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Sample records for aggressive antibiotic therapy

  1. Maintenance periodontal therapy after systemic antibiotic and regenerative therapy of generalized aggressive periodontitis. A case report with 10-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Siqueira, Sergio Júnior; Ribeiro, Fernanda Vieira; Villalpando, Karina Teixeira; Cirano, Fabiano Ribeiro; Pimentel, Suzana Peres

    2015-05-01

    Aggressive periodontitis (AgP) is an inflammatory disease characterized by rapid attachment loss and bone destruction. This case report presents the 10-year results in a subject with generalized AgP treated by a regenerative periodontal therapeutic approach and the adjunctive use of antibiotics, following a systematic maintenance periodontal therapy. The use of enamel matrix derivatives (EMD) and adjunctive antibiotic therapy to treat AgP yielded improvements in clinical parameters and radiographic bony fill. This combined therapeutic approach following a systematic supportive periodontal therapy supports the long-term maintenance of teeth with previous advanced periodontal defects, demonstrating successful stability after 10-years follow-up. Clinical Relevance: The combined treatment protocol using EMD plus adjunctive antibiotic therapy, associated with a systematic supportive periodontal therapy, benefits the long-term maintenance of teeth with previous advanced periodontal defects in subjects presenting AgP, supporting this approach as an alternative in the treatment of AgP.

  2. Appropriate Antibiotic Therapy.

    PubMed

    Allison, Michael G; Heil, Emily L; Hayes, Bryan D

    2017-02-01

    Prescribing antibiotics is an essential component of initial therapy in sepsis. Early antibiotics are an important component of therapy, but speed of administration should not overshadow the patient-specific characteristics that determine the optimal breadth of antimicrobial therapy. Cultures should be drawn before antibiotic therapy if it does not significantly delay administration. Combination antibiotic therapy against gram-negative infections is not routinely required, and combination therapy involving vancomycin and piperacillin/tazobactam is associated with an increase in acute kidney injury. Emergency practitioners should be aware of special considerations in the administration and dosing of antibiotics in order to deliver optimal care to septic patients.

  3. Gene Therapy Shows Promise for Aggressive Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_163824.html Gene Therapy Shows Promise for Aggressive Lymphoma Over one-third of patients appeared disease- ... 2017 (HealthDay News) -- An experimental gene therapy for aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma beat back more than a ...

  4. Systemic antibiotic therapy in periodontics

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, Anoop; Malhotra, Ranjan; Grover, Vishakha; Grover, Deepak

    2012-01-01

    Systemic antibiotics in conjunction with scaling and root planing (SRP), can offer an additional benefit over SRP alone in the treatment of periodontitis, in terms of clinical attachment loss (CAL) and pocket depth change, and reduced risk of additional CAL loss. However, antibiotics are not innocuous drugs. Their use should be justified on the basis of a clearly established need and should not be substituted for adequate local treatment. The aim of this review is to discuss the rationale, proper selection, dosage and duration for antibiotic therapy so as to optimize the usefulness of drug therapy. PMID:23559912

  5. Systemic antibiotic therapy in periodontics.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Anoop; Malhotra, Ranjan; Grover, Vishakha; Grover, Deepak

    2012-09-01

    Systemic antibiotics in conjunction with scaling and root planing (SRP), can offer an additional benefit over SRP alone in the treatment of periodontitis, in terms of clinical attachment loss (CAL) and pocket depth change, and reduced risk of additional CAL loss. However, antibiotics are not innocuous drugs. Their use should be justified on the basis of a clearly established need and should not be substituted for adequate local treatment. The aim of this review is to discuss the rationale, proper selection, dosage and duration for antibiotic therapy so as to optimize the usefulness of drug therapy.

  6. Aggressive Adolescents Benefit from Massage Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diego, Miguel A.; Field, Tiffany; Hernandez-Reif, Maria; Shaw, Jon A.; Rothe, Eugenio M.; Castellanos, Daniel; Mesner, Linda

    2002-01-01

    Seventeen aggressive adolescents were assigned to a massage therapy group or a relaxation therapy group to receive 20-minute therapy sessions, twice a week for five weeks. The massaged adolescents had lower anxiety after the first and last sessions. By the end of the study, they also reported feeling less hostile and they were perceived by their…

  7. [Duration of antibiotic therapy in bacterial meningitis].

    PubMed

    Pereira, P Ricardo; Borges, Fernando; Mansinho, Kamal

    2013-01-01

    The duration of antibiotic therapy in bacterial meningitis is a controversial issue. Antibiotic regimens have changed over time along with the criteria used to determine the ideal antibiotic therapy duration. The authors aim to make an historical overview on this matter and simultaneously add the evidence of recent studies, pointing out some issues in results interpretation, namely, their design and the associated demographic and epidemiological questions. Clinical assays on this subject, with statistically significant results, are quite recent. Most of the scientific knowledge has been acquired empirically through the times. The actual investigation paradigm, in what concerns to antibiotic therapy in bacterial meningitis, lays on the dichotomy: "short versus long duration regimens". Nevertheless, so far, the existing studies have not completely cleared this doubt. Thus, despite some evidence suggests that short duration antibiotic regimens are effective for some patients, in patients with severe disease presentations or with other morbidities its use may be questioned.

  8. Pneumonia in immunocompetent patients: combination antibiotic therapy.

    PubMed

    Salva, S; Borgatta, B; Rello, J

    2014-04-01

    Pneumonia's burden is still important worldwide not only because of its high incidence and mortality, but also for the elevated costs related to it. Despite the concerted efforts to reduce the incidence of sepsis-related complications, they continue to represent a major human and economic burden. The cornerstone of sepsis management is early appropriate empiric broad spectrum antibiotics, resuscitation, and source control. The association between inappropriate use of antibiotics and increased mortality is the rationale for the use of empiric antibiotic combination therapy in critically ill patients. The aim of this manuscript was to discuss recent literature regarding the management of severe pneumonia, both community-acquired and hospital-acquired/ventilator-associated, in critically ill patients. Use of combination therapy is warranted in severe infections with shock; considerations should be made on the importance of optimal antibiotic administration and adverse reactions, thus providing guidance for a rational use of antibiotics.

  9. New antibiotic therapies for acne and rosacea.

    PubMed

    Mays, Rana Majd; Gordon, Rachel A; Wilson, Janice M; Silapunt, Sirunya

    2012-01-01

    Acne and rosacea compromise a substantial portion of the dermatology clinical practice. Over the past century, many treatment modalities have been introduced with antibiotics playing a major role. Today, both oral and topical antibiotics are used in the management of acne and rosacea, with several novel formulations and/or combination regimens recently introduced. The latest studies suggest anti-inflammatory actions to be the most likely mechanism of antibiotics in acne and rosacea, shifting the focus to subantimicrobial-dose oral antibiotics and/or topical antibiotic regimens as the preferred first-line agents. Here we will discuss the most recent oral and topical antibiotic therapies available for treatment of acne and rosacea, with special focus on efficacy data, indication, dosing, and mechanism of action.

  10. [Inhaled antibiotic therapy in cystic fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Girón Moreno, Rosa M; Salcedo Posadas, Antonio; Mar Gómez-Punter, Rosa

    2011-06-01

    Cystic fibrosis is the most frequent fatal genetically-transmitted disease among Caucasians. Chronic bronchial infection, especially by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, is the main cause of morbidity and mortality in this disease. Aerosolized antibiotic therapy achieves high drug concentrations in the airway with low toxicity, allowing chronic use. Currently, two antibiotics have been approved for inhalation therapy, tobramycin inhalation solution and colistimethate sodium aerosol. There is less evidence from clinical trials for the latter. The main indication for these drugs is chronic bronchial colonization by P. aeruginosa, although there is increasing evidence of the importance of the primary infection by this bacterium, whether treated by oral or intravenous antibiotics or not. More controversial is the use of aerosolized antibiotic therapy in bacterial prophylaxis or respiratory exacerbations. For many years, intravenous formulations of distinct antibiotics for aerosolized use have been employed, which are in distinct phases of research for use in nebulizer therapy. In addition to being used to treat P. aeruginosa infection, aerosolized antibiotics have been used to treat other pathogens such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococus aureus, Mycobacterium abscessus and Aspergillus fumigatus.

  11. Antibiotic Therapy of Staphylococcal Infections

    PubMed Central

    Hawks, Gordon H.

    1965-01-01

    The antibiotic treatment of staphylococcal infections remains a problem. Isolation of the organism and sensitivity testing are necessary in the choice of antibiotic. Penicillin G is the most effective penicillin against non-penicillinase-producing staphy-lococci; for the penicillinase producers there is very little to choose between the semisynthetic penicillins, methicillin, cloxacillin, nafcillin and oxacillin. For patients who are hypersensitive to penicillin, the bacteriostatic drugs (erythromycin, novobiocin, tetracycline, chloramphenicol, oleandomycin) are useful for mild infections, while for more severe illness the bactericidal drugs (vancomycin, ristocetin, kanamycin, bacitracin, neomycin) have been used successfully. Acute staphylococcal enterocolitis is probably best treated by a semisynthetic penicillin. Other antibiotics which have been found useful, with clinical trials, for staphylococcal infections are cephalosporin, fucidin, cephaloridine and lincomycin. The latter drug has been reported of value in the treatment of osteomyelitis. There is little justification for the prophylactic use of antibiotics to prevent staphylococcal infection. Surgical drainage is still an important adjunct in the treatment of many staphylococcal infections. PMID:5318575

  12. [Dangerous hypoprothrombinemic hemorrhage in antibiotic therapy].

    PubMed

    Stieger, R; Baumgartner, K; Neff, U

    1992-05-01

    Antibiotics can be associated with hypoprothrombinaemic haemorrhages in risk patients. Risk factors are: poor nutrition, impaired liver- or renal function, coagulation depleting medical therapy or illness. Pathogenetically there is a vitamin K deficiency with reduction of vitamin K dependent clotting factors; mainly by decreased vitamin K synthesis in intestinal bacterias. In consequence every risk patient under antibiotics should receive vitamin K prophylactically and in a parenteral way, because of unreliable resorption in gastrointestinal tract. Prothrombin-time-monitoring is essential to recognize the hypoprothrombinemia in every risk patient under antibiotics.

  13. Molecular Targeted Therapies of Aggressive Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Silvia Martina; Fallahi, Poupak; Politti, Ugo; Materazzi, Gabriele; Baldini, Enke; Ulisse, Salvatore; Miccoli, Paolo; Antonelli, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Differentiated thyroid carcinomas (DTCs) that arise from follicular cells account >90% of thyroid cancer (TC) [papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) 90%, follicular thyroid cancer (FTC) 10%], while medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) accounts <5%. Complete total thyroidectomy is the treatment of choice for PTC, FTC, and MTC. Radioiodine is routinely recommended in high-risk patients and considered in intermediate risk DTC patients. DTC cancer cells, during tumor progression, may lose the iodide uptake ability, becoming resistant to radioiodine, with a significant worsening of the prognosis. The lack of specific and effective drugs for aggressive and metastatic DTC and MTC leads to additional efforts toward the development of new drugs. Several genetic alterations in different molecular pathways in TC have been shown in the past few decades, associated with TC development and progression. Rearranged during transfection (RET)/PTC gene rearrangements, RET mutations, BRAF mutations, RAS mutations, and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 angiogenesis pathways are some of the known pathways determinant in the development of TC. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) are small organic compounds inhibiting tyrosine kinases auto-phosphorylation and activation, most of them are multikinase inhibitors. TKIs act on the aforementioned molecular pathways involved in growth, angiogenesis, local, and distant spread of TC. TKIs are emerging as new therapies of aggressive TC, including DTC, MTC, and anaplastic thyroid cancer, being capable of inducing clinical responses and stabilization of disease. Vandetanib and cabozantinib have been approved for the treatment of MTC, while sorafenib and lenvatinib for DTC refractory to radioiodine. These drugs prolong median progression-free survival, but until now no significant increase has been observed on overall survival; side effects are common. New efforts are made to find new more effective and safe compounds and to personalize the therapy in

  14. Empiric Antibiotic Therapy of Nosocomial Bacterial Infections.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Pramod

    2016-01-01

    Broad-spectrum antibiotics are commonly used by physicians to treat various infections. The source of infection and causative organisms are not always apparent during the initial evaluation of the patient, and antibiotics are often given empirically to patients with suspected sepsis. Fear of attempting cephalosporins and carbapenems in penicillin-allergic septic patients may result in significant decrease in the spectrum of antimicrobial coverage. Empiric antibiotic therapy should sufficiently cover all the suspected pathogens, guided by the bacteriologic susceptibilities of the medical center. It is important to understand the major pharmacokinetic properties of antibacterial agents for proper use and to minimize the development of resistance. In several septic patients, negative cultures do not exclude active infection and positive cultures may not represent the actual infection. This article will review the important differences in the spectrum of commonly used antibiotics for nosocomial bacterial infections with a particular emphasis on culture-negative sepsis and colonization.

  15. [Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of antibiotic therapy].

    PubMed

    Beck, S; Wicha, S G; Kloft, C; Kees, M G

    2014-10-01

    Antibiotic agents are crucial pillars in intensive care medicine and must be used rationally and sensibly. In the case of critically ill patients optimal dosing with respect to pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic principles (PK/PD) can be vital. Preclinical results demonstrated important differences between antibiotic classes and gave rise to differing clinical dosing strategies, e.g. high dose once daily regimens for aminoglycosides or extended/continuous infusion of betalactams. Critically ill patients with altered pharmacokinetic parameters and infections by pathogens with low susceptibility are most likely to benefit from PK/PD-guided therapy.

  16. Antibiotic therapy in impacted third molar surgery.

    PubMed

    Monaco, G; Staffolani, C; Gatto, M R; Checchi, L

    1999-12-01

    The use of routine antibiotic therapy in patients undergoing surgical third molar extraction is controversial. The efficacy of antibiotic therapy in preventing postoperative complications following surgical third molar extractions was evaluated in 141 patients. In the test group (66 patients), the protocol utilized a regimen of 2 g of amoxicillin orally daily for 5 d postoperatively, starting at the completion of surgery. In the control group (75 patients), no antibiotic therapy was given. No significant difference was found between the test group and the control group in the incidence of postoperative sequelae, i.e. fever, pain, swelling and alveolar osteitis. A statistically significant association between smoking, habitual drinking and increased postoperative pain and fever was found. Patient age > or = 18 yr was positively correlated with an increased incidence of alveolar osteitis. Swelling was found to be gender-related, in that female patients experienced more swelling than male patients. No correlation was found between the time required for surgery or difficulty of extraction and post-operative pain. In conclusion, no difference was found between patients receiving postoperative amoxicillin and the control group in the incidence of postoperative sequelae.

  17. [Sputum purulence: practical guide to introduce antibiotic therapy].

    PubMed

    Egger, Micaela; Raetzo, Marc-Andrédre; Kherad, Omar

    2016-02-03

    In the collective unconscious of doctors and patients, purulent sputum is correlated with bacterial infection requiring antibiotics. The introduction of antibiotic therapy in a patient with purulent sputum is legitimate only in certain situations. The presence of purulent sputum during a mild infection of the upper airways does not generally justify the introduction of antibiotic treatment. In patients with chronic respiratory diseases, studies have shown that purulent sputum is often associated with a secondary bacterial infection and antibiotic therapy may provide clinical benefit.

  18. An Eye Popping Case of Orbital Necrotizing Fasciitis Treated with Antibiotics, Surgery, and Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy.

    PubMed

    Singam, Narayanasarma V; Rusia, Deepam; Prakash, Rajan

    2017-04-01

    BACKGROUND Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) of the orbit is a rare and deadly condition that requires prompt surgical and medical management to decrease morbidity and mortality.  CASE REPORT Here we present an interesting case of an individual who developed fulminant NF of the left orbit requiring emergent surgical intervention, antibiotics, and subsequent hyperbaric oxygen therapy in an attempt to save the eye.  CONCLUSIONS With an early and aggressive multifaceted approach using antibiotics, surgery, and hyperbaric oxygen it may be possible to preserve eye structure and function. Without treatment NF is a rapidly progressive condition and can result in significant morbidity.

  19. Aggressive thyroid cancer: targeted therapy with sorafenib.

    PubMed

    Corrado, Alda; Ferrari, Silvia M; Politti, Ugo; Mazzi, Valeria; Miccoli, Mario; Materazzi, Gabriele; Antonelli, Alessandro; Ulisse, Salvatore; Fallahi, Poupak; Miccoli, Paolo

    2017-03-01

    Sorafenib (Nexavar), is a multikinase inhibitor, which has demonstrated both antiproliferative and antiangiogenic properties in vitro and in vivo, inhibiting the activity of targets present in the tumoral cells (c-RAF [proto-oncogene serine/threonine-protein kinase], BRAF, (V600E)BRAF, c-KIT, and FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3) and in tumor vessels (c-RAF, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor [VEGFR]-2, VEGFR-3, and platelet-derived growth factor receptor β). Sorafenib was initially approved for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma and advanced renal cell carcinoma. Experimental studies have demonstrated that sorafenib has both antiproliferative and antiangiogenic properties in vitro and in vivo, against thyroid cancer cells. Furthermore, several completed (or ongoing) studies have evaluated the long-term efficacy and tolerability of sorafenib in patients with papillary, follicular and medullary aggressive thyroid cancer. The results of the different studies showed good clinical responses and stabilization of the disease and suggested that sorafenib is a promising therapeutic option in patients with advanced thyroid cancer that is not responsive to traditional therapeutic strategies (such as radioiodine). Currently, USA Food and Drug Administration has approved the use of sorafenib for metastatic differentiated thyroid cancer.

  20. Antibiotic Therapy for Infective Endocarditis in Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Calza, Leonardo; Manfredi, Roberto; Chiodo, Francesco

    2006-01-01

    Infective endocarditis is relatively uncommon in childhood, but its epidemiology has changed in the past three to four decades and its incidence has been increasing in recent years. With the improved survival rates of children with congenital heart diseases and the overall decreased frequency of rheumatic valvular heart disease in developed countries, congenital cardiac abnormalities now represent the predominant underlying condition for infective endocarditis in children over the age of two years in Western Europe and Northern America. Moreover, the complex management of neonatal and pediatric intensive care unit patients has increased the risk of catheter-related endocarditis. More specifically, the surgical correction of congenital heart alterations is associated with the risk of postoperative infections. Endocarditis in children may be difficult to diagnosis and manage. Emerging resistant bacteria, such as methicillin- or vancomycin-resistant staphylococci and vancomycin-resistant enterococci, are becoming a new challenge for conventional antibiotic therapy. Newer antimicrobial compounds recently introduced in clinical practice, such as streptogramins and oxazolidinones, may be effective alternatives in children with endocarditis sustained by Gram-positive cocci resistant to glycopeptides. Home intravenous therapy has become an acceptable approach for stable patients who are at low risk for embolic complications. However, further clinical studies are needed in order to assess efficacy and safety of these antimicrobial agents in children. This review should help outline the most appropriate antimicrobial treatments for infective endocarditis in children. PMID:23118646

  1. Optimizing antibiotic therapy in the intensive care unit setting

    PubMed Central

    Kollef, Marin H

    2001-01-01

    Antibiotics are one of the most common therapies administered in the intensive care unit setting. In addition to treating infections, antibiotic use contributes to the emergence of resistance among pathogenic microorganisms. Therefore, avoiding unnecessary antibiotic use and optimizing the administration of antimicrobial agents will help to improve patient outcomes while minimizing further pressures for resistance. This review will present several strategies aimed at achieving optimal use of antimicrobial agents. It is important to note that each intensive care unit should have a program in place which monitors antibiotic utilization and its effectiveness. Only in this way can the impact of interventions aimed at improving antibiotic use (e.g. antibiotic rotation, de-escalation therapy) be evaluated at the local level. PMID:11511331

  2. Gut microbiota disturbance during antibiotic therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ferrer, Manuel; Martins dos Santos, Vitor AP; Ott, Stephan J; Moya, Andrés

    2014-01-01

    It is known that the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) microbiota responds to different antibiotics in different ways and that while some antibiotics do not induce disturbances of the community, others drastically influence the richness, diversity, and prevalence of bacterial taxa. However, the metabolic consequences thereof, independent of the degree of the community shifts, are not clearly understood. In a recent article, we used an integrative OMICS approach to provide new insights into the metabolic shifts caused by antibiotic disturbance. The study presented here further suggests that specific bacterial lineage blooms occurring at defined stages of antibiotic intervention are mostly associated with organisms that possess improved survival and colonization mechanisms, such as those of the Enterococcus, Blautia, Faecalibacterium, and Akkermansia genera. The study also provides an overview of the most variable metabolic functions affected as a consequence of a β-lactam antibiotic intervention. Thus, we observed that anabolic sugar metabolism, the production of acetyl donors and the synthesis and degradation of intestinal/colonic epithelium components were among the most variable functions during the intervention. We are aware that these results have been established with a single patient and will require further confirmation with a larger group of individuals and with other antibiotics. Future directions for exploration of the effects of antibiotic interventions are discussed. PMID:24418972

  3. [Antibiotic stewardship: Measures for optimization of antibacterial therapy].

    PubMed

    de With, K

    2015-11-01

    Because the development of resistance is steadily increasing, especially among Gram-negative pathogens and new developments in antibiotics are lacking, a rational antibiotic therapy is necessary now more than ever. A continuing uncritical and non-guideline-conform use of antibiotics leads to selection of multidrug-resistant pathogens, which can colonize patients and as instigators of infections make treatment more difficult. A prerequisite for targeted antibiotic therapy is a critical testing of the suspected infection diagnosis based on a guideline-conform microbiological preanalytical procedure. To promote a guideline-conform antibiotic therapy in hospitals with respect to choice of substance, dosage and duration, in December 2013 so-called antibiotic stewardship (ABS) measures were summarized in a so-called S3-guideline from the Association of the Scientific Medical Societies in Germany (AWMF) under the auspices of the German Society for Infectious Diseases (DGI). With a strategy of targeted antibiotic therapy and infection prevention it is possible to achieve optimum treatment results and to minimize the development of resistance.

  4. Antibiotic therapy and fat digestion and absorption in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Lisowska, Aleksandra; Pogorzelski, Andrzej; Oracz, Grzegorz; Skorupa, Wojciech; Cofta, Szczepan; Szydłowski, Jarosław; Socha, Jerzy; Walkowiak, Jarosław

    2011-01-01

    Antibiotic therapy in the cystic fibrosis (CF) mouse model has been shown to result in reduced bacterial load of the intestine and significant body mass gain. The effect was suggested to be linked to the improvement of intestinal digestion and absorption. Therefore, we aimed to assess the influence of routinely applied antibiotic therapy in CF patients on fat assimilation. Twenty-four CF patients aged 6 to 30 years entered the study. Inclusion criteria comprised confirmed exocrine pancreatic insufficiency and bronchopulmonary exacerbation demanding antibiotic therapy. Exclusion criteria comprised: antibiotic therapy six weeks prior to the test, liver cirrhosis, diabetes mellitus, oxygen dependency, the use of systemic corticosteroids. In all enrolled CF subjects, (13)C-labelled mixed triglyceride breath test ((13)C MTG-BT) was performed to assess lipid digestion and absorption, before and after antibiotic therapy. Sixteen subjects were treated intravenously with ceftazidime and amikacin, eight patients orally with ciprofloxacin. Cumulative percentage dose recovery (CPDR) was considered to reflect digestion and absorption of lipids. The values are expressed as means (medians). The values of CPDR before and after antibiotic therapy did not differ in the whole studied group [4.6(3.3) % vs. 5.7(5.3) %, p = 0.100] as well as in the subgroup receiving them intravenously [4.6(3.2) % vs. 5.7(5.3) %, p = 0.327] or in that with oral drug administration [4.6(3.4) % vs. 5.7(5.4) %, p = 0.167]. In conclusion, antibiotic therapy applied routinely in the course of pulmonary exacerbation in CF patients does not seem to result in an improvement of fat digestion and absorption.

  5. Alternative pharmacologic therapy for aggressive central giant cell granuloma: denosumab.

    PubMed

    Schreuder, Willem H; Coumou, Annet W; Kessler, Peter A H W; de Lange, Jan

    2014-07-01

    In the search for new pharmacologic therapies for central giant cell granuloma (CGCG), proteins that are essential to osteoclastogenesis are intriguing potential targets. In the present case report, we describe a 25-year-old patient with an aggressive CGCG of the maxilla, who was successfully treated with the antiresorptive agent denosumab, after other pharmacologic treatment had failed to achieve regression or stabilization of the tumor. Denosumab could be a promising alternative to potentially mutilating surgery for CGCG. However, more research is needed before definite conclusions can be drawn about the potential role of this agent in the treatment of CGCG.

  6. Antibiotic Therapy for Very Low Birth Weigh Newborns in NICU

    PubMed Central

    Afjeh, Seyyed-Abolfazl; Sabzehei, Mohammad-Kazem; Fahimzad, Seyyed-Ali-Reza; Shiva, Farideh; Shamshiri, Ahmad-Reza; Esmaili, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Background Prolonged empiric antibiotics therapy in neonates results in several adverse consequences including widespread antibiotic resistance, late onset sepsis (LOS), necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), prolonged hospital course (HC) and increase in mortality rates. Objectives To assess the risk factors and the outcome of prolonged empiric antibiotic therapy in very low birth weight (VLBW) newborns. Materials and Methods Prospective study in VLBW neonates admitted to NICU and survived > 2 W, from July 2011 - June 2012. All relevant perinatal and postnatal data including duration of antibiotics therapy (Group I < 2W vs Group II > 2W) and outcome up to the time of discharge or death were documented and compared. Results Out of 145 newborns included in the study, 62 were in group I, and 83 in Group II. Average duration of antibiotic therapy was 14 days (range 3 - 62 days); duration in Group I and Group II was 10 ± 2.3 vs 25.5 ± 10.5 days. Hospital stay was 22.3 ± 11.5 vs 44.3 ± 14.7 days, respectively. Multiple regression analysis revealed following risk factors as significant for prolonged empiric antibiotic therapy: VLBW especially < 1000 g, (P < 0.001), maternal Illness (P = 0.003), chorioamnionitis (P = 0.048), multiple pregnancy (P = 0.03), non-invasive ventilation (P < 0.001) and mechanical ventilation (P < 0.001). Seventy (48.3%) infants developed LOS; 5 with NEC > stage II, 12 (8.3%) newborns died. Infant mortality alone and with LOS/NEC was higher in group II as compared to group I (P < 0.002 and < 0.001 respectively). Conclusions Prolonged empiric antibiotic therapy caused increasing rates of LOS, NEC, HC and infant mortality. PMID:27307961

  7. [LOCAL ANTIBIOTIC THERAPY OF OSTEOMYELITIS USING NONABSORBABLE IMPLANT (REVIEW)].

    PubMed

    Tuleubaev, B; Saginova, D; Abiyev, T; Davletbaev, M; Koshanova, A

    2016-06-01

    Despite the variety of treatments available, including surgical procedures and antimicrobial therapy, bone infections is still a medical problem, because they are difficult to treat. Optimal treatment should stabilize the bone, promote the biological recovery of bone defects and destroy bacterial infection. Systemic antibiotics are part of the standard therapy after surgical treatment of infected bone, but their effectiveness is limited due to malnutrition and low absorption at the site of infection. Moreover, long-term treatment and higher doses are associated with serious side effects. In contrast, the antibiotic impregnated bone cements or fillers can act as a local anti-infective drug delivery system, which not only fills the dead space after debridement, but also provide high concentrations of antibiotics in a potential site of infection, no increase levels of antibiotics in serum. The review analyzed the use of antibiotic-impregnated cement as local delivery of antibiotics systems. Gentamycin impregnated polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) beads, for the topical treatment of orthopedic infections clinically used for over 30 years. Application of antibiotic delivery systems using cement in the infected region is common method of treatment that continues to improve. On the downside of PMMA is that the material does not biodegradable requires subsequent invasive procedures necessary to remove the implant.

  8. Antibiotic and Anti-Inflammatory Therapies for Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Chmiel, James F.; Konstan, Michael W.; Elborn, J. Stuart

    2013-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease is characterized by chronic bacterial infection and an unremitting inflammatory response, which are responsible for most of CF morbidity and mortality. The median expected survival has increased from <6 mo in 1940 to >38 yr now. This dramatic improvement, although not great enough, is due to the development of therapies directed at secondary disease pathologies, especially antibiotics. The importance of developing treatments directed against the vigorous inflammatory response was realized in the 1990s. New therapies directed toward the basic defect are now visible on the horizon. However, the impact of these drugs on downstream pathological consequences is unknown. It is likely that antibiotics and anti-inflammatory drugs will remain an important part of the maintenance regimen for CF in the foreseeable future. Current and future antibiotic and anti-inflammatory therapies for CF are reviewed. PMID:23880054

  9. Bacteriophage therapy: a potential solution for the antibiotic resistance crisis.

    PubMed

    Golkar, Zhabiz; Bagasra, Omar; Pace, Donald Gene

    2014-02-13

    The emergence of multiple drug-resistant bacteria has prompted interest in alternatives to conventional antimicrobials. One of the possible replacement options for antibiotics is the use of bacteriophages as antimicrobial agents. Phage therapy is an important alternative to antibiotics in the current era of drug-resistant pathogens. Bacteriophages have played an important role in the expansion of molecular biology and have been used as antibacterial agents since 1966. In this review, we describe a brief history of bacteriophages and clinical studies on their use in bacterial disease prophylaxis and therapy. We discuss the advantages and disadvantages of bacteriophages as therapeutic agents in this regard.

  10. An Eye Popping Case of Orbital Necrotizing Fasciitis Treated with Antibiotics, Surgery, and Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Singam, Narayanasarma V.; Rusia, Deepam; Prakash, Rajan

    2017-01-01

    Patient: Female, 60 Final Diagnosis: Necrotizing fasciitis of the eye Symptoms: Eye pain Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Infectious Diseases Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) of the orbit is a rare and deadly condition that requires prompt surgical and medical management to decrease morbidity and mortality. Case Report: Here we present an interesting case of an individual who developed fulminant NF of the left orbit requiring emergent surgical intervention, antibiotics, and subsequent hyperbaric oxygen therapy in an attempt to save the eye. Conclusions: With an early and aggressive multifaceted approach using antibiotics, surgery, and hyperbaric oxygen it may be possible to preserve eye structure and function. Without treatment NF is a rapidly progressive condition and can result in significant morbidity. PMID:28364115

  11. Trial of Early Aggressive Therapy in Polyarticular Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Carol A.; Giannini, Edward H.; Spalding, Steven J.; Hashkes, Philip J.; O’Neil, Kathleen M.; Zeft, Andrew S.; Szer, Ilona S.; Ringold, Sarah; Brunner, Hermine I.; Schanberg, Laura E.; Sundel, Robert P.; Milojevic, Diana; Punaro, Marilynn G.; Chira, Peter; Gottlieb, Beth S.; Higgins, Gloria C.; Ilowite, Norman T.; Kimura, Yukiko; Hamilton, Stephanie; Johnson, Anne; Huang, Bin; Lovell, Daniel J.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To determine if aggressive treatment initiated early in the course of rheumatoid factor positive or negative polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis (poly-JIA) can induce clinical inactive disease (CID) within 6 months. METHODS Between May 2007 and October 2010 a multi-center, prospective, double blind, randomized, placebo controlled trial of two aggressive treatments was conducted in 85 children aged 2 to 16 years with polyarticular JIA of less than 12 months duration. Patients received either methotrexate 0.5 mg/kg/wk SQ (40 mg max), etanercept 0.8 mg/kg/wk (50 mg max), prednisolone 0.5 mg/kg/d (60 mg max) tapered to 0 by 17 weeks (Arm 1), or methotrexate (same dose as Arm 1), etanercept placebo, and prednisolone placebo (Arm 2). The primary outcome was CID at 6 months. An exploratory phase determined the rate of clinical remission on medication (6 months of continuous CID) at 12 months. RESULTS By 6 months, 17 of 42 (40%) of patients in Arm 1 and 10 of 43 (23%) in Arm 2 had achieved CID (X2 = 2.91; p = 0.088). After 12 months, 9 patients in Arm 1 and 3 in Arm 2 achieved clinical remission on medication (p = 0.0534). There were no significant inter-arm differences in adverse events. CONCLUSIONS Although this study did not meet its primary endpoint, early aggressive therapy in this cohort of children with recent onset polyarticular JIA resulted in substantial proportions of patients in both arms achieving CID by 6 months and clinical remission on medication within 12 months of treatment. PMID:22183975

  12. Combination antibiotic therapy for community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Caballero, Jesus; Rello, Jordi

    2011-11-23

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a common and potentially serious illness that is associated with morbidity and mortality. Although medical care has improved during the past decades, it is still potentially lethal. Streptococcus pneumoniae is the most frequent microorganism isolated. Treatment includes mandatory antibiotic therapy and organ support as needed. There are several antibiotic therapy regimens that include β-lactams or macrolides or fluoroquinolones alone or in combination. Combination antibiotic therapy achieves a better outcome compared with monotherapy and it should be given in the following subset of patients with CAP: outpatients with comorbidities and previous antibiotic therapy, nursing home patients with CAP, hospitalized patients with severe CAP, bacteremic pneumococcal CAP, presence of shock, and necessity of mechanical ventilation. Better outcome is associated with combination therapy that includes a macrolide for wide coverage of atypical pneumonia, polymicrobial pneumonia, or resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae. Macrolides have shown different properties other than antimicrobial activity, such as anti-inflammatory properties. Although this evidence comes from observational, most of them retrospective and nonblinded studies, the findings are consistent. Ideally, a prospective, multicenter, randomized trial should be performed to confirm these findings.

  13. Photodynamic therapy in the treatment of aggressive periodontitis: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Doufexi, Aikaterini-Ellisavet

    2016-01-01

    Background Aggressive periodontitis (AgP) is a severe form of periodontal diseases with rapid destruction of the supporting bone around teeth. The efficacy of PDT in suppressing periodontal pathogens may be crucial in adopting new protocols for the treatment of AgP. Thus, the aim of this systematic review was to investigate the possible role of PDT in the treatment of AgP as an adjunctive therapy or monotherapy. Material and Methods A systematic search of the literature was performed. Additionally, the references from all the selected full-text studies were searched for relevant articles. Two reviewers screened independently titles and abstracts or full text copies. Quality assessment of all the included studies was held. Results Initial screening of electronic databases yielded 418 potentially relevant publications. After screening of the titles and full-text examination, five studies were included in the systematic review. Four publications evaluated the effects of PDT adjunctive to SRP in patients with AgP: two of them compared the clinical outcomes of SRP and PDT with a control group that received therapy with SRP and antibiotics (metronidazole and amoxicillin); two publications included SRP and PDT in the test group, and SRP alone in the control group. In one study, PDT was tested as a monotherapy compared with SRP alone. Conclusions Within the limitations of this review, PDT may exhibit a beneficial role in the therapy of aggressive periodontitis after repeated applications. In the future, more methodologically sound, long-term randomized clinical trials are needed to be conducted. Key words:Photodynamic therapy, periodontitis, systematic review. PMID:26595837

  14. Antibiotic therapy of aortic graft infection: treatment and prevention recommendations.

    PubMed

    Hodgkiss-Harlow, Kelley D; Bandyk, Dennis F

    2011-12-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) after aortic intervention, an uncommon but serious vascular condition, requires patient-specific antibiotic therapy. Effective treatment and prevention requires the vascular surgeon to be cognizant of changing SSI microbiology, advances in antibiotic delivery, and patient characteristics. The majority of aortic graft infections are caused by Gram-positive bacteria, with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus now the prevalent pathogen. Nasal carriage of methicillin-sensitive or methicillin-resistant S aureus strains, diabetes mellitus, recent hospitalization, a failed arterial reconstruction, and the presence of a groin incision are important SSI risk factors. Overall, the aortic SSI rate is higher than predicted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance risk category system; ranging from 5% after open or endovascular aortic interventions to as high as 10% to 15% after aortofemoral bypass or uni-aortoiliac grafting with femorofemoral bypass. Perioperative measures to reduce S aureus nares and skin colonization, administration of antibiotic prophylaxis, meticulous wound closure/care, and therapy directed to optimize patient host defense regulation mechanisms (eg, temperature, oxygenation, blood sugar) can minimize SSI occurrence. Antibiotic therapy for aortic graft infection should utilize bactericidal drugs that penetrate bacteria biofilms and can be delivered to the surgical site both parenterally and locally in the form of antibiotic-impregnated beads or prosthetic grafts.

  15. Nanoengineered drug delivery systems for enhancing antibiotic therapy.

    PubMed

    Kalhapure, Rahul S; Suleman, Nadia; Mocktar, Chunderika; Seedat, Nasreen; Govender, Thirumala

    2015-03-01

    Formulation scientists are recognizing nanoengineered drug delivery systems as an effective strategy to overcome limitations associated with antibiotic drug therapy. Antibiotics encapsulated into nanodelivery systems will contribute to improved management of patients with various infectious diseases and to overcoming the serious global burden of antibiotic resistance. An extensive review of several antibiotic-loaded nanocarriers that have been formulated to target drugs to infectious sites, achieve controlled drug release profiles, and address formulation challenges, such as low-drug entrapment efficiencies, poor solubility and stability is presented in this paper. The physicochemical properties and the in vitro/in vivo performances of various antibiotic-loaded delivery systems, such as polymeric nanoparticles, micelles, dendrimers, liposomes, solid lipid nanoparticles, lipid-polymer hybrid nanoparticles, nanohybirds, nanofibers/scaffolds, nanosheets, nanoplexes, and nanotubes/horn/rods and nanoemulsions, are highlighted and evaluated. Future studies that will be essential to optimize formulation and commercialization of these antibiotic-loaded nanosystems are also identified. The review presented emphasizes the significant formulation progress achieved and potential that novel nanoengineered antibiotic drug delivery systems have for enhancing the treatment of patients with a range of infections.

  16. De-escalating therapy in gastric aggressive lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Cuccurullo, Rosanna; Govi, Silvia; Ferreri, Andrés JM

    2014-01-01

    The treatment of primary gastric diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) has changed radically over the last 10–15 years, with the abandonment of routine gastrectomy in favor of more conservative therapies. Low-level evidence suggests that consolidation radiotherapy could be avoided in patients with limited-stage DLBCL of the stomach who achieve complete remission after rituximab-CHOP combination. Small, recent prospective trials suggest that selected patients with limited-stage Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori)-positive DLBCL of the stomach and favorable prognostic factors can be managed with antibiotics alone, with excellent disease control and cure rates, keeping chemo-radiotherapy for unresponsive patients. This recommendation should equally regard patients with mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue-related or de novo DLBCL. Future studies should be focused on the establishment of reliable variables able to distinguish the best candidates for exclusive treatment with H. pylori eradication from those who need for conventional chemo-immunotherapy. PMID:25083073

  17. Temozolomide therapy in patients with aggressive pituitary adenomas or carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Losa, Marco; Bogazzi, Fausto; Cannavo, Salvo; Ceccato, Filippo; Curtò, Lorenzo; De Marinis, Laura; Iacovazzo, Donato; Lombardi, Giuseppe; Mantovani, Giovanna; Mazza, Elena; Minniti, Giuseppe; Nizzoli, Maurizio; Reni, Michele; Scaroni, Carla

    2016-02-01

    Temozolomide is effective in some patients with progressive pituitary adenoma or carcinoma. We report a survey study of Italian patients treated with Temozolomide because of aggressive pituitary adenoma or carcinoma resistant to standard therapies. Italian endocrinologists were surveyed and asked to participate into the study. A questionnaire was sent to all those who agreed and had used Temozolomide in at least one patient with pituitary tumor. Database was closed in December 2013. A literature review was also performed. Thirty-one patients were included into the analysis. Mean age at start of Temozolomide treatment was 58.3 ± 1.9 years (± standard error). Six of the 31 (19.4%) Italian patients had a pituitary carcinoma. Twenty-five patients (80.6%) had disease control during Temozolomide treatment, while 6 patients (19.4%) had disease progression. Median follow-up after beginning Temozolomide was 43 months. Thirteen patients had tumor growth after stopping Temozolomide. The 2-year progression-free survival was 47.7% (95% CI 29.5-65.9%), while the 2-year disease control duration was 59.1% (95% CI 39.1-79.1%). Eleven patients died of progressive disease and other two patients of unrelated causes. The 2-year and 4-year overall survival rates were 83.9% (95% CI 70.7-97.1%) and 59.6% (95% CI 40.0-79.2%), respectively. Temozolomide is an additional effective therapeutic option for the treatment of aggressive pituitary tumors. The drug is well tolerated and causes few severe adverse effects. Recurrence of the tumor can occur after an initial positive response and usually portends a grim outcome.

  18. Streamlining antibiotic therapy with procalcitonin protocols: consensus and controversies.

    PubMed

    Haubitz, Sebastian; Mueller, Beat; Schuetz, Philipp

    2013-04-01

    Accumulating evidence supports procalcitonin (PCT) as an accurate surrogate biomarker for likelihood and severity of bacterial infections. In community-acquired pneumonia and other respiratory infections, PCT-guided antibiotic therapy algorithms resulted in reduced antibiotic exposure while maintaining a similar or even better level of safety compared with standard care. Reductions in antibiotic use translate into lower treatment costs, decreased risk of side effects and decreased bacterial multiresistance. This is especially important, as acute respiratory infections represent the most frequent reason for antibiotic prescriptions worldwide. Still, there is some controversy about the benefits of PCT measurement in sepsis patients in the intensive care unit and for nonrespiratory infections. Highly sensitive PCT assays are readily available in many hospitals today, and point-of-care assays with high enough sensitivity for antibiotic guidance are expected to be available soon. Herein, the authors provide an overview of recent studies evaluating PCT in different clinical situations and an outlook of currently enrolling or upcoming interventional trials.

  19. Antibiotic lock therapy: review of technique and logistical challenges

    PubMed Central

    Justo, Julie Ann; Bookstaver, P Brandon

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotic lock therapy (ALT) for the prevention and treatment of catheter-related bloodstream infections is a simple strategy in theory, yet its real-world application may be delayed or avoided due to technical questions and/or logistical challenges. This review focuses on these latter aspects of ALT, including preparation information for a variety of antibiotic lock solutions (ie, aminoglycosides, beta-lactams, fluoroquinolones, folate antagonists, glycopeptides, glycylcyclines, lipopeptides, oxazolidinones, polymyxins, and tetracyclines) and common clinical issues surrounding ALT administration. Detailed data regarding concentrations, additives, stability/compatibility, and dwell times are summarized. Logistical challenges such as lock preparation procedures, use of additives (eg, heparin, citrate, or ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid), timing of initiation and therapy duration, optimal dwell time and catheter accessibility, and risks of ALT are also described. Development of local protocols is recommended in order to avoid these potential barriers and encourage utilization of ALT where appropriate. PMID:25548523

  20. Can Early Burkholderia cepacia Complex Infection in Cystic Fibrosis be Eradicated with Antibiotic Therapy?

    PubMed Central

    Horsley, Alex; Webb, Kevin; Bright-Thomas, Rowland; Govan, John; Jones, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Organisms of the Burkholderia cepacia complex (BCC) are important pathogens in cystic fibrosis (CF). The majority of those who acquire BCC develop chronic infection but it can also result in rapid decline in a significant minority. In addition, chronic infection with Burkholderia cenocepacia in particular is regarded as a contraindication to lung transplantation in many units. Whilst aggressive antibiotic therapy is employed in CF to eradicate Pseudomonas aeruginosa before infection becomes irreversibly established, no formal assessment of such strategies has been previously reported for BCC, despite the apparent widespread adoption of this practice. Methods: UK adult CF centers were surveyed about their current approach to new BCC infection. Outcomes of eradication therapy were assessed in patients attending the Manchester Adult CF Center with new BCC isolates between 1st January 2002 and 1st May 2011. Patients with previous infection with the same strain of BCC were excluded. BCC were identified at the national reference laboratories and confirmed by species-specific PCR and RecA sequencing. Results: Routine use of therapies to attempt eradication of new BCC is commonly used in the UK (12/17 centers who responded). This typically involves a combination of intravenous and nebulised antibiotics. Of 19 eligible cases of new BCC infection, the organism has been eradicated in 7 (37%). Three of these did not receive specific eradication therapy. Of 14 patients who have received eradication therapy and completed follow up, BCC were cleared in only 4 (29%). Conclusions: Attempted eradication of new BCC is a common practice in UK adult CF centers. A minority of patients clear the infection spontaneously and the effects of eradication therapies are at best modest. Early treatment may be associated with better outcomes, though there are insufficient data to support the use of any specific treatment regimen. A prospective, systematic evaluation of treatments

  1. Opportunistic microorganisms in patients undergoing antibiotic therapy for pulmonary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Querido, Silvia Maria Rodrigues; Back-Brito, Graziella Nuernberg; dos Santos, Silvana Soléo Ferreira; Leão, Mariella Vieira Pereira; Koga-Ito, Cristiane Yumi; Jorge, Antonio Olavo Cardoso

    2011-01-01

    Antimicrobial therapy may cause changes in the resident oral microbiota, with the increase of opportunistic pathogens. The aim of this study was to compare the prevalence of Candida, Staphylococcus, Pseudomonas and Enterobacteriaceae in the oral cavity of fifty patients undergoing antibiotic therapy for pulmonary tuberculosis and systemically healthy controls. Oral rinsing and subgingival samples were obtained, plated in Sabouraud dextrose agar with chloramphenicol, mannitol agar and MacConkey agar, and incubated for 48 h at 37°C. Candida spp. and coagulase-positive staphylococci were identified by phenotypic tests, C. dubliniensis, by multiplex PCR, and coagulase-negative staphylococci, Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonas spp., by the API systems. The number of Candida spp. was significantly higher in tuberculosis patients, and C. albicans was the most prevalent specie. No significant differences in the prevalence of other microorganisms were observed. In conclusion, the antimicrobial therapy for pulmonary tuberculosis induced significant increase only in the amounts of Candida spp. PMID:24031759

  2. The importance of teamwork for outpatient parenteral antibiotic therapy.

    PubMed

    Tice, A D

    1995-01-01

    A variety of treatment models can be constructed to provide intravenous antibiotic therapy outside the hospital. The type and details of each model must be adapted to local needs and resources, but those that coordinate the resources of all the primary members of the team necessary to care for patients, offer the greatest potential for a safe and efficient programme. We believe that the teamwork of the physician, nurse, and pharmacist in our clinic-based, physician-directed model can provide a safe and effective service, which is appreciated by the patients we care for.

  3. Reinforcement Behavior Therapy by Kindergarten Teachers on Preschool Children’s Aggression: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Yektatalab, Shahrzad; Alipour, Abdolrasool; Edraki, Mitra; Tavakoli, Pouran

    2016-01-01

    Background: Aggression is a kind of behavior that causes damage or harm to others. The prevalence of aggression is 8–20% in 3–6 years old children. The present study aimed to assess the effect of training kindergarten teachers regarding reinforcement behavior therapy on preschoolers’ aggression. Methods: In this cluster randomized control trial, 14 out of 35 kindergarten and preschool centers of Mohr city, Iran, were chosen using random cluster sampling and then randomly assigned to an intervention and a control group. All 370 kindergarten and preschool children in 14 kindergarten were assessed by preschoolers’ aggression questionnaire and 60 children who obtained a minimum aggression score of 117.48 for girls and 125.77 for boys were randomly selected. The teachers in the intervention group participated in 4 educational sessions on behavior therapy and then practiced this technique under the supervision of the researcher for two months. Preschoolers’ aggression questionnaire was computed in both intervention and control groups before and after a two-month period. Results: The results demonstrated a significant statistical difference in the total aggression score (P=0.01), verbal (P=0.02) and physical (P=0.01) aggression subscales scores in the intervention group in comparison to the control group after the intervention. But the scores of relational aggression (P=0.09) and impulsive anger (P=0.08) subscales were not statistically different in the intervention group compared to the controls. Conclusion: This study highlighted the importance of teaching reinforcement behavior therapy by kindergarten teachers in decreasing verbal and physical aggression in preschoolers. Trial Registration Number: IRCT2014042617436N1 PMID:26793733

  4. Efficacy of Postoperative Prophylactic Antibiotic Therapy in Third Molar Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Reddy B, Praveen

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Surgical extraction of mandibular third molar is the most frequently performed procedure in oral surgery. This procedure is associated with significant postoperative sequelae such as trismus, swelling, pain and infection. The need of antibiotic therapy during the removal of mandibular third molar has been a contentious issue. Method: This study investigated a regimen by using amoxycillin and metronidazole in one group and without using antibiotics in the other. Both the groups were assessed postoperatively on the 1st, 2nd, 5th, 7th and 10th days by the same observer for post operative mouth opening (interincisal distance), presence of a purulent discharge at the site of surgery, pain and swelling. Result: Overall, no statistically significant difference was seen between both the treatment groups when interincisal distance, pain, swelling and purulent discharge were considered. Conclusion: The results of this study failed to show any advantage which was associated with the routine postoperative use of antibiotics in asymptomatic third molar surgeries. PMID:24995236

  5. Understanding veterinarians' prescribing decisions on antibiotic dry cow therapy.

    PubMed

    Higgins, H M; Golding, S E; Mouncey, J; Nanjiani, I; Cook, A J C

    2017-04-01

    In the United Kingdom, blanket antibiotic dry cow therapy (BDCT) is commonly prescribed. An alternate strategy is selective dry cow therapy (SDCT) whereby a teat sealant is given instead of an antibiotic to cows with a low probability of infection. Switching from BDCT to SDCT can significantly reduce antibiotic use. The aims of this study were to explore how veterinarians (vets) rationalized their prescribing decisions for mammary treatments at drying off, and the barriers and motivators they perceived to implementing SDCT. Face-to-face interviews were conducted with 20 purposively recruited vets from 6 practices in England, United Kingdom. The data were analyzed qualitatively using an inductive thematic analysis. The majority of participants stated a personal preference for SDCT because it constitutes more responsible antibiotic use. On the majority of farms, the prescribing decision was taken by a senior veterinarian and BDCT was prescribed. Less experienced vets expressed a desire to be more involved in the decision-making process. The first theme, prioritizing responsible antimicrobial prescribing, encapsulated the difficulties vets expressed engaging with farmers, conflicts of interest, and vets' determination to take action. The second theme, the effect of a vet's experience on their ability to influence farmers, focused on the specific challenges faced by less experienced vets and the importance of vets being both trusted by farmers and being knowledgeable. The third theme, vets' perceptions about the risk and complexity of implementing SDCT, revealed markedly different levels of concern and fears about adverse outcomes with teat sealants versus antibiotics. The results also showed differences in perceptions about how difficult SDCT is to implement in practice. The last theme, vets' suggestions for facilitating the introduction of SDCT, was wide ranging and provided useful insight from a veterinary perspective into ways to facilitate SDCT. Initiatives that

  6. Antibiotics

    MedlinePlus

    Antibiotics are powerful medicines that fight bacterial infections. Used properly, antibiotics can save lives. They either kill bacteria or ... natural defenses can usually take it from there. Antibiotics do not fight infections caused by viruses, such ...

  7. Effect of an Undergraduate Special Problems Elective upon Student Knowledge of Antibiotic Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacCosbe, Paul E.; Segelman, Alvin B.

    1984-01-01

    The knowledge of antibiotic therapy among students taking an elective course in antibiotic prescription following a course in antibiotics and infectious diseases was compared with those not taking the follow-up elective course, and it was determined that the elective course reinforced existing knowledge. (MSE)

  8. [Antibiotic therapy of bacterial infections of the oral cavity].

    PubMed

    Scaglione, F; Castorina, A

    1989-09-30

    More than 300 commencial bacterial species may be found in the oral cavity. Other microorganisms, such as mycoplasms, mycetes, protozoa and viruses are present as well. The virulency of the saprofites and additional contamination by outside microorganisms are factors determining the development of infectious process in the oral tissues. Moreover, streptococci and anaerobes are the most frequent aetiology agents. The antibiotic therapy should comply with the general treatment criteria, on the one hand, and should be specific for these microorganism, on the other. The penicillines (ampicillin, bacampicillin and especially amoxycillin) process pharmacokinetic properties which make them a favorable choice for treatment. These drugs are effective in case of streptococcal infections, with cariogenic processes involvement and dissemination (endocarditis, glomerulonephritis). Other, frequently used drugs are spiramycin, erythromycin, josamycin and myocamycin that are selectively taken up by the oral tissues and present in large quantities in the saliva. The macrolides have a large spectrum of action on microorganisms normally found in the oral cavity. Lincosamides (lincomycin and clindamycin) are active on anaerobes and are drugs of choice for treatment of staphylococcal osteomyelitis. Tetracycline therapy is restricted usually to parodontite cases caused by Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans and Capnocytophaga. In conclusion, the choice of antibacterial therapy should be based on the bacterial aetiology, as well as on the intrinsic drug characteristics (pharmacokinetic, side effects, toxicity etc.).

  9. Implementation of a procalcitonin-guided algorithm for antibiotic therapy in the burn intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    Lavrentieva, A.; Kontou, P.; Soulountsi, V.; Kioumis, J.; Chrysou, O.; Bitzani, M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The purpose of this study was to examine the hypothesis that an algorithm based on serial measurements of procalcitonin (PCT) allows reduction in the duration of antibiotic therapy compared with empirical rules, and does not result in more adverse outcomes in burn patients with infectious complications. All burn patients requiring antibiotic therapy based on confirmed or highly suspected bacterial infections were eligible. Patients were assigned to either a procalcitonin-guided (study group) or a standard (control group) antibiotic regimen. The following variables were analyzed and compared in both groups: duration of antibiotic treatment, mortality rate, percentage of patients with relapse or superinfection, maximum SOFA score (days 1-28), length of ICU and hospital stay. A total of 46 Burn ICU patients receiving antibiotic therapy were enrolled in this study. In 24 patients antibiotic therapy was guided by daily procalcitonin and clinical assessment. PCT guidance resulted in a smaller antibiotic exposure (10.1±4 vs. 15.3±8 days, p=0.034) without negative effects on clinical outcome characteristics such as mortality rate, percentage of patients with relapse or superinfection, maximum SOFA score, length of ICU and hospital stay. The findings thus show that use of a procalcitonin-guided algorithm for antibiotic therapy in the burn intensive care unit may contribute to the reduction of antibiotic exposure without compromising clinical outcome parameters. PMID:27279801

  10. Beta-lactam antibiotic dosing during continuous renal replacement therapy: how can we optimize therapy?

    PubMed

    De Waele, Jan J; Carlier, Mieke

    2014-06-26

    Correct antibiotic treatment is of utmost importance to treat infections in critically ill patients, not only in terms of spectrum and timing but also in terms of dosing. However, this is a real challenge for the clinician because the pathophysiology (such as shock, augmented renal clearance, and multiple organ dysfunction) has a major impact on the pharmacokinetics of hydrophilic antibiotics. The presence of extra-corporal circuits, such as continuous renal replacement therapy, may further complicate this difficult exercise. Standard dosing may result in inadequate concentrations, but unadjusted dosing regimens may lead to toxicity. Recent studies confirm the variability in concentrations, and the wide variation in dialysis techniques used certainly contributes to these findings. Well-designed clinical studies are needed to provide the data from which robust dosing guidance can be developed. In the meantime, non-adjusted dosing in the first 1 to 2 days of antibiotic therapy during continuous renal replacement therapy followed by dose reduction later on seems to be a prudent approach.

  11. How competition governs whether moderate or aggressive treatment minimizes antibiotic resistance

    PubMed Central

    Colijn, Caroline; Cohen, Ted

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how our use of antimicrobial drugs shapes future levels of drug resistance is crucial. Recently, there has been debate over whether an aggressive (i.e., high dose) or more moderate (i.e., lower dose) treatment of individuals will most limit the emergence and spread of resistant bacteria. In this study, we demonstrate how one can understand and resolve these apparently contradictory conclusions. We show that a key determinant of which treatment strategy will perform best at the individual level is the extent of effective competition between resistant and sensitive pathogens within a host. We extend our analysis to the community level, exploring the spectrum between strict inter-strain competition and strain independence. From this perspective as well, we find that the magnitude of effective competition between resistant and sensitive strains determines whether an aggressive approach or moderate approach minimizes the burden of resistance in the population. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10559.001 PMID:26393685

  12. The Role of Aggressive Corticosteroid Therapy in Patients With Juvenile Dermatomyositis: A Propensity Score Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Seshadri, Roopa; Feldman, Brian M.; Ilowite, Norman; Cawkwell, Gail; Pachman, Lauren M.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To compare outcomes at 36 months in patients newly diagnosed with juvenile dermatomyositis (DM) treated with aggressive versus standard therapy. Methods At diagnosis, 139 untreated juvenile DM patients were given aggressive therapy (intravenous methylprednisolone or oral prednisone 5–30 mg/kg/day; n = 76) or standard therapy (1–2 mg/kg/day; n = 63) by the treating physician. Aggressive therapy patients were more ill at diagnosis. Matching was based on the propensity for aggressive therapy because propensity scoring can reduce confounding by indication. Logistic regression of the matched data determined predictors of outcomes, controlling for clinical confounders and propensity score. Outcomes comprised Disease Activity Score (DAS) for skin and muscle, range of motion (ROM), and calcification. Results Sex, race, and age were similar between groups, and initial DAS weakness and ROM significantly predicted the therapy chosen. Based on propensity scores, 42 patients from each group were well matched. In the matched pairs, there were no significant differences in outcomes. Methotrexate use (odds ratio [OR] 3.6, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1.15–11.5) and duration of untreated disease (OR 1.2, 95% CI 1–1.38) were associated with ROM loss, hydroxychloroquine use (OR 11.2, 95% CI 3.7–33) and calcification (OR 6.8, 95% CI 1.8–25.4) with persistent rash, abnormal baseline lactate dehydrogenase (OR 11.2, 95% CI 1.4–92) and age at onset (OR 1.3, 95% CI 1–1.4) with weakness, and duration of untreated disease (OR 1.2, 95% CI 1–1.39) with calcification. Conclusion Using a retrospective, nonrandomized design with propensity score matching, there was little difference in efficacy outcomes between aggressive and standard therapy; however, the sickest patients were treated with aggressive therapy and were not included in the matched analysis. Comprehensive clinical studies are needed to determine therapeutic pathways to the best outcome. PMID:18576304

  13. Efficacy of Photodynamic Therapy and Lasers as an Adjunct to Scaling and Root Planing in the Treatment of Aggressive Periodontitis – A Clinical and Microbiologic Short Term Study

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Indranil; Rajan, Padma; Pai, Jagdish; Malagi, Sachin; Bharmappa, Radhika; Kamath, Vinesh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Aggressive periodontitis comprises a group of rare, severe, rapidly progressive form of periodontitis. Conventional treatment includes mechanical debridement augmented with adjunctive antimicrobial therapy. Development of antibiotic resistance has led to use of lasers. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a novel non-invasive therapeutic approach with increased site and pathogen specificity. This study compares PDT and Lasers as an adjunct to conventional Scaling in the treatment of patients with aggressive periodontitis. Materials and Methods Fifteen untreated aggressive periodo-ntitis patients were randomly assigned in a split mouth design for one of the following treatment modalities: 1) SRP alone; (2) SRP + Diode Laser irradiation with 810 nm at 1W, continuous mode for 30 sec per tooth; (3) SRP + PDT on “0” day; (4) SRP + PDT on “0”, 7th and 21st day. The clinical parameters included PI, BOP, PPD, CAL recorded at the baseline & 3rd month. The site with greatest probing pocket depth (PPD) was selected from each quadrant for bacterial sampling and cultured for Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and Porphyromonas gingivalis & Prevotella intermedia. Results Statistically significant reduction in clinical & microbial parameters was seen. Sites 4 showed a greater reduction compared to other groups. Conclusion Photodynamic therapy is a valuable treatment modality adjunctive to conventional scaling and root planing. PMID:27042576

  14. Fighting urinary tract infections with antibiotic and non-antibiotic therapies.

    PubMed

    Peri, Lluis

    2016-06-25

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) place a considerable burden on the patient and are associated with substantial economic cost. Treatment of UTIs is mainly achieved using antibiotics, however, the rise in antibiotic resistance is concerning and the use of non-antimicrobial prophylaxis offers alternative treatment methods.

  15. Aggressive therapy improves cirrhosis in glycogen storage disease type IX.

    PubMed

    Tsilianidis, Laurie A; Fiske, Laurie M; Siegel, Sara; Lumpkin, Chris; Hoyt, Kate; Wasserstein, Melissa; Weinstein, David A

    2013-06-01

    Glycogen storage disease type IX (GSD IX) is described as a benign condition that often does not require treatment. Most patients with the disease are thought to outgrow the childhood manifestations, which include hepatomegaly, poor growth, and ketosis with or without hypoglycemia. Long term complications including fibrosis and cirrhosis have seldom been reported in the most common subtype, GSD IXα. We present two cases of children with GSD IXα who had fibrosis at the time of diagnosis in addition to the commonly reported disease manifestations. Structured therapy with frequent doses of uncooked cornstarch and protein supplementation was initiated, and both children responded with improved growth velocity, increased energy, decreased hepatomegaly and improved well-being. Additionally, radiographic features of fibrosis improved. We propose that GSD IXα is not a benign condition. Even in patients with a less severe presentation, consideration of a structured treatment regimen to improve quality of life appears warranted.

  16. Protocol for extended antibiotic therapy after laparoscopic cholecystectomy for acute calculous cholecystitis (Cholecystectomy Antibiotic Randomised Trial, CHART)

    PubMed Central

    Pellegrini, Pablo; Campana, Juan Pablo; Dietrich, Agustín; Goransky, Jeremías; Glinka, Juan; Giunta, Diego; Barcan, Laura; Alvarez, Fernando; Mazza, Oscar; Sánchez Claria, Rodrigo; Palavecino, Martin; Arbues, Guillermo; Ardiles, Victoria; de Santibañes, Eduardo; Pekolj, Juan; de Santibañes, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Acute calculous cholecystitis represents one of the most common complications of cholelithiasis. While laparoscopic cholecystectomy is the standard treatment in mild and moderate forms, the need for antibiotic therapy after surgery remains undefined. The aim of the randomised controlled Cholecystectomy Antibiotic Randomised Trial (CHART) is therefore to assess if there are benefits in the use of postoperative antibiotics in patients with mild or moderate acute cholecystitis in whom a laparoscopic cholecystectomy is performed. Methods and analysis A single-centre, double-blind, randomised trial. After screening for eligibility and informed consent, 300 patients admitted for acute calculus cholecystitis will be randomised into two groups of treatment, either receiving amoxicillin/clavulanic acid or placebo for 5 consecutive days. Postoperative evaluation will take place during the first 30 days. Postoperative infectious complications are the primary end point. Secondary end points are length of hospital stay, readmissions, need of reintervention (percutaneous or surgical reinterventions) and overall mortality. The results of this trial will provide strong evidence to either support or abandon the use of antibiotics after surgery, impacting directly in the incidence of adverse events associated with the use of antibiotics, the emergence of bacterial resistance and treatment costs. Ethics and dissemination This study and informed consent sheets have been approved by the Research Projects Evaluating Committee (CEPI) of Hospital Italiano de Buenos Aires (protocol N° 2111). Results The results of the trial will be reported in a peer-reviewed publication. Trial registration number NCT02057679. PMID:26582405

  17. Prophylaxis and antibiotic therapy in management protocols of patients treated with oral and intravenous bisphosphonates

    PubMed Central

    Bermúdez-Bejarano, Elena-Beatriz; Serrera-Figallo, María-Ángeles; Gutiérrez-Corrales, Aida; Romero-Ruiz, Manuel-María; Castillo-de-Oyagüe, Raquel; Gutiérrez-Pérez, José-Luis

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Osteonecrosis of the jaw (MRONJ) linked to bisphosphonate treatment has specific characteristics that render its therapeutic management challenging for clinicians. Poor response to standard treatment makes it essential to take special precautions when treating this type of disease; therefore, antibiotic prophylaxis and/or antibiotic therapy have been proposed as effective and helpful tools in these situations. Objectives This article seeks to assess published evidence in order to evaluate the different protocols used for antibiotic prophylaxis and/or antibiotic therapy in the general context of patients treated with bisphosphonates. Material and Methods A literature review of the last 10 years was carried out in PubMed using the following keywords: “antibiotic prophylaxis and osteonecrosis,” “bisphosphonates AND osteonecrosis AND dental management,” “bisphosphonate AND osteonecrosis AND antibiotic prophylaxis AND oral surgery.” A total of 188 articles were obtained, of which 18 were ultimately selected. Results and Discussion In patients treated with oral and intravenous bisphosphonates without chemotherapy-associated osteonecrosis of the jaw, antibiotic prophylaxis prior to oral surgery is an important tool to avoid osteonecrosis and promote healing of the affected area. If the patient previously exhibited chemotherapy-associated osteonecrosis after tooth extraction, antibiotic prophylaxis is indicated to prevent recurrent osteonecrosis and promote healing of the extraction site. If chemotherapy-associated osteonecrosis is already present, antibiotic therapy is a vital part of conservative management to reduce the symptomatology of MRONJ and keep it from worsening. Finally, a lack of clinical data and randomized controlled trials makes it difficult to choose the most appropriate protocol for the various clinical situations studied. Key words:Bisphosphonates, antibiotic prophylaxis, maxillary osteonecrosis, antibiotic treatment. PMID

  18. Osmotic therapies added to antibiotics for acute bacterial meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Wall, Emma CB; Ajdukiewicz, Katherine MB; Heyderman, Robert S; Garner, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Background Every day children and adults throughout the world die from acute community-acquired bacterial meningitis, particularly in low-income countries. Survivors are at risk of deafness, epilepsy and neurological disabilities. Osmotic therapies have been proposed as an adjunct to improve mortality and morbidity from bacterial meningitis. The theory is that they will attract extra-vascular fluid by osmosis and thus reduce cerebral oedema by moving excess water from the brain into the blood. The intention is to thus reduce death and improve neurological outcomes. Objectives To evaluate the effects on mortality, deafness and neurological disability of osmotic therapies added to antibiotics for acute bacterial meningitis in children and adults. Search methods We searched CENTRAL 2012, Issue 11, MEDLINE (1950 to November week 3, 2012), EMBASE (1974 to November 2012), CINAHL (1981 to November 2012), LILACS (1982 to November 2012) and registers of ongoing clinical trials (April 2012). We also searched conference abstracts and contacted researchers in the field. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials testing any osmotic therapy in adults or children with acute bacterial meningitis. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently screened the search results and selected trials for inclusion. We collected data from each study for mortality, deafness, seizures and neurological disabilities. Results are presented using risk ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) and grouped according to whether the participants received steroids or not. Main results Four trials were included comprising 1091 participants. All compared glycerol (a water-soluble sugar alcohol) with a control; in three trials this was a placebo, and in one a small amount of 50% dextrose. Three trials included comparators of dexamethasone alone or in combination with glycerol. As dexamethasone appeared to have no modifying effect, we aggregated results across arms where both

  19. Maintenance electroconvulsive therapy for aggression and self-injurious behavior in two adolescents with autism and catatonia.

    PubMed

    Haq, Aazaz U; Ghaziuddin, Neera

    2014-01-01

    Frequent aggression toward others and repetitive self-injurious behaviors (SIB) can be features of catatonia in patients with autism. Similar to catatonia secondary to other etiologies, catatonia associated with autism responds well to treatment with benzodiazepines and/or electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). The authors report here on two adolescent patients with autism who presented with severe aggression, one of whom also engaged in repetitive SIB. With ongoing treatment with maintenance ECT, dramatic reduction in aggression and SIB were noted, allowing both patients a reasonable quality of life in their own homes. Attempts to taper off ECT coincided with return of aggression symptoms, although not SIB.

  20. [Pharmaco-economic evaluation of antibiotic therapy in a ward for infections diseases

    PubMed

    Sabbatani, S.; Cannella, B.; Fulgaro, C.; Pipitone, E.; Cesari, R.

    2000-01-01

    For all hospitalized patients admitted in the first six months of 1999, we recorded the data relative to antibiotic therapy (TA) administered, establishing the period of treatment in days and the dosage, including any variations during the period in question. We calculated the prescribed daily dose (PDD) and were thus able to establish the expense incurred in antibiotic therapy, comparing the real overall cost per product used. For all patients, the discharge diagnosis was reported, and the whole case-study was aggregated into homogeneous groups. PDD was compared with DDD (defined daily doses). The Pareto curve was used to highlight the antibiotics with higher overall cost. Besides cotrimoxazole, ceftriaxone and ciprofloxacin were the antibiotics most frequently prescribed, while ceftriaxone, imipenem-cilastatine and vancomycin were the antibiotics incurring the greatest expense. With reference to the average duration of the treatment cycle, ceftriaxone (9.75 dd) and ciprofloxacin tbl (6.75 dd) were the only antibiotics (in monotherapy) used for less than 10 treatment days. Special attention was paid to analysing the TA costs in treating pneumonia, which accounted for the highest percentage of cases (50 cases). Ceftriaxone, especially pulmonary infections, was the most commonly used drug. In hospitalized subjects treated who show good therapeutic response, we recommend early discharge and continuation of the therapy at home (switch therapy). This strategy will allow the patient to return to his/her family in good time, also thereby reducing hospital management costs.

  1. Synthesis and characterization of magnetite/silver/antibiotic nanocomposites for targeted antimicrobial therapy.

    PubMed

    Ivashchenko, Olena; Lewandowski, Mikołaj; Peplińska, Barbara; Jarek, Marcin; Nowaczyk, Grzegorz; Wiesner, Maciej; Załęski, Karol; Babutina, Tetyana; Warowicka, Alicja; Jurga, Stefan

    2015-10-01

    The article is devoted to preparation and characterization of magnetite/silver/antibiotic nanocomposites for targeted antimicrobial therapy. Magnetite nanopowder was produced by thermochemical technique; silver was deposited on the magnetite nanoparticles in the form of silver clusters. Magnetite/silver nanocomposite was investigated by XRD, SEM, TEM, AFM, XPS, EDX techniques. Adsorptivity of magnetite/silver nanocomposite towards seven antibiotics from five different groups was investigated. It was shown that rifampicin, doxycycline, ceftriaxone, cefotaxime and doxycycline may be attached by physical adsorption to magnetite/silver nanocomposite. Electrostatic surfaces of antibiotics were modeled and possible mechanism of antibiotic attachment is considered in this article. Raman spectra of magnetite, magnetite/silver and magnetite/silver/antibiotic were collected. It was found that it is difficult to detect the bands related to antibiotics in the magnetite/silver/antibiotic nanocomposite spectra due to their overlap by the broad carbon bands of magnetite nanopowder. Magnetic measurements revealed that magnetic saturation of the magnetite/silver/antibiotic nanocomposites decreased on 6-19 % in comparison with initial magnetite nanopowder. Pilot study of antimicrobial properties of the magnetite/silver/antibiotic nanocomposites were performed towards Bacillus pumilus.

