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Sample records for aggressive cancer cell

  1. Targeting Aggressive Cancer Stem Cells in Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Seymour, Tracy; Nowak, Anna; Kakulas, Foteini

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common and fatal type of primary brain tumor. Gliosarcoma (GSM) is a rarer and more aggressive variant of GBM that has recently been considered a potentially different disease. Current clinical treatment for both GBM and GSM includes maximal surgical resection followed by post-operative radiotherapy and concomitant and adjuvant chemotherapy. Despite recent advances in treating other solid tumors, treatment for GBM and GSM still remains palliative, with a very poor prognosis and a median survival rate of 12–15 months. Treatment failure is a result of a number of causes, including resistance to radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Recent research has applied the cancer stem cells theory of carcinogenesis to these tumors, suggesting the existence of a small subpopulation of glioma stem-like cells (GSCs) within these tumors. GSCs are thought to contribute to tumor progression, treatment resistance, and tumor recapitulation post-treatment and have become the focus of novel therapy strategies. Their isolation and investigation suggest that GSCs share critical signaling pathways with normal embryonic and somatic stem cells, but with distinct alterations. Research must focus on identifying these variations as they may present novel therapeutic targets. Targeting pluripotency transcription factors, SOX2, OCT4, and Nanog homeobox, demonstrates promising therapeutic potential that if applied in isolation or together with current treatments may improve overall survival, reduce tumor relapse, and achieve a cure for these patients. PMID:26258069

  2. Bioenergetics of Stromal Cells As a Predictor of Aggressive Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    1 AD______________ AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0255 TITLE: BIOENERGETICS OF STROMAL CELLS AS A PREDICTOR OF AGGRESSIVE PROSTATE CANCER...31 Aug 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Bioenergetics Of Stromal Cells As A Predictor Of Aggressive Prostate Cancer” 5b. GRANT NUMBER...form and rapidly falls below the normal as they become aggressive in prostate tumorigenesis. We have validated this in five prostate cancer cell

  3. Highly and moderately aggressive mouse ovarian cancer cell lines exhibit differential gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wensheng; Kale, Shubha P.; McFerrin, Harris; Davenport, Ian; Wang, Guangdi; Skripnikova, Elena; Li, Xiao-Lin; Bowen, Nathan J.; McDaniels, Leticia B; Meng, Yuan-Xiang; Polk, Paula; Liu, Yong-Yu; Zhang, Qian-Jin

    2017-01-01

    Patients with advanced epithelial ovarian cancer often experience disease recurrence after standard therapies, a critical factor in determining their five-year survival rate. Recent reports indicated that long-term or short-term survival is associated with varied gene expression of cancer cells. Thus, identification of novel prognostic biomarkers should be considered. Since the mouse genome is similar to the human genome, we explored potential prognostic biomarkers using two groups of mouse ovarian cancer cell lines (group 1: IG-10, IG-10pw, and IG-10pw/agar; group 2: IG-10 clones 2, 3, and 11) which display highly and moderately aggressive phenotypes in vivo. Mice injected with these cell lines have different survival time and rates, capacities of tumor, and ascites formations, reflecting different prognostic potentials. Using an Affymetrix Mouse Genome 430 2.0 Array, a total of 181 genes were differentially expressed (P<0.01) by at least twofold between two groups of the cell lines. Of the 181 genes, 109 and 72 genes were overexpressed in highly and moderately aggressive cell lines, respectively. Analysis of the 109 and 72 genes using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) tool revealed two cancer-related gene networks. One was associated with the highly aggressive cell lines and affiliated with MYC gene, and another was associated with the moderately aggressive cell lines and affiliated with the androgen receptor (AR). Finally, the gene enrichment analysis indicated that the overexpressed 89 genes (out of 109 genes) in highly aggressive cell lines had a function annotation in the David database. The cancer-relevant significant gene ontology (GO) terms included Cell cycle, DNA metabolic process, and Programmed cell death. None of the genes from a set of the 72 genes overexpressed in the moderately aggressive cell lines had a function annotation in the David database. Our results suggested that the overexpressed MYC and 109 gene set represented highly aggressive ovarian

  4. Stem cell and neurogenic gene-expression profiles link prostate basal cells to aggressive prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dingxiao; Park, Daechan; Zhong, Yi; Lu, Yue; Rycaj, Kiera; Gong, Shuai; Chen, Xin; Liu, Xin; Chao, Hsueh-Ping; Whitney, Pamela; Calhoun-Davis, Tammy; Takata, Yoko; Shen, Jianjun; Iyer, Vishwanath R; Tang, Dean G

    2016-02-29

    The prostate gland mainly contains basal and luminal cells constructed as a pseudostratified epithelium. Annotation of prostate epithelial transcriptomes provides a foundation for discoveries that can impact disease understanding and treatment. Here we describe a genome-wide transcriptome analysis of human benign prostatic basal and luminal epithelial populations using deep RNA sequencing. Through molecular and biological characterizations, we show that the differential gene-expression profiles account for their distinct functional properties. Strikingly, basal cells preferentially express gene categories associated with stem cells, neurogenesis and ribosomal RNA (rRNA) biogenesis. Consistent with this profile, basal cells functionally exhibit intrinsic stem-like and neurogenic properties with enhanced rRNA transcription activity. Of clinical relevance, the basal cell gene-expression profile is enriched in advanced, anaplastic, castration-resistant and metastatic prostate cancers. Therefore, we link the cell-type-specific gene signatures to aggressive subtypes of prostate cancer and identify gene signatures associated with adverse clinical features.

  5. Stem cell and neurogenic gene-expression profiles link prostate basal cells to aggressive prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dingxiao; Park, Daechan; Zhong, Yi; Lu, Yue; Rycaj, Kiera; Gong, Shuai; Chen, Xin; Liu, Xin; Chao, Hsueh-Ping; Whitney, Pamela; Calhoun-Davis, Tammy; Takata, Yoko; Shen, Jianjun; Iyer, Vishwanath R.; Tang, Dean G.

    2016-01-01

    The prostate gland mainly contains basal and luminal cells constructed as a pseudostratified epithelium. Annotation of prostate epithelial transcriptomes provides a foundation for discoveries that can impact disease understanding and treatment. Here we describe a genome-wide transcriptome analysis of human benign prostatic basal and luminal epithelial populations using deep RNA sequencing. Through molecular and biological characterizations, we show that the differential gene-expression profiles account for their distinct functional properties. Strikingly, basal cells preferentially express gene categories associated with stem cells, neurogenesis and ribosomal RNA (rRNA) biogenesis. Consistent with this profile, basal cells functionally exhibit intrinsic stem-like and neurogenic properties with enhanced rRNA transcription activity. Of clinical relevance, the basal cell gene-expression profile is enriched in advanced, anaplastic, castration-resistant and metastatic prostate cancers. Therefore, we link the cell-type-specific gene signatures to aggressive subtypes of prostate cancer and identify gene signatures associated with adverse clinical features. PMID:26924072

  6. Cannabidiol as a novel inhibitor of Id-1 gene expression in aggressive breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    McAllister, Sean D; Christian, Rigel T; Horowitz, Maxx P; Garcia, Amaia; Desprez, Pierre-Yves

    2007-11-01

    Invasion and metastasis of aggressive breast cancer cells is the final and fatal step during cancer progression, and is the least understood genetically. Clinically, there are still limited therapeutic interventions for aggressive and metastatic breast cancers available. Clearly, effective and nontoxic therapies are urgently required. Id-1, an inhibitor of basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors, has recently been shown to be a key regulator of the metastatic potential of breast and additional cancers. Using a mouse model, we previously determined that metastatic breast cancer cells became significantly less invasive in vitro and less metastatic in vivo when Id-1 was down-regulated by stable transduction with antisense Id-1. It is not possible at this point, however, to use antisense technology to reduce Id-1 expression in patients with metastatic breast cancer. Here, we report that cannabidiol (CBD), a cannabinoid with a low-toxicity profile, could down-regulate Id-1 expression in aggressive human breast cancer cells. The CBD concentrations effective at inhibiting Id-1 expression correlated with those used to inhibit the proliferative and invasive phenotype of breast cancer cells. CBD was able to inhibit Id-1 expression at the mRNA and protein level in a concentration-dependent fashion. These effects seemed to occur as the result of an inhibition of the Id-1 gene at the promoter level. Importantly, CBD did not inhibit invasiveness in cells that ectopically expressed Id-1. In conclusion, CBD represents the first nontoxic exogenous agent that can significantly decrease Id-1 expression in metastatic breast cancer cells leading to the down-regulation of tumor aggressiveness.

  7. Human Breast Cancer Invasion and Aggression Correlates with ECM Stiffening and Immune Cell Infiltration

    PubMed Central

    Acerbi, I; Cassereau, L; Dean, I; Shi, Q; Au, A; Park, C; Chen, YY; Liphardt, J; Hwang, ES; Weaver, VM

    2015-01-01

    Tumors are stiff and data suggest that the extracellular matrix stiffening that correlates with experimental mammary malignancy drives tumor invasion and metastasis. Nevertheless, the relationship between tissue and extracellular matrix stiffness and human breast cancer progression and aggression remains unclear. We undertook a biophysical and biochemical assessment of stromal-epithelial interactions in noninvasive, invasive and normal adjacent human breast tissue and in breast cancers of increasingly aggressive subtype. Our analysis revealed that human breast cancer transformation is accompanied by an incremental increase in collagen deposition and a progressive linearization and thickening of interstitial collagen. The linearization of collagen was visualized as an overall increase in tissue birefringence and was most striking at the invasive front of the tumor where the stiffness of the stroma and cellular mechanosignaling were the highest. Amongst breast cancer subtypes we found that the stroma at the invasive region of the more aggressive Basal-like and Her2 tumor subtypes was the most heterogeneous and the stiffest when compared to the less aggressive Luminal A and B subtypes. Intriguingly, we quantified the greatest number of infiltrating macrophages and the highest level of TGF beta signaling within the cells at the invasive front. We also established that stroma stiffness and the level of cellular TGF beta signaling positively correlated with each other and with the number of infiltrating tumor-activated, macrophages, which was highest in the more aggressive tumor subtypes. These findings indicate that human breast cancer progression and aggression, collagen linearization and stromal stiffening are linked and implicate tissue inflammation and TGF beta. PMID:25959051

  8. Novel Biophysical Marker of Aggressive Prostate Cancer Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    2. Chen, C.L., et al., Single-cell analysis of circulating tumor cells identifies cumulative expression patterns of EMT-related genes in metastatic...shear stress have effects on the signaling, gene expression, and Figure 6. Fluid shear stress resistance requires extracellular calcium and actin...December 2012 | Volume 7 | Issue 12 | e5097313 survival of these cells [31]. FSS has also been shown to induce changes in the gene expression, cytoskeletal

  9. GALNT6 expression enhances aggressive phenotypes of ovarian cancer cells by regulating EGFR activity.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tzu-Chi; Chen, Syue-Ting; Huang, Min-Chuan; Huang, John; Hsu, Chia-Lang; Juan, Hsueh-Fen; Lin, Ho-Hsiung; Chen, Chi-Hau

    2017-03-28

    Ovarian cancer is the most lethal of the gynecologic malignancies. N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase 6 (GALNT6), an enzyme that mediates the initial step of mucin type-O glycosylation, has been reported to regulate mammary carcinogenesis. However, the expression and role of GALNT6 in ovarian cancer are still unclear. Here we showed that high GALNT6 expression correlates with increased recurrence, lymph node metastasis, and chemoresistance in ovarian endometrioid and clear cell carcinomas; and higher GALNT6 levels are significantly associated with poorer patient survivals. GALNT6 knockdown with two independent siRNAs significantly suppressed viability, migration, and invasion of ovarian cancer cells. Using phospho-RTK array and Western blot analyses, we identified EGFR as a critical target of GALNT6. GALNT6 knockdown decreased phosphorylation of EGFR, whereas GALNT6 overexpression increased the phosphorylation. Lectin pull-down assays with Vicia villosa agglutinin (VVA) indicated that GALNT6 was able to modify O-glycans on EGFR. Moreover, the GALNT6-enhanced invasive behavior was significantly reversed by erlotinib, an EGFR inhibitor. Our results suggest that GALNT6 expression is associated with poor prognosis of ovarian cancer and enhances the aggressive behavior of ovarian cancer cells by regulating EGFR activity.

  10. Anti-influenza neuraminidase inhibitor oseltamivir phosphate induces canine mammary cancer cell aggressiveness.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Joana T; Santos, Ana L; Gomes, Catarina; Barros, Rita; Ribeiro, Cláudia; Mendes, Nuno; de Matos, Augusto J; Vasconcelos, M Helena; Oliveira, Maria José; Reis, Celso A; Gärtner, Fátima

    2015-01-01

    Oseltamivir phosphate is a widely used anti-influenza sialidase inhibitor. Sialylation, governed by sialyltransferases and sialidases, is strongly implicated in the oncogenesis and progression of breast cancer. In this study we evaluated the biological behavior of canine mammary tumor cells upon oseltamivir phosphate treatment (a sialidase inhibitor) in vitro and in vivo. Our in vitro results showed that oseltamivir phosphate impairs sialidase activity leading to increased sialylation in CMA07 and CMT-U27 canine mammary cancer cells. Surprisingly, oseltamivir phosphate stimulated, CMT-U27 cell migration and invasion capacity in vitro, in a dose-dependent manner. CMT-U27 tumors xenograft of oseltamivir phosphate-treated nude mice showed increased sialylation, namely α2,6 terminal structures and SLe(x) expression. Remarkably, a trend towards increased lung metastases was observed in oseltamivir phosphate-treated nude mice. Taken together, our findings revealed that oseltamivir impairs canine mammary cancer cell sialidase activity, altering the sialylation pattern of canine mammary tumors, and leading, surprisingly, to in vitro and in vivo increased mammary tumor aggressiveness.

  11. Anti-Influenza Neuraminidase Inhibitor Oseltamivir Phosphate Induces Canine Mammary Cancer Cell Aggressiveness

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Joana T.; Santos, Ana L.; Gomes, Catarina; Barros, Rita; Ribeiro, Cláudia; Mendes, Nuno; de Matos, Augusto J.; Vasconcelos, M. Helena; Oliveira, Maria José; Reis, Celso A.; Gärtner, Fátima

    2015-01-01

    Oseltamivir phosphate is a widely used anti-influenza sialidase inhibitor. Sialylation, governed by sialyltransferases and sialidases, is strongly implicated in the oncogenesis and progression of breast cancer. In this study we evaluated the biological behavior of canine mammary tumor cells upon oseltamivir phosphate treatment (a sialidase inhibitor) in vitro and in vivo. Our in vitro results showed that oseltamivir phosphate impairs sialidase activity leading to increased sialylation in CMA07 and CMT-U27 canine mammary cancer cells. Surprisingly, oseltamivir phosphate stimulated, CMT-U27 cell migration and invasion capacity in vitro, in a dose-dependent manner. CMT-U27 tumors xenograft of oseltamivir phosphate-treated nude mice showed increased sialylation, namely α2,6 terminal structures and SLe(x) expression. Remarkably, a trend towards increased lung metastases was observed in oseltamivir phosphate-treated nude mice. Taken together, our findings revealed that oseltamivir impairs canine mammary cancer cell sialidase activity, altering the sialylation pattern of canine mammary tumors, and leading, surprisingly, to in vitro and in vivo increased mammary tumor aggressiveness. PMID:25850034

  12. Rac3 induces a molecular pathway triggering breast cancer cell aggressiveness: differences in MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 breast cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Rho GTPases are involved in cellular functions relevant to cancer. The roles of RhoA and Rac1 have already been established. However, the role of Rac3 in cancer aggressiveness is less well understood. Methods This work was conducted to analyze the implication of Rac3 in the aggressiveness of two breast cancer cell lines, MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7: both express Rac3, but MDA-MB-231 expresses more activated RhoA. The effect of Rac3 in cancer cells was also compared with its effect on the non-tumorigenic mammary epithelial cells MCF-10A. We analyzed the consequences of Rac3 depletion by anti-Rac3 siRNA. Results Firstly, we analyzed the effects of Rac3 depletion on the breast cancer cells’ aggressiveness. In the invasive MDA-MB-231 cells, Rac3 inhibition caused a marked reduction of both invasion (40%) and cell adhesion to collagen (84%), accompanied by an increase in TNF-induced apoptosis (72%). This indicates that Rac3 is involved in the cancer cells’ aggressiveness. Secondly, we investigated the effects of Rac3 inhibition on the expression and activation of related signaling molecules, including NF-κB and ERK. Cytokine secretion profiles were also analyzed. In the non-invasive MCF-7 line; Rac3 did not influence any of the parameters of aggressiveness. Conclusions This discrepancy between the effects of Rac3 knockdown in the two cell lines could be explained as follows: in the MDA-MB-231 line, the Rac3-dependent aggressiveness of the cancer cells is due to the Rac3/ERK-2/NF-κB signaling pathway, which is responsible for MMP-9, interleukin-6, -8 and GRO secretion, as well as the resistance to TNF-induced apoptosis, whereas in the MCF-7 line, this pathway is not functional because of the low expression of NF-κB subunits in these cells. Rac3 may be a potent target for inhibiting aggressive breast cancer. PMID:23388133

  13. Enhancement of the Efficacy of Conventional Anticancer Compounds through the Repression of SNAI Proteins in Aggressive Breast Cancer Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    vitamin D and anti-estrogens in human breast cancer tissues; (b) To determine the effects of alterations of the levels of SNAI proteins in breast...determine the effects of alterations of the levels of SNAI proteins in breast cancer cells on their sensitivity towards vitamin D and/or 4HT; and (3) To...diminish their aggressiveness but also make these cells sensitive to the inhibition of some of the conventional anticancer agents such as vitamin D and

  14. Phenotypic changes of acid adapted cancer cells push them toward aggressiveness in their evolution in the tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Damaghi, Mehdi; Gillies, Robert

    2016-09-16

    The inter- and intra-tumoral metabolic phenotypes of tumors are heterogeneous, and this is related to microenvironments that select for increased glycolysis. Increased glycolysis leads to decreased pH, and these local microenvironment effects lead to further selection. Hence, heterogeneity of phenotypes is an indirect consequence of altering microenvironments during carcinogenesis. In early stages of growth, tumors are stratified, with the most aggressive cells developing within the acidic interior of the tumor. However, these cells eventually find themselves at the tumor edge, where they invade into the normal tissue via acid-mediated invasion. We believe acid adaptation during the evolution of cancer cells in their niche is a Rubicon that, once crossed, allows cells to invade into and outcompete normal stromal tissue. In this study, we illustrate some acid-induced phenotypic changes due to acidosis resulting in more aggressiveness and invasiveness of cancer cells.

  15. CD44v6 promotes β-catenin and TGF-β expression, inducing aggression in ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Xiao, Ling; Luo, Chen-Hui; Zhou, Hui; Zeng, Liang; Zhong, Jingmin; Tang, Yan; Zhao, Xue-Heng; Zhao, Min; Zhang, Yi

    2015-05-01

    A high expression of CD44v6 has been reported in numerous malignant cancers, including stomach, prostate, lung and colon. However, the pathological role and the regulatory mechanisms of CD44v6 have yet to be elucidated. In the present study, the expression levels of CD44v6 were shown to be significantly higher in ovarian cancer tissues, as compared with adjacent normal tissues. Furthermore, the upregulated expression levels of CD44v6 were correlated with disease recurrence and poor survival in patients. The expression of CD44v6 was knocked down in the CAOV3 ovarian cell line, by transfection of a specific small hairpin RNA. The present study showed a correlation between the aggression, viability, invasion and migration of the ovarian cancer cells, with the expression of CD44v6. In addition, the expression of CD44v6 was positively correlated with the expression levels of β‑catenin and tumor growth factor‑β, which indicates that the effects of CD44v6 on ovarian cancer cell aggression may be mediated by these two signaling pathways. In conclusion, the present study provides a novel insight into the association between CD44v6 expression and ovarian cancer. CD44v6 may provide a novel target for the prognosis and treatment of ovarian cancer.

