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Sample records for aggressive brain tumours

  1. Melanotic neuroectodermal tumour of infancy: a rare brain tumour of childhood.

    PubMed

    Khan, Muhammad Babar; Soares, Delvene; Tahir, Muhammad Zubair; Kumar, Rajesh; Minhas, Khurram; Bari, Muhammad Ehsan

    2013-05-01

    Melanotic neuroectodermal tumour of infancy is a rare, mostly benign but locally aggressive tumour of neural crest cell origin occurring in infants. The most commonly affected anatomic site is the maxilla. Such tumours of the brain and skull are very rare. We present the case of an 8 months old baby girl whose presenting complaint was a swelling in the scalp for 6 months. She was otherwise asymptomatic. CT imaging confirmed the presence of an osteolytic tumour in the anterior parasagittal skull with dural involvement. The tumour was surgically excised enbloc. The patient has been well at 2 years follow-up without any evidence of recurrence.

  2. Traumatic Brain Injury and Aggression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Laurence

    1994-01-01

    Persons who have suffered traumatic injury to the brain may subsequently display aggressive behavior. Three main syndromes of aggression following traumatic brain injury are described: (1) episodic dyscontrol; (2) frontal lobe disinhibition; and (3) exacerbation of premorbid antisociality. The neuropsychological substrates of these syndromes are…

  3. Calcifying Epithelial Odontogenic Tumour of the Mandible: An Unusually Aggressive Presentation of an Indolent Tumour

    PubMed Central

    Dev, DP Arul; Michael, Manoj Joseph; Akhilesh, AV; Das, Bindu

    2016-01-01

    Calcifying Epithelial Odontogenic Tumour (CEOT) or Pindborg tumour is a rare odontogenic tumour of epithelial origin. They constitute less than 1% of odontogenic tumours. Intra-ossseous variant of CEOT are more common compared to extra-osseous variant. Although benign, these can exhibit deceptively aggressive presentation. Here we report a rare case of CEOT in a 36-year-old female patient who presented with aggressive intra-osseous lesion with cortical breach and exuberant soft tissue proliferation. The lesion was treated with resection and reconstructed with titanium reconstruction plate. PMID:27790590

  4. Primary brain tumours in adults.

    PubMed

    Ricard, Damien; Idbaih, Ahmed; Ducray, François; Lahutte, Marion; Hoang-Xuan, Khê; Delattre, Jean-Yves

    2012-05-26

    Important advances have been made in the understanding and management of adult gliomas and primary CNS lymphomas--the two most common primary brain tumours. Progress in imaging has led to a better analysis of the nature and grade of these tumours. Findings from large phase 3 studies have yielded some standard treatments for gliomas, and have confirmed the prognostic value of specific molecular alterations. High-throughput methods that enable genome-wide analysis of tumours have improved the knowledge of tumour biology, which should lead to a better classification of gliomas and pave the way for so-called targeted therapy trials. Primary CNS lymphomas are a group of rare non-Hodgkin lymphomas. High-dose methotrexate-based regimens increase survival, but the standards of care and the place of whole-brain radiotherapy remain unclear, and are likely to depend on the age of the patient. The focus now is on the development of new polychemotherapy regimens to reduce or defer whole-brain radiotherapy and its delayed complications.

  5. Imaging biomarkers of brain tumour margin and tumour invasion.

    PubMed

    Price, S J; Gillard, J H

    2011-12-01

    Invasion of tumour cells into the normal brain is one of the major reasons of treatment failure for gliomas. Although there is a good understanding of the molecular and cellular processes that occur during this invasion, it is not possible to detect the extent of the tumour with conventional imaging. However, there is an understanding that the degree of invasion differs with individual tumours, and yet they are all treated the same. Newer imaging techniques that probe the pathological changes within tumours may be suitable biomarkers for invasion. Imaging methods are now available that can detect subtle changes in white matter organisation (diffusion tensor imaging), tumour metabolism and cellular proliferation (using MR spectroscopy and positron emission tomography) occurring in regions of tumour that cannot be detected by conventional imaging. The role of such biomarkers of invasion should allow better delineation of tumour margins, which should improve treatment planning (especially surgery and radiotherapy) and provide information on the invasiveness of an individual tumour to help select the most appropriate therapy and help stratify patients for clinical trials.

  6. Phase congruency map driven brain tumour segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szilágyi, Tünde; Brady, Michael; Berényi, Ervin

    2015-03-01

    Computer Aided Diagnostic (CAD) systems are already of proven value in healthcare, especially for surgical planning, nevertheless much remains to be done. Gliomas are the most common brain tumours (70%) in adults, with a survival time of just 2-3 months if detected at WHO grades III or higher. Such tumours are extremely variable, necessitating multi-modal Magnetic Resonance Images (MRI). The use of Gadolinium-based contrast agents is only relevant at later stages of the disease where it highlights the enhancing rim of the tumour. Currently, there is no single accepted method that can be used as a reference. There are three main challenges with such images: to decide whether there is tumour present and is so localize it; to construct a mask that separates healthy and diseased tissue; and to differentiate between the tumour core and the surrounding oedema. This paper presents two contributions. First, we develop tumour seed selection based on multiscale multi-modal texture feature vectors. Second, we develop a method based on a local phase congruency based feature map to drive level-set segmentation. The segmentations achieved with our method are more accurate than previously presented methods, particularly for challenging low grade tumours.

  7. Guiding intracortical brain tumour cells to an extracortical cytotoxic hydrogel using aligned polymeric nanofibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Anjana; Betancur, Martha; Patel, Gaurangkumar D.; Valmikinathan, Chandra M.; Mukhatyar, Vivek J.; Vakharia, Ajit; Pai, S. Balakrishna; Brahma, Barunashish; MacDonald, Tobey J.; Bellamkonda, Ravi V.

    2014-03-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme is an aggressive, invasive brain tumour with a poor survival rate. Available treatments are ineffective and some tumours remain inoperable because of their size or location. The tumours are known to invade and migrate along white matter tracts and blood vessels. Here, we exploit this characteristic of glioblastoma multiforme by engineering aligned polycaprolactone (PCL)-based nanofibres for tumour cells to invade and, hence, guide cells away from the primary tumour site to an extracortical location. This extracortial sink is a cyclopamine drug-conjugated, collagen-based hydrogel. When aligned PCL-nanofibre films in a PCL/polyurethane carrier conduit were inserted in the vicinity of an intracortical human U87MG glioblastoma xenograft, a significant number of human glioblastoma cells migrated along the aligned nanofibre films and underwent apoptosis in the extracortical hydrogel. Tumour volume in the brain was significantly lower following insertion of aligned nanofibre implants compared with the application of smooth fibres or no implants.

  8. Neuropsychological Differences between Survivors of Supratentorial and Infratentorial Brain Tumours

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patel, S. K.; Mullins, W. A.; O'Neil, S. H.; Wilson, K.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the relationship between brain tumour location and core areas of cognitive and behavioural functioning for paediatric brain tumour survivors. The extant literature both supports and refutes an association between paediatric brain tumour location and neurocognitive outcomes. We examined…

  9. Neuroblastoma patient-derived orthotopic xenografts reflect the microenvironmental hallmarks of aggressive patient tumours.

    PubMed

    Braekeveldt, Noémie; Wigerup, Caroline; Tadeo, Irene; Beckman, Siv; Sandén, Caroline; Jönsson, Jimmie; Erjefält, Jonas S; Berbegall, Ana P; Börjesson, Anna; Backman, Torbjörn; Øra, Ingrid; Navarro, Samuel; Noguera, Rosa; Gisselsson, David; Påhlman, Sven; Bexell, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    Treatment of high-risk childhood neuroblastoma is a clinical challenge which has been hampered by a lack of reliable neuroblastoma mouse models for preclinical drug testing. We have previously established invasive and metastasising patient-derived orthotopic xenografts (PDXs) from high-risk neuroblastomas that retained the genotypes and phenotypes of patient tumours. Given the important role of the tumour microenvironment in tumour progression, metastasis, and treatment responses, here we analysed the tumour microenvironment of five neuroblastoma PDXs in detail. The PDXs resembled their parent tumours and retained important stromal hallmarks of aggressive lesions including rich blood and lymphatic vascularisation, pericyte coverage, high numbers of cancer-associated fibroblasts, tumour-associated macrophages, and extracellular matrix components. Patient-derived tumour endothelial cells occasionally formed blood vessels in PDXs; however, tumour stroma was, overall, of murine origin. Lymphoid cells and lymphatic endothelial cells were found in athymic nude mice but not in NSG mice; thus, the choice of mouse strain dictates tumour microenvironmental components. The murine tumour microenvironment of orthotopic neuroblastoma PDXs reflects important hallmarks of aggressive and metastatic clinical neuroblastomas. Neuroblastoma PDXs are clinically relevant models for preclinical drug testing.

  10. Canine brain tumours: a model for the human disease?

    PubMed

    Hicks, J; Platt, S; Kent, M; Haley, A

    2017-03-01

    Canine brain tumours are becoming established as naturally occurring models of disease to advance diagnostic and therapeutic understanding successfully. The size and structure of the dog's brain, histopathology and molecular characteristics of canine brain tumours, as well as the presence of an intact immune system, all support the potential success of this model. The limited success of current therapeutic regimens such as surgery and radiation for dogs with intracranial tumours means that there can be tremendous mutual benefit from collaboration with our human counterparts resulting in the development of new treatments. The similarities and differences between the canine and human diseases are described in this article, emphasizing both the importance and limitations of canines in brain tumour research. Recent clinical veterinary therapeutic trials are also described to demonstrate the areas of research in which canines have already been utilized and to highlight the important potential benefits of translational research to companion dogs.

  11. Cellular and cordless telephones and the risk for brain tumours.

    PubMed

    Hardell, L; Hallquist, A; Mild, K Hansson; Carlberg, M; Påhlson, A; Lilja, A

    2002-08-01

    Microwave exposure from the use of cellular telephones has been discussed in recent years as a potential risk factor for brain tumours. We included in a case-control study 1617 patients aged 20-80 years of both sexes with brain tumour diagnosed between 1 January 1997 and 30 June 2000. They were alive at the study time and had histopathologically verified brain tumour. One matched control to each case was selected from the Swedish Population Register. The study area was the Uppsala-Orebro, Stockholm, Linköping and Göteborg medical regions of Sweden. Exposure was assessed by a questionnaire that was answered by 1429 (88%) cases and 1470 (91%) controls. In total, use of analogue cellular telephones gave an increased risk with an odds ratio (OR) of 1.3 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.02-1.6). With a tumour induction period of >10 years the risk increased further: OR 1.8 (95% CI 1.1-2.9). No clear association was found for digital or cordless telephones. With regard to the anatomical area of the tumour and exposure to microwaves, the risk was increased for tumours located in the temporal area on the same side of the brain that was used during phone calls; for analogue cellular telephones the OR was 2.5 (95% CI 1.3-4.9). Use of a telephone on the opposite side of the brain was not associated with an increased risk for brain tumours. With regard to different tumour types, the highest risk was for acoustic neurinoma (OR 3.5, 95% CI 1.8-6.8) among analogue cellular telephone users.

  12. Combined radiotherapy and chemotherapy for high-grade brain tumours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barazzuol, Lara

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common primary brain tumour in adults and among the most aggressive of all tumours. For several decades, the standard care of GBM was surgical resection followed by radiotherapy alone. In 2005, a landmark phase III clinical trial coordinated by the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) and the National Cancer Institute of Canada (NCIC) demonstrated the benefit of radiotherapy with concomitant and adjuvant temozolomide (TMZ) chemotherapy. With TMZ, the median life expectancy in optimally managed patients is still only 12-14 months, with only 25% surviving 24 months. There is an urgent need for new therapies in particular in those patients whose tumour has an unmethylated methylguanine methyltransferase gene (MGMT) promoter, which is a predictive factor of benefit from TMZ. In this dissertation, the nature of the interaction between TMZ and radiation is investigated using both a mathematical model, based on in vivo population statistics of survival, and in vitro experimentation on a panel of human GBM cell lines. The results show that TMZ has an additive effect in vitro and that the population-based model may be insufficient in predicting TMZ response. The combination of TMZ with particle therapy is also investigated. Very little preclinical data exists on the effects of charged particles on GBM cell lines as well as on the concomitant application of chemotherapy. In this study, human GBM cells are exposed to 3 MeV protons and 6 MeV alpha particles in concomitance with TMZ. The results suggest that the radiation quality does not affect the nature of the interaction between TMZ and radiation, showing reproducible additive cytotoxicity. Since TMZ and radiation cause DNA damage in cancer cells, there has been increased attention to the use of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors. PARP is a family of enzymes that play a key role in the repair of DNA breaks. In this study, a novel PARP inhibitor, ABT-888

  13. Residential Radon and Brain Tumour Incidence in a Danish Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Bräuner, Elvira V.; Andersen, Zorana J.; Andersen, Claus E.; Pedersen, Camilla; Gravesen, Peter; Ulbak, Kaare; Hertel, Ole; Loft, Steffen; Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole

    2013-01-01

    Background Increased brain tumour incidence over recent decades may reflect improved diagnostic methods and clinical practice, but remain unexplained. Although estimated doses are low a relationship between radon and brain tumours may exist. Objective To investigate the long-term effect of exposure to residential radon on the risk of primary brain tumour in a prospective Danish cohort. Methods During 1993–1997 we recruited 57,053 persons. We followed each cohort member for cancer occurrence from enrolment until 31 December 2009, identifying 121 primary brain tumour cases. We traced residential addresses from 1 January 1971 until 31 December 2009 and calculated radon concentrations at each address using information from central databases regarding geology and house construction. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate incidence rate-ratios (IRR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the risk of primary brain tumours associated with residential radon exposure with adjustment for age, sex, occupation, fruit and vegetable consumption and traffic-related air pollution. Effect modification by air pollution was assessed. Results Median estimated radon was 40.5 Bq/m3. The adjusted IRR for primary brain tumour associated with each 100 Bq/m3 increment in average residential radon levels was 1.96 (95% CI: 1.07; 3.58) and this was exposure-dependently higher over the four radon exposure quartiles. This association was not modified by air pollution. Conclusions We found significant associations and exposure-response patterns between long-term residential radon exposure radon in a general population and risk of primary brain tumours, adding new knowledge to this field. This finding could be chance and needs to be challenged in future studies. PMID:24066143

  14. Epstein-Barr virus-associated smooth muscle tumour presenting as a parasagittal brain tumour.

    PubMed

    Ibebuike, K E; Pather, S; Emereole, O; Ndolo, P; Kajee, A; Gopal, R; Naidoo, S

    2012-11-01

    Dural-based brain tumours, apart from meningiomas, are rare. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated smooth muscle tumor (SMT) is a documented but rare disease that occurs in immunocompromized patients. These tumours may be located at unusual sites including the brain. We present a 37-year-old patient, positive for the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), who was admitted after generalized tonic-clonic seizures. MRI and CT scan revealed a dural-based brain tumour, intraoperatively thought to be a meningioma, but with an eventual histological diagnosis of EBV-SMT. Clinically the patient was well postoperatively with a Glasgow coma scale score of 15/15 and no focal neurologic deficit. This case confirms the association between EBV and SMT in patients with HIV/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). It also highlights the need to include EBV-SMT in the differential diagnosis of intracranial mass lesions in patients with HIV/AIDS.

  15. Reducing proactive aggression through non-invasive brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Dambacher, Franziska; Schuhmann, Teresa; Lobbestael, Jill; Arntz, Arnoud; Brugman, Suzanne; Sack, Alexander T

    2015-10-01

    Aggressive behavior poses a threat to human collaboration and social safety. It is of utmost importance to identify the functional mechanisms underlying aggression and to develop potential interventions capable of reducing dysfunctional aggressive behavior already at a brain level. We here experimentally shifted fronto-cortical asymmetry to manipulate the underlying motivational emotional states in both male and female participants while assessing the behavioral effects on proactive and reactive aggression. Thirty-two healthy volunteers received either anodal transcranial direct current stimulation to increase neural activity within right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, or sham stimulation. Aggressive behavior was measured with the Taylor Aggression Paradigm. We revealed a general gender effect, showing that men displayed more behavioral aggression than women. After the induction of right fronto-hemispheric dominance, proactive aggression was reduced in men. This study demonstrates that non-invasive brain stimulation can reduce aggression in men. This is a relevant and promising step to better understand how cortical brain states connect to impulsive actions and to examine the causal role of the prefrontal cortex in aggression. Ultimately, such findings could help to examine whether the brain can be a direct target for potential supportive interventions in clinical settings dealing with overly aggressive patients and/or violent offenders.

  16. A novel brain tumour model in zebrafish reveals the role of YAP activation in MAPK- and PI3K-induced malignant growth

    PubMed Central

    Mayrhofer, Marie; Gourain, Victor; Reischl, Markus; Affaticati, Pierre; Jenett, Arnim; Joly, Jean-Stephane; Benelli, Matteo; Demichelis, Francesca; Poliani, Pietro Luigi; Sieger, Dirk

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Somatic mutations activating MAPK and PI3K signalling play a pivotal role in both tumours and brain developmental disorders. We developed a zebrafish model of brain tumours based on somatic expression of oncogenes that activate MAPK and PI3K signalling in neural progenitor cells and found that HRASV12 was the most effective in inducing both heterotopia and invasive tumours. Tumours, but not heterotopias, require persistent activation of phospho (p)-ERK and express a gene signature similar to the mesenchymal glioblastoma subtype, with a strong YAP component. Application of an eight-gene signature to human brain tumours establishes that YAP activation distinguishes between mesenchymal glioblastoma and low grade glioma in a wide The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) sample set including gliomas and glioblastomas (GBMs). This suggests that the activation of YAP might be an important event in brain tumour development, promoting malignant versus benign brain lesions. Indeed, co-expression of dominant-active YAP (YAPS5A) and HRASV12 abolishes the development of heterotopias and leads to the sole development of aggressive tumours. Thus, we have developed a model proving that neurodevelopmental disorders and brain tumours might originate from the same activation of oncogenes through somatic mutations, and established that YAP activation is a hallmark of malignant brain tumours. PMID:27935819

  17. Brain tumour classification using Gaussian decomposition and neural networks.

    PubMed

    Arizmendi, Carlos; Sierra, Daniel A; Vellido, Alfredo; Romero, Enrique

    2011-01-01

    The development, implementation and use of computer-based medical decision support systems (MDSS) based on pattern recognition techniques holds the promise of substantially improving the quality of medical practice in diagnostic and prognostic tasks. In this study, the core of a decision support system for brain tumour classification from magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) data is presented. It combines data pre-processing using Gaussian decomposition, dimensionality reduction using moving window with variance analysis, and classification using artificial neural networks (ANN). This combination of techniques is shown to yield high diagnostic classification accuracy in problems concerning diverse brain tumour pathologies, some of which have received little attention in the literature.

  18. Decrease in FOXJ1 expression and its ciliogenesis program in aggressive ependymoma and choroid plexus tumours

    PubMed Central

    Abedalthagafi, Malak S.; Wu, Michael P.; Merrill, Parker H.; Du, Ziming; Woo, Terri; Sheu, Shu-Hsien; Hurwitz, Shelley; Ligon, Keith L.; Santagata, Sandro

    2017-01-01

    Well-differentiated human cancers share transcriptional programs with the normal tissue counterparts from which they arise. These programs broadly influence cell behavior and function and are integral modulators of malignancy. Here, we show that the master regulator of motile ciliogenesis, FOXJ1, is highly expressed in cells along the ventricular surface of the human brain. Strong expression is present in cells of the ependyma and the choroid plexus as well as in a subset of cells residing in the subventricular zone. Expression of FOXJ1 and its transcriptional program is maintained in many well-differentiated human tumours that arise along the ventricle, including low-grade ependymal tumours and choroid plexus papilloma. Anaplastic ependymoma as well as choroid plexus carcinoma show decreased FOXJ1 expression and its associated ciliogenesis program genes. In ependymoma and choroid plexus tumours, reduced expression of FOXJ1 and its ciliogenesis program are markers of poor outcome and are therefore useful biomarkers for assessing these tumours. Transitions in ciliogenesis define distinct differentiation states in ependymal and choroid plexus tumours with important implications for patient care. PMID:26690880

  19. Current approaches to the treatment of metastatic brain tumours.

    PubMed

    Owonikoko, Taofeek K; Arbiser, Jack; Zelnak, Amelia; Shu, Hui-Kuo G; Shim, Hyunsuk; Robin, Adam M; Kalkanis, Steven N; Whitsett, Timothy G; Salhia, Bodour; Tran, Nhan L; Ryken, Timothy; Moore, Michael K; Egan, Kathleen M; Olson, Jeffrey J

    2014-04-01

    Metastatic tumours involving the brain overshadow primary brain neoplasms in frequency and are an important complication in the overall management of many cancers. Importantly, advances are being made in understanding the molecular biology underlying the initial development and eventual proliferation of brain metastases. Surgery and radiation remain the cornerstones of the therapy for symptomatic lesions; however, image-based guidance is improving surgical technique to maximize the preservation of normal tissue, while more sophisticated approaches to radiation therapy are being used to minimize the long-standing concerns over the toxicity of whole-brain radiation protocols used in the past. Furthermore, the burgeoning knowledge of tumour biology has facilitated the entry of systemically administered therapies into the clinic. Responses to these targeted interventions have ranged from substantial toxicity with no control of disease to periods of useful tumour control with no decrement in performance status of the treated individual. This experience enables recognition of the limits of targeted therapy, but has also informed methods to optimize this approach. This Review focuses on the clinically relevant molecular biology of brain metastases, and summarizes the current applications of these data to imaging, surgery, radiation therapy, cytotoxic chemotherapy and targeted therapy.

  20. Further aspects on cellular and cordless telephones and brain tumours.

    PubMed

    Hardell, Lennart; Mild, Kjell Hansson; Carlberg, Michael

    2003-02-01

    We included in a case-control study on brain tumours and mobile and cordless telephones 1,617 patients aged 20-80 years of both sexes diagnosed during January 1, 1997 to June 30, 2000. They were alive at the study time and had histopathology verified brain tumour. One matched control to each case was selected from the Swedish Population Register. The study area was the Uppsala-Orebro, Stockholm, Linköping and Göteborg medical regions of Sweden. Exposure was assessed by a questionnaire that was answered by 1,429 (88%) cases and 1,470 (91%) controls. In total use of analogue cellular telephones gave an increased risk with odds ratio (OR)=1.3, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.04-1.6, whereas digital and cordless phones did not overall increase the risk significantly. Ipsilateral use of analogue phones gave OR=1.7, 95% CI=1.2-2.3, digital phones OR=1.3, 95% CI=1.02-1.8 and cordless phones OR=1.2, 95% CI=0.9-1.6. The risk for ipsilateral use was significantly increased for astrocytoma for all studied phone types, analogue phones OR=1.8,95% CI=1.1-3.2, digital phones OR=1.8, 95% CI=1.1-2.8, cordless phones OR=1.8, 95% CI=1.1-2.9. Use of a telephone on the opposite side of the brain was not associated with a significantly increased risk for brain tumours. Regarding anatomical area of the tumour and exposure to microwaves, the risk was increased for tumours located in the temporal area on the same side of the brain that was used during phone calls, significantly so for analogue cellular telephones OR=2.3, 95% CI=1.2-4.1. For acoustic neurinoma OR=4.4, 95% CI=2.1-9.2 was calculated among analogue cellular telephone users. When duration of use was analysed as a continuous variable in the total material, the risk increased per year for analogue phones with OR=1.04, 95% CI=1.01-1.08. For astrocytoma and ipsilateral use the trend was for analogue phones OR=1.10, 95% CI=1.02-1.19, digital phones OR=1.11, 95% CI=1.01-1.22, and cordless phones OR=1.09, 95% CI=1.01-1.19. There was

  1. Semi-supervised analysis of human brain tumours from partially labeled MRS information, using manifold learning models.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Barbosa, Raúl; Vellido, Alfredo

    2011-02-01

    Medical diagnosis can often be understood as a classification problem. In oncology, this typically involves differentiating between tumour types and grades, or some type of discrete outcome prediction. From the viewpoint of computer-based medical decision support, this classification requires the availability of accurate diagnoses of past cases as training target examples. The availability of such labeled databases is scarce in most areas of oncology, and especially so in neuro-oncology. In such context, semi-supervised learning oriented towards classification can be a sensible data modeling choice. In this study, semi-supervised variants of Generative Topographic Mapping, a model of the manifold learning family, are applied to two neuro-oncology problems: the diagnostic discrimination between different brain tumour pathologies, and the prediction of outcomes for a specific type of aggressive brain tumours. Their performance compared favorably with those of the alternative Laplacian Eigenmaps and Semi-Supervised SVM for Manifold Learning models in most of the experiments.

  2. Wide excision and ulno-carpal arthrodesis for primary aggressive and recurrent giant cell tumours

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, M.; Jandhyala, R.; Sharma, H.; Amin, P.; Pandit, J. P.

    2007-01-01

    Twenty-five patients underwent wide resection of the distal radial giant cell tumours (GCTs) followed by ulno-carpal arthrodesis. There were 15 male and ten female patients, with an average age of 21.5 years. Tumours included ten primary aggressive and 15 recurrent GCTs. Mean follow up was 2.4 years. Pain, swelling and reduced range of movement (ROM) were noted. Average time to fusion was 7.6 months. Five patients had persistent pain in the proximal forearm. Grip strength was 65% compared to the uninvolved side. Two patients had superficial wound infection, two underwent additional bone grafting and three implant removals due to hardware prominence were carried out. There was no evidence of carpal instability or arthritis on clinical or radiological examination at the time of final follow up. Fusion of the carpus to the ulna is a simple method of producing a painless stable wrist, though at the expense of mobility. The procedure allows wide resection with a lower rate of recurrence. Pain in the proximal forearm seems to persist for 3 to 4 months only to improve at subsequent follow up. The procedure provides a valid option for the management of primary aggressive and recurrent GCTs of distal radius. PMID:17643243

  3. Brain Tumour Segmentation based on Extremely Randomized Forest with high-level features.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Adriano; Pereira, Sergio; Correia, Higino; Oliveira, J; Rasteiro, Deolinda M L D; Silva, Carlos A

    2015-08-01

    Gliomas are among the most common and aggressive brain tumours. Segmentation of these tumours is important for surgery and treatment planning, but also for follow-up evaluations. However, it is a difficult task, given that its size and locations are variable, and the delineation of all tumour tissue is not trivial, even with all the different modalities of the Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). We propose a discriminative and fully automatic method for the segmentation of gliomas, using appearance- and context-based features to feed an Extremely Randomized Forest (Extra-Trees). Some of these features are computed over a non-linear transformation of the image. The proposed method was evaluated using the publicly available Challenge database from BraTS 2013, having obtained a Dice score of 0.83, 0.78 and 0.73 for the complete tumour, and the core and the enhanced regions, respectively. Our results are competitive, when compared against other results reported using the same database.

  4. Quetiapine modulates functional connectivity in brain aggression networks.

    PubMed

    Klasen, Martin; Zvyagintsev, Mikhail; Schwenzer, Michael; Mathiak, Krystyna A; Sarkheil, Pegah; Weber, René; Mathiak, Klaus

    2013-07-15

    Aggressive behavior is associated with dysfunctions in an affective regulation network encompassing amygdala and prefrontal areas such as orbitofrontal (OFC), anterior cingulate (ACC), and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). In particular, prefrontal regions have been postulated to control amygdala activity by inhibitory projections, and this process may be disrupted in aggressive individuals. The atypical antipsychotic quetiapine successfully attenuates aggressive behavior in various disorders; the underlying neural processes, however, are unknown. A strengthened functional coupling in the prefrontal-amygdala system may account for these anti-aggressive effects. An inhibition of this network has been reported for virtual aggression in violent video games as well. However, there have been so far no in-vivo observations of pharmacological influences on corticolimbic projections during human aggressive behavior. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled study, quetiapine and placebo were administered for three successive days prior to an fMRI experiment. In this experiment, functional brain connectivity was assessed during virtual aggressive behavior in a violent video game and an aggression-free control task in a non-violent modification. Quetiapine increased the functional connectivity of ACC and DLPFC with the amygdala during virtual aggression, whereas OFC-amygdala coupling was attenuated. These effects were observed neither for placebo nor for the non-violent control. These results demonstrate for the first time a pharmacological modification of aggression-related human brain networks in a naturalistic setting. The violence-specific modulation of prefrontal-amygdala networks appears to control aggressive behavior and provides a neurobiological model for the anti-aggressive effects of quetiapine.

  5. Mobile phones, cordless phones and the risk for brain tumours.

    PubMed

    Hardell, Lennart; Carlberg, Michael

    2009-07-01

    The Hardell-group conducted during 1997-2003 two case control studies on brain tumours including assessment of use of mobile phones and cordless phones. The questionnaire was answered by 905 (90%) cases with malignant brain tumours, 1,254 (88%) cases with benign tumours and 2,162 (89%) population-based controls. Cases were reported from the Swedish Cancer Registries. Anatomical area in the brain for the tumour was assessed and related to side of the head used for both types of wireless phones. In the current analysis we defined ipsilateral use (same side as the tumour) as >or=50% of the use and contralateral use (opposite side) as <50% of the calling time. We report now further results for use of mobile and cordless phones. Regarding astrocytoma we found highest risk for ipsilateral mobile phone use in the >10 year latency group, OR=3.3, 95% CI=2.0-5.4 and for cordless phone use OR=5.0, 95% CI=2.3-11. In total, the risk was highest for cases with first use <20 years age, for mobile phone OR=5.2, 95% CI=2.2-12 and for cordless phone OR=4.4, 95% CI=1.9-10. For acoustic neuroma, the highest OR was found for ipsilateral use and >10 year latency, for mobile phone OR=3.0, 95% CI=1.4-6.2 and cordless phone OR=2.3, 95% CI=0.6-8.8. Overall highest OR for mobile phone use was found in subjects with first use at age <20 years, OR=5.0, 95% CI 1.5-16 whereas no association was found for cordless phone in that group, but based on only one exposed case. The annual age-adjusted incidence of astrocytoma for the age group >19 years increased significantly by +2.16%, 95% CI +0.25 to +4.10 during 2000-2007 in Sweden in spite of seemingly underreporting of cases to the Swedish Cancer Registry. A decreasing incidence was found for acoustic neuroma during the same period. However, the medical diagnosis and treatment of this tumour type has changed during recent years and underreporting from a single center would have a large impact for such a rare tumour.

  6. Incidence of leukaemia and brain tumours in some "electrical occupations".

    PubMed Central

    Törnqvist, S; Knave, B; Ahlbom, A; Persson, T

    1991-01-01

    A 19 year follow up study was conducted to explore the association between occupations expected to be exposed to electromagnetic fields and the occurrence of leukaemia and brain tumours. Incidence of cancer between 1961-79 was calculated and the standardised morbidity ratio (SMR) with a 95% confidence interval (95% CI) was related to that of all Swedish working men. For all the selected "electrical occupations" the SMRs for total leukaemia and brain tumours were near unity. Increased risks were noted for all leukaemia among electrical/electronic engineers and technicians, (SMR 1.3; 95% CI 1.0-1.7) as well as in the sub-groups of telegraph/telephone (2.1; 1.1-3.6) and machine (2.6; 1.0-5.8) industries. Risk for chronic lymphoid leukaemia was increased in the same occupational category (1.7; 1.1-2.5) and in the sub-group of machine industry (4.8; 1.0-14.0), as well as for all linesmen (2.0; 1.0-3.5) and power linesmen (2.8; 1.1-5.7). Risk for acute myeloid leukaemia was increased among all miners (2.2; 1.0-4.1) and miners working in iron/ore mines (5.7; 2.1-12.4). Increased risk for all brain tumours (2.9; 1.2-5.9) and glioblastomas (3.4; 1.1-8.0) appeared among assemblers and repairmen in radio and TV industry. Raised risk for all brain tumours was seen for all welders (1.3; 1.0-1.7) and welders in iron/steel works (3.2; 1.0-7.4) and risk for glioblastomas was also increased for all welders (1.5; 1.1-2.1). No major changes in relative risk estimates were noted after the exclusion of persons who were over 65 at the time of diagnosis. Although a homogeneous pattern of increased risks of leukaemia or brain tumour was not noted, the hypothesis that magnetic fields might play a part in the origin of cancer cannot be rejected. PMID:1911402

  7. Prefrontal brain asymmetry and aggression in imprisoned violent offenders.

    PubMed

    Keune, Philipp M; van der Heiden, Linda; Várkuti, Bálint; Konicar, Lilian; Veit, Ralf; Birbaumer, Niels

    2012-05-02

    Anterior brain asymmetry, assessed through the alpha and beta band in resting-state electroencephalogram (EEG) is associated with approach-related behavioral dispositions, particularly with aggression in the general population. To date, the association between frontal asymmetry and aggression has not been examined in highly aggressive groups. We examined the topographic characteristics of alpha and beta activity, the relation of both asymmetry metrics to trait aggression, and whether alpha asymmetry was extreme in anterior regions according to clinical standards in a group of imprisoned violent offenders. As expected, these individuals were characterized by stronger right than left-hemispheric alpha activity, which was putatively extreme in anterior regions in one third of the cases. We also report that in line with observations made in the general population, aggression was associated with stronger right-frontal alpha activity in these violent individuals. This suggests that frontal alpha asymmetry, as a correlate of trait aggression, might be utilizable as an outcome measure in studies which assess the effects of anti-aggressiveness training in violent offenders.

  8. Lack of MHC class I antigens and tumour aggressiveness of the squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx.

    PubMed Central

    Esteban, F.; Concha, A.; Delgado, M.; Pérez-Ayala, M.; Ruiz-Cabello, F.; Garrido, F.

    1990-01-01

    A series of 60 primary laryngeal and hypopharyngeal tumours, 24 lymph node metastases and normal tissue were evaluated in frozen sections for the expression of MHC class I antigens, using monoclonal antibodies and the APAAP technique. We found 13 tumours presenting total HLA-ABC loss, five with selective loss of HLA-A antigens and one with absence of HLA-B antigens. These losses were statistically associated with clinical and pathological parameters, such as T stage, degree of differentiation, scores according to the Jakobsson and Glanz grading systems and degree of leukocytic infiltration. Our results lead us to the following conclusions: (a) HLA class I losses were found in a group of tumours showing greater aggressiveness and worse prognosis; (b) these alterations in expression were not associated with an increased metastatic potential. Thus, the absence of HLA molecules in laryngeal tumours is related to greater local aggressiveness, and the loss of class I antigens seems to constitute an adaptive tumour mechanism to avoid the different anatomical and immunological barriers within the larynx. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:2257212

  9. Addition of vasopressin synthetic analogue [V(4)Q(5)]dDAVP to standard chemotherapy enhances tumour growth inhibition and impairs metastatic spread in aggressive breast tumour models.

    PubMed

    Garona, Juan; Pifano, Marina; Pastrian, Maria B; Gomez, Daniel E; Ripoll, Giselle V; Alonso, Daniel F

    2016-08-01

    [V(4)Q(5)]dDAVP is a novel 2nd generation vasopressin analogue with robust antitumour activity against metastatic breast cancer. We recently reported that, by acting on vasopressin V2r membrane receptor present in tumour cells and microvascular endothelium, [V(4)Q(5)]dDAVP inhibits angiogenesis and metastatic progression of the disease without overt toxicity. Despite chemotherapy remaining as a primary therapeutic option for aggressive breast cancer, its use is limited by low selectivity and associated adverse effects. In this regard, we evaluated potential combinational benefits by adding [V(4)Q(5)]dDAVP to standard-of-care chemotherapy. In vitro, combination of [V(4)Q(5)]dDAVP with sub-IC50 concentrations of paclitaxel or carmustine resulted in a cooperative inhibition of breast cancer cell growth in comparison to single-agent therapy. In vivo antitumour efficacy of [V(4)Q(5)]dDAVP addition to chemotherapy was first evaluated using the triple-negative MDA-MB-231 breast cancer xenograft model. Tumour-bearing mice were treated with i.v. injections of [V(4)Q(5)]dDAVP (0.3 μg/kg, thrice weekly) in combination with weekly cycles of paclitaxel (10 mg/kg i.p.). After 6 weeks of treatment, combination regimen resulted in greater tumour growth inhibition compared to monotherapy. [V(4)Q(5)]dDAVP addition was also associated with reduction of local aggressiveness, and impairment of tumour invasion and infiltration of the skin. Benefits of combined therapy were confirmed in the hormone-independent and metastatic F3II breast cancer model by combining [V(4)Q(5)]dDAVP with carmustine (25 mg/kg i.p.). Interestingly, [V(4)Q(5)]dDAVP plus cytotoxic agents severely impaired colony forming ability of tumour cells and inhibited breast cancer metastasis to lung. The present study shows that [V(4)Q(5)]dDAVP may complement conventional chemotherapy by modulating metastatic progression and early stages of microtumour establishment, and thus supports further preclinical testing of

  10. Hierarchical probabilistic Gabor and MRF segmentation of brain tumours in MRI volumes.

    PubMed

    Subbanna, Nagesh K; Precup, Doina; Collins, D Louis; Arbel, Tal

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we present a fully automated hierarchical probabilistic framework for segmenting brain tumours from multispectral human brain magnetic resonance images (MRIs) using multiwindow Gabor filters and an adapted Markov Random Field (MRF) framework. In the first stage, a customised Gabor decomposition is developed, based on the combined-space characteristics of the two classes (tumour and non-tumour) in multispectral brain MRIs in order to optimally separate tumour (including edema) from healthy brain tissues. A Bayesian framework then provides a coarse probabilistic texture-based segmentation of tumours (including edema) whose boundaries are then refined at the voxel level through a modified MRF framework that carefully separates the edema from the main tumour. This customised MRF is not only built on the voxel intensities and class labels as in traditional MRFs, but also models the intensity differences between neighbouring voxels in the likelihood model, along with employing a prior based on local tissue class transition probabilities. The second inference stage is shown to resolve local inhomogeneities and impose a smoothing constraint, while also maintaining the appropriate boundaries as supported by the local intensity difference observations. The method was trained and tested on the publicly available MICCAI 2012 Brain Tumour Segmentation Challenge (BRATS) Database [1] on both synthetic and clinical volumes (low grade and high grade tumours). Our method performs well compared to state-of-the-art techniques, outperforming the results of the top methods in cases of clinical high grade and low grade tumour core segmentation by 40% and 45% respectively.

  11. Brain tumour and infiltrations dosimetry of boron neutron capture therapy combined with 252Cf brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Brandão, Sâmia F; Campos, Tarcísio P R

    2012-04-01

    This article presents a dosimetric investigation of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) combined with (252)Cf brachytherapy for brain tumour control. The study was conducted through computational simulation in MCNP5 code, using a precise and discrete voxel model of a human head, in which a hypothetical brain tumour was incorporated. A boron concentration ratio of 1:5 for healthy-tissue: tumour was considered. Absorbed and biologically weighted dose rates and neutron fluency in the voxel model were evaluated. The absorbed dose rate results were exported to SISCODES software, which generates the isodose surfaces on the brain. Analyses were performed to clarify the relevance of boron concentrations in occult infiltrations far from the target tumour, with boron concentration ratios of 1:1 up to 1:50 for healthy-tissue:infiltrations and healthy-tissue:tumour. The average biologically weighted dose rates at tumour area exceed up to 40 times the surrounding healthy tissue dose rates. In addition, the biologically weighted dose rates from boron have the main contribution at the infiltrations, especially far from primary tumour. In conclusion, BNCT combined with (252)Cf brachytherapy is an alternative technique for brain tumour treatment because it intensifies dose deposition at the tumour and at infiltrations, sparing healthy brain tissue.

  12. The effect of brain tumour laterality on anxiety levels among neurosurgical patients

    PubMed Central

    Mainio, A; Hakko, H; Niemela, A; Tuurinkoski, T; Koivukangas, J; Rasanen, P

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the level of anxiety in patients with a primary brain tumour and to analyse the effect of tumour laterality and histology on the level of anxiety. Recurrent measurements were assessed preoperatively, three months, and one year after operation. Methods: The study population consisted of 101 patients with a primary brain tumour from unselected and homogeneous population in northern Finland. The patients were studied preoperatively with CT or MRI to determine the location of the tumour. The histology of the tumour was defined according to WHO classification. The level of anxiety was obtained by Crown-Crisp Experiential Index (CCEI) scale. Results: The patients with a tumour in the right hemisphere had statistically significantly higher mean anxiety scores compared to the patients with a tumour in the left hemisphere before surgery of the tumour. By three months and by one year after surgical resection of the tumour, the level of anxiety declined in patients with a tumour in the right hemisphere. A corresponding decline was not found in patients with a tumour in the left hemisphere. According to laterality by tumour histology, the level of anxiety decreased significantly in male and female patients with a glioma in the right hemisphere, but a corresponding decline was not significant in the female patients with a meningioma in the right hemisphere. Decreased level of anxiety was not found in patients with gliomas or meningiomas in the left hemisphere by follow up measurements. Conclusions: Primary brain tumour in right hemisphere is associated with anxiety symptoms. The laterality of anxiety seems to reflect the differentiation of the two hemispheres. The level of anxiety declined after operation of right tumour, approaching that of the general population. The effect of right hemisphere gliomas on anxiety symptoms deserves special attention in future research. PMID:12933936

  13. Molecular crosstalk between tumour and brain parenchyma instructs histopathological features in glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Bougnaud, Sébastien; Golebiewska, Anna; Oudin, Anaïs; Keunen, Olivier; Harter, Patrick N.; Mäder, Lisa; Azuaje, Francisco; Fritah, Sabrina; Stieber, Daniel; Kaoma, Tony; Vallar, Laurent; Brons, Nicolaas H.C.; Daubon, Thomas; Miletic, Hrvoje; Sundstrøm, Terje; Herold-Mende, Christel; Mittelbronn, Michel; Bjerkvig, Rolf; Niclou, Simone P.

    2016-01-01

    The histopathological and molecular heterogeneity of glioblastomas represents a major obstacle for effective therapies. Glioblastomas do not develop autonomously, but evolve in a unique environment that adapts to the growing tumour mass and contributes to the malignancy of these neoplasms. Here, we show that patient-derived glioblastoma xenografts generated in the mouse brain from organotypic spheroids reproducibly give rise to three different histological phenotypes: (i) a highly invasive phenotype with an apparent normal brain vasculature, (ii) a highly angiogenic phenotype displaying microvascular proliferation and necrosis and (iii) an intermediate phenotype combining features of invasion and vessel abnormalities. These phenotypic differences were visible during early phases of tumour development suggesting an early instructive role of tumour cells on the brain parenchyma. Conversely, we found that tumour-instructed stromal cells differentially influenced tumour cell proliferation and migration in vitro, indicating a reciprocal crosstalk between neoplastic and non-neoplastic cells. We did not detect any transdifferentiation of tumour cells into endothelial cells. Cell type-specific transcriptomic analysis of tumour and endothelial cells revealed a strong phenotype-specific molecular conversion between the two cell types, suggesting co-evolution of tumour and endothelial cells. Integrative bioinformatic analysis confirmed the reciprocal crosstalk between tumour and microenvironment and suggested a key role for TGFβ1 and extracellular matrix proteins as major interaction modules that shape glioblastoma progression. These data provide novel insight into tumour-host interactions and identify novel stroma-specific targets that may play a role in combinatorial treatment strategies against glioblastoma. PMID:27049916

  14. Screening for invasion of the individual human brain tumour in an autologous confrontation system in vitro.

    PubMed

    de Ridder, L

    1999-01-01

    Invasiveness is the major cause of death in patients bearing a brain tumour. The invasiveness or infiltrative capacity of a primary brain tumour has a prognostic value for the evaluation of the process in vivo. So a model to imitate invasion might give information on the in vivo behaviour and outcome of the disease for the individual patient. The developed in vitro model represents an assay in which the patients' brain tumour-derived cells are confronted with connective tissue from the patient himself, i.e. an autologous system to evaluate the individual behaviour of the tumour, in contrast to other invasion models. The test can be applied with tumour-derived material collected by a stereotactic biopsy.

  15. Cellular immortality in brain tumours: an integration of the cancer stem cell paradigm.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Ruman; Heath, Rachel; Grundy, Richard

    2009-04-01

    Brain tumours are a diverse group of neoplasms that continue to present a formidable challenge in our attempt to achieve curable intervention. Our conceptual framework of human brain cancer has been redrawn in the current decade. There is a gathering acceptance that brain tumour formation is a phenotypic outcome of dysregulated neurogenesis, with tumours viewed as abnormally differentiated neural tissue. In relation, there is accumulating evidence that brain tumours, similar to leukaemia and many solid tumours, are organized as a developmental hierarchy which is maintained by a small fraction of cells endowed with many shared properties of tissue stem cells. Proof that neurogenesis persists throughout adult life, compliments this concept. Although the cancer cell of origin is unclear, the proliferative zones that harbour stem cells in the embryonic, post-natal and adult brain are attractive candidates within which tumour-initiation may ensue. Dysregulated, unlimited proliferation and an ability to bypass senescence are acquired capabilities of cancerous cells. These abilities in part require the establishment of a telomere maintenance mechanism for counteracting the shortening of chromosomal termini. A strategy based upon the synthesis of telomeric repeat sequences by the ribonucleoprotein telomerase, is prevalent in approximately 90% of human tumours studied, including the majority of brain tumours. This review will provide a developmental perspective with respect to normal (neurogenesis) and aberrant (tumourigenesis) cellular turnover, differentiation and function. Within this context our current knowledge of brain tumour telomere/telomerase biology will be discussed with respect to both its developmental and therapeutic relevance to the hierarchical model of brain tumourigenesis presented by the cancer stem cell paradigm.

  16. Glioblastoma brain tumours: estimating the time from brain tumour initiation and resolution of a patient survival anomaly after similar treatment protocols.

    PubMed

    Murray, J D

    2012-01-01

    A practical mathematical model for glioblastomas (brain tumours), which incorporates the two key parameters of tumour growth, namely the cancer cell diffusion and the cell proliferation rate, has been shown to be clinically useful and predictive. Previous studies explain why multifocal recurrence is inevitable and show how various treatment scenarios have been incorporated in the model. In most tumours, it is not known when the cancer started. Based on patient in vivo parameters, obtained from two brain scans, it is shown how to estimate the time, after initial detection, when the tumour started. This is an input of potential importance in any future controlled clinical study of any connection between cell phone radiation and brain tumour incidence. It is also used to estimate more accurately survival times from detection. Finally, based on patient parameters, the solution of the model equation of the tumour growth helps to explain why certain patients live longer than others after similar treatment protocols specifically surgical resection (removal) and irradiation.

  17. A novel approach to juxta-articular aggressive and recurrent giant cell tumours: resection arthrodesis using bone transport over an intramedullary nail

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Sharath K.

    2006-01-01

    Aggressive juxta-articular giant cell tumours of the lower limbs occurring in young patients are a challenge to the average orthopaedic surgeon. Although it is the treatment of choice for these tumours, wide resection creates a problem for the reconstruction of large bone gaps. We describe our results after resection arthrodesis of such tumours using the technique of bone transport over a long intramedullary nail in 27 patients. This is the first and largest study of its kind in the management of giant cell tumours in the literature. All our patients fared well with this mode of treatment, and none had recurrence or major complications. PMID:16724184

  18. Functional MRI and intraoperative brain mapping to evaluate brain plasticity in patients with brain tumours and hemiparesis

    PubMed Central

    Roux, F; Boulanouar, K; Ibarrola, D; Tremoulet, M; Chollet, F; Berry, I

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To support the hypothesis about the potential compensatory role of ipsilateral corticofugal pathways when the contralateral pathways are impaired by brain tumours.
METHODS—Retrospective analysis was carried out on the results of functional MRI (fMRI) of a selected group of five paretic patients with Rolandic brain tumours who exhibited an abnormally high ipsilateral/contralateral ratio of activation—that is, movements of the paretic hand activated predominately the ipsilateral cortex. Brain activation was achieved with a flexion extension of the fingers. Statistical parametric activation was obtained using a t test and a threshold of p<0.001. These patients, candidates for tumour resection, also underwent cortical intraoperative stimulation that was correlated to the fMRI spatial data using three dimensional reconstructions of the brain. Three patients also had postoperative control fMRI.
RESULTS—The absence of fMRI activation of the primary sensorimotor cortex normally innervating the paretic hand for the threshold chosen, was correlated with completely negative cortical responses of the cortical hand area during the operation. The preoperative fMRI activation of these patients predominantly found in the ipsilateral frontal and primary sensorimotor cortices could be related to the residual ipsilateral hand function. Postoperatively, the fMRI activation returned to more classic patterns of activation, reflecting the consequences of therapy.
CONCLUSION—In paretic patients with brain tumours, ipsilateral control could be implicated in the residual hand function, when the normal primary pathways are impaired. The possibility that functional tissue still remains in the peritumorous sensorimotor cortex even when the preoperative fMRI and the cortical intraoperative stimulations are negative, should be taken into account when planning the tumour resection and during the operation.

 PMID:10990503

  19. Brain tumour classification and abnormality detection using neuro-fuzzy technique and Otsu thresholding.

    PubMed

    Renjith, Arokia; Manjula, P; Mohan Kumar, P

    2015-01-01

    Brain tumour is one of the main causes for an increase in transience among children and adults. This paper proposes an improved method based on Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) brain image classification and image segmentation approach. Automated classification is encouraged by the need of high accuracy when dealing with a human life. The detection of the brain tumour is a challenging problem, due to high diversity in tumour appearance and ambiguous tumour boundaries. MRI images are chosen for detection of brain tumours, as they are used in soft tissue determinations. First of all, image pre-processing is used to enhance the image quality. Second, dual-tree complex wavelet transform multi-scale decomposition is used to analyse texture of an image. Feature extraction extracts features from an image using gray-level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM). Then, the Neuro-Fuzzy technique is used to classify the stages of brain tumour as benign, malignant or normal based on texture features. Finally, tumour location is detected using Otsu thresholding. The classifier performance is evaluated based on classification accuracies. The simulated results show that the proposed classifier provides better accuracy than previous method.

  20. SMART syndrome: a late reversible complication after radiation therapy for brain tumours.

    PubMed

    Kerklaan, Joost P; Lycklama á Nijeholt, Geert J; Wiggenraad, Ruud G J; Berghuis, Bianca; Postma, Tjeerd J; Taphoorn, Martin J B

    2011-06-01

    With intensified treatment leading to longer survival, complications of therapy for brain tumours are more frequently observed. Regarding radiation therapy, progressive and irreversible white matter disease with cognitive decline is most feared. We report on four patients with reversible clinical and radiological features occurring years after radiation for brain tumours, suggestive for the so called SMART syndrome (stroke-like migraine attacks after radiation therapy). All four patients (males, age 36-60 years) had been treated with focal brain radiation for a primary brain tumour or with whole-brain radiation therapy for brain metastases. Ranging from 2 to 10 years following radiation therapy patients presented with headache and focal neurological deficits, suggestive for tumour recurrence. Two patients also presented with focal seizures. MRI demonstrated typical cortical swelling and contrast enhancement, primarily in the parieto-occipital region. On follow-up both clinical and MRI features improved spontaneously. Three patients eventually proved to have tumour recurrence. The clinical and radiological picture of these patients is compatible with the SMART syndrome, a rare complication of radiation therapy which is probably under recognized in brain tumour patients. The pathophysiology of the SMART syndrome is poorly understood but bears similarities with the posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES). These four cases underline that the SMART syndrome should be considered in patients formerly treated with radiation therapy for brain tumours, who present with new neurologic deficits. Before the diagnosis of SMART syndrome can be established other causes, such as local tumour recurrence, leptomeningeal disease or ischemic disease should be ruled out.

  1. Human Cytomegalovirus Tegument Protein pp65 Is Detected in All Intra- and Extra-Axial Brain Tumours Independent of the Tumour Type or Grade

    PubMed Central

    Libard, Sylwia; Popova, Svetlana N.; Amini, Rose-Marie; Kärjä, Vesa; Pietiläinen, Timo; Hämäläinen, Kirsi M.; Sundström, Christer; Hesselager, Göran; Bergqvist, Michael; Ekman, Simon; Zetterling, Maria; Smits, Anja; Nilsson, Pelle; Pfeifer, Susan; de Ståhl, Teresita Diaz; Enblad, Gunilla; Ponten, Fredrik; Alafuzoff, Irina

    2014-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) has been indicated being a significant oncomodulator. Recent reports have suggested that an antiviral treatment alters the outcome of a glioblastoma. We analysed the performance of commercial HCMV-antibodies applying the immunohistochemical (IHC) methods on brain sample obtained from a subject with a verified HCMV infection, on samples obtained from 14 control subjects, and on a tissue microarray block containing cores of various brain tumours. Based on these trials, we selected the best performing antibody and analysed a cohort of 417 extra- and intra-axial brain tumours such as gliomas, medulloblastomas, primary diffuse large B-cell lymphomas, and meningiomas. HCMV protein pp65 immunoreactivity was observed in all types of tumours analysed, and the IHC expression did not depend on the patient's age, gender, tumour type, or grade. The labelling pattern observed in the tumours differed from the labelling pattern observed in the tissue with an active HCMV infection. The HCMV protein was expressed in up to 90% of all the tumours investigated. Our results are in accordance with previous reports regarding the HCMV protein expression in glioblastomas and medulloblastomas. In addition, the HCMV protein expression was seen in primary brain lymphomas, low-grade gliomas, and in meningiomas. Our results indicate that the HCMV protein pp65 expression is common in intra- and extra-axial brain tumours. Thus, the assessment of the HCMV expression in tumours of various origins and pathologically altered tissue in conditions such as inflammation, infection, and even degeneration should certainly be facilitated. PMID:25268364

  2. MRS water resonance frequency in childhood brain tumours: a novel potential biomarker of temperature and tumour environment.

    PubMed

    Babourina-Brooks, Ben; Wilson, Martin; Arvanitis, Theodoros N; Peet, Andrew C; Davies, Nigel P

    2014-10-01

    (1)H MRS thermometry has been investigated for brain trauma and hypothermia monitoring applications but has not been explored in brain tumours. The proton resonance frequency (PRF) of water is dependent on temperature but is also influenced by microenvironment factors, such as fast proton exchange with macromolecules, ionic concentration and magnetic susceptibility. (1)H MRS has been utilized for brain tumour diagnostic and prognostic purposes in children; however, the water PRF measure may provide complementary information to further improve characterization. Water PRF values were investigated from a repository of MRS data acquired from childhood brain tumours and children with apparently normal brains. The cohort consisted of histologically proven glioma (22), medulloblastoma (19) and control groups (28, MRS in both the basal ganglia and parietal white matter regions). All data were acquired at 1.5 T using a short TE (30 ms) single voxel spectroscopy (PRESS) protocol. Water PRF values were calculated using methyl creatine and total choline. Spectral peak amplitude weighted averaging was used to improve the accuracy of the measurements. Mean PRF values were significantly larger for medulloblastoma compared with glioma, with a difference in the means of 0.0147 ppm (p < 0.05), while the mean PRF for glioma was significantly lower than for the healthy cohort, with a difference in the means of 0.0061 ppm (p < 0.05). This would suggest the apparent temperature of the glioma group was ~1.5 °C higher than the medulloblastomas and ~0.7 °C higher than a healthy brain. However, the PRF shift may not reflect a change in temperature, given that alterations in protein content, microstructure and ionic concentration contribute to PRF shifts. Measurement of these effects could also be used as a supplementary biomarker, and further investigation is required. This study has shown that the water PRF value has the potential to be used for characterizing

  3. Diagnostic segregation of human brain tumours using Fourier-transform infrared and/or Raman spectroscopy coupled with discriminant analysis†

    PubMed Central

    Gajjar, Ketan; Heppenstall, Lara D.; Pang, Weiyi; Ashton, Katherine M.; Trevisan, Júlio; Patel, Imran I.; Llabjani, Valon; Stringfellow, Helen F.; Martin-Hirsch, Pierre L.; Dawson, Timothy; Martin, Francis L.

    2013-01-01

    The most common initial treatment received by patients with a brain tumour is surgical removal of the growth. Precise histopathological diagnosis of brain tumours is to some extent subjective. Furthermore, currently available diagnostic imaging techniques to delineate the excision border during cytoreductive surgery lack the required spatial precision to aid surgeons. We set out to determine whether infrared (IR) and/or Raman spectroscopy combined with multivariate analysis could be applied to discriminate between normal brain tissue and different tumour types (meningioma, glioma and brain metastasis) based on the unique spectral “fingerprints” of their biochemical composition. Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue blocks of normal brain and different brain tumours were de-waxed, mounted on low-E slides and desiccated before being analyzed using attenuated total reflection Fourier-transform IR (ATR-FTIR) and Raman spectroscopy. ATR-FTIR spectroscopy showed a clear segregation between normal and different tumour subtypes. Discrimination of tumour classes was also apparent with Raman spectroscopy. Further analysis of spectral data revealed changes in brain biochemical structure associated with different tumours. Decreased tentatively-assigned lipid-to-protein ratio was associated with increased tumour progression. Alteration in cholesterol esters-to-phenylalanine ratio was evident in grade IV glioma and metastatic tumours. The current study indicates that IR and/or Raman spectroscopy have the potential to provide a novel diagnostic approach in the accurate diagnosis of brain tumours and have potential for application in intra-operative diagnosis. PMID:24098310

  4. Diagnostic segregation of human brain tumours using Fourier-transform infrared and/or Raman spectroscopy coupled with discriminant analysis.

    PubMed

    Gajjar, Ketan; Heppenstall, Lara D; Pang, Weiyi; Ashton, Katherine M; Trevisan, Júlio; Patel, Imran I; Llabjani, Valon; Stringfellow, Helen F; Martin-Hirsch, Pierre L; Dawson, Timothy; Martin, Francis L

    2012-09-06

    The most common initial treatment received by patients with a brain tumour is surgical removal of the growth. Precise histopathological diagnosis of brain tumours is to some extent subjective. Furthermore, currently available diagnostic imaging techniques to delineate the excision border during cytoreductive surgery lack the required spatial precision to aid surgeons. We set out to determine whether infrared (IR) and/or Raman spectroscopy combined with multivariate analysis could be applied to discriminate between normal brain tissue and different tumour types (meningioma, glioma and brain metastasis) based on the unique spectral "fingerprints" of their biochemical composition. Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue blocks of normal brain and different brain tumours were de-waxed, mounted on low-E slides and desiccated before being analyzed using attenuated total reflection Fourier-transform IR (ATR-FTIR) and Raman spectroscopy. ATR-FTIR spectroscopy showed a clear segregation between normal and different tumour subtypes. Discrimination of tumour classes was also apparent with Raman spectroscopy. Further analysis of spectral data revealed changes in brain biochemical structure associated with different tumours. Decreased tentatively-assigned lipid-to-protein ratio was associated with increased tumour progression. Alteration in cholesterol esters-to-phenylalanine ratio was evident in grade IV glioma and metastatic tumours. The current study indicates that IR and/or Raman spectroscopy have the potential to provide a novel diagnostic approach in the accurate diagnosis of brain tumours and have potential for application in intra-operative diagnosis.

  5. Highlights of Children with Cancer UK’s Workshop on Drug Delivery in Paediatric Brain Tumours

    PubMed Central

    Nailor, Audrey; Walker, David A; Jacques, Thomas S; Warren, Kathy E; Brem, Henry; Kearns, Pamela R; Greenwood, John; Penny, Jeffrey I; Pilkington, Geoffrey J; Carcaboso, Angel M; Fleischhack, Gudrun; Macarthur, Donald; Slavc, Irene; Meijer, Lisethe; Gill, Steven; Lowis, Stephen; van Vuurden, Dannis G; Pearl, Monica S; Clifford, Steven C; Morrissy, Sorana; Ivanov, Delyan P; Beccaria, Kévin; Gilbertson, Richard J; Straathof, Karin; Green, Jordan J; Smith, Stuart; Rahman, Ruman; Kilday, John-Paul

    2016-01-01

    The first Workshop on Drug Delivery in Paediatric Brain Tumours was hosted in London by the charity Children with Cancer UK. The goals of the workshop were to break down the barriers to treating central nervous system (CNS) tumours in children, leading to new collaborations and further innovations in this under-represented and emotive field. These barriers include the physical delivery challenges presented by the blood–brain barrier, the underpinning reasons for the intractability of CNS cancers, and the practical difficulties of delivering cancer treatment to the brains of children. Novel techniques for overcoming these problems were discussed, new models brought forth, and experiences compared. PMID:27110286

  6. Linear accelerator radiosurgery in the management of brain tumours.

    PubMed

    Friedman, W A; Foote, K D

    2000-02-01

    Radiosurgery is an increasingly popular method for treating a variety of intracranial tumours. A great deal of treatment data has been accumulated suggesting that radiosurgery may be the treatment of choice for small acoustic schwannomas. Moreover, radiosurgery promises excellent tumour control and minimal risk in the treatment of small meningiomas in risky surgical locations such as the cavernous sinus. Radiosurgery offers superior local control rates for many metastatic neoplasms and has promise as an adjuvant 'boost' technique in certain malignant gliomas. This article presents a brief description of the linear accelerator, LINAC, radiosurgical technique, followed by a review of the more common applications of stereotactic radiosurgery in the treatment of intracranial neoplastic disease.

  7. Hormonal modulation of brain tumour growth: a cell culture study.

    PubMed

    Gibelli, N; Zibera, C; Butti, G; Assietti, R; Sica, G; Scerrati, M; Iacopino, F; Roselli, R; Paoletti, P; Robustelli della Cuna, G

    1989-01-01

    Tissue samples derived from two neuroepithelial tumours and five meningiomas were obtained at surgery from seven patients and cultured in order to study the effect of dexamethasone (DEX) and testosterone acetate (TA) on cell proliferation. Glucocorticoid and androgen receptors (GR, AR) were determined both on tissue samples (7 cases) and on five out of the seven cell cultures obtained by tumours. GR and AR were present respectively in 5 and in 4 out of the tumour specimens assayed and in 4/5 and 2/3 of the tested cell cultures. DEX activity on cell growth was tested on six cell cultures. Four of them showed a significant growth inhibition at the highest drug concentration. On the contrary, a significant growth stimulation was observed in four out of the five cultures, where GR were present, using low hormone concentrations. Treatment with pharmacological doses of TA caused a significant cytotoxicity in all the tested cultures. Low TA concentrations inhibited cell growth in one out of the two cell cultures which contained AR, but were ineffective in cultures lacking AR. Our preliminary results suggest a possible role in growth regulation by DEX and TA in intracranial tumours, on the basis of the presence of specific hormone receptors.

  8. Generating prior probabilities for classifiers of brain tumours using belief networks

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Greg M; Peet, Andrew C; Arvanitis, Theodoros N

    2007-01-01

    Background Numerous methods for classifying brain tumours based on magnetic resonance spectra and imaging have been presented in the last 15 years. Generally, these methods use supervised machine learning to develop a classifier from a database of cases for which the diagnosis is already known. However, little has been published on developing classifiers based on mixed modalities, e.g. combining imaging information with spectroscopy. In this work a method of generating probabilities of tumour class from anatomical location is presented. Methods The method of "belief networks" is introduced as a means of generating probabilities that a tumour is any given type. The belief networks are constructed using a database of paediatric tumour cases consisting of data collected over five decades; the problems associated with using this data are discussed. To verify the usefulness of the networks, an application of the method is presented in which prior probabilities were generated and combined with a classification of tumours based solely on MRS data. Results Belief networks were constructed from a database of over 1300 cases. These can be used to generate a probability that a tumour is any given type. Networks are presented for astrocytoma grades I and II, astrocytoma grades III and IV, ependymoma, pineoblastoma, primitive neuroectodermal tumour (PNET), germinoma, medulloblastoma, craniopharyngioma and a group representing rare tumours, "other". Using the network to generate prior probabilities for classification improves the accuracy when compared with generating prior probabilities based on class prevalence. Conclusion Bayesian belief networks are a simple way of using discrete clinical information to generate probabilities usable in classification. The belief network method can be robust to incomplete datasets. Inclusion of a priori knowledge is an effective way of improving classification of brain tumours by non-invasive methods. PMID:17877822

  9. Biodegradable interstitial release polymer loading a novel small molecule targeting Axl receptor tyrosine kinase and reducing brain tumour migration and invasion

    PubMed Central

    Yen, S-Y; Chen, S-R; Hsieh, J; Li, Y-S; Chuang, S-E; Chuang, H-M; Huang, M-H; Lin, S-Z; Harn, H-J; Chiou, T-W

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and aggressive brain tumour. The neoplasms are difficult to resect entirely because of their highly infiltration property and leading to the tumour edge is unclear. Gliadel wafer has been used as an intracerebral drug delivery system to eliminate the residual tumour. However, because of its local low concentration and short diffusion distance, patient survival improves non-significantly. Axl is an essential regulator in cancer metastasis and patient survival. In this study, we developed a controlled-release polyanhydride polymer loading a novel small molecule, n-butylidenephthalide (BP), which is not only increasing local drug concentration and extending its diffusion distance but also reducing tumour invasion, mediated by reducing Axl expression. First, we determined that BP inhibited the expression of Axl in a dose- and time-dependent manner and reduced the migratory and invasive capabilities of GBM cells. In addition, BP downregulated matrix metalloproteinase activity, which is involved in cancer cell invasion. Furthermore, we demonstrated that BP regulated Axl via the extracellular signal-regulated kinases pathway. Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is related to epithelial cells in the invasive migratory mesenchymal cells that underlie cancer progression; we demonstrated that BP reduced the expression of EMT-related genes. Furthermore, we used the overexpression of Axl in GBM cells to prove that Axl is a crucial target in the inhibition of GBM EMT, migration and invasion. In an in vivo study, we demonstrated that BP inhibited tumour growth and suppressed Axl expression in a dose-dependent manner according to a subcutaneous tumour model. Most importantly, in an intracranial tumour model with BP wafer in situ treatment, we demonstrated that the BP wafer not only significantly increased the survival rate but also decreased Axl expression, and inhibited tumour invasion. These results contribute to the

  10. Mutation analysis of the p73 gene in nonastrocytic brain tumours

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, M E; Bello, M J; Gonzalez-Gomez, P; Lomas, J; Arjona, D; Campos, J M de; Kusak, M E; Sarasa, J L; Isla, A; Rey, J A

    2001-01-01

    Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) involving the distal chromosome 1p36region occurs frequently in nonastrocytic brain tumours, but the tumour suppressor gene targeted by this deletion is unknown. p73is a novel gene that has high sequence homology and similar gene structure to thep53 gene; it has been mapped to 1p36, and may thus represent a candidate for this tumour suppressor gene. To determine whether p73is involved in nonastrocytic brain tumour development, we analysed 65 tumour samples including 26 oligodendrogliomas, 4 ependymomas, 5 medulloblastomas, 10 meningiomas, 2 meningeal haemangiopericytomas, 2 neurofibrosarcomas, 3 primary lymphomas, 8 schwannomas and 5 metastatic tumours to the brain, for p73 alterations. Characterization of allelic loss at 1p36–p35 showed LOH in about 50% of cases, primarily involving oligodendroglial tumours (22 of 26 cases analysed; 85%) and meningiomas (4 of 10; 40%). PCR-SSCP and direct DNA sequencing of exons 2 to 14 of p73 revealed a missense mutation in one primary lymphoma: a G-to-A transition, with Glu291Lys change. 8 additional cases displayed no tumour-specific alterations, as 3 distinct polymorphic changes were identified: a double polymorphic change of exon 5 was found in one ependymoma and both samples derived from an oligodendroglioma, as follows: a G-to-A transition with no change in Pro 146, and a C-to-T variation with no change in Asn 204: a delG at exon 3/+12 position was identified in 4 samples corresponding to 2 oligodendrogliomas, 1 ependymoma and 1 meningioma, and a C-to-T change at exon 2/+10 position was present in a metastatic tumour. Although both LOH at 1p36 and p73 sequence changes were evidenced in 4 cases, it is difficult to establish a causal role of the p73 variations and nonastrocytic brain tumours development. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11461077

  11. Outcomes of low-molecular-weight heparin treatment for venous thromboembolism in patients with primary and metastatic brain tumours.

    PubMed

    Chai-Adisaksopha, Chatree; Linkins, Lori-Ann; ALKindi, Said Y; Cheah, Matthew; Crowther, Mark A; Iorio, Alfonso

    2017-02-28

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is one of the most common complications in patients with brain tumours. There is limited data available in the literature on VTE treatment in these patients. We conducted a matched retrospective cohort study of patients with primary or metastatic brain cancer who were diagnosed with cancer-associated VTE. Patients were selected after a retrospective chart review of consecutive patients who were diagnosed with cancer-associated VTE between January 2010 and January 2014 at the Juravinski Thrombosis Clinic, Hamilton, Canada. Controls were age- and gender-matched patients with cancer-associated VTE from the same cohort, but without known brain tumours. A total of 364 patients with cancer-associated VTE were included (182 with primary or metastatic brain tumours and 182 controls). The median follow-up duration was 6.7 (interquartile range 2.5-15.8) months. The incidence rate of recurrent VTE was 11.0 per 100 patient-years (95 % CI; 6.7-17.9) in patients with brain tumours and 13.5 per 100 patient-years (95 % CI; 9.3-19.7) in non-brain tumour group. The incidence of major bleeding was 8.6 per 100 (95 % CI; 4.8-14.7) patient-years in patients with brain tumours versus 5.0 per 100 patient-years (95 % CI; 2.8-9.2) in controls. Rate of intracranial bleeding was higher in brain tumour patients (4.4 % vs 0 %, p-value=0.004). In summary, rates of recurrent VTE and major bleeding were not significantly different in patients with cancer-associated VTE in the setting of primary or metastatic brain tumours compared those without known brain tumours. However, greater numbers of intracranial bleeds were observed in patients with brain tumours.

  12. Neuro-oncology: Under-recognized mental incapacity in brain tumour patients.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Mark

    2014-09-01

    Many patients with brain tumours possess inadequate mental capacity to provide informed consent, but this situation often goes undetected because clinicians do not routinely conduct formal cognitive assessments. This oversight should be recognized and rectified to enable optimum ethical and medical care of these vulnerable individuals.

  13. Comparative analysis of the brain transcriptome in a hyper-aggressive fruit fly, Drosophila prolongata.

    PubMed

    Kudo, Ayumi; Shigenobu, Shuji; Kadota, Koji; Nozawa, Masafumi; Shibata, Tomoko F; Ishikawa, Yukio; Matsuo, Takashi

    2017-03-01

    Aggressive behavior is observed in many animals, but its intensity differs between species. In a model animal of genetics, Drosophila melanogaster, genetic basis of aggressive behavior has been studied intensively, including transcriptome analyses to identify genes whose expression level was associated with intra-species variation in aggressiveness. However, whether these genes are also involved in the evolution of aggressiveness among different species has not been examined. In this study, we performed de novo transcriptome analysis in the brain of Drosophila prolongata to identify genes associated with the evolution of aggressiveness. Males of D. prolongata were hyper-aggressive compared with closely related species. Comparison of the brain transcriptomes identified 21 differentially expressed genes in males of D. prolongata. They did not overlap with the list of aggression-related genes identified in D. melanogaster, suggesting that genes involved in the evolution of aggressiveness were independent of those associated with the intra-species variation in aggressiveness in Drosophila. Although females of D. prolongata were not aggressive as the males, expression levels of the 21 genes identified in this study were more similar between sexes than between species.