  2. Neonatal sepsis, antibiotic therapy and later risk of asthma and allergy.

    PubMed

    Sobko, Tanja; Schiött, Jessica; Ehlin, Anna; Lundberg, Jon; Montgomery, Scott; Norman, Mikael

    2010-01-01

    Neonatal sepsis and early antibiotic therapy affect bacterial colonisation and immune activation after birth. This could have implications for later risk of allergy and asthma. Using a validated questionnaire (International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Children, ISAAC), we screened for asthma and allergy in three cohorts (total n = 834; median age 12, range 7-23 years) with different perinatal exposures as regards infection and antibiotics. Asthma, but not hay fever, was more prevalent after neonatal sepsis with adjusted odds ratio (OR) 1.63 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.04, 2.56] and early antibiotic therapy (OR 1.48 [0.93, 2.35]) as compared with a control group. There was a trend towards increased atopic eczema after neonatal sepsis (OR = 1.39 [CI = 0.98, 1.98]). We conclude that neonatal sepsis is associated with an increased risk for later development of asthma. Early antibiotic exposure may contribute to this association.

  3. Usefulness of aetiological tests for guiding antibiotic therapy in community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Strålin, K

    2008-01-01

    The goal with antibiotic therapy in community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is to cure the patient, ideally without causing side effects and without contributing to the further development of antibiotic resistance. Although patients with severe CAP should be treated with broad-spectrum antibiotics, patients with non-severe CAP should preferably receive pathogen-directed therapy. Rapid aetiological tests, such as sputum Gram stain and urinary antigen tests, are useful for targeting initial pathogen-directed therapy. Non-rapid tests, such as cultures, can subsequently support a switch from initial broad-spectrum therapy to narrow-spectrum therapy and direct therapy changes in case of treatment failure. As conventional diagnostic methods often fail to identify the aetiology of CAP, PCR (polymerase chain reaction) tests for respiratory pathogens have become useful and should be further developed. Based on the test specificities, aetiological tests may provide diagnoses with varying reliability, i.e. definite aetiologies (e.g., blood culture and Legionella urinary antigen test), probable aetiologies (e.g., sputum culture and PCR for Mycoplasma pneumoniae), or possible aetiologies (e.g., culture of nasopharyngeal secretions and PCR for Streptococcus pneumoniae). A definite or probable aetiology can often be used to target antibiotic therapy.

  4. Effects of Long Term Antibiotic Therapy on Human Oral and Fecal Viromes

    PubMed Central

    Abeles, Shira R.; Ly, Melissa; Santiago-Rodriguez, Tasha M.; Pride, David T.

    2015-01-01

    Viruses are integral members of the human microbiome. Many of the viruses comprising the human virome have been identified as bacteriophage, and little is known about how they respond to perturbations within the human ecosystem. The intimate association of phage with their cellular hosts suggests their communities may change in response to shifts in bacterial community membership. Alterations to human bacterial biota can result in human disease including a reduction in the host's resilience to pathogens. Here we report the ecology of oral and fecal viral communities and their responses to long-term antibiotic therapy in a cohort of human subjects. We found significant differences between the viral communities of each body site with a more heterogeneous fecal virus community compared with viruses in saliva. We measured the relative diversity of viruses, and found that the oral viromes were significantly more diverse than fecal viromes. There were characteristic changes in the membership of oral and fecal bacterial communities in response to antibiotics, but changes in fecal viral communities were less distinguishing. In the oral cavity, an abundance of papillomaviruses found in subjects on antibiotics suggests an association between antibiotics and papillomavirus production. Despite the abundance of papillomaviruses identified, in neither the oral nor the fecal viromes did antibiotic therapy have any significant impact upon overall viral diversity. There was, however, an apparent expansion of the reservoir of genes putatively involved in resistance to numerous classes of antibiotics in fecal viromes that was not paralleled in oral viromes. The emergence of antibiotic resistance in fecal viromes in response to long-term antibiotic therapy in humans suggests that viruses play an important role in the resilience of human microbial communities to antibiotic disturbances. PMID:26309137

  5. Antibiotic Susceptibilities of Bacteria Isolated within the Oral Flora of Florida Blacktip Sharks: Guidance for Empiric Antibiotic Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Unger, Nathan R.; Ritter, Erich; Borrego, Robert; Goodman, Jay; Osiyemi, Olayemi O.

    2014-01-01

    Sharks possess a variety of pathogenic bacteria in their oral cavity that may potentially be transferred into humans during a bite. The aim of the presented study focused on the identification of the bacteria present in the mouths of live blacktip sharks, Carcharhinus limbatus, and the extent that these bacteria possess multi-drug resistance. Swabs were taken from the oral cavity of nineteen live blacktip sharks, which were subsequently released. The average fork length was 146 cm (±11), suggesting the blacktip sharks were mature adults at least 8 years old. All swabs underwent standard microbiological work-up with identification of organisms and reporting of antibiotic susceptibilities using an automated microbiology system. The oral samples revealed an average of 2.72 (±1.4) bacterial isolates per shark. Gram-negative bacteria, making up 61% of all bacterial isolates, were significantly (p<0.001) more common than gram-positive bacteria (39%). The most common organisms were Vibrio spp. (28%), various coagulase-negative Staphylococcus spp. (16%), and Pasteurella spp. (12%). The overall resistance rate was 12% for all antibiotics tested with nearly 43% of bacteria resistant to at least one antibiotic. Multi-drug resistance was seen in 4% of bacteria. No association between shark gender or fork length with bacterial density or antibiotic resistance was observed. Antibiotics with the highest overall susceptibility rates included fluoroquinolones, 3rd generation cephalosporins and sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim. Recommended empiric antimicrobial therapy for adult blacktip shark bites should encompass either a fluoroquinolone or combination of a 3rd generation cephalosporin plus doxycycline. PMID:25110948

  6. Antibiotic susceptibilities of bacteria isolated within the oral flora of Florida blacktip sharks: guidance for empiric antibiotic therapy.

    PubMed

    Unger, Nathan R; Ritter, Erich; Borrego, Robert; Goodman, Jay; Osiyemi, Olayemi O

    2014-01-01

    Sharks possess a variety of pathogenic bacteria in their oral cavity that may potentially be transferred into humans during a bite. The aim of the presented study focused on the identification of the bacteria present in the mouths of live blacktip sharks, Carcharhinus limbatus, and the extent that these bacteria possess multi-drug resistance. Swabs were taken from the oral cavity of nineteen live blacktip sharks, which were subsequently released. The average fork length was 146 cm (±11), suggesting the blacktip sharks were mature adults at least 8 years old. All swabs underwent standard microbiological work-up with identification of organisms and reporting of antibiotic susceptibilities using an automated microbiology system. The oral samples revealed an average of 2.72 (±1.4) bacterial isolates per shark. Gram-negative bacteria, making up 61% of all bacterial isolates, were significantly (p<0.001) more common than gram-positive bacteria (39%). The most common organisms were Vibrio spp. (28%), various coagulase-negative Staphylococcus spp. (16%), and Pasteurella spp. (12%). The overall resistance rate was 12% for all antibiotics tested with nearly 43% of bacteria resistant to at least one antibiotic. Multi-drug resistance was seen in 4% of bacteria. No association between shark gender or fork length with bacterial density or antibiotic resistance was observed. Antibiotics with the highest overall susceptibility rates included fluoroquinolones, 3rd generation cephalosporins and sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim. Recommended empiric antimicrobial therapy for adult blacktip shark bites should encompass either a fluoroquinolone or combination of a 3rd generation cephalosporin plus doxycycline.

  7. [The problem of growing resistance of microorganisms to antibiotic therapy and prospects for Helicobacter pylori eradication].

    PubMed

    Tsimmerman, Ia S

    2013-01-01

    The problem of growing resistance of microorganisms to antibiotic therapy acquires increasingly greater significance as threatening the loss of endosymbiotic bacteria. The causes, mechanisms, and consequences of this phenomenon are considered. Several groups of modern antibiotic drugs are characterized along with the methods for improving their efficacy and preventing side effects. The schemes for Helicobacter pylori eradication as recommended by the Maastricht consensus are discussed in conjunction with major mistakes accounting for marked reduction of their effectiveness. Terminological issues are briefly considered.

  8. [Antibiotic therapy of bone and joint infections in children: recent changes].

    PubMed

    Lorrot, M; Doit, C; Ilharreborde, B; Vitoux, C; Le Henaff, L; Sebag, G; Pennecot, G; Grimprel, E; Bingen, É

    2011-09-01

    Management of bone and joint infections in children associates early appropriate antibiotic therapy against Staphylococcus aureus and Kingella kingae and, if necessary, surgical drainage of abscess or septic arthritis. In 2007, the Paediatric Infectious Diseases Group of the French Society of Paediatrics (GPIP) proposed guidelines for antibiotherapy in acute and non-complicated cases, with an intravenous therapy during 4 to 7 days followed by oral therapy during 3 weeks.

  9. Dexa-BEAM as salvage therapy in patients with primary refractory aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Atta, Johannes; Chow, Kai U; Weidmann, Eckhart; Mitrou, Paris S; Hoelzer, Dieter; Martin, Hans

    2007-02-01

    Although aggressive NHL in relapse after remission can still be cured by second-line treatment followed by high-dose therapy and autologous stem cell transplantation, the long-term prognosis of patients who fail to obtain remission after first-line therapy remains extremely poor. We retrospectively evaluated a series of 29 consecutive patients with primary refractory high-grade NHL who were treated with Dexa-BEAM (DB) as uniform salvage therapy at a single institution. Twenty-nine patients with aggressive NHL primary refractory to CHOP or CHOP-like induction therapy with a median age of 47 (range, 22 - 64) years received 1 - 2 cycles of DB and were candidates for subsequent autologous stem cell (PBSC) mobilization and transplantation (PBSCT). Follow-up of all patients was updated in March 2004. Eight of 29 patients (28%) responded to one cycle of DB (1 complete/7 partial remissions); 2 of whom are alive after PBSCT (1 autologous/1 matched unrelated donor), 1 patient died after autologous PBSCT. Reasons for failure to proceed to high-dose therapy in spite of response to DB were recurrent progressive disease (n = 2), septicemia (n = 1), and allogeneic transplant-related mortality after mobilization failure to DB (n = 2). Twenty-one patients failed to respond to DB and died of progressive disease. Overall survival was 7% after 41 months. We conclude that Dexa-BEAM salvage therapy is not effective in patients with truly primary refractory high-grade NHL. The efficiency of rituximab combined with Dexa-BEAM or novel chemotherapeutic strategies needs to be established.

  10. De-escalation, adequacy of antibiotic therapy and culture positivity in septic patients: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    Moraes, Rafael Barberena; Guillén, Julián Alberto Viteri; Zabaleta, William Javier Castillo; Borges, Flavia Kessler

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the prevalence of antibiotic de-escalation in patients diagnosed with severe sepsis or septic shock at a public academic tertiary hospital and to evaluate antibiotic adequacy and culture positivity. Methods The prevalence of antibiotic de-escalation, the adequacy of antibiotic treatment and the rates of culture positivity were analyzed in patients with severe sepsis and septic shock between April and December 2013 at an intensive care unit in a tertiary university hospital. Results Among the 224 patients included in the study, de-escalation was appropriate in 66 patients (29.4%) but was implemented in 44 patients (19.6%). Among the patients who underwent de-escalation, half experienced narrowing of the antimicrobial spectrum. The mortality rate was 56.3%, with no differences between the patients with or without de-escalation (56.8% versus 56.1%; p = 0.999) nor in the length of hospital stay. Empirical antibiotic therapy was appropriate in 89% of cases. Microorganisms were isolated from total cultures in 30% of cases and from blood cultures in 26.3% of cases. Conclusion The adequacy rate of empirical antibiotic therapy was high, reflecting an active institutional policy of monitoring epidemiological profiles and institutional protocols on antimicrobial use. However, antibiotic de-escalation could have been implemented in a greater number of patients. De-escalation did not affect mortality rates. PMID:27626951

  11. Early and adequate antibiotic therapy in the treatment of severe sepsis and septic shock.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, John D; Kollef, Marin H

    2011-10-01

    Severe sepsis and septic shock are conditions that pose difficult challenges to physicians and the health care system. In the past 10 years, a number of retrospective and prospective observational studies have shed light on the importance of a rapid and systematic approach to treatment of these conditions. A key component is early and appropriate use of antibiotics. Delay of even 6 h can dramatically increase hospital mortality. In addition, multivariate analyses have demonstrated that inappropriate initial antibiotics lead to worse outcomes. The treating physician can rapidly identify risk factors for initial inappropriate antibiotics at the bedside, such as recent antibiotic therapy or recent hospitalization. Organized antibiotic order sets have been shown to significantly improve timely appropriate antibiotic administration in septic patients. Finally, emerging laboratory data suggest that early in the course of septic shock, the pharmacokinetics of common broad spectrum antibiotics may be significantly altered due to increased volumes of distribution having dosing implications for antibiotics in septic shock.

  12. Selection of therapy for acne vulgaris: balancing concerns about antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Del Rosso, James Q

    2008-11-01

    The widespread use of long-term antibiotics to treat acne and rosacea has resulted in increased Propionibacterium acnes resistance to antibiotics. Although resistance may decrease treatment effectiveness in some cases, it also is clear that antimicrobial activity is not the only role antibiotics play in acne management. The anti-inflammatory activity of antibiotics contributes to antipropionibacterial efficacy. In addition, the use of benzoyl peroxide (BPO) in combination with antibiotics to reduce resistant populations of propionibacteria is widely advocated, as P acnes has not developed resistance to it. P acnes now is known to form biofilms, which are bacterial communities that live encased in a glycocalyx polymer that aids in adherence to surfaces, thereby delaying antibiotic penetration. In addition to drug resistance, patient compliance with acne treatment is an important issue. Because compliance is a function of tolerability and convenience, new moisturizing noncomedogenic vehicles and fixed BPO-antibiotic combinations can be expected to improve compliance. Better efficacy has been noted with BPO-antibiotic combination therapy.

  13. Local antibiotic therapy strategies in orthopaedic trauma: Practical tips and tricks and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Hake, Mark E; Young, Heather; Hak, David J; Stahel, Philip F; Hammerberg, E Mark; Mauffrey, Cyril

    2015-08-01

    The use of local antibiotics for the prevention of infection in the setting of open fractures and as part of the treatment of osteomyelitis is well established. Antibiotics are most commonly incorporated into polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) cement, which can then be formed into beads, moulded to fit a bone defect or used to coat a guide wire or IM nail. Newer delivery vehicles and techniques are being evaluated to improve upon these methods. Many factors influence how local antibiotics are applied. Treatment strategies are challenging to standardise due to the variability of clinical presentations. The presence of hardware, upper versus lower extremity, healed versus non-healed fracture and quality of soft tissues overlying the affected bone, as well as patients' comorbidities all need to be considered. Despite the accepted use of local antibiotic therapy in orthopaedic trauma, high-quality evidence regarding the use of local antibiotics is lacking. Indications, techniques, dosages, types of antibiotics, elution properties and pharmacokinetics are poorly defined in the clinical setting. The purpose of our manuscript is to review current strategies and provide practical tips for local application of antibiotics in orthopaedic trauma. We focus on delivery vehicles, types of antibiotics, dosage recommendations when mixed with PMMA and indications.

  14. Novel Microdilution Method to Assess Double and Triple Antibiotic Combination Therapy In Vitro.

    PubMed

    El-Azizi, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    An in vitro microdilution method was developed to assess double and triple combinations of antibiotics. Five antibiotics including ciprofloxacin, amikacin, ceftazidime, piperacillin, and imipenem were tested against 10 clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Each isolate was tested against ten double and nine triple combinations of the antibiotics. A 96-well plate was used to test three antibiotics, each one alone and in double and triple combinations against each isolate. The minimum bacteriostatic and bactericidal concentrations in combination were determined with respect to the most potent antibiotic. An Interaction Code (IC) was generated for each combination, where a numerical value was designated based on the 2-fold increase or decrease in the MICs with respect to the most potent antibiotic. The results of the combinations were verified by time-kill assay at constant concentrations of the antibiotics and in a chemostat. Only 13% of the double combinations were synergistic, whereas 5% showed antagonism. Forty-three percent of the triple combinations were synergistic with no antagonism observed, and 100% synergism was observed in combination of ciprofloxacin, amikacin, and ceftazidime. The presented protocol is simple and fast and can help the clinicians in the early selection of the effective antibiotic therapy for treatment of severe infections.

  15. What we have learned regarding antibiotic therapy for the reduction of infant morbidity after preterm premature rupture of the membranes.

    PubMed

    Mercer, Brian M; Goldenberg, Robert L; Das, Anita F; Thurnau, Gary R; Bendon, Robert W; Miodovnik, Menachem; Ramsey, Risa D; Rabello, Yolanda A

    2003-06-01

    Preterm premature rupture of the membranes (pPROM) is responsible for approximately one third of the over 450,000 preterm births occurring in the United States annually. In this manuscript, we summarize the outcomes and analyses related to the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Maternal Fetal Medicine Units Network (NICHD-MFMU) network multicenter trial of antibiotics to reduce infant morbidity after pPROM. Based on evident reduction in gestational age dependent and infectious infant morbidity, we provide the rationale for aggressive intravenous and oral, broad spectrum Ampicillin/Amoxicillin, and Erythromycin therapy during conservative management of pPROM before 32 weeks' gestation. We further review the histopathologic correlates to pPROM, to antibiotic treatment, and to perinatal outcome, and discuss the relationships between maternal and neonatal cytokine levels intercellular adhesion molecule, and other clinical and plasma markers regarding perinatal morbidity. The use and limitations of ultrasound and vaginally collected amniotic fluid pulmonary maturity assessment are discussed.

  16. Successful surgical drainage and aggressive medical therapy in a preterm neonate with Bacillus cereus meningitis.

    PubMed

    Drazin, Doniel; Lehman, Deborah; Danielpour, Moise

    2010-01-01

    Bacillus cereus meningitis is a rare disease with a very high mortality rate in neonates. The authors present the rare case of a premature infant with B. cereus bacteremia and subsequent intracranial abscesses. In addition to aggressive medical therapy, surgical drainage was performed via a left frontal mini-craniotomy. At 15 months of age, the patient had mild developmental delay, cortical blindness, and sensorineural hearing loss. The clinical case is described and difficulties in the management of B. cereus meningoencephalitis in infants are discussed.

  17. Inhaled antibiotic therapy for ventilator-associated tracheobronchitis and ventilator-associated pneumonia: an update.

    PubMed

    Abu-Salah, Tareq; Dhand, Rajiv

    2011-09-01

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) remains a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in mechanically-ventilated patients in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU). Ventilator-associated tracheobronchitis (VAT) was previously believed to be an intermediate stage between colonization of the lower respiratory tract and VAP. More recent data, however, suggest that VAT may be a separate entity that increases morbidity and mortality, independently of the occurrence of VAP. Some, but not all, patients with VAT progress to develop VAP. Although inhaled antibiotics alone could be effective for the treatment of VAP, the current consensus of opinion favors their role as adjuncts to systemic antimicrobial therapy for VAP. Inhaled antibiotics are increasingly employed for salvage therapy in patients with VAP due to multi-drug resistant Gram-negative bacteria. In contrast to VAP, VAT could be effectively treated with inhaled antibiotic therapy alone or in combination with systemic antimicrobials.

  18. Regression of gastric lymphoma of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue with antibiotic therapy for Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Weber, D M; Dimopoulos, M A; Anandu, D P; Pugh, W C; Steinbach, G

    1994-12-01

    Regression of low-grade B cell gastric lymphoma of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue after eradication of Helicobacter pylori with antibiotic therapy was recently shown in a small number of patients with low-volume tumors. A patient with a > 10 cm nodular gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma that caused hematemesis and weight loss is described. Antibiotic therapy of H. pylori resulted in full clinical recovery and resolution of the mass lesion and morphological features of lymphoma on routine histological examination. However, monotypic immunostaining of plasma cells persisted in a separate and grossly normal-appearing region of the stomach. Antibiotic therapy may be of benefit in patients with mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma with mass lesions and significant signs and symptoms, but periodic search for residual lymphoma is needed.

  19. Hospital outcomes associated with guideline recommended antibiotic therapy for pediatric pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, Joanna; Ambroggio, Lilliam; Kurowski, Eileen Murtagh; Statile, Angela; Graham, Camille; Courter, Joshua D.; Sheehan, Brieanne; Iyer, Srikant; White, Christine M.; Shah, Samir S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Recent national guidelines recommend use of narrow spectrum antibiotic therapy as empiric treatment for children hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia. However, clinical outcomes associated with adoption of this recommendation have not been studied. Methods This retrospective cohort study included children 3 months -18 years, hospitalized with CAP from May 2, 2011 through July 30, 2012. Primary exposure of interest was empiric antibiotic therapy, classified as guideline recommended or not. Primary outcomes were length of stay (LOS), total hospital costs, and inpatient pharmacy costs. Secondary outcomes included broadened antibiotic therapy, emergency department revisits, and readmissions. Multivariable linear regression and Fisher’s exact test were performed to determine the association of guideline recommended antibiotic therapy on outcomes. Results Empiric guideline recommended therapy was prescribed to 168 (76%) of 220 patients. Median hospital LOS was 1.3 days (IQR: 0.9-1.9 days); median total costs of index hospitalization were $4,097 (IQR: $2,657-$6,054); median inpatient pharmacy costs were $91 (IQR: $40-$183). Between patients who did and did not receive guideline recommended therapy, there were no differences in LOS (adjusted −5.8% change; 95% CI: −22.1, 12.8), total costs (adjusted −10.9% change; 95% CI: −27.4, 9.4), or inpatient pharmacy costs (adjusted 14.8% change; 95% CI: −43.4, 27.1). Secondary outcomes were rare with no difference in unadjusted analysis between patients who did and did not receive guideline recommended therapy. Conclusions Use of guideline recommended antibiotic therapy was not associated with unintended negative consequences; there were no changes in LOS, total costs, or inpatient pharmacy costs. PMID:25263758

  20. Bacterial coinfections in travelers with malaria: rationale for antibiotic therapy.

    PubMed

    Sandlund, Johanna; Naucler, Pontus; Dashti, Saduddin; Shokri, Akhar; Eriksson, Sara; Hjertqvist, Marika; Karlsson, Lillemor; Capraru, Teodor; Färnert, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Malaria predisposes children in areas where malaria is endemic to concurrent bacteremia, often with severe outcomes. The importance of bacterial coinfections in patients diagnosed with malaria in nonendemic settings has, however, not been reported. A retrospective analysis of microbiology data was performed in 755 travelers diagnosed with malaria in Sweden. Bacterial cultures from blood and other locations were correlated to clinical outcome and antibiotic treatment. Blood cultures were drawn from 417 (55%) patients (88% of whom were >15 years old), and bacterial isolates of clinical relevance (Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis and Escherichia coli) were detected in 2 patients (0.3%). Cultures from other locations (mainly urine, nasopharyngeal, and fecal samples) were obtained from 44% of the patients with 4.9% positivity. Of the 38 patients given antibiotics, 47% had neither severe malaria nor positive cultures and/or radiology signs indicative of treatment. C-reactive protein levels were associated with bacterial infections but had only a fair predictive value. Bacterial coinfections are uncommon among travelers with malaria. These data suggest a weaker association between malaria and bacteremia than previously described in endemic settings and might indicate different patient populations with different pathophysiological mechanisms and microbial environments. The study supports a restrictive antibiotic policy in returning travelers with malaria.

  1. [Mouth diseases and antibiotic therapy practices in Yaounde].

    PubMed

    Onana, J; Bengondo, M C; Bengono, G

    2006-03-01

    Based on 309 patients (171 women and 138 men), consulted by 15 dental surgeons of Yaounde during one year, the aim of this study was the evaluation of bringing into use an antibiotherapy in daily practice. A questionnaire on the subject was distributed to practitioners. We registered 10 most frequent mouth dental diseases that needed curative antibiotherapy, being 87% of prescriptions. A prophylactic antibiotherapy has been prescripted in three per cent of cases to patients carriers of general pathologies (cardiopathies, diabete...) or mandibular fractures. In 10% of cases, a covering antibiotherapy has been established during simple extractions of teeth without infections, from healthy patients. In 48% of cases the duration of antibiotherapy was short (less than eight days) and in 32% of cases, the quantities were infratherapeutic. There were three per cent of prescriptions concerning antibiotics (sulfonamides, phenicoles...) unsuited to usual germs of mouth cavity. Generics drugs have been prescribed in 12% of cases. The more prescribed antibiotics were amoxicillins, macrolides and cephalosporines. Only a best knowledge of antibiotics' families and their indications are able to avoid clumsiness. At last generic drugs prescription in our difficult economical environment should be common.

  2. A Rapid Biochemical and Radiological Response to the Concomitant Therapy with Temozolomide and Radiotherapy in an Aggressive ACTH Pituitary Adenoma.

    PubMed

    Misir Krpan, Ana; Dusek, Tina; Rakusic, Zoran; Solak, Mirsala; Kraljevic, Ivana; Bisof, Vesna; Ozretic, David; Kastelan, Darko

    2017-01-01

    Background and Importance. In the last eight years temozolomide (TMZ) has been used as the last-line treatment modality for aggressive pituitary tumors to be applied after the failure of surgery, medical therapy, and radiotherapy. The objective was to achieve a rapid control of tumor growth and hormone normalization with concurrent chemoradiotherapy in a patient with very aggressive ACTH pituitary adenoma. Clinical Presentation. We describe a patient with an aggressive ACTH-producing adenoma treated with concurrent temozolomide and radiotherapy. The patient suffered from an aggressive ACTH adenoma resistant to surgical and medical treatment. After two months of concurrent temozolomide and radiotherapy, cortisol normalization and significant tumor shrinkage were observed. After 22 months of follow-up, there is still no evidence of tumor recurrence. Conclusion. Concurrent treatment with temozolomide and irradiation appears to be highly effective in the achievement of the tumor volume control as well as in the control of ACTH secretion in aggressive ACTH adenoma.

  3. A Rapid Biochemical and Radiological Response to the Concomitant Therapy with Temozolomide and Radiotherapy in an Aggressive ACTH Pituitary Adenoma

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Background and Importance. In the last eight years temozolomide (TMZ) has been used as the last-line treatment modality for aggressive pituitary tumors to be applied after the failure of surgery, medical therapy, and radiotherapy. The objective was to achieve a rapid control of tumor growth and hormone normalization with concurrent chemoradiotherapy in a patient with very aggressive ACTH pituitary adenoma. Clinical Presentation. We describe a patient with an aggressive ACTH-producing adenoma treated with concurrent temozolomide and radiotherapy. The patient suffered from an aggressive ACTH adenoma resistant to surgical and medical treatment. After two months of concurrent temozolomide and radiotherapy, cortisol normalization and significant tumor shrinkage were observed. After 22 months of follow-up, there is still no evidence of tumor recurrence. Conclusion. Concurrent treatment with temozolomide and irradiation appears to be highly effective in the achievement of the tumor volume control as well as in the control of ACTH secretion in aggressive ACTH adenoma. PMID:28357143

  4. [Outpatient parenteral antibiotic therapy (OPAT): the Lausanne experience supporting new perspectives].

    PubMed

    Moulin, Estelle; Boillata, Noémie; De Vallière, Serge

    2016-04-13

    With the increase of infections without option for an oral treatment, the systematic use of hospitalization overloads the healthcare system and causes growing political concern. For carefully selected patients, outpatient parenteral antibiotic therapy is an interesting alternative, with more than 40 years of experience in several countries. In this perspective, an outpatient parenteral antibiotic therapy (OPAT) unit was established in Lausanne two years ago. This article aims to describe its activity. Its practice, involving especially self-administration, seems to be safe, efficacious and cost-effective, as long as international good practice recommendations are applied.

  5. How to measure the impacts of antibiotic resistance and antibiotic development on empiric therapy: new composite indices

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Josie S; Hurford, Amy; Finley, Rita L; Patrick, David M; Wu, Jianhong; Morris, Andrew M

    2016-01-01

    Objectives We aimed to construct widely useable summary measures of the net impact of antibiotic resistance on empiric therapy. Summary measures are needed to communicate the importance of resistance, plan and evaluate interventions, and direct policy and investment. Design, setting and participants As an example, we retrospectively summarised the 2011 cumulative antibiogram from a Toronto academic intensive care unit. Outcome measures We developed two complementary indices to summarise the clinical impact of antibiotic resistance and drug availability on empiric therapy. The Empiric Coverage Index (ECI) measures susceptibility of common bacterial infections to available empiric antibiotics as a percentage. The Empiric Options Index (EOI) varies from 0 to ‘the number of treatment options available’, and measures the empiric value of the current stock of antibiotics as a depletable resource. The indices account for drug availability and the relative clinical importance of pathogens. We demonstrate meaning and use by examining the potential impact of new drugs and threatening bacterial strains. Conclusions In our intensive care unit coverage of device-associated infections measured by the ECI remains high (98%), but 37–44% of treatment potential measured by the EOI has been lost. Without reserved drugs, the ECI is 86–88%. New cephalosporin/β-lactamase inhibitor combinations could increase the EOI, but no single drug can compensate for losses. Increasing methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) prevalence would have little overall impact (ECI=98%, EOI=4.8–5.2) because many Gram-positives are already resistant to β-lactams. Aminoglycoside resistance, however, could have substantial clinical impact because they are among the few drugs that provide coverage of Gram-negative infections (ECI=97%, EOI=3.8–4.5). Our proposed indices summarise the local impact of antibiotic resistance on empiric coverage (ECI) and available empiric treatment options

  6. Targeted therapy in uterine serous carcinoma: an aggressive variant of endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Black, Jonathan D; English, Diana P; Roque, Dana M; Santin, Alessandro D

    2014-01-01

    Uterine serous carcinoma (USC) is a highly aggressive variant of endometrial cancer. Although it only represents less than 10% of all cases, it accounts for a disproportionate number of deaths from endometrial cancer. Comprehensive surgical staging followed by carboplatin and paclitaxel chemotherapy represents the mainstay of USC therapy. Vaginal cuff brachytherapy is also of potential benefit in USC. Recent whole-exome sequencing studies have demonstrated gain of function of the HER2/NEU gene, as well as driver mutations in the PIK3CA/AKT/mTOR and cyclin E/FBXW7 oncogenic pathways in a large number of USCs. These results emphasize the relevance of these novel therapeutic targets for biologic therapy of chemotherapy-resistant recurrent USC.

  7. Multifocal aggressive squamous cell carcinomas induced by prolonged voriconazole therapy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Morice, C; Acher, A; Soufir, N; Michel, M; Comoz, F; Leroy, D; Verneuil, L

    2010-01-01

    Voriconazole is a treatment for severe fungal infections. Prolonged voriconazole therapy may induce skin reactions, with 1% of severe photosensitivity accidents. Recently the imputability of voriconazole in skin carcinogenesis has been suggested. This report concerns a 55-year-old man suffering from pulmonary aspergillosis who presented a phototoxic reaction a few months after introduction of voriconazole, followed by multiple squamous cell carcinomas of sun-exposed skin areas. After voriconazole discontinuation, no new carcinoma was observed. The detection of EBV and HPV in skin lesions was negative. Exploration of gene mutations involved in skin carcinogenesis showed two variants of the MICR gene. The occurrence of multiple, recurrent, aggressive squamous cell carcinomas is rare with voriconazole, but its imputability is strongly suggested. A plausible hypothesis is that several factors including voriconazole uptake, immunosuppression, and genetic background could explain the phenotype of fast-developing skin carcinomas. Voriconazole therapy should be accompanied by stringent photoprotection and skin monitoring.

  8. DRESS syndrome due to antibiotic therapy of osteoarticular infections in children: two case reports.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, A; Abril, J C; Cano, J

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarticular infection in children frequently occurs before 10 years of age. Surgical drainage is sometimes required, whereas acute osteomyelitis can be treated with antibiotic therapy alone. The duration of antibiotic therapy varies, 2 weeks is sufficient for septic arthritis, whereas 6 weeks is often required for complicated cases. Some of these antibiotic drugs present direct complications with low clinical impact in certain individuals. Hypersensitivity to these drugs causes different reactions in children. DRESS syndrome (Drug Reaction with Eosinophilia and Systemic Symptoms) is a severe and potentially life-threatening drug reaction. It is characterised by high fever, malaise, lymphadenopathy and skin rash. From a clinical perspective, these symptoms can lead to an exacerbation of the initial infectious process for which treatment was commenced. The liver is the organ most often affected in DRESS syndrome associated with haematological changes, potentially similar to sepsis. We present two cases of children with osteoarticular infections who developed DRESS syndrome after antibiotic therapy. Both patients made a complete recovery after cessation of the antibiotic drugs used.

  9. Steering Evolution with Sequential Therapy to Prevent the Emergence of Bacterial Antibiotic Resistance.

    PubMed

    Nichol, Daniel; Jeavons, Peter; Fletcher, Alexander G; Bonomo, Robert A; Maini, Philip K; Paul, Jerome L; Gatenby, Robert A; Anderson, Alexander R A; Scott, Jacob G

    2015-09-01

    The increasing rate of antibiotic resistance and slowing discovery of novel antibiotic treatments presents a growing threat to public health. Here, we consider a simple model of evolution in asexually reproducing populations which considers adaptation as a biased random walk on a fitness landscape. This model associates the global properties of the fitness landscape with the algebraic properties of a Markov chain transition matrix and allows us to derive general results on the non-commutativity and irreversibility of natural selection as well as antibiotic cycling strategies. Using this formalism, we analyze 15 empirical fitness landscapes of E. coli under selection by different β-lactam antibiotics and demonstrate that the emergence of resistance to a given antibiotic can be either hindered or promoted by different sequences of drug application. Specifically, we demonstrate that the majority, approximately 70%, of sequential drug treatments with 2-4 drugs promote resistance to the final antibiotic. Further, we derive optimal drug application sequences with which we can probabilistically 'steer' the population through genotype space to avoid the emergence of resistance. This suggests a new strategy in the war against antibiotic-resistant organisms: drug sequencing to shepherd evolution through genotype space to states from which resistance cannot emerge and by which to maximize the chance of successful therapy.

  10. Challenges and future prospects of antibiotic therapy: from peptides to phages utilization

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, Santi M.; Roy, Anupam; Ghosh, Ananta K.; Hazra, Tapas K.; Basak, Amit; Franco, Octavio L.

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial infections are raising serious concern across the globe. The effectiveness of conventional antibiotics is decreasing due to global emergence of multi-drug-resistant (MDR) bacterial pathogens. This process seems to be primarily caused by an indiscriminate and inappropriate use of antibiotics in non-infected patients and in the food industry. New classes of antibiotics with different actions against MDR pathogens need to be developed urgently. In this context, this review focuses on several ways and future directions to search for the next generation of safe and effective antibiotics compounds including antimicrobial peptides, phage therapy, phytochemicals, metalloantibiotics, lipopolysaccharide, and efflux pump inhibitors to control the infections caused by MDR pathogens. PMID:24860506

  11. Outpatient antibiotic therapy for elderly patients. HIAT Study Group.

    PubMed

    Angel, J V

    1994-08-15

    The purpose of this study was to determine the safety and efficacy of outpatient intravenous (IV) therapy with a third-generation cephalosporin, cefotaxime, in patients > or = 60 years of age and to determine its effect on length of hospital stay. Subset analysis was performed with 62 patients with various infections who had been enrolled in a prospective, multicenter, open-label trial of IV cefotaxime delivered through a computerized ambulatory delivery system (ADS). Initial treatment was given in hospital if required, followed by home therapy. The overall clinical response rate among evaluable patients was 98%, and the overall bacteriologic response rate was 93%. The mean duration of inpatient therapy was 3.6 days less than the mean of 8.2 days allowed under diagnosis-related group (DRG) allotments. Outpatient therapy with cefotaxime via infusion pump is safe and effective and may reduce hospitalization requirements.

  12. Effectiveness of oral antibiotics for definitive therapy of Gram-negative bloodstream infections.

    PubMed

    Kutob, Leila F; Justo, Julie Ann; Bookstaver, P Brandon; Kohn, Joseph; Albrecht, Helmut; Al-Hasan, Majdi N

    2016-11-01

    There is paucity of data evaluating intravenous-to-oral antibiotic switch options for Gram-negative bloodstream infections (BSIs). This retrospective cohort study examined the effectiveness of oral antibiotics for definitive treatment of Gram-negative BSI. Patients with Gram-negative BSI hospitalised for <14 days at Palmetto Health Hospitals in Columbia, SC, from 1 January 2010 through 31 December 2013 and discharged on oral antibiotics were included in this study. The cohort was stratified into three groups based on bioavailability of oral antibiotics prescribed (high, ≥95%; moderate, 75-94%; and low, <75%). Kaplan-Meier analysis and multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression were used to examine treatment failure. Among the 362 patients, high, moderate and low bioavailability oral antibiotics were prescribed to 106, 179 and 77 patients, respectively, for definitive therapy of Gram-negative BSI. Mean patient age was 63 years, 217 (59.9%) were women and 254 (70.2%) had a urinary source of infection. Treatment failure rates were 2%, 12% and 14% in patients receiving oral antibiotics with high, moderate and low bioavailability, respectively (P = 0.02). Risk of treatment failure in the multivariate Cox model was higher in patients receiving antibiotics with moderate [adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) = 5.9, 95% CI 1.6-38.5; P = 0.005] and low bioavailability (aHR = 7.7, 95% CI 1.9-51.5; P = 0.003) compared with those receiving oral antimicrobial agents with high bioavailability. These data demonstrate the effectiveness of oral antibiotics with high bioavailability for definitive therapy of Gram-negative BSI. Risk of treatment failure increases as bioavailability of the oral regimen declines.

  13. Can We Stop Antibiotic Therapy When Signs and Symptoms Have Resolved in Diabetic Foot Infection Patients?

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Yuejie; Wang, Chao; Zhang, Jinghang; Wang, Penghua; Xu, Jun; Ding, Min; Li, Xiwen; Hou, Xiaoli; Feng, Shuhong; Li, Xuemei

    2015-01-01

    The study aimed to investigate whether we can stop antibiotic therapy when signs and symptoms have resolved in diabetic foot infection (DFI) patients with different grades of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and those without PAD, and to determine whether the severity of PAD and infection has an effect on antibiotic therapy duration. A prospective randomized controlled trial of DFI patients was carried out. Patients were randomized into 2 groups when signs and symptoms had resolved: continuing antibiotics group (CAG) and discontinuing antibiotics group (DAG). The recurrence and clinical outcomes were recorded. The recurrence rate of mild infection with mild/moderate PAD was similar in the 2 groups. Compared with CAG, the recurrence rate of mild infection with severe PAD was higher in DAG (P = .030), also for moderate/severe infection with PAD (mild/moderate [P = .032]; severe [P = .008]). No difference was found in the 2 groups (either mild or moderate/severe) for those without PAD. The clinical outcomes of mild infection in patients were similar in the 2 groups. For moderate/severe infection, the healing rate was higher (73.3% vs 48.3%), and the rate of minor/major amputation and death was lower (23.8% vs 49.4%; 6.9% vs 20.7%; 2.0% vs 13.8%) in the CAG. When the clinical signs and symptoms of infection have resolved, it might be appropriate to stop antibiotics for DFI patients without PAD, and also for patients with mild infection with mild/moderate PAD. For patients with mild infection with severe PAD and moderate/severe infection with PAD, we should perhaps continue antibiotic treatment. Continuing antibiotic therapy could improve clinical outcomes for patients with moderate/severe infection. PMID:26248828

  14. A historical overview of bacteriophage therapy as an alternative to antibiotics for the treatment of bacterial pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Wittebole, Xavier; De Roock, Sophie; Opal, Steven M

    2014-01-01

    The seemingly inexorable spread of antibiotic resistance genes among microbial pathogens now threatens the long-term viability of our current antimicrobial therapy to treat severe bacterial infections such as sepsis. Antibiotic resistance is reaching a crisis situation in some bacterial pathogens where few therapeutic alternatives remain and pan-resistant strains are becoming more prevalent. Non-antibiotic therapies to treat bacterial infections are now under serious consideration and one possible option is the therapeutic use of specific phage particles that target bacterial pathogens. Bacteriophage therapy has essentially been re-discovered by modern medicine after widespread use of phage therapy in the pre-antibiotic era lost favor, at least in Western countries, after the introduction of antibiotics. We review the current therapeutic rationale and clinical experience with phage therapy as a treatment for invasive bacterial infection as novel alternative to antimicrobial chemotherapy. PMID:23973944

  15. Low antibiotic resistance among anaerobic Gram-negative bacteria in periodontitis 5 years following metronidazole therapy.

    PubMed

    Dahlen, G; Preus, H R

    2017-02-01

    The objective of this study was to assess antibiotic susceptibility among predominant Gram-negative anaerobic bacteria isolated from periodontitis patients who 5 years prior had been subject to mechanical therapy with or without adjunctive metronidazole. One pooled sample was taken from the 5 deepest sites of each of 161 patients that completed the 5 year follow-up after therapy. The samples were analyzed by culture. A total number of 85 anaerobic strains were isolated from the predominant subgingival flora of 65/161 patient samples, identified, and tested for antibiotic susceptibility by MIC determination. E-tests against metronidazole, penicillin, amoxicillin, amoxicillin + clavulanic acid and clindamycin were employed. The 73/85 strains were Gram-negative rods (21 Porphyromonas spp., 22 Prevotella/Bacteroides spp., 23 Fusobacterium/Filifactor spp., 3 Campylobacter spp. and 4 Tannerella forsythia). These were all isolated from the treated patients irrespective of therapy procedures (+/-metronidazole) 5 years prior. Three strains (Bifidobacterium spp., Propionibacterium propionicum, Parvimonas micra) showed MIC values for metronidazole over the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing break point of >4 μg/mL. All Porphyromonas and Tannerella strains were highly susceptible. Metronidazole resistant Gram-negative strains were not found, while a few showed resistance against beta-lactam antibiotics. In this population of 161 patients who had been subject to mechanical periodontal therapy with or without adjunct metronidazole 5 years prior, no cultivable antibiotic resistant anaerobes were found in the predominant subgingival microbiota.

  16. Antibiotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anhalt, John P.

    A 28-year-old man was transferred to our hospital and underwent surgery for resection of an aortic graft infected with Klebsiella pneumoniae. Antimicrobial therapy consisted of amikacin, cefazolin, chloramphenicol, sulfamethoxazole, and trimethoprim. A request for amikacin and sulfamethoxazole assays was received by the laboratory along with information that the patient had received tobramycin until 24 h before the serum was obtained.

  17. Antibiotic therapy for bacterial meningitis in children in developing countries.

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, P.; Verma, I. C.

    1993-01-01

    We carried out a study to investigate the effectiveness of chloramphenicol alone as a treatment for bacterial meningitis. A total of 70 consecutive children aged > 3 months with bacterial meningitis, who had been admitted to the paediatric hospital of the All India Institute of Medical Sciences, were randomized to receive chloramphenicol alone or chloramphenicol + penicillin. The two groups were matched with each other. Treatment failure occurred with three (9%) patients in the chloramphenicol-alone group and with four (12.1%) patients in the combination therapy group (P > 0.05). The mean duration of intravenous therapy, the number of intravenous cannulae used per patient, and the incidence of thrombophlebitis were significantly higher for the group that received the combination therapy. Also, the cost of using chloramphenicol + penicillin was four times higher than that of chloramphenicol alone. Hence, chloramphenicol alone was as effective as chloramphenicol + penicillin and much cheaper and more convenient to use. PMID:8490981

  18. [Eradication therapy of antibiotic-resistant strains of Helicobacter pylori].

    PubMed

    Shcherbakov, P L; Belousova, N L; Shcherbakova, M Iu; Kashnikov, V S

    2010-01-01

    Treatment of inflammatory diseases of the upper digestive tract, associated with Helicobacter pylori has recently greatly complicated by the presence of significant number of resistant strains of this microorganism to traditionally used drugs for eradication therapy. Average resistance to metronidazole and clarithromycin in Russia is about 30 and 25% respectively. The article presents the experience of treating patients with metronidazole resistant strains of H. pylori with using triple therapy, which included a drug used nitrofurans--nifuroxazide in suspension, proton pump inhibitors and clarithromycin.

  19. Amniotic membrane transplantation ineffective as additional therapy in patients with aggressive Mooren’s ulcer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mooren’s ulcer is a severe ulcerative inflammation of the cornea. The exact pathogenesis remains unclear. Therefore many therapies of Mooren’s ulcer are recommended in literature. To shed more light on the ongoing question of optimal treatment of severe progressive Mooren’s ulcer, we here report on a retrospective case series of patients treated with systemic immunosuppressive therapy and additional amniotic membrane transplantation. Methods Medical records from seven patients (eleven eyes), 4 male and 3 female, with severe progressive Mooren’s ulcer were analysed retrospectively. The mean follow up was 88.4 ± 80.8 months (range 12–232 month). A HLA-typing was performed in all patients. A systemic immunosuppressive therapy was administered in all patients. The amniotic membrane was transplanted after the base of the ulcer was resected. Results Multiple amniotic membrane transplantations were necessary in six patients. The visual outcome of all patients was poor. No patient achieved a visual acuity better than 20/630 Snellen chart. Five patients were positive for HLA-DQ2 and four patients were positive for HLA-DR17(3). Conclusions The aggressive and highly inflammatory form of Mooren’s ulcer is difficult to treat and the progression of the disease is hard to influence positively even under systemic immunosuppressive therapy. Therefore, the main intention of therapy is to achieve a stable epithelialized corneal surface without the risk of perforation. Amniotic membrane transplantation is not able to cure severe forms of Mooren’s ulcer. However it supports the immunosuppressive therapy in acute situations as in critical corneal thinning. PMID:24345289

  20. Managing an outpatient parenteral antibiotic therapy team: challenges and solutions

    PubMed Central

    Halilovic, Jenana; Christensen, Cinda L; Nguyen, Hien H

    2014-01-01

    Outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy (OPAT) programs should strive to deliver safe, cost effective, and high quality care. One of the keys to developing and sustaining a high quality OPAT program is to understand the common challenges or barriers to OPAT delivery. We review the most common challenges to starting and managing an OPAT program and give practical advice on addressing these issues. PMID:24971015

  1. Unusually Aggressive Primary Testicular Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma with Post Therapy Extensive Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Goel, Shalini; Mohapatra, Ishani; Gajendra, Smeeta; Gupta, Sunil

    2016-01-01

    Primary Testicular Lymphoma (PTL) is a rare intermediate to high grade tumour, diffuse large cell being the most common type. Unlike nodal Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma (DLBCL), testicular DLBCL has a less aggressive course and better prognosis. Metastasis is uncommon in testicular DLBCL. Commonly involved sites are contralateral testes, Waldeyer’s ring, skin, lung, Central Nervous System (CNS) and prostate, however the kidneys, liver, bone marrow, pleura and bones are more rarely involved. We report a case of testicular DLBCL which has metastasized to skin and bone marrow with an aggressive clinical course in a year, in-spite of combined modality of therapy given to the patient. Bone marrow infiltration is common and well documented with nodal DLBCL, however there is no published literature for simultaneous bone marrow and skin infiltration in testicular DLBCL till date. Other large studies done in the west have shown that distinct metastasis is usually common but the median progression-free survival is usually in years. This case stresses on shorter period of progression after standard treatment protocol in this part of the world, thus highlighting the need for other extensive studies to define specific treatment protocol for testicular DLBCL. PMID:27630854

  2. Ulcer pain in patients with venous leg ulcers related to antibiotic treatment and compression therapy.

    PubMed

    Akesson, Nina; Oien, Rut Frank; Forssell, Henrik; Fagerström, Cecilia

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to compare venous leg ulcer patients with and without ulcer pain to see whether ulcer pain affected the use of antibiotic treatment and compression therapy throughout healing. A total of 431 patients with venous leg ulcers were included during the study period. Every patient was registered in a national quality registry for patients with hard-to-heal leg, foot, and pressure ulcers. A high incidence of ulcer pain (57%) was found when the patients entered the study. Patients with ulcer pain had been treated more extensively with antibiotics both before and during the study period. Throughout healing there was a significant reduction of antibiotic use among patients in the 'no pain' group, from 44% to 23% (P=0.008). There was no significant difference between the two groups concerning compression therapy (85% vs. 88%), but 12% of patients in the 'pain' group did not get their prescribed compression compared with 6% of patients in the 'no pain' group. The groups did not differ significantly in terms of ulcer duration, ulcer size or healing time. This study shows a high incidence of ulcer pain, confirming that pain has a great impact on patients with venous leg ulcers. Results further suggest that the presence of ulcer pain increases the prescription of antibiotics but does not affect the use of compression therapy. Several advantages were found from using a national quality registry. The registry is a valuable clinical tool showing the importance of accurate diagnosis and effective treatment.

  3. Surgical Debridement Is Superior to Sole Antibiotic Therapy in a Novel Murine Posttraumatic Osteomyelitis Model

    PubMed Central

    Wallner, Christoph; Ismer, Britta; Schira, Jessica; Abraham, Stephanie; Harati, Kamran; Lehnhardt, Marcus; Behr, Björn

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Bone infections after trauma, i.e. posttraumatic osteomyelitis, pose one of the biggest problems of orthopedic surgery. Even after sufficient clinical therapy including vast debridement of infected bone and antibiotic treatment, regeneration of postinfectious bone seems to be restricted. One explanation includes the large sized defects resulting from sufficient debridement. Furthermore, it remains unclear if inflammatory processes after bone infection do affect bone regeneration. For continuing studies in this field, an animal model is needed where bone regeneration after sufficient treatment can be studied in detail. Methods For this purpose we created a stable infection in murine tibiae by Staphylococcus aureus inoculation. Thereafter, osteomyelitic bones were debrided thoroughly and animals were subsequently treated with antibiotics. Controls included debrided, non-infected, as well as infected animals exclusively treated with antibiotics. To verify sufficient treatment of infected bone, different assessments detecting S. aureus were utilized: agar plates, histology and RT-qPCR. Results All three detection methods revealed massive reduction or eradication of S. aureus within debrided bones 1 and 2 weeks postoperatively, whereas sole antibiotic therapy could not provide sufficient treatment of osteomyelitic bones. Debrided, previously infected bones showed significantly decreased bone formation, compared to debrided, non-infected controls. Discussion Thus, the animal model presented herein provides a reliable and fascinating tool to study posttraumatic osteomyelitis for clinical therapies. PMID:26872128

  4. Studies on a suitable antibiotic therapy for treating swine brucellosis.

    PubMed

    Dieste-Pérez, L; Fraile, L; de Miguel, M J; Barberán, M; Blasco, J M; Muñoz, P M

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this work was developing effective treatments against Brucella suis biovar 2, responsible for swine brucellosis in Europe. MICs for antibiotics used classically in brucellosis and two new macrolides (tulathromycin and tildipirosin) were determined for 33 B. suis biovar 2 field and B. suis reference strains. MIC90 values ranged from 0.01 to 0.25 μg/mL. The best candidates, given alone or combined, were then evaluated in mice. Ten groups (n = 7) of BALB/c mice were inoculated (1 × 10(5) CFU/mouse) with a virulent B. suis biovar 2 field strain. All groups, excepting untreated control, were treated for 14 days with, respectively, doxycycline, dihydrostreptomycin, tulathromycin (one or two doses), or tildipirosin (one or two doses) given alone, and doxycycline combined with dihydrostreptomycin, tulathromycin, or tildipirosin. Combined tildipirosin treatment was the most effective, then selected for pig studies. Sixteen B. suis biovar 2 naturally infected sows were treated with oxytetracycline (20 mg/kg BW/daily) for 21 days. The half of these received also tildipirosin (4 mg/kg BW) in two doses with a 10-day interval. An extensive bacteriological study conducted ten days after ceasing treatments proved the efficacy of this combined oxytetracycline/tildipirosin treatment.

  5. Novel targeted therapies in uterine serous carcinoma, an aggressive variant of endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Menderes, Gulden; Clark, Mitchell; Santin, Alessandro D

    2016-04-01

    Uterine serous carcinoma (USC) is a rare but aggressive subtype of endometrial cancer. Although it represents only 10% of all endometrial cancer cases, USC accounts for up to 40% of all endometrial cancer-related recurrences and subsequent deaths. With such a dismal prognosis, there is an expanding role for novel targeted approaches in the treatment of USC. Recent whole-exome sequencing studies have demonstrated gain of function of the HER2/NEU gene, as well as driver mutations in the PIK3CA/AKT/mTOR and cyclin E/FBXW7 oncogenic pathways in a large number of USCs. The results emphasize the relevance of these novel therapeutic targets for biologic therapy of USC, which will be reviewed in this article.

  6. Safety and effectiveness of home intravenous antibiotic therapy for multidrug-resistant bacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Mujal, A; Sola, J; Hernandez, M; Villarino, M-A; Machado, M-L; Baylina, M; Tajan, J; Oristrell, J

    2015-06-01

    Home intravenous antibiotic therapy is an alternative to hospital admission for moderately severe infections. However, few studies have analyzed its safety and effectiveness in the treatment of infections caused by multidrug-resistant bacteria. The purpose of this study is to analyze the safety and effectiveness of home intravenous antibiotic therapy in multidrug-resistant bacterial infections. We analyzed prospectively all patients admitted to our service who underwent home intravenous antibiotic therapy during the period 2008-2012. All the treatments were administered by caretakers or self-administered by patients, through elastomeric infusion devices. Effectiveness was evaluated by analyzing the readmission rate for poor infection control. Safety was evaluated by analyzing adverse events, catheter-related complications, and readmissions not related to poor infection control. There were 433 admissions (in 355 patients) for home intravenous antibiotic therapy during the study period. There were 226 (52.2 %) admissions due to multidrug-resistant bacterial infections and 207 (47.8 %) due to non-multidrug-resistant infections. Hospital readmissions in patients with multidrug-resistant infections were uncommon. Multidrug-resistant enterococcal infections, healthcare-associated infections, and carbapenem therapy were independent variables associated with increased readmissions due to poor infection control. Readmissions not related to poor infection control, adverse events, and catheter-related complications were similar in multidrug-resistant compared to non-multidrug-resistant bacterial infections. Home intravenous therapy, administered by patients or their caretakers using elastomeric infusion pumps, was safe and effective for the treatment of most multidrug-resistant bacterial infections.

  7. Emergence of antibiotic resistance and prudent use of antibiotic therapy in nosocomially acquired urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Wagenlehner, F M E; Naber, K G

    2004-03-01

    Nosocomially acquired urinary tract infections (NAUTI) are common. The reported rates, however, depend very much on the definitions used and the number of investigations requested. In a prospective study on a surgical intensive care unit and adhering closely to the CDC criteria, NAUTI was diagnosed in about 17% of the patients. The urinary catheter associated UTI rate per 1000 catheter days was 14.5 much higher than otherwise reported. Whereas the rates of symptomatic NAUTI and other nosocomially acquired infections were similar, the main difference was found for asymptomatic UTI which depends very much on the effort to search for it systematically. In a prospective study on a urological ward it could be demonstrated that cross-transmission probably plays a much greater role than so far suggested. Continuous surveillance of the bacterial spectrum and resistance is necessary not only on a global but also on a local level. Selection of an appropriate agent for empirical antibacterial therapy can be better tailored if not only the total bacterial spectrum is considered but if all information already available during the identification process is used, such as Gram stain and other simple and rapid tests for stratification of the pathogens. Since in NAUTI usually some kind of biofilm infection is involved, the fluoroquinolones can be considered agents of choice. Only those substances with high antibacterial activity, good bioavailability and those that are mainly excreted by the kidneys should be chosen and they have to be administered at sufficiently high doses.

  8. Persistent bacteremia in rabbit fetuses despite maternal antibiotic therapy in a novel intrauterine-infection model.

    PubMed

    Gras-Le Guen, C; Debillon, T; Toquet, C; Jarry, A; Winer, N; Jacqueline, C; Kergueris, M F; Bingen, E; Roze, J C; Potel, G; Bugnon, D

    2003-07-01

    The effect of optimized maternal therapy by bactericidal agents was evaluated in a reproducible rabbit model of Escherichia coli maternofetal infection simulating human pharmacokinetics. Intravenous antibiotic therapy was begun in the pregnant rabbit 12 h after bacterial intrauterine inoculation, using a computer-controlled pump to simulate human pharmacokinetics of ceftriaxone (1 g/day) associated or not with gentamicin (3 mg/kg of body weight/day). Data were compared for fetal survival, quantitative blood cultures, fetal histology in treated versus untreated groups, and maternal and fetal antibiotic concentrations in plasma in treated animals. Antibiotic therapy led to dramatic improvement in maternal outcome (100% survival versus 100% death in the untreated group in association with maternal septicemia). Fetal survival also improved, with the two-drug combination providing a more potent effect. After 3 days of treatment, 32% of fetuses survived with one-drug therapy and 62% with two-drug therapy (Yates corrected chi(2), P < 0.05). In untreated animals, bacterial counts in blood cultures increased rapidly during the first 24 h up to 8.1 +/- 0.5 log CFU/ml, but remained relatively constant at all times with antibiotic treatment: 4.5 +/- 0.7 log CFU/ml at the start of treatment and 6.2 +/- 0.4 and 5.2 +/- 0.9 log CFU/ml after 72 h for one- and two-drug therapy, respectively (data are means +/- standard deviations). The failure of animals to be cured after 3 days of treatment was not due to an inadequate concentration of ceftriaxone, as the residual level in fetal serum at sacrifice was more than 1000 times the MIC of the microbe. Unexpectedly, inflammation in fetal lung decreased in the treated group after as little as 24 h of antibiotic therapy, despite persistent bacteremia. Although maternal outcome improved and drug concentrations were above the MIC, the treatment did not achieve sterilization of fetuses in utero for this rabbit E. coli maternofetal infection

  9. Wound infection during the Yom Kippur war: observations concerning antibiotic prophylaxis and therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Klein, R S; Berger, S A; Yekutiel, P

    1975-01-01

    Eighty-eight episodes of wound associated infection were identified among 624 consecutively admitted battlefield casualties. Ninety-one per cent of infections occurred during the administration of antibiotic therapy or prophylaxis and 65% were associated with the use of multiple antibacterial agents. Gram negative bacillary and mixed microbial infection predominated and were found to increase in relative incidence after the second day of hospitalization. Appropriate therapy, based on disc sensitivity testing, was administered in only 33% of infectious episodes. The practice of antibiotic wound prophylaxis may contribute to the incidence and nature of infection in battlefield wounds. Problems unique to the handling of battlefield wounded are discussed in comparing the present data with those of other war associated and civilian studies. PMID:167666

  10. [Antibiotic therapy by suppurative diseases of the abdominal cavity and soft tissues].

    PubMed

    Sazhin, V P; Bodrova, N G; Klimov, D E; Iurishchev, V A; Avdovenko, A L; Sazhin, I V

    2010-01-01

    Microbial background of the departments of abdominal and septic surgery was monitored and analyzed. More the 950 samples from each department was worked out. Therefore, it was determined, that gram-negative bacteria were more typical for the abdominal pathology, whereas, soft tissue infection was represented by gram-positive strains. Compliant antibioticogramms were performed and analyzed. For achieving effective prophylactic and empiric antibiotic therapy, data-based formular lists of antibacterial drugs were performed.

  11. Dosing of antibiotics in critically ill patients undergoing renal replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Kielstein, Jan T; Burkhardt, Olaf

    2011-12-01

    On September 11, 1945 Maria Schafstaat was the first patient who successfully underwent a dialysis treatment for acute kidney injury (AKI), formerly known as acute renal failure. Since then, the number of patients with AKI is increasing worldwide. Today AKI is generally one feature of a multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS), which develops in response to major surgery, cardiogenic shock or sepsis. Several clinical studies have shown that early and appropriate antibiotic therapy in those patients is of utter importance, yet it remains one of the most difficult challenges to meet. Even in critically ill patients with conserved renal function a myriad of pathophysiological changes, resulting in increased volume of distribution, decreased protein binding and altered hepatic drug clearance, makes appropriate antibiotic dosin difficult. Adequate pharmacotherapy, i.e. dose of anti-infective agens is becoming even more complicated if it has to be tailored to counteract their removal by different modes and intensities of renal replacement therapy. This review summarizes our sparse knowledge about pharmacokinetic studies and dosing recommendations of drugs in patients with AKI undergoing continuous renal replacement therapies (CRRTs) such as continuous venovenous hemofiltration (CVVH) as well as extended dialysis (ED), an increasingly used method to treat patients with AKI in the intensive care setting. We reflect on failure of several large prospective controlled studies to show a survival benefit of higher doses of renal replacement therapy, a finding that might be caused by the fact that we still adhere to dosing guidelines for antibiotics which are at best ineffectual but might also lead to potentially dangerous underdosing of these life saving drugs. Lastly we address possible strategies to overcome the lack of knowledge, the lack of data and the lack of interest in this important area of critical care medicine. Improvement of clinical outcomes and reduction of

  12. Generalized aggressive periodontitis: microbiological composition and clinical parameters in non-surgical therapy.

    PubMed

    Usin, María M; Tabares, Sandra M; Menso, Julieta; de Albera, Estela R; Sembaj, Adela

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the variations in periodontal parameters and microbiological composition in periodontal pockets at the baseline and 3 and 6 months post treatmentin patients with Generalized Aggressive Periodontitis(GAP) undergoing non surgical periodontal treatment combined with chlorhexidine and systemic antibiotics. Medical and dental history was taken from 10 subjects, average age 30.6±2.7 years, diagnosed with GAP. A non surgical periodontal treatment combined with 0.12% chlorhexidine, 875 mg amoxicillin and 500 mg metronidazole every 12 hours for ten days was conducted. At each visit, the following measurements wererecorded: bacterial plaque (BP), bleeding on probing (BOP), probing depth (PD), clinical attachment level (CAL), hypermobility, and furcation lesions, and a sample of subgingivalplaque was taken from the site of the deepest probing depth of each sextant to identify Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponemadenticola, Tannerella forsythia, Prevotella intermedia and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans using molecular biology techniques. After 6 months, the Wilcoxon test showed an increase of 0.97 mm in CAL (p=0.0047) and 2.54 mm in PD(p=0.009). A healthy site was defined as having a PD <5 mm, negative BOP and no pathogenic bacteria detected at 6 months, indicating significant improvement (p=0.008), with OR (95%CI) =4.7 (1.102220.11).With the treatment protocol used in this study, 6 months after treatment, patients had an approximately 4- fold higher possibility of presenting PD <5 mm and periodontal pockets without periodontal pathogenic bacteria.

  13. Risk factors for failure of outpatient parenteral antibiotic therapy (OPAT) in infective endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Christopher J. A.; Barr, David A.; Ho, Antonia; Sharp, Emma; Semple, Lindsay; Seaton, R. Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To identify risk factors for failure of outpatient antibiotic therapy (OPAT) in infective endocarditis (IE). Patients and methods We identified IE cases managed at a single centre over 12 years from a prospectively maintained database. ‘OPAT failure’ was defined as unplanned readmission or antibiotic switch due to adverse drug reaction or antibiotic resistance. We analysed patient and disease-related risk factors for OPAT failure by univariate and multivariate logistic regression. We also retrospectively collected follow-up data on adverse disease outcome (defined as IE-related death or relapse) and performed Kaplan–Meier survival analysis up to 36 months following OPAT. Results We identified 80 episodes of OPAT in IE. Failure occurred in 25/80 episodes (31.3%). On multivariate analysis, cardiac or renal failure [pooled OR 7.39 (95% CI 1.84–29.66), P = 0.005] and teicoplanin therapy [OR 8.69 (95% CI 2.01–37.47), P = 0.004] were independently associated with increased OPAT failure. OPAT failure with teicoplanin occurred despite therapeutic plasma levels. OPAT failure predicted adverse disease outcome up to 36 months (P = 0.016 log-rank test). Conclusions These data caution against selecting patients with endocarditis for OPAT in the presence of cardiac or renal failure and suggest teicoplanin therapy may be associated with suboptimal OPAT outcomes. Alternative regimens to teicoplanin in the OPAT setting should be further investigated. PMID:23475647

  14. Antibiotic resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms: towards the development of novel anti-biofilm therapies.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Patrick K; Yeung, Amy T Y; Hancock, Robert E W

    2014-12-10

    The growth of bacteria as structured aggregates termed biofilms leads to their protection from harsh environmental conditions such as physical and chemical stresses, shearing forces, and limited nutrient availability. Because of this highly adapted ability to survive adverse environmental conditions, bacterial biofilms are recalcitrant to antibiotic therapies and immune clearance. This is particularly problematic in hospital settings where biofilms are a frequent cause of chronic and device-related infections and constitute a significant burden on the health-care system. The major therapeutic strategy against infections is the use of antibiotics, which, due to adaptive resistance, are often insufficient to clear biofilm infections. Thus, novel biofilm-specific therapies are required. Specific features of biofilm development, such as surface adherence, extracellular matrix formation, quorum sensing, and highly regulated biofilm maturation and dispersal are currently being studied as targets to be exploited in the development of novel biofilm-specific treatments. Using Pseudomonas aeruginosa for illustrative purposes, this review highlights the antibiotic resistance mechanisms of biofilms, and discusses current research into novel biofilm-specific therapies.

  15. IFN-γ Hinders Recovery from Mucosal Inflammation during Antibiotic Therapy for Salmonella Gut Infection.

    PubMed

    Dolowschiak, Tamas; Mueller, Anna Angelika; Pisan, Lynn Joanna; Feigelman, Rounak; Felmy, Boas; Sellin, Mikael Erik; Namineni, Sukumar; Nguyen, Bidong Dinh; Wotzka, Sandra Yvonne; Heikenwalder, Mathias; von Mering, Christian; Mueller, Christoph; Hardt, Wolf-Dietrich

    2016-08-10

    Salmonella Typhimurium (S.Tm) causes acute enteropathy resolving after 4-7 days. Strikingly, antibiotic therapy does not accelerate disease resolution. We screened for factors blocking remission using a S.Tm enterocolitis model. The antibiotic ciprofloxacin clears pathogen stool loads within 3-24 hr, while gut pathology resolves more slowly (ψ50: ∼48 hr, remission: 6-9 days). This delayed resolution is mediated by an interferon-γ (IFN-γ)-dependent response that is triggered during acute infection and continues throughout therapy. Specifically, IFN-γ production by mucosal T and NK cells retards disease resolution by maintaining signaling through the transcriptional regulator STAT1 and boosting expression of inflammatory mediators like IL-1β, TNF, and iNOS. Additionally, sustained IFN-γ fosters phagocyte accumulation and hampers antimicrobial defense mediated by IL-22 and the lectin REGIIIβ. These findings reveal a role for IFN-γ in delaying resolution of intestinal inflammation and may inform therapies for acute Salmonella enteropathy, chronic inflammatory bowel diseases, or disease resolution during antibiotic treatment.

  16. Initial antibiotic therapy for alligator bites: characterization of the oral flora of Alligator mississippiensis.

    PubMed

    Flandry, F; Lisecki, E J; Domingue, G J; Nichols, R L; Greer, D L; Haddad, R J

    1989-02-01

    An open thumb fracture resulting from an alligator bite became infected with Aeromonas hydrophila, Enterobacter agglomerans, and Citrobacter diversus. The patient was treated by surgical debridement and antibiotic therapy. We obtained cultures from the mouth of ten alligators to characterize their oral flora. Initial empiric therapy after alligator bites should be directed at gram-negative species, in particular, Aeromonas hydrophila and anaerobic species including Clostridium. Of the numerous fungi that were isolated, none has been reported to result in wound infection after alligator bites.

  17. [Antibiotic Stewardship].

    PubMed

    Lanckohr, Christian; Ellger, Björn

    2016-02-01

    The adequate management of infections is an important task in critical care medicine which has an effect on patient outcome. As a result, the prevalence of antiinfective therapy is high in intensive care units. In the face of an unsettling development of worldwide microbial resistance, an optimization and reduction of antiinfective therapy is necessary. Antibiotic stewardship tries to improve antiinfective therapy with an interdisciplinary approach. One overall objective of antibiotic stewardship is the reduction of resistance induction in order to preserve the therapeutic efficiency of antibiotics. Intensive care units are important fields of action for antibiotic stewardship interventions. This article reviews available evidence and some practical aspects for antibiotic stewardship.

  18. Multiple-antibiotic-resistant Helicobacter pylori infection eradicated with a tailor-made quadruple therapy.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Shigemi; Inoue, Hisayuki; Inoue, Tetsuya; Maruoka, Yuri

    2012-04-01

    In 2008, a 44-year-old woman with mild epigastralgia diagnosed as having Helicobacter pylori-positive chronic gastritis without peptic ulcer underwent eradication therapy with lansoprazole (LPZ), amoxicillin (AMPC) and clarithromycin (CAM) for 7 days, but it failed, so treatment with rabeprazole, AMPC, and metronidazole (MNZ) for another 7 days was given, but it also failed. She was then prescribed a modified, 14-day sequential therapy of LPZ and AMPC with an increased dose of CAM followed by MNZ supplement, but the infection was still not eradicated. The H. pylori was cultured and examined for antibiotic susceptibility with the agar dilution method and was found to be resistant to CAM, MNZ, and levofloxacin, and non-sensitive to AMPC, namely multiple-antibiotic-resistant, although sensitive to minocycline. The CYP2C19 genotype of the patient was an extensive metabolizer (G681A: G/A, G636A: G/G). In 2010, she gave informed consent for a 14-day, tailor-made, modified classical (or modified high-dose PPI + AMPC) quadruple therapy comprising 30 mg LPZ, 500 mg AMPC and 500 mg bismuth subnitrate, qid, and 100 mg minocycline, bid. Two months later, her urea breath test was negative. Histology and bacterial culture were still negative 1 year after the therapy. She did not have any adverse events during or after the novel therapy, nor did she feel any further epigastralgia.

