruitment was protective against PDA and resulted in increased infiltration, activation, and Th1 polarization of αβT cells. Although αβT cells were dispensable to outcome in PDA, they became indispensable mediators of tumor protection upon γδT cell ablation. PDA-infiltrating γδT cells expressed high levels of exhaustion ligands and thereby negated adaptive anti-tumor immunity. Blockade of PD-L1 in γδT cells enhanced CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell infiltration and immunogenicity and induced tumor protection suggesting that γδT cells are critical sources of immune-suppressive checkpoint ligands in PDA. We describe γδT cells as central regulators of effector T cell activation in cancer via novel cross-talk.

  15. γδT Cells: the Overlooked T cell Subset in Demyelinating Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wohler, Jillian E.; Smith, Sherry S.; Barnum, Scott R.

    2015-01-01

    γδ T cells represent a small subpopulation of T cells that express a restricted repertoire of T cell receptors and, unlike αβ T cells, function more as cells of the innate immune system. These cells are found in skin and mucosal sites as well as secondary lymphoid tissues and, frequently act as first line of defense sentinels. γδ T cells have been implicated in the pathogenesis of demyelinating disease although little was known regarding their trafficking and effector functions. In this brief review we highlight recent studies demonstrating that γδ T cells migrate rapidly to the CNS during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), the animal model for multiple sclerosis. γδ T cell trafficking to the CNS is independent of β2-integrins and occurs well before onset of clinical signs of disease, peaking early during the acute phase of disease. γδ T cell-mediated production of inflammatory cytokines including IFN-γ and TNF-α appears critical for EAE development, suggesting these cells may set the stage for activation of other subsets of infiltrating effector cells. These data suggest that γδ T cells or subsets of γδ T cells may represent a new therapeutic target in demeylinating disease. PMID:19610090

  16. gammadelta T cells: the overlooked T-cell subset in demyelinating disease.

    PubMed

    Wohler, Jillian E; Smith, Sherry S; Barnum, Scott R

    2010-01-01

    gammadelta T cells represent a small subpopulation of T cells expressing a restricted repertoire of T-cell receptors and, unlike alphabeta T cells, function more as cells of the innate immune system. These cells are found in skin and mucosal sites as well as secondary lymphoid tissues and frequently act as first line of defense sentinels. gammadelta T cells have been implicated in the pathogenesis of demyelinating disease, although little was known regarding their trafficking and effector functions. In this Mini-Review, we highlight recent studies demonstrating that gammadelta T cells migrate rapidly to the CNS during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), the animal model for multiple sclerosis. gammadelta T-cell trafficking to the CNS is independent of beta(2)-integrins and occurs well before onset of clinical signs of disease, peaking early during the acute phase of disease. gammadelta T-cell-mediated production of inflammatory cytokines, including interferon-gamma and tumor necrosis factor-alpha, appears critical for EAE development, suggesting that these cells may set the stage for activation of other subsets of infiltrating effector cells. These data suggest that gammadelta T cells or subsets of gammadelta T cells may represent a new therapeutic target in demeylinating disease.

  17. Staphylococcus aureus convert neonatal conventional CD4(+) T cells into FOXP3(+) CD25(+) CD127(low) T cells via the PD-1/PD-L1 axis.

    PubMed

    Rabe, Hardis; Nordström, Inger; Andersson, Kerstin; Lundell, Anna-Carin; Rudin, Anna

    2014-03-01

    The gut microbiota provides an important stimulus for the induction of regulatory T (Treg) cells in mice, whether this applies to newborn children is unknown. In Swedish children, Staphylococcus aureus has become a common early colonizer of the gut. Here, we sought to study the effects of bacterial stimulation on neonatal CD4(+) T cells for the induction of CD25(+) CD127(low) Treg cells in vitro. The proportion of circulating CD25(+) CD127(low) Treg cells and their expression of FOXP3, Helios and CTLA-4 was examined in newborns and adults. To evaluate if commensal gut bacteria could induce Treg cells, CellTrace violet-stained non-Treg cells from cord or peripheral blood from adults were co-cultured with autologous CD25(+) CD127(low) Treg cells and remaining mononuclear cells and stimulated with S. aureus. Newborns had a significantly lower proportion of CD25(+) CD127(low) Treg cells than adults, but these cells were Helios(+) and CTLA-4(+) to a higher extent than in adults. FOXP3(+) CD25(+) CD127(low) T cells were induced mainly in neonatal CellTrace-stained non-Treg cells after stimulation with S. aureus. In cell cultures from adults, S. aureus induced CD25(+) CD127(low) T cells only if sorted naive CD45RA(+) non-Treg cells were used, but these cells expressed less FOXP3 than those induced from newborns. Sorted neonatal CD25(+) CD127(low) T cells from S. aureus-stimulated cultures were still suppressive. Finally, blocking PD-L1 during stimulation reduced the induction of FOXP3(+) CD25(+) CD127(low) T cells. These results suggest that newborns have a higher proportion of circulating thymically derived Helios(+) Treg cells than adults and that S. aureus possess an ability to convert neonatal conventional CD4(+) T cells into FOXP3(+) CD25(+) CD127(low) Treg cells via the PD-1/PD-L1 axis.

  18. Circulating rotavirus-specific T cells have a poor functional profile

    SciTech Connect

    Parra, Miguel; Herrera, Daniel; Jácome, María Fernanda; Mesa, Martha C.; Rodríguez, Luz-Stella; Guzmán, Carolina; Angel, Juana; Franco, Manuel A.

    2014-11-15

    Frequencies of circulating T cells producing IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-2, and percentages of T cells proliferating after stimulation with rotavirus (RV), tetanus toxoid, and influenza were evaluated in PBMC derived from healthy adults and children. In addition, the potential anergic state of RV-specific T cells was analyzed by stimulation of PBMC with RV antigen in the presence of three anergy inhibitors (rIL-2, rIL-12, or DGKα-i). The quality and magnitude of RV-T cell responses were significantly lower than those of tetanus toxoid and influenza antigens. RV-CD4 T cell response was enriched in monofunctional IFN-γ{sup +} cells, while influenza-CD4 and tetanus toxoid-CD4 T cell responses were enriched in multifunctional T cells. Moreover, rIL-2 – unlike rIL-12 or DGKα-i – increased the frequencies of RV-CD4 TNF-α{sup +}, CD4 IFN-γ{sup +}, and CD8 IFN-γ{sup +} cells. Thus, circulating RV-T cells seem to have a relatively poor functional profile that may be partially reversed in vitro by the addition of rIL-2. - Highlights: • The quality and magnitude of circulating RV-T cell responses are relatively poor. • Circulating RV-CD4 T cells are enriched in monofunctional IFN-γ+ cells. • Treatment with rIL-2 increased the frequencies of cytokine secreting RV-T cells.

  19. PARP-1/PARP-2 double deficiency in mouse T cells results in faulty immune responses and T lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, Judith; Gozalbo-López, Beatriz; Méndez, Andrea C.; Dantzer, Françoise; Schreiber, Valérie; Martínez, Carlos; Arana, David M.; Farrés, Jordi; Revilla-Nuin, Beatriz; Bueno, María F.; Ampurdanés, Coral; Galindo-Campos, Miguel A.; Knobel, Philip A.; Segura-Bayona, Sandra; Martin-Caballero, Juan; Stracker, Travis H.; Aparicio, Pedro; Del Val, Margarita; Yélamos, José

    2017-01-01

    The maintenance of T-cell homeostasis must be tightly regulated. Here, we have identified a coordinated role of Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) and PARP-2 in maintaining T-lymphocyte number and function. Mice bearing a T-cell specific deficiency of PARP-2 in a PARP-1-deficient background showed defective thymocyte maturation and diminished numbers of peripheral CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells. Meanwhile, peripheral T-cell number was not affected in single PARP-1 or PARP-2-deficient mice. T-cell lymphopenia was associated with dampened in vivo immune responses to synthetic T-dependent antigens and virus, increased DNA damage and T-cell death. Moreover, double-deficiency in PARP-1/PARP-2 in T-cells led to highly aggressive T-cell lymphomas with long latency. Our findings establish a coordinated role of PARP-1 and PARP-2 in T-cell homeostasis that might impact on the development of PARP-centred therapies. PMID:28181505

  20. PARP-1/PARP-2 double deficiency in mouse T cells results in faulty immune responses and T lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Judith; Gozalbo-López, Beatriz; Méndez, Andrea C; Dantzer, Françoise; Schreiber, Valérie; Martínez, Carlos; Arana, David M; Farrés, Jordi; Revilla-Nuin, Beatriz; Bueno, María F; Ampurdanés, Coral; Galindo-Campos, Miguel A; Knobel, Philip A; Segura-Bayona, Sandra; Martin-Caballero, Juan; Stracker, Travis H; Aparicio, Pedro; Del Val, Margarita; Yélamos, José

    2017-02-09

    The maintenance of T-cell homeostasis must be tightly regulated. Here, we have identified a coordinated role of Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) and PARP-2 in maintaining T-lymphocyte number and function. Mice bearing a T-cell specific deficiency of PARP-2 in a PARP-1-deficient background showed defective thymocyte maturation and diminished numbers of peripheral CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cells. Meanwhile, peripheral T-cell number was not affected in single PARP-1 or PARP-2-deficient mice. T-cell lymphopenia was associated with dampened in vivo immune responses to synthetic T-dependent antigens and virus, increased DNA damage and T-cell death. Moreover, double-deficiency in PARP-1/PARP-2 in T-cells led to highly aggressive T-cell lymphomas with long latency. Our findings establish a coordinated role of PARP-1 and PARP-2 in T-cell homeostasis that might impact on the development of PARP-centred therapies.

  1. Aggressive Behavior

    MedlinePlus

    ... Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Aggressive Behavior Page Content Article Body My child is sometimes very aggressive. What is the best ... once they are quiet and still reinforces this behavior, so your child learns that time out means “quiet and still.” ...

  2. Novel targets for natural killer/T-cell lymphoma immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kumai, Takumi; Kobayashi, Hiroya; Harabuchi, Yasuaki

    2016-01-01

    Extranodal natural killer/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type (NKTL) is a rare but highly aggressive Epstein-Barr virus-related malignancy, which mainly occurs in nasopharyngeal and nasal/paranasal areas. In addition to its high prevalence in Asian, Central American and South American populations, its incidence rate has been gradually increasing in Western countries. The current mainstay of treatment is a combination of multiple chemotherapies and irradiation. Although chemoradiotherapy can cure NKTL, it often causes severe and fatal adverse events. Because a growing body of evidence suggests that immunotherapy is effective against hematological malignancies, this treatment could provide an alternative to chemoradiotherapy for treatment of NKTL. In this review, we focus on how recent findings could be used to develop efficient immunotherapies against NKTL.

  3. Nasal NK/T-cell lymphoma: epidemiology and pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Takakuwa, Tetsuya; Hongyo, Tadashi; Yang, Woo-Ick

    2008-01-01

    Nasal NK/T-cell lymphoma (NKTCL) is an uncommon disease, but usually shows a highly aggressive clinical course. The disease is much more frequent in Asian and Latin American countries than in Western countries, and is universally associated with Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) infection. Analyses of gene mutations, especially p53 and c-KIT, revealed the different frequencies by district. Epidemiological studies revealed the changes of the disease frequency in Korea during the period from 1977–1989 to 1990–1996. Case-control study showed that the exposure to pesticides and chemical solvents could be causative of NKTCL. Further studies including HLA antigen typing of patients is necessary to further clarify the disease mechanism. PMID:18256789

  4. A very advanced case of a T cell peritoneal lymphomatosis.

    PubMed

    Ridolfini, Marco Pericoli; Caprino, Paola; Berardi, Stefano; Rotondi, Fabio; Cusumano, Giacomo; Sofo, Luigi; Pacelli, Fabio; Doglietto, Giovanni Battista

    2012-01-01

    Small-bowel lymphoma is not a common disease, accounting for 15-20% of primary extranodal gastrointestinal lymphomas. Peritoneal lymphomatosis is considered a rare and aggressive presentation. We describe the case of a 55 years-old man affected by T-cell intestinal lymphoma, presenting with diffuse abdominal involvement, bowel dysfunction, severe ascites and pleural effusion, who underwent surgery. Clinical course led dramatically to death. Preoperative cytology and radiologic investigations did not yield diagnosis and were unable to differentiate between peritoneal carcinosis and lymphomatosis. It is suggested that, in such advanced cases, with rapidly deteriorating clinical conditions and huge systemic involvement, surgery is not indicated. On the contrary, maximum effort has to be spent to obtain a preoperative diagnosis.

  5. Choice of Unmanipulated T Cell Replete Graft for Haploidentical Stem Cell Transplant and Posttransplant Cyclophosphamide in Hematologic Malignancies in Adults: Peripheral Blood or Bone Marrow-Review of Published Literature.

    PubMed

    Farhan, Shatha; Peres, Edward; Janakiraman, Nalini

    2016-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (SCT) is often the only curative option for many patients with malignant and benign hematological stem cell disorders. However, some issues are still of concern regarding finding a donor like shrinking family sizes in many societies, underrepresentation of the ethnic minorities in the registries, genetic variability for some races, and significant delays in obtaining stem cells after starting the search. So there is a considerable need to develop alternate donor stem cell sources. The rapid and near universal availability of the haploidentical donor is an advantage of the haploidentical SCT and an opportunity that is being explored currently in many centers especially using T cell replete graft and posttransplant cyclophosphamide. This is probably because it does not require expertise in graft manipulation and because of the lower costs. However, there are still lots of unanswered questions, like the effect of use of bone marrow versus peripheral blood as the source of stem cells on graft-versus-host disease, graft versus tumor, overall survival, immune reconstitution, and quality of life. Here we review the available publications on bone marrow and peripheral blood experience in the haploidentical SCT setting.

  6. High frequency of malaria-specific T cells in non-exposed humans.

    PubMed

    Zevering, Y; Amante, F; Smillie, A; Currier, J; Smith, G; Houghten, R A; Good, M F

    1992-03-01

    A major goal of current candidate malaria vaccines is to stimulate the expansion of clones of malaria-specific lymphocytes. We have examined the in vitro T cell responses of a group of malaria exposed and non-exposed adult Caucasian donors to recombinant circumsporozoite (CS) proteins, one of which is undergoing clinical trials, to blood-stage parasites, and to synthetic peptides copying the CS protein and defined blood-stage proteins. In nearly all individuals tested, CD4 T cell proliferation or lymphokine production occurred in response to whole parasite or CS protein stimulation, and T cells from many individuals responded to synthetic peptides. T cell responses were major histocompatibility complex-restricted, and stimulation of T cells with malaria parasites or CS protein did not appear to expand a population of T cell receptor gamma/delta cells. Malaria-specific responses were independent of prior malaria exposure, and in some cases exceeded the magnitude of response to tetanus toxoid. Specific T cells are present in high frequency in the peripheral blood of many donors who have never been exposed to malaria. Although malaria-specific CD4 T cells play an important role in immunity, these data question whether vaccines need to stimulate such cells, and focus attention on other aspects of malaria immunity which may be more critical to a successful vaccine.

  7. Loss of naive T cells and repertoire constriction predict poor response to vaccination in old primates.

    PubMed

    Cicin-Sain, Luka; Smyk-Pearson, Susan; Smyk-Paerson, Sue; Currier, Noreen; Byrd, Laura; Koudelka, Caroline; Robinson, Tammie; Swarbrick, Gwendolyn; Tackitt, Shane; Legasse, Alfred; Fischer, Miranda; Nikolich-Zugich, Dragana; Park, Byung; Hobbs, Theodore; Doane, Cynthia J; Mori, Motomi; Axthelm, Michael K; Axthelm, Michael T; Lewinsohn, Deborah A; Nikolich-Zugich, Janko

    2010-06-15

    Aging is usually accompanied by diminished immune protection upon infection or vaccination. Although aging results in well-characterized changes in the T cell compartment of long-lived, outbred, and pathogen-exposed organisms, their relevance for primary Ag responses remain unclear. Therefore, it remains unclear whether and to what extent the loss of naive T cells, their partial replacement by oligoclonal memory populations, and the consequent constriction of TCR repertoire limit the Ag responses in aging primates. We show in this study that aging rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) exhibit poor CD8 T cell and B cell responses in the blood and poor CD8 responses in the lungs upon vaccination with the modified vaccinia strain Ankara. The function of APCs appeared to be maintained in aging monkeys, suggesting that the poor response was likely intrinsic to lymphocytes. We found that the loss of naive CD4 and CD8 T cells, and the appearance of persisting T cell clonal expansions predicted poor CD8 responses in individual monkeys. There was strong correlation between early CD8 responses in the transitory CD28+ CD62L- CD8+ T cell compartment and the peak Ab titers upon boost in individual animals, as well as a correlation of both parameters of immune response to the frequency of naive CD8+ T cells in old but not in adult monkeys. Therefore, our results argue that T cell repertoire constriction and naive cell loss have prognostic value for global immune function in aging primates.

  8. Vδ2+ and α/Δ T cells show divergent trajectories during human aging

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Crystal Tze Ying; Wistuba-Hamprecht, Kilian; Xu, Weili; Nyunt, Ma Schwe Zin; Vasudev, Anusha; Lee, Bernett Teck Kwong; Pawelec, Graham; Puan, Kia Joo; Rotzschke, Olaf; Ng, Tze Pin; Larbi, Anis

    2016-01-01

    Chronological aging and a variety of stressors are driving forces towards immunosenescence. While much attention was paid to the main T cell component, α/β T cells, few studies concentrate on the impact of age on γ/δ T cells' characteristics. The latter are important players of adaptive immunity but also have features associated with innate immunity. Vδ2+ are the main component of γ/δ while Vδ1+ T cells expand upon Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection and with age. The Vδ2+ T cells are not influenced by persistent infections but do contribute to immunosurveillance against bacterial pathogens. Here, we focus on Vδ2+ T cells and report that their composition and functionality is not altered in older adults. We have performed a side-by-side comparison of α/β and Vδ2 cells by using two robust markers of T cell replicative history and cell differentiation (CD28 and CD27), and cytokine secretion (IFN-γ and TNF-α). Significant differences in Vδ2 versus α/β homeostasis, as well as phenotypic and functional changes emerged. However, the data strongly suggest a sustained functionality of the Vδ2 population with age, independently of the challenge. This suggests differential trajectories towards immunosenescence in α/β and Vδ2+ T cells, most likely explained by their intrinsic functions. PMID:27384987

  9. CD4+ T cell anergy prevents autoimmunity and generates regulatory T cell precursors

    PubMed Central

    Kalekar, Lokesh A.; Schmiel, Shirdi E.; Nandiwada, Sarada L.; Lam, Wing Y.; Barsness, Laura O.; Zhang, Na; Stritesky, Gretta L.; Malhotra, Deepali; Pauken, Kristen E.; Linehan, Jonathan L.; O’Sullivan, M. Gerard; Fife, Brian T.; Hogquist, Kristin A.; Jenkins, Marc K.; Mueller, Daniel L.

