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Sample records for aggressive b-cell malignancy

  1. Ibrutinib for B cell malignancies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Research over the role of Bruton’s agammaglobulinemia tyrosine kinase (BTK) in B-lymphocyte development, differentiation, signaling and survival has led to better understanding of the pathogenesis of B-cell malignancies. Down-regulation of BTK activity is an attractive novel strategy for treating patients with B-cell malignancies. Ibrutinib (PCI-32765), a potent inhibitor of BTK induces impressive responses in B-cell malignancies through irreversible bond with cysteine-481 in the active site of BTK (TH/SH1 domain) and inhibits BTK phosphorylation on Tyr223. This review discussed in details the role of BTK in B-cell signaling, molecular interactions between B cell lymphoma/leukemia cells and their microenvironment. Clinical trials of the novel BTK inhibitor, ibrutinib (PCI-32765), in B cell malignancies were summarized. PMID:24472371

  2. B-Cell Hematologic Malignancy Vaccination Registry

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-09-15

    Monoclonal Gammopathy of Undetermined Significance; Multiple Myeloma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia; Lymphocytosis; Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin; B-Cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Hematological Malignancies

  3. Investigational Immunotherapeutics for B-Cell Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Quintás-Cardama, Alfonso; Wierda, William; O'Brien, Susan

    2010-01-01

    The use of rituximab-based chemoimmunotherapy regimens has remarkably improved the response rates, long-term outcomes, and quality of life of patients with B-cell malignancies. However, a substantial number of patients exhibit either primary or acquired resistance to rituximab, which suggests that novel immunotherapeutics with distinct mechanisms of action are necessary. A series of monoclonal antibodies with specificity against different surface antigens expressed on malignant B cells (eg, CD22, CD23, CD40, CD70) and novel immunotherapeutics (eg, bispecific monoclonal antibodies, small-modular immunopharmaceuticals, T-cell engagers) are currently in clinical or final preclinical stages of development. Although these agents offer reason for optimism, considerable challenges lie ahead in establishing their real clinical value, as well as in integrating them into current therapeutic algorithms for patients with B-cell malignancies. This review describes some of the most promising investigational immunotherapeutics for the treatment of B-cell malignancies. PMID:20048186

  4. Neurotrophins and B-cell malignancies.

    PubMed

    Hillis, Jennifer; O'Dwyer, Michael; Gorman, Adrienne M

    2016-01-01

    Neurotrophins and their receptors act as important proliferative and pro-survival factors in a variety of cell types. Neurotrophins are produced by multiple cell types in both pro- and mature forms, and can act in an autocrine or paracrine fashion. The p75(NTR) and Trk receptors can elicit signalling in response to the presence or absence of their corresponding neurotrophin ligands. This signalling, along with neurotrophin and receptor expression, varies between different cell types. Neurotrophins and their receptors have been shown to be expressed by and elicit signalling in B lymphocytes. In general, most neurotrophins are expressed by activated B-cells and memory B-cells. Likewise, the TrkB95 receptor is seen on activated B-cells, while TrkA and p75(NTR) are expressed by both resting and active B-cells as well as memory B-cells. Nerve growth factor stimulates B-cell proliferation, memory B-cell survival, antibody production and CD40 expression. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor is involved in B-cell maturation in the bone marrow through TrkB95. Overall neurotrophins and their receptors have been shown to be involved in B-cell proliferation, development, differentiation, antibody secretion and survival. As well as expression and activity in healthy B-cells, the neurotrophins and their receptors can contribute to B-cell malignancies including acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, Burkitt's lymphoma and multiple myeloma. They are involved in B-cell malignancy survival and potentially in drug resistance. PMID:26399960

  5. A B-Cell Superantigen Induces the Apoptosis of Murine and Human Malignant B Cells.

    PubMed

    Lorenzo, Daniela; Duarte, Alejandra; Mundiñano, Juliana; Berguer, Paula; Nepomnaschy, Irene; Piazzon, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    B-cell superantigens (Sags) bind to conserved sites of the VH or VL regions of immunoglobulin molecules outside their complementarity-determining regions causing the apoptosis of normal cognate B cells. No attempts to investigate whether B-cell Sags are able to induce the apoptosis of cognate malignant B cells were reported. In the present study we show that protein L (PpL), secreted by Finegoldia magna, a B-cell Sag which interacts with κ+ bearing cells, induces the apoptosis of murine and human κ+ lymphoma B cells both in vitro and in vivo. Apoptosis was not altered by caspase-8 inhibitor. No alterations in the levels of Bid, Fas and Fas-L were found suggesting that PpL does not activate the extrinsic pathway of apoptosis. The involvement of the intrinsic pathway was clearly indicated by: i) alterations in mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) both in murine and human lymphoma cells exposed to PpL; ii) decreased levels of apoptosis in the presence of caspase-9 inhibitor; iii) significant increases of Bim and Bax protein levels and downregulation of Bcl-2; iv) the translocation from the cytoplasm to the mitochondria of Bax and Bim pro-apoptotic proteins and its inhibition by caspase-9 inhibitor but not by caspase-8 inhibitor and v) the translocation of Bcl-2 protein from the mitochondria to the cytosol and its inhibition by caspase-9 inhibitor but not by caspase-8 inhibitor. The possibility of a therapeutic use of Sags in lymphoma/leukemia B cell malignancies is discussed. PMID:27603942

  6. Adoptive T-cell therapy for B-cell malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Hudecek, Michael; Anderson, Larry D; Nishida, Tetsuya; Riddell, Stanley R

    2011-01-01

    The success of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) for B-cell malignancies is evidence that these tumors can be eliminated by T lymphocytes. This has encouraged the development of specific adoptive T-cell therapy, both for augmenting the anti-tumor effect of HCT and for patients not undergoing HCT. T cells that are capable of recognizing antigens expressed on malignant B cells may be recruited from the endogenous repertoire or engineered to express tumor-targeting receptors. Critical insights into the qualities of T cells that enable their persistence and function in vivo have been derived, and obstacles to effective T-cell-mediated tumor eradication are being elucidated. These advances provide the tools to translate adoptive T-cell transfer into reliable clinical therapies. PMID:21083018

  7. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells in B cell malignancies.

    PubMed

    Yazdani, Yaghoub; Mohammadnia-Afrouzi, Mousa; Yousefi, Mehdi; Anvari, Enayat; Ghalamfarsa, Ghasem; Hasannia, Hadi; Sadreddini, Sanam; Jadidi-Niaragh, Farhad

    2015-09-01

    Tumor cells use several mechanisms such as soluble immune modulators or suppressive immune cells to evade from anti-tumor responses. Immunomodulatory cytokines, such as transforming growth factor-β, interleukin (IL)-10, and IL-35, soluble factors, such as adenosine, immunosuppressive cells, such as regulatory T cells, NKT cells and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), are the main orchestra leaders involved in immune suppression in cancer by which tumor cells can freely expand without immune cell-mediated interference. Among them, MDSCs have attracted much attention as they represent a heterogenous population derived from myeloid progenitors that are expanded in tumor condition and can also shift toward other myeloid cells, such as macrophages and dendritic cells, after tumor clearing. MDSCs exert their immunosuppressive effects through various immune and non-immune mechanisms which make them as potent tumor-promoting cells. Although, there are several studies regarding the immunobiology of MDSCs in different solid tumors, little is known about the precise characteristics of these cells in hematological malignancies, particularly B cell malignancies. In this review, we tried to clarify the precise role of MDSCs in B cell-derived malignancies. PMID:26330296

  8. Epiglottic diffuse B-cell malignant lymphoma: A case report

    PubMed Central

    CHANG, HUNG-MIN; LI, CHIUNG-CHON; TSAI, STELLA CHIN-SHAW; TSAO, TANG-YI

    2016-01-01

    A 55-year-old male patient was admitted to our department with complaints of dysphagia and throat soreness for 2 months. A tumor of the left epiglottis, with an irregular surface, was identified by video laryngoscopy. The diagnosis of malignant lymphoma was confirmed by biopsy during laryngomicrosurgery. The atypical diffuse lymphocytic lymphoma was positive for CD20 and Bcl-2, and negative for CD3, CD10 and Bcl-1. The diagnosis was diffuse large B-cell malignant lymphoma. The patient was treated with eight cycles of rituximab with cyclophosphamide + doxorubicin + vincristine + prednisolone (R-CHOP regimen). This is a rare case of extranodal non-Hodgkin lymphoma occurring in the epiglottis. PMID:26870358

  9. Harnessing RNAi-based nanomedicines for therapeutic gene silencing in B-cell malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Weinstein, Shiri; Toker, Itai A.; Emmanuel, Rafi; Ramishetti, Srinivas; Hazan-Halevy, Inbal; Rosenblum, Daniel; Goldsmith, Meir; Abraham, Avigdor; Benjamini, Ohad; Bairey, Osnat; Raanani, Pia; Nagler, Arnon; Lieberman, Judy

    2016-01-01

    Despite progress in systemic small interfering RNA (siRNA) delivery to the liver and to solid tumors, systemic siRNA delivery to leukocytes remains challenging. The ability to silence gene expression in leukocytes has great potential for identifying drug targets and for RNAi-based therapy for leukocyte diseases. However, both normal and malignant leukocytes are among the most difficult targets for siRNA delivery as they are resistant to conventional transfection reagents and are dispersed in the body. We used mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) as a prototypic blood cancer for validating a novel siRNA delivery strategy. MCL is an aggressive B-cell lymphoma that overexpresses cyclin D1 with relatively poor prognosis. Down-regulation of cyclin D1 using RNA interference (RNAi) is a potential therapeutic approach to this malignancy. Here, we designed lipid-based nanoparticles (LNPs) coated with anti-CD38 monoclonal antibodies that are specifically taken up by human MCL cells in the bone marrow of xenografted mice. When loaded with siRNAs against cyclin D1, CD38-targeted LNPs induced gene silencing in MCL cells and prolonged survival of tumor-bearing mice with no observed adverse effects. These results highlight the therapeutic potential of cyclin D1 therapy in MCL and present a novel RNAi delivery system that opens new therapeutic opportunities for treating MCL and other B-cell malignancies. PMID:26699502

  10. Harnessing RNAi-based nanomedicines for therapeutic gene silencing in B-cell malignancies.

    PubMed

    Weinstein, Shiri; Toker, Itai A; Emmanuel, Rafi; Ramishetti, Srinivas; Hazan-Halevy, Inbal; Rosenblum, Daniel; Goldsmith, Meir; Abraham, Avigdor; Benjamini, Ohad; Bairey, Osnat; Raanani, Pia; Nagler, Arnon; Lieberman, Judy; Peer, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Despite progress in systemic small interfering RNA (siRNA) delivery to the liver and to solid tumors, systemic siRNA delivery to leukocytes remains challenging. The ability to silence gene expression in leukocytes has great potential for identifying drug targets and for RNAi-based therapy for leukocyte diseases. However, both normal and malignant leukocytes are among the most difficult targets for siRNA delivery as they are resistant to conventional transfection reagents and are dispersed in the body. We used mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) as a prototypic blood cancer for validating a novel siRNA delivery strategy. MCL is an aggressive B-cell lymphoma that overexpresses cyclin D1 with relatively poor prognosis. Down-regulation of cyclin D1 using RNA interference (RNAi) is a potential therapeutic approach to this malignancy. Here, we designed lipid-based nanoparticles (LNPs) coated with anti-CD38 monoclonal antibodies that are specifically taken up by human MCL cells in the bone marrow of xenografted mice. When loaded with siRNAs against cyclin D1, CD38-targeted LNPs induced gene silencing in MCL cells and prolonged survival of tumor-bearing mice with no observed adverse effects. These results highlight the therapeutic potential of cyclin D1 therapy in MCL and present a novel RNAi delivery system that opens new therapeutic opportunities for treating MCL and other B-cell malignancies. PMID:26699502

  11. Targeted Therapies in Adult B-Cell Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Jean-François

    2015-01-01

    B-lymphocytes are programmed for the production of immunoglobulin (Ig) after antigen presentation, in the context of T-lymphocyte control within lymphoid organs. During this differentiation/activation process, B-lymphocytes exhibit different restricted or common surface markers, activation of cellular pathways that regulate cell cycle, metabolism, proteasome activity, and protein synthesis. All molecules involved in these different cellular mechanisms are potent therapeutic targets. Nowadays, due to the progress of the biology, more and more targeted drugs are identified, a situation that is correlated with an extended field of the targeted therapy. The full knowledge of the cellular machinery and cell-cell communication allows making the best choice to treat patients, in the context of personalized medicine. Also, focus should not be restricted to the immediate effects observed as clinical endpoints, that is, response rate, survival markers with conventional statistical methods, but it should consider the prediction of different clinical consequences due to other collateral drug targets, based on new methodologies. This means that new reflection and new bioclinical follow-up have to be monitored, particularly with the new drugs used with success in B-cell malignancies. This review discussed the principal aspects of such evident bioclinical progress. PMID:26425544

  12. Oncogenic Properties of Apoptotic Tumor Cells in Aggressive B Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Ford, Catriona A.; Petrova, Sofia; Pound, John D.; Voss, Jorine J.L.P.; Melville, Lynsey; Paterson, Margaret; Farnworth, Sarah L.; Gallimore, Awen M.; Cuff, Simone; Wheadon, Helen; Dobbin, Edwina; Ogden, Carol Anne; Dumitriu, Ingrid E.; Dunbar, Donald R.; Murray, Paul G.; Ruckerl, Dominik; Allen, Judith E.; Hume, David A.; van Rooijen, Nico; Goodlad, John R.; Freeman, Tom C.; Gregory, Christopher D.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Cells undergoing apoptosis are known to modulate their tissue microenvironments. By acting on phagocytes, notably macrophages, apoptotic cells inhibit immunological and inflammatory responses and promote trophic signaling pathways. Paradoxically, because of their potential to cause death of tumor cells and thereby militate against malignant disease progression, both apoptosis and tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are often associated with poor prognosis in cancer. We hypothesized that, in progression of malignant disease, constitutive loss of a fraction of the tumor cell population through apoptosis could yield tumor-promoting effects. Results Here, we demonstrate that apoptotic tumor cells promote coordinated tumor growth, angiogenesis, and accumulation of TAMs in aggressive B cell lymphomas. Through unbiased “in situ transcriptomics” analysis—gene expression profiling of laser-captured TAMs to establish their activation signature in situ—we show that these cells are activated to signal via multiple tumor-promoting reparatory, trophic, angiogenic, tissue remodeling, and anti-inflammatory pathways. Our results also suggest that apoptotic lymphoma cells help drive this signature. Furthermore, we demonstrate that, upon induction of apoptosis, lymphoma cells not only activate expression of the tumor-promoting matrix metalloproteinases MMP2 and MMP12 in macrophages but also express and process these MMPs directly. Finally, using a model of malignant melanoma, we show that the oncogenic potential of apoptotic tumor cells extends beyond lymphoma. Conclusions In addition to its profound tumor-suppressive role, apoptosis can potentiate cancer progression. These results have important implications for understanding the fundamental biology of cell death, its roles in malignant disease, and the broader consequences of apoptosis-inducing anti-cancer therapy. PMID:25702581

  13. The B-cell receptor orchestrates environment-mediated lymphoma survival and drug resistance in B-cell malignancies.

    PubMed

    Shain, K H; Tao, J

    2014-08-01

    Specific niches within the lymphoma tumor microenvironment (TME) provide sanctuary for subpopulations of tumor cells through stromal cell-tumor cell interactions. These interactions notably dictate growth, response to therapy and resistance of residual malignant B cells to therapeutic agents. This minimal residual disease (MRD) remains a major challenge in the treatment of B-cell malignancies and contributes to subsequent disease relapse. B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling has emerged as essential mediator of B-cell homing, survival and environment-mediated drug resistance (EMDR). Central to EMDR are chemokine- and integrin-mediated interactions between lymphoma and the TME. Further, stromal cell-B cell adhesion confers a sustained BCR signaling leading to chemokine and integrin activation. Recently, the inhibitors of BCR signaling have garnered a substantial clinical interest because of their effectiveness in B-cell disorders. The efficacy of these agents is, at least in part, attributed to attenuation of BCR-dependent lymphoma-TME interactions. In this review, we discuss the pivotal role of BCR signaling in the integration of intrinsic and extrinsic determinants of TME-mediated lymphoma survival and drug resistance. PMID:24037527

  14. A Case of Malignant Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor Initially Misdiagnosed as Malignant B-Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Byoung Jo

    2016-01-01

    Errors that occur in anatomic pathology influence the treatment strategy of patients with malignancy. There are four general types of error with three subtypes in the category of defective interpretation. The first subtype is a false-negative diagnosis or undercall of the extent or severity of the lesion, the second is a false-positive diagnosis, and the third is misclassification. We herein report a 65-year-old female patient with malignant gastrointestinal stromal tumor that was diagnosed after reevaluation of the lesion at our hospital – and treated with proximal gastrectomy – after initial diagnosis as malignant B-cell lymphoma on esophagogastroduodenoscopy biopsy of a small gastric fundic mass and subsequent treatment with six cycles of CHOP chemotherapy with aggravation of the mass at another hospital. PMID:27462236

  15. Targeting Bruton's tyrosine kinase signaling as an emerging therapeutic agent of B-cell malignancies

    PubMed Central

    XIA, BING; QU, FULIAN; YUAN, TIAN; ZHANG, YIZHUO

    2015-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly evident that B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling is central to the development and function of B cells. BCR signaling has emerged as a pivotal pathway and a key driver of numerous B-cell lymphomas. Disruption of BCR signaling can be lethal to malignant B cells. Recently, kinase inhibitors that target BCR signaling have induced notable clinical responses. These inhibitors include spleen tyrosine kinase, mammalian target of rapamycin, phosphoinositide 3′-kinase and Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK). Ibrutinib, an oral irreversible BTK inhibitor, has emerged as a promising targeted therapy for patients with B-cell malignancies. The present review discusses the current understanding of BTK-mediated BCR signaling in the biology and pathobiology of normal and malignant B cells, and the cellular interaction with the tumor microenvironment. The data on ibrutinib in the preclinical and clinical settings is also discussed, and perspectives for the future use of ibrutinib are outlined. PMID:26788133

  16. Novelties in the management of B-cell malignancies: B-cell receptor signaling inhibitors and lenalidomide.

    PubMed

    Salihoglu, Ayse; Ar, Muhlis Cem; Soysal, Teoman

    2015-12-01

    B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders comprise 85% of Non-Hodgkin's lymphomas. Despite successful chemoimmunotherapy regimens, responses are not durable and the outcome is fatal in a considerable portion of patients. There is an inevitable need for less toxic and more potent therapeutic agents. Over the recent years, a plethora of agents including monoclonal antibodies, Bcl-2 antagonists, tyrosine kinase inhibitors, cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors, mTOR inhibitors and immunomodulatory drugs have been developed in B-cell malignancies. The aim of this paper is to focus on B-cell receptor signaling inhibitors and lenalidomide as an immunomodulatory drug and to provide insight on how and when to incorporate these agents into the treatment algorithms. PMID:26413907

  17. Regulation of normal B-cell differentiation and malignant B-cell survival by OCT2.

    PubMed

    Hodson, Daniel J; Shaffer, Arthur L; Xiao, Wenming; Wright, George W; Schmitz, Roland; Phelan, James D; Yang, Yandan; Webster, Daniel E; Rui, Lixin; Kohlhammer, Holger; Nakagawa, Masao; Waldmann, Thomas A; Staudt, Louis M

    2016-04-01

    The requirement for the B-cell transcription factor OCT2 (octamer-binding protein 2, encoded by Pou2f2) in germinal center B cells has proved controversial. Here, we report that germinal center B cells are formed normally after depletion of OCT2 in a conditional knockout mouse, but their proliferation is reduced and in vivo differentiation to antibody-secreting plasma cells is blocked. This finding led us to examine the role of OCT2 in germinal center-derived lymphomas. shRNA knockdown showed that almost all diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) cell lines are addicted to the expression of OCT2 and its coactivator OCA-B. Genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis and gene-expression profiling revealed the broad transcriptional program regulated by OCT2 that includes the expression of STAT3, IL-10, ELL2, XBP1, MYC, TERT, and ADA. Importantly, genetic alteration of OCT2 is not a requirement for cellular addiction in DLBCL. However, we detected amplifications of the POU2F2 locus in DLBCL tumor biopsies and a recurrent mutation of threonine 223 in the DNA-binding domain of OCT2. This neomorphic mutation subtly alters the DNA-binding preference of OCT2, leading to the transactivation of noncanonical target genes including HIF1a and FCRL3 Finally, by introducing mutations designed to disrupt the OCT2-OCA-B interface, we reveal a requirement for this protein-protein interface that ultimately might be exploited therapeutically. Our findings, combined with the predominantly B-cell-restricted expression of OCT2 and the absence of a systemic phenotype in our knockout mice, suggest that an OCT2-targeted therapeutic strategy would be efficacious in both major subtypes of DLBCL while avoiding systemic toxicity. PMID:26993806

  18. MicroRNAs in B-cells: from normal differentiation to treatment of malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Sara Correia; Laursen, Maria Bach; Bødker, Julie Støve; Kjeldsen, Malene Krag; Falgreen, Steffen; Schmitz, Alexander; Bøgsted, Martin; Johnsen, Hans Erik; Dybkaer, Karen

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that play important post-transcriptional regulatory roles in a wide range of biological processes. They are fundamental to the normal development of cells, and evidence suggests that the deregulation of specific miRNAs is involved in malignant transformation due to their function as oncogenes or tumor suppressors. We know that miRNAs are involved in the development of normal B-cells and that different B-cell subsets express specific miRNA profiles according to their degree of differentiation. B-cell-derived malignancies contain transcription signatures reminiscent of their cell of origin. Therefore, we believe that normal and malignant B-cells share features of regulatory networks controlling differentiation and the ability to respond to treatment. The involvement of miRNAs in these processes makes them good biomarker candidates. B-cell malignancies are highly prevalent, and the poor overall survival of patients with these malignancies demands an improvement in stratification according to prognosis and therapy response, wherein we believe miRNAs may be of great importance. We have critically reviewed the literature, and here we sum up the findings of miRNA studies in hematological cancers, from the development and progression of the disease to the response to treatment, with a particular emphasis on B-cell malignancies. PMID:25622103

  19. The microenvironment in mature B-cell malignancies: a target for new treatment strategies

    PubMed Central

    Ghia, Paolo; Rosenwald, Andreas

    2009-01-01

    Despite major therapeutic advances, most mature B-cell malignancies remain incurable. Compelling evidence suggests that crosstalk with accessory stromal cells in specialized tissue microenvironments, such as the bone marrow and secondary lymphoid organs, favors disease progression by promoting malignant B-cell growth and drug resistance. Therefore, disrupting the crosstalk between malignant B cells and their milieu is an attractive novel strategy for treating selected mature B-cell malignancies. Here we summarize the current knowledge about the cellular and molecular interactions between neoplastic B lymphocytes and accessory cells that shape a supportive microenvironment, and the potential therapeutic targets that are emerging, together with the new problems they raise. We discuss clinically relevant aspects and provide an outlook into future biologically oriented therapeutic strategies. We anticipate a paradigm shift in the treatment of selected B-cell malignancies, moving from targeting primarily the malignant cells toward combining cytotoxic drugs with agents that interfere with the microenvironment's proactive role. Such approaches hopefully will help eliminating residual disease, thereby improving our current therapeutic efforts. PMID:19636060

  20. Signaling Proteins and Transcription Factors in Normal and Malignant Early B Cell Development

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Vera, Patricia; Reyes-León, Adriana; Fuentes-Pananá, Ezequiel M.

    2011-01-01

    B cell development starts in bone marrow with the commitment of hematopoietic progenitors to the B cell lineage. In murine models, the IL-7 and preBCR receptors, and the signaling pathways and transcription factors that they regulate, control commitment and maintenance along the B cell pathway. E2A, EBF1, PAX5, and Ikaros are among the most important transcription factors controlling early development and thereby conditioning mice homeostatic B cell lymphopoiesis. Importantly, their gain or loss of function often results in malignant development in humans, supporting conserved roles for these transcription factors. B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia is the most common cause of pediatric cancer, and it is characterized by unpaired early B cell development resulting from genetic lesions in these critical signaling pathways and transcription factors. Fine mapping of these genetic abnormalities is allowing more specific treatments, more accurately predicting risk profiles for this disease, and improving survival rates. PMID:22046564

  1. Malignant transformation of aggressive osteoblastoma to ostesarcoma.

    PubMed

    Görgün, Ömer; Salduz, Ahmet; Kebudi, Rejin; Özger, Harzem; Bilgiç, Bilge

    2016-08-01

    Osteoblastoma is a rare, bone-forming tumor, characterized by osteoid and woven bone production. A 13-year-old boy patient presented to our clinic with complaint of pain in his left proximal tibia. We performed curettage and bone grafting for the lesion diagnosed as osteoblastoma. Two years later, the patient admitted to the hospital with a mass in the same region which was diagnosed by biopsy to be osteosarcoma. Patient was performed reconstruction operation with local resection and mega prosthesis. Fourteen months after termination of chemotherapy, lung metastasis developed and the patient died consequently. In this article, we reported a patient with aggressive osteoblastoma of the left proximal tibia which recurred as an osteosarcoma and discussed the difficulties in the histopathological diagnosis and management of these patients. As some other cases in the literature, our case indicates that osteoblastomas may undergo malignant transformation. PMID:27499324

  2. Gaucher disease and comorbidities: B-cell malignancy and parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Cox, Timothy M; Rosenbloom, Barry E; Barker, Roger A

    2015-07-01

    Data emerging from the International Collaborative Gaucher Group (ICGG) Gaucher Registry together with other contemporary clinical surveys have revealed a close association between Gaucher disease and non-Hodgkin's B-cell lymphoma and myeloma and Gaucher disease and Parkinson's disease. Several possible explanations for increased B-cell proliferation and neoplasia in Gaucher disease have been proposed, including the possible influence of sphingosine (derived from the extra lysosomal metabolism of glucosylceramide), gene modifiers, splenectomy and immune system deregulation induced by cytokines, chemokines, and hydrolases released from Gaucher cells. Parkinson's disease is frequently seen in the otherwise-healthy relatives of Gaucher disease patients leading to the finding that GBA mutations represent a genetic risk factor for Parkinson's disease. The mechanism of the association between GBA mutations and Parkinson's disease has yet to be elucidated but the pathogenesis appears distinct from that of Gaucher disease. Several pathogenic pathways have been proposed including lysosomal and/or mitochondrial dysfunction. The effect of Gaucher disease specific therapies on the incidence of cancer or Parkinson's disease are not clear and will likely be evaluated in future ICGG Gaucher Registry studies. PMID:26096744

  3. Loss of SIRT3 Provides Growth Advantage for B Cell Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Yu, Wei; Denu, Ryan A; Krautkramer, Kimberly A; Grindle, Kreg M; Yang, David T; Asimakopoulos, Fotis; Hematti, Peiman; Denu, John M

    2016-02-12

    B cell malignancies comprise a diverse group of cancers that proliferate in lymph nodes, bone marrow, and peripheral blood. SIRT3 (sirtuin 3) is the major deacetylase within the mitochondrial matrix that promotes aerobic metabolism and controls reactive oxygen species (ROS) by deacetylating and activating isocitrate dehydrogenase 2 (IDH2) and superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2). There is controversy as to whether SIRT3 acts as an oncogene or a tumor suppressor, and here we investigated its role in B cell malignancies. In mantle cell lymphoma patient samples, we found that lower SIRT3 protein expression was associated with worse overall survival. Further, SIRT3 protein expression was reduced in chronic lymphocytic leukemia primary samples and malignant B cell lines compared to primary B cells from healthy donors. This lower level of expression correlated with hyperacetylation of IDH2 and SOD2 mitochondrial proteins, lowered enzymatic activities, and higher ROS levels. Overexpression of SIRT3 decreased proliferation and diminished the Warburg-like phenotype in SIRT3-deficient cell lines, and this effect is largely dependent on deacetylation of IDH2 and SOD2. Lastly, depletion of SIRT3 from malignant B cell lines resulted in greater susceptibility to treatment with an ROS scavenger but did not result in greater sensitivity to inhibition of the hypoxia-inducible factor-1α pathway, suggesting that loss of SIRT3 increases proliferation via ROS-dependent but hypoxia-inducible factor-1α-independent mechanisms. Our study suggests that SIRT3 acts as a tumor suppressor in B cell malignancies, and activating the SIRT3 pathway might represent a novel therapeutic approach for treating B cell malignancies. PMID:26631723

  4. Osteoclast cytomorphometry demonstrates an abnormal population in B cell malignancies but not in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Chappard, D; Rossi, J F; Bataille, R; Alexandre, C

    1991-01-01

    Increased bone resorption in the vicinity of myeloma cells is mediated by local stimulating factors. Other malignancies of the B cell lineage are also able to produce resorbing factors responsible for increased bone resorption. We have studied three groups of subjects: 10 patients with overt multiple myeloma, 10 patients with a B cell malignancy, and 10 healthy human subjects as controls. Patients were studied at the time of diagnosis and had a transiliac bone biopsy. Osteoclasts were evident on histological sections by their acid phosphatase activity. A software was developed on an automatic image analyzer (Leitz TAS+) for measuring the maximal Feret's diameter (Oc.Le) of each osteoclast (corresponding to the osteoclast length). The histogram of Oc.Le frequency distribution was supplied in each group. In myeloma patients, the Oc.Le frequency distribution was similar to that in normal subjects and showed the histogram to be asymetric with a positive skew (maximum peak at 20-25 microns). With a graphical analysis, this distribution was shown to follow a lognormal distribution corresponding to a homogeneous osteoclast population. In other B cell malignancies, Oc.Le displayed a bimodal distribution with a peak at 20-25 microns and a lower peak at 10-15 microns. The graphical analysis showed that small (mononucleated?) osteoclasts are present in B cell malignancies with normal osteoclasts. This might reflect the secretion of different soluble factors by malignant cells of the B lymphocyte lineage. PMID:1706639

  5. Modulation of B-cell receptor and microenvironment signaling by a guanine exchange factor in B-cell malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Wei; Sharma, Sanjai

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) cells over-express a guanine exchange factor (GEF), Rasgrf-1. This GEF increases active Ras as it catalyzes the removal of GDP from Ras so that GTP can bind and activate Ras. This study aims to study the mechanism of action of Rasgrf-1 in B-cell malignancies. Methods: N-terminus truncated Rasgrf-1 variants have a higher GEF activity as compared to the full-length transcript therefore a MCL cell line with stable over-expression of truncated Rasgrf-1 was established. The B-cell receptor (BCR) and chemokine signaling pathways were compared in the Rasgrf-1 over-expressing and a control transfected cell line. Results: Cells over-expressing truncated form of Rasgrf-1 have a higher proliferative rate as compared to control transfected cells. BCR was activated by lower concentrations of anti-IgM antibody in Rasgrf-1 over-expressing cells as compared to control cells indicating that these cells are more sensitive to BCR signaling. BCR signaling also phosphorylates Rasgrf-1 that further increases its GEF function and amplifies BCR signaling. This activation of Rasgrf-1 in over-expressing cells resulted in a higher expression of phospho-ERK, AKT, BTK and PKC-alpha as compared to control cells. Besides BCR, Rasgrf-1 over-expressing cells were also more sensitive to microenvironment stimuli as determined by resistance to apoptosis, chemotaxis and ERK pathway activation. Conclusions: This GEF protein sensitizes B-cells to BCR and chemokine mediated signaling and also upregulates a number of other signaling pathways which promotes growth and survival of these cells. PMID:27458535

  6. miR-155 as a Biomarker in B-Cell Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Due, Hanne; Svendsen, Pernille; Bødker, Julie Støve; Schmitz, Alexander; Bøgsted, Martin; Johnsen, Hans Erik; El-Galaly, Tarec Christoffer; Roug, Anne Stidsholt; Dybkær, Karen

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs have the potential to be useful biomarkers in the development of individualized treatment since they are easy to detect, are relatively stable during sample handling, and are important determinants of cellular processes controlling pathogenesis, progression, and response to treatment of several types of cancers including B-cell malignancies. miR-155 is an oncomiR with a crucial role in tumor initiation and development of several B-cell malignancies. The present review elucidates the potential of miR-155 as a diagnostic, prognostic, or predictive biomarker in B-cell malignancies using a systematic search strategy to identify relevant literature. miR-155 was upregulated in several malignancies compared to nonmalignant controls and overexpression of miR-155 was further associated with poor prognosis. Elevated expression of miR-155 shows potential as a diagnostic and prognostic biomarker in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Additionally, in vitro and in vivo studies suggest miR-155 as an efficient therapeutic target, supporting its oncogenic function. The use of inhibiting anti-miR structures indicates promising potential as novel anticancer therapeutics. Reports from 53 studies prove that miR-155 has the potential to be a molecular tool in personalized medicine. PMID:27294145

  7. Bruton's tyrosine kinase: from X-linked agammaglobulinemia toward targeted therapy for B-cell malignancies.

    PubMed

    Ponader, Sabine; Burger, Jan A

    2014-06-10

    Discovery of Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) mutations as the cause for X-linked agammaglobulinemia was a milestone in understanding the genetic basis of primary immunodeficiencies. Since then, studies have highlighted the critical role of this enzyme in B-cell development and function, and particularly in B-cell receptor signaling. Because its deletion affects mostly B cells, BTK has become an attractive therapeutic target in autoimmune disorders and B-cell malignancies. Ibrutinib (PCI-32765) is the most advanced BTK inhibitor in clinical testing, with ongoing phase III clinical trials in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia and mantle-cell lymphoma. In this article, we discuss key discoveries related to BTK and clinically relevant aspects of BTK inhibitors, and we provide an outlook into clinical development and open questions regarding BTK inhibitor therapy. PMID:24778403

  8. Therapeutic implication of concomitant chromosomal aberrations in patients with aggressive B-cell lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Marullo, Rossella; Rutherford, Sarah C; Leonard, John P; Cerchietti, Leandro

    2016-09-01

    A subset of diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (DLBCL) harbors concomitant rearrangements of MYC, BCL2 and BCL6 and is characterized by clinical aggressiveness and intrinsic refractoriness to standard chemo-immunotherapy. Commonly identified as "double or triple hit" lymphomas, these diseases represent a therapeutic challenge to chemotherapy-based regimens and likely require a more targeted approach. Herein we summarize the unique biological behavior of double and triple hit lymphomas focusing on the coordinated network of pathways that enable cancer cells to tolerate the oncogenic stress imposed by the co-expression of MYC, BCL2 and BCL6. We discuss how these enabling pathways contribute to the chemo-refractoriness of these tumors. We propose to exploit lymphoma cells' addiction to these oncogenic networks to design combinatorial treatments for this aggressive disease based on the modulation of epigenetically-silenced pathways and decreasing expression and activity of these oncogenic drivers. PMID:27419806

  9. Non-Hodgkin's Malignant Lymphoma with Aggressive Development

    PubMed Central

    DANCIU, Cezara Elisabeta; HEROIU (CATALOIU), Adriana-Daniela; POPESCU, Cristian Radu

    2014-01-01

    Non-Hodgkin's malignant lymphoma is a hematologic malignant disease which usually responds to the polychemotherapy. We present a clinical case report of a 50 years old patient who develops an aggressive type of lymphoma. Patient develops a nodal Non-Hodgkin's malignant lymphoma who present at hospital admission as a huge tumor at the right side of the neck. Any type of treatment was a failure, the patient having a particularly aggressive form of lymphoma, resistant to all three chemotherapy regimens tested. Death occurs quickly, about one year after diagnosis and initiation of therapy. PMID:25553129

  10. Recent Advances in Aggressive Large B-cell Lymphomas: A Comprehensive Review.

    PubMed

    Korkolopoulou, Penelope; Vassilakopoulos, Theodoros; Milionis, Vassilios; Ioannou, Maria

    2016-07-01

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is an aggressive disease with considerable heterogeneity reflected in the 2008 World Health Organization classification. In recent years, genome-wide assessment of genetic and epigenetic alterations has shed light upon distinct molecular subsets linked to dysregulation of specific genes or pathways. Besides fostering our knowledge regarding the molecular complexity of DLBCL types, these studies have unraveled previously unappreciated genetic lesions, which may be exploited for prognostic and therapeutic purposes. Following the last World Health Organization classification, we have witnessed the emergence of new variants of specific DLBCL entities, such as CD30 DLBCL, human immunodeficiency virus-related and age-related variants of plasmablastic lymphoma, and EBV DLBCL arising in young patients. In this review, we will present an update on the clinical, pathologic, and molecular features of DLBCL incorporating recently gained information with respect to their pathobiology and prognosis. We will emphasize the distinctive features of newly described or emerging variants and highlight advances in our understanding of entities presenting a diagnostic challenge, such as T-cell/histiocyte-rich large B-cell lmphoma and unclassifiable large B-cell lymphomas. Furthermore, we will discuss recent advances in the genomic characterization of DLBCL, as they may relate to prognostication and tailored therapeutic intervention. The information presented in this review derives from English language publications appearing in PubMed throughout December 2015. For a complete outline of this paper, please visit: http://links.lww.com/PAP/A12. PMID:27271843

  11. MYC-driven aggressive B-cell lymphomas: biology, entity, differential diagnosis and clinical management

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Qingqing; Medeiros, L. Jeffrey; Xu, Xiaolu; Young, Ken H.

    2015-01-01

    MYC, a potent oncogene located at chromosome locus 8q24.21, was identified initially by its involvement in Burkitt lymphoma with t(8;14)(q24;q32). MYC encodes a helix-loop-helix transcription factor that accentuates many cellular functions including proliferation, growth and apoptosis. MYC alterations also have been identified in other mature B-cell neoplasms and are associated with aggressive clinical behavior. There are several regulatory factors and dysregulated signaling that lead to MYC up-regulation in B-cell lymphomas. One typical example is the failure of physiological repressors such as Bcl6 or BLIMP1 to suppress MYC over-expression. In addition, MYC alterations are often developed concurrently with other genetic alterations that counteract the proapoptotic function of MYC. In this review, we discuss the physiologic function of MYC and the role that MYC likely plays in the pathogenesis of B-cell lymphomas. We also summarize the role MYC plays in the diagnosis, prognostication and various strategies to detect MYC rearrangement and expression. PMID:26416427

  12. The tumor microenvironment shapes hallmarks of mature B-cell malignancies.

    PubMed

    Shain, K H; Dalton, W S; Tao, J

    2015-09-01

    B-cell tumorigenesis results from a host of known and unknown genetic anomalies, including non-random translocations of genes that normally function as determinants of cell proliferation or cell survival to regions juxtaposed to active immunoglobulin heavy chain enhancer elements, chromosomal aneuploidy, somatic mutations that further affect oncogenic signaling and loss of heterozygosity of tumor-suppressor genes. However, it is critical to recognize that even in the setting of a genetic disease, the B-cell/plasma cell tumor microenvironment (TME) contributes significantly to malignant transformation and pathogenesis. Over a decade ago, we proposed the concept of cell adhesion-mediated drug resistance to delineate a form of TME-mediated drug resistance that protects hematopoietic tumor cells from the initial effect of diverse therapies. In the interim, it has been increasingly appreciated that TME also contributes to tumor initiation and progression through sustained growth/proliferation, self-renewal capacity, immune evasion, migration and invasion as well as resistance to cell death in a host of B-cell malignancies, including mantle cell lymphoma, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, Waldenstroms macroglobulinemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia and multiple myeloma. Within this review, we propose that TME and the tumor co-evolve as a consequence of bidirectional signaling networks. As such, TME represents an important target and should be considered integral to tumor progression and drug response. PMID:25639873

  13. Biology and clinical application of CAR T cells for B cell malignancies.

    PubMed

    Davila, Marco L; Sadelain, Michel

    2016-07-01

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-modified T cells have generated broad interest in oncology following a series of dramatic clinical successes in patients with chemorefractory B cell malignancies. CAR therapy now appears to be on the cusp of regulatory approval as a cell-based immunotherapy. We review here the T cell biology and cell engineering research that led to the development of second generation CARs, the selection of CD19 as a CAR target, and the preclinical studies in animal models that laid the foundation for clinical trials targeting CD19+ malignancies. We further summarize the status of CD19 CAR clinical therapy for non-Hodgkin lymphoma and B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, including their efficacy, toxicities (cytokine release syndrome, neurotoxicity and B cell aplasia) and current management in humans. We conclude with an overview of recent pre-clinical advances in CAR design that argues favorably for the advancement of CAR therapy to tackle other hematological malignancies as well as solid tumors. PMID:27262700

  14. Imbalanced Matriptase Pericellular Proteolysis Contributes to the Pathogenesis of Malignant B-Cell Lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Feng-Pai; Chen, Ya-Wen; Zhao, Xianfeng F.; Xu-Monette, Zijun Y.; Young, Ken H.; Gartenhaus, Ronald B.; Wang, Jehng-Kang; Kataoka, Hiroaki; Zuo, Annie H.; Barndt, Robert J.; Johnson, Michael; Lin, Chen-Yong

    2014-01-01

    Membrane-associated serine protease matriptase is widely expressed by epithelial/carcinoma cells in which its proteolytic activity is tightly controlled by the Kunitz-type protease inhibitor, hepatocyte growth factor activator inhibitor (HAI-1). We demonstrate that, although matriptase is not expressed in lymphoid hyperplasia, roughly half of the non-Hodgkin B-cell lymphomas analyzed express significant amounts of matriptase. Furthermore, a significant proportion of these tumors express matriptase in the absence of HAI-1. Aggressive Burkitt lymphoma was more likely than indolent follicular lymphoma to express matriptase alone (86% versus 36%). In the absence of significant HAI-1 expression, the lymphoma cells activate and shed active matriptase when the cells are stimulated with mildly acidic buffer or the hypoxia-mimicking agent, CoCl2. The shed active matriptase can initiate pericellular proteolytic cascades by activating urokinase-type plasminogen activator on the cell surface of monocytes, and it can activate prohepatocyte growth factor. In addition, matriptase knockdown suppressed proliferation and colony-forming ability of neoplastic B cells in culture and growth as tumor xenografts in mice. Furthermore, exogenous expression of HAI-1 significantly suppressed proliferation of neoplastic B cells. These studies suggest that dysregulated pericellular proteolysis as a result of unregulated matriptase expression with limited HAI-1 may contribute to the pathological characteristics of several human B-cell lymphomas through modulation of the tumor microenvironment and enhanced tumor growth. PMID:24070417

  15. Combinatorial targeting of nuclear export and translation of RNA inhibits aggressive B-cell lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Culjkovic-Kraljacic, Biljana; Fernando, Tharu M.; Marullo, Rossella; Calvo-Vidal, Nieves; Verma, Akanksha; Yang, ShaoNing; Tabbò, Fabrizio; Gaudiano, Marcello; Zahreddine, Hiba; Goldstein, Rebecca L.; Patel, Jayeshkumar; Taldone, Tony; Chiosis, Gabriela; Ladetto, Marco; Ghione, Paola; Machiorlatti, Rodolfo; Elemento, Olivier; Inghirami, Giorgio; Melnick, Ari; Borden, Katherine L. B.

    2016-01-01

    Aggressive double- and triple-hit (DH/TH) diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (DLBCLs) feature activation of Hsp90 stress pathways. Herein, we show that Hsp90 controls posttranscriptional dynamics of key messenger RNA (mRNA) species including those encoding BCL6, MYC, and BCL2. Using a proteomics approach, we found that Hsp90 binds to and maintains activity of eIF4E. eIF4E drives nuclear export and translation of BCL6, MYC, and BCL2 mRNA. eIF4E RNA-immunoprecipitation sequencing in DLBCL suggests that nuclear eIF4E controls an extended program that includes B-cell receptor signaling, cellular metabolism, and epigenetic regulation. Accordingly, eIF4E was required for survival of DLBCL including the most aggressive subtypes, DH/TH lymphomas. Indeed, eIF4E inhibition induces tumor regression in cell line and patient-derived tumorgrafts of TH-DLBCL, even in the presence of elevated Hsp90 activity. Targeting Hsp90 is typically limited by counterregulatory elevation of Hsp70B, which induces resistance to Hsp90 inhibitors. Surprisingly, we identify Hsp70 mRNA as an eIF4E target. In this way, eIF4E inhibition can overcome drug resistance to Hsp90 inhibitors. Accordingly, rational combinatorial inhibition of eIF4E and Hsp90 inhibitors resulted in cooperative antilymphoma activity in DH/TH DLBCL in vitro and in vivo. PMID:26603836

  16. Unusually Aggressive Primary Testicular Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma with Post Therapy Extensive Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Goel, Shalini; Mohapatra, Ishani; Gajendra, Smeeta; Gupta, Sunil

    2016-01-01

    Primary Testicular Lymphoma (PTL) is a rare intermediate to high grade tumour, diffuse large cell being the most common type. Unlike nodal Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma (DLBCL), testicular DLBCL has a less aggressive course and better prognosis. Metastasis is uncommon in testicular DLBCL. Commonly involved sites are contralateral testes, Waldeyer’s ring, skin, lung, Central Nervous System (CNS) and prostate, however the kidneys, liver, bone marrow, pleura and bones are more rarely involved. We report a case of testicular DLBCL which has metastasized to skin and bone marrow with an aggressive clinical course in a year, in-spite of combined modality of therapy given to the patient. Bone marrow infiltration is common and well documented with nodal DLBCL, however there is no published literature for simultaneous bone marrow and skin infiltration in testicular DLBCL till date. Other large studies done in the west have shown that distinct metastasis is usually common but the median progression-free survival is usually in years. This case stresses on shorter period of progression after standard treatment protocol in this part of the world, thus highlighting the need for other extensive studies to define specific treatment protocol for testicular DLBCL.

  17. Gene expression signatures and outcome prediction in mature B-cell malignancies.

    PubMed

    Dave, Sandeep S

    2006-07-01

    Non-Hodgkin's lymphomas comprise a diverse group of diseases that are subclassified by the state of differentiation of the malignant B cells, presence of specific cytogenetic abnormalities, and characteristic morphology. Gene expression profiling has revealed that within each category of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, there exists a significant molecular heterogeneity that can be reflected in differences in tumor behavior and patient outcome. Appreciation of gene expression signatures that are associated with patient outcome will allow better prognostication of disease course and aid the application of molecularly selective patients to improve patient outcome. PMID:16916486

  18. Aggressive primary cutaneous B-cell lymphomas show increased Angiopoietin-2-induced angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Teichert, Martin; Stumpf, Christine; Booken, Nina; Wobser, Marion; Nashan, Dorothee; Hallermann, Christian; Mogler, Carolin; Müller, Cornelia S L; Becker, Jürgen C; Moritz, Rose K C; Andrulis, Mindaugas; Nicolay, Jan P; Goerdt, Sergij; Thomas, Markus; Klemke, Claus-Detlev; Augustin, Hellmut G; Felcht, Moritz

    2015-06-01

    Primary cutaneous large B-cell lymphomas, leg type (PCLBCL/LT) are primary cutaneous B-cell lymphoma (PCBCL) with an intermediate prognosis. Therefore, antracycline-based polychemotherapy combined with rituximab has been recommended as first-line treatment. Yet, despite this regimen, the 5-year survival rate remains 50-66% only. Angiogenesis, the formation of a vascular network, is essential for the pathogenesis of nodal lymphomas. So far, no study has analysed angiogenesis and its key factors in PCLBCL/LT. The present study was aimed at characterizing angiogenesis in PCLBCL/LT to identify the angiogenic molecules as potential therapeutic targets. The intra-tumoral microvessel density (MVD) was assessed by immunohistochemical studies of CD20 and CD31. The MVD was higher in PCLBCL/LT compared with indolent PCBCL. Analyses of open-source microarray data showed correlation between the angiogenic molecule angiopoietin-2 (Ang-2) and pan-endothelial cell markers. ELISA studies determined a shift between Ang-2 and Ang-1 towards Ang-2 in the peripheral blood of PCLBCL/LT patients. Immunofluorescence costainings against the Ang receptor Tie2/angiogenic integrins/CD34 revealed that the vasculature in both aggressive and indolent PCBCL tumors harbours an endothelial cell subpopulation with reduced expression of Tie2. In contrast, the alternative Ang-2 binding partners, angiogenic integrins, are strongly expressed in PCBCL. In line with these findings, downstream targets of Ang-2-integrin signalling, that is phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase at Tyr397, and sprouting angiogenesis are enhanced in PCLBCL/LT. Our data present Ang-2 as a promising therapeutic target and anti-angiogenic therapy as a new line in treatment of PCLBCL/LT as a hitherto intractable disease. PMID:25776770

  19. AT9283, a novel aurora kinase inhibitor, suppresses tumor growth in aggressive B-cell lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Qi, Wenqing; Liu, Xiaobing; Cooke, Laurence S; Persky, Daniel O; Miller, Thomas P; Squires, Matthew; Mahadevan, Daruka

    2012-06-15

    Aurora kinases are oncogenic serine/threonine kinases that play key roles in regulating the mitotic phase of the eukaryotic cell cycle. Auroras are overexpressed in numerous tumors including B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphomas and are validated oncology targets. AT9283, a pan-aurora inhibitor inhibited growth and survival of multiple solid tumors in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we demonstrated that AT9283 had potent activity against Aurora B in a variety of aggressive B-(non-Hodgkin lymphoma) B-NHL cell lines. Cells treated with AT9283 exhibited endoreduplication confirming the mechanism of action of an Aurora B inhibitor. Also, treatment of B-NHL cell lines with AT9283 induced apoptosis in a dose and time dependent manner and inhibited cell proliferation with an IC(50) < 1 μM. It is well known that inhibition of auroras (A or B) synergistically enhances the effects of microtubule targeting agents such as taxanes and vinca alkaloids to induce antiproliferation and apoptosis. We evaluated whether AT9283 in combination with docetaxel is more efficient in inducing apoptosis than AT9283 or docetaxel alone. At very low doses (5 nM) apoptosis was doubled in the combination (23%) compared to AT9283 or docetaxel alone (10%). A mouse xenograft model of mantle cell lymphoma demonstrated that AT9283 at 15 mg/kg and docetaxel (10 mg/kg) alone had modest anti-tumor activity. However, AT9283 at 20 mg/kg and AT9283 (15 or 20 mg/kg) plus docetaxel (10 mg/kg) demonstrated a statistically significant tumor growth inhibition and enhanced survival. Together, our results suggest that AT9283 plus docetaxel may represent a novel therapeutic strategy in B-cell NHL and warrant early phase clinical trial evaluation. PMID:21796626

  20. The phosphoinositide 3-kinase signaling pathway in normal and malignant B cells: activation mechanisms, regulation and impact on cellular functions.

    PubMed

    Pauls, Samantha D; Lafarge, Sandrine T; Landego, Ivan; Zhang, Tingting; Marshall, Aaron J

    2012-01-01

    The phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway is a central signal transduction axis controlling normal B cell homeostasis and activation in humoral immunity. The p110δ PI3K catalytic subunit has emerged as a critical mediator of multiple B cell functions. The activity of this pathway is regulated at multiple levels, with inositol phosphatases PTEN and SHIP both playing critical roles. When deregulated, the PI3K pathway can contribute to B cell malignancies and autoantibody production. This review summarizes current knowledge on key mechanisms that activate and regulate the PI3K pathway and influence normal B cell functional responses including the development of B cell subsets, antigen presentation, immunoglobulin isotype switch, germinal center responses, and maintenance of B cell anergy. We also discuss PI3K pathway alterations reported in select B cell malignancies and highlight studies indicating the functional significance of this pathway in malignant B cell survival and growth within tissue microenvironments. Finally, we comment on early clinical trial results, which support PI3K inhibition as a promising treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia. PMID:22908014

  1. The phosphoinositide 3-kinase signaling pathway in normal and malignant B cells: activation mechanisms, regulation and impact on cellular functions

    PubMed Central

    Pauls, Samantha D.; Lafarge, Sandrine T.; Landego, Ivan; Zhang, Tingting; Marshall, Aaron J.

    2012-01-01

    The phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway is a central signal transduction axis controlling normal B cell homeostasis and activation in humoral immunity. The p110δ PI3K catalytic subunit has emerged as a critical mediator of multiple B cell functions. The activity of this pathway is regulated at multiple levels, with inositol phosphatases PTEN and SHIP both playing critical roles. When deregulated, the PI3K pathway can contribute to B cell malignancies and autoantibody production. This review summarizes current knowledge on key mechanisms that activate and regulate the PI3K pathway and influence normal B cell functional responses including the development of B cell subsets, antigen presentation, immunoglobulin isotype switch, germinal center responses, and maintenance of B cell anergy. We also discuss PI3K pathway alterations reported in select B cell malignancies and highlight studies indicating the functional significance of this pathway in malignant B cell survival and growth within tissue microenvironments. Finally, we comment on early clinical trial results, which support PI3K inhibition as a promising treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia. PMID:22908014

  2. Dual targeting of the thioredoxin and glutathione antioxidant systems in malignant B cells: a novel synergistic therapeutic approach.

    PubMed

    Kiebala, Michelle; Skalska, Jolanta; Casulo, Carla; Brookes, Paul S; Peterson, Derick R; Hilchey, Shannon P; Dai, Yun; Grant, Steven; Maggirwar, Sanjay B; Bernstein, Steven H

    2015-02-01

    B-cell malignancies are a common type of cancer. One approach to cancer therapy is to either increase oxidative stress or inhibit the stress response systems on which cancer cells rely. In this study, we combined nontoxic concentrations of Auranofin (AUR), an inhibitor of the thioredoxin system, with nontoxic concentrations of buthionine-sulfoximine (BSO), a compound that reduces intracellular glutathione levels, and investigated the effect of this drug combination on multiple pathways critical for malignant B-cell survival. Auranofin interacted synergistically with BSO at low concentrations to trigger death in multiple malignant B-cell lines and primary mantle-cell lymphoma cells. Additionally, there was less toxicity toward normal B cells. Low AUR concentrations inhibited thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) activity, an effect significantly increased by BSO cotreatment. Overexpression of TrxR partially reversed AUR+BSO toxicity. Interestingly, the combination of AUR+BSO inhibited nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) signaling. Moreover, synergistic cell death induced by this regimen was attenuated in cells overexpressing NF-κB proteins, arguing for a functional role for NF-κB inhibition in AUR+BSO-mediated cell death. Together, these findings suggest that AUR+BSO synergistically induces malignant B-cell death, a process mediated by dual inhibition of TrxR and NF-κB, and such an approach warrants further investigation in B-cell malignancies. PMID:25448488

  3. Role of the tumor microenvironment in mature B-cell lymphoid malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Fowler, Nathan H.; Cheah, Chan Yoon; Gascoyne, Randy D.; Gribben, John; Neelapu, Sattva S.; Ghia, Paolo; Bollard, Catherine; Ansell, Stephen; Curran, Michael; Wilson, Wyndham H.; O’Brien, Susan; Grant, Cliona; Little, Richard; Zenz, Thorsten; Nastoupil, Loretta J.; Dunleavy, Kieron

    2016-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment is the cellular and molecular environment in which the tumor exists and with which it continuously interacts. In B-cell lymphomas, this microenvironment is intriguing in that it plays critical roles in the regulation of tumor cell survival and proliferation, fostering immune escape as well as the development of treatment resistance. The purpose of this review is to summarize the proceedings of the Second Annual Summit on the Immune Microenvironment in Hematologic Malignancies that took place on September 11–12, 2014 in Dublin, Ireland. We provide a timely overview of the composition and biological relevance of the cellular and molecular microenvironment interface and discuss the role of interactions between the microenvironment and neoplastic cells in a variety of B-cell lymphomas. In addition, we focus on various novel therapeutic strategies that target the tumor microenvironment, including agents that modulate B-cell receptor pathways and immune-checkpoints, chimeric antigen receptor T cells and immunomodulatory agents. PMID:27132279

  4. Stromal niche communalities underscore the contribution of the matricellular protein SPARC to B-cell development and lymphoid malignancies.

    PubMed

    Sangaletti, Sabina; Tripodo, Claudio; Portararo, Paola; Dugo, Matteo; Vitali, Caterina; Botti, Laura; Guarnotta, Carla; Cappetti, Barbara; Gulino, Alessandro; Torselli, Ilaria; Casalini, Patrizia; Chiodoni, Claudia; Colombo, Mario P

    2014-01-01

    Neoplastic B-cell clones commonly arise within secondary lymphoid organs (SLO). However, during disease progression, lymphomatous cells may also colonize the bone marrow (BM), where they localize within specialized stromal niches, namely the osteoblastic and the vascular niche, according to their germinal center- or extra-follicular-derivation, respectively. We hypothesized the existence of common stromal motifs in BM and SLO B-cell lymphoid niches involved in licensing normal B-cell development as well as in fostering transformed B lymphoid cells. Thus, we tested the expression of prototypical mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC) markers and regulatory matricellular proteins in human BM and SLO under physiologically unperturbed conditions and during B-cell lymphoma occurrence. We identified common stromal features in the BM osteoblastic niche and SLO germinal center (GC) microenvironments, traits that were also enriched within BM infiltrates of GC-associated B-cell lymphomas, suggesting that stromal programs involved in central and peripheral B-cell lymphopoiesis are also involved in malignant B-cell nurturing. Among factors co-expressed by stromal elements within these different specialized niches, we identified the pleiotropic matricellular protein secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (SPARC). The actual role of stromal SPARC in normal B-cell lymphopoiesis, investigated in Sparc(-/-) mice and BM chimeras retaining the Sparc(-/-) genotype in host stroma, demonstrated defective BM and splenic B-cell lymphopoiesis. Moreover, in the Trp53 knockout (KO) lymphoma model, p53(-/-)/Sparc(-/-) double-KO mice displayed impaired spontaneous splenic B-cell lymphomagenesis and reduced neoplastic clone BM infiltration in comparison with their p53(-/-)/Sparc(+/+) counterparts. Our results are among the first to demonstrate the existence of common stromal programs regulating both the BM osteoblastic niche and the SLO GC lymphopoietic functions potentially fostering the genesis

  5. T-cells fighting B-cell lymphoproliferative malignancies: the emerging field of CD19 CAR T-cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Heijink, D M; Kater, A P; Hazenberg, M D; Hagenbeek, A; Kersten, M J

    2016-05-01

    CAR T-cells are autologous T-cells transduced with a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR). The CAR contains an antigen recognition part (originating from an antibody), a T-cell receptor transmembrane and cytoplasmic signalling part, and one or more co-stimulatory domains. While CAR T-cells can be directed against any tumour target, most experience thus far has been obtained with targeting of the B-cell antigen CD19 that is expressed by B-cell acute lymphocytic leukaemia, chronic lymphocytic leukaemia and other B-cell lymphomas. The first clinical results are promising, although there are profound differences in response between patients with different haematological malignancies. Treatment-related side effects have been observed that require specific management. This review will explain the mechanism of action, summarise the experience to date and point out future directions for this hopeful new addition to the therapeutic armamentarium in the treatment of lymphoproliferative B-cell malignancies. PMID:27185772

  6. Evolution of B-cell malignancy; Pre-B-cell leukemia resulting from MYC activation in a B-cell neoplasm with a rearranged BCL2 gene

    SciTech Connect

    Gauwerky, C.E.; Haluska, F.G.; Tsujimoto, Y.; Nowell, P.C.; Croce, C.M. )

    1988-11-01

    The authors have analyzed the molecular genetics of the breakpoints involved in the t(8;14) and t(14;18) translocations of an acute pre-B-cell leukemia from a patient with a history of follicular lymphoma. In this patient's leukemic cells, the breakpoint of the t(14;18) translocation occurred in the major breakpoint-cluster region of the BCL2 gene and became linked to the J{sub H}4 joining-region gene segment of the immunoglobulin heavy-chain locus on the 14q+ chromosome as previously observed in follicular lymphoma. An N region and heptamer and nonamer signal sequences indicated that this translocation occurred as a mistake in V{sub H}-D{sub H}-J{sub H} joining (where V{sub H} and D{sub H} are the variable and diversity segments). In the t(8;14) translocation, the breakpoint was located immediately 5' of the first exon of the MYC protooncogene, which was juxtaposed with the C{gamma}2 constant gene segment of the second 14q+ chromosome. The finding of repeated sequences typical of switch regions suggested that this translocation occurred during heavy-chain isotype switching, resulting in progression to pre-B-cell leukemia with both the 5(8;14) and the t(14;18) translocations. The terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-positive phenotype of the patient's leukemic cells further suggests that the pre-B-cell leukemia was derived from a pre-B cell carrying a t(14;18) translocation in the original follicular lymphoma. The polymerase chain reaction method was then used to identify cancer cells in the bone marrow of the patient.

  7. Trends in incidence, treatment and survival of aggressive B-cell lymphoma in the Netherlands 1989–2010

    PubMed Central

    Issa, Djamila E.; van de Schans, Saskia A.M.; Chamuleau, Martine E.D.; Karim-Kos, Henrike E.; Wondergem, Marielle; Huijgens, Peter C.; Coebergh, Jan Willem W.; Zweegman, Sonja; Visser, Otto

    2015-01-01

    Only a small number of patients with aggressive B-cell lymphoma take part in clinical trials, and elderly patients in particular are under-represented. Therefore, we studied data of the population-based nationwide Netherlands Cancer Registry to determine trends in incidence, treatment and survival in an unselected patient population. We included all patients aged 15 years and older with newly diagnosed diffuse large B-cell lymphoma or Burkitt lymphoma in the period 1989–2010 and mantle cell lymphoma in the period 2001–2010, with follow up until February 2013. We examined incidence, first-line treatment and survival. We calculated annual percentage of change in incidence and carried out relative survival analyses. Incidence remained stable for diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (n=23,527), while for mantle cell lymphoma (n=1,634) and Burkitt lymphoma (n=724) incidence increased for men and remained stable for women. No increase in survival for patients with aggressive B-cell lymphoma was observed during the period 1989–1993 and the period 1994–1998 [5-year relative survival 42% (95%CI: 39%–45%) and 41% (38%–44%), respectively], but increased to 46% (43%–48%) in the period 1999–2004 and to 58% (56%–61%) in the period 2005–2010. The increase in survival was most prominent in patients under 65 years of age, while there was a smaller increase in patients over 75 years of age. However, when untreated patients were excluded, patients over 75 years of age had a similar increase in survival to younger patients. In the Netherlands, survival for patients with aggressive B-cell lymphoma increased over time, particularly in younger patients, but also in elderly patients when treatment had been initiated. The improvement in survival coincided with the introduction of rituximab therapy and stem cell transplantation into clinical practice. PMID:25512643

  8. Combined loss of Tet1 and Tet2 promotes B-cell, but not myeloid malignancies in mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhigang; Chen, Li; Dawlaty, Meelad M.; Pan, Feng; Weeks, Ophelia; Zhou, Yuan; Cao, Zeng; Shi, Hui; Wang, Jiapeng; Lin, Li; Chen, Shi; Yuan, Weiping; Qin, Zhaohui; Ni, Hongyu; Nimer, Stephen D.; Yang, Feng-Chun; Jaenisch, Rudolf; Jin, Peng; Xu, Mingjiang

    2016-01-01

    Summary TET1/2/3 are methylcytosine dioxygenases that regulate cytosine hydroxymethylation. Tet1/2 are abundantly expressed in HSC/HPCs and are implicated in hematological malignancies. Tet2-deletion in mice causes myeloid malignancies, while Tet1-null mice develop B-cell lymphoma after an extended period of latency. Interestingly, TET1/2 are often concomitantly downregulated in acute B-lymphocytic leukemia. Here, we investigated the overlapping and non-redundant functions of Tet1/2 in HSC maintenance and development of hematological malignancies using Tet1/2 double knockout (DKO) mice. DKO and Tet2−/− HSC/HPCs showed overlapping and unique 5hmC and 5mC profiles, and behaved differently. DKO mice exhibited strikingly decreased incidence and delayed-onset of myeloid malignancies compared to Tet2−/− mice, and in contrast developed lethal B-cell malignancies. Transcriptome analysis of DKO tumors revealed expression changes in many genes dysregulated in human B-cell malignancies, such as LMO2, BCL6 and MYC. These results highlight the critical roles of TET1/2 individually and together via communication in the pathogenesis of hematological malignancies. PMID:26586431

  9. USP9X stabilizes XIAP to regulate mitotic cell death and chemoresistance in aggressive B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Engel, Katharina; Rudelius, Martina; Slawska, Jolanta; Jacobs, Laura; Ahangarian Abhari, Behnaz; Altmann, Bettina; Kurutz, Julia; Rathakrishnan, Abirami; Fernández-Sáiz, Vanesa; Brunner, Andrä; Targosz, Bianca-Sabrina; Loewecke, Felicia; Gloeckner, Christian Johannes; Ueffing, Marius; Fulda, Simone; Pfreundschuh, Michael; Trümper, Lorenz; Klapper, Wolfram; Keller, Ulrich; Jost, Philipp J; Rosenwald, Andreas; Peschel, Christian; Bassermann, Florian

    2016-01-01

    The mitotic spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) maintains genome stability and marks an important target for antineoplastic therapies. However, it has remained unclear how cells execute cell fate decisions under conditions of SAC-induced mitotic arrest. Here, we identify USP9X as the mitotic deubiquitinase of the X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) and demonstrate that deubiquitylation and stabilization of XIAP by USP9X lead to increased resistance toward mitotic spindle poisons. We find that primary human aggressive B-cell lymphoma samples exhibit high USP9X expression that correlate with XIAP overexpression. We show that high USP9X/XIAP expression is associated with shorter event-free survival in patients treated with spindle poison-containing chemotherapy. Accordingly, aggressive B-cell lymphoma lines with USP9X and associated XIAP overexpression exhibit increased chemoresistance, reversed by specific inhibition of either USP9X or XIAP. Moreover, knockdown of USP9X or XIAP significantly delays lymphoma development and increases sensitivity to spindle poisons in a murine Eμ-Myc lymphoma model. Together, we specify the USP9X-XIAP axis as a regulator of the mitotic cell fate decision and propose that USP9X and XIAP are potential prognostic biomarkers and therapeutic targets in aggressive B-cell lymphoma. PMID:27317434

  10. Global gene expression changes of in vitro stimulated human transformed germinal centre B cells as surrogate for oncogenic pathway activation in individual aggressive B cell lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Aggressive Non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL) are a group of lymphomas derived from germinal centre B cells which display a heterogeneous pattern of oncogenic pathway activation. We postulate that specific immune response associated signalling, affecting gene transcription networks, may be associated with the activation of different oncogenic pathways in aggressive Non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL). Methodology The B cell receptor (BCR), CD40, B-cell activating factor (BAFF)-receptors and Interleukin (IL) 21 receptor and Toll like receptor 4 (TLR4) were stimulated in human transformed germinal centre B cells by treatment with anti IgM F(ab)2-fragments, CD40L, BAFF, IL21 and LPS respectively. The changes in gene expression following the activation of Jak/STAT, NF-кB, MAPK, Ca2+ and PI3K signalling triggered by these stimuli was assessed using microarray analysis. The expression of top 100 genes which had a change in gene expression following stimulation was investigated in gene expression profiles of patients with Aggressive non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (NHL). Results αIgM stimulation led to the largest number of changes in gene expression, affecting overall 6596 genes. While CD40L stimulation changed the expression of 1194 genes and IL21 stimulation affected 902 genes, only 283 and 129 genes were modulated by lipopolysaccharide or BAFF receptor stimulation, respectively. Interestingly, genes associated with a Burkitt-like phenotype, such as MYC, BCL6 or LEF1, were affected by αIgM. Unique and shared gene expression was delineated. NHL-patients were sorted according to their similarity in the expression of TOP100 affected genes to stimulated transformed germinal centre B cells The αIgM gene module discriminated individual DLBCL in a similar manner to CD40L or IL21 gene modules. DLBCLs with low module activation often carry chromosomal MYC aberrations. DLBCLs with high module activation show strong expression of genes involved in cell-cell communication, immune responses

  11. Milatuzumab-Conjugated Liposomes as Targeted Dexamethasone Carriers for Therapeutic Delivery in CD74+ B-cell Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Yicheng; Triantafillou, Georgia; Hertlein, Erin; Towns, William; Stefanovski, Matthew; Mo, Xiaokui; Jarjoura, David; Phelps, Mitch; Marcucci, Guido; Lee, Ly James; Goldenberg, David M.; Lee, Robert J.; Byrd, John C.; Muthusamy, Natarajan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Corticosteroids are widely used for the treatment of B-cell malignancies, including non-Hodgkin lymphoma, chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), and acute lymphoblastic leukemia; however, this class of drug is associated with undesirable off-target effects. Herein, we developed novel milatuzumab-conjugated liposomes as a targeted dexamethasone carrier for therapeutic delivery in CD74+ B-cell malignancies and explored its effect against the disease. Experimental Design: The targeting efficiency of milatuzumab-targeted liposomes to CD74+ cells was evaluated in vitro. The effect of CD74-targeted liposomal dexamethasone was compared with free dexa-methasone in primary CLL cells and cell lines in vitro. The therapeutic efficacy of CD74-targeted liposomal dexamethasone was evaluated in a Raji-severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) xenograft model in vivo. Results: Milatuzumab-targeted liposomes promoted selective incorporation of carrier molecules into transformed CD74-positive B cells as compared with CD74-negative T-cells. The CD74-dexamethasone-targeted liposomes (CD74-IL-DEX) promoted and increased killing in CD74-positive tumor cells and primary CLL cells. Furthermore, the targeted drug liposomes showed enhanced therapeutic efficacy against a CD74-positive B-cell model as compared with free, or non-targeted, liposomal dexamethasone in SCID mice engrafted with Raji cells in vivo. Conclusions: These studies provide evidence and support for a potential use of CD74-targeted liposomal dexamethasone as a new therapy for B-cell malignancies. PMID:23209030

  12. A Recombinant Bispecific CD20×CD95 Antibody With Superior Activity Against Normal and Malignant B-cells.

    PubMed

    Nalivaiko, Kristina; Hofmann, Martin; Kober, Karina; Teichweyde, Nadine; Krammer, Peter H; Rammensee, Hans-Georg; Grosse-Hovest, Ludger; Jung, Gundram

    2016-02-01

    Monoclonal antibodies directed to the B-cell-specific CD20-antigen are successfully used for the treatment of lymphomas and autoimmune diseases. Here, we compare the anti-B-cell activity of three different antibodies directed to CD20: (i) a chimeric, monospecific antibody, (ii) an Fc-optimized variant thereof, and (iii) a bispecific CD20×CD95-antibody in a newly developed recombinant format, termed Fabsc. The bispecific antibody specifically triggers the CD95 death receptor on malignant, as well as activated, normal B-cells. We found that the capability of this antibody to suppress the growth of malignant B-cells in vitro and in vivo and to specifically deplete normal, activated B-cells from peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) cultures was superior to that of the Fc-optimized monospecific antibody. This antibody in turn was more effective than its nonoptimized variant. Moreover, the bispecific antibody was the only reagent capable of significantly suppressing antibody production in vitro. Our findings imply that the bispecific CD20×CD95-antibody might become a new, prototypical reagent for the treatment of B-cell-mediated autoimmune disease. PMID:26581163

  13. Switch-mediated activation and retargeting of CAR-T cells for B-cell malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Rodgers, David T.; Mazagova, Magdalena; Hampton, Eric N.; Cao, Yu; Ramadoss, Nitya S.; Hardy, Ian R.; Schulman, Andrew; Du, Juanjuan; Wang, Feng; Singer, Oded; Ma, Jennifer; Nunez, Vanessa; Shen, Jiayin; Woods, Ashley K.; Wright, Timothy M.; Schultz, Peter G.; Kim, Chan Hyuk; Young, Travis S.

    2016-01-01

    Chimeric antigen receptor T (CAR-T) cell therapy has produced impressive results in clinical trials for B-cell malignancies. However, safety concerns related to the inability to control CAR-T cells once infused into the patient remain a significant challenge. Here we report the engineering of recombinant antibody-based bifunctional switches that consist of a tumor antigen-specific Fab molecule engrafted with a peptide neo-epitope, which is bound exclusively by a peptide-specific switchable CAR-T cell (sCAR-T). The switch redirects the activity of the bio-orthogonal sCAR-T cells through the selective formation of immunological synapses, in which the sCAR-T cell, switch, and target cell interact in a structurally defined and temporally controlled manner. Optimized switches specific for CD19 controlled the activity, tissue-homing, cytokine release, and phenotype of sCAR-T cells in a dose-titratable manner in a Nalm-6 xenograft rodent model of B-cell leukemia. The sCAR–T-cell dosing regimen could be tuned to provide efficacy comparable to the corresponding conventional CART-19, but with lower cytokine levels, thereby offering a method of mitigating cytokine release syndrome in clinical translation. Furthermore, we demonstrate that this methodology is readily adaptable to targeting CD20 on cancer cells using the same sCAR-T cell, suggesting that this approach may be broadly applicable to heterogeneous and resistant tumor populations, as well as other liquid and solid tumor antigens. PMID:26759369

  14. Switch-mediated activation and retargeting of CAR-T cells for B-cell malignancies.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, David T; Mazagova, Magdalena; Hampton, Eric N; Cao, Yu; Ramadoss, Nitya S; Hardy, Ian R; Schulman, Andrew; Du, Juanjuan; Wang, Feng; Singer, Oded; Ma, Jennifer; Nunez, Vanessa; Shen, Jiayin; Woods, Ashley K; Wright, Timothy M; Schultz, Peter G; Kim, Chan Hyuk; Young, Travis S

    2016-01-26

    Chimeric antigen receptor T (CAR-T) cell therapy has produced impressive results in clinical trials for B-cell malignancies. However, safety concerns related to the inability to control CAR-T cells once infused into the patient remain a significant challenge. Here we report the engineering of recombinant antibody-based bifunctional switches that consist of a tumor antigen-specific Fab molecule engrafted with a peptide neo-epitope, which is bound exclusively by a peptide-specific switchable CAR-T cell (sCAR-T). The switch redirects the activity of the bio-orthogonal sCAR-T cells through the selective formation of immunological synapses, in which the sCAR-T cell, switch, and target cell interact in a structurally defined and temporally controlled manner. Optimized switches specific for CD19 controlled the activity, tissue-homing, cytokine release, and phenotype of sCAR-T cells in a dose-titratable manner in a Nalm-6 xenograft rodent model of B-cell leukemia. The sCAR-T-cell dosing regimen could be tuned to provide efficacy comparable to the corresponding conventional CART-19, but with lower cytokine levels, thereby offering a method of mitigating cytokine release syndrome in clinical translation. Furthermore, we demonstrate that this methodology is readily adaptable to targeting CD20 on cancer cells using the same sCAR-T cell, suggesting that this approach may be broadly applicable to heterogeneous and resistant tumor populations, as well as other liquid and solid tumor antigens. PMID:26759369

  15. Idelalisib- a PI3Kδ targeting agent for B-cell malignancies.

    PubMed

    Hewett, Yvonne G; Uprety, Dipesh; Shah, Binay K

    2016-04-01

    Idelalisib, the first in-class phosphotidlyinositol 3-kinase delta (PI3Kδ) inhibitor, was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration in July 2014. It simultaneously received breakthrough therapy designation in combination with rituximab for the treatment of relapsed chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) as well as accelerated approval as monotherapy for the treatment of relapsed follicular lymphoma and relapsed small lymphocytic lymphoma. In a pivotal phase III study of 220 patients with relapsed CLL, the overall response rate of patients who received rituximab plus idelalisib was 81%. The median progression-free survival (PFS) was 5 months with rituximab plus placebo group, but was not reached in the idelalisib arm. At 24 weeks, the PFS in patients receiving idelalisib was 93%. In a phase II trial of 125 patients with relapsed or refractory indolent non-Hodgkin lymphoma who received idelalisib 150 mg twice daily, the response rate was 57%. Complete response was seen in 6% of patients. The median duration of response was 12.5 months, and median PFS was 11 months. Idelalisib is a promising new therapy for relapsed indolent B-cell malignancies. PMID:25712626

  16. Differences and similarities between LC-MS derived serum fingerprints of patients with B-cell malignancies.

    PubMed

    Piszcz, Jaroslaw; Lemancewicz, Dorota; Dudzik, Danuta; Ciborowski, Michal

    2013-10-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) and chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) are closely related B-cell non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas. MM, a plasma cell malignancy, is the second most common haematopoietic cancer in Western countries, with the median survival time of 3–4 years. CLL, a lymphocyte B malignancy, is the most common leukaemia in Western countries. About 25–30% of all CLL patients do not survive the period of 5 years following diagnosis. Both malignancies are complicated, not fully understood and incurable with the current standard treatment. Biologically, MM and CLL may be preceded by associated precursor conditions, that is, monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance for MM and its cellular counterpart and monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis for CLL. Similarities and differences in the biology of these malignancies prompted us to evaluate their metabolomics in stages requiring chemotherapy. Fingerprinting of serum metabolites by the use of LC-MS has never been applied in studies on MM and CLL patients. Obtained results revealed metabolites common for both malignancies (e.g. fatty acids, acylcarnitines, sphingolipids, phospholipids, phenylalanylphenylalanine and isoprene) as well as those which render them different (e.g. lysophosphatidylcholines, monoacylglycerols, aminocaproic acid, phenylacetylglutamine). PMID:24228264

  17. Long-term outcomes of patients with persistent indolent B cell malignancies undergoing nonmyeloablative allogeneic transplantation.