  14. Manipulation of colony environment modulates honey bee aggression and brain gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Rittschof, Clare C.; Robinson, Gene E.

    2013-01-01

    The social environment plays an essential role in shaping behavior for most animals. Social effects on behavior are often linked to changes in brain gene expression (Robinson et al., 2008). In the honey bee (Apis mellifera L.), social modulation of individual aggression allows colonies to adjust the intensity with which they defend their hive in response to predation threat (Alaux & Robinson, 2007, Couvillon et al., 2008, Hunt et al., 2003). Previous research has demonstrated social effects on both aggression and aggression-related brain gene expression in honey bees, caused by alarm pheromone and unknown factors related to colony genotype (Alaux et al., 2009b). For example, some bees from less aggressive genetic stock reared in colonies with genetic predispositions toward increased aggression show both increased aggression and more aggressive-like brain gene expression profiles (Alaux et al., 2009b, Guzmán-Novoa et al., 2004). We tested the hypothesis that exposure to a colony environment influenced by high levels of predation threat results in increased aggression and aggressive-like gene expression patterns in individual bees. We assessed gene expression using four marker genes. Experimentally induced predation threats modified behavior, but the effect was opposite of our predictions: disturbed colonies showed decreased aggression. Disturbed colonies also decreased foraging activity, suggesting that they did not habituate to threats; other explanations for this finding are discussed. Bees in disturbed colonies also showed changes in brain gene expression, some of which paralleled behavioral findings. These results demonstrate that bee aggression, and associated molecular processes, are subject to complex social influences. PMID:24034579

  15. Factors associated with long-term functional outcomes, psychological sequelae and quality of life in persons after primary brain tumour.

    PubMed

    Khan, Fary; Amatya, Bhasker

    2013-02-01

    To examine factors impacting long-term functional outcomes and psychological sequelae in persons with primary brain tumours (BT) in an Australian community cohort. Participants (n = 106) following definitive treatment for BT in the community were reviewed in rehabilitation clinics to assess impact on participants' current activity and restriction in participation, using validated questionnaires: Functional Independence Measure (FIM), Perceived Impact Problem Profile (PIPP), Depression Anxiety Stress Scale, Cancer Rehabilitation Evaluation System-Short Form and Cancer Survivor Unmet Needs Measure. Mean age of the participants was 51 years (range 21-77 years), majority were female (56 %) with median time since BT diagnosis 2.1 years and a third (39 %) had high grade tumours. Majority showed good functional recovery (median motor FIM score 75). Over half reported pain (56 %), of which 42 % had headaches. Other impairments included: ataxia (44 %), seizures (43 %); paresis (37 %), cognitive dysfunction (36 %) and visual impairment (35 %). About 20 % reported high levels of depression, compared with only 13 % in an Australian normative sample. Two-third (60 %) participants reported highest impact on the PIPP subscales for psychological wellbeing (scores of >3 on 6-point scale) and participation (45 %). Factors significantly associated with poorer current level of functioning and wellbeing included: younger participants (≤40 years), recent diagnoses, aggressive tumour types and presence of pain. No significant differences in scale scores were found across various treatments (surgery, chemotherapy or radiotherapy) on outcomes used. Rehabilitation for BT survivors is challenging and requires long-term management of psychological sequelae impacting activity and participation. More research into participatory limitation is needed to guide treating clinicians.

  16. Environmental Influences, the Developing Brain, and Aggressive Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudley, Cynthia; Novac, Andrei

    2007-01-01

    In this article the authors review research on highly stressful environments that are known to support the development and display of aggressive behavior in childhood, adolescence, and beyond. They also examine some of the mechanisms through which such stressful environments may influence adolescents' aggressive behavior. The review concentrates…

  17. A pharmacological evidence of positive association between mouse intermale aggression and brain serotonin metabolism.

    PubMed

    Kulikov, A V; Osipova, D V; Naumenko, V S; Terenina, E; Mormède, P; Popova, N K

    2012-07-15

    The neurotransmitter serotonin (5-HT) is involved in the regulation of mouse intermale aggression. Previously, it was shown that intensity of mouse intermale aggression was positively associated with activity of the key enzyme of 5-HT synthesis - tryptophan hydroxylase 2 (TPH2) in mouse brain. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of pharmacological activation or inhibition of 5-HT synthesis in the brain on intermale aggression in two mouse strains differing in the TPH2 activity: C57BL/6J (B6, high TPH2 activity, high aggressiveness) and CC57BR/Mv (BR, low TPH2 activity, low aggressiveness). Administration of 5-HT precursor L-tryptophan (300 mg/kg, i.p.) to BR mice significantly increased the 5-HT and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) levels in the midbrain as well as the number of attacks and their duration in the resident-intruder test. And vice versa, administration of TPH2 inhibitor p-chlorophenylalanine (pCPA) (300 mg/kg, i.p., for 3 consecutive days) to B6 mice dramatically reduced the 5-HT and 5-HIAA contents in brain structures and attenuated the frequency and the duration of aggressive attacks. At the same time, L-tryptophan or pCPA did not influence the percentage of aggressive mice and the attack latency reflecting the threshold of aggressive reaction. This result indicated that the intensity of intermale aggression, but not the threshold of aggressive reaction is positively dependent on 5-HT metabolism in mouse brain.

  18. Transient Global Amnesia and Brain Tumour: Chance Concurrence or Aetiological Association? Case Report and Systematic Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Milburn-McNulty, Phil; Larner, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    We report a patient presenting with episodes of transient amnesia, some with features suggestive of transient global amnesia (TGA), and some more reminiscent of transient epileptic amnesia. Investigation with neuroimaging revealed an intrinsic lesion in the right amygdala, with features suggestive of low-grade neoplasia. We undertook a systematic review of the literature on TGA and brain tumour. Fewer than 20 cases were identified, some of which did not conform to the clinical diagnostic criteria for TGA. Hence, the concurrence of brain tumour and TGA is very rare and of doubtful aetiological relevance. In some brain tumour-associated cases, epilepsy may be masquerading as TGA. PMID:25802501

  19. Development of a positron probe for localization and excision of brain tumours during surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogalhas, F.; Charon, Y.; Duval, M.-A.; Lefebvre, F.; Palfi, S.; Pinot, L.; Siebert, R.; Ménard, L.

    2009-07-01

    The survival outcome of patients suffering from gliomas is directly linked to the complete surgical resection of the tumour. To help the surgeons to delineate precisely the boundaries of the tumour, we developed an intraoperative positron probe with background noise rejection capability. The probe was designed to be directly coupled to the excision tool such that detection and removal of the radiolabelled tumours could be simultaneous. The device consists of two exchangeable detection heads composed of clear and plastic scintillating fibres. Each head is coupled to an optic fibre bundle that exports the scintillating light to a photodetection and processing electronic module placed outside the operative wound. The background rejection method is based on a real-time subtraction technique. The measured probe sensitivity for 18F was 1.1 cps kBq-1 ml-1 for the small head and 3.4 cps kBq-1 ml-1 for the large head. The mean spatial resolution was 1.6 mm FWHM on the detector surface. The γ-ray rejection efficiency measured by realistic brain phantom modelling of the surgical cavity was 99.4%. This phantom also demonstrated the ability of the probe to detect tumour discs as small as 5 mm in diameter (20 mg) for tumour-to-background ratios higher than 3:1 and with an acquisition time around 4 s at each scanning step. These results indicate that our detector could be a useful complement to existing techniques for the accurate excision of brain tumour tissue and more generally to improve the efficiency of radio-guided cancer surgery.

  20. The creation of protection and hope in patients with malignant brain tumours.

    PubMed

    Salander, P; Bergenheim, T; Henriksson, R

    1996-04-01

    The malignant brain tumour disease condenses much of the anguish of cancer diseases. The brain is a vital and delicate organ, and the prognosis is generally unfavourable. The patient is exposed and has to rely on cognitive manoeuvres to manage the mental stress. The purpose of this study was to generate new insights into how the patient constructs a new sense of reality when confronted with the malignant brain tumour diagnosis. Within grounded theory methodology, 30 patients with malignant gliomas were interviewed twice, in direct connection with diagnosis, surgery and radiotherapy. In addition, their partners were interviewed, and quantitative instruments (SMMSE, RDCQ) were used as additional references for assessing the patients cognitively and emotionally. Eleven patients were excluded from the final analysis because of cognitive impairment of personality change. Most of the patients were aware of the fact that the brain tumour exposed them to grave danger, but they were also able to use various cognitive manoeuvres to create protection and hope. This process originated from different sources: the body; helpful relations; cognitive schemata; and the handling of information. The importance of the body to raise hope is emphasized. In the discussion we consider this process as an expression of how the patient brings together reality and hope, thus creating her/his own illusion. These findings are also related to adjacent psychoanalytic theory, proposing a theoretical reference with clinical implications when discussing "What to tell cancer patients."

  1. Plumbagin alters telomere dynamics, induces DNA damage and cell death in human brain tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Khaw, Aik Kia; Sameni, Safoura; Venkatesan, Shriram; Kalthur, Guruprasad; Hande, M Prakash

    2015-11-01

    Natural plant products may possess much potential in palliative therapy and supportive strategies of current cancer treatments with lesser cytotoxicity to normal cells compared to conventional chemotherapy. In the current study, anti-cancer properties of plumbagin, a plant-derived naphthoquinone, on brain cancer cells were determined. Plumbagin treatment resulted in the induction of DNA damage, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, followed by suppression of the colony forming ability of the brain tumour cells. These effects were substantiated by upregulation of PTEN, TNFRSF1A and downregulation of E2F1 genes, along with a drop in MDM2, cyclin B1, survivin and BCL2 protein expression. Plumbagin induced elevated levels of caspase-3/7 activity as well. For the first time, we show here that plumbagin inhibits telomerase in brain tumour cells and results in telomere shortening following chronic long-term treatment. This observation implies considerable cytotoxicity of plumbagin towards cancer cells with higher telomerase activity. Collectively, our findings suggest plumbagin as a potential chemotherapeutic phytochemical in brain tumour treatment modalities.

  2. Occupational exposure to extremely low frequency magnetic fields and brain tumour risks in the INTEROCC study

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Michelle C; Benke, Geza; Bowman, Joseph D; Figuerola, Jordi; Fleming, Sarah; Hours, Martine; Kincl, Laurel; Krewski, Daniel; McLean, Dave; Parent, Marie-Elise; Richardson, Lesley; Sadetzki, Siegal; Schlaefer, Klaus; Schlehofer, Brigitte; Schüz, Joachim; Siemiatycki, Jack; van Tongeren, Martie; Cardis, Elisabeth

    2014-01-01

    Background Occupational exposure to extremely low frequency magnetic fields (ELF) is a suspected risk factor for brain tumours, however the literature is inconsistent. Few studies have assessed whether ELF in different time windows of exposure may be associated with specific histologic types of brain tumours. This study examines the association between ELF and brain tumours in the large-scale INTEROCC study. Methods Cases of adult primary glioma and meningioma were recruited in seven countries (Australia, Canada, France, Germany, Israel, New Zealand, United Kingdom) between 2000 and 2004. Estimates of mean workday ELF exposure based on a job exposure matrix assigned. Estimates of cumulative exposure, average exposure, maximum exposure, and exposure duration were calculated for the lifetime, and 1–4, 5–9, and 10+ years prior to the diagnosis/reference date. Results There were 3,761 included brain tumour cases (1,939 glioma, 1,822 meningioma) and 5,404 population controls. There was no association between lifetime cumulative ELF exposure and glioma or meningioma risk. However, there were positive associations between cumulative ELF 1–4 years prior to the diagnosis/reference date and glioma (odds ratio (OR) ≥ 90th percentile vs < 25th percentile = 1.67, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.36–2.07, p < 0.0001 linear trend), and, somewhat weaker associations with meningioma (OR ≥ 90th percentile vs < 25th percentile = 1.23, 95% CI 0.97–1.57, p = 0.02 linear trend). Conclusions Results showed positive associations between ELF in the recent past and glioma. Impact Occupational ELF exposure may play a role in the later stages (promotion and progression) of brain tumourigenesis. PMID:24935666

  3. Integrative genomic analyses identify LIN28 and OLIG2 as markers of survival and metastatic potential in childhood central nervous system primitive neuro-ectodermal brain tumours

    PubMed Central

    Picard, Daniel; Miller, Suzanne; Hawkins, Cynthia E; Bouffet, Eric; Rogers, Hazel A; Chan, Tiffany SY; Kim, Seung-Ki; Ra, Young-Shin; Fangusaro, Jason; Korshunov, Andrey; Toledano, Helen; Nakamura, Hideo; Hayden, James T; Chan, Jennifer; Lafay-Cousin, Lucie; Hu, Ping X; Fan, Xing; Muraszko, Karin M; Pomeroy, Scott L; Lau, Ching C; Ng, Ho-Keung; Jones, Chris; Meter, Timothy Van; Clifford, Steven C; Eberhart, Charles; Gajjar, Amar; Pfister, Stefan M; Grundy, Richard G; Huang, Annie

    2013-01-01

    Background Childhood Central Nervous System Primitive Neuro-Ectodermal brain Tumours (CNS-PNETs) are highly aggressive brain tumours for which molecular features and best therapeutic strategy remains unknown. We interrogated a large cohort of these rare tumours in order to identify molecular markers that will enhance clinical management of CNS-PNET. Methods Transcriptional and copy number profiles from primary hemispheric CNS-PNETs were examined using clustering, gene and pathways enrichment analyses to discover tumour sub-groups and group-specific molecular markers. Immuno-histochemical and/or gene expression analyses were used to validate and examine the clinical significance of novel sub-group markers in 123 primary CNS-PNETs. Findings Three molecular sub-groups of CNS-PNETs distinguished by primitive neural (Group 1), oligo-neural (Group 2) and mesenchymal lineage (Group 3) gene expression signature were identified. Tumour sub-groups exhibited differential expression of cell lineage markers, LIN28 and OLIG2, and correlated with distinct demographics, survival and metastatic incidence. Group 1 tumours affected primarily younger females; male: female ratios were respectively 0.61 (median age 2.9 years; 95% CI: 2.4–5.2; p≤ 0.005), 1.25 (median age 7.9 years; 95% CI: 6–9.7) and 1.63 (median age 5.9 years; 95% CI: 4.9–7.8) for group 1, 2 and 3 patients. Overall outcome was poorest in group 1 patients which had a median survival of 0.8 years (95% CI: 0.47–1.2; p=0.019) as compared to 1.8 years (95% CI: 1.4–2.3) and 4.3 years; (95% CI: 0.82–7.8) respectively for group 2 and 3 patients. Group 3 tumours had the highest incidence of metastases at diagnosis; M0: M+ ratio were respectively 0.9 and 3.9 for group 3, versus group 1 and 2 tumours combined (p=0.037). Interpretation LIN28 and OLIG2 represent highly promising, novel diagnostic and prognostic molecular markers for CNS PNET that warrants further evaluation in prospective clinical trials. PMID:22691720

  4. Childhood brain tumour risk and its association with wireless phones: a commentary.

    PubMed

    Söderqvist, Fredrik; Carlberg, Michael; Hansson Mild, Kjell; Hardell, Lennart

    2011-12-19

    Case-control studies on adults point to an increased risk of brain tumours (glioma and acoustic neuroma) associated with the long-term use of mobile phones. Recently, the first study on mobile phone use and the risk of brain tumours in children and adolescents, CEFALO, was published. It has been claimed that this relatively small study yielded reassuring results of no increased risk. We do not agree. We consider that the data contain several indications of increased risk, despite low exposure, short latency period, and limitations in the study design, analyses and interpretation. The information certainly cannot be used as reassuring evidence against an association, for reasons that we discuss in this commentary.

  5. Lessons from brain mapping in surgery for low-grade glioma: insights into associations between tumour and brain plasticity.

    PubMed

    Duffau, Hugues

    2005-08-01

    Surgical treatment of low-grade gliomas (LGGs) aims to maximise the amount of tumour tissue resected, while minimising the risk of functional sequelae. In this review I address the issue of how to reconcile these two conflicting goals. First, I review the natural history of LGG-growth, invasion, and anaplastic transformation. Second, I discuss the contribution of new techniques, such as functional mapping, to our understanding of brain reorganisation in response to progressive growth of LGG. Third, I consider the clinical implications of interactions between tumour progression and brain plasticity. In particular, I show how longitudinal studies (preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative) could allow us to optimise the surgical risk-to-benefit ratios. I will also discuss controversial issues such as defining surgical indications for LGGs, predicting the risk of postoperative deficit, aspects of operative surgical neuro-oncology (eg, preoperative planning and preservation of functional areas and tracts), and postoperative functional recovery.

  6. Differences in brain circuitry for appetitive and reactive aggression as revealed by realistic auditory scripts

    PubMed Central

    Moran, James K.; Weierstall, Roland; Elbert, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Aggressive behavior is thought to divide into two motivational elements: The first being a self-defensively motivated aggression against threat and a second, hedonically motivated “appetitive” aggression. Appetitive aggression is the less understood of the two, often only researched within abnormal psychology. Our approach is to understand it as a universal and adaptive response, and examine the functional neural activity of ordinary men (N = 50) presented with an imaginative listening task involving a murderer describing a kill. We manipulated motivational context in a between-subjects design to evoke appetitive or reactive aggression, against a neutral control, measuring activity with Magnetoencephalography (MEG). Results show differences in left frontal regions in delta (2–5 Hz) and alpha band (8–12 Hz) for aggressive conditions and right parietal delta activity differentiating appetitive and reactive aggression. These results validate the distinction of reward-driven appetitive aggression from reactive aggression in ordinary populations at the level of functional neural brain circuitry. PMID:25538590

  7. Profile of a Malignant Brain Tumour in Jamaica: An Eight-year Review, 2005 to 2012

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, P; Jaggon, JR; Campbell, J; Bruce, C; Ferron-Boothe, D; James, K; Crandon, I; Eldemire-Shearer, D

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most malignant and most common primary brain tumour worldwide. This study was undertaken to investigate the demographics of this tumour in Jamaica as there is to date no such published data. Data from the recently started Intracranial Tumour Registry (ITR) at the University Hospital of the West Indies was used. Methods: All cases of GBM entered into the ITR between 2005 and 2012 were gathered. Of these, only patients with pathologically proven diagnoses were entered into the study. Demographic data, including age and gender, were recorded. The distribution of the tumours by anatomic location was also documented. Results: Of the 602 patients entered into the ITR up to that time, 42 were found to have histologically proven GBM with a male to female ratio of 2.2:1. There was an age range of 8–92 years with a mean age of diagnosis of 48 years. The majority of the tumours (66.7%) occurred in the left cerebral hemisphere with the most common lobe being the temporal lobe. Two patients (4.8%) had lesions spanning both hemispheres. Conclusions: This preliminary study reveals that there is a similar gender distribution of GBM within our population compared with the rest of the world. It, however, revealed that the mean age of diagnosis in our population (48 years) is lower than that quoted in the worldwide literature (53 to 64 years). One possible explanation for this is the possibility that many of our GBMs are actually secondary tumours which are thought to arise from less malignant, undiagnosed precursors. The percentage of GBMs occurring in the paediatric population was similar to the rest of the world. PMID:26624590

  8. A region-based segmentation of tumour from brain CT images using nonlinear support vector machine classifier.

    PubMed

    Nanthagopal, A Padma; Rajamony, R Sukanesh

    2012-07-01

    The proposed system provides new textural information for segmenting tumours, efficiently and accurately and with less computational time, from benign and malignant tumour images, especially in smaller dimensions of tumour regions of computed tomography (CT) images. Region-based segmentation of tumour from brain CT image data is an important but time-consuming task performed manually by medical experts. The objective of this work is to segment brain tumour from CT images using combined grey and texture features with new edge features and nonlinear support vector machine (SVM) classifier. The selected optimal features are used to model and train the nonlinear SVM classifier to segment the tumour from computed tomography images and the segmentation accuracies are evaluated for each slice of the tumour image. The method is applied on real data of 80 benign, malignant tumour images. The results are compared with the radiologist labelled ground truth. Quantitative analysis between ground truth and the segmented tumour is presented in terms of segmentation accuracy and the overlap similarity measure dice metric. From the analysis and performance measures such as segmentation accuracy and dice metric, it is inferred that better segmentation accuracy and higher dice metric are achieved with the normalized cut segmentation method than with the fuzzy c-means clustering method.

  9. Relationships Between Traumatic Brain Injury and Illicit Drug Use and Their Association With Aggression in Inmates.

    PubMed

    Fishbein, Diana; Dariotis, Jacinda K; Ferguson, Pamela L; Pickelsimer, E Elisabeth

    2016-04-01

    Extensive interviews of correctional inmates in South Carolina (2009-2010) were conducted under a Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) grant. We evaluated the extent to which early traumatic brain injury (TBI) and subsequent illicit drug abuse may conjointly influence development of aggression, controlling for alcohol use, and whether cognitive or emotional dysregulation mediated this relationship. Early TBI predicted greater severity and earlier onset of drug use, and an earlier age at first use predicted greater aggression regardless of the age of TBI. Emotional dysregulation mediated effects of TBI on aggression. The potential to design more targeted treatments for this susceptible population are discussed.

  10. Intracavitary moderator balloon combined with 252Cf brachytherapy and boron neutron capture therapy, improving dosimetry in brain tumour and infiltrations

    PubMed Central

    Brandão, S F

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This article proposes a combination of californium-252 (252Cf) brachytherapy, boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and an intracavitary moderator balloon catheter applied to brain tumour and infiltrations. Methods: Dosimetric evaluations were performed on three protocol set-ups: 252Cf brachytherapy combined with BNCT (Cf-BNCT); Cf-BNCT with a balloon catheter filled with light water (LWB) and the same set-up with heavy water (HWB). Results: Cf-BNCT-HWB has presented dosimetric advantages to Cf-BNCT-LWB and Cf-BNCT in infiltrations at 2.0–5.0 cm from the balloon surface. However, Cf-BNCT-LWB has shown superior dosimetry up to 2.0 cm from the balloon surface. Conclusion: Cf-BNCT-HWB and Cf-BNCT-LWB protocols provide a selective dose distribution for brain tumour and infiltrations, mainly further from the 252Cf source, sparing the normal brain tissue. Advances in knowledge: Malignant brain tumours grow rapidly and often spread to adjacent brain tissues, leading to death. Improvements in brain radiation protocols have been continuously achieved; however, brain tumour recurrence is observed in most cases. Cf-BNCT-LWB and Cf-BNCT-HWB represent new modalities for selectively combating brain tumour infiltrations and metastasis. PMID:25927876

  11. Mobile phone use, exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic field, and brain tumour: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Takebayashi, T; Varsier, N; Kikuchi, Y; Wake, K; Taki, M; Watanabe, S; Akiba, S; Yamaguchi, N

    2008-02-12

    In a case-control study in Japan of brain tumours in relation to mobile phone use, we used a novel approach for estimating the specific absorption rate (SAR) inside the tumour, taking account of spatial relationships between tumour localisation and intracranial radiofrequency distribution. Personal interviews were carried out with 88 patients with glioma, 132 with meningioma, and 102 with pituitary adenoma (322 cases in total), and with 683 individually matched controls. All maximal SAR values were below 0.1 W kg(-1), far lower than the level at which thermal effects may occur, the adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for regular mobile phone users being 1.22 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.63-2.37) for glioma and 0.70 (0.42-1.16) for meningioma. When the maximal SAR value inside the tumour tissue was accounted for in the exposure indices, the overall OR was again not increased and there was no significant trend towards an increasing OR in relation to SAR-derived exposure indices. A non-significant increase in OR among glioma patients in the heavily exposed group may reflect recall bias.

  12. Brain Serotonin Receptors and Transporters: Initiation vs. Termination of Escalated Aggression

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Aki; Quadros, Isabel M.; de Almeida, Rosa M. M.; Miczek, Klaus A.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Recent findings have shown a complexly regulated 5-HT system as it is linked to different kinds of aggression. Objective We focus on (1) phasic and tonic changes of 5-HT and (2) state and trait of aggression, and emphasize the different receptor subtypes, their role in specific brain regions, feed-back regulation and modulation by other amines, acids and peptides. Results New pharmacological tools differentiate the first three 5-HT receptor families and their modulation by GABA, glutamate and CRF. Activation of 5-HT1A, 5-HT1B and 5-HT2A/2C receptors in mesocorticolimbic areas, reduce species-typical and other aggressive behaviors. In contrast, agonists at 5-HT1A and 5-HT1B receptors in the medial prefrontal cortex or septal area can increase aggressive behavior under specific conditions. Activation of serotonin transporters reduce mainly pathological aggression. Genetic analyses of aggressive individuals have identified several molecules that affect the 5-HT system directly (e.g., Tph2, 5-HT1B, 5-HT transporter, Pet1, MAOA) or indirectly (e.g., Neuropeptide Y, αCaMKII, NOS, BDNF). Dysfunction in genes for MAOA escalates pathological aggression in rodents and humans, particularly in interaction with specific experiences. Conclusions Feedback to autoreceptors of the 5-HT1 family and modulation via heteroreceptors are important in the expression of aggressive behavior. Tonic increase of the 5-HT2 family expression may cause escalated aggression, whereas the phasic increase of 5-HT2 receptors inhibits aggressive behaviors. Polymorphisms in the genes of 5-HT transporters or rate-limiting synthetic and metabolic enzymes of 5-HT modulate aggression, often requiring interaction with the rearing environment. PMID:20938650

  13. Impulsivity and aggression mediate regional brain responses in Borderline Personality Disorder: An fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Soloff, Paul H; Abraham, Kristy; Burgess, Ashley; Ramaseshan, Karthik; Chowdury, Asadur; Diwadkar, Vaibhav A

    2017-02-28

    Fronto-limbic brain networks involved in regulation of impulsivity and aggression are abnormal in Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD). However, it is unclear whether, or to what extent, these personality traits actually modulate brain responses during cognitive processing. Using fMRI, we examined the effects of trait impulsivity, aggression, and depressed mood on regional brain responses in 31 female BPD and 25 control subjects during a Go No-Go task using Ekman faces as targets. First-level contrasts modeled effects of negative emotional context. Second-level regression models used trait impulsivity, aggression and depressed mood as predictor variables of regional brain activations. In BPD, trait impulsivity was positively correlated with activation in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, orbital frontal cortex (OFC), basal ganglia (BG), and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, with no areas of negative correlation. In contrast, aggression was negatively correlated with activation in OFC, hippocampus, and BG, with no areas of positive correlation. Depressed mood had a generally dampening effect on activations. Effects of trait impulsivity on healthy controls differed from effects in BPD, suggesting a disorder-specific response. Negative emotional context and trait impulsivity, but not aggression or depression, diminished task performance across both groups. Negative emotional context may interfere with cognitive functioning in BPD through interaction with the neurobiology of personality traits.

  14. Identification of a novel BET bromodomain inhibitor-sensitive, gene regulatory circuit that controls Rituximab response and tumour growth in aggressive lymphoid cancers

    PubMed Central

    Emadali, Anouk; Rousseaux, Sophie; Bruder-Costa, Juliana; Rome, Claire; Duley, Samuel; Hamaidia, Sieme; Betton, Patricia; Debernardi, Alexandra; Leroux, Dominique; Bernay, Benoit; Kieffer-Jaquinod, Sylvie; Combes, Florence; Ferri, Elena; McKenna, Charles E; Petosa, Carlo; Bruley, Christophe; Garin, Jérôme; Ferro, Myriam; Gressin, Rémy; Callanan, Mary B; Khochbin, Saadi

    2013-01-01

    Immuno-chemotherapy elicit high response rates in B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma but heterogeneity in response duration is observed, with some patients achieving cure and others showing refractory disease or relapse. Using a transcriptome-powered targeted proteomics screen, we discovered a gene regulatory circuit involving the nuclear factor CYCLON which characterizes aggressive disease and resistance to the anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, Rituximab, in high-risk B-cell lymphoma. CYCLON knockdown was found to inhibit the aggressivity of MYC-overexpressing tumours in mice and to modulate gene expression programs of biological relevance to lymphoma. Furthermore, CYCLON knockdown increased the sensitivity of human lymphoma B cells to Rituximab in vitro and in vivo. Strikingly, this effect could be mimicked by in vitro treatment of lymphoma B cells with a small molecule inhibitor for BET bromodomain proteins (JQ1). In summary, this work has identified CYCLON as a new MYC cooperating factor that autonomously drives aggressive tumour growth and Rituximab resistance in lymphoma. This resistance mechanism is amenable to next-generation epigenetic therapy by BET bromodomain inhibition, thereby providing a new combination therapy rationale for high-risk lymphoma. The nuclear factor CYCLON is a new MYC cooperating factor that drives tumor growth and Rituximab resistance in lymphoma. This resistance mechanism can be targeted by next-generation epigenetic therapy by BET bromodomain inhibition downstream of MYC. PMID:23828858

  15. Intraoperative probe detecting β- decays in brain tumour radio-guided surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solfaroli Camillocci, E.; Bocci, V.; Chiodi, G.; Collamati, F.; Donnarumma, R.; Faccini, R.; Mancini Terracciano, C.; Marafini, M.; Mattei, I.; Muraro, S.; Recchia, L.; Rucinski, A.; Russomando, A.; Toppi, M.; Traini, G.; Morganti, S.

    2017-02-01

    Radio-guided surgery (RGS) is a technique to intraoperatively detect tumour remnants, favouring a radical resection. Exploiting β- emitting tracers provides a higher signal to background ratio compared to the established technique with γ radiation, allowing the extension of the RGS applicability range. We developed and tested a detector based on para-terphenyl scintillator with high sensitivity to low energy electrons and almost transparent to γs to be used as intraoperative probe for RGS with β- emitting tracer. Portable read out electronics was customised to match the surgeon needs. This probe was used for preclinical test on specific phantoms and a test on ;ex vivo; specimens from patients affected by meningioma showing very promising results for the application of this new technique on brain tumours. In this paper, the prototype of the intraoperative probe and the tests are discussed; then, the results on meningioma are used to make predictions on the performance of the probe detecting residuals of a more challenging and more interesting brain tumour: the glioma.

  16. Walker 256 tumour cells increase substance P immunoreactivity locally and modify the properties of the blood-brain barrier during extravasation and brain invasion.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Kate M; Harford-Wright, Elizabeth; Vink, Robert; Nimmo, Alan J; Ghabriel, Mounir N

    2013-01-01

    It is not yet known how tumour cells traverse the blood-brain barrier (BBB) to form brain metastases. Substance P (SP) release is a key component of neurogenic inflammation which has been recently shown to increase the permeability of the BBB following CNS insults, making it a possible candidate as a mediator of tumour cell extravasation into the brain. This study investigated the properties of the BBB in the early stages of tumour cell invasion into the brain, and the possible involvement of SP. Male Wistar rats were injected with Walker 256 breast carcinoma cells via the internal carotid artery and euthanised at 1, 3, 6 and 9 days post tumour inoculation. Culture medium-injected animals served as controls at 1 and 9 days. Evidence of tumour cell extravasation across the BBB was first observed at 3 days post-inoculation, which corresponded with significantly increased albumin (p < 0.05) and SP immunoreactivity (p < 0.01) and significantly reduced endothelial barrier antigen labelling of microvessels when compared to culture medium control animals (p < 0.001). By day 9 after tumour cell inoculation, 100 % of animals developed large intracranial neoplasms that had significantly increased albumin in the peri-tumoral area (p < 0.001). The increased SP immunoreactivity and altered BBB properties at 3 days post-inoculation that coincided with early tumour invasion may be indicative of a mechanism for tumour cell extravasation into the brain. Thus, extravasation of tumour cells into the brain to form cerebral metastases may be a SP-mediated process.

  17. Clinical application of event related potentials in patients with brain tumours and traumatic head injuries.

    PubMed

    Olbrich, H M; Nau, H E; Zerbin, D; Lanczos, L; Lodemann, E; Engelmeier, M P; Grote, W

    1986-01-01

    Event related potential recording and psychometric evaluation of cognitive impairment were carried out on 21 patients with brain tumours, 21 patients with severe head injuries and 24 controls. The tumour and trauma patients who met the psychometric inclusion criteria for dementia, but not the non-demented patients, had significantly longer N2 and P3 latencies than the controls. In assessing individual patients P3 latency correctly differentiated between demented and non-demented patients in 81% of cases (for N2 latency 77%). Particularly P3 latency may provide a practical and objective measure of mental impairment in neurosurgical disorders producing dementia. Marked asymmetry in N2 and P3 amplitudes between hemispheres was observed in a number of cases. No significant relationship was found between diminution of N2 and P3 components and side of lesion.

  18. Aggression is associated with aerobic glycolysis in the honey bee brain(1).

    PubMed

    Chandrasekaran, S; Rittschof, C C; Djukovic, D; Gu, H; Raftery, D; Price, N D; Robinson, G E

    2015-02-01

    Aerobic glycolysis involves increased glycolysis and decreased oxidative catabolism of glucose even in the presence of an ample oxygen supply. Aerobic glycolysis, a common metabolic pattern in cancer cells, was recently discovered in both the healthy and diseased human brain, but its functional significance is not understood. This metabolic pattern in the brain is surprising because it results in decreased efficiency of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production in a tissue with high energetic demands. We report that highly aggressive honey bees (Apis mellifera) show a brain transcriptomic and metabolic state consistent with aerobic glycolysis, i.e. increased glycolysis in combination with decreased oxidative phosphorylation. Furthermore, exposure to alarm pheromone, which provokes aggression, causes a metabolic shift to aerobic glycolysis in the bee brain. We hypothesize that this metabolic state, which is associated with altered neurotransmitter levels, increased glycolytically derived ATP and a reduced cellular redox state, may lead to increased neuronal excitability and oxidative stress in the brain. Our analysis provides evidence for a robust, distinct and persistent brain metabolic response to aggression-inducing social cues. This finding for the first time associates aerobic glycolysis with naturally occurring behavioral plasticity, which has important implications for understanding both healthy and diseased brain function.

  19. Aggression is associated with aerobic glycolysis in the honey bee brain1

    PubMed Central

    Chandrasekaran, S.; Rittschof, C. C.; Djukovic, D.; Gu, H.; Raftery, D.; Price, N. D.; Robinson, G. E.

    2015-01-01

    Aerobic glycolysis involves increased glycolysis and decreased oxidative catabolism of glucose even in the presence of an ample oxygen supply. Aerobic glycolysis, a common metabolic pattern in cancer cells, was recently discovered in both the healthy and diseased human brain, but its functional significance is not understood. This metabolic pattern in the brain is surprising because it results in decreased efficiency of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production in a tissue with high energetic demands. We report that highly aggressive honey bees (Apis mellifera) show a brain transcriptomic and metabolic state consistent with aerobic glycolysis, i.e. increased glycolysis in combination with decreased oxidative phosphorylation. Furthermore, exposure to alarm pheromone, which provokes aggression, causes a metabolic shift to aerobic glycolysis in the bee brain. We hypothesize that this metabolic state, which is associated with altered neurotransmitter levels, increased glycolytically derived ATP and a reduced cellular redox state, may lead to increased neuronal excitability and oxidative stress in the brain. Our analysis provides evidence for a robust, distinct and persistent brain metabolic response to aggression-inducing social cues. This finding for the first time associates aerobic glycolysis with naturally occurring behavioral plasticity, which has important implications for understanding both healthy and diseased brain function. PMID:25640316

  20. The effect of observers on behavior and the brain during aggressive encounters

    PubMed Central

    Desjardins, Julie K.; Becker, Lisa; Fernald, Russell D.

    2015-01-01

    What effect does an audience have on an animal’s behavior and where is this influence registered in the brain? To answer these questions, we analyzed male cichlid fish fighting in the presence of audiences of various compositions and measured expression of immediate early genes in the brain as a proxy for neural activity. We hypothesized their behavior would change depending on who was watching them. We measured behavioral responses from both the “watchers” and the “watched” during aggressive encounters and found that males fighting in the presence of an audience were more aggressive than males fighting without an audience. Depending on the nature of the audience, immediate early gene expression in key brain nuclei was differentially influenced. Both when an audience of larger males watched fighting males, and when they were watching larger males fighting, nuclei in the brain considered homologous with mammalian nuclei known to be associated with anxiety showed increased activity. When males were in the presence of any audience or when males saw any other males fighting, nuclei in the brain known to be involved in reproduction and aggression were differentially activated relative to control animals. In all cases, there was a close relationship between patterns of brain gene expression between fighters and observers. This suggests that the network of brain regions known as the social behavior network, common across vertebrates, are activated not only in association with the expression of social behavior but also by the reception of social information. PMID:26097004

  1. Differential reinforcement of other behavior (DRO) to reduce aggressive behavior following traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Hegel, M T; Ferguson, R J

    2000-01-01

    Severe brain injury can result in significant neurobehavioral and social functioning impairment. In rehabilitation settings, behavioral problems of aggression and nonadherence to therapeutic activities can pose barriers to maximal recovery of function. Behavioral interventions seem to be effective in reducing problem behavior among individuals recovering from severe brain trauma, but well-controlled studies examining the efficacy of such interventions are sparse. This article presents a single-case, multiple-baseline study of a differential reinforcement of other behavior (DRO) procedure in a 28-year-old, brain-injured male with aggressive behavior problems. The procedure successfully reduced the frequency of problem behavior by up to 74%, maintained at 1-month follow-up. Implications of this intervention for individuals with brain injury are discussed, and testing of this procedure using a between-group design seems indicated.

  2. Accuracy of CT parameters for assessment of tumour size and aggressiveness in lung adenocarcinoma with bronchoalveolar elements.

    PubMed

    Bhure, U N; Lardinois, D; Kalff, V; Hany, T F; Soltermann, A; Seifert, B; Steinert, H C

    2010-10-01

    Accurate determination of tumour size in lung adenocarcinoma with bronchoalveolar features (BAC) is important for the determination of TNM (tumour, nodes, metastasis) scores used in staging, prognosis and therapy response assessment. However, tumour sizes derived using lung window (LW) CT or soft-tissue/mediastinal window (MW) CT often give different results. This study examines which measurement correlates best with actual tumour size and which best identifies advanced disease. This retrospective study included 43 BAC patients who underwent surgical resection with mediastinal lymphadenectomy <4 weeks post CT scan. The largest unidimensional tumour diameter on each CT window was compared with actual histopathological tumour size (HP). LW, MW and HP size measurements and a recently described CT parameter - the modified tumour shadow disappearance rate (mTDR) = (1 - [MW/LW]) - were then used to determine which parameter best discriminated between the presence or absence of advanced disease. There was no difference between HP and LW sizes, but MW significantly underestimated HP size (p<0.0001). Unlike MW (p = 0.01) and mTDR (p = 0.001), neither HP (p = 0.14) nor LW (p = 0.10) distinguished between patients with or without advanced disease. On receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis at a cut-off of ≤0.13, the sensitivity and specificity of mTDR for detecting advanced disease were 69% and 89%, respectively. In patients with tumours ≤3 cm, only mTDR remained a significant predictor of advanced disease (p = 0.017), with best cut-off at ≤0.20, giving a sensitivity and specificity of 71% and 94%, respectively. MW better predicts advanced disease than LW and might also need to be recorded for RECIST (response evaluation criteria in solid tumours) assessment for T staging of BAC; however, mTDR appears to be an even better predictor and should also be used.

  3. Childhood brain tumours and use of mobile phones: comparison of a case-control study with incidence data.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Denis; Feychting, Maria; Schüz, Joachim; Röösli, Martin

    2012-05-20

    The first case-control study on mobile phone use and brain tumour risk among children and adolescents (CEFALO study) has recently been published. In a commentary published in Environmental Health, Söderqvist and colleagues argued that CEFALO suggests an increased brain tumour risk in relation to wireless phone use. In this article, we respond and show why consistency checks of case-control study results with observed time trends of incidence rates are essential, given the well described limitations of case-control studies and the steep increase of mobile phone use among children and adolescents during the last decade. There is no plausible explanation of how a notably increased risk from use of wireless phones would correspond to the relatively stable incidence time trends for brain tumours among children and adolescents observed in the Nordic countries. Nevertheless, an increased risk restricted to heavy mobile phone use, to very early life exposure, or to rare subtypes of brain tumours may be compatible with stable incidence trends at this time and thus further monitoring of childhood brain tumour incidence rate time trends is warranted.

  4. Case report: late aggressive meningioma following prophylactic cranial irradiation for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Stein, M E; Drumea, K; Guilbord, J N; Ben-Itzhak, O; Kuten, A

    1995-10-01

    The clinical, radiological and pathological findings in a 28-year-old female patient who developed aggressive meningioma 20 years after prophylatic cranial irradiation (PCI) for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) are described here. Only four cases of late atypical/aggressive meningioma following PCI were detected in a thorough search of the literature. The high cure rate in childhood ALL, attributable to aggressive chemotherapy and PCI, is capable of inducing secondary brain tumour, including aggressive meningioma.

  5. Image-guided microbeam irradiation to brain tumour bearing mice using a carbon nanotube x-ray source array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lei; Yuan, Hong; Burk, Laurel M.; Inscoe, Christy R.; Hadsell, Michael J.; Chtcheprov, Pavel; Lee, Yueh Z.; Lu, Jianping; Chang, Sha; Zhou, Otto

    2014-03-01

    Microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) is a promising experimental and preclinical radiotherapy method for cancer treatment. Synchrotron based MRT experiments have shown that spatially fractionated microbeam radiation has the unique capability of preferentially eradicating tumour cells while sparing normal tissue in brain tumour bearing animal models. We recently demonstrated the feasibility of generating orthovoltage microbeam radiation with an adjustable microbeam width using a carbon nanotube based x-ray source array. Here we report the preliminary results from our efforts in developing an image guidance procedure for the targeted delivery of the narrow microbeams to the small tumour region in the mouse brain. Magnetic resonance imaging was used for tumour identification, and on-board x-ray radiography was used for imaging of landmarks without contrast agents. The two images were aligned using 2D rigid body image registration to determine the relative position of the tumour with respect to a landmark. The targeting accuracy and consistency were evaluated by first irradiating a group of mice inoculated with U87 human glioma brain tumours using the present protocol and then determining the locations of the microbeam radiation tracks using γ-H2AX immunofluorescence staining. The histology results showed that among 14 mice irradiated, 11 received the prescribed number of microbeams on the targeted tumour, with an average localization accuracy of 454 µm measured directly from the histology (537 µm if measured from the registered histological images). Two mice received one of the three prescribed microbeams on the tumour site. One mouse was excluded from the analysis due to tissue staining errors.

  6. Image-guided microbeam irradiation to brain tumour bearing mice using a carbon nanotube x-ray source array.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Yuan, Hong; Burk, Laurel M; Inscoe, Christy R; Hadsell, Michael J; Chtcheprov, Pavel; Lee, Yueh Z; Lu, Jianping; Chang, Sha; Zhou, Otto

    2014-03-07

    Microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) is a promising experimental and preclinical radiotherapy method for cancer treatment. Synchrotron based MRT experiments have shown that spatially fractionated microbeam radiation has the unique capability of preferentially eradicating tumour cells while sparing normal tissue in brain tumour bearing animal models. We recently demonstrated the feasibility of generating orthovoltage microbeam radiation with an adjustable microbeam width using a carbon nanotube based x-ray source array. Here we report the preliminary results from our efforts in developing an image guidance procedure for the targeted delivery of the narrow microbeams to the small tumour region in the mouse brain. Magnetic resonance imaging was used for tumour identification, and on-board x-ray radiography was used for imaging of landmarks without contrast agents. The two images were aligned using 2D rigid body image registration to determine the relative position of the tumour with respect to a landmark. The targeting accuracy and consistency were evaluated by first irradiating a group of mice inoculated with U87 human glioma brain tumours using the present protocol and then determining the locations of the microbeam radiation tracks using γ-H2AX immunofluorescence staining. The histology results showed that among 14 mice irradiated, 11 received the prescribed number of microbeams on the targeted tumour, with an average localization accuracy of 454 µm measured directly from the histology (537 µm if measured from the registered histological images). Two mice received one of the three prescribed microbeams on the tumour site. One mouse was excluded from the analysis due to tissue staining errors.

  7. Image-guided microbeam irradiation to brain tumour bearing mice using a carbon nanotube X-ray source array

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lei; Yuan, Hong; Burk, Laurel M; Inscoe, Christy R; Hadsell, Michael J; Chtcheprov, Pavel; Lee, Yueh Z; Lu, Jianping; Chang, Sha; Zhou, Otto

    2014-01-01

    Microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) is a promising experimental and preclinical radiotherapy method for cancer treatment. Synchrotron based MRT experiments have shown that spatially fractionated microbeam radiation has the unique capability of preferentially eradicating tumour cells while sparing normal tissue in brain tumour bearing animal models. We recently demonstrated the feasibility of generating orthovoltage microbeam radiation with an adjustable microbeam width using a carbon nanotube based X-ray source array. Here we report the preliminary results from our efforts in developing an image guidance procedure for the targeted delivery of the narrow microbeams to the small tumour region in the mouse brain. Magnetic resonance imaging was used for tumour identification, and on-board X-ray radiography was used for imaging of landmarks without contrast agents. The two images were aligned using 2D rigid body image registration to determine the relative position of the tumour with respect to a landmark. The targeting accuracy and consistency were evaluated by first irradiating a group of mice inoculated with U87 human glioma brain tumours using the present protocol and then determining the locations of the microbeam radiation tracks using γ-H2AX immunofluorescence staining. The histology results showed that among 14 mice irradiated, 11 received the prescribed number of microbeams on the targeted tumour, with an average localization accuracy of 454 μm measured directly from the histology (537 μm if measured from the registered histological images). Two mice received one of the three prescribed microbeams on the tumour site. One mouse was excluded from the analysis due to tissue staining errors. PMID:24556798

  8. Imaging primary prostate cancer with 11C-Choline PET/CT: relation to tumour stage, Gleason score and biomarkers of biologic aggressiveness

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ji; Zhao, Yong; Li, Xin; Sun, Peng; Wang, Muwen; Wang, Ridong; Jin, Xunbo

    2012-01-01

    Background As a significant overlap of 11C-Choline standardized uptake value (SUV) between prostate cancer and benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) tissue, controversy exists regarding the clinical value of 11C-Choline PET/CT scan in primary prostate cancer. In this study, the SUVmax of the prostate lesions and the pelvic muscles were measured and their ratios (SUVmax-P/M ratio) were calculated. Then we evaluated whether the tracer 11C-Choline uptake, quantified as SUVmax-P/M ratio, correlated with tumour stage, Gleason score, and expression levels of several biomarkers of aggressiveness. Methods Twenty-six patients with primary prostate cancer underwent 11C-Choline PET/CT. Tumour specimens from these patients were graded histopathologically, and immunnohistochemistry for Ki-67, CD31, androgen receptor (AR), Her-2/neu, Bcl-2, and PTEN were performed. Results Both SUVmax and SUVmax-P/M ratio showed no significant difference between patients with tumour stage II and III, but significantly elevated in patients with tumour stage IV. SUVmax-P/M ratio was also significantly higher in lesions with Gleason score of 4+3 or higher versus less than or equal to 3+4. SUVmax-P/M ratio was found significantly correlated with expression levels of Ki-67 and CD31. In addition, a higher SUVmax-P/M ratio was demonstrated in Her-2/neu positive subgroup than negative subgroup. At the same time, Gleason score and expression levels of these biomarkers showed no significant association with SUVmax. Conclusions Using the parameter SUVmax-P/M ratio, 11C-Choline PET/CT may be a valuable non-invasive imaging technology in the diagnosis of primary prostate cancer. PMID:23077456

  9. A Testosterone-Related Structural Brain Phenotype Predicts Aggressive Behavior From Childhood to Adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Tuong-Vi; McCracken, James T; Albaugh, Matthew D; Botteron, Kelly N.; Hudziak, James J; Ducharme, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Structural covariance, the examination of anatomic correlations between brain regions, has emerged recently as a valid and useful measure of developmental brain changes. Yet the exact biological processes leading to changes in covariance, and the relation between such covariance and behavior, remain largely unexplored. The steroid hormone testosterone represents a compelling mechanism through which this structural covariance may be developmentally regulated in humans. Although steroid hormone receptors can be found throughout the central nervous system, the amygdala represents a key target for testosterone-specific effects, given its high density of androgen receptors. In addition, testosterone has been found to impact cortical thickness (CTh) across the whole brain, suggesting that it may also regulate the structural relationship, or covariance, between the amygdala and CTh. Here we examined testosterone-related covariance between amygdala volumes and whole-brain CTh, as well as its relationship to aggression levels, in a longitudinal sample of children, adolescents, and young adults 6 to 22 years old. We found: (1) testosterone-specific modulation of the covariance between the amygdala and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC); (2) a significant relationship between amygdala-mPFC covariance and levels of aggression; and (3) mediation effects of amygdala-mPFC covariance on the relationship between testosterone and aggression. These effects were independent of sex, age, pubertal stage, estradiol levels and anxious-depressed symptoms. These findings are consistent with prior evidence that testosterone targets the neural circuits regulating affect and impulse regulation, and show, for the first time in humans, how androgen-dependent organizational effects may regulate a very specific, aggression-related structural brain phenotype from childhood to young adulthood. PMID:26431805

  10. Long-term supratentorial brain structure and cognitive function following cerebellar tumour resections in childhood.

    PubMed

    Moberget, T; Andersson, S; Lundar, T; Due-Tønnessen, B J; Heldal, A; Endestad, T; Westlye, L T

    2015-03-01

    The cerebellum is connected to extensive regions of the cerebrum, and cognitive deficits following cerebellar lesions may thus be related to disrupted cerebello-cerebral connectivity. Moreover, early cerebellar lesions could affect distal brain development, effectively inducing long-term changes in brain structure and cognitive function. Here, we characterize supratentorial brain structure and cognitive function in 20 adult patients treated for cerebellar tumours in childhood (mean age at surgery: 7.1 years) and 26 matched controls. Relative to controls, patients showed reduced cognitive function and increased grey matter density in bilateral cingulum, left orbitofrontal cortex and the left hippocampus. Within the patient group, increased grey matter density in these regions was associated with decreased performance on tests of processing speed and executive function. Further, diffusion tensor imaging revealed widespread alterations in white matter microstructure in patients. While current ventricle volume (an index of previous hydrocephalus severity it patients) was associated with grey matter density and white matter microstructure in patients, this could only partially account for the observed group differences in brain structure and cognitive function. In conclusion, our results show distal effects of cerebellar lesions on cerebral integrity and wiring, likely caused by a combination of neurodegenerative processes and perturbed neurodevelopment.

  11. Impulsivity, aggression and brain structure in high and low lethality suicide attempters with borderline personality disorder

    PubMed Central

    Soloff, Paul; White, Richard; Diwadkar, Vaibhav A.

    2014-01-01

    Impulsivity and aggressiveness are trait dispositions associated with the vulnerability to suicidal behavior across diagnoses. They are associated with structural and functional abnormalities in brain networks involved in regulation of mood, impulse and behavior. They are also core characteristics of borderline personality disorder (BPD), a disorder defined, in part, by recurrent suicidal behavior. We assessed the relationships between personality traits, brain structure and lethality of suicide attempts in 51 BPD attempters using multiple regression analyses on structural MRI data. BPD was diagnosed by the Diagnostic Interview for Borderline Patients-revised, impulsivity by the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS), aggression by the Brown-Goodwin Lifetime History of Aggression (LHA), and high lethality by a score of 4 or more on the Lethality Rating Scale (LRS). Sixteen High Lethality attempters were compared to 35 Low Lethality attempters, with no significant differences noted in gender, co-morbidity, childhood abuse, BIS or LHA scores. Degree of medical lethality (LRS) was negatively related to gray matter volumes across multiple fronto-temporal-limbic regions. Effects of impulsivity and aggression on gray matter volumes discriminated High from Low Lethality attempters and differed markedly within lethality groups. Lethality of suicide attempts in BPD may be related to the mediation of these personality traits by specific neural networks. PMID:24656768

  12. Chemosensory danger detection in the human brain: Body odor communicating aggression modulates limbic system activation.

    PubMed

    Mutic, Smiljana; Brünner, Yvonne F; Rodriguez-Raecke, Rea; Wiesmann, Martin; Freiherr, Jessica

    2017-02-28

    Although the sense of smell is involved in numerous survival functions, the processing of body odor emitted by dangerous individuals is far from understood. The aim of the study was to explore how human fight chemosignals communicating aggression can alter brain activation related to an attentional bias and danger detection. While the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) was seen involved in processing threat-related emotional information, danger detection and error evaluation, it still remains unknown whether human chemosignals communicating aggression can potentially modulate this activation. In the fMRI experiment, healthy male and female normosmic odor recipients (n=18) completed a higher-order processing task (emotional Stroop task with the word categories anger, anxiety, happiness and neutral) while exposed to aggression and exercise chemosignals (collected from a different group of healthy male donors; n=16). Our results provide first evidence that aggression chemosignals induce a time-sensitive attentional bias in chemosensory danger detection and modulate limbic system activation. During exposure to aggression chemosignals compared to exercise chemosignals, functional imaging data indicates an enhancement of thalamus, hypothalamus and insula activation (p<.05, FWE-corrected). Together with the thalamus, the ACC was seen activated in response to threat-related words (p<.001). Chemosensory priming and habituation to body odor signals are discussed.

  13. Registration quality and descriptive epidemiology of childhood brain tumours in Scotland 1975-90.

    PubMed Central

    McKinney, P. A.; Ironside, J. W.; Harkness, E. F.; Arango, J. C.; Doyle, D.; Black, R. J.

    1994-01-01

    Children (0-14 years) with malignant brain and central nervous system (CNS) tumours (ICD9 191 and 192) were listed from the Scottish Cancer Registration Scheme for the years 1975-90. These cases formed the basis for validation and verification procedures aimed at providing a complete and accurate data set for epidemiological analyses. A variety of data sources were cross-checked to optimise ascertainment, and resulting from this 5.7% of validated cases were found on the cancer registry with diagnostic codes outside the ICD-9 range 191-192. A further 8.4% were newly registered cases. Analyses were conducted on the validated data set showing a significant temporal increase in incidence rates over the 16 year study period with an average annual percentage change of +2.6%. Large-scale geographical heterogeneity was also found, with a particularly high incidence in the Fife and Lothian areas and a low incidence in Grampian. Examination of associations with socioeconomic status, using the Carstairs deprivation index, revealed a rising trend in incidence strongly linked to areas with increasing levels of affluence. Our results suggest that for studies of childhood CNS tumours validation of cancer registry data is necessary and large-scale geographical variation and socioeconomic factors should be taken into account in any investigation of distribution in small geographical areas. PMID:7947107

  14. Brain Ischemia in Patients with Intracranial Hemorrhage: Pathophysiological Reasoning for Aggressive Diagnostic Management

    PubMed Central

    Naranjo, Daniel; Arkuszewski, Michal; Rudzinski, Wojciech; Melhem, Elias R.; Krejza, Jaroslaw

    2013-01-01

    Summary Patients with intracranial hemorrhage have to be managed aggressively to avoid or minimize secondary brain damage due to ischemia, which contributes to high morbidity and mortality. The risk of brain ischemia, however, is not the same in every patient. The risk of complications associated with an aggressive prophylactic therapy in patients with a low risk of brain ischemia can outweigh the benefits of therapy. Accurate and timely identification of patients at highest risk is a diagnostic challenge. Despite the availability of many diagnostic tools, stroke is common in this population, mostly because the pathogenesis of stroke is frequently multifactorial whereas diagnosticians tend to focus on one or two risk factors. The pathophysiological mechanisms of brain ischemia in patients with intracranial hemorrhage are not yet fully elucidated and there are several important areas of ongoing research. Therefore, this review describes physiological and pathophysiological aspects associated with the development of brain ischemia such as the mechanism of oxygen and carbon dioxide effects on the cerebrovascular system, neurovascular coupling and respiratory and cardiovascular factors influencing cerebral hemodynamics. Consequently, we review investigations of cerebral blood flow disturbances relevant to various hemodynamic states associated with high intracranial pressure, cerebral embolism, and cerebral vasospasm along with current treatment options. PMID:24355179

  15. An Improved Brain Tumour Classification System using Wavelet Transform and Neural Network.

    PubMed

    Dhas, DAS; Madheswaran, M

    2015-06-09

    An improved brain tumour classification system using wavelet transform and neural network is developed and presented in this paper. The anisotropic diffusion filter is used for image denoising and the performance of oriented rician noise reducing anisotropic diffusion (ORNRAD) filter is validated. The segmentation of the denoised image is carried out by Fuzzy C-means clustering. The features are extracted using Symlet and Coiflet Wavelet transform and Levenberg Marquardt algorithm based neural network is used to classify the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) images. This MRI classification technique is tested and analysed with the existing methodologies and its performance is found to be satisfactory with a classification accuracy of 93.02%. The developed system can assist the physicians for classifying the MRI images for better decision-making.

  16. Developmental transcription factor NFIB is a putative target of oncofetal miRNAs and is associated with tumour aggressiveness in lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Becker-Santos, Daiana D; Thu, Kelsie L; English, John C; Pikor, Larissa A; Martinez, Victor D; Zhang, May; Vucic, Emily A; Luk, Margaret Ty; Carraro, Anita; Korbelik, Jagoda; Piga, Daniela; Lhomme, Nicolas M; Tsay, Mike J; Yee, John; MacAulay, Calum E; Lam, Stephen; Lockwood, William W; Robinson, Wendy P; Jurisica, Igor; Lam, Wan L

    2016-10-01

    Genes involved in fetal lung development are thought to play crucial roles in the malignant transformation of adult lung cells. Consequently, the study of lung tumour biology in the context of lung development has the potential to reveal key developmentally relevant genes that play critical roles in lung cancer initiation/progression. Here, we describe for the first time a comprehensive characterization of miRNA expression in human fetal lung tissue, with subsequent identification of 37 miRNAs in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) that recapitulate their fetal expression patterns. Nuclear factor I/B (NFIB), a transcription factor essential for lung development, was identified as a potential frequent target for these 'oncofetal' miRNAs. Concordantly, analysis of NFIB expression in multiple NSCLC independent cohorts revealed its recurrent underexpression (in ∼40-70% of tumours). Interrogation of NFIB copy number, methylation, and mutation status revealed that DNA level disruption of this gene is rare, and further supports the notion that oncofetal miRNAs are likely the primary mechanism responsible for NFIB underexpression in NSCLC. Reflecting its functional role in regulating lung differentiation, low expression of NFIB was significantly associated with biologically more aggressive subtypes and, ultimately, poorer survival in lung adenocarcinoma patients. Copyright © 2016 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Genetic Influences on Brain Gene Expression in Rats Selected for Tameness and Aggression

    PubMed Central

    Heyne, Henrike O.; Lautenschläger, Susann; Nelson, Ronald; Besnier, François; Rotival, Maxime; Cagan, Alexander; Kozhemyakina, Rimma; Plyusnina, Irina Z.; Trut, Lyudmila; Carlborg, Örjan; Petretto, Enrico; Kruglyak, Leonid; Pääbo, Svante; Schöneberg, Torsten; Albert, Frank W.

    2014-01-01

    Interindividual differences in many behaviors are partly due to genetic differences, but the identification of the genes and variants that influence behavior remains challenging. Here, we studied an F2 intercross of two outbred lines of rats selected for tame and aggressive behavior toward humans for >64 generations. By using a mapping approach that is able to identify genetic loci segregating within the lines, we identified four times more loci influencing tameness and aggression than by an approach that assumes fixation of causative alleles, suggesting that many causative loci were not driven to fixation by the selection. We used RNA sequencing in 150 F2 animals to identify hundreds of loci that influence brain gene expression. Several of these loci colocalize with tameness loci and may reflect the same genetic variants. Through analyses of correlations between allele effects on behavior and gene expression, differential expression between the tame and aggressive rat selection lines, and correlations between gene expression and tameness in F2 animals, we identify the genes Gltscr2, Lgi4, Zfp40, and Slc17a7 as candidate contributors to the strikingly different behavior of the tame and aggressive animals. PMID:25189874

  18. Perimetric visual field and functional MRI correlation: implications for image-guided surgery in occipital brain tumours

    PubMed Central

    Roux, F; Ibarrola, D; Lotterie, J; Chollet, F; Berry, I

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To compare the results of visual functional MRI with those of perimetric evaluation in patients with visual field defects and retrochiasmastic tumours and in normal subjects without visual field defect. The potential clinical usefulness of visual functional MRI data during resective surgery was evaluated in patients with occipital lobe tumours.
METHODS—Eleven patients with various tumours and visual field defects and 12 normal subjects were studied by fMRI using bimonocular or monocular repetitive photic stimulation (8 Hz). The data obtained were analyzed with the statistical parametric maps software (p<10-8) and were compared with the results of Goldmann visual field perimetric evaluation. In patients with occipital brain tumours undergoing surgery, the functional data were registered in a frameless stereotactic device and the images fused into anatomical three standard planes and three dimensional reconstructions of the brain surface.
RESULTS—Two studies of patients were discarded, one because of head motion and the other because of badly followed instructions. On the remaining patients the functional activations found in the visual cortex were consistent with the results of perimetric evaluation in all but one of the patients and all the normal subjects although the results of fMRI were highly dependent on the choices of the analysis thresholds. Visual functional MRI image guided data were used in five patients with occipital brain tumours. No added postoperative functional field defect was detected.
CONCLUSIONS—There was a good correspondence between fMRI data and the results of perimetric evaluation although dependent on the analysis thresholds. Visual fMRI data registered into a frameless stereotactic device may be useful in surgical planning and tumour removal.

 PMID:11561035

  19. Surgeon volume and 30 day mortality for brain tumours in England

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Matt; Treasure, Peter; Greenberg, David; Brodbelt, Andrew; Collins, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Background: There is evidence that surgeons who perform more operations have better outcomes. However, in patients with brain tumours, all of the evidence comes from the USA. Methods: We examined all English patients with an intracranial neoplasm who had an intracranial resection in 2008–2010. We included surgeons who performed at least six operations over 3 years, and at least one operation in the first and last 6 months of the period. Results: The analysis data set comprised 9194 operations, 163 consultant neurosurgeons and 30 centres. Individual surgeon volumes varied widely (7–272; median=46). 72% of operations were on the brain, and 30 day mortality was 3%. A doubling of surgeon load was associated with a 20% relative reduction in mortality. Thirty day mortality varied between centres (0·95–8·62%) but was not related to centre workload. Conclusions: Individual surgeon volumes correlated with patient 30 day mortality. Centres and surgeons in England are busier than surgeons and centres in the USA. There is no relationship between centre volume and 30 day mortality in England. Services in the UK appear to be adequately arranged at a centre level, but would benefit from further surgeon sub-specialisation. PMID:27764843

  20. Increasing rates of brain tumours in the Swedish national inpatient register and the causes of death register.

    PubMed

    Hardell, Lennart; Carlberg, Michael

    2015-04-03

    Radiofrequency emissions in the frequency range 30 kHz-300 GHz were evaluated to be Group 2B, i.e., "possibly", carcinogenic to humans by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) at WHO in May 2011. The Swedish Cancer Register has not shown increasing incidence of brain tumours in recent years and has been used to dismiss epidemiological evidence on a risk. In this study we used the Swedish National Inpatient Register (IPR) and Causes of Death Register (CDR) to further study the incidence comparing with the Cancer Register data for the time period 1998-2013 using joinpoint regression analysis. In the IPR we found a joinpoint in 2007 with Annual Percentage Change (APC) +4.25%, 95% CI +1.98, +6.57% during 2007-2013 for tumours of unknown type in the brain or CNS. In the CDR joinpoint regression found one joinpoint in 2008 with APC during 2008-2013 +22.60%, 95% CI +9.68, +37.03%. These tumour diagnoses would be based on clinical examination, mainly CT and/or MRI, but without histopathology or cytology. No statistically significant increasing incidence was found in the Swedish Cancer Register during these years. We postulate that a large part of brain tumours of unknown type are never reported to the Cancer Register. Furthermore, the frequency of diagnosis based on autopsy has declined substantially due to a general decline of autopsies in Sweden adding further to missing cases. We conclude that the Swedish Cancer Register is not reliable to be used to dismiss results in epidemiological studies on the use of wireless phones and brain tumour risk.

  1. Increasing Rates of Brain Tumours in the Swedish National Inpatient Register and the Causes of Death Register

    PubMed Central

    Hardell, Lennart; Carlberg, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Radiofrequency emissions in the frequency range 30 kHz–300 GHz were evaluated to be Group 2B, i.e., “possibly”, carcinogenic to humans by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) at WHO in May 2011. The Swedish Cancer Register has not shown increasing incidence of brain tumours in recent years and has been used to dismiss epidemiological evidence on a risk. In this study we used the Swedish National Inpatient Register (IPR) and Causes of Death Register (CDR) to further study the incidence comparing with the Cancer Register data for the time period 1998–2013 using joinpoint regression analysis. In the IPR we found a joinpoint in 2007 with Annual Percentage Change (APC) +4.25%, 95% CI +1.98, +6.57% during 2007–2013 for tumours of unknown type in the brain or CNS. In the CDR joinpoint regression found one joinpoint in 2008 with APC during 2008–2013 +22.60%, 95% CI +9.68, +37.03%. These tumour diagnoses would be based on clinical examination, mainly CT and/or MRI, but without histopathology or cytology. No statistically significant increasing incidence was found in the Swedish Cancer Register during these years. We postulate that a large part of brain tumours of unknown type are never reported to the Cancer Register. Furthermore, the frequency of diagnosis based on autopsy has declined substantially due to a general decline of autopsies in Sweden adding further to missing cases. We conclude that the Swedish Cancer Register is not reliable to be used to dismiss results in epidemiological studies on the use of wireless phones and brain tumour risk. PMID:25854296

  2. Meta-analysis of long-term mobile phone use and the association with brain tumours.

    PubMed

    Hardell, Lennart; Carlberg, Michael; Söderqvist, Fredrik; Hansson Mild, Kjell

    2008-05-01

    We evaluated long-term use of mobile phones and the risk for brain tumours in case-control studies published so far on this issue. We identified ten studies on glioma and meta-analysis yielded OR = 0.9, 95% CI = 0.8-1.1. Latency period of > or =10-years gave OR = 1.2, 95% CI = 0.8-1.9 based on six studies, for ipsilateral use (same side as tumour) OR = 2.0, 95% CI = 1.2-3.4 (four studies), but contralateral use did not increase the risk significantly, OR = 1.1, 95% CI = 0.6-2.0. Meta-analysis of nine studies on acoustic neuroma gave OR = 0.9, 95% CI = 0.7-1.1 increasing to OR = 1.3, 95% CI = 0.6-2.8 using > or =10-years latency period (four studies). Ipsilateral use gave OR = 2.4, 95% CI = 1.1-5.3 and contra-lateral OR = 1.2, 95% CI = 0.7-2.2 in the > or =10-years latency period group (three studies). Seven studies gave results for meningioma yielding overall OR = 0.8, 95% CI = 0.7-0.99. Using > or =10-years latency period OR = 1.3, 95% CI = 0.9-1.8 was calculated (four studies) increasing to OR = 1.7, 95% CI = 0.99-3.1 for ipsilateral use and OR = 1.0, 95% CI = 0.3-3.1 for contralateral use (two studies). We conclude that this meta-analysis gave a consistent pattern of an association between mobile phone use and ipsilateral glioma and acoustic neuroma using > or =10-years latency period.

  3. Maternal aggression in rodents: brain oxytocin and vasopressin mediate pup defence

    PubMed Central

    Bosch, Oliver J.

    2013-01-01

    The most significant social behaviour of the lactating mother is maternal behaviour, which comprises maternal care and maternal aggression (MA). The latter is a protective behaviour of the mother serving to defend the offspring against a potentially dangerous intruder. The extent to which the mother shows aggressive behaviour depends on extrinsic and intrinsic factors, as we have learned from studies in laboratory rodents. Among the extrinsic factors are the pups’ presence and age, as well as the intruders’ sex and age. With respect to intrinsic factors, the mothers’ innate anxiety and the prosocial brain neuropeptides oxytocin (OXT) and arginine vasopressin (AVP) play important roles. While OXT is well known as a maternal neuropeptide, AVP has only recently been described in this context. The increased activities of these neuropeptides in lactation are the result of remarkable brain adaptations peripartum and are a prerequisite for the mother to become maternal. Consequently, OXT and AVP are significantly involved in mediating the fine-tuned regulation of MA depending on the brain regions. Importantly, both neuropeptides are also modulators of anxiety, which determines the extent of MA. This review provides a detailed overview of the role of OXT and AVP in MA and the link to anxiety. PMID:24167315

  4. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its precursor (proBDNF) in genetically defined fear-induced aggression.

    PubMed

    Ilchibaeva, Tatiana V; Kondaurova, Elena M; Tsybko, Anton S; Kozhemyakina, Rimma V; Popova, Nina K; Naumenko, Vladimir S

    2015-09-01

    The brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), its precursor (proBDNF) and BDNF mRNA levels were studied in the brain of wild rats selectively bred for more than 70 generations for either high level or for the lack of affective aggressiveness towards man. Significant increase of BDNF mRNA level in the frontal cortex and increase of BDNF level in the hippocampus of aggressive rats was revealed. In the midbrain and hippocampus of aggressive rats proBDNF level was increased, whereas BDNF/proBDNF ratio was reduced suggesting the prevalence and increased influence of proBDNF in highly aggressive rats. In the frontal cortex, proBDNF level in aggressive rats was decreased. Thus, considerable structure-specific differences in BDNF and proBDNF levels as well as in BDNF gene expression between highly aggressive and nonaggressive rats were shown. The data suggested the implication of BDNF and its precursor proBDNF in the mechanism of aggressiveness and in the creation of either aggressive or nonaggressive phenotype.

  5. Disruption of tumour-host communication by downregulation of LFA-1 reduces COX-2 and e-NOS expression and inhibits brain metastasis growth

    PubMed Central

    Soto, Manuel Sarmiento; O'Brien, Emma R.; Andreou, Kleopatra; Scrace, Simon F.; Zakaria, Rasheed; Jenkinson, Michael D.; O'Neill, Eric; Sibson, Nicola R.