    2015-01-01

    The role that anergy, an acquired state of T cell functional unresponsiveness, plays in natural peripheral tolerance remains unclear. In this study, we demonstrate that anergy is selectively induced in fetal antigen-specific maternal CD4+ T cells during pregnancy. A naturally occurring subpopulation of anergic polyclonal CD4+ T cells, enriched in self antigen-specific T cell receptors, is also observed in healthy hosts. Neuropilin-1 expression in anergic conventional CD4+ T cells is associated with thymic regulatory T cell (Treg cell)-related gene hypomethylation, and this correlates with their capacity to differentiate into Foxp3+ Treg cells that suppress immunopathology. Thus, our data suggest that not only is anergy induction important in preventing autoimmunity, but it also generates the precursors for peripheral Treg cell differentiation. PMID:26829766

  10. T-cell receptor variable region gene usage in T-cell populations.

    PubMed Central

    Garman, R D; Ko, J L; Vulpe, C D; Raulet, D H

    1986-01-01

    We have examined T-cell receptor alpha- and beta-chain variable (V) region gene usage in T-cell populations predicted to have different major histocompatibility complex-restriction specificities. Using a sensitive ribonuclease protection assay to measure T-cell receptor mRNA levels, we found no striking differences in the usage of three V alpha genes and three V beta genes in T-cell populations from three congeneic H-2-disparate strains of mice and between the mutually exclusive Ly2+ L3T4- and Ly2- L3T4+ T-cell subpopulations. These results suggest that major histocompatibility complex restriction cannot be explained by the differential usage of nonoverlapping V alpha or V beta gene pools. In contrast, striking but unpredictable differences were seen in V gene usage in populations of T cells selected by activation with particular alloantigens. Images PMID:3487085

  11. Signaling aggression.

    PubMed

    van Staaden, Moira J; Searcy, William A; Hanlon, Roger T

    2011-01-01

    From psychological and sociological standpoints, aggression is regarded as intentional behavior aimed at inflicting pain and manifested by hostility and attacking behaviors. In contrast, biologists define aggression as behavior associated with attack or escalation toward attack, omitting any stipulation about intentions and goals. Certain animal signals are strongly associated with escalation toward attack and have the same function as physical attack in intimidating opponents and winning contests, and ethologists therefore consider them an integral part of aggressive behavior. Aggressive signals have been molded by evolution to make them ever more effective in mediating interactions between the contestants. Early theoretical analyses of aggressive signaling suggested that signals could never be honest about fighting ability or aggressive intentions because weak individuals would exaggerate such signals whenever they were effective in influencing the behavior of opponents. More recent game theory models, however, demonstrate that given the right costs and constraints, aggressive signals are both reliable about strength and intentions and effective in influencing contest outcomes. Here, we review the role of signaling in lieu of physical violence, considering threat displays from an ethological perspective as an adaptive outcome of evolutionary selection pressures. Fighting prowess is conveyed by performance signals whose production is constrained by physical ability and thus limited to just some individuals, whereas aggressive intent is encoded in strategic signals that all signalers are able to produce. We illustrate recent advances in the study of aggressive signaling with case studies of charismatic taxa that employ a range of sensory modalities, viz. visual and chemical signaling in cephalopod behavior, and indicators of aggressive intent in the territorial calls of songbirds.

  12. Altered Intracellular ATP Production by Activated CD4+ T-Cells in Very Preterm Infants

    PubMed Central

    Corvaglia, Luigi; Gabrielli, Liliana; Chiereghin, Angela; Lazzarotto, Tiziana

    2016-01-01

    Background. The neonatal immune system is not fully developed at birth; newborns have adequate lymphocytes counts but these cells lack function. Objective. To assess the activity of T-cells and the influence of the main perinatal factors in very preterm infants (birth weight < 1500 g). Design. Blood samples from 59 preterm infants (21/59 were dizygotic twins) were collected at birth and at 30 days of life to measure CD4+ T-cell activity using the ImmuKnow™ assay. Fifteen healthy adults were included as a control group. Results. CD4+ T-cell activity was lower in VLBW infants compared with adults (p < 0.001). Twins showed lower immune activity compared to singletons (p = 0.005). Infants born vaginally showed higher CD4+ T-cell activity compared to those born by C-section (p = 0.031); infants born after prolonged Premature Rupture of Membranes (pPROM) showed higher CD4+ T-cell activity at birth (p = 0.002) compared to infants born without pPROM. Low CD4+ T-cell activity at birth is associated with necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) in the first week of life (p = 0.049). Conclusions. Preterm infants show a lack in CD4+ T-cell activity at birth. Perinatal factors such as intrauterine inflammation, mode of delivery, and zygosity can influence the adaptive immune activation capacity at birth and can contribute to exposing these infants to serious complications such as NEC. PMID:28070527

  13. A stochastic T cell response criterion

    PubMed Central

    Currie, James; Castro, Mario; Lythe, Grant; Palmer, Ed; Molina-París, Carmen

    2012-01-01

    The adaptive immune system relies on different cell types to provide fast and coordinated responses, characterized by recognition of pathogenic challenge, extensive cellular proliferation and differentiation, as well as death. T cells are a subset of the adaptive immune cellular pool that recognize immunogenic peptides expressed on the surface of antigen-presenting cells by means of specialized receptors on their membrane. T cell receptor binding to ligand determines T cell responses at different times and locations during the life of a T cell. Current experimental evidence provides support to the following: (i) sufficiently long receptor–ligand engagements are required to initiate the T cell signalling cascade that results in productive signal transduction and (ii) counting devices are at work in T cells to allow signal accumulation, decoding and translation into biological responses. In the light of these results, we explore, with mathematical models, the timescales associated with T cell responses. We consider two different criteria: a stochastic one (the mean time it takes to have had N receptor–ligand complexes bound for at least a dwell time, τ, each) and one based on equilibrium (the time to reach a threshold number N of receptor–ligand complexes). We have applied mathematical models to previous experiments in the context of thymic negative selection and to recent two-dimensional experiments. Our results indicate that the stochastic criterion provides support to the thymic affinity threshold hypothesis, whereas the equilibrium one does not, and agrees with the ligand hierarchy experimentally established for thymic negative selection. PMID:22745227

  14. Caveolin-1 regulates TCR signal strength and regulatory T-cell differentiation into alloreactive T cells.

    PubMed

    Schönle, Anne; Hartl, Frederike A; Mentzel, Jan; Nöltner, Theresa; Rauch, Katharina S; Prestipino, Alessandro; Wohlfeil, Sebastian A; Apostolova, Petya; Hechinger, Anne-Kathrin; Melchinger, Wolfgang; Fehrenbach, Kerstin; Guadamillas, Marta C; Follo, Marie; Prinz, Gabriele; Ruess, Ann-Katrin; Pfeifer, Dietmar; del Pozo, Miguel Angel; Schmitt-Graeff, Annette; Duyster, Justus; Hippen, Keli I; Blazar, Bruce R; Schachtrup, Kristina; Minguet, Susana; Zeiser, Robert

    2016-04-14

    Caveolin-1 (Cav-1) is a key organizer of membrane specializations and a scaffold protein that regulates signaling in multiple cell types. We found increased Cav-1 expression in human and murine T cells after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation. Indeed, Cav-1(-/-)donor T cells caused less severe acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and yielded higher numbers of regulatory T cells (Tregs) compared with controls. Depletion of Tregs from the graft abrogated this protective effect. Correspondingly, Treg frequencies increased when Cav-1(-/-)T cells were exposed to transforming growth factor-β/T-cell receptor (TCR)/CD28 activation or alloantigen stimulation in vitro compared with wild-type T cells. Mechanistically, we found that the phosphorylation of Cav-1 is dispensable for the control of T-cell fate by using a nonphosphorylatable Cav-1 (Y14F/Y14F) point-mutation variant. Moreover, the close proximity of lymphocyte-specific protein tyrosine kinase (Lck) to the TCR induced by TCR-activation was reduced in Cav-1(-/-)T cells. Therefore, less TCR/Lck clustering results in suboptimal activation of the downstream signaling events, which correlates with the preferential development into a Treg phenotype. Overall, we report a novel role for Cav-1 in TCR/Lck spatial distribution upon TCR triggering, which controls T-cell fate toward a regulatory phenotype. This alteration translated into a significant increase in the frequency of Tregs and reduced GVHD in vivo.

  15. Supernatural T cells: genetic modification of T cells for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Kershaw, Michael H; Teng, Michele W L; Smyth, Mark J; Darcy, Phillip K

    2005-12-01

    Immunotherapy is receiving much attention as a means of treating cancer, but complete, durable responses remain rare for most malignancies. The natural immune system seems to have limitations and deficiencies that might affect its ability to control malignant disease. An alternative to relying on endogenous components in the immune repertoire is to generate lymphocytes with abilities that are greater than those of natural T cells, through genetic modification to produce 'supernatural' T cells. This Review describes how such T cells can circumvent many of the barriers that are inherent in the tumour microenvironment while optimizing T-cell specificity, activation, homing and antitumour function.

  16. Regulation of naïve fetal T-cell migration by the chemokines Exodus-2 and Exodus-3.

    PubMed

    Christopherson, K; Brahmi, Z; Hromas, R

    1999-08-03

    We and other workers have recently isolated three novel CC chemokines termed Exodus-1/LARC/Mip-3alpha, Exodus-2/6Ckine/SLC/TCA4, and Exodus-3/Mip-3beta/CKbeta11/ELC. These chemokines share an amino terminal Asp-Cys-Cys-Leu sequence, unique among all chemokines. They also selectively regulate migration of adult T cells. Indeed, there is evidence that Exodus-2 and -3 are critical for adult T-cell adhesion to high endothelial venules in lymph nodes, a rate-limiting step for T-cell trafficking through nodal tissue. Less is known of the factors controlling migration of naïve human fetal T cells. We tested whether these chemokines could regulate chemotaxis in cord blood T-cell populations, and compared that efficacy with normal peripheral blood adult T cells. The findings indicated that naive CD45RA+ cord blood T-cell migration is stimulated by Exodus-2 and -3, and CD4+ cord blood T cells are attracted preferentially by Exodus-2 or -3 as compared with CD8+. Exodus-2 and -3 are likely to be critical in regulating the flux of naive CD4 + fetal T-cell population of secondary lymphoid tissue.

  17. Targetless T cells in cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Thor Straten, Per; Garrido, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Attention has recently focused on new cancer immunotherapy protocols aiming to activate T cell mediated anti-tumor responses. To this end, administration of antibodies that target inhibitory molecules regulating T-cell cytotoxicity has achieved impressive clinical responses, as has adoptive cell transfer (ACT) using expanded tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) or genetically modified cytotoxic T cells. However, despite clear clinical responses, only a fraction of patients respond to treatment and there is an urgent call for characterization of predictive biomarkers. CD8 positive T cells can infiltrate tumor tissues and destroy HLA class I positive tumor cells expressing the specific antigen. In fact, current progress in the field of cancer immune therapy is based on the capacity of T cells to kill cancer cells that present tumor antigen in the context on an HLA class I molecule. However, it is also well established that cancer cells are often characterized by loss or down regulation of HLA class I molecules, documented in a variety of human tumors. Consequently, immune therapy building on CD8 T cells will be futile in patients harboring HLA class-I negative or deficient cancer cells. It is therefore mandatory to explore if these important molecules for T cell cytotoxicity are expressed by cancer target cells. We have indications that different types of immunotherapy can modify the tumor microenvironment and up-regulate reduced HLA class I expression in cancer cells but only if the associated molecular mechanisms is reversible (soft). However, in case of structural (hard) aberrations causing HLA class I loss, tumor cells will not be able to recover HLA class I expression and as a consequence will escape T-cell lysis and continue to growth. Characterization of the molecular mechanism underlying the lack or downregulation of HLA class I expression, seems to be a crucial step predicting clinical responses to T cell mediated immunotherapy, and possibly aid the

  18. Lenalidomide enhances antitumor functions of chimeric antigen receptor modified T cells.

    PubMed

    Otáhal, Pavel; Průková, Dana; Král, Vlastimil; Fabry, Milan; Vočková, Petra; Latečková, Lucie; Trněný, Marek; Klener, Pavel

    2016-04-01

    Tumor immunotherapy based on the use of chimeric antigen receptor modified T cells (CAR T cells) is a promising approach for the treatment of refractory hematological malignancies. However, a robust response mediated by CAR T cells is observed only in a minority of patients and the expansion and persistence of CAR T cells in vivo is mostly unpredictable.Lenalidomide (LEN) is an immunomodulatory drug currently approved for the treatment of multiple myeloma (MM) and mantle cell lymphoma, while it is clinically tested in the therapy of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma of activated B cell immunophenotype. LEN was shown to increase antitumor immune responses at least partially by modulating the activity of E3 ubiquitin ligase Cereblon, which leads to increased ubiquitinylation of Ikaros and Aiolos transcription factors, which in turn results in changed expression of various receptors on the surface of tumor cells. In order to enhance the effectiveness of CAR-based immunotherapy, we assessed the anti-lymphoma efficacy of LEN in combination with CAR19 T cells or CAR20 T cells in vitro and in vivo using various murine models of aggressive B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas (B-NHL).Immunodeficient NSG mice were transplanted with various human B-NHL cells followed by treatment with CAR19 or CAR20 T cells with or without LEN. Next, CAR19 T cells were subjected to series of tests in vitro to evaluate their response and signaling capacity following recognition of B cell in the presence or absence of LEN.Our data shows that LEN significantly enhances antitumor functions of CAR19 and CAR20 T cells in vivo. Additionally, it enhances production of interferon gamma by CAR19 T cells and augments cell signaling via CAR19 protein in T cells in vitro. Our data further suggests that LEN works through direct effects on T cells but not on B-NHL cells. The biochemical events underlying this costimulatory effect of LEN are currently being investigated. In summary, our data supports the use of LEN for

  19. Lenalidomide enhances antitumor functions of chimeric antigen receptor modified T cells

    PubMed Central

    Otáhal, Pavel; Průková, Dana; Král, Vlastimil; Fabry, Milan; Vočková, Petra; Latečková, Lucie; Trněný, Marek; Klener, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Tumor immunotherapy based on the use of chimeric antigen receptor modified T cells (CAR T cells) is a promising approach for the treatment of refractory hematological malignancies. However, a robust response mediated by CAR T cells is observed only in a minority of patients and the expansion and persistence of CAR T cells in vivo is mostly unpredictable.Lenalidomide (LEN) is an immunomodulatory drug currently approved for the treatment of multiple myeloma (MM) and mantle cell lymphoma, while it is clinically tested in the therapy of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma of activated B cell immunophenotype. LEN was shown to increase antitumor immune responses at least partially by modulating the activity of E3 ubiquitin ligase Cereblon, which leads to increased ubiquitinylation of Ikaros and Aiolos transcription factors, which in turn results in changed expression of various receptors on the surface of tumor cells. In order to enhance the effectiveness of CAR-based immunotherapy, we assessed the anti-lymphoma efficacy of LEN in combination with CAR19 T cells or CAR20 T cells in vitro and in vivo using various murine models of aggressive B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas (B-NHL).Immunodeficient NSG mice were transplanted with various human B-NHL cells followed by treatment with CAR19 or CAR20 T cells with or without LEN. Next, CAR19 T cells were subjected to series of tests in vitro to evaluate their response and signaling capacity following recognition of B cell in the presence or absence of LEN.Our data shows that LEN significantly enhances antitumor functions of CAR19 and CAR20 T cells in vivo. Additionally, it enhances production of interferon gamma by CAR19 T cells and augments cell signaling via CAR19 protein in T cells in vitro. Our data further suggests that LEN works through direct effects on T cells but not on B-NHL cells. The biochemical events underlying this costimulatory effect of LEN are currently being investigated. In summary, our data supports the use

  20. Bispecific T cell engagers for cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Huehls, Amelia M.; Coupet, Tiffany A.; Sentman, Charles L.

    2015-01-01

    Bispecific T cell engagers are a new class of immunotherapeutic molecules intended for the treatment of cancer. These molecules, termed BiTEs, enhance the patient’s immune response to tumors by retargeting T cells to tumor cells. BiTEs are constructed of two single chain variable fragments (scFv) connected in tandem by a flexible linker. One scFv binds to a T cell-specific molecule, usually CD3, while the second scFv binds to a tumor-associated antigen. This structure and specificity allows a BiTE to physically link a T cell to a tumor cell, ultimately stimulating T cell activation, tumor killing and cytokine production. BiTEs have been developed that target several tumor-associated antigens for a variety of both hematological and solid tumors. Several BiTEs are currently in clinical trials for their therapeutic efficacy and safety. This review examines the salient structural and functional features of BiTEs as well as the current state of their clinical and preclinical development. PMID:25367186

  1. Clinical Activity of the γ-Secretase Inhibitor PF-03084014 in Adults With Desmoid Tumors (Aggressive Fibromatosis).

    PubMed

    Kummar, Shivaani; O'Sullivan Coyne, Geraldine; Do, Khanh T; Turkbey, Baris; Meltzer, Paul S; Polley, Eric; Choyke, Peter L; Meehan, Robert; Vilimas, Rasa; Horneffer, Yvonne; Juwara, Lamin; Lih, Ann; Choudhary, Amul; Mitchell, Sandra A; Helman, Lee J; Doroshow, James H; Chen, Alice P

    2017-03-28

    Purpose Desmoid tumors (aggressive fibromatosis) arise from connective tissue cells or fibroblasts. In general, they are slow growing and do not metastasize; however, locally aggressive desmoid tumors can cause severe morbidity and loss of function. Disease recurrence after surgery and/or radiation and diagnosis of multifocal desmoid tumors highlight the need to develop effective systemic treatments for this disease. In this study, we evaluate objective response rate after therapy with the γ-secretase inhibitor PF-03084014 in patients with recurrent, refractory, progressive desmoid tumors. Patients and Methods Seventeen patients with desmoid tumors received PF-03084014 150 mg orally twice a day in 3-week cycles. Response to treatment was evaluated at cycle 1 and every six cycles, that is, 18 weeks, by RECIST (Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors) version 1.1. Patient-reported outcomes were measured at baseline and at every restaging visit by using the MD Anderson Symptoms Inventory. Archival tumor and blood samples were genotyped for somatic and germline mutations in APC and CTNNB1. Results Of 17 patients accrued to the study, 15 had mutations in APC or CTNNB1 genes. Sixteen patients (94%) were evaluable for response; five (29%) experienced a confirmed partial response and have been on study for more than 2 years. Another five patients with prolonged stable disease as their best response remain on study. Patient-reported outcomes confirmed clinician reporting that the investigational agent was well tolerated and, in subgroup analyses, participants who demonstrated partial response also experienced clinically meaningful and statistically significant improvements in symptom burden. Conclusion PF-03084014 was well tolerated and demonstrated promising clinical benefit in patients with refractory, progressive desmoid tumors who receive long-term treatment.