    PubMed

    Cassaday, Ryan D; Storer, Barry E; Sorror, Mohamed L; Sandmaier, Brenda M; Guthrie, Katherine A; Maloney, David G; Rajendran, Joseph G; Pagel, John M; Flowers, Mary E; Green, Damian J; Rezvani, Andrew R; Storb, Rainer F; Press, Oliver W; Gopal, Ajay K

    2015-02-01

    Relapse is least common in patients with indolent B cell (iB) malignancies (ie, iB non-Hodgkin lymphoma [NHL]) who undergo nonmyeloablative allogeneic transplantation (NMAT) in complete remission (CR). However, for the many patients unable to achieve this state, outcomes are poorly described and methods to improve results are unknown. We sought to describe the long-term follow-up and predictive factors for these poor-risk patients unable to achieve CR before NMAT. We identified and evaluated patients with iB-NHL including chronic lymphocytic leukemia treated with fludarabine/total body irradiation-based NMAT that had evidence of persistent disease before NMAT. From December 1998 to April 2009, 89 patients were identified, most commonly with small/chronic lymphocytic lymphoma (n = 62) and follicular lymphoma (n = 24). Pretransplant anti-CD20 radioimmunotherapy (RIT) using standard yttrium-90-ibritumomab tiuxetan was administered to 18 patients (20%) who more frequently had chemoresistant disease (81% versus 39%, P = .003), disease bulk > 5 cm (61% versus 15%, P < .001), thrombocytopenia < 25k/μL (33% versus 7%, P = .002), and Hematopoietic Cell Transplant Comorbidity Index scores ≥ 3 (72% versus 37%, P = .006). After adjusting for these imbalances, RIT-treated patients had improved rates of progression-free survival (PFS) (hazard ratio [HR] = .4; 95% confidence interval [CI], .2 to .9, P = .02) and overall survival (OS) (HR = .3; 95% CI, .1 to .8, P = .008) compared with the non-RIT group. The 3-year adjusted estimates of PFS and OS for the RIT and non-RIT groups were 71% and 87% versus 44% and 59%, respectively. The use of RIT was the only factor independently associated with improved PFS and OS. Rates of nonrelapse mortality and graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) were similar between the 2 groups, although over 70% of patients developed clinically significant acute or chronic GVHD. In conclusion, despite relatively high rates of GVHD, patients with persistent i

  18. T Cells Expressing CD19/CD20 Bispecific Chimeric Antigen Receptors Prevent Antigen Escape by Malignant B Cells.

    PubMed

    Zah, Eugenia; Lin, Meng-Yin; Silva-Benedict, Anne; Jensen, Michael C; Chen, Yvonne Y

    2016-06-01

    The adoptive transfer of T cells expressing anti-CD19 chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) has shown remarkable curative potential against advanced B-cell malignancies, but multiple trials have also reported patient relapses due to the emergence of CD19-negative leukemic cells. Here, we report the design and optimization of single-chain, bispecific CARs that trigger robust cytotoxicity against target cells expressing either CD19 or CD20, two clinically validated targets for B-cell malignancies. We determined the structural parameters required for efficient dual-antigen recognition, and we demonstrate that optimized bispecific CARs can control both wild-type B-cell lymphoma and CD19(-) mutants with equal efficiency in vivo To our knowledge, this is the first bispecific CAR capable of preventing antigen escape by performing true OR-gate signal computation on a clinically relevant pair of tumor-associated antigens. The CD19-OR-CD20 CAR is fully compatible with existing T-cell manufacturing procedures and implementable by current clinical protocols. These results present an effective solution to the challenge of antigen escape in CD19 CAR T-cell therapy, and they highlight the utility of structure-based rational design in the development of receptors with higher-level complexity. Cancer Immunol Res; 4(6); 498-508. ©2016 AACRSee related Spotlight by Sadelain, p. 473. PMID:27059623

  19. CD20-targeting in B-cell malignancies: novel prospects for antibodies and combination therapies.

    PubMed

    Safdari, Yaghoub; Ahmadzadeh, Vahideh; Farajnia, Safar

    2016-08-01

    Expression of CD20 antigen by the most of transformed B cells is believed to be the driving force for targeting this molecule by using anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies. While it is true that most lymphoma/leukemia patients can be cured, these regimens are limited by the emergence of treatment resistance. Based on these observations, development of anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies and combination therapies have been recently proposed, in particular with the aim to optimize the cytotoxic activity. Here we outline a range of new experimental agents concerning the CD20 positive B-cell tumors which provide high benefit from conventional therapy. PMID:27075017

  20. Fusion Toxin BLyS-Gelonin Inhibits Growth of Malignant Human B Cell Lines In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Luster, Troy A.; Mukherjee, Ipsita; Carrell, Jeffrey A.; Cho, Yun Hee; Gill, Jeffrey; Kelly, Lizbeth; Garcia, Andy; Ward, Christopher; Oh, Luke; Ullrich, Stephen J.; Migone, Thi-Sau; Humphreys, Robin

    2012-01-01

    B lymphocyte stimulator (BLyS) is a member of the TNF superfamily of cytokines. The biological activity of BLyS is mediated by three cell surface receptors: BR3/BAFF-R, TACI and BCMA. The expression of these receptors is highly restricted to B cells, both normal and malignant. A BLyS-gelonin fusion toxin (BLyS-gel) was generated consisting of the recombinant plant-derived toxin gelonin fused to the N-terminus of BLyS and tested against a large and diverse panel of B-NHL cell lines. Interestingly, B-NHL subtypes mantle cell lymphoma (MCL), diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and B cell precursor-acute lymphocytic leukemia (BCP-ALL) were preferentially sensitive to BLyS-gel mediated cytotoxicity, with low picomolar EC50 values. BLyS receptor expression did not guarantee sensitivity to BLyS-gel, even though the construct was internalized by both sensitive and resistant cells. Resistance to BLyS-gel could be overcome by treatment with the endosomotropic drug chloroquine, suggesting BLyS-gel may become trapped within endosomal/lysosomal compartments in resistant cells. BLyS-gel induced cell death was caspase-independent and shown to be at least partially mediated by the “ribotoxic stress response.” This response involves activation of p38 MAPK and JNK/SAPK, and BLyS-gel mediated cytotoxicity was inhibited by the p38/JNK inhibitor SB203580. Finally, BLyS-gel treatment was shown to localize to sites of disease, rapidly reduce tumor burden, and significantly prolong survival in xenograft mouse models of disseminated BCP-ALL, DLBCL, and MCL. Together, these findings suggest BLyS has significant potential as a targeting ligand for the delivery of cytotoxic “payloads” to malignant B cells. PMID:23056634

  1. Defining origins of malignant B cells: a new circulating normal human IgM(+)D(+) B-cell subset lacking CD27 expression and displaying somatically mutated IGHV genes as a relevant memory population.

    PubMed

    Weston-Bell, N; Townsend, M; Di Genova, G; Forconi, F; Sahota, S S

    2009-11-01

    In probing the cell of origin in malignant B cells, an imprint of somatic hypermutation (SHM) in immunoglobulin (Ig) variable (V) region genes delineates antigen encounter, and identifying the precise pathway generating SHM in the normal B-cell counterpart becomes relevant. SHM remains the definitive memory imprint in normal human B cells, but CD27 expression also delineates memory. Recently, dye extrusion adenosine triphosphate-binding transporter assays identified circulating isotype-switched memory B cells that lacked CD27, yet exhibited low levels of SHM. To extend findings, we report a pre-switched CD27(-ve) circulating memory B-cell population in normal blood using comparable assays, and isolated CD19(+)IgM(+)D(+)CD27(-ve) cells (>99% purity) for the analysis of IGHV5/IGHV3-IGHM transcripts. Of these (n=334), approximately 78% were germ line and naive B cell derived. Strikingly, 21.9% of the transcripts were mutated. They showed 3-5 mutations (13.5% of sequences) and >5 mutations (8.4% of sequences) per transcript. Accrual of mutations in a subset of CD19(+)IgM(+)D(+)CD27(-ve) cells define a new circulating pre-switched memory B-cell pool, present in substantial numbers in the population harboring naive B cells. These CD19(+)IgM(+)D(+)CD27(-ve) memory B cells may have a distinct lineage and function, and seem relevant to understanding origins of malignant B cells, in particular those of hairy cell leukemia cells, which display mutated V genes yet lack CD27 expression. PMID:19776762

  2. Treatment of Relapsed and/or Chemotherapy Refractory B-cell Malignancy by CART19

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-26

    Hematopoietic/Lymphoid Cancer; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma

  3. Dual Targeting of the Thioredoxin and Glutathione Anti-Oxidant Systems in Malignant B-cells; A Novel Synergistic Therapeutic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Kiebala, Michelle; Skalska, Jolanta; Casulo, Carla; Brookes, Paul S.; Peterson, Derick R.; Hilchey, Shannon P.; Dai, Yun; Grant, Steven; Maggirwar, Sanjay B.; Bernstein, Steven H.

    2015-01-01

    B-cell malignancies are a common type of cancer. One approach to cancer therapy is to either increase oxidative stress or inhibit the stress response systems on which cancer cells rely. In this study, we combined non-toxic concentrations of Auranofin (AUR), an inhibitor of the thioredoxin (Trx) system, with non-toxic concentrations of buthionine-sulfoximine (BSO), a compound that reduces intracellular glutathione (GSH) levels, and investigated the effect of this drug combination on multiple pathways critical for malignant B-cell survival. AUR interacted synergistically with BSO at low concentrations to trigger death in multiple malignant B-cell lines and primary mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) cells. Additionally, there was less toxicity toward normal B-cells. Low AUR concentrations inhibited Trx reductase (TrxR) activity, an effect significantly increased by BSO co-treatment. TrxR over-expression partially reversed AUR+BSO toxicity. Interestingly, the combination of AUR+BSO inhibited NF-κB signaling. Moreover, synergistic cell death induced by this regimen was attenuated in cells over-expressing NF-κB proteins, arguing for a functional role for NF-κB inhibition in AUR+BSO-mediated cell death. Together, these findings suggest that AUR+BSO synergistically induce malignant B-cell death, a process mediated by dual inhibition of TrxR and NF-κB, and such an approach warrants further investigation in B-cell malignancies. PMID:25448488

  4. Pro-Apoptotic Activity of New Honokiol/Triphenylmethane Analogues in B-Cell Lymphoid Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Mędra, Aleksandra; Witkowska, Magdalena; Majchrzak, Agata; Cebula-Obrzut, Barbara; Bonner, Michael Y; Robak, Tadeusz; Arbiser, Jack L; Smolewski, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Honokiol and triphenylmethanes are small molecules with anti-tumor properties. Recently, we synthesized new honokiol analogues (HAs) that possess common features of both groups. We assessed the anti-tumor effectiveness of HAs in B-cell leukemia/lymphoma cells, namely in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cells ex vivo and in pre-B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (Nalm-6), Burkitt lymphoma (BL; Raji), diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL; Toledo) and multiple myeloma (MM; RPMI 8226) cell lines. Four of these compounds appeared to be significantly active against the majority of cells examined, with no significant impact on healthy lymphocytes. These active HAs induced caspase-dependent apoptosis, causing significant deregulation of several apoptosis-regulating proteins. Overall, these compounds downregulated Bcl-2 and XIAP and upregulated Bax, Bak and survivin proteins. In conclusion, some of the HAs are potent tumor-selective inducers of apoptosis in ex vivo CLL and in BL, DLBCL and MM cells in vitro. Further preclinical studies of these agents are recommended. PMID:27483232

  5. MicroRNA-155 influences B-cell receptor signaling and associates with aggressive disease in chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Bing; Chen, Liguang; Zhang, Suping; Mraz, Marek; Fecteau, Jessie-F.; Yu, Jian; Ghia, Emanuela M.; Zhang, Ling; Bao, Lei; Rassenti, Laura Z.; Messer, Karen; Calin, George A.; Croce, Carlo M.

    2014-01-01

    High-level leukemia cell expression of micro-RNA 155 (miR-155) is associated with more aggressive disease in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), including those cases with a low-level expression of ζ-chain–associated protein of 70 kD. CLL with high-level miR-155 expressed lower levels of Src homology-2 domain-containing inositol 5-phosphatase 1 and were more responsive to B-cell receptor (BCR) ligation than CLL with low-level miR-155. Transfection with miR-155 enhanced responsiveness to BCR ligation, whereas transfection with a miR-155 inhibitor had the opposite effect. CLL in lymphoid tissue expressed higher levels of miR155HG than CLL in the blood of the same patient. Also, isolated CD5brightCXCR4dim cells, representing CLL that had been newly released from the microenvironment, expressed higher levels of miR-155 and were more responsive to BCR ligation than isolated CD5dimCXCR4bright cells of the same patient. Treatment of CLL or normal B cells with CD40-ligand or B-cell–activating factor upregulated miR-155 and enhanced sensitivity to BCR ligation, effects that could be blocked by inhibitors to miR-155. This study demonstrates that the sensitivity to BCR ligation can be enhanced by high-level expression of miR-155, which in turn can be induced by crosstalk within the tissue microenvironment, potentially contributing to its association with adverse clinical outcome in patients with CLL. PMID:24914134

  6. Targeted tumor imaging of anti-CD20-polymeric nanoparticles developed for the diagnosis of B-cell malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Capolla, Sara; Garrovo, Chiara; Zorzet, Sonia; Lorenzon, Andrea; Rampazzo, Enrico; Spretz, Ruben; Pozzato, Gabriele; Núñez, Luis; Tripodo, Claudio; Macor, Paolo; Biffi, Stefania

    2015-01-01

    The expectations of nanoparticle (NP)-based targeted drug delivery systems in cancer, when compared with convectional therapeutic methods, are greater efficacy and reduced drug side effects due to specific cellular-level interactions. However, there are conflicting literature reports on enhanced tumor accumulation of targeted NPs, which is essential for translating their applications as improved drug-delivery systems and contrast agents in cancer imaging. In this study, we characterized biodegradable NPs conjugated with an anti-CD20 antibody for in vivo imaging and drug delivery onto tumor cells. NPs’ binding specificity mediated by anti-CD20 antibody was evaluated on MEC1 cells and chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients’ cells. The whole-body distribution of untargeted NPs and anti-CD20 NPs were compared by time-domain optical imaging in a localized human/mouse model of B-cell malignancy. These studies provided evidence that NPs’ functionalization by an anti-CD20 antibody improves tumor pharmacokinetic profiles in vivo after systemic administration and increases in vivo imaging of tumor mass compared to non-targeted NPs. Together, drug delivery and imaging probe represents a promising theranostics tool for targeting B-cell malignancies. PMID:26124662

  7. Enhanced activation of an amino-terminally truncated isoform of the voltage-gated proton channel HVCN1 enriched in malignant B cells

    PubMed Central

    Hondares, Elayne; Brown, Mark Adrian; Musset, Boris; Morgan, Deri; Cherny, Vladimir V.; Taubert, Christina; Bhamrah, Mandeep K.; Coe, David; Marelli-Berg, Federica; Gribben, John G.; Dyer, Martin J. S.; DeCoursey, Thomas E.; Capasso, Melania

    2014-01-01

    HVCN1 (Hydrogen voltage-gated channel 1) is the only mammalian voltage-gated proton channel. In human B lymphocytes, HVCN1 associates with the B-cell receptor (BCR) and is required for optimal BCR signaling and redox control. HVCN1 is expressed in malignant B cells that rely on BCR signaling, such as chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cells. However, little is known about its regulation in these cells. We found that HVCN1 was expressed in B cells as two protein isoforms. The shorter isoform (HVCN1S) was enriched in B cells from a cohort of 76 CLL patients. When overexpressed in a B-cell lymphoma line, HVCN1S responded more profoundly to protein kinase C-dependent phosphorylation. This more potent enhanced gating response was mediated by increased phosphorylation of the same residue responsible for enhanced gating in HVCN1L, Thr29. Furthermore, the association of HVCN1S with the BCR was weaker, which resulted in its diminished internalization upon BCR stimulation. Finally, HVCN1S conferred a proliferative and migratory advantage as well as enhanced BCR-dependent signaling. Overall, our data show for the first time, to our knowledge, the existence of a shorter isoform of HVCN1 with enhanced gating that is specifically enriched in malignant B cells. The properties of HVCN1S suggest that it may contribute to the pathogenesis of BCR-dependent B-cell malignancies. PMID:25425665

  8. Chimeric antigen receptors: a costimulatory boost promotes immunological memory to B-cell malignancies.

    PubMed

    Peggs, Karl S

    2011-11-01

    Cellular immunotherapies offer perhaps the best proof of concept of the ability of immune cells to eradicate malignancy. However, the majority of these data derive from either the use of expanded tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes to treat metastatic melanoma or the use of donor lymphocytes in relapsed hematological malignancies following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Genetic engineering of T cells to redirect specificity against tumor-associated antigens potentially overcomes one of the major hurdles to more widespread application. Despite early evidence of possible activity, limited in vivo expansion and persistence of adoptively transferred cells has been associated with disappointing clinical efficacy. A report from Porter and colleagues now demonstrates more fully the potential of such genetic modification in a patient with chronic lymphocytic leukemia, illustrating that when delivered in the right setting with appropriate costimulatory signaling, these cells can expand and persist, and in doing so effect quite remarkable anti-tumor activity. PMID:22050014

  9. CD19-Targeted chimeric antigen receptor-modified T-cell immunotherapy for B-cell malignancies.

    PubMed

    Turtle, C J; Riddell, S R; Maloney, D G

    2016-09-01

    Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) comprise a tumor-targeting moiety, often in the form of a single chain variable fragment derived from a monoclonal antibody, fused to one or more intracellular T-cell signaling sequences. Lymphodepletion chemotherapy followed by infusion of T cells that are genetically modified to express a CD19-specific CAR is a promising therapy for patients with refractory CD19(+) B-cell malignancies, producing rates of complete remission that are remarkably high in acute lymphoblastic leukemia and encouraging in non-Hodgkin lymphoma and chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Responses are often durable, although additional studies are needed to define the role of CAR-T cell immunotherapy in the context of other treatments. CAR-modified T-cell immunotherapy can be complicated by cytokine release syndrome and neurologic toxicity, which in most cases are manageable and reversible. Here we review recent clinical trial data and discuss issues for the field. PMID:27170467

  10. Lymphomagenic CARD11/BCL10/MALT1 signaling drives malignant B-cell proliferation via cooperative NF-κB and JNK activation

    PubMed Central

    Knies, Nathalie; Alankus, Begüm; Weilemann, Andre; Tzankov, Alexandar; Brunner, Kristina; Ruff, Tanja; Kremer, Marcus; Keller, Ulrich B.; Lenz, Georg; Ruland, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    The aggressive activated B cell-like subtype of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma is characterized by aberrant B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling and constitutive nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-κB) activation, which is required for tumor cell survival. BCR-induced NF-κB activation requires caspase recruitment domain-containing protein 11 (CARD11), and CARD11 gain-of-function mutations are recurrently detected in human diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). To investigate the consequences of dysregulated CARD11 signaling in vivo, we generated mice that conditionally express the human DLBCL-derived CARD11(L225LI) mutant. Surprisingly, CARD11(L225LI) was sufficient to trigger aggressive B-cell lymphoproliferation, leading to early postnatal lethality. CARD11(L225LI) constitutively associated with B-cell CLL/lymphoma 10 (BCL10) and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma translocation gene 1 (MALT1) to simultaneously activate the NF-κB and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling cascades. Genetic deficiencies of either BCL10 or MALT1 completely rescued the phenotype, and pharmacological inhibition of JNK was, similar to NF-κB blockage, toxic to autonomously proliferating CARD11(L225LI)-expressing B cells. Moreover, constitutive JNK activity was observed in primary human activated B cell-like (ABC)-DLBCL specimens, and human ABC-DLBCL cells were also sensitive to JNK inhibitors. Thus, our results demonstrate that enforced activation of CARD11/BCL10/MALT1 signaling is sufficient to drive transformed B-cell expansion in vivo and identify the JNK pathway as a therapeutic target for ABC-DLBCL. PMID:26668357

  11. CD19-CAR engineered NK-92 cells are sufficient to overcome NK cell resistance in B-cell malignancies.

    PubMed

    Romanski, Annette; Uherek, Christoph; Bug, Gesine; Seifried, Erhard; Klingemann, Hans; Wels, Winfried S; Ottmann, Oliver G; Tonn, Torsten

    2016-07-01

    Many B-cell acute and chronic leukaemias tend to be resistant to killing by natural killer (NK) cells. The introduction of chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) into T cells or NK cells could potentially overcome this resistance. Here, we extend our previous observations on the resistance of malignant lymphoblasts to NK-92 cells, a continuously growing NK cell line, showing that anti-CD19-CAR (αCD19-CAR) engineered NK-92 cells can regain significant cytotoxicity against CD19 positive leukaemic cell lines and primary leukaemia cells that are resistant to cytolytic activity of parental NK-92 cells. The 'first generation' CAR was generated from a scFv (CD19) antibody fragment, coupled to a flexible hinge region, the CD3ζ chain and a Myc-tag and cloned into a retrovirus backbone. No difference in cytotoxic activity of NK-92 and transduced αCD19-CAR NK-92 cells towards CD19 negative targets was found. However, αCD19-CAR NK-92 cells specifically and efficiently lysed CD19 expressing B-precursor leukaemia cell lines as well as lymphoblasts from leukaemia patients. Since NK-92 cells can be easily expanded to clinical grade numbers under current Good Manufactoring Practice (cGMP) conditions and its safety has been documented in several phase I clinical studies, treatment with CAR modified NK-92 should be considered a treatment option for patients with lymphoid malignancies. PMID:27008316

  12. MIB-1 labeling indices in benign, aggressive, and malignant meningiomas: a study of 90 tumors.

    PubMed

    Abramovich, C M; Prayson, R A

    1998-12-01

    Predicting tumor behavior in meningiomas based on histology alone has been problematic. This study retrospectively compares histology and MIB-1 (cell proliferation marker) labeling indices (LI) in benign, aggressive, and malignant meningiomas. Six histological features, including mitoses, necrosis, loss of pattern, hypervascularity/hemosiderin deposition, prominent nucleoli, and nuclear pleomorphism, were compared in 90 meningiomas (Fisher's exact test). Tumors with two or more of the above features were designated as aggressive meningiomas. Malignant meningiomas were characterized by brain invasion or metastasis. The MIB-1 LIs (% positive tumor cell nuclei) were compared between the three groups (Kruskal-Wallis test, Wilcoxon two-sample test). Of the benign meningiomas (n=37; mean age, 54 years), 41% had one of the six histological features, with nuclear pleomorphism (n=10) being the most frequent. The aggressive tumors (n=29; mean age, 61 years) were characterized by nuclear pleomorphism (n=28), mitoses (n=20), necrosis (n=16), loss of pattern (n=16), prominent nucleoli (n=6), and hypervascularity/hemosiderin deposition (n=5). Malignant tumors (n=24; mean age, 59 years) were characterized by nuclear pleomorphism (n=22), mitoses (n=21), loss of pattern (n=21), necrosis (n=21), nucleoli (n=17), and hypervascularity/hemosiderin deposition (n=3). Significant differences were found between the aggressive and malignant groups with regard to loss of pattern, necrosis, and nucleoli (P=.0043, .011, and .00029, respectively). Mean MIB-1 LIs for the benign, aggressive, and malignant groups were 1.0% (range, 0 to 5.5%),5.5% (range, 0.1 to 32.5%), and 12.0% (range, 0.3 to 32.5%), respectively. Differences in the mean MIB-1 LI between groups were statistically significant, with P values of <.0001 (benign v aggressive) and .0012 (aggressive v malignant). Mean MIB-1 LIs for recurrent versus nonrecurrent tumors were 7.1% (range, 0 to 32.5%) versus 3.8% (range, 0 to 20.9%) (P=.32

  13. Deregulation of miR-183 and KIAA0101 in Aggressive and Malignant Pituitary Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Roche, Magali; Wierinckx, Anne; Croze, Séverine; Rey, Catherine; Legras-Lachuer, Catherine; Morel, Anne-Pierre; Fusco, Alfredo; Raverot, Gérald; Trouillas, Jacqueline; Lachuer, Joel

    2015-01-01

    Changes in microRNAs (miRNAs) expression in many types of cancer suggest that they may be involved in crucial steps during tumor progression. Indeed, miRNAs deregulation has been described in pituitary tumorigenesis, but few studies have described their role in pituitary tumor progression toward aggressiveness and malignancy. To assess the role of miRNAs within the hierarchical cascade of events in prolactin (PRL) tumors during progression, we used an integrative genomic approach to associate clinical–pathological features, global miRNA expression, and transcriptomic profiles of the same human tumors. We describe the specific down-regulation of one principal miRNA, miR-183, in the 8 aggressive (A, grade 2b) compared to the 18 non-aggressive (NA, grades 1a, 2a) PRL tumors. We demonstrate that it acts as an anti-proliferative gene by directly targeting KIAA0101, which is involved in cell cycle activation and inhibition of p53–p21-mediated cell cycle arrest. Moreover, we show that miR-183 and KIAA0101 expression significantly correlate with the main markers of pituitary tumors aggressiveness, Ki-67 and p53. These results confirm the activation of proliferation in aggressive and malignant PRL tumors compared to non-aggressive ones. Importantly, these data also demonstrate the ability of such an integrative genomic strategy, applied in the same human tumors, to identify the molecular mechanisms responsible for tumoral progression even from a small cohort of patients. PMID:26322309

  14. Fixed nuclei as alternative template of BIOMED-2 multiplex polymerase chain reaction for immunoglobulin gene clonality testing in B-cell malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yuan; Chen, Jie; Wang, Jianchao; Zheng, Ke; Liao, Dianying; Liao, Xiaomei; Liu, Weiping; Wang, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Evaluation of immunoglobulin (Ig) gene rearrangements with BIOMED-2 multiplex PCR has become a standard detection of clonality in mature B cell malignancies. Conventionally, this method is relatively labor-intensive and time-consuming, as it requires DNA isolation from bone marrow aspirates (BM) or peripheral blood (PB) in patients with BM or PB involvement. On the other hand, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is routinely used as genetic screening in B cell malignancies, but the surplus fixed nuclei initially prepared for FISH usually turn useless afterwards. We sought to use these surplus nuclei after FISH as a template to perform PCR-based Ig gene clonality testing. Templates of 12 patients with mature B cell malignancies, which consisted of both DNA isolated with commercial DNA isolation kit from fresh BM or PB (DNA group) and the fixed nuclei initially prepared for FISH (nuclei group) from the same individuals, were subjected to PCR with BIOMED-2 primer sets for immunoglobulin heavy chain and kappa light chain under recommended conditions. Our result, for the first time, showed a high consistency between the two groups in detecting B cell clonality, which indicates that nuclei for FISH can function as a reliable template comparable to fresh tissue-isolated DNA in PCR based Ig clonality testing. This offers a simple, rapid and more economical alternative to standard Ig testing based on regular DNA. PMID:27069754

  15. Delay in treatment of primary malignant and aggressive musculoskeletal tumours.

    PubMed

    Pan, K L; Zolqarnain, A; Chia, Y Y

    2006-02-01

    Patients with aggressive musculoskeletal tumours often arrive at specialised treatment centres late. Such a delay could mean disfavour for potentially curable or long-term disease-free outcome of limb preserving surgery. This study was undertaken to identify the underlying problem-related delay with a view to propose solution for solving it. We reviewed 30 patients to determine the periods of delay between onset of the first symptom and the definitive treatment. The delays were categorized as 'patient' delay, 'referral' delay and 'treatment' delay. There was 'patient' delay in 57% of patients (n=17), ranging from 1 to 18 months; 'referral' delay in 67% of patients (n=20) ranging from 1 to 19 months and 23% of patients (n=7) had treatment delay (average 23 days) at the treatment centre. The causes of late arrival are not solely patient-related but are multifactorial. Measures to minimize such delays include enhancing awareness only with high index of suspicion among primary care practitioners, creating a special lane specialized imaging studies and establishing a dedicated musculoskeletal tumour unit. PMID:17042231

  16. Germline antibody V regions as determinants of clonal persistence and malignant growth in the B cell compartment.

    PubMed Central

    Förster, I; Gu, H; Rajewsky, K

    1988-01-01

    Antibody V gene expression was studied in a subpopulation of murine B cells (Ly1 B) which was enriched by cell transfer and had earlier been shown to persist in the immune system over long periods of time. Among 17 hybridomas derived from Ly1 B cells of two different mice, eight were progeny of only three different B cell precursors which apparently had expanded to clones of large size, in the absence of detectable somatic mutation of their antibody V regions. Furthermore, several clonally independent cells expressed identical, unmutated V genes. These data define a novel pathway of B cell development in which cells expressing a selected set of germline antibodies are continuously propagated in the organism. A Ly1 B cell leukemia derived from a similar transfer experiment expressed a VH gene that had been isolated in three independent Ly1 B cell hybridomas, suggesting that the leukemic cells had been equally selected in this pathway. Images PMID:3264787

  17. A multicenter phase II study of sepantronium bromide (YM155) plus rituximab in patients with relapsed aggressive B-cell Non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulos, Kyriakos P; Lopez-Jimenez, Javier; Smith, Scott E; Steinberg, Joyce; Keating, Anne; Sasse, Carolyn; Jie, Fei; Thyss, Antoine

    2016-08-01

    This phase II study evaluated YM155, a novel small-molecule survivin suppressant, in combination with rituximab in patients with relapsed aggressive B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) who failed or were not candidates for autologous stem cell transplant (ASCT). During 14-day cycles, 41 patients received YM155 (5mg/m(2)/d) by continuous intravenous (IV) infusion for 168 hours (day 1-7), and rituximab (375mg/m(2)) IV on days 1 and 8 during cycles 1-4 and repeated for 4 cycles every 10 cycles. Forty patients (97.6%) had prior rituximab and 15 patients (36.6%) prior ASCT. Most frequent grade 3-4 adverse events were neutropenia (19.5%) and thrombocytopenia (12.2%). In the per-protocol set (n = 34), objective response rate was 50% and median progression-free survival 17.9 months. Median overall survival was not reached at study termination (median follow-up, 23 months). YM155 in combination with rituximab was tolerable with encouraging antitumor activity and durable responses in relapsed aggressive B-cell NHL patients. PMID:26857688

  18. Clinical significance of co-expression of MYC and BCL2 protein in aggressive B-cell lymphomas treated with a second line immunochemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Miura, Katsuhiro; Takahashi, Hiromichi; Nakagawa, Masaru; Izu, Asami; Sugitani, Masahiko; Kurita, Daisuke; Sakagami, Masashi; Ohtake, Shimon; Uchino, Yoshihito; Hojo, Atsuko; Kodaira, Hitomi; Yagi, Mai; Kobayashi, Yujin; Iriyama, Noriyoshi; Kobayashi, Sumiko; Kiso, Satomi; Hirabayashi, Yukio; Hatta, Yoshihiro; Takei, Masami

    2016-06-01

    The clinical significance of concurrent expression of MYC and BCL2 protein, known as "double-expressor lymphoma" (DEL), among patients with relapsed or refractory aggressive B-cell lymphomas, remains unclear. A retrospective analysis was performed of 38 patients treated with a salvage treatment consisting of rituximab, ifosfamide, etoposide, cytarabine and dexamethasone followed by consolidative high-dose chemotherapies. A total of 17 cases (45%) were categorized as DEL using immunohistochemical assay with a cut-off value of positivity of 40% for MYC and 50% for BCL2, respectively. DEL was associated with a lower overall response rate (35% vs 71%, p = 0.0481), worse 2-year progression-free survival (9% vs 67%, p = 0.001) and overall survival (35% vs 71%, p = 0.037). This analysis suggests that DEL is common among patients with relapsed/refractory aggressive B-cell lymphomas and that such patients require novel treatment strategies. PMID:26390147

  19. Nature and nurture: a case of transcending haematological pre-malignancies in a pair of monozygotic twins adding possible clues on the pathogenesis of B-cell proliferations.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Marcus C; Nyvold, Charlotte G; Roug, Anne S; Kjeldsen, Eigil; Villesen, Palle; Nederby, Line; Hokland, Peter

    2015-05-01

    We describe a comprehensive molecular analysis of a pair of monozygotic twins, who came to our attention when one experienced amaurosis fugax and was diagnosed with JAK2+ polycythaemia vera. He (Twin A) was also found to have an asymptomatic B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (B-CLL). Although JAK2-, Twin B was subsequently shown to have a benign monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis (MBL). Flow cytometric and molecular analyses of the B-cell compartments revealed different immunoglobulin light and heavy chain usage in each twin. We hypothesized that whole exome sequencing could help delineating the pattern of germline B-cell disorder susceptibility and reveal somatic mutations potentially contributing to the differential patterns of pre-malignancy. Comparing bone marrow cells and T cells and employing in-house engineered integrative analysis, we found aberrations in Twin A consistent with a myeloid neoplasm, i.e. in TET2, RUNX1, PLCB1 and ELF4. Employing the method for detecting high-ranking variants by extensive annotation and relevance scoring, we also identified shared germline variants in genes of proteins interacting with B-cell receptor signalling mediators and the WNT-pathway, including IRF8, PTPRO, BCL9L, SIT1 and SIRPB1, all with possible implications in B-cell proliferation. Similar patterns of IGHV-gene usage to those demonstrated here have been observed in inherited acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. Collectively, these findings may help in facilitating identification of putative master gene(s) involved in B-cell proliferations in general and MBL and B-CLL in particular. PMID:25752595

  20. Long-Term Outcomes of Patients with Persistent Indolent B-cell Malignancies Undergoing Nonmyeloablative Allogeneic Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Cassaday, Ryan D.; Storer, Barry E.; Sorror, Mohamed L.; Sandmaier, Brenda M.; Guthrie, Katherine A.; Maloney, David G.; Rajendran, Joseph G.; Pagel, John M.; Flowers, Mary E.; Green, Damian J.; Rezvani, Andrew R.; Storb, Rainer F.; Press, Oliver W.; Gopal, Ajay K.

    2015-01-01

    Relapse is least common in patients with indolent B-cell malignancies (iB-NHL) who undergo nonmyeloablative allogeneic transplantation (NMAT) in complete remission (CR). However, for the many patients unable to achieve this state, outcomes are poorly described and methods to improve results are unknown. We sought to describe the long-term follow-up and predictive factors for these poor-risk patients unable to achieve CR prior to NMAT. We identified and evaluated patients with iB-NHL including chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) treated with fludarabine/total body irradiation-based NMAT that had evidence of persistent disease prior to NMAT. From December 1998 to April 2009, 89 patients were identified, most commonly with small lymphocytic lymphoma/CLL (N = 62) and follicular lymphoma (N = 24). Pretransplant anti-CD20 radioimmunotherapy (RIT) using standard yttrium-90-ibritumomab tiuxetan was administered to 18 (20%), who more frequently had chemoresistant disease (81% vs 39%, P = 0.003), disease bulk >5 cm (61% vs 15%, P <0.001), thrombocytopenia <25k/µL (33% vs 7%, P = 0.002), and Hematopoietic Cell Transplant Comorbidity Index scores of ≥3 (72% vs 37%, P = 0.006). After adjusting for these imbalances, RIT-treated patients had improved PFS (HR = 0.4, 95% CI: 0.2–0.9, P = 0.02) and OS (HR = 0.3, 95% CI: 0.1–0.8, P = 0.008) compared to the non-RIT group. The 3-year adjusted estimates of PFS and OS for the RIT and non-RIT groups were 71% and 87%, vs 44% and 59% (respectively). The use of RIT was the only factor independently associated with improved PFS and OS. Rates of non-relapse mortality and graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) were similar between the two groups, though over 70% of patients developed clinically-significant acute or chronic GVHD. In conclusion, despite relatively high rates of GVHD, patients with persistent iB-NHL can derive durable benefit from NMAT. PMID:25445025

  1. Primary Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma involving the Mandible.

    PubMed

    Alshahrani, Faleh Ali A; Aljabab, Abdulsalam S; Motabi, Ibraheem Hm; Alrashed, Abdullah; Anil, Sukumaran

    2015-10-01

    Lymphomas of the oral cavity are rare and typically present as intraosseous lesions that are most commonly diffuse large B-cell type. Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is an aggressive B-cell lymphoma histologically characterized by diffuse proliferation of large neoplastic B-lymphoid cells with a nuclear size equal to or exceeding normal histiocytic nuclei. A case of DLBCL of the mandible in an 18 years old male patient is presented. This report discusses this rare malignancy, including clinical presentation, histopathologic features, immunologic profile, treatment and prognosis. Though lymphoma of mandible is rare, it must be considered in differential diagnosis of swellings arising in the region. PMID:26581467

  2. Reduced Intensity Allogeneic Transplantation Provides High Event-Free And Overall Survival In Patients With Advanced Indolent B Cell Malignancies: CALGB 109901

    PubMed Central

    Shea, Thomas; Johnson, Jeffrey; Westervelt, Peter; Farag, Sherif; McCarty, John; Bashey, Asad; Isola, Luis; Baxter-Lowe, Lee-Anne; Kelly, Michael; Owzar, Kouros; Linker, Charles

    2011-01-01

    CALGB conducted a Phase II study to evaluate the safety and efficacy of a reduced-intensity conditioning regimen with allogeneic transplantation to treat patients with recurrent low grade B cell malignancies. Patients over age 18 with a diagnosis of relapsed, chemotherapy-sensitive disease underwent transplantation with a matched sibling donor and conditioning with cyclophosphamide (1 g/m2/d × 3) and fludarabine phosphate (25 mg/m2/d × 5). GVH prophylaxis included cyclosporine or tacrolimus plus low-dose methotrexate. Forty-four evaluable patients with a median age of 53 and median of two prior regimens were accrued. Sixteen patients had follicular NHL and 28 had histologies including 7 indolent B cell lymphomas, 4 mantle cell, 15 chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and 2 prolymphocytic leukemia pts. The six-month treatment-related mortality (TRM) was 2.4% and three-year TRM was 9%. Three-year event-free and overall survival were.75 and .81 for the follicular patients, .59 and .71 for the CLL/PLL patients, and .55 and .64 for the other histologies. The incidence of grade 2–4 acute graft vs host disease (GVHD) was 29% and extensive chronic GVHD was 18%. This report demonstrates that allogeneic sibling transplantation with a reduced intensity conditioning regimen is safe and efficacious for patients with advanced indolent B cell malignancies enrolled on a Cooperative Group study. PMID:21296675

  3. Monotherapy with pixantrone in histologically confirmed relapsed or refractory aggressive B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma: post-hoc analyses from a phase III trial.

    PubMed

    Pettengell, Ruth; Sebban, Catherine; Zinzani, Pier Luigi; Derigs, Hans Gunter; Kravchenko, Sergey; Singer, Jack W; Theocharous, Panteli; Wang, Lixia; Pavlyuk, Mariya; Makhloufi, Kahina M; Coiffier, Bertrand

    2016-09-01

    This post hoc analysis of a phase 3 trial explored the effect of pixantrone in patients (50 pixantrone, 47 comparator) with relapsed or refractory aggressive B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) confirmed by centralized histological review. Patients received 28-d cycles of 85 mg/m(2) pixantrone dimaleate (equivalent to 50 mg/m(2) in the approved formulation) on days 1, 8 and 15, or comparator. The population was subdivided according to previous rituximab use and whether they received the study treatment as 3rd or 4th line. Median number of cycles was 4 (range, 2-6) with pixantrone and 3 (2-6) with comparator. In 3rd or 4th line, pixantrone was associated with higher complete response (CR) (23·1% vs. 5·1% comparator, P = 0·047) and overall response rate (ORR, 43·6% vs. 12·8%, P = 0·005). In 3rd or 4th line with previous rituximab (20 pixantrone, 18 comparator), pixantrone produced better ORR (45·0% vs. 11·1%, P = 0·033), CR (30·0% vs. 5·6%, P = 0·093) and progression-free survival (median 5·4 vs. 2·8 months, hazard ratio 0·52, 95% confidence interval 0·26-1·04) than the comparator. Similar results were found in patients without previous rituximab. There were no unexpected safety issues. Pixantrone monotherapy is more effective than comparator in relapsed or refractory aggressive B-cell NHL in the 3rd or 4th line setting, independently of previous rituximab. PMID:27118109

  4. Analysis of the miRNA-mRNA networks in malignant transformation BEAS-2B cells induced by alpha-particles.

    PubMed

    Nie, Ji-Hua; Chen, Zhi-Hai; Shao, Chun-Lin; Pei, Wei-Wei; Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Shu-Yu; Jiao, Yang; Tong, Jian

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the toxicity induced by irradiation with alpha-particles on malignant transformation of immortalized human bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B) using miRNA-mRNA networks. The expression of BEAS-2B cells was determined by measuring colony formation, mtDNA, mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), and ROS levels. Changes in BEAS-2B cell gene expression were observed and quantified using microarrays that included an increase in 157 mRNA and 20 miRNA expression and a decrease in 77 mRNA and 48 miRNA. Bioinformatic software was used to analyze these different mRNA and miRNA, which indicated that miR-107 and miR-494 play an important role in alpha-particles-mediated cellular malignant transformation processes. The pathways related to systemic lupus erythematosus, cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction, MAPK signaling pathway, regulation of actin cytoskeleton, and cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) were stimulated, while those of ribosome, transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta signaling pathway, and metabolic pathways were inhibited. Data suggest that miRNA and mRNA play a crucial role in alpha-particles-mediated malignant transformation processes. It is worth noting that three target genes associated with lung cancer were identified and upregulated PEG 10 (paternally expressed gene 10), ARHGAP26, and IRS1. PMID:27267825

  5. A phase 1 clinical trial of the selective BTK inhibitor ONO/GS-4059 in relapsed and refractory mature B-cell malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Walter, Harriet S.; Rule, Simon A.; Karlin, Lionel; Jones, Ceri; Cazin, Bruno; Quittet, Philippe; Shah, Nimish; Hutchinson, Claire V.; Honda, Hideyuki; Duffy, Kevin; Birkett, Joseph; Jamieson, Virginia; Courtenay-Luck, Nigel; Yoshizawa, Toshio; Sharpe, John; Ohno, Tomoya; Abe, Shinichiro; Nishimura, Akihisa; Cartron, Guillaume; Morschhauser, Franck; Fegan, Christopher; Salles, Gilles

    2016-01-01

    We report the results of a multicenter phase 1 dose-escalation study of the selective Bruton tyrosine kinase (BTK) inhibitor ONO/GS-4059 in 90 patients with relapsed/refractory B-cell malignancies. There were 9 dose-escalation cohorts ranging from 20 mg to 600 mg once daily with twice-daily regimens of 240 mg and 300 mg. Twenty-four of 25 evaluable chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients (96%) responded to ONO/GS-4059, with a median treatment duration of 80 weeks; 21 CLL patients remain on treatment. Lymph node responses were rapid and associated with a concurrent lymphocytosis. Eleven of 12 evaluable patients with mantle cell lymphoma (92%) responded (median treatment duration, 40 weeks). Eleven of 31 non–germinal center B-cell diffuse large B-cell lymphoma patients (35%) responded but median treatment duration was 12 weeks due to development of progressive disease. ONO/GS-4059 was very well tolerated with 75% of adverse events (AEs) being Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0 grade 1 or grade 2. Grade 3/4 AEs were mainly hematologic and recovered spontaneously during therapy. One CLL patient experienced a grade 3 treatment-related bleeding event (spontaneous muscle hematoma) but no clinically significant diarrhea, cardiac dysrhythmias, or arthralgia were observed. No maximal tolerated dose (MTD) was reached in the CLL cohort. In the non-Hodgkin lymphoma cohort, 4 patients developed a dose-limiting toxicity, yielding an MTD of 480 mg once daily. ONO/GS-4059 has significant activity in relapsed/refractory B-cell malignancies without major drug-related toxicity. The selectivity of ONO/GS-4059 should confer advantages in combination therapies. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT01659255. PMID:26542378

  6. The Tandem PH Domain-Containing Protein 2 (TAPP2) Regulates Chemokine-Induced Cytoskeletal Reorganization and Malignant B Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hongzhao; Hou, Sen; Wu, Xun; Nandagopal, Saravanan; Lin, Francis; Kung, Sam; Marshall, Aaron James

    2013-01-01

    The intracellular signaling processes controlling malignant B cell migration and tissue localization remain largely undefined. Tandem PH domain-containing proteins TAPP1 and TAPP2 are adaptor proteins that specifically bind to phosphatidylinositol-3,4-bisphosphate, or PI(3,4)P2, a product of phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3K). While PI3K enzymes have a number of functions in cell biology, including cell migration, the functions of PI(3,4)P2 and its binding proteins are not well understood. Previously we found that TAPP2 is highly expressed in primary leukemic B cells that have strong migratory capacity. Here we find that SDF-1-dependent migration of human malignant B cells requires both PI3K signaling and TAPP2. Migration in a transwell assay is significantly impaired by pan-PI3K and isoform-selective PI3K inhibitors, or by TAPP2 shRNA knockdown (KD). Strikingly, TAPP2 KD in combination with PI3K inhibitor treatment nearly abolished the migration response, suggesting that TAPP2 may contribute some functions independent of the PI3K pathway. In microfluidic chamber cell tracking assays, TAPP2 KD cells show reduction in percentage of migrating cells, migration velocity and directionality. TAPP2 KD led to alterations in chemokine-induced rearrangement of the actin cytoskeleton and failure to form polarized morphology. TAPP2 co-localized with the stable F-actin-binding protein utrophin, with both molecules reciprocally localizing against F-actin accumulated at the leading edge upon SDF-1 stimulation. In TAPP2 KD cells, Rac was over-activated and localized to multiple membrane protrusions, suggesting that TAPP2 may act in concert with utrophin and stable F-actin to spatially restrict Rac activation and reduce formation of multiple membrane protrusions. TAPP2 function in cell migration is also apparent in the more complex context of B cell migration into stromal cell layers – a process that is only partially dependent on PI3K and SDF-1. In summary, this study identified

  7. High-Dose Y-90-Ibritumomab Tiuxetan Added to Reduced-Intensity Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplant Regimen for Relapsed or Refractory Aggressive B-Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-08

    Post-Transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Burkitt Lymphoma; Refractory B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Burkitt Lymphoma; Refractory Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

  8. A phase II study of belinostat (PXD101) in relapsed and refractory aggressive B-cell lymphomas: SWOG S0520.

    PubMed

    Puvvada, Soham D; Li, Hongli; Rimsza, Lisa M; Bernstein, Steven H; Fisher, Richard I; LeBlanc, Michael; Schmelz, Monika; Glinsmann-Gibson, Betty; Miller, Thomas P; Maddox, Anne-Marie; Friedberg, Jonathan W; Smith, Sonali M; Persky, Daniel O

    2016-10-01

    Recent advances in diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (DLBCL) have underscored the importance of tumor microenvironment in escaping host anti-tumor responses. One mechanism is loss of major histocompatibility Class II antigens (MHCII) associated with decreased tumor infiltrating T lymphocytes (TIL) and poor survival. Transcription of MHCII is controlled by CIITA which in turn is regulated by histone acetylation. In this study, we hypothesized that HDAC inhibition with belinostat increases MHCII, CIITA expression, TIL and improves patient outcomes. Primary objective was evaluation of toxicity and response. Twenty-two patients were enrolled for the study. Belinostat was well tolerated with mild toxicity. Two partial responses were observed at 5, 13 months after registration for an overall response rate (ORR) (95% CI) of 10.5% (1.3-33.1%), and three patients had stable disease for 4.7, 42.3+, and 68.4 + months with minimum 3-year follow-up. Included correlative studies support the hypothesis and serve as the basis for SWOG S0806 combining vorinostat with R-CHOP. PMID:26758422

  9. Oral malignant melanoma: An aggressive clinical entity - Report of a rare case with review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Shamimul; Jamdar, Sami Faisal; Jangra, Jogender; Al Beaiji, Sadun Mohammad Al Ageel

    2016-01-01

    Melanomais one of the most dreaded and aggressive neoplasms, being derived from epidermal melanocytes. The majority of melanomas are seen to involve the skin, and primary mucosal melanomas account for less than 1% of all melanomas. Oral malignant melanomas (OMM) are asymptomatic at the initial presentation, but later they become painful with growth and expansion. In the late stages, the patient may present with ulceration, bleeding, tooth mobility, paresthesia, ill-fitting prosthesis, and delayed healing of the extraction sockets. Diagnosis is often delayed due to asymptomatic clinical presentation, with silent progression of the lesion. OMM are associated with poor prognosis due to their invasive and metastasizing tendencies. The condition has poor survival rates, and metastatic melanomas show even worse prognosis. The 5-year survival rate for OMM ranges 4.5–29%, with 18.5 months being the mean survival rate. The tumor is best managed by wide surgical resection; however, consideration should also be made for adjunctive therapies such as chemotherapy, immunotherapy, and radiotherapy. Recurrences may be seen even 10–15 years after the primary therapy. This paper aims to present an interesting report of aggressive OMM in a 50-year-old male patient and emphasizes the role of dental professionals in maintaining a high degree of vigilance for the pigmented lesions of the oral cavity. Pigmented lesions of uncertain origin should be routinely biopsied to rule out malignancy. Early diagnosis of this dreadful entity entails thorough history taking, physical examination, and radiographic features coupled with histopathology. PMID:27114959

  10. Oral malignant melanoma: An aggressive clinical entity - Report of a rare case with review of literature.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Shamimul; Jamdar, Sami Faisal; Jangra, Jogender; Al Beaiji, Sadun Mohammad Al Ageel

    2016-01-01

    Melanomais one of the most dreaded and aggressive neoplasms, being derived from epidermal melanocytes. The majority of melanomas are seen to involve the skin, and primary mucosal melanomas account for less than 1% of all melanomas. Oral malignant melanomas (OMM) are asymptomatic at the initial presentation, but later they become painful with growth and expansion. In the late stages, the patient may present with ulceration, bleeding, tooth mobility, paresthesia, ill-fitting prosthesis, and delayed healing of the extraction sockets. Diagnosis is often delayed due to asymptomatic clinical presentation, with silent progression of the lesion. OMM are associated with poor prognosis due to their invasive and metastasizing tendencies. The condition has poor survival rates, and metastatic melanomas show even worse prognosis. The 5-year survival rate for OMM ranges 4.5-29%, with 18.5 months being the mean survival rate. The tumor is best managed by wide surgical resection; however, consideration should also be made for adjunctive therapies such as chemotherapy, immunotherapy, and radiotherapy. Recurrences may be seen even 10-15 years after the primary therapy. This paper aims to present an interesting report of aggressive OMM in a 50-year-old male patient and emphasizes the role of dental professionals in maintaining a high degree of vigilance for the pigmented lesions of the oral cavity. Pigmented lesions of uncertain origin should be routinely biopsied to rule out malignancy. Early diagnosis of this dreadful entity entails thorough history taking, physical examination, and radiographic features coupled with histopathology. PMID:27114959

  11. Reduction of Prep1 levels affects differentiation of normal and malignant B cells and accelerates Myc driven lymphomagenesis.

    PubMed

    Iotti, Giorgio; Mejetta, Stefania; Modica, Livia; Penkov, Dmitry; Ponzoni, Maurilio; Blasi, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    The Prep1 homeodomain transcription factor has recently been recognized as a tumor suppressor. Among other features, haploinsufficiency of Prep1 is able to strongly accelerate the B-lymphomagenesis in EμMyc mice. Now we report that this occurs concomitantly with a change in the type of B-cell lymphomas generated by the Myc oncogene. Indeed, the tumors generated in the EμMyc-Prep1(+/-) mice are much more immature, being mostly made up of Pro-B or Pre-B cells, while those in the EμMyc-Prep1(+/+) mice are more differentiated being invariably IgM(+). Moreover, we show that Prep1 is in fact required for the differentiation of Pro-B and Pre-B cells into IgM(+) lymphocytes and/or their proliferation, thus showing also how a normal function of Prep1 affects EμMyc lymphomagenesis. Finally, we show that the haploinsufficiency of Prep1 is accompanied with a major decrease of Myc-induced apoptosis and that the haploinsufficieny is sufficient for all these effects because the second allele of Prep1 is not lost even at late stages. Therefore, the tumor-suppressive activity of Prep1 is intertwined with both the interference with Myc-induced apoptosis as well as with natural developmental functions of the protein. PMID:23133585

  12. Translocation t(2;7)(p11;q21) associated with the CDK6/IGK rearrangement is a rare but recurrent abnormality in B-cell lymphoproliferative malignancies.

    PubMed

    Douet-Guilbert, Nathalie; Tous, Corinne; Le Flahec, Glen; Bovo, Clément; Le Bris, Marie-Josée; Basinko, Audrey; Morel, Frédéric; De Braekeleer, Marc

    2014-03-01

    Structural abnormalities of chromosome 7q have been regularly reported in chronic B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders. They include chromosomal translocations involving 7q21, leading to overexpression of the CDK6 gene. Three different translocations, t(7;14)(q21;q32), t(7;22)(q21;q11), and t(2;7)(p11;q21), leading to the juxtaposition of the CDK6 gene with a immunoglobulin gene enhancer during B-cell differentiation, have been described. In the past 2 years, we identified three patients with lymphoproliferative malignancy associated with a t(2;7)(p11;q21). Fluorescent in situ hybridization using an IGK probe and a library of bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones located in bands 7q21.2 and 7q21.3, containing CDK6, revealed that the telomeric part of the IGK probe was translocated on the der(7) within a 51-kb region upstream of the transcriptional start site of CDK6. A total of 23 patients with indolent B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders and juxtaposition of the IG and CDK6 genes, including 20 with IGK and CDK6 juxtaposition, have been reported thus far. This rearrangement leads to the overexpression of CDK6, which encodes a cyclin-dependent protein kinase involved in cell cycle G1 phase progression and G1/S transition. PMID:24726269

  13. Systematic review of the recent evidence for the efficacy and safety of chlorambucil in the treatment of B-cell malignancies.

    PubMed

    Lepretre, Stéphane; Dartigeas, C; Feugier, P; Marty, M; Salles, G

    2016-01-01

    Emergence of new agents has deeply modified treatment options and the role of chlorambucil (CLB) in B-cell malignancies. We conducted a systematic review of prospective, randomized, controlled trials (RCTs) investigating the benefits and harms of CLB used alone or in combination with other treatment in patients suffering from chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), low-grade non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) or Waldenström macroglobulinemia (WM). For CLL, review of the nine RCTs showed that the main advantage of CLB is its low toxicity in comparison with purine nucleoside analogs like fludarabine in either CLL or NHL. In CLL, the major disadvantage is the very low rate of complete response, except when combining an anti-CD20 antibody. For B-cell lymphoma and WM, six RCTs were summarized. Results according to the usual criteria are presented and the role of CLB, used mostly in combination with an anti-CD20 antibody, is discussed for each indication, in particular for unfit patients. PMID:26308278

  14. Gall bladder carcinoma: Aggressive malignancy with protean loco-regional and distant spread.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, Amit Nandan Dhar; Jain, Shivi; Dixit, Ruhi

    2015-03-16

    The most common malignancy of biliary tract is gallbladder cancer (GBC) which is the third most common cancer in gastrointestinal tract. It is a lethal disease for most patients in spite of growing awareness and improved diagnostic techniques. GBC has a very poor prognosis and the 5 year survival rate is < 10%. Although etiology of the carcinoma of the gallbladder is still obscure, various factors have been implicated, cholelithiasis being the most frequent. The incidence of GBC worldwide is based on the gender, geography and ethnicity which suggest that both genetic and environmental factors can cause GBC. The major route of spread of gallbladder cancer (GC) is loco-regional rather than distant. It spreads by lymphatic, vascular, neural, intraperitoneal, and intraductal routes. Sonography is usually the most common imaging test to evaluate symptoms of biliary tract disease including suspected GC. With recent advances in imaging modalities like multi-detector computed tomography (CT) scanners, magnetic resonance imaging-positron emission tomography/CT diagnosis of gallbladder cancer has improved. Studies have also targeted molecular and genetic pathways. Treatment options have included extended and radical surgeries and adjuvant chemotherapy. This review article deals in detail with important aspects of carcinoma gallbladder and its manifestations and challenges. Role of various imaging modalities in characterization and accurate staging has been discussed. The loco-regional spread of this aggressive malignancy is dealt explicitly. PMID:25789296

  15. Gall bladder carcinoma: Aggressive malignancy with protean loco-regional and distant spread

    PubMed Central

    Dwivedi, Amit Nandan Dhar; Jain, Shivi; Dixit, Ruhi

    2015-01-01

    The most common malignancy of biliary tract is gallbladder cancer (GBC) which is the third most common cancer in gastrointestinal tract. It is a lethal disease for most patients in spite of growing awareness and improved diagnostic techniques. GBC has a very poor prognosis and the 5 year survival rate is < 10%. Although etiology of the carcinoma of the gallbladder is still obscure, various factors have been implicated, cholelithiasis being the most frequent. The incidence of GBC worldwide is based on the gender, geography and ethnicity which suggest that both genetic and environmental factors can cause GBC. The major route of spread of gallbladder cancer (GC) is loco-regional rather than distant. It spreads by lymphatic, vascular, neural, intraperitoneal, and intraductal routes. Sonography is usually the most common imaging test to evaluate symptoms of biliary tract disease including suspected GC. With recent advances in imaging modalities like multi-detector computed tomography (CT) scanners, magnetic resonance imaging-positron emission tomography/CT diagnosis of gallbladder cancer has improved. Studies have also targeted molecular and genetic pathways. Treatment options have included extended and radical surgeries and adjuvant chemotherapy. This review article deals in detail with important aspects of carcinoma gallbladder and its manifestations and challenges. Role of various imaging modalities in characterization and accurate staging has been discussed. The loco-regional spread of this aggressive malignancy is dealt explicitly. PMID:25789296

  16. Feasibility of Telomerase-Specific Adoptive T-cell Therapy for B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia and Solid Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Sandri, Sara; Bobisse, Sara; Moxley, Kelly; Lamolinara, Alessia; De Sanctis, Francesco; Boschi, Federico; Sbarbati, Andrea; Fracasso, Giulio; Ferrarini, Giovanna; Hendriks, Rudi W; Cavallini, Chiara; Scupoli, Maria Teresa; Sartoris, Silvia; Iezzi, Manuela; Nishimura, Michael I; Bronte, Vincenzo; Ugel, Stefano

    2016-05-01

    Telomerase (TERT) is overexpressed in 80% to 90% of primary tumors and contributes to sustaining the transformed phenotype. The identification of several TERT epitopes in tumor cells has elevated the status of TERT as a potential universal target for selective and broad adoptive immunotherapy. TERT-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) have been detected in the peripheral blood of B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL) patients, but display low functional avidity, which limits their clinical utility in adoptive cell transfer approaches. To overcome this key obstacle hindering effective immunotherapy, we isolated an HLA-A2-restricted T-cell receptor (TCR) with high avidity for human TERT from vaccinated HLA-A*0201 transgenic mice. Using several relevant humanized mouse models, we demonstrate that TCR-transduced T cells were able to control human B-CLL progression in vivo and limited tumor growth in several human, solid transplantable cancers. TERT-based adoptive immunotherapy selectively eliminated tumor cells, failed to trigger a self-MHC-restricted fratricide of T cells, and was associated with toxicity against mature granulocytes, but not toward human hematopoietic progenitors in humanized immune reconstituted mice. These data support the feasibility of TERT-based adoptive immunotherapy in clinical oncology, highlighting, for the first time, the possibility of utilizing a high-avidity TCR specific for human TERT. Cancer Res; 76(9); 2540-51. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27197263

  17. Safety and efficacy of intrathecal rituximab in children with B cell lymphoid CD20+ malignancies: An international retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Ceppi, Francesco; Weitzman, Sheila; Woessmann, Wilhelm; Davies, Kimberly; Lassaletta, Alvaro; Reismüller, Bettina; Mellgren, Karin; Uyttebroeck, Anne; Maia, Iris; Abdullah, Shaker; Miakova, Natasha; Glaser, Darryl; Cohn, Richard; Abla, Oussama; Attarbaschi, Andishe; Alexander, Sarah

    2016-05-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) involvement in patients with mature B non-Hodgkin lymphoma, post-transplantation proliferative disorder and acute lymphoblastic leukemia confers a significantly inferior prognosis as compared to patients without CNS disease. Intrathecal (IT) or intraventricular administration of rituximab is an option for this group of patients. We report 25 children with CNS involvement of CD20+ B lymphoid malignancies who received in total 163 IT/intraventricular rituximab doses. The median number of doses received by each patient was 6, with a median dose of 25 mg. The most common adverse events were Grades 1 and 2 peripheral neuropathies in five patients (20%), allergy in two patients, and headache in two patients. These events were self-limited, occurring in the 48 hours after treatment and resolving within 24 hr. Three patients presented with more severe though transient side effects, one with a Grade III neuropathy and two with seizure. Eighteen patients (72%) of those treated with IT/intraventricular rituximab, with or without other CNS directed treatment, achieved a CNS remission. This case series suggests that IT/intraventricular rituximab has therapeutic efficacy and relatively limited toxicity. Prospective trials of IT/intraventricular rituximab for patients with CNS involvement of CD20 + B lymphoid malignancies are warranted. Am. J. Hematol. 91:486-491, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26872652

  18. Primary vertebral tumors: a review of epidemiologic, histological and imaging findings, part II: locally aggressive and malignant tumors.

    PubMed

    Ropper, Alexander E; Cahill, Kevin S; Hanna, John W; McCarthy, Edward F; Gokaslan, Ziya L; Chi, John H

    2012-01-01

    This second part of a comprehensive review of primary vertebral tumors focuses on locally aggressive and malignant tumors. As discussed in the earlier part of the review, both benign and malignant types of these tumors affect the adult and the pediatric population, and an understanding of their subtleties may increase their effective resection. In this review, we discuss the epidemiologic, histological, and imaging features of the most common locally aggressive primary vertebral tumors (chordoma and giant-cell tumor) and malignant tumors (chondrosarcoma, Ewing sarcoma, multiple myeloma or plasmacytoma, and osteosarcoma). The figures used for illustration are from operative patients of the senior authors (Z.L.G. and J.H.C.). Taken together, parts 1 and 2 of this article provide a thorough and illustrative review of primary vertebral tumors. PMID:21768918

  19. Maintenance Therapy with Interferon Alfa 2b Improves Outcome in Aggressive Malignant Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Avilés, A; Díaz-Maqueo, J C; Talavera, A; García, E L; Nambo, M J

    1998-01-01

    To assess the efficacy and toxicity of interferon alfa 2b (IFN) as maintenance therapy in patients with malignant lymphoma on complete response after conventional chemotherapy we start a randomized clinical trial. One hundred and seventy patients were randomized to received either IFN 5.0 MU three time at week by one year or no further treatment, as control group. At a median follow-up of 9.0 years (range 4.3 to 11 years) median freedom from relapse (FFR) has not been reached in patients who received IFN, it is statistically significant to patients in control group with a median FFR of 60 months (p <.001). Actuarial curves show that at 10-years, 58 patients (66%, 95% confidence interval (CI) 53% to 79%) remain in first remission, statistical different to control group 33 patients (40%, 95% Cl: 33% to 57%) (p <.001). Event free survival (EFS) shown that a 10-years 63 patients (71%, 95% CI: 59% to 81%) are alive free of disease in the IFN arm compared to only 38 patients (45%, 95% CI: 37% to 57%) in the control group (p <.001). Toxicity was mild, 81 patients received the planned doses of IFN on time and 6 patients had transitory delay secondary to hematological toxicity (grade 1 or 2) and completed the treatment on 13 months. No late side effects has been observed. After a long term follow-up we confirm that IFN used as maintenance therapy improves outcome in patients with aggressive malignant lymphoma who were in complete remission after conventional chemotherapy without excessive toxicity. We feld that IFN will be consider in controlled clinical trials to define the role of this therapeutic option. PMID:27414082

  20. ACR Appropriateness Criteria Follow-Up of Malignant or Aggressive Musculoskeletal Tumors.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Catherine C; Kransdorf, Mark J; Beaman, Francesca D; Adler, Ronald S; Amini, Behrang; Appel, Marc; Bernard, Stephanie A; Fries, Ian Blair; Germano, Isabelle M; Greenspan, Bennett S; Holly, Langston T; Kubicky, Charlotte D; Shek-Man Lo, Simon; Mosher, Timothy J; Sloan, Andrew E; Tuite, Michael J; Walker, Eric A; Ward, Robert J; Wessell, Daniel E; Weissman, Barbara N

    2016-04-01

    Appropriate imaging modalities for the follow-up of malignant or aggressive musculoskeletal tumors include radiography, MRI, CT, (18)F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose PET/CT, (99m)Tc bone scan, and ultrasound. Clinical scenarios reviewed include evaluation for metastatic disease to the lung in low- and high-risk patients, for osseous metastatic disease in asymptomatic and symptomatic patients, for local recurrence of osseous tumors with and without significant hardware present, and for local recurrence of soft tissue tumors. The timing for follow-up of pulmonary metastasis surveillance is also reviewed. The ACR Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed every three years by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and review include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer-reviewed journals and the application of a well-established consensus methodology (modified Delphi) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures by the panel. In those instances in which evidence is lacking or not definitive, expert opinion may be used to recommend imaging or treatment. PMID:26922595

  1. Impact of age and socioeconomic status on treatment and survival from aggressive lymphoma: a UK population-based study of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Alexandra; Crouch, Simon; Howell, Debra; Burton, Cathy; Patmore, Russell; Roman, Eve

    2015-01-01

    Aim To examine the influence of patient’s age and socio-economic status on treatment and outcome in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL); an aggressive curable cancer, with an incidence rate that increases markedly with age but varies little with socio-economic status. Methods Set within a representative UK population of around 4 million, data are from an established patient cohort. This report includes all patients (≥18years) newly diagnosed with DLBCL 2004–2012, with follow-up to February 2015. Results Of the 2137 patients (median age 70.2 years) diagnosed with denovo DLBCL, 1709 (80%) were treated curatively/intensively and 1161(54.3%) died during follow-up. Five-year overall and relative survival (RS) estimates were 46.2% (95% CI 44.0–48.4%) and 54.6% (52.1%-57.0%) respectively for all patients, and 58.5% (56.1–60.9%) and 67.0% (64.3–69.6%) for intensively treated patients. 96.3% of patients <55 years (366/380) and 96.4% of those with the best performance status (543/563) were treated curatively: 5-year RSs being 77.9% (73.1–82%) and 87.1% (82.5–90.6%) respectively. At the other end of the age/fitness spectrum, 33.3% of those ≥85 years (66/198) and 41.1% with the worst performance (94/225) were treated curatively: the corresponding 5-year RSs being 50.5% (27.1–69.0%) and 22.9% (14.0–33.2%). The proportion of patients whose cancer was fully staged fell with increasing age and worsening performance status. No socio-economic variations with treatment, stage at presentation or outcome were detected. Conclusions Performance status is more discriminatory of survival than chronological age, with fitter patients benefiting from treatment across all ages. Socio-economic factors are not predictive of outcome in patients with DLBCL in the UK. PMID:26341588

  2. Anti-CD20 Radioimmunotherapy Before Chemotherapy and Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk B-Cell Malignancies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-13

    Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Adult Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; CD20-Positive Neoplastic Cells Present; Indolent Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Mature B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

  3. Generation of clinical-grade CD19-specific CAR-modified CD8+ memory stem cells for the treatment of human B-cell malignancies.

    PubMed

    Sabatino, Marianna; Hu, Jinhui; Sommariva, Michele; Gautam, Sanjivan; Fellowes, Vicki; Hocker, James D; Dougherty, Sean; Qin, Haiying; Klebanoff, Christopher A; Fry, Terry J; Gress, Ronald E; Kochenderfer, James N; Stroncek, David F; Ji, Yun; Gattinoni, Luca

    2016-07-28

    Long-lived, self-renewing, multipotent T memory stem cells (TSCM) can trigger profound and sustained tumor regression but their rareness poses a major hurdle to their clinical application. Presently, clinically compliant procedures to generate relevant numbers of this T-cell population are undefined. Here, we provide a strategy for deriving large numbers of clinical-grade tumor-redirected TSCM starting from naive precursors. CD8(+)CD62L(+)CD45RA(+) naive T cells enriched by streptamer-based serial-positive selection were activated by CD3/CD28 engagement in the presence of interleukin-7 (IL-7), IL-21, and the glycogen synthase-3β inhibitor TWS119, and genetically engineered to express a CD19-specific chimeric antigen receptor (CD19-CAR). These conditions enabled the generation of CD19-CAR-modified CD8(+) TSCM that were phenotypically, functionally, and transcriptomically equivalent to their naturally occurring counterpart. Compared with CD8(+) T cells generated with clinical protocols currently under investigation, CD19-CAR-modified CD8(+) TSCM exhibited enhanced metabolic fitness and mediated robust, long-lasting antitumor responses against systemic acute lymphoblastic leukemia xenografts. This clinical-grade platform provides the basis for a phase 1 trial evaluating the activity of CD19-CAR-modified CD8(+) TSCM in patients with B-cell malignancies refractory to prior allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. PMID:27226436

  4. Genetic Alteration of a bispecific ligand directed toxin targeting human CD19 and CD22 receptors resulting in improved efficacy against systemic B cell malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Vallera, Daniel A.; Chen, Hua; Sicheneder, Andrew R.; Panoskaltsis-Mortari, Angela; Taras, Elizabeth P.

    2009-01-01

    A bispecific ligand-directed toxin (BLT) called DT2219ARL consisting of two sFv ligands recognizing CD19 and CD22 and catalytic DT390 was genetically enhanced for superior in vivo anti-leukemia activity. Genetic alterations included reverse orienting VH-VL domains and adding aggregation reducing/stabilizing linkers. In vivo, these improvements resulted in previously unseen long-term tumor-free survivors measured in a bioluminescent xenograft imaging model in which the progression of human Raji Burkitt’s lymphoma could be tracked in real time and in a Daudi model as well. Studies showed DT2219ARL was potent (IC50s 0.06–0.2 nM range) and selectively blockable. Imaging studies indicated the highly invasive nature of this B cell malignancy model and showed it likely induced preterminal hind limb paralysis because of metastasis to spinal regions prevented by DT2219ARL. DT2219ARL represents a new class of bispecific biological that can be continually improved by genetic mutation. PMID:19327829

  5. IL-1β promotes malignant transformation and tumor aggressiveness in oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chia-Huei; Chang, Jeffrey Shu-Ming; Syu, Shih-Han; Wong, Thian-Sze; Chan, Jimmy Yu-Wai; Tang, Ya-Chu; Yang, Zhi-Ping; Yang, Wen-Chan; Chen, Chiung-Tong; Lu, Shao-Chun; Tang, Pei-Hua; Yang, Tzu-Ching; Chu, Pei-Yi; Hsiao, Jenn-Ren; Liu, Ko-Jiunn

    2015-04-01

    Chronic inflammation, coupled with alcohol, betel quid, and cigarette consumption, is associated with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) is a critical mediator of chronic inflammation and implicated in many cancers. In this study, we showed that increased pro-IL-1β expression was associated with the severity of oral malignant transformation in a mouse OSCC model induced by 4-Nitroquinolin-1-oxide (4-NQO) and arecoline, two carcinogens related to tobacco and betel quid, respectively. Using microarray and quantitative PCR assay, we showed that pro-IL-1β was upregulated in human OSCC tumors associated with tobacco and betel quid consumption. In a human OSCC cell line TW2.6, we demonstrated nicotine-derived nitrosamine ketone (NNK) and arecoline stimulated IL-1β secretion in an inflammasome-dependent manner. IL-1β treatment significantly increased the proliferation and dysregulated the Akt signaling pathways of dysplastic oral keratinocytes (DOKs). Using cytokine antibodies and inflammation cytometric bead arrays, we found that DOK and OSCC cells secreted high levels of IL-6, IL-8, and growth-regulated oncogene-α following IL-1β stimulation. The conditioned medium of IL-1β-treated OSCC cells exerted significant proangiogenic effects. Crucially, IL-1β increased the invasiveness of OSCC cells through the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), characterized by downregulation of E-cadherin, upregulation of Snail, Slug, and Vimentin, and alterations in morphology. These findings provide novel insights into the mechanism underlying OSCC tumorigenesis. Our study suggested that IL-1β can be induced by tobacco and betel quid-related carcinogens, and participates in the early and late stages of oral carcinogenesis by increasing the proliferation of dysplasia oral cells, stimulating oncogenic cytokines, and promoting aggressiveness of OSCC. PMID:25204733

  6. N-terminally truncated FOXP1 protein expression and alternate internal FOXP1 promoter usage in normal and malignant B cells.

    PubMed

    Brown, Philip J; Gascoyne, Duncan M; Lyne, Linden; Spearman, Hayley; Felce, Suet Ling; McFadden, Nora; Chakravarty, Probir; Barrans, Sharon; Lynham, Steven; Calado, Dinis P; Ward, Malcolm; Banham, Alison H

    2016-07-01

    Strong FOXP1 protein expression is a poor risk factor in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and has been linked to an activated B-cell-like subtype, which preferentially expresses short FOXP1 (FOXP1S) proteins. However, both short isoform generation and function are incompletely understood. Here we prove by mass spectrometry and N-terminal antibody staining that FOXP1S proteins in activated B-cell-like diffuse large B-cell lymphoma are N-terminally truncated. Furthermore, a rare strongly FOXP1-expressing population of normal germinal center B cells lacking the N-terminus of the regular long protein (FOXP1L) was identified. Exon-targeted silencing and transcript analyses identified three alternate 5' non-coding exons [FOXP1-Ex6b(s), FOXP1-Ex7b and FOXP1-Ex7c], downstream of at least two predicted promoters, giving rise to FOXP1S proteins. These were differentially controlled by B-cell activation and methylation, conserved in murine lymphoma cells, and significantly correlated with FOXP1S protein expression in primary diffuse large B-cell lymphoma samples. Alternatively spliced isoforms lacking exon 9 (e.g. isoform 3) did not encode FOXP1S, and an alternate long human FOXP1 protein (FOXP1AL) likely generated from a FOXP1-Ex6b(L) transcript was detected. The ratio of FOXP1L:FOXP1S isoforms correlated with differential expression of plasmacytic differentiation markers in U-2932 subpopulations, and altering this ratio was sufficient to modulate CD19 expression in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma cell lines. Thus, the activity of multiple alternate FOXP1 promoters to produce multiple protein isoforms is likely to regulate B-cell maturation. PMID:27056922

  7. N-terminally truncated FOXP1 protein expression and alternate internal FOXP1 promoter usage in normal and malignant B cells

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Philip J.; Gascoyne, Duncan M.; Lyne, Linden; Spearman, Hayley; Felce, Suet Ling; McFadden, Nora; Chakravarty, Probir; Barrans, Sharon; Lynham, Steven; Calado, Dinis P.; Ward, Malcolm; Banham, Alison H.

    2016-01-01

    Strong FOXP1 protein expression is a poor risk factor in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and has been linked to an activated B-cell-like subtype, which preferentially expresses short FOXP1 (FOXP1S) proteins. However, both short isoform generation and function are incompletely understood. Here we prove by mass spectrometry and N-terminal antibody staining that FOXP1S proteins in activated B-cell-like diffuse large B-cell lymphoma are N-terminally truncated. Furthermore, a rare strongly FOXP1-expressing population of normal germinal center B cells lacking the N-terminus of the regular long protein (FOXP1L) was identified. Exon-targeted silencing and transcript analyses identified three alternate 5′ non-coding exons [FOXP1-Ex6b(s), FOXP1-Ex7b and FOXP1-Ex7c], downstream of at least two predicted promoters, giving rise to FOXP1S proteins. These were differentially controlled by B-cell activation and methylation, conserved in murine lymphoma cells, and significantly correlated with FOXP1S protein expression in primary diffuse large B-cell lymphoma samples. Alternatively spliced isoforms lacking exon 9 (e.g. isoform 3) did not encode FOXP1S, and an alternate long human FOXP1 protein (FOXP1AL) likely generated from a FOXP1-Ex6b(L) transcript was detected. The ratio of FOXP1L:FOXP1S isoforms correlated with differential expression of plasmacytic differentiation markers in U-2932 subpopulations, and altering this ratio was sufficient to modulate CD19 expression in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma cell lines. Thus, the activity of multiple alternate FOXP1 promoters to produce multiple protein isoforms is likely to regulate B-cell maturation. PMID:27056922

  8. Treatment of high-risk aggressive B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas with rituximab, intensive induction and high-dose consolidation: long-term analysis of the R-MegaCHOP-ESHAP-BEAM Trial.

