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Sample records for aggressive breast cancers

  1. Breast Cancers Between Mammograms Have Aggressive Features

    Cancer.gov

    Breast cancers that are discovered in the period between regular screening mammograms—known as interval cancers—are more likely to have features associated with aggressive behavior and a poor prognosis than cancers found via screening mammograms.

  2. Tumor Tension Induces Persistent Inflammation and Promotes Breast Cancer Aggression

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-14-1-0056 TITLE: Tumor Tension Induces Persistent Inflammation and Promotes Breast Cancer Aggression PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...Breast Cancer Aggression 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER Ori Maller and Valerie M. Weaver email...ECM stiffening cooperate with inflammatory signaling to facilitate immune evasion and promote breast cancer aggression . In this progress report, I

  3. Low spinophilin expression enhances aggressive biological behavior of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ress, Anna Lena; Aigelsreiter, Ariane; Schauer, Silvia; Wagner, Karin; Langsenlehner, Tanja; Resel, Margit; Gerger, Armin; Ling, Hui; Ivan, Cristina; Calin, George Adrian; Hoefler, Gerald; Rinner, Beate; Pichler, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Spinophilin, a putative tumor suppressor gene, has been shown to be involved in the pathogenesis of certain types of cancer, but its role has never been systematically explored in breast cancer. In this study, we determined for the first time the expression pattern of spinophilin in human breast cancer molecular subtypes (n = 489) and correlated it with survival (n = 921). We stably reduced spinophilin expression in breast cancer cells and measured effects on cellular growth, apoptosis, anchorage-independent growth, migration, invasion and self-renewal capacity in vitro and metastases formation in vivo. Microarray profiling was used to determine the most abundantly expressed genes in spinophilin-silenced breast cancer cells. Spinophilin expression was significantly lower in basal-like breast cancer (p<0.001) and an independent poor prognostic factor in breast cancer patients (hazard ratio = 1.93, 95% confidence interval: 1.24-3.03; p = 0.004) A reduction of spinophilin levels increased cellular growth in breast cancer cells (p<0.05), without influencing activation of apoptosis. Anchorage-independent growth, migration and self-renewal capacity in vitro and metastatic potential in vivo were also significantly increased in spinophilin-silenced cells (p<0.05). Finally, we identified several differentially expressed genes in spinophilin-silenced cells. According to our data, low levels of spinophilin are associated with aggressive behavior of breast cancer. PMID:25857299

  4. The Antihelmintic Drug Pyrvinium Pamoate Targets Aggressive Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wei; Lacerda, Lara; Debeb, Bisrat G.; Atkinson, Rachel L.; Solley, Travis N.; Li, Li; Orton, Darren; McMurray, John S.; Hang, Brian I.; Lee, Ethan; Klopp, Ann H.; Ueno, Naoto T.; Reuben, James M.; Krishnamurthy, Savitri; Woodward, Wendy A.

    2013-01-01

    WNT signaling plays a key role in the self-renewal of tumor initiation cells (TICs). In this study, we used pyrvinium pamoate (PP), an FDA-approved antihelmintic drug that inhibits WNT signaling, to test whether pharmacologic inhibition of WNT signaling can specifically target TICs of aggressive breast cancer cells. SUM-149, an inflammatory breast cancer cell line, and SUM-159, a metaplastic basal-type breast cancer cell line, were used in these studies. We found that PP inhibited primary and secondary mammosphere formation of cancer cells at nanomolar concentrations, at least 10 times less than the dose needed to have a toxic effect on cancer cells. A comparable mammosphere formation IC50 dose to that observed in cancer cell lines was obtained using malignant pleural effusion samples from patients with IBC. A decrease in activity of the TIC surrogate aldehyde dehydrogenase was observed in PP-treated cells, and inhibition of WNT signaling by PP was associated with down-regulation of a panel of markers associated with epithelial-mesenchymal transition. In vivo, intratumoral injection was associated with tumor necrosis, and intraperitoneal injection into mice with tumor xenografts caused significant tumor growth delay and a trend toward decreased lung metastasis. In in vitro mammosphere-based and monolayer-based clonogenic assays, we found that PP radiosensitized cells in monolayer culture but not mammosphere culture. These findings suggest WNT signaling inhibition may be a feasible strategy for targeting aggressive breast cancer. Investigation and modification of the bioavailability and toxicity profile of systemic PP are warranted. PMID:24013655

  5. Glucose promotes breast cancer aggression and reduces metformin efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Wahdan-Alaswad, Reema; Fan, Zeying; Edgerton, Susan M; Liu, Bolin; Deng, Xin-Sheng; Arnadottir, Sigrid Salling; Richer, Jennifer K; Anderson, Steven M; Thor, Ann D

    2013-01-01

    Metformin treatment has been associated with a decrease in breast cancer risk and improved survival. Metformin induces complex cellular changes, resulting in decreased tumor cell proliferation, reduction of stem cells, and apoptosis. Using a carcinogen-induced rodent model of mammary tumorigenesis, we recently demonstrated that overfeeding in obese animals is associated with a 50% increase in tumor glucose uptake, increased proliferation, and tumor cell reprogramming to an “aggressive” metabolic state. Metformin significantly inhibited these pro-tumorigenic effects. We hypothesized that a dynamic relationship exists between chronic energy excess (glucose by dose) and metformin efficacy/action. Media glucose concentrations above 5 mmol/L was associated with significant increase in breast cancer cell proliferation, clonogenicity, motility, upregulation/activation of pro-oncogenic signaling, and reduction in apoptosis. These effects were most significant in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) cell lines. High-glucose conditions (10 mmol/L or above) significantly abrogated the effects of metformin. Mechanisms of metformin action at normal vs. high glucose overlapped but were not identical; for example, metformin reduced IGF-1R expression in both the HER2+ SK-BR-3 and TNBC MDA-MB-468 cell lines more significantly at 5, as compared with 10 mmol/L glucose. Significant changes in gene profiles related to apoptosis, cellular processes, metabolic processes, and cell proliferation occurred with metformin treatment in cells grown at 5 mmol/L glucose, whereas under high-glucose conditions, metformin did not significantly increase apoptotic/cellular death genes. These data indicate that failure to maintain glucose homeostasis may promote a more aggressive breast cancer phenotype and alter metformin efficacy and mechanisms of action. PMID:24107633

  6. Probing HER2-PUMA and EGFR-PUMA Crosstalks in Aggressive Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-11-1-0600 TITLE: Probing HER2- PUMA and EGFR- PUMA Crosstalks in Aggressive...COVERED 1 Sep 2011 – 31 Aug 2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Probing HER2- PUMA and EGFR- PUMA Crosstalks in Aggressive Breast Cancer 5b...on novel significant findings made from the initial Idea Award. We discovered that proapoptotic PUMA protein is highly expressed in the breast cancer

  7. PKCα expression is a marker for breast cancer aggressiveness

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms are potential targets for breast cancer therapy. This study was designed to evaluate which PKC isoforms might be optimal targets for different breast cancer subtypes. Results In two cohorts of primary breast cancers, PKCα levels correlated to estrogen and progesterone receptor negativity, tumor grade, and proliferative activity, whereas PKCδ and PKCε did not correlate to clinicopathological parameters. Patients with PKCα-positive tumors showed poorer survival than patients with PKCα-negative tumors independently of other factors. Cell line studies demonstrated that PKCα levels are high in MDA-MB-231 and absent in T47D cells which proliferated slower than other cell lines. Furthermore, PKCα silencing reduced proliferation of MDA-MB-231 cells. PKCα inhibition or downregulation also reduced cell migration in vitro. Conclusions PKCα is a marker for poor prognosis of breast cancer and correlates to and is important for cell functions associated with breast cancer progression. PMID:20398285

  8. Chronic psychological stress and its impact on the development of aggressive breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cormanique, Thayse Fachin; de Almeida, Lirane Elize Defante Ferreto; Rech, Cynthia Alba; Rech, Daniel; Herrera, Ana Cristina da Silva do Amaral; Panis, Carolina

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the clinicopathological findings of women diagnosed with breast cancer and study the impact of chronic psychological stress on the pathological characteristics of these tumors. Methods We investigated a cohort composed of women diagnosed with breast cancer and divided into two groups. One group was categorized as presenting with chronic psychological stress (by using the Self-Reporting Questionnaire − SRQ-20). Another group of women with breast cancer, but with no previous history of chronic psychological stress, comprised the Control Group. Clinical and pathological data were assessed. Results Women presenting with a history of chronic distress were significantly overweight when compared to the Control Group. Furthermore, it was observed that these stressed women also had a significant percentage of aggressive breast cancer subtype, the HER2 amplified tumor, which could be putatively associated with the loss of immunosurveillance. Conclusion Our findings suggested an interaction among chronic psychological stress, overweight, and the development of more aggressive breast tumors. PMID:26466057

  9. Cannabidiol as a novel inhibitor of Id-1 gene expression in aggressive breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    McAllister, Sean D; Christian, Rigel T; Horowitz, Maxx P; Garcia, Amaia; Desprez, Pierre-Yves

    2007-11-01

    Invasion and metastasis of aggressive breast cancer cells is the final and fatal step during cancer progression, and is the least understood genetically. Clinically, there are still limited therapeutic interventions for aggressive and metastatic breast cancers available. Clearly, effective and nontoxic therapies are urgently required. Id-1, an inhibitor of basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors, has recently been shown to be a key regulator of the metastatic potential of breast and additional cancers. Using a mouse model, we previously determined that metastatic breast cancer cells became significantly less invasive in vitro and less metastatic in vivo when Id-1 was down-regulated by stable transduction with antisense Id-1. It is not possible at this point, however, to use antisense technology to reduce Id-1 expression in patients with metastatic breast cancer. Here, we report that cannabidiol (CBD), a cannabinoid with a low-toxicity profile, could down-regulate Id-1 expression in aggressive human breast cancer cells. The CBD concentrations effective at inhibiting Id-1 expression correlated with those used to inhibit the proliferative and invasive phenotype of breast cancer cells. CBD was able to inhibit Id-1 expression at the mRNA and protein level in a concentration-dependent fashion. These effects seemed to occur as the result of an inhibition of the Id-1 gene at the promoter level. Importantly, CBD did not inhibit invasiveness in cells that ectopically expressed Id-1. In conclusion, CBD represents the first nontoxic exogenous agent that can significantly decrease Id-1 expression in metastatic breast cancer cells leading to the down-regulation of tumor aggressiveness.

  10. Unusual aggressive breast cancer: metastatic malignant phyllodes tumor.

    PubMed

    Singer, Adam; Tresley, Jonathan; Velazquez-Vega, Jose; Yepes, Monica

    2013-02-01

    For the year of 2012, it has been estimated that breast cancer will account for the greatest number of newly diagnosed cancers and the second highest proportion of cancer related deaths among women. Breast cancer, while often lumped together as one disease, represents a diverse group of malignancies with different imaging findings, histological appearances and behavior. While most invasive primary breast cancers are epithelial derived adenocarcinomas, rare neoplasms such as the phyllodes tumor may arise from mesenchymal tissue. Compared to the breast adenocarcinoma, the phyllodes tumor tends to affect a younger population, follows a different clinical course, is associated with different imaging and histological findings and is managed distinctively. There may be difficulty in differentiating the phyllodes tumor from a large fibroadenoma, but the mammographer plays a key role in reviewing the clinical and imaging data in order to arrive at the correct diagnosis. Early diagnosis with proper surgical management can often cure non-metastatic phyllodes tumors. However, in rare cases where metastasis occurs, prognosis tends to be poor. This report describes the presentation, imaging findings and management of a metastatic malignant phyllodes tumor.

  11. Probing HER2-PUMA and EGFR-PUMA Crosstalks in Aggressive Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-11-1-0600 TITLE: Probing HER2- PUMA and EGFR- PUMA ...AND SUBTITLE Probing HER2- PUMA and EGFR- PUMA Crosstalks in Aggressive Breast Canccer Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-11-1-0600 er 5b. GRANT...Award. We discovered that proapoptotic PUMA protein is highly expressed in the breast cancer cell lines and patient tumors that overexpress HER2 and/or

  12. Human Breast Cancer Invasion and Aggression Correlates with ECM Stiffening and Immune Cell Infiltration

    PubMed Central

    Acerbi, I; Cassereau, L; Dean, I; Shi, Q; Au, A; Park, C; Chen, YY; Liphardt, J; Hwang, ES; Weaver, VM

    2015-01-01

    Tumors are stiff and data suggest that the extracellular matrix stiffening that correlates with experimental mammary malignancy drives tumor invasion and metastasis. Nevertheless, the relationship between tissue and extracellular matrix stiffness and human breast cancer progression and aggression remains unclear. We undertook a biophysical and biochemical assessment of stromal-epithelial interactions in noninvasive, invasive and normal adjacent human breast tissue and in breast cancers of increasingly aggressive subtype. Our analysis revealed that human breast cancer transformation is accompanied by an incremental increase in collagen deposition and a progressive linearization and thickening of interstitial collagen. The linearization of collagen was visualized as an overall increase in tissue birefringence and was most striking at the invasive front of the tumor where the stiffness of the stroma and cellular mechanosignaling were the highest. Amongst breast cancer subtypes we found that the stroma at the invasive region of the more aggressive Basal-like and Her2 tumor subtypes was the most heterogeneous and the stiffest when compared to the less aggressive Luminal A and B subtypes. Intriguingly, we quantified the greatest number of infiltrating macrophages and the highest level of TGF beta signaling within the cells at the invasive front. We also established that stroma stiffness and the level of cellular TGF beta signaling positively correlated with each other and with the number of infiltrating tumor-activated, macrophages, which was highest in the more aggressive tumor subtypes. These findings indicate that human breast cancer progression and aggression, collagen linearization and stromal stiffening are linked and implicate tissue inflammation and TGF beta. PMID:25959051

  13. The PD1/PDL1 axis, a promising therapeutic target in aggressive breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Bertucci, François; Finetti, Pascal; Birnbaum, Daniel; Mamessier, Emilie

    2016-03-01

    Analysis of PDL1 mRNA expression in ∼5,500 breast cancers showed PDL1 upregulation in 38% of basal tumors and 38% of inflammatory breast cancers (IBC). Upregulation, associated with signs of strong cytotoxic local immune response, was associated with a better survival in the basal or triple-negative subtypes, and with a better pathological response to chemotherapy in these subtypes and IBC. Reactivation of dormant tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) by PD1/PDL1-inhibitors represents a promising strategy in these aggressive tumors.

  14. The PD1/PDL1 axis, a promising therapeutic target in aggressive breast cancers

    PubMed Central

    Bertucci, François; Finetti, Pascal; Birnbaum, Daniel; Mamessier, Emilie

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Analysis of PDL1 mRNA expression in ∼5,500 breast cancers showed PDL1 upregulation in 38% of basal tumors and 38% of inflammatory breast cancers (IBC). Upregulation, associated with signs of strong cytotoxic local immune response, was associated with a better survival in the basal or triple-negative subtypes, and with a better pathological response to chemotherapy in these subtypes and IBC. Reactivation of dormant tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) by PD1/PDL1-inhibitors represents a promising strategy in these aggressive tumors. PMID:27141340

  15. Study in mice shows that an aggressive type of breast cancer is linked to an inflammatory protein

    Cancer.gov

    Aberrant expression of an inflammatory protein, nitric oxide synthase 2 (NOS2), may enhance the progression and metastasis of an aggressive and less common form of breast cancer, known as the estrogen receptor-negative type of disease.

  16. Targeting uPAR with antagonistic recombinant human antibodies in aggressive breast cancer.

    PubMed

    LeBeau, Aaron M; Duriseti, Sai; Murphy, Stephanie T; Pepin, Francois; Hann, Byron; Gray, Joe W; VanBrocklin, Henry F; Craik, Charles S

    2013-04-01

    Components of the plasminogen activation system, which are overexpressed in aggressive breast cancer subtypes, offer appealing targets for development of new diagnostics and therapeutics. By comparing gene expression data in patient populations and cultured cell lines, we identified elevated levels of the urokinase plasminogen activation receptor (uPAR, PLAUR) in highly aggressive breast cancer subtypes and cell lines. Recombinant human anti-uPAR antagonistic antibodies exhibited potent binding in vitro to the surface of cancer cells expressing uPAR. In vivo these antibodies detected uPAR expression in triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) tumor xenografts using near infrared imaging and (111)In single-photon emission computed tomography. Antibody-based uPAR imaging probes accurately detected small disseminated lesions in a tumor metastasis model, complementing the current clinical imaging standard (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose at detecting non-glucose-avid metastatic lesions. A monotherapy study using the antagonistic antibodies resulted in a significant decrease in tumor growth in a TNBC xenograft model. In addition, a radioimmunotherapy study, using the anti-uPAR antibodies conjugated to the therapeutic radioisotope (177)Lu, found that they were effective at reducing tumor burden in vivo. Taken together, our results offer a preclinical proof of concept for uPAR targeting as a strategy for breast cancer diagnosis and therapy using this novel human antibody technology.

  17. Enhancement of the Efficacy of Conventional Anticancer Compounds through the Repression of SNAI Proteins in Aggressive Breast Cancer Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    vitamin D and anti-estrogens in human breast cancer tissues; (b) To determine the effects of alterations of the levels of SNAI proteins in breast...determine the effects of alterations of the levels of SNAI proteins in breast cancer cells on their sensitivity towards vitamin D and/or 4HT; and (3) To...diminish their aggressiveness but also make these cells sensitive to the inhibition of some of the conventional anticancer agents such as vitamin D and

  18. Associations between vitamin D deficiency and risk of aggressive breast cancer in African-American women.

    PubMed

    Yao, Song; Ambrosone, Christine B

    2013-07-01

    Although breast cancer incidence in the US is highest for women of European ancestry (EA), women of African ancestry (AA) have higher incidence of cancer diagnosed before age 40 and tumors with more aggressive features (high grade and negative for estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR) and human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER2)), which precludes targeted therapies and leads to poorer outcomes. It is unclear what underlies these disparities. It has been hypothesized that dark skin with high melanin content is the ancestral skin color of origin, with adaptation to northern environs resulting in lighter skin. Although intense sunlight in sub-Saharan Africa may compensate for low sun absorption through skin, an urban or western lifestyle may result in less synthesis of vitamin D with higher skin pigmentation. Laboratory and preclinical data indicate that vitamin D is involved in preventing breast carcinogenesis and progression. Vitamin D receptor (VDR) knock-out mice are more likely to develop tumors that are ER-negative, and we have shown that serum levels of 25OHD are lowest among EA women with triple-negative tumors (negative for ER, PR and HER2); and among non-cancer patients, vitamin D levels are lower in AAs than in EAs. Thus, it is plausible to hypothesize that low vitamin D levels could be associated with the higher prevalence of more aggressive tumors among AA women. In this paper, we review the current literature on vitamin D and aggressive breast cancer subtypes, discuss vitamin D in AA women from a perspective of evolution and adaption, and examine the potential role of vitamin D in cancer racial disparities. We present our recently published data showing two single nucleotide polymorphisms in vitamin D catabolic enzyme CYP24A1 associated with higher risk of estrogen ER-negative risk in AA than in EA women. The relationship of vitamin D with breast cancer risk may be subtype-specific, with emerging evidence of stronger effects of vitamin

  19. In vivo NCL targeting affects breast cancer aggressiveness through miRNA regulation

    PubMed Central

    Palmieri, Dario; De Luca, Luciana; Consiglio, Jessica; You, Jia; Rocci, Alberto; Talabere, Tiffany; Piovan, Claudia; Lagana, Alessandro; Cascione, Luciano; Guan, Jingwen; Gasparini, Pierluigi; Balatti, Veronica; Nuovo, Gerard; Coppola, Vincenzo; Hofmeister, Craig C.; Marcucci, Guido; Byrd, John C.; Volinia, Stefano; Shapiro, Charles L.; Freitas, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Numerous studies have described the altered expression and the causal role of microRNAs (miRNAs) in human cancer. However, to date, efforts to modulate miRNA levels for therapeutic purposes have been challenging to implement. Here we find that nucleolin (NCL), a major nucleolar protein, posttranscriptionally regulates the expression of a specific subset of miRNAs, including miR-21, miR-221, miR-222, and miR-103, that are causally involved in breast cancer initiation, progression, and drug resistance. We also show that NCL is commonly overexpressed in human breast tumors and that its expression correlates with that of NCL-dependent miRNAs. Finally, inhibition of NCL using guanosine-rich aptamers reduces the levels of NCL-dependent miRNAs and their target genes, thus reducing breast cancer cell aggressiveness both in vitro and in vivo. These findings illuminate a path to novel therapeutic approaches based on NCL-targeting aptamers for the modulation of miRNA expression in the treatment of breast cancer. PMID:23610125

  20. Enriched CD44(+)/CD24(-) population drives the aggressive phenotypes presented in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC).

    PubMed

    Ma, Fei; Li, Huihui; Wang, Haijuan; Shi, Xiuqing; Fan, Ying; Ding, Xiaoyan; Lin, Chen; Zhan, Qimin; Qian, Haili; Xu, Binghe

    2014-10-28

    The mechanism underlying the aggressive behaviors of triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) is not well characterized yet. The association between cancer stem cell (CSC) population and the aggressive behaviors of TNBC has not been established. We found the CD44(+)/CD24(-) cell population was enriched in TNBC tissues and cell lines, with a higher capacity of proliferation, migration, invasion and tumorigenicity as well as lower adhesion ability. The CD44(+)/CD24(-) cell population with cancer stem cell-like properties may play an important role in the aggressive behaviors of TNBC. This discovery may lead to new therapeutic strategies targeting CD44(+)/CD24(-) cell population in TNBC.

  1. Lectin chromatography/mass spectrometry discovery workflow identifies putative biomarkers of aggressive breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Drake, Penelope M; Schilling, Birgit; Niles, Richard K; Prakobphol, Akraporn; Li, Bensheng; Jung, Kwanyoung; Cho, Wonryeon; Braten, Miles; Inerowicz, Halina D; Williams, Katherine; Albertolle, Matthew; Held, Jason M; Iacovides, Demetris; Sorensen, Dylan J; Griffith, Obi L; Johansen, Eric; Zawadzka, Anna M; Cusack, Michael P; Allen, Simon; Gormley, Matthew; Hall, Steven C; Witkowska, H Ewa; Gray, Joe W; Regnier, Fred; Gibson, Bradford W; Fisher, Susan J

    2012-04-06

    We used a lectin chromatography/MS-based approach to screen conditioned medium from a panel of luminal (less aggressive) and triple negative (more aggressive) breast cancer cell lines (n=5/subtype). The samples were fractionated using the lectins Aleuria aurantia (AAL) and Sambucus nigra agglutinin (SNA), which recognize fucose and sialic acid, respectively. The bound fractions were enzymatically N-deglycosylated and analyzed by LC-MS/MS. In total, we identified 533 glycoproteins, ∼90% of which were components of the cell surface or extracellular matrix. We observed 1011 glycosites, 100 of which were solely detected in ≥3 triple negative lines. Statistical analyses suggested that a number of these glycosites were triple negative-specific and thus potential biomarkers for this tumor subtype. An analysis of RNaseq data revealed that approximately half of the mRNAs encoding the protein scaffolds that carried potential biomarker glycosites were up-regulated in triple negative vs luminal cell lines, and that a number of genes encoding fucosyl- or sialyltransferases were differentially expressed between the two subtypes, suggesting that alterations in glycosylation may also drive candidate identification. Notably, the glycoproteins from which these putative biomarker candidates were derived are involved in cancer-related processes. Thus, they may represent novel therapeutic targets for this aggressive tumor subtype.

  2. Comprehensive functional analysis of the tousled-like kinase 2 frequently amplified in aggressive luminal breast cancers

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin-Ah; Tan, Ying; Wang, Xian; Cao, Xixi; Veeraraghavan, Jamunarani; Liang, Yulong; Edwards, Dean P.; Huang, Shixia; Pan, Xuewen; Li, Kaiyi; Schiff, Rachel; Wang, Xiao-Song

    2016-01-01

    More aggressive and therapy-resistant oestrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancers remain a great clinical challenge. Here our integrative genomic analysis identifies tousled-like kinase 2 (TLK2) as a candidate kinase target frequently amplified in ∼10.5% of ER-positive breast tumours. The resulting overexpression of TLK2 is more significant in aggressive and advanced tumours, and correlates with worse clinical outcome regardless of endocrine therapy. Ectopic expression of TLK2 leads to enhanced aggressiveness in breast cancer cells, which may involve the EGFR/SRC/FAK signalling. Conversely, TLK2 inhibition selectively inhibits the growth of TLK2-high breast cancer cells, downregulates ERα, BCL2 and SKP2, impairs G1/S cell cycle progression, induces apoptosis and significantly improves progression-free survival in vivo. We identify two potential TLK2 inhibitors that could serve as backbones for future drug development. Together, amplification of the cell cycle kinase TLK2 presents an attractive genomic target for aggressive ER-positive breast cancers. PMID:27694828

  3. Oncogenic miR-181a/b affect the DNA damage response in aggressive breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bisso, Andrea; Faleschini, Michela; Zampa, Federico; Capaci, Valeria; De Santa, Jacopo; Santarpia, Libero; Piazza, Silvano; Cappelletti, Vera; Daidone, Mariagrazia; Agami, Reuven; Del Sal, Giannino

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous tumor type characterized by a complex spectrum of molecular aberrations, resulting in a diverse array of malignant features and clinical outcomes. Deciphering the molecular mechanisms that fuel breast cancer development and act as determinants of aggressiveness is a primary need to improve patient management. Among other alterations, aberrant expression of microRNAs has been found in breast cancer and other human tumors, where they act as either oncogenes or tumor suppressors by virtue of their ability to finely modulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. In this study, we describe a new role for miR-181a/b as negative regulators of the DNA damage response in breast cancer, impacting on the expression and activity of the stress-sensor kinase ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM). We report that miR-181a and miR-181b were overexpressed in more aggressive breast cancers, and their expression correlates inversely with ATM levels. Moreover we demonstrate that deregulated expression of miR-181a/b determines the sensitivity of triple-negative breast cancer cells to the poly-ADP-ribose-polymerase1 (PARP1) inhibition. These evidences suggest that monitoring the expression of miR-181a/b could be helpful in tailoring more effective treatments based on inhibition of PARP1 in breast and other tumor types. PMID:23656790

  4. ZNF503/Zpo2 drives aggressive breast cancer progression by down-regulation of GATA3 expression.

    PubMed

    Shahi, Payam; Wang, Chih-Yang; Lawson, Devon A; Slorach, Euan M; Lu, Angela; Yu, Ying; Lai, Ming-Derg; Gonzalez Velozo, Hugo; Werb, Zena

    2017-03-21

    The transcription factor GATA3 is the master regulator that drives mammary luminal epithelial cell differentiation and maintains mammary gland homeostasis. Loss of GATA3 is associated with aggressive breast cancer development. We have identified ZNF503/ZEPPO2 zinc-finger elbow-related proline domain protein 2 (ZPO2) as a transcriptional repressor of GATA3 expression and transcriptional activity that induces mammary epithelial cell proliferation and breast cancer development. We show that ZPO2 is recruited to GATA3 promoter in association with ZBTB32 (Repressor of GATA, ROG) and that ZBTB32 is essential for down-regulation of GATA3 via ZPO2. Through this modulation of GATA3 activity, ZPO2 promotes aggressive breast cancer development. Our data provide insight into a mechanism of GATA3 regulation, and identify ZPO2 as a possible candidate gene for future diagnostic and therapeutic strategies.

  5. Rac3 induces a molecular pathway triggering breast cancer cell aggressiveness: differences in MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 breast cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Rho GTPases are involved in cellular functions relevant to cancer. The roles of RhoA and Rac1 have already been established. However, the role of Rac3 in cancer aggressiveness is less well understood. Methods This work was conducted to analyze the implication of Rac3 in the aggressiveness of two breast cancer cell lines, MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7: both express Rac3, but MDA-MB-231 expresses more activated RhoA. The effect of Rac3 in cancer cells was also compared with its effect on the non-tumorigenic mammary epithelial cells MCF-10A. We analyzed the consequences of Rac3 depletion by anti-Rac3 siRNA. Results Firstly, we analyzed the effects of Rac3 depletion on the breast cancer cells’ aggressiveness. In the invasive MDA-MB-231 cells, Rac3 inhibition caused a marked reduction of both invasion (40%) and cell adhesion to collagen (84%), accompanied by an increase in TNF-induced apoptosis (72%). This indicates that Rac3 is involved in the cancer cells’ aggressiveness. Secondly, we investigated the effects of Rac3 inhibition on the expression and activation of related signaling molecules, including NF-κB and ERK. Cytokine secretion profiles were also analyzed. In the non-invasive MCF-7 line; Rac3 did not influence any of the parameters of aggressiveness. Conclusions This discrepancy between the effects of Rac3 knockdown in the two cell lines could be explained as follows: in the MDA-MB-231 line, the Rac3-dependent aggressiveness of the cancer cells is due to the Rac3/ERK-2/NF-κB signaling pathway, which is responsible for MMP-9, interleukin-6, -8 and GRO secretion, as well as the resistance to TNF-induced apoptosis, whereas in the MCF-7 line, this pathway is not functional because of the low expression of NF-κB subunits in these cells. Rac3 may be a potent target for inhibiting aggressive breast cancer. PMID:23388133

  6. Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Breast Cancer What is Breast Cancer? How Tumors Form The body is made up ... tumors form in the breast tissue. Who Gets Breast Cancer? Breast cancer is one of the most common ...

  7. RB loss contributes to aggressive tumor phenotypes in MYC-driven triple negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Knudsen, Erik S; McClendon, A Kathleen; Franco, Jorge; Ertel, Adam; Fortina, Paolo; Witkiewicz, Agnieszka K

    2015-01-01

    Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) is characterized by multiple genetic events occurring in concert to drive pathogenic features of the disease. Here we interrogated the coordinate impact of p53, RB, and MYC in a genetic model of TNBC, in parallel with the analysis of clinical specimens. Primary mouse mammary epithelial cells (mMEC) with defined genetic features were used to delineate the combined action of RB and/or p53 in the genesis of TNBC. In this context, the deletion of either RB or p53 alone and in combination increased the proliferation of mMEC; however, the cells did not have the capacity to invade in matrigel. Gene expression profiling revealed that loss of each tumor suppressor has effects related to proliferation, but RB loss in particular leads to alterations in gene expression associated with the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. The overexpression of MYC in combination with p53 loss or combined RB/p53 loss drove rapid cell growth. While the effects of MYC overexpression had a dominant impact on gene expression, loss of RB further enhanced the deregulation of a gene expression signature associated with invasion. Specific RB loss lead to enhanced invasion in boyden chambers assays and gave rise to tumors with minimal epithelial characteristics relative to RB-proficient models. Therapeutic screening revealed that RB-deficient cells were particularly resistant to agents targeting PI3K and MEK pathway. Consistent with the aggressive behavior of the preclinical models of MYC overexpression and RB loss, human TNBC tumors that express high levels of MYC and are devoid of RB have a particularly poor outcome. Together these results underscore the potency of tumor suppressor pathways in specifying the biology of breast cancer. Further, they demonstrate that MYC overexpression in concert with RB can promote a particularly aggressive form of TNBC.

  8. Role of miR-139 as a surrogate marker for tumor aggression in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Dai, Hongyan; Gallagher, Dan; Schmitt, Sarah; Pessetto, Ziyan Y; Fan, Fang; Godwin, Andrew K; Tawfik, Ossama

    2017-03-01

    MicroRNAs are non-protein coding molecules that play a key role in oncogenesis, tumor progression, and metastasis in many types of malignancies including breast cancer. In the current study, we studied the expression of microRNA-139-5p (miR-139) in invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) of the breast and correlated its expression with tumor grade, molecular subtype, hormonal status, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 status, proliferation index, tumor size, lymph node status, patient's age, and overall survival in 74 IDC cases. In addition, we compared and correlated miR-139 expression in 18 paired serum and tissue samples from patients with IDC to assess its value as a serum marker. Our data showed that miR-139 was down-regulated in all tumor tissue samples compared with control. More pronounced down-regulation was seen in tumors that were higher grade, estrogen receptor negative, progesterone receptor negative, more proliferative, or larger in size (P < .05). Although not statistically significant, lower miR-139 level was frequently associated with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 overexpression. In addition, significantly lower miR-139 tissue level was seen in patients who were deceased (P = .027), although older age (>50 years) and positive local nodal disease did not adversely affect miR-139 expression. In contrast, serum miR-139 profile of the patients appeared similar to that of normal control. In conclusion, our study demonstrated that down-regulation of miR-139 was associated with aggressive tumor behavior and disease progression in breast cancer. miR-139 may serve as a risk assessment biomarker in tailoring treatment options.

  9. TNRC9 downregulates BRCA1 expression and promotes breast cancer aggressiveness.

    PubMed

    Shan, Jingxuan; Dsouza, Shoba P; Bakhru, Sasha; Al-Azwani, Eman K; Ascierto, Maria L; Sastry, Konduru S; Bedri, Shahinaz; Kizhakayil, Dhanya; Aigha, Idil I; Malek, Joel; Al-Bozom, Issam; Gehani, Salah; Furtado, Stacia; Mathiowitz, Edith; Wang, Ena; Marincola, Francesco M; Chouchane, Lotfi

    2013-05-01

    Although the linkage between germline mutations of BRCA1 and hereditary breast/ovarian cancers is well established, recent evidence suggests that altered expression of wild-type BRCA1 might contribute to the sporadic forms of breast cancer. The breast cancer gene trinucleotide-repeat-containing 9 (TNRC9; TOX3) has been associated with disease susceptibility but its function is undetermined. Here, we report that TNRC9 is often amplified and overexpressed in breast cancer, particularly in advanced breast cancer. Gene amplification was associated with reduced disease-free and metastasis-free survival rates. Ectopic expression of TNRC9 increased breast cancer cell proliferation, migration, and survival after exposure to apoptotic stimuli. These phenotypes were associated with tumor progression in a mouse model of breast cancer. Gene expression profiling, protein analysis, and in silico assays of large datasets of breast and ovarian cancer samples suggested that TNRC9 and BRCA1 expression were inversely correlated. Notably, we found that TNRC9 bound to both the BRCA1 promoter and the cAMP-responsive element-binding protein (CREB) complex, a regulator of BRCA1 transcription. In support of this connection, expression of TNRC9 downregulated expression of BRCA1 by altering the methylation status of its promoter. Our studies unveil a function for TNRC9 in breast cancer that highlights a new paradigm in BRCA1 regulation.

  10. Breast cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... of a direct link between breast cancer and pesticides. Symptoms Early breast cancer often does not cause ... breast cancer should not drink alcohol at all) Alternative Names Cancer - breast; Carcinoma - ductal; Carcinoma - lobular; DCIS; ...

  11. Loss of RasGAP Tumor Suppressors Underlies the Aggressive Nature of Luminal B Breast Cancers.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Sarah Naomi; Wronski, Ania; Castaño, Zafira; Dake, Benjamin; Malone, Clare; De Raedt, Thomas; Enos, Miriam; DeRose, Yoko S; Zhou, Wenhui; Guerra, Stephanie; Loda, Massimo; Welm, Alana; Partridge, Ann H; McAllister, Sandra S; Kuperwasser, Charlotte; Cichowski, Karen

    2017-02-01

    Luminal breast cancers are typically estrogen receptor-positive and generally have the best prognosis. However, a subset of luminal tumors, namely luminal B cancers, frequently metastasize and recur. Unfortunately, the causal events that drive their progression are unknown, and therefore it is difficult to identify individuals who are likely to relapse and should receive escalated treatment. Here, we identify a bifunctional RasGAP tumor suppressor whose expression is lost in almost 50% of luminal B tumors. Moreover, we show that two RasGAP genes are concomitantly suppressed in the most aggressive luminal malignancies. Importantly, these genes cooperatively regulate two major oncogenic pathways, RAS and NF-κB, through distinct domains, and when inactivated drive the metastasis of luminal tumors in vivo Finally, although the cooperative effects on RAS drive invasion, NF-κB activation triggers epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and is required for metastasis. Collectively, these studies reveal important mechanistic insight into the pathogenesis of luminal B tumors and provide functionally relevant prognostic biomarkers that may guide treatment decisions.

  12. Down regulation of ADAM33 as a Predictive Biomarker of Aggressive Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Manica, Graciele C. M.; Ribeiro, Caroline F.; Oliveira, Marco A. S. de; Pereira, Isabela T.; Chequin, Andressa; Ramos, Edneia A. S.; Klassen, Liliane M. B.; Sebastião, Ana Paula M.; Alvarenga, Larissa M.; Zanata, Silvio M.; Noronha, Lucia De; Rabinovich, Iris; Costa, Fabricio F.; Souza, Emanuel M.; Klassen, Giseli

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease with differences in its clinical, molecular and biological features. Traditionally, immunohistochemical markers together with clinicopathologic parameters are used to classify breast cancer and to predict disease outcome. Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is a particular type of breast cancer that is defined by a lack of expression of hormonal receptors and the HER2 gene. Most cases of TNBC also have a basal-like phenotype (BLBC) with expression of cytokeratin 5/6 and/or EGFR. A basal marker alone is insufficient for a better understanding of the tumor biology of TNBC. In that regard, the ADAM33 gene is silenced by DNA hypermethylation in breast cancer, which suggests that ADAM33 might be useful as a molecular marker. In the present study, we have produced monoclonal antibodies against the ADAM33 protein and have investigated the role of ADAM33 protein in breast cancer. We used 212 breast tumor samples and lower levels of ADAM33 were correlated with TNBC and basal-like markers. A lower level of ADAM33 was also correlated with shorter overall survival and metastasis-free survival and was considered an independent prognostic factor suggesting that ADAM33 is a novel molecular biomarker of TNBC and BLBC that might be useful as a prognostic factor. PMID:28294120

  13. Down regulation of ADAM33 as a Predictive Biomarker of Aggressive Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Manica, Graciele C M; Ribeiro, Caroline F; Oliveira, Marco A S de; Pereira, Isabela T; Chequin, Andressa; Ramos, Edneia A S; Klassen, Liliane M B; Sebastião, Ana Paula M; Alvarenga, Larissa M; Zanata, Silvio M; Noronha, Lucia De; Rabinovich, Iris; Costa, Fabricio F; Souza, Emanuel M; Klassen, Giseli

    2017-03-15

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease with differences in its clinical, molecular and biological features. Traditionally, immunohistochemical markers together with clinicopathologic parameters are used to classify breast cancer and to predict disease outcome. Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is a particular type of breast cancer that is defined by a lack of expression of hormonal receptors and the HER2 gene. Most cases of TNBC also have a basal-like phenotype (BLBC) with expression of cytokeratin 5/6 and/or EGFR. A basal marker alone is insufficient for a better understanding of the tumor biology of TNBC. In that regard, the ADAM33 gene is silenced by DNA hypermethylation in breast cancer, which suggests that ADAM33 might be useful as a molecular marker. In the present study, we have produced monoclonal antibodies against the ADAM33 protein and have investigated the role of ADAM33 protein in breast cancer. We used 212 breast tumor samples and lower levels of ADAM33 were correlated with TNBC and basal-like markers. A lower level of ADAM33 was also correlated with shorter overall survival and metastasis-free survival and was considered an independent prognostic factor suggesting that ADAM33 is a novel molecular biomarker of TNBC and BLBC that might be useful as a prognostic factor.

  14. Shorter telomeres and high telomerase activity correlate with a highly aggressive phenotype in breast cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Ceja-Rangel, Hugo A; Sánchez-Suárez, Patricia; Castellanos-Juárez, Emilio; Peñaroja-Flores, Rubicelia; Arenas-Aranda, Diego J; Gariglio, Patricio; Benítez-Bribiesca, Luis

    2016-09-01

    Maintenance of telomere length is one function of human telomerase that is crucial for the survival of cancer cells and cancer progression. Both telomeres and telomerase have been proposed as possible biomarkers of cancer risk and cancer invasiveness; however, their clinical relevance is still under discussion. In order to improve our understanding of the relationship between telomere length and telomerase activity with cancer invasiveness, we studied telomere length as well as telomerase levels, activity, and intracellular localization in breast cancer cell lines with diverse invasive phenotypes. We found an apparently paradoxical coincidence of short telomeres and enhanced telomerase activity in the most invasive breast cancer cell lines. We also observed that hTERT intracellular localization could be correlated with its level of activity. There was no association between human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) protein expression levels and invasiveness. We propose that simultaneous evaluation of these two biomarkers-telomere length and telomerase activity-could be useful for the assessment of the invasive capacity and aggressiveness of tumor cells from breast cancer patients.

  15. What Is Breast Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research? Breast Cancer About Breast Cancer What Is Breast Cancer? Breast cancer starts when cells in the breast ... spread, see our section on Cancer Basics . Where breast cancer starts Breast cancers can start from different parts ...

  16. Breast Cancer: Treatment Options

    MedlinePlus

    ... when lymph nodes are not involved, called node-negative breast cancer. These shorter schedules are becoming more ... patients with a smaller, less-aggressive, and node-negative tumor. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy. Intensity-modulated radiation ...

  17. Expression of Stromal Caveolin- 1 May Be a Predictor for Aggressive Behaviour of Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Eliyatkin, Nuket; Aktas, Safiye; Diniz, Gulden; Ozgur, Halil Hakan; Ekin, Zubeyde Yildirim; Kupelioglu, Ali

    2017-02-24

    Caveolin-1 (Cav-1) is well known as a principal scaffolding protein of caveolae which are specialized plasma membrane structures. The role of Cav-1 in tumorigenesis of breast cancers is relatively less studied. The aim of the present study is to describe the biological roles of Cav-1 in breast cancers considering its contrasting dual functions as an oncogene and as a tumor suppressor. This study included 71 females with breast cancer who had been histopathologically diagnosed in Private Gunes Pathology Laboratory between the years 2007, and 2012. The mean age is 52.48 ± 12.8 years. Patients were followed up for a mean period of 47.97 ± 20.48 months. We didn't determine Cav-1 positive tumor cells. In 36 cases (50.7%), there were stromal expressions of Cav-1. In the statistical analysis, there was a statistically significant correlation between Cav-1 expression and ER (p = 0.033), metastasis (p = 0.005), lymphatic invasion (p = 0.000), nodal metastasis (p = 0,003), perinodal invasion (p = 0.003), metastasis (p = 0.005) and survival (p = 0.009). We found that Cav-1 expression is associated with tumor size, histological grade, lymph node involvement. Accordingly, we have suggested that Cav-1 may be a predictive biomarker for breast cancer.

  18. miRNA expression profiling of inflammatory breast cancer identifies a 5-miRNA signature predictive of breast tumor aggressiveness.

    PubMed

    Lerebours, Florence; Cizeron-Clairac, Geraldine; Susini, Aurelie; Vacher, Sophie; Mouret-Fourme, Emmanuelle; Belichard, Catherine; Brain, Etienne; Alberini, Jean-Louis; Spyratos, Frédérique; Lidereau, Rosette; Bieche, Ivan

    2013-10-01

    IBC (inflammatory breast cancer) is a rare but very aggressive form of breast cancer with a particular phenotype. The molecular mechanisms responsible for IBC remain largely unknown. In particular, genetic and epigenetic alterations specific to IBC remain to be identified. MicroRNAs, a class of small noncoding RNAs able to regulate gene expression, are deregulated in breast cancer and may therefore serve as tools for diagnosis and prediction. This study was designed to determine miRNA expression profiling (microRNAome) in IBC. Quantitative RT-PCR was used to determine expression levels of 804 miRNAs in a screening series of 12 IBC compared to 31 non-stage-matched non-IBC and 8 normal breast samples. The differentially expressed miRNAs were then validated in a series of 65 IBC and 95 non-IBC. From a set of 18 miRNAs of interest selected from the screening series, 13 were differentially expressed with statistical significance in the validation series of IBC compared to non-IBC. Among these, a 5-miRNA signature comprising miR-421, miR-486, miR-503, miR-720 and miR-1303 was shown to be predictive for IBC phenotype with an overall accuracy of 89%. Moreover, multivariate analysis showed that this signature was an independent predictor of poor Metastasis-Free Survival in non-IBC patients.

  19. One Thousand Genomes Imputation in the National Cancer Institute Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium Aggressive Prostate Cancer Genome-wide Association Study

    PubMed Central

    Machiela, Mitchell J.; Chen, Constance; Liang, Liming; Diver, W. Ryan; Stevens, Victoria L.; Tsilidis, Konstantinos K.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Hunter, David J.; Kraft, Peter

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Genotype imputation substantially increases available markers for analysis in genome-wide association studies (GWAS) by leveraging linkage disequilibrium from a reference panel. We sought to (i) investigate the performance of imputation from the August 2010 release of the 1000 Genomes Project (1000GP) in an existing GWAS of prostate cancer, (ii) look for novel associations with prostate cancer risk, (iii) fine-map known prostate cancer susceptibility regions using an approximate Bayesian framework and stepwise regression, and (iv) compare power and efficiency of imputation and de novo sequencing. METHODS We used 2,782 aggressive prostate cancer cases and 4,458 controls from the NCI Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium aggressive prostate cancer GWAS to infer 5.8 million well-imputed autosomal single nucleotide polymorphisms. RESULTS Imputation quality, as measured by correlation between imputed and true allele counts, was higher among common variants than rare variants. We found no novel prostate cancer associations among a subset of 1.2 million well-imputed low-frequency variants. At a genome-wide sequencing cost of $2,500, imputation from SNP arrays is a more powerful strategy than sequencing for detecting disease associations of SNPs with minor allele frequencies above 1%. CONCLUSIONS 1000GP imputation provided dense coverage of previously-identified prostate cancer susceptibility regions, highlighting its potential as an inexpensive first-pass approach to fine-mapping in regions such as 5p15 and 8q24. Our study shows 1000GP imputation can accurately identify low-frequency variants and stresses the importance of large sample size when studying these variants. PMID:23255287

  20. A novel HMGA1-CCNE2-YAP axis regulates breast cancer aggressiveness

    PubMed Central

    Ciani, Yari; Sgarra, Riccardo; Piazza, Silvano; Manfioletti, Guidalberto

    2015-01-01

    High Mobility Group A1 (HMGA1) is an architectural chromatin factor that promotes neoplastic transformation and progression. However, the mechanism by which HMGA1 exerts its oncogenic function is not fully understood. Here, we show that cyclin E2 (CCNE2) acts downstream of HMGA1 to regulate the motility and invasiveness of basal-like breast cancer cells by promoting the nuclear localization and activity of YAP, the downstream mediator of the Hippo pathway. Mechanistically, the activity of MST1/2 and LATS1/2, the core kinases of the Hippo pathway, are required for the HMGA1- and CCNE2-mediated regulation of YAP localization. In breast cancer patients, high levels of HMGA1 and CCNE2 expression are associated with the YAP/TAZ signature, supporting this connection. Moreover, we provide evidence that CDK inhibitors induce the translocation of YAP from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, resulting in a decrease in its activity. These findings reveal an association between HMGA1 and the Hippo pathway that is relevant to stem cell biology, tissue homeostasis, and cancer. PMID:26265440

  1. 5′-AMP-activated Protein Kinase (AMPK) Supports the Growth of Aggressive Experimental Human Breast Cancer Tumors*

    PubMed Central

    Laderoute, Keith R.; Calaoagan, Joy M.; Chao, Wan-ru; Dinh, Dominc; Denko, Nicholas; Duellman, Sarah; Kalra, Jessica; Liu, Xiaohe; Papandreou, Ioanna; Sambucetti, Lidia; Boros, Laszlo G.

    2014-01-01

    Rapid tumor growth can establish metabolically stressed microenvironments that activate 5′-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a ubiquitous regulator of ATP homeostasis. Previously, we investigated the importance of AMPK for the growth of experimental tumors prepared from HRAS-transformed mouse embryo fibroblasts and for primary brain tumor development in a rat model of neurocarcinogenesis. Here, we used triple-negative human breast cancer cells in which AMPK activity had been knocked down to investigate the contribution of AMPK to experimental tumor growth and core glucose metabolism. We found that AMPK supports the growth of fast-growing orthotopic tumors prepared from MDA-MB-231 and DU4475 breast cancer cells but had no effect on the proliferation or survival of these cells in culture. We used in vitro and in vivo metabolic profiling with [13C]glucose tracers to investigate the contribution of AMPK to core glucose metabolism in MDA-MB-231 cells, which have a Warburg metabolic phenotype; these experiments indicated that AMPK supports tumor glucose metabolism in part through positive regulation of glycolysis and the nonoxidative pentose phosphate cycle. We also found that AMPK activity in the MDA-MB-231 tumors could systemically perturb glucose homeostasis in sensitive normal tissues (liver and pancreas). Overall, our findings suggest that the contribution of AMPK to the growth of aggressive experimental tumors has a critical microenvironmental component that involves specific regulation of core glucose metabolism. PMID:24993821

  2. Breast Cancer Overview

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer > Breast Cancer > Breast Cancer: Overview Request Permissions Breast Cancer: Overview Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , ... bean-shaped organs that help fight infection. About breast cancer Cancer begins when healthy cells in the breast ...

  3. Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Breast cancer affects one in eight women during their lives. No one knows why some women get breast cancer, but there are many risk factors. Risks that ... who have family members with breast or ovarian cancer may wish to be tested for the genes. ...

  4. IGF-IR cooperates with ERα to inhibit breast cancer cell aggressiveness by regulating the expression and localisation of ECM molecules

    PubMed Central

    Afratis, Nikolaos A.; Bouris, Panagiotis; Skandalis, Spyros S.; Multhaupt, Hinke A.; Couchman, John R.; Theocharis, Achilleas D.; Karamanos, Nikos K.

    2017-01-01

    IGF-IR is highly associated with the behaviour of breast cancer cells. In ERα-positive breast cancer, IGF-IR is present at high levels. In clinical practice, prolonged treatment with anti-estrogen agents results in resistance to the therapy with activation of alternative signaling pathways. Receptor Tyrosine Kinases, and especially IGF-IR, have crucial roles in these processes. Here, we report a nodal role of IGF-IR in the regulation of ERα-positive breast cancer cell aggressiveness and the regulation of expression levels of several extracellular matrix molecules. In particular, activation of IGF-IR, but not EGFR, in MCF-7 breast cancer cells results in the reduction of specific matrix metalloproteinases and their inhibitors. In contrast, IGF-IR inhibition leads to the depletion by endocytosis of syndecan-4. Global important changes in cell adhesion receptors, which include integrins and syndecan-4 triggered by IGF-IR inhibition, regulate adhesion and invasion. Cell function assays that were performed in MCF-7 cells as well as their ERα-suppressed counterparts indicate that ER status is a major determinant of IGF-IR regulatory role on cell adhesion and invasion. The strong inhibitory role of IGF-IR on breast cancer cells aggressiveness for which E2-ERα signaling pathway seems to be essential, highlights IGF-IR as a major molecular target for novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:28079144

  5. IGF-IR cooperates with ERα to inhibit breast cancer cell aggressiveness by regulating the expression and localisation of ECM molecules.

    PubMed

    Afratis, Nikolaos A; Bouris, Panagiotis; Skandalis, Spyros S; Multhaupt, Hinke A; Couchman, John R; Theocharis, Achilleas D; Karamanos, Nikos K

    2017-01-12

    IGF-IR is highly associated with the behaviour of breast cancer cells. In ERα-positive breast cancer, IGF-IR is present at high levels. In clinical practice, prolonged treatment with anti-estrogen agents results in resistance to the therapy with activation of alternative signaling pathways. Receptor Tyrosine Kinases, and especially IGF-IR, have crucial roles in these processes. Here, we report a nodal role of IGF-IR in the regulation of ERα-positive breast cancer cell aggressiveness and the regulation of expression levels of several extracellular matrix molecules. In particular, activation of IGF-IR, but not EGFR, in MCF-7 breast cancer cells results in the reduction of specific matrix metalloproteinases and their inhibitors. In contrast, IGF-IR inhibition leads to the depletion by endocytosis of syndecan-4. Global important changes in cell adhesion receptors, which include integrins and syndecan-4 triggered by IGF-IR inhibition, regulate adhesion and invasion. Cell function assays that were performed in MCF-7 cells as well as their ERα-suppressed counterparts indicate that ER status is a major determinant of IGF-IR regulatory role on cell adhesion and invasion. The strong inhibitory role of IGF-IR on breast cancer cells aggressiveness for which E2-ERα signaling pathway seems to be essential, highlights IGF-IR as a major molecular target for novel therapeutic strategies.