  2. 506U78 in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma or T-cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  3. CAR-T Cell Therapy for Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Carlos A; Heslop, Helen E; Brenner, Malcolm K

    2016-01-01

    Lymphomas arise from clonal expansions of B, T, or NK cells at different stages of differentiation. Because they occur in the immunocyte-rich lymphoid tissues, they are easily accessible to antibodies and cell-based immunotherapy. Expressing chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) on T cells is a means of combining the antigen-binding site of a monoclonal antibody with the activating machinery of a T cell, enabling antigen recognition independent of major histocompatibility complex restriction, while retaining the desirable antitumor properties of a T cell. Here, we discuss the basic design of CARs and their potential advantages and disadvantages over other immune therapies for lymphomas. We review current clinical trials in the field and consider strategies to improve the in vivo function and safety of immune cells expressing CARs. The ultimate driver of CAR development and implementation for lymphoma will be the demonstration of their ability to safely and cost-effectively cure these malignancies.

  4. CAR-T Cell Therapy for Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Carlos A.; Heslop, Helen E.; Brenner, Malcolm K.

    2016-01-01

    Lymphomas arise from clonal expansions of B, T, or NK cells at different stages of differentiation. Because they occur in the immunocyte-rich lymphoid tissues, they are easily accessible to antibodies and cell-based immunotherapy. Expressing chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) on T cells is a means of combining the antigen-binding site of a monoclonal antibody with the activating machinery of a T cell, enabling antigen recognition independent of major histocompatibility complex restriction, while retaining the desirable antitumor properties of a T cell. Here, we discuss the basic design of CARs and their potential advantages and disadvantages over other immune therapies for lymphomas. We review current clinical trials in the field and consider strategies to improve the in vivo function and safety of immune cells expressing CARs. The ultimate driver of CAR development and implementation for lymphoma will be the demonstration of their ability to safely and cost-effectively cure these malignancies. PMID:26332003

  5. Aggression, Recognition and Qualification: On the Social Psychology of Adult Education in Everyday Life. [Publications from the Adult Education Research Group].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Kirsten

    This paper discusses the impact of life history and everyday life in the context of training unskilled adults for social work in Denmark. It describes origins of these two texts used as empirical material: a discussion by a group of long-term unemployed skilled adult male workers who went through a 2-year training program to obtain permanent…

  6. T-cell/histiocyte-rich large B-cell lymphoma of stomach.

    PubMed

    Barut, Figen; Kandemir, Nilufer Onak; Gun, Banu Dogan; Ozdamar, Sukru Oguz

    2016-07-01

    T-cell/histiocyte-rich large B-cell lymphoma is an unusually encountered lymphoid neoplasm of stomach with aggressive course, and is an uncommon morphologic variant of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. An ulcerated mass, 7x5x1 cm in size was observed within the gastrectomy specimen of a 76-year-old female patient. In cross sections, besides mature lymphoid cells displaying T-cell phenotype, a neoplastic formation composed of large, pleomorphic atypical lymphoid cells with, prominent nucleoli, vesicular nuclei and abundant eosinophilic cytoplasm displaying B-cell phenotype were observed. Meanwhile, histiocyte-like mononuclear cells and Reed-Sternberg-like multinuclear cells expressing CD68 and Mac387 were also observed. The diagnosis of the case was T cell/histiocyte-rich large B-cell lymphoma. This rarely encountered neoplasm should be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of primary gastric lymphomas.

  7. Development of promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger-expressing innate CD4 T cells requires stronger T-cell receptor signals than conventional CD4 T cells.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Yu; Zhu, Lingqiao; Sofi, Hanief; Lapinski, Philip E; Horai, Reiko; Mueller, Kristen; Stritesky, Gretta L; He, Xi; Teh, Hung-Sia; Wiest, David L; Kappes, Dietmar J; King, Philip D; Hogquist, Kristin A; Schwartzberg, Pamela L; Sant'Angelo, Derek B; Chang, Cheong-Hee

    2012-10-02

    MHC class II-expressing thymocytes and thymic epithelial cells can mediate CD4 T-cell selection resulting in functionally distinct thymocyte-selected CD4 (T-CD4) and epithelial-selected CD4 (E-CD4) T cells, respectively. However, little is known about how T-cell receptor (TCR) signaling influences the development of these two CD4 T-cell subsets. To study TCR signaling for T-CD4 T-cell development, we used a GFP reporter system of Nur77 in which GFP intensity directly correlates with TCR signaling strength. T-CD4 T cells expressed higher levels of GFP than E-CD4 T cells, suggesting that T-CD4 T cells received stronger TCR signaling than E-CD4 T cells during selection. Elimination of Ras GTPase-activating protein enhanced E-CD4 but decreased T-CD4 T-cell selection efficiency, suggesting a shift to negative selection. Conversely, the absence of IL-2-inducible T-cell kinase that causes poor E-CD4 T-cell selection due to insufficient TCR signaling improved T-CD4 T-cell generation, consistent with rescue from negative selection. Strong TCR signaling during T-CD4 T-cell development correlates with the expression of the transcription factor promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger protein. However, although modulation of the signaling strength affected the efficiency of T-CD4 T-cell development during positive and negative selection, the signaling strength is not as important for the effector function of T-CD4 T cells. These findings indicate that innate T-CD4 T cells, together with invariant natural killer T cells and γδ T cells, receive strong TCR signals during their development and that signaling requirements for the development and the effector functions are distinct.

  8. The role of human T cell lymphotropic virus type I tax in the development of cutaneous T cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Zucker-Franklin, D

    2001-09-01

    Although it has been well established that the human T cell lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) causes adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) in regions of the world where this virus is endemic, its role in the pathogenesis of cutaneous T cell lymphoma (CTCL) in the Western world has been less well established. Most patients with CTCL are negative for antibodies to the structural proteins of HTLV-I, and thus a causative role for this virus is usually dismissed. However, the Tax sequence of HTLV-I has been found in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of practically all patients with CTCL. Such patients express Tax mRNA and have antibodies to p40Tax, the protein encoded by this sequence. Sequence analysis of a 159-bp region of Tax extracted from CTCL cells proved to be homologous with the same region prepared from a cell line infected with prototypic HTLV-I. By in situ PCR, Tax has been demonstrated in the lymphocytes infiltrating the skin as well as in the keratinocytes of such patients. Apart from the pathophysiologic and clinical interest of these studies, these observations may have therapeutic implications. In vitro, the proliferation of HTLV-I-transformed cells can be inhibited by antisense to HTLV-I Tax. Since Tax has not been identified in the normal human genome, antisense to Tax deserves serious consideration as a treatment modality for patients whose cells have been demonstrated to harborTax.

  9. Improve T Cell Therapy in Neuroblastoma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-01

    CMV seropositive donors were cocultured with irradiated aAPCs. As shown in Fig 10E, after 10 - 12 days of culture, aAPCs expressing pp65 reactivated CMV ...inferior to the PBMC loaded with pp65 peptides (INF SFU 789 ± 130), aAPCs expressing pp65 were effective in reactivating CMV -specific T cells (INF SFU 83...significantly increased the boosting of CMV -specific T cells (INF SFU 292 ± 56 vs. 502 ± 104 for K562/pp65 and K562/CD40L/pp65, respectively; p=0.034). The

  10. Synthetic biology approaches to engineer T cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chia-Yung; Rupp, Levi J; Roybal, Kole T; Lim, Wendell A

    2015-08-01

    There is rapidly growing interest in learning how to engineer immune cells, such as T lymphocytes, because of the potential of these engineered cells to be used for therapeutic applications such as the recognition and killing of cancer cells. At the same time, our knowhow and capability to logically engineer cellular behavior is growing rapidly with the development of synthetic biology. Here we describe how synthetic biology approaches are being used to rationally alter the behavior of T cells to optimize them for therapeutic functions. We also describe future developments that will be important in order to construct safe and precise T cell therapeutics.

  11. A sharp T-cell antigen receptor signaling threshold for T-cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Au-Yeung, Byron B.; Zikherman, Julie; Mueller, James L.; Ashouri, Judith F.; Matloubian, Mehrdad; Cheng, Debra A.; Chen, Yiling; Shokat, Kevan M.; Weiss, Arthur

    2014-01-01

    T-cell antigen receptor (TCR) signaling is essential for activation, proliferation, and effector function of T cells. Modulation of both intensity and duration of TCR signaling can regulate these events. However, it remains unclear how individual T cells integrate such signals over time to make critical cell-fate decisions. We have previously developed an engineered mutant allele of the critical T-cell kinase zeta-chain-associated protein kinase 70 kDa (Zap70) that is catalytically inhibited by a small molecule inhibitor, thereby blocking TCR signaling specifically and efficiently. We have also characterized a fluorescent reporter Nur77–eGFP transgenic mouse line in which T cells up-regulate GFP uniquely in response to TCR stimulation. The combination of these technologies unmasked a sharp TCR signaling threshold for commitment to cell division both in vitro and in vivo. Further, we demonstrate that this threshold is independent of both the magnitude of the TCR stimulus and Interleukin 2. Similarly, we identify a temporal threshold of TCR signaling that is required for commitment to proliferation, after which T cells are able to proliferate in a Zap70 kinase-independent manner. Taken together, our studies reveal a sharp threshold for the magnitude and duration of TCR signaling required for commitment of T cells to proliferation. These results have important implications for understanding T-cell responses to infection and optimizing strategies for immunomodulatory drug delivery. PMID:25136127

  12. Direct and indirect effects of parenting practices on socio-moral approval of aggression in Polish young adults. Do all practices matter?

    PubMed

    Dominiak-Kochanek, Monika; Konopka, Karolina; Rutkowska, Marta; Frączek, Adam; Ramirez, J Martin

    2016-08-08

    The purpose of this article was to determine the socialisation antecedents of socio-moral approval of aggression (SMAA). In Study 1, we assessed factorial structure and reliability of the SMAA with a sample of 355 students who reported on the extent to which they approved of six forms of aggressive behaviour and six justifications of aggression. Two-factor solutions were obtained with regard to forms and justifications of aggressive acts. Thus, approval of extreme and minor aggression was distinguished as well as legitimate and illegitimate justifications of aggression. In Study 2, we tested the path models of the socialisation antecedents that contributed to the high approval of minor and extreme aggressive acts as well as legitimate and illegitimate justifications of aggression. Data were collected from 173 undergraduate students. Path analyses showed that high levels of approval of extremely aggressive acts and of illegitimate justifications of aggression were preceded by a sequence of negative life events, beginning with frequent misbehaviour in childhood, corporal punishment used by parents and ending with delinquency in adolescence. The approval of minor aggression had little relation to socialisation factors apart from a detrimental effect of psychological aggression while approval of legitimate justifications of aggression had no socialisation antecedents.

  13. Adoptive T-cell therapy for cancer: The era of engineered T cells.

    PubMed

    Bonini, Chiara; Mondino, Anna

    2015-09-01

    Tumors originate from a number of genetic events that deregulate homeostatic mechanisms controlling normal cell behavior. The immune system, devoted to patrol the organism against pathogenic events, can identify transformed cells, and in several cases cause their elimination. It is however clear that several mechanisms encompassing both central and peripheral tolerance limit antitumor immunity, often resulting into progressive diseases. Adoptive T-cell therapy with either allogeneic or autologous T cells can transfer therapeutic immunity. To date, genetic engineering of T cells appears to be a powerful tool for shaping tumor immunity. In this review, we discuss the most recent achievements in the areas of suicide gene therapy, and TCR-modified T cells and chimeric antigen receptor gene-modified T cells. We provide an overview of current strategies aimed at improving the safety and efficacy of these approaches, with an outlook on prospective developments.

  14. Design of T cell receptor libraries with diverse binding properties to examine adoptive T cell responses

    PubMed Central

    Chervin, A.S.; Stone, J.D.; Soto, C.M.; Engels, B.; Schreiber, H.; Roy, E.J.; Kranz, D.M.

    2017-01-01

    Adoptive T cell therapies have shown significant promise in the treatment of cancer and viral diseases. One approach, that introduces antigen-specific T cell receptors (TCRs) into ex vivo activated T cells, is designed to overcome central tolerance mechanisms that prevent responses by endogenous T cell repertoires. Studies have suggested that use of higher affinity TCRs against class I MHC antigens could drive the activity of both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, but the rules that govern the TCR binding optimal for in vivo activity are unknown. Here we describe a high-throughput platform of “reverse biochemistry” whereby a library of TCRs with a wide range of binding properties to the same antigen is introduced into T cells and adoptively transferred into mice with antigen-positive tumors. Extraction of RNA from tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes or lymphoid organs allowed high-throughput sequencing to determine which TCRs were selected in vivo. The results showed that CD8+ T cells expressing the highest affinity TCR variants were deleted in both the tumor infiltrating lymphocyte population and in peripheral lymphoid tissues. In contrast, these same high-affinity TCR variants were preferentially expressed within CD4+ T cells in the tumor, suggesting they played a role in antigen-specific tumor control. The findings thus revealed that the affinity of the transduced TCRs controlled the survival and tumor infiltration of the transferred T cells. Accordingly, the TCR library strategy enables rapid assessment of TCR binding properties that promote peripheral T cell survival and tumor elimination. PMID:23052828

  15. Downregulation of proapoptotic Bim augments IL-2-independent T-cell transformation by human T-cell leukemia virus type-1 Tax.

    PubMed

    Higuchi, Masaya; Takahashi, Masahiko; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Fujii, Masahiro

    2014-12-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1), an etiological agent of adult T-cell leukemia, immortalizes and transforms primary human T cells in vitro in both an interleukin (IL)-2-dependent and IL-2-independent manner. Expression of the HTLV-1 oncoprotein Tax transforms the growth of the mouse T-cell line CTLL-2 from being IL-2-dependent to IL-2-independent. Withdrawal of IL-2 from normal activated T cells induces apoptosis, which is mediated through the inducible expression of several proapoptotic proteins, including Bim. In this study, we found that Tax protects IL-2-depleted T cells against Bim-induced apoptosis. Withdrawal of IL-2 from CTLL-2 cells induced a prominent increase in the level of Bim protein in CTLL-2 cells, but not in Tax-transformed CTLL-2 cells. This inhibition of Bim in Tax-transformed CTLL-2 cells was mediated by two mechanisms: downregulation of Bim mRNA and posttranscriptional reduction of Bim protein. Transient expression of Tax in CTLL-2 cells also inhibited IL-2 depletion-induced expression of Bim, however, this decrease in Bim protein expression was not due to downregulation of Bim mRNA, thus indicating that Bim mRNA downregulation in Tax-transformed CTLL-2 occurs only after long-term expression of Tax. Transient expression of Tax in CTLL-2 cells also induced Erk activation, however, this was not involved in the reduction of Bim protein. Knockdown of Bim expression in CTLL-2 cells augmented Tax-induced IL-2-independent transformation. HTLV-1 infection of human T cells also reduced their levels of Bim protein, and restoring Bim expression in HTLV-1-infected cells reduced their proliferation by inducing apoptosis. Taken together, these results indicate that Tax-induced downregulation of Bim in HTLV-1-infected T cells promotes their IL-2-independent growth, thereby supporting the persistence of HTLV-1 infection in vivo.

  16. Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 tax oncoprotein suppression of multilineage hematopoiesis of CD34+ cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Tripp, Adam; Liu, Yingxian; Sieburg, Michelle; Montalbano, Joanne; Wrzesinski, Stephen; Feuer, Gerold

    2003-11-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) and HTLV-2 are highly related viruses that differ in disease manifestation. HTLV-1 is the etiologic agent of adult T-cell leukemia and lymphoma, an aggressive clonal malignancy of human CD4-bearing T lymphocytes. Infection with HTLV-2 has not been conclusively linked to lymphoproliferative disorders. We previously showed that human hematopoietic progenitor (CD34(+)) cells can be infected by HTLV-1 and that proviral sequences were maintained after differentiation of infected CD34(+) cells in vitro and in vivo. To investigate the role of the Tax oncoprotein of HTLV on hematopoiesis, bicistronic lentiviral vectors were constructed encoding the HTLV-1 or HTLV-2 tax genes (Tax1 and Tax2, respectively) and the green fluorescent protein marker gene. Human hematopoietic progenitor (CD34(+)) cells were infected with lentivirus vectors, and transduced cells were cultured in a semisolid medium permissive for the development of erythroid, myeloid, and primitive progenitor colonies. Tax1-transduced CD34(+) cells displayed a two- to fivefold reduction in the total number of hematopoietic clonogenic colonies that arose in vitro, in contrast to Tax2-transduced cells, which showed no perturbation of hematopoiesis. The ratio of colony types that developed from Tax1-transduced CD34(+) cells remained unaffected, suggesting that Tax1 inhibited the maturation of relatively early, uncommitted hematopoietic stem cells. Since previous reports have linked Tax1 expression with initiation of apoptosis, lentiviral vector-mediated transduction of Tax1 or Tax2 was investigated in CEM and Jurkat T-cell lines. Ectopic expression of either Tax1 or Tax2 failed to induce apoptosis in T-cell lines. These data demonstrate that Tax1 expression perturbs development and maturation of pluripotent hematopoietic progenitor cells, an activity that is not displayed by Tax2, and that the suppression of hematopoiesis is not attributable to induction of apoptosis. Since

  17. Implicit cognitive aggression among young male prisoners: Association with dispositional and current aggression.

    PubMed

    Ireland, Jane L; Adams, Christine

    2015-01-01

    The current study explores associations between implicit and explicit aggression in young adult male prisoners, seeking to apply the Reflection-Impulsive Model and indicate parity with elements of the General Aggression Model and social cognition. Implicit cognitive aggressive processing is not an area that has been examined among prisoners. Two hundred and sixty two prisoners completed an implicit cognitive aggression measure (Puzzle Test) and explicit aggression measures, covering current behaviour (DIPC-R) and aggression disposition (AQ). It was predicted that dispositional aggression would be predicted by implicit cognitive aggression, and that implicit cognitive aggression would predict current engagement in aggressive behaviour. It was also predicted that more impulsive implicit cognitive processing would associate with aggressive behaviour whereas cognitively effortful implicit cognitive processing would not. Implicit aggressive cognitive processing was associated with increased dispositional aggression but not current reports of aggressive behaviour. Impulsive implicit cognitive processing of an aggressive nature predicted increased dispositional aggression whereas more cognitively effortful implicit cognitive aggression did not. The article concludes by outlining the importance of accounting for implicit cognitive processing among prisoners and the need to separate such processing into facets (i.e. impulsive vs. cognitively effortful). Implications for future research and practice in this novel area of study are indicated.