  19. Use of PNA FISH for blood cultures growing Gram-positive cocci in chains without a concomitant antibiotic stewardship intervention does not improve time to appropriate antibiotic therapy.

    PubMed

    Cosgrove, Sara E; Li, David X; Tamma, Pranita D; Avdic, Edina; Hadhazy, Eric; Wakefield, Teresa; Gherna, Michael; Carroll, Karen C

    2016-09-01

    Peptide nucleic acid fluorescence in situ hybridization (PNA FISH) is a rapid diagnostic assay that can identify certain organisms growing in blood cultures 30-90 min from the time of positive Gram-stain. Existing studies have demonstrated a clinical utility with this assay when antibiotic stewardship programs assist clinicians with interpreting the results. However, the benefit of these rapid assays in the absence of concomitant antibiotic stewardship involvement is unclear. In this randomized study of 220 patients with enterococcal or streptococcal bacteremia, we found that PNA FISH, in the absence of concomitant input from an antibiotic stewardship program, had no impact on time to effective or optimal therapy, length of hospital stay, or in-hospital mortality. Our results suggest that in the absence of guidance from an antibiotic stewardship program, the clinical benefits of rapid diagnostic microbiological tools may be reduced.

  20. Proteomics Analysis Reveals a Potential Antibiotic Cocktail Therapy Strategy for Aeromonas hydrophila Infection in Biofilm.

    PubMed

    Li, Wanxin; Yao, Zujie; Sun, Lina; Hu, Wenjie; Cao, Jijuan; Lin, Wenxiong; Lin, Xiangmin

    2016-06-03

    Antibiotic fitness and acquired resistance are the two critical factors when bacteria respond to antibiotics, and the correlations and mechanisms between these two factors remain largely unknown. In this study, a TMT-labeling-based quantitative proteomics method was used to compare the differential expression of proteins between the fitness and acquired resistance to chlortetracycline in Aeromonas hydrophila biofilm. Bioinformatics analysis showed that translation-related ribosomal proteins, such as 30s ribosome subunits, increased in both factors; fatty acid biosynthesis related proteins, such as FabB, FabD, FabG, AccA, and AccD, increased in biofilm fitness, and some pathways (including propanoate-metabolism-related protein, such as PrpB, AtoB, PflB, AcsA, PrpD, and GabT) displayed decreased abundance in acquired resistance biofilm. The varieties of selected proteins involved in fatty acid biosynthesis and propanoate metabolism were further validated by q-PCR assay or Western blotting. Furthermore, the antibiotic-resistance-function assays showed that fatty-acid biosynthesis should be a protective antibiotics-resistance mechanism and a cocktail of chlortetracycline and triclosan, a fatty-acid-biosynthesis inhibitor, exhibited more efficient antimicrobial capability than did each antibiotic individually on biofilm, specifically on chlortetracycline-sensitive biofilm. We therefore demonstrate that the up-regulation of fatty acid biosynthesis may play an important role in antibiotic resistance and suggest that a cocktail of chlortetracycline and triclosan may be a potential cocktail therapy for pathogenic infections in biofilm.

  1. Remission of refractory pyoderma gangrenosum, severe acne, and hidradenitis suppurativa (PASH) syndrome using targeted antibiotic therapy in 4 patients.

    PubMed

    Join-Lambert, Olivier; Duchatelet, Sabine; Delage, Maïa; Miskinyte, Snaigune; Coignard, Hélène; Lemarchand, Nicolas; Alemy-Carreau, Murielle; Lortholary, Olivier; Nassif, Xavier; Hovnanian, Alain; Nassif, Aude

    2015-11-01

    Pyoderma gangrenosum, severe acne, and suppurative hidradenitis (PASH) syndrome can prove refractory to treatment and is characterized by relapses and recurrences. The combination of antibiotic therapy and surgery can produce success in the management of the syndrome. Acute treatment is required, but maintenance therapy is also necessary to prevent disease relapse. The response to antibiotic therapy is hypothesis generating, raising the issue of a modified host response. To date, anecdotal reports support the use of surgery and medical therapy, but controlled investigations with extended follow-up are necessary to substantiate preliminary data observed with individual cases.

  2. Prolactinoma ErbB receptor expression and targeted therapy for aggressive tumors.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Odelia; Mamelak, Adam; Bannykh, Serguei; Carmichael, John; Bonert, Vivien; Lim, Stephen; Cook-Wiens, Galen; Ben-Shlomo, Anat

    2014-06-01

    As ErbB signaling is a determinant of prolactin synthesis, role of ErbB receptors was tested for prolactinoma outcomes and therapy. The objective of this study was to characterize ErbB receptor expression in prolactinomas and then perform a pilot study treating resistant prolactinomas with a targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI). Retrospective analysis of prolactinomas and pilot study for dopamine agonist resistant prolactinomas in tertiary referral center. We performed immunofluorescent staining of a tissue array of 29 resected prolactinoma tissues for EGFR, ErbB2, ErbB3, and ErbB4 correlated with clinical features. Two patients with aggressive resistant prolactinomas enrolled and completed trial. They received lapatinib 1,250 mg daily for 6 months with tumor and hormone assessments. Main outcome measures were positive tumor staining of respective ErbB receptors, therapeutic reduction of prolactin levels and tumor shrinkage. Treated PRL levels and tumor volumes were suppressed in both subjects treated with TKI. EGFR expression was positive in 82 % of adenomas, ErbB2 in 92 %, ErbB3 in 25 %, and ErbB4 in 71 %, with ErbB2 score > EGFR > ErbB4 > ErbB3. Higher ErbB3 expression was associated with optic chiasm compression (p = 0.03), suprasellar extension (p = 0.04), and carotid artery encasement (p = 0.01). Higher DA response rates were observed in tumors with higher ErbB3 expression. Prolactinoma expression of specific ErbB receptors is associated with tumor invasion, symptoms, and response to dopamine agonists. Targeting ErbB receptors may be effective therapy in patients with resistant prolactinomas.

  3. INTRAVENOUS REGIONAL ANTIBIOTIC PERFUSION THERAPY AS AN ADJUNCTIVE TREATMENT FOR DIGITAL LESIONS IN SEABIRDS.

    PubMed

    Fiorello, Christine V

    2017-03-01

    Foot infections are a common problem among seabirds in wildlife rehabilitation. Pododermatitis and digital infections are often challenging to treat because of the presence of suboptimal substrates, abnormal weight-bearing due to injuries, and suboptimal nutritional or health status. Seabirds represent the majority of animals requiring rehabilitation after oil spills, and foot problems are a common reason for euthanasia among these birds. Antibiotic intravenous regional perfusion therapy is frequently used in humans and other species to treat infections of the distal extremities, but it has not been evaluated in seabirds. During the 2015 Refugio oil spill response, four birds with foot lesions (pododermatitis, osteomyelitis, or both) were treated with ampicillin/sulbactam administered intravenously to the affected limb(s) in addition to systemic antibiotics and anti-inflammatories. Three of the birds, all brown pelicans ( Pelecanus occidentalis ) recovered rapidly and were released. Two of these birds had acute pododermatitis and were treated once with intravenous regional perfusion. They were released approximately 3 wk after the perfusion therapy. The third pelican had osteomyelitis of a digit. It was treated twice with intravenous regional perfusion and was released about 1 mo after the initial perfusion therapy. The fourth bird, a Pacific loon ( Gavia pacifica ), was treated once with perfusion therapy but did not respond to treatment and was euthanatized. No serious adverse effects were observed. This technique should be explored further in avian species.

  4. Vancomycin-variable enterococci can give rise to constitutive resistance during antibiotic therapy.

    PubMed

    Thaker, Maulik N; Kalan, Lindsay; Waglechner, Nicholas; Eshaghi, Alireza; Patel, Samir N; Poutanen, Susan; Willey, Barbara; Coburn, Bryan; McGeer, Allison; Low, Donald E; Wright, Gerard D

    2015-03-01

    Vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) are notorious clinical pathogens restricting the use of glycopeptide antibiotics in the clinic setting. Routine surveillance to detect VRE isolated from patients relies on PCR bioassays and chromogenic agar-based test methods. In recent years, we and others have reported the emergence of enterococcal strains harboring a "silent" copy of vancomycin resistance genes that confer a vancomycin-susceptible phenotype (vancomycin-susceptible enterococci [VSE]) and thus escape detection using drug sensitivity screening tests. Alarmingly, these strains are able to convert to a resistance phenotype (VSE→VRE) during antibiotic treatment, severely compromising the success of therapy. Such strains have been termed vancomycin-variable enterococci (VVE). We have investigated the molecular mechanisms leading to the restoration of resistance in VVE isolates through the whole-genome sequencing of resistant isolates, measurement of resistance gene expression, and quantification of the accumulation of drug-resistant peptidoglycan precursors. The results demonstrate that VVE strains can revert to a VRE phenotype through the constitutive expression of the vancomycin resistance cassette. This is accomplished through a variety of changes in the DNA region upstream of the resistance genes that includes both a deletion of a likely transcription inhibitory secondary structure and the introduction of a new unregulated promoter. The VSE→VRE transition of VVE can occur in patients during the course of antibiotic therapy, resulting in treatment failure. These VVE strains therefore pose a new challenge to the current regimen of diagnostic tests used for VRE detection in the clinic setting.

  5. Periorbital cellulitis in children: Analysis of outcome of intravenous antibiotic therapy.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Rita; Menezes, Carlos; Machado, Rute; Ribeiro, Isabel; Lemos, José A

    2016-08-01

    Periorbital cellulitis is a relatively common ocular disease in the pediatric population. Early diagnosis of this disease with a prompt intervention is critical to avoid vision and life-threatening complications. In the last years, medical therapy has been expanding for the treatment of orbital cellulitis, instead of the standard surgical approach. The purpose of this study was to describe the outcome of treatment with intravenous antibiotic of periorbital cellulitis in children. A retrospective review of all children admitted with periorbital cellulitis in our hospital between January 2002 and July 2013 was conducted. Cases were divided in two subgroups, pre-septal and post-septal infection. The demographics, clinical findings, treatment and outcomes were analyzed. In total 110 children were included, 93 with pre-septal and 17 with post-septal cellulitis. The mean age was 3.5 years in children with pre-septal cellulitis and 5.5 years in those with post-septal cellulitis (p = 0.149). For both subgroups the most common predisposing factor was sinusitis. Intravenous antibiotic therapy was successful in all except one patient with an orbital abscess who required surgical intervention. In our study complete recovery was achieve in all (except for one) children with periorbital cellulitis treated with intravenous antibiotics only.

  6. Value and Clinical Impact of an Infectious Disease-Supervised Outpatient Parenteral Antibiotic Therapy Program

    PubMed Central

    Petrak, Russell M.; Skorodin, Nathan C.; Fliegelman, Robert M.; Hines, David W.; Chundi, Vishnu V.; Harting, Brian P.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Outpatient parenteral antibiotic therapy (OPAT) is a safe and effective modality for treating serious infections. This study was undertaken to define the value of OPAT in a multicentered infectious disease (ID) private practice setting. Methods. Over a period of 32 months, 6120 patients were treated using 19 outpatient ID offices in 6 states. Analysis included patient demographics, indications of OPAT, diagnoses, therapeutic agent, duration of therapy, and site of therapy initiation. Outcomes were stratified by therapeutic success, clinical relapse, therapeutic complications, and hospitalizations after initiating therapy. Statistical analysis included an ordinal logistic regression analysis. Results. Forty-three percent of patients initiated therapy in an outpatient office, and 57% began therapy in a hospital. Most common diagnoses treated were bone and joint (32.2%), abscesses (18.8%), cellulitis (18.5%), and urinary tract infection (10.8%). Ninety-four percent of patients were successfully treated, and only 3% were hospitalized after beginning therapy. Most common cause of treatment failure was a relapse of primary infection (60%), progression of primary infection (21%), and therapeutic complication (19%). Conclusions. An ID-supervised OPAT program is safe, efficient, and clinically effective. By maximizing the delivery of outpatient care, OPAT provides a tangible value to hospitals, payers, and patients. This program is a distinctive competency available to ID physicians who offer this service to patients. PMID:27807591

  7. Bench-to-bedside review: Appropriate antibiotic therapy in severe sepsis and septic shock--does the dose matter?

    PubMed

    Pea, Federico; Viale, Pierluigi

    2009-01-01

    Appropriate antibiotic therapy in patients with severe sepsis and septic shock should mean prompt achievement and maintenance of optimal exposure at the infection site with broad-spectrum antimicrobial agents administered in a timely manner. Once the causative pathogens have been identified and tested for in vitro susceptibility, subsequent de-escalation of antimicrobial therapy should be applied whenever feasible. The goal of appropriate antibiotic therapy must be pursued resolutely and with continuity, in view of the ongoing explosion of antibiotic-resistant infections that plague the intensive care unit setting and of the continued decrease in new antibiotics emerging. This article provides some principles for the correct handling of antimicrobial dosing regimens in patients with severe sepsis and septic shock, in whom various pathophysiological conditions may significantly alter the pharmacokinetic behaviour of drugs.

  8. Optimising patient safety when using elastomeric pumps to administer outpatient parenteral antibiotic therapy.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Gemma

    2016-10-27

    Outpatient parenteral antibiotic therapy (OPAT) is a growing area of practice that has numerous benefits for both patients and the healthcare system. In order for OPAT services to be successful, strategies need to be in place to maximise efficiency while providing safe, high-quality care. The use of elastomeric pumps to deliver intravenous (IV) antibiotics can have many benefits for OPAT services; they are cost-effective, easy to use and allow the patient to be fully ambulant. However, plans need to be put in place to make sure their use is safe and effective. This article discusses the use of elastomeric pumps by a UK-based OPAT team and the governance processes the team put in place to optimise patient safety when using elastomeric pumps to deliver IV antibiotics. Furthermore, with experience of using elastomeric pumps for more than 4 years the OPAT team was asked to evaluate an elastomeric pump new to the UK market: the Accufuser pump (Vygon (UK) Limited). By collecting data on its use it was found to be safe and easy to use. The team felt that the Accufuser pump ran to time in 96% of completed evaluations and considered it to be clinically acceptable in all responses.

  9. Subinhibitory Antibiotic Therapy Alters Recurrent Urinary Tract Infection Pathogenesis through Modulation of Bacterial Virulence and Host Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Hannan, Thomas J.; MacPhee, Roderick A.; Schwartz, Drew J.; Macklaim, Jean M.; Gloor, Gregory B.; Razvi, Hassan; Reid, Gregor; Hultgren, Scott J.; Burton, Jeremy P.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The capacity of subinhibitory levels of antibiotics to modulate bacterial virulence in vitro has recently been brought to light, raising concerns over the appropriateness of low-dose therapies, including antibiotic prophylaxis for recurrent urinary tract infection management. However, the mechanisms involved and their relevance in influencing pathogenesis have not been investigated. We characterized the ability of antibiotics to modulate virulence in the uropathogens Staphylococcus saprophyticus and Escherichia coli. Several antibiotics were able to induce the expression of adhesins critical to urothelial colonization, resulting in increased biofilm formation, colonization of murine bladders and kidneys, and promotion of intracellular niche formation. Mice receiving subinhibitory ciprofloxacin treatment were also more susceptible to severe infections and frequent recurrences. A ciprofloxacin prophylaxis model revealed this strategy to be ineffective in reducing recurrences and worsened infection by creating larger intracellular reservoirs at higher frequencies. Our study indicates that certain agents used for antibiotic prophylaxis have the potential to complicate infections. PMID:25827417

  10. Antibiotic Therapy for Chorioamnionitis to Reduce the Global Burden of Associated Disease

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Clark T.; Adami, Rebecca R.; Farzin, Azadeh

    2017-01-01

    Chorioamnionitis is associated with significant maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality throughout the world. In developed countries, great progress has been made to minimize the impact of chorioamnionitis, through timely diagnosis and appropriate treatment. In the global setting, where many women deliver outside the healthcare facilities, this diagnosis is frequently overlooked and not properly treated. In addition to its impact on maternal health, a significant proportion of neonatal morbidity and mortality can be prevented by both recognition and access to readily available treatment. With the increasing focus on saving the most vulnerable members of society, we echo the need for providing parturient women with suspected chorioamnionitis universal access to appropriate therapy. We describe known effective antibiotic therapies for chorioamnionitis and provide an overview of additional potential antimicrobial treatments that might be effectively implemented in areas with limited access to care. PMID:28352229

  11. Negative Pressure Wound Therapy Reduces the Effectiveness of Traditional Local Antibiotic Depot in a Large Complex Musculoskeletal Wound Animal Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    in particular, local antibiotic delivery via polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) bone cement and negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT). In cases with gross...release of gentamicin from polymethylmethacrylate beads. An experimental and pharmacoki- netic study. J Bone Joint Surg Br. 1978;60-B:270 275. 7...diffusion from antibiotic-impregnated polymethylmethacrylate beads. Clin Orthop Relat Res. 1992;278:244 252. Stinner et al J Orthop Trauma Volume

  12. Optimizing antimicrobial therapy of sepsis and septic shock: focus on antibiotic combination therapy.

    PubMed

    Vazquez-Grande, Gloria; Kumar, Anand

    2015-02-01

    There has been little improvement in septic shock mortality in the past 70 years, despite ever more broad-spectrum and potent antimicrobials. In the past, resuscitative elements have been the primary area of clinical septic shock management and research. The question of the optimal use of antimicrobial therapy was relatively ignored in recent decades. This review explores the pathophysiology of sepsis in an attempt to produce a better understanding and define key determinants of antimicrobial therapy response in septic shock. Optimizing existing antimicrobials delivery can drive significant improvements in the outcome of sepsis and septic shock. Inappropriate antimicrobial selection and dosing or delays in the administration substantially increase mortality and morbidity in life-threatening infections. Definitive combination therapy (where a pathogen known to be susceptible to a given agent is additionally covered by another agent) remains controversial. Although some in vitro studies, animal models, and clinical studies of infection including endocarditis, gram-negative bacteremia, and neutropenic infections have supported combination therapy, the potential clinical benefit in other severe infections has been questioned. Several meta-analyses have failed to demonstrate improvement of outcome with combination therapy in immunocompetent patients with sepsis and/or gram-negative bacteremia. These meta-analyses did not undertake subgroup analyses of the septic shock population. This article reviews the existing evidence supporting combination therapy for severe infections, sepsis, and septic shock.

  13. Current and future trends in antibiotic therapy of acute bacterial skin and skin-structure infections.

    PubMed

    Russo, A; Concia, E; Cristini, F; De Rosa, F G; Esposito, S; Menichetti, F; Petrosillo, N; Tumbarello, M; Venditti, M; Viale, P; Viscoli, C; Bassetti, M

    2016-04-01

    In 2013 the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued recommendations and guidance on developing drugs for treatment of skin infection using a new definition of acute bacterial skin and skin-structure infection (ABSSSI). The new classification includes cellulitis, erysipelas, major skin abscesses and wound infection with a considerable extension of skin involvement, clearly referring to a severe subset of skin infections. The main goal of the FDA was to better identify specific infections where the advantages of a new antibiotic could be precisely estimated through quantifiable parameters, such as improvement of the lesion size and of systemic signs of infection. Before the spread and diffusion of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in skin infections, antibiotic therapy was relatively straightforward. Using an empiric approach, a β-lactam was the preferred therapy and cultures from patients were rarely obtained. With the emergence of MRSA in the community setting, initial ABSSSI management has been changed and readdressed. Dalbavancin, oritavancin and tedizolid are new drugs, approved or in development for ABSSSI treatment, that also proved to be efficient against MRSA. Dalbavancin and oritavancin have a long half-life and can be dosed less frequently. This in turn makes it possible to treat patients with ABSSSI in an outpatient setting, avoiding hospitalization or potentially allowing earlier discharge, without compromising efficacy. In conclusion, characteristics of long-acting antibiotics could represent an opportunity for the management of ABSSSI and could profoundly modify the management of these infections by reducing or in some cases eliminating both costs and risks of hospitalization.

  14. Combination therapy including serratiopeptidase improves outcomes of mechanical-antibiotic treatment of periimplantitis.

    PubMed

    Sannino, G; Gigola, P; Puttini, M; Pera, F; Passariello, C

    2013-01-01

    This study was designed as a retrospective analysis of clinical outcomes of cases of periimplantitis treated by mechanical debridement and the administration of antibiotics combined or not with the administration of either the proteolytic enzyme serratiopeptidase (SPEP) or non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Clinical charts of 544 partially edentulous patients treated for periimplantitis between June 1996 and December 2010 were analyzed to obtain clinical data of the affected implants just before the beginning of treatment and 12 months later to evaluate the outcomes of combined mechanical antibiotic treatment alone or in combination with the co-administration of the anti-inflammatory SPEP or NSAIDs. The comparative analysis revealed that therapeutic outcomes were significantly different in the three groups. Failure rate in the group that received SPEP (6 percent) was significantly lower compared to the group that received NSAIDS (16.9 percent; P less than 0.01) and to the group that received no anti-inflammatory therapy (18.9 percent; P less than 0.01). Treatment including SPEP was associated with significantly better healing also when successful treatments alone were considered. The data reported in this paper strongly support the hypothesis that SPEP is a valid addition to protocols for the combined therapy of peri-implantitis. In fact, it allows to enhance success rates significantly and also favors better tissue repair around successfully treated implants as compared to other regimens.

  15. Antibiotic therapy of ventilator-associated pneumonia--a reappraisal of rationale in the era of bacterial resistance.

    PubMed

    Sintchenko, V; Iredell, J R; Gilbert, G L

    2001-09-01

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is the most frequent nosocomial infection in intensive care units (ICU). Resistance patterns seen in ICUs suggest that prescribing recommendations should be reappraised to limit practices engendering resistance to large families of antibiotics. Despite concern surrounding the use of antibiotics in the management of VAP, there is limited evidence to assist the clinician in making decisions about the indications for such therapy, the selection of the correct antibiotic(s), the timing of initiation of therapy and its duration. The high amount of antibiotic use, in combination with the low grade colonisation of patients with multi-resistant pathogens at the time of admission, turns the ICU into an environment where antibiotic policy is likely to have an effect on the resistance problem. Opinions are changing as to the validity of invasive techniques in guiding prescribing decisions. Invasive and semi-invasive diagnostic testing increases physician confidence in the diagnosis and management of VAP and helps to limit or discontinue antibiotic treatment.

  16. Fludarabine, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin (FCD), and rituximab: a remission induction therapy for aggressive pediatric post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD).

    PubMed

    Giraldi, Eugenia; Provenzi, Massimo; Fiocchi, Roberto; Colledan, Michele; Cornelli, Pieremilio; Torre, Giuliano; Rambaldi, Alessandro; Conter, Valentino

    2011-08-01

    Management of aggressive, usually late-occurring, post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLDs), a life-threatening complication after solid organ transplants, remains controversial. Four children affected by aggressive CD20+ PTLDs received a chemo-immunotherapy regimen for remission induction based on fludarabine, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, and rituximab, associated with a rapid discontinuation of immunosuppression (IS). Subsequent consolidation chemotherapy consisted of Berlin-Frankfurt-Münster-modified blocks. All patients achieved a complete remission, which persisted for 25, 68+, 80+, and 103+ months after diagnosis. Therapy was well tolerated. No patients developed allograft rejection during PTLD treatment. Our experience suggests that this chemo-immunotherapeutic approach may be an effective treatment strategy while allowing for a concomitant discontinuation of IS.

  17. Central nervous system recurrence of desmoplastic small round cell tumor following aggressive multimodal therapy: A case report

    PubMed Central

    UMEDA, KATSUTSUGU; SAIDA, SATOSHI; YAMAGUCHI, HIDEKI; OKAMOTO, SHINYA; OKAMOTO, TAKESHI; KATO, ITARU; HIRAMATSU, HIDEFUMI; IMAI, TSUYOSHI; KODAIRA, TAKESHI; HEIKE, TOSHIO; ADACHI, SOUICHI; WATANABE, KEN-ICHIRO

    2016-01-01

    Patients with desmoplastic small round cell tumors (DSRCTs) have an extremely poor outcome despite the use of aggressive therapy. The current study presents the case of 16-year-old male with metastatic DSRCT, in which multimodal therapy, including intensive chemotherapies using frequent autologous stem cell support, gross resection of primary and metastatic lesions, and whole abdominopelvic intensity-modulated radiation therapy, was administered. Subsequent to these treatments, there was no evidence of active disease. However, cerebellar and pineal body lesions, and bone metastasis to the left humerus were detected 1 year and 2 months after the initial diagnosis. Combination chemotherapy with irinotecan and temozolomide was initially effective against the central nervous system (CNS) metastatic lesions; however, the patient succumbed due to progressive CNS disease after seven courses of combination chemotherapy. Additional studies are required to accumulate information regarding CNS recurrence of DSRCT. PMID:26870296

  18. Sub-100 nm Gold Nanomatryoshkas Improve Photo-thermal Therapy Efficacy in Large and Highly Aggressive Triple Negative Breast Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Bishnoi, Sandra; Urban, Alexander; Charron, Heather; Mitchell, Tamika; Shea, Martin; Nanda, Sarmistha; Schiff, Rachel; Halas, Naomi; Joshi, Amit

    2014-01-01

    There is an unmet need for efficient near-infrared photothermal transducers for the treatment of highly aggressive cancers and large tumors where the penetration of light can be substantially reduced, and the intra-tumoral nanoparticle transport is restricted due to the presence of hypoxic or nectrotic regions. We report the performance advantages obtained by sub 100 nm gold nanomatryushkas, comprising of concentric gold-silica-gold layers compared to conventional ~150 nm silica core gold nanoshells for photothermal therapy of triple negative breast cancer. We demonstrate that a 33% reduction in silica-core-gold-shell nanoparticle size, while retaining near-infrared plasmon resonance, and keeping the nanoparticle surface charge constant, results in a four to five fold tumor accumulation of nanoparticles following equal dose of injected gold for both sizes. The survival time of mice bearing large (>1000 mm3) and highly aggressive triple negative breast tumors is doubled for the nanomatryushka treatment group under identical photo-thermal therapy conditions. The higher absorption cross-section of a nanomatryoshka results in a higher efficiency of photonic to thermal energy conversion and coupled with 4-5X accumulation within large tumors results in superior therapy efficacy. PMID:25051221

  19. Sub-100nm gold nanomatryoshkas improve photo-thermal therapy efficacy in large and highly aggressive triple negative breast tumors.

    PubMed

    Ayala-Orozco, Ciceron; Urban, Cordula; Bishnoi, Sandra; Urban, Alexander; Charron, Heather; Mitchell, Tamika; Shea, Martin; Nanda, Sarmistha; Schiff, Rachel; Halas, Naomi; Joshi, Amit

    2014-10-10

    There is an unmet need for efficient near-infrared photothermal transducers for the treatment of highly aggressive cancers and large tumors where the penetration of light can be substantially reduced, and the intra-tumoral nanoparticle transport is restricted due to the presence of hypoxic or necrotic regions. We report the performance advantages obtained by sub 100nm gold nanomatryushkas, comprising concentric gold-silica-gold layers compared to conventional ~150nm silica core gold nanoshells for photothermal therapy of triple negative breast cancer. We demonstrate that a 33% reduction in silica-core-gold-shell nanoparticle size, while retaining near-infrared plasmon resonance, and keeping the nanoparticle surface charge constant, results in a four to five fold tumor accumulation of nanoparticles following equal dose of injected gold for both sizes. The survival time of mice bearing large (>1000mm(3)) and highly aggressive triple negative breast tumors is doubled for the nanomatryushka treatment group under identical photo-thermal therapy conditions. The higher absorption cross-section of a nanomatryoshka results in a higher efficiency of photonic to thermal energy conversion and coupled with 4-5× accumulation within large tumors results in superior therapy efficacy.

  20. Cervical necrotizing fasciitis as a complication of acute epiglottitis managed with minimally aggressive surgical intervention: Case report.

    PubMed

    Gollapalli, Rajesh Babu; Naiman, Ana Nusa; Merry, David

    2015-07-01

    Cervical necrotizing fasciitis secondary to epiglottitis is rare. The standard treatment of this severe condition has long been early and aggressive surgical debridement and adequate antimicrobial therapy. We report the case of an immunocompetent 59-year-old man who developed cervical necrotizing fasciitis as a complication of acute epiglottitis. We were able to successfully manage this patient with conservative surgical treatment (incision and drainage, in addition to antibiotic therapy) that did not involve aggressive debridement.

  1. An outcomes analysis of outpatient parenteral antibiotic therapy (OPAT) in a large Asian cohort.

    PubMed

    Seetoh, Theresa; Lye, David C; Cook, Alex R; Archuleta, Sophia; Chan, Monica; Sulaiman, Zuraidah; Zhong, Lihua; Llorin, Ryan M; Balm, Michelle; Fisher, Dale

    2013-06-01

    Outpatient parenteral antibiotic therapy (OPAT) facilitates early discharge, easing demands on inpatient resources and allowing patients the opportunity to restore home life. In Singapore, two large hospitals established a common prospective database in 2006. This study presents an analysis of all enrolled cases over 6 years to consider factors potentially causing adverse outcomes. In this prospective observational study, patients' first OPAT episodes, from initiation to completion, re-admission or early cessation, were recorded and analysed using Cox regression to identify factors associated with clinical deterioration leading to unplanned hospital re-admission. Of 2229 first episodes, 1874 (84.1%) completed treatment in OPAT as planned; 201 episodes (9.0%) were complicated by clinical deterioration and re-admitted. Other patients who failed to complete treatment were either re-admitted for elective procedures, experienced adverse drug reactions or peripherally inserted central catheter-related complications, or had other reasons for not completing treatment. Increased risk of clinical deterioration was associated with homecare OPAT (aHR=2.5, 95% CI 1.7-3.8; P<0.001), age >70 years (aHR=1.6, 95% CI 1.1-2.2; P=0.008) and non-private care (aHR=1.8, 95% CI 1.0-3.0; P=0.033). Diagnosis and type of antibiotic treatment were not significant risk factors for re-admission. OPAT provides intravenous antibiotics to those who would otherwise remain as hospital inpatients. In this large Asian cohort, clinical factors did not relate to the ability of patients to complete their treatment in OPAT. Criteria identified as significant warrant ongoing consideration as patients are assessed for acceptance into OPAT programmes.

  2. The Rosenzweig Picture-Frustration Study "Extra-Aggression" Score as an Indicator in Cognitive Restructuring Therapy for Male Perpetrators of Domestic Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norman, Michael; Ryan, Lawrence J.

    2008-01-01

    It was hypothesized that male perpetrators of domestic violence in the early stages of a 1-year process of cognitive restructuring therapy would manifest on the Rosenzweig Picture-Frustration Study higher levels of extra-aggressiveness than in later stages of the therapy process. A sample of male batterers in the process of treatment took the…

  3. Cognitive behavioral therapy to reduce overt aggression behavior in Chinese young male violent offenders.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chen; Li, Chun; Wang, Hong; Ou, Jian-Jun; Zhou, Jian-Song; Wang, Xiao-Ping

    2014-01-01

    This 9-week study was designed to determine whether a commercial cognitive-behavioral training program could effectively reduce overt aggression behavior in Chinese young male violent offenders. Sixty-six participants were randomly assigned to receive routine intervention alone (control group) or routine intervention plus Williams LifeSkills Training (WLST group) in a 1:1 ratio. The primary outcome was change scores on the Modified Overt Aggression Scale (MOAS) from baseline to one week following end of training. Secondary outcomes were change scores on the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale-11 (BIS-11) and Cook-Medley Hostility Scale (CMHS). There were significant between-group differences in change of MOAS total score (P < .001) and all sub-scores (Ps < .01) except aggression against property. Between-group differences were also observed in change of BIS-11 and CMHS total score (Ps < 0.05). All results favored the WLST group. These findings suggest WLST has the potential to be an effective intervention to reduce overt aggressive behavior in young male violent offenders.

  4. Source Control and Graft Preservation Using Negative Pressure Wound Therapy with Antibiotic Instillation: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Timothy; Grossi, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) is widely used to treat many types of complex wounds, and the advent of the instillation and dwell time (NPWTi-d) technique has enhanced this system with the addition of automated treatment with topical solutions. In the field of vascular surgery, NPWT is utilized to help close wounds over underlying grafts; however keeping these wounds free of infection and avoiding large reoperation when infection occurs remains a challenge. In this case report we present a patient who required acute intervention for limb ischemia, with a large wound created in the groin for anastomosis of a prosthetic graft bypass. Postoperatively, the wound became infected, and the challenge became balancing infection control and graft preservation with the patient’s multiple comorbidities including postoperative non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI). To avoid a large reoperation, we chose NPWTi-d with automated instillation of an antibiotic solution. There was no reinfection or return to the operating room (OR), the patient was discharged after four weeks and the wound closed on its own shortly thereafter. This case demonstrates that for high-risk surgical patients with known wound infections in the proximity of a bypass graft, NPWTi-d with antibiotic instillation may be an effective augmentation to current treatment strategies and may be considered as a stand-alone technique for wound closure in select cases. PMID:27909643

  5. Changes of Proteases, Antiproteases, and Pathogens in Cystic Fibrosis Patients' Upper and Lower Airways after IV-Antibiotic Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Ulrike; Hentschel, Julia; Janhsen, Wibke K.; Hünniger, Kerstin; Hipler, Uta-Christina; Sonnemann, Jürgen; Pfister, Wolfgang; Böer, Klas; Lehmann, Thomas; Mainz, Jochen G.

    2015-01-01

    Background. In cystic fibrosis (CF) the upper (UAW) and lower airways (LAW) are reservoirs for pathogens like Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The consecutive hosts' release of proteolytic enzymes contributes to inflammation and progressive pulmonary destruction. Objectives were to assess dynamics of protease : antiprotease ratios and pathogens in CF-UAW and LAW sampled by nasal lavage (NL) and sputum before and after intravenous- (IV-) antibiotic therapy. Methods. From 19 IV-antibiotic courses of 17 CF patients NL (10 mL/nostril) and sputum were collected before and after treatment. Microbiological colonization and concentrations of NE/SLPI/CTSS (ELISA) and MMP-9/TIMP-1 (multiplex bead array) were determined. Additionally, changes of sinonasal symptoms were assessed (SNOT-20). Results. IV-antibiotic treatment had more pronounced effects on inflammatory markers in LAW, whereas trends to decrease were also found in UAW. Ratios of MMP-9/TIMP-1 were higher in sputum, and ratios of NE/SLPI were higher in NL. Remarkably, NE/SLPI ratio was 10-fold higher in NL compared to healthy controls. SNOT-20 scores decreased significantly during therapy (P = 0.001). Conclusion. For the first time, changes in microbiological patterns in UAW and LAW after IV-antibiotic treatments were assessed, together with changes of protease/antiprotease imbalances. Delayed responses of proteases and antiproteases to IV-antibiotic therapy were found in UAW compared to LAW. PMID:26185365

  6. Antibiotics. Targeting DnaN for tuberculosis therapy using novel griselimycins.

    PubMed

    Kling, Angela; Lukat, Peer; Almeida, Deepak V; Bauer, Armin; Fontaine, Evelyne; Sordello, Sylvie; Zaburannyi, Nestor; Herrmann, Jennifer; Wenzel, Silke C; König, Claudia; Ammerman, Nicole C; Barrio, María Belén; Borchers, Kai; Bordon-Pallier, Florence; Brönstrup, Mark; Courtemanche, Gilles; Gerlitz, Martin; Geslin, Michel; Hammann, Peter; Heinz, Dirk W; Hoffmann, Holger; Klieber, Sylvie; Kohlmann, Markus; Kurz, Michael; Lair, Christine; Matter, Hans; Nuermberger, Eric; Tyagi, Sandeep; Fraisse, Laurent; Grosset, Jacques H; Lagrange, Sophie; Müller, Rolf

    2015-06-05

    The discovery of Streptomyces-produced streptomycin founded the age of tuberculosis therapy. Despite the subsequent development of a curative regimen for this disease, tuberculosis remains a worldwide problem, and the emergence of multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis has prioritized the need for new drugs. Here we show that new optimized derivatives from Streptomyces-derived griselimycin are highly active against M. tuberculosis, both in vitro and in vivo, by inhibiting the DNA polymerase sliding clamp DnaN. We discovered that resistance to griselimycins, occurring at very low frequency, is associated with amplification of a chromosomal segment containing dnaN, as well as the ori site. Our results demonstrate that griselimycins have high translational potential for tuberculosis treatment, validate DnaN as an antimicrobial target, and capture the process of antibiotic pressure-induced gene amplification.

  7. Gram-negative bacteraemia; a multi-centre prospective evaluation of empiric antibiotic therapy and outcome in English acute hospitals.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, J M; Biswas, J S; Edgeworth, J D; Islam, J; Jenkins, N; Judge, R; Lavery, A J; Melzer, M; Morris-Jones, S; Nsutebu, E F; Peters, J; Pillay, D G; Pink, F; Price, J R; Scarborough, M; Thwaites, G E; Tilley, R; Walker, A S; Llewelyn, M J

    2016-03-01

    Increasing antibiotic resistance makes choosing antibiotics for suspected Gram-negative infection challenging. This study set out to identify key determinants of mortality among patients with Gram-negative bacteraemia, focusing particularly on the importance of appropriate empiric antibiotic treatment. We conducted a prospective observational study of 679 unselected adults with Gram-negative bacteraemia at ten acute english hospitals between October 2013 and March 2014. Appropriate empiric antibiotic treatment was defined as intravenous treatment on the day of blood culture collection with an antibiotic to which the cultured organism was sensitive in vitro. Mortality analyses were adjusted for patient demographics, co-morbidities and illness severity. The majority of bacteraemias were community-onset (70%); most were caused by Escherichia coli (65%), Klebsiella spp. (15%) or Pseudomonas spp. (7%). Main foci of infection were urinary tract (51%), abdomen/biliary tract (20%) and lower respiratory tract (14%). The main antibiotics used were co-amoxiclav (32%) and piperacillin-tazobactam (30%) with 34% receiving combination therapy (predominantly aminoglycosides). Empiric treatment was inappropriate in 34%. All-cause mortality was 8% at 7 days and 15% at 30 days. Independent predictors of mortality (p <0.05) included older age, greater burden of co-morbid disease, severity of illness at presentation and inflammatory response. Inappropriate empiric antibiotic therapy was not associated with mortality at either time-point (adjusted OR 0.82; 95% CI 0.35-1.94 and adjusted OR 0.92; 95% CI 0.50-1.66, respectively). Although our study does not exclude an impact of empiric antibiotic choice on survival in Gram-negative bacteraemia, outcome is determined primarily by patient and disease factors.

  8. Formulation and efficacy of liposome-encapsulated antibiotics for therapy of intracellular Mycobacterium avium infection.

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Y K; Nix, D E; Straubinger, R M

    1995-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium is an intracellular pathogen that can invade and multiply within macrophages of the reticuloendothelial system. Current therapy is not highly effective. Particulate drug carriers that are targeted to the reticuloendothelial system may provide a means to deliver antibiotics more efficiently to M. avium-infected cells. We investigated the formulation of the antibiotics ciprofloxacin and azithromycin in liposomes and tested their antibacterial activities in vitro against M. avium residing within J774, a murine macrophage-like cell line. A conventional passive-entrapment method yielded an encapsulation efficiency of 9% for ciprofloxacin and because of aggregation mediated by the cationic drug, was useful only with liposomes containing < or = 50 mol% negatively charged phospholipid. In contrast, ciprofloxacin was encapsulated with > 90% efficiency, regardless of the content of negatively charged lipids, by a remote-loading technique that utilized both pH and potential gradients to drive drug into preformed liposomes. Both the cellular accumulation and the antimycobacterial activity of ciprofloxacin increased in proportion to the liposome negative charge; the maximal enhancement of potency was 43-fold in liposomes of distearoylphosphatidylglycerol-cholesterol (DSPG-Chol) (10:5). Azithromycin liposomes were prepared as a freeze-dried preparation to avoid chemical instability during storage, and drug could be incorporated at 33 mol% (with respect to phospholipid). Azithromycin also showed enhanced antimycobacterial effect in liposomes, and the potency increased in parallel to the moles percent of negatively charged lipids; azithromycin in DSPG-Chol (10:5) liposomes inhibited intracellular M. avium growth 41-fold more effectively than did free azithromycin. Thus, ciprofloxacin or azithromycin encapsulated in stable liposomes having substantial negative surface charge is superior to nonencapsulated drug in inhibition of M.avium growth within cultured

  9. Electroconvulsive therapy in adolescents with intellectual disability and severe self-injurious behavior and aggression: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Consoli, Angele; Cohen, Johan; Bodeau, Nicolas; Guinchat, Vincent; Wachtel, Lee; Cohen, David

    2013-01-01

    Efficacious intervention for severe, treatment-refractory self-injurious behavior and aggression (SIB/AGG) in children and adolescents with intellectual disability and concomitant psychiatric disorders remains a complex and urgent issue. The aim of this study is to assess the efficacy of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) on severe and treatment-resistant SIB/AGG in young people with intellectual disability and current psychiatric disorder. We reviewed the charts of all patients (N = 4) who received ECT in the context of SIB/AGG with resistance to behavioral interventions, milieu therapy and pharmacotherapy from 2007 to 2011. We scored the daily rate of SIB/AGG per patient for each hospital day. Inter rater reliability was good (intraclass correlations = 0.91). We used a mixed generalized linear model to assess whether the following explanatory variables (time, ECT) influenced the course of SIB/AGG over time, the dependant variable. The sample included two girls and two boys. The mean age at admission was 13.8 years old [range 12-14]. The patients had on average 19 ECT sessions [range 16-26] and one patient received maintenance ECT. There was no effect of time before and after ECT start. ECT was associated with a significant decrease in SIB/AGG scores (p < 0.001): mean aggression score post-ECT was half the pre-ECT value. ECT appears beneficial in severe, treatment-resistant SHBA in adolescents with intellectual disability.

  10. A randomized trial comparing ceftazidime alone with combination antibiotic therapy in cancer patients with fever and neutropenia.

    PubMed

    Pizzo, P A; Hathorn, J W; Hiemenz, J; Browne, M; Commers, J; Cotton, D; Gress, J; Longo, D; Marshall, D; McKnight, J

    1986-08-28

    To assess the efficacy of single-agent therapy relative to standard combination antibiotic therapy for the initial management of fever and neutropenia in cancer patients, we conducted a randomized trial comparing ceftazidime alone with a combination of cephalothin, gentamicin, and carbenicillin. Of 550 evaluable episodes of fever and neutropenia, 282 were treated with ceftazidime alone and 268 with the combination. All episodes were evaluated for responses at 72 hours after the start of treatment and at resolution of the neutropenia. Of the patients with unexplained fever who were given ceftazidime alone, 99 percent were alive at 72 hours and 98 percent were alive when the neutropenia resolved, as compared with 100 percent and 98 percent, respectively, of those given combination therapy. Of the patients with documented infection who were given ceftazidime alone, 98 percent were alive at 72 hours and 89 percent when the neutropenia resolved, as compared with 98 percent and 91 percent, respectively, of those given combination therapy. The majority of episodes of documented infection in both treatment groups necessitated additional antimicrobial treatment or other modifications of the initial regimen, as compared with only 22 percent of the episodes of unexplained fever. We conclude that initial single-agent therapy with certain beta-lactam antibiotics is a safe alternative to standard combination antibiotic therapy, although patients with documented infection or protracted neutropenia are likely to require additional or modified treatment.

  11. Development of targeted therapy in uterine serous carcinoma, a biologically aggressive variant of endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    El-Sahwi, Karim S; Schwartz, Peter E; Santin, Alessandro D

    2012-01-01

    Endometrial cancer (EC) is the most common female genital malignancy in the USA. Most carcinomas arising from the uterus are estrogen dependent and are associated with obesity and hypertension. They are designated type I ECs and typically, due to their early diagnosis secondary to postmenopausal bleeding, have a good prognosis. By contrast, type II ECs develop in older patients, are not hormone dependent and are responsible for most recurrences and deaths from EC. Uterine serous cancer constitutes up to 10% of all endometrial tumors, and represents the most biologically aggressive variant of type II EC. This article will describe the most salient molecular markers that have been identified in uterine serous cancer, thus far with emphasis on the use of erbB2 (HER2/neu) as the first of a series of therapeutic markers for the treatment of this highly-aggressive subset of ECs.

  12. Photodynamic and Antibiotic Therapy in Combination to Fight Biofilms and Resistant Surface Bacterial Infections

    PubMed Central

    Barra, Federica; Roscetto, Emanuela; Soriano, Amata A.; Vollaro, Adriana; Postiglione, Ilaria; Pierantoni, Giovanna Maria; Palumbo, Giuseppe; Catania, Maria Rosaria

    2015-01-01

    Although photodynamic therapy (PDT), a therapeutic approach that involves a photosensitizer, light and O2, has been principally considered for the treatment of specific types of cancers, other applications exist, including the treatment of infections. Unfortunately, PDT does not always guarantee full success since it exerts lethal effects only in cells that have taken up a sufficient amount of photosensitizer and have been exposed to adequate light doses, conditions that are not always achieved. Based on our previous experience on the combination PDT/chemotherapy, we have explored the possibility of fighting bacteria that commonly crowd infected surfaces by combining PDT with an antibiotic, which normally does not harm the strain at low concentrations. To this purpose, we employed 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA), a pro-drug that, once absorbed by proliferating bacteria, is converted into the natural photosensitizer Protoporphyrin IX (PpIX), followed by Gentamicin. Photoactivation generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) which damage or kill the cell, while Gentamicin, even at low doses, ends the work. Our experiments, in combination, have been highly successful against biofilms produced by several Gram positive bacteria (i.e., Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, etc.). This original approach points to potentially new and wide applications in the therapy of infections of superficial wounds and sores. PMID:26343645

  13. Bilateral One-Stage Revision of Infected Total Hip Arthroplasties: Report of Two Cases and Management of Antibiotic Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Pommepuy, Thomas; Lons, Adrien; Benad, Kevin; Beltrand, Eric; Senneville, Eric; Migaud, Henri

    2016-01-01

    Recommendations for the management of chronic and bilateral total hip arthroplasty (THA) infection are lacking. However, this type of infection involves medical problems concerning the management of the antibiotic therapy. We report two cases of such infections operated as one-stage revision. For each case, both hips were infected with the same bacteria (Staphylococcus caprae for one patient and methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus for the other). The probabilistic antibiotic treatment started during the first side (after harvesting intraoperative samples) did not prevent the culture of the bacteriologic harvested during the intervention of the second side. Cultures were positive for the same bacteria for both sides in the two cases presented herein. After results of intraoperative cultures, patients received culture-guided antibiotic therapy for three months and were considered cured at the end of a two-year follow-up. Our results suggest one-stage bilateral change of infected THA is a viable option and that early intraoperative antibiotic, started during the first-side exchange, does not jeopardize microbiological documentation of the second side. This work brings indirect arguments, in favor of the use of prophylactic antibiotics during revision of infected THA. PMID:26904335

  14. CLINICAL FEATURES AND OUTCOME OF INFECTIVE ENDOCARDITIS IN YEMENI PATIENTS TREATED WITH EMPIRICAL ANTIBIOTIC THERAPY

    PubMed Central

    Khaled, Al-Aghbari; Al-Noami, Alezzy Yahya; Al-Ansi, Mohamed; Faiza, Ahmed Askar

    2010-01-01

    Background: Infective endocarditis is a common disease in Yemen. Although the incidence of rheumatic valvular disease and uncorrected congenital heart disease in adults is high in Yemen, there are few data regarding the pattern, characteristic features and outcome of infective endocarditis in Yemen. Objective: The aim was to study the characteristic, clinical features and diagnostic criteria of infective endocarditis in Yemeni patients and the outcome in patients treated with medical therapy. Patients and Method: Seventy-two consecutive patients admitted to Kuwait teaching hospital in Sana’a with suspected infective endocarditis between June 1, 2005 and June 1, 2007 were included in this study. A questionnaire including history, clinical findings, and result of requested investigations, treatment, complications and outcome was used. The diagnosis was based on Dukes criteria, which proposed two major or five minor criteria. In our study, we included raised erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) as a minor criteria. The patients were classified as definite, possible and rejected cases. All patients received empirical antibiotic therapy. Results: The mean age was 28.56 ± 14.5 years. Men were 30 (42.2%) while women were 42 (57.7%). 59 (81.9%) of the patients had been admitted due to fever. Past history of rheumatic heart disease was positive in 38 (53.3%) of the patients. Mitral regurgitation was the commonest form of valvular affection 54 (82.1%) of patients followed by aortic regurgitation in 45 (63%). Anemia was present in 53 (74%) while raised erythrocyte sedimentation rate was high in all patients. Vegetations were detected by transthorasic echocardiography in 51 (70.83%) of the patients while blood culture was positive in only 7 (9.6%). After adding high ESR to the criteria, definite infective endocarditis were found in 34 (47.2%); possible in 38 (52.7%) and no rejected patients. Sixty-two (87.5%) of the patients improved and were discharged in good general

  15. Localized severe aggressive periodontitis. Disease progression and tooth preservation: a short case report over 14 years.

    PubMed

    Pelka, Matthias; Petschelt, Anselm

    2009-04-01

    A case of a 31-year-old female with aggressive periodontitis over 14 years is presented. From 1993 to 2000, no periodontal therapy occurred; disease development and progression could be reconstructed upon radiographic findings. In 2000, full-mouth disinfection therapy and antibiotic therapy was performed, as well as regenerative surgical treatments. Seven years after surgical treatment, stable periodontal conditions and clear bone regeneration in the surgical areas was evident.

  16. Bacteriophage therapy for membrane biofouling in membrane bioreactors and antibiotic-resistant bacterial biofilms.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharjee, Ananda Shankar; Choi, Jeongdong; Motlagh, Amir Mohaghegh; Mukherji, Sachiyo T; Goel, Ramesh

    2015-08-01

    To demonstrate elimination of bacterial biofilm on membranes to represent wastewater treatment as well as biofilm formed by antibiotic-resistant bacterial (ARB) to signify medical application, an antibiotic-resistant bacterium and its lytic bacteriophage were isolated from a full-scale wastewater treatment plant. Based on gram staining and complete 16 S rDNA sequencing, the isolated bacterium showed a more than 99% homology with Delftia tsuruhatensis, a gram-negative bacterium belonging to β-proteobacteria. The Delftia lytic phage's draft genome revealed the phage to be an N4-like phage with 59.7% G + C content. No transfer RNAs were detected for the phage suggesting that the phage is highly adapted to its host Delftia tsuruhatensis ARB-1 with regard to codon usage, and does not require additional tRNAs of its own. The gene annotation of the Delftia lytic phage found three different components of RNA polymerase (RNAP) in the genome, which is a typical characteristic of N4-like phages. The lytic phage specific to D. tsuruhatensis ARB-1 could successfully remove the biofilm formed by it on a glass slide. The water flux through the membrane of a prototype lab-scale membrane bioreactor decreased from 47 L/h m(2) to ∼15 L/h m(2) over 4 days due to a biofilm formed by D. tsuruhatensis ARB-1. However, the flux increased to 70% of the original after the lytic phage application. Overall, this research demonstrated phage therapy's great potential to solve the problem of membrane biofouling, as well as the problems posed by pathogenic biofilms in external wounds and on medical instruments.

  17. Adjunctive Phosphodiesterase-4 Inhibitor Therapy Improves Antibiotic Response to Pulmonary Tuberculosis in a Rabbit Model

    PubMed Central

    Subbian, Selvakumar; Tsenova, Liana; Holloway, Jennifer; Peixoto, Blas; O'Brien, Paul; Dartois, Véronique; Khetani, Vikram; Zeldis, Jerome B.; Kaplan, Gilla

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Adjunctive host-directed therapy is emerging as a new potential approach to improve the outcome of conventional antimicrobial treatment for tuberculosis (TB). We tested the ability of a phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitor (PDE4i) CC-11050, co-administered with the first-line anti-TB drug isoniazid (INH), to accelerate bacillary killing and reduce chronic inflammation in the lungs of rabbits with experimental Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection. Methods A rabbit model of pulmonary TB that recapitulates the pathologic manifestations seen in humans was used. Rabbits were infected with virulent Mtb by aerosol exposure and treated for eight weeks with INH with or without CC-11050, starting at four weeks post infection. The effect of CC-11050 treatment on disease severity, pathology, bacillary load, T cell proliferation and global lung transcriptome profiles were analyzed. Results Significant improvement in bacillary clearance and reduced lung pathology and fibrosis were noted in the rabbits treated for eight weeks with INH + CC-11050, compared to those treated with INH or CC-11050 only. In addition, expression of host genes associated with tissue remodeling, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) regulation, macrophage activation and lung inflammation networks was dampened in CC-11050-treated, compared to the untreated rabbits. Conclusions Adjunctive CC-11050 therapy significantly improves the response of rabbits with experimental pulmonary TB to INH treatment. We propose that CC-11050 may be a promising candidate for host directed therapy of patients with pulmonary TB, reducing the duration and improving clinical outcome of antibiotic treatment. PMID:26981575

  18. Gut microbiota disturbance during antibiotic therapy: a multi-omic approach

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Cobas, Ana Elena; Gosalbes, María José; Friedrichs, Anette; Knecht, Henrik; Artacho, Alejandro; Eismann, Kathleen; Otto, Wolfgang; Rojo, David; Bargiela, Rafael; von Bergen, Martin; Neulinger, Sven C; Däumer, Carolin; Heinsen, Femke-Anouska; Latorre, Amparo; Barbas, Coral; Seifert, Jana; dos Santos, Vitor Martins; Ott, Stephan J; Ferrer, Manuel; Moya, Andrés

    2013-01-01

    Objective Antibiotic (AB) usage strongly affects microbial intestinal metabolism and thereby impacts human health. Understanding this process and the underlying mechanisms remains a major research goal. Accordingly, we conducted the first comparative omic investigation of gut microbial communities in faecal samples taken at multiple time points from an individual subjected to β-lactam therapy. Methods The total (16S rDNA) and active (16S rRNA) microbiota, metagenome, metatranscriptome (mRNAs), metametabolome (high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray ionisation and quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry) and metaproteome (ultra high performing liquid chromatography coupled to an Orbitrap MS2 instrument [UPLC-LTQ Orbitrap-MS/MS]) of a patient undergoing AB therapy for 14 days were evaluated. Results Apparently oscillatory population dynamics were observed, with an early reduction in Gram-negative organisms (day 6) and an overall collapse in diversity and possible further colonisation by ‘presumptive’ naturally resistant bacteria (day 11), followed by the re-growth of Gram-positive species (day 14). During this process, the maximum imbalance in the active microbial fraction occurred later (day 14) than the greatest change in the total microbial fraction, which reached a minimum biodiversity and richness on day 11; additionally, major metabolic changes occurred at day 6. Gut bacteria respond to ABs early by activating systems to avoid the antimicrobial effects of the drugs, while ‘presumptively’ attenuating their overall energetic metabolic status and the capacity to transport and metabolise bile acid, cholesterol, hormones and vitamins; host–microbial interactions significantly improved after treatment cessation. Conclusions This proof-of-concept study provides an extensive description of gut microbiota responses to follow-up β-lactam therapy. The results demonstrate that ABs targeting specific pathogenic infections and

  19. Antibiotic prescription patterns in the empiric therapy of severe sepsis: combination of antimicrobials with different mechanisms of action reduces mortality

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Although early institution of adequate antimicrobial therapy is lifesaving in sepsis patients, optimal antimicrobial strategy has not been established. Moreover, the benefit of combination therapy over monotherapy remains to be determined. Our aims are to describe patterns of empiric antimicrobial therapy in severe sepsis, assessing the impact of combination therapy, including antimicrobials with different mechanisms of action, on mortality. Methods This is a Spanish national multicenter study, analyzing all patients admitted to ICUs who received antibiotics within the first 6 hours of diagnosis of severe sepsis or septic shock. Antibiotic-prescription patterns in community-acquired infections and nosocomial infections were analyzed separately and compared. We compared the impact on mortality of empiric antibiotic treatment, including antibiotics with different mechanisms of action, termed different-class combination therapy (DCCT), with that of monotherapy and any other combination therapy possibilities (non-DCCT). Results We included 1,372 patients, 1,022 (74.5%) of whom had community-acquired sepsis and 350 (25.5%) of whom had nosocomial sepsis. The most frequently prescribed antibiotic agents were β-lactams (902, 65.7%) and carbapenems (345, 25.1%). DCCT was administered to 388 patients (28.3%), whereas non-DCCT was administered to 984 (71.7%). The mortality rate was significantly lower in patients administered DCCTs than in those who were administered non-DCCTs (34% versus 40%; P = 0.042). The variables independently associated with mortality were age, male sex, APACHE II score, and community origin of the infection. DCCT was a protective factor against in-hospital mortality (odds ratio (OR), 0.699; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.522 to 0.936; P = 0.016), as was urologic focus of infection (OR, 0.241; 95% CI, 0.102 to 0.569; P = 0.001). Conclusions β-Lactams, including carbapenems, are the most frequently prescribed antibiotics in empiric

  20. CHOP Chemotherapy for Aggressive Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma with and without HIV in the Antiretroviral Therapy Era in Malawi

    PubMed Central

    Gopal, Satish; Fedoriw, Yuri; Kaimila, Bongani; Montgomery, Nathan D.; Kasonkanji, Edwards; Moses, Agnes; Nyasosela, Richard; Mzumara, Suzgo; Varela, Carlos; Chikasema, Maria; Makwakwa, Victor; Itimu, Salama; Tomoka, Tamiwe; Kamiza, Steve; Dhungel, Bal M.; Chimzimu, Fred; Kampani, Coxcilly; Krysiak, Robert; Richards, Kristy L.; Shea, Thomas C.; Liomba, N. George

    2016-01-01

    There are no prospective studies of aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) treated with CHOP in sub-Saharan Africa. We enrolled adults with aggressive NHL in Malawi between June 2013 and May 2015. Chemotherapy and supportive care were standardized, and HIV+ patients received antiretroviral therapy (ART). Thirty-seven of 58 patients (64%) were HIV+. Median age was 47 years (IQR 39–56), and 35 (60%) were male. Thirty-five patients (60%) had stage III/IV, 43 (74%) B symptoms, and 28 (48%) performance status ≥2. B-cell NHL predominated among HIV+ patients, and all T-cell NHL occurred among HIV- individuals. Thirty-one HIV+ patients (84%) were on ART for a median 9.9 months (IQR 1.1–31.7) before NHL diagnosis, median CD4 was 121 cells/μL (IQR 61–244), and 43% had suppressed HIV RNA. HIV+ patients received a similar number of CHOP cycles compared to HIV- patients, but more frequently developed grade 3/4 neutropenia (84% vs 31%, p = 0.001), resulting in modestly lower cyclophosphamide and doxorubicin doses with longer intervals between cycles. Twelve-month overall survival (OS) was 45% (95% CI 31–57%). T-cell NHL (HR 3.90, p = 0.017), hemoglobin (HR 0.82 per g/dL, p = 0.017), albumin (HR 0.57 per g/dL, p = 0.019), and IPI (HR 2.02 per unit, p<0.001) were associated with mortality. HIV was not associated with mortality, and findings were similar among patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Twenty-three deaths were from NHL (12 HIV+, 11 HIV-), and 12 from CHOP (9 HIV+, 3 HIV-). CHOP can be safe, effective, and feasible for aggressive NHL in Malawi with and without HIV. PMID:26934054

  1. β-Lactam antibiotics and vancomycin inhibit the growth of planktonic and biofilm Candida spp.: an additional benefit of antibiotic-lock therapy?

    PubMed

    Sidrim, José J C; Teixeira, Carlos E C; Cordeiro, Rossana A; Brilhante, Raimunda S N; Castelo-Branco, Débora S C M; Bandeira, Silviane P; Alencar, Lucas P; Oliveira, Jonathas S; Monteiro, André J; Moreira, José L B; Bandeira, Tereza J P G; Rocha, Marcos F G

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of cefepime, meropenem, piperacillin/tazobactam (TZP) and vancomycin on strains of Candida albicans and Candida tropicalis in planktonic and biofilm forms. Twenty azole-derivative-resistant strains of C. albicans (n=10) and C. tropicalis (n=10) were tested. The susceptibility of planktonic Candida spp. to the antibacterial agents was investigated by broth microdilution. The XTT reduction assay was performed to evaluate the viability of growing and mature biofilms following exposure to these drugs. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) ranged from 0.5 mg/mL to 2 mg/mL for cefepime, TZP and vancomycin and from 0.5 mg/mL to 1 mg/mL for meropenem and the drugs also caused statistically significant reductions in biofilm cellular activity both in growing and mature biofilm. Since all of the tested drugs are commonly used in patients with hospital-acquired infections and in those with catheter-related infections under antibiotic-lock therapy, it may be possible to obtain an additional benefit from antibiotic-lock therapy with these drugs, namely the control of Candida biofilm formation.

  2. Response of an aggressive periosteal aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC) of the radius to denosumab therapy.

    PubMed

    Pauli, Chantal; Fuchs, Bruno; Pfirrmann, Christian; Bridge, Julia A; Hofer, Silvia; Bode, Beata

    2014-01-20

    Aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC), once considered a reactive lesion, has been proven to be a neoplasia characterized by rearrangements of the USP6-gene. Aggressive local growth and recurrences are common and therapeutic options may be limited due to the vicinity of crucial structures. We describe a case of a locally aggressive, multinucleated giant cell-containing lesion of the forearm of a 21-year old woman, treated with denosumab for recurrent, surgically uncontrollable disease. Under the influence of this RANKL inhibitor, the tumor showed a marked reduction of the content of the osteoclastic giant cells and an extensive metaplastic osteoid production leading to the bony containment, mostly located intracortically in the proximal radius. The diagnosis of a periosteal ABC was confirmed by FISH demonstrating USP6 gene rearrangement on the initial biopsy. Function conserving surgery could be performed, enabling reconstruction of the affected bone. Inhibition of RANKL with denosumab may offer therapeutic option for patients not only with giant cell tumors but also with ABCs.

  3. Rates and Durability of Response to Salvage Radiation Therapy Among Patients With Refractory or Relapsed Aggressive Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Tseng, Yolanda D.; Chen, Yu-Hui; Catalano, Paul J.; Ng, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the response rate (RR) and time to local recurrence (TTLR) among patients who received salvage radiation therapy for relapsed or refractory aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) and investigate whether RR and TTLR differed according to disease characteristics. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review was performed for all patients who completed a course of salvage radiation therapy between January 2001 and May 2011 at Brigham and Women's Hospital/Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. Separate analyses were conducted for patients treated with palliative and curative intent. Predictors of RR for each subgroup were assessed using a generalized estimating equation model. For patients treated with curative intent, local control (LC) and progression-free survival were estimated with the Kaplan-Meier method; predictors for TTLR were evaluated using a Cox proportional hazards regression model. Results: Salvage radiation therapy was used to treat 110 patients to 121 sites (76 curative, 45 palliative). Salvage radiation therapy was given as part of consolidation in 18% of patients treated with curative intent. Median dose was 37.8 Gy, with 58% and 36% of curative and palliative patients, respectively, receiving 39.6 Gy or higher. The RR was high (86% curative, 84% palliative). With a median follow-up of 4.8 years among living patients, 5-year LC and progression-free survival for curative patients were 66% and 34%, respectively. Refractory disease (hazard ratio 3.3; P=.024) and lack of response to initial chemotherapy (hazard ratio 4.3; P=.007) but not dose (P=.93) were associated with shorter TTLR. Despite doses of 39.6 Gy or higher, 2-year LC was only 61% for definitive patients with refractory disease or disease that did not respond to initial chemotherapy. Conclusions: Relapsed or refractory aggressive NHL is responsive to salvage radiation therapy, and durable LC can be achieved in some cases. However, refractory disease is associated with a shorter

  4. The Rosenzweig Picture-Frustration Study "extra-aggression" score as an indicator in cognitive restructuring therapy for male perpetrators of domestic violence.

    PubMed

    Norman, Michael; Ryan, Lawrence J

    2008-04-01

    It was hypothesized that male perpetrators of domestic violence in the early stages of a 1-year process of cognitive restructuring therapy would manifest on the Rosenzweig Picture-Frustration Study higher levels of extra-aggressiveness than in later stages of the therapy process. A sample of male batterers in the process of treatment took the Rosenzweig instrument. The resulting responses were rated by trained scorers. Chi-square calculations revealed that batterers in the first quarter of treatment manifested Rosenzweig responses indicative of extra-aggressiveness, whereas in the fourth quarter, batterers manifested Rosenzweig responses indicative of im-aggression. The data are discussed relative to implications for domestic violence treatment and the use of the Rosenzweig instrument as an index of treatment progress.

  5. Clinical and economic outcomes of empiric parenteral antibiotic therapy for pneumonia: a retrospective study of 1,032 hospitalized patients.

    PubMed

    Bassi, O; Zuccarelli, S; Amalfitano, M E

    1998-10-01

    The spiraling increase in pharmaceutical costs in hospitals means that the economic aspects of pharmacological therapy can no longer be ignored. The aim of the present study was to evaluate care and cost outcomes following initial therapy with parenteral antibiotics in a hospital setting for the treatment of lower respiratory tract infection (pneumonia and pleurisy with or without complications). From January to December 1996, a total of 1,032 patients were reviewed. The mean age of the patients was 71.9 years (range, 16-100 years). Piperacillin was most frequently prescribed (n=369), followed by ceftriaxone (n=324) and ceftazidime (n=161), among other antibiotics. The clinical success ranged from a maximum of 85.0% and 85.4% for piperacillin and ceftriaxone, respectively, to a minimum of 72.7% and 75.2% for cefodizime and ciprofloxacin, respectively. Differences between the antibiotic regimens emerged for mean prescribed daily doses, therefore the daily cost per administered dose was much lower for antibiotics such as piperacillin or ceftriaxone than for cefotaxime or ceftazidime. Ceftriaxone, at just over 177,840 Italian liras per success, was more cost-effective than other third-generation cephalosporins such as ceftazidime and cefotaxime, whose cost-effectiveness ratios were 420,590 and 272,030 Italian liras, respectively. A comparison of cost ratios for the seven antibiotic regimens evaluated indicates that using ceftriaxone led to a 57.72% cost savings per clinical success compared to using other third generation cephalosporins such as ceftazidime, and a 69.45% savings compared to therapy with ciprofloxacin.

  6. Antimicrobial strategies centered around reactive oxygen species - bactericidal antibiotics, photodynamic therapy and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Vatansever, Fatma; de Melo, Wanessa C.M.A.; Avci, Pinar; Vecchio, Daniela; Sadasivam, Magesh; Gupta, Asheesh; Chandran, Rakkiyappan; Karimi, Mahdi; Parizotto, Nivaldo A; Yin, Rui; Tegos, George P; Hamblin, Michael R

    2013-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) can attack a diverse range of targets to exert antimicrobial activity, which accounts for their versatility in mediating host defense against a broad range of pathogens. Most ROS are formed by the partial reduction of molecular oxygen. Four major ROS are recognized comprising: superoxide (O2•−), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), hydroxyl radical (•OH), and singlet oxygen (1O2), but they display very different kinetics and levels of activity. The effects of O2•− and H2O2 are less acute than those of •OH and 1O2, since the former are much less reactive and can be detoxified by endogenous antioxidants (both enzymatic and non-enzymatic) that are induced by oxidative stress. In contrast, no enzyme can detoxify •OH or 1O2, making them extremely toxic and acutely lethal. The present review will highlight the various methods of ROS formation and their mechanism of action. Antioxidant defenses against ROS in microbial cells and the use of ROS by antimicrobial host defense systems are covered. Antimicrobial approaches primarily utilizing ROS comprise both bactericidal antibiotics, and non-pharmacological methods such as photodynamic therapy, titanium dioxide photocatalysis, cold plasma and medicinal honey. A brief final section covers, reactive nitrogen species, and related therapeutics, such as acidified nitrite and nitric oxide releasing nanoparticles. PMID:23802986

  7. Systemic antibiotics in periodontics.

    PubMed

    Slots, Jørgen

    2004-11-01

    This position paper addresses the role of systemic antibiotics in the treatment of periodontal disease. Topical antibiotic therapy is not discussed here. The paper was prepared by the Research, Science and Therapy Committee of the American Academy of Periodontology. The document consists of three sections: 1) concept of antibiotic periodontal therapy; 2) efficacy of antibiotic periodontal therapy; and 3) practical aspects of antibiotic periodontal therapy. The conclusions drawn in this paper represent the position of the American Academy of Periodontology and are intended for the information of the dental profession.