  16. Shorter telomeres and high telomerase activity correlate with a highly aggressive phenotype in breast cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Ceja-Rangel, Hugo A; Sánchez-Suárez, Patricia; Castellanos-Juárez, Emilio; Peñaroja-Flores, Rubicelia; Arenas-Aranda, Diego J; Gariglio, Patricio; Benítez-Bribiesca, Luis

    2016-09-01

    Maintenance of telomere length is one function of human telomerase that is crucial for the survival of cancer cells and cancer progression. Both telomeres and telomerase have been proposed as possible biomarkers of cancer risk and cancer invasiveness; however, their clinical relevance is still under discussion. In order to improve our understanding of the relationship between telomere length and telomerase activity with cancer invasiveness, we studied telomere length as well as telomerase levels, activity, and intracellular localization in breast cancer cell lines with diverse invasive phenotypes. We found an apparently paradoxical coincidence of short telomeres and enhanced telomerase activity in the most invasive breast cancer cell lines. We also observed that hTERT intracellular localization could be correlated with its level of activity. There was no association between human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) protein expression levels and invasiveness. We propose that simultaneous evaluation of these two biomarkers-telomere length and telomerase activity-could be useful for the assessment of the invasive capacity and aggressiveness of tumor cells from breast cancer patients.

  17. Lentivirus-mediated RASSF1A expression suppresses aggressive phenotypes of gastric cancer cells in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, P-H; Zheng, J-B; Wei, G-B; Wang, X-L; Wang, W; Chen, N-Z; Yu, J-H; Yao, J-F; Wang, H; Lu, S-Y; Sun, X-J

    2015-01-01

    Loss of Ras association domain family protein 1 isoform A (RASSF1A) expression is associated with the development of a variety of human cancers and the expression of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) frequently occurs in gastric cancer. This study investigated the effects of RASSF1A expression restoration using a hypoxia-inducible CEA promoter-driven vector on xenograft tumor growth in nude mice and on the in-vitro regulation of gastric cancer cell viability, cell cycle distribution, apoptosis, colony formation and invasion capacity. The data showed that the level of CEA mRNA and protein was much higher in gastric cancer SGC7901 cells than in a second gastric cancer cell line, MKN28, or in the MCF-10A normal epithelial breast cell line. RASSF1A expression was restored in SGC7901 cells compared with the negative control virus-infected SGC7910 cells. RASSF1A expression restoration significantly inhibited gastric cancer cell viability, colony formation and invasion capacity, but induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in vitro, especially under hypoxic culture conditions. At the gene level, restoration of RASSF1A expression under hypoxic culture conditions significantly suppressed matrix metalloproteinase-2 expression and prevented cyclinD1 expression. A nude mouse xenograft assay showed that the restoration of RASSF1A expression reduced gastric cancer xenograft formation and growth. In conclusion, the restoration of RASSF1A expression using a hypoxia-inducible and CEA promoter-driven vector suppressed aggressive phenotypes of gastric cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. These results suggest that LV-5HRE-CEAp-RASSF1A gene therapy may be a promising novel approach to treat advanced gastric cancer. PMID:26005859

  18. Prolonged and repetitive exposure to Porphyromonas gingivalis increases aggressiveness of oral cancer cells by promoting acquisition of cancer stem cell properties.

    PubMed

    Ha, Na Hee; Woo, Bok Hee; Kim, Da Jeong; Ha, Eun Sin; Choi, Jeom Il; Kim, Sung Jo; Park, Bong Soo; Lee, Ji Hye; Park, Hae Ryoun

    2015-12-01

    Periodontitis is the most common chronic inflammatory condition occurring in the human oral cavity, but our knowledge on its contribution to oral cancer is rather limited. To define crosstalk between chronic periodontitis and oral cancer, we investigated whether Porphyromonas gingivalis, a major pathogen of chronic periodontitis, plays a role in oral cancer progression. To mimic chronic irritation by P. gingivalis in the oral cavity, oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cells were infected with P. gingivalis twice a week for 5 weeks. Repeated infection of oral cancer cells by P. gingivalis resulted in morphological changes of host cancer cells into an elongated shape, along with the decreased expression of epithelial cell markers, suggesting acquisition of an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) phenotype. The prolonged exposure to P. gingivalis also promoted migratory and invasive properties of OSCC cells and provided resistance against a chemotherapeutic agent, all of which are described as cellular characteristics undergoing EMT. Importantly, long-term infection by P. gingivalis induced an increase in the expression level of CD44 and CD133, well-known cancer stem cell markers, and promoted the tumorigenic properties of infected cancer cells compared to non-infected controls. Furthermore, increased invasiveness of P. gingivalis-infected OSCC cells was correlated with enhanced production of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1 and MMP-10 that was stimulated by interleukin-8 (IL-8) release. This is the first report demonstrating that P. gingivalis can increase the aggressiveness of oral cancer cells via epithelial-mesenchymal transition-like changes and the acquisition of stemness, implicating P. gingivalis as a potential bacterial risk modifier.

  19. Mitomycin C treatment induces resistance and enhanced migration via phosphorylated Akt in aggressive lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Liang-Chuan; Chuang, Eric Y.; Tsai, Mong-Hsun

    2016-01-01

    Since 1984, mitomycin C (MMC) has been applied in the treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). MMC-based chemotherapeutic regimens are still under consideration owing to the efficacy and low cost as compared with other second-line regimens in patients with advanced NSCLC. Hence, it is important to investigate whether MMC induces potential negative effects in NSCLC. Here, we found that the malignant lung cancer cells, CL1-2 and CL1-5, were more resistant to MMC than were the parental CL1-0 cells and pre-malignant CL1-1 cells. CL1-2 and CL1-5 cells consistently showed lower sub-G1 fractions post MMC treatment. DNA repair-related proteins were not induced more in CL1-5 than in CL1-0 cells, but the levels of endogenous and MMC-induced phosphorylated Akt (p-Akt) were higher in CL1-5 cells. Administering a p-Akt inhibitor reduced the MMC resistance, demonstrating that p-Akt is important in the MMC resistance of CL1-5 cells. Furthermore, we revealed that cell migration was enhanced by MMC but lowered by a p-Akt inhibitor in CL1-5 cells. This study suggests that in CL1-5 cells, the activity of p-Akt, rather than DNA repair mechanisms, may underlie the resistance to MMC and enhance the cells' migration abilities after MMC treatment. PMID:27833080

  20. Geminin overexpression-dependent recruitment and crosstalk with mesenchymal stem cells enhance aggressiveness in triple negative breast cancers

    PubMed Central

    Ananthula, Suryatheja; Sinha, Abhilasha; Gassim, Mohamed El; Batth, Simran; Marshall, Gailen D.; Gardner, Lauren H.; Shimizu, Yoshiko; ElShamy, Wael M.

    2016-01-01

    Resident mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) promote cancer progression. However, pathways and mechanisms involved in recruiting MSCs into breast tumors remain largely undefined. Here we show that geminin-dependent acetylation releases HMGB1 from the chromatin to the cytoplasm and extracellular space. Extracellular acetylated HMGB1 (Ac-HMGB1) promotes geminin overexpressing (GemOE) cells survival by binding to RAGE and activating NF-κB signaling. Extracellular Ac-HMGB1 also triggers expression and activation of RAGE in the non-expressing MSCs. RAGE activation induces expression of CXCR4 in MSCs and directional migration towards SDF1 (aka CXCL12)-expressing GemOE cells in vitro and in vivo. These effects augmented by the necrotic and hypoxic environment in GemOE tumors, especially within their cores. Reciprocal interactions between newly recruited MSCs and GemOE tumor cells elevate tumor-initiating (TIC), basal and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) traits and enhance aggressiveness in vitro and in vivo in GemOE tumor cells. Indeed, faster, larger and more aggressive tumors develop when GemOE cells are co-injected with MSCs in orthotopic breast tumor model. Concurrently, inhibiting c-Abl (and thus geminin function), RAGE or CXCR4 prevented MSCs recruitment to GemOE cells in vitro and in vivo, and decreased the TIC, basal and EMT phenotypes in these tumor cells. Accordingly, we propose that GemOE tumor cells present within tumor cores represent metastatic precursors, and suppressing the GemOE→HMGB1/RAGE→SDF1/CXCR4 signaling circuit could be a valid target for therapies to inhibit GemOE tumors and their metastases. PMID:26989079

  1. Breast Cancers Between Mammograms Have Aggressive Features

    Cancer.gov

    Breast cancers that are discovered in the period between regular screening mammograms—known as interval cancers—are more likely to have features associated with aggressive behavior and a poor prognosis than cancers found via screening mammograms.

  2. GAD1 Upregulation Programs Aggressive Features of Cancer Cell Metabolism in the Brain Metastatic Microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Schnepp, Patricia M; Lee, Dennis D; Guldner, Ian H; O'Tighearnaigh, Treasa K; Howe, Erin N; Palakurthi, Bhavana; Eckert, Kaitlyn E; Toni, Tiffany A; Ashfeld, Brandon L; Zhang, Siyuan

    2017-04-11

    The impact of altered amino acid metabolism on cancer progression is not fully understood. We hypothesized that a metabolic transcriptome shift during metastatic evolution is crucial for brain metastasis. Here we report a powerful impact in this setting caused by epigenetic upregulation of glutamate decarboxylase 1 (GAD1), a regulator of the GABA neurotransmitter metabolic pathway. In cell-based culture and brain metastasis models, we found that downegulation of the DNA methyltransferase DNMT1 induced by the brain microenvironment-derived clusterin resulted in decreased GAD1 promoter methylation and subsequent upregulation of GAD1 expression in brain metastatic tumor cells. In a system to dynamically visualize cellular metabolic responses mediated by GAD1, we monitored the cytosolic NADH:NAD+ equilibrium in tumor cells. Reducing GAD1 in metastatic cells by primary glia cell co-culture abolished the capacity of metastatic cells to utilize extracellular glutamine, leading to cytosolic accumulation of NADH and increased oxidative status. Similarly, genetic or pharmacological disruption of the GABA metabolic pathway decreased the incidence of brain metastasis in vivo. Taken together, our results show how epigenetic changes in GAD1 expression alter local glutamate metabolism in the brain metastatic microenvironment, contributing to a metabolic adaption that facilitates metastasis outgrowth in that setting.

  3. Phosphoinositide 3-kinase targeting by the β galactoside binding protein cytokine negates akt gene expression and leads aggressive breast cancer cells to apoptotic death

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Valerie; Mallucci, Livio

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)-activated signalling has a critical role in the evolution of aggressive tumourigenesis and is therefore a prime target for anticancer therapy. Previously we have shown that the β galactoside binding protein (βGBP) cytokine, an antiproliferative molecule, induces functional inhibition of class 1A and class 1B PI3K. Here, we have investigated whether, by targeting PI3K, βGBP has therapeutic efficacy in aggressive breast cancer cells where strong mitogenic input is fuelled by overexpression of the ErbB2 (also known as HER/neu, for human epidermal growth factor receptor 2) oncoprotein receptor and have used immortalised ductal cells and non-aggressive mammary cancer cells, which express ErbB2 at low levels, as controls. Methods Aggressive BT474 and SKBR3 cancer cells where ErbB2 is overexpressed, MCF10A immortalised ductal cells and non-invasive MCF-7 cancer cells which express low levels of ErbB2, both in their naive state and when forced to mimic aggressive behaviour, were used. Class IA PI3K was immunoprecipitated and the conversion of phosphatidylinositol (4,5)-biphosphate (PIP2) to phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-trisphosphate (PIP3) assessed by ELISA. The consequences of PI3K inhibition by βGBP were analysed at proliferation level, by extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation, by akt gene expression and by apoptosis. Apoptosis was documented by changes in mitochondrial membrane potential, alteration of the plasma membrane, caspase 3 activation and DNA fragmentation. Phosphorylated and total ERK were measured by Western blot analysis and akt mRNA levels by Northern blot analysis. The results obtained with the BT474 and SKBR3 cells were validated in the MCF10A ductal cells and in non-invasive MCF-7 breast cancer cells forced into mimicking the in vitro behaviour of the BT474 and SKBR3 cells. Results In aggressive breast cancer cells, where mitogenic signalling is enforced by the ErbB2 oncoprotein receptor

  4. Breast Cancer Cell-Derived GM-CSF Licenses Regulatory Th2 Induction by Plasmacytoid Predendritic Cells in Aggressive Disease Subtypes.

    PubMed

    Ghirelli, Cristina; Reyal, Fabien; Jeanmougin, Marine; Zollinger, Raphaël; Sirven, Philémon; Michea, Paula; Caux, Christophe; Bendriss-Vermare, Nathalie; Donnadieu, Marie-Hélène; Caly, Martial; Fourchotte, Virginie; Vincent-Salomon, Anne; Sigal-Zafrani, Brigitte; Sastre-Garau, Xavier; Soumelis, Vassili

    2015-07-15

    Reciprocal interactions between tumor cells and their microenvironment vitally impact tumor progression. In this study, we show that GM-CSF produced by primary breast tumor cells induced the activation of plasmacytoid predendritic cells (pDC), a cell type critical to anti-viral immunity. pDC that expressed the GM-CSF receptor were increased in breast tumors compared with noninvolved adjacent breast tissue. Tumor-activated pDC acquired naïve CD4(+) T-cell stimulatory capacity and promoted a regulatory Th2 response. Finally, the concomitant increase of GM-CSF and pDC was significantly associated with relatively more aggressive breast cancer subtypes. Our results characterize the first tumor-derived factor that can activate pDC to promote a regulatory Th2 response, with implications for therapeutic targeting of a tumor-immune axis of growing recognition in its significance to cancer.

  5. Molecular Targeted Therapies of Aggressive Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Silvia Martina; Fallahi, Poupak; Politti, Ugo; Materazzi, Gabriele; Baldini, Enke; Ulisse, Salvatore; Miccoli, Paolo; Antonelli, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Differentiated thyroid carcinomas (DTCs) that arise from follicular cells account >90% of thyroid cancer (TC) [papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) 90%, follicular thyroid cancer (FTC) 10%], while medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) accounts <5%. Complete total thyroidectomy is the treatment of choice for PTC, FTC, and MTC. Radioiodine is routinely recommended in high-risk patients and considered in intermediate risk DTC patients. DTC cancer cells, during tumor progression, may lose the iodide uptake ability, becoming resistant to radioiodine, with a significant worsening of the prognosis. The lack of specific and effective drugs for aggressive and metastatic DTC and MTC leads to additional efforts toward the development of new drugs. Several genetic alterations in different molecular pathways in TC have been shown in the past few decades, associated with TC development and progression. Rearranged during transfection (RET)/PTC gene rearrangements, RET mutations, BRAF mutations, RAS mutations, and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 angiogenesis pathways are some of the known pathways determinant in the development of TC. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) are small organic compounds inhibiting tyrosine kinases auto-phosphorylation and activation, most of them are multikinase inhibitors. TKIs act on the aforementioned molecular pathways involved in growth, angiogenesis, local, and distant spread of TC. TKIs are emerging as new therapies of aggressive TC, including DTC, MTC, and anaplastic thyroid cancer, being capable of inducing clinical responses and stabilization of disease. Vandetanib and cabozantinib have been approved for the treatment of MTC, while sorafenib and lenvatinib for DTC refractory to radioiodine. These drugs prolong median progression-free survival, but until now no significant increase has been observed on overall survival; side effects are common. New efforts are made to find new more effective and safe compounds and to personalize the therapy in

  6. IGF-IR cooperates with ERα to inhibit breast cancer cell aggressiveness by regulating the expression and localisation of ECM molecules

    PubMed Central

    Afratis, Nikolaos A.; Bouris, Panagiotis; Skandalis, Spyros S.; Multhaupt, Hinke A.; Couchman, John R.; Theocharis, Achilleas D.; Karamanos, Nikos K.

    2017-01-01

    IGF-IR is highly associated with the behaviour of breast cancer cells. In ERα-positive breast cancer, IGF-IR is present at high levels. In clinical practice, prolonged treatment with anti-estrogen agents results in resistance to the therapy with activation of alternative signaling pathways. Receptor Tyrosine Kinases, and especially IGF-IR, have crucial roles in these processes. Here, we report a nodal role of IGF-IR in the regulation of ERα-positive breast cancer cell aggressiveness and the regulation of expression levels of several extracellular matrix molecules. In particular, activation of IGF-IR, but not EGFR, in MCF-7 breast cancer cells results in the reduction of specific matrix metalloproteinases and their inhibitors. In contrast, IGF-IR inhibition leads to the depletion by endocytosis of syndecan-4. Global important changes in cell adhesion receptors, which include integrins and syndecan-4 triggered by IGF-IR inhibition, regulate adhesion and invasion. Cell function assays that were performed in MCF-7 cells as well as their ERα-suppressed counterparts indicate that ER status is a major determinant of IGF-IR regulatory role on cell adhesion and invasion. The strong inhibitory role of IGF-IR on breast cancer cells aggressiveness for which E2-ERα signaling pathway seems to be essential, highlights IGF-IR as a major molecular target for novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:28079144

  7. IGF-IR cooperates with ERα to inhibit breast cancer cell aggressiveness by regulating the expression and localisation of ECM molecules.

    PubMed

    Afratis, Nikolaos A; Bouris, Panagiotis; Skandalis, Spyros S; Multhaupt, Hinke A; Couchman, John R; Theocharis, Achilleas D; Karamanos, Nikos K

    2017-01-12

    IGF-IR is highly associated with the behaviour of breast cancer cells. In ERα-positive breast cancer, IGF-IR is present at high levels. In clinical practice, prolonged treatment with anti-estrogen agents results in resistance to the therapy with activation of alternative signaling pathways. Receptor Tyrosine Kinases, and especially IGF-IR, have crucial roles in these processes. Here, we report a nodal role of IGF-IR in the regulation of ERα-positive breast cancer cell aggressiveness and the regulation of expression levels of several extracellular matrix molecules. In particular, activation of IGF-IR, but not EGFR, in MCF-7 breast cancer cells results in the reduction of specific matrix metalloproteinases and their inhibitors. In contrast, IGF-IR inhibition leads to the depletion by endocytosis of syndecan-4. Global important changes in cell adhesion receptors, which include integrins and syndecan-4 triggered by IGF-IR inhibition, regulate adhesion and invasion. Cell function assays that were performed in MCF-7 cells as well as their ERα-suppressed counterparts indicate that ER status is a major determinant of IGF-IR regulatory role on cell adhesion and invasion. The strong inhibitory role of IGF-IR on breast cancer cells aggressiveness for which E2-ERα signaling pathway seems to be essential, highlights IGF-IR as a major molecular target for novel therapeutic strategies.

  8. Aggressive thyroid cancer: targeted therapy with sorafenib.

    PubMed

    Corrado, Alda; Ferrari, Silvia M; Politti, Ugo; Mazzi, Valeria; Miccoli, Mario; Materazzi, Gabriele; Antonelli, Alessandro; Ulisse, Salvatore; Fallahi, Poupak; Miccoli, Paolo

    2017-03-01

    Sorafenib (Nexavar), is a multikinase inhibitor, which has demonstrated both antiproliferative and antiangiogenic properties in vitro and in vivo, inhibiting the activity of targets present in the tumoral cells (c-RAF [proto-oncogene serine/threonine-protein kinase], BRAF, (V600E)BRAF, c-KIT, and FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3) and in tumor vessels (c-RAF, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor [VEGFR]-2, VEGFR-3, and platelet-derived growth factor receptor β). Sorafenib was initially approved for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma and advanced renal cell carcinoma. Experimental studies have demonstrated that sorafenib has both antiproliferative and antiangiogenic properties in vitro and in vivo, against thyroid cancer cells. Furthermore, several completed (or ongoing) studies have evaluated the long-term efficacy and tolerability of sorafenib in patients with papillary, follicular and medullary aggressive thyroid cancer. The results of the different studies showed good clinical responses and stabilization of the disease and suggested that sorafenib is a promising therapeutic option in patients with advanced thyroid cancer that is not responsive to traditional therapeutic strategies (such as radioiodine). Currently, USA Food and Drug Administration has approved the use of sorafenib for metastatic differentiated thyroid cancer.