    PubMed

    Pytlík, Robert; Belada, David; Kubáčková, Kateřina; Vášová, Ingrid; Kozák, Tomáš; Pirnos, Jan; Bolomská, Ingrid; Matuška, Milan; Přibylová, Jana; Campr, Vít; Burešová, Lucie; Sýkorová, Alice; Berková, Adéla; Klener, Pavel; Trněný, Marek

    2015-01-01

    We have studied the feasibility and efficacy of intensified R-MegaCHOP-ESHAP-BEAM therapy in high-risk aggressive B-cell lymphomas. Altogether 105 patients (19-64 years) with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma (PMBL) or follicular lymphoma grade 3 (FL3) with an age-adjusted International Prognostic Index of 2-3 were recruited. Treatment consisted of three cycles of high-dose R-CHOP (rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, prednisone), followed by three cycles of R-ESHAP (rituximab, etoposide, methylprednisolone, cytarabine, cisplatin) and high-dose consolidation with BEAM (BCNU, etoposide, cytarabine, melphalan) and autologous stem cell transplant. The 5-year progression-free survival (PFS) was 72% (DLBCL 60%, PMBL 89%) and overall survival (OS) was 74% (DLBCL 61%, PMBL 89%) after a median follow-up of 85 months. However, an independent prognostic factor was age only, with patients ≤ 45 years having 5-year PFS 90% and patients > 45 years having PFS 54%. PMBL had better prognosis than DLBCL/FL3 in patients > 45 years (PFS, 88% vs. 48%), but not in younger patients (PFS, 91% vs. 94%). PMID:24628294

  9. Aggressive solitary intracranial metastatic malignant melanoma from a primary mediastinal tumour.

    PubMed

    Sivaraju, Laxminadh; Aryan, Saritha; Hegde, Vinay S; Ghosal, Nandita; Hegde, Alangar S

    2016-08-01

    Malignant melanoma is the third most common tumour to cause cerebral metastases, following breast and lung cancer. Central nervous system metastases occur in 10-40% of patients with melanoma. Intracranial metastasis from a primary malignant melanoma of the anterior mediastinum is uncommon. We report a case of solitary intracranial metastatic melanoma arising from a primary mediastinal tumour. We then discuss the clinico-radiological features and treatment options. PMID:27145991

  10. Mononeuritis multiplex in a patient with B-cell prolymphocytic leukaemia: a diagnostic challenge

    PubMed Central

    Le Clech, Lenaïg; Rizcallah, Marie Jeanne; Alavi, Zarrin; Hutin, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    B-cell prolymphocytic leukaemia (BPLL) is a haematological malignancy defined as lymphocytosis and splenomegaly with >55% circulating cells being clonal prolymphocytes of B-cell origin. The evolution of this disease is more aggressive than chronic lymphocytic leukaemia. We reported a case of a 62-year-old man with BPLL who, on treatment, attained cytological, immunophenotypic and complete cytogenetic remission. He subsequently developed an asymmetric sensorimotor neurological disorder, suggestive of lymphomatous infiltration (neurolymphocytosis). Repetition of the MRI and the electromyography was essential for diagnosis. Progressive mononeuritis multiplex in B-cell leukaemias/lymphomas is rare and may be the only presenting symptom of relapsed or progressive disease. Repeat imaging studies based on judicious evaluation of the clinical scenario for exclusion of other causes of neurological symptoms is necessary. This can be challenging in patients with long-standing malignancies who have received multiple courses of chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy. PMID:24000206

  11. [B-cell neoplasms with plasmacellular and plasmablastic differentiation].

    PubMed

    Fend, F; Quintanilla-Martínez, L

    2013-05-01

    Plasma cell malignancies are tumors of terminally differentiated B-cells in which the neoplastic plasma cells are the dominant and proliferating tumor cell component. Plasma cell myeloma (PCM) is one of the most common hematological neoplasms and typically does not cause diagnostic problems. A morphologically and immunophenotypically detectable plasmacellular orplasmablastic differentiation is, however, commonly observed in a wide range of mature B-cell lymphomas. A confident separation of the distinct entities requires the integration of clinical and morphological findings as well as an adequate phenotyping of both the plasma cell and the B-cell component if present. Detection of lymphotropic viruses, specific translocations and novel molecular markers, such as the MYD88 L265P mutation occurring in the vast majority of lymphoplasmacytic lymphomas complement our diagnostic repertoire. In this review we describe the most commonly observed diagnostic problems in separating small B-cell lymphomas from PCM and high-grade B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (B-NHL) with plasmablastic differentiation from extramedullary spread of aggressive PCM and provide helpful criteria for routine diagnostics. PMID:23462793

  12. Clinical association of baseline levels of conjugated dienes in low-density lipoprotein and nitric oxide with aggressive B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma and their relationship with immunoglobulins and Th1-to-Th2 ratio

    PubMed Central

    Haddouche, Mustapha; Meziane, Warda; Hadjidj, Zeyneb; Mesli, Naima; Aribi, Mourad

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to highlight the clinical association of baseline levels of conjugated dienes in low-density lipoprotein (LDL-BCD) and nitric oxide (NO) with immunoglobulins (Igs) and T helper (Th)1/Th2 ratio in patients with newly diagnosed B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). Patients and methods Thirty-two newly diagnosed patients with aggressive B-cell NHL and 25 age-, sex-, and body-mass-index-matched healthy controls were randomly selected for a cross-sectional case–control study conducted at the Hematology Department of Tlemcen Medical Centre University (northwest of Algeria). Results Circulating levels of LDL-BCD and NO and those of IgA and IgM were significantly higher in patients than in controls. The levels of Th1/Th2 ratio and plasma total antioxidant capacity were significantly lower in patients compared with controls, while malondialdehyde and protein carbonyl levels were significantly higher in patients. B-cell NHL was significantly associated with high levels of LDL-BCD from 25th to 75th percentile (25th percentile: relative risk [RR] =2.26, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.42–3.59, P=0.014; 50th percentile: RR =2.84, 95% CI 1.72–4.68, P<0.001; 75th percentile: RR =5.43, 95% CI 2.58–11.42, P<0.001). Similarly, the disease was significantly associated with high levels of NO production from 25th to 75th percentile (25th percentile: RR =2.07, 95% CI 1.25–3.44, P=0.024; 50th percentile: RR =2.78, 95% CI 1.63–4.72, P<0.001; 75th percentile: RR =4.68, 95% CI 2.21–9.91, P<0.001). Moreover, LDL-BCD levels were positively and significantly correlated with interferon (IFN)-γ, whereas NO levels were inversely and significantly correlated with IFN-γ and Th1/Th2 ratio. Conclusion LDL-BCD and NO production seem to be associated with aggressive B-cell NHL and alteration of Th1/Th2 ratio. Our results have to be examined using ex vivo mechanistic studies leading to further investigations of these parameters, with an interest in the

  13. Rituximab, bendamustine and lenalidomide in patients with aggressive B-cell lymphoma not eligible for anthracycline-based therapy or intensive salvage chemotherapy - SAKK 38/08.

    PubMed

    Hitz, Felicitas; Zucca, Emanuele; Pabst, Thomas; Fischer, Natalie; Cairoli, Anne; Samaras, Panagiotis; Caspar, Clemens B; Mach, Nicolas; Krasniqi, Fatime; Schmidt, Adrian; Rothermundt, Christian; Enoiu, Milica; Eckhardt, Katrin; Berardi Vilei, Simona; Rondeau, Stephanie; Mey, Ulrich

    2016-07-01

    An increasing number of older patients are suffering from aggressive lymphoma. Effective and more tolerable treatment regimens are urgently needed for this growing patient population. Patients with aggressive lymphoma not eligible for anthracycline-based first-line therapy or intensive salvage regimens were treated with the rituximab-bendamustine-lenalidomide (R-BL) regimen (rituximab 375 mg/m(2)  day 1, bendamustine 70 mg/m(2)  d 1, 2, lenalidomide 10 mg d 1-21) for six cycles every 4 weeks. Forty-one patients with a median age of 75 (range 40-94) years were enrolled: 33 patients had substantial co-morbidities. 13 patients were not eligible for anthracycline-based first-line chemotherapy, 28 patients had relapsed/refractory disease. The primary endpoint, overall response, was achieved by 25 (61%) patients (95% confidence interval 45-76%). Grade ≥ 3 toxicity comprised haematological (59%), skin (15%), constitutional (15%) and neurological (12%) events. 9 patients died during trial treatment: 5 from lymphoma progression, 2 from toxicity, 2 with sudden death. After a median follow-up of 25·9 (interquartile range 20·4-31·6) months, 13 patients were still alive. Median overall survival was 14·5 months. In conclusion, R-BL can be considered a treatment option for elderly patients with treatment naïve or relapsed/refractory aggressive lymphoma not eligible for standard aggressive regimens. PMID:27018242

  14. [Glutamate and malignant gliomas, from epilepsia to biological aggressiveness: therapeutic implications].

    PubMed

    Blecic, Serge; Rynkowski, Michal; De Witte, Olivier; Lefranc, Florence

    2013-09-01

    In this review article, we describe the unrecognized roles of glutamate and glutamate receptors in malignant glioma biology. The neurotransmitter glutamate released from malignant glioma cells in the extracellular matrix is responsible for seizure induction and at higher concentration neuronal cell death. This neuronal cell death will create vacated place for tumor growth. Glutamate also stimulates the growth and the migration of glial tumor cells by means of the activation of glutamate receptors on glioma cells in a paracrine and autocrine manner. The multitude of effects of glutamate in glioma biology supports the rationale for pharmacological targeting of glutamate receptors and transporters in the adjuvant treatment of malignant gliomas in neurology and neuro-oncology. Using the website www.clinicaltrials.gov/ as a reference - a service developed by the National Library of Medicine for the National Health Institute in USA - we have evoked the few clinical trials completed and currently ongoing with therapies targeting the glutamate receptors. PMID:23883552

  15. Central nervous system prophylaxis in patients with aggressive diffuse large B cell lymphoma: an analysis of 3,258 patients in a single center.

    PubMed

    Avilés, Agustin; Jesús Nambo, M; Neri, Natividad

    2013-06-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) relapse continues to be a frequent and usually fatal complication in patients with diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL). Multiple factors identify the possibility of relapse and justify neurological prophylaxis; however, most of these have not been confirmed. Thus, the use of prophylaxis has not been defined. From 1988 to 2008, 3,258 patients with DLBCL with higher clinical risks and multiple extranodal involvement that have been treated with standard anthracycline-based chemotherapy: CHOP (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine and prednisone) or CHOP-R (CHOP plus rituximab) and that achieve complete response were retrospectively analyzed to assess the efficacy of CNS prophylaxis. One thousand five patients received different schedules for CNS prophylaxis, and 2,253 patients did not receive CNS prophylaxis. CNS relapse was similar in patients who receive prophylaxis (6 %) compared to patients who did not receive prophylaxis (5.9 %). Overall survival of patients who either receive or did not receive prophylaxis was not statistically significant: 49 % versus 53 % (p = 0.802). Thus, it seems that CNS prophylaxis did not improve outcome in this special setting of patients, and no prognostic factors to predict the presence of CNS relapse were identified. It is evident that multicentric studies are necessary to define the role of prophylaxis in order to prevent CNS relapse and that the therapeutic procedure will be carefully revised. PMID:23456620

  16. Epstein-Barr Virus MicroRNA Expression Increases Aggressiveness of Solid Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Pandya, Deep; Mariani, Marisa; He, Shiquan; Andreoli, Mirko; Spennato, Manuela; Dowell-Martino, Candice; Fiedler, Paul; Ferlini, Cristiano

    2015-01-01

    The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) microRNA (miRNA) initiative has revealed a pivotal role for miRNAs in cancer. Utilizing the TCGA raw data, we performed the first mapping of viral miRNA sequences within cancer and adjacent normal tissues. Results were integrated with TCGA RNA-seq to link the expression of viral miRNAs to the phenotype. Using clinical data and viral miRNA mapping results we also performed outcome analysis. Three lines of evidence lend credence to an active role of viral miRNAs in solid malignancies. First, expression of viral miRNA is consistently higher in cancerous compared to adjacent noncancerous tissues. Second, viral miRNA expression is associated with significantly worse clinical outcome among patients with early stage malignancy. These patients are also featured by increased expression of PD1/PD-L1, a pathway implicated in tumors escaping immune destruction. Finally, a particular cluster of EBV-miRNA (miR-BART2, miR-BART4, miR-BART5, miR-BART18, and miR-BART22) is associated with expression of cytokines known to inhibit host response to cancer. Quantification of specific viral miRNAs may help identify patients who are at risk of poor outcome. These patients may be candidates for novel therapeutic strategies incorporating antiviral agents and/or inhibitors of the PD-1/PD-L1 pathway. PMID:26375401

  17. MOZ regulates B-cell progenitors and, consequently, Moz haploinsufficiency dramatically retards MYC-induced lymphoma development.

    PubMed

    Sheikh, Bilal N; Lee, Stanley C W; El-Saafin, Farrah; Vanyai, Hannah K; Hu, Yifang; Pang, Swee Heng Milon; Grabow, Stephanie; Strasser, Andreas; Nutt, Stephen L; Alexander, Warren S; Smyth, Gordon K; Voss, Anne K; Thomas, Tim

    2015-03-19

    The histone acetyltransferase MOZ (MYST3, KAT6A) is the target of recurrent chromosomal translocations fusing the MOZ gene to CBP, p300, NCOA3, or TIF2 in particularly aggressive cases of acute myeloid leukemia. In this study, we report the role of wild-type MOZ in regulating B-cell progenitor proliferation and hematopoietic malignancy. In the Eμ-Myc model of aggressive pre-B/B-cell lymphoma, the loss of just one allele of Moz increased the median survival of mice by 3.9-fold. MOZ was required to maintain the proliferative capacity of B-cell progenitors, even in the presence of c-MYC overexpression, by directly maintaining the transcriptional activity of genes required for normal B-cell development. Hence, B-cell progenitor numbers were significantly reduced in Moz haploinsufficient animals. Interestingly, we find a significant overlap in genes regulated by MOZ, mixed lineage leukemia 1, and mixed lineage leukemia 1 cofactor menin. This includes Meis1, a TALE class homeobox transcription factor required for B-cell development, characteristically upregulated as a result of MLL1 translocations in leukemia. We demonstrate that MOZ localizes to the Meis1 locus in pre-B-cells and maintains Meis1 expression. Our results suggest that even partial inhibition of MOZ may reduce the proliferative capacity of MEIS1, and HOX-driven lymphoma and leukemia cells. PMID:25605372

  18. Clinical aggressiveness of malignant gliomas is linked to augmented metabolism of amino acids.

    PubMed

    Panosyan, Eduard H; Lasky, Joseph L; Lin, Henry J; Lai, Albert; Hai, Yang; Guo, Xiuqing; Quinn, Michael; Nelson, Stanley F; Cloughesy, Timothy F; Nghiemphu, P Leia

    2016-05-01

    Glutamine, glutamate, asparagine, and aspartate are involved in an enzyme-network that controls nitrogen metabolism. Branched-chain-amino-acid aminotransferase-1 (BCAT1) promotes proliferation of gliomas with wild-type IDH1 and is closely connected to the network. We hypothesized that metabolism of asparagine, glutamine, and branched-chain-amino-acids is associated with progression of malignant gliomas. Gene expression for asparagine synthetase (ASNS), glutaminase (GLS), and BCAT1 were analyzed in 164 gliomas from 156 patients [33-anaplastic gliomas (AG) and 131-glioblastomas (GBM), 64 of which were recurrent GBMs]. ASNS and GLS were twofold higher in GBMs versus AGs. BCAT1 was also higher in GBMs. ASNS expression was twofold higher in recurrent versus new GBMs. Five patients had serial samples: 4-showed higher ASNS and 3-higher GLS at recurrence. We analyzed grade and treatment in 4 groups: (1) low ASNS, GLS, and BCAT1 (n = 96); (2) low ASNS and GLS, but high BCAT1 (n = 26); (3) high ASNS or GLS, but low BCAT1 (n = 25); and (4) high ASNS or GLS and high BCAT1 (n = 17). Ninety-one  % of patients (29/32) with grade-III lesions were in group 1. In contrast, 95 % of patients (62/65) in groups 2-4 had GBMs. Treatment was similar in 4 groups (radiotherapy-80 %; temozolomide-30 %; other chemotherapy-50 %). High expression of ASNS, GLS, and BCAT1 were each associated with poor survival in the entire group. The combination of lower ASNS, GLS, and BCAT1 levels correlated with better survival for newly diagnosed GBMs (66 patients; P = 0.0039). Only tumors with lower enzymes showed improved outcome with temozolomide. IDH1(WT) gliomas had higher expression of these genes. Manipulation of amino acid metabolism in malignant gliomas may be further studied for therapeutics development. PMID:26922345

  19. Differential PAX5 levels promote malignant B-cell infiltration, progression and drug resistance, and predict a poor prognosis in MCL patients independent of CCND1.

    PubMed

    Teo, A E; Chen, Z; Miranda, R N; McDonnell, T; Medeiros, L J; McCarty, N

    2016-03-01

    Reduced Paired box 5 (PAX5) levels have important roles in the pathogenesis of human B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. However, the role of PAX5 in human lymphoma remains unclear. We generated PAX5-silenced cells using mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) as a model system. These PAX5(-) MCL cells exhibited unexpected phenotypes, including increased proliferation in vitro, enhanced tumor infiltration in vivo, robust adhesion to the bone marrow stromal cells and increased retention of quiescent stem-like cells. These phenotypes were attributed to alterations in the expression of genes including p53 and Rb, and to phosphoinositide 3-kinase/mammalian target of rapamycin and phosphorylated signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 pathway hyperactivation. On PAX5 silencing, the MCL cells displayed upregulated interleukin (IL)-6 expression and increased responses to paracrine IL-6. Moreover, decreased PAX5 levels in CD19+ MCL cells correlated with their increased infiltration and progression; thus, PAX5 levels can be used as a prognostic marker independent of cyclin D1 in advanced MCL patients. Importantly, high-throughput screening of 3800 chemical compounds revealed that PAX5(-) MCL cells are highly drug-resistant compared with PAX5 wild-type MCL cells. Collectively, the results of our study support a paradigm shift regarding the functions of PAX5 in human B-cell cancer and encourage future efforts to design effective therapies against MCL. PMID:26073757

  20. Differential PAX5 levels promote malignant B cell infiltration, progression and drug resistance and predict a poor prognosis in MCL patients independent of CCND1

    PubMed Central

    Teo, Albert E.; Chen, Zheng; Miranda, Roberto N.; McDonnell, Timothy; Medeiros, L. Jeffrey; McCarty, Nami

    2015-01-01

    Reduced PAX5 levels play important roles in the pathogenesis of human B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. However, the role of PAX5 in human lymphoma remains unclear. We generated PAX5-silenced cells using mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) as a model system. These PAX5− MCL cells exhibited unexpected phenotypes, including increased proliferation in vitro, enhanced tumor infiltration in vivo, robust adhesion to bone marrow stromal cells, and increased retention of quiescent stem-like cells. These phenotypes were attributed to alterations in the expression of genes including p53 and Rb and to PI3 kinase/mTOR and pSTAT3 pathway hyperactivation. Upon PAX5 silencing, the MCL cells displayed upregulated IL-6 expression and increased responses to paracrine IL-6. Moreover, decreased PAX5 levels in CD19+ MCL cells correlated with their increased infiltration and progression; thus, PAX5 levels can be used as a prognostic marker independent of cyclin D1 in advanced MCL patients. Importantly, high-throughput screening of 3800 chemical compounds revealed that PAX5−MCL cells are highly drug-resistant compared to PAX5 wild-type MCL cells. Collectively, the results of our study support a paradigm shift regarding the functions of PAX5 in human B cell cancer and encourage future efforts to design effective therapies against MCL. PMID:26073757

  1. Pilot study of modified LMB-based therapy for children with ataxia-telangiectasia and advanced stage high grade mature b-cell malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Sandlund, J. T.; Hudson, M. M.; Kennedy, W.; Onciu, M.; Kastan, M. B.

    2014-01-01

    Children with ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) and cancer have a poorer prognosis due in part to increased treatment-related toxicity. We piloted a curative intent approach in five children with A-T who presented with advanced stage (III, n=2; IV, n=3) B-NHL (diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, n=4; Burkitt leukemia, n=1) using a modified LMB-based protocol. Two achieved sustained CCR (one, CCR at 6 years; one, pulmonary death after 3 years in CCR). Two died from toxicity during induction and 1 failed induction with progressive disease. Novel therapeutic approaches which overcome drug resistance and are less toxic are needed for children with A-T and B-NHL. PMID:23900766

  2. Immunotherapy with the trifunctional anti-CD20 x anti-CD3 antibody FBTA05 (Lymphomun) in paediatric high-risk patients with recurrent CD20-positive B cell malignancies.

    PubMed

    Schuster, Friedhelm R; Stanglmaier, Michael; Woessmann, Wilhelm; Winkler, Beate; Siepermann, Meinolf; Meisel, Roland; Schlegel, Paul G; Hess, Jürgen; Lindhofer, Horst; Borkhardt, Arndt; Buhmann, Raymund

    2015-04-01

    Children with B cell malignancies refractory to standard therapy are known to have a poor prognosis and very limited treatment options. Here, we report on the treatment and follow-up of ten patients diagnosed with relapsed or refractory mature B-cell Non Hodgkin Lymphoma (B-NHL), Burkitt leukaemia (B-AL) or pre B-acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (pre B-ALL). All children were treated with FBTA05 (now designated Lymphomun), an anti-CD3 x anti-CD20 trifunctional bispecific antibody (trAb) in compassionate use. Within individual treatment schedules, Lymphomun was applied (a) after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT, n = 6) to induce sustained long-term remission, or (b) stand alone prior to subsequent chemotherapy to eradicate residual disease before allo-SCT (n = 4). Nine of ten children displayed a clinical response: three stable diseases (SD), one partial remission (PR) and five induced or sustained complete remissions (CR). Five of these nine responders died during follow-up. The other patients still maintain CR with a current overall survival of 874-1424 days (median: 1150 days). In conclusion, despite the dismal clinical prognosis of children refractory to standard therapy, immunotherapy with Lymphomun resulted in a favourable clinical outcome in this cohort of refractory paediatric patients. PMID:25495919

  3. In vivo inhibition of human CD19 targeted effector T cells by natural T regulatory cells in a xenotransplant murine model of B cell malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, James; Hayman, Erik; Pegram, Hollie; Santos, Elmer; Heller, Glen; Sadelain, Michel; Brentjens, Renier J.

    2011-01-01

    Human T cells genetically modified to express chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) specific to the B cell tumor antigen CD19 can successfully eradicate systemic human CD19+ tumors in immunocompromised SCID-Beige mice. However, in the clinical setting, CD4+ CD25hi T regulatory cells (Tregs) present within the tumor microenvironment are potent suppressors of tumor-targeted effector T cells. In order to assess the impact of Tregs on CAR-modified T cells in the SCID-Beige xenotransplant model, we isolated, genetically targeted and expanded natural T regulatory cells (nTregs). In vitro, nTregs, modified to express CD19 targeted CARs efficiently inhibited the proliferation of activated human T cells, as well as the capacity of CD19-targeted 19-28z+ effector T cells to lyse CD19+ Raji tumor cells. Intravenous infusion of CD19-targeted nTregs into SCID-Beige mice with systemic Raji tumors traffic to sites of tumor and recapitulate a clinically relevant hostile tumor microenvironment. Anti-tumor efficacy of subsequently infused 19-28z+ effector T cells was fully abrogated as assessed by long-term survival of treated mice. Optimal suppression by genetically targeted nTregs was dependent on nTreg to effector T cell ratios and in vivo nTreg activation. Prior infusion of cyclophosphamide in the setting of this nTreg-mediated hostile microenvironment was able to restore the anti-tumor activity of subsequently infused 19-28z+ effector T cells through the eradication of tumor targeted nTregs. These findings have significant implications on the design of future clinical trials utilizing CAR-based adoptive T cell therapies of cancer. PMID:21487038

  4. Immunophenotypic Analysis of AIDS-Related Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma and Clinical Implications in Patients From AIDS Malignancies Consortium Clinical Trials 010 and 034

    PubMed Central

    Chadburn, Amy; Chiu, April; Lee, Jeannette Y.; Chen, Xia; Hyjek, Elizabeth; Banham, Alison H.; Noy, Ariela; Kaplan, Lawrence D.; Sparano, Joseph A.; Bhatia, Kishor; Cesarman, Ethel

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) represents a clinically heterogeneous disease. Models based on immunohistochemistry predict clinical outcome. These include subdivision into germinal center (GC) versus non-GC subtypes; proliferation index (measured by expression of Ki-67), and expression of BCL-2, FOXP1, or B-lymphocyte-induced maturation protein (Blimp-1)/PRDM1. We sought to determine whether immunohistochemical analyses of biopsies from patients with DLBCL having HIV infection are similarly relevant for prognosis. Patients and Methods We examined 81 DLBCLs from patients with AIDS in AMC010 (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone [CHOP] v CHOP-rituximab) and AMC034 (etoposide, doxorubicin, vincristine, prednisone, and dose-adjusted cyclophosphamide plus rituximab concurrent v sequential) clinical trials and compared the immunophenotype with survival data, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) positivity, and CD4 counts. Results The GC and non-GC subtypes of DLBCL did not differ significantly with respect to overall survival or CD4 count at cancer presentation. EBV could be found in both subtypes of DLBCL, although less frequently in the GC subtype, and did not affect survival. Expression of FOXP1, Blimp-1/PRDM1, or BCL-2 was not correlated with the outcome in patients with AIDS-related DLBCL. Conclusion These data indicate that with current treatment strategies for lymphoma and control of HIV infection, commonly used immunohistochemical markers may not be clinically relevant in HIV-infected patients with DLBCL. The only predictive immunohistochemical marker was found to be Ki-67, where a higher proliferation index was associated with better survival, suggesting a better response to therapy in patients whose tumors had higher proliferation rates. PMID:19752343

  5. Epigenetic Control of B Cell Development and B-Cell-Related Immune Disorders.

    PubMed

    Bao, Yan; Cao, Xuetao

    2016-06-01

    B lymphocytes are generally recognized as the essential component of humoral immunity and also a regulator of innate immunity. The development of B cells is precisely regulated by a variety of factors via different mechanisms, including cytokine/cytokine receptors, signal transduction molecules, and transcription factors. Recent findings suggest that epigenetic factors, such as DNA methylation, histone modification, and non-coding RNA, play critical roles in establishing B cell lineage-specific gene expression profiles to define and sustain B cell identity and function. Epigenetic modifications are also sensitive to external stimuli and might bridge genetic and environmental factors in the pathogenesis or control of B-cell-related immune disorders, such as autoimmune diseases, lymphoma, and leukemia. Better understanding of the epigenetic mechanisms for regulating B cell development and involving B cell abnormal differentiation and function will shed light on the design of new therapeutic approaches to B-cell-related diseases, and potential candidates of epigenetic modulators may be identified to target epigenetic pathways to prevent or treat B cell disorders. We summarize the relevance of epigenetic marks and landscapes in the stages of B cell development, discuss the interaction of the transcriptional networks and epigenetic changes, and review the involvement of epigenetic risk in the pathogenesis of B-cell-related diseases. Understanding how specific epigenetic alterations contribute to the development of B-cell-related autoimmunity and malignancies is instrumental to control B cell disorders. PMID:26066671

  6. CD20-negative diffuse large B-cell lymphomas: biology and emerging therapeutic options.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Jorge J; Chavez, Julio C; Hernandez-Ilizaliturri, Francisco J; Montes-Moreno, Santiago

    2015-06-01

    CD20-negative diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is a rare and heterogeneous group of lymphoproliferative disorders. Known variants of CD20-negative DLBCL include plasmablastic lymphoma, primary effusion lymphoma, large B-cell lymphoma arising in human herpesvirus 8-associated multicentric Castleman disease and anaplastic lymphoma kinase-positive DLBCL. Given the lack of CD20 expression, atypical cellular morphology and aggressive clinical behavior characterized by chemotherapy resistance and inferior survival rates, CD20-negative DLBCL represents a challenge from the diagnostic and therapeutic perspectives. The goals of the present review are to summarize the current knowledge on the biology of the distinct variants of CD20-negative DLBCL, provide future therapeutic directions based on the limited preclinical and clinical data available, and increase awareness concerning these rare malignancies among pathologists and clinicians. PMID:25641215

  7. MuLV-related endogenous retroviral elements and Flt3 participate in aberrant end-joining events that promote B-cell leukemogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Radia M.; Papp, Eniko; Grandal, Ildiko; Kowalski, Paul E.; Nutter, Lauryl; Wong, Raymond C.C.; Joseph-George, Ann M.; Danska, Jayne S.; Guidos, Cynthia J.

    2014-01-01

    During V(D)J recombination of immunoglobulin genes, p53 and nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) suppress aberrant rejoining of DNA double-strand breaks induced by recombinase-activating genes (Rags)-1/2, thus maintaining genomic stability and limiting malignant transformation during B-cell development. However, Rag deficiency does not prevent B-cell leukemogenesis in p53/NHEJ mutant mice, revealing that p53 and NHEJ also suppress Rag-independent mechanisms of B-cell leukemogenesis. Using several cytogenomic approaches, we identified a novel class of activating mutations in Fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 (Flt3), a receptor tyrosine kinase important for normal hematopoiesis in Rag/p53/NHEJ triple-mutant (TM) B-cell leukemias. These mutant Flt3 alleles were created by complex genomic rearrangements with Moloney leukemia virus (MuLV)-related endogenous retroviral (ERV) elements, generating ERV-Flt3 fusion genes encoding an N-terminally truncated mutant form of Flt3 (trFlt3) that was transcribed from ERV long terminal repeats. trFlt3 protein lacked most of the Flt3 extracellular domain and induced ligand-independent STAT5 phosphorylation and proliferation of hematopoietic progenitor cells. Furthermore, expression of trFlt3 in p53/NHEJ mutant hematopoietic progenitor cells promoted development of clinically aggressive B-cell leukemia. Thus, repetitive MuLV-related ERV sequences can participate in aberrant end-joining events that promote development of aggressive B-cell leukemia. PMID:24888589

  8. Primary B-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma of the testis.

    PubMed

    Tombolini, Flavia; Lacetera, Vito; Gini, Guido; Capelli, Debora; Leoni, Pietro; Montironi, Rodolfo; Galosi, Andrea Benedetto; Muzzonigro, Giovanni

    2014-12-01

    We present a rare case of primary lymphoblastic B-cell lymphoma of the testis focusing on ultrasonographic and pathological features and clinical implications. Pathological examination revealed primary testicular lymphoblastic B-cell lymphoma which was treated with adjuvant chemotherapy, including rachicentesis with administration of chemotherapy and with radiotherapy of contralateral testis. Primary testicular lymphoblastic B cell lymphoma is an aggressive disease and it is necessary a multimodal therapy (surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy) to prevent metastasis. PMID:25641484

  9. Dominant neurologic symptomatology in intravascular large B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Kubisova, K; Martanovic, P; Sisovsky, V; Tomleinova, Z; Steno, A; Janega, P; Rychly, B; Babal, P

    2016-01-01

    Intravascular large B-cell lymphoma (IVLBCL) is a rare variant of extranodal large B-cell lymphoma and it is characterized by selective intravascular proliferation of malignant cells. Typical features of the disease include aggressive behavior, rapid and frequently fatal course. Clinical picture is non-specific and heterogeneous, depending on the affected organ. It is not uncommon that this unique type of lymphoma is diagnosed post mortem. Herein, we report two cases of IVLBCL with neurologic symptomatology. In our clinical study patient 1 was an 80-year-old male with mixed paraparesis of lower extremities and difficulties with sphincter control. Patient 2 (56-year-old male) had vision malfunction, mental status changes and defect in phatic and motor functions. In both cases definite diagnosis was established by histological examination of necroptic material. We propose to include IVLBCL in differential diagnostic considerations in patients presenting with gradually impairing neurological status and spinal cord damage of unknown etiology (Fig. 2, Ref. 9). PMID:27546361

  10. Analysis of memory-like natural killer cells in human cytomegalovirus-infected children undergoing αβ+T and B cell-depleted hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for hematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Muccio, Letizia; Bertaina, Alice; Falco, Michela; Pende, Daniela; Meazza, Raffaella; Lopez-Botet, Miguel; Moretta, Lorenzo; Locatelli, Franco; Moretta, Alessandro; Della Chiesa, Mariella

    2016-03-01

    We analyzed the impact of human cytomegalovirus infection on the development of natural killer cells in 27 pediatric patients affected by hematological malignancies, who had received a HLA-haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, depleted of both α/β+ T cells and B cells. In line with previous studies in adult recipients of umbilical cord blood transplantation, we found that human cytomegalovirus reactivation accelerated the emergence of mature natural killer cells. Thus, most children displayed a progressive expansion of a memory-like natural killer cell subset expressing NKG2C, a putative receptor for human cytomegalovirus, and CD57, a marker of terminal natural killer cell differentiation. NKG2C(+)CD57(+) natural killer cells were detectable by month 3 following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and expanded until at least month 12. These cells were characterized by high killer Ig-like receptors (KIRs) and leukocyte inhibitory receptor 1 (LIR-1) and low Siglec-7, NKG2A and Interleukin-18Rα expression, killed tumor targets and responded to cells expressing HLA-E (a NKG2C ligand). In addition, they were poor Interferon-γ producers in response to Interleukin-12 and Interleukin-18. The impaired response to these cytokines, together with their highly differentiated profile, may reflect their skewing toward an adaptive condition specialized in controlling human cytomegalovirus. In conclusion, in pediatric patients receiving a type of allograft different from umbilical cord blood transplantation, human cytomegalovirus also induced memory-like natural killer cells, possibly contributing to controlling infections and reinforcing anti-leukemia effects. PMID:26659918

  11. Analysis of memory-like natural killer cells in human cytomegalovirus-infected children undergoing αβ+T and B cell-depleted hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for hematological malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Muccio, Letizia; Bertaina, Alice; Falco, Michela; Pende, Daniela; Meazza, Raffaella; Lopez-Botet, Miguel; Moretta, Lorenzo; Locatelli, Franco; Moretta, Alessandro; Chiesa, Mariella Della

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed the impact of human cytomegalovirus infection on the development of natural killer cells in 27 pediatric patients affected by hematological malignancies, who had received a HLA-haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, depleted of both α/β+ T cells and B cells. In line with previous studies in adult recipients of umbilical cord blood transplantation, we found that human cytomegalovirus reactivation accelerated the emergence of mature natural killer cells. Thus, most children displayed a progressive expansion of a memory-like natural killer cell subset expressing NKG2C, a putative receptor for human cytomegalovirus, and CD57, a marker of terminal natural killer cell differentiation. NKG2C+CD57+ natural killer cells were detectable by month 3 following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and expanded until at least month 12. These cells were characterized by high killer Ig-like receptors (KIRs) and leukocyte inhibitory receptor 1 (LIR-1) and low Siglec-7, NKG2A and Interleukin-18Rα expression, killed tumor targets and responded to cells expressing HLA-E (a NKG2C ligand). In addition, they were poor Interferon-γ producers in response to Interleukin-12 and Interleukin-18. The impaired response to these cytokines, together with their highly differentiated profile, may reflect their skewing toward an adaptive condition specialized in controlling human cytomegalovirus. In conclusion, in pediatric patients receiving a type of allograft different from umbilical cord blood transplantation, human cytomegalovirus also induced memory-like natural killer cells, possibly contributing to controlling infections and reinforcing anti-leukemia effects. PMID:26659918

  12. B cells in transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Dijke, Esme I.; Platt, Jeffrey L.; Blair, Paul; Clatworthy, Menna R.; Patel, Jignesh K.; Kfoury, A.G.; Cascalho, Marilia

    2016-01-01

    B cell responses underlie the most vexing immunological barriers to organ transplantation. Much has been learned about the molecular mechanisms of B cell responses to antigen and new therapeutic agents that specifically target B cells or suppress their functions are available. Yet, despite recent advances, there remains an incomplete understanding about how B cell functions determine the fate of organ transplants and how, whether or when potent new therapeutics should optimally be used. This gap in understanding reflects in part the realization that besides producing antibodies, B cells can also regulate cellular immunity, contribute to the genesis of tolerance and induce accommodation. Whether non-specific depletion of B cells, their progeny or suppression of their functions would undermine these non-cognate functions and whether graft outcome would suffer as a result is unknown. These questions were discussed at a symposium on “B cells in transplantation” at the 2015 ISHLT annual meeting. Those discussions are summarized here and a new perspective is offered. PMID:26996930

  13. A comprehensive review of lenalidomide in B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Mili; Gowda, Sonia; Tuscano, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Lenalidomide, an immunomodulatory drug that the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved for the treatment of multiple myeloma, 5q- myelodysplasia and mantle-cell lymphoma (MCL), has encouraging efficacy in other B-cell malignancies. Its unique mechanism of action is in part due to altering the tumor microenvironment and potentiating the activity of T and natural-killer (NK) cells. Impressive clinical activity and excellent tolerability allows broad applicability. Lenalidomide has been used in a wide range of B-cell malignancies for years, but in 2013, the FDA marked its approval as a single agent only in relapsed/refractory mantle-cell lymphoma. Perhaps most impressive is the efficacy of lenalidomide when combined with monoclonal antibodies. Impressive efficacy and toxicity profiles with the combination of lenalidomide and rituximab in B-cell lymphomas in both the upfront and relapsed/refractory setting may allow a shift in our current treatment paradigm in both indolent and aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). This review will summarize the current data in the relapsed/refractory and front-line setting of NHL with single-agent lenalidomide as well as its use in combination with other agents. PMID:27493711

  14. Trichoblastic carcinoma ("malignant trichoblastoma") with lymphatic and hematogenous metastases.

    PubMed

    Regauer, S; Beham-Schmid, C; Okcu, M; Hartner, E; Mannweiler, S

    2000-06-01

    We report an aggressively behaving malignant trichogenic tumor arising in a trichoblastoma (TB) with widespread lymphatic and hematogenous metastases in a 55-year-old man with a concomitant B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia. The primary tumor had been present and unchanged for as long as 40 years before excision. Typical trichogenic TB with dystrophic calcification and even ossification was still present peripheral to the malignant transformation. The malignant neoplasm consisted of basaloid cells, spindle cells arranged in fascicles and densely packed rounded nests or "cell balls." The metastases consisted of immature basaloid cells and cell balls, and the recurrences became successively more undifferentiated. The residual TB reacted with antibodies to cytokeratin (CK) 6, 8, 14, and 17 and focally to S-100; the malignant primary tumor reacted uniformly with antibodies to vimentin and only focally with antibodies to CK and S-100. The metastatic tumor had lost epidermal CK expression but maintained expression of S-100 in paraffin-embedded tissues. Trichoblastic differentiation was confirmed in frozen tissues with antibodies to hair keratins. No expression of p53 or bcl-2 was identified, but p-glycoprotein (MDR-1 gene related) was expressed by primary and metastatic tumor cells. We believe that this neoplasm is best classified as a trichoblastic carcinoma arising in a TB in association with a B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia. This case illustrates that TBs have the potential for malignant transformation and aggressive behavior. PMID:10874673

  15. B Cell Lymphoma mimicking Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Cosatti, M A; Pisoni, C N; Altuve, J L; Lorente, C

    2016-01-01

    Non Hodking´s lymphoma (NHL) may involve bones but synovial involvement is uncommon. We describe a patient who presented with polyarthritis, sicca symptoms and rash suggestive of rheumatoid arthritis. An atypical skin rash prompted skin and synovial biopsies. A diagnosis of synovial and skin malignant large B-cell lymphoma anaplastic subtype was performed. Chemotherapy with dexamethasone, vincristine and rituximab was started. Following treatment the patient had complete resolution of cutaneous and articular lymphoma manifestations. PMID:27419896

  16. High expression of microRNA-155 is associated with the aggressive malignant behavior of gallbladder carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kono, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Masafumi; Ohtsuka, Takao; Nagayoshi, Yosuke; Mori, Yasuhisa; Takahata, Shunichi; Aishima, Shinichi; Tanaka, Masao

    2013-07-01

    The prognosis of gallbladder cancer (GBC) remains poor despite recent advances in diagnostics and therapeutic strategies. Although the role of microRNAs (miRs) in GBC have not been well documented, miR-155 is known to be associated with inflammation-associated carcinogenesis in various types of cancers. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical significance of miR-155 expression and the biological functions of miR-155 in GBC. The expression levels of miR-155 in surgically resected GBCs and gallbladders with pancreaticobiliary maljunction (PBM) were assessed by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The relationship between the expression levels of miR-155 and clinicopathological features of GBCs was analyzed. Human GBC cell lines were transfected with miR-155 inhibitors or mimics, and the effects on proliferation and invasion were assessed. miR-155 was significantly overexpressed in GBCs when compared with that in gallbladders with PBM (p=0.007) and normal gallbladders (p=0.04). The high expression level of miR-155 in GBCs was significantly associated with the presence of lymph node metastasis (p=0.01) and a poor prognosis (p=0.02). In vitro assays showed that aberrant expression of miR-155 significantly enhanced GBC cell proliferation and invasion. In conclusion, high miR-155 expression correlates with the aggressive behavior of GBCs, and miR-155 may become a prognostic marker and therapeutic target for GBC. PMID:23660842

  17. A Phase I Clinical Trial of Systemically Delivered NEMO Binding Domain Peptide in Dogs with Spontaneous Activated B-Cell like Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Habineza Ndikuyeze, Georges; Gaurnier-Hausser, Anita; Patel, Reema; Baldwin, Albert S.; May, Michael J.; Flood, Patrick; Krick, Erika; Propert, Kathleen J.; Mason, Nicola J.

    2014-01-01

    Activated B-Cell (ABC) Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma (DLBCL) is a common, aggressive and poorly chemoresponsive subtype of DLBCL, characterized by constitutive canonical NF-κB signaling. Inhibition of NF-κB signaling leads to apoptosis of ABC-DLBCL cell lines, suggesting targeted disruption of this pathway may have therapeutic relevance. The selective IKK inhibitor, NEMO Binding Domain (NBD) peptide effectively blocks constitutive NF-κB activity and induces apoptosis in ABC-DLBCL cells in vitro. Here we used a comparative approach to determine the safety and efficacy of systemic NBD peptide to inhibit constitutive NF-κB signaling in privately owned dogs with spontaneous newly diagnosed or relapsed ABC-like DLBCL. Malignant lymph nodes biopsies were taken before and twenty-four hours after peptide administration to determine biological effects. Intravenous administration of <2 mg/kg NBD peptide was safe and inhibited constitutive canonical NF-κB activity in 6/10 dogs. Reductions in mitotic index and Cyclin D expression also occurred in a subset of dogs 24 hours post peptide and in 3 dogs marked, therapeutically beneficial histopathological changes were identified. Mild, grade 1 toxicities were noted in 3 dogs at the time of peptide administration and one dog developed transient subclinical hepatopathy. Long term toxicities were not identified. Pharmacokinetic data suggested rapid uptake of peptide into tissues. No significant hematological or biochemical toxicities were identified. Overall the results from this phase I study indicate that systemic administration of NBD peptide is safe and effectively blocks constitutive NF-κB signaling and reduces malignant B cell proliferation in a subset of dogs with ABC-like DLBCL. These results have potential translational relevance for human ABC-DLBCL. PMID:24798348

  18. B cells and immunological tolerance.

    PubMed

    Manjarrez-Orduño, Nataly; Quách, Tâm D; Sanz, Iñaki

    2009-02-01

    Work from multiple groups continues to provide additional evidence for the powerful and highly diverse roles, both protective and pathogenic, that B cells play in autoimmune diseases. Similarly, it has become abundantly clear that antibody-independent functions may account for the opposing influences that B cells exercise over other arms of the immune response and ultimately over autoimmunity itself. Finally, it is becoming apparent that the clinical impact of B-cell depletion therapy may be, to a large extent, determined by the functional balance between different B-cell subsets that may be generated by this therapeutic intervention. In this review, we postulate that our perspective of B-cell tolerance and our experimental approach to its understanding are fundamentally changed by this view of B cells. Accordingly, we first discuss current knowledge of B-cell tolerance conventionally defined as the censoring of autoantibody-producing B cells (with an emphasis on human B cells). Therefore, we discuss a different model that contemplates B cells not only as targets of tolerance but also as mediators of tolerance. This model is based on the notion that the onset of clinical autoimmune disease may require a B-cell gain-of-pathogenic function (or a B-cell loss-of-regulatory-function) and that accordingly, disease remission may depend on the restoration of the physiological balance between B-cell pathogenic and protective functions. PMID:19148217

  19. B Cells, Antibodies, and More.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, William; Lakkis, Fadi G; Chalasani, Geetha

    2016-01-01

    B cells play a central role in the immunopathogenesis of glomerulonephritides and transplant rejection. B cells secrete antibodies that contribute to tissue injury via multiple mechanisms. In addition, B cells contribute to disease pathogenesis in autoimmunity and alloimmunity by presenting antigens as well as providing costimulation and cytokines to T cells. B cells also play an immunomodulatory role in regulating the immune response by secreting cytokines that inhibit disease onset and/or progression. B cell-targeted approaches for treating immune diseases of the kidney and other organs have gained significant momentum. However, much remains to be understood about B-cell biology in order to determine the timing, duration, and context of optimal therapeutic response to B cell-targeted approaches. In this review, we discuss the multifaceted roles of B cells as enhancers and regulators of immunity with relevance to kidney disease and transplantation. PMID:26700440

  20. The Genetic Landscape of Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Pasqualucci, Laura; Dalla-Favera, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    Diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL), the most common lymphoid malignancy in the western world, is an aggressive disease that remains incurable in approximately 30% of patients. Over the past decade, the rapid expansion of sequencing technologies allowing the genome-wide assessment of genomic and transcriptional changes has revolutionized our understanding of the genetic basis of DLBCL by providing a comprehensive and unbiased view of the genes/pathways that are disrupted by genetic alterations in this disease, and may contribute to tumor initiation and expansion. These studies uncovered the existence of several previously unappreciated alterations in key cellular pathways that may also influence treatment outcome. Indeed, a number of newly identified genetic lesions are currently being explored as markers for improved diagnosis and risk stratification, or are entering clinical trials as promising therapeutic targets. This review focuses on recent advances in the genomic characterization of DLBCL and discusses how information gained from these efforts has provided new insights into its biology, uncovering potential targets of prognostic and therapeutic relevance. PMID:25805586

  1. The PPARα agonist fenofibrate suppresses B-cell lymphoma in mice by modulating lipid metabolism☆☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jianfeng; Das, Suman Kumar; Jha, Pooja; Al Zoughbi, Wael; Schauer, Silvia; Claudel, Thierry; Sexl, Veronika; Vesely, Paul; Birner-Gruenberger, Ruth; Kratky, Dagmar; Trauner, Michael; Hoefler, Gerald

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is associated with an increased risk for malignant lymphoma development. We used Bcr/Abl transformed B cells to determine the impact of aggressive lymphoma formation on systemic lipid mobilization and turnover. In wild-type mice, tumor size significantly correlated with depletion of white adipose tissues (WAT), resulting in increased serum free fatty acid (FFA) concentrations which promote B-cell proliferation in vitro. Moreover, B-cell tumor development induced hepatic lipid accumulation due to enhanced hepatic fatty acid (FA) uptake and impaired FA oxidation. Serum triglyceride, FFA, phospholipid and cholesterol levels were significantly elevated. Consistently, serum VLDL/LDL-cholesterol and apolipoprotein B levels were drastically increased. These findings suggest that B-cell tumors trigger systemic lipid mobilization from WAT to the liver and increase VLDL/LDL release from the liver to promote tumor growth. Further support for this concept stems from experiments where we used the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) agonist and lipid-lowering drug fenofibrate that significantly suppressed tumor growth independent of angiogenesis and inflammation. In addition to WAT depletion, fenofibrate further stimulated FFA uptake by the liver and restored hepatic FA oxidation capacity, thereby accelerating the clearance of lipids released from WAT. Furthermore, fenofibrate blocked hepatic lipid release induced by the tumors. In contrast, lipid utilization in the tumor tissue itself was not increased by fenofibrate which correlates with extremely low expression levels of PPARα in B-cells. Our data show that fenofibrate associated effects on hepatic lipid metabolism and deprivation of serum lipids are capable to suppress B-cell lymphoma growth which may direct novel treatment strategies. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Lipid Metabolism in Cancer. PMID:23628473

  2. Rituximab Maintenance Therapy After Autologous Stem-Cell Transplantation in Patients With Relapsed CD20+ Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma: Final Analysis of the Collaborative Trial in Relapsed Aggressive Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Gisselbrecht, Christian; Schmitz, Norbert; Mounier, Nicolas; Singh Gill, Devinder; Linch, David C.; Trneny, Marek; Bosly, Andre; Milpied, Noel J.; Radford, John; Ketterer, Nicolas; Shpilberg, Ofer; Dührsen, Ulrich; Hagberg, Hans; Ma, David D.; Viardot, Andreas; Lowenthal, Ray; Brière, Josette; Salles, Gilles; Moskowitz, Craig H.; Glass, Bertram

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The standard treatment for relapsed diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is salvage chemotherapy followed by high-dose therapy and autologous stem-cell transplantation (ASCT). The impact of maintenance rituximab after ASCT is not known. Patients and Methods In total, 477 patients with CD20+ DLBCL who were in their first relapse or refractory to initial therapy were randomly assigned to one of two salvage regimens. After three cycles of salvage chemotherapy, the responding patients received high-dose chemotherapy followed by ASCT. Then, 242 patients were randomly assigned to either rituximab every 2 months for 1 year or observation. Results After ASCT, 122 patients received rituximab, and 120 patients were observed only. The median follow-up time was 44 months. The 4-year event-free survival (EFS) rates after ASCT were 52% and 53% for the rituximab and observation groups, respectively (P = .7). Treatment with rituximab was associated with a 15% attributable risk of serious adverse events after day 100, with more deaths (six deaths v three deaths in the observation arm). Several factors affected EFS after ASCT (P < .05), including relapsed disease within 12 months (EFS: 46% v 56% for relapsed disease after 12 months), secondary age-adjusted International Prognostic Index (saaIPI) more than 1 (EFS: 37% v 61% for saaIPI < 1), and prior treatment with rituximab (EFS: 47% v 59% for no prior rituximab). A significant difference in EFS between women (63%) and men (46%) was also observed in the rituximab group. In the Cox model for maintenance, the saaIPI was a significant prognostic factor (P < .001), as was male sex (P = .01). Conclusion In relapsed DLBCL, we observed no difference between the control group and the rituximab maintenance group and do not recommend rituximab after ASCT. PMID:23091101

  3. High level of soluble programmed cell death ligand 1 in blood impacts overall survival in aggressive diffuse large B-Cell lymphoma: results from a French multicenter clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Rossille, D; Gressier, M; Damotte, D; Maucort-Boulch, D; Pangault, C; Semana, G; Le Gouill, S; Haioun, C; Tarte, K; Lamy, T; Milpied, N; Fest, T

    2014-12-01

    The dosage of soluble programmed cell death ligand 1 (sPD-L1) protein in the blood of adults with cancer has never been performed in a prospective patient cohort. We evaluated the clinical impact of sPD-L1 level measured at the time of diagnosis for newly diagnosed diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). Soluble PD-L1 was measured in the plasma of 288 patients enrolled in a multicenter, randomized phase III trial that compared R-high-dose chemotherapy with R-CHOP. The median follow-up was 41.4 months. A cutoff of 1.52 ng/ml of PD-L1 level was determined and related to overall survival (OS). Patients with elevated sPD-L1 experienced a poorer prognosis with a 3-year OS of 76% versus 89% (P<0.001). Considering clinical characteristics, the multivariate analysis retained this biomarker besides bone marrow involvement and abnormal lymphocyte-monocyte score as independently related to poor outcome. sPD-L1 was detectable in the plasma and not in the serum, found elevated in patients at diagnosis compared with healthy subjects and its level dropped back to normal value after CR. The intention-to-treat analysis showed that elevated sPD-L1 was associated with a poorer prognosis for patients randomized within the R-CHOP arm (P<0.001). Plasma PD-L1 protein is a potent predicting biomarker in DLBCL and may indicate usefulness of alternative therapeutic strategies using PD-1 axis inhibitors. PMID:24732592

  4. Detection of the Epstein-Barr virus in blood and bone marrow mononuclear cells of patients with aggressive B-cell non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma is not associated with prognosis

    PubMed Central

    MARQUES, HERLANDER; CATARINO, RAQUEL; DOMINGUES, NELSON; BARROS, ELIANE; PORTELA, CATARINA; ALMEIDA, MARIA INÊS; COSTA, SANDRA; REIS, RUI MANUEL; MEDEIROS, RUI; LONGATTO-FILHO, ADHEMAR

    2012-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is associated with a large spectrum of lymphoproliferative diseases. Traditional methods of EBV detection include the immunohistochemical identification of viral proteins and DNA probes to the viral genome in tumoral tissue. The present study explored the detection of the EBV genome, using the BALF5 gene, in the bone marrow or blood mononuclear cells of patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (DLBCL) and related its presence to the clinical variables and risk factors. The results show that EBV detection in 21.5% of patients is not associated with age, gender, staging, B symptoms, international prognostic index scores or any analytical parameters, including lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) or β-2 microglobulin (B2M). The majority of patients were treated with R-CHOP-like (rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine and prednisolone or an equivalent combination) and some with CHOP-like chemotherapy. Response rates [complete response (CR) + partial response (PR)] were not significantly different between EBV-negative and -positive cases, with 93.2 and 88.9%, respectively. The survival rate was also similar in the two groups, with 5-year overall survival (OS) rates of 64.3 and 76.7%, respectively. However, when analyzing the treatment groups separately there was a trend in EBV-positive patients for a worse prognosis in patients treated with CHOP-like regimens that was not identified in patients treated with R-CHOP-like regimens. We conclude that EBV detection in the bone marrow and blood mononuclear cells of DLBC patients has the same frequency of EBV detection on tumoral lymphoma tissue but is not associated with the risk factors, response rate and survival in patients treated mainly with immunochemotherapy plus rituximab. These results also suggest that the addition of rituximab to chemotherapy improves the prognosis associated with EBV detection in DLBCL. PMID:23226803

  5. Protocol of the Australasian Malignant Pleural Effusion-2 (AMPLE-2) trial: a multicentre randomised study of aggressive versus symptom-guided drainage via indwelling pleural catheters

    PubMed Central

    Azzopardi, Maree; Thomas, Rajesh; Muruganandan, Sanjeevan; Lam, David C L; Garske, Luke A; Kwan, Benjamin C H; Rashid Ali, Muhammad Redzwan S; Nguyen, Phan T; Yap, Elaine; Horwood, Fiona C; Ritchie, Alexander J; Bint, Michael; Tobin, Claire L; Shrestha, Ranjan; Piccolo, Francesco; De Chaneet, Christian C; Creaney, Jenette; Newton, Robert U; Hendrie, Delia; Murray, Kevin; Read, Catherine A; Feller-Kopman, David; Maskell, Nick A; Lee, Y C Gary

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Malignant pleural effusions (MPEs) can complicate most cancers, causing dyspnoea and impairing quality of life (QoL). Indwelling pleural catheters (IPCs) are a novel management approach allowing ambulatory fluid drainage and are increasingly used as an alternative to pleurodesis. IPC drainage approaches vary greatly between centres. Some advocate aggressive (usually daily) removal of fluid to provide best symptom control and chance of spontaneous pleurodesis. Daily drainages however demand considerably more resources and may increase risks of complications. Others believe that MPE care is palliative and drainage should be performed only when patients become symptomatic (often weekly to monthly). Identifying the best drainage approach will optimise patient care and healthcare resource utilisation. Methods and analysis A multicentre, open-label randomised trial. Patients with MPE will be randomised 1:1 to daily or symptom-guided drainage regimes after IPC insertion. Patient allocation to groups will be stratified for the cancer type (mesothelioma vs others), performance status (Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group status 0–1 vs ≥2), presence of trapped lung (vs not) and prior pleurodesis (vs not). The primary outcome is the mean daily dyspnoea score, measured by a 100 mm visual analogue scale (VAS) over the first 60 days. Secondary outcomes include benefits on physical activity levels, rate of spontaneous pleurodesis, complications, hospital admission days, healthcare costs and QoL measures. Enrolment of 86 participants will detect a mean difference of VAS score of 14 mm between the treatment arms (5% significance, 90% power) assuming a common between-group SD of 18.9 mm and a 10% lost to follow-up rate. Ethics and dissemination The Sir Charles Gairdner Group Human Research Ethics Committee has approved the study (number 2015-043). Results will be published in peer-reviewed journals and presented at scientific meetings. Trial registration

  6. MicroRNA-146a modulates B-cell oncogenesis by regulating Egr1

    PubMed Central

    Contreras, Jorge R.; Palanichamy, Jayanth Kumar; Tran, Tiffany M.; Fernando, Thilini R.; Rodriguez-Malave, Norma I.; Goswami, Neha; Arboleda, Valerie A.; Casero, David; Rao, Dinesh S.

    2015-01-01

    miR-146a is a NF-κB induced microRNA that serves as a feedback regulator of this critical pathway. In mice, deficiency of miR-146a results in hematolymphoid cancer at advanced ages as a consequence of constitutive NF-κB activity. In this study, we queried whether the deficiency of miR-146a contributes to B-cell oncogenesis. Combining miR-146a deficiency with transgenic expression of c-Myc led to the development of highly aggressive B-cell malignancies. Mice transgenic for c-Myc and deficient for miR-146a were characterized by significantly shortened survival, increased lymph node involvement, differential involvement of the spleen and a mature B-cell phenotype. High-throughput sequencing of the tumors revealed significant dysregulation of approximately 250 genes. Amongst these, the transcription factor Egr1 was consistently upregulated in mice deficient for miR-146a. Interestingly, transcriptional targets of Egr1 were enriched in both the high-throughput dataset and in a larger set of miR-146a-deficient tumors. miR-146a overexpression led to downregulation of Egr1 and downstream targets with concomitant decrease in cell growth. Direct targeting of the human EGR1 by miR-146a was seen by luciferase assay. Together our findings illuminate a bona fide role for miR-146a in the modulation of B-cell oncogenesis and reveal the importance of understanding microRNA function in a cell- and disease-specific context. PMID:25906746

  7. B-cell receptor signaling as a driver of lymphoma development and evolution

    PubMed Central

    Niemann, Carsten U.; Wiestner, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    The B-cell receptor (BCR) is essential for normal B-cell development and maturation. In an increasing number of B-cell malignancies, BCR signaling is implicated as a pivotal pathway in tumorigenesis. Mechanisms of BCR activation are quite diverse and range from chronic antigenic drive by microbial or viral antigens to autostimulation of B-cells by self-antigens to activating mutations in intracellular components of the BCR pathway. Hepatitis C virus infection can lead to the development of splenic marginal zone lymphoma, while Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with the development of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphomas. In some of these cases, successful treatment of the infection removes the inciting antigen and results in resolution of the lymphoma. Chronic lymphocytic leukemia has been recognized for decades as a malignancy of auto-reactive B-cells and its clinical course is in part determined by the differential response of the malignant cells to BCR activation. In a number of B-cell malignancies, activating mutations in signal transduction components of the BCR pathway have been identified; prominent examples are activated B-cell-like (ABC) diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (DLBCL) that carry mutations in CD79B and CARD11 and displays chronic active BCR signaling resulting in constitutive activation of the NF-κB pathway. Despite considerable heterogeneity in biology and clinical course, many mature B-cell malignancies are highly sensitive to kinase inhibitors that disrupt BCR signaling. Thus, targeted therapy through inhibition of BCR signaling is emerging as a new treatment paradigm for many B-cell malignancies. Here, we review the role of the BCR in the pathogenesis of B-cell malignancies and summarize clinical results of the emerging class of kinase inhibitors that target this pathway. PMID:24060900

  8. B Cells, Antibodies, and More

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, William; Lakkis, Fadi G.

    2016-01-01

    B cells play a central role in the immunopathogenesis of glomerulonephritides and transplant rejection. B cells secrete antibodies that contribute to tissue injury via multiple mechanisms. In addition, B cells contribute to disease pathogenesis in autoimmunity and alloimmunity by presenting antigens as well as providing costimulation and cytokines to T cells. B cells also play an immunomodulatory role in regulating the immune response by secreting cytokines that inhibit disease onset and/or progression. B cell–targeted approaches for treating immune diseases of the kidney and other organs have gained significant momentum. However, much remains to be understood about B-cell biology in order to determine the timing, duration, and context of optimal therapeutic response to B cell–targeted approaches. In this review, we discuss the multifaceted roles of B cells as enhancers and regulators of immunity with relevance to kidney disease and transplantation. PMID:26700440

  9. Synchronous invasive ductal carcinoma and intravascular large B-cell lymphoma of the breast: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Primary breast lymphomas (PBLs) represent less than 1% of all breast malignancies. Intravascular large B-cell lymphoma (ILBCL) is a rare, aggressive form of extranodal lymphoma. Breast involvement has only been described in the literature once previously. ILBCL is characterized by the proliferation of tumour cells within the lumen of small vessels of involved organs, resulting in their eventual occlusion. Clinical features are often vague, diagnosis is difficult and delayed, and prognosis is usually poor. We report the first ever case of synchronous ILBCL and invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) of the breast in a patient presenting with pyrexia of unknown origin and altered mental status who underwent modified radical mastectomy and subsequent chemotherapy, and review the literature regarding intravascular large B-cell lymphoma, PBLs and synchronous carcinomas and lymphomas of the breast. PMID:24708809

  10. A Gammaherpesvirus Bcl-2 Ortholog Blocks B Cell Receptor-Mediated Apoptosis and Promotes the Survival of Developing B Cells In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Carrie B.; McGraw, Jennifer E.; Feldman, Emily R.; Roth, Alexa N.; Keyes, Lisa R.; Grau, Katrina R.; Cochran, Stephanie L.; Waldschmidt, Thomas J.; Liang, Chengyu; Forrest, J. Craig; Tibbetts, Scott A.

    2014-01-01

    Gammaherpesviruses such as Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV, HHV-8) establish lifelong latency in their hosts and are associated with the development of several types of malignancies, including a subset of B cell lymphomas. These viruses are thought to co-opt the process of B cell differentiation to latently infect a fraction of circulating memory B cells, resulting in the establishment of a stable latency setpoint. However, little is known about how this infected memory B cell compartment is maintained throughout the life of the host. We have previously demonstrated that immature and transitional B cells are long-term latency reservoirs for murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV68), suggesting that infection of developing B cells contributes to the maintenance of lifelong latency. During hematopoiesis, immature and transitional B cells are subject to B cell receptor (BCR)-mediated negative selection, which results in the clonal deletion of autoreactive B cells. Interestingly, numerous gammaherpesviruses encode homologs of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2, suggesting that virus inhibition of apoptosis could subvert clonal deletion. To test this, we quantified latency establishment in mice inoculated with MHV68 vBcl-2 mutants. vBcl-2 mutant viruses displayed a marked decrease in the frequency of immature and transitional B cells harboring viral genome, but this attenuation could be rescued by increased host Bcl-2 expression. Conversely, vBcl-2 mutant virus latency in early B cells and mature B cells, which are not targets of negative selection, was remarkably similar to wild-type virus. Finally, in vivo depletion of developing B cells during chronic infection resulted in decreased mature B cell latency, demonstrating a key role for developing B cells in the maintenance of lifelong latency. Collectively, these findings support a model in which gammaherpesvirus latency in circulating mature B cells is sustained in part through the

  11. Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma Mimicking Granulomatosis with Polyangiitis

    PubMed Central

    Horowitz, Netanel; Ben-Itzhak, Ofer; Braun-Moscovici, Yolanda

    2016-01-01

    In a patient with systemic multiorgan disease with overlapping features, the differential diagnosis included infectious diseases, malignancies, and systemic autoimmune or inflammatory diseases. We present an unusual case of a young male with B cell lymphoma who presented with symptoms mimicking systemic vasculitis and review the existing literature. PMID:27293945

  12. Addition of Rice Bran Arabinoxylan to Curcumin Therapy May Be of Benefit to Patients With Early-Stage B-Cell Lymphoid Malignancies (Monoclonal Gammopathy of Undetermined Significance, Smoldering Multiple Myeloma, or Stage 0/1 Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia): A Preliminary Clinical Study.

    PubMed

    Golombick, Terry; Diamond, Terrence H; Manoharan, Arumugam; Ramakrishna, Rajeev

    2016-06-01

    Hypothesis Prior studies on patients with early B-cell lymphoid malignancies suggest that early intervention with curcumin may lead to delay in progressive disease and prolonged survival. These patients are characterized by increased susceptibility to infections. Rice bran arabinoxylan (Ribraxx) has been shown to have immunostimulatory, anti-inflammatory, and proapoptotic effects. We postulated that addition of Ribraxx to curcumin therapy may be of benefit. Study design Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS)/smoldering multiple myeloma (SMM) or stage 0/1 chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients who had been on oral curcumin therapy for a period of 6 months or more were administered both curcumin (as Curcuforte) and Ribraxx. Methods Ten MGUS/SMM patients and 10 patients with stage 0/1 CLL were administered 6 g of curcumin and 2 g Ribraxx daily. Blood samples were collected at baseline and at 2-month intervals for a period of 6 months, and various markers were monitored. MGUS/SMM patients included full blood count (FBC); paraprotein; free light chains/ratio; C-reactive protein (CRP)and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR); B2 microglobulin and immunological markers. Markers monitored for stage 0/1 CLL were FBC, CRP and ESR, and immunological markers. Results Of 10 MGUS/SMM patients,5 (50%) were neutropenic at baseline, and the Curcuforte/Ribraxx combination therapy showed an increased neutrophil count, varying between 10% and 90% among 8 of the 10 (80%) MGUS/SMM patients. An additional benefit of the combination therapy was the potent effect in reducing the raised ESR in 4 (44%) of the MGUS/SMM patients. Conclusion Addition of Ribraxx to curcumin therapy may be of benefit to patients with early-stage B-cell lymphoid malignancies. PMID:27154182

  13. BTK Signaling in B Cell Differentiation and Autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Corneth, Odilia B J; Klein Wolterink, Roel G J; Hendriks, Rudi W

    2016-01-01

    Since the original identification of Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) as the gene defective in the primary immunodeficiency X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) in 1993, our knowledge on the physiological function of BTK has expanded impressively. In this review, we focus on the role of BTK during B cell differentiation in vivo, both in the regulation of expansion and in the developmental progression of pre-B cells in the bone marrow and as a crucial signal transducer of signals downstream of the IgM or IgG B cell antigen receptor (BCR) in mature B cells governing proliferation, survival, and differentiation. In particular, we highlight BTK function in B cells in the context of host defense and autoimmunity. Small-molecule inhibitors of BTK have very recently shown impressive anti-tumor activity in clinical studies in patients with various B cell malignancies. Since promising effects of BTK inhibition were also seen in experimental animal models for lupus and rheumatoid arthritis, BTK may be a good target for controlling autoreactive B cells in patients with systemic autoimmune disease. PMID:26341110

  14. Cutaneous primary B-cell lymphomas: from diagnosis to treatment*

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Margarida

    2015-01-01

    Primary cutaneous B-cell lymphomas are a heterogeneous group of mature B-cells neoplasms with tropism for the skin, whose biology and clinical course differ significantly from the equivalent nodal lymphomas. The most indolent forms comprise the primary cutaneous marginal zone and follicle center B-cell lymphomas that despite the excellent prognosis have cutaneous recurrences very commonly. The most aggressive forms include the primary cutaneous large B-cell lymphomas, consisting in two major groups: the leg type, with poor prognosis, and others, the latter representing a heterogeneous group of lymphomas from which specific entities are supposed to be individualized over time, such as intravascular large B-cell lymphomas. Treatment may include surgical excision, radiotherapy, antibiotics, corticosteroids, interferon, monoclonal antibodies and chemotherapy, depending on the type of lymphoma and on the type and location of the skin lesions. In subtypes with good prognosis is contraindicated overtreatment and in those associated with a worse prognosis the recommended therapy relies on CHOP-like regimens associated with rituximab, assisted or not with local radiotherapy. We review the primary cutaneous B-cell lymphomas, remembering the diagnostic criteria, differential diagnosis, classification, and prognostic factors and presenting the available therapies. PMID:26560215

  15. Malignant melanoma maxilla

    PubMed Central

    Devi, Seema; Sinha, Richi; Singh, Rakesh Kumar

    2015-01-01

    A malignant melanoma is a highly lethal melanocytic neoplasm. A neoplasm usually affects the skin. Malignant melanomas in the head and neck region are rare, accounting for less than 1% of all melanomas. Malignant melanoma of the nose and paranasal sinuses is an aggressive disease typically presenting at an advanced stage, with a 5-year survival rate ranging 20-30%. Melanomas are tumors arising from melanocytes, which are neuroectodermally derived cells located in the basal layers of the skin. This is a case report of a 35-year-old male, who presented with very aggressive disease and developed liver metastasis. PMID:26668467

  16. The Histological Classification of Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yi; Pittaluga, Stefania; Jaffe, Elaine S.

    2015-01-01

    Diffuse large B cell lymphomas (DLBCLs) are aggressive B-cell neoplasms with considerable clinical, biologic and pathologic diversity, in part reflecting the functional diversity of the B-cell system and multiple pathways of transformation. In recent years, the advent of new high-throughput genomic technologies has provided new insights into the biology of DLBCL, leading to the identification of distinct molecular identities and novel pathogenetic pathways. This increasing complexity had led to an expanding number of entities in the WHO classification. Using a multi-modality approach, the updated 2008 classification delineated some new subgroups, including DLBCLs associated with particular age groups or specific anatomic sites, as well as two borderline categories: tumors at the interface between classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL) and DLBCL as well as between Burkitt Lymphoma (BL) and DLBCL. This article reviews the histopathologic features of the various aggressive B-cell lymphoma subtypes included in the 2008 classification, with emphasis on some of the new entities as well as areas of diagnostic challenge. PMID:25805585

  17. Phenytoin Induced Cutaneous B Cell Pseudolymphoma.

    PubMed

    Riyaz, Najeeba; Sasidharanpillai, Sarita; Aravindan, Karumathil P; Nobin, Babu K; Raghavan, Nisha T; Nikhila, Pappinissery K

    2015-01-01

    Cutaneous pseudolymphomas are benign lymphoproliferative processes mimicking lymphomas clinically and histologically. One of the precipitating factors for pseudolymphoma is drugs like anticonvulsants, antidepressants and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. According to existing literature phenytoin-induced cutaneous pseudolymphomas are usually T-cell predominant. Most often withdrawal of the drug with or without short-course systemic steroids can attain a cure. Rarely malignant transformation has been reported years later despite withdrawal of the offending drug, which necessitates a long-term follow up of the affected. We report an 80-year-old male patient who was receiving phenytoin sodium and who presented with diffuse erythema and infiltrated skin lesions which histologically resembled cutaneous B-cell lymphoma. Substituting phenytoin with levetiracetam achieved resolution of symptoms. Further evaluation was suggestive of a reactive process. A detailed drug history is of paramount importance in differentiating drug-induced pseudolymphoma from lymphoma. Searching literature we could not find any previous reports of phenytoin-induced cutaneous B-cell pseudolymphoma. PMID:26538730

  18. Phenytoin Induced Cutaneous B Cell Pseudolymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Riyaz, Najeeba; Sasidharanpillai, Sarita; Aravindan, Karumathil P; Nobin, Babu K; Raghavan, Nisha T; Nikhila, Pappinissery K

    2015-01-01

    Cutaneous pseudolymphomas are benign lymphoproliferative processes mimicking lymphomas clinically and histologically. One of the precipitating factors for pseudolymphoma is drugs like anticonvulsants, antidepressants and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. According to existing literature phenytoin-induced cutaneous pseudolymphomas are usually T-cell predominant. Most often withdrawal of the drug with or without short-course systemic steroids can attain a cure. Rarely malignant transformation has been reported years later despite withdrawal of the offending drug, which necessitates a long-term follow up of the affected. We report an 80-year-old male patient who was receiving phenytoin sodium and who presented with diffuse erythema and infiltrated skin lesions which histologically resembled cutaneous B-cell lymphoma. Substituting phenytoin with levetiracetam achieved resolution of symptoms. Further evaluation was suggestive of a reactive process. A detailed drug history is of paramount importance in differentiating drug-induced pseudolymphoma from lymphoma. Searching literature we could not find any previous reports of phenytoin-induced cutaneous B-cell pseudolymphoma. PMID:26538730

  19. Evolution of B Cell Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Sunyer, J. Oriol

    2013-01-01

    Two types of adaptive immune strategies are known to have evolved in vertebrates: the VLR-based system, which is present in jawless organisms and is mediated by VLRA and VLRB lymphocytes, and the BCR/TCR-based system, which is present in jawed species and is provided by B and T cell receptors expressed on B and T cells, respectively. Here we summarize features of B cells and their predecessors in the different animal phyla, focusing the review on B cells from jawed vertebrates. We point out the critical role of nonclassical species and comparative immunology studies in the understanding of B cell immunity. Because nonclassical models include species relevant to veterinary medicine, basic science research performed in these animals contributes to the knowledge required for the development of more efficacious vaccines against emerging pathogens. PMID:25340015

  20. PAX5 promotes pre-B cell proliferation by regulating the expression of pre-B cell receptor and its downstream signaling.

    PubMed

    Xue, Kai; Song, Jiazhe; Yang, Yan; Li, Zhi; Wu, Chunhua; Jin, Jinhua; Li, Wenzhe

    2016-05-01

    PAX5 is indispensable for the commitment of early lymphoid progenitors to the B cell lineage as well as for the development of B cells. Although previous studies have indicated that the Pax5-conditional-knockout mouse exhibited dedifferentiation of mature B cell and the development of aggressive lymphomas, the changes of Pax5 gene expressions in pre-B cells have not been analyzed. To understand the functional importance of Pax5 gene in the proliferation and survival of pre-B cells, we established a Pax5-knockdown model using 70Z/3 pre-B cell line. Pax5 knockdown 70Z/3 cells (70Z/3-KD cells) showed down-regulations of pre-BCR compounds such as CD19, BLNK, Id2 and λ5. The signaling via pre-BCRs was significantly diminished in the 70Z/3-KD cells, and this alteration was normalized by restored Pax5 gene expression. Loss of PAX5 reduced the growth rates in the 70Z/3-KD cells, compared to the mock cells. Meanwhile, the proliferation of pre-B cells was reduced by the knockdown of Pax5 gene. Moreover, further examinations showed that PAX5 was also activated in B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) as a cell proliferation enhancer. These findings suggested that pax5 is critically important for the proliferation and survival of pre-B cells. PMID:27016671

  1. T-Cell/Histiocyte-Rich Large B-Cell Lymphoma Presenting as a Primary Central Nervous System Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Advani, Pooja; Starr, Jason; Swaika, Abhisek; Jiang, Liuyan; Qiu, Yushi; Li, Zhimin

    2015-01-01

    Primary central nervous system (PCNSL) lymphoma is an aggressive extranodal non-Hodgkin lymphoma, and most cases are classified as diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) by histology. T-cell/histiocyte-rich large B-cell lymphoma (TCRLBCL) represents a distinct subtype of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and is characterized by the presence of scattered large neoplastic B-cells in a background of abundant T-cells and histiocytes. This is in contrast to the dense perivascular cuffing of neoplastic B-cells in classic DLBCL. T-cell/histiocyte-rich large B-cell lymphoma should be considered in PCNSL cases in which neoplastic B-cells are sparse and scattered. Immunohistochemistry will help identify the B-cells and surrounding infiltrate rich in Tlymphocytes and histiocytes. Future studies exploring the biology of TCRLBCL and the crosstalk between the neoplastic cells and the surrounding inflammatory infiltrate may provide exciting prospects for future therapies for TCRLBCL. PMID:26788280

  2. Functional reconstruction after subtotal glossectomy in the surgical treatment of an uncommon and aggressive neoplasm in this location: Primary malignant melanoma in the base of the tongue

    PubMed Central

    Manzano-Solo-de-Zaldívar, Damián; Moreno-Sánchez, Manuel; Hernández-Vila, Cristina; Ramírez-Pérez, Francisco-Alejandro; González-Ballester, David; Ruíz-Laza, Luis; González-García, Raúl; Monje-Gil, Florencio

    2014-01-01

    Primary malignant melanoma of the oral cavity is a rare neoplasm, especially on the tongue. We report a case of mucosal melanoma at the base of the tongue, an extremely rare location (only about 30 cases have been reported in literature). The extension study doesn´t revealed distant metastatic lesions. The patient was treated by subtotal glossectomy and bilateral functional neck dissection. Tongue is one of the most difficult structures to reconstruct, because of their central role in phonation, swallowing and airway protection. The defect was reconstructed with anterolateral thigh free flap. Surgical treatment was supplemented with adjuvant immunotherapy. The post-operative period was uneventful. At present, 24 months after surgery, patient is asymptomatic, there isn´t evidence of recurrence of melanoma and he hasn´t any difficulty in swallowing or phonation. Key words:Malignant mucosal melanoma, anterolateral thigh free flap, phonation, swallowing. PMID:25593674

  3. The double-edge role of B cells in mediating antitumor T-cell immunity: Pharmacological strategies for cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing-Zhang; Zhang, Yu-Hua; Guo, Xin-Hua; Zhang, Hong-Yan; Zhang, Yuan

    2016-07-01

    Emerging evidence reveals the controversial role of B cells in antitumor immunity, but the underlying mechanisms have to be explored. Three latest articles published in the issue 521 of Nature in 2015 reconfirmed the puzzling topic and put forward some explanations of how B cells regulate antitumor T-cell responses both positively and negatively. This paper attempts to demonstrate that different B-cell subpopulations have distinct immunological properties and that they are involved in either antitumor responses or immunosuppression. Recent studies supporting the positive and negative roles of B cells in tumor development were summarized comprehensively. Several specific B-cell subpopulations, such as IgG(+), IgA(+), IL-10(+), and regulatory B cells, were described in detail. The mechanisms underlying the controversial B-cell effects were mainly attributed to different B-cell subpopulations, different B-cell-derived cytokines, direct B cell-T cell interaction, different cancer categories, and different malignant stages, and the immunological interaction between B cells and T cells is mediated by dendritic cells. Promising B-cell-based antitumor strategies were proposed and novel B-cell regulators were summarized to present interesting therapeutic targets. Future investigations are needed to make sure that B-cell-based pharmacological strategies benefit cancer immunotherapy substantially. PMID:27111515

  4. The regulation of the B-cell gene expression programme by Pax5.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Melissa L; Pridans, Clare; Nutt, Stephen L

    2008-01-01

    The activity of the transcription factor paired box gene 5 (Pax5) is essential for many aspects of B lymphopoiesis including the initial commitment to the lineage, immunoglobulin rearrangement, pre-B cell receptor signalling and maintaining cell identity in mature B cells. Deregulated or reduced Pax5 activity has also been implicated in B-cell malignancies both in human disease and mouse models. Candidate gene approaches and biochemical analysis have revealed that Pax5 regulates B lymphopoiesis by concurrently activating B cell-specific gene expression as well as repressing the expression of genes, many of which are associated with non-B cell lineages. These studies have been recently complemented with more exhaustive microarray studies, which have identified and validated a large panel of Pax5 target genes. These target genes reveal a gene regulatory network, with Pax5 at its centre that controls the B-cell gene expression programme. PMID:17998914

  5. Glucocorticoid Receptor-Targeted Liposomal Codelivery of Lipophilic Drug and Anti-Hsp90 Gene: Strategy to Induce Drug-Sensitivity, EMT-Reversal, and Reduced Malignancy in Aggressive Tumors.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Sujan Kumar; Jinka, Sudhakar; Pal, Krishnendu; Nelli, Swetha; Dutta, Shamit Kumar; Wang, Enfeng; Ahmad, Ajaz; AlKharfy, Khalid M; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata; Banerjee, Rajkumar

    2016-07-01

    Many cancers including the late stage ones become drug-resistant and undergo epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). These lead to enhanced invasion, migration, and metastasis toward manifesting its aggressiveness and malignancy. One of the key hallmarks of cancer is its overdependence on glycolysis as its preferred energy metabolism pathway. The strict avoidance of alternate energy pathway gluconeogenesis by cancer cells points to a yet-to-be hoisted role of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) especially in tumor microenvironment, where cells are known to become drug-sensitive through induction of gluconeogenesis. However, since GR is involved in metabolism, anti-inflammatory reactions, immunity besides inducing gluconeogenesis, a greater role of GR in tumor microenvironment is envisaged. We have shown previously that GR, although ubiquitously expressed in all cells; afford to be an effective cytoplasmic target for killing cancer cells selectively. Herein, we report the therapeutic use of a newly developed GR-targeted liposomal concoction (DXE) coformulating a lipophilic drug (ESC8) and an anti-Hsp90 anticancer gene against aggressive tumor models. This induced drug-sensitivity and apoptosis while reversing EMT in tumor cells toward effective retardation of aggressive growth in pancreas and skin tumor models. Additionally, the ESC8-free lipid formulation upon cotreatment with hydrophilic drugs, gemcitabine and doxorubicin, could effectively sensitize and kill pancreatic cancer and melanoma cells, respectively. The formulation-triggered EMT-reversal was GR-dependent. Overall, we found a new strategy for drug sensitization that led to the advent of new GR-targeted anticancer therapeutics. PMID:27184196

  6. Bryostatin and Vincristine in B-Cell Malignancies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-10

    Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Multiple Myeloma; Stage III Multiple Myeloma

  7. Monoclonal B-Cell Lymphocytosis

    PubMed Central

    D’Arena, G.; Musto, P.