  8. Clinical and Economic Consequences of Failure of Initial Antibiotic Therapy for Patients with Community-Onset Complicated Intra-Abdominal Infections

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Yong Pil; Bae, In-Gyu; Lee, Sang-Rok; Chung, Jin-Won; Jun, Jae-Bum; Choo, Eun Ju; Moon, Soo-youn; Lee, Mi Suk; Jeon, Min Hyok; Song, Eun Hee; Lee, Eun Jung; Park, Seong Yeon; Kim, Yang Soo

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Complicated intra-abdominal infection (cIAI) is infection that extends beyond the hollow viscus of origin into the peritoneal space, and is associated with either abscess formation or peritonitis. There are few studies that have assessed the actual costs and outcomes associated with failure of initial antibiotic therapy for cIAI. The aims of this study were to evaluate risk factors and impact on costs and outcomes of failure of initial antibiotic therapy for community-onset cIAI. Methods A retrospective study was performed at eleven tertiary-care hospitals. Hospitalized adults with community-onset cIAI who underwent an appropriate source control procedure between August 2008 and September 2011 were included. Failure of initial antibiotic therapy was defined as a change of antibiotics due to a lack of improvement of the clinical symptoms and signs associated with cIAI in the first week. Results A total of 514 patients hospitalized for community-onset cIAI were included in the analysis. The mean age of the patients was 53.3 ± 17.6 years, 72 patients (14%) had health care-associated infection, and 48 (9%) experienced failure of initial antibiotic therapy. Failure of initial antibiotic therapy was associated with increased costs and morbidity. After adjustment for covariates, patients with unsuccessful initial therapy received an additional 2.9 days of parenteral antibiotic therapy, were hospitalized for an additional 5.3 days, and incurred $3,287 in additional inpatient charges. Independent risk factors for failure of initial antibiotic therapy were health care-associated infection, solid cancer, and APACHE II ≥13. Conclusions To improve outcomes and costs in patients with community-onset cIAI, rapid assessment of health care-associated risk factors and severity of disease, selection of an appropriate antibiotic regimen accordingly, and early infection source control should be performed. PMID:25910171

  9. Persistence of uropathogenic Escherichia Coli in the bladders of female patients with sterile urine after antibiotic therapies.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shu-Cheng; Han, Xiao-Min; Shi, Ming; Pang, Zi-Li

    2016-10-01

    This study aimed to provide evidence of persistent uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) in female patients with recurrent urinary tract infection (UTI) after antibiotic therapy. We collected biopsies of the bladder, and clean-catch urine samples from 32 women who had episodes of recurrent UTI and were given antibiotic therapy. Urine samples and biopsies were analyzed by conventional bacteriological techniques. Phylogenetic group and 16 virulence factors (VFs) of UPEC were determined using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The infection capability of UPEC was confirmed in a mouse model. Immunofluorescence and electron microscopy were used to detect intracellular bacterial communities (IBCs) in the mouse model. The results showed that all urine specimens were detected sterile. E. coli was found in 6 of 32 biopsies (18.75%), and was identified to be UPEC by PCR. Different VFs associated with the formation of IBCs were identified in all six UPEC isolates. Each UPEC isolate was capable of forming IBCs within the bladder epithelial cells of mice. In conclusion, UPEC with distinctive pathological traits and the capability of IBC formation was first found in the bladders of women after antibiotic therapy, suggesting that the IBC pathogenic pathway may occur in humans and it plays an important role in UTI recurrence.

  10. The influence of macrophages on mesenchymal stromal cell therapy: passive or aggressive agents?

    PubMed

    Carty, F; Mahon, B P; English, K

    2017-04-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) have emerged as promising cell therapies for multiple conditions based on demonstrations of their potent immunomodulatory and regenerative capacities in models of inflammatory disease. Understanding the effects of MSC on T cells has dominated the majority of work carried out in this field to date; recently, however, a number of studies have shown that the therapeutic effect of MSC requires the presence of macrophages. It is timely to review the mechanisms and manner by which MSC modulate macrophage populations in order to design more effective MSC therapies and clinical studies. A complex cross-talk exists through which MSC and macrophages communicate, a communication that is not controlled exclusively by MSC. Here, we examine the evidence that suggests that MSC not only respond to inflammatory macrophages and adjust their secretome accordingly, but also that macrophages respond to encounters with MSC, creating a feedback loop which contributes to the immune regulation observed following MSC therapy. Future studies examining the effects of MSC on macrophages should consider the antagonistic role that macrophages play in this exchange.

  11. Daptomycin Antibiotic Lock Therapy in a Rat Model of Staphylococcal Central Venous Catheter Biofilm Infections▿

    PubMed Central

    Van Praagh, Andrew D. G.; Li, Tongchuan; Zhang, Shuxin; Arya, Anu; Chen, Liping; Zhang, Xi-Xian; Bertolami, Shellie; Mortin, Lawrence I.

    2011-01-01

    Antibiotic lock therapy (ALT) is an adjunctive procedure to prevent or treat central venous catheter infections, ensuing catheter-related bacteremia, and catheter-related metastatic infections. Daptomycin is a cyclic lipopeptide that is rapidly bactericidal against methicillin-susceptible and -resistant Staphylococcus aureus. The efficacies of daptomycin against central venous catheter biofilms, catheter-related bacteremia, and catheter-related metastatic infections were evaluated by adapting a previously reported central venous catheter biofilm model in rats. Combined daptomycin ALT and systemic dosing resulted in the clearance of an established in vivo S. aureus central venous catheter biofilm after just two daily ALT treatments (30 min with daptomycin at 5 mg/ml) with concurrent systemic daptomycin dosing (40 mg/kg of body weight/day subcutaneously [s.c.]; equivalent exposure of 6 mg/kg/day in people). Daptomycin ALT solutions formulated in either saline or lactated Ringer's solution were equally fast in eradicating established in vivo methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis (MRSE) central venous catheter biofilms. However, the lactated Ringer's formulation was superior to that of saline in sustaining the bacterial clearance of treated central venous catheters (83% versus 50%). In MRSE-infected central venous catheter studies, 3 days of daptomycin or vancomycin ALT (18 h at 5 mg/ml) with systemic s.c. dosing (40 mg/kg/day daptomycin or 100 mg/kg/day vancomycin) was equally effective 1 week posttherapy in maintaining cleared central venous catheters (90% [n = 10] versus 100% [n = 8]). These results suggest that daptomycin ALT, along with systemic dosing, could be an effective treatment option for the prevention or eradication of staphylococcal central venous catheter biofilm infections, thereby reducing the occurrence of catheter-related bacteremia or catheter-related metastatic infections. PMID:21709082

  12. Targeted molecular-genetic imaging and ligand-directed therapy in aggressive variant prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Ferrara, Fortunato; Staquicini, Daniela I; Driessen, Wouter H P; D'Angelo, Sara; Dobroff, Andrey S; Barry, Marc; Lomo, Lesley C; Staquicini, Fernanda I; Cardó-Vila, Marina; Soghomonyan, Suren; Alauddin, Mian M; Flores, Leo G; Arap, Marco A; Lauer, Richard C; Mathew, Paul; Efstathiou, Eleni; Aparicio, Ana M; Troncoso, Patricia; Navone, Nora M; Logothetis, Christopher J; Marchiò, Serena; Gelovani, Juri G; Sidman, Richard L; Pasqualini, Renata; Arap, Wadih

    2016-10-24

    Aggressive variant prostate cancers (AVPC) are a clinically defined group of tumors of heterogeneous morphologies, characterized by poor patient survival and for which limited diagnostic and treatment options are currently available. We show that the cell surface 78-kDa glucose-regulated protein (GRP78), a receptor that binds to phage-display-selected ligands, such as the SNTRVAP motif, is a candidate target in AVPC. We report the presence and accessibility of this receptor in clinical specimens from index patients. We also demonstrate that human AVPC cells displaying GRP78 on their surface could be effectively targeted both in vitro and in vivo by SNTRVAP, which also enabled specific delivery of siRNA species to tumor xenografts in mice. Finally, we evaluated ligand-directed strategies based on SNTRVAP-displaying adeno-associated virus/phage (AAVP) particles in mice bearing MDA-PCa-118b, a patient-derived xenograft (PDX) of castration-resistant prostate cancer bone metastasis that we exploited as a model of AVPC. For theranostic (a merging of the terms therapeutic and diagnostic) studies, GRP78-targeting AAVP particles served to deliver the human Herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase type-1 (HSVtk) gene, which has a dual function as a molecular-genetic sensor/reporter and a cell suicide-inducing transgene. We observed specific and simultaneous PET imaging and treatment of tumors in this preclinical model of AVPC. Our findings demonstrate the feasibility of GPR78-targeting, ligand-directed theranostics for translational applications in AVPC.

  13. Targeted molecular-genetic imaging and ligand-directed therapy in aggressive variant prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ferrara, Fortunato; Staquicini, Daniela I.; Driessen, Wouter H. P.; D’Angelo, Sara; Dobroff, Andrey S.; Barry, Marc; Lomo, Lesley C.; Staquicini, Fernanda I.; Cardó-Vila, Marina; Soghomonyan, Suren; Alauddin, Mian M.; Flores, Leo G.; Arap, Marco A.; Lauer, Richard C.; Mathew, Paul; Efstathiou, Eleni; Aparicio, Ana M.; Troncoso, Patricia; Navone, Nora M.; Logothetis, Christopher J.; Marchiò, Serena; Gelovani, Juri G.; Sidman, Richard L.; Pasqualini, Renata; Arap, Wadih

    2016-01-01

    Aggressive variant prostate cancers (AVPC) are a clinically defined group of tumors of heterogeneous morphologies, characterized by poor patient survival and for which limited diagnostic and treatment options are currently available. We show that the cell surface 78-kDa glucose-regulated protein (GRP78), a receptor that binds to phage-display-selected ligands, such as the SNTRVAP motif, is a candidate target in AVPC. We report the presence and accessibility of this receptor in clinical specimens from index patients. We also demonstrate that human AVPC cells displaying GRP78 on their surface could be effectively targeted both in vitro and in vivo by SNTRVAP, which also enabled specific delivery of siRNA species to tumor xenografts in mice. Finally, we evaluated ligand-directed strategies based on SNTRVAP-displaying adeno-associated virus/phage (AAVP) particles in mice bearing MDA-PCa-118b, a patient-derived xenograft (PDX) of castration-resistant prostate cancer bone metastasis that we exploited as a model of AVPC. For theranostic (a merging of the terms therapeutic and diagnostic) studies, GRP78-targeting AAVP particles served to deliver the human Herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase type-1 (HSVtk) gene, which has a dual function as a molecular-genetic sensor/reporter and a cell suicide-inducing transgene. We observed specific and simultaneous PET imaging and treatment of tumors in this preclinical model of AVPC. Our findings demonstrate the feasibility of GPR78-targeting, ligand-directed theranostics for translational applications in AVPC. PMID:27791181

  14. Antibiotic dosing in critically ill patients with septic shock and on continuous renal replacement therapy: can we resolve this problem with pharmacokinetic studies and dosing guidelines?

    PubMed

    Roberts, Jason A; Roberts, Darren M

    2014-06-23

    Dosing antibiotics in critically ill patients to achieve therapeutic concentrations is a significant challenge. The presence of septic shock and prescription of continuous renal replacement therapy introduces further complexities for the clinician. Unfortunately, this is a dilemma encountered daily by intensivists. Although small pharmacokinetic studies are emerging to provide data to help address this problem, the variability in results from these studies is profound. As such, effective antibiotic dosing guidelines for critically ill patients who have septic shock and who receive continuous renal replacement therapy are not available. Dosing flowcharts and therapeutic drug monitoring represent the best available options for clinicians to optimize antibiotic dosing.

  15. Antibiotic therapy in the critically ill - expert opinion of the Intensive Care Medicine Scientific Subcommittee of the European Society of Anaesthesiology.

    PubMed

    Martin-Loeches, Ignacio; Leone, Marc; Madách, Krisztina; Martin, Claude; Einav, Sharon

    2017-04-01

    Antimicrobial treatment is the cornerstone of infection treatment, and the selection of appropriate antibiotic treatment for critically ill patients is challenging. Clinicians working with critically ill patients usually feel a greater obligation towards their patient than towards maintenance of the delicate ecological balance of prevalent microbiological threats and their resistance patterns. Although antibiotic overtreatment is a frequent phenomenon, patient outcomes need not be compromised when antibiotic treatment is driven by informed decision-making.At the 2016 Euro Anaesthesia Conference (London, UK), the European Society of Anaesthesia Intensive Care Scientific Subcommittee convened an expert panel on antibiotic therapy. This article summarises the main conclusions of the panel, namely the principles of antibiotic therapy that all physicians working with critically ill patients must know.

  16. Antibiotic therapy in critically ill patients: expert opinion of the European Society of Anaesthesia Intensive Care Scientific Subcommittee: A narrative review.

    PubMed

    Martin-Loeches, Ignacio; Leone, Marc; Madách, Krisztina; Martin, Claude; Einav, Sharon

    2017-01-30

    Antimicrobial treatment is the cornerstone of infection treatment, and the selection of appropriate antibiotic treatment for critically ill patients is challenging. Clinicians working with critically ill patients usually feel a greater obligation towards their patient than towards maintenance of the delicate ecological balance of prevalent microbiological threats and their resistance patterns. Although antibiotic overtreatment is a frequent phenomenon, patient outcomes need not be compromised when antibiotic treatment is driven by informed decision-making.At the 2016 Euro Anaesthesia Conference (London, UK), the European Society of Anaesthesia Intensive Care Scientific Subcommittee convened an expert panel on antibiotic therapy. This article summarises the main conclusions of the panel, namely the principles of antibiotic therapy that all physicians working with critically ill patients must know.

  17. Empiric antibiotic therapy for acute osteoarticular infections with suspected methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus or Kingella.

    PubMed

    Saphyakhajon, Phisit; Joshi, Avni Y; Huskins, W Charles; Henry, Nancy K; Boyce, Thomas G

    2008-08-01

    The bacterial agents causing bone and joint infections have been changing. Currently, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Kingella kingae are emerging pathogens. For treatment of MRSA infections, clindamycin, vancomycin, and linezolid are commonly prescribed antibiotics. Kingella are sensitive to most penicillins and cephalosporins. Because MRSA osteoarticular infections tend to be severe, longer periods of antibiotic treatment with more frequent monitoring of inflammatory markers are sometimes required to obtain a complete cure with no residual complications. To assist management, we have included a clinical decision tree with antibiotic treatment protocols.

  18. The Relationship Between the Level of Program Integrity and Pre- and Post-Test Changes of Responsive-Aggression Regulation Therapy (Re-ART) Outpatient: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Hoogsteder, Larissa M; van Horn, Joan E; Stams, Geert Jan J M; Wissink, Inge B; Hendriks, Jan

    2016-03-01

    Responsive-Aggression Regulation Therapy (Re-ART) Outpatient is a cognitive behavioral-based intervention for adolescents and young adults (16-24 years) with severe aggressive behavioral problems. This pilot study (N = 26) examined the level of program integrity (PI; that is, the delivery of the intervention as it is originally intended) of Re-ART. We also investigated the pre- and post-test changes in several outcome variables, and the relation between the level of PI and these changes. Participants were recruited from three different outpatient forensic settings. Results showed that the PI of half of the treatments was not sufficient (e.g., the intensity of the program was too low and some standard modules were not offered). In addition, this pilot study demonstrated that sufficient PI was related to positive changes in aggression, cognitive distortions, social support, coping (reported by therapist), and distrust (responsiveness to treatment).

  19. Emergence of resistance to beta-lactam and aminoglycoside antibiotics during moxalactam therapy of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections.

    PubMed Central

    Preheim, L C; Penn, R G; Sanders, C C; Goering, R V; Giger, D K

    1982-01-01

    In four patients with Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections, the infecting strain developed resistance to moxalactam during therapy with this drug. In addition, P. aeruginosa isolates from two of these four patients showed increased resistance to aminoglycosides. Isolates from a third patient acquired cross-resistance to other antipseudomonal beta-lactams. In three of the cases, disk susceptibility tests failed to detect the resistance that was demonstrated in broth dilution assays. Isolate identities were confirmed by serotyping. No new plasmids were found by agarose gel electrophoresis. The mechanisms for this resistance did not involve enzymatic antibiotic degradation. These findings suggest that currently available expanded-spectrum cephalosporin derivatives should probably not be used alone for most serious infections due to P. aeruginosa. They also suggest that strains with multiple antibiotic resistance may become more prevalent in hospitals if these drugs are used extensively. PMID:6218778

  20. Evaluation of Novel Targeted Therapies in Aggressive Biology Sarcoma Patients after progression from US FDA approved Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Subbiah, Vivek; Hess, Kenneth R.; Khawaja, Muhammad Rizwan; Wagner, Michael J.; Tang, Chad; Naing, Aung; Fu, Siqing; Janku, Filip; Piha-Paul, Sarina; Tsimberidou, Apostolia M.; Herzog, Cynthia E.; Ludwig, Joseph A.; Patel, Shreyaskumar; Ravi, Vinod; Benjamin, Robert S.; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Hong, David S.

    2016-01-01

    Prognosis of patients with advanced sarcoma after progression from FDA approved therapies remains grim. In this study, clinical outcomes of 100 patients with advanced sarcoma who received treatment on novel targeted therapy trials were evaluated. Outcomes of interest included best response, clinical benefit rate, progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). Median patient age was 48 years (range 14–80). Patients had received a median of 2 prior lines of systemic treatment. Phase I treatments were anti-VEGF–based (n = 45), mTOR inhibitor–based (n = 15), and anti-VEGF + mTOR inhibitor–based (n = 17) or involved other targets (n = 23). Best responses included partial response (n = 4) and stable disease (n = 57). Clinical benefit rate was 36% (95% confidence interval 27–46%). Median OS was 9.6 months (95% Confidence Interval 8.1–14.2); median PFS was 3.5 months (95% Confidence Interval 2.4–4.7). RMH prognostic score of 2 or 3 was associated with lower median OS (log-rank p-value < 0.0001) and PFS (log-rank p-value 0.0081). Receiving cytotoxic chemotherapy as part of phase I trial was also associated with shorter median OS (log-rank p-value 0.039). Patients with advanced sarcoma treated on phase I clinical trials had a clinical benefit rate of 36% and RMH score predicted survival. PMID:27748430

  1. Mechanistic Insights into Molecular Targeting and Combined Modality Therapy for Aggressive, Localized Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dal Pra, Alan; Locke, Jennifer A.; Borst, Gerben; Supiot, Stephane; Bristow, Robert G.

    2016-01-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) is one of the mainstay treatments for prostate cancer (PCa). The potentially curative approaches can provide satisfactory results for many patients with non-metastatic PCa; however, a considerable number of individuals may present disease recurrence and die from the disease. Exploiting the rich molecular biology of PCa will provide insights into how the most resistant tumor cells can be eradicated to improve treatment outcomes. Important for this biology-driven individualized treatment is a robust selection procedure. The development of predictive biomarkers for RT efficacy is therefore of utmost importance for a clinically exploitable strategy to achieve tumor-specific radiosensitization. This review highlights the current status and possible opportunities in the modulation of four key processes to enhance radiation response in PCa by targeting the: (1) androgen signaling pathway; (2) hypoxic tumor cells and regions; (3) DNA damage response (DDR) pathway; and (4) abnormal extra-/intracell signaling pathways. In addition, we discuss how and which patients should be selected for biomarker-based clinical trials exploiting and validating these targeted treatment strategies with precision RT to improve cure rates in non-indolent, localized PCa. PMID:26909338

  2. The Effects of Aggression on Symptom Severity and Treatment Response in a Trial of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Panic Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Cassiello-Robbins, Clair; Conklin, Laren R.; Anakwenze, Ujunwa; Gorman, Jack M.; Woods, Scott W.; Shear, M. Katherine; Barlow, David H.

    2015-01-01

    Background Previous research suggests that patients with panic disorder exhibit higher levels of aggression than patients with other anxiety disorders. This aggression is associated with more severe symptomatology and interpersonal problems. However, few studies have examined whether higher levels of aggression are associated with a worse treatment response in this population. Methods The present study sought to examine the association of aggression with panic disorder symptom severity in a sample of 379 patients who participated in a trial examining long-term strategies for the treatment of panic disorder. Results We found that aggression was significantly associated with higher baseline levels of panic disorder symptoms, anxiety, depression, and functional impairment. Further, we found that patients higher in aggression did not achieve the same level of improvement in general anxiety symptoms during treatment compared to patients lower in aggression, even when controlling for baseline anxiety symptom severity. Conclusion These results suggest that more research is needed concerning patients with anxiety disorders with higher aggression, as they may be a group in need of additional treatment considerations. PMID:25987198

  3. De-escalation empirical antibiotic therapy improved survival for patients with severe aplastic anemia treated with antithymocyte globulin

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Rong; Chen, Tong; Song, Jia; Wang, Guojin; Li, Lijuan; Ruan, Erbao; Liu, Hui; Wang, Yihao; Wang, Huaquan; Xing, Limin; Wu, Yuhong; Liu, Hong; Qu, Wen; Shao, Zonghong

    2017-01-01

    Abstract We aimed to investigate the efficacy and safety of de-escalation empirical therapy for controlling infection in patients with severe aplastic anaemia (SAA) treated with antithymocyte globulin (ATG). Eighty-seven ATG-treated SAA patients who had microbiological culture-confirmed infections from 2006 to 2015 in our center were retrospectively analyzed. The efficacy of de-escalation and non-de-escalation therapy was compared. Among all 87 patients, 63 patients were treated with de-escalation therapy and 24 patients with non-de-escalation therapy. More patients showed response to anti-infection treatment in de-escalation group than in non-de-escalation group both on day 7 (60.32% vs. 25.00%, P = 0.003) and on day 30 (79.37% vs. 58.33%, P = 0.047) since the initial antimicrobial therapy. On day 30, more patients had increased absolute neutrophil count in de-escalation group compared with non-de-escalation group (76.19% vs. 45.83%, P = 0.007), and de-escalation group had lower morality rate (17.46% vs. 37.50%, P = 0.047) and better survival outcome (P = 0.023) on day 90. Twenty-three patients in de-escalation group and 5 patients in non-escalation group received granulocyte transfusions. Granulocyte transfusions helped to control infections in both de-escalation group (P = 0.027) and non-de-escalation group (P = 0.042) on day 7, but did not improve survival on day 90. We concluded that de-escalation antibiotics improved survival in SAA patients after ATG treatment. Early administration of broad-spectrum antibiotics pending microbiological cultures combined with a commitment to change to narrow-spectrum antibiotics should be recommended for controlling infections in SAA patients treated with ATG. Granulocyte transfusions might be an adjunctive therapy in controlling infections. PMID:28178130

  4. De-escalation empirical antibiotic therapy improved survival for patients with severe aplastic anemia treated with antithymocyte globulin.

    PubMed

    Fu, Rong; Chen, Tong; Song, Jia; Wang, Guojin; Li, Lijuan; Ruan, Erbao; Liu, Hui; Wang, Yihao; Wang, Huaquan; Xing, Limin; Wu, Yuhong; Liu, Hong; Qu, Wen; Shao, Zonghong

    2017-02-01

    We aimed to investigate the efficacy and safety of de-escalation empirical therapy for controlling infection in patients with severe aplastic anaemia (SAA) treated with antithymocyte globulin (ATG). Eighty-seven ATG-treated SAA patients who had microbiological culture-confirmed infections from 2006 to 2015 in our center were retrospectively analyzed. The efficacy of de-escalation and non-de-escalation therapy was compared. Among all 87 patients, 63 patients were treated with de-escalation therapy and 24 patients with non-de-escalation therapy. More patients showed response to anti-infection treatment in de-escalation group than in non-de-escalation group both on day 7 (60.32% vs. 25.00%, P = 0.003) and on day 30 (79.37% vs. 58.33%, P = 0.047) since the initial antimicrobial therapy. On day 30, more patients had increased absolute neutrophil count in de-escalation group compared with non-de-escalation group (76.19% vs. 45.83%, P = 0.007), and de-escalation group had lower morality rate (17.46% vs. 37.50%, P = 0.047) and better survival outcome (P = 0.023) on day 90. Twenty-three patients in de-escalation group and 5 patients in non-escalation group received granulocyte transfusions. Granulocyte transfusions helped to control infections in both de-escalation group (P = 0.027) and non-de-escalation group (P = 0.042) on day 7, but did not improve survival on day 90. We concluded that de-escalation antibiotics improved survival in SAA patients after ATG treatment. Early administration of broad-spectrum antibiotics pending microbiological cultures combined with a commitment to change to narrow-spectrum antibiotics should be recommended for controlling infections in SAA patients treated with ATG. Granulocyte transfusions might be an adjunctive therapy in controlling infections.

  5. [Antibiotic stewardship].

    PubMed

    Kerwat, Klaus; Wulf, Hinnerk

    2014-09-01

    Resistance against antibiotics is continuously increasing throughout the world and has become a very serious problem. For just this reason "Antibiotic Stewardship Programs" have been developed. These programs are intended to lead to a sustained improvement in the situation and to assure a rational practice for the prescription of anti-infective agents in medical facilities. The aim is to prescribe the correct antibiotic therapy to the right patient at the most appropriate point in time. An AWMF S3 guideline on this topic published by the German Society for Infectiology (S3-Leitlinie StrategienzurSicherungrationalerAntibiotika-AnwendungimKrankenhaus.AWMF-Registernummer 092/001 - S3 Guideline on Strategies for the Rational Use of Antibiotics in Hospitals. AWMF - Registry Number 092/001) has been available since the end of 2013. An essential aspect therein is the expert interdisciplinary cooperation of a team comprising a clinically experienced infectiologist, a hospital pharmacist and a consultant for microbiology.

  6. Does antibiotic lock therapy prevent catheter-associated bacteremia in hemodialysis?

    PubMed

    Jiménez, Macarena; Madrid, Trinidad

    2015-01-22

    Central venous catheter-related blood stream infection is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with renal disease treated with hemodialysis. Antibiotic lock solutions can be effective in preventing this complication in patients with hemodialysis. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening more than twenty databases, we identified eight systematic reviews including seventeen randomized trials. We combined the evidence using meta-analysis and generated a summary of findings table following the GRADE approach. We concluded that antibiotic lock solutions probably decrease catheter-related blood stream infection in hemodialysis patients.

  7. Reducing Vibrio load in Artemia nauplii using antimicrobial photodynamic therapy: a promising strategy to reduce antibiotic application in shrimp larviculture.

    PubMed

    Asok, Aparna; Arshad, Esha; Jasmin, C; Pai, S Somnath; Singh, I S Bright; Mohandas, A; Anas, Abdulaziz

    2012-01-01

    We propose antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT) as an alternative strategy to reduce the use of antibiotics in shrimp larviculture systems. The growth of a multiple antibiotic resistant Vibrio harveyi strain was effectively controlled by treating the cells with Rose Bengal and photosensitizing for 30 min using a halogen lamp. This resulted in the death of >50% of the cells within the first 10 min of exposure and the 50% reduction in the cell wall integrity after 30 min could be attributed to the destruction of outer membrane protein of V. harveyi by reactive oxygen intermediates produced during the photosensitization. Further, mesocosm experiments with V. harveyi and Artemia nauplii demonstrated that in 30 min, the aPDT could kill 78.9% and 91.2% of heterotrophic bacterial and Vibrio population respectively. In conclusion, the study demonstrated that aPDT with its rapid action and as yet unreported resistance development possibilities could be a propitious strategy to reduce the use of antibiotics in shrimp larviculture systems and thereby, avoid their hazardous effects on human health and the ecosystem at large.

  8. 5-aminolevulinic acid-mediated photodynamic therapy and its strain-dependent combined effect with antibiotics on Staphylococcus aureus biofilm

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xian-Hui; Yang, Chen; Guo, Li-Min; Liu, Chun-Hong; Qu, Di; Zheng, Chun-Quan

    2017-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is hard to be eradicated, not only due to the emergence of antibiotic resistant strains but also because of its ability to form biofilm. Antibiotics are the major approach to treating biofilm infections, but their effects are unsatisfactory. One of the potential alternative treatments for controlling biofilm infections is photodynamic therapy (PDT), which requires the administration of photosensitizer, followed by light activation. 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA), a natural photosensitizer prodrug, presents favorable characteristics, such as easy penetration and rapid clearance. These advantages enable ALA-based PDT (ALA-PDT) to be well-tolerated by patients and it can be repeatedly applied without cumulative toxicity or serious side effects. ALA-PDT has been proven to be an effective treatment for multidrug resistant pathogens; however, the study of its effect on S. aureus biofilm is limited. Here, we established our PDT system based on the utilization of ALA and a light-emitting diode, and we tested the effect of ALA-PDT on S. aureus biofilm as well as the combined effect of ALA-PDT and antibiotics on S. aureus biofilm. Our results showed that ALA-PDT has a strong antibacterial effect on S. aureus biofilm, which was confirmed by the confocal laser scanning microscope. We also found that lethal photosensitization occurred predominantly in the upper layer of the biofilm, while the residual live bacteria were located in the lower layer of the biofilm. In addition, the improved bactericidal effect was observed in the combined treatment group but in a strain-dependent manner. Our results suggest that ALA-PDT is a potential alternative approach for future clinical use to treat S. aureus biofilm-associated infections, and some patients may benefit from the combined treatment of ALA-PDT and antibiotics, but drug sensitivity testing should be performed in advance. PMID:28358851

  9. 5-aminolevulinic acid-mediated photodynamic therapy and its strain-dependent combined effect with antibiotics on Staphylococcus aureus biofilm.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qing-Zhao; Zhao, Ke-Qing; Wu, Yang; Li, Xian-Hui; Yang, Chen; Guo, Li-Min; Liu, Chun-Hong; Qu, Di; Zheng, Chun-Quan

    2017-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is hard to be eradicated, not only due to the emergence of antibiotic resistant strains but also because of its ability to form biofilm. Antibiotics are the major approach to treating biofilm infections, but their effects are unsatisfactory. One of the potential alternative treatments for controlling biofilm infections is photodynamic therapy (PDT), which requires the administration of photosensitizer, followed by light activation. 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA), a natural photosensitizer prodrug, presents favorable characteristics, such as easy penetration and rapid clearance. These advantages enable ALA-based PDT (ALA-PDT) to be well-tolerated by patients and it can be repeatedly applied without cumulative toxicity or serious side effects. ALA-PDT has been proven to be an effective treatment for multidrug resistant pathogens; however, the study of its effect on S. aureus biofilm is limited. Here, we established our PDT system based on the utilization of ALA and a light-emitting diode, and we tested the effect of ALA-PDT on S. aureus biofilm as well as the combined effect of ALA-PDT and antibiotics on S. aureus biofilm. Our results showed that ALA-PDT has a strong antibacterial effect on S. aureus biofilm, which was confirmed by the confocal laser scanning microscope. We also found that lethal photosensitization occurred predominantly in the upper layer of the biofilm, while the residual live bacteria were located in the lower layer of the biofilm. In addition, the improved bactericidal effect was observed in the combined treatment group but in a strain-dependent manner. Our results suggest that ALA-PDT is a potential alternative approach for future clinical use to treat S. aureus biofilm-associated infections, and some patients may benefit from the combined treatment of ALA-PDT and antibiotics, but drug sensitivity testing should be performed in advance.

  10. BTG1 expression correlates with pathogenesis, aggressive behaviors and prognosis of gastric cancer: a potential target for gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hua-chuan; Li, Jing; Shen, Dao-fu; Yang, Xue-feng; Zhao, Shuang; Wu, Ya-zhou; Takano, Yasuo; Sun, Hong-zhi; Su, Rong-jian; Luo, Jun-sheng; Gou, Wen-feng

    2015-08-14

    Here, we found that BTG1 overexpression inhibited proliferation, migration and invasion, induced G2/M arrest, differentiation, senescence and apoptosis in BGC-823 and MKN28 cells (p < 0.05). BTG1 transfectants showed a higher mRNA expression of Cyclin D1 and Bax, but a lower mRNA expression of cdc2, p21, mTOR and MMP-9 than the control and mock (p < 0.05). After treated with cisplatin, MG132, paclitaxel and SAHA, both BTG1 transfectants showed lower mRNA viability and higher apoptosis than the control in both time- and dose-dependent manners (p < 0.05) with the hypoexpression of chemoresistance-related genes (slug, CD147, GRP78, GRP94, FBXW7 TOP1, TOP2 and GST-π). BTG1 expression was restored after 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine treatment in gastric cancer cells. BTG1 expression was statistically lower in gastric cancer than non-neoplastic mucosa and metastatic cancer in lymph node (p < 0.05). BTG1 expression was positively correlated with depth of invasion, lymphatic and venous invasion, lymph node metastasis, TNM staging and worse prognosis (p < 0.05). The diffuse-type carcinoma showed less BTG1 expression than intestinal- and mixed-type ones (p < 0.05). BTG1 overexpression suppressed tumor growth and lung metastasis of gastric cancer cells by inhibiting proliferation, enhancing autophagy and apoptosis in xenograft models. It was suggested that down-regulated BTG1 expression might promote gastric carcinogenesis partially due to its promoter methylation. BTG1 overexpression might reverse the aggressive phenotypes and be employed as a potential target for gene therapy of gastric cancer.

  11. Procalcitonin-guided protocol is not useful to manage antibiotic therapy in febrile neutropenia: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Lima, Stella Sala Soares; Nobre, Vandack; de Castro Romanelli, Roberta Maia; Clemente, Wanessa Trindade; da Silva Bittencourt, Henrique Neves; Melo, Ana Catarina Mourão; Salomão, Luciana Caetano Botelho; Serufo, José Carlos

    2016-06-01

    Febrile neutropenia (FN) requires immediate use of antibiotics (ATB), and procalcitonin (PCT) is proven to be useful in guiding antibiotic therapy in different settings. This study investigated the use of PCT as a guide for the duration of ATB in FN. A randomized controlled trial was carried out from January-December 2010. A total of 62 hematological adult patients with FN were randomized, in 1:1 ratio, into two groups: (1) PCT group: length of ATB guided by institutional protocol plus PCT dynamics, and (2) control group: duration of ATB in accordance with institutional protocol. There was no difference between groups regarding the use of ATB for the first episode of fever (HR 1.14, 95 % CI 0.66-1.95, p = 0.641), with equivalent median duration of ATB therapy (PCT group 9.0 days and control group 8.0 days, p = 0.67), and median number of days without ATB (0 days, IQR 0-2 days for both groups, p = 0.96). We observed no difference in clinical cure rate (p = 0.68), infection relapse (p = 1.0), superinfection (p = 0.85), length of hospitalization (p = 0.64), and mortality at 28 days (p = 0.39) and at 90 days (p = 0.72). Considering the cut-off of 0.5 ng/ml, PCT was correlated with bacteremia (sensitivity of 51.9 % and specificity of 76.5 %). In this randomized controlled trial, adding a PCT-guided protocol to the standard recommendations did not reduce the use of antibiotics in febrile neutropenia, although no apparent harm was caused. PCT proved to be a marker of bacteremia in this setting.

  12. Optimal duration of antibiotic therapy for uncomplicated urinary tract infection in older women: a double-blind randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, Thomas; Verreault, René; Gourdeau, Marie; Morin, Michèle; Grenier-Gosselin, Lise; Rochette, Louis

    2004-01-01

    Background The optimal duration of antibiotic therapy in older patients with uncomplicated urinary tract infection (UTI) is still a matter of debate. The aim of this randomized controlled double-blind noninferiority trial was to compare the efficacy and safety of 3-day and 7-day courses of oral ciprofloxacin for uncomplicated symptomatic UTI in older women. Methods A total of 183 women at least 65 years of age with acute uncomplicated UTI were recruited from ambulatory clinics and hospital acute care units. Patients with pyelonephritis, contraindications to fluoroquinolones, recent use of antibiotics, urinary tract abnormalities and diabetes mellitus were excluded. Women were randomly assigned to receive either ciprofloxacin 250 mg twice daily orally for 3 days followed by placebo for 4 days (the 3-day group, 93 patients) or ciprofloxacin 250 mg twice daily orally for 7 days (the 7-day group, 90 patients). Bacterial eradication, clinical improvement and occurrence of adverse events were determined 2 days after completion of treatment, and occurrence of reinfection or relapse were determined 6 weeks after completion of treatment. Bacterial eradication and relapse were determined by urine culture. Double-blind procedures were maintained throughout data collection. Results The proportion of patients with bacterial eradication at 2 days after treatment was 98% (91/93) in the 3-day group and 93% (83/89) in the 7-day group (p = 0.16). The frequency of adverse events, including drowsiness, headache, nausea or vomiting, and loss of appetite, was significantly lower in the 3-day group. Interpretation These results suggest that a 3-day course of antibiotic therapy is not inferior to a 7-day course for treatment of uncomplicated symptomatic UTI in older women, and that the shorter course is better tolerated. PMID:14970093

  13. Good response of an aggressive rare variant of signet ring cell carcinoma of prostate with hormonal therapy.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Deviprasad; Nayak, Brusabhanu; Seth, Amlesh

    2017-03-08

    Primary signet ring cell carcinoma (SRCC) of the prostate is a rare entity, characterised by its aggressive nature and dismal prognosis. We report a case of an advanced SRCC of the prostate presenting as a large pelvic mass with obstructive uropathy and rectal involvement managed by complete androgen blockade. At 24 months follow-up, the patient has no evidence of progression or metastasis. Aggressive management with multimodality approach combining surgery, radiation and hormonal ablation can result in long disease-free survival in some patients, despite the aggressive nature of this disease.

  14. Eradication of Mycoplasma synoviae from a multi-age broiler breeder farm using antibiotics therapy.

    PubMed

    Hong, Young-Ho; Kwon, Ji-Seon; Lee, Hyun-Jeong; Song, Chang-Seon; Lee, Sang-Won

    2015-10-01

    Mycoplasma synoviae (MS) is a common respiratory pathogen in the poultry industry. Eradication of MS from broiler breeder flocks is important for reducing economic losses caused by MS-associated diseases on broiler farms. An outbreak of MS infection was detected on a multi-age Korean broiler breeder farm that implements a flock replacement program every 3 to 6 months and uses A-type cages. Continuous administration of tilmicosin after 2 rounds of intensive antibiotics treatment with chlortetracycline, doxycycline, and enrofloxacin reduced MS shedding from the MS-positive flocks and eventually eradicated MS from the farm. Flock 3 was the last MS-positive flock by both PCR and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), while flocks introduced to the farm after flock 3 were MS-negative by both PCR and ELISA at the time of depletion. This is the first report of successful eradication of MS from a multi-age broiler breeder farm using continuous antibiotic treatments.

  15. Succession in the gut microbiome following antibiotic and antibody therapies for Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Peterfreund, Gregory L; Vandivier, Lee E; Sinha, Rohini; Marozsan, Andre J; Olson, William C; Zhu, Jun; Bushman, Frederic D

    2012-01-01

    Antibiotic disruption of the intestinal microbiota may cause susceptibility to pathogens that is resolved by progressive bacterial outgrowth and colonization. Succession is central to ecological theory but not widely documented in studies of the vertebrate microbiome. Here, we study succession in the hamster gut after treatment with antibiotics and exposure to Clostridium difficile. C. difficile infection is typically lethal in hamsters, but protection can be conferred with neutralizing antibodies against the A and B toxins. We compare treatment with neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (mAb) to treatment with vancomycin, which prolongs the lives of animals but ultimately fails to protect them from death. We carried out longitudinal deep sequencing analysis and found distinctive waves of succession associated with each form of treatment. Clindamycin sensitization prior to infection was associated with the temporary suppression of the previously dominant Bacteroidales and the fungus Saccinobaculus in favor of Proteobacteria. In mAb-treated animals, C. difficile proliferated before joining Proteobacteria in giving way to re-expanding Bacteroidales and the fungus Wickerhamomyces. However, the Bacteroidales lineages returning by day 7 were different from those that were present initially, and they persisted for the duration of the experiment. Animals treated with vancomycin showed a different set of late-stage lineages that were dominated by Proteobacteria as well as increased disparity between the tissue-associated and luminal cecal communities. The control animals showed no change in their gut microbiota. These data thus suggest different patterns of ecological succession following antibiotic treatment and C. difficile infection.

  16. Successful treatment of biofilm infections using shock waves combined with antibiotic therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gnanadhas, Divya Prakash; Elango, Monalisha; Janardhanraj, S.; Srinandan, C. S.; Datey, Akshay; Strugnell, Richard A.; Gopalan, Jagadeesh; Chakravortty, Dipshikha

    2015-01-01

    Many bacteria secrete a highly hydrated framework of extracellular polymer matrix on suitable substrates and embed within the matrix to form a biofilm. Bacterial biofilms are observed on many medical devices, endocarditis, periodontitis and lung infections in cystic fibrosis patients. Bacteria in biofilm are protected from antibiotics and >1,000 times of the minimum inhibitory concentration may be required to treat biofilm infections. Here, we demonstrated that shock waves could be used to remove Salmonella, Pseudomonas and Staphylococcus biofilms in urinary catheters. The studies were extended to a Pseudomonas chronic pneumonia lung infection and Staphylococcus skin suture infection model in mice. The biofilm infections in mice, treated with shock waves became susceptible to antibiotics, unlike untreated biofilms. Mice exposed to shock waves responded to ciprofloxacin treatment, while ciprofloxacin alone was ineffective in treating the infection. These results demonstrate for the first time that, shock waves, combined with antibiotic treatment can be used to treat biofilm infection on medical devices as well as in situ infections. PMID:26658706

  17. [In vitro resistance rates of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae clinical isolates to the antibiotics used in therapy].

    PubMed

    Uncu, Hikmet; Colakoğlu, Sule; Turunç, Tuba; Demiroğlu, Yusuf Ziya; Arslan, Hande

    2007-07-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae which cause infections with high morbidity and mortality all over the world, are also the most important bacterial pathogens of community-acquired pneumoniae. In recent years S. pneumoniae is becoming increasingly resistant to a variety of antibiotics. The aim of this study was to detect the in vitro resistance rates of S. pneumoniae and H. influenzae strains isolated from different clinical samples to the antibiotics which are used in the therapy of infections due to these pathogens. Between the period of January 2005 to May 2006, 77 S. pneumoniae (44 sputum, 20 blood, 8 bronchoalveolar lavage, 4 pleural fluids and 1 tracheal aspirate isolate) and 31 H. influenzae (30 sputum and 1 bronchoalveolar lavage isolate) strains isolated from patients who were admitted to Baskent University Hospital, Research and Practice Center of Adana (located in southern Turkey), were included to the study. The antibiotic susceptibility tests were performed by disc diffusion method according to CLSI (Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute; M100-S13) guidelines. The MIC values of S. pneumoniae which gave an inhibition zone diameter of > or =19 mm in with disc diffusion test, were detected by E-test (AB Biodisk, Sweden). Intermediate and high resistance rates of pneumococci to penicilin were found as 38.9% (30/77) and 10.4% (8/77), respectively, with a total resistance rate of 49.4%. Trimethoprim-sulphamethoxazole (TMP/SMX), erithromycin, tetracyclin, clindamycin and chloramphenicol were the other antibiotics which followed penicillin with the resistance rates of 42.8%, 37.6%, 31.1%, 23.3% and 10.3%, respectively. Amongst H. influenzae strains, one (3.2%) was found to be a beta-lactamase producer and it was resistant to both ampicillin and azitromycin. Eight (25.8%) of H. influenzae isolates were resistant to TMP/SMX, and two (6.4%) were resistant to chloramphenicol. As a result, the high penicilin and erithromycin resistance rates

  18. The intrauterine treatment of the retained foetal membrane in dairy goats by ozone: novel alternative to antibiotic therapy.

    PubMed

    Djuricic, D; Valpotic, H; Samardzija, M

    2015-04-01

    One of the major post-parturient complications in dairy goats is the retention of foetal membrane (RFM), which negatively influences their health, reproductive efficacy and welfare. The aim of this study was to compare the efficiency of intrauterine either ozone (OZ) or antibiotic (AB) treatments to establish the use of OZ as a novel and potential alternative to AB therapy in does with the RFM. The study was performed on 7 herds of dairy goats (n = 563) kept in the farms in Croatia. The conception rate was 563 of 641 total matings or 87.83%. The does from selected farms were observed during early puerperium and were divided into animals without the RFM (n = 522) and with the RFM (n = 41), treated either with foam spray OZ (n = 21) or with foaming AB oxytetracycline tablets (n = 20). The does with the RFM were mated successfully and became pregnant next kidding season, regardless of the treatment applied. Treatment with OZ attained similar results to the standard AB therapy, indicating that it could be novel potential alternative therapy of the RFM in dairy goats.

  19. Antibiotic-free nanotherapeutics: hypericin nanoparticles thereof for improved in vitro and in vivo antimicrobial photodynamic therapy and wound healing.

    PubMed

    Nafee, Noha; Youssef, Alaa; El-Gowelli, Hanan; Asem, Heba; Kandil, Sherif

    2013-09-15

    Hypericin (HY) is a naturally-occurring, potent photosensitizer. However, its lipophilicity limits its therapeutic applications. Our attempt is, thus, to develop a biodegradable nanocarrier for hypericin capable of preserving its antibacterial photoactivity. Amphiphilic block copolymers were synthesized to prepare hypericin-laden nanoparticles (HY-NPs). The antimicrobial photoactivity of HY-NPs was assessed; in vitro against biofilm and planktonic cells of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) clinical isolates and in vivo on infected wounds in rats. Nanoparticles of 45 nm in diameter ensured higher amounts of reactive oxygen species upon irradiation. HY-NPs demonstrated superior inhibition of biofilm over planktonic cells. In vivo wound healing studies in rats revealed faster healing, better epithelialization, keratinization and development of collagen fibers when HY-NPs were applied. Determination of growth factors and inflammatory mediators in the wound area confirmed superior healing potential of nanoencapsulated hypericin suggesting that hypericin can join the era of antibiotic-free antimicrobial therapy.

  20. [Anti Pseudomonas aeruginosa antibiotic therapy in cystic fibrosis (exclusion of macrolides)].

    PubMed

    Sermet-Gaudelus, I; Ferroni, A; Vrielinck, S; Lebourgeois, M; Chedevergne, F; Lenoir, G

    2006-10-01

    Antibiotherapy is one of the main treatment in cystic fibrosis. Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection is one of the main causes of pulmonary degradation. The chronic sputum colonisation is characterized by the emergence of the mucoid phenotype, the formation of biofilm and the induction of excessive inflammatory response and consecutive tissue lesion. The choice of antibiotics depends on quantitative and qualitative analysis of sputum, bacteria resistance phenotypes and severity of infection. Treatment of P. aeruginosa is different in case of first colonization or chronic infection. In the first case, parenteral antibiotherapy (beta-lactams-aminoglycosids) followed by inhaled antibiotherapy may eradicate the germ. In the other case, superinfections can be treated with parenteral biantibiothérapy (beta-lactams or quinolons and aminoglycosides) during 15 to 21 days. This is associated with a better nutritional and respiratory status and a prolonged survival. Inhaled antibiotics between the courses have decreased the number of superinfections. This prolonged antibiotherapy must be monitored because of possible induction of bacterial resistance, nephrotoxicity and ototoxicity of aminosids and allergy to beta-lactams.

  1. Combination Therapy With Lysin CF-301 and Antibiotic Is Superior to Antibiotic Alone for Treating Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus–Induced Murine Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Schuch, Raymond; Lee, Han M.; Schneider, Brent C.; Sauve, Karen L.; Law, Christina; Khan, Babar K.; Rotolo, Jimmy A.; Horiuchi, Yuki; Couto, Daniel E.; Raz, Assaf; Fischetti, Vincent A.; Huang, David B.; Nowinski, Robert C.; Wittekind, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Lysins are bacteriophage-derived enzymes that degrade bacterial peptidoglycans. Lysin CF-301 is being developed to treat Staphylococcus aureus because of its potent, specific, and rapid bacteriolytic effects. It also demonstrates activity on drug-resistant strains, has a low resistance profile, eradicates biofilms, and acts synergistically with antibiotics. CF-301 was bacteriolytic against 250 S. aureus strains tested including 120 methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) isolates. In time-kill studies with 62 strains, CF-301 reduced S. aureus by 3-log10 within 30 minutes compared to 6–12 hours required by antibiotics. In bacteremia, CF-301 increased survival by reducing blood MRSA 100-fold within 1 hour. Combinations of CF-301 with vancomycin or daptomycin synergized in vitro and increased survival significantly in staphylococcal-induced bacteremia compared to treatment with antibiotics alone (P < .0001). Superiority of CF-301 combinations with antibiotics was confirmed in 26 independent bacteremia studies. Combinations including CF-301 and antibiotics represent an attractive alternative to antibiotic monotherapies currently used to treat S. aureus bacteremia. PMID:24286983

  2. Procalcitonin Biomarker Algorithm Reduces Antibiotic Prescriptions, Duration of Therapy, and Costs in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: A Comparison in the Netherlands, Germany, and the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    van der Maas, Marloes E; Mantjes, Gertjan; Steuten, Lotte M G

    2017-04-01

    Antibiotics are often recommended as treatment for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) exacerbations. However, not all COPD exacerbations are caused by bacterial infections and there is consequently considerable misuse and overuse of antibiotics among patients with COPD. This poses a severe burden on healthcare resources such as increased risk of developing antibiotic resistance. The biomarker procalcitonin (PCT) displays specificity to distinguish bacterial inflammations from nonbacterial inflammations and may therefore help to rationalize antibiotic prescriptions. We report in this study, a three-country comparison of the health and economic consequences of a PCT biomarker-guided prescription and clinical decision-making strategy compared to current practice in hospitalized patients with COPD exacerbations. A decision tree was developed, comparing the expected costs and effects of the PCT algorithm to current practice in the Netherlands, Germany, and the United Kingdom. The time horizon of the model captured the length of hospital stay and a societal perspective was also adopted. The primary health outcome was the duration of antibiotic therapy. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was defined as the incremental costs per antibiotic day avoided. The incremental cost savings per day on antibiotic therapy avoided were (in Euros) €90 in the Netherlands, €125 in Germany, and €52 in the United Kingdom. Probabilistic sensitivity analyses showed that in the majority of simulations, the PCT biomarker strategy was superior to current practice (the Netherlands: 58%, Germany: 58%, and the United Kingdom: 57%). In conclusion, the PCT biomarker algorithm to optimize antibiotic prescriptions in COPD is likely to be cost-effective compared to current practice. Both the percentage of patients who start with antibiotic treatment as well as the duration of antibiotic therapy are reduced with the PCT decision algorithm, leading to a decrease in

  3. Moxalactam therapy of infections caused by cephalothin-resistant bacteria: influence of serum inhibitory activity on clinical response and acquisition of antibiotic resistance during therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Platt, R; Ehrlich, S L; Afarian, J; O'Brien, T F; Pennington, J E; Kass, E H

    1981-01-01

    Thirty patients infected predominantly by Serratia marcescens and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were treated in an open trial with moxalactam, a broad-spectrum beta-lactam antibiotic. Twenty-three (76%) had a satisfactory microbiological or clinical response. Among 25 patients for whom serum inhibitory concentrations were measured, those with favorable microbiological responses had significantly higher values than those with poor responses (reciprocal geometric mean concentrations, 49 versus 4.9; P less than 0.01). A serum inhibitory concentration of greater than 1:8 correlated significantly with a favorable outcome (17 of 18 versus 2 of 7 responses; P less than 0.01). Although the overall clinical efficacy of moxalactam was good, resistant organisms of species identical to those of the original infecting isolates were recovered during therapy in seven cases, including five caused by Pseudomonas organisms and two caused by Serratia organisms. PMID:6458233

  4. Good practice recommendations for paediatric outpatient parenteral antibiotic therapy (p-OPAT) in the UK: a consensus statement.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sanjay; Abrahamson, Ed; Goldring, Stephen; Green, Helen; Wickens, Hayley; Laundy, Matt

    2015-02-01

    There is compelling evidence to support the rationale for managing children on intravenous antimicrobial therapy at home whenever possible, including parent and patient satisfaction, psychological well-being, return to school/employment, reductions in healthcare-associated infection and cost savings. As a joint collaboration between the BSAC and the British Paediatric Allergy, Immunity and Infection Group, we have developed good practice recommendations to highlight good clinical practice and governance within paediatric outpatient parenteral antibiotic therapy (p-OPAT) services across the UK. These guidelines provide a practical approach for safely delivering a p-OPAT service in both secondary care and tertiary care settings, in terms of the roles and responsibilities of members of the p-OPAT team, the structure required to deliver the service, identifying patients and pathologies that are suitable for p-OPAT, ensuring appropriate vascular access, antimicrobial choice and delivery and the clinical governance aspects of delivering a p-OPAT service. The process of writing a business case to support the introduction of a p-OPAT service is also addressed.

  5. A Galleria mellonella infection model reveals double and triple antibiotic combination therapies with enhanced efficacy versus a multidrug-resistant strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Krezdorn, Jessica; Adams, Sophie; Coote, Peter J

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the inhibitory effect of antibiotic combinations in vitro with efficacy in Galleria mellonella larvae in vivo to identify efficacious combinations that target Pseudomonas aeruginosa. P. aeruginosa NCTC 13437, a multidrug-resistant strain resistant to β-lactams and aminoglycosides, was used. Susceptibility to cefotaxime, piperacillin, meropenem, amikacin, levofloxacin and colistin alone, or in dual or triple combinations, was measured in vitro via a 24 h time-kill assay. In vitro results were then compared with the efficacy of the same dual or triple antibiotic combinations versus G. mellonella larvae infected with P. aeruginosa. G. mellonella haemolymph burden of P. aeruginosa was determined over 96 h post-infection and treatment with the most potent combination therapies. Many dual and triple combinations of antibiotics displayed synergistic inhibition of multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa in vitro. There was little correlation between combinations that were synergistic in vitro and those that showed enhanced efficacy in vivo versus infected G. mellonella larvae. The most potent dual and triple combinations in vivo were cefotaxime plus piperacillin, and meropenem plus piperacillin and amikacin, respectively. Fewer combinations were found to offer enhanced therapeutic benefit in vivo compared with in vitro. The therapeutic benefit arising from treatment with antibiotic combinations in vivo correlated with reduced larval burden of P. aeruginosa. This study has identified antibiotic combinations that merit further investigation for their clinical potential and has demonstrated the utility of using G. mellonella to screen for novel antibiotic treatments that demonstrate efficacy in vivo.

  6. Aggressive Behavior

    MedlinePlus

    ... Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Aggressive Behavior Page Content Article Body My child is sometimes very aggressive. What is the best ... once they are quiet and still reinforces this behavior, so your child learns that time out means “quiet and still.” ...

  7. A multi-agent system approach for monitoring the prescription of restricted use antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Godo, L; Puyol-Gruart, J; Sabater, J; Torra, V; Barrufet, P; Fàbregas, X

    2003-03-01

    Hospitals have a specified set of antibiotics for restricted use (ARU), very expensive, which are only recommended for special pathologies. The pharmacy department daily checks the prescription of this kind of antibiotics since it is often the case that, after a careful analysis, one can get the same therapeutic effects by using normal antibiotics which are much cheaper and usually less aggressive. In this paper, we describe a multi-agent system to help in the revision of medical prescriptions containing antibiotics of restricted use. The proposed approach attaches an agent to each patient which is responsible of checking different medical aspects related to his/her prescribed therapy. A pharmacy agent is responsible for analyzing it and suggesting alternative antibiotic treatments. All these agents are integrated in a hospital distributed scenario composed by many different kinds of software and human agents. This patient-centered multi-agent scenario is specified using the design methodology of Electronic Institutions.

  8. Signaling aggression.

    PubMed

    van Staaden, Moira J; Searcy, William A; Hanlon, Roger T

    2011-01-01

    From psychological and sociological standpoints, aggression is regarded as intentional behavior aimed at inflicting pain and manifested by hostility and attacking behaviors. In contrast, biologists define aggression as behavior associated with attack or escalation toward attack, omitting any stipulation about intentions and goals. Certain animal signals are strongly associated with escalation toward attack and have the same function as physical attack in intimidating opponents and winning contests, and ethologists therefore consider them an integral part of aggressive behavior. Aggressive signals have been molded by evolution to make them ever more effective in mediating interactions between the contestants. Early theoretical analyses of aggressive signaling suggested that signals could never be honest about fighting ability or aggressive intentions because weak individuals would exaggerate such signals whenever they were effective in influencing the behavior of opponents. More recent game theory models, however, demonstrate that given the right costs and constraints, aggressive signals are both reliable about strength and intentions and effective in influencing contest outcomes. Here, we review the role of signaling in lieu of physical violence, considering threat displays from an ethological perspective as an adaptive outcome of evolutionary selection pressures. Fighting prowess is conveyed by performance signals whose production is constrained by physical ability and thus limited to just some individuals, whereas aggressive intent is encoded in strategic signals that all signalers are able to produce. We illustrate recent advances in the study of aggressive signaling with case studies of charismatic taxa that employ a range of sensory modalities, viz. visual and chemical signaling in cephalopod behavior, and indicators of aggressive intent in the territorial calls of songbirds.

  9. The early antibiotic therapy in septic patients--milestone or sticking point?

    PubMed

    Bernhard, Michael; Lichtenstern, Christoph; Eckmann, Christian; Weigand, Markus A

    2014-11-30

    Sepsis is one of the oldest and most elusive syndromes in medicine. Every effort should be made to treat these patients with the best available evidence. As a milestone, empiric antimicrobial therapy is essential in order to reduce morbidity and mortality of septic patients. As a sticking point, the use of broad-spectrum antimicrobial agents may be associated with induction of resistance among common pathogens.

  10. Antibiotics Quiz

    MedlinePlus

    ... National Activities Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work Strategies and Plans Related CDC Education Programs Global Activities Measuring Outpatient Antibiotic Prescribing Tracking Antibiotic-Resistant ...

  11. Antibiotic and Antiinflammatory Therapy Transiently Reduces Inflammation and Hypercoagulation in Acutely SIV-Infected Pigtailed Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Pandrea, Ivona; Xu, Cuiling; Stock, Jennifer L.; Frank, Daniel N.; Ma, Dongzhu; Policicchio, Benjamin B.; He, Tianyu; Kristoff, Jan; Cornell, Elaine; Haret-Richter, George S.; Trichel, Anita; Ribeiro, Ruy M.; Tracy, Russell; Wilson, Cara; Landay, Alan L.; Apetrei, Cristian

    2016-01-01

    Increased chronic immune activation and inflammation are hallmarks of HIV/SIV infection and are highly correlated with progression to AIDS and development of non-AIDS comorbidities, such as hypercoagulability and cardiovascular disease. Intestinal dysfunction resulting in microbial translocation has been proposed as a lead cause of systemic immune activation and hypercoagulability in HIV/SIV infection. Our goal was to assess the biological and clinical impact of a therapeutic strategy designed to reduce microbial translocation through reduction of the microbial content of the intestine (Rifaximin-RFX) and of gut inflammation (Sulfasalazine-SFZ). RFX is an intraluminal antibiotic that was successfully used in patients with hepatic encephalopathy. SFZ is an antiinflammatory drug successfully used in patients with mild to moderate inflammatory bowel disease. Both these clinical conditions are associated with increased microbial translocation, similar to HIV-infected patients. Treatment was administered for 90 days to five acutely SIV-infected pigtailed macaques (PTMs) starting at the time of infection; seven untreated SIVsab-infected PTMs were used as controls. RFX+SFZ were also administered for 90 days to three chronically SIVsab-infected PTMs. RFX+SFZ administration during acute SIVsab infection of PTMs resulted in: significantly lower microbial translocation, lower systemic immune activation, lower viral replication, better preservation of mucosal CD4+ T cells and significantly lower levels of hypercoagulation biomarkers. This effect was clear during the first 40 days of treatment and was lost during the last stages of treatment. Administration of RFX+SFZ to chronically SIVsab–infected PTMs had no discernible effect on infection. Our data thus indicate that early RFX+SFZ administration transiently improves the natural history of acute and postacute SIV infection, but has no effect during chronic infection. PMID:26764484

  12. Outpatient Parenteral Antibiotic Therapy in an Academic Practice in Rhode Island

    PubMed Central

    Touzard Romo, F; Resnick, B; Perez-Cioe, M; Flanigan, TP; Kojic, E; Beckwith, CG

    2015-01-01

    Outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy (OPAT) is an increasingly utilized treatment modality that has been proven to be safe and cost-effective for treating infections that require prolonged antimicrobial treatment. Adequate patient selection, a structured OPAT team with an effective communication system, and routine clinical monitoring are key elements to establish a successful OPAT program. The Infectious Diseases and Immunology Center at The Miriam Hospital offers a multidisciplinary OPAT model coordinated by infectious diseases specialists and serves as a major referral center in Rhode Island. PMID:25562060

  13. Comparison between antibiotic therapy of Brucellosis with and without vitamin A

    PubMed Central

    Salehi, Marziyeh; Salehi, Hassan; Salehi, Mohamad Mahdi; Salehi, Maryam

    2014-01-01

    Background: Brucellosis is one of the endemic diseases in our country and it can be in the types of acute, sub-acute or chronic. It estimates that about 20% of Brucellosis may change from acute to chronic. Because cell mediated immunity (CMI) is the main defense of body against Brucella species, it seems that some degree of Immunologic disorders existed in the patients with chronic form of diseases and some supplements such as Vitamin A (Vit A) as an immunomodulator can stimulate CMI and may decrease the rate of chronicity. Materials and Methods: In a single-blind randomized clinical trial 120 patients with the clinical and serological diagnosed Brucellosis were randomized. A total of 60 patients received streptomycin and Doxycycline as standard therapy for 6 weeks and others in addition to this Regimen received Vit A for about 4 weeks. Results: In the case group, only 1 case (1.6%) relapsed and in the control group 8 (13.5%) with significant difference (P < 0.005) between two groups. Morbidity of disease was different between two groups. Conclusion: Vit A therapy in the patients with Brucellosis with may reduce the disease morbidity and rate of chronicity. PMID:25590023

  14. Treating Comorbid Anxiety and Aggression in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Karyn; Hunt, Caroline; Heriot, Sandra

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness of an intervention that targeted both anxious and aggressive behaviors in children with anxiety disorders and comorbid aggression by parent report. Method: The effects of a cognitive-behavioral therapy intervention targeting comorbid anxiety and aggression problems were compared…

  15. Antibiotic Resistance

    MedlinePlus

    ... lives. But there is a growing problem of antibiotic resistance. It happens when bacteria change and become able ... resistant to several common antibiotics. To help prevent antibiotic resistance Don't use antibiotics for viruses like colds ...

  16. The Beta Lactam Antibiotics as an Empirical Therapy in a Developing Country: An Update on Their Current Status and Recommendations to Counter the Resistance against Them

    PubMed Central

    Thakuria, Bhaskar; Lahon, Kingshuk

    2013-01-01

    In a developing country like India, where the patients have to bear the cost of their healthcare, the microbiological culture and the sensitivity testing of each and every infection is not feasible. Moreover, there are lacunae in the data storage, management and the sharing of knowledge with respect to the microorganisms which are prevalent in the local geographical area and with respect to the antibiotics which are effective against them. Thus, an empirical therapy for treating infections is imperative in such a setting. The beta lactam antibiotics have been widely used for the empirical treatment of infections since the the discovery of penicillin. Many generations of beta lactams have been launched with, the claims of a higher sensitivity and less resistance, but their sensitivity has drastically decreased over time. Thus, the preference for beta lactams, especially the cephalosporins, as an empirical therapy, among the prescribers was justified initially, but the current sensitivity patterns do not support their empirical use in hospital and community acquired infections. There is a need for increasing the awareness and the attitudinal change among the prescribers, screening of the antibiotic prescriptions, the strict implementation of antibiotic policies in hospital settings, restricting the hospital supplies and avoiding the prescriptions of beta lactams, a regular census of the local sensitivity patterns to formulate and update the antibiotic policies, upgradation of the laboratory facilities for a better and faster detection of the isolates, proper collection, analyses and sharing of the data and the encouragement of the research and development of newer antibiotics with novel mechanisms of action. PMID:23905143

  17. Effectiveness of sequential intravenous-to-oral antibiotic switch therapy in hospitalized patients with gram-positive infection: the SEQUENCE cohort study.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Pardo, D; Pigrau, C; Campany, D; Diaz-Brito, V; Morata, L; de Diego, I C; Sorlí, L; Iftimie, S; Pérez-Vidal, R; García-Pardo, G; Larrainzar-Coghen, T; Almirante, B

    2016-08-01

    Switching from intravenous to oral antibiotic therapy may improve inpatient management and reduce hospital stays and the complications of intravenous treatment. We aimed to assess the effectiveness of intravenous-to-oral antibiotic switch therapy and an early discharge algorithm in hospitalized patients with gram-positive infection. We performed a prospective cohort study with a retrospective comparison cohort, recruited from eight tertiary, acute-care Spanish referral hospitals. All patients included had culture-confirmed methicillin-resistant gram-positive infection, or methicillin-susceptible gram-positive infection and beta-lactam allergy and had received intravenous treatment with glycopeptides, lipopeptides, or linezolid. The study comprised two cohorts: the prospective cohort to assess the effectiveness of a sequential intravenous-to-oral antibiotic switch algorithm and early discharge, and a retrospective cohort in which the algorithm had not been applied, used as the comparator. A total of 247 evaluable patients were included; 115 in the prospective and 132 in the retrospective cohort. Forty-five retrospective patients (34 %) were not changed to oral antibiotics, and 87 (66 %) were changed to oral antibiotics without following the proposed algorithm. The duration of hospitalization was significantly shorter in the prospective cohort compared to the retrospective group that did not switch to oral drugs (16.7 ± 18.7 vs 23 ± 13.4 days, P  < 0.001). No differences were observed regarding the incidence of catheter-related bacteraemia (4.4 % vs 2.6 %, P = 0.621). Our results suggest that an intravenous-to-oral antibiotic switch strategy is effective for reducing the length of hospital stay in selected hospitalized patients with gram-positive infection.

  18. Haemophilus influenzae responds to glucocorticoids used in asthma therapy by modulation of biofilm formation and antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Earl, Chris S; Keong, Teh Wooi; An, Shi-qi; Murdoch, Sarah; McCarthy, Yvonne; Garmendia, Junkal; Ward, Joseph; Dow, J Maxwell; Yang, Liang; O'Toole, George A; Ryan, Robert P

    2015-08-01

    Glucocorticosteroids are used as a main treatment to reduce airway inflammation in people with asthma who suffer from neutrophilic airway inflammation, a condition frequently associated with Haemophilus influenzae colonization. Here we show that glucocorticosteroids have a direct influence on the behavior of H. influenzae that may account for associated difficulties with therapy. Using a mouse model of infection, we show that corticosteroid treatment promotes H. influenzae persistence. Transcriptomic analysis of bacteria either isolated from infected mouse airway or grown in laboratory medium identified a number of genes encoding regulatory factors whose expression responded to the presence of glucocorticosteroids. Importantly, a number of these corticosteroid-responsive genes also showed elevated expression in H. influenzae within sputum from asthma patients undergoing steroid treatment. Addition of corticosteroid to H. influenzae led to alteration in biofilm formation and enhanced resistance to azithromycin, and promoted azithromycin resistance in an animal model of respiratory infection. Taken together, these data strongly suggest that H. influenzae can respond directly to corticosteroid treatment in the airway potentially influencing biofilm formation, persistence and the efficacy of antibiotic treatment.

  19. Antibiotic Dosing in Patients With Acute Kidney Injury: "Enough But Not Too Much".

    PubMed

    Lewis, Susan J; Mueller, Bruce A

    2016-03-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that antibiotic dosing in critically ill patients with acute kidney injury (AKI) often does not achieve pharmacodynamic goals, and the continued high mortality rate due to infectious causes appears to confirm these findings. Although there are compelling reasons why clinicians should use more aggressive antibiotic dosing, particularly in patients receiving aggressive renal replacement therapies, concerns for toxicity associated with higher doses are real. The presence of multisystem organ failure and polypharmacy predispose these patients to drug toxicity. This article examines the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic consequences of critical illness, AKI, and renal replacement therapy and describes potential solutions to help clinicians give "enough but not too much" in these very complicated patients.

  20. Effect of Surgical Periodontal Therapy on Serum C-reactive Protein Levels Using ELISA in Both Chronic and Aggressive Periodontitis Patient

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Bharat; Patil, Neha; Yadav, Manoj; Tripathi, Shashank; Sinha, Saurabh; Sharma, Saurabh; Gupta, Saurabh

    2015-01-01

    Background Periodontitis can be defined as a local inflammatory process which mediates destruction of periodontal tissues & is triggered by bacterial insult. In periodontal infections, the levels of C reactive proteins are elevated as compared to the levels in a periodontally healthy individual. The study was done to determine the relative levels of serum CRP in aggressive, chronic and periodontally healthy subjects and to evaluate the effect of surgical periodontal therapy on serum C-reactive protein levels. Materials and Methods Serum samples were collected from 150 participants (50 healthy control patients (non-periodontitis), 50 patients with chronic periodontitis and aggressive periodontitis. Serum C- reactive protein levels were assessed by means of immunoturbidimetric assay at baseline for subjects in all the 3 groups and 3 months after completion of surgical therapy. Results The mean baseline C-reactive protein (CRP) concentrations in the Groups I, II and III were 1.65±0.57 mg/L, 3.03±2.14 mg/L and 3.09±2.27 mg/L respectively. After treatment, the mean C-reactive protein (CRP) levels in Groups II and III reduced from 3.03±1.67 mg/L to 1.46±1.67 mg/L and from 3.09±1.21 to 1.43±1.21 mg/L respectively. Similar results were found for probing depth and all indexes in Group II and III after treatment. Also, the mean attachment loss in Groups II and III reduced, so the results were highly significant. Conclusion Successful periodontal treatment results in significant decrease in serum C-reactive protein (CRP) levels in otherwise healthy subjects. PMID:26557605

  1. Is 2 weeks of antibiotic therapy enough to treat elderly patients with nontyphoid Salmonella bacteremia? A case report of fatal endovascular infection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Po-Lin; Tsai, Liang-Miin; Kan, Chung-Dann; Ko, Wen-Chien

    2014-08-01

    Nontyphoid Salmonella (NTS) can cause invasive diseases in the elderly. Notably, the most feared complication of NTS bacteremia is endovascular infection. The risk factors for infected aortic aneurysm include old age and atherosclerosis. Extended use of antimicrobial therapy (> 2 weeks) for NTS bacteremia should be considered for those who demonstrate the risk factors for endovascular infection, even when a metastatic focus is clinically elusive. Herein, we report the case of a 75-year-old patient with diabetes mellitus, hypertension, chronic kidney disease, and myocardial infarction who died of an infected aortic aneurysm despite 3 weeks of antibiotic therapy that was administered to treat the initial NTS bacteremia.

  2. Quality of documentation on antibiotic therapy in medical records: evaluation of combined interventions in a teaching hospital by repeated point prevalence survey.