  9. Functional interaction between acyl-CoA synthetase 4, lipooxygenases and cyclooxygenase-2 in the aggressive phenotype of breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Maloberti, Paula M; Duarte, Alejandra B; Orlando, Ulises D; Pasqualini, María E; Solano, Angela R; López-Otín, Carlos; Podestá, Ernesto J

    2010-11-11

    The acyl-CoA synthetase 4 (ACSL4) is increased in breast cancer, colon and hepatocellular carcinoma. ACSL4 mainly esterifies arachidonic acid (AA) into arachidonoyl-CoA, reducing free AA intracellular levels, which is in contradiction with the need for AA metabolites in tumorigenesis. Therefore, the causal role of ACSL4 is still not established. This study was undertaken to determine the role of ACSL4 in AA metabolic pathway in breast cancer cells. The first novel finding is that ACSL4 regulates the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and the production of prostaglandin in MDA-MB-231 cells. We also found that ACSL4 is significantly up-regulated in the highly aggressive MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. In terms of its overexpression and inhibition, ACSL4 plays a causal role in the control of the aggressive phenotype. These results were confirmed by the increase in the aggressive behaviour of MCF-7 cells stably transfected with a Tet-off ACSL4 vector. Concomitantly, another significant finding was that intramitochondrial AA levels are significantly higher in the aggressive cells. Thus, the esterification of AA by ACSL4 compartmentalizes the release of AA in mitochondria, a mechanism that serves to drive the specific lipooxygenase metabolization of the fatty acid. To our knowledge, this is the first report that ACSL4 expression controls both lipooxygenase and cyclooxygenase metabolism of AA. Thus, this functional interaction represents an integrated system that regulates the proliferating and metastatic potential of cancer cells. Therefore, the development of combinatory therapies that profit from the ACSL4, lipooxygenase and COX-2 synergistic action may allow for lower medication doses and avoidance of side effects.

  10. Squamous cell cancer (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... a malignant tumor, and is more aggressive than basal cell cancer, but still may be relatively slow-growing. It is more likely than basal cell cancer to spread (metastasize) to other locations, including internal ...

  11. Homeobox A9 directly targeted by miR-196b regulates aggressiveness through nuclear Factor-kappa B activity in non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Seong-Lan; Lee, Dong Chul; Sohn, Hyun Ahm; Lee, Soo Young; Jeon, Hyo Sung; Lee, Joon H; Park, Chang Gyo; Lee, Hoi Young; Yeom, Young Il; Son, Ji Woong; Yoon, Yoo Sang; Kang, Jaeku

    2016-12-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are recognized as crucial posttranscriptional regulators of gene expression, and play critical roles as oncogenes or tumor suppressors in various cancers. Here, we show that miR-196b is upregulated in mesenchymal-like-state non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells and lung cancer tissues. Moreover, miR-196b upregulation stimulates cell invasion and a change in cell morphology to a spindle shape via loss of cell-to-cell contacts. We identified homeobox A9 (HOXA9) as a target gene of miR-196b by using public databases such as TargetScan, miRDB, and microRNA.org. HOXA9 expression is inversely correlated with miR-196b levels in clinical NSCLC samples as compared to that in corresponding control samples, and with the migration and invasion of NSCLC cells. Ectopic expression of HOXA9 resulted in a suppression of miR-196b-induced cell invasion, and HOXA9 reexpression increased E-cadherin expression. Furthermore, HOXA9 potently attenuated the expression of snail family zinc finger 2 (SNAI2/SLUG) and matrix metallopeptidase 9 (MMP9) by controlling the binding of nuclear factor-kappa B to the promoter of SLUG and MMP9 genes, respectively. Therefore, we suggest that HOXA9 plays a central role in controlling the aggressive behavior of lung cancer cells and that miR-196b can serve as a potential target for developing anticancer agents. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Calix[6]arene bypasses human pancreatic cancer aggressiveness: downregulation of receptor tyrosine kinases and induction of cell death by reticulum stress and autophagy.

    PubMed

    Pelizzaro-Rocha, Karin Juliane; de Jesus, Marcelo Bispo; Ruela-de-Sousa, Roberta Regina; Nakamura, Celso Vataru; Reis, Fabiano Souza; de Fátima, Angelo; Ferreira-Halder, Carmen Veríssima

    2013-12-01

    Pancreatic cancer ranks fourth among cancer-related causes of death in North America. Minimal progress has been made in the diagnosis and treatment of patients with late-stage tumors. Moreover, pancreatic cancer aggressiveness is closely related to high levels of pro-survival mediators, which can ultimately lead to rapid disease progression, resistance and metastasis. The main goal of this study was to define the mechanisms by which calix[6]arene, but not other calixarenes, efficiently decreases the aggressiveness of a drug resistant human pancreas carcinoma cell line (Panc-1). Calix[6]arene was more potent in reducing Panc-1 cell viability than gemcitabine and 5-fluorouracil. In relation to the underlying mechanisms of cytotoxic effects, it led to cell cycle arrest in the G0/G1 phase through downregulation of PIM1, CDK2, CDK4 and retinoblastoma proteins. Importantly, calix[6]arene abolished signal transduction of Mer and AXL tyrosine kinase receptors, both of which are usually overexpressed in pancreatic cancer. Accordingly, inhibition of PI3K and mTOR was also observed, and these proteins are positively modulated by Mer and AXL. Despite decreasing the phosphorylation of AKT at Thr308, calix[6]arene caused an increase in phosphorylation at Ser473. These findings in conjunction with increased BiP and IRE1-α provide a molecular basis explaining the capacity of calix[6]arene to trigger endoplasmic reticulum stress and autophagic cell death. Our findings highlight calix[6]arene as a potential candidate for overcoming pancreatic cancer aggressiveness. Importantly, we provide evidence that calix[6]arene affects a broad array of key targets that are usually dysfunctional in pancreatic cancer, a highly desirable characteristic for chemotherapeutics.

  13. Preclinical Development of Novel Rac1-GEF Signaling Inhibitors using a Rational Design Approach in Highly Aggressive Breast Cancer Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Cardama, Georgina A; Comin, Maria J; Hornos, Leandro; Gonzalez, Nazareno; Defelipe, Lucas; Turjanski, Adrian G; Alonso, Daniel F; Gomez, Daniel E; Menna, Pablo Lorenzano

    2014-01-01

    Rho GTPases play a key role in the regulation of multiple essential cellular processes, including actin dynamics, gene transcription and cell cycle progression. Aberrant activation of Rac1, a member of Rho family of small GTPases, is associated with tumorigenesis, cancer progression, invasion and metastasis. Particularly, Rac1 is overexpressed and hyperactivated in highly aggressive breast cancer. Thus, Rac1 appears to be a promising and relevant target for the development of novel anticancer drugs. We identified the novel Rac1 inhibitor ZINC69391 through a docking-based virtual library screening targeting Rac1 activation by GEFs. This compound was able to block Rac1 interaction with its GEF Tiam1, prevented EGF-induced Rac1 activation and inhibited cell proliferation, cell migration and cell cycle progression in highly aggressive breast cancer cell lines. Moreover, ZINC69391 showed an in vivo antimetastatic effect in a syngeneic animal model. We further developed the novel analog 1A-116 by rational design and showed to be specific and more potent than the parental compound in vitro and interfered Rac1-P-Rex1 interaction. We also showed an enhanced in vivo potency of 1A-116 analog. These results show that we have developed novel Rac1 inhibitors that may be used as a novel anticancer therapy. PMID:24066799

  14. Divergent in vitro/in vivo responses to drug treatments of highly aggressive NIH-Ras cancer cells: a PET imaging and metabolomics-mass-spectrometry study

    PubMed Central

    Gaglio, Daniela; Valtorta, Silvia; Ripamonti, Marilena; Bonanomi, Marcella; Damiani, Chiara; Todde, Sergio; Negri, Alfredo Simone; Sanvito, Francesca; Mastroianni, Fabrizia; Campli, Antonella Di; Turacchio, Gabriele; Di Grigoli, Giuseppe; Belloli, Sara; Luini, Alberto; Gilardi, Maria Carla; Colangelo, Anna Maria

    2016-01-01

    Oncogenic K-ras is capable to control tumor growth and progression by rewiring cancer metabolism. In vitro NIH-Ras cells convert glucose to lactate and use glutamine to sustain anabolic processes, but their in vivo environmental adaptation and multiple metabolic pathways activation ability is poorly understood. Here, we show that NIH-Ras cancer cells and tumors are able to coordinate nutrient utilization to support aggressive cell proliferation and survival. Using PET imaging and metabolomics-mass spectrometry, we identified the activation of multiple metabolic pathways such as: glycolysis, autophagy recycling mechanism, glutamine and serine/glycine metabolism, both under physiological and under stress conditions. Finally, differential responses between in vitro and in vivo systems emphasize the advantageous and uncontrolled nature of the in vivo environment, which has a pivotal role in controlling the responses to therapy. PMID:27409831

  15. The Quantitative Criteria Based on the Fractal Dimensions, Entropy, and Lacunarity for the Spatial Distribution of Cancer Cell Nuclei Enable Identification of Low or High Aggressive Prostate Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Waliszewski, Przemyslaw

    2016-01-01

    Background: Tumor grading, PSA concentration, and stage determine a risk of prostate cancer patients with accuracy of about 70%. An approach based on the fractal geometrical model was proposed to eliminate subjectivity from the evaluation of tumor aggressiveness and to improve the prediction. This study was undertaken to validate classes of equivalence for the spatial distribution of cancer cell nuclei in a larger, independent set of prostate carcinomas. Methods: The global fractal capacity D0, information D1 and correlation D2 dimension, the local fractal dimension (LFD) and the local connected fractal dimension (LCFD), Shannon entropy H and lacunarity λ were measured using computer algorithms in digitalized images of both the reference set (n = 60) and the test set (n = 208) of prostate carcinomas. Results: Prostate carcinomas were re-stratified into seven classes of equivalence. The cut-off D0-values 1.5450, 1.5820, 1.6270, 1.6490, 1.6980, 1.7640 defined the classes from C1 to C7, respectively. The other measures but the D1 failed to define the same classes of equivalence. The pairs (D0, LFD), (D0, H), (D0, λ), (D1, LFD), (D1, H), (D1, λ) characterized the spatial distribution of cancer cell nuclei in each class. The co-application of those measures enabled the subordination of prostate carcinomas to one out of three clusters associated with different tumor aggressiveness. For D0 < 1.5820, LFD < 1.3, LCFD > 1.5, H < 0.7, and λ > 0.8, the class C1 or C2 contains low complexity low aggressive carcinomas exclusively. For D0 > 1.6980, LFD > 1.7644, LCFD > 1.7051, H > 0.9, and λ < 0.7, the class C6 or C7 contains high complexity high aggressive carcinomas. Conclusions: The cut-off D0-values defining the classes of equivalence were validated in this study. The cluster analysis suggested that the number of the subjective Gleason grades and the number of the objective classes of equivalence could be decreased from seven to three without a loss of clinically

  16. Resistin and interleukin-6 exhibit racially-disparate expression in breast cancer patients, display molecular association and promote growth and aggressiveness of tumor cells through STAT3 activation.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Sachin K; Srivastava, Sanjeev K; Bhardwaj, Arun; Singh, Ajay P; Tyagi, Nikhil; Marimuthu, Saravanakumar; Dyess, Donna L; Dal Zotto, Valeria; Carter, James E; Singh, Seema

    2015-05-10

    African-American (AA) women with breast cancer (BC) are diagnosed with more aggressive disease, have higher risk of recurrence and poorer prognosis as compared to Caucasian American (CA) women. Therefore, it is imperative to define the factors associated with such disparities to reduce the unequal burden of cancer. Emerging data suggest that inherent differences exist in the tumor microenvironment of AA and CA BC patients, however, its molecular bases and functional impact have remained poorly understood. Here, we conducted cytokine profiling in serum samples from AA and CA BC patients and identified resistin and IL-6 to be the most differentially-expressed cytokines with relative greater expression in AA patients. Resistin and IL-6 exhibited positive correlation in serum levels and treatment of BC cells with resistin led to enhanced production of IL-6. Moreover, resistin also enhanced the expression and phosphorylation of STAT3, and treatment of BC cells with IL-6-neutralizing antibody prior to resistin stimulation abolished STAT3 phosphorylation. In addition, resistin promoted growth and aggressiveness of BC cells, and these effects were mediated through STAT3 activation. Together, these findings suggest a crucial role of resistin, IL-6 and STAT3 in BC racial disparity.

  17. Resistin and interleukin-6 exhibit racially-disparate expression in breast cancer patients, display molecular association and promote growth and aggressiveness of tumor cells through STAT3 activation

    PubMed Central

    Bhardwaj, Arun; Singh, Ajay P.; Tyagi, Nikhil; Marimuthu, Saravanakumar; Dyess, Donna L.; Zotto, Valeria Dal; Carter, James E.; Singh, Seema

    2015-01-01

    African-American (AA) women with breast cancer (BC) are diagnosed with more aggressive disease, have higher risk of recurrence and poorer prognosis as compared to Caucasian American (CA) women. Therefore, it is imperative to define the factors associated with such disparities to reduce the unequal burden of cancer. Emerging data suggest that inherent differences exist in the tumor microenvironment of AA and CA BC patients, however, its molecular bases and functional impact have remained poorly understood. Here, we conducted cytokine profiling in serum samples from AA and CA BC patients and identified resistin and IL-6 to be the most differentially-expressed cytokines with relative greater expression in AA patients. Resistin and IL-6 exhibited positive correlation in serum levels and treatment of BC cells with resistin led to enhanced production of IL-6. Moreover, resistin also enhanced the expression and phosphorylation of STAT3, and treatment of BC cells with IL-6-neutralizing antibody prior to resistin stimulation abolished STAT3 phosphorylation. In addition, resistin promoted growth and aggressiveness of BC cells, and these effects were mediated through STAT3 activation. Together, these findings suggest a crucial role of resistin, IL-6 and STAT3 in BC racial disparity. PMID:25868978

  18. Ovatodiolide sensitizes aggressive breast cancer cells to doxorubicin, eliminates their cancer stem cell-like phenotype, and reduces doxorubicin-associated toxicity.

    PubMed

    Bamodu, Oluwaseun Adebayo; Huang, Wen-Chien; Tzeng, David T W; Wu, Alexander; Wang, Liang Shun; Yeh, Chi-Tai; Chao, Tsu-Yi

    2015-08-10

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is chemotherapy-refractory and associated with poor clinical prognosis. Doxorubicin (Doxo), a class I anthracycline and first-line anticancer agent, effective against a wide spectrum of neoplasms including breast carcinoma, is associated with several cumulative dose-dependent adverse effects, including cardiomyopathy, typhilitis, and acute myelotoxicity. This study evaluated the usability of Ovatodiolide (Ova) in sensitizing TNBC cells to Doxo cytotoxicity, so as to reduce Doxo effective dose and consequently its adverse effects. TNBC cell lines MDA-MB-231 and HS578T were used. Pre-treatment of the TNBC cells with 10 µM Ova 24 h before Doxo administration increased the Doxo anticancer effect (IC50 1.4 µM) compared to simultaneous treatment with Doxo ( IC50 1.8 µM), or Doxo alone (IC50 9.2 µM). Intracellular accumulation of Doxo was lowest in Ova pre-treated cells at all Doxo concentrations, when compared with Doxo or simultaneously treated cells. In comparison to the Doxo-only group, cell cycle analysis of MDA-MB-231 cells treated concurrently with 2.5 µM Ova and 1.25 µM Doxo showed increased percentage of cells arrested at G0/G1; however, pre-treatment with the same concentration of Ova 24 h before Doxo showed greater tumor growth inhibition, with a 2.4-fold increased percentage of cells in G0/G1 arrest, greater Doxo-induced apoptosis, and significantly reduced intracellular Doxo accumulation. Additionally, Ova-sensitized TNBC cells also lost their cancer stem cell-like phenotype evidenced by significant dissolution, necrosis of formed mammospheres. Taken together, these findings indicate that Ova sensitizes TNBC cells to Doxo and potentiates doxorubicin-induced elimination of the TNBC cancer stem cell-like phenotype.

  19. The in vitro and vivo effects of nuclear and cytosolic parafibromin expression on the aggressive phenotypes of colorectal cancer cells: a search of potential gene therapy target.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hua-Chuan; Liu, Jia-Jie; Li, Jing; Wu, Ji-Cheng; Yang, Lei; Zhao, Gui-Feng; Zhao, Xin; Jiang, Hua-Mao; Huang, Ke-Qiang; Li, Zhi-Jie

    2017-02-16

    Down-regulated parafibromin is positively linked to the pathogenesis of parathyroid, lung, breast, ovarian, gastric and colorectal cancers. Here, we found that wild-type (WT) parafibromin overexpression suppressed proliferation, tumor growth, induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in colorectal cancer cells (p<0.05), but it was the converse for mutant-type (MT, mutation in nucleus localization sequence) parafibromin (p<0.05). Both WT and MT transfectants inhibited migration and invasion, and caused better differentiation (p<0.05) of cancer cells. WT parafibromin transfectants showed the overexpression of Cyclin B1, Cyclin D1, Cyclin E, p38, p53, and AIF in HCT-15 and HCT-116 cells, while MT parafibromin only up-regulated p38 expression. There was lower mRNA expression of bcl-2 in parafibromin transfectants than the control and mock, while higher expression of c-myc, Cyclin D1, mTOR, and Raptor. According to transcriptomic analysis, WT parafibromin suppressed PI3K-Akt and FoxO signaling pathways, while MT one promoted PI3K-Akt pathway, focal adhesion, and regulation of actin cytoskeleton. Parafibromin was less expressed in colorectal cancer than paired mucosa (p<0.05), and inversely correlated with its differentiation at both mRNA and protein levels (p<0.05). These findings indicated that WT parafibromin might reverse the aggressive phenotypes of colorectal cancer cells and be employed as a target for gene therapy. Down-regulated parafibromin expression might be closely linked to colorectal carcinogenesis and cancer differentiation.

  20. PDGF-D promotes cell growth, aggressiveness, angiogenesis and EMT transformation of colorectal cancer by activation of Notch1/Twist1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jinhuang; Yuan, Wenzheng; Wu, Liang; Tang, Qiang; Xia, Qinghua; Ji, Jintong; Liu, Zhengyi; Ma, Zhijun; Zhou, Zili; Cheng, Yifeng; Shu, Xiaogang

    2017-02-07

    Platelet-derived growth factor-D (PDGF-D) plays a crucial role in the progression of several cancers. However, its role in colorectal cancer (CRC) remains unclear. Our study showed that PDGF-D was highly expressed in CRC tissues and was positively associated with the clinicopathological features. Down-regulation of PDGF-D inhibited the tumor growth, migration and angiogenesis of SW480 cells in vitro and in vivo. Whereas up-regulation of PDGF-D promoted the malignant behaviors of HCT116 cells. Moreover, PDGF-D up-regulated the expression of Notch1 and Twist1 in CRC cells. In addition, PDGF-D expression promoted Epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT), which was accompanied with decreased E-cadherin and increased Vimentin expression. Consistently, PDGF-D, Notch1, and Twist1 are obviously up-regulated in transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-β1) treated HCT116 cells. Since Notch1 and Twist1 play an important role in EMT and tumor progression, we examined whether there is a correlation between Notch1 and Twist1 in EMT status. Our results showed that up-regulation of Notch1 was able to rescue the effects of PDGF-D down-regulation on Twist1 expression in SW480 cells, whereas down-regulation of Notch1 reduced Twist1 expression in HCT116 cells. Furthermore, we found that Twist1 promoted EMT and aggressiveness of CRC cells. These results suggest that PDGF-D promotes tumor growth and aggressiveness of CRC, moreover, down-regulation of PDGF-D inactivates Notch1/Twist1 axis, which could reverse EMT and prevent CRC progression.

