Science.gov

Sample records for aggressive b-cell nhl

  1. Phase 1/2A Dose Escalation Study in CLL, SLL or NHL

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-09

    Follicular Lymphoma (FL/Indolent NHL); Aggressive NHL (a NHL); Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL) / Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma (SLL); T-cell Lymphoma (PTCL and CTCL); B-cell Non Hodgkin Lymphoma (NHL)

  2. Novel Therapies for Aggressive B-Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Foon, Kenneth A.; Takeshita, Kenichi; Zinzani, Pier L.

    2012-01-01

    Aggressive B-cell lymphoma (BCL) comprises a heterogeneous group of malignancies, including diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), Burkitt lymphoma, and mantle cell lymphoma (MCL). DLBCL, with its 3 subtypes, is the most common type of lymphoma. Advances in chemoimmunotherapy have substantially improved disease control. However, depending on the subtype, patients with DLBCL still exhibit substantially different survival rates. In MCL, a mature B-cell lymphoma, the addition of rituximab to conventional chemotherapy regimens has increased response rates, but not survival. Burkitt lymphoma, the most aggressive BCL, is characterized by a high proliferative index and requires more intensive chemotherapy regimens than DLBCL. Hence, there is a need for more effective therapies for all three diseases. Increased understanding of the molecular features of aggressive BCL has led to the development of a range of novel therapies, many of which target the tumor in a tailored manner and are summarized in this paper. PMID:22536253

  3. AT9283, a novel aurora kinase inhibitor, suppresses tumor growth in aggressive B-cell lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Qi, Wenqing; Liu, Xiaobing; Cooke, Laurence S; Persky, Daniel O; Miller, Thomas P; Squires, Matthew; Mahadevan, Daruka

    2012-06-15

    Aurora kinases are oncogenic serine/threonine kinases that play key roles in regulating the mitotic phase of the eukaryotic cell cycle. Auroras are overexpressed in numerous tumors including B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphomas and are validated oncology targets. AT9283, a pan-aurora inhibitor inhibited growth and survival of multiple solid tumors in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we demonstrated that AT9283 had potent activity against Aurora B in a variety of aggressive B-(non-Hodgkin lymphoma) B-NHL cell lines. Cells treated with AT9283 exhibited endoreduplication confirming the mechanism of action of an Aurora B inhibitor. Also, treatment of B-NHL cell lines with AT9283 induced apoptosis in a dose and time dependent manner and inhibited cell proliferation with an IC(50) < 1 μM. It is well known that inhibition of auroras (A or B) synergistically enhances the effects of microtubule targeting agents such as taxanes and vinca alkaloids to induce antiproliferation and apoptosis. We evaluated whether AT9283 in combination with docetaxel is more efficient in inducing apoptosis than AT9283 or docetaxel alone. At very low doses (5 nM) apoptosis was doubled in the combination (23%) compared to AT9283 or docetaxel alone (10%). A mouse xenograft model of mantle cell lymphoma demonstrated that AT9283 at 15 mg/kg and docetaxel (10 mg/kg) alone had modest anti-tumor activity. However, AT9283 at 20 mg/kg and AT9283 (15 or 20 mg/kg) plus docetaxel (10 mg/kg) demonstrated a statistically significant tumor growth inhibition and enhanced survival. Together, our results suggest that AT9283 plus docetaxel may represent a novel therapeutic strategy in B-cell NHL and warrant early phase clinical trial evaluation. PMID:21796626

  4. AT9283, a novel aurora kinase inhibitor, suppresses tumor growth in aggressive B-cell lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Qi, Wenqing; Liu, Xiaobing; Cooke, Laurence S; Persky, Daniel O; Miller, Thomas P; Squires, Matthew; Mahadevan, Daruka

    2012-06-15

    Aurora kinases are oncogenic serine/threonine kinases that play key roles in regulating the mitotic phase of the eukaryotic cell cycle. Auroras are overexpressed in numerous tumors including B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphomas and are validated oncology targets. AT9283, a pan-aurora inhibitor inhibited growth and survival of multiple solid tumors in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we demonstrated that AT9283 had potent activity against Aurora B in a variety of aggressive B-(non-Hodgkin lymphoma) B-NHL cell lines. Cells treated with AT9283 exhibited endoreduplication confirming the mechanism of action of an Aurora B inhibitor. Also, treatment of B-NHL cell lines with AT9283 induced apoptosis in a dose and time dependent manner and inhibited cell proliferation with an IC(50) < 1 μM. It is well known that inhibition of auroras (A or B) synergistically enhances the effects of microtubule targeting agents such as taxanes and vinca alkaloids to induce antiproliferation and apoptosis. We evaluated whether AT9283 in combination with docetaxel is more efficient in inducing apoptosis than AT9283 or docetaxel alone. At very low doses (5 nM) apoptosis was doubled in the combination (23%) compared to AT9283 or docetaxel alone (10%). A mouse xenograft model of mantle cell lymphoma demonstrated that AT9283 at 15 mg/kg and docetaxel (10 mg/kg) alone had modest anti-tumor activity. However, AT9283 at 20 mg/kg and AT9283 (15 or 20 mg/kg) plus docetaxel (10 mg/kg) demonstrated a statistically significant tumor growth inhibition and enhanced survival. Together, our results suggest that AT9283 plus docetaxel may represent a novel therapeutic strategy in B-cell NHL and warrant early phase clinical trial evaluation.

  5. Global gene expression changes of in vitro stimulated human transformed germinal centre B cells as surrogate for oncogenic pathway activation in individual aggressive B cell lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Aggressive Non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL) are a group of lymphomas derived from germinal centre B cells which display a heterogeneous pattern of oncogenic pathway activation. We postulate that specific immune response associated signalling, affecting gene transcription networks, may be associated with the activation of different oncogenic pathways in aggressive Non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL). Methodology The B cell receptor (BCR), CD40, B-cell activating factor (BAFF)-receptors and Interleukin (IL) 21 receptor and Toll like receptor 4 (TLR4) were stimulated in human transformed germinal centre B cells by treatment with anti IgM F(ab)2-fragments, CD40L, BAFF, IL21 and LPS respectively. The changes in gene expression following the activation of Jak/STAT, NF-кB, MAPK, Ca2+ and PI3K signalling triggered by these stimuli was assessed using microarray analysis. The expression of top 100 genes which had a change in gene expression following stimulation was investigated in gene expression profiles of patients with Aggressive non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (NHL). Results αIgM stimulation led to the largest number of changes in gene expression, affecting overall 6596 genes. While CD40L stimulation changed the expression of 1194 genes and IL21 stimulation affected 902 genes, only 283 and 129 genes were modulated by lipopolysaccharide or BAFF receptor stimulation, respectively. Interestingly, genes associated with a Burkitt-like phenotype, such as MYC, BCL6 or LEF1, were affected by αIgM. Unique and shared gene expression was delineated. NHL-patients were sorted according to their similarity in the expression of TOP100 affected genes to stimulated transformed germinal centre B cells The αIgM gene module discriminated individual DLBCL in a similar manner to CD40L or IL21 gene modules. DLBCLs with low module activation often carry chromosomal MYC aberrations. DLBCLs with high module activation show strong expression of genes involved in cell-cell communication, immune responses

  6. Results of the Japan Association of Childhood Leukemia Study (JACLS) NHL-98 protocol for the treatment of B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma and mature B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia in childhood.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Naoto; Kobayashi, Ryoji; Takimoto, Tetsuya; Nakagawa, Atsuko; Ueda, Kazuhiro; Horibe, Keizo

    2011-02-01

    The Japan Association of Childhood Leukemia Study (JACLS) NHL-98 is a multicenter study designed to evaluate treatment outcomes in Japanese children with B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (B-NHL) and mature B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL). The study was supported by a central pathology review system and used a new, standardized protocol with short, intensive treatment regimens. From April 1998 to May 2002, 69 patients with B-NHL and B-ALL up to 16 years of age were enrolled in the NHL-98 study. Treatment was stratified by risk group; patients with limited disease were in groups A and B, and those with extensive disease were in groups C and D. Patients in groups B, C, and D received consolidation phases with high-dose methotrexate (HDMTX) followed by other multi-agent chemotherapy. Patients in group A did not receive either MTX or etoposide. Only patients in group D received etoposide. The event-free survival rates were 100% in groups A and B, 75.1% in group C, and 66.2% in group D. Overall, patients with limited disease had favorable results. For patients with extensive disease, additional treatment options such as increased doses of anticancer drugs warrant further investigation. PMID:21261497

  7. Therapy of advanced-stage mature B-cell lymphoma and leukemia in children and adolescents with rituximab and reduced intensity induction chemotherapy (B-NHL 2004M protocol): the results of a multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Samochatova, Elena V; Maschan, Alexey A; Shelikhova, Larisa N; Myakova, Natalia V; Belogurova, Margarita B; Khlebnikova, Olga P; Shamardina, Anastasia V; Ryskal, Olga V; Roumiantseva, Julia V; Konovalov, Dmitriy M; Dubrovina, Maria E; Rumyantsev, Alexander G

    2014-07-01

    Pediatric mature B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas (B-NHLs) are highly aggressive malignant tumors that are curable with chemotherapy (ChT). High-dose methotrexate (MTX) is considered indispensable for successful treatment, but this therapy frequently induces severe mucositis and infectious complications, especially in induction, which can cause treatment failure. A prospective multicenter trial of combined immunochemotherapy for advanced-stage B-NHL with rituximab and the modified NHL-BFM-90 protocol was conducted. The major differences from the original protocol were a decrease in the dose of MTX from 5000 to 1000 mg/m/24 h in the first 2 ChT blocks and the addition of rituximab at 375 mg/m to each of the first 4 blocks of ChT. Eighty-three newly diagnosed patients with a median age of 8.84 years with Burkitt lymphoma/leukemia and diffuse large B-cell lymphomas stage III to IV were included. Four patients died during induction ChT due to tumor lysis syndrome and infection. Two additional patients died subsequently due to tumor resistance. Complete remission was achieved in 77 (92.8%) patients; 2 patients relapsed at 1 and 3 months, and 2 developed secondary malignancies at 1 and 6.5 years, respectively, after the completion of therapy. The overall survival probability was 82%±8% with a median follow-up of 65.2 months. Combined therapy with rituximab and intensive ChT with a reduced MTX dose of 1 g/m in the 2 induction courses was feasible and produced high cure rates in patients with pediatric advanced-stage mature B-NHL. PMID:23823112

  8. Study of ADCT-402 in Patients With Relapsed or Refractory B-cell Lineage Non Hodgkin Lymphoma (B-NHL)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-04

    Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Burkitt's Lymphoma; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse; Lymphoma, Follicular; Lymphoma, Mantle-Cell; Lymphoma, Marginal Zone; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  9. PF-04691502, a dual PI3K/mTOR inhibitor has potent pre-clinical activity by inducing apoptosis and G1 cell cycle arrest in aggressive B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Chen, Deyu; Mao, Chaoming; Zhou, Yuepeng; Su, Yuting; Liu, Shenzha; Qi, Wen-Qing

    2016-01-01

    The PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway is activated in a variety of human tumors including B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (B-NHL). Targeting this pathway has been validated in solid and hematological tumors. In the present study, we demonstrated that PF-04691502, a novel PI3K/mTOR inhibitor has potent activity in a panel of aggressive B-NHL cell lines including diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and mantle cell lymphoma (MCL). MTS analysis showed that PF-04691502 effectively inhibited cell proliferation with IC50 values ranging from 0.12 to 0.55 µM. Cells treated with PF-04691502 exhibited decreased phosphorylation of Akt and S6 ribosomal protein confirming the mechanism of action of a PI3K/mTOR inhibitor. Also, treatment of B-NHL cell lines with PF-04691502 induced apoptosis in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Moreover, PF-04691502 significantly induced G1 cell cycle arrest associated with a decrease in cyclin D1 which contributed to suppression of cell proliferation. Finally, rituximab enhanced apoptosis induced by PF-04691502. Taken together, our findings provide for the first time that PF-04691502 inhibits the constitutively activated PI3K/mTOR pathway in aggressive B-cell NHL cell lines associated with inhibition of cell cycle progression, cell proliferation and promotion of apoptosis. These findings suggest that PF-04691502 is a novel therapeutic strategy in aggressive B-cell NHL and warrants early phase clinical trial evaluation with and without rituximab. PMID:26549638

  10. Efficacy and toxicity of a rituximab and methotrexate based regimen (GMALL B-ALL/NHL 2002 protocol) in Burkitt's and primary mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Pohlen, Michele; Gerth, Hans U; Liersch, Ruediger; Koschmieder, Steffen; Mesters, Rolf M; Kessler, Torsten; Appelmann, Iris; Müller-Tidow, Carsten; Berdel, Wolfgang E

    2011-12-01

    There have been several attempts to improve treatment and outcome of patients with primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma (PMBL) and Burkitt's lymphoma (BL). In recent years, chemotherapy dose intensification and the addition of rituximab have led to a remarkable progress and have developed into integral parts of treatment for both entities of lymphoma [1–4]. Here, we report our monocenter results of a high-dose methotrexate based alternating regimen with rituximab (B-ALL/NHL 2002 protocol) in 15 patients with PMBL and 28 patients with sporadic BL. Since the early 1980s, protocols of GMALL have been continuously adapted and in the meantime they have become reference treatment for BL and B-ALL in Germany. The latest changes comprised the additional use of rituximab, standardized G-CSF support,implementation of high-dose cytarabine, intrathecal triple therapy,and age-adjusted stratification. Furthermore, we additionally amended supportive care with palifermin as it reduced severity and prevalence of mucositis [5]. PMID:21898532

  11. Randomized study of granulocyte colony stimulating factor for childhood B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma: a report from the Japanese pediatric leukemia/lymphoma study group B-NHL03 study.

    PubMed

    Tsurusawa, Masahito; Watanabe, Tomoyuki; Gosho, Masahiko; Mori, Tetsuya; Mitsui, Tetsuo; Sunami, Shosuke; Kobayashi, Ryoji; Fukano, Reiji; Tanaka, Fumiko; Fujita, Naoto; Inada, Hiroko; Sekimizu, Masahiro; Koh, Katsuyoshi; Kosaka, Yoshiyuki; Komada, Yoshihiro; Saito, Akiko M; Nakazawa, Atsuko; Horibe, Keizo

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the impact of the primary prophylaxis of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in the management of childhood B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (B-NHL). Patients with advanced-stage mature B-NHL were randomized to receive prophylactic G-CSF (G-CSF+) or not receive G-CSF (G-CSF-) based on protocols of the B-NHL03 study. The G-CSF group received 5 μg/kg/d Lenograstim from day 2 after each course of six chemotherapy courses. Fifty-eight patients were assessable, 29 G-CSF + and 29 G-CSF-. G-CSF + patients showed a positive impact on the meantime to neutrophil recovery and hospital stay. On the other hand, they had no impact in the incidences of febrile neutropenia, serious infections, stomatitis and total cost. Our study showed that administration of prophylactic G-CSF through all six chemotherapy courses for childhood B-NHL showed no clinical and economic benefits for the management of childhood B-NHL treatment.

  12. Expression of the T1 (CD5, p67) surface antigen in B-CLL and B-NHL and its correlation with other B-cell differentiation markers.

    PubMed

    Delia, D; Bonati, A; Giardini, R; Villa, S; De Braud, F; Cattoretti, G; Rilke, F

    1986-01-01

    The T1 surface antigen (CD5,p67) expression on blood lymphocytes (PBL) and lymphoid cells from lymph node biopsies (LN) from 31 patients with B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL) and 79 with B non-Hodgkin lymphoma (B-NHL), was detected in 25 B-CLL (80 per cent) and in 11 B-NHL (13 per cent) belonging to the following histologic subtypes: lymphocytic of CLL type (DLWD) one case, lymphoplasmacytoid (DLWD) four cases, centrocytic (DLPD) five cases, immunoblastic (DH) one case. All B-CLL and the T1 + B-NHL were also tested with monoclonal antibodies against the Common Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Antigen, B cells (FMC7, FMC8, BA1, Y29-55), T cells (OKT11a), HLA-DR and HLA-DQ monomorphic determinants. All the B-CLL and the T1+ B-NHL were CALLA-, BA1+, Y29.55+. FMC7+ cells were detected in large numbers six B-CLL (three T1+ and three T1-) and in four centrocytic lymphomas. FMC8 reacted with 70 per cent of leukemias (where it stained 30 per cent of neoplastic cells) and with 8/9 T+ B-NHL. HLA-DR and HLA-DQ molecules were detected in 100 per cent and 90 per cent of cases respectively. In vitro treatment of HLA-DQ- or T1- B-CLL with phorbol ester TPA led to the expression of these antigens as well as of the receptors for Interleukin 2 and MLR3 activation antigen. Surface membrane Ig (SIg) was detected in 79 per cent of cases, its density measured by FACS analysis varied, even markedly, from case to case. Among the B-CLL, cells with high SIg content were either T1+ or T1- and more likely FMC7+. The SIg- cases were seven B-CLL (five T1+ and two T1-) and two B-NHL, in which, however, cytoplasmic IgM was detected. This study reveals the existence of four major B-CLL subgroups: T1- SIg-, T1+ SIg+, T1+ SIg+, T1- SIg+. It also indicates that the T1 antigen may be transitionally present during B-cell differentiation and that its expression may precede that of SIg as supported by the in vitro studies. In addition, the finding that some B-NHL are T1+ suggests that they derive

  13. Monotherapy with pixantrone in histologically confirmed relapsed or refractory aggressive B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma: post-hoc analyses from a phase III trial.

    PubMed

    Pettengell, Ruth; Sebban, Catherine; Zinzani, Pier Luigi; Derigs, Hans Gunter; Kravchenko, Sergey; Singer, Jack W; Theocharous, Panteli; Wang, Lixia; Pavlyuk, Mariya; Makhloufi, Kahina M; Coiffier, Bertrand

    2016-09-01

    This post hoc analysis of a phase 3 trial explored the effect of pixantrone in patients (50 pixantrone, 47 comparator) with relapsed or refractory aggressive B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) confirmed by centralized histological review. Patients received 28-d cycles of 85 mg/m(2) pixantrone dimaleate (equivalent to 50 mg/m(2) in the approved formulation) on days 1, 8 and 15, or comparator. The population was subdivided according to previous rituximab use and whether they received the study treatment as 3rd or 4th line. Median number of cycles was 4 (range, 2-6) with pixantrone and 3 (2-6) with comparator. In 3rd or 4th line, pixantrone was associated with higher complete response (CR) (23·1% vs. 5·1% comparator, P = 0·047) and overall response rate (ORR, 43·6% vs. 12·8%, P = 0·005). In 3rd or 4th line with previous rituximab (20 pixantrone, 18 comparator), pixantrone produced better ORR (45·0% vs. 11·1%, P = 0·033), CR (30·0% vs. 5·6%, P = 0·093) and progression-free survival (median 5·4 vs. 2·8 months, hazard ratio 0·52, 95% confidence interval 0·26-1·04) than the comparator. Similar results were found in patients without previous rituximab. There were no unexpected safety issues. Pixantrone monotherapy is more effective than comparator in relapsed or refractory aggressive B-cell NHL in the 3rd or 4th line setting, independently of previous rituximab.

  14. Ibritumomab consolidation after 3 cycles of CHOP plus radiotherapy in high-risk limited-stage aggressive B-cell lymphoma: SWOG S0313

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Thomas P.; Unger, Joseph M.; Spier, Catherine M.; Puvvada, Soham; Stea, B. Dino; Press, Oliver W.; Constine, Louis S.; Barton, Kevin P.; Friedberg, Jonathan W.; LeBlanc, Michael; Fisher, Richard I.

    2015-01-01

    In the S0313 trial, we evaluated the impact of adding ibritumomab tiuxetan consolidation to 3 cycles of standard cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (CHOP) chemotherapy plus involved field radiotherapy (IFRT) in patients with limited-stage aggressive B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (LD-NHL). Patients with at least 1 stage-modified adverse risk factor (nonbulky stage II, age >60 years, elevated lactate dehydrogenase, or World Health Organization performance status of 2) were treated with CHOP on days 1, 22, and 43, followed 3 weeks later by 40 to 50 Gy of IFRT. An ibritumomab tiuxetan regimen was initiated 3 to 6 weeks following IFRT. Forty-six patients were registered and eligible, with median follow-up of 7.3 years. The progression-free survival estimate is 89% at 2 years, 82% at 5 years, and 75% at 7 years. The overall survival estimate is 91% at 2 years, 87% at 5 years, and 82% at 7 years. Grade 4 adverse events occurring more than once included neutropenia (8), leukopenia (5), and lymphopenia (2). Febrile neutropenia was observed in 4 patients. No cases of treatment-related myeloid neoplasms were noted. In conclusion, patients with high-risk LD-NHL treated with 3 cycles of CHOP plus IFRT followed by ibritumomab tiuxetan consolidation had outcomes that compare favorably to our historical experience. The clinical trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00070018. PMID:25395425

  15. Clinical association of baseline levels of conjugated dienes in low-density lipoprotein and nitric oxide with aggressive B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma and their relationship with immunoglobulins and Th1-to-Th2 ratio

    PubMed Central

    Haddouche, Mustapha; Meziane, Warda; Hadjidj, Zeyneb; Mesli, Naima; Aribi, Mourad

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to highlight the clinical association of baseline levels of conjugated dienes in low-density lipoprotein (LDL-BCD) and nitric oxide (NO) with immunoglobulins (Igs) and T helper (Th)1/Th2 ratio in patients with newly diagnosed B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). Patients and methods Thirty-two newly diagnosed patients with aggressive B-cell NHL and 25 age-, sex-, and body-mass-index-matched healthy controls were randomly selected for a cross-sectional case–control study conducted at the Hematology Department of Tlemcen Medical Centre University (northwest of Algeria). Results Circulating levels of LDL-BCD and NO and those of IgA and IgM were significantly higher in patients than in controls. The levels of Th1/Th2 ratio and plasma total antioxidant capacity were significantly lower in patients compared with controls, while malondialdehyde and protein carbonyl levels were significantly higher in patients. B-cell NHL was significantly associated with high levels of LDL-BCD from 25th to 75th percentile (25th percentile: relative risk [RR] =2.26, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.42–3.59, P=0.014; 50th percentile: RR =2.84, 95% CI 1.72–4.68, P<0.001; 75th percentile: RR =5.43, 95% CI 2.58–11.42, P<0.001). Similarly, the disease was significantly associated with high levels of NO production from 25th to 75th percentile (25th percentile: RR =2.07, 95% CI 1.25–3.44, P=0.024; 50th percentile: RR =2.78, 95% CI 1.63–4.72, P<0.001; 75th percentile: RR =4.68, 95% CI 2.21–9.91, P<0.001). Moreover, LDL-BCD levels were positively and significantly correlated with interferon (IFN)-γ, whereas NO levels were inversely and significantly correlated with IFN-γ and Th1/Th2 ratio. Conclusion LDL-BCD and NO production seem to be associated with aggressive B-cell NHL and alteration of Th1/Th2 ratio. Our results have to be examined using ex vivo mechanistic studies leading to further investigations of these parameters, with an interest in the

  16. Outcome and pathologic classification of children and adolescents with mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma treated with FAB/LMB96 mature B-NHL therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gerrard, Mary; Waxman, Ian M.; Sposto, Richard; Auperin, Anne; Perkins, Sherrie L.; Goldman, Stanton; Harrison, Lauren; Pinkerton, Ross; McCarthy, Keith; Raphael, Martine; Patte, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    Mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma (MLBL) represents 2% of mature B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma in patients ≤ 18 years of age. We analyzed data from childhood and adolescent patients with stage III MLBL (n = 42) and non-MLBL DLBCL (n = 69) treated with Group B therapy in the French-American-British/Lymphome Malins de Burkitt (FAB/LMB) 96 study. MLBL patients had a male/female 26/16; median age, 15.7 years (range, 12.5-19.7); and LDH < 2 versus ≥ 2 × the upper limit of normal, 23:19. Six MLBL patients (14%) had < a 20% response to initial COP (cyclophosphamide, vincristine, and prednisone) therapy. Central pathology revealed approximately 50% with classical features of primary MLBL. Five-year event-free survival for the stage III MLBL and non-MLBL DLBCL groups was 66% (95% confidence interval [CI], 49%-78%) and 85% (95% CI, 71%-92%), respectively (P < .001; 14%). The 5-year overall survival in the 42 MLBL patients was 73% (95% CI, 56%-84%). We conclude that MLBL in adolescent patients is associated with significantly inferior event-free survival compared with stage III non-MLBL DLBCL and can be of multiple histologies. Alternate treatment strategies should be investigated in the future taking into account both adult MLBL approaches and more recent biologic findings in adult MLBL. PMID:23149845

  17. Outcome and pathologic classification of children and adolescents with mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma treated with FAB/LMB96 mature B-NHL therapy.

    PubMed

    Gerrard, Mary; Waxman, Ian M; Sposto, Richard; Auperin, Anne; Perkins, Sherrie L; Goldman, Stanton; Harrison, Lauren; Pinkerton, Ross; McCarthy, Keith; Raphael, Martine; Patte, Catherine; Cairo, Mitchell S

    2013-01-10

    Mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma (MLBL) represents 2% of mature B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma in patients ≤ 18 years of age. We analyzed data from childhood and adolescent patients with stage III MLBL (n = 42) and non-MLBL DLBCL (n = 69) treated with Group B therapy in the French-American-British/Lymphome Malins de Burkitt (FAB/LMB) 96 study. MLBL patients had a male/female 26/16; median age, 15.7 years (range, 12.5-19.7); and LDH < 2 versus ≥ 2 × the upper limit of normal, 23:19. Six MLBL patients (14%) had < a 20% response to initial COP (cyclophosphamide, vincristine, and prednisone) therapy. Central pathology revealed approximately 50% with classical features of primary MLBL. Five-year event-free survival for the stage III MLBL and non-MLBL DLBCL groups was 66% (95% confidence interval [CI], 49%-78%) and 85% (95% CI, 71%-92%), respectively (P < .001; 14%). The 5-year overall survival in the 42 MLBL patients was 73% (95% CI, 56%-84%). We conclude that MLBL in adolescent patients is associated with significantly inferior event-free survival compared with stage III non-MLBL DLBCL and can be of multiple histologies. Alternate treatment strategies should be investigated in the future taking into account both adult MLBL approaches and more recent biologic findings in adult MLBL. PMID:23149845

  18. Ultrasonographic features of aggressive primary thyroid diffuse B-cell lymphoma: A report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    HU, GUOBING; ZHU, XIANGMING

    2016-01-01

    Primary thyroid lymphoma (PTL) is a relatively rare malignant tumor. Aggressive PTL is extremely rare, and there is limited literature regarding the imaging features of PTL with invasion into adjacent structures, including internal jugular vein, muscles, esophagus, trachea and carotid artery. In addition, the ultrasonographic features of the cases presented in the current report differ from those reported in previous studies. In the present study, two cases of PTL, who presented to The First Affiliated Hospital of Wannan Medical College (Wuhu, China) with a short history of a rapidly growing mass in the front of their neck, are reported. Both patients had undergone ultrasound examination, and the subsequent histopathological and immunohistochemical examinations confirmed that the two masses were primary diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. The ultrasonographic findings of these two cases are discussed in the present report. PMID:27073503

  19. Combinatorial targeting of nuclear export and translation of RNA inhibits aggressive B-cell lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Culjkovic-Kraljacic, Biljana; Fernando, Tharu M.; Marullo, Rossella; Calvo-Vidal, Nieves; Verma, Akanksha; Yang, ShaoNing; Tabbò, Fabrizio; Gaudiano, Marcello; Zahreddine, Hiba; Goldstein, Rebecca L.; Patel, Jayeshkumar; Taldone, Tony; Chiosis, Gabriela; Ladetto, Marco; Ghione, Paola; Machiorlatti, Rodolfo; Elemento, Olivier; Inghirami, Giorgio; Melnick, Ari; Borden, Katherine L. B.

    2016-01-01

    Aggressive double- and triple-hit (DH/TH) diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (DLBCLs) feature activation of Hsp90 stress pathways. Herein, we show that Hsp90 controls posttranscriptional dynamics of key messenger RNA (mRNA) species including those encoding BCL6, MYC, and BCL2. Using a proteomics approach, we found that Hsp90 binds to and maintains activity of eIF4E. eIF4E drives nuclear export and translation of BCL6, MYC, and BCL2 mRNA. eIF4E RNA-immunoprecipitation sequencing in DLBCL suggests that nuclear eIF4E controls an extended program that includes B-cell receptor signaling, cellular metabolism, and epigenetic regulation. Accordingly, eIF4E was required for survival of DLBCL including the most aggressive subtypes, DH/TH lymphomas. Indeed, eIF4E inhibition induces tumor regression in cell line and patient-derived tumorgrafts of TH-DLBCL, even in the presence of elevated Hsp90 activity. Targeting Hsp90 is typically limited by counterregulatory elevation of Hsp70B, which induces resistance to Hsp90 inhibitors. Surprisingly, we identify Hsp70 mRNA as an eIF4E target. In this way, eIF4E inhibition can overcome drug resistance to Hsp90 inhibitors. Accordingly, rational combinatorial inhibition of eIF4E and Hsp90 inhibitors resulted in cooperative antilymphoma activity in DH/TH DLBCL in vitro and in vivo. PMID:26603836

  20. CD4-positive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma: A variant with aggressive clinical potential

    PubMed Central

    Hussaini, Mohammad O; Kreisel, Friederike H; Hassan, Anjum; Nguyen, TuDung T; Frater, John L

    2016-01-01

    CD4 expression is rare in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), with 4 previously reported cases. Its significance is uncertain. We report five patients with CD4+ DLBCL and one CD4+ primary mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma. Cases were identified by searching the electronic database of the department; each was reviewed. Average age was 56 years. Neoplastic cells expressed CD20 (5/6 tested cases). BCL2/BCL6 expression were seen in 3/3 tested cases, suggesting a germinal center origin. Additionally, expression of T-cell antigens CD2 and CD5 was noted in 2/2 and CD7 in 1/1 tested case. CD3 was negative in all. Lymph nodes were commonly involved (67%). Patients received chemotherapy +/- radiation (6/6) and bone marrow transplant (2/6). Average survival was 44.2 mo. CD4 expression in DLBCL raises questions of lineage commitment. CD4+ DLBCL is rare; care should be exercised not to diagnose these as T-cell lymphomas. A subset behaves aggressively. PMID:27679780

  1. CD4-positive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma: A variant with aggressive clinical potential.

    PubMed

    Hussaini, Mohammad O; Kreisel, Friederike H; Hassan, Anjum; Nguyen, TuDung T; Frater, John L

    2016-09-26

    CD4 expression is rare in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), with 4 previously reported cases. Its significance is uncertain. We report five patients with CD4(+) DLBCL and one CD4(+) primary mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma. Cases were identified by searching the electronic database of the department; each was reviewed. Average age was 56 years. Neoplastic cells expressed CD20 (5/6 tested cases). BCL2/BCL6 expression were seen in 3/3 tested cases, suggesting a germinal center origin. Additionally, expression of T-cell antigens CD2 and CD5 was noted in 2/2 and CD7 in 1/1 tested case. CD3 was negative in all. Lymph nodes were commonly involved (67%). Patients received chemotherapy +/- radiation (6/6) and bone marrow transplant (2/6). Average survival was 44.2 mo. CD4 expression in DLBCL raises questions of lineage commitment. CD4(+) DLBCL is rare; care should be exercised not to diagnose these as T-cell lymphomas. A subset behaves aggressively. PMID:27679780

  2. CD4-positive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma: A variant with aggressive clinical potential

    PubMed Central

    Hussaini, Mohammad O; Kreisel, Friederike H; Hassan, Anjum; Nguyen, TuDung T; Frater, John L

    2016-01-01

    CD4 expression is rare in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), with 4 previously reported cases. Its significance is uncertain. We report five patients with CD4+ DLBCL and one CD4+ primary mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma. Cases were identified by searching the electronic database of the department; each was reviewed. Average age was 56 years. Neoplastic cells expressed CD20 (5/6 tested cases). BCL2/BCL6 expression were seen in 3/3 tested cases, suggesting a germinal center origin. Additionally, expression of T-cell antigens CD2 and CD5 was noted in 2/2 and CD7 in 1/1 tested case. CD3 was negative in all. Lymph nodes were commonly involved (67%). Patients received chemotherapy +/- radiation (6/6) and bone marrow transplant (2/6). Average survival was 44.2 mo. CD4 expression in DLBCL raises questions of lineage commitment. CD4+ DLBCL is rare; care should be exercised not to diagnose these as T-cell lymphomas. A subset behaves aggressively.

  3. Unusually Aggressive Primary Testicular Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma with Post Therapy Extensive Metastasis.

    PubMed

    Goel, Shalini; Sachdev, Ritesh; Mohapatra, Ishani; Gajendra, Smeeta; Gupta, Sunil

    2016-07-01

    Primary Testicular Lymphoma (PTL) is a rare intermediate to high grade tumour, diffuse large cell being the most common type. Unlike nodal Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma (DLBCL), testicular DLBCL has a less aggressive course and better prognosis. Metastasis is uncommon in testicular DLBCL. Commonly involved sites are contralateral testes, Waldeyer's ring, skin, lung, Central Nervous System (CNS) and prostate, however the kidneys, liver, bone marrow, pleura and bones are more rarely involved. We report a case of testicular DLBCL which has metastasized to skin and bone marrow with an aggressive clinical course in a year, in-spite of combined modality of therapy given to the patient. Bone marrow infiltration is common and well documented with nodal DLBCL, however there is no published literature for simultaneous bone marrow and skin infiltration in testicular DLBCL till date. Other large studies done in the west have shown that distinct metastasis is usually common but the median progression-free survival is usually in years. This case stresses on shorter period of progression after standard treatment protocol in this part of the world, thus highlighting the need for other extensive studies to define specific treatment protocol for testicular DLBCL. PMID:27630854

  4. Unusually Aggressive Primary Testicular Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma with Post Therapy Extensive Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Goel, Shalini; Mohapatra, Ishani; Gajendra, Smeeta; Gupta, Sunil

    2016-01-01

    Primary Testicular Lymphoma (PTL) is a rare intermediate to high grade tumour, diffuse large cell being the most common type. Unlike nodal Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma (DLBCL), testicular DLBCL has a less aggressive course and better prognosis. Metastasis is uncommon in testicular DLBCL. Commonly involved sites are contralateral testes, Waldeyer’s ring, skin, lung, Central Nervous System (CNS) and prostate, however the kidneys, liver, bone marrow, pleura and bones are more rarely involved. We report a case of testicular DLBCL which has metastasized to skin and bone marrow with an aggressive clinical course in a year, in-spite of combined modality of therapy given to the patient. Bone marrow infiltration is common and well documented with nodal DLBCL, however there is no published literature for simultaneous bone marrow and skin infiltration in testicular DLBCL till date. Other large studies done in the west have shown that distinct metastasis is usually common but the median progression-free survival is usually in years. This case stresses on shorter period of progression after standard treatment protocol in this part of the world, thus highlighting the need for other extensive studies to define specific treatment protocol for testicular DLBCL.

  5. Unusually Aggressive Primary Testicular Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma with Post Therapy Extensive Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Goel, Shalini; Mohapatra, Ishani; Gajendra, Smeeta; Gupta, Sunil

    2016-01-01

    Primary Testicular Lymphoma (PTL) is a rare intermediate to high grade tumour, diffuse large cell being the most common type. Unlike nodal Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma (DLBCL), testicular DLBCL has a less aggressive course and better prognosis. Metastasis is uncommon in testicular DLBCL. Commonly involved sites are contralateral testes, Waldeyer’s ring, skin, lung, Central Nervous System (CNS) and prostate, however the kidneys, liver, bone marrow, pleura and bones are more rarely involved. We report a case of testicular DLBCL which has metastasized to skin and bone marrow with an aggressive clinical course in a year, in-spite of combined modality of therapy given to the patient. Bone marrow infiltration is common and well documented with nodal DLBCL, however there is no published literature for simultaneous bone marrow and skin infiltration in testicular DLBCL till date. Other large studies done in the west have shown that distinct metastasis is usually common but the median progression-free survival is usually in years. This case stresses on shorter period of progression after standard treatment protocol in this part of the world, thus highlighting the need for other extensive studies to define specific treatment protocol for testicular DLBCL. PMID:27630854

  6. Clinicopathological features of aggressive B-cell lymphomas including B-cell lymphoma, unclassifiable, with features intermediate between diffuse large B-cell and Burkitt lymphomas: a study of 44 patients from Argentina.

    PubMed

    Bürgesser, María Virginia; Gualco, Gabriela; Diller, Ana; Natkunam, Yasodha; Bacchi, Carlos E

    2013-06-01

    Aggressive B-cell lymphomas incorporate a wide spectrum of lymphomas that pose challenges in diagnosis as well as treatment. We evaluated the clinicopathological features of 44 patients with aggressive B-cell lymphomas which were classified into 3 groups based on the World Health Organization 2008 classification as follows: including 30 cases of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), 8 cases of Burkitt lymphoma (BL) and 6 cases of B-cell lymphoma, unclassifiable, with features intermediate between Burkitt lymphoma and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (BCLU). Male predominance was observed in BL and BCLU groups and the mean age varied from 29 years in BL, 61 years in DLBCL and 70 years in BCLU. Patients with BCLU presented at more advanced stages and had a higher international prognostic index. By immunohistochemistry, they shared characteristics of both BL (including more frequent expression of SOX11) and DLBCL. FISH analyses showed three cases with more than one rearrangement: one MYC/BCL2 and two BCL2/BCL6, in addition to which one case with BCL2/IGH translocation and another with MYC rearrangement were also detected. The mean follow-up survival time of BCLU was 6.6 months, which was significantly shorter in comparison to DLBCL (31 months) and BL (30 months), respectively. The importance of recognizing this BCLU group relies on its different clinical course, poor prognosis and shorter survival than DLBCL and BL. An accurate diagnosis is critical for risk stratification and to improve therapeutic approaches and outcomes.

  7. Oncogenic Properties of Apoptotic Tumor Cells in Aggressive B Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Ford, Catriona A.; Petrova, Sofia; Pound, John D.; Voss, Jorine J.L.P.; Melville, Lynsey; Paterson, Margaret; Farnworth, Sarah L.; Gallimore, Awen M.; Cuff, Simone; Wheadon, Helen; Dobbin, Edwina; Ogden, Carol Anne; Dumitriu, Ingrid E.; Dunbar, Donald R.; Murray, Paul G.; Ruckerl, Dominik; Allen, Judith E.; Hume, David A.; van Rooijen, Nico; Goodlad, John R.; Freeman, Tom C.; Gregory, Christopher D.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Cells undergoing apoptosis are known to modulate their tissue microenvironments. By acting on phagocytes, notably macrophages, apoptotic cells inhibit immunological and inflammatory responses and promote trophic signaling pathways. Paradoxically, because of their potential to cause death of tumor cells and thereby militate against malignant disease progression, both apoptosis and tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are often associated with poor prognosis in cancer. We hypothesized that, in progression of malignant disease, constitutive loss of a fraction of the tumor cell population through apoptosis could yield tumor-promoting effects. Results Here, we demonstrate that apoptotic tumor cells promote coordinated tumor growth, angiogenesis, and accumulation of TAMs in aggressive B cell lymphomas. Through unbiased “in situ transcriptomics” analysis—gene expression profiling of laser-captured TAMs to establish their activation signature in situ—we show that these cells are activated to signal via multiple tumor-promoting reparatory, trophic, angiogenic, tissue remodeling, and anti-inflammatory pathways. Our results also suggest that apoptotic lymphoma cells help drive this signature. Furthermore, we demonstrate that, upon induction of apoptosis, lymphoma cells not only activate expression of the tumor-promoting matrix metalloproteinases MMP2 and MMP12 in macrophages but also express and process these MMPs directly. Finally, using a model of malignant melanoma, we show that the oncogenic potential of apoptotic tumor cells extends beyond lymphoma. Conclusions In addition to its profound tumor-suppressive role, apoptosis can potentiate cancer progression. These results have important implications for understanding the fundamental biology of cell death, its roles in malignant disease, and the broader consequences of apoptosis-inducing anti-cancer therapy. PMID:25702581

  8. Associations of non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (NHL) risk with autoimmune conditions according to putative NHL loci.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sophia S; Vajdic, Claire M; Linet, Martha S; Slager, Susan L; Voutsinas, Jenna; Nieters, Alexandra; de Sanjose, Silvia; Cozen, Wendy; Alarcón, Graciela S; Martinez-Maza, Otoniel; Brown, Elizabeth E; Bracci, Paige M; Lightfoot, Tracy; Turner, Jennifer; Hjalgrim, Henrik; Spinelli, John J; Zheng, Tongzhang; Morton, Lindsay M; Birmann, Brenda M; Flowers, Christopher R; Paltiel, Ora; Becker, Nikolaus; Holly, Elizabeth A; Kane, Eleanor; Weisenburger, Dennis; Maynadie, Marc; Cocco, Pierluigi; Foretova, Lenka; Staines, Anthony; Davis, Scott; Severson, Richard; Cerhan, James R; Breen, Elizabeth C; Lan, Qing; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; De Roos, Anneclaire J; Smith, Martyn T; Roman, Eve; Boffetta, Paolo; Kricker, Anne; Zhang, Yawei; Skibola, Christine; Chanock, Stephen J; Rothman, Nathaniel; Benavente, Yolanda; Hartge, Patricia; Smedby, Karin E

    2015-03-15

    Autoimmune conditions and immune system-related genetic variations are associated with risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). In a pooled analysis of 8,692 NHL cases and 9,260 controls from 14 studies (1988-2007) within the International Lymphoma Epidemiology Consortium, we evaluated the interaction between immune system genetic variants and autoimmune conditions in NHL risk. We evaluated the immunity-related single nucleotide polymorphisms rs1800629 (tumor necrosis factor gene (TNF) G308A), rs1800890 (interleukin-10 gene (IL10) T3575A), rs6457327 (human leukocyte antigen gene (HLA) class I), rs10484561 (HLA class II), and rs2647012 (HLA class II)) and categorized autoimmune conditions as primarily mediated by B-cell or T-cell responses. We constructed unconditional logistic regression models to measure associations between autoimmune conditions and NHL with stratification by genotype. Autoimmune conditions mediated by B-cell responses were associated with increased NHL risk, specifically diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (odds ratio (OR) = 3.11, 95% confidence interval (CI): 2.25, 4.30) and marginal zone lymphoma (OR = 5.80, 95% CI: 3.82, 8.80); those mediated by T-cell responses were associated with peripheral T-cell lymphoma (OR = 2.14, 95% CI: 1.35, 3.38). In the presence of the rs1800629 AG/AA genotype, B-cell-mediated autoimmune conditions increased NHL risk (OR = 3.27, 95% CI: 2.07, 5.16; P-interaction = 0.03) in comparison with the GG genotype (OR = 1.82, 95% CI: 1.31, 2.53). This interaction was consistent across major B-cell NHL subtypes, including marginal zone lymphoma (P-interaction = 0.02) and follicular lymphoma (P-interaction = 0.04).

  9. Associations of Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (NHL) Risk With Autoimmune Conditions According to Putative NHL Loci

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Sophia S.; Vajdic, Claire M.; Linet, Martha S.; Slager, Susan L.; Voutsinas, Jenna; Nieters, Alexandra; de Sanjose, Silvia; Cozen, Wendy; Alarcón, Graciela S.; Martinez-Maza, Otoniel; Brown, Elizabeth E.; Bracci, Paige M.; Lightfoot, Tracy; Turner, Jennifer; Hjalgrim, Henrik; Spinelli, John J.; Zheng, Tongzhang; Morton, Lindsay M.; Birmann, Brenda M.; Flowers, Christopher R.; Paltiel, Ora; Becker, Nikolaus; Holly, Elizabeth A.; Kane, Eleanor; Weisenburger, Dennis; Maynadie, Marc; Cocco, Pierluigi; Foretova, Lenka; Staines, Anthony; Davis, Scott; Severson, Richard; Cerhan, James R.; Breen, Elizabeth C.; Lan, Qing; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; De Roos, Anneclaire J.; Smith, Martyn T.; Roman, Eve; Boffetta, Paolo; Kricker, Anne; Zhang, Yawei; Skibola, Christine; Chanock, Stephen J.; Rothman, Nathaniel; Benavente, Yolanda; Hartge, Patricia; Smedby, Karin E.

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune conditions and immune system–related genetic variations are associated with risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). In a pooled analysis of 8,692 NHL cases and 9,260 controls from 14 studies (1988–2007) within the International Lymphoma Epidemiology Consortium, we evaluated the interaction between immune system genetic variants and autoimmune conditions in NHL risk. We evaluated the immunity-related single nucleotide polymorphisms rs1800629 (tumor necrosis factor gene (TNF) G308A), rs1800890 (interleukin-10 gene (IL10) T3575A), rs6457327 (human leukocyte antigen gene (HLA) class I), rs10484561 (HLA class II), and rs2647012 (HLA class II)) and categorized autoimmune conditions as primarily mediated by B-cell or T-cell responses. We constructed unconditional logistic regression models to measure associations between autoimmune conditions and NHL with stratification by genotype. Autoimmune conditions mediated by B-cell responses were associated with increased NHL risk, specifically diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (odds ratio (OR) = 3.11, 95% confidence interval (CI): 2.25, 4.30) and marginal zone lymphoma (OR = 5.80, 95% CI: 3.82, 8.80); those mediated by T-cell responses were associated with peripheral T-cell lymphoma (OR = 2.14, 95% CI: 1.35, 3.38). In the presence of the rs1800629 AG/AA genotype, B-cell-mediated autoimmune conditions increased NHL risk (OR = 3.27, 95% CI: 2.07, 5.16; P-interaction = 0.03) in comparison with the GG genotype (OR = 1.82, 95% CI: 1.31, 2.53). This interaction was consistent across major B-cell NHL subtypes, including marginal zone lymphoma (P-interaction = 0.02) and follicular lymphoma (P-interaction = 0.04). PMID:25713336

  10. BET Inhibition Induces Apoptosis in Aggressive B-Cell Lymphoma via Epigenetic Regulation of BCL-2 Family Members.

    PubMed

    Hogg, Simon J; Newbold, Andrea; Vervoort, Stephin J; Cluse, Leonie A; Martin, Benjamin P; Gregory, Gareth P; Lefebure, Marcus; Vidacs, Eva; Tothill, Richard W; Bradner, James E; Shortt, Jake; Johnstone, Ricky W

    2016-09-01

    Targeting BET bromodomain proteins using small molecules is an emerging anticancer strategy with clinical evaluation of at least six inhibitors now underway. Although MYC downregulation was initially proposed as a key mechanistic property of BET inhibitors, recent evidence suggests that additional antitumor activities are important. Using the Eμ-Myc model of B-cell lymphoma, we demonstrate that BET inhibition with JQ1 is a potent inducer of p53-independent apoptosis that occurs in the absence of effects on Myc gene expression. JQ1 skews the expression of proapoptotic (Bim) and antiapoptotic (BCL-2/BCL-xL) BCL-2 family members to directly engage the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. Consistent with this, Bim knockout or Bcl-2 overexpression inhibited apoptosis induction by JQ1. We identified lymphomas that were either intrinsically resistant to JQ1-mediated death or acquired resistance following in vivo exposure. Strikingly, in both instances BCL-2 was strongly upregulated and was concomitant with activation of RAS pathways. Eμ-Myc lymphomas engineered to express activated Nras upregulated BCL-2 and acquired a JQ1 resistance phenotype. These studies provide important information on mechanisms of apoptosis induction and resistance to BET-inhibition, while providing further rationale for the translation of BET inhibitors in aggressive B-cell lymphomas. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(9); 2030-41. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27406984

  11. Oncogene Translocations and NHL

    Cancer.gov

    A colloboration with several large population-based cohorts to determine whether the prevalence or level of t14;18 is associated with risk of NHL and to investigate the clonal relationship between translocation-bearing cells and subsequent tumors

  12. Activation of the Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress-Associated Transcription Factor X Box-Binding Protein-1 Occurs in a Subset of Normal Germinal-Center B Cells and in Aggressive B-Cell Lymphomas with Prognostic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Balague, Olga; Mozos, Ana; Martinez, Daniel; Hernandez, Luis; Colomo, Lluis; Mate, Jose Luis; Teruya-Feldstein, Julie; Lin, Oscar; Campo, Elias; Lopez-Guillermo, Armando; Martinez, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    X box-binding protein 1 (Xbp-1) is a transcription factor that is required for the terminal differentiation of B lymphocytes into plasma cells. The Xbp-1 gene is activated in response to endoplasmic reticulum stress signals, which generate a 50-kDa nuclear protein that acts as a potent transactivator and regulates the expression of genes related to the unfolded protein response. Activated Xbp-1 is essential for cell survival in plasma-cell tumors but its role in B-cell lymphomas is unknown. We analyzed the expression of activated Xbp-1 in reactive lymphoid tissues, 411 lymphomas and plasma-cell neoplasms, and 24 B-cell lines. In reactive tissues, Xbp-1 was only found in nuclear extracts. Nuclear expression of Xbp-1 was observed in occasional reactive plasma cells and in a subpopulation of Irf-4+/Bcl-6−/Pax-5− B cells in the light zones of reactive germinal centers, probably representing cells committed to plasma-cell differentiation. None of the low-grade lymphomas showed evidence of Xbp-1 activation; however, Xbp-1 activation was found in 28% of diffuse large B-cell lymphomas, independent of germinal or postgerminal center phenotype, as well as in 48% of plasmablastic lymphomas and 69% of plasma-cell neoplasms. Diffuse large B-cell lymphomas with nuclear Xbp-1 expression had a significantly worse response to therapy and shorter overall survival compared with negative tumors. These findings suggest that Xbp-1 activation may play a role in the pathogenesis of aggressive B-cell lymphomas. PMID:19389935

  13. Clinical significance of co-expression of MYC and BCL2 protein in aggressive B-cell lymphomas treated with a second line immunochemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Miura, Katsuhiro; Takahashi, Hiromichi; Nakagawa, Masaru; Izu, Asami; Sugitani, Masahiko; Kurita, Daisuke; Sakagami, Masashi; Ohtake, Shimon; Uchino, Yoshihito; Hojo, Atsuko; Kodaira, Hitomi; Yagi, Mai; Kobayashi, Yujin; Iriyama, Noriyoshi; Kobayashi, Sumiko; Kiso, Satomi; Hirabayashi, Yukio; Hatta, Yoshihiro; Takei, Masami

    2016-01-01

    The clinical significance of concurrent expression of MYC and BCL2 protein, known as "double-expressor lymphoma" (DEL), among patients with relapsed or refractory aggressive B-cell lymphomas, remains unclear. A retrospective analysis was performed of 38 patients treated with a salvage treatment consisting of rituximab, ifosfamide, etoposide, cytarabine and dexamethasone followed by consolidative high-dose chemotherapies. A total of 17 cases (45%) were categorized as DEL using immunohistochemical assay with a cut-off value of positivity of 40% for MYC and 50% for BCL2, respectively. DEL was associated with a lower overall response rate (35% vs 71%, p = 0.0481), worse 2-year progression-free survival (9% vs 67%, p = 0.001) and overall survival (35% vs 71%, p = 0.037). This analysis suggests that DEL is common among patients with relapsed/refractory aggressive B-cell lymphomas and that such patients require novel treatment strategies.

  14. Global microRNA expression profiling uncovers molecular markers for classification and prognosis in aggressive B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Javeed; Shen, Yulei; Huang, Xin; Liu, Yanyan; Wake, Laura; Liu, Cuiling; Deffenbacher, Karen; Lachel, Cynthia M; Wang, Chao; Rohr, Joseph; Guo, Shuangping; Smith, Lynette M; Wright, George; Bhagavathi, Sharathkumar; Dybkaer, Karen; Fu, Kai; Greiner, Timothy C; Vose, Julie M; Jaffe, Elaine; Rimsza, Lisa; Rosenwald, Andreas; Ott, German; Delabie, Jan; Campo, Elias; Braziel, Rita M; Cook, James R; Tubbs, Raymond R; Armitage, James O; Weisenburger, Dennis D; Staudt, Louis M; Gascoyne, Randy D; McKeithan, Timothy W; Chan, Wing C

    2015-02-12

    We studied the global microRNA (miRNA) expression in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL; n = 79), Burkitt lymphoma (BL; n = 36), primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma (PMBL; n = 12), B-cell lines (n = 11), and normal subsets of naïve B cells, centroblasts (CBs), and peripheral blood B cells along with their corresponding gene expression profiles (GEPs). The normal B-cell subsets have well-defined miRNA signatures. The CB miRNA signature was significantly associated with germinal center B-cell (GCB)-DLBCL compared with activated B-cell (ABC)-DLBCL (P = .002). We identified a 27-miRNA signature that included v-myc avian myelomatosis viral oncogene homolog (MYC) targets and enabled the differentiation of BL from DLBCL, a distinction comparable with the "gold standard" GEP-defined diagnosis. Distinct miRNA signatures were identified for DLBCL subgroups, including GCB-DLBCL, activated B-cell (ABC)-DLBCL, and PMBL. Interestingly, most of the unclassifiable-DLBCL by GEP showed a strong similarity to the ABC-DLBCL by miRNA expression profiling. Consistent results for BL and DLBCL subgroup classification were observed in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue, making such tests practical for clinical use. We also identified predictive miRNA biomarker signatures in DLBCL, including high expression of miR-155, which is significantly associated with rituximab plus cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (R-CHOP) treatment failure. This finding was further supported by the observation that high expression of miR-155 sensitizes cells to v-akt murine thymoma viral oncogene homolog-1 inhibitors in vitro, suggesting a novel treatment option for resistant DLBCL. PMID:25498913

  15. Global microRNA expression profiling uncovers molecular markers for classification and prognosis in aggressive B-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yulei; Huang, Xin; Liu, Yanyan; Wake, Laura; Liu, Cuiling; Deffenbacher, Karen; Lachel, Cynthia M.; Wang, Chao; Rohr, Joseph; Guo, Shuangping; Smith, Lynette M.; Wright, George; Bhagavathi, Sharathkumar; Dybkaer, Karen; Fu, Kai; Greiner, Timothy C.; Vose, Julie M.; Jaffe, Elaine; Rimsza, Lisa; Rosenwald, Andreas; Ott, German; Delabie, Jan; Campo, Elias; Braziel, Rita M.; Cook, James R.; Tubbs, Raymond R.; Armitage, James O.; Weisenburger, Dennis D.; Staudt, Louis M.; Gascoyne, Randy D.; McKeithan, Timothy W.; Chan, Wing C.

    2015-01-01

    We studied the global microRNA (miRNA) expression in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL; n = 79), Burkitt lymphoma (BL; n = 36), primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma (PMBL; n = 12), B-cell lines (n = 11), and normal subsets of naïve B cells, centroblasts (CBs), and peripheral blood B cells along with their corresponding gene expression profiles (GEPs). The normal B-cell subsets have well-defined miRNA signatures. The CB miRNA signature was significantly associated with germinal center B-cell (GCB)–DLBCL compared with activated B-cell (ABC)–DLBCL (P = .002). We identified a 27-miRNA signature that included v-myc avian myelomatosis viral oncogene homolog (MYC) targets and enabled the differentiation of BL from DLBCL, a distinction comparable with the “gold standard” GEP-defined diagnosis. Distinct miRNA signatures were identified for DLBCL subgroups, including GCB-DLBCL, activated B-cell (ABC)-DLBCL, and PMBL. Interestingly, most of the unclassifiable-DLBCL by GEP showed a strong similarity to the ABC-DLBCL by miRNA expression profiling. Consistent results for BL and DLBCL subgroup classification were observed in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue, making such tests practical for clinical use. We also identified predictive miRNA biomarker signatures in DLBCL, including high expression of miR-155, which is significantly associated with rituximab plus cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (R-CHOP) treatment failure. This finding was further supported by the observation that high expression of miR-155 sensitizes cells to v-akt murine thymoma viral oncogene homolog-1 inhibitors in vitro, suggesting a novel treatment option for resistant DLBCL. PMID:25498913

  16. CHOP Chemotherapy for Aggressive Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma with and without HIV in the Antiretroviral Therapy Era in Malawi

    PubMed Central

    Gopal, Satish; Fedoriw, Yuri; Kaimila, Bongani; Montgomery, Nathan D.; Kasonkanji, Edwards; Moses, Agnes; Nyasosela, Richard; Mzumara, Suzgo; Varela, Carlos; Chikasema, Maria; Makwakwa, Victor; Itimu, Salama; Tomoka, Tamiwe; Kamiza, Steve; Dhungel, Bal M.; Chimzimu, Fred; Kampani, Coxcilly; Krysiak, Robert; Richards, Kristy L.; Shea, Thomas C.; Liomba, N. George

    2016-01-01

    There are no prospective studies of aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) treated with CHOP in sub-Saharan Africa. We enrolled adults with aggressive NHL in Malawi between June 2013 and May 2015. Chemotherapy and supportive care were standardized, and HIV+ patients received antiretroviral therapy (ART). Thirty-seven of 58 patients (64%) were HIV+. Median age was 47 years (IQR 39–56), and 35 (60%) were male. Thirty-five patients (60%) had stage III/IV, 43 (74%) B symptoms, and 28 (48%) performance status ≥2. B-cell NHL predominated among HIV+ patients, and all T-cell NHL occurred among HIV- individuals. Thirty-one HIV+ patients (84%) were on ART for a median 9.9 months (IQR 1.1–31.7) before NHL diagnosis, median CD4 was 121 cells/μL (IQR 61–244), and 43% had suppressed HIV RNA. HIV+ patients received a similar number of CHOP cycles compared to HIV- patients, but more frequently developed grade 3/4 neutropenia (84% vs 31%, p = 0.001), resulting in modestly lower cyclophosphamide and doxorubicin doses with longer intervals between cycles. Twelve-month overall survival (OS) was 45% (95% CI 31–57%). T-cell NHL (HR 3.90, p = 0.017), hemoglobin (HR 0.82 per g/dL, p = 0.017), albumin (HR 0.57 per g/dL, p = 0.019), and IPI (HR 2.02 per unit, p<0.001) were associated with mortality. HIV was not associated with mortality, and findings were similar among patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Twenty-three deaths were from NHL (12 HIV+, 11 HIV-), and 12 from CHOP (9 HIV+, 3 HIV-). CHOP can be safe, effective, and feasible for aggressive NHL in Malawi with and without HIV. PMID:26934054

  17. CHOP Chemotherapy for Aggressive Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma with and without HIV in the Antiretroviral Therapy Era in Malawi.

    PubMed

    Gopal, Satish; Fedoriw, Yuri; Kaimila, Bongani; Montgomery, Nathan D; Kasonkanji, Edwards; Moses, Agnes; Nyasosela, Richard; Mzumara, Suzgo; Varela, Carlos; Chikasema, Maria; Makwakwa, Victor; Itimu, Salama; Tomoka, Tamiwe; Kamiza, Steve; Dhungel, Bal M; Chimzimu, Fred; Kampani, Coxcilly; Krysiak, Robert; Richards, Kristy L; Shea, Thomas C; Liomba, N George

    2016-01-01

    There are no prospective studies of aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) treated with CHOP in sub-Saharan Africa. We enrolled adults with aggressive NHL in Malawi between June 2013 and May 2015. Chemotherapy and supportive care were standardized, and HIV+ patients received antiretroviral therapy (ART). Thirty-seven of 58 patients (64%) were HIV+. Median age was 47 years (IQR 39-56), and 35 (60%) were male. Thirty-five patients (60%) had stage III/IV, 43 (74%) B symptoms, and 28 (48%) performance status ≥ 2. B-cell NHL predominated among HIV+ patients, and all T-cell NHL occurred among HIV- individuals. Thirty-one HIV+ patients (84%) were on ART for a median 9.9 months (IQR 1.1-31.7) before NHL diagnosis, median CD4 was 121 cells/μL (IQR 61-244), and 43% had suppressed HIV RNA. HIV+ patients received a similar number of CHOP cycles compared to HIV- patients, but more frequently developed grade 3/4 neutropenia (84% vs 31%, p = 0.001), resulting in modestly lower cyclophosphamide and doxorubicin doses with longer intervals between cycles. Twelve-month overall survival (OS) was 45% (95% CI 31-57%). T-cell NHL (HR 3.90, p = 0.017), hemoglobin (HR 0.82 per g/dL, p = 0.017), albumin (HR 0.57 per g/dL, p = 0.019), and IPI (HR 2.02 per unit, p<0.001) were associated with mortality. HIV was not associated with mortality, and findings were similar among patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Twenty-three deaths were from NHL (12 HIV+, 11 HIV-), and 12 from CHOP (9 HIV+, 3 HIV-). CHOP can be safe, effective, and feasible for aggressive NHL in Malawi with and without HIV.

  18. CHOP Chemotherapy for Aggressive Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma with and without HIV in the Antiretroviral Therapy Era in Malawi.

    PubMed

    Gopal, Satish; Fedoriw, Yuri; Kaimila, Bongani; Montgomery, Nathan D; Kasonkanji, Edwards; Moses, Agnes; Nyasosela, Richard; Mzumara, Suzgo; Varela, Carlos; Chikasema, Maria; Makwakwa, Victor; Itimu, Salama; Tomoka, Tamiwe; Kamiza, Steve; Dhungel, Bal M; Chimzimu, Fred; Kampani, Coxcilly; Krysiak, Robert; Richards, Kristy L; Shea, Thomas C; Liomba, N George

    2016-01-01

    There are no prospective studies of aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) treated with CHOP in sub-Saharan Africa. We enrolled adults with aggressive NHL in Malawi between June 2013 and May 2015. Chemotherapy and supportive care were standardized, and HIV+ patients received antiretroviral therapy (ART). Thirty-seven of 58 patients (64%) were HIV+. Median age was 47 years (IQR 39-56), and 35 (60%) were male. Thirty-five patients (60%) had stage III/IV, 43 (74%) B symptoms, and 28 (48%) performance status ≥ 2. B-cell NHL predominated among HIV+ patients, and all T-cell NHL occurred among HIV- individuals. Thirty-one HIV+ patients (84%) were on ART for a median 9.9 months (IQR 1.1-31.7) before NHL diagnosis, median CD4 was 121 cells/μL (IQR 61-244), and 43% had suppressed HIV RNA. HIV+ patients received a similar number of CHOP cycles compared to HIV- patients, but more frequently developed grade 3/4 neutropenia (84% vs 31%, p = 0.001), resulting in modestly lower cyclophosphamide and doxorubicin doses with longer intervals between cycles. Twelve-month overall survival (OS) was 45% (95% CI 31-57%). T-cell NHL (HR 3.90, p = 0.017), hemoglobin (HR 0.82 per g/dL, p = 0.017), albumin (HR 0.57 per g/dL, p = 0.019), and IPI (HR 2.02 per unit, p<0.001) were associated with mortality. HIV was not associated with mortality, and findings were similar among patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Twenty-three deaths were from NHL (12 HIV+, 11 HIV-), and 12 from CHOP (9 HIV+, 3 HIV-). CHOP can be safe, effective, and feasible for aggressive NHL in Malawi with and without HIV. PMID:26934054

  19. Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in adolescents: experiences in 378 adolescent NHL patients treated according to pediatric NHL-BFM protocols.

    PubMed

    Burkhardt, B; Oschlies, I; Klapper, W; Zimmermann, M; Woessmann, W; Meinhardt, A; Landmann, E; Attarbaschi, A; Niggli, F; Schrappe, M; Reiter, A

    2011-01-01

    Age-related differences in the distribution, biology and treatment response of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) in adolescents remain to be elucidated. The current analyses present clinical parameters and outcomes of adolescents treated in pediatric NHL-BFM trials. Patients were stratified by histological subtype: lymphoblastic lymphoma (LBL); mature B-NHL, including Burkitt's lymphoma/leukemia (BL/B-AL), diffuse B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL-CB) and mediastinal B-cell lymphoma (PMLBL); and anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL). Between October 1986 and December 2007, 2915 patients were registered, including 378 (13%) adolescents (15-18 years) with BL/B-AL (n=101), ALCL (n=74), DLBCL-CB (n=55), T-LBL (n=45), PMLBL (n=24), pB-LBL (n=13) and rare or not-specified NHL subtypes (n=66). The 5-year event-free survival (EFS) was 79±2% for adolescents compared with 85±1% for patients aged <15 years (P=0.014). EFS was 83±7% for adolescents with T-LBL, 82±4% with BL/B-AL, 85±5% with DLBCL-CB, 57±10% with PMLBL and 70±6% with ALCL. According to sex, the 5-year EFS in females versus males, respectively, was 70±5 versus 83±2% overall (P=0.004), 57±17 versus 92±6% (P=0.0036) for T-LBL patients and 71±9 versus 97±3% (P=0.0067) for DLBCL-CB patients. Adolescents with NHL treated according to pediatric NHL-BFM protocols had an EFS of 79±2%, which is marginally inferior to that of children. In adolescents with T-LBL and DLBCL-CB, female sex was associated with a worse prognosis. PMID:21030984

  20. High-Dose Y-90-Ibritumomab Tiuxetan Added to Reduced-Intensity Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplant Regimen for Relapsed or Refractory Aggressive B-Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-08

    Post-Transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Burkitt Lymphoma; Refractory B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Burkitt Lymphoma; Refractory Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

  1. A phase II study of belinostat (PXD101) in relapsed and refractory aggressive B-cell lymphomas: SWOG S0520.

    PubMed

    Puvvada, Soham D; Li, Hongli; Rimsza, Lisa M; Bernstein, Steven H; Fisher, Richard I; LeBlanc, Michael; Schmelz, Monika; Glinsmann-Gibson, Betty; Miller, Thomas P; Maddox, Anne-Marie; Friedberg, Jonathan W; Smith, Sonali M; Persky, Daniel O

    2016-10-01

    Recent advances in diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (DLBCL) have underscored the importance of tumor microenvironment in escaping host anti-tumor responses. One mechanism is loss of major histocompatibility Class II antigens (MHCII) associated with decreased tumor infiltrating T lymphocytes (TIL) and poor survival. Transcription of MHCII is controlled by CIITA which in turn is regulated by histone acetylation. In this study, we hypothesized that HDAC inhibition with belinostat increases MHCII, CIITA expression, TIL and improves patient outcomes. Primary objective was evaluation of toxicity and response. Twenty-two patients were enrolled for the study. Belinostat was well tolerated with mild toxicity. Two partial responses were observed at 5, 13 months after registration for an overall response rate (ORR) (95% CI) of 10.5% (1.3-33.1%), and three patients had stable disease for 4.7, 42.3+, and 68.4 + months with minimum 3-year follow-up. Included correlative studies support the hypothesis and serve as the basis for SWOG S0806 combining vorinostat with R-CHOP.

  2. Novel Therapeutics for Aggressive Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Mahadevan, Daruka; Fisher, Richard I.

    2011-01-01

    Application of advances in genomic and proteomic technologies has provided molecular insights into distinct types of aggressive B- and T-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHLs). This has led to the validation of novel biomarkers of classification, risk-stratification, and druggable targets. The promise of novel treatments from genomic research has been slow to materialize because of the lack of a therapeutic signature for the distinct NHL subtypes. Patients with lymphoma with aggressive disease urgently require the development of novel therapies on the basis of investigation of dysregulated intracellular oncogenic processes that arise during lymphomagenesis. Although monoclonal antibodies have made significant contributions to the armamentarium of B-cell NHL therapy (eg, anti-CD20), parallel development of small-molecule inhibitors (SMIs) to intracellular targets has lagged behind. Despite these deficiencies, several promising anti-NHL therapies are in development that target immune kinases of the B-cell receptor signaling pathway, mammalian target of rapamycin complex, proteasome, DNA/histone epigenetic complex, antiapoptosis, neoangiogenesis, and immune modulation. This review focuses on novel SMI therapeutic strategies that target overlapping core oncogenic pathways in the context of the 10 hallmarks of cancer. Furthermore, we have developed the concept of a therapeutic signature using the 10 hallmarks of cancer, which may be incorporated into novel phase I/II drug development programs. PMID:21483007

  3. A comprehensive review of lenalidomide in B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Mili; Gowda, Sonia; Tuscano, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Lenalidomide, an immunomodulatory drug that the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved for the treatment of multiple myeloma, 5q- myelodysplasia and mantle-cell lymphoma (MCL), has encouraging efficacy in other B-cell malignancies. Its unique mechanism of action is in part due to altering the tumor microenvironment and potentiating the activity of T and natural-killer (NK) cells. Impressive clinical activity and excellent tolerability allows broad applicability. Lenalidomide has been used in a wide range of B-cell malignancies for years, but in 2013, the FDA marked its approval as a single agent only in relapsed/refractory mantle-cell lymphoma. Perhaps most impressive is the efficacy of lenalidomide when combined with monoclonal antibodies. Impressive efficacy and toxicity profiles with the combination of lenalidomide and rituximab in B-cell lymphomas in both the upfront and relapsed/refractory setting may allow a shift in our current treatment paradigm in both indolent and aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). This review will summarize the current data in the relapsed/refractory and front-line setting of NHL with single-agent lenalidomide as well as its use in combination with other agents. PMID:27493711

  4. A comprehensive review of lenalidomide in B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Arora, Mili; Gowda, Sonia; Tuscano, Joseph

    2016-08-01

    Lenalidomide, an immunomodulatory drug that the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved for the treatment of multiple myeloma, 5q- myelodysplasia and mantle-cell lymphoma (MCL), has encouraging efficacy in other B-cell malignancies. Its unique mechanism of action is in part due to altering the tumor microenvironment and potentiating the activity of T and natural-killer (NK) cells. Impressive clinical activity and excellent tolerability allows broad applicability. Lenalidomide has been used in a wide range of B-cell malignancies for years, but in 2013, the FDA marked its approval as a single agent only in relapsed/refractory mantle-cell lymphoma. Perhaps most impressive is the efficacy of lenalidomide when combined with monoclonal antibodies. Impressive efficacy and toxicity profiles with the combination of lenalidomide and rituximab in B-cell lymphomas in both the upfront and relapsed/refractory setting may allow a shift in our current treatment paradigm in both indolent and aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). This review will summarize the current data in the relapsed/refractory and front-line setting of NHL with single-agent lenalidomide as well as its use in combination with other agents. PMID:27493711

  5. Jejunal stricture: a rare complication of chemotherapy in pediatric gastrointestinal B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Gaurav; Agarwala, Sandeep; Thulkar, Sanjay; Shukla, Bhaskar; Bakhshi, Sameer

    2011-03-01

    The use of intensive chemotherapy has led to remarkable improvements in the treatment of high-grade B-cell Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL); however, it is associated with significant side effects such as myelosuppression and mucositis. Gastrointestinal NHL rarely leads to the development of aneurysmal dilatation of the bowel, as desmoplastic reaction is not a feature of NHL. Strictures and fibrosis are not a manifestation of NHL involvement. Here, we report a child with primary gastrointestinal B-cell NHL who presented with jejunal stricture developing as a sequela of severe chemotherapy-induced mucositis. The patient improved with surgical resection of stricture and end-to-end anastomosis. PMID:21127430

  6. Ph I/II Study of Subcutaneously Administered Veltuzumab (hA20) in NHL and CLL

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-03-25

    NHL; Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin; Lymphoma, B-Cell; Lymphoma, Follicular; Lymphoma, Intermediate-Grade; Lymphoma, Large-Cell; Lymphoma, Low-Grade; Lymphoma, Mixed-Cell; Lymphoma, Small-Cell; Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Chronic; Leukemia, B-Cell, Chronic; Leukemia, Prolymphocytic; Leukemia, Small Lymphocytic; Lymphoma, Small Lymphocytic; Lymphoma, Lymphoplasmacytoid, CLL; Lymphoplasmacytoid Lymphoma, CLL; CLL; SLL

  7. A Case of p63 Positive Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma of the Bladder

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Carol

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL), currently the most common type of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), is an aggressive B cell neoplasm that typically presents in older adults as a rapidly enlarging mass. The enlarging mass typically represents a lymph node, although extranodal disease can occur in a significant percentage (40%) of cases. The most common extranodal sites of involvement include the gastrointestinal tract and skin; primary bladder lymphoma represents only 0.2% of extranodal non-Hodgkin lymphomas. We report a case of diffuse large B cell lymphoma occurring in the bladder of an 83-year-old gentleman with an initial presentation of hematuria. This neoplasm displayed large, atypical cells with vesicular chromatin and prominent nucleoli that involved the bladder mucosa with invasion into muscularis propria, prostate, and urethra. Positive staining for p63 initially raised suspicion for poorly differentiated urothelial carcinoma; however, lack of staining for pancytokeratin and positive staining for LCA, CD20, CD79a, and PAX-5 confirmed the diagnosis of diffuse large B cell lymphoma. Though it does not occur in all cases, p63 can be positive in a significant percentage of cases of DLBCL; therefore, a diagnosis of lymphoma remains an important entity on the differential diagnosis of aggressive and particularly poorly differentiated neoplasms. PMID:27648316

  8. A Case of p63 Positive Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma of the Bladder

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Carol

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL), currently the most common type of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), is an aggressive B cell neoplasm that typically presents in older adults as a rapidly enlarging mass. The enlarging mass typically represents a lymph node, although extranodal disease can occur in a significant percentage (40%) of cases. The most common extranodal sites of involvement include the gastrointestinal tract and skin; primary bladder lymphoma represents only 0.2% of extranodal non-Hodgkin lymphomas. We report a case of diffuse large B cell lymphoma occurring in the bladder of an 83-year-old gentleman with an initial presentation of hematuria. This neoplasm displayed large, atypical cells with vesicular chromatin and prominent nucleoli that involved the bladder mucosa with invasion into muscularis propria, prostate, and urethra. Positive staining for p63 initially raised suspicion for poorly differentiated urothelial carcinoma; however, lack of staining for pancytokeratin and positive staining for LCA, CD20, CD79a, and PAX-5 confirmed the diagnosis of diffuse large B cell lymphoma. Though it does not occur in all cases, p63 can be positive in a significant percentage of cases of DLBCL; therefore, a diagnosis of lymphoma remains an important entity on the differential diagnosis of aggressive and particularly poorly differentiated neoplasms.

  9. A Case of p63 Positive Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma of the Bladder.

    PubMed

    Deel, Chelsey D; Jones, Carol; Scordino, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL), currently the most common type of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), is an aggressive B cell neoplasm that typically presents in older adults as a rapidly enlarging mass. The enlarging mass typically represents a lymph node, although extranodal disease can occur in a significant percentage (40%) of cases. The most common extranodal sites of involvement include the gastrointestinal tract and skin; primary bladder lymphoma represents only 0.2% of extranodal non-Hodgkin lymphomas. We report a case of diffuse large B cell lymphoma occurring in the bladder of an 83-year-old gentleman with an initial presentation of hematuria. This neoplasm displayed large, atypical cells with vesicular chromatin and prominent nucleoli that involved the bladder mucosa with invasion into muscularis propria, prostate, and urethra. Positive staining for p63 initially raised suspicion for poorly differentiated urothelial carcinoma; however, lack of staining for pancytokeratin and positive staining for LCA, CD20, CD79a, and PAX-5 confirmed the diagnosis of diffuse large B cell lymphoma. Though it does not occur in all cases, p63 can be positive in a significant percentage of cases of DLBCL; therefore, a diagnosis of lymphoma remains an important entity on the differential diagnosis of aggressive and particularly poorly differentiated neoplasms. PMID:27648316

  10. Impact of age and socioeconomic status on treatment and survival from aggressive lymphoma: a UK population-based study of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Alexandra; Crouch, Simon; Howell, Debra; Burton, Cathy; Patmore, Russell; Roman, Eve

    2015-01-01

    Aim To examine the influence of patient’s age and socio-economic status on treatment and outcome in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL); an aggressive curable cancer, with an incidence rate that increases markedly with age but varies little with socio-economic status. Methods Set within a representative UK population of around 4 million, data are from an established patient cohort. This report includes all patients (≥18years) newly diagnosed with DLBCL 2004–2012, with follow-up to February 2015. Results Of the 2137 patients (median age 70.2 years) diagnosed with denovo DLBCL, 1709 (80%) were treated curatively/intensively and 1161(54.3%) died during follow-up. Five-year overall and relative survival (RS) estimates were 46.2% (95% CI 44.0–48.4%) and 54.6% (52.1%-57.0%) respectively for all patients, and 58.5% (56.1–60.9%) and 67.0% (64.3–69.6%) for intensively treated patients. 96.3% of patients <55 years (366/380) and 96.4% of those with the best performance status (543/563) were treated curatively: 5-year RSs being 77.9% (73.1–82%) and 87.1% (82.5–90.6%) respectively. At the other end of the age/fitness spectrum, 33.3% of those ≥85 years (66/198) and 41.1% with the worst performance (94/225) were treated curatively: the corresponding 5-year RSs being 50.5% (27.1–69.0%) and 22.9% (14.0–33.2%). The proportion of patients whose cancer was fully staged fell with increasing age and worsening performance status. No socio-economic variations with treatment, stage at presentation or outcome were detected. Conclusions Performance status is more discriminatory of survival than chronological age, with fitter patients benefiting from treatment across all ages. Socio-economic factors are not predictive of outcome in patients with DLBCL in the UK. PMID:26341588

  11. High prevalence of occult hepatitis B virus infection in patients with B cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ming-Huang; Hsiao, Liang-Tsai; Chiou, Tzeon-Jye; Liu, Jin-Hwang; Gau, Jyh-Pyng; Teng, Hao-Wei; Wang, Wei-Shu; Chao, Ta-Chung; Yen, Chueh-Chuan; Chen, Po-Min

    2008-06-01

    Several reports recently found that patients with B cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) had a higher carrier rate of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). The current study aimed to examine the hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection status of NHL patients in Taiwan, an HBV-endemic area. Serum HBV and serum hepatitis C virus were measured in 471 NHL patients and 1,013 non-lymphoma cancer patients enrolled between February 2000 and March 2007. Furthermore, nested polymerase chain reaction of HBV-DNA was used to examine the sera from selected patients in these two populations and healthy volunteers for the presence of occult HBV infection. The infection rates (as indicated by the rates of HBsAg and occult HBV) were compared between different groups. There was a higher incidence of HBV infection in B cell NHL patients (23.5%), especially patients with diffuse large B lymphoma, than solid tumor patients (15.6%, P = 0.001). Among HbsAg-negative patients, those with B cell NHL had a higher prevalence of occult HBV infection (6%) than those with non-lymphoma solid tumors and healthy volunteers, 0% and 0.9%, respectively (P = 0.005). B cell NHL patients, even HBsAg-negative B cell NHL patients, but not T cell NHL patients, have a higher incidence of HBV infection than patients with solid tumors. Our findings support the etiologic role of HBV infection in B cell NHL. PMID:18327583

  12. Cyclin Dl expression in B-cell non Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Aref, Salah; Mossad, Y; El-Khodary, T; Awad, M; El-Shahat, E

    2006-10-01

    Disorders of the cell cycle regulatory machinery play a key role in the pathogenesis of cancer. Over-expression of cyclin D1 protein has been reported in several solid tumors and certain lymphoid malignancies, but little is known about the effect of its expression on clinical behavior and outcome in B-cell Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). In this study, we investigated the expression of cyclin Dl in group of patients with NHL and correlated the results with the clinical and laboratory data. The degree of expression of cyclin Dl protein was evaluated by flow cytometry in a group of NHL patients (n = 46) and in normal control group (n = 10). Cyclin Dl over expression was detected in 10 out of 46 (21.7%) patients; they were 5/5-mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) (100%) and 5/28 large B-cell lymphoma (17.8%). All other NHL subtypes showed normal cyclin D1 expression. The clinical signs (hepatomegaly, splenomegaly and B-symptoms, clinical staging) and laboratory data (hemoglobin, white cell count (WBCs), platelet count, and bone marrow infiltration) were not significantly different between NHL subgroup with cyclin Dl over expression and that with normal cyclin Dl expression. Serum lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) levels and lymphadenopathy were significantly higher in NHL group with cyclin D1 over expression as compared to those without. Also, cyclin D1 over expression is associated with poor outcome of NHL patients. Cyclin Dl over expression was evident among all cases of MCL and few cases of large B-cell lymphoma. Cyclin Dl over expression might be used as adjuvant tool for diagnosis of MCL; has role in NHL biology and is bad prognostic index in NHL. PMID:17607588

  13. B Cell Lymphoma mimicking Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Cosatti, M A; Pisoni, C N; Altuve, J L; Lorente, C

    2016-01-01

    Non Hodking´s lymphoma (NHL) may involve bones but synovial involvement is uncommon. We describe a patient who presented with polyarthritis, sicca symptoms and rash suggestive of rheumatoid arthritis. An atypical skin rash prompted skin and synovial biopsies. A diagnosis of synovial and skin malignant large B-cell lymphoma anaplastic subtype was performed. Chemotherapy with dexamethasone, vincristine and rituximab was started. Following treatment the patient had complete resolution of cutaneous and articular lymphoma manifestations. PMID:27419896

  14. Treatment of high-risk aggressive B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas with rituximab, intensive induction and high-dose consolidation: long-term analysis of the R-MegaCHOP-ESHAP-BEAM Trial.