  18. Enteropathy-type T-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Zettl, Andreas; deLeeuw, Ron; Haralambieva, Eugenia; Mueller-Hermelink, Hans-Konrad

    2007-05-01

    Session 7 of the Society for Hematopathology/European Association for Haematopathology Workshop was devoted to case presentations and discussion of enteropathy-type T-cell lymphoma (ETL) and other T-cell lymphomas involving the gastrointestinal tract. ETL is a rare type of T-cell lymphoma, often associated with a history of celiac disease, that usually arises in the jejunum but can involve other gastrointestinal tract sites (eg, stomach and colon). As the cases submitted illustrate, there are 2 histologic groups of ETL that correlate with clinical and immunophenotypic features. Pleomorphic-anaplastic ETL is usually associated with a history of celiac disease and histologic evidence of enteropathy and is most often CD56-. Monomorphic ETL often occurs without a history of celiac disease, has variable histologic evidence of enteropathy, and is usually CD56+. Comparative genomic hybridization has shown recurrent chromosomal gains and losses that are characteristic of ETL and uncommon in other T-cell lymphomas, providing useful ancillary data for the diagnosis of ETL.

  19. T Cell Allorecognition via Molecular Mimicry

    SciTech Connect

    Macdonald, Whitney A.; Chen, Zhenjun; Gras, Stephanie; Archbold, Julia K.; Tynan, Fleur E.; Clements, Craig S.; Bharadwaj, Mandvi; Kjer-Nielsen, Lars; Saunders, Philippa M.; Wilce, Matthew C.J.; Crawford, Fran; Stadinsky, Brian; Jackson, David; Brooks, Andrew G.; Purcell, Anthony W.; Kappler, John W.; Burrows, Scott R.; Rossjohn, Jamie; McCluskey, James

    2010-08-16

    T cells often alloreact with foreign human leukocyte antigens (HLA). Here we showed the LC13 T cell receptor (TCR), selected for recognition on self-HLA-B*0801 bound to a viral peptide, alloreacts with B44 allotypes (HLA-B*4402 and HLA-B*4405) bound to two different allopeptides. Despite extensive polymorphism between HLA-B*0801, HLA-B*4402, and HLA-B*4405 and the disparate sequences of the viral and allopeptides, the LC13 TCR engaged these peptide-HLA (pHLA) complexes identically, accommodating mimicry of the viral peptide by the allopeptide. The viral and allopeptides adopted similar conformations only after TCR ligation, revealing an induced-fit mechanism of molecular mimicry. The LC13 T cells did not alloreact against HLA-B*4403, and the single residue polymorphism between HLA-B*4402 and HLA-B*4403 affected the plasticity of the allopeptide, revealing that molecular mimicry was associated with TCR specificity. Accordingly, molecular mimicry that is HLA and peptide dependent is a mechanism for human T cell alloreactivity between disparate cognate and allogeneic pHLA complexes.

  20. T cells and autoimmune kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Suárez-Fueyo, Abel; Bradley, Sean J; Klatzmann, David; Tsokos, George C

    2017-03-13

    Glomerulonephritis is traditionally considered to result from the invasion of the kidney by autoantibodies and immune complexes from the circulation or following their formation in situ, and by cells of the innate and the adaptive immune system. The inflammatory response leads to the proliferation and dysfunction of cells of the glomerulus, and invasion of the interstitial space with immune cells, resulting in tubular cell malfunction and fibrosis. T cells are critical drivers of autoimmunity and related organ damage, by supporting B-cell differentiation and antibody production or by directly promoting inflammation and cytotoxicity against kidney resident cells. T cells might become activated by autoantigens in the periphery and become polarized to secrete inflammatory cytokines before entering the kidney where they have the opportunity to expand owing to the presence of costimulatory molecules and activating cytokines. Alternatively, naive T cells could enter the kidney where they become activated after encountering autoantigen and expand locally. As not all individuals with a peripheral autoimmune response to kidney antigens develop glomerulonephritis, the contribution of local kidney factors expressed or produced by kidney cells is probably of crucial importance. Improved understanding of the biochemistry and molecular biology of T cells in patients with glomerulonephritis offers unique opportunities for the recognition of treatment targets for autoimmune kidney disease.

  1. Improve T Cell Therapy in Neuroblastoma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-07-01

    transfer of Epstein - Barr - virus (EBV)-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (EBV- CTLs) genetically modified to express a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR-GD2...4 Introduction. In our recent Phase I study we found that the adoptive transfer of Epstein - Barr - virus (EBV...specific aims. 8 Reference List 1. Pule MA, Savoldo B, Myers GD et al. Virus -specific T cells

  2. Genetic engineering with T cell receptors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ling; Morgan, Richard A

    2012-06-01

    In the past two decades, human gene transfer research has been translated from a laboratory technology to clinical evaluation. The success of adoptive transfer of tumor-reactive lymphocytes to treat the patients with metastatic melanoma has led to new strategies to redirect normal T cells to recognize tumor antigens by genetic engineering with tumor antigen-specific T cell receptor (TCR) genes. This new strategy can generate large numbers of defined antigen-specific cells for therapeutic application. Much progress has been made to TCR gene transfer systems by optimizing gene expression and gene transfer protocols. Vector and protein modifications have enabled excellent expression of introduced TCR chains in human lymphocytes with reduced mis-pairing between the introduced and endogenous TCR chains. Initial clinical studies have demonstrated that TCR gene-engineered T cells could mediate tumor regression in vivo. In this review, we discuss the progress and prospects of TCR gene-engineered T cells as a therapeutic strategy for treating patients with melanoma and other cancers.

  3. Reprogramming the T cell response to Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Woodworth, Joshua S.; Andersen, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Recently, Coscolla, Copin et al. use comparative genomics of M.tuberculosis strains to show that most human T cell-recognized epitopes are hyperconserved, but bona fide variable epitopes also exist. This identification of two sets of antigens implies opposing evolutionary processes and has an important impact on Tuberculosis vaccine strategy and design. PMID:26777728

  4. T Cells of Infants Are Mature, but Hyporeactive Due to Limited Ca2+ Influx

    PubMed Central

    Schmiedeberg, Kristin; Krause, Hardy; Röhl, Friedrich-Wilhelm; Hartig, Roland; Jorch, Gerhard

    2016-01-01

    CD4 T cells in human infants and adults differ in the initiation and strength of their responses. The molecular basis for these differences is not yet understood. To address this the principle key molecular events of TCR- and CD28-induced signaling in naive CD4 T cells, such as Ca2+ influx, NFAT expression, phosphorylation and translocation into the nucleus, ERK activation and IL-2 response, were analyzed over at least the first 3 years of life. We report dramatically reduced IL-2 and TNFα responses in naive CD31+ T cells during infancy. Looking at the obligatory Ca2+ influx required to induce T cell activation and proliferation, we demonstrate characteristic patterns of impairment for each stage of infancy that are partly due to the differential usage of Ca2+ stores. Consistent with those findings, translocation of NFATc2 is limited, but still dependent on Ca2+ influx as demonstrated by sensitivity to cyclosporin A (CsA) treatment. Thus weak Ca2+ influx functions as a catalyst for the implementation of restricted IL-2 response in T cells during infancy. Our studies also define limited mobilization of Ca2+ ions as a characteristic property of T cells during infancy. This work adds to our understanding of infants’ poor T cell responsiveness against pathogens. PMID:27893767

  5. Review: Current clinical applications of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) modified T cells.

    PubMed

    Geyer, Mark B; Brentjens, Renier J

    2016-11-01

    The past several years have been marked by extraordinary advances in clinical applications of immunotherapy. In particular, adoptive cellular therapy utilizing chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-modified T cells targeted to CD19 has demonstrated substantial clinical efficacy in children and adults with relapsed or refractory B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) and durable clinical benefit in a smaller subset of patients with relapsed or refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) or B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (B-NHL). Early-phase clinical trials are currently assessing CAR T-cell safety and efficacy in additional malignancies. Here, we discuss clinical results from the largest series to date investigating CD19-targeted CAR T cells in B-ALL, CLL, and B-NHL, including discussion of differences in CAR T-cell design and production and treatment approach, as well as clinical efficacy, nature of severe cytokine release syndrome and neurologic toxicities, and CAR T-cell expansion and persistence. We additionally review the current and forthcoming use of CAR T cells in multiple myeloma and several solid tumors and highlight challenges and opportunities afforded by the current state of CAR T-cell therapies, including strategies to overcome inhibitory aspects of the tumor microenvironment and enhance antitumor efficacy.

  6. T cell responses and dengue haemorrhagic fever.

    PubMed

    Screaton, Gavin; Mongkolsapaya, Juthathip

    2006-01-01

    The enhancement of severe disease upon secondary infection makes dengue almost unique among infectious pathogens and presents a serious challenge to vaccine design. Several key observations have been made which shed light onto this phenomenon particularly that antibodies can enhance Fc receptor-dependent uptake of virus into macrophages thereby increasing virus replication. Furthermore there seems to be a relationship between the peak virus load and disease severity. However, a second key feature of dengue is that the life-threatening symptoms do not correlate with the period of high viraemia; instead they occur at a time when the virus load is in steep decline. The coincidence of severe disease manifestations with defervescence and virus control suggests that the symptoms may be a consequence of the immune response to the virus rather than virus induced cytopathology. One of the key elements in the immune response to viruses are T cells which can both secrete a host of inflammatory cytokines and also be directly cytotoxic to infected cells. There are a number of experimental models of T cell-induced immunopathology including in responses to viruses. Particularly interesting in this respect are models of RSV-induced immunopathology, which have direct relevance to vaccine design as a formalin-inactivated vaccine to RSV actually enhanced disease in children when they became naturally infected with RSV, an echo of the disease enhancement seen in dengue. We will present an analysis of CD8+ T cell responses to a number of novel T cell epitopes during dengue infection and also analyse the function and cytokine secretion of these cells. We suggest that an exaggerated and partially misdirected T cell response seen in secondary dengue infection may be part of the complex series of events leading to dengue haemorrhagic fever and shock.

  7. Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells in tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Larson, Ryan P; Shafiani, Shahin; Urdahl, Kevin B

    2013-01-01

    The immune response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) must be tightly regulated to mount a sufficient response to limit bacterial growth and dissemination while avoiding excessive inflammation that could damage host tissues. A wide variety of cell types, cell surface molecules, and cytokines are likely to contribute to this regulation, but recent studies have revealed that a subset of CD4 T cells expressing the transcription factor Foxp3, called regulatory T (reg) cells, play a critical role [1-3]. Although the first reports of T reg cells in tuberculosis (TB) occurred only recently (i.e., 2006) [4, 5], we have already gained many insights into their activity during TB. While it is likely that T reg cells do play some beneficial roles by preventing inflammation-mediated damage to host tissues during TB, this aspect of their function has not been well studied to date. What is clear, however, is that during the initial T cell response to Mtb infection, Mtb induces the expansions of T reg cells that delay the onset of adaptive immunity, suggesting that Mtb has hijacked T reg cell-mediated immune suppression to allow it to replicate unabated in the lung until T cells finally arrive [6]. In this chapter, we will first provide an overview of the delayed T cell response to Mtb and a brief introduction to regulatory T cells. We will then review what is known about T reg cells from observations in human populations, discuss mechanistic insights revealed in the mouse model, and speculate about the relevance of this understanding for future efforts to prevent and treat TB.

  8. T-Cell Tumor Elimination as a Result of T-Cell Receptor-Mediated Activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashwell, Jonathan D.; Longo, Dan L.; Bridges, Sandra H.

    1987-07-01

    It has recently been shown that activation of murine T-cell hybridomas with antigen inhibits their growth in vitro. The ``suicide'' of these neoplastic T cells upon stimulation with antigen suggested the possibility that activation via the antigen-specific receptor could also inhibit the growth of neoplastic T cells in vivo. To test this, mice were subcutaneously inoculated with antigen-specific T-cell hybridomas and then treated intraperitoneally with antigen. Administration of the appropriate antigen immediately after inoculation with the T-cell hybridoma abrogated tumor formation; antigen administered after tumors had become established decreased the tumor burden and, in a substantial fraction of animals, led to long-term survival. The efficacy of antigen therapy was due to both a direct inhibitory effect on tumor growth and the induction of host immunity. These studies demonstrate the utility of cellular activation as a means of inhibiting neoplastic T-cell growth in vivo and provide a rationale for studying the use of less selective reagents that can mimic the activating properties of antigen, such as monoclonal antibodies, in the treatment of T-cell neoplasms of unknown antigen specificity.

  9. PPARγ negatively regulates T cell activation to prevent follicular helper T cells and germinal center formation.

    PubMed

    Park, Hong-Jai; Kim, Do-Hyun; Choi, Jin-Young; Kim, Won-Ju; Kim, Ji Yun; Senejani, Alireza G; Hwang, Soo Seok; Kim, Lark Kyun; Tobiasova, Zuzana; Lee, Gap Ryol; Craft, Joseph; Bothwell, Alfred L M; Choi, Je-Min

    2014-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) is a transcription factor that regulates lipid and glucose metabolism. Although studies of PPARγ ligands have demonstrated its regulatory functions in inflammation and adaptive immunity, its intrinsic role in T cells and autoimmunity has yet to be fully elucidated. Here we used CD4-PPARγKO mice to investigate PPARγ-deficient T cells, which were hyper-reactive to produce higher levels of cytokines and exhibited greater proliferation than wild type T cells with increased ERK and AKT phosphorylation. Diminished expression of IκBα, Sirt1, and Foxo1, which are inhibitors of NF-κB, was observed in PPARγ-deficient T cells that were prone to produce all the signature cytokines under Th1, Th2, Th17, and Th9 skewing condition. Interestingly, 1-year-old CD4-PPARγKO mice spontaneously developed moderate autoimmune phenotype by increased activated T cells, follicular helper T cells (TFH cells) and germinal center B cells with glomerular inflammation and enhanced autoantibody production. Sheep red blood cell immunization more induced TFH cells and germinal centers in CD4-PPARγKO mice and the T cells showed increased of Bcl-6 and IL-21 expression suggesting its regulatory role in germinal center reaction. Collectively, these results suggest that PPARγ has a regulatory role for TFH cells and germinal center reaction to prevent autoimmunity.

  10. Efficient Gene Editing in Primary Human T Cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yvonne Y

    2015-11-01

    Recent advances in T-cell therapy for cancer, viral infections, and autoimmune diseases highlight the broad therapeutic potential of T-cell engineering. However, site-specific genetic manipulation in primary human T cells remains challenging. Two recent studies describe efficient genome editing in T cells using CRISPR and TALEN approaches.

  11. Inactivation of RUNX3/p46 Promotes Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Haider, Ahmed; Steininger, Anne; Ullmann, Reinhard; Hummel, Michael; Dimitrova, Lora; Beyer, Marc; Vandersee, Staffan; Lenze, Dido; Sterry, Wolfram; Assaf, Chalid; Möbs, Markus

    2016-11-01

    The key role of RUNX3 in physiological T-cell differentiation has been extensively documented. However, information on its relevance for the development of human T-cell lymphomas or leukemias is scarce. Here, we show that alterations of RUNX3 by either heterozygous deletion or methylation of its distal promoter can be observed in the tumor cells of 15 of 21 (71%) patients suffering from Sézary syndrome, an aggressive variant of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. As a consequence, mRNA levels of RUNX3/p46, the isoform controlled by the distal promoter, are significantly lower in Sézary syndrome tumor cells. Re-expression of RUNX3/p46 reduces cell viability and promotes apoptosis in a RUNX3/p46(low) cell line of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. Based on this, we present evidence that RUNX3 can act as a tumor suppressor in a human T-cell malignancy and suggest that this effect is predominantly mediated through transcripts from its distal promoter, in particular RUNX3/p46.