  1. Low spinophilin expression enhances aggressive biological behavior of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ress, Anna Lena; Aigelsreiter, Ariane; Schauer, Silvia; Wagner, Karin; Langsenlehner, Tanja; Resel, Margit; Gerger, Armin; Ling, Hui; Ivan, Cristina; Calin, George Adrian; Hoefler, Gerald; Rinner, Beate; Pichler, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Spinophilin, a putative tumor suppressor gene, has been shown to be involved in the pathogenesis of certain types of cancer, but its role has never been systematically explored in breast cancer. In this study, we determined for the first time the expression pattern of spinophilin in human breast cancer molecular subtypes (n = 489) and correlated it with survival (n = 921). We stably reduced spinophilin expression in breast cancer cells and measured effects on cellular growth, apoptosis, anchorage-independent growth, migration, invasion and self-renewal capacity in vitro and metastases formation in vivo. Microarray profiling was used to determine the most abundantly expressed genes in spinophilin-silenced breast cancer cells. Spinophilin expression was significantly lower in basal-like breast cancer (p<0.001) and an independent poor prognostic factor in breast cancer patients (hazard ratio = 1.93, 95% confidence interval: 1.24-3.03; p = 0.004) A reduction of spinophilin levels increased cellular growth in breast cancer cells (p<0.05), without influencing activation of apoptosis. Anchorage-independent growth, migration and self-renewal capacity in vitro and metastatic potential in vivo were also significantly increased in spinophilin-silenced cells (p<0.05). Finally, we identified several differentially expressed genes in spinophilin-silenced cells. According to our data, low levels of spinophilin are associated with aggressive behavior of breast cancer. PMID:25857299

  2. The Antihelmintic Drug Pyrvinium Pamoate Targets Aggressive Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wei; Lacerda, Lara; Debeb, Bisrat G.; Atkinson, Rachel L.; Solley, Travis N.; Li, Li; Orton, Darren; McMurray, John S.; Hang, Brian I.; Lee, Ethan; Klopp, Ann H.; Ueno, Naoto T.; Reuben, James M.; Krishnamurthy, Savitri; Woodward, Wendy A.

    2013-01-01

    WNT signaling plays a key role in the self-renewal of tumor initiation cells (TICs). In this study, we used pyrvinium pamoate (PP), an FDA-approved antihelmintic drug that inhibits WNT signaling, to test whether pharmacologic inhibition of WNT signaling can specifically target TICs of aggressive breast cancer cells. SUM-149, an inflammatory breast cancer cell line, and SUM-159, a metaplastic basal-type breast cancer cell line, were used in these studies. We found that PP inhibited primary and secondary mammosphere formation of cancer cells at nanomolar concentrations, at least 10 times less than the dose needed to have a toxic effect on cancer cells. A comparable mammosphere formation IC50 dose to that observed in cancer cell lines was obtained using malignant pleural effusion samples from patients with IBC. A decrease in activity of the TIC surrogate aldehyde dehydrogenase was observed in PP-treated cells, and inhibition of WNT signaling by PP was associated with down-regulation of a panel of markers associated with epithelial-mesenchymal transition. In vivo, intratumoral injection was associated with tumor necrosis, and intraperitoneal injection into mice with tumor xenografts caused significant tumor growth delay and a trend toward decreased lung metastasis. In in vitro mammosphere-based and monolayer-based clonogenic assays, we found that PP radiosensitized cells in monolayer culture but not mammosphere culture. These findings suggest WNT signaling inhibition may be a feasible strategy for targeting aggressive breast cancer. Investigation and modification of the bioavailability and toxicity profile of systemic PP are warranted. PMID:24013655

  3. The mitotic checkpoint regulator RAE1 induces aggressive breast cancer cell phenotypes by mediating epithelial-mesenchymal transition

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Ji Hoon; Hur, Ho; Lee, Ji-Yeon; Kim, Yeejeong; Seo, Younsoo; Kim, Myoung Hee

    2017-01-01

    The gene RAE1 encodes ribonucleic acid export 1 (RAE1), which is involved in mRNA export and is known to serve as a mitotic checkpoint regulator. In addition, RAE1 haplo-insufficiency leads to chromosome missegregation and early aging-associated phenotypes. In humans, a positive correlation has been found between RAE1 copy number abnormalities and gene amplification in breast cancer cells. However, the precise functional role of RAE1 in breast cancer remains to be determined. An in silico analysis of data retrieved from GENT and cBio-Portal identified RAE1 upregulation in breast cancer tissues relative to normal breast cells. Functional studies of various cell lines showed that RAE1 induced invasive and migratory abilities by regulating epithelial-mesenchymal transition signals. A tissue microarray was constructed to demonstrate the interrelationship between clinicopathological features and RAE1 expression. Immunohistochemistry revealed a positive correlation between RAE1 expression and a high histologic grade. Furthermore, RAE1 overexpression was associated with considerably poorer disease-free survival and distant metastasis-free survival, especially in patients with oestrogen receptor-positive tumours. In summary, RAE1 may be a prognostic marker and therapeutic intervention target in malignant breast cancers. PMID:28181567

  4. The mitotic checkpoint regulator RAE1 induces aggressive breast cancer cell phenotypes by mediating epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

    PubMed

    Oh, Ji Hoon; Hur, Ho; Lee, Ji-Yeon; Kim, Yeejeong; Seo, Younsoo; Kim, Myoung Hee

    2017-02-09

    The gene RAE1 encodes ribonucleic acid export 1 (RAE1), which is involved in mRNA export and is known to serve as a mitotic checkpoint regulator. In addition, RAE1 haplo-insufficiency leads to chromosome missegregation and early aging-associated phenotypes. In humans, a positive correlation has been found between RAE1 copy number abnormalities and gene amplification in breast cancer cells. However, the precise functional role of RAE1 in breast cancer remains to be determined. An in silico analysis of data retrieved from GENT and cBio-Portal identified RAE1 upregulation in breast cancer tissues relative to normal breast cells. Functional studies of various cell lines showed that RAE1 induced invasive and migratory abilities by regulating epithelial-mesenchymal transition signals. A tissue microarray was constructed to demonstrate the interrelationship between clinicopathological features and RAE1 expression. Immunohistochemistry revealed a positive correlation between RAE1 expression and a high histologic grade. Furthermore, RAE1 overexpression was associated with considerably poorer disease-free survival and distant metastasis-free survival, especially in patients with oestrogen receptor-positive tumours. In summary, RAE1 may be a prognostic marker and therapeutic intervention target in malignant breast cancers.

  5. Tumor Tension Induces Persistent Inflammation and Promotes Breast Cancer Aggression

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-14-1-0056 TITLE: Tumor Tension Induces Persistent Inflammation and Promotes Breast Cancer Aggression PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...Breast Cancer Aggression 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER Ori Maller and Valerie M. Weaver email...ECM stiffening cooperate with inflammatory signaling to facilitate immune evasion and promote breast cancer aggression . In this progress report, I

  6. Tumor reactive stroma in cholangiocarcinoma: The fuel behind cancer aggressiveness

    PubMed Central

    Brivio, Simone; Cadamuro, Massimiliano; Strazzabosco, Mario; Fabris, Luca

    2017-01-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is a highly aggressive epithelial malignancy still carrying a dismal prognosis, owing to early lymph node metastatic dissemination and striking resistance to conventional chemotherapy. Although mechanisms underpinning CCA progression are still a conundrum, it is now increasingly recognized that the desmoplastic microenvironment developing in conjunction with biliary carcinogenesis, recently renamed tumor reactive stroma (TRS), behaves as a paramount tumor-promoting driver. Indeed, once being recruited, activated and dangerously co-opted by neoplastic cells, the cellular components of the TRS (myofibroblasts, macrophages, endothelial cells and mesenchymal stem cells) continuously rekindle malignancy by secreting a huge variety of soluble factors (cyto/chemokines, growth factors, morphogens and proteinases). Furthermore, these factors are long-term stored within an abnormally remodeled extracellular matrix (ECM), which in turn can deleteriously mold cancer cell behavior. In this review, we will highlight evidence for the active role played by reactive stromal cells (as well as by the TRS-associated ECM) in CCA progression, including an overview of the most relevant TRS-derived signals possibly fueling CCA cell aggressiveness. Hopefully, a deeper knowledge of the paracrine communications reciprocally exchanged between cancer and stromal cells will steer the development of innovative, combinatorial therapies, which can finally hinder the progression of CCA, as well as of other cancer types with abundant TRS, such as pancreatic and breast carcinomas.

  7. Pterostilbene Decreases the Antioxidant Defenses of Aggressive Cancer Cells In Vivo: A Physiological Glucocorticoids- and Nrf2-Dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Benlloch, María; Obrador, Elena; Valles, Soraya L.; Rodriguez, María L.; Sirerol, J. Antoni; Alcácer, Javier; Pellicer, José A.; Salvador, Rosario; Cerdá, Concha; Sáez, Guillermo T.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Polyphenolic phytochemicals have anticancer properties. However, in mechanistic studies, lack of correlation with the bioavailable concentrations is a critical issue. Some reports had suggested that these molecules downregulate the stress response, which may affect growth and the antioxidant protection of malignant cells. Initially, we studied this potential underlying mechanism using different human melanomas (with genetic backgrounds correlating with most melanomas), growing in nude mice as xenografts, and pterostilbene (Pter, a natural dimethoxylated analog of resveratrol). Results: Intravenous administration of Pter decreased human melanoma growth in vivo. However, Pter, at levels measured within the tumors, did not affect melanoma growth in vitro. Pter inhibited pituitary production of the adrenocorticotropin hormone (ACTH), decreased plasma levels of corticosterone, and thereby downregulated the glucocorticoid receptor- and nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2)-dependent antioxidant defense system in growing melanomas. Exogenous corticosterone or genetically induced Nrf2 overexpression in melanoma cells prevented the inhibition of tumor growth and decreased antioxidant defenses in these malignant cells. These effects and mechanisms were also found in mice bearing different human pancreatic cancers. Glutathione depletion (selected as an antimelanoma strategy) facilitated the complete elimination by chemotherapy of melanoma cells isolated from mice treated with Pter. Innovation: Although bioavailability-related limitations may preclude direct anticancer effects in vivo, natural polyphenols may also interfere with the growth and defense of cancer cells by downregulating the pituitary gland-dependent ACTH synthesis. Conclusions: Pter downregulates glucocorticoid production, thus decreasing the glucocorticoid receptor and Nrf2-dependent signaling/transcription and the antioxidant protection of melanoma and pancreatic cancer cells

  8. mRNA and methylation profiling of radioresistant esophageal cancer cells: the involvement of Sall2 in acquired aggressive phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Judong; Wang, Wenjie; Tang, Yiting; Zhou, Dandan; Gao, Yi; Zhang, Qi; Zhou, Xifa; Zhu, Hui; Xing, Ligang; Yu, Jinming

    2017-01-01

    Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is one of the deadliest malignancies worldwide. Radiotherapy plays a critical role in the curative management of inoperable ESCC patients. However, radioresistance restricts the efficacy of radiotherapy for ESCC patients. The molecules involved in radioresistance remain largely unknown, and new approaches to sensitize cells to irradiation are in demand. Technical advances in analysis of mRNA and methylation have enabled the exploration of the etiology of diseases and have the potential to broaden our understanding of the molecular pathways of ESCC radioresistance. In this study, we constructed radioresistant TE-1 and Eca-109 cell lines (TE-1/R and Eca-109/R, respectively). The radioresistant cells showed an increased migration ability but reduced apoptosis and cisplatin sensitivity compared with their parent cells. mRNA and methylation profiling by microarray revealed 1192 preferentially expressed mRNAs and 8841 aberrantly methylated regions between TE-1/R and TE-1 cells. By integrating the mRNA and methylation profiles, we related the decreased expression of transcription factor Sall2 with a corresponding increase in its methylation in TE-1/R cells, indicating its involvement in radioresistance. Upregulation of Sall2 decreased the growth and migration advantage of radioresistant ESCC cells. Taken together, our present findings illustrate the mRNA and DNA methylation changes during the radioresistance of ESCC and the important role of Sall2 in esophageal cancer malignancy. PMID:28367244

  9. The TORC1/TORC2 inhibitor, Palomid 529, reduces tumor growth and sensitizes to docetaxel and cisplatin in aggressive and hormone-refractory prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Gravina, Giovanni Luca; Marampon, Francesco; Petini, Foteini; Biordi, Leda; Sherris, David; Jannini, Emmanuele A; Tombolini, Vincenzo; Festuccia, Claudio

    2011-08-01

    One of the major obstacles in the treatment of hormone-refractory prostate cancer (HRPC) is the development of chemo-resistant tumors. The aim of this study is to evaluate the role of Palomid 529 (P529), a novel TORC1/TORC2 inhibitor, in association with docetaxel (DTX) and cisplatin (CP). This work utilizes a wide panel of prostatic cancer cell lines with or without basal activation of Akt as well as two in vivo models of aggressive HRPC. The blockade of Akt/mTOR activity was associated to reduced cell proliferation and induction of apoptosis. Comparison of IC50 values calculated for PTEN-positive and PTEN-negative cell lines as well as the PTEN transfection in PC3 cells or PTEN silencing in DU145 cells revealed that absence of PTEN was indicative for a better activity of the drug. In addition, P529 synergized with DTX and CP. The strongest synergism was achieved when prostate cancer (PCa) cells were sequentially exposed to CP or DTX followed by treatment with P529. Treatment with P529 before the exposure to chemotherapeutic drugs resulted in a moderate synergism, whereas intermediated values of combination index were found when drugs were administered simultaneously. In vivo treatment of a combination of P529 with DTX or CP increased the percentage of complete responses and reduced the number of mice with tumor progression. Our results provide a rationale for combinatorial treatment using conventional chemotherapy and a Akt/mTOR inhibitor as promising therapeutic approach for the treatment of HRPC, a disease largely resistant to conventional therapies.

  10. PEG-3, a nontransforming cancer progression gene, is a positive regulator of cancer aggressiveness and angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Su, Z Z; Goldstein, N I; Jiang, H; Wang, M N; Duigou, G J; Young, C S; Fisher, P B

    1999-12-21

    Cancer is a progressive disease culminating in acquisition of metastatic potential by a subset of evolving tumor cells. Generation of an adequate blood supply in tumors by production of new blood vessels, angiogenesis, is a defining element in this process. Although extensively investigated, the precise molecular events underlying tumor development, cancer progression, and angiogenesis remain unclear. Subtraction hybridization identified a genetic element, progression elevated gene-3 (PEG-3), whose expression directly correlates with cancer progression and acquisition of oncogenic potential by transformed rodent cells. We presently demonstrate that forced expression of PEG-3 in tumorigenic rodent cells, and in human cancer cells, increases their oncogenic potential in nude mice as reflected by a shorter tumor latency time and the production of larger tumors with increased vascularization. Moreover, inhibiting endogenous PEG-3 expression in progressed rodent cancer cells by stable expression of an antisense expression vector extinguishes the progressed cancer phenotype. Cancer aggressiveness of PEG-3 expressing rodent cells correlates directly with increased RNA transcription, elevated mRNA levels, and augmented secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Furthermore, transient ectopic expression of PEG-3 transcriptionally activates VEGF in transformed rodent and human cancer cells. Taken together these data demonstrate that PEG-3 is a positive regulator of cancer aggressiveness, a process regulated by augmented VEGF production. These studies also support an association between expression of a single nontransforming cancer progression-inducing gene, PEG-3, and the processes of cancer aggressiveness and angiogenesis. In these contexts, PEG-3 may represent an important target molecule for developing cancer therapeutics and inhibitors of angiogenesis.

  11. Vitamin D and Related Genes, Race and Prostate Cancer Aggressiveness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-29

    vitamin D and genetic polymorphisms act synergistically to affect prostate cancer aggressiveness. We examined these associations among vitamin D...epidemiologic techniques for estimating odds of high aggressive prostate cancer according to vitamin D metabolites, PTH, calcium, phosphorus and genetic ...hypotheses a. Statistical analyses have been performed examining associations between 25(OH)D, 1,25(OH)2D, genetic polymorphisms and prostate cancer

  12. Retraction: "Activated K-Ras and INK4a/Arf Deficiency Promote Aggressiveness of Pancreatic Cancer by Induction of EMT Consistent With Cancer Stem Cell Phenotype" by Wang et al.

    PubMed

    2016-10-01

    The above article, published online on November 23, 2012 in Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary.com), has been retracted by agreement between the journal Editor in Chief, Gary S. Stein, and Wiley Periodicals, Inc. The retraction has been agreed following an investigation from Wayne State University involving the first author and the corresponding author that found Figure 4B and C to be inappropriately manipulated and re-labeled. Literature Cited Wang Z, Ali S, Banerjee S, Bao B, Li Y, Azmi AS, Korc M, Sarkar FH. 2013. Activated K-Ras and INK4a/Arf deficiency promote aggressiveness of pancreatic cancer by induction of EMT consistent with cancer stem cell phenotype. J Cell Physiol 228:556-562; doi: 10.1002/jcp.24162.

  13. Enriched CD44(+)/CD24(-) population drives the aggressive phenotypes presented in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC).

    PubMed

    Ma, Fei; Li, Huihui; Wang, Haijuan; Shi, Xiuqing; Fan, Ying; Ding, Xiaoyan; Lin, Chen; Zhan, Qimin; Qian, Haili; Xu, Binghe

    2014-10-28

    The mechanism underlying the aggressive behaviors of triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) is not well characterized yet. The association between cancer stem cell (CSC) population and the aggressive behaviors of TNBC has not been established. We found the CD44(+)/CD24(-) cell population was enriched in TNBC tissues and cell lines, with a higher capacity of proliferation, migration, invasion and tumorigenicity as well as lower adhesion ability. The CD44(+)/CD24(-) cell population with cancer stem cell-like properties may play an important role in the aggressive behaviors of TNBC. This discovery may lead to new therapeutic strategies targeting CD44(+)/CD24(-) cell population in TNBC.