    PubMed

    Pytlík, Robert; Belada, David; Kubáčková, Kateřina; Vášová, Ingrid; Kozák, Tomáš; Pirnos, Jan; Bolomská, Ingrid; Matuška, Milan; Přibylová, Jana; Campr, Vít; Burešová, Lucie; Sýkorová, Alice; Berková, Adéla; Klener, Pavel; Trněný, Marek

    2015-01-01

    We have studied the feasibility and efficacy of intensified R-MegaCHOP-ESHAP-BEAM therapy in high-risk aggressive B-cell lymphomas. Altogether 105 patients (19-64 years) with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma (PMBL) or follicular lymphoma grade 3 (FL3) with an age-adjusted International Prognostic Index of 2-3 were recruited. Treatment consisted of three cycles of high-dose R-CHOP (rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, prednisone), followed by three cycles of R-ESHAP (rituximab, etoposide, methylprednisolone, cytarabine, cisplatin) and high-dose consolidation with BEAM (BCNU, etoposide, cytarabine, melphalan) and autologous stem cell transplant. The 5-year progression-free survival (PFS) was 72% (DLBCL 60%, PMBL 89%) and overall survival (OS) was 74% (DLBCL 61%, PMBL 89%) after a median follow-up of 85 months. However, an independent prognostic factor was age only, with patients ≤ 45 years having 5-year PFS 90% and patients > 45 years having PFS 54%. PMBL had better prognosis than DLBCL/FL3 in patients > 45 years (PFS, 88% vs. 48%), but not in younger patients (PFS, 91% vs. 94%). PMID:24628294

  15. Treatment of primary CNS lymphoma (PCNSL) following successful treatment of systemic non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL): a case series.

    PubMed

    Chamberlain, Marc C

    2013-05-01

    Management of PCNSL occurring after successful treatment of systemic non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) is poorly defined. Illustrate a treatment approach for PCNSL following prior treatment of a systemic NHL. A retrospective case series of 6 patients (mean age 60 years; range 46-65) diagnosed with a diffuse large B cell lymphoma of the CNS following prior successful treatment of a systemic NHL (low-grade in 2; high-grade in 4). Mean interval to diagnosis of PCNSL after diagnosis of systemic NHL was 12 months (range 7-18). In 4/6 patients in whom genetic analysis could be performed, the PCNSL and NHL differed. Treatment utilized high-dose methotrexate and rituximab (immunochemotherapy) followed in patients with a radiographic complete response by autologous peripheral stem cell transplant (ASCT) with total body irradiation (TBI) and multi-agent conditioning chemotherapy (BEAM: carmustine, etoposide, cytarabine, melphalan). 5/6 patients had a radiographic complete response to immunochemotherapy and were treated with ASCT. 4/5 patients were free of disease following ASCT with a mean follow-up of 3 years (range 0.5-4 years). There were no toxic deaths and all patients transplanted successfully engrafted within 28 days (mean 18). Using a treatment paradigm similar to that utilized for recurrent systemic NHL (induction chemotherapy followed by ASCT) for PCNSL occurring metachronously after successful treatment of systemic NHL appears safe and effective. PMID:23456654

  16. Central nervous system prophylaxis in patients with aggressive diffuse large B cell lymphoma: an analysis of 3,258 patients in a single center.

    PubMed

    Avilés, Agustin; Jesús Nambo, M; Neri, Natividad

    2013-06-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) relapse continues to be a frequent and usually fatal complication in patients with diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL). Multiple factors identify the possibility of relapse and justify neurological prophylaxis; however, most of these have not been confirmed. Thus, the use of prophylaxis has not been defined. From 1988 to 2008, 3,258 patients with DLBCL with higher clinical risks and multiple extranodal involvement that have been treated with standard anthracycline-based chemotherapy: CHOP (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine and prednisone) or CHOP-R (CHOP plus rituximab) and that achieve complete response were retrospectively analyzed to assess the efficacy of CNS prophylaxis. One thousand five patients received different schedules for CNS prophylaxis, and 2,253 patients did not receive CNS prophylaxis. CNS relapse was similar in patients who receive prophylaxis (6 %) compared to patients who did not receive prophylaxis (5.9 %). Overall survival of patients who either receive or did not receive prophylaxis was not statistically significant: 49 % versus 53 % (p = 0.802). Thus, it seems that CNS prophylaxis did not improve outcome in this special setting of patients, and no prognostic factors to predict the presence of CNS relapse were identified. It is evident that multicentric studies are necessary to define the role of prophylaxis in order to prevent CNS relapse and that the therapeutic procedure will be carefully revised. PMID:23456620

  17. Unusual involvement of scalp and bilateral kidneys in an aggressive mediastinal diffuse large B cell lymphoma: documentation by FDG-PET imaging.

    PubMed

    Basu, Sandip; Ramani, S K; Lad, S

    2009-09-01

    In the present communication, an unusual combination of scalp soft tissue and underlying brain involvement with intact skull bone coupled with bilateral renal involvement from a mediastinal diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBL) is presented. A 45-year-old man, a diagnosed case of mediastinal DLBL with bilateral lung involvement, was treated with conventional 6 cycles of chemotherapy and local external radiotherapy with initial good treatment response evidenced by considerable regression in mass size and regression in pulmonary lesions. Three months later, he returned with complaints of soft tissue swelling over the scalp; one of them in the high parietal bone and the other over the occipital region. A whole body FDG-PET at this time showed 2 moderate-sized foci in the scalp (with preservation of both tables of skull bone) and corresponding large foci in the brain parenchyma beneath, a superior mediastinal focus, a few foci in the apical and lower zone of left lung, extensive irregular uptake in the right pleura and the right lung parenchyma coupled with a loculated effusion in its lower zone and studded foci of hypermetabolism throughout the bilaterally enlarged kidneys. CT of the head confirmed the FDG-PET findings and histopathology of the biopsy from the scalp swelling was suggestive of DLBL. Ultrasound imaging of the abdomen showed lobulated bilaterally enlarged kidneys with multiple hypoechoic areas within them. The patient underwent palliative local external radiotherapy to the brain and systemic chemotherapy with poor clinical results with raised serum beta-2 microglobulin and serum LDH levels and deranged renal function. The patient died within a month after the FDG-PET study. The event of scalp and bilateral renal involvement from DLBL is rare in lymphoma literature and this report highlights that such unusual events can occur as part of widespread dissemination and underscores the importance of whole-body imaging with FDG-PET. PMID:19692836

  18. EBV-negative aggressive B-cell lymphomas of donor origin after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: a report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Federmann, Birgit; Bonzheim, Irina; Schittenhelm, Jens; Quintanilla-Martínez, Leticia; Mankel, Barbara; Vogel, Wichard; Faul, Christoph; Bethge, Wolfgang; Fend, Falko

    2016-11-01

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD) develop as a consequence of iatrogenic immunosuppression, and the majority is associated with EBV. PTLD after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HCT) are rare. Most cases are donor-derived, reflecting immune reconstitution by malignant transformed donor cells, and are EBV-positive. We report three unusual cases of aggressive EBV-negative PTLD of monomorphic type after allo-HCT. All cases were of donor origin and arose with long latency, 4-12 years after HCT. The patients had a history of severe graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) resulting in prolonged immunosuppression before the diagnosis of lymphoma. In one case, the temporal evolution of the malignant clone was analyzed by clone-specific PCR targeting the immunoglobulin heavy chain rearrangement. A tumor-specific product was already detected 3 years before lymphoma development. This indicates that chronic antigenic stimulation and reduced immune surveillance, may promote the outgrowth of premalignant donor-derived clones after acquisition of additional genetic alterations.

  19. Integrating understanding of epidemiology and genomics in B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma as a pathway to novel management strategies.

    PubMed

    Glass, Samantha; Phan, Anh; Williams, Jessica N; Flowers, Christopher R; Koff, Jean L

    2016-03-01

    Non-Hodgkin lymphomas include a biologically and clinically heterogeneous group of cancers distinguished by genetics, histology, and treatment outcomes. New discoveries regarding the genomic alterations and epidemiological exposures associated with these lymphomas have enhanced our understanding of factors that contribute to lymphomagenesis for specific subtypes. We explore the impact of normal B-cell biology engineered for recognizing a wide variety of antigens on the development of specific lymphoma subtypes, review lymphoma genetics, and examine the epidemiology of B-cell NHLs including recent investigations of risk factors for particular lymphoma subtypes based on large pooled analyses. Burkitt lymphoma, an aggressive form of B-cell NHL involving translocation of the MYC gene and an immunoglobulin gene has been associated with a history of eczema, hepatitis C, and occupation as a cleaner. Increased risk of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma has been associated with increased young adult body mass index, history of B-cell-activating autoimmune diseases, hepatitis C, and several single nucleotide variants involving the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) region of chromosome 6 and non-HLA loci near EXOC2, PVT1, MYC, and NCOA1. Tumor sequencing studies suggest that multiple pathways are involved in the development of DLBCL. Additional studies of epidemiological exposures, genome wide associations, and tumor sequencing in follicular, lymphoplasmacytic, marginal zone, and mantle cell lymphoma demonstrate overlapping areas of increased risk factors and unique factors for specific subtypes. Integrating these findings is important for constructing comprehensive models of NHL pathogenesis, which could yield novel targets for therapy and strategies for lymphoma prevention in certain populations. PMID:27115168

  20. Immunohistochemical (IHC) Analysis of Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma (NHL) Spectrum According to WHO/REAL Classification: A Single Centre Experience from Punjab, India

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Manisha; Mannan, Rahul; Madhukar, Mohit; Navani, Sanjay; Manjari, Mridu; Bhasin, Tejinder Singh; Gill, Karamjit Singh

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The distribution of the major subtypes of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL) differs across geographic regions. This study, from the north Indian state of Punjab, has incorporated immunophenotypic findings while investigating the distribution of NHL subtypes based on World Health Organization (WHO)/ Revised European-American Classification of Lymphoid Neoplasms (REAL) system of classification. Patients and methods: Over all seventy seven cases of lymphoma over a period of one year (between April 2012 and April 2013) were diagnosed in the Department of Pathology, Sri Guru Ram Das Institute of Medical Sciences and Research, Amritsar (Punjab). Of these 30 cases (39%) were of Hodgkin’s Lymphoma (HL) and 47 cases (61%) were of Non Hodgkins lymphoma NHL. Of the total of cases of lympho-proliferative disorders, the diagnosis of NHL was done by light microscopy alone. All the cases diagnosed provisionally as NHL were taken up for immunophenotyping with Immunohistochemical (IHC) studies. There was 100 % concordance between the light microscopy and IHC studies. The individual NHL cases were classified according to the WHO/REAL classification according to the positive or relevant negative immonophenotypic expression and tabulated to ascertain the morphological spectrum of NHL in this part of the country. Results: B-cell lymphomas formed 89.3%, whereas T-cell lymphomas formed 10.7% of the NHLs. Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma (DLBCL) was the most common subtype (46.8% of all NHLs). B-cell small lymphocytic lymphoma, Mantle-Cell Lymphoma (MCL), marginal zone B-cell lymphomas (including MALT lymphomas), Diffuse, mixed small cleaved cell and large-cell type and Follicular centre-cell lymphomas amounted to 17%, 12.8%, 2.1%, 2.1% and 4.3%, respectively. Among the T-cell lymphomas, T-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma, anaplastic large-cell lymphomas of T/null-cell type, and Angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma (AITL) accounted for 6.4%, 2.1%, and 2.1% of all NHL cases

  1. Proteomics Based Identification of Proteins with Deregulated Expression in B Cell Lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Wu, Rui; Nijland, Marcel; Rutgers, Bea; Veenstra, Rianne; Langendonk, Myra; van der Meeren, Lotte E; Kluin, Philip M; Li, Guanwu; Diepstra, Arjan; Chiu, Jen-Fu; van den Berg, Anke; Visser, Lydia

    2016-01-01

    Follicular lymphoma and diffuse large B cell lymphomas comprise the main entities of adult B cell malignancies. Although multiple disease driving gene aberrations have been identified by gene expression and genomic studies, only a few studies focused at the protein level. We applied 2 dimensional gel electrophoresis to compare seven GC B cell non Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) cell lines with a lymphoblastoid cell line (LCL). An average of 130 spots were at least two folds different in intensity between NHL cell lines and the LCL. We selected approximately 38 protein spots per NHL cell line and linked them to 145 unique spots based on the location in the gel. 34 spots that were found altered in at least three NHL cell lines when compared to LCL, were submitted for LC-MS/MS. This resulted in 28 unique proteins, a substantial proportion of these proteins were involved in cell motility and cell metabolism. Loss of expression of B2M, and gain of expression of PRDX1 and PPIA was confirmed in the cell lines and primary lymphoma tissue. Moreover, inhibition of PPIA with cyclosporine A blocked cell growth of the cell lines, the effect size was associated with the PPIA expression levels. In conclusion, we identified multiple differentially expressed proteins by 2-D proteomics, and showed that some of these proteins might play a role in the pathogenesis of NHL. PMID:26752561

  2. 77 FR 44670 - Information Collection Activities: National Historic Landmarks (NHL) Condition Survey

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-30

    ... National Park Service Information Collection Activities: National Historic Landmarks (NHL) Condition Survey....gov (email). Please reference Information Collection 1024-NEW, National Historic Landmarks (NHL... Landmarks (NHL) are nationally significant historic places designated by the Secretary of the...

  3. Genetically predicted longer telomere length is associated with increased risk of B-cell lymphoma subtypes.

    PubMed

    Machiela, Mitchell J; Lan, Qing; Slager, Susan L; Vermeulen, Roel C H; Teras, Lauren R; Camp, Nicola J; Cerhan, James R; Spinelli, John J; Wang, Sophia S; Nieters, Alexandra; Vijai, Joseph; Yeager, Meredith; Wang, Zhaoming; Ghesquières, Hervé; McKay, James; Conde, Lucia; de Bakker, Paul I W; Cox, David G; Burdett, Laurie; Monnereau, Alain; Flowers, Christopher R; De Roos, Anneclaire J; Brooks-Wilson, Angela R; Giles, Graham G; Melbye, Mads; Gu, Jian; Jackson, Rebecca D; Kane, Eleanor; Purdue, Mark P; Vajdic, Claire M; Albanes, Demetrius; Kelly, Rachel S; Zucca, Mariagrazia; Bertrand, Kimberly A; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Lawrence, Charles; Hutchinson, Amy; Zhi, Degui; Habermann, Thomas M; Link, Brian K; Novak, Anne J; Dogan, Ahmet; Asmann, Yan W; Liebow, Mark; Thompson, Carrie A; Ansell, Stephen M; Witzig, Thomas E; Tilly, Hervé; Haioun, Corinne; Molina, Thierry J; Hjalgrim, Henrik; Glimelius, Bengt; Adami, Hans-Olov; Roos, Göran; Bracci, Paige M; Riby, Jacques; Smith, Martyn T; Holly, Elizabeth A; Cozen, Wendy; Hartge, Patricia; Morton, Lindsay M; Severson, Richard K; Tinker, Lesley F; North, Kari E; Becker, Nikolaus; Benavente, Yolanda; Boffetta, Paolo; Brennan, Paul; Foretova, Lenka; Maynadie, Marc; Staines, Anthony; Lightfoot, Tracy; Crouch, Simon; Smith, Alex; Roman, Eve; Diver, W Ryan; Offit, Kenneth; Zelenetz, Andrew; Klein, Robert J; Villano, Danylo J; Zheng, Tongzhang; Zhang, Yawei; Holford, Theodore R; Turner, Jenny; Southey, Melissa C; Clavel, Jacqueline; Virtamo, Jarmo; Weinstein, Stephanie; Riboli, Elio; Vineis, Paolo; Kaaks, Rudolph; Boeing, Heiner; Tjønneland, Anne; Angelucci, Emanuele; Di Lollo, Simonetta; Rais, Marco; De Vivo, Immaculata; Giovannucci, Edward; Kraft, Peter; Huang, Jinyan; Ma, Baoshan; Ye, Yuanqing; Chiu, Brian C H; Liang, Liming; Park, Ju-Hyun; Chung, Charles C; Weisenburger, Dennis D; Fraumeni, Joseph F; Salles, Gilles; Glenn, Martha; Cannon-Albright, Lisa; Curtin, Karen; Wu, Xifeng; Smedby, Karin E; de Sanjose, Silvia; Skibola, Christine F; Berndt, Sonja I; Birmann, Brenda M; Chanock, Stephen J; Rothman, Nathaniel

    2016-04-15

    Evidence from a small number of studies suggests that longer telomere length measured in peripheral leukocytes is associated with an increased risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). However, these studies may be biased by reverse causation, confounded by unmeasured environmental exposures and might miss time points for which prospective telomere measurement would best reveal a relationship between telomere length and NHL risk. We performed an analysis of genetically inferred telomere length and NHL risk in a study of 10 102 NHL cases of the four most common B-cell histologic types and 9562 controls using a genetic risk score (GRS) comprising nine telomere length-associated single-nucleotide polymorphisms. This approach uses existing genotype data and estimates telomere length by weighing the number of telomere length-associated variant alleles an individual carries with the published change in kb of telomere length. The analysis of the telomere length GRS resulted in an association between longer telomere length and increased NHL risk [four B-cell histologic types combined; odds ratio (OR) = 1.49, 95% CI 1.22-1.82,P-value = 8.5 × 10(-5)]. Subtype-specific analyses indicated that chronic lymphocytic leukemia or small lymphocytic lymphoma (CLL/SLL) was the principal NHL subtype contributing to this association (OR = 2.60, 95% CI 1.93-3.51,P-value = 4.0 × 10(-10)). Significant interactions were observed across strata of sex for CLL/SLL and marginal zone lymphoma subtypes as well as age for the follicular lymphoma subtype. Our results indicate that a genetic background that favors longer telomere length may increase NHL risk, particularly risk of CLL/SLL, and are consistent with earlier studies relating longer telomere length with increased NHL risk. PMID:27008888

  4. Cranial radiation necessary for CNS prophylaxis in pediatric NHL

    SciTech Connect

    Mandell, L.R.; Wollner, N.; Fuks, Z.

    1987-03-01

    The records of 95 consecutive children less than or equal to 21 years of age with previously untreated diffuse histology NHL registered in our protocols from 1978 to 1983 were reviewed. Seventy-nine patients were considered eligible for analysis. The histologic subtypes represented included lymphoblastic (LB) 37%; histiocytic (DHL) 29%; undifferentiated (DU) 19%; poorly differentiated (DPDL) 9%; and unclassified (UNHL) 6%. Distribution of the patients according to stage showed Stage I, 0%; Stage II, 11%; Stage III, 53%; Stage IV, 36%. Four different Memorial Hospital protocols for systemic chemotherapy were used (LSA2L2 73%; L10 9%; L17 10%; L17M 8%); however, the IT (intrathecal) chemotherapy was uniform (Methotrexate: 6.0-6.25 mg/M2 per treatment course) and was included in the induction, consolidation, and maintenance phases of all treatment protocols. Cranial radiation was included in the induction, consolidation, and maintenance phases of all treatment protocols. Cranial radiation was not included in the CNS prophylaxis program. The overall median time of follow-up was 43 months. The overall CNS relapse rate was 6.3%; however, the incidence of CNS lymphoma presenting as the first isolated site of relapse in patients in otherwise complete remission (minimum follow-up of 19 months with 97% of patients off treatment) was only 1/58 (1.7%). Our data suggest that IT chemotherapy when given in combination with modern aggressive systemic combination chemotherapy, and without cranial radiation appears to be a highly effective modality for CNS prophylaxis regardless of stage, histology, or bone marrow or mediastinal involvement. (Abstract Truncated)

  5. Blood Erythrocyte Concentrations of Cadmium and Lead and the Risk of B-Cell Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma and Multiple Myeloma: A Nested Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Porta, Miquel; Bergdahl, Ingvar A.; Palli, Domenico; Johansson, Ann-Sofie; Botsivali, Maria; Vineis, Paolo; Vermeulen, Roel; Kyrtopoulos, Soterios A.; Chadeau-Hyam, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Background Cadmium (Cd) and lead (Pb) are hypothesised to be risk factors for non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL), a group of haematological malignancies with a suspected environmental aetiology. Within the EnviroGenoMarkers study we utilised pre-diagnostic erythrocyte concentrations of Cd and Pb to determine whether exposure was associated with risk of B-cell NHL and multiple myeloma. Methods 194 incident cases of B-cell NHL and 76 cases of multiple myeloma diagnosed between 1990 and 2006 were identified from two existing cohorts; EPIC-Italy and the Northern Sweden Health and Disease Study. Cases were matched to healthy controls by centre, age, gender and date of blood collection. Cd and Pb were measured in blood samples provided at recruitment using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. Logistic regression was applied to assess the association with risk. Analyses were stratified by cohort and gender and by subtype where possible. Results There was little evidence of an increased risk of B-cell NHL or multiple myeloma with exposure to Cd (B-cell NHL: OR 1.09 95%CI 0.61, 1.93, MM: OR 1.16 95% CI: 0.40, 3.40 ) or Pb (B-cell NHL: 0.93 95% CI 0.43, 2.02, multiple myeloma: OR 1.63 95%CI 0.45, 5.94) in the total population when comparing the highest to the lowest quartile of exposure. However, gender and cohort specific differences in results were observed. In females the risk of B-cell NHL was more than doubled in those with a body burden of Cd >1µg/L (OR 2.20 95%CI; 1.04, 4.65). Conclusions This nested case-control study does not support a consistent positive association between Cd or Pb and NHL, but there is some indication of a gender specific effect suggesting further research is warranted. PMID:24312375

  6. Primary B-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma of the testis.

    PubMed

    Tombolini, Flavia; Lacetera, Vito; Gini, Guido; Capelli, Debora; Leoni, Pietro; Montironi, Rodolfo; Galosi, Andrea Benedetto; Muzzonigro, Giovanni

    2014-12-01

    We present a rare case of primary lymphoblastic B-cell lymphoma of the testis focusing on ultrasonographic and pathological features and clinical implications. Pathological examination revealed primary testicular lymphoblastic B-cell lymphoma which was treated with adjuvant chemotherapy, including rachicentesis with administration of chemotherapy and with radiotherapy of contralateral testis. Primary testicular lymphoblastic B cell lymphoma is an aggressive disease and it is necessary a multimodal therapy (surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy) to prevent metastasis. PMID:25641484

  7. Two maturation-associated mouse erythrocyte receptors of human B cells. I. Identification of four human B-cell subsets.

    PubMed Central

    Forbes, I J; Zalewski, P D; Valente, L; Gee, D

    1982-01-01

    Using rosetting tests with untreated mouse erythrocytes (M) and pronase-treated M (pro M), four human B cell subsets can be identified. Three of these, possessing the phenotypes BM+ pro M+, BM- pro M+ or BM- pro M-, constitute 17%, 61% and 22% of normal blood B cells respectively. The fourth subset, BM+ pro M-, does not occur in normal tissues but was found in the pre-B-cell line of Raji cells, indicating that this phenotype may be a marker for early B cells. Some differences in the proportion of each subset were found in cord blood, lymph nodes and tonsils. Surface-immunoglobulin-positive (SIg+) and -negative (SIg-) non-T cells were present in each subset. M and pro-M rosetting tests were applied to cells from blood of 27 cases of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) and to cells from involved nodes, spleen or marrow in five cases of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). In 15 cases of CLL, there was considerable increase in the BM+ pro M+ subset (BM+ pro M+ type CLL); in seven cases, there was a predominance of BM- pro M+ cells and in another four cases, BM- pro M- cells predominated. All five cases of NHL were greatly enriched in BM- pro M- cells. There was no obvious correlation between rosetting and other surface markers but BM- pro M- clones in CLL or NHL always stained brightly with FITC-anti-Ig. This was not found in BM+ pro M+ or BM- pro M+ clones. Rosette formation of neuraminidase-treated B cells with M identifies the same subset as B-pro-M rosetting in normals and CLL. Evidence is presented that two types of receptors are involved in M and pro-M rosetting, designated R1 and R2, binding to corresponding M ligands L1 and L2. M rosetting is due to R1-L1 binding while R2-L2 binding mediates B-pro-M rosetting. Shifts between subsets within the same clone in some cases of CLL suggest that the subsets are distinct maturational stage of B-cell development rather than families of B cells of different lineage. The following B-cell maturation sequence is proposed: R1+ R2

  8. B-Cell Lymphoma of the Mandible: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Adouani, Ali; Bouguila, Jed; Jeblaoui, Yassine; Ben Aicha, Mehdi; Abdelali, Mouhamed Ali; Hellali, Mouna; Zitouni, Karima; Amani, Landolsi; Issam, Zairi

    2008-01-01

    Summary Introduction The mandible is an infrequent localisation of primary osseous non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas. Few cases of mandibular non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas (NHL) have been reported. Case report A rare condition of primary malignant non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma of the mandible in 53-year-old man, was reported at the Department of Maxillofacial and Plastic Surgery in Charles Nicolle Hospital (Tunis, Tunisia). Histologic and Immunohistochemical (IHC) examination Confirmed a B-Cell lymphoma. Discussion The purpose of this report is to describe this rare case of NHL of the mandible, explore the diagnosis and workup, and discuss treatment strategies. In this localisation, neither the clinical features nor the radiologic appearances are often pathognomonic. Conclusion Particular care must be taken to consider lymphoma in the differential diagnosis because this uncommon lesion can pose significant diagnostic problems and is frequently misdiagnosed. PMID:21892315

  9. B cells in transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Dijke, Esme I.; Platt, Jeffrey L.; Blair, Paul; Clatworthy, Menna R.; Patel, Jignesh K.; Kfoury, A.G.; Cascalho, Marilia

    2016-01-01

    B cell responses underlie the most vexing immunological barriers to organ transplantation. Much has been learned about the molecular mechanisms of B cell responses to antigen and new therapeutic agents that specifically target B cells or suppress their functions are available. Yet, despite recent advances, there remains an incomplete understanding about how B cell functions determine the fate of organ transplants and how, whether or when potent new therapeutics should optimally be used. This gap in understanding reflects in part the realization that besides producing antibodies, B cells can also regulate cellular immunity, contribute to the genesis of tolerance and induce accommodation. Whether non-specific depletion of B cells, their progeny or suppression of their functions would undermine these non-cognate functions and whether graft outcome would suffer as a result is unknown. These questions were discussed at a symposium on “B cells in transplantation” at the 2015 ISHLT annual meeting. Those discussions are summarized here and a new perspective is offered. PMID:26996930

  10. Impact of Fc gamma-receptor polymorphisms on the response to rituximab treatment in children and adolescents with mature B cell lymphoma/leukemia.

    PubMed

    Burkhardt, Birgit; Yavuz, Deniz; Zimmermann, Martin; Schieferstein, Jutta; Kabickova, Edita; Attarbaschi, Andishe; Lisfeld, Jasmin; Reiter, Alfred; Makarova, Olga; Worch, Jennifer; Bonn, Bettina R; Damm-Welk, Christine

    2016-09-01

    Recent studies in adult lymphoma patients have indicated a correlation between polymorphisms of Fc gamma-receptors (FcγRs, encoded by the respective FCGR genes) and the response to rituximab treatment. In vitro, cells expressing FcγRIIIa-158V mediate antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) more efficiently than cells expressing FcγRIIIa-158F. The impact of the FCGR2A-131HR polymorphism is unclear. In this study, the FCGR polymorphisms FCGR3A-158VF and FCGR2A-131HR were analyzed in pediatric patients with mature aggressive B cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma/leukemia (B-NHL). Pediatric patients received a single dose of rituximab monotherapy. Response was evaluated on day 5 followed by standard chemotherapy for B-NHL. Among 105 evaluable patients, a response to rituximab was observed in 21 % of those homozygous for FcγRIIa-131RR (5/24) compared to 48 % of patients who were HH and HR FcγRIIa-131 allele carriers (18/34 and 21/47, respectively; p = 0.044). Among patients with the FCGR3A-158 polymorphism, those homozygous for the FF genotype had a significantly favorable rituximab response rate of 59 % (22/37) compared to 32 % in patients who were FcγRIIIa-158VV and FcγRIIIa-VF allele carriers (2/9 and 20/59, respectively; p = 0.022). A stringent phase II response evaluation of children and adolescents with B-NHL after one dose of rituximab monotherapy showed a significant association between the rituximab response rate and FCGR polymorphisms. These findings support the hypothesis that FCGR polymorphisms represent patient-specific parameters that influence the response to rituximab. PMID:27376362

  11. The potential relevance of the endocannabinoid, 2-arachidonoylglycerol, in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jianqing; Medina-Cleghorn, Daniel; Bernal-Mizrachi, Leon; Bracci, Paige M.; Hubbard, Alan; Conde, Lucia; Riby, Jacques; Nomura, Daniel K.; Skibola, Christine F.

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma is an aggressive, genetically heterogenerous disease and the most common type of non-Hodgkin lymphoma among adults. To gain further insights into the etiology of DLBCL and to discover potential disease-related factors, we performed a serum lipid analysis on a subset of individuals from a population-based NHL case-control study. An untargeted mass-spectrometry-based metabolomics platform was used to analyze serum samples from 100 DLBCL patients and 100 healthy matched controls. Significantly elevated levels of the endocannabinoid, 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), were detected in the serum of DLBCL patients (121%, P < 0.05). In the male controls, elevated 2-AG levels were observed in those who were overweight (BMI ≥ 25 - < 30 kg/m2; 108%, P < 0.01) and obese (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2; 118%, P < 0.001) compared to those with a BMI < 25 kg/m2. DLBCL cell lines treated with exogenous 2-AG across a range of concentrations, exhibited heterogenous responses: proliferation rates were markedly higher in 4 cell lines by 22%-68% (P < 0.001) and lower in 8 by 20%-75% (P < 0.001). The combined findings of elevated 2-AG levels in DLBCL patients and the proliferative effects of 2-AG on a subset of DLBCL cell lines suggests that 2-AG may play a potential role in the pathogenesis or progression of a subset of DLBCLs. PMID:26973858

  12. Rare manifestation of the thrombotic microangiopathy in a patient with sarcoidosis, common variable immunodeficiency and large B-cell non-hodgkin lymphoma: case report.

    PubMed

    Ekart, Robert; Grobelšek, Vesna Kovačič; Dai, Klara; Cernelč, Peter; Hojs, Radovan

    2013-06-01

    58-year old Caucasian woman was diagnosed with sarcoidosis. Low immunoglobulin levels were found and common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) was diagnosed 1year later. Laboratory tests and clinical course at this time revealed thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA). Therapeutic plasma exchange was started and her clinical status and laboratory parameters improved. According to CVID she received human immunoglobulin intravenously. Four months later we noticed swelling of the parotid glands and generalized lymphadenopathy. Histology of cervical lymph node confirmed large B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (B-cell NHL). To the best of our knowledge, TMA complicating the course of sarcoidosis, CVID and B-cell NHL has never been reported. PMID:23619325

  13. Rare clinical presentation of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma as otitis media and facial palsy.

    PubMed

    Siddiahgari, Sirisha Rani; Yerukula, Pallavi; Lingappa, Lokesh; Moodahadu, Latha S

    2016-01-01

    Extra nodal presentation of Non Hodgkins Lymphoma (NHL) is a rare entity, and data available about the NHL that primarily involves of middle ear and mastoid is limited. We report a case of diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL), in a 2 year 8 month old boy, who developed otalgia and facial palsy. Computed tomography revealed a mass in the left mastoid. Mastoid exploration and histopathological examination revealed DLBCL. This case highlights the importance of considering malignant lymphoma as one of the differential diagnosis in persistent otitis media and/facial palsy.

  14. Aberrant expression of the CHFR prophase checkpoint gene in human B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Song, Aiqin; Ye, Junli; Zhang, Kunpeng; Yu, Hongsheng; Gao, Yanhua; Wang, Hongfang; Sun, Lirong; Xing, Xiaoming; Yang, Kun; Zhao, Min

    2015-05-01

    Checkpoint with FHA and Ring Finger (CHFR) is a checkpoint protein that reportedly initiates a cell cycle delay in response to microtubule stress during prophase in mitosis, which has become an interesting target for understanding cancer pathogenesis. Recently, aberrant methylation of the CHFR gene associated with gene silencing has been reported in several cancers. In the present study, we examined the expression of CHFR in B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (B-NHL) in vitro and in vivo. Our results showed that the expression level of CHFR mRNA and protein was reduced in B-NHL tissue samples and B cell lines. Furthermore, CHFR methylation was detected in 39 of 122 B-NHL patients, which was not found in noncancerous reactive hyperplasia of lymph node (RH) tissues. CHFR methylation correlated with the reduced expression of CHFR, high International Prognostic Index (IPI) scores and later pathologic Ann Arbor stages of B-NHL. Treatment with demethylation reagent, 5-Aza-dC, could eliminate the hypermethylation of CHFR, enhance CHFR expression and cell apoptosis and inhibit the cell proliferation of Raji cells, which could be induced by high expression of CHFR in Raji cells. Our results indicated that aberrant methylation of CHFR may be associated with the pathogenesis, progression for B-NHL, which might be a novel molecular marker as prognosis and treatment for B-NHL. PMID:25798877

  15. Quality of Life is Similar between Long-term Survivors of Indolent and Aggressive Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Beaven, Anne W; Samsa, Greg; Zimmerman, Sheryl; Smith, Sophia K

    2016-07-01

    Differences in quality of life (QOL) of long-term survivors of aggressive or indolent subtypes of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) have not been frequently evaluated. We assessed these differences by analyzing results of a large QOL survey of long-term NHL survivors. We hypothesized that the incurable nature of indolent NHL would relate to worse QOL in long-term survivors while the potentially cured long-term survivors of aggressive lymphoma would have better QOL. We found that QOL was similar between the two groups. Results suggest that patients with indolent NHL are coping well with their disease, yet experience some overall feelings of life threat. PMID:27379565

  16. Clonal B cells in Waldenström's macroglobulinemia exhibit functional features of chronic active B-cell receptor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Argyropoulos, K V; Vogel, R; Ziegler, C; Altan-Bonnet, G; Velardi, E; Calafiore, M; Dogan, A; Arcila, M; Patel, M; Knapp, K; Mallek, C; Hunter, Z R; Treon, S P; van den Brink, M R M; Palomba, M L

    2016-01-01

    Waldenström's macroglobulinemia (WM) is a B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (B-NHL) characterized by immunoglobulin M (IgM) monoclonal gammopathy and the medullary expansion of clonal lymphoplasmacytic cells. Neoplastic transformation has been partially attributed to hyperactive MYD88 signaling, secondary to the MYD88 L265P mutation, occurring in the majority of WM patients. Nevertheless, the presence of chronic active B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling, a feature of multiple IgM+ B-NHL, remains a subject of speculation in WM. Here, we interrogated the BCR signaling capacity of primary WM cells by utilizing multiparametric phosphoflow cytometry and found heightened basal phosphorylation of BCR-related signaling proteins, and augmented phosphoresponses on surface IgM (sIgM) crosslinking, compared with normal B cells. In support of those findings we observed high sIgM expression and loss of phosphatase activity in WM cells, which could both lead to signaling potentiation in clonal cells. Finally, led by the high-signaling heterogeneity among WM samples, we generated patient-specific phosphosignatures, which subclassified patients into a ‘high' and a ‘healthy-like' signaling group, with the second corresponding to patients with a more indolent clinical phenotype. These findings support the presence of chronic active BCR signaling in WM while providing a link between differential BCR signaling utilization and distinct clinical WM subgroups. PMID:26867669

  17. Antiviral Treatment of HCV-Infected Patients with B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma: ANRS HC-13 Lympho-C Study

    PubMed Central

    Alric, Laurent; Besson, Caroline; Lapidus, Nathanael; Jeannel, Juliette; Michot, Jean-Marie; Cacoub, Patrice; Canioni, Danielle; Pol, Stanislas; Davi, Frédéric; Rabiega, Pascaline; Ysebaert, Loic; Bonnet, Delphine; Hermine, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is associated with lymphoproliferative disorders and B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas (B-NHLs). Evaluation of the efficacy and safety profiles of different antiviral therapies in HCV patients with B-NHL is warranted. Methods: First, we evaluated the sustained virologic response (SVR) and safety of Peg-interferon-alpha (Peg-IFN) + ribavirin +/- first protease inhibitors (PI1s) therapy in 61 HCV patients with B-NHL enrolled in a nationwide observational survey compared with 94 matched HCV-infected controls without B-NHL. In a second series, interferon-free regimens using a newly optimal combination therapy with direct-acting antiviral drugs (DAAs) were evaluated in 10 patients with HCV and B-NHL. Results: The main lymphoma type was diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (38%) followed by marginal zone lymphoma (31%). In the multivariate analysis, patients with B-NHL treated by Peg-IFN-based therapy exhibited a greater SVR rate compared with controls, 50.8% vs 30.8%, respectively, p<0.01, odds ratio (OR) = 11.2 [2.3, 52.8]. B-NHL response was better (p = 0.02) in patients with SVR (69%) than in patients without SVR (31%). Premature discontinuation of Peg-IFN-based therapy was significantly more frequent in the B-NHL group (19.6%) compared with the control group (6.3%), p<0.02. Overall, survival was significantly enhanced in the controls than in the B-NHL group (hazard ratio = 34.4 [3.9, 304.2], p< 0.01). Using DAAs, SVR was achieved in 9/10 patients (90%). DAAs were both well tolerated and markedly efficient. Conclusions: The virologic response of HCV-associated B-NHL is high. Our study provides a comprehensive evaluation of different strategies for the antiviral treatment of B-NHL associated with HCV infection. PMID:27749916

  18. A Phase II Study of Doxycycline in Relapsed NHL

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-23

    Adult Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Mantle Cell Lymphoma Recurrent; Lymphoma, Follicular; Marginal Zone B-Cell Lymphoma; Malignant Lymphoma - Lymphoplasmacytic; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia; Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL); T-Cell Lymphoma

  19. Aberrant Circulating Th17 Cells in Patients with B-Cell Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ting; Yu, Shuang; Liu, Yan; Yin, Congcong; Ye, Jingjing; Liu, Zhi; Ma, Daoxin; Ji, Chunyan

    2016-01-01

    Non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHLs) are a heterogeneous group of neoplasm in which 90% are B-cell lymphomas and 10% T-cell lymphomas. Although T-helper 17 (Th17) cells have been implicated to be essential in the pathogenesis of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases, its role in B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (B-NHL) remains unknown. In this study, we observed a significantly decreased frequency of Th17 cells in peripheral blood from B-NHL patients compared with healthy individuals, accompanied with increased Th1 cells. IL-17AF plasma levels were remarkably decreased in B-NHL patients, accompanied with undetectable IL-17FF and unchangeable IL-17AA. Moreover, Th17 and Th1 cells became normalized after one or two cycles of chemotherapy. Interestingly, in B-NHL, circulating Th17 cells frequencies were significantly higher in relapsed patients than those in untreated patients or normal individuals. Meanwhile, there was no statistical difference regarding the frequencies of Th1 cells between relapsed and untreated patients. Taken these data together, circulating Th17 subset immune response may be associated with the response of patients to treatment and with different stages of disease. PMID:26812681

  20. MicroRNA signatures in B-cell lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Di Lisio, L; Sánchez-Beato, M; Gómez-López, G; Rodríguez, M E; Montes-Moreno, S; Mollejo, M; Menárguez, J; Martínez, M A; Alves, F J; Pisano, D G; Piris, M A; Martínez, N

    2012-01-01

    Accurate lymphoma diagnosis, prognosis and therapy still require additional markers. We explore the potential relevance of microRNA (miRNA) expression in a large series that included all major B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) types. The data generated were also used to identify miRNAs differentially expressed in Burkitt lymphoma (BL) and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) samples. A series of 147 NHL samples and 15 controls were hybridized on a human miRNA one-color platform containing probes for 470 human miRNAs. Each lymphoma type was compared against the entire set of NHLs. BL was also directly compared with DLBCL, and 43 preselected miRNAs were analyzed in a new series of routinely processed samples of 28 BLs and 43 DLBCLs using quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. A signature of 128 miRNAs enabled the characterization of lymphoma neoplasms, reflecting the lymphoma type, cell of origin and/or discrete oncogene alterations. Comparative analysis of BL and DLBCL yielded 19 differentially expressed miRNAs, which were confirmed in a second confirmation series of 71 paraffin-embedded samples. The set of differentially expressed miRNAs found here expands the range of potential diagnostic markers for lymphoma diagnosis, especially when differential diagnosis of BL and DLBCL is required. PMID:22829247

  1. Suppression of Human B Cell Activation by 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin Involves Altered Regulation of B Cell Lymphoma-6

    PubMed Central

    Phadnis-Moghe, Ashwini S.; Crawford, Robert B.; Kaminski, Norbert E.

    2015-01-01

    The environmental contaminant 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) produces marked suppression of the primary humoral immune response in virtually every animal species evaluated thus far. In addition, epidemiological studies performed in areas of dioxin contamination have identified an association between TCDD exposure and an increased incidence of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL). Recent studies using an in vitro CD40 ligand model of human B cell differentiation have shown that TCDD impairs both B cell activation and differentiation. The present study extends these findings by identifying B cell lymphoma-6 [BCL-6] as a putative cellular target for deregulation by TCDD, which may contribute to suppression of B cell function as well as NHL. BCL-6 is a multifunctional transcriptional repressor frequently mutated in NHLs and known to regulate critical events of B cell activation and differentiation. In the presence of TCDD, BCL-6 protein levels were elevated and concurrently the same population of cells with high BCL-6 levels showed decreased CD80 and CD69 expression indicative of impaired cellular activation. The elevated BCL-6 levels resulted in a concomitant increase in BCL-6 DNA binding activity at its cognate binding site within an enhancer region for CD80. Furthermore, a small molecule inhibitor of BCL-6 activity reversed TCDD-mediated suppression of CD80 expression in human B cells. In the presence of a low-affinity ligand of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), suppression of B cell activation and altered BCL-6 regulation were not observed. These results provide new mechanistic insights into the role of BCL-6 in the suppression of human B cell activation by TCDD. PMID:25543051

  2. Cytogenetic, FISH and molecular characterization of 3q27/BCL-6 rearrangements in NHL

    SciTech Connect

    Wiodarska, I.; Styl, M.; Mecucci, C.

    1994-09-01

    Reciprocal translocations involving the chromosomal region 3q27 and one of the immunoglobulin loci at 14q32, 2p12 or 22q11 have been identified as the third most common type of chromosomal abnormality in Non Hodgkin`s lymphomas (NHLs), in addition to t(14;18) and t(8;14). These abnormalities appeared to be strongly associated with a diffuse, large cell subtype of B-cell NHL. Recently, a t(3;14) and t(3;22) have been cloned and a new transcriptional unit at 3q27, designated BCL-5, BCL-6 or LAZ3, has been identified. The gene appears to encode a new zinc finger protein with the putative function of a transcription factor. Rearrangements of the BCL-6 gene have been detected not only in cases with a typical t(3;14), t(2;3) and t(3;22), but also in a few NHL cases carrying 3q27 translocations not involving Ig genes. We report on nine B-NHL cases with a 3q27/BCL-6 rearrangement demonstrated by cytogenetic, FISH, and Southern analysis. Cytogenetic analysis complemented by FISH studies showed the presence of a classical t(3;14) or a t(3;22) in three cases and a variety of chromosomal aberrations involving the 3q27 locus in the remaining cases. Some of these translocations were not previously identified by conventional banding analysis. In three patients chromosome painting demonstrated involvement of both chromosome at the 3q24 band. We conclude: 3q27/BCL-6 rearrangements seem not to be restricted to diffuse large cell lymphoma. We here documented 3q27/BCL-6 abnormalities in Richter syndrome and follicular lymphomas. The variety of 3q27 aberrations at cytogenetic level suggests that, in addition to immunoglobulin genes, a number of other genes spreading over the human genome may deregulate BCL-6 in lymphomas. Chromosome painting is a powerful tool to demonstrate 3q27 abnormalities, not identified by conventional banding analysis.

  3. Protein kinase CK2 is widely expressed in follicular, Burkitt and diffuse large B-cell lymphomas and propels malignant B-cell growth.

    PubMed

    Pizzi, Marco; Piazza, Francesco; Agostinelli, Claudio; Fuligni, Fabio; Benvenuti, Pietro; Mandato, Elisa; Casellato, Alessandro; Rugge, Massimo; Semenzato, Gianpietro; Pileri, Stefano A

    2015-03-30

    Serine-threonine kinase CK2 is highly expressed and pivotal for survival and proliferation in multiple myeloma, chronic lymphocytic leukemia and mantle cell lymphoma. Here, we investigated the expression of α catalytic and β regulatory CK2 subunits by immunohistochemistry in 57 follicular (FL), 18 Burkitt (BL), 52 diffuse large B-cell (DLBCL) non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL) and in normal reactive follicles. In silico evaluation of available Gene Expression Profile (GEP) data sets from patients and Western blot (WB) analysis in NHL cell-lines were also performed. Moreover, the novel, clinical-grade, ATP-competitive CK2-inhibitor CX-4945 (Silmitasertib) was assayed on lymphoma cells. CK2 was detected in 98.4% of cases with a trend towards a stronger CK2α immunostain in BL compared to FL and DLBCL. No significant differences were observed between Germinal Center B (GCB) and non-GCB DLBCL types. GEP data and WB confirmed elevated CK2 mRNA and protein levels as well as active phosphorylation of specific targets in NHL cells. CX-4945 caused a dose-dependent growth-arresting effect on GCB, non-GCB DLBCL and BL cell-lines and it efficiently shut off phosphorylation of NF-κB RelA and CDC37 on CK2 target sites. Thus, CK2 is highly expressed and could represent a suitable therapeutic target in BL, FL and DLBCL NHL.

  4. Comparison of hematological alterations and markers of B-cell activation in workers exposed to benzene, formaldehyde and trichloroethylene.

    PubMed

    Bassig, Bryan A; Zhang, Luoping; Vermeulen, Roel; Tang, Xiaojiang; Li, Guilan; Hu, Wei; Guo, Weihong; Purdue, Mark P; Yin, Songnian; Rappaport, Stephen M; Shen, Min; Ji, Zhiying; Qiu, Chuangyi; Ge, Yichen; Hosgood, H Dean; Reiss, Boris; Wu, Banghua; Xie, Yuxuan; Li, Laiyu; Yue, Fei; Freeman, Laura E Beane; Blair, Aaron; Hayes, Richard B; Huang, Hanlin; Smith, Martyn T; Rothman, Nathaniel; Lan, Qing

    2016-07-01

    Benzene, formaldehyde (FA) and trichloroethylene (TCE) are ubiquitous chemicals in workplaces and the general environment. Benzene is an established myeloid leukemogen and probable lymphomagen. FA is classified as a myeloid leukemogen but has not been associated with non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), whereas TCE has been associated with NHL but not myeloid leukemia. Epidemiologic associations between FA and myeloid leukemia, and between benzene, TCE and NHL are, however, still debated. Previously, we showed that these chemicals are associated with hematotoxicity in cross-sectional studies of factory workers in China, which included extensive personal monitoring and biological sample collection. Here, we compare and contrast patterns of hematotoxicity, monosomy 7 in myeloid progenitor cells (MPCs), and B-cell activation biomarkers across these studies to further evaluate possible mechanisms of action and consistency of effects with observed hematologic cancer risks. Workers exposed to benzene or FA, but not TCE, showed declines in cell types derived from MPCs, including granulocytes and platelets. Alterations in lymphoid cell types, including B cells and CD4+ T cells, and B-cell activation markers were apparent in workers exposed to benzene or TCE. Given that alterations in myeloid and lymphoid cell types are associated with hematological malignancies, our data provide biologic insight into the epidemiological evidence linking benzene and FA exposure with myeloid leukemia risk, and TCE and benzene exposure with NHL risk. PMID:27207665

  5. Rituximab Maintenance Therapy After Autologous Stem-Cell Transplantation in Patients With Relapsed CD20+ Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma: Final Analysis of the Collaborative Trial in Relapsed Aggressive Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Gisselbrecht, Christian; Schmitz, Norbert; Mounier, Nicolas; Singh Gill, Devinder; Linch, David C.; Trneny, Marek; Bosly, Andre; Milpied, Noel J.; Radford, John; Ketterer, Nicolas; Shpilberg, Ofer; Dührsen, Ulrich; Hagberg, Hans; Ma, David D.; Viardot, Andreas; Lowenthal, Ray; Brière, Josette; Salles, Gilles; Moskowitz, Craig H.; Glass, Bertram

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The standard treatment for relapsed diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is salvage chemotherapy followed by high-dose therapy and autologous stem-cell transplantation (ASCT). The impact of maintenance rituximab after ASCT is not known. Patients and Methods In total, 477 patients with CD20+ DLBCL who were in their first relapse or refractory to initial therapy were randomly assigned to one of two salvage regimens. After three cycles of salvage chemotherapy, the responding patients received high-dose chemotherapy followed by ASCT. Then, 242 patients were randomly assigned to either rituximab every 2 months for 1 year or observation. Results After ASCT, 122 patients received rituximab, and 120 patients were observed only. The median follow-up time was 44 months. The 4-year event-free survival (EFS) rates after ASCT were 52% and 53% for the rituximab and observation groups, respectively (P = .7). Treatment with rituximab was associated with a 15% attributable risk of serious adverse events after day 100, with more deaths (six deaths v three deaths in the observation arm). Several factors affected EFS after ASCT (P < .05), including relapsed disease within 12 months (EFS: 46% v 56% for relapsed disease after 12 months), secondary age-adjusted International Prognostic Index (saaIPI) more than 1 (EFS: 37% v 61% for saaIPI < 1), and prior treatment with rituximab (EFS: 47% v 59% for no prior rituximab). A significant difference in EFS between women (63%) and men (46%) was also observed in the rituximab group. In the Cox model for maintenance, the saaIPI was a significant prognostic factor (P < .001), as was male sex (P = .01). Conclusion In relapsed DLBCL, we observed no difference between the control group and the rituximab maintenance group and do not recommend rituximab after ASCT. PMID:23091101

  6. Association of cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 genetic polymorphism, hepatitis C viral infection and B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma: an Egyptian study.

    PubMed

    Khorshied, Mervat Mamdooh; Gouda, Heba Mahmoud; Khorshid, Ola M Reda

    2014-05-01

    Abstract Genetic and environmental factors are involved in the pathogenesis of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). The present study aimed to investigate the association between cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4) genetic polymorphism, hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and B-cell NHL risk in Egypt. Genotyping of CTLA-4 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) was performed by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) assay for 181 adult patients with B-NHL and 200 controls. Our study revealed that CTLA-4 + 49 A/G polymorphism conferred increased risk of B-NHL (odds ratio [OR] = 1.7, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.36-2.565). The prevalence of HCV infection in individuals harboring the mutant genotype + 49 A/G and - 318 C/T SNPs was higher in patients with B-NHL and was associated with increased risk of B-NHL (OR = 2.79, 95% CI = 1.24-6.93 for + 49 A/G and OR = 3.9, 95% CI = 1.01-15.98 for - 318 C/T). In conclusion, some SNPs of CTLA-4 are genetic risk factors for B-NHL. Moreover, this study identified an association of CTLA-4 + 49 A/G and - 318 C/T promoter polymorphisms with HCV infection.

  7. Phase 2 study of idelalisib and entospletinib: pneumonitis limits combination therapy in relapsed refractory CLL and NHL

    PubMed Central

    Saylors, Gene B.; Spurgeon, Stephen E.; Cheson, Bruce D.; Greenwald, Daniel R.; O’Brien, Susan M.; Liem, Andre K. D.; Mclntyre, Rosemary E.; Joshi, Adarsh; Abella-Dominicis, Esteban; Hawkins, Michael J.; Reddy, Anita; Di Paolo, Julie; Lee, Hank; He, Joyce; Hu, Jing; Dreiling, Lyndah K.; Friedberg, Jonathan W.

    2016-01-01

    Although agents targeting B-cell receptor signaling have provided practice-changing results in relapsed chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), they require prolonged administration and provide incomplete responses. Given synergistic preclinical activity with phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase δ and spleen tyrosine kinase inhibition, this phase 2 study evaluated the safety and efficacy of the combination of idelalisib and entospletinib. Eligible patients with relapsed or refractory CLL or NHL underwent intrapatient dose escalation with each agent. With a median treatment exposure of 10 weeks, 60% and 36% of patients with CLL or follicular lymphoma, respectively, achieved objective responses. However, the study was terminated early because of treatment-emergent pneumonitis in 18% of patients (severe in 11 of 12 cases). Although most patients recovered with supportive measures and systemic steroids, 2 fatalities occurred and were attributed to treatment-emergent pneumonitis. Increases of interferon-γ and interleukins 6, 7, and 8 occurred over time in patients who developed pneumonitis. Future studies of novel combinations should employ conservative designs that incorporate pharmacodynamics/biomarker monitoring. These investigations should also prospectively evaluate plasma cytokine/chemokine levels in an attempt to validate biomarkers predictive of response and toxicity. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT01796470. PMID:26968534

  8. Phase 2 study of idelalisib and entospletinib: pneumonitis limits combination therapy in relapsed refractory CLL and NHL.

    PubMed

    Barr, Paul M; Saylors, Gene B; Spurgeon, Stephen E; Cheson, Bruce D; Greenwald, Daniel R; O'Brien, Susan M; Liem, Andre K D; Mclntyre, Rosemary E; Joshi, Adarsh; Abella-Dominicis, Esteban; Hawkins, Michael J; Reddy, Anita; Di Paolo, Julie; Lee, Hank; He, Joyce; Hu, Jing; Dreiling, Lyndah K; Friedberg, Jonathan W

    2016-05-19

    Although agents targeting B-cell receptor signaling have provided practice-changing results in relapsed chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), they require prolonged administration and provide incomplete responses. Given synergistic preclinical activity with phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase δ and spleen tyrosine kinase inhibition, this phase 2 study evaluated the safety and efficacy of the combination of idelalisib and entospletinib. Eligible patients with relapsed or refractory CLL or NHL underwent intrapatient dose escalation with each agent. With a median treatment exposure of 10 weeks, 60% and 36% of patients with CLL or follicular lymphoma, respectively, achieved objective responses. However, the study was terminated early because of treatment-emergent pneumonitis in 18% of patients (severe in 11 of 12 cases). Although most patients recovered with supportive measures and systemic steroids, 2 fatalities occurred and were attributed to treatment-emergent pneumonitis. Increases of interferon-γ and interleukins 6, 7, and 8 occurred over time in patients who developed pneumonitis. Future studies of novel combinations should employ conservative designs that incorporate pharmacodynamics/biomarker monitoring. These investigations should also prospectively evaluate plasma cytokine/chemokine levels in an attempt to validate biomarkers predictive of response and toxicity. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT01796470. PMID:26968534

  9. B Cells, Antibodies, and More

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, William; Lakkis, Fadi G.

    2016-01-01

    B cells play a central role in the immunopathogenesis of glomerulonephritides and transplant rejection. B cells secrete antibodies that contribute to tissue injury via multiple mechanisms. In addition, B cells contribute to disease pathogenesis in autoimmunity and alloimmunity by presenting antigens as well as providing costimulation and cytokines to T cells. B cells also play an immunomodulatory role in regulating the immune response by secreting cytokines that inhibit disease onset and/or progression. B cell–targeted approaches for treating immune diseases of the kidney and other organs have gained significant momentum. However, much remains to be understood about B-cell biology in order to determine the timing, duration, and context of optimal therapeutic response to B cell–targeted approaches. In this review, we discuss the multifaceted roles of B cells as enhancers and regulators of immunity with relevance to kidney disease and transplantation. PMID:26700440

  10. Remission of severe antiphospholipid syndrome associated with non-Hodgkin's B-cell lymphoma after combined treatment with rituximab and chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Veneri, Dino; Ambrosetti, Achille; Franchini, Massimo; Mosna, Federico; Poli, Giovanni; Pizzolo, Giovanni

    2005-11-01

    The association of lymphoid neoplasms and antiphospolipid antibodies (APA), with or without thromboembolic complications, has been reported in several cases. We describe one case of B-cell non-Hodgkinís lymphoma (NHL) in which the combination of rituximab with standard chemotherapy led to the complete remission of a severe hypercoagulable state associated with APA.

  11. Evidence that the B lymphocyte proliferating in B-CLL and in other B-cell malignancies is frequently committed to production of natural autoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Dighiero, G; Borche, L

    1990-01-01

    Autoreactive B-cells constitute a substantial part of B-cell repertoire. They frequently secrete polyspecific natural autoantibodies which are the expression of germinal genes. During recent years, considerable evidence has accumulated indicating that autoreactive B-cells frequently undergo malignant transformation. This evidence arose from the study of monoclonal immunoglobulins (MIgs) and from recent studies of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and non Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) B lymphocytes. The present review, includes two sections. The first one reviews evidence supporting the idea that autoreactive B-cells constitute a substantial part of autoreactive B-cell repertoire. The second one is devoted to review evidence favouring the view that this autoreactive B-cell repertoire is frequently involved in B-cell malignancies.

  12. BnNHL18A shows a localization change by stress-inducing chemical treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Suk-Bae; Ham, Byung-Kook; Park, Jeong Mee; Kim, Young Jin; Paek, Kyung-Hee . E-mail: khpaek95@korea.ac.kr

    2006-01-06

    The two genes, named BnNHL18A and BnNHL18B, showing sequence homology with Arabidopsis NDR1/HIN1-like (NHL) genes, were isolated from cDNA library prepared with oilseed rape (Brassica napus) seedlings treated with NaCl. The transcript level of BnNHL18A was increased by sodium chloride, ethephon, hydrogen peroxide, methyl jasmonate, or salicylic acid treatment. The coding regions of BnNHL18A and BnNHL18B contain a sarcolipin (SLN)-like sequence. Analysis of the localization of smGFP fusion proteins showed that BnNHL18A is mainly localized to endoplasmic reticulum (ER). This result suggests that the SLN-like sequence plays a role in retaining proteins in ER membrane in plants. In response to NaCl, hydrogen peroxide, ethephon, and salicylic acid treatments, the protein localization of BnNHL18A was changed. Our findings suggest a common function of BnNHL18A in biotic and abiotic stresses, and demonstrate the presence of the shared mechanism of protein translocalization between the responses to plant pathogen and to osmotic stress.

  13. Steroid receptor coactivator-3 is a pivotal target of gambogic acid in B-cell Non-Hodgkin lymphoma and an inducer of histone H3 deacetylation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zichu; Zhang, Xia; Wen, Lu; Yi, Sha; Hu, Jingyu; Ruan, Jun; Zhao, Fei; Cui, Guohui; Fang, Jun; Chen, Yan

    2016-10-15

    Gambogic acid (GA), the active ingredient from gamboges, has been verified as a potent anti-tumor agent in many cancer cells. Nevertheless, its function in lymphoma, especially in B-cell Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), remains unclear. Amplification and/or overexpression of steroid receptor coactivator-3 (SRC-3) have been detected in multiple tumors and have confirmed its critical roles in carcinogenesis, progression, metastasis and therapy resistance in these cancers. However, no clinical data have revealed the overexpression of SRC-3 and its role in B-cell NHL. In this study, we demonstrated the anti-tumor effects of GA, which included cell growth inhibition, G1/S phase cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in B-cell NHL. We also verified that SRC-3 was overexpressed in B-cell NHL in both cell lines and lymph node samples from patients. The overexpressed SRC-3 was a central drug target of GA, and its down-regulation subsequently modulated down-stream gene expression, ultimately contributing to apoptosis. Silencing SRC-3 decreased the expression of Bcl-2, Bcl-6 and cyclin D3, but not of NF-κB and IκB-α. GA treatment did not inhibit the activation of AKT signaling pathway, but induced the deacetylation of histone H3 at lysine 9 and lysine 27. Down-regulated SRC-3 was observed to interact with more HDAC1 to mediate the deacetylation of H3. As the component of E3 ligase, Cullin3 was up-regulated and mediated the degradation of SRC-3. Our results demonstrate that GA is a potent anti-tumor agent that can be used for therapy against B-cell NHL, especially against those with an abundance of SRC-3. PMID:27370960

  14. Epstein Barr virus in relation to apoptosis markers and patients' outcome in pediatric B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Chabay, P; Lara, J; Lorenzetti, M; Cambra, P; Acosta Haab, G; Aversa, L; De Matteo, E; Preciado, M V

    2011-08-28

    In this study, we investigated Epstein Barr virus (EBV) presence, associated to proliferation and apoptosis proteins in pediatric B-cell Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (B-NHL). EBERs, Ki67, active caspase 3, Bax and Bcl2 were analyzed on B-NHL tissue from 40 patients. Forty percent showed EBV expression, significantly higher among patients ⩽10years (P=0.027), and associated with immunosuppression (P=0.020), but not associated apotosis markers. However, EBV was associated with a worse event-free survival (P=0.016), particularly under immunosuppression. Even though EBV did not seem to alter apoptotic pathways, it exhibited survival disadvantage and could be an important cofactor in B-cell lymphomagenesis in younger children. PMID:21546156

  15. Practical diagnostic approaches to composite plasma cell neoplasm and low grade B-cell lymphoma/clonal infiltrates in the bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Hussein, Shafinaz; Gill, Kamraan; Baer, Lea N; Hoehn, Daniela; Mansukhani, Mahesh; Jobanputra, Vaidehi; Bhagat, Govind; Alobeid, Bachir

    2015-03-01

    Composite plasma cell neoplasm (PCN) and low grade B-cell lymphoma (B-NHL) in the bone marrow are uncommon and raise the differential diagnosis of B-NHL with plasmacytic differentiation and PCN with lymphoplasmacytic morphology. This can be a challenging differential diagnosis, and the distinctions are important because of differences in management. We report five cases of composite PCN with B-NHL or clonal B-cell infiltrates involving the bone marrow. By using multiple different diagnostic modalities, including immunophenotyping by flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry, cytogenetic analysis and IGH gene rearrangement studies by polymerase chain reaction, we were able to distinguish two distinct clonally unrelated neoplasms in all cases. We describe the utility and pitfalls of these different diagnostic modalities. Flow cytometric analysis with a panel of antibodies that includes CD19, CD56, CD138, CD45 and other aberrant markers commonly expressed by PCN will allow identification of clonally unrelated PCN and B-NHL in a composite neoplasm, and distinguish them from B-NHL with plasmacytic differentiation and PCN with lymphoplasmacytic morphology. Cytogenetic and molecular analyses can give false-negative or false-positive results. In summary, a multimodal approach utilizing these different tools, including clinical data, should be used to arrive at the correct diagnosis.

  16. Cutaneous primary B-cell lymphomas: from diagnosis to treatment*

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Margarida

    2015-01-01

    Primary cutaneous B-cell lymphomas are a heterogeneous group of mature B-cells neoplasms with tropism for the skin, whose biology and clinical course differ significantly from the equivalent nodal lymphomas. The most indolent forms comprise the primary cutaneous marginal zone and follicle center B-cell lymphomas that despite the excellent prognosis have cutaneous recurrences very commonly. The most aggressive forms include the primary cutaneous large B-cell lymphomas, consisting in two major groups: the leg type, with poor prognosis, and others, the latter representing a heterogeneous group of lymphomas from which specific entities are supposed to be individualized over time, such as intravascular large B-cell lymphomas. Treatment may include surgical excision, radiotherapy, antibiotics, corticosteroids, interferon, monoclonal antibodies and chemotherapy, depending on the type of lymphoma and on the type and location of the skin lesions. In subtypes with good prognosis is contraindicated overtreatment and in those associated with a worse prognosis the recommended therapy relies on CHOP-like regimens associated with rituximab, assisted or not with local radiotherapy. We review the primary cutaneous B-cell lymphomas, remembering the diagnostic criteria, differential diagnosis, classification, and prognostic factors and presenting the available therapies. PMID:26560215

  17. Primary Mediastinal B-Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Pileri, Stefano A.; Gaidano, Gianluca; Zinzani, Pier Luigi; Falini, Brunangelo; Gaulard, Philippe; Zucca, Emanuele; Pieri, Federica; Berra, Eva; Sabattini, Elena; Ascani, Stefano; Piccioli, Milena; Johnson, Peter W. M.; Giardini, Roberto; Pescarmona, Edoardo; Novero, Domenico; Piccaluga, Pier Paolo; Marafioti, Teresa; Alonso, Miguel A.; Cavalli, Franco

    2003-01-01

    Although primary mediastinal (thymic) large B-cell lymphoma has been primarily studied, its precise phenotype, molecular characteristics, and histogenesis are still a matter of debate. The International Extranodal Lymphoma Study Group collected 137 such cases for extensive pathological review. Histologically, the lymphomatous growth was predominantly diffuse with fibrosis that induced compartmentalized cell aggregation. It consisted of large cells with varying degrees of nuclear polymorphism and clear to basophilic cytoplasm. On immunohistochemistry, the following phenotype was observed: CD45+, CD20+, CD79a+, PAX5/BSAP+, BOB.1+, Oct-2+, PU.1+, Bcl-2+, CD30+, HLA-DR+, MAL protein+/−, Bcl-6+/−, MUM1/IRF4+/−, CD10−/+, CD21−, CD15−, CD138−, CD68−, and CD3−. Immunoglobulins were negative both at immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization. Molecular analysis, performed in 45 cases, showed novel findings. More than half of the cases displayed BCL-6 gene mutations, which usually occurred along with functioning somatic IgVH gene mutations and Bcl-6 and/or MUM1/IRF4 expression. The present study supports the concept that a sizable fraction of cases of this lymphoma are from activated germinal center or postgerminal center cells. However, it differs from other aggressive B-cell lymphomas in that it shows defective immunoglobulin production despite the expression of OCT-2, BOB.1, and PU.1 transcription factors and the lack of IgVH gene crippling mutations. PMID:12507907

  18. Significance of p27 Immunostaining in B-Cell Neoplasm.

    PubMed

    El-Kerdany, Tahany A; Shams Eldin El Telbany, Manal A; Esmaeel, Manal M; Mahmoud, Hanan M

    2016-08-01

    P27 is an important cell cycle regulatory protein. Many reports have validated the utility of p27 as a prognostic marker in different human cancers and to prove its prognostic role in B-cell neoplasm; 80 newly diagnosed B-cell neoplasm patients with mean age of 46.6 years recruited from Hematology/Oncology Unit of Ain Shams University Hospitals during the period from January 2008 till June 2010 were studied for their p27 immunostaining results which showed that all cases of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) were positive for p27, whereas all mantly cell lymphoma cases were negative for it. There was significantly higher p27 positivity in CLL cases compared with non-Hodgkin lymphoma and that indolent cases showed significantly higher rate of positivity when compared with aggressive and highly aggressive cases. So, we can use this marker to differentiate CLL and mantly cell lymphoma in cases of confusion.

  19. [Treatment of aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphomas].

    PubMed

    Moreno Nogueira, J A; Ruiz Borrego, M; Pérez Valderrama, B; Valero Azbiru, M

    2009-02-01

    Aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHL) in localized stages I and II, without bulky areas and a fair International Prognostic Factor (IPI) (30% of all cases) have high possibilities of cure (80%) when treated with combined chemotherapy, CHOP or CHOP-like (3-4 courses) followed by locoregional radiation therapy. Localized aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphomas with signs of poor prognosis or advanced stages (III and IV) must be treated with rituximab-containing immunochemotherapy. As second line in responding patients (DHAP, ESHAP, MINE, VIM, DICE, etc., and rituximab) high doses chemotherapy with hematopoietic growth factor support should be considered, although not in refractory patients.

  20. The Histological Classification of Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yi; Pittaluga, Stefania; Jaffe, Elaine S.

    2015-01-01

    Diffuse large B cell lymphomas (DLBCLs) are aggressive B-cell neoplasms with considerable clinical, biologic and pathologic diversity, in part reflecting the functional diversity of the B-cell system and multiple pathways of transformation. In recent years, the advent of new high-throughput genomic technologies has provided new insights into the biology of DLBCL, leading to the identification of distinct molecular identities and novel pathogenetic pathways. This increasing complexity had led to an expanding number of entities in the WHO classification. Using a multi-modality approach, the updated 2008 classification delineated some new subgroups, including DLBCLs associated with particular age groups or specific anatomic sites, as well as two borderline categories: tumors at the interface between classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL) and DLBCL as well as between Burkitt Lymphoma (BL) and DLBCL. This article reviews the histopathologic features of the various aggressive B-cell lymphoma subtypes included in the 2008 classification, with emphasis on some of the new entities as well as areas of diagnostic challenge. PMID:25805585

  1. CD38 and interleukin 6 gene polymorphism in egyptians with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL).

    PubMed

    Talaat, Roba M; Abdel-Aziz, Amal M; El-Maadawy, Eman A; Abdel-Bary, Naser

    2015-01-01

    Given the importance of understanding the genetic variations involved in the pathogenesis of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), this pilot study was designed to investigate the impact of CD38 (184C/G; rs6449182) and IL-6 (-174 G/C; rs1800795) gene polymorphism on susceptibility of Egyptians to diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL); major types of NHL. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first one that examines CD38 polymorphism in the NHL. Genotyping polymorphism is performed using restriction fragment length polymorphism-polymerase chain reaction (RFLP-PCR) for CD38 and Mutagenically separated PCR (MS-PCR) for IL-6 in 100 Egyptian NHL patients with DLBCL subtype and 119 normal controls. The serum level of IL-6 was measured using Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). CD38 (184C/G) genotype is significantly increased in NHL patients (p < 0.01), while the GG genotype is significantly increased in controls (p < 0.05). Only two genotypes were found (GG and GC) in IL-6 (-174), no CC in our NHL patients and only one case in the controls. Insignificant change in IL-6 (-174 G/C) genotypes was recorded. Significantly increased serum IL-6 (p < 0.05) was positively correlated (r = 0.17; p < 0.05) with the disease. Taken together, our data stressed the importance of CD38 gene polymorphism in developing DLBCL. Our pilot study indicates that CD38 (184) CG genotype might play a role in DLBCL susceptibility in Egyptians. Additional prospective studies on larger population are needed to confirm our findings.

  2. CD5-positive B-cell malignancies frequently express cross-reactive idiotypes associated with IgM autoantibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Kipps, T. J.; Robbins, B. A.; Tefferi, A.; Meisenholder, G.; Banks, P. M.; Carson, D. A.

    1990-01-01

    Using monoclonal antibodies (MAb) specific for cross-reactive idiotypes (CRIs) associated with human monoclonal IgM autoantibodies, we examined 57 biopsy specimens that previously had been noted to have immunohistologic features of CD5-positive B-cell small lymphocytic (SL) non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). Twenty-five lymphoma specimens were noted to be from patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Eight of thirty-four (24%) immunoglobulin (Ig) kappa light-chain expressing lymphomas reacted with 17.109, a MAb specific for a major CRI encoded by a conserved Ig kappa variable region gene (Vk gene) of the VkIIIb sub-subgroup. All 17.109-reactive tissues and two 17.109-negative specimens were recognized by another MAb specific for VkIIIb framework determinant(s). Seven of all fifty-six (13%) Ig-expressing tumors bound G6, a MAb specific for an autoantibody heavy-chain-associated CRI that is encoded by a conserved antibody heavy chain variable region gene(s) (VHgene) of the VH1 subgroup. All seven G6-positive lymphomas and two G6-negative tumors reacted with Cc1, another MAb specific for a rheumatoid factor heavy-chain-associated CRI. A third autoantibody-heavy-chain-associated CRI, termed Lc1, was expressed by seven (13%) other lymphomas. Finally, a fourth MAb specific for RF heavy-chain-associated CRI, named B6, detected two additional tumors. The expression frequencies of autoantibody-associated CRIs among SL NHL patients without peripheral lymphocytosis did not differ from those noted among patients with CLL but were significantly higher than those observed among patients with NHL of follicular center-cell origin. These data imply that the malignant B cells of patients with either CD5-positive B-cell SL NHL or CLL express a restricted set of Ig V genes that have not substantially diversified from the germline DNA. Images Figure 1 PMID:1691593

  3. The value of PCR technique in fine needle aspiration biopsy of salivary gland for diagnosis of low-grade B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Ruschenburg, I; Korabiowska, M; Schlott, T; Kubitz, A; Droese, M

    1998-09-01

    In fine needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) of salivary gland delineation of low-grade B-cell lymphoma from benign lymphoid lesions of myoepithelial sialadenitis (MESA) may be very difficult by means of cytomorphological criteria alone. To improve cytodiagnosis PCR technique was applied on routinely stained smears to determine clonal status by amplifying the third complementarity-determining region (CDR3) of the hypervariable domain of the immunoglobulin heavy chain. Twelve cases diagnosed cytologically as suspicious of low-grade B-NHL with following histology of B-NHL (n = 5) or MESA (n = 7) were analyzed. The CDR3-IgH PCR produced distinct bands in 10/12 cases. The PCR products were analyzed with Genescan software on the DNA sequencer, which demonstrated monoclonal bands in all NHLs and in one case of MESA. The results indicate that PCR technique may be helpful in improving cytodiagnostic accuracy for recognition of low-grade B-NHL of salivary gland.