  6. Vitamin D, Vitamin D Receptor Polymorphisms and Breast Cancer Aggressiveness in African American and European American Women

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-01

    successfully funded by NCI (P01 CA151135, PIs: Ambrosone, Palmer, Millikan ). CONCLUSION To conclude, we found premenopausal women with cancer of...e1000279. 15. Millikan RC, Newman B, Tse CK, Moorman PG, Conway K, et al. (2008) Epidemiology of basal-like breast cancer. Breast Cancer Res Treat

  7. Surgery for Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pregnancy Breast Cancer Breast Cancer Treatment Surgery for Breast Cancer Surgery is a common treatment for breast cancer, ... Relieve symptoms of advanced cancer Surgery to remove breast cancer There are two main types of surgery to ...

  8. Oridonin Ring A-Based Diverse Constructions of Enone Functionality: Identification of Novel Dienone Analogues Effective for Highly Aggressive Breast Cancer by Inducing Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Chunyong; Zhang, Yusong; Chen, Haijun; Yang, Zhengduo; Wild, Christopher; Ye, Na; Ester, Corbin D.; Xiong, Ailian; White, Mark A.; Shen, Qiang; Zhou, Jia

    2013-01-01

    Oridonin (1) has attracted considerable attention in recent years due to its unique and safe anticancer pharmacological profile. Nevertheless, it exhibits moderate to poor effects against highly aggressive cancers including triple-negative and drug-resistant breast cancer cells. Herein, we report the rational design and synthesis of novel dienone derivatives with an additional α,β-unsaturated ketone system diversely installed in the A-ring based on this class of natural scaffold that features dense functionalities and stereochemistry-rich frameworks. Efficient and regioselective enone construction strategies have been established. Meanwhile, a unique 3,7-rearrangement reaction was identified to furnish an unprecedented dienone scaffold. Intriguingly, these new analogues have been demonstrated to significantly induce apoptosis and inhibit colony formation with superior antitumor effects against aggressive and drug-resistant breast cancer cells in vitro and in vivo, while also exhibiting comparable or lower toxicity to normal human mammary epithelial cells in comparison with 1. PMID:24128046

  9. Oridonin ring A-based diverse constructions of enone functionality: identification of novel dienone analogues effective for highly aggressive breast cancer by inducing apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Ding, Chunyong; Zhang, Yusong; Chen, Haijun; Yang, Zhengduo; Wild, Christopher; Ye, Na; Ester, Corbin D; Xiong, Ailian; White, Mark A; Shen, Qiang; Zhou, Jia

    2013-11-14

    Oridonin (1) has attracted considerable attention in recent years because of its unique and safe anticancer pharmacological profile. Nevertheless, it exhibits moderate to poor effects against highly aggressive cancers including triple-negative and drug-resistant breast cancer cells. Herein, we report the rational design and synthesis of novel dienone derivatives with an additional α,β-unsaturated ketone system diversely installed in the A-ring based on this class of natural scaffold that features dense functionalities and stereochemistry-rich frameworks. Efficient and regioselective enone construction strategies have been established. Meanwhile, a unique 3,7-rearrangement reaction was identified to furnish an unprecedented dienone scaffold. Intriguingly, these new analogues have been demonstrated to significantly induce apoptosis and inhibit colony formation with superior antitumor effects against aggressive and drug-resistant breast cancer cells in vitro and in vivo while also exhibiting comparable or lower toxicity to normal human mammary epithelial cells in comparison with 1.

  10. Geminin overexpression-dependent recruitment and crosstalk with mesenchymal stem cells enhance aggressiveness in triple negative breast cancers

    PubMed Central

    Ananthula, Suryatheja; Sinha, Abhilasha; Gassim, Mohamed El; Batth, Simran; Marshall, Gailen D.; Gardner, Lauren H.; Shimizu, Yoshiko; ElShamy, Wael M.

    2016-01-01

    Resident mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) promote cancer progression. However, pathways and mechanisms involved in recruiting MSCs into breast tumors remain largely undefined. Here we show that geminin-dependent acetylation releases HMGB1 from the chromatin to the cytoplasm and extracellular space. Extracellular acetylated HMGB1 (Ac-HMGB1) promotes geminin overexpressing (GemOE) cells survival by binding to RAGE and activating NF-κB signaling. Extracellular Ac-HMGB1 also triggers expression and activation of RAGE in the non-expressing MSCs. RAGE activation induces expression of CXCR4 in MSCs and directional migration towards SDF1 (aka CXCL12)-expressing GemOE cells in vitro and in vivo. These effects augmented by the necrotic and hypoxic environment in GemOE tumors, especially within their cores. Reciprocal interactions between newly recruited MSCs and GemOE tumor cells elevate tumor-initiating (TIC), basal and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) traits and enhance aggressiveness in vitro and in vivo in GemOE tumor cells. Indeed, faster, larger and more aggressive tumors develop when GemOE cells are co-injected with MSCs in orthotopic breast tumor model. Concurrently, inhibiting c-Abl (and thus geminin function), RAGE or CXCR4 prevented MSCs recruitment to GemOE cells in vitro and in vivo, and decreased the TIC, basal and EMT phenotypes in these tumor cells. Accordingly, we propose that GemOE tumor cells present within tumor cores represent metastatic precursors, and suppressing the GemOE→HMGB1/RAGE→SDF1/CXCR4 signaling circuit could be a valid target for therapies to inhibit GemOE tumors and their metastases. PMID:26989079

  11. Overexpression of TMPRSS4 promotes tumor proliferation and aggressiveness in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiao-Mei; Liu, Wen-Lou; Chen, Xu; Wang, Ya-Wen; Shi, Duan-Bo; Zhang, Hui; Ma, Ran-Ran; Liu, Hai-Ting; Guo, Xiang-Yu; Hou, Feng; Li, Ming; Gao, Peng

    2017-01-01

    Transmembrane protease serine 4 (TMPRSS4) is a novel type II transmembrane serine protease that is overexpressed in various types of human cancers and has an important function in cancer progression. However, there is a paucity of data available regarding the biological effects of TMPRSS4 on breast cancer (BC) cells and the underlying mechanisms. In this study, expression of TMPRSS4 in BC tissues was detected by immunohistochemistry. The relationship between TMPRSS4 expression and clinicopathological characteristics as well as prognosis was evaluated. The effects of TMPRSS4 on cell proliferation, migration and invasion were investigated in BC cell lines in vitro. Additionally, RT-qPCR and western blot analysis were used to determine the expressions of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) biomarkers and TMPRSS4 in BC cell lines. We found that TMPRSS4 was overexpressed in BC tissues and its expression level was closely correlated with tumor size, histological grade, lymph node metastasis, clinical stage as well as poor survival (all P<0.05) and could be recognized as an independent prognostic factor for BC patients. Overexpression of TMPRSS4 promoted the proliferation, migration and invasion of BC cells in vitro. Moreover, TMPRSS4 knockdown significantly enhanced the expression of E-cadherin and claudin-1 and inhibited the expression of vimentin and Slug, indicating suppression of EMT. Our results suggest that TMPRSS4 plays a crucial role in the progression of BC. Moreover, TMPRSS4 overexpression promoted the proliferation, invasion and migration of BC cells by possibly inducing EMT. To conclude, TMPRSS4 may be a potential therapeutic target for cancer treatment. PMID:28259959

  12. Breast Cancer Types: What Your Type Means

    MedlinePlus

    ... the most different looking and considered the most aggressive. Some breast cancers are sensitive to your body's ... which cancers will spread and which may need aggressive treatments. That way, women with relatively low-risk ...

  13. Breast Cancer Cell-Derived GM-CSF Licenses Regulatory Th2 Induction by Plasmacytoid Predendritic Cells in Aggressive Disease Subtypes.

    PubMed

    Ghirelli, Cristina; Reyal, Fabien; Jeanmougin, Marine; Zollinger, Raphaël; Sirven, Philémon; Michea, Paula; Caux, Christophe; Bendriss-Vermare, Nathalie; Donnadieu, Marie-Hélène; Caly, Martial; Fourchotte, Virginie; Vincent-Salomon, Anne; Sigal-Zafrani, Brigitte; Sastre-Garau, Xavier; Soumelis, Vassili

    2015-07-15

    Reciprocal interactions between tumor cells and their microenvironment vitally impact tumor progression. In this study, we show that GM-CSF produced by primary breast tumor cells induced the activation of plasmacytoid predendritic cells (pDC), a cell type critical to anti-viral immunity. pDC that expressed the GM-CSF receptor were increased in breast tumors compared with noninvolved adjacent breast tissue. Tumor-activated pDC acquired naïve CD4(+) T-cell stimulatory capacity and promoted a regulatory Th2 response. Finally, the concomitant increase of GM-CSF and pDC was significantly associated with relatively more aggressive breast cancer subtypes. Our results characterize the first tumor-derived factor that can activate pDC to promote a regulatory Th2 response, with implications for therapeutic targeting of a tumor-immune axis of growing recognition in its significance to cancer.

  14. Phosphoinositide 3-kinase targeting by the β galactoside binding protein cytokine negates akt gene expression and leads aggressive breast cancer cells to apoptotic death

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Valerie; Mallucci, Livio

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)-activated signalling has a critical role in the evolution of aggressive tumourigenesis and is therefore a prime target for anticancer therapy. Previously we have shown that the β galactoside binding protein (βGBP) cytokine, an antiproliferative molecule, induces functional inhibition of class 1A and class 1B PI3K. Here, we have investigated whether, by targeting PI3K, βGBP has therapeutic efficacy in aggressive breast cancer cells where strong mitogenic input is fuelled by overexpression of the ErbB2 (also known as HER/neu, for human epidermal growth factor receptor 2) oncoprotein receptor and have used immortalised ductal cells and non-aggressive mammary cancer cells, which express ErbB2 at low levels, as controls. Methods Aggressive BT474 and SKBR3 cancer cells where ErbB2 is overexpressed, MCF10A immortalised ductal cells and non-invasive MCF-7 cancer cells which express low levels of ErbB2, both in their naive state and when forced to mimic aggressive behaviour, were used. Class IA PI3K was immunoprecipitated and the conversion of phosphatidylinositol (4,5)-biphosphate (PIP2) to phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-trisphosphate (PIP3) assessed by ELISA. The consequences of PI3K inhibition by βGBP were analysed at proliferation level, by extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation, by akt gene expression and by apoptosis. Apoptosis was documented by changes in mitochondrial membrane potential, alteration of the plasma membrane, caspase 3 activation and DNA fragmentation. Phosphorylated and total ERK were measured by Western blot analysis and akt mRNA levels by Northern blot analysis. The results obtained with the BT474 and SKBR3 cells were validated in the MCF10A ductal cells and in non-invasive MCF-7 breast cancer cells forced into mimicking the in vitro behaviour of the BT474 and SKBR3 cells. Results In aggressive breast cancer cells, where mitogenic signalling is enforced by the ErbB2 oncoprotein receptor

  15. Breast cancer screening

    MedlinePlus

    Mammogram - breast cancer screening; Breast exam - breast cancer screening; MRI - breast cancer screening ... performed to screen women to detect early breast cancer when it is more likely to be cured. ...

  16. Molecular apocrine breast cancers are aggressive estrogen receptor negative tumors overexpressing either HER2 or GCDFP15

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Molecular apocrine (MA) tumors are estrogen receptor (ER) negative breast cancers characterized by androgen receptor (AR) expression. We analyzed a group of 58 transcriptionally defined MA tumors and proposed a new tool to identify these tumors. Methods We performed quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) for ESR1, AR, FOXA1 and AR-related genes, and immunohistochemistry (IHC) for ER, PR, Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 (HER2), CK5/6, CK17, EGFR, Ki67, AR, FOXA1 and GCDFP15 and we analyzed clinical features. Results MA tumors were all characterized by ESR1(-) AR(+) FOXA1(+) and AR-related genes positive mRNA profile. IHC staining on these tumors showed 93% ER(-), only 58% AR(+) and 90% FOXA1(+). 67% and 57% MA tumors were HER2(3+) and GCDFP15(+), respectively. Almost all MA tumors (94%) had the IHC signature HER2(3+) or GCDFP15(+) but none of the 13 control basal-like (BL) tumors did. Clinically, MA tumors were rather aggressive, with poor prognostic factors. Conclusion MA tumors could be better defined by their qRT-PCR-AR profile than by AR IHC. In addition, we found that HER2 or GCDFP15 protein overexpression is a sensitive and specific tool to differentiate MA from BL in the context of ER negative tumors. A composite molecular and IHC signature could, therefore, help to identify MA tumors in daily practice. PMID:23663520

  17. Endoscopic Breast Surgery in Treating Patients With Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-02-05

    Male Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  18. Functional interaction between acyl-CoA synthetase 4, lipooxygenases and cyclooxygenase-2 in the aggressive phenotype of breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Maloberti, Paula M; Duarte, Alejandra B; Orlando, Ulises D; Pasqualini, María E; Solano, Angela R; López-Otín, Carlos; Podestá, Ernesto J

    2010-11-11

    The acyl-CoA synthetase 4 (ACSL4) is increased in breast cancer, colon and hepatocellular carcinoma. ACSL4 mainly esterifies arachidonic acid (AA) into arachidonoyl-CoA, reducing free AA intracellular levels, which is in contradiction with the need for AA metabolites in tumorigenesis. Therefore, the causal role of ACSL4 is still not established. This study was undertaken to determine the role of ACSL4 in AA metabolic pathway in breast cancer cells. The first novel finding is that ACSL4 regulates the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and the production of prostaglandin in MDA-MB-231 cells. We also found that ACSL4 is significantly up-regulated in the highly aggressive MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. In terms of its overexpression and inhibition, ACSL4 plays a causal role in the control of the aggressive phenotype. These results were confirmed by the increase in the aggressive behaviour of MCF-7 cells stably transfected with a Tet-off ACSL4 vector. Concomitantly, another significant finding was that intramitochondrial AA levels are significantly higher in the aggressive cells. Thus, the esterification of AA by ACSL4 compartmentalizes the release of AA in mitochondria, a mechanism that serves to drive the specific lipooxygenase metabolization of the fatty acid. To our knowledge, this is the first report that ACSL4 expression controls both lipooxygenase and cyclooxygenase metabolism of AA. Thus, this functional interaction represents an integrated system that regulates the proliferating and metastatic potential of cancer cells. Therefore, the development of combinatory therapies that profit from the ACSL4, lipooxygenase and COX-2 synergistic action may allow for lower medication doses and avoidance of side effects.

  19. Mutation of genes of the PI3K/AKT pathway in breast cancer supports their potential importance as biomarker for breast cancer aggressiveness.

    PubMed

    Tserga, Aggeliki; Chatziandreou, Ilenia; Michalopoulos, Nicolaos V; Patsouris, Efstratios; Saetta, Angelica A

    2016-07-01

    Deregulation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT signaling pathway is closely associated with cancer development and cancer progression. PIK3CA, AKT1, and PTEN are the fundamental molecules of the PI3K/AKT pathway with increased mutation rates in cancer cases leading to aberrant regulation of the pathway. Even though molecular alterations of the PI3K/AKT pathway have been studied in breast cancer, correlations between specific molecular alterations and clinicopathological features remain contradictory. In this study, we examined mutations of the PI3K/AKT pathway in 75 breast carcinomas using high-resolution melting analysis and pyrosequencing, in parallel with analysis of relative expression of PIK3CA and AKT2 genes. Mutations of PIK3CA were found in our cohort in 21 cases (28 %), 10 (13 %) in exon 9 and 11(15 %) in exon 20. Mutation frequency of AKT1 and PTEN genes was 4 and 3 %, respectively. Overall, alterations in the PI3K/AKT signaling cascade were detected in 35 % of the cases. Furthermore, comparison of 50 breast carcinomas with adjacent normal tissues showed elevated PIK3CA messenger RNA (mRNA) levels in 18 % of tumor cases and elevated AKT2 mRNA levels in 14 %. Our findings, along with those of previous studies, underline the importance of the PI3K/AKT pathway components as potential biomarkers for breast carcinogenesis.

  20. Abundant NDRG2 Expression Is Associated with Aggressiveness and Unfavorable Patients’ Outcome in Basal-Like Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gasthaus, Janina; Tiedemann, Janina; Mijnes, Jolein; Heide, Timon; Braunschweig, Till; Knüchel, Ruth; Dahl, Edgar

    2016-01-01

    NDRG2, a member of the N-myc downstream-regulated gene family, is thought to be a putative tumor suppressor gene with promising clinical impact in breast cancer. Since breast cancer comprises heterogeneous intrinsic subtypes with distinct clinical outcomes we investigated the pivotal role of NDRG2 in basal-type breast cancers. Based on subtype classified tumor (n = 45) and adjacent normal tissues (n = 17) we examined NDRG2 mRNA expression and CpG-hypermethylation, whose significance was further validated by independent data sets from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). In addition, NDRG2 protein expression was evaluated immunohistochemically using a tissue micro array (TMA, n = 211). In vitro, we investigated phenotypic effects caused by NDRG2 silencing in the basal A-like HCC1806 as well as NDRG2 over-expression in basal A-like BT20 compared to luminal-type MCF7 breast cancer cells. Our tissue collections demonstrated an overall low NDRG2 mRNA expression in breast cancer subtypes compared to normal breast tissue in line with an increased CpG-hypermethylation in breast cancer tissue. Independent TCGA data sets verified a significant (P<0.001) expression loss of NDRG2 in breast tumors. Of interest, basal-like tumors more frequently retained abundant NDRG2 expression concordant with a lower CpG-hypermethylation. Unexpectedly, basal-like breast cancer revealed an association of NDRG2 expression with unfavorable patients’ outcome. In line with this observation, in vitro experiments demonstrated reduced proliferation and migration rates (~20%) in HCC1806 cells following NDRG2 silencing. In contrast, NDRG2 over-expressing luminal-type MCF7 cells demonstrated a 26% decreased proliferation rate. Until now, this is the first study investigating the putative role of NDRG2 in depth in basal-type breast cancer. Our data indicate that the described putative tumor suppressive function of NDRG2 may be confined to luminal- and basal B-type breast cancers. PMID:27400234

  1. Learning about Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... genetic terms used on this page Learning About Breast Cancer What do we know about heredity and breast ... Cancer What do we know about heredity and breast cancer? Breast cancer is a common disease. Each year, ...

  2. 6 Common Cancers - Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Breast Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... her down. Photo: AP Photo/Brett Flashnick Breast Cancer Breast cancer is a malignant (cancerous) growth that ...

  3. Breast Cancer In Women

    Cancer.gov

    This infographic shows the Breast Cancer Subtypes in Women. It’s important for guiding treatment and predicting survival. Know the Science: HR = Hormone receptor. HR+ means tumor cells have receptors for the hormones estrogen or progesterone, which can promote the growth of HR+ tumors. Hormone therapies like tamoxifen can be used to treat HR+ tumors. HER2 = Human epidermal growth Factor receptor, HER2+ means tumor cells overexpress (make high levels of) a protein, called HE2/neu, which has been shown to be associated with certain aggressive types of breast cancer. Trastuzumab and some other therapies can target cells that overexpress HER2. HR+/HER2, aka “LuminalA”. 73% of all breast cancer cases: best prognosis, most common subtype for every race, age, and poverty level. HR-/HER2, aka “Triple Negative”: 13% of all breast cancer cases, Worst prognosis, Non-Hispanic blacks have the highest rate of this subtype at every age and poverty level. HR+/HER2+, aka “Luminal B”, 10% of all breast cancer cases, little geographic variation by state. HR-/HER2+, aka”HER2-enriched”, 5% of all breast cancer cases, lowest rates for all races and ethnicities. www.cancer.gov Source: Special section of the Annual Report to the Nation on the Status of Cancer, 1975-2011.

  4. Enhancement of the Efficacy of Conventional Anticancer Compounds Through the Repression of SNAI Proteins in Aggressive Breast Cancer Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-01

    67] Ooi, L. L., Zhou, H., Kalak, R., Zheng, Y., Conigrave, A. D., Seibel, M. J., and Dunstan, C. R. (2010) Vitamin D deficiency promotes human breast...agents such as vitamin D and anti-estrogens. Specific Aims: (1) To evaluate the levels of SNAI proteins in relation to the levels of the proteins...that impart resistance against vitamin D and anti-estrogens in human breast cancer tissues; (2) To determine the effects of alterations of the levels

  5. The mitotic checkpoint regulator RAE1 induces aggressive breast cancer cell phenotypes by mediating epithelial-mesenchymal transition

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Ji Hoon; Hur, Ho; Lee, Ji-Yeon; Kim, Yeejeong; Seo, Younsoo; Kim, Myoung Hee

    2017-01-01

    The gene RAE1 encodes ribonucleic acid export 1 (RAE1), which is involved in mRNA export and is known to serve as a mitotic checkpoint regulator. In addition, RAE1 haplo-insufficiency leads to chromosome missegregation and early aging-associated phenotypes. In humans, a positive correlation has been found between RAE1 copy number abnormalities and gene amplification in breast cancer cells. However, the precise functional role of RAE1 in breast cancer remains to be determined. An in silico analysis of data retrieved from GENT and cBio-Portal identified RAE1 upregulation in breast cancer tissues relative to normal breast cells. Functional studies of various cell lines showed that RAE1 induced invasive and migratory abilities by regulating epithelial-mesenchymal transition signals. A tissue microarray was constructed to demonstrate the interrelationship between clinicopathological features and RAE1 expression. Immunohistochemistry revealed a positive correlation between RAE1 expression and a high histologic grade. Furthermore, RAE1 overexpression was associated with considerably poorer disease-free survival and distant metastasis-free survival, especially in patients with oestrogen receptor-positive tumours. In summary, RAE1 may be a prognostic marker and therapeutic intervention target in malignant breast cancers. PMID:28181567

  6. The mitotic checkpoint regulator RAE1 induces aggressive breast cancer cell phenotypes by mediating epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

    PubMed

    Oh, Ji Hoon; Hur, Ho; Lee, Ji-Yeon; Kim, Yeejeong; Seo, Younsoo; Kim, Myoung Hee

    2017-02-09

    The gene RAE1 encodes ribonucleic acid export 1 (RAE1), which is involved in mRNA export and is known to serve as a mitotic checkpoint regulator. In addition, RAE1 haplo-insufficiency leads to chromosome missegregation and early aging-associated phenotypes. In humans, a positive correlation has been found between RAE1 copy number abnormalities and gene amplification in breast cancer cells. However, the precise functional role of RAE1 in breast cancer remains to be determined. An in silico analysis of data retrieved from GENT and cBio-Portal identified RAE1 upregulation in breast cancer tissues relative to normal breast cells. Functional studies of various cell lines showed that RAE1 induced invasive and migratory abilities by regulating epithelial-mesenchymal transition signals. A tissue microarray was constructed to demonstrate the interrelationship between clinicopathological features and RAE1 expression. Immunohistochemistry revealed a positive correlation between RAE1 expression and a high histologic grade. Furthermore, RAE1 overexpression was associated with considerably poorer disease-free survival and distant metastasis-free survival, especially in patients with oestrogen receptor-positive tumours. In summary, RAE1 may be a prognostic marker and therapeutic intervention target in malignant breast cancers.

  7. Preclinical Development of Novel Rac1-GEF Signaling Inhibitors using a Rational Design Approach in Highly Aggressive Breast Cancer Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Cardama, Georgina A; Comin, Maria J; Hornos, Leandro; Gonzalez, Nazareno; Defelipe, Lucas; Turjanski, Adrian G; Alonso, Daniel F; Gomez, Daniel E; Menna, Pablo Lorenzano

    2014-01-01

    Rho GTPases play a key role in the regulation of multiple essential cellular processes, including actin dynamics, gene transcription and cell cycle progression. Aberrant activation of Rac1, a member of Rho family of small GTPases, is associated with tumorigenesis, cancer progression, invasion and metastasis. Particularly, Rac1 is overexpressed and hyperactivated in highly aggressive breast cancer. Thus, Rac1 appears to be a promising and relevant target for the development of novel anticancer drugs. We identified the novel Rac1 inhibitor ZINC69391 through a docking-based virtual library screening targeting Rac1 activation by GEFs. This compound was able to block Rac1 interaction with its GEF Tiam1, prevented EGF-induced Rac1 activation and inhibited cell proliferation, cell migration and cell cycle progression in highly aggressive breast cancer cell lines. Moreover, ZINC69391 showed an in vivo antimetastatic effect in a syngeneic animal model. We further developed the novel analog 1A-116 by rational design and showed to be specific and more potent than the parental compound in vitro and interfered Rac1-P-Rex1 interaction. We also showed an enhanced in vivo potency of 1A-116 analog. These results show that we have developed novel Rac1 inhibitors that may be used as a novel anticancer therapy. PMID:24066799

  8. Understanding a Breast Cancer Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Category Cancer A-Z Breast Cancer Understanding a Breast Cancer Diagnosis If you’ve been diagnosed with breast ... cancer or how fast it’s growing. Types of Breast Cancer There are several types of breast cancer. The ...

  9. Vitamin D, Vitamin D Receptor Polymorphisms and Breast Cancer Aggressiveness in African American and European American Women

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-01

    stratified by menopausal status, vitamin D levels were lower in women with invasive breast cancer than in controls, regardless of menopausal status (Table 6...mean ± SD (year) 55.8 ± 12.5 53.8 ± 13.8 Menopause , n (%) Premenopausal 245 (42.3) 245 (42.7) Postmenopausal 334 (57.7) 329 (57.3) BMI...10 | P a g e Table 6. Serum 25-OHD levels by tumor characteristics and menopausal status Premenopausal

  10. Breast Cancer -- Male

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home > Types of Cancer > Breast Cancer in Men Breast Cancer in Men This is Cancer.Net’s Guide to Breast Cancer in Men. Use the menu below to choose ... social workers, and patient advocates. Cancer.Net Guide Breast Cancer in Men Introduction Statistics Risk Factors and Prevention ...

  11. Photonic Breast Tomography and Tumor Aggressiveness Assessment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-07-01

    component involved application and further refinement of optical tomographic imaging using independent component analysis ( OPTICA ) for locating and cross...section imaging of a tumor in a model cancerous breast assembled using ex vivo breast tissue specimens. The OPTICA approach was able to detect...infrared imaging, optical tomography using independent component analysis ( OPTICA ), training, molecular imaging, cancer biology 16. SECURITY

  12. Male Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Although breast cancer is much more common in women, men can get it too. It happens most often to men between ... 60 and 70. Breast lumps usually aren't cancer. However, most men with breast cancer have lumps. ...

  13. Breast Cancer (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... de los dientes Video: Getting an X-ray Breast Cancer KidsHealth > For Kids > Breast Cancer Print A A ... for it when they are older. What Is Breast Cancer? The human body is made of tiny building ...

  14. Breast Cancer Trends

    MedlinePlus

    ... Breast Cancer Funding: Young Breast Cancer Survivors Funding: Breast Cancer Genomics Statistics Rates by Race and Ethnicity Rates by State Risk by Age Trends What CDC Is Doing Research African American Women and Mass Media Campaign Public Service Announcements Print ...

  15. Resistin and interleukin-6 exhibit racially-disparate expression in breast cancer patients, display molecular association and promote growth and aggressiveness of tumor cells through STAT3 activation.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Sachin K; Srivastava, Sanjeev K; Bhardwaj, Arun; Singh, Ajay P; Tyagi, Nikhil; Marimuthu, Saravanakumar; Dyess, Donna L; Dal Zotto, Valeria; Carter, James E; Singh, Seema

    2015-05-10

    African-American (AA) women with breast cancer (BC) are diagnosed with more aggressive disease, have higher risk of recurrence and poorer prognosis as compared to Caucasian American (CA) women. Therefore, it is imperative to define the factors associated with such disparities to reduce the unequal burden of cancer. Emerging data suggest that inherent differences exist in the tumor microenvironment of AA and CA BC patients, however, its molecular bases and functional impact have remained poorly understood. Here, we conducted cytokine profiling in serum samples from AA and CA BC patients and identified resistin and IL-6 to be the most differentially-expressed cytokines with relative greater expression in AA patients. Resistin and IL-6 exhibited positive correlation in serum levels and treatment of BC cells with resistin led to enhanced production of IL-6. Moreover, resistin also enhanced the expression and phosphorylation of STAT3, and treatment of BC cells with IL-6-neutralizing antibody prior to resistin stimulation abolished STAT3 phosphorylation. In addition, resistin promoted growth and aggressiveness of BC cells, and these effects were mediated through STAT3 activation. Together, these findings suggest a crucial role of resistin, IL-6 and STAT3 in BC racial disparity.

  16. Resistin and interleukin-6 exhibit racially-disparate expression in breast cancer patients, display molecular association and promote growth and aggressiveness of tumor cells through STAT3 activation

    PubMed Central

    Bhardwaj, Arun; Singh, Ajay P.; Tyagi, Nikhil; Marimuthu, Saravanakumar; Dyess, Donna L.; Zotto, Valeria Dal; Carter, James E.; Singh, Seema

    2015-01-01

    African-American (AA) women with breast cancer (BC) are diagnosed with more aggressive disease, have higher risk of recurrence and poorer prognosis as compared to Caucasian American (CA) women. Therefore, it is imperative to define the factors associated with such disparities to reduce the unequal burden of cancer. Emerging data suggest that inherent differences exist in the tumor microenvironment of AA and CA BC patients, however, its molecular bases and functional impact have remained poorly understood. Here, we conducted cytokine profiling in serum samples from AA and CA BC patients and identified resistin and IL-6 to be the most differentially-expressed cytokines with relative greater expression in AA patients. Resistin and IL-6 exhibited positive correlation in serum levels and treatment of BC cells with resistin led to enhanced production of IL-6. Moreover, resistin also enhanced the expression and phosphorylation of STAT3, and treatment of BC cells with IL-6-neutralizing antibody prior to resistin stimulation abolished STAT3 phosphorylation. In addition, resistin promoted growth and aggressiveness of BC cells, and these effects were mediated through STAT3 activation. Together, these findings suggest a crucial role of resistin, IL-6 and STAT3 in BC racial disparity. PMID:25868978

  17. Breast Cancer: Epidemiology and Etiology.

    PubMed

    Tao, ZiQi; Shi, Aimin; Lu, Cuntao; Song, Tao; Zhang, Zhengguo; Zhao, Jing

    2015-06-01

    Breast cancer, the most frequently occurring cancer in women, is a major public health problem, with 1,384,155 estimated new cases worldwide with nearly 459,000 related deaths. Breast cancer is highly heterogeneous in its pathological characteristics, some cases showing slow growth with excellent prognosis, while others being aggressive tumors. Current predictions and statistics suggest that both worldwide incidence of breast cancer and related mortality are on the rise. According to 2012 GLOBOCAN statistics, nearly 1.7 million women were diagnosed with breast cancer with 522,000 related deaths-an increase in breast cancer incidence and related mortality by nearly 18 % from 2008. According to American Cancer Society, one in eight women in the United States will develop breast cancer in her lifetime. It has been predicted that the worldwide incidence of female breast cancer will reach approximately 3.2 million new cases per year by 2050. These numbers reflect the magnitude of breast cancer incidence, its effect on society worldwide and the need for urgency for preventive and treatment measures. While technological advances in medical sciences and health care have made it possible to detect the disease early and to start the treatment early on to prevent the progress of the disease into a metastatic state, there are several unanswered questions with regard to the molecular mechanisms that underlie the aggressiveness of certain forms of this disease. Epidemiological studies suggest that addressing socio economical issues is utmost important, so that all women have equal access to medical care from screening to advanced treatment, and only such decisive action can help reduce the worldwide burden of breast cancer.

  18. Biomarkers to Distinguish Aggressive Cancers from Non-aggressive or Non-progressing Cancer — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    Distinguishing aggressive cancers from non-aggressive or non-progressing cancers is an issue of both clinical and public health importance particularly for those cancers with an available screening test. With respect to breast cancer, mammographic screening has been shown in randomized trials to reduce breast cancer mortality, but given the limitations of its sensitivity and specificity some breast cancers are missed by screening. These so called interval detected breast cancers diagnosed between regular screenings are known to have a more aggressive clinical profile. In addition, of those cancers detected by mammography some are indolent while others are more likely to recur despite treatment. The pilot study proposed herein is highly responsive to the EDRN supplement titled “Biomarkers to Distinguish Aggressive Cancers from Nonaggressive or Non-progressing Cancers” in that it addresses both of the research objectives related to these issues outlined in the notice for this supplement: Aim 1: To identify biomarkers in tumor tissue related to risk of interval detected vs. mammography screen detected breast cancer focusing on early stage invasive disease. We will compare gene expression profiles using the whole genome-cDNA-mediated Annealing, Selection, extension and Ligation (DASL) assay of 50 screen detected cancers to those of 50 interval detected cancers. Through this approach we will advance our understanding of the molecular characteristics of interval vs. screen detected breast cancers and discover novel biomarkers that distinguish between them. Aim 2: To identify biomarkers in tumor tissue related to risk of cancer recurrence among patients with screen detected early stage invasive breast cancer. Using the DASL assay we will compare gene expression profiles from screen detected early stage breast cancer that either recurred within five years or never recurred within five years. These two groups of patients will be matched on multiple factors including

  19. Male Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... hasn't spread beyond your breast tissue. Radiation therapy Radiation therapy uses high-energy beams to kill ... option for men with advanced breast cancer. Hormone therapy Most men with male breast cancer have tumors ...

  20. Breast cancer in men

    MedlinePlus

    ... in situ - male; Intraductal carcinoma - male; Inflammatory breast cancer - male; Paget disease of the nipple - male; Breast cancer - male ... The cause of breast cancer in men is not clear. But there are risk factors that make breast cancer more likely in men: Exposure to ...

  1. The Third International Inflammatory Breast Cancer Conference.

    PubMed

    van Golen, Kenneth L; Cristofanilli, Massimo

    2013-11-05

    Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is the most aggressive and deadly form of breast cancer. Disease-specific research and conferences have been organized since 2008 with the intent to bring together experts in various disciplines. This report focus on the Third International IBC Conference held in Philadelphia on December 2012.

  2. Stages of Male Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Male Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information about Male Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Male ...

  3. Maternal defense: breast feeding increases aggression by reducing stress.

    PubMed

    Hahn-Holbrook, Jennifer; Holt-Lunstad, Julianne; Holbrook, Colin; Coyne, Sarah M; Lawson, E Thomas

    2011-10-01

    Mothers in numerous species exhibit heightened aggression in defense of their young. This shift typically coincides with the duration of lactation in nonhuman mammals, which suggests that human mothers may display similarly accentuated aggressiveness while breast feeding. Here we report the first behavioral evidence for heightened aggression in lactating humans. Breast-feeding mothers inflicted louder and longer punitive sound bursts on unduly aggressive confederates than did formula-feeding mothers or women who had never been pregnant. Maternal aggression in other mammals is thought to be facilitated by the buffering effect of lactation on stress responses. Consistent with the animal literature, our results showed that while lactating women were aggressing, they exhibited lower systolic blood pressure than did formula-feeding or never-pregnant women while they were aggressing. Mediation analyses indicated that reduced arousal during lactation may disinhibit female aggression. Together, our results highlight the contributions of breast feeding to both protecting infants and buffering maternal stress.

  4. Reactivity with A monoclonal antibody to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) nuclear antigen 1 defines a subset of aggressive breast cancers in the absence of the EBV genome.

    PubMed

    Murray, Paul G; Lissauer, David; Junying, Jia; Davies, Gillian; Moore, Sukhjinder; Bell, Andrew; Timms, Judith; Rowlands, David; McConkey, Christopher; Reynolds, Gary M; Ghataura, Suk; England, David; Caroll, Rebecca; Young, Lawrence S

    2003-05-01

    Previous studies have suggested that common breast cancers are associated with EBV. We used a highly sensitive quantitative real-time PCR method to screen whole tumor sections of breast cancers for the presence of the EBV genome. EBV DNA was detected in 19 of 92 (21%) tumors, but viral load was very low in positive samples (mean = 1.1 copy EBV/1000 cells, maximum = 7.1 copies EBV/1000 cells). Importantly, quantitative real-time PCR failed to detect the EBV genome in microdissected tumor cells from any case. Using a monoclonal antibody (2B4-1) reactive against the EBV nuclear antigen-1, we noted strong staining of tumor nuclei in a proportion of those breast cancers that had tested negative for the presence of the EBV genome. Because nuclear staining with the 2B4-1 antibody was previously observed more frequently in poor prognosis breast cancers, we examined a larger series of breast cancers with complete clinical follow-up. Strong punctate staining of tumor cell nuclei was observed in 47 of 153 (31%) breast cancers; 2B4-1-positive tumors were significantly more likely to be ER-negative (P < 0.0001), to be of higher grade (P = 0.001) and larger (P = 0.03), to involve more regional lymph nodes (P = 0.01), and to have higher Nottingham Prognostic Index scores (P = 0.0003). Conclusions are: (a) EBV can be regularly detected in whole sections of breast cancers but viral copy number is very low; (b) in these cases, tumor cells do not harbor virus; and (c) reactivity with the monoclonal antibody 2B4-1 is detectable in the absence of the EBV genome and is strongly associated with ER-negative breast tumors and with prognostically unfavorable disease. Additional studies should be directed to the identification of this protein and to elucidation of its role in breast cancer.

  5. MicroRNA-378-mediated suppression of Runx1 alleviates the aggressive phenotype of triple negative MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Browne, Gillian; Dragon, Julie A.; Hong, Deli; Messier, Terri L.; Gordon, Jonathan A. R.; Farina, Nicholas H.; Boyd, Joseph R.; VanOudenhove, Jennifer J.; Perez, Andrew W.; Zaidi, Sayyed K.; Stein, Janet L.; Stein, Gary S.; Lian, Jane B.

    2016-01-01

    The Runx1 transcription factor, known for its essential role normal hematopoiesis, was reported in limited studies to be mutated or associated with human breast tumor tissues. Runx 1 increases concomitant with disease progression in the MMTV-PyMT transgenic mouse model of breast cancer. Compelling questions relate to mechanisms that regulate Runx1 expression in breast cancer. Here, we tested the hypothesis that dysregulation of Runx1-targeting microRNAs (miRNAs) allows for pathologic increase of Runx1 during breast cancer progression. Microarray profiling of the MMTV-PyMT model revealed significant down-regulation of numerous miRNAs predicted to target Runx1. One of these, miR-378, was inversely correlated with Runx1 expression during breast cancer progression in mouse, and in human breast cancer cell lines MCF7 and triple negative MDA-MB-231 that represent early and late stage disease, respectively. MiR-378 is nearly absent in MDA-MB-231 cells. Luciferase reporter assays revealed that miR-378 binds the Runx1 3′UTR and inhibits Runx1 expression. Functionally, we demonstrated that ectopic expression of miR-378 in MDA-MB-231 cells inhibited Runx1 and suppressed migration and invasion; while inhibition of miR-378 in MCF7 cells increased Runx1 levels and cell migration. Depletion of Runx1 in late stage breast cancer cells resulted in increased expression of both the miR-378 host gene PPARGC1B and pre-miR-378, suggesting a feedback loop. Taken together, our study identifies a novel and clinically relevant mechanism for regulation of Runx1 in breast cancer that is mediated by a PPARGC1B-miR-378-Runx1 regulatory pathway. Our results highlight the translational potential of miRNA replacement therapy for inhibiting Runx1 in breast cancer. PMID:26749280

  6. Breast cancer staging

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000911.htm Breast cancer staging To use the sharing features on this ... Once your health care team knows you have breast cancer , they will do more tests to stage it. ...

  7. Stages of Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... to treat breast cancer. Internal radiation therapy with strontium-89 (a radionuclide ) is used to relieve bone ... breast cancer that has spread to the bones. Strontium-89 is injected into a vein and travels ...

  8. Breast Cancer Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... to treat breast cancer. Internal radiation therapy with strontium-89 (a radionuclide ) is used to relieve bone ... breast cancer that has spread to the bones. Strontium-89 is injected into a vein and travels ...

  9. Breast Cancer Early Detection and Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... En Español Category Cancer A-Z Breast Cancer Breast Cancer Early Detection and Diagnosis Breast cancer is sometimes ... cancer screening is so important. Learn more. Can Breast Cancer Be Found Early? Breast cancer is sometimes found ...

  10. Stratification and therapeutic potential of PML in metastatic breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Martín, Natalia; Piva, Marco; Urosevic, Jelena; Aldaz, Paula; Sutherland, James D.; Fernández-Ruiz, Sonia; Arreal, Leire; Torrano, Verónica; Cortazar, Ana R.; Planet, Evarist; Guiu, Marc; Radosevic-Robin, Nina; Garcia, Stephane; Macías, Iratxe; Salvador, Fernando; Domenici, Giacomo; Rueda, Oscar M.; Zabala-Letona, Amaia; Arruabarrena-Aristorena, Amaia; Zúñiga-García, Patricia; Caro-Maldonado, Alfredo; Valcárcel-Jiménez, Lorea; Sánchez-Mosquera, Pilar; Varela-Rey, Marta; Martínez-Chantar, Maria Luz; Anguita, Juan; Ibrahim, Yasir H.; Scaltriti, Maurizio; Lawrie, Charles H.; Aransay, Ana M.; Iovanna, Juan L.; Baselga, Jose; Caldas, Carlos; Barrio, Rosa; Serra, Violeta; dM Vivanco, Maria; Matheu, Ander; Gomis, Roger R.; Carracedo, Arkaitz

    2016-01-01

    Patient stratification has been instrumental for the success of targeted therapies in breast cancer. However, the molecular basis of metastatic breast cancer and its therapeutic vulnerabilities remain poorly understood. Here we show that PML is a novel target in aggressive breast cancer. The acquisition of aggressiveness and metastatic features in breast tumours is accompanied by the elevated PML expression and enhanced sensitivity to its inhibition. Interestingly, we find that STAT3 is responsible, at least in part, for the transcriptional upregulation of PML in breast cancer. Moreover, PML targeting hampers breast cancer initiation and metastatic seeding. Mechanistically, this biological activity relies on the regulation of the stem cell gene SOX9 through interaction of PML with its promoter region. Altogether, we identify a novel pathway sustaining breast cancer aggressiveness that can be therapeutically exploited in combination with PML-based stratification. PMID:27553708

  11. Breast Cancer (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... With Breast Cancer Breast Cancer Prevention en español Cáncer de mama You may have heard about special events, like walks or races, to raise money for breast cancer research. Or maybe you've seen people wear ...

  12. Inflammatory breast cancer: an overview.

    PubMed

    van Uden, D J P; van Laarhoven, H W M; Westenberg, A H; de Wilt, J H W; Blanken-Peeters, C F J M

    2015-02-01

    Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is the most aggressive entity of breast cancer. Management involves coordination of multidisciplinary management and usually includes neoadjuvant chemotherapy, ablative surgery if a tumor-free resection margin is expected and locoregional radiotherapy. This multimodal therapeutic approach has significantly improved patient survival. However, the median overall survival among women with IBC is still poor. By elucidating the biologic characteristics of IBC, new treatment options may become available. We performed a comprehensive review of the English-language literature on IBC through computerized literature searches. The objective of the current review is to present an overview of the literature related to the biology, imaging and multidisciplinary treatment of inflammatory breast cancer.

  13. Breast Cancer Rates by State

    MedlinePlus

    ... Associated Lung Ovarian Prostate Skin Uterine Cancer Home Breast Cancer Rates by State Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend ... from breast cancer each year. Rates of Getting Breast Cancer by State The number of people who get ...

  14. ¹⁸F-FDG PET/CT in the early prediction of pathological response in aggressive subtypes of breast cancer: review of the literature and recommendations for use in clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Groheux, David; Mankoff, David; Espié, Marc; Hindié, Elif

    2016-05-01

    Early assessment of response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) might be helpful in avoiding the toxicity of ineffective chemotherapy and allowing refinement of treatment. We conducted a review of the literature regarding the applicability of (18)F-FDG PET/CT to the prediction of an early pathological response in different subgroups of breast cancer. Clinical research in this field has intensified in the last few years. Early studies by various groups have shown the potential of (18)F-FDG PET/CT in the early assessment of response to NAC. However, interim PET/CT in breast cancer has not yet gained wide acceptance compared to its use in other settings such as lymphomas. This is in part due to a lack of consensus that early evaluation of response can be used to direct change in therapy in the neoadjuvant breast cancer setting, and only limited data showing that response-adaptive therapy leads to improved outcomes. However, one major element that has hampered the use of (18)F-FDG PET/CT in directing neoadjuvant therapy is its evaluation in populations with mixed subtypes of breast cancer. However, major improvements have occurred in recent years. Pilot studies have highlighted the need for considering breast cancer subtype and the type of treatment, and have offered criteria for the use of PET/CT for the early prediction of response in specific settings. (18)F-FDG PET/CT has considerable potential for the early prediction of pathological complete response to NAC in aggressive subtypes such as triple-negative or HER2-positive breast cancers. The results of a multicentre trial that used early metabolic response on (18)F-FDG PET/CT as a means to select poor responders to adapt neoadjuvant treatment have recently been published. Other trials are ongoing or being planned.

  15. Pembrolizumab in Treating Patients With Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-11

    Estrogen Receptor Negative; HER2/Neu Negative; Invasive Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Stage 0 Breast Cancer; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage III Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

  16. Breast cancer disparities: high-risk breast cancer and African ancestry.

    PubMed

    Newman, Lisa A

    2014-07-01

    African American women have a lower lifetime incidence of breast cancer than white/Caucasian Americans yet have a higher risk of breast cancer mortality. African American women are also more likely to be diagnosed with breast cancer at young ages, and they have higher risk for the biologically more aggressive triple-negative breast cancers. These features are also more common among women from western, sub-Saharan Africa who share ancestry with African Americans, and this prompts questions regarding an association between African ancestry and inherited susceptibility for certain patterns of mammary carcinogenesis.

  17. Male Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yalaza, Metin; İnan, Aydın; Bozer, Mikdat

    2016-01-01

    Male breast cancer (MBC) is a rare disease, accounting for less than 1% of all breast cancer diagnoses worldwide. Although breast carcinomas share certain characteristics in both genders, there are notable differences. Most studies on men with breast cancer are very small. Thus, most data on male breast cancer are derived from studies on females. However, when a number of these small studies are grouped together, we can learn more from them. This review emphasizes the incidence, etiology, clinical features, diagnosis, treatment, pathology, survival, and prognostic factors related to MBC.

  18. Ovatodiolide sensitizes aggressive breast cancer cells to doxorubicin, eliminates their cancer stem cell-like phenotype, and reduces doxorubicin-associated toxicity.

    PubMed

    Bamodu, Oluwaseun Adebayo; Huang, Wen-Chien; Tzeng, David T W; Wu, Alexander; Wang, Liang Shun; Yeh, Chi-Tai; Chao, Tsu-Yi

    2015-08-10

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is chemotherapy-refractory and associated with poor clinical prognosis. Doxorubicin (Doxo), a class I anthracycline and first-line anticancer agent, effective against a wide spectrum of neoplasms including breast carcinoma, is associated with several cumulative dose-dependent adverse effects, including cardiomyopathy, typhilitis, and acute myelotoxicity. This study evaluated the usability of Ovatodiolide (Ova) in sensitizing TNBC cells to Doxo cytotoxicity, so as to reduce Doxo effective dose and consequently its adverse effects. TNBC cell lines MDA-MB-231 and HS578T were used. Pre-treatment of the TNBC cells with 10 µM Ova 24 h before Doxo administration increased the Doxo anticancer effect (IC50 1.4 µM) compared to simultaneous treatment with Doxo ( IC50 1.8 µM), or Doxo alone (IC50 9.2 µM). Intracellular accumulation of Doxo was lowest in Ova pre-treated cells at all Doxo concentrations, when compared with Doxo or simultaneously treated cells. In comparison to the Doxo-only group, cell cycle analysis of MDA-MB-231 cells treated concurrently with 2.5 µM Ova and 1.25 µM Doxo showed increased percentage of cells arrested at G0/G1; however, pre-treatment with the same concentration of Ova 24 h before Doxo showed greater tumor growth inhibition, with a 2.4-fold increased percentage of cells in G0/G1 arrest, greater Doxo-induced apoptosis, and significantly reduced intracellular Doxo accumulation. Additionally, Ova-sensitized TNBC cells also lost their cancer stem cell-like phenotype evidenced by significant dissolution, necrosis of formed mammospheres. Taken together, these findings indicate that Ova sensitizes TNBC cells to Doxo and potentiates doxorubicin-induced elimination of the TNBC cancer stem cell-like phenotype.

  19. AR Signaling in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rahim, Bilal; O’Regan, Ruth

    2017-01-01

    Androgen receptor (AR, a member of the steroid hormone receptor family) status has become increasingly important as both a prognostic marker and potential therapeutic target in breast cancer. AR is expressed in up to 90% of estrogen receptor (ER) positive breast cancer, and to a lesser degree, human epidermal growth factor 2 (HER2) amplified tumors. In the former, AR signaling has been correlated with a better prognosis given its inhibitory activity in estrogen dependent disease, though conversely has also been shown to increase resistance to anti-estrogen therapies such as tamoxifen. AR blockade can mitigate this resistance, and thus serves as a potential target in ER-positive breast cancer. In HER2 amplified breast cancer, studies are somewhat conflicting, though most show either no effect or are associated with poorer survival. Much of the available data on AR signaling is in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), which is an aggressive disease with inferior outcomes comparative to other breast cancer subtypes. At present, there are no approved targeted therapies in TNBC, making study of the AR signaling pathway compelling. Gene expression profiling studies have also identified a luminal androgen receptor (LAR) subtype that is dependent on AR signaling in TNBC. Regardless, there seems to be an association between AR expression and improved outcomes in TNBC. Despite lower pathologic complete response (pCR) rates with neoadjuvant therapy, patients with AR-expressing TNBC have been shown to have a better prognosis than those that are AR-negative. Clinical studies targeting AR have shown somewhat promising results. In this paper we review the literature on the biology of AR in breast cancer and its prognostic and predictive roles. We also present our thoughts on therapeutic strategies. PMID:28245550

  20. AR Signaling in Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Rahim, Bilal; O'Regan, Ruth

    2017-02-24

    Androgen receptor (AR, a member of the steroid hormone receptor family) status has become increasingly important as both a prognostic marker and potential therapeutic target in breast cancer. AR is expressed in up to 90% of estrogen receptor (ER) positive breast cancer, and to a lesser degree, human epidermal growth factor 2 (HER2) amplified tumors. In the former, AR signaling has been correlated with a better prognosis given its inhibitory activity in estrogen dependent disease, though conversely has also been shown to increase resistance to anti-estrogen therapies such as tamoxifen. AR blockade can mitigate this resistance, and thus serves as a potential target in ER-positive breast cancer. In HER2 amplified breast cancer, studies are somewhat conflicting, though most show either no effect or are associated with poorer survival. Much of the available data on AR signaling is in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), which is an aggressive disease with inferior outcomes comparative to other breast cancer subtypes. At present, there are no approved targeted therapies in TNBC, making study of the AR signaling pathway compelling. Gene expression profiling studies have also identified a luminal androgen receptor (LAR) subtype that is dependent on AR signaling in TNBC. Regardless, there seems to be an association between AR expression and improved outcomes in TNBC. Despite lower pathologic complete response (pCR) rates with neoadjuvant therapy, patients with AR-expressing TNBC have been shown to have a better prognosis than those that are AR-negative. Clinical studies targeting AR have shown somewhat promising results. In this paper we review the literature on the biology of AR in breast cancer and its prognostic and predictive roles. We also present our thoughts on therapeutic strategies.

  1. Bone marrow recuperation by AM3 in breast cancer patients submitted to aggressive adjuvant treatment. A preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Millá, A; Sanchiz, F; Sada, G; Villarrubia, V G

    1986-01-01

    The results of a prospective randomized study of 46 patients with breast carcinoma are presented. Twenty six patients were treated with AM3 (biological response modifier) associated with adjuvant radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Bone marrow hypoplasia was observed in 26.9% of the patients treated with AM3 compared with a 65% incidence in the control group (P less than 0.05). All patients showed leukopenia in peripheral blood count; however, the nadir of leukocytes was 4,000 leu/mm3 in the test group, compared with 1,900 leu/mm3 in the control group. None of the patients in the AM3 group showed thrombocytopenia, whereas 55% in the control group did. In none of the AM-3-treated cases was it necessary to modify the therapeutic schedule of adjuvant treatment.

  2. Breast Cancer in Men

    MedlinePlus

    ... Older age • B RCA2 gene mutation • F amily history of breast cancer • Gynecomastia (enlargement of the breast tissue) • Klinefelter’s syndrome (a genetic condition related to high levels ...

  3. Do We Know What Causes Breast Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research? Breast Cancer About Breast Cancer How Does Breast Cancer Form? Changes or mutations in DNA can cause ... please see our Content Usage Policy . More In Breast Cancer About Breast Cancer Risk and Prevention Early Detection ...

  4. Treating Male Breast Cancer by Stage

    MedlinePlus

    ... Men Treating Breast Cancer in Men Treatment of Breast Cancer in Men, by Stage Because there have been ... Doctor About Breast Cancer in Men? More In Breast Cancer In Men About Breast Cancer in Men Causes, ...