  14. Imaging Prostatic Lipids to Distinguish Aggressive Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    FAS activity in prostatectomy samples, intraprostatic lipid as measured by MRSI and prostate tumor aggressiveness. 3) To quantify key metabolic ...intermediates involved in lipid metabolism , mitochondrial function, inflammation, and apoptosis in the prostatectomy samples. 15. SUBJECT TERMS : none...vivo intraprostatic fat as measured by 1H MRSI, metabolic signatures of lipid oxidation and metabolism , and prostate cancer aggressiveness, our

  15. Human periprostatic adipose tissue promotes prostate cancer aggressiveness in vitro

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Obesity is associated with prostate cancer aggressiveness and mortality. The contribution of periprostatic adipose tissue, which is often infiltrated by malignant cells, to cancer progression is largely unknown. Thus, this study aimed to determine if periprostatic adipose tissue is linked with aggressive tumor biology in prostate cancer. Methods Supernatants of whole adipose tissue (explants) or stromal vascular fraction (SVF) from paired fat samples of periprostatic (PP) and pre-peritoneal visceral (VIS) anatomic origin from different donors were prepared and analyzed for matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) 2 and 9 activity. The effects of those conditioned media (CM) on growth and migration of hormone-refractory (PC-3) and hormone-sensitive (LNCaP) prostate cancer cells were measured. Results We show here that PP adipose tissue of overweight men has higher MMP9 activity in comparison with normal subjects. The observed increased activities of both MMP2 and MMP9 in PP whole adipose tissue explants, likely reveal the contribution of adipocytes plus stromal-vascular fraction (SVF) as opposed to SVF alone. MMP2 activity was higher for PP when compared to VIS adipose tissue. When PC-3 cells were stimulated with CM from PP adipose tissue explants, increased proliferative and migratory capacities were observed, but not in the presence of SVF. Conversely, when LNCaP cells were stimulated with PP explants CM, we found enhanced motility despite the inhibition of proliferation, whereas CM derived from SVF increased both cell proliferation and motility. Explants culture and using adipose tissue of PP origin are most effective in promoting proliferation and migration of PC-3 cells, as respectively compared with SVF culture and using adipose tissue of VIS origin. In LNCaP cells, while explants CM cause increased migration compared to SVF, the use of PP adipose tissue to generate CM result in the increase of both cellular proliferation and migration. Conclusions Our

  16. MMP1, MMP9, and COX2 Expressions in Promonocytes Are Induced by Breast Cancer Cells and Correlate with Collagen Degradation, Transformation-Like Morphological Changes in MCF-10A Acini, and Tumor Aggressiveness

    PubMed Central

    Chimal-Ramírez, G. K.; Espinoza-Sánchez, N. A.; Utrera-Barillas, D.; Benítez-Bribiesca, L.; Velázquez, J. R.; Arriaga-Pizano, L. A.; Monroy-García, A.; Reyes-Maldonado, E.; Domínguez-López, M. L.; Piña-Sánchez, Patricia; Fuentes-Pananá, E. M.

    2013-01-01

    Tumor-associated immune cells often lack immune effector activities, and instead they present protumoral functions. To understand how tumors promote this immunological switch, invasive and noninvasive breast cancer cell (BRC) lines were cocultured with a promonocytic cell line in a Matrigel-based 3D system. We hypothesized that if communication exists between tumor and immune cells, coculturing would result in augmented expression of genes associated with tumor malignancy. Upregulation of proteases MMP1 and MMP9 and inflammatory COX2 genes was found likely in response to soluble factors. Interestingly, changes were more apparent in promonocytes and correlated with the aggressiveness of the BRC line. Increased gene expression was confirmed by collagen degradation assays and immunocytochemistry of prostaglandin 2, a product of COX2 activity. Untransformed MCF-10A cells were then used as a sensor of soluble factors with transformation-like capabilities, finding that acini formed in the presence of supernatants of the highly aggressive BRC/promonocyte cocultures often exhibited total loss of the normal architecture. These data support that tumor cells can modify immune cell gene expression and tumor aggressiveness may importantly reside in this capacity. Modeling interactions in the tumor stroma will allow the identification of genes useful as cancer prognostic markers and therapy targets. PMID:23762835

  17. Cancer-associated fibroblast-derived annexin A6+ extracellular vesicles support pancreatic cancer aggressiveness

    PubMed Central

    Leca, Julie; Martinez, Sébastien; Lac, Sophie; Nigri, Jérémy; Secq, Véronique; Rubis, Marion; Bressy, Christian; Lavaut, Marie-Noelle; Dusetti, Nelson; Loncle, Céline; Roques, Julie; Pietrasz, Daniel; Bousquet, Corinne; Garcia, Stéphane; Granjeaud, Samuel; Ouaissi, Mehdi; Bachet, Jean Baptiste; Iovanna, Juan L.; Zimmermann, Pascale; Vasseur, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    The intratumoral microenvironment, or stroma, is of major importance in the pathobiology of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA), and specific conditions in the stroma may promote increased cancer aggressiveness. We hypothesized that this heterogeneous and evolving compartment drastically influences tumor cell abilities, which in turn influences PDA aggressiveness through crosstalk that is mediated by extracellular vesicles (EVs). Here, we have analyzed the PDA proteomic stromal signature and identified a contribution of the annexin A6/LDL receptor-related protein 1/thrombospondin 1 (ANXA6/LRP1/TSP1) complex in tumor cell crosstalk. Formation of the ANXA6/LRP1/TSP1 complex was restricted to cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) and required physiopathologic culture conditions that improved tumor cell survival and migration. Increased PDA aggressiveness was dependent on tumor cell–mediated uptake of CAF-derived ANXA6+ EVs carrying the ANXA6/LRP1/TSP1 complex. Depletion of ANXA6 in CAFs impaired complex formation and subsequently impaired PDA and metastasis occurrence, while injection of CAF-derived ANXA6+ EVs enhanced tumorigenesis. We found that the presence of ANXA6+ EVs in serum was restricted to PDA patients and represents a potential biomarker for PDA grade. These findings suggest that CAF–tumor cell crosstalk supported by ANXA6+ EVs is predictive of PDA aggressiveness, highlighting a therapeutic target and potential biomarker for PDA. PMID:27701147

  18. Highly prevalent TERT promoter mutations in aggressive thyroid cancers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoli; Bishop, Justin; Shan, Yuan; Pai, Sara; Liu, Dingxie; Murugan, Avaniyapuram Kannan; Sun, Hui; El-Naggar, Adel K; Xing, Mingzhao

    2013-08-01

    Mutations 1 295 228 C>T and 1 295 250 C>T (termed C228T and C250T respectively), corresponding to -124 C>T and -146 C>T from the translation start site in the promoter of the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) gene, have recently been reported in human cancers, but not in thyroid cancers yet. We explored these mutations in thyroid cancers by genomic sequencing of a large number of primary tumor samples. We found the C228T mutation in 0 of 85 (0.0%) benign thyroid tumors, 30 of 257 (11.7%) papillary thyroid cancers (PTC), 9 of 79 (11.4%) follicular thyroid cancers (FTC), 3 of 8 (37.5%) poorly differentiated thyroid cancers (PDTC), 23 of 54 (42.6%) anaplastic thyroid cancers (ATC), and 8 of 12 (66.7%) thyroid cancer cell lines. The C250T mutation was uncommon, but mutually exclusive with the C228T mutation, and the two mutations were collectively found in 11 of 79 (13.9%) FTC, 25 of 54 (46.3%) ATC, and 11 of 12 (91.7%) thyroid cancer cell lines. Among PTC variants, the C228T mutation was found in 4 of 13 (30.8%) tall-cell PTC (TCPTC), 23 of 187 (12.3%) conventional PTC, and 2 of 56 (3.6%) follicular variant PTC samples. No TERT mutation was found in 16 medullary thyroid cancer samples. The C228T mutation was associated with the BRAF V600E mutation in PTC, being present in 19 of 104 (18.3%) BRAF mutation-positive PTC vs 11 of 153 (7.2%) the BRAF mutation-negative PTC samples (P=0.0094). Conversely, BRAF mutation was found in 19 of 30 (63.3%) C228T mutation-positive PTC vs 85 of 227 (37.4%) C228T mutation-negative PTC samples (P=0.0094). We thus for the first time, to our knowledge, demonstrate TERT promoter mutations in thyroid cancers, that are particularly prevalent in the aggressive thyroid cancers TCPTC, PDTC, ATC and BRAF mutation-positive PTC, revealing a novel genetic background for thyroid cancers.

  19. Glucose promotes breast cancer aggression and reduces metformin efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Wahdan-Alaswad, Reema; Fan, Zeying; Edgerton, Susan M; Liu, Bolin; Deng, Xin-Sheng; Arnadottir, Sigrid Salling; Richer, Jennifer K; Anderson, Steven M; Thor, Ann D

    2013-01-01

    Metformin treatment has been associated with a decrease in breast cancer risk and improved survival. Metformin induces complex cellular changes, resulting in decreased tumor cell proliferation, reduction of stem cells, and apoptosis. Using a carcinogen-induced rodent model of mammary tumorigenesis, we recently demonstrated that overfeeding in obese animals is associated with a 50% increase in tumor glucose uptake, increased proliferation, and tumor cell reprogramming to an “aggressive” metabolic state. Metformin significantly inhibited these pro-tumorigenic effects. We hypothesized that a dynamic relationship exists between chronic energy excess (glucose by dose) and metformin efficacy/action. Media glucose concentrations above 5 mmol/L was associated with significant increase in breast cancer cell proliferation, clonogenicity, motility, upregulation/activation of pro-oncogenic signaling, and reduction in apoptosis. These effects were most significant in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) cell lines. High-glucose conditions (10 mmol/L or above) significantly abrogated the effects of metformin. Mechanisms of metformin action at normal vs. high glucose overlapped but were not identical; for example, metformin reduced IGF-1R expression in both the HER2+ SK-BR-3 and TNBC MDA-MB-468 cell lines more significantly at 5, as compared with 10 mmol/L glucose. Significant changes in gene profiles related to apoptosis, cellular processes, metabolic processes, and cell proliferation occurred with metformin treatment in cells grown at 5 mmol/L glucose, whereas under high-glucose conditions, metformin did not significantly increase apoptotic/cellular death genes. These data indicate that failure to maintain glucose homeostasis may promote a more aggressive breast cancer phenotype and alter metformin efficacy and mechanisms of action. PMID:24107633

  20. Overexpression of α (1,6) fucosyltransferase associated with aggressive prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiangchun; Chen, Jing; Li, Qing Kay; Peskoe, Sarah B; Zhang, Bai; Choi, Caitlin; Platz, Elizabeth A; Zhang, Hui

    2014-10-01

    Aberrant protein glycosylation is known to be associated with the development of cancers. The aberrant glycans are produced by the combined actions of changed glycosylation enzymes, substrates and transporters in glycosylation synthesis pathways in cancer cells. To identify glycosylation enzymes associated with aggressive prostate cancer (PCa), we analyzed the difference in the expression of glycosyltransferase genes between aggressive and non-aggressive PCa. Three candidate genes encoding glycosyltransferases that were elevated in aggressive PCa were subsequently selected. The expression of the three candidates was then further evaluated in androgen-dependent (LNCaP) and androgen-independent (PC3) PCa cell lines. We found that the protein expression of one of the glycosyltransferases, α (1,6) fucosyltransferase (FUT8), was only detected in PC3 cells, but not in LNCaP cells. We further showed that FUT8 protein expression was elevated in metastatic PCa tissues compared to normal prostate tissues. In addition, using tissue microarrays, we found that FUT8 overexpression was statistically associated with PCa with a high Gleason score. Using PC3 and LNCaP cells as models, we found that FUT8 overexpression in LNCaP cells increased PCa cell migration, while loss of FUT8 in PC3 cells decreased cell motility. Our results suggest that FUT8 may be associated with aggressive PCa and thus is potentially useful for its prognosis.

  1. Enhancement of the Efficacy of Conventional Anticancer Compounds Through the Repression of SNAI Proteins in Aggressive Breast Cancer Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-01

    67] Ooi, L. L., Zhou, H., Kalak, R., Zheng, Y., Conigrave, A. D., Seibel, M. J., and Dunstan, C. R. (2010) Vitamin D deficiency promotes human breast...agents such as vitamin D and anti-estrogens. Specific Aims: (1) To evaluate the levels of SNAI proteins in relation to the levels of the proteins...that impart resistance against vitamin D and anti-estrogens in human breast cancer tissues; (2) To determine the effects of alterations of the levels

  2. MMSET is overexpressed in cancers: Link with tumor aggressiveness

    SciTech Connect

    Kassambara, Alboukadel; Klein, Bernard Moreaux, Jerome

    2009-02-20

    MMSET is expressed ubiquitously in early development and its deletion is associated with the malformation syndrome called Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome. It is involved in the t(4; 14) (p16; q32) chromosomal translocation, which is the second most common translocation in multiple myeloma (MM) and is associated with the worst prognosis. MMSET expression has been shown to promote cellular adhesion, clonogenic growth and tumorigenicity in multiple myeloma. MMSET expression has been recently shown to increase with ascending tumor proliferation activity in glioblastoma multiforme. These data demonstrate that MMSET could be implicated in tumor emergence and/or progression. Therefore, we compared the expression of MMSET in 40 human tumor types - brain, epithelial, lymphoid - to that of their normal tissue counterparts using publicly available gene expression data, including the Oncomine Cancer Microarray database. We found significant overexpression of MMSET in 15 cancers compared to their normal counterparts. Furthermore MMSET is associated with tumor aggressiveness or prognosis in many types of these aforementioned cancers. Taken together, these data suggest that MMSET potentially acts as a pathogenic agent in many cancers. The identification of the targets of MMSET and their role in cell growth and survival will be key to understand how MMSET is associated with tumor development.

  3. Should aggressive thoracic therapy be performed in patients with synchronous oligometastatic non-small cell lung cancer? A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dianhe; Wang, Haofei; Qiu, Min; Li, Na

    2017-01-01

    Background We performed a meta-analysis to compare overall survival (OS) outcomes in patients with synchronous oligometastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who underwent aggressive thoracic therapy (ATT) with those who did not. Methods A systematic review of controlled trials of ATT on survival in synchronous oligometastatic NSCLC was conducted. Hazard ratio (HR) for the main endpoint OS was pooled using a fixed-effects model. Subgroup analysis was performed in patients with single organ metastases, or with different numbers of brain metastases, or with different stages of thoracic disease. Pooled survival curves of OS were constructed. Results Seven eligible retrospective observational cohort studies were identified including 668 synchronous oligometastatic NSCLC patients, of whom 227 (34.0%) received ATT. For patients with synchronous oligometastatic NSCLC, ATT was associated with a significant improvement of OS (HR, 0.48; 95% CI, 0.39–0.60; P<0.00001). In subgroup analysis, the association with OS was similar or even strengthened, with a HR of 0.42 (95% CI, 0.31–0.56) in single organ metastases group, 0.49 (95% CI, 0.31–0.75) in solitary brain metastasis group, and 0.38 (95% CI, 0.20–0.73) in thoracic stage I–II group, respectively. The pooled cumulative survival rates for patients received ATT were 74.9% at 1 year, 52.1% at 2 years, 23.0% at 3 years, and 12.6% at 4 years. The corresponding pooled survival for patients who did not receive ATT were 32.3%, 13.7%, 3.7%, and 2.0%, respectively. Conclusions Survival benefit from ATT is common in synchronous oligometastatic patients. Selected patients with synchronous oligometastatic NSCLC could also achieve long-term survival with ATT. PMID:28275479

  4. Two Susceptibility Loci Identified for Prostate Cancer Aggressiveness

    PubMed Central

    Berndt, Sonja I.; Wang, Zhaoming; Yeager, Meredith; Alavanja, Michael C.; Albanes, Demetrius; Amundadottir, Laufey; Andriole, Gerald; Freeman, Laura Beane; Campa, Daniele; Cancel-Tassin, Geraldine; Canzian, Federico; Cornu, Jean-Nicolas; Cussenot, Olivier; Diver, W. Ryan; Gapstur, Susan M.; Grönberg, Henrik; Haiman, Christopher A.; Henderson, Brian; Hutchinson, Amy; Hunter, David J.; Key, Timothy J.; Kolb, Suzanne; Koutros, Stella; Kraft, Peter; Le Marchand, Loic; Lindström, Sara; Machiela, Mitchell J.; Ostrander, Elaine A.; Riboli, Elio; Schumacher, Fred; Siddiq, Afshan; Stanford, Janet L.; Stevens, Victoria L.; Travis, Ruth C.; Tsilidis, Konstantinos K.; Virtamo, Jarmo; Weinstein, Stephanie; Wilkund, Fredrik; Xu, Jianfeng; Zheng, S. Lilly; Yu, Kai; Wheeler, William; Zhang, Han; Sampson, Joshua; Black, Amanda; Jacobs, Kevin; Hoover, Robert N; Tucker, Margaret; Chanock, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    Most men diagnosed with prostate cancer will experience indolent disease; hence discovering genetic variants that distinguish aggressive from non-aggressive prostate cancer is of critical clinical importance for disease prevention and treatment. In a multistage, case-only genome-wide association study of 12,518 prostate cancer cases, we identify two loci associated with Gleason score, a pathological measure of disease aggressiveness: rs35148638 at 5q14.3 (RASA1, P=6.49×10-9) and rs78943174 at 3q26.31 (NAALADL2, P=4.18×10-8). In a stratified case-control analysis, the SNP at 5q14.3 appears specific for aggressive prostate cancer (P=8.85×10-5) with no association for non-aggressive prostate cancer compared to controls (P=0.57). The proximity of these loci to genes involved in vascular disease suggests potential biological mechanisms worthy of further investigation. PMID:25939597

  5. Role of MicroRNA in Aggressive Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-11-1-0491 TITLE: Role of MicroRNA in Aggressive Prostate... MicroRNA in Aggressive Prostate Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-11-1-0491 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Jer...action is not fully characterized. Using microRNA microarray screening, we found microRNA -363 (miR363) is significantly down regulated in several

  6. Biomarkers to Distinguish Aggressive Cancers from Non-aggressive or Non-progressing Cancer — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    Distinguishing aggressive cancers from non-aggressive or non-progressing cancers is an issue of both clinical and public health importance particularly for those cancers with an available screening test. With respect to breast cancer, mammographic screening has been shown in randomized trials to reduce breast cancer mortality, but given the limitations of its sensitivity and specificity some breast cancers are missed by screening. These so called interval detected breast cancers diagnosed between regular screenings are known to have a more aggressive clinical profile. In addition, of those cancers detected by mammography some are indolent while others are more likely to recur despite treatment. The pilot study proposed herein is highly responsive to the EDRN supplement titled “Biomarkers to Distinguish Aggressive Cancers from Nonaggressive or Non-progressing Cancers” in that it addresses both of the research objectives related to these issues outlined in the notice for this supplement: Aim 1: To identify biomarkers in tumor tissue related to risk of interval detected vs. mammography screen detected breast cancer focusing on early stage invasive disease. We will compare gene expression profiles using the whole genome-cDNA-mediated Annealing, Selection, extension and Ligation (DASL) assay of 50 screen detected cancers to those of 50 interval detected cancers. Through this approach we will advance our understanding of the molecular characteristics of interval vs. screen detected breast cancers and discover novel biomarkers that distinguish between them. Aim 2: To identify biomarkers in tumor tissue related to risk of cancer recurrence among patients with screen detected early stage invasive breast cancer. Using the DASL assay we will compare gene expression profiles from screen detected early stage breast cancer that either recurred within five years or never recurred within five years. These two groups of patients will be matched on multiple factors including

  7. Profilin 1 is a Potential Biomarker for Bladder Cancer Aggressiveness*

    PubMed Central

    Zoidakis, Jerome; Makridakis, Manousos; Zerefos, Panagiotis G.; Bitsika, Vasiliki; Esteban, Sergio; Frantzi, Maria; Stravodimos, Konstantinos; Anagnou, Nikolaos P.; Roubelakis, Maria G.; Sanchez-Carbayo, Marta; Vlahou, Antonia