    2014-01-01

    Monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis (MBL) is an asymptomatic hematologic condition defined by the presence of a small (<5 x 109/L) clonal B-cell population in the peripheral blood in the absence of lymph-node enlargement, cytopenias or autoimmune diseases. It is found in approximately 3-12% of normal persons depending on the accuracy of analytical techniques applied. According to the immunophenotypic profile of clonal B-cells, the majority of MBL cases (75%) are classified as chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL)-like. This form may progress into CLL at a rate of 1–2% per year. It is thought that CLL is always preceded by MBL. The remaining MBL cases are defined as atypical CLL-like (CD5+/CD20bright) and CD5- MBL. The MBL clone size is quite heterogenous. Accordingly, two forms of MBL are identified: i) high-count, or ‘clinical’ MBL, in which an evidence of lymphocytosis (<5 x 109/L clonal B-cells) is seen, and ii) a low-count MBL, in which a normal leukocyte count is found and that is identified only in population-screening studies. Both forms of MBL may carry the cytogenetic abnormalities that are the hallmark of CLL, including 13q-, 17p- and trisomy 12. Consistent with the indolent phenotype of this condition, genetic lesions, such as TP53, ATM, NOTCH1 and SF3B1 mutations, usually associated with high-risk CLL, are rarely seen. Overall, no prognostic indicator of evolution of MBL to overt CLL has been found at present time. However, taking into account this possibility, a clinical and lab monitoring (at least annually), is recommended. PMID:24779000

  8. NHL (diffuse large B-cell lymphoma)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL) is the sixth most common cancer in the UK; 9443 new cases were diagnosed in the UK in 2002, and it caused 4418 UK deaths in 2003. Incidence rates show distinct geographical variation, with age-standardised incidence rates ranging from 17 per 100,000 in northern America to 4 per 100,000 in south-central Asia. NHL occurs more commonly in males than in females, and the age-standardised UK incidence increased by 10.3% between 1993 and 2002. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of first-line treatments for aggressive, or for relapsed aggressive, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (diffuse large B-cell lymphoma)? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to January 2010 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 26 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: allogeneic stem-cell support, chemotherapy (conventional dose salvage, high-dose plus autologous transplant stem-cell support, conventional dose in people with chemosensitive disease), CHOP 14, CHOP 21, CHOP 21 with radiotherapy, CHOP 21 with rituximab, ACVBP, MACOP-B, m-BACOD, PACEBOM, and ProMACE-CytaBOM. PMID:21406125

  9. HIV-associated memory B cell perturbations

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhiliang; Luo, Zhenwu; Wan, Zhuang; Wu, Hao; Li, Wei; Zhang, Tong; Jiang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Memory B-cell depletion, hyperimmunoglobulinemia, and impaired vaccine responses are the hallmark of B cell perturbations inhuman immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease. Although B cells are not the targets for HIV infection, there is evidence for B cell, especially memory B cell dysfunction in HIV disease mediated by other cells or HIV itself. This review will focus on HIV-associated phenotypic and functional alterations in memory B cells. Additionally, we will discuss the mechanism underlying these perturbations and the effect of anti-retroviral therapy (ART) on these perturbations. PMID:25887082

  10. Tetraspanin CD37 protects against the development of B cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    de Winde, Charlotte M.; Veenbergen, Sharon; Young, Ken H.; Xu-Monette, Zijun Y.; Wang, Xiao-xiao; Xia, Yi; Jabbar, Kausar J.; van den Brand, Michiel; van der Schaaf, Alie; Elfrink, Suraya; van Houdt, Inge S.; Gijbels, Marion J.; van de Loo, Fons A.J.; Bennink, Miranda B.; Hebeda, Konnie M.; Groenen, Patricia J.T.A.; van Krieken, J. Han; Figdor, Carl G.; van Spriel, Annemiek B.

    2016-01-01

    Worldwide, B cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma is the most common hematological malignancy and represents a substantial clinical problem. The molecular events that lead to B cell lymphoma are only partially defined. Here, we have provided evidence that deficiency of tetraspanin superfamily member CD37, which is important for B cell function, induces the development of B cell lymphoma. Mice lacking CD37 developed germinal center–derived B cell lymphoma in lymph nodes and spleens with a higher incidence than Bcl2 transgenic mice. We discovered that CD37 interacts with suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3); therefore, absence of CD37 drives tumor development through constitutive activation of the IL-6 signaling pathway. Moreover, animals deficient for both Cd37 and Il6 were fully protected against lymphoma development, confirming the involvement of the IL-6 pathway in driving tumorigenesis. Loss of CD37 on neoplastic cells in patients with diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) directly correlated with activation of the IL-6 signaling pathway and with worse progression-free and overall survival. Together, this study identifies CD37 as a tumor suppressor that directly protects against B cell lymphomagenesis and provides a strong rationale for blocking the IL-6 pathway in patients with CD37– B cell malignancies as a possible therapeutic intervention. PMID:26784544

  11. PD-1 Blockade Can Restore Functions of T-Cells in Epstein-Barr Virus-Positive Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Quan, Lina; Chen, Xue; Liu, Aichun; Zhang, Yan; Guo, Xiuchen; Yan, Shujie; Liu, Yue

    2015-01-01

    Epstein–Barr virus-positive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (EBV+DLBCL) is an aggressive malignancy that is largely resistant to current therapeutic regimens, and is an attractive target for immune-based therapies. Anti-programmed death-1 (PD-1) antibodies showed encouraging anti-tumor effects in both preclinical models and advanced solid and hematological malignancies, but its efficacy against EBV+DLBCL is unknown. Herein, we performed experiments using co-culture system with T cells and lymphoma cell lines including EBV+DLBCL and EBV-DLBCL [including germinal center B-cell like (GCB)-DLBCL and non-GCB-DLBCL] in vitro. We show that lymphoma cells augmented the expression of PD-1 on T cells, decreased the proliferation of T cells, and altered the secretion of multiple cytokines. However, through PD-1 blockade, these functions could be largely restored. Notbaly, the effect of PD-1 blockade on antitumor immunity was more effective in EBV+DLBCL than that in EBV-DLBCL in vitro. These results suggest that T-cell exhaustion and immune escape in microenvironment is one of the mechanisms underlying DLBCL; and PD-1 blockade could present as a efficacious immunotherapeutic treatment for EBV+DLBCL. PMID:26361042

  12. Primary bone marrow diffuse large B-cell lymphoma accompanying cold agglutinin disease: A case report with review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Tomoko; Ishida, Mitsuaki; Moro, Hiroko; Yumoto, Hirofumi; Uchibayashi, Sachiko; Yoshii, Miyuki; Nakanishi, Ryota; Okuno, Hiroko; Yoshida, Takashi; Okuno, Takafumi; Hodohara, Keiko; Okabe, Hidetoshi

    2014-01-01

    Cold agglutinin disease (CAD) is a well-recognized complication of lymphoproliferative disorders. It has been previously recognized that cases of primary CAD frequently exhibit underlying malignant lymphoma in the bone marrow. Lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma is the most common subtype of malignant lymphoma; however, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) has also been documented, albeit extremely rare. The current report presents a case of primary bone marrow DLBCL accompanying CAD. A 76-year-old male presented with fever and fatigue. Laboratory tests revealed anemia and elevated bilirubin and cold agglutinins with a titer of 8,192 at 4°C. Bone marrow biopsy demonstrated DLBCL and systemic surveillance failed to detect tumorous lesions or lymphadenopathy. Following R-THP-COP therapy, cold agglutinins titer was markedly decreased (by <4); however, malignant lymphoma relapsed and cold agglutinin levels increased again (4,096). This is the second documented case of primary bone marrow DLBCL accompanying CAD. Previously, malignant lymphoma exclusively involving the bone marrow, namely primary bone marrow lymphoma (PBML), has been recognized as a rare and aggressive subtype. The analyses of the present study revealed that the incidence of hemolytic anemia in primary bone marrow DLBCL may be high compared with conventional DLBCL. Therefore, additional analyses are required to clarify the clinicopathological features of PBML. PMID:24348825

  13. Primary bone marrow diffuse large B-cell lymphoma accompanying cold agglutinin disease: A case report with review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    YAMASHITA, TOMOKO; ISHIDA, MITSUAKI; MORO, HIROKO; YUMOTO, HIROFUMI; UCHIBAYASHI, SACHIKO; YOSHII, MIYUKI; NAKANISHI, RYOTA; OKUNO, HIROKO; YOSHIDA, TAKASHI; OKUNO, TAKAFUMI; HODOHARA, KEIKO; OKABE, HIDETOSHI

    2014-01-01

    Cold agglutinin disease (CAD) is a well-recognized complication of lymphoproliferative disorders. It has been previously recognized that cases of primary CAD frequently exhibit underlying malignant lymphoma in the bone marrow. Lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma is the most common subtype of malignant lymphoma; however, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) has also been documented, albeit extremely rare. The current report presents a case of primary bone marrow DLBCL accompanying CAD. A 76-year-old male presented with fever and fatigue. Laboratory tests revealed anemia and elevated bilirubin and cold agglutinins with a titer of 8,192 at 4°C. Bone marrow biopsy demonstrated DLBCL and systemic surveillance failed to detect tumorous lesions or lymphadenopathy. Following R-THP-COP therapy, cold agglutinins titer was markedly decreased (by <4); however, malignant lymphoma relapsed and cold agglutinin levels increased again (4,096). This is the second documented case of primary bone marrow DLBCL accompanying CAD. Previously, malignant lymphoma exclusively involving the bone marrow, namely primary bone marrow lymphoma (PBML), has been recognized as a rare and aggressive subtype. The analyses of the present study revealed that the incidence of hemolytic anemia in primary bone marrow DLBCL may be high compared with conventional DLBCL. Therefore, additional analyses are required to clarify the clinicopathological features of PBML. PMID:24348825

  14. Nuclear TRAF3 is a negative regulator of CREB in B cells.

    PubMed

    Mambetsariev, Nurbek; Lin, Wai W; Stunz, Laura L; Hanson, Brett M; Hildebrand, Joanne M; Bishop, Gail A

    2016-01-26

    The adaptor protein TNF receptor-associated factor 3 (TRAF3) regulates signaling through B-lymphocyte receptors, including CD40, BAFF receptor, and Toll-like receptors, and also plays a critical role inhibiting B-cell homoeostatic survival. Consistent with these findings, loss-of-function human TRAF3 mutations are common in B-cell cancers, particularly multiple myeloma and B-cell lymphoma. B cells of B-cell-specific TRAF3(-/-) mice (B-Traf3(-/-)) display remarkably enhanced survival compared with littermate control (WT) B cells. The mechanism for this abnormal homeostatic survival is poorly understood, a key knowledge gap in selecting optimal treatments for human B-cell cancers with TRAF3 deficiency. We show here for the first time to our knowledge that TRAF3 is a resident nuclear protein that associates with the transcriptional regulator cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) in both mouse and human B cells. The TRAF-C domain of TRAF3 was necessary and sufficient to localize TRAF3 to the nucleus via a functional nuclear localization signal. CREB protein was elevated in TRAF3(-/-) B cells, without change in mRNA, but with a decrease in CREB ubiquitination. CREB-mediated transcriptional activity was increased in TRAF3-deficient B cells. Consistent with these findings, Mcl-1, an antiapoptotic target of CREB-mediated transcription, was increased in the absence of TRAF3 and enhanced Mcl-1 was suppressed with CREB inhibition. TRAF3-deficient B cells were also preferentially sensitive to survival inhibition with pharmacologic CREB inhibitor. Our results identify a new mechanism by which nuclear TRAF3 regulates B-cell survival via inhibition of CREB stability, information highly relevant to the role of TRAF3 in B-cell malignancies. PMID:26755589

  15. Role of Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors in Indolent and Other Mature B-Cell Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Kutsch, Nadine; Marks, Reinhard; Ratei, Richard; Held, Thomas K; Schmidt-Hieber, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Targeting tyrosine kinases represents a highly specific treatment approach for different malignancies. This also includes non-Hodgkin lymphoma since it is well known that these enzymes are frequently involved in the lymphomagenesis. Hereby, tyrosine kinases might either be dysregulated intrinsically or be activated within signal transduction pathways leading to tumor survival and growth. Among others, Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (Btk) is of particular interest as a potential therapeutic target. Btk is stimulated by B-cell receptor signaling and activates different transcription factors such as nuclear factor κB. The Btk inhibitor ibrutinib has been approved for the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia and mantle-cell lymphoma recently. Numerous clinical trials evaluating this agent in different combinations (eg, with rituximab or classical chemotherapeutic agents) as a treatment option for aggressive and indolent lymphoma are under way. Here, we summarize the role of tyrosine kinase inhibitors in the treatment of indolent and other non-Hodgkin lymphomas (eg, mantle-cell lymphoma). PMID:26327780

  16. Targeting B-cell receptor signaling kinases in chronic lymphocytic leukemia: the promise of entospletinib

    PubMed Central

    Sharman, Jeff; Di Paolo, Julie

    2016-01-01

    The B-cell receptor signaling pathway has emerged as an important therapeutic target in chronic lymphocytic leukemia and other B-cell malignancies. Novel agents have been developed targeting the signaling enzymes spleen tyrosine kinase (SYK), Bruton’s tyrosine kinase, and phosphoinositide 3-kinase delta. This review discusses the rationale for targeting these enzymes, as well as the preclinical and clinical evidence supporting their role as therapeutic targets, with a particular focus on SYK inhibition with entospletinib. PMID:27247756

  17. Targeting B-cell receptor signaling kinases in chronic lymphocytic leukemia: the promise of entospletinib.

    PubMed

    Sharman, Jeff; Di Paolo, Julie

    2016-06-01

    The B-cell receptor signaling pathway has emerged as an important therapeutic target in chronic lymphocytic leukemia and other B-cell malignancies. Novel agents have been developed targeting the signaling enzymes spleen tyrosine kinase (SYK), Bruton's tyrosine kinase, and phosphoinositide 3-kinase delta. This review discusses the rationale for targeting these enzymes, as well as the preclinical and clinical evidence supporting their role as therapeutic targets, with a particular focus on SYK inhibition with entospletinib. PMID:27247756

  18. Composite diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and follicular B-cell lymphoma - case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Turbatu, Andrei; Stoian, Marilena; Brezean, Iulian; Stoica, Victor Constantin Ion; Colita, Andrei; Dobrea, Camelia; State, Nicoleta; Ionescu, Cosmin; Ivanescu, Ana-Maria; Oprea, Madalina; Ghimici, Cecilia; Lupu, Anca Roxana

    2014-06-01

    Composite lymphoma refers to the co-occurrence of two or more morphologically and immunophenotypically separate lymphomas in the same topographic site at the time of clinical presentation. It is an infrequent type of lymphoid neoplasm, present in lymphoid tissue and may be due to the existence of two genetically related neoplasms such as transformation of a single lymphoma into another more aggressive lymphoma or be due to the presence of two clonally unrelated lymphomas. This paper is presenting a case of diffuse non-Hodgkin large B-cell lymphoma with areas of low grade and high grade follicular non-Hodgkin B-cell lymphoma in a retroperitoneal lymph node and spleen of an 62 year old woman. Histopathological examination and immunohistochemistry features proved the diagnosis of composite lymphoma. PMID:25705280

  19. Composite Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma and Follicular B-Cell Lymphoma – Case Report and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    TURBATU, Andrei; STOIAN, Marilena; BREZEAN, Iulian; STOICA, Victor Constantin Ion; COLITA, Andrei; DOBREA, Camelia; STATE, Nicoleta; IONESCU, Cosmin; IVANESCU, Ana-Maria; OPREA, Madalina; GHIMICI, Cecilia; LUPU, Anca Roxana

    2014-01-01

    Composite lymphoma refers to the co-occurrence of two or more morphologically and immunophenotypically separate lymphomas in the same topographic site at the time of clinical presentation. It is an infrequent type of lymphoid neoplasm, present in lymphoid tissue and may be due to the existence of two genetically related neoplasms such as transformation of a single lymphoma into another more aggressive lymphoma or be due to the presence of two clonally unrelated lymphomas. This paper is presenting a case of diffuse non-Hodgkin large B-cell lymphoma with areas of low grade and high grade follicular non-Hodgkin B-cell lymphoma in a retroperitoneal lymph node and spleen of an 62 year old woman. Histopathological examination and immunohistochemistry features proved the diagnosis of composite lymphoma. PMID:25705280

  20. Rituximab efficiently depletes B cells in lung tumors and normal lung tissue

    PubMed Central

    Joly-Battaglini, Albane; Hammarström, Clara; Stankovic, Branislava; Aamodt, Henrik; Stjärne, Johan; Brustugun, Odd Terje; Helland, Åslaug; Øynebråten, Inger; Corthay, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Rituximab is a monoclonal antibody that targets the CD20 B-cell-specific antigen and is widely used as therapy for B-cell lymphoma. Since rituximab depletes both malignant and normal B cells, it is increasingly being used to treat various conditions in which normal B cells have a pathogenic role, such as rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis. It is well-established that rituximab efficiently eliminates B cells in blood, lymph nodes, and spleen. In contrast, the effect of rituximab in non-lymphoid tissues remains poorly documented and is debated. Here, we report a rheumatoid arthritis patient who was treated with rituximab before receiving thoracic surgery for non-small cell lung cancer. Using flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry, we show that rituximab efficiently depleted CD20-positive B cells in a primary lung tumor, in lung-associated lymph nodes, and in normal lung tissue. We conclude that rituximab may be very efficient at depleting normal B cells in the lungs. This property of rituximab may potentially be exploited for the treatment of conditions in which pathogenic B cells reside in the lungs. On the other hand, the clearance of lung B cells may provide an explanation for the rare cases of severe non-infectious pulmonary toxicity of rituximab. PMID:27081474

  1. Identification of a cDNA for a human high-molecular-weight B-cell growth factor.

    PubMed Central

    Ambrus, J L; Pippin, J; Joseph, A; Xu, C; Blumenthal, D; Tamayo, A; Claypool, K; McCourt, D; Srikiatchatochorn, A; Ford, R J

    1993-01-01

    Proliferation is necessary for many of the phenotypic changes that occur during B-cell maturation. Further differentiation of mature B cells into plasma cells or memory B cells requires additional rounds of proliferation. In this manuscript, we describe a cDNA for a human B-cell growth factor we call high-molecular-weight B-cell growth factor (HMW-BCGF). Purified HMW-BCGF has been shown to induce B-cell proliferation, inhibit immunoglobulin secretion, and selectively expand certain B-cell subpopulations. Studies using antibodies to HMW-BCGF and its receptor have suggested that HMW-BCGF, while produced by T cells and some malignant B cells, acts predominantly on normal and malignant B cells. The HMW-BCGF cDNA was identified by expression cloning using a monoclonal antibody and polyclonal antisera to HMW-BCGF. Protein produced from the cDNA induced B-cell proliferation, inhibited immunoglobulin secretion, and was recognized in immunoblots by anti-HMW-BCGF antibodies. The amino acid sequence of HMW-BCGF deduced from the cDNA predicts a secreted protein of 53 kDa with three potential N-linked glycosylation sites. The identification of this cDNA will allow further studies examining physiologic roles of this cytokine. We propose to call it interleukin 14. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 4 Fig. 6 PMID:8327514

  2. Memory B cells in mouse models.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, B; Grimsholm, O; Thorarinsdottir, K; Ren, W; Jirholt, P; Gjertsson, I; Mårtensson, I-L

    2013-08-01

    One of the principles behind vaccination, as shown by Edward Jenner in 1796, and host protection is immunological memory, and one of the cells central to this is the antigen-experienced memory B cell that responds rapidly upon re-exposure to the initiating antigen. Classically, memory B cells have been defined as progenies of germinal centre (GC) B cells expressing isotype-switched and substantially mutated B cell receptors (BCRs), that is, membrane-bound antibodies. However, it has become apparent over the last decade that this is not the only pathway to B cell memory. Here, we will discuss memory B cells in mice, as defined by (1) cell surface markers; (2) multiple layers; (3) formation in a T cell-dependent and either GC-dependent or GC-independent manner; (4) formation in a T cell-independent fashion. Lastly, we will touch upon memory B cells in; (5) mouse models of autoimmune diseases. PMID:23679222

  3. Human Lyb-2 homolog CD72 is a marker for progenitor B-cell leukemias.

    PubMed

    Schwarting, R; Castello, R; Moldenhauer, G; Pezzutto, A; von Hoegen, I; Ludwig, W D; Parnes, J R; Dörken, B

    1992-11-01

    S-HCL 2 is the prototype antibody of the recently defined CD72 cluster (human Lyb-2). Under nonreducing conditions, S-HCL 2 monoclonal antibody (mAb) precipitates a glycoprotein of 80-86 kDa. Under reducing conditions, a dimer of 43 and 39 kDa, with core proteins of 40 and 36 kDa, is precipitated. CD72 expression in normal and malignant tissues is different from expression of all other previously described human B-cell antigens. In peripheral blood and bone marrow, the antigen appears to be present on all B lymphocytes, with the exception of plasma cells. In tissue, immunohistochemical staining revealed positivity for all known B-cell compartments; however, pulpa macrophages of the spleen and von Kupffer cells exhibited distinct positivity for CD72 also. Among 83 malignant non-Hodgkin's lymphomas examined by immunohistochemistry (alkaline phosphatase anti-alkaline phosphatase technique), all 54 B-cell lymphomas, including precursor B-cell lymphomas, Burkitt's lymphomas, germinal center lymphomas, chronic lymphocytic leukemias, and hairy cell leukemias, were CD72 positive, but no T-cell lymphomas were. Flow cytometry study of more than 80 mainly acute leukemias (52 B-cell leukemias) showed reactivity with S-HCL 2 mAb over the full range of B-cell differentiation. In particular, very early B cells in cytoplasmic Ig (cIg)-negative, CD19-positive pre-pre-B-cell leukemias and hybrid leukemias (mixed myeloid and B-cell type) were consistently positive for CD72 on the cell surface. Therefore, CD72 may become an important marker for progenitor B-cell leukemias. PMID:1384316

  4. Recent progress on normal and malignant pancreatic stem/progenitor cell research: therapeutic implications for the treatment of type 1 or 2 diabetes mellitus and aggressive pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mimeault, M; Batra, S K

    2010-01-01

    Recent progress on pancreatic stem/progenitor cell research has revealed that the putative multipotent pancreatic stem/progenitor cells and/or more committed beta cell precursors may persist in the pancreatic gland in adult life. The presence of immature pancreatic cells with stem cell-like properties offers the possibility of stimulating their in vivo expansion and differentiation or to use their ex vivo expanded progenies for beta cell replacement-based therapies for type 1 or 2 diabetes mellitus in humans. In addition, the transplantation of either insulin-producing beta cells derived from embryonic, fetal and other tissue-resident adult stem/progenitor cells or genetically modified adult stem/progenitor cells may also constitute alternative promising therapies for treating diabetic patients. The genetic and/or epigenetic alterations in putative pancreatic adult stem/progenitor cells and/or their early progenies may, however, contribute to their acquisition of a dysfunctional behaviour as well as their malignant transformation into pancreatic cancer stem/progenitor cells. More particularly, the activation of distinct tumorigenic signalling cascades, including the hedgehog, epidermal growth factor–epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF–EGFR) system, wingless ligand (Wnt)/β-catenin and/or stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1)–CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) pathways may play a major role in the sustained growth, survival, metastasis and/or drug resistance of pancreatic cancer stem/progenitor cells and their further differentiated progenies. The combination of drugs that target the oncogenic elements in pancreatic cancer stem/progenitor cells and their microenvironment, with the conventional chemotherapeutic regimens, could represent promising therapeutic strategies. These novel targeted therapies should lead to the development of more effective treatments of locally advanced and metastatic pancreatic cancers, which remain incurable with current therapies

  5. Essential Role for Survivin in the Proliferative Expansion of Progenitor and Mature B Cells.

    PubMed

    Miletic, Ana V; Jellusova, Julia; Cato, Matthew H; Lee, Charlotte R; Baracho, Gisele V; Conway, Edward M; Rickert, Robert C

    2016-03-01

    Survivin is a member of the inhibitor of apoptosis family of proteins and a biomarker of poor prognosis in aggressive B cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. In addition to its role in inhibition of apoptosis, survivin also regulates mitosis. In this article, we show that deletion of survivin during early B cell development results in a complete block at the cycling pre-B stage. In the periphery, B cell homeostasis is not affected, but survivin-deficient B cells are unable to mount humoral responses. Correspondingly, we show that survivin is required for cell division in response to mitogenic stimulation. Thus, survivin is essential for proliferation of B cell progenitors and activated mature B cells, but is dispensable for B cell survival. Moreover, a small-molecule inhibitor of survivin strongly impaired the growth of representative B lymphoma lines in vitro, supporting the validity of survivin as an attractive therapeutic target for high-grade B cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. PMID:26810226

  6. Microbes and B cell development.

    PubMed

    Wesemann, Duane R

    2015-01-01

    Animals and many of their chronic microbial inhabitants form relationships of symbiotic mutualism, which occurs when coexisting life-forms derive mutual benefit from stable associations. While microorganisms receive a secure habitat and constant food source from vertebrate hosts, they are required for optimal immune system development and occupy niches otherwise abused by pathogens. Microbes have also been shown to provide vertebrate hosts with metabolic capabilities that enhance energy and nutrient uptake from the diet. The immune system plays a central role in the establishment and maintenance of host-microbe homeostasis, and B lineage cells play a key role in this regulation. Here, I reviewed the structure and function of the microbiota and the known mechanisms of how nonpathogenic microbes influence B cell biology and immunoglobulin repertoire development early in life. I also discuss what is known about how B lineage cells contribute to the process of shaping the composition of commensal/mutualistic microbe membership. PMID:25591467

  7. Polyclonal B-cell lymphocytosis with binucleated lymphocytes (PPBL).

    PubMed

    Troussard, Xavier; Cornet, Edouard; Lesesve, Jean-François; Kourel, Carine; Mossafa, Hossein

    2008-01-01

    Persistent polyclonal B-cell lymphocytosis (PPBL) is a rare and recently described entity. The review of the literature show PPBL is diagnosed predominantly but not exclusively in women, usually smokers. PPBL is recognized by a moderate, chronic and absolute lymphocytosis (>4 × 10(9)/l) in the peripheral blood. In 10% of cases without lymphocytosis, the PPBL diagnosis has to be suggested by peripheral blood examination showing in all cases atypical binucleated lymphocytes. A polyclonal serum IgM is also associated and HLA-DR7 expression is present in most cases. Contrary to B-cell chronic lymphoproliferative disorders (B-CLPD), peripheral B cells are polyclonal with kappa and lambda light-chain expression and no clonal rearrangement of immunoglobulin heavy chain genes is usually demonstrated. The detection of an extra isochromosome for the long arm of chromosome 3 +i(3)(q10) has to be considered as a specific marker of PPBL. We performed conventional cytogenetic analysis (CCA) in 111 patients with typical PPBL we followed-up more than 4 years. +i(3q) was detected in 34% (33/98), PCC in 8% (8/98) and both abnormalities in 31% (30/98). CCA showed neither +i(3q) nor PCC in 28% (27/98). Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was also performed in 84 cases and +i(3q) was detected in 71% (60/84). When combining both procedures in 84 patients, +i(3q) was detected in 17 patients with negative CCA and was confirmed in 43 patients with positive CCA. CCA and FISH were both negative in 24 cases. Whether patients with PPBL are at increased risk of hematological malignancy remains unclear. After a median follow-up of 4.4 years, most PPBL patients presented a stable clinical and biological course. Six patients died from pulmonary cancer, myocardial infarction, cerebral aneurysm rupture or diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Two patients had IgM monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) at the time of PPBL diagnosis and two other patients developed IgM MGUS

  8. A case of primary adrenal diffuse large B-cell lymphoma in HIV.

    PubMed

    Malik, Seema; Chapman, Cordelia B-P; Drew, Olivia

    2016-07-01

    Primary adrenal diffuse large B-cell lymphoma in HIV is a very rare, highly aggressive extra-nodal lymphoma. There is only one previous case reported in the literature. Our patient presented with isolated bilateral adrenal masses with no lymphadenopathy or visceral involvement, which made the diagnosis challenging. PMID:26113518

  9. Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma of the prostate.

    PubMed

    Warrick, Joshua I; Owens, Scott R; Tomlins, Scott A

    2014-10-01

    In this article, we review prostatic lymphomas and discuss the differential diagnosis of high-grade malignant neoplasms of the prostate. We illustrate this with a case of a 46-year-old man seen with lower urinary tract obstruction who had diffuse involvement by a high-grade malignancy on prostate biopsy. Morphologic evaluation and immunohistochemistry were consistent with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma of the prostate. Workup with positron emission tomography-computed tomography demonstrated intensely hypermetabolic lymph nodes in the mediastinum, as well as widespread osseous involvement and involvement of the pancreatic tail, prostate, and urinary bladder, suggesting secondary prostatic involvement by a nodal lymphoma. Lymphomas of the prostate are uncommon in surgical pathology practice and usually represent secondary involvement from leukemia/lymphoma at a more typical site. Chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma is the most common subtype. PMID:25268190

  10. B cell conducts the lymphocyte orchestra.

    PubMed

    Youinou, Pierre

    2007-01-01

    The interest for B cells has recently been revived. They normally play a role in the development, the regulation, as well as the activation of lymphoid architecture: they regulate dendritic cells and T-cell subsets function through cytokine production. Receptor editing is also essential in B cells and aids in preventing autoimmunity. Both abnormalities in the distribution of B-cell subsets and clinical benefit response to B-cell depletion in autoimmune states illustrate their importance. A new area has thus been reached, whereby B lymphocytes return as a significant contributor to autoimmune disorders. PMID:17363215

  11. T-cell/histiocyte-rich large B-cell lymphoma of stomach.

    PubMed

    Barut, Figen; Kandemir, Nilufer Onak; Gun, Banu Dogan; Ozdamar, Sukru Oguz

    2016-07-01

    T-cell/histiocyte-rich large B-cell lymphoma is an unusually encountered lymphoid neoplasm of stomach with aggressive course, and is an uncommon morphologic variant of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. An ulcerated mass, 7x5x1 cm in size was observed within the gastrectomy specimen of a 76-year-old female patient. In cross sections, besides mature lymphoid cells displaying T-cell phenotype, a neoplastic formation composed of large, pleomorphic atypical lymphoid cells with, prominent nucleoli, vesicular nuclei and abundant eosinophilic cytoplasm displaying B-cell phenotype were observed. Meanwhile, histiocyte-like mononuclear cells and Reed-Sternberg-like multinuclear cells expressing CD68 and Mac387 were also observed. The diagnosis of the case was T cell/histiocyte-rich large B-cell lymphoma. This rarely encountered neoplasm should be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of primary gastric lymphomas. PMID:27427148

  12. Maintenance therapy with interferon-alpha 2b, cyclophosphamide, and prednisone in aggressive diffuse large cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Avilés, Agustin; Neri, Natividad; Nambo, M Jesús; Castañeda, Claudia; Talavera, Alejandra; Huerta-Guzmán, Judith; Murillo, Edgar

    2004-04-01

    Maintenance therapy in patients with aggressive malignant lymphoma using biological modifiers remains uncertain. We conducted a controlled clinical trial to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of interferon-alpha 2b, cyclophosphamide, and prednisone as maintenance therapy in patients with aggressive diffuse large B cell lymphomas in complete remission after aggressive chemotherapy. In an intent-to-treat analysis, 169 patients were eligible for this study; the end points were event-free survival (EFS) and overall survival (OS). With a median follow-up of 49.3 months, no statistical differences were observed and actuarial curves at 5 years showed that EFS was 71% (95% confidence interval [CI], 63-79%) for patients who received maintenance compared to 63% (95% CI, 59-71%) for patients in control group (p = 0.05). No statistical differences were observed in OS between maintenance arm: 84% (95% CI, 78-89%) and control group 83% (95% CI, 77-88%) in control group (p = 0.2). All patients received the maintenance therapy as planned and in time, thus dose intensity was considered 1.0 in all cases. Acute toxicity was mild, and no delay or suspension of treatment was necessary. Late toxicity was not evident until now. We conclude that use of maintenance therapy combining interferon-alpha 2b, cyclophosphamide, and prednisone is not useful in patients with aggressive lymphoma if they had been treated with aggressive combined chemotherapy. PMID:15186737

  13. Production of RANKL by Memory B Cells

    PubMed Central

    Meednu, Nida; Zhang, Hengwei; Owen, Teresa; Sun, Wen; Wang, Victor; Cistrone, Christopher; Rangel-Moreno, Javier; Xing, Lianping; Anolik, Jennifer H.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic autoimmune disease that often leads to joint damage. The mechanisms of bone damage in RA are complex, involving activation of bone-resorbing osteoclasts (OCs) by synoviocytes and Th17 cells. This study was undertaken to investigate whether B cells play a direct role in osteoclastogenesis through the production of RANKL, the essential cytokine for OC development. Methods RANKL production by total B cells or sorted B cell subpopulations in the peripheral blood and synovial tissue from healthy donors or anti–cyclic citrullinated peptide–positive patients with RA was examined by flow cytometry, real-time polymerase chain reaction, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and immunohistochemical analysis. To define direct effects on osteoclastogenesis, B cells were cocultured with CD14+ monocytes, and OCs were enumerated by tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining. Results Healthy donor peripheral blood B cells were capable of expressing RANKL upon stimulation, with switched memory B cells (CD27+IgD−) having the highest propensity for RANKL production. Notably, switched memory B cells in the peripheral blood from RA patients expressed significantly more RANKL compared to healthy controls. In RA synovial fluid and tissue, memory B cells were enriched and spontaneously expressed RANKL, with some of these cells visualized adjacent to RANK+ OC precursors. Critically, B cells supported OC differentiation in vitro in a RANKL-dependent manner, and the number of OCs was higher in cultures with RA B cells than in those derived from healthy controls. Conclusion These findings reveal the critical importance of B cells in bone homeostasis and their likely contribution to joint destruction in RA. PMID:26554541

  14. Germinal center reentries of BCL2-overexpressing B cells drive follicular lymphoma progression

    PubMed Central

    Sungalee, Stéphanie; Mamessier, Emilie; Morgado, Ester; Grégoire, Emilie; Brohawn, Philip Z.; Morehouse, Christopher A.; Jouve, Nathalie; Monvoisin, Céline; Menard, Cédric; Debroas, Guilhaume; Faroudi, Mustapha; Mechin, Violaine; Navarro, Jean-Marc; Drevet, Charlotte; Eberle, Franziska C.; Chasson, Lionel; Baudimont, Fannie; Mancini, Stéphane J.; Tellier, Julie; Picquenot, Jean-Michel; Kelly, Rachel; Vineis, Paolo; Ruminy, Philippe; Chetaille, Bruno; Jaffe, Elaine S.; Schiff, Claudine; Hardwigsen, Jean; Tice, David A.; Higgs, Brandon W.; Tarte, Karin; Nadel, Bertrand; Roulland, Sandrine

    2014-01-01

    It has recently been demonstrated that memory B cells can reenter and reengage germinal center (GC) reactions, opening the possibility that multi-hit lymphomagenesis gradually occurs throughout life during successive immunological challenges. Here, we investigated this scenario in follicular lymphoma (FL), an indolent GC-derived malignancy. We developed a mouse model that recapitulates the FL hallmark t(14;18) translocation, which results in constitutive activation of antiapoptotic protein B cell lymphoma 2 (BCL2) in a subset of B cells, and applied a combination of molecular and immunofluorescence approaches to track normal and t(14;18)+ memory B cells in human and BCL2-overexpressing B cells in murine lymphoid tissues. BCL2-overexpressing B cells required multiple GC transits before acquiring FL-associated developmental arrest and presenting as GC B cells with constitutive activation–induced cytidine deaminase (AID) mutator activity. Moreover, multiple reentries into the GC were necessary for the progression to advanced precursor stages of FL. Together, our results demonstrate that protracted subversion of immune dynamics contributes to early dissemination and progression of t(14;18)+ precursors and shapes the systemic presentation of FL patients. PMID:25384217

  15. B Cells and Autoantibodies in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Pröbstel, Anne-Katrin; Sanderson, Nicholas S. R.; Derfuss, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    While over the past decades T cells have been considered key players in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS), it has only recently become evident that B cells have a major contributing role. Our understanding of the role of B cells has evolved substantially following the clinical success of B cell-targeting therapies and increasing experimental evidence for significant B cell involvement. Rather than mere antibody-producing cells, it is becoming clear that they are team players with the capacity to prime and regulate T cells, and function both as pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators. However, despite tremendous efforts, the target antigen(s) of B cells in MS have yet to be identified. The first part of this review summarizes the clinical evidence and results from animal studies pointing to the relevance of B cells in the pathogenesis of MS. The second part gives an overview of the currently known potential autoantigen targets. The third part recapitulates and critically appraises the currently available B cell-directed therapies. PMID:26197319

  16. Primary diffuse large B-cell lymphoma associated with chronic osteomyelitis of the knee.

    PubMed

    Romero-Rojas, Alfredo E; Diaz-Perez, Julio A; Raju, Sharat; Messa-Botero, Oscar; Prieto-Bletan, Andres; Criollo-Palacios, Felipe

    2014-12-01

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) associated with chronic inflammation is a recently adopted category of DLBCL, which describes an aggressive B-cell lymphoma raised in the setting of non-immune chronic inflammation. Primary presentation of this subtype of DLBCL in bone is extremely rare. Here, we present the case of a 27 year old woman with DLBCL of the right distal femur, identified after a three-year history of chronic osteomyelitis. In this report, we describe the clinical and histopathologic features of this unusual presentation of DLBCL and discuss aspects relevant to diagnosis and treatment of this entity. PMID:25199714

  17. Ikaros limits follicular B cell activation by regulating B cell receptor signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Heizmann, Beate; Sellars, MacLean; Macias-Garcia, Alejandra; Chan, Susan; Kastner, Philippe

    2016-02-12

    The Ikaros transcription factor is essential for early B cell development, but its effect on mature B cells is debated. We show that Ikaros is required to limit the response of naive splenic B cells to B cell receptor signals. Ikaros deficient follicular B cells grow larger and enter cell cycle faster after anti-IgM stimulation. Unstimulated mutant B cells show deregulation of positive and negative regulators of signal transduction at the mRNA level, and constitutive phosphorylation of ERK, p38, SYK, BTK, AKT and LYN. Stimulation results in enhanced and prolonged ERK and p38 phosphorylation, followed by hyper-proliferation. Pharmacological inhibition of ERK and p38 abrogates the increased proliferative response of Ikaros deficient cells. These results suggest that Ikaros functions as a negative regulator of follicular B cell activation. PMID:26775846

  18. Galectin-3 binds to CD45 on diffuse large B-cell lymphoma cells to regulate susceptibility to cell death

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Mary C.; Pang, Mabel; Hsu, Daniel K.; Liu, Fu-Tong; de Vos, Sven; Gascoyne, Randy D.; Said, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is the most common non-Hodgkin lymphoma and an aggressive malignancy. Galectin-3 (gal-3), the only antiapoptotic member of the galectin family, is overexpressed in DLBCL. While gal-3 can localize to intracellular sites, gal-3 is secreted by DLBCL cells and binds back to the cell surface in a carbohydrate-dependent manner. The major counterreceptor for gal-3 on DLBCL cells was identified as the transmembrane tyrosine phosphatase CD45. Removal of cell-surface gal-3 from CD45 with the polyvalent glycan inhibitor GCS-100 rendered DLBCL cells susceptible to chemotherapeutic agents. Binding of gal-3 to CD45 modulated tyrosine phosphatase activity; removal of endogenous cell-surface gal-3 from CD45 with GCS-100 increased phosphatase activity, while addition of exogenous gal-3 reduced phosphatase activity. Moreover, the increased susceptibility of DLBCL cells to chemotherapeutic agents after removal of gal-3 by GCS-100 required CD45 phosphatase activity. Gal-3 binding to a subset of highly glycosylated CD45 glycoforms was regulated by the C2GnT-1 glycosyltransferase, indicating that specific glycosylation of CD45 is important for regulation of gal-3–mediated signaling. These data identify a novel role for cell-surface gal-3 and CD45 in DLBCL survival and suggest novel therapeutic targets to sensitize DLBCL cells to death. PMID:23065155

  19. Case report of acute-on-chronic liver failure secondary to diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Siba, Yahuza; Obiokoye, Kenechukwu; Ferstenberg, Richard; Robilotti, James; Culpepper-Morgan, Joan

    2014-01-01

    Acute liver failure is a rare presentation of hematologic malignancy. Acute on chronic liver failure (ACLF) is a newly recognized clinical entity that describes acute hepatic decompensation in persons with preexisting liver disease. Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is an aggressive non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL) with increasing incidence in older males, females and blacks. However, it has not yet been reported, to present with acute liver failure in patients with preexisting chronic liver disease due to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/hepatitis C virus (HCV) co-infection. We describe a case of ACLF as the presenting manifestation of DLBCL in an elderly black man with HIV/HCV co-infection and prior Hodgkin’s disease in remission for three years. The rapidly fatal outcome of this disease is highlighted as is the distinction of ACLF from decompensated cirrhosis. Due to the increased prevalence of HIV/HCV co-infection in the African American 1945 to 1965 birth cohort and the fact that both are risk factors for chronic liver disease and NHL we postulate that the incidence of NHL presenting as ACLF may increase. PMID:25469050

  20. Reprogramming human B cells into induced pluripotent stem cells and its enhancement by C/EBPα.

    PubMed

    Bueno, C; Sardina, J L; Di Stefano, B; Romero-Moya, D; Muñoz-López, A; Ariza, L; Chillón, M C; Balanzategui, A; Castaño, J; Herreros, A; Fraga, M F; Fernández, A; Granada, I; Quintana-Bustamante, O; Segovia, J C; Nishimura, K; Ohtaka, M; Nakanishi, M; Graf, T; Menendez, P

    2016-03-01

    B cells have been shown to be refractory to reprogramming and B-cell-derived induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) have only been generated from murine B cells engineered to carry doxycycline-inducible Oct4, Sox2, Klf4 and Myc (OSKM) cassette in every tissue and from EBV/SV40LT-immortalized lymphoblastoid cell lines. Here, we show for the first time that freshly isolated non-cultured human cord blood (CB)- and peripheral blood (PB)-derived CD19+CD20+ B cells can be reprogrammed to iPSCs carrying complete VDJH immunoglobulin (Ig) gene monoclonal rearrangements using non-integrative tetracistronic, but not monocistronic, OSKM-expressing Sendai Virus. Co-expression of C/EBPα with OSKM facilitates iPSC generation from both CB- and PB-derived B cells. We also demonstrate that myeloid cells are much easier to reprogram than B and T lymphocytes. Differentiation potential back into the cell type of their origin of B-cell-, T-cell-, myeloid- and fibroblast-iPSCs is not skewed, suggesting that their differentiation does not seem influenced by 'epigenetic memory'. Our data reflect the actual cell-autonomous reprogramming capacity of human primary B cells because biased reprogramming was avoided by using freshly isolated primary cells, not exposed to cytokine cocktails favoring proliferation, differentiation or survival. The ability to reprogram CB/PB-derived primary human B cells offers an unprecedented opportunity for studying developmental B lymphopoiesis and modeling B-cell malignancies. PMID:26500142

  1. Angiocrine Factors Deployed by Tumor Vascular Niche Induce B-Cell Lymphoma Invasiveness and Chemoresistance

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Zhongwei; Ding, Bi-Sen; Guo, Peipei; Lee, Sharrell B.; Butler, Jason M.; Casey, Stephanie C.; Simons, Michael; Tam, Wayne; Felsher, Dean W.; Shido, Koji; Rafii, Arash; Scandura, Joseph M.; Rafii, Shahin

    2014-01-01

    Summary Tumor endothelial cells (ECs) promote cancer progression in ways beyond their role as conduits supporting metabolism. However, it is not understood how vascular niche-derived paracrine factors, known as angiocrine factors, provoke tumor aggressiveness. Here, we show that FGF4 produced by B-Cell lymphoma cells (LCs) through activating FGFR1 upregulates the Notch-ligand Jagged1 (Jag1) on neighboring tumor ECs. In turn, upregulation of Jag1 on ECs reciprocally induces Notch2-Hey1 in LCs. This crosstalk enforces aggressive CD44+IGF1R+CSF1R+ LC phenotypes, including extra-nodal invasion and chemoresistance. Inducible EC-selective deletion of Fgfr1 or Jag1 in the Eμ-Myc lymphoma model or impairing Notch2 signaling in mouse and human LCs diminished lymphoma aggressiveness and prolonged mouse survival. Thus, targeting the angiocrine FGF4-FGFR1/Jag1-Notch2 loop could inhibit LC aggressiveness and enhance chemosensitivity. PMID:24651014

  2. Congenital B cell lymphocytosis explained by novel germline CARD11 mutations.

    PubMed

    Snow, Andrew L; Xiao, Wenming; Stinson, Jeffrey R; Lu, Wei; Chaigne-Delalande, Benjamin; Zheng, Lixin; Pittaluga, Stefania; Matthews, Helen F; Schmitz, Roland; Jhavar, Sameer; Kuchen, Stefan; Kardava, Lela; Wang, Wei; Lamborn, Ian T; Jing, Huie; Raffeld, Mark; Moir, Susan; Fleisher, Thomas A; Staudt, Louis M; Su, Helen C; Lenardo, Michael J

    2012-11-19

    Nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) controls genes involved in normal lymphocyte functions, but constitutive NF-κB activation is often associated with B cell malignancy. Using high-throughput whole transcriptome sequencing, we investigated a unique family with hereditary polyclonal B cell lymphocytosis. We found a novel germline heterozygous missense mutation (E127G) in affected patients in the gene encoding CARD11, a scaffolding protein required for antigen receptor (AgR)-induced NF-κB activation in both B and T lymphocytes. We subsequently identified a second germline mutation (G116S) in an unrelated, phenotypically similar patient, confirming mutations in CARD11 drive disease. Like somatic, gain-of-function CARD11 mutations described in B cell lymphoma, these germline CARD11 mutants spontaneously aggregate and drive constitutive NF-κB activation. However, these CARD11 mutants rendered patient T cells less responsive to AgR-induced activation. By reexamining this rare genetic disorder first reported four decades ago, our findings provide new insight into why activating CARD11 mutations may induce B cell expansion and preferentially predispose to B cell malignancy without dramatically perturbing T cell homeostasis. PMID:23129749

  3. Congenital B cell lymphocytosis explained by novel germline CARD11 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Wenming; Stinson, Jeffrey R.; Lu, Wei; Chaigne-Delalande, Benjamin; Zheng, Lixin; Pittaluga, Stefania; Matthews, Helen F.; Schmitz, Roland; Jhavar, Sameer; Kuchen, Stefan; Kardava, Lela; Wang, Wei; Lamborn, Ian T.; Jing, Huie; Raffeld, Mark; Moir, Susan; Fleisher, Thomas A.; Staudt, Louis M.; Su, Helen C.

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) controls genes involved in normal lymphocyte functions, but constitutive NF-κB activation is often associated with B cell malignancy. Using high-throughput whole transcriptome sequencing, we investigated a unique family with hereditary polyclonal B cell lymphocytosis. We found a novel germline heterozygous missense mutation (E127G) in affected patients in the gene encoding CARD11, a scaffolding protein required for antigen receptor (AgR)–induced NF-κB activation in both B and T lymphocytes. We subsequently identified a second germline mutation (G116S) in an unrelated, phenotypically similar patient, confirming mutations in CARD11 drive disease. Like somatic, gain-of-function CARD11 mutations described in B cell lymphoma, these germline CARD11 mutants spontaneously aggregate and drive constitutive NF-κB activation. However, these CARD11 mutants rendered patient T cells less responsive to AgR-induced activation. By reexamining this rare genetic disorder first reported four decades ago, our findings provide new insight into why activating CARD11 mutations may induce B cell expansion and preferentially predispose to B cell malignancy without dramatically perturbing T cell homeostasis. PMID:23129749

  4. Cell-specific uptake of mantle cell lymphoma-derived exosomes by malignant and non-malignant B-lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Hazan-Halevy, Inbal; Rosenblum, Daniel; Weinstein, Shiri; Bairey, Osnat; Raanani, Pia; Peer, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is an aggressive and incurable mature B cell neoplasm. The current treatments are based on chemotherapeutics and new class of drugs (e.g. Ibrutinib®), which in most cases ends with tumor resistance and relapse. Therefore, further development of novel therapeutic modalities are needed. Exosomes are natural extracellular vesicles, which play an important role in intercellular communication. The specificity of exosome uptake by different target cells remains unknown. In this study, we observed that MCL exosomes are taken up rapidly and preferentially by MCL cells. Only minor fraction of exosomes was internalized into T-cell leukemia and bone marrow stroma cell lines, when these cells were co-cultured with MCL cells. Moreover, MCL patients’ exosomes were taken up by both healthy and patients’ B-lymphocytes with no apparent internalization to T lymphocytes and NK cells. Exosome internalization was not inhibited by specific siRNA against caveolin1 and clathrin but was found to be mediated by cholesterol-dependent pathway. These findings demonstrate natural specificity of exosomes to B-lymphocytes and ultimately might be used for therapeutic intervention in B cells malignancies. PMID:25933830

  5. Intravascular Large B-Cell Lymphoma: A Difficult Diagnostic Challenge.

    PubMed

    Khan, Maria S; McCubbin, Mark; Nand, Sucha

    2014-01-01

    Case Presentation. A 69-year-old Hispanic male, with a past history of diabetes and coronary disease, was admitted for fever, diarrhea, and confusion of 4 weeks duration. Physical examination showed a disoriented patient with multiple ecchymoses, possible ascites, and bilateral scrotal swelling. Hemoglobin was 6.7, prothrombin time (PT) 21.4 seconds with international normalized ratio 2.1, partial thromboplastin time (PTT) 55.6 seconds, fibrin split 10 µg/L, and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) 1231 IU/L. Except for a positive DNA test for Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection, extensive diagnostic workup for infections, malignancy, or a neurological cause was negative. Mixing studies revealed a nonspecific inhibitor of PT and PTT but Factor VIII levels were normal. The patient was empirically treated with antibiotics but developed hypotension and died on day 27 of admission. At autopsy, patient was found to have intravascular diffuse large B-cell lymphoma involving skin, testes, lung, and muscles. The malignant cells were positive for CD20, CD791, Mum-1, and Pax-5 and negative for CD3, CD5, CD10, CD30, and Bcl-6. The malignant cells were 100% positive for Ki-67. Discussion. Intravascular large cell B-cell lymphoma (IVLBCL) is rare form of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and tends to proliferate within small blood vessels, particularly capillaries and postcapillary venules. The cause of its affinity for vascular bed remains unknown. In many reports, IVLBCL was associated with HIV, HHV8, and EBV infections. The fact that our case showed evidence of EBV infection lends support to the association of this diagnosis to viral illness. The available literature on this subject is scant, and in many cases, the diagnosis was made only at autopsy. The typical presentation of this disorder is with B symptoms, progressive neurologic deficits, and skin findings. Bone marrow, spleen, and liver are involved in a minority of patients. Nearly all patients have elevated LDH, and about 65% are

  6. T cells induce terminal differentiation of transformed B cells to mature plasma cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Hilbert, D M; Shen, M Y; Rapp, U R; Rudikoff, S

    1995-01-31

    Major interest in the analysis of mature plasma cell neoplasias of mice and humans has focused on identification of precursor cells that give rise to mature malignant plasma cells. Although several laboratories have recently suggested that such cells are present in the granulomas of pristane-treated mice and the bone marrow of some multiple myeloma patients, the in vivo cellular interactions required for their differentiation into mature plasma cell tumors remains unclear. Given the extensive interactions of peripheral T cells and normal B cells, we assessed the potential role of T cells in plasma-cell tumor development, by using a myc, raf-containing retrovirus, J3V1, to induce plasmacytomas in normal BALB/c mice, T-cell-deficient nude mice, and T-cell-reconstituted nude mice. The B-lineage tumors arising in normal BALB/c mice were uniformly mature plasmacytomas, most of which secreted immunoglobulin. In contrast, nude mice yielded predominantly non-immunoglobulin-secreting B-cell lymphomas with a phenotype characteristic of peripheral B cells. T-cell reconstitution of nude mice prior to tumor induction resulted in a shift from B-cell lymphomas to plasmacytomas. These results imply that transformation can occur prior to terminal differentiation of B cells and that such transformed cells can be driven to terminal differentiation by peripheral T cells. These findings further suggest that, in human multiple myeloma, the ability of T cells to influence the differentiation state of transformed B cells may provide a mechanism by which malignant plasma cells found in the bone marrow could arise from clonotypically related less-mature B cells found in both the bone marrow and periphery. PMID:7846031

  7. What are genome-wide association studies telling us about B-cell tumor development?

    PubMed Central

    Sherborne, Amy L; Houlston, Richard S

    2010-01-01

    It has long been speculated that common genetic variation influences the development of B-cell malignancy, however until recently evidence for this assertion was lacking. The advent of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) has allowed the search for this class of susceptibility allele to be conducted on a genome-wide basis. Recent GWAS of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) have identified novel disease genes for CLL and ALL and underscore the importance of polymorphic variation in B-cell development genes as determinants of leukemia risk. PMID:21307401

  8. Primary bladder lymphoma, diffuse large B-cell type: Case report and literature review of 26 cases.

    PubMed

    Simpson, W Greg; Lopez, Armando; Babbar, Paurush; Payne, Lynnetta Faith

    2015-01-01

    Primary lymphoma of the urinary bladder is exceedingly rare, representing 0.2% of all extranodal non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Although Matsuno et al. and others state the most common type is mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma, 20% of all the primary lymphomas of the urinary bladder are considered to be high grade neoplasms; the majority being diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). This is a case report of a 48-year-old man that presented with hematuria, frequency, nocturia, and flank pain that was found to have high grade DLBCL. Twenty-six other cases of both low and high grade primary bladder lymphomas were selected in order to provide a thorough comparison of different treatment modalities. Of the cases reviewed, bladder lymphoma was more common in females (2:1). The average age at diagnosis was 63.9 years old (low grade: 68.7 years old, high grade: 58.8 years old). The most common low-grade neoplasm was MALT lymphoma (85.7%). For the low-grade malignancies, the most successful treatments were simple therapies (2 transurethral resection of a bladder tumour [TURBT], 1 antibiotics), solitary chemotherapy, and combination TURBT/chemo; all 3 of which achieved 100% clinical remission (CR) in the cases reviewed. The most common high grade neoplasm was DLBCL (76.9%). The most successful therapies used to treat high grade lesions were solitary chemotherapy (cyclophosphamide, duanorubacin, vincristine, prednisolone [CHOP] or ritoximab, CHOP [R-CHOP]) and combination therapies (2 radiation/CHOP, 2 surgery/CHOP). In the agreement with the current literature, this review has shown that simple therapies (TURBT) are equally as effective as aggressive treatments (chemotherapy, radiation) and should therefore be used as first line treatment in low grade tumors. For high grade malignancies, chemotherapy (R-CHOP or CHOP) alone or combination therapy (CHOP/surgery or CHOP/radiation) is recommended. PMID:25837971

  9. Primary bladder lymphoma, diffuse large B-cell type: Case report and literature review of 26 cases

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, W. Greg; Lopez, Armando; Babbar, Paurush; Payne, Lynnetta Faith

    2015-01-01

    Primary lymphoma of the urinary bladder is exceedingly rare, representing 0.2% of all extranodal non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Although Matsuno et al. and others state the most common type is mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma, 20% of all the primary lymphomas of the urinary bladder are considered to be high grade neoplasms; the majority being diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). This is a case report of a 48-year-old man that presented with hematuria, frequency, nocturia, and flank pain that was found to have high grade DLBCL. Twenty-six other cases of both low and high grade primary bladder lymphomas were selected in order to provide a thorough comparison of different treatment modalities. Of the cases reviewed, bladder lymphoma was more common in females (2:1). The average age at diagnosis was 63.9 years old (low grade: 68.7 years old, high grade: 58.8 years old). The most common low-grade neoplasm was MALT lymphoma (85.7%). For the low-grade malignancies, the most successful treatments were simple therapies (2 transurethral resection of a bladder tumour [TURBT], 1 antibiotics), solitary chemotherapy, and combination TURBT/chemo; all 3 of which achieved 100% clinical remission (CR) in the cases reviewed. The most common high grade neoplasm was DLBCL (76.9%). The most successful therapies used to treat high grade lesions were solitary chemotherapy (cyclophosphamide, duanorubacin, vincristine, prednisolone [CHOP] or ritoximab, CHOP [R-CHOP]) and combination therapies (2 radiation/CHOP, 2 surgery/CHOP). In the agreement with the current literature, this review has shown that simple therapies (TURBT) are equally as effective as aggressive treatments (chemotherapy, radiation) and should therefore be used as first line treatment in low grade tumors. For high grade malignancies, chemotherapy (R-CHOP or CHOP) alone or combination therapy (CHOP/surgery or CHOP/radiation) is recommended. PMID:25837971

  10. CCI-779 in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Refractory B-Cell Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma or Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-07

    B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Malignant Neoplasm; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  11. Cyclin Dl expression in B-cell non Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Aref, Salah; Mossad, Y; El-Khodary, T; Awad, M; El-Shahat, E

    2006-10-01

    Disorders of the cell cycle regulatory machinery play a key role in the pathogenesis of cancer. Over-expression of cyclin D1 protein has been reported in several solid tumors and certain lymphoid malignancies, but little is known about the effect of its expression on clinical behavior and outcome in B-cell Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). In this study, we investigated the expression of cyclin Dl in group of patients with NHL and correlated the results with the clinical and laboratory data. The degree of expression of cyclin Dl protein was evaluated by flow cytometry in a group of NHL patients (n = 46) and in normal control group (n = 10). Cyclin Dl over expression was detected in 10 out of 46 (21.7%) patients; they were 5/5-mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) (100%) and 5/28 large B-cell lymphoma (17.8%). All other NHL subtypes showed normal cyclin D1 expression. The clinical signs (hepatomegaly, splenomegaly and B-symptoms, clinical staging) and laboratory data (hemoglobin, white cell count (WBCs), platelet count, and bone marrow infiltration) were not significantly different between NHL subgroup with cyclin Dl over expression and that with normal cyclin Dl expression. Serum lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) levels and lymphadenopathy were significantly higher in NHL group with cyclin D1 over expression as compared to those without. Also, cyclin D1 over expression is associated with poor outcome of NHL patients. Cyclin Dl over expression was evident among all cases of MCL and few cases of large B-cell lymphoma. Cyclin Dl over expression might be used as adjuvant tool for diagnosis of MCL; has role in NHL biology and is bad prognostic index in NHL. PMID:17607588

  12. Targeting Stereotyped B Cell Receptors from Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Patients with Synthetic Antigen Surrogates.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Mohosin; Liu, Yun; Qi, Junpeng; Peng, Haiyong; Morimoto, Jumpei; Rader, Christoph; Chiorazzi, Nicholas; Kodadek, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is a disease in which a single B-cell clone proliferates relentlessly in peripheral lymphoid organs, bone marrow, and blood. DNA sequencing experiments have shown that about 30% of CLL patients have stereotyped antigen-specific B-cell receptors (BCRs) with a high level of sequence homology in the variable domains of the heavy and light chains. These include many of the most aggressive cases that haveIGHV-unmutated BCRs whose sequences have not diverged significantly from the germ line. This suggests a personalized therapy strategy in which a toxin or immune effector function is delivered selectively to the pathogenic B-cells but not to healthy B-cells. To execute this strategy, serum-stable, drug-like compounds able to target the antigen-binding sites of most or all patients in a stereotyped subset are required. We demonstrate here the feasibility of this approach with the discovery of selective, high affinity ligands for CLL BCRs of the aggressive, stereotyped subset 7P that cross-react with the BCRs of several CLL patients in subset 7p, but not with BCRs from patients outside this subset. PMID:26851280

  13. EZH2 inhibition re-sensitizes multidrug resistant B-cell lymphomas to etoposide mediated apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Smonskey, Matthew; Lasorsa, Elena; Rosario, Spencer; Kirk, Jason S.; Hernandez-Ilizaliturri, Francisco J.; Ellis, Leigh

    2016-01-01

    Reactivation of apoptotic pathways is an attractive strategy for patients with treatment-resistant B-cell lymphoma. The tumor suppressor, p53 is central for apoptotic response to multiple DNA damaging agents used to treat aggressive B-cell lymphomas, including etoposide. It has been demonstrated that etoposide induced DNA damage and therapeutic efficacy is enhanced by combination with inhibitors of the histone methyltransferase, enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2). Further, EZH2 was identified to regulate cell fate decisions in response to DNA damage. Using B-cell lymphoma cell lines resistant to etoposide induced cell death; we show that p53 is dramatically down regulated and MDMX, a negative regulator of p53, is significantly up regulated. However, these cell lines remain responsive to etoposide mediated DNA damage and exhibit cell cycle inhibition and induction of senescence. Furthermore, chemical inhibition of EZH2 directs DNA damage to a predominant p53 dependent apoptotic response associated with loss of MDMX and BCL-XL. These data provide confirmation of EZH2 in determining cell fate following DNA damage and propose a novel therapeutic strategy for patients with aggressive treatment-resistant B-cell lymphoma. PMID:26973857

  14. Human norovirus culture in B cells.

    PubMed

    Jones, Melissa K; Grau, Katrina R; Costantini, Veronica; Kolawole, Abimbola O; de Graaf, Miranda; Freiden, Pamela; Graves, Christina L; Koopmans, Marion; Wallet, Shannon M; Tibbetts, Scott A; Schultz-Cherry, Stacey; Wobus, Christiane E; Vinjé, Jan; Karst, Stephanie M

    2015-12-01

    Human noroviruses (HuNoVs) are a leading cause of foodborne disease and severe childhood diarrhea, and they cause a majority of the gastroenteritis outbreaks worldwide. However, the development of effective and long-lasting HuNoV vaccines and therapeutics has been greatly hindered by their uncultivability. We recently demonstrated that a HuNoV replicates in human B cells, and that commensal bacteria serve as a cofactor for this infection. In this protocol, we provide detailed methods for culturing the GII.4-Sydney HuNoV strain directly in human B cells, and in a coculture system in which the virus must cross a confluent epithelial barrier to access underlying B cells. We also describe methods for bacterial stimulation of HuNoV B cell infection and for measuring viral attachment to the surface of B cells. Finally, we highlight variables that contribute to the efficiency of viral replication in this system. Infection assays require 3 d and attachment assays require 3 h. Analysis of infection or attachment samples, including RNA extraction and RT-qPCR, requires ∼6 h. PMID:26513671

  15. Human norovirus culture in B cells

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Melissa K; Grau, Katrina R; Costantini, Veronica; Kolawole, Abimbola O; de Graaf, Miranda; Freiden, Pamela; Graves, Christina L; Koopmans, Marion; Wallet, Shannon M; Tibbetts, Scott A; Schultz-Cherry, Stacey; Wobus, Christiane E; Vinjé, Jan; Karst, Stephanie M

    2015-01-01

    Human noroviruses (HunoVs) are a leading cause of foodborne disease and severe childhood diarrhea, and they cause a majority of the gastroenteritis outbreaks worldwide. However, the development of effective and long-lasting HunoV vaccines and therapeutics has been greatly hindered by their uncultivability. We recently demonstrated that a HunoV replicates in human B cells, and that commensal bacteria serve as a cofactor for this infection. In this protocol, we provide detailed methods for culturing the GII.4-sydney HunoV strain directly in human B cells, and in a coculture system in which the virus must cross a confluent epithelial barrier to access underlying B cells. We also describe methods for bacterial stimulation of HunoV B cell infection and for measuring viral attachment to the surface of B cells. Finally, we highlight variables that contribute to the efficiency of viral replication in this system. Infection assays require 3 d and attachment assays require 3 h. analysis of infection or attachment samples, including rna extraction and rt-qpcr, requires ~6 h. PMID:26513671

  16. Cerebral toxoplasmosis in a diffuse large B cell lymphoma patient

    PubMed Central

    Savsek, Lina; Opaskar, Tanja Ros

    2016-01-01

    Background Toxoplasmosis is an opportunistic protozoal infection that has, until now, probably been an underestimated cause of encephalitis in patients with hematological malignancies, independent of stem cell or bone marrow transplant. T and B cell depleting regimens are probably an important risk factor for reactivation of a latent toxoplasma infection in these patients. Case report We describe a 62-year-old HIV-negative right-handed Caucasian female with systemic diffuse large B cell lymphoma who presented with sudden onset of high fever, headache, altered mental status, ataxia and findings of pancytopenia, a few days after receiving her final, 8th cycle of rituximab, cyclophosphamide, vincristine, doxorubicin, prednisolone (R-CHOP) chemotherapy regimen. A progression of lymphoma to the central nervous system was suspected. MRI of the head revealed multiple on T2 and fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) hyperintense parenchymal lesions with mild surrounding edema, located in both cerebral and cerebellar hemispheres that demonstrated moderate gadolinium enhancement. The polymerase chain reaction on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF PCR) was positive for Toxoplasma gondii. The patient was diagnosed with toxoplasmic encephalitis and successfully treated with sulfadiazine, pyrimethamine and folic acid. Due to the need for maintenance therapy with rituximab for lymphoma remission, the patient now continues with secondary prophylaxis of toxoplasmosis. Conclusions With this case report, we wish to emphasize the need to consider cerebral toxoplasmosis in patients with hematological malignancies on immunosuppressive therapy when presenting with new neurologic deficits. In such patients, there are numerous differential diagnoses for cerebral toxoplasmosis, and the CNS lymphoma is the most difficult among all to distinguish it from. If left untreated, cerebral toxoplasmosis has a high mortality rate; therefore early recognition and treatment are of essential importance. PMID

  17. The B-cell tumor–associated antigen ROR1 can be targeted with T cells modified to express a ROR1-specific chimeric antigen receptor

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, Thomas M.; Baskar, Sivasubramanian; Lupo-Stanghellini, Maria Teresa; Nishida, Tetsuya; Yamamoto, Tori N.; Bleakley, Marie; Turtle, Cameron J.; Chang, Wen-Chung; Greisman, Harvey A.; Wood, Brent; Maloney, David G.; Jensen, Michael C.; Rader, Christoph; Riddell, Stanley R.

    2010-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies and T cells modified to express chimeric antigen receptors specific for B-cell lineage surface molecules such as CD20 exert antitumor activity in B-cell malignancies, but deplete normal B cells. The receptor tyrosine kinase-like orphan receptor 1 (ROR1) was identified as a highly expressed gene in B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL), but not normal B cells, suggesting it may serve as a tumor-specific target for therapy. We analyzed ROR1-expression in normal nonhematopoietic and hematopoietic cells including B-cell precursors, and in hematopoietic malignancies. ROR1 has characteristics of an oncofetal gene and is expressed in undifferentiated embryonic stem cells, B-CLL and mantle cell lymphoma, but not in major adult tissues apart from low levels in adipose tissue and at an early stage of B-cell development. We constructed a ROR1-specific chimeric antigen receptor that when expressed in T cells from healthy donors or CLL patients conferred specific recognition of primary B-CLL and mantle cell lymphoma, including rare drug effluxing chemotherapy resistant tumor cells that have been implicated in maintaining the malignancy, but not mature normal B cells. T-cell therapies targeting ROR1 may be effective in B-CLL and other ROR1-positive tumors. However, the expression of ROR1 on some normal tissues suggests the potential for toxi-city to subsets of normal cells. PMID:20702778

  18. AID-induced remodeling of immunoglobulin genes and B cell fate

    PubMed Central

    Laffleur, Brice; Denis-Lagache, Nicolas; Péron, Sophie; Sirac, Christophe; Moreau, Jeanne; Cogné, Michel

    2014-01-01

    Survival and phenotype of normal and malignant B lymphocytes are critically dependent on constitutive signals by the B cell receptor (BCR) for antigen. In addition, either antigen ligation of the BCR or various mitogenic stimuli result in B cell activation and induction of activation-induced deaminase (AID). AID activity can in turn mediate somatic hypermutation (SHM) of immunoglobulin (Ig) V regions and also deeply remodel the Ig heavy chain locus through class switch recombination (CSR) or locus suicide recombination (LSR). In addition to changes linked to affinity for antigen, modifying the class/isotype (i.e. the structure and function) of the BCR or suddenly deleting BCR expression also modulates the fate of antigen-experienced B cells. PMID:24851241

  19. Eμ-BRD2 transgenic mice develop B-cell lymphoma and leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Greenwald, Rebecca J.; Tumang, Joseph R.; Sinha, Anupama; Currier, Nicolas; Cardiff, Robert D.; Rothstein, Thomas L.; Faller, Douglas V.; Denis, Gerald V.

    2010-01-01

    Transgenic mice with lymphoid-restricted overexpression of the double bromodomain protein bromodomain-containing 2 (Brd2) develop splenic B-cell lymphoma and, upon transplantation, B-cell leukemia with leukemic infiltrates in liver and lung. Brd2 is a nuclear-localized transcription factor kinase that is most closely related to TATA box binding protein–associated factor, 250 kDa (TAFII250) and the Drosophila developmental protein female sterile homeotic. Constitutive expression of BRD2 in the lymphoid compartment increases cyclin A transcription, “priming” transgenic B cells for proliferation. Mice stochastically develop an aggressive B-cell lymphoma with the features of B-1 cells, including CD5 and surface IgM expression. The B-cell lymphoma is monoclonal for immunoglobulin gene rearrangement and is phenotypically stable. The lymphoblasts are very large and express a transcriptome that is similar to human non-Hodgkin lymphomas. Both a wild-type BRD2 transgene and a kinase-null point mutant drive lymphomagenesis; therefore we propose that, rather than kinase activity, Brd2-mediated recruitment of E2 promoter binding factors (E2Fs) and a specific histone acetyltransferase to the cyclin A promoter by both types of transgene is a mechanistic basis for neoplasia. This report is the first to describe a transgenic mouse model for constitutive expression of a protein with more than one bromodomain. PMID:14563639

  20. Horizontal Transmission of Malignancy: In-Vivo Fusion of Human Lymphomas with Hamster Stroma Produces Tumors Retaining Human Genes and Lymphoid Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Goldenberg, David M.; Gold, David V.; Loo, Meiyu; Liu, Donglin; Chang, Chien-Hsing; Jaffe, Elaine S.

    2013-01-01

    We report the in-vivo fusion of two Hodgkin lymphomas with golden hamster cheek pouch cells, resulting in serially-transplanted (over 5–6 years) GW-532 and GW-584 heterosynkaryon tumor cells displaying both human and hamster DNA (by FISH), lymphoma-like morphology, aggressive metastasis, and retention of 7 human genes (CD74, CXCR4, CD19, CD20, CD71, CD79b, and VIM) out of 24 tested by PCR. The prevalence of B-cell restricted genes (CD19, CD20, and CD79b) suggests that this uniform population may be the clonal initiating (malignant) cells of Hodgkin lymphoma, despite their not showing translation to their respective proteins by immunohistochemical analysis. This is believed to be the first report of in-vivo cell-cell fusion of human lymphoma and rodent host cells, and may be a method to disclose genes regulating both organoid and metastasis signatures, suggesting that the horizontal transfer of tumor DNA to adjacent stromal cells may be implicated in tumor heterogeneity and progression. The B-cell gene signature of the hybrid xenografts suggests that Hodgkin lymphoma, or its initiating cells, is a B-cell malignancy. PMID:23405135

  1. Immunotherapy for malignant glioma

    PubMed Central

    Suryadevara, Carter M.; Verla, Terence; Sanchez-Perez, Luis; Reap, Elizabeth A.; Choi, Bryan D.; Fecci, Peter E.; Sampson, John H.

    2015-01-01

    Malignant gliomas (MG) are the most common type of primary malignant brain tumor. Most patients diagnosed with glioblastoma (GBM), the most common and malignant glial tumor, die within 12–15 months. Moreover, conventional treatment, which includes surgery followed by radiation and chemotherapy, can be highly toxic by causing nonspecific damage to healthy brain and other tissues. The shortcomings of standard-of-care have thus created a stimulus for the development of novel therapies that can target central nervous system (CNS)-based tumors specifically and efficiently, while minimizing off-target collateral damage to normal brain. Immunotherapy represents an investigational avenue with the promise of meeting this need, already having demonstrated its potential against B-cell malignancy and solid tumors in clinical trials. T-cell engineering with tumor-specific chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) is one proven approach that aims to redirect autologous patient T-cells to sites of tumor. This platform has evolved dramatically over the past two decades to include an improved construct design, and these modern CARs have only recently been translated into the clinic for brain tumors. We review here emerging immunotherapeutic platforms for the treatment of MG, focusing on the development and application of a CAR-based strategy against GBM. PMID:25722935

  2. B Cells and Humoral Immunity in Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Tsiantoulas, Dimitrios; Diehl, Cody J.; Witztum, Joseph L.; Binder, Christoph J.

    2014-01-01

    Insights into the important contribution of inflammation and immune functions in the development and progression of atherosclerosis have greatly improved our understanding of this disease. Although the role of T cells has been extensively studied for decades, only recently has the role of B cells gained more attention. Recent studies have identified differential effects of different B-cell subsets and helped to clarify the still poorly understood mechanisms by which these act. B1 cells have been shown to prevent lesion formation, whereas B2 cells have been suggested to promote it. Natural IgM antibodies, mainly derived from B1 cells, have been shown to mediate atheroprotective effects, but the functional role of other immunoglobulin classes, particularly IgG, still remains elusive. In this review, we will focus on recent insights on the role of B cells and various immunoglobulin classes and how these may mediate their effects in atherosclerotic lesion formation. Moreover, we will highlight potential therapeutic approaches focusing on B-cell depletion that could be used to translate experimental evidence to human disease. PMID:24855199

  3. A monoclonal antibody that recognizes B cells and B cell precursors in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Coffman, R.L.; Weissman, I.L.

    1981-02-01

    The monoclonal antibody, RA3-2C2, appears to be specific for cells within the B cell lineage. This antibody does not recognize thymocytes, peripheral T cells, or nonlymphoid hematopoietic cells in the spleen or bone marrow. Nor does it recognize the pluripotent hematopoietic stem cells, the spleen colony-forming unit, All sIg+ B cells and most plasma cells are RA3-2C2+. In addition, approximately 20% of nucleated bone marrow cells are RA3-2C2+ but sIg-. This population contains B cell precursors that can give rise to sIg+ cells within 2 d in vitro.