  4. T-Cell/Histiocyte-Rich Large B-Cell Lymphoma Presenting as a Primary Central Nervous System Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Advani, Pooja; Starr, Jason; Swaika, Abhisek; Jiang, Liuyan; Qiu, Yushi; Li, Zhimin; Tun, Han W

    2015-12-29

    Primary central nervous system (PCNSL) lymphoma is an aggressive extranodal non-Hodgkin lymphoma, and most cases are classified as diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) by histology. T-cell/histiocyte-rich large B-cell lymphoma (TCRLBCL) represents a distinct subtype of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and is characterized by the presence of scattered large neoplastic B-cells in a background of abundant T-cells and histiocytes. This is in contrast to the dense perivascular cuffing of neoplastic B-cells in classic DLBCL. T-cell/histiocyte-rich large B-cell lymphoma should be considered in PCNSL cases in which neoplastic B-cells are sparse and scattered. Immunohistochemistry will help identify the B-cells and surrounding infiltrate rich in Tlymphocytes and histiocytes. Future studies exploring the biology of TCRLBCL and the crosstalk between the neoplastic cells and the surrounding inflammatory infiltrate may provide exciting prospects for future therapies for TCRLBCL. PMID:26788280

  5. Antiviral therapy of hepatitis C as curative treatment of indolent B-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Merli, Michele; Carli, Giuseppe; Arcaini, Luca; Visco, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    The association of hepatitis C virus (HCV) and B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL) has been highlighted by several epidemiological and biological insights; however the most convincing evidence is represented by interventional studies demonstrating the capability of antiviral treatment (AT) with interferon (IFN) with or without ribavirin to induce the regression of indolent lymphomas, especially of marginal-zone origin. In the largest published retrospective study (100 patients) the overall response rate (ORR) after first-line IFN-based AT was 77% (44% complete responses) and responses were sustainable (median duration of response 33 mo). These results were confirmed by a recent meta-analysis on 254 patients, demonstrating an ORR of 73%. Moreover this analysis confirmed the highly significant correlation between the achievement of viral eradication sustained virological response (SVR) and hematological responses. Two large prospective studies demonstrated that AT is associated with improved survival and argue in favor of current guidelines’ recommendation of AT as preferential first-line option in asymptomatic patients with HCV-associated indolent NHL. The recently approved direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs) revolutionized the treatment of HCV infection, leading to SVR approaching 100% in all genotypes. Very preliminary data of IFN-free DAAs therapy in indolent HCV-positive NHL seem to confirm their activity in inducing lymphoma regression. PMID:27784957

  6. Nanoscale mapping and organization analysis of target proteins on cancer cells from B-cell lymphoma patients

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Mi; Xiao, Xiubin; Liu, Lianqing; Xi, Ning; Wang, Yuechao; Dong, Zaili; Zhang, Weijing

    2013-11-01

    CD20, a membrane protein highly expressed on most B-cell lymphomas, is an effective target demonstrated in clinical practice for treating B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). Rituximab is a monoclonal antibody against CD20. In this work, we applied atomic force microscopy (AFM) to map the nanoscale distribution of CD20 molecules on the surface of cancer cells from clinical B-cell NHL patients under the assistance of ROR1 fluorescence recognition (ROR1 is a specific cell surface marker exclusively expressed on cancer cells). First, the ROR1 fluorescence labeling experiments showed that ROR1 was expressed on cancer cells from B-cell lymphoma patients, but not on normal cells from healthy volunteers. Next, under the guidance of ROR1 fluorescence, the rituximab-conjugated AFM tips were moved to cancer cells to image the cellular morphologies and detect the CD20-rituximab interactions on the cell surfaces. The distribution maps of CD20 on cancer cells were constructed by obtaining arrays of (16×16) force curves in local areas (500×500 nm{sup 2}) on the cell surfaces. The experimental results provide a new approach to directly investigate the nanoscale distribution of target protein on single clinical cancer cells. - Highlights: • Cancer cells were recognized from healthy cells by ROR1 fluorescence labeling. • The nanoscale distribution of CD20 on cancer cells was characterized. • The distribution of CD20 was non-uniform on the surface of cancer cells.

  7. Investigation of Epstein-Barr Virus as a Potential Cause of B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma in a Prospective Cohort

    PubMed Central

    De Roos, Anneclaire J.; Martínez-Maza, Otoniel; Jerome, Keith R.; Mirick, Dana K.; Kopecky, Kenneth J.; Madeleine, Margaret M.; Magpantay, Larry; Edlefsen, Kerstin L.; LaCroix, Andrea Z.

    2013-01-01

    Background We hypothesized that poor control of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection, leading to reactivation of the virus, increases the risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) in the general population of primarily immunocompetent persons. Methods We conducted a case-control study nested within the Women’s Health Initiative Observational Study cohort in which we measured antibodies to EBV antigens (IgG to viral capsid antigen [VCA], nuclear antigen [EBNA1], and early antigen [EA-D]) and EBV DNA load in prediagnostic samples of 491 B-cell NHL cases and 491 controls. Results We found no association with established EBV infection, based on seropositivity for VCA. Seropositivity for EBNA1 was associated with decreased risk of B-cell NHL, overall (odds ratio [OR]=0.5, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.3-0.8) and for each of the histologic subtypes examined. Increased risk of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and related subtypes was observed with higher levels of EBV DNA and antibody to EA-D, both markers reflective of reactivation. These associations were strongest for cases with the shortest time interval between blood draw and diagnosis. Conclusions In balance, these results do not provide strong evidence of EBV playing a causal role in B-cell NHL in general population women. The associations we observed may reflect increased risk of NHL with underlying immune impairment or could be due to reverse causation. Impact Further characterization of the subtype-specific association with CLL is warranted. Exclusion of cases with preclinical disease markers (such as monoclonal B-lymphocytosis for CLL) may help rule out reverse causation in future studies. PMID:23885038

  8. Autoantibody activity of immunoglobulins isolated from B-cell follicular lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Dighiero, G; Hart, S; Lim, A; Borche, L; Levy, R; Miller, R A

    1991-08-01

    Previous work with monoclonal Igs (MIgs) has demonstrated that a high proportion of paraproteins bind to self-antigens such as the Fc fragment of IgG, Ii blood group antigens, cytoskeleton proteins, DNA, and myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG). Recent work in CLL indicates that CD5+ B lymphocytes are frequently committed to production of autoantibodies. We have examined the antibody specificity of MIgs derived from the tumor cells of 31 different patients with CD5- B-cell lymphomas. Our results indicate that the tumor cells from 8 of these 31 patients (25.8%) express Igs with autoantibody activity. In two cases antibody activity was multispecific. In four cases, antibody activity was exclusively directed against the Fc fragment of IgG, whereas the two other cases bound to both Fc fragment of IgG and nuclear antigens. Most non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHL) are derived from CD5- B cells. These results indicate that like CLL, NHL also express Igs that frequently have autoantibody activity.

  9. Primary cutaneous precursor B cell lymphoblastic lymphoma in a child, complicated by fatal disseminated varicella zoster virus.

    PubMed

    Rashidghamat, E; Robson, A

    2015-12-01

    Precursor B-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma (PBLL) is a rare subtype of childhood non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). Most lymphoblastic lymphomas have a T-cell immunophenotype, but a small distinct proportion is of precursor B-cell origin. Skin and bone involvement is seen more commonly in this clinical variant. Primary cutaneous PBLL is rare. We describe an 8-year-old girl who presented with an asymptomatic nodule on the left upper arm. Histopathological features were consistent with pre-B-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma, and staging investigations excluded extracutaneous disease, resulting in a diagnosis of primary cutaneous PBLL. The child was started on induction chemotherapy, UKALL 2003 regimen B. She developed disseminated varicella zoster virus and died despite treatment. We discuss previously reported cases of primary cutaneous PBLL and their outcomes. PMID:25959984

  10. Rasburicase in the prevention of laboratory/clinical tumour lysis syndrome in children with advanced mature B-NHL: A Children’s Oncology Group Report

    PubMed Central

    Galardy, Paul; Hochberg, Jessica; Perkins, Sherrie L.; Harrison, Lauren; Goldman, Stanton; Cairo, Mitchell S.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Laboratory (LTLS) and clinical (CTLS) tumour lysis syndrome (TLS) are frequent complications in newly diagnosed children with advanced mature B cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (B-NHL). Rasburicase, compared to allopurinol, results in more rapid reduction of uric acid in paediatric patients at risk for TLS. However, the safety and efficacy of rasburicase for the treatment or or prevention of TLS has not been prospectively evaluated. Children with newly diagnosed stage III–IV, bone marrow+ and/or central nervous system+ mature B-NHL received hydration and rasburicase prior to cytoreductive therapy. Rasburicase was safe and well-tolerated and there were no grade III–IV toxicities probably or directly related to rasburicase. Patients with an initial lactate dehydrogenase ≥2x upper limit of normal had a significantly elevated uric acid level (P=0.005), increased incidence of TLS (p-0.005) and lower glomerular filtration rate (GFR; p<0.001). Following rasburicase, there was only a 9% and 5% incidence of LTLS and CTLS, respectively. Furthermore, there was a significant improvement in estimated GFR from Day 0 to Day 7 following rasburicase (p=0.0007) and only 1.3% of patients required new onset renal assisted support after rasburicase administration. A TLS strategy incorporating rasburicase prior to cytoreductive chemotherapy proved safe and effective in preventing new onset renal failure and was associated with a significant improvement in GFR. PMID:24032600

  11. [Regulatory B cells in human autoimmune diseases].

    PubMed

    Miyagaki, Tomomitsu

    2015-01-01

    B cells have been generally considered to be positive regulators of immune responses because of their ability to produce antigen-specific antibodies and to activate T cells through antigen presentation. Impairment of B cell development and function may cause autoimmune diseases. Recently, specific B cell subsets that can negatively regulate immune responses have been described in mouse models of a wide variety of autoimmune diseases. The concept of those B cells, termed regulatory B cells, is now recognized as important in the murine immune system. Among several regulatory B cell subsets, IL-10-producing regulatory B cells are the most widely investigated. On the basis of discoveries from studies of such mice, human regulatory B cells that produce IL-10 in most cases are becoming an active area of research. There have been emerging data suggesting the importance of human regulatory B cells in various diseases. Revealing the immune regulation mechanisms of human regulatory B cells in human autoimmune diseases could lead to the development of novel B cell targeted therapies. This review highlights the current knowledge on regulatory B cells, mainly IL-10-producing regulatory B cells, in clinical research using human samples. PMID:26725860

  12. Factors influencing visor use among players in the National Hockey League (NHL).

    PubMed

    Micieli, Robert; Micieli, Jonathan A

    2014-01-01

    Eye, orbital, and facial injuries are significant risks to National Hockey League (NHL) players, and can be mitigated by the use of a partial visor - currently optional for all non-rookie players. The goal of the current study was to determine the overall use of visors among non-rookie NHL players in the 2013-2014 season and assess factors influencing their uptake. This was an observational, cross-sectional study using active NHL rosters and demographic information obtained from the official NHL website. Visor use was determined based on in-game video or images at two different time points in the 2013-2014 season. The use of visors during the 2013-2014 season was 75.2% among non-rookie players. When rookies were included, the overall use of visors was 77.8%. Compared to Canadian-born players, European players were significantly more likely to choose to wear a visor (odds ratio [OR] 3.48, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.96-6.17). Players in the younger age-groups, particularly those younger than 24 years (OR 5.67, 95% CI 2.52-5.76) and those between 24 and 28 years (OR 2.18, 95% CI 1.23-3.87), were more likely to wear a visor compared to older players. Overall, visor use continues to grow in the NHL independently of new legislation, and is more likely in younger players and those of European origin. PMID:24744613

  13. Multiple Curricula for B Cell Developmental Programming.

    PubMed

    Rothenberg, Ellen V

    2016-09-20

    B-1 B cells differ from conventional B-2 B cells functionally, but how these differences relate to the ontogeny of these lineages has been unclear. Two recent Immunity articles, Kristiansen et al. (2016) and Montecino-Rodriguez et al. (2016), now provide insight into the origins of B-1 and B-2 B cells, revealing a multi-layered developmental program and successive waves of B cell precursors.

  14. Multiple Curricula for B Cell Developmental Programming.

    PubMed

    Rothenberg, Ellen V

    2016-09-20

    B-1 B cells differ from conventional B-2 B cells functionally, but how these differences relate to the ontogeny of these lineages has been unclear. Two recent Immunity articles, Kristiansen et al. (2016) and Montecino-Rodriguez et al. (2016), now provide insight into the origins of B-1 and B-2 B cells, revealing a multi-layered developmental program and successive waves of B cell precursors. PMID:27653594

  15. Emerging immunotherapy and strategies directly targeting B cells for the treatment of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Witkowska, Magdalena; Smolewski, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    During the last decade, significant prolonged survival in diffusive large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) has been observed. The efficacy of initial treatment improved mostly due to addition of a chimeric anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody (rituximab) to standard chemotherapeutic regimens. Moreover, accurate understanding of DLBCL pathogenesis and remarkable progress in gene expression profiling have led to the development of a variety of tumor-specific regimens. Novel agents target directly the pathways involved in signal transduction, lead to apoptosis and cancer cells differentiation. In this article, we mainly focus on new treatment options, such as monoclonal antibodies, tyrosine kinase inhibitors and immunomodulatory drugs, currently investigated in aggressive B-cell lymphoma with particular attention to DLBCL type.

  16. Bilateral conjunctival extranodal marginal zone B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Kram, David E; Brathwaite, Carole D; Khatib, Ziad A

    2010-12-15

    Extranodal marginal zone B-cell lymphomas (EMZLs), while relatively common in adults, are rare entities in the pediatric population. A subclass of the typically aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphomas, the few reported pediatric cases indicate that, as in adults, these tumors tend to be indolent. We present a case of EMZL arising in the conjunctivae in a 9-year-old male with bilateral disease. The patient was treated with surgical excision alone and has remained disease-free 6 years after the operation. PMID:20981695

  17. Detection of gene amplification in non-Hodgkins lymphoma (NHL) by comparative genomic hybridization (CGH)

    SciTech Connect

    Mathew, S.; Houldsworth, J.; Rao, P.H.

    1994-09-01

    Gene amplification characterized by distinct cytogenetic structures, such as homogeneously stained regions (hsrs), aberrantly banded marked chromosomes (abms), and double minutes (dmins) chromosomes is commonly found in tumor cells, and is considered as an important mechanism by which tumor cells gain increased levels of expression of critical genes. Very little is known about gene amplification in NHL. So far, no commonly amplified gene(s) have been identified in NHL. DNA in-gel renaturation assay provided evidence for the presence of amplified DNA fragments in NHL. In order to identify the gene(s) amplified in NHL we performed a modified form of CGH (hybridization and normal chromosomes with biotin labeled tumor DNA) to a panel of 10 NHL, which showed cytogenetic evidence for gene amplification in the form of hsrs and dmins. A number of chromosomal regions were found to be non-randomly amplified: 1p32-36(9/10), 1q32-44(6/10), 6p(9/10), 6q26-27(5/10), 16(8/10), 19(7/10) and 22q(7/10). Amplification of DNA from specific chromosomal bands was noted at 4p16(8/10), 11q13(10/10), and 12q24(8/10). Tumor L-10 showed specific amplification of 2p13. This study details the first CGH study performed on a panel of NHLs to identify gene amplification and chromosomal origin of hsrs and dmins identified by conventional cytogenetic analysis. The modified CGH employed in this study indicated that gene amplification is a frequent genetic alteration in NHL.

  18. Memory B cells in mouse models.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, B; Grimsholm, O; Thorarinsdottir, K; Ren, W; Jirholt, P; Gjertsson, I; Mårtensson, I-L

    2013-08-01

    One of the principles behind vaccination, as shown by Edward Jenner in 1796, and host protection is immunological memory, and one of the cells central to this is the antigen-experienced memory B cell that responds rapidly upon re-exposure to the initiating antigen. Classically, memory B cells have been defined as progenies of germinal centre (GC) B cells expressing isotype-switched and substantially mutated B cell receptors (BCRs), that is, membrane-bound antibodies. However, it has become apparent over the last decade that this is not the only pathway to B cell memory. Here, we will discuss memory B cells in mice, as defined by (1) cell surface markers; (2) multiple layers; (3) formation in a T cell-dependent and either GC-dependent or GC-independent manner; (4) formation in a T cell-independent fashion. Lastly, we will touch upon memory B cells in; (5) mouse models of autoimmune diseases. PMID:23679222

  19. B Cell Autonomous TLR Signaling and Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Meyer-Bahlburg, Almut; Rawlings, David J

    2009-01-01

    B cells play a central role in the pathogenesis of multiple autoimmune diseases and the recognition of importance of B cells in these disorders has grown dramatically in association with the remarkable success of B-cell depletion as a treatment for autoimmunity. The precise mechanisms that promote alterations in B cell tolerance remain incompletely defined. There is increasing evidence, however, that TLRs play a major role in these events. Stimulation of B cells via the TLR pathway not only leads to an increase in antibody production but also promotes additional changes including cytokine production and upregulation of activation markers increasing the effectiveness of B cells as APCs. Understanding the role of TLRs in systemic autoimmunity will not only provide insight into the disease pathogenesis but may also lead to the development of novel therapies. This article gives an overview of TLR signaling in B cells and the possible involvement of such signals in autoimmune diseases. PMID:18295736

  20. Microbes and B cell development.

    PubMed

    Wesemann, Duane R

    2015-01-01

    Animals and many of their chronic microbial inhabitants form relationships of symbiotic mutualism, which occurs when coexisting life-forms derive mutual benefit from stable associations. While microorganisms receive a secure habitat and constant food source from vertebrate hosts, they are required for optimal immune system development and occupy niches otherwise abused by pathogens. Microbes have also been shown to provide vertebrate hosts with metabolic capabilities that enhance energy and nutrient uptake from the diet. The immune system plays a central role in the establishment and maintenance of host-microbe homeostasis, and B lineage cells play a key role in this regulation. Here, I reviewed the structure and function of the microbiota and the known mechanisms of how nonpathogenic microbes influence B cell biology and immunoglobulin repertoire development early in life. I also discuss what is known about how B lineage cells contribute to the process of shaping the composition of commensal/mutualistic microbe membership.

  1. The unexpected evolution of a case of diffuse large B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Găman, Amelia; Bold, Adriana; Găman, G

    2011-01-01

    The diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) represents the most common type of aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma with a heterogeneous morphology, biology and clinical presentation. Gene expression profiling studies identified three distinct molecular subtypes of DLCBL arisen from B-cells at different stages of differentiation: germinal center B-cell-like (GCB) DLBCL, activated B-cell-like (ABC) DLBCL, primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma (PMBL). The most relevant oncogenic pathways in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma are: deregulated B-cell receptor/proliferation signaling, BCL6 and NF-kB constitutive expression, defects in apoptosis and neoangiogenesis. The treatment of DLBCL has been completely modified in the last ten years by combination of anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody (rituximab) and CHOP chemotherapy, which is now the first line therapy. In the last years, there have been reported several cases of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) at patients with rheumatoid arthritis treated with rituximab. Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy is possible as an adverse reaction to rituximab at patients treated with R-CHOP for diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. PMID:21655667

  2. The feature of distribution and clonality of TCR γ/δ subfamilies T cells in patients with B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liang; Xu, Meng; Wang, Chunyan; Zhu, Lihua; Hu, Junyan; Chen, Shaohua; Wu, Xiuli; Li, Bo; Li, Yangqiu

    2014-01-01

    Restricted T-cell receptor (TCR) Vα/Vβ repertoire expression and clonal expansion of αβ T cells especially for putative tumor-associated antigens were observed in patients with hematological malignancies. To further characterize the γδ T-cell immune status in B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (B-NHL), we investigated the distribution and clonality of TCR Vγ/Vδ repertoire in peripheral blood (PB), bone marrow (BM), and lymph node (LN) from patients with B-NHL. Four newly diagnosed B-NHL cases, including three with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and one with small lymphocytic lymphoma (SLL), were enrolled. The restrictive expression of TCR Vγ/Vδ subfamilies with different distribution patterns could be detected in PB, BM, or LN from all of four patients, and partial subfamily T cells showed clonal proliferation. At least one clonally expanded Vδ subfamily member was found in PB from each patient. However, the expression pattern and clonality of TCR Vγ/Vδ changed in different immune organs and showed individual feature in different patients. The clonally expanded Vδ5, Vδ6, and Vδ8 were detected only in PB but neither in BM nor LN while clonally expanded Vδ2 and Vδ3 could be detected in both PB and BM/LN. In conclusion, the results provide a preliminary profile of distribution and clonality of TCR γ/δ subfamilies T cells in PB, BM, and LN from B-NHL; similar clonally expanded Vδ subfamily T cells in PB and BM may be related to the same B-cell lymphoma-associated antigens, while the different reactive clonally expanded Vγ/Vδ T cells may be due to local immune response. PMID:24963496

  3. Cyclophosphamide pharmacokinetics and pharmacogenetics in children with B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Veal, Gareth J.; Cole, Michael; Chinnaswamy, Girish; Sludden, Julieann; Jamieson, David; Errington, Julie; Malik, Ghada; Hill, Christopher R.; Chamberlain, Thomas; Boddy, Alan V.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Variation in cyclophosphamide pharmacokinetics and metabolism has been highlighted as a factor that may impact on clinical outcome in various tumour types. The current study in children with B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) was designed to corroborate previous findings in a large prospective study incorporating genotype for common polymorphisms known to influence cyclophosphamide pharmacology. Methods A total of 644 plasma samples collected over a 5 year period, from 49 B-cell NHL patients ≤18 years receiving cyclophosphamide (250 mg/m2), were used to characterise a population pharmacokinetic model. Polymorphisms in genes including CYP2B6 and CYP2C19 were analysed. Results A two-compartment model provided the best fit of the population analysis. The mean cyclophosphamide clearance value following dose 1 was significantly lower than following dose 5 (1.83 ± 1.07 versus 3.68 ± 1.43 L/h/m2, respectively; mean ± standard deviation from empirical Bayes estimates; P < 0.001). The presence of at least one CYP2B6*6 variant allele was associated with a lower cyclophosphamide clearance following both dose 1 (1.54 ± 0.11 L/h/m2 versus 2.20 ± 0.31 L/h/m2, P = 0.033) and dose 5 (3.12 ± 0.17 L/h/m2 versus 4.35 ± 0.37 L/h/m2, P = 0.0028), as compared to homozygous wild-type patients. No pharmacokinetic parameters investigated were shown to have a significant influence on progression free survival. Conclusion The results do not support previous findings of a link between cyclophosphamide pharmacokinetics or metabolism and disease recurrence in childhood B-cell NHL. While CYP2B6 genotype was shown to influence pharmacokinetics, there was no clear impact on clinical outcome. PMID:26773420

  4. Signaling aggression.

    PubMed

    van Staaden, Moira J; Searcy, William A; Hanlon, Roger T

    2011-01-01

    From psychological and sociological standpoints, aggression is regarded as intentional behavior aimed at inflicting pain and manifested by hostility and attacking behaviors. In contrast, biologists define aggression as behavior associated with attack or escalation toward attack, omitting any stipulation about intentions and goals. Certain animal signals are strongly associated with escalation toward attack and have the same function as physical attack in intimidating opponents and winning contests, and ethologists therefore consider them an integral part of aggressive behavior. Aggressive signals have been molded by evolution to make them ever more effective in mediating interactions between the contestants. Early theoretical analyses of aggressive signaling suggested that signals could never be honest about fighting ability or aggressive intentions because weak individuals would exaggerate such signals whenever they were effective in influencing the behavior of opponents. More recent game theory models, however, demonstrate that given the right costs and constraints, aggressive signals are both reliable about strength and intentions and effective in influencing contest outcomes. Here, we review the role of signaling in lieu of physical violence, considering threat displays from an ethological perspective as an adaptive outcome of evolutionary selection pressures. Fighting prowess is conveyed by performance signals whose production is constrained by physical ability and thus limited to just some individuals, whereas aggressive intent is encoded in strategic signals that all signalers are able to produce. We illustrate recent advances in the study of aggressive signaling with case studies of charismatic taxa that employ a range of sensory modalities, viz. visual and chemical signaling in cephalopod behavior, and indicators of aggressive intent in the territorial calls of songbirds.

  5. B-Cell Hematologic Malignancy Vaccination Registry

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-09-15

    Monoclonal Gammopathy of Undetermined Significance; Multiple Myeloma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia; Lymphocytosis; Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin; B-Cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Hematological Malignancies

  6. T-cell/histiocyte-rich large B-cell lymphoma of stomach.

    PubMed

    Barut, Figen; Kandemir, Nilufer Onak; Gun, Banu Dogan; Ozdamar, Sukru Oguz

    2016-07-01

    T-cell/histiocyte-rich large B-cell lymphoma is an unusually encountered lymphoid neoplasm of stomach with aggressive course, and is an uncommon morphologic variant of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. An ulcerated mass, 7x5x1 cm in size was observed within the gastrectomy specimen of a 76-year-old female patient. In cross sections, besides mature lymphoid cells displaying T-cell phenotype, a neoplastic formation composed of large, pleomorphic atypical lymphoid cells with, prominent nucleoli, vesicular nuclei and abundant eosinophilic cytoplasm displaying B-cell phenotype were observed. Meanwhile, histiocyte-like mononuclear cells and Reed-Sternberg-like multinuclear cells expressing CD68 and Mac387 were also observed. The diagnosis of the case was T cell/histiocyte-rich large B-cell lymphoma. This rarely encountered neoplasm should be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of primary gastric lymphomas. PMID:27427148

  7. Clinical development of radioimmunotherapy for B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Meredith, Ruby F. . E-mail: rmeredith@uabmc.edu; Knox, Susan J.

    2006-10-01

    Over the past several decades, several biomolecules have been investigated for their ability to deliver radiation to cancer cells, but antibodies have been the carriers of choice in systemic targeted radionuclide therapy (STaRT). Two radioimmunotherapy agents that target the CD20 antigen, {sup 131}I-tositumomab and {sup 9}Y-ibritumomab tiuxetan, have been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of patients with relapsed or refractory B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), and clinical trials have shown that they are effective as monotherapies in the salvage setting, producing response rates that are often higher and durations of response that are often longer than those with chemotherapy. Escalated doses of these agents can be supported with stem cell transplantation and can produce high rates of complete response and greater survival in patients with relapsed NHL. The quality and duration of responses are greater with radioimmunotherapy when it is used earlier in the course of treatment.

  8. Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma of Maxilla – A Case Report of Late Relapse

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Medikonda Suresh; Chandragiri, Anuradha; Amarnath, Konda

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphomas (DLBCL) encompasses a heterogeneous group of tumors that together constitute the commonest of all Non Hodgkin Lymphoma (NHL) and the proclivity of DLBCL to oral cavity is unknown. They mostly arise from soft tissues as asymptomatic lesions, mostly without ‘B’ symptoms and involvement of jaw bones is uncommon. Most studies and case reports of oral DLBCL’s are based on, manifestation of primary extra-nodal disease or a component of a disseminated disease process involving regional lymph nodes. Many investigators have proposed that patients with this cell type who maintain a complete response for 24 consecutive months are cured because late relapses seldom occur. With advances in treatment modalities, many patients with NHL become long-term survivors and the risk of relapses or second tumors are of growing concern. We present a case of DLBCL which relapsed after five years of initial lesion in a 41 year old female patient and presented as a nonspecific bilateral anterior maxillary radiolucency. DLBCL usually express pan-B markers with small percentage expressing T-cell markers. Few rare cases of DLBCL have shown CD3 expression, which is a most sensitive T-cell marker which was focally expressed in the present case. PMID:27190967

  9. An Unusual Case of Marginal Zone B-Cell Lymphoma Arising in the Breast - Its Diagnosis and the Role of Radiotherapy in its Management.

    PubMed

    Rock, Kathy; Rangaswamy, Guhan; O'Sullivan, Siobhra; Coffey, Jerome

    2011-10-01

    BACKGROUND: Primary lymphoma of the breast accounts for 0.04-0.5% of all breast malignancies and approximately 1% of all extranodal lymphomas. For stage IE node-negative disease, involved field radiotherapy is recommended except for very young women in whom the risk of breast cancer is a concern. The rate of complete response for limited stage extranodal marginal B-cell lymphoma is in excess of 90%. CASE REPORT: We report the case of a 62-year-old lady who presented with a unilateral painless palpable right breast lump. She subsequently underwent a trucut biopsy of the lesion. The histology revealed a low-grade B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). Immunohistochemistry showed that more than 95% of the cells were B cells which were CD 20+/CD 45+ and BC L6+. This confirmed the diagnosis of marginal zone lymphoma. Staging work-up was negative for distant metastases. Serum alkaline phosphatase and lactate dehydrogenase were normal. The patient had no 'B' symptoms. Her final diagnosis was clinical stage IAE NHL, and she was referred for curative radiotherapy. CONCLUSION: Radiation treatment is a safe and extremely effective modality of treatment for early stage I marginal zone B-cell lymphomas of the breast.

  10. In Situ Hepatitis C NS3 Protein Detection Is Associated with High Grade Features in Hepatitis C-Associated B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Rabiega, Pascaline; Molina, Thierry J.; Charlotte, Frédéric; Lazure, Thierry; Davi, Frédéric; Settegrana, Catherine; Berger, Françoise; Alric, Laurent; Cacoub, Patrice; Terrier, Benjamin; Suarez, Felipe; Sibon, David; Dupuis, Jehan; Feray, Cyrille; Tilly, Hervé; Pol, Stanislas; Deau Fischer, Bénédicte; Roulland, Sandrine; Thieblemont, Catherine; Leblond, Véronique; Carrat, Fabrice; Hermine, Olivier; Besson, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) infection is associated with the B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL), preferentially marginal zone lymphomas (MZL) and diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (DLBCL). While chronic antigenic stimulation is a main determinant of lymphomagenesis in marginal zone lymphomas (MZL), a putative role of HCV infection of B-cells is supported by in vitro studies. We performed a pathological study within the "ANRS HC-13 LymphoC" observational study focusing on in situ expression of the oncogenic HCV non structural 3 (NS3) protein. Lympho-C study enrolled 116 HCV-positive patients with B-NHL of which 86 histological samples were collected for centralized review. Main histological subtypes were DLBCL (36%) and MZL (34%). Almost half of DLBCL (12/26) were transformed from underlying small B-cell lymphomas. NS3 immunostaining was found positive in 17 of 37 tested samples (46%). There was a striking association between NS3 detection and presence of high grade lymphoma features: 12 out of 14 DLBCL were NS3+ compared to only 4 out of 14 MZL (p = 0.006). Moreover, 2 among the 4 NS3+ MZL were enriched in large cells. Remarkably, this study supports a new mechanism of transformation with a direct oncogenic role of HCV proteins in the occurrence of high-grade B lymphomas. PMID:27257992

  11. Production of RANKL by Memory B Cells

    PubMed Central

    Meednu, Nida; Zhang, Hengwei; Owen, Teresa; Sun, Wen; Wang, Victor; Cistrone, Christopher; Rangel-Moreno, Javier; Xing, Lianping; Anolik, Jennifer H.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic autoimmune disease that often leads to joint damage. The mechanisms of bone damage in RA are complex, involving activation of bone-resorbing osteoclasts (OCs) by synoviocytes and Th17 cells. This study was undertaken to investigate whether B cells play a direct role in osteoclastogenesis through the production of RANKL, the essential cytokine for OC development. Methods RANKL production by total B cells or sorted B cell subpopulations in the peripheral blood and synovial tissue from healthy donors or anti–cyclic citrullinated peptide–positive patients with RA was examined by flow cytometry, real-time polymerase chain reaction, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and immunohistochemical analysis. To define direct effects on osteoclastogenesis, B cells were cocultured with CD14+ monocytes, and OCs were enumerated by tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining. Results Healthy donor peripheral blood B cells were capable of expressing RANKL upon stimulation, with switched memory B cells (CD27+IgD−) having the highest propensity for RANKL production. Notably, switched memory B cells in the peripheral blood from RA patients expressed significantly more RANKL compared to healthy controls. In RA synovial fluid and tissue, memory B cells were enriched and spontaneously expressed RANKL, with some of these cells visualized adjacent to RANK+ OC precursors. Critically, B cells supported OC differentiation in vitro in a RANKL-dependent manner, and the number of OCs was higher in cultures with RA B cells than in those derived from healthy controls. Conclusion These findings reveal the critical importance of B cells in bone homeostasis and their likely contribution to joint destruction in RA. PMID:26554541

  12. A 75-Year-Old Female with Dyspnea: An Unusual Presentation of Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Mukarram, Osama; Abusaada, Khalid

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is a common variant of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). It usually presents as a rapidly enlarging mass. Numerous presentations involving the gastrointestinal tract, bone, and the central nervous system have been reported in the past including both primary and secondary involvement of organs. A 75-year-old lady was found to have a pericardial effusion while being evaluated for shortness of breath. A therapeutic pericardial tap was positive for pan-B cell markers. The patient's detailed radiological studies failed to show a primary tumor. We report this unusual presentation of DLBCL as a pericardial effusion without a primary source in a patient with mild shortness of breath.

  13. The CD40 ligand expressed by human B cells costimulates B cell responses.

    PubMed

    Grammer, A C; Bergman, M C; Miura, Y; Fujita, K; Davis, L S; Lipsky, P E

    1995-05-15

    The possibility that activated B cells might express a ligand for CD40 that was of functional importance for B cell responses was examined by using highly purified human peripheral blood B cells, as well as a variety of B lymphoblastoid cell lines and hybridomas. Following stimulation with the combination of a calcium ionophore and a phorbol ester, human B cells bound a soluble fusion protein containing the extracellular portion of CD40 and the Fc region of IgG1 (CD40.Ig). A variety of B cell lines and hybridomas also bound CD40.Ig, either constitutively or after activation. In addition, CD40.Ig specifically immunoprecipitated a 33-kDa glycoprotein from surface 125I-labeled activated B cells. The nucleotide sequence of the coding region of the CD40 ligand mRNA amplified by RT-PCR from activated T cells and B cell lines was identical. The CD40 ligand expressed on human B cells was important functionally because homotypic aggregation of CD40 ligand-expressing B cells was inhibited by the CD40.Ig construct. Additionally, RNA and DNA synthesis as well as Ig production by polyclonally activated, highly purified peripheral B cells and a variety of B cell lines were inhibited significantly by the CD40.Ig construct. Finally, B cell lines expressing the CD40 ligand induced Ig production from resting normal B cells in a CD40-dependent manner. These results indicate that human B cells express a ligand for CD40 that is identical with that expressed by activated T cells and that the B cell-expressed CD40 ligand plays an important role in facilitating responses of activated B cells.

  14. MYC gene rearrangements detected by interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization in diffuse large B-cell lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Misharina, J A; Sitko, V V; Klymenko, S V; Minchenko, J A; Kurchenko, A I; Silaev, Y O; Lyashenko, L O; Polyanska, V M; Bebeshko, V G

    2014-09-01

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is the most common type of lymphoma, including approximately 30-40% of all B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas (B-NHL). Chromosomal translocations are the hallmark of genetic aberrations in B-lymphoma and are often associated with a specific subtype of B-NHL. MYC gene dysregulation due to chromosomal translocations is characteristic for the most cases of Burkitt's lymphoma. Objective. The goal of this study was to improve the diagnostic accuracy of DLBCL. Identification of chromosome 8 and 14 abnormalities including the translocation of MYC gene t(8; 14)(q24; q32) in substrate cells of lymph nodes was applied using the method of tri-color interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization (I-FISH). Materials and methods. Lymph node biopsy specimens of 17 patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and three patients with Burkitt's lymphoma (including one participant of liquidation of consequences of the catastrophe at the Chornobyl NPP) were studied. The age of patients ranged from 10 to 66 years old (41.3 ± 3.7 average). Biopsy specimens fixed in paraffin. I-FISH-analysis was performed using the commercial test Vysis IGH/MYC, CEP 8 tri-color, dual fusion translocation probe (Abbott Molecular, USA). Results and conclusions. MYC gene and immunoglobulin heavy chain (IGH) gene translocations were found in four out of twenty persons. Consequently the I-FISH method allows identification of of MYC and IGH gene rearrangements in tissue cells substrate of lymphoma fixed in paraffin. Using this method the molecular-cytogenetic abnormalities were found in eight of twenty patients with B-cell lymphoma providing verification of the lymphoma diagnosis, prediction of their clinical course and advance in management i.e increase the effectiveness of therapy, in refractory lymphoma cases among others.

  15. Molecular underpinning of B-cell anergy

    PubMed Central

    Yarkoni, Yuval; Getahun, Andrew; Cambier, John C.

    2010-01-01

    Summary A byproduct of the largely stochastic generation of a diverse B-cell specificity repertoire is production of cells that recognize autoantigens. Indeed, recent studies indicate that more than half of the primary repertoire consists of autoreactive B cells that must be silenced to prevent autoimmunity. While this silencing can occur by multiple mechanisms, it appears that most autoreactive B cells are silenced by anergy, wherein they populate peripheral lymphoid organs and continue to express unoccupied antigen receptors yet are unresponsive to antigen stimulation. Here we review molecular mechanisms that appear operative in maintaining the antigen unresponsiveness of anergic B cells. In addition, we present new data indicating that the failure of anergic B cells to mobilize calcium in response to antigen stimulation is not mediated by inactivation of stromal interacting molecule 1, a critical intermediary in intracellular store depletion-induced calcium influx. PMID:20727040

  16. Genomic Landscape of Primary Mediastinal B-Cell Lymphoma Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Dai, Haiping; Ehrentraut, Stefan; Nagel, Stefan; Eberth, Sonja; Pommerenke, Claudia; Dirks, Wilhelm G; Geffers, Robert; Kalavalapalli, Srilaxmi; Kaufmann, Maren; Meyer, Corrina; Faehnrich, Silke; Chen, Suning; Drexler, Hans G; MacLeod, Roderick A F

    2015-01-01

    Primary mediastinal B-Cell lymphoma (PMBL) is a recently defined entity comprising ~2-10% non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL). Unlike most NHL subtypes, PMBL lacks recurrent gene rearrangements to serve as biomarkers or betray target genes. While druggable, late chemotherapeutic complications warrant the search for new targets and models. Well characterized tumor cell lines provide unlimited material to serve as preclinical resources for verifiable analyses directed at the discovery of new biomarkers and pathological targets using high throughput microarray technologies. The same cells may then be used to seek intelligent therapies directed at clinically validated targets. Four cell lines have emerged as potential PMBL models: FARAGE, KARPAS-1106P, MEDB-1 and U-2940. Transcriptionally, PMBL cell lines cluster near c(lassical)-HL and B-NHL examples showing they are related but separate entities. Here we document genomic alterations therein, by cytogenetics and high density oligonucleotide/SNP microarrays and parse their impact by integrated global expression profiling. PMBL cell lines were distinguished by moderate chromosome rearrangement levels undercutting cHL, while lacking oncogene translocations seen in B-NHL. In total 61 deletions were shared by two or more cell lines, together with 12 amplifications (≥4x) and 72 homozygous regions. Integrated genomic and transcriptional profiling showed deletions to be the most important class of chromosome rearrangement. Lesions were mapped to several loci associated with PMBL, e.g. 2p15 (REL/COMMD1), 9p24 (JAK2, CD274), 16p13 (SOCS1, LITAF, CIITA); plus new or tenuously associated loci: 2p16 (MSH6), 6q23 (TNFAIP3), 9p22 (CDKN2A/B), 20p12 (PTPN1). Discrete homozygous regions sometimes substituted focal deletions accompanied by gene silencing implying a role for epigenetic or mutational inactivation. Genomic amplifications increasing gene expression or gene-activating rearrangements were respectively rare or absent. Our findings

  17. Genomic Landscape of Primary Mediastinal B-Cell Lymphoma Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Dai, Haiping; Ehrentraut, Stefan; Nagel, Stefan; Eberth, Sonja; Pommerenke, Claudia; Dirks, Wilhelm G; Geffers, Robert; Kalavalapalli, Srilaxmi; Kaufmann, Maren; Meyer, Corrina; Faehnrich, Silke; Chen, Suning; Drexler, Hans G; MacLeod, Roderick A F

    2015-01-01

    Primary mediastinal B-Cell lymphoma (PMBL) is a recently defined entity comprising ~2-10% non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL). Unlike most NHL subtypes, PMBL lacks recurrent gene rearrangements to serve as biomarkers or betray target genes. While druggable, late chemotherapeutic complications warrant the search for new targets and models. Well characterized tumor cell lines provide unlimited material to serve as preclinical resources for verifiable analyses directed at the discovery of new biomarkers and pathological targets using high throughput microarray technologies. The same cells may then be used to seek intelligent therapies directed at clinically validated targets. Four cell lines have emerged as potential PMBL models: FARAGE, KARPAS-1106P, MEDB-1 and U-2940. Transcriptionally, PMBL cell lines cluster near c(lassical)-HL and B-NHL examples showing they are related but separate entities. Here we document genomic alterations therein, by cytogenetics and high density oligonucleotide/SNP microarrays and parse their impact by integrated global expression profiling. PMBL cell lines were distinguished by moderate chromosome rearrangement levels undercutting cHL, while lacking oncogene translocations seen in B-NHL. In total 61 deletions were shared by two or more cell lines, together with 12 amplifications (≥4x) and 72 homozygous regions. Integrated genomic and transcriptional profiling showed deletions to be the most important class of chromosome rearrangement. Lesions were mapped to several loci associated with PMBL, e.g. 2p15 (REL/COMMD1), 9p24 (JAK2, CD274), 16p13 (SOCS1, LITAF, CIITA); plus new or tenuously associated loci: 2p16 (MSH6), 6q23 (TNFAIP3), 9p22 (CDKN2A/B), 20p12 (PTPN1). Discrete homozygous regions sometimes substituted focal deletions accompanied by gene silencing implying a role for epigenetic or mutational inactivation. Genomic amplifications increasing gene expression or gene-activating rearrangements were respectively rare or absent. Our findings

  18. Genomic Landscape of Primary Mediastinal B-Cell Lymphoma Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Nagel, Stefan; Eberth, Sonja; Pommerenke, Claudia; Dirks, Wilhelm G.; Geffers, Robert; Kalavalapalli, Srilaxmi; Kaufmann, Maren; Meyer, Corrina; Faehnrich, Silke; Chen, Suning; Drexler, Hans G.; MacLeod, Roderick A. F.

    2015-01-01

    Primary mediastinal B-Cell lymphoma (PMBL) is a recently defined entity comprising ~2–10% non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL). Unlike most NHL subtypes, PMBL lacks recurrent gene rearrangements to serve as biomarkers or betray target genes. While druggable, late chemotherapeutic complications warrant the search for new targets and models. Well characterized tumor cell lines provide unlimited material to serve as preclinical resources for verifiable analyses directed at the discovery of new biomarkers and pathological targets using high throughput microarray technologies. The same cells may then be used to seek intelligent therapies directed at clinically validated targets. Four cell lines have emerged as potential PMBL models: FARAGE, KARPAS-1106P, MEDB-1 and U-2940. Transcriptionally, PMBL cell lines cluster near c(lassical)-HL and B-NHL examples showing they are related but separate entities. Here we document genomic alterations therein, by cytogenetics and high density oligonucleotide/SNP microarrays and parse their impact by integrated global expression profiling. PMBL cell lines were distinguished by moderate chromosome rearrangement levels undercutting cHL, while lacking oncogene translocations seen in B-NHL. In total 61 deletions were shared by two or more cell lines, together with 12 amplifications (≥4x) and 72 homozygous regions. Integrated genomic and transcriptional profiling showed deletions to be the most important class of chromosome rearrangement. Lesions were mapped to several loci associated with PMBL, e.g. 2p15 (REL/COMMD1), 9p24 (JAK2, CD274), 16p13 (SOCS1, LITAF, CIITA); plus new or tenuously associated loci: 2p16 (MSH6), 6q23 (TNFAIP3), 9p22 (CDKN2A/B), 20p12 (PTPN1). Discrete homozygous regions sometimes substituted focal deletions accompanied by gene silencing implying a role for epigenetic or mutational inactivation. Genomic amplifications increasing gene expression or gene-activating rearrangements were respectively rare or absent. Our findings

  19. B-cell markers in malignant B-cell lymphoma with scleroderma-like manifestation.

    PubMed

    Van Joost, T; Stolz, E; Blog, F B; Van der Kwast, T H; Vuzevski, V D; Van Dongen, J M

    1984-12-01

    A case is described of malignant B-cell lymphoma with scleroderma-like manifestation. Using different monoclonals as B-cell markers the tumor appeared to be positive for surface immunoglobulins (SmIg) and for B2-antigen, but negative for intracytoplasmic immunoglobulin (CIg), BA2- and FMC7-antigens. Therefore, the tumor could be determined as a highly differentiated Sm-positive early B-cell type of B-cell lymphoma. In this clinically rare manifestation of cutaneous B-cell lymphoma aspects of the cell morphology and of cellular mediated immunity are briefly discussed.

  20. Expression cloning of human B cell immunoglobulins.

    PubMed

    Wardemann, Hedda; Kofer, Juliane

    2013-01-01

    The majority of lymphomas originate from B cells at the germinal center stage or beyond. Preferential selection of B cell clones by a limited set of antigens has been suggested to drive lymphoma development. However, little is known about the specificity of the antibodies expressed by lymphoma cells, and the role of antibody-specificity in lymphomagenesis remains elusive. Here, we describe a strategy to characterize the antibody reactivity of human B cells. The approach allows the unbiased characterization of the human antibody repertoire on a single cell level through the generation of recombinant monoclonal antibodies from single primary human B cells of defined origin. This protocol offers a detailed description of the method starting from the flow cytometric isolation of single human B cells, to the RT-PCR-based amplification of the expressed Igh, Igκ, and Igλ chain genes, and Ig gene expression vector cloning for the in vitro production of monoclonal antibodies. The strategy may be used to obtain information on the clonal evolution of B cell lymphomas by single cell Ig gene sequencing and on the antibody reactivity of human lymphoma B cells.

  1. Primary cutaneous B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Bogle, Melissa A; Riddle, Christy C; Triana, Emily M; Jones, Dan; Duvic, Madeleine

    2005-09-01

    Primary cutaneous B-cell lymphomas include extranodal marginal zone B-cell lymphoma, follicular lymphoma, large B-cell lymphoma, and, rarely, mantle cell lymphoma. Our purpose in conducting this review was to determine the clinical and behavioral characteristics of primary cutaneous B-cell lymphomas, their relationship to infectious triggers, and therapeutic response. We conducted a retrospective chart review of 23 adult patients presenting to the dermatology clinic at M. D. Anderson Cancer Center with primary cutaneous B-cell lymphoma between January 1999 and May 2003. Primary cutaneous B-cell lymphomas generally present on the head and neck, with the trunk and extremities afflicted to a lesser extent. Patients were found to have serologic evidence of prior infection with Borrelia burgdorferi (n = 10), Helicobacter pylori (n = 5), and Epstein-Barr virus (n = 6). Overall, treatment of primary cutaneous B-cell lymphoma should involve multiple modalities; however, specific treatment aimed at concurrent or suspected infection, particularly B burgdorferi, is a helpful adjunct and may achieve complete remission in a small subset of patients.

  2. The B cell in systemic lupus erythaematosus: a rational target for more effective therapy.

    PubMed

    Driver, C B; Ishimori, M; Weisman, M H

    2008-10-01

    Current treatment options for systemic lupus erythaematosus (SLE) are diverse and poorly defined, and aggressive therapy can be associated with serious toxicity and tolerability issues. There is, therefore, a need for new and improved treatments to be studied thoroughly in well-designed controlled trials. B Cell dysfunction has emerged as a key pathophysiological component of SLE and is a prime target for the development of new agents for a wide range of lupus severity, including advanced disease. Although many current drugs appear to modify B cell function, the advent of new, targeted therapies offers the hope of improved efficacy and a better long-term tolerability profile.

  3. The Histological and Biological Spectrum of Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma in the WHO Classification

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Madhu P.; Pittaluga, Stefania; Jaffe, Elaine S.

    2012-01-01

    Diffuse large B cell lymphomas (DLBCL) are aggressive B-cell lymphomas that are clinically, pathologically and genetically diverse, in part reflecting the functional diversity of the B-cell system. The focus in recent years has been towards incorporation of clinical features, morphology, immunohistochemistry and ever evolving genetic data into the classification scheme. The 2008 WHO classification reflects this complexity with the addition of several new entities and variants. The discovery of distinct subtypes by gene expression profiling (GEP) heralded a new era with a focus on pathways of transformation as well as a promise of more targeted therapies, directed at specific pathways. Some DLBCLs exhibit unique clinical characteristics with a predilection for specific anatomic sites; the anatomic site often reflects underlying biological distinctions. Recently, the spectrum of EBV-driven B-cell proliferations in patients without iatrogenic or congenital immunosuppression has been better characterized; most of these occur in patients of advanced age, and include EBV-positive large B-cell lymphoma of the elderly. HHV-8 is involved in the pathogenesis of primary effusion lymphoma, which can present as a “solid variant.” Two borderline categories were created; one deals with tumors at the interface between classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL) and DLBCL. The second confronts the interface between Burkitt Lymphoma (BL) and DLBCL, so called “B-cell lymphoma, unclassifiable, with features intermediate between diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and Burkitt lymphoma” in the 2008 classification. Most cases harbor both MYC and BCL2 translocations, and are highly aggressive. Another interesting entity is ALK+ DLBCL, which renders itself potentially targetable by ALK inhibitors. Ongoing investigations at the genomic level, with both exome and whole genome sequencing, are sure to reveal new pathways of transformation in the future. PMID:23006945

  4. Preclinical Evaluation of the Novel BTK Inhibitor Acalabrutinib in Canine Models of B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Harrington, Bonnie K; Gardner, Heather L; Izumi, Raquel; Hamdy, Ahmed; Rothbaum, Wayne; Coombes, Kevin R; Covey, Todd; Kaptein, Allard; Gulrajani, Michael; Van Lith, Bart; Krejsa, Cecile; Coss, Christopher C; Russell, Duncan S; Zhang, Xiaoli; Urie, Bridget K; London, Cheryl A; Byrd, John C; Johnson, Amy J; Kisseberth, William C

    2016-01-01

    Acalabrutinib (ACP-196) is a second-generation inhibitor of Bruton agammaglobulinemia tyrosine kinase (BTK) with increased target selectivity and potency compared to ibrutinib. In this study, we evaluated acalabrutinib in spontaneously occurring canine lymphoma, a model of B-cell malignancy similar to human diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). First, we demonstrated that acalabrutinib potently inhibited BTK activity and downstream effectors in CLBL1, a canine B-cell lymphoma cell line, and primary canine lymphoma cells. Acalabrutinib also inhibited proliferation in CLBL1 cells. Twenty dogs were enrolled in the clinical trial and treated with acalabrutinib at dosages of 2.5 to 20mg/kg every 12 or 24 hours. Acalabrutinib was generally well tolerated, with adverse events consisting primarily of grade 1 or 2 anorexia, weight loss, vomiting, diarrhea and lethargy. Overall response rate (ORR) was 25% (5/20) with a median progression free survival (PFS) of 22.5 days. Clinical benefit was observed in 30% (6/20) of dogs. These findings suggest that acalabrutinib is safe and exhibits activity in canine B-cell lymphoma patients and support the use of canine lymphoma as a relevant model for human non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). PMID:27434128

  5. Preclinical Evaluation of the Novel BTK Inhibitor Acalabrutinib in Canine Models of B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Heather L.; Izumi, Raquel; Hamdy, Ahmed; Rothbaum, Wayne; Coombes, Kevin R.; Covey, Todd; Kaptein, Allard; Gulrajani, Michael; Van Lith, Bart; Krejsa, Cecile; Coss, Christopher C.; Russell, Duncan S.; Zhang, Xiaoli; Urie, Bridget K.; London, Cheryl A.; Byrd, John C.; Johnson, Amy J.; Kisseberth, William C.

    2016-01-01

    Acalabrutinib (ACP-196) is a second-generation inhibitor of Bruton agammaglobulinemia tyrosine kinase (BTK) with increased target selectivity and potency compared to ibrutinib. In this study, we evaluated acalabrutinib in spontaneously occurring canine lymphoma, a model of B-cell malignancy similar to human diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). First, we demonstrated that acalabrutinib potently inhibited BTK activity and downstream effectors in CLBL1, a canine B-cell lymphoma cell line, and primary canine lymphoma cells. Acalabrutinib also inhibited proliferation in CLBL1 cells. Twenty dogs were enrolled in the clinical trial and treated with acalabrutinib at dosages of 2.5 to 20mg/kg every 12 or 24 hours. Acalabrutinib was generally well tolerated, with adverse events consisting primarily of grade 1 or 2 anorexia, weight loss, vomiting, diarrhea and lethargy. Overall response rate (ORR) was 25% (5/20) with a median progression free survival (PFS) of 22.5 days. Clinical benefit was observed in 30% (6/20) of dogs. These findings suggest that acalabrutinib is safe and exhibits activity in canine B-cell lymphoma patients and support the use of canine lymphoma as a relevant model for human non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). PMID:27434128

  6. Enhanced Cultivation Of Stimulated Murine B Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sammons, David W.

    1994-01-01

    Method of in vitro cultivation of large numbers of stimulated murine B lymphocytes. Cells electrofused with other cells to produce hybridomas and monoclonal antibodies. Offers several advantages: polyclonally stimulated B-cell blasts cultivated for as long as 14 days, hybridomas created throughout culture period, yield of hybridomas increases during cultivation, and possible to expand polyclonally in vitro number of B cells specific for antigenic determinants first recognized in vivo.

  7. Understanding Aggression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, J. P.

    Research in many fields of the social and biological sciences indicates that there are ecological, cultural, social, psychological, physiological, and genetic causes of aggression. The agonistic behavior system, which adapts to situations of social conflict, includes several patterns of conduct ranging from overt fighting to complete passivity. In…

  8. The Genetic Basis of Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Pasqualucci, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review Diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is an aggressive disease featuring heterogeneous genetic, phenotypic and clinical characteristics. Understanding the basis for this heterogeneity represents a critical step toward further progress in the management of this disease, which remains a clinical challenge in approximately one third of patients. This review summarizes current knowledge about the molecular pathogenesis of DLBCL, and describes how recent advances in the genomic characterization of this cancer have provided new insights into its biology, revealing several potential targets for improved diagnosis and therapy. Recent findings In the past few years, the development of high-resolution technologies has provided significant help in identifying genetic lesions and/or disrupted signaling pathways that are required for DLBCL initiation and progression. These studies uncovered the involvement of cellular programs that had not been previously appreciated, including histone/chromatin remodeling and immune recognition. Alterations in these pathways could favor epigenetic reprogramming and escape from cellular immunity. Summary The identification of genetic alterations that contribute to the malignant transformation of a B cell into a DLBCL is helping to better understand the biology of this disease and to identify critical nodes driving tumor progression or resistance to therapy. The rapid pace at which these discoveries are taking place is poised to have significant impact for patients stratification based on molecular predictors and for the development of rational targeted therapies. PMID:23673341

  9. Dominant neurologic symptomatology in intravascular large B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Kubisova, K; Martanovic, P; Sisovsky, V; Tomleinova, Z; Steno, A; Janega, P; Rychly, B; Babal, P

    2016-01-01

    Intravascular large B-cell lymphoma (IVLBCL) is a rare variant of extranodal large B-cell lymphoma and it is characterized by selective intravascular proliferation of malignant cells. Typical features of the disease include aggressive behavior, rapid and frequently fatal course. Clinical picture is non-specific and heterogeneous, depending on the affected organ. It is not uncommon that this unique type of lymphoma is diagnosed post mortem. Herein, we report two cases of IVLBCL with neurologic symptomatology. In our clinical study patient 1 was an 80-year-old male with mixed paraparesis of lower extremities and difficulties with sphincter control. Patient 2 (56-year-old male) had vision malfunction, mental status changes and defect in phatic and motor functions. In both cases definite diagnosis was established by histological examination of necroptic material. We propose to include IVLBCL in differential diagnostic considerations in patients presenting with gradually impairing neurological status and spinal cord damage of unknown etiology (Fig. 2, Ref. 9). PMID:27546361

  10. Proinflammatory GM-CSF-producing B cells in multiple sclerosis and B cell depletion therapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Rui; Rezk, Ayman; Miyazaki, Yusei; Hilgenberg, Ellen; Touil, Hanane; Shen, Ping; Moore, Craig S; Michel, Laure; Althekair, Faisal; Rajasekharan, Sathy; Gommerman, Jennifer L; Prat, Alexandre; Fillatreau, Simon; Bar-Or, Amit

    2015-10-21

    B cells are not limited to producing protective antibodies; they also perform additional functions relevant to both health and disease. However, the relative contribution of functionally distinct B cell subsets in human disease, the signals that regulate the balance between such subsets, and which of these subsets underlie the benefits of B cell depletion therapy (BCDT) are only partially elucidated. We describe a proinflammatory, granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF)-expressing human memory B cell subset that is increased in frequency and more readily induced in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients compared to healthy controls. In vitro, GM-CSF-expressing B cells efficiently activated myeloid cells in a GM-CSF-dependent manner, and in vivo, BCDT resulted in a GM-CSF-dependent decrease in proinflammatory myeloid responses of MS patients. A signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5)- and STAT6-dependent mechanism was required for B cell GM-CSF production and reciprocally regulated the generation of regulatory IL-10-expressing B cells. STAT5/6 signaling was enhanced in B cells of untreated MS patients compared with healthy controls, and B cells reemerging in patients after BCDT normalized their STAT5/6 signaling as well as their GM-CSF/IL-10 cytokine secretion ratios. The diminished proinflammatory myeloid cell responses observed after BCDT persisted even as new B cells reconstituted. These data implicate a proinflammatory B cell/myeloid cell axis in disease and underscore the rationale for selective targeting of distinct B cell populations in MS and other human autoimmune diseases. PMID:26491076

  11. CD19 chimeric antigen receptor (CD19 CAR)-redirected adoptive T-cell immunotherapy for the treatment of relapsed or refractory B-cell Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Onea, Alexandra S; Jazirehi, Ali R

    2016-01-01

    Recovery rates for B-cell Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma (NHL) are up to 70% with current standard-of-care treatments including rituximab (chimeric anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody) in combination with chemotherapy (R-CHOP). However, patients who do not respond to first-line treatment or develop resistance have a very poor prognosis. This signifies the need for the development of an optimal treatment approach for relapsed/refractory B-NHL. Novel CD19- chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell redirected immunotherapy is an attractive option for this subset of patients. Anti-CD19 CAR T-cell therapy has already had remarkable efficacy in various leukemias as well as encouraging outcomes in phase I clinical trials of relapsed/refractory NHL. In going forward with additional clinical trials, complementary treatments that may circumvent potential resistance mechanisms should be used alongside anti-CD19 T-cells in order to prevent relapse with resistant strains of disease. Some such supplementary tactics include conditioning with lymphodepletion agents, sensitizing with kinase inhibitors and Bcl-2 inhibitors, enhancing function with multispecific CAR T-cells and CD40 ligand-expressing CAR T-cells, and safeguarding with lymphoma stem cell-targeted treatments. A therapy regimen involving anti-CD19 CAR T-cells and one or more auxiliary treatments could dramatically improve prognoses for patients with relapsed/refractory B-cell NHL. This approach has the potential to revolutionize B-NHL salvage therapy in much the same way rituximab did for first-line treatments. PMID:27186412

  12. Targeting Stereotyped B Cell Receptors from Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Patients with Synthetic Antigen Surrogates.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Mohosin; Liu, Yun; Qi, Junpeng; Peng, Haiyong; Morimoto, Jumpei; Rader, Christoph; Chiorazzi, Nicholas; Kodadek, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is a disease in which a single B-cell clone proliferates relentlessly in peripheral lymphoid organs, bone marrow, and blood. DNA sequencing experiments have shown that about 30% of CLL patients have stereotyped antigen-specific B-cell receptors (BCRs) with a high level of sequence homology in the variable domains of the heavy and light chains. These include many of the most aggressive cases that haveIGHV-unmutated BCRs whose sequences have not diverged significantly from the germ line. This suggests a personalized therapy strategy in which a toxin or immune effector function is delivered selectively to the pathogenic B-cells but not to healthy B-cells. To execute this strategy, serum-stable, drug-like compounds able to target the antigen-binding sites of most or all patients in a stereotyped subset are required. We demonstrate here the feasibility of this approach with the discovery of selective, high affinity ligands for CLL BCRs of the aggressive, stereotyped subset 7P that cross-react with the BCRs of several CLL patients in subset 7p, but not with BCRs from patients outside this subset.

  13. Recurrent mutations of the STAT6 DNA binding domain in primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Ritz, Olga; Guiter, Chrystelle; Castellano, Flavia; Dorsch, Karola; Melzner, Julia; Jais, Jean-Philippe; Dubois, Gwendoline; Gaulard, Philippe; Möller, Peter; Leroy, Karen

    2009-08-01

    Primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma (PMBL) is a separate entity of aggressive B-cell lymphoma, characterized by a constitutive activation of janus kinase-signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK-STAT) signaling pathway, also observed in Hodgkin lymphoma. Although many cancers exhibit constitutive JAK-STAT pathway activation, mutations of STAT genes have not been reported in neoplasms. Here, we show that MedB-1 PMBL-derived and L1236 Hodgkin-derived cell lines and 20 of 55 (36%) PMBL cases harbor heterozygous missense mutations in STAT6 DNA binding domain, whereas no mutation was found in 25 diffuse large B-cell lymphoma samples. In 3 cases, somatic origin was indicated by the absence of the mutations in the nontumoral tissue. The pattern of STAT6 mutations was different from the classical features of somatic hypermutations. The mutant STAT6 proteins showed a decreased DNA binding ability in transfected HEK cells, but no decrease in expression of STAT6 canonical target genes was observed in PMBL cases with a mutated STAT6 gene. Although the oncogenic properties of STAT6 mutant proteins remain to be determined, their recurrent selection in PMBL strongly argues for their involvement in the pathogenesis of this aggressive B-cell lymphoma. PMID:19423726

  14. Targeting Stereotyped B Cell Receptors from Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Patients with Synthetic Antigen Surrogates.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Mohosin; Liu, Yun; Qi, Junpeng; Peng, Haiyong; Morimoto, Jumpei; Rader, Christoph; Chiorazzi, Nicholas; Kodadek, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is a disease in which a single B-cell clone proliferates relentlessly in peripheral lymphoid organs, bone marrow, and blood. DNA sequencing experiments have shown that about 30% of CLL patients have stereotyped antigen-specific B-cell receptors (BCRs) with a high level of sequence homology in the variable domains of the heavy and light chains. These include many of the most aggressive cases that haveIGHV-unmutated BCRs whose sequences have not diverged significantly from the germ line. This suggests a personalized therapy strategy in which a toxin or immune effector function is delivered selectively to the pathogenic B-cells but not to healthy B-cells. To execute this strategy, serum-stable, drug-like compounds able to target the antigen-binding sites of most or all patients in a stereotyped subset are required. We demonstrate here the feasibility of this approach with the discovery of selective, high affinity ligands for CLL BCRs of the aggressive, stereotyped subset 7P that cross-react with the BCRs of several CLL patients in subset 7p, but not with BCRs from patients outside this subset. PMID:26851280

  15. Human norovirus culture in B cells.

    PubMed

    Jones, Melissa K; Grau, Katrina R; Costantini, Veronica; Kolawole, Abimbola O; de Graaf, Miranda; Freiden, Pamela; Graves, Christina L; Koopmans, Marion; Wallet, Shannon M; Tibbetts, Scott A; Schultz-Cherry, Stacey; Wobus, Christiane E; Vinjé, Jan; Karst, Stephanie M

    2015-12-01

    Human noroviruses (HuNoVs) are a leading cause of foodborne disease and severe childhood diarrhea, and they cause a majority of the gastroenteritis outbreaks worldwide. However, the development of effective and long-lasting HuNoV vaccines and therapeutics has been greatly hindered by their uncultivability. We recently demonstrated that a HuNoV replicates in human B cells, and that commensal bacteria serve as a cofactor for this infection. In this protocol, we provide detailed methods for culturing the GII.4-Sydney HuNoV strain directly in human B cells, and in a coculture system in which the virus must cross a confluent epithelial barrier to access underlying B cells. We also describe methods for bacterial stimulation of HuNoV B cell infection and for measuring viral attachment to the surface of B cells. Finally, we highlight variables that contribute to the efficiency of viral replication in this system. Infection assays require 3 d and attachment assays require 3 h. Analysis of infection or attachment samples, including RNA extraction and RT-qPCR, requires ∼6 h.

  16. Analysis of Environmental Chemical Mixtures and Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Risk in the NCI-SEER NHL Study

    PubMed Central

    Czarnota, Jenna; Gennings, Chris; Colt, Joanne S.; De Roos, Anneclaire J.; Cerhan, James R.; Severson, Richard K.; Hartge, Patricia; Ward, Mary H.

    2015-01-01

    Background There are several suspected environmental risk factors for non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). The associations between NHL and environmental chemical exposures have typically been evaluated for individual chemicals (i.e., one-by-one). Objectives We determined the association between a mixture of 27 correlated chemicals measured in house dust and NHL risk. Methods We conducted a population-based case–control study of NHL in four National Cancer Institute–Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results centers—Detroit, Michigan; Iowa; Los Angeles County, California; and Seattle, Washington—from 1998 to 2000. We used weighted quantile sum (WQS) regression to model the association of a mixture of chemicals and risk of NHL. The WQS index was a sum of weighted quartiles for 5 polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), 7 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and 15 pesticides. We estimated chemical mixture weights and effects for study sites combined and for each site individually, and also for histologic subtypes of NHL. Results The WQS index was statistically significantly associated with NHL overall [odds ratio (OR) = 1.30; 95% CI: 1.08, 1.56; p = 0.006; for one quartile increase] and in the study sites of Detroit (OR = 1.71; 95% CI: 1.02, 2.92; p = 0.045), Los Angeles (OR = 1.44; 95% CI: 1.00, 2.08; p = 0.049), and Iowa (OR = 1.76; 95% CI: 1.23, 2.53; p = 0.002). The index was marginally statistically significant in Seattle (OR = 1.39; 95% CI: 0.97, 1.99; p = 0.071). The most highly weighted chemicals for predicting risk overall were PCB congener 180 and propoxur. Highly weighted chemicals varied by study site; PCBs were more highly weighted in Detroit, and pesticides were more highly weighted in Iowa. Conclusions An index of chemical mixtures was significantly associated with NHL. Our results show the importance of evaluating chemical mixtures when studying cancer risk. Citation Czarnota J, Gennings C, Colt JS, De Roos AJ, Cerhan JR, Severson RK, Hartge P, Ward MH

  17. Widespread Use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) among Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (NHL) Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Osian, S. Rausch; Leal, A.D.; Allmer, C.; Maurer, M.J.; Nowakowski, G.; Inwards, D.J.; Macon, W.R.; Ehlers, S.L.; Weiner, G.J.; Habermann, T.M.; Cerhan, J.R.; Thompson, C.A.

    2015-01-01

    There are few studies examining complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use and beliefs among non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) survivors. 719 NHL patients from the University of Iowa/Mayo Clinic Molecular Epidemiology Resource who completed the 3-year post-diagnosis questionnaire were included in this study. 636 (89%) reported ever using CAM, with 78% utilizing vitamins, 54% alternative therapies and 45% herbals. Female gender was associated with increased overall CAM use (P<.0001) as well as use of vitamins (P<.0001), herbals (P=.006) and alternative therapy (P=.0002) for cancer. Older age (>60) was associated with increased vitamin use (P=.005) and decreased herbal use (P=.008). Among users, 143 (20%) believe CAM assists healing, 123 (17%) believe CAM relieves symptoms, 122 (17%) believe CAM gives a feeling of control, 110 (15%) believe CAM assists other treatments, 108 (15%) believe CAM boosts immunity, 26 (4%) believe CAM cures cancer, and 36 (5%) believe CAM prevents the spread of cancer. PMID:24745936

  18. Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia in relation to CD4+ lymphocyte count in patients with B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma treated with chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Kenji; Kobayashi, Yukio; Asakura, Yoshitaka; Mori, Masakazu; Azuma, Teruhisa; Maruyama, Dai; Kim, Sung-Won; Watanabe, Takashi; Tobinai, Kensei

    2010-10-01

    An increasing incidence of Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia (PCP) in patients with B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (B-NHL) receiving rituximab treatment has been reported. We reviewed patients with B-NHL who underwent chemotherapy from 2004 to 2008 at our institution to identify risk factors for PCP development during and after chemotherapy. Among 297 patients with B-NHL, six developed PCP. Of 121 patients (41%) who received PCP prophylaxis with sulfamethoxazole–trimethoprim during chemotherapy, none developed PCP (0%), while among 176 patients (59%) who had no prophylaxis, six (3.4%) developed PCP at a median of 2 months (range: 1–3 months) after starting chemotherapy. Patients with CD4+ lymphocyte counts ≤200/mm3 before chemotherapy had a higher risk of developing PCP (p=0.045), while a history of rituximab treatment was not related to PCP. CD4+ lymphocyte counts ≤200/mm3 during and after chemotherapy were observed in 18.9% of patients. PMID:20919860

  19. A multicentre phase II study of vorinostat in patients with relapsed or refractory indolent B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma and mantle cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Ogura, Michinori; Ando, Kiyoshi; Suzuki, Tatsuya; Ishizawa, Kenichi; Oh, Sung Yong; Itoh, Kuniaki; Yamamoto, Kazuhito; Au, Wing Yan; Tien, Hwei-Fang; Matsuno, Yoshihiro; Terauchi, Takashi; Yamamoto, Keiko; Mori, Masahiko; Tanaka, Yoshinobu; Shimamoto, Takashi; Tobinai, Kensei; Kim, Won Seog

    2014-01-01

    Although initial rituximab-containing chemotherapies achieve high response rates, indolent B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (B-NHL), such as follicular lymphoma (FL), is still incurable. Therefore, new effective agents with novel mechanisms are anticipated. In this multicentre phase II study, patients with relapsed/refractory indolent B-NHL and mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) received vorinostat 200 mg twice daily for 14 consecutive days in a 21-d cycle until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity occurred. The primary endpoint was overall response rate (ORR) in FL patients and safety and tolerability in all patients. Secondary endpoints included progression-free survival (PFS). Fifty-six eligible patients were enrolled; 50 patients (39 with FL, seven with other B-NHL, and four with MCL) were evaluable for ORR, and 40 patients had received rituximab-containing prior chemotherapeutic regimens. For the 39 patients with FL, the ORR was 49% [95% confidence interval (CI): 32·4, 65·2] and the median PFS was 20 months (95% CI: 11·2, 29·7). Major toxicities were manageable grade 3/4 thrombocytopenia and neutropenia. Vorinostat offers sustained antitumour activity in patients with relapsed or refractory FL with an acceptable safety profile. Further investigation of vorinostat for clinical efficacy is warranted. PMID:24617454

  20. Copy Number Variation Analysis on a Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Case-Control Study Identifies an 11q25 Duplication Associated with Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Conde, Lucia; Riby, Jacques; Zhang, Jianqing; Bracci, Paige M.; Skibola, Christine F.

    2014-01-01

    Recent GWAS have identified several susceptibility loci for NHL. Despite these successes, much of the heritable variation in NHL risk remains to be explained. Common copy-number variants are important genomic sources of variability, and hence a potential source to explain part of this missing heritability. In this study, we carried out a CNV analysis using GWAS data from 681 NHL cases and 749 controls to explore the relationship between common structural variation and lymphoma susceptibility. Here we found a novel association with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) risk involving a partial duplication of the C-terminus region of the LOC283177 long non-coding RNA that was further confirmed by quantitative PCR. For chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma (CLL/SLL), known somatic deletions were identified on chromosomes 13q14, 11q22-23, 14q32 and 22q11.22. Our study shows that GWAS data can be used to identify germline CNVs associated with disease risk for DLBCL and somatic CNVs for CLL/SLL. PMID:25133503

  1. [Aggressive fibromatoses].

    PubMed

    Döhler, J R; Hamelmann, H; Lasson, U

    1984-03-01

    Benign by nature, aggressive fibromatoses (desmoid fibromas) may represent as difficult therapeutic problems as malignant tumours. When subtotally resected they tend to recur. But spontaneous regression is possible. Expense and limits of their surgical treatment are discussed with reference to seven patients. In five cases primary affliction of bone was evident. There are three reports given in detail: In the first, malignant transformation may be due to radiation therapy and hemipelvectomy could not prevent recurrence. In the second, spontaneous regression of untreated pelvic affection may have occurred. In the third, several resections and amputation of the leg failed to cure congenital infantile fibromatosis.

  2. Interaction of Staphylococci with Human B cells

    PubMed Central

    Nygaard, Tyler K.; Kobayashi, Scott D.; Freedman, Brett; Porter, Adeline R.; Voyich, Jovanka M.; Otto, Michael; Schneewind, Olaf; DeLeo, Frank R.

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of human infections worldwide. The pathogen produces numerous molecules that can interfere with recognition and binding by host innate immune cells, an initial step required for the ingestion and subsequent destruction of microbes by phagocytes. To better understand the interaction of this pathogen with human immune cells, we compared the association of S. aureus and S. epidermidis with leukocytes in human blood. We found that a significantly greater proportion of B cells associated with S. epidermidis relative to S. aureus. Complement components and complement receptors were important for the binding of B cells with S. epidermidis. Experiments using staphylococci inactivated by ultraviolet radiation and S. aureus isogenic deletion mutants indicated that S. aureus secretes molecules regulated by the SaeR/S two-component system that interfere with the ability of human B cells to bind this bacterium. We hypothesize that the relative inability of B cells to bind S. aureus contributes to the microbe’s success as a human pathogen. PMID:27711145

  3. B cell abnormalities in systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    2003-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic, multisystem autoimmune disease characterized by the differentiation of short- and long-lived immunoglobulin secreting plasma cells that secrete pathogenic autoantibodies. Ectopic germinal centers and plasma cells secreting autoantibodies have been observed in lupus nephritis kidneys. Candidate genetic susceptibility loci for SLE include genes that affect differentiation and survival of plasma cells, such as those that influence activation, proliferation, cytokine and chemokine secretion/responsiveness, and apoptosis of the T and B cells that are involved in humoral immunity generated in germinal centers, as well as genes that are involved in presentation and clearance of apoptotic material and autoantigens by antigen presenting cells and other phagocytes. Emerging data have demonstrated that B lymphocytes are active participants in humoral immune responses that lead to T-dependent and T-independent differentiation of immunoglobulin-secreting plasma cells by homotypic CD154–CD40 interactions as well as continued stimulation by B cell activating factor through B cell maturation antigen, B cell activating factor receptor and transmembrane activater. PMID:15180894

  4. B cell abnormalities in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Grammer, Amrie C; Lipsky, Peter E

    2003-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic, multisystem autoimmune disease characterized by the differentiation of short- and long-lived immunoglobulin secreting plasma cells that secrete pathogenic autoantibodies. Ectopic germinal centers and plasma cells secreting autoantibodies have been observed in lupus nephritis kidneys. Candidate genetic susceptibility loci for SLE include genes that affect differentiation and survival of plasma cells, such as those that influence activation, proliferation, cytokine and chemokine secretion/responsiveness, and apoptosis of the T and B cells that are involved in humoral immunity generated in germinal centers, as well as genes that are involved in presentation and clearance of apoptotic material and autoantigens by antigen presenting cells and other phagocytes. Emerging data have demonstrated that B lymphocytes are active participants in humoral immune responses that lead to T-dependent and T-independent differentiation of immunoglobulin-secreting plasma cells by homotypic CD154-CD40 interactions as well as continued stimulation by B cell activating factor through B cell maturation antigen, B cell activating factor receptor and transmembrane activater.

  5. Overexpression of the NDR1/HIN1-Like Gene NHL6 Modifies Seed Germination in Response to Abscisic Acid and Abiotic Stresses in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Bao, Yan; Song, Wei-Meng; Pan, Jing; Jiang, Chun-Mei; Srivastava, Renu; Li, Bei; Zhu, Lu-Ying; Su, Hong-Yan; Gao, Xiao-Shu; Liu, Hua; Yu, Xiang; Yang, Lei; Cheng, Xian-Hao; Zhang, Hong-Xia

    2016-01-01

    NHL (NDR1/HIN1-like) genes play crucial roles in pathogen induced plant responses to biotic stress. Here, we report the possible function of NHL6 in plant response to abscisic acid (ABA) and abiotic stress. NHL6 was highly expressed in non-germinated seeds, and its expression was strongly induced by ABA and multiple abiotic stress signals. Loss-of-function of NHL6 decreased sensitivity to ABA in the early developmental stages including seed germination and post-germination seedling growth of the nhl6 mutants. However, overexpression of NHL6 increased sensitivity to ABA, salt and osmotic stress of the transgenic plants. Further studies indicated that the increased sensitivity in the 35S::NHL6 overexpressing plants could be a result of both ABA hypersensitivity and increased endogenous ABA accumulation under the stress conditions. It was also seen that the ABA-responsive element binding factors AREB1, AREB2 and ABF3 could regulate NHL6 expression at transcriptional level. Our results indicate that NHL6 plays an important role in the abiotic stresses-induced ABA signaling and biosynthesis, particularly during seed germination and early seedling development in Arabidopsis.