  12. HBV-specific and global T-cell dysfunction in chronic hepatitis B

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jang-June; Wong, David K.; Wahed, Abdus S.; Lee, William M.; Feld, Jordan J.; Terrault, Norah; Khalili, Mandana; Sterling, Richard K.; Kowdley, Kris V.; Bzowej, Natalie; Lau, Daryl T.; Kim, W. Ray; Smith, Coleman; Carithers, Robert L.; Torrey, Keith W.; Keith, James W.; Levine, Danielle L.; Traum, Daniel; Ho, Suzanne; Valiga, Mary E.; Johnson, Geoffrey S.; Doo, Edward; Lok, Anna S. F.; Chang, Kyong-Mi

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims T cells play a critical role in in viral infection. We examined whether T-cell effector and regulatory responses can define clinical stages of chronic hepatitis B (CHB). Methods We enrolled 200 adults with CHB who participated in the NIH-supported Hepatitis B Research Network from 2011 through 2013 and 20 uninfected individuals (controls). Peripheral blood lymphocytes from these subjects were analyzed for T-cell responses (proliferation and production of interferon-γ and interleukin-10) to overlapping hepatitis B virus (HBV) peptides (preS, S, preC, core, and reverse transcriptase), influenza matrix peptides, and lipopolysaccharide. T-cell expression of regulatory markers FOXP3, programmed death-1 (PD1), and cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen-4 (CTLA4) was examined by flow cytometry. Immune measures were compared with clinical parameters, including physician-defined immune-active, immune-tolerant, or inactive CHB phenotypes, in a blinded fashion. Results Compared to controls, patients with CHB had weak T-cell proliferative, interferon-γ, and interleukin-10 responses to HBV, with increased frequency of circulating FOXP3+CD127− regulatory T cells and CD4+ T-cell expression of PD1 and CTLA4. T-cell measures did not clearly distinguish between clinical CHB phenotypes, although the HBV core-specific T-cell response was weaker in HBeAg+ than HBeAg− patients (% responders: 3% vs 23%, P=.00008). Although in vitro blockade of PD1 or CTLA4 increased T-cell responses to HBV, the effect was weaker in HBeAg+ than HBeAg− patients. Furthermore, T-cell responses to influenza and lipopolysaccharide were weaker in CHB patients than controls. Conclusion HBV persists with virus-specific and global T-cell dysfunction mediated by multiple regulatory mechanisms including circulating HBeAg, but without distinct T-cell–based immune signatures for clinical phenotypes. These findings suggest additional T-cell independent or regulatory mechanisms of CHB

  13. “The role of T cell receptor signaling thresholds in guiding T cell fate decisions”

    PubMed Central

    Zikherman, Julie; Au-Yeung, Byron

    2015-01-01

    Canonical T cell receptor signal transduction has been extensively studied and dissected in cell lines and primary lymphocytes. However, a static depiction of this signaling cascade fails to capture the complex and dynamic process by which individual T cells discriminate TCR:peptide-MHC affinity, then integrate signals over time to drive discrete cellular behaviors such as thymic selection, proliferation, and cytokine production. Recent technological advances have made it possible to study complex lymphocyte behavior on a single cell level and are revealing how T cells interpret information about affinity and abundance of antigen in order to make life-and-death cell fate decisions individually and collectively. PMID:25660212

  14. The composition of T cell subtypes in duodenal biopsies are altered in coeliac disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Steenholt, Janni V.; Nielsen, Christian; Baudewijn, Leen; Staal, Anne; Rasmussen, Karina S.; Sabir, Hardee J.; Barington, Torben; Husby, Steffen; Toft-Hansen, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    One of the hallmarks of Celiac disease (CD) is intraepithelial lymphocytosis in the small intestine. Until now, investigations to characterize the T cell subpopulations within the epithelial layer have not discriminated between the heterodimeric co-receptor molecule, CD8αβ, and the possibly immunoregulatory CD8αα homodimer molecule. Besides TCRαβ+ CD4+ cells, no other phenotypes have been shown to be gluten-reactive. Using flow cytometry on lymphocytes from duodenal biopsies, we determined that the number of B cells (CD3- CD19+) and the number of CD3+ CD4- CD8- double-negative (DN) T cells were elevated 6–7 fold in children with CD. We next isolated and quantified intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs) from biopsies obtained from patients (both children and adults) with CD, potential CD and non-CD controls. Flow cytometric analysis of the duodenal T cell subpopulations was performed including the markers TCRαβ, TCRγδ, CD4, CD8α and CD8β. Proportions of γδ T cells and CD8αβ+ cells among IELs were increased in CD patients, whereas proportions of CD4+ CD8αα+ and CD4+ single-positive T cells were decreased. Additionally, two gluten-reactive T cell lines (TCLs) derived from CD biopsies were analyzed for changes in proportions of T cell subsets before and after gluten stimulation. In a proliferation assay, dividing cells were tracked with carboxyfluorescein succinimidyl ester (CFSE), and both αβ and γδ T cells proliferated in response to gluten. Changes in duodenal T cell subpopulations in potential CD patients followed the same pattern as for CD patients, but with less pronounced effect. PMID:28166225

  15. T Cell Maturation Stage Prior to and During GMP Processing Informs on CAR T Cell Expansion in Patients.

    PubMed

    Klaver, Yarne; van Steenbergen, Sabine C L; Sleijfer, Stefan; Debets, Reno; Lamers, Cor H J

    2016-01-01

    Autologous T cells were genetically modified to express a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) directed toward carboxy-anhydrase-IX (CAIX) and used to treat patients with CAIX-positive metastatic renal cell carcinoma. In this study, we questioned whether the T cell maturation stage in the pre-infusion product affected CAIX CAR expression and function in vitro as well as in vivo CAR T cell numbers and expansion. During the 14 days expansion of CAR T cells prior to administration, we observed shifts from a predominant CD4 to a CD8 T cell phenotype and from a significant fraction of naïve to central effector T cells. Surface expression of the CAR was equally distributed among different T cell subsets and T cell maturation stages. During T cell culture days 14-18 (which covered patient treatment days 1-5), T cells demonstrated a decline in CAR expression level per cell irrespective of T cell maturation stage, although the proportion of CAR-positive T cells and CAR-mediated T cell effector functions remained similar for both CD4 and CD8 T cell populations. Notably, patients with a higher fraction of naïve CD8 T cells at baseline (prior to genetic modification) or central effector CD8 T cells at 2 weeks of CAR T cell culture demonstrated a higher fold expansion and absolute numbers of circulating CAR T cells at 1 month after start of therapy. We conclude that the T cell maturation stage prior to and during CAR T cell expansion culture is related to in vivo CAR T cell expansion.

  16. T-cell proliferation and forkhead box P3 expression in human T cells are dependent on T-cell density: physics of a confined space?

    PubMed

    Bernardo, David; Al-Hassi, Hafid O; Mann, Elizabeth R; Tee, Cheng T; Murugananthan, Aravinth U; Peake, Simon T C; Hart, Ailsa L; Knight, Stella C

    2012-03-01

    T-cell proliferation rates in vitro depend on factors including initial T-cell number, dose of stimulus, culture time, and available physical space. The role of forkhead box P3 (FoxP3) in the identification of T cells with a regulatory phenotype remains controversial in humans. Through 5-carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester labeling of human T cells and subsequent culture of different numbers of T cells and antigen-presenting cells (APC), we studied proliferative T-cell responses and FoxP3 expression in divided T cells. T-cell proliferation rates depended on initial T-cell/APC numbers. Proliferation rates decreased when high initial T-cell numbers were increased. FoxP3 expression was expressed exclusively in virtually all divided T cells cultured at high T-cell densities, irrespective of their CD4 nature or cytokine content, and was coexpressed with T-bet. However, when T cells were cultured on larger surfaces or at lower initial numbers, FoxP3 expression was not induced in divided T cells, even when most of the cells had undergone cell division. FoxP3(+) T cells generated at high cell densities did not elicit a suppressive phenotype and FoxP3 expression was subsequently lost in time when the stimulus was removed. Therefore, caution should be observed in the use of FoxP3 expression to identify regulatory T cells in humans because its expression may be only a consequence of activation status in a restricted environment.

  17. gammadelta T cells link innate and adaptive immune responses.

    PubMed

    Holtmeier, Wolfgang; Kabelitz, Dieter

    2005-01-01

    While most T cells use a CD3-associated alpha/beta T cell receptor as antigen recognition structure, a second population of T cells expresses the alternative gamma/delta T cell receptor. gamma/delta T cells are a minor population in the peripheral blood but constitute a major population among intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes. Most gamma/delta T cells recognize ligands which are fundamentally different from the short peptides that are seen by alpha/beta T cells in the context of MHC class I or class II molecules. Thus, human Vdelta2 T cells recognize small bacterial phosphoantigens, alkylamines and synthetic aminobisphosphonates, whereas Vdelta1 T cells recognize stress-inducible MHC-related molecules MICA/B as well as several other ligands. At the functional level, gamma/delta T cells rapidly produce a variety of cytokines and usually exert potent cytotoxic activity, also towards many tumor cells. In this article, we discuss the role of gamma/delta T cells as a bridge between the innate and the adaptive immune system, based on the interpretation that gamma/delta T cells use their T cell receptor as a pattern recognition receptor. Our increasing understanding of the ligand recognition and activation mechanisms of gamma/delta T cells also opens new perspectives for the development of gamma/delta T cell-based immunotherapies.

  18. Mechanism of T-cell mediated protection in newborn mice against a Chlamydia infection.

    PubMed

    Pal, Sukumar; de la Maza, Luis M

    2013-01-01

    To determine the immune components needed for protection of newborn mice against Chlamydia muridarum, animals born to Chlamydia-immunized and to sham-immunized dams were infected intranasally with C. muridarum at 2 post-natal days. T-cells isolated from immunized or sham-immunized adult mice were adoptively transferred to newborn mice at the time of infection. Also, to establish what cytokines are involved in protection, IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-10, and IL-12 were passively transferred to newborn mice. To assess the Chlamydia burden in the lungs mice were euthanized at 12 post-natal days. When T-cells from immunized adult mice were transferred, mice born to and fed by immunized dams were significantly protected as evidenced by the reduced number of Chlamydia isolated from the lungs compared to mice born to and fed by sham-immunized dams. Transfer of IFN-γ and TNF-α also significantly reduced the number of Chlamydia in the lungs of mice born to immunized dams. Transfer of IL-10 or IL-12 did not result in a significant reduction of Chlamydia. In vitro T-cell proliferation data suggest that neonatal antigen presenting cells can present Chlamydia antigens to adult T-cells. In conclusion, maternal antibodies and Chlamydia specific T-cells or Th1 cytokines are required for protection of neonates against this pathogen.

  19. Bax alpha perturbs T cell development and affects cell cycle entry of T cells.

    PubMed Central

    Brady, H J; Gil-Gómez, G; Kirberg, J; Berns, A J

    1996-01-01

    Bax alpha can heterodimerize with Bcl-2 and Bcl-X(L), countering their effects, as well as promoting apoptosis on overexpression. We show that bax alpha transgenic mice have greatly reduced numbers of mature T cells, which results from an impaired positive selection in the thymus. This perturbation in positive selection is accompanied by an increase in the number of cycling thymocytes. Further to this, mature T cells overexpressing Bax alpha have lower levels of p27Kip1 and enter S phase more rapidly in response to interleukin-2 stimulation than do control T cells, while the converse is true of bcl-2 transgenic T cells. These data indicate that apoptotic regulatory proteins can modulate the level of cell cycle-controlling proteins and thereby directly impact on the cell cycle. Images PMID:9003775

  20. Dichotomy between T Cell and B Cell Tolerance to Neonatal Retroviral Infection Permits T Cell Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Mavrommatis, Bettina; Baudino, Lucie; Levy, Prisca; Merkenschlager, Julia; Eksmond, Urszula; Donnarumma, Tiziano; Young, George; Stoye, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Elucidation of the immune requirements for control or elimination of retroviral infection remains an important aim. We studied the induction of adaptive immunity to neonatal infection with a murine retrovirus, under conditions leading to immunological tolerance. We found that the absence of either maternal or offspring adaptive immunity permitted efficient vertical transmission of the retrovirus. Maternal immunodeficiency allowed the retrovirus to induce central Th cell tolerance in the infected offspring. In turn, this compromised the offspring’s ability to mount a protective Th cell–dependent B cell response. However, in contrast to T cells, offspring B cells were not centrally tolerized and retained their ability to respond to the infection when provided with T cell help. Thus, escape of retrovirus-specific B cells from deletional tolerance offers the opportunity to induce protective retroviral immunity by restoration of retrovirus-specific T cell help, suggesting similar T cell immunotherapies for persistent viral infections. PMID:27647833

  1. {gamma}{delta} T cell homeostasis is established in competition with {alpha}{beta} T cells and NK cells.

    PubMed

    French, Jena D; Roark, Christina L; Born, Willi K; O'brien, Rebecca L

    2005-10-11

    gammadelta T cells are a diverse population of lymphocytes that play an important role in immune regulation. The size of the gammadelta T cell pool is tightly regulated, comprising only 1-10% of total lymphoid T cells in mice and humans. We examined the homeostatic regulation of gammadelta T cells using a model of lymphopenia-induced homeostatic expansion. We found that IL-15 and, to a lesser extent, IL-7 play an important role in lymphoid gammadelta T cell homeostasis. Moreover, gammadelta T cell homeostatic expansion was limited not only by gammadelta T cells themselves but also by natural killer cells and alphabeta T cells. Our results suggest that CD8(+) alphabeta T cells are the most potent inhibitors of gammadelta T cell homeostasis and exert their effect by competing for IL-15.

  2. Adoptive T cell immunotherapy for cancer.

    PubMed

    Perica, Karlo; Varela, Juan Carlos; Oelke, Mathias; Schneck, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Harnessing the immune system to recognize and destroy tumor cells has been the central goal of anti-cancer immunotherapy. In recent years, there has been an increased interest in optimizing this technology in order to make it a clinically feasible treatment. One of the main treatment modalities within cancer immunotherapy has been adoptive T cell therapy (ACT). Using this approach, tumor-specific cytotoxic T cells are infused into cancer patients with the goal of recognizing, targeting, and destroying tumor cells. In the current review, we revisit some of the major successes of ACT, the major hurdles that have been overcome to optimize ACT, the remaining challenges, and future approaches to make ACT widely available.

  3. The T Cell Response to Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Bröker, Barbara M.; Mrochen, Daniel; Péton, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is a dangerous pathogen and a leading cause of both nosocomial and community acquired bacterial infection worldwide. However, on the other hand, we are all exposed to this bacterium, often within the first hours of life, and usually manage to establish equilibrium and coexist with it. What does the adaptive immune system contribute toward lifelong control of S. aureus? Will it become possible to raise or enhance protective immune memory by vaccination? While in the past the S. aureus-specific antibody response has dominated this discussion, the research community is now coming to appreciate the role that the cellular arm of adaptive immunity, the T cells, plays. There are numerous T cell subsets, each with differing functions, which together have the ability to orchestrate the immune response to S. aureus and hence to tip the balance between protection and pathology. This review summarizes the state of the art in this dynamic field of research. PMID:26999219

  4. Tr1-Like T Cells – An Enigmatic Regulatory T Cell Lineage

    PubMed Central

    White, Anna Malgorzata; Wraith, David C.

    2016-01-01

    The immune system evolved to respond to foreign invaders and prevent autoimmunity to self-antigens. Several types of regulatory T cells facilitate the latter process. These include a subset of Foxp3− CD4+ T cells able to secrete IL-10 in an antigen-specific manner, type 1 regulatory (Tr1) T cells. Although their suppressive function has been confirmed both in vitro and in vivo, their phenotype remains poorly defined. It has been suggested that the surface markers LAG-3 and CD49b are biomarkers for murine and human Tr1 cells. Here, we discuss these findings in the context of our data regarding the expression pattern of inhibitory receptors (IRs) CD49b, TIM-3, PD-1, TIGIT, LAG-3, and ICOS on Tr1-like human T cells generated in vitro from CD4+ memory T cells stimulated with αCD3 and αCD28 antibodies. We found that there were no differences in IR expression between IL-10+ and IL-10− T cells. However, CD4+IL-10+ T cells isolated ex vivo, following a short stimulation and cytokine secretion assay, contained significantly higher proportions of TIM-3+ and PD-1+ cells. They also expressed significantly higher TIGIT mRNA and showed a trend toward increased TIM-3 mRNA levels. These data led us to conclude that large pools of IRs may be stored intracellularly; hence, they may not represent ideal candidates as cell surface biomarkers for Tr1-like T cells. PMID:27683580

  5. T Cell Receptor Signaling in the Control of Regulatory T Cell Differentiation and Function

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ming O.; Rudensky, Alexander Y.

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (TReg cells), a specialized T cell lineage, have a pivotal function in the control of self-tolerance and inflammatory responses. Recent studies have revealed a discrete mode of TCR signaling that regulates Treg cell differentiation, maintenance and function and that impacts on gene expression, metabolism, cell adhesion and migration of these cells. Here, we discuss the emerging understanding of TCR-guided differentiation of Treg cells in the context of their function in health and disease. PMID:27026074

  6. Pregnancy persistently affects memory T cell populations.

    PubMed

    Kieffer, Tom E C; Faas, Marijke M; Scherjon, Sicco A; Prins, Jelmer R

    2017-02-01

    Pregnancy is an immune challenge to the maternal immune system. The effects of pregnancy on maternal immunity and particularly on memory T cells during and after pregnancy are not fully known. This observational study aims to show the short term and the long term effects of pregnancy on the constitution, size and activation status of peripheral human memory T-lymphocyte populations. Effector memory (EM) and central memory (CM) T-lymphocytes were analyzed using flow cytometry of peripheral blood from 14 nulligravid, 12 primigravid and 15 parous women that were on average 18 months postpartum. The short term effects were shown by the significantly higher CD4+ EM cell and activated CD4+ memory cell proportions in primigravid women compared to nulligravid women. The persistent effects found in this study were the significantly higher proportions of CD4+ EM, CD4+ CM and activated memory T cells in parous women compared to nulligravid women. In contrast to CD4+ cells, activation status of CD8+ memory cells did not differ between the groups. This study shows that pregnancy persistently affects the pre-pregnancy CD4+ memory cell pool in human peripheral blood. During pregnancy, CD4+ T-lymphocytes might differentiate into EM cells followed by persistent higher proportions of CD4+ CM and EM cells postpartum. The persistent effects of pregnancy on memory T cells found in this study support the hypothesis that memory T cells are generated during pregnancy and that these cells could be involved in the lower complication risks in multiparous pregnancies in humans.