    2016-01-01

    Over 20% of cancer patients will suffer metastatic spread to the brain, and prognosis remains poor. Communication between tumour cells and host tissue is essential during metastasis, yet little is known of the processes underlying such interactions in the brain. Here we test the hypothesis that cross-talk between tumour cells and host brain cells, through tumour cell leukocyte function associated protein-1 (LFA-1), is critical in metastasis development. Temporal expression of LFA-1 and its major ligand intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) was determined in two different mouse models of brain metastasis. Marked upregulation of both proteins was found, co-localising with astrocytes, microglia and tumour cells themselves. Silencing of LFA-1 expression in MDA231Br-GFP cells prior to intracerebral injection resulted in > 70% reduction in tumour burden compared to control MDA231Br-GFP cells (p < 0.005, n = 5). Subsequent qRT-PCR analysis of brain tissue revealed significant reductions in COX-2, VEGF and eNOS from host brain tissue, but not tumour cells, in mice injected with LFA-1 knockdown cells (p < 0.0001, n = 5). Finally, expression of both LFA-1 and ICAM-1 was demonstrated in human brain metastasis samples. The results of this study suggest LFA-1 as a new target in brain metastasis therapy and highlight the potential synergy with current anti-COX-2 and anti-NOS therapies. PMID:27447568

  6. Risk of brain tumours in relation to estimated RF dose from mobile phones: results from five Interphone countries

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, B K; Bowman, J D; Giles, G G; Hours, M; Krewski, D; McBride, M; Parent, M E; Sadetzki, S; Woodward, A; Brown, J; Chetrit, A; Figuerola, J; Hoffmann, C; Jarus-Hakak, A; Montestruq, L; Nadon, L; Richardson, L; Villegas, R; Vrijheid, M

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this study was to examine the associations of brain tumours with radio frequency (RF) fields from mobile phones. Methods Patients with brain tumour from the Australian, Canadian, French, Israeli and New Zealand components of the Interphone Study, whose tumours were localised by neuroradiologists, were analysed. Controls were matched on age, sex and region and allocated the ‘tumour location’ of their matched case. Analyses included 553 glioma and 676 meningioma cases and 1762 and 1911 controls, respectively. RF dose was estimated as total cumulative specific energy (TCSE; J/kg) absorbed at the tumour's estimated centre taking into account multiple RF exposure determinants. Results ORs with ever having been a regular mobile phone user were 0.93 (95% CI 0.73 to 1.18) for glioma and 0.80 (95% CI 0.66 to 0.96) for meningioma. ORs for glioma were below 1 in the first four quintiles of TCSE but above 1 in the highest quintile, 1.35 (95% CI 0.96 to 1.90). The OR increased with increasing TCSE 7+ years before diagnosis (p-trend 0.01; OR 1.91, 95% CI 1.05 to 3.47 in the highest quintile). A complementary analysis in which 44 glioma and 135 meningioma cases in the most exposed area of the brain were compared with gliomas and meningiomas located elsewhere in the brain showed increased ORs for tumours in the most exposed part of the brain in those with 10+ years of mobile phone use (OR 2.80, 95% CI 1.13 to 6.94 for glioma). Patterns for meningioma were similar, but ORs were lower, many below 1.0. Conclusions There were suggestions of an increased risk of glioma in long-term mobile phone users with high RF exposure and of similar, but apparently much smaller, increases in meningioma risk. The uncertainty of these results requires that they be replicated before a causal interpretation can be made. PMID:21659469

  7. Rare Aggressive Behavior of MDM2-Amplified Retroperitoneal Dedifferentiated Liposarcoma, with Brain, Lung and Subcutaneous Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Ben Salha, Imen; Zaidi, Shane; Noujaim, Jonathan; Miah, Aisha B.; Fisher, Cyril; Jones, Robin L.; Thway, Khin

    2016-01-01

    Dedifferentiated liposarcoma (DDL) is a histologically pleomorphic sarcoma, traditionally defined as well-differentiated liposarcoma with abrupt transition to high grade, non-lipogenic sarcoma. It can occur as part of recurrent well-differentiated liposarcoma, or may arise de novo. DDL most frequently occurs within the retroperitoneum, and while it is prone to local recurrence, it usually has a lower rate of metastasis than other pleomorphic sarcomas. We describe a case of retroperitoneal dedifferentiated liposarcoma in a 63-year-old male, who showed MDM2 amplification with fluorescence in situ hybridization, which displayed unusually aggressive behavior, with brain, lung and subcutaneous soft tissue metastases. As previous reports of metastatic liposarcoma have largely grouped DDL in with other (genetically and clinically distinct) liposarcoma subtypes, we highlight and discuss the rare occurrence of brain metastasis in MDM2-amplified retroperitoneal liposarcoma. PMID:27746879

  8. Relationship between paediatric CT scans and subsequent risk of leukaemia and brain tumours: assessment of the impact of underlying conditions

    PubMed Central

    de Gonzalez, Amy Berrington; Salotti, Jane A; McHugh, Kieran; Little, Mark P; Harbron, Richard W; Lee, Choonsik; Ntowe, Estelle; Braganza, Melissa Z; Parker, Louise; Rajaraman, Preetha; Stiller, Charles; Stewart, Douglas R; Craft, Alan W; Pearce, Mark S

    2016-01-01

    Background: We previously reported evidence of a dose–response relationship between ionising-radiation exposure from paediatric computed tomography (CT) scans and the risk of leukaemia and brain tumours in a large UK cohort. Underlying unreported conditions could have introduced bias into these findings. Methods: We collected and reviewed additional clinical information from radiology information systems (RIS) databases, underlying cause of death and pathology reports. We conducted sensitivity analyses excluding participants with cancer-predisposing conditions or previous unreported cancers and compared the dose–response analyses with our original results. Results: We obtained information from the RIS and death certificates for about 40% of the cohort (n∼180 000) and found cancer-predisposing conditions in 4 out of 74 leukaemia/myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) cases and 13 out of 135 brain tumour cases. As these conditions were unrelated to CT exposure, exclusion of these participants did not alter the dose–response relationships. We found evidence of previous unreported cancers in 2 leukaemia/MDS cases, 7 brain tumour cases and 232 in non-cases. These previous cancers were related to increased number of CTs. Exclusion of these cancers reduced the excess relative risk per mGy by 15% from 0.036 to 0.033 for leukaemia/MDS (P-trend=0.02) and by 30% from 0.023 to 0.016 (P-trend<0.0001) for brain tumours. When we included pathology reports we had additional clinical information for 90% of the cases. Additional exclusions from these reports further reduced the risk estimates, but this sensitivity analysis may have underestimated risks as reports were only available for cases. Conclusions: Although there was evidence of some bias in our original risk estimates, re-analysis of the cohort with additional clinical data still showed an increased cancer risk after low-dose radiation exposure from CT scans in young patients. PMID:26882064

  9. Non-negative matrix factorisation methods for the spectral decomposition of MRS data from human brain tumours

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In-vivo single voxel proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (SV 1H-MRS), coupled with supervised pattern recognition (PR) methods, has been widely used in clinical studies of discrimination of brain tumour types and follow-up of patients bearing abnormal brain masses. SV 1H-MRS provides useful biochemical information about the metabolic state of tumours and can be performed at short (< 45 ms) or long (> 45 ms) echo time (TE), each with particular advantages. Short-TE spectra are more adequate for detecting lipids, while the long-TE provides a much flatter signal baseline in between peaks but also negative signals for metabolites such as lactate. Both, lipids and lactate, are respectively indicative of specific metabolic processes taking place. Ideally, the information provided by both TE should be of use for clinical purposes. In this study, we characterise the performance of a range of Non-negative Matrix Factorisation (NMF) methods in two respects: first, to derive sources correlated with the mean spectra of known tissue types (tumours and normal tissue); second, taking the best performing NMF method for source separation, we compare its accuracy for class assignment when using the mixing matrix directly as a basis for classification, as against using the method for dimensionality reduction (DR). For this, we used SV 1H-MRS data with positive and negative peaks, from a widely tested SV 1H-MRS human brain tumour database. Results The results reported in this paper reveal the advantage of using a recently described variant of NMF, namely Convex-NMF, as an unsupervised method of source extraction from SV1H-MRS. Most of the sources extracted in our experiments closely correspond to the mean spectra of some of the analysed tumour types. This similarity allows accurate diagnostic predictions to be made both in fully unsupervised mode and using Convex-NMF as a DR step previous to standard supervised classification. The obtained results are comparable to, or

  10. Radiation exposure from CT scans in childhood and subsequent risk of leukaemia and brain tumours: a retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, Mark S; Salotti, Jane A; Little, Mark P; McHugh, Kieran; Lee, Choonsik; Kim, Kwang Pyo; Howe, Nicola L; Ronckers, Cecile M; Rajaraman, Preetha; Craft, Alan W; Parker, Louise; de González, Amy Berrington

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background Although CT scans are very useful clinically, potential cancer risks exist from associated ionising radiation, in particular for children who are more radiosensitive than adults. We aimed to assess the excess risk of leukaemia and brain tumours after CT scans in a cohort of children and young adults. Methods In our retrospective cohort study, we included patients without previous cancer diagnoses who were first examined with CT in National Health Service (NHS) centres in England, Wales, or Scotland (Great Britain) between 1985 and 2002, when they were younger than 22 years of age. We obtained data for cancer incidence, mortality, and loss to follow-up from the NHS Central Registry from Jan 1, 1985, to Dec 31, 2008. We estimated absorbed brain and red bone marrow doses per CT scan in mGy and assessed excess incidence of leukaemia and brain tumours cancer with Poisson relative risk models. To avoid inclusion of CT scans related to cancer diagnosis, follow-up for leukaemia began 2 years after the first CT and for brain tumours 5 years after the first CT. Findings During follow-up, 74 of 178 604 patients were diagnosed with leukaemia and 135 of 176 587 patients were diagnosed with brain tumours. We noted a positive association between radiation dose from CT scans and leukaemia (excess relative risk [ERR] per mGy 0·036, 95% CI 0·005–0·120; p=0·0097) and brain tumours (0·023, 0·010–0·049; p<0·0001). Compared with patients who received a dose of less than 5 mGy, the relative risk of leukaemia for patients who received a cumulative dose of at least 30 mGy (mean dose 51·13 mGy) was 3·18 (95% CI 1·46–6·94) and the relative risk of brain cancer for patients who received a cumulative dose of 50–74 mGy (mean dose 60·42 mGy) was 2·82 (1·33–6·03). Interpretation Use of CT scans in children to deliver cumulative doses of about 50 mGy might almost triple the risk of leukaemia and doses of about 60 mGy might triple the risk of brain

  11. A systematic review of the risk factors associated with the onset and progression of primary brain tumours.

    PubMed

    Quach, Pauline; El Sherif, Reem; Gomes, James; Krewksi, Daniel

    2016-05-17

    The overall aim of this systematic review was to identify risk factors for onset and natural progression, which were shown to increase, decrease, or have a null association with risk of primary brain tumour. For onset, the project was separated into two phases. The first phase consisted of a systematic search of existing systematic reviews and meta-analyses. Moderate to high methodological quality reviews were incorporated and summarized with relevant observational studies published since 2010, identified from a systematic search performed in phase 2. For natural progression, only the first phase was conducted. Standard systematic review methodology was utilized. Based on this review, various genetic variants, pesticide exposures, occupational farming/hairdressing, cured meat consumption and personal hair dye use appear to be associated with increased risk of onset amongst adults. The specific EGF polymorphsm 61-A allele within Caucasian populations and having a history of allergy was associated with a decreased risk. For progression, M1B-1 antigen was shown to increase the risk. High birth weight, pesticide exposure (childhood exposure, and parental occupational exposure) and maternal consumption of cured meat during pregnancy may also increase the risk of onset of childhood brain tumours. Conversely, maternal intake of pre-natal supplements (folic acid) appeared to decrease risk. Children with neurofibromatosis 2 were considered to have worse overall and relapse free survival compared to neurofibromatosis 1, as were those children who had grade III tumours compared to lesser grades.

  12. Spectroscopic magnetic resonance imaging of the brain: voxel localisation and tissue segmentation in the follow up of brain tumour.

    PubMed

    Poloni, Guy; Bastianello, S; Vultaggio, Angela; Pozzi, S; Maccabelli, Gloria; Germani, Giancarlo; Chiarati, Patrizia; Pichiecchio, Anna

    2008-01-01

    The field of application of magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) in biomedical research is expanding all the time and providing opportunities to investigate tissue metabolism and function. The data derived can be integrated with the information on tissue structure gained from conventional and non-conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques. Clinical MRS is also strongly expected to play an important role as a diagnostic tool. Essential for the future success of MRS as a clinical and research tool in biomedical sciences, both in vivo and in vitro, is the development of an accurate, biochemically relevant and physically consistent and reliable data analysis standard. Stable and well established analysis algorithms, in both the time and the frequency domain, are already available, as is free commercial software for implementing them. In this study, we propose an automatic algorithm that takes into account anatomical localisation, relative concentrations of white matter, grey matter, cerebrospinal fluid and signal abnormalities and inter-scan patient movement. The endpoint is the collection of a series of covariates that could be implemented in a multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA) of the MRS data, as a tool for dealing with differences that may be ascribed to the anatomical variability of the subjects, to inaccuracies in the localisation of the voxel or slab, or to movement, rather than to the pathology under investigation. The aim was to develop an analysis procedure that can be consistently and reliably applied in the follow up of brain tumour. In this study, we demonstrate that the inclusion of such variables in the data analysis of quantitative MRS is fundamentally important (especially in view of the reduced accuracy typical of MRS measures compared to other MRI techniques), reducing the occurrence of false positives.

  13. Lost in laterality: interpreting ''preferred side of the head during mobile phone use and risk of brain tumour'' associations.

    PubMed

    Schüz, Joachim

    2009-08-01

    Due to the highly localized exposure from mobile phones, the preferred side of the head during their use is important information when investigating a possible link with brain tumour risk, but at the same time, error and bias hamper the assessment of this information in case-control studies. Current studies provide evidence of reporting bias insofar as cases appear to over-report the side of the head where the tumour occurred as the one that they preferred in the past when using mobile phones. More refined methods of analysis among only cases or prospective studies with an assessment of the laterality of mobile phone use before the diagnosis of disease are needed to evaluate whether associations seen in some studies are entirely due to reporting bias or a mixture of reporting bias and a causal effect.

  14. Prospective diagnostic performance evaluation of single-voxel 1H MRS for typing and grading of brain tumours.

    PubMed

    Julià-Sapé, Margarida; Coronel, Indira; Majós, Carles; Candiota, Ana Paula; Serrallonga, Marta; Cos, Mònica; Aguilera, Carles; Acebes, Juan José; Griffiths, John R; Arús, Carles

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether single-voxel (1)H MRS could add useful information to conventional MRI in the preoperative characterisation of the type and grade of brain tumours. MRI and MRS examinations from a prospective cohort of 40 consecutive patients were analysed double blind by radiologists and spectroscopists before the histological diagnosis was known. The spectroscopists had only the MR spectra, whereas the radiologists had both the MR images and basic clinical details (age, sex and presenting symptoms). Then, the radiologists and spectroscopists exchanged their predictions and re-evaluated their initial opinions, taking into account the new evidence. Spectroscopists used four different systems of analysis for (1)H MRS data, and the efficacy of each of these methods was also evaluated. Information extracted from (1)H MRS significantly improved the radiologists' MRI-based characterisation of grade IV tumours (glioblastomas, metastases, medulloblastomas and lymphomas) in the cohort [area under the curve (AUC) in the MRI re-evaluation 0.93 versus AUC in the MRI evaluation 0.85], and also of the less malignant glial tumours (AUC in the MRI re-evaluation 0.93 versus AUC in the MRI evaluation 0.81). One of the MRS analysis systems used, the INTERPRET (International Network for Pattern Recognition of Tumours Using Magnetic Resonance) decision support system, outperformed the others, as well as being better than the MRI evaluation for the characterisation of grade III astrocytomas. Thus, preoperative MRS data improve the radiologists' performance in diagnosing grade IV tumours and, for those of grade II-III, MRS data help them to recognise the glial lineage. Even in cases in which their diagnoses were not improved, the provision of MRS data to the radiologists had no negative influence on their predictions.

  15. Glucocorticoid receptor blockade inhibits brain cell addition and aggressive signaling in electric fish, Apteronotus leptorhynchus.

    PubMed

    Dunlap, Kent D; Jashari, Denisa; Pappas, Kristina M

    2011-08-01

    When animals are under stress, glucocorticoids commonly inhibit adult neurogenesis by acting through glucocorticoid receptors (GRs). However, in some cases, conditions that elevate glucocorticoids promote adult neurogenesis, and the role of glucocorticoid receptors in these circumstances is not well understood. We examined the involvement of GRs in social enhancement of brain cell addition and aggressive signaling in electric fish, Apteronotus leptorhynchus. In this species, long-term social interaction simultaneously elevates plasma cortisol, enhances brain cell addition and increases production of aggressive electrocommunication signals ("chirps"). We implanted isolated and paired fish with capsules containing nothing (controls) or the GR antagonist, RU486, recorded chirp production and locomotion for 7d, and measured the density of newborn cells in the periventricular zone. Compared to isolated controls, paired controls showed elevated chirping in two phases: much higher chirp rates in the first 5h and moderately higher nocturnal rates thereafter. Treating paired fish with RU486 reduced chirp rates in both phases to those of isolated fish, demonstrating that GR activation is crucial for socially induced chirping. Neither RU486 nor social interaction affected locomotion. RU486 treatment to paired fish had a partial effect on cell addition: paired RU486 fish had less cell addition than paired control fish but more than isolated fish. This suggests that cortisol activation of GRs contributes to social enhancement of cell addition but works in parallel with another GR-independent mechanism. RU486 also reduced cell addition in isolated fish, indicating that GRs participate in the regulation of cell addition even when cortisol levels are low.

  16. Rapid increase in aggressive behavior precedes the decrease in brain aromatase activity during socially mediated sex change in Lythrypnus dalli.

    PubMed

    Black, Michael P; Balthazart, Jacques; Baillien, Michelle; Grober, Matthew S

    2011-01-01

    In the bluebanded goby, Lythrypnus dalli, removal of the male from a social group results in a rapid behavioral response where one female becomes dominant and changes sex to male. In a previous study, within hours of male removal, aromatase activity in the brain (bAA) of dominant females was almost 50% lower than that of control females from a group in which the male had not been removed. For those females that displayed increased aggressive behavior after the male was removed, the larger the increase in aggressive behavior, the greater the reduction in bAA. To investigate whether decreased bAA leads to increased aggression, the present study used a more rapid time course of behavioral profiling and bAA assay, looking within minutes of male removal from the group. There were no significant differences in bAA between control females (large females from groups with the male still present), females that doubled their aggressive behavior by 10 or 20 min after male removal, or females that did not double their aggressive behavior within 30 min after male removal. Further, individual variation in bAA and aggressive behavior were not correlated in these fish. Whole brain decreases in aromatase activity thus appear to follow, rather than precede, rapid increases in aggressive behavior, which provides one potential mechanism underlying the rapid increase in androgens that follows aggressive interactions in many vertebrate species. For fish species that change sex from female to male, this increase in androgens could subsequently facilitate sex change.

  17. Overexpression of s6 kinase 1 in brain tumours is associated with induction of hypoxia-responsive genes and predicts patients' survival.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Heba M S

    2012-01-01

    mTOR/S6K pathway is a crucial regulator of cell growth and metabolism. Deregulated signalling via S6K has been linked to various human pathologies, including metabolic disorders and cancer. Many of the molecules signalling upstream of S6K have been shown to be either mutated or overexpressed in tumours, leading to S6K activation. The role of S6K1 in brain tumours is not fully investigated. In this study, we investigated the gene expression profile of S6 kinases in brain and CNS tumours using the publically available Cancer Microarray Database. We found that S6K1 but not S6K2 gene is overexpressed in brain tumours and this upregulation is associated with patients' poor survival. Furthermore, we interrogated Oncomine database for the expression profile of hypoxia-induced genes using a literature-defined concept. This gene list included HIF1A, VEGFA, SOX4, SOX9, MMP2, and NEDD9. We show that those genes are upregulated in all brain tumour studies investigated. Additionally, we analysed the coexpression profile of S6K1 and hypoxia responsive genes. The analysis was done across 4 different brain studies and showed that S6K1 is co-overexpressed with several hypoxia responsive genes. This study highlights the possible role of S6K1 in brain tumour progression and prediction of patients' survival. However, new epidemiological studies should be conducted in order to confirm these associations and to refine the role of S6K1 in brain tumours as a useful marker for patients' survival.

  18. Effects of ractopamine feeding, gender and social rank on aggressiveness and monoamine concentrations in different brain areas of finishing pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study evaluated the effects of the feed additive ractopamine (RAC), gender and social rank on aggressiveness and brain monoamines levels of serotonin (5HT), dopamine (DA), their metabolites, norepinephrine (NE) and epinephrine (EP) in finishing pigs. Thirty-two pigs (16 barrows/16 gilts) were a...

  19. Penetration and intracellular uptake of poly(glycerol-adipate) nanoparticles into three-dimensional brain tumour cell culture models.

    PubMed

    Meng, Weina; Garnett, Martin C; Walker, David A; Parker, Terence L

    2016-03-01

    Nanoparticle (NP) drug delivery systems may potentially enhance the efficacy of therapeutic agents. It is difficult to characterize many important properties of NPs in vivo and therefore attempts have been made to use realistic in vitro multicellular spheroids instead. In this paper, we have evaluated poly(glycerol-adipate) (PGA) NPs as a potential drug carrier for local brain cancer therapy. Various three-dimensional (3-D) cell culture models have been used to investigate the delivery properties of PGA NPs. Tumour cells in 3-D culture showed a much higher level of endocytic uptake of NPs than a mixed normal neonatal brain cell population. Differences in endocytic uptake of NPs in 2-D and 3-D models strongly suggest that it is very important to use in vitro 3-D cell culture models for evaluating this parameter. Tumour penetration of NPs is another important parameter which could be studied in 3-D cell models. The penetration of PGA NPs through 3-D cell culture varied between models, which will therefore require further study to develop useful and realistic in vitro models. Further use of 3-D cell culture models will be of benefit in the future development of new drug delivery systems, particularly for brain cancers which are more difficult to study in vivo.

  20. Aggressive multiple surgical interventions to pulmonary artery sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Akiko; Shirasaka, Tomonori; Okada, Kenji; Okita, Yutaka

    2015-02-01

    We describe our experience with a patient who had metastasized pulmonary artery sarcoma, but survived 7 years after diagnosis. A 61-year-old man was diagnosed with pulmonary artery intimal sarcoma after resection of metastatic tumours to the bilateral lungs. The primary lesion in the pulmonary artery trunk extending into the bilateral branches was treated by tumour endoarterectomy followed by chemotherapy. He underwent resections of lung metastases two more times before detection of recurrent obstructive pulmonary artery sarcoma 4 years after the tumour endoarterectomy. En bloc resection of the tumour including the pulmonary artery trunk, valve and interventricular septum was performed, and the right ventricular out flow tract was reconstructed with a stentless pulmonary valve and equine pericardium. He died of the disease soon after an operation for metastatic brain tumour 3 years later. Pulmonary artery sarcoma has a dismal prognosis, but aggressively repeated surgical interventions may lengthen survival.

  1. Pharmaco-thermodynamics of deuterium-induced oedema in living rat brain via 1H2O MRI: implications for boron neutron capture therapy of malignant brain tumours.

    PubMed

    Medina, Daniel C; Li, Xin; Springer, Charles S

    2005-05-07

    In addition to its common usage as a tracer in metabolic and physiological studies, deuterium possesses anti-tumoural activity and confers protection against gamma-irradiation. A more recent interest in deuterium emanates from the search for alternatives capable of improving neutron penetrance whilst reducing healthy tissue radiation dose deposition in boron neutron capture therapy of malignant brain tumours. Despite this potential clinical application, deuterium induces brain oedema, which is detrimental to neutron capture therapy. In this study, five adult male rats were titrated with deuterated drinking water while brain oedema was monitored via water proton magnetic resonance imaging. This report concludes that deuterium, as well as deuterium-induced brain oedema, possesses a uniform brain bio-distribution. At a steady-state blood fluid deuteration value of 16%, when the deuterium isotope fraction in drinking water was 25%, a mean oedematous volume change of 9 +/- 2% (p-value <0.001) was observed in the rat brain-this may account for neurological and behavioural abnormalities found in mammals drinking highly deuterated water. In addition to characterizing the pharmaco-thermodynamics of deuterium-induced oedema, this report also estimates the impact of oedema on thermal neutron enhancement and effective dose reduction factors using simple linear transport calculations. While body fluid deuteration enhances thermal neutron flux penetrance and reduces dose deposition, oedema has the opposite effect because it increases the volume of interest, e.g., the brain volume. Thermal neutron enhancement and effective dose reduction factors could be reduced by as much as approximately 10% in the presence of a 9% water volume increase (oedema).

  2. Localisation of the sensorimotor cortex during surgery for brain tumours: feasibility and waveform patterns of somatosensory evoked potentials

    PubMed Central

    Romstock, J; Fahlbusch, R; Ganslandt, O; Nimsky, C; Strauss, C

    2002-01-01

    surgical planning and intraoperative use during surgery on perirolandic tumours, but compensation for brain shift, accuracy, and cost effectiveness are still a matter for discussion. PMID:11796773

  3. Independent benzodiazepine and beta-carboline binding sites in the brain of aggressive and timid-defensive mice

    SciTech Connect

    Sukhotina, I.A.; Rozhanets, V.V.; Poshivalov, V.P.

    1987-11-01

    The authors study the distribution of specific binding sites of labeled benzodiazepine and beta-carboline derivatives in parts of the brain of intact aggressive and timid-defensive mice, and also of animals subjected to subchronic administration of diazepam. The concentrations of /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam and /sup 3/H-beta-carboline-3-carboxylate ethyl ester in the incubation mixture for binding are given. Analysis of their specific binding with brain membranes of animals not receiving diazepam showed that the concentration of specific binding sites for both ligands in both types of mice was significantly higher in the cortex than in other brain regions.

  4. Developmental effects of aggressive behavior in male adolescents assessed with structural and functional brain imaging

    PubMed Central

    Strenziok, Maren; Krueger, Frank; Heinecke, Armin; Lenroot, Rhoshel K.; Knutson, Kristine M.; van der Meer, Elke

    2011-01-01

    Aggressive behavior is common during adolescence. Although aggression-related functional changes in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) and frontopolar cortex (FPC) have been reported in adults, the neural correlates of aggressive behavior in adolescents, particularly in the context of structural neurodevelopment, are obscure. We used functional and structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to measure the blood oxygenation level-depended signal and cortical thickness. In a block-designed experiment, 14–17-year old adolescents imagined aggressive and non-aggressive interactions with a peer. We show reduced vmPFC activation associated with imagined aggressive behavior as well as enhanced aggression-related activation and cortical thinning in the FPC with increasing age. Changes in FPC activation were also associated with judgments of the severity of aggressive acts. Reduced vmPFC activation was associated with greater aggression indicating its normal function is to exert inhibitory control over aggressive impulses. Concurrent FPC activation likely reflects foresight of harmful consequences that result from aggressive acts. The correlation of age-dependent activation changes and cortical thinning demonstrates ongoing maturation of the FPC during adolescence towards a refinement of social and cognitive information processing that can potentially facilitate mature social behavior in aggressive contexts. PMID:19770220

  5. Pharmaco-thermodynamics of deuterium-induced oedema in living rat brain via 1H2O MRI: implications for boron neutron capture therapy of malignant brain tumours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medina, Daniel C.; Li, Xin; Springer, Charles S., Jr.

    2005-05-01

    In addition to its common usage as a tracer in metabolic and physiological studies, deuterium possesses anti-tumoural activity and confers protection against γ-irradiation. A more recent interest in deuterium emanates from the search for alternatives capable of improving neutron penetrance whilst reducing healthy tissue radiation dose deposition in boron neutron capture therapy of malignant brain tumours. Despite this potential clinical application, deuterium induces brain oedema, which is detrimental to neutron capture therapy. In this study, five adult male rats were titrated with deuterated drinking water while brain oedema was monitored via water proton magnetic resonance imaging. This report concludes that deuterium, as well as deuterium-induced brain oedema, possesses a uniform brain bio-distribution. At a steady-state blood fluid deuteration value of 16%, when the deuterium isotope fraction in drinking water was 25%, a mean oedematous volume change of 9 ± 2% (p-value <0.001) was observed in the rat brain—this may account for neurological and behavioural abnormalities found in mammals drinking highly deuterated water. In addition to characterizing the pharmaco-thermodynamics of deuterium-induced oedema, this report also estimates the impact of oedema on thermal neutron enhancement and effective dose reduction factors using simple linear transport calculations. While body fluid deuteration enhances thermal neutron flux penetrance and reduces dose deposition, oedema has the opposite effect because it increases the volume of interest, e.g., the brain volume. Thermal neutron enhancement and effective dose reduction factors could be reduced by as much as ~10% in the presence of a 9% water volume increase (oedema). All three authors have contributed equally to this work.

  6. X-ray fluorescence study of the concentration of selected trace and minor elements in human brain tumours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wandzilak, Aleksandra; Czyzycki, Mateusz; Radwanska, Edyta; Adamek, Dariusz; Geraki, Kalotina; Lankosz, Marek

    2015-12-01

    Neoplastic and healthy brain tissues were analysed to discern the changes in the spatial distribution and overall concentration of elements using micro X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy. High-resolution distribution maps of minor and trace elements such as P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Fe, Cu and Zn made it possible to distinguish between homogeneous cancerous tissue and areas where some structures could be identified, such as blood vessels and calcifications. Concentrations of the elements in the selected homogeneous areas of brain tissue were compared between tumours with various malignancy grades and with the controls. The study showed a decrease in the average concentration of Fe, P, S and Ca in tissues with high grades of malignancy as compared to the control group, whereas the concentration of Zn in these tissues was increased. The changes in the concentration were found to be correlated with the tumour malignancy grade. The efficacy of micro X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy to distinguish between various types of cancer based on the concentrations of studied elements was confirmed by multivariate discriminant analysis. Our analysis showed that the most important elements for tissue classification are Cu, K, Fe, Ca, and Zn. This method made it possible to correctly classify histopathological types in 99.93% of the cases used to build the model and in as much as 99.16% of new cases.

  7. Sex differences in structural brain asymmetry predict overt aggression in early adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Visser, Troy A. W.; Ohan, Jeneva L.; Whittle, Sarah; Yücel, Murat; Simmons, Julian G.; Allen, Nicholas B.

    2014-01-01

    The devastating social, emotional and economic consequences of human aggression are laid bare nightly on newscasts around the world. Aggression is principally mediated by neural circuitry comprising multiple areas of the prefrontal cortex and limbic system, including the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), amygdala and hippocampus. A striking characteristic of these regions is their structural asymmetry about the midline (i.e. left vs right hemisphere). Variations in these asymmetries have been linked to clinical disorders characterized by aggression and the rate of aggressive behavior in psychiatric patients. Here, we show for the first time that structural asymmetries in prefrontal cortical areas are also linked to aggression in a normal population of early adolescents. Our findings indicate a relationship between parent reports of aggressive behavior in adolescents and structural asymmetries in the limbic and paralimbic ACC and OFC, and moreover, that this relationship varies by sex. Furthermore, while there was no relationship between aggression and structural asymmetries in the amygdala or hippocampus, hippocampal volumes did predict aggression in females. Taken together, the results suggest that structural asymmetries in the prefrontal cortex may influence human aggression, and that the anatomical basis of aggression varies substantially by sex. PMID:23446839

  8. Sex differences in structural brain asymmetry predict overt aggression in early adolescents.

    PubMed

    Visser, Troy A W; Ohan, Jeneva L; Whittle, Sarah; Yücel, Murat; Simmons, Julian G; Allen, Nicholas B

    2014-04-01

    The devastating social, emotional and economic consequences of human aggression are laid bare nightly on newscasts around the world. Aggression is principally mediated by neural circuitry comprising multiple areas of the prefrontal cortex and limbic system, including the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), amygdala and hippocampus. A striking characteristic of these regions is their structural asymmetry about the midline (i.e. left vs right hemisphere). Variations in these asymmetries have been linked to clinical disorders characterized by aggression and the rate of aggressive behavior in psychiatric patients. Here, we show for the first time that structural asymmetries in prefrontal cortical areas are also linked to aggression in a normal population of early adolescents. Our findings indicate a relationship between parent reports of aggressive behavior in adolescents and structural asymmetries in the limbic and paralimbic ACC and OFC, and moreover, that this relationship varies by sex. Furthermore, while there was no relationship between aggression and structural asymmetries in the amygdala or hippocampus, hippocampal volumes did predict aggression in females. Taken together, the results suggest that structural asymmetries in the prefrontal cortex may influence human aggression, and that the anatomical basis of aggression varies substantially by sex.

  9. Aggressive digital papillary adenoma-adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Keramidas, Evangelos G; Miller, Gavin; Revelos, Kyriakos; Kitsanta, Panagiota; Page, Robert E

    2006-01-01

    Aggressive digital papillary adenocarcinoma and aggressive digital papillary adenoma are rare tumours of the sweat glands. They are most common in the most distal part of the fingers and are locally aggressive with a 50% local recurrence rate; 14% of tumours metastasize. We present two cases.

  10. Melanotic neuroectodermal tumour of infancy.

    PubMed

    Pattanayak Mohanty, Sweta; Ray, Jay Gopal; Richa; Mukherjee, Sanjit; Mandal, Chitra; Chaudhuri, Keya

    2010-11-23

    Melanotic neuroectodermal tumour of infancy (MNTI) is a rare benign tumour of neural crest origin that was first described by Krompecher in 1918.1 It is predominantly found in infancy, with about 92% of cases below the age of 12 months and 82% below the age of 6 months. The predominant site of origin is in the premaxilla though it is reported at other sites also including the skull, the mandible, the epididymis and the brain.2 The lesions often have areas of bluish discolouration on the surface and are characterised by displacement of the involved tooth bud and local aggressiveness. The present report deals with two cases of MNTI, a 5-month-old baby girl and a 6-month-old baby boy who reported to the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology, Dr R Ahmed Dental College and Hospital, Kolkata, India. The clinical, radiological, histological and immunohistochemical findings, confirmed the diagnosis of MNTI. Flow cytometry was performed to analyse aneuploidy. The tumours were treated surgically with no history of recurrence to date.

  11. In-phantom two-dimensional thermal neutron distribution for intraoperative boron neutron capture therapy of brain tumours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, T.; Matsumura, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Kumada, H.; Shibata, Y.; Nose, T.

    2002-07-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the in-phantom thermal neutron distribution derived from neutron beams for intraoperative boron neutron capture therapy (IOBNCT). Gold activation wires arranged in a cylindrical water phantom with (void-in-phantom) or without (standard phantom) a cylinder styrene form placed inside were irradiated by using the epithermal beam (ENB) and the mixed thermal-epithermal beam (TNB-1) at the Japan Research Reactor No 4. With ENB, we observed a flattened distribution of thermal neutron flux and a significantly enhanced thermal flux delivery at a depth compared with the results of using TNB-1. The thermal neutron distribution derived from both the ENB and TNB-1 was significantly improved in the void-in-phantom, and a double high dose area was formed lateral to the void. The flattened distribution in the circumference of the void was observed with the combination of ENB and the void-in-phantom. The measurement data suggest that the ENB may provide a clinical advantage in the form of an enhanced and flattened dose delivery to the marginal tissue of a post-operative cavity in which a residual and/or microscopically infiltrating tumour often occurs. The combination of the epithermal neutron beam and IOBNCT will improve the clinical results of BNCT for brain tumours.

  12. In-phantom two-dimensional thermal neutron distribution for intraoperative boron neutron capture therapy of brain tumours.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, T; Matsumura, A; Yamamoto, K; Kumada, H; Shibata, Y; Nose, T

    2002-07-21

    The aim of this study was to determine the in-phantom thermal neutron distribution derived from neutron beams for intraoperative boron neutron capture therapy (IOBNCT). Gold activation wires arranged in a cylindrical water phantom with (void-in-phantom) or without (standard phantom) a cylinder styrene form placed inside were irradiated by using the epithermal beam (ENB) and the mixed thermal-epithermal beam (TNB-1) at the Japan Research Reactor No 4. With ENB, we observed a flattened distribution of thermal neutron flux and a significantly enhanced thermal flux delivery at a depth compared with the results of using TNB-1. The thermal neutron distribution derived from both the ENB and TNB-1 was significantly improved in the void-in-phantom, and a double high dose area was formed lateral to the void. The flattened distribution in the circumference of the void was observed with the combination of ENB and the void-in-phantom. The measurement data suggest that the ENB may provide a clinical advantage in the form of an enhanced and flattened dose delivery to the marginal tissue of a post-operative cavity in which a residual and/or microscopically infiltrating tumour often occurs. The combination of the epithermal neutron beam and IOBNCT will improve the clinical results of BNCT for brain tumours.

  13. The 'radiation vacation': Parents' experiences of travelling to have their children's brain tumours treated with proton beam therapy.

    PubMed

    Cockle, Sam G; Ogden, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Proton beam therapy is a new form of radiotherapy. Little is known about patients' experiences of proton beam therapy and less about parents' experiences of children receiving treatment. Semi-structured interviews explored 10 parents' experiences of travelling from the United Kingdom to the United States to have their children's brain tumours treated with proton beam therapy. Thematic analysis uncovered themes of 'adjusting to the PBT routine', 'finding benefit in the situation' and 'readjusting upon returning home'. Parents' initial worries were elevated by travel, but they found benefit in their experiences, describing them positively. The periods before and after treatment were most difficult, illustrating a cycle from upset to calm, back to upset upon their return home.

  14. REPEATED ANABOLIC/ANDROGENIC STEROID EXPOSURE DURING ADOLESCENCE ALTERS PHOSPHATE-ACTIVATED GLUTAMINASE AND GLUTAMATE RECEPTOR 1 SUBUNIT IMMUNOREACTIVITY IN HAMSTER BRAIN: CORRELATION WITH OFFENSIVE AGGRESSION

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Shannon G.; Ricci, Lesley A.; Melloni, Richard H.

    2007-01-01

    Male Syrian hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus) treated with moderately high doses (5.0mg/kg/day) of anabolic/androgenic steroids (AAS) during adolescence (P27–P56) display highly escalated offensive aggression. The current study examined whether adolescent AAS-exposure influenced the immunohistochemical localization of phosphate-activated glutaminase (PAG), the rate-limiting enzyme in the synthesis of glutamate, a fast-acting neurotransmitter implicated in the modulation of aggression in various species and models of aggression, as well as glutamate receptor 1 subunit (GluR1). Hamsters were administered AAS during adolescence, scored for offensive aggression using the resident-intruder paradigm, and then examined for changes in PAG and GluR1 immunoreactivity in areas of the brain implicated in aggression control. When compared with sesame oil-treated control animals, aggressive AAS-treated hamsters displayed a significant increase in the number of PAG- and area density of GluR1- containing neurons in several notable aggression regions, although the differential pattern of expression did not appear to overlap across brain regions. Together, these results suggest that altered glutamate synthesis and GluR1 receptor expression in specific aggression areas may be involved in adolescent AAS-induced offensive aggression. PMID:17418431

  15. Staff-reported antecedents to aggression in a post-acute brain injury treatment programme: What are they and what implications do they have for treatment?

    PubMed Central

    Giles, Gordon Muir; Scott, Karen; Manchester, David

    2013-01-01

    Research in psychiatric settings has found that staff attribute the majority of inpatient aggression to immediate environmental stressors. We sought to determine if staff working with persons with brain injury-related severe and chronic impairment make similar causal attributions. If immediate environmental stressors precipitate the majority of aggressive incidents in this client group, it is possible an increased focus on the management of factors that initiate client aggression may be helpful. The research was conducted in a low-demand treatment programme for individuals with chronic cognitive impairment due to acquired brain injury. Over a six-week period, 63 staff and a research assistant reported on 508 aggressive incidents. Staff views as to the causes of client aggression were elicited within 72 hours of observing an aggressive incident. Staff descriptions of causes were categorised using qualitative methods and analysed both qualitatively and quantitatively. Aggression towards staff was predominantly preceded by (a) actions that interrupted or redirected a client behaviour, (b) an activity demand, or (c) a physical intrusion. The majority of aggressive incidents appeared hostile/angry in nature and were not considered by staff to be pre-meditated. Common treatment approaches can be usefully augmented by a renewed focus on interventions aimed at reducing antecedents that provoke aggression. Possible approaches for achieving this are considered. PMID:23782342

  16. Oxytocin-Induced Changes in Monoamine Level in Symmetric Brain Structures of Isolated Aggressive C57Bl/6 Mice.

    PubMed

    Karpova, I V; Mikheev, V V; Marysheva, V V; Bychkov, E R; Proshin, S N

    2016-03-01

    Changes in activity of monoaminergic systems of the left and right brain hemispheres after administration of saline and oxytocin were studied in male C57Bl/6 mice subjected to social isolation. The concentrations of dopamine, norepinephrine, serotonin, and their metabolites dihydroxyphenylacetic, homovanillic, and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acids were measured in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, olfactory tubercle, and striatum of the left and right brain hemispheres by HPLC. In isolated aggressive males treated intranasally with saline, the content of serotonin and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid was significantly higher in the right hippocampus. Oxytocin reduces aggression caused by long-term social isolation, but has no absolute ability to suppress this type of behavior. Oxytocin reduced dopamine content in the left cortex and serotonin content in the right hippocampus and left striatum. Furthermore, oxytocin evened the revealed asymmetry in serotonin and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid concentrations in the hippocampus. At the same time, asymmetry in dopamine concentration appeared in the cortex with predominance of this transmitter in the right hemisphere. The data are discussed in the context of lateralization of neurotransmitter systems responsible for intraspecific aggression caused by long-term social isolation.

  17. Aggression and flight behaviour of the marmoset monkey Callithrix jacchus: an ethogram for brain stimulation studies.

    PubMed

    Lipp, H P

    1978-01-01

    The aggressive and flight behaviour of the common marmoset monkey (Callithrix jacchus) is described and split into behavioural units, allowing analysis of agonistic behaviour evoked by electrical stimulation of the hypothalamus. The social context of the described units is also considered. C. jacchus shows clearly recognizable behavioural patterns. Free-born animals are very timid and show typical flight reactions. Within aggressive behaviour, two types of aggression can be distinguished: very violent attacks causing severe injuries, often accompanied by particular threat displays and observed during dominance and territorial encounters, and, on the other hand, relatively harmless short attacks, together with a noisy vocalization, for defensive purposes or keeping group members at a distance.

  18. Improvement effect on the depth-dose distribution by CSF drainage and air infusion of a tumour-removed cavity in boron neutron capture therapy for malignant brain tumours.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Yoshinori; Ono, Koji; Miyatake, Shin-Ichi; Maruhashi, Akira

    2006-03-07

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) without craniotomy for malignant brain tumours was started using an epi-thermal neutron beam at the Kyoto University Reactor in June 2002. We have tried some techniques to overcome the treatable-depth limit in BNCT. One of the effective techniques is void formation utilizing a tumour-removed cavity. The tumorous part is removed by craniotomy about 1 week before a BNCT treatment in our protocol. Just before the BNCT irradiation, the cerebro-spinal fluid (CSF) in the tumour-removed cavity is drained out, air is infused to the cavity and then the void is made. This void improves the neutron penetration, and the thermal neutron flux at depth increases. The phantom experiments and survey simulations modelling the CSF drainage and air infusion of the tumour-removed cavity were performed for the size and shape of the void. The advantage of the CSF drainage and air infusion is confirmed for the improvement in the depth-dose distribution. From the parametric surveys, it was confirmed that the cavity volume had good correlation with the improvement effect, and the larger effect was expected as the cavity volume was larger.

  19. Improvement effect on the depth-dose distribution by CSF drainage and air infusion of a tumour-removed cavity in boron neutron capture therapy for malignant brain tumours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakurai, Yoshinori; Ono, Koji; Miyatake, Shin-ichi; Maruhashi, Akira

    2006-03-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) without craniotomy for malignant brain tumours was started using an epi-thermal neutron beam at the Kyoto University Reactor in June 2002. We have tried some techniques to overcome the treatable-depth limit in BNCT. One of the effective techniques is void formation utilizing a tumour-removed cavity. The tumorous part is removed by craniotomy about 1 week before a BNCT treatment in our protocol. Just before the BNCT irradiation, the cerebro-spinal fluid (CSF) in the tumour-removed cavity is drained out, air is infused to the cavity and then the void is made. This void improves the neutron penetration, and the thermal neutron flux at depth increases. The phantom experiments and survey simulations modelling the CSF drainage and air infusion of the tumour-removed cavity were performed for the size and shape of the void. The advantage of the CSF drainage and air infusion is confirmed for the improvement in the depth-dose distribution. From the parametric surveys, it was confirmed that the cavity volume had good correlation with the improvement effect, and the larger effect was expected as the cavity volume was larger.

  20. The relationship between brain behavioral systems and the characteristics of the five factor model of personality with aggression among Iranian students

    PubMed Central

    Komasi, Saeid; Saeidi, Mozhgan; Soroush, Ali; Zakiei, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: Background: Aggression is one of the negative components of emotion and it is usually considered to be the outcome of the activity of the Behavioral Inhibition and the Behavioral Activation System (BIS/BAS): components which can be considered as predisposing factors for personality differences. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between brain behavioral systems and the characteristics of the five factor model of personality with aggression among students. Methods: The present study has a correlation descriptive design. The research population included all of the Razi University students in the academic year of 2012-2013. The sampling was carried out with a random stratified method and 360 people (308 female and 52 male) were studied according to a table of Morgan. The study instruments were Buss and Perry Aggression Questionnaire, NEO Personality Inventory (Short Form), and Carver and White scale for BAS/BIS. Finally, SPSS20 was utilized to analyze the data using Pearson correlation, regression analysis, and canonical correlation. Results: The data showed a significant positive relationship between the neurosis and agreeableness personality factors with aggression; but there is a significant negative relationship between the extroversion, openness, and conscientiousness personality factors with aggression. Furthermore, there is a significant positive relationship between all the components of brain behavioral systems (impulsivity, novelty seeking, sensitivity, tender) and aggression. The results of regression analysis indicated the personality characteristics and the brain behavioral systems which can predict 29 percent of the changes to aggression, simultaneously. Conclusions: According to a predictable level of aggressiveness by the personality characteristics and brain behavioral systems, it is possible to identify the personality characteristics and template patterns of brain behavioral systems for the students

  1. OP04QUANTITATIVE MEASUREMENT OF BLOOD FLOW IN PAEDIATRIC BRAIN TUMOURS - A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF DYNAMIC SUSCEPTIBILITY CONTRAST AND MULTI-TIMEPOINT ARTERIAL SPIN LABEL IMAGING

    PubMed Central

    Abernethy, L.J.; Vidyasagar, R.; Pizer, B.L.; Mallucci, C.L.; Avula, S.; Parkes, L.M.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Arterial spin labeling (ASL) is a MR technique that allows for noninvasive quantification of cerebral blood flow (CBF). This technique, predominately used in research, has seen significant technical developments in the last few years that have led to more clinical applications. Currently, the main MR method used to provide perfusion measures in brain tumours is dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC). DSC traces the signal changes caused by the transit of a bolus of gadolinium contrast agent. ASL has the advantage of not requiring bolus injection of contrast. We have performed a comparative study of DSC and multi-timepoint ASL in paediatric brain tumours (PBT). METHOD: Data from a total of 19 PBT patients (mean age: 9 ± 5 years; 10 females, 9 males) were included in the analyses for this study. Data used were from first presentation scans performed before any surgical intervention. Comparisons of the quantitative measures of CBF and blood arrival time between the two techniques were carried out to test the feasibility of ASL to provide useful quantification measures of CBF in PBT. RESULTS: DSC measurements of tumour blood flow showed a significant decrease in flow in comparison with normal brain, but this is not seen with ASL. There was a strong correlation between ASL and DSC measures of blood flow in normal brain (r = 0.65, p = 0.009), but not in tumour blood flow (r = 0.33, p = 0.2). CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates the feasibility and potential utility of ASL as a non-invasive technique for measuring blood flow in PBT. However, there is a discrepancy between ASL and DSC measures, that may be due to leakage of gadolinium contrast, reflecting the abnormal characteristics of tumour blood vessels in PBT.

  2. A role for the malignant brain tumour (MBT) domain protein LIN-61 in DNA double-strand break repair by homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Nicholas M; Lemmens, Bennie B L G; Tijsterman, Marcel

    2013-01-01

    Malignant brain tumour (MBT) domain proteins are transcriptional repressors that function within Polycomb complexes. Some MBT genes are tumour suppressors, but how they prevent tumourigenesis is unknown. The Caenorhabditis elegans MBT protein LIN-61 is a member of the synMuvB chromatin-remodelling proteins that control vulval development. Here we report a new role for LIN-61: it protects the genome by promoting homologous recombination (HR) for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). lin-61 mutants manifest numerous problems associated with defective HR in germ and somatic cells but remain proficient in meiotic recombination. They are hypersensitive to ionizing radiation and interstrand crosslinks but not UV light. Using a novel reporter system that monitors repair of a defined DSB in C. elegans somatic cells, we show that LIN-61 contributes to HR. The involvement of this MBT protein in HR raises the possibility that MBT-deficient tumours may also have defective DSB repair.

  3. L-Phenylalanine preloading reduces the (10)B(n, α)(7)Li dose to the normal brain by inhibiting the uptake of boronophenylalanine in boron neutron capture therapy for brain tumours.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Tsubasa; Tanaka, Hiroki; Fukutani, Satoshi; Suzuki, Minoru; Hiraoka, Masahiro; Ono, Koji

    2016-01-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a cellular-level particle radiation therapy that combines the selective delivery of boron compounds to tumour tissue with neutron irradiation. Previously, high doses of one of the boron compounds used for BNCT, L-BPA, were found to reduce the boron-derived irradiation dose to the central nervous system. However, injection with a high dose of L-BPA is not feasible in clinical settings. We aimed to find an alternative method to improve the therapeutic efficacy of this therapy. We examined the effects of oral preloading with various analogues of L-BPA in a xenograft tumour model and found that high-dose L-phenylalanine reduced the accumulation of L-BPA in the normal brain relative to tumour tissue. As a result, the maximum irradiation dose in the normal brain was 19.2% lower in the L-phenylalanine group relative to the control group. This study provides a simple strategy to improve the therapeutic efficacy of conventional boron compounds for BNCT for brain tumours and the possibility to widen the indication of BNCT to various kinds of other tumours.

  4. Assessing the performance of four different categories of histological criteria in brain tumours grading by means of a computer-aided diagnosis image analysis system.

    PubMed

    Kostopoulos, S; Konstandinou, C; Sidiropoulos, K; Ravazoula, P; Kalatzis, I; Asvestas, P; Cavouras, D; Glotsos, D

    2015-10-01

    Brain tumours are considered one of the most lethal and difficult to treat forms of cancer, with unknown aetiology and lack of any realistic screening. In this study, we examine, whether the combination of descriptive criteria, used by expert histopathologists in assessing histologic tissue samples, and quantitative image analysis features may improve the diagnostic accuracy of brain tumour grading. Data comprised 61 cases of brain cancers (astrocytomas, oligodendrogliomas, meningiomas) collected from the archives of the University Hospital of Patras, Greece. Incorporating physician's descriptive criteria and image analysis's quantitative features into a discriminant function, a computer-aided diagnosis system was designed for discriminating low-grade from high-grade brain tumours. Physician's descriptive features, when solely used in the system, proved of high discrimination accuracy (93.4%). When verbal descriptive features were combined with quantitative image analysis features in the system, discrimination accuracy improved to 98.4%. The generalization of the proposed system to unseen data converged to an overall prediction accuracy of 86.7% ± 5.4%. Considering that histological grading affects treatment selection and diagnostic errors may be notable in clinical practice, the utilization of the proposed system may safeguard against diagnostic misinterpretations in every day clinical practice.

  5. Sexual Conspecific Aggressive Response (SCAR): A Model of Sexual Trauma that Disrupts Maternal Learning and Plasticity in the Female Brain

    PubMed Central

    Shors, Tracey J.; Tobόn, Krishna; DiFeo, Gina; Durham, Demetrius M.; Chang, Han Yan M.

    2016-01-01

    Sexual aggression can disrupt processes related to learning as females emerge from puberty into young adulthood. To model these experiences in laboratory studies, we developed SCAR, which stands for Sexual Conspecific Aggressive Response. During puberty, a rodent female is paired daily for 30-min with a sexually-experienced adult male. During the SCAR experience, the male tracks the anogenital region of the female as she escapes from pins. Concentrations of the stress hormone corticosterone were significantly elevated during and after the experience. Moreover, females that were exposed to the adult male throughout puberty did not perform well during training with an associative learning task nor did they learn well to express maternal behaviors during maternal sensitization. Most females that were exposed to the adult male did not learn to care for offspring over the course of 17 days. Finally, females that did not express maternal behaviors retained fewer newly-generated cells in their hippocampus whereas those that did express maternal behaviors retained more cells, most of which would differentiate into neurons within weeks. Together these data support SCAR as a useful laboratory model for studying the potential consequences of sexual aggression and trauma for the female brain during puberty and young adulthood. PMID:26804826

  6. Survival analysis for apparent diffusion coefficient measures in children with embryonal brain tumours.

    PubMed

    Grech-Sollars, Matthew; Saunders, Dawn E; Phipps, Kim P; Clayden, Jonathan D; Clark, Chris A

    2012-10-01

    Embryonal brain tumors constitute a large and important subgroup of pediatric brain tumors. Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) measures have been previously used in the analysis of these tumors. We investigated a newly described ADC-derived parameter, the apparent transient coefficient in tumor (ATCT), a measure of the gradient change of ADC from the peri-tumoral edema into the tumor core, to study whether ATCT correlates with survival outcome. Sixty-one patients with histologically proven embryonal brain tumors and who had diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) as part of their clinical imaging were enrolled in a retrospective study correlating ADC measures with survival. Kaplan-Meier survival curves were constructed for extent of surgical resection, age <3 years at diagnosis, tumor type, and metastasis at presentation. A multivariate survival analysis was performed that took into consideration ATCT and variables found to be significant in the Kaplan-Meier analysis as covariates. Results from the multivariate analysis showed that ATCT was the only significant covariate (P < .001). Survival analysis using Kaplan-Meier curves, dividing the patients into 4 groups of increasing values of ATCT, showed that more negative values of ATCT were significantly associated with a poorer prognosis (P < .001). A statistically significant difference was observed for survival data with respect to the change in ADC from edema into the tumor volume. Results show that more negative ATCT values are significantly associated with a poorer survival among children with embryonal brain tumors, irrespective of tumor type, extent of resection, age <3 years at diagnosis, and metastasis at presentation.

  7. Sex and species differences in plasma testosterone and in counts of androgen receptor-positive cells in key brain regions of Sceloporus lizard species that differ in aggression

    PubMed Central

    Hews, Diana K.; Hara, Erina; Anderson, Maurice C.

    2012-01-01

    We studied neuroendocrine correlates of aggression differences in adults of two Sceloporus lizard species. These species differ in the degree of sex difference in aggressive color signals (belly patches) and in aggression: S. undulatus (males blue, high aggression; females white, low aggression) and S. virgatus (both sexes white, lower aggression). We measured plasma testosterone and counted cells expressing androgen receptor-like immunoreactivity to the affinity-purified polyclonal AR antibody, PG-21, in three brain regions of breeding season adults. Male S. undulatus had the highest mean plasma testosterone and differed significantly from conspecific females. In contrast, there was no sex difference in plasma testosterone concentrations in S. virgatus. Male S. undulatus also had the highest mean number of AR-positive cells in the preoptic area: the sexes differed in S. undulatus but not in S. virgatus, and females of the two species did not differ. In the ventral medial hypothalamus, S. undulatus males had higher mean AR cell counts compared to females, but again there was no sex difference in S. virgatus. In the habenula, a control brain region, the sexes did not differ, and although the sex by species interaction significant was not significant, there was a trend (p = 0.050) for S. virgatus to have higher mean AR cell counts than S. undulatus. Thus hypothalamic AR cell counts paralleled sex and species differences in aggression, as did mean plasma testosterone levels in these breeding-season animals. PMID:22230767

  8. Induction of HSP70 is associated with vincristine resistance in heat-shocked 9L rat brain tumour cells.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, W. C.; Lin, K. Y.; Chen, K. D.; Lai, Y. K.

    1992-01-01

    The most prominent cellular changes in heat-shock response are induction of HSPs synthesis and reorganisation of cytoskeleton. Vincristine was used as a tool to evaluate the integrity of microtubules in 9L rat brain tumour cells recovering from heat-shock treatment. Cells treated at 45 degrees C for 15 min and recovered under normal growing condition became resistant to vincristine-inflicted cytotoxicity and microtubule destruction. Among all HSPs, the level of HSP70 and the degree of vincristine resistance are best correlated. HSP70 and tubulin were found to be associated with each other as they were co-immunoprecipitated by either anti-HSP70 or anti-beta-tubulin monoclonal antibody. The current studies establish for the first time that HSP70 can complex with tubulin in cells and this association may stabilise the organisation of microtubules thus protect the heat-treated cells from vincristine damage. These findings are noteworthy in combining hyperthermia and chemotherapy in the management of malignant diseases. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:1419602

  9. Improved Grading and Survival Prediction of human astrocytic brain tumours by artificial neural network analysis of gene expression microarray data

    PubMed Central

    Petalidis, Lawrence P.; Oulas, Anastasis; Backlund, Magnus; Wayland, Matthew T.; Liu, Lu; Plant, Karen; Happerfield, Lisa; Freeman, Tom C.; Poirazi, Panayiota; Collins, V. Peter

    2010-01-01

    Histopathological grading of astrocytic tumours based on current WHO criteria offers a valuable but simplified representation of oncological reality and is often insufficient to predict clinical outcome. In this study we report a new astrocytic tumour microarray gene expression dataset (n=65). We have used a simple Artificial Neural Network (ANN) algorithm to address grading of human astrocytic tumours, derive specific transcriptional signatures from histopathological subtypes of astrocytic tumours and asses whether these molecular signatures define survival prognostic subclasses. 59 classifier genes were identified and found to fall within three distinct functional classes namely angiogenesis, cell differentiation and lower grade astrocytic tumour discrimination. These gene classes were found to characterize three molecular tumour subtypes denoted ANGIO, INTER and LOWER. Grading of samples using these subtypes agreed with prior histopathological grading both for our dataset (96.15%) as well as an independent dataset. Six tumours were particularly challenging to diagnose histopathologically. We present an ANN grading for these samples, and offer an evidence-based interpretation of grading results using clinical metadata to substantiate findings. The prognostic value of the three identified tumour subtypes was found to outperform histopathological grading as well as tumour subtypes reported in other studies, indicating a high survival prognostic potential for the 59 gene classifiers. Finally, 11 gene classifiers that differentiate between primary and secondary glioblastomas were also identified. PMID:18445660

  10. Single-unit analysis of the human posterior hypothalamus and red nucleus during deep brain stimulation for aggressivity.

    PubMed

    Micieli, Robert; Rios, Adriana Lucia Lopez; Aguilar, Ricardo Plata; Posada, Luis Fernando Botero; Hutchison, William D

    2017-04-01

    OBJECTIVE Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the posterior hypothalamus (PH) has been reported to be effective for aggressive behavior in a number of isolated cases. Few of these case studies have analyzed single-unit recordings in the human PH and none have quantitatively analyzed single units in the red nucleus (RN). The authors report on the properties of ongoing neuronal discharges in bilateral trajectories targeting the PH and the effectiveness of DBS of the PH as a treatment for aggressive behavior. METHODS DBS electrodes were surgically implanted in the PH of 1 awake patient with Sotos syndrome and 3 other anesthetized patients with treatment-resistant aggressivity. Intraoperative extracellular recordings were obtained from the ventral thalamus, PH, and RN and analyzed offline to discriminate single units and measure firing rates and firing patterns. Target location was based on the stereotactic coordinates used by Sano et al. in their 1970 study and the location of the dorsal border of the RN. RESULTS A total of 138 units were analyzed from the 4 patients. Most of the PH units had a slow, irregular discharge (mean [± SD] 4.5 ± 2.7 Hz, n = 68) but some units also had a higher discharge rate (16.7 ± 4.7 Hz, n = 15). Two populations of neurons were observed in the ventral thalamic region as well, one with a high firing rate (mean 16.5 ± 6.5 Hz, n = 5) and one with a low firing rate (mean 4.6 ± 2.8 Hz, n = 6). RN units had a regular firing rate with a mean of 20.4 ± 9.9 Hz and displayed periods of oscillatory activity in the beta range. PH units displayed a prolonged period of inhibition following microstimulation compared with RN units that were not inhibited. Patients under anesthesia showed a trend for lower firing rates in the PH but not in the RN. All 4 patients displayed a reduction in their aggressive behavior after surgery. CONCLUSIONS During PH DBS, microelectrode recordings can provide an additional mechanism to help identify the PH target and

  11. Brain tumour differentiation: rapid stratified serum diagnostics via attenuated total reflection Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hands, James R; Clemens, Graeme; Stables, Ryan; Ashton, Katherine; Brodbelt, Andrew; Davis, Charles; Dawson, Timothy P; Jenkinson, Michael D; Lea, Robert W; Walker, Carol; Baker, Matthew J

    2016-05-01

    The ability to diagnose cancer rapidly with high sensitivity and specificity is essential to exploit advances in new treatments to lead significant reductions in mortality and morbidity. Current cancer diagnostic tests observing tissue architecture and specific protein expression for specific cancers suffer from inter-observer variability, poor detection rates and occur when the patient is symptomatic. A new method for the detection of cancer using 1 μl of human serum, attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and pattern recognition algorithms is reported using a 433 patient dataset (3897 spectra). To the best of our knowledge, we present the largest study on serum mid-infrared spectroscopy for cancer research. We achieve optimum sensitivities and specificities using a Radial Basis Function Support Vector Machine of between 80.0 and 100 % for all strata and identify the major spectral features, hence biochemical components, responsible for the discrimination within each stratum. We assess feature fed-SVM analysis for our cancer versus non-cancer model and achieve 91.5 and 83.0 % sensitivity and specificity respectively. We demonstrate the use of infrared light to provide a spectral signature from human serum to detect, for the first time, cancer versus non-cancer, metastatic cancer versus organ confined, brain cancer severity and the organ of origin of metastatic disease from the same sample enabling stratified diagnostics depending upon the clinical question asked.

  12. Assessing occupational exposure to chemicals in an international epidemiological study of brain tumours.

    PubMed

    van Tongeren, Martie; Kincl, Laurel; Richardson, Lesley; Benke, Geza; Figuerola, Jordi; Kauppinen, Timo; Lakhani, Ramzan; Lavoué, Jérôme; McLean, Dave; Plato, Nils; Cardis, Elisabeth

    2013-06-01

    The INTEROCC project is a multi-centre case-control study investigating the risk of developing brain cancer due to occupational chemical and electromagnetic field exposures. To estimate chemical exposures, the Finnish Job Exposure Matrix (FINJEM) was modified to improve its performance in the INTEROCC study and to address some of its limitations, resulting in the development of the INTEROCC JEM. An international team of occupational hygienists developed a crosswalk between the Finnish occupational codes used in FINJEM and the International Standard Classification of Occupations 1968 (ISCO68). For ISCO68 codes linked to multiple Finnish codes, weighted means of the exposure estimates were calculated. Similarly, multiple ISCO68 codes linked to a single Finnish code with evidence of heterogeneous exposure were refined. One of the key time periods in FINJEM (1960-1984) was split into two periods (1960-1974 and 1975-1984). Benzene exposure estimates in early periods were modified upwards. The internal consistency of hydrocarbon exposures and exposures to engine exhaust fumes was improved. Finally, exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon and benzo(a)pyrene was modified to include the contribution from second-hand smoke. The crosswalk ensured that the FINJEM exposure estimates could be applied to the INTEROCC study subjects. The modifications generally resulted in an increased prevalence of exposure to chemical agents. This increased prevalence of exposure was not restricted to the lowest categories of cumulative exposure, but was seen across all levels for some agents. Although this work has produced a JEM with important improvements compared to FINJEM, further improvements are possible with the expansion of agents and additional external data.

  13. Assessing Occupational Exposure to Chemicals in an International Epidemiological Study of Brain Tumours

    PubMed Central

    van Tongeren, Martie

    2013-01-01

    The INTEROCC project is a multi-centre case–control study investigating the risk of developing brain cancer due to occupational chemical and electromagnetic field exposures. To estimate chemical exposures, the Finnish Job Exposure Matrix (FINJEM) was modified to improve its performance in the INTEROCC study and to address some of its limitations, resulting in the development of the INTEROCC JEM. An international team of occupational hygienists developed a crosswalk between the Finnish occupational codes used in FINJEM and the International Standard Classification of Occupations 1968 (ISCO68). For ISCO68 codes linked to multiple Finnish codes, weighted means of the exposure estimates were calculated. Similarly, multiple ISCO68 codes linked to a single Finnish code with evidence of heterogeneous exposure were refined. One of the key time periods in FINJEM (1960–1984) was split into two periods (1960–1974 and 1975–1984). Benzene exposure estimates in early periods were modified upwards. The internal consistency of hydrocarbon exposures and exposures to engine exhaust fumes was improved. Finally, exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon and benzo(a)pyrene was modified to include the contribution from second-hand smoke. The crosswalk ensured that the FINJEM exposure estimates could be applied to the INTEROCC study subjects. The modifications generally resulted in an increased prevalence of exposure to chemical agents. This increased prevalence of exposure was not restricted to the lowest categories of cumulative exposure, but was seen across all levels for some agents. Although this work has produced a JEM with important improvements compared to FINJEM, further improvements are possible with the expansion of agents and additional external data. PMID:23467593

  14. Targeting brain serotonin synthesis: insights into neurodevelopmental disorders with long-term outcomes related to negative emotionality, aggression and antisocial behaviour.

    PubMed

    Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Araragi, Naozumi; Waider, Jonas; van den Hove, Daniel; Gutknecht, Lise

    2012-09-05

    Aggression, which comprises multi-faceted traits ranging from negative emotionality to antisocial behaviour, is influenced by an interaction of biological, psychological and social variables. Failure in social adjustment, aggressiveness and violence represent the most detrimental long-term outcome of neurodevelopmental disorders. With the exception of brain-specific tryptophan hydroxylase-2 (Tph2), which generates serotonin (5-HT) in raphe neurons, the contribution of gene variation to aggression-related behaviour in genetically modified mouse models has been previously appraised (Lesch 2005 Novartis Found Symp. 268, 111-140; Lesch & Merschdorf 2000 Behav. Sci. Law 18, 581-604). Genetic inactivation of Tph2 function in mice led to the identification of phenotypic changes, ranging from growth retardation and late-onset obesity, to enhanced conditioned fear response, increased aggression and depression-like behaviour. This spectrum of consequences, which are amplified by stress-related epigenetic interactions, are attributable to deficient brain 5-HT synthesis during development and adulthood. Human data relating altered TPH2 function to personality traits of negative emotionality and neurodevelopmental disorders characterized by deficits in cognitive control and emotion regulation are based on genetic association and are therefore not as robust as the experimental mouse results. Mouse models in conjunction with approaches focusing on TPH2 variants in humans provide unexpected views of 5-HT's role in brain development and in disorders related to negative emotionality, aggression and antisocial behaviour.

  15. Targeting brain serotonin synthesis: insights into neurodevelopmental disorders with long-term outcomes related to negative emotionality, aggression and antisocial behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Araragi, Naozumi; Waider, Jonas; van den Hove, Daniel; Gutknecht, Lise

    2012-01-01

    Aggression, which comprises multi-faceted traits ranging from negative emotionality to antisocial behaviour, is influenced by an interaction of biological, psychological and social variables. Failure in social adjustment, aggressiveness and violence represent the most detrimental long-term outcome of neurodevelopmental disorders. With the exception of brain-specific tryptophan hydroxylase-2 (Tph2), which generates serotonin (5-HT) in raphe neurons, the contribution of gene variation to aggression-related behaviour in genetically modified mouse models has been previously appraised (Lesch 2005 Novartis Found Symp. 268, 111–140; Lesch & Merschdorf 2000 Behav. Sci. Law 18, 581–604). Genetic inactivation of Tph2 function in mice led to the identification of phenotypic changes, ranging from growth retardation and late-onset obesity, to enhanced conditioned fear response, increased aggression and depression-like behaviour. This spectrum of consequences, which are amplified by stress-related epigenetic interactions, are attributable to deficient brain 5-HT synthesis during development and adulthood. Human data relating altered TPH2 function to personality traits of negative emotionality and neurodevelopmental disorders characterized by deficits in cognitive control and emotion regulation are based on genetic association and are therefore not as robust as the experimental mouse results. Mouse models in conjunction with approaches focusing on TPH2 variants in humans provide unexpected views of 5-HT's role in brain development and in disorders related to negative emotionality, aggression and antisocial behaviour. PMID:22826343

  16. The interacting role of media violence exposure and aggressive-disruptive behavior in adolescent brain activation during an emotional Stroop task.

    PubMed

    Kalnin, Andrew J; Edwards, Chad R; Wang, Yang; Kronenberger, William G; Hummer, Tom A; Mosier, Kristine M; Dunn, David W; Mathews, Vincent P

    2011-04-30

    Only recently have investigations of the relationship between media violence exposure (MVE) and aggressive behavior focused on brain functioning. In this study, we examined the relationship between brain activation and history of media violence exposure in adolescents, using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Samples of adolescents with no psychiatric diagnosis or with disruptive behavior disorder (DBD) with aggression were compared to investigate whether the association of MVE history and brain activation is moderated by aggressive behavior/personality. Twenty-two adolescents with a history of aggressive behavior and diagnosis of either conduct disorder or oppositional-defiant disorder (DBD sample) and 22 controls completed an emotional Stroop task during fMRI. Primary imaging results indicated that controls with a history of low MVE demonstrated greater activity in the right inferior frontal gyrus and rostral anterior cingulate during the violent word condition. In contrast, in adolescents with DBD, those with high MVE exhibited decreased activation in the right amygdala, compared with those with low MVE. These findings are consistent with research demonstrating the importance of fronto-limbic structures for processing emotional stimuli, and with research suggesting that media violence may affect individuals in different ways depending on the presence of aggressive traits.

  17. The INTERPRET Decision-Support System version 3.0 for evaluation of Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy data from human brain tumours and other abnormal brain masses

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Proton Magnetic Resonance (MR) Spectroscopy (MRS) is a widely available technique for those clinical centres equipped with MR scanners. Unlike the rest of MR-based techniques, MRS yields not images but spectra of metabolites in the tissues. In pathological situations, the MRS profile changes and this has been particularly described for brain tumours. However, radiologists are frequently not familiar to the interpretation of MRS data and for this reason, the usefulness of decision-support systems (DSS) in MRS data analysis has been explored. Results This work presents the INTERPRET DSS version 3.0, analysing the improvements made from its first release in 2002. Version 3.0 is aimed to be a program that 1st, can be easily used with any new case from any MR scanner manufacturer and 2nd, improves the initial analysis capabilities of the first version. The main improvements are an embedded database, user accounts, more diagnostic discrimination capabilities and the possibility to analyse data acquired under additional data acquisition conditions. Other improvements include a customisable graphical user interface (GUI). Most diagnostic problems included have been addressed through a pattern-recognition based approach, in which classifiers based on linear discriminant analysis (LDA) were trained and tested. Conclusions The INTERPRET DSS 3.0 allows radiologists, medical physicists, biochemists or, generally speaking, any person with a minimum knowledge of what an MR spectrum is, to enter their own SV raw data, acquired at 1.5 T, and to analyse them. The system is expected to help in the categorisation of MR Spectra from abnormal brain masses. PMID:21114820

  18. Aggressive local therapy combined with systemic chemotherapy provides long-term control in grade II stage 2 canine mast cell tumour: 21 cases (1999-2012).