  6. Overexpression of the NDR1/HIN1-Like Gene NHL6 Modifies Seed Germination in Response to Abscisic Acid and Abiotic Stresses in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Bao, Yan; Song, Wei-Meng; Pan, Jing; Jiang, Chun-Mei; Srivastava, Renu; Li, Bei; Zhu, Lu-Ying; Su, Hong-Yan; Gao, Xiao-Shu; Liu, Hua; Yu, Xiang; Yang, Lei; Cheng, Xian-Hao; Zhang, Hong-Xia

    2016-01-01

    NHL (NDR1/HIN1-like) genes play crucial roles in pathogen induced plant responses to biotic stress. Here, we report the possible function of NHL6 in plant response to abscisic acid (ABA) and abiotic stress. NHL6 was highly expressed in non-germinated seeds, and its expression was strongly induced by ABA and multiple abiotic stress signals. Loss-of-function of NHL6 decreased sensitivity to ABA in the early developmental stages including seed germination and post-germination seedling growth of the nhl6 mutants. However, overexpression of NHL6 increased sensitivity to ABA, salt and osmotic stress of the transgenic plants. Further studies indicated that the increased sensitivity in the 35S::NHL6 overexpressing plants could be a result of both ABA hypersensitivity and increased endogenous ABA accumulation under the stress conditions. It was also seen that the ABA-responsive element binding factors AREB1, AREB2 and ABF3 could regulate NHL6 expression at transcriptional level. Our results indicate that NHL6 plays an important role in the abiotic stresses-induced ABA signaling and biosynthesis, particularly during seed germination and early seedling development in Arabidopsis. PMID:26849212

  7. Overexpression of the NDR1/HIN1-Like Gene NHL6 Modifies Seed Germination in Response to Abscisic Acid and Abiotic Stresses in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Jing; Jiang, Chun-Mei; Srivastava, Renu; Li, Bei; Zhu, Lu-Ying; Su, Hong-Yan; Gao, Xiao-Shu; Liu, Hua; Yu, Xiang; Yang, Lei; Cheng, Xian-Hao; Zhang, Hong-Xia

    2016-01-01

    NHL (NDR1/HIN1-like) genes play crucial roles in pathogen induced plant responses to biotic stress. Here, we report the possible function of NHL6 in plant response to abscisic acid (ABA) and abiotic stress. NHL6 was highly expressed in non-germinated seeds, and its expression was strongly induced by ABA and multiple abiotic stress signals. Loss-of-function of NHL6 decreased sensitivity to ABA in the early developmental stages including seed germination and post-germination seedling growth of the nhl6 mutants. However, overexpression of NHL6 increased sensitivity to ABA, salt and osmotic stress of the transgenic plants. Further studies indicated that the increased sensitivity in the 35S::NHL6 overexpressing plants could be a result of both ABA hypersensitivity and increased endogenous ABA accumulation under the stress conditions. It was also seen that the ABA-responsive element binding factors AREB1, AREB2 and ABF3 could regulate NHL6 expression at transcriptional level. Our results indicate that NHL6 plays an important role in the abiotic stresses-induced ABA signaling and biosynthesis, particularly during seed germination and early seedling development in Arabidopsis. PMID:26849212

  8. Rituximab does not reset defective early B cell tolerance checkpoints.

    PubMed

    Chamberlain, Nicolas; Massad, Christopher; Oe, Tyler; Cantaert, Tineke; Herold, Kevan C; Meffre, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) patients show abnormalities in early B cell tolerance checkpoints, resulting in the accumulation of large numbers of autoreactive B cells in their blood. Treatment with rituximab, an anti-CD20 mAb that depletes B cells, has been shown to preserve β cell function in T1D patients and improve other autoimmune diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis. However, it remains largely unknown how anti-B cell therapy thwarts autoimmunity in these pathologies. Here, we analyzed the reactivity of Abs expressed by single, mature naive B cells from 4 patients with T1D before and 52 weeks after treatment to determine whether rituximab resets early B cell tolerance checkpoints. We found that anti-B cell therapy did not alter the frequencies of autoreactive and polyreactive B cells, which remained elevated in the blood of all patients after rituximab treatment. Moreover, the limited proliferative history of autoreactive B cells after treatment revealed that these clones were newly generated B cells and not self-reactive B cells that had escaped depletion and repopulated the periphery through homeostatic expansion. We conclude that anti-B cell therapy may provide a temporary dampening of autoimmune processes through B cell depletion. However, repletion with autoreactive B cells may explain the relapse that occurs in many autoimmune patients after anti-B cell therapy. PMID:26642366

  9. Proliferation and apoptosis in malignant and normal cells in B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphomas.

    PubMed Central

    Stokke, T.; Holte, H.; Smedshammer, L.; Smeland, E. B.; Kaalhus, O.; Steen, H. B.

    1998-01-01

    We have examined apoptosis and proliferation in lymph node cell suspensions from patients with B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma using flow cytometry. A method was developed which allowed estimation of the fractions of apoptotic cells and cells in the S-phase of the cell cycle simultaneously with tumour-characteristic light chain expression. Analysis of the tumour S-phase fraction and the tumour apoptotic fraction in lymph node cell suspensions from 95 B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) patients revealed a non-normal distribution for both parameters. The median fraction of apoptotic tumour cells was 1.1% (25 percentiles 0.5%, 2.7%). In the same samples, the median fraction of apoptotic normal cells was higher than for the tumour cells (1.9%; 25 percentiles 0.7%, 4.0%; P = 0.03). The median fraction of tumour cells in S-phase was 1.4% (25 percentiles 0.8%, 4.8%), the median fraction of normal cells in S-phase was significantly lower than for the tumour cells (1.0%; 25 percentiles 0.6%, 1.9%; P = 0.004). When the number of cases was plotted against the logarithm of the S-phase fraction of the tumour cells, a distribution with two Gaussian peaks was needed to fit the data. One peak was centred around an S-phase fraction of 0.9%; the other was centred around 7%. These peaks were separated by a valley at approximately 3%, indicating that the S-phase fraction in NHL can be classified as 'low' (< 3%) or 'high' (> 3%), independent of the median S-phase fraction. The apoptotic fractions were log-normally distributed. The median apoptotic fraction was higher (1.5%) in the 'high' S-phase group than in the 'low' S-phase group (0.8%; P = 0.02). However, there was no significant correlation between the two parameters (P > 0.05). PMID:9667654

  10. Pathobiology of primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Pileri, Stefano A; Zinzani, Pier L; Gaidano, Gianluca; Falini, Brunangelo; Gaulard, Philippe; Zucca, Emanuele; Sabattini, Elena; Ascani, Stefano; Rossi, Maura; Cavalli, Franco

    2003-01-01

    consisted of large cells with varying degrees of nuclear polymorphism and clear to basophilic cytoplasm. Molecular analysis was performed on 40 cases and showed novel findings. More than half of the cases displayed bcl-6 gene mutations, which usually occurred together with functioning somatic IgV(H) gene mutations, and BCL-6 and/or MUM1/IRF4 expression. The present study supports the concept that PBML is derived from activated GC or post-germinal center cells. However, it differs from other aggressive B-cell lymphomas in that it shows defective Ig production despite the expression of Oct-2, BOB.1, and PU.1 transcription factors, and a lack of IgV(H) gene crippling mutations. PMID:15202521

  11. Advances in Human B Cell Phenotypic Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Kaminski, Denise A.; Wei, Chungwen; Qian, Yu; Rosenberg, Alexander F.; Sanz, Ignacio

    2012-01-01

    To advance our understanding and treatment of disease, research immunologists have been called-upon to place more centralized emphasis on impactful human studies. Such endeavors will inevitably require large-scale study execution and data management regulation (“Big Biology”), necessitating standardized and reliable metrics of immune status and function. A well-known example setting this large-scale effort in-motion is identifying correlations between eventual disease outcome and T lymphocyte phenotype in large HIV-patient cohorts using multiparameter flow cytometry. However, infection, immunodeficiency, and autoimmunity are also characterized by correlative and functional contributions of B lymphocytes, which to-date have received much less attention in the human Big Biology enterprise. Here, we review progress in human B cell phenotyping, analysis, and bioinformatics tools that constitute valuable resources for the B cell research community to effectively join in this effort. PMID:23087687

  12. CD40-Activated B Cell Cancer Vaccine Improves Second Clinical Remission and Survival in Privately Owned Dogs with Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Krick, Erika; Coughlin, Christina M.; Overley, Beth; Gregor, Thomas P.

    2011-01-01

    Cell-based active immunotherapy for cancer is a promising novel strategy, with the first dendritic cell (DC) vaccine achieving regulatory approval for clinical use last year. Manufacturing remains arduous, especially for DC vaccines, and the prospect of using cell-based immunotherapy in the adjuvant setting or in combination with chemotherapy remains largely untested. Here, we used a comparative oncology approach to test the safety and potential efficacy of tumor RNA-loaded, CD40-activated B cells in privately owned dogs presenting with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), a clinical scenario that represents not only a major problem in veterinary medicine but also a bona fide spontaneous animal model for the human condition. When administered to NHL dogs in remission after induction chemotherapy, CD40-B cells electroporated ex vivo with autologous tumor RNA safely stimulated immunity in vivo. Although chemotherapy plus CD40-B vaccination did not improve time-to-progression or lymphoma-specific survival compared to dogs treated with chemotherapy alone, vaccination potentiated the effects of salvage therapy and improved the rate of durable second remissions as well as subsequent lymphoma-specific survival following salvage therapy. Several of these relapsed dogs are now long-term survivors and free of disease for more than a year. Overall, these clinical and immunological results suggest that cell-based CD40 cancer vaccination is safe and synergizes with chemotherapy to improve clinical outcome in canine NHL. More broadly, our findings underscore the unique value of clinical investigations in tumor-bearing companion animals. PMID:21904611

  13. GWAS of follicular lymphoma reveals allelic heterogeneity at 6p21.32 and suggests shared genetic susceptibility with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Smedby, Karin E; Foo, Jia Nee; Skibola, Christine F; Darabi, Hatef; Conde, Lucia; Hjalgrim, Henrik; Kumar, Vikrant; Chang, Ellen T; Rothman, Nathaniel; Cerhan, James R; Brooks-Wilson, Angela R; Rehnberg, Emil; Irwan, Ishak D; Ryder, Lars P; Brown, Peter N; Bracci, Paige M; Agana, Luz; Riby, Jacques; Cozen, Wendy; Davis, Scott; Hartge, Patricia; Morton, Lindsay M; Severson, Richard K; Wang, Sophia S; Slager, Susan L; Fredericksen, Zachary S; Novak, Anne J; Kay, Neil E; Habermann, Thomas M; Armstrong, Bruce; Kricker, Anne; Milliken, Sam; Purdue, Mark P; Vajdic, Claire M; Boyle, Peter; Lan, Qing; Zahm, Shelia H; Zhang, Yawei; Zheng, Tongzhang; Leach, Stephen; Spinelli, John J; Smith, Martyn T; Chanock, Stephen J; Padyukov, Leonid; Alfredsson, Lars; Klareskog, Lars; Glimelius, Bengt; Melbye, Mads; Liu, Edison T; Adami, Hans-Olov; Humphreys, Keith; Liu, Jianjun

    2011-04-01

    Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) represents a diverse group of hematological malignancies, of which follicular lymphoma (FL) is a prevalent subtype. A previous genome-wide association study has established a marker, rs10484561 in the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II region on 6p21.32 associated with increased FL risk. Here, in a three-stage genome-wide association study, starting with a genome-wide scan of 379 FL cases and 791 controls followed by validation in 1,049 cases and 5,790 controls, we identified a second independent FL-associated locus on 6p21.32, rs2647012 (OR(combined)  = 0.64, P(combined)  = 2 × 10(-21)) located 962 bp away from rs10484561 (r(2)<0.1 in controls). After mutual adjustment, the associations at the two SNPs remained genome-wide significant (rs2647012:OR(adjusted)  = 0.70, P(adjusted)  =  4 × 10(-12); rs10484561:OR(adjusted)  = 1.64, P(adjusted)  = 5 × 10(-15)). Haplotype and coalescence analyses indicated that rs2647012 arose on an evolutionarily distinct haplotype from that of rs10484561 and tags a novel allele with an opposite (protective) effect on FL risk. Moreover, in a follow-up analysis of the top 6 FL-associated SNPs in 4,449 cases of other NHL subtypes, rs10484561 was associated with risk of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (OR(combined)  = 1.36, P(combined)  =  1.4 × 10(-7)). Our results reveal the presence of allelic heterogeneity within the HLA class II region influencing FL susceptibility and indicate a possible shared genetic etiology with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. These findings suggest that the HLA class II region plays a complex yet important role in NHL.

  14. GWAS of Follicular Lymphoma Reveals Allelic Heterogeneity at 6p21.32 and Suggests Shared Genetic Susceptibility with Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Skibola, Christine F.; Darabi, Hatef; Conde, Lucia; Hjalgrim, Henrik; Kumar, Vikrant; Chang, Ellen T.; Rothman, Nathaniel; Cerhan, James R.; Brooks-Wilson, Angela R.; Rehnberg, Emil; Irwan, Ishak D.; Ryder, Lars P.; Brown, Peter N.; Bracci, Paige M.; Agana, Luz; Riby, Jacques; Cozen, Wendy; Davis, Scott; Hartge, Patricia; Morton, Lindsay M.; Severson, Richard K.; Wang, Sophia S.; Slager, Susan L.; Fredericksen, Zachary S.; Novak, Anne J.; Kay, Neil E.; Habermann, Thomas M.; Armstrong, Bruce; Kricker, Anne; Milliken, Sam; Purdue, Mark P.; Vajdic, Claire M.; Boyle, Peter; Lan, Qing; Zahm, Shelia H.; Zhang, Yawei; Zheng, Tongzhang; Leach, Stephen; Spinelli, John J.; Smith, Martyn T.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Padyukov, Leonid; Alfredsson, Lars; Klareskog, Lars; Glimelius, Bengt; Melbye, Mads; Liu, Edison T.; Adami, Hans-Olov; Humphreys, Keith; Liu, Jianjun

    2011-01-01

    Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) represents a diverse group of hematological malignancies, of which follicular lymphoma (FL) is a prevalent subtype. A previous genome-wide association study has established a marker, rs10484561 in the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II region on 6p21.32 associated with increased FL risk. Here, in a three-stage genome-wide association study, starting with a genome-wide scan of 379 FL cases and 791 controls followed by validation in 1,049 cases and 5,790 controls, we identified a second independent FL–associated locus on 6p21.32, rs2647012 (ORcombined = 0.64, Pcombined = 2×10−21) located 962 bp away from rs10484561 (r2<0.1 in controls). After mutual adjustment, the associations at the two SNPs remained genome-wide significant (rs2647012:ORadjusted = 0.70, Padjusted = 4×10−12; rs10484561:ORadjusted = 1.64, Padjusted = 5×10−15). Haplotype and coalescence analyses indicated that rs2647012 arose on an evolutionarily distinct haplotype from that of rs10484561 and tags a novel allele with an opposite (protective) effect on FL risk. Moreover, in a follow-up analysis of the top 6 FL–associated SNPs in 4,449 cases of other NHL subtypes, rs10484561 was associated with risk of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (ORcombined = 1.36, Pcombined = 1.4×10−7). Our results reveal the presence of allelic heterogeneity within the HLA class II region influencing FL susceptibility and indicate a possible shared genetic etiology with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. These findings suggest that the HLA class II region plays a complex yet important role in NHL. PMID:21533074

  15. Systematic review of the recent evidence for the efficacy and safety of chlorambucil in the treatment of B-cell malignancies.

    PubMed

    Lepretre, Stéphane; Dartigeas, C; Feugier, P; Marty, M; Salles, G

    2016-01-01

    Emergence of new agents has deeply modified treatment options and the role of chlorambucil (CLB) in B-cell malignancies. We conducted a systematic review of prospective, randomized, controlled trials (RCTs) investigating the benefits and harms of CLB used alone or in combination with other treatment in patients suffering from chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), low-grade non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) or Waldenström macroglobulinemia (WM). For CLL, review of the nine RCTs showed that the main advantage of CLB is its low toxicity in comparison with purine nucleoside analogs like fludarabine in either CLL or NHL. In CLL, the major disadvantage is the very low rate of complete response, except when combining an anti-CD20 antibody. For B-cell lymphoma and WM, six RCTs were summarized. Results according to the usual criteria are presented and the role of CLB, used mostly in combination with an anti-CD20 antibody, is discussed for each indication, in particular for unfit patients. PMID:26308278

  16. Systematic review of the recent evidence for the efficacy and safety of chlorambucil in the treatment of B-cell malignancies.

    PubMed

    Lepretre, Stéphane; Dartigeas, C; Feugier, P; Marty, M; Salles, G

    2016-01-01

    Emergence of new agents has deeply modified treatment options and the role of chlorambucil (CLB) in B-cell malignancies. We conducted a systematic review of prospective, randomized, controlled trials (RCTs) investigating the benefits and harms of CLB used alone or in combination with other treatment in patients suffering from chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), low-grade non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) or Waldenström macroglobulinemia (WM). For CLL, review of the nine RCTs showed that the main advantage of CLB is its low toxicity in comparison with purine nucleoside analogs like fludarabine in either CLL or NHL. In CLL, the major disadvantage is the very low rate of complete response, except when combining an anti-CD20 antibody. For B-cell lymphoma and WM, six RCTs were summarized. Results according to the usual criteria are presented and the role of CLB, used mostly in combination with an anti-CD20 antibody, is discussed for each indication, in particular for unfit patients.

  17. New insights in the regulation of human B cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Schmidlin, Heike; Diehl, Sean A.; Blom, Bianca

    2009-01-01

    B lymphocytes provide the cellular basis of the humoral immune response. All stages of this process, from B cell activation to formation of germinal centers and differentiation into memory B cells or plasma cells, are influenced by extrinsic signals and controlled by transcriptional regulation. Compared to naïve B cells, memory B cells display a distinct expression profile, which allows for their rapid secondary responses. Indisputably, many B cell malignancies result from aberrations in the circuitry controlling B cell function, particularly during the GC reaction. Here we review new insights into memory B cell subtypes, recent literature on transcription factors regulating human B cell differentiation, and further evidence for B cell lymphomagenesis emanating from errors during the GC cell reactions. PMID:19447676

  18. Germinal center B cells and mixed leukocyte reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Monfalcone, A.P.; Kosco, M.H.; Szakal, A.K.; Tew, J.G. )

    1989-09-01

    The present study was undertaken to determine if germinal center (GC) B cells are sufficiently activated to stimulate mixed leukocyte reactions (MLR). Percoll density fractionation and a panning technique with peanut agglutinin (PNA) were used to isolate GC B cells from the lymph nodes of immune mice. The GC B cells were treated with mitomycin C or irradiation and used to stimulate allogeneic or syngeneic splenic T cells in the MLR. Controls included high-density (HD) B cells prepared from spleens of the same mice and HD B cells activated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and dextran sulfate. GC B cells bound high amount sof PNA (i.e., PNAhi). Similarly, the LPS-dextran sulfate-activated B cells were PNAhi. Treatment with neuraminidase rendered the PNAlo HD B cells PNAhi. GC B cells and the LPS-dextran sulfate-activated HD B cells stimulated a potent MLR, while the untreated HD B cells did not. However, following neuraminidase treatment, the resulting PNAhi HD B cell population was able to induce an MLR. The PNA marker appeared to be an indicator of stimulatory activity, but incubating the cells with PNA to bind the cell surface ligand did not interfere with the MLR. GC B cells were also capable of stimulating a syngeneic MLR in most experiments although this was not consistently obtained. It appears that germinal centers represent a unique in vivo microenvironment that provides the necessary signals for B cells to become highly effective antigen-presenting cells.

  19. Epigenetics and B-cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Shaknovich, Rita; Melnick, Ari

    2011-01-01

    STRUCTURED ABSTRACT Purpose of review It has only recently become apparent that mutations in epigenetic mechanisms and perturbation of epigenomic patterning are frequent events in B-cell lymphomas. The purpose of this review is to highlight these new findings and provide a conceptual framework for understanding how epigenetic modifications might contribute to lymphomagenesis. Recent findings Somatic mutations affecting histone methyltransferases such as EZH2 and MLL2, histone demethylases including UTX and JMJD2C and histone acetyltransferases including CBP and p300 are recurrent and common in lymphomas. These mutations result in disruption of chromatin structure and functions of other proteins, ultimately causing aberrant transcriptional programming affecting multiple gene networks. Widespread perturbation of cytosine methylation patterning now appears to be a hallmark of B-cell lymphomas and occurs in specific patterns that can distinguish disease subtypes. Therapeutic targeting strategies can overcome abnormal epigenetic mechanisms and potently kill lymphoma cells. Summary Newly discovered epigenetic lesions may provide critical insights into the genesis of B-cell lymphomas but further studies are required to understand how they affect biological mechanism. Epigenetic lesions offer tremendous opportunities for the development of improved biomarkers and treatments. PMID:21577103

  20. Metachronous/concomitant B-cell neoplasms with discordant light-chain or heavy-chain isotype restrictions: evidence of distinct B-cell neoplasms rather than clonal evolutions.

    PubMed

    Wei, Qiang; Sebastian, Siby; Papavassiliou, Paulie; Rehder, Catherine; Wang, Endi

    2014-10-01

    Metachronous/concomitant B-cell neoplasms with distinct morphology are usually considered clonally related. We retrospectively analyzed 4 cases of metachronous/concomitant B-cell neoplasms with discordant light-chain/heavy-chain restrictions. The primary diagnoses included chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL; n = 2), lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma (n = 1), and pediatric follicular lymphoma (FL; n = 1). The respective secondary diagnoses included diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL; n = 2), plasmablastic myeloma, and pediatric FL. The secondary B-cell neoplasm occurred after the primary diagnosis in 3 cases, with the median interval of 120 months (range, 21-216), whereas the remaining 1 case had the 2 neoplasms (CLL/DLBCL) diagnosed concurrently. Histology suggested aggressive transformation in 3 cases and recurrence in 1 case (FL). Nonetheless, 3 cases showed discordant light-chain restrictions between the 2 B-cell neoplasms, whereas in the remaining case (lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma/plasmablastic myeloma), the 2 neoplasms shared κ light-chain restriction but expressed different heavy-chain isotypes (IgM versus IgA). The 2 CLL/DLBCL cases had polymerase chain reaction-based IGH/K gene rearrangement study and amplicon sequence analysis performed, which demonstrated distinct clonal amplicons between the 2 B-cell neoplasms in each case. Concomitant/metachronous B-cell neoplasms may be clonally unrelated, which can be confirmed by immunoglobulin isotype analysis and/or genotypic studies. We advocate analysis of clonal identities in large cell transformation or recurrent disease compared with primary indolent B-cell neoplasm because of a potential difference in prognosis between clonally related and unrelated secondary B-cell neoplasms.

  1. Class-switched B cells display response to therapeutic B-cell depletion in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Möller, Burkhard; Aeberli, Daniel; Eggli, Stefan; Fuhrer, Martin; Vajtai, Istvan; Vögelin, Esther; Ziswiler, Hans-Rudolf; Dahinden, Clemens A; Villiger, Peter M

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Reconstitution of peripheral blood (PB) B cells after therapeutic depletion with the chimeric anti-CD20 antibody rituximab (RTX) mimics lymphatic ontogeny. In this situation, the repletion kinetics and migratory properties of distinct developmental B-cell stages and their correlation to disease activity might facilitate our understanding of innate and adaptive B-cell functions in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods Thirty-five 'RTX-naïve' RA patients with active arthritis were treated after failure of tumour necrosis factor blockade in an open-label study with two infusions of 1,000 mg RTX. Prednisone dose was tapered according to clinical improvement from a median of 10 mg at baseline to 5 mg at 9 and 12 months. Conventional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs were kept stable. Subsets of CD19+ B cells were assessed by flow cytometry according to their IgD and CD27 surface expression. Their absolute number and relative frequency in PB were followed every 3 months and were determined in parallel in synovial tissue (n = 3) or synovial fluid (n = 3) in the case of florid arthritis. Results Six of 35 patients fulfilled the European League Against Rheumatism criteria for moderate clinical response, and 19 others for good clinical response. All PB B-cell fractions decreased significantly in number (P < 0.001) after the first infusion. Disease activity developed independently of the total B-cell number. B-cell repopulation was dominated in quantity by CD27-IgD+ 'naïve' B cells. The low number of CD27+IgD- class-switched memory B cells (MemB) in the blood, together with sustained reduction of rheumatoid factor serum concentrations, correlated with good clinical response. Class-switched MemB were found accumulated in flaring joints. Conclusions The present data support the hypothesis that control of adaptive immune processes involving germinal centre-derived, antigen, and T-cell-dependently matured B cells is essential for successful RTX treatment. PMID

  2. Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma in patient after treatment of angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Skugor, Nives Dzeko; Perić, Zinaida; Vrhovac, Radovan; Radić-Kristo, Delfa; Kardum-Skelin, Ika; Jaksić, Branimir

    2010-03-01

    -induced proliferation of latently or newly EBV-infected B-cells with eventual clonal selection and progression to aggressive B-cell lymphoma. PMID:20432757

  3. CONCEPT ANALYSIS: AGGRESSION

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jianghong

    2006-01-01

    The concept of aggression is important to nursing because further knowledge of aggression can help generate a better theoretical model to drive more effective intervention and prevention approaches. This paper outlines a conceptual analysis of aggression. First, the different forms of aggression are reviewed, including the clinical classification and the stimulus-based classification. Then the manifestations and measurement of aggression are described. Finally, the causes and consequences of aggression are outlined. It is argued that a better understanding of aggression and the causal factors underlying it are essential for learning how to prevent negative aggression in the future. PMID:15371137

  4. A B-Cell Superantigen Induces the Apoptosis of Murine and Human Malignant B Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzo, Daniela; Duarte, Alejandra; Mundiñano, Juliana; Berguer, Paula; Nepomnaschy, Irene; Piazzon, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    B-cell superantigens (Sags) bind to conserved sites of the VH or VL regions of immunoglobulin molecules outside their complementarity-determining regions causing the apoptosis of normal cognate B cells. No attempts to investigate whether B-cell Sags are able to induce the apoptosis of cognate malignant B cells were reported. In the present study we show that protein L (PpL), secreted by Finegoldia magna, a B-cell Sag which interacts with κ+ bearing cells, induces the apoptosis of murine and human κ+ lymphoma B cells both in vitro and in vivo. Apoptosis was not altered by caspase-8 inhibitor. No alterations in the levels of Bid, Fas and Fas-L were found suggesting that PpL does not activate the extrinsic pathway of apoptosis. The involvement of the intrinsic pathway was clearly indicated by: i) alterations in mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) both in murine and human lymphoma cells exposed to PpL; ii) decreased levels of apoptosis in the presence of caspase-9 inhibitor; iii) significant increases of Bim and Bax protein levels and downregulation of Bcl-2; iv) the translocation from the cytoplasm to the mitochondria of Bax and Bim pro-apoptotic proteins and its inhibition by caspase-9 inhibitor but not by caspase-8 inhibitor and v) the translocation of Bcl-2 protein from the mitochondria to the cytosol and its inhibition by caspase-9 inhibitor but not by caspase-8 inhibitor. The possibility of a therapeutic use of Sags in lymphoma/leukemia B cell malignancies is discussed. PMID:27603942

  5. A B-Cell Superantigen Induces the Apoptosis of Murine and Human Malignant B Cells.

    PubMed

    Lorenzo, Daniela; Duarte, Alejandra; Mundiñano, Juliana; Berguer, Paula; Nepomnaschy, Irene; Piazzon, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    B-cell superantigens (Sags) bind to conserved sites of the VH or VL regions of immunoglobulin molecules outside their complementarity-determining regions causing the apoptosis of normal cognate B cells. No attempts to investigate whether B-cell Sags are able to induce the apoptosis of cognate malignant B cells were reported. In the present study we show that protein L (PpL), secreted by Finegoldia magna, a B-cell Sag which interacts with κ+ bearing cells, induces the apoptosis of murine and human κ+ lymphoma B cells both in vitro and in vivo. Apoptosis was not altered by caspase-8 inhibitor. No alterations in the levels of Bid, Fas and Fas-L were found suggesting that PpL does not activate the extrinsic pathway of apoptosis. The involvement of the intrinsic pathway was clearly indicated by: i) alterations in mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) both in murine and human lymphoma cells exposed to PpL; ii) decreased levels of apoptosis in the presence of caspase-9 inhibitor; iii) significant increases of Bim and Bax protein levels and downregulation of Bcl-2; iv) the translocation from the cytoplasm to the mitochondria of Bax and Bim pro-apoptotic proteins and its inhibition by caspase-9 inhibitor but not by caspase-8 inhibitor and v) the translocation of Bcl-2 protein from the mitochondria to the cytosol and its inhibition by caspase-9 inhibitor but not by caspase-8 inhibitor. The possibility of a therapeutic use of Sags in lymphoma/leukemia B cell malignancies is discussed. PMID:27603942

  6. The Genetic Landscape of Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Pasqualucci, Laura; Dalla-Favera, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    Diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL), the most common lymphoid malignancy in the western world, is an aggressive disease that remains incurable in approximately 30% of patients. Over the past decade, the rapid expansion of sequencing technologies allowing the genome-wide assessment of genomic and transcriptional changes has revolutionized our understanding of the genetic basis of DLBCL by providing a comprehensive and unbiased view of the genes/pathways that are disrupted by genetic alterations in this disease, and may contribute to tumor initiation and expansion. These studies uncovered the existence of several previously unappreciated alterations in key cellular pathways that may also influence treatment outcome. Indeed, a number of newly identified genetic lesions are currently being explored as markers for improved diagnosis and risk stratification, or are entering clinical trials as promising therapeutic targets. This review focuses on recent advances in the genomic characterization of DLBCL and discusses how information gained from these efforts has provided new insights into its biology, uncovering potential targets of prognostic and therapeutic relevance. PMID:25805586

  7. High-level DNA amplifications are common genetic aberrations in B-cell neoplasms.

    PubMed Central

    Werner, C. A.; Döhner, H.; Joos, S.; Trümper, L. H.; Baudis, M.; Barth, T. F.; Ott, G.; Möller, P.; Lichter, P.; Bentz, M.

    1997-01-01

    Gene amplification is one of the molecular mechanisms resulting in the up-regulation of gene expression. In non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, such gene amplifications have been identified rarely. Using comparative genomic hybridization, a technique that has proven to be very sensitive for the detection of high-level DNA amplifications, we analyzed 108 cases of B-cell neoplasms (42 chronic B-cell leukemias, 5 mantle cell lymphomas, and 61 aggressive B-cell lymphomas). Twenty-four high-level amplifications were identified in 13% of the patients and mapped to 15 different genomic regions. Regions most frequently amplified were bands Xq26-28, 2p23-24, and 2p14-16 as well as 18q21 (three times each). Amplification of several proto-oncogenes and a cell cycle control gene (N-MYC (two cases), BCL2, CCND2, and GLI) located within the amplified regions was demonstrated by Southern blot analysis or fluorescence in situ hybridization to interphase nuclei of tumor cells. These data demonstrate that gene amplifications in B-cell neoplasms are much more frequent than previously assumed. The identification of highly amplified DNA regions and genes included in the amplicons provides important information for further analyses of genetic events involved in lymphomagenesis. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9250147

  8. Advanced Stage, Increased Lactate Dehydrogenase, and Primary Site, but Not Adolescent Age (≥ 15 Years), Are Associated With an Increased Risk of Treatment Failure in Children and Adolescents With Mature B-Cell Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma: Results of the FAB LMB 96 Study

    PubMed Central

    Cairo, Mitchell S.; Sposto, Richard; Gerrard, Mary; Auperin, Anne; Goldman, Stanton C.; Harrison, Lauren; Pinkerton, Ross; Raphael, Martine; McCarthy, Keith; Perkins, Sherrie L.; Patte, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Adolescents (age 15 to 21 years) compared with younger children with mature B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) have been historically considered to have an inferior prognosis. We therefore analyzed the impact of age and other diagnostic factors on the risk of treatment failure in children and adolescents treated on the French-American-British Mature B-Cell Lymphoma 96 (FAB LMB 96) trial. Patients and Methods Patients were divided by risk: group A (limited), group B (intermediate), and group C (advanced), as previously described. Prognostic factors analyzed for event-free survival (EFS) included age (< 15 v ≥ 15 years), stage (I/II v III/IV), primary site, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), bone marrow/CNS (BM/CNS) involvement, and histology (diffuse large B-cell lymphoma v mediastinal B-cell lymphoma v Burkitt lymphoma or Burkitt-like lymphoma). Results The 3-year EFS for the whole cohort was 88% ± 1%. Age was not associated as a risk factor for increased treatment failure in either univariate analysis (P = .15) or multivariate analysis (P = .58). Increased LDH (≥ 2 × upper limit of normal [ULN] v < 2 × ULN), primary site, and BM-positive/CNS-positive disease were all independent risk factors associated with a significant increase in treatment failure rate (relative risk, 2.0; P < .001, P < .012, and P < .001, respectively). Conclusion LDH level at diagnosis, mediastinal disease, and combined BM-positive/CNS-positive involvement are independent risk factors in children with mature B-cell NHL. Future studies should be developed to identify specific therapeutic strategies (immunotherapy) to overcome these risk factors and to identify the biologic basis associated with these prognostic factors in children with mature B-cell NHL. PMID:22215753

  9. Treatment of ongoing autoimmune encephalomyelitis with activated B-cell progenitors maturing into regulatory B cells

    PubMed Central

    Korniotis, Sarantis; Gras, Christophe; Letscher, Hélène; Montandon, Ruddy; Mégret, Jérôme; Siegert, Stefanie; Ezine, Sophie; Fallon, Padraic G.; Luther, Sanjiv A.; Fillatreau, Simon; Zavala, Flora

    2016-01-01

    The influence of signals perceived by immature B cells during their development in bone marrow on their subsequent functions as mature cells are poorly defined. Here, we show that bone marrow cells transiently stimulated in vivo or in vitro through the Toll-like receptor 9 generate proB cells (CpG-proBs) that interrupt experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) when transferred at the onset of clinical symptoms. Protection requires differentiation of CpG-proBs into mature B cells that home to reactive lymph nodes, where they trap T cells by releasing the CCR7 ligand, CCL19, and to inflamed central nervous system, where they locally limit immunopathogenesis through interleukin-10 production, thereby cooperatively inhibiting ongoing EAE. These data demonstrate that a transient inflammation at the environment, where proB cells develop, is sufficient to confer regulatory functions onto their mature B-cell progeny. In addition, these properties of CpG-proBs open interesting perspectives for cell therapy of autoimmune diseases. PMID:27396388

  10. Primary bilateral adrenal B-cell lymphoma associated with EBV and JCV infection

    PubMed Central

    Barzon, Luisa; Trevisan, Marta; Marino, Filippo; Guzzardo, Vincenza; Palù, Giorgio

    2009-01-01

    Primary lymphoma of the adrenal gland is a rare and highly aggressive disease, with only a few reports in the literature. The pathogenesis is unknown, but detection of Epstein Barr virus (EBV) genome sequences and gene expression in some cases of primary adrenal lymphomas suggested the virus might be a causative agent of the malignancy. While investigating the presence of genome sequences of oncogenic viruses in a large series of adrenal tumors, both EBV and JC polyomavirus (JCV) DNA sequences were detected in a diffuse large primary bilateral B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma of the adrenal gland, which was diagnosed only at postmortem examination in a 77 year-old woman with incidentally discovered adrenal masses and primary adrenal insufficiency. The presence of both EBV and JCV genome sequences suggests the relevance of EBV and JCV coinfection in the pathogenesis of this rare form of B-cell lymphoma. PMID:19146683

  11. Hepatitis C and double-hit B cell lymphoma successfully treated by antiviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Galati, Giovanni; Rampa, Lorenzo; Vespasiani-Gentilucci, Umberto; Marino, Mirella; Pisani, Francesco; Cota, Carlo; Guidi, Alessandro; Picardi, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    B cells lymphoma is one of the most challenging extra-hepatic manifestations of hepatitis C virus (HCV). Recently, a new kind of B-cell lymphoma, named double-hit B (DHL), was characterized with an aggressive clinical course whereas a potential association with HCV was not investigated. The new antiviral direct agents (DAAs) against HCV are effective and curative in the majority of HCV infections. We report the first case, to our knowledge, of DHL and HCV-infection successfully treated by new DAAs. According to our experience, a DHL must be suspected in case of HCV-related lymphoma, and an early diagnosis could direct towards a different hematological management because a worse prognosis might be expected. A possible effect of DAAs on DHL regression should be investigated, but eradicating HCV would avoid life-threatening reactivation of viral hepatitis during pharmacological immunosuppression in onco-haematological diseases. PMID:27803769

  12. Detection of MYD88 L265P in patients with lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma/Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia and other B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Sang-Yong; Kim, Hyun-Young; Park, Chang-Hun; Kim, Hee-Jin; Kim, Jong-Won; Kim, Seok Jin; Kim, Won Seog

    2016-01-01

    Background Recent studies have identified a high prevalence of the MYD88 L265P mutation in lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma (LPL)/Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia (WM) cases, whereas low frequencies have been observed in other B cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHLs). Methods We evaluated the sensitivity of the mutant enrichment 3'-modified oligonucleotide (MEMO)-PCR technique, a new detection method. We examined the MYD88 L265P mutation in a series of Korean patients with LPL/WM and other B cell NHLs in bone marrow aspirates, using the MEMO-PCR technique. Results The sensitivity of MEMO-PCR was estimated to be approximately 10-16.7%. MYD88 L265P was detected in 21 of 28 LPL cases (75%) and only three of 69 B cell NHL cases (4.3%). Conclusion Although MEMO-PCR had relatively low sensitivity, we confirmed the high prevalence of the MYD88 L265P mutation in Korean LPL patients. Our study suggests the diagnostic value of MYD88 L265P for differentiating B-cell NHLs.

  13. Activation-Induced Cytidine Deaminase Expression in Human B Cell Precursors Is Essential for Central B Cell Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Cantaert, Tineke; Schickel, Jean-Nicolas; Bannock, Jason M; Ng, Yen-Shing; Massad, Christopher; Oe, Tyler; Wu, Renee; Lavoie, Aubert; Walter, Jolan E; Notarangelo, Luigi D; Al-Herz, Waleed; Kilic, Sara Sebnem; Ochs, Hans D; Nonoyama, Shigeaki; Durandy, Anne; Meffre, Eric

    2015-11-17

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), the enzyme-mediating class-switch recombination (CSR) and somatic hypermutation (SHM) of immunoglobulin genes, is essential for the removal of developing autoreactive B cells. How AID mediates central B cell tolerance remains unknown. We report that AID enzymes were produced in a discrete population of immature B cells that expressed recombination-activating gene 2 (RAG2), suggesting that they undergo secondary recombination to edit autoreactive antibodies. However, most AID+ immature B cells lacked anti-apoptotic MCL-1 and were deleted by apoptosis. AID inhibition using lentiviral-encoded short hairpin (sh)RNA in B cells developing in humanized mice resulted in a failure to remove autoreactive clones. Hence, B cell intrinsic AID expression mediates central B cell tolerance potentially through its RAG-coupled genotoxic activity in self-reactive immature B cells.

  14. Aggressive behavior problems.

    PubMed

    Beaver, B V

    1986-12-01

    Accurate diagnosis of the cause of aggression in horses is essential to determining the appropriate course of action. The affective forms of aggression include fear-induced, pain-induced, intermale, dominance, protective, maternal, learned, and redirected aggressions. Non-affective aggression includes play and sex-related forms. Irritable aggression and hypertestosteronism in mares are medical problems, whereas genetic factors, brain dysfunction, and self-mutilation are also concerns. PMID:3492250

  15. B cell biology: implications for treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Anolik, J H

    2013-04-01

    B cells are critical players in the orchestration of properly regulated immune responses, normally providing protective immunity without autoimmunity. Balance in the B cell compartment is achieved through the finely regulated participation of multiple B cell populations with different antibody-dependent and independent functions. Both types of functions allow B cells to modulate other components of the innate and adaptive immune system. Autoantibody-independent B cell functions include antigen presentation, T cell activation and polarization, and dendritic cell modulation. Several of these functions are mediated by the ability of B cells to produce immunoregulatory cytokines and chemokines and by their critical contribution to lymphoid tissue development and organization including the development of ectopic tertiary lymphoid tissue. Additionally, the functional versatility of B cells enables them to play either protective or pathogenic roles in autoimmunity. In turn, B cell dysfunction has been critically implicated in the pathophysiology of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), a complex disease characterized by the production of autoantibodies and heterogeneous clinical involvement. Thus, the breakdown of B cell tolerance is a defining and early event in the disease process and may occur by multiple pathways, including alterations in factors that affect B cell activation thresholds, B cell longevity, and apoptotic cell processing. Once tolerance is broken, autoantibodies contribute to autoimmunity by multiple mechanisms including immune-complex mediated Type III hypersensitivity reactions, type II antibody-dependent cytotoxicity, and by instructing innate immune cells to produce pathogenic cytokines including IFNα, TNF and IL-1. The complexity of B cell functions has been highlighted by the variable success of B cell-targeted therapies in multiple autoimmune diseases, including those conventionally viewed as T cell-mediated conditions. Given the widespread

  16. Born at the Wrong Time: Selection Bias in the NHL Draft

    PubMed Central

    Deaner, Robert O.; Lowen, Aaron; Cobley, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Relative age effects (RAEs) occur when those who are relatively older for their age group are more likely to succeed. RAEs occur reliably in some educational and athletic contexts, yet the causal mechanisms remain unclear. Here we provide the first direct test of one mechanism, selection bias, which can be defined as evaluators granting fewer opportunities to relatively younger individuals than is warranted by their latent ability. Because RAEs are well-established in hockey, we analyzed National Hockey League (NHL) drafts from 1980 to 2006. Compared to those born in the first quarter (i.e., January–March), those born in the third and fourth quarters were drafted more than 40 slots later than their productivity warranted, and they were roughly twice as likely to reach career benchmarks, such as 400 games played or 200 points scored. This selection bias in drafting did not decrease over time, apparently continues to occur, and reduces the playing opportunities of relatively younger players. This bias is remarkable because it is exhibited by professional decision makers evaluating adults in a context where RAEs have been widely publicized. Thus, selection bias based on relative age may be pervasive. PMID:23460902

  17. Cell of origin associated classification of B-cell malignancies by gene signatures of the normal B-cell hierarchy.

    PubMed

    Johnsen, Hans Erik; Bergkvist, Kim Steve; Schmitz, Alexander; Kjeldsen, Malene Krag; Hansen, Steen Møller; Gaihede, Michael; Nørgaard, Martin Agge; Bæch, John; Grønholdt, Marie-Louise; Jensen, Frank Svendsen; Johansen, Preben; Bødker, Julie Støve; Bøgsted, Martin; Dybkær, Karen

    2014-06-01

    Recent findings have suggested biological classification of B-cell malignancies as exemplified by the "activated B-cell-like" (ABC), the "germinal-center B-cell-like" (GCB) and primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma (PMBL) subtypes of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and "recurrent translocation and cyclin D" (TC) classification of multiple myeloma. Biological classification of B-cell derived cancers may be refined by a direct and systematic strategy where identification and characterization of normal B-cell differentiation subsets are used to define the cancer cell of origin phenotype. Here we propose a strategy combining multiparametric flow cytometry, global gene expression profiling and biostatistical modeling to generate B-cell subset specific gene signatures from sorted normal human immature, naive, germinal centrocytes and centroblasts, post-germinal memory B-cells, plasmablasts and plasma cells from available lymphoid tissues including lymph nodes, tonsils, thymus, peripheral blood and bone marrow. This strategy will provide an accurate image of the stage of differentiation, which prospectively can be used to classify any B-cell malignancy and eventually purify tumor cells. This report briefly describes the current models of the normal B-cell subset differentiation in multiple tissues and the pathogenesis of malignancies originating from the normal germinal B-cell hierarchy. PMID:23998255

  18. Circulating CD21low B cells in common variable immunodeficiency resemble tissue homing, innate-like B cells

    PubMed Central

    Rakhmanov, Mirzokhid; Keller, Baerbel; Gutenberger, Sylvia; Foerster, Christian; Hoenig, Manfred; Driessen, Gertjan; van der Burg, Mirjam; van Dongen, Jacques J.; Wiech, Elisabeth; Visentini, Marcella; Quinti, Isabella; Prasse, Antje; Voelxen, Nadine; Salzer, Ulrich; Goldacker, Sigune; Fisch, Paul; Eibel, Hermann; Schwarz, Klaus; Peter, Hans-Hartmut; Warnatz, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    The homeostasis of circulating B cell subsets in the peripheral blood of healthy adults is well regulated, but in disease it can be severely disturbed. Thus, a subgroup of patients with common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) presents with an extraordinary expansion of an unusual B cell population characterized by the low expression of CD21. CD21low B cells are polyclonal, unmutated IgM+IgD+ B cells but carry a highly distinct gene expression profile which differs from conventional naïve B cells. Interestingly, while clearly not representing a memory population, they do share several features with the recently defined memory-like tissue, Fc receptor-like 4 positive B cell population in the tonsils of healthy donors. CD21low B cells show signs of previous activation and proliferation in vivo, while exhibiting defective calcium signaling and poor proliferation in response to B cell receptor stimulation. CD21low B cells express decreased amounts of homeostatic but increased levels of inflammatory chemokine receptors. This might explain their preferential homing to peripheral tissues like the bronchoalveolar space of CVID or the synovium of rheumatoid arthritis patients. Therefore, as a result of the close resemblance to the gene expression profile, phenotype, function and preferential tissue homing of murine B1 B cells, we suggest that CD21low B cells represent a human innate-like B cell population. PMID:19666505

  19. Clinical significance of interleukin-4 and interleukin-18 levels in aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma patients.

    PubMed

    Soydinc, H O; Guney, N; Basaran, M; Duranyildiz, D; Yasasever, V

    2016-01-01

    Strong evidence indicates that tumor growth can be actively controlled by the immune system, and interleukins (ILs) are known to play an influential role in immune response regulation. Moreover, inflammatory cytokines are significantly involved in lymphoma pathogenesis. We aimed to investigate serum levels of IL-4 and IL-18 in aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (A-NHL) patients and their relationship with prognostic parameters and therapy outcome. These serum factors were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in 46 patients with pathologically verified A-NHL before and after chemotherapy, and in 20 healthy controls. No significant difference in serum IL-4 (P = 0.11) and IL-18 (P = 0.261) levels was observed between the A-NHL and controls groups. None of the prognostic parameters analyzed significantly correlated with serum IL-4 concentration, while only lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) measurements were associated with IL-18 values. Serum IL-18 was elevated in the patients with high LDH levels compared to those exhibiting normal values (P = 0.045). In addition, no correlation was found between the concentrations of serum IL-4 and IL-18 in A-NHL patients (r = 0.188, P = 0.187). While IL-18 values did not change, serum IL-4 levels decreased following chemotherapy, independently from treatment response (P = 0.002). Our study is the first to report the response of serum IL-4 levels to chemotherapy. In conclusion, although IL-4 serum concentration has no diagnostic role, it is sensitivite to standard chemotherapy in A-NHL. However, serum IL-18 measurements have no diagnostic or prognostic role in this disease. PMID:27525895

  20. The life and death of a B cell.

    PubMed

    Defrance, Thierry; Casamayor-Pallejà, Montserrat; Krammer, Peter H

    2002-01-01

    Regulation of apoptosis in the B cell lineage has implications for homeostasis, quality control of the antibody response, and tolerance. In this chapter we examine the different checkpoints that control life and death decisions of B cells during the antigen-independent and antigen-dependent phases of their development. We discuss the cell death mechanism involved in elimination of unwanted B cells at different stages of their development as well as the signals that trigger or repress the apoptotic process. At the steady state, before or after development of an immune response, B cell apoptosis ensures that the antigen receptor (BCR) on newly produced B cells is functional and does not recognize self-antigens with high avidity. It also ensures that the size of the peripheral B cell compartment remains constant in spite of the continuous input of B cells from the bone marrow. All these processes are controlled by the mitochondrial death pathway and are thus perturbed by overexpression of the antiapoptotic members of the bcl-2 gene family. By contrast, the death receptor pathway plays a prominent role during the antigen-dependent phase of B cell development. Three sets of membrane molecules stand as crucial regulators of B cell survival. First, the BCR which plays a central but ambiguous role. On the one hand, it triggers death of B cells that recognize self-antigens or have been exposed to repeated antigenic stimulations. On the other hand, it promotes survival of the peripheral mature B cell pool and protects activated B cells from CD95-induced killing. Second, the death receptor Fas/CD95 which is instrumental in censoring B cells activated in a bystander fashion at the initiation of the response to T-dependent antigens. It also drives elimination of low-affinity and self-reactive B cell clones that arise through the process of somatic mutations during the germinal center reaction. As such, it contributes to the affinity maturation of the antibody response. Finally

  1. SAR3419: an anti-CD19-Maytansinoid Immunoconjugate for the treatment of B-cell malignancies.

    PubMed

    Blanc, Veronique; Bousseau, Anne; Caron, Anne; Carrez, Chantal; Lutz, Robert J; Lambert, John M

    2011-10-15

    SAR3419 is a novel anti-CD19 humanized monoclonal antibody conjugated to a maytansine derivate through a cleavable linker for the treatment of B-cell malignancies. SAR3419 combines the strengths of a high-potency tubulin inhibitor and the exquisite B-cell selectivity of an anti-CD19 antibody. The internalization and processing of SAR3419, following its binding at the surface of CD19-positive human lymphoma cell lines and xenograft models, release active metabolites that trigger cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis, leading to cell death and tumor regression. SAR3419 has also been shown to be active in different lymphoma xenograft models, including aggressive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, resulting in complete regressions and tumor-free survival. In these models, the activity of SAR3419 compared favorably with rituximab and lymphoma standard of care chemotherapy. Two phase I trials with 2 different schedules of SAR3419 as a single agent were conducted in refractory/relapsed B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Activity was reported in both schedules, in heavily pretreated patients of both follicular and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma subtypes, with a notable lack of significant hematological toxicity, validating SAR3419 as an effective antibody-drug conjugate and opening opportunities in the future. Numerous B-cell-specific anti-CD19 biologics are available to treat B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma, and early phase I results obtained with SAR3419 suggest that it is a promising candidate for further development in this disease. In addition, thanks to the broad expression of CD19, SAR3419 may provide treatment options for B-cell leukemias that are often CD20-negative. PMID:22003072

  2. Dengue Virus Directly Stimulates Polyclonal B Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Papa, Michelle Premazzi; de Morais, Ana Theresa Silveira; Peçanha, Ligia Maria Torres; de Arruda, Luciana Barros

    2015-01-01

    Dengue infection is associated to vigorous inflammatory response, to a high frequency of activated B cells, and to increased levels of circulating cross-reactive antibodies. We investigated whether direct infection of B cells would promote activation by culturing primary human B lymphocytes from healthy donors with DENV in vitro. B cells were susceptible, but poorly permissive to infection. Even though, primary B cells cultured with DENV induced substantial IgM secretion, which is a hallmark of polyclonal B cell activation. Notably, DENV induced the activation of B cells obtained from either DENV immune or DENV naïve donors, suggesting that it was not dependent on DENV-specific secondary/memory response. B cell stimulation was dependent on activation of MAPK and CD81. B cells cultured with DENV also secreted IL-6 and presented increased expression of CD86 and HLA-DR, which might contribute to B lymphocyte co-stimulatory function. Indeed, PBMCs, but not isolated B cells, secreted high amounts of IgG upon DENV culture, suggesting that interaction with other cell types in vivo might promote Ig isotype switching and IgG secretion from different B cell clones. These findings suggest that activation signaling pathways triggered by DENV interaction with non-specific receptors on B cells might contribute to the exacerbated response observed in dengue patients. PMID:26656738

  3. The Contribution of B Cells to Renal Interstitial Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Heller, Florian; Lindenmeyer, Maja T.; Cohen, Clemens D.; Brandt, Ulrike; Draganovici, Dan; Fischereder, Michael; Kretzler, Matthias; Anders, Hans-Joachim; Sitter, Thomas; Mosberger, Isabella; Kerjaschki, Dontscho; Regele, Heinz; Schlöndorff, Detlef; Segerer, Stephan

    2007-01-01

    Local B-cell infiltrates play a role in tissue fibrosis, neolymphangiogenesis, and renal allograft survival. We sought to characterize the B-cell infiltrates, factors involved in B-cell recruitment, and lymphangiogenesis in renal interstitial injury (ie, acute and chronic interstitial nephritis and chronic IgA nephropathy). CD20-positive B cells formed a prominent part of the interstitial infiltrating cells. Together with CD3-positive T cells, the CD20-positive B cells formed larger nodular structures. CD10-positive pre-B cells were rare, and the majority were mature CD27-positive B cells. Proliferating B cells were detected within nodular infiltrates. The level of mRNA expression of the chemokine CXCL13 was increased and correlated with CD20 mRNA in the tubulointerstitial space. CXCL13 protein was predominantly found at sites of nodular infiltrates, in association with CXCR5-positive B cells. Furthermore, sites of chronic interstitial inflammation were associated with a high number of lymphatic vessels. B-cell infiltrates form a prominent part of the interstitial infiltrates both in primary interstitial lesions and in IgA nephropathy. CXCR5-positive B cells might be recruited via the chemokine CXCL13 and seem to contribute to the formation of intrarenal lymphoid follicle-like structures. These might represent an intrarenal immune system. PMID:17255314

  4. G-rich proto-oncogenes are targeted for genomic instability in B-cell lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Duquette, Michelle L; Huber, Michael D; Maizels, Nancy

    2007-03-15

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma is the most common lymphoid malignancy in adults. It is a heterogeneous disease with variability in outcome. Genomic instability of a subset of proto-oncogenes, including c-MYC, BCL6, RhoH, PIM1, and PAX5, can contribute to initial tumor development and has been correlated with poor prognosis and aggressive tumor growth. Lymphomas in which these proto-oncogenes are unstable derive from germinal center B cells that express activation-induced deaminase (AID), the B-cell-specific factor that deaminates DNA to initiate immunoglobulin gene diversification. Proto-oncogene instability is evident as both aberrant hypermutation and translocation, paralleling programmed instability which diversifies the immunoglobulin loci. We have asked if genomic sequence correlates with instability in AID-positive B-cell lymphomas. We show that instability does not correlate with enrichment of the WRC sequence motif that is the consensus for deamination by AID. Instability does correlate with G-richness, evident as multiple runs of the base guanine on the nontemplate DNA strand. Extending previous analysis of c-MYC, we show experimentally that transcription of BCL6 and RhoH induces formation of structures, G-loops, which contain single-stranded regions targeted by AID. We further show that G-richness does not characterize translocation breakpoints in AID-negative B- and T-cell malignancies. These results identify G-richness as one feature of genomic structure that can contribute to genomic instability in AID-positive B-cell malignancies.

  5. The role of bone marrow biopsy and FDG-PET/CT in identifying bone marrow infiltration in the initial diagnosis of high grade non-Hodgkin B-cell lymphoma and Hodgkin lymphoma. Accuracy in a multicenter series of 372 patients.

    PubMed

    Chen-Liang, Tzu-Hua; Martin-Santos, Taida; Jerez, Andres; Senent, Leonor; Orero, Maria Teresa; Remigia, Maria Jose; Muiña, Begoña; Romera, Marta; Fernandez-Muñoz, Hermogenes; Raya, Jose M; Fernandez-Gonzalez, Marta; Lancharro, Aima; Villegas, Carolina; Carlos Herrera, Juan; Frutos, Laura; Luis Navarro, Jose; Uña, Jon; Igua, Carolina; Sanchez-Vaño, Raquel; Cozar, Maria Del Puig; Contreras, Jose; Sanchez-Blanco, Jose Javier; Perez-Ceballos, Elena; Ortuño, Francisco Jose

    2015-08-01

    Bone marrow infiltration (BMI), categorized as an extra-nodal site, affects stage and is associated with poor prognosis in newly diagnosed lymphoma patients. We have evaluated the accuracy of PET/CT and bone marrow biopsy (BMB) to assess BMI in 372 lymphoma patients [140 Hodgkin Lymphoma (HL) and 232 High Grade B-cell non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (HG B-NHL), among them 155 Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma (DLCL)]. For HL cases, and taking into account PET/CT, sensitivity, negative predictive value (NPV) and accuracy were 96.7, 99.3, and 99.3% while those of BMB were 32.3, 83.8, and 85%, respectively. For HG B-NHL and considering PET/CT, sensitivity, NPV, and accuracy were 52.7, 81.7, and 84.1%, while those of BMB were 77.6, 90.2, and 90.7%, respectively. In the HG B-NHL group, 25 patients would have been under-staged without BMB. These results lead us to recommend PET/CT and the avoidance of BMB to assess BMI in HL. In the case of HG B-NHL, bone marrow status should be assessed firstly by means of PET/CT; only in either focal or diffuse PET/CT with low borderline SUV max values or in negative cases, should BMB be carried out afterwards. In the HG B-NHL setting and at the present moment, both techniques are complementary. PMID:25925613

  6. CNS accumulation of regulatory B cells is VLA-4-dependent

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann-Horn, Klaus; Sagan, Sharon A.; Winger, Ryan C.; Spencer, Collin M.; Bernard, Claude C.A.; Sobel, Raymond A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the role of very late antigen-4 (VLA-4) on regulatory B cells (Breg) in CNS autoimmune disease. Methods: Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) was induced in mice selectively deficient for VLA-4 on B cells (CD19cre/α4f/f) by immunization with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) peptide (p)35–55 or recombinant human (rh) MOG protein. B-cell and T-cell populations were examined by flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry. Breg were evaluated by intracellular IL-10 staining of B cells and, secondly, by coexpression of CD1d and CD5. Results: As previously reported, EAE was less severe in B-cell VLA-4-deficient vs control CD19cre mice when induced by rhMOG, a model that is B-cell-dependent and leads to efficient B-cell activation and antibody production. Paradoxically, B-cell VLA-4-deficient mice developed more severe clinical disease than control mice when EAE was induced with MOG p35-55, a B-cell-independent encephalitogen that does not efficiently activate B cells. Peripheral T-cell and humoral immune responses were not altered in B-cell VLA-4-deficient mice. In MOG p35-55-induced EAE, B-cell VLA-4 deficiency reduced CNS accumulation of B but not T cells. Breg were detected in the CNS of control mice with MOG p35-55-induced EAE. However, more severe EAE in B-cell VLA-4-deficient mice was associated with virtual absence of CNS Breg. Conclusions: Our results demonstrate that CNS accumulation of Breg is VLA-4-dependent and suggest that Breg may contribute to regulation of CNS autoimmunity in situ. These observations underscore the need to choose the appropriate encephalitogen when studying how B cells contribute to pathogenesis or regulation of CNS autoimmunity. PMID:27027096

  7. [Primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma].

    PubMed

    Coso, D; Rey, J; Bouabdallah, R

    2010-02-01

    Primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma (PMBL) is a clinicopathological entity among the world health organization classification of lymphoid neoplasms. PMBL often concerns young adults, and the disease remains a localized disease in the majority of cases. The outcome of patients with PMBL is variable and unlike diffuse large cell lymphomas, the international prognostic index seems to be less applicable to such disease. The combination of rituximab and chemotherapy is the gold standard treatment of patients with good prognosis features and allows high cure rates. However, high-dose chemotherapy supported by peripheral blood stem cell support is often warranted in poor-prognosis patients. The use of positrons emission tomography examination is more and more used in such situations to select the best therapeutic strategy. PMID:20207294

  8. The human intestinal B-cell response.

    PubMed

    Spencer, J; Sollid, L M

    2016-09-01

    The intestinal immune system is chronically challenged by a huge plethora of antigens derived from the lumen. B-cell responses in organized gut-associated lymphoid tissues and regional lymph nodes that are driven chronically by gut antigens generate the largest population of antibody-producing cells in the body: the gut lamina propria plasma cells. Although animal studies have provided insights into mechanisms that underpin this dynamic process, some very fundamental differences in this system appear to exist between species. Importantly, this prevents extrapolation from mice to humans to inform translational research questions. Therefore, in this review we will describe the structures and mechanisms involved in the propagation, dissemination, and regulation of this immense plasma cell population in man. Uniquely, we will seek our evidence exclusively from studies of human cells and tissues. PMID:27461177

  9. Rheumatoid factors, B cells and immunoglobulin genes.

    PubMed

    Jefferis, R

    1995-04-01

    The paradigm of self, non-self discrimination in the immune system is under review as autoreactive B or T cells are increasingly delineated within normal individuals. The products of autoreactive B cells are, mostly, polyspecific IgM antibodies of low affinity. These 'natural' antibodies include rheumatoid factors (RF) encoded by unmutated germline immunoglobulin genes. In rheumatoid arthritis (RA) the RF may be of the IgM, IgG or IgA isotype, show evidence of somatic mutation and have increased affinity; consistent with maturation of an antigen driven immune response. This response could be initiated or driven by an auto-immunogenic form of IgG or an exogenous cross-reactive antigen. Changes in galactosylation of IgG have been reported to be a valuable diagnostic and prognostic indicator in RA. Speculation that these changes may precipitate some of the disease processes is critically reviewed.

  10. A prospective study of concussions among National Hockey League players during regular season games: the NHL-NHLPA Concussion Program

    PubMed Central

    Benson, Brian W.; Meeuwisse, Willem H.; Rizos, John; Kang, Jian; Burke, Charles J.

    2011-01-01

    Background In 1997, the National Hockey League (NHL) and NHL Players’ Association (NHLPA) launched a concussion program to improve the understanding of this injury. We explored initial postconcussion signs, symptoms, physical examination findings and time loss (i.e., time between the injury and medical clearance by the physician to return to competitive play), experienced by male professional ice-hockey players, and assessed the utility of initial postconcussion clinical manifestations in predicting time loss among hockey players. Methods We conducted a prospective case series of concussions over seven NHL regular seasons (1997–2004) using an inclusive cohort of players. The primary outcome was concussion and the secondary outcome was time loss. NHL team physicians documented post-concussion clinical manifestations and recorded the date when a player was medically cleared to return to play. Results Team physicians reported 559 concussions during regular season games. The estimated incidence was 1.8 concussions per 1000 player-hours. The most common postconcussion symptom was headache (71%). On average, time loss (in days) increased 2.25 times (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.41–3.62) for every subsequent (i.e., recurrent) concussion sustained during the study period. Controlling for age and position, significant predictors of time loss were postconcussion headache (p < 0.001), low energy or fatigue (p = 0.01), amnesia (p = 0.02) and abnormal neurologic examination (p = 0.01). Using a previously suggested time loss cut-point of 10 days, headache (odds ratio [OR] 2.17, 95% CI 1.33–3.54) and low energy or fatigue (OR 1.72, 95% CI 1.04–2.85) were significant predictors of time loss of more than 10 days. Interpretation Postconcussion headache, low energy or fatigue, amnesia and abnormal neurologic examination were significant predictors of time loss among professional hockey players. PMID:21502355

  11. Syk Tyrosine Kinase Is Required for the Positive Selection of Immature B Cells into the Recirculating B Cell Pool

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Martin; Gulbranson-Judge, Adam; Quinn, Marian E.; Walters, Alice E.; MacLennan, Ian C.M.; Tybulewicz, Victor L.J.

    1997-01-01

    The tyrosine kinase Syk has been implicated as a key signal transducer from the B cell antigen receptor (BCR). We show here that mutation of the Syk gene completely blocks the maturation of immature B cells into recirculating cells and stops their entry into B cell follicles. Furthermore, using radiation chimeras we demonstrate that this developmental block is due to the absence of Syk in the B cells themselves. Syk-deficient B cells are shown to have the life span of normal immature B cells. If this is extended by over-expression of Bcl-2, they accumulate in the T zone and red pulp of the spleen in increased numbers, but still fail to mature to become recirculating follicular B cells. Despite this defect in maturation, Syk-deficient B cells were seen to give rise to switched as well as nonswitched splenic plasma cells. Normally only a proportion of immature B cells is recruited into the recirculating pool. Our results suggest that Syk transduces a BCR signal that is absolutely required for the positive selection of immature B cells into the recirculating B cell pool. PMID:9396770

  12. Lymphomagenic CARD11/BCL10/MALT1 signaling drives malignant B-cell proliferation via cooperative NF-κB and JNK activation

    PubMed Central

    Knies, Nathalie; Alankus, Begüm; Weilemann, Andre; Tzankov, Alexandar; Brunner, Kristina; Ruff, Tanja; Kremer, Marcus; Keller, Ulrich B.; Lenz, Georg; Ruland, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    The aggressive activated B cell-like subtype of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma is characterized by aberrant B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling and constitutive nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-κB) activation, which is required for tumor cell survival. BCR-induced NF-κB activation requires caspase recruitment domain-containing protein 11 (CARD11), and CARD11 gain-of-function mutations are recurrently detected in human diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). To investigate the consequences of dysregulated CARD11 signaling in vivo, we generated mice that conditionally express the human DLBCL-derived CARD11(L225LI) mutant. Surprisingly, CARD11(L225LI) was sufficient to trigger aggressive B-cell lymphoproliferation, leading to early postnatal lethality. CARD11(L225LI) constitutively associated with B-cell CLL/lymphoma 10 (BCL10) and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma translocation gene 1 (MALT1) to simultaneously activate the NF-κB and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling cascades. Genetic deficiencies of either BCL10 or MALT1 completely rescued the phenotype, and pharmacological inhibition of JNK was, similar to NF-κB blockage, toxic to autonomously proliferating CARD11(L225LI)-expressing B cells. Moreover, constitutive JNK activity was observed in primary human activated B cell-like (ABC)-DLBCL specimens, and human ABC-DLBCL cells were also sensitive to JNK inhibitors. Thus, our results demonstrate that enforced activation of CARD11/BCL10/MALT1 signaling is sufficient to drive transformed B-cell expansion in vivo and identify the JNK pathway as a therapeutic target for ABC-DLBCL. PMID:26668357

  13. Regulation of VH replacement by B cell receptor-mediated signaling in human immature B cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Lange, Miles D; Hong, Sang Yong; Xie, Wanqin; Xu, Kerui; Huang, Lin; Yu, Yangsheng; Ehrhardt, Götz R A; Zemlin, Michael; Burrows, Peter D; Su, Kaihong; Carter, Robert H; Zhang, Zhixin

    2013-06-01

    VH replacement provides a unique RAG-mediated recombination mechanism to edit nonfunctional IgH genes or IgH genes encoding self-reactive BCRs and contributes to the diversification of Ab repertoire in the mouse and human. Currently, it is not clear how VH replacement is regulated during early B lineage cell development. In this article, we show that cross-linking BCRs induces VH replacement in human EU12 μHC(+) cells and in the newly emigrated immature B cells purified from peripheral blood of healthy donors or tonsillar samples. BCR signaling-induced VH replacement is dependent on the activation of Syk and Src kinases but is inhibited by CD19 costimulation, presumably through activation of the PI3K pathway. These results show that VH replacement is regulated by BCR-mediated signaling in human immature B cells, which can be modulated by physiological and pharmacological treatments.

  14. Histone deacetylase inhibitors activate CIITA and MHC class II antigen expression in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Cycon, Kelly A; Mulvaney, Kathleen; Rimsza, Lisa M; Persky, Daniel; Murphy, Shawn P

    2013-01-01

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), the most common form of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) diagnosed in the USA, consists of at least two distinct subtypes: germinal centre B (GCB) and activated B-cell (ABC). Decreased MHC class II (MHCII) expression on the tumours in both DLBCL subtypes directly correlates with significant decreases in patient survival. One common mechanism accounting for MHCII down-regulation in DLBCL is reduced expression of the MHC class II transactivator (CIITA), the master regulator of MHCII transcription. Furthermore, reduced CIITA expression in ABC DLBCL correlates with the presence of the transcriptional repressor positive regulatory domain-I-binding factor-1 (PRDI-BF1). However, the mechanisms underlying down-regulation of CIITA in GCB DLBCL are currently unclear. In this study, we demonstrate that neither PRDI-BF1 nor CpG hypermethylation at the CIITA promoters are responsible for decreased CIITA in GCB DLBCL. In contrast, histone modifications associated with an open chromatin conformation and active transcription were significantly lower at the CIITA promoters in CIITA− GCB cells compared with CIITA+ B cells, which suggests that epigenetic mechanisms contribute to repression of CIITA transcription. Treatment of CIITA− or CIITAlow GCB cells with several different histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) activated modest CIITA and MHCII expression. However, CIITA and MHCII levels were significantly higher in these cells after exposure to the HDAC-1-specific inhibitor MS-275. These results suggest that CIITA transcription is repressed in GCB DLBCL cells through epigenetic mechanisms involving HDACs, and that HDACi treatment can alleviate repression. These observations may have important implications for patient therapy. PMID:23789844

  15. Brucella abortus-infected B cells induce osteoclastogenesis.

    PubMed

    Pesce Viglietti, Ayelén Ivana; Arriola Benitez, Paula Constanza; Giambartolomei, Guillermo Hernán; Delpino, María Victoria

    2016-09-01

    Brucella abortus is an intracellular bacterium that establishes lifelong infections in livestock and humans although the mechanisms of its chronicity are poorly understood. Activated B cells have long lifespan and B. abortus infection activates B cells. Our results indicate that the direct infection of B cells with B. abortus induced matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), receptor activator for NF κB ligand (RANKL), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-6 secretion. In addition, supernatants from B. abortus-infected B cells induced bone marrow-derived monocytes to undergo osteoclastogenesis. Using osteoprotegerin, RANKL's decoy receptor, we determined that RANKL is involved in osteoclastogenesis induced by supernatants from B. abortus-infected B cells. The results presented here shed light on how the interactions of B. abortus with B cells may have a role in the pathogenesis of brucellar osteoarticular disease.

  16. Dual immunoglobulin light chain B cells: Trojan horses of autoimmunity?

    PubMed

    Pelanda, Roberta

    2014-04-01

    Receptor editing, a major mechanism of B cell tolerance, can also lead to allelic inclusion at the immunoglobulin light chain loci and the development of B cells that coexpress two different immunoglobulin light chains and, therefore, two antibody specificities. Most allelically included B cells express two κ chains, although rare dual-λ cells are also observed. Moreover, these cells typically coexpress an autoreactive and a nonautoreactive antibody. Thus, allelically included B cells could operate like 'Trojan horses': expression and function of the nonautoreactive antigen receptors might promote their maturation, activation, and terminal differentiation into effector cells that also express and secrete autoantibodies. Indeed, dual-κ B cells are greatly expanded into effector B cell subsets in some autoimmune mice, thus indicating they might play an important role in disease.

  17. A Case of De Novo CD5+ Disseminated Intravascular Large B-Cell Lymphoma Presenting as Multiorgan Failure

    PubMed Central

    Kapuria, Devika; Nanua, Suparna; Gaur, Rakesh

    2016-01-01

    Intravascular large B-cell lymphoma is an extremely rare extranodal lymphoma that proliferates in the lumen of the blood vessels while sparing the organ parenchyma. It usually presents with CNS and skin involvement. A 65-year-old Caucasian female presented with fevers and chills of 3-4 months' duration. Bone marrow biopsy done 3 months prior showed no significant myelodysplasia or lymphoid aggregates. The patient later died due to multiorgan failure. A bone marrow biopsy showed 20–30% CD5+ B cells consistent with infiltrative large B-cell lymphoma. An autopsy performed revealed diffuse intravascular invasion by lymphoma cells. Multiorgan involvement by intravascular B-cell lymphoma is very rare. Based on our literature review and to the best of our knowledge, there are only 5 case reports describing the presentation of this lymphoma with multiorgan failure. The immunophenotypic studies performed revealed that our patient had de novo CD5+ intravascular large B-cell lymphoma which is known to be aggressive with very poor prognosis. Although it is an extremely rare lymphoma, it should be considered as a potential cause of multiorgan failure when no other cause has been identified. A prompt tissue diagnosis and high-dose chemotherapy followed by ASCT can sometimes achieve remission. PMID:27777803

  18. Current trends in the treatment of primary mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma – an overview

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Primary mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma has been recognised as a distinct entity with unique clinical, pathologic, and genetic features. According to WHO 2008 classification it is marked as a variant of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma but shares characteristics with classic Hodgkin lymphoma. Genetic analysis has shown that amplification of the 9p24.1 region is the disease's specific structural alteration. Aggressive behaviour and a tendency to invade surrounding tissues of the thoracic cavity, often causing superior vena cava syndrome, or pleural or pericardial effusions, are the clinical hallmarks of this disease. For a long period of time it has been considered as a disease with poor prognosis, which responds poorly to the conventional treatment created for diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. An elective treatment has not yet been established, but recently the situation has became much more favourable. After the introduction of rituximab the cure rates have risen to over 80%, and the most recent results have demonstrated a new insight with dose-adjusted intensified continuous treatments, in which the cure rates have exceeded 90%. Current trends have led to the introduction of dose-adjusted intensified protocols becoming a standard of care, whereas the use of radiotherapy remains controversial because of the questionable predictive value of post-treatment PET/CT validity. The relapse rate is very low after two years of sustained complete remission. If the disease relapses or is resistant the outcome is very poor regardless of the applied treatment modality. PMID:26843837

  19. Identification of bovine B cell reactive and B cell specific monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Mukwedeya, D T; Takamatsu, H; Parkhouse, R M

    1993-11-01

    All monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) submitted to the workshop panel were screened for reactivity with bovine surface immunoglobulin (sIg)+ cells (gated small dense lymphocytes from peripheral blood) by fluorescence activated cell sorter (FACS) analysis. Eighteen temporary clusters--TCs 1-12, 15, 16, 18, 19, 25 and 26--contained mAbs reactive with sIg+ cells. mAb BAS21A (unclustered) and CC92 (TC25) were also reactive with sIg+ cells. Further FACS analysis with B cells from peripheral blood lymphocytes and mesenteric lymph nodes, and B and T lymphoma cell lines, indicated that the majority of mAbs within TCs 2, 4, 15, 18 and 26 reacted specifically with bovine B cells. Bovine B cell specific mAbs within these clusters were TH14B, IL-A55, CACT101A, MUC76A from TC4, VPM30, GC65A, CACT65A from TC15, IL-A58, CC56, CC70, IL-A65 from TC18, and CC57 and 26A9 from TC26. Three mAbs--IL-A65, CC70, and BAQ15A--within TC18 defined WC3; mAbs TD9 and CC56 may also be related to WC3.

  20. Utilization of a photoactivatable antigen system to examine B-cell probing termination and the B-cell receptor sorting mechanisms during B-cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Tang, Shan; Wan, Zhengpeng; Gao, Yiren; Cao, Yiyun; Yi, Junyang; Si, Yanyan; Zhang, Haowen; Liu, Lei; Liu, Wanli

    2016-01-01

    Antigen binding to the B-cell receptor (BCR) induces several responses, resulting in B-cell activation, proliferation, and differentiation. However, it has been difficult to study these responses due to their dynamic, fast, and transient nature. Here, we attempted to solve this problem by developing a controllable trigger point for BCR and antigen recognition through the construction of a photoactivatable antigen, caged 4-hydroxy-3-nitrophenyl acetyl (caged-NP). This photoactivatable antigen system in combination with live cell and single molecule imaging techniques enabled us to illuminate the previously unidentified B-cell probing termination behaviors and the precise BCR sorting mechanisms during B-cell activation. B cells in contact with caged-NP exhibited probing behaviors as defined by the unceasing extension of membrane pseudopods in random directions. Further analyses showed that such probing behaviors are cell intrinsic with strict dependence on F-actin remodeling but not on tonic BCR signaling. B-cell probing behaviors were terminated within 4 s after photoactivation, suggesting that this response was sensitive and specific to BCR engagement. The termination of B-cell probing was concomitant with the accumulation response of the BCRs into the BCR microclusters. We also determined the Brownian diffusion coefficient of BCRs from the same B cells before and after BCR engagement. The analysis of temporally segregated single molecule images of both BCR and major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) demonstrated that antigen binding induced trapping of BCRs into the BCR microclusters is a fundamental mechanism for B cells to acquire antigens. PMID:26764382

  1. Depletion of B cells in murine lupus: efficacy and resistance.

    PubMed

    Ahuja, Anupama; Shupe, Jonathan; Dunn, Robert; Kashgarian, Michael; Kehry, Marilyn R; Shlomchik, Mark J

    2007-09-01

    In mice, genetic deletion of B cells strongly suppresses systemic autoimmunity, providing a rationale for depleting B cells to treat autoimmunity. In fact, B cell depletion with rituximab is approved for rheumatoid arthritis patients, and clinical trials are underway for systemic lupus erythematosus. Yet, basic questions concerning mechanism, pathologic effect, and extent of B cell depletion cannot be easily studied in humans. To better understand how B cell depletion affects autoimmunity, we have generated a transgenic mouse expressing human CD20 on B cells in an autoimmune-prone MRL/MpJ-Fas(lpr) (MRL/lpr) background. Using high doses of a murine anti-human CD20 mAb, we were able to achieve significant depletion of B cells, which in turn markedly ameliorated clinical and histologic disease as well as antinuclear Ab and serum autoantibody levels. However, we also found that B cells were quite refractory to depletion in autoimmune-prone strains compared with non-autoimmune-prone strains. This was true with multiple anti-CD20 Abs, including a new anti-mouse CD20 Ab, and in several different autoimmune-prone strains. Thus, whereas successful B cell depletion is a promising therapy for lupus, at least some patients might be resistant to the therapy as a byproduct of the autoimmune condition itself.