  7. Distinct CD4 T-cell effects on primary versus recall CD8 T-cell responses during viral encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Mihyun; Phares, Timothy W; Hinton, David R; Stohlman, Stephen A; Bergmann, Cornelia C; Min, Booki

    2015-01-01

    CD4 T-cell help is not a universal requirement for effective primary CD8 T cells but is essential to generate memory CD8 T cells capable of recall responses. This study examined how CD4 T cells affect primary and secondary anti-viral CD8 T-cell responses within the central nervous system (CNS) during encephalomyelitis induced by sublethal gliatropic coronavirus. CD4 T-cell depletion before infection did not impair peripheral expansion, interferon-γ production, CNS recruitment or initial CNS effector capacity of virus-specific CD8 T cells ex vivo. Nevertheless, impaired virus control in the absence of CD4 T cells was associated with gradually diminished CNS CD8 T-cell interferon-γ production. Furthermore, within the CD8 T-cell population short-lived effector cells were increased and memory precursor effector cells were significantly decreased, consistent with higher T-cell turnover. Transfer of memory CD8 T cells to reduce viral load in CD4-depleted mice reverted the recipient CNS CD8 T-cell phenotype to that in wild-type control mice. However, memory CD8 T cells primed without CD4 T cells and transferred into infected CD4-sufficient recipients expanded less efficiently and were not sustained in the CNS, contrasting with their helped counterparts. These data suggest that CD4 T cells are dispensable for initial expansion, CNS recruitment and differentiation of primary resident memory CD8 T cells as long as the duration of antigen exposure is limited. By contrast, CD4 T cells are essential to prolong primary CD8 T-cell function in the CNS and imprint memory CD8 T cells for recall responses. PMID:25187405

  8. Inducible T-cell receptor expression in precursor T-cells for leukemia control

    PubMed Central

    Hoseini, Shahabuddin S; Hapke, Martin; Herbst, Jessica; Wedekind, Dirk; Baumann, Rolf; Heinz, Niels; Schiedlmeier, Bernhard; Vignali, Dario AA; van den Brink, Marcel R.M.; Schambach, Axel; Blazar, Bruce R.; Sauer, Martin G.

    2015-01-01

    Co-transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells with those engineered to express leukemia-reactive T cell receptors (TCRs) and differentiated ex vivo into precursor T cells (preTs) may reduce the risk of leukemia relapse. Since expression of potentially self-(leukemia-) reactive TCRs will lead to negative selection or provoke autoimmunity upon thymic maturation, we investigated a novel concept whereby TCR expression set under the control of an inducible promoter would allow timely controlled TCR expression. After in vivo maturation and gene induction, preTs developed potent anti-leukemia effects. Engineered preTs provided protection even after repeated leukemia challenges by giving rise to effector and central memory cells. Importantly, adoptive transfer of TCR-transduced allogeneic preTs mediated anti-leukemia effect without evoking graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Earlier transgene induction forced CD8+ T cell development, was required to obtain a mature T cell subset of targeted specificity, allowed engineered T cells to efficiently pass positive selection and abrogated the endogenous T cell repertoire. Later induction favored CD4 differentiation and failed to produce a leukemia-reactive population emphasizing the dominant role of positive selection. Taken together, we provide new functional insights for the employment of TCR-engineered precursor cells as a controllable immunotherapeutic modality with significant anti-leukemia activity. PMID:25652739

  9. Loss of Functionally Redundant p38 Isoforms in T Cells Enhances Regulatory T Cell Induction*

    PubMed Central

    Hayakawa, Morisada; Hayakawa, Hiroko; Petrova, Tsvetana; Ritprajak, Patcharee; Sutavani, Ruhcha V.; Jiménez-Andrade, Guillermina Yanek; Sano, Yasuyo; Choo, Min-Kyung; Seavitt, John; Venigalla, Ram K. C.; Otsu, Kinya; Georgopoulos, Katia; Arthur, J. Simon C.; Park, Jin Mo

    2017-01-01

    The evolutionarily conserved protein kinase p38 mediates innate resistance to environmental stress and microbial infection. Four p38 isoforms exist in mammals and may have been co-opted for new roles in adaptive immunity. Murine T cells deficient in p38α, the ubiquitously expressed p38 isoform, showed no readily apparent cell-autonomous defects while expressing elevated amounts of another isoform, p38β. Mice with T cells simultaneously lacking p38α and p38β displayed lymphoid atrophy and elevated Foxp3+ regulatory T cell frequencies. Double deficiency of p38α and p38β in naïve CD4+ T cells resulted in an attenuation of MAPK-activated protein kinase (MK)-dependent mTOR signaling after T cell receptor engagement, and enhanced their differentiation into regulatory T cells under appropriate inducing conditions. Pharmacological inhibition of the p38-MK-mTOR signaling module produced similar effects, revealing potential for therapeutic applications. PMID:28011639

  10. SNX17 Affects T Cell Activation by Regulating T Cell Receptor and Integrin Recycling

    PubMed Central

    Osborne, Douglas G.; Piotrowski, Joshua T.; Dick, Christopher J.; Zhang, Jin-San; Billadeau, Daniel D.

    2015-01-01

    A key component in T cell activation is the endosomal recycling of receptors to the cell surface, thereby allowing continual integration of signaling and antigen recognition. One protein potentially involved in T cell receptor transport is sorting nexin 17 (SNX17). SNX proteins have been found to bind proteins involved in T cell activation, but specifically the role of SNX17 in receptor recycling and T cell activation is unknown. Using immunofluorescence, we find that SNX17 co-localizes with TCR and localizes to the immune synapse in T-APC conjugates. Significantly, knockdown of the SNX17 resulted in fewer T-APC conjugates, lower CD69, TCR, and LFA-1 surface expression, as well as lower overall TCR recycling compared to control T cells. Lastly, we identified the FERM-domain of SNX17 as being responsible in the binding and trafficking of TCR and LFA-1 to the cell surface. These data suggest that SNX17 plays a role in the maintenance of normal surface levels of activating receptors and integrins to permit optimum T cell activation at the immune synapse. PMID:25825439

  11. More aggressive cartoons are funnier.

    PubMed

    McCauley, C; Woods, K; Coolidge, C; Kulick, W

    1983-04-01

    Independent rankings of humor and aggressiveness were obtained for sets of cartoons drawn randomly from two different magazines. The correlation of median humor and median aggressiveness rankings ranged from .49 to .90 in six studies involving six different sets of cartoons and six different groups of subjects, including children and adults, high and low socioeconomic status (SES) individuals, and native- and foreign-born individuals. This correlation is consistent with Freudian, arousal, and superiority theories of humor. Another prediction of Freudian theory, that high-SES subjects should be more appreciative of aggressive humor than low-SES subjects, was not supported.

  12. Human T Cell Memory: A Dynamic View

    PubMed Central

    Macallan, Derek C.; Borghans, José A. M.; Asquith, Becca

    2017-01-01

    Long-term T cell-mediated protection depends upon the formation of a pool of memory cells to protect against future pathogen challenge. In this review we argue that looking at T cell memory from a dynamic viewpoint can help in understanding how memory populations are maintained following pathogen exposure or vaccination. For example, a dynamic view resolves the apparent paradox between the relatively short lifespans of individual memory cells and very long-lived immunological memory by focussing on the persistence of clonal populations, rather than individual cells. Clonal survival is achieved by balancing proliferation, death and differentiation rates within and between identifiable phenotypic pools; such pools correspond broadly to sequential stages in the linear differentiation pathway. Each pool has its own characteristic kinetics, but only when considered as a population; single cells exhibit considerable heterogeneity. In humans, we tend to concentrate on circulating cells, but memory T cells in non-lymphoid tissues and bone marrow are increasingly recognised as critical for immune defence; their kinetics, however, remain largely unexplored. Considering vaccination from this viewpoint shifts the focus from the size of the primary response to the survival of the clone and enables identification of critical system pinch-points and opportunities to improve vaccine efficacy. PMID:28165397

  13. T cell immunoregulation in active ocular toxoplasmosis.

    PubMed

    Cordeiro, Cynthia A; Vieira, Erica L M; Castro, Vinicius M; Dutra, Walderez O; Costa, Rogerio A; Orefice, Juliana L; Campos, Wesley R; Orefice, Fernando; Young, Lucy H; Teixeira, Antonio Lucio

    2017-04-01

    Toxoplasma gondii infection is an important cause of infectious ocular disease. The physiopathology of retinochoroidal lesions associated with this infection is not completely understood. The present study was undertaken to investigate cytokine production by T cells from individuals with active toxoplasmic retinochoroiditis (TR) comparing with controls. Eighteen patients with active TR and 15 healthy controls (6 controls IgG(+) to Toxoplasma and 9 negative controls) were included in the study. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were incubated in the presence or absence of T. gondii antigen (STAg), and stained against CD4, CD8, TNF, IL-10 and IFN-γ. Baseline expression of cytokines was higher in TR/IgG(+) patients in comparison with controls. Cytokine expression was not increased by STAg in vitro stimulation in controls. After stimulation, TR/IgG(+) patients' lymphocytes increased cytokine as compared to cultures from both controls. While T cells were the main source of IL-10, but also IFN-γ and TNF, other lymphocyte populations were relevant source of inflammatory cytokines. Interestingly, it was observed a negative correlation between ocular lesion size and IL-10 expression by CD4(+) lymphocytes. This study showed that T cells are the main lymphocyte populations expressing IL-10 in patients with TR. Moreover, expression of IL-10 plays a protective role in active TR.

  14. Human T Cell Memory: A Dynamic View.

    PubMed

    Macallan, Derek C; Borghans, José A M; Asquith, Becca

    2017-02-04

    Long-term T cell-mediated protection depends upon the formation of a pool of memory cells to protect against future pathogen challenge. In this review we argue that looking at T cell memory from a dynamic viewpoint can help in understanding how memory populations are maintained following pathogen exposure or vaccination. For example, a dynamic view resolves the apparent paradox between the relatively short lifespans of individual memory cells and very long-lived immunological memory by focussing on the persistence of clonal populations, rather than individual cells. Clonal survival is achieved by balancing proliferation, death and differentiation rates within and between identifiable phenotypic pools; such pools correspond broadly to sequential stages in the linear differentiation pathway. Each pool has its own characteristic kinetics, but only when considered as a population; single cells exhibit considerable heterogeneity. In humans, we tend to concentrate on circulating cells, but memory T cells in non-lymphoid tissues and bone marrow are increasingly recognised as critical for immune defence; their kinetics, however, remain largely unexplored. Considering vaccination from this viewpoint shifts the focus from the size of the primary response to the survival of the clone and enables identification of critical system pinch-points and opportunities to improve vaccine efficacy.

  15. T-cell identity and epigenetic memory

    PubMed Central

    Rothenberg, Ellen V.; Zhang, Jingli

    2013-01-01

    Summary T cell development endows cells with a flexible range of effector differentiation options, superimposed on a stable core of lineage-specific gene expression that is maintained while access to alternative hematopoietic lineages is permanently renounced. This combination of features could be explained by environmentally responsive transcription factor mobilization overlaying an epigenetically stabilized base gene expression state. For example, “poising” of promoters could offer preferential access to T-cell genes, while repressive histone modifications and DNA methylation of non-T regulatory genes could be responsible for keeping non-T developmental options closed. Here we critically review the evidence for the actual deployment of epigenetic marking to support the stable aspects of T-cell identity. Much of epigenetic marking is dynamically maintained or subject to rapid modification by local action of transcription factors. Repressive histone marks are used in gene-specific ways that do not fit a simple, developmental lineage-exclusion hierarchy. We argue that epigenetic analysis may achieve its greatest impact for illuminating regulatory biology when it is used to locate cis-regulatory elements by catching them in the act of mediating regulatory change. PMID:21833836

  16. Evolution of two prototypic T cell lineages

    PubMed Central

    Das, Sabyasachi; Li, Jianxu; Hirano, Masayuki; Sutoh, Yoichi; Herrin, Brantley R.; Cooper, Max D.

    2015-01-01

    Jawless vertebrates, which occupy a unique position in chordate phylogeny, employ leucine-rich repeat (LRR)-based variable lymphocyte receptors (VLR) for antigen recognition. During the assembly of the VLR genes (VLRA, VLRB and VLRC), donor LRR-encoding sequences are copied in a step-wise manner into the incomplete germ-line genes. The assembled VLR genes are differentially expressed by discrete lymphocyte lineages: VLRA- and VLRC-producing cells are T-cell like, whereas VLRB-producing cells are B-cell like. VLRA+ and VLRC+ lymphocytes resemble the two principal T-cell lineages of jawed vertebrates that express the αβ or γδ T-cell receptors (TCR). Reminiscent of the interspersed nature of the TCRα/TCRδ locus in jawed vertebrates, the close proximity of the VLRA and VLRC loci facilitates sharing of donor LRR sequences during VLRA and VLRC assembly. Here we discuss the insight these findings provide into vertebrate T- and B-cell evolution, and the alternative types of anticipatory receptors they use for adaptive immunity. PMID:25958271

  17. Accumulation of cytolytic CD8{sup +} T cells in B16-melanoma and proliferation of mature T cells in TIS21-knockout mice after T cell receptor stimulation

    SciTech Connect

    Ryu, Min Sook; Woo, Min-Yeong; Kwon, Daeho; Hong, Allen E.; Song, Kye Yong; Park, Sun; Lim, In Kyoung

    2014-10-01

    In vivo and in vitro effects of TIS21 gene on the mature T cell activation and antitumor activities were explored by employing MO5 melanoma orthograft and splenocytes isolated from the TIS21-knockout (KO) mice. Proliferation and survival of mature T cells were significantly increased in the KO than the wild type (WT) cells, indicating that TIS21 inhibits the rate of mature T cell proliferation and its survival. In MO5 melanoma orthograft model, the KO mice recruited much more CD8{sup +} T cells into the tumors at around day 14 after tumor cell injection along with reduced tumor volumes compared with the WT. The increased frequency of granzyme B{sup +} CD8{sup +} T cells in splenocytes of the KO mice compared with the WT may account for antitumor-immunity of TIS21 gene in the melanoma orthograft. In contrast, reduced frequencies of CD107a{sup +} CD8{sup +} T cells in the splenocytes of KO mice may affect the loss of CD8{sup +} T cell infiltration in the orthograft at around day 19. These results indicate that TIS21 exhibits antiproliferative and proapoptotic effects in mature T cells, and differentially affects the frequencies of granzyme B{sup +} CD8{sup +} T-cells and CD107a{sup +} CD8{sup +} T-cells, thus transiently regulating in vivo anti-tumor immunity. - Highlights: • Constitutive expression of TIS21 in splenocytes and upregulation by TCR stimulation. • Proliferation of mature T-cells in spleen of TIS21KO mice after TCR stimulation. • Inhibition of cell death in mature T-cells of TIS21KO mice compared with the wild type. • Inhibition of melanoma growth in TIS21KO mice and CD8{sup +} T cell infiltration in tumor. • Reduction of CD 107{sup +}CD8{sup +} T cells, but increased granzyme B{sup +} CD8{sup +} T cells in TIS21KO mice.

  18. Critical influence of the thymus on peripheral T cell homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Vianna, Pedro Henrique Oliveira; Canto, Fábio B.; Nogueira, Jeane S.; Nunes, Caroline Fraga Cabral Gomes; Bonomo, Adriana César

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction A tight balance between regulatory CD4+Foxp3+ (Treg) and conventional CD4+Foxp3− (Tconv) T cell subsets in the peripheral compartment, maintained stable throughout most of lifetime, is essential for preserving self‐tolerance along with efficient immune responses. An excess of Treg cells, described for aged individuals, may critically contribute to their reported immunodeficiency. In this work, we investigated if quantitative changes in thymus emigration may alter the Treg/Tconv homeostasis regardless of the aging status of the peripheral compartment. Methods We used two different protocols to modify the rate of thymus emigration: thymectomy of adult young (4–6 weeks old) mice and grafting of young thymus onto aged (18 months old) hosts. Additionally, lymphoid cells from young and aged B6 mice were intravenously transferred to B6.RAG2−/− mice. Alterations in Treg and Tconv peripheral frequencies following these protocols were investigated after 30 days by flow cytometry. Results Thymectomized young mice presented a progressive increase in the Treg cell frequency, while the grafting of a functional thymus in aged mice restored the young‐like physiological Treg/Tconv proportion. Strikingly, T cells derived from young or aged splenocytes colonized the lymphopenic periphery of RAG−/− hosts to the same extent, giving rise to similarly elevated Treg cell levels irrespective of the age of the donor population. In the absence of thymus output, the Treg subset seems to survive longer, as confirmed by their lower proportion of Annexin‐V+ cells. Conclusions Our data suggest that the thymus‐emigrating population, harboring an adequate proportion of Treg/Tconv lymphocytes, may be essential to keep the Treg cell balance, independently of age‐related shifts intrinsic to the peripheral environment or to the T cell biology. PMID:27980781

  19. Functional characterization of prethymic T cells committed to alloreactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Blank, M.; Gronau, C.; Sauer, M.; Wottge, H.U.; Mueller-Ruchholtz, W.

    1986-06-01

    The results of previous experiments on MHC fully allogenic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) in nonthymectomizd recipients indicated that anti-MHC alloreactivity starts to become irreversibly committed at the prethymic level. This is a matter of some controversy. Since it is possible that conflicting results depend on the methods chosen, we reexamined our previous results by applying two new approaches. Adult thymectomized (ATX) Balb/c mice received a syngeneic fetal thymus either 3 weeks before or 3 weeks after lethal irradiation and reconstitution with C57BL/6 BM incubated in antiserum. Since monoclonal antibodies such as anti-Thy 1 are of limited value for investigations of the above type (Thy 1 antigen crosses the prethymic/thymic border), we used two highly selective, excessively cytotoxic xenoantisera for incubation of the donor BM--either a specific anti-T cell serum (SAT) that eliminated only mature T cells, or a specific antilymphocyte serum (SAL) that reacted additionally with a subset of prethymic T cells (PTC). In both experimental approaches the results were similar: Recipients of SAT-BM developed antihost reactivity, in contrast to recipients of SAL-BM. SAT-BM recipients became immunodeficient, whereas SAL-BM chimeras were immunocompetent. Late mortality was observed only following SAT treatment. Preliminary morphological findings in the lymphoid tissue of BM recipients agree fully with the functional observations. We conclude that the data confirm our previous results in nonthymectomized BM recipients--i.e., PTCs initiate antihost reactivity in MHC fully allogeneic BMT--and PTC commitment is thymus/thymus factor independent. These conclusions are discussed with regard to the problems of MHC allogeneic clinical BMT.

  20. A minimum number of autoimmune T cells to induce autoimmunity?

    PubMed

    Bosch, Angela J T; Bolinger, Beatrice; Keck, Simone; Stepanek, Ondrej; Ozga, Aleksandra J; Galati-Fournier, Virginie; Stein, Jens V; Palmer, Ed

    2017-03-12

    While autoimmune T cells are present in most individuals, only a minority of the population suffers from an autoimmune disease. To better appreciate the limits of T cell tolerance, we carried out experiments to determine how many autoimmune T cells are required to initiate an experimental autoimmune disease. Variable numbers of autoimmune OT-I T cells were transferred into RIP-OVA mice, which were injected with antigen-loaded DCs in a single footpad; this restricted T cell priming to a few OT-I T cells that are present in the draining popliteal lymph node. Using selective plane illumination microscopy (SPIM) we counted the number of OT-I T cells present in the popliteal lymph node at the time of priming. Analysis of our data suggests that a single autoimmune T cell cannot induce an experimental autoimmune disease, but a "quorum" of 2-5 autoimmune T cells clearly has this capacity.