  5. Living as a Breast Cancer Survivor

    MedlinePlus

    ... a Breast Cancer Survivor Follow up Care After Breast Cancer Treatment Many women are relieved or excited to ... Menopausal Hormone Therapy After Breast Cancer More In Breast Cancer About Breast Cancer Risk and Prevention Early Detection ...

  6. Claudin 1 in Breast Cancer: New Insights

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Bowen; Moodie, Amanda; Blanchard, Anne A. A.; Leygue, Etienne; Myal, Yvonne

    2015-01-01

    Claudin 1 is a small transmembrane protein responsible for maintaining the barrier function that exists between epithelial cells. A tight junction protein that regulates the paracellular transport of small ions across adjacent cells, claudin 1 maintains cellular polarity and plays a major role in cell-cell communication and epithelial cell homeostasis. Long considered to be a putative tumor suppressor in human breast cancer, new studies suggest a role much more complex. While most invasive breast cancers exhibit a down regulation or absence of claudin 1, some aggressive subtypes that exhibit high claudin 1 levels have now been described. Furthermore, a causal role for claudin 1 in breast cancer progression has recently been demonstrated in some breast cancer cell lines. In this review we highlight new insights into the role of claudin 1 in breast cancer, including its involvement in collective migration and epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT). PMID:26633531

  7. Vitamin D, Vitamin D Receptor Polymorphisms, and Breast Cancer Aggressiveness in African American and European American Women

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-01

    have finished all the required didactic course work and exams. I have been attending a series of meetings that are specifically in or highly correlated...of the patients were postmenopausal (65.4%), and had education more than high school (65.6%). Among the patients, 14.3% had cancer at in situ stage...Menopausal status, n (%) Premenopause 176 (34.6) Postmenopause 333 (65.4) Education , n (%) Less than high school 28 (6.6

  8. Carboplatin and Eribulin Mesylate in Triple Negative Breast Cancer Patients

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-30

    Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Male Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  9. Treatment of Breast Cancer during Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... During Pregnancy Breast Cancer Breast Cancer Treatment Treating Breast Cancer During Pregnancy If you are diagnosed with breast ... treatment more complicated. Is it safe to treat breast cancer during pregnancy? Pregnant women can get treatment for ...

  10. Breast cancer statistics, 2011.

    PubMed

    DeSantis, Carol; Siegel, Rebecca; Bandi, Priti; Jemal, Ahmedin

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the American Cancer Society provides an overview of female breast cancer statistics in the United States, including trends in incidence, mortality, survival, and screening. Approximately 230,480 new cases of invasive breast cancer and 39,520 breast cancer deaths are expected to occur among US women in 2011. Breast cancer incidence rates were stable among all racial/ethnic groups from 2004 to 2008. Breast cancer death rates have been declining since the early 1990s for all women except American Indians/Alaska Natives, among whom rates have remained stable. Disparities in breast cancer death rates are evident by state, socioeconomic status, and race/ethnicity. While significant declines in mortality rates were observed for 36 states and the District of Columbia over the past 10 years, rates for 14 states remained level. Analyses by county-level poverty rates showed that the decrease in mortality rates began later and was slower among women residing in poor areas. As a result, the highest breast cancer death rates shifted from the affluent areas to the poor areas in the early 1990s. Screening rates continue to be lower in poor women compared with non-poor women, despite much progress in increasing mammography utilization. In 2008, 51.4% of poor women had undergone a screening mammogram in the past 2 years compared with 72.8% of non-poor women. Encouraging patients aged 40 years and older to have annual mammography and a clinical breast examination is the single most important step that clinicians can take to reduce suffering and death from breast cancer. Clinicians should also ensure that patients at high risk of breast cancer are identified and offered appropriate screening and follow-up. Continued progress in the control of breast cancer will require sustained and increased efforts to provide high-quality screening, diagnosis, and treatment to all segments of the population.

  11. Analysis of gene expression of secreted factors associated with breast cancer metastases in breast cancer subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Fertig, Elana J.; Lee, Esak; Pandey, Niranjan B.; Popel, Aleksander S.

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease, having multiple subtypes with different malignant phenotypes. The triple-negative breast cancer, or basal breast cancer, is highly aggressive, metastatic, and difficult to treat. Previously, we identified that key molecules (IL6, CSF2, CCL5, VEGFA, and VEGFC) secreted by tumor cells and stromal cells in basal breast cancer can promote metastasis. It remains to assess whether these molecules function similarly in other subtypes of breast cancer. Here, we characterize the relative gene expression of the five secreted molecules and their associated receptors (GP130, GMRA, GMRB, CCR5, VEGFR2, NRP1, VEGFR3, NRP2) in the basal, HER2 (human epidermal growth factor receptor 2) positive, luminal A, and luminal B subtypes using high throughput data from tumor samples in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and Molecular Taxonomy of Breast Cancer International Consortium (METABRIC). IL6 and CCL5 gene expression are basal breast cancer specific, whereas high gene expression of GP130 was observed in luminal A/B. VEGFA/C and CSF2 mRNA are overexpressed in HER2 positive breast cancer, with VEGFA and CSF2 also overexpressed in basal breast cancer. Further study of the specific protein function of these factors within their associated cancer subtypes may yield personalized biomarkers and treatment modalities. PMID:26173622

  12. Hormones and Breast Cancer.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-10-01

    criteria were: having ever been treated with chemotherapy, or been diagnosed with systemic lupus erythematosus or liver cirrhosis ; having smoked the previous...concentrations of total and non- protein -bound oestradiol in patients with breast cancer and in normal controls. Int J Cancer 1982;29:17-21. 33. Reed MJ...and prolactin in postmenopausal breast cancer patients. Br J Cancer 1983;47:269-75. 36. Bruning PF, Bonfrer JMG, Hart, AAM. Non- protein bound

  13. Synchronous bilateral breast cancer in a male

    PubMed Central

    Rubio Hernández, María Caridad; Díaz Prado, Yenia Ivet; Pérez, Suanly Rodríguez; Díaz, Ronald Rodríguez; Aleaga, Zaili Gutiérrez

    2013-01-01

    Male breast cancer, which represents only 1% of all breast cancers, is occasionally associated with a family history of breast cancer. Sporadic male breast cancers presenting with another primary breast cancer are extremely rare. In this article, we report on a 70-year-old male patient with bilateral multifocal and synchronous breast cancer and without a family history of breast cancer. PMID:24319497

  14. Global breast cancer seasonality.

    PubMed

    Oh, Eun-Young; Ansell, Christine; Nawaz, Hamayun; Yang, Chul-Ho; Wood, Patricia A; Hrushesky, William J M

    2010-08-01

    Human breast cancer incidence has seasonal patterns that seem to vary among global populations. The aggregate monthly frequency of breast cancer diagnosis was collected and examined for 2,921,714 breast cancer cases diagnosed across 64 global regions over spans from 2 to 53 years. Breast cancer is consistently diagnosed more often in spring and fall, both in the Northern and Southern Hemispheres, regardless of presumable menopausal status (50). This seasonality is increasingly more prominent as population distance from the equator increases and this latitude dependence is most pronounced among women living in rural areas. Moreover, the overall annual incidence (2005-2006), per 100,000 population, of breast cancer increased as the latitude of population residence increased. These data make it clear that human breast cancer discovery occurs non-randomly throughout each year with peaks near both equinoxes and valleys near both solstices. This stable global breast cancer seasonality has implications for better prevention, more accurate screening, earlier diagnosis, and more effective treatment. This complex latitude-dependent breast cancer seasonality is clearly related to predictable local day/night length changes which occur seasonally. Its mechanism may depend upon seasonal sunlight mediation of vitamin D and seasonal mediation of nocturnal melatonin peak level and duration.

  15. BREAST CANCER AND EXERCISE

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2008-03-19

    Prevent Osteoporosis and Osteoporotic Fractures; Improve Quality of Life; Improve Weight Control, and Muscular and Cardiovascular Fitness; Help the Patients to Return to Working Life; Reduce the Risk of Breast Cancer Recurrence; Prevent Other Diseases and Reduce All-Cause Mortality in Patients With Primary Breast Cancer.

  16. MMP1, MMP9, and COX2 Expressions in Promonocytes Are Induced by Breast Cancer Cells and Correlate with Collagen Degradation, Transformation-Like Morphological Changes in MCF-10A Acini, and Tumor Aggressiveness

    PubMed Central

    Chimal-Ramírez, G. K.; Espinoza-Sánchez, N. A.; Utrera-Barillas, D.; Benítez-Bribiesca, L.; Velázquez, J. R.; Arriaga-Pizano, L. A.; Monroy-García, A.; Reyes-Maldonado, E.; Domínguez-López, M. L.; Piña-Sánchez, Patricia; Fuentes-Pananá, E. M.

    2013-01-01

    Tumor-associated immune cells often lack immune effector activities, and instead they present protumoral functions. To understand how tumors promote this immunological switch, invasive and noninvasive breast cancer cell (BRC) lines were cocultured with a promonocytic cell line in a Matrigel-based 3D system. We hypothesized that if communication exists between tumor and immune cells, coculturing would result in augmented expression of genes associated with tumor malignancy. Upregulation of proteases MMP1 and MMP9 and inflammatory COX2 genes was found likely in response to soluble factors. Interestingly, changes were more apparent in promonocytes and correlated with the aggressiveness of the BRC line. Increased gene expression was confirmed by collagen degradation assays and immunocytochemistry of prostaglandin 2, a product of COX2 activity. Untransformed MCF-10A cells were then used as a sensor of soluble factors with transformation-like capabilities, finding that acini formed in the presence of supernatants of the highly aggressive BRC/promonocyte cocultures often exhibited total loss of the normal architecture. These data support that tumor cells can modify immune cell gene expression and tumor aggressiveness may importantly reside in this capacity. Modeling interactions in the tumor stroma will allow the identification of genes useful as cancer prognostic markers and therapy targets. PMID:23762835

  17. Increasing Breast Cancer Surveillance Among African American Breast Cancer Survivors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-01

    the Witness model will be tailored for breast cancer survivors and the peer interventionists (breast cancer survivors and lay health advisors) will be...by a lay health advisor; 4) discussion of concerns and myths about breast cancer and screening /surveillance that are prevalent among AAW; 5) review...Breast cancer screening surveillance Breast cancer screening Treatment/Time of Treatment intention /adherence & physician recommendation

  18. Breast Cancer and Bone Loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... Balance › Breast Cancer and Bone Loss Fact Sheet Breast Cancer and Bone Loss July, 2010 Download PDFs English ... JoAnn Pinkerton, MD What is the link between breast cancer and bone loss? Certain treatments for breast cancer ...

  19. Breast cancer and depression.

    PubMed

    Somerset, Wendy; Stout, Steven C; Miller, Andrew H; Musselman, Dominique

    2004-07-01

    Major depression and depressive symptoms, although commonly encountered in patients with medical illnesses, are frequently underdiagnosed and undertreated in women with breast cancer. Depression and its associated symptoms diminish quality of life, adversely affect compliance with medical therapies, and reduce survival. Treatment of depression in women with breast cancer improves their dysphoria and other depressive symptoms, enhances quality of life, and may increase longevity. In this review, studies that investigate pathophysiologic alterations in patients with cancer and comorbid depression are discussed, and the few studies on treatment of depression and related symptoms in women with breast cancer are examined.

  20. Women with Disabilities and Breast Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Reasonable Accommodations (RA) Women with Disabilities and Breast Cancer Screening Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Finding Breast Cancer Early Can Save Lives Disabilities & Breast Cancer Screening ...

  1. High Intratumoral Stromal Content Defines Reactive Breast Cancer as a Low-risk Breast Cancer Subtype | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    Improved biomarker tests are required to minimize overdiagnosis and overtreatment of breast cancers. A number of pathologic criteria have been established to differentiate indolent or aggressive behavior, such as Nottingham grade of cancer cells. However, the effects of the tumor microenvironment on patient outcomes have not been integrated into pathologic criteria. In the current study, the Reactive subtype of breast cancer, identified by reverse-phase protein arrays, was demonstrated to indicate a favorable outcome.

  2. Diabetes and Breast Cancer Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Bronsveld, Heleen K.; Jensen, Vibeke; Vahl, Pernille; De Bruin, Marie L.; Cornelissen, Sten; Sanders, Joyce; Auvinen, Anssi; Haukka, Jari; Andersen, Morten; Vestergaard, Peter; Schmidt, Marjanka K.

    2017-01-01

    Background Women with diabetes have a worse survival after breast cancer diagnosis compared to women without diabetes. This may be due to a different etiological profile, leading to the development of more aggressive breast cancer subtypes. Our aim was to investigate whether insulin and non-insulin treated women with diabetes develop specific clinicopathological breast cancer subtypes compared to women without diabetes. Methods and Findings This cross-sectional study included randomly selected patients with invasive breast cancer diagnosed in 2000–2010. Stratified by age at breast cancer diagnosis (≤50 and >50 years), women with diabetes were 2:1 frequency-matched on year of birth and age at breast cancer diagnosis (both in 10-year categories) to women without diabetes, to select ~300 patients with tumor tissue available. Tumor MicroArrays were stained by immunohistochemistry for estrogen and progesterone receptor (ER, PR), HER2, Ki67, CK5/6, CK14, and p63. A pathologist scored all stains and revised morphology and grade. Associations between diabetes/insulin treatment and clinicopathological subtypes were analyzed using multivariable logistic regression. Morphology and grade were not significantly different between women with diabetes (n = 211) and women without diabetes (n = 101), irrespective of menopausal status. Premenopausal women with diabetes tended to have more often PR-negative (OR = 2.44(95%CI:1.07–5.55)), HER2-negative (OR = 2.84(95%CI:1.11–7.22)), and basal-like (OR = 3.14(95%CI:1.03–9.60) tumors than the women without diabetes, with non-significantly increased frequencies of ER-negative (OR = 2.48(95%CI:0.95–6.45)) and triple negative (OR = 2.60(95%CI:0.88–7.67) tumors. After adjustment for age and BMI, the associations remained similar in size but less significant. We observed no evidence for associations of clinicopathological subtypes with diabetes in postmenopausal women, or with insulin treatment in general. Conclusions We found no

  3. Identifying Breast Cancer Oncogenes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-01

    which is a study of 3131 human tumor samples and cancer cell lines including 243 breast samples. Tumorscape showed that PAK1 is located in an...chromosome 11q of human tumor samples and cancer cell lines that exhibit highest level of PAK1 amplification divided according to cancer type...breast, non-small cell (NSC) lung, ovarian (Ov), small cell lung (SCL), melanoma (Mel) and esophageal squamous (Esq). PAK1 and CCND1 1oci are marked . B

  4. Docosahexaenoic Acid in Preventing Recurrence in Breast Cancer Survivors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-20

    Benign Breast Neoplasm; Ductal Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Invasive Breast Carcinoma; Lobular Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Paget Disease of the Breast; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  5. Hexokinase and phosphofructokinase activity and intracellular distribution correlate with aggressiveness and invasiveness of human breast carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Raquel G; Calaça, Isadora C; Celestrini, Deborah M; Correia-Carneiro, Ana Helena P; Costa, Mauricio M; Zancan, Patricia; Sola-Penna, Mauro

    2015-10-06

    Glycolytic enzymes, such as hexokinase and phosphofructokinase, have been reported to be upregulated in many cancer types. Here, we evaluated these two enzymes in 54 breast cancer samples collected from volunteers subjected to mastectomy, and the results were correlated with the prognosis markers commonly used. We found that both enzymes positively correlate with the major markers for invasiveness and aggressiveness. For invasiveness, the enzymes activities increase in parallel to the tumor size. Moreover, we found augmented activities for both enzymes when the samples were extirpated from patients presenting lymph node involvement or occurrence of metastasis. For aggressiveness, we stained the samples for the estrogen and progesterone receptors, HER-2, p53 and Ki-67. The enzyme activities positively correlated with all markers but Ki-67. Finally, we conclude that these enzymes are good markers for breast cancer prognosis.

  6. Hexokinase and phosphofructokinase activity and intracellular distribution correlate with aggressiveness and invasiveness of human breast carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Raquel G.; Calaça, Isadora C.; Celestrini, Deborah M.; Correia-Carneiro, Ana Helena P.; Costa, Mauricio M.; Zancan, Patricia; Sola-Penna, Mauro

    2015-01-01

    Glycolytic enzymes, such as hexokinase and phosphofructokinase, have been reported to be upregulated in many cancer types. Here, we evaluated these two enzymes in 54 breast cancer samples collected from volunteers subjected to mastectomy, and the results were correlated with the prognosis markers commonly used. We found that both enzymes positively correlate with the major markers for invasiveness and aggressiveness. For invasiveness, the enzymes activities increase in parallel to the tumor size. Moreover, we found augmented activities for both enzymes when the samples were extirpated from patients presenting lymph node involvement or occurrence of metastasis. For aggressiveness, we stained the samples for the estrogen and progesterone receptors, HER-2, p53 and Ki-67. The enzyme activities positively correlated with all markers but Ki-67. Finally, we conclude that these enzymes are good markers for breast cancer prognosis. PMID:26320188

  7. Broccoli Sprout Extract in Treating Patients With Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-14

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Ductal Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Estrogen Receptor Negative; Estrogen Receptor Positive; Invasive Breast Carcinoma; Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Postmenopausal; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer

  8. Targeting Breast Cancer Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xin; Mu, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Metastasis is the leading cause of breast cancer-associated deaths. Despite the significant improvement in current therapies in extending patient life, 30–40% of patients may eventually suffer from distant relapse and succumb to the disease. Consequently, a deeper understanding of the metastasis biology is key to developing better treatment strategies and achieving long-lasting therapeutic efficacies against breast cancer. This review covers recent breakthroughs in the discovery of various metastatic traits that contribute to the metastasis cascade of breast cancer, which may provide novel avenues for therapeutic targeting. PMID:26380552

  9. Treatment Options for Male Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Male Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information about Male Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Male ...

  10. Treatment Option Overview (Male Breast Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Male Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information about Male Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Male ...

  11. General Information about Male Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Male Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information about Male Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Male ...

  12. Metabolic syndrome and breast cancer: an overview.

    PubMed

    Gezgen, G; Roach, E C; Kizilarslanoglu, M C; Petekkaya, I; Altundag, K

    2012-01-01

    Worldwide, breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed life-threatening cancer in women and the most important cause of cancer-related deaths among women. This disease is on the rise in Turkey. Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of metabolic disturbances including insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, hypertension, abdominal obesity and high blood sugar. Several studies have examined the association of the individual components of the metabolic syndrome with breast cancer. More recent studies have shown it to be an independent risk factor for breast cancer. It has also been associated with poorer prognosis, increased incidence, a more aggressive tumor phenotype. Basic research studies are now in progress to illuminate the molecular pathways and mechanisms that are behind this correlation. Given the fact that all of the components of metabolic syndrome are modifiable risk factors, preventive measures must be established to improve the outcome of breast cancer patients. In this review we set the background by taking into account previous studies which have identified the components of metabolic syndrome individually as breast cancer risk factors. Then we present the latest findings which elaborate possible explanations regarding how metabolic syndrome as a single entity may affect breast cancer risk.

  13. Cutaneous manifestations of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Tan, Antoinette R

    2016-06-01

    Breast cancer may present with cutaneous symptoms. The skin manifestations of breast cancer are varied. Some of the more common clinical presentations of metastatic cutaneous lesions from breast cancer will be described. Paraneoplastic cutaneous dermatoses have been reported as markers of breast malignancy and include erythema gyratum repens, acquired ichthyosis, dermatomyositis, multicentric reticulohistiocytosis, and hypertrichosis lanuginosa acquisita. Mammary Paget's disease, often associated with an underlying breast cancer, and Cowden syndrome, which has an increased risk of breast malignancy, each have specific dermatologic findings. Recognition of these distinct cutaneous signs is important in the investigation of either newly diagnosed or recurrent breast cancer.

  14. Recurrent Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... when examined under a microscope, that's considered a negative margin. If any part of the border has ... or treatments directed at the HER2 gene (triple negative breast cancer), you may have an increased risk ...

  15. The breast cancer conundrum.

    PubMed

    Adams, Patrick

    2013-09-01

    For decades, rates of breast cancer have been going up faster in rich countries than in poor ones. Scientists are beginning to understand more about its causes but unanswered questions remain. Patrick Adams reports.

  16. Obesity and Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Fortner, Renée T; Katzke, Verena; Kühn, Tilman; Kaaks, Rudolf

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between adiposity and breast cancer risk and prognosis is complex, with associations that differ depending on when body size is assessed (e.g., pre- vs. postmenopausal obesity) and when breast cancer is diagnosed (i.e., pre- vs. postmenopausal disease). Further, the impact of obesity on risk differs by tumor hormone receptor status (e.g., estrogen (ER) and progesterone (PR) receptor) and, among postmenopausal women, use of exogenous hormones (i.e., hormone replacement therapy (HRT)). In the context of these complexities, this review focuses on associations between childhood and adolescent adiposity, general adiposity, weight changes (i.e., loss and gain), abdominal adiposity, and breast cancer risk and survival. Finally, we discuss potential mechanisms linking adiposity to breast cancer.

  17. FOXC1 identifies basal-like breast cancer in a hereditary breast cancer cohort

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Jeff; Choi, Michael; Dadmanesh, Farnaz; Han, Bingchen; Qu, Ying; Yu-Rice, Yi; Zhang, Xiao; Bagaria, Sanjay; Taylor, Clive; Giuliano, Armando E.; Amersi, Farin; Cui, Xiaojiang

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancers arising in the setting of the hereditary breast cancer genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 are most commonly classified as basal-like breast cancer (BLBC) or luminal breast cancer, respectively. BLBC is an aggressive subtype of breast cancer associated with liver and lung metastases and poorer prognosis than other subtypes and for which chemotherapy is the only systemic therapy. Multiple immunohistochemical markers are used to identify the basal-like subtype, including the absence of estrogen receptor alpha, progesterone receptor, and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2. Forkhead box C1 (FOXC1) has been identified as a specific marker expressed in BLBC in general breast cancer cohorts. We examined an institutional cohort of breast cancer patients with germline BRCA1 (n=46) and BRCA2 (n=35) mutations and found that FOXC1 expression on immunohistochemical staining is associated with BRCA1 vs BRCA2 mutations [30/46 vs. 6/35]. In BRCA1 mutant tumors, FOXC1 was expressed in 28/31 BLBC tumors and 2/13 non-BLBC tumors, In BRCA2 mutant tumors, FOXC1 was expressed in 5/5 BLBC tumors and 1/30 non-BLBC tumors. In cell culture models of BRCA1-mutant breast cancer, FOXC1 is associated with increased proliferation and may serve as a marker for sensitivity to PARP-inhibitor therapy with olaparib. PMID:27708239

  18. Stereotactic Image-Guided Navigation During Breast Reconstruction in Patients With Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-12

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  19. Phyto-oestrogens and breast cancer chemoprevention

    PubMed Central

    Limer, Jane L; Speirs, Valerie

    2004-01-01

    Phytoestrogens are polyphenol compounds of plant origin that exhibit a structural similarity to the mammalian steroid hormone 17β-oestradiol. In Asian nations the staple consumption of phyto-oestrogen-rich foodstuffs correlates with a reduced incidence of breast cancer. Human dietary intervention trials have noted a direct relationship between phyto-oestrogen ingestion and a favourable hormonal profile associated with decreased breast cancer risk. However, these studies failed to ascertain the precise effect of dietary phyto-oestrogens on the proliferation of mammary tissue. Epidemiological and rodent studies crucially suggest that breast cancer chemoprevention by dietary phyto-oestrogen compounds is dependent on ingestion before puberty, when the mammary gland is relatively immature. Phyto-oestrogen supplements are commercially marketed for use by postmenopausal women as natural and safe alternatives to hormone replacement therapy. Of current concern is the effect of phyto-oestrogen compounds on the growth of pre-existing breast tumours. Data are contradictory, with cell culture studies reporting both the oestrogenic stimulation of oestrogen receptor-positive breast cancer cell lines and the antagonism of tamoxifen activity at physiological phyto-oestrogen concentrations. Conversely, phyto-oestrogen ingestion by rodents is associated with the development of less aggressive breast tumours with reduced metastatic potential. Despite the present ambiguity, current data do suggest a potential benefit from use of phyto-oestrogens in breast cancer chemoprevention and therapy. These aspects are discussed. PMID:15084232

  20. Viruses and Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lawson, James S.; Heng, Benjamin

    2010-01-01

    Viruses are the accepted cause of many important cancers including cancers of the cervix and anogenital area, the liver, some lymphomas, head and neck cancers and indirectly human immunodeficiency virus associated cancers. For over 50 years, there have been serious attempts to identify viruses which may have a role in breast cancer. Despite these efforts, the establishment of conclusive evidence for such a role has been elusive. However, the development of extremely sophisticated new experimental techniques has allowed the recent development of evidence that human papilloma virus, Epstein-Barr virus, mouse mammary tumor virus and bovine leukemia virus may each have a role in the causation of human breast cancers. This is potentially good news as effective vaccines are already available to prevent infections from carcinogenic strains of human papilloma virus, which causes cancer of the uterine cervix. PMID:24281093

  1. Computerized Cognitive Retraining in Improving Cognitive Function in Breast Cancer Survivors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-02

    Cancer Survivor; Stage 0 Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  2. Cardiac Rehabilitation Program in Improving Cardiorespiratory Fitness in Stage 0-III Breast Cancer Survivors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-30

    Cancer Survivor; Stage 0 Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  3. Breast Cancer Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The BioScan System was developed by OmniCorder Technologies, Inc. at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The system is able to locate cancerous lesions by detecting the cancer's ability to recruit a new blood supply. A digital sensor detects infrared energy emitted from the body and identifies the minute differences accompanying the blood flow changes associated with cancerous cells. It also has potential use as a monitoring device during cancer treatment. This technology will reduce the time taken to detect cancerous cells and allow for earlier intervention, therefore increasing the overall survival rates of breast cancer patients.

  4. Oral contraceptives and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Johnson, K H; Millard, P S

    1996-10-01

    The Collaborative Group on Hormonal Factors in Breast Cancer conducted a meta-analysis of data from 10 cohort and 44 case-control studies of the association between combined oral contraceptive (OC) use and breast cancer. 53,297 women with breast cancer and 100,239 women with no breast cancer from 25 countries worldwide were studied. Current OC users faced a 24% increased risk of developing breast cancer (confidence interval = 1.15-1.33). This risk fell steadily after cessation and reached 0 at 10 years and thereafter. Use of OCs with higher doses were associated with a greater risk of breast cancer than medium or low-dose OCs. The number of excess cancers in women while using OCs and up to 10 years after OC cessation stood at 0.5/10,000 women 16-19 years old, 1.5/10,000 women 20-24 years old, and 4.7/10,000 women 25-29 years old. The elevated risk of developing breast cancer did not differ by country of origin, ethnic background, reproductive history, or family history of breast cancer. OC users had less clinically advanced breast cancer than never-users who had breast cancer. This finding plus the moderate reduced risk of breast cancer more than 10 years after OC cessation suggest that OCs may effect earlier diagnosis of existing breast cancer instead of causing new breast cancers. The findings of this meta-analysis along with a plausible biologic mechanism (estrogen stimulates breast cancer cells) suggest a causal relationship between OC use and breast cancer. They also indicate that the risk is small, decreases with time, and is lower among low-dose OC users. It is reassuring that the breast cancers found among OC users is less clinically advanced than those found in never-users.

  5. Understanding your breast cancer risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... ency/patientinstructions/000830.htm Understanding your breast cancer risk To use the sharing features on this page, ... you can do to help prevent breast cancer. Risk Factors You Cannot Control Risk factors you cannot ...

  6. Risks of Breast Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... trials is available from the NCI website . Three tests are used by health care providers to screen for breast cancer: Mammogram Mammography is the most common screening test for breast cancer . A mammogram is an x- ...

  7. Treatment Option Overview (Breast Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... to treat breast cancer. Internal radiation therapy with strontium-89 (a radionuclide ) is used to relieve bone ... breast cancer that has spread to the bones. Strontium-89 is injected into a vein and travels ...

  8. General Information about Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... to treat breast cancer. Internal radiation therapy with strontium-89 (a radionuclide ) is used to relieve bone ... breast cancer that has spread to the bones. Strontium-89 is injected into a vein and travels ...

  9. What's New in Breast Cancer Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Research? Breast Cancer About Breast Cancer What’s New in Breast Cancer Research? Researchers around the world ... cancer causes Reducing breast cancer risk Managing DCIS New lab tests for breast cancer New imaging tests ...

  10. Omega-3 Fatty Acid in Treating Patients With Stage I-III Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-13

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Male Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  11. "Targeting" triple-negative breast cancer: the lessons learned from BRCA1-associated breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Nanda, Rita

    2011-04-01

    Breast cancer has long been recognized as a heterogeneous entity, with distinct subsets characterized by differences in tumor biology and response to therapy. With the advent of molecular profiling, we have gained a further appreciation of the heterogeneity of this complex disease. While the last decade has seen advances in the treatment of hormone receptor (HR) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2/erb-B2 (HER2)-positive breast cancers, outcomes for women with estrogen receptor (ER)-, progesterone receptor (PR)-, and HER2-negative-or "triple-negative"-breast cancer (TNBC) remain poor. A better understanding of the shared biology of BRCA1-associated breast cancer and sporadic TNBC holds much promise for changing the outlook for women with this aggressive disease. This review focuses on our current understanding of the clinicopathological features of TNBC, therapeutic options and ongoing research efforts.

  12. Pregnancy associated breast cancer and pregnancy after breast cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Doğer, Emek; Calışkan, Eray; Mallmann, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers diagnosed during pregnancy and its frequency is increasing as more women postpone their pregnancies to their thirties and forties. Breast cancer diagnosis during pregnancy and lactation is difficult and complex both for the patient and doctors. Delay in diagnosis is frequent and treatment modalities are difficult to accept for the pregnant women. The common treatment approach is surgery after diagnosis, chemotherapy after the first trimester and radiotherapy after delivery. Even though early stage breast cancers have similar prognosis, advanced stage breast cancers diagnosed during pregnancy and lactation have poorer prognosis than similar stage breast cancers diagnosed in non-pregnant women. Women who desire to become pregnant after treatment of breast cancer will have many conflicts. Although the most common concern is recurrence of breast cancer due to pregnancy, the studies conducted showed that pregnancy has no negative effect on breast cancer prognosis. In this review we search for the frequency of breast cancer during pregnancy, the histopathological findings, risk factor, diagnostic and treatment modalities. We reviewed the literature for evidence based findings to help consult the patients on the outcome of breast cancer diagnosed during pregnancy and lactation, and also inform the patients who desire to become pregnant after breast cancer according to current evidences.

  13. The role of lipolysis stimulated lipoprotein receptor in breast cancer and directing breast cancer cell behavior.

    PubMed

    Reaves, Denise K; Fagan-Solis, Katerina D; Dunphy, Karen; Oliver, Shannon D; Scott, David W; Fleming, Jodie M

    2014-01-01

    The claudin-low molecular subtype of breast cancer is of particular interest for clinically the majority of these tumors are poor prognosis, triple negative, invasive ductal carcinomas. Claudin-low tumors are characterized by cancer stem cell-like features and low expression of cell junction and adhesion proteins. Herein, we sought to define the role of lipolysis stimulated lipoprotein receptor (LSR) in breast cancer and cancer cell behavior as LSR was recently correlated with tumor-initiating features. We show that LSR was expressed in epithelium, endothelium, and stromal cells within the healthy breast tissue, as well as in tumor epithelium. In primary breast tumor bioposies, LSR expression was significantly correlated with invasive ductal carcinomas compared to invasive lobular carcinomas, as well as ERα positive tumors and breast cancer cell lines. LSR levels were significantly reduced in claudin-low breast cancer cell lines and functional studies illustrated that re-introduction of LSR into a claudin-low cell line suppressed the EMT phenotype and reduced individual cell migration. However, our data suggest that LSR may promote collective cell migration. Re-introduction of LSR in claudin-low breast cancer cell lines reestablished tight junction protein expression and correlated with transepithelial electrical resistance, thereby reverting claudin-low lines to other intrinsic molecular subtypes. Moreover, overexpression of LSR altered gene expression of pathways involved in transformation and tumorigenesis as well as enhanced proliferation and survival in anchorage independent conditions, highlighting that reestablishment of LSR signaling promotes aggressive/tumor initiating cell behaviors. Collectively, these data highlight a direct role for LSR in driving aggressive breast cancer behavior.

  14. Increasing Breast Cancer Surveillance Among African American Breast Cancer Survivors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    one or both breasts were affected. Family Member (e.g. grandmother, aunt) Paternal or Maternal Type or Location of Cancer (e.g. breast...breast cancer who previously participated in an ongoing parent project and are at least 3 months post-treatment. Participants were to be assigned to... parent study also awaiting approval (“Behavior, Estrogen Metabolism, and Breast Cancer Risk: A Molecular Epidemiologic Study” HSRRB Log Number A

  15. Diet and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Bradlow, H Leon; Sepkovic, Daniel W

    2002-06-01

    The preponderance of evidence suggests a role for fat and alcohol as risk factors for breast cancer. The role of milk is more controversial with some studies suggesting that milk is a risk factor and others that consumption of milk is protective against breast cancer. No other major nutrient appears to play a significant role in increasing breast cancer risk. On the other hand, there is increasing evidence that a variety of micronutrients and hormones appear to have significant anticancer activity. These range from steroids such as dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and its analysis to indoles, isothiocyanates, and isoflavone derivatives. These compounds act directly by interfering with cyclins and promoting apoptosis as well as indirectly by altering estrogen metabolism in a favorable direction. These effects are not merely theoretical actions in cell culture and tissue explants; they have been demonstrated in human patients as a range of studies have demonstrated.

  16. Virtual Weight Loss Program in Maintaining Weight in African American Breast Cancer Survivors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-19

    Cancer Survivor; Invasive Breast Carcinoma; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  17. Accelerated Radiation Therapy After Surgery in Treating Patients With Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-20

    Inflammatory Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Mucinous Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Papillary Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Tubular Ductal Breast Carcinoma

  18. Abortion, Miscarriage, and Breast Cancer Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Abortion, Miscarriage, and Breast Cancer Risk: 2003 Workshop In ... cancer risk, including studies of induced and spontaneous abortions. They concluded that having an abortion or miscarriage ...

  19. Inflammatory Breast Cancer from Metastatic Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Achariyapota, Vuthinun; Chuangsuwanich, Tuenjai

    2016-01-01

    Metastases to the breast from tumors other than breast carcinomas are extremely rare and represent only 0.2–1.3% of all diagnosed malignant breast tumors. Furthermore, while the most common sites for advanced ovarian cancer metastases are the liver, lung, and pleura, metastasis to the breast from a primary ovarian cancer is uncommon and has only been reported in 0.03–0.6% of all breast cancers. Here we describe a case report of a 50-year-old female patient with a rare case of breast metastases from an advanced ovarian cancer, presenting as inflammatory breast cancer. Our observations emphasize the clinical importance of distinguishing between primary and metastatic breast cancer during diagnosis for the purpose of appropriate prognosis and treatment. PMID:27047697

  20. Photonic Breast Tomography and Tumor Aggressiveness Assessment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-01

    approaches for detection of breast tumors in early stages of growth when those are more amenable to treatment; and (b) training of CCNY researchers at...classification method of Multiple Signal Classification ( MUSIC ). It provided the locations of small absorptive and scattering targets within a turbid...targets, the locations are determined using the MUSIC pseudo spectrum [11]     2 22 ( ) ( ) j T s p s p s p j s pP g g v g    X X X X

  1. Resolving breast cancer heterogeneity by searching reliable protein cancer biomarkers in the breast fluid secretome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background One of the major goals in cancer research is to find and evaluate the early presence of biomarkers in human fluids and tissues. To resolve the complex cell heterogeneity of a tumor mass, it will be useful to characterize the intricate biomolecular composition of tumor microenvironment (the so called cancer secretome), validating secreted proteins as early biomarkers of cancer initiation and progression. This approach is not broadly applicable because of the paucity of well validated and FDA-approved biomarkers and because most of the candidate biomarkers are mainly organ-specific rather than tumor-specific. For these reasons, there is an urgent need to identify and validate a panel of biomarker combinations for early detection of human tumors. This is especially important for breast cancer, the cancer spread most worldwide among women. It is well known that patients with early diagnosed breast cancer live longer, require less extensive treatment and fare better than patients with more aggressive and/or advanced disease. Results In the frame of searching breast cancer biomarkers (especially using nipple aspirate fluid mirroring breast microenvironment), studies have highlighted an optimal combination of well-known biomarkers: uPA + PAI-1 + TF. When individually investigated they did not show perfect accuracy in predicting the presence of breast cancer, whereas the triple combination has been demonstrated to be highly predictive of pre-cancer and/or cancerous conditions, approaching 97-100% accuracy. Conclusion Despite the heterogeneous composition of breast cancer and the difficulties to find specific breast cancer biomolecules, the noninvasive analysis of the nipple aspirate fluid secretome may significantly improve the discovery of promising biomarkers, helping also the differentiation among benign and invasive breast diseases, opening new frontiers in early oncoproteomics. PMID:23849048

  2. Early detection of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Nettles-Carlson, B

    1989-01-01

    Timely, comprehensive screening for breast cancer is a major, though often overlooked, component of primary health care for women. This article reviews the scientific rationale for screening and outlines the current recommendations of the American Cancer Society and the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force regarding the use of mammography, clinical breast examination (CBE), and breast self-examination (BSE). Nursing interventions to decrease barriers to effective screening are discussed, and an expanded role of nurses in breast cancer screening is proposed.

  3. Breast cancer epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Kelsey, J L; Berkowitz, G S

    1988-10-15

    The various risk factors for breast cancer have been recognized for many years. A table lists these established breast cancer risk factors together with the approximate magnitude of the increase in risk associated with them. Breast cancer incidence rates increase with age throughout the life span in Western countries, although the rate of increase is greater up to age 50 years than after 50 years. Breast cancer is more common among women in upper rather than lower social classes, among women who never have been married, among women living in urban areas, among women living in the northern US than in the southern US, and among whites than blacks, at least among those over age 50. Women in North American and Northern European countries have the highest risk for breast cancer, women in Southern European and Latin American countries are at intermediate risk, and women in Africa and Asian countries have the lowest risk. Yet, rapid rates of increase in incident rates have been noted in recent years in many Asian, Central European, and some South American countries. The later the age at which a woman has her 1st full-term pregnancy, the higher her risk for breast cancer; the earlier the age at menarche and the later the age at menopause the higher the risk; and among women who have a premenopausal oophorectomy, the earlier the age at which this occurs the lower the risk. Among postmenopausal women, obesity is associated with an increase in risk. Lactation is negatively associated with subsequent breast cancer risk. Some current research is considering potential risk factors that have not been well studied in the past, including alcohol consumption, cigarette smoking, caffeine consumption, exposure to diethylstilbestrol (DES), emotional stress, exposure to electric power, and lack of physical activity. Other areas of current research reviewed here include radiation, mammographic parenchymal patterns, a high-fat diet, use of oral contraceptives (OCs), use of estrogen

  4. Intrinsic breast tumor subtypes, race, and long-term survival in the Carolina Breast Cancer Study

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, Katie M.; Cole, Stephen R.; Tse, Chiu-Kit; Perou, Charles M.; Carey, Lisa A.; Foulkes, William D.; Dressler, Lynn G.; Geradts, Joseph; Millikan, Robert C.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Previous research identified differences in breast cancer-specific mortality across four "intrinsic" tumor subtypes: luminal A, luminal B, basal-like, and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 positive/estrogen receptor negative (HER2+/ER−). Experimental Design We used immunohistochemical markers to subtype 1149 invasive breast cancer patients (518 African American, 631 white) in the Carolina Breast Cancer Study, a population-based study of women diagnosed with breast cancer. Vital status was determined through 2006 using the National Death Index, with median follow-up of 9 years. Results Cancer subtypes luminal A, luminal B, basal-like and HER2+/ER- were distributed as 64%, 11%, 11% and 5% for whites, and 48%, 8%, 22% and 7% for African Americans, respectively. Breast cancer mortality was higher for patients with HER2+/ER- and basal-like breast cancer compared to luminal A and B. African Americans had higher breast-cancer specific mortality than whites, but the effect of race was statistically significant only among women with luminal A breast cancer. However, when compared to the luminal A subtype within racial categories, mortality for patients with basal-like breast cancer was higher among whites (HR=2.0, 95% CI: 1.2, 3.4) than African Americans (HR=1.5, 95% CI: 1.0, 2.4), with the strongest effect seen in postmenopausal white women (HR=3.9, 95% CI: 1.5, 10.0). Conclusions Our results confirm the association of basal-like breast cancer with poor prognosis, and suggest that basal-like breast cancer is not an inherently more aggressive disease in African American women compared to whites. Additional analyses are needed in populations with known treatment profiles to understand the role of tumor subtypes and race in breast cancer mortality, and in particular our finding that among women with luminal A breast cancer, African Americans have higher mortality than whites. PMID:21169259

  5. Recurrent pure mucinous carcinoma of the breast with mediastinal great vessel invasion: HER-2/neu confers aggressiveness.

    PubMed

    Adair, Jamie D; Harvey, Kyle P; Mahmood, Ali; Caralis, James; Gordon, William; Yanish, Gregory

    2008-02-01

    Mucinous carcinoma of the breast, also known as colloid carcinoma, is a less common variant of breast cancer constituting less than five per cent of breast cancers. We report the case of a 42-year-old premenopausal female who presented with a palpable chest wall recurrence 4 years after simple mastectomy, axillary node dissection, and TRAM flap reconstruction for pure mucinous carcinoma. The recurrent neoplasm was a pure mucinous carcinoma and was found to be invading the mediastinum into the great vessels. The tumor was estrogen receptor positive, progesterone receptor negative, and HER-2/neu positive, which is an unusual finding for mucinous carcinoma. The fact that this tumor demonstrated HER-2/neu positivity may explain the uncharacteristic aggressive nature of this normally indolent type of breast tumor. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of any mucinous breast cancer invading the mediastinal great vessels and its subsequent en-bloc resection.

  6. Mucinous micropapillary carcinoma of the breast: an aggressive counterpart to conventional pure mucinous tumors.

    PubMed

    Barbashina, Violetta; Corben, Adriana D; Akram, Muzaffar; Vallejo, Christina; Tan, Lee K

    2013-08-01

    Mucinous micropapillary carcinoma of the breast, also described as "pure mucinous carcinoma with micropapillary pattern," has recently come to attention as an unusual form of invasive breast cancer exhibiting dual mucinous and micropapillary differentiation. Despite increasing awareness of this morphologic variant, its clinical significance has not yet been elucidated. Here, we present 15 additional examples of these rare tumors to highlight some important differences between mucinous micropapillary carcinoma of the breast and ordinary pure mucinous carcinomas. The key features of mucinous micropapillary carcinoma of the breast included (a) largely or entirely mucinous appearance (>90% mucinous morphology), (b) distinctive micropapillary arrangement of the neoplastic cells, (c) intermediate to high nuclear grade, (d) "hobnail" cells, and (e) frequent psammomatous calcifications. In contrast to ordinary pure mucinous carcinomas, 20% of mucinous micropapillary carcinomas of the breast were characterized by human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 positivity, and 23% were p53 positive. More than half of mucinous micropapillary carcinomas of the breast (60%) demonstrated lymphovascular invasion, sometimes extensive. Synchronous axillary lymph node metastases were detected in 33% of patients and, on 2 occasions, involved more than 10 nodes. With a median follow-up of 4.5 years, we identified 1 patient (7%) with chest wall recurrence of mucinous micropapillary carcinoma of the breast after mastectomy. We conclude that mucinous micropapillary carcinomas of the breast constitute a clinically aggressive subset of mucin-producing breast carcinomas characterized by an increased capacity for lymphatic invasion and regional lymph node metastasis, reflective of their dual phenotype. Recognition of the morphologic and biologic heterogeneity within breast cancer subtypes should allow for a more accurate classification of the individual tumors and better patient stratification for

  7. Pertuzumab, Trastuzumab, and Paclitaxel Albumin-Stabilized Nanoparticle Formulation in Treating Patients With HER2-Positive Advanced Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-23

    HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Breast Adenocarcinoma; Inflammatory Breast Carcinoma

  8. Breast Cancer Research Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    tion of tumor cells with red indicating the highest density of tumor cells at the primary tumor (4th mammary fat pad ) and purple/blue showing the...Idea Award Elaine Hardman and Philippe Georgel “ Maternal Consumption of Omega 3 Fatty Acids to Reduce Breast Cancer Risk in Offspring” FY09

  9. Surveying Breast Cancer's Genomic Landscape.

    PubMed

    2016-07-01

    An in-depth analysis has produced the most comprehensive portrait to date of the myriad genomic alterations involved in breast cancer. In sequencing the whole genomes of 560 breast cancers and combining this information with published data from another 772 breast tumors, the research team uncovered several new genes and mutational signatures that potentially influence this disease.

  10. Breast cancer in systemic lupus.

    PubMed

    Bernatsky, S; Ramsey-Goldman, R; Petri, M; Urowitz, M B; Gladman, D D; Fortin, P F; Ginzler, E; Romero-Diaz, J; Peschken, C; Jacobsen, S; Hanly, J G; Gordon, C; Nived, O; Yelin, E H; Isenberg, D; Rahman, A; Bae, S-C; Joseph, L; Witte, T; Ruiz-Irastorza, G; Aranow, C; Kamen, D; Sturfeldt, G; Foulkes, W D; Hansen, J E; St Pierre, Y; Raymer, P Chrétien; Tessier-Cloutier, B; Clarke, A E

    2017-03-01

    Objective There is a decreased breast cancer risk in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) versus the general population. We assessed a large sample of SLE patients, evaluating demographic and clinical characteristics and breast cancer risk. Methods We performed case-cohort analyses within a multi-center international SLE sample. We calculated the breast cancer hazard ratio (HR) in female SLE patients, relative to demographics, reproductive history, family history of breast cancer, and time-dependent measures of anti-dsDNA positivity, cumulative disease activity, and drugs, adjusted for SLE duration. Results There were 86 SLE breast cancers and 4498 female SLE cancer-free controls. Patients were followed on average for 7.6 years. Versus controls, SLE breast cancer cases tended to be white and older. Breast cancer cases were similar to controls regarding anti-dsDNA positivity, disease activity, and most drug exposures over time. In univariate and multivariate models, the principal factor associated with breast cancers was older age at cohort entry. Conclusions There was little evidence that breast cancer risk in this SLE sample was strongly driven by any of the clinical factors that we studied. Further search for factors that determine the lower risk of breast cancer in SLE may be warranted.

  11. Breast cancer screening and biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Mai

    2009-01-01

    Annual screening mammograms have been shown to be cost-effective and are credited for the decline in mortality of breast cancer. New technologies including breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may further improve early breast cancer detection in asymptomatic women. Serum tumor markers such as CA 15-3, carcinoembyonic antigen (CEA), and CA 27-29 are ordered in the clinic mainly for disease surveillance, and not useful for detection of localized cancer. This review will discuss blood-based markers and breast-based markers, such as nipple/ductal fluid, with an emphasis on biomarkers for early detection of breast cancer. In the future, it is likely that a combination approach to simultaneously measure multiple markers would be most successful in detecting early breast cancer. Ideally, such a biomarker panel should be able to detect breast cancer in asymptomatic patients, even in the setting of normal mammogram and physical examination results.

  12. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Dr. Harry Mahtani analyzes the gas content of nutrient media from Bioreactor used in research on human breast cancer. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunourous tissues.

  13. Relationship of Predicted Risk of Developing Invasive Breast Cancer, as Assessed with Three Models, and Breast Cancer Mortality among Breast Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Pfeiffer, Ruth M.; Miglioretti, Diana L.; Kerlikowske, Karla; Tice, Jeffery; Vacek, Pamela M.; Gierach, Gretchen L.

    2016-01-01

    women counseling, it may be useful to note that high predicted risk of developing breast cancer does not imply that if cancer develops it will behave aggressively. PMID:27560501

  14. Mindfulness Meditation or Survivorship Education in Improving Behavioral Symptoms in Younger Stage 0-III Breast Cancer Survivors (Pathways to Wellness)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-21

    Cancer Survivor; Early-Stage Breast Carcinoma; Stage 0 Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  15. Azacitidine in Treating Patients With Triple Negative Stage I-IV Invasive Breast Cancer That Can Be Removed By Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-02-05

    Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  16. NIH scientists identify molecular link between metabolism and breast cancer

    Cancer.gov

    A protein associated with conditions of metabolic imbalance, such as diabetes and obesity, may play a role in the development of aggressive forms of breast cancer, according to new findings by researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI), part of th

  17. Genetic epidemiology of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Thompson, W D

    1994-07-01

    It has been recognized for some time that a family history of breast cancer is associated rather strongly with a woman's own risk of developing the disease. Recent segregation analyses of population-based data on familial patterns provide evidence for a rare autosomal dominant allele that increases a carrier's susceptibility to breast cancer. The estimated proportion of breast cancer patients who carry this allele declines sharply with age at diagnosis. Empirical estimates of the risk associated with particular patterns of family history of breast cancer indicate the following: (1) having any first-degree relative with breast cancer increases a woman's risk of breast cancer 1.5-3-fold, depending on age, (2) having multiple first degree relatives affected is associated with particularly elevated risks, (3) having a second-degree relative affected increases the risk by approximately 50%, (4) affected family members on the maternal side and the paternal side contribute similarly to the risk, (5) a family history of breast cancer is associated with bilateral disease, and (6) breast cancer in males is associated with breast cancer in female relatives in much the same way as is breast cancer in women. Ovarian cancer clearly has been shown to be associated with breast cancer in families, and genetic linkage has provided strong evidence for a breast-ovarian cancer gene located somewhere on chromosome 17q. At the population level, having a first degree relative with ovarian cancer may be at least as predictive of a woman's risk for developing breast cancer as is having a second-degree relative with breast cancer. Considerably weaker evidence points to a possible familial relationship between breast and endometrial cancer and between breast cancer in women and prostatic cancer in males. The clinical applications of the genetic epidemiology of breast cancer are complicated by uncertainty as to the efficacy of mammographic screening in women under the age of 50. For the vast

  18. Proteomics of breast cancer: principles and potential clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Bertucci, François; Birnbaum, Daniel; Goncalves, Anthony

    2006-10-01

    Progresses in screening, early diagnosis, prediction of aggressiveness and of therapeutic response or toxicity, and identification of new targets for therapeutic will improve survival of breast cancer. These progresses will likely be accelerated by the new proteomic techniques. In this review, we describe the different techniques currently applied to clinical samples of breast cancer and the most important results obtained with the two most popular proteomic approaches in translational research (tissue microarrays and SELDI-TOF).

  19. Development of Biodegradable Zinc Oxide Nanowires Targeting Breast Cancer Metastasis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    potential as a new diagnostic and therapeutic strategy to combat the extremely aggressive TNB that is associated with poor prognosis. Figures... rat anti-mouse CD31 antibody and Cy3-labeled donkey anti- rat IgG (red). Immunofluorescence CD105/CD31 staining of various tissues ex vivo revealed...breast cancer. Hum Pathol, 2013. 44(11): p. 2581-9. 6. Imbert, A.M., et al., CD146 expression in human breast cancer cell lines induces phenotypic and

  20. Tumor reactive stroma in cholangiocarcinoma: The fuel behind cancer aggressiveness

    PubMed Central

    Brivio, Simone; Cadamuro, Massimiliano; Strazzabosco, Mario; Fabris, Luca

    2017-01-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is a highly aggressive epithelial malignancy still carrying a dismal prognosis, owing to early lymph node metastatic dissemination and striking resistance to conventional chemotherapy. Although mechanisms underpinning CCA progression are still a conundrum, it is now increasingly recognized that the desmoplastic microenvironment developing in conjunction with biliary carcinogenesis, recently renamed tumor reactive stroma (TRS), behaves as a paramount tumor-promoting driver. Indeed, once being recruited, activated and dangerously co-opted by neoplastic cells, the cellular components of the TRS (myofibroblasts, macrophages, endothelial cells and mesenchymal stem cells) continuously rekindle malignancy by secreting a huge variety of soluble factors (cyto/chemokines, growth factors, morphogens and proteinases). Furthermore, these factors are long-term stored within an abnormally remodeled extracellular matrix (ECM), which in turn can deleteriously mold cancer cell behavior. In this review, we will highlight evidence for the active role played by reactive stromal cells (as well as by the TRS-associated ECM) in CCA progression, including an overview of the most relevant TRS-derived signals possibly fueling CCA cell aggressiveness. Hopefully, a deeper knowledge of the paracrine communications reciprocally exchanged between cancer and stromal cells will steer the development of innovative, combinatorial therapies, which can finally hinder the progression of CCA, as well as of other cancer types with abundant TRS, such as pancreatic and breast carcinomas.