    PubMed

    Lejeune, A; Skorupski, K; Frazier, S; Vanhaezebrouck, I; Rebhun, R B; Reilly, C M; Rodriguez, C O

    2015-09-01

    This retrospective case series evaluates the outcome of 21 dogs with grade II stage 2 mast cell tumour (MCT) treated with adequate local therapy and adjuvant systemic chemotherapy (prednisone, vinblastine and CCNU). The median survival for all dogs was 1359 days (range, 188-2340). Median disease-free interval was 2120 days (149-2325 days). Dogs treated with surgery and chemotherapy had shorter survival (median, 1103 days; 188-2010 days) than those that underwent surgery, radiation therapy and chemotherapy as part of their treatment (median, 2056 days; 300-2340 days). Two patients had local recurrence in the radiation field and four patients had de novo MCT. Distant metastasis was not observed in any dogs. The results of this study suggest that, in the presence of loco-regional lymph node metastasis in grade II MCT, the use of prednisone, vinblastine and CCNU after adequate local-regional therapy can provide a median survival in excess of 40 months.

  19. GAD1 Upregulation Programs Aggressive Features of Cancer Cell Metabolism in the Brain Metastatic Microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Schnepp, Patricia M; Lee, Dennis D; Guldner, Ian H; O'Tighearnaigh, Treasa K; Howe, Erin N; Palakurthi, Bhavana; Eckert, Kaitlyn E; Toni, Tiffany A; Ashfeld, Brandon L; Zhang, Siyuan

    2017-04-11

    The impact of altered amino acid metabolism on cancer progression is not fully understood. We hypothesized that a metabolic transcriptome shift during metastatic evolution is crucial for brain metastasis. Here we report a powerful impact in this setting caused by epigenetic upregulation of glutamate decarboxylase 1 (GAD1), a regulator of the GABA neurotransmitter metabolic pathway. In cell-based culture and brain metastasis models, we found that downegulation of the DNA methyltransferase DNMT1 induced by the brain microenvironment-derived clusterin resulted in decreased GAD1 promoter methylation and subsequent upregulation of GAD1 expression in brain metastatic tumor cells. In a system to dynamically visualize cellular metabolic responses mediated by GAD1, we monitored the cytosolic NADH:NAD+ equilibrium in tumor cells. Reducing GAD1 in metastatic cells by primary glia cell co-culture abolished the capacity of metastatic cells to utilize extracellular glutamine, leading to cytosolic accumulation of NADH and increased oxidative status. Similarly, genetic or pharmacological disruption of the GABA metabolic pathway decreased the incidence of brain metastasis in vivo. Taken together, our results show how epigenetic changes in GAD1 expression alter local glutamate metabolism in the brain metastatic microenvironment, contributing to a metabolic adaption that facilitates metastasis outgrowth in that setting.

  20. Fast and accurate water content and T2* mapping in brain tumours localised with FET-PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oros-Peusquens, A.-M.; Keil, F.; Langen, K. J.; Herzog, H.; Stoffels, G.; Weiss, C.; Shah, N. J.

    2014-01-01

    The availability of combined MR-PET scanners opens new opportunities for the characterisation of tumour environment. In this study, water content and relaxation properties of glioblastoma were investigated in five patients using advanced MRI. The region containing metabolically active tumour tissue was defined by simultaneously measured FET-PET uptake. The mean value of water content in tumour tissue - obtained noninvasively with high precision and accuracy for the first time - amounted to 84.5%, similar to the value for normal grey matter. Constancy of water content contrasted with a large variability of T2* values in tumour tissue, qualitatively related to the magnetic inhomogeneity of tissue created by blood vessels and/or microbleeds. The quantitative MRI protocol takes 71/2 > min of measurement time and is proposed for extended clinical use.

  1. [The vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF): a model of gene regulation and a marker of tumour aggressiveness. An obvious therapeutic target?].

    PubMed

    Grépin, Renaud; Pagès, Gilles

    2009-01-01

    VEGF represents a model of gene expression regulation. RAS/RAF/MEK/ERK and PI3 Kinase pathways, activated in response to growth factors stimulation or by oncogenes, contribute to its expression by activating transcription factors or inactivating proteins implicated in degradation of its mRNA. These factors (Sp1/Sp3, HIF-1 and TTP) constitute molecular markers of tumor aggressiveness. VEGF is overexpressed in solid or hematologic tumors. Thus, numerous compounds regulating angiogenesis by targeting VEGF have been developed. However, their effects are not as spectacular as expected. The existence of anti-angiogenic isoforms of VEGF could be a cause of their less potent activity. These different points are discussed in this review article.

  2. Long-term consumption of sugar-sweetened beverage during the growth period promotes social aggression in adult mice with proinflammatory responses in the brain.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jung-Yun; Park, Mi-Na; Kim, Chong-Su; Lee, Young-Kwan; Choi, Eun Young; Chun, Woo Young; Shin, Dong-Mi

    2017-04-10

    Overconsumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) is known to be a key contributor to the obesity epidemic; however, its effects on behavioral changes are yet to be fully studied. In the present study, we examined the long-term effects of SSB on social aggression in mice. Three-week-old weaned mice started to drink either a 30 w/v% sucrose solution (S30), plain water (CT), or an aspartame solution with sweetness equivalent to the sucrose solution (A30) and continued to drink until they were 11-week-old adults. Aggressive behaviors were assessed by the resident-intruder test. We found that SSB significantly promoted social aggression, accompanied by heightened serum corticosterone and reduced body weight. To understand the underlying mechanism, we performed transcriptome analyses of brain. The profiles of mice on S30 were dramatically different from those on CT or A30. Transcriptional networks related to immunological function were significantly dysregulated by SSB. FACS analysis of mice on S30 revealed increased numbers of inflammatory cells in peripheral blood. Interestingly, the artificial sweetener failed to mimic the effects of sugar on social aggression and inflammatory responses. These results demonstrate that SSB promotes aggressive behaviors and provide evidence that sugar reduction strategies may be useful in efforts to prevent social aggression.

  3. Long-term consumption of sugar-sweetened beverage during the growth period promotes social aggression in adult mice with proinflammatory responses in the brain

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jung-Yun; Park, Mi-Na; Kim, Chong-Su; Lee, Young-Kwan; Choi, Eun Young; Chun, Woo Young; Shin, Dong-Mi

    2017-01-01

    Overconsumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) is known to be a key contributor to the obesity epidemic; however, its effects on behavioral changes are yet to be fully studied. In the present study, we examined the long-term effects of SSB on social aggression in mice. Three-week-old weaned mice started to drink either a 30 w/v% sucrose solution (S30), plain water (CT), or an aspartame solution with sweetness equivalent to the sucrose solution (A30) and continued to drink until they were 11-week-old adults. Aggressive behaviors were assessed by the resident-intruder test. We found that SSB significantly promoted social aggression, accompanied by heightened serum corticosterone and reduced body weight. To understand the underlying mechanism, we performed transcriptome analyses of brain. The profiles of mice on S30 were dramatically different from those on CT or A30. Transcriptional networks related to immunological function were significantly dysregulated by SSB. FACS analysis of mice on S30 revealed increased numbers of inflammatory cells in peripheral blood. Interestingly, the artificial sweetener failed to mimic the effects of sugar on social aggression and inflammatory responses. These results demonstrate that SSB promotes aggressive behaviors and provide evidence that sugar reduction strategies may be useful in efforts to prevent social aggression. PMID:28393871

  4. Violence, mental illness, and the brain - A brief history of psychosurgery: Part 3 - From deep brain stimulation to amygdalotomy for violent behavior, seizures, and pathological aggression in humans.

    PubMed

    Faria, Miguel A

    2013-01-01

    In the final installment to this three-part, essay-editorial on psychosurgery, we relate the history of deep brain stimulation (DBS) in humans and glimpse the phenomenal body of work conducted by Dr. Jose Delgado at Yale University from the 1950s to the 1970s. The inception of the National Commission for the Protection of Human Subjects of Biomedical and Behavioral Research (1974-1978) is briefly discussed as it pertains to the "determination of the Secretary of Health, Education and Welfare regarding the recommendations and guidelines on psychosurgery." The controversial work - namely recording of brain activity, DBS, and amygdalotomy for intractable psychomotor seizures in patients with uncontrolled violence - conducted by Drs. Vernon H. Mark and Frank Ervin is recounted. This final chapter recapitulates advances in neuroscience and neuroradiology in the evaluation of violent individuals and ends with a brief discussion of the problem of uncontrolled rage and "pathologic aggression" in today's modern society - as violence persists, and in response, we move toward authoritarianism, with less freedom and even less dignity.

  5. Neuroimaging and Aggression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Shari; Raine, Adrian

    1994-01-01

    Brain imaging research allows direct assessment of structural and functional brain abnormalities, and thereby provides an improved methodology for studying neurobiological factors predisposing to violent and aggressive behavior. This paper reviews 20 brain imaging studies using four different types of neuroimaging techniques that were conducted in…

  6. Primary primitive neuroectodermal tumour of the kidney in adults.

    PubMed

    Verma, Ritu; Singhal, Mitali; Pandey, Rakesh

    2013-03-04

    Primitive neuroectodermal tumour (PNET) is a neural crest tumour derived from neuroectoderm. Renal PNET is a very rare tumour occurring during childhood or adolescence. We report two cases of PNET involving kidney in adults. Presenting signs and symptoms include abdominal/flank pain and/or haematuria. Microscopy reveals the tumour consisted of small round cells with round nuclei and scant cytoplasm. Diagnosis was confirmed by immunohistochemistry with diffuse membranous positivity of tumour cells with CD99. As these tumours have an aggressive clinical course with rapid death in many reported cases, it is important to differentiate them from other small round-cell tumours.

  7. Generation of brain tumours in mice by Cre-mediated recombination of neural progenitors in situ with the tamoxifen metabolite endoxifen.

    PubMed

    Benedykcinska, Anna; Ferreira, Andreia; Lau, Joanne; Broni, Jessica; Richard-Loendt, Angela; Henriquez, Nico V; Brandner, Sebastian

    2016-02-01

    Targeted cell- or region-specific gene recombination is widely used in the functional analysis of genes implicated in development and disease. In the brain, targeted gene recombination has become a mainstream approach to study neurodegeneration or tumorigenesis. The use of the Cre-loxP system to study tumorigenesis in the adult central nervous system (CNS) can be limited, when the promoter (such as GFAP) is also transiently expressed during development, which can result in the recombination of progenies of different lineages. Engineering of transgenic mice expressing Cre recombinase fused to a mutant of the human oestrogen receptor (ER) allows the circumvention of transient developmental Cre expression by inducing recombination in the adult organism. The recombination of loxP sequences occurs only in the presence of tamoxifen. Systemic administration of tamoxifen can, however, exhibit toxicity and might also recombine unwanted cell populations if the promoter driving Cre expression is active at the time of tamoxifen administration. Here, we report that a single site-specific injection of an active derivative of tamoxifen successfully activates Cre recombinase and selectively recombines tumour suppressor genes in neural progenitor cells of the subventricular zone in mice, and we demonstrate its application in a model for the generation of intrinsic brain tumours.

  8. Case-control study of the association between malignant brain tumours diagnosed between 2007 and 2009 and mobile and cordless phone use

    PubMed Central

    HARDELL, LENNART; CARLBERG, MICHAEL; SÖDERQVIST, FREDRIK; MILD, KJELL HANSSON

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have shown a consistent association between long-term use of mobile and cordless phones and glioma and acoustic neuroma, but not for meningioma. When used these phones emit radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMFs) and the brain is the main target organ for the hand-held phone. The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) classified in May, 2011 RF-EMF as a group 2B, i.e. a ‘possible’ human carcinogen. The aim of this study was to further explore the relationship between especially long-term (>10 years) use of wireless phones and the development of malignant brain tumours. We conducted a new case-control study of brain tumour cases of both genders aged 18–75 years and diagnosed during 2007–2009. One population-based control matched on gender and age (within 5 years) was used to each case. Here, we report on malignant cases including all available controls. Exposures on e.g. use of mobile phones and cordless phones were assessed by a self-administered questionnaire. Unconditional logistic regression analysis was performed, adjusting for age, gender, year of diagnosis and socio-economic index using the whole control sample. Of the cases with a malignant brain tumour, 87% (n=593) participated, and 85% (n=1,368) of controls in the whole study answered the questionnaire. The odds ratio (OR) for mobile phone use of the analogue type was 1.8, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.04–3.3, increasing with >25 years of latency (time since first exposure) to an OR=3.3, 95% CI=1.6–6.9. Digital 2G mobile phone use rendered an OR=1.6, 95% CI=0.996–2.7, increasing with latency >15–20 years to an OR=2.1, 95% CI=1.2–3.6. The results for cordless phone use were OR=1.7, 95% CI=1.1–2.9, and, for latency of 15–20 years, the OR=2.1, 95% CI=1.2–3.8. Few participants had used a cordless phone for >20–25 years. Digital type of wireless phones (2G and 3G mobile phones, cordless phones) gave increased risk with latency >1–5 years, then a

  9. Case-control study of the association between malignant brain tumours diagnosed between 2007 and 2009 and mobile and cordless phone use.

    PubMed

    Hardell, Lennart; Carlberg, Michael; Söderqvist, Fredrik; Mild, Kjell Hansson

    2013-12-01

    Previous studies have shown a consistent association between long-term use of mobile and cordless phones and glioma and acoustic neuroma, but not for meningioma. When used these phones emit radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMFs) and the brain is the main target organ for the handheld phone. The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) classified in May, 2011 RF-EMF as a group 2B, i.e. a 'possible' human carcinogen. The aim of this study was to further explore the relationship between especially long-term (>10 years) use of wireless phones and the development of malignant brain tumours. We conducted a new case-control study of brain tumour cases of both genders aged 18-75 years and diagnosed during 2007-2009. One population-based control matched on gender and age (within 5 years) was used to each case. Here, we report on malignant cases including all available controls. Exposures on e.g. use of mobile phones and cordless phones were assessed by a self-administered questionnaire. Unconditional logistic regression analysis was performed, adjusting for age, gender, year of diagnosis and socio-economic index using the whole control sample. Of the cases with a malignant brain tumour, 87% (n=593) participated, and 85% (n=1,368) of controls in the whole study answered the questionnaire. The odds ratio (OR) for mobile phone use of the analogue type was 1.8, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.04‑3.3, increasing with >25 years of latency (time since first exposure) to an OR=3.3, 95% CI=1.6-6.9. Digital 2G mobile phone use rendered an OR=1.6, 95% CI=0.996-2.7, increasing with latency >15-20 years to an OR=2.1, 95% CI=1.2-3.6. The results for cordless phone use were OR=1.7, 95% CI=1.1-2.9, and, for latency of 15-20 years, the OR=2.1, 95% CI=1.2-3.8. Few participants had used a cordless phone for >20-25 years. Digital type of wireless phones (2G and 3G mobile phones, cordless phones) gave increased risk with latency >1-5 years, then a lower risk in the following

  10. Serotonin and arginine-vasopressin mediate sex differences in the regulation of dominance and aggression by the social brain.

    PubMed

    Terranova, Joseph I; Song, Zhimin; Larkin, Tony E; Hardcastle, Nathan; Norvelle, Alisa; Riaz, Ansa; Albers, H Elliott

    2016-11-15

    There are profound sex differences in the incidence of many psychiatric disorders. Although these disorders are frequently linked to social stress and to deficits in social engagement, little is known about sex differences in the neural mechanisms that underlie these phenomena. Phenotypes characterized by dominance, competitive aggression, and active coping strategies appear to be more resilient to psychiatric disorders such as posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) compared with those characterized by subordinate status and the lack of aggressiveness. Here, we report that serotonin (5-HT) and arginine-vasopressin (AVP) act in opposite ways in the hypothalamus to regulate dominance and aggression in females and males. Hypothalamic injection of a 5-HT1a agonist stimulated aggression in female hamsters and inhibited aggression in males, whereas injection of AVP inhibited aggression in females and stimulated aggression in males. Striking sex differences were also identified in the neural mechanisms regulating dominance. Acquisition of dominance was associated with activation of 5-HT neurons within the dorsal raphe in females and activation of hypothalamic AVP neurons in males. These data strongly indicate that there are fundamental sex differences in the neural regulation of dominance and aggression. Further, because systemically administered fluoxetine increased aggression in females and substantially reduced aggression in males, there may be substantial gender differences in the clinical efficacy of commonly prescribed 5-HT-active drugs such as selective 5-HT reuptake inhibitors. These data suggest that the treatment of psychiatric disorders such as PTSD may be more effective with the use of 5-HT-targeted drugs in females and AVP-targeted drugs in males.

  11. Serotonin and arginine–vasopressin mediate sex differences in the regulation of dominance and aggression by the social brain

    PubMed Central

    Terranova, Joseph I.; Song, Zhimin; Larkin, Tony E.; Hardcastle, Nathan; Norvelle, Alisa; Riaz, Ansa; Albers, H. Elliott

    2016-01-01

    There are profound sex differences in the incidence of many psychiatric disorders. Although these disorders are frequently linked to social stress and to deficits in social engagement, little is known about sex differences in the neural mechanisms that underlie these phenomena. Phenotypes characterized by dominance, competitive aggression, and active coping strategies appear to be more resilient to psychiatric disorders such as posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) compared with those characterized by subordinate status and the lack of aggressiveness. Here, we report that serotonin (5-HT) and arginine–vasopressin (AVP) act in opposite ways in the hypothalamus to regulate dominance and aggression in females and males. Hypothalamic injection of a 5-HT1a agonist stimulated aggression in female hamsters and inhibited aggression in males, whereas injection of AVP inhibited aggression in females and stimulated aggression in males. Striking sex differences were also identified in the neural mechanisms regulating dominance. Acquisition of dominance was associated with activation of 5-HT neurons within the dorsal raphe in females and activation of hypothalamic AVP neurons in males. These data strongly indicate that there are fundamental sex differences in the neural regulation of dominance and aggression. Further, because systemically administered fluoxetine increased aggression in females and substantially reduced aggression in males, there may be substantial gender differences in the clinical efficacy of commonly prescribed 5-HT–active drugs such as selective 5-HT reuptake inhibitors. These data suggest that the treatment of psychiatric disorders such as PTSD may be more effective with the use of 5-HT–targeted drugs in females and AVP-targeted drugs in males. PMID:27807133

  12. Repeated anabolic/androgenic steroid exposure during adolescence alters phosphate-activated glutaminase and glutamate receptor 1 (GluR1) subunit immunoreactivity in Hamster brain: correlation with offensive aggression.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Shannon G; Ricci, Lesley A; Melloni, Richard H

    2007-06-04

    Male Syrian hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus) treated with moderately high doses (5.0mg/kg/day) of anabolic/androgenic steroids (AAS) during adolescence (P27-P56) display highly escalated offensive aggression. The current study examined whether adolescent AAS-exposure influenced the immunohistochemical localization of phosphate-activated glutaminase (PAG), the rate-limiting enzyme in the synthesis of glutamate, a fast-acting neurotransmitter implicated in the modulation of aggression in various species and models of aggression, as well as glutamate receptor 1 subunit (GluR1). Hamsters were administered AAS during adolescence, scored for offensive aggression using the resident-intruder paradigm, and then examined for changes in PAG and GluR1 immunoreactivity in areas of the brain implicated in aggression control. When compared with sesame oil-treated control animals, aggressive AAS-treated hamsters displayed a significant increase in the number of PAG- and area density of GluR1-containing neurons in several notable aggression regions, although the differential pattern of expression did not appear to overlap across brain regions. Together, these results suggest that altered glutamate synthesis and GluR1 receptor expression in specific aggression areas may be involved in adolescent AAS-induced offensive aggression.

  13. The ‘radiation vacation’: Parents’ experiences of travelling to have their children’s brain tumours treated with proton beam therapy

    PubMed Central

    Cockle, Sam G; Ogden, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Proton beam therapy is a new form of radiotherapy. Little is known about patients’ experiences of proton beam therapy and less about parents’ experiences of children receiving treatment. Semi-structured interviews explored 10 parents’ experiences of travelling from the United Kingdom to the United States to have their children’s brain tumours treated with proton beam therapy. Thematic analysis uncovered themes of ‘adjusting to the PBT routine’, ‘finding benefit in the situation’ and ‘readjusting upon returning home’. Parents’ initial worries were elevated by travel, but they found benefit in their experiences, describing them positively. The periods before and after treatment were most difficult, illustrating a cycle from upset to calm, back to upset upon their return home. PMID:28070403

  14. New Zealand adolescents’ cellphone and cordless phone user-habits: are they at increased risk of brain tumours already? A cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cellphone and cordless phone use is very prevalent among early adolescents, but the extent and types of use is not well documented. This paper explores how, and to what extent, New Zealand adolescents are typically using and exposed to active cellphones and cordless phones, and considers implications of this in relation to brain tumour risk, with reference to current research findings. Methods This cross-sectional study recruited 373 Year 7 and 8 school students with a mean age of 12.3 years (range 10.3-13.7 years) from the Wellington region of New Zealand. Participants completed a questionnaire and measured their normal body-to-phone texting distances. Main exposure-metrics included self-reported time spent with an active cellphone close to the body, estimated time and number of calls on both phone types, estimated and actual extent of SMS text-messaging, cellphone functions used and people texted. Statistical analyses used Pearson Chi2 tests and Pearson’s correlation coefficient (r). Analyses were undertaken using SPSS version 19.0. Results Both cellphones and cordless phones were used by approximately 90% of students. A third of participants had already used a cordless phone for ≥ 7 years. In 4 years from the survey to mid-2013, the cordless phone use of 6% of participants would equal that of the highest Interphone decile (≥ 1640 hours), at the surveyed rate of use. High cellphone use was related to cellphone location at night, being woken regularly, and being tired at school. More than a third of parents thought cellphones carried a moderate-to-high health risk for their child. Conclusions While cellphones were very popular for entertainment and social interaction via texting, cordless phones were most popular for calls. If their use continued at the reported rate, many would be at increased risk of specific brain tumours by their mid-teens, based on findings of the Interphone and Hardell-group studies. PMID:23302218

  15. Pooled analysis of case-control studies on malignant brain tumours and the use of mobile and cordless phones including living and deceased subjects.

    PubMed

    Hardell, Lennart; Carlberg, Michael; Hansson Mild, Kjell

    2011-05-01

    We studied the association between use of mobile and cordless phones and malignant brain tumours. Pooled analysis was performed of two case-control studies on patients with malignant brain tumours diagnosed during 1997-2003 and matched controls alive at the time of study inclusion and one case-control study on deceased patients and controls diagnosed during the same time period. Cases and controls or relatives to deceased subjects were interviewed using a structured questionnaire. Replies were obtained for 1,251 (85%) cases and 2,438 (84%) controls. The risk increased with latency period and cumulative use in hours for both mobile and cordless phones. Highest risk was found for the most common type of glioma, astrocytoma, yielding in the >10 year latency group for mobile phone use odds ratio (OR) = 2.7, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.9-3.7 and cordless phone use OR = 1.8, 95% CI = 1.2-2.9. In a separate analysis, these phone types were independent risk factors for glioma. The risk for astrocytoma was highest in the group with first use of a wireless phone before the age of 20; mobile phone use OR = 4.9, 95% CI = 2.2-11, cordless phone use OR = 3.9, 95% CI = 1.7-8.7. In conclusion, an increased risk was found for glioma and use of mobile or cordless phone. The risk increased with latency time and cumulative use in hours and was highest in subjects with first use before the age of 20.

  16. Impact of brain tumour location on emotion and personality: a voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping study on mentalization processes.

    PubMed

    Campanella, Fabio; Shallice, Tim; Ius, Tamara; Fabbro, Franco; Skrap, Miran

    2014-09-01

    Patients affected by brain tumours may show behavioural and emotional regulation deficits, sometimes showing flattened affect and sometimes experiencing a true 'change' in personality. However, little evidence is available to the surgeon as to what changes are likely to occur with damage at specific sites, as previous studies have either relied on single cases or provided only limited anatomical specificity, mostly reporting associations rather than dissociations of symptoms. We investigated these aspects in patients undergoing surgery for the removal of cerebral tumours. We argued that many of the problems described can be ascribed to the onset of difficulties in one or more of the different levels of the process of mentalizing (i.e. abstracting and reflecting upon) emotion and intentions, which impacts on everyday behaviour. These were investigated in terms of (i) emotion recognition; (ii) Theory of Mind; (iii) alexithymia; and (iv) self-maturity (personality disorder). We hypothesized that temporo/limbic areas would be critical for processing emotion and intentions at a more perceptual level, while frontal lobe structures would be more critical when higher levels of mentalization/abstraction are required. We administered four different tasks, Task 1: emotion recognition of Ekman faces; Task 2: the Eyes Test (Theory of Mind); Task 3: Toronto Alexithymia Scale; and Task 4: Temperament and Character Inventory (a personality inventory), both immediately before and few days after the operation for the removal of brain tumours in a series of 71 patients (age range: 18-75 years; 33 female) with lesions located in the left or right frontal, temporal and parietal lobes. Lobe-based and voxel-based analysis confirmed that tasks requiring interpretation of emotions and intentions at more basic (less mentalized) levels (Tasks 1 and 2) were more affected by temporo/insular lesions, with emotion recognition (Task 1) being maximally impaired by anterior temporal and amygdala

  17. Nuclear expression of Survivin in paediatric ependymomas and choroid plexus tumours correlates with morphologic tumour grade.

    PubMed

    Altura, R A; Olshefski, R S; Jiang, Y; Boué, D R

    2003-11-03

    Survivin is a gene that is widely expressed throughout the development of the normal mammalian embryo. Subcellular localisation of Survivin to both the nucleus and cytoplasm has suggested multiple functional roles, including inhibition of cell death, especially as demonstrated within a variety of malignant cell types, as well as regulation of the mitotic spindle checkpoint. The expression of Survivin has been associated with an adverse clinical outcome in a large number of malignancies. However, nuclear Survivin expression has been described as an independent variable of favourable prognosis in two large clinical studies of breast and gastric carcinomas. Reports of Survivin expression in normal postnatal, differentiated tissues have been restricted to cell types with high proliferative capacities, including vascular endothelium, endometrium, colonic epithelium, and activated lymphocytes. Prior to this report, expression within the normal human brain had not been characterised. Here, we analyse the expression of Survivin in human brain sections obtained from perinatal and paediatric autopsy cases. We report a strikingly high level of expression of Survivin within normal ependyma and choroid plexus (CP). Analysis of corresponding neoplastic tissue in paediatric ependymomas and CP tumours shows that expression of the nuclear form of Survivin correlates with morphologic tumour grade, with a loss of nuclear expression associated with progressive cytologic anaplasia. This pattern of expression supports a hypothesis that Survivin plays a functional role in normal ependymal growth and/or neural stem cell differentiation, and that abnormally low levels of expression of the nuclear form of this protein may be a marker of more aggressive disease and/or higher morphologic grade in ependymal and CP tumours.

  18. Primitive neuroectodermal adrenal gland tumour.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Y P; Lang, Brian H H; Tam, S C; Wong, K P

    2014-10-01

    Ewing's sarcoma, also called primitive neuroectodermal tumour of the adrenal gland, is extremely rare. Only a few cases have been reported in the literature. We report on a woman with adult-onset primitive neuroectodermal tumour of the adrenal gland presenting with progressive flank pain. Computed tomography confirmed an adrenal tumour with invasion of the left diaphragm and kidney. Radical surgery was performed and the pain completely resolved; histology confirmed the presence of primitive neuroectodermal tumour, for which she was given chemotherapy. The clinical presentation of this condition is non-specific, and a definitive diagnosis is based on a combination of histology, as well as immunohistochemical and cytogenic analysis. According to the literature, these tumours demonstrate rapid growth and aggressive behaviour but there are no well-established guidelines or treatment strategies. Nevertheless, surgery remains the mainstay of local disease control; curative surgery can be performed in most patients. Adjuvant chemoirradiation has been advocated yet no consensus is available. The prognosis of patients with primitive neuroectodermal tumours remains poor.

  19. Extended extra- and intracerebral ulceration and brain abscess following self-mutilation in an auto-aggressive 51-year-old woman: case report.

    PubMed

    Schebesch, K M; Herbst, A; Schoedel, P; Rockmann, F; Brawanski, A

    2010-02-01

    In neurosurgical practice, the operative treatment of deep or infected wounds caused by auto-mutilation is quite rare, especially in the neurocranium. We present an extraordinary case of an auto-aggressive 51-year-old female suffering from a deeply ulcerated wound on the right frontal skull with consecutive brain abscess, caused manually with needles and forceps over a period of 8 months. The clinical course is present ed together with a description of the conservative and surgical regimen and is illustrated with photographs and CT and MRI images.

  20. Brain Serotonin Synthesis in Adult Males Characterized by Physical Aggression during Childhood: A 21-Year Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    Booij, Linda; Tremblay, Richard E.; Leyton, Marco; Séguin, Jean R.; Vitaro, Frank; Gravel, Paul; Perreau-Linck, Elisabeth; Lévesque, Mélissa L.; Durand, France; Diksic, Mirko; Turecki, Gustavo; Benkelfat, Chawki

    2010-01-01

    Background Adults exhibiting severe impulsive and aggressive behaviors have multiple indices of low serotonin (5-HT) neurotransmission. It remains unclear though whether low 5-HT mediates the behavior or instead reflects a pre-existing vulnerability trait. Methodology/Principal Findings In the present study, positron emission tomography with the tracer alpha-[11C]methyl-L-tryptophan (11C-AMT) was used to compare 5-HT synthesis capacity in two groups of adult males from a 21-year longitudinal study (mean age ± SD: 27.1±0.7): individuals with a history of childhood-limited high physical aggression (C-LHPA; N = 8) and individuals with normal (low) patterns of physical aggression (LPA; N = 18). The C-LHPA males had significantly lower trapping of 11C-AMT bilaterally in the orbitofrontal cortex and self-reported more impulsiveness. Despite this, in adulthood there were no group differences in plasma tryptophan levels, genotyping, aggression, emotional intelligence, working memory, computerized measures of impulsivity, psychosocial functioning/adjustment, and personal and family history of mood and substance abuse disorders. Conclusions/Significance These results force a re-examination of the low 5-HT hypothesis as central in the biology of violence. They suggest that low 5-HT does not mediate current behavior and should be considered a vulnerability factor for impulsive-aggressive behavior that may or may not be expressed depending on other biological factors, experience, and environmental support during development. PMID:20582306

  1. Tumour angiogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, F.

    1985-01-01

    Tumours induce the growth of host blood vessels to support their proliferation. This process of angiogenesis is evoked by specific chemical signals. Recognition of these angiogenic factors has led to experimental methods for cancer diagnosis and for inhibiting malignant growth by specifically blocking neovascularisation. The clinical potential of these techniques is discussed. PMID:2413796

  2. Oral Tumours

    PubMed Central

    Lecavalier, D.R.; Main, J.H.P.

    1988-01-01

    The authors of this article review briefly the anatomy of the oral soft tissues and describe the more common benign and malignant tumours of the mouth, giving emphasis to their clinical features. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8 PMID:21253197

  3. Estimating associations of mobile phone use and brain tumours taking into account laterality: a comparison and theoretical evaluation of applied methods.

    PubMed

    Frederiksen, Kirsten; Deltour, Isabelle; Schüz, Joachim

    2012-12-10

    Estimating exposure-outcome associations using laterality information on exposure and on outcome is an issue, when estimating associations of mobile phone use and brain tumour risk. The exposure is localized; therefore, a potential risk is expected to exist primarily on the side of the head, where the phone is usually held (ipsilateral exposure), and to a lesser extent at the opposite side of the head (contralateral exposure). Several measures of the associations with ipsilateral and contralateral exposure, dealing with different sampling designs, have been presented in the literature. This paper presents a general framework for the analysis of such studies using a likelihood-based approach in a competing risks model setting. The approach clarifies the implicit assumptions required for the validity of the presented estimators, particularly that in some approaches the risk with contralateral exposure is assumed to be zero. The performance of the estimators is illustrated in a simulation study showing for instance that while in some scenarios there is a loss of statistical power, others - in case of a positive ipsilateral exposure-outcome association - would result in a negatively biased estimate of the contralateral exposure parameter, irrespective of any additional recall bias. In conclusion, our theoretical evaluations and results from the simulation study emphasize the importance of setting up a formal model, which furthermore allows for estimation in more complicated and perhaps more realistic exposure settings, such as taking into account exposure to both sides of the head.

  4. Sequence comparison of prefrontal cortical brain transcriptome from a tame and an aggressive silver fox (Vulpes vulpes)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Two strains of the silver fox (Vulpes vulpes), with markedly different behavioral phenotypes, have been developed by long-term selection for behavior. Foxes from the tame strain exhibit friendly behavior towards humans, paralleling the sociability of canine puppies, whereas foxes from the aggressive strain are defensive and exhibit aggression to humans. To understand the genetic differences underlying these behavioral phenotypes fox-specific genomic resources are needed. Results cDNA from mRNA from pre-frontal cortex of a tame and an aggressive fox was sequenced using the Roche 454 FLX Titanium platform (> 2.5 million reads & 0.9 Gbase of tame fox sequence; >3.3 million reads & 1.2 Gbase of aggressive fox sequence). Over 80% of the fox reads were assembled into contigs. Mapping fox reads against the fox transcriptome assembly and the dog genome identified over 30,000 high confidence fox-specific SNPs. Fox transcripts for approximately 14,000 genes were identified using SwissProt and the dog RefSeq databases. An at least 2-fold expression difference between the two samples (p < 0.05) was observed for 335 genes, fewer than 3% of the total number of genes identified in the fox transcriptome. Conclusions Transcriptome sequencing significantly expanded genomic resources available for the fox, a species without a sequenced genome. In a very cost efficient manner this yielded a large number of fox-specific SNP markers for genetic studies and provided significant insights into the gene expression profile of the fox pre-frontal cortex; expression differences between the two fox samples; and a catalogue of potentially important gene-specific sequence variants. This result demonstrates the utility of this approach for developing genomic resources in species with limited genomic information. PMID:21967120

  5. 5-HT1A receptor gene silencers Freud-1 and Freud-2 are differently expressed in the brain of rats with genetically determined high level of fear-induced aggression or its absence.

    PubMed

    Kondaurova, Elena M; Ilchibaeva, Tatiana V; Tsybko, Anton S; Kozhemyakina, Rimma V; Popova, Nina K; Naumenko, Vladimir S

    2016-09-01

    Serotonin 5-HT1A receptor is known to play a crucial role in the mechanisms of genetically defined aggression. In its turn, 5-HT1A receptor functional state is under control of multiple factors. Among others, transcriptional factors Freud-1 and Freud-2 are known to be involved in the repression of 5-HT1A receptor gene expression. However, implication of these factors in the regulation of behavior is unclear. Here, we investigated the expression of 5-HT1A receptor and silencers Freud-1 and Freud-2 in the brain of rats selectively bred for 85 generations for either high level of fear-induced aggression or its absence. It was shown that Freud-1 and Freud-2 levels were different in aggressive and nonaggressive animals. Freud-1 protein level was decreased in the hippocampus, whereas Freud-2 protein level was increased in the frontal cortex of highly aggressive rats. There no differences in 5-HT1A receptor gene expression were found in the brains of highly aggressive and nonaggressive rats. However, 5-HT1A receptor protein level was decreased in the midbrain and increased in the hippocampus of highly aggressive rats. These data showed the involvement of Freud-1 and Freud-2 in the regulation of genetically defined fear-induced aggression. However, these silencers do not affect transcription of the 5-HT1A receptor gene in the investigated rats. Our data indicate the implication of posttranscriptional rather than transcriptional regulation of 5-HT1A receptor functional state in the mechanisms of genetically determined aggressive behavior. On the other hand, the implication of other transcriptional regulators for 5-HT1A receptor gene in the mechanisms of genetically defined aggression could be suggested.

  6. Radiological aspects of gamma knife radiosurgery for arteriovenous malformations and other non-tumoural disorders of the brain.

    PubMed

    Guo, W Y

    1993-01-01

    The aims of the thesis were to investigate stereotaxic procedures in radiosurgery for cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) and radiation effects of single session high-dose irradiation delivered by gamma knife on the human brain. Investigation of gamma knife radiosurgery in 1,464 patients constitutes the data base of this thesis. High quality stereotaxic angiography is the gold standard targeting imaging in radiosurgery for cerebral AVMs, particularly for small AVMs or residual AVMs after other treatments. For medium and large size AVMs, stereotaxic MR techniques can improve targeting precision and decrease irradiation volume as compared to stereotaxic angiography in selected cases provided that proper pulse sequences are used. Combined treatments, where embolization precedes radiosurgery, can improve amenability of the treatment for large AVMs. This is on condition that the partially embolized nidi are well delineated and the volume of the residual nidi has been decreased to a level where an optimum irradiation can be safely prescribed. Radiologically, adverse radiation effects (ARE) of gamma knife radiosurgery for cerebral AVMs are observed in 16% (131/816) of the patients. The ARE are observed as a focal low attenuation on CT or as a focal high signal on MR image without enhancement in 47% (61/131), and as a peripheral or homogeneous enhancing lesion in 48% (63/131). MR imaging is more sensitive than CT in detecting the ARE. 91% of the ARE are observed within 18 months after radiosurgery and 89% are seen to regress within 18 months. Clinically, symptomatic ARE are only observed in 6% (51/816) and only in half of them, i.e. 3%, are the symptoms permanent. The risk of ARE in radiosurgery for venous angiomas is higher as compared to AVMs. Other mechanisms have probably been employed. In gamma capsulotomy, the necrotic lesions and reaction volumes created by using multiple isocentres of 4 mm collimators are less predictable as compared to that by single

  7. Prospective evaluation of aggressive medical therapy for atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis, with renal artery stenting reserved for previously injured heart, brain, or kidney.

    PubMed

    Hanzel, George; Balon, Helena; Wong, Oliver; Soffer, Daniel; Lee, Daniel Taehee; Safian, Robert David

    2005-11-01

    Sixty-six patients with atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis (RAS) and serum creatinine < or =2.0 mg/dl were treated with antihypertensive therapy, a statin, and aspirin. Renal stenting was reserved for patients with injuries to the heart, brain, or kidneys. The primary end point was stenotic kidney glomerular filtration rate (GFR) at 21 months; secondary end points included major adverse clinical events, serum creatinine, total GFR, and blood pressure (BP). After baseline evaluation, 26 of 66 patients underwent renal stenting because of injuries to the heart, brain, or kidneys. After 21 months, 6 medical patients required renal stenting, and 5 patients experienced late clinical events (2 medical patients, 3 stent patients). There was no difference in final BP between groups. Whereas medical patients experienced 6% and 8% decreases in total and stenotic kidney GFR, stent patients experienced 7% and 11% increases in total kidney (p = 0.006) and stenotic kidney (p = 0.02) GFR. There was no difference in final serum creatinine. In conclusion, patients with atherosclerotic RAS and baseline creatinine < or =2.0 mg/dl can be safely managed with aggressive medical therapy, with a small decrease in GFR. For patients who develop injuries to the heart, brain, or kidneys, renal artery stenting may further reduce hypertension and improve renal function.

  8. KLRC3, a Natural Killer receptor gene, is a key factor involved in glioblastoma tumourigenesis and aggressiveness.

    PubMed

    Cheray, Mathilde; Bessette, Barbara; Lacroix, Aurélie; Mélin, Carole; Jawhari, Soha; Pinet, Sandra; Deluche, Elise; Clavère, Pierre; Durand, Karine; Sanchez-Prieto, Ricardo; Jauberteau, Marie-Odile; Battu, Serge; Lalloué, Fabrice

    2017-02-01

    Glioblastoma is the most lethal brain tumour with a poor prognosis. Cancer stem cells (CSC) were proposed to be the most aggressive cells allowing brain tumour recurrence and aggressiveness. Current challenge is to determine CSC signature to characterize these cells and to develop new therapeutics. In a previous work, we achieved a screening of glycosylation-related genes to characterize specific genes involved in CSC maintenance. Three genes named CHI3L1, KLRC3 and PRUNE2 were found overexpressed in glioblastoma undifferentiated cells (related to CSC) compared to the differentiated ones. The comparison of their roles suggest that KLRC3 gene coding for NKG2E, a protein initially identified in NK cells, is more important than both two other genes in glioblastomas aggressiveness. Indeed, KLRC3 silencing decreased self-renewal capacity, invasion, proliferation, radioresistance and tumourigenicity of U87-MG glioblastoma cell line. For the first time we report that KLRC3 gene expression is linked to glioblastoma aggressiveness and could be a new potential therapeutic target to attenuate glioblastoma.

  9. ICGC PedBrain: Dissecting the genomic complexity underlying medulloblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Jones, David TW; Jäger, Natalie; Kool, Marcel; Zichner, Thomas; Hutter, Barbara; Sultan, Marc; Cho, Yoon-Jae; Pugh, Trevor J; Hovestadt, Volker; Stütz, Adrian M; Rausch, Tobias; Warnatz, Hans-Jörg; Ryzhova, Marina; Bender, Sebastian; Sturm, Dominik; Pleier, Sabrina; Cin, Huriye; Pfaff, Elke; Sieber, Laura; Wittmann, Andrea; Remke, Marc; Witt, Hendrik; Hutter, Sonja; Tzaridis, Theophilos; Weischenfeldt, Joachim; Raeder, Benjamin; Avci, Meryem; Amstislavskiy, Vyacheslav; Zapatka, Marc; Weber, Ursula D; Wang, Qi; Lasitschka, Bärbel; Bartholomae, Cynthia C; Schmidt, Manfred; von Kalle, Christof; Ast, Volker; Lawerenz, Chris; Eils, Jürgen; Kabbe, Rolf; Benes, Vladimir; van Sluis, Peter; Koster, Jan; Volckmann, Richard; Shih, David; Betts, Matthew J; Russell, Robert B; Coco, Simona; Tonini, Gian Paolo; Schüller, Ulrich; Hans, Volkmar; Graf, Norbert; Kim, Yoo-Jin; Monoranu, Camelia; Roggendorf, Wolfgang; Unterberg, Andreas; Herold-Mende, Christel; Milde, Till; Kulozik, Andreas E; von Deimling, Andreas; Witt, Olaf; Maass, Eberhard; Rössler, Jochen; Ebinger, Martin; Schuhmann, Martin U; Frühwald, Michael C; Hasselblatt, Martin; Jabado, Nada; Rutkowski, Stefan; von Bueren, André O; Williamson, Dan; Clifford, Steven C; McCabe, Martin G; Collins, V. Peter; Wolf, Stephan; Wiemann, Stefan; Lehrach, Hans; Brors, Benedikt; Scheurlen, Wolfram; Felsberg, Jörg; Reifenberger, Guido; Northcott, Paul A; Taylor, Michael D; Meyerson, Matthew; Pomeroy, Scott L; Yaspo, Marie-Laure; Korbel, Jan O; Korshunov, Andrey; Eils, Roland; Pfister, Stefan M; Lichter, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Summary Medulloblastoma is an aggressively-growing tumour, arising in the cerebellum or medulla/brain stem. It is the most common malignant brain tumour in children, and displays tremendous biological and clinical heterogeneity1. Despite recent treatment advances, approximately 40% of children experience tumour recurrence, and 30% will die from their disease. Those who survive often have a significantly reduced quality of life. Four tumour subgroups with distinct clinical, biological and genetic profiles are currently discriminated2,3. WNT tumours, displaying activated wingless pathway signalling, carry a favourable prognosis under current treatment regimens4. SHH tumours show hedgehog pathway activation, and have an intermediate prognosis2. Group 3 & 4 tumours are molecularly less well-characterised, and also present the greatest clinical challenges2,3,5. The full repertoire of genetic events driving this distinction, however, remains unclear. Here we describe an integrative deep-sequencing analysis of 125 tumour-normal pairs. Tetraploidy was identified as a frequent early event in Group 3 & 4 tumours, and a positive correlation between patient age and mutation rate was observed. Several recurrent mutations were identified, both in known medulloblastoma-related genes (CTNNB1, PTCH1, MLL2, SMARCA4) and in genes not previously linked to this tumour (DDX3X, CTDNEP1, KDM6A, TBR1), often in subgroup-specific patterns. RNA-sequencing confirmed these alterations, and revealed the expression of the first medulloblastoma fusion genes. Chromatin modifiers were frequently altered across all subgroups. These findings enhance our understanding of the genomic complexity and heterogeneity underlying medulloblastoma, and provide several potential targets for new therapeutics, especially for Group 3 & 4 patients. PMID:22832583

  10. Factors related to pregnancy and birth and the risk of childhood brain tumours: The ESTELLE and ESCALE studies (SFCE, France).

    PubMed

    Bailey, Helen D; Rios, Paula; Lacour, Brigitte; Guerrini-Rousseau, Léa; Bertozzi, Anne-Isabelle; Leblond, Pierre; Faure-Conter, Cécile; Pellier, Isabelle; Freycon, Claire; Michon, Jean; Puget, Stéphanie; Ducassou, Stéphane; Orsi, Laurent; Clavel, Jacqueline

    2017-04-15

    Little is known of the causes of childhood brain tumors (CBT). The aims of this study were to investigate whether extremes of birth weight were associated with increased risk of CBT and whether maternal preconceptional folic acid supplementation or breastfeeding reduced the risk. In addition, other maternal characteristics and birth related factors were also investigated. We pooled data from two French national population-based case-control studies with similar designs conducted in 2003-2004 and 2010-2011. The mothers of 510 CBT cases (directly recruited from the national childhood cancer register) and 3,102 controls aged under 15 years, frequency matched by age and gender did a telephone interview, which focussed on demographic and perinatal characteristics, and maternal life style habits and reproductive history. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using unconditional logistic regression, adjusted for age, sex, study of origin and relevant confounders. No association was found between CBT and birth weight or fetal growth. The use of preconceptional folic acid supplementation was rare (5.3% in cases and 7.8% in controls) and the OR was 0.8 (95% CI 0.5, 1.4). There was no association with breastfeeding, even prolonged (six months or more; OR 1.0, 95% CI 0.8, 1.4). Neither was there any association between CBT and other investigated factors (maternal body mass index, gestational weight gain, congenital abnormality, maternal reproductive history or use of fertility treatments. Although large, this study was underpowered for subtype analyses. Pooling data with other population-based studies may provide further insight into findings by CBT subtypes.

  11. Aggressive Behavior

    MedlinePlus

    ... Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Aggressive Behavior Page Content Article Body My child is sometimes very aggressive. What is the best ... once they are quiet and still reinforces this behavior, so your child learns that time out means “quiet and still.” ...

  12. Outcome-based profiling of astrocytic tumours identifies prognostic gene expression signatures which link molecular and morphology-based pathology.

    PubMed

    Beetz, Christian; Bergner, Sven; Brodoehl, Stefan; Brodhun, Michael; Ewald, Christian; Kalff, Rolf; Krüger, Jutta; Patt, Stephan; Kiehntopf, Michael; Deufel, Thomas

    2006-11-01

    Astrocytomas are intracranial malignancies for which invasive growth and high motility of tumour cells preclude total resection; the tumours usually recur in a more aggressive and, eventually, lethal form. Clinical outcome is highly variable and the accuracy of morphology-based prognostic statements is limited. In order to identify novel molecular markers for prognosis we obtained expression profiles of: i) tumours associated with particularly long recurrence-free intervals, ii) tumours which led to rapid patient death, and iii) tumour-free control brain. Unsupervised data analysis completely separated the three sample entities indicating a strong impact of the selection criteria on general gene expression. Consequently, significant numbers of specifically expressed genes could be identified for each entity. An extended set of tumours was then investigated by RT-PCR targeting 12 selected genes. Data from these experiments were summarised into a sample-specific index which assigns tumours to high- and low-risk groups as successfully as does morphology-based grading. Moreover, this index directly correlates with definite survival suggesting that integrated gene expression data allow individualised prognostic statements. We also analysed localisation of selected marker transcripts by in situ hybridization. Our finding of cell-specificity for some of these outcome-determining genes relates global expression data to the presence of morphological correlates of tumour behaviour and, thus, provides a link between morphology-based and molecular pathology. Our identification of expression signatures that are associated individually with clinical outcome confirms the prognostic relevance of gene expression data and, thus, represents a step towards eventually implementing molecular diagnosis into clinical practice in neuro-oncology.

  13. The nature of human aggression.

    PubMed

    Archer, John

    2009-01-01

    Human aggression is viewed from four explanatory perspectives, derived from the ethological tradition. The first consists of its adaptive value, which can be seen throughout the animal kingdom, involving resource competition and protection of the self and offspring, which has been viewed from a cost-benefit perspective. The second concerns the phylogenetic origin of aggression, which in humans involves brain mechanisms that are associated with anger and inhibition, the emotional expression of anger, and how aggressive actions are manifest. The third concerns the origin of aggression in development and its subsequent modification through experience. An evolutionary approach to development yields conclusions that are contrary to the influential social learning perspective, notably that physical aggression occurs early in life, and its subsequent development is characterized by learned inhibition. The fourth explanation concerns the motivational mechanisms controlling aggression: approached from an evolutionary background, these mechanisms range from the inflexible reflex-like responses to those incorporating rational decision-making.

  14. Signaling aggression.

    PubMed

    van Staaden, Moira J; Searcy, William A; Hanlon, Roger T

    2011-01-01

    From psychological and sociological standpoints, aggression is regarded as intentional behavior aimed at inflicting pain and manifested by hostility and attacking behaviors. In contrast, biologists define aggression as behavior associated with attack or escalation toward attack, omitting any stipulation about intentions and goals. Certain animal signals are strongly associated with escalation toward attack and have the same function as physical attack in intimidating opponents and winning contests, and ethologists therefore consider them an integral part of aggressive behavior. Aggressive signals have been molded by evolution to make them ever more effective in mediating interactions between the contestants. Early theoretical analyses of aggressive signaling suggested that signals could never be honest about fighting ability or aggressive intentions because weak individuals would exaggerate such signals whenever they were effective in influencing the behavior of opponents. More recent game theory models, however, demonstrate that given the right costs and constraints, aggressive signals are both reliable about strength and intentions and effective in influencing contest outcomes. Here, we review the role of signaling in lieu of physical violence, considering threat displays from an ethological perspective as an adaptive outcome of evolutionary selection pressures. Fighting prowess is conveyed by performance signals whose production is constrained by physical ability and thus limited to just some individuals, whereas aggressive intent is encoded in strategic signals that all signalers are able to produce. We illustrate recent advances in the study of aggressive signaling with case studies of charismatic taxa that employ a range of sensory modalities, viz. visual and chemical signaling in cephalopod behavior, and indicators of aggressive intent in the territorial calls of songbirds.

  15. Melanotic neuroectodermal tumour of infancy.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, T H; Amin, M R; Bashar, M A; Ahmed, Z; Matin, A; Hasan, G Z; Islam, M D; Hossain, M Z

    2011-04-01

    Melanotic neuroectodermal tumour in infancy is rare, mainly benign with little tendency to recur after excision or effective curettage. This pigmented neoplasm of neural crest origin occurring in infants before 1 year of age. The most common site of occurrence is the anterior maxillary alveolar ridge (70%), following by the skull, brain and mandible. The genital organ is the most frequent extra cranial site. We report a 6 months old male baby with a similar tumour arising from right half of cheek involving the maxilla. We diagnosed the case after histological report. We remove the tumour through a sub-labial incision. The mass was blackish in colour, and was mobilized from all side including from the maxillary sinuses. The author thought that this should be reported for improving the clinical awareness and treatment of pigmented soft tissue mass in children. Almost one year follow up of the patients showed no recurrence.

  16. Neural mechanisms of predatory aggression in rats-implications for abnormal intraspecific aggression.

    PubMed

    Tulogdi, Aron; Biro, Laszlo; Barsvari, Beata; Stankovic, Mona; Haller, Jozsef; Toth, Mate

    2015-04-15

    Our recent studies showed that brain areas that are activated in a model of escalated aggression overlap with those that promote predatory aggression in cats. This finding raised the interesting possibility that the brain mechanisms that control certain types of abnormal aggression include those involved in predation. However, the mechanisms of predatory aggression are poorly known in rats, a species that is in many respects different from cats. To get more insights into such mechanisms, here we studied the brain activation patterns associated with spontaneous muricide in rats. Subjects not exposed to mice, and those which did not show muricide were used as controls. We found that muricide increased the activation of the central and basolateral amygdala, and lateral hypothalamus as compared to both controls; in addition, a ventral shift in periaqueductal gray activation was observed. Interestingly, these are the brain regions from where predatory aggression can be elicited, or enhanced by electrical stimulation in cats. The analysis of more than 10 other brain regions showed that brain areas that inhibited (or were neutral to) cat predatory aggression were not affected by muricide. Brain activation patterns partly overlapped with those seen earlier in the cockroach hunting model of rat predatory aggression, and were highly similar with those observed in the glucocorticoid dysfunction model of escalated aggression. These findings show that the brain mechanisms underlying predation are evolutionarily conservative, and indirectly support our earlier assumption regarding the involvement of predation-related brain mechanisms in certain forms of escalated social aggression in rats.

  17. A new clinical guideline from the Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health with a national awareness campaign accelerates brain tumor diagnosis in UK children—“HeadSmart: Be Brain Tumour Aware”

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background A national survey in 2006 identified that UK referral practice for pediatric CNS tumors ranked poorly in international comparisons, which led to new National Health Service (NHS) Evidence accredited referral guidelines published in 2008 by the Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health and a campaign to raise awareness of early features of CNS tumors and the need for timely imaging. Methods The “HeadSmart: Be Brain Tumour Aware” campaign was launched in June 2011 across the UK as a quality improvement strategy directed at reducing the total diagnostic interval (TDI) from a pre-campaign (2006) median of 14 (mean, 35.4) weeks to a target of 5 weeks in order to equal the best reported internationally. Professional and public awareness was measured by questionnaire surveys. TDI was collected by clinical champions in 18 regional children's cancer centers and the public campaign was coordinated by a national charity, working with a network of community champions. Results The guidelines and campaign raised awareness among pediatricians and were associated with reduction in TDI to a median of 6.7 (mean, 21.3) weeks by May 2013. This change in referral practice was most pronounced in the time from first medical contact to CNS imaging, for which the median was reduced from 3.3 to 1.4 weeks between January 2011 and May 2013 (P = .009). Conclusion This strategy to accelerate brain tumor diagnosis by the NHS using a public and professional awareness campaign is a “world first” in pediatric cancer and is being emulated internationally and acknowledged by a series of NHS and charity awards for excellence. PMID:26523066

  18. Renal Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumour: Case Report of a Rare Entity

    PubMed Central

    Kumarguru, B.N.; Bhat, Balachandra; Ramaswamy, A.S.; Kumar, M. Udaya

    2017-01-01

    The peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumour (PNET) is a member of the family of small round cell tumours. PNET is more aggressive in kidney when compared to the other sites. It usually presents in childhood or adolescence. It has an aggressive clinical course and may process towards metastatic disease culminating in death. A 24-year-old female presented with left sided abdominal swelling. Abdominal ultrasound confirmed a heterogeneous left renal mass. Consequently the patient underwent nephrectomy of left kidney and left oophorectomy. Grossly, the tumour involved almost entire kidney, showed multi-lobular, grey, glistening appearance with focal haemorrhagic areas. Histologically, the tumour cells were arranged in diffuse infiltrating sheets, cohesive lobules, Homer-Wright rosettes and perivascular pseudo-rosettes. Individual tumour cells were small round cells with scant cytoplasm and round nuclei having dispersed chromatin. Features were suggestive of PNET. Immunohistochemistry showed tumour cells displaying strong membrane positivity for MIC 2. Renal PNET needs to be differentiated from other primary and metastatic renal round-cell tumours. Most of the cases of renal PNET have poor response to standard treatment of combined surgical resection, post-operative irradiation, and chemotherapy. PNET is a rare primary tumour in the kidney. Histopathological diagnosis has to be confirmed by immunophenotyping of the tumour cells. PMID:28384877

  19. Nine cases of Merkel cell tumour.

    PubMed Central

    Bose, A

    1997-01-01

    Merkel cell tumour is an aggressive neuroendocrine neoplasm arising in the dermis. Although only a few hundred cases have been reported worldwide, nine were seen in Nottingham between 1985 and early 1994. The patients were five women and four men age 63-88. One was the first Afro-Caribbean reported to have such a tumour. In no case was the diagnosis made clinically; histological and histochemical examination was necessary. Three of the patients died quickly with metastatic disease. The primary treatment is surgical excision. For advanced disease, radiotherapy is commonly beneficial. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9306997

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging findings in 40 dogs with histologically confirmed intracranial tumours.

    PubMed

    Ródenas, Sergio; Pumarola, Marti; Gaitero, Lluís; Zamora, Angels; Añor, Sònia

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) images of 40 dogs with histologically confirmed primary and secondary intracranial tumours were reviewed. Forty-one tumours were diagnosed by means of MR imaging (MRI). MRI findings allowed diagnosis of a neoplastic lesion in 37/41 cases. Based on MRI features, differentiation between neoplastic and non-neoplastic lesions was possible in 24/27 (89%) primary brain tumours and in 13/14 (92%) secondary brain tumours. Diagnosis of tumour type based on MRI features was correct in 19/27 (70%) primary tumours and in 13/14 secondary tumours. The results of this study show that MRI is a good diagnostic imaging modality to detect neoplastic lesions and to diagnose tumour type in dogs. However, as some neoplasms show equivocal MRI features the technique has limitations in the detection of some intracranial tumours and in predicting tumour type.

  1. Using single-case experimental design methodology to evaluate the effects of the ABC method for nursing staff on verbal aggressive behaviour after acquired brain injury.

    PubMed

    Winkens, Ieke; Ponds, Rudolf; Pouwels, Climmy; Eilander, Henk; van Heugten, Caroline

    2014-01-01

    The ABC method is a basic and simplified form of behavioural modification therapy for use by nurses. ABC refers to the identification of Antecedent events, target Behaviours, and Consequent events. A single-case experimental AB design was used to evaluate the effects of the ABC method on a woman diagnosed with olivo-ponto-cerebellar ataxia. Target behaviour was verbal aggressive behaviour during ADL care, assessed at 9 time points immediately before implementation of the ABC method and at 36 time points after implementation. A randomisation test showed a significant treatment effect between the baseline and intervention phases (t = .58, p = .03; ES [Nonoverlap All Pairs] = .62). Visual analysis, however, showed that the target behaviour was still present after implementation of the method and that on some days the nurses even judged the behaviour to be more severe than at baseline. Although the target behaviour was still present after treatment, the ABC method seems to be a promising tool for decreasing problem behaviour in patients with acquired brain injury. It is worth investigating the effects of this method in future studies. When interpreting single-subject data, both visual inspection and statistical analysis are needed to determine whether treatment is effective and whether the effects lead to clinically desirable results.

  2. C1473G polymorphism in mouse tph2 gene is linked to tryptophan hydroxylase-2 activity in the brain, intermale aggression, and depressive-like behavior in the forced swim test.

    PubMed

    Osipova, Daria V; Kulikov, Alexander V; Popova, Nina K

    2009-04-01

    Tryptophan hydroxylase-2 (TPH2) is the rate-limiting enzyme of brain serotonin synthesis. The C1473G polymorphism in the mouse tryptophan hydroxylase-2 gene affects the enzyme's activity. In the present study, we investigated the linkage between the C1473G polymorphism, enzyme activity in the brain, and behavior in the forced swim, intermale aggression, and open field tests using mice of the C57BL/6 (C/C) and CC57BR/Mv (G/G) strains and the B6-1473C (C/C) and B6-1473G (G/G) lines created by three successive backcrossings on C57BL/6. Mice of the CC57BR/Mv strain had decreased brain enzyme activity, aggression intensity, and immobility in the forced swim test, but increased locomotor activity and time spent in the central part of the open field arena compared with animals of the C57BL/6 strain. Mice of the B6-1473G line homozygous for the 1473G allele had lower TPH2 activity in the brain, aggression intensity, and immobility time in the forced swim test compared with animals of the B6-1473C line homozygous for the 1473C allele. No differences were found between the B6-1473G and B6-1473C mice in locomotor activity and time spent in the central part of the arena in the open field test. Thus, the C1473G polymorphism is involved in the determination of TPH2 activity and is linked to aggression intensity and forced-swim immobility in mice. At the same time, the polymorphism does not affect locomotion and anxiety-related behavior in the open field test. The B6-1473C and B6-1473G mice represent a valuable experimental model for investigating molecular mechanisms of serotonin-related behavior.

  3. Aggressive operative treatment of isolated blunt traumatic brain injury in the elderly is associated with favourable outcome.

    PubMed

    Wutzler, Sebastian; Lefering, Rolf; Wafaisade, Arasch; Maegele, Marc; Lustenberger, Thomas; Walcher, Felix; Marzi, Ingo; Laurer, Helmut

    2015-09-01

    Outcome after traumatic brain injury (TBI) in the elderly has not been fully elucidated. The present retrospective observational study investigates the age-dependent outcome of patients suffering from severe isolated TBI with regard to operative and non-operative treatment. Data were prospectively collected in the TraumaRegister DGU. Anonymous datasets of 8629 patients with isolated severe blunt TBI (AISHead≥3, AISBody≤1) documented from 2002 to 2011 were analysed. Patients were grouped according to age: 1-17, 18-59, 60-69, 70-79 and ≥80 years. Cranial fractures (44.8%) and subdural haematomas (42.6%) were the most common TBIs. Independent from the type of TBI the group of patients with operative treatment declined with rising age. Subgroup analysis of patients with critical TBI (AISHead=5) revealed standardised mortality ratios (SMRs) of 0.81 (95% CI 0.75-0.87) in case of operative treatment (n=1201) and 1.13 (95% CI 1.09-1.18) in case of non-operative treatment (n=1096). All age groups ≥60 years showed significantly reduced SMRs in case of operative treatment. Across all age groups the group of patients with low/moderate disability according to the GOS (4 or 5 points) was higher in case of operative treatment. Results of this retrospective observational study have to be interpreted cautiously. However, good outcome after TBI with severe space-occupying haemorrhage is more frequent in patients with operative treatment across all age groups. Age alone should not be the reason for limited care or denial of operative intervention.

  4. Detection and Characterization of CD133+ Cancer Stem Cells in Human Solid Tumours

    PubMed Central

    d'Aquino, Riccardo; De Francesco, Francesco; Pirozzi, Giuseppe; Galderisi, Umberto; Cavaliere, Carlo; De Rosa, Alfredo; Papaccio, Gianpaolo

    2008-01-01

    Background Osteosarcoma is the most common primary tumour of bone. Solid tumours are made of heterogeneous cell populations, which display different goals and roles in tumour economy. A rather small cell subset can hold or acquire stem potentials, gaining aggressiveness and increasing expectancy of recurrence. The CD133 antigen is a pentaspan membrane glycoprotein, which has been proposed as a cancer stem cell marker, since it has been previously demonstrated to be capable of identifying a cancer initiating subpopulation in brain, colon, melanoma and other solid tumours. Therefore, our aim was to observe the possible presence of cells expressing the CD133 antigen within solid tumour cell lines of osteosarcoma and, then, understand their biological characteristics and performances. Methodology and Principal Findings In this study, using SAOS2, MG63 and U2OS, three human sarcoma cell lines isolated from young Caucasian subjects, we were able to identify and characterize, among them, CD133+ cells showing the following features: high proliferation rate, cell cycle detection in a G2\\M phase, positivity for Ki-67, and expression of ABCG2 transporters. In addition, at the FACS, we were able to observe the CD133+ cell fraction showing side population profile and forming sphere-clusters in serum-free medium with a high clonogenic efficiency. Conclusions Taken together, our findings lead to the thought that we can assume that we have identified, for the first time, CD133+ cells within osteosarcoma cell lines, showing many features of cancer stem cells. This can be of rather interest in order to design new therapies against the bone cancer. PMID:18941626

  5. Extracellular vesicles in the biology of brain tumour stem cells--Implications for inter-cellular communication, therapy and biomarker development.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Ichiro; Garnier, Delphine; Minata, Mutsuko; Rak, Janusz

    2015-04-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) act as carriers of molecular and oncogenic signatures present in subsets of tumour cells and tumour-associated stroma, and as mediators of intercellular communication. These processes likely involve cancer stem cells (CSCs). EVs represent a unique pathway of cellular export and cell-to-cell transfer of insoluble molecular regulators such as membrane receptors, signalling proteins and metabolites, thereby influencing the functional integration of cancer cell populations. While mechanisms that control biogenesis, cargo and uptake of different classes of EVs (exosomes, microvesicles, ectosomes, large oncosomes) are poorly understood, they likely remain under the influence of stress-responses, microenvironment and oncogenic processes that define the biology and heterogeneity of human cancers. In glioblastoma (GBM), recent molecular profiling approaches distinguished several disease subtypes driven by distinct molecular, epigenetic and mutational mechanisms, leading to formation of proneural, neural, classical and mesenchymal tumours. Moreover, molecularly distinct clonal cellular lineages co-exist within individual GBM lesions, where they differentiate according to distinct stem cell hierarchies resulting in several facets of tumour heterogeneity and the related potential for intercellular interactions. Glioma stem cells (GSCs) may carry signatures of either proneural or mesenchymal GBM subtypes and differ in several biological characteristics that are, at least in part, represented by the output and repertoire of EV production (vesiculome). We report that vesiculomes differ between known GBM subtypes. EVs may also reflect and influence the equilibrium of the stem cell hierarchy, contain oncogenic drivers and modulate the microenvironment (vascular niche). The GBM/GSC subtype-specific differentials in EV cargo of proteins, transcripts, microRNA and DNA may enable detection of the dynamics of the stem cell compartment and result in

  6. Mathematical Modelling of a Brain Tumour Initiation and Early Development: A Coupled Model of Glioblastoma Growth, Pre-Existing Vessel Co-Option, Angiogenesis and Blood Perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Yan; Wu, Jie; Li, Zhiyong; Long, Quan

    2016-01-01

    We propose a coupled mathematical modelling system to investigate glioblastoma growth in response to dynamic changes in chemical and haemodynamic microenvironments caused by pre-existing vessel co-option, remodelling, collapse and angiogenesis. A typical tree-like architecture network with different orders for vessel diameter is designed to model pre-existing vasculature in host tissue. The chemical substances including oxygen, vascular endothelial growth factor, extra-cellular matrix and matrix degradation enzymes are calculated based on the haemodynamic environment which is obtained by coupled modelling of intravascular blood flow with interstitial fluid flow. The haemodynamic changes, including vessel diameter and permeability, are introduced to reflect a series of pathological characteristics of abnormal tumour vessels including vessel dilation, leakage, angiogenesis, regression and collapse. Migrating cells are included as a new phenotype to describe the migration behaviour of malignant tumour cells. The simulation focuses on the avascular phase of tumour development and stops at an early phase of angiogenesis. The model is able to demonstrate the main features of glioblastoma growth in this phase such as the formation of pseudopalisades, cell migration along the host vessels, the pre-existing vasculature co-option, angiogenesis and remodelling. The model also enables us to examine the influence of initial conditions and local environment on the early phase of glioblastoma growth. PMID:26934465

  7. Mathematical Modelling of a Brain Tumour Initiation and Early Development: A Coupled Model of Glioblastoma Growth, Pre-Existing Vessel Co-Option, Angiogenesis and Blood Perfusion.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yan; Wu, Jie; Li, Zhiyong; Long, Quan

    2016-01-01

    We propose a coupled mathematical modelling system to investigate glioblastoma growth in response to dynamic changes in chemical and haemodynamic microenvironments caused by pre-existing vessel co-option, remodelling, collapse and angiogenesis. A typical tree-like architecture network with different orders for vessel diameter is designed to model pre-existing vasculature in host tissue. The chemical substances including oxygen, vascular endothelial growth factor, extra-cellular matrix and matrix degradation enzymes are calculated based on the haemodynamic environment which is obtained by coupled modelling of intravascular blood flow with interstitial fluid flow. The haemodynamic changes, including vessel diameter and permeability, are introduced to reflect a series of pathological characteristics of abnormal tumour vessels including vessel dilation, leakage, angiogenesis, regression and collapse. Migrating cells are included as a new phenotype to describe the migration behaviour of malignant tumour cells. The simulation focuses on the avascular phase of tumour development and stops at an early phase of angiogenesis. The model is able to demonstrate the main features of glioblastoma growth in this phase such as the formation of pseudopalisades, cell migration along the host vessels, the pre-existing vasculature co-option, angiogenesis and remodelling. The model also enables us to examine the influence of initial conditions and local environment on the early phase of glioblastoma growth.

  8. The neurosurgical aspects in the treatment of cerebral tumours.

    PubMed

    Czirják, S; Bábel, B

    1994-01-01

    Experience with more than 500 tumour cases operated in one year in the National Institute of Neurosurgery and the relevant oncological literature point to an important role of neurosurgery in the treatment of cerebral tumours. After reviewing the dramatic advances of neuroimaging and neurosurgical methods the main problems of neuro-oncology will be brought to light and the new directions of brain tumour research will be shown.

  9. Extrarenal teratoid Wilms' tumour.

    PubMed

    Chowhan, A K; Reddy, M K; Javvadi, V; Kannan, T

    2011-06-01

    We report an unusual case of extrarenal teratoid Wilms' tumour in a 15-month-old male child. The tumour was retroperitoneal in location and consisted of triphasic Wilms' tumour elements, along with the presence of heterologous components. The heterologous teratoid elements were composed of predominantly glandular epithelium with the presence of focal skeletal muscle, adipose and neuroglial tissues. Although extrarenal Wilms' tumours have been documented in the literature, only a few cases have been noted to date. We present the relevant clinical, radiological, histomorphological, histochemical and immunohistochemical features of this rare tumour, and discuss the various theories of its histogenesis.

  10. Quantifying Aggressive Behavior in Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Teles, Magda C; Oliveira, Rui F

    2016-01-01

    Aggression is a complex behavior that influences social relationships and can be seen as adaptive or maladaptive depending on the context and intensity of expression. A model organism suitable for genetic dissection of the underlying neural mechanisms of aggressive behavior is still needed. Zebrafish has already proven to be a powerful vertebrate model organism for the study of normal and pathological brain function. Despite the fact that zebrafish is a gregarious species that forms shoals, when allowed to interact in pairs, both males and females express aggressive behavior and establish dominance hierarchies. Here, we describe two protocols that can be used to quantify aggressive behavior in zebrafish, using two different paradigms: (1) staged fights between real opponents and (2) mirror-elicited fights. We also discuss the methodology for the behavior analysis, the expected results for both paradigms, and the advantages and disadvantages of each paradigm in face of the specific goals of the study.

  11. Vasopressin/oxytocin and aggression.

    PubMed

    Ferris, Craig F

    2005-01-01

    Vasopressin/oxytocin and related peptides comprise a phylogenetically old superfamily of chemical signals in both vertebrates and invertebrates. Each peptide isoform has its own distinct receptor subtype and specific cellular action. The conservation and dispersion of vasopressin/oxytocin signalling systems across the animal kingdom attests to their functional significance in evolution. Indeed, they are involved in the physiology of fluid balance, carbohydrate metabolism, thermoregulation, immunity and reproduction. In addition, these peptides evolved a role in social behaviours related to aggression and affiliation. The focus of this chapter is the role of vasopressin/oxytocin as chemical signals in the brain altering aggressive responding in a context- and species-dependent manner. There is compelling evidence from several mammalian species including humans that vasopressin enhances aggression. The activity of the vasopressin appears linked to the serotonin system providing a mechanism for enhancing and suppressing aggressive behaviour.