  1. Intravenous immunoglobulin treatment responsiveness depends on the degree of CD8+ T cell activation in Kawasaki disease.

    PubMed

    Ye, Qing; Gong, Fang-Qi; Shang, Shi-Qiang; Hu, Jian

    2016-10-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) has become the most common cause of acquired heart disease in children and is also a risk factor for ischemic heart disease in adults. However, Kawasaki disease lacks specific laboratory diagnostic indices. Thus, this study analyzed the T cell activation profiles of Kawasaki disease and assessed their value in the diagnosis of Kawasaki disease and the prediction of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) sensitivity. We analyzed human leukocyte antigen-DR (HLA-DR), CD69 and CD25 expression on peripheral blood CD4+ and CD8+ T cells during the acute phase of KD. We compared the percentages of HLA-DR+/CD69+/CD25+ T cells in the CD4+ and CD8+ T cell populations of IVIG-effective and IVIG-resistant groups. Receiver operating characteristic curves were used to assess the diagnostic value of the above parameters. The median percentage of CD8+HLA-DR+ T cells and the median ratio of CD8+HLA-DR+ T cells/CD8+CD25+ T cells were significantly elevated in the patient group compared with those in the control group during the acute phase of KD. Regarding the diagnosis of Kawasaki disease, the area under the ROC curve was 0.939 for the percentage of CD8+HLA-DR+ T cells. There was a significant difference in the ratio of CD8+HLA-DR+ T cells/CD8+CD69+ T cells between IVIG-resistant patients and IVIG-sensitive patients. Regarding IVIG sensitivity, the area under the ROC curve was 0.795 for it. Excessive CD8+ T cell activation, as well as an imbalance between CD8+ T cell activation and inhibition, underlies the pathogenesis of Kawasaki disease. The percentage of CD8+ HLA-DR+ T cells may be used as an index to diagnose Kawasaki disease. IVIG inhibits CD8+ T cell activation, but excessive CD8+ T cell activation may cause IVIG resistance. The ratio of CD8+HLA-DR+ T cells/CD8+CD69+ T cells may be used as a predictor of IVIG sensitivity.

  2. Nutrient and Metabolic Sensing in T Cell Responses

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Jun; Raynor, Jana; Nguyen, Thanh-Long M.; Chi, Hongbo

    2017-01-01

    T cells play pivotal roles in shaping host immune responses in infectious diseases, autoimmunity, and cancer. The activation of T cells requires immune and growth factor-derived signals. However, alterations in nutrients and metabolic signals tune T cell responses by impinging upon T cell fates and immune functions. In this review, we summarize how key nutrients, including glucose, amino acids, and lipids, and their sensors and transporters shape T cell responses. We also briefly discuss regulation of T cell responses by oxygen and energy sensing mechanisms. PMID:28337199

  3. Nylon wool purification alters the activation of T cells.

    PubMed

    Wohler, Jillian E; Barnum, Scott R

    2009-02-01

    Purification of lymphocytes, particularly T cells, is commonly performed using nylon wool. This enrichment method selectively retains B cells and some myeloid cells allowing a significantly more pure T cell population to flow through a nylon wool column. T cells purified in this fashion are assumed to be unaltered and functionally naïve, however some studies have suggested aberrant in vitro T cell responses after nylon wool treatment. We found that nylon wool purification significantly altered T cell proliferation, expression of activation markers and production of cytokines. Our results suggest that nylon wool treatment modifies T cell activation responses and that caution should be used when choosing this purification method.

  4. Vorinostat, Rituximab, Ifosfamide, Carboplatin, and Etoposide in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Lymphoma or Previously Untreated T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma or Mantle Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-09-02

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage II Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  5. WT1-specific T cell receptor gene therapy: improving TCR function in transduced T cells.

    PubMed

    Stauss, Hans J; Thomas, Sharyn; Cesco-Gaspere, Michela; Hart, Daniel P; Xue, Shao-An; Holler, Angelika; King, Judy; Wright, Graham; Perro, Mario; Pospori, Constantina; Morris, Emma

    2008-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of antigen-specific T lymphocytes is an attractive form of immunotherapy for haematological malignancies and cancer. The difficulty of isolating antigen-specific T lymphocytes for individual patients limits the more widespread use of adoptive T cell therapy. The demonstration that cloned T cell receptor (TCR) genes can be used to produce T lymphocyte populations of desired specificity offers new opportunities for antigen-specific T cell therapy. The first trial in humans demonstrated that TCR gene-modified T cells persisted for an extended time period and reduced tumor burden in some patients. The WT1 protein is an attractive target for immunotherapy of leukemia and solid cancer since elevated expression has been demonstrated in AML, CML, MDS and in breast, colon and ovarian cancer. In the past, we have isolated high avidity CTL specific for a WT1-derived peptide presented by HLA-A2 and cloned the TCR alpha and beta genes of a WT1-specific CTL line. The genes were inserted into retroviral vectors for transduction of human peripheral blood T lymphocytes of leukemia patients and normal donors. The treatment of leukemia-bearing NOD/SCID mice with T cells transduced with the WT1-specific TCR eliminated leukemia cells in the bone marrow of most mice, while treatment with T cells transduced with a TCR of irrelevant specificity did not diminish the leukemia burden. In order to improve the safety and efficacy of TCR gene therapy, we have developed lentiviral TCR gene transfer. In addition, we employed strategies to enhance TCR expression while avoiding TCR mis-pairing. It may be possible to generate dominant TCR constructs that can suppress the expression of the endogenous TCR on the surface of transduced T cells. The development of new TCR gene constructs holds great promise for the safe and effective delivery of TCR gene therapy for the treatment of malignancies.

  6. Expression of HTLV-1 Genes in T-Cells Using RNA Electroporation.

    PubMed

    Manicone, Mariangela; Rende, Francesca; Cavallari, Ilaria; Thoma-Kress, Andrea K; Ciminale, Vincenzo

    2017-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) infects about 20 million people world-wide. Around 5% of the infected individuals develop adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) or a neurological disease termed tropical spastic paraparesis (TSP) after a clinical latency of years to decades. Through the use of two promoters and alternative splicing HTLV-1 expresses at least 12 different proteins. HTLV-1 establishes a life-long persistent infection by inducing the clonal expansion of infected cells, a property largely ascribed to the viral genes Tax and HBZ. However, the fact that ATL arises in a minority of infected individuals after a long clinical latency suggests the existence of factors counterbalancing the oncogenic potential of HTLV-1 in the context of natural infection.To study the role of the different HTLV-1 gene products in the HTLV-1 life cycle, we optimized a transfection protocol for primary T-cells using an approach based on the electroporation of in vitro-transcribed RNA. Results showed that the RNA transfection technique combines a high transfection efficiency with low toxicity, not only in Jurkat T-cells but also in primary T-cells. These findings suggest that RNA electroporation is preferable for experiments aimed at investigating the role of HTLV-1 gene products in the context of primary T-cells, which represent the main target of HTLV-1 in vivo.

  7. Immunological identification of human T cells intracranially and tracing of neuronal projections by magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kornguth, S.; Turski, P.; Perman, W.; Kalinke, T.; Reale, R.; Schultz, R.

    1986-05-01

    This report describes the preparation and utilization of paramagnetically labelled proteins to trace neural projections in vivo, and to distinguish between human T cells and bovine T cells implanted into canine brain. The proteins are covalently coupled to the chelator (DTPA), then labelled with gadolinium and visualized in vivo by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques. Gadolinium labelled horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was injected into the auditory cortex of adult cats (1-7 ..mu..1 containing 50 ..mu..g HRP per ..mu..1) and 48-72 hours later the brain was imaged by MRI. The HRP was labelled with an average of 20 DTPA per HRP. MRI unambiguously identified the HRP injection sites and the sites of neural projections in the medical geniculate body (MGB). MGB localization of HRP-Gd was confirmed histologically demonstrating that MRI can distinguish between paramagnetically labelled protein and local environment effects in the brain (i.e. gray vs white matter). Two monoclonal antibodies against human T cells were labelled with gadolinium. The distinguished by MRI, human from bovine T cells implanted into canine brains (each implant contained 10 million cells in 40 ..mu..1). The T1 weighted and calculated images readily identified the human T cells as a lesion of <4 mm while the bovine T cells did not yield a significant MRI signal. The ratio of DTPA to protein during the coupling procedure, affects the formation of protein aggregates by crosslinking.

  8. Regulatory T Cells Are Critical for Clearing Influenza A Virus in Neonatal Mice

    PubMed Central

    Oliphant, Samantha; Lines, J. Louise; Hollifield, Melissa L.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We previously reported that neonatal mice infected with influenza A virus (IAV) develop interstitial pneumonia characterized by reduced lung cytokine and chemokine responses. The failure of T cells to infiltrate the airways of neonates correlated with delayed clearance of sublethal IAV infections compared to adults. We hypothesized that negative regulators in the neonatal lungs such as cytokines or T regulatory (Treg) cells are responsible for these differences. Neonates either deficient in interleukin-10 (IL-10) or with T cells unresponsive to transforming growth factor-β signaling due to absence of SMAD family member 4 (Smad4) had similar IAV clearance kinetics to wild-type pups and no difference in T-cell responses. In contrast, functional depletion of Treg cells with anti-CD25 monoclonal antibody resulted in increased proportions of activated CD4+ T cells in the lungs, but failure to clear IAV. Similarly, scurfy pups (mutation in forkhead box P3 [Foxp3] rendering them deficient in Treg cells) had increased proportions of activated T cells in the lungs compared to littermate controls. Scurfy pups also had increased proportions of IL-13-producing CD4+ T cells. Interestingly, like anti-CD25-treated pups, scurfy pups had significantly elevated viral loads compared to controls. Based on these data, we conclude that Tregs are critical for clearance of IAV in neonatal mice. PMID:26501792

  9. T cells targeting NY-ESO-1 demonstrate efficacy against disseminated neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Singh, Nathan; Kulikovskaya, Irina; Barrett, David M; Binder-Scholl, Gwendolyn; Jakobsen, Bent; Martinez, Daniel; Pawel, Bruce; June, Carl H; Kalos, Michael D; Grupp, Stephan A

    The cancer-testis antigen NY-ESO-1 is expressed by many solid tumors and has limited expression by mature somatic tissues, making it a highly attractive target for tumor immunotherapy. Targeting NY-ESO-1 using engineered T cells has demonstrated clinical efficacy in the treatment of some adult tumors. Neuroblastoma is a significant cause of cancer mortality in children, and is a tumor type shown to be responsive to immunotherapies. We evaluated a large panel of primarily resected neuroblastoma samples and demonstrated that 23% express NY-ESO-1. After confirming antigen-specific activity of T cells genetically engineered to express an NY-ESO-1 directed high-affinity transgenic T cell receptor in vitro, we performed xenograft mouse studies assessing the efficacy of NY-ESO-1-targeted T cells in both localized and disseminated models of neuroblastoma. Disease responses were monitored by tumor volume measurement and in vivo bioluminescence. After delivery of NY-ESO-1 transgenic TCR T cells, we observed significant delay of tumor progression in mice bearing localized and disseminated neuroblastoma, as well as enhanced animal survival. These data demonstrate that NY-ESO-1 is an antigen target in neuroblastoma and that targeted T cells represent a potential therapeutic option for patients with neuroblastoma.

  10. CD19-Targeted CAR T Cells: A New Tool in the Fight against B Cell Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Miller, Brian C; Maus, Marcela V

    2015-01-01

    Adoptive cell immunotherapy is a novel tool in the fight against cancer. Serving both effector and memory functions for the immune system, T cells make an obvious candidate for adoptive cell immunotherapy. By modifying native T cells with a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR), these cells can theoretically be targeted against any extracellular antigen. To date, the best-studied and clinically validated CAR T cells recognize CD19, a cell surface molecule on B cells and B cell malignancies. These CD19-directed T cells have shown clinical utility in chronic lymphocytic leukemia, acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), and non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, with some patients achieving long-term disease remissions after treatment. This review will briefly summarize the current data supporting the use of adoptively transferred CAR T cells for the treatment of CD19-positive malignancies. Given these exciting results, the Food and Drug Administration has granted a 'breakthrough' designation for several variations of CD19-directed CAR T cells for treatment of adult and pediatric relapsed/refractory ALL.

  11. TCR signal strength controls thymic differentiation of discrete proinflammatory γδ T cell subsets

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Ruiz, Miguel; Ribot, Julie C.; Grosso, Ana R.; Gonçalves-Sousa, Natacha; Pamplona, Ana; Pennington, Daniel J.; Regueiro, José R.

    2016-01-01

    The murine thymus produces discrete γδ T cell subsets making either interferon-γ (IFN--γ) or interleukin 17 (IL-17), but the role of the TCR in this developmental process remains controversial. Here we show that mice haploinsufficient for both Cd3g and Cd3d (CD3DH, for CD3 double haploinsufficient) have reduced TCR expression and signaling strength selectively on γδ T cells. CD3DH mice had normal numbers and phenotype of αβ thymocyte subsets but impaired differentiation of fetal Vγ6+ (but not Vγ4+) IL-17-producing γδ T cells and a marked depletion of IFN-γ-producing CD122+ NK1.1+ γδ T cells throughout ontogeny. Adult CD3DH mice showed reduced peripheral IFN-γ+ γδ T cells and were resistant to experimental cerebral malaria. Thus, TCR signal strength within specific thymic developmental windows is a major determinant of the generation of proinflammatory γδ T cell subsets and their impact on pathophysiology. PMID:27043412

  12. Histopathology and immunohistochemistry of peripheral T cell lymphomas: a proposal for their classification.

    PubMed Central

    Suchi, T; Lennert, K; Tu, L Y; Kikuchi, M; Sato, E; Stansfeld, A G; Feller, A C

    1987-01-01

    Based on the results of histological and immunohistochemical observations of a large number of peripheral T cell lymphomas from China, England, Germany and Japan, histological and cytological morphology were correlated with immunophenotype, aetiological association with HTLV-1, and clinical behaviour to produce a working classification of the T cell lymphomas. This classification, based mainly on cytological criteria, divides the peripheral T cell lymphomas into tumours of low grade and high grade malignancy. Adult T cell lymphoma/leukaemia (ATLL) is caused by HTLV-1 and belongs chiefly to the high grade category. Some tumours are characterised by an admixture of other cells (epithelioid cells, follicular dendritic cells, etc) and structures (high endothelial venules, follicles), which may indicate the secretion of lymphokines by the tumour cells. Clear cells seem to be specific for T cell lymphomas and may occur in various types of peripheral T cell lymphoma. Images Fig 1 Fig 2 Fig 3 Fig 4 Fig 5 Fig 6 Fig 7 Fig 8 Fig 9 Fig 10 Fig 11 Fig 12 Fig 13 Fig 14 Fig 15 PMID:3312308

  13. Alisertib in Combination With Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Recurrent Hodgkin Lymphoma, B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, or Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-26

    Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-Cell Lymphoma; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Cutaneous B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma of Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-Cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Lymphomatous Involvement of Non-Cutaneous Extranodal Site; Mature T-Cell and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides and Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestinal Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; T-Cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  14. Type 1 diabetes immunotherapy using polyclonal regulatory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Bluestone, Jeffrey A.; Buckner, Jane H.; Fitch, Mark; Gitelman, Stephen E.; Gupta, Shipra; Hellerstein, Marc K.; Herold, Kevan C.; Lares, Angela; Lee, Michael R.; Li, Kevin; Liu, Weihong; Long, S. Alice; Masiello, Lisa M.; Nguyen, Vinh; Putnam, Amy L.; Rieck, Mary; Sayre, Peter; Tang, Qizhi

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disease that occurs in genetically susceptible individuals. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) have been shown to be defective in the autoimmune disease setting. Thus, efforts to repair or replace Tregs in T1D may reverse autoimmunity and protect the remaining insulin-producing β cells. On the basis of this premise, a robust technique has been developed to isolate and expand Tregs from patients with T1D. The expanded Tregs retained their T cell receptor diversity and demonstrated enhanced functional activity. We report on a phase 1 trial to assess safety of Treg adoptive immunotherapy in T1D. Fourteen adult subjects with T1D, in four dosing cohorts, received ex vivo–expanded autologous CD4+CD127lo/−CD25+ polyclonal Tregs (0.05 × 108 to 26 × 108 cells). A subset of the adoptively transferred Tregs was long-lived, with up to 25% of the peak level remaining in the circulation at 1 year after transfer. Immune studies showed transient increases in Tregs in recipients and retained a broad Treg FOXP3+CD4+CD25hiCD127lo phenotype long-term. There were no infusion reactions or cell therapy–related high-grade adverse events. C-peptide levels persisted out to 2+ years after transfer in several individuals. These results support the development of a phase 2 trial to test efficacy of the Treg therapy. PMID:26606968

  15. Lactose inhibits regulatory T-cell-mediated suppression of effector T-cell interferon-γ and IL-17 production.

    PubMed

    Paasela, Monika; Kolho, Kaija-Leena; Vaarala, Outi; Honkanen, Jarno

    2014-12-14

    Our interest in lactose as an immunomodulatory molecule results from studies showing that lactose binds to galectin-9, which has been shown to have various regulatory functions in the immune system including regulation of T-cell responses. Impaired regulation of T helper (Th)1 and Th17 type immune responses and dysfunction of regulatory T cells (Treg) have been implicated in many human immune-mediated diseases. In the present study, we investigated the effects of lactose on immune regulation using co-cultures of human peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC)-derived Treg and effector T cells (Teff) obtained from twenty healthy adults. Treg, i.e. CD4+CD25+CD127-, were isolated from PBMC by immunomagnetic separation. The fraction of CD4+CD127- cells that was depleted of CD25+ cells was used as Teff. Treg and Teff at a ratio 1:5 were activated and the effects of lactose on the secretion of interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and IL-17 were analysed using ELISA for protein and quantitative RT-PCR for mRNA. Treg down-regulated the secretion of both IFN-γ (8.8-3.9 ng/ml, n 20, P= 0.003) and IL-17 (0.83-0.64 ng/ml, n 15, P= 0.04) in co-cultures, while in the presence of lactose the levels of secreted IFN-γ and IL-17 remained high and no down-regulation was observed (16.4 v. 3.99 ng/ml, n 20, P< 0.0001, and 0.74 v. 0.64 ng/ml, n 15, P= 0.005, respectively). We showed that lactose inhibits human Treg-mediated suppression of Th1 and Th17 immune responses in vitro.