  2. The molecular biology of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Frick, Mareike; Dörken, Bernd; Lenz, Georg

    2011-12-01

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) represents the most common type of malignant lymphoma. In the last few years, significant progress has been achieved in the understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of this entity. Gene expression profiling has identified three molecular DLBCL subtypes, termed germinal-center B-cell-like (GCB) DLBCL, activated B-cell-like (ABC) DLBCL, and primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma (PMBL). In this review, we summarize our current understanding of the biology of these DLBCL subtypes with a special emphasis on novel diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. PMID:23556103

  3. B-cell targeted therapeutics in clinical development

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    B lymphocytes are the source of humoral immunity and are thus a critical component of the adaptive immune system. However, B cells can also be pathogenic and the origin of disease. Deregulated B-cell function has been implicated in several autoimmune diseases, including systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, and multiple sclerosis. B cells contribute to pathological immune responses through the secretion of cytokines, costimulation of T cells, antigen presentation, and the production of autoantibodies. DNA-and RNA-containing immune complexes can also induce the production of type I interferons, which further promotes the inflammatory response. B-cell depletion with the CD20 antibody rituximab has provided clinical proof of concept that targeting B cells and the humoral response can result in significant benefit to patients. Consequently, the interest in B-cell targeted therapies has greatly increased in recent years and a number of new biologics exploiting various mechanisms are now in clinical development. This review provides an overview on current developments in the area of B-cell targeted therapies by describing molecules and subpopulations that currently offer themselves as therapeutic targets, the different strategies to target B cells currently under investigation as well as an update on the status of novel therapeutics in clinical development. Emerging data from clinical trials are providing critical insight regarding the role of B cells and autoantibodies in various autoimmune conditions and will guide the development of more efficacious therapeutics and better patient selection. PMID:23566679

  4. Involvement of B cells in non-infectious uveitis

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Justine R; Stempel, Andrew J; Bharadwaj, Arpita; Appukuttan, Binoy

    2016-01-01

    Non-infectious uveitis—or intraocular inflammatory disease—causes substantial visual morbidity and reduced quality of life amongst affected individuals. To date, research of pathogenic mechanisms has largely been focused on processes involving T lymphocyte and/or myeloid leukocyte populations. Involvement of B lymphocytes has received relatively little attention. In contrast, B-cell pathobiology is a major field within general immunological research, and large clinical trials have showed that treatments targeting B cells are highly effective for multiple systemic inflammatory diseases. B cells, including the terminally differentiated plasma cell that produces antibody, are found in the human eye in different forms of non-infectious uveitis; in some cases, these cells outnumber other leukocyte subsets. Recent case reports and small case series suggest that B-cell blockade may be therapeutic for patients with non-infectious uveitis. As well as secretion of antibody, B cells may promote intraocular inflammation by presentation of antigen to T cells, production of multiple inflammatory cytokines and support of T-cell survival. B cells may also perform various immunomodulatory activities within the eye. This translational review summarizes the evidence for B-cell involvement in non-infectious uveitis, and considers the potential contributions of B cells to the development and control of the disease. Manipulations of B cells and/or their products are promising new approaches to the treatment of non-infectious uveitis. PMID:26962453

  5. Invited article: inhibition of B cell functions: implications for neurology.

    PubMed

    Dalakas, Marinos C

    2008-06-01

    B cells are involved in the pathophysiology of many neurologic diseases, either in a causative or contributory role, via production of autoantibodies, cytokine secretion, or by acting as antigen-presenting cells leading to T cell activation. B cells are clonally expanded in various CNS disorders, such as multiple sclerosis (MS), paraneoplastic CNS disorders, or stiff-person syndrome, and are activated to produce pathogenic autoantibodies in demyelinating neuropathies and myasthenia. B cell activating factor (BAFF) and a proliferating inducing ligand (APRIL), key cytokines for B cell survival, are strongly unregulated in MS brain and in muscles of inflammatory myopathies. Modulation of B cell functions using a series of monoclonal antibodies against CD20+ B cells or the molecules that increase B cell survival, such as BAFF/APRIL and their receptors BAFF-R, TACI, and BCMA, provide a rational approach to the treatment of the aforementioned neurologic disorders. In controlled studies, rituximab, a B cell-depleting monoclonal antibody, has been encouraging in MS and paraproteinemic anti-MAG demyelinating neuropathy, exerting long-lasting remissions. In uncontrolled series, benefit has been reported in several disorders. B cell depletion is a well-tolerated therapeutic option currently explored in the treatment of several autoimmune neurologic disorders.

  6. Primary splenic B-cell lymphoma, unclassifiable, with features intermediate between diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and classical Hodgkin lymphoma: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Feng; Zhou, Quan; Gao, Ying; Cui, Xiang-Qing; Chang, Hong

    2016-01-01

    B-cell lymphoma (BCL), unclassifiable, with features intermediate between diffuse large BCL (DLBCL) and classical Hodgkin's lymphoma (CHL), is a novel entity to the World Health Organization classification system. These tumors are rare aggressive lymphomas that have a poor prognosis. The present study reports the case of a patient with one such lymphoma that occurred in the spleen, which expressed cluster of differentiation (CD)20, CD79α, melanoma associated antigen (mutated) 1, BCL6, CD15 and CD30. Polymerase chain reaction analysis demonstrated a clonal rearrangement of the genes coding for immunoglobulin heavy chains. The tumor cells demonstrated a negative reaction in the Epstein-Barr virus-encoded small RNA assay. Following the diagnosis of unclassifiable BCL, with intermediate features between DLBCL and CHL, the patient received 7 cycles of the CHOP regimen, and so far, has been in good general condition and tumor-free for 17 months. PMID:27602118

  7. The B-Cell-Specific src-Family Kinase Blk Is Dispensable for B-Cell Development and Activation

    PubMed Central

    Texido, Gemma; Su, I-hsin; Mecklenbräuker, Ingrid; Saijo, Kaoru; Malek, Sami N.; Desiderio, Stephen; Rajewsky, Klaus; Tarakhovsky, Alexander

    2000-01-01

    The B-cell lymphocyte kinase (Blk) is a src-family protein tyrosine kinase specifically expressed in B-lineage cells of mice. The early onset of Blk expression during B-cell development in the bone marrow and the high expression levels of Blk in mature B cells suggest a possible important role of Blk in B-cell physiology. To study the in vivo function of Blk, mice homozygous for the targeted disruption of the blk gene were generated. In homozygous mutant mice, neither blk mRNA nor Blk protein is expressed. Despite the absence of Blk, the development, in vitro activation, and humoral immune responses of B cells to T-cell-dependent and -independent antigens are unaltered. These data are consistent with functional redundancy of Blk in B-cell development and immune responses. PMID:10648608

  8. Pretransplantation fluorine-18-deoxyglucose--positron emission tomography scan lacks prognostic value in chemosensitive B cell non-hodgkin lymphoma patients undergoing nonmyeloablative allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Sauter, Craig S; Lechner, Lauren; Scordo, Michael; Zheng, Junting; Devlin, Sean M; Fleming, Stephen E; Castro-Malaspina, Hugo; Moskowitz, Craig H

    2014-06-01

    Whether chemosensitivity, as determined by positron emission tomography using fluorine-18-deoxyglucose (FDG-PET), is a requirement for successful allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) has yet to be established. We analyzed 88 patients with B cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (B-NHL) for event-free (EFS) and overall survival (OS) according to computed tomography (CT) and FDG-PET criteria before uniform nonmyeloablative (NMA) allo-SCT. Patients who were chemosensitive, according to CT criteria, experienced significantly greater EFS (P < .001) and OS (P < .03) compared with those who were chemorefractory at the time of allo-SCT. Of 58 patients within this cohort who were chemosensitive by CT criteria, there was no difference in EFS (P = .85) or OS (P = .96) between FDG-PET-positive (Deauville 4 to 5, n = 24) and FDG-PET-negative (Deauville 1 to 3, n = 34) patients. There was no difference in survival according to age < or ≥ 60 years, prior autologous-stem cell transplantation, allograft characteristics, or histology. FDG-PET adds no prognostic value in chemosensitive B-NHL before NMA-allo-SCT.

  9. Phase II multicenter study of oblimersen sodium, a Bcl-2 antisense oligonucleotide, in combination with rituximab in patients with recurrent B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Pro, Barbara; Leber, Brian; Smith, Mitchell; Fayad, Luis; Romaguera, Jorge; Hagemeister, Fredrick; Rodriguez, Alma; McLaughlin, Peter; Samaniego, Felipe; Zwiebel, James; Lopez, Adriana; Kwak, Larry; Younes, Anas

    2008-11-01

    Oblimersen sodium plus rituximab was evaluated in relapsed/refractory B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) patients. Oblimersen was administered as a continuous intravenous infusion at a daily dose of 3 mg/kg/d for 7 d on alternate weeks for 3 weeks. Rituximab was given at a weekly dose of 375 mg/m(2) for six doses. Patients with stable disease or objective response were allowed to receive a second course of treatment. The overall response rate (ORR) was 42% with 10 complete responses (CR) and eight partial responses (PR). Twelve (28%) patients achieved a minimal response or stable disease. Among the 20 patients with follicular lymphoma the ORR was 60% (eight CR, four PR). Three of the responders were refractory to prior treatment with rituximab, and two of the responses occurred in patients who had failed an autologous stem cell transplant. Median duration of response was 12 months. Most toxicities were low grade and reversible. In conclusion, oblimersen sodium can be safely combined with rituximab. The combination appears to be most beneficial in patients with indolent NHL and warrants further investigation in a large randomized trial. PMID:18764869

  10. Molecular and cytogenetic characterization of expanded B-cell clones from multiclonal versus monoclonal B-cell chronic lymphoproliferative disorders

    PubMed Central

    Henriques, Ana; Rodríguez-Caballero, Arancha; Criado, Ignacio; Langerak, Anton W.; Nieto, Wendy G.; Lécrevisse, Quentin; González, Marcos; Cortesão, Emília; Paiva, Artur; Almeida, Julia; Orfao, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Chronic antigen-stimulation has been recurrently involved in the earlier stages of monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis, chronic lymphocytic leukemia and other B-cell chronic lymphoproliferative disorders. The expansion of two or more B-cell clones has frequently been reported in individuals with these conditions; potentially, such coexisting clones have a greater probability of interaction with common immunological determinants. Here, we analyzed the B-cell receptor repertoire and molecular profile, as well as the phenotypic, cytogenetic and hematologic features, of 228 chronic lymphocytic leukemia-like and non-chronic lymphocytic leukemia-like clones comparing multiclonal (n=85 clones from 41 cases) versus monoclonal (n=143 clones) monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis, chronic lymphocytic leukemia and other B-cell chronic lymphoproliferative disorders. The B-cell receptor of B-cell clones from multiclonal cases showed a slightly higher degree of HCDR3 homology than B-cell clones from mono clonal cases, in association with unique hematologic (e.g. lower B-lymphocyte counts) and cytogenetic (e.g. lower frequency of cytogenetically altered clones) features usually related to earlier stages of the disease. Moreover, a subgroup of coexisting B-cell clones from individual multiclonal cases which were found to be phylogenetically related showed unique molecular and cytogenetic features: they more frequently shared IGHV3 gene usage, shorter HCDR3 sequences with a greater proportion of IGHV mutations and del(13q14.3), than other unrelated B-cell clones. These results would support the antigen-driven nature of such multiclonal B-cell expansions, with potential involvement of multiple antigens/epitopes. PMID:24488564

  11. Axl Inhibition Primes Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia B-Cells to Apoptosis and Show Synergistic/Additive Effects in Combination with BTK inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Sutapa; Boysen, Justin; Nelson, Michael; Secreto, Charla; Warner, Steven L.; Bearss, David J.; Lesnick, Connie; Shanafelt, Tait D.; Kay, Neil E.; Ghosh, Asish K.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is an incurable disease despite aggressive therapeutic approaches. We previously found that Axl receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) plays a critical role in CLL B-cell survival. Here, we explored the possibility of using a high-affinity Axl inhibitor as a single agent or in combination with Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (BTK) inhibitors for future clinical trial to treat CLL patients. Experimental Design Expression/activation status of other members of the TAM (Tyro3, Axl, MER) family of RTKs in CLL B-cells was evaluated. Cells were treated with a high-affinity orally bioavailable Axl inhibitor TP-0903 with or without presence of CLL bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs). Inhibitory effects of TP-0903 on Axl signaling pathway was also evaluated in CLL B-cells. Finally, cells were exposed to TP-0903 in combination with BTK inhibitors to determine any synergistic/additive effects of the combination. Results CLL B-cells overexpress Tyro3, but not MER. Of interest, Tyro3 remains as constitutively phosphorylated and form a complex with Axl in CLL B-cells. TP-0903 induces massive apoptosis in CLL B-cells with LD50 values of nanomolar ranges. Importantly, CLL BMSCs could not protect the leukemic B-cells from TP-0903 induced apoptosis. A marked reduction of the anti-apoptotic proteins Mcl-1, Bcl-2, XIAP and upregulation of the pro-apoptotic protein BIM in CLL B-cells were detected as a result of Axl inhibition. Finally, combination of TP-0903 with BTK inhibitors augments CLL B-cell apoptosis. Conclusion Administration of TP-0903 either as a single agent or in combination with BTK inhibitors may be effective in treating CLL patients. PMID:25673699

  12. Constitutively activated STAT3 promotes cell proliferation and survival in the activated B-cell subtype of diffuse large B-cell lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Ding, B. Belinda; Yu, J. Jessica; Yu, Raymond Y.-L.; Mendez, Lourdes M.; Shaknovich, Rita; Zhang, Yonghui; Cattoretti, Giorgio

    2008-01-01

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) consists of at least 2 phenotypic subtypes; that is, the germinal center B-cell–like (GCB-DLBCL) and the activated B-cell–like (ABC-DLBCL) groups. It has been shown that GCB-DLBCL responds favorably to chemotherapy and expresses high levels of BCL6, a transcription repressor known to play a causative role in lymphomagenesis. In comparison, ABC-DLBCL has lower levels of BCL6, constitutively activated nuclear factor-κB, and tends to be refractory to chemotherapy. Here, we report that the STAT3 gene is a transcriptional target of BCL6. As a result, high-level STAT3 expression and activation are preferentially detected in ABC-DLBCL and BCL6-negative normal germinal center B cells. Most importantly, inactivating STAT3 by either AG490 or small interference RNA in ABC-DLBCL cells inhibits cell proliferation and triggers apoptosis. These phenotypes are accompanied by decreased expression of several known STAT3 target genes, including c-Myc, JunB, and Mcl-1, and increased expression of the cell- cycle inhibitor p27. In addition to identifying STAT3 as a novel BCL6 target gene, our results define a second oncogenic pathway, STAT3 activation, which operates in ABC-DLBCL, suggesting that STAT3 may be a new therapeutic target in these aggressive lymphomas. PMID:17951530

  13. Relational aggression in marriage.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Jason S; Nelson, David A; Yorgason, Jeremy B; Harper, James M; Ashton, Ruth Hagmann; Jensen, Alexander C

    2010-01-01

    Drawing from developmental theories of relational aggression, this article reports on a study designed to identify if spouses use relationally aggressive tactics when dealing with conflict in their marriage and the association of these behaviors with marital outcomes. Using a sample of 336 married couples (672 spouses), results revealed that the majority of couples reported that relationally aggressive behaviors, such as social sabotage and love withdrawal, were a part of their marital dynamics, at least to some degree. Gender comparisons of partner reports of their spouse's behavior revealed that wives were significantly more likely to be relationally aggressive than husbands. Structural equation modeling demonstrated that relational aggression is associated with lower levels of marital quality and greater marital instability for both husbands and wives. Implications are drawn for the use of relational aggression theory in the future study of couple conflict and marital aggression.

  14. ABSENCE OF SCLEROSTIN ADVERSELY AFFECTS B CELL SURVIVAL

    PubMed Central

    Cain, Corey J.; Rueda, Randell; McLelland, Bryce; Collette, Nicole M.; Loots, Gabriela G.; Manilay, Jennifer O.

    2012-01-01

    Increased osteoblast activity in sclerostin-knockout (Sost−/−) mice results in generalized hyperostosis and bones with small bone marrow cavities due to hyperactive mineralizing osteoblast populations. Hematopoietic cell fate decisions are dependent on their local microenvironment, which contains osteoblast and stromal cell populations that support both hematopoietic stem cell quiescence and facilitate B cell development. In this study, we investigated whether high bone mass environments affect B cell development via the utilization of Sost−/− mice, a model of sclerosteosis. We found the bone marrow of Sost−/− mice to be specifically depleted of B cells, due to elevated apoptosis at all B cell developmental stages. In contrast, B cell function in the spleen was normal. Sost expression analysis confirmed that Sost is primarily expressed in osteocytes and is not expressed in any hematopoietic lineage, which indicated that the B cell defects in Sost−/− mice are non-cell autonomous and this was confirmed by transplantation of wildtype (WT) bone marrow into lethally irradiated Sost−/− recipients. WT→Sost−/− chimeras displayed a reduction in B cells, whereas reciprocal Sost−/−→WT chimeras did not, supporting the idea that the Sost−/− bone environment cannot fully support normal B cell development. Expression of the pre-B cell growth stimulating factor, Cxcl12, was significantly lower in bone marrow stromal cells of Sost−/− mice while the Wnt target genes Lef-1 and Ccnd1 remained unchanged in B cells. Taken together, these results demonstrate a novel role for Sost in the regulation of bone marrow environments that support B cells. PMID:22434688

  15. Tissue-Specific B-Cell Dysfunction and Generalized Memory B-Cell Loss during Acute SIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Peruchon, Sandrine; Chaoul, Nada; Burelout, Chantal; Delache, Benoit; Brochard, Patricia; Laurent, Pascale; Cognasse, Fabrice; Prévot, Sophie; Garraud, Olivier; Le Grand, Roger; Richard, Yolande

    2009-01-01

    Background Primary HIV-infected patients display severe and irreversible damage to different blood B-cell subsets which is not restored by highly efficient anti-retroviral therapy (HAART). Because longitudinal investigations of primary HIV-infection is limited by the availability of lymphoid organs, we studied the tissue-specific B-cell dysfunctions in acutely simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) mac251-infected Cynomolgus macaques. Methods and Findings Experiments were performed on three groups of macaques infected for 14, 21 or 28 days and on three groups of animals treated with HAART for two-weeks either initiated at 4 h, 7 or 14 days post-infection (p.i.). We have simultaneously compared changes in B-cell phenotypes and functions and tissue organization of B-cell areas in various lymphoid organs. We showed that SIV induced a steady decline in SIgG-expressing memory (SIgD−CD27+) B-cells in spleen and lymph nodes during the first 4 weeks of infection, concomitant to selective homing/sequestration of B-cells to the small intestine and spleen. SIV non-specific Ig production was transiently increased before D14p.i., whereas SIV-specific Ig production was only detectable after D14p.i., coinciding with the presence of CD8+ T-cells and IgG-expressing plasma cells within germinal centres. Transient B-cell apoptosis on D14p.i. and commitment to terminal differentiation contributed to memory B-cell loss. HAART abrogated B-cell apoptosis, homing to the small intestine and SIV-specific Ig production but had minimal effect on early Ig production, increased B-cell proportions in spleen and loss of memory B-cells. Therefore, virus–B-cell interactions and SIV-induced inflammatory cytokines may differently contribute to early B-cell dysfunction and impaired SIV/HIV-specific antibody response. Conclusions These data establish tissue-specific impairments in B-cell trafficking and functions and a generalized and steady memory B-cell loss in secondary lymphoid organs

  16. BAFF enhances chemotaxis of primary human B cells: a particular synergy between BAFF and CXCL13 on memory B cells.

    PubMed

    Badr, Gamal; Borhis, Gwenoline; Lefevre, Eric A; Chaoul, Nada; Deshayes, Frederique; Dessirier, Valérie; Lapree, Genevieve; Tsapis, Andreas; Richard, Yolande

    2008-03-01

    B-cell-activating factor of the TNF family, (BAFF), and a proliferation-inducing ligand (APRIL) regulate B-lymphocyte survival and activation. We report that BAFF, but not APRIL, increased the chemotactic response of primary human B cells to CCL21, CXCL12, and CXCL13. The BAFF-induced increase in B-cell chemotaxis was totally abolished by blockade of BAFF-R and was strongly dependent on the activation of PI3K/AKT, NF-kappaB, and p38MAPK pathways. BAFF had similar effects on the chemotaxis of naive and memory B cells in response to CCL21 but increased more strongly that of memory B cells to CXCL13 than that of naive B cells. Our findings indicate a previously unreported role for the BAFF/BAFF-R pair in mature B-cell chemotaxis. The synergy between CXCL13 and BAFF produced by stromal cells and follicular dendritic cells may have important implications for B-cell homeostasis, the development of normal B-cell areas, and for the formation of germinal center-like follicles that may be observed in various autoimmune diseases.

  17. B Cell Lymphoma, Unclassifiable, Transformed from Follicular Lymphoma: A Rare Presentation with Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Kanna, Anila; Agrawal, Swati; Jayant, Kumar; Kumar Pala, Varun; Altujjar, Mohammad; Hadid, Tarik; Khurram, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    B cell lymphoma, unclassifiable, with features of diffuse large B cell lymphoma and classical Hodgkin's lymphoma (BCLu-DLBCL/CHL) is more commonly known as gray zone lymphoma. These cases more often present with mediastinal disease. In this report, we present a very rare case of BCLu-DLBCL/CHL without mediastinal involvement, transformed from follicular lymphoma (FL) to BCLu-DLBCL/CHL. This patient initially presented with a mass in the right neck; biopsy of the lymph node showed predominantly nodular, follicular pattern. Immunohistochemical (IHC) staining of tumor cells expressed positivity for mature B cell markers CD20, CD19, CD10, CD23, CD45, and CD38 but negative for CD5,11c. Hence, diagnosed with FL, he was given rituximab, cyclophosphamide, vincristine, and prednisone (RCVP) regimen, followed by maintenance rituximab. He showed good response. After 2 years, he presented again with a mass in the right side of the neck. Although the needle core biopsy of this mass was suggestive of B cell lymphoma, excisional biopsy showed morphological features of DLBCL as well as foci of histological pattern of CHL. IHC staining expressed positivity for CD20, CD79a, PAX5, and CD15 and CD30 consistent with DLBCL and CHL. He was diagnosed with BCLu-DLBCL/CHL. The patient received “ACVBP” (doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, vindesine, bleomycin, and prednisone) followed by radiation. BCLu-DLBCL/CHL is clinically an aggressive tumor with poorer outcomes, but our case showed complete response to ACVBP regimen with tumor regression. PMID:26380128

  18. An Unusual Case of Extranodal Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma Infiltrating Skeletal Muscle: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Hatem, Joseph; Bogusz, Agata M.

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma is extranodal in approximately 40% of cases, arising in nearly any organ system. DLBCL involvement of soft tissue and in particular skeletal muscle is extremely rare, comprising less than 1% of all extranodal non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL). We report a case of a 79-year-old man that presented with a DLBCL of the left triceps. In particular, we describe an unusual histologic appearance of pseudoglandular structures, resembling adenocarcinoma. We performed a review of lymphoma cases involving skeletal muscle diagnosed at our institution over the past 15 years as well as thorough PubMed review of the literature. We discuss the features of lymphoma involving skeletal muscle as it pertains to clinical characteristics, histologic subtype, tumor localization, diagnostic studies, therapy, and outcome. Finally, we highlight the diagnostic difficulties that can present in these rare and often challenging cases. PMID:27247818

  19. B Cells: The Old New Players in Reproductive Immunology

    PubMed Central

    Fettke, Franziska; Schumacher, Anne; Costa, Serban-Dan; Zenclussen, Ana Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Reproductive immunology research has long focused on T cell responses to paternal antigens and tolerance mechanisms supporting fetal well-being. The participation of B cells herein was not widely studied. Because of the fascinating immunological uniqueness of pregnancy, it is however to be expected that such pleiotropic cells play a considerable role. In fact, on the one hand B cells contribute toward pregnancy tolerance by secreting the immunomodulatory cytokine IL-10 but on the other hand can seriously harm pregnancy because of their capacity of producing autoantibodies. As for protective B cells, new evidences in mouse models arise suggesting that IL-10 producing B cells, the so-called B10 cells, help in maintaining tolerance toward semi-allogenic fetal antigens. They may be also important to fight danger signals at the fetal-maternal interface as, e.g., in the case of infections with the aim to restore the disrupted fetal tolerance. In human pregnancies, IL-10 producing B cells increase with pregnancy onset but not in the case of spontaneous abortions. In vitro, they are able to suppress TNF-α production by T cells from pregnant individuals. Their generation and functionality will be discussed throughout this review article. B cells can be deleterious to pregnancy as well. Aberrant B cell compartment is associated with obstetric pathologies. In particular, the capacity of B2 cells to produce specific autoantibodies or of B-1a B cells to secrete natural autoantibodies that can turn autoreactive will be discussed herein. PMID:25002862

  20. Are autoantibodies the targets of B-cell-directed therapy?

    PubMed

    Pisetsky, David S; Grammer, Amrie C; Ning, Tony C; Lipsky, Peter E

    2011-09-01

    B-cell-directed therapy-the use of agents that eliminate B cells or block cytokines important for B-cell function-is emerging as a promising approach to the treatment of rheumatic disease. Target diseases, including systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), display diverse patterns of autoantibody production and aberrant activation of B cells. Despite the success of this general approach, the mechanisms by which B-cell-directed therapy ameliorates disease, and the role of autoantibodies as biomarkers of clinical response remain unclear. Importantly, although B-cell-directed therapy can reduce the production of some autoantibodies, the effects can be variable and heterogeneous, probably reflecting the critical (but ill-defined) roles of different B-cell and plasma cell populations in autoantibody production. Future studies during clinical trials of these agents are needed to define which B-cell and autoantibody populations are affected (or ought to be), and to discover informative biomarkers of clinical response that can be used to advance this therapeutic approach.

  1. A fine romance: T follicular helper cells and B cells.

    PubMed

    King, Cecile

    2011-06-24

    T follicular helper (Tfh) cells help B cells to generate affinity-matured antibodies. Three papers in this issue of Immunity (Choi et al., 2011; Kerfoot et al., 2011; Kitano et al., 2011) provide information about the reciprocal relationship between B cells and Tfh cells.

  2. DNA breaks early in replication in B cell cancers

    Cancer.gov

    Research by scientists at the NCI has identified a new class of DNA sites in cells that break early in the replication process. They found that these break sites correlate with damage often seen in B cell cancers, such as diffuse large B cell lymphoma.

  3. A fine romance: T follicular helper cells and B cells.

    PubMed

    King, Cecile

    2011-06-24

    T follicular helper (Tfh) cells help B cells to generate affinity-matured antibodies. Three papers in this issue of Immunity (Choi et al., 2011; Kerfoot et al., 2011; Kitano et al., 2011) provide information about the reciprocal relationship between B cells and Tfh cells. PMID:21703537

  4. B cells as therapeutic targets in autoimmune neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Dalakas, Marinos C

    2008-10-01

    B cells have a fundamental role in the pathogenesis of various autoimmune neurological disorders, not only as precursors of antibody-producing cells, but also as important regulators of the T-cell activation process through their participation in antigen presentation, cytokine production, and formation of ectopic germinal centers in the intermeningeal spaces. Two B-cell trophic factors-BAFF (B-cell-activating factor) and APRIL (a proliferation-inducing ligand)-and their receptors are strongly upregulated in many immunological disorders of the CNS and PNS, and these molecules contribute to clonal expansion of B cells in situ. The availability of monoclonal antibodies or fusion proteins against B-cell surface molecules and trophic factors provides a rational approach to the treatment of autoimmune neurological diseases. This article reviews the role of B cells in autoimmune neurological disorders and summarizes the experience to date with rituximab, a B-cell-depleting monoclonal antibody against CD20, for the treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis, autoimmune neuropathies, neuromyelitis optica, paraneoplastic neurological disorders, myasthenia gravis, and inflammatory myopathies. It is expected that ongoing controlled trials will establish the efficacy and long-term safety profile of anti-B-cell agents in several autoimmune neurological disorders, as well as exploring the possibility of a safe and synergistic effect with other immunosuppressants or immunomodulators.

  5. Therapeutic strategies targeting B-cells in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Milo, Ron

    2016-07-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory and demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS) that traditionally has been considered to be mediated primarily by T-cells. Increasing evidence, however, suggests the fundamental role of B-cells in the pathogenesis of the disease. Recent strategies targeting B-cells in MS have demonstrated impressive and sometimes surprising results: B-cell depletion by monoclonal antibodies targeting the B-cell surface antigen CD20 (e.g. rituximab, ocrelizumab, ofatumumab) was shown to exert profound anti-inflammatory effect in MS with favorable risk-benefit ratio, with ocrelizumab demonstrating efficacy in both relapsing-remitting (RR) and primary-progressive (PP) MS in phase III clinical trials. Depletion of CD52 expressing T- and B-cells and monocytes by alemtuzumab resulted in impressive and durable suppression of disease activity in RRMS patients. On the other hand, strategies targeting B-cell cytokines such as atacicept resulted in increased disease activity. As our understanding of the biology of B-cells in MS is increasing, new compounds that target B-cells continue to be developed which promise to further expand the armamentarium of MS therapies and allow for more individualized therapy for patients with this complex disease.

  6. B cells do not present antigen covalently linked to microspheres.

    PubMed Central

    Galelli, A; Charlot, B; Dériaud, E; Leclerc, C

    1993-01-01

    B cells have been shown to present antigen to T cells very efficiently through their capacity to capture antigens by their membrane immunoglobulin. This direct cognate interaction of T and B cells results in the proliferation and differentiation of B cells. This concept has been established using soluble proteins. However, most of the antigens to which the immune system is exposed are included in complex particulate structures such as bacteria or parasites. The capacity of B cells to present these large and complex antigens is still unclear. To address this question we have studied the presentation by trinitrophenyl (TNP)-specific B cells of the same antigen TNP-KLH (keyhole limpet haemocyanin), either in a soluble form or covalently linked to poly(acrolein) microspheres, from 0.25 to 1.5 microns in diameter. In the presence of irradiated splenocytes or purified macrophages as a source of antigen-presenting cells (APC), KLH-specific T cells proliferated in response to soluble TNP-KLH or to TNP-KLH coupled to beads. In contrast, TNP-specific memory B cells were totally ineffective in presenting the TNP-KLH beads to KLH-specific T cells whereas they presented very efficiently soluble TNP-KLH. Similar results were obtained with the A20 B lymphoma or with lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated TNP-specific B cells. These results therefore indicate that B cells are unable to present large size particulate antigens such as bacteria or parasites. PMID:8509143

  7. DHA-enriched fish oil targets B cell lipid microdomains and enhances ex vivo and in vivo B cell function

    PubMed Central

    Gurzell, Eric A.; Teague, Heather; Harris, Mitchel; Clinthorne, Jonathan; Shaikh, Saame Raza; Fenton, Jenifer I.

    2013-01-01

    DHA is a n-3 LCPUFA in fish oil that generally suppresses T lymphocyte function. However, the effect of fish oil on B cell function remains relatively understudied. Given the important role of B cells in gut immunity and increasing human fish oil supplementation, we sought to determine whether DFO leads to enhanced B cell activation in the SMAD−/− colitis-prone mouse model, similar to that observed with C57BL/6 mice. This study tested the hypothesis that DHA from fish oil is incorporated into the B cell membrane to alter lipid microdomain clustering and enhance B cell function. Purified, splenic B cells from DFO-fed mice displayed increased DHA levels and diminished GM1 microdomain clustering. DFO enhanced LPS-induced B cell secretion of IL-6 and TNF-α and increased CD40 expression ex vivo compared with CON. Despite increased MHCII expression in the unstimulated ex vivo B cells from DFO-fed mice, we observed no difference in ex vivo OVA-FITC uptake in B cells from DFO or CON mice. In vivo, DFO increased lymphoid tissue B cell populations and surface markers of activation compared with CON. Finally, we investigated whether these ex vivo and in vivo observations were consistent with systemic changes. Indeed, DFO-fed mice had significantly higher plasma IL-5, IL-13, and IL-9 (Th2-biasing cytokines) and cecal IgA compared with CON. These results support the hypothesis and an emerging concept that fish oil enhances B cell function in vivo. PMID:23180828

  8. Precursor B Cells Increase in the Lung during Airway Allergic Inflammation: A Role for B Cell-Activating Factor

    PubMed Central

    Malmhäll, Carina; Rådinger, Madeleine; Ramos-Ramirez, Patricia; Lu, You; Deák, Tünde; Semitekolou, Maria; Gaga, Mina; Sjöstrand, Margareta; Lötvall, Jan; Bossios, Apostolos

    2016-01-01

    Background B cells, key cells in allergic inflammation, differentiate in the bone marrow and their precursors include pro-B, pre-B and immature B cells. Eosinophil progenitor cells increase in the lung after allergen exposure. However, the existence and possible role of B cell precursors in the lung during allergic inflammation remains elusive. Methods A BALB/c mouse model of allergic airway inflammation was utilized to perform phenotypic and quantification analyses of pro-B and pre-B cells in the lung by flow cytometry. B cell maturation factors IL-7 and B cell-activating factor (BAFF) and their receptors (CD127 and BAFFR, BCMA, TACI, respectively) were also evaluated in the lung and serum. The effect of anti-BAFF treatment was investigated both in vivo (i.p. administration of BAFF-R-Ig fusion protein) and in vitro (colony forming cell assay). Finally, BAFF levels were examined in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) of asthmatic patients and healthy controls. Results Precursor pro and pre-B cells increase in the lung after allergen exposure, proliferate in the lung tissue in vivo, express markers of chemotaxis (CCR10 and CXCR4) and co-stimulation (CD40, CD86) and are resistant to apoptosis (Bax). Precursor B cells express receptors for BAFF at baseline, while after allergen challenge both their ligand BAFF and the BCMA receptor expression increases in B cell precursors. Blocking BAFFR in the lung in vivo decreases eosinophils and proliferating precursor B cells. Blocking BAFFR in bone marrow cultures in vitro reduces pre-B colony formation units. BAFF is increased in the BAL of severe asthmatics. Conclusion Our data support the concept of a BAFF-mediated role for B cell precursors in allergic airway inflammation. PMID:27513955

  9. NK cell depletion diminish tumour-specific B cell responses.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Markus; Tawadros, Samir; Sedlacek, Hans-Harald; Schultze, Joachim L; Berthold, Frank

    2004-05-15

    Natural killer (NK) cells can exercise immediate cytotoxicity against malignant cells and thus far modulate the development of tumour directed T cell immunity. To investigate the impact of NK cells on the development of tumour directed B cell immunity mice were immunised with IMR5-75 human neuroblastoma cells with or without prior in vivo NK cell depletion. Flow cytometry analyses gave evidence for an impaired IgG response against the cells immunised with. Dissection of Th1 (IgG2a) and Th2 (IgG1) oriented B cell responses revealed Th1 responses as primarily affected, while Th2 oriented B cell responses as measured by flow cytometry and GD2 ganglioside-specific ELISA were enforced. The data reveal an unexpected impact of NK cells on the development of tumour directed B cell responses. Consequently, NK cell function has also to be taken into account when developing B cell-based cancer immunotherapy.

  10. The regulation and activation of lupus-associated B cells.

    PubMed

    Fields, Michele L; Hondowicz, Brian D; Wharton, Gina N; Adair, Brigette S; Metzgar, Michele H; Alexander, Shawn T; Caton, Andrew J; Erikson, Jan

    2005-04-01

    Anti-double-stranded DNA (anti-dsDNA) B cells are regulated in non-autoimmune mice. While some are deleted or undergo receptor editing, a population of anti-dsDNA (VH3H9/V lambda 1) B cells that emigrate into the periphery has also been identified. These cells have an altered phenotype relative to normal B cells in that they have a reduced lifespan, appear developmentally arrested, and localize primarily to the T/B-cell interface in the spleen. This phenotype may be the consequence of immature B cells encountering antigen in the absence of T-cell help. When provided with T-cell help, the anti-dsDNA B cells differentiate into antibody-forming cells. In the context of the autoimmune-prone lpr/lpr or gld/gld mutations, the VH3H9/V lambda 1 anti-dsDNA B cells populate the B-cell follicle and by 12 weeks of age produce serum autoantibodies. The early event of anti-dsDNA B-cell follicular entry, in the absence of autoantibody production, is dependent upon CD4(+) T cells. We hypothesize that control of autoantibody production in young autoimmune-prone mice may be regulated by the counterbalancing effect of T-regulatory (T(reg)) cells. Consistent with this model, we have demonstrated that T(reg) cells are able to prevent autoantibody production induced by T-cell help. Additional studies are aimed at investigating the mechanisms of this suppression as well as probing the impact of distinct forms of T-cell-dependent and -independent activation on anti-dsDNA B cells.

  11. Specific cytogenetic abnormalities are associated with a significantly inferior outcome in children and adolescents with mature B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma: results of the FAB/LMB 96 international study.

    PubMed

    Poirel, H A; Cairo, M S; Heerema, N A; Swansbury, J; Aupérin, A; Launay, E; Sanger, W G; Talley, P; Perkins, S L; Raphaël, M; McCarthy, K; Sposto, R; Gerrard, M; Bernheim, A; Patte, C

    2009-02-01

    Clinical studies showed that advanced stage, high LDH, poor response to reduction therapy and combined bone marrow and central nervous system disease are significantly associated with a decreased event-free survival (EFS) in pediatric mature B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (B-NHL) treated on FAB/LMB96. Although rearranged MYC/8q24 (R8q24) is characteristic of Burkitt lymphoma (BL), little information is available on other cytogenetic abnormalities and their prognostic importance. We performed an international review of 238 abnormal karyotypes in childhood mature B-NHL treated on FAB/LMB96: 76% BL, 8% Burkitt-like lymphoma, 13% diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). The main BL R8q24-associated chromosomal aberrations were +1q (29%), +7q and del(13q) (14% each). The DLBCL appeared heterogeneous and more complex. Incidence of R8q24 (34%) was higher than reported in adult DLBCL. The prognostic value of cytogenetic abnormalities on EFS was studied by Cox model controlling for the known risk factors: R8q24, +7q and del(13q) were independently associated with a significant inferior EFS (hazard ratio: 6.1 (P=0.030), 2.5 (P=0.015) and 4.0 (P=0.0003), respectively). The adverse prognosis of R8q24 was observed only in DLBCL, whereas del(13q) and +7q had a similar effect in DLBCL and BL. These results emphasize the significant biological heterogeneity and the development of cytogenetic risk-adapted therapy in childhood mature B-NHL.

  12. Antiviral therapy is associated with a better survival in patients with hepatitis C virus and B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas, ANRS HC-13 lympho-C study.

    PubMed

    Michot, Jean-Marie; Canioni, Danielle; Driss, Henda; Alric, Laurent; Cacoub, Patrice; Suarez, Felipe; Sibon, David; Thieblemont, Catherine; Dupuis, Jehan; Terrier, Benjamin; Feray, Cyrille; Tilly, Hervé; Pol, Stanislas; Leblond, Véronique; Settegrana, Catherine; Rabiega, Pascaline; Barthe, Yoann; Hendel-Chavez, Houria; Nguyen-Khac, Florence; Merle-Béral, Hélène; Berger, Françoise; Molina, Thierry; Charlotte, Frédéric; Carrat, Fabrice; Davi, Frédéric; Hermine, Olivier; Besson, Caroline

    2015-03-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection increases the risk of B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas (B-NHL). Antiviral treatment (AT) can induce hematological responses in patients with marginal zone lymphomas (MZL). The ANRS HC-13 Lympho-C study aimed at a better understanding of the impact of AT on HCV associated B-NHL. This multicentric study enrolled 116 HCV-positive patients with B-NHL between 2006 and 2012. Cytological and histological samples were collected for centralized review. At lymphoma diagnosis, median age was 61 years and gender ratio M/F was 1. Cytohistological distribution was marginal zone lymphoma (MZL) n = 45 (39%), diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) n = 45 (39%), and other types n = 26 (22%). MZL patients had more frequent detection of rheumatoid factor (68% vs. 35%; P = 0.001) and more frequently mixed cryoglobulinemia (74% vs. 44%; P = 0.021) than patients with DLBCL. Among patients receiving AT, a sustained virologic response was achieved in 23 of 38 (61%) patients with MZL and in 9 of 17 (53%) with DLBCL (P = 0.42). Three-year overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival were 78% 95%CI [63-88] and 64% [48-76], respectively, without difference between cytohistological groups. Outcome analysis showed a favorable association between OS and AT in all patients (P = 0.05) and in the subgroup of MZL patients only (P = 0.04). Our data support that AT improves the outcomes of HCV-associated NHLs. The impact of new AT regimen with protease inhibitor needs to be investigated in this setting. [clinicalTrials.gov Identification number NCT01545544] PMID:25417909

  13. B-cell receptor signaling inhibitors for treatment of autoimmune inflammatory diseases and B-cell malignancies.

    PubMed

    Puri, Kamal D; Di Paolo, Julie A; Gold, Michael R

    2013-08-01

    B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling is essential for normal B-cell development, selection, survival, proliferation, and differentiation into antibody-secreting cells. Similarly, this pathway plays a key role in the pathogenesis of multiple B-cell malignancies. Genetic and pharmacological approaches have established an important role for the Spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk), Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk), and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase isoform p110delta (PI3Kδ) in coupling the BCR and other BCRs to B-cell survival, migration, and activation. In the past few years, several small-molecule inhibitory drugs that target PI3Kδ, Btk, and Syk have been developed and shown to have efficacy in clinical trials for the treatment of several types of B-cell malignancies. Emerging preclinical data have also shown a critical role of BCR signaling in the activation and function of self-reactive B cells that contribute to autoimmune diseases. Because BCR signaling plays a major role in both B-cell-mediated autoimmune inflammation and B-cell malignancies, inhibition of this pathway may represent a promising new strategy for treating these diseases. This review summarizes recent achievements in the mechanism of action, pharmacological properties, and clinical activity and toxicity of these BCR signaling inhibitors, with a focus on their emerging role in treating lymphoid malignancies and autoimmune disorders.

  14. Prolactin Rescues Immature B-Cells from Apoptosis Induced by B-Cell Receptor Cross-Linking

    PubMed Central

    Flores-Fernández, Rocio; Blanco-Favela, Francisco; Fuentes-Pananá, Ezequiel M.; Chávez-Sánchez, Luis; Gorocica-Rosete, Patricia; Pizaña-Venegas, Alberto; Chávez-Rueda, Adriana Karina

    2016-01-01

    Prolactin has an immunomodulatory effect and has been associated with B-cell-triggered autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). In mice that develop SLE, the PRL receptor is expressed in early bone marrow B-cells, and increased levels of PRL hasten disease manifestations, which are correlated with a reduction in the absolute number of immature B-cells. The aim of this work was to determine the effect of PRL in an in vitro system of B-cell tolerance using WEHI-231 cells and immature B-cells from lupus prone MRL/lpr mice. WEHI-231 cells express the long isoform of the PRL receptor, and PRL rescued the cells from cell death by decreasing the apoptosis induced by the cross-linking of the B-cell antigen receptor (BCR) as measured by Annexin V and active caspase-3. This decrease in apoptosis may have been due to the PRL and receptor interaction, which increased the relative expression of antiapoptotic Bcl-xL and decreased the relative expression of proapoptotic Bad. In immature B-cells from MRL/lpr mice, PRL increased the viability and decreased the apoptosis induced by the cross-linking of BCR, which may favor the maturation of self-reactive B-cells and contribute to the onset of disease. PMID:27314053

  15. Differential expression of Toll-like receptor (TLR) and B cell receptor (BCR) signaling molecules in primary diffuse large B-cell lymphoma of the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Akhter, Ariz; Masir, Noraidah; Elyamany, Ghaleb; Phang, Kean-Chang; Mahe, Etienne; Al-Zahrani, Ali Matar; Shabani-Rad, Meer-Taher; Stewart, Douglas Allan; Mansoor, Adnan

    2015-01-01

    Primary diffuse large B-cell lymphoma of the central nervous system (CNS DLBCL) is a distinct and aggressive lymphoma that is confined to CNS. Since, central nervous system is barrier-protected and immunologically silent; role of TLR/BCR signaling in pathogenesis and biology of CNS DLBCL is intriguing. Genomic mutations in key regulators of TLR/BCR signaling pathway (MYD88/CD79B/CARD11) have recently been reported in this disease. These observations raised possible implications in novel targeted therapies; however, expression pattern of molecules related to TLR/BCR pathways in this lymphoma remains unknown. We have analyzed the expression of 19 genes encoding TLR/BCR pathways and targets in CNS DLBCLs (n = 20) by Nanostring nCounter™ analysis and compared it with expression patterns in purified reactive B-lymphocytes and systemic diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) (n = 20). Relative expression of TLR4, TLR5, TLR9, CD79B and BLNK was higher in CNS DLBCLs than in control B-lymphocytes; where as TLR7, MALT1, BCL10, CD79A and LYN was lower in CNS DLBCLs (P < 0.0001). When compared with systemic DLBCL samples, higher expression of TLR9, CD79B, CARD11, LYN and BLNK was noted in CNS DLBCL (>1.5 fold change; P < 0.01). The B cell receptor molecules like BLNK and CD79B were also associated with higher expression of MYD88 dependent TLRs (TLR4/5/9). In conclusion, we have shown over expression of TLR/BCR related genes or their targets, where genomic mutations have commonly been identified in CNS DLBCL. We have also demonstrated that TLR over expression closely relate with up regulation of genes associated with BCR pathway like CD79B/BLNK and CARD11, which play an important role in NF-kB pathway activation. Our results provide an important insight into the possibility of TLR and/or B-cell receptor signaling molecules as possible therapeutic targets in CNS DLBCL. PMID:25391967

  16. Punishment of elicited aggression.

    PubMed

    Azrin, N H

    1970-07-01

    Aversive shocks are known to produce aggression when the shocks are not dependent on behavior and to suppress behavior when the shocks are arranged as a dependent punisher. These two processes were studied by presenting non-dependent shock to monkeys at regular intervals, thereby producing biting attacks on a pneumatic tube. Immediate shock punishment was stimultaneously delivered for each biting attack. The attacks were found to decrease as a function of increasing punishment intensity. These results show that aggression is eliminated by direct punishment of the aggression even when the stimulus that is used as a punisher otherwise causes the aggression. PMID:4988590

  17. B Cells in Chronic Graft versus Host Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sarantopoulos, Stefanie; Blazar, Bruce R.; Cutler, Corey; Ritz, Jerome

    2015-01-01

    Chronic graft versus host disease (cGVHD) continues to be a common complication of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Unlike acute GVHD, which is mediated almost entirely by donor T cells, the immune pathology of cGVHD is more complex and donor B cells have also been found to play an important role. Recent studies from several laboratories have enhanced our understanding of how donor B cells contribute to this clinical syndrome and this has led to new therapeutic opportunities. Here, Dr. Sarantopoulos reviews some of the important mechanisms responsible for persistent B cell activation and loss of B cell tolerance in patients with cGVHD. Dr. Blazar describes recent studies in preclinical models that have identified novel B cell directed agents that may be effective for prevention or treatment of cGVHD. Some B cell directed therapies have already been tested in patients with cGVHD and Dr. Cutler reviews the results of these studies documenting the potential efficacy of this approach. Supported by studies mechanistic studies in patients and preclinical models, new B cell directed therapies for cGVHD will now be evaluated in clinical trials. PMID:25452031

  18. Gallium arsenide exposure impairs splenic B cell accessory function.

    PubMed

    Gondre-Lewis, Timothy A; Hartmann, Constance B; Caffrey, Rebecca E; McCoy, Kathleen L

    2003-03-01

    Gallium arsenide (GaAs) is utilized in industries for its semiconductor and optical properties. Chemical exposure of animals systemically suppresses several immune functions. The ability of splenic B cells to activate antigen-specific helper CD4(+) T cell hybridomas was assessed, and various aspects of antigen-presenting cell function were examined. GaAs-exposed murine B cells were impaired in processing intact soluble protein antigens, and the defect was antigen dependent. In contrast, B cells after exposure competently presented peptides to the T cells, which do not require processing. Cell surface expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules and several costimulatory molecules on splenic B cells, which are critical for helper T cell activation, was not affected by chemical exposure. GaAs exposure also did not influence the stability of MHC class II heterodimers, suggesting that the defect may precede peptide exchange. GaAs-exposed B cells contained a normal level of aspartyl cathepsin activity; however, proteolytic activities of thiol cathepsins B and L were approximately half the control levels. Furthermore, two cleavage fragments of invariant chain, a molecular chaperone of MHC class II molecules, were increased in GaAs-exposed B cells, indicative of defective degradation. Thus, diminished thiol proteolytic activity in B cells may be responsible for their impaired antigen processing and invariant chain degradation, which may contribute to systemic immunosuppression caused by GaAs exposure.

  19. YY1 Is Required for Germinal Center B Cell Development

    PubMed Central

    Vuyyuru, Raja; Jha, Vibha; Hodewadekar, Suchita; Manser, Tim; Atchison, Michael L.

    2016-01-01

    YY1 has been implicated as a master regulator of germinal center B cell development as YY1 binding sites are frequently present in promoters of germinal center-expressed genes. YY1 is known to be important for other stages of B cell development including the pro-B and pre-B cells stages. To determine if YY1 plays a critical role in germinal center development, we evaluated YY1 expression during B cell development, and used a YY1 conditional knock-out approach for deletion of YY1 in germinal center B cells (CRE driven by the immunoglobulin heavy chain γ1 switch region promoter; γ1-CRE). We found that YY1 is most highly expressed in germinal center B cells and is increased 3 fold in splenic B cells activated by treatment with anti-IgM and anti-CD40. In addition, deletion of the yy1 gene by action of γ1-CRE recombinase resulted in significant loss of GC cells in both un-immunized and immunized contexts with corresponding loss of serum IgG1. Our results show a crucial role for YY1 in the germinal center reaction. PMID:27167731

  20. The Relationship between B-cell Epitope and Mimotope Sequences.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chunhua; Li, Yunyun; Tang, Weina; Zhou, Zhiguo; Sun, Pingping; Ma, Zhiqiang

    2016-01-01

    B-cell epitope is a group of residues which is on the surface of an antigen. It invokes humoral responses. Locating B-cell epitope is important for effective vaccine design, and the development of diagnostic reagents. Mimotope-based B-cell epitope prediction method is a kind of conformational B-cell epitope prediction, and the core idea of the method is mapping the mimotope sequences which are obtained from a random phage display library. However, current mimotope-based B-cell epitope prediction methods cannot maintain a high degree of satisfaction in the circumstances of employing only mimotope sequences. In this study, we did a multi-perspective analysis on parameters for conformational B-cell epitopes and characteristics between epitope and mimotope on a benchmark datasets which contains 67 mimotope sets, corresponding to 40 unique complex structures. In these 67 cases, there are 25 antigen-antibody complexes and 42 protein-protein interactions. We analyzed the two parts separately. The results showed the mimotope sequences do have some epitope features, but there are also some epitope properties that mimotope sequences do not contain. In addition, the numbers of epitope segments with different lengths were obviously different between the antigen-antibody complexes and the protein-protein interactions. This study reflects how similar do mimotope sequence and genuine epitopes have; and evaluates existing mimotope-based B-cell epitope prediction methods from a novel viewpoint.

  1. Salmonella induces PD-L1 expression in B cells.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Medina, Marcela; Perez-Lopez, Araceli; Alpuche-Aranda, Celia; Ortiz-Navarrete, Vianney

    2015-10-01

    Salmonella persists for a long time in B cells; however, the mechanism(s) through which infected B cells avoid effector CD8 T cell responses has not been characterized. In this study, we show that Salmonella infects and survives within all B1 and B2 cell subpopulations. B cells are infected with a Salmonella typhimurium strain expressing an ovalbumin (OVA) peptide (SIINFEKL) to evaluate whether B cells process and present Salmonella antigens in the context of MHC-I molecules. Our data showed that OVA peptides are presented by MHC class I K(b)-restricted molecules and the presented antigen is generated through proteasomal degradation and vacuolar processing. In addition, Salmonella-infected B cells express co-stimulatory molecules such as CD40, CD80, and CD86 as well as inhibitory molecules such as PD-L1. Thus, the cross-presentation of Salmonella antigens and the expression of activation molecules suggest that infected B cells are able to prime and activate specific CD8(+) T cells. However, the Salmonella infection-stimulated expression of PD-L1 suggests that the PD-1/PD-L1 pathway may be involved in turning off the cytotoxic effector response during Salmonella persistent infection, thereby allowing B cells to become a reservoir for the bacteria.

  2. The Relationship between B-cell Epitope and Mimotope Sequences.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chunhua; Li, Yunyun; Tang, Weina; Zhou, Zhiguo; Sun, Pingping; Ma, Zhiqiang

    2016-01-01

    B-cell epitope is a group of residues which is on the surface of an antigen. It invokes humoral responses. Locating B-cell epitope is important for effective vaccine design, and the development of diagnostic reagents. Mimotope-based B-cell epitope prediction method is a kind of conformational B-cell epitope prediction, and the core idea of the method is mapping the mimotope sequences which are obtained from a random phage display library. However, current mimotope-based B-cell epitope prediction methods cannot maintain a high degree of satisfaction in the circumstances of employing only mimotope sequences. In this study, we did a multi-perspective analysis on parameters for conformational B-cell epitopes and characteristics between epitope and mimotope on a benchmark datasets which contains 67 mimotope sets, corresponding to 40 unique complex structures. In these 67 cases, there are 25 antigen-antibody complexes and 42 protein-protein interactions. We analyzed the two parts separately. The results showed the mimotope sequences do have some epitope features, but there are also some epitope properties that mimotope sequences do not contain. In addition, the numbers of epitope segments with different lengths were obviously different between the antigen-antibody complexes and the protein-protein interactions. This study reflects how similar do mimotope sequence and genuine epitopes have; and evaluates existing mimotope-based B-cell epitope prediction methods from a novel viewpoint. PMID:26715528

  3. Human Memory B Cells in Healthy Gingiva, Gingivitis, and Periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Mahanonda, Rangsini; Champaiboon, Chantrakorn; Subbalekha, Keskanya; Sa-Ard-Iam, Noppadol; Rattanathammatada, Warattaya; Thawanaphong, Saranya; Rerkyen, Pimprapa; Yoshimura, Fuminobu; Nagano, Keiji; Lang, Niklaus P; Pichyangkul, Sathit

    2016-08-01

    The presence of inflammatory infiltrates with B cells, specifically plasma cells, is the hallmark of periodontitis lesions. The composition of these infiltrates in various stages of homeostasis and disease development is not well documented. Human tissue biopsies from sites with gingival health (n = 29), gingivitis (n = 8), and periodontitis (n = 21) as well as gingival tissue after treated periodontitis (n = 6) were obtained and analyzed for their composition of B cell subsets. Ag specificity, Ig secretion, and expression of receptor activator of NF-κB ligand and granzyme B were performed. Although most of the B cell subsets in healthy gingiva and gingivitis tissues were CD19(+)CD27(+)CD38(-) memory B cells, the major B cell component in periodontitis was CD19(+)CD27(+)CD38(+)CD138(+)HLA-DR(low) plasma cells, not plasmablasts. Plasma cell aggregates were observed at the base of the periodontal pocket and scattered throughout the gingiva, especially apically toward the advancing front of the lesion. High expression of CXCL12, a proliferation-inducing ligand, B cell-activating factor, IL-10, IL-6, and IL-21 molecules involved in local B cell responses was detected in both gingivitis and periodontitis tissues. Periodontitis tissue plasma cells mainly secreted IgG specific to periodontal pathogens and also expressed receptor activator of NF-κB ligand, a bone resorption cytokine. Memory B cells resided in the connective tissue subjacent to the junctional epithelium in healthy gingiva. This suggested a role of memory B cells in maintaining periodontal homeostasis. PMID:27335500

  4. Increased Expression of a Phloem Membrane Protein Encoded by NHL26 Alters Phloem Export and Sugar Partitioning in Arabidopsis[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Vilaine, Françoise; Kerchev, Pavel; Clément, Gilles; Batailler, Brigitte; Cayla, Thibaud; Bill, Laurence; Gissot, Lionel; Dinant, Sylvie

    2013-01-01

    The complex process of phloem sugar transport involves symplasmic and apoplasmic events. We characterized Arabidopsis thaliana lines ectopically expressing a phloem-specific gene encoding NDR1/HIN1-like26 (NHL26), a putative membrane protein. NHL26 overexpressor plants grew more slowly than wild-type plants, accumulated high levels of carbohydrates in mature leaves, and had a higher shoot biomass, contrasting with slower root growth and a lower seed yield. Similar effects were observed when NHL26 was overexpressed in companion cells, under the control of a companion cell–specific promoter. The soluble sugar content of the phloem sap and sink organs was lower than that in the wild type, providing evidence of a sugar export defect. This was confirmed in a phloem-export assay with the symplastic tracer carboxyfluorescein diacetate. Leaf sugar accumulation was accompanied by higher organic acid, amino acid, and protein contents, whereas analysis of the metabolite profile of phloem sap exudate revealed no change in amino acid or organic acid content, indicating a specific effect on sugar export. NHL26 was found to be located in the phloem plasmodesmata and the endoplasmic reticulum. These findings reveal that NHL26 accumulation affects either the permeability of plasmodesmata or sugar signaling in companion cells, with a specific effect on sugar export. PMID:23715470

  5. B-cell memory and the persistence of antibody responses.

    PubMed Central

    MacLennan, I C; García de Vinuesa, C; Casamayor-Palleja, M

    2000-01-01

    Antigens such as viral envelope proteins and bacterial exotoxins induce responses which result in the production of neutralizing antibody. These responses persist for years and provide highly efficient defence against reinfection. During these antibody responses a proportion of participating B cells mutate the genes that encode their immunoglobulin variable regions. This can increase the affinity of the antibody, but can also induce autoreactive B cells. Selection mechanisms operate which allow the cells with high affinity for the provoking antigen to persist, while other B cells recruited into the response die. PMID:10794052

  6. BAFF: a fundamental survival factor for B cells.

    PubMed

    Mackay, Fabienne; Browning, Jeffrey L

    2002-07-01

    B-cell-activating factor of the tumour-necrosis-factor family (BAFF) enhances B-cell survival--a function that is indispensable for B-cell maturation--and has a role in enhancing immune responses. Moreover, the overexpression of BAFF results in severe autoimmune disorders in mice, and elevated serum levels of BAFF occur in some patients who have autoimmune diseases. The elucidation of the role of BAFF has set the stage for a new approach to the treatment of autoimmune disease.

  7. PI3 Kinase signals BCR dependent mature B cell survival

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Lakshmi; Sasaki, Yoshiteru; Calado, Dinis Pedro; Zhang, Baochun; Paik, Ji Hye; DePinho, Ronald A.; Kutok, Jeffrey L.; Kearney, John F.; Otipoby, Kevin L.; Rajewsky, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    Summary Previous work has shown that mature B cells depend upon survival signals delivered to the cells by their antigen receptor (BCR). To identify the molecular nature of this survival signal, we have developed a genetic approach in which ablation of the BCR is combined with the activation of specific, BCR dependent signaling cascades in mature B cells in vivo. Using this system, we provide evidence that the survival of BCR deficient mature B cells can be rescued by a single signaling pathway downstream of the BCR, namely PI3K signaling, with the FOXO1 transcription factor playing a central role. PMID:19879843

  8. Epstein-Barr virus-positive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma in children: a disease reminiscent of Epstein-Barr virus-positive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma of the elderly.

    PubMed

    Uccini, Stefania; Al-Jadiry, Mazin F; Scarpino, Stefania; Ferraro, Daniela; Alsaadawi, Adel R; Al-Darraji, Amir F; Moleti, Maria Luisa; Testi, Anna Maria; Al-Hadad, Salma A; Ruco, Luigi

    2015-05-01

    Pediatric Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-positive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (EBV+ DLBCL) is a rare disease in nonimmunocompromised hosts. In a review of 231 cases of malignant lymphoma (87 Hodgkin lymphoma and 144 non-Hodgkin lymphoma) occurring in Iraqi children, 7 cases (5% of NHLs) were classified as EBV+ DLBCL. Six children presented with nodal disease, and 1 presented with extranodal localization (bone). In all cases, the disease was at an advanced clinical stage (III/IV). Evidence of immunodeficiency (Evans syndrome and selective IgA deficiency) was observed in a single case. Two cases were "monomorphic" with immunoblastic histology, and 5 cases were "polymorphic" with histologic aspects reminiscent of nodular lymphocyte-predominant Hodgkin lymphoma (2 cases) and of CD30+ classical Hodgkin lymphoma (3 cases). In all cases, tumor cells were EBV infected (EBER+/LMP-1+), were medium-large B-cells (CD20+/CD79a+/PAX-5+/BOB-1+/OCT-2+) of non-germinal center (non-GC) origin (CD10-/MUM-1+), and had high proliferative activity (50%-70%). Chromosomal translocations involving BCL2, MYC, and IGH genes were not observed. IGH monoclonality could be demonstrated in 3 of 3 investigated cases. Six cases of EBV-negative DLBCL (4% of NHL) were present in the same series. All had monomorphic histology with centroblastic/immunoblastic morphology; 3 cases were of GC type and 3 of non-GC type. Our findings indicate that in Iraq, DLBCLs are 9% of NHLs. Moreover, 2 different types of the disease do exist; the EBV-positive cases, with strong histologic and immunohistochemical resemblance with EBV+ DLBCL of the elderly, and the EBV-negative cases, which are similar to the pediatric DLBCL usually observed in Western populations. PMID:25704629

  9. Pathological features of lymphoid proliferations of the salivary glands: lymphoepithelial sialadenitis versus low-grade B-cell lymphoma of the malt type.

    PubMed

    Carbone, A; Gloghini, A; Ferlito, A

    2000-12-01

    Lymphoid proliferations of the salivary glands can be either reactive or neoplastic. Reactive lesions include the lymphoepithelial sialadenitis (LESA; also known as myoepithelial sialadenitis [MESA]) of Sjogren's syndrome. Lymphomas of the salivary glands are predominantly B-cell type and include extranodal marginal zone B-cell lymphoma of the mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) type. The spectrum of histopathologic features of LESA/MESA includes 1) "fully benign lymphoid infiltrate," with or without an associated lymphoid follicular structure, without immunoglobulin (Ig) light chain restriction in B-cells, and without any features of aggressive behavior, and 2) "lymphoproliferative lesions," with or without areas of Ig light chain restriction in B-cells, with the usual presence of centrocyte-like cells. A more or less pronounced lymphoepithelial aggressiveness may be present without definite evidence of malignancy. B-cell clones are detected in over 50% of cases of LESA/MESA by molecular genetic methods, but this does not correlate with morphological or clinical evidence of overt lymphoma. On the other hand, "marginal zone B-cell lymphoma of the MALT type" of the salivary glands produces a dense lymphoid infiltrate diffusely involving the gland, with obliteration of acini. The centrocyte-like cells form broad "halos" around the epithelial cell nests and broad strands between lymphoepithelial lesions, often linking together several lymphoepithelial lesions. Further, lymphoma cells express monotypic surface Ig, and in the majority of the cases, the plasma cells are also monoclonal. In conclusion, the diagnosis of LESA/MESA versus marginal zone B-cell lymphoma of the MALT type still relies on the evaluation of morphological features. It seems that molecular genetic analysis has little or no practical role in the clinical diagnosis of salivary gland lymphoma in a setting of LESA/MESA and Sjögren's syndrome.

  10. A Strategic Approach to Aggression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Archer, John

    2001-01-01

    Discusses two issues raised by Underwood et al.: the distinction between indirect and relational forms of aggression, and implications of indirect aggression for definitions of aggression; and the normative view of aggression that indicates that aggressive individuals may be socially skilled. Suggests that both issues lead to the conclusion that…

  11. HIV-dependent depletion of influenza-specific memory B cells impacts B cell responsiveness to seasonal influenza immunisation

    PubMed Central

    Wheatley, Adam K.; Kristensen, Anne B.; Lay, William N.; Kent, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    Infection with HIV drives significant alterations in B cell phenotype and function that can markedly influence antibody responses to immunisation. Anti-retroviral therapy (ART) can partially reverse many aspects of B cell dysregulation, however complete normalisation of vaccine responsiveness is not always observed. Here we examine the effects of underlying HIV infection upon humoral immunity to seasonal influenza vaccines. Serological and memory B cell responses were assessed in 26 HIV+ subjects receiving ART and 30 healthy controls immunised with the 2015 Southern Hemisphere trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (IIV3). Frequencies and phenotypes of influenza hemagglutinin (HA)-specific B cells were assessed by flow cytometry using recombinant HA probes. Serum antibody was measured using hemagglutination inhibition assays. Serological responses to IIV3 were comparable between HIV+ and HIV− subjects. Likewise, the activation and expansion of memory B cell populations specific for vaccine-component influenza strains was observed in both cohorts, however peak frequencies were diminished in HIV+ subjects compared to uninfected controls. Lower circulating frequencies of memory B cells recognising vaccine-component and historical influenza strains were observed in HIV+ subjects at baseline, that were generally restored to levels comparable with HIV− controls post-vaccination. HIV infection is therefore associated with depletion of selected HA-specific memory B cell pools. PMID:27220898

  12. ATM deficiency promotes development of murine B-cell lymphomas that resemble diffuse large B-cell lymphoma in humans

    PubMed Central

    Hathcock, Karen S.; Padilla-Nash, Hesed M.; Camps, Jordi; Shin, Dong-Mi; Triner, Daniel; Shaffer, Arthur L.; Maul, Robert W.; Steinberg, Seth M.; Gearhart, Patricia J.; Staudt, Louis M.; Morse, Herbert C.; Ried, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The serine-threonine kinase ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) plays a central role in maintaining genomic integrity. In mice, ATM deficiency is exclusively associated with T-cell lymphoma development, whereas B-cell tumors predominate in human ataxia-telangiectasia patients. We demonstrate in this study that when T cells are removed as targets for lymphomagenesis and as mediators of immune surveillance, ATM-deficient mice exclusively develop early-onset immunoglobulin M+ B-cell lymphomas that do not transplant to immunocompetent mice and that histologically and genetically resemble the activated B cell–like (ABC) subset of human diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). These B-cell lymphomas show considerable chromosomal instability and a recurrent genomic amplification of a 4.48-Mb region on chromosome 18 that contains Malt1 and is orthologous to a region similarly amplified in human ABC DLBCL. Of importance, amplification of Malt1 in these lymphomas correlates with their dependence on nuclear factor (NF)-κB, MALT1, and B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling for survival, paralleling human ABC DLBCL. Further, like some human ABC DLBCLs, these mouse B-cell lymphomas also exhibit constitutive BCR-dependent NF-κB activation. This study reveals that ATM protects against development of B-cell lymphomas that model human ABC DLBCL and identifies a potential role for T cells in preventing the emergence of these tumors. PMID:26400962

  13. B Cell Development in the Bone Marrow Is Regulated by Homeostatic Feedback Exerted by Mature B Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shahaf, Gitit; Zisman-Rozen, Simona; Benhamou, David; Melamed, Doron; Mehr, Ramit

    2016-01-01

    Cellular homeostasis in the B cell compartment is strictly imposed to balance cell production and cell loss. However, it is not clear whether B cell development in the bone marrow is an autonomous process or subjected to regulation by the peripheral B cell compartment. To specifically address this question, we used mice transgenic for human CD20, where effective depletion of B lineage cells is obtained upon administration of mouse anti-human CD20 antibodies, in the absence of any effect on other cell lineages and/or tissues. We followed the kinetics of B cell return to equilibrium by BrdU labeling and flow cytometry and analyzed the resulting data by mathematical modeling. Labeling was much faster in depleted mice. Compared to control mice, B cell-depleted mice exhibited a higher proliferation rate in the pro-/pre-B compartment, and higher cell death and lower differentiation in the immature B cell compartment. We validated the first result by analysis of the expression of Ki67, the nuclear protein expressed in proliferating cells, and the second using Annexin V staining. Collectively, our results suggest that B lymphopoiesis is subjected to homeostatic feedback mechanisms imposed by mature B cells in the peripheral compartment. PMID:27047488

  14. Transgelin-2 in B-Cells Controls T-Cell Activation by Stabilizing T Cell - B Cell Conjugates

    PubMed Central

    Chae, Myoung-Won; Kim, Hye-Ran; Kim, Chang-Hyun; Jun, Chang-Duk; Park, Zee-Yong

    2016-01-01

    The immunological synapse (IS), a dynamic and organized junction between T-cells and antigen presenting cells (APCs), is critical for initiating adaptive immunity. The actin cytoskeleton plays a major role in T-cell reorganization during IS formation, and we previously reported that transgelin-2, an actin-binding protein expressed in T-cells, stabilizes cortical F-actin, promoting T-cell activation in response to antigen stimulation. Transgelin-2 is also highly expressed in B-cells, although no specific function has been reported. In this study, we found that deficiency in transgelin-2 (TAGLN2-/-) in B-cells had little effect on B-cell development and activation, as measured by the expression of CD69, MHC class II molecules, and CD80/86. Nevertheless, in B-cells, transgelin-2 accumulated in the IS during the interaction with T-cells. These results led us to hypothesize that transgelin-2 may also be involved in IS stability in B-cells, thereby influencing T-cell function. Notably, we found that transgelin-2 deficiency in B-cells reduced T-cell activation, as determined by the release of IL-2 and interferon-γ and the expression of CD69. Furthermore, the reduced T-cell activation was correlated with reduced B-cell–T-cell conjugate formation. Collectively, these results suggest that actin stability in B-cells during IS formation is critical for the initiation of adaptive T-cell immunity. PMID:27232882

  15. Primary Cutaneous Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma With a MYC-IGH Rearrangement and Gain of BCL2: Expanding the Spectrum of MYC/BCL2 Double-Hit Lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Testo, Natalia; Olson, Luke C; Subramaniyam, Shivakumar; Hanson, Ty; Magro, Cynthia M

    2016-10-01

    Aggressive extracutaneous B-cell lymphomas span the various stages of B-cell ontogeny and include B-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma, Burkitt lymphoma, mantle cell lymphoma, and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Diffuse large B-cell lymphomas represent the most common histologic subtype of non-Hodgkin lymphomas, comprising 30% of adult non-Hodgkin lymphomas in the United States. A distinctive form of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma is the double-hit lymphoma, with most cases exhibiting a combined MYC and BCL2 rearrangement, leading some hematopathologists to propose the term MYC/BCL2 lymphoma. More recently, MYC rearrangement with multiple copies/gain of BCL2 or multiple copies/gain of MYC with a BCL2 rearrangement have been described and exhibit a very similar clinical course to conventional double-hit lymphomas. We report the seventh case of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma exhibiting this distinct cytogenetic abnormality and the first reported case in the skin. The patient's clinical course was aggressive, succumbing to disease 18 months after his initial presentation. PMID:27391453

  16. Portraying the Expression Landscapes of B-Cell Lymphoma-Intuitive Detection of Outlier Samples and of Molecular Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Hopp, Lydia; Lembcke, Kathrin; Binder, Hans; Wirth, Henry

    2013-01-01

    We present an analytic framework based on Self-Organizing Map (SOM) machine learning to study large scale patient data sets. The potency of the approach is demonstrated in a case study using gene expression data of more than 200 mature aggressive B-cell lymphoma patients. The method portrays each sample with individual resolution, characterizes the subtypes, disentangles the expression patterns into distinct modules, extracts their functional context using enrichment techniques and enables investigation of the similarity relations between the samples. The method also allows to detect and to correct outliers caused by contaminations. Based on our analysis, we propose a refined classification of B-cell Lymphoma into four molecular subtypes which are characterized by differential functional and clinical characteristics. PMID:24833231

  17. Girls' Aggressive Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owens, Larry; Shute, Rosalyn; Slee, Phillip

    2004-01-01

    In contrast to boys' bullying behavior which is often overt and easily visible, girls' aggression is usually indirect and covert. Less research has been conducted on the types of bullying that girls usually engage in. Using focus groups composed of teenaged girls, Dr. Owens and colleagues examine the nature of teenage girls' indirect aggression.

  18. Third Person Instigated Aggression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaebelein, Jacquelyn

    Since many acts of aggression in society are more than simply an aggressor-victim encounter, the role played by third person instigated aggression also needs examination. The purpose of this study was to develop a laboratory procedure to systematically investigate instigation. In a competitive reaction time task, high and low Machiavellian Males…

  19. Social Aggression among Girls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Underwood, Marion K.

    Noting recent interest in girls' social or "relational" aggression, this volume offers a balanced, scholarly analysis of scientific knowledge in this area. The book integrates current research on emotion regulation, gender, and peer relations, to examine how girls are socialized to experience and express anger and aggression from infancy through…

  20. B-cell survival factors in autoimmune rheumatic disorders.

    PubMed

    Morais, Sandra A; Vilas-Boas, Andreia; Isenberg, David A

    2015-08-01

    Autoimmune rheumatic disorders have complex etiopathogenetic mechanisms in which B cells play a central role. The importance of factors stimulating B cells, notably the B-cell activating factor (BAFF) and A proliferation inducing ligand (APRIL) axis is now recognized. BAFF and APRIL are cytokines essential for B-cell proliferation and survival from the immature stages to the development of plasma cells. Their levels are increased in some subsets of patients with autoimmune disorders. Several recent biologic drugs have been developed to block this axis, namely belimumab [already licensed for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) treatment], tabalumab, atacicept and blisibimod. Many clinical trials to evaluate the safety and efficacy of these drugs in several autoimmune disorders are ongoing, or have been completed recently. This review updates the information on the use of biologic agents blocking BAFF/APRIL for patients with SLE, rheumatoid arthritis, Sjögren's syndrome and myositis. PMID:26288664

  1. An eruption of European B-cell biology.

    PubMed

    Cancro, Michael P

    2010-09-01

    Volcanic ash clouds disrupted the 2010 ESF/EMBO meeting on B cells and protection. Nevertheless, the delegates who did make it to Catalonia put together their own programme of talks covering a range of themes from mutualism to epigenetics.

  2. BAFF suppresses IL-15 expression in B cells.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ning; Xing, Chen; Xiao, He; He, Youdi; Han, Gencheng; Chen, Guojiang; Hou, Chunmei; Marrero, Bernadette; Wang, Yujuan; Zhang, Shengquan; Shen, Beifen; Li, Yan; Wang, Renxi

    2014-05-01

    Clinical trials have shown that BAFF inhibitors do not reduce memory B cell levels but can reduce the number of mature B cells. It remains uncertain whether BAFF affects memory-maintaining cytokines such as IL-15. We found that BAFF suppressed IL-15 expression in B cells from lupus-like or experimental allergic encephalomyelitis mice. When BAFF was blocked with atacicept-IgG, IL-15 expression was upregulated in lupus-like or experimental allergic encephalomyelitis mice. Finally, we showed that BAFF suppressed IL-15 expression in transitional 2 B cells by reducing Foxo1 expression and inducing Foxo1 phosphorylation. This study suggests that BAFF suppresses IL-15 expression in autoimmune diseases, and this opens up the possible opportunity for the clinical application of BAFF- and IL-15-specific therapeutic agents.

  3. How Follicular Dendritic Cells Shape the B-Cell Antigenome

    PubMed Central

    Kranich, Jan; Krautler, Nike Julia

    2016-01-01

    Follicular dendritic cells (FDCs) are stromal cells residing in primary follicles and in germinal centers of secondary and tertiary lymphoid organs (SLOs and TLOs). There, they play a crucial role in B-cell activation and affinity maturation of antibodies. FDCs have the unique capacity to bind and retain native antigen in B-cell follicles for long periods of time. Therefore, FDCs shape the B-cell antigenome (the sum of all B-cell antigens) in SLOs and TLOs. In this review, we discuss recent findings that explain how this stromal cell type can arise in almost any tissue during TLO formation and, furthermore, focus on the mechanisms of antigen capture and retention involved in the generation of long-lasting antigen depots displayed on FDCs. PMID:27446069

  4. Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma Version 1.2016.

    PubMed

    Zelenetz, Andrew D; Gordon, Leo I; Wierda, William G; Abramson, Jeremy S; Advani, Ranjana H; Andreadis, C Babis; Bartlett, Nancy; Byrd, John C; Fayad, Luis E; Fisher, Richard I; Glenn, Martha J; Habermann, Thomas M; Lee Harris, Nancy; Hernandez-Ilizaliturri, Francisco; Hoppe, Richard T; Horwitz, Steven M; Kaminski, Mark S; Kelsey, Christopher R; Kim, Youn H; Krivacic, Susan; LaCasce, Ann S; Lunning, Matthew; Nademanee, Auayporn; Porcu, Pierluigi; Press, Oliver; Rabinovitch, Rachel; Reddy, Nishitha; Reid, Erin; Roberts, Kenneth; Saad, Ayman A; Sokol, Lubomir; Swinnen, Lode J; Vose, Julie M; Yahalom, Joachim; Zafar, Nadeem; Dwyer, Mary; Sundar, Hema

    2016-02-01

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (DLBCL) are now considered a heterogeneous group of distinct molecular subtypes (germinal center B-cell DLBCL, activated B-cell DLBCL, and primary mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma (PMBL) with varied natural history and response to therapy. In addition, a subset of patients with DLBCL have concurrent MYC and/or BCL2 gene rearrangements (double-hit lymphomas; DHL) and others have a dual expression of both MYC and BCL2 proteins (double-expressing DLBCL; DEL). The standard of care for the treatment of patients with PMBL, DHL, or DEL has not been established. Adequate immunophenotyping and molecular testing (in selected circumstances) are necessary for the accurate diagnosis of different subtypes of DLBCL. The NCCN Guidelines included in this issue, part of the NCCN Guidelines for non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, address the diagnosis and management of DLBCL and its subtypes. PMID:26850490

  5. Chronic B-Cell Leukemias and Agent Orange

    MedlinePlus

    ... survivors' benefits . Research on B-cell leukemias and herbicides The Health and Medicine Division (HMD) (formally known ... sufficient evidence of an association between exposure to herbicides and chronic lymphocytic leukemia. In 2003, VA recognized ...

  6. COMPUTATION MODELING OF TCDD DISRUPTION OF B CELL TERMINAL DIFFERENTIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this study, we established a computational model describing the molecular circuit underlying B cell terminal differentiation and how TCDD may affect this process by impinging upon various molecular targets.