  4. DNA methylation dynamics during B cell maturation underlie a continuum of disease phenotypes in chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Oakes, Christopher C; Seifert, Marc; Assenov, Yassen; Gu, Lei; Przekopowitz, Martina; Ruppert, Amy S; Wang, Qi; Imbusch, Charles D; Serva, Andrius; Koser, Sandra D; Brocks, David; Lipka, Daniel B; Bogatyrova, Olga; Weichenhan, Dieter; Brors, Benedikt; Rassenti, Laura; Kipps, Thomas J; Mertens, Daniel; Zapatka, Marc; Lichter, Peter; Döhner, Hartmut; Küppers, Ralf; Zenz, Thorsten; Stilgenbauer, Stephan; Byrd, John C; Plass, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Charting differences between tumors and normal tissue is a mainstay of cancer research. However, clonal tumor expansion from complex normal tissue architectures potentially obscures cancer-specific events, including divergent epigenetic patterns. Using whole-genome bisulfite sequencing of normal B cell subsets, we observed broad epigenetic programming of selective transcription factor binding sites coincident with the degree of B cell maturation. By comparing normal B cells to malignant B cells from 268 patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), we showed that tumors derive largely from a continuum of maturation states reflected in normal developmental stages. Epigenetic maturation in CLL was associated with an indolent gene expression pattern and increasingly favorable clinical outcomes. We further uncovered that most previously reported tumor-specific methylation events are normally present in non-malignant B cells. Instead, we identified a potential pathogenic role for transcription factor dysregulation in CLL, where excess programming by EGR and NFAT with reduced EBF and AP-1 programming imbalances the normal B cell epigenetic program. PMID:26780610

  5. Interleukin 35-Producing B Cells (i35-Breg): A New Mediator of Regulatory B-Cell Functions in CNS Autoimmune Diseases.

    PubMed

    Egwuagu, Charles E; Yu, Cheng-Rong

    2015-01-01

    Neuroinflammation contributes to neuronal deficits in neurodegenerative CNS (central nervous system) autoimmune diseases, such as multiple sclerosis and uveitis. The major goal of most treatment modalities for CNS autoimmune diseases is to limit inflammatory responses in the CNS; immune-suppressive drugs are the therapy of choice. However, lifelong immunosuppression increases the occurrence of infections, nephrotoxicity, malignancies, cataractogenesis, and glaucoma, which can greatly impair quality of life for the patient. Biologics that target pathogenic T cells is an alternative approach that is gaining wide acceptance as indicated by the popularity of a variety of Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved anti-inflammatory compounds and humanized antibodies such as Zenapax, Etanercept, Remicade, anti-ICAM, rapamycin, or tacrolimus. B cells are also potential therapeutic targets because they provide costimulatory signals that activate pathogenic T cells and secrete cytokines that promote autoimmune pathology. B cells also produce autoreactive antibodies implicated in several organ-specific and systemic autoimmune diseases including lupus erythematosus, Graves' disease, and Hashimoto's thyroiditis. On the other hand, recent studies have led to the discovery of several regulatory B-cell (Breg) populations that suppress immune responses and autoimmune diseases. In this review, we present a brief overview of Breg phenotypes and in particular, the newly discovered IL35-producing regulatory B cell (i35-Breg). We discuss the critical roles played by i35-Bregs in regulating autoimmune diseases and the potential use of adoptive Breg therapy in CNS autoimmune diseases. PMID:25746047

  6. Human tonsil intraepithelial B cells: a marginal zone-related subpopulation.

    PubMed Central

    Morente, M.; Piris, M. A.; Orradre, J. L.; Rivas, C.; Villuendas, R.

    1992-01-01

    AIMS: To determine if intraepithelial B cells in reactive human palatine tonsils were similar to the marginal zone cells of the spleen and Peyer's patches. METHODS: Reactive human palatine tonsils were studied using conventional methods of light microscopy, electron microscopy, and a panel of monoclonal antibodies for leucocyte common antigens. RESULTS: Clinically important numbers of marginal zone-related B cells around the mantle zone were absent in lymphoid follicles, but in the cryptal epithelium there were abundant lymphoid cells with centrocyte-like nuclei and clear cytoplasm, intermingled with macrophages and plasma cells. The immunophenotype of these intraepithelial B cells was distinctive and similar to that found in the splenic marginal zone cells (IgM+, IgD-, CD23-, CD10-, CD35+, CD21+, bc12+, KB61+). CONCLUSIONS: Intraepithelial B cells in human tonsil could represent the counterpart of the marginal zone described in Peyer's patches. Their presence within the epithelium could reflect the destination for the malignant B cells in the lymphoepithelial lesion of mucosa associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphomas. Human palatine tonsil lymphoid tissue has morphological, immunophenotypic, and pathological features similar to those of MALT. Images PMID:1401174

  7. Cutaneous Spindle-Cell B-Cell Lymphomas: Most are Neoplasms of Follicular Center Cell Origin.

    PubMed

    Charli-Joseph, Yann; Cerroni, Lorenzo; LeBoit, Philip E

    2015-06-01

    Cutaneous lymphomas of both B cells and less commonly T cells can exceptionally exhibit spindle-cell morphology. Less than 30 spindle-cell B-cell lymphomas of the skin have been described, mostly before the adoption of detailed immunohistochemistry, and thus initially interpreted as variants of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). Furthermore, some authors suggest that cutaneous spindle-cell B-cell lymphomas (cSCBCLs) may behave more aggressively than their conventional morphologic counterparts and may thus merit more aggressive treatment. Herein we describe the largest case series of cSCBCL analyzed to date to characterize their clinicopathologic and immunohistochemical features and clarify their subtype according to the current WHO/EORTC classification scheme. Twenty-four cSCBCLs arose in 18 male and 6 female individuals with a mean age of 55 years, mostly on the head (12/24), trunk (8/24), and lower extremities (4/24). Histopathologic features were similar for all cases. Neoplasms involved the entire dermis and focally the subcutis. The neoplastic infiltrates comprised a mixture of medium-sized, visually prominent spindled cells (15%; up to 85% of the infiltrate) arranged in a fascicular pattern around nodular aggregates and admixed in a random manner between centrocyte/centroblast-like cells within these nodular collections. Immunohistochemical support for a follicular center cell origin was present in 22/24 cases, 1 was consistent with DLBCL-leg type and 1 defied precise classification, best fitting with intermediate-grade DLBCL-other. Our findings reinforce the concept that most cSCBCLs are variants of low-grade B-cell lymphomas of follicle center cell origin and not intermediate-grade variants of DLBCL. PMID:25634743

  8. Rituximab does not reset defective early B cell tolerance checkpoints

    PubMed Central

    Chamberlain, Nicolas; Massad, Christopher; Oe, Tyler; Cantaert, Tineke; Herold, Kevan C.; Meffre, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) patients show abnormalities in early B cell tolerance checkpoints, resulting in the accumulation of large numbers of autoreactive B cells in their blood. Treatment with rituximab, an anti-CD20 mAb that depletes B cells, has been shown to preserve β cell function in T1D patients and improve other autoimmune diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis. However, it remains largely unknown how anti–B cell therapy thwarts autoimmunity in these pathologies. Here, we analyzed the reactivity of Abs expressed by single, mature naive B cells from 4 patients with T1D before and 52 weeks after treatment to determine whether rituximab resets early B cell tolerance checkpoints. We found that anti–B cell therapy did not alter the frequencies of autoreactive and polyreactive B cells, which remained elevated in the blood of all patients after rituximab treatment. Moreover, the limited proliferative history of autoreactive B cells after treatment revealed that these clones were newly generated B cells and not self-reactive B cells that had escaped depletion and repopulated the periphery through homeostatic expansion. We conclude that anti–B cell therapy may provide a temporary dampening of autoimmune processes through B cell depletion. However, repletion with autoreactive B cells may explain the relapse that occurs in many autoimmune patients after anti–B cell therapy. PMID:26642366

  9. Switched-memory B cells remodel B cell receptors within secondary germinal centers

    PubMed Central

    Okitsu, Shinji L.; McHeyzer-Williams, Michael G.

    2015-01-01

    Effective vaccines induce high-affinity memory B cells and durable antibody responses through accelerated mechanisms of natural selection. Secondary changes in antibody repertoires after vaccine boosts suggest progressive B cell receptor (BCR) re-diversification, but underlying mechanisms remain unresolved. Here integrated specificity and function of individual memory B cell progeny reveal ongoing evolution of polyclonal antibody specificities through germinal center (GC) specific transcriptional activity. At the clonal and sub-clonal levels, single cell expression of Cd83 and Pol□ segregates the secondary GC transcriptional program into 4 stages that regulate divergent mechanisms of memory BCR evolution. These studies demonstrate that vaccine boosts re-activate a cyclic program of GC function in switched-memory B cells to remodel existing antibody specificities and enhance durable immune protection. PMID:25642821

  10. Cellular Ontogeny and Hierarchy Influence the Reprogramming Efficiency of Human B Cells into Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-López, Álvaro; van Roon, Eddy H J; Romero-Moya, Damià; López-Millan, Belén; Stam, Ronald W; Colomer, Dolors; Nakanishi, Mahito; Bueno, Clara; Menendez, Pablo

    2016-03-01

    Although B cells have been shown to be refractory to reprogramming into pluripotency, induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have been very recently generated, at very low efficiency, from human cord blood (CB)- and peripheral blood (PB)-derived CD19+CD20 + B cells using nonintegrative tetracistronic OSKM-expressing Sendai Virus (SeV). Here, we addressed whether cell ontogeny and hierarchy influence the reprogramming efficiency of the B-cell compartment. We demonstrate that human fetal liver (FL)-derived CD19 + B cells are 110-fold easier to reprogram into iPSCs than those from CB/PB. Similarly, FL-derived CD34+CD19 + B progenitors are reprogrammed much easier than mature B cells (0.46% vs. 0.11%). All FL B-cell iPSCs carry complete VDJH rearrangements while 55% and 45% of the FL B-progenitor iPSCs carry incomplete and complete VDJH rearrangements, respectively, reflecting the reprogramming of developmentally different B progenitors (pro-B vs. pre-B) within a continuous differentiation process. Finally, our data suggest that successful B-cell reprogramming relies on active cell proliferation, and it is MYC-dependent as identical nonintegrative polycistronic SeV lacking MYC (OSKL or OSKLN) fail to reprogram B cells. The ability to efficiently reprogram human fetal primary B cells and B precursors offers an unprecedented opportunity for studying developmental B-lymphopoiesis and modeling B-cell malignances. Stem Cells 2016;34:581-587. PMID:26850912

  11. Advances in Human B Cell Phenotypic Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Kaminski, Denise A.; Wei, Chungwen; Qian, Yu; Rosenberg, Alexander F.; Sanz, Ignacio

    2012-01-01

    To advance our understanding and treatment of disease, research immunologists have been called-upon to place more centralized emphasis on impactful human studies. Such endeavors will inevitably require large-scale study execution and data management regulation (“Big Biology”), necessitating standardized and reliable metrics of immune status and function. A well-known example setting this large-scale effort in-motion is identifying correlations between eventual disease outcome and T lymphocyte phenotype in large HIV-patient cohorts using multiparameter flow cytometry. However, infection, immunodeficiency, and autoimmunity are also characterized by correlative and functional contributions of B lymphocytes, which to-date have received much less attention in the human Big Biology enterprise. Here, we review progress in human B cell phenotyping, analysis, and bioinformatics tools that constitute valuable resources for the B cell research community to effectively join in this effort. PMID:23087687

  12. Impaired regulatory B cells in myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Jian Rong; Rezania, Kourosh; Soliven, Betty

    2016-08-15

    Regulatory B cells (Bregs) attenuate the severity of experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG) in an interleukin-10 (IL-10)-dependent manner. The goal of this study was to investigate the role of human Bregs in MG focusing on CD19(+)CD1d(hi) CD5(+) and CD19(+)CD24(hi)CD38(hi) subsets. We found that MG patients exhibited a decrease in the frequency of both Breg subsets and IL-10 producing B cells within each subset, which correlated with disease severity. In addition, there was impaired suppression of Th1 polarization in MG. These findings, taken together with EAMG data, indicate that Bregs play an important role in regulating the severity of MG. PMID:27397074

  13. Polyclonal B cell activation in ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed Central

    Barbieri, P; Olivieri, I; Benedettini, G; Marelli, P; Ciompi, M L; Pasero, G; Campa, M

    1990-01-01

    The peripheral blood lymphocyte response of patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) to several polyclonal B cell activators was investigated. No differences were found in the reactivity to pokeweed mitogen and protein A between patients and controls; in contrast, the peripheral blood lymphocyte response to Staphylococcus aureus strain Cowan I (SAC) was significantly higher in patients with AS than in controls. This responsiveness was not influenced either by the presence of the HLA-B27 antigen or by environmental factors or associated diseases, and it was higher in patients with active AS than in those with inactive disease. The percentage of circulating B cells was normal. The responses to T cell mitogens and the percentages of T cell subpopulations were similar in patients and in controls. The peripheral blood lymphocyte hyperactivity of patients with AS to SAC was associated with an increased in vitro production of immunoglobulins. PMID:2383063

  14. Early detection of intravascular large B-cell lymphoma by 18FDG-PET/CT with diffuse FDG uptake in the lung without respiratory symptoms or chest CT abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Shiiba, Masato; Izutsu, Koji; Ishihara, Makiko

    2014-01-01

    Intravascular large B-cell lymphoma (IVLBCL) is a rare and aggressive subtype of systemic extranodal non-Hodgkin diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). We report a rare case of IVLBCL who showed diffuse 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake in the lung in FDG-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) without respiratory symptoms or chest CT abnormalities. Serum biochemical studies showed a raised level of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and serum soluble interleukin-2 receptor (sIL-2R), which suggested the presence of malignant lymphoma strongly. A non-contrast CT showed no abnormalities in the lung fields, no lymphadenopathy was found. FDG-PET/CT revealed diffuse FDG uptake in the both lungs and in spleen as well as multiple hot spots in the liver. Under the suspicion of IVLBCL especially by the diffuse FDG uptake in the lung, a random skin biopsy was performed from three regions, the left forearm, right abdomen and left thigh in which there had been no evidence of FDG uptake. The definite diagnosis of IVLBCL was made based on the pathological analysis of the specimen from the left thigh. She achieved complete remission (CR) after combined chemoimmunotherapy. FDG-PET/CT was useful for the early detection of IVLBCL even without respiratory symptoms or any abnormal findings by chest CT.

  15. B Cells and Antibodies in Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Koenig, Alice; Mariat, Christophe; Mousson, Christiane; Wood, Kathryn J; Rifle, Gérard; Thaunat, Olivier

    2016-07-01

    Overlooked for decades, the humoral alloimmune response is increasingly recognized as a leading cause of graft loss after transplantation. However, improvement in the diagnosis of antibody-mediated rejection has not yet translated into better outcomes for transplanted patients. After an update on B cell physiology and antibody generation, the 2015 Beaune Seminar in Transplant Research challenged the conventional view of antibody-mediated rejection pathophysiology and discussed the latest promising therapeutic approaches. PMID:26845305

  16. Germinal center B cells and mixed leukocyte reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Monfalcone, A.P.; Kosco, M.H.; Szakal, A.K.; Tew, J.G. )

    1989-09-01

    The present study was undertaken to determine if germinal center (GC) B cells are sufficiently activated to stimulate mixed leukocyte reactions (MLR). Percoll density fractionation and a panning technique with peanut agglutinin (PNA) were used to isolate GC B cells from the lymph nodes of immune mice. The GC B cells were treated with mitomycin C or irradiation and used to stimulate allogeneic or syngeneic splenic T cells in the MLR. Controls included high-density (HD) B cells prepared from spleens of the same mice and HD B cells activated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and dextran sulfate. GC B cells bound high amount sof PNA (i.e., PNAhi). Similarly, the LPS-dextran sulfate-activated B cells were PNAhi. Treatment with neuraminidase rendered the PNAlo HD B cells PNAhi. GC B cells and the LPS-dextran sulfate-activated HD B cells stimulated a potent MLR, while the untreated HD B cells did not. However, following neuraminidase treatment, the resulting PNAhi HD B cell population was able to induce an MLR. The PNA marker appeared to be an indicator of stimulatory activity, but incubating the cells with PNA to bind the cell surface ligand did not interfere with the MLR. GC B cells were also capable of stimulating a syngeneic MLR in most experiments although this was not consistently obtained. It appears that germinal centers represent a unique in vivo microenvironment that provides the necessary signals for B cells to become highly effective antigen-presenting cells.

  17. Intraoral malignant melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Babburi, Suresh; Subramanyam, R. V.; Aparna, V.; Sowjanya, P.

    2013-01-01

    Primary oral mucosal melanoma is a rare aggressive neoplasm and accounts for only 0.2-8% of all reported melanomas. It is a malignant neoplasm of melanocytes that may arise from a benign melanocytic lesion or de novo from melanocytes within normal skin or mucosa. It is considered to be the most deadly and biologically unpredictable of all human neoplasms, having the worst prognosis. In this article, we report a case of oral melanoma in a 52-year-old female patient with a chief complaint of black discolouration of the maxillary gingiva and palate. PMID:24249959

  18. Metachronous/concomitant B-cell neoplasms with discordant light-chain or heavy-chain isotype restrictions: evidence of distinct B-cell neoplasms rather than clonal evolutions.

    PubMed

    Wei, Qiang; Sebastian, Siby; Papavassiliou, Paulie; Rehder, Catherine; Wang, Endi

    2014-10-01

    Metachronous/concomitant B-cell neoplasms with distinct morphology are usually considered clonally related. We retrospectively analyzed 4 cases of metachronous/concomitant B-cell neoplasms with discordant light-chain/heavy-chain restrictions. The primary diagnoses included chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL; n = 2), lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma (n = 1), and pediatric follicular lymphoma (FL; n = 1). The respective secondary diagnoses included diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL; n = 2), plasmablastic myeloma, and pediatric FL. The secondary B-cell neoplasm occurred after the primary diagnosis in 3 cases, with the median interval of 120 months (range, 21-216), whereas the remaining 1 case had the 2 neoplasms (CLL/DLBCL) diagnosed concurrently. Histology suggested aggressive transformation in 3 cases and recurrence in 1 case (FL). Nonetheless, 3 cases showed discordant light-chain restrictions between the 2 B-cell neoplasms, whereas in the remaining case (lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma/plasmablastic myeloma), the 2 neoplasms shared κ light-chain restriction but expressed different heavy-chain isotypes (IgM versus IgA). The 2 CLL/DLBCL cases had polymerase chain reaction-based IGH/K gene rearrangement study and amplicon sequence analysis performed, which demonstrated distinct clonal amplicons between the 2 B-cell neoplasms in each case. Concomitant/metachronous B-cell neoplasms may be clonally unrelated, which can be confirmed by immunoglobulin isotype analysis and/or genotypic studies. We advocate analysis of clonal identities in large cell transformation or recurrent disease compared with primary indolent B-cell neoplasm because of a potential difference in prognosis between clonally related and unrelated secondary B-cell neoplasms. PMID:25179408

  19. CONCEPT ANALYSIS: AGGRESSION

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jianghong

    2006-01-01

    The concept of aggression is important to nursing because further knowledge of aggression can help generate a better theoretical model to drive more effective intervention and prevention approaches. This paper outlines a conceptual analysis of aggression. First, the different forms of aggression are reviewed, including the clinical classification and the stimulus-based classification. Then the manifestations and measurement of aggression are described. Finally, the causes and consequences of aggression are outlined. It is argued that a better understanding of aggression and the causal factors underlying it are essential for learning how to prevent negative aggression in the future. PMID:15371137

  20. Concept analysis: aggression.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianghong

    2004-01-01

    The concept of aggression is important to nursing because further knowledge of aggression can help generate a better theoretical model to drive more effective intervention and prevention approaches. This paper outlines a conceptual analysis of aggression. First, the different forms of aggression are reviewed, including the clinical classification and the stimulus-based classification. Then the manifestations and measurement of aggression are described. Finally, the causes and consequences of aggression are outlined. It is argued that a better understanding of aggression and the causal factors underlying it are essential for learning how to prevent negative aggression in the future. PMID:15371137

  1. BCL-6 mutations in normal germinal center B cells: Evidence of somatic hypermutation acting outside Ig loci

    PubMed Central

    Pasqualucci, Laura; Migliazza, Anna; Fracchiolla, Nicola; William, Christopher; Neri, Antonino; Baldini, Luca; Chaganti, R. S. K.; Klein, Ulf; Küppers, Ralf; Rajewsky, Klaus; Dalla-Favera, Riccardo

    1998-01-01

    The molecular mechanism involved in the process of antigen-driven somatic hypermutation of Ig genes is unknown, but it is commonly believed that this mechanism is restricted to the Ig loci. B cell lymphomas commonly display multiple somatic mutations clustering in the 5′-regulatory region of BCL-6, a proto-oncogene encoding for a POZ/Zinc finger transcriptional repressor expressed in germinal center (GC) B cells and required for GC formation. To determine whether BCL-6 mutations represent a tumor-associated phenomenon or reflect a physiologic mechanism, we screened single human tonsillar GC B cells for mutations occurring in the BCL-6 5′-noncoding region and in the Ig variable heavy chain sequences. Thirty percent of GC B cells, but not naive B cells, displayed mutations in the 742 bp region analyzed within the first intron of BCL-6 (overall frequency: 5 × 10−4/bp). Accordingly, an expanded survey in lymphoid malignancies showed that BCL-6 mutations are restricted to B cell tumors displaying GC or post-GC phenotype and carrying mutated Ig variable heavy chain sequences. These results indicate that the somatic hypermutation mechanism active in GC B cells physiologically targets non-Ig sequences. PMID:9751748

  2. Neuropilin-1 expression characterizes T follicular helper (Tfh) cells activated during B cell differentiation in human secondary lymphoid organs.

    PubMed

    Renand, Amédée; Milpied, Pierre; Rossignol, Julien; Bruneau, Julie; Lemonnier, François; Dussiot, Michael; Coulon, Séverine; Hermine, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    T follicular helper (Tfh) cells play an essential role in the development of antigen-specific B cell immunity. Tfh cells regulate the differentiation and survival of activated B cells outside and inside germinal centers (GC) of secondary lymphoid organs. They act through cognate contacts with antigen-presenting B cells, but there is no current marker to specifically identify those Tfh cells which productively interact with B cells. Here we show that neuropilin 1 (Nrp1), a cell surface receptor, is selectively expressed by a subset of Tfh cells in human secondary lymphoid organs. Nrp1 expression on Tfh cells correlates with B cell differentiation in vivo and in vitro, is transient, and can be induced upon co-culture with autologous memory B cells in a cell contact-dependent manner. Comparative analysis of ex vivo Nrp1(+) and Nrp1(-) Tfh cells reveals gene expression modulation during activation. Finally, Nrp1 is expressed by malignant Tfh-like cells in a severe case of angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma (AITL) associated with elevated terminal B cell differentiation. Thus, Nrp1 is a specific marker of Tfh cells cognate activation in humans, which may prove useful as a prognostic factor and a therapeutic target in neoplastic diseases associated with Tfh cells activity. PMID:24386482

  3. Hyaluronan in human malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Sironen, R.K.; Tammi, M.; Tammi, R.; Auvinen, P.K.; Anttila, M.; Kosma, V-M.

    2011-02-15

    Hyaluronan, a major macropolysaccharide in the extracellular matrix of connective tissues, is intimately involved in the biology of cancer. Hyaluronan accumulates into the stroma of various human tumors and modulates intracellular signaling pathways, cell proliferation, motility and invasive properties of malignant cells. Experimental and clinicopathological evidence highlights the importance of hyaluronan in tumor growth and metastasis. A high stromal hyaluronan content is associated with poorly differentiated tumors and aggressive clinical behavior in human adenocarcinomas. Instead, the squamous cell carcinomas and malignant melanomas tend to have a reduced hyaluronan content. In addition to the stroma-cancer cell interaction, hyaluronan can influence stromal cell recruitment, tumor angiogenesis and epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Hyaluronan receptors, hyaluronan synthases and hyaluronan degrading enzymes, hyaluronidases, are involved in the modulation of cancer progression, depending on the tumor type. Furthermore, intracellular signaling and angiogenesis are affected by the degradation products of hyaluronan. Hyaluronan has also therapeutic implications since it is involved in multidrug resistance.

  4. Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma in patient after treatment of angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Skugor, Nives Dzeko; Perić, Zinaida; Vrhovac, Radovan; Radić-Kristo, Delfa; Kardum-Skelin, Ika; Jaksić, Branimir

    2010-03-01

    -induced proliferation of latently or newly EBV-infected B-cells with eventual clonal selection and progression to aggressive B-cell lymphoma. PMID:20432757

  5. Multifunctional Role of Bcl-2 in Malignant Transformation and Tumorigenesis of Cr(VI)-Transformed Lung Cells

    PubMed Central

    Azad, Neelam; Wang, Liying; Jiang, Bing-Hua; Davis, Mary E.; Barnett, John B.; Guo, Lan; Rojanasakul, Yon

    2012-01-01

    B-cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2) is an antiapoptotic protein known to be important in the regulation of apoptosis in various cell types. However, its role in malignant transformation and tumorigenesis of human lung cells is not well understood. We previously reported that chronic exposure of human lung epithelial cells to the carcinogenic hexavalent chromium Cr(VI) caused malignant transformation and Bcl-2 upregulation; however, the role of Bcl-2 in the transformation is unclear. Using a gene silencing approach, we showed that Bcl-2 plays an important role in the malignant properties of Cr(VI)-transformed cells. Downregulation of Bcl-2 inhibited the invasive and proliferative properties of the cells as well as their colony forming and angiogenic activities, which are upregulated in the transformed cells as compared to control cells. Furthermore, animal studies showed the inhibitory effect of Bcl-2 knockdown on the tumorigenesis of Cr(VI)-transformed cells. The role of Bcl-2 in malignant transformation and tumorigenesis was confirmed by gene silencing experiments using human lung carcinoma NCI-H460 cells. These cells exhibited aggressive malignant phenotypes similar to those of Cr(VI)-transformed cells. Knockdown of Bcl-2 in the H460 cells inhibited malignant and tumorigenic properties of the cells, indicating the general role of Bcl-2 in human lung tumorigenesis. Ingenuity Pathways Analysis (IPA) revealed potential effectors of Bcl-2 in tumorigenesis regulation. Additionally, using IPA together with ectopic expression of p53, we show p53 as an upstream regulator of Bcl-2 in Cr(VI)-transformed cells. Together, our results indicate the novel and multifunctional role of Bcl-2 in malignant transformation and tumorigenesis of human lung epithelial cells chronically exposed to Cr(VI). PMID:22666341

  6. B-cell-specific conditional expression of Myd88p.L252P leads to the development of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma in mice.

    PubMed

    Knittel, Gero; Liedgens, Paul; Korovkina, Darya; Seeger, Jens M; Al-Baldawi, Yussor; Al-Maarri, Mona; Fritz, Christian; Vlantis, Katerina; Bezhanova, Svetlana; Scheel, Andreas H; Wolz, Olaf-Oliver; Reimann, Maurice; Möller, Peter; López, Cristina; Schlesner, Matthias; Lohneis, Philipp; Weber, Alexander N R; Trümper, Lorenz; Staudt, Louis M; Ortmann, Monika; Pasparakis, Manolis; Siebert, Reiner; Schmitt, Clemens A; Klatt, Andreas R; Wunderlich, F Thomas; Schäfer, Stephan C; Persigehl, Thorsten; Montesinos-Rongen, Manuel; Odenthal, Margarete; Büttner, Reinhard; Frenzel, Lukas P; Kashkar, Hamid; Reinhardt, H Christian

    2016-06-01

    The adaptor protein MYD88 is critical for relaying activation of Toll-like receptor signaling to NF-κB activation. MYD88 mutations, particularly the p.L265P mutation, have been described in numerous distinct B-cell malignancies, including diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). Twenty-nine percent of activated B-cell-type DLBCL (ABC-DLBCL), which is characterized by constitutive activation of the NF-κB pathway, carry the p.L265P mutation. In addition, ABC-DLBCL frequently displays focal copy number gains affecting BCL2 Here, we generated a novel mouse model in which Cre-mediated recombination, specifically in B cells, leads to the conditional expression of Myd88(p.L252P) (the orthologous position of the human MYD88(p.L265P) mutation) from the endogenous locus. These mice develop a lymphoproliferative disease and occasional transformation into clonal lymphomas. The clonal disease displays the morphologic and immunophenotypical characteristics of ABC-DLBCL. Lymphomagenesis can be accelerated by crossing in a further novel allele, which mediates conditional overexpression of BCL2 Cross-validation experiments in human DLBCL samples revealed that both MYD88 and CD79B mutations are substantially enriched in ABC-DLBCL compared with germinal center B-cell DLBCL. Furthermore, analyses of human DLBCL genome sequencing data confirmed that BCL2 amplifications frequently co-occurred with MYD88 mutations, further validating our approach. Finally, in silico experiments revealed that MYD88-mutant ABC-DLBCL cells in particular display an actionable addiction to BCL2. Altogether, we generated a novel autochthonous mouse model of ABC-DLBCL that could be used as a preclinical platform for the development and validation of novel therapeutic approaches for the treatment of ABC-DLBCL. PMID:27048211

  7. [Malignant peritoneal mesothelioma].

    PubMed

    Scripcariu, V; Dajbog, Elena; Lefter, L; Ferariu, D; Pricop, Adriana; Grigoraş, M; Dragomir, Cr

    2006-01-01

    Mesothelioma is a neoplasm originating from the mesothelial surface lining cells of the serous human cavities. It may involve the pleura, less frequently the peritoneum rarely, the pericardium, the tunica vaginalis testis and ovarian epithelium. Asbestos has been widely used in industry. A causal relationship between asbestos exposure and pleural, peritoneal and pericardial malign mesothelioma was suggested, the risk of cancer being correlated to cumulate exposure. Studies from National Cancer Institute, USA, show that the malignant mesothelioma is a rare and aggressive asbestos related malignancy. The symptomatology is insidious and poses difficult problems in diagnosis and treatment. This paper presents the case of a 59 year old patient with malignant peritoneal mesothelioma who worked almost 40 years as an electrician, exposed to asbestos fibers. He was hospitalized for important weight loss, abdominal pain and tiredness being diagnosed after imaging tests with a giant tumor, localized at the abdominal upper level, which seems to originate from the spleen's superior pole. During surgery we discovered a tumor with cystic parts, intense vascularized, which turn to be adherent in the upper side to the lower face of the left midriff cupola, to the spleen superior pole and 1/3 middle level of the great gastric curve. It was performed surgical ablation of the tumor, splenectomy with favorable postoperative evolution, the patient being now under chemotherapy treatment. PMID:17283842

  8. The management of adult aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Couderc, B; Dujols, J P; Mokhtari, F; Norkowski, J L; Slawinski, J C; Schlaifer, D

    2000-07-01

    Aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphona include diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, anaplastic large cell lymphona, and different peripheral T-cell lymphomas. An international prognostic index has been developed including age, serum LDH, performance status, and extranodal involvement. For localized aggressive lymphoma, the preferred treatment is 3-4 CHOP and radiation therapy, with a cure rate of 70-80%. For disseminated aggressive lymphoma, current regimens have a cure rate of less than 40%. Innovative strategies, including dose escalation, autologus stem cell support, new drugs, and immunotherapy are being explored to improve these results. PMID:10863150

  9. High-level DNA amplifications are common genetic aberrations in B-cell neoplasms.

    PubMed Central

    Werner, C. A.; Döhner, H.; Joos, S.; Trümper, L. H.; Baudis, M.; Barth, T. F.; Ott, G.; Möller, P.; Lichter, P.; Bentz, M.

    1997-01-01

    Gene amplification is one of the molecular mechanisms resulting in the up-regulation of gene expression. In non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, such gene amplifications have been identified rarely. Using comparative genomic hybridization, a technique that has proven to be very sensitive for the detection of high-level DNA amplifications, we analyzed 108 cases of B-cell neoplasms (42 chronic B-cell leukemias, 5 mantle cell lymphomas, and 61 aggressive B-cell lymphomas). Twenty-four high-level amplifications were identified in 13% of the patients and mapped to 15 different genomic regions. Regions most frequently amplified were bands Xq26-28, 2p23-24, and 2p14-16 as well as 18q21 (three times each). Amplification of several proto-oncogenes and a cell cycle control gene (N-MYC (two cases), BCL2, CCND2, and GLI) located within the amplified regions was demonstrated by Southern blot analysis or fluorescence in situ hybridization to interphase nuclei of tumor cells. These data demonstrate that gene amplifications in B-cell neoplasms are much more frequent than previously assumed. The identification of highly amplified DNA regions and genes included in the amplicons provides important information for further analyses of genetic events involved in lymphomagenesis. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9250147

  10. Malignant external otitis: CT evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Curtin, H.D.; Wolfe, P.; May, M.

    1982-11-01

    Malignant external otitis is an aggressive infection caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa that most often occurs in elderly diabetics. Malignant external otitis often spreads inferiorly from the external canal to involve the subtemporal area and progresses medially towards the petrous apex leading to multiple cranial nerve palsies. The computed tomographic (CT) findings in malignant external otitis include obliteration of the normal fat planes in the subtemporal area as well as patchy destruction of the bony cortex of the mastoid. The point of exit of the various cranial nerves can be identified on CT scans, and the extent of the inflammatory mass correlates well with the clinical findings. Four cases of malignant external otitis are presented. In each case CT provided a good demonstration of involvement of the soft tissues at the base of the skull.

  11. Genome-Wide Association Study of Event-Free Survival in Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma Treated With Immunochemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Ghesquieres, Hervé; Slager, Susan L.; Jardin, Fabrice; Veron, Amelie S.; Asmann, Yan W.; Maurer, Matthew J.; Fest, Thierry; Habermann, Thomas M.; Bene, Marie C.; Novak, Anne J.; Mareschal, Sylvain; Haioun, Corinne; Lamy, Thierry; Ansell, Stephen M.; Tilly, Herve; Witzig, Thomas E.; Weiner, George J.; Feldman, Andrew L.; Dogan, Ahmet; Cunningham, Julie M.; Olswold, Curtis L.; Molina, Thierry Jo; Link, Brian K.; Milpied, Noel; Cox, David G.; Salles, Gilles A.; Cerhan, James R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We performed a multistage genome-wide association study to identify inherited genetic variants that predict outcome in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma patients treated with immunochemotherapy. Methods We conducted a meta-analysis of two genome-wide association study data sets, one from the LNH2003B trial (N = 540), a prospective clinical trial from the Lymphoma Study Association, and the other from the Molecular Epidemiology Resource study (N = 312), a prospective observational study from the University of Iowa–Mayo Clinic Lymphoma Specialized Program of Research Excellence. Top single nucleotide polymorphisms were then genotyped in independent cohorts of patients from the Specialized Program of Research Excellence (N = 391) and the Groupe Ouest-Est des Leucémies Aiguës et Maladies du Sang (GOELAMS) -075 randomized trial (N = 294). We calculated the hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% CIs for event-free survival (EFS) and overall survival (OS) using a log-additive genetic model with adjustment for age, sex, and age-adjusted International Prognostic Index. Results In a meta-analysis of the four studies, the top loci for EFS were marked by rs7712513 at 5q23.2 (near SNX2 and SNCAIP; HR, 1.39; 95% CI, 1.23 to 1.57; P = 2.08 × 10−7), and rs7765004 at 6q21 (near MARCKS and HDAC2; HR, 1.38; 95% CI, 1.22 to 1.57; P = 7.09 × 10−7), although they did not reach conventional genome-wide significance (P = 5 × 10−8). Both rs7712513 (HR, 1.49; 95% CI, 1.29 to 1.72; P = 3.53 × 10−8) and rs7765004 (HR, 1.47; 95% CI, 1.27 to 1.71; P = 5.36 × 10−7) were also associated with OS. In exploratory analyses, a two–single nucleotide polymorphism risk score was highly predictive of EFS (P = 1.78 × 10−12) and was independent of treatment, IPI, and cell-of-origin classification. Conclusion Our study provides encouraging evidence for associations between loci at 5q23.2 and 6q21 with EFS and OS in patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma treated with immunochemotherapy

  12. Numb Chin Syndrome as First Symptom of Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Carbone, Mario; Della Ferrera, Francesco; Carbone, Lucio; Gatti, Gaia; Carrozzo, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Numb chin syndrome is a rare sensory neuropathy of the mental nerve characterized by numbness, hypoesthesia, paraesthesia, and very rarely pain. Dental causes, especially iatrogenic ones, maxillofacial trauma, or malignant neoplasm are etiologic factors for this rare syndrome. Many malignant and metastatic neoplasms are causing this syndrome, like primary osteosarcoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and mandibular metastasis of primary carcinoma of breast, lung, thyroid, kidney, prostate, and nasopharynx. Haematological malignancies like acute lymphocytic leukaemia, Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphoma, and myeloma can cause this neuropathy. The authors report a case of a 71-year-old woman in which the numb chin syndrome was the first symptom of the diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, which caused infiltration and reabsorption of the alveolar ridge and lower mandibular cortex. A biopsy of the mass was performed on fragments of tissue collected from the mandibular periosteum, medullary and cortical mandibular bone, and inferior alveolar nerve. PMID:25580308

  13. Treatment of ongoing autoimmune encephalomyelitis with activated B-cell progenitors maturing into regulatory B cells.

    PubMed

    Korniotis, Sarantis; Gras, Christophe; Letscher, Hélène; Montandon, Ruddy; Mégret, Jérôme; Siegert, Stefanie; Ezine, Sophie; Fallon, Padraic G; Luther, Sanjiv A; Fillatreau, Simon; Zavala, Flora

    2016-01-01

    The influence of signals perceived by immature B cells during their development in bone marrow on their subsequent functions as mature cells are poorly defined. Here, we show that bone marrow cells transiently stimulated in vivo or in vitro through the Toll-like receptor 9 generate proB cells (CpG-proBs) that interrupt experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) when transferred at the onset of clinical symptoms. Protection requires differentiation of CpG-proBs into mature B cells that home to reactive lymph nodes, where they trap T cells by releasing the CCR7 ligand, CCL19, and to inflamed central nervous system, where they locally limit immunopathogenesis through interleukin-10 production, thereby cooperatively inhibiting ongoing EAE. These data demonstrate that a transient inflammation at the environment, where proB cells develop, is sufficient to confer regulatory functions onto their mature B-cell progeny. In addition, these properties of CpG-proBs open interesting perspectives for cell therapy of autoimmune diseases. PMID:27396388

  14. Gastrointestinal B-cell lymphomas: From understanding B-cell physiology to classification and molecular pathology

    PubMed Central

    Sagaert, Xavier; Tousseyn, Thomas; Yantiss, Rhonda K

    2012-01-01

    The gut is the most common extranodal site where lymphomas arise. Although all histological lymphoma types may develop in the gut, small and large B-cell lymphomas predominate. The sometimes unexpected finding of a lymphoid lesion in an endoscopic biopsy of the gut may challenge both the clinician (who is not always familiar with lymphoma pathogenesis) and the pathologist (who will often be hampered in his/her diagnostic skill by the limited amount of available tissue). Moreover, the past 2 decades have spawned an avalanche of new data that encompasses both the function of the reactive B-cell as well as the pathogenic pathways that lead to its neoplastic counterpart, the B-cell lymphoma. Therefore, this review aims to offer clinicians an overview of B-cell lymphomas in the gut, and their pertinent molecular features that have led to new insights regarding lymphomagenesis. It addresses the question as how to incorporate all presently available information on normal and neoplastic B-cell differentiation, and how this knowledge can be applied in daily clinical practice (e.g., diagnostic tools, prognostic biomarkers or therapeutic targets) to optimalise the managment of this heterogeneous group of neoplasms. PMID:23443141

  15. Gastrointestinal B-cell lymphomas: From understanding B-cell physiology to classification and molecular pathology.

    PubMed

    Sagaert, Xavier; Tousseyn, Thomas; Yantiss, Rhonda K

    2012-12-15

    The gut is the most common extranodal site where lymphomas arise. Although all histological lymphoma types may develop in the gut, small and large B-cell lymphomas predominate. The sometimes unexpected finding of a lymphoid lesion in an endoscopic biopsy of the gut may challenge both the clinician (who is not always familiar with lymphoma pathogenesis) and the pathologist (who will often be hampered in his/her diagnostic skill by the limited amount of available tissue). Moreover, the past 2 decades have spawned an avalanche of new data that encompasses both the function of the reactive B-cell as well as the pathogenic pathways that lead to its neoplastic counterpart, the B-cell lymphoma. Therefore, this review aims to offer clinicians an overview of B-cell lymphomas in the gut, and their pertinent molecular features that have led to new insights regarding lymphomagenesis. It addresses the question as how to incorporate all presently available information on normal and neoplastic B-cell differentiation, and how this knowledge can be applied in daily clinical practice (e.g., diagnostic tools, prognostic biomarkers or therapeutic targets) to optimalise the managment of this heterogeneous group of neoplasms. PMID:23443141

  16. Leukemia - B-Cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia and Hairy Cell Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Leukemia: Introduction Request Permissions Print to PDF Leukemia - B-cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia and Hairy Cell Leukemia: Introduction ... Research and Advocacy Survivorship Blog About Us Leukemia - B-cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia and Hairy Cell Leukemia Guide ...

  17. Digital PCR for quantification of recurrent and potentially actionable somatic mutations in circulating free DNA from patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Camus, Vincent; Sarafan-Vasseur, Nasrin; Bohers, Elodie; Dubois, Sydney; Mareschal, Sylvain; Bertrand, Philippe; Viailly, Pierre-Julien; Ruminy, Philippe; Maingonnat, Catherine; Lemasle, Emilie; Stamatoullas, Aspasia; Picquenot, Jean-Michel; Cornic, Marie; Beaussire, Ludivine; Bastard, Christian; Frebourg, Thierry; Tilly, Hervé; Jardin, Fabrice

    2016-09-01

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is an aggressive and heterogeneous malignancy harboring frequent targetable activating somatic mutations. Emerging evidence suggests that circulating cell-free DNA (cfDNA) can be used to detect somatic variants in DLBCL using Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) experiments. In this proof-of-concept study, we chose to develop simple and valuable digital PCR (dPCR) assays for the detection of recurrent exportin-1 (XPO1) E571K, EZH2 Y641N, and MYD88 L265P mutations in DLBCL patients, thereby identifying patients most likely to potentially benefit from targeted therapies. We demonstrated that our dPCR assays were sufficiently sensitive to detect rare XPO1, EZH2, and MYD88 mutations in plasma cfDNA, with a sensitivity of 0.05%. cfDNA somatic mutation detection by dPCR seems to be a promising technique in the management of DLBCL, in addition to NGS experiments. PMID:26883583

  18. CD43 expression in B cell lymphoma.

    PubMed Central

    Treasure, J.; Lane, A.; Jones, D. B.; Wright, D. H.

    1992-01-01

    AIMS: To determine the expression of CD43 in frozen sections in a range of B cell lymphomas. METHODS: The monoclonal antibody WR14, clustered provisionally in the Fourth Leucocyte Typing Workshop as a CD43 reagent, was investigated by epitope blocking studies on formalin fixed reactive lymph node tissue, using the established CD43 antibody MT1, to validate its use as a CD43 reagent. CD43 expression was studied in 131 immunophenotypically defined B cell lymphomas, including lymphocytic lymphoma (Lc, n = 13), centrocytic lymphoma (Cc, n = 14), and a range of follicle centre cell lymphomas (FCC) including centroblastic/centrocytic follicular (CbCcF, n = 48), centroblastic diffuse (CbD, n = 39), centroblastic/centrocytic diffuse (CbCcD, n = 4), centroblastic follicular and diffuse (Cb FD, n = 3) and centroblastic/centrocytic follicular and diffuse (CbCc FD, n = 1). Nine lymphomas of mucosa associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) were also examined. RESULTS: Epitope blocking studies showed that WR14 is a CD43 reagent that binds to an epitope identical with or close to that recognised by MT1. Eleven of 13 (84%) cases of Lc and 11 of 14 (78%) cases of Cc expressed CD43; 87 of 95 (91%) cases of FCC did not. All eight low grade lymphomas of MALT were negative. One high grade lymphoma, transformed from a low grade MALT lymphoma, was positive for CD43. The expression of CD43 by tumours of B cell lineage was associated with the expression of CD5 (p < 0.001) although either antigen could occasionally be found in the absence of the other. CONCLUSION: CD43 reagents can be used in conjunction with CD5 antibodies for the immunophenotypic discrimination of follicle centre cell lymphomas from non-follicle centre cell lymphomas. Images PMID:1280654

  19. Exosomes Derived from Burkitt’s Lymphoma Cell Lines Induce Proliferation, Differentiation, and Class-Switch Recombination in B Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gutzeit, Cindy; Nagy, Noemi; Gentile, Maurizio; Lyberg, Katarina; Gumz, Janine; Vallhov, Helen; Puga, Irene; Klein, Eva; Gabrielsson, Susanne; Cerutti, Andrea; Scheynius, Annika

    2014-01-01

    Exosomes, nano-sized membrane vesicles, are released by various cells and are found in many human body fluids. They are active players in intercellular communication and have immune-suppressive, immune-regulatory, and immune-stimulatory functions. EBV is a ubiquitous human herpesvirus that is associated with various lymphoid and epithelial malignancies. EBV infection of B cells in vitro induces the release of exosomes that harbor the viral latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1). LMP1 per se mimics CD40 signaling and induces proliferation of B lymphocytes and T cell–independent class-switch recombination. Constitutive LMP1 signaling within B cells is blunted through the shedding of LMP1 via exosomes. In this study, we investigated the functional effect of exosomes derived from the DG75 Burkitt’s lymphoma cell line and its sublines (LMP1 transfected and EBV infected), with the hypothesis that they might mimic exosomes released during EBV-associated diseases. We show that exosomes released during primary EBV infection of B cells harbored LMP1, and similar levels were detected in exosomes from LMP1-transfected DG75 cells. DG75 exosomes efficiently bound to human B cells within PBMCs and were internalized by isolated B cells. In turn, this led to proliferation, induction of activation-induced cytidine deaminase, and the production of circle and germline transcripts for IgG1 in B cells. Finally, exosomes harboring LMP1 enhanced proliferation and drove B cell differentiation toward a plasmablast-like phenotype. In conclusion, our results suggest that exosomes released from EBV-infected B cells have a stimulatory capacity and interfere with the fate of human B cells. PMID:24829410

  20. FDG-PET imaging in hematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Valls, L; Badve, C; Avril, S; Herrmann, K; Faulhaber, P; O'Donnell, J; Avril, N

    2016-07-01

    The majority of aggressive lymphomas is characterized by an up regulated glycolytic activity, which enables the visualization by F-18 FDG-PET/CT. One-stop hybrid FDG-PET/CT combines the functional and morphologic information, outperforming both, CT and FDG-PET as separate imaging modalities. This has resulted in several recommendations using FDG-PET/CT for staging, restaging, monitoring during therapy, and assessment of treatment response as well as identification of malignant transformation. FDG-PET/CT may obviate the need for a bone marrow biopsy in patients with Hodgkin's lymphoma and diffuse large B cell lymphoma. FDG-PET/CT response assessment is recommended for FDG-avid lymphomas, whereas CT-based response evaluation remains important in lymphomas with low or variable FDG avidity. The treatment induced change in metabolic activity allows for assessment of response after completion of therapy as well as prediction of outcome early during therapy. The five-point scale Deauville Criteria allows the assessment of treatment response based on visual FDG-PET analysis. Although the use of FDG-PET/CT for prediction of therapeutic response is promising it should only be conducted in the context of clinical trials. Surveillance FDG-PET/CT after complete remission is discouraged due to the relative high number of false-positive findings, which in turn may result in further unnecessary investigations. Future directions include the use of new PET tracers such as F-18 fluorothymidine (FLT), a surrogate biomarker of cellular proliferation and Ga-68 CXCR4, a chemokine receptor imaging biomarker as well as innovative digital PET/CT and PET/MRI techniques. PMID:27090170

  1. Mutation of chromatin modifiers; an emerging hallmark of germinal center B-cell lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Lunning, M A; Green, M R

    2015-01-01

    Subtypes of non-Hodgkin's lymphomas align with different stages of B-cell development. Germinal center B-cell (GCB)-like diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), follicular lymphoma (FL) and Burkitt's lymphoma (BL) each share molecular similarities with normal GCB cells. Recent next-generation sequencing studies have gained insight into the genetic etiology of these malignancies and revealed a high frequency of mutations within genes encoding proteins that modifying chromatin. These include activating and inactivating mutations of genes that perform post-translational modification of histones and organize chromatin structure. Here, we discuss the function of histone acetyltransferases (CREBBP, EP300), histone methyltransferases (KDM2C/D, EZH2) and regulators of higher order chromatin structure (HIST1H1C/D/E, ARID1A and SMARCA4) that have been reported to be mutated in ⩾5% of DLBCL, FL or BL. Mutations of these genes are an emerging hallmark of lymphomas with GCB-cell origins, and likely represent the next generation of therapeutic targets for these malignancies. PMID:26473533

  2. Identification of IFN-γ-producing innate B cells

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Yan; Liu, Xingguang; Han, Chaofeng; Xu, Sheng; Xie, Bin; Zhang, Qian; Gu, Yan; Hou, Jin; Qian, Li; Qian, Cheng; Han, Huanxing; Cao, Xuetao

    2014-01-01

    Although B cells play important roles in the humoral immune response and the regulation of adaptive immunity, B cell subpopulations with unique phenotypes, particularly those with non-classical immune functions, should be further investigated. By challenging mice with Listeria monocytogenes, Escherichia coli, vesicular stomatitis virus and Toll-like receptor ligands, we identified an inducible CD11ahiFcγRIIIhi B cell subpopulation that is significantly expanded and produces high levels of IFN-γ during the early stage of the immune response. This subpopulation of B cells can promote macrophage activation via generating IFN-γ, thereby facilitating the innate immune response against intracellular bacterial infection. As this new subpopulation is of B cell origin and exhibits the phenotypic characteristics of B cells, we designated these cells as IFN-γ-producing innate B cells. Dendritic cells were essential for the inducible generation of these innate B cells from the follicular B cells via CD40L-CD40 ligation. Increased Bruton's tyrosine kinase activation was found to be responsible for the increased activation of non-canonical NF-κB pathway in these innate B cells after CD40 ligation, with the consequent induction of additional IFN-γ production. The identification of this new population of innate B cells may contribute to a better understanding of B cell functions in anti-infection immune responses and immune regulation. PMID:24296781

  3. DNA repair genes are selectively mutated in diffuse large B cell lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    de Miranda, Noel FCC; Peng, Roujun; Georgiou, Konstantinos; Wu, Chenglin; Sörqvist, Elin Falk; Berglund, Mattias; Chen, Longyun; Gao, Zhibo; Lagerstedt, Kristina; Lisboa, Susana; Roos, Fredrik; van Wezel, Tom; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Rosenquist, Richard; Sundström, Christer; Enblad, Gunilla; Nilsson, Mats; Zeng, Yixin; Kipling, David

    2013-01-01

    DNA repair mechanisms are fundamental for B cell development, which relies on the somatic diversification of the immunoglobulin genes by V(D)J recombination, somatic hypermutation, and class switch recombination. Their failure is postulated to promote genomic instability and malignant transformation in B cells. By performing targeted sequencing of 73 key DNA repair genes in 29 B cell lymphoma samples, somatic and germline mutations were identified in various DNA repair pathways, mainly in diffuse large B cell lymphomas (DLBCLs). Mutations in mismatch repair genes (EXO1, MSH2, and MSH6) were associated with microsatellite instability, increased number of somatic insertions/deletions, and altered mutation signatures in tumors. Somatic mutations in nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) genes (DCLRE1C/ARTEMIS, PRKDC/DNA-PKcs, XRCC5/KU80, and XRCC6/KU70) were identified in four DLBCL tumors and cytogenetic analyses revealed that translocations involving the immunoglobulin-heavy chain locus occurred exclusively in NHEJ-mutated samples. The novel mutation targets, CHEK2 and PARP1, were further screened in expanded DLBCL cohorts, and somatic as well as novel and rare germline mutations were identified in 8 and 5% of analyzed tumors, respectively. By correlating defects in a subset of DNA damage response and repair genes with genomic instability events in tumors, we propose that these genes play a role in DLBCL lymphomagenesis. PMID:23960188

  4. Cernunnos influences human immunoglobulin class switch recombination and may be associated with B cell lymphomagenesis.

    PubMed

    Du, Likun; Peng, Roujun; Björkman, Andrea; Filipe de Miranda, Noel; Rosner, Cornelia; Kotnis, Ashwin; Berglund, Mattias; Liu, Chonghai; Rosenquist, Richard; Enblad, Gunilla; Sundström, Christer; Hojjat-Farsangi, Mohammad; Rabbani, Hodjattallah; Teixeira, Manuel R; Revy, Patrick; Durandy, Anne; Zeng, Yixin; Gennery, Andrew R; de Villartay, Jean-Pierre; Pan-Hammarström, Qiang

    2012-02-13

    Cernunnos is involved in the nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) process during DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. Here, we studied immunoglobulin (Ig) class switch recombination (CSR), a physiological process which relies on proper repair of the DSBs, in B cells from Cernunnos-deficient patients. The pattern of in vivo generated CSR junctions is altered in these cells, with unusually long microhomologies and a lack of direct end-joining. The CSR junctions from Cernunnos-deficient patients largely resemble those from patients lacking DNA ligase IV, Artemis, or ATM, suggesting that these factors are involved in the same end-joining pathway during CSR. By screening 269 mature B cell lymphoma biopsies, we also identified a somatic missense Cernunnos mutation in a diffuse large B cell lymphoma sample. This mutation has a dominant-negative effect on joining of a subset of DNA ends in an in vitro NHEJ assay. Translocations involving both Ig heavy chain loci and clonal-like, dynamic IgA switching activities were observed in this tumor. Collectively, our results suggest a link between defects in the Cernunnos-dependent NHEJ pathway and aberrant CSR or switch translocations during the development of B cell malignancies. PMID:22312109

  5. A functional receptor for B-cell activating factor is expressed on human acute lymphoblastic leukemias

    PubMed Central

    Parameswaran, Reshmi; Muschen, Markus; Kim, Yong-mi; Groffen, John; Heisterkamp, Nora

    2010-01-01

    B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) arises by transformation of a progenitor (pre-B) cell. Cure rates in adults remain low and treatment is complicated by support provided by the microenvironment to the leukemic cells, indicating an urgent need to better understand the factors that promote their survival. B cell activating factor (BAFF) and its receptor BAFF-R are important for survival and growth of mature normal and malignant B-cells but are not expressed on pre-B cells. Unexpectedly, all cells in the primary Philadelphia-chromosome positive and negative ALL samples tested were positive for high BAFF-R cell surface expression. The BAFF-R was fully competent to bind BAFF and stimulation of the receptor activated both the classical and the non-canonical NFκB pathways. Recombinant BAFF supported survival of the ALL cells in the absence of stroma, and it significantly attenuated the rate of apoptosis caused by exposure to nilotinib, a drug used therapeutically to treat Philadelphia-chromosome positive ALLs. Surprisingly, BAFF mRNA and protein were also expressed in the same cells but BAFF was not shed into the medium. Our report is the first showing universal expression of the BAFF-R by pre-B ALL cells and opens the possibility of blocking its function as an adjuvant therapeutic strategy. PMID:20460528

  6. CD79B limits response of diffuse large B cell lymphoma to ibrutinib.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joo Hyun; Kim, Won Seog; Ryu, Kyungju; Kim, Seok Jin; Park, Chaehwa

    2016-06-01

    Blockage of B cell receptor signaling with ibrutinib presents a promising clinical approach for treatment of B-cell malignancies. However, many patients show primary resistance to the drug or develop secondary resistance. In the current study, cDNA microarray and Western blot analyses revealed CD79B upregulation in the activated B cell-like diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (ABC-DLBCL) that display differential resistance to ibrutinib. CD79B overexpression was sufficient to induce resistance to ibrutinib and enhanced AKT and MAPK activation, indicative of an alternative mechanism underlying resistance. Conversely, depletion of CD79B sensitized primary refractory cells to ibrutinib and led to reduced phosphorylation of AKT or MAPK. Combination of the AKT inhibitor or the MAPK inhibitor with ibrutinib resulted in circumvention of both primary and acquired resistance in ABC-DLBCL. Our data collectively indicate that CD79B overexpression leading to activation of AKT/MAPK is a potential mechanism underlying primary ibrutinib resistance in ABC-DLBCL, and support its utility as an effective biomarker to predict therapeutic response to ibrutinib. PMID:26699656

  7. Preclinical targeting of human T-cell malignancies using CD4-specific chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-engineered T cells.

    PubMed

    Pinz, K; Liu, H; Golightly, M; Jares, A; Lan, F; Zieve, G W; Hagag, N; Schuster, M; Firor, A E; Jiang, X; Ma, Y

    2016-03-01

    Peripheral T-cell lymphomas (PTCLs) are aggressive lymphomas with no effective upfront standard treatment and ineffective options in relapsed disease, resulting in poorer clinical outcomes as compared with B-cell lymphomas. The adoptive transfer of T cells engineered to express chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) is a promising new approach for treatment of hematological malignancies. However, preclinical reports of targeting T-cell lymphoma with CARs are almost non-existent. Here we have designed a CAR, CD4CAR, which redirects the antigen specificity of CD8+ cytotoxic T cells to CD4-expressing cells. CD4CAR T cells derived from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and cord blood effectively redirected T-cell specificity against CD4+ cells in vitro. CD4CAR T cells efficiently eliminated a CD4+ leukemic cell line and primary CD4+ PTCL patient samples in co-culture assays. Notably, CD4CAR T cells maintained a central memory stem cell-like phenotype (CD8+CD45RO+CD62L+) under standard culture conditions. Furthermore, in aggressive orthotropic T-cell lymphoma models, CD4CAR T cells efficiently suppressed the growth of lymphoma cells while also significantly prolonging mouse survival. Combined, these studies demonstrate that CD4CAR-expressing CD8+ T cells are efficacious in ablating malignant CD4+ populations, with potential use as a bridge to transplant or stand-alone therapy for the treatment of PTCLs. PMID:26526988

  8. B cell lymphoma, unclassifiable, with features intermediate between diffuse large B cell lymphoma and classical hodgkin lymphoma: diagnosis by fine-needle aspiration cytology.

    PubMed

    Lynnhtun, Kyaw; Varikatt, Winny; Pathmanathan, Nirmala

    2014-08-01

    A 58-year-old lady presented with mediastinal lymphadenopathy. A thoracoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration showed large atypical epithelioid cells arranged in cohesive sheets and dispersed as single cells with intact cytoplasm amid a background of lymphocytes and histiocytes. A cytological diagnosis of "a malignant neoplasm" was made, raising a broad list of differential diagnoses. A broad panel of immunocytochemical stains performed on the cell block was indicative of a lymphoproliferative disorder, but the immunophenotype was intermediate between diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL). Diffuse and strong reactivity to CD20, CD79a, and PAX-5, and weak reactivity to CD30, was in favor of a DLBCL, or more precisely mediastinal (thymic) large B cell lymphoma (MLBL). However, there were negative staining for LCA, OCT-2, and BOB-1 as well as positive staining for EBV-encoded RNA, which were against a diagnosis of MLBL and raised the possibility of cHL. The absence of RS cells and the typical mileu, the negativity for CD15 and the strong positivity of CD20 and PAX-5 were against a diagnosis of cHL. On this basis, the diagnosis of "B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder with features intermediate between DLBCL and cHL" was rendered. The diagnosis was subsequently confirmed on excisional biopsy. This case report demonstrates broad differential diagnoses raised by this diagnostic entity and the importance of an adequate cell block for accurate designation. PMID:23630122

  9. Lectin-like transcript 1 is a marker of germinal center-derived B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphomas dampening natural killer cell functions

    PubMed Central

    Germain, Claire; Guillaudeux, Thierry; Galsgaard, Elisabeth D; Hervouet, Catherine; Tekaya, Nedra; Gallouet, Anne-Sophie; Fassy, Julien; Bihl, Franck; Poupon, Gwenola; Lazzari, Anne; Spee, Pieter; Anjuère, Fabienne; Pangault, Céline; Tarte, Karin; Tas, Patrick; Xerri, Luc; Braud, Veronique M

    2015-01-01

    Non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHLs) are malignant neoplasms which are clinically and biologically diverse. Their incidence is constantly increasing and despite treatment advances, there is a need for novel targeted therapies. Here, we identified Lectin-like transcript 1 (LLT1) as a biomarker of germinal center (GC)-derived B-cell NHLs. LLT1 identifies GC B cells in reactive tonsils and lymph nodes and its expression is maintained in B-cell NHLs which derive from GC, including Burkitt lymphoma (BL), follicular lymphoma (FL), and GC-derived diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). We further show that LLT1 expression by tumors dampens natural killer (NK) cell functions following interaction with its receptor CD161, uncovering a potential immune escape mechanism. Our results pinpoint LLT1 as a novel biomarker of GC-derived B-cell NHLs and as a candidate target for innovative immunotherapies. PMID:26405582

  10. SNS01-T modulation of eIF5A inhibits B-cell cancer progression and synergizes with bortezomib and lenalidomide.

    PubMed

    Francis, Sarah M; Taylor, Catherine A; Tang, Terence; Liu, Zhongda; Zheng, Qifa; Dondero, Richard; Thompson, John E

    2014-09-01

    The high rates of recurrence and low median survival in many B-cell cancers highlight a need for new targeted therapeutic modalities. In dividing cells, eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A (eIF5A) is hypusinated and involved in regulation of protein synthesis and proliferation, whereas the non-hypusinated form of eIF5A is a potent inducer of cell death in malignant cells. Here, we demonstrate the potential of modulating eIF5A expression as a novel approach to treating B-cell cancers. SNS01-T is a nonviral polyethylenimine-based nanoparticle, designed to induce apoptosis selectively in B-cell cancers by small interfering RNA-mediated suppression of hypusinated eIF5A and plasmid-based overexpression of a non-hypusinable eIF5A mutant. In this study, we show that SNS01-T is preferentially taken up by malignant B cells, inhibits tumor growth in multiple animal models of B-cell cancers without damaging normal tissues, and synergizes with the current therapies bortezomib and lenalidomide to inhibit tumor progression. The results collectively demonstrate the potential of SNS01-T as a novel therapeutic for treatment of a diverse range of B-cell malignancies. PMID:24569836

  11. T cell binding to B lymphoid cell lines in humans: a marker for T-B cell interaction?

    PubMed

    Goust, J M; Fudenberg, H H

    1983-04-15

    Binding of human circulating T cells to established normal and malignant B cell lines results in rosette formation. The percentage of B cells, circulating T cells, and thymocytes able to bind to the B-LCL Raji were 0%, 59 +/- 4% and 61 +/- 6%, respectively. The percentage of rosettes formed between Raji cells and circulating mononuclear cells from 92 normal individuals was 27.8 +/- 5.3%, and remained stable over several months. This phenomenon seems to involve relatively mature B cells, and a T cell marker which appears early in T cell ontogeny. In the peripheral blood, most of the B-LCL binding T cells exhibit a 'helper-inducer' phenotype, as determined with the monoclonal antibodies Leu 3a and OKT4. However, a significant percentage of T cells with so-called 'cytotoxic-suppressor' markers (Leu 2a and OKT8) also bind to B-LCL. The T cells involved in this morphological interactive reaction with B cells might conceivably be specifically involved in regulating B cell functions. Enumeration of this particular subset may be useful in conditions where abnormal T-B cell interactions are suspected. PMID:6601166

  12. AID-Induced Genotoxic Stress Promotes B Cell Differentiation in the Germinal Center via ATM and LKB1 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, Mara H.; Kuraishy, Ali I.; Deshpande, Chetan; Hong, Jason S.; Cacalano, Nicholas A.; Gatti, Richard A.; Manis, John P.; Damore, Michael A.; Pellegrini, Matteo; Teitell, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY During an immune response, B cells undergo rapid proliferation and AID-dependent remodeling of immunoglobulin (IG) genes within germinal centers (GCs) to generate memory B and plasma cells. Unfortunately, the genotoxic stress associated with the GC reaction also promotes most B cell malignancies. Here we report that exogenous- and intrinsic AID-induced DNA strand breaks activate ATM, which signals through an LKB1 intermediate to inactivate CRTC2, a transcriptional coactivator of CREB. Using genome-wide location analysis, we determined that CRTC2 inactivation unexpectedly represses a genetic program that controls GC B cell proliferation, self-renewal, and differentiation while opposing lymphomagenesis. Inhibition of this pathway results in increased GC B cell proliferation, reduced antibody secretion, and impaired terminal differentiation. Multiple distinct pathway disruptions were also identified in human GC B cell lymphoma patient samples. Combined, our data show that CRTC2 inactivation, via physiologic DNA damage response signaling, promotes B cell differentiation in response to genotoxic stress. PMID:20864035

  13. Bi-functional CD22 ligands use multimeric immunoglobulins as protein scaffolds in assembly of immune complexes on B cells

    PubMed Central

    O'Reilly, Mary K.; Collins, Brian E.; Han, Shoufa; Liao, Liang; Rillahan, Cory; Kitov, Pavel I.; Bundle, David R.; Paulson, James C.

    2008-01-01

    CD22 is a B cell specific sialic-acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectin (Siglec) whose function as a regulator of B cell signaling is modulated by its interaction with glycan ligands bearing the sequence NeuAcα2-6Gal. To date, only highly multivalent polymeric ligands (n=450) have achieved sufficient avidity to bind to CD22 on native B cells. Here we demonstrate that a synthetic bi-functional molecule comprising a ligand of CD22 linked to an antigen (nitrophenol; NP) can use a monoclonal anti-NP-IgM as a decavalent protein scaffold to efficiently drive assembly of IgM-CD22 complexes on the surface of native B cells. Surprisingly, anti-NP antibodies of lower valency, IgA (n =4) and IgG (n =2), were also found to drive complex formation, though with lower avidity. Ligands bearing alternate linkers of variable length and structure were constructed to establish the importance of a minimal length requirement, and versatility in the structural requirement. We show that the ligand drives assembly of IgM complexes exclusively on the surface of B cells and not other classes of white blood cells that do not express CD22, which lends itself to the possibility of targeting B cells in certain hematopoietic malignancies. PMID:18505252

  14. Dengue Virus Directly Stimulates Polyclonal B Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Papa, Michelle Premazzi; de Morais, Ana Theresa Silveira; Peçanha, Ligia Maria Torres; de Arruda, Luciana Barros

    2015-01-01

    Dengue infection is associated to vigorous inflammatory response, to a high frequency of activated B cells, and to increased levels of circulating cross-reactive antibodies. We investigated whether direct infection of B cells would promote activation by culturing primary human B lymphocytes from healthy donors with DENV in vitro. B cells were susceptible, but poorly permissive to infection. Even though, primary B cells cultured with DENV induced substantial IgM secretion, which is a hallmark of polyclonal B cell activation. Notably, DENV induced the activation of B cells obtained from either DENV immune or DENV naïve donors, suggesting that it was not dependent on DENV-specific secondary/memory response. B cell stimulation was dependent on activation of MAPK and CD81. B cells cultured with DENV also secreted IL-6 and presented increased expression of CD86 and HLA-DR, which might contribute to B lymphocyte co-stimulatory function. Indeed, PBMCs, but not isolated B cells, secreted high amounts of IgG upon DENV culture, suggesting that interaction with other cell types in vivo might promote Ig isotype switching and IgG secretion from different B cell clones. These findings suggest that activation signaling pathways triggered by DENV interaction with non-specific receptors on B cells might contribute to the exacerbated response observed in dengue patients. PMID:26656738

  15. CX3CR1(+) B Cells Show Immune Suppressor Properties*

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zhiqiang

    2014-01-01

    The immune regulatory functions of B cells are not fully understood yet. The present study aims to characterize a subtype of B cells that expresses CX3CR1. In this study, peripheral blood samples were collected from patients with food allergies and healthy subjects. Peripheral B cells were analyzed by flow cytometry. T cell proliferation was assessed by carboxyfluorescein succinimidyl ester dilution assay. The results showed that the CX3CR1+ B cells were detected in the peripheral blood samples of healthy subjects and were significantly less in patients with food allergies. CX3CR1+ B cells expressed high levels of TGF-β and integrin αvβ6. CX3CR1+ B cells could efficiently suppress other effector CD4+ T cell activation. We conclude that human peripheral CX3CR1+ B cells have immune suppressor properties. PMID:24970890

  16. Epigenetics of Peripheral B-Cell Differentiation and the Antibody Response

    PubMed Central

    Zan, Hong; Casali, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    pathogens, and generation of pathogenic autoantibodies, IgE in allergic reactions, as well as B cell neoplasia. Epigenetic marks would be attractive targets for new therapeutics for autoimmune and allergic diseases, and B cell malignancies. PMID:26697022

  17. Motility and trafficking in B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (Review).

    PubMed

    Till, Kathleen J; Coupland, Sarah E; Pettitt, Andrew R

    2014-07-01

    B cell non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (B-NHLs) consist of a wide spectrum of entities and consequently have varied clinical courses. Like many other malignancies, each of the B-NHL depend on their microenvironment for growth and survival; therefore, understanding the factors involved in their tissue localisation is likely to have implications for therapies designed to treat B-NHL. This review summarises the chemokines, integrins and sphingosine-1 phosphate receptors involved in normal B cell location and distribution within the lymphoid tissues (lymph nodes, spleen and bone marrow). It also provides a précis of what is known about these factors in the disease state: i.e., in some subtypes of B-NHL. PMID:24788871

  18. CNS accumulation of regulatory B cells is VLA-4-dependent

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann-Horn, Klaus; Sagan, Sharon A.; Winger, Ryan C.; Spencer, Collin M.; Bernard, Claude C.A.; Sobel, Raymond A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the role of very late antigen-4 (VLA-4) on regulatory B cells (Breg) in CNS autoimmune disease. Methods: Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) was induced in mice selectively deficient for VLA-4 on B cells (CD19cre/α4f/f) by immunization with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) peptide (p)35–55 or recombinant human (rh) MOG protein. B-cell and T-cell populations were examined by flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry. Breg were evaluated by intracellular IL-10 staining of B cells and, secondly, by coexpression of CD1d and CD5. Results: As previously reported, EAE was less severe in B-cell VLA-4-deficient vs control CD19cre mice when induced by rhMOG, a model that is B-cell-dependent and leads to efficient B-cell activation and antibody production. Paradoxically, B-cell VLA-4-deficient mice developed more severe clinical disease than control mice when EAE was induced with MOG p35-55, a B-cell-independent encephalitogen that does not efficiently activate B cells. Peripheral T-cell and humoral immune responses were not altered in B-cell VLA-4-deficient mice. In MOG p35-55-induced EAE, B-cell VLA-4 deficiency reduced CNS accumulation of B but not T cells. Breg were detected in the CNS of control mice with MOG p35-55-induced EAE. However, more severe EAE in B-cell VLA-4-deficient mice was associated with virtual absence of CNS Breg. Conclusions: Our results demonstrate that CNS accumulation of Breg is VLA-4-dependent and suggest that Breg may contribute to regulation of CNS autoimmunity in situ. These observations underscore the need to choose the appropriate encephalitogen when studying how B cells contribute to pathogenesis or regulation of CNS autoimmunity. PMID:27027096

  19. Mucosal malignant melanoma of the maxillary sinus.

    PubMed

    Norhafizah, M; Mustafa, W M B W; Sabariah, A R; Shiran, M S; Pathmanathan, R

    2010-09-01

    Mucosal malignant melanoma (MMM) is an aggressive tumour occurring in the upper respiratory tract. It is rare compared to malignant melanoma of the skin. We report a case of a 53-year-old man with left paranasal swelling. A biopsy showed high-grade spindle cell tumour. Subsequently a subtotal maxillectomy was performed. Histopathological examination revealed a hypercellular tumour composed of mixed spindle and epitheloid cells with very occasional intracytoplasmic melanin pigment. The malignant cells were immunopositive for vimentin, S-100 protein and HMB-45. It was diagnosed as mucosal malignant melanoma (MMM). This article illustrates a rare case of MMM where the diagnosis may be missed or delayed without proper histopathological examination that include meticulous search for melanin pigment and appropriate immunohistochemical stains to confirm the diagnosis. Malignant melanoma can mimic many other types of high-grade malignancy and should be considered as a differential diagnosis in many of these instances. PMID:21939172

  20. Immunotherapy using unconjugated CD19 monoclonal antibodies in animal models for B lymphocyte malignancies and autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Yazawa, Norihito; Hamaguchi, Yasuhito; Poe, Jonathan C; Tedder, Thomas F

    2005-10-18

    Immunotherapy with unconjugated CD20 monoclonal antibodies has proven effective for treating non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and autoimmune disease. CD20 immunotherapy depletes mature B cells but does not effectively deplete pre-B or immature B cells, some B cell subpopulations, antibody-producing cells, or their malignant counterparts. Because CD19 is expressed earlier during B cell development, a therapeutic strategy for the treatment of early lymphoblastic leukemias/lymphomas was developed by using CD19-specific monoclonal antibodies in a transgenic mouse expressing human CD19. Pre-B cells and their malignant counterparts were depleted as well as antibody- and autoantibody-producing cells. These results demonstrate clinical utility for the treatment of diverse B cell malignancies, autoimmune disease, and humoral transplant rejection. PMID:16217038

  1. The SH3-SAM adaptor HACS1 is up-regulated in B cell activation signaling cascades.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yuan Xiao; Benn, Sally; Li, Zhi Hua; Wei, Ellen; Masih-Khan, Esther; Trieu, Young; Bali, Meenakshi; McGlade, C Jane; Claudio, Jaime O; Stewart, A Keith

    2004-09-20

    HACS1 is a Src homology 3 and sterile alpha motif domain-containing adaptor that is preferentially expressed in normal hematopoietic tissues and malignancies including myeloid leukemia, lymphoma, and myeloma. Microarray data showed HACS1 expression is up-regulated in activated human B cells treated with interleukin (IL)-4, CD40L, and anti-immunoglobulin (Ig)M and clustered with genes involved in signaling, including TNF receptor-associated protein 1, signaling lymphocytic activation molecule, IL-6, and DEC205. Immunoblot analysis demonstrated that HACS1 is up-regulated by IL-4, IL-13, anti-IgM, and anti-CD40 in human peripheral blood B cells. In murine spleen B cells, Hacs1 can also be up-regulated by lipopolysaccharide but not IL-13. Induction of Hacs1 by IL-4 is dependent on Stat6 signaling and can also be impaired by inhibitors of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, protein kinase C, and nuclear factor kappaB. HACS1 associates with tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins after B cell activation and binds in vitro to the inhibitory molecule paired Ig-like receptor B. Overexpression of HACS1 in murine spleen B cells resulted in a down-regulation of the activation marker CD23 and enhancement of CD138 expression, IgM secretion, and Xbp-1 expression. Knock down of HACS1 in a human B lymphoma cell line by small interfering ribonucleic acid did not significantly change IL-4-stimulated B cell proliferation. Our study demonstrates that HACS1 is up-regulated by B cell activation signals and is a participant in B cell activation and differentiation. PMID:15381729

  2. B Cells in Multiple Sclerosis: Connecting the Dots

    PubMed Central

    von Büdingen, H.-Christian; Bar-Or, Amit; Zamvil, Scott S.

    2014-01-01

    Over the last two decades B cells have increasingly moved into the spotlight in multiple sclerosis (MS) research. This interest was fuelled by growing understanding and acceptance of pathological involvement of B cells and antibodies in MS. Data derived from animal models of MS, human histopathological studies, and analyses of B cells in the peripheral blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) have permitted the integration of B cells in our overall picture of MS immunopathogenesis. The as yet strongest direct evidence for a central role of B cells in MS autoimmunity was the demonstration that peripheral B cell depletion leads to a rapid decline of disease-activity in MS. While lending formidable impact to peripheral blood B cells as mediators of disease activity, the effects of anti-CD20 treatment also seemingly challenged the paradigm of a role of antibodies in targeted central nervous system (CNS) myelin destruction. This review shall attempt to provide an overview of our current understanding of B cell and antibody mediated mechanisms relevant to MS. We will include findings from, both, human studies, and animal models to highlight the complexity of B cell function as it pertains to MS. B cells appear to be effective drivers of inflammatory activity in MS by way of a diverse toolset of cellular functions. These functions appear to be closely linked to B cells that can be found in the periphery. However, by serving as the source of antibodies, B cells offer a direct humoral response that may target the CNS and lead to tissue specific destruction. Therefore, B cells participate in MS pathogenesis on both sides of the blood-brain barrier. PMID:21983151

  3. KSHV-Mediated Regulation of Par3 and SNAIL Contributes to B-Cell Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Jha, Hem C; Sun, Zhiguo; Upadhyay, Santosh K; El-Naccache, Darine W; Singh, Rajnish K; Sahu, Sushil K; Robertson, Erle S

    2016-07-01

    Studies have suggested that Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT) and transformation is an important step in progression to cancer. Par3 (partitioning-defective protein) is a crucial factor in regulating epithelial cell polarity. However, the mechanism by which the latency associated nuclear antigen (LANA) encoded by Kaposi's Sarcoma associated herpesvirus (KSHV) regulates Par3 and EMTs markers (Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition) during viral-mediated B-cell oncogenesis has not been fully explored. Moreover, several studies have demonstrated a crucial role for EMT markers during B-cell malignancies. In this study, we demonstrate that Par3 is significantly up-regulated in KSHV-infected primary B-cells. Further, Par3 interacted with LANA in KSHV positive and LANA expressing cells which led to translocation of Par3 from the cell periphery to a predominantly nuclear signal. Par3 knockdown led to reduced cell proliferation and increased apoptotic induction. Levels of SNAIL was elevated, and E-cadherin was reduced in the presence of LANA or Par3. Interestingly, KSHV infection in primary B-cells led to enhancement of SNAIL and down-regulation of E-cadherin in a temporal manner. Importantly, knockdown of SNAIL, a major EMT regulator, in KSHV cells resulted in reduced expression of LANA, Par3, and enhanced E-cadherin. Also, SNAIL bound to the promoter region of p21 and can regulate its activity. Further a SNAIL inhibitor diminished NF-kB signaling through upregulation of Caspase3 in KSHV positive cells in vitro. This was also supported by upregulation of SNAIL and Par3 in BC-3 transplanted NOD-SCID mice which has potential as a therapeutic target for KSHV-associated B-cell lymphomas. PMID:27463802

  4. IL-10-Producing Regulatory B Cells Are Decreased in Patients with Common Variable Immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Priscilla Ramos; Barros, Myrthes Toledo; Kalil, Jorge; Kokron, Cristina Maria

    2016-01-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is the most prevalent symptomatic primary immunodeficiency in adults. CVID patients often present changes in the frequency and function of B lymphocytes, reduced number of Treg cells, chronic immune activation, recurrent infections, high incidence of autoimmunity and increased risk for malignancies. We hypothesized that the frequency of B10 cells would be diminished in CVID patients because these cells play an important role in the development of Treg cells and in the control of T cell activation and autoimmunity. Therefore, we evaluated the frequency of B10 cells in CVID patients and correlated it with different clinical and immunological characteristics of this disease. Forty-two CVID patients and 17 healthy controls were recruited for this study. Cryopreserved PBMCs were used for analysis of T cell activation, frequency of Treg cells and characterization of B10 cells by flow cytometry. IL-10 production by sorted B cells culture and plasma sCD14 were determined by ELISA. We found that CVID patients presented decreased frequency of IL-10-producing CD24hiCD38hi B cells in different cell culture conditions and decreased frequency of IL-10-producing CD24hiCD27+ B cells stimulated with CpG+PIB. Moreover, we found that CVID patients presented lower secretion of IL-10 by sorting-purified B cells when compared to healthy controls. The frequency of B10 cells had no correlation with autoimmunity, immune activation and Treg cells in CVID patients. This work suggests that CVID patients have a compromised regulatory B cell compartment which is not correlated with clinical and immunological characteristics presented by these individuals. PMID:26991898

  5. Aberrantly Expressed OTX Homeobox Genes Deregulate B-Cell Differentiation in Hodgkin Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Nagel, Stefan; Ehrentraut, Stefan; Meyer, Corinna; Kaufmann, Maren; Drexler, Hans G.; MacLeod, Roderick A. F.