    PubMed

    Vercheval, C; Gillet, M; Maes, N; Albert, A; Frippiat, F; Damas, P; Van Hees, T

    2016-09-01

    This study aimed to improve the quality of documentation on antibiotic therapy in the computerized medical records of inpatients. A prospective, uncontrolled, interrupted time series (ITS) study was conducted by repeated point prevalence survey (PPS) to audit the quality of documentation on antibiotic therapy in the medical records before and after a combined intervention strategy (implementation of guidelines, distribution of educational materials, educational outreach visits, group educational interactive sessions) from the antimicrobial stewardship team (AST) in the academic teaching hospital (CHU) of Liège, Belgium. The primary outcome measure was the documentation rate on three quality indicators in the computerized medical records: (1) indication for treatment, (2) antibiotics prescribed, and (3) duration or review date. Segmented regression analysis was used to analyze the ITS. The medical records of 2306 patients receiving antibiotics for an infection (1177 in the pre-intervention period and 1129 in the post-intervention period) were analyzed. A significant increase in mean percentages in the post-intervention period was observed as compared with the pre-intervention period for the three quality indicators (indication documented 83.4 ± 10.4 % vs. 90.3 ± 6.6 %, p = 0.0013; antibiotics documented 87.9 ± 9.0 % vs. 95.6 ± 5.1 %, p < 0.0001; and duration or review date documented 31.9 ± 15.4 % vs. 67.7 ± 15.2 %, p < 0.0001). The study demonstrated the successful implementation of a combined intervention strategy from the AST. This strategy was associated with significant changes in the documentation rate in the computerized medical records for the three quality indicators.

  3. Impact of β-lactam antibiotic therapeutic drug monitoring on dose adjustments in critically ill patients undergoing continuous renal replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Economou, Caleb J P; Wong, Gloria; McWhinney, Brett; Ungerer, Jacobus P J; Lipman, Jeffrey; Roberts, Jason A

    2017-03-21

    The objective of this study was to describe the effect of therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) and dose adjustments of β-lactam antibiotics administered to critically ill patients undergoing continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) in a 30-bed tertiary intensive care unit (ICU). β-Lactam TDM data in our tertiary referral ICU were retrospectively reviewed. Clinical, demographic and dosing data were collected for patients administered β-lactam antibiotics while undergoing CRRT. The target trough concentration range was 1-10× the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). A total of 111 TDM samples from 76 patients (46 male) with a mean ± standard deviation age of 56.6 ± 15.9 years and weight of 89.1 ± 25.8 kg were identified. The duration of antibiotic therapy was between 2 days and 42 days. TDM identified a need for dose modification of β-lactam antibiotics in 39 (35%) instances; in 27 (24%) samples, TDM values resulted in decreasing the prescribed dose of β-lactam antibiotic whereas an increase in the prescribed dose occurred in 12 (11%) cases. In patients treated for hospital-acquired pneumonia and primary or secondary bacteraemia, the dose was required to be decreased in 10/25 (40%) and 7/46 (15%) cases, respectively, to attain target concentrations. β-Lactam TDM is a useful tool for guiding drug dosing in complex patients such as those receiving CRRT. Although over one-third of patients manifested concentrations outside the therapeutic range, most of these CRRT patients had excessive β-lactam concentrations.

  4. Oral Gentamicin Gut Decontamination for Prevention of KPC-Producing Klebsiella pneumoniae Infections: Relevance of Concomitant Systemic Antibiotic Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Tascini, Carlo; Sbrana, Francesco; Flammini, Sarah; Tagliaferri, Enrico; Arena, Fabio; Leonildi, Alessandro; Ciullo, Ilaria; Amadori, Francesco; Di Paolo, Antonello; Ripoli, Andrea; Lewis, Russell; Rossolini, Gian Maria

    2014-01-01

    Gut colonization represents the main source for KPC-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae (KPC-Kp) epidemic dissemination. Oral gentamicin, 80 mg four times daily, was administered to 50 consecutive patients with gut colonization by gentamicin-susceptible KPC-Kp in cases of planned surgery, major medical intervention, or need for patient transfer. The overall decontamination rate was 68% (34/50). The median duration of gentamicin treatment was 9 days (interquartile range, 7 to 15 days) in decontaminated patients compared to 24 days (interquartile range, 20 to 30 days) in those with persistent colonization (P < 0.001). In the six-month period of follow-up, KPC-Kp infections were documented in 5/34 (15%) successfully decontaminated patients compared to 12/16 (73%) persistent carriers (P < 0.001). The decontamination rate was 96% (22/23) in patients receiving oral gentamicin only, compared to 44% (12/27) of those treated with oral gentamicin and concomitant systemic antibiotic therapy (CSAT) (P < 0.001). The multivariate analysis confirmed CSAT and KPC-Kp infection as the variables associated with gut decontamination. In the follow-up period, KPC-Kp infections were documented in 2/23 (9%) of patients treated with oral gentamicin only and in 15/27 (56%) of those also receiving CSAT (P = 0.003). No difference in overall death rate between different groups was documented. Gentamicin-resistant KPC-Kp strains were isolated from stools of 4/16 persistent carriers. Peak gentamicin blood levels were below 1 mg/liter in 12/14 tested patients. Oral gentamicin was shown to be potentially useful for gut decontamination and prevention of infection due to KPC-Kp, especially in patients not receiving CSAT. The risk of emergence of gentamicin-resistant KPC-Kp should be considered. PMID:24419337

  5. 19F Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Perfluorocarbons for the Evaluation of Response to Antibiotic Therapy in a Staphylococcus aureus Infection Model

    PubMed Central

    Jakob, Peter; Ohlsen, Knut

    2013-01-01

    Background The emergence of antibiotic resistant bacteria in recent decades has highlighted the importance of developing new drugs to treat infections. However, in addition to the design of new drugs, the development of accurate preclinical testing methods is essential. In vivo imaging technologies such as bioluminescence imaging (BLI) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are promising approaches. In a previous study, we showed the effectiveness of 19F MRI using perfluorocarbon (PFC) emulsions for detecting the site of Staphylococcus aureus infection. In the present follow-up study, we investigated the use of this method for in vivo visualization of the effects of antibiotic therapy. Methods/Principal findings Mice were infected with S. aureus Xen29 and treated with 0.9% NaCl solution, vancomycin or linezolid. Mock treatment led to the highest bioluminescence values during infection followed by vancomycin treatment. Counting the number of colony-forming units (cfu) at 7 days post-infection (p.i.) showed the highest bacterial burden for the mock group and the lowest for the linezolid group. Administration of PFCs at day 2 p.i. led to the accumulation of 19F at the rim of the abscess in all mice (in the shape of a hollow sphere), and antibiotic treatment decreased the 19F signal intensity and volume. Linezolid showed the strongest effect. The BLI, cfu, and MRI results were comparable. Conclusions 19F-MRI with PFCs is an effective non-invasive method for assessing the effects of antibiotic therapy in vivo. This method does not depend on pathogen specific markers and can therefore be used to estimate the efficacy of antibacterial therapy against a broad range of clinically relevant pathogens, and to localize sites of infection. PMID:23724049

  6. Chronic bacterial prostatitis: efficacy of short-lasting antibiotic therapy with prulifloxacin (Unidrox®) in association with saw palmetto extract, lactobacillus sporogens and arbutin (Lactorepens®)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Bacterial prostatitis (BP) is a common condition accounting responsible for about 5-10% of all prostatitis cases; chronic bacterial prostatitis (CBP) classified as type II, are less common but is a condition that significantly hampers the quality of life, (QoL) because not only is it a physical condition but also a psychological distress. Commonly patients are treated with antibiotics alone, and in particular fluoroquinolones are suggested by the European Urology guidelines. This approach, although recommended, may not be enough. Thus, a multimodal approach to the prolonged antibiotic therapy may be helpful. Methods 210 patients affected by chronic bacterial prostatitis were enrolled in the study. All patients were positive to Meares-Stamey test and symptoms duration was > 3 months. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the efficacy of a long lasting therapy with a fluoroquinolone in association with a nutraceutical supplement (prulifloxacin 600 mg for 21 days and an association of Serenoa repens 320 mg, Lactobacillus Sporogens 200 mg, Arbutin 100 mg for 30 days). Patients were randomized in two groups (A and B) receiving respectively antibiotic alone and an association of antibiotic plus supplement. Results Biological recurrence at 2 months in Group A was observed in 21 patients (27.6%) and in Group B in 6 patients (7.8%). Uropathogens found at the first follow-up were for the majority Gram – (E. coli and Enterobacter spp.). A statistically significant difference was found at the time of the follow-up between Group A and B in the NIH-CPSI questionnaire score, symptoms evidence and serum PSA. Conclusions Broad band, short-lasting antibiotic therapy in association with a nutritional supplement (serenoa repens, lactobacillus sporogens and arbutin) show better control and recurrence rate on patients affected by chronic bacterial prostatitits in comparison with antibiotic treatment alone. Trial registration NCT02130713 Date of trial

  7. Rapid identification and susceptibility testing of uropathogenic microbes via immunosorbent ATP-bioluminescence assay on a microfluidic simulator for antibiotic therapy.

    PubMed

    Dong, Tao; Zhao, Xinyan

    2015-02-17

    The incorporation of pathogen identification with antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) was implemented on a concept microfluidic simulator, which is well suited for personalizing antibiotic treatment of urinary tract infections (UTIs). The microfluidic device employs a fiberglass membrane sandwiched between two polypropylene components, with capture antibodies immobilized on the membrane. The chambers in the microfluidic device share the same geometric distribution as the wells in a standard 384-well microplate, resulting in compatibility with common microplate readers. Thirteen types of common uropathogenic microbes were selected as the analytes in this study. The microbes can be specifically captured by various capture antibodies and then quantified via an ATP bioluminescence assay (ATP-BLA) either directly or after a variety of follow-up tests, including urine culture, antibiotic treatment, and personalized antibiotic therapy simulation. Owing to the design of the microfluidic device, as well as the antibody specificity and the ATP-BLA sensitivity, the simulator was proven to be able to identify UTI pathogen species in artificial urine samples within 20 min and to reliably and simultaneously verify the antiseptic effects of eight antibiotic drugs within 3-6 h. The measurement range of the device spreads from 1 × 10(3) to 1 × 10(5) cells/mL in urine samples. We envision that the medical simulator might be broadly employed in UTI treatment and could serve as a model for the diagnosis and treatment of other diseases.

  8. The microbial community shifts of subgingival plaque in patients with generalized aggressive periodontitis following non-surgical periodontal therapy: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Han, Jing; Wang, Peng; Ge, Shaohua

    2017-02-07

    The object of this study is to characterize the bacterial community of subgingival plaque of two subjects with generalized aggressive periodontitis (GAgP) pre- and post-treatment. We picked two patients with GAgP and used high-throughput 16S rDNA sequencing. V4 hypervariable region was picked for PCR amplification of subgingival samples. Then, the PCR products were sequenced through Illumina MiSeq platform. One month after therapy, both the clinical features and periodontal parameters improved obviously. Moreover, the composition and structure of subgingival bacterial community changed after initial periodontal therapy. Also, the composition of the subgingival microbiota was highly individualized among different patients. Bacteroidetes, Spirochaetes and Fusobacteria were related to pathogenicity of GAgP while Actinobacteria and Proteobacteria seemed associated with clinical symptoms resolution. In this study, we found the subgingival bacterial community was high in species richness but dominated by a few species or phylotypes, with significant shifts of microbiota that occurred after treatment. This study demonstrated the shift of the subgingival bacterial community before and after treatment by high-throughput 16S rDNA sequencing, and provided a concise method for analysis of microbial community for periodontal diseases.

  9. Prospective evaluation of aggressive medical therapy for atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis, with renal artery stenting reserved for previously injured heart, brain, or kidney.

    PubMed

    Hanzel, George; Balon, Helena; Wong, Oliver; Soffer, Daniel; Lee, Daniel Taehee; Safian, Robert David

    2005-11-01

    Sixty-six patients with atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis (RAS) and serum creatinine < or =2.0 mg/dl were treated with antihypertensive therapy, a statin, and aspirin. Renal stenting was reserved for patients with injuries to the heart, brain, or kidneys. The primary end point was stenotic kidney glomerular filtration rate (GFR) at 21 months; secondary end points included major adverse clinical events, serum creatinine, total GFR, and blood pressure (BP). After baseline evaluation, 26 of 66 patients underwent renal stenting because of injuries to the heart, brain, or kidneys. After 21 months, 6 medical patients required renal stenting, and 5 patients experienced late clinical events (2 medical patients, 3 stent patients). There was no difference in final BP between groups. Whereas medical patients experienced 6% and 8% decreases in total and stenotic kidney GFR, stent patients experienced 7% and 11% increases in total kidney (p = 0.006) and stenotic kidney (p = 0.02) GFR. There was no difference in final serum creatinine. In conclusion, patients with atherosclerotic RAS and baseline creatinine < or =2.0 mg/dl can be safely managed with aggressive medical therapy, with a small decrease in GFR. For patients who develop injuries to the heart, brain, or kidneys, renal artery stenting may further reduce hypertension and improve renal function.

  10. Evaluation of Galleria mellonella larvae for measuring the efficacy and pharmacokinetics of antibiotic therapies against Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection.

    PubMed

    Hill, Lucy; Veli, Neyme; Coote, Peter J

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether Galleria mellonella larvae can be used (i) as an in vivo infection model for Pseudomonas aeruginosa and (ii) for evaluating the pharmacokinetics and efficacy of antipseudomonal antibiotics. Two strains of P. aeruginosa were employed, NCTC 10662 (antibiotic-susceptible) and NCTC 13437 (multidrug-resistant). Larvae were infected with increasing doses of either P. aeruginosa strain to investigate the effect of inoculum size on survival. Subsequently, infected larvae were treated with a range of antibiotics to examine whether these agents were effective against P. aeruginosa infection in vivo and whether the efficacy of these drugs matched the known susceptibilities of each bacterial strain. Larval burden of P. aeruginosa was also determined after infection and treatment with cefotaxime. Pharmacokinetic properties of the antibiotics tested were measured using a well diffusion assay to determine the concentration of antibiotics in larval haemolymph over time. Galleria mellonella larvae were sensitive to P. aeruginosa infection, and increasing inoculum doses of live cells resulted in greater larval mortality. Heat-killed bacteria had no detrimental effect on survival. Antibiotic efficacy against P. aeruginosa-infected G. mellonella correlated with the measured in vitro sensitivities of the two strains tested. The therapeutic benefit arising from administration of cefotaxime correlated with a reduced burden of bacteria present in the haemolymph. There was a clear correlation between measured antibiotic pharmacokinetics and the therapeutic effect. This study strongly supports future application of the G. mellonella infection model to initial studies of novel antipseudomonal treatments.

  11. Neural Mechanisms of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Aggression in Children and Adolescents: Design of a Randomized Controlled Trial Within the National Institute for Mental Health Research Domain Criteria Construct of Frustrative Non-Reward

    PubMed Central

    Wyk, Brent C. Vander; Eilbott, Jeffrey A.; McCauley, Spencer A.; Ibrahim, Karim; Crowley, Michael J.; Pelphrey, Kevin A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: We present the rationale and design of a randomized controlled trial of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for aggression in children and adolescents, which is conducted in response to the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) Research Domain Criteria (RDoC) approach initiative. Specifically, the study is focused on the brain-behavior associations within the RDoC construct of frustrative non-reward. On the behavioral level, this construct is defined by reactions elicited in response to withdrawal or prevention of reward, most notably reactive aggression. This study is designed to test the functional magnetic resonance (fMRI) and electrophysiological (EEG) correlates of aggression and its reduction after CBT. Methods: Eighty children and adolescents with high levels of aggression across multiple traditional diagnostic categories, ages 8–16, will be randomly assigned to receive 12 sessions of CBT or 12 sessions of supportive psychotherapy. Clinical outcomes will be measured by the ratings of aggressive behavior collected at baseline, midpoint, and endpoint evaluations, and by the Improvement Score of the Clinical Global Impressions Scale assigned by an independent evaluator (blinded rater). Subjects will also perform a frustration-induction Go-NoGo task and a task of emotional face perception during fMRI scanning and EEG recording at baseline and endpoint. Results: Consistent with the NIMH strategic research priorities, if functional neuroimaging and EEG variables can identify subjects who respond to CBT for aggression, this can provide a neuroscience-based classification scheme that will improve treatment outcomes for children and adolescents with aggressive behavior. Conclusions: Demonstrating that a change in the key nodes of the emotion regulation circuitry is associated with a reduction of reactive aggression will provide evidence to support the validity of the frustrative non-reward construct. PMID:26784537

  12. Antibiotic Resistance

    MedlinePlus

    ... For Consumers Consumer Information by Audience For Women Antibiotic Resistance Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... these products really help. To Learn More about Antibiotic Resistance Get Smart About Antibiotics (Video) Fact Sheets ...

  13. Infusional etoposide, cyclophosphamide, vincristine, doxorubicin, and prednisone +/- rituximab as first-line therapy for aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Lamar, Zanetta S.; Fino, Nora; Palmer, Jodi; Gruber, Lindsey; Morris, Bonny B.; RaetskayaSolntseva, Olga; Kennedy, LeAnne; Vaidya, Rakhee; Hurd, David; Zamkoff, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Dose-adjusted etoposide, prednisone, vincristine, cyclophosphamide and doxorubicin (DA-EPOCH) was developed in an effort to overcome inadequate drug concentrations and to compensate for increased drug clearance. The goal of this study was to examine risk factors and outcomes in patients with aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma (aNHL) treated with DA-EPOCH. Patients and Methods We report 136 patients with previously untreated aNHL treated with infusional DA-EPOCH chemotherapy +/- rituximab from 2005-2013. Overall survival was estimated by Kaplan Meier methods. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression was used to determine factors associated with experiencing death, progression, or relapse at two years. Results The overall response rate was 82%. Relapse-free survival at 1, 3, and 5 years was 68%, 63%, and 52% with 95% CIs [0.59,0.85], [0.54,0.70], and [0.31,0.70], respectively. Patients with T-cell aNHL had increased risk of death, progression or relapse [OR:3.5, 95% CI: 1.4, 8.8] compared to those with B-cell aNHL. In multivariate analysis, current smoking, disease in the bone marrow and number of cycles completed were independent predictors of death or relapse. Conclusion Our data suggests EPOCH+/-R is active in both B and T-cell aNHL. Toxicity did not significantly delay treatment or negatively impact outcomes. Dose adjustment by hematopoietic nadir had no impact on outcomes. The impact of smoking during chemotherapy should be further evaluated. PMID:26725264

  14. [Initial antibiotic therapy in maternal-fetal infections which include ampicillin even in countries where listeriosis is an incidental disease].

    PubMed

    Boukadida, J; Taher, N Bel Hadj; Seket, B; Monastiri, K; Salem, N; Snoussi, N

    2002-06-01

    Neonatal listeriosis is an exceptional disease in Northern Africa. Hence, protocols for maternal-fetal infection treatment include only a third generation cephalosporin and an aminoside. This protocol does not take into account the possibility of Listeria monocytogenes infection. We report a fatal case of neonatal listeriosis in Tunisia. The use of first antibiotics in maternal-foetal infection must be reconsidered when lacking sufficient bacteriological data and include systematically ampicillin in presumptive antibiotic protocols.

  15. Implementation of a Computerized Decision Support System to Improve the Appropriateness of Antibiotic Therapy Using Local Microbiologic Data

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Maresca, Manuel; Sorlozano, Antonio; Grau, Magnolia; Rodriguez-Castaño, Rocio; Ruiz-Valverde, Andres; Gutierrez-Fernandez, Jose

    2014-01-01

    A prospective quasi-experimental study was undertaken in 218 patients with suspicion of nosocomial infection hospitalized in a polyvalent ICU where a new electronic device (GERB) has been designed for antibiotic prescriptions. Two GERB-based applications were developed to provide local resistance maps (LRMs) and preliminary microbiological reports with therapeutic recommendation (PMRTRs). Both applications used the data in the Laboratory Information System of the Microbiology Department to report on the optimal empiric therapeutic option, based on the most likely susceptibility profile of the microorganisms potentially responsible for infection in patients and taking into account the local epidemiology of the hospital department/unit. LRMs were used for antibiotic prescription in 20.2% of the patients and PMRTRs in 78.2%, and active antibiotics against the finally identified bacteria were prescribed in 80.0% of the former group and 82.4% of the latter. When neither LMRs nor PMRTRs were considered for empiric treatment prescription, only around 40% of the antibiotics prescribed were active. Hence, the percentage appropriateness of the empiric antibiotic treatments was significantly higher when LRM or PMRTR guidelines were followed rather than other criteria. LRMs and PMRTRs applications are dynamic, highly accessible, and readily interpreted instruments that contribute to the appropriateness of empiric antibiotic treatments. PMID:25197643

  16. Effect of intrauterine dextrose or antibiotic therapy on reproductive performance of lactating dairy cows diagnosed with clinical endometritis.

    PubMed

    Brick, T A; Schuenemann, G M; Bas, S; Daniels, J B; Pinto, C R; Rings, D M; Rajala-Schultz, P J

    2012-04-01

    . Pregnancy per AI from DEX (29.8±4%) cows tended to differ from that of CON (21.1±4%) or CCFA cows (19.7±4%), but it resulted in similar P/AI as those cows without CE (39.1±2%). The use of intrauterine DEX alone or as an adjunct of antibiotic therapy for the treatment of CE needs further investigation.

  17. Multiple Genetic Analysis System-Based Antibiotic Susceptibility Testing in Helicobacter pylori and High Eradication Rate With Phenotypic Resistance-Guided Quadruple Therapy.

    PubMed

    Dong, Fangyuan; Ji, Danian; Huang, Renxiang; Zhang, Fan; Huang, Yiqin; Xiang, Ping; Kong, Mimi; Nan, Li; Zeng, Xianping; Wu, Yong; Bao, Zhijun

    2015-11-01

    Antibiotics resistance in Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is the major factor for eradication failure. Molecular tests including fluorescence in situ hybridization, PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism, and dual priming oligonucleotide-PCR (DPO-PCR) play critical roles in the detection of antibiotic susceptibility; however, limited knowledge is known about application of multiple genetic analysis system (MGAS) in the area of H. pylori identification and antibiotics resistance detection.The aim of this study is to determine the antibiotics resistance using different molecular tests and evaluate the treatment outcomes of E-test-based genotypic resistance.A total of 297 patients with dyspepsia complaint were recruited for gastroscopies. Ninety patients with H. pylori culture positive were randomly divided into 2 groups (test group and control group). E-test, general PCR, and MGAS assay were performed in test group. Patients in control group were treated with empirical therapy (rabeprazole + bismuth potassium citrate + amoxicillin [AMX] + clarithromycin [CLR]), whereas patients in test group received quadruple therapy based on E-test results twice daily for 14 consecutive days. The eradication effect of H. pylori was confirmed by C-urea breath test after at least 4 weeks when treatment was finished.Rapid urease test showed 46.5% (128/297) patients with H. pylori infection, whereas 30.3% (90/297) patients were H. pylori culture positive. E-test showed that H. pylori primary resistance rate to CLR, AMX, metronidazole, tetracycline, and levofloxacin (LVX) was 40.0% (18/45), 4.4% (2/45), 53.3% (24/45), 0% (0/45), and 55.6% (25/45), respectively. In addition, there are many multidrug resistant (MDR) phenotypes, and the MDR strains have higher minimum inhibitory concentration than their single-drug resistant counterparts. Considering E-test as the reference test, the sensitivities of general PCR and MGAS in detecting CLR resistance were 83.3% (15/18) and 94.4% (17

  18. [Antibiotics in primary care].

    PubMed

    Steciwko, Andrzej; Lubieniecka, Małgorzata; Muszyńska, Agnieszka

    2011-05-01

    Discovered in the forties of the twentieth century antimicrobial agents have changed the world. Currently, due to their overuse, we are threatened by the increasing resistance of bacteria to antibiotics, and soon we may face a threat of inability to fight these pathogens. For that reason, the world, European and national organizations introduce antibiotics protection programs. In Poland since 2004, the National Program of Protection of Antibiotics is being held. The concept of rational antibiotic therapy is associated not only with the appropriate choice of therapy or antimicrobial dosage but also with a reduction in costs associated with a refund of medicines. Antibiotics are prescribed mostly by primary care physicians (GP), and about one fifth of visits to family doctor's office ends with prescribing antimicrobial drug. These trends are probably related to both the difficulty in applying the differential diagnosis of viral and bacterial infection in a primary care doctor's office, as well as patient's conviction about the effectiveness of antibiotic therapy in viral infections. However, although patients often want to influence the therapeutic decisions and ask their doctor for prescribing antimicrobial drug, the right conversation with a doctor alone is the critical component in satisfaction with medical care. Many countries have established standards to clarify the indications for use of antibiotics and thereby reduce their consumption. The next step is to monitor the prescribing and use of these drugs and to assess the rise of drug resistance in the area. In Poland, the recommendations regarding outpatient respiratory tract infections treatment were published and usage of antimicrobial agents monitoring has begun. However, lack of publications covering a broad analysis of antibiotic therapy and drug resistance on Polish territory is still a problem. Modem medicine has yet another tool in the fight against bacteria--they are bacteriophages. Phage therapy is

  19. Suicide plus immune gene therapy prevents post-surgical local relapse and increases overall survival in an aggressive mouse melanoma setting.

    PubMed

    Villaverde, Marcela S; Combe, Kristell; Duchene, Adriana G; Wei, Ming X; Glikin, Gerardo C; Finocchiaro, Liliana M E

    2014-09-01

    In an aggressive B16-F10 murine melanoma model, we evaluated the effectiveness and antitumor mechanisms triggered by a surgery adjuvant treatment that combined a local suicide gene therapy (SG) with a subcutaneous genetic vaccine (Vx) composed of B16-F10 cell extracts and lipoplexes carrying the genes of human interleukin-2 and murine granulocyte and macrophage colony stimulating factor. Pre-surgical SG treatment, neither alone nor combined with Vx was able to slow down the fast evolution of this tumor. After surgery, both SG and SG + Vx treatments, significantly prevented (in 50% of mice) or delayed (in the remaining 50%) post-surgical recurrence, as well as significantly prolonged recurrence-free (SG and SG + Vx) and overall median survival (SG + Vx). The treatment induced the generation of a pseudocapsule wrapping and separating the tumor from surrounding host tissue. Both, SG and the subcutaneous Vx, induced this envelope that was absent in the control group. On the other hand, PET scan imaging of the SG + Vx group suggested the development of an effective systemic immunostimulation that enhanced (18)FDG accrual in the thymus, spleen and vertebral column. When combined with surgery, direct intralesional injection of suicide gene plus distal subcutaneous genetic vaccine displayed efficacy and systemic antitumor immune response without host toxicity. This suggests the potential value of the assayed approach for clinical purposes.

  20. Combinatory antibiotic therapy increases rate of bacterial kill but not final outcome in a novel mouse model of Staphylococcus aureus spinal implant infection

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yan; Johansen, Daniel; Loftin, Amanda H.; Dworsky, Erik; Zoller, Stephen D.; Park, Howard Y.; Hamad, Christopher D.; Nelson, George E.; Francis, Kevin P.; Scaduto, Anthony; Bernthal, Nicholas M.

    2017-01-01

    Background Management of spine implant infections (SII) are challenging. Explantation of infected spinal hardware can destabilize the spine, but retention can lead to cord compromise and biofilm formation, complicating management. While vancomycin monotherapy is commonly used, in vitro studies have shown reduced efficacy against biofilm compared to combination therapy with rifampin. Using an established in vivo mouse model of SII, we aim to evaluate whether combination therapy has increased efficacy compared to both vancomycin alone and infected controls. Methods An L-shaped, Kirschner-wire was transfixed into the L4 spinous process of 12-week-old C57BL/6 mice, and inoculated with bioluminescent Staphylococcus aureus. Mice were randomized into a vancomycin group, a combination group with vancomycin plus rifampin, or a control group receiving saline. Treatment began on post-operative day (POD) 7 and continued through POD 14. In vivo imaging was performed to monitor bioluminescence for 35 days. Colony-forming units (CFUs) were cultured on POD 35. Results Bioluminescence peaked around POD 7 for all groups. The combination group had a 10-fold decrease in signal by POD 10. The vancomycin and control groups reached similar levels on POD 17 and 21, respectively. On POD 25 the combination group dropped below baseline, but rebounded to the same level as the other groups, demonstrating a biofilm-associated infection by POD 35. Quantification of CFUs on POD 35 confirmed an ongoing infection in all three groups. Conclusions Although both therapies were initially effective, they were not able to eliminate implant biofilm bacteria, resulting in a rebound infection after antibiotic cessation. This model shows, for the first time, why histologic-based, static assessments of antimicrobials can be misleading, and the importance of longitudinal tracking of infection. Future studies can use this model to test combinations of antibiotic therapies to see if they are more effective in

  1. Biofilms and antibiotic therapy: is there a role for combating bacterial resistance by the use of novel drug delivery systems?

    PubMed

    Smith, Anthony W

    2005-07-29

    The conventional view of antibiotic resistance is one where bacteria exhibit significantly reduced susceptibility to antimicrobials in laboratory tests by mechanisms such as altered drug uptake, altered drug target and drug inactivation. Whilst these mechanisms undoubtedly make a major contribution to antibiotic failure in the clinic, the phenomenon of clinical failure in spite of sensitivity in laboratory tests is also well recognised. It is in this context that attention has focussed on bacteria growing as adherent biofilms, not only as the mode of growth of device-related infections associated for example with artificial joints and venous catheters, but also with other chronic infections such as those occurring in the respiratory tract. Growth as a biofilm almost always leads to a significant decrease in susceptibility to antimicrobial agents compared with cultures grown in suspension and, whilst there is no generally agreed mechanism for the resistance of biofilm bacteria, it is largely phenotypic. That is, when biofilm bacteria are grown in conventional laboratory suspension culture they become susceptible to antimicrobials. A number of elements in the process of biofilm formation have been studied as targets for novel drug delivery technologies. These include surface modification of devices to reduce bacterial attachment and biofilm development as well as incorporation of antimicrobials-again to prevent colonisation. Electrical approaches have been used either to release antimicrobials from device surfaces or to drive antimicrobials through the biofilm. Other technologies not specifically focussed on biofilms include aerosolized delivery of antibiotics to the lung and formulation into liposome and polymer-based vehicles. Liposomal systems have been widely studied, either to target antibiotics to the surface of bacterial biofilms, or by virtue of their property of being taken up cells of the reticuloendothelial system, to target antibiotics towards

  2. Long term antibiotic therapy may be an effective treatment for children co-morbid with Lyme disease and autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Mason; Grave, Shannon; Bransfield, Robert; Harris, Steven

    2012-05-01

    Patients diagnosed with Lyme disease share many of the same physical manifestations as those diagnosed with an Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). In this study four male children (ages 26-55 months) who have an ASD diagnosis and one male child (age -O meets state and federal requirements for providing a comprehensive, ongoing assessment of a child with an ASD [33]. The SAP-O form measures children's abilities using observational, authentic assessment procedures in the domains of joint attention, symbol use, mutual regulation, and self regulation via observations of specific behaviors in familiar settings [33]. The five children tested positive for Lyme disease and their SAP-O score was evaluated before and after 6 months of antibiotic therapy. Each child was prescribed 200mg of amoxicillin three times per day and three of the five children were prescribed an additional 50mg of Azithromycin once per day. All of the children's scores on the SAP-O assessment improved after 6 months of antibiotic therapy. The assessors also reported anecdotal data of improved speech, eye contact, sleep behaviors, and a reduction of repetitive behaviors.

  3. Chitosan coating to enhance the therapeutic efficacy of calcium sulfate-based antibiotic therapy in the treatment of chronic osteomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Beenken, Karen E; Smith, James K; Skinner, Robert A; Mclaren, Sandra G; Bellamy, William; Gruenwald, M Johannes; Spencer, Horace J; Jennings, Jessica A; Haggard, Warren O; Smeltzer, Mark S

    2014-10-01

    We demonstrate that coating calcium sulfate with deacetylated chitosan enhances the elution profile of daptomycin by prolonging the period during which high concentrations of antibiotic are released. Coatings reduced initial bolus release of daptomycin by a factor of 10 to approximately 1000 µg/ml, and levels remained above 100 µg/ml for up to 10 days. Chitosan-coated and uncoated calcium sulfate implants with and without 15% daptomycin were evaluated in an experimental model of staphylococcal osteomyelitis through bacteriology scores, radiology, histopathology, and Gram staining. Significant reduction in bacteriology scores was observed for implants containing daptomycin and coated with chitosan compared with all the other groups. We confirm that the use of chitosan-coated calcium sulfate beads for local antibiotic delivery can be correlated with an improved therapeutic outcome following surgical debridement in the treatment of chronic osteomyelitis.

  4. The in vitro and vivo effects of nuclear and cytosolic parafibromin expression on the aggressive phenotypes of colorectal cancer cells: a search of potential gene therapy target.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hua-Chuan; Liu, Jia-Jie; Li, Jing; Wu, Ji-Cheng; Yang, Lei; Zhao, Gui-Feng; Zhao, Xin; Jiang, Hua-Mao; Huang, Ke-Qiang; Li, Zhi-Jie

    2017-02-16

    Down-regulated parafibromin is positively linked to the pathogenesis of parathyroid, lung, breast, ovarian, gastric and colorectal cancers. Here, we found that wild-type (WT) parafibromin overexpression suppressed proliferation, tumor growth, induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in colorectal cancer cells (p<0.05), but it was the converse for mutant-type (MT, mutation in nucleus localization sequence) parafibromin (p<0.05). Both WT and MT transfectants inhibited migration and invasion, and caused better differentiation (p<0.05) of cancer cells. WT parafibromin transfectants showed the overexpression of Cyclin B1, Cyclin D1, Cyclin E, p38, p53, and AIF in HCT-15 and HCT-116 cells, while MT parafibromin only up-regulated p38 expression. There was lower mRNA expression of bcl-2 in parafibromin transfectants than the control and mock, while higher expression of c-myc, Cyclin D1, mTOR, and Raptor. According to transcriptomic analysis, WT parafibromin suppressed PI3K-Akt and FoxO signaling pathways, while MT one promoted PI3K-Akt pathway, focal adhesion, and regulation of actin cytoskeleton. Parafibromin was less expressed in colorectal cancer than paired mucosa (p<0.05), and inversely correlated with its differentiation at both mRNA and protein levels (p<0.05). These findings indicated that WT parafibromin might reverse the aggressive phenotypes of colorectal cancer cells and be employed as a target for gene therapy. Down-regulated parafibromin expression might be closely linked to colorectal carcinogenesis and cancer differentiation.

  5. Should aggressive thoracic therapy be performed in patients with synchronous oligometastatic non-small cell lung cancer? A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dianhe; Wang, Haofei; Qiu, Min; Li, Na

    2017-01-01

    Background We performed a meta-analysis to compare overall survival (OS) outcomes in patients with synchronous oligometastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who underwent aggressive thoracic therapy (ATT) with those who did not. Methods A systematic review of controlled trials of ATT on survival in synchronous oligometastatic NSCLC was conducted. Hazard ratio (HR) for the main endpoint OS was pooled using a fixed-effects model. Subgroup analysis was performed in patients with single organ metastases, or with different numbers of brain metastases, or with different stages of thoracic disease. Pooled survival curves of OS were constructed. Results Seven eligible retrospective observational cohort studies were identified including 668 synchronous oligometastatic NSCLC patients, of whom 227 (34.0%) received ATT. For patients with synchronous oligometastatic NSCLC, ATT was associated with a significant improvement of OS (HR, 0.48; 95% CI, 0.39–0.60; P<0.00001). In subgroup analysis, the association with OS was similar or even strengthened, with a HR of 0.42 (95% CI, 0.31–0.56) in single organ metastases group, 0.49 (95% CI, 0.31–0.75) in solitary brain metastasis group, and 0.38 (95% CI, 0.20–0.73) in thoracic stage I–II group, respectively. The pooled cumulative survival rates for patients received ATT were 74.9% at 1 year, 52.1% at 2 years, 23.0% at 3 years, and 12.6% at 4 years. The corresponding pooled survival for patients who did not receive ATT were 32.3%, 13.7%, 3.7%, and 2.0%, respectively. Conclusions Survival benefit from ATT is common in synchronous oligometastatic patients. Selected patients with synchronous oligometastatic NSCLC could also achieve long-term survival with ATT. PMID:28275479

  6. Antibiotic Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... resistance develops, the antibiotic is not able to kill the germs causing the infection. Your infection may ... to vaginal yeast infections. This happens because antibiotics kill the normal bacteria in the vagina and this ...

  7. Chronic lung infection by Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm is cured by L-Methionine in combination with antibiotic therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gnanadhas, Divya Prakash; Elango, Monalisha; Datey, Akshay; Chakravortty, Dipshikha

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms are associated with 80–90% of infections. Within the biofilm, bacteria are refractile to antibiotics, requiring concentrations >1,000 times the minimum inhibitory concentration. Proteins, carbohydrates and DNA are the major components of biofilm matrix. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) biofilms, which are majorly associated with chronic lung infection, contain extracellular DNA (eDNA) as a major component. Herein, we report for the first time that L-Methionine (L-Met) at 0.5 μM inhibits Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) biofilm formation and disassembles established PA biofilm by inducing DNase expression. Four DNase genes (sbcB, endA, eddB and recJ) were highly up-regulated upon L-Met treatment along with increased DNase activity in the culture supernatant. Since eDNA plays a major role in establishing and maintaining the PA biofilm, DNase activity is effective in disrupting the biofilm. Upon treatment with L-Met, the otherwise recalcitrant PA biofilm now shows susceptibility to ciprofloxacin. This was reflected in vivo, in the murine chronic PA lung infection model. Mice treated with L-Met responded better to antibiotic treatment, leading to enhanced survival as compared to mice treated with ciprofloxacin alone. These results clearly demonstrate that L-Met can be used along with antibiotic as an effective therapeutic against chronic PA biofilm infection. PMID:26521707

  8. Adlerian Therapy with Aggressive Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kizer, Betty

    Alfred Adler devised a theory that was holistic, social, teleological, and phenomenological. Adler believed that the basis of problems with children originated in the child's inability to cooperate with society, feelings of inferiority, and a lack of a goal in life. Adler felt the child's life should be examined through the child's eyes.…

  9. Tigecycline Therapy for Nosocomial Pneumonia due to Carbapenem-Resistant Gram-Negative Bacteria in Critically Ill Patients Who Received Inappropriate Initial Antibiotic Treatment: A Retrospective Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yefei; Chen, Qiuying; Gong, Liuyang; Lin, Jian; Lv, Dongqing; Feng, Jiaxi

    2016-01-01

    Background. Nosocomial pneumonia due to carbapenem-resistant Gram-negative bacteria (CRGNB) is a growing concern because treatment options are limited and the mortality rate is high. The effect of tigecycline (TGC) on nosocomial pneumonia due to CRGNB in patients who have received inappropriate initial empiric antibiotic treatment (IIAT) is unclear. Therefore, this study aimed to examine the effect of TGC on nosocomial pneumonia due to CRGNB in critically ill patients who had received IIAT. Methods. A retrospective study was conducted in an adult respiratory intensive care unit. Data were obtained and analyzed for all patients who were treated with TGC ≥ 3 days for microbiologically confirmed nosocomial pneumonia due to CRGNB and had experienced initial antibiotic failure. Clinical and microbiological outcomes were investigated. Results. Thirty-one patients with hospital-acquired pneumonia or ventilator-associated pneumonia were included in the study. The majority of the responsible organisms were carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (67.7%), followed by Klebsiella pneumoniae (16.1%) and Escherichia coli (9.7%). Twenty patients were treated with high-dose TGC therapy (100 mg every 12 h after a 200 mg loading dose), and the others received a standard-dose therapy (50 mg every 12 h after a 100 mg loading dose). The duration of TGC therapy was 14.3 ± 2.8 days. The global clinical cure rate and the microbiological eradication rate were 48.4% and 61.3%, respectively. The overall ICU mortality rate was 45.2%. A higher score on the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II and a longer duration of IIAT were associated with clinical failure. High-dose TGC therapy had a higher clinical success rate [65.0% (13/20) versus 18.2% (2/11), P = 0.023] and a lower ICU mortality rate [30.0% (6/20) versus 72.7% (8/11), P = 0.031] than the standard-dose therapy. Conclusions. TGC, especially a high-dose regimen, might be a justifiable option for

  10. Resistance-resistant antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Oldfield, Eric; Feng, Xinxin

    2014-12-01

    New antibiotics are needed because drug resistance is increasing while the introduction of new antibiotics is decreasing. We discuss here six possible approaches to develop 'resistance-resistant' antibiotics. First, multitarget inhibitors in which a single compound inhibits more than one target may be easier to develop than conventional combination therapies with two new drugs. Second, inhibiting multiple targets in the same metabolic pathway is expected to be an effective strategy owing to synergy. Third, discovering multiple-target inhibitors should be possible by using sequential virtual screening. Fourth, repurposing existing drugs can lead to combinations of multitarget therapeutics. Fifth, targets need not be proteins. Sixth, inhibiting virulence factor formation and boosting innate immunity may also lead to decreased susceptibility to resistance. Although it is not possible to eliminate resistance, the approaches reviewed here offer several possibilities for reducing the effects of mutations and, in some cases, suggest that sensitivity to existing antibiotics may be restored in otherwise drug-resistant organisms.

  11. Therapy of acne.

    PubMed

    Olsen, T G

    1982-07-01

    Today acne vulgaris is a disease which can be well controlled using a combination of topical, systemic, and physical therapeutic modalities. However, successful acne management depends to a large extent on physician interest and the ability of the physician to apply therapy to the evolutionary stage of the disease and to the disturbed pathogenetic mechanisms. It is this author's opinion that grades I and II comedonal and papulopustular acne can be effectively treated solely with topical preparations, particularly the concurrent use of tretinoin with benzoyl peroxide or topical antibiotics. The majority of patients with grades III and IV inflammatory disease require oral antibiotics in addition to aggressive topical treatments. Intralesional steroids can be effective in all grades of acne when lesions develop an inflammatory nodulocystic quality. The physician should consider the use of estrogen (in females) or oral vitamin A in the small group of patients with grades III and IV inflammatory-cystic acne that has been unresponsive to conventional therapy. Combined systemic therapies of high-dose antibiotics, systemic corticosteroids, and sulfones clearly take precedence over topical preparations in conglobate acne and acne fulminans. Finally, oral isotretinoin, alone and perhaps in combination with more conventional modalities, should play an important role in the future management of severe inflammatory-cystic acne.

  12. Low in vitro third-body wear on total hip prostheses induced by calcium sulphate used for local antibiotic therapy.

    PubMed

    Heuberger, R; Wahl, P; Krieg, J; Gautier, E

    2014-10-23

    In case of implant associated infection, implant preservation is associated with high failure rates. Therefore, a removal or exchange of the implant is most often mandatory for treatment success. Alternatively, under certain conditions, local antibiotic delivery can be applied - preserving the implant, using for example calcium sulphate as a resorbable carrier. In this work, third-body wear on total hip prostheses caused by calcium sulphate particles was tested in a hip simulator. Inlays made of ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) and cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE) against 28 mm CoCrMo heads and 36 mm alumina pairings were tested in triplicate, both with and without calcium sulphate particles in the test liquid. Neither the alumina articulations nor the CoCrMo heads were affected by the calcium sulphate particles since calcium sulphate is a relatively soft material. The polyethylene inlays showed 39-89 % higher wear during exposure compared to references, but wear returned to normal when no more particles were added. Thus, calcium sulphate might be used as antibiotic carrier even in the presence of total hip prostheses without fearing excessive third-body wear.

  13. Comparative Outcome Analysis of Penicillin-Based Versus Fluoroquinolone-Based Antibiotic Therapy for Community-Acquired Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chi-Chuan; Lin, Chia-Hui; Lin, Kuan-Yin; Chuang, Yu-Chung; Sheng, Wang-Huei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a common but potentially life-threatening condition, but limited information exists on the effectiveness of fluoroquinolones compared to β-lactams in outpatient settings. We aimed to compare the effectiveness and outcomes of penicillins versus respiratory fluoroquinolones for CAP at outpatient clinics. This was a claim-based retrospective cohort study. Patients aged 20 years or older with at least 1 new pneumonia treatment episode were included, and the index penicillin or respiratory fluoroquinolone therapies for a pneumonia episode were at least 5 days in duration. The 2 groups were matched by propensity scores. Cox proportional hazard models were used to compare the rates of hospitalizations/emergence service visits and 30-day mortality. A logistic model was used to compare the likelihood of treatment failure between the 2 groups. After propensity score matching, 2622 matched pairs were included in the final model. The likelihood of treatment failure of fluoroquinolone-based therapy was lower than that of penicillin-based therapy (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 0.88; 95% confidence interval [95%CI], 0.77–0.99), but no differences were found in hospitalization/emergence service (ES) visits (adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 1.27; 95% CI, 0.92–1.74) and 30-day mortality (adjusted HR, 0.69; 95% CI, 0.30–1.62) between the 2 groups. The likelihood of treatment failure of fluoroquinolone-based therapy was lower than that of penicillin-based therapy for CAP on an outpatient clinic basis. However, this effect may be marginal. Further investigation into the comparative effectiveness of these 2 treatment options is warranted. PMID:26871827

  14. Catheter-associated and nosocomial urinary tract infections: antibiotic resistance and influence on commonly used antimicrobial therapy.

    PubMed

    Milan, Potic B; Ivan, Ignjatovic M

    2009-01-01

    The objective is to evaluate resistance between community-acquired urinary tract infections (CAUTI), nosocomialy-acquired urinary tract infections (NAUTI), and empirical therapy adequacy. E. coli is the predominant pathogen of both CAUTI and NAUTI, followed by Klebsiella spp. in NAUTI and Pseudomonas spp. in catheter-associated urinary tract infections. The highest level of general resistance was found among isolates of NAUTI and catheter-associated UTI followed by CAUTI isolates. Absolute or high level resistance for commonly used empirical antimicrobial therapy was found in catheter-associated UTI and NAUTI while resistance among CAUTI was respectable. Patients with NAUTI as well as patients with catheter-associated urinary tract infections have similar resistance and similar microorganisms isolated as a causative agents, and should not be empirically treated unless the clinical emergency requests.

  15. Hyperpolarized 13C MR Markers of Renal Tumor Aggressiveness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    reliably distinguish renal cancer aggressiveness for optimal triage of therapies . Hyperpolarized (HP) 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI...reliably distinguish renal cancer aggressiveness for optimal triage of therapies . Hyperpolarized (HP) 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) is... cancer and normal tissues were obtained from nephrectomy specimens and sliced using Krumdieck slicer. With a precision gauge micrometer, the slice

  16. AGGRESSIVE TREATMENT OF SPONTANEOUS PNEUMOTHORAX

    PubMed Central

    Hecker, Sydney P.; Jamplis, Robert W.; Mitchell, Sidney P.

    1962-01-01

    In analysis of the results of treatment of 48 episodes of spontaneous pneumothorax, aggressive treatment by means of closed intercostal drainage with constant suction was found to achieve the aims of therapy more effectively than conservative measures of bed rest with or without needle aspiration. In general, full expansion of the lung was more quickly restored, recurrence was of lesser incidence, the period in hospital was shorter and the time away from work was reduced. ImagesFigure 1. PMID:13905846

  17. Long-term follow-up of tandem high-dose therapy with autologous stem cell support for adults with high-risk age-adjusted international prognostic index aggressive non-Hodgkin Lymphomas: a GOELAMS pilot study.

    PubMed

    Monjanel, Hélène; Deconinck, Eric; Perrodeau, Elodie; Gastinne, Thomas; Delwail, Vincent; Moreau, Anne; François, Sylvie; Berthou, Christian; Gyan, Emmanuel; Milpied, Noël

    2011-06-01

    Single high-dose therapy (HDT) followed by autologous peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) support improves complete response and overall survival (OS) in untreated aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). However, patients with a high age-adjusted international prognostic index (aa-IPI equal to 3) still have poor clinical outcome despite high dose intensity regimen. To improve complete response in this subgroup, the French Groupe Ouest-Est des Leucémies et Autres Maladies du Sang (GOELAMS) conducted a pilot phase II trial (073) evaluating tandem HDT with PBSC support in a series of 45 patients with aa-IPI equal to 3 untreated aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. After induction with an anthracyclin-containing regimen, responders underwent tandem HDT conditioned by high-dose mitoxantrone plus cytarabine for the first HDT and total-body irradiation (TBI), carmustine, etoposide, and cyclophosphamide for the second HDT. Thirty-one patients out of 41 evaluable patients completed the program. There were 4 toxic deaths. The complete response rate was 49%. With a median follow-up of 114 months for surviving patients, the OS was 51%, and 19 out of the 22 patients (86%) who reached a complete response are alive and relapse-free. Recent prospective evaluation of quality of life and comorbidities of surviving patients does not reveal long-term toxicities of the procedure. In the era of monoclonal antibodies and response-adapted therapy, the role of tandem HDT still need to be determined.

  18. Aggression in Huntington's disease: a systematic review of rates of aggression and treatment methods.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Caroline A; Sewell, Katherine; Brown, Anahita; Churchyard, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Aggression is commonly reported in individuals with Huntington's disease (HD). While correlating factors for aggression are often speculated about, features that are associated with, and contribute to, aggression in this population have not been clearly determined. This systematic review investigates rates of aggression and treatment options for aggression in HD. A number of key findings were revealed. Studies reporting on rates of aggression revealed that its prevalence is high, falling between 22 and 66 percent in the majority of studies. Aggression may be more common in males with HD, and is also found in higher rates in individuals who experience frequent falls, have obsessive-compulsive symptoms and suicidal ideation. There is little research investigating antecedents for aggression in HD. A wide variety of psychotropic medications have been reported in the literature to treat individuals with HD and aggressive behaviour. However, due to methodological limitations, no treatment recommendations can be made, based on the current literature. Two non-medication therapies have been investigated, behaviour support and sensory modulation intervention. However, again, due to methodological limitations with these studies, further research is needed before they can be recommended as frontline interventions. This review highlights the need for further methodologically rigorous studies investigating the treatment of aggression in HD.

  19. Alcohol and Aggression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gustafson, Roland

    1994-01-01

    Reviews the acute effects of alcohol on aggressive responding. From experimental studies that use human subjects, it is concluded that a moderate dose of alcohol does not increase aggression if subjects are unprovoked. Under provocative situations, aggression is increased as a function of alcohol intoxication, provided that subjects are restricted…

  20. Daptomycin antibiotic lock therapy for hemodialysis patients with Gram-positive bloodstream infections following use of tunneled, cuffed hemodialysis catheters: retrospective single center analysis.

    PubMed

    Yen, Hung-Wen; Yang, Wu-Chang; Tarng, Der-Cherng; Yang, Chih-Yu; Chuang, Chiao-Lin; Huang, Ling-Ju; Lin, Pei-Yu; Wang, Chih-Chun; Li, Szu-Yuan

    2016-04-01

    Catheter-related blood stream infection (CRBSI) is a major complication in hemodialysis patients. We assessed the efficacy of systemic daptomycin (DPT) plus DPT antibiotic lock therapy (DPT-ALT) for catheter salvage in patients with Gram-positive CRBSIs. This is a retrospective study of hemodialysis patients with tunneled and cuffed hemodialysis catheters. All patients were from a single institution in Taipei and received systemic DPT plus DPT-ALT for the treatment of Gram-positive CRBSI. Successful resolution of CRBSI was implemented. Resolution of fever within 48 hours, negative result of repeated blood cultures after resolution of fever, no clinical evidence of CRBSI relapse and no need for catheter removal were measured. Fifteen hemodialysis patients received DPT-ALT for CRBSI, nine with coagulase-negative Staphylococcus (CONS), two with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), three with methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) and one with polymicrobial infections. Systemic DPT plus DPT-ALT cured 11 patients (73.3%). Treatment failed in all three MRSA cases (two with MRSA and one with MRSA + Enterococcus faecalis). Retrospective design and small sample size were the limitations of this study. Systemic DPT plus DPT-ALT appears to be a promising treatment for CRBSI from CONS and MSSA, but not for MRSA CRBSI. Systemic DPT plus DPT-ALT should be considered for patients with CRBSIs caused by certain species.

  1. A Pilot Trial of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy Augmentation of Antibiotic Treatment in Youth with Pediatric Acute-Onset Neuropsychiatric Syndrome-Related Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Cary; Selles, Robert R.; Wu, Monica S.; King, Morgan A.; Patel, Priyal D.; Hanks, Camille E.; Arnold, Elysse B.; Lewin, Adam B.; Murphy, Tanya K.; Storch, Eric A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: This study reports an open trial of family-based cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) in children and adolescents with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) exhibiting an onset pattern consistent with pediatric acute-onset neuropsychiatric syndrome (PANS). Methods: Eleven primarily Caucasian youth with PANS-related OCD (range=4–14 years; 6 boys) who were incomplete responders to antibiotic treatment, received family-based CBT delivered either face-to-face or via web camera. Results: All participants completing treatment (8 of 8) were considered improved at posttreatment, and average obsessive-compulsive symptom severity was reduced by 49%. Significant reductions in obsessive-compulsive symptom severity and in clinician- and parent-rated OCD-related impairment were noted. Reductions in parent- and child-rated anxiety, child-rated OCD-related impairment, and comorbid neuropsychiatric symptoms were not statistically significant. Conclusions: Gains were maintained at follow-up, with 100% (6 of 6) of those assessed remaining improved. Implications for treatment and further research are discussed. PMID:25978743

  2. Use of 16S rRNA sequencing and quantitative PCR to correlate venous leg ulcer bacterial bioburden dynamics with wound expansion, antibiotic therapy, and healing

    PubMed Central

    Sprockett, Daniel D.; Ammons, Christine G.; Tuttle, Marie S.

    2016-01-01

    Clinical diagnosis of infection in chronic wounds is currently limited to subjective clinical signs and culture-based methods that underestimate the complexity of wound microbial bioburden as revealed by DNA-based microbial identification methods. Here, we use 16S rRNA next generation sequencing and quantitative polymerase chain reaction to characterize weekly changes in bacterial load, community structure, and diversity associated with a chronic venous leg ulcer over the 15-week course of treatment and healing. Our DNA-based methods and detailed sampling scheme reveal that the bacterial bioburden of the wound is unexpectedly dynamic, including changes in the bacterial load and community structure that correlate with wound expansion, antibiotic therapy, and healing. We demonstrate that these multidimensional changes in bacterial bioburden can be summarized using swabs taken prior to debridement, and therefore, can be more easily collected serially than debridement or biopsy samples. Overall, this case illustrates the importance of detailed clinical indicators and longitudinal sampling to determine the pathogenic significance of chronic wound microbial dynamics and guide best use of antimicrobials for improvement of healing outcomes. PMID:25902876

  3. New approaches to antibiotic discovery.

    PubMed

    Kealey, C; Creaven, C A; Murphy, C D; Brady, C B

    2017-03-08

    New antibiotics are urgently required by human medicine as pathogens emerge with developed resistance to almost all antibiotic classes. Pioneering approaches, methodologies and technologies have facilitated a new era in antimicrobial discovery. Innovative culturing techniques such as iChip and co-culturing methods which use 'helper' strains to produce bioactive molecules have had notable success. Exploiting antibiotic resistance to identify antibacterial producers performed in tandem with diagnostic PCR based identification approaches has identified novel candidates. Employing powerful metagenomic mining and metabolomic tools has identified the antibiotic'ome, highlighting new antibiotics from underexplored environments and silent gene clusters enabling researchers to mine for scaffolds with both a novel mechanism of action and also few clinically established resistance determinants. Modern biotechnological approaches are delivering but will require support from government initiatives together with changes in regulation to pave the way for valuable, efficacious, highly targeted, pathogen specific antimicrobial therapies.

  4. Hearing regulates Drosophila aggression.

    PubMed

    Versteven, Marijke; Vanden Broeck, Lies; Geurten, Bart; Zwarts, Liesbeth; Decraecker, Lisse; Beelen, Melissa; Göpfert, Martin C; Heinrich, Ralf; Callaerts, Patrick

    2017-02-21

    Aggression is a universal social behavior important for the acquisition of food, mates, territory, and social status. Aggression in Drosophila is context-dependent and can thus be expected to involve inputs from multiple sensory modalities. Here, we use mechanical disruption and genetic approaches in Drosophila melanogaster to identify hearing as an important sensory modality in the context of intermale aggressive behavior. We demonstrate that neuronal silencing and targeted knockdown of hearing genes in the fly's auditory organ elicit abnormal aggression. Further, we show that exposure to courtship or aggression song has opposite effects on aggression. Our data define the importance of hearing in the control of Drosophila intermale aggression and open perspectives to decipher how hearing and other sensory modalities are integrated at the neural circuit level.

  5. Origins and evolution of antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Davies, Julian; Davies, Dorothy

    2010-09-01

    Antibiotics have always been considered one of the wonder discoveries of the 20th century. This is true, but the real wonder is the rise of antibiotic resistance in hospitals, communities, and the environment concomitant with their use. The extraordinary genetic capacities of microbes have benefitted from man's overuse of antibiotics to exploit every source of resistance genes and every means of horizontal gene transmission to develop multiple mechanisms of resistance for each and every antibiotic introduced into practice clinically, agriculturally, or otherwise. This review presents the salient aspects of antibiotic resistance development over the past half-century, with the oft-restated conclusion that it is time to act. To achieve complete restitution of therapeutic applications of antibiotics, there is a need for more information on the role of environmental microbiomes in the rise of antibiotic resistance. In particular, creative approaches to the discovery of novel antibiotics and their expedited and controlled introduction to therapy are obligatory.

  6. Antibiotic stewardship programmes and the surgeon's role.

    PubMed

    Çakmakçi, M

    2015-04-01

    Inappropriate antibiotic use is a frequent occurrence, especially in surgical units. Among the unnecessary costs of such usage are unfavourable outcomes for patients and the emergence and spread of resistant bacteria. Antibiotic stewardship programmes aim to limit the spread of antibiotic resistance by promoting thoughtful prescribing of antibiotics. Such programmes usually try to control inappropriate use of antibiotics; to optimize the choice of drug, dosing, route, and duration of therapy; to maximize clinical cure or prevention of infection; and to limit unwanted effects and excess cost. In this paper, I discuss the impact of improper use of antibiotics and outline why I believe that antibiotic stewardship is likely to be the best way of dealing with it. Engagement of surgeons in antibiotic stewardship programmes is crucial to their success.

  7. Origins and Evolution of Antibiotic Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Julian; Davies, Dorothy

    2010-01-01

    Summary: Antibiotics have always been considered one of the wonder discoveries of the 20th century. This is true, but the real wonder is the rise of antibiotic resistance in hospitals, communities, and the environment concomitant with their use. The extraordinary genetic capacities of microbes have benefitted from man's overuse of antibiotics to exploit every source of resistance genes and every means of horizontal gene transmission to develop multiple mechanisms of resistance for each and every antibiotic introduced into practice clinically, agriculturally, or otherwise. This review presents the salient aspects of antibiotic resistance development over the past half-century, with the oft-restated conclusion that it is time to act. To achieve complete restitution of therapeutic applications of antibiotics, there is a need for more information on the role of environmental microbiomes in the rise of antibiotic resistance. In particular, creative approaches to the discovery of novel antibiotics and their expedited and controlled introduction to therapy are obligatory. PMID:20805405

  8. Orthodontic Management in Aggressive Periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Gyawali, Rajesh; Bhattarai, Bhagabat

    2017-01-01

    Aggressive periodontitis is a type of periodontitis with early onset and rapid progression and mostly affecting young adults who occupy a large percentage of orthodontic patients. The role of the orthodontist is important in screening the disease, making a provisional diagnosis, and referring it to a periodontist for immediate treatment. The orthodontist should be aware of the disease not only before starting the appliance therapy, but also during and after the active mechanotherapy. The orthodontic treatment plan, biomechanics, and appliance system may need to be modified to deal with the teeth having reduced periodontal support. With proper force application and oral hygiene maintenance, orthodontic tooth movement is possible without any deleterious effect in the tooth with reduced bone support. With proper motivation and interdisciplinary approach, orthodontic treatment is possible in patients with controlled aggressive periodontitis.

  9. Orthodontic Management in Aggressive Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Bhattarai, Bhagabat

    2017-01-01

    Aggressive periodontitis is a type of periodontitis with early onset and rapid progression and mostly affecting young adults who occupy a large percentage of orthodontic patients. The role of the orthodontist is important in screening the disease, making a provisional diagnosis, and referring it to a periodontist for immediate treatment. The orthodontist should be aware of the disease not only before starting the appliance therapy, but also during and after the active mechanotherapy. The orthodontic treatment plan, biomechanics, and appliance system may need to be modified to deal with the teeth having reduced periodontal support. With proper force application and oral hygiene maintenance, orthodontic tooth movement is possible without any deleterious effect in the tooth with reduced bone support. With proper motivation and interdisciplinary approach, orthodontic treatment is possible in patients with controlled aggressive periodontitis. PMID:28299350

  10. Antibiotics and oral contraceptives.

    PubMed

    DeRossi, Scott S; Hersh, Elliot V

    2002-10-01

    With the exception of rifampin-like drugs, there is a lack of scientific evidence supporting the ability of commonly prescribed antibiotics, including all those routinely employed in outpatient dentistry, to either reduce blood levels and/or the effectiveness of oral contraceptives. To date, all clinical trials studying the effects of concomitant antibiotic therapy (with the exception of rifampin and rifabutin) have failed to demonstrate an interaction. Like all drugs, oral contraceptives are not 100% effective with the failure rate in the typical United States population reported to be as high as 3%. It is thus possible that the case reports of unintended pregnancies during antibiotic therapy may simply represent the normal failure rate of these drugs. Considering that both drug classes are prescribed frequently to women of childbearing potential, one would expect a much higher rate of oral contraceptive failure in this group of patients if a true drug:drug interaction existed. On the other hand, if the interaction does exist but is a relatively rare event, occurring in, say, 1 in 5000 women, clinical studies such as those described in this article would not detect the interaction. The pharmacokinetic studies of simultaneous antibiotic and oral contraceptive ingestion, and the retrospective studies of pregnancy rates among oral contraceptive users exposed to antibiotics, all suffer from one potential common weakness, i.e., their relatively small sample size. Sample sizes in the pharmacokinetic trials ranged from 7 to 24 participants, whereas the largest retrospective study of pregnancy rates still evaluated less than 800 total contraceptive users. Still, the incidence of such a rare interaction would not differ from the accepted normal failure rate of oral contraceptive therapy. The medico-legal ramifications of what looks like at best a rare interaction remains somewhat "murky." On one hand, we have medico-legal experts advising the profession to exercise caution

  11. Antibiotic / Antimicrobial Resistance Glossary

    MedlinePlus

    ... National Activities Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work Strategies and Plans Related CDC Education Programs Global Activities Measuring Outpatient Antibiotic Prescribing Tracking Antibiotic-Resistant ...

  12. Facts about Antibiotic Resistance

    MedlinePlus

    ... National Activities Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work Strategies and Plans Related CDC Education Programs Global Activities Measuring Outpatient Antibiotic Prescribing Tracking Antibiotic-Resistant ...

  13. Manual ventilation therapy and aggressive potassium supplementation in the management of respiratory failure secondary to severe hypokalaemia in a cat with exocrine pancreatic insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Daste, Thomas; Dossin, Olivier; Reynolds, Brice S; Aumann, Marcel

    2014-04-01

    A domestic shorthair cat was referred for progressive muscle weakness and dyspnoea. The cat had a 2-month history of severe weight loss, small intestinal diarrhoea, polyphagia and polyuria/polydipsia. Biochemical analysis and venous blood gas evaluation revealed severe hypokalaemia [1.7 mmol/l; reference interval (RI): 3.5-5.1 mmol/l] and hypoventilation (partial pressure of carbon dioxide = 68 mmHg; RI: 34-38 mmHg). Aggressive potassium supplementation was initiated. The cat was manually ventilated until serum potassium increased to 3 mmol/l. A diagnosis of exocrine pancreatic insufficiency (EPI) was made based on clinical signs and serum feline trypsin-like immunoreactivity (0.1 μg/l; RI: 12-82 μg/l). Medical management of the EPI resulted in clinical recovery.

  14. Evolutionary Rationale for Phages as Complements of Antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Torres-Barceló, Clara; Hochberg, Michael E

    2016-04-01

    Antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections are a major concern to public health. Phage therapy has been proposed as a promising alternative to antibiotics, but an increasing number of studies suggest that both of these antimicrobial agents in combination are more effective in controlling pathogenic bacteria than either alone. We advocate the use of phages in combination with antibiotics and present the evolutionary basis for our claim. In addition, we identify compelling challenges for the realistic application of phage-antibiotic combined therapy.

  15. Resistance-Resistant Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Oldfield, Eric; Feng, Xinxin

    2014-01-01

    New antibiotics are needed because as drug resistance is increasing, the introduction of new antibiotics is decreasing. Here, we discuss six possible approaches to develop ‘resistance-resistant’ antibiotics. First, multi-target inhibitors in which a single compound inhibits more than one target may be easier to develop than conventional combination therapies with two new drugs. Second, inhibiting multiple targets in the same metabolic pathway is expected to be an effective strategy due to synergy. Third, discovering multiple-target inhibitors should be possible by using sequential virtual screening. Fourth, re-purposing existing drugs can lead to combinations of multi-target therapeutics. Fifth, targets need not be proteins. Sixth, inhibiting virulence factor formation and boosting innate immunity may also lead to decreased susceptibility to resistance. Although it is not possible to eliminate resistance, the approaches reviewed here offer several possibilities for reducing the effects of mutations and in some cases suggest that sensitivity to existing antibiotics may be restored, in otherwise drug resistant organisms. PMID:25458541

  16. Antibiotic-Associated Diarrhea

    MedlinePlus

    Antibiotic-associated diarrhea Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Antibiotic-associated diarrhea refers to passing loose, watery stools ... after taking medications used to treat bacterial infections (antibiotics). Most often, antibiotic-associated diarrhea is mild and ...

  17. Successful administration of aggressive chemotherapy concomitant to tuberculostatic and highly active antiretroviral therapy in a patient with AIDS-related Burkitt's lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, C; Wyen, C; Hoffmann, C; Fätkenheuer, G

    2005-01-01

    Treatment of AIDS-related malignant lymphoma (ARL) remains a therapeutic challenge. There are concerns not only about infectious and haematological complications in HIV-infected patients during intensive chemotherapy, but also about potential interactions between chemotherapy and highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Current data on patients treated concomitantly with intensive chemotherapy and HAART are limited, and no data exist on patients with ARL suffering from active opportunistic infections. We report the case of a 38-year-old man with advanced HIV-1 infection, pulmonary tuberculosis and Burkitt's lymphoma. Intensive chemotherapy was administered in parallel with tuberculostatic therapy and HAART. Six months later, the patient achieved not only a complete remission of Burkitt's lymphoma and sustained viral suppression, but also a full recovery from tuberculosis. This case report provides some useful observations on the successful application of intensive chemotherapy in addition to tuberculostatic therapy and HAART in HIV-infected patients.

  18. Aggressive local therapy combined with systemic chemotherapy provides long-term control in grade II stage 2 canine mast cell tumour: 21 cases (1999-2012).

    PubMed

    Lejeune, A; Skorupski, K; Frazier, S; Vanhaezebrouck, I; Rebhun, R B; Reilly, C M; Rodriguez, C O

    2015-09-01

    This retrospective case series evaluates the outcome of 21 dogs with grade II stage 2 mast cell tumour (MCT) treated with adequate local therapy and adjuvant systemic chemotherapy (prednisone, vinblastine and CCNU). The median survival for all dogs was 1359 days (range, 188-2340). Median disease-free interval was 2120 days (149-2325 days). Dogs treated with surgery and chemotherapy had shorter survival (median, 1103 days; 188-2010 days) than those that underwent surgery, radiation therapy and chemotherapy as part of their treatment (median, 2056 days; 300-2340 days). Two patients had local recurrence in the radiation field and four patients had de novo MCT. Distant metastasis was not observed in any dogs. The results of this study suggest that, in the presence of loco-regional lymph node metastasis in grade II MCT, the use of prednisone, vinblastine and CCNU after adequate local-regional therapy can provide a median survival in excess of 40 months.

  19. Delivery of antibiotics with polymeric particles.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Meng-Hua; Bao, Yan; Yang, Xian-Zhu; Zhu, Yan-Hua; Wang, Jun

    2014-11-30

    Despite the wide use of antibiotics, bacterial infection is still one of the leading causes of hospitalization and mortality. The clinical failure of antibiotic therapy is linked with low bioavailability, poor penetration to bacterial infection sites, and the side effects of antibiotics, as well as the antibiotic resistance properties of bacteria. Antibiotics encapsulated in nanoparticles or microparticles made up of a biodegradable polymer have shown great potential in replacing the administration of antibiotics in their "free" form. Polymeric particles provide protection to antibiotics against environmental deactivation and alter antibiotic pharmacokinetics and biodistribution. Polymeric particles can overcome tissue and cellular barriers and deliver antibiotics into very dense tissues and inaccessible target cells. Polymeric particles can be modified to target or respond to particular tissues, cells, and even bacteria, and thereby facilitate the selective concentration or release of the antibiotic at infection sites, respectively. Thus, the delivery of antibiotics with polymeric particles augments the level of the bioactive drug at the site of infection while reducing the dosage and the dosing frequency. The end results are improved therapeutic effects as well as decreased "pill burden" and drug side effects in patients. The main objective of this review is to analyze recent advances and current perspectives in the use of polymeric antibiotic delivery systems in the treatment of bacterial infection.

  20. Addressing canine and feline aggression in the veterinary clinic.

    PubMed

    Moffat, Kelly

    2008-09-01

    Handling aggressive dogs and cats in the veterinary clinic can be frustrating, time consuming, and injurious for both employee and animal. This article discusses the etiology of the aggressive dog and cat patient and how best to approach these cases. A variety of handling techniques, safety products, and drug therapy are reviewed.