    2012-01-01

    Of the most important clinical needs for bladder cancer (BC) management is the identification of biomarkers for disease aggressiveness. Urine is a “gold mine” for biomarker discovery, nevertheless, with multiple proteins being in low amounts, urine proteomics becomes challenging. In the present study we applied a fractionation strategy of urinary proteins based on the use of immobilized metal affinity chromatography for the discovery of biomarkers for aggressive BC. Urine samples from patients with non invasive (two pools) and invasive (two pools) BC were subjected to immobilized metal affinity chromatography fractionation and eluted proteins analyzed by 1D-SDS-PAGE, band excision and liquid chromatography tandem MS. Among the identified proteins, multiple corresponded to proteins with affinity for metals and/or reported to be phosphorylated and included proteins with demonstrated association with BC such as MMP9, fibrinogen forms, and clusterin. In agreement to the immobilized metal affinity chromatography results, aminopeptidase N, profilin 1, and myeloblastin were further found to be differentially expressed in urine from patients with invasive compared with non invasive BC and benign controls, by Western blot or Elisa analysis, nevertheless exhibiting high interindividual variability. By tissue microarray analysis, profilin 1 was found to have a marked decrease of expression in the epithelial cells of the invasive (T2+) versus high risk non invasive (T1G3) tumors with occasional expression in stroma; importantly, this pattern strongly correlated with poor prognosis and increased mortality. The functional relevance of profilin 1 was investigated in the T24 BC cells where blockage of the protein by the use of antibodies resulted in decreased cell motility with concomitant decrease in actin polymerization. Collectively, our study involves the application of a fractionation method of urinary proteins and as one main result of this analysis reveals the

  8. Acrp30 inhibits leptin-induced metastasis by downregulating the JAK/STAT3 pathway via AMPK activation in aggressive SPEC-2 endometrial cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaomei; Yan, Qin; Zhang, Zhenbo; Du, Guiqiang; Wan, Xiaoping

    2012-05-01

    Obesity is a well-established risk factor for endometrial cancer, due in part to the adipokines generated by adipose tissue, such as adiponectin (also known as Acrp30) and leptin, which are associated with many endocrine-related cancers. Recent reports suggested that Acrp30 inhibits leptin-stimulated cell proliferation in HEC-1A and RL95-2 endometrial cancer cell lines, and that the serum leptin/Acrp30 ratio plays an important role in endometrial cancer development. We explored whether Acrp30 could reverse the leptin-induced metastasis phenotype in the SPEC-2 endometrial cancer cell line. Transcripts for Acrp30 receptors (AdipoR1 and AdipoR2) and leptin receptor (Ob-Rb) were detected by quantitative real-time RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) in six endometrial cancer cell lines. Leptin (1 µg/ml) treatment stimulated SPEC-2 cell proliferation by inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, while Acrp30 (10 µg/ml) treatment inhibited the growth of SPEC-2 cells. Importantly, Acrp30 was able to inhibit leptin-induced SPEC-2 cell proliferation. Leptin promoted SPEC-2 cell invasion in a Matrigel transwell assay, while Acrp30 partly suppressed the invasion stimulated by leptin. To investigate the molecular mechanism underlying this phenomenon, we monitored the AMPK and JAK/STAT3 signaling pathways by western blotting and cell immunofluorescence. Acrp30 reduced leptin-induced STAT3 phosphorylation and nuclear translocation via activation of the MAPK pathway. AG490 (JAK/STAT3 inhibitor) reduced MMP-2 and MMP-9 protein levels in cells treated with leptin, while IL-6 (JAK/STAT3 stimulator) and Compound C (AMPK inhibitor) elevated MMP-2 and MMP-9 protein levels in cells treated with Acrp30. In conclusion, we demonstrated that Acrp30 effectively reversed the invasion stimulated by leptin, and AMPK and JAK/STAT3 pathways mediated the invasive phenotype of SPEC-2 cells.

  9. TIMP-1 is under regulation of the EGF signaling axis and promotes an aggressive phenotype in KRAS-mutated colorectal cancer cells: A potential novel approach to the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Ib J.; Nordgaard, Cathrine; Noer, Julie; Guren, Tormod K.; Glimelius, Bengt; Sorbye, Halfdan; Ikdahl, Tone; Kure, Elin H.; Tveit, Kjell M.; Nielsen, Hans J.

    2016-01-01

    It is now widely accepted that therapeutic antibodies targeting epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) can have efficacy in KRAS wild-type advanced colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. What remains to be ascertained is whether a subgroup of KRAS-mutated CRC patients might not also derive benefit from EGFR inhibitors. Metalloproteinase inhibitor 1 (TIMP-1) is a pleiotropic factor predictive of survival outcome of CRC patients. Levels of TIMP-1 were measured in pre-treatment plasma samples (n = 426) of metastatic CRC patients randomized to Nordic FLOX (5-fluorouracil and oxaliplatin) +/− cetuximab (NORDIC VII study). Multivariate analysis demonstrated a significant interaction between plasma TIMP-1 protein levels, KRAS status and treatment with patients bearing KRAS mutated tumors and high TIMP-1 plasma level (> 3rd quartile) showing a significantly longer overall survival if treated with cetuximab (HR, 0.48; 95% CI, 0.25 to 0.93). To gain mechanistic insights into this association we analyzed a set of five different CRC cell lines. We show here that EGFR signaling induces TIMP-1 expression in CRC cells, and that TIMP-1 promotes a more aggressive behavior, specifically in KRAS mutated cells. The two sets of data, clinical and in vitro, are complementary and support each other, lending strength to our contention that TIMP- 1 plasma levels can identify a subset of patients with KRAS-mutated metastatic CRC that will have benefit from EGFR-inhibition therapy. PMID:27509063

  10. Microarray analysis revealed dysregulation of multiple genes associated with chemoresistance to As(2)O(3) and increased tumor aggressiveness in a newly established arsenic-resistant ovarian cancer cell line, OVCAR-3/AsR.

    PubMed

    Ong, Pei-Shi; Chan, Sui-Yung; Ho, Paul C

    2012-02-14

    The potential of arsenic trioxide (As(2)O(3)) for use as a novel therapy for ovarian cancer treatment has been increasingly recognized. In this study, we developed an arsenic-resistant OVCAR-3 subline (OVCAR-3/AsR) and aimed to identify the molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways contributing to the development of acquired arsenic chemoresistance in ovarian cancer. OVCAR-3/AsR cells were obtained following continual exposure of parental OVCAR-3 cells to low dose As(2)O(3) for 12months. Cytotoxicity of OVCAR-3/AsR cells to As(2)O(3), paclitaxel and cisplatin was investigated. Cell apoptosis and cell cycle distribution following As(2)O(3) treatment of OVCAR-3/AsR cells was also analyzed using flow cytometry. Subsequently, cDNA microarray analysis was performed from the RNA samples of OVCAR-3 and OVCAR-3/AsR cells in duplicate experiments. Microarray data were analyzed using Genespring® and Pathway Studio® Softwares. OVCAR-3/AsR cells showed 9-fold greater resistance to As(2)O(3) and lack of collateral resistance to cisplatin and paclitaxel. Compared with parental OVCAR-3 cells, OVCAR-3/AsR had significantly lower apoptotic rates following As(2)O(3) treatment. These cells were also arrested at both the S phase and G(2)/M phase of the cell cycle after exposure to high concentrations of As(2)O(3). Gene expression profiling revealed significant differences in expression levels of 397 genes between OVCAR-3/AsR and OVCAR-3 cells. The differentially regulated transcripts genes have functional ontologies related to continued cancer cell growth, cell survival, tumor metastasis and tumor aggressiveness. Additionally, numerous gene targets of the nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NRF2) transcription factor showed elevated expression in OVCAR-3/AsR cells. Subsequent pathway analysis further revealed a gene network involving interleukin 1-alpha (IL1A) in mediating the arsenic-resistant phenotype. These results showed that changes in multiple genes and an

  11. Probing HER2-PUMA and EGFR-PUMA Crosstalks in Aggressive Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-11-1-0600 TITLE: Probing HER2- PUMA and EGFR- PUMA ...AND SUBTITLE Probing HER2- PUMA and EGFR- PUMA Crosstalks in Aggressive Breast Canccer Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-11-1-0600 er 5b. GRANT...Award. We discovered that proapoptotic PUMA protein is highly expressed in the breast cancer cell lines and patient tumors that overexpress HER2 and/or

  12. Molecular Pathways Associated with Aggressiveness of Papillary Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Benvenga, Salvatore; Koch, Christian A

    2014-01-01

    The most common thyroid malignancy is papillary thyroid cancer (PTC). Mortality rates from PTC mainly depend on its aggressiveness. Geno- and phenotyping of aggressive PTC has advanced our understanding of treatment failures and of potential future therapies. Unraveling molecular signaling pathways of PTC including its aggressive forms will hopefully pave the road to reduce mortality but also morbidity from this cancer. The mitogen-activated protein kinase and the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase signaling pathway as well as the family of RAS oncogenes and BRAF as a member of the RAF protein family and the aberrant expression of microRNAs miR-221, miR-222, and miR-146b all play major roles in tumor initiation and progression of aggressive PTC. Small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors targeting BRAF-mediated events, vascular endothelial growth factor receptors, RET/PTC rearrangements, and other molecular targets, show promising results to improve treatment of radioiodine resistant, recurrent, and aggressive PTC. PMID:24955023

  13. MicroRNA-378-mediated suppression of Runx1 alleviates the aggressive phenotype of triple negative MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Browne, Gillian; Dragon, Julie A.; Hong, Deli; Messier, Terri L.; Gordon, Jonathan A. R.; Farina, Nicholas H.; Boyd, Joseph R.; VanOudenhove, Jennifer J.; Perez, Andrew W.; Zaidi, Sayyed K.; Stein, Janet L.; Stein, Gary S.; Lian, Jane B.

    2016-01-01

    The Runx1 transcription factor, known for its essential role normal hematopoiesis, was reported in limited studies to be mutated or associated with human breast tumor tissues. Runx 1 increases concomitant with disease progression in the MMTV-PyMT transgenic mouse model of breast cancer. Compelling questions relate to mechanisms that regulate Runx1 expression in breast cancer. Here, we tested the hypothesis that dysregulation of Runx1-targeting microRNAs (miRNAs) allows for pathologic increase of Runx1 during breast cancer progression. Microarray profiling of the MMTV-PyMT model revealed significant down-regulation of numerous miRNAs predicted to target Runx1. One of these, miR-378, was inversely correlated with Runx1 expression during breast cancer progression in mouse, and in human breast cancer cell lines MCF7 and triple negative MDA-MB-231 that represent early and late stage disease, respectively. MiR-378 is nearly absent in MDA-MB-231 cells. Luciferase reporter assays revealed that miR-378 binds the Runx1 3′UTR and inhibits Runx1 expression. Functionally, we demonstrated that ectopic expression of miR-378 in MDA-MB-231 cells inhibited Runx1 and suppressed migration and invasion; while inhibition of miR-378 in MCF7 cells increased Runx1 levels and cell migration. Depletion of Runx1 in late stage breast cancer cells resulted in increased expression of both the miR-378 host gene PPARGC1B and pre-miR-378, suggesting a feedback loop. Taken together, our study identifies a novel and clinically relevant mechanism for regulation of Runx1 in breast cancer that is mediated by a PPARGC1B-miR-378-Runx1 regulatory pathway. Our results highlight the translational potential of miRNA replacement therapy for inhibiting Runx1 in breast cancer. PMID:26749280

  14. The 19q12 bladder cancer GWAS signal: association with cyclin E function and aggressive disease

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Yi-Ping; Kohaar, Indu; Moore, Lee E.; Lenz, Petra; Figueroa, Jonine D.; Tang, Wei; Porter-Gill, Patricia; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Scott-Johnson, Alexandra; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Muchmore, Brian; Baris, Dalsu; Paquin, Ashley; Ylaya, Kris; Schwenn, Molly; Apolo, Andrea B.; Karagas, Margaret R.; Tarway, McAnthony; Johnson, Alison; Mumy, Adam; Schned, Alan; Guedez, Liliana; Jones, Michael A.; Kida, Masatoshi; Monawar Hosain, GM; Malats, Nuria; Kogevinas, Manolis; Tardon, Adonina; Serra, Consol; Carrato, Alfredo; Garcia-Closas, Reina; Lloreta, Josep; Wu, Xifeng; Purdue, Mark; Andriole, Gerald L.; Grubb, Robert L.; Black, Amanda; Landi, Maria T.; Caporaso, Neil E.; Vineis, Paolo; Siddiq, Afshan; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Ljungberg, Börje; Severi, Gianluca; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Krogh, Vittorio; Dorronsoro, Miren; Travis, Ruth C.; Tjønneland, Anne; Brennan, Paul; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Riboli, Elio; Prescott, Jennifer; Chen, Constance; De Vivo, Immaculata; Govannucci, Edward; Hunter, David; Kraft, Peter; Lindstrom, Sara; Gapstur, Susan M.; Jacobs, Eric J.; Diver, W. Ryan; Albanes, Demetrius; Weinstein, Stephanie J.; Virtamo, Jarmo; Kooperberg, Charles; Hohensee, Chancellor; Rodabough, Rebecca J.; Cortessis, Victoria K.; Conti, David V.; Gago-Dominguez, Manuela; Stern, Mariana C.; Pike, Malcolm C.; Van Den Berg, David; Yuan, Jian-Min; Haiman, Christopher A.; Cussenot, Olivier; Cancel-Tassin, Geraldine; Roupret, Morgan; Comperat, Eva; Porru, Stefano; Carta, Angela; Pavanello, Sofia; Arici, Cecilia; Mastrangelo, Giuseppe; Grossman, H. Barton; Wang, Zhaoming; Deng, Xiang; Chung, Charles C.; Hutchinson, Amy; Burdette, Laurie; Wheeler, William; Fraumeni, Joseph; Chanock, Stephen J.; Hewitt, Stephen M.; Silverman, Debra T.; Rothman, Nathaniel; Prokunina-Olsson, Ludmila

    2014-01-01

    A genome-wide association study (GWAS) of bladder cancer identified a genetic marker rs8102137 within the 19q12 region as a novel susceptibility variant. This marker is located upstream of the CCNE1 gene, which encodes cyclin E, a cell cycle protein. We performed genetic fine mapping analysis of the CCNE1 region using data from two bladder cancer GWAS (5,942 cases and 10,857 controls). We found that the original GWAS marker rs8102137 represents a group of 47 linked SNPs (with r2≥0.7) associated with increased bladder cancer risk. From this group we selected a functional promoter variant rs7257330, which showed strong allele-specific binding of nuclear proteins in several cell lines. In both GWAS, rs7257330 was associated only with aggressive bladder cancer, with a combined per-allele odds ratio (OR) =1.18 (95%CI=1.09-1.27, p=4.67×10−5 vs. OR =1.01 (95%CI=0.93-1.10, p=0.79) for non-aggressive disease, with p=0.0015 for case-only analysis. Cyclin E protein expression analyzed in 265 bladder tumors was increased in aggressive tumors (p=0.013) and, independently, with each rs7257330-A risk allele (ptrend=0.024). Over-expression of recombinant cyclin E in cell lines caused significant acceleration of cell cycle. In conclusion, we defined the 19q12 signal as the first GWAS signal specific for aggressive bladder cancer. Molecular mechanisms of this genetic association may be related to cyclin E over-expression and alteration of cell cycle in carriers of CCNE1 risk variants. In combination with established bladder cancer risk factors and other somatic and germline genetic markers, the CCNE1 variants could be useful for inclusion into bladder cancer risk prediction models. PMID:25320178

  15. Modeling Aggressive Medulloblastoma Using Human-Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0176 TITLE: Modeling Aggressive Medulloblastoma Using Human-Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 July 2015 Annual 01-July 2014 -- 30 Jun 2015 Modeling Aggressive Medulloblastoma Using Human-Induced Pluripotent Stem...induced pluripotent stem cells by Atoh1 induction can be efficiently transformed by MYC oncogene to form aggressive brain tumors that recapitulate human

  16. Role of MicroRNA in Aggressive Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-01

    SUBTITLE Role of microRNA in aggressive prostate cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-11-1-0491 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER... cancer lesion, we applied ISH on formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) tissue . We first confirmed the specificity of miR363 probe using benign...with prostate cancer development. REPORTABLE OUTCOMES Lo, U., Pong, R.C., Tseng, S.F., Hsieh, J.T. (2013) MicroRNA -363 regulated by a novel

  17. MicroRNA in Prostate Cancer Racial Disparities and Aggressiveness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    Detroit, MI. Little is known about the role of microRNAs ( miRNAs ) and their biogenesis in prostate cancer (PCa), and less is understood about the possible...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0477 TITLE: MicroRNA in Prostate Cancer Racial Disparities and Aggressiveness PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Cathryn...ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE 2014 2. REPORT TYPE Annual 3. DATES COVERED 30 Sept 2013-29 Sept 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE MicroRNA in Prostate Cancer Racial

  18. Estimation of the tumor size at cure threshold among aggressive non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLCs): evidence from the surveillance, epidemiology, and end results (SEER) program and the national lung screening trial (NLST).

    PubMed

    Goldwasser, Deborah L

    2017-03-15

    The National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) demonstrated that non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) mortality can be reduced by a program of annual CT screening in high-risk individuals. However, CT screening regimens and adherence vary, potentially impacting the lung cancer mortality benefit. We defined the NSCLC cure threshold as the maximum tumor size at which a given NSCLC would be curable due to early detection. We obtained data from 518,234 NSCLCs documented in the U.S. SEER cancer registry between 1988 and 2012 and 1769 NSCLCs detected in the NLST. We demonstrated mathematically that the distribution function governing the cure threshold for the most aggressive NSCLCs, G(x|Φ = 1), was embedded in the probability function governing detection of SEER-documented NSCLCs. We determined the resulting probability functions governing detection over a range of G(x|Φ = 1) scenarios and compared them with their expected functional forms. We constructed a simulation framework to determine the cure threshold models most consistent with tumor sizes and outcomes documented in SEER and the NLST. Whereas the median tumor size for lethal NSCLCs documented in SEER is 43 mm (males) and 40 mm (females), a simulation model in which the median cure threshold for the most aggressive NSCLCs is 10 mm (males) and 15 mm (females) best fit the SEER and NLST data. The majority of NSCLCs in the NLST were treated at sizes greater than our median cure threshold estimates. New technology is needed to better distinguish and treat the most aggressive NSCLCs when they are small (i.e., 5-15 mm).

  19. Effect of Statins and Anticoagulants on Prostate Cancer Aggressiveness

    SciTech Connect

    Alizadeh, Moein; Sylvestre, Marie-Pierre; Zilli, Thomas; Van Nguyen, Thu; Guay, Jean-Pierre; Bahary, Jean-Paul; Taussky, Daniel

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: Statins and anticoagulants (ACs) have both been associated with a less-aggressive prostate cancer (PCa) and a better outcome after treatment of localized PCa. The results of these studies might have been confounded because patients might often take both medications. We examined their respective influence on PCa aggressiveness at initial diagnosis. Materials and Methods: We analyzed 381 patients treated with either external beam radiotherapy or brachytherapy for low-risk (n = 152), intermediate-risk (n = 142), or high-risk (n = 87) localized PCa. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to investigate an association between these drug classes and prostate cancer aggressiveness. We tested whether the concomitant use of statins and ACs had a different effect than that of either AC or statin use alone. Results: Of the 381 patients, 172 (45.1%) were taking statins and 141 (37.0%) ACs; 105 patients (27.6%) used both. On univariate analysis, the statin and AC users were associated with the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level (p = .017) and National Comprehensive Cancer Network risk group (p = .0022). On multivariate analysis, statin use was associated with a PSA level <10 ng/mL (odds ratio, 2.9; 95% confidence interval, 1.3-6.8; p = .012) and a PSA level >20 ng/mL (odds ratio, 0.29; 95% confidence interval, 0.08-0.83; p = .03). The use of ACs was associated with a PSA level >20 ng/mL (odds ratio, 0.13; 95% confidence interval, 0.02-0.59, p = .02). Conclusion: Both AC and statins have an effect on PCa aggressiveness, with statins having a more stringent relationship with the PSA level, highlighting the importance of considering statin use in studies of PCa aggressiveness.