    2015-01-01

    In Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) we recently reported that deregulated homeobox gene MSX1 mediates repression of the B-cell specific transcription factor ZHX2. In this study we investigated regulation of MSX1 in this B-cell malignancy. Accordingly, we analyzed expression and function of OTX homeobox genes which activate MSX1 transcription during embryonal development in the neural plate border region. Our data demonstrate that OTX1 and OTX2 are aberrantly expressed in both HL patients and cell lines. Moreover, both OTX loci are targeted by genomic gains in overexpressing cell lines. Comparative expression profiling and subsequent pathway modulations in HL cell lines indicated that aberrantly enhanced FGF2-signalling activates the expression of OTX2. Downstream analyses of OTX2 demonstrated transcriptional activation of genes encoding transcription factors MSX1, FOXC1 and ZHX1. Interestingly, examination of the physiological expression profile of ZHX1 in normal hematopoietic cells revealed elevated levels in T-cells and reduced expression in B-cells, indicating a discriminatory role in lymphopoiesis. Furthermore, two OTX-negative HL cell lines overexpressed ZHX1 in correlation with genomic amplification of its locus at chromosomal band 8q24, supporting the oncogenic potential of this gene in HL. Taken together, our data demonstrate that deregulated homeobox genes MSX1 and OTX2 respectively impact transcriptional inhibition of (B-cell specific) ZHX2 and activation of (T-cell specific) ZHX1. Thus, we show how reactivation of a specific embryonal gene regulatory network promotes disturbed B-cell differentiation in HL. PMID:26406991

  6. KSHV-Mediated Regulation of Par3 and SNAIL Contributes to B-Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Hem C.; Sun, Zhiguo; Upadhyay, Santosh K.; El-Naccache, Darine W.; Singh, Rajnish K.; Sahu, Sushil K.; Robertson, Erle S.

    2016-01-01

    Studies have suggested that Epithelial–Mesenchymal Transition (EMT) and transformation is an important step in progression to cancer. Par3 (partitioning-defective protein) is a crucial factor in regulating epithelial cell polarity. However, the mechanism by which the latency associated nuclear antigen (LANA) encoded by Kaposi's Sarcoma associated herpesvirus (KSHV) regulates Par3 and EMTs markers (Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition) during viral-mediated B-cell oncogenesis has not been fully explored. Moreover, several studies have demonstrated a crucial role for EMT markers during B-cell malignancies. In this study, we demonstrate that Par3 is significantly up-regulated in KSHV-infected primary B-cells. Further, Par3 interacted with LANA in KSHV positive and LANA expressing cells which led to translocation of Par3 from the cell periphery to a predominantly nuclear signal. Par3 knockdown led to reduced cell proliferation and increased apoptotic induction. Levels of SNAIL was elevated, and E-cadherin was reduced in the presence of LANA or Par3. Interestingly, KSHV infection in primary B-cells led to enhancement of SNAIL and down-regulation of E-cadherin in a temporal manner. Importantly, knockdown of SNAIL, a major EMT regulator, in KSHV cells resulted in reduced expression of LANA, Par3, and enhanced E-cadherin. Also, SNAIL bound to the promoter region of p21 and can regulate its activity. Further a SNAIL inhibitor diminished NF-kB signaling through upregulation of Caspase3 in KSHV positive cells in vitro. This was also supported by upregulation of SNAIL and Par3 in BC-3 transplanted NOD-SCID mice which has potential as a therapeutic target for KSHV-associated B-cell lymphomas. PMID:27463802

  7. Type II NKT-TFH cells against Gaucher lipids regulate B-cell immunity and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Shiny; Boddupalli, Chandra Sekhar; Verma, Rakesh; Liu, Jun; Yang, Ruhua; Pastores, Gregory M.; Mistry, Pramod K.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic inflammation including B-cell activation is commonly observed in both inherited (Gaucher disease [GD]) and acquired disorders of lipid metabolism. However, the cellular mechanisms underlying B-cell activation in these settings remain to be elucidated. Here, we report that β-glucosylceramide 22:0 (βGL1-22) and glucosylsphingosine (LGL1), 2 major sphingolipids accumulated in GD, can be recognized by a distinct subset of CD1d-restricted human and murine type II natural killer T (NKT) cells. Human βGL1-22– and LGL1-reactive CD1d tetramer–positive T cells have a distinct T-cell receptor usage and genomic and cytokine profiles compared with the classical type I NKT cells. In contrast to type I NKT cells, βGL1-22– and LGL1-specific NKT cells constitutively express T-follicular helper (TFH) phenotype. Injection of these lipids leads to an increase in respective lipid-specific type II NKT cells in vivo and downstream induction of germinal center B cells, hypergammaglobulinemia, and production of antilipid antibodies. Human βGL1-22– and LGL1-specific NKT cells can provide efficient cognate help to B cells in vitro. Frequency of LGL1-specific T cells in GD mouse models and patients correlates with disease activity and therapeutic response. Our studies identify a novel type II NKT-mediated pathway for glucosphingolipid-mediated dysregulation of humoral immunity and increased risk of B-cell malignancy observed in metabolic lipid disorders. PMID:25499455

  8. Corruption of Human Follicular B-Lymphocyte Trafficking by a B-Cell Superantigen

    PubMed Central

    Borhis, Gwenoline; Viau, Muriel; Badr, Gamal; Richard, Yolande; Zouali, Moncef

    2012-01-01

    Protein A (SpA) of Staphylococcus aureus is known to target the paratope of immunoglobulins expressing VH3 genes, and to delete marginal zone B cells and B-1a in vivo. We have discovered that SpA endows S. aureus with the potential to subvert B-cell trafficking in the host. We found that SpA, whose Fc-binding site has been inactivated, binds essentially to naïve B cells and induces a long-lasting decrease in CXCR4 expression and in B-cell chemotaxis to CXCL12. Competition experiments indicated that SpA does not interfere with binding of CXCR4 ligands and does not directly bind to CXCR4. This conclusion is strongly supported by the inability of SpA to modulate clathrin-mediated CXCR4 internalization, which contrasts with the potent effect of anti-immunoglobin M (IgM) antibodies. Microscopy and biochemical experiments confirmed that SpA binds to the surface IgM/IgD complex and induces its clathrin-dependent internalization. Concomitantly, the SpA-induced signaling leads to protein kinase C–dependent CXCR4 downmodulation, suggesting that SpA impairs the recycling of CXCR4, a postclathrin process that leads to either degradation into lysozomes or de novo expression at the cell surface. In addition to providing novel insight into disruption of B-cell trafficking by an infectious agent, our findings may have therapeutic implications. Because CXCR4 has been associated with cancer metastasis and with certain autoimmune diseases, SpA behaves as an evolutionary tailored highly specific, chemokine receptor inhibitor that may have value in addition to conventional cytotoxic therapy in patients with various malignancies and immune-mediated diseases. PMID:22367177

  9. What Is Aggressive Violence?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singer, Dorothy G.; Luca, Wendy

    1985-01-01

    Responses to a questionnaire dealing with what constitutes aggressive violence on television indicate that health care providers tend to rate items describing acts on television as more aggressive than television writers, producers, and executives do. (MBR)

  10. Rare clinical presentation of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma as otitis media and facial palsy

    PubMed Central

    Siddiahgari, Sirisha Rani; Yerukula, Pallavi; Lingappa, Lokesh; Moodahadu, Latha S.

    2016-01-01

    Extra nodal presentation of Non Hodgkins Lymphoma (NHL) is a rare entity, and data available about the NHL that primarily involves of middle ear and mastoid is limited. We report a case of diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL), in a 2 year 8 month old boy, who developed otalgia and facial palsy. Computed tomography revealed a mass in the left mastoid. Mastoid exploration and histopathological examination revealed DLBCL. This case highlights the importance of considering malignant lymphoma as one of the differential diagnosis in persistent otitis media and/facial palsy. PMID:27195036

  11. Synchronous Diagnosis of Multiple Myeloma, Breast Cancer, and Monoclonal B-Cell Lymphocytosis on Initial Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Vennepureddy, A.; Motilal Nehru, V.; Liu, Y.; Mohammad, F.; Atallah, J. P.

    2016-01-01

    The cooccurrence of more than one oncologic illness in a patient can present a diagnostic challenge. Here we report an unusual case of concomitant existence of multiple myeloma, breast cancer, and monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis on initial presentation. The challenge was to accurately diagnose each disease and stage in order to maximize the therapeutic regimen to achieve cure/remission. Successful management of the patient and increased life expectancy can be achieved by multidisciplinary management and patient-oriented approach in multiple primary malignant synchronous tumors. PMID:27247815

  12. Precursor B-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma of oral cavity: A case report with its diagnostic workup

    PubMed Central

    Talreja, Komal Ladharam; Barpande, Suresh Ramchandra; Bhavthankar, Jyoti Dilip; Mandale, Mandakini S

    2016-01-01

    Lymphoblastic lymphoma (LBL), seen primarily in children or young adults, is a malignant neoplasia that originates from B or T lymphocyte precursors and rarely occurs in the oral cavity. In this localization, neither the clinical features nor the radiologic appearances are pathognomic and can pose significant diagnostic problems. Histopathologically, it presents as a round blue cell tumor. An early and accurate diagnosis of this entity is very important due to its high cure rate. We report a case of B-cell LBL involving oral cavity in a 10-year-old child. The purpose of this report is to explore the diagnostic workup. PMID:27194876

  13. Improvement of paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis after systemic treatment with rituximab in a patient with B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Nogai, Hendrik; Israel-Willner, Heike; Zschenderlein, Rolf; Pezzutto, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Limbic encephalitis is an inflammatory disease of the central nervous system characterized by diverse neurologic symptoms including mnestic disturbances, hallucinations, and seizures as well as behavioral symptoms like depression, personality changes, and acute confusional states resembling dementia. Several antibodies have been described in the pathogenesis of limbic encephalitis. It is often a paraneoplastic syndrome associated with small cell lung cancer, breast cancer, or Hodgkin's lymphoma among others. Here, we report a patient with B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL), presenting with otherwise unexplained neurologic symptoms consistent with limbic encephalitis. Despite intensive diagnostic procedures, no causing agent could be identified. Pleocytosis consisting of T cells was detected in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). We initiated anti-B-cell therapy with Rituximab for B-CLL with quick and durable resolution of symptoms. We speculate that disruption of interaction between autoreactive T and malignant B cells is responsible for the therapeutic effect of Rituximab. PMID:23984126

  14. Neurobiological Patterns of Aggression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, Robert D.

    1993-01-01

    Describes chemical model for patterns of aggressive behavior. Addresses cultural, neurobiological, and cognitive factors that affect violent children. Identifies five patterns of aggression (overaroused, impulsive, affective, predatory, and instrumental) and examines these dimensions of aggression for each pattern: baseline, precipitators,…

  15. A new model of LMP1–MYC interaction in B cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Ontiveros, Evelena P.; Halwani, Ahmad; Stunz, Laura L.; Kamberos, Natalie; Olivier, Alicia K.; Janz, Siegfried; Bishop, Gail A.

    2014-01-01

    Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) is associated with aggressive B cell lymphomas (BCLs). Latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1) of EBV is an oncogenic protein required for EBV B cell transformation. However, LMP1 is a weak oncogene in mice. Mice expressing Myc inserted 5′ of the Eμ enhancer (iMycEμ), mimicking the t(8;14) translocation of endemic Burkitt lymphoma, develop delayed onset BCLs. To investigate potential cooperation between LMP1 and oncogenic MYC, we produced mice expressing the LMP1 signaling domain via a hybrid CD40–LMP1 transgene (mCD40–LMP1), and the dysregulated MYC protein of aggressive EBV+ BCLs. mCD40-LMP1/iMycEμ mice trended toward earlier BCL onset. BCLs from mCD40–LMP1/iMycEμ mice expressed LMP1 and were transplantable into immunocompetent recipients. iMycEμ and mCD40–LMP1/iMycEμ mice developed BCLs with similar immunophenotypes. LMP1 signaling was intact in BCLs as shown by inducible interleukin-6. Additionally, LMP1 signaling to tumor cells induced the two isoforms of Pim1, a constitutively active prosurvival kinase implicated in lymphomagenesis. PMID:24605938

  16. IRF4: Immunity. Malignancy! Therapy?

    PubMed Central

    Shaffer, Arthur L.; Tolga Emre, N. C.; Romesser, Paul B.; Staudt, Louis M.

    2009-01-01

    IRF4, a member of the IRF family of transcription factors, is expressed in cells of the immune system where it transduces signals from various receptors to activate or repress gene expression. IRF4 expression is a key regulator of several steps in lymphoid, myeloid and dendritic cell differentiation, including the differentiation of mature B cells into antibody-secreting plasma cells. IRF4 expression is also associated with many lymphoid malignancies, with recent evidence pointing to an essential role in multiple myeloma, a malignancy of plasma cells. Interference with IRF4 expression is lethal to multiple myeloma cells, irrespective of their genetic etiology, making IRF4 an “Achilles’ heel” that may be exploited therapeutically. PMID:19383829

  17. Current trends in the treatment of primary mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma – an overview

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Primary mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma has been recognised as a distinct entity with unique clinical, pathologic, and genetic features. According to WHO 2008 classification it is marked as a variant of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma but shares characteristics with classic Hodgkin lymphoma. Genetic analysis has shown that amplification of the 9p24.1 region is the disease's specific structural alteration. Aggressive behaviour and a tendency to invade surrounding tissues of the thoracic cavity, often causing superior vena cava syndrome, or pleural or pericardial effusions, are the clinical hallmarks of this disease. For a long period of time it has been considered as a disease with poor prognosis, which responds poorly to the conventional treatment created for diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. An elective treatment has not yet been established, but recently the situation has became much more favourable. After the introduction of rituximab the cure rates have risen to over 80%, and the most recent results have demonstrated a new insight with dose-adjusted intensified continuous treatments, in which the cure rates have exceeded 90%. Current trends have led to the introduction of dose-adjusted intensified protocols becoming a standard of care, whereas the use of radiotherapy remains controversial because of the questionable predictive value of post-treatment PET/CT validity. The relapse rate is very low after two years of sustained complete remission. If the disease relapses or is resistant the outcome is very poor regardless of the applied treatment modality. PMID:26843837

  18. Mantle cell lymphoma in cyclin D1 transgenic mice with Bim-deficient B cells

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Samuel G.; LaBelle, James L.; Meng, Hailong; Valeriano, Regina P.; Fisher, Jill K.; Sun, Heather; Rodig, Scott J.; Kleinstein, Steven H.

    2014-01-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is a highly aggressive B-cell lymphoma resistant to conventional chemotherapy. Although defined by the characteristic t(11;14) translocation, MCL has not been recapitulated in transgenic mouse models of cyclin D1 overexpression alone. Indeed, several genetic aberrations have been identified in MCL that may contribute to its pathogenesis and chemoresistance. Of particular interest is the frequent biallelic deletion of the proapoptotic BCL-2 family protein BIM. BIM exerts its pro-death function via its α-helical BH3 death domain that has the dual capacity to inhibit antiapoptotic proteins such as BCL-2 and MCL-1 and directly trigger proapoptotic proteins such as the mitochondrial executioner protein BAX. To evaluate a functional role for Bim deletion in the pathogenesis of MCL, we generated cyclin D1–transgenic mice harboring Bim-deficient B cells. In response to immunization, EμCycD1CD19CREBimfl/fl mice manifested selective expansion of their splenic mantle zone compartment. Three distinct immune stimulation regimens induced lymphomas with histopathologic and molecular features of human MCL in a subset of mice. Thus, deletion of Bim in B cells, in the context of cyclin D1 overexpression, disrupts a critical control point in lymphoid maturation and predisposes to the development of MCL. This genetic proof of concept for MCL pathogenesis suggests an opportunity to reactivate the death pathway by pharmacologic mimicry of proapoptotic BIM. PMID:24352880

  19. Survival and clonal expansion of mutating "forbidden" (immunoglobulin receptor-deficient) epstein-barr virus-infected b cells in angioimmunoblastic t cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Bräuninger, A; Spieker, T; Willenbrock, K; Gaulard, P; Wacker, H H; Rajewsky, K; Hansmann, M L; Küppers, R

    2001-10-01

    Angioimmunoblastic lymphadenopathy with dysproteinemia (AILD) is a peculiar T cell lymphoma, as expanding B cell clones are often present besides the malignant T cell clones. In addition, large numbers of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-infected B cells are frequently observed. To analyze the differentiation status and clonal composition of EBV-harboring B cells in AILD, single EBV-infected cells were micromanipulated from lymph nodes of six patients with frequent EBV(+) cells and their rearranged immunoglobulin (Ig) genes analyzed. Most EBV-infected B cells carried mutated Ig genes, indicating that in AILD, EBV preferentially resides in memory and/or germinal center B cells. EBV(+) B cell clones observed in all six cases ranged from small polyclonal to large monoclonal expansions and often showed ongoing somatic hypermutation while EBV(-) B cells showed little tendency for clonal expansion. Surprisingly, many members of expanding B cell clones had acquired destructive mutations in originally functional V gene rearrangements and showed an unfavorable high load of replacement mutations in the framework regions, indicating that they accumulated mutations over repeated rounds of mutation and division while not being selected through their antigen receptor. This sustained selection-free accumulation of somatic mutations is unique to AILD. Moreover, the survival and clonal expansion of "forbidden" (i.e., Ig-deficient) B cells has not been observed before in vivo and thus represents a novel type of viral latency in the B cell compartment. It is likely the interplay between the microenvironment in AILD lymph nodes and the viral transformation that leads to the survival and clonal expansion of Ig-less B cells. PMID:11581315

  20. Survival and Clonal Expansion of Mutating “Forbidden” (Immunoglobulin Receptor–Deficient) Epstein-Barr Virus–Infected B Cells in Angioimmunoblastic T Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Bräuninger, Andreas; Spieker, Tilmann; Willenbrock, Klaus; Gaulard, Philippe; Wacker, Hans-Heinrich; Rajewsky, Klaus; Hansmann, Martin-Leo; Küppers, Ralf

    2001-01-01

    Angioimmunoblastic lymphadenopathy with dysproteinemia (AILD) is a peculiar T cell lymphoma, as expanding B cell clones are often present besides the malignant T cell clones. In addition, large numbers of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-infected B cells are frequently observed. To analyze the differentiation status and clonal composition of EBV-harboring B cells in AILD, single EBV-infected cells were micromanipulated from lymph nodes of six patients with frequent EBV+ cells and their rearranged immunoglobulin (Ig) genes analyzed. Most EBV-infected B cells carried mutated Ig genes, indicating that in AILD, EBV preferentially resides in memory and/or germinal center B cells. EBV+ B cell clones observed in all six cases ranged from small polyclonal to large monoclonal expansions and often showed ongoing somatic hypermutation while EBV− B cells showed little tendency for clonal expansion. Surprisingly, many members of expanding B cell clones had acquired destructive mutations in originally functional V gene rearrangements and showed an unfavorable high load of replacement mutations in the framework regions, indicating that they accumulated mutations over repeated rounds of mutation and division while not being selected through their antigen receptor. This sustained selection-free accumulation of somatic mutations is unique to AILD. Moreover, the survival and clonal expansion of “forbidden” (i.e., Ig-deficient) B cells has not been observed before in vivo and thus represents a novel type of viral latency in the B cell compartment. It is likely the interplay between the microenvironment in AILD lymph nodes and the viral transformation that leads to the survival and clonal expansion of Ig-less B cells. PMID:11581315

  1. B-cell-activating factor inhibits CD20-mediated and B-cell receptor-mediated apoptosis in human B cells

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Yohei; Miyagawa, Yoshitaka; Onda, Keiko; Nakajima, Hideki; Sato, Ban; Horiuchi, Yasuomi; Okita, Hajime; Katagiri, Yohko U; Saito, Masahiro; Shimizu, Toshiaki; Fujimoto, Junichiro; Kiyokawa, Nobutaka

    2008-01-01

    B-cell-activating factor (BAFF) is a survival and maturation factor for B cells belonging to the tumour necrosis factor superfamily. Among three identified functional receptors, the BAFF receptor (BAFF-R) is thought to be responsible for the effect of BAFF on B cells though details of how remain unclear. We determined that a hairy-cell leukaemia line, MLMA, expressed a relatively high level of BAFF-R and was susceptible to apoptosis mediated by either CD20 or B-cell antigen receptor (BCR). Using MLMA cells as an in vitro model of mature B cells, we found that treatment with BAFF could inhibit apoptosis mediated by both CD20 and BCR. We also observed, using immunoblot analysis and microarray analysis, that BAFF treatment induced activation of nuclear factor-κB2 following elevation of the expression level of Bcl-2, which may be involved in the molecular mechanism of BAFF-mediated inhibition of apoptosis. Interestingly, BAFF treatment was also found to induce the expression of a series of genes, such as that for CD40, related to cell survival, suggesting the involvement of a multiple mechanism in the BAFF-mediated anti-apoptotic effect. MLMA cells should provide a model for investigating the molecular basis of the effect of BAFF on B cells in vitro and will help to elucidate how B cells survive in the immune system in which BAFF-mediated signalling is involved. PMID:18540961

  2. EBV, HHV8 and HIV in B cell non Hodgkin lymphoma in Kampala, Uganda

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background B cell non Hodgkin lymphomas account for the majority of lymphomas in Uganda. The commonest is endemic Burkitt lymphoma, followed by diffuse large-B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). There has been an increase in incidence of malignant lymphoma since the onset of the HIV/AIDS pandemic. However, the possible linkages of HHV8 and EBV to the condition of impaired immunity present in AIDS are still not yet very clearly understood. Objectives 1. To describe the prevalence of Epstein-Barr virus, Human Herpes virus 8 and Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 in B cell non Hodgkin lymphoma biopsy specimens in Kampala, Uganda. 2. To describe the histopathology of non Hodgkin lymphoma by HIV serology test result in Kampala, Uganda Method Tumour biopsies specimens from 119 patients with B cell non Hodgkin lymphoma were classified according to the WHO classification. Immunohistochemistry was used for detection of HHV8 and in situ hybridization with Epstein Barr virus encoded RNA (EBER) for EBV. Real time and nested PCR were used for the detection of HIV. The patients from whom the 1991-2000 NHL biopsies had been taken did not have HIV serology results therefore 145 patients biopsies where serology results were available were used to describe the association of HIV with non Hodgkin lymphoma type during 2008-2009. Results In this study, the majority (92%) of the Burkitt lymphomas and only 34.8% of the diffuse large B cell lymphomas were EBV positive. None of the precursor B lymphoblastic lymphomas or the mantle cell lymphomas showed EBV integration in the lymphoma cells. None of the Burkitt lymphoma biopsies had HIV by PCR. Of the 121 non Hodgkin B cell lymphoma patients with HIV test results, 19% had HIV. However, only 1(0.04%) case of Burkitt lymphoma had HIV. All the tumours were HHV8 negative. Conclusions The majority of the Burkitt lymphomas and two fifths of the diffuse large B cell lymphomas had EBV. All the tumours were HHV8 negative. Generally, the relationship of NHL and HIV

  3. Perspectives on fetal derived CD5+ B1 B cells.

    PubMed

    Hardy, Richard R; Hayakawa, Kyoko

    2015-11-01

    CD5(+) B-cell origins and their predisposition to lymphoma are long-standing issues. Transfer of fetal and adult liver BM Pro-B cells generates B cells with distinct phenotypes: fetal cells generate IgM(high) IgD(low) CD5(+) , whereas adult cells IgM(low) IgD(high) CD5(-) . This suggests a developmental switch in B lymphopoiesis, similar to the switch in erythropoiesis. Comparison of mRNA and miRNA expression in fetal and adult Pro-B cells revealed differential expression of Lin28b mRNA and Let-7 miRNA, providing evidence that this regulatory axis functions in the switch. Recent work has shown that Arid3a is a key transcription factor mediating fetal-type B-cell development. Lin28b-promoted fetal development generates CD5(+) B cells as a consequence of positively selected self-reactivity. CD5(+) B cells play important roles in clearance of apoptotic cells and in protective immune responses, but also pose a risk of progression to leukemia/lymphoma. Differential Lin28b expression in fetal and adult human B-cell precursors showed that human B-cell development may resemble mouse, with self-reactive "innate-like" B cells generated early in life. It remains to be determined whether such human B cells have a higher propensity to leukemic progression. This review describes our recent research with CD5(+) B cells and presents our perspective on their role in disease. PMID:26339791

  4. B-Cell Lymphopoiesis Is Regulated by Cathepsin L

    PubMed Central

    Badano, Maria Noel; Camicia, Gabriela Lorena; Lombardi, Gabriela; Maglioco, Andrea; Cabrera, Gabriel; Costa, Hector; Meiss, Roberto Pablo

    2013-01-01

    Cathepsin L (CTSL) is a ubiquitously expressed lysosomal cysteine peptidase with diverse and highly specific functions. The involvement of CTSL in thymic CD4+ T-cell positive selection has been well documented. Using CTSLnkt/nkt mice that lack CTSL activity, we have previously demonstrated that the absence of CTSL activity affects the homeostasis of the T-cell pool by decreasing CD4+ cell thymic production and increasing CD8+ thymocyte production. Herein we investigated the influence of CTSL activity on the homeostasis of peripheral B-cell populations and bone marrow (BM) B-cell maturation. B-cell numbers were increased in lymph nodes (LN), spleen and blood from CTSLnkt/nkt mice. Increases in splenic B-cell numbers were restricted to transitional T1 and T2 cells and to the marginal zone (MZ) cell subpopulation. No alterations in the proliferative or apoptosis levels were detected in peripheral B-cell populations from CTSLnkt/nkt mice. In the BM, the percentage and the absolute number of pre-pro-B, pro-B, pre-B, immature and mature B cells were not altered. However, in vitro and in vivo experiments showed that BM B-cell production was markedly increased in CTSLnkt/nkt mice. Besides, BM B-cell emigration to the spleen was increased in CTSLnkt/nkt mice. Colony-forming unit pre-B (CFU pre-B) assays in the presence of BM stromal cells (SC) and reciprocal BM chimeras revealed that both BM B-cell precursors and SC would contribute to sustain the increased B-cell hematopoiesis in CTSLnkt/nkt mice. Overall, our data clearly demonstrate that CTSL negatively regulates BM B-cell production and output therefore influencing the homeostasis of peripheral B cells. PMID:23585893

  5. Malignant mesothelioma

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Alastair J; Parker, Robert J; Wiggins, John

    2008-01-01

    Malignant mesothelioma is a fatal asbestos-associated malignancy originating from the lining cells (mesothelium) of the pleural and peritoneal cavities, as well as the pericardium and the tunica vaginalis. The exact prevalence is unknown but it is estimated that mesotheliomas represent less than 1% of all cancers. Its incidence is increasing, with an expected peak in the next 10–20 years. Pleural malignant mesothelioma is the most common form of mesothelioma. Typical presenting features are those of chest pain and dyspnoea. Breathlessness due to a pleural effusion without chest pain is reported in about 30% of patients. A chest wall mass, weight loss, sweating, abdominal pain and ascites (due to peritoneal involvement) are less common presentations. Mesothelioma is directly attributable to occupational asbestos exposure with a history of exposure in over 90% of cases. There is also evidence that mesothelioma may result from both para-occupational exposure and non-occupational "environmental" exposure. Idiopathic or spontaneous mesothelioma can also occur in the absence of any exposure to asbestos, with a spontaneous rate in humans of around one per million. A combination of accurate exposure history, along with examination radiology and pathology are essential to make the diagnosis. Distinguishing malignant from benign pleural disease can be challenging. The most helpful CT findings suggesting malignant pleural disease are 1) a circumferential pleural rind, 2) nodular pleural thickening, 3) pleural thickening of > 1 cm and 4) mediastinal pleural involvement. Involvement of a multidisciplinary team is recommended to ensure prompt and appropriate management, using a framework of radiotherapy, chemotherapy, surgery and symptom palliation with end of life care. Compensation issues must also be considered. Life expectancy in malignant mesothelioma is poor, with a median survival of about one year following diagnosis. PMID:19099560

  6. Utilization of a photoactivatable antigen system to examine B-cell probing termination and the B-cell receptor sorting mechanisms during B-cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Tang, Shan; Wan, Zhengpeng; Gao, Yiren; Cao, Yiyun; Yi, Junyang; Si, Yanyan; Zhang, Haowen; Liu, Lei; Liu, Wanli

    2016-01-01

    Antigen binding to the B-cell receptor (BCR) induces several responses, resulting in B-cell activation, proliferation, and differentiation. However, it has been difficult to study these responses due to their dynamic, fast, and transient nature. Here, we attempted to solve this problem by developing a controllable trigger point for BCR and antigen recognition through the construction of a photoactivatable antigen, caged 4-hydroxy-3-nitrophenyl acetyl (caged-NP). This photoactivatable antigen system in combination with live cell and single molecule imaging techniques enabled us to illuminate the previously unidentified B-cell probing termination behaviors and the precise BCR sorting mechanisms during B-cell activation. B cells in contact with caged-NP exhibited probing behaviors as defined by the unceasing extension of membrane pseudopods in random directions. Further analyses showed that such probing behaviors are cell intrinsic with strict dependence on F-actin remodeling but not on tonic BCR signaling. B-cell probing behaviors were terminated within 4 s after photoactivation, suggesting that this response was sensitive and specific to BCR engagement. The termination of B-cell probing was concomitant with the accumulation response of the BCRs into the BCR microclusters. We also determined the Brownian diffusion coefficient of BCRs from the same B cells before and after BCR engagement. The analysis of temporally segregated single molecule images of both BCR and major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) demonstrated that antigen binding induced trapping of BCRs into the BCR microclusters is a fundamental mechanism for B cells to acquire antigens. PMID:26764382

  7. MicroRNA-155 and Its Role in Malignant Hematopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Ranganath, Prajnya

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNA-155 (miR-155) is a multifunctional molecule involved in both normal and malignant hematopoiesis. It has been found to be involved in the pathogenesis of many different hematological malignancies with either an oncogenic or a tumor-repressor effect, depending on the nature of the cell and the type of malignancy. In particular, it has been strongly implicated in the causation of diffuse large B-cell lymphomas. This review focuses on the molecular interactions of miR-155, its oncogenic mechanisms, and its potential as an effective therapeutic target for the associated malignancies. PMID:26523117

  8. Calcitriol-mediated hypercalcemia in a patient with bilateral adrenal non-Hodgkin's B-cell lymphoma case report

    PubMed Central

    Abaroa-Salvatierra, Ana; Shaikh, Bilal; Deshmukh, Mrunalini; Alweis, Richard; Patel, Arti

    2016-01-01

    Calcitriol-mediated hypercalcemia is a frequent manifestation of hematological malignancies. However, there are a few reports of cases presenting with increased angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) level, which suggests a possible mechanism similar to that of granulomatous diseases. We present a patient with hypercalcemia, normal parathyroid hormone, and parathyroid hormone-related protein levels but high calcitriol and ACE levels that, after further investigation, was diagnosed with bilateral adrenal non-Hodgkin's B-cell lymphoma. Primary adrenal lymphoma represents only 1% of all non-Hodgkin's lymphomas and is usually asymptomatic but should be considered by clinicians among the malignancies that cause calcitriol-mediated hypercalcemia. PMID:27124160

  9. Involvement of B cells in non-infectious uveitis

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Justine R; Stempel, Andrew J; Bharadwaj, Arpita; Appukuttan, Binoy

    2016-01-01

    Non-infectious uveitis—or intraocular inflammatory disease—causes substantial visual morbidity and reduced quality of life amongst affected individuals. To date, research of pathogenic mechanisms has largely been focused on processes involving T lymphocyte and/or myeloid leukocyte populations. Involvement of B lymphocytes has received relatively little attention. In contrast, B-cell pathobiology is a major field within general immunological research, and large clinical trials have showed that treatments targeting B cells are highly effective for multiple systemic inflammatory diseases. B cells, including the terminally differentiated plasma cell that produces antibody, are found in the human eye in different forms of non-infectious uveitis; in some cases, these cells outnumber other leukocyte subsets. Recent case reports and small case series suggest that B-cell blockade may be therapeutic for patients with non-infectious uveitis. As well as secretion of antibody, B cells may promote intraocular inflammation by presentation of antigen to T cells, production of multiple inflammatory cytokines and support of T-cell survival. B cells may also perform various immunomodulatory activities within the eye. This translational review summarizes the evidence for B-cell involvement in non-infectious uveitis, and considers the potential contributions of B cells to the development and control of the disease. Manipulations of B cells and/or their products are promising new approaches to the treatment of non-infectious uveitis. PMID:26962453

  10. CD23 can negatively regulate B-cell receptor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chaohong; Richard, Katharina; Wiggins, Melvin; Zhu, Xiaoping; Conrad, Daniel H.; Song, Wenxia

    2016-01-01

    CD23 has been implicated as a negative regulator of IgE and IgG antibody responses. However, whether CD23 has any role in B-cell activation remains unclear. We examined the expression of CD23 in different subsets of peripheral B cells and the impact of CD23 expression on the early events of B-cell receptor (BCR) activation using CD23 knockout (KO) mice. We found that in addition to marginal zone B cells, mature follicular B cells significantly down regulate the surface expression level of CD23 after undergoing isotype switch and memory B-cell differentiation. Upon stimulation with membrane-associated antigen, CD23 KO causes significant increases in the area of B cells contacting the antigen-presenting membrane and the magnitude of BCR clustering. This enhanced cell spreading and BCR clustering is concurrent with increases in the levels of phosphorylation of tyrosine and Btk, as well as the levels of F-actin and phosphorylated Wiskott Aldrich syndrome protein, an actin nucleation promoting factor, in the contract zone of CD23 KO B cells. These results reveal a role of CD23 in the negative regulation of BCR signaling in the absence of IgE immune complex and suggest that CD23 down-regulates BCR signaling by influencing actin-mediated BCR clustering and B-cell morphological changes. PMID:27181049

  11. CD23 can negatively regulate B-cell receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chaohong; Richard, Katharina; Wiggins, Melvin; Zhu, Xiaoping; Conrad, Daniel H; Song, Wenxia

    2016-01-01

    CD23 has been implicated as a negative regulator of IgE and IgG antibody responses. However, whether CD23 has any role in B-cell activation remains unclear. We examined the expression of CD23 in different subsets of peripheral B cells and the impact of CD23 expression on the early events of B-cell receptor (BCR) activation using CD23 knockout (KO) mice. We found that in addition to marginal zone B cells, mature follicular B cells significantly down regulate the surface expression level of CD23 after undergoing isotype switch and memory B-cell differentiation. Upon stimulation with membrane-associated antigen, CD23 KO causes significant increases in the area of B cells contacting the antigen-presenting membrane and the magnitude of BCR clustering. This enhanced cell spreading and BCR clustering is concurrent with increases in the levels of phosphorylation of tyrosine and Btk, as well as the levels of F-actin and phosphorylated Wiskott Aldrich syndrome protein, an actin nucleation promoting factor, in the contract zone of CD23 KO B cells. These results reveal a role of CD23 in the negative regulation of BCR signaling in the absence of IgE immune complex and suggest that CD23 down-regulates BCR signaling by influencing actin-mediated BCR clustering and B-cell morphological changes. PMID:27181049

  12. Age effects on B cells and humoral immunity in humans

    PubMed Central

    Frasca, Daniela; Diaz, Alain; Romero, Maria; Landin, Ana Marie; Blomberg, Bonnie B

    2010-01-01

    Both humoral and cellular immune responses are impaired in aged individuals, leading to decreased vaccine responses. Although T cell defects occur, defects in B cells play a significant role in age-related humoral immune changes. The ability to undergo class switch recombination (CSR), the enzyme for CSR, AID (activation-induced cytidine deaminase) and the transcription factor E47 are all decreased in aged stimulated B cells. We here present an overview of age-related changes in human B cell markers and functions, and also discuss some controversies in the field of B cell aging. PMID:20728581

  13. Primary splenic B-cell lymphoma, unclassifiable, with features intermediate between diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and classical Hodgkin lymphoma: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Feng; Zhou, Quan; Gao, Ying; Cui, Xiang-Qing; Chang, Hong

    2016-01-01

    B-cell lymphoma (BCL), unclassifiable, with features intermediate between diffuse large BCL (DLBCL) and classical Hodgkin's lymphoma (CHL), is a novel entity to the World Health Organization classification system. These tumors are rare aggressive lymphomas that have a poor prognosis. The present study reports the case of a patient with one such lymphoma that occurred in the spleen, which expressed cluster of differentiation (CD)20, CD79α, melanoma associated antigen (mutated) 1, BCL6, CD15 and CD30. Polymerase chain reaction analysis demonstrated a clonal rearrangement of the genes coding for immunoglobulin heavy chains. The tumor cells demonstrated a negative reaction in the Epstein-Barr virus-encoded small RNA assay. Following the diagnosis of unclassifiable BCL, with intermediate features between DLBCL and CHL, the patient received 7 cycles of the CHOP regimen, and so far, has been in good general condition and tumor-free for 17 months. PMID:27602118

  14. Relational aggression in marriage.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Jason S; Nelson, David A; Yorgason, Jeremy B; Harper, James M; Ashton, Ruth Hagmann; Jensen, Alexander C

    2010-01-01

    Drawing from developmental theories of relational aggression, this article reports on a study designed to identify if spouses use relationally aggressive tactics when dealing with conflict in their marriage and the association of these behaviors with marital outcomes. Using a sample of 336 married couples (672 spouses), results revealed that the majority of couples reported that relationally aggressive behaviors, such as social sabotage and love withdrawal, were a part of their marital dynamics, at least to some degree. Gender comparisons of partner reports of their spouse's behavior revealed that wives were significantly more likely to be relationally aggressive than husbands. Structural equation modeling demonstrated that relational aggression is associated with lower levels of marital quality and greater marital instability for both husbands and wives. Implications are drawn for the use of relational aggression theory in the future study of couple conflict and marital aggression. PMID:20698028

  15. Sternal Resection and Reconstruction for Malignant Phylloides Tumor.

    PubMed

    Selvakumar, Veda Padma Priya; Poonia, Dharmaram; Agrawal, Juhi; Goel, Ashish; Mehta, Sandeep; Kumar, Kapil

    2015-08-01

    Malignant phylloides tumor is a locally aggressive breast neoplasm constituting less than 1 % of all breast cancers. It has a tendency for local recurrence and management is multidisciplinary. We hereby report a case of total sternal resection and reconstruction using Biopore HDPE prosthesis for Malignant Phylloides tumor. PMID:26702245

  16. Axl Inhibition Primes Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia B-Cells to Apoptosis and Show Synergistic/Additive Effects in Combination with BTK inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Sutapa; Boysen, Justin; Nelson, Michael; Secreto, Charla; Warner, Steven L.; Bearss, David J.; Lesnick, Connie; Shanafelt, Tait D.; Kay, Neil E.; Ghosh, Asish K.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is an incurable disease despite aggressive therapeutic approaches. We previously found that Axl receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) plays a critical role in CLL B-cell survival. Here, we explored the possibility of using a high-affinity Axl inhibitor as a single agent or in combination with Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (BTK) inhibitors for future clinical trial to treat CLL patients. Experimental Design Expression/activation status of other members of the TAM (Tyro3, Axl, MER) family of RTKs in CLL B-cells was evaluated. Cells were treated with a high-affinity orally bioavailable Axl inhibitor TP-0903 with or without presence of CLL bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs). Inhibitory effects of TP-0903 on Axl signaling pathway was also evaluated in CLL B-cells. Finally, cells were exposed to TP-0903 in combination with BTK inhibitors to determine any synergistic/additive effects of the combination. Results CLL B-cells overexpress Tyro3, but not MER. Of interest, Tyro3 remains as constitutively phosphorylated and form a complex with Axl in CLL B-cells. TP-0903 induces massive apoptosis in CLL B-cells with LD50 values of nanomolar ranges. Importantly, CLL BMSCs could not protect the leukemic B-cells from TP-0903 induced apoptosis. A marked reduction of the anti-apoptotic proteins Mcl-1, Bcl-2, XIAP and upregulation of the pro-apoptotic protein BIM in CLL B-cells were detected as a result of Axl inhibition. Finally, combination of TP-0903 with BTK inhibitors augments CLL B-cell apoptosis. Conclusion Administration of TP-0903 either as a single agent or in combination with BTK inhibitors may be effective in treating CLL patients. PMID:25673699

  17. Molecular and cytogenetic characterization of expanded B-cell clones from multiclonal versus monoclonal B-cell chronic lymphoproliferative disorders

    PubMed Central

    Henriques, Ana; Rodríguez-Caballero, Arancha; Criado, Ignacio; Langerak, Anton W.; Nieto, Wendy G.; Lécrevisse, Quentin; González, Marcos; Cortesão, Emília; Paiva, Artur; Almeida, Julia; Orfao, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Chronic antigen-stimulation has been recurrently involved in the earlier stages of monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis, chronic lymphocytic leukemia and other B-cell chronic lymphoproliferative disorders. The expansion of two or more B-cell clones has frequently been reported in individuals with these conditions; potentially, such coexisting clones have a greater probability of interaction with common immunological determinants. Here, we analyzed the B-cell receptor repertoire and molecular profile, as well as the phenotypic, cytogenetic and hematologic features, of 228 chronic lymphocytic leukemia-like and non-chronic lymphocytic leukemia-like clones comparing multiclonal (n=85 clones from 41 cases) versus monoclonal (n=143 clones) monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis, chronic lymphocytic leukemia and other B-cell chronic lymphoproliferative disorders. The B-cell receptor of B-cell clones from multiclonal cases showed a slightly higher degree of HCDR3 homology than B-cell clones from mono clonal cases, in association with unique hematologic (e.g. lower B-lymphocyte counts) and cytogenetic (e.g. lower frequency of cytogenetically altered clones) features usually related to earlier stages of the disease. Moreover, a subgroup of coexisting B-cell clones from individual multiclonal cases which were found to be phylogenetically related showed unique molecular and cytogenetic features: they more frequently shared IGHV3 gene usage, shorter HCDR3 sequences with a greater proportion of IGHV mutations and del(13q14.3), than other unrelated B-cell clones. These results would support the antigen-driven nature of such multiclonal B-cell expansions, with potential involvement of multiple antigens/epitopes. PMID:24488564

  18. Neutrophils trigger a NF-κB dependent polarization of tumor-supportive stromal cells in germinal center B-cell lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Grégoire, Murielle; Guilloton, Fabien; Pangault, Céline; Mourcin, Frédéric; Sok, Phaktra; Latour, Maelle; Amé-Thomas, Patricia; Flecher, Erwan; Fest, Thierry; Tarte, Karin

    2015-06-30

    Both tumor-associated neutrophils (TAN) and cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) display specific phenotypic and functional features and contribute to tumor cell niche. However, their bidirectional crosstalk has been poorly studied, in particular in the context of hematological malignancies. Follicular lymphomas (FL) and diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (DLBCL) are two germinal center-derived lymphomas where various cell components of infiltrating microenvironment, including TAN and CAFs, have been demonstrated to favor directly and indirectly malignant B-cell survival, growth, and drug resistance. We show here that, besides a direct and contact-dependent supportive effect of neutrophils on DLBCL B-cell survival, mediated through the BAFF/APRIL pathway, neutrophils and stromal cells cooperate to sustain FL B-cell growth. This cooperation relies on an overexpression of IL-8 by lymphoma-infiltrating stromal cells that could thereafter efficiently promote neutrophil survival and prime them to neutrophil extracellular trap. Conversely, neutrophils are able to activate stromal cells in a NF-κB-dependent manner, inducing their commitment towards an inflammatory lymphoid stroma phenotype associated with an increased capacity to trigger malignant B-cell survival, and to recruit additional monocytes and neutrophils through the release of CCL2 and IL-8, respectively. Altogether, a better understanding of the lymphoma-supporting effects of neutrophils could be helpful to design new anti-tumor therapeutic strategies. PMID:26158216

  19. Hematologic malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Hoogstraten, B.

    1986-01-01

    The principle aim of this book is to give practical guidelines to the modern treatment of the six important hematologic malignancies. Topics considered include the treatment of the chronic leukemias; acute leukemia in adults; the myeloproliferative disorders: polycythemia vera, essential thrombocythemia, and idiopathic myelofibrosis/agnogenic myeloid metaplasia; Hodgkin's Disease; non-Hodgkin's lymphoma; and Multiple Myeloma.

  20. Homeobox NKX2-3 promotes marginal-zone lymphomagenesis by activating B-cell receptor signalling and shaping lymphocyte dynamics.

    PubMed

    Robles, Eloy F; Mena-Varas, Maria; Barrio, Laura; Merino-Cortes, Sara V; Balogh, Péter; Du, Ming-Qing; Akasaka, Takashi; Parker, Anton; Roa, Sergio; Panizo, Carlos; Martin-Guerrero, Idoia; Siebert, Reiner; Segura, Victor; Agirre, Xabier; Macri-Pellizeri, Laura; Aldaz, Beatriz; Vilas-Zornoza, Amaia; Zhang, Shaowei; Moody, Sarah; Calasanz, Maria Jose; Tousseyn, Thomas; Broccardo, Cyril; Brousset, Pierre; Campos-Sanchez, Elena; Cobaleda, Cesar; Sanchez-Garcia, Isidro; Fernandez-Luna, Jose Luis; Garcia-Muñoz, Ricardo; Pena, Esther; Bellosillo, Beatriz; Salar, Antonio; Baptista, Maria Joao; Hernandez-Rivas, Jesús Maria; Gonzalez, Marcos; Terol, Maria Jose; Climent, Joan; Ferrandez, Antonio; Sagaert, Xavier; Melnick, Ari M; Prosper, Felipe; Oscier, David G; Carrasco, Yolanda R; Dyer, Martin J S; Martinez-Climent, Jose A

    2016-01-01

    NKX2 homeobox family proteins have a role in cancer development. Here we show that NKX2-3 is overexpressed in tumour cells from a subset of patients with marginal-zone lymphomas, but not with other B-cell malignancies. While Nkx2-3-deficient mice exhibit the absence of marginal-zone B cells, transgenic mice with expression of NKX2-3 in B cells show marginal-zone expansion that leads to the development of tumours, faithfully recapitulating the principal clinical and biological features of human marginal-zone lymphomas. NKX2-3 induces B-cell receptor signalling by phosphorylating Lyn/Syk kinases, which in turn activate multiple integrins (LFA-1, VLA-4), adhesion molecules (ICAM-1, MadCAM-1) and the chemokine receptor CXCR4. These molecules enhance migration, polarization and homing of B cells to splenic and extranodal tissues, eventually driving malignant transformation through triggering NF-κB and PI3K-AKT pathways. This study implicates oncogenic NKX2-3 in lymphomagenesis, and provides a valid experimental mouse model for studying the biology and therapy of human marginal-zone B-cell lymphomas. PMID:27297662

  1. Homeobox NKX2-3 promotes marginal-zone lymphomagenesis by activating B-cell receptor signalling and shaping lymphocyte dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Robles, Eloy F.; Mena-Varas, Maria; Barrio, Laura; Merino-Cortes, Sara V.; Balogh, Péter; Du, Ming-Qing; Akasaka, Takashi; Parker, Anton; Roa, Sergio; Panizo, Carlos; Martin-Guerrero, Idoia; Siebert, Reiner; Segura, Victor; Agirre, Xabier; Macri-Pellizeri, Laura; Aldaz, Beatriz; Vilas-Zornoza, Amaia; Zhang, Shaowei; Moody, Sarah; Calasanz, Maria Jose; Tousseyn, Thomas; Broccardo, Cyril; Brousset, Pierre; Campos-Sanchez, Elena; Cobaleda, Cesar; Sanchez-Garcia, Isidro; Fernandez-Luna, Jose Luis; Garcia-Muñoz, Ricardo; Pena, Esther; Bellosillo, Beatriz; Salar, Antonio; Baptista, Maria Joao; Hernandez-Rivas, Jesús Maria; Gonzalez, Marcos; Terol, Maria Jose; Climent, Joan; Ferrandez, Antonio; Sagaert, Xavier; Melnick, Ari M.; Prosper, Felipe; Oscier, David G.; Carrasco, Yolanda R.; Dyer, Martin J. S.; Martinez-Climent, Jose A.

    2016-01-01

    NKX2 homeobox family proteins have a role in cancer development. Here we show that NKX2-3 is overexpressed in tumour cells from a subset of patients with marginal-zone lymphomas, but not with other B-cell malignancies. While Nkx2-3-deficient mice exhibit the absence of marginal-zone B cells, transgenic mice with expression of NKX2-3 in B cells show marginal-zone expansion that leads to the development of tumours, faithfully recapitulating the principal clinical and biological features of human marginal-zone lymphomas. NKX2-3 induces B-cell receptor signalling by phosphorylating Lyn/Syk kinases, which in turn activate multiple integrins (LFA-1, VLA-4), adhesion molecules (ICAM-1, MadCAM-1) and the chemokine receptor CXCR4. These molecules enhance migration, polarization and homing of B cells to splenic and extranodal tissues, eventually driving malignant transformation through triggering NF-κB and PI3K-AKT pathways. This study implicates oncogenic NKX2-3 in lymphomagenesis, and provides a valid experimental mouse model for studying the biology and therapy of human marginal-zone B-cell lymphomas. PMID:27297662

  2. B-Cell-Mediated Strategies to Fight Chronic Allograft Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Dalloul, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Solid organs have been transplanted for decades. Since the improvement in graft selection and in medical and surgical procedures, the likelihood of graft function after 1 year is now close to 90%. Nonetheless even well-matched recipients continue to need medications for the rest of their lives hence adverse side effects and enhanced morbidity. Understanding Immune rejection mechanisms, is of increasing importance since the greater use of living-unrelated donors and genetically unmatched individuals. Chronic rejection is devoted to T-cells, however the role of B-cells in rejection has been appreciated recently by the observation that B-cell depletion improve graft survival. By contrast however, B-cells can be beneficial to the grafted tissue. This protective effect is secondary to either the secretion of protective antibodies or the induction of B-cells that restrain excessive inflammatory responses, chiefly by local provision of IL-10, or inhibit effector T-cells by direct cellular interactions. As a proof of concept B-cell-mediated infectious transplantation tolerance could be achieved in animal models, and evidence emerged that the presence of such B-cells in transplanted patients correlate with a favorable outcome. Among these populations, regulatory B-cells constitute a recently described population. These cells may develop as a feedback mechanism to prevent uncontrolled reactivity to antigens and inflammatory stimuli. The difficult task for the clinician, is to quantify the respective ratios and functions of “tolerant” vs. effector B-cells within a transplanted organ, at a given time point in order to modulate B-cell-directed therapy. Several receptors at the B-cell membrane as well as signaling molecules, can now be targeted for this purpose. Understanding the temporal expansion of regulatory B-cells in grafted patients and the stimuli that activate them will help in the future to implement specific strategies aimed at fighting chronic allograft

  3. Marginal zone B-cells, a gatekeeper of innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Zouali, Moncef; Richard, Yolande

    2011-01-01

    To maintain the integrity of an organism constantly challenged by pathogens, the immune system is endowed with a variety of cell types. B lymphocytes were initially thought to only play a role in the adaptive branch of immunity. However, a number of converging observations revealed that two B-cell subsets, marginal zone (MZ) and B1 cells, exhibit unique developmental and functional characteristics, and can contribute to innate immune responses. In addition to their capacity to mount a local antibody response against type-2 T-cell-independent (TI-2) antigens, MZ B-cells can participate to T-cell-dependent (TD) immune responses through the capture and import of blood-borne antigens to follicular areas of the spleen. Here, we discuss the multiple roles of MZ B-cells in humans, non-human primates, and rodents. We also summarize studies - performed in transgenic mice expressing fully human antibodies on their B-cells and in macaques whose infection with Simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) represents a suitable model for HIV-1 infection in humans - showing that infectious agents have developed strategies to subvert MZ B-cell functions. In these two experimental models, we observed that two microbial superantigens for B-cells (protein A from Staphylococcus aureus and protein L from Peptostreptococcus magnus) as well as inactivated AT-2 virions of HIV-1 and infectious SIV preferentially deplete innate-like B-cells - MZ B-cells and/or B1 B-cells - with different consequences on TI and TD antibody responses. These data revealed that viruses and bacteria have developed strategies to deplete innate-like B-cells during the acute phase of infection and to impair the antibody response. Unraveling the intimate mechanisms responsible for targeting MZ B-cells in humans will be important for understanding disease pathogenesis and for designing novel vaccine strategies. PMID:22566852

  4. Krüppel-Like Factor 4 Regulates B Cell Number and Activation-Induced B Cell Proliferation1

    PubMed Central

    Klaewsongkram, Jettanong; Yang, Yinhua; Golech, Susanne; Katz, Jonathan; Kaestner, Klaus H.; Weng, Nan-ping

    2008-01-01

    Krüppel-like factor 4 (Klf4) is a transcription factor and functions in regulating cell differentiation, cell growth, and cell cycle. Although Klf4 is expressed in lymphocytes, its function in lymphocytes is unknown. In this study, we report that the levels of Klf4 expression were low in pro-B cells and continuously increased in pre-B and in mature B cells. Upon activation, Klf4 was rapidly decreased in mature B cells after 2 h of activation. A modest decrease in numbers of pre-B cells in bone marrow and mature B cells in spleen was observed in Klf4-deficient mice. In the absence of Klf4, fewer B cells entered the S phase of the cell cycle and completed cell division in response to the engagement of BCR and/or CD40 in vitro. Furthermore, the delay in entering the cell cycle is associated with decreased expression of cyclin D2 in B cells that lack Klf4 expression. We then demonstrated that Klf4 directly bound to the promoter of cyclin D2 and regulated its expression. These findings demonstrate that Klf4 regulates B cell number and activation-induced B cell proliferation through directly acting on the promoter of cyclin D2. PMID:17878366

  5. Curative drug treatment of trypanosomosis leads to the restoration of B-cell lymphopoiesis and splenic B-cell compartments.

    PubMed

    Cnops, J; Bockstal, V; De Trez, C; Miquel, M C; Radwanska, M; Magez, S

    2015-09-01

    African trypanosomosis is a parasitic disease affecting both humans (sleeping sickness) and animals (nagana). In murine trypanosomosis, the B-cell compartment is rapidly destroyed after infection. In addition, B-cell lymphopoiesis in the bone marrow is abrogated, B-cell subsets in the spleen are irreversibly depleted, and B-cell memory is destroyed. Here, we investigated the effect of cure of infection on the B-cell compartment. Suramin and diminazene aceturate were used in this study as these drugs exhibit different modes of uptake and different mechanisms of trypanocidal action. Curative drug treatment of trypanosomosis infection led to the re-initiation of B-cell lymphopoiesis in the bone marrow, and to the repopulation of splenic B-cell subsets, independent of the drug used. Neither of these drugs by itself induced measurable effects on B-cell lymphopoiesis in the bone marrow or B-cell homoeostasis in the spleen in healthy, naïve animals. PMID:26072963

  6. The adaptor protein TRAF3 inhibits interleukin-6 receptor signaling in B cells to limit plasma cell development

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Wai W.; Yi, Zuoan; Stunz, Laura L.; Maine, Christian J.; Sherman, Linda A.; Bishop, Gail A.

    2016-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor receptor–associated factor 3 (TRAF3) is an adaptor protein that inhibits signaling by CD40 and by the receptor for B cell–activating factor (BAFF) and negatively regulates homeostatic B cell survival. Loss-of-function mutations in TRAF3 are associated with human B cell malignancies, in particular multiple myeloma. The cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6) supports the differentiation and survival of normal and neoplastic plasma cells. We found that mice with a deficiency in TRAF3 specifically in B cells (B-Traf3−/− mice) had about twice as many plasma cells as did their littermate controls. TRAF3-deficient B cells had enhanced responsiveness to IL-6, and genetic loss of IL-6 in B-Traf3−/− mice restored their plasma cell numbers to normal. TRAF3 inhibited IL-6 receptor (IL-6R)–mediated signaling by facilitating the association of PTPN22 (a nonreceptor protein tyrosine phosphatase) with the kinase Janus-activated kinase 1 (Jak1), which in turn blocked phosphorylation of the transcription factor STAT3 (signal transducer and activator of transcription 3). Consistent with these results, the number of plasma cells in the PTPN22-deficient mice was increased compared to that in the wild-type mice. Our findings identify TRAF3 and PTPN22 as inhibitors of IL-6R signaling in B cells and reveal a previously uncharacterized role for TRAF3 in the regulation of plasma cell differentiation. PMID:26329582

  7. The histone lysine methyltransferase KMT2D sustains a gene expression program that represses B cell lymphoma development

    PubMed Central

    Ortega-Molina, Ana; Boss, Isaac W.; Canela, Andres; Pan, Heng; Jiang, Yanwen; Zhao, Chunying; Jiang, Man; Hu, Deqing; Agirre, Xabier; Niesvizky, Itamar; Lee, Ji-Eun; Chen, Hua-Tang; Ennishi, Daisuke; Scott, David W.; Mottok, Anja; Hother, Christoffer; Liu, Shichong; Cao, Xing-Jun; Tam, Wayne; Shaknovich, Rita; Garcia, Benjamin A.; Gascoyne, Randy D.; Ge, Kai; Shilatifard, Ali; Elemento, Olivier; Nussenzweig, Andre; Melnick, Ari M.; Wendel, Hans-Guido

    2015-01-01

    The lysine-specific histone methyltransferase KMT2D has emerged as one of the most frequently mutated genes in follicular lymphoma (FL) and diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL). However, the biological consequences of KMT2D mutations on lymphoma development are not known. Here we show that KMT2D functions as a bona fide tumor suppressor and that its genetic ablation in B cells promotes lymphoma development in mice. KMT2D deficiency also delays germinal center (GC) involution, impedes B cell differentiation and class switch recombination (CSR). Integrative genomic analyses indicate that KMT2D affects H3K4 methylation and expression of a specific set of genes including those in the CD40, JAK-STAT, Toll-like receptor, and B cell receptor pathways. Notably, other KMT2D target genes include frequently mutated tumor suppressor genes such as TNFAIP3, SOCS3, and TNFRSF14. Therefore, KMT2D mutations may promote malignant outgrowth by perturbing the expression of tumor suppressor genes that control B cell activating pathways. PMID:26366710

  8. Role of EBNA-3 Family Proteins in EBV Associated B-cell Lymphomagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharjee, Shaoni; Ghosh Roy, Shatadru; Bose, Priyanka; Saha, Abhik

    2016-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is highly ubiquitous in human population and establishes a lifelong asymptomatic infection within the infected host unless the immune system is compromised. Following initial infection in the oropharyngeal epithelial cells, EBV primarily infects naive B-lymphocytes and develops a number of B-cell lymphomas particularly in immune-deficient individuals. In vitro, EBV can also infect and subsequently transform quiescent B-lymphocytes into continuously proliferating lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) resembling EBV-induced lymphoproliferative disorders in which a subset of latent transcripts are detected. Genetic studies revealed that EBNA-3 family comprising of three adjacent genes in the viral genome—EBNA-3A and -3C, but not -3B, are critical for B-cell transformation. Nevertheless, all three proteins appear to significantly contribute to maintain the overall proliferation and viability of transformed cells, suggesting a critical role in lymphoma development. Apart from functioning as important viral transcriptional regulators, EBNA-3 proteins associate with many cellular proteins in different signaling networks, providing a suitable platform for lifelong survival of the virus and concurrent lymphoma development in the infected host. The chapter describes the function of each these EBV nuclear antigen 3 proteins employed by the virus as a means to understand viral pathogenesis of several EBV-associated B-cell malignancies. PMID:27092119

  9. Proteomics Based Identification of Proteins with Deregulated Expression in B Cell Lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Wu, Rui; Nijland, Marcel; Rutgers, Bea; Veenstra, Rianne; Langendonk, Myra; van der Meeren, Lotte E; Kluin, Philip M; Li, Guanwu; Diepstra, Arjan; Chiu, Jen-Fu; van den Berg, Anke; Visser, Lydia

    2016-01-01

    Follicular lymphoma and diffuse large B cell lymphomas comprise the main entities of adult B cell malignancies. Although multiple disease driving gene aberrations have been identified by gene expression and genomic studies, only a few studies focused at the protein level. We applied 2 dimensional gel electrophoresis to compare seven GC B cell non Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) cell lines with a lymphoblastoid cell line (LCL). An average of 130 spots were at least two folds different in intensity between NHL cell lines and the LCL. We selected approximately 38 protein spots per NHL cell line and linked them to 145 unique spots based on the location in the gel. 34 spots that were found altered in at least three NHL cell lines when compared to LCL, were submitted for LC-MS/MS. This resulted in 28 unique proteins, a substantial proportion of these proteins were involved in cell motility and cell metabolism. Loss of expression of B2M, and gain of expression of PRDX1 and PPIA was confirmed in the cell lines and primary lymphoma tissue. Moreover, inhibition of PPIA with cyclosporine A blocked cell growth of the cell lines, the effect size was associated with the PPIA expression levels. In conclusion, we identified multiple differentially expressed proteins by 2-D proteomics, and showed that some of these proteins might play a role in the pathogenesis of NHL. PMID:26752561

  10. DOCK2 regulates cell proliferation through Rac and ERK activation in B cell lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lei; Nishihara, Hiroshi; Kimura, Taichi; Kato, Yasutaka; Tanino, Mishie; Nishio, Mitsufumi; Obara, Masato; Endo, Tomoyuki; Koike, Takao; Tanaka, Shinya

    2010-04-23

    DOCK2; a member of the CDM protein family, regulates cell motility and cytokine production through the activation of Rac in mammalian hematopoietic cells and plays a pivotal role in the modulation of the immune system. Here we demonstrated the alternative function of DOCK2 in hematopoietic tumor cells, especially in terms of its association with the tumor progression. Immunostaining for DOCK2 in 20 cases of human B cell lymphoma tissue specimens including diffuse large B cell lymphoma and follicular lymphoma revealed the prominent expression of DOCK2 in all of the lymphoma cells. DOCK2-knockdown (KD) of the B cell lymphoma cell lines, Ramos and Raji, using the lentiviral shRNA system presented decreased cell proliferation compared to the control cells. Furthermore, the tumor formation of DOCK2-KD Ramos cell in nude mice was significantly abrogated. Western blotting analysis and pull-down assay using GST-PAK-RBD kimeric protein suggested the presence of DOCK2-Rac-ERK pathway regulating the cell proliferation of these lymphoma cells. This is the first report to clarify the prominent role of DOCK2 in hematopoietic malignancy.

  11. Anti-cancer activity of withaferin A in B-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    McKenna, MK; Gachuki, BW; Alhakeem, SS; Oben, KN; Rangnekar, VM; Gupta, RC; Bondada, S

    2015-01-01

    Withaferin A (WA), a withanolide from the plant, Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera) used in Ayurvedic medicine, has been found to be valuable in the treatment of several medical ailments. WA has been found to have anticancer activity against various solid tumors, but its effects on hematological malignancies have not been studied in detail. WA strongly inhibited the survival of several human and murine B cell lymphoma cell lines. Additionally, in vivo studies with syngeneic-graft lymphoma cells suggest that WA inhibits the growth of tumor but does not affect other proliferative tissues. We demonstrate that WA inhibits the efficiency of NF-κB nuclear translocation in diffuse large B cell lymphomas and found that WA treatment resulted in a significant decrease in protein levels involved in B cell receptor signaling and cell cycle regulation. WA inhibited the activity of heat shock protein (Hsp) 90 as reflected by a sharp increase in Hsp70 expression levels. Hence, we propose that the anti-cancer effects of WA in lymphomas are likely due to its ability to inhibit Hsp90 function and subsequent reduction of critical kinases and cell cycle regulators that are clients of Hsp90. PMID:26020511

  12. Functional and clinical aspects of the B-cell-activating factor (BAFF): a narrative review.

    PubMed

    Lied, G A; Berstad, A

    2011-01-01

    B-cell-activating factor (BAFF) influences peripheral B-cell survival, maturation and immunoglobulin class-switch recombination and has a range of potential clinical implications. Biological functions of BAFF and its relevance in various clinical disorders including currently investigated BAFF-targeting therapies are reviewed and discussed based on PubMed search of relevant articles. Serum levels of BAFF are increased in autoimmune diseases including autoimmune hepatitis and primary biliary cirrhosis where BAFF concentrations are related to titres of autoantibodies and disease progression. Increased BAFF levels are found in synovial, bronchoalveolar and gut lavage fluids, suggesting local class switching and immunoglobulin production. Clinical relevance and diagnostic potential of BAFF are also noted in patients with allergic diseases, malignancies and infections including hepatitis C virus. BAFF antagonists are promising new therapeutic agents, currently being tried in B-cell-related autoimmune diseases. Serum level of BAFF may indicate disease mechanisms and the degree of activity. Determination of BAFF in different body compartments like synovium, airways and gut may also have clinical implications. Results of ongoing clinical trials with BAFF antagonists are eagerly awaited. PMID:21128997

  13. Using gene therapy to manipulate the immune system in the fight against B cell leukemias

    PubMed Central

    Bouhassira, Diana CG; Thompson, Joshua J; Davila, Marco L

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Over 20 years ago, chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) were created to endow T-cells with new antigen-specificity and create a therapy that could eradicate cancer and provide life-long protection against recurrence. Steady progress has led to significant improvements with CAR design and CAR T-cell production, allowing evaluation of CAR T-cells in patients. The initial trials have targeted CD19, which is expressed on normal and malignant B-cells. Areas covered We review data from trials for patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL). In addition, we discuss the on-target toxicities, B-cell aplasia and cytokine release syndrome (CRS), which is uniquely associated with T-cell immunotherapies. Expert Opinion We compare the results when targeting the same antigen in CLL or B-ALL and speculate on reasons for outcome differences and future directions to enhance outcomes. Furthermore, the dramatic results targeting B-ALL require further analysis in Phase II trials, and we discuss important components of these future trials. We also suggest a management scheme for CRS. The next several years will be critical and may lead to the first clinical indication of a gene-engineered cell therapy for cancer. PMID:25666545

  14. The role of B-cell receptor inhibitors in the treatment of patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Wiestner, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia is a malignancy of mature auto-reactive B cells. Genetic and functional studies implicate B-cell receptor signaling as a pivotal pathway in its pathogenesis. Full B-cell receptor activation requires tumor-microenvironment interactions in lymphoid tissues. Spleen tyrosine kinase, Bruton’s tyrosine kinase, and the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) δ isoform are essential for B-cell receptor signal transduction but also mediate the effect of other pathways engaged in chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells in the tissue-microenvironment. Orally bioavailable inhibitors of spleen tyrosine kinase, Bruton’s tyrosine kinase, or PI3Kδ, induce high rates of durable responses. Ibrutinib, a covalent inhibitor of Bruton’s tyrosine kinase, and idelalisib, a selective inhibitor of PI3Kδ, have obtained regulatory approval in chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Ibrutinib and idelalisib are active in patients with high-risk features, achieving superior disease control in difficult-to-treat patients than prior best therapy, making them the preferred agents for chronic lymphocytic leukemia with TP53 aberrations and for patients resistant to chemoimmunotherapy. In randomized trials, both ibrutinib, versus ofatumumab, and idelalisib in combination with rituximab, versus placebo with rituximab improved survival in relapsed/refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Responses to B-cell receptor inhibitors are mostly partial, and within clinical trials treatment is continued until progression or occurrence of intolerable side effects. Ibrutinib and idelalisib are, overall, well tolerated; notable adverse events include increased bruising and incidence of atrial fibrillation on ibrutinib and colitis, pneumonitis and transaminase elevations on idelalisib. Randomized trials investigate the role of B-cell receptor inhibitors in first-line therapy and the benefit of combinations. This review discusses the biological basis for targeted therapy of chronic lymphocytic

  15. Human bronchial epithelial BEAS-2B cells, an appropriate in vitro model to study heavy metals induced carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Park, Youn-Hee; Kim, Donghern; Dai, Jin; Zhang, Zhuo

    2015-09-15

    Occupational and environmental exposure to arsenic (III) and chromium VI (Cr(VI)) have been confirmed to cause lung cancer. Mechanisms of these metals carcinogenesis are still under investigation. Selection of cell lines to be used is essential for the studies. Human bronchial epithelial BEAS-2B cells are the cells to be utilized by most of scientists. However, due to p53 missense mutation (CCG→TCG) at codon 47 and the codon 72 polymorphism (CGC→CCC) in BEAS-2B cells, its usage has frequently been questioned. The present study has examined activity and expression of 53 and its downstream target protein p21 upon acute or chronic exposure of BEAS-2B cells to arsenic and Cr(VI). The results show that short-term exposure of BEAS-2B cells to arsenic or Cr(VI) was able to activate both p53 and p21. Chronic exposure of BEAS-2B cells to these two metals caused malignant cell transformation and tumorigenesis. In arsenic-transformed BEAS-2B cells reductions in p53 promoter activity, mRNA expression, and phosphorylation of p53 at Ser392 were observed, while the total p53 protein level remained the same compared to those in passage-matched parent ones. p21 promoter activity and expression were decreased in arsenic-transformed cells. Cr(VI)-transformed cells exhibit elevated p53 promoter activity, mRNA expression, and phosphorylation at Ser15, but reduced phosphorylation at Ser392 and total p53 protein level compared to passage-matched parent ones. p21 promoter activity and expression were elevated in Cr(VI)-transformed cells. These results demonstrate that p53 is able to respond to exposure of arsenic or Cr(VI), suggesting that BEAS-2B cells are an appropriate in vitro model to investigate arsenic or Cr(VI) induced lung cancer. PMID:26091798

  16. The role of B-cell receptor inhibitors in the treatment of patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Wiestner, Adrian

    2015-12-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia is a malignancy of mature auto-reactive B cells. Genetic and functional studies implicate B-cell receptor signaling as a pivotal pathway in its pathogenesis. Full B-cell receptor activation requires tumor-microenvironment interactions in lymphoid tissues. Spleen tyrosine kinase, Bruton's tyrosine kinase, and the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) δ isoform are essential for B-cell receptor signal transduction but also mediate the effect of other pathways engaged in chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells in the tissue-microenvironment. Orally bioavailable inhibitors of spleen tyrosine kinase, Bruton's tyrosine kinase, or PI3Kδ, induce high rates of durable responses. Ibrutinib, a covalent inhibitor of Bruton's tyrosine kinase, and idelalisib, a selective inhibitor of PI3Kδ, have obtained regulatory approval in chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Ibrutinib and idelalisib are active in patients with high-risk features, achieving superior disease control in difficult-to-treat patients than prior best therapy, making them the preferred agents for chronic lymphocytic leukemia with TP53 aberrations and for patients resistant to chemoimmunotherapy. In randomized trials, both ibrutinib, versus ofatumumab, and idelalisib in combination with rituximab, versus placebo with rituximab improved survival in relapsed/refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Responses to B-cell receptor inhibitors are mostly partial, and within clinical trials treatment is continued until progression or occurrence of intolerable side effects. Ibrutinib and idelalisib are, overall, well tolerated; notable adverse events include increased bruising and incidence of atrial fibrillation on ibrutinib and colitis, pneumonitis and transaminase elevations on idelalisib. Randomized trials investigate the role of B-cell receptor inhibitors in first-line therapy and the benefit of combinations. This review discusses the biological basis for targeted therapy of chronic lymphocytic

  17. From Melanocyte to Metastatic Malignant Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Bandarchi, Bizhan; Ma, Linglei; Navab, Roya; Seth, Arun; Rasty, Golnar

    2010-01-01

    Malignant melanoma is one of the most aggressive malignancies in human and is responsible for almost 60% of lethal skin tumors. Its incidence has been increasing in white population in the past two decades. There is a complex interaction of environmental (exogenous) and endogenous, including genetic, risk factors in developing malignant melanoma. 8–12% of familial melanomas occur in a familial setting related to mutation of the CDKN2A gene that encodes p16. The aim of this is to briefly review the microanatomy and physiology of the melanocytes, epidemiology, risk factors, clinical presentation, historical classification and histopathology and, more in details, the most recent discoveries in biology and genetics of malignant melanoma. At the end, the final version of 2009 AJCC malignant melanoma staging and classification is presented. PMID:20936153

  18. A catalogue of treatment and technologies for malignant pleural mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Schunselaar, Laurel M; Quispel-Janssen, Josine M M F; Neefjes, Jacques J C; Baas, Paul

    2016-04-01

    Malignant pleural mesothelioma is an aggressive fatal malignancy with a prognosis that has not significantly improved in the last decades. This review summarizes the current state of treatment and the various attempts that are made to improve overall survival for patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma. It also discusses technologies and protocols to test new and hopefully more effective compounds in a more individualized manner. These developments are expected to improve the prognosis for this group of patients. PMID:26943000

  19. Determination of soluble CD21 as a parameter of B cell activation.

    PubMed

    Huemer, H P; Larcher, C; Prodinger, W M; Petzer, A L; Mitterer, M; Falser, N

    1993-08-01

    In this study we established a novel solid-phase immunoassay for CD21 using the time-resolved fluorescence of lanthanide chelates. The capture assay was able to detect concentrations of as low as 100 pg of CD21 antigen per millilitre of sample and was used for quantitative determination of CD21 in lysates of different cell lines as well as in patient serum specimens. CD21 was measured in lysates of tonsils and cell lines of B, T cell and myelomonocyte lineage, and appeared to consist of monomeric antigen under the detergent conditions used. Elevated levels of soluble CD21 were observed in serum of patients with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection, a disease known to be associated with polyclonal B cell activation, and in infection with the lymphotropic rubella virus. Significantly increased levels were also found in malignancies which are associated with EBV. In patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), a correlation with the titre of EBV-specific IgA was observed, thus supporting a possible role of soluble CD21 as a marker for disease activity in certain malignancies. Our data suggest that measurement of soluble CD21 could serve as a marker for activation of the immune system and diseases involving the B cell lymphoid system. Possible mechanisms and functions of soluble CD21 are discussed. PMID:8348744

  20. A detailed molecular analysis of complete bovine leukemia virus genomes isolated from B-cell lymphosarcomas.

    PubMed

    Moratorio, Gonzalo; Fischer, Sabrina; Bianchi, Sergio; Tomé, Lorena; Rama, Gonzalo; Obal, Gonzalo; Carrión, Federico; Pritsch, Otto; Cristina, Juan

    2013-01-01

    It is widely accepted that the majority of cancers result from multiple cellular events leading to malignancy after a prolonged period of clinical latency, and that the immune system plays a critical role in the control of cancer progression. Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) is an oncogenic member of the Retroviridae family. Complete genomic sequences of BLV strains isolated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from cattle have been previously reported. However, a detailed characterization of the complete genome of BLV strains directly isolated from bovine tumors is much needed in order to contribute to the understanding of the mechanisms of leukemogenesis induced by BLV in cattle. In this study, we performed a molecular characterization of BLV complete genomes from bovine B-cell lymphosarcoma isolates. A nucleotide substitution was found in the glucocorticoid response element (GRE) site of the 5' long terminal repeat (5'LTR) of the BLV isolates. All amino acid substitutions in Tax previously found to be related to stimulate high transcriptional activity of 5'LTR were not found in these studies. Amino acid substitutions were found in the nucleocapsid, gp51 and G4 proteins. Premature stop-codons in R3 were observed. Few mutations or amino acid substitutions may be needed to allow BLV provirus to achieve silencing. Substitutions that favor suppression of viral expression in malignant B cells might be a strategy to circumvent effective immune attack. PMID:23506507

  1. Blinatumomab: Bridging the Gap in Adult Relapsed/Refractory B-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Folan, Stephanie A; Rexwinkle, Amber; Autry, Jane; Bryan, Jeffrey C

    2016-08-01

    Adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia who relapse after frontline therapy have extremely poor outcomes despite advances in chemotherapy and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Blinatumomab is a first-in-class bispecific T-cell engager that links T cells to tumor cells leading to T-cell activation and tumor cell lysis. In December 2014, the Food and Drug Administration approved blinatumomab for treatment of relapsed or refractory Philadelphia chromosome-negative precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. In a phase II trial, blinatumomab produced response rates of 43%, and 40% of patients achieving a complete remission proceeded to hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Early use of blinatumomab was complicated with adverse effects, including cytokine release syndrome and neurotoxicity. Management strategies, including dexamethasone premedication and 2-step dose escalation during the first cycle of blinatumomab, have decreased the incidence and severity of these adverse effects. Blinatumomab currently is being studied for other B-cell malignancies and has the potential to benefit many patients with CD19+ malignancies in the future. PMID:27521320

  2. Deep sequencing reveals abundant noncanonical retroviral microRNAs in B-cell leukemia/lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Rosewick, Nicolas; Momont, Mélanie; Durkin, Keith; Takeda, Haruko; Caiment, Florian; Cleuter, Yvette; Vernin, Céline; Mortreux, Franck; Wattel, Eric; Burny, Arsène; Georges, Michel; Van den Broeke, Anne

    2013-02-01

    Viral tumor models have significantly contributed to our understanding of oncogenic mechanisms. How transforming delta-retroviruses induce malignancy, however, remains poorly understood, especially as viral mRNA/protein are tightly silenced in tumors. Here, using deep sequencing of broad windows of small RNA sizes in the bovine leukemia virus ovine model of leukemia/lymphoma, we provide in vivo evidence of the production of noncanonical RNA polymerase III (Pol III)-transcribed viral microRNAs in leukemic B cells in the complete absence of Pol II 5'-LTR-driven transcriptional activity. Processed from a cluster of five independent self-sufficient transcriptional units located in a proviral region dispensable for in vivo infectivity, bovine leukemia virus microRNAs represent ∼40% of all microRNAs in both experimental and natural malignancy. They are subject to strong purifying selection and associate with Argonautes, consistent with a critical function in silencing of important cellular and/or viral targets. Bovine leukemia virus microRNAs are strongly expressed in preleukemic and malignant cells in which structural and regulatory gene expression is repressed, suggesting a key role in tumor onset and progression. Understanding how Pol III-dependent microRNAs subvert cellular and viral pathways will contribute to deciphering the intricate perturbations that underlie malignant transformation. PMID:23345446

  3. A fine romance: T follicular helper cells and B cells.

    PubMed

    King, Cecile

    2011-06-24

    T follicular helper (Tfh) cells help B cells to generate affinity-matured antibodies. Three papers in this issue of Immunity (Choi et al., 2011; Kerfoot et al., 2011; Kitano et al., 2011) provide information about the reciprocal relationship between B cells and Tfh cells. PMID:21703537

  4. B-cell acquisition of antigen: Sensing the surface.

    PubMed

    Knight, Andrew M

    2015-06-01

    B-cell antigen receptor (BCR) recognition and acquisition of antigen by B cells is the essential first step in the generation of effective antibody responses. As B-cell-mediated antigen presentation is also believed to play a significant role in the activation of CD4(+) Th-cell responses, considerable effort has focused on clarifying the nature of antigen/BCR interactions. Following earlier descriptions of interactions of soluble antigens with the BCR, it is now clear that B cells also recognize, physically extract and present antigens that are tethered to, or integral components of, the surfaces or extracellular matrix of other cells. In this issue of the European Journal of Immunology, Zeng et al. [Eur. J. Immunol. 2015. 45: XXXX-XXXX] examine how the physical property or "stiffness" of the surface displaying antigens to B cells influences the B-cell response. This commentary reports that antigen tethered on "less stiff" surfaces induces increased B-cell activation and antibody responses. I then infer how "sensing the surface" by B cells may represent a new component of the immune system's ability to detect "damage," and how this understanding may influence approaches to clinical therapies where immune activity is either unwanted or desired. PMID:25929718

  5. Therapeutic strategies targeting B-cells in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Milo, Ron

    2016-07-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory and demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS) that traditionally has been considered to be mediated primarily by T-cells. Increasing evidence, however, suggests the fundamental role of B-cells in the pathogenesis of the disease. Recent strategies targeting B-cells in MS have demonstrated impressive and sometimes surprising results: B-cell depletion by monoclonal antibodies targeting the B-cell surface antigen CD20 (e.g. rituximab, ocrelizumab, ofatumumab) was shown to exert profound anti-inflammatory effect in MS with favorable risk-benefit ratio, with ocrelizumab demonstrating efficacy in both relapsing-remitting (RR) and primary-progressive (PP) MS in phase III clinical trials. Depletion of CD52 expressing T- and B-cells and monocytes by alemtuzumab resulted in impressive and durable suppression of disease activity in RRMS patients. On the other hand, strategies targeting B-cell cytokines such as atacicept resulted in increased disease activity. As our understanding of the biology of B-cells in MS is increasing, new compounds that target B-cells continue to be developed which promise to further expand the armamentarium of MS therapies and allow for more individualized therapy for patients with this complex disease. PMID:26970489

  6. DNA breaks early in replication in B cell cancers

    Cancer.gov

    Research by scientists at the NCI has identified a new class of DNA sites in cells that break early in the replication process. They found that these break sites correlate with damage often seen in B cell cancers, such as diffuse large B cell lymphoma.