  1. Pharmacokinetically Guided Everolimus in Patients With Breast Cancer, Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors, or Kidney Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-09

    Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Gastrinoma; Glucagonoma; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Insulinoma; Mucositis; Oral Complications; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Islet Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Cancer; Somatostatinoma; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer

  2. Targeting HER2 Positive Breast Cancer with Chemopreventive Agents

    PubMed Central

    Wahler, Joseph; Suh, Nanjoo

    2015-01-01

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive (HER2+) breast cancer is a subtype of breast cancer that is exhibited in approximately 20-30% of breast cancer cases. The overexpression of HER2 is typically associated with a more aggressive disease and poor prognosis. Currently, the therapeutic drugs trastuzumab and lapatinib are the most commonly used to combat HER2+ breast cancer. However, tumors can develop resistance to these drugs. A better understanding of the mechanism of how HER2+ breast cancer works will help aid the development for new therapeutic approaches which more closely target the source of the signaling dysfunction. This review summarizes four major points in the context of HER2 over-expressing breast cancer (i) HER2 as a molecular target in breast cancer therapy, (ii) current treatment options as well as ongoing clinical studies, (iii) animal and cellular models for the study of HER2 over-expressing breast cancer, and (iv) future therapies and chemopreventive agents used to target HER2+ breast cancer. PMID:26442201

  3. What Happens After Treatment for Breast Cancer in Men?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Men After Treatment What Happens After Treatment for Breast Cancer in Men? For many men with breast cancer, ... Breast Cancer in Men Stops Working More In Breast Cancer In Men About Breast Cancer in Men Causes, ...

  4. Male breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Reis, Leonardo Oliveira; Dias, Fernando Gf; Castro, Marcos As; Ferreira, Ubirajara

    2011-06-01

    Male breast cancer (MBC) is a rare disease. However, as global populace ages, there is a trend to MBC increasing. Although aetiology is still unclear, constitutional, environmental, hormonal (abnormalities in estrogen/androgen balance) and genetic (positive family history, Klinefelter syndrome, mutations in BRCA1 and specially BRCA2) risk factors are already known. Clinic manifestation is painless hard and fixed nodule in the subareolar region in 75% of cases, with nipple commitment earlier than in women. Breast cancer has similar prognostic factors in males and females, among which axillary adenopathy (present in 40-55% cases) is the most important one. Although mammography, ultrasonography and scintigraphy can be useful tools in diagnosis; clinical assessment, along with a confirmatory biopsy, remains the main step in the evaluation of men with breast lesions. Infiltrating ductal carcinoma is the most frequent histological type. The established standard of care is modified radical mastectomy followed by tamoxifen for endocrine-responsive positive disease, although other options are being explored. While similarities between breast cancer in males and females exist, it is not appropriate to extrapolate data from female disease to the treatment of male. There is a need for specific multi-institutional trials to better understanding of clinicopathologic features and establishment of optimal therapy for this disease.

  5. [Occult multicentric breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Vtorushin, S V; Zab'ialova, M V; Glushchenko, S A; Perel'muter, V M; Slonimskaia, E M

    2009-01-01

    The study included 92 patients with invasive ductal breast cancer (T2-4N0-2M0-1). In 38 cases, tumor growth was unicentric while histologically identifiable ones as multicentric in 44. Multicentricity mostly occurred in cases of macroscopically-identifiable nodes located in the central segments of the breast. Clinically-identifiable nodes of multicentric tumor growth measured more than 3 cm. Multicentric tumors were mostly grade III, featured lower expression of sex hormone receptors and positive Her2 status.

  6. Increasing Breast Cancer Surveillance among African American Breast Cancer Survivors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-07-01

    predictors of surveillance and follow-up care is Baldwin’s Afrocentric model for describing AA women’s participation in breast and cervical cancer screening...African American women’s participation in breast and cervical cancer early detection and screening. Adv Nurs Sci. 1996;19(2):27Y42. 28. Marin G. Subjective...AD_________________ Award Number: DAMD17-03-1-0454 TITLE: Increasing Breast Cancer Surveillance

  7. Breast-Conserving Surgery Followed by Radiation Therapy With MRI-Detected Stage I or Stage II Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2011-12-07

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Male Breast Cancer; Medullary Ductal Breast Carcinoma With Lymphocytic Infiltrate; Mucinous Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Papillary Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Tubular Ductal Breast Carcinoma

  8. Tamoxifen Action in ER-Negative Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Manna, Subrata; Holz, Marina K

    2016-02-10

    Breast cancer is a highly heterogeneous disease. Tamoxifen is a selective estrogen receptor (ER) modulator and is mainly indicated for the treatment of breast cancer in postmenopausal women and postsurgery neoadjuvant therapy in ER-positive breast cancers. Interestingly, 5-10% of the ER-negative breast cancers have also shown sensitivity to tamoxifen treatment. The involvement of molecular markers and/or signaling pathways independent of ER signaling has been implicated in tamoxifen sensitivity in the ER-negative subgroup. Studies reveal that variation in the expression of estrogen-related receptor alpha, ER subtype beta, tumor microenvironment, and epigenetics affects tamoxifen sensitivity. This review discusses the background of the research on the action of tamoxifen that may inspire future studies to explore effective therapeutic strategies for the treatment of ER-negative and triple-negative breast cancers, the latter being an aggressive disease with worse clinical outcome.

  9. Tamoxifen Action in ER-Negative Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Manna, Subrata; Holz, Marina K.

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is a highly heterogeneous disease. Tamoxifen is a selective estrogen receptor (ER) modulator and is mainly indicated for the treatment of breast cancer in postmenopausal women and postsurgery neoadjuvant therapy in ER-positive breast cancers. Interestingly, 5–10% of the ER-negative breast cancers have also shown sensitivity to tamoxifen treatment. The involvement of molecular markers and/or signaling pathways independent of ER signaling has been implicated in tamoxifen sensitivity in the ER-negative subgroup. Studies reveal that variation in the expression of estrogen-related receptor alpha, ER subtype beta, tumor microenvironment, and epigenetics affects tamoxifen sensitivity. This review discusses the background of the research on the action of tamoxifen that may inspire future studies to explore effective therapeutic strategies for the treatment of ER-negative and triple-negative breast cancers, the latter being an aggressive disease with worse clinical outcome. PMID:26989346

  10. You, Your Teenage Daughter and Breast Cancer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brateman, Libby

    1991-01-01

    Discusses breast cancer and teenagers, focusing on how parents can introduce the subject and encourage breast self-examination. The article provides information on breast cancer statistics, mammography, and American Cancer Society services. (SM)

  11. Reproduction and Breast Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Hanf, Volker; Hanf, Dorothea

    2014-01-01

    Summary Reproduction is doubtlessly one of the main biological meanings of life. It is therefore not surprising that various aspects of reproduction impact on breast cancer risk. Various developmental levels may become targets of breast tumorigenesis. This review follows the chronologic sequence of events in the life of a female at risk, starting with the intrauterine development. Furthermore, the influence of both contraceptive measures and fertility treatment on breast cancer development is dealt with, as well as various pregnancy-associated factors, events, and perinatal outcomes. Finally, the contribution of breast feeding to a reduced breast cancer risk is discussed. PMID:25759622

  12. Breast Cancer Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Marino, Natascia; Woditschka, Stephan; Reed, L. Tiffany; Nakayama, Joji; Mayer, Musa; Wetzel, Maria; Steeg, Patricia S.

    2014-01-01

    Despite important progress in adjuvant and neoadjuvant therapies, metastatic disease often develops in breast cancer patients and remains the leading cause of their deaths. For patients with established metastatic disease, therapy is palliative, with few breaks and with mounting adverse effects. Many have hypothesized that a personalized or precision approach (the terms are used interchangeably) to cancer therapy, in which treatment is based on the individual characteristics of each patient, will provide better outcomes. Here, we discuss the molecular basis of breast cancer metastasis and the challenges in personalization of treatment. The instability of metastatic tumors remains a leading obstacle to personalization, because information from a patient’s primary tumor may not accurately reflect the metastasis, and one metastasis may vary from another. Furthermore, the variable presence of tumor subpopulations, such as stem cells and dormant cells, may increase the complexity of the targeted treatments needed. Although molecular signatures and circulating biomarkers have been identified in breast cancer, there is lack of validated predictive molecular markers to optimize treatment choices for either prevention or treatment of metastatic disease. Finally, to maximize the information that can be obtained, increased attention to clinical trial design in the metastasis preventive setting is needed. PMID:23895915

  13. Molecular Targeted Therapies of Aggressive Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Silvia Martina; Fallahi, Poupak; Politti, Ugo; Materazzi, Gabriele; Baldini, Enke; Ulisse, Salvatore; Miccoli, Paolo; Antonelli, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Differentiated thyroid carcinomas (DTCs) that arise from follicular cells account >90% of thyroid cancer (TC) [papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) 90%, follicular thyroid cancer (FTC) 10%], while medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) accounts <5%. Complete total thyroidectomy is the treatment of choice for PTC, FTC, and MTC. Radioiodine is routinely recommended in high-risk patients and considered in intermediate risk DTC patients. DTC cancer cells, during tumor progression, may lose the iodide uptake ability, becoming resistant to radioiodine, with a significant worsening of the prognosis. The lack of specific and effective drugs for aggressive and metastatic DTC and MTC leads to additional efforts toward the development of new drugs. Several genetic alterations in different molecular pathways in TC have been shown in the past few decades, associated with TC development and progression. Rearranged during transfection (RET)/PTC gene rearrangements, RET mutations, BRAF mutations, RAS mutations, and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 angiogenesis pathways are some of the known pathways determinant in the development of TC. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) are small organic compounds inhibiting tyrosine kinases auto-phosphorylation and activation, most of them are multikinase inhibitors. TKIs act on the aforementioned molecular pathways involved in growth, angiogenesis, local, and distant spread of TC. TKIs are emerging as new therapies of aggressive TC, including DTC, MTC, and anaplastic thyroid cancer, being capable of inducing clinical responses and stabilization of disease. Vandetanib and cabozantinib have been approved for the treatment of MTC, while sorafenib and lenvatinib for DTC refractory to radioiodine. These drugs prolong median progression-free survival, but until now no significant increase has been observed on overall survival; side effects are common. New efforts are made to find new more effective and safe compounds and to personalize the therapy in

  14. Endoplasmic Reticulum-Associated Degradation Factor ERLIN2: Oncogenic Roles and Molecular Targeting of Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    phenotype. Oncogenes, such as Her2 , play important roles in uncontrolled proliferation and survival of breast cancer cells. However, cancer cells must...transforming roles of ERLIN2 and molecular mechanisms by which ERLIN2 coordinates ER pathways in breast cancer have not been elucidated. In this... signaling in aggressive forms of human breast cancer . Accordingly, we propose that ERLIN2 represents a novel class of oncogenic factors and that

  15. Signaling Through the PI 3-K, Akt, and SGK Pathway in Breast Cancer Progression

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-01

    ANSI Std. Z39.18 The aggressive behavior of malignant breast cancer is determined by a complex array of signaling pathways that regulate cell...Akt signaling promotes cancer progression. Many of the enzymes that regulate PI 3-K signaling are frequently mutated in human breast cancer , thereby...K, PIK3CA, is the most frequently mutated oncogene in breast cancer . However, recent studies have demonstrated that distinct Akt isoforms can either

  16. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Dr. Robert Richmond extracts breast cell tissue from one of two liquid nitrogen dewars. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunourous tissues.

  17. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Breast tissue specimens in traditional sample dishes. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunourous tissues.

  18. Progress in breast cancer: overview.

    PubMed

    Arteaga, Carlos L

    2013-12-01

    This edition of CCR Focus titled Research in Breast Cancer: Frontiers in Genomics, Biology, and Clinical Investigation reviews six topics that cover areas of translational research of high impact in breast cancer. These topics represent areas of breast cancer research where significant progress has occurred but also where very important challenges remain. The papers in this CCR Focus section are contributed by experts in the respective areas of investigation. Herein, key aspects of these contributions and the research directions they propose are reviewed.

  19. [Organized breast cancer screening].

    PubMed

    Rouëssé, Jacques; Sancho-Garnier, Hélèn

    2014-02-01

    Breast screening programs are increasingly controversial, especially regarding two points: the number of breast cancer deaths they avoid, and the problem of over-diagnosis and over-treatment. The French national breast cancer screening program was extended to cover the whole country in 2004. Ten years later it is time to examine the risk/benefit ratio of this program and to discuss the need for change. Like all forms of cancer management, screening must be regularly updated, taking into account the state of the art, new evidence, and uncertainties. All screening providers should keep themselves informed of the latest findings. In the French program, women aged 50-74 with no major individual or familial risk factors for breast cancer are offered screening mammography and clinical breast examination every two years. Images considered non suspicious of malignancy by a first reader are re-examined by a second reader. The devices and procedures are subjected to quality controls. Participating radiologists (both public and private) are required to read at least 500 mammographies per year. The program's national participation rate was 52.7 % in 2012. When individual screening outside of the national program is taken into account (nearly 15 % of women), coverage appears close to the European recommendation of 65 %. Breast cancer mortality has been falling in France by 0.6 % per year for over 30 years, starting before mass screening was implemented, and by 1.5 % since 2005. This decline can be attributed in part to earlier diagnosis and better treatment, so that the specific impact of screening cannot easily be measured. Over-treatment, defined as the detection and treatment of low-malignancy tumors that would otherwise not have been detected in a person's lifetime, is a major negative effect of screening, but its frequency is not precisely known (reported to range from 1 % to 30 %). In view of these uncertainties, it would be advisable to modify the program in order to

  20. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    High magnification view of human primary breast tumor cells after 56 days of culture in a NASA Bioreactor. The arrow points to bead surface indicating breast cancer cells (as noted by the staining of tumor cell intermediate filaments). NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Jearne Becker, University of South Florida

  1. Over-treatment in metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Senkus, Elżbieta; Łacko, Aleksandra

    2017-02-01

    Metastatic breast cancer is an incurable disease and the main goals of treatment are prolongation of survival and preservation/improvement of quality of life. Thus the main philosophy of treatment should be to use the least toxic methods, as long as they provide sufficient disease control. In ER-positive tumours this can be in many cases achieved by endocrine therapy; in HER2-positive cancers efficacy of backbone therapy can be enhanced by an anti-HER2 agent. In patients requiring chemotherapy, consecutive single agent regimen provide disease control of a duration at least comparable to multidrug regimen, at a cost of significantly lower toxicity and are a preferred strategy in the majority of cases. Available data demonstrate, however, that aggressive chemotherapy is still overused in many metastatic breast cancer patients. The objective of this manuscript is to critically review available data on treatment choices and sequence in metastatic breast cancer across all breast cancer subtypes in relation to possible overtreatment, including therapies which are not recommended by current guidelines or not even approved. Our aim is to provide guidance on applying these data to clinical practice, but also to describe various, often non-scientific factors influencing therapeutic decisions in an aim to identify areas requiring educational and possibly political actions.

  2. Amphiphysin and Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-10-01

    condition appears to represent a novel entity within the emerging family of neurological autoimmune paraneoplastic syndromes , conditions in which...We have recently identified a new human syndrome characterized by breast cancer, autoimmunity directed against the neuronal protein in amphiphysin...and Stiff-Man syndrome (SMS). SMS is a rare disease of the central nervous system characterized by progressive rigidity of the body musculature. This

  3. Breast Cancer Training Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-08-01

    Institut Curie, Centre Multiply damaged sites in DNA : a challenge Universitaire for cellular repair processes ? May 1, 2004 Dr. Nancy E Davidson...participation in the activities of the Breast Cancer Research Program has enabled her to gain a fundamental understanding of the disease process as well as its...postdoctoral trainee supported in year 04 Dr. Maeda is studying the role of cadherin switching in TGF- BI -mediated epithelial to mesenchymal transition in

  4. Breast cancer risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Ciszewski, Tomasz; Łopacka-Szatan, Karolina; Miotła, Paweł; Starosławska, Elżbieta

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed neoplastic disease in women around menopause often leading to a significant reduction of these women's ability to function normally in everyday life. The increased breast cancer incidence observed in epidemiological studies in a group of women actively participating in social and professional life implicates the necessity of conducting multidirectional studies in order to identify risk factors associated with the occurrence of this type of neoplasm. Taking the possibility of influencing the neoplastic transformation process in individuals as a criterion, all the risk factors initiating the process can be divided into two groups. The first group would include inherent factors such as age, sex, race, genetic makeup promoting familial occurrence of the neoplastic disease or the occurrence of benign proliferative lesions of the mammary gland. They all constitute independent parameters and do not undergo simple modification in the course of an individual's life. The second group would include extrinsic factors conditioned by lifestyle, diet or long-term medical intervention such as using oral hormonal contraceptives or hormonal replacement therapy and their influence on the neoplastic process may be modified to a certain degree. Identification of modifiable factors may contribute to development of prevention strategies decreasing breast cancer incidence. PMID:26528110

  5. X chromosome gain in male breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Di Oto, Enrico; Monti, Valentina; Cucchi, Maria C; Masetti, Riccardo; Varga, Zsuzsanna; Foschini, Maria P

    2015-12-01

    Male breast cancer (MBC) is an uncommon disease whose molecular profile is not well known. X chromosome gain has been described as a marker of aggressive behavior in female breast cancer. The aim of this study is to investigate the role of the X chromosome in male breast cancer. Twenty cases of male breast invasive ductal carcinoma were retrieved and compared with 10 cases of gynecomastia. Cases were tested by fluorescence in situ hybridization to assess a cytogenetic profile for the X chromosome. The X chromosome status was compared with histopathologic features and stage at presentation. All MBC cases harbored an X chromosome gain (100%) in a variable percentage of neoplastic cells, ranging from 31% to 85% (mean, 59%). On the contrary, all cases of gynecomastia showed wild X chromosome asset. The patients' age at surgery and tumor grading showed a statistically significant correlation (P = .0188-.04), with the percentages of neoplastic cells showing an X chromosome gain. These data suggest that this X chromosome gain plays a role in the neoplastic transformation of male breast epithelial cells.

  6. Vascular and Cognitive Assessments in Patients With Breast Cancer Undergoing Chemotherapy After Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-20

    Cognitive/Functional Effects; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  7. Rosuvastatin in Treating Women With Cardiovascular Complications Who Are Undergoing Chemotherapy For Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-20

    Cardiovascular Complications; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  8. EFA6B antagonizes breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Zangari, Joséphine; Partisani, Mariagrazia; Bertucci, François; Milanini, Julie; Bidaut, Ghislain; Berruyer-Pouyet, Carole; Finetti, Pascal; Long, Elodie; Brau, Frédéric; Cabaud, Olivier; Chetaille, Bruno; Birnbaum, Daniel; Lopez, Marc; Hofman, Paul; Franco, Michel; Luton, Frédéric

    2014-10-01

    One of the earliest events in epithelial carcinogenesis is the dissolution of tight junctions and cell polarity signals that are essential for normal epithelial barrier function. Here, we report that EFA6B, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for the Ras superfamily protein Arf6 that helps assemble and stabilize tight junction, is required to maintain apico-basal cell polarity and mesenchymal phenotypes in mammary epithelial cells. In organotypic three-dimensional cell cultures, endogenous levels of EFA6B were critical to determine epithelial-mesenchymal status. EFA6B downregulation correlated with a mesenchymal phenotype and ectopic expression of EFA6B hampered TGFβ-induced epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Transcriptomic and immunohistochemical analyses of human breast tumors revealed that the reduced expression of EFA6B was associated with loss of tight junction components and with increased signatures of EMT, cancer stemness, and poor prognosis. Accordingly, tumors with low levels of EFA6B were enriched in the aggressive triple-negative and claudin-low breast cancer subtypes. Our results identify EFA6B as a novel antagonist in breast cancer and they point to its regulatory and signaling pathways as rational therapeutic targets in aggressive forms of this disease.

  9. IMP3 protein promotes chemoresistance in breast cancer cells by regulating breast cancer resistance protein (ABCG2) expression.

    PubMed

    Samanta, Sanjoy; Pursell, Bryan; Mercurio, Arthur M

    2013-05-03

    IMP3, a member of a family of insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) mRNA-binding proteins (IMPs), is expressed preferentially in triple-negative breast cancers, which are resistant to many chemotherapeutics. However, the mechanisms by which it impacts breast cancer have not been elucidated. We hypothesized a role for IMP3 in chemoresistance based on these observations. Depletion of IMP3 expression in triple-negative breast cancer cells increased their sensitivity to doxorubicin and mitoxantrone significantly but not to taxol. Given that doxorubicin and mitoxantrone are effluxed by breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), we assessed whether IMP3 regulates BCRP. The data obtained demonstrate that IMP3 binds to BCRP mRNA and regulates BCRP expression. These findings are significant because they provide insight into the mechanism by which IMP3 contributes to aggressive cancers, and they highlight the potential for targeting this mRNA-binding protein for the clinical management of cancer.

  10. Paclitaxel Albumin-Stabilized Nanoparticle Formulation in Treating Older Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-14

    Male Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  11. Pathways to Breast Cancer Recurrence

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer remains a deadly disease, even with all the recent technological advancements. Early intervention has made an impact, but an overwhelmingly large number of breast cancer patients still live under the fear of “recurrent” disease. Breast cancer recurrence is clinically a huge problem and one that is largely not well understood. Over the years, a number of factors have been studied with an overarching aim of being able to prognose recurrent disease. This paper attempts to provide an overview of our current knowledge of breast cancer recurrence and its associated challenges. Through a survey of the literature on cancer stem cells (CSCs), epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), various signaling pathways such as Notch/Wnt/hedgehog, and microRNAs (miRNAs), we also examine the hypotheses that are currently under investigation for the prevention of breast cancer recurrence. PMID:23533807

  12. Breast cancer statistics and markers.

    PubMed

    Donepudi, Mallika Siva; Kondapalli, Kasturi; Amos, Seelam Jeevan; Venkanteshan, Pavithra

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the familiar diseases in women. Incidence and mortality due to cancer, particularly breast cancer has been increasing for last 50 years, even though there is a lacuna in the diagnosis of breast cancer at early stages. According to World Health Organization (WHO) 2012 reports, breast cancer is the leading cause of death in women, accounting 23% of all cancer deaths. In Asia, one in every three women faces the risk of breast cancer in their lifetime as per reports of WHO 2012. Here, the review is been focused on different breast cancer markers, that is, tissue markers (hormone receptors, human epidermal growth factor-2, urokinase plasminogen activator, plasminogen activator inhibitor, p53 and cathepsin D), genetic markers (BRAC1 and 2 and gene expression microarray technique, etc.), and serum markers (CA 15.3, BR 27.29, MCA, CA 549, carcinoembryonic antigen, oncoproteins, and cytokeratins) used in present diagnosis, but none of the mentioned markers can diagnose breast cancer at an early stage. There is a disquieting need for the identification of best diagnosing marker, which can be able to diagnose even in early stage of breast carcinogenesis.

  13. Drugs Approved for Breast Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for breast cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

  14. Hormone Therapy for Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... outcomes: the NSABP Study of Tamoxifen and Raloxifene (STAR) P–2 trial. JAMA 2006; 295(23):2727– ... and Bowel Project Study of Tamoxifen and Raloxifene (STAR) P-2 Trial: Preventing breast cancer. Cancer Prevention ...

  15. Fulvestrant and/or Anastrozole in Treating Postmenopausal Patients With Stage II-III Breast Cancer Undergoing Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-06

    Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  16. Breast and Colon Cancer Family Registries

    Cancer.gov

    The Breast Cancer Family Registry and the Colon Cancer Family Registry were established by the National Cancer Institute as a resource for investigators to use in conducting studies on the genetics and molecular epidemiology of breast and colon cancer.

  17. Breast Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Velasco-Velázquez, Marco A.; Homsi, Nora; De La Fuente, Marisol; Pestell, Richard G.

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs) constitute a subpopulation of tumor cells that express stem cell-associated markers and have a high capacity for tumor generation in vivo. Identification of BCSCs from tumor samples or breast cancer cell lines has been based mainly on CD44+/CD24−/low or ALDH+ phenotypes. BCSCs isolation has allowed the analysis of the molecular mechanisms involved in their origin, self-renewal, differentiation into tumor cells, resistance to radiation therapy and chemotherapy, and invasiveness and metastatic ability. Molecular genetic analysis using knockout animals and inducible transgenics have identified NF-κB, c-Jun, p21CIP1, and Forkhead-like-protein Dach1 in BCSC expansion and fate. Clinical analyses of BCSCs in breast tumors have found a correlation between the proportion of BCSCs and poor prognosis. Therefore, new therapies that specifically target BCSCs are an urgent need. We summarize recent evidence that partially explain the biological characteristics of BCSCs. PMID:22249027

  18. Aggressive thyroid cancer: targeted therapy with sorafenib.

    PubMed

    Corrado, Alda; Ferrari, Silvia M; Politti, Ugo; Mazzi, Valeria; Miccoli, Mario; Materazzi, Gabriele; Antonelli, Alessandro; Ulisse, Salvatore; Fallahi, Poupak; Miccoli, Paolo

    2017-03-01

    Sorafenib (Nexavar), is a multikinase inhibitor, which has demonstrated both antiproliferative and antiangiogenic properties in vitro and in vivo, inhibiting the activity of targets present in the tumoral cells (c-RAF [proto-oncogene serine/threonine-protein kinase], BRAF, (V600E)BRAF, c-KIT, and FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3) and in tumor vessels (c-RAF, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor [VEGFR]-2, VEGFR-3, and platelet-derived growth factor receptor β). Sorafenib was initially approved for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma and advanced renal cell carcinoma. Experimental studies have demonstrated that sorafenib has both antiproliferative and antiangiogenic properties in vitro and in vivo, against thyroid cancer cells. Furthermore, several completed (or ongoing) studies have evaluated the long-term efficacy and tolerability of sorafenib in patients with papillary, follicular and medullary aggressive thyroid cancer. The results of the different studies showed good clinical responses and stabilization of the disease and suggested that sorafenib is a promising therapeutic option in patients with advanced thyroid cancer that is not responsive to traditional therapeutic strategies (such as radioiodine). Currently, USA Food and Drug Administration has approved the use of sorafenib for metastatic differentiated thyroid cancer.

  19. HER-2 Positive Breast Cancer - a Mini-Review.

    PubMed

    Asif, Hafiz Muhammad; Sultana, Sabira; Ahmed, Saeed; Akhtar, Naheed; Tariq, Muhammad

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of among all cancers with increased incidence, high mortality rate, and high economic and social costs. The the most common type of cancer among females worldwide, breast cancer is actually the uncontrolled proliferation of cells which attain malignancy. Recently it has shown that breast cancer contributes 11% among all types of cancer diagnosed globally on an annual basis and it is one of the leading causes of death among women. The human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER-2) is a receptor tyrosine-protein kinase erbB-2 normally involved in the proliferation and division of breast cells. In some abnormal cases the HER2 gene does not work correctly and makes too many copies of itself. HER2-positive (HER2+) breast cancers constitute an aggressive type of breast cancer and tend to grow faster and are more likely to spread. However, therapies that specifically target HER2, such as Herceptin® (traztuzumab), are very effective. HER2 targeted therapies, has significantly improved the therapeutic outcome for patients with HER2 positive breast cancer.

  20. [Can breast cancer be prevented?].

    PubMed

    Vatten, L J

    1991-05-30

    More than six-fold variation in incidence between countries, an increasing incidence among immigrants to high incidence areas, and a general increase in the incidence of breast cancer within countries, are factors which suggest a potential for prevention. Reproductive factors such as early menarche, late age at first full term birth, nulliparity, and late age at menopause increase risk of breast cancer, but manipulation of any one of these factors does not seem to be a realistic preventive tool. Nevertheless, the future possibility of using tamoxifen as a chemopreventive agent against breast cancer is discussed, particularly in relation to women at increased risk due to familial clustering. Alcohol consumption by young women, and overweight among postmenopausal women may also increase the incidence of breast cancer. Consequently, reduced alcohol intake by young women, and weight reduction among overweight women after menopause may reduce the risk of breast cancer.

  1. [Therapeutic advances in breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Pestalozzi, B C

    2006-04-01

    The treatment of breast cancer has made significant improvements during the past ten years. For early breast cancer with a clinically negative axilla sentinel node biopsy has become the preferred approach. For endocrine therapy of postmenopausal patients the selective aromatase inhibitors have become standard in metastatic as well as in early breast cancer. Trastuzumab (Herceptin) plays an important role in the treatment of HER2-positive breast cancer in the metastatic and since 2005 also in the adjuvant setting. When chemotherapy is used to treat metastatic breast cancer drug combinations are superior to monotherapy only in terms of response rates. By contrast, in the adjuvant setting combination drug therapy is the standard. New methods of tissue analysis including expression patterns of mRNA and proteins are promising research strategies to further advance the field.

  2. The CCL5/CCR5 axis promotes metastasis in basal breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Velasco-Velázquez, Marco; Pestell, Richard G.

    2013-01-01

    Recently, we have shown that the CCL5/CCR5 axis is active in patients affected by an aggressive basal subtype of breast cancer. Using preclinical models, we have demonstrated that CCR5 promotes breast cancer invasiveness and metastatic potential, while CCR5 inhibition abrogates them. Thus, CCR5 antagonists may constitute an alternative therapeutic approach for patients affected by metastatic basal breast cancer. PMID:23734321

  3. Addition of Carboplatin to Neoadjuvant Therapy for Triple-negative and HER2-positive Early Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-12

    Tubular Breast Cancer Stage II; Mucinous Breast Cancer Stage II; Breast Cancer Female NOS; Invasive Ductal Breast Cancer; Tubular Breast Cancer Stage III; HER-2 Positive Breast Cancer; Inflammatory Breast Cancer Stage IV; Inflammatory Breast Cancer

  4. What Are the Key Statistics about Breast Cancer in Men?

    MedlinePlus

    ... in Men What Are the Key Statistics About Breast Cancer in Men? The American Cancer Society estimates for ... Treatment in Breast Cancer in Men? More In Breast Cancer In Men About Breast Cancer in Men Causes, ...

  5. Exercise Intervention in Targeting Adiposity and Inflammation With Movement to Improve Prognosis in Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-21

    Cancer Survivor; Central Obesity; Estrogen Receptor Positive; Postmenopausal; Progesterone Receptor Positive; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage III Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  6. Optimal breast cancer pathology manifesto.

    PubMed

    Tot, T; Viale, G; Rutgers, E; Bergsten-Nordström, E; Costa, A

    2015-11-01

    This manifesto was prepared by a European Breast Cancer (EBC) Council working group and launched at the European Breast Cancer Conference in Glasgow on 20 March 2014. It sets out optimal technical and organisational requirements for a breast cancer pathology service, in the light of concerns about variability and lack of patient-centred focus. It is not a guideline about how pathology services should be performed. It is a call for all in the cancer community--pathologists, oncologists, patient advocates, health administrators and policymakers--to check that services are available that serve the needs of patients in a high quality, timely way.

  7. Polyunsaturated fatty acid content is increased in the milk of women with pregnancy associated breast cancer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Pregnancy associated breast cancer (PABC) is aggressive and difficult to diagnose. High intake of most types of dietary fat is thought to increase breast cancer risk, however results in humans supporting this premise remain equivocal. Fatty acid (FA) concentrations in the body comprise b...

  8. Biomarkers in Tissue Samples From Patients With Newly Diagnosed Breast Cancer Treated With Zoledronic Acid

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-12

    Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer

  9. Neo-adjuvant Therapy With Anastrozole Plus Pazopanib in Stage II and III ER+ Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-24

    Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Human Epidermal Growth Factor 2 Negative Carcinoma of Breast; Male Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer

  10. Defining the molecular biology of inflammatory breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Charafe-Jauffret, Emmanuelle; Tarpin, Carole; Viens, Patrice; Bertucci, François

    2008-02-01

    Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is a rare, but aggressive form of breast cancer. Despite the progress related to the introduction of primary combination chemotherapy (CT) to the multimodality treatment regimen, the prognosis of IBC remains poor with long-term survival inferior to 50%. Until recently, IBC remained understudied at the molecular level. In the past 10 years, advances have been made in the molecular characterization of the disease. Recently, the use of experimental models and new high-throughput molecular profiling technologies have led to the identification of genes or pathways potentially involved in disease development, which might represent new clinically relevant targets. The aim of this review is to present and discuss what is known about the biology of this particularly aggressive form of breast cancer and to discuss how this knowledge could improve its management.

  11. Oncolytic virotherapy of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Hartkopf, Andreas D; Fehm, Tanja; Wallwiener, Diethelm; Lauer, Ulrich M

    2011-10-01

    The use of replication competent viruses that selectively target and destroy cancer cells has rapidly evolved over the past decade and numerous innovative oncolytic viruses have been created. Many of these promising anti-cancer agents have recently entered into clinical trials (including those on breast cancer) and demonstrated encouraging safety and efficacy. Virotherapeutic strategies are thus of considerable interest to combat breast cancer in both (i) the primary disease situation in which relapse should be avoided as good as possible and (ii) in the metastatic situation which remains incurable to date. Here, we summarize data from preclinical and clinical trials using oncolytic virotherapy to treat breast cancer. This includes strategies to specifically target breast cancer cells, to arm oncolytic viruses with additional therapeutic transgenes and an outlining of future challenges when translating these promising therapeutics "from bench to bedside".

  12. Aluminium, antiperspirants and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Darbre, P D

    2005-09-01

    Aluminium salts are used as the active antiperspirant agent in underarm cosmetics, but the effects of widespread, long term and increasing use remain unknown, especially in relation to the breast, which is a local area of application. Clinical studies showing a disproportionately high incidence of breast cancer in the upper outer quadrant of the breast together with reports of genomic instability in outer quadrants of the breast provide supporting evidence for a role for locally applied cosmetic chemicals in the development of breast cancer. Aluminium is known to have a genotoxic profile, capable of causing both DNA alterations and epigenetic effects, and this would be consistent with a potential role in breast cancer if such effects occurred in breast cells. Oestrogen is a well established influence in breast cancer and its action, dependent on intracellular receptors which function as ligand-activated zinc finger transcription factors, suggests one possible point of interference from aluminium. Results reported here demonstrate that aluminium in the form of aluminium chloride or aluminium chlorhydrate can interfere with the function of oestrogen receptors of MCF7 human breast cancer cells both in terms of ligand binding and in terms of oestrogen-regulated reporter gene expression. This adds aluminium to the increasing list of metals capable of interfering with oestrogen action and termed metalloestrogens. Further studies are now needed to identify the molecular basis of this action, the longer term effects of aluminium exposure and whether aluminium can cause aberrations to other signalling pathways in breast cells. Given the wide exposure of the human population to antiperspirants, it will be important to establish dermal absorption in the local area of the breast and whether long term low level absorption could play a role in the increasing incidence of breast cancer.

  13. Expression and functionality of TRPV1 in breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Lea V; Al-Refae, Klaudia; Wölk, Gerhard; Bonatz, Gabriele; Altmüller, Janine; Becker, Christian; Gisselmann, Günter; Hatt, Hanns

    2016-01-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels contribute to the regulation of intracellular calcium, which can promote cancer hallmarks in cases of dysregulation of gene transcription and calcium-dependent pro-proliferative or anti-apoptotic mechanisms. Several studies have begun to elucidate the roles of TRPV1, TRPV6, TRPM8, and TRPC1 in cancer progression; however, no study has examined the expression profiles of human TRP channels in breast cancer on a large scale. This study focused on the expression and functionality of TRPV1, a nonselective cation channel that was found to be expressed in different carcinoma tissues. Next-generation sequencing analyses revealed the expression of TRPV1 in several native breast cancer tissues, which was subsequently validated via reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Activation of TRPV1 by its ligand capsaicin was associated with the growth inhibition of some cancer cell types; however, the signaling components involved are complex. In this study, stimulation by the TRPV1 agonist, capsaicin, of SUM149PT cells, a model system for the most aggressive breast cancer subtype, triple-negative breast cancer, led to intracellular calcium signals that were diminished by the specific TRPV1 antagonist, capsazepin. Activation of TRPV1 by capsaicin caused significant inhibition of cancer cell growth and induced apoptosis and necrosis. In conclusion, the current study revealed the expression profiles of human TRP channels in 60 different breast cancer tissues and cell lines and furthermore validated the antitumor activity of TRPV1 against SUM149PT breast cancer cells, indicating that activation of TRPV1 could be used as a therapeutic target, even in the most aggressive breast cancer types. PMID:28008282

  14. Expression and functionality of TRPV1 in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Weber, Lea V; Al-Refae, Klaudia; Wölk, Gerhard; Bonatz, Gabriele; Altmüller, Janine; Becker, Christian; Gisselmann, Günter; Hatt, Hanns

    2016-01-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels contribute to the regulation of intracellular calcium, which can promote cancer hallmarks in cases of dysregulation of gene transcription and calcium-dependent pro-proliferative or anti-apoptotic mechanisms. Several studies have begun to elucidate the roles of TRPV1, TRPV6, TRPM8, and TRPC1 in cancer progression; however, no study has examined the expression profiles of human TRP channels in breast cancer on a large scale. This study focused on the expression and functionality of TRPV1, a nonselective cation channel that was found to be expressed in different carcinoma tissues. Next-generation sequencing analyses revealed the expression of TRPV1 in several native breast cancer tissues, which was subsequently validated via reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Activation of TRPV1 by its ligand capsaicin was associated with the growth inhibition of some cancer cell types; however, the signaling components involved are complex. In this study, stimulation by the TRPV1 agonist, capsaicin, of SUM149PT cells, a model system for the most aggressive breast cancer subtype, triple-negative breast cancer, led to intracellular calcium signals that were diminished by the specific TRPV1 antagonist, capsazepin. Activation of TRPV1 by capsaicin caused significant inhibition of cancer cell growth and induced apoptosis and necrosis. In conclusion, the current study revealed the expression profiles of human TRP channels in 60 different breast cancer tissues and cell lines and furthermore validated the antitumor activity of TRPV1 against SUM149PT breast cancer cells, indicating that activation of TRPV1 could be used as a therapeutic target, even in the most aggressive breast cancer types.

  15. The Biology of Breast Cancer Metastasis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-10-01

    Breast cancer is the second most common cause of brain metastases, diagnosed in 10 to 15% of breast cancer patients and found at autopsy in 20 to 30...Relatively little is known about how breast cancer cells metastasize to the brain , and what phenotypes characterize these cells. This is due in...breast cancer brain metastases, using intra-carotid artery injection of breast cancer cells into nude mice.

  16. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Time-lapse exposure depicts Bioreactor rotation. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunourous tissues.

  17. Integrated Immunotherapy for Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    2 AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-12-1-0366 TITLE: Integrated Immunotherapy for Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL...31Aug2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Integrated Immunotherapy for Breast Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1-0366 5c. PROGRAM... immunotherapy , tumor microenvironment, dendritic cells, metastasis, cancer stroma. 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18

  18. [Radiotherapy of breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Hennequin, C; Barillot, I; Azria, D; Belkacémi, Y; Bollet, M; Chauvet, B; Cowen, D; Cutuli, B; Fourquet, A; Hannoun-Lévi, J M; Leblanc, M; Mahé, M A

    2016-09-01

    In breast cancer, radiotherapy is an essential component of the treatment. After conservative surgery for an infiltrating carcinoma, radiotherapy must be systematically performed, regardless of the characteristics of the disease, because it decreases the rate of local recurrence and by this way, specific mortality. Partial breast irradiation could not be proposed routinely but only in very selected and informed patients. For ductal carcinoma in situ, adjuvant radiotherapy must be also systematically performed after lumpectomy. After mastectomy, chest wall irradiation is required for pT3-T4 tumours and if there is an axillary nodal involvement, whatever the number of involved lymph nodes. After neo-adjuvant chemotherapy and mastectomy, in case of pN0 disease, chest wall irradiation is recommended if there is a clinically or radiologically T3-T4 or node positive disease before chemotherapy. Axillary irradiation is recommended only if there is no axillary surgical dissection and a positive sentinel lymph node. Supra and infra-clavicular irradiation is advised in case of positive axillary nodes. Internal mammary irradiation must be discussed case by case, according to the benefit/risk ratio (cardiac toxicity). Dose to the chest wall or the breast must be between 45-50Gy with a conventional fractionation. A boost dose over the tumour bed is required if the patient is younger than 60 years old. Hypofractionation (42.5 Gy in 16 fractions, or 41.6 Gy en 13 or 40 Gy en 15) is possible after tumorectomy and if a nodal irradiation is not mandatory. Delineation of the breast, the chest wall and the nodal areas are based on clinical and radiological evaluations. 3D-conformal irradiation is the recommended technique, intensity-modulated radiotherapy must be proposed only in case of specific clinical situations. Respiratory gating could be useful to decrease the cardiac dose. Concomitant administration of chemotherapy in unadvised, but hormonal treatment could be start with

  19. Current status of hormone therapy in patients with hormone receptor positive (HR+) advanced breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Dalmau, Elsa; Armengol-Alonso, Alejandra; Muñoz, Montserrat; Seguí-Palmer, Miguel Ángel

    2014-12-01

    The natural history of HR+ breast cancer tends to be different from hormone receptor-negative disease in terms of time to recurrence, site of recurrence and overall aggressiveness of the disease. The developmental strategies of hormone therapy for the treatment of breast cancer have led to the classes of selective estrogen receptor modulators, selective estrogen receptor downregulators, and aromatase inhibitors. These therapeutic options have improved breast cancer outcomes in the metastatic setting, thereby delaying the need for chemotherapy. However, a subset of hormone receptor-positive breast cancers do not benefit from endocrine therapy (intrinsic resistance), and all HR+ metastatic breast cancers ultimately develop resistance to hormonal therapies (acquired resistance). Considering the multiple pathways involved in the HR network, targeting other components of pathologically activated intracellular signaling in breast cancer may prove to be a new direction in clinical research. This review focuses on current and emerging treatments for HR+ metastatic breast cancer.

  20. Breast cancer amongst Filipino migrants: a review of the literature and ten-year institutional analysis.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Jory S; Briggs, Kaleigh; George, Ralph

    2015-06-01

    As one migrates from an area of low to high incidence of breast cancer their personal risk of developing breast cancer increases. This is however not equally distributed across all races and ethnicities. This paper specifically examines Filipino migrants. A literature review was conducted to summarize breast cancer incidence, screening practices and trends in treatment amongst Filipino migrants. In addition, a retrospective cohort study was conducted specifically examining the age in which Filipino women were diagnosed with breast cancer compared to Asian and Caucasian counterparts. Filipino women are diagnosed with breast cancer at a statistically significant younger age (53.2) compared to their Asian (55.1) and Caucasian (58.4) counterparts. In addition, they are at an increased risk of developing more aggressive breast cancer with noteworthy disparities in the care they are receiving. The evidence suggest this group is worthy of special focus when diagnosing and treating breast cancer.

  1. Vitamin D and Related Genes, Race and Prostate Cancer Aggressiveness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-29

    vitamin D and genetic polymorphisms act synergistically to affect prostate cancer aggressiveness. We examined these associations among vitamin D...epidemiologic techniques for estimating odds of high aggressive prostate cancer according to vitamin D metabolites, PTH, calcium, phosphorus and genetic ...hypotheses a. Statistical analyses have been performed examining associations between 25(OH)D, 1,25(OH)2D, genetic polymorphisms and prostate cancer

  2. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Human primary breast tumor cells after 56 days of culture in a NASA Bioreactor. A cross-section of a construct, grown from surgical specimens of brease cancer, stained for microscopic examination, reveals areas of tumor cells dispersed throughout the non-epithelial cell background. The arrow denotes the foci of breast cancer cells. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Jearne Becker, University of South Florida

  3. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Human primary breast tumor cells after 49 days of growth in a NASA Bioreactor. Tumor cells aggregate on microcarrier beads (indicated by arrow). NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Jearne Becker, University of South Florida

  4. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    High magnification of view of tumor cells aggregate on microcarrier beads, illustrting breast cells with intercellular boundaires on bead surface and aggregates of cells achieving 3-deminstional growth outward from bead after 56 days of culture in a NASA Bioreactor. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Jearne Becker, University of South Florida.

  5. Doxorubicin Hydrochloride, Cyclophosphamide, and Filgrastim Followed By Paclitaxel Albumin-Stabilized Nanoparticle Formulation With or Without Trastuzumab in Treating Patients With Breast Cancer Previously Treated With Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-05-07

    Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  6. Southeastern Cancer Study Group: breast cancer studies

    SciTech Connect

    Smalley, R.V.; Bartolucci, A.A.; Moore, M.

    1983-12-01

    During the past 10 years, the Southeastern Cancer Study Group (SECSG) has been engaged in one major adjuvant study and three major advanced disease studies for patients with adenocarcinoma of the breast. The adjuvant study is demonstrating that six months of adjuvant CMF is the therapeutic equivalent of 12 months and that post-operative irradiation is of no added therapeutic benefit. In patients with advanced disease, a low dose 5 drug combination of CMFVP induces more objective responses than single agent 5FU, but improves survival only for those patients with liver metastases when compared to the sequential use of the same 5 single agents. The three drug combination, CAF, utilizing doxorubicin, induces more objective responses than low dose CMFVP, but it does not improve overall survival. The addition of a phase active combination, CAMELEON, (i.e., sequentially alternating therapy) of CAF has not improved the duration of disease control and survival for patients with liver metastases, lymphangitic and nodular lung metastases compared to CAF. Aggressive combination chemotherapeutic approaches to patients with advanced disease provide better and longer disease and tumor control but only marginal improvements in overall survival. Adding additional agents to a maximally tolerable regimen has not improved the therapeutic outcome.

  7. Cadherin-11 expression is upregulated in invasive human breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pohlodek, Kamil; Tan, Yen Y.; Singer, Christian F.; Gschwantler-Kaulich, Daphne

    2016-01-01

    Loss of expression of cadherin-11 protein is correlated with a loss of epithelial phenotype and a gain in tumor cell proliferation and invasion. It has been hypothesized that cadherin-11 may be a molecular marker for a more aggressive subtype of breast cancer. The present study examined the expression of the mesenchymal gene/protein cadherin-11 in malignant, benign and healthy breast cancer samples. A paraffin-embedded tissue microarray of both malignant and benign/healthy breast tumor was used. Clinicopathological parameters, including age, grading, tumor size, hormone receptors and HER2 receptors status were obtained from patient medical records. Expression of cadherin-11 was analyzed using the monoclonal mouse anti cadherin-11 IgG2B clone. Total RNA was extracted from each breast cancer sample and subjected to semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis for cadherin-11. Cadherin-11 was detected in 80/82 malignant breast cancer samples and in 33/70 non-malignant tissue samples. Cadherin-11 expression was observed to be predominantly localized to the membrane of tumor cells. When compared to healthy breast tissue biopsies, both cadherin-11 mRNA and protein were demonstrated to be significantly overexpressed in breast carcinoma (P=0.040 and P<0.0001, respectively). Within malignant tumors, however, protein expression was not identified to be associated with other clinicopathological parameters. Our results indicate that cadherin-11 expression is upregulated in malignant human breast cancer. PMID:28101202

  8. ZEB1 turns into a transcriptional activator by interacting with YAP1 in aggressive cancer types.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Waltraut; Mossmann, Dirk; Kleemann, Julia; Mock, Kerstin; Meisinger, Chris; Brummer, Tilman; Herr, Ricarda; Brabletz, Simone; Stemmler, Marc P; Brabletz, Thomas

    2016-02-15

    Early dissemination, metastasis and therapy resistance are central hallmarks of aggressive cancer types and the leading cause of cancer-associated deaths. The EMT-inducing transcriptional repressor ZEB1 is a crucial stimulator of these processes, particularly by coupling the activation of cellular motility with stemness and survival properties. ZEB1 expression is associated with aggressive behaviour in many tumour types, but the potent effects cannot be solely explained by its proven function as a transcriptional repressor of epithelial genes. Here we describe a direct interaction of ZEB1 with the Hippo pathway effector YAP, but notably not with its paralogue TAZ. In consequence, ZEB1 switches its function to a transcriptional co-activator of a 'common ZEB1/YAP target gene set', thereby linking two pathways with similar cancer promoting effects. This gene set is a predictor of poor survival, therapy resistance and increased metastatic risk in breast cancer, indicating the clinical relevance of our findings.

  9. ZEB1 turns into a transcriptional activator by interacting with YAP1 in aggressive cancer types

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann, Waltraut; Mossmann, Dirk; Kleemann, Julia; Mock, Kerstin; Meisinger, Chris; Brummer, Tilman; Herr, Ricarda; Brabletz, Simone; Stemmler, Marc P.; Brabletz, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Early dissemination, metastasis and therapy resistance are central hallmarks of aggressive cancer types and the leading cause of cancer-associated deaths. The EMT-inducing transcriptional repressor ZEB1 is a crucial stimulator of these processes, particularly by coupling the activation of cellular motility with stemness and survival properties. ZEB1 expression is associated with aggressive behaviour in many tumour types, but the potent effects cannot be solely explained by its proven function as a transcriptional repressor of epithelial genes. Here we describe a direct interaction of ZEB1 with the Hippo pathway effector YAP, but notably not with its paralogue TAZ. In consequence, ZEB1 switches its function to a transcriptional co-activator of a ‘common ZEB1/YAP target gene set', thereby linking two pathways with similar cancer promoting effects. This gene set is a predictor of poor survival, therapy resistance and increased metastatic risk in breast cancer, indicating the clinical relevance of our findings. PMID:26876920

  10. Soy Isoflavones Supplementation in Treating Women at High Risk For or With Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-08

    BRCA1 Mutation Carrier; BRCA2 Mutation Carrier; Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer

  11. Onalespib and Paclitaxel in Treating Patients With Advanced Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-02

    Estrogen Receptor Negative; HER2/Neu Negative; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Stage III Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

  12. Aromatase and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Brodie, A; Sabnis, G; Jelovac, D

    2006-12-01

    Several aromatase inhibitors and also new antiestrogens are now available for treating breast cancer. We have developed a model to compare the antitumor efficacy of these agents and to explore strategies for their optimal use. Results from the model have been predictive of clinical outcome. In this model, tumors are grown in ovariectomized, immunodeficient mice from MCF-7 human breast cancer cells transfected with the aromatase gene (MCF-7Ca). The possibility that blockade of estrogen action and estrogen synthesis may be synergistic was explored by treating mice with the aromatase inhibitor letrozole and the antiestrogen tamoxifen alone and in combination. The results indicated that letrozole alone was better than all other treatments. In addition, when tamoxifen treatment was no longer effective, tumor growth was significantly reduced in mice switched to letrozole treatment. However, tumors ultimately began to grow during continued treatment. To investigate the mechanisms by which tumors eventually adapt and grow during letrozole treatment, we determined the expression of signaling proteins in tumors during the course of letrozole treatment compared to the tumors of control mice. Tumors initially up-regulated the ER while responding to treatment, but subsequently receptor levels decreased in tumors unresponsive to letrozole. Also, Her-2 and adapter proteins (p-Shc and Grb-2) as well as all of the signaling proteins in the MAPK cascade (p-Raf, p-Mekl/2, and p-MAPK), but not in the Pl3/Akt pathway, were increased in tumors no longer responsive to letrozole. To investigate whether sensitivity to letrozole could be regained, cells were isolated from the letrozole resistant tumors (LTLT) and treated with inhibitors of the MAPKinase pathway (PD98059 and UO126). These compounds reduced MAPK activity and increased ER expression. EGFR/Her-2 inhibitors, gefitinib and AEE78S although not effective in the parental MCF-70a cells, restored the sensitivity of LTLT cells to

  13. Survivorship Care Plan in Promoting Physical Activity in Breast or Colorectal Cancer Survivors in Wisconsin

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-19

    Cancer Survivor; Healthy Subject; Stage I Colorectal Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIC Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Colorectal Cancer

  14. Consumer Health Education. Breast Cancer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arkansas Univ., Fayetteville, Cooperative Extension Service.