  20. Imaging Prostatic Lipids to Distinguish Aggressive Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    saturation bands (six for fat and two for water) were used to minimize lipid/water contamination to the VOI. The 2D MRSI sequence details are: TR/TE... fat as measured by in-vivo imaging using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy imaging in the prediction of prostate disease aggressiveness...histology, in-vivo intraprostatic fat as measured by 1H MRSI, metabolic signatures of lipid oxidation and metabolism, and prostate cancer

  1. microRNA in Prostate Cancer Racial Disparities and Aggressiveness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    final analyses. 15. SUBJECT TERMS prostate cancer, microRNA, racial disparities, African American, genetic polymorphisms, biochemical recurrence...is to identify novel genetic and epigenetic factors that might contribute significantly to racial/ethnic disparity in PCa risk and progression. We...related miRNAs and PCa aggressiveness, and 3) determine the associations between genetic polymorphisms in miRNA biogenesis pathway genes and plasma levels

  2. Vitamin D and Related Genes, Race, and Prostate Cancer Aggressiveness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Vitamin D and Related Genes, Race, and Prostate Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-11-1-0568 Aggressiveness 5c. PROGRAM...examine whether altered vitamin D status (as measured by serum metabolites and by functional polymorphisms within genes related to vitamin D...potential to provide insights into a chronically underserved population carrying an unequal burden of disease. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Vitamin D, prostate

  3. Detection and imaging of aggressive cancer cells using an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-targeted filamentous plant virus-based nanoparticle.

    PubMed

    Chariou, Paul L; Lee, Karin L; Wen, Amy M; Gulati, Neetu M; Stewart, Phoebe L; Steinmetz, Nicole F

    2015-02-18

    Molecular imaging approaches and targeted drug delivery hold promise for earlier detection of diseases and treatment with higher efficacy while reducing side effects, therefore increasing survival rates and quality of life. Virus-based nanoparticles are a promising platform because their scaffold can be manipulated both genetically and chemically to simultaneously display targeting ligands while carrying payloads for diagnosis or therapeutic intervention. Here, we displayed a 12-amino-acid peptide ligand, GE11 (YHWYGYTPQNVI), on nanoscale filaments formed by the plant virus potato virus X (PVX). Bioconjugation was used to produce fluorescently labeled PVX-GE11 filaments targeted toward the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Cell detection and imaging was demonstrated using human skin epidermoid carcinoma, colorectal adenocarcinoma, and triple negative breast cancer cell lines (A-431, HT-29, MDA-MB-231), all of which upregulate EGFR to various degrees. Nonspecific uptake in ductal breast carcinoma (BT-474) cells was not observed. Furthermore, co-culture experiments with EGFR(+) cancer cells and macrophages indicate successful targeting and partitioning toward the cancer cells. This study lays a foundation for the development of EGFR-targeted filaments delivering contrast agents for imaging and diagnosis, and/or toxic payloads for targeted drug delivery.

  4. Neuropilin 2: Novel Biomarker and Therapeutic Target for Aggressive Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-12-1-0308 TITLE: Neuropilin-2: Novel Biomarker and Therapeutic Target for Aggressive Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL...14Aug2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Neuropilin-2: Novel Biomarker and Therapeutic Target for Aggressive Prostate Cancer 5b. GRANT... aggressive prostate cancer. Cancer Discov 2(10):906-921. 3. Gualberto A & Pollak M (2009) Emerging role of insulin-like growth factor receptor inhibitors in

  5. Targeting uPAR with antagonistic recombinant human antibodies in aggressive breast cancer.

    PubMed

    LeBeau, Aaron M; Duriseti, Sai; Murphy, Stephanie T; Pepin, Francois; Hann, Byron; Gray, Joe W; VanBrocklin, Henry F; Craik, Charles S

    2013-04-01

    Components of the plasminogen activation system, which are overexpressed in aggressive breast cancer subtypes, offer appealing targets for development of new diagnostics and therapeutics. By comparing gene expression data in patient populations and cultured cell lines, we identified elevated levels of the urokinase plasminogen activation receptor (uPAR, PLAUR) in highly aggressive breast cancer subtypes and cell lines. Recombinant human anti-uPAR antagonistic antibodies exhibited potent binding in vitro to the surface of cancer cells expressing uPAR. In vivo these antibodies detected uPAR expression in triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) tumor xenografts using near infrared imaging and (111)In single-photon emission computed tomography. Antibody-based uPAR imaging probes accurately detected small disseminated lesions in a tumor metastasis model, complementing the current clinical imaging standard (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose at detecting non-glucose-avid metastatic lesions. A monotherapy study using the antagonistic antibodies resulted in a significant decrease in tumor growth in a TNBC xenograft model. In addition, a radioimmunotherapy study, using the anti-uPAR antibodies conjugated to the therapeutic radioisotope (177)Lu, found that they were effective at reducing tumor burden in vivo. Taken together, our results offer a preclinical proof of concept for uPAR targeting as a strategy for breast cancer diagnosis and therapy using this novel human antibody technology.

  6. PKCα expression is a marker for breast cancer aggressiveness

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms are potential targets for breast cancer therapy. This study was designed to evaluate which PKC isoforms might be optimal targets for different breast cancer subtypes. Results In two cohorts of primary breast cancers, PKCα levels correlated to estrogen and progesterone receptor negativity, tumor grade, and proliferative activity, whereas PKCδ and PKCε did not correlate to clinicopathological parameters. Patients with PKCα-positive tumors showed poorer survival than patients with PKCα-negative tumors independently of other factors. Cell line studies demonstrated that PKCα levels are high in MDA-MB-231 and absent in T47D cells which proliferated slower than other cell lines. Furthermore, PKCα silencing reduced proliferation of MDA-MB-231 cells. PKCα inhibition or downregulation also reduced cell migration in vitro. Conclusions PKCα is a marker for poor prognosis of breast cancer and correlates to and is important for cell functions associated with breast cancer progression. PMID:20398285

  7. Overexpression of collagen triple helix repeat containing 1 (CTHRC1) is associated with tumour aggressiveness and poor prognosis in human non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Ke, Zunfu; He, Weiling; Lai, Yuanhui; Guo, Xuefeng; Chen, Sharon; Li, Shuhua; Wang, Yuefeng; Wang, Liantang

    2014-10-15

    Collagen triple helix repeat-containing 1 (CTHRC1), a novel oncogene, was identified to be aberrantly overexpressed in several malignant tumors. However, the expression profile of CTHRC1 and its clinical significance in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) remain unknown. In this study, we showed that CTHRC1 was evidently overexpressed in human NSCLC tissues and NSCLC cell lines at the protein and mRNA level. Ectopic up-regulation of CTHRC1 in cancer cells resulted in elevated invasive and proliferative abilities, which were attenuated by the specific CTHRC1 siRNA. The biological effect of CTHRC1 on metastasis and proliferation was mediated by the activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. Furthermore, CTHRC1 immunoreactivity was evidently overexpressed in paraffin-embedded NSCLC tissues (212/292, 72.60%) in comparison to corresponding adjacent non-cancerous tissues (6/66, 9.09%) (p<0.001). Clinicopathologic analysis showed that CTHRC1 expression was significantly correlated with differentiation degree (p<0.001), clinical stage (p<0.001), T classification (p<0.001), lymph node metastasis (p=0.013) and distant metastasis (p<0.001). Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed that patients with high CTHRC1 expression had poorer overall survival rates than those with low CTHRC1 expression. Multivariate analysis indicated that CTHRC1 expression was an independent prognostic factor for the overall survival of NSCLC patients. Collectively, CTHRC1 plays important roles in NSCLC progression, and the evaluation of CTHRC1 expression could serve as a potential marker for metastasis progression and prognosis in NSCLC patients.

  8. HES6 promotes prostate cancer aggressiveness independently of Notch signalling.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Filipe L F; Marchionni, Luigi; Gupta, Anuj; Kummangal, Basheer A; Schaeffer, Edward M; Ross, Ashley E; Berman, David M

    2015-07-01

    Notch signalling is implicated in the pathogenesis of a variety of cancers, but its role in prostate cancer is poorly understood. However, selected Notch pathway members are overrepresented in high-grade prostate cancers. We comprehensively profiled Notch pathway components in prostate cells and found prostate cancer-specific up-regulation of NOTCH3 and HES6. Their expression was particularly high in androgen responsive lines. Up- and down-regulating Notch in these cells modulated expression of canonical Notch targets, HES1 and HEY1, which could also be induced by androgen. Surprisingly, androgen treatment also suppressed Notch receptor expression, suggesting that androgens can activate Notch target genes in a receptor-independent manner. Using a Notch-sensitive Recombination signal binding protein for immunoglobulin kappa J region (RBPJ) reporter assay, we found that basal levels of Notch signalling were significantly lower in prostate cancer cells compared to benign cells. Accordingly pharmacological Notch pathway blockade did not inhibit cancer cell growth or viability. In contrast to canonical Notch targets, HES6, a HES family member known to antagonize Notch signalling, was not regulated by Notch signalling, but relied instead on androgen levels, both in cultured cells and in human cancer tissues. When engineered into prostate cancer cells, reduced levels of HES6 resulted in reduced cancer cell invasion and clonogenic growth. By molecular profiling, we identified potential roles for HES6 in regulating hedgehog signalling, apoptosis and cell migration. Our results did not reveal any cell-autonomous roles for canonical Notch signalling in prostate cancer. However, the results do implicate HES6 as a promoter of prostate cancer progression.

  9. Characterization of aggressive prostate cancer using ultrasound RF time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khojaste, Amir; Imani, Farhad; Moradi, Mehdi; Berman, David; Siemens, D. Robert; Sauerberi, Eric E.; Boag, Alexander H.; Abolmaesumi, Purang; Mousavi, Parvin

    2015-03-01

    Prostate cancer is the most prevalently diagnosed and the second cause of cancer-related death in North American men. Several approaches have been proposed to augment detection of prostate cancer using different imaging modalities. Due to advantages of ultrasound imaging, these approaches have been the subject of several recent studies. This paper presents the results of a feasibility study on differentiating between lower and higher grade prostate cancer using ultrasound RF time series data. We also propose new spectral features of RF time series to highlight aggressive prostate cancer in small ROIs of size 1 mm × 1 mm in a cohort of 19 ex vivo specimens of human prostate tissue. In leave-one-patient-out cross-validation strategy, an area under accumulated ROC curve of 0.8 has been achieved with overall sensitivity and specificity of 81% and 80%, respectively. The current method shows promising results on differentiating between lower and higher grade of prostate cancer using ultrasound RF time series.

  10. Lectin chromatography/mass spectrometry discovery workflow identifies putative biomarkers of aggressive breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Drake, Penelope M; Schilling, Birgit; Niles, Richard K; Prakobphol, Akraporn; Li, Bensheng; Jung, Kwanyoung; Cho, Wonryeon; Braten, Miles; Inerowicz, Halina D; Williams, Katherine; Albertolle, Matthew; Held, Jason M; Iacovides, Demetris; Sorensen, Dylan J; Griffith, Obi L; Johansen, Eric; Zawadzka, Anna M; Cusack, Michael P; Allen, Simon; Gormley, Matthew; Hall, Steven C; Witkowska, H Ewa; Gray, Joe W; Regnier, Fred; Gibson, Bradford W; Fisher, Susan J

    2012-04-06

    We used a lectin chromatography/MS-based approach to screen conditioned medium from a panel of luminal (less aggressive) and triple negative (more aggressive) breast cancer cell lines (n=5/subtype). The samples were fractionated using the lectins Aleuria aurantia (AAL) and Sambucus nigra agglutinin (SNA), which recognize fucose and sialic acid, respectively. The bound fractions were enzymatically N-deglycosylated and analyzed by LC-MS/MS. In total, we identified 533 glycoproteins, ∼90% of which were components of the cell surface or extracellular matrix. We observed 1011 glycosites, 100 of which were solely detected in ≥3 triple negative lines. Statistical analyses suggested that a number of these glycosites were triple negative-specific and thus potential biomarkers for this tumor subtype. An analysis of RNaseq data revealed that approximately half of the mRNAs encoding the protein scaffolds that carried potential biomarker glycosites were up-regulated in triple negative vs luminal cell lines, and that a number of genes encoding fucosyl- or sialyltransferases were differentially expressed between the two subtypes, suggesting that alterations in glycosylation may also drive candidate identification. Notably, the glycoproteins from which these putative biomarker candidates were derived are involved in cancer-related processes. Thus, they may represent novel therapeutic targets for this aggressive tumor subtype.

  11. Ectopic Activation of Germline and Placental Genes Identifies Aggressive Metastasis-Prone Lung Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Rousseaux, Sophie; Debernardi, Alexandra; Jacquiau, Baptiste; Vitte, Anne-Laure; Vesin, Aurélien; Nagy-Mignotte, Hélène; Moro-Sibilot, Denis; Brichon, Pierre-Yves; Lantuejoul, Sylvie; Hainaut, Pierre; Laffaire, Julien; de Reyniès, Aurélien; Beer, David G.; Timsit, Jean-François; Brambilla, Christian; Brambilla, Elisabeth; Khochbin, Saadi

    2016-01-01

    Activation of normally silent tissue-specific genes and the resulting cell “identity crisis” are the unexplored consequences of malignant epigenetic reprogramming. We designed a strategy for investigating this reprogramming, which consisted of identifying a large number of tissue-restricted genes that are epigenetically silenced in normal somatic cells and then detecting their expression in cancer. This approach led to the demonstration that large-scale “off-context” gene activations systematically occur in a variety of cancer types. In our series of 293 lung tumors, we identified an ectopic gene expression signature associated with a subset of highly aggressive tumors, which predicted poor prognosis independently of the TNM (tumor size, node positivity, and metastasis) stage or histological subtype. The ability to isolate these tumors allowed us to reveal their common molecular features characterized by the acquisition of embryonic stem cell/germ cell gene expression profiles and the down-regulation of immune response genes. The methodical recognition of ectopic gene activations in cancer cells could serve as a basis for gene signature–guided tumor stratification, as well as for the discovery of oncogenic mechanisms, and expand the understanding of the biology of very aggressive tumors. PMID:23698379

  12. Screening for Novel Germline Rare Mutations Associated with Aggressive Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0348 TITLE: “Screening for Novel Germline Rare Mutations Associated with Aggressive Prostate Cancer ” PRINCIPAL...TITLE AND SUBTITLE “Screening for Novel Germline Rare Mutations Associated with Aggressive Prostate Cancer ” 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER...Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Prostate cancer is the most common noncutaneous cancer in males in the U.S. While the major indolent form

  13. Microvascular Channel Device to Study Aggressiveness in Prostate Cancer Metastasis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    leukocyte like’ cells to be transported through the blood stream to their metastatic destinations (1). Like leukocytes, prostate cancer ( PRCA ) cells...for the dynamic flow-based E-selectin+SDF-1 coated microtubes, which can capture PRCA cells and allow us to study the circulating tumor cell...1 dyne/cm2 is the best possible combination to collect the smallest most potent PRCA cells from the tube based circulation model (preliminary data

  14. [Radiation-induces increased tumor cell aggressiveness of tumors of the glioblastomas?].

    PubMed

    Falk, Alexander T; Moncharmont, Coralie; Guilbert, Matthieu; Guy, Jean-Baptiste; Alphonse, Gersende; Trone, Jane-Chloé; Rivoirard, Romain; Gilormini, Marion; Toillon, Robert-Alain; Rodriguez-Lafrasse, Claire; Magné, Nicolas

    2014-09-01

    Glioblastoma multiform is the most common and aggressive brain tumor with a worse prognostic. Ionizing radiation is a cornerstone in the treatment of glioblastome with chemo-radiation association being the actual standard. As a paradoxal effect, it has been suggested that radiotherapy could have a deleterious effect on local recurrence of cancer. In vivo studies have studied the effect of radiotherapy on biological modification and pathogenous effect of cancer cells. It seems that ionizing radiations with photon could activate oncogenic pathways in glioblastoma cell lines. We realized a review of the literature of photon-enhanced effect on invasion and migration of glioblastoma cells by radiotherapy.

  15. Comprehensive functional analysis of the tousled-like kinase 2 frequently amplified in aggressive luminal breast cancers

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin-Ah; Tan, Ying; Wang, Xian; Cao, Xixi; Veeraraghavan, Jamunarani; Liang, Yulong; Edwards, Dean P.; Huang, Shixia; Pan, Xuewen; Li, Kaiyi; Schiff, Rachel; Wang, Xiao-Song

    2016-01-01

    More aggressive and therapy-resistant oestrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancers remain a great clinical challenge. Here our integrative genomic analysis identifies tousled-like kinase 2 (TLK2) as a candidate kinase target frequently amplified in ∼10.5% of ER-positive breast tumours. The resulting overexpression of TLK2 is more significant in aggressive and advanced tumours, and correlates with worse clinical outcome regardless of endocrine therapy. Ectopic expression of TLK2 leads to enhanced aggressiveness in breast cancer cells, which may involve the EGFR/SRC/FAK signalling. Conversely, TLK2 inhibition selectively inhibits the growth of TLK2-high breast cancer cells, downregulates ERα, BCL2 and SKP2, impairs G1/S cell cycle progression, induces apoptosis and significantly improves progression-free survival in vivo. We identify two potential TLK2 inhibitors that could serve as backbones for future drug development. Together, amplification of the cell cycle kinase TLK2 presents an attractive genomic target for aggressive ER-positive breast cancers. PMID:27694828

  16. What Is Thyroid Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment? Thyroid Cancer About Thyroid Cancer What Is Thyroid Cancer? Cancer starts when cells in the body begin ... cell) Medullary Anaplastic (an aggressive undifferentiated tumor) Differentiated thyroid cancers Most thyroid cancers are differentiated cancers. The cells ...

  17. Microvascular Channel Device to Study Aggressiveness in Prostate Cancer Metastasis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    Prostate Cancer ( PRCA ) cells preferentially adhere and roll on bone marrow endothelial cells (BMECs) (2, 3) where abundant E-selectin is expressed (4...successfully established parameters’ for the dynamic flow-based E-selectin+SDF-1 coated microtubes, which can capture PRCA cells and allow us to study the...ml of SDF-1β with shear stress 1 dyne/cm2 is the best possible combination to collect the smallest more potent PRCA cells from the tube based

  18. Microvascular Channel Device to Study Aggressiveness in Prostate Cancer Metastasis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-01

    stream to their metastatic destinations (1). Like leukocytes, Prostate Cancer ( PRCA ) cells preferentially adhere and roll on bone marrow endothelial...microtubes, which can capture PRCA cells and allow us to study the circulating tumor cell behavior and its contribution to tumor metastasis. It was...the smallest more potent PRCA cells from the tube based circulation model (preliminary data). We used this selectin and SDF-1β coated micro-renathane

  19. A Multiplex Cancer/Testis Antigen-Based Biomarker Panel to Predict Aggressive Phenotype of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-12-1-0535 TITLE: A Multiplex Cancer/Testis Antigen-Based Biomarker Panel to Predict Aggressive Phenotype of Prostate...30Sep2014 - 29Sep2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE: A Multiplex Cancer/Testis Antigen-Based Biomarker Panel to Predict Aggressive Phenotype of Prostate...different between aggressive and indolent tumors. For the third year of the grant, we evaluated the gene expression of these 8 CTAs in PCa and benign

  20. Mitochondrial oncobioenergetic index: A potential biomarker to predict progression from indolent to aggressive prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Vayalil, Praveen K; Landar, Aimee

    2015-12-15

    Mitochondrial function is influenced by alterations in oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes and changes in the microenvironment occurring during tumorigenesis. Therefore, we hypothesized that mitochondrial function will be stably and dynamically altered at each stage of the prostate tumor development. We tested this hypothesis in RWPE-1 cells and its tumorigenic clones with progressive malignant characteristics (RWPE-1 < WPE-NA22 < WPE-NB14 < WPE-NB11 < WPE-NB26) using high-throughput respirometry. Our studies demonstrate that mitochondrial content do not change with increasing malignancy. In premalignant cells (WPE-NA22 and WPE-NB14), OXPHOS is elevated in presence of glucose or glutamine alone or in combination compared to RWPE-1 cells and decreases with increasing malignancy. Glutamine maintained higher OXPHOS than glucose and suggests that it may be an important substrate for the growth and proliferation of prostate epithelial cells. Glycolysis significantly increases with malignancy and follow a classical Warburg phenomenon. Fatty acid oxidation (FAO) is significantly lower in tumorigenic clones and invasive WPE-NB26 does not utilize FAO at all. In this paper, we introduce for the first time the mitochondrial oncobioenergetic index (MOBI), a mathematical representation of oncobioenergetic profile of a cancer cell, which increases significantly upon transformation into localized premalignant form and rapidly falls below the normal as they become aggressive in prostate tumorigenesis. We have validated this in five prostate cancer cell lines and MOBI appears to be not related to androgen dependence or mitochondrial content, but rather dependent on the stage of the cancer. Altogether, we propose that MOBI could be a potential biomarker to distinguish aggressive cancer from that of indolent disease.