  12. Synchronous Appearance of Adenocarcinoma and Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumour (GIST) of the Stomach: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Pushparaj, Magesh; Masih, Dipti; Pulimood, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Adenocarcinoma is the most common histological type of gastric tumour, accounting for approximately 95% of all gastric carcinomas. Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) are rare mesenchymal neoplasms of the digestive tract. Synchronous adenocarcinoma and gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST) occurring in the stomach is rare and very few cases have been reported in literature. Synchronous tumours in the stomach are rarely diagnosed preoperatively. A 63-year-old gentleman was diagnosed with a gastric adenocarcinoma on endoscopic biopsy and underwent surgery. Postoperative histopathologic examination revealed 2 synchronous tumours with both adenocarcinoma and GIST. The adenocarcinoma was determined to be the aggressive tumour based on histologic features. GIST was categorized as a very low risk of malignancy, based on its size and mitosis. The patient underwent chemotherapy for adenocarcinoma. He is under follow up and is currently disease free. Careful histopathologic evaluation is required to detect co-existing rare synchronous tumours. Presence of the second tumour may require additional procedures or protocols. PMID:27042477

  13. Synchronous Appearance of Adenocarcinoma and Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumour (GIST) of the Stomach: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Telugu, Ramesh Babu; Pushparaj, Magesh; Masih, Dipti; Pulimood, Anna

    2016-02-01

    Adenocarcinoma is the most common histological type of gastric tumour, accounting for approximately 95% of all gastric carcinomas. Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) are rare mesenchymal neoplasms of the digestive tract. Synchronous adenocarcinoma and gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST) occurring in the stomach is rare and very few cases have been reported in literature. Synchronous tumours in the stomach are rarely diagnosed preoperatively. A 63-year-old gentleman was diagnosed with a gastric adenocarcinoma on endoscopic biopsy and underwent surgery. Postoperative histopathologic examination revealed 2 synchronous tumours with both adenocarcinoma and GIST. The adenocarcinoma was determined to be the aggressive tumour based on histologic features. GIST was categorized as a very low risk of malignancy, based on its size and mitosis. The patient underwent chemotherapy for adenocarcinoma. He is under follow up and is currently disease free. Careful histopathologic evaluation is required to detect co-existing rare synchronous tumours. Presence of the second tumour may require additional procedures or protocols.

  14. Imaging tumours of the ampulla of Vater.

    PubMed

    Zbar, Andrew P; Maor, Yaakov; Czerniak, Abraham

    2012-12-01

    Although comparatively rare, ampullary tumours tend to be more readily curable than periampullary lesions and pancreatic carcinomas, consequent upon an earlier presentation, a lower likelihood of involved lymph nodes or vascular infiltration and a less aggressive histology. Recently, selected early cases have been able to resected endoscopically making accurate preoperative tumour (T) staging critical in such decision making. The most commonly available imaging methods are endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) and CT scanning where in the former case there is variable accuracy for larger (T2/T3) ampullary tumours particularly where the patient has undergone preoperative common bile duct stenting. CT scanning has consistent shown inferior T staging of ampullary tumours when compared with EUS, although it provides information concerning visceral and nodal metastatic disease. Transpapillary intraductal ultrasound (where available) has shown high accuracy for early T1 tumours potentially suitable for endoscopic or local ampullary excision with the added advantage that it may be conducted without preliminary sphincterotomy. Recently, our group has been using intraoperative transduodenal ultrasound which assists surgical decision making concerning local excision or radical pancreaticoduodenal resection. Very recent images using 3-dimensional endoduodenal ultrasound has provided exquisite images of the ampulla and remain to be validated in ampullary neoplasms.

  15. Ameloblastoma: an aggressive lesion of the mandible.

    PubMed

    Suma, M S; Sundaresh, K J; Shruthy, R; Mallikarjuna, Rachappa

    2013-10-09

    Ameloblastoma is a benign locally invasive epithelial odontogenic tumour comprising 1% of all tumours and cysts arising in the jaws. It is commonly found in the third and fourth decade in the molar ramus region of the mandible. Among all types of ameloblastoma, multicystic ameloblastoma is believed to be locally aggressive lesion that has the tendency for recurrence. In this report we present a large multicystic ameloblastoma in the left body-ramus region of the mandible in a 55-year-old woman. This large lesion was diagnosed with the help of CT and was successfully managed by hemimandibulectomy with simultaneous reconstruction using iliac crest bone.

  16. Human Aggression Linked to Chemical Balance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science News, 1978

    1978-01-01

    Recent studies done by federal researchers indicate that human aggression may be affected by a critical balance of two or three key brain chemical neurotransmitters. Results of this study with human beings are included in this article. (MA)

  17. Randomized pilot study and qualitative evaluation of a clinical decision support system for brain tumour diagnosis based on SV ¹H MRS: evaluation as an additional information procedure for novice radiologists.

    PubMed

    Sáez, Carlos; Martí-Bonmatí, Luis; Alberich-Bayarri, Angel; Robles, Montserrat; García-Gómez, Juan M

    2014-02-01

    The results of a randomized pilot study and qualitative evaluation of the clinical decision support system Curiam BT are reported. We evaluated the system's feasibility and potential value as a radiological information procedure complementary to magnetic resonance (MR) imaging to assist novice radiologists in diagnosing brain tumours using MR spectroscopy (1.5 and 3.0T). Fifty-five cases were analysed at three hospitals according to four non-exclusive diagnostic questions. Our results show that Curiam BT improved the diagnostic accuracy in all the four questions. Additionally, we discuss the findings of the users' feedback about the system, and the further work to optimize it for real environments and to conduct a large clinical trial.

  18. Neuromodulation can reduce aggressive behavior elicited by violent video games.

    PubMed

    Riva, Paolo; Gabbiadini, Alessandro; Romero Lauro, Leonor J; Andrighetto, Luca; Volpato, Chiara; Bushman, Brad J

    2017-04-01

    Research has shown that exposure to violent media increases aggression. However, the neural underpinnings of violent-media-related aggression are poorly understood. Additionally, few experiments have tested hypotheses concerning how to reduce violent-media-related aggression. In this experiment, we focused on a brain area involved in the regulation of aggressive impulses-the right ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (rVLPFC). We tested the hypothesis that brain polarization through anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) over rVLPFC reduces aggression related to violent video games. Participants (N = 79) were randomly assigned to play a violent or a nonviolent video game while receiving anodal or sham stimulation. Afterward, participants aggressed against an ostensible partner using the Taylor aggression paradigm (Taylor Journal of Personality, 35, 297-310, 1967), which measures both unprovoked and provoked aggression. Among those who received sham stimulation, unprovoked aggression was significantly higher for violent-game players than for nonviolent-game players. Among those who received anodal stimulation, unprovoked aggression did not differ for violent- and nonviolent-game players. Thus, anodal stimulation reduced unprovoked aggression in violent-game players. No significant effects were found for provoked aggression, suggesting tit-for-tat responding. This experiment sheds light on one possible neural underpinning of violent-media-related aggression-the rVLPFC, a brain area involved in regulating negative feelings and aggressive impulses.

  19. Malignant tumours after renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Fahlenkamp, D; Reinke, P; Kirchner, S; Schnorr, D; Lindeke, A; Loening, S A

    1996-10-01

    In 1243 patients after renal transplantation, 39 malignant tumours were detected in 37 patients. The average latency period between transplantation and tumour disease was 72 months. Tumours included 8 malignant lymphomas, 7 dermatomas and 24 visceral tumours. The patients who developed a tumour had received fewer blood transfusions before transplantation than a tumour-free control group of 60 patients with renal transplants. Rejection crises occurred in a significantly smaller number of tumour patients compared with the control group.

  20. Endolymphatic sac tumour.

    PubMed

    Zulkarnaen, Mohammad; Tang, Ing Ping; Wong, Siong Lung

    2012-06-01

    We present a case of a papillary tumour at the cerebellopontine angle in a 41-year-old man. He presented with left-sided facial and ear pain associated with dizziness, nystagmus and hearing loss. CT scan of the temporal bone showed a destructive tumour at the left cerebellopontine angle. Surgical excision was performed and the diagnosis of the endolymphatic sac tumour was made. Endolymphatic tumour is a low grade adenocarcinoma that originates from the endolymphatic sac. The definitive diagnosis requires a combination of clinical features, radiological finding and pathological correlation.

  1. Tumour progression and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Arvelo, Francisco; Sojo, Felipe; Cotte, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The two biological mechanisms that determine types of malignancy are infiltration and metastasis, for which tumour microenvironment plays a key role in developing and establishing the morphology, growth and invasiveness of a malignancy. The microenvironment is formed by complex tissue containing the extracellular matrix, tumour and non-tumour cells, a signalling network of cytokines, chemokines, growth factors, and proteases that control autocrine and paracrine communication among individual cells, facilitating tumour progression. During the development of the primary tumour, the tumour stroma and continuous genetic changes within the cells makes it possible for them to migrate, having to count on a pre-metastatic niche receptor that allows the tumour’s survival and distant growth. These niches are induced by factors produced by the primary tumour; if it is eradicated, the active niches become responsible for activating the latent disseminated cells. Due to the importance of these mechanisms, the strategies that develop tumour cells during tumour progression and the way in which the microenvironment influences the formation of metastasis are reviewed. It also suggests that the metastatic niche can be an ideal target for new treatments that make controlling metastasis possible. PMID:26913068

  2. New frontiers for astrocytic tumours.

    PubMed

    Nano, Rosanna; Lascialfari, Alessandro; Corti, Maurizio; Paolini, Alessandro; Pasi, Francesca; Corbella, Franco; DI Liberto, Riccardo

    2012-07-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme, the most common type of primary brain tumour, remains an unsolved clinical problem. A great deal of work has been done in an effort to understand the biology and genetics of glioblastoma multiforme, but clinically effective treatments remain elusive. It is well known that malignant gliomas develop resistance to chemo- and radiotherapy. In this review we evaluated the literature data regarding therapeutic progress for the treatment of astrocytic tumours, focusing our attention on new frontiers for glioblastoma. The research studies performed in in vitro and in vivo models show that the application of hyperthermia using magnetic nanoparticles is safe and could be a promising tool in the treatment of glioblastoma patients. Our efforts are focused towards new fields of research, for example nanomedicine and the study of the uptake and cytotoxic effects of magnetic nanoparticles. The improvement of the quality of life of patients, by increasing their survival rate is the best result to be pursued, since these tumours are considered as ineradicable.

  3. [The role of diagnostic neuropathology in familial tumour syndromes].

    PubMed

    Feiden, S; Sartorius, E; Feiden, W

    2010-10-01

    Inherited cancer syndromes often involve the central and peripheral nervous system. For the surgical neuropathologist the possibility in individual patients of a familial tumour syndrome needs to be considered in the case of special tumours such as malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour (MPNST), medulloblastoma with extensive nodularity (MBEN) or even atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumour (AT/RT) of the brain. Furthermore, tumour location and patient age may point to a familial tumour syndrome as in the case of neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) with typical bilateral vestibular schwannoma in young age. This short review discusses some of the diagnostic aspects in this field relating to neurofibromatosis type 1 and 2 (NF1, NF2), as well as the two rare tumors MBEN in Gorlin-Goltz syndrome and AT/RT in particular.

  4. Testosterone and aggressive behavior in man.

    PubMed

    Batrinos, Menelaos L

    2012-01-01

    Atavistic residues of aggressive behavior prevailing in animal life, determined by testosterone, remain attenuated in man and suppressed through familial and social inhibitions. However, it still manifests itself in various intensities and forms from; thoughts, anger, verbal aggressiveness, competition, dominance behavior, to physical violence. Testosterone plays a significant role in the arousal of these behavioral manifestations in the brain centers involved in aggression and on the development of the muscular system that enables their realization. There is evidence that testosterone levels are higher in individuals with aggressive behavior, such as prisoners who have committed violent crimes. Several field studies have also shown that testosterone levels increase during the aggressive phases of sports games. In more sensitive laboratory paradigms, it has been observed that participant's testosterone rises in the winners of; competitions, dominance trials or in confrontations with factitious opponents. Aggressive behavior arises in the brain through interplay between subcortical structures in the amygdala and the hypothalamus in which emotions are born and the prefrontal cognitive centers where emotions are perceived and controlled. The action of testosterone on the brain begins in the embryonic stage. Earlier in development at the DNA level, the number of CAG repeats in the androgen receptor gene seems to play a role in the expression of aggressive behavior. Neuroimaging techniques in adult males have shown that testosterone activates the amygdala enhancing its emotional activity and its resistance to prefrontal restraining control. This effect is opposed by the action of cortisol which facilitates prefrontal area cognitive control on impulsive tendencies aroused in the subcortical structures. The degree of impulsivity is regulated by serotonin inhibiting receptors, and with the intervention of this neurotransmitter the major agents of the neuroendocrine

  5. Progressive dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumour.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Hamish; Tannenburg, Anthony; Walker, David G; Coyne, Terry

    2015-01-01

    Dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumour (DNET) is a benign tumour characterised by cortical location and presentation with drug resistant partial seizures in children. Recently the potential for malignant transformation has been reported, however progression without malignant transformation remains rare. We report a case of clinical and radiologic progression of a DNET in a girl 10 years after initial biopsy.

  6. COX-2 over-expression correlates with VEGF and tumour angiogenesis in canine mammary cancer.

    PubMed

    Queiroga, Felisbina L; Pires, Isabel; Parente, Margarida; Gregório, Hugo; Lopes, Carlos S

    2011-07-01

    This study was designed to investigate the possible roles of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in canine mammary cancer angiogenesis. Immunohistochemistry was performed on 70 tumours (28 benign and 42 malignant) in order to detect COX-2 and VEGF expression. Microvessel density (MVD) was determined by CD31 immunolabelling to assess tumour angiogenesis. There was a significantly higher expression of COX-2 (P<0.001), VEGF (P<0.001) and MVD (P<0.001) in malignant compared to benign tumours. In the malignant group, the MVD of COX-2 positive tumours was significantly higher than that of COX-2 negative tumours (P=0.026). A similar association was observed for VEGF (P<0.001) positive tumours. The results from this study suggested that over-expression of COX-2 and VEGF may contribute to increased angiogenesis and aggression in malignant tumours.

  7. Sonic Hedgehog promotes proliferation of Notch-dependent monociliated choroid plexus tumour cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li; Grausam, Katie B.; Wang, Jun; Lun, Melody P.; Ohli, Jasmin; Lidov, Hart G. W.; Calicchio, Monica L.; Zeng, Erliang; Salisbury, Jeffrey L.; Wechsler-Reya, Robert J.; Lehtinen, Maria K.; Schüller, Ulrich; Zhao, Haotian

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant Notch signaling has been linked to many cancers including choroid plexus (CP) tumours, a group of rare and predominantly pediatric brain neoplasms. We developed animal models of CP tumours by inducing sustained expression of Notch1 that recapitulate properties of human CP tumours with aberrant NOTCH signaling. Whole transcriptome and functional analyses showed that tumour cell proliferation is associated with Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) in the tumour microenvironment. Unlike CP epithelial cells, which have multiple primary cilia, tumour cells possess a solitary primary cilium as a result of Notch-mediated suppression of multiciliate diffferentiation. A Shh-driven signaling cascade in the primary cilium occurs in tumour cells but not in epithelial cells. Lineage studies show that CP tumours arise from mono-ciliated progenitors in the roof plate characterized by elevated Notch signaling. Abnormal SHH signaling and distinct ciliogenesis are detected in human CP tumours, suggesting SHH pathway and cilia differentiation as potential therapeutic avenues. PMID:26999738

  8. An imbalance in progenitor cell populations reflects tumour progression in breast cancer primary culture models

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Many factors influence breast cancer progression, including the ability of progenitor cells to sustain or increase net tumour cell numbers. Our aim was to define whether alterations in putative progenitor populations could predict clinicopathological factors of prognostic importance for cancer progression. Methods Primary cultures were established from human breast tumour and adjacent non-tumour tissue. Putative progenitor cell populations were isolated based on co-expression or concomitant absence of the epithelial and myoepithelial markers EPCAM and CALLA respectively. Results Significant reductions in cellular senescence were observed in tumour versus non-tumour cultures, accompanied by a stepwise increase in proliferation:senescence ratios. A novel correlation between tumour aggressiveness and an imbalance of putative progenitor subpopulations was also observed. Specifically, an increased double-negative (DN) to double-positive (DP) ratio distinguished aggressive tumours of high grade, estrogen receptor-negativity or HER2-positivity. The DN:DP ratio was also higher in malignant MDA-MB-231 cells relative to non-tumourogenic MCF-10A cells. Ultrastructural analysis of the DN subpopulation in an invasive tumour culture revealed enrichment in lipofuscin bodies, markers of ageing or senescent cells. Conclusions Our results suggest that an imbalance in tumour progenitor subpopulations imbalances the functional relationship between proliferation and senescence, creating a microenvironment favouring tumour progression. PMID:21521500

  9. Peripheral primitive neuroectodermal tumour of the orbit.

    PubMed

    Romero, Ricardo; Castano, Ananda; Abelairas, Jose; Peralta, Jesus; Garcia-Cabezas, Miguel A; Sanchez-Orgaz, Margarita; Arbizu, Alvaro; Vallejo-Garcia, Jose

    2011-07-01

    Peripheral primitive neuroectodermal tumours (pPNETs) are a group of soft-tissue tumours of neuroepithelial origin that arise outside the central and sympathetic nervous system. Orbital location is infrequent, and to the best of the authors' knowledge only 16 cases have been reported in the literature. With this article, the authors report the demographics and clinical characteristics, diagnostic features, differential diagnosis, prognosis and therapeutic options of primary orbital peripheral primitive neuroectodermal tumour, based on their patients and on the cases reported in the literature to date. A differential diagnosis should be made with other small round cell tumours; immunohistochemical and ultrastructural techniques are essential for this purpose. Although bone invasion and extraorbital extension are possible, systemic metastases are uncommon in the cases of orbital pPNETs. Surgery has been the initial treatment in most cases; chemotherapy with or without radiotherapy is considered the best additional treatment. The orbital pPNET could be less aggressive than other forms of pPNETs, since most of the patients reported were alive after the follow-up period (at least 6 months).

  10. Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour of penis.

    PubMed

    Kaur, J; Madan, R; Singh, L; Sharma, D N; Julka, P K; Rath, G K; Roy, S

    2015-04-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour (MPNST) is a rare variety of soft tissue sarcoma that originates from Schwann cells or pluripotent cells of neural crest origin. They have historically been difficult tumours to diagnose and treat. Surgery is the mainstay of treatment with a goal to achieve negative margins. Despite aggressive surgery and adjuvant therapy, the prognosis of patients with MPNST remains poor. MPNST arising from penis is a very rare entity; thus, it presents a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. We present a case of penile MPNST in a 38-year-old man in the absence of neurofibromatosis treated with surgery followed by post-operative radiotherapy to a dose of 60 Gray in 30 fractions and adjuvant chemotherapy with ifosfamide and adriamycin.

  11. Possible Roles of the Dominant Uncinate Fasciculus in Naming Objects: A Case Report of Intraoperative Electrical Stimulation on a Patient with a Brain Tumour

    PubMed Central

    Nomura, Keiko; Kazui, Hiroaki; Tokunaga, Hiromasa; Hirata, Masayuki; Goto, Tetsu; Goto, Yuko; Hashimoto, Naoya; Yoshimine, Toshiki; Takeda, Masatoshi

    2013-01-01

    How the dominant uncinate fasciculus (UF) contributes to naming performance is uncertain. In this case report, a patient with an astrocytoma near the dominant UF was given a picture-naming task during intraoperative electrical stimulation in order to resect as much tumourous tissues as possible without impairing the dominant UF function. Here we report that the stimulations with the picture-naming task also provided some insights into how the dominant UF contributes to naming performance. The stimulation induced naming difficulty, verbal paraphasia, and recurrent and continuous perseveration. Moreover, just after producing the incorrect responses, the patient displayed continuous perseveration even though the stimulation had ended. The left UF connects to the inferior frontal lobe, which is necessary for word production, so that the naming difficulty appears to be the result of disrupted word production caused by electrical stimulation of the dominant UF. The verbal paraphasia appears to be due to the failure to select the correct word from semantic memory and the failure to suppress the incorrect word. The left UF is associated with working memory, which plays an important role in recurrent perseveration. The continuous perseveration appears to be due to disturbances in word production and a failure to inhibit an appropriate response. These findings in this case suggest that the dominant UF has multiple roles in the naming of objects. PMID:23242348

  12. Effect of anti-glycolytic agents on tumour cells in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korshunov, D. A.; Kondakova, I. V.

    2016-08-01

    A metabolic change is one of the tumour hallmarks, which has recently attracted a great amount of attention. One of the main metabolic characteristics of tumour cells is a high level of glycolysis even in the presence of oxygen, known as aerobic glycolysis or the Warburg effect. The energy production is much less in a glycolysis pathway than that in a tricarboxylic acid cycle. The Warburg effect constitutes a fundamental adaptation of tumour cells to a relatively hostile environment, and supports the evolution of aggressive and metastatic phenotypes. As a result, tumour glycolysis may become an attractive target for cancer therapy. Here, we research the effect of potential anticancer agents on tumour cells in vitro. In our study, we found a high sensitivity of tumour cells to anti-glycolityc drugs. In addition, tumour cells are more resistant to the agents studied in comparison with normal cells. We also observed an atypical cooperative interaction of tumour cells in the median lethal dose of drugs. They formed the specific morphological structure of the surviving cells. This behavior is not natural for the culture of tumour cells. Perhaps this is one of the mechanisms of cells' adaptation to the aggressive environment.

  13. Endometrial endometrioid adenocarcinoma associated with primitive neuroectodermal tumour of the uterus: a poor prognostic subtype of uterine tumours.

    PubMed

    Bartosch, Carla; Vieira, Joana; Teixeira, Manuel R; Lopes, José Manuel

    2011-12-01

    Uterine primitive neuroectodermal tumours are extremely rare tumours. They can occur in pure form or combined with another component including endometrioid adenocarcinoma. We aimed to review the clinical impact of neuroectodermal phenotype in uterine tumours, after we recently diagnosed one such case. A 58-year-old female presented with irregular vaginal bleeding. Ultrasonography and CT showed the presence of a large uterine mass with irregular contours. At laparotomy it was found to extend to the right ureter, sigmoid colon and some small intestinal loops. Microscopic examination revealed that the tumour consisted of an endometrioid adenocarcinoma component merging with an extensive neuroectodermal component. No EWSR1 or FUS rearrangement was found in the two tumour components. The patient received two courses of chemotherapy but died 11 months after the initial diagnosis. We reviewed the morphological and molecular criteria for the diagnosis of uterine primitive neuroectodermal tumours published in the literature. We conclude that regardless of the detection of an EWSR1 rearrangement, the presence of a neuroectodermal differentiation component in these rare uterine tumours is a marker of aggressive behaviour, and its presence should be highlighted in the diagnosis.

  14. Factors affecting platinum concentrations in human surgical tumour specimens after cisplatin.

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, D. J.; Molepo, J. M.; Green, R. M.; Montpetit, V. A.; Hugenholtz, H.; Lamothe, A.; Mikhael, N. Z.; Redmond, M. D.; Gadia, M.; Goel, R.

    1995-01-01

    We assessed factors which affect cisplatin concentrations in human surgical tumour specimens. Cisplatin 10 mg m-2 was given i.v. to 45 consenting patients undergoing surgical resection of neoplasms, and platinum was assayed in resected tumour and in deproteinated plasma by flameless atomic absorption spectrophotometry. By multiple stepwise regression analysis of normalised data, patient characteristics that emerged as being most closely associated (P < 0.05) with tumour platinum concentrations (after correcting for associations with other variables) were tumour 'source' [primary brain lymphomas, medulloblastomas and meningiomas ('type LMM') > 'others' > lung cancer > head/neck cancer > gliomas) or tumour 'type' (LMM > brain metastases > extracerebral tumours > gliomas), serum calcium and chloride (positive correlations) and bilirubin (negative). Tumour location (intracranial vs extracranial) did not correlate with platinum concentrations. If values for a single outlier were omitted, high-grade gliomas had significantly higher platinum concentrations (P < 0.003) than low-grade gliomas. For intracranial tumours, the computerised tomographic scan feature that correlated most closely with platinum concentrations in multivariate analysis was the darkness of peritumoral oedema. Tumour source or type is a much more important correlate of human tumour cisplatin concentrations than is intracranial vs extracranial location. Serum calcium, chloride and bilirubin levels may affect tumour cisplatin uptake or retention. CT scan characteristics may help predict cisplatin concentrations in intracranial tumours. PMID:7880744

  15. Cytologic Interpretation of Melanotic Neuroectodermal Tumour of Infancy Involving Cranial Bones: Clue to Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Biswal, Priyadarshini; Behera, Susmita; Dhal, Ipsita; Surabhi

    2015-01-01

    Melanotic neuroectodermal tumour of infancy (MNTI) is a rare, benign but locally aggressive neoplasm of infants commonly affecting the maxilla. It can also involve other areas like skull, mandible, brain and epididymis. The tumour comprise of dual populations of cells like small, basophilic neuroblast like cells and large pigment laden epithelial cells arranged in tubular and pseudoglandular pattern. The proportion of two components varies and therefore the diagnosis can be difficult in absence of the large cells. We describe the cytologic, histologic and immunohistochemical findings in a case of MNTI involving left side orbit with frontal, temporal and parietal bones. The cytologic interpretation could be made due to the suggestive clinical and radiologic findings and detection of large epithelial pigmented cells on thorough searching. The neuroblast like cells was positive for Neuron specific enolase, large cells for HMB-45 and Pan CK. Both the cellular components were negative for desmin. This case report is presented due to its rarity and also to aid the surgical pathologists in diagnosis where the findings are not too straight forward. PMID:26500916

  16. Breast-conserving surgery is contraindicated for recurrent giant multifocal phyllodes tumours of breast

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The controversy between breast conserving surgery and simple mastectomy for phyllodes tumours of the breast remains because of the unpredictable nature of the disease. Although some benign tumours may show an unusually aggressive behaviour, modified radical surgery for phyllodes tumours offers no survival advantage, and recently more conservative surgical approaches have been deployed. Case presentation A 30-year-old woman with a giant multifocal tumour of the breast underwent breast-conserving surgery that made use of the well- circumscribed feature of the tumour. The case demonstrates the safety, and cosmetic benefit of the breast-conserving approach for multifocal phyllodes tumours except for the high recurrence rate. Conclusions Large size, multifocality, and borderline or malignant histology are contraindications for breast-conserving surgery. PMID:25023082

  17. Neonatal exposure to estradiol-17β modulates tumour necrosis factor alpha and cyclooxygenase-2 expression in brain and also in ovaries of adult female rats.

    PubMed

    Shridharan, Radhika Nagamangalam; Krishnagiri, Harshini; Govindaraj, Vijayakumar; Sarangi, SitiKantha; Rao, Addicam Jagannadha

    2016-02-01

    The sexually dimorphic organization in perinatal rat brain is influenced by steroid hormones. Exposure to high levels of estrogen or endocrine-disrupting compounds during perinatal period may perturb this process, resulting in compromised reproductive physiology and behavior as observed in adult In our recent observation neonatal exposure of the female rats to estradiol-17β resulted in down-regulation of TNF-α, up-regulation of COX-2 and increase in SDN-POA size in pre-optic area in the adulthood. It is known that the control of reproductive performance in female involves a complex interplay of the hypothalamus, pituitary, and ovary. The present study was undertaken to understand the possible molecular mechanism involved in changes observed in the ovarian morphology and expression of selected genes in the ovary. Administration of estradiol-17β (100 μg) on day 2 and 3 after birth revealed up-regulation of ER-α, ER-β, COX-2 and down-regulation of TNF-α expression. Also the decrease in the ovarian weight, altered ovarian morphology and changes in the 2D protein profiles were also seen. This is apparently the first report documenting that neonatal estradiol exposure modulates TNF-α and COX-2 expression in the ovary as seen during adult stage. Our results permit us to suggest that cues originating from the modified brain structure due to neonatal exposure of estradiol-17β remodel the ovary at the molecular level in such a way that there is a disharmony in the reproductive function during adulthood and these changes are perennial and can lead to infertility and changes of reproductive behavior.

  18. The determinants of tumour immunogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Blankenstein, Thomas; Coulie, Pierre G.; Gilboa, Eli; Jaffee, Elizabeth M.

    2013-01-01

    Many standard and targeted therapies, as well as radiotherapy, have been shown to induce an anti-tumour immune response, and immunotherapies rely on modulating the host immune system to induce an anti-tumour immune response. However, the immune response to such therapies is often reliant on the immunogenicity of a tumour. Tumour immunogenicity varies greatly between cancers of the same type in different individuals and between different types of cancer. So, what do we know about tumour immunogenicity and how might we therapeutically improve tumour immunogenicity? We asked four leading cancer immunologists around the world for their opinions on this important issue. PMID:22378190

  19. Neural mediators of the intergenerational transmission of family aggression.

    PubMed

    Saxbe, Darby; Del Piero, Larissa Borofsky; Immordino-Yang, Mary Helen; Kaplan, Jonas Todd; Margolin, Gayla

    2016-05-01

    Youth exposed to family aggression may become more aggressive themselves, but the mechanisms of intergenerational transmission are understudied. In a longitudinal study, we found that adolescents' reduced neural activation when rating their parents' emotions, assessed via magnetic resonance imaging, mediated the association between parents' past aggression and adolescents' subsequent aggressive behavior toward parents. A subsample of 21 youth, drawn from the larger study, underwent magnetic resonance imaging scanning proximate to the second of two assessments of the family environment. At Time 1 (when youth were on average 15.51 years old) we measured parents' aggressive marital and parent-child conflict behaviors, and at Time 2 (≈2 years later), we measured youth aggression directed toward parents. Youth from more aggressive families showed relatively less activation to parent stimuli in brain areas associated with salience and socioemotional processing, including the insula and limbic structures. Activation patterns in these same areas were also associated with youths' subsequent parent-directed aggression. The association between parents' aggression and youths' subsequent parent-directed aggression was statistically mediated by signal change coefficients in the insula, right amygdala, thalamus, and putamen. These signal change coefficients were also positively associated with scores on a mentalizing measure. Hypoarousal of the emotional brain to family stimuli may support the intergenerational transmission of family aggression.

  20. Neural mediators of the intergenerational transmission of family aggression

    PubMed Central

    Saxbe, Darby; Del Piero, Larissa Borofsky; Immordino-Yang, Mary Helen; Kaplan, Jonas Todd; Margolin, Gayla

    2015-01-01

    Youth exposed to family aggression may become more aggressive themselves, but the mechanisms of intergenerational transmission are understudied. In a longitudinal study, we found that adolescents’ reduced neural activation when rating their parents’ emotions, assessed via magnetic resonance imaging, mediated the association between parents’ past aggression and adolescents’ subsequent aggressive behavior toward parents. A subsample of 21 youth, drawn from the larger study, underwent magnetic resonance imaging scanning proximate to the second of two assessments of the family environment. At Time 1 (when youth were on average 15.51 years old) we measured parents’ aggressive marital and parent–child conflict behaviors, and at Time 2 (≈2 years later), we measured youth aggression directed toward parents. Youth from more aggressive families showed relatively less activation to parent stimuli in brain areas associated with salience and socioemotional processing, including the insula and limbic structures. Activation patterns in these same areas were also associated with youths’ subsequent parent-directed aggression. The association between parents’ aggression and youths’ subsequent parent-directed aggression was statistically mediated by signal change coefficients in the insula, right amygdala, thalamus, and putamen. These signal change coefficients were also positively associated with scores on a mentalizing measure. Hypoarousal of the emotional brain to family stimuli may support the intergenerational transmission of family aggression. PMID:26073067

  1. Alcohol and Aggression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gustafson, Roland

    1994-01-01

    Reviews the acute effects of alcohol on aggressive responding. From experimental studies that use human subjects, it is concluded that a moderate dose of alcohol does not increase aggression if subjects are unprovoked. Under provocative situations, aggression is increased as a function of alcohol intoxication, provided that subjects are restricted…

  2. Senescence and tumour clearance is triggered by p53 restoration in murine liver carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Wen; Zender, Lars; Miething, Cornelius; Dickins, Ross A.; Hernando, Eva; Krizhanovsky, Valery; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Lowe, Scott W.

    2015-01-01

    Although cancer arises from a combination of mutations in oncogenes and tumour suppressor genes, the extent to which tumour suppressor gene loss is required for maintaining established tumours is poorly understood. p53 is an important tumour suppressor that acts to restrict proliferation in response to DNA damage or deregulation of mitogenic oncogenes, by leading to the induction of various cell cycle checkpoints, apoptosis or cellular senescence1,2. Consequently, p53 mutations increase cell proliferation and survival, and in some settings promote genomic instability and resistance to certain chemotherapies3. To determine the consequences of reactivating the p53 pathway in tumours, we used RNA interference (RNAi) to conditionally regulate endogenous p53 expression in a mosaic mouse model of liver carcinoma4,5. We show that even brief reactivation of endogenous p53 in p53-deficient tumours can produce complete tumour regressions. The primary response to p53 was not apoptosis, but instead involved the induction of a cellular senescence program that was associated with differentiation and the upregulation of inflammatory cytokines. This program, although producing only cell cycle arrest in vitro, also triggered an innate immune response that targeted the tumour cells in vivo, thereby contributing to tumour clearance. Our study indicates that p53 loss can be required for the maintenance of aggressive carcinomas, and illustrates how the cellular senescence program can act together with the innate immune system to potently limit tumour growth. PMID:17251933

  3. How effective is temozolomide for treating pituitary tumours and when should it be used?

    PubMed

    Halevy, Carmel; Whitelaw, Benjamin C

    2017-04-01

    Temozolomide (TMZ) has been shown as an effective treatment option in aggressive pituitary adenomas and carcinomas. This review analyses the published case series and demonstrates 42 % of patents show a radiological response and 27 % experience stable disease following TMZ. Prolactinomas and corticotroph tumours respond best to TMZ, showing approximately a 50 % response rate, with non-functioning tumours responding only half as frequently. Other factors that may predict the tumour's TMZ response include MGMT and MSH status, but neither is sufficiently robust to determine treatment decisions. TMZ has an accepted role in treating pituitary carcinoma and adenomas if radiation and surgery have failed to control tumour growth. To use TMZ on the basis of anticipated future aggression, as a primary therapy, or in preference to radiotherapy remains controversial.

  4. Tumour Cell Heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Gay, Laura; Baker, Ann-Marie; Graham, Trevor A.

    2016-01-01

    The population of cells that make up a cancer are manifestly heterogeneous at the genetic, epigenetic, and phenotypic levels. In this mini-review, we summarise the extent of intra-tumour heterogeneity (ITH) across human malignancies, review the mechanisms that are responsible for generating and maintaining ITH, and discuss the ramifications and opportunities that ITH presents for cancer prognostication and treatment. PMID:26973786

  5. The relationship between total and phosphorylated STAT1 and STAT3 tumour cell expression, components of tumour microenvironment and survival in patients with invasive ductal breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gujam, Fadia J.A.; McMillan, Donald C.; Edwards, Joanne

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the relationship between tumour cell expression of total and phosphorylated STAT1 (ph-STAT1) and STAT3 (ph-STAT-3), components of tumour microenvironment and survival in patients with invasive ductal breast cancer. Immunohistochemical analysis of total and ph-STAT1, and STAT3 were performed on tissue microarray of 384 breast cancer specimens. Tumour cell expression of STAT1 and STAT3 at both cytoplasmic and nuclear locations were combined and identified as STAT1/STAT3 tumour cell expression. These results were related to cancer specific survival (CSS) and phenotypic features of the tumour and the host. High ph-STAT1 and ph-STAT3 tumour cell expression were associated with increased ER (both P≤0.001) and PR (both P <0.05), reduced tumour grade (P=0.015 and P<0.001 respectively) and necrosis (both P=0.001). Ph-STAT1 was associated with increased general inflammatory infiltrate (P=0.007) and ph-STAT3 was associated with lower CD4+ infiltration (P=0.024). In multivariate survival analysis, only high ph-STAT3 tumour cell expression was a predictor of improved CSS (P=0.010) independent of other tumour and host-based factors. STAT1 and STAT3 tumour cell expression appeared to be an important determinant of favourable outcome in patients with invasive ductal breast cancer. The present results suggest that STAT1 and STAT3 may affect disease outcome through direct impact on tumour cells, counteracting aggressive tumour features, as well as interaction with the surrounding microenvironment. PMID:27769057

  6. Hearing regulates Drosophila aggression.

    PubMed

    Versteven, Marijke; Vanden Broeck, Lies; Geurten, Bart; Zwarts, Liesbeth; Decraecker, Lisse; Beelen, Melissa; Göpfert, Martin C; Heinrich, Ralf; Callaerts, Patrick

    2017-02-21

    Aggression is a universal social behavior important for the acquisition of food, mates, territory, and social status. Aggression in Drosophila is context-dependent and can thus be expected to involve inputs from multiple sensory modalities. Here, we use mechanical disruption and genetic approaches in Drosophila melanogaster to identify hearing as an important sensory modality in the context of intermale aggressive behavior. We demonstrate that neuronal silencing and targeted knockdown of hearing genes in the fly's auditory organ elicit abnormal aggression. Further, we show that exposure to courtship or aggression song has opposite effects on aggression. Our data define the importance of hearing in the control of Drosophila intermale aggression and open perspectives to decipher how hearing and other sensory modalities are integrated at the neural circuit level.

  7. Modeling Aggressive Medulloblastoma Using Human-Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0176 TITLE: Modeling Aggressive Medulloblastoma Using Human-Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 July 2015 Annual 01-July 2014 -- 30 Jun 2015 Modeling Aggressive Medulloblastoma Using Human-Induced Pluripotent Stem...induced pluripotent stem cells by Atoh1 induction can be efficiently transformed by MYC oncogene to form aggressive brain tumors that recapitulate human

  8. Vascular endothelial growth factor is a potential tumour angiogenesis factor in human gliomas in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plate, Karl H.; Breier, Georg; Weich, Herbert A.; Risau, Werner

    1992-10-01

    CLINICAL and experimental studies suggest that angiogenesis is a prerequisite for solid tumour growth1,2. Several growth factors with mitogenic or chemotactic activity for endothelial cells in vitro have been described, but it is not known whether these mediate tumour vascularization in vivo3,4. Glioblastoma, the most common and most malignant brain tumour in humans, is distinguished from astrocytoma by the presence of necroses and vascular prolifer-ations5'6. Here we show that expression of an endothelial cell-specific mitogen, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), is induced in astrocytoma cells but is dramatically upregulated in two apparently different subsets of glioblastoma cells. The high-affinity tyrosine kinase receptor for VEGF, flt, although not expressed in normal brain endothelium, is upregulated in tumour endothelial cells in vivo. These observations strongly support the concept that tumour angiogenesis is regulated by paracrine mechanisms and identify VEGF as a potential tumour angiogenesis factor in vivo.

  9. Lateralisation of aggressive displays in a tephritid fly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benelli, Giovanni; Donati, Elisa; Romano, Donato; Stefanini, Cesare; Messing, Russell H.; Canale, Angelo

    2015-02-01

    Lateralisation (i.e. different functional and/or structural specialisations of the left and right sides of the brain) of aggression has been examined in several vertebrate species, while evidence for invertebrates is scarce. In this study, we investigated lateralisation of aggressive displays (boxing with forelegs and wing strikes) in the Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata. We attempted to answer the following questions: (1) do medflies show lateralisation of aggressive displays at the population-level; (2) are there sex differences in lateralisation of aggressive displays; and (3) does lateralisation of aggression enhance fighting success? Results showed left-biased population-level lateralisation of aggressive displays, with no consistent differences among sexes. In both male-male and female-female conflicts, aggressive behaviours performed with left body parts led to greater fighting success than those performed with right body parts. As we found left-biased preferential use of body parts for both wing strikes and boxing, we predicted that the left foreleg/wing is quicker in exploring/striking than the right one. We characterised wing strike and boxing using high-speed videos, calculating mean velocity of aggressive displays. For both sexes, aggressive displays that led to success were faster than unsuccessful ones. However, left wing/legs were not faster than right ones while performing aggressive acts. Further research is needed on proximate causes allowing enhanced fighting success of lateralised aggressive behaviour. This is the first report supporting the adaptive role of lateralisation of aggressive displays in insects.

  10. Tumour exosome integrins determine organotropic metastasis.

    PubMed

    Hoshino, Ayuko; Costa-Silva, Bruno; Shen, Tang-Long; Rodrigues, Goncalo; Hashimoto, Ayako; Tesic Mark, Milica; Molina, Henrik; Kohsaka, Shinji; Di Giannatale, Angela; Ceder, Sophia; Singh, Swarnima; Williams, Caitlin; Soplop, Nadine; Uryu, Kunihiro; Pharmer, Lindsay; King, Tari; Bojmar, Linda; Davies, Alexander E; Ararso, Yonathan; Zhang, Tuo; Zhang, Haiying; Hernandez, Jonathan; Weiss, Joshua M; Dumont-Cole, Vanessa D; Kramer, Kimberly; Wexler, Leonard H; Narendran, Aru; Schwartz, Gary K; Healey, John H; Sandstrom, Per; Labori, Knut Jørgen; Kure, Elin H; Grandgenett, Paul M; Hollingsworth, Michael A; de Sousa, Maria; Kaur, Sukhwinder; Jain, Maneesh; Mallya, Kavita; Batra, Surinder K; Jarnagin, William R; Brady, Mary S; Fodstad, Oystein; Muller, Volkmar; Pantel, Klaus; Minn, Andy J; Bissell, Mina J; Garcia, Benjamin A; Kang, Yibin; Rajasekhar, Vinagolu K; Ghajar, Cyrus M; Matei, Irina; Peinado, Hector; Bromberg, Jacqueline; Lyden, David

    2015-11-19

    Ever since Stephen Paget's 1889 hypothesis, metastatic organotropism has remained one of cancer's greatest mysteries. Here we demonstrate that exosomes from mouse and human lung-, liver- and brain-tropic tumour cells fuse preferentially with resident cells at their predicted destination, namely lung fibroblasts and epithelial cells, liver Kupffer cells and brain endothelial cells. We show that tumour-derived exosomes uptaken by organ-specific cells prepare the pre-metastatic niche. Treatment with exosomes from lung-tropic models redirected the metastasis of bone-tropic tumour cells. Exosome proteomics revealed distinct integrin expression patterns, in which the exosomal integrins α6β4 and α6β1 were associated with lung metastasis, while exosomal integrin αvβ5 was linked to liver metastasis. Targeting the integrins α6β4 and αvβ5 decreased exosome uptake, as well as lung and liver metastasis, respectively. We demonstrate that exosome integrin uptake by resident cells activates Src phosphorylation and pro-inflammatory S100 gene expression. Finally, our clinical data indicate that exosomal integrins could be used to predict organ-specific metastasis.

  11. Tumour exosome integrins determine organotropic metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Hoshino, Ayuko; Costa-Silva, Bruno; Shen, Tang-Long; Rodrigues, Goncalo; Hashimoto, Ayako; Mark, Milica Tesic; Molina, Henrik; Kohsaka, Shinji; Di Giannatale, Angela; Ceder, Sophia; Singh, Swarnima; Williams, Caitlin; Soplop, Nadine; Uryu, Kunihiro; Pharmer, Lindsay; King, Tari; Bojmar, Linda; Davies, Alexander E.; Ararso, Yonathan; Zhang, Tuo; Zhang, Haiying; Hernandez, Jonathan; Weiss, Joshua M.; Dumont-Cole, Vanessa D.; Kramer, Kimberly; Wexler, Leonard H.; Narendran, Aru; Schwartz, Gary K.; Healey, John H.; Sandstrom, Per; Labori, Knut Jørgen; Kure, Elin H.; Grandgenett, Paul M.; Hollingsworth, Michael A.; de Sousa, Maria; Kaur, Sukhwinder; Jain, Maneesh; Mallya, Kavita; Batra, Surinder K.; Jarnagin, William R.; Brady, Mary S.; Fodstad, Oystein; Muller, Volkmar; Pantel, Klaus; Minn, Andy J.; Bissell, Mina J.; Garcia, Benjamin A.; Kang, Yibin; Rajasekhar, Vinagolu K.; Ghajar, Cyrus M.; Matei, Irina; Peinado, Hector; Bromberg, Jacqueline; Lyden, David

    2015-01-01

    Ever since Stephen Paget’s 1889 hypothesis, metastatic organotropism has remained one of cancer’s greatest mysteries. Here we demonstrate that exosomes from mouse and human lung-, liver- and brain-tropic tumour cells fuse preferentially with resident cells at their predicted destination, namely lung fibroblasts and epithelial cells, liver Kupffer cells and brain endothelial cells. We show that tumour-derived exosomes uptaken by organ-specific cells prepare the pre-metastatic niche. Treatment with exosomes from lung-tropic models redirected the metastasis of bone-tropic tumour cells. Exosome proteomics revealed distinct integrin expression patterns, in which the exosomal integrins α6β4 and α6β1 were associated with lung metastasis, while exosomal integrin αvβ5 was linked to liver metastasis. Targeting the integrins α6β4 and αvβ5 decreased exosome uptake, as well as lung and liver metastasis, respectively. We demonstrate that exosome integrin uptake by resident cells activates Src phosphorylation and pro-inflammatory S100 gene expression. Finally, our clinical data indicate that exosomal integrins could be used to predict organ-specific metastasis. PMID:26524530

  12. P17.35GEINO-10: A PROSPECTIVE OBSERVATIONAL MULTICENTER STUDY OF THE CHARACTERISTICS OF PATIENTS WITH INTRA-AXIAL BRAIN TUMOURS AND THEIR THERAPEUTIC MANAGEMENT IN SPANISH HOSPITALS

    PubMed Central

    Gil-Gil, M.J.; Sepúlveda, J.M.; Vieitez, J.M.; Peñas, R. de las; Fernández-Pérez, I.; Pérez-Segura, P.; Fuster, P.; Martinez-García, M.; Quintanar, T.; del Barco, S.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Primitive brain tumours (BT) represent 2% of adult malignancies. BT patients are treated by different clinical specialists in Spanish hospitals. This means that we did not know with certainty how these patients are treated in Spain. To improve this knowledge the Neuro-Oncology Investigation Spanish Group (GEINO) designed this prospective observational multicenter study. OBJECTIVE: Describe the clinical and pathological characteristics and therapeutic management of intra-axial BT patients diagnosed after January 2010 in Spain. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients >18 years old, diagnosed after January 2010 of a intra-axial BT, treated or not, and gave written informed consent. RESULTS: 397 patients from 22 hospitals were enrolled between 08/01/2012 and 12/03/2013. The median age was 56.9 (18-83) years. 58% were male and 42% female. 87% had ECOG ≤2. 48.5% had comorbidity. 9% had previous history of cancer (2% BT). Symptoms at diagnoses: seizures 30%, epilepsy 25%, cognitive impairment 23.5%, ataxia 7.5%. BT was located in frontal lobe in 33.5%, temporal 29%, parietal 13%, posterior fosse or brainstem 5%. By histology Glioblastoma (GBM) were 67%, anaplastic astrocytoma (AA) 12%, oligodendroglioma or oligoastrocytoma grade 2-3 were 11%, low-grade astrocytoma 6%, medulloblastoma 2% and ependymoma 1%. Of the 313 patients with GBM or AA 98% underwent surgery (SR): 40% complete resection, 41% partial, 11% stereotactic biopsy and 7% open biopsy. 8% of patients received neoadjuvant temozolomide (TMZ) + /- bevacizumab (BV) into a clinical trial. 94% of patients received radiotherapy (RT): 72% focal, 21% whole-brain and 6% hemi-brain. 83% of patients received adjuvant chemotherapy (QT): 99% TMZ with a median of 5 cycles (1-18) and 1% PCV (all were AA). Median Progression Free survival was 10.4 months (95%CI: 9-11.8) for GBM and 31.1 months (95%CI: 12.2-49.9) for AA. 130/167 (78%) of GBM or AA patients received treatment at 1st relapse: 14% SR, 8% RT and 96% QT (CPT11

  13. Socially explosive minds: the triple imbalance hypothesis of reactive aggression.

    PubMed

    van Honk, Jack; Harmon-Jones, Eddie; Morgan, Barak E; Schutter, Dennis J L G

    2010-02-01

    The psychobiological basis of reactive aggression, a condition characterized by uncontrolled outbursts of socially violent behavior, is unclear. Nonetheless, several theoretical models have been proposed that may have complementary views about the psychobiological mechanisms involved. In this review, we attempt to unite these models and theorize further on the basis of recent data from psychological and neuroscientific research to propose a comprehensive neuro-evolutionary framework: The Triple Imbalance Hypothesis (TIH) of reactive aggression. According to this model, reactive aggression is essentially subcortically motivated by an imbalance in the levels of the steroid hormones cortisol and testosterone (Subcortical Imbalance Hypothesis). This imbalance not only sets a primal predisposition for social aggression, but also down-regulates cortical-subcortical communication (Cortical-Subcortical Imbalance Hypothesis), hence diminishing control by cortical regions that regulate socially aggressive inclinations. However, these bottom-up hormonally mediated imbalances can drive both instrumental and reactive social aggression. The TIH suggests that reactive aggression is differentiated from proactive aggression by low brain serotonergic function and that reactive aggression is associated with left-sided frontal brain asymmetry (Cortical Imbalance Hypothesis), especially observed when the individual is socially threatened or provoked. This triple biobehavioral imbalance mirrors an evolutionary relapse into violently aggressive motivational drives that are adaptive among many reptilian and mammalian species, but may have become socially maladaptive in modern humans.

  14. Radiotherapy in Phyllodes Tumour

    PubMed Central

    Sasidharan, Balukrishna; Manipadam, Marie Therese; Paul, M J; Backianathan, Selvamani

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Phyllodes Tumour (PT) of the breast is a relatively rare breast neoplasm (<1%) with diverse range of pathology and biological behaviour. Aim To describe the clinical course of PT and to define the role of Radiotherapy (RT) in PT of the breast. Materials and Methods Retrospective analysis of hospital data of patients with PT presented from 2005 to 2014 was done. Descriptive statistics was used to analyze the results. Simple description of data was done in this study. Age and duration of symptoms were expressed in median and range. Percentages, tables and general discussions were used to understand the meaning of the data analyzed. Results Out of the 98 patients, 92 were eligible for analysis. The median age of presentation was 43 years. A total of 64/92 patients were premenopausal. There was no side predilection for this tumour but 57/92 patients presented as an upper outer quadrant lump. Fifty percent of the patients presented as giant (10 cm) PT. The median duration of symptoms was 12 months (range: 1-168 months). A 60% of patients had Benign (B), 23% had Borderline (BL) and 17% had malignant (M) tumours. The surgical treatment for benign histology included Lumpectomy (L) for 15%, Wide Local Excision (WLE) for 48%, and Simple Mastectomy (SM) for 37%. All BL and M tumours were treated with WLE or SM. There was no recurrence in B and BL group when the margin was ≥1 cm. All non-metastatic M tumours received adjuvant RT irrespective of their margin status. Total 3/16 patients with M developed local recurrence. Total 6/16 M patients had distant metastases (lung or bone). Our median duration of follow up was 20 months (range: 1-120 months). Conclusion Surgical resection with adequate margins (>1 cm) gave excellent local control in B and BL tumours. For patients with BL PT, local radiotherapy is useful, if margins are close or positive even after the best surgical resection. There is a trend towards improved local control with adjuvant radiotherapy for

  15. Leukaemia cell of origin identified by chromatin landscape of bulk tumour cells

    PubMed Central

    George, Joshy; Uyar, Asli; Young, Kira; Kuffler, Lauren; Waldron-Francis, Kaiden; Marquez, Eladio; Ucar, Duygu; Trowbridge, Jennifer J.

    2016-01-01

    The precise identity of a tumour's cell of origin can influence disease prognosis and outcome. Methods to reliably define tumour cell of origin from primary, bulk tumour cell samples has been a challenge. Here we use a well-defined model of MLL-rearranged acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) to demonstrate that transforming haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and multipotent progenitors results in more aggressive AML than transforming committed progenitor cells. Transcriptome profiling reveals a gene expression signature broadly distinguishing stem cell-derived versus progenitor cell-derived AML, including genes involved in immune escape, extravasation and small GTPase signal transduction. However, whole-genome profiling of open chromatin reveals precise and robust biomarkers reflecting each cell of origin tested, from bulk AML tumour cell sampling. We find that bulk AML tumour cells exhibit distinct open chromatin loci that reflect the transformed cell of origin and suggest that open chromatin patterns may be leveraged as prognostic signatures in human AML. PMID:27397025

  16. Diagnosing Musculoskeletal Tumours

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Simon R.; Spooner, David; Sneath, Rodney S.

    2001-01-01

    In 1993 we became aware of a worrying increase in apparent errors in the histopathological diagnosis of musculoskeletal tumours in our Unit. As a result all cases seen over the past 8 years were reviewed by an independent panel. Of the 1996 cases reviewed there was an error in 87. In 54 cases (2.7%) this had led to some significant change in the active management of the patient. The main areas where errors arose were in those very cases where clinical and radiological features were not helpful in confirming or refuting the diagnosis. The incidence of errors rose with the passage of time, possibly related to a deterioration in the pathologist’s health. The error rate in diagnosing bone tumours in previously published series ranges from 9 to 40%. To ensure as accurate a rate of diagnosis as possible multidisciplinary working and regular audit are essential. PMID:18521309

  17. [Adrenal tumours in childhood].

    PubMed

    Martos-Moreno, G A; Pozo-Román, J; Argente, J

    2013-09-01

    This special article aims to summarise the current knowledge regarding the two groups of tumours with their origin in the adrenal gland: 1) adrenocortical tumours, derived from the cortex of the adrenal gland and 2) phaeochromocytomas and paragangliomas, neuroendocrine tumours derived from nodes of neural crest derived cells symmetrically distributed at both sides of the entire spine (paragangliomas [PG]). These PGs can be functioning tumors that secrete catecholamines, which confers their typical dark colour after staining with chromium salts (chromaffin tumors). Among these, the term phaeochromocytoma (PC) is restricted to those PGs derived from the chromaffin cells in the adrenal medulla (intra-adrenal PGs), whereas the term PG is used for those sympathetic or parasympathetic ones in an extra-adrenal location. We analyse the state of the art of their pathogenic and genetic bases, as well as their clinical signs and symptoms, the tests currently available for performing their diagnosis (biochemical, hormonal, imaging and molecular studies) and management (surgery, pre- and post-surgical medical treatment), considering the current and developing strategies in chemo- and radiotherapy.

  18. Tumours of the kidney

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Svend W.; Mackey, L. J.; Misdorp, W.

    1976-01-01

    The most frequent renal tumours of animals are renal cell carcinoma and nephroblastoma. Renal cell carcinomas are seen mainly in dogs and cattle and nephroblastoma is encountered in pigs, puppies, and calves. Renal cell carcinomas are usually papillary in the dog. They show a marked propensity for vascular invasion, penetration of the posterior vena cava, and subsequent pulmonary metastasis. Nephroblastoma, which is morphologically identical to Wilms' tumour of children, is almost always a benign tumour in animals. It is one of the most frequent neoplasms of pigs, possibly owing to the fact that most pigs are slaughtered (and examined) when a few months old. Lymphosarcoma involving the kidney is particularly frequent in the cat, but is also seen in other species as part of a generalized disease. ImagesFig. 5,6Fig. 7Fig. 8Fig. 1,2Fig. 3,4Fig. 16,17,18,19Fig. 9,10Fig. 11Fig. 12Fig. 13Fig. 14,15 PMID:1086154

  19. Gating and tracking, 4D in thoracic tumours.

    PubMed

    Verellen, D; Depuydt, T; Gevaert, T; Linthout, N; Tournel, K; Duchateau, M; Reynders, T; Storme, G; De Ridder, M

    2010-10-01

    The limited ability to control for a tumour's location compromises the accuracy with which radiation can be delivered to tumour-bearing tissue. The resultant requirement for larger treatment volumes to accommodate target uncertainty restricts the radiation dose because more surrounding normal tissue is exposed. With image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT), these volumes can be optimized and tumouricidal doses may be delivered, achieving maximum tumour control with minimal complications. Moreover, with the ability of high precision dose delivery and real-time knowledge of the target volume location, IGRT has initiated the exploration of new indications in radiotherapy such as hypofractionated radiotherapy (or stereotactic body radiotherapy), deliberate inhomogeneous dose distributions coping with tumour heterogeneity (dose painting by numbers and biologically conformal radiation therapy), and adaptive radiotherapy. In short: "individualized radiotherapy". Tumour motion management, especially for thoracic tumours, is a particular problem in this context both for the delineation of tumours and organs at risk as well as during the actual treatment delivery. The latter will be covered in this paper with some examples based on the experience of the UZ Brussel. With the introduction of the NOVALIS system (BrainLAB, Feldkirchen, Germany) in 2000 and consecutive prototypes of the ExacTrac IGRT system, gradually a hypofractionation treatment protocol was introduced for the treatment of lung tumours and liver metastases evolving from motion-encompassing techniques towards respiratory-gated radiation therapy with audio-visual feedback and most recently dynamic tracking using the VERO system (BrainLAB, Feldkirchen, Germany). This evolution will be used to illustrate the recent developments in this particular field of research.

  20. Cytokeratin immunoreactivity in Ewing sarcoma/ primitive neuroectodermal tumour.

    PubMed

    Elbashier, S H A; Nazarina, A R; Looi, L M

    2013-12-01

    Ewing sarcoma (ES)/ primitive neuroectodermal tumour (PNET) is an aggressive malignant neoplasm affecting mainly children and young adults. The tumour is included with other primitive neoplasms under the category of small round cell tumour. Cytokeratin expression in ES/PNET has been described in sporadic case reports as well as a few systemic series. We studied this feature in Malaysian patients diagnosed in University Malaya Medical Centre on the basis of typical morphology and immunohistochemical assays. Immunohistochemical staining for AE1/AE3 and MNF116 were performed in 43 cases. Cytokeratin was expressed in 17 cases (39.5%) in focal, intermediate or diffuse patterns. There was no significant association between cytokeratin immunoreactivity and the following parameters: patient age, sex, skeletal and extraskeletal primary location as well as primary, metastastic or recurrent tumours or chemotherapy treatment. A significant association between cytokeratin and neuron specific enolase (NSE) expression was demonstrated. Our study supports evidence of epithelial differentiation in ES/PNET and emphasizes that the expression of cytokeratin does not exclude ES/PNET in the differential diagnosis of small round cell tumours.

  1. The development of tumours under a ketogenic diet in association with the novel tumour marker TKTL1: A case series in general practice.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Natalie; Walach, Harald

    2016-01-01

    Since the initial observations by Warburg in 1924, it has become clear in recent years that tumour cells require a high level of glucose to proliferate. Therefore, a ketogenic diet that provides the body with energy mainly through fat and proteins, but contains a reduced amount of carbohydrates, has become a dietary option for supporting tumour treatment and has exhibited promising results. In the present study, the first case series of such a treatment in general practice is presented, in which 78 patients with tumours were treated within a time window of 10 months. The patients were monitored regarding their levels of transketolase-like-1 (TKTL1), a novel tumour marker associated with aerobic glycolysis of tumour cells, and the patients' degree of adherence to a ketogenic diet. Tumour progression was documented according to oncologists' reports. Tumour status was correlated with TKTL1 expression (Kruskal-Wallis test, P<0.0001), indicating that more progressed and aggressive tumours may require a higher level of aerobic glycolysis. In palliative patients, a clear trend was observed in patients who adhered strictly to a ketogenic diet, with one patient experiencing a stagnation in tumour progression and others an improvement in their condition. The adoption of a ketogenic diet was also observed to affect the levels of TKTL1 in those patients. In conclusion, the results from the present case series in general practice suggest that it may be beneficial to advise tumour patients to adopt a ketogenic diet, and that those who adhere to it may have positive results from this type of diet. Thus, the use of a ketogenic diet as a complementary treatment to tumour therapy must be further studied in rigorously controlled trials.

  2. [Phyllodes tumour: a rare, rapidly growing breast tumour].

    PubMed

    den Exter, Paul L; Hornstra, Bonne J; Vree, Robbert

    2009-01-01

    A 40-year-old woman presented at the breast outpatient clinic with a giant tumour of her left breast. The size, rapid growth and radiological characteristics of the lesion led us to suspect a phyllodes tumour. A histological examination of a needle biopsy confirmed this diagnosis. An additional CT scan revealed no signs of metastases. We performed a mastectomy during which a tumour measuring 48 x 33 x 25 cm was resected. Histological examination revealed a borderline phyllodes tumour. Phyllodes tumours are rare fibroepithelial neoplasms of the breast and pre-operatively these are often difficult to differentiate from fibroadenomas. Phyllodes tumours have a variable clinical course with the ability to metastasize and a propensity to recur locally. Complete excision with wide margins is essential to prevent local recurrence. In our case, the surgical margins were limited and our patient was therefore treated with postoperative radiation therapy.

  3. Clinical features of gastroenteropancreatic tumours

    PubMed Central

    Czarnywojtek, Agata; Bączyk, Maciej; Ziemnicka, Katarzyna; Fischbach, Jakub; Wrotkowska, Elżbieta; Ruchała, Marek

    2015-01-01

    Gastroenteropancreatic (GEP) endocrine tumours (carcinoids and pancreatic islet cell tumours) are composed of multipotent neuroendocrine cells that exhibit a unique ability to produce, store, and secrete biologically active substances and cause distinct clinical syndromes. The classification of GEP tumours as functioning or non-functioning is based on the presence of symptoms that accompany these syndromes secondary to the secretion of hormones, neuropeptides and/or neurotransmitters (functioning tumours). Non-functioning tumours are considered to be neoplasms of neuroendocrine differentiation that are not associated with obvious symptoms attributed to the hypersecretion of metabolically active substances. However, a number of these tumours are either capable of producing low levels of such substances, which can be detected by immunohistochemistry but are insufficient to cause symptoms related to a clinical syndrome, or alternatively, they may secrete substances that are either metabolically inactive or inappropriately processed. In some cases, GEP tumours are not associated with the production of any hormone or neurotransmitter. Both functioning and non-functioning tumours can also produce symptoms due to mass effects compressing vital surrounding structures. Gastroenteropancreatic tumours are usually classified further according to the anatomic site of origin: foregut (including respiratory tract, thymus, stomach, duodenum, and pancreas), midgut (including small intestine, appendix, and right colon), and hindgut (including transverse colon, sigmoid, and rectum). Within these subgroups the biological and clinical characteristics of the tumours vary considerably, but this classification is still in use because a significant number of previous studies, mainly observational, have used it extensively. PMID:26516377

  4. Metabolic substrate utilization by tumour and host tissues in cancer cachexia.

    PubMed Central

    Mulligan, H D; Tisdale, M J

    1991-01-01

    Utilization of metabolic substrates in tumour and host tissues was determined in the presence or absence of two colonic tumours, the MAC16, which is capable of inducing cachexia in recipient animals, and the MAC13, which is of the same histological type, but without the effect on host body composition. Glucose utilization by different tissues was determined in vivo by the 2-deoxyglucose tracer technique. Glucose utilization by the MAC13 tumour was significantly higher than by the MAC16 tumour, and in animals bearing tumours of either type the tumour was the second major consumer of glucose after the brain. This extra demand for glucose was accompanied by a marked decrease in glucose utilization by the epididymal fat-pads, testes, colon, spleen, kidney and, in particular, the brain, in tumour-bearing animals irrespective of cachexia. The decrease in glucose consumption by the brain was at least as high as the metabolic demand by the tumour. This suggests that the tissues of tumour-bearing animals adapt to use substrates other than glucose and that alterations in glucose utilization are not responsible for the cachexia. Studies in vitro showed that brain metabolism in the tumour-bearing state was maintained by an increased use of lactate and 3-hydroxybutyrate, accompanied by a 50% increase in 3-oxoacid CoA-transferase. This was supported by studies in vivo which showed an increased metabolism of 3-hydroxybutyrate in tumour-bearing animals. Thus ketone bodies may be utilized as a metabolic fuel during the cancer-bearing state, even though the nutritional conditions mimic the fed state. PMID:1859359

  5. Study Casts Doubt on A Brain Cancer's Link to Herpes

    MedlinePlus

    ... between a common type of herpes virus and aggressive brain cancers, according to a new study that ... researchers analyzed tumor tissue from 125 patients with aggressive brain cancers called gliomas. Ninety-nine of the ...

  6. Metabolic scaling in solid tumours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milotti, E.; Vyshemirsky, V.; Sega, M.; Stella, S.; Chignola, R.

    2013-06-01

    Tumour metabolism is an outstanding topic of cancer research, as it determines the growth rate and the global activity of tumours. Recently, by combining the diffusion of oxygen, nutrients, and metabolites in the extracellular environment, and the internal motions that mix live and dead cells, we derived a growth law of solid tumours which is linked to parameters at the cellular level. Here we use this growth law to obtain a metabolic scaling law for solid tumours, which is obeyed by tumours of different histotypes both in vitro and in vivo, and we display its relation with the fractal dimension of the distribution of live cells in the tumour mass. The scaling behaviour is related to measurable parameters, with potential applications in the clinical practice.

  7. Metabolic scaling in solid tumours

    PubMed Central

    Milotti, E.; Vyshemirsky, V.; Sega, M.; Stella, S.; Chignola, R.

    2013-01-01

    Tumour metabolism is an outstanding topic of cancer research, as it determines the growth rate and the global activity of tumours. Recently, by combining the diffusion of oxygen, nutrients, and metabolites in the extracellular environment, and the internal motions that mix live and dead cells, we derived a growth law of solid tumours which is linked to parameters at the cellular level1. Here we use this growth law to obtain a metabolic scaling law for solid tumours, which is obeyed by tumours of different histotypes both in vitro and in vivo, and we display its relation with the fractal dimension of the distribution of live cells in the tumour mass. The scaling behaviour is related to measurable parameters, with potential applications in the clinical practice. PMID:23727729

  8. Modelling and Detecting Tumour Oxygenation Levels

    PubMed Central

    Skeldon, Anne C.; Chaffey, Gary; Lloyd, David J. B.; Mohan, Vineet; Bradley, David A.; Nisbet, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Tumours that are low in oxygen (hypoxic) tend to be more aggressive and respond less well to treatment. Knowing the spatial distribution of oxygen within a tumour could therefore play an important role in treatment planning, enabling treatment to be targeted in such a way that higher doses of radiation are given to the more radioresistant tissue. Mapping the spatial distribution of oxygen in vivo is difficult. Radioactive tracers that are sensitive to different levels of oxygen are under development and in the early stages of clinical use. The concentration of these tracer chemicals can be detected via positron emission tomography resulting in a time dependent concentration profile known as a tissue activity curve (TAC). Pharmaco-kinetic models have then been used to deduce oxygen concentration from TACs. Some such models have included the fact that the spatial distribution of oxygen is often highly inhomogeneous and some have not. We show that the oxygen distribution has little impact on the form of a TAC; it is only the mean oxygen concentration that matters. This has significant consequences both in terms of the computational power needed, and in the amount of information that can be deduced from TACs. PMID:22761687

  9. Testosterone and Aggression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Archer, John

    1994-01-01

    Studies comparing aggressive and nonaggressive prisoners show higher testosterone levels among the former. While there is limited evidence for a strong association between aggressiveness and testosterone during adolescence, other studies indicate that testosterone levels are responsive to influences from the social environment, particularly those…

  10. Social Aggression among Girls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Underwood, Marion K.

    Noting recent interest in girls' social or "relational" aggression, this volume offers a balanced, scholarly analysis of scientific knowledge in this area. The book integrates current research on emotion regulation, gender, and peer relations, to examine how girls are socialized to experience and express anger and aggression from infancy…

  11. Neuropsychiatry of Aggression

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Scott D.; Kjome, Kimberly L.; Moeller, F. Gerard

    2010-01-01

    Synopsis Aggression is a serious medical problem that can place both the patient and the health care provider at risk. Aggression can result from medical, neurologic and or psychiatric disorders. A comprehensive patient evaluation is needed. Treatment options include pharmacotherapy as well as non-pharmacologic interventions, both need to be individualized to the patient. PMID:21172570

  12. Humor, Aggression, and Aging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrick, Ann Louise; And Others

    Although humor is an important phenomenon in human interactions, it has rarely been studied in the elderly. An understanding of responses to humor in aggressive cartoons as a function of advancing age would provide information regarding both the development of humor and the negative (aggressive) emotional experiences of the elderly. This study was…

  13. Serotonin and Aggression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Serena-Lynn; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Decreased serotonin function has consistently been shown to be highly correlated with impulsive aggression across a number of different experimental paradigms. Such lowered serotonergic indices appear to correlate with the dimension of aggression dyscontrol and/or impulsivity rather than with psychiatric diagnostic categories per se. Implications…

  14. VEGF targets the tumour cell.

    PubMed

    Goel, Hira Lal; Mercurio, Arthur M

    2013-12-01

    The function of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in cancer is not limited to angiogenesis and vascular permeability. VEGF-mediated signalling occurs in tumour cells, and this signalling contributes to key aspects of tumorigenesis, including the function of cancer stem cells and tumour initiation. In addition to VEGF receptor tyrosine kinases, the neuropilins are crucial for mediating the effects of VEGF on tumour cells, primarily because of their ability to regulate the function and the trafficking of growth factor receptors and integrins. This has important implications for our understanding of tumour biology and for the development of more effective therapeutic approaches.

  15. Expression of the brain transcription factor OTX1 occurs in a subset of normal germinal-center B cells and in aggressive Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Omodei, Daniela; Acampora, Dario; Russo, Filippo; De Filippi, Rosaria; Severino, Valeria; Di Francia, Raffaele; Frigeri, Ferdinando; Mancuso, Pietro; De Chiara, Anna; Pinto, Antonio; Casola, Stefano; Simeone, Antonio

    2009-12-01

    The roles in brain development. Previous studies have shown the association between OTX2 and OTX1 with anaplastic and desmoplastic medulloblastomas, respectively. Here, we investigated OTX1 and OTX2 expression in Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (NHL) and multiple myeloma. A combination of semiquantitative RT-PCR, Western blot, and immunohistochemical analyses was used to measure OTX1 and OTX2 levels in normal lymphoid tissues and in 184 tumor specimens representative of various forms of NHL and multiple myeloma. OTX1 expression was activated in 94% of diffuse large B-cell lymphomas, in all Burkitt lymphomas, and in 90% of high-grade follicular lymphomas. OTX1 was undetectable in precursor-B lymphoblastic lymphoma, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and in most marginal zone and mantle cell lymphomas and multiple myeloma. OTX2 was undetectable in all analyzed malignancies. Analysis of OTX1 expression in normal lymphoid tissues identified a subset of resting germinal center (GC) B cells lacking PAX5 and BCL6 and expressing cytoplasmic IgG and syndecan. About 50% of OTX1(+) GC B cells co-expressed CD10 and CD20. This study identifies OTX1 as a molecular marker for high-grade GC-derived NHL and suggests an involvement of this transcription factor in B-cell lymphomagenesis. Furthermore, OTX1 expression in a subset of normal GC B cells carrying plasma cell markers suggests its possible contribution to terminal B-cell differentiation.