    This short booklet is designed to be used by health educators when teaching women about breast cancer and its early detection and the procedure for breast self-examination. It includes the following: (1) A one-page teaching plan consisting of objectives, subject matter, methods (including titles of films and printed materials), target audience,…

  15. Gene expression profiling of breast cancer in Lebanese women

    PubMed Central

    Makoukji, Joelle; Makhoul, Nadine J.; Khalil, Maya; El-Sitt, Sally; Aldin, Ehab Saad; Jabbour, Mark; Boulos, Fouad; Gadaleta, Emanuela; Sangaralingam, Ajanthah; Chelala, Claude; Boustany, Rose-Mary; Tfayli, Arafat

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is commonest cancer in women worldwide. Elucidation of underlying biology and molecular pathways is necessary for improving therapeutic options and clinical outcomes. Molecular alterations in breast cancer are complex and involve cross-talk between multiple signaling pathways. The aim of this study is to extract a unique mRNA fingerprint of breast cancer in Lebanese women using microarray technologies. Gene-expression profiles of 94 fresh breast tissue samples (84 cancerous/10 non-tumor adjacent samples) were analyzed using GeneChip Human Genome U133 Plus 2.0 arrays. Quantitative real-time PCR was employed to validate candidate genes. Differentially expressed genes between breast cancer and non-tumor tissues were screened. Significant differences in gene expression were established for COL11A1/COL10A1/MMP1/COL6A6/DLK1/S100P/CXCL11/SOX11/LEP/ADIPOQ/OXTR/FOSL1/ACSBG1 and C21orf37. Pathways/diseases representing these genes were retrieved and linked using PANTHER®/Pathway Studio®. Many of the deregulated genes are associated with extracellular matrix, inflammation, angiogenesis, metastasis, differentiation, cell proliferation and tumorigenesis. Characteristics of breast cancers in Lebanese were compared to those of women from Western populations to explain why breast cancer is more aggressive and presents a decade earlier in Lebanese victims. Delineating molecular mechanisms of breast cancer in Lebanese women led to key genes which could serve as potential biomarkers and/or novel drug targets for breast cancer. PMID:27857161

  16. Gene expression profiling of breast cancer in Lebanese women.

    PubMed

    Makoukji, Joelle; Makhoul, Nadine J; Khalil, Maya; El-Sitt, Sally; Aldin, Ehab Saad; Jabbour, Mark; Boulos, Fouad; Gadaleta, Emanuela; Sangaralingam, Ajanthah; Chelala, Claude; Boustany, Rose-Mary; Tfayli, Arafat

    2016-11-18

    Breast cancer is commonest cancer in women worldwide. Elucidation of underlying biology and molecular pathways is necessary for improving therapeutic options and clinical outcomes. Molecular alterations in breast cancer are complex and involve cross-talk between multiple signaling pathways. The aim of this study is to extract a unique mRNA fingerprint of breast cancer in Lebanese women using microarray technologies. Gene-expression profiles of 94 fresh breast tissue samples (84 cancerous/10 non-tumor adjacent samples) were analyzed using GeneChip Human Genome U133 Plus 2.0 arrays. Quantitative real-time PCR was employed to validate candidate genes. Differentially expressed genes between breast cancer and non-tumor tissues were screened. Significant differences in gene expression were established for COL11A1/COL10A1/MMP1/COL6A6/DLK1/S100P/CXCL11/SOX11/LEP/ADIPOQ/OXTR/FOSL1/ACSBG1 and C21orf37. Pathways/diseases representing these genes were retrieved and linked using PANTHER(®)/Pathway Studio(®). Many of the deregulated genes are associated with extracellular matrix, inflammation, angiogenesis, metastasis, differentiation, cell proliferation and tumorigenesis. Characteristics of breast cancers in Lebanese were compared to those of women from Western populations to explain why breast cancer is more aggressive and presents a decade earlier in Lebanese victims. Delineating molecular mechanisms of breast cancer in Lebanese women led to key genes which could serve as potential biomarkers and/or novel drug targets for breast cancer.

  17. Imaging Prostatic Lipids to Distinguish Aggressive Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    FAS activity in prostatectomy samples, intraprostatic lipid as measured by MRSI and prostate tumor aggressiveness. 3) To quantify key metabolic ...intermediates involved in lipid metabolism , mitochondrial function, inflammation, and apoptosis in the prostatectomy samples. 15. SUBJECT TERMS : none...vivo intraprostatic fat as measured by 1H MRSI, metabolic signatures of lipid oxidation and metabolism , and prostate cancer aggressiveness, our

  18. Association of Breast Cancer Risk loci with Breast Cancer Survival

    PubMed Central

    Barrdahl, Myrto; Canzian, Federico; Lindström, Sara; Shui, Irene; Black, Amanda; Hoover, Robert N.; Ziegler, Regina G.; Buring, Julie E.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Diver, W. Ryan; Gapstur, Susan M.; Gaudet, Mia M.; Giles, Graham G.; Haiman, Christopher; Henderson, Brian E.; Hankinson, Susan; Hunter, David J.; Joshi, Amit D.; Kraft, Peter; Lee, I-Min; Le Marchand, Loic; Milne, Roger L.; Southey, Melissa C.; Willett, Walter; Gunter, Marc; Panico, Salvatore; Sund, Malin; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Sánchez, María-José; Overvad, Kim; Dossus, Laure; Peeters, Petra H; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Kaaks, Rudolf; Campa, Daniele

    2015-01-01

    The survival of breast cancer patients is largely influenced by tumor characteristics, such as TNM stage, tumor grade and hormone receptor status. However, there is growing evidence that inherited genetic variation might affect the disease prognosis and response to treatment. Several lines of evidence suggest that alleles influencing breast cancer risk might also be associated with breast cancer survival. We examined the associations between 35 breast cancer susceptibility loci and the disease over-all survival (OS) in 10,255 breast cancer patients from the National Cancer Institute Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3) of which 1,379 died, including 754 of breast cancer. We also conducted a meta-analysis of almost 35,000 patients and 5,000 deaths, combining results from BPC3 and the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC) and performed in silico analyses of SNPs with significant associations. In BPC3, the C allele of LSP1-rs3817198 was significantly associated with improved OS (HRper-allele=0.70; 95% CI: 0.58–0.85; Ptrend=2.84×10−4; HRheterozygotes=0.71; 95% CI: 0.55–0.92; HRhomozygotes=0.48; 95% CI: 0.31–0.76; P2DF=1.45×10−3). In silico, the C allele of LSP1-rs3817198 was predicted to increase expression of the tumor suppressor cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1C (CDKN1C). In the meta-analysis, TNRC9-rs3803662 was significantly associated with increased death hazard (HRMETA =1.09; 95% CI: 1.04–1.15; Ptrend=6.6×10−4; HRheterozygotes=0.96 95% CI: 0.90–1.03; HRhomozygotes= 1.21; 95% CI: 1.09–1.35; P2DF=1.25×10−4). In conclusion, we show that there is little overlap between the breast cancer risk single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) identified so far and the SNPs associated with breast cancer prognosis, with the possible exceptions of LSP1-rs3817198 and TNRC9-rs3803662. PMID:25611573

  19. Hormones, Women and Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... used therapy is a female hormone blocker called tamoxifen. A newer therapy uses a pill (anastrozole, letrozole, ... are at high risk for developing breast cancer, tamoxifen or raloxifene can also be taken to prevent ...

  20. Preventing Breast Cancer: Making Progress

    MedlinePlus

    ... medical literature, the Study of Tamoxifen and Raloxifene (STAR) trial was started in 1998. That study enrolled ... in the BCPT. Studies, such as BCPT and STAR, involve women who have not had breast cancer, ...

  1. Palbociclib for Advanced Breast Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    An interim analysis of the PALOMA3 trial shows that women with hormone receptor-positive metastatic breast cancer who received palbociclib plus fulvestrant had longer progression-free survival rates than women who received a placebo plus fulvestrant.

  2. Tumour markers in breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Cove, D. H.; Woods, K. L.; Smith, S. C.; Burnett, D.; Leonard, J.; Grieve, R. J.; Howell, A.

    1979-01-01

    The clinical usefulness of 8 potential tumour markers has been evaluated in 69 patients with Stage I and II breast cancer and 57 patients with Stage III and IV. Serum CEA concentrations were raised in 13% of patients with local and 65% of those with advanced breast cancer. In patients with clinical evidence of progression or regression of tumour, serum CEA levels changed appropriately in 83% of cases. Taking 4 of the markers (carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), lactalbumin, alpha subunit and haptoglobin) serum concentrations of one or more were raised in 33% of patients with local disease and 81% of those with advanced breast cancer. However, marker concentrations were often only marginally raised, and are unlikely to provide sensitive guide to tumour burden. CEA, lactalbumin and alpha subunit were detectable in 68%, 43% and 40% respectively of extracts of primary breast cancers. PMID:92331

  3. HER2-associated radiation resistance of breast cancer stem cells isolated from HER2-negative breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Duru, Nadire; Fan, Ming; Candas, Demet; Menaa, Cheikh; Liu, Hsin-Chen; Nantajit, Danupon; Wen, Yunfei; Xiao, Kai; Eldridge, Angela; Chromy, Brett A.; Li, Shiyong; Spitz, Douglas R.; Lam, Kit S.; Wicha, Max S.; Li, Jian Jian

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To understand the role of HER2-associated signaling network in breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs); using radiation-resistant breast cancer cells and clinical recurrent breast cancers to evaluate HER2-targeted therapy as a tumor eliminating strategy for recurrent HER2−/low breast cancers. Experimental Design HER2-expressing BCSCs (HER2+/CD44+/CD24−/low) were isolated from radiation-treated breast cancer MCF7 cells and in vivo irradiated MCF7 xenograft tumors. Tumor aggressiveness and radiation resistance were analyzed by gap filling, Matrigel invasion, tumor-sphere formation, and clonogenic survival assays. The HER2/CD44 feature was analyzed in 40 primary and recurrent breast cancer specimens. Protein expression profiling in HER2+/CD44+/CD24−/low versus HER2−/CD44+/CD24−/low BCSCs was conducted with 2-D DIGE and HPLC-MS/MS analysis and HER2-mediated signaling network was generated by MetaCore™ program. Results Compared to HER2-negative BCSCs, HER2+/CD44+/CD24−/low cells showed elevated aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity and aggressiveness tested by matrigel invasion, tumor sphere formation and in vivo tumorigenesis. The enhanced aggressive phenotype and radioresistance of the HER2+/CD44+/CD24−/low cells were markedly reduced by inhibition of HER2 via siRNA or Herceptin treatments. Clinical breast cancer specimens revealed that cells co-expressing HER2 and CD44 were more frequently detected in recurrent (84.6%) than primary tumors (57.1%). In addition, 2-D DIGE and HPLC-MS/MS of HER2+/CD44+/CD24−/low versus HER2−/CD44+/CD24−/low BCSCs reported a unique HER2-associated protein profile including effectors involved in tumor metastasis, apoptosis, mitochondrial function and DNA repair. A specific feature of HER2-STAT3 network was identified. Conclusion This study provides the evidence that HER2-mediated pro-survival signaling network is responsible for the aggressive phenotype of breast cancer stem cells that could be targeted to control

  4. Breast cancer. Part 3: advanced cancer and psychological implications.

    PubMed

    Harmer, Victoria

    This is the last article in this 3-part series on breast cancer. The previous two articles have outlined the principles behind breast awareness and breast health, detailing common benign breast diseases, types of breast cancer and staging, and treatment for breast cancer, including surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy and endocrine treatment. The series concludes by giving information on advanced disease, including when a patient presents late with a fungating breast lesion, or if the disease has metastasized from the breast to other organs. Lymphoedema is also described and discussed, and the latter half of this article discusses psychological implications of breast cancer, from diagnosis through the individual treatments.

  5. Metals and Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, Celia; Divekar, Shailaja D.; Storchan, Geoffrey B.; Parodi, Daniela A.; Martin, Mary Beth

    2014-01-01

    Metalloestrogens are metals that activate the estrogen receptor in the absence of estradiol. The metalloestrogens fall into two subclasses: metal/metalloid anions and bivalent cationic metals. The metal/metalloid anions include compounds such as arsenite, nitrite, selenite, and vanadate while the bivalent cations include metals such as cadmium, calcium, cobalt, copper, nickel, chromium, lead, mercury, and tin. The best studied metalloestrogen is cadmium. It is a heavy metal and a prevalent environmental contaminant with no known physiological function. This review addresses our current understanding of the mechanism by which cadmium and the bivalent cationic metals activate estrogen receptor-α. The review also summarizes the in vitro and in vivo evidence that cadmium functions as an estrogen and the potential role of cadmium in breast cancer. PMID:23338949

  6. Endocrine Therapy of Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    breast cancers is whether an aromatase inhibitor, e.g., letrozole (LET) or TAM should be given as first line endocrine therapy . Unfortunately...response rates are lower, and response durations are shorter, on crossover than when these agents are given as first line therapies , e.g., -40% of tumors...effective treatment for hormone receptor positive invasive breast cancer. Such therapy includes antiestrogens (tamoxifen, fulvestrant ) and aromatase

  7. Breast Cancer Research Training Grant

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-03-01

    Schools of Medicine and Public Health (BUSM, BUSPH) in research into the etiology, prevention, detection, diagnosis and therapy of breast cancer using...research relevant to the etiology, prevention, detection, diagnosis and therapy of breast cancer using the most advanced knowledge and techniques...these questions is discussed briefly. rats. The major impetus for the study was the problem of decreased survival due to nephropathy in male F344 rats

  8. Inflammatory breast cancer: A decade of experience.

    PubMed

    Do Nascimento, Vinicius C; Rajan, Ruben; Redfern, Andrew; Saunders, Christobel

    2016-09-01

    Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is an aggressive and rare form of breast cancer. At present, there are no established diagnostic, radiological, pathological or molecular diagnostic criteria for this entity. The aim of this study was to examine the patterns of presentation, treatment and outcomes of IBC in this institution over the course of a decade. This is a retrospective observational study using data from the Royal Perth Hospital from January 2001 to December 2010. Our results identified 57 women with IBC, representing 1.9% of all new breast cancer presentations. Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 (HER2)-positive and triple negative tumors were overrepresented (41% and 18%, respectively). Forty-four (77%) patients had early disease at diagnosis, of whom 35 underwent surgery and 16 are relapse-free. All six patients achieving complete pathological response were relapse-free in contrast to 11 (38%) with lesser responses at a median follow-up of 59 months. Median survival in 13 patients with metastatic disease at diagnosis was 21.7 months, with two patients still in remission. Clearly, this small but important group continues to offer management challenges and warrants ongoing study, including better molecular and pathological profiling of tumors to allow improved diagnostic clarity and more effective targeted therapy.

  9. The extracellular matrix in breast cancer predicts prognosis through composition, splicing, and crosslinking.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Claire

    2016-04-10

    The extracellular matrix in the healthy breast has an important tumor suppressive role, whereas the abnormal ECM in tumors can promote aggressiveness, and has been linked to breast cancer relapse, survival and resistance to chemotherapy. This review article gives an overview of the elements of the ECM which have been linked to prognosis of breast cancers, including changes in ECM protein composition, splicing, and microstructure.

  10. Targeting Aggressive Cancer Stem Cells in Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Seymour, Tracy; Nowak, Anna; Kakulas, Foteini

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common and fatal type of primary brain tumor. Gliosarcoma (GSM) is a rarer and more aggressive variant of GBM that has recently been considered a potentially different disease. Current clinical treatment for both GBM and GSM includes maximal surgical resection followed by post-operative radiotherapy and concomitant and adjuvant chemotherapy. Despite recent advances in treating other solid tumors, treatment for GBM and GSM still remains palliative, with a very poor prognosis and a median survival rate of 12–15 months. Treatment failure is a result of a number of causes, including resistance to radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Recent research has applied the cancer stem cells theory of carcinogenesis to these tumors, suggesting the existence of a small subpopulation of glioma stem-like cells (GSCs) within these tumors. GSCs are thought to contribute to tumor progression, treatment resistance, and tumor recapitulation post-treatment and have become the focus of novel therapy strategies. Their isolation and investigation suggest that GSCs share critical signaling pathways with normal embryonic and somatic stem cells, but with distinct alterations. Research must focus on identifying these variations as they may present novel therapeutic targets. Targeting pluripotency transcription factors, SOX2, OCT4, and Nanog homeobox, demonstrates promising therapeutic potential that if applied in isolation or together with current treatments may improve overall survival, reduce tumor relapse, and achieve a cure for these patients. PMID:26258069

  11. Cigarette smoking and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Baron, J A; Newcomb, P A; Longnecker, M P; Mittendorf, R; Storer, B E; Clapp, R W; Bogdan, G; Yuen, J

    1996-05-01

    A priori hypotheses suggest that cigarette smoking could either increase or decrease breast cancer incidence. To clarify these competing hypotheses, we used data from a very large population-based breast cancer case-control study to investigate the impact of smoking on breast cancer risk. Breast cancer patients less than 75 years old were identified from statewide tumor registries in Wisconsin, Massachusetts, Maine, and New Hampshire; controls were randomly selected from driver's license lists (age less than 65) or lists of Medicare beneficiaries (age 65-74). Information on reproductive history, medical history, and personal habits including cigarette smoking was obtained by telephone interview. A total of 6,888 cases and 9,529 controls were interviewed. There was virtually no relationship between current smoking and breast cancer risk (multivariate odds ratio, 1.00; 95% confidence interval, 0.92-1.09), and former smokers had a barely increased risk (odds ratio, 1.10; 95% confidence interval, 1.01-1.19). Similar results were observed among both premenopausal and postmenopausal women. There was no suggestion that heavy or long-term smoking increased or decreased risk, nor were there indications that women who began smoking at an early age were at increased risk, as has been hypothesized. The results of this large population-based study indicate that smoking does not influence the risk of breast cancer, even among heavy smokers who began smoking at an early age.

  12. Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group

    PubMed Central

    Christiansen, Peer; Ejlertsen, Bent; Jensen, Maj-Britt; Mouridsen, Henning

    2016-01-01

    Aim of database Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group (DBCG), with an associated database, was introduced as a nationwide multidisciplinary group in 1977 with the ultimate aim to improve the prognosis in breast cancer. Since then, the database has registered women diagnosed with primary invasive nonmetastatic breast cancer. The data reported from the departments to the database included details of the characteristics of the primary tumor, of surgery, radiotherapy, and systemic therapies, and of follow-up reported on specific forms from the departments in question. Descriptive data From 1977 through 2014, ~110,000 patients are registered in the nationwide, clinical database. The completeness has gradually improved to more than 95%. DBCG has continuously prepared evidence-based guidelines on diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer and conducted quality control studies to ascertain the degree of adherence to the guidelines in the different departments. Conclusion Utilizing data from the DBCG database, a long array of high-quality DBCG studies of various designs and scope, nationwide or in international collaboration, have contributed to the current updating of the guidelines, and have been an instrumental resource in the improvement of management and prognosis of breast cancer in Denmark. Thus, since the establishment of DBCG, the prognosis in breast cancer has continuously improved with a decrease in 5-year mortality from ~37% to 15%. PMID:27822082

  13. Iodide transport and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Poole, Vikki L; McCabe, Christopher J

    2015-10-01

    Breast cancer is the second most common cancer worldwide and the leading cause of cancer death in women, with incidence rates that continue to rise. The heterogeneity of the disease makes breast cancer exceptionally difficult to treat, particularly for those patients with triple-negative disease. To address the therapeutic complexity of these tumours, new strategies for diagnosis and treatment are urgently required. The ability of lactating and malignant breast cells to uptake and transport iodide has led to the hypothesis that radioiodide therapy could be a potentially viable treatment for many breast cancer patients. Understanding how iodide is transported, and the factors regulating the expression and function of the proteins responsible for iodide transport, is critical for translating this hypothesis into reality. This review covers the three known iodide transporters - the sodium iodide symporter, pendrin and the sodium-coupled monocarboxylate transporter - and their role in iodide transport in breast cells, along with efforts to manipulate them to increase the potential for radioiodide therapy as a treatment for breast cancer.

  14. BREAST CANCER, DERMATOFIBROMAS AND ARSENIC

    PubMed Central

    Dantzig, Paul I

    2009-01-01

    Background: Dermatofibromas are common benign tumors in women, and breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women. The aim of this study is to determine if there is any relationship between the two conditions. Materials and Methods: Five patients with dermatofibromas and 10 control patients (two groups) had their skin biopsies measured for arsenic by inductively coupled mass spectrometry. Fifty randomly selected patients with breast cancer and 50 control patients were examined for the presence of dermatofibromas. Results: The dermatofibromas were found to have an arsenic concentration of 0.171 micrograms/gram, compared with 0.06 and 0.07 micrograms/gram of the two control groups. Forty-three out of 50 patients with breast cancer had dermatofibromas and 32/50 patients with breast cancer had multiple dermatofibromas, compared to 10/50 control patients with dermatofibromas and only 1/50 with multiple dermatofibromas. Conclusions: Arsenic is important in the development of dermatofibromas and dermatofibromas represent a reservoir and important sign of chronic arsenic exposure. Dermatofibromas represent an important sign for women at risk for breast cancer, and arsenic may represent the cause of the majority of cases of breast cancer. PMID:20049264

  15. Natural Products for Chemoprevention of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Eun-Yi; Moon, Aree

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the primary cause of cancer death in women. Although current therapies have shown some promise against breast cancer, there is still no effective cure for the majority of patients in the advanced stages of breast cancer. Development of effective agents to slow, reduce, or reverse the incidence of breast cancer in high-risk women is necessary. Chemoprevention of breast cancer by natural products is advantageous, as these compounds have few side effects and low toxicity compared to synthetic compounds. In the present review, we summarize natural products which exert chemopreventive activities against breast cancer, such as curcumin, sauchinone, lycopene, denbinobin, genipin, capsaicin, and ursolic acid. This review examines the current knowledge about natural compounds and their mechanisms that underlie breast cancer chemopreventive activity both in vitro and in vivo. The present review may provide information on the use of these compounds for the prevention of breast cancer. PMID:26734584

  16. Environmental pollutants and breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Brody, Julia Green; Rudel, Ruthann A

    2003-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women and the leading cause of cancer death among women 35-54 years of age. Rising incidence, increased risk among migrants to higher risk regions, and poor prediction of individual risk have prompted a search for additional modifiable factors. Risk factors for breast cancer include reproductive characteristics associated with estrogen and other hormones, pharmaceutical hormones, and activities such as alcohol use and lack of exercise that affect hormone levels. As a result, investigation of hormonally active compounds in commercial products and pollution is a priority. Compounds that cause mammary tumors in animals are additional priorities. Animal models provide insight into possible mechanisms for effects of environmental pollutants on breast cancer and identify chemical exposures to target in epidemiologic studies. Although few epidemiologic studies have been conducted for chemical exposures, occupational studies show associations between breast cancer and exposure to certain organic solvents and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Population-based studies have been limited to a few organochlorine compounds and PAHs and have been mostly negative. A variety of challenges in studies of breast cancer and the environment may have contributed to negative findings. Lack of exposure assessment tools and few hypothesis-generating toxicologic studies limit the scope of epidemiologic studies. Issues of timing with respect to latency and periods of breast vulnerability, and individual differences in susceptibility pose other challenges. Substantial work is needed in exposure assessment, toxicology, and susceptibility before we can expect a pay-off from large epidemiologic studies of breast cancer and environment. PMID:12826474

  17. Inflammatory Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ... Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ...

  18. New Immunotherapy Strategies in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Lin-Yu; Tang, Jie; Zhang, Cong-Min; Zeng, Wen-Jing; Yan, Han; Li, Mu-Peng; Chen, Xiao-Ping

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer among women. Therapeutic treatments for breast cancer generally include surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, endocrinotherapy and molecular targeted therapy. With the development of molecular biology, immunology and pharmacogenomics, immunotherapy becomes a promising new field in breast cancer therapies. In this review, we discussed recent progress in breast cancer immunotherapy, including cancer vaccines, bispecific antibodies, and immune checkpoint inhibitors. Several additional immunotherapy modalities in early stages of development are also highlighted. It is believed that these new immunotherapeutic strategies will ultimately change the current status of breast cancer therapies. PMID:28085094

  19. New Immunotherapy Strategies in Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lin-Yu; Tang, Jie; Zhang, Cong-Min; Zeng, Wen-Jing; Yan, Han; Li, Mu-Peng; Chen, Xiao-Ping

    2017-01-12

    Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer among women. Therapeutic treatments for breast cancer generally include surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, endocrinotherapy and molecular targeted therapy. With the development of molecular biology, immunology and pharmacogenomics, immunotherapy becomes a promising new field in breast cancer therapies. In this review, we discussed recent progress in breast cancer immunotherapy, including cancer vaccines, bispecific antibodies, and immune checkpoint inhibitors. Several additional immunotherapy modalities in early stages of development are also highlighted. It is believed that these new immunotherapeutic strategies will ultimately change the current status of breast cancer therapies.

  20. Breast cancer in young women: special considerations in multidisciplinary care

    PubMed Central

    Reyna, Chantal; Lee, Marie Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most prevalent cancers in females, and 5%–7% of breast cancer cases occur in women under 40 years of age. Breast cancer in the young has gained increased attention with an attempt to improve diagnosis and prognosis. Young patients tend to have different epidemiology, presenting with later stages and more aggressive phenotypes. Diagnostic imaging is also more difficult in this age group. Multidisciplinary care generally encompasses surgeons, medical oncologists, radiation oncologists, radiologists, and social workers. Other special considerations include reconstruction options, fertility, genetics, and psychosocial issues. These concerns enlarge the already diverse multidisciplinary team to incorporate new expertise, such as reproductive specialists and genetic counselors. This review encompasses an overview of the current multimodal treatment regimens and the unique challenges in treating this special population. Integration of diagnosis, treatment, and quality of life issues should be addressed and understood by each member in the interdisciplinary team in order to optimize outcomes. PMID:25300196

  1. Mechanisms of lapatinib resistance in HER2-driven breast cancer.

    PubMed

    D'Amato, Valentina; Raimondo, Lucia; Formisano, Luigi; Giuliano, Mario; De Placido, Sabino; Rosa, Roberta; Bianco, Roberto

    2015-12-01

    Targeted therapies have been approved for various malignancies but the acquisition of resistance remains a substantial challenge in the clinical management of advanced cancers. Twenty-five per cent of breast cancers overexpress ErbB2/HER2, which confers a more aggressive phenotype and is associated with a poor prognosis. HER2-targeting therapies (trastuzumab, pertuzumab, TDM1 and lapatinib) are available, but a significant fraction of HER2-positive breast cancers eventually relapse or progress. This suggests that acquired or intrinsic resistance enables escape from HER2 inhibition. This review focuses on mechanisms of intrinsic/acquired resistance to lapatinib identified in preclinical and clinical studies. A better understanding of these mechanisms could lead to novel predictive markers of lapatinib response and to novel therapeutic strategies for breast cancer patients.

  2. Increased invasiveness and aggressiveness in breast epithelia with cytoplasmic p63 expression

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Yi-Hsuan; Su, Yan A.; Tsai, Horng-Der; Mason, Jeffrey T.; Chou, Ming-Chih; Man, Yan-gao

    2010-01-01

    Our previous studies revealed that pregnancy associated breast cancer (PABC) had significantly reduced nuclear p63 expression in myoepithelia, while intense cytoplasmic p63 expression in associated epithelia. Our current study assessed these epithelia using immunohistochemistry with a panel of aggressiveness and invasiveness related markers and comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) with over 30,000 DNA probes. These epithelia showed several unique alterations, including (1) immunohistochemical and morphological resemblance to invasive cancer, (2) significant gain in copy numbers of DNA coding genes for morphogenesis, angiogenesis, and metastasis, and (3) significant loss in copy numbers of DNA coding genes for tumor suppressors, cell adhesion, and macromolecular complex assembly or intra-cellular trafficking. Detected array-CGH alterations correlated well with in vivo expression of a number of corresponding proteins tested. These findings suggest that aberrant sub-cellular localization of p63 expression in normal or hyperplastic appearing epithelial cells may significant contribute to increased invasiveness and aggressiveness of these cells. PMID:20714441

  3. Veliparib, Cisplatin, and Vinorelbine Ditartrate in Treating Patients With Recurrent and/or Metastatic Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-27

    Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Hereditary Breast/Ovarian Cancer - BRCA1; Hereditary Breast/Ovarian Cancer - BRCA2; Male Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  4. Alternative Dosing of Exemestane Before Surgery in Treating Postmenopausal Patients With Stage 0-II Estrogen Positive Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-17

    Estrogen Receptor Positive; Postmenopausal; Stage 0 Breast Cancer; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer

  5. Fulvestrant and Palbociclib in Treating Older Patients With Hormone Responsive Breast Cancer That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-21

    Estrogen Receptor and/or Progesterone Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Negative; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  6. Minocycline Hydrochloride in Reducing Chemotherapy Induced Depression and Anxiety in Patients With Stage I-III Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-28

    Anxiety Disorder; Depression; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  7. Heavy Metal Exposure in Predicting Peripheral Neuropathy in Patients With Stage I-III Breast Cancer Undergoing Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-05-01

    Male Breast Cancer; Neurotoxicity; Peripheral Neuropathy; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  8. Breast Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Cancer.gov

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing breast cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  9. Addressing Breast Cancer's Unequal Burden

    MedlinePlus

    ... be useful for all women. How will the study work? The initiative will gather data from 18 smaller studies. While some of these studies were able to ... future cancer research among minority populations. Dr. Martin's work seeks to ... women in breast cancer studies? Historically, trust has been a key issue in ...

  10. Loneliness May Sabotage Breast Cancer Survival: Study

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/news/fullstory_162498.html Loneliness May Sabotage Breast Cancer Survival: Study Weak social ties linked to higher ... 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Loneliness may impede long-term breast cancer survival, a new study suggests. In the years ...

  11. Screening for Breast Cancer: Staging and Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Screening For Breast Cancer Staging and Treatment Past Issues / Summer 2014 Table of Contents Staging The extent (stage) of breast cancer needs to be determined to help choose the ...

  12. Screening for Breast Cancer: Detection and Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Screening For Breast Cancer Detection and Diagnosis Past Issues / Summer 2014 Table ... States Preventive Services Task Force updated recommendations on breast cancer screening, suggesting that women ages 50 to 74 ...

  13. Breast Cancer and Estrogen-Alone Update

    MedlinePlus

    ... Current Issue Past Issues Research News From NIH Breast Cancer and Estrogen-Alone Update Past Issues / Summer 2006 ... hormone therapy does not increase the risk of breast cancer in postmenopausal women, according to an updated analysis ...

  14. Breast Cancer and the Environment Research Program

    Cancer.gov

    The Breast Cancer and the Environment Research Program supports a multidisciplinary network of scientists, clinicians, and community partners to examine the effects of environmental exposures that may predispose a woman to breast cancer throughout her life.

  15. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Isolation of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Isolate of long-term growth human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from outgrowth of duct element; cells shown soon after isolation and early in culture in a dish. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Robert Tichmond, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

  16. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Isolation of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Same long-term growth human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC), but after 3 weeks in concinuous culture. Note attempts to reform duct elements, but this time in two dimensions in a dish rather that in three demensions in tissue. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Robert Tichmond, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

  17. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Isolation of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Outgrowth of cells from duct element in upper right corner cultured in a standard dish; most cells spontaneously die during early cell divisions, but a few will establish long-term growth. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Robert Tichmond, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

  18. Breast cancer and racial disparity between Caucasian and African American women, part 1 (BRCA-1).

    PubMed

    Tariq, Khurram; Latif, Naeem; Zaiden, Robert; Jasani, Nick; Rana, Fauzia

    2013-08-01

    Breast cancer is a commonly diagnosed malignancy and the second leading cause of cancer-related death among American women today. Despite the lower incidence of breast cancer among African American women, they are more likely to die from the disease each year than their white counterparts. We present a retrospective cohort study of the tumor registry data from electronic medical records of patients diagnosed with breast cancer at the University of Florida Health, Jacksonville from 2000 to 2005. A total of 907 patients were diagnosed with breast cancer; 445 patients with invasive breast cancer had complete medical records and were selected for this review. Much like previously published research, we found that African American patients presented with a more advanced stage and aggressive subtype of breast cancer than white patients, and were less likely to have health insurance. However, we have yet to determine if universal health care insurance can lead to improved health care access, better breast cancer awareness, and an enhanced attitude toward breast cancer screenings. Such factors would ultimately lead to an earlier diagnosis and better outcomes in both African American and white patients. We plan to investigate this critical issue in a follow-up study (BRCA-2; Breast Cancer and Racial Disparity Between Caucasian and African American Women, Part 2), which will begin a few years after the complete implementation of the universal health care law enacted by President Obama in 2010. The higher frequency of aggressive tumor subtypes in African American women warrants more attention. We suggest further research to determine whether decreasing the initial age for screening or increasing the frequency of mammograms in African American women would improve breast cancer outcomes. This study underscores the importance of identifying and preventing obstacles in routine breast cancer screening, as well as increasing breast cancer awareness.

  19. Multi-epitope Folate Receptor Alpha Peptide Vaccine, Sargramostim, and Cyclophosphamide in Treating Patients With Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-24

    Bilateral Breast Carcinoma; Estrogen Receptor Negative; HER2/Neu Negative; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage III Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma; Unilateral Breast Carcinoma

  20. Cdx2 Polymorphism Affects the Activities of Vitamin D Receptor in Human Breast Cancer Cell Lines and Human Breast Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Di Benedetto, Anna; Korita, Etleva; Goeman, Frauke; Sacconi, Andrea; Biagioni, Francesca; Blandino, Giovanni; Strano, Sabrina; Muti, Paola; Mottolese, Marcella; Falvo, Elisabetta

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin D plays a role in cancer development and acts through the vitamin D receptor (VDR). It regulates the action of hormone responsive genes and is involved in cell cycle regulation, differentiation and apoptosis. VDR is a critical component of the vitamin D pathway and different common single nucleotide polymorphisms have been identified. Cdx2 VDR polymorphism can play an important role in breast cancer, modulating the activity of VDR. The objective of this study is to assess the relationship between the Cdx2 VDR polymorphism and the activities of VDR in human breast cancer cell lines and carcinomas breast patients. Cdx2 VDR polymorphism and antiproliferative effects of vitamin D treatment were investigated in a panel of estrogen receptor-positive (MCF7 and T-47D) and estrogen receptor-negative (MDA-MB-231, SUM 159PT, SK-BR-3, BT549, MDA-MB-468, HCC1143, BT20 and HCC1954) human breast cancer cell lines. Furthermore, the potential relationship among Cdx2 VDR polymorphism and a number of biomarkers used in clinical management of breast cancer was assessed in an ad hoc set of breast cancer cases. Vitamin D treatment efficacy was found to be strongly dependent on the Cdx2 VDR status in ER-negative breast cancer cell lines tested. In our series of breast cancer cases, the results indicated that patients with variant homozygote AA were associated with bio-pathological characteristics typical of more aggressive tumours, such as ER negative, HER2 positive and G3. Our results may suggest a potential effect of Cdx2 VDR polymorphism on the efficacy of vitamin D treatment in aggressive breast cancer cells (estrogen receptor negative). These results suggest that Cdx2 polymorphism may be a potential biomarker for vitamin D treatment in breast cancer, independently of the VDR receptor expression. PMID:25849303

  1. Cdx2 polymorphism affects the activities of vitamin D receptor in human breast cancer cell lines and human breast carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Pulito, Claudio; Terrenato, Irene; Di Benedetto, Anna; Korita, Etleva; Goeman, Frauke; Sacconi, Andrea; Biagioni, Francesca; Blandino, Giovanni; Strano, Sabrina; Muti, Paola; Mottolese, Marcella; Falvo, Elisabetta

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin D plays a role in cancer development and acts through the vitamin D receptor (VDR). It regulates the action of hormone responsive genes and is involved in cell cycle regulation, differentiation and apoptosis. VDR is a critical component of the vitamin D pathway and different common single nucleotide polymorphisms have been identified. Cdx2 VDR polymorphism can play an important role in breast cancer, modulating the activity of VDR. The objective of this study is to assess the relationship between the Cdx2 VDR polymorphism and the activities of VDR in human breast cancer cell lines and carcinomas breast patients. Cdx2 VDR polymorphism and antiproliferative effects of vitamin D treatment were investigated in a panel of estrogen receptor-positive (MCF7 and T-47D) and estrogen receptor-negative (MDA-MB-231, SUM 159PT, SK-BR-3, BT549, MDA-MB-468, HCC1143, BT20 and HCC1954) human breast cancer cell lines. Furthermore, the potential relationship among Cdx2 VDR polymorphism and a number of biomarkers used in clinical management of breast cancer was assessed in an ad hoc set of breast cancer cases. Vitamin D treatment efficacy was found to be strongly dependent on the Cdx2 VDR status in ER-negative breast cancer cell lines tested. In our series of breast cancer cases, the results indicated that patients with variant homozygote AA were associated with bio-pathological characteristics typical of more aggressive tumours, such as ER negative, HER2 positive and G3. Our results may suggest a potential effect of Cdx2 VDR polymorphism on the efficacy of vitamin D treatment in aggressive breast cancer cells (estrogen receptor negative). These results suggest that Cdx2 polymorphism may be a potential biomarker for vitamin D treatment in breast cancer, independently of the VDR receptor expression.

  2. Inhibition of heregulin expression blocks tumorigenicity and metastasis of breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, Miaw-Sheue; Shamon-Taylor, Lisa A.; Mehmi, Inderjit; Tang, Careen K.; Cardillo, Marina; Lupu, Ruth

    2001-12-20

    The growth factor Heregulin (HRG) is expressed in 30% of breast cancer tumors. HRG induces tumorigenicity and metastasis of breast cancer cells. Our investigation into whether blockage of HRG reduces the aggressiveness of breast cancer cells demonstrated that transfection of MDA-MB-231 with an HRG antisense cDNA suppressed proliferation, tumorigenicity, and metastasis. Blockage of the aggressive phenotype is mediated possibly through inactivation of the erbB signaling pathways and a decrease in MMP-9 activity. Our study is the first to report that HRG is a key promoter of breast cancer progression and should be deemed as a potential target in developing therapies for the treatment of breast carcinomas.

  3. Breast Cancer Stem Cells in Antiestrogen Resistance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    stimulated by antiestrogens. The effects of antiestrogens on the ER-positive breast cancer stem/progenitor involve changes of both proliferation and...self-renewal capabilities of breast cancer stem/progenitor cells. The effects of antiestrogens on the ER- positive breast cancer stem/progenitor...potent tumor-seeding efficiency. . Fig 3. The effects of antiestrogens on the differentiation of ER-positive breast cancer stem cells expressing

  4. The Epidemiology of Male Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ferzoco, Raina M; Ruddy, Kathryn J

    2016-01-01

    Male breast cancer is a rare disease, accounting for only 1% of breast cancer diagnoses in the USA. The current literature suggests that genetic factors including BRCA2 mutations, family history, age, androgen/estrogen imbalance, and environmental exposures may predispose to male breast cancer. In this manuscript, we will review known and possible risk factors for male breast cancer, as well as describe the clinical patterns of the disease.

  5. Vitamin D, Breast Cancer, and Bone Health

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-01

    breast cancer subjects and those at high risk of breast cancer . Currently recommended vitamin D supplemental doses are only appropriate for patients...for those at high risk for breast cancer . Currently recommended doses of vitamin D are appropriate for subjects with normal vitamin D levels and for...sunscreen use, clothing , and increasing amount of time spent indoors or on transportation). Vitamin D and breast cancer prevention Vitamin D

  6. Pro-Apoptotic Breast Cancer Nanotherapeutics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-01

    basal-like breast cancer using a novel nanotechnology platform pioneered by my mentor Prof. Stupp. Our original plan was to combine nanoparticles ...Fellowship has supported my training in translational breast cancer research as part of an interdisciplinary team of scientists using nanotechnology to...basal-like breast cancer . 15. SUBJECT TERMS Nanotechnology ; Peptide Amphiphile; Drug Delivery; Breast Cancer ; Cell Death 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF

  7. Evaluate Risk/Benefit of Nab Paclitaxel in Combination With Gemcitabine and Carboplatin Compared to Gemcitabine and Carboplatin in Triple Negative Metastatic Breast Cancer (or Metastatic Triple Negative Breast Cancer)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-30

    Breast Tumor; Breast Cancer; Cancer of the Breast; Estrogen Receptor- Negative Breast Cancer; HER2- Negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor- Negative Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Metastatic Breast Cancer; Metastatic Breast Cancer

  8. Breast cancer: a psychogenic disease?

    PubMed

    Hiller, J E

    1989-01-01

    Over the centuries, the breast cancer literature has contained numerous references to the role of psychological factors in the etiology of the disease. Theories and research findings pertaining to this work are reviewed, with a focus on twentieth century work. The specific hypotheses examined in each historic period can be seen in the context of views held about women in society. Epidemiologic features of breast cancer, particularly certain reproductive behaviors, are associated with specific lifestyles, and these features lend themselves to the investigation of the role of personality in the etiology of the disease. In the eighteenth and 19th centuries, clinicians wrote of the role of depression, grief and anxiety in the etiology of breast cancer. Hard work, which women were not supposed to engage in, resulted in breast tumors. The rise of interest in psychodynamic theories in the twentieth century resulted in a proliferation of investigations demonstrating the association between sexual repression or ambivalence about the female role and breast cancer. The language of psychoanalysis was used throughout society. Single women, at increased risk of breast cancer, were seen as suffering from unconscious rejection of their femininity. Although the study designs used to investigate this association were inadequate and the findings equivocal, belief in this association has continued. More recent work in this field has focussed on the role of repressed anger, reflecting a societal preoccupation with constraints on self-expression. Hypotheses regarding the psychological etiology of breast cancer can be examined in the social context in which they evolve and tend to reflect views of women rather than truths derived from research data.

  9. Multicenter Breast Cancer Collaborative Registry

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, Simon; Shats, Oleg; Fleissner, Elizabeth; Bascom, George; Yiee, Kevin; Copur, Mehmet; Crow, Kate; Rooney, James; Mateen, Zubeena; Ketcham, Marsha A.; Feng, Jianmin; Sherman, Alexander; Gleason, Michael; Kinarsky, Leo; Silva-Lopez, Edibaldo; Edney, James; Reed, Elizabeth; Berger, Ann; Cowan, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    The Breast Cancer Collaborative Registry (BCCR) is a multicenter web-based system that efficiently collects and manages a variety of data on breast cancer (BC) patients and BC survivors. This registry is designed as a multi-tier web application that utilizes Java Servlet/JSP technology and has an Oracle 11g database as a back-end. The BCCR questionnaire has accommodated standards accepted in breast cancer research and healthcare. By harmonizing the controlled vocabulary with the NCI Thesaurus (NCIt) or Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine-Clinical Terms (SNOMED-CT), the BCCR provides a standardized approach to data collection and reporting. The BCCR has been recently certified by the National Cancer Institute’s Center for Biomedical Informatics and Information Technology (NCI CBIIT) as a cancer Biomedical Informatics Grid (caBIG®) Bronze Compatible product. The BCCR is aimed at facilitating rapid and uniform collection of critical information and biological samples to be used in developing diagnostic, prevention, treatment, and survivorship strategies against breast cancer. Currently, seven cancer institutions are participating in the BCCR that contains data on almost 900 subjects (BC patients and survivors, as well as individuals at high risk of getting BC). PMID:21918596

  10. Breast Cancer and Posttraumatic Growth

    PubMed Central

    İnan, Figen Şengün; Üstün, Besti

    2014-01-01

    The current methods for early diagnosis and increased treatment options have improved survival rates in breast cancer. Breast cancer diagnosis effects individuals in physical, psychological and social dimensions either positively or negatively. In the literature, usually the negative effects encountered in the period after the diagnosis of breast cancer are mostly described, with limited data on the positive effects. Nevertheless, the identification of positive changes and defining its determinants is important in supporting and strengthening posttraumatic growth in this group. The objective of this review is to explain posttraumatic growth and its determinants in breast cancer during the post-treatment period in accordance with the relevant literature. In our evaluation, it was noticed that breast cancer survivors experience posttraumatic growth in the post-treatment period, but the literature is limited in explaining the nature of posttraumatic growth and its determinants. Both qualitative and quantitative research that will provide in-depth information on the subject, explaining culture-specific posttraumatic growth and related factors, are required. PMID:28331647

  11. Internet Use and Breast Cancer Survivors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muhamad, Mazanah; Afshari, Mojgan; Mohamed, Nor Aini

    2011-01-01

    A survey was administered to 400 breast cancer survivors at hospitals and support group meetings in Peninsular Malaysia to explore their level of Internet use and factors related to the Internet use by breast cancer survivors. Findings of this study indicated that about 22.5% of breast cancer survivors used Internet to get information about breast…

  12. Do underarm cosmetics cause breast cancer?

    PubMed

    Gikas, Panagiotis D; Mansfield, Lucy; Mokbel, Kefah

    2004-01-01

    Although animal and laboratory studies suggest a possible link between certain chemicals used in underarm cosmetics and breast cancer development, there is no reliable evidence that underarm cosmetics use increases breast cancer risk in humans. This article reviews the evidence for and against the possible link between breast cancer and underarm cosmetics and highlights the need for further research to clarify this issue.

  13. Can We Prevent Breast Cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Saadat, Sabiha

    2008-01-01

    Breast cancer is the second most common cancer in the world and the most common cancer in females accounting to 23% of all cases. Between January 1998 and December 2004–2004, 6,882 cases were reported from all GCC states accounting to 11.8% from all cancers and 22.7% from cancers in females. An ASR/100,000 woman was 46.4 from Bahrain, 44.3 from Kuwait, 35.5 from Qatar, 19.2 from UAE, 14.2 from Oman and 12.9 from KSA. Breast cancer is the most frequent cancer in Arab women constituting 14–42% of all women cancers. Breast cancer in Arab countries presents almost 10 yrs younger than in USA and Europe. Median age at presentation is 48–52 and 50% of all cases are below the age of 50 where as only 25% of cases in industrialized nations are below the age of 50 yrs. What we need to fight this deadly disease is opening of screening centers with trained physicians equipped with ultrasound, x-ray unit, a pathology lab and most of all a system where a patient is seen urgently on referral to a secondary level care. Health education campaigns should be organized, female medical students should be encouraged to be general surgeons in a community where social customs still have value. PMID:21475500

  14. Multiple primary breast and thyroid cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Ron, E.; Curtis, R.; Hoffman, D. A.; Flannery, J. T.

    1984-01-01

    The occurrence of breast and thyroid multiple primary cancers was evaluated using data from the Connecticut Tumor Registry. The study population consisted of 1618 women with primary thyroid cancer and 39,194 women with primary breast cancer diagnosed between 1935 and 1978. Thirty-four thyroid cancer patients subsequently developed breast cancer and 24 breast cancer patients later had thyroid cancer. A significantly elevated risk of thyroid cancer following breast cancer (SIR = 1.68) and breast cancer following thyroid cancer (SIR = 1.89) was demonstrated. The finding was even more notable when compared with the risks obtained for other sites. The elevated risk was particularly evident in women under 40 years of age at time of diagnosis of the first cancer. Analysis by histologic type revealed that the highest risk of second primary breast cancer was found among patients with follicular or mixed papillary-follicular thyroid cancer. Women under age 40 with follicular carcinoma had a 10-fold risk of developing breast cancer (4 observed, 0.4 expected). An enhanced risk of second primary tumours was evident for the entire period after treatment of the first primary, although it was highest within one year after diagnosis of the first primary. This may be due to the close medical surveillance of cancer patients which would increase early diagnosis of second tumours. Our findings suggest that breast and thyroid cancer may share common aetiologic features. PMID:6691901

  15. Multiparametric Breast MRI of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rahbar, Habib; Partridge, Savannah C.

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis Breast MRI has increased in popularity over the past two decades due to evidence for its high sensitivity for cancer detection. Current clinical MRI approaches rely on the use of a dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE-MRI) acquisition that facilitates morphologic and semi-quantitative kinetic assessments of breast lesions. The use of more functional and quantitative parameters, such as pharmacokinetic features from high temporal resolution DCE-MRI, apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) on diffusion weighted MRI, and choline concentrations on MR spectroscopy, hold promise to broaden the utility of MRI and improve its specificity. However, due to wide variations in approach among centers for measuring these parameters and the considerable technical challenges, robust multicenter data supporting their routine use is not yet available, limiting current applications of many of these tools to research purposes. PMID:26613883

  16. Intensity Modulated Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Before Surgery in Treating Older Patients With Hormone Responsive Stage 0-I Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-04

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma With Predominant Intraductal Component; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Medullary Ductal Breast Carcinoma With Lymphocytic Infiltrate; Mucinous Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Papillary Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Tubular Ductal Breast Carcinoma

  17. Tamoxifen for breast cancer prevention

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, V.C.

    1995-02-01

    The case for tamoxifen to be tested as a preventive for breast cancer has merit. Animal studies demonstrate that tamoxifen prevents mammary carcinogenesis and clinical studies now confirm that adjuvant tamoxifen therapy is the only systemic treatment that will prevent contralateral breast cancer. Developing clinical studies confirm the laboratory data that tamoxifen will maintain post-menopausal bone density in the lumbar spine and the neck of the femur; two important skeletal sites for the ultimate prevention of osteoporosis. However, a most important target site-specific effect of tamoxifen is the decrease in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels in postmenopausal women. This positive property of tamoxifen may be responsible for the recorded decreases in hospital visits for the treatment of cardiac conditions and the significant decrease in fatal myocardial infarction for women treated with 5 years of adjuvant tamoxifen. These data provide the scientific basis to undertake randomized, placebocontrolled clinical trials to test the worth of tamoxifen to prevent breast cancer.

  18. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunourous tissues. Here, two High-Aspect Ratio Vessels turn at about 12 rmp to keep breast tissue constructs suspended inside the culture media. Syringes allow scientists to pull for analysis during growth sequences. The tube in the center is a water bubbler that dehumidifies the air to prevent evaporation of the media and thus the appearance of destructive bubbles in the bioreactor.

  19. Two Susceptibility Loci Identified for Prostate Cancer Aggressiveness

    PubMed Central

    Berndt, Sonja I.; Wang, Zhaoming; Yeager, Meredith; Alavanja, Michael C.; Albanes, Demetrius; Amundadottir, Laufey; Andriole, Gerald; Freeman, Laura Beane; Campa, Daniele; Cancel-Tassin, Geraldine; Canzian, Federico; Cornu, Jean-Nicolas; Cussenot, Olivier; Diver, W. Ryan; Gapstur, Susan M.; Grönberg, Henrik; Haiman, Christopher A.; Henderson, Brian; Hutchinson, Amy; Hunter, David J.; Key, Timothy J.; Kolb, Suzanne; Koutros, Stella; Kraft, Peter; Le Marchand, Loic; Lindström, Sara; Machiela, Mitchell J.; Ostrander, Elaine A.; Riboli, Elio; Schumacher, Fred; Siddiq, Afshan; Stanford, Janet L.; Stevens, Victoria L.; Travis, Ruth C.; Tsilidis, Konstantinos K.; Virtamo, Jarmo; Weinstein, Stephanie; Wilkund, Fredrik; Xu, Jianfeng; Zheng, S. Lilly; Yu, Kai; Wheeler, William; Zhang, Han; Sampson, Joshua; Black, Amanda; Jacobs, Kevin; Hoover, Robert N; Tucker, Margaret; Chanock, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    Most men diagnosed with prostate cancer will experience indolent disease; hence discovering genetic variants that distinguish aggressive from non-aggressive prostate cancer is of critical clinical importance for disease prevention and treatment. In a multistage, case-only genome-wide association study of 12,518 prostate cancer cases, we identify two loci associated with Gleason score, a pathological measure of disease aggressiveness: rs35148638 at 5q14.3 (RASA1, P=6.49×10-9) and rs78943174 at 3q26.31 (NAALADL2, P=4.18×10-8). In a stratified case-control analysis, the SNP at 5q14.3 appears specific for aggressive prostate cancer (P=8.85×10-5) with no association for non-aggressive prostate cancer compared to controls (P=0.57). The proximity of these loci to genes involved in vascular disease suggests potential biological mechanisms worthy of further investigation. PMID:25939597

  20. Contribution of xanthine oxidoreductase to mammary epithelial and breast cancer cell differentiation in part modulates inhibitor of differentiation-1.

    PubMed

    Fini, Mehdi A; Monks, Jenifer; Farabaugh, Susan M; Wright, Richard M

    2011-09-01

    Loss of xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) has been linked to aggressive breast cancer in vivo and to breast cancer cell aggressiveness in vitro. In the present study, we hypothesized that the contribution of XOR to the development of the normal mammary gland may underlie its capacity to modulate breast cancer. We contrasted in vitro and in vivo developmental systems by differentiation marker and microarray analyses. Human breast cancer microarray was used for clinical outcome studies. The role of XOR in differentiation and proliferation was examined in human breast cancer cells and in a mouse xenograft model. Our data show that XOR was required for functional differentiation of mammary epithelial cells both in vitro and in vivo. Poor XOR expression was observed in a mouse ErbB2 breast cancer model, and pharmacologic inhibition of XOR increased breast cancer tumor burden in mouse xenograft. mRNA microarray analysis of human breast cancer revealed that low XOR expression was significantly associated with time to tumor relapse. The opposing expression of XOR and inhibitor of differentiation-1 (Id1) during HC11 differentiation and mammary gland development suggested a potential functional relationship. While overexpression of Id1 inhibited HC11 differentiation and XOR expression, XOR itself modulated expression of Id1 in differentiating HC11 cells. Overexpression of XOR both inhibited Id1-induced proliferation and -stimulated differentiation of Heregulin-β1-treated human breast cancer cells. These results show that XOR is an important functional component of differentiation whose diminished expression contributes to breast cancer aggressiveness, and they support XOR as both a breast cancer biomarker and a target for pharmacologic activation in therapeutic management of aggressive breast cancer.