  7. B-cell survival factors in autoimmune rheumatic disorders

    PubMed Central

    Morais, Sandra A.; Vilas-Boas, Andreia

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune rheumatic disorders have complex etiopathogenetic mechanisms in which B cells play a central role. The importance of factors stimulating B cells, notably the B-cell activating factor (BAFF) and A proliferation inducing ligand (APRIL) axis is now recognized. BAFF and APRIL are cytokines essential for B-cell proliferation and survival from the immature stages to the development of plasma cells. Their levels are increased in some subsets of patients with autoimmune disorders. Several recent biologic drugs have been developed to block this axis, namely belimumab [already licensed for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) treatment], tabalumab, atacicept and blisibimod. Many clinical trials to evaluate the safety and efficacy of these drugs in several autoimmune disorders are ongoing, or have been completed recently. This review updates the information on the use of biologic agents blocking BAFF/APRIL for patients with SLE, rheumatoid arthritis, Sjögren’s syndrome and myositis. PMID:26288664

  8. Intravascular large B-cell lymphoma with hemophagocytic syndrome (Asian variant) in a Caucasian patient.

    PubMed

    Fung, Kar-Ming; Chakrabarty, Jennifer H; Kern, William F; Magharyous, Hany; Gehrs, Bradley C; Li, Shibo

    2012-01-01

    Intravascular lymphoma is an aggressive and extremely rare extranodal lymphoma with neoplastic lymphoid cells confined exclusively within intravascular spaces. The histopathologic findings are subtle due to the rarity of the neoplastic cells in blood vessels. Clinical presentations are non-specific and focal space-occupying lesions or lymphoadenopathy are always lacking. It is a diagnostic challenge. Secondary hemophagocytic syndrome is uncommon and is typically associated with infection, malignancy, and suppressed immune states. Intravascular lymphoma has a strong association with hemophagocytic syndrome in Asian patients, the so-called "Asian variant", but not in Western patients. We report a case of intravascular B-cell lymphoma in a Caucasian patient associated with secondary hemophagocytic syndrome. The patient was diagnosed by core liver biopsy and successfully treated. This case demonstrates the importance of high index of suspicion and astute histopathologic examination in recognition of this unusual clinical and pathologic combination.

  9. Outcome of childhood relapsed or refractory mature B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma and acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Anoop, Parameswaran; Sankpal, Sushama; Stiller, Charles; Tewari, Sanjay; Lancaster, Donna L; Khabra, Komel; Taj, Mary M

    2012-10-01

    Patients with childhood relapsed and refractory mature B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (B-NHL) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) are rare and have a dismal prognosis. The previous UK national analysis of 26 children over a 7-year period prior to 1996 had highlighted the poor outcome, with only three survivors. This 10-year multicenter study evaluated recent data, since 2000. Of 33 children, nine survived (27.3%), with a median follow-up of 4.3 years. On exclusion of six children treated with palliative intent, the survival was one-third (nine of 27; 33.3%). All patients with primary refractory disease (n = 7) and all except one with early relapse (n = 11) died. Administration of four doses of 375 mg/m(2) of rituximab was associated with a longer survival (p = 0.006). Response to reinduction (p < 0.001) and autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplant (auto-HSCT) (p = 0.003) were significant on multivariate analysis. Patients with a time to relapse of at least 6 months are potentially curable and must be offered intensive treatment with salvage chemotherapy, rituximab and auto-HSCT. PMID:22448922

  10. VISA is required for B cell expression of TLR7.

    PubMed

    Xu, Liang-Guo; Jin, Lei; Zhang, Bi-Cheng; Akerlund, Linda J; Shu, Hong-Bing; Cambier, John C

    2012-01-01

    B cells play a critical role in the initialization and development of the systemic lupus erythematosus that is dependent on the expression of the endosomal ssRNA receptor TLR7. Previous studies have established that B cell expression of TLR7 is controlled by the type I IFN secreted by plasmacytoid dendritic cells. In this article, we report that VISA, also known as MAVS, IPS-1, and CardIf, essential for RIG-I/MDA5-mediated signaling following sensing of cytosolic RNA, regulate B cell expression of TLR7 and CD23. We found that B cells from a VISA(-/-) mouse express reduced TLR7 but normal basal levels of type I IFN. We also show that although IFN-β and TLR7 agonists synergize to promote TLR7 expression in VISA(-/-) B cells, they do not fully complement the defect seen in VISA(-/-) cells. Cell transfer experiments revealed that the observed effects of VISA(-/-) are B cell intrinsic. The reduced TLR7 expression in B cells is correlated with impaired TLR7 agonist-induced upregulation of activation markers CD69 and CD86, cell proliferation, production of IFN-α, TNF, and IL-12, and NF-κB activation. Finally, studies indicate that genetic background may influence the observed phenotype of our VISA(-/-) mice, because VISA(-/-) B cells differ in CD23 and TLR7 expression when on C57BL/6 versus 129Sv-C57BL/6 background. Thus, our findings suggest an unexpected link between VISA-mediated cytosolic RLR signaling and autoimmunity.

  11. B CELL DEPLETION THERAPY EXACERBATES MURINE PRIMARY BILIARY CIRRHOSIS

    PubMed Central

    Dhirapong, Amy; Lleo, Ana; Yang, Guo-Xiang; Tsuneyama, Koichi; Dunn, Robert; Kehry, Marilyn; Packard, Thomas A.; Cambier, John C.; Liu, Fu-Tong; Lindor, Keith; Coppel, Ross L.; Ansari, Aftab A.; Gershwin, M. Eric

    2010-01-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) is considered a model autoimmune disease due to the clinical homogeneity of patients and the classic hallmark of anti-mitochondrial antibodies (AMAS). Indeed, the presence of AMAS is the most highly directed and specific autoantibody in autoimmune diseases. However, the contribution of B cells to the pathogenesis of PBC is unclear. Thus, although AMAs appear to interact with the biliary cell apotope and contribute to biliary pathology, there is no correlation of disease severity and titer of AMA. The recent development of well characterized mAbs specific for the B cell populations, anti-CD20 and anti-CD79, and the development of a well defined xenobiotic induced model of autoimmune cholangitis, prompted us to utilize these reagents and the model to address the contribution of B cells in the pathogenesis of murine PBC. Prior to the induction of autoimmune cholangitis, mice were treated with either anti-CD20, anti-CD79, or isotype matched control mAb and followed for B cell development, the appearance of AMAs, liver pathology and cytokine production. Results of the studies reported herein show that the in vivo depletion of B cells using either anti-CD20 or anti-CD79 led to the development of a more severe form of cholangitis than control mice which is in contrast with results from a number of other autoimmune models which have documented an important therapeutic role of B cell specific depletion. The anti-CD20/CD79 treated mice have increased liver T cell infiltrates and higher levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines. In conclusion, our results reflect a novel disease protective role of B cells in PBC and suggest that B cell depletion therapy in humans with PBC should be approached with caution. PMID:21274873

  12. Rituximab induces Interleukin-6 production by human B cells

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Jonathan D.; Hamilton, B. JoNell; Skopelja, Sladjana; Rigby, William F. C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Rituximab (RTX), an anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, is highly effective in the treatment of several autoimmune diseases. The mechanism by which RTX treatment improves Rheumatoid Arthritis and ANCA-Associated Vasculitis is not easily related to B cell depletion. We have shown that RTX mediates a rapid stripping of CD20 and CD19 from the human B cell through a process known as trogocytosis. We hypothesized that changes in B cell phenotype resulting from trogocytosis would diminish the ability of B cells to promote autoimmune disease. Methods Human PBMC were cultured with RTX under conditions that permitted trogocytosis. Changes in B cell phenotype and cytokine production were measured under basal and activated (IL-4/anti-CD40) conditions. The effects of RTX were characterized for their requirements for FcγR and Fc-dependent interactions. Results Trogocytosis induced a marked loss of surface CD19, IgD, CD40 and BR3, but did not alter induction of CD86 expression on purified B cells by IL-4/anti-CD40 treatment. Unexpectedly, RTX-dependent trogocytosis of normal human B cells in vitro led to a rapid upregulation of IL-6 production, with no effect on TNFα, IL-1β, INFγ, or IL-10 production. This effect was Fc-dependent and required the presence of an FcγR bearing cell. This effect involved the release of pre-formed intracellular IL-6 protein as well as marked increases in IL-6 mRNA levels. Conclusion RTX mediated trogocytosis of B cells in vitro results in acute production and release of IL-6. The nature of this effect and its relationship to acute infusion reactions seen with RTX administration remain to be determined. PMID:25080282

  13. Autoimmunity, polyclonal B-cell activation and infection.

    PubMed

    Granholm, N A; Cavallo, T

    1992-02-01

    It is widely believed that autoimmunity is an integral part of the immune system, and that genetic, immunologic, hormonal, environmental and other factors contribute to the pathogenesis of autoimmune disease. Thus, autoimmune disease may represent an abnormal expression of immune functions instead of loss of tolerance to self, and it can be organ specific or systemic in its manifestations. We review the various factors that contribute to the development of autoimmune disease; we also review the mechanisms of polyclonal B-cell activation, with emphasis on the role of infectious agents. We consider systemic lupus erythematosus in humans and in experimental animals as prototypic autoimmune disease, and we summarize data to indicate that polyclonal B-cell activation is central to the pathogenesis of systemic autoimmune disease. The effect of polyclonal B-cell activation, brought about by injections of a B-cell activator-lipopolysaccharide from Gram-negative bacteria-is sufficient to cause autoimmune disease in an immunologically normal host. In fact, autoimmune disease can be arrested if excessive polyclonal B-cell activation is suppressed; alternatively, autoimmune disease can be exacerbated if polyclonal B-cell activation is enhanced. We explore the mechanism of tissue injury when autoimmune disease is induced or exacerbated, and we consider the pathogenic roles of autoantibodies, immune complexes, complement, the blood cell carrier system, and the mononuclear phagocyte system. Although polyclonal B-cell activation may be the mechanism whereby various factors can cause or exacerbate systemic autoimmune disease, polyclonal B-cell activation may cause autoimmune disease on its own.

  14. Long Noncoding RNA Expression during Human B-Cell Development.

    PubMed

    Petri, Andreas; Dybkær, Karen; Bøgsted, Martin; Thrue, Charlotte Albæk; Hagedorn, Peter H; Schmitz, Alexander; Bødker, Julie Støve; Johnsen, Hans Erik; Kauppinen, Sakari

    2015-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have emerged as important regulators of diverse cellular processes, but their roles in the developing immune system are poorly understood. In this study, we analysed lncRNA expression during human B-cell development by array-based expression profiling of eleven distinct flow-sorted B-cell subsets, comprising pre-B1, pre-B2, immature, naive, memory, and plasma cells from bone marrow biopsies (n = 7), and naive, centroblast, centrocyte, memory, and plasmablast cells from tonsil tissue samples (n = 6), respectively. A remapping strategy was used to assign the array probes to 37630 gene-level probe sets, reflecting recent updates in genomic and transcriptomic databases, which enabled expression profiling of 19579 long noncoding RNAs, comprising 3947 antisense RNAs, 5277 lincRNAs, 7625 pseudogenes, and 2730 additional lncRNAs. As a first step towards inferring the functions of the identified lncRNAs in developing B-cells, we analysed their co-expression with well-characterized protein-coding genes, a method known as "guilt by association". By using weighted gene co-expression network analysis, we identified 272 lincRNAs, 471 antisense RNAs, 376 pseudogene RNAs, and 64 lncRNAs within seven sub-networks associated with distinct stages of B-cell development, such as early B-cell development, B-cell proliferation, affinity maturation of antibody, and terminal differentiation. These data provide an important resource for future studies on the functions of lncRNAs in development of the adaptive immune response, and the pathogenesis of B-cell malignancies that originate from distinct B-cell subpopulations. PMID:26394393

  15. B cells mediate chronic allograft rejection independently of antibody production.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Qiang; Ng, Yue-Harn; Singh, Tripti; Jiang, Ke; Sheriff, Khaleefathullah A; Ippolito, Renee; Zahalka, Salwa; Li, Qi; Randhawa, Parmjeet; Hoffman, Rosemary A; Ramaswami, Balathiripurasundari; Lund, Frances E; Chalasani, Geetha

    2014-03-01

    Chronic rejection is the primary cause of long-term failure of transplanted organs and is often viewed as an antibody-dependent process. Chronic rejection, however, is also observed in mice and humans with no detectable circulating alloantibodies, suggesting that antibody-independent pathways may also contribute to pathogenesis of transplant rejection. Here, we have provided direct evidence that chronic rejection of vascularized heart allografts occurs in the complete absence of antibodies, but requires the presence of B cells. Mice that were deficient for antibodies but not B cells experienced the same chronic allograft vasculopathy (CAV), which is a pathognomonic feature of chronic rejection, as WT mice; however, mice that were deficient for both B cells and antibodies were protected from CAV. B cells contributed to CAV by supporting splenic lymphoid architecture, T cell cytokine production, and infiltration of T cells into graft vessels. In chimeric mice, in which B cells were present but could not present antigen, both T cell responses and CAV were markedly reduced. These findings establish that chronic rejection can occur in the complete absence of antibodies and that B cells contribute to this process by supporting T cell responses through antigen presentation and maintenance of lymphoid architecture.

  16. Origin of B-Cell Neoplasms in Autoimmune Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hemminki, Kari; Liu, Xiangdong; Ji, Jianguang; Försti, Asta

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases (ADs) are associated with a number of B-cell neoplasms but the associations are selective in regard to the type of neoplasm and the conferred risks are variable. So far no mechanistic bases for these differential associations have been demonstrated. We speculate that developmental origin of B-cells might propose a mechanistic rationale for their carcinogenic response to autoimmune stimuli and tested the hypothesis on our previous studies on the risks of B-cell neoplasms after any of 33 ADs. We found that predominantly germinal center (GC)-derived B-cells showed multiple associations with ADs: diffuse large B cell lymphoma associated with 15 ADs, follicular lymphoma with 7 ADs and Hodgkin lymphoma with 11 ADs. Notably, these neoplasms shared significant associations with 5 ADs (immune thrombocytopenic purpura, polymyositis/dermatomyositis, rheumatoid arthritis, Sjogren syndrome and systemic lupus erythematosis). By contrast, primarily non-GC neoplasms, acute lymphocytic leukemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia and myeloma associated with 2 ADs only and mantle cell lymphoma with 1 AD. None of the neoplasms shared associated ADs. These data may suggest that autoimmune stimulation critically interferes with the rapid cell division, somatic hypermutation, class switch recombination and immunological selection of maturing B-cell in the GC and delivers damage contributing to transformation. PMID:27355450

  17. B cells with regulatory properties in transplantation tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Durand, Justine; Chiffoleau, Elise

    2015-01-01

    Induction of tolerance remains a major goal in transplantation. Indeed, despite potent immunosuppression, chronic rejection is still a real problem in transplantation. The humoral response is an important mediator of chronic rejection, and numerous strategies have been developed to target either B cells or plasma cells. However, the use of anti-CD20 therapy has highlighted the beneficial role of subpopulation of B cells, termed regulatory B cells. These cells have been characterized mainly in mice models of auto-immune diseases but emerging literature suggests their role in graft tolerance in transplantation. Regulatory B cells seem to be induced following inflammation to restrain excessive response. Different phenotypes of regulatory B cells have been described and are functional at various differentiation steps from immature to plasma cells. These cells act by multiple mechanisms such as secretion of immuno-suppressive cytokines interleukin-10 (IL-10) or IL-35, cytotoxicity, expression of inhibitory receptors or by secretion of non-inflammatory antibodies. Better characterization of the development, phenotype and mode of action of these cells seems urgent to develop novel approaches to manipulate the different B cell subsets and the response to the graft in a clinical setting. PMID:26722647

  18. Identification of the human mature B cell miRNome

    PubMed Central

    Basso, Katia; Sumazin, Pavel; Morozov, Pavel; Schneider, Christof; Maute, Roy L.; Kitagawa, Yukiko; Mandelbaum, Jonathan; Haddad, Joseph; Chen, Chang-Zheng; Califano, Andrea; Dalla-Favera, Riccardo

    2009-01-01

    The full set of microRNAs (miRNAs) in the human genome is not known. Because presently known miRNAs have been identified by virtue of their abundant expression in a few cell types, many tissue-specific miRNAs remain unrevealed. To understand the role of miRNAs in B-cell function and lymphomagenesis, we generated short-RNA libraries from normal human B cells at different stages of development (naïve, germinal-center, memory) and from a Burkitt lymphoma cell-line. A combination of cloning and computational analysis identified 178 miRNAs (miRNome) expressed in normal and/or transformed B-cell libraries. Most notably, the B-cell miRNome included 75 miRNAs which to our knowledge have not been previously reported and of which 66 have been validated by RNA blot and/or RT-PCR analyses. Numerous miRNAs were expressed in a stage- or transformation-specific fashion in B cells, suggesting specific functional or pathologic roles. These results provide a resource for studying the role of miRNAs in B-cell development, immune function, and lymphomagenesis. PMID:19446474

  19. Transcriptional analysis of the B cell germinal center reaction

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Ulf; Tu, Yuhai; Stolovitzky, Gustavo A.; Keller, Jeffrey L.; Haddad, Joseph; Miljkovic, Vladan; Cattoretti, Giorgio; Califano, Andrea; Dalla-Favera, Riccardo

    2003-01-01

    The germinal center (GC) reaction is crucial for T cell-dependent immune responses and is targeted by B cell lymphomagenesis. Here we analyzed the transcriptional changes that occur in B cells during GC transit (naïve B cells → centroblasts → centrocytes → memory B cells) by gene expression profiling. Naïve B cells, characterized by the expression of cell cycle-inhibitory and antiapoptotic genes, become centroblasts by inducing an atypical proliferation program lacking c-Myc expression, switching to a proapoptotic program, and down-regulating cytokine, chemokine, and adhesion receptors. The transition from GC to memory cells is characterized by a return to a phenotype similar to that of naïve cells except for an apoptotic program primed for both death and survival and for changes in the expression of cell surface receptors including IL-2 receptor β. These results provide insights into the dynamics of the GC reaction and represent the basis for the analysis of B cell malignancies. PMID:12604779

  20. Origin of B-Cell Neoplasms in Autoimmune Disease.

    PubMed

    Hemminki, Kari; Liu, Xiangdong; Ji, Jianguang; Försti, Asta

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases (ADs) are associated with a number of B-cell neoplasms but the associations are selective in regard to the type of neoplasm and the conferred risks are variable. So far no mechanistic bases for these differential associations have been demonstrated. We speculate that developmental origin of B-cells might propose a mechanistic rationale for their carcinogenic response to autoimmune stimuli and tested the hypothesis on our previous studies on the risks of B-cell neoplasms after any of 33 ADs. We found that predominantly germinal center (GC)-derived B-cells showed multiple associations with ADs: diffuse large B cell lymphoma associated with 15 ADs, follicular lymphoma with 7 ADs and Hodgkin lymphoma with 11 ADs. Notably, these neoplasms shared significant associations with 5 ADs (immune thrombocytopenic purpura, polymyositis/dermatomyositis, rheumatoid arthritis, Sjogren syndrome and systemic lupus erythematosis). By contrast, primarily non-GC neoplasms, acute lymphocytic leukemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia and myeloma associated with 2 ADs only and mantle cell lymphoma with 1 AD. None of the neoplasms shared associated ADs. These data may suggest that autoimmune stimulation critically interferes with the rapid cell division, somatic hypermutation, class switch recombination and immunological selection of maturing B-cell in the GC and delivers damage contributing to transformation. PMID:27355450

  1. Altered B cell receptor signaling in human systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Jenks, Scott A.; Sanz, Iñaki

    2009-01-01

    Regulation of B cell receptor signaling is essential for the development of specific immunity while retaining tolerance to self. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is characterized by a loss of B cell tolerance and the production of anti-self antibodies. Accompanying this break down in tolerance are alterations in B cell receptor signal transduction including elevated induced calcium responses and increased protein phosphorylation. Specific pathways that negatively regulate B cell signaling have been shown to be impaired in some SLE patients. These patients have reduced levels of the kinase Lyn in lipid raft microdomains and this reduction is inversely correlated with increased CD45 in lipid rafts. Function and expression of the inhibitory immunoglobulin receptor FcγRIIB is also reduced in Lupus IgM- CD27+ memory cells. Because the relative contribution of different memory and transitional B cell subsets can be abnormal in SLE patients, we believe studies targeted to well defined B cell subsets will be necessary to further our understanding of signaling abnormalities in SLE. Intracellular flow cytometric analysis of signaling is a useful approach to accomplish this goal. PMID:18723129

  2. Receptor editing and genetic variability in human autoreactive B cells.

    PubMed

    Lang, Julie; Ota, Takayuki; Kelly, Margot; Strauch, Pamela; Freed, Brian M; Torres, Raul M; Nemazee, David; Pelanda, Roberta

    2016-01-11

    The mechanisms by which B cells undergo tolerance, such as receptor editing, clonal deletion, and anergy, have been established in mice. However, corroborating these mechanisms in humans remains challenging. To study how autoreactive human B cells undergo tolerance, we developed a novel humanized mouse model. Mice expressing an anti-human Igκ membrane protein to serve as a ubiquitous neo self-antigen (Ag) were transplanted with a human immune system. By following the fate of self-reactive human κ(+) B cells relative to nonautoreactive λ(+) cells, we show that tolerance of human B cells occurs at the first site of self-Ag encounter, the bone marrow, via a combination of receptor editing and clonal deletion. Moreover, the amount of available self-Ag and the genetics of the cord blood donor dictate the levels of central tolerance and autoreactive B cells in the periphery. Thus, this model can be useful for studying specific mechanisms of human B cell tolerance and to reveal differences in the extent of this process among human populations.

  3. Hepatitis C virus and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma: Pathogenesis, behavior and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Visco, Carlo; Finotto, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    A significant association between hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and B-cell lymphoma has been reported by epidemiological studies, most of them describing a strong relationship between indolent lymphomas and HCV. Furthermore, the curative potential of antiviral therapy on HCV related indolent lymphomas supports a specific role for the virus in lymphomagenesis. These observations are reinforced by numerous laboratory experiments that led to several hypothetical models of B-cell transformation by HCV. Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), the most common lymphoma subtype in the western countries, has been associated to HCV infection despite its aggressive nature. This association seems particularly prominent in some geographical areas. Clinical presentation of HCV-associated DLBCL has consistently been reported to differ from the HCV-negative counterpart. Nevertheless, histopathology, tolerance to standard-of-care chemo-immunotherapy (R-CHOP or CHOP-like regimens) and final outcome of HCV-positive DLBCL patients is still matter of debate. Addition of rituximab has been described to enhance viral replication but the probability of severe hepatic complications remains low, with some exceptions (i.e., hepatitis B virus or immune immunodeficiency virus co-infected patients, presence of grade > 2 transaminases elevation, cirrhosis or hepatocarcinoma). HCV viral load in this setting is not necessarily directly associated with liver damage. Overall, treatment of HCV associated DLBCL should be performed in an interdisciplinary approach with hepatologists and hematologists with close monitoring of liver function. Available reports reveal that the final outcome of HCV-positive DLBCL that receive standard immunochemotherapy is not inferior to their HCV-negative counterpart. This review summarizes data on epidemiology, pathogenesis and therapeutic approach on HCV-associated DLBCL. Several issues that are matter of debate like clinical management of patients with transaminase

  4. Tumor microenvironment (TME)-driven immune suppression in B cell malignancy.

    PubMed

    Nicholas, Nicole S; Apollonio, Benedetta; Ramsay, Alan G

    2016-03-01

    Immune checkpoint blockade antibodies and immunomodulatory drugs can unleash anti-tumor T cell immunity and mediate durable cancer regressions. However, only a fraction of patients currently respond to immunotherapy. Lymphoid malignancies are known to have clinically exploitable immune sensitivity and their intrinsic lymphoid tumor-microenvironment (TME) should make them natural targets for immunotherapy. However, accumulating evidence is showing that malignant cells engage in novel associations/interdependencies with reprogrammed immune and stromal cells in the TME that provide crucial contributions to the licencing of tumour progression and immune evasion (suppression of antitumor immune responses). In this review, we outline TME-driven contributions to the licencing of immune evasion mechanisms including the expression and activity of the immune checkpoint network, focussing on two types of B cell malignancy: indolent chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and aggressive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). We also highlight recent therapeutic strategies to re-educate the TME to have anti-tumorigenic effects. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Tumor Microenvironment Regulation of Cancer Cell Survival, Metastasis, Inflammation, and Immune Surveillance edited by Peter Ruvolo and Gregg L. Semenza.

  5. Malaria-associated atypical memory B cells exhibit markedly reduced B cell receptor signaling and effector function.

    PubMed

    Portugal, Silvia; Tipton, Christopher M; Sohn, Haewon; Kone, Younoussou; Wang, Jing; Li, Shanping; Skinner, Jeff; Virtaneva, Kimmo; Sturdevant, Daniel E; Porcella, Stephen F; Doumbo, Ogobara K; Doumbo, Safiatou; Kayentao, Kassoum; Ongoiba, Aissata; Traore, Boubacar; Sanz, Inaki; Pierce, Susan K; Crompton, Peter D

    2015-05-08

    Protective antibodies in Plasmodium falciparum malaria are only acquired after years of repeated infections. Chronic malaria exposure is associated with a large increase in atypical memory B cells (MBCs) that resemble B cells expanded in a variety of persistent viral infections. Understanding the function of atypical MBCs and their relationship to classical MBCs will be critical to developing effective vaccines for malaria and other chronic infections. We show that VH gene repertoires and somatic hypermutation rates of atypical and classical MBCs are indistinguishable indicating a common developmental history. Atypical MBCs express an array of inhibitory receptors and B cell receptor (BCR) signaling is stunted in atypical MBCs resulting in impaired B cell responses including proliferation, cytokine production and antibody secretion. Thus, in response to chronic malaria exposure, atypical MBCs appear to differentiate from classical MBCs becoming refractory to BCR-mediated activation and potentially interfering with the acquisition of malaria immunity.

  6. Antibodies That Block or Activate Mouse B Cell Activating Factor of the Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) Family (BAFF), Respectively, Induce B Cell Depletion or B Cell Hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Kowalczyk-Quintas, Christine; Schuepbach-Mallepell, Sonia; Vigolo, Michele; Willen, Laure; Tardivel, Aubry; Smulski, Cristian R; Zheng, Timothy S; Gommerman, Jennifer; Hess, Henry; Gottenberg, Jacques-Eric; Mackay, Fabienne; Donzé, Olivier; Schneider, Pascal

    2016-09-16

    B cell activating factor of the TNF family (BAFF), also known as B lymphocyte stimulator, is a ligand required for the generation and maintenance of B lymphocytes. In this study, the ability of different monoclonal antibodies to recognize, inhibit, or activate mouse BAFF was investigated. One of them, a mouse IgG1 named Sandy-2, prevented the binding of BAFF to all of its receptors, BAFF receptor, transmembrane activator and calcium modulating ligand interactor, and B cell maturation antigen, at a stoichiometric ratio; blocked the activity of mouse BAFF on a variety of cell-based reporter assays; and antagonized the prosurvival action of BAFF on primary mouse B cells in vitro A single administration of Sandy-2 in mice induced B cell depletion within 2 weeks, down to levels close to those observed in BAFF-deficient mice. This depletion could then be maintained with a chronic treatment. Sandy-2 and a previously described rat IgG1 antibody, 5A8, also formed a pair suitable for the sensitive detection of endogenous circulating BAFF by ELISA or using a homogenous assay. Interestingly, 5A8 and Sandy-5 displayed activities opposite to that of Sandy-2 by stimulating recombinant BAFF in vitro and endogenous BAFF in vivo These tools will prove useful for the detection and functional manipulation of endogenous mouse BAFF and provide an alternative to the widely used BAFF receptor-Fc decoy receptor for the specific depletion of BAFF in mice. PMID:27451394

  7. Intrinsic differences in the initiation of B cell receptor signaling favor responses of human IgG(+) memory B cells over IgM(+) naive B cells.

    PubMed

    Davey, Angel M; Pierce, Susan K

    2012-04-01

    The acquisition of long-lived memory B cells (MBCs) is critical for the defense against many infectious diseases. Despite their importance, little is known about how Ags trigger human MBCs, even though our understanding of the molecular basis of Ag activation of B cells in model systems has advanced considerably. In this study, we use quantitative, high-resolution, live-cell imaging at the single-cell and single-molecule levels to describe the earliest Ag-driven events in human isotype-switched, IgG-expressing MBCs and compare them with those in IgM-expressing naive B cells. We show that human MBCs are more robust than naive B cells at each step in the initiation of BCR signaling, including interrogation of Ag-containing membranes, formation of submicroscopic BCR oligomers, and recruitment and activation of signaling-associated kinases. Despite their robust response to Ag, MBCs remain highly sensitive to FcγRIIB-mediated inhibition. We also demonstrate that in the absence of Ag, a portion of MBC receptors spontaneously oligomerized, and phosphorylated kinases accumulated at the membrane and speculate that heightened constitutive signaling may play a role in maintaining MBC longevity. Using high-resolution imaging, we have provided a description of the earliest events in the Ag activation of MBCs and evidence for acquired cell-intrinsic differences in the initiation of BCR signaling in human naive and MBCs.

  8. Treatment outcome of Chinese children with anaplastic large cell lymphoma by using a modified B-NHL-BFM-90 protocol.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaofei; Zhen, Zijun; Lin, Suxia; Zhu, Jia; Wang, Juan; Lu, Suying; Chen, Yan; Zhang, Fei; Sun, Feifei; Li, Pengfei

    2014-09-01

    Pediatric anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) has rarely been reported in Chinese pediatric patients. This study evaluated the clinical characteristics and treatment outcome of Chinese pediatric patients with ALCL. Between October 2002 and October 2012, 39 untreated pediatric patients with ALCL were enrolled at a single institution. The patients were stratified into three groups (R1, R2, and R3) based on the stage of the disease, clinical risk factors, and chemotherapeutic response, and received different intensive chemotherapy regimens based on a modified B-NHL-BFM-90 protocol. Of the 39 patients, 22 were boys, and 17 were girls, with a median age at diagnosis of 10 years (range 2-16 years), 91.2% were anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-positive. The patient groups R1, R2, and R3 accounted for 12.8%, 30.4%, and 56.4% of the total, respectively. 87.2% of patients were stage III/IV. At a median follow-up period of 52 months (range 15-136 months), seven patients relapsed and three patients died of their disease. The 5-year event-free survival for all patients was 81.4% ± 6.4%, with 100%, 83.3% ± 10% and 75.3% ± 9.8% for groups R1, R2, and R3, respectively. The overall survival for all patients was 92.2% ± 4.3%. Our study demonstrates that a risk-stratified treatment with a modified B-NHL-BFM-90 protocol is efficacious for Chinese children with ALCL. PMID:25116372

  9. Safety and Tolerability Study of PCI-32765 in B Cell Lymphoma and Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-26

    B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Diffuse Well-differentiated Lymphocytic Lymphoma; B Cell Lymphoma; Follicular Lymphoma,; Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia; Burkitt Lymphoma; B-Cell Diffuse Lymphoma

  10. Anaplastic lymphoma kinase-positive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma presenting in nasal cavity: a case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ji; Feng, Xiaoli; Dong, Mei

    2015-01-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-positive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is a rare subtype of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL) with distinct morphologic and immunohistochemical features. We reported a 57-year-old female with ALK-positive DLBCL in her left nasal cavity. Histologically, the tumor cells were characterized by plasmablastic morphology and tested positive for ALK in a cytoplasmic granular staining pattern. The neoplastic cells were positive for CD38, CD4, MUM1, CD138 and Vimentin. However, they failed to express CD56, CD30, as well as mature B cells markers, such as CD79a, CD20 and T cells markers such as CD2, CD3, CD5, CD7 and CD8. The patient achieved complete response after four cycles of CHOEP (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, prednisone, and etoposide) treatment. Then she received radiotherapy of the originally involved area. This case represented a rare ALK-positive DLBCL in the nasal region. PMID:25973114

  11. Aggression in Pretend Play and Aggressive Behavior in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fehr, Karla K.; Russ, Sandra W.

    2013-01-01

    Research Findings: Pretend play is an essential part of child development and adjustment. However, parents, teachers, and researchers debate the function of aggression in pretend play. Different models of aggression predict that the expression of aggression in play could either increase or decrease actual aggressive behavior. The current study…

  12. B-cell lymphomas with concurrent MYC and BCL2 abnormalities other than translocations behave similarly to MYC/BCL2 double-hit lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Li, Shaoying; Seegmiller, Adam C; Lin, Pei; Wang, Xuan J; Miranda, Roberto N; Bhagavathi, Sharathkumar; Medeiros, L Jeffrey

    2015-02-01

    Large B-cell lymphomas with IGH@BCL2 and MYC rearrangement, known as double-hit lymphoma (DHL), are clinically aggressive neoplasms with a poor prognosis. Some large B-cell lymphomas have concurrent abnormalities of MYC and BCL2 other than coexistent translocations. Little is known about patients with these lymphomas designated here as atypical DHL. We studied 40 patients of atypical DHL including 21 men and 19 women, with a median age of 60 years. Nine (23%) patients had a history of B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma. There were 30 diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), 7 B-cell lymphoma, unclassifiable, with features intermediate between DLBCL and Burkitt lymphoma, and 3 DLBCL with coexistent follicular lymphoma. CD10, BCL2, and MYC were expressed in 28/39 (72%), 33/35 (94%), and 14/20 (70%) cases, respectively. Patients were treated with standard (n=14) or more aggressive chemotherapy regimens (n=17). We compared the atypical DHL group with 76 patients with DHLand 35 patients with DLBCL lacking MYC and BCL2 abnormalities. The clinicopathologic features and therapies were similar between patients with atypical and typical DHL. The overall survival of patients with atypical double-hit lymphoma was similar to that of patients with double-hit lymphoma (P=0.47) and significantly worse than that of patients with DLBCL with normal MYC and BCL2 (P=0.02). There were some minor differences. Cases of atypical double-hit lymphoma more often have DLBCL morphology (P<0.01), less frequently expressed CD10 (P<0.01), and patients less often had an elevated serum lactate dehydrogenase level (P=0.01). In aggregate, these results support expanding the category of MYC/BCL2 DHL to include large B-cell lymphomas with coexistent MYC and BCL2 abnormalities other than concurrent translocations. PMID:25103070

  13. TIM-1 signaling in B cells regulates antibody production

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Juan; Usui, Yoshihiko; Takeda, Kazuyoshi; Harada, Norihiro; Yagita, Hideo; Okumura, Ko; Akiba, Hisaya

    2011-03-11

    Highlights: {yields} TIM-1 is highly expressed on anti-IgM + anti-CD40-stimulated B cells. {yields} Anti-TIM-1 mAb enhanced proliferation and Ig production on activated B cell in vitro. {yields} TIM-1 signaling regulates Ab production by response to TI-2 and TD antigens in vivo. -- Abstract: Members of the T cell Ig and mucin (TIM) family have recently been implicated in the control of T cell-mediated immune responses. In this study, we found TIM-1 expression on anti-IgM- or anti-CD40-stimulated splenic B cells, which was further up-regulated by the combination of anti-IgM and anti-CD40 Abs. On the other hand, TIM-1 ligand was constitutively expressed on B cells and inducible on anti-CD3{sup +} anti-CD28-stimulated CD4{sup +} T cells. In vitro stimulation of activated B cells by anti-TIM-1 mAb enhanced proliferation and expression of a plasma cell marker syndecan-1 (CD138). We further examined the effect of TIM-1 signaling on antibody production in vitro and in vivo. Higher levels of IgG2b and IgG3 secretion were detected in the culture supernatants of the anti-TIM-1-stimulated B cells as compared with the control IgG-stimulated B cells. When immunized with T-independent antigen TNP-Ficoll, TNP-specific IgG1, IgG2b, and IgG3 Abs were slightly increased in the anti-TIM-1-treated mice. When immunized with T-dependent antigen OVA, serum levels of OVA-specific IgG2b, IgG3, and IgE Abs were significantly increased in the anti-TIM-1-treated mice as compared with the control IgG-treated mice. These results suggest that TIM-1 signaling in B cells augments antibody production by enhancing B cell proliferation and differentiation.

  14. B-cell-targeted therapy for systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Sabahi, Ramin; Anolik, Jennifer H

    2006-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a complex disease characterised by numerous autoantibodies and clinical involvement in multiple organ systems. The immunological events triggering the onset of clinical manifestations have not yet been fully defined, but a central role for B cells in the pathogenesis of this disease has more recently gained prominence as a result of research in both mice and humans. Both antibody-dependent and -independent mechanisms of B cells are important in SLE. Autoantibodies contribute to autoimmunity by multiple mechanisms, including immune complex-mediated type III hypersensitivity reactions, type II antibody-dependent cytotoxicity, and by instructing innate immune cells to produce pathogenic cytokines such as interferon-alpha, tumour necrosis factor and interleukin-1. Suggested autoantibody-independent B-cell functions include antigen presentation, T-cell activation and polarisation, and dendritic-cell modulation. Several of these functions are mediated by the ability of B cells to produce immunoregulatory cytokines, chemokines and lymphangiogenic growth factors, and by their critical contribution to lymphoid tissue development and organisation, including the development of ectopic tertiary lymphoid tissue. Given the large body of evidence implicating abnormalities in the B-cell compartment in SLE, a recent therapeutic focus has been to develop interventions that target the B-cell compartment by multiple mechanisms.Rituximab, a mouse-human chimeric monoclonal antibody against CD20 that specifically depletes B cells, has been studied the most extensively. Although promising open-label data await confirmation in ongoing multicentre placebo-controlled trials, a number of preliminary conclusions can be drawn. The adequacy of peripheral B-cell depletion depends on achieving high and sustained serum rituximab concentrations, pharmacokinetics that can be varied with treatment dose and factors that may affect drug clearance, such as human anti

  15. The Role of Latently Infected B Cells in CNS Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Márquez, Ana Citlali; Horwitz, Marc Steven

    2015-01-01

    The onset of multiple sclerosis (MS) is caused by both genetic and environmental factors. Among the environmental factors, it is believed that previous infection with Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) may contribute in the development of MS. EBV has been associated with other autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematous, and cancers like Burkitt’s lymphoma. EBV establishes a life-long latency in B cells with occasional reactivation of the virus throughout the individual’s life. The role played by B cells in MS pathology has been largely studied, yet is not clearly understood. In MS patients, Rituximab, a novel treatment that targets CD20+ B cells, has proven to have successful results in diminishing the number of relapses in remitting relapsing MS; however, the mechanism of how this drug acts has not been clearly established. In this review, we analyze the evidence of how B cells latently infected with EBV might be altering the immune system response and helping in the development of MS. We will also discuss how animal models, such as experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) and murine gammaherpesvirus-68 (γHV-68), can be used as powerful tools in the study of the relationship between EBV, MS, and B cells. PMID:26579121

  16. TRAF3 deficiency promotes metabolic reprogramming in B cells

    PubMed Central

    Mambetsariev, Nurbek; Lin, Wai W.; Wallis, Alicia M.; Stunz, Laura L.; Bishop, Gail A.

    2016-01-01

    The adaptor protein TNF receptor-associated factor 3 (TRAF3) is a critical regulator of B lymphocyte survival. B cell-specific TRAF3 deficiency results in enhanced viability and is associated with development of lymphoma and multiple myeloma. We show that TRAF3 deficiency led to induction of two proteins important for glucose metabolism, Glut1 and Hexokinase 2 (HXK2). This was associated with increased glucose uptake. In the absence of TRAF3, anaerobic glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation were increased in B cells without changes in mitochondrial mass or reactive oxygen species. Chemical inhibition of glucose metabolism or glucose deprivation substantially attenuated the enhanced survival of TRAF3-deficient B cells, with a decrease in the pro-survival protein Mcl-1. Changes in Glut1 and Mcl-1 levels, glucose uptake and B cell number in the absence of TRAF3 were all dependent upon NF-κB inducing kinase (NIK). These results indicate that TRAF3 deficiency suffices to metabolically reprogram B cells, a finding that improves our understanding of the role of TRAF3 as a tumor suppressor, and suggests potential therapeutic strategies. PMID:27752131

  17. Long noncoding RNAs in B-cell development and activation

    PubMed Central

    Brazão, Tiago F.; Johnson, Jethro S.; Müller, Jennifer; Heger, Andreas; Ponting, Chris P.

    2016-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are potentially important regulators of cell differentiation and development, but little is known about their roles in B lymphocytes. Using RNA-seq and de novo transcript assembly, we identified 4516 lncRNAs expressed in 11 stages of B-cell development and activation. Most of these lncRNAs have not been previously detected, even in the closely related T-cell lineage. Comparison with lncRNAs previously described in human B cells identified 185 mouse lncRNAs that have human orthologs. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation-seq, we classified 20% of the lncRNAs as either enhancer-associated (eRNA) or promoter-associated RNAs. We identified 126 eRNAs whose expression closely correlated with the nearest coding gene, thereby indicating the likely location of numerous enhancers active in the B-cell lineage. Furthermore, using this catalog of newly discovered lncRNAs, we show that PAX5, a transcription factor required to specify the B-cell lineage, bound to and regulated the expression of 109 lncRNAs in pro-B and mature B cells and 184 lncRNAs in acute lymphoblastic leukemia. PMID:27381906

  18. Aggressive Cunninghamella pneumonia in an adolescent.

    PubMed

    Malkan, Alpin D; Wahid, Fazal N; Rao, Bhaskar N; Sandoval, John A

    2014-10-01

    Children with hematologic malignancies may be challenged with life-threatening, invasive fungal infections by organisms that would otherwise have a low potential for virulence in healthy hosts. Presented is a case of a 15-year-old adolescent with B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia who was receiving steroids and chemotherapy. He developed cough associated with left chest pain with suspicion for fungal pneumonia. He began systemic antifungal therapy, underwent computed tomography of the chest demonstrating a large cavitary lesion (reversed halo sign) in the left lung. Over a 48-hour period the patient clinically deteriorated with worsening pneumonia and required left thoracotomy with nonanatomic pulmonary resection. This case illustrates the aggressive nature of Cunninghamella pneumonia in patients with hematologic malignancies, and the multidisciplinary approach required to have the greatest possible outcome. PMID:25089609

  19. An analysis of B cell selection mechanisms in germinal centers.

    PubMed

    Meyer-Hermann, Michael E; Maini, Philip K; Iber, Dagmar

    2006-09-01

    Affinity maturation of antibodies during immune responses is achieved by multiple rounds of somatic hypermutation and subsequent preferential selection of those B cells that express B cell receptors with improved binding characteristics for the antigen. The mechanism underlying B cell selection has not yet been defined. By employing an agent-based model, we show that for physiologically reasonable parameter values affinity maturation can be driven by competition for neither binding sites nor antigen--even in the presence of competing secreted antibodies. Within the tested mechanisms, only clonal competition for T cell help or a refractory time for the interaction of centrocytes with follicular dendritic cells is found to enable affinity maturation while generating the experimentally observed germinal centre characteristics and tolerating large variations in the initial antigen density. PMID:16707510

  20. The role of B cells and autoantibodies in neuropsychiatric lupus.

    PubMed

    Wen, Jing; Stock, Ariel D; Chalmers, Samantha A; Putterman, Chaim

    2016-09-01

    The central nervous system manifestations of SLE (neuropsychiatric lupus, NPSLE) occur frequently, though are often difficult to diagnose and treat. Symptoms of NPSLE can be quite diverse, including chronic cognitive and emotional manifestations, as well as acute presentations, such as stroke and seizures. Although the pathogenesis of NPSLE has yet to be well characterized, B-cell mediated damage is believed to be an important contributor. B-cells and autoantibodies may traverse the blood brain barrier promoting an inflammatory environment consisting of glia activation, neurodegeneration, and consequent averse behavioral outcomes. This review will evaluate the various suggested roles of B-cells and autoantibodies in NPSLE, as well as therapeutic modalities targeting these pathogenic mediators.

  1. High-efficiency Generation of Multiple Short Noncoding RNA in B-cells and B-cell-derived Extracellular Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Almanza, Gonzalo; Zanetti, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Short noncoding (snc)RNAs are important new players in the landscape of biologics with therapeutic potential. Recently, we reported on a new method for the synthesis and delivery of snc RNA in B-cells transfected with plasmid DNA. Here using the same approach, we demonstrate that B-cells can be programmed for the enforced biogenesis and synchronous release of multiple sncRNAs. Our data show that this goal is feasible and that multiple sncRNA are released in the extracellular compartment in amounts comparable to those from B-cells programmed to express and secrete one scnRNA only. Furthermore, we found that the cargo of extracellular vescicles (EVs) isolated from programmed B-cells is remarkably enriched for multiple sncRNA. On average, we found that the content of multiple sncRNAs in EVs is 3.6 copynumber/EV. Collectively, we demonstrate that B-cells can be easily programmed toward the synthesis and release of multiple sncRNAs, including sncRNA-laden EVs, efficiently and specifically. PMID:26670278

  2. Successful differentiation to T cells, but unsuccessful B-cell generation, from B-cell-derived induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wada, Haruka; Kojo, Satoshi; Kusama, Chie; Okamoto, Naoki; Sato, Yorino; Ishizuka, Bunpei; Seino, Ken-ichiro

    2011-01-01

    Forced expression of certain transcription factors in somatic cells results in generation of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, which differentiate into various cell types. We investigated T-cell and B-cell lineage differentiation from iPS cells in vitro. To evaluate the impact of iPS cell source, murine splenic B-cell-derived iPS (B-iPS) cells were generated after retroviral transduction of four transcription factors (Oct4, Sox2, Klf4 and c-Myc). B-iPS cells were identical to embryonic stem (ES) cells and mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF)-derived iPS cells in morphology, ES cell marker expression as well as teratoma and chimera mouse formation. Both B-iPS and MEF-derived iPS cells differentiated into lymphocytes in OP9 co-culture systems. Both efficiently differentiated into T-cell lineage that produced IFN-γ on T-cell receptor stimulation. However, iPS cells including B-iPS cells were relatively resistant to B-cell lineage differentiation. One of the reasons of the failure of B-cell lineage differentiation seemed due to a defect of Pax5 expression in the differentiated cells. Therefore, current in vitro differentiation systems using iPS cells are sufficient for inducing T-cell but not B-cell lineage. PMID:21135032

  3. T-24.B-cell differentiation factor induces immunoglobulin secretion in human B cells without prior cell replication.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, G; Christie, J F; Stimson, W H; Guy, K; Dewar, A E

    1987-04-01

    Stimulation of B lymphocytes from B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (B-CLL) with 12-0-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) has shown that these cells are capable of differentiation (Totterman, Nilsson & Sundstrom, 1980). Increases in the expression of different class II MHC antigens (Guy et al., 1983, 1986) and responsiveness to growth factors (Kabelitz et al., 1985; Suzuki, Butler & Cooper, 1985) have been studied. Supernatant from the human bladder carcinoma line T-24 contains a B-cell differentiation factor (BCDF) able to induce immunoglobulin secretion from CESS cells. We investigated the induction of proliferation and immunoglobulin secretion in human B cells by studying the effects of this factor on B-CLL cells, in both the presence and absence of TPA. We report here that this material (termed T-24.BCDF) causes immunoglobulin secretion to be initiated in these cells, and that this is not accompanied by detectable DNA synthesis. These observations were extended to normal human B cells and demonstrate that human B cells can secrete immunoglobulin in the absence of clonal expansion. PMID:3495482

  4. Regulation of AID, the B-cell genome mutator.

    PubMed

    Keim, Celia; Kazadi, David; Rothschild, Gerson; Basu, Uttiya

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms by which B cells somatically engineer their genomes to generate the vast diversity of antibodies required to challenge the nearly infinite number of antigens that immune systems encounter are of tremendous clinical and academic interest. The DNA cytidine deaminase activation-induced deaminase (AID) catalyzes two of these mechanisms: class switch recombination (CSR) and somatic hypermutation (SHM). Recent discoveries indicate a significant promiscuous targeting of this B-cell mutator enzyme genome-wide. Here we discuss the various regulatory elements that control AID activity and prevent AID from inducing genomic instability and thereby initiating oncogenesis.

  5. Surrogate light chain is required for central and peripheral B-cell tolerance and inhibits anti-DNA antibody production by marginal zone B cells.

    PubMed

    Ren, Weicheng; Grimsholm, Ola; Bernardi, Angelina I; Höök, Nina; Stern, Anna; Cavallini, Nicola; Mårtensson, Inga-Lill

    2015-04-01

    Selection of the primary antibody repertoire takes place in pro-/pre-B cells, and subsequently in immature and transitional B cells. At the first checkpoint, μ heavy (μH) chains assemble with surrogate light (SL) chain into a precursor B-cell receptor. In mice lacking SL chain, μH chain selection is impaired, and serum autoantibody levels are elevated. However, whether the development of autoantibody-producing cells is due to an inability of the resultant B-cell receptors to induce central and/or peripheral B-cell tolerance or other factors is unknown. Here, we show that receptor editing is defective, and that a higher proportion of BM immature B cells are prone to undergoing apoptosis. Furthermore, transitional B cells are also more prone to undergoing apoptosis, with a stronger selection pressure to enter the follicular B-cell pool. Those that enter the marginal zone (MZ) B-cell pool escape selection and survive, possibly due to the B-lymphopenia and elevated levels of B-cell activating factor. Moreover, the MZ B cells are responsible for the elevated IgM anti-dsDNA antibody levels detected in these mice. Thus, the SL chain is required for central and peripheral B-cell tolerance and inhibits anti-DNA antibody production by MZ B cells.

  6. Canine Lymphoma, More Than a Morphological Diagnosis: What We Have Learned about Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Aresu, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is the most common canine aggressive B-cell lymphoma worldwide, and new recent molecular approaches have shown that DLBCL constitutes a heterogeneous tumor that cannot be unraveled by morphology and immunophenotype. DLBCL behaves aggressively, typically progressing over a short period of time, and the therapy response may be difficult to be predicted. Recently, the rate of bone marrow infiltration by flow cytometry has been demonstrated to be prognostic, but more sensible markers are needed. As the clinical behavior is different, there is vast clinical and basic research devoted to identifying prognostically or biologically distinct DLBCL subgroups. Transcriptomic analysis by gene expression profile, copy number variations by array comparative genomic hybridization and epigenetic perturbations have tentatively described this heterogeneity. Molecular subgroups using oncogenic pathways and target genes have also been correlated to different outcome in a small number of cases. The objectives of this review are to summarize the current knowledge on the biology, clinical, and pathological characteristics of canine DLBCL. To date, DLBCL probably is the most investigated tumor in veterinary medicine, and its relevance as spontaneous model for human DLBCL has been confirmed by these studies. In future, these discoveries will ultimately lead to a better understanding of the underlying disease mechanisms, possibly translating into more effective therapeutic strategies. PMID:27630997

  7. Canine Lymphoma, More Than a Morphological Diagnosis: What We Have Learned about Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Aresu, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is the most common canine aggressive B-cell lymphoma worldwide, and new recent molecular approaches have shown that DLBCL constitutes a heterogeneous tumor that cannot be unraveled by morphology and immunophenotype. DLBCL behaves aggressively, typically progressing over a short period of time, and the therapy response may be difficult to be predicted. Recently, the rate of bone marrow infiltration by flow cytometry has been demonstrated to be prognostic, but more sensible markers are needed. As the clinical behavior is different, there is vast clinical and basic research devoted to identifying prognostically or biologically distinct DLBCL subgroups. Transcriptomic analysis by gene expression profile, copy number variations by array comparative genomic hybridization and epigenetic perturbations have tentatively described this heterogeneity. Molecular subgroups using oncogenic pathways and target genes have also been correlated to different outcome in a small number of cases. The objectives of this review are to summarize the current knowledge on the biology, clinical, and pathological characteristics of canine DLBCL. To date, DLBCL probably is the most investigated tumor in veterinary medicine, and its relevance as spontaneous model for human DLBCL has been confirmed by these studies. In future, these discoveries will ultimately lead to a better understanding of the underlying disease mechanisms, possibly translating into more effective therapeutic strategies. PMID:27630997

  8. Canine Lymphoma, More Than a Morphological Diagnosis: What We Have Learned about Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Aresu, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is the most common canine aggressive B-cell lymphoma worldwide, and new recent molecular approaches have shown that DLBCL constitutes a heterogeneous tumor that cannot be unraveled by morphology and immunophenotype. DLBCL behaves aggressively, typically progressing over a short period of time, and the therapy response may be difficult to be predicted. Recently, the rate of bone marrow infiltration by flow cytometry has been demonstrated to be prognostic, but more sensible markers are needed. As the clinical behavior is different, there is vast clinical and basic research devoted to identifying prognostically or biologically distinct DLBCL subgroups. Transcriptomic analysis by gene expression profile, copy number variations by array comparative genomic hybridization and epigenetic perturbations have tentatively described this heterogeneity. Molecular subgroups using oncogenic pathways and target genes have also been correlated to different outcome in a small number of cases. The objectives of this review are to summarize the current knowledge on the biology, clinical, and pathological characteristics of canine DLBCL. To date, DLBCL probably is the most investigated tumor in veterinary medicine, and its relevance as spontaneous model for human DLBCL has been confirmed by these studies. In future, these discoveries will ultimately lead to a better understanding of the underlying disease mechanisms, possibly translating into more effective therapeutic strategies.

  9. Anti-CD20 antibody promotes cancer escape via enrichment of tumor-evoked regulatory B cells expressing low levels of CD20 and CD137L.

    PubMed

    Bodogai, Monica; Lee Chang, Catalina; Wejksza, Katarzyna; Lai, Jinping; Merino, Maria; Wersto, Robert P; Gress, Ronald E; Chan, Andrew C; Hesdorffer, Charles; Biragyn, Arya

    2013-04-01

    The possible therapeutic benefits of B-cell depletion in combating tumoral immune escape have been debated. In support of this concept, metastasis of highly aggressive 4T1 breast cancer cells in mice can be abrogated by inactivation of tumor-evoked regulatory B cells (tBreg). Here, we report the unexpected finding that B-cell depletion by CD20 antibody will greatly enhance cancer progression and metastasis. Both murine and human tBregs express low levels of CD20 and, as such, anti-CD20 mostly enriches for these cells. In the 4T1 model of murine breast cancer, this effect of enriching for tBregs suggests that B-cell depletion by anti-CD20 may not be beneficial at all in some cancers. In contrast, we show that in vivo-targeted stimulation of B cells with CXCL13-coupled CpG oligonucleotides (CpG-ODN) can block cancer metastasis by inhibiting CD20(Low) tBregs. Mechanistic investigations suggested that CpG-ODN upregulates low surface levels of 4-1BBL on tBregs to elicit granzyme B-expressing cytolytic CD8(+) T cells, offering some explanative power for the effect. These findings underscore the immunotherapeutic importance of tBreg inactivation as a strategy to enhance cancer therapy by targeting both the regulatory and activating arms of the immune system in vivo. PMID:23365136

  10. Immunoproliferative Small Intestinal Disease Associated with Overwhelming Polymicrobial Gastrointestinal Infection with Transformation to Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Ewers, Evan C; Sheffler, Robert L; Wang, James; Ngauy, Viseth

    2016-05-01

    Immunoproliferative small intestinal disease (IPSID) is an extra-nodal B-cell lymphoma most commonly described in the Mediterranean, Africa, and Asia. It is associated with poverty and poor sanitation, and is rarely encountered in developed countries. A 26-year-old previously healthy, Marshallese male was transferred to our facility with a 6-month history of watery diarrhea, weakness, and cachexia refractory to multiple short courses of oral antibiotics. Stool cultures grew Campylobacter jejuni and Vibrio fluvialis. Endoscopic evaluation showed histologic evidence of Helicobacter pylori gastritis and gross evidence of whipworm infection found in the colon. Mesenteric lymph node biopsy cultures grew Escherichia coli. Histopathology and immunohistochemical stains of the small intestine were consistent with IPSID. He subsequently transformed to diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) with tonsillar involvement despite treatment with rituximab and an extended course of antibiotics. Systemic chemotherapy with six cycles of rituximab, cyclophosphamide, vincristine, doxorubicin, prednisone, and lenalidomide, resulted in remission of his diffuse B cell lymphoma. This case is illustrative of IPSID developing in a previously healthy individual due to overwhelming polymicrobial gastrointestinal infection by C. jejuni and other enteric pathogens with subsequent transformation to an aggressive DLBCL. IPSID should be considered in residents of developing countries presenting with refractory chronic diarrhea, weight loss, and mesenteric lymphadenopathy. PMID:26903604

  11. DUSP4 deficiency caused by promoter hypermethylation drives JNK signaling and tumor cell survival in diffuse large B cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, Corina A.; Robinson, Mark D.; Scheifinger, Nicole A.; Müller, Sebastian; Cogliatti, Sergio; Tzankov, Alexandar

    2015-01-01

    The epigenetic dysregulation of tumor suppressor genes is an important driver of human carcinogenesis. We have combined genome-wide DNA methylation analyses and gene expression profiling after pharmacological DNA demethylation with functional screening to identify novel tumor suppressors in diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL). We find that a CpG island in the promoter of the dual-specificity phosphatase DUSP4 is aberrantly methylated in nodal and extranodal DLBCL, irrespective of ABC or GCB subtype, resulting in loss of DUSP4 expression in 75% of >200 examined cases. The DUSP4 genomic locus is further deleted in up to 13% of aggressive B cell lymphomas, and the lack of DUSP4 is a negative prognostic factor in three independent cohorts of DLBCL patients. Ectopic expression of wild-type DUSP4, but not of a phosphatase-deficient mutant, dephosphorylates c-JUN N-terminal kinase (JNK) and induces apoptosis in DLBCL cells. Pharmacological or dominant-negative JNK inhibition restricts DLBCL survival in vitro and in vivo and synergizes strongly with the Bruton’s tyrosine kinase inhibitor ibrutinib. Our results indicate that DLBCL cells depend on JNK signaling for survival. This finding provides a mechanistic basis for the clinical development of JNK inhibitors in DLBCL, ideally in synthetic lethal combinations with inhibitors of chronic active B cell receptor signaling. PMID:25847947

  12. Aggression in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Kravitz, Edward A; Fernandez, Maria de la Paz

    2015-10-01

    Aggression is used by essentially all species of animals to gain access to desired resources, including territory, food, and potential mates: Fruit flies are no exception. In Drosophila, both males and females compete in same sex fights for resources, but only males establish hierarchical relationships. Many investigators now study aggression using the fruit fly model, mainly because (a) aggression in fruit flies is a quantifiable well-defined and easily evoked behavior; (b) powerful genetic methods allow investigators to manipulate genes of interest at any place or time during embryonic, larval, pupal or adult life, and while flies are behaving; (c) the growth of the relatively new field of optogenetics makes physiological studies possible at single neuron levels despite the small sizes of neurons and other types of cells in fly brains; and (d) the rearing of fly stocks with their short generation times and limited growth space requirements can easily be performed at relatively low cost in most laboratories. This review begins with an examination of the behavior, both from a historical perspective and then from the birth of the "modern" era of studies of aggression in fruit flies including its quantitative analysis. The review continues with examinations of the roles of genes, neurotransmitters and neurohormones, peptides, nutritional and metabolic status, and surface cuticular hydrocarbons in the initiation and maintenance of aggression. It concludes with suggestions for future studies with this important model system.

  13. Early B-cell Factor 1 Regulates the Expansion of B-cell Progenitors in a Dose-dependent Manner*

    PubMed Central

    Åhsberg, Josefine; Ungerbäck, Jonas; Strid, Tobias; Welinder, Eva; Stjernberg, Jenny; Larsson, Malin; Qian, Hong; Sigvardsson, Mikael

    2013-01-01

    Transcription factor doses are of importance for normal and malignant B-lymphocyte development; however, the understanding of underlying mechanisms and functional consequences of reduced transcription factor levels is limited. We have analyzed progenitor and B-lineage compartments in mice carrying heterozygote mutations in the E2a, Ebf1, or Pax5 gene. Although lymphoid progenitors from Ebf1 or Pax5 heterozygote mice were specified and lineage-restricted in a manner comparable with Wt progenitors, this process was severely impaired in E2a heterozygote mutant mice. This defect was not significantly enhanced upon combined deletion of E2a with Ebf1 or Pax5. Analysis of the pre-B-cell compartment in Ebf1 heterozygote mice revealed a reduction in cell numbers. These cells expressed Pax5 and other B-lineage-associated genes, and global gene expression analysis suggested that the reduction of the pre-B-cell compartment was a result of impaired pre-B-cell expansion. This idea was supported by a reduction in IL2Rα-expressing late pre-B-cells as well as by cell cycle analysis and by the finding that the complexity of the VDJ rearrangement patterns was comparable in Wt and Ebf1+/− pre-B-cells, although the number of progenitors was reduced. Heterozygote deletion of Ebf1 resulted in impaired response to IL7 in vitro and reduced expression levels of pre-BCR on the cell surface, providing possible explanations for the observed stage-specific reduction in cellular expansion. Thus, transcription factor doses are critical for specification as well as expansion of B-lymphoid progenitors, providing increased insight into the molecular regulation of B-cell development. PMID:24078629

  14. Specific cytogenetic abnormalities are associated with a significantly inferior outcome in children and adolescents with mature B-cell Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma: Results of the FAB/LMB 96 international study

    PubMed Central

    Poirel, HA; Cairo, MS; Heerema, NA; Swansbury, J; Aupérin, A; Launay, E; Sanger, WG; Talley, P; Perkins, SL; Raphaël, M; McCarthy, K; Sposto, R; Gerrard, M; Bernheim, A; Patte, C

    2010-01-01

    Clinical studies showed that advanced stage, high LDH, poor response to reduction therapy and combined bone marrow and central nervous system disease are significantly associated with a decreased event free survival (EFS) in pediatric mature B-NHL treated on FAB/LMB96. Although rearranged MYC/8q24 (R8q24) is characteristic of Burkitt Lymphoma (BL), little information is available on other cytogenetic abnormalities and their prognostic importance. We performed an international review of 238 abnormal karyotypes in childhood mature-B-NHL treated on FAB/LMB96: 76% BL, 8% Burkitt-like lymphoma, 13% diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). The main BL R8q24 associated chromosomal aberrations were +1q [29%], +7q and del(13q) [14% each]. The DLBCL appeared heterogeneous and more complex. Incidence of R8q24 [34%] was higher than reported in adult DLBCL. The prognostic value of cytogenetic abnormalities on EFS was studied by Cox model controlling for the known risk factors: R8q24, +7q and del(13q) were independently associated with a significant inferior EFS [HR: 6.1 (p=0.030), 2.5 (p=0.015), 4.0 (p=0.0003), respectively]. The adverse prognosis of R8q24 was observed only in DLBCL while del(13q) and +7q had a similar effect in DLBCL and BL. These results emphasize the significant biological heterogeneity and the development of cytogenetic risk adapted therapy in childhood mature-B-NHL. PMID:19020548

  15. Minimal Disease Assessment in the Treatment of Children and Adolescents with Intermediate-Risk (Stage III/IV) B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma: A Children’s Oncology Group Report

    PubMed Central

    Shiramizu, Bruce; Goldman, Stanton; Kusao, Ian; Agsalda, Melissa; Lynch, James; Smith, Lynette; Harrison, Lauren; Morris, Erin; Gross, Thomas G.; Sanger, Warren; Perkins, Sherrie; Cairo, Mitchell S.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Children/adolescents with mature B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (B-NHL) have an excellent prognosis but relapses still occur. While chromosomal aberrations and/or clonal immunoglobulin (Ig) gene rearrangements may indicate risk of failure, a more universal approach was developed to detect minimal disease (MD). Children/adolescents with intermediate-risk B-NHL were treated with French-British-American/Lymphome Malins de Burkitt 96 (FAB/LMB96) B4 modified chemotherapy and rituximab. Specimens from diagnosis, end of induction (EOI), and end of therapy (EOT) were assayed for MD. Initial specimens were screened for IGHV family usage with primer pools followed by individual primers to identify MD. Thirty-two diagnostic/staging specimens screened positive with primer pools and unique IGHV family primers were identified. Two patients relapsed; first relapse (4 months from diagnosis) was MD-positive at EOI, the second (36 months from diagnosis) was MD-positive at EOT. At EOI, recurrent rates were similar between the MRD-positive and MRD-negative patients (p=0.40). At EOT, only 13/32 patients had MRD data available with 1 relapse in the MRD-positive group and no recurrences in the MRD-negative group (p=0.077). The study demonstrated molecular-disseminated disease in which IgIGHV primer pools could be used to assess MD. This feasibility study supports future investigations to assess the validity and significance of MD screening in a larger cohort of patients with intermediate-risk mature B-NHL. PMID:21496005

  16. Minimal disease assessment in the treatment of children and adolescents with intermediate-risk (Stage III/IV) B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma: a children's oncology group report.

    PubMed

    Shiramizu, Bruce; Goldman, Stanton; Kusao, Ian; Agsalda, Melissa; Lynch, James; Smith, Lynette; Harrison, Lauren; Morris, Erin; Gross, Thomas G; Sanger, Warren; Perkins, Sherrie; Cairo, Mitchell S

    2011-06-01

    Children/adolescents with mature B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (B-NHL) have an excellent prognosis but relapses still occur. While chromosomal aberrations and/or clonal immunoglobulin (Ig) gene rearrangements may indicate risk of failure, a more universal approach was developed to detect minimal disease (MD). Children/adolescents with intermediate-risk B-NHL were treated with French-British-American/Lymphome Malins de Burkitt 96 (FAB/LMB96) B4 modified chemotherapy and rituximab. Specimens from diagnosis, end of induction (EOI), and end of therapy (EOT) were assayed for MD. Initial specimens were screened for IGHV family usage with primer pools followed by individual primers to identify MD. Thirty-two diagnostic/staging specimens screened positive with primer pools and unique IGHV family primers were identified. Two patients relapsed; first relapse (4 months from diagnosis) was MD-positive at EOI, the second (36 months from diagnosis) was MD-positive at EOT. At EOI, recurrent rates were similar between the MRD-positive and MRD-negative patients (P = 0·40). At EOT, only 13/32 patients had MRD data available with one relapse in the MRD-positive group and no recurrences in the MRD-negative group (P = 0·077). The study demonstrated molecular-disseminated disease in which IgIGHV primer pools could be used to assess MD. This feasibility study supports future investigations to assess the validity and significance of MD screening in a larger cohort of patients with intermediate-risk mature B-NHL. PMID:21496005

  17. High-Dose [131I]Tositumomab (anti-CD20) Radioimmunotherapy and Autologous Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation for Adults ≥ 60 Years Old with Relapsed or Refractory B-Cell Lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Gopal, Ajay K.; Rajendran, Joseph G.; Gooley, Ted; Pagel, John M.; Fisher, Darrell R.; Petersdorf, Stephen; Maloney, David G.; Eary, Janet F.; Appelbaum, Frederick R.; Press, Oliver W.

    2007-04-10

    Purpose: The majority of patients with relapsed or refractory B-cell, non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL) are over 60 years of age, yet they are often denied potentially curative high-dose therapy and autologous stem cell transplants (ASCT) due to the risk of excessive treatment-related morbidity and mortality. Myeloablative anti-CD20 radioimmunotherapy (RIT) can deliver curative radiation doses to tumor sites while limiting exposure to normal organs and may be particularly suited for older adults requiring high-dose therapy. Methods: Patients over age 60 with relapsed B-NHL received infusions of tositumomab anti-CD20 antibody labeled with 5-10mCi I-131 tracer for dosimetry purposes followed 10 days later by individualized therapeutic infusions of I-131-tositumomab (median 525 mCi, range 328-1154 mCi) to deliver 25-27Gy to the critical normal organ receiving the highest radiation dose. ASCT was performed approximately 2 weeks after therapy. Results: Twenty-four patients with a median age of 64 (range 60-76) who had received a median of four prior regimens (range 2-14) were treated. Thirteen (54%) had chemotherapy-resistant disease. The estimated 3-year overall and progression-free survivals were 59% and 51%, respectively with a median follow-up of 2.9 years (range 1-6 years). All patients experienced expected myeloablation with engraftment of platelets (≥20K/µL) and neutrophils (≥500/µL) occurring a median of 9 and 15 days, respectively following ASCT. There were no treatment-related deaths, and only two patients experienced grade 4 non-hematologic toxicity. Conclusions: Myeloablative RIT and ASCT is a safe and effective therapeutic option for older adults with relapsed B-NHL.

  18. Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma Mimicking Granulomatosis with Polyangiitis

    PubMed Central

    Horowitz, Netanel; Ben-Itzhak, Ofer; Braun-Moscovici, Yolanda

    2016-01-01

    In a patient with systemic multiorgan disease with overlapping features, the differential diagnosis included infectious diseases, malignancies, and systemic autoimmune or inflammatory diseases. We present an unusual case of a young male with B cell lymphoma who presented with symptoms mimicking systemic vasculitis and review the existing literature. PMID:27293945

  19. 324 Facility B-Cell quality process plan

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, J.L.

    1998-06-10

    B-Cell is currently being cleaned out (i.e., removal of equipment, fixtures and residual radioactive materials) and deactivated. TPA Milestone M-89-02 dictates that all mixed waste and equipment be removed from B-Cell by 5/31/99. The following sections describe the major activities that remain for completion of the TPA milestone. This includes: (1) Size Reduce Tank 119 and Miscellaneous Equipment. This activity is the restart of hotwork in B-Cell to size reduce the remainder of Tank 119 and other miscellaneous pieces of equipment into sizes that can be loaded into a grout container. This activity also includes the process of preparing the containers for shipment from the cell. The specific activities and procedures used are detailed in a table. (2) Load and Ship Low-Level Waste. This activity covers the process of taking a grouted LLW container from B-Cell and loading it into the cask in the REC airlock and Cask Handling Area (CHA) for shipment to the LLBG. The detailed activities and procedures for this part of cell cleanout are included in second table.

  20. Likelihood-Based Inference of B Cell Clonal Families

    PubMed Central

    Ralph, Duncan K.

    2016-01-01

    The human immune system depends on a highly diverse collection of antibody-making B cells. B cell receptor sequence diversity is generated by a random recombination process called “rearrangement” forming progenitor B cells, then a Darwinian process of lineage diversification and selection called “affinity maturation.” The resulting receptors can be sequenced in high throughput for research and diagnostics. Such a collection of sequences contains a mixture of various lineages, each of which may be quite numerous, or may consist of only a single member. As a step to understanding the process and result of this diversification, one may wish to reconstruct lineage membership, i.e. to cluster sampled sequences according to which came from the same rearrangement events. We call this clustering problem “clonal family inference.” In this paper we describe and validate a likelihood-based framework for clonal family inference based on a multi-hidden Markov Model (multi-HMM) framework for B cell receptor sequences. We describe an agglomerative algorithm to find a maximum likelihood clustering, two approximate algorithms with various trade-offs of speed versus accuracy, and a third, fast algorithm for finding specific lineages. We show that under simulation these algorithms greatly improve upon existing clonal family inference methods, and that they also give significantly different clusters than previous methods when applied to two real data sets. PMID:27749910

  1. Regulatory roles of B cells in infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Fillatreau, Simon

    2016-01-01

    B lymphocytes provide essential mechanisms of protection against infectious diseases. The secretion of specific antibodies by long-lived plasma cells is thought to account for the improved resistance afforded by most successful vaccines against pathogens. Accordingly, a goal in vaccine development is to induce potent B cell responses in order to drive the efficient formation of long-lived antibody-secreting cells. However, the roles of activated B cells are complex in infectious diseases. It was recently observed that activated B cells could also negatively regulate host defence mechanisms, both during primary infection and, after vaccination, upon secondary challenge, via mechanisms involving their production of the anti-inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-10 and IL-35. Remarkably, the B cells expressing IL-10 and IL-35 in vivo were distinct subsets of IgMhiCD19+CD138hi antibody-secreting cells. A better understanding of the diverse roles of these distinct antibody-secreting cell subsets in immunity and immunological memory, as well as of the signals controlling their generation, might help the rational development of better prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines. PMID:27586794

  2. Mucosal B cells: phenotypic characteristics, transcriptional regulation, and homing properties.

    PubMed

    Brandtzaeg, Per; Johansen, Finn-Eirik

    2005-08-01

    Mucosal antibody defense depends on a complex cooperation between local B cells and secretory epithelia. Mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue gives rise to B cells with striking J-chain expression that are seeded to secretory effector sites. Such preferential homing constitutes the biological basis for local production of polymeric immunoglobulin A (pIgA) and pentameric IgM with high affinity to the epithelial pIg receptor that readily can export these antibodies to the mucosal surface. This ultimate functional goal of mucosal B-cell differentiation appears to explain why the J chain is also expressed by IgG- and IgD-producing plasma cells (PCs) occurring at secretory tissue sites; these immunocytes may be considered as 'spin-offs' from early effector clones that through class switch are on their way to pIgA production. Abundant evidence supports the notion that intestinal PCs are largely derived from B cells initially activated in gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT). Nevertheless, insufficient knowledge exists concerning the relative importance of M cells, major histocompatibility complex class II-expressing epithelial cells, and professional antigen-presenting cells for the uptake, processing, and presentation of luminal antigens in GALT to accomplish the extensive and sustained priming and expansion of mucosal B cells. Likewise, it is unclear how the germinal center reaction in GALT so strikingly can promote class switch to IgA and expression of J chain. Although B-cell migration from GALT to the intestinal lamina propria is guided by rather well-defined adhesion molecules and chemokines/chemokine receptors, the cues directing preferential homing to different segments of the gut require better definition. This is even more so for the molecules involved in homing of mucosal B cells to secretory effector sites beyond the gut, and in this respect, the role of Waldever's ring (including the palatine tonsils and adenoids) as a regional inductive tissue needs further

  3. Control of Viremia Enables Acquisition of Resting Memory B Cells with Age and Normalization of Activated B Cell Phenotypes in HIV-Infected Children

    PubMed Central

    Muema, Daniel M.; Macharia, Gladys N.; Hassan, Amin S.; Mwaringa, Shalton M.; Fegan, Greg W.; Berkley, James A.; Urban, Britta C.

    2015-01-01

    HIV affects the function of all lymphocyte populations, including B cells. Phenotypic and functional defects of B cells in HIV-infected adults have been well characterized, but defects in children have not been studied to the same extent. We determined the proportion of B cell subsets and frequencies of Ag-specific memory B cells in peripheral blood from HIV-infected children and healthy controls, using flow cytometry and B cell ELISPOT, respectively. In addition, we measured the quantities and avidities of plasma Abs against various Ags by ELISA. We also determined plasma levels of BAFF and expression of BAFF receptors on B cells. Children with high HIV viremia had increased proportions of activated mature B cells, tissue-like memory B cells and plasmablasts, and low proportions of naive B cells when compared with community controls and children with low HIV viremia, similar to adults infected with HIV. HIV-infected groups had lower proportions of resting memory B cells than did community controls. Notably, high HIV viremia prevented the age-dependent accumulation of class-switched resting memory B cells. HIV-infected children, regardless of the level of viremia, showed lower quantities and avidities of IgG and lower frequencies of memory B cells against Expanded Program on Immunization vaccines. The HIV-infected children had an altered BAFF profile that could have affected their B cell compartment. Therefore, B cell defects in HIV-infected children are similar to those seen in HIV-infected adults. However, control of HIV viremia is associated with normalization of activated B cell subsets and allows age-dependent accumulation of resting memory B cells. PMID:26116511

  4. Control of Viremia Enables Acquisition of Resting Memory B Cells with Age and Normalization of Activated B Cell Phenotypes in HIV-Infected Children.

    PubMed

    Muema, Daniel M; Macharia, Gladys N; Hassan, Amin S; Mwaringa, Shalton M; Fegan, Greg W; Berkley, James A; Nduati, Eunice W; Urban, Britta C

    2015-08-01

    HIV affects the function of all lymphocyte populations, including B cells. Phenotypic and functional defects of B cells in HIV-infected adults have been well characterized, but defects in children have not been studied to the same extent. We determined the proportion of B cell subsets and frequencies of Ag-specific memory B cells in peripheral blood from HIV-infected children and healthy controls, using flow cytometry and B cell ELISPOT, respectively. In addition, we measured the quantities and avidities of plasma Abs against various Ags by ELISA. We also determined plasma levels of BAFF and expression of BAFF receptors on B cells. Children with high HIV viremia had increased proportions of activated mature B cells, tissue-like memory B cells and plasmablasts, and low proportions of naive B cells when compared with community controls and children with low HIV viremia, similar to adults infected with HIV. HIV-infected groups had lower proportions of resting memory B cells than did community controls. Notably, high HIV viremia prevented the age-dependent accumulation of class-switched resting memory B cells. HIV-infected children, regardless of the level of viremia, showed lower quantities and avidities of IgG and lower frequencies of memory B cells against Expanded Program on Immunization vaccines. The HIV-infected children had an altered BAFF profile that could have affected their B cell compartment. Therefore, B cell defects in HIV-infected children are similar to those seen in HIV-infected adults. However, control of HIV viremia is associated with normalization of activated B cell subsets and allows age-dependent accumulation of resting memory B cells.

  5. Translational Mini-Review Series on B cell subsets in disease. Transitional B cells in systemic lupus erythematosus and Sjögren's syndrome: clinical implications and effects of B cell-targeted therapies.

    PubMed

    Vossenkämper, A; Lutalo, P M K; Spencer, J

    2012-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and Sjögren's syndrome are autoimmune disorders which are characterized by a disturbed B cell homeostasis which leads ultimately to dysfunction of various organs. One of the B cell subsets that appear in abnormal numbers is the population of transitional B cells, which is increased in the blood of patients with SLE and Sjögren's syndrome. Transitional B cells are newly formed B cells. In mice, transitional B cells undergo selection checks for unwanted specificity in the bone marrow and the spleen in order to eliminate autoreactive B cells from the circulating naive B cell population. In humans, the exact anatomical compartments and mechanisms of the specificity check-points for transitional B cells remain unclear, but appear to be defective in SLE and Sjögren's syndrome. This review aims to highlight the current understanding of transitional B cells and their defects in the two disorders before and after B cell-targeted therapies.