  16. Expression of the Brain Transcription Factor OTX1 Occurs in a Subset of Normal Germinal-Center B Cells and in Aggressive Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Omodei, Daniela; Acampora, Dario; Russo, Filippo; De Filippi, Rosaria; Severino, Valeria; Di Francia, Raffaele; Frigeri, Ferdinando; Mancuso, Pietro; De Chiara, Anna; Pinto, Antonio; Casola, Stefano; Simeone, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    The roles in brain development. Previous studies have shown the association between OTX2 and OTX1 with anaplastic and desmoplastic medulloblastomas, respectively. Here, we investigated OTX1 and OTX2 expression in Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (NHL) and multiple myeloma. A combination of semiquantitative RT-PCR, Western blot, and immunohistochemical analyses was used to measure OTX1 and OTX2 levels in normal lymphoid tissues and in 184 tumor specimens representative of various forms of NHL and multiple myeloma. OTX1 expression was activated in 94% of diffuse large B-cell lymphomas, in all Burkitt lymphomas, and in 90% of high-grade follicular lymphomas. OTX1 was undetectable in precursor-B lymphoblastic lymphoma, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and in most marginal zone and mantle cell lymphomas and multiple myeloma. OTX2 was undetectable in all analyzed malignancies. Analysis of OTX1 expression in normal lymphoid tissues identified a subset of resting germinal center (GC) B cells lacking PAX5 and BCL6 and expressing cytoplasmic IgG and syndecan. About 50% of OTX1+ GC B cells co-expressed CD10 and CD20. This study identifies OTX1 as a molecular marker for high-grade GC-derived NHL and suggests an involvement of this transcription factor in B-cell lymphomagenesis. Furthermore, OTX1 expression in a subset of normal GC B cells carrying plasma cell markers suggests its possible contribution to terminal B-cell differentiation. PMID:19893048

  17. Serotonin transporter activity in platelets and canine aggression.

    PubMed

    Rosado, Belén; García-Belenguer, Sylvia; Palacio, Jorge; Chacón, Gema; Villegas, Ainara; Alcalde, Ana I

    2010-10-01

    Several studies have suggested an inhibitory action of the serotonergic system in the regulation of canine aggression, but the role of the serotonin (5-HT) transporter (5-HTT) has not been investigated. Platelet 5-HT uptake has been proposed as a peripheral marker of brain 5-HTT. The aim of the study was to investigate the relationship between platelet 5-HTT activity and canine aggression by measuring the rate of 5-HT uptake mediated by 5-HTT in platelets and serum concentrations of 5-HT in both aggressive (n=14) and non-aggressive dogs (n=17). Aggressive dogs showed significantly higher 5-HT uptake by 5-HTT in platelets and lower serum concentrations of 5-HT, compared with the control group. These results suggested an association between an alteration in the serotonergic system and canine aggression, possibly mediated by an increased 5-HT transport.

  18. Imaging the neural circuitry and chemical control of aggressive motivation

    PubMed Central

    Ferris, Craig F; Stolberg, Tara; Kulkarni, Praveen; Murugavel, Murali; Blanchard, Robert; Blanchard, D Caroline; Febo, Marcelo; Brevard, Mathew; Simon, Neal G

    2008-01-01

    Background With the advent of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in awake animals it is possible to resolve patterns of neuronal activity across the entire brain with high spatial and temporal resolution. Synchronized changes in neuronal activity across multiple brain areas can be viewed as functional neuroanatomical circuits coordinating the thoughts, memories and emotions for particular behaviors. To this end, fMRI in conscious rats combined with 3D computational analysis was used to identifying the putative distributed neural circuit involved in aggressive motivation and how this circuit is affected by drugs that block aggressive behavior. Results To trigger aggressive motivation, male rats were presented with their female cage mate plus a novel male intruder in the bore of the magnet during image acquisition. As expected, brain areas previously identified as critical in the organization and expression of aggressive behavior were activated, e.g., lateral hypothalamus, medial basal amygdala. Unexpected was the intense activation of the forebrain cortex and anterior thalamic nuclei. Oral administration of a selective vasopressin V1a receptor antagonist SRX251 or the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine, drugs that block aggressive behavior, both caused a general suppression of the distributed neural circuit involved in aggressive motivation. However, the effect of SRX251, but not fluoxetine, was specific to aggression as brain activation in response to a novel sexually receptive female was unaffected. Conclusion The putative neural circuit of aggressive motivation identified with fMRI includes neural substrates contributing to emotional expression (i.e. cortical and medial amygdala, BNST, lateral hypothalamus), emotional experience (i.e. hippocampus, forebrain cortex, anterior cingulate, retrosplenial cortex) and the anterior thalamic nuclei that bridge the motor and cognitive components of aggressive responding. Drugs that block vasopressin

  19. Cardiac failure due to a giant desmoid tumour of the posterior mediastinum.

    PubMed

    Bouchikh, Mohammed; Arame, Alex; Riquet, Marc; Le Pimpec-Barthes, Françoise

    2013-12-01

    We report a rare case of a giant desmoid tumour responsible for cardiac and respiratory failure. Complete removal was decided upon, despite an initial failure in another centre because of symptom severity. In such cases, wide local resection remains the best therapeutic approach, but the risk of local recurrence is high. Literature review confirms the exceptional presentation and the benefit of aggressive surgery.

  20. [Effect of sodium valproate on aggressive behavior of male mice with various aggression experience].

    PubMed

    Smagin, D A; Bondar', N P; Kudriavtseva, N N

    2010-01-01

    Sector of Social Behavior Neurogenetics, Institute of Cytology and Genetics, Siberian Branch, Effects of sodium valproate on the aggressive behavior of male mice with 2- and 20-day positive fighting experience have been studied. It is established that valproate administered in a singe dose of 100 mg/kg has no effect on the behavior of male mice with a 2-day experience of aggression. The treatment of mice with 300 mg/kg of valproate significantly decreased the level of aggressive motivation and the percentage of animals demonstrating attacks and threats. In male mice with a 20-day experience of aggression, valproate decreased the time of hostile behavior in a dose-dependent manner. Valproate in a single dose of 300 mg/kg significantly decreased the level of aggressive motivation, but also produced a toxic effect, whereby 73% of aggressive males demonstrated long-term immobility and 45% exhibited movement abnormalities (falls) upon the treatment. It is suggested that changes in the brain neurochemical activity, which are caused by a prolonged experience of aggression, modify the effects of sodium valproate.

  1. Effect of naloxone on food competition aggression in food-restricted high and low aggression pigeons (Columba livia).

    PubMed

    Fachinelli, C; Torrecillas, M; Rodríguez Echandía, E L

    2004-03-01

    We determined the effect of the opiate receptor antagonist naloxone on aggression, emotion, feeder control, and eating behavior in high and low aggression female pigeons maintained at 80% of their normal weight and exposed to food competition interactions. Pigeons were divided into pairs by previously ranked high aggression (total time spent in offensive aggression exceeding 60 s/5 min; N=6 pairs) and low aggression females (time spent in offensive aggression less than 10 s/5 min; N=6 pairs). A pigeon in each pair received an s.c. dose of naloxone (1 mg kg(-1) ml saline(-1)) and the other animal received the vehicle. Trials (10 min) were performed 30 min after the naloxone/vehicle administration. The naloxone group of high aggression pigeons showed lower scores of total time spent in offensive aggression (control: 98.6 +/- 12.0; naloxone: 46.8 +/- 6.6 s; P<0.05) and higher scores of time spent in emotional responses (control: 3.5 +/- 0.6; naloxone: 10.8 +/- 2.4 s; P<0.05) than controls. The other behaviors scored, feeder control and eating behavior, were not affected in this group. The naloxone group of low aggression pigeons, however, showed higher scores of offensive aggression than their controls (5.3 +/- 1.3; naloxone: 28.7 +/- 8.0 s; P<0.05). The present results suggest that opiate receptor mechanisms are implicated in offensive aggression responses in high and low aggression pigeons. However, as reported for brain 5-hydroxytryptamine manipulation and GABA-A-benzodiazepine receptor manipulation, the effect of the opiate receptor antagonist on food competition aggression in pigeons was related to their pretreatment level of aggression.

  2. Bovine papillomaviruses: their role in the aetiology of cutaneous tumours of bovids and equids.

    PubMed

    Nasir, Lubna; Campo, M Saveria

    2008-10-01

    Bovine papillomavirus (BPV) is perhaps the most extensively studied animal papillomavirus. In cattle BPVs induce benign tumours of cutaneous or mucosal epithelia, called papillomas or warts. Cattle papillomas are benign tumours and generally regress without eliciting any serious clinical problems in the host, but occasionally persist and provide the focus for malignant transformation to squamous cell carcinoma, as in the case of cancer of the urinary bladder and cancer of the upper alimentary canal. BPV is the only papillomavirus that jumps species: the virus also infects equids, and gives rise to fibroblastic tumours called sarcoids. Sarcoids very rarely regress, more often they persist and can be locally aggressive. These tumours are the most common dermatological tumour of equids worldwide. The purpose of this review is to discuss the biology of BPV, the biology of bovine tumours and equine sarcoids, and present the current understanding of BPV in tumour pathogenesis in its natural host, cattle, and in its heterologous host, equids. Finally, the use of anti-BPV vaccines as a therapy for equine sarcoids will be discussed. Only limited information on the clinical or pathological aspects of either bovine or equine tumours will be provided as this subject has been extensively addressed previously.

  3. Identification of genes involved in the biology of atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumours using Drosophila melanogaster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeibmann, Astrid; Eikmeier, Kristin; Linge, Anna; Kool, Marcel; Koos, Björn; Schulz, Jacqueline; Albrecht, Stefanie; Bartelheim, Kerstin; Frühwald, Michael C.; Pfister, Stefan M.; Paulus, Werner; Hasselblatt, Martin

    2014-06-01

    Atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumours (AT/RT) are malignant brain tumours. Unlike most other human brain tumours, AT/RT are characterized by inactivation of one single gene, SMARCB1. SMARCB1 is a member of the evolutionarily conserved SWI/SNF chromatin remodelling complex, which has an important role in the control of cell differentiation and proliferation. Little is known, however, about the pathways involved in the oncogenic effects of SMARCB1 inactivation, which might also represent targets for treatment. Here we report a comprehensive genetic screen in the fruit fly that revealed several genes not yet associated with loss of snr1, the Drosophila homologue of SMARCB1. We confirm the functional role of identified genes (including merlin, kibra and expanded, known to regulate hippo signalling pathway activity) in human rhabdoid tumour cell lines and AT/RT tumour samples. These results demonstrate that fly models can be employed for the identification of clinically relevant pathways in human cancer.

  4. Radiotherapy by particle beams (hadrontherapy) of intracranial tumours: a survey on pathology.

    PubMed

    Schiffer, D

    2005-04-01

    A review of the principal contributions of radio-therapy of brain tumours by beam particles is carried out. Neutrons, protons and light ions are considered along with their pros and cons in relation to types and locations of brain tumours. A particular emphasis is given to the pathologic studies of their effects directly o n tumours and on the normal nervous tissue, considering mainly the relevant action mechanisms of the radiation types and the requirements of the clinical therapeutic strategies. For comparison the main features of the pathologic effects of radiotherapy by photons are described. From the review it emerges that the new modality of radiation by protons and light ions, because of their peculiar physical characteristics, may represent a new way of destroying the tumour and sparing normal nervous tissue, especially when deeply located and irregularly shaped tumours are concerned. More neuropathological studies are needed in order to better understand the potentiality of the new treatment of modalities.

  5. Uterine Tumour Resembling Ovarian Sex Cord Tumour- A Rare Entity

    PubMed Central

    Ilhan, Tolgay Tuyan; Gül, Ayhan; Ugurluoglu, Ceyhan; Çelik, Çetin

    2016-01-01

    Uterine Tumour Resembling Ovarian Sex-Cord Tumours (UTROSCTs) are an extremely rare type of uterine body tumours arising from the endometrial stroma. Epidemiology, aetiology, pathogenesis, management and natural history of UTROSCTs are still a question of debate, as there is little available data in the literature. Although rare, the possibility of UTROSCTs should be kept in mind, when a patient presents with abnormal bleeding and an enlarged uterus. UTROSCTs appear dirty white/cream-coloured, gelatinous, well-circumscribed mass with smooth surface on macroscopic examination. We present a rare case of endometrial stromal tumour with sex-cord-like differentiation which was successfully treated by hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy. The clinical manifestations, pathologic characteristics, diagnosis and management of these tumours are reviewed here. PMID:28208949

  6. Behavioral and Pharmacogenetics of Aggressive Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Aki; Quadros, Isabel M.; de Almeida, Rosa M. M.; Miczek, Klaus A.

    2013-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) has long been considered as a key transmitter in the neurocircuitry controlling aggression. Impaired regulation of each subtype of 5-HT receptor, 5-HT transporter, synthetic and metabolic enzymes has been linked particularly to impulsive aggression. The current summary focuses mostly on recent findings from pharmacological and genetic studies. The pharmacological treatments and genetic manipulations or polymorphisms of a specific target (e.g., 5-HT1A receptor) can often result in inconsistent results on aggression, due to “phasic” effects of pharmacological agents vs “trait”-like effects of genetic manipulations. Also, the local administration of a drug using the intracranial microinjection technique has shown that activation of specific subtypes of 5-HT receptors (5-HT1A and 5-HT1B) in mesocorticolimbic areas can reduce species-typical and other aggressive behaviors, but the same receptors in the medial prefrontal cortex or septal area promote escalated forms of aggression. Thus, there are receptor populations in specific brain regions that preferentially modulate specific types of aggression. Genetic studies have shown important gene × environment interactions; it is likely that the polymorphisms in the genes of 5-HT transporters (e.g., MAO A) or rate-limiting synthetic and metabolic enzymes of 5-HT determine the vulnerability to adverse environmental factors that escalate aggression. We also discuss the interaction between the 5-HT system and other systems. Modulation of 5-HT neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus by GABA, glutamate, and CRF profoundly regulate aggressive behaviors. Also, interactions of the 5-HT system with other neuropeptides (arginine vasopressin, oxytocin, neuropeptide Y, opioid) have emerged as important neurobiological determinants of aggression. Studies of aggression in genetically modified mice identified several molecules that affect the 5-HT system directly (e.g., Tph2, 5-HT1B, 5-HT transporter, Pet1, MAOA) or

  7. Aggression and sport.

    PubMed

    Burton, Robert W

    2005-10-01

    Viewing aggression in its healthy form, in contrast to its extreme and inappropriate versions, and sport as a health-promoting exercise in psychological development and maturation may allow participants and spectators alike to retain an interest in aggression and sport and derive further enjoyment from them. In addition, it will benefit all involved with sport to have a broader understanding of human aggression. Physicians, mental health professionals, and other health care providers can be influential in this process, and should be willing to get involved and speak out when issues and problems arise.

  8. Adapting radiotherapy to hypoxic tumours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinen, Eirik; Søvik, Åste; Hristov, Dimitre; Bruland, Øyvind S.; Rune Olsen, Dag

    2006-10-01

    In the current work, the concepts of biologically adapted radiotherapy of hypoxic tumours in a framework encompassing functional tumour imaging, tumour control predictions, inverse treatment planning and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) were presented. Dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCEMRI) of a spontaneous sarcoma in the nasal region of a dog was employed. The tracer concentration in the tumour was assumed related to the oxygen tension and compared to Eppendorf histograph measurements. Based on the pO2-related images derived from the MR analysis, the tumour was divided into four compartments by a segmentation procedure. DICOM structure sets for IMRT planning could be derived thereof. In order to display the possible advantages of non-uniform tumour doses, dose redistribution among the four tumour compartments was introduced. The dose redistribution was constrained by keeping the average dose to the tumour equal to a conventional target dose. The compartmental doses yielding optimum tumour control probability (TCP) were used as input in an inverse planning system, where the planning basis was the pO2-related tumour images from the MR analysis. Uniform (conventional) and non-uniform IMRT plans were scored both physically and biologically. The consequences of random and systematic errors in the compartmental images were evaluated. The normalized frequency distributions of the tracer concentration and the pO2 Eppendorf measurements were not significantly different. 28% of the tumour had, according to the MR analysis, pO2 values of less than 5 mm Hg. The optimum TCP following a non-uniform dose prescription was about four times higher than that following a uniform dose prescription. The non-uniform IMRT dose distribution resulting from the inverse planning gave a three times higher TCP than that of the uniform distribution. The TCP and the dose-based plan quality depended on IMRT parameters defined in the inverse planning procedure (fields

  9. Intraspinal tumours in the Kenya African.

    PubMed

    Ruberti, R F; Carmagnani, A L

    1976-06-01

    Thirty-one cases of intraspinal tumours in the African have been described, with age, sex incidence, frequency, site and histopathology shown. Intraspinal tumours in this series are compared with the larger series. Extradural and intramedullary tumours together with cervical spine tumours appear to be more frequent in this series. There is a high incidence of dumbell tumours in the neurinomas. Sarcomas are the most common type of tumours and mainly affect the thoracic spine.

  10. Aggression in Pretend Play and Aggressive Behavior in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fehr, Karla K.; Russ, Sandra W.

    2013-01-01

    Research Findings: Pretend play is an essential part of child development and adjustment. However, parents, teachers, and researchers debate the function of aggression in pretend play. Different models of aggression predict that the expression of aggression in play could either increase or decrease actual aggressive behavior. The current study…

  11. Aggression as positive reinforcement in people with intellectual disabilities.

    PubMed

    May, Michael E

    2011-01-01

    From an applied behavior-analytic perspective, aggression in people with intellectual disabilities is mostly maintained by social reinforcement consequences. However, nonsocial consequences have also been identified in functional assessments on aggression. Behaviors producing their own reinforcement have been labeled "automatic" or "nonsocial" in the behavior-analytic literature, a label that bares a striking resemblance to biobehavioral explanations of reward-seeking behaviors. Biobehavioral studies have revealed that aggression activates the same endogenous brain mechanisms as primary reinforcers like food. Therefore, integrating brain-environment explanations would result in a better understanding of the functional mechanisms associated with nonsocial aggression. The purpose of this paper was to explore aggression as a reinforcing consequence for reinforcement-seeking behaviors in people with intellectual disabilities. First, the literature establishing aggression as reinforcement for arbitrary responding will be reviewed. Next, the reward-related biological process associated with aggression was described. Finally, the paper discusses what might be done to assess and treat aggression maintained by nonsocial reinforcement.

  12. Benign hepatic tumours and tumour like conditions in men.

    PubMed Central

    Karhunen, P J

    1986-01-01

    In a consecutive medicolegal necropsy series benign hepatic tumours and tumour like conditions occurred in 52% of the 95 men aged 35-69 years. The incidence increased with age, mainly due to small bile duct tumours (n = 26; mean age 56.7 years; p less than 0.01; mean size 1.3 mm). The next most common tumours were cavernous hemangiomas (n = 19; mean age 53.9 years; mean size 5.2 mm) that were not related to age. Focal nodular hyperplasia (n = 3; mean size 8.0 mm) tended to occur in a younger age group (mean age 40.3 years; p less than 0.001). Multiple bile duct tumours were present in 46% and hemangiomas in 50% of the men studied. Liver cell adenoma, nodular regenerative hyperplasia, and peliosis hepatis were incidental findings (one case of each). Nodular regenerative hyperplasia was associated with the consumption of alcohol and a total dose of 21.5 g of testosterone. These results indicate that benign hepatic tumours and tumour like conditions are not rare in men but may remain undetected because of their small size. Images PMID:3950039

  13. Pancreatic stellate cells support tumour metabolism through autophagic alanine secretion.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Cristovão M; Biancur, Douglas E; Wang, Xiaoxu; Halbrook, Christopher J; Sherman, Mara H; Zhang, Li; Kremer, Daniel; Hwang, Rosa F; Witkiewicz, Agnes K; Ying, Haoqiang; Asara, John M; Evans, Ronald M; Cantley, Lewis C; Lyssiotis, Costas A; Kimmelman, Alec C

    2016-08-25

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is an aggressive disease characterized by an intense fibrotic stromal response and deregulated metabolism. The role of the stroma in PDAC biology is complex and it has been shown to play critical roles that differ depending on the biological context. The stromal reaction also impairs the vasculature, leading to a highly hypoxic, nutrient-poor environment. As such, these tumours must alter how they capture and use nutrients to support their metabolic needs. Here we show that stroma-associated pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) are critical for PDAC metabolism through the secretion of non-essential amino acids (NEAA). Specifically, we uncover a previously undescribed role for alanine, which outcompetes glucose and glutamine-derived carbon in PDAC to fuel the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, and thus NEAA and lipid biosynthesis. This shift in fuel source decreases the tumour’s dependence on glucose and serum-derived nutrients, which are limited in the pancreatic tumour microenvironment. Moreover, we demonstrate that alanine secretion by PSCs is dependent on PSC autophagy, a process that is stimulated by cancer cells. Thus, our results demonstrate a novel metabolic interaction between PSCs and cancer cells, in which PSC-derived alanine acts as an alternative carbon source. This finding highlights a previously unappreciated metabolic network within pancreatic tumours in which diverse fuel sources are used to promote growth in an austere tumour microenvironment.

  14. Unravelling the neurophysiological basis of aggression in a fish model

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Aggression is a near-universal behaviour with substantial influence on and implications for human and animal social systems. The neurophysiological basis of aggression is, however, poorly understood in all species and approaches adopted to study this complex behaviour have often been oversimplified. We applied targeted expression profiling on 40 genes, spanning eight neurological pathways and in four distinct regions of the brain, in combination with behavioural observations and pharmacological manipulations, to screen for regulatory pathways of aggression in the zebrafish (Danio rerio), an animal model in which social rank and aggressiveness tightly correlate. Results Substantial differences occurred in gene expression profiles between dominant and subordinate males associated with phenotypic differences in aggressiveness and, for the chosen gene set, they occurred mainly in the hypothalamus and telencephalon. The patterns of differentially-expressed genes implied multifactorial control of aggression in zebrafish, including the hypothalamo-neurohypophysial-system, serotonin, somatostatin, dopamine, hypothalamo-pituitary-interrenal, hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal and histamine pathways, and the latter is a novel finding outside mammals. Pharmacological manipulations of various nodes within the hypothalamo-neurohypophysial-system and serotonin pathways supported their functional involvement. We also observed differences in expression profiles in the brains of dominant versus subordinate females that suggested sex-conserved control of aggression. For example, in the HNS pathway, the gene encoding arginine vasotocin (AVT), previously believed specific to male behaviours, was amongst those genes most associated with aggression, and AVT inhibited dominant female aggression, as in males. However, sex-specific differences in the expression profiles also occurred, including differences in aggression-associated tryptophan hydroxylases and estrogen receptors

  15. Calvarial malignant melanotic neuroectodermal tumour of infancy presenting with widespread intracranial metastasis.

    PubMed

    Furtado, Sunil V; Ghosal, Nandita; Hegde, Alangar S

    2012-09-01

    The piamater, branchial arch derivatives and melanocytes, derivatives of the neural crest, are associated with rare, sporadic, non-inherited embryonic neuroectodermal dysplasia. We report a case of a 13 year-old girl with a malignant melanotic neuroectodermal tumour of infancy, an uncommon malignant extra-axial pigmented tumour with an aggressive clinical course. The clinical presentation, radiology, surgical management, adjuvant therapy are discussed along with a brief review of literature. The patient had widespread intracranial metastasis at presentation and rapidly deteriorated while on adjuvant therapy. A hyperdense extra-axial tumour on plain computed tomogram in a child could suggest a melanotic neuroectodermal tumour. Its malignant variant is associated with a poor prognosis when associated with widespread intracranial metastasis.

  16. Unravelling tumour heterogeneity using next-generation imaging: radiomics, radiogenomics, and habitat imaging.

    PubMed

    Sala, E; Mema, E; Himoto, Y; Veeraraghavan, H; Brenton, J D; Snyder, A; Weigelt, B; Vargas, H A

    2017-01-01

    Tumour heterogeneity in cancers has been observed at the histological and genetic levels, and increased levels of intra-tumour genetic heterogeneity have been reported to be associated with adverse clinical outcomes. This review provides an overview of radiomics, radiogenomics, and habitat imaging, and examines the use of these newly emergent fields in assessing tumour heterogeneity and its implications. It reviews the potential value of radiomics and radiogenomics in assisting in the diagnosis of cancer disease and determining cancer aggressiveness. This review discusses how radiogenomic analysis can be further used to guide treatment therapy for individual tumours by predicting drug response and potential therapy resistance and examines its role in developing radiomics as biomarkers of oncological outcomes. Lastly, it provides an overview of the obstacles in these emergent fields today including reproducibility, need for validation, imaging analysis standardisation, data sharing and clinical translatability and offers potential solutions to these challenges towards the realisation of precision oncology.

  17. Genetics of human aggressive behaviour.

    PubMed

    Craig, Ian W; Halton, Kelly E

    2009-07-01

    A consideration of the evolutionary, physiological and anthropological aspects of aggression suggests that individual differences in such behaviour will have important genetic as well as environmental underpinning. Surveys of the likely pathways controlling the physiological and neuronal processes involved highlight, as obvious targets to investigate, genes implicated in sexual differentiation, anxiety, stress response and the serotonin neurotransmitter pathway. To date, however, association studies on single candidates have provided little evidence for any such loci with a major effect size. This may be because genes do not operate independently, but function against a background in which other genetic and environmental factors are crucial. Indeed, a series of recent studies, particularly concentrating on the serotonin and norepinephrine metabolising enzyme, monoamine oxidase A, has emphasised the necessity of examining gene by environmental interactions if the contributions of individual loci are to be understood. These findings will have major significance for the interpretation and analysis of data from detailed whole genome association studies. Functional imaging studies of genetic variants affecting serotonin pathways have also provided valuable insights into potential links between genes, brain and aggressive behaviour.

  18. Violence, mental illness, and the brain – A brief history of psychosurgery: Part 3 – From deep brain stimulation to amygdalotomy for violent behavior, seizures, and pathological aggression in humans

    PubMed Central

    Faria, Miguel A.

    2013-01-01

    In the final installment to this three-part, essay-editorial on psychosurgery, we relate the history of deep brain stimulation (DBS) in humans and glimpse the phenomenal body of work conducted by Dr. Jose Delgado at Yale University from the 1950s to the 1970s. The inception of the National Commission for the Protection of Human Subjects of Biomedical and Behavioral Research (1974-1978) is briefly discussed as it pertains to the “determination of the Secretary of Health, Education and Welfare regarding the recommendations and guidelines on psychosurgery.” The controversial work - namely recording of brain activity, DBS, and amygdalotomy for intractable psychomotor seizures in patients with uncontrolled violence – conducted by Drs. Vernon H. Mark and Frank Ervin is recounted. This final chapter recapitulates advances in neuroscience and neuroradiology in the evaluation of violent individuals and ends with a brief discussion of the problem of uncontrolled rage and “pathologic aggression” in today’s modern society – as violence persists, and in response, we move toward authoritarianism, with less freedom and even less dignity. PMID:23956934

  19. Tumours of bones and joints

    PubMed Central

    Misdorp, W.; Van Der Heul, R. O.

    1976-01-01

    Tumours of bones and joints are not infrequent in dogs but are rare in other domestic animals. In the dog, most bone tumours are malignant; osteosarcomas are by far the most frequently encountered tumours, especially in giant breeds and boxers. The following main categories of bone tumour are described: bone-forming, cartilage-forming, giant cell, marrow, vascular, miscellaneous, metastatic, unclassified, and tumour-like lesions. The tumours of joints and related structures are classified as synovial sarcomas, fibroxanthomas, and malignant giant cell tumour of soft tissues. ImagesFig. 21Fig. 22Fig. 23Fig. 24Fig. 17Fig. 18Fig. 19Fig. 20Fig. 29Fig. 30Fig. 31Fig. 32Fig. 33Fig. 34Fig. 35Fig. 36Fig. 25Fig. 26Fig. 27Fig. 28Fig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 37Fig. 38Fig. 39Fig. 40Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 8Fig. 13Fig. 14Fig. 15Fig. 16Fig. 9Fig. 10Fig. 11Fig. 12 PMID:1086157

  20. Murine Bioluminescent Hepatic Tumour Model

    PubMed Central

    Rajendran, Simon; Salwa, Slawomir; Gao, Xuefeng; Tabirca, Sabin; O'Hanlon, Deirdre; O'Sullivan, Gerald C.; Tangney, Mark

    2010-01-01

    This video describes the establishment of liver metastases in a mouse model that can be subsequently analysed by bioluminescent imaging. Tumour cells are administered specifically to the liver to induce a localised liver tumour, via mobilisation of the spleen and splitting into two, leaving intact the vascular pedicle for each half of the spleen. Lewis lung carcinoma cells that constitutively express the firefly luciferase gene (luc1) are inoculated into one hemi-spleen which is then resected 10 minutes later. The other hemi-spleen is left intact and returned to the abdomen. Liver tumour growth can be monitored by bioluminescence imaging using the IVIS whole body imaging system. Quantitative imaging of tumour growth using IVIS provides precise quantitation of viable tumour cells. Tumour cell death and necrosis due to drug treatment is indicated early by a reduction in the bioluminescent signal. This mouse model allows for investigating the mechanisms underlying metastatic tumour-cell survival and growth and can be used for the evaluation of therapeutics of liver metastasis. PMID:20689502

  1. Tumours of the nasal cavity*

    PubMed Central

    Stünzi, H.; Hauser, B.

    1976-01-01

    Tumours of the nasal cavity are rare in domestic animals, most cases occurring in the dog. Epithelial tumours are the most common type in carnivores (dogs and cats). In general, the same types of tumour occur in domestic animals as occur in man. There was no significant predisposition for breed in dogs, but in both dogs and cats far more males than females were affected. Metastases occurred only rarely. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 9Fig. 10Fig. 11Fig. 12Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 8 PMID:1086156

  2. Giant solitary fibrous tumour of the pleura. Case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Crnjac, Anton; Veingerl, Bojan; Vidovic, Damjan; Kavalar, Rajko; Hojski, Aljaz

    2015-01-01

    Background Solitary fibrous tumours of the pleura (SFTP) are rare tumours. They are mostly benign. Only around 12% of them are malign ant. In the initial stage they are mostly asymptomatic and by growing they cause chest pain, irritating cough and dyspnoea on account of the pressure created on the surrounding structures. Rare giant tumours have compression symptoms on the mediastinal structures. The condition requires tiered diagnostic radiology. Preoperative biopsy is not successful in most cases. The therapy of choice is radical surgical tumour removal. Malignant or non-radically removed benign solitary fibrous tumours of the pleura additionally require neoadjuvant therapy. Case report A 68-year old patient was hospitalized for giant solitary fibrous tumour of the pleura in the right pleural cavity. With its expansive growth the tumour caused the shift of the mediastinum by compressing the lower vena cava, right cardiac auricle as well as the intermediate and lower lobe bronchus. Due to cardiac inflow obstruction and right lung collapse, the patient’s life was endangered with signs of cardio-respiratory failure. After preoperative diagnostic radiology, the tumour was surgically removed. Postoperatively, the patient’s condition improved. No disease recurrence was diagnosed after a year. Conclusions Giant solitary fibrous tumour of the pleura may cause serious and life-threatening conditions by causing compression of the pleural cavity with its expansive growth. Early diagnosis of the condition enables less aggressive as well as video-assisted thoracic surgery in patients with significantly better state of health. Large tumour surgeries in cardio-respiratory affected patients are highly risk-associated procedures. PMID:26834527

  3. The occurrence of intracranial rhabdoid tumours in mice depends on temporal control of Smarcb1 inactivation

    PubMed Central

    Han, Zhi-Yan; Richer, Wilfrid; Fréneaux, Paul; Chauvin, Céline; Lucchesi, Carlo; Guillemot, Delphine; Grison, Camille; Lequin, Delphine; Pierron, Gaelle; Masliah-Planchon, Julien; Nicolas, André; Ranchère-Vince, Dominique; Varlet, Pascale; Puget, Stéphanie; Janoueix-Lerosey, Isabelle; Ayrault, Olivier; Surdez, Didier; Delattre, Olivier; Bourdeaut, Franck

    2016-01-01

    Rhabdoid tumours (RTs) are highly aggressive tumours of infancy, frequently localized in the central nervous system (CNS) where they are termed atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumours (AT/RTs) and characterized by bi-allelic inactivation of the SMARCB1 tumour suppressor gene. In this study, by temporal control of tamoxifen injection in Smarcb1flox/flox;Rosa26-CreERT2 mice, we explore the phenotypes associated with Smarcb1 inactivation at different developmental stages. Injection before E6, at birth or at 2 months of age recapitulates previously described phenotypes including embryonic lethality, hepatic toxicity or development of T-cell lymphomas, respectively. Injection between E6 and E10 leads to high penetrance tumours, mainly intra-cranial, with short delays (median: 3 months). These tumours demonstrate anatomical, morphological and gene expression profiles consistent with those of human AT/RTs. Moreover, intra- and inter-species comparisons of tumours reveal that human and mouse RTs can be split into different entities that may underline the variety of RT cells of origin. PMID:26818002

  4. Interleukin-2 and histamine in combination inhibit tumour growth and angiogenesis in malignant glioma

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, M; Henriksson, R; Bergenheim, A T; Koskinen, L-O D

    2000-01-01

    Biotherapy including interleukin-2 (IL-2) treatment seems to be more effective outside the central nervous system when compared to the effects obtained when the same tumour is located intracerebrally. Recently published studies suggest that reduced activity of NK cells in tumour tissue can be increased by histamine. The present study was designed to determine whether IL-2 and histamine, alone or in combination, can induce anti-tumour effects in an orthotopic rat glioma model. One group of rats was treated with histamine alone (4 mg kg–1s.c. as daily injections from day 6 after intracranial tumour implantation), another group with IL-2 alone as a continuous subcutaneous infusion and a third group with both histamine and IL-2. The animals were sacrificed at day 24 after tumour implantation. IL-2 and histamine in combination significantly reduced tumour growth. The microvessel density was significantly reduced, an effect mainly affecting the small vessels. No obvious alteration in the pattern of VEGF mRNA expression was evident and no significant changes in apoptosis were observed. Neither IL-2 nor histamine alone caused any detectable effects on tumour growth. Histamine caused an early and pronounced decline in tumour blood flow compared to normal brain. The results indicate that the novel combination of IL-2 and histamine can be of value in reducing intracerebral tumour growth and, thus, it might be of interest to re-evaluate the therapeutic potential of biotherapy in malignant glioma. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10952789

  5. Intracranial tumoural haemorrhage--a report of 58 cases.

    PubMed

    Yuguang, Liu; Meng, Liu; Shugan, Zhu; Yuquan, Jiang; Gang, Li; Xingang, Li; Chengyuan, Wu

    2002-11-01

    In order to study the computerized tomographic (CT) appearances and clinical characteristics of intracranial tumoural haemorrhage (ITH), we analyzed retrospectively fifty-eight patients with ITH and reviewed the literature. As a result, 91% patients had acute or subacute onset and 26% manifested haemorrhage as their first symptoms. CT scanning indicated that intratumoural bleeding occurred in 23 cases, bleeding into parenchyma 18 cases, subarachnoid space 6 cases, ventricle 3 cases and subdural space 8 cases. Thirty-eight patients had emergency operations and the others had selective operations. Both tumours and haematomas were removed all together in all patients. Fifty-five patients were cured or improved and three died during the perioperative stage in our series. Among the patients with ITH, there were 21 metastatic tumours, 19 gliomas, 10 meningiomas, 6 pituitary adenomas, 1 melanoma and 1 acoustic neurilemoma. The onset of most ITH resembled that of cerebrovascular diseases. The location of ITH and the CT appearances of ITH varied in different cerebral tumours. Radical removal of brain tumours with haemorrhage is an effective treatment for ITH, which can greatly decrease the perioperative mortality rate and improve the prognoses of patients.

  6. Multicellular Streaming in Solid Tumours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kas, Josef

    As early as 400 BCE, the Roman medical encyclopaedist Celsus recognized that solid tumours are stiffer than surrounding tissue. However, cancer cell lines are softer, and softer cells facilitate invasion. This paradox raises several questions: Does softness emerge from adaptation to mechanical and chemical cues in the external microenvironment, or are soft cells already present inside a primary solid tumour? If the latter, how can a more rigid tissue contain more soft cells? Here we show that in primary tumour samples from patients with mammary and cervix carcinomas, cells do exhibit a broad distribution of rigidities, with a higher fraction of softer and more contractile cells compared to normal tissue. Mechanical modelling based on patient data reveals that, surprisingly, tumours with a significant fraction of very soft cells can still remain rigid. Moreover, in tissues with the observed distributions of cell stiffnesses, softer cells spontaneously self-organize into lines or streams, possibly facilitating cancer metastasis.

  7. Neural correlates of impulsive aggressive behavior in subjects with a history of alcohol dependence.

    PubMed

    Kose, Samet; Steinberg, Joel L; Moeller, F Gerard; Gowin, Joshua L; Zuniga, Edward; Kamdar, Zahra N; Schmitz, Joy M; Lane, Scott D

    2015-04-01

    Alcohol-related aggression is a complex and problematic phenomenon with profound public health consequences. We examined neural correlates potentially moderating the relationship between human aggressive behavior and chronic alcohol use. Thirteen subjects meeting DSM-IV criteria for past alcohol-dependence in remission (AD) and 13 matched healthy controls (CONT) participated in an fMRI study adapted from a laboratory model of human aggressive behavior (Point Subtraction Aggression Paradigm, or PSAP). Blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) activation was measured during bouts of operationally defined aggressive behavior, during postprovocation periods, and during monetary-reinforced behavior. Whole brain voxelwise random-effects analyses found group differences in brain regions relevant to chronic alcohol use and aggressive behavior (e.g., emotional and behavioral control). Behaviorally, AD subjects responded on both the aggressive response and monetary response options at significantly higher rates than CONT. Whole brain voxelwise random-effects analyses revealed significant group differences in response to provocation (monetary subtractions), with CONT subjects showing greater activation in frontal and prefrontal cortex, thalamus, and hippocampus. Collapsing data across all subjects, regression analyses of postprovocation brain activation on aggressive response rate revealed significant positive regression slopes in precentral gyrus and parietal cortex; and significant negative regression slopes in orbitofrontal cortex, prefrontal cortex, caudate, thalamus, and middle temporal gyrus. In these collapsed analyses, response to provocation and aggressive behavior were associated with activation in brain regions subserving inhibitory and emotional control, sensorimotor integration, and goal directed motor activity.

  8. Neural Correlates of Impulsive Aggressive Behavior in Subjects With a History of Alcohol Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Kose, Samet; Steinberg, Joel L.; Moeller, F. Gerard; Gowin, Joshua L.; Zuniga, Edward; Kamdar, Zahra N.; Schmitz, Joy M.; Lane, Scott D.

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol-related aggression is a complex and problematic phenomenon with profound public health consequences. We examined neural correlates potentially moderating the relationship between human aggressive behavior and chronic alcohol use. Thirteen subjects meeting DSM–IV criteria for past alcohol-dependence in remission (AD) and 13 matched healthy controls (CONT) participated in an fMRI study adapted from a laboratory model of human aggressive behavior (Point Subtraction Aggression Paradigm, or PSAP). Blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) activation was measured during bouts of operationally defined aggressive behavior, during postprovocation periods, and during monetary-reinforced behavior. Whole brain voxelwise random-effects analyses found group differences in brain regions relevant to chronic alcohol use and aggressive behavior (e.g., emotional and behavioral control). Behaviorally, AD subjects responded on both the aggressive response and monetary response options at significantly higher rates than CONT. Whole brain voxelwise random-effects analyses revealed significant group differences in response to provocation (monetary subtractions), with CONT subjects showing greater activation in frontal and prefrontal cortex, thalamus, and hippocampus. Collapsing data across all subjects, regression analyses of postprovocation brain activation on aggressive response rate revealed significant positive regression slopes in precentral gyrus and parietal cortex; and significant negative regression slopes in orbitofrontal cortex, prefrontal cortex, caudate, thalamus, and middle temporal gyrus. In these collapsed analyses, response to provocation and aggressive behavior were associated with activation in brain regions subserving inhibitory and emotional control, sensorimotor integration, and goal directed motor activity. PMID:25664566

  9. Targeting the erythropoietin receptor on glioma cells reduces tumour growth

    SciTech Connect

    Peres, Elodie A.; Valable, Samuel; Guillamo, Jean-Sebastien; Marteau, Lena; Bernaudin, Jean-Francois; Roussel, Simon; Lechapt-Zalcman, Emmanuele; Bernaudin, Myriam; Petit, Edwige

    2011-10-01

    Hypoxia has been shown to be one of the major events involved in EPO expression. Accordingly, EPO might be expressed by cerebral neoplastic cells, especially in glioblastoma, known to be highly hypoxic tumours. The expression of EPOR has been described in glioma cells. However, data from the literature remain descriptive and controversial. On the basis of an endogenous source of EPO in the brain, we have focused on a potential role of EPOR in brain tumour growth. In the present study, with complementary approaches to target EPO/EPOR signalling, we demonstrate the presence of a functional EPO/EPOR system on glioma cells leading to the activation of the ERK pathway. This EPO/EPOR system is involved in glioma cell proliferation in vitro. In vivo, we show that the down-regulation of EPOR expression on glioma cells reduces tumour growth and enhances animal survival. Our results support the hypothesis that EPOR signalling in tumour cells is involved in the control of glioma growth.

  10. Thrombospondin-1 expression in urothelial carcinoma: prognostic significance and association with p53 alterations, tumour angiogenesis and extracellular matrix components

    PubMed Central

    Ioachim, E; Michael, MC; Salmas, M; Damala, K; Tsanou, E; Michael, MM; Malamou-Mitsi, V; Stavropoulos, NE

    2006-01-01

    recurrence and disease progression Conclusion Our data suggest that both tumour and stromal TSP-1 expression may play a role in tumour aggressiveness and angiogenesis. In addition, the correlation of stromal TSP-1 expression with extracellular matrix components fibronectin and tenascin indicate its possible implication in tumour stroma remodeling. PMID:16732887

  11. The World Health Organization 2016 classification of testicular germ cell tumours: a review and update from the International Society of Urological Pathology Testis Consultation Panel.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Sean R; Delahunt, Brett; Magi-Galluzzi, Cristina; Algaba, Ferran; Egevad, Lars; Ulbright, Thomas M; Tickoo, Satish K; Srigley, John R; Epstein, Jonathan I; Berney, Daniel M

    2017-02-01

    Since the last World Health Organization (WHO) classification scheme for tumours of the urinary tract and male genital organs, there have been a number of advances in the understanding, classification, immunohistochemistry and genetics of testicular germ cell tumours. The updated 2016 draft classification was discussed at an International Society of Urological Pathology Consultation on Testicular and Penile Cancer. This review addresses the main updates to germ cell tumour classification. Major changes include a pathogenetically derived classification using germ cell neoplasia in situ (GCNIS) as a new name for the precursor lesion, and the distinction of prepubertal tumours (non-GCNIS-derived) from postpubertal-type tumours (GCNIS-derived), acknowledging the existence of rare benign prepubertal-type teratomas in the postpubertal testis. Spermatocytic tumour is adopted as a replacement for spermatocytic seminoma, to avoid potential confusion with the unrelated usual seminoma. The spectrum of trophoblastic tumours arising in the setting of testicular germ cell tumour continues to expand, to include epithelioid and placental site trophoblastic tumours analogous to those of the gynaecological tract. Currently, reporting of anaplasia (seminoma or spermatocytic tumour) or immaturity (teratoma) is not required, as these do not have demonstrable prognostic importance. In contrast, overgrowth of a teratomatous component (somatic-type malignancy) and sarcomatous change in spermatocytic tumour indicate more aggressive behaviour, and should be reported.

  12. Adult supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumour presenting as intracranial haemorrhage: Case report.

    PubMed

    Black-Tiong, Sean P; Sandler, Simon J I; Otto, Sophia; Wells, Adam J

    2017-03-01

    Primitive neuroectodermal tumours (PNET) are highly malignant tumours with an aggressive clinical behaviour. Commonly seen in children, they are uncommon in the adult population, and rare in the supratentorial location. Adult supratentorial PNETs (ST-PNET) typically present with symptoms relating to raised intracranial pressure, seizures, or focal neurological deficits. Presentation with intracranial haemorrhage has been reported only twice before in the literature, one of which was fatal. We report the case of intracranial haemorrhage secondary to ST-PNET in a young adult and her immediate management.

  13. Microsatellite instability in thyroid tumours and tumour-like lesions

    PubMed Central

    Lazzereschi, D; Palmirotta, R; Ranieri, A; Ottini, L; Verì, M C; Cama, A; Cetta, F; Nardi, F; Colletta, G; Mariani-Costantini, R

    1999-01-01

    Fifty-one thyroid tumours and tumour-like lesions were analysed for instability at ten dinucleotide microsatellite loci and at two coding mononucleotide repeats within the transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) type II receptor (TβRII) and insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) receptor (IGFIIR) genes respectively. Microsatellite instability (MI) was detected in 11 out of 51 cases (21.5%), including six (11.7%) with MI at one or two loci and five (9.8%) with Ml at three or more loci (RER+ phenotype). No mutations in the TβRII and IGFIIR repeats were observed. The overall frequency of MI did not significantly vary in relation to age, gender, benign versus malignant status and tumour size. However, widespread MI was significantly more frequent in follicular adenomas and carcinomas than in papillary and Hürthle cell tumours: three out of nine tumours of follicular type (33.3%) resulted in replication error positive (RER+), versus 1 out of 29 papillary carcinomas (3.4%, P = 0.01), and zero out of eight Hürthle cell neoplasms. Regional lymph node metastases were present in five MI-negative primary cancers and resulted in MI-positive in two cases. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:9888478

  14. Therapy-induced tumour secretomes promote resistance and tumour progression

    PubMed Central

    Obenauf, Anna C.; Zou, Yilong; Ji, Andrew L.; Vanharanta, Sakari; Shu, Weiping; Shi, Hubing; Kong, Xiangju; Bosenberg, Marcus C.; Wiesner, Thomas; Rosen, Neal; Lo, Roger S.; Massagué, Joan

    2015-01-01

    Drug resistance invariably limits the clinical efficacy of targeted therapy with kinase inhibitors against cancer1,2. Here we show that targeted therapy with BRAF, ALK, or EGFR kinase inhibitors induces a complex network of secreted signals in drug-stressed melanoma and lung adenocarcinoma cells. This therapy-induced secretome (TIS) stimulates the outgrowth, dissemination, and metastasis of drug-resistant cancer cell clones and supports the survival of drug-sensitive cancer cells, contributing to incomplete tumour regression. The vemurafenib reactive secretome in melanoma is driven by down-regulation of the transcription factor FRA1. In situ transcriptome analysis of drug-resistant melanoma cells responding to the regressing tumour microenvironment revealed hyperactivation of multiple signalling pathways, most prominently the AKT pathway. Dual inhibition of RAF and PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathways blunted the outgrowth of the drug-resistant cell population in BRAF mutant melanoma tumours, suggesting this combination therapy as a strategy against tumour relapse. Thus, therapeutic inhibition of oncogenic drivers induces vast secretome changes in drug-sensitive cancer cells, paradoxically establishing a tumour microenvironment that supports the expansion of drug-resistant clones, but is susceptible to combination therapy. PMID:25807485

  15. Epilepsy, Antiepileptic Drugs, and Aggression: An Evidence-Based Review

    PubMed Central

    Besag, Frank; Ettinger, Alan B.; Mula, Marco; Gobbi, Gabriella; Comai, Stefano; Aldenkamp, Albert P.; Steinhoff, Bernhard J.

    2016-01-01

    Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) have many benefits but also many side effects, including aggression, agitation, and irritability, in some patients with epilepsy. This article offers a comprehensive summary of current understanding of aggressive behaviors in patients with epilepsy, including an evidence-based review of aggression during AED treatment. Aggression is seen in a minority of people with epilepsy. It is rarely seizure related but is interictal, sometimes occurring as part of complex psychiatric and behavioral comorbidities, and it is sometimes associated with AED treatment. We review the common neurotransmitter systems and brain regions implicated in both epilepsy and aggression, including the GABA, glutamate, serotonin, dopamine, and noradrenaline systems and the hippocampus, amygdala, prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, and temporal lobes. Few controlled clinical studies have used behavioral measures to specifically examine aggression with AEDs, and most evidence comes from adverse event reporting from clinical and observational studies. A systematic approach was used to identify relevant publications, and we present a comprehensive, evidence-based summary of available data surrounding aggression-related behaviors with each of the currently available AEDs in both adults and in children/adolescents with epilepsy. A psychiatric history and history of a propensity toward aggression/anger should routinely be sought from patients, family members, and carers; its presence does not preclude the use of any specific AEDs, but those most likely to be implicated in these behaviors should be used with caution in such cases. PMID:27255267

  16. Hypothalamic control of male aggression-seeking behavior.

    PubMed

    Falkner, Annegret L; Grosenick, Logan; Davidson, Thomas J; Deisseroth, Karl; Lin, Dayu

    2016-04-01

    In many vertebrate species, certain individuals will seek out opportunities for aggression, even in the absence of threat-provoking cues. Although several brain areas have been implicated in the generation of attack in response to social threat, little is known about the neural mechanisms that promote self-initiated or 'voluntary' aggression-seeking when no threat is present. To explore this directly, we utilized an aggression-seeking task in which male mice self-initiated aggression trials to gain brief and repeated access to a weaker male that they could attack. In males that exhibited rapid task learning, we found that the ventrolateral part of the ventromedial hypothalamus (VMHvl), an area with a known role in attack, was essential for aggression-seeking. Using both single-unit electrophysiology and population optical recording, we found that VMHvl neurons became active during aggression-seeking and that their activity tracked changes in task learning and extinction. Inactivation of the VMHvl reduced aggression-seeking behavior, whereas optogenetic stimulation of the VMHvl accelerated moment-to-moment aggression-seeking and intensified future attack. These data demonstrate that the VMHvl can mediate both acute attack and flexible seeking actions that precede attack.

  17. Hypothalamic control of male aggression-seeking behavior

    PubMed Central

    Grosenick, Logan; Davidson, Thomas J.; Deisseroth, Karl

    2016-01-01

    In many vertebrate species, certain individuals will seek out opportunities for aggression, even in the absence of threat provoking cues. While several brain areas have been implicated in generating attack in response to social threat, little is known about the neural mechanisms that promote self-initiated or “voluntary” aggression seeking when no threat is present. To explore this directly, we utilize an aggression-seeking task wherein male mice can self-initiate aggression trials to gain brief and repeated access to a weaker male that they attack. In males that exhibit rapid task learning, we find that the ventrolateral part of the ventromedial hypothalamus (VMHvl), an area with a known role in attack, is essential for aggression seeking. Using both single unit electrophysiology and population optical recording, we find that VMHvl neurons become active during aggression seeking and their activity tracks changes in task learning and extinction. Inactivation of the VMHvl reduces aggression-seeking behavior, whereas optogenetic stimulation of the VMHvl accelerates moment-to-moment aggression seeking and intensifies future attack. These data demonstrate that the VMHvl can mediate both acute attack and flexible seeking actions that precede attack. PMID:26950005

  18. Stability of Aggressive Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eron, Leonard D.; Huesmann, L. Rowell

    As indicated by multiple measures (including overt criminal behavior), stability of aggressive behavior was investigated across 22 years for males and females in a variety of situations. Originally, subjects included the entire population enrolled in the third grade in a semi-rural county in New York State. The sample included approximately 870…

  19. Aggressiveness and Disobedience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaaland, Grete Sorensen; Idsoe, Thormod; Roland, Erling

    2011-01-01

    This study aims to conceptualize disobedient pupil behavior within the more general framework of antisocial behavior and to reveal how two forms of aggressiveness are related to disobedience. Disobedience, in the context of this article, covers disruptive pupil behavior or discipline problems when the pupil is aware of breaking a standard set by…

  20. Intellectual Competence and Aggression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huesmann, L. Rowell; Yarmel, Patty Warnick

    Using data from a broader longitudinal study, this investigation explores within-subject and cross-generational stability of intellectual competence and the relationship of such stability to aggressive behavior. Data were gathered three times (when subjects' modal age was 8, 19, and 30 years). Initially, subjects included the entire population…

  1. Relational Aggression among Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Ellie L.; Nelson, David A.; Hottle, America B.; Warburton, Brittney; Young, Bryan K.

    2011-01-01

    "Relational aggression" refers to harm within relationships caused by covert bullying or manipulative behavior. Examples include isolating a youth from his or her group of friends (social exclusion), threatening to stop talking to a friend (the silent treatment), or spreading gossip and rumors by email. This type of bullying tends to be…

  2. Human Aggression and Suicide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Gerald L.; Goodwin, Frederick K

    1986-01-01

    The central nervous system transmitter serontonin may be altered in aggressive/impulsive and suicidal behaviors in humans. These reports are largely consistent with animal data, and constitute one of the most highly replicated set of findings in biological psychiatry. Suggests that some suicidal behavior may be a special kind of aggressive…

  3. Vasoproliferative tumours of the retina

    PubMed Central

    Heimann, H.; Bornfeld, N.; Vij, O.; Coupland, S.; Bechrakis, N.; Kellner, U.; Foerster, M.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Vasoproliferative tumours of the retina (VPTR) are benign tumours of unknown origin, occurring mostly in otherwise healthy patients. VPTR may be associated with other chorioretinal diseases, such as uveitis. The tumours, which histologically represent reactive gliovascular proliferations, are characterised by a pink to yellow appearance on funduscopy and are accompanied by exudative and haemorrhagic changes of the retina.
METHODS—22 cases of VPTR in 21 patients were examined with a follow up period between 1 month and 6 years. Ophthalmological changes associated with VPTR were intraretinal and subretinal exudations (n=18), exudative detachments of the surrounding sensory retina (n=13), intraretinal and subretinal haemorrhages (n=10), exudative changes within the macula (n=10), hyperpigmentation of the retinal pigment epithelium at the border of the exudative retinal changes (n=9), and vitreous haemorrhages (n=4). Tumour biopsy was performed in two cases. Treatment consisted of plaque radiotherapy (n=14), plaque radiotherapy and cryotherapy (two), cryotherapy only (two), observation (three), and enucleation in one case of a blind and painful eye.
RESULTS—Regression of the tumour and the associated exudative changes could be observed in all treated cases. Visual acuity at last follow up improved two lines or more in two cases, remained within two lines of the initial visual acuity in 15 cases, and worsened in the remaining five. Histopathological examination of the biopsy specimens and the tumour of the enucleated eye showed massive capillary proliferation with perivascular spindle-shaped glial cells of retinal origin.
CONCLUSION—The correct diagnosis of VPTR is of importance as these lesions may lead to visual loss. Further, VPTR must be differentiated from angiomas associated with von Hippel-Lindau disease as well as from ocular and systemic malignancies. Regression of tumour thickness and associated retinal changes can be achieved with

  4. Epilepsy-associated tumours: what epileptologists should know about neuropathology, terminology, and classification systems.

    PubMed

    Holthausen, Hans; Blümcke, Ingmar

    2016-09-01

    Brain tumours are an ever-challenging issue in neurology and related medical disciplines. This applies in particular to brain tumours associated with childhood-onset epilepsies, in which seizures are the presenting and only neurological symptom, as our current understanding of the biology and clinical behaviour of an individual tumour is far from being evidence-based. Prospective and randomized clinical trials are lacking in the field of epilepsy-associated tumours and a review of the current literature evokes more questions than provides answers. In this review, current areas of controversy in neuropathology, as well as terminology and classification, are discussed from an epileptologist's perspective. An illustrative case report exemplifies this controversy to further promote interdisciplinary discussion and novel research avenues towards comprehensive patient management in the near future.

  5. Parents' Aggressive Influences and Children's Aggressive Problem Solutions with Peers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duman, Sarah; Margolin, Gayla

    2007-01-01

    This study examined children's aggressive and assertive solutions to hypothetical peer scenarios in relation to parents' responses to similar hypothetical social scenarios and parents' actual marital aggression. The study included 118 children ages 9 to 10 years old and their mothers and fathers. Children's aggressive solutions correlated with…

  6. Relational Aggression and Physical Aggression among Adolescent Cook Islands Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Page, Angela; Smith, Lisa F.

    2016-01-01

    Both physical and relational aggression are characterised by the intent to harm another. Physical aggression includes direct behaviours such as hitting or kicking; relational aggression involves behaviours designed to damage relationships, such as excluding others, spreading rumours, and delivering threats and verbal abuse. This study extended…

  7. [Liposomal cytarabine for the treatment of leptomeningeal dissemination of central nervous system tumours in children and adolescents].

    PubMed

    Moreno, Lucas; García Ariza, Miguel Angel; Cruz, Ofelia; Calvo, Carlota; Fuster, Jose Luis; Salinas, Jose Antonio; Moscardo, Cristina; Portugal, Raquel; Merino, Jose Manuel; Madero, Luis

    2016-11-01

    Leptomeningeal dissemination in paediatric central nervous system (CNS) tumours is associated with a poor outcome, and new therapeutic strategies are desperately needed. One of the main difficulties in the treatment of CNS tumours is blood brain barrier penetration. Intrathecal therapy has shown to be effective in several paediatric tumours. The aim of this article is to review the data available on the use of liposomal cytarabine for paediatric patients with leptomeningeal dissemination of CNS tumours, including the pharmacology, administration route, safety and efficacy data.

  8. Significance and therapeutic implications of endothelial progenitor cells in angiogenic-mediated tumour metastasis.

    PubMed

    Flamini, Valentina; Jiang, Wen G; Lane, Jane; Cui, Yu-Xin

    2016-04-01

    Cancer conveys profound social and economic consequences throughout the world. Metastasis is responsible for approximately 90% of cancer-associated mortality and, when it occurs, cancer becomes almost incurable. During metastatic dissemination, cancer cells pass through a series of complex steps including the establishment of tumour-associated angiogenesis. The human endothelial progenitor cells (hEPCs) are a cell population derived from the bone marrow which are required for endothelial tubulogenesis and neovascularization. They also express abundant inflammatory cytokines and paracrine angiogenic factors. Clinically hEPCs are highly correlated with relapse, disease progression, metastasis and treatment response in malignancies such as breast cancer, ovarian cancer and non-small-cell lung carcinoma. It has become evident that the hEPCs are involved in the angiogenesis-required progression and metastasis of tumours. However, it is not clear in what way the signalling pathways, controlling the normal cellular function of human BM-derived EPCs, are hijacked by aggressive tumour cells to facilitate tumour metastasis. In addition, the actual roles of hEPCs in tumour angiogenesis-mediated metastasis are not well characterised. In this paper we reviewed the clinical relevance of the hEPCs with cancer diagnosis, progression and prognosis. We further summarised the effects of tumour microenvironment on the hEPCs and underlying mechanisms. We also hypothesized the roles of altered hEPCs in tumour angiogenesis and metastasis. We hope this review may enhance our understanding of the interaction between hEPCs and tumour cells thus aiding the development of cellular-targeted anti-tumour therapies.

  9. Tumour banking: the Spanish design.

    PubMed

    Morente, M M; de Alava, E; Fernandez, P L

    2007-01-01

    In the last decade the technical advances in high throughput techniques to analyze DNA, RNA and proteins have had a potential major impact on prevention, diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of many human diseases. Key pieces in this process, mainly thinking about the future, are tumour banks and tumour bank networks. To face these challenges, diverse suitable models and designs can be developed. The current article presents the development of a nationwide design of tumour banks in Spain based on a network of networks, specially focusing on its harmonization efforts mainly regarding technical procedures, ethical requirements, unified quality control policy and unique sample identification. We also describe our most important goals for the next years. This model does not correspond to a central tumour bank, but to a cooperative and coordinated network of national and regional networks. Independently from the network in which it is included, sample collections reside in their original institution, where it can be used for further clinical diagnosis, teaching and research activities of each independent hospital. The herein described 'network of networks' functional model could be useful for other countries and/or international tumour bank activities.

  10. Radiotherapy alone for local tumour control in esthesioneuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Benfari, G; Fusconi, M; Ciofalo, A; Gallo, A; Altissimi, G; Celani, T; De Vincentiis, M

    2008-12-01

    Esthesioneuroblastoma is an uncommon tumour. Due to its low incidence, this neoplasm is difficult to evaluate and its treatment remains a matter of debate. Although the role of post-operative radiation is relatively well-defined, little is reported regarding the role of radiotherapy as the only treatment modality. A retrospective analysis of the literature has been conducted. With reference to the treatment of esthesioneuroblastoma, 55 patients submitted only to radiotherapy have been selected from publications of internationally indexed literature between 1979 and 2006. According to the Kadish classification, 6 patients were in stage A, 12 in stage B, and 37 in stage C. Response to therapy for each stage was assessed. There was no evidence of disease in: 6/6 stage A patients with a median follow-up period of 103.6 months, 7/12 stage B patients with a median followup period of 120 months, and 7/37 stage C patients with a median follow-up period of 77.3 months. A total of 27 patients died due to tumour-related causes and 5 due to intercurrent disease, while 3 patients were alive with disease (local recurrence and cervical lymph node metastasis). In conclusion, esthesioneuroblastoma is a malignant tumour which grows both locoregionally and distantly. For this reason, despite the satisfying results regarding response to radiotherapy alone in stage A patients, irradiation should be used only in early lesions arising below the cribriform plate, whereas all other cases require aggressive and multimodal therapy.

  11. Serotonin and Aggressiveness in Chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Serotonin (5-HT) regulates aggressive behavior in animals. This study examined if 5-HT regulation of aggressiveness is gene-dependent. Chickens from two divergently selected lines KGB and MBB (Kind Gentle Birds and Mean Bad Birds displaying low and high aggressiveness, respectively) and DXL (Dekalb ...

  12. A Rare Collision Tumour of Uterus- Squamous Cell Carcinoma and Endometrial Stromal Sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Bindiya; Pathre, Abhishek; Rajaram, Shalini; Goyal, Neerja

    2017-01-01

    Collision tumours are defined by co-existence of two tumours in the same or adjacent organs which are topographically and histologically distinct with minimal or no histological admixture. Collision tumours have been described in many organs notably thyroid, brain, adrenal gland, stomach and rarely uterus. Most of the collision tumours reported in uterus have two components; an adenocarcinoma and a sarcoma. We report a case of a 60-year-old lady who presented with complaints of post-menopausal bleeding. A cervical biopsy was performed which showed a non-keratinizing squamous cell carcinoma of cervix. Intra-operatively the uterus was bulky with a 6 cm x 5 cm polypoidal mass in the endometrial canal along with a 2 cm friable cervical growth. The fleshy uterine cavity mass was a spindle cell tumour with moderate pleomorphism and frequent mitosis. It was immunopositive for CD10 and negative for smooth muscle actin and cytokeratin 5/6. The other growth showed non-keratinizing squamous cell carcinoma which was positive for cytokeratin 5/6. Based on the distinct topographical location and limited areas of tumour admixture of the two tumours, a diagnosis of collision tumour of uterus comprising of endometrial stromal sarcoma (high grade) uterus and squamous cell carcinoma cervix was made. PMID:28384878

  13. The 2007 WHO classification of tumours of the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Louis, David N; Ohgaki, Hiroko; Wiestler, Otmar D; Cavenee, Webster K; Burger, Peter C; Jouvet, Anne; Scheithauer, Bernd W; Kleihues, Paul

    2007-08-01

    The fourth edition of the World Health Organization (WHO) classification of tumours of the central nervous system, published in 2007, lists several new entities, including angiocentric glioma, papillary glioneuronal tumour, rosette-forming glioneuronal tumour of the fourth ventricle, papillary tumour of the pineal region, pituicytoma and spindle cell oncocytoma of the adenohypophysis. Histological variants were added if there was evidence of a different age distribution, location, genetic profile or clinical behaviour; these included pilomyxoid astrocytoma, anaplastic medulloblastoma and medulloblastoma with extensive nodularity. The WHO grading scheme and the sections on genetic profiles were updated and the rhabdoid tumour predisposition syndrome was added to the list of familial tumour syndromes typically involving the nervous system. As in the previous, 2000 edition of the WHO 'Blue Book', the classification is accompanied by a concise commentary on clinico-pathological characteristics of each tumour type. The 2007 WHO classification is based on the consensus of an international Working Group of 25 pathologists and geneticists, as well as contributions from more than 70 international experts overall, and is presented as the standard for the definition of brain tumours to the clinical oncology and cancer research communities world-wide.

  14. Tumour-associated eosinophilia in the bladder.

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, D; Fletcher, C D; Gower, R L

    1984-01-01

    Tumour eosinophilia is an uncommon but striking phenomenon which has been found in many tumours, mostly of large cell type or squamous differentiation. The incidence, appearance and importance of tumour eosinophilia in the bladder are described. Eosinophilia is commoner in deeply invasive tumours and in tumours showing squamous metaplasia. Transitional cell carcinomas with eosinophilia have a better prognosis than those without, but this improvement is not seen in squamous cell carcinomas of the bladder. When eosinophilia is found on superficial biopsies of a bladder tumour, the possibility of muscle invasion should be considered. PMID:6725595

  15. Pitfalls in colour photography of choroidal tumours.

    PubMed

    Schalenbourg, A; Zografos, L

    2013-02-01

    Colour imaging of fundus tumours has been transformed by the development of digital and confocal scanning laser photography. These advances provide numerous benefits, such as panoramic images, increased contrast, non-contact wide-angle imaging, non-mydriatic photography, and simultaneous angiography. False tumour colour representation can, however, cause serious diagnostic errors. Large choroidal tumours can be totally invisible on angiography. Pseudogrowth can occur because of artefacts caused by different methods of fundus illumination, movement of reference blood vessels, and flattening of Bruch's membrane and sclera when tumour regression occurs. Awareness of these pitfalls should prevent the clinician from misdiagnosing tumours and wrongfully concluding that a tumour has grown.

  16. PHD2 in tumour angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Chan, D A; Giaccia, A J

    2010-01-01

    Originally identified as the enzymes responsible for catalysing the oxidation of specific, conserved proline residues within hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α), the additional roles for the prolyl hydroxylase domain (PHD) proteins have remained elusive. Of the four identified PHD enzymes, PHD2 is considered to be the key oxygen sensor, as knockdown of PHD2 results in elevated HIF protein. Several recent studies have highlighted the importance of PHD2 in tumourigenesis. However, there is conflicting evidence as to the exact role of PHD2 in tumour angiogenesis. The divergence seems to be because of the contribution of stromal-derived PHD2, and in particular the involvement of endothelial cells, vs tumour-derived PHD2. This review summarises our current understanding of PHD2 and tumour angiogenesis, focusing on the influences of PHD2 on vascular normalisation and neovascularisation. PMID:20461086

  17. Tumour markers in breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Cove, D. H.; Woods, K. L.; Smith, S. C.; Burnett, D.; Leonard, J.; Grieve, R. J.; Howell, A.

    1979-01-01

    The clinical usefulness of 8 potential tumour markers has been evaluated in 69 patients with Stage I and II breast cancer and 57 patients with Stage III and IV. Serum CEA concentrations were raised in 13% of patients with local and 65% of those with advanced breast cancer. In patients with clinical evidence of progression or regression of tumour, serum CEA levels changed appropriately in 83% of cases. Taking 4 of the markers (carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), lactalbumin, alpha subunit and haptoglobin) serum concentrations of one or more were raised in 33% of patients with local disease and 81% of those with advanced breast cancer. However, marker concentrations were often only marginally raised, and are unlikely to provide sensitive guide to tumour burden. CEA, lactalbumin and alpha subunit were detectable in 68%, 43% and 40% respectively of extracts of primary breast cancers. PMID:92331

  18. Neuroblastoma patient-derived orthotopic xenografts retain metastatic patterns and geno- and phenotypes of patient tumours.

    PubMed

    Braekeveldt, Noémie; Wigerup, Caroline; Gisselsson, David; Mohlin, Sofie; Merselius, My; Beckman, Siv; Jonson, Tord; Börjesson, Anna; Backman, Torbjörn; Tadeo, Irene; Berbegall, Ana P; Ora, Ingrid; Navarro, Samuel; Noguera, Rosa; Påhlman, Sven; Bexell, Daniel

    2015-03-01

    Neuroblastoma is a childhood tumour with heterogeneous characteristics and children with metastatic disease often have a poor outcome. Here we describe the establishment of neuroblastoma patient-derived xenografts (PDXs) by orthotopic implantation of viably cryopreserved or fresh tumour explants of patients with high risk neuroblastoma into immunodeficient mice. In vivo tumour growth was monitored by magnetic resonance imaging and fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography. Neuroblastoma PDXs retained the undifferentiated histology and proliferative capacity of their corresponding patient tumours. The PDXs expressed neuroblastoma markers neural cell adhesion molecule, chromogranin A, synaptophysin and tyrosine hydroxylase. Whole genome genotyping array analyses demonstrated that PDXs retained patient-specific chromosomal aberrations such as MYCN amplification, deletion of 1p and gain of chromosome 17q. Thus, neuroblastoma PDXs recapitulate the hallmarks of high-risk neuroblastoma in patients. PDX-derived cells were cultured in serum-free medium where they formed free-floating neurospheres, expressed neuroblastoma gene markers MYCN, CHGA, TH, SYP and NPY, and retained tumour-initiating and metastatic capacity in vivo. PDXs showed much higher degree of infiltrative growth and distant metastasis as compared to neuroblastoma SK-N-BE(2)c cell line-derived orthotopic tumours. Importantly, the PDXs presented with bone marrow involvement, a clinical feature of aggressive neuroblastoma. Thus, neuroblastoma PDXs serve as clinically relevant models for studying and targeting high-risk metastatic neuroblastoma.

  19. Tumour endothelial cells in high metastatic tumours promote metastasis via epigenetic dysregulation of biglycan

    PubMed Central

    Maishi, Nako; Ohba, Yusuke; Akiyama, Kosuke; Ohga, Noritaka; Hamada, Jun-ichi; Nagao-Kitamoto, Hiroko; Alam, Mohammad Towfik; Yamamoto, Kazuyuki; Kawamoto, Taisuke; Inoue, Nobuo; Taketomi, Akinobu; Shindoh, Masanobu; Hida, Yasuhiro; Hida, Kyoko

    2016-01-01

    Tumour blood vessels are gateways for distant metastasis. Recent studies have revealed that tumour endothelial cells (TECs) demonstrate distinct phenotypes from their normal counterparts. We have demonstrated that features of TECs are different depending on tumour malignancy, suggesting that TECs communicate with surrounding tumour cells. However, the contribution of TECs to metastasis has not been elucidated. Here, we show that TECs actively promote tumour metastasis through a bidirectional interaction between tumour cells and TECs. Co-implantation of TECs isolated from highly metastatic tumours accelerated lung metastases of low metastatic tumours. Biglycan, a small leucine-rich repeat proteoglycan secreted from TECs, activated tumour cell migration via nuclear factor-κB and extracellular signal–regulated kinase 1/2. Biglycan expression was upregulated by DNA demethylation in TECs. Collectively, our results demonstrate that TECs are altered in their microenvironment and, in turn, instigate tumour cells to metastasize, which is a novel mechanism for tumour metastasis. PMID:27295191

  20. Imbalance between nitric oxide and dopamine may underly aggression in acute neurological patients.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Bermudez, J; Perez-Neri, I; Montes, S; Ramirez-Abascal, M; Nente, F; Abundes-Corona, A; Soto-Hernandez, J L; Rios, C

    2010-10-01

    The neurochemical basis of aggressive behavior in humans is not fully understood. In this study we explored the relationship between aggressiveness (as measured by the Overt Aggression Scale), cognitive performance (as measured by the Mini Mental State Examination), and biochemical markers of dopamine neurotransmission (homovanillic acid, HVA) and nitric oxide synthesis (nitrite plus nitrate, NO(x)) in cerebrospinal fluid from 70 patients with acute brain disorders, mainly brain infections. Aggressive behavior and cognitive performance showed an inverse correlation. NO(x)/HVA ratio was inversely correlated to aggressive behavior, and positively correlated to cognitive performance. A subanalysis with antipsychotic-naïve patients confirmed those results. The balance between nitric oxide and dopamine could be related to the cognitive control of aggressive impulse.