  1. Infection, antibiotic therapy and risk of colorectal cancer: a nationwide nested case-control study in patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiun-Ling; Chang, Chia-Hsuin; Lin, Jou-Wei; Wu, Li-Chiu; Chuang, Lee-Ming; Lai, Mei-Shu

    2014-08-15

    Patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus are at a higher risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). The objective of our study was to examine the inter-relationship among infection sites, systemic antibiotic use and risk of CRC among patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus. From a diabetic cohort from the Taiwan's National Health Insurance claims database, we identified 3,593 incident colon cancer cases, 1,979 rectal cancer cases and 22,288 controls and conducted a nested case-control study to examine the association between antibiotic use and CRC incidence. Logistic regression models were applied to estimate the odds ratio (OR) and the 95% confidence interval (95% CI) between infection sites, antibiotic use and CRC incidence. Patients with intra-abdominal infection were significantly associated with increased risk for colon cancer (OR = 2.01, 95% CI = 1.73-2.35) and rectal cancer (OR = 1.59, 95% CI = 1.26-2.00). Any antianaerobic antibiotic use was associated with a higher risk of colon cancer (OR = 2.31, 95% CI = 2.12-2.52) and rectal cancer (OR = 1.69, 95% CI = 1.50-1.90) but without an obvious dose-response relationship for cumulative use. Antianaerobic antibiotics also increased the risks for those with nonintra-abdominal infection. No association was found between antiaerobic agent use and the CRC risk. The results suggest intra-abdominal infections and antianaerobic antibiotic use may be a marker for precancerous lesions or early CRC, although the possibility of antianaerobic antibiotics playing an additional role cannot be excluded. Further research examining the relationship between intra-abdominal infection, antianaerobic antibiotics use and possible change of microbiota leading to colorectal carcinogenesis is warranted.

  2. Testosterone and Aggression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Archer, John

    1994-01-01

    Studies comparing aggressive and nonaggressive prisoners show higher testosterone levels among the former. While there is limited evidence for a strong association between aggressiveness and testosterone during adolescence, other studies indicate that testosterone levels are responsive to influences from the social environment, particularly those…

  3. Social Aggression among Girls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Underwood, Marion K.

    Noting recent interest in girls' social or "relational" aggression, this volume offers a balanced, scholarly analysis of scientific knowledge in this area. The book integrates current research on emotion regulation, gender, and peer relations, to examine how girls are socialized to experience and express anger and aggression from infancy…

  4. Neuropsychiatry of Aggression

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Scott D.; Kjome, Kimberly L.; Moeller, F. Gerard

    2010-01-01

    Synopsis Aggression is a serious medical problem that can place both the patient and the health care provider at risk. Aggression can result from medical, neurologic and or psychiatric disorders. A comprehensive patient evaluation is needed. Treatment options include pharmacotherapy as well as non-pharmacologic interventions, both need to be individualized to the patient. PMID:21172570

  5. Humor, Aggression, and Aging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrick, Ann Louise; And Others

    Although humor is an important phenomenon in human interactions, it has rarely been studied in the elderly. An understanding of responses to humor in aggressive cartoons as a function of advancing age would provide information regarding both the development of humor and the negative (aggressive) emotional experiences of the elderly. This study was…

  6. Serotonin and Aggression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Serena-Lynn; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Decreased serotonin function has consistently been shown to be highly correlated with impulsive aggression across a number of different experimental paradigms. Such lowered serotonergic indices appear to correlate with the dimension of aggression dyscontrol and/or impulsivity rather than with psychiatric diagnostic categories per se. Implications…

  7. Training Aggressive Adolescents in Prosocial Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldstein, Arnold P.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Structured Learning Therapy (SLT) teaches aggressive adolescents prosocial skills (negotiation, self-relaxation, and anger control) by modeling, role playing, social reinforcement, and transfer of training. This article summarizes initial application of SLT with psychiatric clients, includes guidelines for improving trainee-trainer-treatment…

  8. A review of newly approved antibiotics and antibiotics reserved for resistant infections: Implications for emergency medicine.

    PubMed

    Mazer-Amirshahi, Maryann; Pourmand, Ali; May, Larissa

    2016-10-17

    Millions of patients are evaluated every year in the emergency department (ED) for bacterial infections. Emergency physicians often diagnose and prescribe initial antibiotic therapy for a variety of bacterial infections, ranging from simple urinary tract infections to severe sepsis. In life-threatening infections, inappropriate choice of initial antibiotic has been shown to increase morbidity and mortality. As such, initiation of appropriate antibiotic therapy on the part of the emergency physician is critical. Increasing rates of antibiotic resistance, drug allergies, and antibiotic shortages further complicates the choice of antibiotics. Patients may have a history of prior resistant infections or culture data indicating that common first-line antibiotics used in the ED may be ineffective. In recent years, there have been several new antibiotic approvals as well as renewed interest in second and third line antibiotics because of the aforementioned concerns. In addition, several newly approved antibiotics have the advantage of being administered once weekly or even as a single infusion, which has the potential to decrease hospitalizations and healthcare costs. This article reviews newly approved antibiotics and antibiotics used to treat resistant infections with a focus on implications for emergency medicine.

  9. Brief Report: Comparative Effects of Antecedent Exercise and Lorazepam on the Aggressive Behavior of an Autistic Man.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allison, David B.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    This case study of a 24-year-old man with autistic disorder and mental retardation who exhibited aggression found that antecedent exercise significantly decreased aggression; drug therapy with an anxiolytic (lorazepam) alone had no significant effect on aggression; and exercise plus medication decreased aggression to a somewhat lesser degree than…

  10. Multiscale Models of Antibiotic Probiotics

    PubMed Central

    Kaznessis, Yiannis N.

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of antibiotics is one of the most important advances in the history of humankind. For eighty years human life expectancy and standards of living improved greatly thanks to antibiotics. But bacteria have been fighting back, developing resistance to our most potent molecules. New, alternative strategies must be explored as antibiotic therapies become obsolete because of bacterial resistance. Mathematical models and simulations guide the development of complex technologies, such as aircrafts, bridges, communication systems and transportation systems. Herein, models are discussed that guide the development of new antibiotic technologies. These models span multiple molecular and cellular scales, and facilitate the development of a technology that addresses a significant societal challenge. We argue that simulations can be a creative source of knowledge. PMID:25313349

  11. [Sinusitis--judicious antibiotic treatment].

    PubMed

    Niedzielska, Grazyna

    2007-01-01

    The paper presents different forms of sinusitis in children and adults as well as the patomechanism of sinusitis of infective and non-infective origin. The role of bacterial infection has been discussed. Participation of major pathogens of URTI such as S. pneumoniae, H. influenzae and M. catarrhalis has been highlighted and the factors influencing growth of their antibiotic-resistant stains. Guidelines concerning antibiotic therapy in children and adults, depending on disease course, age and factors influencing growth of resistant stains have been presented. Causes of failure in treatment of sinusitis have been analysed eg. in case of bacterial biofilm growth or non-neutrophilic inflammation forms. Antimicrobial treatment concerns mainly acute and aggravated infections. In case of chronic sinusitis, antibiotic therapy is complementary to surgical treatment.

  12. Salmonella-Based Therapy Targeting Indoleamine 2,3-Dioxygenase Coupled with Enzymatic Depletion of Tumor Hyaluronan Induces Complete Regression of Aggressive Pancreatic Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Manuel, Edwin R.; Chen, Jeremy; D'Apuzzo, Massimo; Lampa, Melanie G.; Kaltcheva, Teodora I.; Thompson, Curtis B.; Ludwig, Thomas; Chung, Vincent; Diamond, Don J.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial-based therapies are emerging as effective cancer treatments and hold promise for refractory neoplasms such as pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), which has not shown significant improvement in therapy for over twenty-five years. Using a novel combination of shIDO-ST, a Salmonella-based therapy targeting the immunosuppressive molecule indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), with an enzyme, PEGPH20, which depletes extracellular matrix hyaluronan, we observed extended survival with frequent total regression of autochthonous and orthotopic PDAC tumors. This was associated with migration and accumulation of activated polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) from spleens into tumors, which was not observed using a scrambled control (shScr-ST). Purified splenic PMNs from PEGPH20/shIDO-ST-treated mice exhibited significant IDO knockdown and were able to kill tumor targets ex-vivo through mechanisms involving FasL and serine proteases. In addition, CD8+ T cells were observed to contribute to late control of pancreatic tumors. Collectively, our data demonstrate that entry of shIDO-ST and PMNs into otherwise impermeable desmoplastic tumors is facilitated by PEGPH20-mediated HA removal, further highlighting an important component of effective treatment for PDAC. PMID:26134178

  13. Toxicity of aggressive multimodality therapy including cisplatinum, bleomycin and methotrexate with radiation and/or surgery for advanced head and neck cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Weichselbaum, R.R.; Posner, M.R.; Ervin, T.J.; Fabian, R.L.; Miller, D.

    1982-05-01

    A combined modality regimen employing induction chemotherapy with cisplatinum, bleomycin and methotrexate followed by surgery and/or radiation therapy was initiated in patients with advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. In the first 23 patients treated with this program there was a 90% response rate to induction chemotherapy (9% CR and 81% PR). Toxicity associated with radiotherapy, but not surgery, was increased with 11 of 23 patients (48%) who experienced some toxicity during or immediately after radiotherapy. Mucositis was worse than expected and severe delayed mucositis was seen in 2 patients, one of whom required hospitalization. Late complications, possibly related to therapy included one myocardial infarction and one episode of hypoglycemia, both of which were fatal. One other patient voluntarily failed to take prescribed oral leucovorin, dying of unrescued methotrexate toxicity during adjuvant therapy, a questionable suicide. Further follow-up analysis of failure will be necessary to determine if the value of a combined modality regimen in producing an increased cure rate and long term survival will out weigh increased toxicity.

  14. The Impact of Appropriate Antibiotic Prescribing on Treatment Evaluation Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Honoré, Mitonga Kabwebwe; Lubbe, Martie; Serfontein, Jan; Allen, Kirk

    2013-01-01

    The therapeutic impact of inappropriate prescribing of antibiotics is debatable, particularly in situations where infections are treated empirically with multiply prescribed antibiotics. Prescribers may remain under the illusion that such prescriptions are appropriate on the basis of any observed positive treatment outcomes, even though an antibiotic prescribed in such combination therapy may actually be infective against infecting pathogens. This, inevitably, promotes inappropriate antibiotic prescribing. Prescribers may be motivated to make more conscious attempts to prescribe antibiotics appropriately if it is proven that judicious prescribing of antibiotics has positive impacts on treatment outcomes. The objective of this study was to determine the impact of appropriate prescribing of antibiotics on treatment outcomes, days of patient hospitalization and costs related to antibiotic treatment. Observational data on antibiotic treatment were collected for a one-month period from case notes of all inpatients (n=307) and outpatients (n=865) at five government and mission hospitals in Lesotho. Prescriptions were classified into categories of appropriateness based on extents to which antibiotics were prescribed according to principles. Treatment success rates, mean days of hospitalization and costs of antibiotic treatments of inpatients treated with specified prescription categories were determined. Appropriate prescribing of antibiotics for inpatients had positive impacts on treatment outcomes, patients’ days of hospitalization for infections and costs of antibiotic treatments. In outpatient settings, appropriate prescribing of antibiotics failed to show any significant impact on costs of antibiotics. Appropriate prescribing of antibiotics had a positive impact on patients’ recovery and costs of antibiotic treatments in inpatient settings.

  15. [Enteropathogens and antibiotics].

    PubMed

    González-Torralba, Ana; García-Esteban, Coral; Alós, Juan-Ignacio

    2015-08-12

    Infectious gastroenteritis remains a public health problem. The most severe cases are of bacterial origin. In Spain, Campylobacter and Salmonella are the most prevalent bacterial genus, while Yersinia and Shigella are much less frequent. Most cases are usually self-limiting and antibiotic therapy is not generally indicated, unless patients have risk factors for severe infection and shigellosis. Ciprofloxacin, third generation cephalosporins, azithromycin, ampicillin, cotrimoxazole and doxycycline are the most recommended drugs. The susceptibility pattern of the different bacteria determines the choice of the most appropriate treatment. The aim of this review is to analyse the current situation, developments, and evolution of resistance and multidrug resistance in these 4 enteric pathogens.

  16. Aggression and sport.

    PubMed

    Burton, Robert W

    2005-10-01

    Viewing aggression in its healthy form, in contrast to its extreme and inappropriate versions, and sport as a health-promoting exercise in psychological development and maturation may allow participants and spectators alike to retain an interest in aggression and sport and derive further enjoyment from them. In addition, it will benefit all involved with sport to have a broader understanding of human aggression. Physicians, mental health professionals, and other health care providers can be influential in this process, and should be willing to get involved and speak out when issues and problems arise.

  17. Evaluation of Two Treatments for Reactive and Proactive Aggression in Preschool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitaker, Regina Navonne

    2010-01-01

    Previous research has indicated that preschoolers identified for aggressive behavior would benefit from family, group, or individual therapy. However, there remains an important gap in the current literature regarding treatments for aggressive behavior based on the subtype of aggression. The purpose of this pilot study was to examine if 2…

  18. Aggression in Pretend Play and Aggressive Behavior in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fehr, Karla K.; Russ, Sandra W.

    2013-01-01

    Research Findings: Pretend play is an essential part of child development and adjustment. However, parents, teachers, and researchers debate the function of aggression in pretend play. Different models of aggression predict that the expression of aggression in play could either increase or decrease actual aggressive behavior. The current study…

  19. Periodontal Treatment Reduces Matrix Metalloproteinase Levels in Localized Aggressive Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, Patricia Furtado; Huang, Hong; McAninley, Suzanna; Alfant, Barnett; Harrison, Peter; Aukhil, Ikramuddin; Walker, Clay; Shaddox, Luciana Macchion

    2015-01-01

    Background Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a family of host-derived proteinases reported to mediate multiple functions associated with periodontal destruction and inflammation. We have previously reported high MMP levels in African-American children with localized aggressive periodontitis (LAP). However, little is known about MMP reductions in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) after therapy. This study aimed to evaluate MMP levels in the GCF following treatment of LAP and to correlate these levels with clinical response. Methods GCF samples were collected from 29 African-American individuals diagnosed with LAP. GCF was collected from one diseased site (pocket depth [PD]>4mm, bleeding on probing [BoP] and clinical attachment level [CAL] ≥2mm) and one healthy site (PD≤3mm, no BoP) from each individual at baseline, 3 and 6 months after periodontal treatment, which consisted of full-mouth SRP and systemic antibiotics. The volume of GCF was controlled using a calibrated gingival fluid meter and levels of MMP-1, 2, 3, 8, 9, 12 and 13 were assessed using fluorometric kits. Results MMP-1, 8, 9 12, and 13 levels were reduced significantly up to 6 months, at which point were comparable with healthy sites. Significant correlations were noted between MMP-2, 3, 8, 9, 12 and 13 levels and % of sites with PD>4mm. MMP-3, 12 and 13 levels also correlated with mean pocket depth of affected sites. Conclusion Treatment of LAP with SRP and systemic antibiotics was effective in reducing the local levels specific MMPs in African-American individuals, which correlated positively with some clinical parameters. PMID:23537121

  20. Antibiotic use in neonatal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Yurdakök, M

    1998-01-01

    Neonatal sepsis is a life-threatening emergency and any delay in treatment may cause death. Initial signs of neonatal sepsis are slight and nonspecific. Therefore, in suspected sepsis, two or three days empirical antibiotic therapy should begin immediately after cultures have been obtained without awaiting the results. Antibiotics should be reevaluated when the results of the cultures and susceptibility tests are available. If the cultures are negative and the clinical findings are well, antibiotics should be stopped. Because of the nonspecific nature of neonatal sepsis, especially in small preterm infants, physicians continue antibiotics once started. If a baby has pneumonia or what appears to be sepsis, antibiotics should not be stopped, although cultures are negative. The duration of therapy depends on the initial response to the appropriate antibiotics but should be 10 to 14 days in most infants with sepsis and minimal or absent focal infection. In infants who developed sepsis during the first week of life, empirical therapy must cover group B streptococci, Enterobacteriaceae (especially E. coli) and Listeria monocytogenes. Penicillin or ampicillin plus an aminoglycoside is usually effective against all these organisms. Initial empirical antibiotic therapy for infants who developed sepsis beyond the first days of life must cover the organisms associated with early-onset sepsis as well as hospital-acquired pathogens such as staphylococci, enterococci and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Penicillin or ampicillin and an aminoglycoside combination may also be used in the initial therapy of late-onset sepsis as in cases with early-onset sepsis. In nosocomial infections, netilmicin or amikacin should be preferred. In cases showing increased risk of staphylococcal infection (e.g. presence of vascular catheter) or Pseudomonas infection (e.g. presence of typical skin lesions), antistaphylococcal or anti-Pseudomonas agents may be preferred in the initial empirical therapy. In

  1. Failure of oral antibiotic therapy, including azithromycin, in the treatment of a recurrent breast abscess caused by Salmonella enterica serotype Paratyphi A

    PubMed Central

    Fernando, Shelanah; Molland, Janice Gail; Gottlieb, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of recurrent, multifocal Salmonella enterica serotype Paratyphi A breast abscesses, resistant to ciprofloxacin, which relapsed despite surgery, aspiration and multiple courses of antibiotics, including co-trimoxazole and azithromycin. The patient was cured after a prolonged course of intravenous ceftriaxone. PMID:23182142

  2. Platelet gel biotechnology applied to regenerative surgery of intrabony defects in patients with refractory generalized aggressive peridontitis. Case report.

    PubMed

    Mauro, S; Orlando, L; Panzoni, R; Orlando, P F

    2003-01-01

    Platelet gel biotechnology, a method which has all the components of "tissue engineering" techniques, potentiates the already known healing process of guided tissue regeneration procedures (GTR) by multiplying the number of molecules that activate the healing response and by grafting in the host site various cell types, among which stem cells. Here are reported cases of patients affected by refractory generalized aggressive periodontitis treated with the association GTR and platelet gel biotechnology to verify if the contribution of the gel would produce superior results than those obtained by surgery alone which had been previously applied to the same sites with negative results. Three patients in therapy from 4 to 11 years, already subjected to surgery (GTR) and antibiotic therapy, were reoperated with the adjunct of autologous platelet gel. At a distance of 15.2 months (range 11-17 months) the operated sites showed a reduction in probing pocket depth of 3.4 mm (range 2.8-4.8 mm) and a gain in clinical attachment level of 3.1 mm (range 3-3.5 mm). The association of platelet gel biotechnology with GTR in the surgical treatment of intrabony defects of refractory generalized aggressive periodontitis patients seems to produce results similar to those reported for patients with chronic adult periodontitis. The observations at 15.2 months indicate that there is a stability over time of the results in those sites where previous surgical therapy had shown relapse.

  3. Antibiotic-non-antibiotic combinations for combating extremely drug-resistant Gram-negative 'superbugs'.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Elena K; Reyes-Ortega, Felisa; Velkov, Tony; Li, Jian

    2017-02-28

    The emergence of antimicrobial resistance of Gram-negative pathogens has become a worldwide crisis. The status quo for combating resistance is to employ synergistic combinations of antibiotics. Faced with this fast-approaching post-antibiotic era, it is critical that we devise strategies to prolong and maximize the clinical efficacy of existing antibiotics. Unfortunately, reports of extremely drug-resistant (XDR) Gram-negative pathogens have become more common. Combining antibiotics such as polymyxin B or the broad-spectrum tetracycline and minocycline with various FDA-approved non-antibiotic drugs have emerged as a novel combination strategy against otherwise untreatable XDR pathogens. This review surveys the available literature on the potential benefits of employing antibiotic-non-antibiotic drug combination therapy. The apex of this review highlights the clinical utility of this novel therapeutic strategy for combating infections caused by 'superbugs'.

  4. Systems, not pills: The options market for antibiotics seeks to rejuvenate the antibiotic pipeline.

    PubMed

    Brogan, David M; Mossialos, Elias

    2016-02-01

    Over the past decade, there has been a growing recognition of the increasing growth of antibiotic resistant bacteria and a relative decline in the production of novel antibacterial therapies. The combination of these two forces poses a potentially grave threat to global health, in both developed and developing countries. Current market forces do not provide appropriate incentives to stimulate new antibiotic development, thus we propose a new incentive mechanism: the Options Market for Antibiotics. This mechanism, modelled on the principle of financial call options, allows payers to buy the right, in early stages of development, to purchase antibiotics at a discounted price if and when they ever make it to market approval. This paper demonstrates the effect of such a model on the expected Net Present Value of a typical antibacterial project. As part of an integrated strategy to confront the impending antibiotic crisis, the Options Market for Antibiotics may effectively stimulate corporate and public investment into antibiotic research and development.

  5. Effects of antibiotic dry-cow therapy and internal teat sealant on milk somatic cell counts and clinical and subclinical mastitis in early lactation.

    PubMed

    Golder, H M; Hodge, A; Lean, I J

    2016-09-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the efficacy of an internal teat sealant (TS; Teatseal; Zoetis Australia, Silverwater, NSW, Australia), when used in combination with antibiotic dry-cow therapy (ADCT) administered at dry-off, on milk individual somatic cell count (ISCC), milk production and components, and the incidence of clinical and subclinical mastitis in dairy cows up to 60 d after calving, when compared with ADCT only. Multiparous Holstein, Jersey, or Holstein cross cows (n=2,200) from 8 farms in southern and eastern Australia were randomly assigned to treatment of all 4 quarters with ADCT alone or with ADCT plus TS (ADCT + TS) at dry-off in this randomized, multisite clinical trial. Individual milk yield, fat and protein percentages, and ISCC were measured at intervals of 14±3 d after calving for the first 60 d of lactation. The first measurement occurred between 10 and 24 d after calving. Clinical mastitis and health events were recorded from dry-off to 60 d of lactation. Milk samples were collected from first cases of clinical mastitis and subjected to bacteriology. Treatment and the interaction of treatment by time did not affect milk yield, ISCC weighted by milk yield, or fat and protein percentages. Treatment with ADCT + TS decreased geometric mean ISCC compared with treatment with ADCT alone over the first 60 d of lactation. Geometric mean ISCC (×10(3) cells/mL) was 32.0 [95% confidence interval (CI): 26.8 to 38.3] and 43.5 (95% CI: 36.2 to 52.1) for ADCT + TS and ADCT alone, respectively. The odds of at least 1 case of subclinical mastitis (ISCC ≥250,000 cells/mL) were 1.9 times higher (95% CI: 1.4 to 2.6) with ADCT alone in the first 60 d of lactation compared with ADCT + TS. Use of ADCT + TS reduced the estimated incidence of at least 1 case of subclinical mastitis on all 8 farms, compared with use of ADCT alone. Only 4 cows that calved 40 to 100 d after dry-off had a first case of clinical mastitis in the dry period. Five percent of

  6. Association between augmented renal clearance and clinical outcomes in patients receiving β-lactam antibiotic therapy by continuous or intermittent infusion: a nested cohort study of the BLING-II randomised, placebo-controlled, clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Udy, Andrew A; Dulhunty, Joel M; Roberts, Jason A; Davis, Joshua S; Webb, Steven A R; Bellomo, Rinaldo; Gomersall, Charles; Shirwadkar, Charudatt; Eastwood, Glenn M; Myburgh, John; Paterson, David L; Starr, Therese; Paul, Sanjoy K; Lipman, Jeffrey

    2017-03-09

    Augmented renal clearance (ARC) is known to influence β-lactam antibiotic pharmacokinetics. This substudy of the BLING-II trial aimed to explore the association between ARC and patient outcomes in a large randomised clinical trial. BLING-II enrolled 432 participants with severe sepsis randomised to receive β-lactam therapy by continuous or intermittent infusion. An 8-h creatinine clearance (CLCr) measured on Day 1 was used to identify ARC, defined as CLCr ≥ 130 mL/min. Patients receiving any form of renal replacement therapy were excluded. Primary outcome was alive ICU-free days at Day 28. Secondary outcomes included 90-day mortality and clinical cure at 14 days following antibiotic cessation. A total of 254 patients were included, among which 45 (17.7%) manifested ARC [median (IQR) CLCr 165 (144-198) mL/min]. ARC patients were younger (P <0.001), more commonly male (P = 0.04) and had less organ dysfunction (P <0.001). There was no difference in ICU-free days at Day 28 [ARC, 21 (12-24) days; no ARC, 21 (11-25) days; P = 0.89], although clinical cure was significantly greater in the unadjusted analysis in those manifesting ARC [33/45 (73.3%) vs. 115/209 (55.0%) P = 0.02]. This was attenuated in the multivariable analysis. No difference was noted in 90-day mortality. There were no statistically significant differences in clinical outcomes in ARC patients according to the dosing strategy employed. In this substudy of a large clinical trial of β-lactam antibiotics in severe sepsis, ARC was not associated with any differences in outcomes, regardless of dosing strategy.

  7. Integrating Antimicrobial Therapy with Host Immunity to Fight Drug-Resistant Infections: Classical vs. Adaptive Treatment.

    PubMed

    Gjini, Erida; Brito, Patricia H

    2016-04-01

    Antimicrobial resistance of infectious agents is a growing problem worldwide. To prevent the continuing selection and spread of drug resistance, rational design of antibiotic treatment is needed, and the question of aggressive vs. moderate therapies is currently heatedly debated. Host immunity is an important, but often-overlooked factor in the clearance of drug-resistant infections. In this work, we compare aggressive and moderate antibiotic treatment, accounting for host immunity effects. We use mathematical modelling of within-host infection dynamics to study the interplay between pathogen-dependent host immune responses and antibiotic treatment. We compare classical (fixed dose and duration) and adaptive (coupled to pathogen load) treatment regimes, exploring systematically infection outcomes such as time to clearance, immunopathology, host immunization, and selection of resistant bacteria. Our analysis and simulations uncover effective treatment strategies that promote synergy between the host immune system and the antimicrobial drug in clearing infection. Both in classical and adaptive treatment, we quantify how treatment timing and the strength of the immune response determine the success of moderate therapies. We explain key parameters and dimensions, where an adaptive regime differs from classical treatment, bringing new insight into the ongoing debate of resistance management. Emphasizing the sensitivity of treatment outcomes to the balance between external antibiotic intervention and endogenous natural defenses, our study calls for more empirical attention to host immunity processes.

  8. Integrating Antimicrobial Therapy with Host Immunity to Fight Drug-Resistant Infections: Classical vs. Adaptive Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Gjini, Erida; Brito, Patricia H.

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance of infectious agents is a growing problem worldwide. To prevent the continuing selection and spread of drug resistance, rational design of antibiotic treatment is needed, and the question of aggressive vs. moderate therapies is currently heatedly debated. Host immunity is an important, but often-overlooked factor in the clearance of drug-resistant infections. In this work, we compare aggressive and moderate antibiotic treatment, accounting for host immunity effects. We use mathematical modelling of within-host infection dynamics to study the interplay between pathogen-dependent host immune responses and antibiotic treatment. We compare classical (fixed dose and duration) and adaptive (coupled to pathogen load) treatment regimes, exploring systematically infection outcomes such as time to clearance, immunopathology, host immunization, and selection of resistant bacteria. Our analysis and simulations uncover effective treatment strategies that promote synergy between the host immune system and the antimicrobial drug in clearing infection. Both in classical and adaptive treatment, we quantify how treatment timing and the strength of the immune response determine the success of moderate therapies. We explain key parameters and dimensions, where an adaptive regime differs from classical treatment, bringing new insight into the ongoing debate of resistance management. Emphasizing the sensitivity of treatment outcomes to the balance between external antibiotic intervention and endogenous natural defenses, our study calls for more empirical attention to host immunity processes. PMID:27078624

  9. [Gas gangrene with ulcerative colitis under immunosuppressive therapy: report of a case].

    PubMed

    Jackisch, T; Freitag, M; Ludwig, K

    2006-02-01

    We report on a 30-year-old male with ulcerative colitis who developed a spontaneous gas gangrene in the right limb, the gluteal muscles and the retroperitoneal region under immunosuppressive therapy. In spite of immediate aggressive surgical and antibiotic therapy the massive infection led to septicemia and ultimately death. Clostridium septicum was identified with multiple local manifestations in the skeletal muscles. Gas gangrene is extremely rare in patients with ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease and immunosuppression. The therapeutic options are discussed and the relevant present literature is reviewed.

  10. How to treat splenic marginal zone lymphoma (SMZL) in patients unfit for surgery or more aggressive therapies: experience in 30 cases.

    PubMed

    Cervetti, Giulia; Ghio, Francesco; Cecconi, Nadia; Morganti, Riccardo; Galimberti, Sara; Petrini, Mario

    2017-04-01

    Splenic marginal zone lymphoma (SMZL) is an indolent disease that typically affects elderly patients. Thanks to its outcome, most patients don't need any specific therapy and 'a watch and wait' policy is frequently employed. Treatment is required in symptomatic cases. Splenectomy remains one of the first line options in patients fit for surgery. The best pharmacological strategy has not yet been identified for poor surgical risk cases. Amongst different possible chemotherapeutic approaches, alkylating agents, alone or in association with Rituximab, could employ in 'frail' patients. In the present study, the role of oral cyclophosphamide (100 mg per day for 15 consecutive days, every 30 for a total of six cycles) associated with anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody has been evaluated in 30 newly diagnosed SMZL patients, not fit for splenectomy or more toxic chemotherapic regimens. Overall response rate was 87% (CR 70%; PR 17%). Median PFS was 20 months (range, 1-53), with better outcome for low-risk cases according to IIL score prognostic index. Toxicity profile resulted mild.

  11. WAAR (World Alliance against Antibiotic Resistance): Safeguarding antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Summary Resistance to antibiotics has increased recently to a dramatic extend, and the pipeline of new antibiotics is almost dry for the five next years. Failures happen already for trivial community acquired infections, like pyelonephritis, or peritonitis, and this is likely to increase. Difficult surgical procedures, transplants, and other immunosuppressive therapies will become far more risky. Resistance is mainly due to an excessive usage of antibiotics, in all sectors, including the animal one. Action is urgently needed. Therefore, an alliance against MDRO has been recently created, which includes health care professionals, consumers, health managers, and politicians. The document highlights the different proposed measures, and represents a strong consensus between the different professionals, including general practicionners, and veterinarians. PMID:22958542

  12. Aggressive lymphoma in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Lichtman, S M

    2000-02-01

    Persons 65 years of age and older are the fastest growing segment of the United States population. Over the next 30 years they will comprise approximately 20% of the population. There will be a parallel rise in the number of patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Age has long been known to be an adverse prognostic factor. Clinical trials of older patients are complicated by the effect of comorbid illness, particularly its effect on overall survival. CHOP (cyclophosphamide, Adriamycin, vincristine, prednisone) remains the standard therapy for all patients with aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. There are a number of regimens which may be beneficial for older patients with significant comorbidity and poor performance status. The randomized trials in the elderly has reaffirmed CHOP and emphasize the need for adequate dosing, maintaining schedule and anthracyclines. Relapsed patients have a poor prognosis but selected fit older patients may benefit from aggressive reinduction regimens and possibly bone marrow transplantation. Future research should include defining the role of comorbidity, measurement of organ dysfunction and assessment of performance status with geriatric functional scales. New drug treatments should also be explored.

  13. Response-adapted therapy for aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphomas based on early [18F] FDG-PET scanning: ECOG-ACRIN Cancer Research Group study (E3404).

    PubMed

    Swinnen, Lode J; Li, Hailun; Quon, Andrew; Gascoyne, Randy; Hong, Fangxin; Ranheim, Erik A; Habermann, Thomas M; Kahl, Brad S; Horning, Sandra J; Advani, Ranjana H

    2015-07-01

    A persistently positive positron emission tomography (PET) scan during therapy for diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is predictive of treatment failure. A response-adapted strategy consisting of an early treatment change to four cycles of R-ICE (rituximab, ifosfamide, carboplatin, etoposide) was studied in the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group E3404 trial. Previously untreated patients with DLBCL stage III, IV, or bulky II, were eligible. PET scan was performed after three cycles of R-CHOP (rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, prednisone) and scored as positive or negative by central review during the fourth cycle. PET-positive patients received four cycles of R-ICE, PET-negative patients received two more cycles of R-CHOP. A ≥ 45% 2-year progression-free survival (PFS) for mid-treatment PET-positive patients was viewed as promising. Of 74 patients, 16% were PET positive, 79% negative. The PET positivity rate was much lower than the 33% expected. Two-year PFS was 70%; 42% [90% confidence interval (CI), 19-63%] for PET-positives and 76% (90% CI 65-84%) for PET-negatives. Three-year overall survival (OS) was 69% (90% CI 43-85%) and 93% (90% CI 86-97%) for PET-positive and -negative cases, respectively. The 2-year PFS for mid-treatment PET-positive patients intensified to R-ICE was 42%, with a wide confidence interval due to the low proportion of positive mid-treatment PET scans. Treatment modification based on early PET scanning should remain confined to clinical trials.

  14. [Alliance against MDRO: safeguarding antibiotics].

    PubMed

    Carlet, J; Rambaud, C; Pulcini, C

    2012-09-01

    Resistance to antibiotics has increased recently to a dramatic extend, and the pipeline of new antibiotics is almost dry for the 5 next years. Failures happen already for trivial community acquired infections, like pyelonephritis, or peritonitis, and this is likely to increase. Difficult surgical procedures, transplants, and other immunosuppressive therapies will become far more risky. Resistance is mainly due to an excessive usage of antibiotics, in all sectors, including the animal one. Action is urgently needed. Therefore, an alliance against MDRO has been recently created, which includes health care professionals, consumers, health managers, and politicians. The document highlights the different proposed measures, and represents a strong consensus between the different professionals, including general practitioners, and veterinarians.

  15. Treatment of diarrhea in young children: results from surveys on the perception and use of oral rehydration solutions, antibiotics, and other therapies in India and Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Zwisler, Greg; Simpson, Evan; Moodley, Melissa

    2013-01-01

    Background Diarrheal disease is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality among children under five. Although oral rehydration solution (ORS) has tremendous therapeutic benefits, coverage of and demand for this product have remained low in many developing countries. This study surveyed caregivers and health care providers in India and Kenya to gather information about perceptions and use of various diarrhea treatments, assess reasons for low ORS use, and identify opportunities for expanding ORS use. Methods The project team conducted two rounds of semi–structured, quantitative surveys with more than 2000 caregivers in India and Kenya in 2012. A complementary survey covered more than 500 pharmacy staff and health care workers in both countries. In Kenya, the team also surveyed rural pharmacies to gather pricing and sales data. Results Although caregivers generally had very positive perceptions of ORS, they typically ranked antibiotics ahead of ORS as the strongest medicine for diarrhea (in India 62% ranked antibiotics first and 23% ranked ORS first, n = 404; in Kenya results were 55% and 29%, n = 401). Many caregivers had misconceptions about the purpose and effectiveness of various treatments. For example, most caregivers who gave ORS at last episode expected it to stop their child’s diarrhea (65% in India, n = 190; 73% in Kenya, n = 154). There were noteworthy differences between India and Kenya in the selection and sourcing of treatments. Much of the money spent by families during the last episode of diarrhea was for inappropriate treatments. This was especially true in India, where rural households typically spent US$ 2.29 (median for the 79% of rural households that paid for health care services or treatments, n = 199) with most of this going to pay fees of private health workers and/or for antibiotics. Conclusions Caregivers’ primary treatment goal is to stop diarrhea, and many believe that antibiotics or ORS will accomplish this

  16. Risk of bleeding and antibiotic use in patients receiving continuous phenprocoumon therapy. A case-control study nested in a large insurance- and population-based German cohort.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Sascha; Ihle, Peter; Harder, Sebastian; Schubert, Ingrid

    2014-05-05

    There is major concern about coumarins interacting with various drug classes and increasing the risk of overanticoagulation. The aim of the study was to assess bleeding risk in patients with concurrent use of antibiotics and phenprocoumon, the most widely prescribed coumarin in many European countries. We conducted a nested-case-control study within a cohort of 513,338 incident and continuous phenprocoumon users ≥ 18 years of age using claims data of the statutory health insurance company AOK, covering 30% of the German population. Bleeding risk associated with current use of antibiotics for systemic use (antibacterials/antimycotics) was calculated using conditional logistic regression in 13,785 cases with a bleeding event and 55,140 risk-set sampling-matched controls. Bleeding risk associated with any antibacterial use in phenprocoumon users was significantly increased [odds ratio (OR) 2.37, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.20-2.56]. The association was stronger for gastrointestinal than for cerebral bleeding (OR 2.09, 95% CI 1.84-2.38 and OR 1.34, 95% CI 1.03-1.74, respectively) and highest for other/unspecified bleeding (OR 2.92, 95% CI 2.62-3.26). Specific antibiotic classes were strongly associated with bleeding risk, e.g. cotrimoxazole (OR 3.86, 95% CI 3.08-4.84) and fluorquinolones (OR 3.13, 95% CI 2.74-3.59), among those highest for ofloxacin (OR 5.00, 95% CI 3.01-8.32). Combined use of phenprocoumon and antimycotics was not significantly associated with bleeding risk. Risk was not significantly modified by age (pint=0.25) or sex (pint=0.96). The association was stronger the closer the antibiotic exposure was to the bleeding event. Among continuous phenprocoumon users, antibiotics - particularly quinolones and cotrimoxazole - should be prescribed after careful consideration due to an increased bleeding risk. Close monitoring of international normalised ratio levels after prescription is recommended.

  17. Nucleotide Selectivity of Antibiotic Kinases▿

    PubMed Central

    Shakya, Tushar; Wright, Gerard D.

    2010-01-01

    Antibiotic kinases, which include aminoglycoside and macrolide phosphotransferases (APHs and MPHs), pose a serious threat to currently used antimicrobial therapies. These enzymes show structural and functional homology with Ser/Thr/Tyr kinases, which is suggestive of a common ancestor. Surprisingly, recent in vitro studies using purified antibiotic kinase enzymes have revealed that a number are able to utilize GTP as the antibiotic phospho donor, either preferentially or exclusively compared to ATP, the canonical phosphate donor in most biochemical reactions. To further explore this phenomenon, we examined three enzymes, APH(3′)-IIIa, APH(2″)-Ib, and MPH(2′)-I, using a competitive assay that mimics in vivo nucleotide triphosphate (NTP) concentrations and usage by each enzyme. Downstream analysis of reaction products by high-performance liquid chromatography enabled the determination of partitioning of phosphate flux from NTP donors to antibiotics. Using this ratio along with support from kinetic analysis and inhibitor studies, we find that under physiologic concentrations of NTPs, APH(3′)-IIIa exclusively uses ATP, MPH(2′)-I exclusively uses GTP, and APH(2″)-Ib is able to use both species with a preference for GTP. These differences reveal likely different pathways in antibiotic resistance enzyme evolution and can be exploited in selective inhibitor design to counteract resistance. PMID:20231391

  18. Nucleotide selectivity of antibiotic kinases.

    PubMed

    Shakya, Tushar; Wright, Gerard D

    2010-05-01

    Antibiotic kinases, which include aminoglycoside and macrolide phosphotransferases (APHs and MPHs), pose a serious threat to currently used antimicrobial therapies. These enzymes show structural and functional homology with Ser/Thr/Tyr kinases, which is suggestive of a common ancestor. Surprisingly, recent in vitro studies using purified antibiotic kinase enzymes have revealed that a number are able to utilize GTP as the antibiotic phospho donor, either preferentially or exclusively compared to ATP, the canonical phosphate donor in most biochemical reactions. To further explore this phenomenon, we examined three enzymes, APH(3')-IIIa, APH(2'')-Ib, and MPH(2')-I, using a competitive assay that mimics in vivo nucleotide triphosphate (NTP) concentrations and usage by each enzyme. Downstream analysis of reaction products by high-performance liquid chromatography enabled the determination of partitioning of phosphate flux from NTP donors to antibiotics. Using this ratio along with support from kinetic analysis and inhibitor studies, we find that under physiologic concentrations of NTPs, APH(3')-IIIa exclusively uses ATP, MPH(2')-I exclusively uses GTP, and APH(2'')-Ib is able to use both species with a preference for GTP. These differences reveal likely different pathways in antibiotic resistance enzyme evolution and can be exploited in selective inhibitor design to counteract resistance.

  19. Bactericidal antibiotics induce programmed metabolic toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Rowan, Aislinn D.; Cabral, Damien J.; Belenky, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The misuse of antibiotics has led to the development and spread of antibiotic resistance in clinically important pathogens. These resistant infections are having a significant impact on treatment outcomes and contribute to approximately 25,000 deaths in the U.S. annually. If additional therapeutic options are not identified, the number of annual deaths is predicted to rise to 317,000 in North America and 10,000,000 worldwide by 2050. Identifying therapeutic methodologies that utilize our antibiotic arsenal more effectively is one potential way to extend the useful lifespan of our current antibiotics. Recent studies have indicated that modulating metabolic activity is one possible strategy that can impact the efficacy of antibiotic therapy. In this review, we will address recent advances in our knowledge about the impacts of bacterial metabolism on antibiotic effectiveness and the impacts of antibiotics on bacterial metabolism. We will particularly focus on two studies, Lobritz, et al. (PNAS, 112(27): 8173-8180) and Belenky et al. (Cell Reports, 13(5): 968-980) that together demonstrate that bactericidal antibiotics induce metabolic perturbations that are linked to and required for bactericidal antibiotic toxicity.

  20. [Documentation of Antibiotic Stewardship (ABS)-interventions during proactive audit of antibiotic use].

    PubMed

    Wilke, Katja; de With, Katja

    2015-01-01

    Proactive audit of antibiotic use ensures quality of prescribing and can improve outcome in patients with infections. A rational, individualized therapy is being defined in interdisciplinary cooperation on the basis of clinical, laboratory, radiological and microbiological examination findings. By fostering targeted antibiotic therapy proactive audit reduces adverse effects and contributes to drug therapy safety and subsequently to patient safety. A proactive audit of antibiotic use is performed weekly on four intensive care units at the University Hospital Dresden by a infectious disease specialist a pharmacist and the attending physicians. Patient-related therapy adjustments were systematically documented over a 4-month period; antibiotic use before and after audit as well as ABS strategies (de-escalation, oral switch, duration of treatment, dose and administration optimization) were analyzed. Both targeted therapy and interventions regarding the duration of treatment led to a reduction in the prescribing of broad spectrum antibiotics by 20%. Routine interdisciplinary proactive audit of antibiotic use with intervention and feedback increases guideline-adherent therapy and process quality.

  1. Scope of photodynamic therapy in periodontics.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vivek; Sinha, Jolly; Verma, Neelu; Nayan, Kamal; Saimbi, C S; Tripathi, Amitandra K

    2015-01-01

    Periodontal disease results from inflammation of the supporting structure of the teeth and in response to chronic infection caused by various periodontopathic bacteria. The mechanical removal of this biofilm and adjunctive use of antibacterial disinfectants and antibiotics have been the conventional methods of periodontal therapy. However, the removal of plaque and the reduction in the number of infectious organisms can be impaired in sites with difficult access. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a powerful laser-initiated photochemical reaction, involving the use of a photoactive dye (photosensitizer) activated by light of a specific wavelength in the presence of oxygen. Application of PDT in periodontics such as pocket debridement, gingivitis, and aggressive periodontitis continue to evolve into a mature clinical treatment modality and is considered as a promising novel approach for eradicating pathogenic bacteria in periodontitis.

  2. Stability of Aggressive Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eron, Leonard D.; Huesmann, L. Rowell

    As indicated by multiple measures (including overt criminal behavior), stability of aggressive behavior was investigated across 22 years for males and females in a variety of situations. Originally, subjects included the entire population enrolled in the third grade in a semi-rural county in New York State. The sample included approximately 870…

  3. Aggressiveness and Disobedience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaaland, Grete Sorensen; Idsoe, Thormod; Roland, Erling

    2011-01-01

    This study aims to conceptualize disobedient pupil behavior within the more general framework of antisocial behavior and to reveal how two forms of aggressiveness are related to disobedience. Disobedience, in the context of this article, covers disruptive pupil behavior or discipline problems when the pupil is aware of breaking a standard set by…

  4. Intellectual Competence and Aggression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huesmann, L. Rowell; Yarmel, Patty Warnick

    Using data from a broader longitudinal study, this investigation explores within-subject and cross-generational stability of intellectual competence and the relationship of such stability to aggressive behavior. Data were gathered three times (when subjects' modal age was 8, 19, and 30 years). Initially, subjects included the entire population…

  5. Relational Aggression among Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Ellie L.; Nelson, David A.; Hottle, America B.; Warburton, Brittney; Young, Bryan K.

    2011-01-01

    "Relational aggression" refers to harm within relationships caused by covert bullying or manipulative behavior. Examples include isolating a youth from his or her group of friends (social exclusion), threatening to stop talking to a friend (the silent treatment), or spreading gossip and rumors by email. This type of bullying tends to be…

  6. Neuroimaging and Aggression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Shari; Raine, Adrian

    1994-01-01

    Brain imaging research allows direct assessment of structural and functional brain abnormalities, and thereby provides an improved methodology for studying neurobiological factors predisposing to violent and aggressive behavior. This paper reviews 20 brain imaging studies using four different types of neuroimaging techniques that were conducted in…

  7. Human Aggression and Suicide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Gerald L.; Goodwin, Frederick K

    1986-01-01

    The central nervous system transmitter serontonin may be altered in aggressive/impulsive and suicidal behaviors in humans. These reports are largely consistent with animal data, and constitute one of the most highly replicated set of findings in biological psychiatry. Suggests that some suicidal behavior may be a special kind of aggressive…

  8. Parents' Aggressive Influences and Children's Aggressive Problem Solutions with Peers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duman, Sarah; Margolin, Gayla

    2007-01-01

    This study examined children's aggressive and assertive solutions to hypothetical peer scenarios in relation to parents' responses to similar hypothetical social scenarios and parents' actual marital aggression. The study included 118 children ages 9 to 10 years old and their mothers and fathers. Children's aggressive solutions correlated with…

  9. Relational Aggression and Physical Aggression among Adolescent Cook Islands Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Page, Angela; Smith, Lisa F.

    2016-01-01

    Both physical and relational aggression are characterised by the intent to harm another. Physical aggression includes direct behaviours such as hitting or kicking; relational aggression involves behaviours designed to damage relationships, such as excluding others, spreading rumours, and delivering threats and verbal abuse. This study extended…

  10. Development of allergic airway disease in mice following antibiotic therapy and fungal microbiota increase: role of host genetics, antigen, and interleukin-13.

    PubMed

    Noverr, Mairi C; Falkowski, Nicole R; McDonald, Rod A; McKenzie, Andrew N; Huffnagle, Gary B

    2005-01-01

    Lending support to the hygiene hypothesis, epidemiological studies have demonstrated that allergic disease correlates with widespread use of antibiotics and alterations in fecal microbiota ("microflora"). Antibiotics also lead to overgrowth of the yeast Candida albicans, which can secrete potent prostaglandin-like immune response modulators, from the microbiota. We have recently developed a mouse model of antibiotic-induced gastrointestinal microbiota disruption that is characterized by stable increases in levels of gastrointestinal enteric bacteria and Candida. Using this model, we have previously demonstrated that microbiota disruption can drive the development of a CD4 T-cell-mediated airway allergic response to mold spore challenge in immunocompetent C57BL/6 mice without previous systemic antigen priming. The studies presented here address important questions concerning the universality of the model. To investigate the role of host genetics, we tested BALB/c mice. As with C57BL/6 mice, microbiota disruption promoted the development of an allergic response in the lungs of BALB/c mice upon subsequent challenge with mold spores. In addition, this allergic response required interleukin-13 (IL-13) (the response was absent in IL-13(-/-) mice). To investigate the role of antigen, we subjected mice with disrupted microbiota to intranasal challenge with ovalbumin (OVA). In the absence of systemic priming, only mice with altered microbiota developed airway allergic responses to OVA. The studies presented here demonstrate that the effects of microbiota disruption are largely independent of host genetics and the nature of the antigen and that IL-13 is required for the airway allergic response that follows microbiota disruption.

  11. Beta-Lactam Antibiotics as A Possible Novel Therapy for Managing Epilepsy and Autism, A Case Report and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    GHANIZADEH, Ahmad; BERK, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Autism is a disorder of unknown etiology. There are few FDA approved medications for treating autism. Co-occurring autism and epilepsy is common, and glutamate antagonists improve some symptoms of autism. Ceftriaxone, a beta-lactam antibiotic, increases the expression of the glutamate transporter 1 which decreases extracellular glutamate levels. It is hypothesized that modulating astrocyte glutamate transporter expression by ceftriaxone or cefixime might improve some symptoms of autism. This case report of a child with autism and epilepsy suggests a decrease in seizures after taking cefixime PMID:25767546

  12. Marked increase in incidence for bloodstream infections due to Escherichia coli, a side effect of previous antibiotic therapy in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    van der Mee-Marquet, Nathalie L.; Blanc, Dominique S.; Gbaguidi-Haore, Houssein; Dos Santos Borges, Sandra; Viboud, Quentin; Bertrand, Xavier; Quentin, Roland

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a survey including 3334 bloodstream infections (BSIs) due to E. coli diagnosed in 2005–2014 at a stable cohort of hospitals. Marked increases in incidence were observed for community-acquired (CA) BSIs in patients aged >75 years, CA-BSIs of digestive origin in patients aged 60–74 years, healthcare-associated BSIs, and BSIs associated with ESBL (extended-spectrum B-lactamase)-producing E. coli (ESBLEc). Using MLST, we studied the genetic diversity of 412 BSI isolates recovered during the 2014 survey: 7 major sequence type complexes (STCs) were revealed in phylogenetic group B2, 3 in group A/B1 and 2 in group D. Among the 31 ESBLEc isolates, 1/3 belonged to STC 131. We searched for possible associations between clonal groups, clinical determinants and characteristics of BSIs: isolates from groups B2 (except STC 131) and D were susceptible to antibiotics and associated with BSIs of urinary origin in patients <60 years. STC 131 and group A/B1 isolates were multi-drug resistant and associated with CA-BSIs of digestive origin in patients aged 60–74 with a recent history of antibiotic treatment. STC 131 isolates were associated with HCA-BSIs in patients with recent/present hospitalization in a long-stay unit. We provide a unique population-based picture of the epidemiology of E. coli BSI. The aging nature of the population led to an increase in the number of cases caused by the B2 and D isolates generally implicated in BSIs. In addition, the association of a trend toward increasing rates of gut colonization with multi drug-resistant isolates revealed by the rise in the incidence of BSIs of digestive origin caused by STC 131 and A/B1 (STCs 10, 23, and 155) isolates, and a significant increase in the frequency of BSIs in elderly patients with recent antibiotic treatment suggested that antibiotic use may have contributed to the growing incidence of BSI. PMID:26175721

  13. [Comparison of the effects of prophylactic antibiotic therapy and cost-effectiveness between cefazolin (CEZ) and Sulbactam/Ampicillin (SBT/ABPC) in gastric cancer surgery employing clinical pathway].

    PubMed

    Ise, Yuya; Hagiwara, Ken; Saitoh, Setsuo; Honjo, Kazuyoshi; Soh, Shizuka; Kato, Ayumi; Katayama, Shirou; Nishizawa, Kenji; Hirano, Masaaki; Yoshiyuki, Toshiro; Kiyama, Teruo; Mitsuhashi, Kyoko; Kamei, Miwako; Shiragami, Makoto

    2004-11-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the effects of prophylactic antibiotic therapy and the cost-effectiveness of Cefazolin (CEZ) and Sulbactam/Ampicillin (SBT/ABPC) in gastric cancer surgery employing clinical pathway. 157 patients (62 in the CEZ group and 95 in the SBT/ABPC group), who underwent surgery for gastric cancer at the First Department of Surgery of our hospital, were investigated. There was no significant difference between the groups with regard to sex, age, incidence of complication, stage of cancer, surgical method, operative time and blood loss, length of hospitalization, the appearance of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), changes body temperature, white blood cell count (WBC), C-reactive protein (CRP), or clinical outcome of postoperative care by a nurse during post-operation for 7 days. The prophylactic effect of infection was also no different between the CEZ (69.4%) and SBT/ABPC (69.5%) groups. In contrast, decision analysis strongly indicated that the anticipate cost of antibiotics was higher in the latter group (yen 20402) than in the CEZ group (yen 15556), suggesting that the prophylactic effect of CEZ may be more cost-effective. Thus, evaluations of pharmacotherapy from the aspect of cost may be one of the important responsibility of hospital pharmacists in the future.

  14. Dry powder inhalation of antibiotics in cystic fibrosis therapy, part 1: development of a powder formulation with colistin sulfate for a special test inhaler with an air classifier as de-agglomeration principle.

    PubMed

    de Boer, A H; Le Brun, P P H; van der Woude, H G; Hagedoorn, P; Heijerman, H G M; Frijlink, H W

    2002-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the pulmonary administration of antibiotics as dry powder to patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), as an alternative for nebulization. This part of the study describes the development of a powder formulation with colistin sulfate as model substance. The aim of the new dosage form was to increase pulmonary deposition, therapeutic efficiency and, by that, compliance by the CF patients. A physical powder mixture of colistin and a size fraction of lactose (106-150 microm) was prepared and the mixture was optimized with respect to colistin content (83.3%) for use in a special test inhaler. A laser diffraction apparatus with special inhaler adapter was applied for analysis of the size distribution of the aerosol cloud from the inhaler. The size distributions of the aerosol clouds from the test inhaler at flow rates between 30 and 60 l/min for the optimized formulation showed nearly the same median diameter as that for the primary drug particles. But the X(100)-value was much lower, because of an effective large particle separation from the inspiratory air by an air classifier in the test inhaler. The results suggest that dry powder inhalation might be a suitable and highly efficient alternative for nebulization of antibiotic drugs in CF therapy.

  15. Therapeutic strategies to combat antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Benjamin D; Brooks, Amanda E

    2014-11-30

    With multidrug resistant bacteria on the rise, new antibiotic approaches are required. Although a number of new small molecule antibiotics are currently in the development pipeline with many more in preclinical development, the clinical options and practices for infection control must be expanded. Biologics and non-antibiotic adjuvants offer this opportunity for expansion. Nevertheless, to avoid known mechanisms of resistance, intelligent combination approaches for multiple simultaneous and complimentary therapies must be designed. Combination approaches should extend beyond biologically active molecules to include smart controlled delivery strategies. Infection control must integrate antimicrobial stewardship, new antibiotic molecules, biologics, and delivery strategies into effective combination therapies designed to 1) fight the infection, 2) avoid resistance, and 3) protect the natural microbiome. This review explores these developing strategies in the context of circumventing current mechanisms of resistance.

  16. Impulsive Aggression as a Comorbidity of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder in Children and Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Amann, Birgit H.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: This article examines the characteristics of impulsive aggression (IA) as a comorbidity in children and adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), focusing on its incidence, impact on ADHD outcomes, need for timely intervention, and limitations of current treatment practices. Methods: Relevant literature was retrieved with electronic searches in PubMed and PsycINFO using the search strategy of “ADHD OR attention deficit hyperactivity disorder” AND “impulsive aggression OR reactive aggression OR hostile aggression OR overt aggression” AND “pediatric OR childhood OR children OR pre-adolescent OR adolescent” with separate searches using review OR clinical trial as search limits. Key articles published before the 2007 Expert Consensus Report on IA were identified using citation analysis. Results: More than 50% of preadolescents with ADHD combined subtype reportedly display clinically significant aggression, with impulsive aggression being the predominant subtype. Impulsive aggression is strongly predictive of a highly unfavorable developmental trajectory characterized by the potential for persistent ADHD, increasing psychosocial burden, accumulating comorbidities, serious lifelong functional deficits across a broad range of domains, delinquency/criminality, and adult antisocial behavior. Impulsive aggression, which triggers peer rejection and a vicious cycle of escalating dysfunction, may be a key factor in unfavorable psychosocial outcomes attributed to ADHD. Because severe aggressive behavior does not remit in many children when treated with primary ADHD therapy (i.e., stimulants and behavioral therapy), a common practice is to add medication of a different class to specifically target aggressive behavior. Conclusions: Impulsive aggression in children and adolescents with ADHD is a serious clinical and public health problem. Although adjunctive therapy with an aggression-targeted agent is widely recommended when

  17. Study of immunological aspects of aspergillosis in mice and effect of polyene macrolide antibiotic (SJA-95) and IFN-γ: a possible role of IFN-γ as an adjunct in antifungal therapy.

    PubMed

    Naik, Suresh R; Thakare, Vishnu N; Desai, Sandhya K; Rahalkar, Prabhakar R

    2011-12-30

    New polyene macrolide antibiotic SJA-95 in free as well as liposomal (lip.) forms, with and without interferon-γ (IFN-γ) was studied in mice model of aspergillosis using biological and biochemical parameters viz. colony forming units (CFU) in liver, spleen, kidney, lung and brain, and serum IgG, and interleukin-4 (IL-4). Treatment with free and lip SJA-95 along with IFN-γ prolonged the survival time, reduced CFU in vital organs, decreased serum IgG and IL-4 levels. SJA-95 lip form showed greater antifungal activity as compared to free form. The combined treatment of lip SJA-95 with IFN-γ showed further enhancement in antifungal activity of SJA-95 (lip). The present experimental findings demonstrated IFN-γ might act as a potent modulator in immune reaction during fungal infection and can be a useful adjunctive in antifungal therapy in the management of deep seated systemic mycoses.

  18. Serotonin and Aggressiveness in Chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Serotonin (5-HT) regulates aggressive behavior in animals. This study examined if 5-HT regulation of aggressiveness is gene-dependent. Chickens from two divergently selected lines KGB and MBB (Kind Gentle Birds and Mean Bad Birds displaying low and high aggressiveness, respectively) and DXL (Dekalb ...

  19. Non-absorbed Antibiotics for IBS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-16

    absorbed antibiotic rifaximin for nonconstipated irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). This effort adds to the body of literature from other, smaller studies that...have demonstrated clinical efficacy for IBS with rifaximin . Non-absorbed antibiotics have been endorsed by the American College of Gastroenterology... rifaximin 400 mg three times daily for 10 days or placebo. During the initial 2 weeks of therapy and the subsequent 10 weeks of follow-up rifaximin

  20. Shorter courses of parenteral antibiotic therapy do not appear to influence response rates for children with acute hematogenous osteomyelitis: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Le Saux, Nicole; Howard, Andrew; Barrowman, Nicholas J; Gaboury, Isabelle; Sampson, Margaret; Moher, David

    2002-01-01

    Background Acute hematogenous osteomyelitis (AHO) occurs primarily in children and is believed to evolve from bacteremia followed by localization of infection to the metaphysis of bones. Currently, there is no consensus on the route and duration of antimicrobial therapy to treat AHO. Methods We conducted a systematic review of a short versus long course of treatment for AHO due primarily to Staphylococcus aureus in children aged 3 months to 16 years. We searched Medline, Embase and the Cochrane trials registry for controlled trials. Clinical cure rate at 6 months was the primary outcome variable, and groups receiving less than 7 days of intravenous therapy were compared with groups receiving one week or longer of intravenous antimicrobials. Results 12 eligible prospective studies, one of which was randomized, were identified. The overall cure rate at 6 months for the short course of intravenous therapy was 95.2% (95% CI = 90.4, 97.7) compared to 98.8% (95% CI = 93.6, 99.8) for the longer course of therapy. There was no significant difference in the duration of oral therapy between the two groups. Conclusions Given the potential increased morbidity and cost associated with longer courses of intravenous therapy, this finding should be confirmed through a randomized controlled equivalence trial. PMID:12181082

  1. Antibiotic releasing biodegradable scaffolds for osteomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Nair, Manitha; Krishnan, Amit

    2014-01-01

    Osteomyelitis is characterized by progressive inflammatory bone degeneration. In the management of chronic osteomyelitis, it is necessary to remove the infected bone tissue followed by implantation of an antibiotic releasing biomaterial that can release antibiotic locally for long periods of time. The main carrier used in clinics for this application is polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) (Eg. Septopal beads). However, major drawback is the need of an additional surgery to remove the beads after therapy, as PMMA is not biodegradable. This necessitates the requirement of biodegradable carrier systems that can release antibiotics and simultaneously support debrided bone formation. This review summarizes biodegradable carrier systems that have been reported for the localised treatment and prophylaxis of osteomyelitis.

  2. Antibiotic dosing in multiple organ dysfunction syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ulldemolins, Marta; Roberts, Jason A; Lipman, Jeffrey; Rello, Jordi

    2011-05-01

    Although early and appropriate antibiotic therapy remains the cornerstone of success for the treatment of septic shock, few data exist to guide antibiotic dose optimization in critically ill patients, particularly those with multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS). It is well known that MODS significantly alters the patient's physiology, but the effects of these variations on pharmacokinetics have not been reviewed concisely. Therefore, the aims of this article are to summarize the disease-driven variations in pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics and to provide antibiotic dosing recommendations for critically ill patients with MODS. The main findings of this review are that the two parameters that vary with greatest significance in critically ill patients with MODS are drug volume of distribution and clearance. Disease- and clinician-driven changes lead to an increased volume of distribution and lower-than-expected plasma drug concentrations during the first day of therapy at least. Decreased antibiotic clearance is common and can lead to drug toxicity. In summary, "front-loaded" doses of antibiotic during the first 24 h of therapy should account for the likely increases in the antibiotic volume of distribution. Thereafter, maintenance dosing must be guided by drug clearance and adjusted to the degree of organ dysfunction.

  3. Group Music Intervention Reduces Aggression and Improves Self-esteem in Children with Highly Aggressive Behavior: A Pilot Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Myeong Soo; Lee, Jung-Sook

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the effects of group music intervention on aggression and self-esteem in children with highly aggressive behavior. Forty-eight children were allocated to either a music intervention group or an untreated control group. The music intervention group received 50 min of music intervention twice weekly for 15 consecutive weeks. The outcome measures were Child Behavior Checklist Aggression Problems Scale (Parents), Child Aggression Assessment Inventory (Teachers) and Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale. After 15 weeks, the music intervention group showed significant reduction of aggression and improvement of self-esteem compared with the control group. All outcome measures were significantly lower in the music intervention group than prior to treatment, while there was no change in the control group. These findings suggest that music can reduce aggressive behavior and improve self-esteem in children with highly aggressive behavior. Music intervention is an easily accessible therapy for children and as such may be an effective intervention for aggressive behavior. Further more, objective and replicable measures are required from a randomized controlled trial with a larger sample size and active comparable control. PMID:18955314

  4. Analysis of antibiotic consumption in burn patients

    PubMed Central

    Soleymanzadeh-Moghadam, Somayeh; Azimi, Leila; Amani, Laleh; Rastegar Lari, Aida; Alinejad, Faranak; Rastegar Lari, Abdolaziz

    2015-01-01

    Infection control is very important in burn care units, because burn wound infection is one of the main causes of morbidity and mortality among burn patients. Thus, the appropriate prescription of antibiotics can be helpful, but unreasonable prescription can have detrimental consequences, including greater expenses to patients and community alike. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of antibiotic therapy on the emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. 525 strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter baumannii and Staphylococcus aureus were isolated from 335 hospitalized burn patients. Antibiotic susceptibility tests were performed after identification the strains. The records of patients were audited to find the antibiotic used. The results indicated that P. aeruginosa is the most prevalent Gram-negative bacteria. Further, it showed a relation between abuse of antibiotics and emergence of antibiotic resistance. Control of resistance to antibiotics by appropriate prescription practices not only facilitates prevention of infection caused by multi-drug resistant (MDR) microorganisms, but it can also decrease the cost of treatment. PMID:26124986

  5. Antibiotic misuse in a pediatric teaching hospital.

    PubMed Central

    Schollenberg, E.; Albritton, W. L.

    1980-01-01

    Antibiotic use at a pediatric teaching hospital was reviewed for a month. A total of 188 courses of therapy were evaluated with respect to choice of antibiotic, dosage and necessity of treatment. Errors in therapy were noted in 30% of the medical orders and 63% of the surgical orders. The most frequent error, unnecessary therapy, was found in 13% and 45% of the medical and surgical orders respectively. Error rates were highest for the most frequently ordered antibiotics, notably the penicillins. The magnitude of the problem appeared to be similar to that previously reported from general ana adult hospitals. The difficulties with solutions such as educational programs and compulsory consultation are discussed. PMID:7363195

  6. Antibiotic Resistance Questions and Answers

    MedlinePlus

    ... National Activities Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work Strategies and Plans Related CDC Education Programs Global Activities Measuring Outpatient Antibiotic Prescribing Tracking Antibiotic-Resistant ...

  7. Motives in Sexual Aggression: The Chinese Context.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tang, Catherine So-Kum; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Compared sexual and aggressive motives for sexual aggression in Chinese college students. Male undergraduates (N=146) completed self-report measures. Results suggest that sex guilt and aggressive guilt acted as inhibitors for their respective drives and sexual aggression resulted from aggressive, rather than sexual, motives. Sexual aggression may…

  8. RecA Inhibitors Potentiate Antibiotic Activity and Block Evolution of Antibiotic Resistance.

    PubMed

    Alam, Md Kausar; Alhhazmi, Areej; DeCoteau, John F; Luo, Yu; Geyer, C Ronald

    2016-03-17

    Antibiotic resistance arises from the maintenance of resistance mutations or genes acquired from the acquisition of adaptive de novo mutations or the transfer of resistance genes. Antibiotic resistance is acquired in response to antibiotic therapy by activating SOS-mediated DNA repair and mutagenesis and horizontal gene transfer pathways. Initiation of the SOS pathway promotes activation of RecA, inactivation of LexA repressor, and induction of SOS genes. Here, we have identified and characterized phthalocyanine tetrasulfonic acid RecA inhibitors that block antibiotic-induced activation of the SOS response. These inhibitors potentiate the activity of bactericidal antibiotics, including members of the quinolone, β-lactam, and aminoglycoside families in both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. They reduce the ability of bacteria to acquire antibiotic resistance mutations and to transfer mobile genetic elements conferring resistance. This study highlights the advantage of including RecA inhibitors in bactericidal antibiotic therapies and provides a new strategy for prolonging antibiotic shelf life.

  9. ANTIBIOTIC EFFECTS ON BACTERIAL PROFILE IN OSTEONECROSIS OF THE JAW

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Xiaojie; Pushalkar, Smruti; Li, Yihong; Glickman, Robert; Fleisher, Kenneth; Saxena, Deepak

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Oral infection is considered to play a critical role in the pathogenesis of bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaw (BRONJ) and antibiotic therapy has become a mainstay of BRONJ therapy. This study was aimed to investigate the effect of antibiotics on bacterial diversity in BRONJ tissues. MATERIALS AND METHODS The bacterial profile from soft tissues associated with the BRONJ lesion was determined using 16S rRNA-based denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and sequencing. Twenty BRONJ subjects classified as stage 0 to 2 were enrolled in this study and patient groups were divided into an antibiotic cohort (n=10) treated with systemic antibiotic and a non-antibiotic cohort (n=10) with no prior antibiotic therapy. RESULTS The DGGE fingerprints indicated no significant differences in bacterial diversity of BRONJ tissue samples. Patients on antibiotics had higher relative abundance of phylum Firmicutes with bacterial species, Streptococcus intermedius, Lactobacillus gasseri, Mogibacterium timidum and Solobacterium moorei whereas patients without antibiotics had greater amounts of Parvimonas micra, and S. anginosus. Thirty percent of bacterial populations were uncultured (yet-to be cultured) phylotypes. CONCLUSION This study using limited sample size indicated that oral antibiotic therapy may have a limited efficacy on the bacterial population associated with BRONJ lesions. PMID:21883710

  10. [Antibiotic prophylaxis before kidney transplantation].

    PubMed

    Robles, N R; Gallego, E; Anaya, F; Franco, A; Valderrábano, F

    1990-02-01

    The effectiveness of antibiotic prophylaxis was evaluated in the immediate postoperative period of renal transplantation (RT). Before RT, the patients were randomly assigned to one of the following groups: 1) cefotaxime (intravenous infusion of 1 g one hour before the operation). 2) Ceftriaxone (1 g i.v. given in a similar way). 3) Control (without antibiotics). Patients who required antibiotic therapy during the first 3 postoperative weeks were excluded. 20 recipients of cadaveric renal grafts were included in each group. There were 39 males and 21 females with a mean age of 39.9 years. One patient from the cefotaxime group (5%), 2 from the ceftriaxone group (10%) and 2 from the control group (10%) developed infection of the surgical wound, all due to grampositive organisms. 19 patients had urinary tract infections: 7 from the control group (35%), 7 from the cefotaxime group (35%), and 5 from the ceftriaxone group (25%). The development of wound infection was not correlated with urea, creatinine, hemoglobin or total protein levels, or with urinary tract infection or fistula, diabetes or fever. The mean packed red cell volume of the patients who developed wound infection was 24.7 +/- 1.2 vs 28.6 +/- 6.6 in those who did not (p less than 0.01). All patients with visible hematoma and 3 of 10 with perirenal blood collection had wound infection. It was concluded that antibiotic prophylaxis for renal transplantation was useless in our patients.

  11. Antibiotics and Resistance: Glossary

    MedlinePlus

    ... induced by natural or human activity on the ecology and living organisms. Ecology The study of the relationships and interactions between ... antibiotics The Cost of Resistance Science of Resistance Ecology Antibiotics in Agriculture Antibacterial Agents Glossary References Web ...

  12. Comparative Outcome Analysis of Penicillin-Based Versus Fluoroquinolone-Based Antibiotic Therapy for Community-Acquired Pneumonia: A Nationwide Population-Based Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chi-Chuan; Lin, Chia-Hui; Lin, Kuan-Yin; Chuang, Yu-Chung; Sheng, Wang-Huei

    2016-02-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a common but potentially life-threatening condition, but limited information exists on the effectiveness of fluoroquinolones compared to β-lactams in outpatient settings. We aimed to compare the effectiveness and outcomes of penicillins versus respiratory fluoroquinolones for CAP at outpatient clinics.This was a claim-based retrospective cohort study. Patients aged 20 years or older with at least 1 new pneumonia treatment episode were included, and the index penicillin or respiratory fluoroquinolone therapies for a pneumonia episode were at least 5 days in duration. The 2 groups were matched by propensity scores. Cox proportional hazard models were used to compare the rates of hospitalizations/emergence service visits and 30-day mortality. A logistic model was used to compare the likelihood of treatment failure between the 2 groups.After propensity score matching, 2622 matched pairs were included in the final model. The likelihood of treatment failure of fluoroquinolone-based therapy was lower than that of penicillin-based therapy (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 0.88; 95% confidence interval [95%CI], 0.77-0.99), but no differences were found in hospitalization/emergence service (ES) visits (adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 1.27; 95% CI, 0.92-1.74) and 30-day mortality (adjusted HR, 0.69; 95% CI, 0.30-1.62) between the 2 groups.The likelihood of treatment failure of fluoroquinolone-based therapy was lower than that of penicillin-based therapy for CAP on an outpatient clinic basis. However, this effect may be marginal. Further investigation into the comparative effectiveness of these 2 treatment options is warranted.