  7. Precursor B Cells Increase in the Lung during Airway Allergic Inflammation: A Role for B Cell-Activating Factor

    PubMed Central

    Malmhäll, Carina; Rådinger, Madeleine; Ramos-Ramirez, Patricia; Lu, You; Deák, Tünde; Semitekolou, Maria; Gaga, Mina; Sjöstrand, Margareta; Lötvall, Jan; Bossios, Apostolos

    2016-01-01

    Background B cells, key cells in allergic inflammation, differentiate in the bone marrow and their precursors include pro-B, pre-B and immature B cells. Eosinophil progenitor cells increase in the lung after allergen exposure. However, the existence and possible role of B cell precursors in the lung during allergic inflammation remains elusive. Methods A BALB/c mouse model of allergic airway inflammation was utilized to perform phenotypic and quantification analyses of pro-B and pre-B cells in the lung by flow cytometry. B cell maturation factors IL-7 and B cell-activating factor (BAFF) and their receptors (CD127 and BAFFR, BCMA, TACI, respectively) were also evaluated in the lung and serum. The effect of anti-BAFF treatment was investigated both in vivo (i.p. administration of BAFF-R-Ig fusion protein) and in vitro (colony forming cell assay). Finally, BAFF levels were examined in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) of asthmatic patients and healthy controls. Results Precursor pro and pre-B cells increase in the lung after allergen exposure, proliferate in the lung tissue in vivo, express markers of chemotaxis (CCR10 and CXCR4) and co-stimulation (CD40, CD86) and are resistant to apoptosis (Bax). Precursor B cells express receptors for BAFF at baseline, while after allergen challenge both their ligand BAFF and the BCMA receptor expression increases in B cell precursors. Blocking BAFFR in the lung in vivo decreases eosinophils and proliferating precursor B cells. Blocking BAFFR in bone marrow cultures in vitro reduces pre-B colony formation units. BAFF is increased in the BAL of severe asthmatics. Conclusion Our data support the concept of a BAFF-mediated role for B cell precursors in allergic airway inflammation. PMID:27513955

  8. Interaction between Mesenchymal Stem Cells and B-Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Linxiao; Hu, Chenxia; Chen, Jiajia; Cen, Panpan; Wang, Jie; Li, Lanjuan

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent; non-hematopoietic stem cells. Because of their immunoregulatory abilities; MSCs are widely used for different clinical applications. Compared with that of other immune cells; the investigation of how MSCs specifically regulate B-cells has been superficial and insufficient. In addition; the few experimental studies on this regulation are often contradictory. In this review; we summarize the various interactions between different types or states of MSCs and B-cells; address how different types of MSCs and B-cells affect this interaction and examine how other immune cells influence the regulation of B-cells by MSCs. Finally; we hypothesize why there are conflicting results on the interaction between MSCs and B-cells in the literature. PMID:27164080

  9. Thymic B Cells and Central T Cell Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Yamano, Tomoyoshi; Steinert, Madlen; Klein, Ludger

    2015-01-01

    Central T cell tolerance is believed to be mainly induced by thymic dendritic cells and medullary thymic epithelial cells. The thymus also harbors substantial numbers of B cells. These may arise though intrathymic B lymphopoiesis or immigration from the bloodstream. Importantly, and in contrast to resting “mainstream” B cells in the periphery, thymic B cells display elevated levels of MHC class II and constitutively express CD80. Arguably, their most unexpected feature is the expression of autoimmune regulator. These unique features of thymic B cells result from a licensing process that involves cross-talk with CD4 single-positive T cells and CD40 signaling. Together, these recent findings suggest that B cells play a more prominent role as thymic APCs than previously appreciated. PMID:26257742

  10. Molecular Mechanisms of B Cell Antigen Gathering and Endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Hoogeboom, Robbert; Tolar, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Generation of high-affinity, protective antibodies requires B cell receptor (BCR) signaling, as well as antigen internalization and presentation to helper T cells. B cell antigen internalization is initiated by antigen capture, either from solution or from immune synapses formed on the surface of antigen-presenting cells, and proceeds via clathrin-dependent endocytosis and intracellular routing to late endosomes. Although the components of this pathway are still being discovered, it has become clear that antigen internalization is actively regulated by BCR signaling at multiple steps and, vice versa, that localization of the BCR along the endocytic pathway modulates signaling. Accordingly, defects in BCR internalization or trafficking contribute to enhanced B cell activation in models of autoimmune diseases and in B cell lymphomas. In this review, we discuss how BCR signaling complexes regulate each of the steps of this endocytic process and why defects along this pathway manifest as hyperactive B cell responses in vivo. PMID:26336965

  11. Authoritarianism and sexual aggression.

    PubMed

    Walker, W D; Rowe, R C; Quinsey, V L

    1993-11-01

    In Study 1, 198 men completed the Right Wing Authoritarianism, Sex Role Ideology, Hostility Towards Women, Acceptance of Interpersonal Violence, Adversarial Sexual Beliefs, and Rape Myth Acceptance scales, as well as measures of past sexually aggressive behavior and likelihood of future sexual aggression. As predicted, authoritarianism and sex role ideology were as closely related to self-reported past and potential future sexually aggressive behavior as were the specifically sexual and aggression-related predictors. Among 134 men in Study 2, authoritarianism and sex guilt positively correlated with each other and with self-reported past sexual aggression. In both studies, the relationship of authoritarianism and sexual aggression was larger in community than in university samples. PMID:8246111

  12. TOX expression in cutaneous B-cell lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Schrader, Anne M R; Jansen, Patty M; Willemze, Rein

    2016-08-01

    Thymocyte selection-associated high-mobility group box (TOX) is aberrantly expressed in cutaneous T-cell lymphomas. In a recent study, TOX expression was noted unexpectedly in the follicle center (germinal center) B-cells of reactive lymph nodes and tonsils, used as external controls. To evaluate whether TOX is also expressed by cutaneous B-cell lymphomas, TOX immunohistochemistry was performed on skin biopsies of 44 patients with primary and secondary cutaneous B-cell proliferations. TOX was expressed not only in the reactive follicle center cells of lymph nodes, tonsils, cutaneous lymphoid hyperplasia, and primary cutaneous marginal zone lymphomas, but also by the neoplastic follicle center cells of 16/17 patients with primary cutaneous follicle center lymphoma (PCFCL) and 7/7 patients with cutaneous manifestations of systemic follicular lymphoma (FL). Notably, TOX showed a very similar expression pattern as BCL6, a marker of germinal center B-cells. In 4/10 patients with a BCL6(+) primary cutaneous diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, leg type (PCDLBCL,LT) and in 2/2 patients with a secondary cutaneous BCL6(+) diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), TOX was expressed by more than 50 % of the neoplastic B-cells. In contrast, in 3/3 BCL6(-) PCDLBCL,LT, TOX was completely negative or weakly expressed by a minor proportion of the neoplastic B-cells. In conclusion, TOX is expressed not only by neoplastic T-cells, but also by both reactive and neoplastic follicle center (germinal center) B-cells and a proportion of BCL6(+) PCDLBCL,LT and secondary cutaneous BCL6(+) DLBCL. The functional significance of TOX expression in reactive and neoplastic B-cells remains to be elucidated. PMID:27180090

  13. CD83 Modulates B Cell Activation and Germinal Center Responses.

    PubMed

    Krzyzak, Lena; Seitz, Christine; Urbat, Anne; Hutzler, Stefan; Ostalecki, Christian; Gläsner, Joachim; Hiergeist, Andreas; Gessner, André; Winkler, Thomas H; Steinkasserer, Alexander; Nitschke, Lars

    2016-05-01

    CD83 is a maturation marker for dendritic cells. In the B cell lineage, CD83 is expressed especially on activated B cells and on light zone B cells during the germinal center (GC) reaction. The function of CD83 during GC responses is unclear. CD83(-/-) mice have a strong reduction of CD4(+) T cells, which makes it difficult to analyze a functional role of CD83 on B cells during GC responses. Therefore, in the present study we generated a B cell-specific CD83 conditional knockout (CD83 B-cKO) model. CD83 B-cKO B cells show defective upregulation of MHC class II and CD86 expression and impaired proliferation after different stimuli. Analyses of GC responses after immunization with various Ags revealed a characteristic shift in dark zone and light zone B cell numbers, with an increase of B cells in the dark zone of CD83 B-cKO mice. This effect was not accompanied by alterations in the level of IgG immune responses or by major differences in affinity maturation. However, an enhanced IgE response was observed in CD83 B-cKO mice. Additionally, we observed a strong competitive disadvantage of CD83-cKO B cells in GC responses in mixed bone marrow chimeras. Furthermore, infection of mice with Borrelia burgdorferi revealed a defect in bacterial clearance of CD83 B-cKO mice with a shift toward a Th2 response, indicated by a strong increase in IgE titers. Taken together, our results show that CD83 is important for B cell activation and modulates GC composition and IgE Ab responses in vivo. PMID:26983787

  14. Molecular biology of malignant gliomas.

    PubMed

    Belda-Iniesta, Cristóbal; de Castro Carpeño, Javier; Casado Sáenz, Enrique; Cejas Guerrero, Paloma; Perona, Rosario; González Barón, Manuel

    2006-09-01

    Gliomas are the most common primary brain tumours. In keeping with the degree of aggressiveness, gliomas are divided into four grades, with different biological behaviour. Furthermore, as different gliomas share a predominant histological appearance, the final classification includes both, histological features and degree of malignancy. For example, gliomas of astrocytic origin (astrocytomas) are classified into pilocytic astrocytoma (grade I), astrocytoma (grade II), anaplastic astrocytoma (grade III) and glioblastoma multiforme (GMB) (grade IV). Tumors derived from oligodendrocytes include grade II (oliogodendrogliomas) and grade III neoplasms (oligoastrocytoma). Each subtype has a specific prognosis that dictates the clinical management. In this regard, a patient diagnosed with an oligodendroglioma totally removed has 10-15 years of potential survival. On the opposite site, patients carrying a glioblastoma multiforme usually die within the first year after the diagnosis is made. Therefore, different approaches are needed in each case. Obviously, prognosis and biological behaviour of malignant gliomas are closely related and supported by the different molecular background that possesses each type of glioma. Furthermore, the ability that allows several low-grade gliomas to progress into more aggressive tumors has allowed cancer researchers to elucidate several pathways implicated in molecular biology of these devastating tumors. In this review, we describe classical pathways involved in human malignant gliomas with special focus with recent advances, such as glioma stem-like cells and expression patterns from microarray studies. PMID:17005465

  15. Genomic Uracil Homeostasis during Normal B Cell Maturation and Loss of This Balance during B Cell Cancer Development

    PubMed Central

    Shalhout, Sophia; Haddad, Dania; Sosin, Angela; Holland, Thomas C.; Al-Katib, Ayad; Martin, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Activation-induced deaminase (AID) converts DNA cytosines to uracils in immunoglobulin genes, creating antibody diversification. It also causes mutations and translocations that promote cancer. We examined the interplay between uracil creation by AID and its removal by UNG2 glycosylase in splenocytes undergoing maturation and in B cell cancers. The genomic uracil levels remain unchanged in normal stimulated B cells, demonstrating a balance between uracil generation and removal. In stimulated UNG−/− cells, uracil levels increase by 11- to 60-fold during the first 3 days. In wild-type B cells, UNG2 gene expression and enzymatic activity rise and fall with AID levels, suggesting that UNG2 expression is coordinated with uracil creation by AID. Remarkably, a murine lymphoma cell line, several human B cell cancer lines, and human B cell tumors expressing AID at high levels have genomic uracils comparable to those seen with stimulated UNG−/−splenocytes. However, cancer cells express UNG2 gene at levels similar to or higher than those seen with peripheral B cells and have nuclear uracil excision activity comparable to that seen with stimulated wild-type B cells. We propose that more uracils are created during B cell cancer development than are removed from the genome but that the uracil creation/excision balance is restored during establishment of cell lines, fixing the genomic uracil load at high levels. PMID:25154417

  16. Prolactin Rescues Immature B-Cells from Apoptosis Induced by B-Cell Receptor Cross-Linking

    PubMed Central

    Flores-Fernández, Rocio; Blanco-Favela, Francisco; Fuentes-Pananá, Ezequiel M.; Chávez-Sánchez, Luis; Gorocica-Rosete, Patricia; Pizaña-Venegas, Alberto; Chávez-Rueda, Adriana Karina

    2016-01-01

    Prolactin has an immunomodulatory effect and has been associated with B-cell-triggered autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). In mice that develop SLE, the PRL receptor is expressed in early bone marrow B-cells, and increased levels of PRL hasten disease manifestations, which are correlated with a reduction in the absolute number of immature B-cells. The aim of this work was to determine the effect of PRL in an in vitro system of B-cell tolerance using WEHI-231 cells and immature B-cells from lupus prone MRL/lpr mice. WEHI-231 cells express the long isoform of the PRL receptor, and PRL rescued the cells from cell death by decreasing the apoptosis induced by the cross-linking of the B-cell antigen receptor (BCR) as measured by Annexin V and active caspase-3. This decrease in apoptosis may have been due to the PRL and receptor interaction, which increased the relative expression of antiapoptotic Bcl-xL and decreased the relative expression of proapoptotic Bad. In immature B-cells from MRL/lpr mice, PRL increased the viability and decreased the apoptosis induced by the cross-linking of BCR, which may favor the maturation of self-reactive B-cells and contribute to the onset of disease. PMID:27314053

  17. Long Noncoding RNA Expression Profiling in Normal B-Cell Subsets and Hodgkin Lymphoma Reveals Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg Cell-Specific Long Noncoding RNAs.

    PubMed

    Tayari, Mina Masoumeh; Winkle, Melanie; Kortman, Gertrud; Sietzema, Jantine; de Jong, Debora; Terpstra, Martijn; Mestdagh, Pieter; Kroese, Frans G M; Visser, Lydia; Diepstra, Arjan; Kok, Klaas; van den Berg, Anke; Kluiver, Joost

    2016-09-01

    Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) is a malignancy of germinal center (GC) B-cell origin. To explore the role of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) in HL, we studied lncRNA expression patterns in normal B-cell subsets, HL cell lines, and tissues. Naive and memory B cells showed a highly similar lncRNA expression pattern, distinct from GC-B cells. Significant differential expression between HL and normal GC-B cells was observed for 475 lncRNA loci. For two validated lncRNAs, an enhanced expression was observed in HL, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, and lymphoblastoid cell lines. For a third lncRNA, increased expression levels were observed in HL and part of Burkitt lymphoma cell lines. RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization on primary HL tissues revealed a tumor cell-specific expression pattern for all three lncRNAs. A potential cis-regulatory role was observed for 107 differentially expressed lncRNA-mRNA pairs localizing within a 60-kb region. Consistent with a cis-acting role, we showed a preferential nuclear localization for two selected candidates. Thus, we showed dynamic lncRNA expression changes during the transit of normal B cells through the GC reaction and widely deregulated lncRNA expression patterns in HL. Three lncRNAs showed a tumor cell-specific expression pattern in HL tissues and might therefore be of value as a biomarker. PMID:27423697

  18. Differential expression of Toll-like receptor (TLR) and B cell receptor (BCR) signaling molecules in primary diffuse large B-cell lymphoma of the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Akhter, Ariz; Masir, Noraidah; Elyamany, Ghaleb; Phang, Kean-Chang; Mahe, Etienne; Al-Zahrani, Ali Matar; Shabani-Rad, Meer-Taher; Stewart, Douglas Allan; Mansoor, Adnan

    2015-01-01

    Primary diffuse large B-cell lymphoma of the central nervous system (CNS DLBCL) is a distinct and aggressive lymphoma that is confined to CNS. Since, central nervous system is barrier-protected and immunologically silent; role of TLR/BCR signaling in pathogenesis and biology of CNS DLBCL is intriguing. Genomic mutations in key regulators of TLR/BCR signaling pathway (MYD88/CD79B/CARD11) have recently been reported in this disease. These observations raised possible implications in novel targeted therapies; however, expression pattern of molecules related to TLR/BCR pathways in this lymphoma remains unknown. We have analyzed the expression of 19 genes encoding TLR/BCR pathways and targets in CNS DLBCLs (n = 20) by Nanostring nCounter™ analysis and compared it with expression patterns in purified reactive B-lymphocytes and systemic diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) (n = 20). Relative expression of TLR4, TLR5, TLR9, CD79B and BLNK was higher in CNS DLBCLs than in control B-lymphocytes; where as TLR7, MALT1, BCL10, CD79A and LYN was lower in CNS DLBCLs (P < 0.0001). When compared with systemic DLBCL samples, higher expression of TLR9, CD79B, CARD11, LYN and BLNK was noted in CNS DLBCL (>1.5 fold change; P < 0.01). The B cell receptor molecules like BLNK and CD79B were also associated with higher expression of MYD88 dependent TLRs (TLR4/5/9). In conclusion, we have shown over expression of TLR/BCR related genes or their targets, where genomic mutations have commonly been identified in CNS DLBCL. We have also demonstrated that TLR over expression closely relate with up regulation of genes associated with BCR pathway like CD79B/BLNK and CARD11, which play an important role in NF-kB pathway activation. Our results provide an important insight into the possibility of TLR and/or B-cell receptor signaling molecules as possible therapeutic targets in CNS DLBCL. PMID:25391967

  19. Integrin-mediated interactions between B cells and follicular dendritic cells influence germinal center B cell fitness1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoming; Rodda, Lauren; Bannard, Oliver; Cyster, Jason G.

    2014-01-01

    Integrin-ligand interactions between germinal center (GC) B cells and antigen-presenting follicular dendritic cells (FDCs) have been suggested to play central roles during GC responses but their in vivo requirement has not been directly tested. Here we show that while integrins αLβ2 and α4β1 are highly expressed and functional on mouse GC B cells, removal of single integrins or their ligands had little effect on B cell participation in the GC response. Combined β2-integrin deficiency and α4-integrin blockade also did not affect the GC response against a particulate antigen. However, the combined integrin deficiency did cause B cells to be outcompeted in splenic GC responses against a soluble protein antigen and in mesenteric lymph node GC responses against gut-derived antigens. Similar findings were made for β2-deficient B cells in mice lacking VCAM1 on FDCs. The reduced fitness of the GC B cells did not appear to be due to decreased antigen acquisition, proliferation rates or pAKT levels. In summary, our findings provide evidence that αLβ2 and α4β1 play overlapping and context-dependent roles in supporting interactions with FDCs that can augment the fitness of responding GC B cells. We also find that mouse GC B cells upregulate αvβ3 and adhere to vitronectin and milk fat globule EGF-factor-8 protein. Integrin β3-deficient B cells contributed in a slightly exaggerated manner to GC responses suggesting this integrin has a regulatory function in GC B cells. PMID:24740506

  20. Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor -A Rare Malignancy in Mandible

    PubMed Central

    Majumdar, Sumit; Kotina, Sreekanth; Uppala, Divya; Kumar, Singam Praveen

    2016-01-01

    Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor (MPNST) is biologically an aggressive tumor that is usually found in the extremities, trunk and infrequently found in the head and neck area particularly in the jaws, arising from the cells allied with nerve sheath. Mandibular MPNST may either arise from a preexisting neurofibroma or develop de novo. Because of the greater variability from case to case in overall appearance both clinically and histologically, a case of MPNST of the mandible in a 25-year-old female patient is reported. The lesion was excised and immunohistological studies (S-100 & Neuron specific enolase) were conducted to confirm the neural origin. PMID:27504425

  1. Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor -A Rare Malignancy in Mandible.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Sumit; Kotina, Sreekanth; Mahesh, Nirujogi; Uppala, Divya; Kumar, Singam Praveen

    2016-06-01

    Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor (MPNST) is biologically an aggressive tumor that is usually found in the extremities, trunk and infrequently found in the head and neck area particularly in the jaws, arising from the cells allied with nerve sheath. Mandibular MPNST may either arise from a preexisting neurofibroma or develop de novo. Because of the greater variability from case to case in overall appearance both clinically and histologically, a case of MPNST of the mandible in a 25-year-old female patient is reported. The lesion was excised and immunohistological studies (S-100 & Neuron specific enolase) were conducted to confirm the neural origin. PMID:27504425

  2. B Cells in Chronic Graft versus Host Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sarantopoulos, Stefanie; Blazar, Bruce R.; Cutler, Corey; Ritz, Jerome

    2015-01-01

    Chronic graft versus host disease (cGVHD) continues to be a common complication of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Unlike acute GVHD, which is mediated almost entirely by donor T cells, the immune pathology of cGVHD is more complex and donor B cells have also been found to play an important role. Recent studies from several laboratories have enhanced our understanding of how donor B cells contribute to this clinical syndrome and this has led to new therapeutic opportunities. Here, Dr. Sarantopoulos reviews some of the important mechanisms responsible for persistent B cell activation and loss of B cell tolerance in patients with cGVHD. Dr. Blazar describes recent studies in preclinical models that have identified novel B cell directed agents that may be effective for prevention or treatment of cGVHD. Some B cell directed therapies have already been tested in patients with cGVHD and Dr. Cutler reviews the results of these studies documenting the potential efficacy of this approach. Supported by studies mechanistic studies in patients and preclinical models, new B cell directed therapies for cGVHD will now be evaluated in clinical trials. PMID:25452031

  3. YY1 Is Required for Germinal Center B Cell Development

    PubMed Central

    Vuyyuru, Raja; Jha, Vibha; Hodewadekar, Suchita; Manser, Tim; Atchison, Michael L.

    2016-01-01

    YY1 has been implicated as a master regulator of germinal center B cell development as YY1 binding sites are frequently present in promoters of germinal center-expressed genes. YY1 is known to be important for other stages of B cell development including the pro-B and pre-B cells stages. To determine if YY1 plays a critical role in germinal center development, we evaluated YY1 expression during B cell development, and used a YY1 conditional knock-out approach for deletion of YY1 in germinal center B cells (CRE driven by the immunoglobulin heavy chain γ1 switch region promoter; γ1-CRE). We found that YY1 is most highly expressed in germinal center B cells and is increased 3 fold in splenic B cells activated by treatment with anti-IgM and anti-CD40. In addition, deletion of the yy1 gene by action of γ1-CRE recombinase resulted in significant loss of GC cells in both un-immunized and immunized contexts with corresponding loss of serum IgG1. Our results show a crucial role for YY1 in the germinal center reaction. PMID:27167731

  4. B cell fate decisions following influenza virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Rothaeusler, Kristina; Baumgarth, Nicole

    2010-01-01

    Summary Rapidly induced, specific antibodies generated in extrafollicular foci are important components of early immune protection to influenza virus. The signal(s) that prompt B cells to participate in extrafollicular rather than germinal center responses are incompletely understood. To study the regulation of early B cell differentiation events following influenza infection, we exploited earlier findings of a strong contribution of C12 idiotype-expressing B cells to the primary hemagglutinin (HA)-specific response against influenza A/PR/8/34. Using an idiotype-specific mAb to C12 and labeled-HA, in conjunction with multicolor flow cytometry, we followed the fate of C12Id-expressing influenza HA-specific B cells in wildtype BALB/c mice, requiring neither genetic manipulation nor adoptive cell transfer. Our studies demonstrate that HA-specific C12Id+ B cells are phenotypically indistinguishable from follicular B cells. While they induced both extrafollicular and germinal center responses, extrafollicular responses were strongly predominant. Provision of increased HA-specific T cell help increased the magnitude of the extrafollicular response, but did not shift the C12Id+ response towards germinal center formation. Collectively the data are consistent with the hypothesis that B cell fate-determination following activation is a stochastic process in which infection-induced innate signals might drive the preferential expansion of the early extrafollicular response. PMID:19946883

  5. The Relationship between B-cell Epitope and Mimotope Sequences.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chunhua; Li, Yunyun; Tang, Weina; Zhou, Zhiguo; Sun, Pingping; Ma, Zhiqiang

    2016-01-01

    B-cell epitope is a group of residues which is on the surface of an antigen. It invokes humoral responses. Locating B-cell epitope is important for effective vaccine design, and the development of diagnostic reagents. Mimotope-based B-cell epitope prediction method is a kind of conformational B-cell epitope prediction, and the core idea of the method is mapping the mimotope sequences which are obtained from a random phage display library. However, current mimotope-based B-cell epitope prediction methods cannot maintain a high degree of satisfaction in the circumstances of employing only mimotope sequences. In this study, we did a multi-perspective analysis on parameters for conformational B-cell epitopes and characteristics between epitope and mimotope on a benchmark datasets which contains 67 mimotope sets, corresponding to 40 unique complex structures. In these 67 cases, there are 25 antigen-antibody complexes and 42 protein-protein interactions. We analyzed the two parts separately. The results showed the mimotope sequences do have some epitope features, but there are also some epitope properties that mimotope sequences do not contain. In addition, the numbers of epitope segments with different lengths were obviously different between the antigen-antibody complexes and the protein-protein interactions. This study reflects how similar do mimotope sequence and genuine epitopes have; and evaluates existing mimotope-based B-cell epitope prediction methods from a novel viewpoint. PMID:26715528

  6. Human Memory B Cells in Healthy Gingiva, Gingivitis, and Periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Mahanonda, Rangsini; Champaiboon, Chantrakorn; Subbalekha, Keskanya; Sa-Ard-Iam, Noppadol; Rattanathammatada, Warattaya; Thawanaphong, Saranya; Rerkyen, Pimprapa; Yoshimura, Fuminobu; Nagano, Keiji; Lang, Niklaus P; Pichyangkul, Sathit

    2016-08-01

    The presence of inflammatory infiltrates with B cells, specifically plasma cells, is the hallmark of periodontitis lesions. The composition of these infiltrates in various stages of homeostasis and disease development is not well documented. Human tissue biopsies from sites with gingival health (n = 29), gingivitis (n = 8), and periodontitis (n = 21) as well as gingival tissue after treated periodontitis (n = 6) were obtained and analyzed for their composition of B cell subsets. Ag specificity, Ig secretion, and expression of receptor activator of NF-κB ligand and granzyme B were performed. Although most of the B cell subsets in healthy gingiva and gingivitis tissues were CD19(+)CD27(+)CD38(-) memory B cells, the major B cell component in periodontitis was CD19(+)CD27(+)CD38(+)CD138(+)HLA-DR(low) plasma cells, not plasmablasts. Plasma cell aggregates were observed at the base of the periodontal pocket and scattered throughout the gingiva, especially apically toward the advancing front of the lesion. High expression of CXCL12, a proliferation-inducing ligand, B cell-activating factor, IL-10, IL-6, and IL-21 molecules involved in local B cell responses was detected in both gingivitis and periodontitis tissues. Periodontitis tissue plasma cells mainly secreted IgG specific to periodontal pathogens and also expressed receptor activator of NF-κB ligand, a bone resorption cytokine. Memory B cells resided in the connective tissue subjacent to the junctional epithelium in healthy gingiva. This suggested a role of memory B cells in maintaining periodontal homeostasis. PMID:27335500

  7. CD19 CAR T Cells for B Cell Malignancies After Allogeneic Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-04

    Philadelphia Chromosome Negative Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

  8. B cell regulation of anti-tumor immune response.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Morgan, Richard; Podack, Eckhard R; Rosenblatt, Joseph

    2013-12-01

    Our laboratory has been investigating the role of B cells on tumor immunity. We have studied the immune response in mice that are genetically lacking in B cells (BCDM) using a variety of syngeneic mouse tumors and compared immune responses in BCDM with those seen in wild type (WT) immunocompetent mice (ICM). A variety of murine tumors are rejected or inhibited in their growth in BCDM, compared with ICM, including the EL4 thymoma, and the MC38 colon carcinoma in C57BL/6 mice, as well as the EMT-6 breast carcinoma in BALB/c mice. In all three murine models, tumors show reduced growth in BCDM which is accompanied by increased T cell and NK cell infiltration, and a more vigorous Th1 cytokine response, and increased cytolytic T cell response in the absence of B cells. Reconstitution of the mice with B cells results in augmented tumor growth due to a diminished anti-tumor immune response and in reduction in CD8+ T cell and NK cell infiltration. Studies involving BCR transgenic mice indicated that B cells inhibit anti-tumor T cell responses through antigen non-specific mechanisms. More recent studies using the EMT-6 model demonstrated that both the number and function of Treg cells in ICM was increased relative to that seen in BCDM. Increased expansion of Treg cells was evident following EMT-6 implantation in ICM relative to that seen in non-tumor-bearing mice or BCDM. The percentage and number of Tregs in spleen, tumor draining lymph nodes, and the tumor bed are increased in ICM compared with BCDM. Treg functional capacity as measured by suppression assays appears to be reduced in BCDM compared with ICM. In contrast to other described types of B regulatory activity, adoptive transfer of B cells can rescue tumor growth independently of the ability of B cells to secrete IL-10, and also independently of MHC-II expression. In experiments using the MC38 adenocarcinoma model, BCDM reconstituted with WT B cells support tumor growth while tumor growth continues to be inhibited

  9. Mature B-cell lymphoma and leukemia in children and adolescents-review of standard chemotherapy regimen and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Worch, Jennifer; Rohde, Marius; Burkhardt, Birgit

    2013-09-01

    Mature B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (B-NHL) comprises more than 50% of all non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) in children and adolescents. Many B-NHL subtypes frequently observed in adults are rarely diagnosed in children and adolescents. In this age group, Burkitt lymphoma (BL), Burkitt leukemia or FAB L3 leukemia (B-AL), diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), primary mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma (PMLBL), follicular lymphoma (FL), and aggressive mature B-NHL not further classifiable (B-NHL nfc) are the most common subtypes. Diverse clinical trials demonstrated similar results of current combination chemotherapy regimens succeeding in overall survival rates of more than 80%. However, treatment-related toxicity and the poor prognosis of relapse are serious concerns. Furthermore, specific histological B-NHL subtypes are rare in children and optimal treatment is not established. New treatment modalities are urgently needed for these patient groups. Rituximab, a monoclonal antibody that is already established in the treatment of adults with mature B-NHL, demonstrated promising results in pediatric patients. The definitive role of rituximab in the treatment of children and adolescents with B-NHL needs to be evaluated in prospective controlled clinical trials. This review provides a comprehensive overview of chemotherapy regimens and the perspectives for children and adolescents with mature B-cell lymphoma and leukemia. PMID:23570584

  10. Angry and Aggressive Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Jim

    2008-01-01

    Students who engage in physical aggression in school present a serious challenge to maintaining a safe and supportive learning environment. Unlike other forms of student aggression, fighting is explicit, is violent, and demands attention. A fight between students in a classroom, hallway, or the lunchroom brings every other activity to a halt and…

  11. Girls' Aggressive Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owens, Larry; Shute, Rosalyn; Slee, Phillip

    2004-01-01

    In contrast to boys' bullying behavior which is often overt and easily visible, girls' aggression is usually indirect and covert. Less research has been conducted on the types of bullying that girls usually engage in. Using focus groups composed of teenaged girls, Dr. Owens and colleagues examine the nature of teenage girls' indirect aggression.

  12. Testosterone and Aggression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Archer, John

    1994-01-01

    Studies comparing aggressive and nonaggressive prisoners show higher testosterone levels among the former. While there is limited evidence for a strong association between aggressiveness and testosterone during adolescence, other studies indicate that testosterone levels are responsive to influences from the social environment, particularly those…

  13. Aggression: Psychopharmacologic Management

    PubMed Central

    Conlon, Patrick; Frommhold, Kristine

    1989-01-01

    Aggression may be part of a variety of psychiatric diagnoses. The appropriate treatment requires that the physician recognize the underlying cause. Pharmacologic agents may form part of the overall treatment of the patient. The number of possible drugs for treating aggression has expanded rapidly, and it is important that the physician be familiar with the various options avilable. PMID:21248947

  14. Social Aggression among Girls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Underwood, Marion K.

    Noting recent interest in girls' social or "relational" aggression, this volume offers a balanced, scholarly analysis of scientific knowledge in this area. The book integrates current research on emotion regulation, gender, and peer relations, to examine how girls are socialized to experience and express anger and aggression from infancy through…

  15. Third Person Instigated Aggression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaebelein, Jacquelyn

    Since many acts of aggression in society are more than simply an aggressor-victim encounter, the role played by third person instigated aggression also needs examination. The purpose of this study was to develop a laboratory procedure to systematically investigate instigation. In a competitive reaction time task, high and low Machiavellian Males…

  16. Neuropsychiatry of Aggression

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Scott D.; Kjome, Kimberly L.; Moeller, F. Gerard

    2010-01-01

    Synopsis Aggression is a serious medical problem that can place both the patient and the health care provider at risk. Aggression can result from medical, neurologic and or psychiatric disorders. A comprehensive patient evaluation is needed. Treatment options include pharmacotherapy as well as non-pharmacologic interventions, both need to be individualized to the patient. PMID:21172570

  17. Human bronchial epithelial BEAS-2B cells, an appropriate in vitro model to study heavy metals induced carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Youn-hee; Kim, Donghern; Dai, Jin; Zhang, Zhuo

    2015-09-15

    Occupational and environmental exposure to arsenic (III) and chromium VI (Cr(VI)) have been confirmed to cause lung cancer. Mechanisms of these metals carcinogenesis are still under investigation. Selection of cell lines to be used is essential for the studies. Human bronchial epithelial BEAS-2B cells are the cells to be utilized by most of scientists. However, due to p53 missense mutation (CCG → TCG) at codon 47 and the codon 72 polymorphism (CGC → CCC) in BEAS-2B cells, its usage has frequently been questioned. The present study has examined activity and expression of 53 and its downstream target protein p21 upon acute or chronic exposure of BEAS-2B cells to arsenic and Cr(VI). The results show that short-term exposure of BEAS-2B cells to arsenic or Cr(VI) was able to activate both p53 and p21. Chronic exposure of BEAS-2B cells to these two metals caused malignant cell transformation and tumorigenesis. In arsenic-transformed BEAS-2B cells reductions in p53 promoter activity, mRNA expression, and phosphorylation of p53 at Ser392 were observed, while the total p53 protein level remained the same compared to those in passage-matched parent ones. p21 promoter activity and expression were decreased in arsenic-transformed cells. Cr(VI)-transformed cells exhibit elevated p53 promoter activity, mRNA expression, and phosphorylation at Ser15, but reduced phosphorylation at Ser392 and total p53 protein level compared to passage-matched parent ones. p21 promoter activity and expression were elevated in Cr(VI)-transformed cells. These results demonstrate that p53 is able to respond to exposure of arsenic or Cr(VI), suggesting that BEAS-2B cells are an appropriate in vitro model to investigate arsenic or Cr(VI) induced lung cancer. - Highlights: • Short-term exposure of BEAS-2B cells to arsenic or Cr(VI) activates p53 and p21. • Chronic exposure of BEAS-2B cells to arsenic or Cr(VI) causes cell transformation and tumorigenesis. • Arsenic-transformed cells exhibit

  18. ATM deficiency promotes development of murine B-cell lymphomas that resemble diffuse large B-cell lymphoma in humans

    PubMed Central

    Hathcock, Karen S.; Padilla-Nash, Hesed M.; Camps, Jordi; Shin, Dong-Mi; Triner, Daniel; Shaffer, Arthur L.; Maul, Robert W.; Steinberg, Seth M.; Gearhart, Patricia J.; Staudt, Louis M.; Morse, Herbert C.; Ried, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The serine-threonine kinase ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) plays a central role in maintaining genomic integrity. In mice, ATM deficiency is exclusively associated with T-cell lymphoma development, whereas B-cell tumors predominate in human ataxia-telangiectasia patients. We demonstrate in this study that when T cells are removed as targets for lymphomagenesis and as mediators of immune surveillance, ATM-deficient mice exclusively develop early-onset immunoglobulin M+ B-cell lymphomas that do not transplant to immunocompetent mice and that histologically and genetically resemble the activated B cell–like (ABC) subset of human diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). These B-cell lymphomas show considerable chromosomal instability and a recurrent genomic amplification of a 4.48-Mb region on chromosome 18 that contains Malt1 and is orthologous to a region similarly amplified in human ABC DLBCL. Of importance, amplification of Malt1 in these lymphomas correlates with their dependence on nuclear factor (NF)-κB, MALT1, and B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling for survival, paralleling human ABC DLBCL. Further, like some human ABC DLBCLs, these mouse B-cell lymphomas also exhibit constitutive BCR-dependent NF-κB activation. This study reveals that ATM protects against development of B-cell lymphomas that model human ABC DLBCL and identifies a potential role for T cells in preventing the emergence of these tumors. PMID:26400962

  19. HIV-dependent depletion of influenza-specific memory B cells impacts B cell responsiveness to seasonal influenza immunisation.

    PubMed

    Wheatley, Adam K; Kristensen, Anne B; Lay, William N; Kent, Stephen J

    2016-01-01

    Infection with HIV drives significant alterations in B cell phenotype and function that can markedly influence antibody responses to immunisation. Anti-retroviral therapy (ART) can partially reverse many aspects of B cell dysregulation, however complete normalisation of vaccine responsiveness is not always observed. Here we examine the effects of underlying HIV infection upon humoral immunity to seasonal influenza vaccines. Serological and memory B cell responses were assessed in 26 HIV+ subjects receiving ART and 30 healthy controls immunised with the 2015 Southern Hemisphere trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (IIV3). Frequencies and phenotypes of influenza hemagglutinin (HA)-specific B cells were assessed by flow cytometry using recombinant HA probes. Serum antibody was measured using hemagglutination inhibition assays. Serological responses to IIV3 were comparable between HIV+ and HIV- subjects. Likewise, the activation and expansion of memory B cell populations specific for vaccine-component influenza strains was observed in both cohorts, however peak frequencies were diminished in HIV+ subjects compared to uninfected controls. Lower circulating frequencies of memory B cells recognising vaccine-component and historical influenza strains were observed in HIV+ subjects at baseline, that were generally restored to levels comparable with HIV- controls post-vaccination. HIV infection is therefore associated with depletion of selected HA-specific memory B cell pools. PMID:27220898

  20. B Cell Development in the Bone Marrow Is Regulated by Homeostatic Feedback Exerted by Mature B Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shahaf, Gitit; Zisman-Rozen, Simona; Benhamou, David; Melamed, Doron; Mehr, Ramit

    2016-01-01

    Cellular homeostasis in the B cell compartment is strictly imposed to balance cell production and cell loss. However, it is not clear whether B cell development in the bone marrow is an autonomous process or subjected to regulation by the peripheral B cell compartment. To specifically address this question, we used mice transgenic for human CD20, where effective depletion of B lineage cells is obtained upon administration of mouse anti-human CD20 antibodies, in the absence of any effect on other cell lineages and/or tissues. We followed the kinetics of B cell return to equilibrium by BrdU labeling and flow cytometry and analyzed the resulting data by mathematical modeling. Labeling was much faster in depleted mice. Compared to control mice, B cell-depleted mice exhibited a higher proliferation rate in the pro-/pre-B compartment, and higher cell death and lower differentiation in the immature B cell compartment. We validated the first result by analysis of the expression of Ki67, the nuclear protein expressed in proliferating cells, and the second using Annexin V staining. Collectively, our results suggest that B lymphopoiesis is subjected to homeostatic feedback mechanisms imposed by mature B cells in the peripheral compartment. PMID:27047488

  1. Transgelin-2 in B-Cells Controls T-Cell Activation by Stabilizing T Cell - B Cell Conjugates

    PubMed Central

    Chae, Myoung-Won; Kim, Hye-Ran; Kim, Chang-Hyun; Jun, Chang-Duk; Park, Zee-Yong

    2016-01-01

    The immunological synapse (IS), a dynamic and organized junction between T-cells and antigen presenting cells (APCs), is critical for initiating adaptive immunity. The actin cytoskeleton plays a major role in T-cell reorganization during IS formation, and we previously reported that transgelin-2, an actin-binding protein expressed in T-cells, stabilizes cortical F-actin, promoting T-cell activation in response to antigen stimulation. Transgelin-2 is also highly expressed in B-cells, although no specific function has been reported. In this study, we found that deficiency in transgelin-2 (TAGLN2-/-) in B-cells had little effect on B-cell development and activation, as measured by the expression of CD69, MHC class II molecules, and CD80/86. Nevertheless, in B-cells, transgelin-2 accumulated in the IS during the interaction with T-cells. These results led us to hypothesize that transgelin-2 may also be involved in IS stability in B-cells, thereby influencing T-cell function. Notably, we found that transgelin-2 deficiency in B-cells reduced T-cell activation, as determined by the release of IL-2 and interferon-γ and the expression of CD69. Furthermore, the reduced T-cell activation was correlated with reduced B-cell–T-cell conjugate formation. Collectively, these results suggest that actin stability in B-cells during IS formation is critical for the initiation of adaptive T-cell immunity. PMID:27232882

  2. HIV-dependent depletion of influenza-specific memory B cells impacts B cell responsiveness to seasonal influenza immunisation

    PubMed Central

    Wheatley, Adam K.; Kristensen, Anne B.; Lay, William N.; Kent, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    Infection with HIV drives significant alterations in B cell phenotype and function that can markedly influence antibody responses to immunisation. Anti-retroviral therapy (ART) can partially reverse many aspects of B cell dysregulation, however complete normalisation of vaccine responsiveness is not always observed. Here we examine the effects of underlying HIV infection upon humoral immunity to seasonal influenza vaccines. Serological and memory B cell responses were assessed in 26 HIV+ subjects receiving ART and 30 healthy controls immunised with the 2015 Southern Hemisphere trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (IIV3). Frequencies and phenotypes of influenza hemagglutinin (HA)-specific B cells were assessed by flow cytometry using recombinant HA probes. Serum antibody was measured using hemagglutination inhibition assays. Serological responses to IIV3 were comparable between HIV+ and HIV− subjects. Likewise, the activation and expansion of memory B cell populations specific for vaccine-component influenza strains was observed in both cohorts, however peak frequencies were diminished in HIV+ subjects compared to uninfected controls. Lower circulating frequencies of memory B cells recognising vaccine-component and historical influenza strains were observed in HIV+ subjects at baseline, that were generally restored to levels comparable with HIV− controls post-vaccination. HIV infection is therefore associated with depletion of selected HA-specific memory B cell pools. PMID:27220898

  3. Donor Atorvastatin Treatment in Preventing Severe Acute GVHD After Nonmyeloablative Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Patients With Hematological Malignancies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-28

    Aggressive Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Aggressive Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Plasma Cell Myeloma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  4. A ribosome-related signature in peripheral blood CLL B cells is linked to reduced survival following treatment.

    PubMed

    Sbarrato, T; Horvilleur, E; Pöyry, T; Hill, K; Chaplin, L C; Spriggs, R V; Stoneley, M; Wilson, L; Jayne, S; Vulliamy, T; Beck, D; Dokal, I; Dyer, M J S; Yeomans, A M; Packham, G; Bushell, M; Wagner, S D; Willis, A E

    2016-01-01

    We have used polysome profiling coupled to microarray analysis to examine the translatome of a panel of peripheral blood (PB) B cells isolated from 34 chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) patients. We have identified a 'ribosome-related' signature in CLL patients with mRNAs encoding for ribosomal proteins and factors that modify ribosomal RNA, e.g. DKC1 (which encodes dyskerin, a pseudouridine synthase), showing reduced polysomal association and decreased expression of the corresponding proteins. Our data suggest a general impact of dyskerin dysregulation on the translational apparatus in CLL and importantly patients with low dyskerin levels have a significantly shorter period of overall survival following treatment. Thus, translational dysregulation of dyskerin could constitute a mechanism by which the CLL PB B cells acquire an aggressive phenotype and thus have a major role in oncogenesis. PMID:27253413

  5. ZFP521 contributes to pre-B-cell lymphomagenesis through modulation of the pre-B-cell receptor signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Hiratsuka, T; Takei, Y; Ohmori, R; Imai, Y; Ozeki, M; Tamaki, K; Haga, H; Nakamura, T; Tsuruyama, T

    2016-06-23

    ZFP521 was previously identified as a putative gene involved in induction of B-cell lymphomagenesis. However, the contribution of ZFP521 to lymphomagenesis has not been confirmed. In this study, we sought to elucidate the role of ZFP521 in B-cell lymphomagenesis. To this end, we used a retroviral insertion method to show that ZFP521 was a target of mutagenesis in pre-B-lymphoblastic lymphoma cells. The pre-B-cell receptor (pre-BCR) signaling molecules BLNK, BTK and BANK1 were positively regulated by the ZFP521 gene, leading to enhancement of the pre-BCR signaling pathway. In addition, c-myc and c-jun were upregulated following activation of ZFP521. Stimulation of pre-BCR signaling using anti-Vpreb antibodies caused aberrant upregulation of c-myc and c-jun and of Ccnd3, which encodes cyclin D3, thereby inducing the growth of pre-B cells. Stimulation with Vpreb affected the growth of pre-B cells, and addition of interleukin (IL)-7 receptor exerted competitive effects on pre-B-cell growth. Knockdown of BTK and BANK1, targets of ZFP521, suppressed the effects of Vpreb stimulation on cell growth. Furthermore, in human lymphoblastic lymphoma, analogous to pre-B-cell lymphoma in mice, the expression of ZNF521, the homolog of ZFP521 in humans, was upregulated. In conclusion, our data showed that the ZFP521 gene comprehensively induced pre-B-cell lymphomagenesis by modulating the pre-B-cell receptor signaling pathway. PMID:26522721

  6. B-cell survival factors in autoimmune rheumatic disorders

    PubMed Central

    Morais, Sandra A.; Vilas-Boas, Andreia

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune rheumatic disorders have complex etiopathogenetic mechanisms in which B cells play a central role. The importance of factors stimulating B cells, notably the B-cell activating factor (BAFF) and A proliferation inducing ligand (APRIL) axis is now recognized. BAFF and APRIL are cytokines essential for B-cell proliferation and survival from the immature stages to the development of plasma cells. Their levels are increased in some subsets of patients with autoimmune disorders. Several recent biologic drugs have been developed to block this axis, namely belimumab [already licensed for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) treatment], tabalumab, atacicept and blisibimod. Many clinical trials to evaluate the safety and efficacy of these drugs in several autoimmune disorders are ongoing, or have been completed recently. This review updates the information on the use of biologic agents blocking BAFF/APRIL for patients with SLE, rheumatoid arthritis, Sjögren’s syndrome and myositis. PMID:26288664

  7. Plasticity and complexity of B cell responses against persisting pathogens.

    PubMed

    Perez-Shibayama, Christian; Gil-Cruz, Cristina; Ludewig, Burkhard

    2014-11-01

    Vaccines against acute infections execute their protective effects almost exclusively via the induction of antibodies. Development of protective vaccines against persisting pathogens lags behind probably because standard immunogens and application regimen do not sufficiently stimulate those circuits in B cell activation that mediate protection. In general, B cell responses against pathogen derived-antigens are generated through complex cellular interactions requiring the coordination of innate and adaptive immune mechanisms. In this review, we summarize recent findings from prototypic infection models to exemplify how generation of protective antibodies against persisting pathogens is imprinted by particular pathogen-derived factors and how distinct CD4(+) T cell populations determine the quality of these antibodies. Clearly, it is the high plasticity of these processes that is instrumental to drive tailored B cell responses that protect the host. In sum, application of novel knowledge on B cell plasticity and complexity can guide the development of rationally designed vaccines that elicit protective antibodies against persisting pathogens. PMID:25068435

  8. How Follicular Dendritic Cells Shape the B-Cell Antigenome

    PubMed Central

    Kranich, Jan; Krautler, Nike Julia

    2016-01-01

    Follicular dendritic cells (FDCs) are stromal cells residing in primary follicles and in germinal centers of secondary and tertiary lymphoid organs (SLOs and TLOs). There, they play a crucial role in B-cell activation and affinity maturation of antibodies. FDCs have the unique capacity to bind and retain native antigen in B-cell follicles for long periods of time. Therefore, FDCs shape the B-cell antigenome (the sum of all B-cell antigens) in SLOs and TLOs. In this review, we discuss recent findings that explain how this stromal cell type can arise in almost any tissue during TLO formation and, furthermore, focus on the mechanisms of antigen capture and retention involved in the generation of long-lasting antigen depots displayed on FDCs. PMID:27446069

  9. COMPUTATION MODELING OF TCDD DISRUPTION OF B CELL TERMINAL DIFFERENTIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this study, we established a computational model describing the molecular circuit underlying B cell terminal differentiation and how TCDD may affect this process by impinging upon various molecular targets.

  10. Chronic B-Cell Leukemias and Agent Orange

    MedlinePlus

    ... survivors' benefits . Research on B-cell leukemias and herbicides The Health and Medicine Division (HMD) (formally known ... sufficient evidence of an association between exposure to herbicides and chronic lymphocytic leukemia. In 2003, VA recognized ...

  11. INTERFERON REGULATORY FACTOR 4 AND 8 IN B CELL DEVELOPMENT

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Runqing

    2010-01-01

    IRF4 and 8 are members of the interferon regulatory factor family of transcription factors and have been shown to be essential for the development and function of T cells, macrophages and dendritic cells. A series of recent studies have further demonstrated critical functions for IRF4 and 8 at several stages of B cell development including pre-B cell development, receptor editing, germinal center reaction and plasma cell generation. Collectively, these new studies provide molecular insights into the function of IRF4 and 8 and underscore a requirement for IRF4 and 8 throughout B cell development. This review focuses on the recent advances on roles of IRF4 and 8 in B cell development. PMID:18775669

  12. Monomeric and oligomeric complexes of the B cell antigen receptor.

    PubMed

    Schamel, W W; Reth, M

    2000-07-01

    The current structural model of the B cell antigen receptor (BCR) describes it as a symmetric protein complex in which one membrane-bound immunoglobulin molecule (mIg) is noncovalently bound on each side by an Ig-alpha/Ig-beta heterodimer. Using peptide-tagged Ig-alpha proteins, blue native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (BN-PAGE), and biosynthetical labeling of B cells, we find that the mIg:Ig-alpha/Ig-beta complex has a stoichiometry of 1:1 and not 1:2. An anti-Flag stimulation of B cells coexpressing Flag-tagged and wild-type Ig-alpha proteins results in the phosphorylation of both Ig-alpha proteins, suggesting that on the surface of living B cells, several BCR monomers are in contact with each other. A BN-PAGE analysis after limited detergent lysis provides further evidence for an oligomeric BCR structure. PMID:10933390

  13. B-Cell waste classification sampling and analysis plan

    SciTech Connect

    HOBART, R.L.

    1999-09-22

    This report documents the methods used to collect and analyze samples to obtain data necessary to verify and/or determine the radionuclide content of the 324 Facility B-Cell decontamination and decommissioning waste stream.

  14. A Rapid Embryonic Stem Cell-Based Mouse Model for B-cell Lymphomas Driven by Epstein-Barr Virus Protein LMP1.

    PubMed

    Ba, Zhaoqing; Meng, Fei-Long; Gostissa, Monica; Huang, Pei-Yi; Ke, Qiang; Wang, Zhe; Dao, Mai N; Fujiwara, Yuko; Rajewsky, Klaus; Zhang, Baochun; Alt, Frederick W

    2015-06-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1) contributes to oncogenic human B-cell transformation. Mouse B cells conditionally expressing LMP1 are not predisposed to B-cell malignancies, as LMP1-expressing B cells are eliminated by T cells. However, mice with conditional B-cell LMP1 expression and genetic elimination of α/β and γ/δ T cells ("CLT" mice) die early in association with B-cell lymphoproliferation and lymphomagenesis. Generation of CLT mice involves in-breeding multiple independently segregating alleles. Thus, although introduction of additional activating or knockout mutations into the CLT model is desirable for further B-cell expansion and immunosurveillance studies, doing such experiments by germline breeding is time-consuming, expensive, and sometimes unfeasible. To generate a more tractable model, we generated clonal CLT embryonic stem (ES) cells from CLT embryos and injected them into RAG2-deficient blastocysts to generate chimeric mice, which, like germline CLT mice, harbor splenic CLT B cells and lack T cells. CLT chimeric mice generated by this RAG2-deficient blastocyst complementation ("RDBC") approach die rapidly in association with B-cell lymphoproliferation and lymphoma. Because CLT lymphomas routinely express the activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) antibody diversifier, we tested potential AID roles by eliminating the AID gene in CLT ES cells and testing them via RDBC. We found that CLT and AID-deficient CLT ES chimeras had indistinguishable phenotypes, showing that AID is not essential for LMP1-induced lymphomagenesis. Beyond expanding accessibility and utility of CLT mice as a cancer immunotherapy model, our studies provide a new approach for facilitating generation of genetically complex mouse cancer models. PMID:25934172

  15. Memory B Cells and Pneumococcal Antibody After Splenectomy1

    PubMed Central

    Wasserstrom, Heather; Bussel, James; Lim, Lony C.-L.; Cunningham-Rundles, Charlotte

    2010-01-01

    Splenectomized patients are susceptible to bloodstream infections with encapsulated bacteria, potentially due to loss of blood filtering but also defective production of anticarbohydrate Ab. Recent studies propose that a lack of Ab is related to reduced numbers of IgM+ CD27+ memory B cells found after splenectomy. To test this, we analyzed CD27+ memory B cell subsets, IgG, and IgM pneumococcal Ab responses in 26 vaccinated splenectomized subjects in comparison to memory B cell subsets and Ab responses in healthy controls. As shown previously, the splenectomized autoimmune subjects had fewer total, isotype switched, and IgM+ CD27+ memory B cells as compared with controls, but there was no difference in memory B cells subsets between controls and splenectomized subjects with spherocytosis. There was no difference between the geometric mean IgG Ab response between normal controls and splenectomized subjects (p = 0.51; p = 0.81). Control subjects produced more IgM Ab than splenectomized autoimmune subjects (p = 0.01) but the same levels as subjects with spherocytosis (p = 0.15.) There was no correlation between memory B cell subsets and IgG or IgM Ab responses for controls or splenectomized subjects. These data suggest that splenectomy alone may not be the sole reason for loss of memory B cells and reduced IgM antipneumococcal Ab. Because subjects with autoimmunity had splenectomy at a significantly older age than participants with spherocytosis, these data suggest that an age-related loss of extra splenic sites necessary for the maintenance or function of memory B cells may lead to impaired immunity in these subjects. PMID:18714044

  16. B cells with regulatory properties in transplantation tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Durand, Justine; Chiffoleau, Elise

    2015-01-01

    Induction of tolerance remains a major goal in transplantation. Indeed, despite potent immunosuppression, chronic rejection is still a real problem in transplantation. The humoral response is an important mediator of chronic rejection, and numerous strategies have been developed to target either B cells or plasma cells. However, the use of anti-CD20 therapy has highlighted the beneficial role of subpopulation of B cells, termed regulatory B cells. These cells have been characterized mainly in mice models of auto-immune diseases but emerging literature suggests their role in graft tolerance in transplantation. Regulatory B cells seem to be induced following inflammation to restrain excessive response. Different phenotypes of regulatory B cells have been described and are functional at various differentiation steps from immature to plasma cells. These cells act by multiple mechanisms such as secretion of immuno-suppressive cytokines interleukin-10 (IL-10) or IL-35, cytotoxicity, expression of inhibitory receptors or by secretion of non-inflammatory antibodies. Better characterization of the development, phenotype and mode of action of these cells seems urgent to develop novel approaches to manipulate the different B cell subsets and the response to the graft in a clinical setting. PMID:26722647

  17. Origin of B-Cell Neoplasms in Autoimmune Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hemminki, Kari; Liu, Xiangdong; Ji, Jianguang; Försti, Asta

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases (ADs) are associated with a number of B-cell neoplasms but the associations are selective in regard to the type of neoplasm and the conferred risks are variable. So far no mechanistic bases for these differential associations have been demonstrated. We speculate that developmental origin of B-cells might propose a mechanistic rationale for their carcinogenic response to autoimmune stimuli and tested the hypothesis on our previous studies on the risks of B-cell neoplasms after any of 33 ADs. We found that predominantly germinal center (GC)-derived B-cells showed multiple associations with ADs: diffuse large B cell lymphoma associated with 15 ADs, follicular lymphoma with 7 ADs and Hodgkin lymphoma with 11 ADs. Notably, these neoplasms shared significant associations with 5 ADs (immune thrombocytopenic purpura, polymyositis/dermatomyositis, rheumatoid arthritis, Sjogren syndrome and systemic lupus erythematosis). By contrast, primarily non-GC neoplasms, acute lymphocytic leukemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia and myeloma associated with 2 ADs only and mantle cell lymphoma with 1 AD. None of the neoplasms shared associated ADs. These data may suggest that autoimmune stimulation critically interferes with the rapid cell division, somatic hypermutation, class switch recombination and immunological selection of maturing B-cell in the GC and delivers damage contributing to transformation. PMID:27355450

  18. CD46-induced human Tregs enhance B cell responses

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Anja; Atkinson, John P.; Fremeaux-Bacchi, Veronique; Kemper, Claudia

    2010-01-01

    Summary Regulatory CD4+ T cells (Tregs) are important modulators of the immune response. Different types of Tregs have been identified based on whether they are thymically derived (natural Tregs) or induced in the periphery (adaptive Tregs). We recently reported on an adaptive Treg phenotype that can be induced by the concomitant stimulation of human CD4+ T cells through CD3 and the membrane complement regulator CD46. These complement-induced Treg cells (cTreg) potently inhibit bystander T cell proliferation through high-level secretion of IL-10. In addition, cTreg express granzyme B and exhibit cytotoxic effects towards activated effector T cells. Here we analyzed the effect of cTreg on B cell functions in a co-culture system. We found that cTreg enhance B cell antibody production. This B cell support is dependent on cell/cell contact as well as cTreg-derived IL-10. In addition, we show that T cells from a CD46-deficient patient are not capable of promoting B cell responses, whereas CD46-deficient B cells have no intrinsic defect in Ig production. This finding may relate to a subset of CD46-deficient patients who present with common variable immunodeficiency (CVID). Thus, the lack of cTreg function in optimizing B cell responses could explain why some CD46-deficient patients develop CVID. PMID:19784949

  19. Origin of B-Cell Neoplasms in Autoimmune Disease.

    PubMed

    Hemminki, Kari; Liu, Xiangdong; Ji, Jianguang; Försti, Asta

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases (ADs) are associated with a number of B-cell neoplasms but the associations are selective in regard to the type of neoplasm and the conferred risks are variable. So far no mechanistic bases for these differential associations have been demonstrated. We speculate that developmental origin of B-cells might propose a mechanistic rationale for their carcinogenic response to autoimmune stimuli and tested the hypothesis on our previous studies on the risks of B-cell neoplasms after any of 33 ADs. We found that predominantly germinal center (GC)-derived B-cells showed multiple associations with ADs: diffuse large B cell lymphoma associated with 15 ADs, follicular lymphoma with 7 ADs and Hodgkin lymphoma with 11 ADs. Notably, these neoplasms shared significant associations with 5 ADs (immune thrombocytopenic purpura, polymyositis/dermatomyositis, rheumatoid arthritis, Sjogren syndrome and systemic lupus erythematosis). By contrast, primarily non-GC neoplasms, acute lymphocytic leukemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia and myeloma associated with 2 ADs only and mantle cell lymphoma with 1 AD. None of the neoplasms shared associated ADs. These data may suggest that autoimmune stimulation critically interferes with the rapid cell division, somatic hypermutation, class switch recombination and immunological selection of maturing B-cell in the GC and delivers damage contributing to transformation. PMID:27355450

  20. Is rituximab sub-optimally dosed in indolent B cell lymphoma?

    PubMed

    Sawalha, Yazeed; Rouphail, Basel; Jia, Xuefei; Dean, Robert M; Hill, Brian T; Jagadeesh, Deepa; Pohlman, Brad L; Smith, Mitchell R

    2016-09-01

    Rituximab pharmacokinetics are affected by gender, age and weight and can affect outcomes in aggressive B cell lymphoma. Less is known about the pharmacokinetics of rituximab in indolent B cell lymphoma (iNHL). We analysed the effects of gender, age, weight and body surface area on the outcomes of 303 patients treated with first line rituximab-based regimens for iNHL. The patients were divided into 3 treatment cohorts: rituximab only, rituximab + chemotherapy (R-CTX) and R-CTX followed by rituximab maintenance; furthermore, each cohort was subdivided as follicular (FL) or non-FL, based on histology. Older males and patients with higher weight had worse outcomes when treated with R-CTX, probably due to faster rituximab clearance. Our results concur with studies of R-CTX for DLBCL. As this effect was not observed in patients treated with rituximab alone or R-CTX followed by rituximab maintenance, we hypothesize that higher rituximab levels reached with weekly rituximab and/or prolonged exposure achieved with maintenance therapy exceed the therapeutic threshold, even with faster clearance, which nullifies the negative effect of higher weight and male gender. In conclusion, under current practices, a subset of patients with iNHL, i.e., FL treated with R-CTX, may be sub-optimally dosed with rituximab. PMID:27136331

  1. Extensive Gene-Specific Translational Reprogramming in a Model of B Cell Differentiation and Abl-Dependent Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Bates, Jamie G.; Salzman, Julia; May, Damon; Garcia, Patty B.; Hogan, Gregory J.; McIntosh, Martin; Schlissel, Mark S.; Brown, Pat O.

    2012-01-01

    To what extent might the regulation of translation contribute to differentiation programs, or to the molecular pathogenesis of cancer? Pre-B cells transformed with the viral oncogene v-Abl are suspended in an immortalized, cycling state that mimics leukemias with a BCR-ABL1 translocation, such as Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML) and Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL). Inhibition of the oncogenic Abl kinase with imatinib reverses transformation, allowing progression to the next stage of B cell development. We employed a genome-wide polysome profiling assay called Gradient Encoding to investigate the extent and potential contribution of translational regulation to transformation and differentiation in v-Abl-transformed pre-B cells. Over half of the significantly translationally regulated genes did not change significantly at the level of mRNA abundance, revealing biology that might have been missed by measuring changes in transcript abundance alone. We found extensive, gene-specific changes in translation affecting genes with known roles in B cell signaling and differentiation, cancerous transformation, and cytoskeletal reorganization potentially affecting adhesion. These results highlight a major role for gene-specific translational regulation in remodeling the gene expression program in differentiation and malignant transformation. PMID:22693568

  2. Pre-B cell proliferation and lymphoblastic leukemia/high-grade lymphoma in Eμ-miR155 transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Costinean, Stefan; Zanesi, Nicola; Pekarsky, Yuri; Tili, Esmerina; Volinia, Stefano; Heerema, Nyla; Croce, Carlo M.

    2006-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) represent a newly discovered class of posttranscriptional regulatory noncoding small RNAs that bind to targeted mRNAs and either block their translation or initiate their degradation. miRNA profiling of hematopoietic lineages in humans and mice showed that some miRNAs are differentially expressed during hematopoietic development, suggesting a role in hematopoietic cell differentiation. In addition, recent studies suggest the involvement of miRNAs in the initiation and progression of cancer. miR155 and BIC, its host gene, have been reported to accumulate in human B cell lymphomas, especially in diffuse large B cell lymphomas, Hodgkin lymphomas, and certain types of Burkitt lymphomas. Here, we show that Eμ-mmu-miR155 transgenic mice exhibit initially a preleukemic pre-B cell proliferation evident in spleen and bone marrow, followed by frank B cell malignancy. These findings indicate that the role of miR155 is to induce polyclonal expansion, favoring the capture of secondary genetic changes for full transformation. PMID:16641092

  3. Identification of Stage-Specific Surface Markers in Early B Cell Development Provides Novel Tools for Identification of Progenitor Populations.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Christina T; Lang, Stefan; Somasundaram, Rajesh; Soneji, Shamit; Sigvardsson, Mikael

    2016-09-01

    Whereas the characterization of B lymphoid progenitors has been facilitated by the identification of lineage- and stage-specific surface markers, the continued identification of differentially expressed proteins increases our capacity to explore normal and malignant B cell development. To identify novel surface markers with stage-specific expression patterns, we explored the reactivity of CD19(+) B cell progenitor cells to Abs targeted to 176 surface proteins. Markers with stage-specific expression were identified using a transgenic reporter gene system subdividing the B cell progenitors into four surface IgM(-) stages. This approach affirmed the utility of known stage-specific markers, as well as identifying additional proteins that selectively marked defined stages of B cell development. Among the stage-specific markers were the cell adhesion proteins CD49E, CD11A, and CD54 that are highly expressed selectively on the most immature progenitors. This work identifies a set of novel stage-specific surface markers that can be used as a complement to the classical staining protocols to explore B lymphocyte development. PMID:27456481

  4. Preclinical Evaluation of the Novel BTK Inhibitor Acalabrutinib in Canine Models of B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Heather L.; Izumi, Raquel; Hamdy, Ahmed; Rothbaum, Wayne; Coombes, Kevin R.; Covey, Todd; Kaptein, Allard; Gulrajani, Michael; Van Lith, Bart; Krejsa, Cecile; Coss, Christopher C.; Russell, Duncan S.; Zhang, Xiaoli; Urie, Bridget K.; London, Cheryl A.; Byrd, John C.; Johnson, Amy J.; Kisseberth, William C.

    2016-01-01

    Acalabrutinib (ACP-196) is a second-generation inhibitor of Bruton agammaglobulinemia tyrosine kinase (BTK) with increased target selectivity and potency compared to ibrutinib. In this study, we evaluated acalabrutinib in spontaneously occurring canine lymphoma, a model of B-cell malignancy similar to human diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). First, we demonstrated that acalabrutinib potently inhibited BTK activity and downstream effectors in CLBL1, a canine B-cell lymphoma cell line, and primary canine lymphoma cells. Acalabrutinib also inhibited proliferation in CLBL1 cells. Twenty dogs were enrolled in the clinical trial and treated with acalabrutinib at dosages of 2.5 to 20mg/kg every 12 or 24 hours. Acalabrutinib was generally well tolerated, with adverse events consisting primarily of grade 1 or 2 anorexia, weight loss, vomiting, diarrhea and lethargy. Overall response rate (ORR) was 25% (5/20) with a median progression free survival (PFS) of 22.5 days. Clinical benefit was observed in 30% (6/20) of dogs. These findings suggest that acalabrutinib is safe and exhibits activity in canine B-cell lymphoma patients and support the use of canine lymphoma as a relevant model for human non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). PMID:27434128

  5. CD19xCD3 DART protein mediates human B-cell depletion in vivo in humanized BLT mice

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Perry; Thayer, William O; Liu, Liqin; Silvestri, Guido; Nordstrom, Jeffrey L; Garcia, J Victor

    2016-01-01

    Novel therapeutic strategies are needed for the treatment of hematologic malignancies; and bispecific antibody-derived molecules, such as dual-affinity re-targeting (DART) proteins, are being developed to redirect T cells to kill target cells expressing tumor or viral antigens. Here we present our findings of specific and systemic human B-cell depletion by a CD19xCD3 DART protein in humanized BLT mice. Administration of the CD19xCD3 DART protein resulted in a dramatic sustained depletion of human CD19+ B cells from the peripheral blood, as well as a dramatic systemic reduction of human CD19+ B-cell levels in all tissues (bone marrow, spleen, liver, lung) analyzed. When human CD8+ T cells were depleted from the mice, no significant B-cell depletion was observed in response to CD19xCD3 DART protein treatment, confirming that human CD8+ T cells are the primary effector cells in this in vivo model. These studies validate the use of BLT humanized mice for the in vivo evaluation and preclinical development of bispecific molecules that redirect human T cells to selectively deplete target cells. PMID:27119115

  6. Translational Mini-Review Series on B cell subsets in disease. Transitional B cells in systemic lupus erythematosus and Sjögren's syndrome: clinical implications and effects of B cell-targeted therapies

    PubMed Central

    Vossenkämper, A; Lutalo, P M K; Spencer, J

    2012-01-01

    OTHER ARTICLES PUBLISHED IN THIS MINI-REVIEW SERIES ON B CELL SUBSETS IN DISEASE B cells in multiple sclerosis: drivers of disease pathogenesis and Trojan horse for Epstein—Barr virus entry to the central nervous system? Clinical and Experimental Immunology 2012, 167: 1–6. Reconstitution after haematopoietic stem cell transplantation – revelation of B cell developmental pathways and lineage phenotypes. Clinical and Experimental Immunology 2012, 167: 15–25. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and Sjögren's syndrome are autoimmune disorders which are characterized by a disturbed B cell homeostasis which leads ultimately to dysfunction of various organs. One of the B cell subsets that appear in abnormal numbers is the population of transitional B cells, which is increased in the blood of patients with SLE and Sjögren's syndrome. Transitional B cells are newly formed B cells. In mice, transitional B cells undergo selection checks for unwanted specificity in the bone marrow and the spleen in order to eliminate autoreactive B cells from the circulating naive B cell population. In humans, the exact anatomical compartments and mechanisms of the specificity check-points for transitional B cells remain unclear, but appear to be defective in SLE and Sjögren's syndrome. This review aims to highlight the current understanding of transitional B cells and their defects in the two disorders before and after B cell-targeted therapies. PMID:22132879

  7. (18)FDG PET/CT appearance in primary cutaneous diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, leg type.