  1. Cellular automata coupled with steady-state nutrient solution permit simulation of large-scale growth of tumours.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Sachin Man Bajimaya; Joldes, Grand Roman; Wittek, Adam; Miller, Karol

    2013-04-01

    We model complete growth of an avascular tumour by employing cellular automata for the growth of cells and steady-state equation to solve for nutrient concentrations. Our modelling and computer simulation results show that, in the case of a brain tumour, oxygen distribution in the tumour volume may be sufficiently described by a time-independent steady-state equation without losing the characteristics of a time-dependent diffusion equation. This makes the solution of oxygen concentration in the tumour volume computationally more efficient, thus enabling simulation of tumour growth on a large scale. We solve this steady-state equation using a central difference method. We take into account the composition of cells and intercellular adhesion in addition to processes involved in cell cycle--proliferation, quiescence, apoptosis, and necrosis--in the tumour model. More importantly, we consider cell mutation that gives rise to different phenotypes and therefore a tumour with heterogeneous population of cells. A new phenotype is probabilistically chosen and has the ability to survive at lower levels of nutrient concentration and reproduce faster. We show that heterogeneity of cells that compose a tumour leads to its irregular growth and that avascular growth is not supported for tumours of diameter above 18 mm. We compare results from our growth simulation with existing experimental data on Ehrlich ascites carcinoma and tumour spheroid cultures and show that our results are in good agreement with the experimental findings.

  2. Pharmacokinetic and anti-cancer properties of high dose ascorbate in solid tumours of ascorbate-dependent mice.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Elizabeth J; Vissers, Margreet C M; Wohlrab, Christina; Hicks, Kevin O; Strother, R Matthew; Bozonet, Stephanie M; Robinson, Bridget A; Dachs, Gabi U

    2016-10-01

    Despite recent evidence for an anti-tumour role for high-dose ascorbate, potential mechanisms of action are still unclear. At mM concentrations that are achieved with high-dose intravenous administration, autoxidation of ascorbate can generate cytotoxic levels of H2O2. Ascorbate is also a required co-factor for the hydroxylases that suppress the transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF-1). HIF-1 supports an aggressive tumour phenotype and is associated with poor prognosis, and previous studies have shown that optimizing intracellular ascorbate levels down-regulates HIF-1 activation. In this study we have simultaneously measured ascorbate concentrations and the HIF-1 pathway activity in tumour tissue following high dose ascorbate administration, and have studied tumour growth and physiology. Gulo(-/-) mice, a model of the human ascorbate dependency condition, were implanted with syngeneic Lewis lung tumours, 1g/kg ascorbate was administered into the peritoneum, and ascorbate concentrations were monitored in plasma, liver and tumours. Ascorbate levels peaked within 30min, and although plasma and liver ascorbate returned to baseline within 16h, tumour levels remained elevated for 48h, possibly reflecting increased stability in the hypoxic tumour environment. The expression of HIF-1 and its target proteins was down-regulated with tumour ascorbate uptake. Elevated tumour ascorbate levels could be maintained with daily administration, and HIF-1 and vascular endothelial growth factor protein levels were reduced in these conditions. Increased tumour ascorbate was associated with slowed tumour growth, reduced tumour microvessel density and decreased hypoxia. Alternate day administration of ascorbate resulted in lower tumour levels and did not consistently decrease HIF-1 pathway activity. Levels of sodium-dependent vitamin C transporters 1 and 2 were not clearly associated with ascorbate accumulation by murine tumour cells in vitro or in vivo. Our results support

  3. Motives in Sexual Aggression: The Chinese Context.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tang, Catherine So-Kum; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Compared sexual and aggressive motives for sexual aggression in Chinese college students. Male undergraduates (N=146) completed self-report measures. Results suggest that sex guilt and aggressive guilt acted as inhibitors for their respective drives and sexual aggression resulted from aggressive, rather than sexual, motives. Sexual aggression may…

  4. Prozac impacts lateralization of aggression in male Siamese fighting fish.

    PubMed

    HedayatiRad, Maryam; Nematollahi, Mohammad Ali; Forsatkar, Mohammad Navid; Brown, Culum

    2017-06-01

    Previous studies have shown that Siamese fighting fish, Betta splendens, preferentially use right-eye during the aggressive displays. However, administration of antidepressant drugs may disrupt eye-use preference in association with a reduction in aggression; a phenomena that has not been explored in fish. The objective of the current study was to examine the effects of exposure to the antidepressant drug, fluoxetine, on lateralization in eye-use during aggressive displays in male Siamese fighting fish. Baseline aggression and lateralization in eye use of thirty fish were assessed toward live conspecifics, following which experimental subjects (n=15) were then exposed to fluoxetine (540ng/L) in a static renewal water system. Behavior was quantified again after 9 days of exposure. All of the subjects preferentially used the right-eye during aggressive responses before the exposure experiments. Fluoxetine exposed subjects showed a reduction in the time spent gill flaring as has previously been reported, indicative of a reduction in the level of aggression. Fluoxetine also had a significant effect on the lateralization in preferred eye-use while looking at their opponent. Fish exposed to fluoxetine switched from a preferential use of the right-eye during aggressive encounters prior to exposure to using their left-eye after exposure to fluoxetine. The results are discussed with regard to asymmetrical distribution of serotonin between the two brain hemispheres.

  5. Aggression, science, and law: The origins framework. Introduction.

    PubMed

    Victoroff, Jeff

    2009-01-01

    Human societies have formalized instincts for compliance with reciprocal altruism in laws that sanction some aggression and not other aggression. Neuroscience makes steady advances toward measurements of various aspects of brain function pertinent to the aggressive behaviors that laws are designed to regulate. Consciousness, free will, rationality, intent, reality testing, empathy, moral reasoning, and capacity for self-control are somewhat subject to empirical assessment. The question becomes: how should law accommodate the wealth of information regarding these elements of mind that the science of aggression increasingly makes available? This essay discusses the evolutionary purpose of aggression, the evolutionary purpose of law, the problematic assumptions of the mens rea doctrine, and the prospects for applying the neuroscience of aggression toward the goal of equal justice for unequal minds. Nine other essays are introduced, demonstrating how each of them fits into the framework of the permanent debate about neuroscience and justice. It is concluded that advances in the science of human aggression will have vital, but biologically limited, impact on the provision of justice.

  6. Primary spinal primitive neuroectodermal tumour: report of two cases mimicking neurofibroma and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Patnaik, Ashis; Mishra, Sudhansu; Mishra, Sanjib; Deo, Rama

    2012-01-01

    Primary spinal primitive neuroectodermal tumours (PNETs) are a rare entity. Most of them occur in children and young adults. To date, 47 cases of primary spinal PNET have been reported in the literature. We present two cases of primary spinal PNET. In both cases, the tumours were thoracic extradural ones with intrathoracic extension through intervertebral foramina resembling neurofibroma. These tumours are highly aggressive with rapid growth as evidenced by the short history in both of our cases. Both cases underwent gross total removal of the intraspinal and thoracic components. Postoperatively, both patients underwent cranio-spinal radiotherapy. A review of the literature shows that the overall prognosis of PNETs of the spinal cord is very poor even with adequate surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy. One patient died after 4 months and the other one is still alive 8 months after surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy.

  7. Remitting seronegative symmetrical synovitis with pitting edema (RS3PE); a rare association with phyllodes tumour of breast.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, R N; Phaujdar, Sibaji; Banerjee, Siwalik; Siddhanta, Sattik; De, Dibyendu; Bhattachary, Kuntal; Pal, Hare Krishna

    2012-04-01

    Remitting seronegative symmetrical synovitis with pitting edema (RS3PE) is a rare entity mainly found in elderly males. It is characterized by pitting edema mainly of dorsum of both hands giving a "boxing glove hand" appearance; rarely involving feet also, acute in onset, negative rheumatoid factor and a good response to low dose corticosteroid therapy. Clinically it almost resembles a case of polymyalgia rheumatica, late onset rheumatoid arthritis or other seronegative spondyloarthropathy.Though there are multiple underlying factors causing this rare entity but it has very close associations with many malignancies.So far its association with solid tumours and hematological malignancies has been reported. Phyllodes tumour of breast shows wide spectrum of activity from a benign condition to a locally aggressive and sometimes metastatic tumour.One fourth of the cases recur after definitive treatment.Our case represent an unusual association with recurrent phyllodes tumour of breast with RS3PE.

  8. An Improved Tumour Temperature Measurement and Control Method for Superficial Tumour Ultrasound Hyperthermia Therapeutic System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen1, G. F.; Chen, Y. Z.; Ren, G. X.

    2006-10-01

    In tumour hyperthermia therapy, the research on measurement and control of tumour temperature is very important. Based on the hardware platform of superficial tumour ultrasound hyperthermia therapeutic system, an improved tumour temperature measurement and control method is presented in this paper. The experiment process, data and results are discussed in detail. The improved method will greatly reduce the pain and dread of the patients during the therapy period on the tumour temperature measurement and control by using the pinhead sensor.

  9. 'Primary extrarenal Wilms' tumour': rare presentation of a common paediatric tumour.

    PubMed

    Goel, Vandana; Verma, Amit Kumar; Batra, Vineeta; Puri, Sunil Kumar

    2014-06-06

    Wilms' tumour (nephroblastoma), the most common abdominal malignancy of childhood, occurs primarily as a malignant renal tumour. Extrarenal Wilms' tumour is rare with occasional reports from the Indian subcontinent. The various locations of extrarenal Wilms' tumour include retroperitoneum, uterus, skin and thorax. In this report we will discuss the imaging features highlighting the imaging differential diagnosis in a case of retroperitoneal (extrarenal) primary Wilms' tumour.

  10. Transperineal aggressive angiomyxoma.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Pedro; Melo Abreu, Elisa; Cunha, Teresa Margarida; Rolim, Inês

    2017-04-11

    A 45-year-old woman with a history of total hysterectomy with adnexal preservation for uterine leiomyomas presented to our hospital with a right gluteal palpable mass, which she first noticed 6 months before and had progressively enlarged since then.Radiological studies revealed a 14 cm lesion with translevator growth that displaced rather than invaded adjacent structures, with a peculiar whorled pattern on T2-weighted MRI, which enhanced following gadolinium administration. CT-guided biopsy was performed, and in conjunction with imaging features the diagnosis of an aggressive angiomyxoma was assumed and confirmed following surgical excision.

  11. Isolation of inflammatory cells from human tumours.

    PubMed

    Polak, Marta E

    2011-01-01

    Inflammatory cells are present in many tumours, and understanding their function is of increasing importance, particularly to studies of tumour immunology. The tumour-infiltrating leukocytes encompass a variety of cell types, e.g. T lymphocytes, macrophages, dendritic cells, NK cells, and mast cells. Choice of the isolation method greatly depends on the tumour type and the leukocyte subset of interest, but the protocol usually includes tissue disaggregation and cell enrichment. We recommend density centrifugation for initial enrichment, followed by specific magnetic bead negative or positive panning with leukocyte and tumour cell selective antibodies.

  12. Basal forebrain projections to the lateral habenula modulate aggression reward

    PubMed Central

    Golden, Sam A.; Heshmati, Mitra; Flanigan, Meghan; Christoffel, Dan J.; Guise, Kevin; Pfau, Madeline L.; Aleyasin, Hossein; Menard, Caroline; Zhang, Hongxing; Hodes, Georgia E.; Bregman, Dana; Khibnik, Lena; Tai, Jonathan; Rebusi, Nicole; Krawitz, Brian; Chaudhury, Dipesh; Walsh, Jessica J.; Han, Ming-Hu; Shapiro, Matt L.; Russo, Scott J.

    2016-01-01

    Maladaptive aggressive behavior is associated with a number of neuropsychiatric disorders1 and is thought to partly result from inappropriate activation of brain reward systems in response to aggressive or violent social stimuli2. Nuclei within the ventromedial hypothalamus3–5, extended amygdala6 and limbic7 circuits are known to encode initiation of aggression; however, little is known about the neural mechanisms that directly modulate the motivational component of aggressive behavior8. To address this, we established a mouse model to measure the valence of aggressive inter-male social interaction with a smaller subordinate intruder as reinforcement for the development of conditioned place preference (CPP). Aggressors (AGG) develop a CPP, while non-aggressors (NON) develop a conditioned place aversion (CPA), to the intruder-paired context. Further, we identify a functional GABAergic projection from the basal forebrain (BF) to the lateral habenula (lHb) that bi-directionally controls the valence of aggressive interactions. Circuit-specific silencing of GABAergic BF-lHb terminals of AGG with halorhodopsin (NpHR3.0) increases lHb neuronal firing and abolishes CPP to the intruder-paired context. Activation of GABAergic BF-lHb terminals of NON with channelrhodopsin (ChR2) decreases lHb neuronal firing and promotes CPP to the intruder-paired context. Lastly, we show that altering inhibitory transmission at BF-lHb terminals does not control the initiation of aggressive behavior. These results demonstrate that the BF-lHb circuit plays a critical role in regulating the valence of inter-male aggressive behavior and provide novel mechanistic insight into the neural circuits modulating aggression reward processing. PMID:27357796

  13. Frontal white matter changes and aggression in methamphetamine dependence.

    PubMed

    Lederer, Katharina; Fouche, Jean-Paul; Wilson, Don; Stein, Dan J; Uhlmann, Anne

    2016-02-01

    Chronic methamphetamine (MA) use can lead to white matter (WM) changes and increased levels of aggression. While previous studies have examined WM abnormalities relating to cognitive impairment, associations between WM integrity and aggression in MA dependence remain unclear. Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) was used to investigate WM changes in 40 individuals with MA dependence and 40 matched healthy controls. A region of interest (ROI) approach using tract based spatial statistics (TBSS) in FSL was performed. We compared fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD), parallel diffusivity (λ║) and perpendicular diffusivity (λ┴) in WM tracts of the frontal brain. A relationship of WM with aggression scores from the Buss & Perry Questionnaire was investigated. Mean scores for anger (p < 0.001), physical aggression (p = 0.032) and total aggression (p = 0.021) were significantly higher in the MA group relative to controls. ROI analysis showed increased MD (U = 439.5, p = 0.001) and λ┴ (U = 561.5, p = 0.021) values in the genu of the corpus callosum, and increased MD (U = 541.5, p = 0.012) values in the right cingulum in MA dependence. None of the WM changes were significantly associated with aggression scores. This study provides evidence of frontal WM changes and increased levels of aggression in individuals with MA dependence. The lack of significant associations between WM and aggressive behaviour may reflect methodological issues in measuring such behaviour, or may indicate that the neurobiology of aggression is not simply correlated with WM damage but is more complex.

  14. The neurobiology of offensive aggression: Revealing a modular view.

    PubMed

    de Boer, S F; Olivier, B; Veening, J; Koolhaas, J M

    2015-07-01

    Experimental studies aimed at understanding the neurobiology of aggression started in the early 20th century, and by employing increasingly sophisticated tools of functional neuroanatomy (i.e., from electric/chemical lesion and stimulation techniques to neurochemical mapping and manipulations) have provided the important framework for the functional brain circuit organization of aggressive behaviors. Recently, newly emerging technologies for mapping,measuring and manipulating neural circuitry at the level of molecular and genetically defined neuronal subtypes promise to further delineate the precise neural microcircuits mediating the initiation and termination of aggressive behavior, and characterize its dynamic neuromolecular functioning. This paper will review some of the behavioral, neuroanatomical and neurochemical evidence in support of a modular view of the neurobiology of offensive aggressive behavior. Although aggressive behavior likely arises from a specific concerted activity within a distributed neural network across multiple brain regions, emerging opto- and pharmacogenetic neuronal manipulation studies make it clear that manipulation of molecularly-defined neurons within a single node of this global interconnected network seems to be both necessary and sufficient to evoke aggressive attacks. However, the evidence so far also indicates that in addition to behavior-specific neurons there are neuronal systems that should be considered as more general behavioral control modules. The answer to the question of behavioral specificity of brain structures at the level of individual neurons requires a change of the traditional experimental setup. Studies using c-fos expression mapping usually compare the activation patterns induced by for example aggression with a home cage control. However, to reveal the behavioral specificity of this neuronal activation pattern, a comparison with other social and non-social related behaviors such as mating, defensive burying

  15. Aggression can be contagious: Longitudinal associations between proactive aggression and reactive aggression among young twins.

    PubMed

    Dickson, Daniel J; Richmond, Ashley D; Brendgen, Mara; Vitaro, Frank; Laursen, Brett; Dionne, Ginette; Boivin, Michel

    2015-01-01

    The present study examined sibling influence over reactive and proactive aggression in a sample of 452 same-sex twins (113 male dyads, 113 female dyads). Between and within siblings influence processes were examined as a function of relative levels of parental coercion and hostility to test the hypothesis that aggression contagion between twins occurs only among dyads who experience parental coerciveness. Teacher reports of reactive and proactive aggression were collected for each twin in kindergarten (M = 6.04 years; SD = 0.27) and in first grade (M = 7.08 years; SD = 0.27). Families were divided into relatively low, average, and relatively high parental coercion-hostility groups on the basis of maternal reports collected when the children were 5 years old. In families with relatively high levels of parental coercion-hostility, there was evidence of between-sibling influence, such that one twin's reactive aggression at age 6 predicted increases in the other twin's reactive aggression from ages 6 to 7, and one twin's proactive aggression at age 6 predicted increases in the other twin's proactive aggression from ages 6 to 7. There was also evidence of within-sibling influence such that a child's level of reactive aggression at age 6 predicted increases in the same child's proactive aggression at age 7, regardless of parental coercion-hostility. The findings provide new information about the etiology of reactive and proactive aggression and individual differences in their developmental interplay.

  16. Psychotherapeutic approaches to aggressive and violent patients.

    PubMed

    Alpert, J E; Spillmann, M K

    1997-06-01

    Behavioral and cognitive-behavioral strategies and a broad range of group, family, couples, and milieu treatment approaches have been developed for the psychotherapy of aggressive and violent patients. These methods have been carried out in diverse settings ranging from hospitals and prisons to individual outpatient practices and have been applied across diverse populations including adults with mental retardation, dementia, and brain injury; children with attention deficit and conduct disorders and autism; recurrent violent offenders with antisocial personality disorder; and individuals with chronic psychotic disorders, mood disorders, or medical illnesses such as hypertension. Bridging these different strategies are the underlying principles of psychotherapy with aggressive and violent patients. These include ensuring the safety of clinician, patient, and potential victims as the foremost concern; developing a finely detailed assessment of aggressive and violent acts and of the antecedents, assumptions, and consequences that are attached to them; formulating well-defined goals and striving for clear communication to achieve consistency in the pursuit of these goals between therapist and patient, and among therapist and other clinicians, staff, and relevant family members or agencies; specifying ahead of time well-considered outcome measures to be used to gauge the effectiveness of treatment; and maintaining a healthy vigilance for countertransferential and similar reactions and a willingness to use consultation as an integral part of treatment.

  17. Television viewing, aggression, and ethnicity.

    PubMed

    Harris, M B

    1992-02-01

    For 416 college students, questioned about their experiences with aggression and television viewing, only very weak correlations between preference for violent shows and aggression were observed. Black males watched significantly more television than other respondents. These findings suggest that the frequently reported correlation between viewing televised violence and aggression may not appear when sex, ethnicity, and education are controlled in a sample of young adults.

  18. [Malignant intracerebral nerve sheath tumours: Two case reports and complete review of the literature cases].

    PubMed

    Le Fèvre, C; Castelli, J; Perrin, C; Hénaux, P L; Noël, G

    2016-04-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumours are extremely rare and can be associated with neurofibramatosis type 1. Their prognosis is poor and surgery remains the mainstay of therapy and should be the first line of treatment. Radiotherapy and chemotherapy are second line treatment and their effectiveness remains to demonstrate. The diagnosis is clinical, radiological, histological and immunohistochemical. Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumours have a potential of local tumour recurrence very high and can metastasize. They often occur in extremity of the members but also rarely into brain. We report two cases of intracerebral nerve sheath tumour. The first was a 68-year-old woman who was admitted with progressive symptoms of headache and diplopia. A left frontotemporal malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumours was diagnosed and was treated by surgery and irradiation. Ten months later, she presented a local recurrence and spine bone's metastases were treated by vertebroplasty and irradiation. The patient died 15 months after the diagnosis. The second case was a 47-year-old woman who was referred because headache and vomiting symptoms. A right frontal malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumours was diagnosed and treated by surgery and irradiation. After that, the patient had three local recurrence operated and pulmonary and cranial bone's metastases. She was still alive after 20 months. We propose a literature review with 25 cases of intracerebral nerve sheath tumour identified, including the two current cases.

  19. Mesenteric gastrointestinal stromal tumour presenting as intracranial space occupying lesion

    PubMed Central

    Puri, Tarun; Gunabushanam, Gowthaman; Malik, Monica; Goyal, Shikha; Das, Anup K; Julka, Pramod K; Rath, Goura K

    2006-01-01

    Background Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GIST) usually present with non-specific gastrointestinal symptoms such as abdominal mass, pain, anorexia and bowel obstruction. Methods We report a case of a 42 year old male who presented with a solitary intracranial space occupying lesion which was established as a metastasis from a mesenteric tumour. Results The patient was initially treated as a metastatic sarcoma, but a lack of response to chemotherapy prompted testing for CD117 which returned positive. A diagnosis of mesenteric GIST presenting as solitary brain metastasis was made, and the patient was treated with imatinib. Conclusion We recommend that all sarcomas with either an intraabdominal or unknown origin be routinely tested for CD117 to rule out GIST. PMID:17105654

  20. Hemi-dystonia secondary to localised basal ganglia tumour.

    PubMed Central

    Narbona, J; Obeso, J A; Tuñon, T; Martinez-Lage, J M; Marsden, C D

    1984-01-01

    An 8-year-old boy with an 18 month history of left limb hemi-dystonia due to a right lenticular nucleus astrocytoma originating in the putamen is reported. Subsequent neuropathological study demonstrated that the tumour was mainly localised to the right lenticular nucleus, with cystic necrosis in the infero-lateral putamen. Solid tumour also infiltrated the right hypothalamus, the anterior commisure and the optic chiasm, and there was perivascular spread into the globus pallidus, internal capsule and roof of the right lateral ventricle. This case, and the few other published reports of symptomatic dystonia due to focal brain lesions verified pathologically, indicate that damage to the lenticular nucleus, and to the putamen in particular, can cause limb dystonia in man. Images PMID:6747646

  1. Anger under Control: Neural Correlates of Frustration as a Function of Trait Aggression

    PubMed Central

    Pawliczek, Christina M.; Derntl, Birgit; Kellermann, Thilo; Gur, Ruben C.; Schneider, Frank; Habel, Ute

    2013-01-01

    Antisocial behavior and aggression are prominent symptoms in several psychiatric disorders including antisocial personality disorder. An established precursor to aggression is a frustrating event, which can elicit anger or exasperation, thereby prompting aggressive responses. While some studies have investigated the neural correlates of frustration and aggression, examination of their relation to trait aggression in healthy populations are rare. Based on a screening of 550 males, we formed two extreme groups, one including individuals reporting high (n=21) and one reporting low (n=18) trait aggression. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) at 3T, all participants were put through a frustration task comprising unsolvable anagrams of German nouns. Despite similar behavioral performance, males with high trait aggression reported higher ratings of negative affect and anger after the frustration task. Moreover, they showed relatively decreased activation in the frontal brain regions and the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) as well as relatively less amygdala activation in response to frustration. Our findings indicate distinct frontal and limbic processing mechanisms following frustration modulated by trait aggression. In response to a frustrating event, HA individuals show some of the personality characteristics and neural processing patterns observed in abnormally aggressive populations. Highlighting the impact of aggressive traits on the behavioral and neural responses to frustration in non-psychiatric extreme groups can facilitate further characterization of neural dysfunctions underlying psychiatric disorders that involve abnormal frustration processing and aggression. PMID:24205247

  2. A mechanically coupled reaction-diffusion model that incorporates intra-tumoural heterogeneity to predict in vivo glioma growth.

    PubMed

    Hormuth, David A; Weis, Jared A; Barnes, Stephanie L; Miga, Michael I; Rericha, Erin C; Quaranta, Vito; Yankeelov, Thomas E

    2017-03-01

    While gliomas have been extensively modelled with a reaction-diffusion (RD) type equation it is most likely an oversimplification. In this study, three mathematical models of glioma growth are developed and systematically investigated to establish a framework for accurate prediction of changes in tumour volume as well as intra-tumoural heterogeneity. Tumour cell movement was described by coupling movement to tissue stress, leading to a mechanically coupled (MC) RD model. Intra-tumour heterogeneity was described by including a voxel-specific carrying capacity (CC) to the RD model. The MC and CC models were also combined in a third model. To evaluate these models, rats (n = 14) with C6 gliomas were imaged with diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging over 10 days to estimate tumour cellularity. Model parameters were estimated from the first three imaging time points and then used to predict tumour growth at the remaining time points which were then directly compared to experimental data. The results in this work demonstrate that mechanical-biological effects are a necessary component of brain tissue tumour modelling efforts. The results are suggestive that a variable tissue carrying capacity is a needed model component to capture tumour heterogeneity. Lastly, the results advocate the need for additional effort towards capturing tumour-to-tissue infiltration.

  3. Imaging biomarkers of angiogenesis and the microvascular environment in cerebral tumours

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, G; Mills, S J; Coope, D J; O’connor, J P B; Jackson, A

    2011-01-01

    Conventional contrast-enhanced CT and MRI are now in routine clinical use for the diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of diseases in the brain. The presence of contrast enhancement is a proxy for the pathological changes that occur in the normally highly regulated brain vasculature and blood-brain barrier. With recognition of the limitations of these techniques, and a greater appreciation for the nuanced mechanisms of microvascular change in a variety of pathological processes, novel techniques are under investigation for their utility in further interrogating the microvasculature of the brain. This is particularly important in tumours, where the reliance on angiogenesis (new vessel formation) is crucial for tumour growth, and the resulting microvascular configuration and derangement has profound implications for diagnosis, treatment and monitoring. In addition, novel therapeutic approaches that seek to directly modify the microvasculature require more sensitive and specific biological markers of baseline tumour behaviour and response. The currently used imaging biomarkers of angiogenesis and brain tumour microvascular environment are reviewed. PMID:22433824

  4. Neural control of predatory aggression in wild and domesticated animals.

    PubMed

    Nikulina, E M

    1991-01-01

    The neural mechanisms of predatory aggression in laboratory animals were investigated in a variety of rodents and members of the order Carnivora. Experimental enhancement of brain serotonin (5-HT) blocked killing behavior in rats, mice, mink and silver foxes, indicating that there is a 5-HT inhibiting mechanism of predatory aggression in animals of different species. Suppressed killing behavior, at least in some strains of mice, does not depend for expression on the inhibitory effect of the brain 5-HT system, but is caused by the low tonus of the system activating predatory behavior. Long-term satiation of mink increased the level of 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid in the lateral hypothalamus and amygdala and enhanced the latency of predatory aggression. It is suggested that 5-HT represents a dietary responsive endogenous factor regulating predatory behavior in carnivores. Selection of Norway rats over many generations for tamed behavior towards man (domestication) leads to an increase in level and turnover of 5-HT in the midbrain and hypothalamus, but does not change predatory aggression. Substantially reduced defensive behavior of domesticated rats is thus unconnected with the neural mechanism of predatory aggression.

  5. Notch as a tumour suppressor.

    PubMed

    Nowell, Craig S; Radtke, Freddy

    2017-03-01

    The Notch signalling cascade is an evolutionarily conserved pathway that has a crucial role in regulating development and homeostasis in various tissues. The cellular processes and events that it controls are diverse, and continued investigation over recent decades has revealed how the role of Notch signalling is multifaceted and highly context dependent. Consistent with the far-reaching impact that Notch has on development and homeostasis, aberrant activity of the pathway is also linked to the initiation and progression of several malignancies, and Notch can in fact be either oncogenic or tumour suppressive depending on the tissue and cellular context. The Notch pathway therefore represents an important target for therapeutic agents designed to treat many types of cancer. In this Review, we focus on the latest developments relating specifically to the tumour-suppressor activity of Notch signalling and discuss the potential mechanisms by which Notch can inhibit carcinogenesis in various tissues. Potential therapeutic strategies aimed at restoring or augmenting Notch-mediated tumour suppression will also be highlighted.

  6. Methylator phenotype of malignant germ cell tumours in children identifies strong candidates for chemotherapy resistance

    PubMed Central

    Jeyapalan, J N; Noor, D A Mohamed; Lee, S-H; Tan, C L; Appleby, V A; Kilday, J P; Palmer, R D; Schwalbe, E C; Clifford, S C; Walker, D A; Murray, M J; Coleman, N; Nicholson, J C; Scotting, P J

    2011-01-01

    Background: Yolk sac tumours (YSTs) and germinomas are the two major pure histological subtypes of germ cell tumours. To date, the role of DNA methylation in the aetiology of this class of tumour has only been analysed in adult testicular forms and with respect to only a few genes. Methods: A bank of paediatric tumours was analysed for global methylation of LINE-1 repeat elements and global methylation of regulatory elements using GoldenGate methylation arrays. Results: Both germinomas and YSTs exhibited significant global hypomethylation of LINE-1 elements. However, in germinomas, methylation of gene regulatory regions differed little from control samples, whereas YSTs exhibited increased methylation at a large proportion of the loci tested, showing a ‘methylator' phenotype, including silencing of genes associated with Caspase-8-dependent apoptosis. Furthermore, we found that the methylator phenotype of YSTs was coincident with higher levels of expression of the DNA methyltransferase, DNA (cytosine-5)-methyltransferase 3B, suggesting a mechanism underlying the phenotype. Conclusion: Epigenetic silencing of a large number of potential tumour suppressor genes in YSTs might explain why they exhibit a more aggressive natural history than germinomas and silencing of genes associated with Caspase-8-dependent cell death might explain the relative resistance of YSTs to conventional therapy. PMID:21712824

  7. The prognosis of primary intracerebral tumours presenting with epilepsy: the outcome of medical and surgical management.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, D F; Hutton, J L; Sandemann, D; Foy, P M; Shaw, M D; Williams, I R; Chadwick, D W

    1991-01-01

    It is not known whether conservative or early aggressive (resective surgery with or without radiotherapy) management is better for tumours presenting with epilepsy. The prognosis of 560 patients with a clinical and CT diagnosis of intrinsic supratentorial tumour was examined retrospectively. Epilepsy was the first symptom in 164 patients. Histological confirmation of diagnosis was available in 391 (70%) of cases. Median survival was 37 months in the group presenting with epilepsy and six months in those presenting with other symptoms (p less than 0.0001). Patients presenting with epilepsy were more likely to have a normal clinical examination, a non-enhancing low density lesion on CT scan and a low grade tumour. From Cox's stepwise proportional hazards model, significant independent variables adversely affecting prognosis were increasing age, focal neurological signs and enhancing CT lesions at diagnosis, non-resective surgery and male sex. Of those presenting with epilepsy 80 patients had surgical treatment within two months of CT diagnosis. The Cox's model failed to identify any beneficial effects for either early resective surgery or radiotherapy. In primary intracerebral tumours with presentations other than epilepsy, resective surgery and radiotherapy were amongst the important factors associated with prolonged survival. Primary intracerebral tumours presenting with epilepsy are relatively benign and their outcome appears to be chiefly determined by clinical factors. PMID:1744647

  8. Immunohistochemical expression of Type IV Collagen and Autocrine Motility Factor Receptor in Odontogenic Tumours

    PubMed Central

    Sethi, Sneha

    2014-01-01

    Background: Autocrine motility factor receptor (AMFR) is a tumour motility stimulating protein secreted by tumour cells. The protein encoded by this gene is a glycosylated transmembrane protein and a receptor for autocrine motility factor. It has been known to play a role in progression of neoplastic lesions. Basement membranes are specialized extracellular matrices that serve as structural barriers as well as substrates for cellular interactions. The network of type IV collagen is thought to define the scaffold integrating other components such as laminins and perlecan into highly organized supramolecular architecture. The aim of this study was to determine and evaluate the immunohistochemical expression of Type IV Collagen and Autocrine motility factor receptor in odontogenic lesions. Materials and Methods: Immunohistochemical expression of Type IV Collagen and Autocrine motility factor receptor was evaluated in 31 odontogenic lesions, including unicystic ameloblastoma, multicystic ameloblastoma, keratocystic odontogenic tumour and ameloblastic carcinoma. Normal follicular tissue formed the control. Results: Maximum expression for Type IV Collagen was seen in multicystic ameloblastoma and minimum expression in keratocystic odontogenic tumour. The maximum expression of AMFR was seen in ameloblastic carcinoma and minimum expression in multicystic ameloblastoma. Conclusion: The results of this study suggested an association of loss of expression of type IV Collagen with progression of lesion. AMFR expression was found to be associated with the aggressive potential of tumours. PMID:25478440

  9. Effects of pigment epithelium derived factor (PEDF) on malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumours (MPNSTs).

    PubMed

    Demestre, Maria; Terzi, Menderes Yusuf; Mautner, Victor; Vajkoczy, Peter; Kurtz, Andreas; Piña, Ana Luisa

    2013-12-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is an inherited genetic disease affecting 1 in 3,500 individuals. A prominent feature of NF1 is the formation of benign tumours of the peripheral nerve sheath (neurofibromas). However, these can become malignant and form highly metastatic malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumours (MPNST), which are usually fatal despite aggressive surgery, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy. Recent studies have shown that pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) can induce differentiation and inhibit angiogenesis in several kinds of tumours. The present study was designed to determine the in vitro and in vivo effects of PEDF on MPNST angiogenesis and tumour growth. PEDF inhibited proliferation and augmented apoptosis in S462 MPNST cells after 48 h of treatment in culture. In xenografts of S462 MPNST cells in athymic nude mice, PEDF suppressed MPNST tumour burden, due mainly to inhibition of angiogenesis. These results demonstrate for the first time inhibitory effects of PEDF on the growth of human MPNST via induction of anti-angiogenesis and apoptosis. Our results suggest that PEDF could be a novel approach for future therapeutic purposes against MPNST.

  10. Cell lines from MYCN transgenic murine tumours reflect the molecular and biological characteristics of human neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Andy J; Cheng, Ngan Ching; Ford, Jette; Smith, Janice; Murray, Jayne E; Flemming, Claudia; Lastowska, Maria; Jackson, Michael S; Hackett, Christopher S; Weiss, William A; Marshall, Glenn M; Kees, Ursula R; Norris, Murray D; Haber, Michelle

    2007-06-01

    Overexpression of the human MYCN oncogene driven by a tyrosine hydroxylase promoter causes tumours in transgenic mice that recapitulate the childhood cancer neuroblastoma. To establish an in vitro model to study this process, a series of isogenic cell lines were developed from these MYCN-driven murine tumours. Lines were established from tumours arising in homozygous and hemizygous MYCN transgenic mice. Hemizygous tumours gave rise to cell lines growing only in suspension. Homozygous tumours gave rise to similar suspension lines as well as morphologically distinct substrate-adherent lines characteristic of human S-type neuroblastoma cells. FISH analysis demonstrated selective MYCN transgene amplification in cell lines derived from hemizygous mice. Comparative genomic hybridisation (CGH) and fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) analysis confirmed a range of neuroblastoma-associated genetic changes in the various lines, in particular, gain of regions syntenic with human 17q. These isogenic lines together with the transgenic mice thus represent valuable models for investigating the biological characteristics of aggressive neuroblastoma.

  11. CXCL1 mediates obesity-associated adipose stromal cell trafficking and function in the tumour microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tao; Tseng, Chieh; Zhang, Yan; Sirin, Olga; Corn, Paul G.; Li-Ning-Tapia, Elsa M.; Troncoso, Patricia; Davis, John; Pettaway, Curtis; Ward, John; Frazier, Marsha L.; Logothetis, Christopher; Kolonin, Mikhail G.

    2016-01-01

    White adipose tissue (WAT) overgrowth in obesity is linked with increased aggressiveness of certain cancers. Adipose stromal cells (ASCs) can become mobilized from WAT, recruited by tumours and promote cancer progression. Mechanisms underlying ASC trafficking are unclear. Here we demonstrate that chemokines CXCL1 and CXCL8 chemoattract ASC by signalling through their receptors, CXCR1 and CXCR2, in cell culture models. We further show that obese patients with prostate cancer have increased epithelial CXCL1 expression. Concomitantly, we observe that cells with ASC phenotype are mobilized and infiltrate tumours in obese patients. Using mouse models, we show that the CXCL1 chemokine gradient is required for the obesity-dependent tumour ASC recruitment, vascularization and tumour growth promotion. We demonstrate that αSMA expression in ASCs is induced by chemokine signalling and mediates the stimulatory effects of ASCs on endothelial cells. Our data suggest that ASC recruitment to tumours, driven by CXCL1 and CXCL8, promotes prostate cancer progression. PMID:27241286

  12. Resistance to tumour challenge after tumour laser thermotherapy is associated with a cellular immune response

    PubMed Central

    Ivarsson, K; Myllymäki, L; Jansner, K; Stenram, U; Tranberg, K-G

    2005-01-01

    Previous studies in our laboratory have shown that interstitial laser thermotherapy (ILT) of an experimental liver tumour is superior to surgical excision, at least partly due to a laser-induced immunological effect. The aim of the present study was to investigate the time–response relationship of the ILT-induced immunisation and the cellular response of macrophages and lymphocytes. A dimethylhydrazine-induced adenocarcinoma was transplanted into the liver of syngeneic rats. Rats with tumour were treated 6–8 days later (tumour size 0.25–0.40 cm3) with ILT of tumour or resection of the tumour-bearing lobe. Two groups of rats without tumour were treated with resection of a normal liver lobe or ILT of normal liver. A challenging tumour was implanted into the liver of each rat 2, 5 or 10 weeks after primary treatment. Rats were killed 6, 12 and 48 days (or earlier due to their condition) after challenge (n=8 in all groups). Immunohistochemical techniques were used to determine lymphocytes (CD8, CD4) and macrophages (ED1, ED2) in rats having had treatment of a primary tumour. Interstitial laser thermotherapy of the first tumour was followed by eradication of challenging tumour and absence of tumour spread. This contrasted with rapid growth and spread of challenging tumour in the other groups. In the challenging vital tumour tissue and in the interface between the tumour and surroundings, the number of ED1 macrophages and CD8 lymphocytes was higher in rats having been treated with the ILT of tumour than in those having undergone resection of the tumour-bearing lobe. The number of ED2 macrophages and CD4 lymphocytes was low and did not vary between these two groups. Interstitial laser thermotherapy elicited an immune response that eradicated a challenging tumour and was associated with increased numbers of tumour-infiltrating macrophages and CD8 lymphocytes. PMID:16091763

  13. A preliminary investigation of the role of the transcription co-activators YAP/TAZ of the Hippo signalling pathway in canine and feline mammary tumours.

    PubMed

    Beffagna, G; Sacchetto, R; Cavicchioli, L; Sammarco, A; Mainenti, M; Ferro, S; Trez, D; Zulpo, M; Michieletto, S; Cecchinato, A; Goldschmidt, M; Zappulli, V

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women worldwide. Cancer metastases are responsible for the high mortality rate. A small but distinct subset of cells, cancer stem cells (CSCs), have the capacity to self-renew, initiate tumour formation, and develop metastases. The CSC content in human breast cancer correlates with the Hippo tumour suppressor signalling pathway. Specifically, the activity of YAP/TAZ, transcription co-activators of the Hippo pathway, sustains the self-renewal and tumour-initiation capacities of CSCs. Little is known about YAP/TAZ in canine and feline mammary tumours, which are very common tumours. The preliminary aim of the study was to investigate the expression of YAP/TAZ in canine and feline mammary tumours by Western blot and immunohistochemistry. Increased cytoplasmic and nuclear expression of YAP/TAZ was observed in all carcinomas compared to normal tissues, indicating neoplastic deregulation of the Hippo pathway. Nuclear expression significantly increased in grade III (high grade carcinomas) compared to grade I (low grade carcinomas) tumours, suggesting that YAP/TAZ play a role in the increased aggressiveness of these tumours. Moreover, different scoring systems for immunohistochemical analyses were compared and the H index and the Allred scores were the most significant. In conclusion, YAP/TAZ are expressed in aggressive canine and feline mammary tumours as reported in some human cancers. Further studies might better elucidate the role of the Hippo pathway in prognosis and as a target for new therapies. In addition, tumours in dogs and cats may be a useful model to study this pathway.

  14. Reduction of Aggressive Behavior in the School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petermann, Ulrike

    1988-01-01

    Discusses what may be considered aggressive behavior, what motivates aggressive students, and possible teacher responses to aggressive behavior. Describes four points on which teachers can focus to diminish the attractiveness of aggression and ensure that it is not rewarded. Identifies learning activities which provide aggressive students with the…

  15. The Effects of Pornography on Aggressive Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stacy, Lauri L.

    This document reviews existing empirical research on the effect of pornography on aggressive behavior. Two types of pornography are distinguished: aggressive pornography and non-aggressive pornography. Conclusions drawn from the research review are presented, including: (1) aggressive pornograpy consistently increases aggressive attitudes and…

  16. Neuroimaging and Neurocognitive Correlates of Aggression and Violence in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Elisabeth M.

    2012-01-01

    Individuals diagnosed with major mental disorders such as schizophrenia are more likely to have engaged in violent behavior than mentally healthy members of the same communities. Although aggressive acts can have numerous causes, research about the underlying neurobiology of violence and aggression in schizophrenia can lead to a better understanding of the heterogeneous nature of that behavior and can assist in developing new treatment strategies. The purpose of this paper is to review the recent literature and discuss some of the neurobiological correlates of aggression and violence. The focus will be on schizophrenia, and the results of neuroimaging and neuropsychological studies that have directly investigated brain functioning and/or structure in aggressive and violent samples will be discussed as well as other domains that might predispose to aggression and violence such as deficits in responding to the emotional expressions of others, impulsivity, and psychopathological symptoms. Finally gender differences regarding aggression and violence are discussed. In this context several methodological and conceptional issues that limited the comparison of these studies will be addressed. PMID:24278673

  17. PET imaging of primary mediastinal tumours.

    PubMed Central

    Kubota, K.; Yamada, S.; Kondo, T.; Yamada, K.; Fukuda, H.; Fujiwara, T.; Ito, M.; Ido, T.

    1996-01-01

    Mediastinal masses include a wide variety of tumours and remain an interesting diagnostic challenge for radiologist. We performed positron emission tomography (PET) studies of primary mediastinal tumours in order to predict the malignancy of these tumours preoperatively. Twenty-two patients with primary mediastinal tumours were studied with PET using 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-glucose (FDG). The histological findings of surgical pathology or biopsy, or mediastinoscopy were compared with those of computerised tomography (CT) and PET. PET images were evaluated semiquantitatively using the differential uptake ratio (DUR). Increased FDG uptake was observed in nine of ten patients with malignant tumours, including thymic carcinomas, lymphomas, invasive thymomas and a case of sarcoidosis. A moderate level of FDG uptake was found in a myeloma, non-invasive thymomas, and a schwannoma, whereas a low uptake was observed in a teratoma and various benign cysts. The mean FDG uptake of malignant tumours was significantly higher than that of benign tumours. Both thymic cancer and invasive thymoma showed a high FDG uptake. CT examination resulted in three false-negative and two false-positive cases when used in predicting tumour invasion, while PET was associated with a false-positive and a false-negative case. In conclusion, the use of FDG with PET is clinically helpful in evaluating the malignant nature of primary mediastinal tumours. Our results also suggest that a high FDG uptake reflects the invasiveness of malignant nature of thymic tumours. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8611400

  18. Gene expression profiling of human ovarian tumours

    PubMed Central

    Biade, S; Marinucci, M; Schick, J; Roberts, D; Workman, G; Sage, E H; O'Dwyer, P J; LiVolsi, V A; Johnson, S W

    2006-01-01

    There is currently a lack of reliable diagnostic and prognostic markers for ovarian cancer. We established gene expression profiles for 120 human ovarian tumours to identify determinants of histologic subtype, grade and degree of malignancy. Unsupervised cluster analysis of the most variable set of expression data resulted in three major tumour groups. One consisted predominantly of benign tumours, one contained mostly malignant tumours, and one was comprised of a mixture of borderline and malignant tumours. Using two supervised approaches, we identified a set of genes that distinguished the benign, borderline and malignant phenotypes. These algorithms were unable to establish profiles for histologic subtype or grade. To validate these findings, the expression of 21 candidate genes selected from these analyses was measured by quantitative RT–PCR using an independent set of tumour samples. Hierarchical clustering of these data resulted in two major groups, one benign and one malignant, with the borderline tumours interspersed between the two groups. These results indicate that borderline ovarian tumours may be classified as either benign or malignant, and that this classifier could be useful for predicting the clinical course of borderline tumours. Immunohistochemical analysis also demonstrated increased expression of CD24 antigen in malignant versus benign tumour tissue. The data that we have generated will contribute to a growing body of expression data that more accurately define the biologic and clinical characteristics of ovarian cancers. PMID:16969345

  19. Gene expression profiling of human ovarian tumours.

    PubMed

    Biade, S; Marinucci, M; Schick, J; Roberts, D; Workman, G; Sage, E H; O'Dwyer, P J; Livolsi, V A; Johnson, S W

    2006-10-23

    There is currently a lack of reliable diagnostic and prognostic markers for ovarian cancer. We established gene expression profiles for 120 human ovarian tumours to identify determinants of histologic subtype, grade and degree of malignancy. Unsupervised cluster analysis of the most variable set of expression data resulted in three major tumour groups. One consisted predominantly of benign tumours, one contained mostly malignant tumours, and one was comprised of a mixture of borderline and malignant tumours. Using two supervised approaches, we identified a set of genes that distinguished the benign, borderline and malignant phenotypes. These algorithms were unable to establish profiles for histologic subtype or grade. To validate these findings, the expression of 21 candidate genes selected from these analyses was measured by quantitative RT-PCR using an independent set of tumour samples. Hierarchical clustering of these data resulted in two major groups, one benign and one malignant, with the borderline tumours interspersed between the two groups. These results indicate that borderline ovarian tumours may be classified as either benign or malignant, and that this classifier could be useful for predicting the clinical course of borderline tumours. Immunohistochemical analysis also demonstrated increased expression of CD24 antigen in malignant versus benign tumour tissue. The data that we have generated will contribute to a growing body of expression data that more accurately define the biologic and clinical characteristics of ovarian cancers.

  20. Reducing aggressive responses to social exclusion using transcranial direct current stimulation.

    PubMed

    Riva, Paolo; Romero Lauro, Leonor J; DeWall, C Nathan; Chester, David S; Bushman, Brad J

    2015-03-01

    A vast body of research showed that social exclusion can trigger aggression. However, the neural mechanisms involved in regulating aggressive responses to social exclusion are still largely unknown. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) modulates the excitability of a target region. Building on studies suggesting that activity in the right ventrolateral pre-frontal cortex (rVLPFC) might aid the regulation or inhibition of social exclusion-related distress, we hypothesized that non-invasive brain polarization through tDCS over the rVLPFC would reduce behavioral aggression following social exclusion. Participants were socially excluded or included while they received tDCS or sham stimulation to the rVLPFC. Next, they received an opportunity to aggress. Excluded participants demonstrated cognitive awareness of their inclusionary status, yet tDCS (but not sham stimulation) reduced their behavioral aggression. Excluded participants who received tDCS stimulation were no more aggressive than included participants. tDCS stimulation did not influence socially included participants' aggression. Our findings provide the first causal test for the role of rVLPFC in modulating aggressive responses to social exclusion. Our findings suggest that modulating activity in a brain area (i.e. the rVLPFC) implicated in self-control and emotion regulation can break the link between social exclusion and aggression.

  1. Pott's puffy tumour: still not an eradicated entity.

    PubMed

    Guillén, A; Brell, M; Cardona, E; Claramunt, E; Costa, J M

    2001-05-01

    Pott's puffy tumour is an infrequent entity characterised by one or more subperiosteal abscesses associated with frontal bone osteomyelitis. Although cases in patients of all ages have been reported, teenagers are the most frequently affected. Early diagnosis and aggressive treatment are essential because of the high risk of severe neurological complications, such as epidural abscess, subdural empyema, and secondary septic thrombosis of the dural sinuses. This paper describes the case of a patient with a subperiosteal abscess resulting from sinusitis, with orbital and intracranial extension, and subsequent neurological complications. Despite modern methods of diagnosis and treatment, 13 new cases have been published in the last 5 years; in at least 3 (23%) of these cases there were serious neurological complications. Upper respiratory infections and sinusitis are leading causes of visits to the emergency department in the paediatric age group; however, no risk factors for poor outcome have so far been identified in any of these patients.

  2. Lunar Influences on Human Aggression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Gordon W.; Dua, Manjula

    1983-01-01

    Used league records of all Canadian hockey games (N=426) played during a season to test a lunar-aggression hypothesis. Despite the use of multiple measures of lunar phase and interpersonal aggression, support for lunar influence was not forthcoming. Supplemental data revealed that beliefs in lunar influence are fairly common. (JAC)

  3. [The probability of developing brain tumours among users of cellular telephones (scientific information to the decision of the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) announced on May 31, 2011)].

    PubMed

    Grigor'ev, Iu G

    2011-01-01

    The WHO's International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) has made May 31 2011 PRESS RELEASE No 208 which classifies radiofrequency electromagnetic fields as possibly carcinogenic to humans (Group 2B). The decision is based on an increased risk of glioma, i.e., a malignant type of brain cancer associated with the wireless phone use. This paper reports the analysis of the long-term research on the issue in question that had been carried out in many countries around the world before the decision was made.

  4. The Neurobiology of Impulsive Aggression.

    PubMed

    Blair, Robert J R

    2016-02-01

    This selective review provides a model of the neurobiology of impulsive aggression from a cognitive neuroscience perspective. It is argued that prototypical cases of impulsive aggression, those associated with anger, involve the recruitment of the acute threat response system structures; that is, the amygdala, hypothalamus, and periaqueductal gray. It is argued that whether the recruitment of these structures results in impulsive aggression or not reflects the functional roles of ventromedial frontal cortex and dorsomedial frontal and anterior insula cortex in response selection. It is also argued that impulsive aggression may occur because of impaired decision making. The aggression may not be accompanied by anger, but it will reflect disrupted evaluation of the rewards/benefits of the action.

  5. The Neurobiology of Impulsive Aggression

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This selective review provides a model of the neurobiology of impulsive aggression from a cognitive neuroscience perspective. It is argued that prototypical cases of impulsive aggression, those associated with anger, involve the recruitment of the acute threat response system structures; that is, the amygdala, hypothalamus, and periaqueductal gray. It is argued that whether the recruitment of these structures results in impulsive aggression or not reflects the functional roles of ventromedial frontal cortex and dorsomedial frontal and anterior insula cortex in response selection. It is also argued that impulsive aggression may occur because of impaired decision making. The aggression may not be accompanied by anger, but it will reflect disrupted evaluation of the rewards/benefits of the action. PMID:26465707

  6. False memories for aggressive acts.

    PubMed

    Laney, Cara; Takarangi, Melanie K T

    2013-06-01

    Can people develop false memories for committing aggressive acts? How does this process compare to developing false memories for victimhood? In the current research we used a simple false feedback procedure to implant false memories for committing aggressive acts (causing a black eye or spreading malicious gossip) or for victimhood (receiving a black eye). We then compared these false memories to other subjects' true memories for equivalent events. False aggressive memories were all too easy to implant, particularly in the minds of individuals with a proclivity towards aggression. Once implanted, the false memories were indistinguishable from true memories for the same events, on several dimensions, including emotional content. Implications for aggression-related memory more generally as well as false confessions are discussed.

  7. Psychopathy & Aggression: When Paralimbic Dysfunction Leads to Violence

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Nathaniel E.; Kiehl, Kent A.

    2015-01-01

    Psychopaths can be alarmingly violent, both in the frequency with which they engage in violence and the gratuitous extent of their violent acts. Indeed, one principal utility of the clinical construct of psychopathy is in predicting future violent behavior in criminal offenders. Aggression is a complex construct that intersects psychopathy at many levels. This chapter provides a review of psychopathy as a clinical construct including the most prominent cognitive and neurobiological models which serve to account for its pathophysiology. We then describe how the brain abnormalities implicated in psychopathy may lead to diverse behavioral outcomes, which can include aggression in its many forms. PMID:24306955

  8. Treatment of human aggression with major tranquilizers, antidepressants, and newer psychotropic drugs.

    PubMed

    Itil, T M; Wadud, A

    1975-02-01

    Most of the drugs used in the treatment of aggressive syndromes have originally been developed for other clinical applications. Despite significant differences in the pathogenesis of various aggressive disorders, the frequently used "antiaggression" drugs are the major tranquilizers (neuroleptics). If the aggresstion is associated with psychosis, chlorpromazine or haloperidol are the drugs of choice. Aggressive disorders within the acute and chronic brain syndromes are best treated with pericyazine, thioridazine, and thiothixene. In aggressive symptoms of mentally retarded patients, particularly with epileptic syndromes, a new benzazepine (SCH12,679)was found to be very effective. Aggression associated with alcoholism or narcotic addiction showed best response to chlorpormazine and haloperidol. As a general rule, in aggressive patients with clinically known epilepsy, or with abnormal electroencephalographic findings, the major tranquilizers with potent sedative properties should be given with great caution.

  9. Neural and Behavioral Correlates of Alcohol-Induced Aggression Under Provocation.

    PubMed

    Gan, Gabriela; Sterzer, Philipp; Marxen, Michael; Zimmermann, Ulrich S; Smolka, Michael N

    2015-12-01

    Although alcohol consumption is linked to increased aggression, its neural correlates have not directly been studied in humans so far. Based on a comprehensive neurobiological model of alcohol-induced aggression, we hypothesized that alcohol-induced aggression would go along with increased amygdala and ventral striatum reactivity and impaired functioning of the prefrontal cortex (PFC) under alcohol. We measured neural and behavioral correlates of alcohol-induced aggression in a provoking vs non-provoking condition with a variant of the Taylor aggression paradigm (TAP) allowing to differentiate between reactive (provoked) and proactive (unprovoked) aggression. In a placebo-controlled cross-over design with moderate alcohol intoxication (~0.6 g/kg), 35 young healthy adults performed the TAP during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Analyses revealed that provoking vs non-provoking conditions and alcohol vs placebo increased aggression and decreased brain responses in the anterior cingulate cortex/dorso-medial PFC (provokingaggression (alcohol × provocation interaction). However, investigation of inter-individual differences revealed (1) that pronounced alcohol-induced proactive aggression was linked to higher levels of aggression under placebo, and (2) that pronounced alcohol-induced reactive aggression was related to increased amygdala and ventral striatum reactivity under alcohol, providing evidence for their role in human alcohol-induced reactive aggression. Our findings suggest that in healthy young adults a liability for alcohol-induced aggression in a non-provoking context might depend on overall high levels of aggression, but on alcohol-induced increased striatal and amygdala reactivity when triggered by provocation.

  10. Beliefs about aggression moderate alcohol's effects on aggression.

    PubMed

    Levinson, Cheri A; Giancola, Peter R; Parrott, Dominic J

    2011-02-01

    The goal of this investigation was to determine whether permissive beliefs about aggression moderate the relation between acute alcohol intoxication and aggression in two large experiments. Participants in Study 1 were 328 (163 men and 165 women) social drinkers and those in Study 2 were 518 (252 men and 266 women) social drinkers. Beliefs about aggression were assessed using a well-validated self-report measure. Following the consumption of either an alcohol or a placebo beverage, participants were tested on a laboratory task in which electric shocks were received from, and administered to, a fictitious opponent under the guise of a competitive reaction-time task. Aggression was operationalized as the combined mean responses for shock intensity and duration across all trials. Our central finding was that alcohol increased aggression in persons with more approving beliefs about aggression than in those who did not hold such beliefs. Our results are discussed within the context of Huesmann's (1988) cognitive script model of aggression. Suggestions for violence prevention efforts are put forth as well.

  11. Aggressive Erotica and Violence against Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donnerstein, Edward

    1980-01-01

    Examines the effects of aggressive-erotic stimuli on male aggression toward females. Male subjects' deliveries of electric shocks to males or females after viewing either a neutral, erotic, or aggressive-erotic film were measured. (Author/SS)

  12. Mobile phones and head tumours. The discrepancies in cause-effect relationships in the epidemiological studies - how do they arise?

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Whether or not there is a relationship between use of mobile phones (analogue and digital cellulars, and cordless) and head tumour risk (brain tumours, acoustic neuromas, and salivary gland tumours) is still a matter of debate; progress requires a critical analysis of the methodological elements necessary for an impartial evaluation of contradictory studies. Methods A close examination of the protocols and results from all case-control and cohort studies, pooled- and meta-analyses on head tumour risk for mobile phone users was carried out, and for each study the elements necessary for evaluating its reliability were identified. In addition, new meta-analyses of the literature data were undertaken. These were limited to subjects with mobile phone latency time compatible with the progression of the examined tumours, and with analysis of the laterality of head tumour localisation corresponding to the habitual laterality of mobile phone use. Results Blind protocols, free from errors, bias, and financial conditioning factors, give positive results that reveal a cause-effect relationship between long-term mobile phone use or latency and statistically significant increase of ipsilateral head tumour risk, with biological plausibility. Non-blind protocols, which instead are affected by errors, bias, and financial conditioning factors, give negative results with systematic underestimate of such risk. However, also in these studies a statistically significant increase in risk of ipsilateral head tumours is quite common after more than 10 years of mobile phone use or latency. The meta-analyses, our included, examining only data on ipsilateral tumours in subjects using mobile phones since or for at least 10 years, show large and statistically significant increases in risk of ipsilateral brain gliomas and acoustic neuromas. Conclusions Our analysis of the literature studies and of the results from meta-analyses of the significant data alone shows an almost doubling of

  13. Expression of doublecortin in tumours of the central and peripheral nervous system and in human non-neuronal tissues.

    PubMed

    Bernreuther, Christian; Salein, Nora; Matschke, Jakob; Hagel, Christian

    2006-03-01

    Doublecortin is a microtubule-associated phosphoprotein involved in neuronal migration and differentiation expressed in migrating neuroblasts in the central nervous system. We systematically analysed doublecortin expression in 179 tumours of the central and 65 tumours of peripheral nervous system as well as in 74 different non-neuronal tissues to evaluate the specificity of doublecortin as a marker for neuronal differentiation in glioneuronal tumours. Glioneuronal tumours and oligodendrogliomas grade II and III uniformly showed a high intensity and frequency of doublecortin staining, whereas intermediate doublecortin expression was observed in astrocytic tumours of grade II-IV. In pilocytic astrocytomas and ependymomas only scattered doublecortin positive cells were detected. In the peripheral nervous system, doublecortin expression was found in neurofibroma but was absent in schwannoma. Double staining of tumour tissue revealed co-expression of doublecortin and neurofilament in cells of gangliocytomas and gangliogliomas and co-expression of doublecortin with S100 protein or GFAP in glial tumours, respectively. In a tissue array comprised of 74 different normal non-neuronal human tissues, doublecortin expression was demonstrated in epithelia of the kidney, liver, salivary glands and duodenum among others. Interestingly, doublecortin expression could not be shown in brain metastases of tumours originating from these tissues. Immunohistochemical data was further corroborated by Western blot analysis and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. In conclusion, doublecortin can be regarded as specific neuronal marker only in normal developing brain, but lacks specificity in glioneuronal and glial tumours and other non-neuronal human tissues where it is expressed in a wide variety of tumours and tissues.

  14. Prognostic significance of tumour stroma ratio in inflammatory breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Downey, Candice L; Thygesen, Helene H; Sharma, Nisha; Shaaban, Abeer M

    2015-01-01

    Tumour stroma ratio (TSR) is emerging as an important prognostic indicator in cancer. We have previously shown TSR to be prognostic in oestrogen receptor positive breast cancer. Its role in inflammatory breast cancer, a rare but aggressive form of breast cancer, has not been identified. Here we aimed to determine the prognostic significance of TSR in a cohort of patients with inflammatory breast carcinoma. TSR was measured by point counting virtual H&E stained tissue sections in 45 inflammatory breast cancer cases. The whole tumour area was sampled. Optimum cut-offs to distinguish high and low TSR was determined by log-rank test. The relationship of TSR to overall survival and disease-free survival (DFS) was analysed alongside multivariate analysis. The optimal cut-offs between high and low TSR were determined to be 31% for OS and 46% for DFS. There was no significant difference in OS (p = 0.53) nor DFS (p = 0.66) between high and low TSR groups. Multivariate analysis did not demonstrate any new trends, within the limits of a small data sample. A significant correlation was found between pathological response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy and survival (p = 0.008). There is no evidence that TSR has prognostic significance in inflammatory breast cancer. When compared with published data in non-inflammatory breast carcinoma, this supports the view that differences in stromal biology exist between tumour types and highlights the importance of considering this when interpreting the prognostic value of TSR. However, these findings must be interpreted in the light of the small sample size.

  15. Surgical treatment of benign endobronchial tumours

    PubMed Central

    Halttunen, P; Meurala, H; Standertskjöld-Nordenstam, C-G

    1982-01-01

    Four cases of benign endobronchial tumour are reported which were successfully treated by bronchial resection. In two cases (of fibroma and leiomyoma respectively) a cylinder of bronchus alone was resected; in one case (lipoma) a healthy right upper lobe was preserved by a bronchoplastic procedure and in the other (chondroma) the tumour was removed with the right lower lobe, which was irreversibly damaged. It is important to recognise that such tumours are unsuitable for treatment by endoscopic means alone. Images PMID:7157223

  16. Steroid hormones alter neuroanatomy and aggression independently in the tree lizard

    PubMed Central

    Kabelik, David; Weiss, Stacey L.; Moore, Michael C.

    2008-01-01

    KABELIK, D., Weiss S. L. AND MOORE M. C. Steroid hormones alter neuroanatomy and aggression independently in the tree lizard. PHYSIOL BEHAV 00(0) 000-000, 0000. –Steroid hormones affect changes in both neuroanatomy and aggressive behavior in animals of various taxa. However, whether changes in neuroanatomy directly underlie changes in aggression is unknown. We investigate this relationship among steroid hormones, neuroanatomy, and aggression in a free-living vertebrate with a relatively simple nervous system, the tree lizard (Urosaurus ornatus). Weiss and Moore [1] manipulated testosterone and progesterone levels in adult male tree lizards and found that both hormones facilitated aggressive behavior toward a conspecific. In this study, we examined the brains of a subset of these animals to determine whether changes in limbic morphology were associated with hormone-induced changes in aggressive behavior. Specifically, we tested the hypothesis that testosterone and/or progesterone cause changes in neural morphology that are necessary for the expression of testosterone’s effects on aggressive behavior. We found that both hormones increased aggression; however, only testosterone induced changes in neuroanatomy. Testosterone increased the size of both the amygdala and nucleus sphericus. However, we could detect no individual correlations between neuroanatomy and aggression levels suggesting that the observed large-scale changes in neuroanatomy are not precisely reflective of changes in mechanisms underlying aggression. PMID:17996258

  17. [The effect of media violence on aggression: is aggressive behavior mediated by aggressive cognitions and emotions?].

    PubMed

    Yukawa, S; Yoshida, F

    1999-06-01

    This study investigated whether cognitions and emotions elicited by media violence mediate aggressive behavior. Eighty undergraduates, 40 men and 40 women, participated in the experiment. First, subjects were exposed to one of four violent videos which varied in levels of violence and entertainment. Subjects' heart rate and eyeblink rate were continuously recorded while they watched the video. After watching it, subjects described their thoughts which occurred while watching it and rated their affective reactions to it. Finally, their aggressive behavior was measured. Results showed that (1) videos high in violence elicited more aggressive thoughts, more thoughts of negative affect, stronger negative affects, and stronger empty-powerless affects, whereas videos high in entertainment elicited stronger positive affects; (2) no significant differences were found among the videos in terms of physiological reactions and aggressive behavior; and (3) cognitions and emotions elicited by media violence did not mediate aggressive behavior.

  18. Tumour promotion versus tumour suppression in chronic hepatic iron overload.

    PubMed

    Bloomer, Steven A; Brown, Kyle E

    2015-06-01

    Although iron-catalysed oxidative damage is presumed to be a major mechanism of injury leading to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma in hemochromatosis, these events have been difficult to recapitulate in an animal model. In this study, we evaluated regulators of hepatocarcinogenesis in a rodent model of chronic iron overload. Sprague-Dawley rats were iron loaded with iron dextran over 6 months. Livers were harvested and analysed for markers of oxidative stress, as well as the following proteins: p53, murine double minute 2, the Shc proteins p66, p52, p46; β-catenin, CHOP, C/EBPα and Yes-associated protein. In this model, iron loading is associated with hepatocyte proliferation, and indices of oxidative damage are mildly increased in tandem with augmented antioxidant defenses. Alterations potentially favouring carcinogenesis included a modest but significant decrease in p53 levels and increases in p52, p46 and β-catenin levels compared with control livers. Countering these factors, the iron-loaded livers demonstrated a significant decrease in CHOP, which has recently been implicated in the development of hepatocellular carcinoma, as well as a reciprocal increase in C/EBPα and decrease in Yes-associated protein. Our results suggest that chronic iron overload elicits both tumour suppressive as well as tumour-promoting mechanisms in rodent liver.

  19. Endovascular treatment of primary hepatic tumours

    PubMed Central

    Popiel, M; Gulie, L; Turculeţ, C; Beuran, M

    2008-01-01

    First transcatheter embolization of hepatic artery has been materializing in 1974, in France, for unresectable hepatic tumours. Then, this treatment has become use enough in many countries, especially in Japan, where primary hepatic tumours are very frequent. In this article, we present procedures of interventional endovascular treatment for primary hepatic tumours: chemoembolization, intra–arterial chemotherapy. The study comprises patients with primary hepatic tumours investigated by hepatic–ultrasound and contrast–enhanced CT or MRI. DSA–hepatic angiography is very important to verify the accessory hepatic supply. It has been performed selective catheterization of right/left hepatic branches followed by cytostatics injection. Most of the patients have benefit by hepatic chemoembolization (cytostatics, Lipiodol and embolic materials). The selective intra–arterial chemotherapy (cytostatics without Lipiodol) was performing in cases with contraindications for Lipiodol or embolic materials injection (cirrhosis–Child C, thrombosis of portal vein, hepatic insufficiency). For treatment of primary hepatic tumours we use 5–F–Uracil, Farmarubicin and Mytomicin C. Less numbers of the reservoirs were placed because financial causes. Chemoembolization was better than procedures without Lipiodol or embolic materials. Lipiodol reached in tumoural tissue and the distribution of Lipiodol harmonises with degree of vascularisation. After the chemoembolization procedure, the diameter of tumours decreased gradually depending on the size of tumour. Effective alternative for unresectable primary hepatic tumours (big size, hepatic dysfunction, and other surgical risk factors) is endovascular interventional treatment. PMID:20108517

  20. Tumours of the upper alimentary tract

    PubMed Central

    Head, K. W.

    1976-01-01

    Tumours of the oropharynx of domestic animals are common in most parts of the world, but squamous cell carcinoma of the upper alimentary tract shows differences in prevalence in different geographical areas and occurs at different sites in the various species. Oral tumours of the melanogenic system are more common in dogs than in man. The following main histological categories, which broadly correspond to those used in the classification of tumours of man, are described: papilloma; squamous cell carcinoma; salivary gland tumours; malignant melanoma; tumours of soft (mesenchymal) tissues; tumours of the facial bones; tumours of haematopoietic and related tissues; and odontogenic tumours and jaw cysts. Papilloma, squamous cell carcinoma, malignant melanoma, fibroma, and fibrosarcoma account for about 80% of the tumours that occur in the upper alimentary tract of domestic animals. ImagesFig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 8Fig. 9Fig. 34Fig. 35Fig. 36Fig. 37Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 22Fig. 23Fig. 24Fig. 25Fig. 26Fig. 27Fig. 28Fig. 29Fig. 14Fig. 15Fig. 16Fig. 17Fig. 30Fig. 31Fig. 32Fig. 33Fig. 18Fig. 19Fig. 20Fig. 21Fig. 10Fig. 11Fig. 12Fig. 13Fig. 1 PMID:1086147

  1. Histogenesis of ovarian malignant mixed mesodermal tumours.

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, T J

    1990-01-01

    The histogenesis of ovarian malignant mixed mesodermal tumours, which includes the concept of metaplastic carcinoma, is controversial. Four such tumours were examined for evidence of metaplastic transition from carcinoma to sarcoma using morphology and reticulin stains. Consecutive sections were stained immunohistochemically using cytokeratin and vimentin to determine whether cells at the interface between carcinoma and sarcoma expressed both cytokeratin and vimentin. There was no evidence of morphological, architectural, or immunohistochemical transitions from carcinoma to sarcoma in the four tumours studied. This suggests that ovarian malignant mixed mesodermal tumours are not metaplastic carcinomas but are composed of histogenetically different elements. Images PMID:2160478

  2. Aggression Can be Contagious: Longitudinal Associations between Proactive Aggression and Reactive Aggression Among Young Twins

    PubMed Central

    Dickson, Daniel J.; Richmond, Ashley; Brendgen, Mara; Vitaro, Frank; Laursen, Brett; Dionne, Ginette; Boivin, Michel

    2015-01-01

    The present study examined sibling influence over reactive and proactive aggression in a sample of 452 same-sex twins (113 male dyads, 113 female dyads). Between and within siblings influence processes were examined as a function of relative levels of parental coercion and hostility to test the hypothesis that aggression contagion between twins occurs only among dyads who experience parental coerciveness. Teacher reports of reactive and proactive aggression were collected for each twin in kindergarten (M = 6.04 years; SD = 0.27) and in first grade (M = 7.08 years; SD = 0.27). Families were divided into relatively low, average, and relatively high parental coercion-hostility groups on the basis of maternal reports collected when the children were 5 years old. In families with relatively high levels of parental coercion-hostility, there was evidence of between-sibling influence, such that one twin’s reactive aggression at age 6 predicted increases in the other twin’s reactive aggression from ages 6 to 7, and one twin’s proactive aggression at age 6 predicted increases in the other twin’s proactive aggression from ages 6 to 7. There was also evidence of within-sibling influence such that a child’s level of reactive aggression at age 6 predicted increases in the same child’s proactive aggression at age 7, regardless of parental coercion-hostility. The findings provide new information about the etiology of reactive and proactive aggression and individual differences in their developmental interplay. PMID:25683448

  3. Short-day aggression is independent of changes in cortisol or glucocorticoid receptors in male Siberian hamsters (Phodopus sungorus).