  6. Adhesive interactions regulate transcriptional diversity in malignant B cells.

    PubMed

    Nadav-Dagan, Liat; Shay, Tal; Dezorella, Nili; Naparstek, Elizabeth; Domany, Eytan; Katz, Ben-Zion; Geiger, Benjamin

    2010-04-01

    The genetic profiling of B-cell malignancies is rapidly expanding, providing important information on the tumorigenic potential, response to treatment, and clinical outcome of these diseases. However, the relative contributions of inherent gene expression versus microenvironmental effects are poorly understood. The regulation of gene expression programs by means of adhesive interactions was studied here in ARH-77 human malignant B-cell variants, derived from the same cell line by selective adhesion to a fibronectin matrix. The populations included cells that adhere to fibronectin and are highly tumorigenic (designated "type A" cells) and cells that fail to adhere to fibronectin and fail to develop tumors in vivo ("type F" cells). To identify genes directly affected by cell adhesion to fibronectin, type A cells deprived of an adhesive substrate (designated "AF cells") were also examined. Bioinformatic analyses revealed a remarkable correlation between cell adhesion and both B-cell differentiation state and the expression of multiple myeloma (MM)-associated genes. The highly adherent type A cells expressed higher levels of NFkappaB-regulated genes, many of them associated with MM. Moreover, we found that the transcription of several MM-related proto-oncogenes is stimulated by adhesion to fibronectin. In contrast, type F cells, which display poor adhesive and tumorigenic properties, expressed genes associated with higher levels of B-cell differentiation. Our findings indicate that B-cell differentiation, as manifested by gene expression profiles, is attenuated by cell adhesion to fibronectin, leading to upregulation of specific genes known to be associated with the pathogenesis of MM.

  7. B cell autophagy mediates TLR7-dependent autoimmunity and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Weindel, Chi G; Richey, Lauren J; Bolland, Silvia; Mehta, Abhiruchi J; Kearney, John F; Huber, Brigitte T

    2015-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a heterogeneous autoimmune disease, defined by loss of B cell self-tolerance that results in production of antinuclear antibodies (ANA) and chronic inflammation. While the initiating events in lupus development are not well defined, overexpression of the RNA-recognizing toll-like receptor (TLR)7 has been linked to SLE in humans and mice. We postulated that autophagy plays an essential role in TLR7 activation of B cells for the induction of SLE by delivering RNA ligands to the endosomes, where this innate immune receptor resides. To test this hypothesis, we compared SLE development in Tlr7 transgenic (Tg) mice with or without B cell-specific ablation of autophagy (Cd19-Cre Atg5f/f). We observed that in the absence of B cell autophagy the 2 hallmarks of SLE, ANA and inflammation, were eliminated, thus curing these mice of lupus. This was also evident in the significantly extended survival of the autophagy-deficient mice compared to Tlr7.1 Tg mice. Furthermore, glomerulonephritis was ameliorated, and the serum levels of inflammatory cytokines in the knockout (KO) mice were indistinguishable from those of control mice. These data provide direct evidence that B cells require TLR7-dependent priming through an autophagy-dependent mechanism before autoimmunity is induced, thereafter involving many cell types. Surprisingly, hyper-IgM production persisted in Tlr7.1 Tg mice in the absence of autophagy, likely involving a different activation pathway than the production of autoantibodies. Furthermore, these mice still presented with anemia, but responded with a striking increase in extramedullary hematopoiesis (EMH), possibly due to the absence of pro-inflammatory cytokines. PMID:26120731

  8. Inducible resistance to Fas-mediated apoptosis in B cells.

    PubMed

    Rothstein, T L

    2000-12-01

    Apoptosis produced in B cells through Fas (APO-1, CD95) triggering is regulated by signals derived from other surface receptors: CD40 engagement produces upregulation of Fas expression and marked susceptibility to Fas-induced cell death, whereas antigen receptor engagement, or IL-4R engagement, inhibits Fas killing and in so doing induces a state of Fas-resistance, even in otherwise sensitive, CD40-stimulated targets. Surface immunoglobulin and IL-4R utilize at least partially distinct pathways to produce Fas-resistance that differentially depend on PKC and STAT6, respectively. Further, surface immunoglobulin signaling for inducible Fas-resistance bypasses Btk, requires NF-kappaB, and entails new macromolecular synthesis. Terminal effectors of B cell Fas-resistance include the known anti-apoptotic gene products, Bcl-xL and FLIP, and a novel anti-apoptotic gene that encodes FAIM (Fas Apoptosis Inhibitory Molecule). faim was identified by differential display and exists in two alternatively spliced forms; faim-S is broadly expressed, but faim-L expression is tissue-specific. The FAIM sequence is highly evolu- tionarily conserved, suggesting an important role for this molecule throughout phylogeny. Inducible resistance to Fas killing is hypothesized to protect foreign antigen-specific B cells during potentially hazardous interactions with FasL-bearing T cells, whereas autoreactive B cells fail to become Fas-resistant and are deleted via Fas-dependent cytotoxicity. Inadvertent or aberrant acquisition of Fas-resistance may permit autoreactive B cells to escape Fas deletion, and malignant lymphocytes to impede anti-tumor immunity.

  9. B cell autophagy mediates TLR7-dependent autoimmunity and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Weindel, Chi G; Richey, Lauren J; Bolland, Silvia; Mehta, Abhiruchi J; Kearney, John F; Huber, Brigitte T

    2015-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a heterogeneous autoimmune disease, defined by loss of B cell self-tolerance that results in production of antinuclear antibodies (ANA) and chronic inflammation. While the initiating events in lupus development are not well defined, overexpression of the RNA-recognizing toll-like receptor (TLR)7 has been linked to SLE in humans and mice. We postulated that autophagy plays an essential role in TLR7 activation of B cells for the induction of SLE by delivering RNA ligands to the endosomes, where this innate immune receptor resides. To test this hypothesis, we compared SLE development in Tlr7 transgenic (Tg) mice with or without B cell-specific ablation of autophagy (Cd19-Cre Atg5(f/f)). We observed that in the absence of B cell autophagy the 2 hallmarks of SLE, ANA and inflammation, were eliminated, thus curing these mice of lupus. This was also evident in the significantly extended survival of the autophagy-deficient mice compared to Tlr7.1 Tg mice. Furthermore, glomerulonephritis was ameliorated, and the serum levels of inflammatory cytokines in the knockout (KO) mice were indistinguishable from those of control mice. These data provide direct evidence that B cells require TLR7-dependent priming through an autophagy-dependent mechanism before autoimmunity is induced, thereafter involving many cell types. Surprisingly, hyper-IgM production persisted in Tlr7.1 Tg mice in the absence of autophagy, likely involving a different activation pathway than the production of autoantibodies. Furthermore, these mice still presented with anemia, but responded with a striking increase in extramedullary hematopoiesis (EMH), possibly due to the absence of pro-inflammatory cytokines.

  10. Loss of HLA-DR expression and immunoblastic morphology predict adverse outcome in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma – analyses of cases from two prospective randomized clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Bernd, Heinz-Wolfram; Ziepert, Marita; Thorns, Christoph; Klapper, Wolfram; Wacker, Hans-Heinrich; Hummel, Michael; Stein, Harald; Hansmann, Martin-Leo; Ott, German; Rosenwald, Andreas; Müller-Hermelink, Hans-Konrad; Barth, Thomas F. E.; Möller, Peter; Cogliatti, Sergio B.; Pfreundschuh, Michael; Schmitz, Norbert; Trümper, Lorenz; Höller, Silvia; Löffler, Markus; Feller, Alfred C.

    2009-01-01

    Background Research on prognostically relevant immunohistochemical markers in diffuse large B-cell lymphomas has mostly been performed on retrospectively collected clinical data. This is also true for immunohistochemical classifiers that are thought to reflect the cell-of-origin subclassification of gene expression studies. In order to obtain deeper insight into the heterogeneous prognosis of diffuse large B-cell lymphomas and to validate a previously published immunohistochemical classifier, we analyzed data from a large set of cases from prospective clinical trials with long-term follow-up. Design and Methods We performed morphological and extensive immunohistochemical analyses in 414 cases of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma from two prospective randomized clinical trials (NHL-B1/B2, Germany). Classification into germinal center and non-germinal center subtypes of B-cell lymphoma was based on the expression pattern of CD10, BCL6, and IRF4. Multivariate analyses were performed adjusting for the factors in the International Prognostic Index. Results Analyzing 20 different epitopes on tissue microarrays, expression of HLA-DR, presence of CD23+ follicular dendritic cell meshworks, and monotypic light chain expression emerged as International Prognostic Index-independent markers of superior overall survival. Immunoblastic morphology was found to be related to poor event-free survival. The non-germinal center subtype, according to the three-epitope classifier (CD10, BCL6, and IRF4) did not have prognostic relevance when adjusted for International Prognostic Index factors (relative risk=1.2, p=0.328 for overall survival; and relative risk=1.1, p=0.644 for event-free survival). Conclusions The previously reported International Prognostic Index-independent prognostic value of stratification into germinal center/non-germinal center B-cell lymphoma using the expression pattern of CD10, BCL6, and IRF4 was not reproducible in our series. However, other markers and the

  11. Malaria-associated atypical memory B cells exhibit markedly reduced B cell receptor signaling and effector function

    PubMed Central

    Portugal, Silvia; Tipton, Christopher M; Sohn, Haewon; Kone, Younoussou; Wang, Jing; Li, Shanping; Skinner, Jeff; Virtaneva, Kimmo; Sturdevant, Daniel E; Porcella, Stephen F; Doumbo, Ogobara K; Doumbo, Safiatou; Kayentao, Kassoum; Ongoiba, Aissata; Traore, Boubacar; Sanz, Inaki; Pierce, Susan K; Crompton, Peter D

    2015-01-01

    Protective antibodies in Plasmodium falciparum malaria are only acquired after years of repeated infections. Chronic malaria exposure is associated with a large increase in atypical memory B cells (MBCs) that resemble B cells expanded in a variety of persistent viral infections. Understanding the function of atypical MBCs and their relationship to classical MBCs will be critical to developing effective vaccines for malaria and other chronic infections. We show that VH gene repertoires and somatic hypermutation rates of atypical and classical MBCs are indistinguishable indicating a common developmental history. Atypical MBCs express an array of inhibitory receptors and B cell receptor (BCR) signaling is stunted in atypical MBCs resulting in impaired B cell responses including proliferation, cytokine production and antibody secretion. Thus, in response to chronic malaria exposure, atypical MBCs appear to differentiate from classical MBCs becoming refractory to BCR-mediated activation and potentially interfering with the acquisition of malaria immunity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07218.001 PMID:25955968

  12. Aberrant immunoglobulin class switch recombination and switch translocations in activated B cell-like diffuse large B cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Lenz, Georg; Nagel, Inga; Siebert, Reiner; Roschke, Anna V; Sanger, Warren; Wright, George W; Dave, Sandeep S; Tan, Bruce; Zhao, Hong; Rosenwald, Andreas; Muller-Hermelink, Hans Konrad; Gascoyne, Randy D; Campo, Elias; Jaffe, Elaine S; Smeland, Erlend B; Fisher, Richard I; Kuehl, W Michael; Chan, Wing C; Staudt, Louis M

    2007-03-19

    To elucidate the mechanisms underlying chromosomal translocations in diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL), we investigated the nature and extent of immunoglobulin class switch recombination (CSR) in these tumors. We used Southern blotting to detect legitimate and illegitimate CSR events in tumor samples of the activated B cell-like (ABC), germinal center B cell-like (GCB), and primary mediastinal B cell lymphoma (PMBL) subgroups of DLBCL. The frequency of legitimate CSR was lower in ABC DLBCL than in GCB DLBCL and PMBL. In contrast, ABC DLBCL had a higher frequency of internal deletions within the switch mu (Smu) region compared with GCB DLBCL and PMBL. ABC DLBCLs also had frequent deletions within Sgamma and other illegitimate switch recombinations. Sequence analysis revealed ongoing Smu deletions within ABC DLBCL tumor clones, which were accompanied by ongoing duplications and activation-induced cytidine deaminase-dependent somatic mutations. Unexpectedly, short fragments derived from multiple chromosomes were interspersed within Smu in one case. These findings suggest that ABC DLBCLs have abnormalities in the regulation of CSR that could predispose to chromosomal translocations. Accordingly, aberrant switch recombination was responsible for translocations in ABC DLBCLs involving BCL6, MYC, and a novel translocation partner, SPIB. PMID:17353367

  13. Different spectra of recurrent gene mutations in subsets of chronic lymphocytic leukemia harboring stereotyped B-cell receptors.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Lesley-Ann; Young, Emma; Baliakas, Panagiotis; Hadzidimitriou, Anastasia; Moysiadis, Theodoros; Plevova, Karla; Rossi, Davide; Kminkova, Jana; Stalika, Evangelia; Pedersen, Lone Bredo; Malcikova, Jitka; Agathangelidis, Andreas; Davis, Zadie; Mansouri, Larry; Scarfò, Lydia; Boudjoghra, Myriam; Navarro, Alba; Muggen, Alice F; Yan, Xiao-Jie; Nguyen-Khac, Florence; Larrayoz, Marta; Panagiotidis, Panagiotis; Chiorazzi, Nicholas; Niemann, Carsten Utoft; Belessi, Chrysoula; Campo, Elias; Strefford, Jonathan C; Langerak, Anton W; Oscier, David; Gaidano, Gianluca; Pospisilova, Sarka; Davi, Frederic; Ghia, Paolo; Stamatopoulos, Kostas; Rosenquist, Richard

    2016-08-01

    We report on markedly different frequencies of genetic lesions within subsets of chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients carrying mutated or unmutated stereotyped B-cell receptor immunoglobulins in the largest cohort (n=565) studied for this purpose. By combining data on recurrent gene mutations (BIRC3, MYD88, NOTCH1, SF3B1 and TP53) and cytogenetic aberrations, we reveal a subset-biased acquisition of gene mutations. More specifically, the frequency of NOTCH1 mutations was found to be enriched in subsets expressing unmutated immunoglobulin genes, i.e. #1, #6, #8 and #59 (22-34%), often in association with trisomy 12, and was significantly different (P<0.001) to the frequency observed in subset #2 (4%, aggressive disease, variable somatic hypermutation status) and subset #4 (1%, indolent disease, mutated immunoglobulin genes). Interestingly, subsets harboring a high frequency of NOTCH1 mutations were found to carry few (if any) SF3B1 mutations. This starkly contrasts with subsets #2 and #3 where, despite their immunogenetic differences, SF3B1 mutations occurred in 45% and 46% of cases, respectively. In addition, mutations within TP53, whilst enriched in subset #1 (16%), were rare in subsets #2 and #8 (both 2%), despite all being clinically aggressive. All subsets were negative for MYD88 mutations, whereas BIRC3 mutations were infrequent. Collectively, this striking bias and skewed distribution of mutations and cytogenetic aberrations within specific chronic lymphocytic leukemia subsets implies that the mechanisms underlying clinical aggressiveness are not uniform, but rather support the existence of distinct genetic pathways of clonal evolution governed by a particular stereotyped B-cell receptor selecting a certain molecular lesion(s). PMID:27198719

  14. Different spectra of recurrent gene mutations in subsets of chronic lymphocytic leukemia harboring stereotyped B-cell receptors

    PubMed Central

    Sutton, Lesley-Ann; Young, Emma; Baliakas, Panagiotis; Hadzidimitriou, Anastasia; Moysiadis, Theodoros; Plevova, Karla; Rossi, Davide; Kminkova, Jana; Stalika, Evangelia; Pedersen, Lone Bredo; Malcikova, Jitka; Agathangelidis, Andreas; Davis, Zadie; Mansouri, Larry; Scarfò, Lydia; Boudjoghra, Myriam; Navarro, Alba; Muggen, Alice F.; Yan, Xiao-Jie; Nguyen-Khac, Florence; Larrayoz, Marta; Panagiotidis, Panagiotis; Chiorazzi, Nicholas; Niemann, Carsten Utoft; Belessi, Chrysoula; Campo, Elias; Strefford, Jonathan C.; Langerak, Anton W.; Oscier, David; Gaidano, Gianluca; Pospisilova, Sarka; Davi, Frederic; Ghia, Paolo; Stamatopoulos, Kostas; Rosenquist, Richard

    2016-01-01

    We report on markedly different frequencies of genetic lesions within subsets of chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients carrying mutated or unmutated stereotyped B-cell receptor immunoglobulins in the largest cohort (n=565) studied for this purpose. By combining data on recurrent gene mutations (BIRC3, MYD88, NOTCH1, SF3B1 and TP53) and cytogenetic aberrations, we reveal a subset-biased acquisition of gene mutations. More specifically, the frequency of NOTCH1 mutations was found to be enriched in subsets expressing unmutated immunoglobulin genes, i.e. #1, #6, #8 and #59 (22–34%), often in association with trisomy 12, and was significantly different (P<0.001) to the frequency observed in subset #2 (4%, aggressive disease, variable somatic hypermutation status) and subset #4 (1%, indolent disease, mutated immunoglobulin genes). Interestingly, subsets harboring a high frequency of NOTCH1 mutations were found to carry few (if any) SF3B1 mutations. This starkly contrasts with subsets #2 and #3 where, despite their immunogenetic differences, SF3B1 mutations occurred in 45% and 46% of cases, respectively. In addition, mutations within TP53, whilst enriched in subset #1 (16%), were rare in subsets #2 and #8 (both 2%), despite all being clinically aggressive. All subsets were negative for MYD88 mutations, whereas BIRC3 mutations were infrequent. Collectively, this striking bias and skewed distribution of mutations and cytogenetic aberrations within specific chronic lymphocytic leukemia subsets implies that the mechanisms underlying clinical aggressiveness are not uniform, but rather support the existence of distinct genetic pathways of clonal evolution governed by a particular stereotyped B-cell receptor selecting a certain molecular lesion(s). PMID:27198719

  15. Ibrutinib Before and After Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-27

    Activated B-Cell-Like Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; B-Cell Lymphoma, Unclassifiable, With Features Intermediate Between Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma and Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

  16. Expansion of Activated Peripheral Blood Memory B Cells in Rheumatoid Arthritis, Impact of B Cell Depletion Therapy, and Biomarkers of Response

    PubMed Central

    Adlowitz, Diana G.; Barnard, Jennifer; Biear, Jamie N.; Cistrone, Christopher; Owen, Teresa; Wang, Wensheng; Palanichamy, Arumugam; Ezealah, Ezinma; Campbell, Debbie; Wei, Chungwen; Looney, R. John; Sanz, Inaki; Anolik, Jennifer H.

    2015-01-01

    Although B cell depletion therapy (BCDT) is effective in a subset of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, both mechanisms and biomarkers of response are poorly defined. Here we characterized abnormalities in B cell populations in RA and the impact of BCDT in order to elucidate B cell roles in the disease and response biomarkers. In active RA patients both CD27+IgD- switched memory (SM) and CD27-IgD- double negative memory (DN) peripheral blood B cells contained significantly higher fractions of CD95+ and CD21- activated cells compared to healthy controls. After BCD the predominant B cell populations were memory, and residual memory B cells displayed a high fraction of CD21- and CD95+ compared to pre-depletion indicating some resistance of these activated populations to anti-CD20. The residual memory populations also expressed more Ki-67 compared to pre-treatment, suggesting homeostatic proliferation in the B cell depleted state. Biomarkers of clinical response included lower CD95+ activated memory B cells at depletion time points and a higher ratio of transitional B cells to memory at reconstitution. B cell function in terms of cytokine secretion was dependent on B cell subset and changed with BCD. Thus, SM B cells produced pro-inflammatory (TNF) over regulatory (IL10) cytokines as compared to naïve/transitional. Notably, B cell TNF production decreased after BCDT and reconstitution compared to untreated RA. Our results support the hypothesis that the clinical and immunological outcome of BCDT depends on the relative balance of protective and pathogenic B cell subsets established after B cell depletion and repopulation. PMID:26047509

  17. Aggressiveness and Disobedience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaaland, Grete Sorensen; Idsoe, Thormod; Roland, Erling

    2011-01-01

    This study aims to conceptualize disobedient pupil behavior within the more general framework of antisocial behavior and to reveal how two forms of aggressiveness are related to disobedience. Disobedience, in the context of this article, covers disruptive pupil behavior or discipline problems when the pupil is aware of breaking a standard set by…

  18. Neuroimaging and Aggression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Shari; Raine, Adrian

    1994-01-01

    Brain imaging research allows direct assessment of structural and functional brain abnormalities, and thereby provides an improved methodology for studying neurobiological factors predisposing to violent and aggressive behavior. This paper reviews 20 brain imaging studies using four different types of neuroimaging techniques that were conducted in…

  19. Intellectual Competence and Aggression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huesmann, L. Rowell; Yarmel, Patty Warnick

    Using data from a broader longitudinal study, this investigation explores within-subject and cross-generational stability of intellectual competence and the relationship of such stability to aggressive behavior. Data were gathered three times (when subjects' modal age was 8, 19, and 30 years). Initially, subjects included the entire population…

  20. Stability of Aggressive Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eron, Leonard D.; Huesmann, L. Rowell

    As indicated by multiple measures (including overt criminal behavior), stability of aggressive behavior was investigated across 22 years for males and females in a variety of situations. Originally, subjects included the entire population enrolled in the third grade in a semi-rural county in New York State. The sample included approximately 870…

  1. Relational Aggression among Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Ellie L.; Nelson, David A.; Hottle, America B.; Warburton, Brittney; Young, Bryan K.

    2011-01-01

    "Relational aggression" refers to harm within relationships caused by covert bullying or manipulative behavior. Examples include isolating a youth from his or her group of friends (social exclusion), threatening to stop talking to a friend (the silent treatment), or spreading gossip and rumors by email. This type of bullying tends to be…

  2. Human Aggression and Suicide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Gerald L.; Goodwin, Frederick K

    1986-01-01

    The central nervous system transmitter serontonin may be altered in aggressive/impulsive and suicidal behaviors in humans. These reports are largely consistent with animal data, and constitute one of the most highly replicated set of findings in biological psychiatry. Suggests that some suicidal behavior may be a special kind of aggressive…

  3. Parents' Aggressive Influences and Children's Aggressive Problem Solutions with Peers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duman, Sarah; Margolin, Gayla

    2007-01-01

    This study examined children's aggressive and assertive solutions to hypothetical peer scenarios in relation to parents' responses to similar hypothetical social scenarios and parents' actual marital aggression. The study included 118 children ages 9 to 10 years old and their mothers and fathers. Children's aggressive solutions correlated with…

  4. Relational Aggression and Physical Aggression among Adolescent Cook Islands Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Page, Angela; Smith, Lisa F.

    2016-01-01

    Both physical and relational aggression are characterised by the intent to harm another. Physical aggression includes direct behaviours such as hitting or kicking; relational aggression involves behaviours designed to damage relationships, such as excluding others, spreading rumours, and delivering threats and verbal abuse. This study extended…

  5. Long-term risk of cardiovascular disease after treatment for aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Moser, Elizabeth C; Noordijk, Evert M; van Leeuwen, Flora E; le Cessie, Saskia; Baars, Joke W; Thomas, José; Carde, Patrice; Meerwaldt, Jacobus H; van Glabbeke, Martine; Kluin-Nelemans, Hanneke C

    2006-04-01

    Cardiovascular disease frequently occurs after lymphoma therapy, but it is common in the general population too. Therefore, risk estimation requires comparison to population-based rates. We calculated risk by standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) and absolute excess risks (AERs) per 10,000 person-years based on general population rates (Continuous Morbidity Registry Nijmegen) in 476 (Dutch and Belgian) patients with aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) treated with at least 6 cycles of doxorubicin-based chemotherapy in 4 European Organization for Research on Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) trials (1980-1999). Cumulative incidence of cardiovascular disease, estimated in a competing risk model, was 12% at 5 years and 22% at 10 years (median follow-up, 8.4 years). Risk of chronic heart failure appeared markedly increased (SIR, 5.4; 95% CI, 4.1-6.9) with an AER of 208 excess cases per 10 000 person-years, whereas risk of coronary artery disease matched the general population (SIR, 1.2; 95% CI, 0.8-1.8; AER, 8 per 10 000 person-years). Risk of stroke was raised (SIR, 1.8; 95% CI, 1.1-2.4; AER, 15 per 10 000 person-years), especially after additional radiotherapy (> 40 Gy). Preexisting hypertension, NHL at young age, and salvage treatment increased risk of all cardiovascular events; the effect of radiotherapy was dose dependent. In conclusion, patients are at long-term high risk of chronic heart failure after NHL treatment and need therefore life-long monitoring. In contrast, risk of coronary artery disease appeared more age dependent than treatment related. PMID:16339404

  6. Long-term risk of cardiovascular disease after treatment for aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Moser, Elizabeth C; Noordijk, Evert M; van Leeuwen, Flora E; le Cessie, Saskia; Baars, Joke W; Thomas, José; Carde, Patrice; Meerwaldt, Jacobus H; van Glabbeke, Martine; Kluin-Nelemans, Hanneke C

    2006-04-01

    Cardiovascular disease frequently occurs after lymphoma therapy, but it is common in the general population too. Therefore, risk estimation requires comparison to population-based rates. We calculated risk by standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) and absolute excess risks (AERs) per 10,000 person-years based on general population rates (Continuous Morbidity Registry Nijmegen) in 476 (Dutch and Belgian) patients with aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) treated with at least 6 cycles of doxorubicin-based chemotherapy in 4 European Organization for Research on Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) trials (1980-1999). Cumulative incidence of cardiovascular disease, estimated in a competing risk model, was 12% at 5 years and 22% at 10 years (median follow-up, 8.4 years). Risk of chronic heart failure appeared markedly increased (SIR, 5.4; 95% CI, 4.1-6.9) with an AER of 208 excess cases per 10 000 person-years, whereas risk of coronary artery disease matched the general population (SIR, 1.2; 95% CI, 0.8-1.8; AER, 8 per 10 000 person-years). Risk of stroke was raised (SIR, 1.8; 95% CI, 1.1-2.4; AER, 15 per 10 000 person-years), especially after additional radiotherapy (> 40 Gy). Preexisting hypertension, NHL at young age, and salvage treatment increased risk of all cardiovascular events; the effect of radiotherapy was dose dependent. In conclusion, patients are at long-term high risk of chronic heart failure after NHL treatment and need therefore life-long monitoring. In contrast, risk of coronary artery disease appeared more age dependent than treatment related.

  7. Reverse Discrimination and Aggressive Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Stephen D.

    1980-01-01

    White subjects were aggressive toward Black opponents when contest results appeared to reflect elements of reverse discrimination; but they showed less aggressive behavior toward Black opponents when they thought their loss was due to their opponents' superior ability. (RL)

  8. Deletion of genes encoding PU.1 and Spi-B in B cells impairs differentiation and induces pre-B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Sokalski, Kristen M; Li, Stephen K H; Welch, Ian; Cadieux-Pitre, Heather-Anne T; Gruca, Marek R; DeKoter, Rodney P

    2011-09-01

    The E26 transformation-specific (Ets) transcription factor PU.1 is required to generate lymphoid progenitor cells from hematopoietic stem cells, but it is not required to generate B cells from committed B-cell lineage progenitors. We hypothesized that PU.1 function in B-cell differentiation is complemented by the related Ets transcription factor Spi-B. To test this hypothesis, mice were generated lacking both PU.1 and Spi-B in the B-cell lineage. Unlike mice lacking PU.1 or Spi-B, mice deficient in both PU.1 and Spi-B in the B-cell lineage had reduced frequencies of B cells as well as impaired B-cell differentiation. Strikingly, all PU.1 and Spi-B-deficient mice developed pre-B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia before 30 weeks of age. Pre-B cells accumulated in the thymus resulting in massive thymic enlargement and dyspnea. These findings demonstrate that PU.1 and Spi-B are essential transcriptional regulators of B-cell differentiation as well as novel tumor suppressors in the B-cell lineage.

  9. Characterization of 8p21.3 chromosomal deletions in B-cell lymphoma: TRAIL-R1 and TRAIL-R2 as candidate dosage-dependent tumor suppressor genes.

    PubMed

    Rubio-Moscardo, Fanny; Blesa, David; Mestre, Cinta; Siebert, Reiner; Balasas, Theo; Benito, Adalberto; Rosenwald, Andreas; Climent, Joan; Martinez, Jose I; Schilhabel, Markus; Karran, E Lorraine; Gesk, Stefan; Esteller, Manel; deLeeuw, Ronald; Staudt, Louis M; Fernandez-Luna, Jose Luis; Pinkel, Daniel; Dyer, Martin J S; Martinez-Climent, Jose A

    2005-11-01

    Deletions of chromosome 8p are a recurrent event in B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (B-NHL), suggesting the presence of a tumor suppressor gene. We have characterized these deletions using comparative genomic hybridization to microarrays, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) mapping, DNA sequencing, and functional studies. A minimal deleted region (MDR) of 600 kb was defined in chromosome 8p21.3, with one mantle cell lymphoma cell line (Z138) exhibiting monoallelic deletion of 650 kb. The MDR extended from bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones RP11-382J24 and RP11-109B10 and included the tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) receptor gene loci. Sequence analysis of the individual expressed genes within the MDR and DNA sequencing of the entire MDR in Z138 did not reveal any mutation. Gene expression analysis and quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (QRT-PCR) showed down-regulation of TRAIL-R1 and TRAIL-R2 receptor genes as a consistent event in B-NHL with 8p21.3 loss. Epigenetic inactivation was excluded via promoter methylation analysis. In vitro studies showed that TRAIL-induced apoptosis was dependent on TRAIL-R1 and/or -R2 dosage in most tumors. Resistance to apoptosis of cell lines with 8p21.3 deletion was reversed by restoration of TRAIL-R1 or TRAIL-R2 expression by gene transfection. Our data suggest that TRAIL-R1 and TRAIL-R2 act as dosage-dependent tumor suppressor genes whose monoallelic deletion can impair TRAIL-induced apoptosis in B-cell lymphoma. PMID:16051735

  10. 324 Facility B-cell quality process plan

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, J.L.

    1998-07-29

    B-Cell is currently being cleaned out (i.e., removal of equipment, fixtures and residual radioactive materials) and deactivated. TPA Milestone M-89-02 dictates that all mixed waste and equipment be removed from B-Cell by 5/31/99. The following sections describe the major activities that remain for completion of the TPA milestone. These include: Size Reduce Tank 119 and Miscellaneous Equipment; Load and Ship Low-Level Waste; Remove and Size Reduce the 1B Rack; Collect Dispersible Material from Cell Floor; Remove and Size Reduce the 2A Rack; Size Reduce the 1A Rack; Load and Ship Mixed Waste to PUREX Tunnels; and Move Spent Fuel to A-Cell;

  11. Impact of involved field radiotherapy in partial response after doxorubicin-based chemotherapy for advanced aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Moser, Elizabeth C. . E-mail: e.c.moser@lumc.nl; Kluin-Nelemans, Hanneke C.; Carde, Patrice; Meerwaldt, Jacobus H.; Tirelli, Umberto; Aleman, Berthe M.P.; Baars, Joke; Thomas, Jose; Glabbeke, Martine van; Noordijk, Evert M.

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: Whether salvage therapy in patients with advanced aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) in partial remission (PR) should consist of radiotherapy or autologous stem-cell transplantation (ASCT) is debatable. We evaluated the impact of radiotherapy on outcome in PR patients treated in four successive European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer trials for aggressive NHL. Patients and Methods: Records of 974 patients (1980-1999) were reviewed regarding initial response, final outcome, and type and timing of salvage treatment. After 8 cycles of doxorubicin-based chemotherapy, 227 NHL patients were in PR and treated: 114 received involved field radiotherapy, 16 ASCT, 93 second-line chemotherapy, and 4 were operated. Overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) after radiotherapy were estimated (Kaplan-Meier method) and compared with other treatments (log-rank). Impact on survival was evaluated by multivariate analysis (Cox proportional hazards model). Results: The median PFS in PR patients was 4.2 years and 48% remained progression-free at 5 years. Half of the PR patients converted to a complete remission. After conversion, survival was comparable to patients directly in complete remission. Radiotherapy resulted in better OS and PFS compared with other treatments, especially in patients with low to intermediate International Prognostic Index score, bulky disease, or nodal disease only. Correction by multivariate analysis for prognostic factors such as stage, bulky disease, and number of extranodal locations showed that radiotherapy was clearly the most significant factor affecting both OS and PFS. Conclusion: This retrospective analysis demonstrates that radiotherapy can be effective for patients in PR after fully dosed chemotherapy; assessment in a randomized trial (radiotherapy vs. ASCT) is justified.

  12. Are T cells at the origin of B cell lymphomas?

    PubMed

    Meyer-Hermann, Michael E

    2007-02-21

    Lymphoma pathogenesis is at least in some cases related to transformed B cells (BCs) arising from germinal centre reactions (GCRs). In this article possible deregulations of GCRs are investigated using in silico simulations. It is found that the final differentiation of BCs as regulated by helper T cells (TCs) is the best candidate mechanism for such a deregulation. This shifts the paradigm of BC lymphoma pathogenesis from BC transformations to an emphasized role of TC-BC interactions. PMID:17070849

  13. Early alterations of B cells in patients with septic shock

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction It has recently been proposed that B lymphocytes are involved in sepsis pathogenesis. The goal of this study is to investigate potential abnormalities in a subset distribution and activation of circulating B lymphocytes in patients with septic shock. Methods This observational prospective study was conducted in a medical-surgical ICU. All patients with septic shock were eligible for inclusion. B-cell phenotypes (CD19+CD69+, CD19+CD23+, CD19+CD5+, CD19+CD80, CD19+CD86+, CD19+CD40 and CD19+CD95+) were assessed by quantitative flow cytometry upon admission to the ICU and 3, 7, 14 and 28 d later. Results Fifty-two patients were included. Thirty-six healthy volunteers matched for age and sex were used as controls. The patients had lymphopenia that was maintained during 28 d of follow-up. In patients with septic shock who died, the percentage of CD19+CD23+ was lower during the 7 d of follow-up than it was in survival patients. Moreover, the percentage of CD80+ and CD95+ expression on B cells was higher in patients who died than in survivors. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis showed that a CD19+CD23+ value of 64.6% at ICU admission enabled discrimination between survivors and nonsurvivors with a sensitivity of 90.9% and a specificity of 80.0% (P = 0.0001). Conclusions Patients with septic shock who survive and those who don't have different patterns of abnormalities in circulating B lymphocytes. At ICU admission, a low percentage of CD23+ and a high of CD80+ and CD95+ on B cells were associated with increased mortality of patients with septic shock. Moreover, a drop in circulating B cells persisted during 28 d of ICU follow-up. PMID:23721745

  14. Molecular characterization of primary mediastinal B cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Tsang, P; Cesarman, E; Chadburn, A; Liu, Y F; Knowles, D M

    1996-06-01

    Primary mediastinal B cell lymphoma (PMBL) is a diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLCL) postulated to arise from noncirculating thymic B lymphocytes. Because of its distinctive clinical and morphological features and putative unique cellular origin, PMBL is generally considered a distinct clinicopathological entity. Little is known, however, about the molecular characteristics of PMBL. Therefore, we analyzed 16 PMBLs for molecular alterations involving the bcl-1, bcl-2, bcl-6, c-myc, H-ras, K-ras, N-ras, and p53 genes and for Epstein-Barr virus infection, which are commonly involved in lymphoid neoplasia. Employing a combination of Southern blotting and/or polymerase chain reaction and single-strand conformation polymorphism assays, we detected genetic alterations in 7 of the 16 (44%) PMBLs. Whereas the bcl-6 gene is rearranged in up to 45% of DLCLs, rearrangement of the bcl-6 gene was detected in only 1 of these 16 (6%) PMBLS. Point mutations of the 5' noncoding region of the c-myc gene were demonstrated in 3 other cases (19%), although c-myc gene rearrangements were not seen by Southern blotting. Missense point mutations of the p53 gene were identified in 3 additional PMBLs (19%). Alterations of the bcl-1, bcl-2, or ras genes and evidence of Epstein-Barr virus infection were not observed. In conclusion, a variety of molecular lesions occur in PMBLs and may be involved in their pathogenesis. This molecular genetic pattern bears little resemblance to that known for other B cell malignancies, including DLCL. In particular, the infrequent occurrence of bcl-6 gene rearrangement in PMBLs distinguishes them from other DLCLs of B cell origin, suggesting that PMBLs do not represent a distinct subtype of DLCL. PMID:8669486

  15. Molecular characterization of primary mediastinal B cell lymphoma.

    PubMed Central

    Tsang, P.; Cesarman, E.; Chadburn, A.; Liu, Y. F.; Knowles, D. M.

    1996-01-01

    Primary mediastinal B cell lymphoma (PMBL) is a diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLCL) postulated to arise from noncirculating thymic B lymphocytes. Because of its distinctive clinical and morphological features and putative unique cellular origin, PMBL is generally considered a distinct clinicopathological entity. Little is known, however, about the molecular characteristics of PMBL. Therefore, we analyzed 16 PMBLs for molecular alterations involving the bcl-1, bcl-2, bcl-6, c-myc, H-ras, K-ras, N-ras, and p53 genes and for Epstein-Barr virus infection, which are commonly involved in lymphoid neoplasia. Employing a combination of Southern blotting and/or polymerase chain reaction and single-strand conformation polymorphism assays, we detected genetic alterations in 7 of the 16 (44%) PMBLs. Whereas the bcl-6 gene is rearranged in up to 45% of DLCLs, rearrangement of the bcl-6 gene was detected in only 1 of these 16 (6%) PMBLS. Point mutations of the 5' noncoding region of the c-myc gene were demonstrated in 3 other cases (19%), although c-myc gene rearrangements were not seen by Southern blotting. Missense point mutations of the p53 gene were identified in 3 additional PMBLs (19%). Alterations of the bcl-1, bcl-2, or ras genes and evidence of Epstein-Barr virus infection were not observed. In conclusion, a variety of molecular lesions occur in PMBLs and may be involved in their pathogenesis. This molecular genetic pattern bears little resemblance to that known for other B cell malignancies, including DLCL. In particular, the infrequent occurrence of bcl-6 gene rearrangement in PMBLs distinguishes them from other DLCLs of B cell origin, suggesting that PMBLs do not represent a distinct subtype of DLCL. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8669486

  16. [Significance of regulatory B cells in nosogenesis of immune thrombocytopenia].

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Wang, Fang; Ding, Kai Yang; Dai, Lan

    2014-04-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the role of regulatory B cells (Breg) in pathogenesis of immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) and its clinical significance. A total of 35 ITP patients and 20 normal controls were enrolled in this study. The expression of CD19(+)CD24(hi)CD38(hi) B cells was detected by flow cytometry and the expression of IL-10 mRNA and TGF-β1 mRNA was assayed by RT-PCR. The results indicated that the expression level of CD19(+)CD24(hi)CD38(hi) B cells in peripheral blood of newly diagnosed ITP patients was obviously lower than that in normal controls (P < 0.05); the expression level of CD19(+)CD24(hi)CD38(hi) B cells in ITP patients with increased platelet count after treatment was higher than that before treatment (P < 0.05); the expression level of IL-10 mRNA in newly diagnosed ITP patients was significantly lower than that the in normal controls (P < 0.05), the expression level of TGF-β1 mRNA in newly diagnosed ITP patients increases as compared with normal controls (P < 0.05), after treatment with DXM the expression of IL-10 mRNA was enhanced, the expression of TGF-β1 mRNA was reduced as compared with expression level before treatment (P < 0.05). It is concluded that the Breg cells may play an important role in the pathogenesis of ITP via humoral immunity and its regulation of T lymphocytes.

  17. "Ladettes," Social Representations, and Aggression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muncer, Steven; Campbell, Anne; Jervis, Victoria; Lewis, Rachel

    2001-01-01

    Examined the relationship among "laddishness" (traditionally working-class, youthful, male social behavior by young women), social representations, and self-reported aggression among English college students. Measures of aggression correlated with holding more instrumental representations of aggression. Females indicated no relationship between…

  18. Activated mast cells promote differentiation of B cells into effector cells

    PubMed Central

    Palm, Anna-Karin E.; Garcia-Faroldi, Gianni; Lundberg, Marcus; Pejler, Gunnar; Kleinau, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Based on the known accumulation of mast cells (MCs) in B cell-dependent inflammatory diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, we hypothesized that MCs directly modulate B cells. We show here that degranulated, and to a lesser extent naïve or IgE-sensitized, MCs activate both naïve and B cell receptor-activated B cells. This was shown by increased proliferation, blast formation, and expression of CD19, MHC class II and CD86 in the B cells. Further, MCs stimulated the secretion of IgM and IgG in IgM+ B cells, indicating that MCs can induce class-switch recombination in B cells. We also show that coculture of MCs with B cells promotes surface expression of L-selectin, a homing receptor, on the B cells. The effects of MCs on B cells were partly dependent on cell-cell contact and both follicular and marginal zone B cells could be activated by MCs. Our findings suggest that degranulated MCs support optimal activation of B cells, a finding that is in line with in vivo studies showing that MCs frequently degranulate in the context of B-cell driven pathologies such as arthritis. Together, our findings show that MCs have the capacity to differentiate B cells to effector cells. PMID:26847186

  19. Large anaplastic spinal B-cell lymphoma in a cat.

    PubMed

    Flatland, Bente; Fry, Michael M; Newman, Shelley J; Moore, Peter F; Smith, Joanne R; Thomas, William B; Casimir, Roslyn H

    2008-12-01

    A 5-year-old female spayed domestic shorthair cat was presented for evaluation of tetraparesis. The neurologic lesion was localized to the cervical spinal segment (C1-C6). A left axillary mass was identified, and the results of fine needle aspiration cytology indicated malignant round cell neoplasia of possible histiocytic origin. The cells were large, had marked anisocytosis and anisokaryosis, occasional bi- and multinucleation, and cytoplasmic vacuolation. Euthanasia was performed due to the poor prognosis associated with severe, progressive neurologic signs and a malignant neoplasm. Postmortem examination revealed spinal cord compression and an extradural mass at the C1-C2 spinal segment, with neoplastic cells in the adjacent vertebral bodies, surrounding skeletal muscle, left axillary lymph node, and bone marrow from the right femur. The initial histologic diagnosis was anaplastic sarcoma, but immunohistochemical results indicated the cells were CD20+ and CD45R+ and CD3-, compatible with a diagnosis of B-cell lymphoma. CD79a staining was nonspecific and uninterpretable. Weak to moderate CD18 positivity and E-cadherin positivity were also observed. Clonality of the B-cell population could not be demonstrated using PCR testing for antigen receptor gene rearrangement. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first reported case of a feline spinal anaplastic B-cell lymphoma exhibiting bi- and multinucleated cells. The prognostic significance of this cell morphology and immunophenotype is unknown.

  20. APOBEC3 enzymes restrict marginal zone B cells

    PubMed Central

    Beck-Engeser, Gabriele B.; Winkelmann, Rebecca; Wheeler, Matthew L.; Shansab, Maryam; Yu, Philipp; Wünsche, Sarah; Walchhütter, Anja; Metzner, Mirjam; Vettermann, Christian; Eilat, Dan; DeFranco, Anthony; Jäck, Hans-Martin; Wabl, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    In general, a long-lasting immune response to viruses is achieved when they are infectious and replication-competent. In the mouse, the neutralizing antibody response to Friend murine leukemia virus is contributed by an allelic form of the enzyme Apobec3 (abbreviated A3). This is counterintuitive, because A3 directly controls viremia before the onset of adaptive anti-viral immune responses. It suggests that A3 also affects the antibody response directly. Here we studied the relative size of cell populations of the adaptive immune system as a function of A3 activity. We created a transgenic mouse that expresses all seven human A3 enzymes (hA3) and compared it to wild-type and mouse A3 (mA3)-deficient mice. A3 enzymes decreased the number of marginal zone (MZ) B cells, but not the number of follicular B or T cells. When mA3 was knocked out, the retroelement hitchhiker-1 and sialyl transferases encoded by genes close to it were overexpressed three and two orders of magnitude, respectively. We suggest that A3 shifts the balance, from the fast antibody response mediated by MZ B cells with little affinity maturation, to a more sustained germinal center B-cell response, which drives affinity maturation and, thereby, a better neutralizing response. PMID:25501566

  1. Adaptive Response of T and B Cells in Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ketelhuth, Daniel F J; Hansson, Göran K

    2016-02-19

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease that is initiated by the retention and accumulation of cholesterol-containing lipoproteins, particularly low-density lipoprotein, in the artery wall. In the arterial intima, lipoprotein components that are generated through oxidative, lipolytic, and proteolytic activities lead to the formation of several danger-associated molecular patterns, which can activate innate immune cells as well as vascular cells. Moreover, self- and non-self-antigens, such as apolipoprotein B-100 and heat shock proteins, can contribute to vascular inflammation by triggering the response of T and B cells locally. This process can influence the initiation, progression, and stability of plaques. Substantial clinical and experimental data support that the modulation of adaptive immune system may be used for treating and preventing atherosclerosis. This may lead to the development of more selective and less harmful interventions, while keeping host defense mechanisms against infections and tumors intact. Approaches such as vaccination might become a realistic option for cardiovascular disease, especially if they can elicit regulatory T and B cells and the secretion of atheroprotective antibodies. Nevertheless, difficulties in translating certain experimental data into new clinical therapies remain a challenge. In this review, we discuss important studies on the function of T- and B-cell immunity in atherosclerosis and their manipulation to develop novel therapeutic strategies against cardiovascular disease.

  2. How B cells Shape the Immune Response against Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Maglione, Paul J.; Chan, John

    2009-01-01

    Extensive work illustrating the importance of cellular immune mechanisms for protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis has largely relegated B cell biology to an afterthought within the tuberculosis (TB) field. However, recent studies have illustrated that B lymphocytes, through a variety of interactions with the cellular immune response, play previously underappreciated roles in shaping host defense against nonviral intracellular pathogens, including M. tuberculosis. Work in our laboratory has recently shown that, by considering these lymphocytes more broadly within their variety of interactions with cellular immunity, B cells have a significant impact on the outcome of airborne challenge with M. tuberculosis as well as the resultant inflammatory response. In this review, we advocate for a revised view of TB immunology in which roles of cellular and humoral immunity are not mutually exclusive. In the context of our current understanding of host defense against nonviral intracellular infections, we review recent data supporting a more significant role of B cells during M. tuberculosis infection than previously thought. PMID:19283721

  3. Large anaplastic spinal B-cell lymphoma in a cat.

    PubMed

    Flatland, Bente; Fry, Michael M; Newman, Shelley J; Moore, Peter F; Smith, Joanne R; Thomas, William B; Casimir, Roslyn H

    2008-12-01

    A 5-year-old female spayed domestic shorthair cat was presented for evaluation of tetraparesis. The neurologic lesion was localized to the cervical spinal segment (C1-C6). A left axillary mass was identified, and the results of fine needle aspiration cytology indicated malignant round cell neoplasia of possible histiocytic origin. The cells were large, had marked anisocytosis and anisokaryosis, occasional bi- and multinucleation, and cytoplasmic vacuolation. Euthanasia was performed due to the poor prognosis associated with severe, progressive neurologic signs and a malignant neoplasm. Postmortem examination revealed spinal cord compression and an extradural mass at the C1-C2 spinal segment, with neoplastic cells in the adjacent vertebral bodies, surrounding skeletal muscle, left axillary lymph node, and bone marrow from the right femur. The initial histologic diagnosis was anaplastic sarcoma, but immunohistochemical results indicated the cells were CD20+ and CD45R+ and CD3-, compatible with a diagnosis of B-cell lymphoma. CD79a staining was nonspecific and uninterpretable. Weak to moderate CD18 positivity and E-cadherin positivity were also observed. Clonality of the B-cell population could not be demonstrated using PCR testing for antigen receptor gene rearrangement. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first reported case of a feline spinal anaplastic B-cell lymphoma exhibiting bi- and multinucleated cells. The prognostic significance of this cell morphology and immunophenotype is unknown. PMID:19055573

  4. Diffuse large B cell lymphoma with chronic granulomatous inflammation.

    PubMed

    Nyunt, W W T; Wong, Y P; Wan Jamaludin, W F; Abdul Wahid, S F S

    2016-04-01

    Non-necrotic epithelioid granulomas have been reported in association with neoplasms including Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. We report a case of diffuse large B cell lymphoma with chronic granulomatous inflammation to highlight awareness of obscure tumour cells within the granuloma, to avoid delay in diagnosis and management of lymphoma. A 39-year-old Malay lady with no past medical history, presented with a 2-month history of progressive worsening of difficulty in breathing, cough, low-grade fever, loss of weight and loss of appetite. Chest X-ray showed an anterior mediastinal mass and computed tomography (CT)-guided biopsy was reported as chronic granulomatous inflammation suggestive of tuberculosis. After 2 months of anti-TB treatment, her symptoms were not relieved. The patient underwent another CT-guided biopsy of the anterior mediastinal mass in another hospital and the histopathology revealed diffuse large B cell lymphoma. The patient was referred for treatment. On histopathological review, the first sample showed noncaseating granulomas engulfing tumour cells and large abnormal lymphoid cells which were CD20 positive and with high Ki-67 proliferative index. The patient was diagnosed with diffuse large B cell lymphoma stage IV B IPSS score 3. She underwent chemotherapy (R-EPOCH) and responded well to treatment. PMID:27126666

  5. Epstein-Barr Virus-Induced Gene 3 (EBI3): A Novel Diagnosis Marker in Burkitt Lymphoma and Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Bastard, Christian; Picquenot, Jean-Michel; Couturier, Jérôme; Radford-Weiss, Isabelle; Dietrich, Céline; Brousse, Nicole; Vacher-Lavenu, Marie-Cécile; Devergne, Odile

    2011-01-01

    The distinction between Burkitt lymphoma (BL) and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), two types of mature aggressive B-cell lymphomas that require distinct treatments, can be difficult because of forms showing features intermediate between DLBCL and BL (here called BL/DLBCL). They can be discriminated by the presence of c-myc translocations characteristic of BL. However, these are not exclusive of BL and when present in DLBCL are associated with lower survival. In this study, we show that Epstein-Barr virus-induced gene 3 (EBI3) is differentially expressed among BL and DLBCL. Analysis of gene expression data from 502 cases of aggressive mature B-cell lymphomas available on Gene Expression Omnibus and immunohistochemical analysis of 184 cases of BL, BL/DLBCL or DLBCL, showed that EBI3 was not expressed in EBV-positive or -negative BL cases, whereas it was expressed by over 30% of tumoral cells in nearly 80% of DLBCL cases, independently of their subtypes. In addition, we show that c-myc overexpression represses EBI3 expression, and that DLBCL or BL/DLBCL cases with c-myc translocations have lower expression of EBI3. Thus, EBI3 immunohistochemistry could be useful to discriminate BL from DLBCL, and to identify cases of BL/DLBCL or DLBCL with potential c-myc translocations. PMID:21931777

  6. [EBV-associated B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder of the elderly successfully treated with autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation and locoregional radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Sugino, Noriko; Nakamura, Chishiho; Fujii, Sumie; Matsui, Yusuke; Kaneko, Hitomi; Watanabe, Mitsumasa; Miura, Yasuo; Wakasa, Tomoko; Tsudo, Mitsuru

    2011-03-01

    Age-related EBV-associated B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder is a highly aggressive lymphoma, and a standard therapy for this disease has not yet been established. A 58-year-old male was admitted to our hospital because of fever and lymphadenopathy across the whole body. Neck lymph node biopsy showed hemorrhagic and geographic necrosis with Hodgkin-like large cells against a background of small lymphocytes. The large cells were positive for CD30 and EBER. The patient was diagnosed as having age-related EBV-associated B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder. Although there was no response to CHOP therapy, he obtained partial response after 3 courses of DeVIC therapy. Because his lymphoma was highly aggressive and chemotherapy-resistant, he underwent autologous stem cell transplantation with a conditioning regimen including ranimustine, etoposide, cytarabine, and melphalan. After stem cell transplantation and subsequent radiotherapy to the residual lesion, the patient achieved complete remission. This is the first report of successful autologous stem cell transplantation for a patient with age-related EBV-associated B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder. PMID:21471700

  7. Children's normative beliefs about aggression and aggressive behavior.

    PubMed

    Huesmann, L R; Guerra, N G

    1997-02-01

    Normative beliefs have been defined as self-regulating beliefs about the appropriateness of social behaviors. In 2 studies the authors revised their scale for assessing normative beliefs about aggression, found that it is reliable and valid for use with elementary school children, and investigated the longitudinal relation between normative beliefs about aggression and aggressive behavior in a large sample of elementary school children living in poor urban neighborhoods. Using data obtained in 2 waves of observations 1 year apart, the authors found that children tended to approve more of aggression as they grew older and that this increase appeared to be correlated with increases in aggressive behavior. More important, although individual differences in aggressive behavior predicted subsequent differences in normative beliefs in younger children, individual differences in aggressive behavior were predicted by preceding differences in normative beliefs in older children. PMID:9107008

  8. Isolation and characterization of a novel B cell activation gene

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, J.X.; Wilson, G.L.; Fox, C.H.; Kehrl, J.H. )

    1993-05-01

    Using subtractive cDNA cloning, the authors have isolated a series of cDNA clones that are differentially expressed between B and T lymphocytes. Whereas some of the isolated cDNA are from known B cell-specific genes, many of them represent previously uncharacterized genes. One of these unknown genes was denoted as BL34. Northern blot analysis performed with the BL34 cDNA revealed a 1.6-kb mRNA transcript that was present at low levels in RNA extracted from resting B lymphocytes, but whose expression was markedly increased in RNA prepared from mitogen-activated B cells. Similarly, RNA prepared from several B cell lines treated with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) contained high levels of BL34 mRNA. In contrast, RNA from purified T cells treated with phytohemagglutinin and PMA had undetectable amounts of BL34 mRNA. In addition, high levels of BL34 mRNA were detected in RNA purified from PBMC of a patient with B cell acute lymphocytic leukemia. Southern blot analysis of human DNA from various tissues and cells lines demonstrated that BL34 is a single-copy gene without evidence of rearrangement. Two full length BL34 cDNA were sequenced, and an open reading frame of 588 bp was identified that was predicted to encode for a 196 amino acid protein. Searches of several protein data bases failed to find any homologous proteins. To directly analyze the expression of BL34 mRNA in lymphoid tissues in situ, hybridization studies with human tonsil tissue sections were performed. BL34 mRNA was detected in a portion of the cells in the germinal center region and adjacent to the mantle region. Further characterization of the BL34 gene and its protein should lead to insights to its role in B cell function and the consequences of its over-expression in acute lymphocytic leukemia. 26 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Aggressive drowsy cache cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shawkey, H. A.; El-Dib, D. A.; Abid, Z.

    2010-01-01

    An aggressive drowsy cache block management, where the cache block is forced into drowsy mode all the time except during write and read operations, is proposed. The word line (WL) is used to enable the normal supply voltage (V DD_high) to the cache line only when it is accessed for read or write whereas the drowsy supply voltage (V DD_low) is enabled to the cache cell otherwise. The proposed block management neither needs extra cycles nor extra control signals to wake the drowsy cache cell, thereby reducing the performance penalty associated with traditional drowsy caches. In fact, the proposed aggressive drowsy mode can reduce the total power consumption of the traditional drowsy mode by 13% or even more, depending on the cache access rate, access frequency and the CMOS technology used.

  10. Pathogen manipulation of B cells: the best defence is a good offence.

    PubMed

    Nothelfer, Katharina; Sansonetti, Philippe J; Phalipon, Armelle

    2015-03-01

    B cells have long been regarded as simple antibody production units, but are now becoming known as key players in both adaptive and innate immune responses. However, several bacteria, viruses and parasites have evolved the ability to manipulate B cell functions to modulate immune responses. Pathogens can affect B cells indirectly, by attacking innate immune cells and altering the cytokine environment, and can also target B cells directly, impairing B cell-mediated immune responses. In this Review, we provide a summary of recent advances in elucidating direct B cell-pathogen interactions and highlight how targeting this specific cell population benefits different pathogens.

  11. Autotransplant conditioning regimens for aggressive lymphoma: are we on the right road?

    PubMed

    Fernandez, H F; Escalón, M P; Pereira, D; Lazarus, H M

    2007-09-01

    High-dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplant (ASCT) is the standard approach for chemosensitive, relapsed aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). Various conditioning regimens have been used as treatment before ASCT and disease-free (DFS) and overall survival (OS) rates range from 34 to 60% and 26 to 46%, respectively. To date, few comparative randomized trials have been performed and no regimen has demonstrated superiority to another. Reduction of disease relapse remains the major hurdle for improving patient outcome and in vitro and in vivo purging of lymphoma cells has not necessarily enhanced results. Rituximab pre-mobilization and post-transplant appear to provide better response rates with OS approaching 87-91% at 2-3 years. Newer approaches with radioimmunotherapy may raise DFS to 78% and OS to 93%, albeit with short follow-up. Advances in the conditioning regimens and supportive care have reduced transplant-related mortality to less than 10%. In this review we discuss commonly utilized conditioning regimens, describe their pros and cons and address purging and present conditioning strategies. Owing to the poor outcome with conventional chemotherapy in mantle cell, Burkitt's and T-cell lymphoma, we propose the standard approach of front-line ASCT for these high-risk lymphoma patients. Finally, we will present novel strategies, which can enhance the anti-lymphoma effect, at the same time reducing toxicity, to improve the outcome of ASCT in NHL patients.

  12. [Aggressive fibromatoses in orthopedics].

    PubMed

    Adler, C P; Stock, D

    1986-01-01

    Aggressive fibromatoses which may develop either in soft tissue or in the bone present considerable problems for the pathologist trying to establish a diagnosis as well as for the radiologist and surgeon. In radiographs, a destruction of the soft and osseous tissue is seen which suggests a malignant tumor. Histologically a monomorphic connective tissue prevails in the biopsy showing no essential signs of malignancy. Under pathoanatomical aspects often a benign proliferation of the connective tissue is assumed. Surgically the tumor may either be removed in a too radical and mutilating way, or the excision may remain incomplete. Two cases of desmoplastic bone fibroma (aggressive fibromatosis in the ulna and in the sacrum) are described in which the complete tumor removal led to healing, whereas the incomplete excision of the tumor resulted in recurrences. Aggressive fibromatosis represents a semimalignant tumor which has a locally destructive and invasive growth tendency but does not metastasize. The various fibromatoses are defined with regard to their biological growth tendency and the therapeutic consequences are discussed.

  13. [EXPRESSION OF THE LIGHT CHAINS OF IMMUNOGLOBULINS IN NORMAL B-CELLS AND SOME B-CELL LYMPHOMAS].

    PubMed

    Khudoleeva, O A; Vorobjev, I A

    2015-01-01

    The quantitative method of determining the level of expression of immunoglobulin light chains on uncompensated data was suggested and used to examine disorders in light chain expression in various B-cell tumors. The average level of expression of the lambda isotype was 4 times higher than the level of expression of kappa isotype. The level of surface and cytoplasmic expression of LC IG varied within wide limits for different people, but there was a high degree of correlation between the levels of expression of kappa and lambda isotypes LC IG as well as between expression of the surface and cytoplasmic forms of each in isotype the same individual. In the majority of B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphomas correlation between the expression of LC IG on the surface and in the cytoplasm of the cells was diminished. Expression of LC IG in CLL was significantly reduced on the surface of the cells and to a lesser extent--in the cytoplasm. In the case of marginal zone cell lymphoma, LC IG expression level was reduced on the surface of circulating cells and to a lesser extent--in the cytoplasm. In the case of mantle cell lymphoma and DLBCL, expression level of LC IG on the cell surface and in the cytoplasm was the same as in normal B-cells. However, in some cases DLBCL, no LC IG was expressed both on the surface and in the cytoplasm. PMID:26863766

  14. RAG1 and RAG2 expression by B cell subsets from human tonsil and peripheral blood.

    PubMed

    Girschick, H J; Grammer, A C; Nanki, T; Mayo, M; Lipsky, P E

    2001-01-01

    It has been suggested that B cells acquire the capacity for secondary V(D)J recombination during germinal center (GC) reactions. The nature of these B cells remains controversial. Subsets of tonsil and blood B cells and also individual B cells were examined for the expression of recombination-activating gene (RAG) mRNA. Semiquantitative analysis indicated that RAG1 mRNA was present in all tonsil B cell subsets, with the largest amount found in naive B cells. RAG2 mRNA was only found in tonsil naive B cells, centrocytes, and to a lesser extent in centroblasts. Neither RAG1 nor RAG2 mRNA was routinely found in normal peripheral blood B cells. In individual tonsil B cells, RAG1 and RAG2 mRNAs were found in 18% of naive B cells, 22% of GC founder cells, 0% of centroblasts, 13% of centrocytes, and 9% of memory B cells. Individual naive tonsil B cells containing both RAG1 and RAG2 mRNA were activated (CD69(+)). In normal peripheral blood approximately 5% of B cells expressed both RAG1 and RAG2. These cells were uniformly postswitch memory B cells as documented by the coexpression of IgG mRNA. These results indicate that coordinate RAG expression is not found in normal peripheral naive B cells but is up-regulated in naive B cells which are activated in the tonsil. With the exception of centroblasts, RAG1 and RAG2 expression can be found in all components of the GC, including postswitch memory B cells, some of which may circulate in the blood of normal subjects.

  15. Chemokine-mediated B cell trafficking during early rabbit GALT development

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Shi-Kang; Volgina, Veronica V.; Sethupathi, Periannan; Knight, Katherine L.; Lanning, Dennis K.

    2014-01-01

    Microbial and host cell interactions stimulate rabbit B cells to diversify the primary antibody repertoire in gut-associated lymphoid tissues (GALT). B cells at the base of appendix follicles begin proliferating and diversifying their V-(D)-J genes around 1 week of age, ∼5 days after B cells first begin entering appendix follicles, To gain insight into the microbial and host cell interactions that stimulate B cells to diversify the primary antibody repertoire, we analyzed B cell trafficking within follicles during the first week of life. We visualized B cells, as well as chemokines that mediate B cell homing in lymphoid tissues, by in situ hybridization, and examined B cell chemokine receptor expression by flow cytometry. We found that B cells were activated, and began downregulating their BCRs, well before a detectable B cell proliferative region appeared at the follicle base. The proliferative region was similar to germinal center dark zones, in that it exhibited elevated CXCL12 mRNA expression, and B cells that upregulated CXCR4 mRNA in response to signals acquired from select intestinal commensals localized in this region. Our results suggest that, after entering appendix follicles, B cells home sequentially to the FAE, the FDC network, the B cell:T cell boundary and, ultimately, the base of the follicle, where they enter a proliferative program and diversify the primary antibody repertoire. PMID:25385821

  16. [Central nervous system relapse in diffuse large B cell lymphoma: Risk factors].

    PubMed

    Sancho, Juan-Manuel; Ribera, Josep-Maria

    2016-01-15

    Central nervous system (CNS) involvement by lymphoma is a complication associated, almost invariably, with a poor prognosis. The knowledge of the risk factors for CNS relapse is important to determine which patients could benefit from prophylaxis. Thus, patients with very aggressive lymphomas (such as lymphoblastic lymphoma or Burkitt's lymphoma) must systematically receive CNS prophylaxis due to a high CNS relapse rate (25-30%), while in patients with indolent lymphoma (such as follicular lymphoma or marginal lymphoma) prophylaxis is unnecessary. However, the question about CNS prophylaxis in patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), the most common type of lymphoma, remains controversial. The information available is extensive, mainly based on retrospective and heterogeneous studies. There seems that immunochemotherapy based on rituximab reduces the CNS relapse rate. On the other hand, patients with increased serum lactate dehydrogenase plus more than one extranodal involvement seem to have a higher risk of CNS relapse, but a prophylaxis strategy based only on the presence of these 2 factors does not prevent all CNS relapses. Patients with involvement of testes or breast have high risk of CNS relapse and prophylaxis is mandatory. Finally, CNS prophylaxis could be considered in patients with DLBCL and renal or epidural space involvement, as well as in those cases with MYC rearrangements, although additional studies are necessary.

  17. Novel Cryptic Rearrangements in Adult B-Cell Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Involving the MLL Gene

    PubMed Central

    Othman, Moneeb A. K.; Grygalewicz, Beata; Pienkowska-Grela, Barbara; Rincic, Martina; Rittscher, Katharina; Melo, Joana B.; Carreira, Isabel M.; Meyer, Britta; Marzena, Watek

    2015-01-01

    MLL (mixed-lineage-leukemia) gene rearrangements are typical for acute leukemia and are associated with an aggressive course of disease, with a worse outcome than comparable case, and thus require intensified treatment. Here we describe a 69-year-old female with adult B cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (BCP-ALL) with hyperleukocytosis and immunophenotype CD10- and CD19+ with cryptic MLL rearrangements. G-banding at the time of diagnosis showed a normal karyotype: 46,XX. Molecular cytogenetics using multitude multicolor banding (mMCB) revealed a complex rearrangement of the two copies of chromosome 11. However, a locus-specific probe additionally identified that the MLL gene at 11q23.3 was disrupted, and that the 5′ region was inserted into the chromosomal sub-band 4q21; thus the aberration involved three chromosomes and five break events. Unfortunately, the patient died six months after the initial diagnosis from serious infections and severe complications. Overall, the present findings confirm that, by far not all MLL aberrations are seen by routine chromosome banding techniques and that fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) should be regarded as standard tool to access MLL rearrangements in patients with BCP-ALL. PMID:25699572

  18. Role of Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors in Indolent and Other Mature B-Cell Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Kutsch, Nadine; Marks, Reinhard; Ratei, Richard; Held, Thomas K; Schmidt-Hieber, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Targeting tyrosine kinases represents a highly specific treatment approach for different malignancies. This also includes non-Hodgkin lymphoma since it is well known that these enzymes are frequently involved in the lymphomagenesis. Hereby, tyrosine kinases might either be dysregulated intrinsically or be activated within signal transduction pathways leading to tumor survival and growth. Among others, Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (Btk) is of particular interest as a potential therapeutic target. Btk is stimulated by B-cell receptor signaling and activates different transcription factors such as nuclear factor κB. The Btk inhibitor ibrutinib has been approved for the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia and mantle-cell lymphoma recently. Numerous clinical trials evaluating this agent in different combinations (eg, with rituximab or classical chemotherapeutic agents) as a treatment option for aggressive and indolent lymphoma are under way. Here, we summarize the role of tyrosine kinase inhibitors in the treatment of indolent and other non-Hodgkin lymphomas (eg, mantle-cell lymphoma). PMID:26327780

  19. Novel Cryptic Rearrangements in Adult B-Cell Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Involving the MLL Gene.

    PubMed

    Othman, Moneeb A K; Grygalewicz, Beata; Pienkowska-Grela, Barbara; Rincic, Martina; Rittscher, Katharina; Melo, Joana B; Carreira, Isabel M; Meyer, Britta; Marzena, Watek; Liehr, Thomas

    2015-05-01

    MLL (mixed-lineage-leukemia) gene rearrangements are typical for acute leukemia and are associated with an aggressive course of disease, with a worse outcome than comparable case, and thus require intensified treatment. Here we describe a 69-year-old female with adult B cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (BCP-ALL) with hyperleukocytosis and immunophenotype CD10- and CD19+ with cryptic MLL rearrangements. G-banding at the time of diagnosis showed a normal karyotype: 46,XX. Molecular cytogenetics using multitude multicolor banding (mMCB) revealed a complex rearrangement of the two copies of chromosome 11. However, a locus-specific probe additionally identified that the MLL gene at 11q23.3 was disrupted, and that the 5' region was inserted into the chromosomal sub-band 4q21; thus the aberration involved three chromosomes and five break events. Unfortunately, the patient died six months after the initial diagnosis from serious infections and severe complications. Overall, the present findings confirm that, by far not all MLL aberrations are seen by routine chromosome banding techniques and that fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) should be regarded as standard tool to access MLL rearrangements in patients with BCP-ALL. PMID:25699572

  20. Improving outcomes for patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Flowers, Christopher R; Sinha, Rajni; Vose, Julie M

    2010-01-01

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is the most commonly occurring form of non-Hodgkin lymphoma in the western world. Until the mid 1990s the incidence of DLBCL increased in both sexes, across racial categories, and across all age groups except the very young, the etiology of most cases remains unknown. DLBCL is associated with an aggressive natural history, but it can be cured with combination chemotherapy regimens like cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (CHOP), which has been the mainstay of therapy for several decades. Remarkable progress has been made in understanding the biological heterogeneity of DLBCL and in improving survival for DLBCL patients with novel combinations of chemotherapy and immunotherapy. Gene expression profiling (GEP) has uncovered DLBCL subtypes that have distinct clinical behaviors and prognoses, and the addition of the monoclonal antibody, rituximab, to CHOP has markedly improved outcomes. Future approaches to DLBCL management will use molecular signatures identified through GEP to provide prognostic information and to isolate therapeutic targets that are being evaluated for DLBCL patients who relapse or those with high risk disease.

  1. [Central nervous system relapse in diffuse large B cell lymphoma: Risk factors].

    PubMed

    Sancho, Juan-Manuel; Ribera, Josep-Maria

    2016-01-15

    Central nervous system (CNS) involvement by lymphoma is a complication associated, almost invariably, with a poor prognosis. The knowledge of the risk factors for CNS relapse is important to determine which patients could benefit from prophylaxis. Thus, patients with very aggressive lymphomas (such as lymphoblastic lymphoma or Burkitt's lymphoma) must systematically receive CNS prophylaxis due to a high CNS relapse rate (25-30%), while in patients with indolent lymphoma (such as follicular lymphoma or marginal lymphoma) prophylaxis is unnecessary. However, the question about CNS prophylaxis in patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), the most common type of lymphoma, remains controversial. The information available is extensive, mainly based on retrospective and heterogeneous studies. There seems that immunochemotherapy based on rituximab reduces the CNS relapse rate. On the other hand, patients with increased serum lactate dehydrogenase plus more than one extranodal involvement seem to have a higher risk of CNS relapse, but a prophylaxis strategy based only on the presence of these 2 factors does not prevent all CNS relapses. Patients with involvement of testes or breast have high risk of CNS relapse and prophylaxis is mandatory. Finally, CNS prophylaxis could be considered in patients with DLBCL and renal or epidural space involvement, as well as in those cases with MYC rearrangements, although additional studies are necessary. PMID:25817451

  2. Transformation of follicular lymphoma to double hit B-cell lymphoma causing hypercalcemia in a 69-year-old female: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Kapur, Sakshi; Levin, Miles B

    2014-01-01

    Double hit B-cell lymphomas are rare tumors that are defined by a chromosomal breakpoint affecting the MYC/8q24 locus in combination with another recurrent breakpoint, mainly a t(14;18)(q32;q21) involving BCL2. These tumors mostly occur in adults and carry a very poor prognosis. Double hit lymphomas can occur de novo, or arise from transformation of follicular lymphoma. We report a case of a 69-year-old female with abdominal distention and progressively worsening weakness over six months. Patient presented with severe hypercalcemia and multiple intra-abdominal/pelvic masses. Histopathology results of the abdominal mass were compatible with a double hit B-cell lymphoma. However, bone marrow biopsy results showed a low grade follicular lymphoma, thus suggesting peripheral transformation of follicular lymphoma to double hit B-cell lymphoma. Patient was transferred to a tertiary care center and was started on combination chemotherapy (EPOCH: doxorubicin, etoposide, vincristine, cyclophosphamide, and prednisone). Our paper highlights not only transformation of follicular lymphoma to double hit B-cell lymphoma and the challenges encountered in diagnosing and treating these aggressive tumors, but also the association of new onset/worsening hypercalcemia in such patients.

  3. Transformation of Follicular Lymphoma to Double Hit B-Cell Lymphoma Causing Hypercalcemia in a 69-Year-Old Female: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Double hit B-cell lymphomas are rare tumors that are defined by a chromosomal breakpoint affecting the MYC/8q24 locus in combination with another recurrent breakpoint, mainly a t(14;18)(q32;q21) involving BCL2. These tumors mostly occur in adults and carry a very poor prognosis. Double hit lymphomas can occur de novo, or arise from transformation of follicular lymphoma. We report a case of a 69-year-old female with abdominal distention and progressively worsening weakness over six months. Patient presented with severe hypercalcemia and multiple intra-abdominal/pelvic masses. Histopathology results of the abdominal mass were compatible with a double hit B-cell lymphoma. However, bone marrow biopsy results showed a low grade follicular lymphoma, thus suggesting peripheral transformation of follicular lymphoma to double hit B-cell lymphoma. Patient was transferred to a tertiary care center and was started on combination chemotherapy (EPOCH: doxorubicin, etoposide, vincristine, cyclophosphamide, and prednisone). Our paper highlights not only transformation of follicular lymphoma to double hit B-cell lymphoma and the challenges encountered in diagnosing and treating these aggressive tumors, but also the association of new onset/worsening hypercalcemia in such patients. PMID:25161781

  4. Differential expression of viral agents in lymphoma tissues of patients with ABC diffuse large B-cell lymphoma from high and low endemic infectious disease regions

    PubMed Central

    Högfeldt, Therese; Jaing, Crystal; Loughlin, Kevin Mc; Thissen, James; Gardner, Shea; Bahnassy, Abeer A.; Gharizadeh, Baback; Lundahl, Joachim; Österborg, Anders; Porwit, Anna; Zekri, Abdel-Rahman N.; Khaled, Hussein M.; Mellstedt, Håkan; Moshfegh, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), the most common type of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) in adults, accounts for approximately 30–40% of newly diagnosed lymphomas worldwide. Environmental factors, such as viruses and bacteria, may contribute to cancer development through chronic inflammation and the integration of oncogenes, and have previously been indicated in cervical cancer, hepatocellular carcinoma, gastric cancer and lymphoproliferative disorders. In the present study, the presence of microbial agents was analyzed in the lymphoma tissue of patients with activated B-cell like (ABC) DLBCL. The present study compared two groups of patients from geographically varied regions that possess a difference in the prevalence of viral and other microbial agents. The patient populations were from Sweden (a low endemic infectious disease region) and Egypt (a high endemic infectious disease region). A differential expression of several viruses in lymphoma tissues was noted when comparing Swedish and Egyptian patients. JC polyomavirus (JCV) was detected in Swedish and Egyptian patients and, uniquely, the complete hepatitis B virus (HBV) genome was detected only in Egyptian lymphoma patients. None of these viruses were detected in control lymph tissues from Sweden or Egypt. In total, 38% of the Egyptian patients were found to have HBV surface antigens (HBsAgs) in their serum; however, HBsAgs were not found in any of the Swedish patients. The percentage of serum HBsAgs in Egyptian patients with ABC DLBCL was significantly increased compared with the general Egyptian population (P<0.05). The present study may support a notion that viral agents, including JCV and HBV, may be involved in the tumorigenesis of DLBCL in regions of high infectious disease. PMID:27698858

  5. Differential expression of viral agents in lymphoma tissues of patients with ABC diffuse large B-cell lymphoma from high and low endemic infectious disease regions

    PubMed Central

    Högfeldt, Therese; Jaing, Crystal; Loughlin, Kevin Mc; Thissen, James; Gardner, Shea; Bahnassy, Abeer A.; Gharizadeh, Baback; Lundahl, Joachim; Österborg, Anders; Porwit, Anna; Zekri, Abdel-Rahman N.; Khaled, Hussein M.; Mellstedt, Håkan; Moshfegh, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), the most common type of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) in adults, accounts for approximately 30–40% of newly diagnosed lymphomas worldwide. Environmental factors, such as viruses and bacteria, may contribute to cancer development through chronic inflammation and the integration of oncogenes, and have previously been indicated in cervical cancer, hepatocellular carcinoma, gastric cancer and lymphoproliferative disorders. In the present study, the presence of microbial agents was analyzed in the lymphoma tissue of patients with activated B-cell like (ABC) DLBCL. The present study compared two groups of patients from geographically varied regions that possess a difference in the prevalence of viral and other microbial agents. The patient populations were from Sweden (a low endemic infectious disease region) and Egypt (a high endemic infectious disease region). A differential expression of several viruses in lymphoma tissues was noted when comparing Swedish and Egyptian patients. JC polyomavirus (JCV) was detected in Swedish and Egyptian patients and, uniquely, the complete hepatitis B virus (HBV) genome was detected only in Egyptian lymphoma patients. None of these viruses were detected in control lymph tissues from Sweden or Egypt. In total, 38% of the Egyptian patients were found to have HBV surface antigens (HBsAgs) in their serum; however, HBsAgs were not found in any of the Swedish patients. The percentage of serum HBsAgs in Egyptian patients with ABC DLBCL was significantly increased compared with the general Egyptian population (P<0.05). The present study may support a notion that viral agents, including JCV and HBV, may be involved in the tumorigenesis of DLBCL in regions of high infectious disease.

  6. Candidate genes contributing to the aggressive phenotype of mantle cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Henson, Sarah E.; Morford, Travis; Stein, Mary-Pat; Wall, Randolph; Malone, Cindy S.

    2012-01-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma and small lymphocytic lymphoma are lymphocyte cancers that have similar morphologies and a common age of onset. Mantle cell lymphoma is generally an aggressive B cell lymphoma with a short median survival time, whereas small lymphocytic lymphoma is typically an indolent B cell lymphoma with a prolonged median survival time. Using primary tumor samples in bidirectional suppression subtractive hybridization, we identified genes with differential expression in an aggressive mantle cell lymphoma versus an indolent small lymphocytic lymphoma. “Virtual” Northern blot analyses of multiple lymphoma samples confirmed that a set of genes was preferentially expressed in aggressive mantle cell lymphoma compared to indolent small lymphocytic lymphoma. These analyses identified mantle cell lymphoma-specific genes that may be involved in the aggressive behavior of mantle cell lymphoma and possibly other aggressive human lymphomas. Interestingly, most of these differentially-expressed genes have not been identified using other techniques, highlighting the unique ability of suppression subtractive hybridization to identify potentially rare or low expression genes. PMID:21145576

  7. Immunomodulatory nonablative conditioning regimen for B-cell lymphoid malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Chinratanalab, Wichai; Reddy, Nishitha; Greer, John P.; Morgan, David; Engelhardt, Brian; Kassim, Adetola; Brandt, Stephen J.; Jagasia, Madan; Goodman, Stacey; Savani, Bipin N.