    PubMed

    Samarghandi, Amin; Gru, Alejandro Ariel; Natwa, Mona; Barker, David W

    2015-06-01

    We report the case of a 70-year-old woman who presented with a small and painless red skin nodule in the right lower leg, which rapidly and significantly increased in size over few weeks and developed a central eschar. Skin biopsy was consistent with primary cutaneous diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, leg type (PCDBCL-LT), an aggressive and rare cutaneous lymphoma. F-FDG PET/CT showed a hypermetabolic soft tissue mass in the right leg with no evidence of systemic involvement of disease. PMID:25742229

  8. Malignant thymoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, L S; Huang, M H; Lin, T S; Huang, B S; Chien, K Y

    1992-07-15

    Sixty-one patients underwent operations for malignant thymomas between 1961 and 1989. Twenty-three patients had associated myasthenia gravis (MG), an incidence of 37.7%. Upon being admitted to the hospital, the patients' most common symptoms included chest pain, MG, cough, and dyspnea. Only 7 of 61 (11.5%) patients had no symptom. Tumor staging of 58 patients with invasive thymomas was performed according to Masaoka classification. The patients were classified as follows: Stage II disease, 5; Stage III, 41; Stage IVa, 8; and Stage IVb, 4. In addition, thymic carcinoma was present in three patients. The series had a resection rate of 55.7%. The incidence of operative complications was 16.3%. Only one patient died of myocardial infarction; the incidence of operative mortality was 1.6%. The patients with MG had a higher rate of resection (69.6%) and a higher incidence of complete thymectomy (14 of 23 patients; 60.9%). Mixed lymphoepithelial tumors and epithelial cell predominant tumors were the most frequent histologic patterns (45.9% and 34.4%, respectively). Fifty-two patients had postoperative radiation therapy, and 10 patients had chemotherapy. The overall cumulative survival rates in the series were 59% and 34% at 5 and 10 years, respectively. The results demonstrated that the factors affecting the prognosis may include resectability, postoperative irradiation or chemotherapy, MG, and tumor staging. The influence of histologic variation on survival rates could not be clearly defined in the series. Surgical resection, particularly complete thymectomy, followed by irradiation is the primary option of therapeutic management for malignant thymoma. PMID:1617594

  9. Protein kinase inhibitors against malignant lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    D’Cruz, Osmond J; Uckun, Fatih M

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Tyrosine kinases (TKs) are intimately involved in multiple signal transduction pathways regulating survival, activation, proliferation and differentiation of lymphoid cells. Deregulation or overexpression of specific oncogenic TKs is implicated in maintaining the malignant phenotype in B-lineage lymphoid malignancies. Several novel targeted TK inhibitors (TKIs) have recently emerged as active in the treatment of relapsed or refractory B-cell lymphomas that inhibit critical signaling pathways, promote apoptotic mechanisms or modulate the tumor microenvironment. Areas covered In this review, the authors summarize the clinical outcomes of newer TKIs in various B-cell lymphomas from published and ongoing clinical studies and abstracts from major cancer and hematology conferences. Expert opinion Multiple clinical trials have demonstrated that robust antitumor activity can be obtained with TKIs directed toward specific oncogenic TKs that are genetically deregulated in various subtypes of B-cell lymphomas. Clinical success of targeting TKIs is dependent upon on identifying reliable molecular and clinical markers associated with select cohorts of patients. Further understanding of the signaling pathways should stimulate the identification of novel molecular targets and expand the development of new therapeutic options and individualized therapies. PMID:23496343

  10. Clinicopathological prognostic factors of 24 patients with B-cell lymphoma, unclassifiable, with features intermediate between diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and Burkitt lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Ken-Ichi; Kobayashi, Yukio; Maeshima, Akiko Miyagi; Taniguchi, Hirokazu; Nomoto, Junko; Kitahara, Hideaki; Fukuhara, Suguru; Munakata, Wataru; Maruyama, Dai; Tobinai, Kensei

    2016-06-01

    B-cell lymphoma, unclassifiable, with features intermediate between diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and Burkitt lymphoma (iBL/DLBCL), is a rare, but an aggressive subtype. In iBL/DLBCL, clinicopathological prognostic factors, including MYC and BCL2 translocations (double hit translocation, DHT) and the expression of both MYC and BCL2 (double hit score 2, DHS2), have not been studied thoroughly. We retrospectively analyzed the prognostic impact of clinicopathological factors, including MYC split, IGH/BCL2 fusion, MYC and BCL2 expressions, in 24 iBL/DLBCL patients (median age: 47 years). Fifteen patients (62 %) underwent intensive chemotherapy, and nine patients (38 %) underwent rituximab-cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisolone (R-CHOP). The 5-year progression-free (PFS) and overall survival (OS) rates of intensive chemotherapy and R-CHOP were 57 and 72 %, respectively. PFS was significantly shorter in patients with high IPI score (P < .0001), stage IV (P = .001), aged ≥60 years (P = .042), IGH/BCL2 fusion (P = .029), DHS2 (P = .015), and DHT (P = .03). OS was significantly shorter in patients with high IPI score (P < .0001) and aged ≥60 years (P = .008). In iBL/DLBCL, IGH/BCL2 fusion, DHS2, and DHT were pathological prognostic factors for poor PFS, while IPI remained as more predictive for PFS and OS. PMID:27095041

  11. Kidins220/ARMS binds to the B cell antigen receptor and regulates B cell development and activation

    PubMed Central

    Fiala, Gina J.; Janowska, Iga; Prutek, Fabiola; Hobeika, Elias; Satapathy, Annyesha; Sprenger, Adrian; Plum, Thomas; Seidl, Maximilian; Dengjel, Jörn; Reth, Michael; Cesca, Fabrizia; Brummer, Tilman

    2015-01-01

    B cell antigen receptor (BCR) signaling is critical for B cell development and activation. Using mass spectrometry, we identified a protein kinase D–interacting substrate of 220 kD (Kidins220)/ankyrin repeat–rich membrane-spanning protein (ARMS) as a novel interaction partner of resting and stimulated BCR. Upon BCR stimulation, the interaction increases in a Src kinase–independent manner. By knocking down Kidins220 in a B cell line and generating a conditional B cell–specific Kidins220 knockout (B-KO) mouse strain, we show that Kidins220 couples the BCR to PLCγ2, Ca2+, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk) signaling. Consequently, BCR-mediated B cell activation was reduced in vitro and in vivo upon Kidins220 deletion. Furthermore, B cell development was impaired at stages where pre-BCR or BCR signaling is required. Most strikingly, λ light chain–positive B cells were reduced sixfold in the B-KO mice, genetically placing Kidins220 in the PLCγ2 pathway. Thus, our data indicate that Kidins220 positively regulates pre-BCR and BCR functioning. PMID:26324445

  12. Safety and Tolerability Study of PCI-32765 in B Cell Lymphoma and Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-26

    B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Diffuse Well-differentiated Lymphocytic Lymphoma; B Cell Lymphoma; Follicular Lymphoma,; Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia; Burkitt Lymphoma; B-Cell Diffuse Lymphoma

  13. Linkages between Aggression and Children's Legitimacy of Aggression Beliefs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erdley, Cynthia A.; Asher, Steven R.

    To determine whether Slaby and Guerra's (1988) measure of aggression would reliably assess younger children's belief about aggression and whether children's belief about the legitimacy of aggression relates to their self-reports of it and to their levels of aggression as evaluated by peers, 781 fourth and fifth graders were asked to complete an…

  14. Aggressive Attitudes Predict Aggressive Behavior in Middle School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McConville, David W.; Cornell, Dewey G.

    2003-01-01

    This prospective study found that self-reported attitudes toward peer aggression among 403 middle school students were both internally consistent and stable over time (7 months). Aggressive attitudes were correlated with four outcome criteria for aggressive behavior: student self-report of peer aggression; peer and teacher nominations of bullying;…

  15. Aggression in Pretend Play and Aggressive Behavior in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fehr, Karla K.; Russ, Sandra W.

    2013-01-01

    Research Findings: Pretend play is an essential part of child development and adjustment. However, parents, teachers, and researchers debate the function of aggression in pretend play. Different models of aggression predict that the expression of aggression in play could either increase or decrease actual aggressive behavior. The current study…

  16. Sporadic Burkitt's lymphoma/acute B-cell leukaemia presenting with progressive proptosis and orbital mass in a child.

    PubMed

    Grasso, Daniela; Borreggine, Carmela; Ladogana, Saverio; De Santis, Raffaela; Delle Noci, Nicola; Grilli, Gianpaolo; Macarini, Luca

    2016-06-01

    Burkitt's lymphoma (BL) is an aggressive B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma that is found predominantly in children, with the highest incidence occurring in Africa. The sporadic form occurs in non-endemic areas and typically involves the ileo-caecum and the bowel, whereas orbital and paranasal sinus involvement is rare. Here, we present an unusual case of sporadic BL in a Caucasian male child with rapidly progressive painful proptosis of the right eye. Magnetic resonance imaging showed an oval-shaped, extraconal mass in the supero-lateral part of the right orbit that deformed and dislocated the eyeball antero-inferiorly. The patient underwent anterior orbitotomy, and a biopsy of the excised tissue revealed a starry-sky appearance characteristic of BL. Postoperative aggressive chemotherapy was initiated with a good response after one week. PMID:27006106

  17. Therapeutic targeting of B cells for rheumatic autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Engel, Pablo; Gómez-Puerta, José A; Ramos-Casals, Manuel; Lozano, Francisco; Bosch, Xavier

    2011-03-01

    Autoreactive B cells are characterized by their ability to secrete autoantibodies directed against self-peptides. During the last decade, it has become increasingly apparent that B lymphocytes not only produce autoantibodies but also exert important regulatory roles independent of their function as antibody-producing cells. This is especially relevant in the context of autoimmunity, because autoreactive B cells have been shown to possess the ability to activate pathogenic T cells, to produce pro-inflammatory cytokines, and to promote the formation of tertiary lymphoid tissue in target organs. The production of monoclonal antibodies against B-cell-surface molecules has facilitated the characterization of several distinct B lymphocyte subsets. These cell-surface molecules have not only served as useful cell differentiation markers but have also helped to unravel the important biological functions of these cells. Some of these molecules, all of which are expressed on the cell surface, have proven to be effective therapeutic targets. In both animal models and in clinical assays, the efficient elimination of B lymphocytes has been shown to be useful in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and other autoimmune diseases. The treatment of most rheumatic autoimmune diseases relies mainly on the use of cytotoxic immunosuppressants and corticosteroids. Although this has resulted in improved disease survival, patients may nonetheless suffer severe adverse events and, in some cases, their relapse rate remains high. The increasing need for safer and more effective drugs along with burgeoning new insights into the pathogenesis of these disorders has fueled interest in biological agents; clinical trials involving the B-cell depletion agent rituximab have been especially promising. This article reviews the current knowledge of B-cell biology and pathogenesis as well as the modern therapeutic approaches for rheumatic autoimmune diseases focusing in particular on the targeting of B-cell

  18. Chemotherapy and targeted agents for thymic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Girard, Nicolas

    2012-05-01

    Thymic malignancies are rare epithelial tumors that may be aggressive and difficult to treat. Thymomas are usually localized to the anterior mediastinum and are frequently eligible for upfront surgical resection. However, nearly 30% of patients present with locally advanced tumors at time of diagnosis, and chemotherapy is then used to reduce the tumor burden, possibly allowing subsequent surgery and/or radiotherapy. Metastatic and recurrent thymic malignancies may similarly be treated with chemotherapy. More recently, the molecular characterization of thymoma and thymic carcinoma led to the identification of potentially druggable targets, laying the foundations to implement personalized medicine for patients. PMID:22594902

  19. Penile Sarcoma: Report of a Rare Malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Vijay; Chaturvedi, Arun; Vishnoi, Jeevan Ram; Dontula, Prashant

    2016-01-01

    Penile cancer is an uncommon malignancy. Squamous cell carcinoma constitutes approximately 95% of all histology. Non-squamous malignancies are rare in penis. Sarcomas of penis are rarer among them. Spindle cell sarcoma is one of the extremely rare sarcoma of penis. To best of our knowledge, only two cases have been reported so far, one in English literature and other in Japanese. We are presenting this uncommon case of spindle cell sarcoma of penis, which was diagnosed with microscopy with its characteristic immunohistochemistry. The disease had an aggressive course with multiple recurrences in a short duration despite margin negative resection. Disease responded poorly with the chemotherapy and patient succumbed to the disease.

  20. Is metastatic pancreatic cancer an untargetable malignancy?

    PubMed Central

    Kourie, Hampig Raphael; Gharios, Joseph; Elkarak, Fadi; Antoun, Joelle; Ghosn, Marwan

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic pancreatic cancer (MPC) is one of the most aggressive malignancies, known to be chemo-resistant and have been recently considered resistant to some targeted therapies (TT). Erlotinib combined to gemcitabine is the only targeted therapy that showed an overall survival benefit in MPC. New targets and therapeutic approaches, based on new-TT, are actually being evaluated in MPC going from immunotherapy, epigenetics, tumor suppressor gene and oncogenes to stromal matrix regulators. We aim in this paper to present the major causes rendering MPC an untargetable malignancy and to focus on the new therapeutic modalities based on TT in MPC. PMID:26989465

  1. Early B-cell differentiation in Merkel cell carcinomas: clues to cellular ancestry.

    PubMed

    Zur Hausen, Axel; Rennspiess, Dorit; Winnepenninckx, Veronique; Speel, Ernst-Jan; Kurz, Anna Kordelia

    2013-08-15

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a highly malignant neuroendocrine nonmelanoma skin cancer, which is associated with the Merkel cell polyoma virus (MCPyV). Recently, expression of the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT) and the paired box gene 5 (PAX 5) has been consistently reported in the majority of MCCs. We tested 21 MCCs for the expression of MCPyV, TdT, PAX5, IgG, IgM, IgA, kappa, and lambda by immunohistochemistry and assessed IgH and Igk rearrangement in all 21 MCCs. All of the MCCs revealed specific expression of PAX5 and 72.8% of the MCCs expressed TdT. In addition, most of the MCCs revealed specific expression of one or more Ig subclasses and kappa or lambda. One MCC did reveal monoclonal IgH and Igk rearrangement next to two other MCCs showing Igk rearrangement. As coexpression of TdT and PAX5 under physiologic circumstances is restricted to pro/pre- and pre-B cells we propose, on the basis of our results, that the cell of origin of MCCs is a pro/pre- or pre-B cell rather than the postmitotic Merkel cells. MCPyV infection and transformation of pro-/pre-B cells are likely to induce the expression of simple cytokeratins as has been shown for SV40 in other nonepithelial cells. This model of cellular ancestry of MCCs might impact therapy and possibly helps to understand why approximately 20% of MCCs are MCPyV-negative. PMID:23576560

  2. Clinical Significance of sIL-2R Levels in B-Cell Lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Noriaki; Oda, Miyo; Kuroda, Yoshiaki; Katayama, Yuta; Okikawa, Yoshiko; Masunari, Taro; Fujiwara, Megumu; Nishisaka, Takashi; Sasaki, Naomi; Sadahira, Yoshito; Mihara, Keichiro; Asaoku, Hideki; Matsui, Hirotaka; Seto, Masao; Kimura, Akiro; Arihiro, Koji; Sakai, Akira

    2013-01-01

    Elevated soluble interleukin-2 receptor (sIL-2R) in sera is observed in patients with malignant lymphoma (ML). Therefore, sIL-2R is commonly used as a diagnostic and prognostic marker for ML, but the mechanisms responsible for the increase in sIL-2R levels in patients with B-cell lymphomas have not yet been elucidated. We first hypothesized that lymphoma cells expressing IL-2R and some proteinases such as matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in the tumor microenvironment can give rise to increased sIL-2R in sera. However, flow cytometric studies revealed that few lymphoma cells expressed IL-2R α chain (CD25) in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and follicular lymphoma (FL), and most CD25-expressing cells in the tumor were T-cells. Distinct correlations between CD25 expression on B-lymphoma cells and sIL-2R levels were not observed. We then confirmed that MMP-9 plays an important role in producing sIL-2R in functional studies. Immunohistochemical (IHC) analysis also revealed that MMP-9 is mainly derived from tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs). We therefore evaluated the number of CD68 and CD163 positive macrophages in the tumor microenvironment using IHC analysis. A positive correlation between the levels of sIL-2R in sera and the numbers of CD68 positive macrophages in the tumor microenvironment was confirmed in FL and extranodal DLBCL. These results may be useful in understanding the pathophysiology of B-cell lymphomas. PMID:24236041

  3. Enhanced B Cell Alloantigen Presentation and Its Epigenetic Dysregulation in Liver Transplant Rejection.

    PubMed

    Ningappa, M; Ashokkumar, C; Higgs, B W; Sun, Q; Jaffe, R; Mazariegos, G; Li, D; Weeks, D E; Subramaniam, S; Ferrell, R; Hakonarson, H; Sindhi, R

    2016-02-01

    T cell suppression prevents acute cellular rejection but causes life-threatening infections and malignancies. Previously, liver transplant (LTx) rejection in children was associated with the single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs9296068 upstream of the HLA-DOA gene. HLA-DOA inhibits B cell presentation of antigen, a potentially novel antirejection drug target. Using archived samples from 122 white pediatric LTx patients (including 77 described previously), we confirmed the association between rs9296068 and LTx rejection (p = 0.001, odds ratio [OR] 2.55). Next-generation sequencing revealed that the putative transcription factor (CCCTC binding factor [CTCF]) binding SNP locus rs2395304, in linkage disequilibrium with rs9296068 (D' 0.578, r(2) = 0.4), is also associated with LTx rejection (p = 0.008, OR 2.34). Furthermore, LTx rejection is associated with enhanced B cell presentation of donor antigen relative to HLA-nonidentical antigen in a novel cell-based assay and with a downregulated HLA-DOA gene in a subset of these children. In lymphoblastoid B (Raji) cells, rs2395304 coimmunoprecipitates with CTCF, and CTCF knockdown with morpholino antisense oligonucleotides enhances alloantigen presentation and downregulates the HLA-DOA gene, reproducing observations made with HLA-DOA knockdown and clinical rejection. Alloantigen presentation is suppressed by inhibitors of methylation and histone deacetylation, reproducing observations made during resolution of rejection. Enhanced donor antigen presentation by B cells and its epigenetic dysregulation via the HLA-DOA gene represent novel opportunities for surveillance and treatment of transplant rejection. PMID:26663361

  4. Primary diffuse large B-cell lymphoma of the left ureter: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ping; Jiang, Maoqing; Lin, Yuanwei; Ye, Xianwang; Ruan, Xinzhong; Huang, Qiuli

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is a subtype of non-Hodgkin lymphoma occurring in various sites, but rarely involving the ureters. Primary DLBCL is a rare entity. Imaging studies in a 82-year-old male patient revealed left hydronephrosis and an area of nodular soft tissue density in the upper ureteral wall. On enhanced computed tomography scans, the lesion exhibited early enhancement. As the lesion was considered to be malignant, a left nephroureterectomy was performed for the purpose of pathological diagnosis. Histological analysis and immunohistochemistry revealed DLBCL. Since the surgery, the patient has survived for 16 months without evidence of a relapse. Thus, in cases with ureteral stenosis or obstruction for which the cause is uncertain, the possibility of primary lymphoma of the ureter should be considered and further histopathological examination of bioptic samples should be performed as soon as possible. PMID:27588189

  5. SEOM clinical guidelines for the treatment of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Gómez Codina, José; Sabín Domínguez, Pilar; Provencio Pulla, Mariano; Rueda Domínguez, Antonio; Isla Casado, Dolores

    2010-11-01

    Diffuse large B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (LDCGB) is one of the best examples of chemotherapy curable malignant diseases. This "Oncoguía SEOM" summarizes the basic directions of staging and recommended treatment options. The staging study should be thorough and includes clinical, laboratory, diagnostic imaging and nuclear medicine. Treatment depends on patient characteristics and comorbidity and on disease extension and prognostic factors. In localized cases, chemoimmunotherapy (CHOP-R) of short duration, followed by involved-field irradiation is the preferred option. In advanced stages, the association of CHOP-like chemotherapy and Rituximab has been a major breakthrough in terms of cure rate. It is important do not forget the supportive treatment in these patients. PMID:20974570

  6. Retroperitoneal fibrosis due to B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma: Responding to rituximab!

    PubMed

    Alvarez Argote, Juliana; Bauer, Frank A; Posteraro, Anthony F; Dasanu, Constantin A

    2016-02-01

    Retroperitoneal fibrosis is a rare disease manifesting as chronic soft tissue fibrosis in the retroperitoneum, with potential anatomic and/or functional compromise of adjacent organs. It can be primary (idiopathic) or secondary to other conditions such as cancers, autoimmune disorders, or drugs. We report herein a 66-year-old patient with symptomatic retroperitoneal fibrosis leading to bilateral hydronephrosis and renal failure, in whom, after a complex diagnostic work-up and protracted clinical course, a B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma in the retroperitoneal space and several vertebral bodies was identified. The patient was treated with radiation therapy and weekly rituximab infusions, with resolution of hydronephrosis and lower back pain. We include a thorough literature review on etiopathogenesis, diagnosis, therapy, and prognosis of retroperitoneal fibrosis. A meticulous search for malignancy is necessary in this rare condition that, if positive, may have significant therapeutic and prognostic implications. PMID:25013186

  7. Targeting the B-Cell Lymphoma/Leukemia 2 Family in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Davids, Matthew S.; Letai, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    The B-cell lymphoma/leukemia 2 (BCL-2) family of proteins has attracted the attention of cancer biologists since the cloning of BCL-2 more than 25 years ago. In the intervening decades, the way the BCL-2 family controls commitment to programmed cell death has been greatly elucidated. Several drugs directed at inhibiting BCL-2 and related antiapoptotic proteins have been tested clinically, with some showing considerable promise, particularly in lymphoid malignancies. A better understanding of the BCL-2 family has also provided insight into how conventional chemotherapy selectively kills cancer cells and why some cancers are more chemosensitive than others. Further exploitation of our understanding of the BCL-2 family promises to offer improved predictive biomarkers for oncologists and improved therapies for patients with cancer. PMID:22649144

  8. Selective Immunophenotyping for Diagnosis of B-cell Neoplasms: Immunohistochemistry and Flow Cytometry Strategies and Results

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, Scott D.; Natkunam, Yasodha; Allen, John R.; Warnke, Roger A.

    2012-01-01

    Determining the immunophenotype of hematologic malignancies is now an indispensible part of diagnostic classification, and can help to guide therapy, or to predict clinical outcome. Diagnostic workup should be guided by morphologic findings and evaluate clinically important markers, but ideally should avoid the use of overly-broad panels of immunostains that can reveal incidental findings of uncertain significance and give rise to increased costs. Here, we outline our approach to diagnosis of B cell neoplasms, combining histologic and clinical data with tailored panels of immunophenotyping reagents, in the context of the 2008 World Health Organization classification. We present data from cases seen at our institution from 2004-8 using this approach, to provide a practical reference for findings seen in daily diagnostic practice. PMID:22820658

  9. [Primary bilateral adrenal T-cell lymphoma. A case report rarer than B-cell lymphoma].

    PubMed

    Sfaxi, M; Bouzouita, A; Bouasker, I; Kourda, N; Ben Slama, M R; Ben Jilani Baltaji, S; Chebil, M

    2008-06-01

    Primary adrenal lymphoma is a rare condition. Only 70 cases were described in the literature. Adrenal lymphoma is often bilateral and in most of the cases of B-cell type. T-cell lymphoma is exceptional. The prognosis is bad and patient can die early because of acute adrenal insufficiency. We report a case of a 70-year-old man who was admitted for acute adrenal insufficiency due to primary bilateral adrenal T-cell lymphoma. He had corticotherapy and surgical exploration for intra-abdominal sepsis. He died because of multivisceral deficiency. Clinical features and imaging are not specific. (18)F-FDG PET Scan is an excellent mean to detect malignant tumor of adrenal gland. Percutaneous needle biopsy is useful to determine histology. The standard treatment is chemotherapy. PMID:18455145

  10. B-cell lymphomas with concurrent MYC and BCL2 abnormalities other than translocations behave similarly to MYC/BCL2 double-hit lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Li, Shaoying; Seegmiller, Adam C; Lin, Pei; Wang, Xuan J; Miranda, Roberto N; Bhagavathi, Sharathkumar; Medeiros, L Jeffrey

    2015-02-01

    Large B-cell lymphomas with IGH@BCL2 and MYC rearrangement, known as double-hit lymphoma (DHL), are clinically aggressive neoplasms with a poor prognosis. Some large B-cell lymphomas have concurrent abnormalities of MYC and BCL2 other than coexistent translocations. Little is known about patients with these lymphomas designated here as atypical DHL. We studied 40 patients of atypical DHL including 21 men and 19 women, with a median age of 60 years. Nine (23%) patients had a history of B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma. There were 30 diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), 7 B-cell lymphoma, unclassifiable, with features intermediate between DLBCL and Burkitt lymphoma, and 3 DLBCL with coexistent follicular lymphoma. CD10, BCL2, and MYC were expressed in 28/39 (72%), 33/35 (94%), and 14/20 (70%) cases, respectively. Patients were treated with standard (n=14) or more aggressive chemotherapy regimens (n=17). We compared the atypical DHL group with 76 patients with DHLand 35 patients with DLBCL lacking MYC and BCL2 abnormalities. The clinicopathologic features and therapies were similar between patients with atypical and typical DHL. The overall survival of patients with atypical double-hit lymphoma was similar to that of patients with double-hit lymphoma (P=0.47) and significantly worse than that of patients with DLBCL with normal MYC and BCL2 (P=0.02). There were some minor differences. Cases of atypical double-hit lymphoma more often have DLBCL morphology (P<0.01), less frequently expressed CD10 (P<0.01), and patients less often had an elevated serum lactate dehydrogenase level (P=0.01). In aggregate, these results support expanding the category of MYC/BCL2 DHL to include large B-cell lymphomas with coexistent MYC and BCL2 abnormalities other than concurrent translocations. PMID:25103070

  11. Colorimetric In Situ Hybridization Identifies MYC Gene Signal Clusters Correlating With Increased Copy Number, mRNA, and Protein in Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Valentino, Carlo; Kendrick, Samantha; Johnson, Nathalie; Gascoyne, Randy; Chan, Wing C.; Weisenburger, Dennis; Braziel, Rita; Cook, James R.; Tubbs, Raymond; Campo, Elias; Rosenwald, Andreas; Ott, German; Delabie, Jan; Jaffe, Elaine; Zhang, Wenjun; Brunhoeber, Patrick; Nitta, Hiro; Grogan, Tom; Rimsza, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Abnormalities of the MYC oncogene on chromosome 8 are characteristic of Burkitt lymphoma and other aggressive B-cell lymphomas, including diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). We recently described a colorimetric in situ hybridization (CISH) method for detecting extra copies of the MYC gene in DLBCL and the frequent occurrence of excess copies of discrete MYC signals in the context of diploidy or polyploidy of chromosome 8, which correlated with increased mRNA signals. We further observed enlarged MYC signals, which were counted as a single gene copy but, by their dimension and unusual shape, likely consisted of “clusters” of MYC genes. In this study, we sought to further characterize these clusters of MYC signals by determining whether the presence of these correlated with other genetic features, mRNA levels, protein, and overall survival. We found that MYC clusters correlated with an abnormal MYC locus and with increased mRNA. MYC mRNA correlated with protein levels, and both increased mRNA and protein correlated with poorer overall survival. MYC clusters were seen in both the germinal center and activated B-cell subtypes of DLBCL. Clusters of MYC signals may be an underappreciated, but clinically important, feature of aggressive B-cell lymphomas with potential prognostic and therapeutic relevance. PMID:23355209

  12. TIM-1 signaling in B cells regulates antibody production

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Juan; Usui, Yoshihiko; Takeda, Kazuyoshi; Harada, Norihiro; Yagita, Hideo; Okumura, Ko; Akiba, Hisaya

    2011-03-11

    Highlights: {yields} TIM-1 is highly expressed on anti-IgM + anti-CD40-stimulated B cells. {yields} Anti-TIM-1 mAb enhanced proliferation and Ig production on activated B cell in vitro. {yields} TIM-1 signaling regulates Ab production by response to TI-2 and TD antigens in vivo. -- Abstract: Members of the T cell Ig and mucin (TIM) family have recently been implicated in the control of T cell-mediated immune responses. In this study, we found TIM-1 expression on anti-IgM- or anti-CD40-stimulated splenic B cells, which was further up-regulated by the combination of anti-IgM and anti-CD40 Abs. On the other hand, TIM-1 ligand was constitutively expressed on B cells and inducible on anti-CD3{sup +} anti-CD28-stimulated CD4{sup +} T cells. In vitro stimulation of activated B cells by anti-TIM-1 mAb enhanced proliferation and expression of a plasma cell marker syndecan-1 (CD138). We further examined the effect of TIM-1 signaling on antibody production in vitro and in vivo. Higher levels of IgG2b and IgG3 secretion were detected in the culture supernatants of the anti-TIM-1-stimulated B cells as compared with the control IgG-stimulated B cells. When immunized with T-independent antigen TNP-Ficoll, TNP-specific IgG1, IgG2b, and IgG3 Abs were slightly increased in the anti-TIM-1-treated mice. When immunized with T-dependent antigen OVA, serum levels of OVA-specific IgG2b, IgG3, and IgE Abs were significantly increased in the anti-TIM-1-treated mice as compared with the control IgG-treated mice. These results suggest that TIM-1 signaling in B cells augments antibody production by enhancing B cell proliferation and differentiation.

  13. Interphase cytogenetics of B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia by FISH-technique

    SciTech Connect

    Peddanna, N.; Gogineni, S.K.; Rosenthal, C.J.

    1994-09-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia [CLL] accounts for about 30% of all lymphoproliferative disorders. In over 95% of these cases, the leukemia is caused by B-cells, rarely T-cells. Fifty percent of B-CLL have chromosomal aberrations and of such cases, one-third have trisomy 12. Malignant B-cells have a very low mitotic index and those metaphases that can be analyzed usually represent the normal T-cell population. Retrospectively, we decided to identify the additional chromosome 12 (trisomy 12) directly at interphase by the FISH-technique using centrometric 12 specific alphoid probe (Oncor, Gaithersburg, MD). Preparations were made from 9 patients with B-CLL. All cultures except one failed to produce metaphases for conventional karyotyping. Eighty percent of the cells have two dots (normal cells) over the interphase nuclei while the remaining 20% have three dots (trisomy 12). The clinical implication of trisomy 12 in the pathogenesis of CLL including age, staging and duration of disease, differentials and immunological markers are correlated with interphase cytogenetic data. The loss and/or gain of specific chromosomes in human neoplasia is common and rapid evaluation of such cases should be considered as a routine approach.

  14. Transcription factor networks in B-cell differentiation link development to acute lymphoid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Somasundaram, Rajesh; Prasad, Mahadesh A. J.; Ungerbäck, Jonas

    2015-01-01

    B-lymphocyte development in the bone marrow is controlled by the coordinated action of transcription factors creating regulatory networks ensuring activation of the B-lymphoid program and silencing of alternative cell fates. This process is tightly connected to malignant transformation because B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells display a pronounced block in differentiation resulting in the expansion of immature progenitor cells. Over the last few years, high-resolution analysis of genetic changes in leukemia has revealed that several key regulators of normal B-cell development, including IKZF1, TCF3, EBF1, and PAX5, are genetically altered in a large portion of the human B-lineage acute leukemias. This opens the possibility of directly linking the disrupted development as well as aberrant gene expression patterns in leukemic cells to molecular functions of defined transcription factors in normal cell differentiation. This review article focuses on the roles of transcription factors in early B-cell development and their involvement in the formation of human leukemia. PMID:25990863

  15. Cutaneous diffuse large B-cell lymphoma of the leg associated with chronic lymphedema.

    PubMed

    González-Vela, M Carmen; González-López, Marcos A; Val-Bernal, J Fernando; Fernández-Llaca, Héctor

    2008-02-01

    Development of malignant tumors is a rare but well known complication in chronic lymphedema (CL). We report herein a cutaneous diffuse large B-cell lymphoma of the leg associated with CL. An 89-year-old man presented with multiple cutaneous lesions on his right limb that showed a CL. Dermatological examination disclosed multiple violaceous, firm, slightly infiltrated nodules on the anterior aspect of the leg and the dorsum and sole of the foot. A biopsy of one nodule of the leg disclosed a diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, type of the legs. There was no evidence of lymphadenopathy on computed tomography (CT) scans of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis. A bone marrow aspiration and biopsy showed normal results. The patient was treated with local radiotherapy at a dose of 40 Gy, obtaining a highly significant, almost complete, clinical remission. A literature search identified 11 additional cases of primary cutaneous lymphoma associated with CL. An inadequate lymphatic drainage may make the lymphedematous region an immunologically vulnerable area, predisposing to neoplasia. PMID:18211492

  16. The Role of Latently Infected B Cells in CNS Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Márquez, Ana Citlali; Horwitz, Marc Steven

    2015-01-01

    The onset of multiple sclerosis (MS) is caused by both genetic and environmental factors. Among the environmental factors, it is believed that previous infection with Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) may contribute in the development of MS. EBV has been associated with other autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematous, and cancers like Burkitt’s lymphoma. EBV establishes a life-long latency in B cells with occasional reactivation of the virus throughout the individual’s life. The role played by B cells in MS pathology has been largely studied, yet is not clearly understood. In MS patients, Rituximab, a novel treatment that targets CD20+ B cells, has proven to have successful results in diminishing the number of relapses in remitting relapsing MS; however, the mechanism of how this drug acts has not been clearly established. In this review, we analyze the evidence of how B cells latently infected with EBV might be altering the immune system response and helping in the development of MS. We will also discuss how animal models, such as experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) and murine gammaherpesvirus-68 (γHV-68), can be used as powerful tools in the study of the relationship between EBV, MS, and B cells. PMID:26579121

  17. FCRL regulation in innate-like B cells.

    PubMed

    Davis, Randall S

    2015-12-01

    Coelomic cavity-derived B-1 and splenic marginal zone (MZ) B lymphocytes play principal roles in frontline host protection at homeostasis and during primary humoral immune responses. Although they share many features that enable rapid and broad-based defense against pathogens, these innate-like subsets have disparate B cell receptor (BCR) signaling features. Members of the Fc receptor-like (FCRL) family are preferentially expressed by B cells and possess tyrosine-based immunoregulatory function. An unusual characteristic of many of these cell surface proteins is the presence of both inhibitory (ITIM) and activating (ITAM-like) motifs in their cytoplasmic tails. In mice, FCRL5 is a discrete marker of splenic MZ and peritoneal B-1 B cells and has both ITIM and ITAM-like sequences. Recent work explored its signaling properties and identified that FCRL5 differentially influences innate-like BCR function. Closer scrutiny of these differences disclosed the ability of FCRL5 to counter-regulate BCR activation by recruiting SHP-1 and Lyn to its cytoplasmic motifs. Furthermore, the disparity in FCRL5 regulation between MZ and B-1 B cells correlated with relative intracellular concentrations of SHP-1. These findings validate and extend our understanding of the unique signaling features in innate-like B cells and provide new insight into the complexity of FCRL modulation. PMID:25964091

  18. Long noncoding RNAs in B-cell development and activation

    PubMed Central

    Brazão, Tiago F.; Johnson, Jethro S.; Müller, Jennifer; Heger, Andreas; Ponting, Chris P.

    2016-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are potentially important regulators of cell differentiation and development, but little is known about their roles in B lymphocytes. Using RNA-seq and de novo transcript assembly, we identified 4516 lncRNAs expressed in 11 stages of B-cell development and activation. Most of these lncRNAs have not been previously detected, even in the closely related T-cell lineage. Comparison with lncRNAs previously described in human B cells identified 185 mouse lncRNAs that have human orthologs. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation-seq, we classified 20% of the lncRNAs as either enhancer-associated (eRNA) or promoter-associated RNAs. We identified 126 eRNAs whose expression closely correlated with the nearest coding gene, thereby indicating the likely location of numerous enhancers active in the B-cell lineage. Furthermore, using this catalog of newly discovered lncRNAs, we show that PAX5, a transcription factor required to specify the B-cell lineage, bound to and regulated the expression of 109 lncRNAs in pro-B and mature B cells and 184 lncRNAs in acute lymphoblastic leukemia. PMID:27381906

  19. Long noncoding RNAs in B-cell development and activation.

    PubMed

    Brazão, Tiago F; Johnson, Jethro S; Müller, Jennifer; Heger, Andreas; Ponting, Chris P; Tybulewicz, Victor L J

    2016-08-18

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are potentially important regulators of cell differentiation and development, but little is known about their roles in B lymphocytes. Using RNA-seq and de novo transcript assembly, we identified 4516 lncRNAs expressed in 11 stages of B-cell development and activation. Most of these lncRNAs have not been previously detected, even in the closely related T-cell lineage. Comparison with lncRNAs previously described in human B cells identified 185 mouse lncRNAs that have human orthologs. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation-seq, we classified 20% of the lncRNAs as either enhancer-associated (eRNA) or promoter-associated RNAs. We identified 126 eRNAs whose expression closely correlated with the nearest coding gene, thereby indicating the likely location of numerous enhancers active in the B-cell lineage. Furthermore, using this catalog of newly discovered lncRNAs, we show that PAX5, a transcription factor required to specify the B-cell lineage, bound to and regulated the expression of 109 lncRNAs in pro-B and mature B cells and 184 lncRNAs in acute lymphoblastic leukemia. PMID:27381906

  20. Identification of Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) Nuclear Antigen 2 (EBNA2) Target Proteins by Proteome Analysis: Activation of EBNA2 in Conditionally Immortalized B Cells Reflects Early Events after Infection of Primary B Cells by EBV

    PubMed Central

    Schlee, Martin; Krug, Tanja; Gires, Olivier; Zeidler, Reinhard; Hammerschmidt, Wolfgang; Mailhammer, Reinhard; Laux, Gerhard; Sauer, Guido; Lovric, Josip; Bornkamm, Georg W.

    2004-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a ubiquitous B-lymphotropic herpesvirus associated with several malignant tumors, e.g., Burkitt's lymphoma and Hodgkin's disease, and is able to efficiently immortalize primary B lymphocytes in vitro. The growth program of infected B cells is initiated and maintained by the viral transcription factor EBV nuclear antigen 2 (EBNA2), which regulates viral and cellular genes, including the proto-oncogene c-myc. In our study, patterns of protein expression in B cells with and without EBNA2 were analyzed by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. For this purpose, we used a conditional immortalization system for EBV, a B cell line (EREB2-5) that expresses an estrogen receptor-EBNA2 fusion protein. In order to discriminate downstream targets of c-Myc from c-Myc-independent EBNA2 targets, we used an EREB2-5-derived cell line, P493-6, in which c-Myc is expressed under the control of a tetracycline-regulated promoter. Of 20 identified EBNA2 target proteins, 11 were c-Myc dependent and therefore most probably associated with proliferation, and one of these proteins was a posttranslationally modified protein, i.e., hypusinylated eIF5a. Finally, to estimate the relevance of EBNA2 targets during early EBV infection, we analyzed the proteomes of primary B cells before and after infection with EBV. The protein expression pattern induced upon EBV infection was similar to that following EBNA2 activation. These findings underscore the value of EREB2-5 cells as an appropriate model system for the analysis of early events in the process of EBV-mediated B-cell immortalization. PMID:15047810

  1. Malignant hyperpyrexia

    PubMed Central

    Isaacs, Hyam; Barlow, M. B.

    1973-01-01

    The history, clinical presentation, and management of malignant hyperpyrexia are presented. The aetiology seems to be associated with some inherited abnormality which affects the movement and binding of calcium ions in the sarcoplasmic reticulum, sarcoplasm, and mitochondria. Whether this is a primary muscular defect or secondary to some trophic neural influence is yet to be established. The subjects carrying the abnormal trait show evidence of a myopathy which is subclinical in most instances and revealed only by estimation of serum CPK or biopsy. In some families where the myopathy is clinically obvious there may be, in addition, a variety of musculoskeletal abnormalities. A plea is made for routine monitoring of temperature during anaesthesia and for procainamide or procaine to be readily available in all operating theatres. A history of anaesthetic deaths in a family calls for special care, and, if the serum CPK is elevated, suxamethonium and halothane are to be avoided. Families with orthopaedic and muscular abnormalities are at increased risk and should have estimation of serum CPK before surgery. As a bonus of this study it is suggested that serum CPK estimations be used to screen pigs for selective breeding and so eliminate the disease, which causes soft exudative pork. Images PMID:4708457

  2. [Malignant Pleural Mesotheliomas].

    PubMed

    Biancosino, C; Redwan, B; Krüger, M; Eberlein, M; Bölükbas, S

    2016-09-01

    Malignant pleural mesotheliomas (MPM) are very aggressive tumors, which originate from the mesothelial cells of the pleural surface. The main risk factor associated with MPM is exposure to asbestos. The latency period between asbestos exposure and MPM can be 30-60 years. Clinical symptoms and signs are often nonspecifc. The diagnosis of MPM requires an adequate tissue specimen for pathological examination, and video assisted thoracoscopic surgey (VATS) is associated with the highest diagnostic yield. MPM are histologically classified into epitheloid, sacromatoid and biphasic (mixed) sub-types. Accurate staging with invasive tests, if needed, is an important step before an interdisciplinary team can decide on an optimal (multi-modal) treatment approach. A multi-modal treatment approach (surgery, radiation oncology and chemotherapy) is superior to all approaches relying only on a single modality, if the patient qualifies for it from an oncological and functional standpoint. The goal of the surgical therapy is to achieve macroscopic complete resection. There are two competing surgical approaches and philosophies: extrapleural pneumonectomy (EPP) and radical pleurectomy (RP). Over the last years a paradigm shift from EPP to RP occurred and RP is now often the preferred surgical option. PMID:27612329

  3. A benign maxillary tumour with malignant features.

    PubMed

    Ricalde, Rosario R; Lim, Aimee Caroline E; Lopa, Ramon Antonio B; Carnate, Jose M

    2010-06-01

    Non-specific biopsy results such as chronic inflammation, hemorrhage, necrosis can be frustrating to the clinician. This is especially true if the patient presents with clinical features suggestive of an aggressive tumour. This is a review of the clinical features, diagnostic dilemmas and surgical management of a benign maxillary mass with malignant features - a disease called hematoma-like mass of the maxillary sinus (HLMMS). Our experience with five cases will also be cited. PMID:20502750

  4. Inferring processes underlying B-cell repertoire diversity.

    PubMed

    Elhanati, Yuval; Sethna, Zachary; Marcou, Quentin; Callan, Curtis G; Mora, Thierry; Walczak, Aleksandra M

    2015-09-01

    We quantify the VDJ recombination and somatic hypermutation processes in human B cells using probabilistic inference methods on high-throughput DNA sequence repertoires of human B-cell receptor heavy chains. Our analysis captures the statistical properties of the naive repertoire, first after its initial generation via VDJ recombination and then after selection for functionality. We also infer statistical properties of the somatic hypermutation machinery (exclusive of subsequent effects of selection). Our main results are the following: the B-cell repertoire is substantially more diverse than T-cell repertoires, owing to longer junctional insertions; sequences that pass initial selection are distinguished by having a higher probability of being generated in a VDJ recombination event; somatic hypermutations have a non-uniform distribution along the V gene that is well explained by an independent site model for the sequence context around the hypermutation site. PMID:26194757

  5. Activation of normal murine B cells by Echinococcus granulosus.

    PubMed Central

    Cox, D A; Marshall-Clarke, S; Dixon, J B

    1989-01-01

    Echinococcus granulosus protoscolex (PSC) infection of BALB/c mice led, after 4 days, to raised numbers of cells forming plaques with trinitrophenyl-treated sheep red cells and bromelain-treated mouse red cells. The findings were similar in athymic and euthymic CBA mice. Activation of B cells was accompanied by secretion of immunoglobulin, as indicated by the reverse plaque technique. In addition, co-culture of PSC with the 7OZ/3 pre-B-cell led to the induction of differentiation, resulting in the expression of surface immunoglobulin (Ig). It is concluded that E. granulosus is a polyclonal activator of B cells inducing both transformation and differentiation, and that the effect is thymus-independent. PMID:2661414

  6. Inferring processes underlying B-cell repertoire diversity

    PubMed Central

    Elhanati, Yuval; Sethna, Zachary; Marcou, Quentin; Callan, Curtis G.; Mora, Thierry; Walczak, Aleksandra M.

    2015-01-01

    We quantify the VDJ recombination and somatic hypermutation processes in human B cells using probabilistic inference methods on high-throughput DNA sequence repertoires of human B-cell receptor heavy chains. Our analysis captures the statistical properties of the naive repertoire, first after its initial generation via VDJ recombination and then after selection for functionality. We also infer statistical properties of the somatic hypermutation machinery (exclusive of subsequent effects of selection). Our main results are the following: the B-cell repertoire is substantially more diverse than T-cell repertoires, owing to longer junctional insertions; sequences that pass initial selection are distinguished by having a higher probability of being generated in a VDJ recombination event; somatic hypermutations have a non-uniform distribution along the V gene that is well explained by an independent site model for the sequence context around the hypermutation site. PMID:26194757

  7. The role of B cells and autoantibodies in neuropsychiatric lupus.

    PubMed

    Wen, Jing; Stock, Ariel D; Chalmers, Samantha A; Putterman, Chaim

    2016-09-01

    The central nervous system manifestations of SLE (neuropsychiatric lupus, NPSLE) occur frequently, though are often difficult to diagnose and treat. Symptoms of NPSLE can be quite diverse, including chronic cognitive and emotional manifestations, as well as acute presentations, such as stroke and seizures. Although the pathogenesis of NPSLE has yet to be well characterized, B-cell mediated damage is believed to be an important contributor. B-cells and autoantibodies may traverse the blood brain barrier promoting an inflammatory environment consisting of glia activation, neurodegeneration, and consequent averse behavioral outcomes. This review will evaluate the various suggested roles of B-cells and autoantibodies in NPSLE, as well as therapeutic modalities targeting these pathogenic mediators. PMID:27389531

  8. Activation of B cells by antigens on follicular dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    El Shikh, Mohey Eldin M.; El Sayed, Rania M.; Sukumar, Selvakumar; Szakal, Andras K.; Tew, John G.

    2010-01-01

    A need for antigen-processing and presentation to B cells is not widely appreciated. However, cross-linking of multiple B cell receptors (BCRs) by T-independent antigens delivers a potent signal that induces antibody responses. Such BCR cross-linking also occurs in germinal centers where follicular dendritic cells (FDCs) present multimerized antigens as periodically arranged antigen-antibody complexes (ICs). Unlike T cells that recognize antigens as peptide-MHC complexes, optimal B cell-responses are induced by multimerized FDC-ICs that simultaneously engage multiple BCRs. FDC-FcγRIIB mediates IC-periodicity and FDC-BAFF, -IL-6 and -C4bBP are co-stimulators. Remarkably, specific antibody responses can be induced by FDC-ICs in the absence of T cells, opening up the exciting possibility that people with T cell insufficiencies may be immunized with T-dependent vaccines via FDC-ICs. PMID:20418164

  9. An analysis of B cell selection mechanisms in germinal centers.

    PubMed

    Meyer-Hermann, Michael E; Maini, Philip K; Iber, Dagmar

    2006-09-01

    Affinity maturation of antibodies during immune responses is achieved by multiple rounds of somatic hypermutation and subsequent preferential selection of those B cells that express B cell receptors with improved binding characteristics for the antigen. The mechanism underlying B cell selection has not yet been defined. By employing an agent-based model, we show that for physiologically reasonable parameter values affinity maturation can be driven by competition for neither binding sites nor antigen--even in the presence of competing secreted antibodies. Within the tested mechanisms, only clonal competition for T cell help or a refractory time for the interaction of centrocytes with follicular dendritic cells is found to enable affinity maturation while generating the experimentally observed germinal centre characteristics and tolerating large variations in the initial antigen density. PMID:16707510

  10. Generation and identification of tumor-evoked regulatory B cells

    PubMed Central

    Biragyn, Arya; Lee-Chang, Catalina; Bodogai, Monica

    2014-01-01

    The involvement of Bregs in cancer remains poorly understood despite their well-documented regulation of responses to the self and protection from harmful autoimmunity. We recently discovered a unique regulatory B cell subset evoked by breast cancer to mediate protection of metastasizing cancer cells. These results together with the wealth of findings of the last 40 years on B cells in tumorigenesis suggest the existence of additional cancer Bregs modulating anticancer responses. To facilitate the search for them, here we provide our detailed protocol for the characterization and generation of tumor-evoked regulatory B cells. Wherever applicable, we also discuss nuances and uniqueness of a Breg study in cancer to warn potential pitfalls. PMID:25015287

  11. Autoreactive marginal zone B cells are spontaneously activated but lymph node B cells require T cell help

    PubMed Central

    Mandik-Nayak, Laura; Racz, Jennifer; Sleckman, Barry P.; Allen, Paul M.

    2006-01-01

    In K/BxN mice, arthritis is induced by autoantibodies against glucose-6-phosphate-isomerase (GPI). To investigate B cell tolerance to GPI in nonautoimmune mice, we increased the GPI-reactive B cell frequency using a low affinity anti-GPI H chain transgene. Surprisingly, anti-GPI B cells were not tolerant to this ubiquitously expressed and circulating autoantigen. Instead, they were found in two functionally distinct compartments: an activated population in the splenic marginal zone (MZ) and an antigenically ignorant one in the recirculating follicular/lymph node (LN) pool. This difference in activation was due to increased autoantigen availability in the MZ. Importantly, the LN anti-GPI B cells remained functionally competent and could be induced to secrete autoantibodies in response to cognate T cell help in vitro and in vivo. Therefore, our study of low affinity autoreactive B cells reveals two distinct but potentially concurrent mechanisms for their activation, of which one is T cell dependent and the other is T cell independent. PMID:16880262

  12. Successful differentiation to T cells, but unsuccessful B-cell generation, from B-cell-derived induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wada, Haruka; Kojo, Satoshi; Kusama, Chie; Okamoto, Naoki; Sato, Yorino; Ishizuka, Bunpei; Seino, Ken-ichiro

    2011-01-01

    Forced expression of certain transcription factors in somatic cells results in generation of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, which differentiate into various cell types. We investigated T-cell and B-cell lineage differentiation from iPS cells in vitro. To evaluate the impact of iPS cell source, murine splenic B-cell-derived iPS (B-iPS) cells were generated after retroviral transduction of four transcription factors (Oct4, Sox2, Klf4 and c-Myc). B-iPS cells were identical to embryonic stem (ES) cells and mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF)-derived iPS cells in morphology, ES cell marker expression as well as teratoma and chimera mouse formation. Both B-iPS and MEF-derived iPS cells differentiated into lymphocytes in OP9 co-culture systems. Both efficiently differentiated into T-cell lineage that produced IFN-γ on T-cell receptor stimulation. However, iPS cells including B-iPS cells were relatively resistant to B-cell lineage differentiation. One of the reasons of the failure of B-cell lineage differentiation seemed due to a defect of Pax5 expression in the differentiated cells. Therefore, current in vitro differentiation systems using iPS cells are sufficient for inducing T-cell but not B-cell lineage. PMID:21135032

  13. Clostridium butyricum in combination with specific immunotherapy converts antigen-specific B cells to regulatory B cells in asthmatic patients

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Hong-Ying; Tao, Li; Zhao, Jian; Qin, Jie; Zeng, Gu-Cheng; Cai, Song-Wang; Li, Yun; Zhang, Jian; Chen, Hui-Guo

    2016-01-01

    The effect of antigen specific immunotherapy (SIT) on asthma is supposed to be improved. Published data indicate that administration of probiotics alleviates allergic diseases. B cells play important roles in the pathogenesis of allergic diseases. This study aims to modulate antigen specific B cell property by the administration of Clostridium butyrate (CB) in combination with SIT. The results showed that after a 3-month treatment, the total asthma clinical score and serum specific IgE were improved in the patients treated with SIT, which was further improved in those treated with both SIT and CB, but not in those treated with CB alone. Treatment with SIT and CB increased p300 and STAT3 activation, up regulated the IL-10 gene transcription and increased the frequency of peripheral antigen specific B cells. In conclusion, administration with SIT in combination with CB converts Der p 1 specific B cells to regulatory B cells in asthma patients allergic to Der p 1. The data suggest a potential therapeutic remedy in the treatment of allergic diseases. PMID:26857726

  14. Mediastinal B-Cell Lymphoma Presenting with Jugular-Subclavian Deep Vein Thrombosis as the First Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Eltawansy, Sherif Ali; Ceniza, Sidney; Sharon, David

    2015-01-01

    Jugular venous thrombosis infrequently could be secondary to malignancy and has seldom been reported secondary to mediastinal large B-cell lymphomas. The postulated mechanisms are mechanical compression that leads to stagnation of blood in the venous system of the neck and/or an increase in the circulating thrombogenic elements that could cause venous thromboembolism as a paraneoplastic phenomenon. We report the case of a middle aged male presenting with right sided neck pain and arm swelling secondary to ipsilateral jugular-subclavian deep vein thrombosis. Investigations revealed it to be secondary to a mediastinal mass shown on CT scan of the chest. PMID:25821628

  15. [Comparison of salvage chemotherapy regimen ACES with ESHAP for refractory or relapsed malignant lymphoma].

    PubMed

    Imataki, Osamu; Tamai, Yotaro; Kawakami, Kimihiro

    2007-10-01

    Standard salvage chemotherapy for refractory or relapsed malignant lymphoma has not been defined. The efficacy and feasibility of the ACES regimen, consisting of carboplatin at 100 mg/m(2) on day 1 to 4, etoposide at 80 mg/m(2) on day 1 to 4, high-dose Ara-C at 2 g/m(2) on day 5 and methylprednisolone at 500 mg/day for 5 days, for refractory or relapsed lymphoma were retrospectively reviewed in comparison with the ESHAP regimen. The subjects were 29 patients, including 7 aggressive follicular lymphomas, 16 large B cell lymphomas and 6 Hodgkin lymphomas. Characteristics of patients with ESHAP (19 cases) and the ACES (10 cases) group were as follows: male/female ratio, 10/9 and 3/7; median age, 49 (range, 31-72) and 54 (22-65); and initial clinical stage (I and II / III / IV), 5/8/6 and 1/1/8, respectively. Among the 29 patients, complete response was achieved in 68% (13/19) in ESHAP and 40% (4/10) in ACES.Progression-free survival and overall survival were 31.3% and 34.3%, respectively. Hematological toxicity was not significantly different between the two groups, and renal toxicity was significantly higher in ESHAP (52%) than ACES (0%). We concluded that the ACES regimen had a possibility of effective consolidation therapy for the elderly aiming to undergo autologous stem cell transplantation. PMID:17940378

  16. Malignant cancer and invasive placentation

    PubMed Central

    D'Souza, Alaric W.; Wagner, Günter P.

    2014-01-01

    Cancer metastasis is an invasive process that involves the transplantation of cells into new environments. Since human placentation is also invasive, hypotheses about a relationship between invasive placentation in eutherian mammals and metastasis have been proposed. The relationship between metastatic cancer and invasive placentation is usually presented in terms of antagonistic pleiotropy. According to this hypothesis, evolution of invasive placentation also established the mechanisms for cancer metastasis. Here, in contrast, we argue that the secondary evolution of less invasive placentation in some mammalian lineages may have resulted in positive pleiotropic effects on cancer survival by lowering malignancy rates. These positive pleiotropic effects would manifest themselves as resistance to cancer cell invasion. To provide a preliminary test of this proposal, we re-analyze data from Priester and Mantel (Occurrence of tumors in domestic animals. Data from 12 United States and Canadian colleges of veterinary medicine. J Natl Cancer Inst 1971;47:1333-44) about malignancy rates in cows, horses, cats and dogs. From our analysis we found that equines and bovines, animals with less invasive placentation, have lower rates of metastatic cancer than felines and canines in skin and glandular epithelial cancers as well as connective tissue sarcomas. We conclude that a link between type of placentation and species-specific malignancy rates is more likely related to derived mechanisms that suppress invasion rather than different degrees of fetal placental aggressiveness. PMID:25324490

  17. Prolonged Response in Patient With Multiply Relapsed B-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia and Monosomy-7 to Bortezomib, Lenalidomide, and Dexamethasone.

    PubMed

    Vundamati, Divya; Bostrom, Bruce

    2016-08-01

    Isolated monosomy-7, a rare cytogenetic abnormality in patients with pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), portends a worse prognosis. Despite improvements in treatment, outcomes for patients with relapsed ALL remain poor. Novel treatments adopted from the B-cell malignancy multiple myeloma may have a role in treatment of ALL. Bortezomib is one such agent currently in phase III trials for B and T ALL. This study presents a patient with B-cell ALL and monosomy-7 who relapsed off therapy. The combination of bortezomib, lenalidomide, and dexamethasone was used to attain remission before bone marrow transplant after conventional relapse therapy failed. A recurrence after bone marrow transplant was controlled for a prolonged period with the same therapy. The case supports the hypothesis that bortezomib, lenalidomide, and dexamethasone should be further explored in the treatment of B-cell ALL with monosomy-7. PMID:27299598

  18. Adolescents’ Aggression to Parents: Longitudinal Links with Parents’ Physical Aggression

    PubMed Central

    Margolin, Gayla; Baucom, Brian R.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To investigate whether parents’ previous physical aggression (PPA) exhibited during early adolescence is associated with adolescents’ subsequent parent-directed aggression even beyond parents’ concurrent physical aggression (CPA); to investigate whether adolescents’ emotion dysregulation and attitudes condoning child-to-parent aggression moderate associations. Methods Adolescents (N = 93) and their parents participated in a prospective, longitudinal study. Adolescents and parents reported at waves 1–3 on four types of parents’ PPA (mother-to-adolescent, father-to-adolescent, mother-to-father, father-to-mother). Wave 3 assessments also included adolescents’ emotion dysregulation, attitudes condoning aggression, and externalizing behaviors. At waves 4 and 5, adolescents and parents reported on adolescents’ parent-directed physical aggression, property damage, and verbal aggression, and on parents’ CPA Results Parents’ PPA emerged as a significant indicator of adolescents’ parent-directed physical aggression (odds ratio [OR]: 1.25, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.0–1.55; p = .047), property damage (OR: 1.29, 95% CI: 1.1–1.5, p = .002), and verbal aggression (OR: 1.35, 95% CI: 1.15–1.6, p < .001) even controlling for adolescents’ sex, externalizing behaviors, and family income. When controlling for parents’ CPA, previous mother-to-adolescent aggression still predicted adolescents’ parent-directed physical aggression (OR: 5.56, 95% CI: 1.82–17.0, p = .003), and father-to-mother aggression predicted adolescents’ parent-directed verbal aggression (OR: 1.86, 95% CI: 1.0–3.3, p = .036). Emotion dysregulation and attitudes condoning aggression did not produce direct or moderated effects. Conclusions Adolescents’ parent-directed aggression deserves greater attention in discourse about lasting, adverse effects of even minor forms of parents’ physical aggression. Future research should investigate parent-directed aggression as

  19. Targeting B-cell neoplasia with T-cell receptors recognizing a CD20-derived peptide on patient-specific HLA.

    PubMed

    Mensali, Nadia; Ying, Fan; Sheng, Vincent Oei Yi; Yang, Weiwen; Walseng, Even; Kumari, Shraddha; Fallang, Lars-Egil; Kolstad, Arne; Uckert, Wolfgang; Malmberg, Karl Johan; Wälchli, Sébastien; Olweus, Johanna

    2016-05-01

    T cells engineered to express chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) targeted to CD19 are effective in treatment of B-lymphoid malignancies. However, CARs recognize all CD19 positive (pos) cells, and durable responses are linked to profound depletion of normal B cells. Here, we designed a strategy to specifically target patient B cells by utilizing the fact that T-cell receptors (TCRs), in contrast to CARs, are restricted by HLA. Two TCRs recognizing a peptide from CD20 (SLFLGILSV) in the context of foreign HLA-A*02:01 (CD20p/HLA-A2) were expressed as 2A-bicistronic constructs. T cells re-directed with the A23 and A94 TCR constructs efficiently recognized malignant HLA-A2(pos) B cells endogenously expressing CD20, including patient-derived follicular lymphoma and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cells. In contrast, a wide range of HLA-A2(pos)CD20(neg) cells representing different tissue origins, and HLA-A2(neg)CD20(pos) cells, were not recognized. Cytotoxic T cells re-directed with CD20p/HLA-A2-specific TCRs or CD19 CARs responded with similar potencies to cells endogenously expressing comparable levels of CD20 and CD19. The CD20p/HLA-A2-specific TCRs recognized CD20p bound to HLA-A2 with high functional avidity. The results show that T cells expressing CD20p/HLA-A2-specific TCRs efficiently and specifically target B cells. When used in context of an HLA-haploidentical allogeneic stem cell transplantation where the donor is HLA-A2(neg) and the patient HLA-A2(pos), these T cells would selectively kill patient-derived B cells and allow reconstitution of the B-cell compartment with HLA-A2(neg) donor cells. These results should pave the way for clinical testing of T cells genetically engineered to target malignant B cells without permanent depletion of normal B cells. PMID:27467957

  20. Canine Lymphoma, More Than a Morphological Diagnosis: What We Have Learned about Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Aresu, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is the most common canine aggressive B-cell lymphoma worldwide, and new recent molecular approaches have shown that DLBCL constitutes a heterogeneous tumor that cannot be unraveled by morphology and immunophenotype. DLBCL behaves aggressively, typically progressing over a short period of time, and the therapy response may be difficult to be predicted. Recently, the rate of bone marrow infiltration by flow cytometry has been demonstrated to be prognostic, but more sensible markers are needed. As the clinical behavior is different, there is vast clinical and basic research devoted to identifying prognostically or biologically distinct DLBCL subgroups. Transcriptomic analysis by gene expression profile, copy number variations by array comparative genomic hybridization and epigenetic perturbations have tentatively described this heterogeneity. Molecular subgroups using oncogenic pathways and target genes have also been correlated to different outcome in a small number of cases. The objectives of this review are to summarize the current knowledge on the biology, clinical, and pathological characteristics of canine DLBCL. To date, DLBCL probably is the most investigated tumor in veterinary medicine, and its relevance as spontaneous model for human DLBCL has been confirmed by these studies. In future, these discoveries will ultimately lead to a better understanding of the underlying disease mechanisms, possibly translating into more effective therapeutic strategies.

  1. Anti-CD20 antibody promotes cancer escape via enrichment of tumor-evoked regulatory B cells expressing low levels of CD20 and CD137L.

    PubMed

    Bodogai, Monica; Lee Chang, Catalina; Wejksza, Katarzyna; Lai, Jinping; Merino, Maria; Wersto, Robert P; Gress, Ronald E; Chan, Andrew C; Hesdorffer, Charles; Biragyn, Arya

    2013-04-01

    The possible therapeutic benefits of B-cell depletion in combating tumoral immune escape have been debated. In support of this concept, metastasis of highly aggressive 4T1 breast cancer cells in mice can be abrogated by inactivation of tumor-evoked regulatory B cells (tBreg). Here, we report the unexpected finding that B-cell depletion by CD20 antibody will greatly enhance cancer progression and metastasis. Both murine and human tBregs express low levels of CD20 and, as such, anti-CD20 mostly enriches for these cells. In the 4T1 model of murine breast cancer, this effect of enriching for tBregs suggests that B-cell depletion by anti-CD20 may not be beneficial at all in some cancers. In contrast, we show that in vivo-targeted stimulation of B cells with CXCL13-coupled CpG oligonucleotides (CpG-ODN) can block cancer metastasis by inhibiting CD20(Low) tBregs. Mechanistic investigations suggested that CpG-ODN upregulates low surface levels of 4-1BBL on tBregs to elicit granzyme B-expressing cytolytic CD8(+) T cells, offering some explanative power for the effect. These findings underscore the immunotherapeutic importance of tBreg inactivation as a strategy to enhance cancer therapy by targeting both the regulatory and activating arms of the immune system in vivo. PMID:23365136

  2. DUSP4 deficiency caused by promoter hypermethylation drives JNK signaling and tumor cell survival in diffuse large B cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, Corina A.; Robinson, Mark D.; Scheifinger, Nicole A.; Müller, Sebastian; Cogliatti, Sergio; Tzankov, Alexandar

    2015-01-01

    The epigenetic dysregulation of tumor suppressor genes is an important driver of human carcinogenesis. We have combined genome-wide DNA methylation analyses and gene expression profiling after pharmacological DNA demethylation with functional screening to identify novel tumor suppressors in diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL). We find that a CpG island in the promoter of the dual-specificity phosphatase DUSP4 is aberrantly methylated in nodal and extranodal DLBCL, irrespective of ABC or GCB subtype, resulting in loss of DUSP4 expression in 75% of >200 examined cases. The DUSP4 genomic locus is further deleted in up to 13% of aggressive B cell lymphomas, and the lack of DUSP4 is a negative prognostic factor in three independent cohorts of DLBCL patients. Ectopic expression of wild-type DUSP4, but not of a phosphatase-deficient mutant, dephosphorylates c-JUN N-terminal kinase (JNK) and induces apoptosis in DLBCL cells. Pharmacological or dominant-negative JNK inhibition restricts DLBCL survival in vitro and in vivo and synergizes strongly with the Bruton’s tyrosine kinase inhibitor ibrutinib. Our results indicate that DLBCL cells depend on JNK signaling for survival. This finding provides a mechanistic basis for the clinical development of JNK inhibitors in DLBCL, ideally in synthetic lethal combinations with inhibitors of chronic active B cell receptor signaling. PMID:25847947

  3. Immunoproliferative Small Intestinal Disease Associated with Overwhelming Polymicrobial Gastrointestinal Infection with Transformation to Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Ewers, Evan C; Sheffler, Robert L; Wang, James; Ngauy, Viseth

    2016-05-01

    Immunoproliferative small intestinal disease (IPSID) is an extra-nodal B-cell lymphoma most commonly described in the Mediterranean, Africa, and Asia. It is associated with poverty and poor sanitation, and is rarely encountered in developed countries. A 26-year-old previously healthy, Marshallese male was transferred to our facility with a 6-month history of watery diarrhea, weakness, and cachexia refractory to multiple short courses of oral antibiotics. Stool cultures grew Campylobacter jejuni and Vibrio fluvialis. Endoscopic evaluation showed histologic evidence of Helicobacter pylori gastritis and gross evidence of whipworm infection found in the colon. Mesenteric lymph node biopsy cultures grew Escherichia coli. Histopathology and immunohistochemical stains of the small intestine were consistent with IPSID. He subsequently transformed to diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) with tonsillar involvement despite treatment with rituximab and an extended course of antibiotics. Systemic chemotherapy with six cycles of rituximab, cyclophosphamide, vincristine, doxorubicin, prednisone, and lenalidomide, resulted in remission of his diffuse B cell lymphoma. This case is illustrative of IPSID developing in a previously healthy individual due to overwhelming polymicrobial gastrointestinal infection by C. jejuni and other enteric pathogens with subsequent transformation to an aggressive DLBCL. IPSID should be considered in residents of developing countries presenting with refractory chronic diarrhea, weight loss, and mesenteric lymphadenopathy. PMID:26903604

  4. Regulation of B cell activating factor (BAFF) receptor expression by NF-κB signaling in rheumatoid arthritis B cells

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Yun-Ju; Yoon, Bo-Young; Jhun, Joo-Yeon; Oh, Hye-Jwa; Min, Sewon; Park, Sung-Hwan; Kim, Ho-Youn

    2011-01-01

    B cells play an important role in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). High levels of B cell activating factor (BAFF) are detected in autoimmune diseases. BAFF and BAFF receptor (BAFF-R) are expressed in B and T cells of RA synovium. The study was undertaken to identify the NF-κB signal pathway involved in the induction of BAFF-R in human B cells. Immunohistochemical staining of NF-κB p65, NF-κB p50, BAFF, and BAFF-R was performed on sections of synovium from severe and mild RA and osteoarthritis (OA) patients. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were isolated from control and RA patients and B cells were isolated from controls. BAFF-R was analyzed by flow cytometry, realtime PCR and confocal staining after treatment with NF-κB inhibitors. NF-κB p65, NF-κB p50, BAFF, and BAFF-R were highly expressed in severe RA synovium relative to mild RA synovium or OA synovium. BAFF-R expression was reduced by NF-κB inhibitors in PBMCs and B cells from normal controls. We also showed reduction in expression of BAFF-R via inhibition of the NF-κB pathway in PBMCs of RA patients. BAFF/BAFF-R signaling is an important mechanism of pathogenesis in RA and that BAFF-R reduction by NF-κB blocking therapy is another choice for controlling B cells in autoimmune diseases such as RA. PMID:21515993

  5. Microbiology of aggressive periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Könönen, Eija; Müller, Hans-Peter

    2014-06-01

    For decades, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans has been considered the most likely etiologic agent in aggressive periodontitis. Implementation of DNA-based microbiologic methodologies has considerably improved our understanding of the composition of subgingival biofilms, and advanced open-ended molecular techniques even allow for genome mapping of the whole bacterial spectrum in a sample and characterization of both the cultivable and not-yet-cultivable microbiota associated with periodontal health and disease. Currently, A. actinomycetemcomitans is regarded as a minor component of the resident oral microbiota and as an opportunistic pathogen in some individuals. Its specific JP2 clone, however, shows properties of a true exogenous pathogen and has an important role in the development of aggressive periodontitis in certain populations. Still, limited data exist on the impact of other microbes specifically in aggressive periodontitis. Despite a wide heterogeneity of bacteria, especially in subgingival samples collected from patients, bacteria of the red complex in particular, and those of the orange complex, are considered as potential pathogens in generalized aggressive periodontitis. These types of bacterial findings closely resemble those found for chronic periodontitis, representing a mixed polymicrobial infection without a clear association with any specific microorganism. In aggressive periodontitis, the role of novel and not-yet-cultivable bacteria has not yet been elucidated. There are geographic and ethnic differences in the carriage of periodontitis-associated microorganisms, and they need to be taken into account when comparing study reports on periodontal microbiology in different study populations. In the present review, we provide an overview on the colonization of potential periodontal pathogens in childhood and adolescence, and on specific microorganisms that have been suspected for their role in the initiation and progression of aggressive

  6. Clinical Significance of “Double-hit” and “Double-protein” expression in Primary Gastric B-cell Lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    He, Miaoxia; Chen, Keting; Li, Suhong; Zhang, Shimin; Zheng, Jianming; Hu, Xiaoxia; Gao, Lei; Chen, Jie; Song, Xianmin; Zhang, Weiping; Wang, Jianmin; Yang, Jianmin

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Primary gastric B-cell lymphoma is the second most common malignancy of the stomach. There are many controversial issues about its diagnosis, treatment and clinical management. “Double-hit” and “double-protein” involving gene rearrangement and protein expression of c-Myc and bcl2/bcl6 are the most used terms to describe DLBCL poor prognostic factors in recent years. However, very little is known about the role of these prognostic factors in primary gastric B-cell lymphomas. This study aims to obtain a molecular pathology prognostic model of gastric B-cell lymphoma for clinical stratified management by evaluating how the “double-hit” and “double-protein” in tumor cells as well as microenvironmental reaction of tumor stromal tissue affect clinical outcome in primary gastric B-cell lymphomas. METHODS: Data and tissues of 188 cases diagnosed with gastric B-cell lymphomas were used in this study. Tumor tissue microarray (TMA) of formalin fixed and paraffin embedded (FFPE) tissues was constructed for fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and immunohistochemistry (IHC) analysis with a serial of biomarkers containing MYC, BCL2, BCL6, CD31, SPARC, CD10, MUM1 and Ki-67. Modeled period analysis was used to estimate 3-year and 5-year overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) distributions. RESULTS: There was no definite “double-hit” case though the gene rearrangement of c-Myc (5.9%), bcl2 (0.1%) and bcl6 (7.4%) was found in gastric B-cell lymphomas. The gene amplification or copy gains of c-Myc (10.1%), bcl-2 (17.0%) and bcl-6 (0.9%) were present in these lymphomas. There were 12 cases of the lymphomas with the “double-protein” expression of MYC and BCL2/BCL6. All patients with “double-protein” gastric B-cell lymphomas had poor outcome compared with those without. More importantly, “MYC-BCL2-BCL6” negative group of gastric B-cell lymphoma patients had favorable clinical outcome regardless clinical stage

  7. Lymphomagenesis-related gene expression in B cells from sustained virological responders with occult hepatitis C virus infection.

    PubMed

    Roque Cuéllar, M C; García-Lozano, J R; Sánchez, B; Praena-Fernández, J M; Martínez Sierra, C; Núñez-Roldán, A; Aguilar-Reina, J

    2016-08-01

    The expression of activation-induced cytidine deaminase, B-aggressive lymphoma, cyclin D1 and serine/threonine kinase 15 genes, among others, is increased in B cells from patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. It is unknown whether the level of expression of these genes in B cells is increased in patients with hepatitis C who have achieved a sustained virological response (SVR) but who have persistent, detectable HCV RNA, so-called occult infection. Eighty-three patients who achieved and SVR, 27 with detectable HCV and 56 without detectable HCV RNA, 28 chronic hepatitis C patients and 32 healthy controls were studied. RNA was extracted from B cells, and gene expression levels were measured by RT-PCR. Patients with chronic HCV and those who achieved an SVR (with and without persistent low-level HCV RNA) showed a statistically significant higher expression compared to healthy controls, of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (P = 0.004, P < 0.001 and P = 0.002, respectively), B-aggressive lymphoma (P < 0.001, P = 0.001 and P = 0.006) and cyclin D1 (P = 0.026, P = 0.001; P = 0.038). For activation-induced cytidine deaminase patients with an SVR and 'occult infection' had a statistically significantly higher expression level than patients with and SVR without 'occult infection' (P = 0.014). The higher expression levels found for activation-induced cytidine deaminase, together with other genes indicates that these B lymphomagenesis-related genes are upregulated following HCV therapy and this is more marked when HCV can be detected in PBMCs. PMID:26946048

  8. CD10 delineates a subset of human IL-4 producing follicular helper T cells involved in the survival of follicular lymphoma B cells.

    PubMed

    Amé-Thomas, Patricia; Hoeller, Sylvia; Artchounin, Catherine; Misiak, Jan; Braza, Mounia Sabrina; Jean, Rachel; Le Priol, Jérôme; Monvoisin, Céline; Martin, Nadine; Gaulard, Philippe; Tarte, Karin

    2015-04-01

    In follicular lymphoma (FL), follicular helper T cells (TFH) have been depicted as one of the main components of the malignant B-cell niche and a promising therapeutic target. Although defined by their capacity to sustain FL B-cell growth together with specific gene expression and cytokine secretion profiles, FL-TFH constitute a heterogeneous cell population. However, specific markers reflecting such functional heterogeneity are still lacking. In this study, we demonstrate that CD10 identifies a subset of fully functional germinal center TFH in normal secondary lymphoid organs. Importantly, this subset is amplified in the FL context, unlike in other B-cell lymphomas with a follicular growth pattern. Furthermore, whereas FL-TFH produce high levels of interleukin (IL)-21 and low levels of IL-17 irrespectively of their CD10 expression, CD10(pos) FL-TFH specifically exhibit an IL-4(hi)IFN-γ(lo)TNF-α(hi) cytokine profile associated with a high capacity to sustain directly and indirectly malignant B-cell survival. Altogether, our results highlight the important role of this novel functional subset in the FL cell niche. PMID:25733581

  9. Diffuse large B cell lymphoma of the cranial vault: two case reports.

    PubMed

    Tashiro, Ryosuke; Kanamori, Masayuki; Suzuki, Hiroyoshi; Utsunomiya, Akihiro; Meguro, Kuniaki; Uenohara, Hiroshi; Tominaga, Teiji

    2015-10-01

    Malignant lymphoma of the cranial vault is a rare entity and the tumor growth patterns are not well understood. Here we report two cases of malignant lymphoma involving the scalp and epidural space with slight changes in the intervening skull. A 63-year-old woman presented with a scalp mass in her right frontal area. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging demonstrated mass lesions in the scalp and epidural space with slight osteolytic changes in the intervening skull. She underwent resection of the lesions. A 53-year-old man presented with a mass in his right frontal area. CT and MR imaging showed mass lesions in the scalp and epidural space without changes in the skull. He underwent resection of the lesions. The histopathological diagnosis was diffuse large B cell lymphoma in both cases. Microscopic examination of the intervening skull found that the bone marrow was diffusely replaced by lymphoma cells, and lymphoma cells extended to the extra- or intra-cranial space along the emissary veins without destruction of the cortical or trabecular bone. These histopathological findings explain the radiological findings and provide the clues to elucidate the mechanism of extension of cranial vault lymphoma. PMID:26177806

  10. Functional role of regulatory T cells in B cell lymphoma and related mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wei; Wan, Jun; Xia, Ruixiang; Huang, Zhenqi; Ni, Jing; Yang, Mingzhen

    2015-01-01

    B cell lymphoma (BCL) has a higher degree of malignancy and complicated pathogenic mechanism. Regulatory T cells (Treg cells) are known to exert certain immune suppression functions, in addition to immune mediating effects. Recent studies have revealed the role of Treg cells in pathogenesis and progression of multiple malignant tumors. This study therefore investigated the functional role and related mechanism of Treg cells in BCL. A cohort of thirty patients who were diagnosed with BCL in our hospital between January 2013 and December 2014. Another thirty healthy individuals were recruited. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were separated and analyzed for the ratio of CD4+/CD25+ Treg cells. The mRNA expression levels of Foxp3, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 and interleukin (IL)-10 genes were quantified by real-time PCR, while their serum levels were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Meanwhile all laboratory indexes for patients were monitored during the complete remission (CR) stage. BCL patients significantly elevated ratio of CD4+/CD25+ Treg cells, which were decreased at CR stage. mRNA levels of Foxp3, TGF-β1 and IL-10, in addition to protein levels of TGF-β1 and IL-10 were potentiated in lymphoma patients but decreased in CR patients (P<0.05 in all cases). CD4+/CD25+ Treg cells exert immune suppressing functions in BCL via regulating cytokines, thereby facilitating the pathogenesis and progression of lymphoma. PMID:26464657

  11. Role of Calcium Signaling in B Cell Activation and Biology.

    PubMed

    Baba, Yoshihiro; Kurosaki, Tomohiro

    2016-01-01

    Increase in intracellular levels of calcium ions (Ca2+) is one of the key triggering signals for the development of B cell response to the antigen. The diverse Ca2+ signals finely controlled by multiple factors participate in the regulation of gene expression, B cell development, and effector functions. B cell receptor (BCR)-initiated Ca2+ mobilization is sourced from two pathways: one is the release of Ca2+ from the intracellular stores, endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and other is the prolonged influx of extracellular Ca2+ induced by depleting the stores via store-operated calcium entry (SOCE) and calcium release-activated calcium (CRAC) channels. The identification of stromal interaction molecule 1(STIM1), the ER Ca2+ sensor, and Orai1, a key subunit of the CRAC channel pore, has now provided the tools to understand the mode of Ca2+ influx regulation and physiological relevance. Herein, we discuss our current understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying BCR-triggered Ca2+ signaling as well as its contribution to the B cell biological processes and diseases. PMID:26369772

  12. The Memory Function of the B Cell Antigen Receptor.

    PubMed

    Wienands, Jürgen; Engels, Niklas

    2016-01-01

    Activated B lymphocytes preserve their antigen experience by differentiating into long-lived pools of antibody-secreting plasma cells or various types of memory B cells (MBCs). The former population constantly produces serum immunoglobulins with sufficient specificity and affinity to thwart infections with recurrent pathogens. By contrast, memory B cell populations retain their antigen receptors on the cell surface and hence need pathogen-induced differentiation steps before they can actively contribute to host defense. The terminal differentiation of MBCs into antibody-secreting plasma cells is hallmarked by the absence of the lag phase characteristic for primary antibody responses. Moreover, secondary antibody responses are predominantly driven by MBCs that bear an antigen receptor of the IgG class on their surface although IgM-positive memory populations exist as well. These fundamental principles of B cell memory were enigmatic for decades. Only recently, we have begun to understand the underlying mechanisms. This review summarizes our current understanding of how different subpopulations of MBCs are generated during primary immune responses and how their functional heterogeneity on antigen recall is controlled by different signaling capabilities of B cell antigen receptor (BCR) isotypes and by the nature of the antigen. PMID:26362935

  13. Regulatory roles of B cells in infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Fillatreau, Simon

    2016-01-01

    B lymphocytes provide essential mechanisms of protection against infectious diseases. The secretion of specific antibodies by long-lived plasma cells is thought to account for the improved resistance afforded by most successful vaccines against pathogens. Accordingly, a goal in vaccine development is to induce potent B cell responses in order to drive the efficient formation of long-lived antibody-secreting cells. However, the roles of activated B cells are complex in infectious diseases. It was recently observed that activated B cells co