  1. Triple Negative Breast Cancer: Nanosolutions for a Big Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Mendes, Tânia Filipa S.; Kluskens, Leon D.

    2015-01-01

    Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) is a particular immunopathological subtype of breast cancer that lacks expression of estrogen and progesterone receptors (ER/PR) and amplification of the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) gene. Characterized by aggressive and metastatic phenotypes and high rates of relapse, TNBC is the only breast cancer subgroup still lacking effective therapeutic options, thus presenting the worst prognosis. The development of targeted therapies, as well as early diagnosis methods, is vital to ensure an adequate and timely therapeutic intervention in patients with TNBC. This review intends to discuss potentially emerging approaches for the diagnosis and treatment of TNBC patients, with a special focus on nano‐based solutions that actively target these particular tumors. PMID:27980912

  2. Role of MicroRNA in Aggressive Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-11-1-0491 TITLE: Role of MicroRNA in Aggressive Prostate... MicroRNA in Aggressive Prostate Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-11-1-0491 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Jer...action is not fully characterized. Using microRNA microarray screening, we found microRNA -363 (miR363) is significantly down regulated in several

  3. Nanoparticle-based Paclitaxel vs Solvent-based Paclitaxel as Part of Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy for Early Breast Cancer (GeparSepto)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-11

    Tubular Breast Cancer Stage II; Mucinous Breast Cancer Stage II; Breast Cancer Female NOS; Invasive Ductal Breast Cancer; Tubular Breast Cancer Stage III; HER-2 Positive Breast Cancer; Inflammatory Breast Cancer Stage IV; Inflammatory Breast Cancer

  4. Combination Chemotherapy and Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant Followed By Aldesleukin and Sargramostim in Treating Patients With Inflammatory Stage IIIB or Metastatic Stage IV Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2011-07-08

    Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Inflammatory Breast Cancer; Male Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  5. Reconstruction for breast cancer in a nutshell.

    PubMed

    Harmer, Victoria

    Breast cancer is a disease many will experience. Depending on the size of the cancer, the size of the host breast, and whether it is multi-focal, a mastectomy may be recommended as part of the treatment. If this is the case, an immediate breast reconstruction may be offered. This article will describe the three main types of breast reconstruction and discuss pertinent issues regarding this, including complications, surgery to the other (contraleteral) breast and potential psychological implications of this surgery.

  6. Occupational exposure and risk of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Fenga, Concettina

    2016-03-01

    Breast cancer is a multifactorial disease and the most commonly diagnosed cancer in women. Traditional risk factors for breast cancer include reproductive status, genetic mutations, family history and lifestyle. However, increasing evidence has identified an association between breast cancer and occupational factors, including environmental stimuli. Epidemiological and experimental studies demonstrated that ionizing and non-ionizing radiation exposure, night-shift work, pesticides, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and metals are defined environmental factors for breast cancer, particularly at young ages. However, the mechanisms by which occupational factors can promote breast cancer initiation and progression remains to be elucidated. Furthermore, the evaluation of occupational factors for breast cancer, particularly in the workplace, also remains to be explained. The present review summarizes the occupational risk factors and the associated mechanisms involved in breast cancer development, in order to highlight new environmental exposures that could be correlated to breast cancer and to provide new insights for breast cancer prevention in the occupational settings. Furthermore, this review suggests that there is a requirement to include, through multidisciplinary approaches, different occupational exposure risks among those associated with breast cancer development. Finally, the design of new epigenetic biomarkers may be useful to identify the workers that are more susceptible to develop breast cancer.

  7. Occupational exposure and risk of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    FENGA, CONCETTINA

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is a multifactorial disease and the most commonly diagnosed cancer in women. Traditional risk factors for breast cancer include reproductive status, genetic mutations, family history and lifestyle. However, increasing evidence has identified an association between breast cancer and occupational factors, including environmental stimuli. Epidemiological and experimental studies demonstrated that ionizing and non-ionizing radiation exposure, night-shift work, pesticides, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and metals are defined environmental factors for breast cancer, particularly at young ages. However, the mechanisms by which occupational factors can promote breast cancer initiation and progression remains to be elucidated. Furthermore, the evaluation of occupational factors for breast cancer, particularly in the workplace, also remains to be explained. The present review summarizes the occupational risk factors and the associated mechanisms involved in breast cancer development, in order to highlight new environmental exposures that could be correlated to breast cancer and to provide new insights for breast cancer prevention in the occupational settings. Furthermore, this review suggests that there is a requirement to include, through multidisciplinary approaches, different occupational exposure risks among those associated with breast cancer development. Finally, the design of new epigenetic biomarkers may be useful to identify the workers that are more susceptible to develop breast cancer. PMID:26998264

  8. Interactive Gentle Yoga in Improving Quality of Life in Patients With Stage I-III Breast Cancer Undergoing Radiation Therapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-17

    Anxiety Disorder; Depression; Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Fatigue; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  9. Genetic epidemiology of breast cancer in Britain.

    PubMed

    Iselius, L; Slack, J; Littler, M; Morton, N E

    1991-05-01

    A complex segregation analysis was conducted on two British series (one consecutive series of probands with breast cancer and one series ascertained through a normal consultand). Altogether there were 1248 nuclear families with breast cancer. A dominant gene with a frequency of 0.003 giving a lifetime penetrance of 0.83 is favoured. Ovarian, endometrial and cancers associated with the SBLA syndrome, as well as benign breast disease, were significantly more common in familial breast cancer than in families of single cases. Probands in families with more than one individual with breast cancer were non-significantly younger than isolated probands.

  10. [Hormonal therapy in breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Espinós, J; Reyna, C; de la Cruz, S; Oiler, C; Hernández, A; Fernández Hidalgo, O; Santisteban, M; García Foncillas, J

    2008-01-01

    Hormonal therapy has been the first systemic treatment against breast cancer. Up to now Tamoxifen and ovarian supression/ablation were the best optionts we had to treat early breast cancer as advancer disease. The advent of aromatase inhibitors, new SERMS and antistrogen Fulvestrant have supoused a great advance in the treatment of this disease and at the same time have complicated the election of the optimal drug for each patient. This article tries to review the aviable treatment options insiting on its indications.

  11. NUCKS overexpression in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Drosos, Yiannis; Kouloukoussa, Mirsini; Østvold, Anne Carine; Grundt, Kirsten; Goutas, Nikos; Vlachodimitropoulos, Dimitrios; Havaki, Sophia; Kollia, Panagoula; Kittas, Christos; Marinos, Evangelos; Aleporou-Marinou, Vassiliki

    2009-01-01

    Background NUCKS (Nuclear, Casein Kinase and Cyclin-dependent Kinase Substrate) is a nuclear, DNA-binding and highly phosphorylated protein. A number of reports show that NUCKS is highly expressed on the level of mRNA in several human cancers, including breast cancer. In this work, NUCKS expression on both RNA and protein levels was studied in breast tissue biopsies consisted of invasive carcinomas, intraductal proliferative lesions, benign epithelial proliferations and fibroadenomas, as well as in primary cultures derived from the above biopsies. Specifically, in order to evaluate the level of NUCKS protein in correlation with the histopathological features of breast disease, immunohistochemistry was employed on paraffin sections of breast biopsies of the above types. In addition, NUCKS expression was studied by means of Reverse Transcription PCR (RT-PCR), real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) and Western immunoblot analyses in the primary cell cultures developed from the same biopsies. Results The immunohistochemical Results showed intense NUCKS staining mostly in grade I and II breast carcinomas compared to normal tissues. Furthermore, NUCKS was moderate expressed in benign epithelial proliferations, such as adenosis and sclerosing adenosis, and highly expressed in intraductal lesions, specifically in ductal carcinomas in situ (DCIS). It is worth noting that all the fibroadenoma tissues examined were negative for NUCKS staining. RT-PCR and qRT-PCR showed an increase of NUCKS expression in cells derived from primary cultures of proliferative lesions and cancerous tissues compared to the ones derived from normal breast tissues and fibroadenomas. This increase was also confirmed by Western immunoblot analysis. Although NUCKS is a cell cycle related protein, its expression does not correlate with Ki67 expression, neither in tissue sections nor in primary cell cultures. Conclusion The results show overexpression of the NUCKS protein in a number of non malignant breast lesions and

  12. Protein arginine methyltransferase 7 promotes breast cancer cell invasion through the induction of MMP9 expression.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, R Mitchell; Haghandish, Nasim; Daneshmand, Manijeh; Amin, Shahrier; Paris, Geneviève; Falls, Theresa J; Bell, John C; Islam, Shahidul; Côté, Jocelyn

    2015-02-20

    Recent evidence points to the protein arginine methyltransferase (PRMT) family of enzymes playing critical roles in cancer. PRMT7 has been identified in several gene expression studies to be associated with increased metastasis and decreased survival in breast cancer patients. However, this has not been extensively studied. Here we report that PRMT7 expression is significantly upregulated in both primary breast tumour tissues and in breast cancer lymph node metastases. We have demonstrated that reducing PRMT7 levels in invasive breast cancer cells using RNA interference significantly decreased cell invasion in vitro and metastasis in vivo. Conversely, overexpression of PRMT7 in non-aggressive MCF7 cells enhanced their invasiveness. Furthermore, we show that PRMT7 induces the expression of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9), a well-known mediator of breast cancer metastasis. Importantly, we significantly rescued invasion of aggressive breast cancer cells depleted of PRMT7 by the exogenous expression of MMP9. Our results demonstrate that upregulation of PRMT7 in breast cancer may have a significant role in promoting cell invasion through the regulation of MMP9. This identifies PRMT7 as a novel and potentially significant biomarker and therapeutic target for breast cancer.

  13. Breast cancer (metastatic)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Median survival from metastatic breast cancer is 12 months without treatment, but young people can survive up to 20 years with the disease, whereas in other metastatic cancers this would be considered unusual. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of first-line hormonal treatment? What are the effects of second-line hormonal treatment in women who have not responded to tamoxifen? What are the effects of first-line chemotherapy? What are the effects of first-line chemotherapy in combination with a monoclonal antibody? What are the effects of second-line chemotherapy? What are the effects of treatments for bone metastases? What are the effects of treatments for spinal cord metastases? What are the effects of treatments for cerebral or choroidal metastases? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to June 2009 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 77 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: first-line hormonal treatment using anti-oestrogens (tamoxifen), ovarian ablation, progestins, selective aromatase inhibitors, or combined gonadorelin analogues plus tamoxifen; second-line hormonal treatment using progestins or selective aromatase inhibitors; first-line non-taxane combination chemotherapy; first-line taxane-based combination chemotherapy; first-line high- versus low-dose standard chemotherapy

  14. MicroRNA and Breast Cancer Progression

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-08-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-05-1-0428 TITLE: MicroRNA and Breast Cancer Progression...3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 15 JUL 2005 - 14 JUL 2007 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER MicroRNA and Breast Cancer Progression 5b...We hypothesized that certain miRNA species are differentially expressed in the normal breast epithelium and breast cancer cells. Our concept was that

  15. Cancer-associated fibroblast-secreted CXCL16 attracts monocytes to promote stroma activation in triple-negative breast cancers

    PubMed Central

    Allaoui, Roni; Bergenfelz, Caroline; Mohlin, Sofie; Hagerling, Catharina; Salari, Kiarash; Werb, Zena; Anderson, Robin L.; Ethier, Stephen P.; Jirström, Karin; Påhlman, Sven; Bexell, Daniel; Tahin, Balázs; Johansson, Martin E.; Larsson, Christer; Leandersson, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Triple-negative (TN) breast cancers (ER−PR−HER2−) are highly metastatic and associated with poor prognosis. Within this subtype, invasive, stroma-rich tumours with infiltration of inflammatory cells are even more aggressive. The effect of myeloid cells on reactive stroma formation in TN breast cancer is largely unknown. Here, we show that primary human monocytes have a survival advantage, proliferate in vivo and develop into immunosuppressive myeloid cells expressing the myeloid-derived suppressor cell marker S100A9 only in a TN breast cancer environment. This results in activation of cancer-associated fibroblasts and expression of CXCL16, which we show to be a monocyte chemoattractant. We propose that this migratory feedback loop amplifies the formation of a reactive stroma, contributing to the aggressive phenotype of TN breast tumours. These insights could help select more suitable therapies targeting the stromal component of these tumours, and could aid prediction of drug resistance. PMID:27725631

  16. Minimal breast cancer: a clinical appraisal.

    PubMed Central

    Peters, T G; Donegan, W L; Burg, E A

    1977-01-01

    Eighty-five patients with a diagnosis of minimal breast cancer were evaluated. The predominant lesion was intraductal carcinoma, and axillary metastases occurred in association with minimal breast cancer in seven of 96 cases. One death occurred due to minimal breast cancer. Bilateral mammary carcinoma was evident in 24% and bilateral minimal breast cancer in 13% of the patients. The component lesions of minimal breast cancer have varied biologic activity, but prognosis is good with a variety of operations. The multifocal nature of minimal breast cancer and the potential for metastases should be recognized. Therapy should include removal of the entire mammary parenchyma and low axillary nodes. The high incidence of bilateral malignancy supports elective contralateral biopsy at the time of therapy for minimal breast cancer. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 5. PMID:203233

  17. Immunotherapy in breast cancer: An introduction.

    PubMed

    Disis, Mary L; Stanton, Sasha E

    2017-02-03

    The field of breast cancer immunology has progressed tremendously over the last decade. Twenty years ago immunotherapy was not considered for the treatment of breast cancers because breast cancer was not considered immunogenic. Today we know that most patients with breast cancer have some evidence of an adaptive immune response against their tumors, detectable either in the peripheral blood or in the tumor. Moreover, immunity to breast cancer begins at the earliest stages of the disease, in some patients prior to diagnosis. Recent evidence suggests that lymphocytes infiltrating breast cancers and found in the tumor stroma are strong prognostic indicators of a beneficial disease outcome. These observations now pave the way for the integration of immunomodulation into standard of care therapy for the treatment of breast cancer.

  18. The menopause specialist and breast cancer survivorship.

    PubMed

    Marsden, Jo

    2016-09-15

    Due to improvement in survival rates, breast cancer is the most prevalent female malignancy in Europe and hence the management of breast cancer survivorship is garnering significant attention. Most of the health issues associated with treatment result from iatrogenic estrogen deficiency and recognition of this in the recent National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) menopause guidance has resulted in the recommendation for referral of breast cancer patients to menopause specialists for appropriate counselling about and management of early menopause, estrogen deficiency symptoms and lifestyle risk modification. The latter has significant implications for both all-cause and breast cancer-specific mortality. Extending the role of health professionals with an interest in menopause to provide such service for breast cancer patients is necessary as this is not within the remit or expertise of specialist breast cancer teams; however it will in turn, require menopause specialists to expand and regularly update their knowledge of breast cancer and its treatment.

  19. Targeting aberrant expression of Notch-1 in ALDH(+) cancer stem cells in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Pal, Deeksha; Kolluru, Venkatesh; Chandrasekaran, Balaji; Baby, Becca V; Aman, Masarath; Suman, Suman; Sirimulla, Suman; Sanders, Mary Ann; Alatassi, Houda; Ankem, Murali K; Damodaran, Chendil

    2017-03-01

    We have previously reported that high aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) enzyme activity in breast cancer cells results in breast cancer stem cell (BCSC) properties by upregualting Notch-1 and epithelial mesenchymal markers. This results in chemoresistance in breast cancer. Here, we examined the functional and clinical significance of ALDH expression by measuring the ALDH levels in breast cancer tissues by immunohistochemistry. There was a significantly higher ALDH expression in higher grade breast cancer tumor tissues (Grade- II and III) versus normal breast tissues. Injection of BCSC (ALDH(+) and CD44(+) /CD22(-) ) cells resulted in aggressive tumor growth in athymic mice versus ALDH(-) cells. The ALDH(+) and CD44(+) /CD22(-) tumors grow rapidly and are larger than ALDH(-) tumors which were slow growing and smaller. Molecularly, ALDH(+) tumors expressed higher expression of Notch-1 and EMT markers than ALDH(-) tumors. Oral administration of the naturally occurring Psoralidin (Pso, 25 mg/kg of body weight) significantly inhibited the growth in ALDH(+) and ALDH(-) tumors as well. Psoralidin inhibited Notch-1 mediated EMT activation in ALDH(+) and ALDH(-) tumors-this confirms our in vitro findings. Our results suggest that Notch-1 could be an attractive target and inhibition of Notch-1 by Psoralidin may prevent pathogenesis of breast cancer as well as metastasis. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Caloric Restriction in Treating Patients With Stage 0-I Breast Cancer Undergoing Surgery and Radiation Therapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-19

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer

  1. Plasma matrix metalloproteinase 2 levels and breast cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Aroner, Sarah A; Rosner, Bernard A; Tamimi, Rulla M; Tworoger, Shelley S; Baur, Nadja; Joos, Thomas O; Hankinson, Susan E

    2015-06-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2) is an enzyme with important functions in breast cancer invasion and metastasis. However, it is unclear whether circulating MMP2 levels may predict breast cancer risk. We conducted a prospective nested case-control analysis in the Nurses' Health Study among 1136 cases who were diagnosed with invasive breast cancer between 1992 and 2004 and 1136 matched controls. All participants provided blood samples in 1989-1990, and a subset (170 cases, 170 controls) contributed an additional sample in 2000-2002. Pre-diagnostic plasma MMP2 levels were measured via immunoassay, and conditional logistic regression was performed to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs), adjusted for breast cancer risk factors. No association was observed between plasma MMP2 levels and risk of total invasive breast cancer (top vs. bottom quartile, OR=1.0; 95% CI: 0.7, 1.2; p-trend=0.89). Findings did not vary significantly by time since blood draw, body mass index, postmenopausal hormone use, or menopausal status at either blood draw or breast cancer diagnosis. MMP2 was associated with a greater risk of nodal metastases at diagnosis (top vs. bottom quartile, OR=1.5; 95% CI: 1.0, 2.2; p-heterogeneity, any vs. no lymph nodes=0.002), but no significant associations were observed with other tumor characteristics or with recurrent or fatal cancers. Plasma MMP2 levels do not appear to be predictive of total invasive breast cancer risk, although associations with aggressive disease warrant further study.

  2. Antiangiogenic therapy for breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Angiogenesis is an important component of cancer growth, invasion and metastasis. Therefore, inhibition of angiogenesis is an attractive strategy for treatment of cancer. We describe existing clinical trials of antiangiogenic agents and the challenges facing the clinical development and optimal use of these agents for the treatment of breast cancer. Currently, the most promising approach has been the use of bevacizumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody directed against the most potent pro-angiogenic factor, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Small molecular inhibitors of VEGF tyrosine kinase activity, such as sorafenib, appear promising. While, the role of sunitinib and inhibitors of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in breast cancer has to be defined. Several unanswered questions remain, such as choice of drug(s), optimal duration of therapy and patient selection criteria. PMID:21067536

  3. What You Need to Know about Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Publications Reports What You Need To Know About™ Breast Cancer This booklet is about breast cancer. Learning about your cancer can help you take ... This booklet covers: Basics about breast anatomy and breast cancer Treatments for breast cancer, including taking part in ...

  4. Identifying Breast Cancer Oncogenes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-01

    utilizing mouse intestinal cells and rat fibroblasts suggest that PTK6 may be required for cell death triggered by specific stimuli such as DNA damage [41...Parallel data of 12 normal breast organoids RNA samples and 7 bulk normal breast tissue specimens were used as normal control. Array probe data were...JJ, Tyner AL (2009) Induction of protein tyrosine kinase 6 in mouse intestinal crypt epithelial cells promotes DNA damage-induced apoptosis

  5. Nonlinear Growth Kinetics of Breast Cancer Stem Cells: Implications for Cancer Stem Cell Targeted Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xinfeng; Johnson, Sara; Liu, Shou; Kanojia, Deepak; Yue, Wei; Singn, Udai; Wang, Qian; Wang, Qi; Nie, Qing; Chen, Hexin

    2013-08-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) have been identified in primary breast cancer tissues and cell lines. The CSC population varies widely among cancerous tissues and cell lines, and is often associated with aggressive breast cancers. Despite of intensive research, how the CSC population is regulated within a tumor is still not well understood so far. In this paper, we present a mathematical model to explore the growth kinetics of CSC population both in vitro and in vivo. Our mathematical models and supporting experiments suggest that there exist non-linear growth kinetics of CSCs and negative feedback mechanisms to control the balance between the population of CSCs and that of non-stem cancer cells. The model predictions can help us explain a few long-standing questions in the field of cancer stem cell research, and can be potentially used to predict the efficicacy of anti-cancer therapy.

  6. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Isolation of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue; A: Duct element recovered from breast tissue digest. B: Outgrowth of cells from duct element in upper right corner cultured in a standard dish; most cells spontaneousely die during early cell divisions, but a few will establish long-term growth. C: Isolate of long-term frowth HMEC from outgrowth of duct element; cells shown soon after isolation and in early full-cell contact growth in culture in a dish. D: same long-term growth HMEC, but after 3 weeks in late full-cell contact growth in a continuous culture in a dish. Note attempts to reform duct elements but this in two demensions in a dish rather than in three dimensions in tissue. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Robert Richmond, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

  7. Genetics Home Reference: breast cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... a small or moderate contribution to overall breast cancer risk. Some of these genes provide instructions for making proteins that interact with the proteins produced from the BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes. Others act through different pathways. Researchers suspect that the combined influence of variations ...

  8. Breast Cancer Startup Challenge winners

    Cancer.gov

    Ten winners of a world-wide competition to bring emerging breast cancer research technologies to market faster were announced today by the Avon Foundation for Women, in partnership with NCI and the Center for Advancing Innovation (CAI). Avon is providing

  9. The Pittsburgh Breast Cancer Consortium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-08-01

    Randomized. Open-Label. Dose Comparison Study of Recombinant Human Chorionic Gonadotropin for Third Line Treatment of Metastatic Breast Cancer in...by the sponsor. Phase I Dose-Escalation Study of Thrice Weekly Recombinant Human Interleukin-2 in Combination with Trastuzumab in Subjects with

  10. Improvement of survival and prospect of cure in patients with metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yee Chung; Ueno, Naoto T

    2012-07-01

    Patients with metastatic breast cancer have traditionally been considered incurable with conventional treatment. However, 5-10% of those patients survive more than 5 years, and 2-5% survive more than 10 years. Recent studies suggest that the survival of patients with metastatic breast cancer has been slowly improving. In this review, we examine the possible curative approach for a certain group of patients with metastatic breast cancer. We identify that patients most likely to benefit from such an aggressive approach are young and have good performance status, adequate body functional reserve, long disease-free interval before recurrence, oligometastatic disease, and low systemic tumor load. An aggressive multidisciplinary approach including both local treatment of macroscopic disease and systemic treatment of microscopic disease can result in prolonged disease control in certain patients with metastatic breast cancer. Whether patients with prolonged disease control are "cured" remains controversial.

  11. Many with Breast Cancer Unnecessarily Choose Double Mastectomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_162665.html Many With Breast Cancer Unnecessarily Choose Double Mastectomy: Study Removing healthy breast ... 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Many women with early stage breast cancer choose to have their healthy opposite breast removed, ...

  12. Breast cancer control programme in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Pinotti, J A; Barros, A C; Hegg, R; Zeferino, L C

    1993-01-01

    Breast cancer is a very important health problem in developing countries, where its incidence has increased in the last decades. Mortality rates due to breast cancer have also increased, and the main reason for this is late diagnosis. The authors demonstrate that organizing programmes for early breast cancer detection is possible by making use of simple resources. A set of tiered interventions is proposed, stratified in levels of complexity: Level 1--Identification of abnormal breast by health professionals; Level 2--Medical assistance to women whose breast is considered abnormal, in order to diagnose and treat benign diseases and recognize suspect cases of cancer; Level 3--Management of the women with suspected or diagnosed breast cancer by a multidisciplinary team. Therefore, a proposal for wide action for breast cancer control in developing countries is presented.

  13. FLT PET in Measuring Treatment Response in Patients With Newly Diagnosed Estrogen Receptor-Positive, HER2-Negative Stage I-III Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-02

    Estrogen Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Negative; Male Breast Carcinoma; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  14. Rural-urban disparities of breast cancer patients in China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Bu, Yulan; Gao, Hua

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the rural-urban disparities in breast cancer patients in China. The retrospective study was performed with a total of 2,139 breast cancer patients hospitalized in Qilu Hospital of Shandong University between the years 1997 and 2011. We applied Chi-square analysis to identify significant disparities between rural and urban populations. Logistic regression model was used to estimate factors associated with the adjuvant chemotherapy treatment. Two-fifths of patients were considered rural dwellers. Significant disparities were found in marriage age (p < 0.0001), history of breast cancer (p = 0.0187), smoking (p = 0.0025) and reason for visiting a doctor (p < 0.0001) among all demographic variables. Rural patients tend to suffer more aggressive tumor histology (p = 0.0251), larger tumor size (p < 0.0001) and more metastatic lymph nodes (p < 0.0001) than urban patients. In addition, rural-urban differences were also shown in the choice of neo-adjuvant chemotherapy (p = 0.0050) and surgical procedures (p < 0.0001). With logistic regression model, we found some significant factors associated with the choice of post-adjuvant chemotherapy, including age at diagnosis, history of breast cancer, tumor histology and number of positive lymph node. Differences in rural-urban breast cancer patients exist in China. Interventions to increase early diagnosis of breast cancer among rural area are in need. Further research is needed to investigate potential attitude and perception differences between rural and urban populations with respect to breast cancer preventions and treatments.

  15. Targeted Therapy for Breast Cancer Prevention

    PubMed Central

    den Hollander, Petra; Savage, Michelle I.; Brown, Powel H.

    2013-01-01

    With a better understanding of the etiology of breast cancer, molecularly targeted drugs have been developed and are being testing for the treatment and prevention of breast cancer. Targeted drugs that inhibit the estrogen receptor (ER) or estrogen-activated pathways include the selective ER modulators (tamoxifen, raloxifene, and lasofoxifene) and aromatase inhibitors (AIs) (anastrozole, letrozole, and exemestane) have been tested in preclinical and clinical studies. Tamoxifen and raloxifene have been shown to reduce the risk of breast cancer and promising results of AIs in breast cancer trials, suggest that AIs might be even more effective in the prevention of ER-positive breast cancer. However, these agents only prevent ER-positive breast cancer. Therefore, current research is focused on identifying preventive therapies for other forms of breast cancer such as human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-positive and triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC, breast cancer that does express ER, progesterone receptor, or HER2). HER2-positive breast cancers are currently treated with anti-HER2 therapies including trastuzumab and lapatinib, and preclinical and clinical studies are now being conducted to test these drugs for the prevention of HER2-positive breast cancers. Several promising agents currently being tested in cancer prevention trials for the prevention of TNBC include poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitors, vitamin D, and rexinoids, both of which activate nuclear hormone receptors (the vitamin D and retinoid X receptors). This review discusses currently used breast cancer preventive drugs, and describes the progress of research striving to identify and develop more effective preventive agents for all forms of breast cancer. PMID:24069582

  16. Preventable breast cancer is postmenopausal.

    PubMed

    Hemminki, Kari; Försti, Asta; Sundquist, Jan; Mousavi, Seyed Mohsen

    2011-01-01

    Breast cancer incidence has markedly increased in Western countries for reasons that are not entirely understood. We characterized periodic and age-specific incidence trends of breast cancer in immigrants who migrated from low incidence areas to Sweden. The incidence in immigrants was compared to that in native Swedes and standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated, based on the Swedish Family-Cancer Database. Age-specific incidence data for low and high incidence populations were obtained from Cancer Incidence in Five Continents IX and NORDCAN. For immigrants from the seven lowest countries/regions 535 breast cancers were identified; the SIRs ranging from 0.45 for Turkish to 0.70 for Greek women. The SIR increased somewhat with the length of stay in Sweden, from 0.55 for stay between 0 and 10 years to 0.59 for a stay of 20+ years. The age-specific incidence curves for these immigrants were superimposable upon the earliest Swedish (year 1960) or Danish (1943) rates. These rates differed from the current Swedish rates by a much lower postmenopausal component. Large incidence differences were also observed between white Californians and immigrants from China and Korea. Our results show that the main difference between high and low incidence areas is in postmenopausal cancer which has increased preferentially during the past century. Immigrants from low risk areas to Sweden show age-specific incidence patterns of Swedes half a century ago. These differences offer opportunities for the identification of factors underlying breast cancer etiology and tools for prevention.

  17. Desmoid Tumor of the Chest Wall Mimicking Recurrent Breast Cancer: Multimodality Imaging Findings

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Kyeong A; An, Yeong Yi

    2016-01-01

    Desmoid tumor of breast is a rare benign, locally aggressive tumor with a high recurrence rate. It has been associated with scar from previous breast surgery or trauma. Especially in breast cancer patients with previous operation history, it may simulate recurrent breast cancer clinically and radiologically. We presented multimodality imaging findings (ultrasound, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography/computed tomography) of chest wall desmoid tumor mimicking recurrent breast cancer in a 38-year-old patient with a history of left modified mastectomy. The desmoid tumor is a rare benign tumor that should be considered in the differential diagnosis of malignant local tumor recurrence after breast cancer operation. Biopsy was required for accurate diagnosis and wide local excision was its appropriate surgical management. PMID:27895871

  18. Dietary fat and risk of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Binukumar, Bhaskarapillai; Mathew, Aleyamma

    2005-01-01

    Background Breast cancer is one of the major public health problems among women worldwide. A number of epidemiological studies have been carried out to find the role of dietary fat and the risk of breast cancer. The main objective of the present communication is to summarize the evidence from various case-control and cohort studies on the consumption of fat and its subtypes and their effect on the development of breast cancer. Methods A Pubmed search for literature on the consumption of dietary fat and risk of breast cancer published from January 1990 through December 2003 was carried out. Results Increased consumption of total fat and saturated fat were found to be positively associated with the development of breast cancer. Even though an equivocal association was observed for the consumption of total monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) and the risk of breast cancer, there exists an inverse association in the case of oleic acid, the most abundant MUFA. A moderate inverse association between consumption of n-3 fatty acids and breast cancer risk and a moderate positive association between n-6 fatty acids and breast cancer risk were observed. Conclusion Even though all epidemiological studies do not provide a strong positive association between the consumption of certain types of dietary fat and breast cancer risk, at least a moderate association does seem to exist and this has a number of implications in view of the fact that breast cancer is an increasing public health concern. PMID:16022739

  19. Galectin-7 Expression Potentiates HER-2-Positive Phenotype in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Grosset, Andrée-Anne; Poirier, Françoise; Gaboury, Louis; St-Pierre, Yves

    2016-01-01

    HER-2 positive tumors are among the most aggressive subtypes of breast cancer and are frequently associated with metastasis and poor outcome. As with other aggressive subtypes of breast cancer, these tumors are associated with abnormally high expression of galectin-7 (gal-7), which confers metastatic breast tumor cells with increased invasive behavior. Although previous studies in the rat model of breast tumorigenesis have shown that gal-7 is also increased in primary breast tumor, its contribution to the development of the primary breast tumors remains unclear. In the present work, we have used genetically-engineered gal-7-deficient mice to examine the role of gal-7 in the development of the mammary gland and of breast cancer. Using histological and immunohistological analysis of whole mammary glands at different stages of development, we detected no significant changes between normal and gal-7-deficient mice. To test the involvement of gal-7 in breast cancer, we next examined the effects of loss of gal-7 on mammary tumor development by crossing gal-7-deficient mice with the mammary tumor transgenic mouse strain FVB-Tg(MMTV-Erbb2)NK1Mul/J. Finally, assessment of mice survival and tumor volume showed a delay of mammary tumor growth in the absence of systemic gal-7. These data suggest that gal-7 could potentiate the phenotype of HER-2 positive primary breast cancer. PMID:27902734

  20. Doxorubicin Hydrochloride and Cyclophosphamide Followed by Paclitaxel With or Without Carboplatin in Treating Patients With Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-04

    Breast Adenocarcinoma; Estrogen Receptor Negative; HER2/Neu Negative; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

  1. Triciribine Phosphate, Paclitaxel, Doxorubicin Hydrochloride, and Cyclophosphamide in Treating Patients With Stage IIB-IV Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-13

    Breast Adenocarcinoma; Estrogen Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Negative; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  2. Breast-feeding after breast cancer: if you wish, madam.

    PubMed

    Azim, Hatem A; Bellettini, Giulia; Gelber, Shari; Peccatori, Fedro A

    2009-03-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignant tumor-affecting women during the child bearing period. With the rising trend in delaying pregnancy later in life, the issue of subsequent pregnancy and lactation following breast cancer diagnosis has been more frequently encountered. In this context, data is scarce particularly those addressing the issue of lactation. In this review, we discussed different endocrinal, clinical and biological aspects dealing with breast-feeding after breast cancer in an attempt to determine how safe and feasible this approach is.

  3. Breast carcinoma after cancer therapy in childhood

    SciTech Connect

    Li, F.P.; Corkery, J.; Vawter, G.; Fine, W.; Sallan, S.E.

    1983-02-01

    Among 910 survivors of childhood cancer, four developed infiltrating carcinoma of the breast and another had noninfiltrating breast tumor. Expected frequency was 0.3 cases of breast cancer in the series. The affected women developed breast carcinoma at ages 20, 25 and 38 years, and the men at ages 38 and 39 years, respectively. Each patient had received orthovoltage chest irradiation for treatment of Wilms' tumor or bone sarcoma between seven and 34 years previously, and estimated radiation dose to the breast exceeded 300 rad in each instance. Four patients also received diverse forms of chemotherapy. Survivors of childhood cancer have increased risk of developing breast cancer and should undergo periodic screening, particularly after breast tissue had been irradiated. Individualized radiotherapy planning can help exclude the breasts from treatment fields for some thoracic neoplasms.

  4. Breast and Gynecologic Cancer | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    [[{"fid":"184","view_mode":"default","fields":{"format":"default","field_file_image_alt_text[und][0][value]":"Breast and Gynecologic Cancer Research Group Homepage Logo","field_file_image_title_text[und][0][value]":"Breast and Gynecologic Cancer Research Group Homepage Logo","field_folder[und]":"15"},"type":"media","attributes":{"alt":"Breast and Gynecologic Cancer Research Group Homepage Logo","title":"Breast and Gynecologic Cancer Research Group Homepage Logo","height":"266","width":"400"," | Prevention and early detection of breast, cervix, endometrial and ovarian cancers and their precursors.

  5. Reversing breast cancer stem cell into breast somatic stem cell.

    PubMed

    Wijaya, L; Agustina, D; Lizandi, A O; Kartawinata, M M; Sandra, F

    2011-02-01

    Stem cells have an important role in cell biology, allowing tissues to be renewed by freshly created cells throughout their lifetime. The specific micro-environment of stem cells is called stem cell niche; this environment influences the development of stem cells from quiescence through stages of differentiation. Recent advance researches have improved the understanding of the cellular and molecular components of the micro-environment--or niche--that regulates stem cells. We point out an important trend to the study of niche activity in breast cancers. Breast cancer has long been known to conserve a heterogeneous population of cells. While the majority of cells that make up tumors are destined to differentiate and eventually stop dividing, only minority populations of cells, termed cancer stem cell, possess extensive self renewal capability. These cancer stem cells possess characteristics of both stem cells and cancer cells. Breast cancer stem cells reversal to breast somatic stem cells offer a new therapy, that not only can stop the spread of breast cancer cells, but also can differentiate breast cancer stem cells into normal breast somatic stem cells. These can replace damaged breast tissue. Nevertheless, the complexity of realizing this therapy approach needs further research.

  6. Over surgery in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    MacNeill, Fiona; Karakatsanis, Andreas

    2017-02-01

    Breast surgery remains the original and most effective 'targeted' therapy: excision of early cancer is curative and for more advanced disease surgery improves local disease control. However in well intentioned pursuit of cure and local disease control, some cancers are over-treated resulting in major physical and emotional morbidity. Less breast surgery is safe, as evidenced by steady reductions in mortality and local recurrence; earlier diagnosis and widespread use of systemic therapies and radiotherapy have allowed more conservative surgery. As tumour biology dictates cancer outcomes not surgery extent, surgery can safely be 'minimum required' rather than 'more is better' with the focus on removal of disease rather than healthy tissue. Surgeons can reduce the burden of surgery further but it is important that less surgery is not over-compensated by more radical or unnecessary systemic therapies and/or radiotherapy with their own toxicities and morbidity. We all need to be alert to the potential drivers of over treatment and over surgery such as failure to work within a multidisciplinary team, failure to design a multimodality treatment plan at diagnosis or overuse of novel assessment technologies of uncertain clinical utility. Pursuit of wide margins and the removal of the contra-lateral healthy breast for marginal risk-reduction gains are also to be discouraged as is routine local/regional surgery in stage 4 disease. The surgeon has a pivotal role in minimizing breast surgery to what is required to achieve the best oncological, functional and aesthetic outcomes.

  7. The Role of Oncoplastic Breast Surgery in Breast Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Emiroğlu, Mustafa; Sert, İsmail; İnal, Abdullah

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to discuss indications, advantages, disadvantages, oncologic and aesthetic results of Oncoplastic Surgery (OBS). Pubmed and Medline database were searched for articles published between 1998 and 2014 for keywords: oncoplastic breast surgery, therapeutic mammoplasty, oncoplastic breast reduction, synchrenous reconstructions. Role of OBS in breast cancer surgery, its aspects to be considered, its value and results have been interpreted. This technique has advantages by providing more extensive tumourectomy, yielding better aesthetic results compared with breast conserving surgery, allowing oncoplastic reduction in breast cancer patients with macromastia, with higher patient satisfaction and quality of life and by being inexpensive due to single session practice. As for its disadvantages are: re-excision is more difficult, risk for mastectomy is higher, it is depent on the Surgeron’s experience, it has a risk for delay in adjuvant therapies and its requirement for additional imaging studies during management. Main indications are patients with small tumour/breast volume, macromastia, multifocality, procedures which can disrupt breast cosmesis such as surgeries for upper inner breas tquadrient tumours. Contraindications are positive margin problems after wide excision, diffuse malign microcalsifications, inflammatory breast cancer, history of radiotherapy and patients’ preferences. Despite low evidence level, Oncoplastic Breast Surgery seems to be both reliable and acceptable in terms of oncologic and aesthetic aspects. Oncoplastic Breast Surgery increase the application rate of breast conserving surgery by obviating practical limitations and improve the results of breast conserving surgery. Correct patient and technique choice in OBS is vital for optimization of post surgical

  8. Cyclooxygenase-2 regulates TGFβ-induced cancer stemness in triple-negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Jun; Hachim, Mahmood Y.; Hachim, Ibrahim Y.; Dai, Meiou; Lo, Chieh; Raffa, Fatmah Al; Ali, Suhad; Lebrun, Jean Jacques

    2017-01-01

    Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC), an aggressive subtype of breast cancer, display poor prognosis and exhibit resistance to conventional therapies, partly due to an enrichment in breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs). Here, we investigated the role of the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), a downstream target of TGFβ, in regulating BCSCs in TNBC. Bioinformatics analysis revealed that COX-2 is highly expressed in TNBC and that its expression correlated with poor survival outcome in basal subtype of breast cancer. We also found TGFβ-mediated COX-2 expression to be Smad3-dependent and to be required for BCSC self-renewal and expansion in TNBCs. Knocking down COX-2 expression strikingly blocked TGFβ-induced tumorsphere formation and TGFβ-induced enrichment of the two stem-like cell populations, CD24lowCD44high and ALDH+ BCSCs. Blocking COX-2 activity, using a pharmacological inhibitor also prevented TGFβ-induced BCSC self-renewal. Moreover, we found COX-2 to be required for TGFβ-induced expression of mesenchymal and basal breast cancer markers. In particular, we found that TGFβ-induced expression of fibronectin plays a central role in TGFβ-mediated breast cancer stemness. Together, our results describe a novel role for COX-2 in mediating the TGFβ effects on BCSC properties and imply that targeting the COX-2 pathway may prove useful for the treatment of TNBC by eliminating BCSCs. PMID:28054666

  9. Prognostic significance of tumour stroma ratio in inflammatory breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Downey, Candice L; Thygesen, Helene H; Sharma, Nisha; Shaaban, Abeer M

    2015-01-01

    Tumour stroma ratio (TSR) is emerging as an important prognostic indicator in cancer. We have previously shown TSR to be prognostic in oestrogen receptor positive breast cancer. Its role in inflammatory breast cancer, a rare but aggressive form of breast cancer, has not been identified. Here we aimed to determine the prognostic significance of TSR in a cohort of patients with inflammatory breast carcinoma. TSR was measured by point counting virtual H&E stained tissue sections in 45 inflammatory breast cancer cases. The whole tumour area was sampled. Optimum cut-offs to distinguish high and low TSR was determined by log-rank test. The relationship of TSR to overall survival and disease-free survival (DFS) was analysed alongside multivariate analysis. The optimal cut-offs between high and low TSR were determined to be 31% for OS and 46% for DFS. There was no significant difference in OS (p = 0.53) nor DFS (p = 0.66) between high and low TSR groups. Multivariate analysis did not demonstrate any new trends, within the limits of a small data sample. A significant correlation was found between pathological response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy and survival (p = 0.008). There is no evidence that TSR has prognostic significance in inflammatory breast cancer. When compared with published data in non-inflammatory breast carcinoma, this supports the view that differences in stromal biology exist between tumour types and highlights the importance of considering this when interpreting the prognostic value of TSR. However, these findings must be interpreted in the light of the small sample size.

  10. Selected National Cancer Institute Breast Cancer Research Topics | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sciences are jointly funding three Breast Cancer and Environment Research Centers (BCERCs) to conduct interdisciplinary research on the effects of early environmental exposures on breast development and breast cancer risk. The Breast Cancer Surveillance ...

  11. tRNAs as Biomarkers and Regulators for Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-08-01

    transduction pathways. These results demonstrate that studies of tRNA and breast cancer biology will be useful in understanding breast cancer type and progression and may lead to new drug targets for breast cancer treatment.

  12. What Are the Risk Factors for Breast Cancer in Men?

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Prevention What Are the Risk Factors for Breast Cancer in Men? A risk factor is anything that ... old when they are diagnosed. Family history of breast cancer Breast cancer risk is increased if other members ...

  13. HER2-Positive Breast Cancer: What Is It?

    MedlinePlus

    ... it? A friend of mine has HER2-positive breast cancer. Can you tell me what this means? Answers from Timothy J. Moynihan, M.D. HER2-positive breast cancer is a breast cancer that tests positive for ...

  14. NIH study confirms risk factors for male breast cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Pooled data from studies of about 2,400 men with breast cancer and 52,000 men without breast cancer confirmed that risk factors for male breast cancer include obesity, a rare genetic condition called Klinefelter syndrome, and gynecomastia.

  15. Molecular Pathways Associated with Aggressiveness of Papillary Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Benvenga, Salvatore; Koch, Christian A

    2014-01-01

    The most common thyroid malignancy is papillary thyroid cancer (PTC). Mortality rates from PTC mainly depend on its aggressiveness. Geno- and phenotyping of aggressive PTC has advanced our understanding of treatment failures and of potential future therapies. Unraveling molecular signaling pathways of PTC including its aggressive forms will hopefully pave the road to reduce mortality but also morbidity from this cancer. The mitogen-activated protein kinase and the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase signaling pathway as well as the family of RAS oncogenes and BRAF as a member of the RAF protein family and the aberrant expression of microRNAs miR-221, miR-222, and miR-146b all play major roles in tumor initiation and progression of aggressive PTC. Small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors targeting BRAF-mediated events, vascular endothelial growth factor receptors, RET/PTC rearrangements, and other molecular targets, show promising results to improve treatment of radioiodine resistant, recurrent, and aggressive PTC. PMID:24955023

  16. Postmenopausal hormone therapy and breast cancer: a clinician's message for patients.

    PubMed

    Speroff, Leon

    2004-08-01

    The Women's Health Initiative agrees with some but not all case-control and cohort studies that current use of postmenopausal estrogen-progestin therapy is associated with a small increase in the risk of breast cancer. It is not known whether this is because of new tumor growth or an effect of hormonal therapy on preexisting tumors. Many studies indicate that women who develop breast cancer while using postmenopausal hormone therapy have a reduced risk of dying from breast cancer; this is consistent with an effect on preexisting tumors so that tumors appear at a less virulent and aggressive stage.

  17. Breast cancer in Singapore: some perspectives.

    PubMed

    Jara-Lazaro, Ana Richelia; Thilagaratnam, Shyamala; Tan, Puay Hoon

    2010-01-01

    Breast cancer is the commonest malignancy among Singapore women, accounting for 29.7% of all female cancers, with an age-standardized rate of 54.9 per 100,000 per year. It has been the most frequent cancer in Singapore women for the last 30 years, with the highest rates previously reported in those aged between 45 and 49 years, but with a more recent observation of a change in peak age group to women in their late 50s. About 1,100 new cases are diagnosed annually and approximately 270 women die in Singapore each year from breast cancer. In the multiethnic population of Singapore, it has been noted that rising breast cancer incidence is consistent across all three ethnic groups (Chinese, Malays, and Indians). Singapore has among the highest breast cancer incidence in Asia. Possible explanations include rapid urbanization, improvement in socio-economic status, and adoption of a western lifestyle. Our experience with the Singapore breast screening pilot project (1994-1997) and the national breast-screening program (BreastScreen Singapore) has led to increased understanding of this disease in the country. Data from the pilot project showed that breast screening is just as effective in a predominantly Asian population as in the west. Early breast cancer accounted for most breast cancers detected, with pre-invasive ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) comprising 26% of all screen-detected cancers in the pilot study. In the currently on-going BreastScreen Singapore, DCIS forms >30% of all breast cancers among pre-menopausal women, a relatively high proportion probably accounted for partially by the greater participation of women aged between 40 and 49 years. Despite the ready availability of subsidized mammographic screening, there are still women in Singapore who present with locally advanced breast cancer. Clinical management of an increasing number of women with breast cancer embraces a multidisciplinary team-based approach, with regular discussions of therapeutic

  18. CDK4 regulates cancer stemness and is a novel therapeutic target for triple-negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Meiou; Zhang, Chenjing; Ali, Ayad; Hong, Xinyuan; Tian, Jun; Lo, Chieh; Fils-Aimé, Nadège; Burgos, Sergio A.; Ali, Suhad; Lebrun, Jean-Jacques

    2016-01-01

    Triple negative breast cancers exhibit very aggressive features and poor patient outcomes. These tumors are enriched in cancer stem cells and exhibit resistance to most treatments and chemotherapy. In this study, we found the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK4) to act as a cancer stem cell regulator and novel prognostic marker in triple negative breast cancers. We found CDK4 to be highly expressed in these tumors and its expression to correlate with poor overall and relapse free survival outcomes, high tumor grade and poor prognostic features of triple negative breast cancer patients. Moreover, we found that blocking CDK4 expression or kinase activity, using a pharmacological inhibitor prevented breast cancer stem cell self-renewal. Interestingly, suppression of CDK4 expression or kinase activity reversed the basal-B TNBC mesenchymal phenotype to an epithelial- and luminal-like phenotype which correlates with better clinical prognosis. Finally, blocking CDK4 activity efficiently eliminated both normal and chemotherapy-resistant cancer cells in triple negative breast cancers, highlighting CDK4 as a promising novel therapeutic target for these aggressive breast tumors. PMID:27759034

  19. Electric power, melatonin, and breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, R.G.

    1987-08-01

    In this paper, the epidemiology of breast cancer will be discussed, followed by a brief description of the effect of electric fields on melatonin and the relation of melatonin to mammary cancer in rats. Finally, there will be a consideration of factors such as alcohol that affect melatonin and their relation to breast cancer risk. 55 refs.

  20. Carboplatin, Gemcitabine Hydrochloride, and Mifepristone in Treating Patients With Advanced Breast Cancer or Recurrent or Persistent Ovarian Epithelial, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-28

    Male Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  1. Educational Counseling in Improving Communication and Quality of Life in Spouses and Breast Cancer Patients

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-29

    Anxiety Disorder; Depression; Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Psychosocial Effects of Cancer and Its Treatment; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  2. Diet and risk of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Diet may play a role in both promoting and inhibiting human breast cancer development. In this review, nutritional risk factors such as consumption of dietary fat, meat, fiber, and alcohol, and intake of phytoestrogen, vitamin D, iron, and folate associated with breast cancer are reviewed. These nutritional factors have a variety of associations with breast cancer risk. Type of fat consumed has different effects on risk of breast cancer: consumption of meat is associated with heterocyclic amine (HCA) exposure; different types of plant fiber have various effects on breast cancer risk; alcohol consumption may increase the risk of breast cancer by producing acetaldehyde and reactive oxygen species (ROS); intake of phytoestrogen may reduce risk of breast cancer through genomic and non-genomic action; vitamin D can reduce the risk of breast cancer by inhibiting the process of cancer invasion and metastasis; intake of dietary iron may lead to oxidative stress, DNA damage, and lipid peroxidation; and lower intake of folate may be linked to a higher risk of breast cancer. PMID:27095934

  3. Typhoid Vaccine in Testing Response to Immune Stress in Patients With Stage I-IIIA Breast Cancer Who Received Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-29

    Cognitive Side Effects of Cancer Therapy; Depression; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer

  4. MicroRNA expression profiling identifies decreased expression of miR-205 in inflammatory breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Huo, Lei; Wang, Yan; Gong, Yun; Krishnamurthy, Savitri; Wang, Jing; Diao, Lixia; Liu, Chang-Gong; Liu, Xiuping; Lin, Feng; Symmans, William F; Wei, Wei; Zhang, Xinna; Sun, Li; Alvarez, Ricardo H; Ueno, Naoto T; Fouad, Tamer M; Harano, Kenichi; Debeb, Bisrat G; Wu, Yun; Reuben, James; Cristofanilli, Massimo; Zuo, Zhuang

    2016-04-01

    Inflammatory breast cancer is the most aggressive form of breast cancer. Identifying new biomarkers to be used as therapeutic targets is in urgent need. Messenger RNA expression profiling studies have indicated that inflammatory breast cancer is a transcriptionally heterogeneous disease, and specific molecular targets for inflammatory breast cancer have not been well established. We performed microRNA expression profiling in inflammatory breast cancer in comparison with locally advanced noninflammatory breast cancer in this study. Although many microRNAs were differentially expressed between normal breast tissue and tumor tissue, most of them did not show differential expression between inflammatory and noninflammatory tumor samples. However, by microarray analysis, quantitative reverse transcription PCR, and in situ hybridization, we showed that microRNA-205 expression was decreased not only in tumor compared with normal breast tissue, but also in inflammatory breast cancer compared with noninflammatory breast cancer. Lower expression of microRNA-205 correlated with worse distant metastasis-free survival and overall survival in our cohort. A small-scale immunohistochemistry analysis showed coexistence of decreased microRNA-205 expression and decreased E-cadherin expression in some ductal tumors. MicroRNA-205 may serve as a therapeutic target in advanced breast cancer including inflammatory breast cancer.

  5. Vaccine Therapy in Preventing Cancer Recurrence in Patients With Non-Metastatic, Node Positive, HER2 Negative Breast Cancer That is in Remission

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-28

    HER2/Neu Negative; No Evidence of Disease; One or More Positive Axillary Nodes; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  6. Breast cancer and autism.