    2013-01-01

    Twenty-six patients with recurrent CD20+ B-cell lymphoid malignancies received fludarabine, cyclophosphamide, and rituximab–based nonablative conditioning followed by either matched related (n = 18) or unrelated (n = 8) donor allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) between March 2008 and May 2011. Median age of patients at transplantation was 59 years (range, 41–64 years). At diagnosis, 20 (77%) had stage IV disease; 23 (88%) received ≥3 regimens, 14 (54%) received ≥4 regimens, and 4 (15%) had earlier autologous-SCT. All patients had either chemosensitive or stable disease and nine (35%) were in complete remission before transplantation. At the time of analysis, 17 patients were alive with an estimated 2-year overall survival and progression-free survival rate of 63% and nonrelapse mortality of 25%. Grade II to IV acute graft-vs-host-disease occurred in 8 (31%) and chronic graft-vs-host-disease in 6 (23%) patients (extensive, n = 3). Causes of death include progressive disease in four, acute graft-vs-host-disease in two (both after receiving donor lymphocyte infusion for mixed chimerism with residual disease), infection in one, and other (e.g., substance abuse, leukoencephalopathy) in two. Six patients required rehospitalization within 100 days of SCT (mean = 10 days; range, 3–18 days). Our data support fludarabine, cyclophosphamide, and rituximab–based nonablative conditioning allo-SCT in CD20+ B-cell lymphoid malignancies and it is time to compare this regimen with an alternative reduced-intensity conditioning regimen in B-cell malignancies. PMID:22269114

  8. Clonal relationships in recurrent B-cell lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung Eun; Kang, So Young; Yoo, Hae Yong; Kim, Seok Jin; Kim, Won Seog; Ko, Young Hyeh

    2016-03-15

    Immunoglobulin (Ig) gene rearrangements remain largely unmodified during the clonal expansion of neoplastic cells. We investigated the clonal relationships between lymphoma components at diagnosis and at relapse by analyzing Ig gene rearrangements. A BIOMED-2 multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was performed in 27 patients using formalin-fixed paraffin embedded tissues, with subsequent cloning and sequencing of the amplified Ig genes in 17 patients. All 27 cases of primary and corresponding relapsed tumors showed monoclonal rearrangements of the Ig genes by BIOMED-2 PCR. Whereas IgVH or IgVK fragment lengths were identical in 8/27 pairs (30%), fragment lengths differed in 19/27 pairs (70%). In 17 cases analyzed by sequencing, an identical VDJ gene rearrangement was confirmed in 4/4 pairs (100%) with the same fragment lengths and in 10/13 pairs (77%) with different fragment lengths. Four of 17 primary lymphomas had multiple VDJ rearrangements, and three of them showed an unrelated relapse. Unrelated relapse was observed in 1/8 mantle cell lymphomas, 1/5 diffuse large B-cell lymphomas, and a large B cell lymphoma developed in a patient with a small lymphocytic lymphoma. Unrelated relapses developed after a longer disease-free interval and tended to show poorer outcome compared with related relapse. In summary, relapse of a lymphoma from an unrelated clone is uncommon, but can occur in B-cell lymphomas. Clonal relationships should be determined by sequencing of the Ig genes, and not just by comparing the PCR product size. PMID:26848863

  9. Mucosal immunoglobulins and B cells of Teleost fish

    PubMed Central

    Salinas, Irene; Zhang, Yong-An; Sunyer, J. Oriol

    2012-01-01

    As physical barriers that separate teleost fish from the external environment, mucosae are also active immunological sites that protect them against exposure to microbes and stressors. In mammals, the sites where antigens are sampled from mucosal surfaces and where stimulation of naive T and B lymphocytes occurs are known as inductive sites and are constituted by mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT). According to anatomical location, the MALT in teleost fish is subdivided into gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT), skin-associated lymphoid tissue (SALT), and gill-associated lymphoid tissue (GIALT). All MALT contain a variety of leukocytes, including, but not limited to, T cells, B cells, plasma cells, macrophages and granulocytes. Secretory immunoglobulins are produced mainly by plasmablasts and plasma cells, and play key roles in the maintenance of mucosal homeostasis. Until recently, teleost fish B cells were thought to express only two classes of immunoglobulins, IgM and IgD, in which IgM was thought to be the only one responding to pathogens both in systemic and mucosal compartments. However, a third teleost immunoglobulin class, IgT/IgZ, was discovered in 2005, and it has recently been shown to behave as the prevalent immunoglobulin in gut mucosal immune responses. The purpose of this review is to summarise the current knowledge of mucosal immunoglobulins and B cells of fish MALT. Moreover, we attempt to integrate the existing knowledge on both basic and applied research findings on fish mucosal immune responses, with the goal to provide new directions that may facilitate the development of novel vaccination strategies that stimulate not only systemic, but also mucosal immunity. PMID:22133710

  10. Translational Mini-Review Series on B Cell-Directed Therapies: Recent advances in B cell-directed biological therapies for autoimmune disorders

    PubMed Central

    Levesque, M C

    2009-01-01

    B cell-directed therapies are promising treatments for autoimmune disorders. Besides targeting CD20, newer B cell-directed therapies are in development that target other B cell surface molecules and differentiation factors. An increasing number of B cell-directed therapies are in development for the treatment of autoimmune disorders. Like rituximab, which is approved as a treatment for rheumatoid arthritis (RA), many of these newer agents deplete B cells or target pathways essential for B cell development and function; however, many questions remain about their optimal use in the clinic and about the role of B cells in disease pathogenesis. Other therapies besides rituximab that target CD20 are the furthest along in development. Besides targeting CD20, the newer B cell-directed therapies target CD22, CD19, CD40–CD40L, B cell activating factor belonging to the TNF family (BAFF) and A proliferation-inducing ligand (APRIL). Rituximab is being tested in an ever-increasing number of autoimmune disorders and clinical studies of rituximab combined with other biological therapies are being pursued for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). B cell-directed therapies are being tested in clinical trials for a variety of autoimmune disorders including RA, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), Sjögren's syndrome, vasculitis, multiple sclerosis (MS), Graves' disease, idiopathic thrombocytopenia (ITP), the inflammatory myopathies (dermatomyositis and polymyositis) and the blistering skin diseases pemphigus and bullous pemphigoid. Despite the plethora of clinical studies related to B cell-directed therapies and wealth of new information from these trials, much still remains to be discovered about the pathophysiological role of B cells in autoimmune disorders. PMID:19604259

  11. Impairment of Mature B Cell Maintenance upon Combined Deletion of the Alternative NF-κB Transcription Factors RELB and NF-κB2 in B Cells.

    PubMed

    De Silva, Nilushi S; Silva, Kathryn; Anderson, Michael M; Bhagat, Govind; Klein, Ulf

    2016-03-15

    BAFF is critical for the survival and maturation of mature B cells. BAFF, via BAFFR, activates multiple signaling pathways in B cells, including the alternative NF-κB pathway. The transcription factors RELB and NF-κB2 (p100/p52) are the downstream mediators of the alternative pathway; however, the B cell-intrinsic functions of these NF-κB subunits have not been studied in vivo using conditional alleles, either individually or in combination. We in this study report that B cell-specific deletion of relb led to only a slight decrease in the fraction of mature splenic B cells, whereas deletion of nfkb2 caused a marked reduction. This phenotype was further exacerbated upon combined deletion of relb and nfkb2 and most dramatically affected the maintenance of marginal zone B cells. BAFF stimulation, in contrast to CD40 activation, was unable to rescue relb/nfkb2-deleted B cells in vitro. RNA-sequencing analysis of BAFF-stimulated nfkb2-deleted versus normal B cells suggests that the alternative NF-κB pathway, in addition to its critical role in BAFF-mediated cell survival, may control the expression of genes involved in the positioning of B cells within the lymphoid microenvironment and in the establishment of T cell-B cell interactions. Thus, by ablating the downstream transcription factors of the alternative NF-κB pathway specifically in B cells, we identify in this study a critical role for the combined activity of the RELB and NF-κB2 subunits in B cell homeostasis that cannot be compensated for by the canonical NF-κB pathway under physiological conditions.

  12. Genetic lesions in diffuse large B-cell lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Testoni, M.; Zucca, E.; Young, K. H.; Bertoni, F.

    2015-01-01

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is the most common lymphoma in adults, accounting for 35%–40% of all cases. The combination of the anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody rituximab with anthracycline-based combination chemotherapy (R-CHOP, rituximab with cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine and prednisone) lead to complete remission in most and can cure more than half of patients with DLBCL. The diversity in clinical presentation, as well as the pathologic and biologic heterogeneity, suggests that DLBCL comprises several disease entities that might ultimately benefit from different therapeutic approaches. In this review, we summarize the current literature focusing on the genetic lesions identified in DLBCL. PMID:25605746

  13. Primary Malignant B-cell Lymphoma of the Epididymis

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Jungyo; Jeong, Hyeon; Kim, Young A.

    2015-01-01

    Primary epididymal lymphomas are very rare condition, only 6 case report was published. In 4 of them, initial presentation was non-tender, continuous growth of testis. It can be misdiagnosed with epididymitis, 5 of them was treated by antibiotics before surgery. One patients treated by surgery another 5 makes neoadjuvant therapy, 2 of radiotherapy 3 of chemotherapy. Only one man died after treatment. This case is about 54-year male patients, diagnosed by diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, who treated by surgery and neoadjuvant chemotherapy combined with radiotherapy. PMID:26793572

  14. The intestinal B-cell response in celiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Mesin, Luka; Sollid, Ludvig M.; Niro, Roberto Di

    2012-01-01

    The function of intestinal immunity is to provide protection toward pathogens while preserving the composition of the microflora and tolerance to orally fed nutrients. This is achieved via a number of tightly regulated mechanisms including production of IgA antibodies by intestinal plasma cells. Celiac disease is a common gut disorder caused by a dysfunctional immune regulation as signified, among other features, by a massive intestinal IgA autoantibody response. Here we review the current knowledge of this B-cell response and how it is induced, and we discuss key questions to be addressed in future research. PMID:23060888

  15. Hepatitis C virus - associated B cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Mihăilă, Romeo-Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) infected patients are prone to develop bone marrow or various tissue infiltrates with monoclonal B cells, monoclonal B lymphocytosis or different types of B cell non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (BCNHL), of which the most common are splenic marginal zone BCNHL, diffuse large BCNHL and follicular lymphoma. The association between chronic HCV infection and non Hodgkin’s lymphoma has been observed especially in areas with high prevalence of this viral infection. Outside the limitations of some studies that have been conducted, there are also geographic, environmental, and genetic factors that contribute to the epidemiological differences. Various microenvironmental signals, such as cytokines, viral antigenic external stimulation of lymphocyte receptors by HCV antigens, and intercellular interactions contribute to B cell proliferation. HCV lymphotropism and chronic antigenic stimulation are involved in B-lymphocyte expansion, as mixted cryoglobulinemia or monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance, which can progress to BCNHL. HCV replication in B lymphocytes has oncogenic effect mediated by intracellular HCV proteins. It is also involved in an important induction of reactive oxygen species that can lead to permanent B lymphocyte damage, as DNA mutations, after binding to surface B-cell receptors. Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder could appear and it has a multiclonal potentiality that may develop into different types of lymphomas. The hematopoietic stem cell transplant made for lymphoma in HCV-infected patients can increase the risk of earlier progression to liver fibrosis and cirrhosis. HCV infected patients with indolent BCNHL who receive antiviral therapy can be potentially cured. Viral clearance was related to lymphoma response, fact that highlights the probable involvement of HCV in lymphomagenesis. Direct acting antiviral drugs could be a solution for the patients who did not tolerate or respond to interferon, as they

  16. Hepatitis C virus - associated B cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Mihăilă, Romeo-Gabriel

    2016-07-21

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) infected patients are prone to develop bone marrow or various tissue infiltrates with monoclonal B cells, monoclonal B lymphocytosis or different types of B cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (BCNHL), of which the most common are splenic marginal zone BCNHL, diffuse large BCNHL and follicular lymphoma. The association between chronic HCV infection and non Hodgkin's lymphoma has been observed especially in areas with high prevalence of this viral infection. Outside the limitations of some studies that have been conducted, there are also geographic, environmental, and genetic factors that contribute to the epidemiological differences. Various microenvironmental signals, such as cytokines, viral antigenic external stimulation of lymphocyte receptors by HCV antigens, and intercellular interactions contribute to B cell proliferation. HCV lymphotropism and chronic antigenic stimulation are involved in B-lymphocyte expansion, as mixted cryoglobulinemia or monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance, which can progress to BCNHL. HCV replication in B lymphocytes has oncogenic effect mediated by intracellular HCV proteins. It is also involved in an important induction of reactive oxygen species that can lead to permanent B lymphocyte damage, as DNA mutations, after binding to surface B-cell receptors. Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder could appear and it has a multiclonal potentiality that may develop into different types of lymphomas. The hematopoietic stem cell transplant made for lymphoma in HCV-infected patients can increase the risk of earlier progression to liver fibrosis and cirrhosis. HCV infected patients with indolent BCNHL who receive antiviral therapy can be potentially cured. Viral clearance was related to lymphoma response, fact that highlights the probable involvement of HCV in lymphomagenesis. Direct acting antiviral drugs could be a solution for the patients who did not tolerate or respond to interferon, as they seem to

  17. Clinical presentation, evolution, and prognosis of precursor B-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma in trials LMT96, EORTC 58881, and EORTC 58951.

    PubMed

    Ducassou, Stéphane; Ferlay, Céline; Bergeron, Christophe; Girard, Sandrine; Laureys, Geneviève; Pacquement, Hélène; Plantaz, Dominique; Lutz, Patrick; Vannier, Jean-Pierre; Uyttebroeck, Anna; Bertrand, Yves

    2011-02-01

    In children, lymphoblastic lymphomas represent 30% of Non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL), and approximately 15% are precursor B-cell lymphomas (PBLL). Our study evaluated their main clinical characteristics, evolution, and prognosis in three trials. From 1989 to 2008, 53 children with PBLL (median age 7·75 years) were included in three protocols: Malignant Lymphoma Therapy (LMT) 96, European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) 58881, and EORTC 58951 using Berlin-Frankfürt-Münster-derived acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) therapy. There were 10 stage I disease, 9 stage II, 9 stage III and 25 stage IV. Clinical presentation was heterogeneous with a majority of bone lesions and cutaneous or subcutaneous manifestations. At diagnosis 23 patients had bone marrow involvement, and only three had central nervous system involvement. The median follow-up was 74 months. At last follow-up, 45 patients were in continuous complete remission, whereas eight had progressed or had relapsed (7 Stages IV and 1 Stage III) and died. Two patients had a secondary neoplasia, and are still alive. Disease stage was a major prognostic factor, with better overall survival (OS) and event-free survival (EFS) (P < 0·05) rates observed in patients with Stage I to III as compared to those with Stage IV. Treatment with protocols derived from ALL therapy are efficient with an 82% EFS and an 85% OS at 5 years. PMID:21210776

  18. Phase I study of the anti-CD74 monoclonal antibody milatuzumab (hLL1) in patients with previously treated B-cell lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Peter; Furman, Richard R.; Rutherford, Sarah; Ruan, Jia; Ely, Scott; Greenberg, June; Coleman, Morton; Goldsmith, Stanley J.; Leonard, John P.

    2016-01-01

    Milatuzumab (hLL1), a humanized anti-CD74 monoclonal antibody, has activity in preclinical NHL models. We conducted a phase 1 trial in previously treated B-cell malignancies. Dose escalation included 4 planned dose levels (1.5, 4, 6, and 8 mg/kg) with milatuzumab given twice weekly for 6 weeks. After dose level 1, the schedule was changed to daily (Monday-Friday) for 10 days. Twenty-two patients were treated. The most common possibly-related toxicities were infusion reaction, anemia, lymphopenia, neutropenia, and thrombocytopenia. Three patients experienced dose-limiting toxicity (neutropenia, neutropenia, rash) at dose levels 1, 2, and 4 respectively. Eight patients had stable disease, with no objective responses. The serum half-life of milatuzumab was ~2 hours. In 7 patients, In-111-imaging showed no clear evidence of tumor targeting. The short half-life may reflect CD74 rapid internalization and presence on extratumoral tissues; this antigen sink must be overcome to capitalize on the promising preclinical activity of the drug. PMID:25754579

  19. Hepatitis C virus upregulates B-cell receptor signaling: a novel mechanism for HCV-associated B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders

    PubMed Central

    Dai, B; Chen, A Y; Corkum, C P; Peroutka, R J; Landon, A; Houng, S; Muniandy, P A; Zhang, Y; Lehrmann, E; Mazan-Mamczarz, K; Steinhardt, J; Shlyak, M; Chen, Q C; Becker, K G; Livak, F; Michalak, T I; Talwani, R; Gartenhaus, R B

    2016-01-01

    B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling is essential for the development of B cells and has a critical role in B-cell neoplasia. Increasing evidence indicates an association between chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and B-cell lymphoma, however, the mechanisms by which HCV causes B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder are still unclear. Herein, we demonstrate the expression of HCV viral proteins in B cells of HCV-infected patients and show that HCV upregulates BCR signaling in human primary B cells. HCV nonstructural protein NS3/4A interacts with CHK2 and downregulates its activity, modulating HuR posttranscriptional regulation of a network of target mRNAs associated with B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders. Interestingly, the BCR signaling pathway was found to have the largest number of transcripts with increased association with HuR and was upregulated by NS3/4A. Our study reveals a previously unidentified role of NS3/4A in regulation of host BCR signaling during HCV infection, contributing to a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying HCV-associated B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders. PMID:26434584

  20. JCAR014 and Durvalumab in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-06

    Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Recurrent Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Mediastinal (Thymic) Large B-Cell Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Mediastinal (Thymic) Large B-Cell Cell Lymphoma

  1. R-ICE and Lenalidomide in Treating Patients With First-Relapse/Primary Refractory Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-13

    Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Mediastinal (Thymic) Large B-Cell Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Mediastinal (Thymic) Large B-Cell Cell Lymphoma; Transformed Recurrent Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

  2. Downregulation of FOXP1 is required during germinal center B-cell function

    PubMed Central

    Sagardoy, Ainara; Martinez-Ferrandis, Jose I.; Roa, Sergio; Bunting, Karen L.; Aznar, María Angela; Elemento, Olivier; Shaknovich, Rita; Fontán, Lorena; Fresquet, Vicente; Perez-Roger, Ignacio; Robles, Eloy F.; De Smedt, Linde; Sagaert, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    B-cell maturation and germinal center (GC) formation are dependent on the interplay between BCL6 and other transcriptional regulators. FOXP1 is a transcription factor that regulates early B-cell development, but whether it plays a role in mature B cells is unknown. Analysis of human tonsillar B-cell subpopulations revealed that FOXP1 shows the opposite expression pattern to BCL6, suggesting that FOXP1 regulates the transition from resting follicular B cell to activated GC B cell. Chromatin immunoprecipitation-on-chip and gene expression assays on B cells indicated that FOXP1 acts as a transcriptional activator and repressor of genes involved in the GC reaction, half of which are also BCL6 targets. To study FOXP1 function in vivo, we developed transgenic mice expressing human FOXP1 in lymphoid cells. These mice exhibited irregular formation of splenic GCs, showing a modest increase in naïve and marginal-zone B cells and a significant decrease in GC B cells. Furthermore, aberrant expression of FOXP1 impaired transcription of noncoding γ1 germline transcripts and inhibited efficient class switching to the immunoglobulin G1 isotype. These studies show that FOXP1 is physiologically downregulated in GC B cells and that aberrant expression of FOXP1 impairs mechanisms triggered by B-cell activation, potentially contributing to B-cell lymphomagenesis. PMID:23580662

  3. Lentiviral-mediated gene therapy restores B cell tolerance in Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome patients.

    PubMed

    Pala, Francesca; Morbach, Henner; Castiello, Maria Carmina; Schickel, Jean-Nicolas; Scaramuzza, Samantha; Chamberlain, Nicolas; Cassani, Barbara; Glauzy, Salome; Romberg, Neil; Candotti, Fabio; Aiuti, Alessandro; Bosticardo, Marita; Villa, Anna; Meffre, Eric

    2015-10-01

    Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) is an X-linked immunodeficiency characterized by microthrombocytopenia, eczema, and high susceptibility to developing tumors and autoimmunity. Recent evidence suggests that B cells may be key players in the pathogenesis of autoimmunity in WAS. Here, we assessed whether WAS protein deficiency (WASp deficiency) affects the establishment of B cell tolerance by testing the reactivity of recombinant antibodies isolated from single B cells from 4 WAS patients before and after gene therapy (GT). We found that pre-GT WASp-deficient B cells were hyperreactive to B cell receptor stimulation (BCR stimulation). This hyperreactivity correlated with decreased frequency of autoreactive new emigrant/transitional B cells exiting the BM, indicating that the BCR signaling threshold plays a major role in the regulation of central B cell tolerance. In contrast, mature naive B cells from WAS patients were enriched in self-reactive clones, revealing that peripheral B cell tolerance checkpoint dysfunction is associated with impaired suppressive function of WAS regulatory T cells. The introduction of functional WASp by GT corrected the alterations of both central and peripheral B cell tolerance checkpoints. We conclude that WASp plays an important role in the establishment and maintenance of B cell tolerance in humans and that restoration of WASp by GT is able to restore B cell tolerance in WAS patients. PMID:26368308

  4. B cell homeostasis and plasma cell homing controlled by Krüppel-like factor 2.

    PubMed

    Winkelmann, Rebecca; Sandrock, Lena; Porstner, Martina; Roth, Edith; Mathews, Martina; Hobeika, Elias; Reth, Michael; Kahn, Mark L; Schuh, Wolfgang; Jäck, Hans-Martin

    2011-01-11

    Krüppel-like factor 2 (KLF2) controls T lymphocyte egress from lymphoid organs by regulating sphingosin-1 phosphate receptor 1 (S1Pr1). Here we show that this is not the case for B cells. Instead, KLF2 controls homeostasis of B cells in peripheral lymphatic organs and homing of plasma cells to the bone marrow, presumably by controlling the expression of β(7)-integrin. In mice with a B cell-specific deletion of KLF2, S1Pr1 expression on B cells was only slightly affected. Accordingly, all splenic B cell subsets including B1 cells were present, but their numbers were increased with a clear bias for marginal zone (MZ) B cells. In contrast, fewer peyers patches harboring fewer B cells were found, and fewer B1 cells in the peritoneal cavity as well as recirculating B cells in the bone marrow were detected. Upon thymus-dependent immunization, IgG titers were diminished, and antigen-specific plasma cells were absent in the bone marrow, although numbers of antigen-specific splenic plasmablasts were normal. KLF2 plays also a role in determining the identity of follicular B cells, as KLF2-deficient follicular B cells showed calcium responses similar to those of MZ B cells and failed to down-regulate MZ B cell signature genes, such as CD21 and CXCR7. PMID:21187409

  5. B cells have distinct roles in host protection against different nematode parasites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    B cells may mediate protective responses against nematode parasites by supporting Th2 cell development and/or by producing antibodies. To examine this, B cell-deficient mice were inoculated with Nippostrongylus brasiliensis (Nb) or Heligmosomoides polygyrus (Hp). B cell-deficient and wild type (WT...

  6. Autoantigen-specific B-cell depletion overcomes failed immune tolerance in type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Henry, Rachel A; Kendall, Peggy L; Thomas, James W

    2012-08-01

    Eliminating autoantigen-specific B cells is an attractive alternative to global B-cell depletion for autoimmune disease treatment. To identify the potential for targeting a key autoimmune B-cell specificity in type 1 diabetes, insulin-binding B cells were tracked within a polyclonal repertoire using heavy chain B-cell receptor (BCR) transgenic (VH125Tg) mice. Insulin-specific B cells are rare in the periphery of nonautoimmune VH125Tg/C57BL/6 mice and WT/NOD autoimmune mice, whereas they clearly populate 1% of mature B-cell subsets in VH125Tg/NOD mice. Autoantigen upregulates CD86 in anti-insulin B cells, suggesting they are competent to interact with T cells. Endogenous insulin occupies anti-insulin BCR beginning with antigen commitment in bone marrow parenchyma, as identified by a second anti-insulin monoclonal antibody. Administration of this monoclonal antibody selectively eliminates insulin-reactive B cells in vivo and prevents disease in WT/NOD mice. Unexpectedly, developing B cells are less amenable to depletion, despite increased BCR sensitivity. These findings exemplify how a critical type 1 diabetes B-cell specificity escapes immune tolerance checkpoints. Disease liability is corrected by eliminating this B-cell specificity, providing proof of concept for a novel therapeutic approach for autoimmune disease. PMID:22698916

  7. Cerebrospinal fluid B cells from Multiple Sclerosis patients are subject to normal germinal center selection

    PubMed Central

    Harp, Christopher; Lee, Jane; Lambracht-Washington, Doris; Cameron, Elizabeth; Olsen, Gregory; Frohman, Elliot; Racke, Michael; Monson, Nancy

    2007-01-01

    Previous findings from our laboratory demonstrated that some clonally expanded cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) B cells from MS patients exhibit diminished mutation targeting patterns in comparison to typical B cells selected in the context of germinal centers (GCs). In order to determine whether the overall CSF B cell repertoires adhered to mutation patterns typical of GC-selected B cells, we analyzed the immunoglobulin repertoires from CSF B cells of 8 MS patients for mutation characteristics typical of GC-derived B cells. Mutation targeting was preserved. Thus, clonal expansion of some CSF B cells may occur independently of GC, but the CSF B cell pool is governed by typical GC selection. Interestingly, the heavy chain CDR3’s of CSF B cells from MS patients had a net acidic charge, similar to GC-derived B cells, but a tendency towards longer CDR3’s, consistent with autoreactive B cells. How these findings may support current hypotheses regarding the origin of CSF B cells is discussed. PMID:17169437

  8. Cerebrospinal fluid B cells from multiple sclerosis patients are subject to normal germinal center selection.

    PubMed

    Harp, Christopher; Lee, Jane; Lambracht-Washington, Doris; Cameron, Elizabeth; Olsen, Gregory; Frohman, Elliot; Racke, Michael; Monson, Nancy

    2007-02-01

    Previous findings from our laboratory demonstrated that some clonally expanded cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) B cells from MS patients exhibit diminished mutation targeting patterns in comparison to typical B cells selected in the context of germinal centers (GCs). In order to determine whether the overall CSF B cell repertoires adhered to mutation patterns typical of GC-selected B cells, we analyzed the immunoglobulin repertoires from CSF B cells of 8 MS patients for mutation characteristics typical of GC-derived B cells. Mutation targeting was preserved. Thus, clonal expansion of some CSF B cells may occur independently of GC, but the CSF B cell pool is governed by typical GC selection. Interestingly, the heavy chain CDR3's of CSF B cells from MS patients had a net acidic charge, similar to GC-derived B cells, but a tendency towards longer CDR3's, consistent with autoreactive B cells. How these findings may support current hypotheses regarding the origin of CSF B cells is discussed. PMID:17169437

  9. Girls, aggression, and emotion regulation.

    PubMed

    Conway, Anne M

    2005-04-01

    Many studies have demonstrated that boys are more aggressive than girls (see J. D. Coie & K. Dodge, 1997, for a review) and that emotion regulation difficulties are associated with problematic behaviors (N. Eisenberg & R. A. Fabes, 1999; M. Gilliom, D. S. Shaw, J. E. Beck, M. A. Schonberg, & J. L. Lukon, 2002). However, recent findings indicate that gender differences in aggressive behaviors disappear when assessments are broadened to include relational aggression--behaviors designed to harm the relationship goals of others by spreading rumors, gossiping, and eliciting peer rejection of others. Moreover, although difficulties regulating emotions have been reported for physically aggressive children, little research has examined these processes in relationally aggressive children. This article argues that investigation into the associations between emotion regulation and relational aggression is a critical direction for future research on the etiology and prevention of mental health problems in girls. PMID:15839769

  10. [The aggressive child (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Harbauer, H

    1978-08-01

    In children a "normal" aggressiveness should be distinguished from "hostile" and "inhibited" aggression; the latter usually become apparent as heteroaggressive or autoaggressive behaviour. Autoaggression is more common with younger children. Different hypotheses about the origin of aggressiveness are discussed. In the younger child nail biting, trichotillomania, rocking, an intensified phase of contrariness and enkopresis may have components of aggressiveness. In older children and adolescents dissocial forms of development, drug taking, attempted suicid, and anorexia nervosa may be parts of aggressive behaviour. Minimal brain dysfunction, autism, and postencephalitic syndromes predominate amongst organic alterations of the brain as causes for aggressive behaviour. Particularly the Lesch-Nyhan-syndrome, but equally the Cornelia de Lange-syndrome show autoaggressive tendencies.

  11. Malignant hematopoietic cell lines: in vitro models for the study of primary mediastinal B-cell lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Drexler, Hans G; Ehrentraut, Stefan; Nagel, Stefan; Eberth, Sonja; MacLeod, Roderick A F

    2015-01-01

    Primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma (PMBL) is a highly aggressive disease with a unique set of biological, clinical, morphological, immunological and in particular genetic features that in the molecular era of defining lymphomas clearly distinguishes it as a separate entity from other diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (DLBCL). A precise molecular diagnosis of PMBL can be achieved by gene expression profiling. The signature gene expression profile of PMBL is more closely related to classic Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL) than to other DLBCL subgroups. A number of common genetic aberrations in PMBL and cHL further underscore their close relationship. To investigate the pathobiology of lymphomas in depth, many groups have turned to cell lines that are suitable models facilitating molecular studies and providing unique insights. For the purposes of the current perspective, we focus on four bona fide PMBL-derived cell lines (FARAGE, KARPAS-1106, MEDB-1, U-2940) that we identified and validated as such through hierarchical cluster analysis among a large collection of leukemia-lymphoma cell lines. These gene expression profiles showed that the four PMBL cell lines represent a distinct entity and are most similar to cHL cell lines, confirming derivation from a related cell type. A validated cell line resource for PMBL should assist those seeking druggable targets in this entity. This review aims to provide a comprehensive overview of the currently available cellular models for the study of PMBL. PMID:25480038

  12. PEITC in End-Stage B-Cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia: Case Report of Possible Sensitization to Salvage R-CHOP

    PubMed Central

    Nachat, Arian; Turoff-Ortmeyer, Sam; Liu, Chunnan; McCulloch, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: B-cell prolymphocytic leukemia (B-PLL) is a rare, aggressive leukemia distinct from chronic lymphocytic leukemia, with median survival of only 3 years. B-PLL is resistant to most chemotherapy and newer targeted therapies such as alemtuzumab and thalidomide. Phenylethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC) is a natural compound from horseradish with evidence for therapeutic potential in multiple leukemia types. Case Presentation: Here we present a case report of a 53-year-old man whose chronic lymphocytic leukemia transformed to end-stage B-PLL, disqualifying him for allogenic stem cell transplantation. He was treated with PEITC followed by salvage R-CHOP (Rituximab, Cyclophosphamide, Hydroxydaunorubicin [doxorubicin hydrochloride], Oncovin [vincristine sulfate], Prednisone or Prednisolone) chemotherapy, which led to normalized white blood cell count and disease stabilization that requalified him for allogenic peripheral stem-cell transplant therapy. We conducted a systematic review to analyze and interpret the potential contribution of PEITC to his unexpectedly favorable R-CHOP response. Following sequential 8 weeks of PEITC/pentostatin and 6 cycles of R-CHOP, the patient received allogenic peripheral blood stem cell transplant on an outpatient basis and remains well at the time of this publication, with no evidence of CD20+ small B-cells. Discussion: Given the limited data for R-CHOP in B-PLL, this patient’s recovery suggests presensitization of B-PLL cells toward R-CHOP, potentially justifying further investigation. PMID:27168399

  13. Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma Classification System That Associates Normal B-Cell Subset Phenotypes With Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Dybkær, Karen; Bøgsted, Martin; Falgreen, Steffen; Bødker, Julie S.; Kjeldsen, Malene K.; Schmitz, Alexander; Bilgrau, Anders E.; Xu-Monette, Zijun Y.; Li, Ling; Bergkvist, Kim S.; Laursen, Maria B.; Rodrigo-Domingo, Maria; Marques, Sara C.; Rasmussen, Sophie B.; Nyegaard, Mette; Gaihede, Michael; Møller, Michael B.; Samworth, Richard J.; Shah, Rajen D.; Johansen, Preben; El-Galaly, Tarec C.; Young, Ken H.; Johnsen, Hans E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Current diagnostic tests for diffuse large B-cell lymphoma use the updated WHO criteria based on biologic, morphologic, and clinical heterogeneity. We propose a refined classification system based on subset-specific B-cell–associated gene signatures (BAGS) in the normal B-cell hierarchy, hypothesizing that it can provide new biologic insight and diagnostic and prognostic value. Patients and Methods We combined fluorescence-activated cell sorting, gene expression profiling, and statistical modeling to generate BAGS for naive, centrocyte, centroblast, memory, and plasmablast B cells from normal human tonsils. The impact of BAGS-assigned subtyping was analyzed using five clinical cohorts (treated with cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone [CHOP], n = 270; treated with rituximab plus CHOP [R-CHOP], n = 869) gathered across geographic regions, time eras, and sampling methods. The analysis estimated subtype frequencies and drug-specific resistance and included a prognostic meta-analysis of patients treated with first-line R-CHOP therapy. Results Similar BAGS subtype frequencies were assigned across 1,139 samples from five different cohorts. Among R-CHOP–treated patients, BAGS assignment was significantly associated with overall survival and progression-free survival within the germinal center B-cell–like subclass; the centrocyte subtype had a superior prognosis compared with the centroblast subtype. In agreement with the observed therapeutic outcome, centrocyte subtypes were estimated as being less resistant than the centroblast subtype to doxorubicin and vincristine. The centroblast subtype had a complex genotype, whereas the centrocyte subtype had high TP53 mutation and insertion/deletion frequencies and expressed LMO2, CD58, and stromal-1–signature and major histocompatibility complex class II–signature genes, which are known to have a positive impact on prognosis. Conclusion Further development of a diagnostic platform using

  14. Modulation of B-cell receptor and microenvironment signaling by a guanine exchange factor in B-cell malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Wei; Sharma, Sanjai

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) cells over-express a guanine exchange factor (GEF), Rasgrf-1. This GEF increases active Ras as it catalyzes the removal of GDP from Ras so that GTP can bind and activate Ras. This study aims to study the mechanism of action of Rasgrf-1 in B-cell malignancies. Methods: N-terminus truncated Rasgrf-1 variants have a higher GEF activity as compared to the full-length transcript therefore a MCL cell line with stable over-expression of truncated Rasgrf-1 was established. The B-cell receptor (BCR) and chemokine signaling pathways were compared in the Rasgrf-1 over-expressing and a control transfected cell line. Results: Cells over-expressing truncated form of Rasgrf-1 have a higher proliferative rate as compared to control transfected cells. BCR was activated by lower concentrations of anti-IgM antibody in Rasgrf-1 over-expressing cells as compared to control cells indicating that these cells are more sensitive to BCR signaling. BCR signaling also phosphorylates Rasgrf-1 that further increases its GEF function and amplifies BCR signaling. This activation of Rasgrf-1 in over-expressing cells resulted in a higher expression of phospho-ERK, AKT, BTK and PKC-alpha as compared to control cells. Besides BCR, Rasgrf-1 over-expressing cells were also more sensitive to microenvironment stimuli as determined by resistance to apoptosis, chemotaxis and ERK pathway activation. Conclusions: This GEF protein sensitizes B-cells to BCR and chemokine mediated signaling and also upregulates a number of other signaling pathways which promotes growth and survival of these cells. PMID:27458535

  15. Microbial Cryptotopes are Prominent Targets of B-cell Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Rieder, Franz J. J.; Biebl, Julia; Kastner, Marie-Theres; Schneider, Martina; Jungbauer, Christof; Redlberger-Fritz, Monika; Britt, William J.; Kundi, Michael; Steininger, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    B-cell recognition of microbial antigens may be limited by masking of epitopes within three-dimensional structures (cryptotopes). Here we report that unmasking of cryptotopes by unfolding whole cytomegalovirus (CMV) antigen preparations with the chaotropic reagent Urea and probing with immune sera from healthy individuals (n = 109) increased ELISA signals by 36% in comparison to folded CMV antigens (P < 0.001). ELISA signals increased also significantly upon unfolding of S. aureus or E. coli antigens, whereas unfolded influenza H1N1 or respiratory syncitial virus antigens yielded reduced or unchanged reactivity in comparison to folded ones, respectively. Blocking of CMV cryptotope-specific Abs by incubation of an immunoglobuline preparation and three sera with unfolded CMV antigens enhanced clearly the neutralizing capacity of this immunoglobuline preparation against CMV infection. Thus, B-cell immunity frequently targets cryptotopes on CMV but these Abs are non-neutralizing, may reduce the neutralizing effectiveness of pathogen-specific Abs, and increase during immune maturation following primary CMV infection. The observation of functional consequences of Abs specific for cryptotopes may open whole new avenues to a better understanding of the humoral immune response to CMV and development of more effective vaccines and immunoglobuline preparations. PMID:27539094

  16. Identifying Novel B Cell Epitopes within Toxoplasma gondii GRA6

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yanhua; Wang, Guangxiang; Cai, Jian Ping

    2016-01-01

    The study of antigenic epitopes from Toxoplasma gondii has not only enhanced our understanding of the structure and function of antigens, the reactions between antigens and antibodies, and many other aspects of immunology, but it also plays a significant role in the development of new diagnostic reagents and vaccines. In the present study, T. gondii GRA6 epitopes were identified using bioinformatics tools and a synthetic peptide technique. The potential B cell epitopes of GRA6 predicted by bioinformatics tools concentrated upon 3 regions of GRA6, 1-20 aa, 44-103 aa, and 172-221 aa. Ten shorter peptides from the 3 regions were synthesized and assessed by ELISA using pig sera from different time points after infection. Three of the 10 peptides (amino acids 44-63, 172-191, and 192-211) tested were recognized by all sera and determined to be immunodominant B-cell epitopes of GRA6. The results indicated that we precisely and accurately located the T. gondii GRA6 epitopes using pig sera collected at different time points after infection. The identified epitopes may be very useful for further studies of epitope-based vaccines and diagnostic reagents. PMID:27658594

  17. Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma with Extensive Cutaneous Relapse

    PubMed Central

    Malkan, Umit Yavuz; Gunes, Gursel; Yayar, Okan; Demiroglu, Haluk

    2015-01-01

    Herein, we aimed to report a diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) case that had extensive cutaneous relapse with no skin involvement previously. A 59-year-old man presented to hospital in April 2014 with fatigue, anorexia, fever, and anemia. Cervical lymph node biopsy revealed CD20+, BCL2+, MUM1+, BCL6+ high grade B lymphoproliferative neoplasm. After FISH investigation, he was diagnosed as DLBCL. He was given 7 cycles of R-CHOP and achieved remission. However, in November 2014, he had emerging skin lesions that cover nearly all of his body. A control PET-CT revealed diffuse cutaneous involvement. CD20+, BCL2+, MUM1+, BCL6+ high grade B cell lymphoma infiltration was detected with skin biopsy. He was diagnosed as relapse lymphoma, so 2 cycles of R-DHAP were given. There was no treatment response; therefore, R-ICE regimen was started. The patient had achieved second complete remission and his skin lesions were completely regressed. The involvement of skin with CD20+ cells after 7 cycles of rituximab therapy favors that there is a rituximab resistant disease which tends to involve the skin. To conclude, DLBCL may relapse extensively with cutaneous involvement and the best treatment option in these patients is salvage chemotherapy followed by autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation. PMID:26457084

  18. Microbial Cryptotopes are Prominent Targets of B-cell Immunity.

    PubMed

    Rieder, Franz J J; Biebl, Julia; Kastner, Marie-Theres; Schneider, Martina; Jungbauer, Christof; Redlberger-Fritz, Monika; Britt, William J; Kundi, Michael; Steininger, Christoph

    2016-08-19

    B-cell recognition of microbial antigens may be limited by masking of epitopes within three-dimensional structures (cryptotopes). Here we report that unmasking of cryptotopes by unfolding whole cytomegalovirus (CMV) antigen preparations with the chaotropic reagent Urea and probing with immune sera from healthy individuals (n = 109) increased ELISA signals by 36% in comparison to folded CMV antigens (P < 0.001). ELISA signals increased also significantly upon unfolding of S. aureus or E. coli antigens, whereas unfolded influenza H1N1 or respiratory syncitial virus antigens yielded reduced or unchanged reactivity in comparison to folded ones, respectively. Blocking of CMV cryptotope-specific Abs by incubation of an immunoglobuline preparation and three sera with unfolded CMV antigens enhanced clearly the neutralizing capacity of this immunoglobuline preparation against CMV infection. Thus, B-cell immunity frequently targets cryptotopes on CMV but these Abs are non-neutralizing, may reduce the neutralizing effectiveness of pathogen-specific Abs, and increase during immune maturation following primary CMV infection. The observation of functional consequences of Abs specific for cryptotopes may open whole new avenues to a better understanding of the humoral immune response to CMV and development of more effective vaccines and immunoglobuline preparations.

  19. Microbial Cryptotopes are Prominent Targets of B-cell Immunity.

    PubMed

    Rieder, Franz J J; Biebl, Julia; Kastner, Marie-Theres; Schneider, Martina; Jungbauer, Christof; Redlberger-Fritz, Monika; Britt, William J; Kundi, Michael; Steininger, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    B-cell recognition of microbial antigens may be limited by masking of epitopes within three-dimensional structures (cryptotopes). Here we report that unmasking of cryptotopes by unfolding whole cytomegalovirus (CMV) antigen preparations with the chaotropic reagent Urea and probing with immune sera from healthy individuals (n = 109) increased ELISA signals by 36% in comparison to folded CMV antigens (P < 0.001). ELISA signals increased also significantly upon unfolding of S. aureus or E. coli antigens, whereas unfolded influenza H1N1 or respiratory syncitial virus antigens yielded reduced or unchanged reactivity in comparison to folded ones, respectively. Blocking of CMV cryptotope-specific Abs by incubation of an immunoglobuline preparation and three sera with unfolded CMV antigens enhanced clearly the neutralizing capacity of this immunoglobuline preparation against CMV infection. Thus, B-cell immunity frequently targets cryptotopes on CMV but these Abs are non-neutralizing, may reduce the neutralizing effectiveness of pathogen-specific Abs, and increase during immune maturation following primary CMV infection. The observation of functional consequences of Abs specific for cryptotopes may open whole new avenues to a better understanding of the humoral immune response to CMV and development of more effective vaccines and immunoglobuline preparations. PMID:27539094

  20. Gaucher disease and comorbidities: B-cell malignancy and parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Cox, Timothy M; Rosenbloom, Barry E; Barker, Roger A

    2015-07-01

    Data emerging from the International Collaborative Gaucher Group (ICGG) Gaucher Registry together with other contemporary clinical surveys have revealed a close association between Gaucher disease and non-Hodgkin's B-cell lymphoma and myeloma and Gaucher disease and Parkinson's disease. Several possible explanations for increased B-cell proliferation and neoplasia in Gaucher disease have been proposed, including the possible influence of sphingosine (derived from the extra lysosomal metabolism of glucosylceramide), gene modifiers, splenectomy and immune system deregulation induced by cytokines, chemokines, and hydrolases released from Gaucher cells. Parkinson's disease is frequently seen in the otherwise-healthy relatives of Gaucher disease patients leading to the finding that GBA mutations represent a genetic risk factor for Parkinson's disease. The mechanism of the association between GBA mutations and Parkinson's disease has yet to be elucidated but the pathogenesis appears distinct from that of Gaucher disease. Several pathogenic pathways have been proposed including lysosomal and/or mitochondrial dysfunction. The effect of Gaucher disease specific therapies on the incidence of cancer or Parkinson's disease are not clear and will likely be evaluated in future ICGG Gaucher Registry studies. PMID:26096744

  1. Identifying Novel B Cell Epitopes within Toxoplasma gondii GRA6.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanhua; Wang, Guangxiang; Cai, Jian Ping

    2016-08-01

    The study of antigenic epitopes from Toxoplasma gondii has not only enhanced our understanding of the structure and function of antigens, the reactions between antigens and antibodies, and many other aspects of immunology, but it also plays a significant role in the development of new diagnostic reagents and vaccines. In the present study, T. gondii GRA6 epitopes were identified using bioinformatics tools and a synthetic peptide technique. The potential B cell epitopes of GRA6 predicted by bioinformatics tools concentrated upon 3 regions of GRA6, 1-20 aa, 44-103 aa, and 172-221 aa. Ten shorter peptides from the 3 regions were synthesized and assessed by ELISA using pig sera from different time points after infection. Three of the 10 peptides (amino acids 44-63, 172-191, and 192-211) tested were recognized by all sera and determined to be immunodominant B-cell epitopes of GRA6. The results indicated that we precisely and accurately located the T. gondii GRA6 epitopes using pig sera collected at different time points after infection. The identified epitopes may be very useful for further studies of epitope-based vaccines and diagnostic reagents. PMID:27658594

  2. Quantifying evolutionary constraints on B-cell affinity maturation

    PubMed Central

    McCoy, Connor O.; Bedford, Trevor; Minin, Vladimir N.; Bradley, Philip; Robins, Harlan; Matsen, Frederick A.

    2015-01-01

    The antibody repertoire of each individual is continuously updated by the evolutionary process of B-cell receptor (BCR) mutation and selection. It has recently become possible to gain detailed information concerning this process through high-throughput sequencing. Here, we develop modern statistical molecular evolution methods for the analysis of B-cell sequence data, and then apply them to a very deep short-read dataset of BCRs. We find that the substitution process is conserved across individuals but varies significantly across gene segments. We investigate selection on BCRs using a novel method that side-steps the difficulties encountered by previous work in differentiating between selection and motif-driven mutation; this is done through stochastic mapping and empirical Bayes estimators that compare the evolution of in-frame and out-of-frame rearrangements. We use this new method to derive a per-residue map of selection, which provides a more nuanced view of the constraints on framework and variable regions. PMID:26194758

  3. Aggressive fibromatosis of anterior maxilla

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Devi C; Urs, Aadithya B; Ahuja, Puneet; Sikka, Seema

    2011-01-01

    Aggressive fibromatosis is a comparitively rare tumor with unpredictable growth and varying local recurrence rates. It does not develop distant metastases but locally it shows an aggressive and infiltrative behavior. Clinically, aggressive fibromatosis manifests as a painless, firm, often rapidly enlarging mass, fixed to underlying bone or soft tissue. It is never encapsulated. Histologically, it is rich in collagen and fibroblastic cells that are devoid of hyperchromatic or atypical nuclei, but with more variable cellularity in different tumor sections. PMID:21731285

  4. Dysfunctional B-cell activation in cirrhosis due to hepatitis C infection associated with disappearance of CD27+ B-cell population

    PubMed Central

    Doi, Hiroyoshi; Iyer, Tara K.; Carpenter, Erica; Li, Hong; Chang, Kyong-Mi; Vonderheide, Robert H.; Kaplan, David E.

    2011-01-01

    Background Chronic hepatitis C virus infection is a leading cause of cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Both advanced solid tumors and hepatitis C have previously been associated with memory B-cell dysfunction. In this study we sought to dissect the impact of viral infection, cirrhosis and liver cancer on memory B-cell frequency and function in the spectrum of HCV disease. Methods Peripheral blood from healthy donors, HCV-infected patients with F1–F2 liver fibrosis, HCV-infected patients with cirrhosis, patients with HCV-related hepatocellular carcinoma and non-HCV-infected cirrhotics were assessed for B-cell phenotype by flow cytometry. Isolated B-cells were stimulated with anti-CD40 antibodies and TLR9 agonist for assessment of costimulation marker expression, cytokine production, immunoglobulin production and CD4+ T-cell allostimulatory capacity. Results CD27+ memory B-cells, and more specifically CD27+IgM+ B-cells, were markedly less frequent in cirrhotic patients independent of HCV infection. Circulating B-cells in cirrhotics were hyporesponsive to CD40/TLR9 activation as characterized by CD70 upregulation, TNFβ secretion, IgG production and T-cell allostimulation. Lastly, blockade of TLR4 and TLR9 signaling abrogated the activation of normal donor B-cells by cirrhotic plasma suggesting a role for bacterial translocation in driving B-cell changes in cirrhosis. Conclusion Profound abnormalities in B-cell phenotype and function occur in cirrhosis independent of hepatitis C viral infection. These B-cell defects may explain in part the vaccine hyporesponsiveness and susceptibility to bacterial infection in this population. PMID:21932384

  5. Characterization of Regulatory B Cells in Graves' Disease and Hashimoto's Thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, Birte; Hegedüs, Laszlo; Lundy, Steven K; Brimnes, Marie K; Smith, Terry J; Nielsen, Claus H

    2015-01-01

    A hallmark of regulatory B cells is IL-10 production, hence their designation as IL-10+ B cells. Little is known about the ability of self-antigens to induce IL-10+ B cells in Graves' disease (GD), Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT), or other autoimmune disease. Here we pulsed purified B cells from 12 HT patients, 12 GD patients, and 12 healthy donors with the thyroid self-antigen, thyroglobulin (TG) and added the B cells back to the remaining peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). This procedure induced IL-10+ B-cell differentiation in GD. A similar tendency was observed in healthy donors, but not in cells from patients with HT. In GD, B cells primed with TG induced IL-10-producing CD4+ T cells. To assess the maximal frequency of inducible IL-10+ B cells in the three donor groups PBMCs were stimulated with PMA/ionomycin. The resulting IL-10+ B-cell frequency was similar in the three groups and correlated with free T3 levels in GD patients. IL-10+ B cells from both patient groups displayed CD25 or TIM-1 more frequently than did those from healthy donors. B-cell expression of two surface marker combinations previously associated with regulatory B-cell functions, CD24hiCD38hi and CD27+CD43+, did not differ between patients and healthy donors. In conclusion, our findings indicate that autoimmune thyroiditis is not associated with reduced frequency of IL-10+ B cells. These results do not rule out regulatory B-cell dysfunction, however. The observed phenotypic differences between IL-10+ B cells from patients and healthy donors are discussed.

  6. A role for TLR signaling during B cell activation in antiretroviral-treated HIV individuals.

    PubMed

    Siewe, Basile; Keshavarzian, Ali; French, Audrey; Demarais, Patricia; Landay, Alan

    2013-10-01

    The mechanisms underlying B cell activation that persists during antiretroviral therapy (ART) are unknown. Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling is a critical mediator of innate cell activation and though B cells express TLRs, few studies have investigated a role for TLR signaling in B cell activation during HIV infection. We addressed this question by assessing the activated phenotype and TLR expression/responsiveness of B cells from ART-treated HIV-infected subjects (HIVART(+)). We evaluated activation markers implicated in B cell-mediated T cell trans infection during HIV pathogenesis. We found no significant difference in TLR expression between B cells of HIVART(+) and HIV(-) subjects. However, B cells of HIVART(+) subjects exhibited heightened endogenous expression levels of IL-6 (p=0.0051), T cell cognate ligands CD40 (p=0.0475), CD54 (p=0.0229), and phosphorylated p38 (p<0.0001), a marker of TLR signaling. In vitro, B cells of HIVART(+) individuals were less responsive to TLR stimulation compared to B cells of HIV(-) subjects. The activated phenotype of in vitro TLR-stimulated B cells of HIV(-) subjects was similar to ex vivo B cells from HIVART(+) individuals. TLR2 stimulation was a potent mediator of B cell activation, whereas B cells were least responsive to TLR4 stimulation. Compared to HIV(-) subjects, the serum level of lipoteichoic acid (TLR2 ligand) in HIVART(+) subjects was significantly higher (p=0.0207), correlating positively with viral load (p=0.0127, r=0.6453). Our data suggest that during HIV infection TLR-activated B cells may exert a pathogenic role and B cells from HIVART(+) subjects respond to in vitro TLR stimulation, yet exhibit a TLR tolerant phenotype suggesting prior in vivo TLR stimulation. PMID:23763346

  7. A Role for TLR Signaling During B Cell Activation in Antiretroviral-Treated HIV Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Keshavarzian, Ali; French, Audrey; Demarais, Patricia; Landay, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The mechanisms underlying B cell activation that persists during antiretroviral therapy (ART) are unknown. Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling is a critical mediator of innate cell activation and though B cells express TLRs, few studies have investigated a role for TLR signaling in B cell activation during HIV infection. We addressed this question by assessing the activated phenotype and TLR expression/responsiveness of B cells from ART-treated HIV-infected subjects (HIVART+). We evaluated activation markers implicated in B cell-mediated T cell trans infection during HIV pathogenesis. We found no significant difference in TLR expression between B cells of HIVART+ and HIV− subjects. However, B cells of HIVART+ subjects exhibited heightened endogenous expression levels of IL-6 (p=0.0051), T cell cognate ligands CD40 (p=0.0475), CD54 (p=0.0229), and phosphorylated p38 (p<0.0001), a marker of TLR signaling. In vitro, B cells of HIVART+ individuals were less responsive to TLR stimulation compared to B cells of HIV− subjects. The activated phenotype of in vitro TLR-stimulated B cells of HIV− subjects was similar to ex vivo B cells from HIVART+ individuals. TLR2 stimulation was a potent mediator of B cell activation, whereas B cells were least responsive to TLR4 stimulation. Compared to HIV− subjects, the serum level of lipoteichoic acid (TLR2 ligand) in HIVART+ subjects was significantly higher (p=0.0207), correlating positively with viral load (p=0.0127, r=0.6453). Our data suggest that during HIV infection TLR-activated B cells may exert a pathogenic role and B cells from HIVART+ subjects respond to in vitro TLR stimulation, yet exhibit a TLR tolerant phenotype suggesting prior in vivo TLR stimulation. PMID:23763346

  8. Activation-induced necroptosis contributes to B-cell lymphopenia in active systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Fan, H; Liu, F; Dong, G; Ren, D; Xu, Y; Dou, J; Wang, T; Sun, L; Hou, Y

    2014-01-01

    B-cell abnormality including excessive activation and lymphopenia is a central feature of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Although activation threshold, auto-reaction and death of B cells can be affected by intrinsical and/or external signaling, the underlying mechanisms are unclear. Herein, we demonstrate that co-activation of Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7) and B-cell receptor (BCR) pathways is a core event for the survival/dead states of B cells in SLE. We found that the mortalities of CD19+CD27- and CD19+IgM+ B-cell subsets were increased in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of SLE patients. The gene microarray analysis of CD19+ B cells from active SLE patients showed that the differentially expressed genes were closely correlated to TLR7, BCR, apoptosis, necroptosis and immune pathways. We also found that co-activation of TLR7 and BCR could trigger normal B cells to take on SLE-like B-cell characters including the elevated viability, activation and proliferation in the first 3 days and necroptosis in the later days. Moreover, the necroptotic B cells exhibited mitochondrial dysfunction and hypoxia, along with the elevated expression of necroptosis-related genes, consistent with that in both SLE B-cell microarray and real-time PCR verification. Expectedly, pretreatment with the receptor-interacting protein kinase 1 (RIPK1) inhibitor Necrostatin-1, and not the apoptosis inhibitor zVAD, suppressed B-cell death. Importantly, B cells from additional SLE patients also significantly displayed high expression levels of necroptosis-related genes compared with those from healthy donors. These data indicate that co-activation of TLR7 and BCR pathways can promote B cells to hyperactivation and ultimately necroptosis. Our finding provides a new explanation on B-cell lymphopenia in active SLE patients. These data suggest that extrinsic factors may increase the intrinsical abnormality of B cells in SLE patients. PMID:25210799

  9. Evaluation of Bone Mineral Density in Children with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) and Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma (NHL): Chemotherapy with/without Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Ghassemi, Ali; Banihashem, Abdollah; Ghaemi, Nosrate; Elmi, Saghi; Erfani Sayyar, Reza; Elmi, Sam; Esmaeili, Habibollah

    2016-01-01

    Background: Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) are the most common malignancies in children and adolescents. Therapies such as corticosteroids, cytotoxic and radiotherapy will have harmful effect on bone mineral density (BMD) which can lead to increased possibility of osteoporosis and pathological fractures. Subjects and methods: This 3-year cross-sectional study was performed in 50 children with ALL (n=25) and NHL (n=25) at Dr. Sheikh Children's Hospital in Mashhad. Half the patients received chemotherapy alone (n=25), while the other half received chemotherapy plus radiotherapy (n=25). We assessed them in the remission phase by DEXA bone mineral densitometry at the lumbar spine and femoral neck (hip). The survey results were adjusted in accordance with age, height, sex and Body Mass Index. Results : The mean age was 3.93± 8.28 years. There was no significant difference in bone biomarkers (Ca, P, ALP, PTH) among ALL, NHL and also the two treatment groups. Children with ALL had lower density at the hip and lumbar spine (p-value<0.001 and p-value=0.018, respectively). Among the total of 50 patients, 3 patients had normal results for detected hip BMD (6%), while 14 (28%) had osteopenia and 33 had osteoporosis (66%). Only one patient had normal BMD among all the patients who received chemotherapy plus radiotherapy, whereas 2 patients had normal BMD with just chemotherapy treatment. Conclusion : Given that 94% of our patients had abnormal bone density, it seems to be crucial to pay more attention to the metabolic status and BMD in children with cancer. PMID:27489591

  10. Gammaherpesvirus targets peritoneal B-1 B cells for long-term latency.

    PubMed

    Rekow, Michaela M; Darrah, Eric J; Mboko, Wadzanai P; Lange, Philip T; Tarakanova, Vera L

    2016-05-01

    Gammaherpesviruses establish life-long infection in most adults and are associated with the development of B cell lymphomas. While the interaction between gammaherpesviruses and splenic B cells has been explored, very little is known about gammaherpesvirus infection of B-1 B cells, innate-like B cells that primarily reside in body cavities. This study demonstrates that B-1 B cells harbor the highest frequency of latently infected cells in the peritoneum throughout chronic infection, highlighting a previously unappreciated feature of gammaherpesvirus biology.

  11. Rethinking Aggression: A Typological Examination of the Functions of Aggression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Little, Todd D.; Brauner, Jessica; Jones, Stephanie M.; Nock, Matthew K.; Hawley, Patricia H.

    2003-01-01

    Compared five subgroups of aggressive children and adolescents on several adjustment correlates. Found that the reactive group and the group high on both instrumental and reactive reasons for aggression showed consistent maladaptive patterns across the adjustment correlates. The instrumental and typical groups (moderate on instrumental and…

  12. Essential role of MALT1 protease activity in activated B cell-like diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Hailfinger, Stephan; Lenz, Georg; Ngo, Vu; Posvitz-Fejfar, Anita; Rebeaud, Fabien; Guzzardi, Montserrat; Penas, Eva-Maria Murga; Dierlamm, Judith; Chan, Wing C.; Staudt, Louis M.; Thome, Margot

    2009-01-01

    A key element for the development of suitable anti-cancer drugs is the identification of cancer-specific enzymatic activities that can be therapeutically targeted. Mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue transformation protein 1 (MALT1) is a proto-oncogene that contributes to tumorigenesis in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) of the activated B-cell (ABC) subtype, the least curable subtype of DLBCL. Recent data suggest that MALT1 has proteolytic activity, but it is unknown whether this activity is relevant for tumor growth. Here we report that MALT1 is constitutively active in DLBCL lines of the ABC but not the GCB subtype. Inhibition of the MALT1 proteolytic activity led to reduced expression of growth factors and apoptosis inhibitors, and specifically affected the growth and survival of ABC DLBCL lines. These results demonstrate a key role for the proteolytic activity of MALT1 in DLBCL of the ABC subtype, and provide a rationale for the development of pharmacological inhibitors of MALT1 in DLBCL therapy. PMID:19897720

  13. Increased BCR responsiveness in B cells from patients with chronic GVHD

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Jessica L.; Tata, Prasanthi V.; Fore, Matthew S.; Wooten, Jenna; Rudra, Sharmistha; Deal, Allison M.; Sharf, Andrew; Hoffert, Todd; Roehrs, Philip A.; Shea, Thomas C.; Serody, Jonathan S.; Richards, Kristy L.; Jagasia, Madan; Lee, Stephanie J.; Rizzieri, David; Horwitz, Mitchell E.; Chao, Nelson J.

    2014-01-01

    Although B cells have emerged as important contributors to chronic graft-versus-host-disease (cGVHD) pathogenesis, the mechanisms responsible for their sustained activation remain unknown. We previously showed that patients with cGVHD have significantly increased B cell–activating factor (BAFF) levels and that their B cells are activated and resistant to apoptosis. Exogenous BAFF confers a state of immediate responsiveness to antigen stimulation in normal murine B cells. To address this in cGVHD, we studied B-cell receptor (BCR) responsiveness in 48 patients who were >1 year out from allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). We found that B cells from cGVHD patients had significantly increased proliferative responses to BCR stimulation along with elevated basal levels of the proximal BCR signaling components B cell linker protein (BLNK) and Syk. After initiation of BCR signaling, cGVHD B cells exhibited increased BLNK and Syk phosphorylation compared with B cells from patients without cGVHD. Blocking Syk kinase activity prevented relative post-HSCT BCR hyper-responsiveness of cGVHD B cells. These data suggest that a lowered BCR signaling threshold in cGVHD associates with increased B-cell proliferation and activation in response to antigen. We reveal a mechanism underpinning aberrant B-cell activation in cGVHD and suggest that therapeutic inhibition of the involved kinases may benefit these patients. PMID:24532806

  14. Cannabinoid receptor 2 positions and retains marginal zone B cells within the splenic marginal zone

    PubMed Central

    Muppidi, Jagan R.; Arnon, Tal I.; Bronevetsky, Yelena; Veerapen, Natacha; Tanaka, Masato; Besra, Gurdyal S.

    2011-01-01

    Specialized B cells residing in the splenic marginal zone (MZ) continuously survey the blood for antigens and are important for immunity to systemic infections. However, the cues that uniquely attract cells to the MZ have not been defined. Previous work demonstrated that mice deficient in cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2) have decreased numbers of MZ B cells but it has been unclear whether CB2 regulates MZ B cell development or positioning. We show that MZ B cells are highly responsive to the CB2 ligand 2-arachidonylglycerol (2-AG) and that CB2 antagonism rapidly displaces small numbers of MZ B cells to the blood. Antagonism for longer durations depletes MZ B cells from the spleen. In mice deficient in sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor function, CB2 antagonism causes MZ B cell displacement into follicles. Moreover, CB2 overexpression is sufficient to position B cells to the splenic MZ. These findings establish a role for CB2 in guiding B cells to the MZ and in preventing their loss to the blood. As a consequence of their MZ B cell deficiency, CB2-deficient mice have reduced numbers of CD1d-high B cells. We show that CB2 deficiency results in diminished humoral responses to a CD1d-restricted systemic antigen. PMID:21875957

  15. Nodal marginal zone B cells in mice: a novel subset with dormant self-reactivity

    PubMed Central

    Palm, Anna-Karin E.; Friedrich, Heike C.; Kleinau, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Marginal zone (MZ) B cells, representing a distinct subset of innate-like B cells, mount rapid T-independent responses to blood-borne antigens. They express low-affinity polyreactive antigen receptors that recognize both foreign and self-structures. The spleen is considered the exclusive site for murine MZ B cells. However, we have here identified B cells with a MZ B-cell phenotype in the subcapsular sinuses of mouse lymph nodes. The nodal MZ (nMZ) B cells display high levels of IgM, costimulators and TLRs, and are represented by naïve and memory cells. The frequency of nMZ B cells is about 1–6% of nodal B cells depending on mouse strain, with higher numbers in older mice and a trend of increased numbers in females. There is a significant expansion of nMZ B cells following immunization with an autoantigen, but not after likewise immunization with a control protein or with the adjuvant alone. The nMZ B cells secrete autoantibodies upon activation and can efficiently present autoantigen to cognate T cells in vitro, inducing T-cell proliferation. The existence of self-reactive MZ B cells in lymph nodes may be a source of autoantigen-presenting cells that in an unfortunate environment may activate T cells leading to autoimmunity. PMID:27277419

  16. A role for intrathymic B cells in the generation of natural regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Walters, Stacey N; Webster, Kylie E; Daley, Stephen; Grey, Shane T

    2014-07-01

    B cells inhabit the normal human thymus, suggesting a role in T cell selection. In this study, we report that B cells can modulate thymic production of CD4+ Foxp3+ T cells (regulatory T cells [Tregs]). Mice with transgenic expression of BAFF (BAFF-Tg) harbor increased numbers of Helios+ Foxp3+ thymic Tregs and, similar to some human autoimmune conditions, also exhibit increased numbers of B cells colonizing the thymus. Distinct intrathymic B cell subpopulations were identified, namely B220+, IgM+, CD23(hi), CD21(int) cells; B220+, IgM+, CD23(lo), CD21(lo) cells; and a population of B220+, IgM+, CD23(lo), CD21(hi) cells. Anatomically, CD19+ B cells accumulated in the thymic medulla region juxtaposed to Foxp3+ T cells. These intrathymic B cells engender Tregs. Indeed, thymic Treg development was diminished in both B cell-deficient BAFF-Tg chimeras, but also B cell-deficient wild-type chimeras. B cell Ag capture and presentation are critical in vivo events for Treg development. In the absence of B cell surface MHC class II expression, thymic expansion of BAFF-Tg Tregs was lost. Further to this, expansion of Tregs did not occur in BAFF-Tg/Ig hen egg lysozyme BCR chimeras, demonstrating a requirement for Ag specificity. Thus, we present a mechanism whereby intrathymic B cells, through the provision of cognate help, contribute to the shaping of the Treg repertoire.

  17. Marginal Zone B Cells in Neonatal Rats Express Intermediate Levels of CD90 (Thy-1)

    PubMed Central

    Dammers, Peter M.; Lodewijk, Monique E.; Zandvoort, André; Kroese, Frans G. M.

    2002-01-01

    Here we show that marginal zone (MZ)-B cells in rats can already be detected in neonatal spleen from two days after birth. At this time point, morphologically distinct MZs are not present yet and the vast majority of B cells in spleen are located in a concentric area surrounding the T cell zones (PALS). Before MZs are obviously detectable in spleen (14 days after birth), MZ-B cells seem to be enriched at the outer zones of the concentric B cell areas. Similar to adult rats, neonatal MZ-B cells are intermediate-sized cells that express high levels of surface (s)IgM and HIS57 antigen, and low levels of sIgD and CD45R (HIS24). We show here, however, that in contrast to adult MZ-B cells, MZ-B cells (and also recirculating follicular (RF)-B cells) in neonatal rats express higher levels of CD90 (Thy-1). In adult rats, expression of CD90 on the B cell lineage is confined to immature B cells. We speculate that the expression of CD90 on neonatal MZ-B cells may have implications for their responsiveness to polysaccharide (T cell-independent type 2) antigens. PMID:15144015

  18. The actin-bundling protein L-plastin is essential for marginal zone B cell development

    PubMed Central

    Todd, Elizabeth M.; Deady, Lauren E.; Morley, Sharon Celeste

    2011-01-01

    B cell development is exquisitely sensitive to location within specialized niches in the bone marrow and spleen. Location within these niches is carefully orchestrated through chemotactic and adhesive cues. Here we demonstrate the requirement for the actin-bundling protein L-plastin (LPL) in B cell motility towards the chemokines CXCL12 and CXCL13 and the lipid chemoattractant sphingosine-1-phosphate, which guide normal B cell development. Impaired motility of B cells in LPL−/− mice correlated with diminished splenic maturation of B cells, with a moderate (40%) loss of follicular B cells and a profound (>80%) loss of marginal zone B cells. Entry of LPL−/− B cells into the lymph nodes and bone marrow of mice was also impaired. Furthermore, LPL was required for the integrin-mediated enhancement of transwell migration but was dispensable for integrin-mediated lymphocyte adhesion. These results suggest that LPL may participate in signaling that enables lymphocyte transmigration. In support of this hypothesis, the phosphorylation of Pyk-2, a tyrosine kinase that integrates chemotactic and adhesive cues, is diminshed in LPL−/− B cells stimulated with chemokine. Finally, a well-characterized role of marginal zone B cells is the generation of a rapid humoral response to polysaccharide antigens. LPL−/− mice exhibited a defective antibody response to Streptococcus pneumoniae, indicating a functional consequence of defective MZ B cell development in LPL−/− mice. PMID:21832165

  19. Translational Mini-Review Series on B cell subsets in disease. Reconstitution after haematopoietic stem cell transplantation – revelation of B cell developmental pathways and lineage phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Bemark, M; Holmqvist, J; Abrahamsson, J; Mellgren, K

    2012-01-01

    OTHER ARTICLES PUBLISHED IN THIS MINI-REVIEW SERIES ON B CELL SUBSETS IN DISEASE B cells in multiple sclerosis: drivers of disease pathogenesis and Trojan horse for Epstein—Barr virus entry to the central nervous system? Clinical and Experimental Immunology 2012, 167: 1–6. Transitional B cells in systemic lupus erythematosus and Sjögren's syndrome: clinical implications and effects of B cell-targeted therapies. Clinical and Experimental Immunology 2012, 167: 7–14. Haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is an immunological treatment that has been used for more than 40 years to cure a variety of diseases. The procedure is associated with serious side effects, due to the severe impairment of the immune system induced by the treatment. After a conditioning regimen with high-dose chemotherapy, sometimes in combination with total body irradiation, haematopoietic stem cells are transferred from a donor, allowing a donor-derived blood system to form. Here, we discuss the current knowledge of humoral problems and B cell development after HSCT, and relate these to the current understanding of human peripheral B cell development. We describe how these studies have aided the identification of subsets of transitional B cells and also a robust memory B cell phenotype. PMID:22132880

  20. Expression of sprouty2 inhibits B-cell proliferation and is epigenetically silenced in mouse and human B-cell lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Matthew J.; Dawson, David W.; Bensinger, Steven J.; Hong, Jason S.; Knosp, Wendy M.; Xu, Lizhong; Balatoni, Cynthia E.; Allen, Eric L.; Shen, Rhine R.; Bar-Sagi, Dafna; Martin, Gail R.

    2009-01-01

    B-cell lymphoma is the most common immune system malignancy. TCL1 transgenic mice (TCL1-tg), in which TCL1 is ectopically expressed in mature lymphocytes, develop multiple B- and T-cell leukemia and lymphoma subtypes, supporting an oncogenic role for TCL1 that probably involves AKT and MAPK-ERK signaling pathway augmentation. Additional, largely unknown genetic and epigenetic alterations cooperate with TCL1 during lymphoma progression. We examined DNA methylation patterns in TCL1-tg B-cell tumors to discover tumor-associated epigenetic changes, and identified hypermethylation of sprouty2 (Spry2). Sprouty proteins are context-dependent negative or positive regulators of MAPK-ERK pathway signaling, but their role(s) in B-cell physiology or pathology are unknown. Here we show that repression of Spry2 expression in TCL1-tg mouse and human B-cell lymphomas and cell lines is associated with dense DNA hypermethylation and was reversed by inhibition of DNA methylation. Spry2 expression was induced in normal splenic B cells by CD40/B-cell receptor costimulation and regulated a negative feedback loop that repressed MAPK-ERK signaling and decreased B-cell viability. Conversely, loss of Spry2 function hyperactivated MAPK-ERK signaling and caused increased B-cell proliferation. Combined, these results implicate epigenetic silencing of Spry2 expression in B lymphoma progression and suggest it as a companion lesion to ectopic TCL1 expression in enhancing MAPK-ERK pathway signaling. PMID:19147787

  1. B cells from aged mice exhibit reduced apoptosis upon B-cell antigen receptor stimulation and differential ability to up-regulate survival signals.

    PubMed

    Montes, C L; Maletto, B A; Acosta Rodriguez, E V; Gruppi, A; Pistoresi-Palencia, M C

    2006-01-01

    During ageing, autoimmune disorders and the higher susceptibility to infectious have been associated with alterations in the humoral immune response. We report that splenic B lymphocytes from aged mice exhibit lower level of apoptosis induced by B-cell antigen receptor (BCR) ligation in vitro. Respect to B cells from young mice the anti-mu stimulated aged B cells show similar Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL expression but differential kinetic of A1 degradation and a higher level of cFLIP and FAIM. Even though B cells from aged mice show minor Fas expression they exhibit the same susceptibility to anti-Fas induced apoptosis. Aged B cells also present upon BCR stimulation, a higher proliferative response and similar level of activation markers expression than B cells from young mice. These data agree with the observation that aged mice exhibit an increment of T2 and mature B cell subset which rapidly enters cell cycle upon BCR engagement. The diminished apoptosis after activation in aged mice could compromise homeostatic mechanism allowing the persistence of self and non-self antigen specific B cells.

  2. Early B-cell-specific inactivation of ATM synergizes with ectopic CyclinD1 expression to promote pre-germinal center B-cell lymphomas in mice.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, K; Lee, B J; Li, C; Dubois, R L; Hobeika, E; Bhagat, G; Zha, S

    2015-06-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) kinase is a master regulator of the DNA damage response. ATM is frequently inactivated in human B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas, including ~50% of mantle cell lymphomas (MCLs) characterized by ectopic expression of CyclinD1. Here we report that early and robust deletion of ATM in precursor/progenitor B cells causes cell autonomous, clonal mature B-cell lymphomas of both pre- and post-germinal center (GC) origins. Unexpectedly, naive B-cell-specific deletion of ATM is not sufficient to induce lymphomas in mice, highlighting the important tumor suppressor function of ATM in immature B cells. Although EμCyclinD1 is not sufficient to induce lymphomas, EμCyclinD1 accelerates the kinetics and increases the incidence of clonal lymphomas in ATM-deficient B-cells and skews the lymphomas toward pre-GC-derived small lymphocytic neoplasms, sharing morphological features of human MCL. This is in part due to CyclinD1-driven expansion of ATM-deficient naive B cells with genomic instability, which promotes the deletions of additional tumor suppressor genes (i.e. Trp53, Mll2, Rb1 and Cdkn2a). Together these findings define a synergistic function of ATM and CyclinD1 in pre-GC B-cell proliferation and lymphomagenesis and provide a prototypic animal model to study the pathogenesis of human MCL. PMID:25676421

  3. Immunotherapy with the trifunctional anti-CD20 x anti-CD3 antibody FBTA05 (Lymphomun) in paediatric high-risk patients with recurrent CD20-positive B cell malignancies.

    PubMed

    Schuster, Friedhelm R; Stanglmaier, Michael; Woessmann, Wilhelm; Winkler, Beate; Siepermann, Meinolf; Meisel, Roland; Schlegel, Paul G; Hess, Jürgen; Lindhofer, Horst; Borkhardt, Arndt; Buhmann, Raymund

    2015-04-01

    Children with B cell malignancies refractory to standard therapy are known to have a poor prognosis and very limited treatment options. Here, we report on the treatment and follow-up of ten patients diagnosed with relapsed or refractory mature B-cell Non Hodgkin Lymphoma (B-NHL), Burkitt leukaemia (B-AL) or pre B-acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (pre B-ALL). All children were treated with FBTA05 (now designated Lymphomun), an anti-CD3 x anti-CD20 trifunctional bispecific antibody (trAb) in compassionate use. Within individual treatment schedules, Lymphomun was applied (a) after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT, n = 6) to induce sustained long-term remission, or (b) stand alone prior to subsequent chemotherapy to eradicate residual disease before allo-SCT (n = 4). Nine of ten children displayed a clinical response: three stable diseases (SD), one partial remission (PR) and five induced or sustained complete remissions (CR). Five of these nine responders died during follow-up. The other patients still maintain CR with a current overall survival of 874-1424 days (median: 1150 days). In conclusion, despite the dismal clinical prognosis of children refractory to standard therapy, immunotherapy with Lymphomun resulted in a favourable clinical outcome in this cohort of refractory paediatric patients. PMID:25495919

  4. Intravascular Large B-Cell Lymphoma: A Difficult Diagnostic Challenge.

    PubMed

    Khan, Maria S; McCubbin, Mark; Nand, Sucha

    2014-01-01

    Case Presentation. A 69-year-old Hispanic male, with a past history of diabetes and coronary disease, was admitted for fever, diarrhea, and confusion of 4 weeks duration. Physical examination showed a disoriented patient with multiple ecchymoses, possible ascites, and bilateral scrotal swelling. Hemoglobin was 6.7, prothrombin time (PT) 21.4 seconds with international normalized ratio 2.1, partial thromboplastin time (PTT) 55.6 seconds, fibrin split 10 µg/L, and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) 1231 IU/L. Except for a positive DNA test for Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection, extensive diagnostic workup for infections, malignancy, or a neurological cause was negative. Mixing studies revealed a nonspecific inhibitor of PT and PTT but Factor VIII levels were normal. The patient was empirically treated with antibiotics but developed hypotension and died on day 27 of admission. At autopsy, patient was found to have intravascular diffuse large B-cell lymphoma involving skin, testes, lung, and muscles. The malignant cells were positive for CD20, CD791, Mum-1, and Pax-5 and negative for CD3, CD5, CD10, CD30, and Bcl-6. The malignant cells were 100% positive for Ki-67. Discussion. Intravascular large cell B-cell lymphoma (IVLBCL) is rare form of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and tends to proliferate within small blood vessels, particularly capillaries and postcapillary venules. The cause of its affinity for vascular bed remains unknown. In many reports, IVLBCL was associated with HIV, HHV8, and EBV infections. The fact that our case showed evidence of EBV infection lends support to the association of this diagnosis to viral illness. The available literature on this subject is scant, and in many cases, the diagnosis was made only at autopsy. The typical presentation of this disorder is with B symptoms, progressive neurologic deficits, and skin findings. Bone marrow, spleen, and liver are involved in a minority of patients. Nearly all patients have elevated LDH, and about 65% are