  13. Intensive Insulin Therapy: Tight Blood Sugar Control

    MedlinePlus

    ... insulin therapy can help you achieve desired blood sugar control and what intensive insulin therapy requires of ... aggressive treatment approach designed to control your blood sugar levels. Intensive insulin therapy requires close monitoring of ...

  14. Sweet antibiotics - the role of glycosidic residues in antibiotic and antitumor activity and their randomization.

    PubMed

    Kren, Vladimír; Rezanka, Tomás

    2008-08-01

    A large number of antibiotics are glycosides. In numerous cases the glycosidic residues are crucial to their activity; sometimes, glycosylation only improves their pharmacokinetic parameters. Recent developments in molecular glycobiology have improved our understanding of aglycone vs. glycoside activities and made it possible to develop new, more active or more effective glycodrugs based on these findings - a very illustrative recent example is vancomycin. The majority of attention has been devoted to glycosidic antibiotics including their past, present, and probably future position in antimicrobial therapy. The role of the glycosidic residue in the biological activity of glycosidic antibiotics, and the attendant targeting and antibiotic selectivity mediated by glycone and aglycone in antibiotics some antitumor agents is discussed here in detail. Chemical and enzymatic modifications of aglycones in antibiotics, including their synthesis, are demonstrated on various examples, with particular emphasis on the role of specific and mutant glycosyltransferases and glycorandomization in the preparation of these compounds. The last section of this review describes and explains the interactions of the glycone moiety of the antibiotics with DNA and especially the design and structure-activity relationship of glycosidic antibiotics, including their classification based on their aglycone and glycosidic moiety. The new enzymatic methodology 'glycorandomization' enabled the preparation of glycoside libraries and opened up new ways to prepare optimized or entirely novel glycoside antibiotics.

  15. Finding alternatives to antibiotics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The spread of antibiotic-resistant pathogens requires new treatments. The availability of new antibiotics has severely declined, and so alternatives to antibiotics need to be considered in both animal agriculture and human medicine. Products for disease prevention are different than products for d...

  16. Antibiotic resistant in microorganisms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Antimicrobial agents are necessary for use in veterinary medicine including the production of food producing animals. Antibiotic use is indicated for the treatment of bacterial target organisms and/or disease for which the antibiotic was developed. However, an unintended consequence of antibiotic ...

  17. Highly Aggressive Women in a Forensic Psychiatric Hospital.

    PubMed

    Beck, Niels C; Hammer, Joseph H; Robbins, Sharon; Tubbesing, Tara; Menditto, Anthony; Pardee, Alicia

    2017-03-01

    In this study, we compared three groups of women admitted to a public forensic inpatient facility over the course of a two-year period. Detailed and systematic examination of social and psychiatric histories revealed that the group with the most persistent levels of aggression differed from the other two groups with respect to frequency of self-harming behavior, intellectual impairment, hypothyroidism, a childhood diagnosis of attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and age of onset of psychiatric and behavioral symptoms. The high-aggression group also had the highest rate of childhood physical and sexual abuse, but the difference between that group and the two lower aggression groups did not achieve statistical significance. From the standpoint of childhood adversity, 94 percent of those in the high-aggression group had been placed outside of the original home by age 11. Eighty-nine percent were intellectually impaired. At admission, physical examinations revealed that 50 percent had a history of hypothyroidism and two-thirds were obese. Before admission, most had manifested severe aggression and emotional dysregulation, as evinced by high levels of self-harm, suicide attempts, and aggressive behavior in previous institutional settings that was both frequent and intense. Patients who share these characteristics are currently placed on a ward at the hospital with a milieu and individual therapy programs that are based on a dialectical behavior therapy approach that targets key symptoms of emotional and behavioral dysregulation.

  18. Transperineal aggressive angiomyxoma.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Pedro; Melo Abreu, Elisa; Cunha, Teresa Margarida; Rolim, Inês

    2017-04-11

    A 45-year-old woman with a history of total hysterectomy with adnexal preservation for uterine leiomyomas presented to our hospital with a right gluteal palpable mass, which she first noticed 6 months before and had progressively enlarged since then.Radiological studies revealed a 14 cm lesion with translevator growth that displaced rather than invaded adjacent structures, with a peculiar whorled pattern on T2-weighted MRI, which enhanced following gadolinium administration. CT-guided biopsy was performed, and in conjunction with imaging features the diagnosis of an aggressive angiomyxoma was assumed and confirmed following surgical excision.

  19. The nature of human aggression.

    PubMed

    Archer, John

    2009-01-01

    Human aggression is viewed from four explanatory perspectives, derived from the ethological tradition. The first consists of its adaptive value, which can be seen throughout the animal kingdom, involving resource competition and protection of the self and offspring, which has been viewed from a cost-benefit perspective. The second concerns the phylogenetic origin of aggression, which in humans involves brain mechanisms that are associated with anger and inhibition, the emotional expression of anger, and how aggressive actions are manifest. The third concerns the origin of aggression in development and its subsequent modification through experience. An evolutionary approach to development yields conclusions that are contrary to the influential social learning perspective, notably that physical aggression occurs early in life, and its subsequent development is characterized by learned inhibition. The fourth explanation concerns the motivational mechanisms controlling aggression: approached from an evolutionary background, these mechanisms range from the inflexible reflex-like responses to those incorporating rational decision-making.

  20. Aggression can be contagious: Longitudinal associations between proactive aggression and reactive aggression among young twins.

    PubMed

    Dickson, Daniel J; Richmond, Ashley D; Brendgen, Mara; Vitaro, Frank; Laursen, Brett; Dionne, Ginette; Boivin, Michel

    2015-01-01

    The present study examined sibling influence over reactive and proactive aggression in a sample of 452 same-sex twins (113 male dyads, 113 female dyads). Between and within siblings influence processes were examined as a function of relative levels of parental coercion and hostility to test the hypothesis that aggression contagion between twins occurs only among dyads who experience parental coerciveness. Teacher reports of reactive and proactive aggression were collected for each twin in kindergarten (M = 6.04 years; SD = 0.27) and in first grade (M = 7.08 years; SD = 0.27). Families were divided into relatively low, average, and relatively high parental coercion-hostility groups on the basis of maternal reports collected when the children were 5 years old. In families with relatively high levels of parental coercion-hostility, there was evidence of between-sibling influence, such that one twin's reactive aggression at age 6 predicted increases in the other twin's reactive aggression from ages 6 to 7, and one twin's proactive aggression at age 6 predicted increases in the other twin's proactive aggression from ages 6 to 7. There was also evidence of within-sibling influence such that a child's level of reactive aggression at age 6 predicted increases in the same child's proactive aggression at age 7, regardless of parental coercion-hostility. The findings provide new information about the etiology of reactive and proactive aggression and individual differences in their developmental interplay.

  1. Antibiotics: a new hope.

    PubMed

    Wright, Gerard D

    2012-01-27

    Antibiotic resistance is one of the most significant challenges to the health care sector in the 21st century. A myriad of resistance mechanisms have emerged over the past decades and are widely disseminated worldwide through bacterial populations. At the same time there have been ever fewer new antibiotics brought to market, and the pharmaceutical industry increasingly sees antibiotics as a poor investment. Paradoxically, we are in a Golden Age of understanding how antibiotics work and where resistance comes from. This knowledge is fueling a renaissance of interest and innovation in antibiotic discovery, synthesis, and mechanism that is poised to inform drug discovery to address pressing clinical needs.

  2. Bile signalling promotes chronic respiratory infections and antibiotic tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Reen, F. Jerry; Flynn, Stephanie; Woods, David F.; Dunphy, Niall; Chróinín, Muireann Ní; Mullane, David; Stick, Stephen; Adams, Claire; O’Gara, Fergal

    2016-01-01

    Despite aggressive antimicrobial therapy, many respiratory pathogens persist in the lung, underpinning the chronic inflammation and eventual lung decline that are characteristic of respiratory disease. Recently, bile acid aspiration has emerged as a major comorbidity associated with a range of lung diseases, shaping the lung microbiome and promoting colonisation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Cystic Fibrosis (CF) patients. In order to uncover the molecular mechanism through which bile modulates the respiratory microbiome, a combination of global transcriptomic and phenotypic analyses of the P. aeruginosa response to bile was undertaken. Bile responsive pathways responsible for virulence, adaptive metabolism, and redox control were identified, with macrolide and polymyxin antibiotic tolerance increased significantly in the presence of bile. Bile acids, and chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) in particular, elicited chronic biofilm behaviour in P. aeruginosa, while induction of the pro-inflammatory cytokine Interleukin-6 (IL-6) in lung epithelial cells by CDCA was Farnesoid X Receptor (FXR) dependent. Microbiome analysis of paediatric CF sputum samples demonstrated increased colonisation by P. aeruginosa and other Proteobacterial pathogens in bile aspirating compared to non-aspirating patients. Together, these data suggest that bile acid signalling is a leading trigger for the development of chronic phenotypes underlying the pathophysiology of chronic respiratory disease. PMID:27432520

  3. Television viewing, aggression, and ethnicity.

    PubMed

    Harris, M B

    1992-02-01

    For 416 college students, questioned about their experiences with aggression and television viewing, only very weak correlations between preference for violent shows and aggression were observed. Black males watched significantly more television than other respondents. These findings suggest that the frequently reported correlation between viewing televised violence and aggression may not appear when sex, ethnicity, and education are controlled in a sample of young adults.

  4. Effect of Antibiotic Class on Stroke Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Zierath, Dannielle; Kunze, Allison; Fecteau, Leia; Becker, Kyra

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Infections are common following stroke and associated with worse outcome. Clinical trials evaluating the benefit of prophylactic antibiotics have produced mixed results. This study explores the possibility that antibiotics of different classes may differentially affect stroke outcome. Methods Lewis rats were subjected to transient cerebral ischemia (2 hrs) and survived for 1 month. The day after stroke they were randomized to therapy with ceftiofur (a β-lactam antibiotic), enrofloxacin (a fluoroquinolone antibiotic) or vehicle (as controls) and underwent the equivalent of 7 days of treatment. Behavioral tests were performed weekly until sacrifice. In a subset of animals, histology was done. Results There were no differences in outcomes at 24 hours or 1 week after stroke among the different groups. At 1 month after stroke, however, performance on the rotarod was worse in enrofloxacin treated animals when compared to control animals. Conclusions Independent of infection, the antibiotic enrofloxacin was associated with worse stroke outcome. These data echo the clinical observations to date and suggest that the secondary effects of antibiotics on stroke outcome should be considered when treating infection in subjects with stroke. The mechanism by which this antibiotic affects outcome needs to be elucidated. PMID:26138122

  5. Antibiotic resistance in Chlamydiae.

    PubMed

    Sandoz, Kelsi M; Rockey, Daniel D

    2010-09-01

    There are few documented reports of antibiotic resistance in Chlamydia and no examples of natural and stable antibiotic resistance in strains collected from humans. While there are several reports of clinical isolates exhibiting resistance to antibiotics, these strains either lost their resistance phenotype in vitro, or lost viability altogether. Differences in procedures for chlamydial culture in the laboratory, low recovery rates of clinical isolates and the unknown significance of heterotypic resistance observed in culture may interfere with the recognition and interpretation of antibiotic resistance. Although antibiotic resistance has not emerged in chlamydiae pathogenic to humans, several lines of evidence suggest they are capable of expressing significant resistant phenotypes. The adept ability of chlamydiae to evolve to antibiotic resistance in vitro is demonstrated by contemporary examples of mutagenesis, recombination and genetic transformation. The isolation of tetracycline-resistant Chlamydia suis strains from pigs also emphasizes their adaptive ability to acquire antibiotic resistance genes when exposed to significant selective pressure.

  6. Local antibiotic delivery with bovine cancellous chips.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Christine S; Katz, Jordan; Baker, Maribel I; Supronowicz, Peter R; Gill, Elise; Cobb, Ronald R

    2011-11-01

    Infected bone defects and osteomyelitis are encountered frequently in trauma cases. Currently, the standard of care for osteomyelitis cases is prolonged systemic antibiotic therapy and implantation of antibiotic carrier beads. However, this method requires a secondary surgery to remove the beads after the infection has cleared. In the present study a common bone void filler was investigated for its ability to be infused with an antibiotic. This study demonstrates that the xenograft material tested can be loaded with gentamicin and release clinically relevant levels of the drug for at least 14 days in vitro allowing for the inhibition of bacterial growth on the graft. This study also demonstrates that the levels of gentamicin released did not have an adverse effect on primary osteoblast cell proliferation or ability to generate alkaline phosphatase. This bone void filler may represent a viable alternative to current methods of local antibiotic delivery in orthopedic applications.

  7. Antibiotic stewardship in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Luyt, Charles-Edouard; Bréchot, Nicolas; Trouillet, Jean-Louis; Chastre, Jean

    2014-08-13

    The rapid emergence and dissemination of antimicrobial-resistant microorganisms in ICUs worldwide constitute a problem of crisis dimensions. The root causes of this problem are multifactorial, but the core issues are clear. The emergence of antibiotic resistance is highly correlated with selective pressure resulting from inappropriate use of these drugs. Appropriate antibiotic stewardship in ICUs includes not only rapid identification and optimal treatment of bacterial infections in these critically ill patients, based on pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic characteristics, but also improving our ability to avoid administering unnecessary broad-spectrum antibiotics, shortening the duration of their administration, and reducing the numbers of patients receiving undue antibiotic therapy. Either we will be able to implement such a policy or we and our patients will face an uncontrollable surge of very difficult-to-treat pathogens.

  8. Antibiotic therapy for inducible AmpC β-lactamase-producing Gram-negative bacilli: what are the alternatives to carbapenems, quinolones and aminoglycosides?

    PubMed

    Harris, P N A; Ferguson, J K

    2012-10-01

    Some bacteria that possess chromosomally determined AmpC β-lactamases may express these enzymes at a high level following exposure to β-lactams, either by induction or selection for derepressed mutants. This may lead to clinical failure even if an isolate initially tests susceptible in vitro, a phenomenon best characterised by third-generation cephalosporin therapy for Enterobacter bacteraemia or meningitis. Several other Enterobacteriaceae, such as Serratia marcescens, Citrobacter freundii, Providencia spp. and Morganella morganii (often termed the 'ESCPM' group), may also express high levels of AmpC. However, the risk of clinical failure with β-lactams that test susceptible in vitro is less clear in these species than for Enterobacter. Laboratories frequently do not report β-lactam or β-lactamase inhibitor combination drug susceptibilities for ESCPM organisms, encouraging alternative therapy with quinolones, aminoglycosides or carbapenems. However, quinolones and carbapenems present problems with selective pressure for multiresistant organisms, and aminoglycosides with potential toxicity. The risk of emergent AmpC-mediated resistance for non-Enterobacter spp. appears rare in clinical studies. Piperacillin/tazobactam may remain effective and may be less selective for AmpC derepressed mutants than cephalosporins. The potential roles for agents such as cefepime or trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole are also discussed. Clinical studies that better define optimal treatment for this group of bacteria are required.

  9. Reduction of Aggressive Behavior in the School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petermann, Ulrike

    1988-01-01

    Discusses what may be considered aggressive behavior, what motivates aggressive students, and possible teacher responses to aggressive behavior. Describes four points on which teachers can focus to diminish the attractiveness of aggression and ensure that it is not rewarded. Identifies learning activities which provide aggressive students with the…

  10. The Effects of Pornography on Aggressive Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stacy, Lauri L.

    This document reviews existing empirical research on the effect of pornography on aggressive behavior. Two types of pornography are distinguished: aggressive pornography and non-aggressive pornography. Conclusions drawn from the research review are presented, including: (1) aggressive pornograpy consistently increases aggressive attitudes and…

  11. Lunar Influences on Human Aggression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Gordon W.; Dua, Manjula

    1983-01-01

    Used league records of all Canadian hockey games (N=426) played during a season to test a lunar-aggression hypothesis. Despite the use of multiple measures of lunar phase and interpersonal aggression, support for lunar influence was not forthcoming. Supplemental data revealed that beliefs in lunar influence are fairly common. (JAC)

  12. Traumatic Brain Injury and Aggression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Laurence

    1994-01-01

    Persons who have suffered traumatic injury to the brain may subsequently display aggressive behavior. Three main syndromes of aggression following traumatic brain injury are described: (1) episodic dyscontrol; (2) frontal lobe disinhibition; and (3) exacerbation of premorbid antisociality. The neuropsychological substrates of these syndromes are…

  13. A multiplexed microfluidic platform for rapid antibiotic susceptibility testing.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Ritika; Mukherjee, Arnab; Sevgen, Selami E; Sanpitakseree, Chotitath; Lee, Jaebum; Schroeder, Charles M; Kenis, Paul J A

    2013-11-15

    Effective treatment of clinical infections is critically dependent on the ability to rapidly screen patient samples to identify antibiograms of infecting pathogens. Existing methods for antibiotic susceptibility testing suffer from several disadvantages, including long turnaround times, excess sample and reagent consumption, poor detection sensitivity, and limited combinatorial capabilities. Unfortunately, these factors preclude the timely administration of appropriate antibiotics, complicating management of infections and exacerbating the development of antibiotic resistance. Here, we seek to address these issues by developing a microfluidic platform that relies on fluorescence detection of bacteria that express green fluorescent protein for highly sensitive and rapid antibiotic susceptibility testing. This platform possesses several advantages compared to conventional methods: (1) analysis of antibiotic action in two to four hours, (2) enhanced detection sensitivity (≈ 1 cell), (3) minimal consumption of cell samples and antibiotic reagents (<6 µL), and (4) improved portability through the implementation of normally closed valves. We employed this platform to quantify the effects of four antibiotics (ampicillin, cefalexin, chloramphenicol, tetracycline) and their combinations on Escherichia coli. Within four hours, the susceptibility of bacteria to antibiotics can be determined by detecting variations in maxima of local fluorescence intensity over time. As expected, cell density is a major determinant of antibiotic efficacy. Our results also revealed that combinations of three or more antibiotics are not necessarily better for eradicating pathogens compared to pairs of antibiotics. Overall, this microfluidic based biosensor technology has the potential to provide rapid and precise guidance in clinical therapies by identifying the antibiograms of pathogens.

  14. Spectrum, antibiotic susceptibility and virulence factors of bacterial infections complicating severe acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Israil, A M; Palade, R; Chifiriuc, M C; Vasile, D; Grigoriu, M; Voiculescu, D; Popa, D

    2011-01-01

    Secondary infection of pancreatic necrotic tissue and peripancreatic fluid is a serious complication of acute pancreatitis resulting in significant morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to find out the spectrum of bacterial infections, their antibiotic susceptibility patterns and virulence features in patients with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). A total of 19 patients with acute pancreatitis were consecutively selected from 153 clinical cases of septic abdominal surgical emergencies (age 29-80, 12 males, 7 females) admitted during 2009-2011, in the First Surgical Clinic of the University Emergency Hospital of Bucharest. All 19 SAP cases were submitted to pre-operatory antibiotic empiric treatment. Ten cases were culture negative, in spite of the positive microscopy registered in eight of them. The rest of nine cases were culture positive, 17 different bacterial strains being isolated and identified as belonging to eight aerobic and four anaerobic species. Polymicrobial infection was seen in six patients and the etiology was dominated by Gram-negative bacilli, followed by gut anaerobic bacteria, attesting their colonic origin. The susceptibility testing of the isolated strains confirmed in vitro in all cases the efficiency of the antibiotics that had been used in the empiric pre-operatory treatment. Out of 19 cases submitted to pre-operatory empiric treatment, 14 proved a favorable evolution and five a lethal outcome. The host depending factors (sepsis and other co-morbidities), as well as the aggressivity of the isolated microbial strains (mediated by the presence of different factors implicated in adherence, toxicity and invasion) were found to contribute to the unfavorable, even lethal clinical outcome of SAP cases. In spite of all theoretical controversies, the antibiotic therapy remains at present a very important therapeutic mean for the SAP treatment; although it cannot solve the septic necrotizing pancreatitis in 100% of cases, however

  15. The Neurobiology of Impulsive Aggression.

    PubMed

    Blair, Robert J R

    2016-02-01

    This selective review provides a model of the neurobiology of impulsive aggression from a cognitive neuroscience perspective. It is argued that prototypical cases of impulsive aggression, those associated with anger, involve the recruitment of the acute threat response system structures; that is, the amygdala, hypothalamus, and periaqueductal gray. It is argued that whether the recruitment of these structures results in impulsive aggression or not reflects the functional roles of ventromedial frontal cortex and dorsomedial frontal and anterior insula cortex in response selection. It is also argued that impulsive aggression may occur because of impaired decision making. The aggression may not be accompanied by anger, but it will reflect disrupted evaluation of the rewards/benefits of the action.

  16. The Neurobiology of Impulsive Aggression

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This selective review provides a model of the neurobiology of impulsive aggression from a cognitive neuroscience perspective. It is argued that prototypical cases of impulsive aggression, those associated with anger, involve the recruitment of the acute threat response system structures; that is, the amygdala, hypothalamus, and periaqueductal gray. It is argued that whether the recruitment of these structures results in impulsive aggression or not reflects the functional roles of ventromedial frontal cortex and dorsomedial frontal and anterior insula cortex in response selection. It is also argued that impulsive aggression may occur because of impaired decision making. The aggression may not be accompanied by anger, but it will reflect disrupted evaluation of the rewards/benefits of the action. PMID:26465707

  17. False memories for aggressive acts.

    PubMed

    Laney, Cara; Takarangi, Melanie K T

    2013-06-01

    Can people develop false memories for committing aggressive acts? How does this process compare to developing false memories for victimhood? In the current research we used a simple false feedback procedure to implant false memories for committing aggressive acts (causing a black eye or spreading malicious gossip) or for victimhood (receiving a black eye). We then compared these false memories to other subjects' true memories for equivalent events. False aggressive memories were all too easy to implant, particularly in the minds of individuals with a proclivity towards aggression. Once implanted, the false memories were indistinguishable from true memories for the same events, on several dimensions, including emotional content. Implications for aggression-related memory more generally as well as false confessions are discussed.

  18. Antibiotics and Breastfeeding.

    PubMed

    de Sá Del Fiol, Fernando; Barberato-Filho, Silvio; de Cássia Bergamaschi, Cristiane; Lopes, Luciane Cruz; Gauthier, Timothy P

    2016-01-01

    During the breastfeeding period, bacterial infections can occur in the nursing mother, requiring the use of antibiotics. A lack of accurate information may lead health care professionals and mothers to suspend breastfeeding, which may be unnecessary. This article provides information on the main antibiotics that are appropriate for clinical use and the interference of these antibiotics with the infant to support medical decisions regarding the discontinuation of breastfeeding. We aim to provide information on the pharmacokinetic factors that interfere with the passage of antibiotics into breast milk and the toxicological implications of absorption by the infant. Publications related to the 20 most frequently employed antibiotics and their transfer into breast milk were evaluated. The results demonstrate that most antibiotics in clinical use are considered suitable during breastfeeding; however, the pharmacokinetic profile of each drug must be observed to ensure the resolution of the maternal infection and the safety of the infant.

  19. Biotic acts of antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Aminov, Rustam I.

    2013-01-01

    Biological functions of antibiotics are not limited to killing. The most likely function of antibiotics in natural microbial ecosystems is signaling. Does this signaling function of antibiotics also extend to the eukaryotic – in particular mammalian – cells? In this review, the host modulating properties of three classes of antibiotics (macrolides, tetracyclines, and β-lactams) will be briefly discussed. Antibiotics can be effective in treatment of a broad spectrum of diseases and pathological conditions other than those of infectious etiology and, in this capacity, may find widespread applications beyond the intended antimicrobial use. This use, however, should not compromise the primary function antibiotics are used for. The biological background for this inter-kingdom signaling is also discussed. PMID:23966991

  20. Platforms for antibiotic discovery.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Kim

    2013-05-01

    The spread of resistant bacteria, leading to untreatable infections, is a major public health threat but the pace of antibiotic discovery to combat these pathogens has slowed down. Most antibiotics were originally isolated by screening soil-derived actinomycetes during the golden era of antibiotic discovery in the 1940s to 1960s. However, diminishing returns from this discovery platform led to its collapse, and efforts to create a new platform based on target-focused screening of large libraries of synthetic compounds failed, in part owing to the lack of penetration of such compounds through the bacterial envelope. This article considers strategies to re-establish viable platforms for antibiotic discovery. These include investigating untapped natural product sources such as uncultured bacteria, establishing rules of compound penetration to enable the development of synthetic antibiotics, developing species-specific antibiotics and identifying prodrugs that have the potential to eradicate dormant persisters, which are often responsible for hard-to-treat infections.

  1. Beliefs about aggression moderate alcohol's effects on aggression.

    PubMed

    Levinson, Cheri A; Giancola, Peter R; Parrott, Dominic J

    2011-02-01

    The goal of this investigation was to determine whether permissive beliefs about aggression moderate the relation between acute alcohol intoxication and aggression in two large experiments. Participants in Study 1 were 328 (163 men and 165 women) social drinkers and those in Study 2 were 518 (252 men and 266 women) social drinkers. Beliefs about aggression were assessed using a well-validated self-report measure. Following the consumption of either an alcohol or a placebo beverage, participants were tested on a laboratory task in which electric shocks were received from, and administered to, a fictitious opponent under the guise of a competitive reaction-time task. Aggression was operationalized as the combined mean responses for shock intensity and duration across all trials. Our central finding was that alcohol increased aggression in persons with more approving beliefs about aggression than in those who did not hold such beliefs. Our results are discussed within the context of Huesmann's (1988) cognitive script model of aggression. Suggestions for violence prevention efforts are put forth as well.

  2. Antibiotics and the gut microbiota.

    PubMed

    Modi, Sheetal R; Collins, James J; Relman, David A

    2014-10-01

    Antibiotics have been a cornerstone of innovation in the fields of public health, agriculture, and medicine. However, recent studies have shed new light on the collateral damage they impart on the indigenous host-associated communities. These drugs have been found to alter the taxonomic, genomic, and functional capacity of the human gut microbiota, with effects that are rapid and sometimes persistent. Broad-spectrum antibiotics reduce bacterial diversity while expanding and collapsing membership of specific indigenous taxa. Furthermore, antibiotic treatment selects for resistant bacteria, increases opportunities for horizontal gene transfer, and enables intrusion of pathogenic organisms through depletion of occupied natural niches, with profound implications for the emergence of resistance. Because these pervasive alterations can be viewed as an uncoupling of mutualistic host-microbe relationships, it is valuable to reconsider antimicrobial therapies in the context of an ecological framework. Understanding the biology of competitive exclusion, interspecies protection, and gene flow of adaptive functions in the gut environment may inform the design of new strategies that treat infections while preserving the ecology of our beneficial constituents.

  3. Desensitization to antibiotics in children.

    PubMed

    Cernadas, Josefina R

    2013-02-01

    Drug hypersensitivity reactions can occur to almost all drugs and antibiotics are among the most common cause for this kind of reactions. Drug hypersensitivity may affect any organ or system, and manifestations range widely in clinical severity from mild pruritus to anaphylaxis. In most cases, the suspected drug is avoided in the future. In case of infection, there is usually a safe antibiotic alternative. Nonetheless, in some cases, no alternative treatment exists for optimal therapy. Under these circumstances, desensitization may be performed. Drug desensitization is defined as the induction of a temporary state of tolerance to a drug which can only be maintained by continuous administration of the medication responsible for the hypersensitivity reaction. Desensitization is mainly performed in IgE-mediated reactions. Increasing doses of the implicated drug are administered over a short period of time, until the therapeutic dose is achieved and tolerated. Very few studies confined to children are found in literature. Most of them are case reports. In general, the proposed desensitization schemes are similar to those used in adults differing only in the final dose administered. The purpose of this study is to review desensitization to antibiotics in children presenting and discussing three clinical practical cases of desensitization in this age group.

  4. Antibiotic resistance in Burkholderia species.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, Katherine A; Schweizer, Herbert P

    2016-09-01

    The genus Burkholderia comprises metabolically diverse and adaptable Gram-negative bacteria, which thrive in often adversarial environments. A few members of the genus are prominent opportunistic pathogens. These include Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei of the B. pseudomallei complex, which cause glanders and melioidosis, respectively. Burkholderia cenocepacia, Burkholderia multivorans, and Burkholderia vietnamiensis belong to the Burkholderia cepacia complex and affect mostly cystic fibrosis patients. Infections caused by these bacteria are difficult to treat because of significant antibiotic resistance. The first line of defense against antimicrobials in Burkholderia species is the outer membrane penetration barrier. Most Burkholderia contain a modified lipopolysaccharide that causes intrinsic polymyxin resistance. Contributing to reduced drug penetration are restrictive porin proteins. Efflux pumps of the resistance nodulation cell division family are major players in Burkholderia multidrug resistance. Third and fourth generation β-lactam antibiotics are seminal for treatment of Burkholderia infections, but therapeutic efficacy is compromised by expression of several β-lactamases and ceftazidime target mutations. Altered DNA gyrase and dihydrofolate reductase targets cause fluoroquinolone and trimethoprim resistance, respectively. Although antibiotic resistance hampers therapy of Burkholderia infections, the characterization of resistance mechanisms lags behind other non-enteric Gram-negative pathogens, especially ESKAPE bacteria such as Acinetobacter baumannii, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

  5. Aggressive Erotica and Violence against Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donnerstein, Edward

    1980-01-01

    Examines the effects of aggressive-erotic stimuli on male aggression toward females. Male subjects' deliveries of electric shocks to males or females after viewing either a neutral, erotic, or aggressive-erotic film were measured. (Author/SS)

  6. Differential diagnosis and management of human-directed aggression in dogs.

    PubMed

    Reisner, Ilana R

    2003-03-01

    Canine aggression directed to human beings is a common presenting complaint and requires attention to safety issues and behavior modification to minimize the risks of future aggression. Dogs may bite familiar people, including family members, or unfamiliar people for a variety of reasons. Anxiety plays an important role in aggression regardless of its target or circumstances. Effective management of aggression may include education and safety counseling for owners, lifestyle changes for dogs and owners, avoidance of provocations when possible, and behavior modification to minimize the risk of future bites. Drug therapy may be indicated to facilitate behavior modification or to reduce reactivity in the dog.

  7. Antibiotic dose optimization in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Cotta, M O; Roberts, J A; Lipman, J

    2015-12-01

    The judicious use of existing antibiotics is essential for preserving their activity against infections. In the era of multi-drug resistance, this is of particular importance in clinical areas characterized by high antibiotic use, such as the ICU. Antibiotic dose optimization in critically ill patients requires sound knowledge not only of the altered physiology in serious infections - including severe sepsis, septic shock and ventilator-associated pneumonia - but also of the pathogen-drug exposure relationship (i.e. pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic index). An important consideration is the fact that extreme shifts in organ function, such as those seen in hyperdynamic patients or those with multiple organ dysfunction syndrome, can have an impact upon drug exposure, and constant vigilance is required when reviewing antibiotic dosing regimens in the critically ill. The use of continuous renal replacement therapy and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation remain important interventions in these patients; however, both of these treatments can have a profound effect on antibiotic exposure. We suggest placing emphasis on the use of therapeutic drug monitoring and dose individualization when optimizing therapy in these settings.

  8. [The effect of media violence on aggression: is aggressive behavior mediated by aggressive cognitions and emotions?].

    PubMed

    Yukawa, S; Yoshida, F

    1999-06-01

    This study investigated whether cognitions and emotions elicited by media violence mediate aggressive behavior. Eighty undergraduates, 40 men and 40 women, participated in the experiment. First, subjects were exposed to one of four violent videos which varied in levels of violence and entertainment. Subjects' heart rate and eyeblink rate were continuously recorded while they watched the video. After watching it, subjects described their thoughts which occurred while watching it and rated their affective reactions to it. Finally, their aggressive behavior was measured. Results showed that (1) videos high in violence elicited more aggressive thoughts, more thoughts of negative affect, stronger negative affects, and stronger empty-powerless affects, whereas videos high in entertainment elicited stronger positive affects; (2) no significant differences were found among the videos in terms of physiological reactions and aggressive behavior; and (3) cognitions and emotions elicited by media violence did not mediate aggressive behavior.

  9. Aggression Can be Contagious: Longitudinal Associations between Proactive Aggression and Reactive Aggression Among Young Twins

    PubMed Central

    Dickson, Daniel J.; Richmond, Ashley; Brendgen, Mara; Vitaro, Frank; Laursen, Brett; Dionne, Ginette; Boivin, Michel

    2015-01-01

    The present study examined sibling influence over reactive and proactive aggression in a sample of 452 same-sex twins (113 male dyads, 113 female dyads). Between and within siblings influence processes were examined as a function of relative levels of parental coercion and hostility to test the hypothesis that aggression contagion between twins occurs only among dyads who experience parental coerciveness. Teacher reports of reactive and proactive aggression were collected for each twin in kindergarten (M = 6.04 years; SD = 0.27) and in first grade (M = 7.08 years; SD = 0.27). Families were divided into relatively low, average, and relatively high parental coercion-hostility groups on the basis of maternal reports collected when the children were 5 years old. In families with relatively high levels of parental coercion-hostility, there was evidence of between-sibling influence, such that one twin’s reactive aggression at age 6 predicted increases in the other twin’s reactive aggression from ages 6 to 7, and one twin’s proactive aggression at age 6 predicted increases in the other twin’s proactive aggression from ages 6 to 7. There was also evidence of within-sibling influence such that a child’s level of reactive aggression at age 6 predicted increases in the same child’s proactive aggression at age 7, regardless of parental coercion-hostility. The findings provide new information about the etiology of reactive and proactive aggression and individual differences in their developmental interplay. PMID:25683448

  10. Antibiotics for the treatment of hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Patidar, Kavish R; Bajaj, Jasmohan S

    2013-06-01

    The treatment of hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is complex and therapeutic regimens vary according to the acuity of presentation and the goals of therapy. Most treatments for HE rely on manipulating the intestinal milieu and therefore antibiotics that act on the gut form a key treatment strategy. Prominent antibiotics studied in HE are neomycin, metronidazole, vancomycin and rifaximin. For the management of the acute episode, all antibiotics have been tested. However the limited numbers studied, adverse effects (neomycin oto- and nephrotoxicity, metronidazole neurotoxicity) and potential for resistance emergence (vancomycin-resistant enterococcus) has limited the use of most antibiotics, apart from rifaximin which has the greatest evidence base. Rifaximin has also demonstrated, in conjunction with lactulose, to prevent overt HE recurrence in a multi-center, randomized trial. Despite its cost in the US, rifaximin may prove cost-saving by preventing hospitalizations for overt HE. In minimal/covert HE, rifaximin is the only systematically studied antibiotic. Rifaximin showed improvement in cognition, inflammation, quality-of-life and driving simulator performance but cost-analysis does not favor its use at the current time. Antibiotics, especially rifaximin, have a definite role in the management across the spectrum of HE.

  11. Predictors of aggressive clinical phenotype among immunohistochemically confirmed atypical adenomas.

    PubMed

    Zaidi, Hasan A; Cote, David J; Dunn, Ian F; Laws, Edward R

    2016-12-01

    Despite formal pathological criteria, not all atypical pituitary adenomas display clinically aggressive behavior. We set out to determine which factors predict a clinically aggressive phenotype among a cohort of atypical pituitary adenomas. Medical records were retrospectively reviewed from April 2008 to July 2015. Of 569 pituitary adenomas, 47 (8.3%) patients were surgically treated for atypical adenomas as defined by the WHO criteria. Clinically aggressive adenomas were defined as occurring in those patients who necessitated additional therapeutic intervention after the index (first) surgery, including additional surgery, medical therapy, or radiosurgery. Forty-seven patients with histopathological and immunohistochemical confirmation of atypical adenomas were identified and of these, 23 were noted to have a clinically aggressive course. Among the remaining 24 patients, the disease remained quiescent after the index surgery. On univariate analysis, clinically aggressive lesions were more likely to have a larger axial diameter on MRI (2.9±1.9cm vs. 1.9±0.7cm, p=0.02), greater incidence of cavernous sinus invasion (65.2% vs. 20.8%, p<0.01), and greater incidence of clival extension (60.9% vs. 0, p<0.01) on preoperative imaging. The two groups were equivalent with regard to immunohistochemical staining for ACTH, HGH, LH, FSH, PRL, and TSH. Clinically aggressive lesions, however, trended towards a greater average MIB-1 proliferative index (7.5%±4.9 vs. 6.0%±3.6, p=0.03). On multivariate analysis, the MIB-1 proliferative index trended towards statistical significance (p=0.06) as an independent predictor of clinical aggressiveness. Atypical pituitary adenomas are defined by a rigid set of immunohistochemical markers, but not all necessarily demonstrate an aggressive clinical phenotype.

  12. Combined Therapy for Postirradiation Infection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    weeks after ex- posure to ionizing radiation. Antibiotics alone do not provide adequate the- rapy for induced infections in neutropenic mice. Because... Antibiotics alone do not assure cure of infec- effect of TDM against different challenge doses tions or survival of irradiated animals of K. pneumoniae...Treated with Combined Therapy of TDM and Ceftriaxone. LD50/30 Antibiotic % Survival? .pneumoniae Therapy TDM/o TDM/s Saline Oil 5000 ceftriaxone 100 88 69

  13. An Aggressive Retroperitoneal Fibromatosis

    PubMed Central

    Campara, Zoran; Spasic, Aleksandar; Aleksic, Predrag; Milev, Bosko

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Aggressive fibromatosis (AF) is a heterogeneous group of mesenchymal tumors that have locally infiltrative growth and a tendency to relapse. The clinical picture is often conditioned by the obstruction of the ureter or small intestine. Diagnosis is based on clinical, radiological and histological parameters. A case report: We report a case of male patient, aged 35 years, with the retroperitoneal fibromatosis. He reported to the physician because of frequent urination with the feeling of pressure and pain. Computed tomography revealed the tumor mass on the front wall of the bladder with diameter of 70mm with signs of infiltration of the musculature of the anterior abdominal wall. Endoscopic transurethral biopsy showed proliferative lesion binders by type of fibromatosis. The tumor was surgically removed in a classical way. The patient feels well and has no recurrence thirty-six months after the operative procedure. Conclusion: The complete tumor resection is the therapeutic choice for the primary tumor as well as for a relapse. PMID:27147794

  14. From aggressiveness to creativity.

    PubMed

    Mrevlje, Gorazd V

    2004-02-01

    Psychology has a long tradition of considering human creativity as a distinct human characteristic and a special kind of human activity. After explaining the key motives for such an attitude, the author discusses those forms of healthy aggressiveness that stand out as necessary and constitutive elements of the creative process. Taking the well-known statement of C. G. Jung's 'The person who does not build (create), will demolish and destroy' as a starting point, the author compares the basic premises for understanding the process of human creativity, at the same time drawing on Freud's psychology of the individual and Jung's principle of the collective unconscious as well as his notion of 'complexes'. In doing so, the author somewhat boldly paraphrases Jung's dictum: 'In order to be creative, rather than just constructive, one must occasionally also destroy'. With reference to Wallas, Taylor and Neumann (Wallas 1926; Taylor 1959;;Neumann 2001), the author goes on to explore those concepts which help us to investigate the phenomenon of human creativity, drawing distinctions between emergent, expressive, productive, inventive and innovative creativity. The second part of the article discusses the importance of intelligence, originality, nonconformity, subversiveness and free-mindedness for the creative process of human beings. The author concludes with a further explanation of Erich Neumann's argument that human creativity cannot be understood solely as a result of sociogenetic factors, and argues that it is only by taking into consideration Jung's perception of creativity that a global ontological understanding of these processes can be achieved.

  15. [Ototoxicity of locally administered aminoglycoside antibiotics].

    PubMed

    Heidemüller, B

    1994-06-01

    In 7 children impairment of hearing was observed after local therapy with neomycin and gentamicin because of scalding wounds. In all cases the hearing loss depends on the duration of treatment with the aminoglycoside antibiotics. Deep and well vascularised wounds strikingly enhance the absorption rates of the ototoxic drugs. 3 adults locally treated with aminoglycoside antibiotics (neomycin, framycetin, gentamicin) for ulcera cruris displayed a delayed development of hearing loss. The hearing impairment occurs several weeks after therapy and leads to deafness in severe cases even if the treatment had been discontinued a long time ago. The most relevant factors in preventing such damage are: strictest possible indication, taking into account all contraindications, as well as shortest possible duration of therapy.

  16. More aggressive cartoons are funnier.

    PubMed

    McCauley, C; Woods, K; Coolidge, C; Kulick, W

    1983-04-01

    Independent rankings of humor and aggressiveness were obtained for sets of cartoons drawn randomly from two different magazines. The correlation of median humor and median aggressiveness rankings ranged from .49 to .90 in six studies involving six different sets of cartoons and six different groups of subjects, including children and adults, high and low socioeconomic status (SES) individuals, and native- and foreign-born individuals. This correlation is consistent with Freudian, arousal, and superiority theories of humor. Another prediction of Freudian theory, that high-SES subjects should be more appreciative of aggressive humor than low-SES subjects, was not supported.

  17. Predicting workplace aggression and violence.

    PubMed

    Barling, Julian; Dupré, Kathryne E; Kelloway, E Kevin

    2009-01-01

    Consistent with the relative recency of research on workplace aggression and the considerable media attention given to high-profile incidents, numerous myths about the nature of workplace aggression have emerged. In this review, we examine these myths from an evidence-based perspective, bringing greater clarity to our understanding of the predictors of workplace aggression. We conclude by pointing to the need for more research focusing on construct validity and prevention issues as well as for methodologies that minimize the likelihood of mono-method bias and that strengthen the ability to make causal inferences.

  18. Bronchial hygiene therapy.

    PubMed

    Peruzzi, W T; Smith, B

    1995-01-01

    Bronchial hygiene therapy is useful and effective in the presence of careful patient evaluation, clear definition of therapeutic goals, and application of appropriate modalities. This article defines the variable bronchial hygiene modalities and discusses their indications, contraindications, and applications. Prophylactic and therapeutic bronchial hygiene modalities, diagnostic methods associated with bronchial hygiene therapy, inhaled antibiotic therapy, and therapist driven protocols are also addressed.

  19. Replacement for antibiotics: Lysozyme

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Antibiotics have been fed at subtherapeutic levels to swine as growth promoters for more than 60 years, and the majority of swine produced in the U.S. receive antibiotics in their feed at some point in their production cycle. These compounds benefit the producers by minimizing production losses by ...

  20. Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longenecker, Nevin E.; Oppenheimer, Dan

    1982-01-01

    A study conducted by high school advanced bacteriology students appears to confirm the hypothesis that the incremental administration of antibiotics on several species of bacteria (Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus epidermis, Bacillus sublitus, Bacillus megaterium) will allow for the development of antibiotic-resistant strains. (PEB)

  1. Setamycin, a new antibiotic.

    PubMed

    Omura, S; Otoguro, K; Nishikiori, T; Oiwa, R; Iwai, Y

    1981-10-01

    A new antibiotic, setamycin, was extracted from the mycelia of a rare actinomycete strain KM-6054. The antibiotic, the molecular formula of which was found to be C42H61NO12 (tentative), is a yellow powder showing activity against some fungi, trichomonads and weakly against Gram-positive bacteria.

  2. [Side effects of antibiotics].

    PubMed

    Hoigné, R

    1975-03-01

    The clinically severe and newer forms of antibiotic side effects are reviewed. The study covers the following antibiotics: penicillins, cephalosporins, aminoglycosides and polymyxins, tetracyclines, chloramphenicol and thiamphenicol, macrolides and lincomycin, rifamycins and sulfonamides. Special reference is made to (1) hematologic side effects, and (2) general evaluation of drug reactions. The relationship between reaction time and clinical symptoms is of particular practical significance.

  3. Principles of judicious antibiotic prescribing for upper respiratory tract infections in pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Hersh, Adam L; Jackson, Mary Anne; Hicks, Lauri A

    2013-12-01

    Most upper respiratory tract infections are caused by viruses and require no antibiotics. This clinical report focuses on antibiotic prescribing strategies for bacterial upper respiratory tract infections, including acute otitis media, acute bacterial sinusitis, and streptococcal pharyngitis. The principles for judicious antibiotic prescribing that are outlined focus on applying stringent diagnostic criteria, weighing the benefits and harms of antibiotic therapy, and understanding situations when antibiotics may not be indicated. The principles can be used to amplify messages from recent clinical guidelines for local guideline development and for patient communication; they are broadly applicable to antibiotic prescribing in general.

  4. [Pathophysiology of aggressive behavior: evaluation and management of pathological aggression].

    PubMed

    Pompili, E; Carlone, C; Silvestrini, C; Nicolò, G

    2016-01-01

    This work aims to define the aggression in all its forms, with notes on management and rapid tranquilization. The pathological aggression is described as a non-homogeneous phenomenon, it is variable in according to social, psychological and biological agents. The distinction of violence between affective aggression and predatory aggression can be functional to the prediction of outcome of any treatment. In general, a pattern of predatory violence tend to match with patients unresponsive and not compliant to treatment, a low probability to predict future violence and, therefore, a difficulty in managing risk. The affective aggressor, however, shows increased probability of treatment response, with more predictability of violent actions in reaction to situations perceived as threatening and, therefore, greater management of future violence risk. Those who act affective violence tend to show a wide range of emotional and cognitive problems, while those who act with predatory patterns show greater inclination to aggression and antisocial behavior. Aggression that occurs in psychiatry mostly appears to be affective, therefore susceptible to modulation through treatments.

  5. Parameter on aggressive periodontitis. American Academy of Periodontology.

    PubMed

    2000-05-01

    The American Academy of Periodontology has developed the following parameter on the treatment of aggressive periodontitis. Patients should be informed of the disease process, therapeutic alternatives, potential complications, expected results, and their responsibility in treatment. Consequences of no treatment should be explained. Failure to treat aggressive periodontitis appropriately can result in progressive and often rapid loss of periodontal supporting tissues. This may have an adverse effect upon prognosis and could result in tooth loss. Given this information, patients (or their parents or guardians, as appropriate) should then be able to make informed decisions regarding their periodontal therapy.

  6. Application of a Silicone Sheet in Negative-Pressure Wound Therapy to Treat an Abdominal Wall Defect after Necrotizing Fasciitis

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jin Su

    2017-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) is an aggressive soft-tissue infection involving the deep fascia and is characterized by extensive deterioration of the surrounding tissue. Immediate diagnosis and intensive treatment, including debridement and systemic antibiotics, represent the most important factors influencing the survival of NF patients. In this report, we present a case of NF in the abdomen due to an infection caused by a perforated small bowel after abdominal liposuction. It was successfully treated using negative-pressure wound therapy, in which a silicone sheet functioned as a barrier between the sponge and internal organs to protect the small bowel. PMID:28194352

  7. History of Antibiotics Research.

    PubMed

    Mohr, Kathrin I

    2016-01-01

    For thousands of years people were delivered helplessly to various kinds of infections, which often reached epidemic proportions and have cost the lives of millions of people. This is precisely the age since mankind has been thinking of infectious diseases and the question of their causes. However, due to a lack of knowledge, the search for strategies to fight, heal, and prevent the spread of communicable diseases was unsuccessful for a long time. It was not until the discovery of the healing effects of (antibiotic producing) molds, the first microscopic observations of microorganisms in the seventeenth century, the refutation of the abiogenesis theory, and the dissolution of the question "What is the nature of infectious diseases?" that the first milestones within the history of antibiotics research were set. Then new discoveries accelerated rapidly: Bacteria could be isolated and cultured and were identified as possible agents of diseases as well as producers of bioactive metabolites. At the same time the first synthetic antibiotics were developed and shortly thereafter, thousands of synthetic substances as well as millions of soil borne bacteria and fungi were screened for bioactivity within numerous microbial laboratories of pharmaceutical companies. New antibiotic classes with different targets were discovered as on assembly line production. With the beginning of the twentieth century, many of the diseases which reached epidemic proportions at the time-e.g., cholera, syphilis, plague, tuberculosis, or typhoid fever, just to name a few, could be combatted with new discovered antibiotics. It should be considered that hundred years ago the market launch of new antibiotics was significantly faster and less complicated than today (where it takes 10-12 years in average between the discovery of a new antibiotic until the launch). After the first euphoria it was quickly realized that bacteria are able to develop, acquire, and spread numerous resistance mechanisms

  8. [Antibiotics and gait disorders].

    PubMed

    Gomez-Porro, P; Vinagre-Aragon, A; Zabala-Goiburu, J A

    2016-12-01

    The neurological toxicity of many antibiotics has been reported in a number of articles and clinical notes. In this review antibiotics are classified according to the physiopathogenic mechanism that can give rise to a gait disorder, taking both clinical and experimental data into account. An exhaustive search was conducted in Google Scholar and PubMed with the aim of finding reviews, articles and clinical cases dealing with gait disorders secondary to different antibiotics. The different antibiotics were separated according to the physiopathogenic mechanism that could cause them to trigger a gait disorder. They were classified into antibiotics capable of producing cerebellar ataxia, vestibular ataxia, sensitive ataxia or an extrapyramidal gait disorder. The main aim was to group all the drugs that can give rise to a gait disorder, in order to facilitate the clinical suspicion and, consequently, the management of patients.

  9. Using Chemical Reaction Kinetics to Predict Optimal Antibiotic Treatment Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Abel zur Wiesch, Pia; Cohen, Ted

    2017-01-01

    Identifying optimal dosing of antibiotics has proven challenging—some antibiotics are most effective when they are administered periodically at high doses, while others work best when minimizing concentration fluctuations. Mechanistic explanations for why antibiotics differ in their optimal dosing are lacking, limiting our ability to predict optimal therapy and leading to long and costly experiments. We use mathematical models that describe both bacterial growth and intracellular antibiotic-target binding to investigate the effects of fluctuating antibiotic concentrations on individual bacterial cells and bacterial populations. We show that physicochemical parameters, e.g. the rate of drug transmembrane diffusion and the antibiotic-target complex half-life are sufficient to explain which treatment strategy is most effective. If the drug-target complex dissociates rapidly, the antibiotic must be kept constantly at a concentration that prevents bacterial replication. If antibiotics cross bacterial cell envelopes slowly to reach their target, there is a delay in the onset of action that may be reduced by increasing initial antibiotic concentration. Finally, slow drug-target dissociation and slow diffusion out of cells act to prolong antibiotic effects, thereby allowing for less frequent dosing. Our model can be used as a tool in the rational design of treatment for bacterial infections. It is easily adaptable to other biological systems, e.g. HIV, malaria and cancer, where the effects of physiological fluctuations of drug concentration are also poorly understood. PMID:28060813

  10. Surgical treatment of aggressive vertebral hemangiomas.

    PubMed

    Vasudeva, Viren S; Chi, John H; Groff, Michael W

    2016-08-01

    patient who underwent en bloc resection who continued to have back pain. CONCLUSIONS Gross-total resection or subtotal resection in combination with vertebroplasty or adjuvant radiation therapy to treat residual tumor seems sufficient in the treatment of aggressive vertebral hemangiomas. En bloc resection appears to provide a similar oncological benefit, but it carries higher morbidity to the patient.

  11. Quantifying Aggressive Behavior in Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Teles, Magda C; Oliveira, Rui F

    2016-01-01

    Aggression is a complex behavior that influences social relationships and can be seen as adaptive or maladaptive depending on the context and intensity of expression. A model organism suitable for genetic dissection of the underlying neural mechanisms of aggressive behavior is still needed. Zebrafish has already proven to be a powerful vertebrate model organism for the study of normal and pathological brain function. Despite the fact that zebrafish is a gregarious species that forms shoals, when allowed to interact in pairs, both males and females express aggressive behavior and establish dominance hierarchies. Here, we describe two protocols that can be used to quantify aggressive behavior in zebrafish, using two different paradigms: (1) staged fights between real opponents and (2) mirror-elicited fights. We also discuss the methodology for the behavior analysis, the expected results for both paradigms, and the advantages and disadvantages of each paradigm in face of the specific goals of the study.

  12. Vasopressin/oxytocin and aggression.

    PubMed

    Ferris, Craig F

    2005-01-01

    Vasopressin/oxytocin and related peptides comprise a phylogenetically old superfamily of chemical signals in both vertebrates and invertebrates. Each peptide isoform has its own distinct receptor subtype and specific cellular action. The conservation and dispersion of vasopressin/oxytocin signalling systems across the animal kingdom attests to their functional significance in evolution. Indeed, they are involved in the physiology of fluid balance, carbohydrate metabolism, thermoregulation, immunity and reproduction. In addition, these peptides evolved a role in social behaviours related to aggression and affiliation. The focus of this chapter is the role of vasopressin/oxytocin as chemical signals in the brain altering aggressive responding in a context- and species-dependent manner. There is compelling evidence from several mammalian species including humans that vasopressin enhances aggression. The activity of the vasopressin appears linked to the serotonin system providing a mechanism for enhancing and suppressing aggressive behaviour.

  13. Environmental factors and aggressive behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, A.C.

    1982-07-01

    This paper briefly reviews some of the research areas which indicate a correlation between environmental factors and initiation of aggressive behavior. Environmental factors including lunar influences, month of birth, climate and the effects of crowding and certain chemicals are discussed.

  14. Expression and/or activity of the SVCT2 ascorbate transporter may be decreased in many aggressive cancers, suggesting potential utility for sodium bicarbonate and dehydroascorbic acid in cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    McCarty, Mark F

    2013-10-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) is a heterodimer transcription factor whose elevated activity in many cancers helps them to survive under hypoxic conditions and enhances their capacity to grow invasively, establish metastases, and survive chemo- or radiotherapy. Optimal intracellular levels of ascorbate suppress the level and transcriptional activity of HIF-1under normoxic or mildly hypoxic conditions by supporting the activity of proly and asparagyl hydroxylases that target HIF-1alpha. High intracellular ascorbate can also work in various ways to down-regulate activation of NF-kappaB which, like HIF-1 is constitutively active in many cancers and promotes aggressive behavior - in part by promoting transcription of HIF-1alpha. Yet recent evidence suggests that, even in the context of adequate ascorbate nutrition, the intracellular ascorbate content of many aggressive cancers may be supoptimal for effective HIF-1 control. This likely reflects low expression or activity of the SVCT2 ascorbate transporter. The expression of SVCT2 in cancers has so far received little study; but the extracellular acidity characteristic of many tumors would be expected to reduce the activity of this transporter, which has a mildly alkaline pH optimum. Unfortunately, since SVCT2 has a high affinity for ascorbate, and its activity is nearly saturated at normal healthy serum levels of this vitamin, increased oral administration of ascorbate would be unlikely to have much impact on the intracellular ascorbate content of tumors. However, cancers in which HIF-1 is active express high levels of glucose transporters such as GLUT-1, and these transporters can promote influx of dehydroascorbic acid (DHA) via facilitated diffusion; once inside the cell, DHA is rapidly reduced to ascorbate, which effectively is "trapped" within the cell. Hence, episodic intravenous infusions of modest doses of DHA may have potential for optimizing the intracellular ascorbate content of cancers, potentially

  15. [Biology of aggression in dogs].

    PubMed

    Feddersen-Petersen, D U

    2001-03-01

    The science of ethology is concerned with the way external stimuli and internal events cause animals to fight in a particular way. The classification of dog breeds with respect to their relative danger to humans makes no sense, as both, the complex antecedent conditions in which aggressive behaviour occurs, and its ramifying consequences in the individual dog's ecological and social environment, are not considered. From a biological point of view, environmental and learning effects are always superimposed upon genetic influences. Based on the recent developments in the study of ethology, aggression of wolves (Canis lupus L.) and domesticated dogs (Canis lupus f. familiaris) was put into context with respect to other aspects of the lifestyle of wild and domestic canids. Aggressive behaviour does not occur in a biological vacuum. This is also true for domestic dogs and their relationship to human partners. Individual dogs can become highly aggressive and dangerous. Their development and social situation will be presented and discussed in case studies. Finally, there is the question about defining "normal aggression" versus symptoms for maladaptive aggression resp. danger to humans as conspecifics. It is possible to protect the safety of the public and at the the same time practise animal care. Effective animal control legislation must focus on responsible ownership and socialisation of pups f.e. Problems are not unique to some breeds.

  16. Music, Substance Use, and Aggression

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Meng-Jinn; Miller, Brenda A.; Grube, Joel W.; Waiters, Elizabeth D.

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study investigated whether young people’s substance use and aggressive behaviors are related to their listening to music containing messages of substance use and violence. Method Data were collected using self-administered questionnaires and from a sample of community college students aged 15-25 (N = 1056; 43% male). A structural equation modeling method was used to simultaneously assess the associations between listening to various genres of music, alcohol use, illicit drug use, and aggressive behaviors, taking into account respondents’ age, gender, race/ethnicity, and level of sensation seeking. Results Listening to rap music was significantly and positively associated with alcohol use, problematic alcohol use, illicit drug use, and aggressive behaviors when all other variables were controlled. Additionally, alcohol and illicit drug use were positively associated with listening to musical genres of techno and reggae. Control variables such as sensation seeking, age, gender and race/ethnicity were significantly related to substance use and aggressive behaviors. Conclusion The findings suggest that young people’s substance use and aggressive behaviors may be related to their frequent exposure to music containing references to substance use and violence. Conversely, music listening preference may reflect some personal predispositions or lifestyle preferences. Alternatively, substance use, aggression and music preference are independent constructs, but share common “third factors.” PMID:16608146

  17. Driver irritation and aggressive behaviour.

    PubMed

    Björklund, Gunilla M

    2008-05-01

    A sample of 98 drivers responded to a Swedish version of the UK Driving Anger Scale [UK DAS; [Lajunen, T., Parker, D., Stradling, S.G., 1998. Dimensions of driver anger, aggressive and highway code violations and their mediation by safety orientation in UK drivers. Transport. Res. Part F 1, 107-121]. The results indicated that the Swedish version, like the British original, measures three sources of driver irritation: "progress impeded", "reckless driving", and "direct hostility". Structural equation modelling was used to investigate the relationships between the three sources of self-reported driver irritation, aggressive actions, speed, sex, age, and annual mileage. The models suggested a positive relationship between the amount of driver irritation and frequency of aggressive actions for all three sources of irritation. Female drivers tended to become more irritated than male drivers, while the male drivers tended to act aggressively more often. Surprisingly, drivers who reported that they enjoy fast speeds did not become more irritated than slower drivers when obstructed. The important conclusions are that experienced irritation often leads to openly aggressively actions, and that expression of aggressive behaviours may be a cause of other drivers' feeling of irritation.

  18. Aggressive Early Debridement in Treatment of Acute Periprosthetic Joint Infections After Hip and Knee Replacements

    PubMed Central

    Volpin, Andrea; Sukeik, Mohamed; Alazzawi, Sulaiman; Haddad, Fares Sami

    2016-01-01

    Background: Periprosthetic Joint Infection Remains a Dreaded Complication After Hip and Knee Replacement Surgery. Treatment Options for Acute Postoperative and Acute Hematogenous Infections Include Arthroscopic or Open Debridement With Retention or Exchange of the Prostheses. This Review Article Aims to Summarize the Evidence for Management of Acute Postoperative And Acute Hematogenous Infections. Methods: A Systematic Literature Search Was Performed Using a Computer-based Search Engine Covering Medline (OvidSP), PubMed Database (U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health), Embase, Web of Science, Cochrane and Google Scholar for Relevant Articles. Results: Common Themes Around Treatment of Acute Postoperative and Acute Hematogenous Infections Discussed in this Review Include the Timing of Intervention, Description of the Optimal Procedure and How we Perform it at our Institution, the Role of Arthroscopic Debridement, Most Commonly Isolated Micro-organisms and Prognostic Factors for Infection Control. Conclusion: Success in Treating Acute Postoperative and Acute Hematogenous Infections Depends on Early Diagnosis and Aggressive Surgical Debridement Combined With Effective Antibiotic Therapy. PMID:28144377

  19. Normative beliefs about aggression and cyber aggression among young adults: a longitudinal investigation.

    PubMed

    Wright, Michelle F; Li, Yan

    2013-01-01

    This longitudinal study examined normative beliefs about aggression (e.g., face-to-face, cyber) in relation to the engagement in cyber aggression 6 months later among 126 (69 women) young adults. Participants completed electronically administered measures assessing their normative beliefs, face-to-face and cyber aggression at Time 1, and cyber aggression 6 months later (Time 2). We found that men reported more cyber relational and verbal aggression when compared to women. After controlling for each other, Time 1 face-to-face relational aggression was positively related to Time 2 cyber relational aggression, whereas Time 1 face-to-face verbal aggression was positively related to Time 2 cyber verbal aggression. Normative beliefs regarding cyber aggression was positively related to both forms of cyber aggression 6 months later, after controlling for normative beliefs about face-to-face aggression. Furthermore, a significant two-way interaction between Time 1 cyber relational aggression and normative beliefs about cyber relational aggression was found. Follow-up analysis showed that Time 1 cyber relational aggression was more strongly related to Time 2 cyber relational aggression when young adults held higher normative beliefs about cyber relational aggression. A similar two-way interaction was found for cyber verbal aggression such that the association between Time 1 and Time 2 cyber verbal aggression was stronger at higher levels of normative beliefs about cyber verbal aggression. Results are discussed in terms of the social cognitive and behavioral mechanisms associated with the engagement of cyber aggression.

  20. Biosensors, antibiotics and food.

    PubMed

    Virolainen, Nina; Karp, Matti

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotics are medicine's leading asset for fighting microbial infection, which is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. However, the misuse of antibiotics has led to the rapid spread of antibiotic resistance among bacteria and the development of multiple resistant pathogens. Therefore, antibiotics are rapidly losing their antimicrobial value. The use of antibiotics in food production animals is strictly controlled by the European Union (EU). Veterinary use is regulated to prevent the spread of resistance. EU legislation establishes maximum residue limits for veterinary medicinal products in foodstuffs of animal origin and enforces the establishment and execution of national monitoring plans. Among samples selected for monitoring, suspected noncompliant samples are screened and then subjected to confirmatory analysis to establish the identity and concentration of the contaminant. Screening methods for antibiotic residues are typically based on microbiological growth inhibition, whereas physico-chemical methods are used for confirmatory analysis. This chapter discusses biosensors, especially whole-cell based biosensors, as emerging screening methods for antibiotic residues. Whole-cell biosensors can offer highly sensitive and specific detection of residues. Applications demonstrating quantitative analysis and specific analyte identification further improve their potential as screening methods.

  1. Do Teachers Misbehave? Aggression in School Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ben Sasson, Dvora; Somech, Anit

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Despite growing research on school aggression, significant gaps remain in the authors' knowledge of team aggression, since most studies have mainly explored aggression on the part of students. The purpose of this paper is to focus on understanding the phenomenon of workplace aggression in school teams. Specifically, the purpose of the…

  2. Spinal epidural abscess treated with antibiotics alone.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Ashish; Singh, Poonam; Gehlot, Prateek; Dhaneria, Mamta

    2013-04-30

    Spinal epidural abscess (SEA) is a rare clinical condition among children. Most patients do not present with classical signs. A 13-year-old boy without any predisposing factors presented with paraparesis, bladder and bowel involvement. MRI spine demonstrated an SEA at the C7 and D1 levels on both sides of the midline with cord oedema at the C2-3 to C6 level with minimal marrow oedema in the C6 vertebral body. We treated the patient with antibiotics (ceftriaxone and vancomycin) alone. The patient showed excellent response with only minimal residual gait disturbance at the end of 6 weeks of antibiotic therapy. This is the first paediatric report of complete recovery of a patient at clinical stage 4 following antibiotic treatment alone from India. However, caution should be exercised to closely monitor the patient's recovery as any progression in the neurological state warrants surgery.

  3. Sampling the antibiotic resistome.

    PubMed

    D'Costa, Vanessa M; McGrann, Katherine M; Hughes, Donald W; Wright, Gerard D

    2006-01-20

    Microbial resistance to antibiotics currently spans all known classes of natural and synthetic compounds. It has not only hindered our treatment of infections but also dramatically reshaped drug discovery, yet its origins have not been systematically studied. Soil-dwelling bacteria produce and encounter a myriad of antibiotics, evolving corresponding sensing and evading strategies. They are a reservoir of resistance determinants that can be mobilized into the microbial community. Study of this reservoir could provide an early warning system for future clinically relevant antibiotic resistance mechanisms.

  4. Burkholderia cepacia complex Phage-Antibiotic Synergy (PAS): antibiotics stimulate lytic phage activity.

    PubMed

    Kamal, Fatima; Dennis, Jonathan J

    2015-02-01

    The Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) is a group of at least 18 species of Gram-negative opportunistic pathogens that can cause chronic lung infection in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Bcc organisms possess high levels of innate antimicrobial resistance, and alternative therapeutic strategies are urgently needed. One proposed alternative treatment is phage therapy, the therapeutic application of bacterial viruses (or bacteriophages). Recently, some phages have been observed to form larger plaques in the presence of sublethal concentrations of certain antibiotics; this effect has been termed phage-antibiotic synergy (PAS). Those reports suggest that some antibiotics stimulate increased production of phages under certain conditions. The aim of this study is to examine PAS in phages that infect Burkholderia cenocepacia strains C6433 and K56-2. Bcc phages KS12 and KS14 were tested for PAS, using 6 antibiotics representing 4 different drug classes. Of the antibiotics tested, the most pronounced effects were observed for meropenem, ciprofloxacin, and tetracycline. When grown with subinhibitory concentrations of these three antibiotics, cells developed a chain-like arrangement, an elongated morphology, and a clustered arrangement, respectively. When treated with progressively higher antibiotic concentrations, both the sizes of plaques and phage titers increased, up to a maximum. B. cenocepacia K56-2-infected Galleria mellonella larvae treated with phage KS12 and low-dose meropenem demonstrated increased survival over controls treated with KS12 or antibiotic alone. These results suggest that antibiotics can be combined with phages to stimulate increased phage production and/or activity and thus improve the efficacy of bacterial killing.

  5. Burkholderia cepacia Complex Phage-Antibiotic Synergy (PAS): Antibiotics Stimulate Lytic Phage Activity

    PubMed Central

    Kamal, Fatima

    2014-01-01

    The Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) is a group of at least 18 species of Gram-negative opportunistic pathogens that can cause chronic lung infection in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Bcc organisms possess high levels of innate antimicrobial resistance, and alternative therapeutic strategies are urgently needed. One proposed alternative treatment is phage therapy, the therapeutic application of bacterial viruses (or bacteriophages). Recently, some phages have been observed to form larger plaques in the presence of sublethal concentrations of certain antibiotics; this effect has been termed phage-antibiotic synergy (PAS). Those reports suggest that some antibiotics stimulate increased production of phages under certain conditions. The aim of this study is to examine PAS in phages that infect Burkholderia cenocepacia strains C6433 and K56-2. Bcc phages KS12 and KS14 were tested for PAS, using 6 antibiotics representing 4 different drug classes. Of the antibiotics tested, the most pronounced effects were observed for meropenem, ciprofloxacin, and tetracycline. When grown with subinhibitory concentrations of these three antibiotics, cells developed a chain-like arrangement, an elongated morphology, and a clustered arrangement, respectively. When treated with progressively higher antibiotic concentrations, both the sizes of plaques and phage titers increased, up to a maximum. B. cenocepacia K56-2-infected Galleria mellonella larvae treated with phage KS12 and low-dose meropenem demonstrated increased survival over controls treated with KS12 or antibiotic alone. These results suggest that antibiotics can be combined with phages to stimulate increased phage production and/or activity and thus improve the efficacy of bacterial killing. PMID:25452284

  6. Sensory modulation intervention and behaviour support modification for the treatment of severe aggression in Huntington's disease. A single case experimental design.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Caroline A; Brown, Anahita

    2015-10-13

    Aggression is common in Huntington's disease. However, at present there are no standard guidelines for managing aggression in Huntington's sufferers due to a lack of empirical research. This paper presents a case study of the treatment of very high levels of aggression with sensory modulation and behaviour support intervention in a Huntington's sufferer. The client exhibited a range of aggressive behaviours, including physical aggression to people, furniture and objects, and verbal aggression. Following an eight week baseline phase, five weeks of sensory modulation intervention were employed. A behaviour support plan was then implemented as an adjunct to the sensory intervention, with aggressive behaviour systematically audited for a further 11 weeks. The results indicate a significant reduction in reported levels of aggression during the combined sensory modulation and behaviour support phase, compared to both the baseline and the sensory modulation therapy alone phases. This case study highlights the efficacy non-pharmacological interventions may have for reducing aggression in HD.

  7. Therapy of Lies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Sean

    2012-01-01

    Conversion therapy comes in many forms, ranging from informal chats with counselors to aggressive physical coercion, but all are based on the belief that a gay male or a lesbian can be changed "back" to heterosexual behavior. It is not just alarmed parents who turn to this therapy. Many LGBT individuals seek out such treatment in an effort to…

  8. Massage Therapy Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field, Tiffany; Diego, Miguel; Hernandez-Reif, Maria

    2007-01-01

    Massage therapy has been notably effective in preventing prematurity, enhancing growth of infants, increasing attentiveness, decreasing depression and aggression, alleviating motor problems, reducing pain, and enhancing immune function. This review covers massage therapy research from the last decade, as an update to the American Psychologist 1998…

  9. Kindergarten Children's Genetic Vulnerabilities Interact with Friends' Aggression to Promote Children's Own Aggression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Lier, Pol; Boivin, Michel; Dionne, Ginette; Vitaro, Frank; Brendgen, Mara; Koot, Hans; Tremblay, Richard E.; Perusse, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To examine whether kindergarten children's genetic liability to physically aggress moderates the contribution of friends' aggression to their aggressive behaviors. Method: Teacher and peer reports of aggression were available for 359 6-year-old twin pairs (145 MZ, 212 DZ) as well as teacher and peer reports of aggression of the two best…

  10. Fighting antibiotic resistance in the intensive care unit using antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Plantinga, Nienke L; Wittekamp, Bastiaan H J; van Duijn, Pleun J; Bonten, Marc J M

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a global and increasing problem that is not counterbalanced by the development of new therapeutic agents. The prevalence of antibiotic resistance is especially high in intensive care units with frequently reported outbreaks of multidrug-resistant organisms. In addition to classical infection prevention protocols and surveillance programs, counterintuitive interventions, such as selective decontamination with antibiotics and antibiotic rotation have been applied and investigated to control the emergence of antibiotic resistance. This review provides an overview of selective oropharyngeal and digestive tract decontamination, decolonization of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and antibiotic rotation as strategies to modulate antibiotic resistance in the intensive care unit.