  16. Aggression on inpatient units: Clinical characteristics and consequences.

    PubMed

    Renwick, Laoise; Stewart, Duncan; Richardson, Michelle; Lavelle, Mary; James, Karen; Hardy, Claire; Price, Owen; Bowers, Len

    2016-08-01

    Aggression and violence are widespread in UK Mental Health Trusts, and are accompanied by negative psychological and physiological consequences for both staff and other patients. Patients who are younger, male, and have a history of substance use and psychosis diagnoses are more likely to display aggression; however, patient factors are not solely responsible for violence, and there are complex circumstances that lead to aggression. Indeed, patient-staff interactions lead to a sizeable portion of aggression and violence on inpatient units, thus they cannot be viewed without considering other forms of conflict and containment that occur before, during, and after the aggressive incident. For this reason, we examined sequences of aggressive incidents in conjunction with other conflict and containment methods used to explore whether there were particular profiles to aggressive incidents. In the present study, 522 adult psychiatric inpatients from 84 acute wards were recruited, and there were 1422 incidents of aggression (verbal, physical against objects, and physical). Cluster analysis revealed that aggressive incident sequences could be classified into four separate groups: solo aggression, aggression-rule breaking, aggression-medication, and aggression-containment. Contrary to our expectations, we did not find physical aggression dominant in the aggression-containment cluster, and while verbal aggression occurred primarily in solo aggression, physical aggression also occurred here. This indicates that the management of aggression is variable, and although some patient factors are linked with different clusters, these do not entirely explain the variation.

  17. Survival of mature T cells depends on signaling through HOIP

    PubMed Central

    Okamura, Kazumi; Kitamura, Akiko; Sasaki, Yoshiteru; Chung, Doo Hyun; Kagami, Shoji; Iwai, Kazuhiro; Yasutomo, Koji

    2016-01-01

    T cell development in the thymus is controlled by a multistep process. The NF-κB pathway regulates T cell development as well as T cell activation at multiple differentiation stages. The linear ubiquitin chain assembly complex (LUBAC) is composed of Sharpin, HOIL-1L and HOIP, and it is crucial for regulating the NF-κB and cell death pathways. However, little is known about the roles of LUBAC in T-cell development and activation. Here, we show that in T-HOIPΔlinear mice lacking the ubiquitin ligase activity of LUBAC, thymic CD4+ or CD8+ T cell numbers were markedly reduced with severe defects in NKT cell development. HOIPΔlinear CD4+ T cells failed to phosphorylate IκBα and JNK through T cell receptor-mediated stimulation. Mature CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in T-HOIPΔlinear mice underwent apoptosis more rapidly than control T cells, and it was accompanied by lower CD127 expression on CD4+CD24low and CD8+CD24low T cells in the thymus. The enforced expression of CD127 in T-HOIPΔlinear thymocytes rescued the development of mature CD8+ T cells. Collectively, our results showed that LUBAC ligase activity is key for the survival of mature T cells, and suggest multiple roles of the NF-κB and cell death pathways in activating or maintaining T cell-mediated adaptive immune responses. PMID:27786304

  18. Concomitant T-cell receptor alpha and delta gene rearrangements in individual T-cell precursors.

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, S D; Pelkonen, J; Hurwitz, J L

    1990-01-01

    A debate has recently surfaced concerning the degree of precommitment attained by alpha beta and gamma delta T-cell precursors prior to T-cell receptor (TCR) gene rearrangement. It has been suggested that precursors may be precommitted to rearrange either alpha or delta genes, but not both, thus giving rise to alpha beta- and gamma delta-producing T cells, respectively. Alternatively, the precursors may be flexible with regard to potential TCR gene rearrangements. To address this controversy, the gene rearrangements among a group of T-cell hybridomas from fetal, newborn, and early postnatal mouse thymi were examined. Six probes spanning the delta and alpha loci were used in Southern blot analyses to characterize the rearrangements which occurred on homologous chromosomes in each cell. Although homologous chromosomes often rearranged in synchrony within the alpha locus, a number of hybridomas were found which had retained a delta rearrangement on one chromosome and an alpha rearrangement on the second. Results show that a precommitment by T cells to rearrange delta or alpha genes in a mutually exclusive manner is not an absolute feature of mouse thymocyte development. Images PMID:2164690

  19. Tumor-infiltrating regulatory T cells inhibit endogenous cytotoxic T cell responses to lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ganesan, Anusha-Preethi; Johansson, Magnus; Ruffell, Brian; Beltran, Adam; Lau, Jonathan; Jablons, David M.; Coussens, Lisa M.

    2013-01-01

    Immune cells comprise a substantial proportion of the tumor mass in human non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC), but the precise composition and significance of this infiltration is unclear. Herein we examined immune complexity of human NSCLC as well as NSCLC developing in CC10-TAg transgenic mice, and revealed that CD4+ T lymphocytes represent the dominant population of CD45+ immune cells, and relative to normal lung tissue, CD4+FoxP3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) were significantly increased as a proportion of total CD4+ cells. To assess the functional significance of increased Treg cells, we evaluated CD8+ T cell-deficient/CC10-TAg mice and revealed that CD8+ T cells significantly controlled tumor growth with anti-tumor activity that was partially repressed by Treg cells. However, while treatment with anti-CD25 depleting mAb as monotherapy preferentially depleted Tregs and improved CD8+ T cell-mediated control of tumor progression during early tumor development, similar monotherapy was ineffective at later stages. Since mice bearing early NSCLC treated with anti-CD25 mAb exhibited increased tumor cell death associated with infiltration by CD8+ T cells expressing elevated levels of granzyme A, granzyme B, perforin and interferon-γ, we therefore evaluated carboplatin combination therapy resulting in a significantly extended survival beyond that observed with chemotherapy alone, indicating that Treg depletion in combination with cytotoxic therapy may be beneficial as a treatment strategy for advanced NSCLC. PMID:23851682

  20. Deletion of CTLA-4 on regulatory T cells during adulthood leads to resistance to autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Paterson, Alison M.; Lovitch, Scott B.; Sage, Peter T.; Juneja, Vikram R.; Lee, Youjin; Trombley, Justin D.; Arancibia-Cárcamo, Carolina V.; Sobel, Raymond A.; Rudensky, Alexander Y.; Kuchroo, Vijay K.; Freeman, Gordon J.

    2015-01-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4) is an essential negative regulator of T cell responses. Germline Ctla4 deficiency is lethal, making investigation of the function of CTLA-4 on mature T cells challenging. To elucidate the function of CTLA-4 on mature T cells, we have conditionally ablated Ctla4 in adult mice. We show that, in contrast to germline knockout mice, deletion of Ctla4 during adulthood does not precipitate systemic autoimmunity, but surprisingly confers protection from experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) and does not lead to increased resistance to MC38 tumors. Deletion of Ctla4 during adulthood was accompanied by activation and expansion of both conventional CD4+Foxp3− (T conv) and regulatory Foxp3+ (T reg cells) T cell subsets; however, deletion of CTLA-4 on T reg cells was necessary and sufficient for protection from EAE. CTLA-4 deleted T reg cells remained functionally suppressive. Deletion of Ctla4 on T reg cells alone or on all adult T cells led to major changes in the Ctla4 sufficient T conv cell compartment, including up-regulation of immunoinhibitory molecules IL-10, LAG-3 and PD-1, thereby providing a compensatory immunosuppressive mechanism. Collectively, our findings point to a profound role for CTLA-4 on T reg cells in limiting their peripheral expansion and activation, thereby regulating the phenotype and function of T conv cells. PMID:26371185

  1. Despite large-scale T cell activation, only a minor subset of T cells responding in vitro to Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans differentiate into effector T cells.

    PubMed

    Zadeh, H H; Tanavoli, S; Haines, D D; Kreutzer, D L

    2000-06-01

    Recent studies in our laboratory have demonstrated that Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans has a potent T cell stimulatory effect, activating more than half of all T cells. However, since the fate of these activated T cells was not known, the present study sought to determine whether all of these T cells differentiate into effector cells. To that end, the intracellular expression of T cell cytokines (IL-2, IFN-gamma, IL-4 and IL-10) in response to A. actinomycetemcomitans was determined by flow cytometry. Results demonstrated a time-dependent increase in the expression of the cytokines, most reaching peak levels at 24-48 h. At 48 h, the proportion of T cells expressing each of the cytokines were as follows: IL-2 (1.7%+/-0.3), IFN-gamma (1.8%+/-0.5), IL-4 (1.0%+/-0.2) and IL-10 (1.5%+/-0.5). These data indicated that only 2-5% of all T cells stimulated with A. actinomycetemcomitans expressed any T cell cytokines. The finding of large-scale T cell activation in the absence of cytokine expression suggests that the activation of T cells in response to A. actinomycetemcomitans is incomplete. To investigate this phenomenon, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were cultured with A. actinomycetemcomitans for 24 h followed by sorting of the activated (CD69+) cells by immunomagnetic separation and restimulation with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and ionomycin. Results demonstrated that nearly 90% of the T cells were unresponsive to further restimulation. A possible explanation for this unresponsiveness is the induction of clonal anergy among the responding T cells. To determine possible preferential effects of the stimulation on specific cytokines, the expression of each cytokine among T cells responding to A. actinomycetemcomitans was compared to the maximum levels achieved by PMA + ionomycin stimulation. Results showed that number of IL-2+ and IFN-gamma+ T cells observed in response to A. actinomycetemcomitans were between 2% and 7% of those seen in

  2. T-Cell Regulation in Lepromatous Leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Bobosha, Kidist; Wilson, Louis; van Meijgaarden, Krista E.; Bekele, Yonas; Zewdie, Martha; van der Ploeg- van Schip, Jolien J.; Abebe, Markos; Hussein, Jemal; Khadge, Saraswoti; Neupane, Kapil D.; Hagge, Deanna A.; Jordanova, Ekaterina S.; Aseffa, Abraham; Ottenhoff, Tom H. M.; Geluk, Annemieke

    2014-01-01

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells are known for their role in maintaining self-tolerance and balancing immune reactions in autoimmune diseases and chronic infections. However, regulatory mechanisms can also lead to prolonged survival of pathogens in chronic infections like leprosy and tuberculosis (TB). Despite high humoral responses against Mycobacterium leprae (M. leprae), lepromatous leprosy (LL) patients have the characteristic inability to generate T helper 1 (Th1) responses against the bacterium. In this study, we investigated the unresponsiveness to M. leprae in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of LL patients by analysis of IFN-γ responses to M. leprae before and after depletion of CD25+ cells, by cell subsets analysis of PBMC and by immunohistochemistry of patients' skin lesions. Depletion of CD25+ cells from total PBMC identified two groups of LL patients: 7/18 (38.8%) gained in vitro responsiveness towards M. leprae after depletion of CD25+ cells, which was reversed to M. leprae-specific T-cell unresponsiveness by addition of autologous CD25+ cells. In contrast, 11/18 (61.1%) remained anergic in the absence of CD25+ T-cells. For both groups mitogen-induced IFN-γ was, however, not affected by depletion of CD25+ cells. In M. leprae responding healthy controls, treated lepromatous leprosy (LL) and borderline tuberculoid leprosy (BT) patients, depletion of CD25+ cells only slightly increased the IFN-γ response. Furthermore, cell subset analysis showed significantly higher (p = 0.02) numbers of FoxP3+ CD8+CD25+ T-cells in LL compared to BT patients, whereas confocal microscopy of skin biopsies revealed increased numbers of CD68+CD163+ as well as FoxP3+ cells in lesions of LL compared to tuberculoid and borderline tuberculoid leprosy (TT/BT) lesions. Thus, these data show that CD25+ Treg cells play a role in M. leprae-Th1 unresponsiveness in LL. PMID:24722473

  3. Romidepsin for the Treatment of Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Barbarotta, Lisa; Hurley, Kristen

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral T-cell lymphomas (PTCLs) are a rare, heterogeneous group of T-cell– or natural killer cell–derived non-Hodgkin lymphomas. The majority of patients with PTCL experience an aggressive disease course and poor overall survival. Historically, PTCL has been treated with chemotherapy regimens used to treat B-cell lymphomas; however, a lack of durable responses to frontline therapies and few effective options for salvage treatment have led to the development of newer therapies. Romidepsin is a structurally unique, potent, bicyclic class 1 selective histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor that has demonstrated durable clinical responses in patients with relapsed/refractory PTCL, leading to its approval by the US Food and Drug Administration in 2011 for the treatment of PTCL in patients who have received at least one prior therapy. Here, the authors provide an overview of PTCL, review the role of HDAC inhibitors as anticancer agents, discuss romidepsin use in PTCL, and highlight considerations for advanced practitioners (including the management of side effects). PMID:26413372

  4. Improve T Cell Therapy in Neuroblastoma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    antibodies and T-cell immune responses elicited by tumor vaccine , we have combined the beneficial effects of both humoral and cell-mediated components of...the anti-neuroblastoma activity of CTLs expressing the GD2-specific CAR in two xenograft mouse models of neuroblastoma. Figure 1: Vaccination with...K562-derived whole-cell vaccine expressing CMV-pp65, CD40L and OX40L enhances antitumor effects of CAR-CMV- CTLs in vivo. Panel A. NOG/SCID/γc

  5. Officer attitudes towards intra-group aggression in young people and young adults: does the reported motivation of an aggressor impact on intervention and support?

    PubMed

    Turner, Polly; Ireland, Jane L

    2011-01-01

    The present study aims to assess whether global and context specific attitudes influence the ability to correctly identify the motivation for aggression and selection of appropriate intervention strategies. A sample of 105 prison officers completed a measure assessing global attitudes towards prisoners, one assessing context specific attitudes towards aggression, and also a case vignette. Officers were asked to consider the motivation for aggression and to select an appropriate intervention. It was predicted that sex, age and level of experience would impact on global and context specific attitudes. Officers expressing positive global attitudes and non-aggressive context specific attitudes were expected to be more able to identify the motivation for aggression and more likely to adopt a rehabilitative approach. There was evidence to indicate sex differences in global and context specific attitudes but no impact of age. Level of experience of aggression impacted both on global and context specific attitudes. Global or context specific attitudes did not influence the ability to interpret aggression, but aggression type did. Limitations and directions for future research are discussed.

  6. The Social Information Processing Model as a Framework for Explaining Frequent Aggression in Adults with Mild to Moderate Intellectual Disabilities: A Systematic Review of the Evidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larkin, Peter; Jahoda, Andrew; MacMahon, Ken

    2013-01-01

    Background: There is an established evidence base concerning the use of anger management interventions with violent offenders who have intellectual disabilities. However, there has been limited research investigating the role of social cognitive factors underpinning problems of aggression. Psychosocial sources of aggression in the non-disabled…

  7. Comparison of a Cognitive Re-Appraisal Approach and a Problem-Solving Approach to Improve Social Cognition in Adults with Intellectual Disabilities Who Exhibit Aggressive Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collado-Castillo, Carmen J.

    2010-01-01

    It has been established in the literature that aggressive behaviors in individuals with intellectual disabilities (ID) represents a high percentage of referrals to mental health services (Davidson, Cain, Sloane-Reeves, Speybroech, Segel, et al., 1994). The results of several studies conducted with children with ID and aggressive behaviors indicate…

  8. Recent advances in T-cell immunotherapy for haematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Rouce, Rayne H; Sharma, Sandhya; Huynh, Mai; Heslop, Helen E

    2017-03-01

    In vitro discoveries have paved the way for bench-to-bedside translation in adoptive T cell immunotherapy, resulting in remarkable clinical responses in a variety of haematological malignancies. Adoptively transferred T cells genetically modified to express CD19 CARs have shown great promise, although many unanswered questions regarding how to optimize T-cell therapies for both safety and efficacy remain. Similarly, T cells that recognize viral or tumour antigens though their native receptors have produced encouraging clinical responses. Honing manufacturing processes will increase the availability of T-cell products, while combining T-cell therapies has the ability to increase complete response rates. Lastly, innovative mechanisms to control these therapies may improve safety profiles while genome editing offers the prospect of modulating T-cell function. This review will focus on recent advances in T-cell immunotherapy, highlighting both clinical and pre-clinical advances, as well as exploring what the future holds.

  9. Adoptive transfer of effector CD8+ T cells derived from central memory cells establishes persistent T cell memory in primates.

    PubMed

    Berger, Carolina; Jensen, Michael C; Lansdorp, Peter M; Gough, Mike; Elliott, Carole; Riddell, Stanley R

    2008-01-01

    The adoptive transfer of antigen-specific T cells that have been expanded ex vivo is being actively pursued to treat infections and malignancy in humans. The T cell populations that are available for adoptive immunotherapy include both effector memory and central memory cells, and these differ in phenotype, function, and homing. The efficacy of adoptive immunotherapy requires that transferred T cells persist in vivo, but identifying T cells that can reproducibly survive in vivo after they have been numerically expanded by in vitro culture has proven difficult. Here we show that in macaques, antigen-specific CD8(+) T cell clones derived from central memory T cells, but not effector memory T cells, persisted long-term in vivo, reacquired phenotypic and functional properties of memory T cells, and occupied memory T cell niches. These results demonstrate that clonally derived CD8+ T cells isolated from central memory T cells are distinct from those derived from effector memory T cells and retain an intrinsic capacity that enables them to survive after adoptive transfer and revert to the memory cell pool. These results could have significant implications for the selection of T cells to expand or to engineer for adoptive immunotherapy of human infections or malignancy.

  10. Activated skin γδ T-cells regulate T-cell infiltration of the wound site after burn.

    PubMed

    Rani, Meenakshi; Zhang, Qiong; Scherer, Michael R; Cap, Andrew P; Schwacha, Martin G

    2015-02-01

    Burn induces an immunopathological response involving multiple immune cell types that includes γδ T-cells. Nonetheless, the role of γδ T-cells at the wound site after burn is not clearly defined. Wild type and γδ T-cell receptor deficient (δ TCR(-/-)) mice were subjected to a major burn or sham procedure. At 1-7 d thereafter, skin samples were collected and T-cell populations analy