    PubMed

    Radcliff, Lisa

    2013-03-01

    Case Study Amy is a 44-year-old woman with severe autism. She lives with her sister Susan, who is her caregiver and guardian. Amy is ambulatory and able to dress and feed herself. She is a healthy individual with no other significant comorbidities. She walks daily and enjoys her sister's company. Amy's life expectancy is greater than 10 years. However, she is difficult to care for medically, as she will not allow a physical examination and strikes out when strangers try to touch her. She is nonverbal and unable to participate in decision-making. INITIAL DIAGNOSIS Amy has a history of breast cancer diagnosed 2 years ago, originally presenting as a stage I lesion (T2N0) that was palpated by her caregiver while bathing. She underwent right simple mastectomy with sentinel lymph node resection. Susan recalls that the mastectomy was a very challenging ordeal, as Amy kept pulling out IV lines, drains, and dressings. Susan felt that Amy withdrew from her after the procedure as she most likely associated Susan with the cause of the pain, making her role as caregiver more difficult. Pathology confirmed an invasive ductal carcinoma, moderately differentiated, 2.4 cm, estrogen/progesterone receptor negative, HER2/neu negative, with negative surgical margins. Two right axillary sentinel lymph nodes were negative for disease. The standard of care for a patient with these tumor features is surgery plus adjuvant chemotherapy (National Comprehensive Cancer Network [NCCN], 2012). According to the Adjuvant Online! database (2012), Amy's risk for relapse was approximately 40% without adjuvant treatment; her risk for mortality was approximately 29%. After meeting with a medical oncologist, Amy did not receive adjuvant chemotherapy. According to Susan, she was not offered the choice, and the decision was not explained to them. She was simply told that it was not necessary. Aside from pathology, previous records were unavailable for review. Medical assessment of Amy's level of autism

  7. Early Life and Risk of Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-08-01

    birth weight and of growth during childhood and adolescence on risk of breast cancer. We used a unique material of school charts with information on...childhood and adolescence influence breast cancer risk. 14. SUBJECT TERMS 15. NUMBER OF PAGES Epidemiology, Etiology, Risk Factors, Weight, Growth 132 16...childhood and adolescence on risk of breast cancer in a cohort of more than 150,000 girls on whom information on birth weight and between 6 and 8

  8. The breast cancer epidemic: 10 facts.

    PubMed

    Schneider, A Patrick; Zainer, Christine M; Kubat, Christopher Kevin; Mullen, Nancy K; Windisch, Amberly K

    2014-08-01

    Breast cancer, affecting one in eight American women, is a modern epidemic. The increasing frequency of breast cancer is widely recognized. However, the wealth of compelling epidemiological data on its prevention is generally not available, and as a consequence, is largely unknown to the public. The purpose of this report is to review the epidemiological evidence of preventable causes of breast cancer. [Table: see text].

  9. Targeting of Breast Cancer with Triptolide Nanoparticles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-08-01

    AD Award Number: W81XWH-04-1-0766 TITLE: Targeting of Breast Cancer with Triptolide Nanoparticles PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Shanmin Yang, M.D...NUMBER Targeting of Breast Cancer with Triptolide Nanoparticles 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-04-1-0766 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT...breast cancer is not well studied. In past year, we have successfully finished the following works: 1) demonstrated the effectiveness of TPL in inhibition

  10. Programmed Cell Death in Breast Cancer.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-10-01

    TITLE: Programmed Cell Death in Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Clark W. Distelhorst, M.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Case Western Reserve...Programmed Cell Death in Breast Cancer DAMD17-94-J-4451 6. AUTHOR(S) Clark W. Distelhorst, M.D. 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8...cell death , apoptosis, in breast cancer cells has been developed. This model is based on induction of apoptosis by the selective endoplasmic reticulum

  11. Phytoestrogens oestrogen synthesis and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Rice, Suman; Whitehead, Saffron A

    2008-02-01

    Phytoestrogens are used as 'natural' alternatives to HRT and, although epidemiological evidence implies that diets rich in phytoestrogens reduce the incidence of breast cancer, their weak oestrogenicity is also known to stimulate growth in experimental models of breast cancer. This review addresses the question as to how phytoestrogens may protect against breast cancer through their ability to bind preferentially to oestrogen receptor beta, inhibit enzymes that convert circulating steroid precursors into oestradiol and inhibit cell signalling pathways of growth factors.

  12. Heparanase Mechanisms in Brain - Metastatic Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-01

    by 74%. These findings introduce a new concept that links microRNA mechanisms with brain metastatic breast cancer by downregulating HPSE, providing...the groundwork for heparanase-based therapeutics in patients with brain metastases, BMBC in particular. MicroRNA , Breast Cancer , Brain...by 74% (Figs. 4B-D). These findings introduce new concepts that links microRNA mechanisms with brain metastatic breast cancer by downregulating

  13. The lipid peroxidation in breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Kedzierska, Magdalena; Olas, Beata; Wachowicz, Barbara; Jeziorski, Arkadiusz; Piekarski, Janusz

    2010-06-01

    The aim of our study was to estimate oxidative stress (by using different biomarkers of lipid peroxidation--isoprostanes and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS)) in patients with invasive breast cancer, patients with benign breast diseases and in a control group. We observed a statistically increased level of TBARS in plasma and isoprostanes in urine of patients with invasive breast cancer in comparison with a control group. The concentration of tested biomarkers in plasma or urine from patients with invasive breast cancer was also higher than in patients with benign breast diseases. Moreover, the levels of tested markers in patients with benign breast diseases and in a control group did not differ. Considering the data presented in this study, we suggest that free radicals induce peroxidation of unsaturated fatty acid in patients with breast cancer.

  14. Using hair to screen for breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Veronica; Kearsley, John; Irving, Tom; Amemiya, Yoshiyuki; Cookson, David

    1999-03-01

    We have studied hair using fibre X-ray diffraction studies with synchrotron radiation and find that hair from breast-cancer patients has a different intermolecular structure to hair from healthy subjects. These changes are seen in all samples of scalp and pubic hair taken from women diagnosed with breast cancer. All the hair samples from women who tested positive for a mutation of the BRCA1 gene, which is associated with a higher risk of breast cancer, also show these changes. Because our results are so consistent, we propose that such hair analyses may be used as a simple, non-invasive screening method for breast cancer.

  15. Radiation Therapy in Treating Post-Menopausal Women With Early Stage Breast Cancer Undergoing Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-09-02

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Estrogen Receptor Negative; Estrogen Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Negative; Invasive Cribriform Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Ductal Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Lobular Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Mucinous Breast Carcinoma; Papillary Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor Positive; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Tubular Breast Carcinoma

  16. Endocrine therapy of breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Cavalli, F.

    1986-01-01

    This book results from a meeting of the ESO (European School of Oncology) Task Force on endocrine aspects of breast cancer. The contributions stem from some of the most outstanding researchers in Europe and highlight mainly methodological issues and new avenues for future research. The chapters on basic research deal primarily with experimental strategies for studying the relationship between steroid hormones, growth factors, and oncongenes. The clinically oriented chapters treat the methodology of clinical trials. Provocative questions are raised, such as: What are the pitfalls in endocrine trials. What does statistical proof mean. How can we consider a quality of life endpoint in the adjuvant setting. Two special reports deal with the controversial issues of chemoprevention in high-risk normal women and the optimization of the hormonal contribution to the adjuvant therapy of breast cancer. Topics considered included oncogenic transformations, radiotherapy, steroid hormones, cell proliferation, tamoxifen, and preventive medicine.

  17. Breast cancer phenotypes regulated by tissue factor-factor VII pathway: Possible therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Koizume, Shiro; Miyagi, Yohei

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is a leading cause of cancer death in women, worldwide. Fortunately, breast cancer is relatively chemosensitive, with recent advances leading to the development of effective therapeutic strategies, significantly increasing disease cure rate. However, disease recurrence and treatment of cases lacking therapeutic molecular targets, such as epidermal growth factor receptor 2 and hormone receptors, referred to as triple-negative breast cancers, still pose major hurdles in the treatment of breast cancer. Thus, novel therapeutic approaches to treat aggressive breast cancers are essential. Blood coagulation factor VII (fVII) is produced in the liver and secreted into the blood stream. Tissue factor (TF), the cellular receptor for fVII, is an integral membrane protein that plays key roles in the extrinsic coagulation cascade. TF is overexpressed in breast cancer tissues. The TF-fVII complex may be formed in the absence of injury, because fVII potentially exists in the tissue fluid within cancer tissues. The active form of this complex (TF-fVIIa) may stimulate the expression of numerous malignant phenotypes in breast cancer cells. Thus, the TF-fVII pathway is a potentially attractive target for breast cancer treatment. To date, a number of studies investigating the mechanisms by which TF-fVII signaling contributes to breast cancer progression, have been conducted. In this review, we summarize the mechanisms controlling TF and fVII synthesis and regulation in breast cancer cells. Our current understanding of the TF-fVII pathway as a mediator of breast cancer progression will be also described. Finally, we will discuss how this knowledge can be applied to the design of future therapeutic strategies. PMID:25493229

  18. Role of MicroRNA in Aggressive Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-01

    SUBTITLE Role of microRNA in aggressive prostate cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-11-1-0491 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER... cancer lesion, we applied ISH on formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) tissue . We first confirmed the specificity of miR363 probe using benign...with prostate cancer development. REPORTABLE OUTCOMES Lo, U., Pong, R.C., Tseng, S.F., Hsieh, J.T. (2013) MicroRNA -363 regulated by a novel

  19. MicroRNA in Prostate Cancer Racial Disparities and Aggressiveness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    Detroit, MI. Little is known about the role of microRNAs ( miRNAs ) and their biogenesis in prostate cancer (PCa), and less is understood about the possible...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0477 TITLE: MicroRNA in Prostate Cancer Racial Disparities and Aggressiveness PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Cathryn...ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE 2014 2. REPORT TYPE Annual 3. DATES COVERED 30 Sept 2013-29 Sept 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE MicroRNA in Prostate Cancer Racial

  20. California Cancer Registry Enhancement for Breast Cancer Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-10-01

    programs to correlate screening status with subsequent diagnostic status. In collaboration with the California Breast and Cervical Cancer Control...screened for breast and cervical cancer with a CCR file of all female cancer cases diagnosed between 1988 and 1997 that were available to the CCR as of...BC, April 22, 1998. 5. Schulman J, Richardson L, Sever L, Wolters C. Follow-Up and Treatment Issues in the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early

  1. Sub-100 nm Gold Nanomatryoshkas Improve Photo-thermal Therapy Efficacy in Large and Highly Aggressive Triple Negative Breast Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Bishnoi, Sandra; Urban, Alexander; Charron, Heather; Mitchell, Tamika; Shea, Martin; Nanda, Sarmistha; Schiff, Rachel; Halas, Naomi; Joshi, Amit

    2014-01-01

    There is an unmet need for efficient near-infrared photothermal transducers for the treatment of highly aggressive cancers and large tumors where the penetration of light can be substantially reduced, and the intra-tumoral nanoparticle transport is restricted due to the presence of hypoxic or nectrotic regions. We report the performance advantages obtained by sub 100 nm gold nanomatryushkas, comprising of concentric gold-silica-gold layers compared to conventional ~150 nm silica core gold nanoshells for photothermal therapy of triple negative breast cancer. We demonstrate that a 33% reduction in silica-core-gold-shell nanoparticle size, while retaining near-infrared plasmon resonance, and keeping the nanoparticle surface charge constant, results in a four to five fold tumor accumulation of nanoparticles following equal dose of injected gold for both sizes. The survival time of mice bearing large (>1000 mm3) and highly aggressive triple negative breast tumors is doubled for the nanomatryushka treatment group under identical photo-thermal therapy conditions. The higher absorption cross-section of a nanomatryoshka results in a higher efficiency of photonic to thermal energy conversion and coupled with 4-5X accumulation within large tumors results in superior therapy efficacy. PMID:25051221

  2. Sub-100nm gold nanomatryoshkas improve photo-thermal therapy efficacy in large and highly aggressive triple negative breast tumors.

    PubMed

    Ayala-Orozco, Ciceron; Urban, Cordula; Bishnoi, Sandra; Urban, Alexander; Charron, Heather; Mitchell, Tamika; Shea, Martin; Nanda, Sarmistha; Schiff, Rachel; Halas, Naomi; Joshi, Amit

    2014-10-10

    There is an unmet need for efficient near-infrared photothermal transducers for the treatment of highly aggressive cancers and large tumors where the penetration of light can be substantially reduced, and the intra-tumoral nanoparticle transport is restricted due to the presence of hypoxic or necrotic regions. We report the performance advantages obtained by sub 100nm gold nanomatryushkas, comprising concentric gold-silica-gold layers compared to conventional ~150nm silica core gold nanoshells for photothermal therapy of triple negative breast cancer. We demonstrate that a 33% reduction in silica-core-gold-shell nanoparticle size, while retaining near-infrared plasmon resonance, and keeping the nanoparticle surface charge constant, results in a four to five fold tumor accumulation of nanoparticles following equal dose of injected gold for both sizes. The survival time of mice bearing large (>1000mm(3)) and highly aggressive triple negative breast tumors is doubled for the nanomatryushka treatment group under identical photo-thermal therapy conditions. The higher absorption cross-section of a nanomatryoshka results in a higher efficiency of photonic to thermal energy conversion and coupled with 4-5× accumulation within large tumors results in superior therapy efficacy.

  3. KiSS-1 expression in human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Martin, Tracey A; Watkins, Gareth; Jiang, Wen G

    2005-01-01

    The KiSS-1 gene encodes a 145 amino acid residue peptide that is further processed to a final peptide, metastin, a ligand to a G-coupled orphan receptor (OT7T175/AXOR12). KiSS-1 has been identified as a putative human metastasis suppressor gene in melanomas and in breast cancer cell lines. This study aimed to determine the expression and distribution of KiSS-1 and its receptor in human breast cancer tissues and to identify a possible link between expression levels and patient prognosis. Frozen sections from breast cancer primary tumours (matched tumour 124 and background 33) were immuno-stained with KiSS-1 antibody. RNA was reverse transcribed and analyzed by Q-PCR (standardized using beta-actin, and normalized with cytokeratin-19 levels). Levels of expression of KiSS-1 were higher in tumour compared to background tissues (3,124+/-1,262 vs 2,397+/-1,181) and significantly increased in node positive tumours compared to node negative (3,637+/-1,719 vs 2,653+/-1,994, P = 0.02). KiSS-1 expression was also increased with increasing grade and TNM status. There were no such trends with the KiSS-1 receptor. Expression of KiSS-1 was higher in patients who had died from breast cancer than those who had remained healthy (4,631+/-3,024 vs 2,280+/-1,403) whereas expression of the receptor was reduced (480+/-162 vs 195+/-134). Immunohistochemical staining showed increased expression of KiSS-1 in tumour sections. Insertion of the KiSS-1 gene into the human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231, resulted in cells that were significantly more motile and invasive in behaviour, with reduced adhesion to matrix, using respective assays. In conclusion, KiSS-1 expression is increased in human breast cancer, particularly in patients with aggressive tumours and with mortality. Over-expression of KiSS-1 in breast cancer cells result in more aggressive phenotype. Together, it suggests that KiSS-1 plays a role beyond the initial metastasis repressor in this cancer type.

  4. Adolescent meat intake and breast cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Farvid, Maryam S; Cho, Eunyoung; Chen, Wendy Y; Eliassen, A. Heather; Willett, Walter C

    2015-01-01

    The breast is particularly vulnerable to carcinogenic influences during adolescence due to rapid proliferation of mammary cells and lack of terminal differentiation. We investigated consumption of adolescent red meat and other protein sources in relation to breast cancer risk in the Nurses' Health Study II cohort. We followed prospectively 44,231 women aged 33-52 years who, in 1998, completed a detailed questionnaire about diet during adolescence. Relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) were estimated using Cox proportional hazard regression. We documented 1132 breast cancer cases during 13-year follow-up. In multivariable Cox regression models with major breast cancer risk factors adjustment, greater consumption of adolescent total red meat was significantly associated with higher premenopausal breast cancer risk (highest vs lowest quintiles, RR, 1.42; 95%CI, 1.05-1.94; Ptrend=0.007), but not postmenopausal breast cancer. Adolescent poultry intake was associated with lower risk of breast cancer overall (RR, 0.75; 95%CI, 0.59-0.96; for each serving/day). Adolescent intakes of iron, heme iron, fish, eggs, legumes and nuts were not associated with breast cancer. Replacement of one serving/day of total red meat with one serving of combination of poultry, fish, legumes, and nuts was associated with a 16% lower risk of breast cancer overall (RR, 0.84; 95%CI, 0.74-0.96) and a 24% lower risk of premenopausal breast cancer (RR, 0.76; 95%CI, 0.64-0.92). Higher consumption of red meat during adolescence was associated with premenopausal breast cancer. Substituting other dietary protein sources for red meat in adolescent diet may decrease premenopausal breast cancer risk. PMID:25220168

  5. Endocrine Therapy of Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-01

    or TAM should be given as first line endocrine therapy . Unfortunately, response rates are lower, and response durations are shorter, on crossover than...when these agents are given as first line therapies , e.g., ~40% of tumors show cross resistance to TAM or an aromatase inhibitor on crossover. Only...effective treatment for hormone receptor positive invasive breast cancer. Such therapy includes antiestrogens (tamoxifen, fulvestrant ) and aromatase

  6. The Breast Cancer DNA Interactome

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    common to all samples. Figure 2. Intrachromosomal Interactions of IGFBP3 A) Spider plot showing the significant long-range interactions of...investigate the molecular basis of disrupted long-range interactions among breast cancer gene loci. (Months 12-24) We have no data to report from this Task...which is scheduled to be undertaken this year. Task 3: Use the high-resolution molecular assay Associated Chromatin Trap (ACT) to

  7. Breast Cancer Screening and Prevention.

    PubMed

    Nattinger, Ann B; Mitchell, Julie L

    2016-06-07

    This issue provides a clinical overview of breast cancer screening and prevention, focusing on risk assessment, screening, prevention, and practice improvement. The content of In the Clinic is drawn from the clinical information and education resources of the American College of Physicians (ACP), including MKSAP (Medical Knowledge and Self-Assessment Program). Annals of Internal Medicine editors develop In the Clinic in collaboration with the ACP's Medical Education and Publishing divisions and with the assistance of additional science writers and physician writers.

  8. Metastatic progression and gene expression between breast cancer cell lines from African American and Caucasian women

    PubMed Central

    Yancy, Haile F; Mason, Jacquline A; Peters, Sharla; Thompson, Charles E; Littleton, George K; Jett, Marti; Day, Agnes A

    2007-01-01

    African American (AA) women have a lower overall incidence of breast cancer than do Caucasian (CAU) women, but a higher overall mortality. Little is known as to why the incidence of breast cancer is lower yet mortality is higher in AA women. Many studies speculate that this is only a socio-economical problem. This investigation suggests the possibility that molecular mechanisms contribute to the increased mortality of AA women with breast cancer. This study investigates the expression of 14 genes which have been shown to play a role in cancer metastasis. Cell lines derived from AA and CAU patients were analyzed to demonstrate alterations in the transcription of genes known to be involved in cancer and the metastatic process. Total RNA was isolated from cell lines and analyzed by RT-PCR analysis. Differential expression of the 14 targeted genes between a spectrum model (6 breast cancer cell lines and 2 non-cancer breast cell lines) and a metastasis model (12 metastatic breast cancer cell lines) were demonstrated. Additionally, an in vitro comparison of the expression established differences in 5 of the 14 biomarker genes between African American and Caucasian breast cell lines. Results from this study indicates that altered expression of the genes Atp1b1, CARD 10, KLF4, Spint2, and Acly may play a role in the aggressive phenotype seen in breast cancer in African American women. PMID:17472751

  9. A Comprehensive Analysis of CXCL12 Isoforms in Breast Cancer(1,2.)

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shuang; Chang, S Laura; Linderman, Jennifer J; Feng, Felix Y; Luker, Gary D

    2014-05-13

    CXCL12-CXCR4-CXCR7 signaling promotes tumor growth and metastasis in breast cancer. Alternative splicing of CXCL12 produces isoforms with distinct structural and biochemical properties, but little is known about isoform-specific differences in breast cancer subtypes and patient outcomes. We investigated global expression profiles of the six CXCL12 isoforms, CXCR4, and CXCR7 in The Cancer Genome Atlas breast cancer cohort using next-generation RNA sequencing in 948 breast cancer and benign samples and seven breast cancer cell lines. We compared expression levels with several clinical parameters, as well as metastasis, recurrence, and overall survival (OS). CXCL12-α, -β, and -γ are highly co-expressed, with low expression correlating with more aggressive subtypes, higher stage disease, and worse clinical outcomes. CXCL12-δ did not correlate with other isoforms but was prognostic for OS and showed the same trend for metastasis and recurrence-free survival. Effects of CXCL12-δ remained independently prognostic when taking into account expression of CXCL12,CXCR4, and CXCR7. These results were also reflected when comparing CXCL12-α, -β, and -γ in breast cancer cell lines. We summarized expression of all CXCL12 isoforms in an important chemokine signaling pathway in breast cancer in a large clinical cohort and common breast cancer cell lines, establishing differences among isoforms in multiple clinical, pathologic, and molecular subgroups. We identified for the first time the clinical importance of a previously unstudied isoform, CXCL12-δ.

  10. Breast Cancer 2012 - New Aspects.

    PubMed

    Kolberg, H-C; Lüftner, D; Lux, M P; Maass, N; Schütz, F; Fasching, P A; Fehm, T; Janni, W; Kümmel, S

    2012-07-01

    Treatment options as well as the characteristics for therapeutic decisions in patients with primary and advanced breast cancer are increasing in number and variety. New targeted therapies in combination with established chemotherapy schemes are broadening the spectrum, however potentially promising combinations do not always achieve a better result. New data from the field of pharmacogenomics point to prognostic and predictive factors that take not only the properties of the tumour but also inherited genetic properties of the patient into consideration. Current therapeutic decision-making is thus based on a combination of classical clinical and modern molecular biomarkers. Also health-economic aspects are more frequently being taken into consideration so that health-economic considerations may also play a part. This review is based on information from the recent annual congresses. The latest of these are the 34th San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium 2011 and the ASCO Annual Meeting 2012. Among their highlights are the clinically significant results from the CLEOPATRA, BOLERO-2, EMILIA and SWOG S0226 trials on the therapy for metastatic breast cancer as well as further state-of-the-art data on the adjuvant use of bisphosphonates within the framework of the ABCSG-12, ZO-FAST, NSABP-B34 and GAIN trials.

  11. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Epithelial and fibroblast cell coculture: Long-term growth human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) admixed in coculture with fibroblast from the same initial breast tissue grown as 3-dimenstional constructions in the presence of attachment beads in the NASA Bioreactor. A: A typical constrct about 2.0 mm in diameter without beads on the surface. The center of these constrcts is hollow, and beads are organized about the irner surface. Although the coculture provides smaller constructs than the monoculture, the metabolic of the organized cells is about the same. B, C, D: Closer views of cells showing that the shape of cells and cell-to-cell interactions apprear different in the coculture than in the monoculture constructs. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Robert Richmond, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

  12. Metabolic syndrome in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vargas-Aguilar, VM; Moreno-Eutimio, Mario Adanm; Acosta-Altamirano, Gustavo; Tovar-Rodriguez, JM

    2013-01-01

    Breast Cancer is a heterogeneous disease, progressive, currently, are classified according to in pattern of gene expression luminal A, luminal B, basal and HER-2neu + and Triple-negative, 75% to 80% have receptors positive hormonal and 15% to 20% are positive for hER-2neu and 10% to 20% are triple negative, with hormone receptor negative and HER2-neu and their diagnostic is made by exclusion, the Metabolic Syndrome is related to a higher incidence of these cancers where the insulin-leptin axis-adiponectin are implicated in carcinogenesis. PMID:25083463

  13. Intractable pain with breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Watson, C. P.; Evans, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    This study examines retrospectively the cause, clinical features, natural history and results of treatment of intractable pain associated with breast cancer in 210 patients. The three chief types of pain were that due to skeletal metastases or brachial plexus neuropathy and pain of psychogenic origin. Onset at the time of cancer diagnosis characterized the psychogenic pain, whereas pain from metastases first occurred after a median latency of 3.7 years. Treatment was custom-tailored to the specific patient and pain problem, with several factors taken into account. The onset of intractable pain due to metastatic disease indicated a short survival (median, 9 months). PMID:6277445

  14. 0927GCC: Entinostat and Anastrozole in Treating Postmenopausal Women With Triple-Negative Breast Cancer That Can Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-01

    Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  15. Carboplatin and Paclitaxel Albumin-Stabilized Nanoparticle Formulation Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Inflammatory Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-13

    Inflammatory Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor Negative; Progesterone Receptor Negative; HER2/Neu Negative

  16. Effect of Statins and Anticoagulants on Prostate Cancer Aggressiveness

    SciTech Connect

    Alizadeh, Moein; Sylvestre, Marie-Pierre; Zilli, Thomas; Van Nguyen, Thu; Guay, Jean-Pierre; Bahary, Jean-Paul; Taussky, Daniel

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: Statins and anticoagulants (ACs) have both been associated with a less-aggressive prostate cancer (PCa) and a better outcome after treatment of localized PCa. The results of these studies might have been confounded because patients might often take both medications. We examined their respective influence on PCa aggressiveness at initial diagnosis. Materials and Methods: We analyzed 381 patients treated with either external beam radiotherapy or brachytherapy for low-risk (n = 152), intermediate-risk (n = 142), or high-risk (n = 87) localized PCa. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to investigate an association between these drug classes and prostate cancer aggressiveness. We tested whether the concomitant use of statins and ACs had a different effect than that of either AC or statin use alone. Results: Of the 381 patients, 172 (45.1%) were taking statins and 141 (37.0%) ACs; 105 patients (27.6%) used both. On univariate analysis, the statin and AC users were associated with the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level (p = .017) and National Comprehensive Cancer Network risk group (p = .0022). On multivariate analysis, statin use was associated with a PSA level <10 ng/mL (odds ratio, 2.9; 95% confidence interval, 1.3-6.8; p = .012) and a PSA level >20 ng/mL (odds ratio, 0.29; 95% confidence interval, 0.08-0.83; p = .03). The use of ACs was associated with a PSA level >20 ng/mL (odds ratio, 0.13; 95% confidence interval, 0.02-0.59, p = .02). Conclusion: Both AC and statins have an effect on PCa aggressiveness, with statins having a more stringent relationship with the PSA level, highlighting the importance of considering statin use in studies of PCa aggressiveness.

  17. Intraoperative radiotherapy for breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Norman R.; Pigott, Katharine H.; Brew-Graves, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Intra-operative radiotherapy (IORT) as a treatment for breast cancer is a relatively new technique that is designed to be a replacement for whole breast external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) in selected women suitable for breast-conserving therapy. This article reviews twelve reasons for the use of the technique, with a particular emphasis on targeted intra-operative radiotherapy (TARGIT) which uses X-rays generated from a portable device within the operating theatre immediately after the breast tumour (and surrounding margin of healthy tissue) has been removed. The delivery of a single fraction of radiotherapy directly to the tumour bed at the time of surgery, with the capability of adding EBRT at a later date if required (risk-adaptive technique) is discussed in light of recent results from a large multinational randomised controlled trial comparing TARGIT with EBRT. The technique avoids irradiation of normal tissues such as skin, heart, lungs, ribs and spine, and has been shown to improve cosmetic outcome when compared with EBRT. Beneficial aspects to both institutional and societal economics are discussed, together with evidence demonstrating excellent patient satisfaction and quality of life. There is a discussion of the published evidence regarding the use of IORT twice in the same breast (for new primary cancers) and in patients who would never be considered for EBRT because of their special circumstances (such as the frail, the elderly, or those with collagen vascular disease). Finally, there is a discussion of the role of the TARGIT Academy in developing and sustaining high standards in the use of the technique. PMID:25083504

  18. The role of inflammation in inflammatory breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Fouad, Tamer M; Kogawa, Takahiro; Reuben, James M; Ueno, Naoto T

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is the most aggressive form of breast cancer. Despite extensive study, whether inflammation contributes to the tumorigenicity or aggressiveness of IBC remains largely unknown. In this chapter, we will review the potential role played by inflammation in IBC based on the results of in vitro, in vivo, and patient studies. Current evidence suggests that several major inflammatory signaling pathways are constitutively active in IBC and breast cancer. Among them, the NF-κB, COX-2, and JAK/STAT signaling systems seem to play a major role in the tumorigenesis of IBC. Inflammatory molecules such as interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), and gamma interferon have been shown to contribute to malignant transformation in preclinical studies of IBC, while transforming growth factor-β, interleukins 8 and 1β, as well as TNF-α appear to play a role in proliferation, survival, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, invasion, and metastasis. In this chapter, we also describe work thus far involving inhibitors of inflammation in the development of prevention and treatment strategies for IBC.

  19. Review of hormonal treatment of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Abdulkareem, I H; Zurmi, I B

    2012-01-01

    This critical review focuses on the role of steroid hormones and their receptors in the development and treatment of breast cancer, with special reference to estrogen receptors, as well as mechanisms of receptor-ligand interactions, response or resistance to hormonal therapy against breast cancer, in conjunction with other modalities like surgery and chemotherapy. Tamoxifen is used in hormonal treatment of breast cancer for up to five years, depending on the presentation. However, there have been recent developments in hormonal therapy of breast cancer in the last ten years, with the introduction of many different alternative therapies for this condition. A critical review of published articles in Pubmed/Medline, Athens, AJOL, NHS Evidence, Science Direct and Google, relating to hormonal treatment of breast cancer, was undertaken, in order to evaluate the mechanisms of estrogen receptor-ligand interactions, their involvement in the etio-pathogenesis of breast cancer, resistance of breast cancer cells to anti-hormonal agents, as well as ways of treating breast cancer using anti-hormone drugs like tamoxifen. Although tamoxifen is the established drug for hormonal treatment of breast cancer, cases of hormone resistance breast cancer have been described recently in the literature. This can happen from the beginning, or during treatment. Therefore, we aim to examine the causes of resistance to hormonal treatment with a view to understand the options of tackling this problem, and suggest other novel alternative hormonal therapies that can be tried, which may overtake tamoxifen in the future. We also seek to emphasize that hormonal therapy has a definite place in the treatment of breast cancer along with surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy, as the disease is often considered to be multi-systemic even from the beginning.

  20. Coping with a Breast Cancer Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Be patient. Coping with breast cancer requires time, acceptance, a fighting spirit and support. Many people also ... is to get rid of the cancer and offer the best possible chance of survival. But even ...

  1. Genetics and molecular biology of breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    King, M.C.; Lippman, M.

    1992-12-31

    This volume contains the abstracts of oral presentations and poster sessions presented at the Cold Springs Harbor Meeting on Cancer Cells, this meeting entitled Genetics and Molecular Biology of Breast Cancer.

  2. Palbociclib in Combination With Tamoxifen as First Line Therapy for Metastatic Hormone Receptor Positive Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-28

    Hormone Receptor Positive Malignant Neoplasm of Breast; Human Epidermal Growth Factor 2 Negative Carcinoma of Breast; Estrogen Receptor Positive Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor Positive Tumor; Metastatic Breast Cancer

  3. Etiology of breast cancer I. Genetic aspects

    PubMed Central

    Vakil, Damodar V.; Morgan, Robert W.

    1973-01-01

    The subject of breast cancer is reviewed with particular emphasis on the genetic aspect of its etiology. A number of studies using various approaches gave the same results: the familial form occurs earlier and there is a higher risk in female members of the breast-cancer families. An association between breast cancer and cancer of certain other sites among women is reported. Cytogenetic studies of “cancer families” revealed increased frequency of aneuploidy in some members. However, the role of chromosome abnormalities in carcinogenesis is still not clear. PMID:4577599

  4. Genome-wide association study identifies 25 known breast cancer susceptibility loci as risk factors for triple-negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Couch, Fergus J.

    2014-01-01

    Triple-negative (TN) breast cancer is an aggressive subtype of breast cancer associated with a unique set of epidemiologic and genetic risk factors. We conducted a two-stage genome-wide association study of TN breast cancer (stage 1: 1529 TN cases, 3399 controls; stage 2: 2148 cases, 1309 controls) to identify loci that influence TN breast cancer risk. Variants in the 19p13.1 and PTHLH loci showed genome-wide significant associations (P < 5 × 10− 8) in stage 1 and 2 combined. Results also suggested a substantial enrichment of significantly associated variants among the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) analyzed in stage 2. Variants from 25 of 74 known breast cancer susceptibility loci were also associated with risk of TN breast cancer (P < 0.05). Associations with TN breast cancer were confirmed for 10 loci (LGR6, MDM4, CASP8, 2q35, 2p24.1, TERT-rs10069690, ESR1, TOX3, 19p13.1, RALY), and we identified associations with TN breast cancer for 15 additional breast cancer loci (P < 0.05: PEX14, 2q24.1, 2q31.1, ADAM29, EBF1, TCF7L2, 11q13.1, 11q24.3, 12p13.1, PTHLH, NTN4, 12q24, BRCA2, RAD51L1-rs2588809, MKL1). Further, two SNPs independent of previously reported signals in ESR1 [rs12525163 odds ratio (OR) = 1.15, P = 4.9 × 10− 4] and 19p13.1 (rs1864112 OR = 0.84, P = 1.8 × 10− 9) were associated with TN breast cancer. A polygenic risk score (PRS) for TN breast cancer based on known breast cancer risk variants showed a 4-fold difference in risk between the highest and lowest PRS quintiles (OR = 4.03, 95% confidence interval 3.46–4.70, P = 4.8 × 10− 69). This translates to an absolute risk for TN breast cancer ranging from 0.8% to 3.4%, suggesting that genetic variation may be used for TN breast cancer risk prediction. PMID:24325915

  5. Early adulthood uprooted: transitoriness in young women with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Shaha, Maya; Bauer-Wu, Susan

    2009-01-01

    Young women with breast cancer face a more aggressive disease and lower survival rate compared with those who are older, thereby confronting the potential finitude of life or transitoriness at a time when they are establishing their careers, developing partnerships, and building families. Little is known about the perspectives of young women with breast cancer in how they consider issues of their own mortality. Patients with stage I to III breast cancer aged 39 years and younger who were diagnosed within the last year (N = 16) were included in this qualitative study, which was a secondary analysis of texts written during an expressive writing intervention. Thematic analysis was done by 2 researchers, who reached consensus in coding and theme identification. Nine of the 16 participants (56%) wrote about their mortality (transitoriness). Three themes (being remembered, landscape of emotions and perspectives, and omnipresence of life's finitude) and 10 subthemes were identified from the rich narrative texts. Despite early-stage diagnosis and the beginning phases of adulthood, young women with breast cancer contemplate their mortality and its potential repercussions on their loved ones and their careers. Oncology professionals need to be sensitive to these concerns and provide opportunities for discussion and/or referrals for their young patients as they grapple with such potentially overwhelming issues.

  6. [Breast tomosynthesis: a new tool for diagnosing breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Martínez Miravete, P; Etxano, J

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer continues to be the most common malignant tumor in women in occidental countries. Mammography is currently the technique of choice for screening programs; however, although it has been widely validated, mammography has its limitations, especially in dense breasts. Breast tomosynthesis is a revolutionary advance in the diagnosis of breast cancer. It makes it possible to define lesions that are occult in the glandular tissue and therefore to detect breast tumors that are impossible to see on conventional mammograms. In considering the combined use of mammography and tomosynthesis, many factors must be taken into account apart from cancer detection; these include additional radiation, the recall rate, and the time necessary to carry out and interpret the two tests. In this article, we review the technical principles of tomosynthesis, it main uses, and the future perspective for this imaging technique.

  7. Population Based Assessment of MHC Class I Antigens Down Regulation as Markers of Increased Risk for Development and Progression of Breast Cancer from Benign Breast Lesions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    Manuscript attached: Appendix A- 2 C: EXPRESSION OF MHC CLASS I AND II EXPRESSION SIGNIFICANTLY DISCRIMINATES AMONG BENIGN, CARCINOMA IN SITU, AND...Tumor aggressiveness and MHC class I and II antigens in laryngeal and breast cancer. Semin Cancer Biol. 2 :47-54; 1991. 5. Sawtell, NM., DiPersio, L... 2 , 3). In breast lesions examined for expression of MHC class I, approximately half (51%) of carcinomas had an abnormally low content of HLA-A, -B

  8. SATB1 tethers multiple gene loci to reprogram expression profiledriving breast cancer metastasis

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Hye-Jung; Kohwi, Yoshinori; Kohwi-Shigematsu, Terumi

    2006-07-13

    Global changes in gene expression occur during tumor progression, as indicated by expression profiling of metastatic tumors. How this occurs is poorly understood. SATB1 functions as a genome organizer by folding chromatin via tethering multiple genomic loci and recruiting chromatin remodeling enzymes to regulate chromatin structure and expression of a large number of genes. Here we show that SATB1 is expressed at high levels in aggressive breast cancer cells, and is undetectable in non-malignant breast epithelial cells. Importantly, RNAi-mediated removal of SATB1 from highly-aggressive MDA-MB-231 cells altered the expression levels of over 1200 genes, restored breast-like acinar polarity in three-dimensional cultures, and prevented the metastastic phenotype in vivo. Conversely, overexpression of SATB1 in the less-aggressive breast cancer cell line Hs578T altered the gene expression profile and increased metastasis dramatically in vivo. Thus, SATB1 is a global regulator of gene expression in breast cancer cells, directly regulating crucial metastasis-associated genes, including ERRB2 (HER2/NEU), TGF-{beta}1, matrix metalloproteinase 3, and metastasin. The identification of SATB1 as a protein that re-programs chromatin organization and transcription profiles to promote breast cancer metastasis suggests a new model for metastasis and may provide means of therapeutic intervention.

  9. Breast Cancer Detection Using Optical Vascular Fusion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    growing characteristics in order to determine the strengths and weaknesses of the current non- invasive imaging technique . As a model for breast cancer...cells, to help improve technique detection and validation of the imaging system and protocols. In this work we used two human breast cancer models...brain cancer, and DLD-1 colon cancer). Our imaging technique examines the vasculature of the tumor through its response to inhalation of carbon

  10. Imaging Prostatic Lipids to Distinguish Aggressive Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    saturation bands (six for fat and two for water) were used to minimize lipid/water contamination to the VOI. The 2D MRSI sequence details are: TR/TE... fat as measured by in-vivo imaging using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy imaging in the prediction of prostate disease aggressiveness...histology, in-vivo intraprostatic fat as measured by 1H MRSI, metabolic signatures of lipid oxidation and metabolism, and prostate cancer

  11. microRNA in Prostate Cancer Racial Disparities and Aggressiveness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    final analyses. 15. SUBJECT TERMS prostate cancer, microRNA, racial disparities, African American, genetic polymorphisms, biochemical recurrence...is to identify novel genetic and epigenetic factors that might contribute significantly to racial/ethnic disparity in PCa risk and progression. We...related miRNAs and PCa aggressiveness, and 3) determine the associations between genetic polymorphisms in miRNA biogenesis pathway genes and plasma levels

  12. Vitamin D and Related Genes, Race, and Prostate Cancer Aggressiveness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Vitamin D and Related Genes, Race, and Prostate Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-11-1-0568 Aggressiveness 5c. PROGRAM...examine whether altered vitamin D status (as measured by serum metabolites and by functional polymorphisms within genes related to vitamin D...potential to provide insights into a chronically underserved population carrying an unequal burden of disease. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Vitamin D, prostate

  13. Evaluation of Breast Cancer Stem Cells and Intratumor Stemness Heterogeneity in Triple-negative Breast Cancer as Prognostic Factors

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Fang; Cao, Lulu; Sun, Zijia; Jin, Juan; Fang, Hehui; Zhang, Wenwen; Guan, Xiaoxiang

    2016-01-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is a tumor subtype with aggressive behavior and poor clinical outcome for lacking effective therapies. Breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs) have been suggested to have tumor-initiating properties, but it remains unclear whether their presence contributes to the increased aggressiveness and poor prognosis of TNBC. Also, the breast cancers display frequent inter- and intra-tumor heterogeneity, which adds the complexity in diagnosis and predicting prognosis. Here we investigated the clinical relevance and prognostic value of the BCSC markers, CD44+/CD24-, aldehyde dehydrogenase family 1 member A1 (ALDH1A1) and CD133 in 88 TNBC cases. We found that a few patients displayed spatial heterogeneity of the BCSC markers in expression, which was defined as intratumor stemness heterogeneity (ITSH) below. There was no significant correlation between any BCSC marker alone or ITSH and progression-free survival (PFS). Interestingly, the combined BCSC phenotype by CD44+/CD24- and ALDH1A1 was significantly associated with worse PFS (P = 0.009). Further stratification analysis revealed that this combined BCSC phenotype was an independent prognostic factor for PFS in some subgroups. In conclusion, we demonstrated the existence of ITSH in TNBC and found that the ITSH as well as a single BCSC marker was not significantly associated with survival, whereas combing the analysis of BCSC markers could improve prognostic value. Our findings may lead to an improvement of prognostic indicators in TNBC. PMID:27994520

  14. Are diet quality scores after breast cancer diagnosis associated with improved breast cancer survival?

    PubMed Central

    Izano, Monika A.; Fung, Teresa T.; Chiuve, Stephanie S; Hu, Frank B.; Holmes, Michelle D.

    2013-01-01

    Background Previous studies have found that diets rich in fruits and vegetables are associated with reduced breast cancer mortality. However, these eating patterns do not necessarily reflect overall diet quality. The association of breast cancer mortality with a priori defined dietary scores, which are based on recommended dietary guidelines and reflect diet quality, has not been evaluated. We hypothesized that diet quality indices based on recommended guidelines are associated with decreased risk of breast cancer and non-breast cancer mortality in breast cancer survivors. Methods We examined the association between the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) score, and the Alternative Healthy Eating Index (AHEI)-2010, and the risk of breast cancer mortality and total mortality among women from the Nurses’ Health Study diagnosed with breast cancer. Results Adherence to DASH-style and AHEI-2010 diets were associated with reduced risk of non-breast cancer mortality (comparing the fifth quintile with the first quintile RR = 0.72, 95% CI: 0.53–0.99, p-trend = 0.03 for DASH, and RR = 0.57, 95% CI: 0.42–0.77, p-trend <0.0001 for AHEI-2010). Diet scores were not significantly associated with breast cancer mortality. Conclusions Our findings suggest that adherence to a higher quality diet after breast cancer diagnosis does not considerably change the risk of breast cancer death and recurrence. However, healthy dietary choices after breast cancer were associated with reduced risk of non-breast cancer mortality in women with breast cancer. PMID:23909725

  15. Risk determination and prevention of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Howell, Anthony; Anderson, Annie S; Clarke, Robert B; Duffy, Stephen W; Evans, D Gareth; Garcia-Closas, Montserat; Gescher, Andy J; Key, Timothy J; Saxton, John M; Harvie, Michelle N

    2014-09-28

    Breast cancer is an increasing public health problem. Substantial advances have been made in the treatment of breast cancer, but the introduction of methods to predict women at elevated risk and prevent the disease has been less successful. Here, we summarize recent data on newer approaches to risk prediction, available approaches to prevention, how new approaches may be made, and the difficult problem of using what we already know to prevent breast cancer in populations. During 2012, the Breast Cancer Campaign facilitated a series of workshops, each covering a specialty area of breast cancer to identify gaps in our knowledge. The risk-and-prevention panel involved in this exercise was asked to expand and update its report and review recent relevant peer-reviewed literature. The enlarged position paper presented here highlights the key gaps in risk-and-prevention research that were identified, together with recommendations for action. The panel estimated from the relevant literature that potentially 50% of breast cancer could be prevented in the subgroup of women at high and moderate risk of breast cancer by using current chemoprevention (tamoxifen, raloxifene, exemestane, and anastrozole) and that, in all women, lifestyle measures, including weight control, exercise, and moderating alcohol intake, could reduce breast cancer risk by about 30%. Risk may be estimated by standard models potentially with the addition of, for example, mammographic density and appropriate single-nucleotide polymorphisms. This review expands on four areas: (a) the prediction of breast cancer risk, (b) the evidence for the effectiveness of preventive therapy and lifestyle approaches to prevention, (c) how understanding the biology of the breast may lead to new targets for prevention, and (d) a summary of published guidelines for preventive approaches and measures required for their implementation. We hope that efforts to fill these and other gaps will lead to considerable advances in our

  16. Breast Cancer Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory has come up with a technique to decrease exposure to harmful x-rays in mammographies or breast radiography. Usually, physicians make more than one exposure to arrive at an x-ray film of acceptable density. Now the same solar cells used to convert sunlight into electricity on space satellites can make a single exposure sufficient. When solar cell sensor is positioned directly beneath x-ray film, it can determine exactly when film has received sufficient radiation and has been exposed to optimum density. At that point associated electronic equipment sends signal to cut off x-ray source. Reduction of mammography to single exposures not only reduced x-ray hazard significantly, but doubled the number of patient examinations handled by one machine. The NASA laboratory used this control system at the Huntington Memorial Hospital with overwhelming success.

  17. KeraStat Skin Therapy in Treating Radiation Dermatitis in Patients With Newly Diagnosed Stage 0-IIIA Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-20

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Skin Reactions Secondary to Radiation Therapy; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer

  18. Trastuzumab Emtansine in Treating Older Patients With Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2-Positive Stage I-III Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-03

    Estrogen Receptor Negative; HER2 Positive Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  19. GDC-0941 and Cisplatin in Treating Patients With Androgen Receptor-Negative Triple Negative Metastatic Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-17

    Estrogen Receptor Negative Breast Cancer; Human Epidermal Growth Factor 2 Negative Carcinoma of Breast; Triple Negative Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  20. Bilateral breast cancer associated with diffuse scleroderma.

    PubMed

    Pineda, V; Salvador, R; Soriano, J

    2003-06-01

    There is a strong evidence to suggest the association between breast cancer and diffuse scleroderma, though it is an infrequent occurrence. We describe the clinical and radiological findings in a patient who, over a period of 2 years, was diagnosed initially of diffuse scleroderma, next with right breast cancer and finally with left breast cancer. A review of the literature evidencing the relation between these two pathologies is provided. We suggest that special vigilance for tumoral pathology of the breast should be performed in patients with systemic scleroderma.

  1. Male breast cancer: a review

    PubMed Central

    Fentiman, IS

    2009-01-01

    Male breast cancer (MBC) is rare, with the peak age of onset at 71 years. BRCA2 mutations are more frequent than BRCA1 with 20% of cases giving a family history. Risk factors for MBC are poorly understood and include working in high-ambient temperatures and exhaust fume exposure. MBC is associated with hyperoestrogenic states found in liver disease, Klinefelter’s syndrome, gonadal dysfunction or obesity. Most information on treatment of MBC is derived from large randomized trials carried out in female patients. The small numbers of MBC seen in any unit annually has precluded significant trials being carried out. Diagnosis and treatment of MBC is similar to that of female patients, but men tend to be treated with mastectomy rather than breast-conserving surgery. The mainstay of adjuvant therapy or palliative treatment for advanced disease is endocrine, mostly tamoxifen. Prognosis of male patients is equal to that of stage-matched women, but men tend to fare worse because of delay in presentation, leading to a large proportion of patients presenting with stage III or IV disease. Increased input is needed for psychological support for male breast cancer patients. Specific therapeutic questions about MBC need international trials to obtain meaningful answers. PMID:22276005

  2. ABO Blood Group Alleles and Prostate Cancer Risk: Results from the Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3)

    PubMed Central

    Markt, Sarah C.; Shui, Irene M.; Unger, Robert H.; Urun, Yuksel; Berg, Christine D.; Black, Amanda; Brennan, Paul; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas; Gapstur, Susan M.; Giovannucci, Edward; Haiman, Christopher; Henderson, Brian; Hoover, Robert N.; Hunter, David J.; Key, Timothy J.; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Canzian, Federico; Larranga, Nerea; Le Marchand, Loic; Ma, Jing; Naccarati, Alessio; Siddiq, Afshan; Stampfer, Meir J.; Stattin, Par; Stevens, Victoria L.; Stram, Daniel O.; Tjønneland, Anne; Travis, Ruth C.; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Ziegler, Regina G.; Lindstrom, Sara; Kraft, Peter; Mucci, Lorelei A.; Choueiri, Toni K.; Wilson, Kathryn M.

    2015-01-01

    Background ABO blood group has been associated with risk of cancers of the pancreas, stomach, ovary, kidney and skin, but has not been evaluated in relation to risk of aggressive prostate cancer. Methods We used three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (rs8176746, rs505922, and rs8176704) to determine ABO genotype in 2,774 aggressive prostate cancer cases and 4,443 controls from the Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3). Unconditional logistic regression was used to calculate age and study adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for the association between blood type, genotype and risk of aggressive prostate cancer (Gleason score ≥8 or locally advanced/metastatic disease (stage T3/T4/N1/M1). Results We found no association between ABO blood type and risk of aggressive prostate cancer (Type A: OR=0.97, 95% CI=0.87-1.08; Type B: OR=0.92, 95% CI=0.77-1.09; Type AB: OR=1.25, 95% CI=0.98-1.59, compared to Type O, respectively). Similarly, there was no association between ‘dose’ of A or B alleles and aggressive prostate cancer risk. Conclusions ABO blood type was not associated with risk of aggressive prostate cancer. PMID:26268879

  3. A Scary Onset of a Rare and Aggressive Type of Primary Breast Sarcoma: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Ramalho, Inês; Campos, Sara; Rebelo, Teresa; Figueiredo Dias, Margarida

    2016-01-01

    Primary breast sarcoma, arising from connective tissue within the breast, is extremely rare, accounting for less than 1% of all primary breast malignancies and no more than 5% of all sarcomas. The rarity of this pathology limits most studies to case reports and small retrospective studies, which has led to a lack of consensus on the clinical management. We report a clinical case of a 52-year-old woman, perimenopausal, previously healthy, with regular breast surveillance, who presented with a large (>20 cm) and rapidly expanding hypervascularized tumor of the left breast developed over 10 days, with a very thin preulcerative skin over the last 4 days. There was no systemic dissemination. The patient was submitted to total mastectomy and excision of axillary adenopathy. The tumor was diagnosed histologically as malignant phyllodes tumor associated with areas of high-grade sarcoma. Due to rapid growth and aggressive histological characteristics, adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy were performed. There is a lot of evidence that tumors larger than 5 cm are associated with a poor prognosis. Despite the poor prognosis associated with this aggressive entity, the patient had no recurrence during 5 years of follow-up. We review the relevant literature about primary breast sarcomas. PMID:28101028

  4. Breast cancer and post-menopausal hormone therapy.

    PubMed

    Kenemans, P; Bosman, A

    2003-03-01

    From the introduction of post-menopausal hormone replacement therapy (HRT) there has been great concern that HRT could possibly increase the risk of breast cancer. Prolonged exposure to endogenous oestrogens undeniably increases the risk of breast cancer. Questions that are important and until now only partly answered, are the following. Are oestrogens tumour promoters, as they induce mitosis, lead to proliferation and, therefore, accelerated growth of clinically occult pre-existing tumours? In addition to this, are they genotoxic mutagenic carcinogens, or could they initiate tumours by way of accumulation of incessant DNA-replication damage mechanism? Opinions vary as to the effect of the addition of a progestogen. There is a multitude of different progestogens which could bind with differing affinity to progesterone receptor PR-A or PR-B, and which have different physiological functions via differential gene regulation. The action of a progestogen on the oestrogen-induced cellular mitotic activity could be synergistic or antagonistic (by different pathways: oestrogen receptor downregulation, activating of metabolic pathways within the breast or stimulation of apoptosis)? Over 60 observational studies and two randomized trials provide evidence that the small but significant increase in risk appears with long-term current post-menopausal hormone use. The addition of a progestogen does not decrease the risk as seen with oestrogens alone and might increase the risk further. It is not clear whether there is a difference in risk with sequentially combined versus continuously combined HRT. Many questions nevertheless still remain. Is the risk increase limited to lean women only? What about risk-modifying factors such as alcohol use and a positive family history for breast cancer? Are tumours detected under HRT less aggressive, is there a better prognosis and is the mortality not increased while morbidity is? And is HRT contraindicated for women with a positive family

  5. Predictors of Lymphedema Following Breast Cancer Surgery

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-01

    1-0738 TITLE: Predictors of Lymphedema Following Breast Cancer Surgery PRINCIPAL...2006 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Predictors of Lymphedema Following Breast Cancer Surgery 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER DAMD17-03-1-0738...following axillary lymph node dissection (ALND) is upper-extremity lymphedema . The purpose of this study is to identify risk factors for lymphedema

  6. Predictors of Lymphedema Following Breast Cancer Surgery

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-01

    1-0738 TITLE: Predictors of Lymphedema Following Breast Cancer Surgery PRINCIPAL...2007 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Predictors of Lymphedema Following Breast Cancer Surgery 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER DAMD17-03-1-0738...following axillary lymph node dissection (ALND) is upper-extremity lymphedema . The purpose of this study is to identify risk factors for lymphedema

  7. Radiation-Induced Vaccination to Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-11-1-0531 TITLE: Radiation-Induced Vaccination to Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: William H. McBride CONTRACTING...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Radiation-Induced Vaccination to Breast Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-11-1-0531 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER

  8. ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS AFFECTING BREAST CANCER SUSCEPTIBILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental Factors Affecting Breast Cancer Susceptibility
    Suzanne. E. Fenton
    US EPA, ORD, MD-67 NHEERL, Reproductive Toxicology Division, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711.

    Breast cancer is still the most common malignancy afflicting women in the Western world. Alt...