  11. Molecular Pathways Associated with Aggressiveness of Papillary Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Benvenga, Salvatore; Koch, Christian A

    2014-01-01

    The most common thyroid malignancy is papillary thyroid cancer (PTC). Mortality rates from PTC mainly depend on its aggressiveness. Geno- and phenotyping of aggressive PTC has advanced our understanding of treatment failures and of potential future therapies. Unraveling molecular signaling pathways of PTC including its aggressive forms will hopefully pave the road to reduce mortality but also morbidity from this cancer. The mitogen-activated protein kinase and the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase signaling pathway as well as the family of RAS oncogenes and BRAF as a member of the RAF protein family and the aberrant expression of microRNAs miR-221, miR-222, and miR-146b all play major roles in tumor initiation and progression of aggressive PTC. Small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors targeting BRAF-mediated events, vascular endothelial growth factor receptors, RET/PTC rearrangements, and other molecular targets, show promising results to improve treatment of radioiodine resistant, recurrent, and aggressive PTC. PMID:24955023

  12. Targeting Antibiotic Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Chellat, Mathieu F.; Raguž, Luka

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Finding strategies against the development of antibiotic resistance is a major global challenge for the life sciences community and for public health. The past decades have seen a dramatic worldwide increase in human‐pathogenic bacteria that are resistant to one or multiple antibiotics. More and more infections caused by resistant microorganisms fail to respond to conventional treatment, and in some cases, even last‐resort antibiotics have lost their power. In addition, industry pipelines for the development of novel antibiotics have run dry over the past decades. A recent world health day by the World Health Organization titled “Combat drug resistance: no action today means no cure tomorrow” triggered an increase in research activity, and several promising strategies have been developed to restore treatment options against infections by resistant bacterial pathogens. PMID:27000559

  13. Intravenous desensitization to beta-lactam antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Borish, L; Tamir, R; Rosenwasser, L J

    1987-09-01

    Patients allergic to penicillin (PCN) often require treatment with beta-lactam antibiotics for life-threatening bacterial infections. In this article, we review our experience with rapid intravenous desensitization for patients who gave a history of PCN allergy and who had hypersensitivity demonstrated by skin tests. Skin testing was performed with both prick and intradermal techniques and with the recommended antibiotic as well as PCN G, penicilloyl polylysine, and a minor determinant mixture. Patients were transferred to the intensive care unit, and desensitization was performed with a buret technique that required minimal preparation and was easily applied to any antibiotic. Fifteen desensitizations in 12 patients were associated with no immediate reactions. One patient developed a delayed reaction consisting of a pruritic rash and angioedema. A second patient developed a more serious delayed serum sickness-like illness with fever, rash, eosinophilia, abnormal liver function tests, and urinary abnormalities. These reactions did not necessitate stopping the antibiotic, although the latter patient required corticosteroids to suppress his symptoms. Rapid intravenous desensitization is a rapid, safe, and effective technique for patients demonstrating hypersensitivity to beta-lactam antibiotics who require therapy with these medications.

  14. Salinomycin, a polyether ionophoric antibiotic, inhibits adipogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Szkudlarek-Mikho, Maria; Saunders, Rudel A.; Yap, Sook Fan; Ngeow, Yun Fong; Chin, Khew-Voon

    2012-11-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Salinomycin inhibits preadipocyte differentiation into adipocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Salinomycin inhibits transcriptional regulation of adipogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pharmacological effects of salinomycin suggest toxicity in cancer therapy. -- Abstract: The polyether ionophoric antibiotics including monensin, salinomycin, and narasin, are widely used in veterinary medicine and as food additives and growth promoters in animal husbandry including poultry farming. Their effects on human health, however, are not fully understood. Recent studies showed that salinomycin is a cancer stem cell inhibitor. Since poultry consumption has risen sharply in the last three decades, we asked whether the consumption of meat tainted with growth promoting antibiotics might have effects on adipose cells. We showed in this report that the ionophoric antibiotics inhibit the differentiation of preadipocytes into adipocytes. The block of differentiation is not due to the induction of apoptosis nor the inhibition of cell proliferation. In addition, salinomycin also suppresses the transcriptional activity of the CCAAT/enhancer binding proteins and the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma}. These results suggest that the ionophoric antibiotics can be exploited as novel anti-obesity therapeutics and as pharmacological probes for the study of adipose biology. Further, the pharmacological effects of salinomycin could be a harbinger of its toxicity on the adipose tissue and other susceptible target cells in cancer therapy.

  15. Natural solution to antibiotic resistance: bacteriophages 'The Living Drugs'.

    PubMed

    Jassim, Sabah A A; Limoges, Richard G

    2014-08-01

    Antibiotics have been a panacea in animal husbandry as well as in human therapy for decades. The huge amount of antibiotics used to induce the growth and protect the health of farm animals has lead to the evolution of bacteria that are resistant to the drug's effects. Today, many researchers are working with bacteriophages (phages) as an alternative to antibiotics in the control of pathogens for human therapy as well as prevention, biocontrol, and therapy in animal agriculture. Phage therapy and biocontrol have yet to fulfill their promise or potential, largely due to several key obstacles to their performance. Several suggestions are shared in order to point a direction for overcoming common obstacles in applied phage technology. The key to successful use of phages in modern scientific, farm, food processing and clinical applications is to understand the common obstacles as well as best practices and to develop answers that work in harmony with nature.

  16. Adaptive Landscapes of Resistance Genes Change as Antibiotic Concentrations Change.

    PubMed

    Mira, Portia M; Meza, Juan C; Nandipati, Anna; Barlow, Miriam

    2015-10-01

    Most studies on the evolution of antibiotic resistance are focused on selection for resistance at lethal antibiotic concentrations, which has allowed the detection of mutant strains that show strong phenotypic traits. However, solely focusing on lethal concentrations of antibiotics narrowly limits our perspective of antibiotic resistance evolution. New high-resolution competition assays have shown that resistant bacteria are selected at relatively low concentrations of antibiotics. This finding is important because sublethal concentrations of antibiotics are found widely in patients undergoing antibiotic therapies, and in nonmedical conditions such as wastewater treatment plants, and food and water used in agriculture and farming. To understand the impacts of sublethal concentrations on selection, we measured 30 adaptive landscapes for a set of TEM β-lactamases containing all combinations of the four amino acid substitutions that exist in TEM-50 for 15 β-lactam antibiotics at multiple concentrations. We found that there are many evolutionary pathways within this collection of landscapes that lead to nearly every TEM-genotype that we studied. While it is known that the pathways change depending on the type of β-lactam, this study demonstrates that the landscapes including fitness optima also change dramatically as the concentrations of antibiotics change. Based on these results we conclude that the presence of multiple concentrations of β-lactams in an environment result in many different adaptive landscapes through which pathways to nearly every genotype are available. Ultimately this may increase the diversity of genotypes in microbial populations.

  17. A Pathogen-Selective Antibiotic Minimizes Disturbance to the Microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Jiangwei; Carter, Robert A.; Vuagniaux, Grégoire; Barbier, Maryse; Rosch, Jason W.

    2016-01-01

    Broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy decimates the gut microbiome, resulting in a variety of negative health consequences. Debio 1452 is a staphylococcus-selective enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase (FabI) inhibitor under clinical development and was used to determine whether treatment with pathogen-selective antibiotics would minimize disturbance to the microbiome. The effect of oral Debio 1452 on the microbiota of mice was compared to the effects of four commonly used broad-spectrum oral antibiotics. During the 10 days of oral Debio 1452 treatment, there was minimal disturbance to the gut bacterial abundance and composition, with only the unclassified S24-7 taxon reduced at days 6 and 10. In comparison, broad-spectrum oral antibiotics caused ∼100- to 4,000-fold decreases in gut bacterial abundance and severely altered the microbial composition. The gut bacterial abundance and composition of Debio 1452-treated mice were indistinguishable from those of untreated mice 2 days after the antibiotic treatment was stopped. In contrast, the bacterial abundance in broad-spectrum-antibiotic-treated mice took up to 7 days to recover, and the gut composition of the broad-spectrum-antibiotic-treated mice remained different from that of the control group 20 days after the cessation of antibiotic treatment. These results illustrate that a pathogen-selective approach to antibiotic development will minimize disturbance to the gut microbiome. PMID:27161626

  18. [Therapeutic Aggressiveness and Liquid Oncology].

    PubMed

    Barón Duarte, F J; Rodríguez Calvo, M S; Amor Pan, J R

    2017-01-01

    Aggressiveness criteria proposed in the scientific literature a decade ago provide a quality judgment and are a reference in the care of patients with advanced cancer, but their use is not generalized in the evaluation of Oncology Services. In this paper we analyze the therapeutic aggressiveness, according to standard criteria, in 1.001 patients with advanced cancer who died in our Institution between 2010 and 2013. The results seem to show that aggressiveness at the end of life is present more frequently than experts recommend. About 25% of patients fulfill at least one criterion of aggressiveness. This result could be explained by a liquid Oncology which does not prioritize the patient as a moral subject in the clinical appointment. Medical care is oriented to necessities and must be articulated in a model focused on dignity and communication. Its implementation through Advanced Care Planning, consideration of patient's values and preferences, and Limitation of therapeutic effort are ways to reduce aggressiveness and improve clinical practice at the end of life. We need to encourage synergic and proactive attitudes, adding the best of cancer research with the best clinical care for the benefit of human being, moral subject and main goal of Medicine.

  19. [The history of antibiotics].

    PubMed

    Yazdankhah, Siamak; Lassen, Jørgen; Midtvedt, Tore; Solberg, Claus Ola

    2013-12-10

    The development of chemical compounds for the treatment of infectious diseases may be divided into three phases: a) the discovery in the 1600s in South America of alkaloid extracts from the bark of the cinchona tree and from the dried root of the ipecacuanha bush, which proved effective against, respectively, malaria (quinine) and amoebic dysentery (emetine); b) the development of synthetic drugs, which mostly took place in Germany, starting with Paul Ehrlich's (1854-1915) discovery of salvarsan (1909), and crowned with Gerhard Domagk's (1895-1964) discovery of the sulfonamides (1930s); and c) the discovery of antibiotics. The prime example of the latter is the development of penicillin in the late 1920s following a discovery by a solitary research scientist who never worked in a team and never as part of a research programme. It took another ten years or so before drug-quality penicillin was produced, with research now dependent on being conducted in large collaborative teams, frequently between universities and wealthy industrial companies. The search for new antibiotics began in earnest in the latter half of the 1940s and was mostly based on soil microorganisms. Many new antibiotics were discovered in this period, which may be termed «the golden age of antibiotics». Over the past three decades, the development of new antibiotics has largely stalled, while antibiotic resistance has increased. This situation may require new strategies for the treatment of infectious diseases.

  20. Behavioral Interventions for Anger, Irritability, and Aggression in Children and Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Stephanie D.; McCauley, Spencer A.; Ibrahim, Karim; Piasecka, Justyna B.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: Anger, irritability, and aggression are among the most common reasons for child mental health referrals. This review is focused on two forms of behavioral interventions for these behavioral problems: Parent management training (PMT) and cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT). Methods: First, we provide an overview of anger/irritability and aggression as the treatment targets of behavioral interventions, followed by a discussion of the general principles and techniques of these treatment modalities. Then we discuss our current work concerning the transdiagnostic approach to CBT for anger, irritability, and aggression. Results: PMT is aimed at improving aversive patterns of family interactions that engender children's disruptive behavior. CBT targets deficits in emotion regulation and social problem-solving that are associated with aggressive behavior. Both forms of treatment have received extensive support in randomized controlled trials. Given that anger/irritability and aggressive behavior are common in children with a variety of psychiatric diagnoses, a transdiagnostic approach to CBT for anger and aggression is described in detail. Conclusions: PMT and CBT have been well studied in randomized controlled trials in children with disruptive behavior disorders, and studies of transdiagnostic approaches to CBT for anger and aggression are currently underway. More work is needed to develop treatments for other types of aggressive behavior (e.g., relational aggression) that have been relatively neglected in clinical research. The role of callous-unemotional traits in response to behavioral interventions and treatment of irritability in children with anxiety and mood disorders also warrants further investigation. PMID:26745682

  1. Antibiotic therapy for Listeria monocytogenes bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Hung, C C; Chang, S C; Chen, Y C; Hsieh, W C; Luh, K T

    1995-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes has been recognized as an important pathogen in immunocompromised patients, but it has been rarely reported in Taiwan. We reviewed 13 cases of L. monocytogenes bacteremia at National Taiwan University Hospital over a 12-year period. All of the patients had underlying diseases. Fever was the most common presenting symptom, and neurologic signs were found in 6 patients. Most of the patients received penicillin G, ampicillin or piperacillin with an aminoglycoside. Corticosteroids were used in 9 of 13 patients. The overall mortality directly due to L. monocytogenes bacteremia was 31%. However, patients treated with cephalosporins or oxacillin had higher mortality than those treated with penicillin G, ampicillin or piperacillin (p = 0.05). Given the increasing number of immunosuppressed patients in Taiwan, it is likely that more cases will be encountered. Physicians in Taiwan should be aware of L. monocytogenes bacteremia and its treatment.

  2. Strategies to Minimize Antibiotic Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chang-Ro; Cho, Ill Hwan; Jeong, Byeong Chul; Lee, Sang Hee

    2013-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance can be reduced by using antibiotics prudently based on guidelines of antimicrobial stewardship programs (ASPs) and various data such as pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) properties of antibiotics, diagnostic testing, antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST), clinical response, and effects on the microbiota, as well as by new antibiotic developments. The controlled use of antibiotics in food animals is another cornerstone among efforts to reduce antibiotic resistance. All major resistance-control strategies recommend education for patients, children (e.g., through schools and day care), the public, and relevant healthcare professionals (e.g., primary-care physicians, pharmacists, and medical students) regarding unique features of bacterial infections and antibiotics, prudent antibiotic prescribing as a positive construct, and personal hygiene (e.g., handwashing). The problem of antibiotic resistance can be minimized only by concerted efforts of all members of society for ensuring the continued efficiency of antibiotics. PMID:24036486

  3. Strategies to minimize antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chang-Ro; Cho, Ill Hwan; Jeong, Byeong Chul; Lee, Sang Hee

    2013-09-12

    Antibiotic resistance can be reduced by using antibiotics prudently based on guidelines of antimicrobial stewardship programs (ASPs) and various data such as pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) properties of antibiotics, diagnostic testing, antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST), clinical response, and effects on the microbiota, as well as by new antibiotic developments. The controlled use of antibiotics in food animals is another cornerstone among efforts to reduce antibiotic resistance. All major resistance-control strategies recommend education for patients, children (e.g., through schools and day care), the public, and relevant healthcare professionals (e.g., primary-care physicians, pharmacists, and medical students) regarding unique features of bacterial infections and antibiotics, prudent antibiotic prescribing as a positive construct, and personal hygiene (e.g., handwashing). The problem of antibiotic resistance can be minimized only by concerted efforts of all members of society for ensuring the continued efficiency of antibiotics.

  4. Play Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lawver, Timothy; Blankenship, Kelly

    2008-01-01

    Play therapy is a treatment modality in which the therapist engages in play with the child. Its use has been documented in a variety of settings and with a variety of diagnoses. Treating within the context of play brings the therapist and the therapy to the level of the child. By way of an introduction to this approach, a case is presented of a six-year-old boy with oppositional defiant disorder. The presentation focuses on the events and interactions of a typical session with an established patient. The primary issues of the session are aggression, self worth, and self efficacy. These themes manifest themselves through the content of the child’s play and narration of his actions. The therapist then reflects these back to the child while gently encouraging the child toward more positive play. Though the example is one of nondirective play therapy, a wide range of variation exists under the heading of play therapy. PMID:19724720

  5. Antibiotic failure mediated by a resistant subpopulation in Enterobacter cloacae.

    PubMed

    Band, Victor I; Crispell, Emily K; Napier, Brooke A; Herrera, Carmen M; Tharp, Greg K; Vavikolanu, Kranthi; Pohl, Jan; Read, Timothy D; Bosinger, Steven E; Trent, M Stephen; Burd, Eileen M; Weiss, David S

    2016-05-09

    Antibiotic resistance is a major public health threat, further complicated by unexplained treatment failures caused by bacteria that appear antibiotic susceptible. We describe an Enterobacter cloacae isolate harbouring a minor subpopulation that is highly resistant to the last-line antibiotic colistin. This subpopulation was distinct from persisters, became predominant in colistin, returned to baseline after colistin removal and was dependent on the histidine kinase PhoQ. During murine infection, but in the absence of colistin, innate immune defences led to an increased frequency of the resistant subpopulation, leading to inefficacy of subsequent colistin therapy. An isolate with a lower-frequency colistin-resistant subpopulation similarly caused treatment failure but was misclassified as susceptible by current diagnostics once cultured outside the host. These data demonstrate the ability of low-frequency bacterial subpopulations to contribute to clinically relevant antibiotic resistance, elucidating an enigmatic cause of antibiotic treatment failure and highlighting the critical need for more sensitive diagnostics.

  6. Novel antibody-antibiotic conjugate eliminates intracellular S. aureus.

    PubMed

    Lehar, Sophie M; Pillow, Thomas; Xu, Min; Staben, Leanna; Kajihara, Kimberly K; Vandlen, Richard; DePalatis, Laura; Raab, Helga; Hazenbos, Wouter L; Morisaki, J Hiroshi; Kim, Janice; Park, Summer; Darwish, Martine; Lee, Byoung-Chul; Hernandez, Hilda; Loyet, Kelly M; Lupardus, Patrick; Fong, Rina; Yan, Donghong; Chalouni, Cecile; Luis, Elizabeth; Khalfin, Yana; Plise, Emile; Cheong, Jonathan; Lyssikatos, Joseph P; Strandh, Magnus; Koefoed, Klaus; Andersen, Peter S; Flygare, John A; Wah Tan, Man; Brown, Eric J; Mariathasan, Sanjeev

    2015-11-19

    Staphylococcus aureus is considered to be an extracellular pathogen. However, survival of S. aureus within host cells may provide a reservoir relatively protected from antibiotics, thus enabling long-term colonization of the host and explaining clinical failures and relapses after antibiotic therapy. Here we confirm that intracellular reservoirs of S. aureus in mice comprise a virulent subset of bacteria that can establish infection even in the presence of vancomycin, and we introduce a novel therapeutic that effectively kills intracellular S. aureus. This antibody-antibiotic conjugate consists of an anti-S. aureus antibody conjugated to a highly efficacious antibiotic that is activated only after it is released in the proteolytic environment of the phagolysosome. The antibody-antibiotic conjugate is superior to vancomycin for treatment of bacteraemia and provides direct evidence that intracellular S. aureus represents an important component of invasive infections.

  7. Prophylactic Antibiotic Guidelines in Modern Interventional Radiology Practice

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Eunice; Tam, Matthew D.B.S.; Kikano, Raghid N.; Karuppasamy, Karunakaravel

    2010-01-01

    Modern interventional radiology practice is continuously evolving. Developments include increases in the number of central venous catheter placements and tumor treatments (uterine fibroid therapy, radio- and chemoembolization of liver tumor, percutaneous radiofrequency and cryoablation), and new procedures such as abdominal aortic aneurysm stent-graft repair, vertebroplasty, kyphoplasty, and varicose vein therapies. There have also been recent advancements in standard biliary and urinary drainage procedures, percutaneous gastrointestinal feeding tube placement, and transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunts. Prophylactic antibiotics have become the standard of care in many departments, with little clinical data to support its wide acceptance. The rise in antibiotic-resistant strains of organisms in all hospitals worldwide have forced every department to question the use of prophylactic antibiotics. The authors review the evidence behind use of prophylactic antibiotics in standard interventional radiology procedures, as well as in newer procedures that have only recently been incorporated into interventional radiology practice. PMID:22550374

  8. Basis for selecting optimum antibiotic regimens for secondary peritonitis.

    PubMed

    Maseda, Emilio; Gimenez, Maria-Jose; Gilsanz, Fernando; Aguilar, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Adequate management of severely ill patients with secondary peritonitis requires supportive therapy of organ dysfunction, source control of infection and antimicrobial therapy. Since secondary peritonitis is polymicrobial, appropriate empiric therapy requires combination therapy in order to achieve the needed coverage for both common and more unusual organisms. This article reviews etiological agents, resistance mechanisms and their prevalence, how and when to cover them and guidelines for treatment in the literature. Local surveillances are the basis for the selection of compounds in antibiotic regimens, which should be further adapted to the increasing number of patients with risk factors for resistance (clinical setting, comorbidities, previous antibiotic treatments, previous colonization, severity…). Inadequate antimicrobial regimens are strongly associated with unfavorable outcomes. Awareness of resistance epidemiology and of clinical consequences of inadequate therapy against resistant bacteria is crucial for clinicians treating secondary peritonitis, with delicate balance between optimization of empirical therapy (improving outcomes) and antimicrobial overuse (increasing resistance emergence).

  9. Antibiotic treatment for Helicobacter pylori: Is the end coming?

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Su Young; Choi, Duck Joo; Chung, Jun-Won

    2015-01-01

    Infection with the Gram-negative pathogen Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) has been associated with gastro-duodenal disease and the importance of H. pylori eradication is underscored by its designation as a group I carcinogen. The standard triple therapy consists of a proton pump inhibitor, amoxicillin and clarithromycin, although many other regimens are used, including quadruple, sequential and concomitant therapy regimens supplemented with metronidazole, clarithromycin and levofloxacin. Despite these efforts, current therapeutic regimens lack efficacy in eradication due to antibiotic resistance, drug compliance and antibiotic degradation by the acidic stomach environment. Antibiotic resistance to clarithromycin and metronidazole is particularly problematic and several approaches have been proposed to overcome this issue, such as complementary probiotic therapy with Lactobacillus. Other studies have identified novel molecules with an anti-H. pylori effect, as well as tailored therapy and nanotechnology as viable alternative eradication strategies. This review discusses current antibiotic therapy for H. pylori infections, limitations of this type of therapy and predicts the availability of newly developed therapies for H. pylori eradication. PMID:26558152

  10. Hypocholesterolaemia in dogs with dominance aggression.

    PubMed

    Sentürk, S; Yalçin, E; Pentürk, S

    2003-09-01

    Serum lipids and lipoprotein concentrations have been associated with dominance aggression in humans. The aim of this study was to investigate the link between serum lipids, including cholesterol, triglyceride, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), total cholesterol (TC) to HDL-C ratio and dominance aggression in dogs. Levels of serum TC, triglyceride and HDL-C were significantly lower in dogs with dominance aggression compared with non-aggressive dogs (P < 0.001). These results suggest that a relationship exists between serum lipid profile and dominance aggression in dogs, and hypocholesterolaemia exists in dogs with dominance aggression.

  11. Genetics and neurobiology of aggression in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Zwarts, Liesbeth; Versteven, Marijke; Callaerts, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Aggressive behavior is widely present throughout the animal kingdom and is crucial to ensure survival and reproduction. Aggressive actions serve to acquire territory, food, or mates and in defense against predators or rivals; while in some species these behaviors are involved in establishing a social hierarchy. Aggression is a complex behavior, influenced by a broad range of genetic and environmental factors. Recent studies in Drosophila provide insight into the genetic basis and control of aggression. The state of the art on aggression in Drosophila and the many opportunities provided by this model organism to unravel the genetic and neurobiological basis of aggression are reviewed. PMID:22513455

  12. [Influence of personal attitude of the manager on antibiotic use in pig production].

    PubMed

    Malik, J; Kaufmann, G; Hirsiger, P; Kümmerlen, D; Arnold, C; Spring, P; Sidler, X

    2015-12-01

    The attitude as well as the expertise of a person affect the behavior and actions in daily life. To investigate the influence of attitude and knowledge of pig producers on the use of antibiotics in farms, 220 Swiss pig producers were questioned on health awareness, attitude towards sustainable production, risk behavior, intrinsic motivation and knowledge about antibiotics and resistance development. In addition, the strategy of antibiotic use (therapeutic or prophylactic) and the business practice (single or group therapy) for the amount of antibiotics on one hand and for the risk of antibiotic resistance development on the other hand, were determined in a personal interview. Farmers using antibiotics only therapeutically had a better business practice. A direct link between the personal attitude and the antibiotic use or a higher risk of development of antibiotic resistance was not found in this investigation.

  13. The use of oral antibiotics in treating acne vulgaris: a new approach.

    PubMed

    Farrah, Georgia; Tan, Ernest

    2016-09-01

    Although acne is not an infectious disease, oral antibiotics have remained a mainstay of treatment over the last 40 years. The anti-inflammatory properties of oral antibiotics, particularly the tetracyclines, are efficacious in treating inflammatory acne lesions. Common prescribing practices in Dermatology exert significant selection pressure on bacteria, contributing to the development of antibiotic resistance. Antibiotic use for acne not only promotes resistance in Propionibacterium acnes, but also affects other host bacteria with pathogenic potential. This review will summarize the commonly used treatments for acne vulgaris, and how they should be combined as rational treatment. The indications for using oral antibiotics in acne will be highlighted. Strategies described in the literature to conserve the utility of oral antibiotics will be summarized. These include limiting the duration of antibiotic therapy, concomitant use of a topical non-antibiotic agent, use of subantimicrobial dose doxycycline, and the introduction of topical dapsone.

  14. Nonsurgical periodontal therapy.

    PubMed

    Drisko, C H

    2001-01-01

    reports, however, would indicate that, when daily irrigation with water was added to a regular oral hygiene home regimen, a significant reduction in probing depth, bleeding on probing and Gingival Index was observed. A significant reduction in cytokine levels (interleukin-1beta and prostaglandin E2, which are associated with destructive changes in inflamed tissues and bone resorption also occurs. If patient-applied antimicrobial therapy is insufficient in preventing, arresting, or reversing the disease progression, then professionally applied antimicrobial agents should be considered including sustained local drug delivery products. Other, more broadly based pharmacotherapeutic agents may be indicated for multiple failing sites. Such agents would include systemic antibiotics or host modulating drugs used in conjunction with periodontal debridement. More aggressive types of juvenile periodontitis or severe rapidly advancing adult periodontitis usually require a combination of surgical intervention in conjunction with systemic antibiotics and generally are not controlled with nonsurgical anti-infective therapy alone. It should be noted, however, that, to date, no home care products or devices currently available can completely control or eliminate the pathogenic plaques associated with periodontal diseases for extended periods of time. Daily home care and frequent recall are still paramount for long-term success. Nonsurgical therapy remains the cornerstone of periodontal treatment. Attention to detail, patient compliance and proper selection of adjunctive antimicrobial agents for sustained plaque control are important elements in achieving successful long-term results. Frequent re-evaluation and careful monitoring allows the practitioner the opportunity to intervene early in the disease state, to reverse or arrest the progression of periodontal disease with meticulous nonsurgical anti-infective therapy.

  15. Antibiotics after rattlesnake envenomation.

    PubMed

    LoVecchio, Frank; Klemens, Jane; Welch, Sharon; Rodriguez, Ron

    2002-11-01

    To record the outcome, with regard to infection rate, of patients with rattlesnake bites (RSBs) who do not receive prophylactic antibiotics, a prospective observational study was performed of patients with RSBs treated at our institution during a consecutive 18-month period. The inclusion criteria were RSBs <24 h old and completion of follow-up (telephone call, mail reply, medical toxicologist, or private physician examination) 7-10 days following envenomation. Fifty-six consecutive patients (Median age: 32.8 years [range 4-67 years]) were enrolled. One patient was excluded because of presentation 38 h after envenomation and two patients failed to complete the required follow-up. One patient received a dose of antibiotics before transfer. Antibiotics were discontinued upon arrival. Of the total 56 RSB patients, 34 (61%) RSBs involved the upper extremity and 22 (39%) involved the lower extremity. Six patients (11%) applied ice and two (4%) used a tourniquet before evaluation. The mean arrival time was 2.7 h (Range <1-24 h). Forty-three patients (81%) received antivenin. Fifty-three patients (100%) had extremity swelling and 38 patients (72%) had tender proximal lymph nodes. Of the 53 patients who completed the study, 3 (6%) received antibiotics from their primary care physicians at 7-10 day follow-up, with no cases (0%) of documented infection. Prophylactic antibiotics are not indicated in patients with rattlesnake bites.

  16. Alternatives to antibiotics-a pipeline portfolio review.

    PubMed

    Czaplewski, Lloyd; Bax, Richard; Clokie, Martha; Dawson, Mike; Fairhead, Heather; Fischetti, Vincent A; Foster, Simon; Gilmore, Brendan F; Hancock, Robert E W; Harper, David; Henderson, Ian R; Hilpert, Kai; Jones, Brian V; Kadioglu, Aras; Knowles, David; Ólafsdóttir, Sigríður; Payne, David; Projan, Steve; Shaunak, Sunil; Silverman, Jared; Thomas, Christopher M; Trust, Trevor J; Warn, Peter; Rex, John H

    2016-02-01

    Antibiotics have saved countless lives and enabled the development of modern medicine over the past 70 years. However, it is clear that the success of antibiotics might only have been temporary and we now expect a long-term and perhaps never-ending challenge to find new therapies to combat antibiotic-resistant bacteria. A broader approach to address bacterial infection is needed. In this Review, we discuss alternatives to antibiotics, which we defined as non-compound approaches (products other than classic antibacterial agents) that target bacteria or any approaches that target the host. The most advanced approaches are antibodies, probiotics, and vaccines in phase 2 and phase 3 trials. This first wave of alternatives to antibiotics will probably best serve as adjunctive or preventive therapies, which suggests that conventional antibiotics are still needed. Funding of more than £1·5 billion is needed over 10 years to test and develop these alternatives to antibiotics. Investment needs to be partnered with translational expertise and targeted to support the validation of these approaches in phase 2 trials, which would be a catalyst for active engagement and investment by the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industry. Only a sustained, concerted, and coordinated international effort will provide the solutions needed for the future.

  17. Acute sinusitis in children: do antibiotics have any role?

    PubMed

    Abzug, Mark J

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria can be recovered from paranasal sinuses in the majority of patients given the diagnosis of acute bacterial sinusitis (ABS), and bacteriologic cure can be achieved with appropriate antibiotic treatment. The critical question is whether bacteriologic cure correlates with meaningful clinical endpoints such as clinical improvement, reduction in recurrent disease, or prevention of complications. Of the 4 pediatric placebo-controlled randomized clinical trials (PCRCTs), 2 suggest superiority of antibiotic treatment and 2 suggest lack of superiority. PCRCTs in adults are mixed as to clinical benefit. Pediatric and adult meta-analyses demonstrate modest benefit of antibiotic therapy and rates of spontaneous recovery without antibiotics of 60-65%. Although retrospective studies indicate that some patients who develop orbital or neurologic complications of sinusitis were pre-treated with antibiotic therapy, a low rate of complications precludes determination of whether antibiotic treatment prevents complications in some proportion of patients. Like the literature evidence, expert guideline recommendations are mixed. Although the evidence base is incomplete and conflicting, the limited data suggest that antibiotics probably do have a role in the treatment of pediatric ABS. The most compelling rationale is prevention of serious complications, but proof for this rationale is lacking.

  18. Nonsurgical treatment of aggressive fibromatosis in the head and neck

    SciTech Connect

    West, C.B. Jr.; Shagets, F.W.; Mansfield, M.J. )

    1989-09-01

    Aggressive fibromatosis is a poorly defined, locally aggressive, yet histologically benign fibroblastic proliferative lesion that may occur in the head and neck. The lesion is highly cellular and locally infiltrative and has a propensity to invade and erode bone, compromising vital structures within the head and neck. However, it is not a true malignancy because it does not have malignant cytologic characteristics nor does it metastasize. We present two cases of aggressive fibromatosis occurring in young adult men. The first case involved a rapidly enlarging mass of the anterior maxilla that involved the upper lip, nasal alae, nasal septum, inferior turbinates, and hard palate. The patient underwent incisional biopsy to confirm the diagnosis. Because of difficulty in determining the actual margins of this extensive lesion and the significant morbidity that would have resulted from surgical resection, we elected to treat this patient with chemotherapy and radiation therapy. The second case was an extensive lesion involving the right temporal bone, pterygomaxillary space, and infratemporal, temporal, and middle cranial fossae. Incisional biopsy confirmed the diagnosis. Because of the lack of functional and cosmetic deficits and the unavoidable morbidity of a surgical resection, this patient was treated with radiation therapy. Although wide field resection is the most satisfactory form of treatment, in situations in which this modality would result in unacceptable morbidity or if surgical margins are positive, then radiation therapy and chemotherapy should be considered. Support for these therapeutic modalities is found in larger series of cases outside the head and neck.

  19. Aggressive periodontitis: The unsolved mystery.

    PubMed

    Clark, Danielle; Febbraio, Maria; Levin, Liran

    2017-01-01

    Aggressive periodontal disease is an oral health mystery. Our current understanding of this disease is that specific bacteria invade the oral cavity and the host reacts with an inflammatory response leading to mass destruction of the alveolar bone. Aggressive periodontal disease is typically observed in a population under the age of 30 and occurs so rapidly that it is difficult to treat. Unfortunately, the consequence of this disease frequently involves tooth extractions. As a result, the aftermath is chewing disability and damage to self-esteem due to an altered self-image. Furthermore, patients are encumbered by frequent dental appointments which have an economic impact in regards to both personal financial strain and absent days in the workplace. Aggressive periodontal disease has a tremendous effect on patients' overall quality of life and needs to be investigated more extensively in order to develop methods for earlier definitive diagnosis and effective treatments. One of the mysteries of aggressive periodontal disease is the relatively nominal amount of plaque present on the tooth surface in relation to the large amount of bone loss. There seems to be a hidden factor that lies between the response by the patient's immune system and the bacterial threat that is present. A better mechanistic understanding of this disease is essential to provide meaningful care and better outcomes for patients.

  20. Risperidone and Explosive Aggressive Autism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horrigan, Joseph P.; Barnhill, L. Jarrett

    1997-01-01

    In this study, 11 males with autism and mental retardation were administered risperidone. Substantial clinical improvement was noted almost immediately; patients with aggression, self-injury, explosivity, and poor sleep hygiene were most improved. The modal dose for optimal response was 0.5 mg bid. Weight gain was a significant side effect.…

  1. School Athletics and Fan Aggression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryan, Clifford; Horton, Robert

    1976-01-01

    Several hypotheses are developed regarding fans and their behavior based upon a review of the literature. An exploratory study is then described, in which participant observers at a university sports arena observed cases of aggressive behavior among the spectators. Based upon the literature review and the findings of the study, four…

  2. Biochemistry and Aggression: Psychohematological Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Hilliard G., Jr.; Spitz, Reuben T.

    1994-01-01

    Examines biochemical measures in a population of forensic psychiatric inpatients. Regression equations utilizing chemical and biological variables were developed and evaluated to determine their value in predicting the severity and frequency of aggression. Findings strongly suggest the presence of specific biochemical alteration among those…

  3. Teachers' Reactions to Children's Aggression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nesdale, Drew; Pickering, Kaye

    2006-01-01

    Drawing on social schema theory (Fiske & Taylor, 1991) and social identity theory (Tajfel & Turner, 1979), this study examined the impact on teachers' reactions to children's aggression of three variables, two of which were related to the aggressors and one was related to the teachers. Experienced female elementary school teachers (N=90) each read…

  4. Inflammation, Antibiotics, and Diet as Environmental Stressors of the Gut Microbiome in Pediatric Crohn's Disease.

    PubMed

    Lewis, James D; Chen, Eric Z; Baldassano, Robert N; Otley, Anthony R; Griffiths, Anne M; Lee, Dale; Bittinger, Kyle; Bailey, Aubrey; Friedman, Elliot S; Hoffmann, Christian; Albenberg, Lindsey; Sinha, Rohini; Compher, Charlene; Gilroy, Erin; Nessel, Lisa; Grant, Amy; Chehoud, Christel; Li, Hongzhe; Wu, Gary D; Bushman, Frederic D

    2015-10-14

    Abnormal composition of intestinal bacteria--"dysbiosis"-is characteristic of Crohn's disease. Disease treatments include dietary changes and immunosuppressive anti-TNFα antibodies as well as ancillary antibiotic therapy, but their effects on microbiota composition are undetermined. Using shotgun metagenomic sequencing, we analyzed fecal samples from a prospective cohort of pediatric Crohn's disease patients starting therapy with enteral nutrition or anti-TNFα antibodies and reveal the full complement and dynamics of bacteria, fungi, archaea, and viruses during treatment. Bacterial community membership was associated independently with intestinal inflammation, antibiotic use, and therapy. Antibiotic exposure was associated with increased dysbiosis, whereas dysbiosis decreased with reduced intestinal inflammation. Fungal proportions increased with disease and antibiotic use. Dietary therapy had independent and rapid effects on microbiota composition distinct from other stressor-induced changes and effectively reduced inflammation. These findings reveal that dysbiosis results from independent effects of inflammation, diet, and antibiotics and shed light on Crohn disease treatments.

  5. Personal standards for judging aggression by a relationship partner: How much aggression is too much?

    PubMed

    Arriaga, Ximena B; Capezza, Nicole M; Daly, Christine A

    2016-01-01

    What determines whether people tolerate partner aggression? This research examined how norms, relationship experiences, and commitment predict personal standards for judging aggressive acts by a partner. Studies 1a and 1b (n = 689) revealed that experiencing aggression in a current relationship and greater commitment predicted greater tolerance for common partner aggression. Study 2 longitudinally tracked individuals who had never experienced partner aggression (n = 52). Once aggression occurred, individuals adopted more tolerant standards, but only if they were highly committed. Study 3 involved experimentally manipulating the relevance of partner aggression among individuals who reported current partner aggression (n = 73); they were more tolerant of aggressive acts imagined to occur by their partner (vs. the same acts by a stranger), but only if they were highly committed. Personal standards for judging partner aggression are dynamic. They shift toward greater tolerance when committed people experience aggression in a current relationship.

  6. The multifaceted roles of antibiotics and antibiotic resistance in nature

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Saswati; Chattopadhyay, Madhab K.; Grossart, Hans-Peter

    2013-01-01

    Antibiotics are chemotherapeutic agents, which have been a very powerful tool in the clinical management of bacterial diseases since the 1940s. However, benefits offered by these magic bullets have been substantially lost in subsequent days following the widespread emergence and dissemination of antibiotic-resistant strains. While it is obvious that excessive and imprudent use of antibiotics significantly contributes to the emergence of resistant strains, antibiotic resistance is also observed in natural bacteria of remote places unlikely to be impacted by human intervention. Both antibiotic biosynthetic genes and resistance-conferring genes have been known to evolve billions of years ago, long before clinical use of antibiotics. Hence it appears that antibiotics and antibiotics resistance determinants have some other roles in nature, which often elude our attention because of overemphasis on the therapeutic importance of antibiotics and the crisis imposed by the antibiotic resistance in pathogens. In the natural milieu, antibiotics are often found to be present in sub-inhibitory concentrations acting as signaling molecules supporting the process of quorum sensing and biofilm formation. They also play an important role in the production of virulence factors and influence host–parasite interactions (e.g., phagocytosis, adherence to the target cell, and so on). The evolutionary and ecological aspects of antibiotics and antibiotic resistance in the naturally occurring microbial community are little understood. Therefore, the actual role of antibiotics in nature warrants in-depth investigations. Studies on such an intriguing behavior of the microorganisms promise insight into the intricacies of the microbial physiology and are likely to provide some lead in controlling the emergence and subsequent dissemination of antibiotic resistance. This article highlights some of the recent findings on the role of antibiotics and the genes that confer resistance to antibiotics

  7. Implicit cognitive aggression among young male prisoners: Association with dispositional and current aggression.

    PubMed

    Ireland, Jane L; Adams, Christine

    2015-01-01

    The current study explores associations between implicit and explicit aggression in young adult male prisoners, seeking to apply the Reflection-Impulsive Model and indicate parity with elements of the General Aggression Model and social cognition. Implicit cognitive aggressive processing is not an area that has been examined among prisoners. Two hundred and sixty two prisoners completed an implicit cognitive aggression measure (Puzzle Test) and explicit aggression measures, covering current behaviour (DIPC-R) and aggression disposition (AQ). It was predicted that dispositional aggression would be predicted by implicit cognitive aggression, and that implicit cognitive aggression would predict current engagement in aggressive behaviour. It was also predicted that more impulsive implicit cognitive processing would associate with aggressive behaviour whereas cognitively effortful implicit cognitive processing would not. Implicit aggressive cognitive processing was associated with increased dispositional aggression but not current reports of aggressive behaviour. Impulsive implicit cognitive processing of an aggressive nature predicted increased dispositional aggression whereas more cognitively effortful implicit cognitive aggression did not. The article concludes by outlining the importance of accounting for implicit cognitive processing among prisoners and the need to separate such processing into facets (i.e. impulsive vs. cognitively effortful). Implications for future research and practice in this novel area of study are indicated.

  8. Tetracycline Antibiotics and Resistance.

    PubMed

    Grossman, Trudy H

    2016-04-01

    Tetracyclines possess many properties considered ideal for antibiotic drugs, including activity against Gram-positive and -negative pathogens, proven clinical safety, acceptable tolerability, and the availability of intravenous (IV) and oral formulations for most members of the class. As with all antibiotic classes, the antimicrobial activities of tetracyclines are subject to both class-specific and intrinsic antibiotic-resistance mechanisms. Since the discovery of the first tetracyclines more than 60 years ago, ongoing optimization of the core scaffold has produced tetracyclines in clinical use and development that are capable of thwarting many of these resistance mechanisms. New chemistry approaches have enabled the creation of synthetic derivatives with improved in vitro potency and in vivo efficacy, ensuring that the full potential of the class can be explored for use against current and emerging multidrug-resistant (MDR) pathogens, including carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, MDR Acinetobacter species, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

  9. Update on acne therapy.

    PubMed

    O'Donoghue, M N

    1999-06-01

    Current therapy of acne vulgaris is very effective. It consists of a combination of topical comedolytic agents, antibacterial agents, and combinations of both. The use of systemic therapy with antibiotics, isotretinoin, and hormones is necessary for cystic acne. The management of patients with the various combinations of topical and systemic medications is discussed.

  10. Improving shared decision-making in adolescents through antibiotic education.

    PubMed

    Ngadimon, I W; Islahudin, F; Mohamed Shah, N; Md Hatah, E; Makmor-Bakry, M

    2017-02-01

    Background Shared decision-making is vital in achieving desired drug therapy goals, especially with antibiotics, in view of the potential long-term reduction in drug resistance. However, shared decision-making is rarely practiced with adolescent patients. Objectives The aim of the study was to identify the effect antibiotic education has on willingness to engage in shared decision-making among adolescents in Malaysia. Setting Participants from secondary schools in Malaysia were enrolled with ethical approval. Method The adolescents answered a validated questionnaire, which included demographics, antibiotic knowledge, attitude towards antibiotic use, and the Control Preference Scale, which measures willingness to engage in shared decision-making. Afterwards, antibiotic education was delivered to participating students. Main outcome measure Knowledge about and attitude toward antibiotics were investigated. Results A total of 510 adolescents participated in the study. Knowledge of antibiotics significantly increased post education (pre 3.2 ± 1.8 vs. post 6.8 ± 2.1, p < 0.001), as did attitude score (pre 3.3 ± 1.7 vs. post 5.4 ± 1.9, p = 0.003). Interestingly, adolescents were less likely to be passively involved in shared decision-making post education (χ = 36.9, df = 2, p < 0.001). Adolescents who were more collaborative in shared decision-making had a significantly higher total antibiotics knowledge and attitude scores compared to those who were not collaborative (p = 0.003). Conclusion The present work demonstrates that antibiotic education improves knowledge, attitude, and willingness to engage in shared decision-making among adolescents. Antibiotic education can therefore be introduced as a strategy to reduce inappropriate antibiotic use.

  11. Allergy to antibiotics in children: an overestimated problem.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Susanna; Castellazzi, Luca; Tagliabue, Claudia; Principi, Nicola

    2016-10-01

    Antibiotics are the most prescribed drugs for children, and a relevant number of prescriptions are associated with the emergence of adverse events. Allergic reactions are the most frequently reported adverse events, with an incidence of up to 10% of all prescriptions. However, literature analysis has shown that allergy to antibiotics is generally overdiagnosed in children because in most cases the diagnosis is based only on the clinical history without a full allergy work-up. Consequently, children are often improperly deprived of narrow-spectrum antibiotics because of a suspected allergy to these drugs. β-Lactams, mainly penicillins, are more frequently involved as a cause of allergy to antibiotics, although allergic problems are reported for most of the antibiotic classes. Accurate diagnosis is essential for a precise definition of determination of allergy to a given drug. Diagnosis has to be based on history, laboratory tests and, when possible, on in vitro and drug provocation tests. Unfortunately, the allergological work-up is well structured only for β-lactam antibiotics, whereas for non-β-lactams few studies are available, with very limited experience in children. The main aim of this paper is to discuss the real relevance of allergy to antibiotics in children in order to provide physicians with the knowledge needed to establish an appropriate diagnostic allergy work-up and to make better use of antibiotic therapy.

  12. Adjuvant strategies for potentiation of antibiotics to overcome antimicrobial resistance.

    PubMed

    Pieren, Michel; Tigges, Marcel

    2012-10-01

    Alarming facts about the occurrence and spreading of multiple antibiotic resistant bacteria have caught the attention of global surveillance authorities and public media. The demand for novel effective antimicrobial drugs is high and on the rise while, at the same time, the supply of fresh 'magic bullets' is drying up. This review summarizes examples of recent strategies for development of adjunctive antibiotic therapies that overcome microbial resistance and thus rejuvenate the existing arsenal of drugs. Recent studies have demonstrated the potential of compounds that inhibit the action of the repressor protein implicated in ethionamide resistance, thus stimulating activation of the drug and thereby restoring the activity of the antibiotic for treatment of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Such specific interference with regulators or signal transduction mechanisms involved in antibiotic resistance or virulence provides a new toolbox for novel combinations of antimicrobial drugs with adjuvant molecules lacking intrinsic antibiotic activity. In addition to the development of new antibiotics and vaccination initiatives this strategy of restoring or potentiating the activity of existing antibiotics may help to postpone the day when antibiotics are no longer generally efficacious.

  13. Antibiotic stewardship implementation in the EU: the way forward.

    PubMed

    Allerberger, Franz; Gareis, Roland; Jindrák, Vlastimil; Struelens, Marc J

    2009-12-01

    There is an urgent need for an agreement on the principles and key components of antibiotic stewardship to support the EU member states in developing their national or regional programs. A proposal for a conceptual framework was drafted during an international expert workshop on hospital antibiotic stewardship organized under the Czech presidency in Prague on 15 April 2009. This document aims at defining structural and organizational requirements to optimize antibiotic use for hospitalized patients. Optimization should aim at improving patient outcomes, ensuring cost-effective therapy, and reducing the adverse health and ecological effects of antimicrobial use, including drug resistance. Antibiotic stewardship is of relevance to hospital as well as community care. To progress on antibiotic stewardship implementation in the EU, we suggest that three issues need to be addressed: the need for further research on the comparative effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of antibiotic stewardship strategies and interventions in different healthcare settings, the development of expert consensus on key elements of evidence-based best practice in hospital and community antibiotic stewardship, and strengthening the legal basis and core funding of antibiotic stewardship programs as integral components of quality and efficiency of care promotion initiatives.

  14. Silver enhances antibiotic activity against gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Morones-Ramirez, Jose Ruben; Winkler, Jonathan A; Spina, Catherine S; Collins, James J

    2013-06-19

    A declining pipeline of clinically useful antibiotics has made it imperative to develop more effective antimicrobial therapies, particularly against difficult-to-treat Gram-negative pathogens. Silver has been used as an antimicrobial since antiquity, yet its mechanism of action remains unclear. We show that silver disrupts multiple bacterial cellular processes, including disulfide bond formation, metabolism, and iron homeostasis. These changes lead to increased production of reactive oxygen species and increased membrane permeability of Gram-negative bacteria that can potentiate the activity of a broad range of antibiotics against Gram-negative bacteria in different metabolic states, as well as restore antibiotic susceptibility to a resistant bacterial strain. We show both in vitro and in a mouse model of urinary tract infection that the ability of silver to induce oxidative stress can be harnessed to potentiate antibiotic activity. Additionally, we demonstrate in vitro and in two different mouse models of peritonitis that silver sensitizes Gram-negative bacteria to the Gram-positive-specific antibiotic vancomycin, thereby expanding the antibacterial spectrum of this drug. Finally, we used silver and antibiotic combinations in vitro to eradicate bacterial persister cells, and show both in vitro and in a mouse biofilm infection model that silver can enhance antibacterial action against bacteria that produce biofilms. This work shows that silver can be used to enhance the action of existing antibiotics against Gram-negative bacteria, thus strengthening the antibiotic arsenal for fighting bacterial infections.

  15. Predicting and preventing supervisory workplace aggression.

    PubMed

    Dupré, Kathryne E; Barling, Julian

    2006-01-01

    The authors examined factors that lead to and prevent aggression toward supervisors at work using two samples: doctoral students and correctional service guards. The results supported that perceived interpersonal injustice mediates the relationship between perceptions of supervisory control over work performance and psychological aggression directed at supervisors, and further that psychological aggression toward supervisors is positively associated with physical acts of aggression directed at supervisors, supporting the notion of an escalation of aggressive workplace behaviors. Moreover, employees' perceptions of organizational sanctions (i.e., negative consequences for disobeying organizational policies) against aggression appear to play an important role in the prevention of workplace aggression by moderating the relationship between injustice and aggression targeting supervisors.

  16. Antibiotic prophylaxis in otolaryngologic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Ottoline, Ana Carolina Xavier; Tomita, Shiro; Marques, Marise da Penha Costa; Felix, Felippe; Ferraiolo, Priscila Novaes; Laurindo, Roberta Silveira Santos

    2013-01-01

    Summary Aim: Antibiotic prophylaxis aims to prevent infection of surgical sites before contamination or infection occurs. Prolonged antibiotic prophylaxis does not enhance the prevention of surgical infection and is associated with higher rates of antibiotic-resistant microorganisms. This review of the literature concerning antibiotic prophylaxis, with an emphasis on otolaryngologic surgery, aims to develop a guide for the use of antibiotic prophylaxis in otolaryngologic surgery in order to reduce the numbers of complications stemming from the indiscriminate use of antibiotics. PMID:25991999

  17. New classes of antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Moir, Donald T; Opperman, Timothy J; Butler, Michelle M; Bowlin, Terry L

    2012-10-01

    Several novel chemical classes of antibiotics are currently in human clinical studies. While most are narrow spectrum agents that inhibit unexploited targets, the susceptible pathogens are clinically important, including staphylococci, pseudomonads, and mycobacteria. Given the paucity of antibacterial agents consisting of novel chemical scaffolds that act on established targets, these new antibacterial scaffolds, which are active against new targets, represent an important advance in the battle against antibiotic resistance. Indeed, most of these compounds are unlikely to be subject to existing compound-based or target-based resistance mechanisms.

  18. Antibiotics in Animal Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falcão, Amílcar C.

    The administration of antibiotics to animals to prevent or treat diseases led us to be concerned about the impact of these antibiotics on human health. In fact, animal products could be a potential vehicle to transfer drugs to humans. Using appropri ated mathematical and statistical models, one can predict the kinetic profile of drugs and their metabolites and, consequently, develop preventive procedures regarding drug transmission (i.e., determination of appropriate withdrawal periods). Nevertheless, in the present chapter the mathematical and statistical concepts for data interpretation are strictly given to allow understanding of some basic pharma-cokinetic principles and to illustrate the determination of withdrawal periods

  19. Predicting antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Martínez, José L; Baquero, Fernando; Andersson, Dan I

    2007-12-01

    The treatment of bacterial infections is increasingly complicated because microorganisms can develop resistance to antimicrobial agents. This article discusses the information that is required to predict when antibiotic resistance is likely to emerge in a bacterial population. Indeed, the development of the conceptual and methodological tools required for this type of prediction represents an important goal for microbiological research. To this end, we propose the establishment of methodological guidelines that will allow researchers to predict the emergence of resistance to a new antibiotic before its clinical introduction.

  20. Antibiotics and antibiotic resistance in agroecosystems: State of the science

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We propose a simple causal model depicting relationships involved in dissemination of antibiotics and antibiotic resistance in agroecosystems and potential effects on human health, functioning of natural ecosystems, and agricultural productivity. Available evidence for each causal link is briefly su...

  1. Microbial profiles at baseline and not the use of antibiotics determine the clinical outcome of the treatment of chronic periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Bizzarro, S; Laine, M L; Buijs, M J; Brandt, B W; Crielaard, W; Loos, B G; Zaura, E

    2016-02-01

    Antibiotics are often used in the treatment of chronic periodontitis, which is a major cause of tooth loss. However, evidence in favour of a microbial indication for the prescription of antibiotics is lacking, which may increase the risk of the possible indiscriminate use of antibiotics, and consequent, microbial resistance. Here, using an open-ended technique, we report the changes in the subgingival microbiome up to one year post-treatment of patients treated with basic periodontal therapy with or without antibiotics. Antibiotics resulted in a greater influence on the microbiome 3 months after therapy, but this difference disappeared at 6 months. Greater microbial diversity, specific taxa and certain microbial co-occurrences at baseline and not the use of antibiotics predicted better clinical treatment outcomes. Our results demonstrate the predictive value of specific subgingival bacterial profiles for the decision to prescribe antibiotics in the treatment of periodontitis, but they also indicate the need for alternative therapies based on ecological approaches.

  2. Microbial profiles at baseline and not the use of antibiotics determine the clinical outcome of the treatment of chronic periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Bizzarro, S.; Laine, M. L.; Buijs, M. J.; Brandt, B. W.; Crielaard, W.; Loos, B. G.; Zaura, E.

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotics are often used in the treatment of chronic periodontitis, which is a major cause of tooth loss. However, evidence in favour of a microbial indication for the prescription of antibiotics is lacking, which may increase the risk of the possible indiscriminate use of antibiotics, and consequent, microbial resistance. Here, using an open-ended technique, we report the changes in the subgingival microbiome up to one year post-treatment of patients treated with basic periodontal therapy with or without antibiotics. Antibiotics resulted in a greater influence on the microbiome 3 months after therapy, but this difference disappeared at 6 months. Greater microbial diversity, specific taxa and certain microbial co-occurrences at baseline and not the use of antibiotics predicted better clinical treatment outcomes. Our results demonstrate the predictive value of specific subgingival bacterial profiles for the decision to prescribe antibiotics in the treatment of periodontitis, but they also indicate the need for alternative therapies based on ecological approaches. PMID:26830979

  3. The influence of IgM-enriched immunoglobulin therapy on neonatal mortality and hematological variables in newborn infants with blood culture-proven sepsis.

    PubMed

    Abbasoğlu, Aslıhan; Ecevit, Ayşe; Tuğcu, Ali Ulaş; Yapakçı, Ece; Tekindal, Mustafa Agah; Tarcan, Aylin; Ecevit, Zafer

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of adjuvant immunoglobulin M (IgM)-enriched intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) therapy on mortality rate, hematological variables and length of hospital stay in newborn infants with blood culture-proven sepsis. Demographic and clinical features and outcome measures of 63 newborn infants with blood culture-proven sepsis were documented retrospectively from the medical records. The patients were divided into two groups according to their treatment history. The patients in Group 1 received antibiotic therapy only and the patients in Group 2 received both antibiotic and adjuvant IgMenriched IVIG. The study revealed that mortality rates were 28.1% and 12.9% in Group 1 and Group 2, respectively. The mortality rate was lower in Group 2, but the difference between the two groups was not statistically significant (p=0.21). Coagulase-negative Staphylococcus was the most common type of bacteria isolated from the blood culture in both groups. When changing laboratory results were compared between the two groups, hemoglobin, leukocyte count and C-reactive protein levels were different during the first three days of antibiotic treatment. Our study revealed that if diagnosed at an early stage and treated aggressively with appropriate and effective antibiotics, adjuvant IgM-enriched IVIG treatment has no additional benefits in neonatal sepsis.

  4. Personality and trait aggression profiles of male and female prison inmates.

    PubMed

    Falk, Örjan; Sfendla, Anis; Brändström, Sven; Anckarsäter, Henrik; Nilsson, Thomas; Kerekes, Nóra

    2017-04-01

    Gender specific personality profiles in association with the level of aggressive antisocial behavior in offenders have not been previously investigated. In the present study we analyzed data collected from 65 male and 50 female offenders using structured protocols regarding criminal history (by criminal register data), trait aggression (by the Life History of Aggression (LHA) questionnaire), and personality profiles (by the Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI)). Prison inmates differed significantly on several personality dimensions, most pronouncedly were they characterized with low character maturity (low scores in the Self-Directedness and Cooperativeness dimensions of TCI) when compared to gender and age matched controls of the general population. The majority of offenders scored distinctively high on trait aggression. There were moderate to strong associations between the personality dimensions and each of the subscales of LHA (Aggression, Self-directed Aggression and Antisocial behavior). These associations were stronger in the female offender sample. Trait aggression could be best explained by a model, which included male gender, younger age, high novelty seeking temperament and low character maturity. Our results suggest that therapies aiming at strengthening self-governance and increasing cooperativeness (focusing on character maturity) may alleviate aggressive antisocial behavior in offenders.

  5. Aggressive digital papillary adenoma-adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Keramidas, Evangelos G; Miller, Gavin; Revelos, Kyriakos; Kitsanta, Panagiota; Page, Robert E

    2006-01-01

    Aggressive digital papillary adenocarcinoma and aggressive digital papillary adenoma are rare tumours of the sweat glands. They are most common in the most distal part of the fingers and are locally aggressive with a 50% local recurrence rate; 14% of tumours metastasize. We present two cases.

  6. Lunar Cycles and Human Aggression: A Replication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Gordon W.; de Graaf, Jane P.

    1985-01-01

    Tested lunar-aggression hypothesis using the aggressive penalties awarded in ice hockey over a season of competition. Interpersonal aggression was found to be unrelated to either the synodic or anomalistic cycles. Discussion centers on the persistence of lunar beliefs and their links to the literature on selective exposure and interpersonal…

  7. Ventilator Associated Pneumonia in a Military Deployed Setting: The Impact of an Aggressive Infection Control Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-02-01

    Franklin GA, Stassen NA, et al. Prophylactic antibiotics adversely affect nosocomial pneumonia in trauma patients. J Trauma. 2003;55:249–254. 18...Ventilator Associated Pneumonia in a Military Deployed Setting: The Impact of an Aggressive Infection Control Program Michael L. Landrum, MD and...resistant bacterial infections among combat casualties. We describe the rates of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) before and after the implementation

  8. Social Aggression on Television and Its Relationship to Children's Aggression in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martins, Nicole; Wilson, Barbara J.

    2012-01-01

    A survey was conducted with over 500 children in grades K-5 to examine whether exposure to socially aggressive content was related to children's use of social aggression. The results of the survey revealed a significant relationship between exposure to televised social aggression and increased social aggression at school, but only for girls and…

  9. Examining the Mediating Effect of Self-Efficacy on Approval of Aggression and Proactive Aggression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hadley, Jade; Mowbray, Tony; Jacobs, Nicky

    2017-01-01

    Proactive aggression (PA) is goal-directed, hostile social behavior that has been linked to detrimental outcomes. It has been theorized that adolescents who believe aggression is a normal and acceptable social response (approval of aggression) are more likely to show PA. Confidence in one's ability to behave aggressively (self-efficacy about…

  10. Antibiotic cement-coated plates for management of infected fractures.

    PubMed

    Conway, Janet D; Hlad, Lee M; Bark, Samantha E

    2015-02-01

    Deep infection in the presence of an implant after open reduction and internal fixation is usually treated with removal of the implant, serial débridement procedures, lavage, intravenously administered antibiotics, and occasionally, placement of antibiotic-impregnated beads. If infection occurs during the early stages of bone healing, fracture stabilization might be compromised after implant removal. Osteomyelitis, unstable owing to a bone deficit or fracture, was treated with an antibiotic cement-coated (tobramycin and vancomycin) plate. The goal was successful eradication of infection with the patient remaining infection-free for 1 year. Four patients were treated with antibiotic-coated plates for osteomyelitis and all have achieved successful union, clinically free of signs of infection for more than 1 year. One patient experienced a prominent and painful plate, necessitating removal. Based on our experience, early aggressive débridement coupled with broad-spectrum antibiotic cement-coated plate insertion, provides fracture stability and helps eradicate the infection with 1 surgical procedure.

  11. Salinomycin, a polyether ionophoric antibiotic, inhibits adipogenesis.

    PubMed

    Szkudlarek-Mikho, Maria; Saunders, Rudel A; Yap, Sook Fan; Ngeow, Yun Fong; Chin, Khew-Voon

    2012-11-30

    The polyether ionophoric antibiotics including monensin, salinomycin, and narasin, are widely used in veterinary medicine and as food additives and growth promoters in animal husbandry including poultry farming. Their effects on human health, however, are not fully understood. Recent studies showed that salinomycin is a cancer stem cell inhibitor. Since poultry consumption has risen sharply in the last three decades, we asked whether the consumption of meat tainted with growth promoting antibiotics might have effects on adipose cells. We showed in this report that the ionophoric antibiotics inhibit the differentiation of preadipocytes into adipocytes. The block of differentiation is not due to the induction of apoptosis nor the inhibition of cell proliferation. In addition, salinomycin also suppresses the transcriptional activity of the CCAAT/enhancer binding proteins and the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ. These results suggest that the ionophoric antibiotics can be exploited as novel anti-obesity therapeutics and as pharmacological probes for the study of adipose biology. Further, the pharmacological effects of salinomycin could be a harbinger of its toxicity on the adipose tissue and other susceptible target cells in cancer therapy.

  12. The genomic enzymology of antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Morar, Mariya; Wright, Gerard D

    2010-01-01

    The need for new antibiotic therapies is acute and growing in large part because of the emergence of drug-resistant pathogens. A vast number of resistance determinants are, however, found in nonpathogenic micro-organisms. The resistance totality in the global microbiota is the antibiotic resistome and includes not only established resistance genes but also genes that have the potential to evolve into resistance elements. We term these proto-resistance genes and hypothesize that they share common ancestry with other functional units known as housekeeping genes. Genomic enzymology is the study of protein structure-function in light of genetic context and evolution of protein superfamilies. This concept is highly applicable to study of antibiotic resistance evolution from proto-resistance elements. In this review, we summarize some of the genomic enzymology evidence for resistance enzymes pointing to common ancestry with genes of other metabolic functions. Genomic enzymology plays a key role in understanding the origins of antibiotic resistance and aids in designing strategies for diagnosis and prevention thereof.

  13. Prophylactic antibiotics and anticonvulsants in neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Ratilal, B; Sampaio, C

    2011-01-01

    The prophylactic administration of antibiotics to prevent infection and the prophylactic administration of anticonvulsants to prevent first seizure episodes are common practice in neurosurgery. If prophylactic medication therapy is not indicated, the patient not only incurs the discomfort and the inconvenience resulting from drug treatment but is also unnecessarily exposed to adverse drug reactions, and incurs extra costs. The main situations in which prophylactic anticonvulsants and antibiotics are used are described and those situations we found controversial in the literature and lack further investigation are identified: anticonvulsants for preventing seizures in patients with chronic subdural hematomas, antiepileptic drugs for preventing seizures in those suffering from brain tumors, antibiotic prophylaxis for preventing meningitis in patients with basilar skull fractures, and antibiotic prophylaxis for the surgical introduction of intracranial ventricular shunts.In the following we present systematic reviews of the literature in accordance with the standard protocol of The Cochrane Collaboration to evaluate the effectiveness of the use of these prophylactic medications in the situations mentioned. Our goal was to efficiently integrate valid information and provide a basis for rational decision-making.

  14. Local application of free antibiotic powder in the treatment of osteomyelitis in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Garcia, E'Stephan J; Sieg, Ryan N; Abdelgawad, Amr A

    2013-08-01

    To date, several strategies have been developed to provide local antibiotic therapy in the treatment of osteomyelitis, such as antibiotic-loaded bone cement, antibiotic-impregnated collagen sponges, polymethylmethacrylate beads, antibiotic-loaded bone graft, antibiotic-loaded synthetic bone substitutes, and antibiotic-coated implants. The optimum carrier for local antibiotic therapy has not been identified. Tibial osteomyelitis using methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus was created in a rat model. Rats were assigned to 3 treatment groups: group A, systemic antibiotics only; group B, systemic antibiotics plus surgical debridement; and group C, systemic antibiotics, surgical debridement, and application of cefazolin. Infection was assessed using gross tissue analysis, radiographs, quantitative bacteriology, and histopathology. One-half of the rat tibias were randomly chosen for histological evaluation and the other half were used for microbiological analysis. Radiographs were reviewed and graded by 4 blinded board-certified radiologists. Histology slides were reviewed and graded by a blinded board-certified pathologist. Gross tissue analysis of treatment groups B and C demonstrated a statistically significant improvement in soft tissue infection clearance compared with group A (P<.05). No difference was found between treatment groups B and C. No significant difference existed in gross tissue, radiographic, microbiologic, or histopathologic analyses among the 3 groups for osteomyelitis. The results of this study demonstrated that the local application of free antibiotic powder is as effective as local debridement alone in treating soft tissue infection associated with tibial osteomyelitis in a rat model.

  15. Mechanisms of Antibiotic Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Munita, Jose M.; Arias, Cesar A.

    2015-01-01

    Emergence of resistance among the most important bacterial pathogens is recognized as a major public health threat affecting humans worldwide. Multidrug-resistant organisms have emerged not only in the hospital environment but are now often identified in community settings, suggesting that reservoirs of antibiotic-resistant bacteria are present outside the hospital. The bacterial response to the antibiotic “attack” is the prime example of bacterial adaptation and the pinnacle of evolution. “Survival of the fittest” is a consequence of an immense genetic plasticity of bacterial pathogens that trigger specific responses that result in mutational adaptations, acquisition of genetic material or alteration of gene expression producing resistance to virtually all antibiotics currently available in clinical practice. Therefore, understanding the biochemical and genetic basis of resistance is of paramount importance to design strategies to curtail the emergence and spread of resistance and devise innovative therapeutic approaches against multidrug-resistant organisms. In this chapter, we will describe in detail the major mechanisms of antibiotic resistance encountered in clinical practice providing specific examples in relevant bacterial pathogens. PMID:27227291

  16. Read anything mean lately? associations between reading aggression in books and aggressive behavior in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Stockdale, Laura A; Coyne, Sarah M; Nelson, David A; Padilla-Walker, Laura M

    2013-01-01

    Although there have been hundreds of studies on media violence, few have focused on literature, with none examining novels. Accordingly, the aim of the current study was to examine whether reading physical and relational aggression in books was associated with aggressive behavior in adolescents. Participants consisted of 223 adolescents who completed a variety of measures detailing their media use and aggressive behavior. A non-recursive structural equation model revealed that reading aggression in books was positively associated with aggressive behavior, even after controlling for exposure to aggression in other forms of media. Associations were only found for congruent forms of aggression. Implications regarding books as a form of media are discussed.

  17. Bacterial cheating limits antibiotic resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao Chao, Hui; Yurtsev, Eugene; Datta, Manoshi; Artemova, Tanya; Gore, Jeff

    2012-02-01

    The widespread use of antibiotics has led to the evolution of resistance in bacteria. Bacteria can gain resistance to the antibiotic ampicillin by acquiring a plasmid carrying the gene beta-lactamase, which inactivates the antibiotic. This inactivation may represent a cooperative behavior, as the entire bacterial population benefits from removing the antibiotic. The cooperative nature of this growth suggests that a cheater strain---which does not contribute to breaking down the antibiotic---may be able to take advantage of cells cooperatively inactivating the antibiotic. Here we find experimentally that a ``sensitive'' bacterial strain lacking the plasmid conferring resistance can invade a population of resistant bacteria, even in antibiotic concentrations that should kill the sensitive strain. We observe stable coexistence between the two strains and find that a simple model successfully explains the behavior as a function of antibiotic concentration and cell density. We anticipate that our results will provide insight into the evolutionary origin of phenotypic diversity and cooperative behaviors.

  18. Antibiotic-Resistant Gonorrhea (ARG)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Twitter STD on Facebook Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STDs) Antibiotic-Resistant Gonorrhea Basic Information Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... Page Surveillance Trends and Treatment Challenges Laboratory Issues Antibiotic resistance (AR) is the ability of bacteria to ...

  19. Mission Critical: Preventing Antibiotic Resistance

    MedlinePlus

    ... Button Past Emails CDC Features Mission Critical: Preventing Antibiotic Resistance Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Can ... spp. So, what can we do to prevent antibiotic resistance in healthcare settings? Patients, healthcare providers, healthcare ...

  20. Antibiotics, pediatric dysbiosis, and disease.

    PubMed

    Vangay, Pajau; Ward, Tonya; Gerber, Jeffrey S; Knights, Dan

    2015-05-13

    Antibiotics are by far the most common medications prescribed for children. Recent epidemiological data suggests an association between early antibiotic use and disease phenotypes in adulthood. Antibiotic use during infancy induces imbalances in gut microbiota, called dysbiosis. The gut microbiome's responses to antibiotics and its potential link to disease development are especially complex to study in the changing infant gut. Here, we synthesize current knowledge linking antibiotics, dysbiosis, and disease and propose a framework for studying antibiotic-related dysbiosis in children. We recommend future studies into the microbiome-mediated effects of antibiotics focused on four types of dysbiosis: loss of keystone taxa, loss of diversity, shifts in metabolic capacity, and blooms of pathogens. Establishment of a large and diverse baseline cohort to define healthy infant microbiome development is essential to advancing diagnosis, interpretation, and eventual treatment of pediatric dysbiosis. This approach will also help provide evidence-based recommendations for antibiotic usage in infancy.