    PubMed

    Scotti, Melissa-Ann L; Rendon, Nikki M; Greives, Timothy J; Romeo, Russell D; Demas, Gregory E

    2015-06-01

    Testosterone mediates aggression in many vertebrates. In some species, aggression remains high during the non-breeding season (e.g., winter), when testosterone levels are low. In Siberian hamsters (Phodopus sungorus), we have demonstrated photoperiodic changes in aggression with hamsters housed in short, "winter-like" days displaying significantly more territorial aggression than long-day animals, despite low levels of testosterone. The mechanisms by which photoperiod regulates aggression, however, remain largely unknown. Adrenocortical hormones (e.g., glucocorticoids) have been implicated in mediating seasonal aggression; circulating concentrations of these hormones have been correlated with aggression in some species. The goal of this study was to examine the role of cortisol and glucocorticoid receptors in mediating photoperiodic changes in aggression in male Siberian hamsters. Males were housed in long or short days and treated with either exogenous cortisol or vehicle. Circulating levels of cortisol, adrenal cortisol content, and aggression were quantified. Lastly, photoperiodic effects on glucocorticoid receptor (GR) protein levels were quantified in limbic brain regions associated with aggression, including medial prefrontal cortex, amygdala, and hippocampus. Short-day hamsters were more aggressive than long-day hamsters, however cortisol treatment did not affect aggression. Photoperiod had no effect on serum or adrenal cortisol or GR levels in the brain regions examined. Taken together, these data suggest that increases in cortisol levels do not cause increases associated with short-day aggression, and further that GR protein levels are not associated with photoperiodic changes in aggression. The results of this study contribute to our understanding of the role of adrenocortical steroids in mediating seasonal aggression.

  4. An Aggressive Retroperitoneal Fibromatosis

    PubMed Central

    Campara, Zoran; Spasic, Aleksandar; Aleksic, Predrag; Milev, Bosko

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Aggressive fibromatosis (AF) is a heterogeneous group of mesenchymal tumors that have locally infiltrative growth and a tendency to relapse. The clinical picture is often conditioned by the obstruction of the ureter or small intestine. Diagnosis is based on clinical, radiological and histological parameters. A case report: We report a case of male patient, aged 35 years, with the retroperitoneal fibromatosis. He reported to the physician because of frequent urination with the feeling of pressure and pain. Computed tomography revealed the tumor mass on the front wall of the bladder with diameter of 70mm with signs of infiltration of the musculature of the anterior abdominal wall. Endoscopic transurethral biopsy showed proliferative lesion binders by type of fibromatosis. The tumor was surgically removed in a classical way. The patient feels well and has no recurrence thirty-six months after the operative procedure. Conclusion: The complete tumor resection is the therapeutic choice for the primary tumor as well as for a relapse. PMID:27147794

  5. From aggressiveness to creativity.

    PubMed

    Mrevlje, Gorazd V

    2004-02-01

    Psychology has a long tradition of considering human creativity as a distinct human characteristic and a special kind of human activity. After explaining the key motives for such an attitude, the author discusses those forms of healthy aggressiveness that stand out as necessary and constitutive elements of the creative process. Taking the well-known statement of C. G. Jung's 'The person who does not build (create), will demolish and destroy' as a starting point, the author compares the basic premises for understanding the process of human creativity, at the same time drawing on Freud's psychology of the individual and Jung's principle of the collective unconscious as well as his notion of 'complexes'. In doing so, the author somewhat boldly paraphrases Jung's dictum: 'In order to be creative, rather than just constructive, one must occasionally also destroy'. With reference to Wallas, Taylor and Neumann (Wallas 1926; Taylor 1959;;Neumann 2001), the author goes on to explore those concepts which help us to investigate the phenomenon of human creativity, drawing distinctions between emergent, expressive, productive, inventive and innovative creativity. The second part of the article discusses the importance of intelligence, originality, nonconformity, subversiveness and free-mindedness for the creative process of human beings. The author concludes with a further explanation of Erich Neumann's argument that human creativity cannot be understood solely as a result of sociogenetic factors, and argues that it is only by taking into consideration Jung's perception of creativity that a global ontological understanding of these processes can be achieved.

  6. More aggressive cartoons are funnier.

    PubMed

    McCauley, C; Woods, K; Coolidge, C; Kulick, W

    1983-04-01

    Independent rankings of humor and aggressiveness were obtained for sets of cartoons drawn randomly from two different magazines. The correlation of median humor and median aggressiveness rankings ranged from .49 to .90 in six studies involving six different sets of cartoons and six different groups of subjects, including children and adults, high and low socioeconomic status (SES) individuals, and native- and foreign-born individuals. This correlation is consistent with Freudian, arousal, and superiority theories of humor. Another prediction of Freudian theory, that high-SES subjects should be more appreciative of aggressive humor than low-SES subjects, was not supported.

  7. Predicting workplace aggression and violence.

    PubMed

    Barling, Julian; Dupré, Kathryne E; Kelloway, E Kevin

    2009-01-01

    Consistent with the relative recency of research on workplace aggression and the considerable media attention given to high-profile incidents, numerous myths about the nature of workplace aggression have emerged. In this review, we examine these myths from an evidence-based perspective, bringing greater clarity to our understanding of the predictors of workplace aggression. We conclude by pointing to the need for more research focusing on construct validity and prevention issues as well as for methodologies that minimize the likelihood of mono-method bias and that strengthen the ability to make causal inferences.

  8. [Mobile phones and head tumours: it is time to read and highlight data in a proper way].

    PubMed

    Levis, Angelo G; Minicucci, Nadia; Ricci, Paolo; Gennaro, Valerio; Garbisa, Spiridione

    2011-01-01

    The uncertainty about the relationship between the use of mobile phones (MPs: analogue and digital cellulars, and cordless) and the increase of head tumour risk can be solved by a critical analysis of the methodological elements of both the positive and the negative studies. Results by Hardell indicate a cause/effect relationship: exposures for or latencies from ≥ 10 years to MPs increase by up to 100% the risk of tumour on the same side of the head preferred for phone use (ipsilateral tumours) - which is the only one significantly irradiated - with statistical significance for brain gliomas, meningiomas and acoustic neuromas. On the contrary, studies published under the Interphone project and others produced negative results and are characterised by the substantial underestimation of the risk of tumour. However, also in the Interphone studies a clear and statistically significant increase of ipsilateral head tumours (gliomas, neuromas and parotid gland tumours) is quite common in people having used MPs since or for ≥ 10 years. And also the metaanalyses by Hardell and other Authors, including only the literature data on ipsilateral tumours in people having used MPs since or for ≥ 10 years - and so also part of the Interphone data - still show statistically significant increases of head tumours.

  9. Combined texture feature analysis of segmentation and classification of benign and malignant tumour CT slices.

    PubMed

    Padma, A; Sukanesh, R

    2013-01-01

    A computer software system is designed for the segmentation and classification of benign from malignant tumour slices in brain computed tomography (CT) images. This paper presents a method to find and select both the dominant run length and co-occurrence texture features of region of interest (ROI) of the tumour region of each slice to be segmented by Fuzzy c means clustering (FCM) and evaluate the performance of support vector machine (SVM)-based classifiers in classifying benign and malignant tumour slices. Two hundred and six tumour confirmed CT slices are considered in this study. A total of 17 texture features are extracted by a feature extraction procedure, and six features are selected using Principal Component Analysis (PCA). This study constructed the SVM-based classifier with the selected features and by comparing the segmentation results with the experienced radiologist labelled ground truth (target). Quantitative analysis between ground truth and segmented tumour is presented in terms of segmentation accuracy, segmentation error and overlap similarity measures such as the Jaccard index. The classification performance of the SVM-based classifier with the same selected features is also evaluated using a 10-fold cross-validation method. The proposed system provides some newly found texture features have an important contribution in classifying benign and malignant tumour slices efficiently and accurately with less computational time. The experimental results showed that the proposed system is able to achieve the highest segmentation and classification accuracy effectiveness as measured by jaccard index and sensitivity and specificity.

  10. [Pathophysiology of aggressive behavior: evaluation and management of pathological aggression].

    PubMed

    Pompili, E; Carlone, C; Silvestrini, C; Nicolò, G

    2016-01-01

    This work aims to define the aggression in all its forms, with notes on management and rapid tranquilization. The pathological aggression is described as a non-homogeneous phenomenon, it is variable in according to social, psychological and biological agents. The distinction of violence between affective aggression and predatory aggression can be functional to the prediction of outcome of any treatment. In general, a pattern of predatory violence tend to match with patients unresponsive and not compliant to treatment, a low probability to predict future violence and, therefore, a difficulty in managing risk. The affective aggressor, however, shows increased probability of treatment response, with more predictability of violent actions in reaction to situations perceived as threatening and, therefore, greater management of future violence risk. Those who act affective violence tend to show a wide range of emotional and cognitive problems, while those who act with predatory patterns show greater inclination to aggression and antisocial behavior. Aggression that occurs in psychiatry mostly appears to be affective, therefore susceptible to modulation through treatments.

  11. Clinico-pathological characteristics of different types of immunodeficiency-associated smooth muscle tumours.

    PubMed

    Hussein, Kais; Rath, Berenice; Ludewig, Britta; Kreipe, Hans; Jonigk, Danny

    2014-09-01

    Rare Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)+ smooth muscle tumours (SMT) manifest typically under immunosuppression. Three major subtypes are known: human immunodeficiency virus-associated (HIV-SMT), after transplantation (PTSMT) or associated with congenital immunodeficiency syndromes (CI-SMT). So far, there are no analyses which compare the clinico-pathological characteristics of all three subtypes. Case reports and case series on these three tumour types were collected (1990-2012). Meta-data analysis was performed for identification of similarities and differences. A total of 73 HIV-SMT, 66 PTSMT and 9 CI-SMT were evaluated. There was a slight female predominance (55-67%). Children were affected nearly equally in HIV-SMT (33%) and PTSMT (35%), while all CI-SMT occurred in children. HIV-SMT manifested preferentially in the central nervous system, gut/liver, skin, lungs/larynx/pharynx and adrenal glands. PTSMT were predominantly found in the liver, lungs/larynx/pharynx, gut/spleen and brain. CI-SMT were often found in lungs/larynx, brain, liver, adrenal glands and spleen. Antecedent EBV+ lymphoproliferations manifested more often in PTSMT. In all three tumour subtypes, survival analyses did not show any significant differences regarding surgical therapeutic approaches, the occurrence of multiple tumours, tumour size or sarcoma-like histological features. HIV-SMT had the poorest overall survival, which might be attributed to HIV-associated infectious complications.

  12. Activation of tumour cell ECM degradation by thrombin-activated platelet membranes: potentially a P-selectin and GPIIb/IIIa-dependent process.

    PubMed

    Pang, J H; Coupland, L A; Freeman, C; Chong, B H; Parish, Christopher R

    2015-06-01

    The promotion of tumour metastasis by platelets may occur through several mechanisms including the induction of a more metastatic phenotype in tumour cells and assisted extravasation of circulating tumour cells. Whilst the mechanisms underlying platelet-assisted extravasation have been extensively studied, much less attention has been paid to the mechanisms underlying platelet promotion of an aggressive phenotype within a tumour cell population. Herein, we demonstrate in vitro that MDA-MB-231 breast carcinoma cells incubated with washed thrombin-activated platelet membranes adopt a Matrigel-degrading phenotype in a dose- and contact time-dependent manner. The same phenotypic change was observed with three other human tumour cell lines of diverse anatomical origin. Moreover, tumour cell lines that had been cultured with washed thrombin-activated platelet membranes had a greater metastatic capacity when injected into mice. This in vivo effect was reliant upon a co-incubation period of >2 h implying a mechanism involving more than platelet membrane binding that occurred within 5 min. Upon further investigation it was found that simultaneous blocking of the platelet-membrane proteins P-selectin and GPIIb/IIIa prevented interactions between platelet membranes and MDA-MB-231 cells but also significantly reduced the ability of tumour cells to degrade Matrigel. These results confirm that platelets induce a more aggressive phenotype in tumour cells but also identify the platelet proteins involved in this effect. P-selectin and GPIIb/IIIa also play a role in assisting tumour cell extravasation and, thus, are ideal targets for the therapeutic intervention of both stages of platelet-assisted metastasis.

  13. Transillumination imaging of intraocular tumours.

    PubMed

    Kjersem, Bård; Krohn, Jørgen

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss a recently described modification of a standard photo slit lamp system for ocular transillumination, with special emphasis on the light transmission through the eye wall and the photographic technique. Transillumination photography was carried out with the Haag-Streit Photo-Slit Lamp BX 900 (Haag-Streit AG, Koeniz, Switzerland). After having released the background lighting optic fibre cable from its holder, the patient was positioned at the slit lamp, and the fibre tip was gently pressed against the sclera or the cornea of the patient's eye. During about 1/1000 of a second, the eye was illuminated by the flash and the scleral shadow of the tumour was exposed to the camera sensor. The images were of good diagnostic quality, making it easy to outline the tumours and to evaluate the involvement of intraocular structures. None of the examined patients experienced discomfort or negative side effects. The method is recommended in cases where photographic transillumination documentation of intraocular pathologies is considered important.

  14. Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumours: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Somerhausen, Nicolas De Saint Aubain

    1998-01-01

    Purpose. To study the evolution of concepts concerning gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) over 30 years. Discussion. GISTs have been, for more than 30 years, the subject of considerable controversy regarding their line of differentiation as well as the prediction of their behaviour. Furthermore, once they spread within the peritoneal cavity, they are extremely hard to control. The recent findings of c-Kit mutations and the immunohistochemical detection of the product of this gene, KIT or CD117, in the mainly non-myogenic subset of this family of tumours, has led to a reappraisal of this group of lesions, which, with some exceptions, is now thought to be derived from the interstitial cells of Cajal, and this has facilitated a clearer definition of their pathological spectrum. In this article, we review chronologically the evolution of the concept of GIST with the gradual application of electron microscopy, immunohistochemistry, DNA ploidy analysis. We discuss the impact of these techniques on the pathological assessment and clinical management of GISTs. PMID:18521245

  15. Honey bee aggression supports a link between gene regulation and behavioral evolution

    PubMed Central

    Alaux, Cédric; Sinha, Saurabh; Hasadsri, Linda; Hunt, Greg J.; Guzmán-Novoa, Ernesto; DeGrandi-Hoffman, Gloria; Uribe-Rubio, José Luis; Southey, Bruce R.; Rodriguez-Zas, Sandra; Robinson, Gene E.

    2009-01-01

    A prominent theory states that animal phenotypes arise by evolutionary changes in gene regulation, but the extent to which this theory holds true for behavioral evolution is not known. Because “nature and nurture” are now understood to involve hereditary and environmental influences on gene expression, we studied whether environmental influences on a behavioral phenotype, i.e., aggression, could have evolved into inherited differences via changes in gene expression. Here, with microarray analysis of honey bees, we show that aggression-related genes with inherited patterns of brain expression are also environmentally regulated. There were expression differences in the brain for hundreds of genes between the highly aggressive Africanized honey bee compared with European honey bee (EHB) subspecies. Similar results were obtained for EHB in response to exposure to alarm pheromone (which provokes aggression) and when comparing old and young bees (aggressive tendencies increase with age). There was significant overlap of the gene lists generated from these three microarray experiments. Moreover, there was statistical enrichment of several of the same cis regulatory motifs in promoters of genes on all three gene lists. Aggression shows a remarkably robust brain molecular signature regardless of whether it occurs because of inherited, age-related, or environmental (social) factors. It appears that one element in the evolution of different degrees of aggressive behavior in honey bees involved changes in regulation of genes that mediate the response to alarm pheromone. PMID:19706434

  16. Serotonin decreases aggression via 5-HT1A receptors in the fighting fish Betta splendens.

    PubMed

    Clotfelter, Ethan D; O'Hare, Erin P; McNitt, Meredith M; Carpenter, Russ E; Summers, Cliff H

    2007-01-01

    The role of the monoamine neurotransmitter serotonin (5-HT) in the modulation of conspecific aggression in the fighting fish (Betta splendens) was investigated using pharmacological manipulations. We used a fish's response to its mirror image as our index of aggressive behavior. We also investigated the effects of some manipulations on monoamine levels in the B. splendens brain. Acute treatment with 5-HT and with the 5-HT1A receptor agonist 8-OH-DPAT both decreased aggressive behavior; however, treatment with the 5-HT1A receptor antagonist WAY-100635 did not increase aggression. Chronic treatment with the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine caused no significant changes in aggressive behavior and a significant decline in 5-HT and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) concentrations. Treatment with the serotonin synthesis inhibitor p-chlorophenylalanine resulted in no change in aggression, yet serotonergic activity decreased significantly. Finally, a diet supplemented with L-tryptophan (Trp), the precursor to 5-HT, showed no consistent effects on aggressive behavior or brain monoamine concentrations. These results suggest a complex role for serotonin in the expression of aggression in teleost fishes, and that B. splendens may be a useful model organism in pharmacological and toxicological studies.

  17. Environmental factors and aggressive behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, A.C.

    1982-07-01

    This paper briefly reviews some of the research areas which indicate a correlation between environmental factors and initiation of aggressive behavior. Environmental factors including lunar influences, month of birth, climate and the effects of crowding and certain chemicals are discussed.

  18. FDG uptake, a surrogate of tumour hypoxia?

    PubMed Central

    Van de Wiele, Christophe

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Tumour hyperglycolysis is driven by activation of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) through tumour hypoxia. Accordingly, the degree of 2-fluro-2-deoxy-d-glucose (FDG) uptake by tumours might indirectly reflect the level of hypoxia, obviating the need for more specific radiopharmaceuticals for hypoxia imaging. Discussion In this paper, available data on the relationship between hypoxia and FDG uptake by tumour tissue in vitro and in vivo are reviewed. In pre-clinical in vitro studies, acute hypoxia was consistently shown to increase FDG uptake by normal and tumour cells within a couple of hours after onset with mobilisation or modification of glucose transporters optimising glucose uptake, followed by a delayed response with increased rates of transcription of GLUT mRNA. In pre-clinical imaging studies on chronic hypoxia that compared FDG uptake by tumours grown in rat or mice to uptake by FMISO, the pattern of normoxic and hypoxic regions within the human tumour xenografts, as imaged by FMISO, largely correlated with glucose metabolism although minor locoregional differences could not be excluded. In the clinical setting, data are limited and discordant. Conclusion Further evaluation of FDG uptake by various tumour types in relation to intrinsic and bioreductive markers of hypoxia and response to radiotherapy or hypoxia-dependent drugs is needed to fully assess its application as a marker of hypoxia in the clinical setting. PMID:18509637

  19. Peculiarities of hyperlipidaemia in tumour patients.

    PubMed Central

    Dilman, V. M.; Berstein, L. M.; Ostroumova, M. N.; Tsyrlina, Y. V.; Golubev, A. G.

    1981-01-01

    The study group included 684 cases: 258 patients with breast carcinoma, 113 males with lung cancer, 42 patients with rectal tumours, 42 patients with stomach tumours, 59 patients with fibroadenomatosis, and 170 healthy subjects of varying age (male and female). A relatively high blood triglyceride level was found in patients with breast, lung, rectal (females), and stomach (female) tumours. The blood concentration of high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol in patients with breast, lung, and stomach (female) tumours was relatively low. The elimination of tumour (breast carcinoma) did not lead to significant changes in lipid metabolism. There was no correlation between degree of lipidaemia and stage of tumour progression except in the cases of rectal cancer. Preliminary results are presented on the tentative classification of hyperlipoproteinaemia in tumour patients, using the lipid concentration threshold values advocated by Carlson et al. (1977); an increased frequency of Type IV hyperlipoproteinaemia proved to be the most characteristic feature of tumour patients. The results are discussed in terms of the concept of the importance of lipid metabolic disturbances, primarily those due to ageing, in the genesis of the syndrome of "cancerophilia" (predisposition to cancer). PMID:7248149

  20. Cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhoea in pituitary tumours1

    PubMed Central

    Cole, I E; Keene, Malcolm

    1980-01-01

    Three cases of CSF rhinorrhoea due to pituitary tumours are reported and the literature reviewed. The treatment of choice appears to be trans-sphenoidal exploration of the pituitary fossa with insertion of a free muscle graft followed by radiotherapy. The probability of the tumour being a prolactin-secreting adenoma is discussed. PMID:7017123

  1. Skull metastasis from rectal gastrointestinal stromal tumours.

    PubMed

    Gil-Arnaiz, Irene; Martínez-Trufero, Javier; Pazo-Cid, Roberto Antonio; Felipo, Francesc; Lecumberri, María José; Calderero, Verónica

    2009-09-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GIST) are the most common mesenchymal neoplasm of the gastrointestinal tract. Rectum localisation is infrequent for these neoplasms, accounting for about 5% of all cases. Distant metastases of GIST are also rare. We present a patient with special features: the tumour is localised in rectum and it has an uncommon metastatic site, the skull, implying a complex differential diagnosis approach.

  2. Classification of odontogenic tumours. A historical review.

    PubMed

    Philipsen, Hans Peter; Reichart, Peter A

    2006-10-01

    Using the term odontome for any tumour arising from the dental formative tissues, Broca suggested a classification of odontogenic tumours (OTs) in 1869. From 1888 to 1914, Bland-Sutton and Gabell, James and Payne modified tumour terminology, while maintaining Broca's odontome concept. Thoma and Goldman's classification (1946) divided the OTs into tumours of ectodermal, mesodermal and mixed origin and abolished the general term odontome. The Pindborg and Clausen classification (1958) based on the idea that the reciprocal epithelial-mesenchymal tissue interactions were also operating in the pathogenesis of OTs. In 1966, WHO established a Collaborating Centre for the Histological Classification of Odontogenic Tumours and Allied Lesions (including jaw cysts) headed by Dr Jens Pindborg. In 1971, the first authoritative WHO guide to the classification of OTs and cysts appeared followed in 1992 by a second edition. In 2002, Philipsen and Reichart produced a revision of the 1992-edition and in 2003, the editors of the WHO Blue Book series: 'WHO Classification of Tumours' decided to produce a volume on the Head and Neck Tumours including a chapter on Odontogenic Tumours and Bone Related Lesions. In July of 2005 this volume was published by IARC, Lyon.

  3. [Single-cell sequencing and tumour heterogeneity].

    PubMed

    Jordan, Bertrand

    2014-12-01

    The heterogeneity of tumours is now beginning to be documented precisely by single-cell new-generation sequencing. Recently published results on breast tumours show that each of the cells analysed displays a unique pattern of point mutations. This extensive genetic diversity is present before any treatment, and is likely to cause resistance to initially successful targeted therapies.

  4. Neurobiology of aggression and violence in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Soyka, Michael

    2011-09-01

    There is much evidence that schizophrenia patients have an increased risk for aggression and violent behavior, including homicide. The neurobiological basis and correlates of this risk have not been much studied. While genome-wide association studies are lacking, a number of candidate genes have been investigated. By far, the most intensively studied is the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene on chromosome 22. COMT is involved in the metabolism of dopamine, a key neurotransmitter in schizophrenia pathophysiology. Several studies suggest that the Val158Met polymorphism of this gene affects COMT activity. Methionine (Met)/Met homozygote schizophrenia patients show 4- to 5-fold lower COMT activity than valine (Val)/Val homozygotes, and some but not all studies have found an association with aggression and violence. Recently, a new functional single-nucleotide polymorphism in the COMT gene, Ala72Ser, was found to be associated with homicidal behavior in schizophrenia, but this finding warrants further replication. Studies published so far indicate that an association with the monoamine oxidase A, B, or tryptophan hydroxylase 1 genes is unlikely. Data for the brain-derived neurotrophic factor gene are conflicting and limited. Data from the limited number of neuroimaging studies performed to date are interesting. Frontal and temporal lobe abnormalities are found consistently in aggressive schizophrenia patients. Positron emission tomography and single photon-emission computed tomography (SPECT) data indicate deficits also in the orbitofrontal and temporal cortex. Some functional magnetic resonance imaging studies found a negative association of violent behavior with frontal and right-sided inferior parietal activity. Neuroimaging studies may well help further elucidate the interrelationship between neurocognitive functioning, personality traits, and antisocial and violent behavior.

  5. [Biology of aggression in dogs].

    PubMed

    Feddersen-Petersen, D U

    2001-03-01

    The science of ethology is concerned with the way external stimuli and internal events cause animals to fight in a particular way. The classification of dog breeds with respect to their relative danger to humans makes no sense, as both, the complex antecedent conditions in which aggressive behaviour occurs, and its ramifying consequences in the individual dog's ecological and social environment, are not considered. From a biological point of view, environmental and learning effects are always superimposed upon genetic influences. Based on the recent developments in the study of ethology, aggression of wolves (Canis lupus L.) and domesticated dogs (Canis lupus f. familiaris) was put into context with respect to other aspects of the lifestyle of wild and domestic canids. Aggressive behaviour does not occur in a biological vacuum. This is also true for domestic dogs and their relationship to human partners. Individual dogs can become highly aggressive and dangerous. Their development and social situation will be presented and discussed in case studies. Finally, there is the question about defining "normal aggression" versus symptoms for maladaptive aggression resp. danger to humans as conspecifics. It is possible to protect the safety of the public and at the the same time practise animal care. Effective animal control legislation must focus on responsible ownership and socialisation of pups f.e. Problems are not unique to some breeds.

  6. Music, Substance Use, and Aggression

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Meng-Jinn; Miller, Brenda A.; Grube, Joel W.; Waiters, Elizabeth D.

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study investigated whether young people’s substance use and aggressive behaviors are related to their listening to music containing messages of substance use and violence. Method Data were collected using self-administered questionnaires and from a sample of community college students aged 15-25 (N = 1056; 43% male). A structural equation modeling method was used to simultaneously assess the associations between listening to various genres of music, alcohol use, illicit drug use, and aggressive behaviors, taking into account respondents’ age, gender, race/ethnicity, and level of sensation seeking. Results Listening to rap music was significantly and positively associated with alcohol use, problematic alcohol use, illicit drug use, and aggressive behaviors when all other variables were controlled. Additionally, alcohol and illicit drug use were positively associated with listening to musical genres of techno and reggae. Control variables such as sensation seeking, age, gender and race/ethnicity were significantly related to substance use and aggressive behaviors. Conclusion The findings suggest that young people’s substance use and aggressive behaviors may be related to their frequent exposure to music containing references to substance use and violence. Conversely, music listening preference may reflect some personal predispositions or lifestyle preferences. Alternatively, substance use, aggression and music preference are independent constructs, but share common “third factors.” PMID:16608146

  7. Driver irritation and aggressive behaviour.

    PubMed

    Björklund, Gunilla M

    2008-05-01

    A sample of 98 drivers responded to a Swedish version of the UK Driving Anger Scale [UK DAS; [Lajunen, T., Parker, D., Stradling, S.G., 1998. Dimensions of driver anger, aggressive and highway code violations and their mediation by safety orientation in UK drivers. Transport. Res. Part F 1, 107-121]. The results indicated that the Swedish version, like the British original, measures three sources of driver irritation: "progress impeded", "reckless driving", and "direct hostility". Structural equation modelling was used to investigate the relationships between the three sources of self-reported driver irritation, aggressive actions, speed, sex, age, and annual mileage. The models suggested a positive relationship between the amount of driver irritation and frequency of aggressive actions for all three sources of irritation. Female drivers tended to become more irritated than male drivers, while the male drivers tended to act aggressively more often. Surprisingly, drivers who reported that they enjoy fast speeds did not become more irritated than slower drivers when obstructed. The important conclusions are that experienced irritation often leads to openly aggressively actions, and that expression of aggressive behaviours may be a cause of other drivers' feeling of irritation.

  8. Dasatinib inhibits mammary tumour development in a genetically engineered mouse model.

    PubMed

    Karim, Saadia A; Creedon, Helen; Patel, Hitesh; Carragher, Neil O; Morton, Jennifer P; Muller, William J; Evans, Thomas Rj; Gusterson, Barry; Sansom, Owen J; Brunton, Valerie G

    2013-08-01

    Src family kinase activity is elevated in a number of human cancers including breast cancer. This increased activity has been associated with aggressive disease and poor prognosis. Src inhibitors are currently in clinical development with a number of trials currently assessing their activity in breast cancer. However, the results to date have been disappointing and a further evaluation of the preclinical effects of Src inhibitors is required to help establish whether these agents will be useful in the treatment of breast cancer. In this study we investigate the effects of dasatinib, which is a potent inhibitor of Src family kinases, on the initiation and development of breast cancer in a genetically engineered model of the disease. The mouse model utilized is driven by expression of activated ErbB-2 under the transcriptional control of its endogenous promoter coupled with conditional loss of Pten under the control of Cre recombinase expressed by the BLG promoter. We show that daily oral administration of dasatinib delays tumour onset and increases overall survival but does not inhibit the proliferation of established tumours. The striking difference between the dasatinib-treated group of tumours and the vehicle controls was the prominent squamous metaplasia that was seen in six out of 11 dasatinib-treated tumours. This was accompanied by a dramatic up-regulation of both E-cadherin and β-catenin and down-regulation of ErbB-2 in the dasatinib-treated tumours. Dasatinib also inhibited both the migration and the invasion of tumour-derived cell lines in vitro. Together these data support the argument that benefits of Src inhibitors may predominate in early or even pre-invasive disease.

  9. The status of epidermal growth factor receptor in borderline ovarian tumours

    PubMed Central

    Showeil, Rania; Romano, Claudia; Valganon, Mikel; Lambros, Maryou; Trivedi, Pritesh; Van Noorden, Susan; Sriraksa, Ruethairat; El-Kaffash, Dalal; El-Etreby, Nour; Natrajan, Rachael; Foroni, Letizia; Osborne, Richard; El-Bahrawy, Mona

    2016-01-01

    The majority of borderline ovarian tumours (BOTs) behave in a benign fashion, but some may show aggressive behavior. The reason behind this has not been elucidated. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is known to contribute to cell survival signals as well as metastatic potential of some tumours. EGFR expression and gene status have not been thoroughly investigated in BOTs as it has in ovarian carcinomas. In this study we explore protein expression as well as gene mutations and amplifications of EGFR in BOTs in comparison to a subset of other epithelial ovarian tumours. We studied 85 tumours, including 61 BOTs, 10 low grade serous carcinomas (LGSCs), 9 high grade serous carcinomas (HGSCs) and 5 benign epithelial tumours. EGFR protein expression was studied using immunohistochemistry. Mutations were investigated by Sanger sequencing exons 18-21 of the tyrosine kinase domain of EGFR. Cases with comparatively higher protein expression were examined for gene amplification by chromogenic in situ hybridization. We also studied the tumours for KRAS and BRAF mutations. Immunohistochemistry results revealed both cytoplasmic and nuclear EGFR expression with variable degrees between tumours. The level of nuclear localization was relatively higher in BOTs and LGSCs as compared to HGSCs or benign tumours. The degree of nuclear expression of BOTs showed no significant difference from that in LGSCs (mean ranks 36.48, 33.05, respectively, p=0.625), but was significantly higher than in HGSCs (mean ranks: 38.88, 12.61 respectively, p< 0.001) and benign tumours (mean ranks: 35.18, 13.00 respectively, p= 0.010). Cytoplasmic expression level was higher in LGSCs. No EGFR gene mutations or amplification were identified, yet different polymorphisms were detected. Five different types of point mutations in the KRAS gene and the V600E BRAF mutation were detected exclusively in BOTs and LGSCs. Our study reports for the first time nuclear localization of EGFR in BOTs. The nuclear

  10. Normative beliefs about aggression and cyber aggression among young adults: a longitudinal investigation.

    PubMed

    Wright, Michelle F; Li, Yan

    2013-01-01

    This longitudinal study examined normative beliefs about aggression (e.g., face-to-face, cyber) in relation to the engagement in cyber aggression 6 months later among 126 (69 women) young adults. Participants completed electronically administered measures assessing their normative beliefs, face-to-face and cyber aggression at Time 1, and cyber aggression 6 months later (Time 2). We found that men reported more cyber relational and verbal aggression when compared to women. After controlling for each other, Time 1 face-to-face relational aggression was positively related to Time 2 cyber relational aggression, whereas Time 1 face-to-face verbal aggression was positively related to Time 2 cyber verbal aggression. Normative beliefs regarding cyber aggression was positively related to both forms of cyber aggression 6 months later, after controlling for normative beliefs about face-to-face aggression. Furthermore, a significant two-way interaction between Time 1 cyber relational aggression and normative beliefs about cyber relational aggression was found. Follow-up analysis showed that Time 1 cyber relational aggression was more strongly related to Time 2 cyber relational aggression when young adults held higher normative beliefs about cyber relational aggression. A similar two-way interaction was found for cyber verbal aggression such that the association between Time 1 and Time 2 cyber verbal aggression was stronger at higher levels of normative beliefs about cyber verbal aggression. Results are discussed in terms of the social cognitive and behavioral mechanisms associated with the engagement of cyber aggression.

  11. Complications of mandibular reconstruction in childhood: Report of a case of Juvenile Aggressive Fibromatosis.

    PubMed

    De Riu, Giacomo; Meloni, Silvio Mario; Raho, Maria Teresa; Tullio, Antonio

    2006-04-01

    Juvenile aggressive fibromatosis is an acquired disease affecting young children. There are two types: superficial and deep; the first is not aggressive whilst the second invades other tissues deeply. This is a case report of the deep variant of juvenile aggressive fibromatosis of the lateral mandible affecting a 24-month-old young female patient. The tumour has been treated surgically by resection of the mandible and reconstruction with a rib-graft. To by-passs resorption of the rib-graft and to re-establish the correct three-dimensional shape of the facial skeleton, osteodistraction of the reconstructed mandible was performed six months post-peratively. In this article the surgical techniques to reconstruct the mandible in young children are discussed.

  12. p53 tumour suppressor gene expression in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumour cells.

    PubMed Central

    Bartz, C; Ziske, C; Wiedenmann, B; Moelling, K

    1996-01-01

    Neuroendocrine pancreatic tumours grow slower and metastasise later than ductal and acinar carcinomas. The expression of the p53 tumour suppressor gene in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumour cells is unknown. Pancreatic neuroendocrine cell lines (n = 5) and human tumour tissues (n = 19) were studied for changed p53 coding sequence, transcription, and translation. Proliferative activity of tumour cells was determined analysing Ki-67 expression. No mutation in the p53 nucleotide sequence of neuroendocrine tumour cell was found. However, an overexpression of p53 could be detected in neuroendocrine pancreatic tumour cell lines at a protein level. As no p53 mutations were seen, it is suggested that post-translational events can also lead to an overexpression of p53. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:8675094

  13. High trait aggression in men is associated with low 5-HT levels, as indexed by 5-HT4 receptor binding.

    PubMed

    da Cunha-Bang, Sofi; Mc Mahon, Brenda; Fisher, Patrick MacDonald; Jensen, Peter Steen; Svarer, Claus; Knudsen, Gitte Moos

    2016-04-01

    Impulsive aggression has commonly been associated with a dysfunction of the serotonin (5-HT) system: many, but not all, studies point to an inverse relationship between 5-HT and aggression. As cerebral 5-HT4 receptor (5-HT4R) binding has recently been recognized as a proxy for stable brain levels of 5-HT, we here test the hypothesis in healthy men and women that brain 5-HT levels, as indexed by cerebral 5-HT4R, are inversely correlated with trait aggression and impulsivity. Sixty-one individuals (47 men) underwent positron emission tomography scanning with the radioligand [(11)C]SB207145 for quantification of brain 5-HT4R binding. The Buss-Perry Aggression Questionnaire (BPAQ) and the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale were used for assessment of trait aggression and trait impulsivity. Among male subjects, there was a positive correlation between global 5-HT4R and BPAQ total score (P = 0.037) as well as BPAQ physical aggression (P = 0.025). No main effect of global 5-HT4R on trait aggression or impulsivity was found in the mixed gender sample, but there was evidence for sex interaction effects in the relationship between global 5-HT4R and BPAQ physical aggression. In conclusion we found that low cerebral 5-HT levels, as indexed by 5-HT4R binding were associated with high trait aggression in males, but not in females.

  14. Do Teachers Misbehave? Aggression in School Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ben Sasson, Dvora; Somech, Anit

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Despite growing research on school aggression, significant gaps remain in the authors' knowledge of team aggression, since most studies have mainly explored aggression on the part of students. The purpose of this paper is to focus on understanding the phenomenon of workplace aggression in school teams. Specifically, the purpose of the…

  15. Training for planning tumour resection: augmented reality and human factors.

    PubMed

    Abhari, Kamyar; Baxter, John S H; Chen, Elvis C S; Khan, Ali R; Peters, Terry M; de Ribaupierre, Sandrine; Eagleson, Roy

    2015-06-01

    Planning surgical interventions is a complex task, demanding a high degree of perceptual, cognitive, and sensorimotor skills to reduce intra- and post-operative complications. This process requires spatial reasoning to coordinate between the preoperatively acquired medical images and patient reference frames. In the case of neurosurgical interventions, traditional approaches to planning tend to focus on providing a means for visualizing medical images, but rarely support transformation between different spatial reference frames. Thus, surgeons often rely on their previous experience and intuition as their sole guide is to perform mental transformation. In case of junior residents, this may lead to longer operation times or increased chance of error under additional cognitive demands. In this paper, we introduce a mixed augmented-/virtual-reality system to facilitate training for planning a common neurosurgical procedure, brain tumour resection. The proposed system is designed and evaluated with human factors explicitly in mind, alleviating the difficulty of mental transformation. Our results indicate that, compared to conventional planning environments, the proposed system greatly improves the nonclinicians' performance, independent of the sensorimotor tasks performed ( ). Furthermore, the use of the proposed system by clinicians resulted in a significant reduction in time to perform clinically relevant tasks ( ). These results demonstrate the role of mixed-reality systems in assisting residents to develop necessary spatial reasoning skills needed for planning brain tumour resection, improving patient outcomes.

  16. Canine mammary tumour cell lines established in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hellmén, E

    1993-01-01

    Mammary tumours are the most common tumours in the female dog. The tumours have a complex histology and exist in epithelial, mixed and mesenchymal forms. To study the biology of canine mammary tumours, five cell lines have been established and characterized. The results indicate that canine mammary tumours might be derived from mammary stem cells and that the tumour growth is independent of oestrogens. The established canine mammary tumour cell lines will be valuable tools in further studies of the histogenesis and pathogenesis of these tumours.

  17. Adult Wilms' Tumour: Case Report and Review of Literature.

    PubMed

    Modi, Sunny; Tiang, Kor Woi; Inglis, Po; Collins, Stuart

    2016-01-01

    Wilms' tumour (nephroblastoma) is the most common renal tumour in children. Wilms' tumour in adults is extremely rare and has a poorer prognosis than paediatric Wilms' tumour. It is difficult to differentiate adult Wilms' tumour from renal cell carcinoma based on radiological findings alone. The diagnosis in adults is often serendipitous following nephrectomy for presumed renal cell carcinoma. Because of the paucity of literature, there are no standard protocols for the management of adult Wilms' tumour, and therefore, it is managed as per paediatric Wilms' tumour. Herein, we report the case of adult Wilms' tumour in a 43-year-old man, which was diagnosed unexpectedly following nephrectomy for presumed renal cell carcinoma.

  18. The pleasure of revenge: retaliatory aggression arises from a neural imbalance toward reward.

    PubMed

    Chester, David S; DeWall, C Nathan

    2016-07-01

    Most of daily life hums along peacefully but provocations tip the balance toward aggression. Negative feelings are often invoked to explain why people lash out after an insult. Yet people might retaliate because provocation makes aggression hedonically rewarding. To test this alternative hypothesis, 69 participants underwent functional neuroimaging while they completed a behavioral aggression task that repeatedly manipulated whether aggression was preceded by an instance of provocation or not. After provocation, greater activity in the nucleus accumbens (NAcc) (a brain region reliably associated with reward) during aggressive decisions predicted louder noise blasts administered in retaliation. Greater NAcc activation was also associated with participants' history of real-world violence. Functional connectivity between the NAcc and a regulatory region in the lateral prefrontal cortex related to lower retaliatory aggression. These findings suggest that provocation tips the neural balance towards hedonic reward, which fosters retaliatory aggression. Although such pleasure of inflicting pain may promote retaliatory aggression, self-regulatory processes can keep such aggressive urges at bay. Implications for theory and violence reduction are discussed.

  19. P1 interneurons promote a persistent internal state that enhances inter-male aggression in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Hoopfer, Eric D; Jung, Yonil; Inagaki, Hidehiko K; Rubin, Gerald M; Anderson, David J

    2015-01-01

    How brains are hardwired to produce aggressive behavior, and how aggression circuits are related to those that mediate courtship, is not well understood. A large-scale screen for aggression-promoting neurons in Drosophila identified several independent hits that enhanced both inter-male aggression and courtship. Genetic intersections revealed that 8-10 P1 interneurons, previously thought to exclusively control male courtship, were sufficient to promote fighting. Optogenetic experiments indicated that P1 activation could promote aggression at a threshold below that required for wing extension. P1 activation in the absence of wing extension triggered persistent aggression via an internal state that could endure for minutes. High-frequency P1 activation promoted wing extension and suppressed aggression during photostimulation, whereas aggression resumed and wing extension was inhibited following photostimulation offset. Thus, P1 neuron activation promotes a latent, internal state that facilitates aggression and courtship, and controls the overt expression of these social behaviors in a threshold-dependent, inverse manner. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11346.001 PMID:26714106

  20. Adamantinoma: an unusual bone tumour.

    PubMed

    Roque, Pedro; Mankin, Henry J; Rosenberg, Andrew

    2008-12-01

    Adamantinoma is a rare tumour, which most often affects the tibia and produces lytic and sometimes destructive lesions, which can cause fractures. The lesions occur principally in adults and are more common in males. A small percentage of the patients develop metastases, sometimes quite late in the course. Our institution has treated 42 patients with adamantinomas since 1972 and has evaluated them by imaging studies and histology. The majority of the patients were treated by resection of the lesion and insertion of an intercalary allograft. Only three of the patients died of disease with the time until death ranging from 10 to 17 years. Recurrence occurred in only three patients and the allograft success rate in terms of function was 71% at a mean time of 10 years.

  1. Targeting the hypoxic fraction of tumours using hypoxia-activated prodrugs.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Roger M

    2016-03-01

    The presence of a microenvironment within most tumours containing regions of low oxygen tension or hypoxia has profound biological and therapeutic implications. Tumour hypoxia is known to promote the development of an aggressive phenotype, resistance to both chemotherapy and radiotherapy and is strongly associated with poor clinical outcome. Paradoxically, it is recognised as a high-priority target and one of the therapeutic strategies designed to eradicate hypoxic cells in tumours is a group of compounds known collectively as hypoxia-activated prodrugs (HAPs) or bioreductive drugs. These drugs are inactive prodrugs that require enzymatic activation (typically by 1 or 2 electron oxidoreductases) to generate cytotoxic species with selectivity for hypoxic cells being determined by (1) the ability of oxygen to either reverse or inhibit the activation process and (2) the presence of elevated expression of oxidoreductases in tumours. The concepts underpinning HAP development were established over 40 years ago and have been refined over the years to produce a new generation of HAPs that are under preclinical and clinical development. The purpose of this article is to describe current progress in the development of HAPs focusing on the mechanisms of action, preclinical properties and clinical progress of leading examples.

  2. Desmoplastic small round cell tumour of the pleura: a case report with unusual follow-up.

    PubMed

    Ostoros, Gyula; Orosz, Zsolt; Kovács, Gábor; Soltész, Ilona

    2002-06-01

    In 1994 a 19-year-old woman presented with a few weeks history of back ache. Routine chest X-ray and CT examination revealed a lesion originating from the parietal pleura and destroying the ribs. The tumour was resected during thoracotomy. The histological examination raised the possibility of atypical carcinoid tumour. One year later the tumour recurred. After its re-resection, the patient received radiotherapy. Three years after the initial presentation multiple pulmonary metastases developed. The patient was treated with chemotherapy, receiving vincristine, epi-adriamycin and cyclophosphamide in 8 cycles, which resulted in complete remission. Between 1998 and 1999 progressions and partial remissions were observed, while the patient received further cycles of chemotherapy. Histological revision was performed in 1999 and a final diagnosis of desmoplastic small round cell tumour of the pleura was made. Immunohistochemically co-expression of cytokeratin, vimentin, desmin, and NSE was observed. The patient died in June 2000. The whole follow-up period was 76 months. We thought this case to be worth for presentation because this unusual long survival, which was probably due to the aggressive complex anticancer treatment.

  3. Beneficial role of overexpression of TFPI-2 on tumour progression in human small cell lung cancer☆

    PubMed Central

    Lavergne, Marion; Jourdan, Marie-Lise; Blechet, Claire; Guyetant, Serge; Pape, Alain Le; Heuze-Vourc’h, Nathalie; Courty, Yves; Lerondel, Stephanie; Sobilo, Julien; Iochmann, Sophie; Reverdiau, Pascale

    2013-01-01

    Tissue factor pathway inhibitor-2 (TFPI-2) is a potent inhibitor of plasmin, a protease which is involved in tumour progression by activating (MMPs). This therefore makes TFPI-2 a potential inhibitor of invasiveness and the development of metastases. In this study, low levels of TFPI-2 expression were found in 65% of patients with small cell lung cancer (SCLC), the most aggressive type of lung cancer. To study the impact of TFPI-2 in tumour progression, TFPI-2 was overexpressed in NCI-H209 SCLC cells which were orthotopically implanted in nude mice. Investigations showed that TFPI-2 inhibited lung tumour growth. Such inhibition could be explained in vitro by a decrease in tumour cell viability, blockade of G1/S phase cell cycle transition and an increase in apoptosis shown in NCI-H209 cells expressing TFPI-2. We also demonstrated that TFPI-2 upregulation in NCI-H209 cells decreased MMP expression, particularly by downregulating MMP-1 and MMP-3. Moreover, TFPI-2 inhibited phosphorylation of the MAPK signalling pathway proteins involved in the induction of MMP transcripts, among which MMP-1 was predominant in SCLC tissues and was inversely expressed with TFPI-2 in 35% of cases. These results suggest that downregulation of TFPI-2 expression could favour the development of SCLC. PMID:23905012

  4. Wiring Pathways to Replace Aggression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bath, Howard

    2006-01-01

    The previous article in this series introduced the triune brain, the three components of which handle specialized life tasks. The survival brain, or brain stem, directs automatic physiological functions, such as heartbeat and breathing, and mobilizes fight/flight behaviour in times of threat. The emotional (or limbic) brain activates positive or…

  5. Transsphenoidal surgery for pituitary tumours

    PubMed Central

    Massoud, A; Powell, M; Williams, R; Hindmarsh, P; Brook, C

    1997-01-01

    Accepted 29 January 1997
 OBJECTIVES—Transsphenoidal surgery (TSS) is the preferred method for the excision of pituitary microadenomas in adults. This study was carried out to establish the long term efficacy and safety of TSS in children.
STUDY DESIGN—A 14 year retrospective analysis was carried out on 23 children (16 boys and seven girls), all less than 18 years of age, who had undergone TSS at our centre.
RESULTS—Twenty nine transsphenoidal surgical procedures were carried out. The most common diagnosis was an adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) secreting adenoma (14 (61%) patients). The median length of follow up was 8.0 years (range 0.3-14.0 years). Eighteen (78%) patients were cured after the first procedure. No death was related to the operation. The most common postoperative complication was diabetes insipidus, which was transient in most patients. Other complications were headaches in two patients and cerebrospinal fluid leaks in two patients. De novo endocrine deficiencies after TSS in children were as follows: three (14%) patients developed panhypopituitarism, eight (73%) developed growth hormone insufficiency, three (14%) developed secondary hypothyroidism, and four (21%) developed gonadotrophin deficiency. Permanent ACTH deficiency occurred in five (24%) patients, though all patients received postoperative glucocorticoid treatment until dynamic pituitary tests were performed three months after TSS.
CONCLUSIONS—TSS in children is a safe and effective treatment for pituitary tumours, provided it is performed by surgeons with considerable experience and expertise. Surgical complications are minimal. Postoperative endocrine deficit is considerable, but is only permanent in a small proportion of patients.

 • Transsphenoidal surgery is a safe and effective treatment for pituitary tumours in children • Transsphenoidal surgery should be performed by surgeons with considerable experience and expertise • Surgical complications of

  6. Kindergarten Children's Genetic Vulnerabilities Interact with Friends' Aggression to Promote Children's Own Aggression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Lier, Pol; Boivin, Michel; Dionne, Ginette; Vitaro, Frank; Brendgen, Mara; Koot, Hans; Tremblay, Richard E.; Perusse, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To examine whether kindergarten children's genetic liability to physically aggress moderates the contribution of friends' aggression to their aggressive behaviors. Method: Teacher and peer reports of aggression were available for 359 6-year-old twin pairs (145 MZ, 212 DZ) as well as teacher and peer reports of aggression of the two best…

  7. Tracking the dynamics of circulating tumour cell phenotypes using nanoparticle-mediated magnetic ranking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poudineh, Mahla; Aldridge, Peter M.; Ahmed, Sharif; Green, Brenda J.; Kermanshah, Leyla; Nguyen, Vivian; Tu, Carmen; Mohamadi, Reza M.; Nam, Robert K.; Hansen, Aaron; Sridhar, Srikala S.; Finelli, Antonio; Fleshner, Neil E.; Joshua, Anthony M.; Sargent, Edward H.; Kelley, Shana O.

    2016-11-01

    Profiling the heterogeneous phenotypes of rare circulating tumour cells (CTCs) in whole blood is critical to unravelling the complex and dynamic properties of these potential clinical markers. This task is challenging because these cells are present at parts per billion levels among normal blood cells. Here we report a new nanoparticle-enabled method for CTC characterization, called magnetic ranking cytometry, which profiles CTCs on the basis of their surface expression phenotype. We achieve this using a microfluidic chip that successfully processes whole blood samples. The approach classifies CTCs with single-cell resolution in accordance with their expression of phenotypic surface markers, which is read out using magnetic nanoparticles. We deploy this new technique to reveal the dynamic phenotypes of CTCs in unprocessed blood from mice as a function of tumour growth and aggressiveness. We also test magnetic ranking cytometry using blood samples collected from cancer patients.

  8. Perianal giant condyloma acuminata [buschke lowenstein tumour] - first case report from the Kashmir valley.

    PubMed

    Chowdri, Nisar A; Gagloo, Mushtaq A; Parray, Fazal Q; Sheikh, Zahoor A; Rouf, A; Wani, A

    2007-10-01

    Buschke Lowenstein tumour or giant condyloma acuminata is a rare entity with only less then 50 cases reported in English literature so far. No such case has been reported from the Kashmir valley. They are considered as intermediate lesions between simple condyloma acuminata and invasive squamous cell carcinoma. A 57-year-old heterosexual male presented with a giant perianal condyloma. The lesion was surgically excised completely. Postoperatively patient was put on topical 5-FU ointment. Patient is recurrence free 6 months after surgery. The giant condyloma acuminate is an aggressive tumour with propensity for recurrance and malignant transformation. Surgical excision is the treatment of choice. One such rare case is discussed with review of literature.

  9. Transcriptome analysis of genes and gene networks involved in aggressive behavior in mouse and zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Malki, Karim; Du Rietz, Ebba; Crusio, Wim E; Pain, Oliver; Paya-Cano, Jose; Karadaghi, Rezhaw L; Sluyter, Frans; de Boer, Sietse F; Sandnabba, Kenneth; Schalkwyk, Leonard C; Asherson, Philip; Tosto, Maria Grazia

    2016-09-01

    Despite moderate heritability estimates, the molecular architecture of aggressive behavior remains poorly characterized. This study compared gene expression profiles from a genetic mouse model of aggression with zebrafish, an animal model traditionally used to study aggression. A meta-analytic, cross-species approach was used to identify genomic variants associated with aggressive behavior. The Rankprod algorithm was used to evaluated mRNA differences from prefrontal cortex tissues of three sets of mouse lines (N = 18) selectively bred for low and high aggressive behavior (SAL/LAL, TA/TNA, and NC900/NC100). The same approach was used to evaluate mRNA differences in zebrafish (N = 12) exposed to aggressive or non-aggressive social encounters. Results were compared to uncover genes consistently implicated in aggression across both studies. Seventy-six genes were differentially expressed (PFP < 0.05) in aggressive compared to non-aggressive mice. Seventy genes were differentially expressed in zebrafish exposed to a fight encounter compared to isolated zebrafish. Seven genes (Fos, Dusp1, Hdac4, Ier2, Bdnf, Btg2, and Nr4a1) were differentially expressed across both species 5 of which belonging to a gene-network centred on the c-Fos gene hub. Network analysis revealed an association with the MAPK signaling cascade. In human studies HDAC4 haploinsufficiency is a key genetic mechanism associated with brachydactyly mental retardation syndrome (BDMR), which is associated with aggressive behaviors. Moreover, the HDAC4 receptor is a drug target for valproic acid, which is being employed as an effective pharmacological treatment for aggressive behavior in geriatric, psychiatric, and brain-injury patients. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Malignant sweat gland tumours: an update.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, José C; Calonje, Eduardo

    2015-11-01

    Cutaneous adnexal tumours can be a diagnostic challenge for the pathologist. This is particularly true in the case of tumours with sweat gland differentiation, due to a large number of rare entities, a multiplicity of names to designate the same neoplasms and consequent lack of consensus regarding their classification and nomenclature. In the traditional view, sweat gland tumours were divided into eccrine and apocrine. However, this has been challenged in recent years, and in fact many of these tumours may have both eccrine and apocrine variants. Some display more complex features and defy classification, due to the presence of other lines of differentiation, namely follicular and/or sebaceous (in the case of apocrine tumours, due to the close embryological relationship between apocrine glands, hair follicles and sebaceous glands). The present paper reviews and updates the basic concepts regarding the following malignant sweat gland tumours: apocrine carcinoma, porocarcinoma, hidradenocarcinoma, spiradenocarcinoma, cylindrocarcinoma, microcystic adnexal carcinoma and related entities, squamoid eccrine ductal carcinoma, digital papillary adenocarcinoma, primary cutaneous mucinous carcinoma, endocrine mucin-producing sweat gland carcinoma and primary cutaneous signet ring cell carcinoma. Particular emphasis is put in recent findings that may have implications in the diagnosis and management of these tumours.

  11. A model of vascular tumour growth in mice combining longitudinal tumour size data with histological biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Ribba, Benjamin; Watkin, Emmanuel; Tod, Michel; Girard, Pascal; Grenier, Emmanuel; You, Benoît; Giraudo, Enrico; Freyer, Gilles

    2011-02-01

    Optimising the delivery of antiangiogenic drugs requires the development of drug-disease models of vascular tumour growth that incorporate histological data indicative of cytostatic action. In this study, we formulated a model to analyse the dynamics of tumour progression in nude mice xenografted with HT29 or HCT116 colorectal cancer cells. In 30 mice, tumour size was periodically measured, and percentages of hypoxic and necrotic tissue were assessed using immunohistochemistry techniques on tumour samples after euthanasia. The simultaneous analysis of histological data together with longitudinal tumour size data prompted the development of a semi-mechanistic model integrating random effects of parameters. In this model, the peripheral non-hypoxic tissue proliferates according to a generalised-logistic equation where the maximal tumour size is represented by a variable called 'carrying capacity'. The ratio of the whole tumour size to the carrying capacity was used to define the hypoxic stress. As this stress increases, non-hypoxic tissue turns hypoxic. Hypoxic tissue does not stop proliferating, but hypoxia constitutes a transient stage before the tissue becomes necrotic. As the tumour grows, the carrying capacity increases owing to the process of angiogenesis. The model is shown to correctly predict tumour growth dynamics as well as percentages of necrotic and hypoxic tissues within the tumour. We show how the model can be used as a theoretical tool to investigate the effects of antiangiogenic treatments on tumour growth. This model provides a tool to analyse tumour size data in combination with histological biomarkers such as the percentages of hypoxic and necrotic tissue and is shown to be useful for gaining insight into the effects of antiangiogenic drugs on tumour growth and composition.

  12. Sweetened Blood Cools Hot Tempers: Physiological Self-Control and Aggression

    PubMed Central

    DeWall, C. Nathan; Deckman, Timothy; Gailliot, Matthew T.; Bushman, Brad J.

    2014-01-01

    Aggressive and violent behaviors are restrained by self-control. Self-control consumes a lot of glucose in the brain, suggesting that low glucose and poor glucose metabolism are linked to aggression and violence. Four studies tested this hypothesis. Study 1 found that participants who consumed a glucose beverage behaved less aggressively than did participants who consumed a placebo beverage. Study 2 found an indirect relationship between diabetes (a disorder marked by low glucose levels and poor glucose metabolism) and aggressiveness through low self-control. Study 3 found that states with high diabetes rates also had high violent crime rates. Study 4 found that countries with high rates of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency (a metabolic disorder related to low glucose levels) also had higher killings rates, both war related and non-war related. All four studies suggest that a spoonful of sugar helps aggressive and violent behaviors go down. PMID:21064166

  13. [Therapeutic Aggressiveness and Liquid Oncology].

    PubMed

    Barón Duarte, F J; Rodríguez Calvo, M S; Amor Pan, J R

    2017-01-01

    Aggressiveness criteria proposed in the scientific literature a decade ago provide a quality judgment and are a reference in the care of patients with advanced cancer, but their use is not generalized in the evaluation of Oncology Services. In this paper we analyze the therapeutic aggressiveness, according to standard criteria, in 1.001 patients with advanced cancer who died in our Institution between 2010 and 2013. The results seem to show that aggressiveness at the end of life is present more frequently than experts recommend. About 25% of patients fulfill at least one criterion of aggressiveness. This result could be explained by a liquid Oncology which does not prioritize the patient as a moral subject in the clinical appointment. Medical care is oriented to necessities and must be articulated in a model focused on dignity and communication. Its implementation through Advanced Care Planning, consideration of patient's values and preferences, and Limitation of therapeutic effort are ways to reduce aggressiveness and improve clinical practice at the end of life. We need to encourage synergic and proactive attitudes, adding the best of cancer research with the best clinical care for the benefit of human being, moral subject and main goal of Medicine.

  14. Intraoperative β{sup -} detecting probe for radio-guided surgery in tumour resection

    SciTech Connect

    Solfaroli Camillocci, Elena; Bellini, Fabio; Bocciy, Valerio; Collamatiyz, Francesco; Faccini, Riccardo; Paramattiy, Riccardo; Paterayz, Vincenzo; Pinciy, Davide; Recchiay, Luigi; Sciubbayz, Adalberto; Senzacqua, Martina; Voenay, Cecilia; Morgantiy, Silvio; De Luciax, Erika; Matteixk, Ilaria; Sartizx, Alessio; Russomando, Aandrea; Marafiniy, Michela

    2015-07-01

    The development of the β{sup -} based radio-guided surgery aims to extend the technique to those tumours where surgery is the only possible treatment and the assessment of the resection would most profit from the low background around the lesion, as for brain tumours. Feasibility studies on meningioma and gliomas already estimated the potentiality of this new treatment. To validate the technique, a prototype of the intraoperative probe detecting β{sup -} decays and specific phantoms simulating tumour remnant patterns embedded in healthy tissue have been realized. The response of the probe in this simulated environment is tested with dedicated procedures. This document discusses the innovative aspects of the method, the status of the developed intraoperative β{sup -} detecting probe and the results of the preclinical tests. (authors)

  15. Contrast‐enhanced ultrasound of pancreatic tumours

    PubMed Central

    D'Onofrio, Mirko; Crosara, Stefano; Dal Corso, Flavia; Barbi, Emilio; Canestrini, Stefano; Mucelli, Roberto Pozzi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Indication/purpose: To review contrast‐enhanced ultrasound features of the most common pancreatic tumours. Methods: Contrast‐enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) can provide distinctive features of pancreatic tumours that are reported in the present paper, providing radiologic‐pathological correlations and clarifying the main differential diagnosis. Conclusion: Contrast‐enhanced ultrasound plays a well‐established role in the evaluation of pancreatic tumours. When possible, CEUS should be always performed after the initial US diagnosis, in order to improve the accuracy of the first line examination. PMID:28191218

  16. Photodynamic therapy and anti-tumour immunity

    PubMed Central

    Castano, Ana P.; Mroz, Pawel; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2010-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) uses non-toxic photosensitizers and harmless visible light in combination with oxygen to produce cytotoxic reactive oxygen species that kill malignant cells by apoptosis and/or necrosis, shut down the tumour microvasculature and stimulate the host immune system. In contrast to surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy that are mostly immunosuppressive, PDT causes acute inflammation, expression of heat-shock proteins, invasion and infiltration of the tumour by leukocytes, and might increase the presentation of tumour-derived antigens to T cells. PMID:16794636

  17. Transoral robotic surgery for retromolar trigone tumours.

    PubMed

    Durmus, K; Apuhan, T; Ozer, E

    2013-12-01

    The retromolar trigone is a challenging transoral surgical site due to the difficulty of visualization. Our aim is to report a new technique of transoral robotic resection of retromolar trigone tumours. We present three patients with retromolar trigone tumours with pathological diagnosis of squamous cell carcinoma who underwent successful transoral robotic resection. Robotic retromolar trigone resection and concurrent supraomohyoid neck dissections were performed in all patients without any complication. In conclusion, transoral robotic surgery is a safe and feasible technique for resection of malignant retromolar trigone tumours with minimal complications and favourable outcomes.

  18. [Malignant phyllodes tumour : a case report].

    PubMed

    Radermacher, J; Burlet, O; Sylvestre, R M; Wetz, P; Delvenne, Ph

    2016-11-01

    A 28 year old woman has suffered over the previous month from a post-traumatic swelling sensation of the left breast. Ultrasonography demonstrates a 9 cm, sharply-cut, rounded, hypo-echogenic lesion. Surgery is performed, with the hypothesis of an haematoma. The pathological analysis of the lesion shows a malignant phyllodes tumour with heterologous rhabdomyosarcomatous features. No metastasis is found. A radical mastectomy is performed and the patient benefits from an adjuvant radio-chemotherapy. Phyllodes tumours represent up to 1 % of all mammary cancers, with 10-20 % of malignant lesions. These tumours behave differently from usual breast cancers. This atypical case, arising in a traumatic context, provides the opportunity to discuss the treatment and classification of phyllodes tumours of the breast.

  19. Peripheral primitive neuroectodermal tumour in a dog.

    PubMed

    Junginger, J; Röthlisberger, A; Lehmbecker, A; Stein, V M; Ludwig, D C; Baumgärtner, W; Seehusen, F

    2013-11-01

    A 1-year-old German shepherd dog was presented with paraparesis quickly progressing to paraplegia. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a large mass beneath the thoracolumbar vertebral column infiltrating the spinal canal and resulting in severe extradural compression of the spinal cord. Microscopically, this comprised a cell-rich unencapsulated tumour supported by fine bands of a fibrovascular stroma and occasionally forming primitive rosettes. Immunohistochemistry showed the tumour cells to express synaptophysin and neuron-specific enolase. Ultrastructurally, the neoplastic cells had low to moderate numbers of intracytoplasmic neurosecretory granules. A peripheral primitive neuroectodermal tumour was diagnosed. This is a rare embryonal tumour of neural origin that may have arisen from adrenal medulla, autonomic ganglia or peripheral nerves.

  20. Hypocholesterolaemia in dogs with dominance aggression.

    PubMed

    Sentürk, S; Yalçin, E; Pentürk, S

    2003-09-01

    Serum lipids and lipoprotein concentrations have been associated with dominance aggression in humans. The aim of this study was to investigate the link between serum lipids, including cholesterol, triglyceride, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), total cholesterol (TC) to HDL-C ratio and dominance aggression in dogs. Levels of serum TC, triglyceride and HDL-C were significantly lower in dogs with dominance aggression compared with non-aggressive dogs (P < 0.001). These results suggest that a relationship exists between serum lipid profile and dominance aggression in dogs, and hypocholesterolaemia exists in dogs with dominance aggression.

  1. Genetics and neurobiology of aggression in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Zwarts, Liesbeth; Versteven, Marijke; Callaerts, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Aggressive behavior is widely present throughout the animal kingdom and is crucial to ensure survival and reproduction. Aggressive actions serve to acquire territory, food, or mates and in defense against predators or rivals; while in some species these behaviors are involved in establishing a social hierarchy. Aggression is a complex behavior, influenced by a broad range of genetic and environmental factors. Recent studies in Drosophila provide insight into the genetic basis and control of aggression. The state of the art on aggression in Drosophila and the many opportunities provided by this model organism to unravel the genetic and neurobiological basis of aggression are reviewed. PMID:22513455

  2. Keratocystic odontogenic tumour: systematic review

    PubMed Central

    MacDonald-Jankowski, D S

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this review is to evaluate the principal clinical and conventional radiographic features of non-syndromic keratocystic odontogenic tumour (KCOT) by systematic review (SR), and to compare the frequencies between four global groups. Methods The databases searched were the PubMed interface of Medline and LILACS. Only those reports of KCOTs that occurred in a series of consecutive cases, in the reporting authors' caseload, were considered. Results 51 reports, of 49 series of cases, were included in the SR. 11 SR-included series were in languages other than English. KCOTs affected males more frequently and were three times more prevalent in the mandible. Although the mean age at first presentation was 37 years, the largest proportion of cases first presented in the third decade. The main symptom was swelling. Over a third were found incidentally. Nearly two-thirds displayed buccolingual expansion. Over a quarter of cases recurred. Only a quarter of all SR-included reported series of cases included details of at least one radiological feature. The East Asian global group presented significantly as well-defined, even corticated, multilocular radiolucencies with buccolingual expansion. The KCOTs affecting the Western global group significantly displayed an association with unerupted teeth. Conclusions Long-term follow-up of large series that would have revealed detailed radiographic description and long-term outcomes of non-syndromic KCOT was lacking. PMID:21159911

  3. Tumour-targeted nanomedicines: principles and practice

    PubMed Central

    Lammers, T; Hennink, W E; Storm, G

    2008-01-01

    Drug targeting systems are nanometre-sized carrier materials designed for improving the biodistribution of systemically applied (chemo)therapeutics. Various different tumour-targeted nanomedicines have been evaluated over the years, and clear evidence is currently available for substantial improvement of the therapeutic index of anticancer agents. Here, we briefly summarise the most important targeting systems and strategies, and discuss recent advances and future directions in the development of tumour-targeted nanomedicines. PMID:18648371

  4. Adolescent anabolic-androgenic steroid exposure alters lateral anterior hypothalamic serotonin-2A receptors in aggressive male hamsters.

    PubMed

    Schwartzer, Jared J; Ricci, Lesley A; Melloni, Richard H

    2009-05-16

    Chronic anabolic-androgenic steroid (AAS) treatment during adolescence facilitates offensive aggression in male Syrian hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus). Serotonin (5-HT) modulates aggressive behavior and has been shown to be altered after chronic treatment with AAS. Furthermore, 5-HT type 2 receptors have been implicated in the control of aggression. For example, treatment with 5-HT(2A) receptor antagonists suppress the generation of the offensive aggressive phenotype. However, it is unclear whether these receptors are sensitive to adolescent AAS exposure. The current study assessed whether treatment with AAS throughout adolescence influenced the immunohistochemical localization of 5-HT(2A) in areas of the hamster brain implicated in the control of aggression. Hamsters were administered AAS (5.0 mg/kg) each day throughout adolescence, scored for offensive aggression, and then examined for differences in 5-HT(2A)-immunoreactivity (5-HT(2A)-ir). When compared with non-aggressive oil-treated controls, aggressive AAS-treated hamsters showed significant increases in 5-HT(2A)-ir fibers in the lateral portion of the anterior hypothalamus (LAH). Further analysis revealed that AAS treatment also produced a significant increase in the number of cells expressing 5-HT(2A)-ir in the LAH. Together, these results support a role for altered 5-HT(2A) expression and further implicate the LAH as a central brain region important in the control of adolescent AAS-induced offensive aggression.

  5. Rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells undergo malignant transformation via indirect co-cultured with tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianping; Zhang, Yalan; Bai, Lu; Cui, Xiangrong; Zhu, Jing

    2012-12-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have potential applications in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering as well as being potential carriers for tumour therapy. However, the safety of using MSCs in tumours is unknown. Herein, we analyse malignant transformation of MSCs in the tumour microenvironment. Rat bone marrow MSCs were cultured with malignant rat glioma C6 cells without direct cell-cell contact. After 7 days, the cells were assessed for transformation using flow cytometry, real-time quantitative PCR, immunofluorescence and chromosomal analysis. In addition, wild-type (WT) p53, mutant p53 and mdm2 was determined using Western blotting. Almost all MSCs became phenotypically malignant cells, with significantly decreased WT p53 expression and increased expression of mutant p53 and mdm2, along with an aneuploid karyotype. To evaluate tumorigenesis in vivo, the MSCs indirect co-cultured with C6 cells for 7 days were transplanted subcutaneously into immuno-deficient mice. The cells developed into a large tumour at the injection site within 8 weeks, with systemic symptoms including cachexia and scoliosis. Pathological and cytological analysis revealed poorly differentiated pleomorphic cells with a dense vascular network and aggressive invasion into the adjacent muscle. These data demonstrate that MSCs became malignant cancer cells when exposed to the tumour microenvironment and suggest that factors released from the cancer cells have a critical role in the malignant transformation of MSCs.

  6. Targeting the NG2/CSPG4 proteoglycan retards tumour growth and angiogenesis in preclinical models of GBM and melanoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Svendsen, Agnete; Kmiecik, Justyna; Immervoll, Heike; Skaftnesmo, Kai Ove; Planagumà, Jesús; Reed, Rolf Kåre; Bjerkvig, Rolf; Miletic, Hrvoje; Enger, Per Øyvind; Rygh, Cecilie Brekke; Chekenya, Martha

    2011-01-01

    Aberrant expression of the progenitor marker Neuron-glia 2 (NG2/CSPG4) or melanoma proteoglycan on cancer cells and angiogenic vasculature is associated with an aggressive disease course in several malignancies including glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and melanoma. Thus, we investigated the mechanism of NG2 mediated malignant progression and its potential as a therapeutic target in clinically relevant GBM and melanoma animal models. Xenografting NG2 overexpressing GBM cell lines resulted in increased growth rate, angiogenesis and vascular permeability compared to control, NG2 negative tumours. The effect of abrogating NG2 function was investigated after intracerebral delivery of lentivirally encoded shRNAs targeting NG2 in patient GBM xenografts as well as in established subcutaneous A375 melanoma tumours. NG2 knockdown reduced melanoma proliferation and increased apoptosis and necrosis. Targeting NG2 in two heterogeneous GBM xenografts significantly reduced tumour growth and oedema levels, angiogenesis and normalised vascular function. Vascular normalisation resulted in increased tumour invasion and decreased apoptosis and necrosis. We conclude that NG2 promotes tumour progression by multiple mechanisms and represents an amenable target for cancer molecular therapy.

  7. A dynamical model of tumour immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Frascoli, Federico; Kim, Peter S; Hughes, Barry D; Landman, Kerry A

    2014-07-01

    A coupled ordinary differential equation model of tumour-immune dynamics is presented and analysed. The model accounts for biological and clinical factors which regulate the interaction rates of cytotoxic T lymphocytes on the surface of the tumour mass. A phase plane analysis demonstrates that competition between tumour cells and lymphocytes can result in tumour eradication, perpetual oscillations, or unbounded solutions. To investigate the dependence of the dynamic behaviour on model parameters, the equations are solved analytically and conditions for unbounded versus bounded solutions are discussed. An analytic characterisation of t