  9. Novel Oncogenes in Breast Cancer Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-07-01

    determinants that contribute to the development of breast cancer remain unknown We have developed and applied a novel retrovirus-based library ... screening strategy coupled to a biological assay for growth transformation, to identify novel oncogenes in breast cancer development The approach involves the

  10. Curcumin enhances poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitor sensitivity to chemotherapy in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Choi, Young Eun; Park, Eunmi

    2015-12-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitor has shown promising responses in homologous recombination (HR) repair-deficient cancer cells. More specifically, targeting HR pathway in combination with PARP inhibitor has been an effective chemotherapy strategy by so far. Curcumin has been recognized as anticancer agents for several types of cancers. Here, we demonstrate that curcumin inhibits a critical step in HR pathway, Rad51 foci formation, and accumulates γ-H2AX levels in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Curcumin also directly reduces HR and induces cell death with cotreatment of PARP inhibitor in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Moreover, curcumin, when combined with ABT-888, could effectively delayed breast tumor formation in vivo. Our study indicates that cotreatment of curcumin and PARP inhibitor might be useful for the combination chemotherapy for aggressive breast cancer treatment as a natural bioactive compound.

  11. Breast self examination and survival from breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Le Geyte, M.; Mant, D.; Vessey, M. P.; Jones, L.; Yudkin, P.

    1992-01-01

    The survival of 616 women aged 15-59 with breast cancer, 226 of whom had been taught and practised breast self examination (BSE) prior to diagnosis and 390 of whom had not, is reported. Six year survival rates were 73.1% in the BSE taught group and 66.1% in other women (P = 0.07). PMID:1419636

  12. Epigenetic Testing for Breast Cancer Risk Stratification

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    no detectable methylation in lymphocytes. As part of this project we obtained RP-FNA samples from Carol Fabian. Dr. Fabian expels her RP-FNA samples...1943. 8. Lewis CM, Cler LR, Bu DW, et al. Promoter hypermethylation in benign breast epithelium in relation to predicted breast cancer risk. Clin...American Society of Preventive Oncology. May 2008;17(5):1051-1059. 10. Bu D, Lewis CM, Sarode V, et al. Identification of breast cancer DNA methylation

  13. Dietary Fat, Eicosanoids and Breast Cancer Risk

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-01

    eicosanoid balance, and breast cancer risk in postmenopausal women. The study objectives are to: 1) evaluate the effects of total fat and omega -3 fatty acid ...Dietary fat, omega -3 fatty acids , eicosanoids, sex hormones 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: U 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a...Eicosanoids, and Breast Cancer Risk”, is a dietary intervention aimed at evaluating the effects of total fat intake and omega -3 fatty acids on breast

  14. Early breast cancer in the older woman

    PubMed Central

    VanderWalde, Ari; Hurria, Arti

    2013-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Breast cancer is a disease associated with aging; there is a rise in both breast cancer incidence and mortality with increasing age. With the aging of the US population, the number of older adults diagnosed with breast cancer and the number of breast cancer survivors is on the rise. The majority of cases of breast cancer are diagnosed with early stage (non-metastatic) potentially curable disease. This article will review the treatment of early stage breast cancer in older adults including a focus on the risks and benefits of surgery, radiation therapy, endocrine therapy, chemotherapy, and trastuzumab. Although the majority of studies to date demonstrate that older adults experience similar benefits from most multimodality treatments for breast cancer as compared to younger adults, these studies have primarily been performed in healthy and fit older adults. There are limited data at the extremes of age or in those patients with significant comorbidity or functional decline. A primary question facing the doctor and patient is whether the breast cancer is likely to impact the patient’s life expectancy or quality of life. If so, then the risks and benefits of treatment must be considered with a final decision regarding therapy made in the context of the patient’s preferences. This article will review the toxicities (both short- and long-term) from common cancer therapies in early breast cancer. Finally, the decision as to type of secondary screening and prevention of future breast cancers must also be weighed against the life expectancy of the older adult. PMID:22326036

  15. The Changing World of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kuhl, Christiane K.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Compared with other fields of medicine, there is hardly an area that has seen such fast development as the world of breast cancer. Indeed, the way we treat breast cancer has changed fundamentally over the past decades. Breast imaging has always been an integral part of this change, and it undergoes constant adjustment to new ways of thinking. This relates not only to the technical tools we use for diagnosing breast cancer but also to the way diagnostic information is used to guide treatment. There is a constant change of concepts for and attitudes toward breast cancer, and a constant flux of new ideas, new treatment approaches, and new insights into the molecular and biological behavior of this disease. Clinical breast radiologists and even more so, clinician scientists, interested in breast imaging need to keep abreast with this rapidly changing world. Diagnostic or treatment approaches that are considered useful today may be abandoned tomorrow. Approaches that seem irrelevant or far too extravagant today may prove clinically useful and adequate next year. Radiologists must constantly question what they do, and align their clinical aims and research objectives with the changing needs of contemporary breast oncology. Moreover, knowledge about the past helps better understand present debates and controversies. Accordingly, in this article, we provide an overview on the evolution of breast imaging and breast cancer treatment, describe current areas of research, and offer an outlook regarding the years to come. PMID:26083829

  16. MARCKS protein overexpression in inflammatory breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Manai, Maroua; Lopez, Marc; Eghozzi, Radhia; Ayadi, Sinda; Lamine, Olfa Ben; Manai, Mohamed; Rahal, Khaled; Charafe-Jauffret, Emmanuelle; Jacquemier, Jocelyne; Viens, Patrice; Birnbaum, Daniel; Boussen, Hamouda; Chaffanet, Max; Bertucci, François

    2017-01-01

    Background Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is the most aggressive form of locally-advanced breast cancer. Identification of new therapeutic targets is crucial. We previously reported MARCKS mRNA overexpression in IBC in the largest transcriptomics study reported to date. Here, we compared MARCKS protein expression in IBC and non-IBC samples, and searched for correlations between protein expression and clinicopathological features. Results Tumor samples showed heterogeneity with respect to MARCKS staining: 18% were scored as MARCKS-positive (stained cells ≥ 1%) and 82% as MARCKS-negative. MARCKS expression was more frequent in IBC (36%) than in non-IBC (11%; p = 1.4E−09), independently from molecular subtypes and other clinicopathological variables. We found a positive correlation between protein and mRNA expression in the 148/502 samples previously analyzed for MARCKS mRNA expression. MARCKS protein expression was associated with other poor-prognosis features in the whole series of samples such as clinical axillary lymph node or metastatic extension, high pathological grade, ER-negativity, PR-negativity, HER2-positivity, and triple-negative and HER2+ statutes. In IBC, MARCKS expression was the sole tested variable associated with poor MFS. Materials and Methods We retrospectively analyzed MARCKS protein expression by immunohistochemistry in 502 tumors, including 133 IBC and 369 non-IBC, from Tunisian and French patients. All samples were pre-therapeutic clinical samples. We searched for correlations between MARCKS expression and clinicopathological features including the IBC versus non-IBC phenotype and metastasis-free survival (MFS). Conclusions MARCKS overexpression might in part explain the poor prognosis of IBC. As an oncogene associated with poor MFS, MARCKS might represent a new potential therapeutic target in IBC. PMID:28009981

  17. Use of a panel of novel genes for differentiating breast cancer from non-breast tissues.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Neil; O'Donovan, Norma; Foley, Deirdre; Hill, Arnold D K; McDermott, Enda; O'Higgins, Niall; Duffy, Michael J

    2007-01-01

    Existing serum markers for breast cancer such as CA 15-3, BR 27.29 and CEA lack sensitivity and specificity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the value of new putative breast-specific markers for differentiating breast cancer from non-breast tissues. Expression of mammaglobin A (MGA), B726P, small breast epithelial mucin (SBEM) and MUC1 was measured by RT-PCR. MGA mRNA was detected in 86/162 (60%) breast cancers but in only 1/32 (3%) non-breast tissues; B726P was detected in 44/108 (41%) breast cancers but in none of 20 non-breast tissues, while SBEM was present in 52/103 (51%) breast cancers but in only 1/26 non-breast cancer tissues. In contrast to these novel markers, the established breast cancer marker MUC1 was detected in 72/99 (73%) breast cancers and in 22/32 (59%) of non-breast tissues. Combining MGA with B726P separated breast cancer from non-breast tissue with a sensitivity of 71% and a specificity of 95% while combining MGA with SBEM differentiated breast cancer from non-breast tissues with a sensitivity of 76% and a specificity of 89%. Genes such as MGA, B726P and SBEM that are expressed relatively exclusively in breast tissue are potential new markers for breast cancer.

  18. The potential role of breast ductoscopy in breast cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Sarakbi, W Al; Escobar, Pedro F; Mokbel, Kefah

    2005-01-01

    Breast cancer remains the most common malignancy among women in the Western world. Mammography, which is currently the main screening modality for early detection, has a low positive predictive value of only 25%, especially in young women with very dense breasts. Therefore, new screening approaches are needed for the early detection of breast cancer in all age groups. Mammary ductoscopy (MD) is a newly developed endoscopic technique that allows direct visualization and biopsy of the mammary ductal epithelium where most cancers originate. The procedure can be performed under local anesthesia in the office setting. At present, MD is used as a diagnostic adjunct in patients with pathological nipple discharge and to guide duct excision surgery. This article focuses on the potential of this technique in breast cancer screening and highlights its limitations in this context.

  19. Time-resolved fluorescence for breast cancer detection using an octreotate-indocyanine green derivative dye conjugate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sordillo, Laura A.; Das, B. B.; Pu, Yang; Liang, Kexian; Milione, Giovanni; Sordillo, Peter P.; Achilefu, Sam; Alfano, R. R.

    2013-03-01

    Time-resolved fluorescence was used to investigate malignant and normal adjacent breast tissues stained with a conjugate of indocyanine green and octreotate. A marked increase in fluorescence lifetime intensity was seen in the breast cancer sample compared to the normal sample. The fluorescent lifetimes were also investigated and showed similar fluorescence decay curves in stained malignant and normal breast tissue. These results confirm that somatostatin receptors occur on human breast carcinomas, suggest that the presence of somatostatin receptors should be investigated as a marker of breast cancer aggressiveness, and suggest that this conjugate might be used to detect the presence of residual breast cancer after surgery, allowing better assessment of tumor margins and reducing the need for second or repeat biopsies in selected patients. These results may also provide clues for designing future treatment options for breast cancer patients.

  20. Breast cancer. Part 2: present and future treatment modalities.

    PubMed

    Harmer, Victoria

    This is the second article in a series of three on breast cancer. Part 1 discussed breast anatomy, the principles behind breast awareness and breast health, detailing common benign breast diseases, types of breast cancer and staging. In this article, treatment for breast cancer is discussed. The article will follow the usual order of modalities in the trajectory, starting with surgery, then chemotherapy, radiotherapy and endocrine treatment, finishing with a discussion of future and biological treatments.

  1. Questionnaires in Identifying Upper Extremity Function and Quality of Life After Treatment in Patients With Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-24

    Musculoskeletal Complication; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Therapy-Related Toxicity

  2. California Cancer Registry Enhancement for Breast Cancer Research.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-10-01

    AD Grant Number DAMD17-94-J-4508. TITLE: California Cancer Registry Enhancement for Breast Cancer Research PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: William...96 - 30 Sep 97) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE California Cancer Registry Enhancement for Breast Cancer Research 6. AUTHOR(S) William Wright, Ph.D. 7...of this project is to enhance the value of the California Cancer Registry as a research tool for clinicians and epidemiologists interested in

  3. Genomic profiling of inflammatory breast cancer: a review.

    PubMed

    Bertucci, François; Finetti, Pascal; Vermeulen, Peter; Van Dam, Peter; Dirix, Luc; Birnbaum, Daniel; Viens, Patrice; Van Laere, Steven

    2014-10-01

    Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is a rare but aggressive form of breast cancer. Despite efforts in the past decade to delineate the molecular biology of IBC by applying high-throughput molecular profiling technologies to clinical samples, IBC remains insufficiently characterized. The reasons for that include limited sizes of the study population, heterogeneity with respect to the composition of the IBC and non-IBC control groups and technological differences across studies. In 2008, the World IBC Consortium was founded to foster collaboration between research groups focusing on IBC. One of the initial projects was to redefine the molecular profile of IBC using an unprecedented number of samples and search for gene signatures associated with survival and response to neo-adjuvant chemotherapy. Here, we provide an overview of all the molecular profiling studies that have been performed on IBC clinical samples to date.

  4. Neuropilin 2: Novel Biomarker and Therapeutic Target for Aggressive Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-12-1-0308 TITLE: Neuropilin-2: Novel Biomarker and Therapeutic Target for Aggressive Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL...14Aug2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Neuropilin-2: Novel Biomarker and Therapeutic Target for Aggressive Prostate Cancer 5b. GRANT... aggressive prostate cancer. Cancer Discov 2(10):906-921. 3. Gualberto A & Pollak M (2009) Emerging role of insulin-like growth factor receptor inhibitors in

  5. Breast Cancer-Targeted Nuclear Drug Delivery Overcoming Drug Resistance for Breast Cancer Chemotherapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    anti- cancer drugs. We developed various kinds of nuclear-targeted charge- reversal nanoparticles (TCRNs) which can directly localize and release drug...breast cancer chemotherapy (12 Months): a. In vitro test drug release profile at pH 7.4. b. Test stability in blood. c. In vitro test cellular...anti-breast cancer activity. TASK 3. To in vivo evaluate TCRNs’ anti-breast cancer efficacy (12 months) a. In vivo test biodistribution and tumor

  6. [Infertility, fertility treatment and breast cancer risk].

    PubMed

    Riskin-Mashiah, Shlomit

    2013-10-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women in Israel and throughout the world. It is the leading cause of death from cancer in women. The cause of breast cancer is unknown; however gynecological history and hormonal factors have a major impact on the risk to develop breast cancer. Infertility affects 15-20% of couples in developed countries and most of them will need fertility treatment. The variety of fertility treatments and their use has been widespread during the last 50 years and especially since the introduction of in vitro fertilization. During fertility treatment, and depending on the type of treatment, there is ovarian hyperstimulation with maturation of several follicles and higher than normal estradiol levels. This article reviews the leading studies that evaluated the possible link between fertility treatment and the development of breast cancer. Most studies showed no association between fertility drugs and breast cancer. Whereas other researchers demonstrated a possible link between some fertility drugs and increased risk for breast cancer in certain subgroups. Therefore, larger studies with longer follow-up periods and better control for all possible confounding factors are needed in order to confirm the safety of fertility treatments in the long run. The combination of infertility and fertility treatment might cause harm, such as an increased risk for breast cancer Therefore, one has to consider carefully, together with the woman, the need for fertility treatment and give the lowest possible dosage for the shortest duration in order to minimize the risk.

  7. FoxD3 deficiency promotes breast cancer progression by induction of epithelial–mesenchymal transition

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Tian-Li; Zhao, Hong-Meng; Li, Yue; Chen, Ao-Xiang; Sun, Xuan; Ge, Jie

    2014-04-04

    Highlights: • FOXD3 is down-regulated in breast cancer tissues. • FOXD3 inhibits breast cancer cell proliferation and invasion. • FoxD3 deficiency induces epithelial–mesenchymal transition. - Abstract: The transcription factor forkhead box D3 (FOXD3) plays an important role in the development of neural crest and gastric cancer cells. However, the function and mechanisms of FOXD3 in the breast tumorigenesis and progression is still limited. Here, we report that FOXD3 is a tumor suppressor of breast cancer tumorigenicity and aggressiveness. We found that FOXD3 is down-regulated in breast cancer tissues. Patients with low FOXD3 expression have a poor outcome. Depletion of FOXD3 expression promotes breast cancer cell proliferation and invasion in vitro, whereas overexpression of FOXD3 inhibits breast cancer cell proliferation and invasion both in vitro and in vivo. In addition, depletion of FOXD3 is linked to epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT)-like phenotype. Our results indicate FOXD3 exhibits tumor suppressive activity and may be useful for breast therapy.

  8. Germline mutations in PALB2 in African-American breast cancer cases.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yuan Chun; Steele, Linda; Chu, Li-Hao; Kelley, Karen; Davis, Helen; John, Esther M; Tomlinson, Gail E; Neuhausen, Susan L

    2011-02-01

    Breast cancer incidence is lower in African Americans than in Caucasian Americans. However, African-American women have higher breast cancer mortality rates and tend to be diagnosed with earlier-onset disease. Identifying factors correlated to the racial/ethnic variation in the epidemiology of breast cancer may provide better understanding of the more aggressive disease at diagnosis. Truncating germline mutations in PALB2 have been identified in approximately 1% of early-onset and/or familial breast cancer cases. To date, PALB2 mutation testing has not been performed in African-American breast cancer cases. We screened for germline mutations in PALB2 in 139 African-American breast cases by denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography and direct sequencing. Twelve variants were identified in these cases and none caused truncation of the protein. Three missense variants, including two rare variants (P8L and T300I) and one common variant (P210L), were predicted to be pathogenic, and were located in a coiled-coil domain of PALB2 required for RAD51- and BRCA1-binding. We investigated and found no significant association between the P210L variant and breast cancer risk in a small case-control study of African-American women. This study adds to the literature that PALB2 mutations, although rare, appear to play a role in breast cancer in all populations investigated to date.

  9. The genetics of breast and ovarian cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Ford, D.; Easton, D. F.

    1995-01-01

    A number of genes are known to be involved in inherited susceptibility to breast and/or ovarian cancer. In the context of high-risk families the most important genes are BRCA1 on chromosome 17q, which is associated with a high penetrance of both breast and ovarian cancer, and BRCA2 on chromosome 13q, which causes a high risk of breast cancer but a lower risk of ovarian cancer. Other high-risk cancer genes that confer increased risks of breast or ovarian cancer in addition to other cancers include the hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer genes and the TP53 gene, which causes breast cancer as part of the Li-Fraumeni syndrome. The predisposing mutations in these genes are relatively rare in the population. More common genes which are associated with an increased, but lower, risk of breast cancer are the ataxiatelangiectasia gene and the HRAS1 gene. This paper reviews recent progress in mapping and cloning of these susceptibility genes, and provides estimates of the cancer risks associated with each gene and the frequency of predisposing mutations. PMID:7547224

  10. CHST11 gene expression and DNA methylation in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    HERMAN, DAMIR; LEAKEY, TATIANA I.; BEHRENS, ALICE; YAO-BORENGASSER, AIWEI; COONEY, CRAIG A.; JOUSHEGHANY, FARIBA; PHANAVANH, BOUNLEUT; SIEGEL, ERIC R.; SAFAR, A. MAZIN; KOROURIAN, SOHEILA; KIEBER-EMMONS, THOMAS; MONZAVI-KARBASSI, BEHJATOLAH

    2015-01-01

    Our previously published data link P-selectin-reactive chondroitin sulfate structures on the surface of breast cancer cells to metastatic behavior of cells. We have shown that a particular sulfation pattern mediated by the expression of carbohydrate (chondroitin 4) sulfotransferase-11 (CHST11) correlates with P-selectin binding and aggressiveness of human breast cancer cell lines. The present study was performed to evaluate the prognostic value of CHST11 expression and determine whether aberrant DNA methylation controls CHST11 expression in breast cancer. Publicly available datasets were used to examine the association of CHST11 expression to aggressiveness and progression of breast cancer. Methylation status was analyzed using bisulfite genomic sequencing. 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine (5AzadC) was used for DNA demethylation. Reduced representation bisulfite sequencing was performed in the CpG island of CHST11 with a minimum coverage of 10. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR was employed to confirm the expression profile of CHST11 in breast cancer cell lines. Flow cytometry was also used to confirm the expression of the CHST11 product, chondroitin sulfate A (CS-A). The expression of CHST11 was significantly higher in basal-like and Her2-amplified cell lines compared to luminal cell lines. CHST11 was also highly expressed in cancer tissues compared to normal tissues and the expression levels were significantly associated with tumor progression. We observed very low levels of DNA methylation in a CpG island of CHST11 in basal-like cells but very high levels in the same region in luminal cells. Treatment of MCF7 cells, a luminal cell line with very low expression of CHST11, with 5AzadC increased the expression of CHST11 and its immediate product, CS-A, in a dose-dependent manner. These results suggest that CHST11 may play a direct role in progression of breast cancer and that its expression is controlled by DNA methylation. Therefore, in addition to CHST11 mRNA levels, the

  11. DDT Exposure in Utero and Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    La Merrill, Michele; Krigbaum, Nickilou Y.; Yeh, Gregory; Park, June-Soo; Zimmermann, Lauren; Cirillo, Piera M.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Currently no direct evidence links in utero dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) exposure to human breast cancer. However, in utero exposure to another xenoestrogen, diethylstilbestrol, predicts an increased breast cancer risk. If this finding extends to DDT, it could have far-reaching consequences. Many women were heavily exposed in utero during widespread DDT use in the 1960s. They are now reaching the age of heightened breast cancer risk. DDT exposure persists and use continues in Africa and Asia without clear knowledge of the consequences for the next generation. Hypothesis: In utero exposure to DDT is associated with an increased risk of breast cancer. Design: This was a case-control study nested in a prospective 54-year follow-up of 9300 daughters in the Child Health and Development Studies pregnancy cohort (n = 118 breast cancer cases, diagnosed by age 52 y and 354 controls matched on birth year). Setting and Participants: Kaiser Foundation Health Plan members who received obstetric care in Alameda County, California, from 1959 to 1967, and their adult daughters participated in the study. Main Outcome Measure: Daughters' breast cancer diagnosed by age 52 years as of 2012 was measured. Results: Maternal o,p′-DDT predicted daughters' breast cancer (odds ratio fourth quartile vs first = 3.7, 95% confidence interval 1.5–9.0). Mothers' lipids, weight, race, age, and breast cancer history did not explain the findings. Conclusions: This prospective human study links measured DDT exposure in utero to risk of breast cancer. Experimental studies are essential to confirm results and discover causal mechanisms. Findings support classification of DDT as an endocrine disruptor, a predictor of breast cancer, and a marker of high risk. PMID:26079774

  12. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Epithelial cell monoculture: Long-term growth of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) grown in monoculture as 3-dimensional constructions in the presence of attachment beads in the NASA Bioreactor. A: A typical construct about 3.5 mm (less than 1/8th inch) in diameter with slightly dehydrted, crinkled beads contained on the surface as well as within the 3-dimensional structure. B: The center of these constructs is hollow. Crinkling of the beads causes a few to fall out, leaving crater-like impressiions in the construct. The central impression shows a small hole that accesses the hollow center of the construct. C: A closeup view of the cells and the hole the central impression. D: Closer views of cells in the construct showing sell-to-cell interactions. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Robert Richmond, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

  13. Addition of vasopressin synthetic analogue [V(4)Q(5)]dDAVP to standard chemotherapy enhances tumour growth inhibition and impairs metastatic spread in aggressive breast tumour models.

    PubMed

    Garona, Juan; Pifano, Marina; Pastrian, Maria B; Gomez, Daniel E; Ripoll, Giselle V; Alonso, Daniel F

    2016-08-01

    [V(4)Q(5)]dDAVP is a novel 2nd generation vasopressin analogue with robust antitumour activity against metastatic breast cancer. We recently reported that, by acting on vasopressin V2r membrane receptor present in tumour cells and microvascular endothelium, [V(4)Q(5)]dDAVP inhibits angiogenesis and metastatic progression of the disease without overt toxicity. Despite chemotherapy remaining as a primary therapeutic option for aggressive breast cancer, its use is limited by low selectivity and associated adverse effects. In this regard, we evaluated potential combinational benefits by adding [V(4)Q(5)]dDAVP to standard-of-care chemotherapy. In vitro, combination of [V(4)Q(5)]dDAVP with sub-IC50 concentrations of paclitaxel or carmustine resulted in a cooperative inhibition of breast cancer cell growth in comparison to single-agent therapy. In vivo antitumour efficacy of [V(4)Q(5)]dDAVP addition to chemotherapy was first evaluated using the triple-negative MDA-MB-231 breast cancer xenograft model. Tumour-bearing mice were treated with i.v. injections of [V(4)Q(5)]dDAVP (0.3 μg/kg, thrice weekly) in combination with weekly cycles of paclitaxel (10 mg/kg i.p.). After 6 weeks of treatment, combination regimen resulted in greater tumour growth inhibition compared to monotherapy. [V(4)Q(5)]dDAVP addition was also associated with reduction of local aggressiveness, and impairment of tumour invasion and infiltration of the skin. Benefits of combined therapy were confirmed in the hormone-independent and metastatic F3II breast cancer model by combining [V(4)Q(5)]dDAVP with carmustine (25 mg/kg i.p.). Interestingly, [V(4)Q(5)]dDAVP plus cytotoxic agents severely impaired colony forming ability of tumour cells and inhibited breast cancer metastasis to lung. The present study shows that [V(4)Q(5)]dDAVP may complement conventional chemotherapy by modulating metastatic progression and early stages of microtumour establishment, and thus supports further preclinical testing of

  14. Obesity, insulin resistance and breast cancer outcomes.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, Pamela J

    2015-11-01

    There is growing evidence that obesity is associated with poor outcomes in early stage breast cancer. This paper addresses four current areas of focus: 1. Is obesity associated with poor outcomes in all biologic subtypes of breast cancer? 2. Does obesity effect AI efficacy or estrogen suppression in the adjuvant setting? 3. What are the potential biologic underpinnings of the obesity-breast cancer association? 4. Are intervention studies warranted? If so, which interventions in which populations? Research is needed to resolve these questions; intervention trials involving lifestyle interventions or targeting the biology postulated to link obesity and cancer are recommended.

  15. Review: mitochondrial defects in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Salgado, Josefa; Honorato, Beatriz; García-Foncillas, Jesús

    2008-01-01

    Mitochondria play important roles in cellular energy metabolism, free radical generation, and apoptosis. Mitochondrial DNA has been proposed to be involved in carcinogenesis because of its high susceptibility to mutations and limited repair mechanisms in comparison to nuclear DNA. Breast cancer is the most frequent cancer type among women in the world and, although exhaustive research has been done on nuclear DNA changes, several studies describe a variety of mitochondrial DNA alterations present in breast cancer. In this review article, we to provide a summary of the mitochondrial genomic alterations reported in breast cancer and their functional consequences.

  16. Review: Mitochondrial Defects in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Salgado, Josefa; Honorato, Beatriz; García-Foncillas, Jesús

    2008-01-01

    Mitochondria play important roles in cellular energy metabolism, free radical generation, and apoptosis. Mitochondrial DNA has been proposed to be involved in carcinogenesis because of its high susceptibility to mutations and limited repair mechanisms in comparison to nuclear DNA. Breast cancer is the most frequent cancer type among women in the world and, although exhaustive research has been done on nuclear DNA changes, several studies describe a variety of mitochondrial DNA alterations present in breast cancer. In this review article, we to provide a summary of the mitochondrial genomic alterations reported in breast cancer and their functional consequences. PMID:21892280

  17. Genomic similarities between breast and ovarian cancers

    Cancer.gov

    One subtype of breast cancer shares many genetic features with high-grade serous ovarian cancer, a cancer that is very difficult to treat, according to researchers supported by the National Institutes of Health. The findings suggest that the two cancers a

  18. Suppression of Ovarian Function With Either Tamoxifen or Exemestane Compared With Tamoxifen Alone in Treating Premenopausal Women With Hormone-Responsive Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-29

    Estrogen Receptor Positive Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor Positive Tumor; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer

  19. Disparities in breast cancer and african ancestry: a global perspective.

    PubMed

    Newman, Lisa A

    2015-01-01

    Recognition of breast cancer disparities between African-American and White American women has generated exciting research opportunities investigating the biologic and hereditary factors that contribute to the observed outcome differences, leading to international studies of breast cancer in Africa. The study of breast cancer in women with African ancestry has opened the door to unique investigations regarding breast cancer subtypes and the genetics of this disease. International research efforts can advance our understanding of race/ethnicity-associated breast cancer disparities within the USA; the pathogenesis of triple negative breast cancer; and hereditary susceptibility for breast cancer.

  20. NF-kappaB Is Involved in the Regulation of EMT Genes in Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Pires, Bruno R B; Mencalha, Andre L; Ferreira, Gerson M; de Souza, Waldemir F; Morgado-Díaz, José A; Maia, Amanda M; Corrêa, Stephany; Abdelhay, Eliana S F W

    2017-01-01

    The metastatic process in breast cancer is related to the expression of the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition transcription factors (EMT-TFs) SNAIL, SLUG, SIP1 and TWIST1. EMT-TFs and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation have been associated with aggressiveness and metastatic potential in carcinomas. Here, we sought to examine the role of NF-κB in the aggressive properties and regulation of EMT-TFs in human breast cancer cells. Blocking NF-κB/p65 activity by reducing its transcript and protein levels (through siRNA-strategy and dehydroxymethylepoxyquinomicin [DHMEQ] treatment) in the aggressive MDA-MB-231 and HCC-1954 cell lines resulted in decreased invasiveness and migration, a downregulation of SLUG, SIP1, TWIST1, MMP11 and N-cadherin transcripts and an upregulation of E-cadherin transcripts. No significant changes were observed in the less aggressive cell line MCF-7. Bioinformatics tools identified several NF-κB binding sites along the promoters of SNAIL, SLUG, SIP1 and TWIST1 genes. Through chromatin immunoprecipitation and luciferase reporter assays, the NF-κB/p65 binding on TWIST1, SLUG and SIP1 promoter regions was confirmed. Thus, we suggest that NF-κB directly regulates the transcription of EMT-TF genes in breast cancer. Our findings may contribute to a greater understanding of the metastatic process of this neoplasia and highlight NF-κB as a potential target for breast cancer treatment.

  1. Breast cancer: Diagnosis and treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Ariel, I.M.; Clearly, J.B.

    1987-01-01

    This is a publication about the diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer with an appeal for unified reporting of end results. Nine chapters cover historical reviews, risk factors, pathology-receptors-immunology, detection and diagnosis, treatment of the potentially curable patient, and treatment of the patient with advanced disease. The three concluding chapters discuss reconstruction, special clinical situations, and support for the patient. The role of radiation therapy is presented well. The current status of chemotherapy, hormonal therapy and combined therapies is also addressed by authoritative authors.

  2. Characterization of a naturally occurring breast cancer subset enriched in EMT and stem cell characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Hennessy, Bryan T.; Gonzalez-Angulo, Ana-Maria; Stemke-Hale, Katherine; Gilcrease, Michael Z.; Krishnamurthy, Savitri; Lee, Ju-Seog; Fridlyand, Jane; Sahin, Aysegul; Agarwal, Roshan; Joy, Corwin; Liu, Wenbin; Stivers, David; Baggerly, Keith; Carey, Mark; Lluch, Ana; Monteagudo, Carlos; He, Xiaping; Weigman, Victor; Fan, Cheng; Palazzo, Juan; Hortobagyi, Gabriel N.; Nolden, Laura K.; Wang, Nicholas J.; Valero, Vicente; Gray, Joe W.; Perou, Charles M.; Mills, Gordon B.

    2009-05-19

    Metaplastic breast cancers (MBC) are aggressive, chemoresistant tumors characterized by lineage plasticity. To advance understanding of their pathogenesis and relatedness to other breast cancer subtypes, 28 MBCs were compared with common breast cancers using comparative genomic hybridization, transcriptional profiling, and reverse-phase protein arrays and by sequencing for common breast cancer mutations. MBCs showed unique DNA copy number aberrations compared with common breast cancers. PIK3CA mutations were detected in 9 of 19 MBCs (47.4%) versus 80 of 232 hormone receptor-positive cancers (34.5%; P = 0.32), 17 of 75 HER-2-positive samples (22.7%; P = 0.04), 20 of 240 basal-like cancers (8.3%; P < 0.0001), and 0 of 14 claudin-low tumors (P = 0.004). Of 7 phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/AKT pathway phosphorylation sites, 6 were more highly phosphorylated in MBCs than in other breast tumor subtypes. The majority of MBCs displayed mRNA profiles different from those of the most common, including basal-like cancers. By transcriptional profiling, MBCs and the recently identified claudin-low breast cancer subset constitute related receptor-negative subgroups characterized by low expression of GATA3-regulated genes and of genes responsible for cell-cell adhesion with enrichment for markers linked to stem cell function and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). In contrast to other breast cancers, claudin-low tumors and most MBCs showed a significant similarity to a 'tumorigenic' signature defined using CD44{sup +}/CD24{sup -} breast tumor-initiating stem cell-like cells. MBCs and claudin-low tumors are thus enriched in EMT and stem cell-like features, and may arise from an earlier, more chemoresistant breast epithelial precursor than basal-like or luminal cancers. PIK3CA mutations, EMT, and stem cell-like characteristics likely contribute to the poor outcomes of MBC and suggest novel therapeutic targets.

  3. Association between mammographic density and basal-like and luminal A breast cancer subtypes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Mammographic density is a strong risk factor for breast cancer overall, but few studies have examined the association between mammographic density and specific subtypes of breast cancer, especially aggressive basal-like breast cancers. Because basal-like breast cancers are less frequently screen-detected, it is important to understand how mammographic density relates to risk of basal-like breast cancer. Methods We estimated associations between mammographic density and breast cancer risk according to breast cancer subtype. Cases and controls were participants in the Carolina Breast Cancer Study (CBCS) who also had mammograms recorded in the Carolina Mammography Registry (CMR). A total of 491 cases had mammograms within five years prior to and one year after diagnosis and 528 controls had screening or diagnostic mammograms close to the dates of selection into CBCS. Mammographic density was reported to the CMR using Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System categories. The expression of estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), human epidermal growth factor receptor 1 and 2 (HER1 and HER2), and cytokeratin 5/6 (CK5/6) were assessed by immunohistochemistry and dichotomized as positive or negative, with ER+ and/or PR+, and HER2- tumors classified as luminal A and ER-, PR-, HER2-, HER1+ and/or CK5/6+ tumors classified as basal-like breast cancer. Triple negative tumors were defined as negative for ER, PR and HER2. Of the 491 cases 175 were missing information on subtypes; the remaining cases included 181 luminal A, 17 luminal B, 48 basal-like, 29 ER-/PR-/HER2+, and 41 unclassified subtypes. Odds ratios comparing each subtype to all controls and case-case odds ratios comparing mammographic density distributions in basal-like to luminal A breast cancers were estimated using logistic regression. Results Mammographic density was associated with increased risk of both luminal A and basal-like breast cancers, although estimates were imprecise. The

  4. Friend leukemia virus integration 1 activates the Rho GTPase pathway and is associated with metastasis in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Song, Wei; Li, Wei; Li, Lingyu; Zhang, Shilin; Yan, Xu; Wen, Xue; Zhang, Xiaoying; Tian, Huimin; Li, Ailing; Hu, Ji-Fan; Cui, Jiuwei

    2015-09-15

    Breast cancer is the most prevalent malignant disease in women worldwide. In patients with breast cancer, metastasis to distant sites directly determines the survival outcome. However, the molecular mechanism underlying metastasis in breast cancer remains to be defined. In this report, we found that Friend leukemia virus integration 1 (FLI1) proto-oncogene was differentially expressed between the aggressive MDA-MB231 and the non-aggressive MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Congruently, immunohistochemical staining of clinical samples revealed that FLI1 was overexpressed in breast cancers as compared with the adjacent tissues. The abundance of FLI1 protein was strongly correlated with the advanced stage, poor differentiation, and lymph node metastasis in breast cancer patients. Knockdown of FLI1 with small interfering RNAs significantly attenuated the potential of migration and invasion in highly metastatic human breast cancer cells. FLI1 oncoprotein activated the Rho GTPase pathway that is known to play a role in tumor metastasis. This study for the first time identifies FLI1 as a clinically and functionally important target gene of metastasis, providing a rationale for developing FLI1 inhibitors in the treatment of breast cancer.

  5. Genomic Disparities in Breast Cancer Among Latinas

    PubMed Central

    Lynce, Filipa; Graves, Kristi D.; Jandorf, Lina; Ricker, Charité; Castro, Eida; Moreno, Laura; Augusto, Bianca; Fejerman, Laura; Vadaparampil, Susan T.

    2016-01-01

    Background Breast cancer is the most common cancer diagnosed among Latinas in the United States and the leading cause of cancer-related death among this population. Latinas tend to be diagnosed at a later stage and have worse prognostic features than their non-Hispanic white counterparts. Genetic and genomic factors may contribute to observed breast cancer health disparities in Latinas. Methods We provide a landscape of our current understanding and the existing gaps that need to be filled across the cancer prevention and control continuum. Results We summarize available data on mutations in high and moderate penetrance genes for inherited risk of breast cancer and the associated literature on disparities in awareness of and uptake of genetic counseling and testing in Latina populations. We also discuss common genetic polymorphisms and risk of breast cancer in Latinas. In the treatment setting, we examine tumor genomics and pharmacogenomics in Latina patients with breast cancer. Conclusions As the US population continues to diversify, extending genetic and genomic research into this underserved and understudied population is critical. By understanding the risk of breast cancer among ethnically diverse populations, we will be better positioned to make treatment advancements for earlier stages of cancer, identify more effective and ideally less toxic treatment regimens, and increase rates of survival. PMID:27842325

  6. Aetio-pathogenesis of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Abdulkareem, Imran Haruna

    2013-01-01

    This is a literature review on the aetiology and pathogenesis of breast cancer, which is the most common cancer worldwide, and the second leading cause of cancer death, especially in Western countries. Several aetiological factors have been implicated in its pathogenesis, and include age, genetics, family history, diet, alcohol, obesity, lifestyle, physical inactivity, as well as endocrine factors. These factors act separately or together in the causation of breast cancer. More recently, triple negative breast cancer has been described in certain categories of patients and is associated with poorer prognosis and earlier recurrence compared with the conventional breast cancer. Therefore, adequate knowledge of these factors is important in identifying high risk groups and individuals, which will help in screening, early detection and follow-up. This will help to decrease the morbidity and mortality from this life-threatening disease. PMID:24665149

  7. Management of breast cancer in very young women.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Shoshana M; Partridge, Ann H

    2015-11-01

    Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths in women age 40 and younger in developed countries, and although generally improving, survival rates for young women with breast cancer remain lower than for older women. Young women are more likely to develop more aggressive subtypes of breast cancer (more triple negative and more Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 [HER2]-positive disease) and present with more advanced stage disease. Previous research has demonstrated that young age is an independent risk factor for disease recurrence and death, although recent data suggest this may not be the case in certain tumor molecular subtypes. Recent preliminary evidence suggests potential unique biologic features of breast cancer that occurs in young women although this has yet to have been translated into treatment differences. There are clearly host differences that affect the management of breast cancer for young patients including generally being premenopausal at diagnosis, and fertility, genetics, and social/emotional issues in particular should be considered early in the course of their care. Despite an increased risk of local recurrence, young age alone is not a contraindication to breast conserving therapy given the equivalent survival seen in this population with either mastectomy or breast conservation. However, many young women in recent years are choosing bilateral mastectomy, even without a known hereditary predisposition to the disease. For those who need chemotherapy, multi-agent chemotherapy and biologic therapy targeting the tumor similar to the treatment in older women is the standard approach. Select young women will do well with hormone therapy only. Recent data from the TEXT and SOFT trials evaluating the optimal endocrine therapy for the first 5 years, and the ATTom and ATLAS trials demonstrating benefit from extended duration of tamoxifen (10 vs. 5 years), have further defined options for adjuvant endocrine therapy for young women

  8. High histologic grade and increased relative content of tryptophan in breast cancer using ratios from fingerprint fluorescence spectral peaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sordillo, Laura A.; Sordillo, Peter P.; Budansky, Yury; Pu, Yang; Alfano, R. R.

    2015-03-01

    Histologic grade is a very important, but underappreciated, parameter of breast cancer aggressiveness. Despite its importance, it has historically not been included as one of the criteria for staging of this cancer. In this study, spectral fluorescence profiles from patients with breast carcinoma were acquired. Ratios of emission peaks at 340 over 440,460 nm from biomolecules in malignant and normal samples were calculated. Cancerous over normal ratios (double ratio (DR) method) were evaluated with respect to tumor characteristics. Increased tryptophan content in breast cancer tissues correlates strongly with high grade, but not with lymph node metastases, estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor or Her-2-Neu receptor status.

  9. Chemotherapy With or Without Trastuzumab After Surgery in Treating Women With Invasive Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-31

    Estrogen Receptor Negative; Estrogen Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Positive; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Progesterone Receptor Positive; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  10. Nested Nanotherapeutics for Drug Synergy Enhancement in Breast Cancer Therapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    completion of the proposed aims has resulted in the development of a truly innovative nanoparticle platform for synergistic enhancement in breast cancer ...of nested nanoparticles and intracellular release in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. a. Confocal microscopy of MCF-7 breast cancer cells at... nanoparticle accumulation over time in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. d. Mean fluorescence intensity over time in MCF-7 breast cancer cells as determined by

  11. Intracellular Protein Delivery for Treating Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-01

    nanocapsules with specific cancer cell targeting ligands; Task 3. Preparing and testing of MMP activatable cell penetrating peptides (ACCPs)-coupled...AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-11-1-0371 TITLE: Intracellular Protein Delivery for Treating Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr...SUBTITLE Intracellular Protein Delivery for Treating Breast Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-11-1-0371 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6

  12. Periodontal disease may associate with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Söder, Birgitta; Yakob, Maha; Meurman, Jukka H; Andersson, Leif C; Klinge, Björn; Söder, Per-Östen

    2011-06-01

    The main purpose was to evaluate the association between periodontal disease and the incidence of breast cancer in a prospective study of 3273 randomly selected subjects aged 30-40 years at baseline. Breast cancer incidence was registered from 1985 to 2001 according to the WHO International Classification of Diseases criteria. At baseline, 1676 individuals also underwent a clinical oral examination (Group A) whereas 1597 subjects were not clinically examined but were registered (Group B). The associations between breast cancer, periodontal disease, and missing molars were determined using multiple logistic regression models with several background variables and known risk factors for cancer. In total 26 subjects in group A and 15 subjects in group B had breast cancer. The incidence of breast cancer was 1.75% in subjects who had periodontal disease and/or any missing molars, and 0 in subjects who had periodontal disease but had no missing molars. For periodontally healthy subjects with no missing teeth the breast cancer incidence was 1%. For group B the respective incidence was 0.94%. Female gender (odds ratio (OR) 13.08) and missing any molar in the mandible (OR 2.36) were explanatory variables for breast cancer. Of the subjects with periodontal disease and any missing molars in the mandible 5.5% had breast cancer in comparison to 0.5% of the subjects who had periodontal disease but no missing molars in the mandible (P < 0.02). Chronic periodontal disease indicated by missing molars seemed to associate statistically with breast cancer.

  13. The Relationship between Adiponectin and Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Erbay, Burcu; Yılmaz, Tonguç Utku; Eraldemir, Ceyla; Üren, Nihal; Tiryaki, Çağrı; Ergül, Emel; Utkan, Zafer

    2016-01-01

    Objective Breast cancer is the most common type of cancer in women worldwide. It is indicated that increased body mass index elevates the risk of developing breast cancer, worsens prognosis, and decreases survival. Several polymorphisms of adiponectin have been shown to affect serum levels of adiponectin and their association with breast cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between the adiponectin 45T/G and 276 G/T gene polymorphism and breast cancer in the East Marmara region. Materials and Methods A case-control study was performed in 97 patients with breast cancer and 101 controls in East Marmara in order to evaluate the prevalence of adiponectin gene polymorphism at positions 45 and 276. Patients with familial breast cancer and those who had received chemotherapy or radiotherapy were excluded from the study. Adiponectin gene polymorphisms were investigated using polymerase chain reaction - restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP). Results Adiponectin 45T/G gene genotype frequencies of TT, TG, and GG were 61.9%, 37.1%, and 1% in patients with breast cancer, and 67.3%, 30.7%, and 2% in the control group, respectively. Adiponectin 276G/T gene genotype frequencies of GG, GT, and TT were 45.4%, 45.4%, and 9.3% in patients with breast cancer and 55.4%, 39.6%, and 5.0% in the control group, respectively. Conclusion Our study showed that adiponectin 45T/G and 276 G/T gene polymorphism is not associated with breast cancer risk in patients from the East Marmara region.

  14. Molecular basis of invasion in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    McSherry, E A; Donatello, S; Hopkins, A M; McDonnell, S

    2007-12-01

    Cancer cell invasion involves the breaching of tissue barriers by cancer cells, and the subsequent infiltration of these cells throughout the surrounding tissue. In breast cancer, invasion at the molecular level requires the coordinated efforts of numerous processes within the cancer cell and its surroundings. Accumulation of genetic changes which impair the regulation of cell growth and death is generally accepted to initiate cancer. Loss of cell-adhesion molecules, resulting in a loss in tissue architecture, in parallel with matrix remodelling may also confer a motile or migratory advantage to breast cancer cells. The tumour microenvironment may further influence the behaviour of these cancer cells through expression of cytokines, growth factors, and proteases promoting chemotaxis and invasion. This review will attempt to summarise recent work on these fundamental processes influencing or facilitating breast cancer cell invasion. (Part of a Multi-author Review).

  15. Barriers on Breast Cancer Early Detection Methods

    PubMed Central

    Aksoy, Yasemin Erkal; Turfan, Esin Çeber; Sert, Ebru; Mermer, Gülengül

    2015-01-01

    Objective Breast cancer is the most common type of cancer in women throughout the world. It is the second leading cause of cancer related deaths, after lung cancer. Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women in Turkey with a rate of 23,4%. One out of every four women has breast cancer. This study was conducted to determine the barriers on methods of early diagnosis of breast cancer. Materials and Methods The research population consisted of women over the age of 40 years who live in the neighborhood of Doğanlar (N=2404). The sample size was determined (n=251) with Epi İnfo Statcalc account program with 95% confidence interval, with the incidence of breast cancer accepted as 24%. Women over the age of 40 years who agreed to participate were included in the study. In order to collect the necessary data, a 27-item questionnaire including socio-demographic characteristics and methods of early diagnosis was created according to the literature. This study was conducted between March-October 2012 in Doğanlar neighborhood. Results Two-hundred-fifty-four women participated in the study, with a mean age of 54,27±1, and an average monthly income of 895,0197 TL (min=0 TL, max=7000 TL). 79,1% were married, 89,8% were housewives, 56,7% were literate, and 83,1% had health insurance. The status of performing regular Breast Self Examination (BSE) was significantly higher in women who had knowledge about BSE, (p=0.000). Married (p=0.015) women and those who had a social security system (p=0.048) had significantly higher rates of mammography. Women who were informed on mammography (p=0.000) had significantly higher rates of mammography. When reasons for not getting mammography was addressed, it was observed that 99,2% was due to lack of information and education. Women who had regular BSE had significantly higher Clinical Breast Examination (CBE) (p=0.024). Women’s sociodemographic characteristics did not affect the status of performing regular BSE and CBE significantly

  16. [Physical activity and breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Ramírez, Karol; Acevedo, Francisco; Herrera, María Elisa; Ibáñez, Carolina; Sánchez, César

    2017-01-01

    In Chile breast cancer (BC) is the first cause of death in women. While the most important risk factor for its development is estrogenic stimulation, environmental factors and lifestyles also contribute to its pathogenesis. Epidemiological studies show a direct relationship between physical activity (PA), incidence and recurrence of BC. Supervised PA practice is recommended in most cancer patients to improve their quality of life, to reduce adverse effects from treatment and eventually to improve the prognosis of the disease. We review the epidemiological evidence linking PA and BC and the biological basis of this relationship. We also review the relevant interventional studies and we explore some practical indications of PA in patients with BC, as a model for other tumors of epidemiological importance.

  17. Contrast enhanced ultrasound of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cassano, E; Rizzo, S; Bozzini, A; Menna, S; Bellomi, M

    2006-01-01

    The importance of ultrasound examination in the diagnosis of breast cancer has been widely demonstrated. During the last few years, the introduction of ultrasound contrast media has been considered a promising tool for studying the vascular pattern of focal lesions within the breast. Our purpose was to assess whether contrast-enhanced (CE) ultrasound examination, performed using specific contrast imaging modes, can be helpful for detection and characterization of breast lesions, and for prediction of the response of breast cancer to therapy. PMID:16478698

  18. CD146, an epithelial-mesenchymal transition inducer, is associated with triple-negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Qiqun; Li, Weidong; Lu, Di; Wu, Zhenzhen; Duan, Hongxia; Luo, Yongting; Feng, Jing; Yang, Dongling; Fu, Li; Yan, Xiyun

    2012-01-24

    The epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) plays an important role in breast cancer metastasis, especially in the most aggressive and lethal subtype, "triple-negative breast cancer" (TNBC). Here, we report that CD146 is a unique activator of EMTs and significantly correlates with TNBC. In epithelial breast cancer cells, overexpression of CD146 down-regulated epithelial markers and up-regulated mesenchymal markers, significantly promoted cell migration and invasion, and induced cancer stem cell-like properties. We further found that RhoA pathways positively regulated CD146-induced EMTs via the key EMT transcriptional factor Slug. An orthotopic breast tumor model demonstrated that CD146-overexpressing breast tumors showed a poorly differentiated phenotype and displayed increased tumor invasion and metastasis. We confirmed these findings by conducting an immunohistochemical analysis of 505 human primary breast tumor tissues and found that CD146 expression was significantly associated with high tumor stage, poor prognosis, and TNBC. CD146 was expressed at abnormally high levels (68.9%), and was strongly associated with E-cadherin down-regulation in TNBC samples. Taken together, these findings provide unique evidence that CD146 promotes breast cancer progression by induction of EMTs via the activation of RhoA and up-regulation of Slug. Thus, CD146 could be a therapeutic target for breast cancer, especially for TNBC.

  19. Cyr61 promotes breast tumorigenesis and cancer progression

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, Miaw-Sheue; Bogart, Daphne F.; Castaneda, Jessica M.; Li, Patricia; Lupu, Ruth

    2002-01-16

    Cyr61, a member of the CCN family of genes, is an angiogenic factor. We have shown that it is overexpressed in invasive and metastatic human breast cancer cells and tissues. Here, we investigated whether Cyr61 is necessary and/or sufficient to bypass the ''normal'' estrogen (E2) requirements for breast cancer cell growth. Our results demonstrate that under E2-depleted condition, Cyr61 is sufficient to induce MCF-7 cells grow in the absence of E2. MCF-7 cells transfected with Cyr61 (MCF-7/Cyr61) became E2-independent but still E2-responsive. On the other hand, MCF-7/vector cells remain E2-dependent. MCF-7/Cyr61 cells acquire an antiestrogen-resistant phenotype, one of the most common clinical occurrences during breast cancer progression. MCF-7/Cyr61 cells are anchorage-independent and capable of forming Matrigel outgrowth patterns in the absence of E2. ERa expression in MCF-7/Cyr61 cells is decreased although still functional. Additionally, MCF-7/Cyr61 cells are tumorigenic in ovariectomized athymic nude mice. The tumors resemble human invasive carcinomas with increased vascularization and overexpression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Our results demonstrate that Cyr61 is a tumor-promoting factor and a key regulator of breast cancer progression. This study provides evidence that Cyr61 is sufficient to induce E2-independence and anti-E2 resistance, and to promote invasiveness in vitro, and to induce tumorigenesis in vivo, all of which are characteristics of an aggressive breast cancer phenotype.

  20. Main controversies in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zervoudis, Stephane; Iatrakis, George; Tomara, Eirini; Bothou, Anastasia; Papadopoulos, George; Tsakiris, George

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we have reviewed available evidence for diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up in female breast cancer (BC). Into daily clinical practice some controversies are occurred. Especially, in the diagnosis field, despite the fact that the optimal age in which screening mammography should start is a subject of intense controversy, there is a shift toward the beginning at the age of 40 although it is suggested that the net benefit is small for women aged 40 to 49 years. In addition, a promising tool in BC screening seems to be breast tomosynthesis. Other tools such as 3D ultrasound and shear wave elastography (SWE) are full of optimism in BC screening although ultrasonography is not yet a first-line screening method and there is insufficient evidence to recommend the systemic use of the SWE for BC screening. As for breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), even if it is useful in BC detection in women who have a strong family history of BC, it is not generally recommended as a screening tool. Moreover, based on the lack of randomized clinical trials showing a benefit of presurgical breast MRI in overall survival, it’s integration into breast surgical operations remains debatable. Interestingly, in contrast to fine needle aspiration, core biopsy has gained popularity in presurgical diagnosis. Furthermore, after conservative surgery in patients with positive sentinel lymph nodes, the recent tendency is the shift from axillary dissection to axillary conserving strategies. While the accuracy of sentinel lymph node after neoadjuvant chemotherapy and second BC surgery remains controversial, more time is needed for evaluation and for determining the optimal interval between the two surgeries. Additionally, in the decision between immediate or delayed breast reconstruction, there is a tendency in the immediate use. In the prevention of BC, the controversial issue between tamoxifen and raloxifene becomes clear with raloxifene be more profitable through the toxicities