  1. Metabolic coupling in urothelial bladder cancer compartments and its correlation to tumor aggressiveness

    PubMed Central

    Afonso, Julieta; Santos, Lúcio L.; Morais, António; Amaro, Teresina; Longatto-Filho, Adhemar; Baltazar, Fátima

    2016-01-01

    abstract Monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs) are vital for intracellular pH homeostasis by extruding lactate from highly glycolytic cells. These molecules are key players of the metabolic reprogramming of cancer cells, and evidence indicates a potential contribution in urothelial bladder cancer (UBC) aggressiveness and chemoresistance. However, the specific role of MCTs in the metabolic compartmentalization within bladder tumors, namely their preponderance on the tumor stroma, remains to be elucidated. Thus, we evaluated the immunoexpression of MCTs in the different compartments of UBC tissue samples (n = 111), assessing the correlations among them and with the clinical and prognostic parameters. A significant decrease in positivity for MCT1 and MCT4 occurred from normoxic toward hypoxic regions. Significant associations were found between the expression of MCT4 in hypoxic tumor cells and in the tumor stroma. MCT1 staining in normoxic tumor areas, and MCT4 staining in hypoxic regions, in the tumor stroma and in the blood vessels were significantly associated with UBC aggressiveness. MCT4 concomitant positivity in hypoxic tumor cells and in the tumor stroma, as well as positivity in each of these regions concomitant with MCT1 positivity in normoxic tumor cells, was significantly associated with an unfavourable clinicopathological profile, and predicted lower overall survival rates among patients receiving platinum-based chemotherapy. Our results point to the existence of a multi-compartment metabolic model in UBC, providing evidence of a metabolic coupling between catabolic stromal and cancer cells’ compartments, and the anabolic cancer cells. It is urgent to further explore the involvement of this metabolic coupling in UBC progression and chemoresistance. PMID:26636903

  2. Prediction of Aggressive Human Prostate Cancer by Cathepsin B

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-01

    microdisection (LCM) in this task is in progress. Prostate cancer (PC), and benign prostatic hyperplasia ( BPH ) as control samples, were collected at the...antigen (PSA) levels in less than five years even though the post-RP pathology report did not detect cancer cell invasion to prostate margin/capsule...design of prospective studies. Biopsies showed significantly higher levels of CB to SA ratios than BPH . 15. SUBJECT TERMS African and White American Men

  3. Lung cancer - small cell

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - lung - small cell; Small cell lung cancer; SCLC ... About 15% of all lung cancer cases are SCLC. Small cell lung cancer is slightly more common in men than women. Almost all cases of SCLC are ...

  4. ZNF503/Zpo2 drives aggressive breast cancer progression by down-regulation of GATA3 expression.

    PubMed

    Shahi, Payam; Wang, Chih-Yang; Lawson, Devon A; Slorach, Euan M; Lu, Angela; Yu, Ying; Lai, Ming-Derg; Gonzalez Velozo, Hugo; Werb, Zena

    2017-03-21

    The transcription factor GATA3 is the master regulator that drives mammary luminal epithelial cell differentiation and maintains mammary gland homeostasis. Loss of GATA3 is associated with aggressive breast cancer development. We have identified ZNF503/ZEPPO2 zinc-finger elbow-related proline domain protein 2 (ZPO2) as a transcriptional repressor of GATA3 expression and transcriptional activity that induces mammary epithelial cell proliferation and breast cancer development. We show that ZPO2 is recruited to GATA3 promoter in association with ZBTB32 (Repressor of GATA, ROG) and that ZBTB32 is essential for down-regulation of GATA3 via ZPO2. Through this modulation of GATA3 activity, ZPO2 promotes aggressive breast cancer development. Our data provide insight into a mechanism of GATA3 regulation, and identify ZPO2 as a possible candidate gene for future diagnostic and therapeutic strategies.

  5. Natalizumab in aggressive multiple sclerosis after haematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Capobianco, Marco; Motuzova, Y; Frau, J; Cocco, E; Mamusa, E; Marrosu, M G; Bertolotto, A

    2012-08-01

    High-dose cyclophosphamide followed by autologous haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HDC-AHSCT) is a treatment option for aggressive and refractory multiple sclerosis (MS). Natalizumab is a monoclonal antibody approved for relapsing-remitting (RR) MS unresponsive to immunomodulating drugs. Nothing is known about the use of natalizumab in patients after HDC-AHSCT. We describe five female RR-MS patients with incomplete response to HDC-AHSCT. Natalizumab was then administered with abolition of both MRI and clinical activity. No severe adverse events, in particular opportunistic infections such as Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy (PML), were observed. Our results suggest that the use of natalizumab in aggressive RR-MS after HDC-AHSCT could be effective and safe. The very long-term risk of adverse events due to sequential aggressive immunosuppression has to be established.

  6. Association between Serum 25-Hydroxy-Vitamin D and Aggressive Prostate Cancer in African American Men

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Shakira M.; Batai, Ken; Ahaghotu, Chiledum; Agurs-Collins, Tanya; Kittles, Rick A.

    2016-01-01

    African American men have higher incidence rates of aggressive prostate cancer, where high levels of calcium and serum vitamin D deficient levels play a role in the racial differences in incidence. In this study, we examined associations of serum vitamin D with aggressive prostate cancer to improve our understanding of higher susceptibility of aggressive disease in this racial cohort. From Howard University Hospital, 155 African American men with clinically-identified prostate cancer were identified; 46 aggressive cases, and 58 non-aggressive cases. Serum vitamin D was assessed from fasting blood samples, and total calcium intake was assessed using the Block Food Frequency Questionnaire. Vitamin D receptor polymorphisms from three different loci were genotyped; rs731236, rs1544410, and rs11568820. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to determine odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) comparing aggressive to non-aggressive prostate cancer. Vitamin D deficiency (<20 ng/mL) significantly increased risk of aggressive disease (OR: 3.1, 95% CI: 1.03–9.57, p-value = 0.04). Stratification by total calcium showed high calcium levels (≥800 mg/day) modified this association (OR: 7.3, 95% CI: 2.15–47.68, p-interaction = 0.03). Genetic variant rs11568820 appeared to increase the magnitude of association between deficient serum vitamin D and aggressive prostate cancer (OR: 3.64, 95% CI: 1.12–11.75, p-value = 0.05). These findings suggest that high incidence of aggressive prostate cancer risk in African American men may be due in-part to deficient levels of serum vitamin D. Other factors, including genetics, should be considered for future studies. PMID:28036013

  7. Molecular Innovations Toward Theranostics of Aggressive Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    objective is to develop dendrimer -based theranostic agent with prostate cancer specificity and positron emission tomography imaging capability that...The goal of this project is to construct dendrimer nanoconjuate containing a prostate specific cell permeation peptide, peptide therapeutic(s) and...bifunctional chelator for PET imaging. Dr. Simanek’s laboratory will make dendrimers that bear functional handles for conjugation with imaging

  8. Basal cell cancer (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Basal cell cancer is a malignant skin tumor involving cancerous changes of basal skin cells. Basal cell skin cancers ... biopsy is needed to prove the diagnosis of basal cell carcinoma. Treatment varies depending on the size, depth, and ...

  9. Establishment of a novel human medulloblastoma cell line characterized by highly aggressive stem-like cells.

    PubMed

    Silva, Patrícia Benites Gonçalves da; Rodini, Carolina Oliveira; Kaid, Carolini; Nakahata, Adriana Miti; Pereira, Márcia Cristina Leite; Matushita, Hamilton; Costa, Silvia Souza da; Okamoto, Oswaldo Keith

    2016-08-01

    Medulloblastoma is a highly aggressive brain tumor and one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality related to childhood cancer. These tumors display differential ability to metastasize and respond to treatment, which reflects their high degree of heterogeneity at the genetic and molecular levels. Such heterogeneity of medulloblastoma brings an additional challenge to the understanding of its physiopathology and impacts the development of new therapeutic strategies. This translational effort has been the focus of most pre-clinical studies which invariably employ experimental models using human tumor cell lines. Nonetheless, compared to other cancers, relatively few cell lines of human medulloblastoma are available in central repositories, partly due to the rarity of these tumors and to the intrinsic difficulties in establishing continuous cell lines from pediatric brain tumors. Here, we report the establishment of a new human medulloblastoma cell line which, in comparison with the commonly used and well-established cell line Daoy, is characterized by enhanced proliferation and invasion capabilities, stem cell properties, increased chemoresistance, tumorigenicity in an orthotopic metastatic model, replication of original medulloblastoma behavior in vivo, strong chromosome structural instability and deregulation of genes involved in neural development. These features are advantageous for designing biologically relevant experimental models in clinically oriented studies, making this novel cell line, named USP-13-Med, instrumental for the study of medulloblastoma biology and treatment.

  10. Oncogenic Properties of Apoptotic Tumor Cells in Aggressive B Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Ford, Catriona A.; Petrova, Sofia; Pound, John D.; Voss, Jorine J.L.P.; Melville, Lynsey; Paterson, Margaret; Farnworth, Sarah L.; Gallimore, Awen M.; Cuff, Simone; Wheadon, Helen; Dobbin, Edwina; Ogden, Carol Anne; Dumitriu, Ingrid E.; Dunbar, Donald R.; Murray, Paul G.; Ruckerl, Dominik; Allen, Judith E.; Hume, David A.; van Rooijen, Nico; Goodlad, John R.; Freeman, Tom C.; Gregory, Christopher D.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Cells undergoing apoptosis are known to modulate their tissue microenvironments. By acting on phagocytes, notably macrophages, apoptotic cells inhibit immunological and inflammatory responses and promote trophic signaling pathways. Paradoxically, because of their potential to cause death of tumor cells and thereby militate against malignant disease progression, both apoptosis and tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are often associated with poor prognosis in cancer. We hypothesized that, in progression of malignant disease, constitutive loss of a fraction of the tumor cell population through apoptosis could yield tumor-promoting effects. Results Here, we demonstrate that apoptotic tumor cells promote coordinated tumor growth, angiogenesis, and accumulation of TAMs in aggressive B cell lymphomas. Through unbiased “in situ transcriptomics” analysis—gene expression profiling of laser-captured TAMs to establish their activation signature in situ—we show that these cells are activated to signal via multiple tumor-promoting reparatory, trophic, angiogenic, tissue remodeling, and anti-inflammatory pathways. Our results also suggest that apoptotic lymphoma cells help drive this signature. Furthermore, we demonstrate that, upon induction of apoptosis, lymphoma cells not only activate expression of the tumor-promoting matrix metalloproteinases MMP2 and MMP12 in macrophages but also express and process these MMPs directly. Finally, using a model of malignant melanoma, we show that the oncogenic potential of apoptotic tumor cells extends beyond lymphoma. Conclusions In addition to its profound tumor-suppressive role, apoptosis can potentiate cancer progression. These results have important implications for understanding the fundamental biology of cell death, its roles in malignant disease, and the broader consequences of apoptosis-inducing anti-cancer therapy. PMID:25702581

  11. Evaluation of protein biomarkers of prostate cancer aggressiveness

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Prognostic multibiomarker signatures in prostate cancer (PCa) may improve patient management and provide a bridge for developing novel therapeutics and imaging methods. Our objective was to evaluate the association between expression of 33 candidate protein biomarkers and time to biochemical failure (BF) after prostatectomy. Methods PCa tissue microarrays were constructed representing 160 patients for whom clinicopathologic features and follow-up data after surgery were available. Immunohistochemistry for each of 33 proteins was quantified using automated digital pathology techniques. Relationships between clinicopathologic features, staining intensity, and time to BF were assessed. Predictive modeling using multiple imputed datasets was performed to identify the top biomarker candidates. Results In univariate analyses, lymph node positivity, surgical margin positivity, non-localized tumor, age at prostatectomy, and biomarkers CCND1, HMMR, IGF1, MKI67, SIAH2, and SMAD4 in malignant epithelium were significantly associated with time to BF. HMMR, IGF1, and SMAD4 remained significantly associated with BF after adjusting for clinicopathologic features while additional associations were observed for HOXC6 and MAP4K4 following adjustment. In multibiomarker predictive models, 3 proteins including HMMR, SIAH2, and SMAD4 were consistently represented among the top 2, 3, 4, and 5 most predictive biomarkers, and a signature comprised of these proteins best predicted BF at 3 and 5 years. Conclusions This study provides rationale for investigation of HMMR, HOXC6, IGF1, MAP4K4, SIAH2, and SMAD4 as biomarkers of PCa aggressiveness in larger cohorts. PMID:24708576

  12. Probing HER2-PUMA and EGFR-PUMA Crosstalks in Aggressive Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-11-1-0600 TITLE: Probing HER2- PUMA and EGFR- PUMA Crosstalks in Aggressive...COVERED 1 Sep 2011 – 31 Aug 2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Probing HER2- PUMA and EGFR- PUMA Crosstalks in Aggressive Breast Cancer 5b...on novel significant findings made from the initial Idea Award. We discovered that proapoptotic PUMA protein is highly expressed in the breast cancer

  13. [Pancreatic cancer stem cell].

    PubMed

    Hamada, Shin; Masamune, Atsushi; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2015-05-01

    Prognosis of pancreatic cancer remains dismal due to the resistance against conventional therapies. Metastasis and massive invasion toward surrounding organs hamper radical resection. Small part of entire cancer cells reveal resistance against chemotherapy or radiotherapy, increased tumorigenicity and migratory phenotype. These cells are called as cancer stem cells, as a counter part of normal stem cells. In pancreatic cancer, several cancer stem cell markers have been identified, which enabled detailed characterization of pancreatic cancer stem cells. Recent researches clarified that conventional chemotherapy itself could increase cancer cells with stem cell-phenotype, suggesting the necessity of cancer stem cell-targeting therapy. Based on these observations, pancreatic cancer stem cell-targeting therapies have been tested, which effectively eliminated cancer stem cell fraction and attenuated cancer progression in experimental models. Clinical efficacy of these therapies need to be evaluated, and cancer stem cell-targeting therapy will contribute to improve the prognosis of pancreatic cancer.

  14. Molecular Innovations Toward Theranostics of Aggressive Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    to develop dendrimer -based theranostic agent with prostate cancer specificity and positron emission tomography imaging capability that can prevent...laboratories to develop a new molecular medicine. The goal of this project is to construct dendrimer nanoconjuate containing a prostate specific...cell permeation peptide, peptide therapeutic(s) and bifunctional chelator for PET imaging. Dr. Simanek’s laboratory will make dendrimers that bear

  15. RB loss contributes to aggressive tumor phenotypes in MYC-driven triple negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Knudsen, Erik S; McClendon, A Kathleen; Franco, Jorge; Ertel, Adam; Fortina, Paolo; Witkiewicz, Agnieszka K

    2015-01-01

    Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) is characterized by multiple genetic events occurring in concert to drive pathogenic features of the disease. Here we interrogated the coordinate impact of p53, RB, and MYC in a genetic model of TNBC, in parallel with the analysis of clinical specimens. Primary mouse mammary epithelial cells (mMEC) with defined genetic features were used to delineate the combined action of RB and/or p53 in the genesis of TNBC. In this context, the deletion of either RB or p53 alone and in combination increased the proliferation of mMEC; however, the cells did not have the capacity to invade in matrigel. Gene expression profiling revealed that loss of each tumor suppressor has effects related to proliferation, but RB loss in particular leads to alterations in gene expression associated with the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. The overexpression of MYC in combination with p53 loss or combined RB/p53 loss drove rapid cell growth. While the effects of MYC overexpression had a dominant impact on gene expression, loss of RB further enhanced the deregulation of a gene expression signature associated with invasion. Specific RB loss lead to enhanced invasion in boyden chambers assays and gave rise to tumors with minimal epithelial characteristics relative to RB-proficient models. Therapeutic screening revealed that RB-deficient cells were particularly resistant to agents targeting PI3K and MEK pathway. Consistent with the aggressive behavior of the preclinical models of MYC overexpression and RB loss, human TNBC tumors that express high levels of MYC and are devoid of RB have a particularly poor outcome. Together these results underscore the potency of tumor suppressor pathways in specifying the biology of breast cancer. Further, they demonstrate that MYC overexpression in concert with RB can promote a particularly aggressive form of TNBC.

  16. HGF/Met and FOXM1 form a positive feedback loop and render pancreatic cancer cells resistance to Met inhibition and aggressive phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Cui, J; Xia, T; Xie, D; Gao, Y; Jia, Z; Wei, D; Wang, L; Huang, S; Quan, M; Xie, K

    2016-09-08

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF)/Met signaling has critical roles in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) development and progression and is considered a potential therapeutic target for this disease. However, the mechanism of aberrant activation of HGF/Met signaling and resistance to Met inhibition in PDA remains unclear. The mechanistic role of cross talk between Forkhead box M1 (FOXM1) and HGF/Met signaling in promotion of PDA growth and resistance to Met inhibition was examined using cell culture, molecular biology and mouse models; and the relevance of our experimental and mechanistic findings were validated using human PDA tissues. Met was markedly overexpressed in both PDA cell lines and pancreatic tumor specimens, and the expression of Met correlated directly with that of FOXM1 in human tumor specimens. Mechanistically, FOXM1 bound to the promoter region of the Met gene and transcriptionally increased the expression of Met. Increased expression of FOXM1 enhanced the activation of HGF/Met signaling and its downstream pathways, including retrovirus-associated DNA sequences/extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2, phosphoinositide 3-kinase/AKT and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3. Furthermore, activation of HGF/Met signaling increased the expression and transcriptional activity of FOXM1, and the cross talk between FOXM1 and HGF/Met signaling promoted PDA growth and resistance to Met inhibition. Collectively, our findings identified a positive feedback loop formed by FOXM1 and HGF/Met and revealed that this loop is a potentially effective therapeutic target for PDA.

  17. βIII-tubulin overexpression is linked to aggressive tumor features and genetic instability in urinary bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Hinsch, Andrea; Chaker, Aref; Burdelski, Christian; Koop, Christina; Tsourlakis, Maria Christina; Steurer, Stefan; Rink, Michael; Eichenauer, Till Simon; Wilczak, Waldemar; Wittmer, Corinna; Fisch, Margit; Simon, Ronald; Sauter, Guido; Büschek, Franziska; Clauditz, Till; Minner, Sarah; Jacobsen, Frank

    2017-03-01

    Development of genetic instability is a hallmark of tumor progression. Type III β-tubulin (TUBB3) is a component of microtubules involved in chromosome segregation. Its overexpression has been linked to adverse features of urinary bladder cancer. To investigate the role of TUBB3 for development of genetic instability, we compared TUBB3 expression with histopathological features and surrogate markers of genetic instability and tumor aggressiveness; copy number changes of HER2, TOP2A, CCND1, RAF1, and FGFR1; nuclear accumulation of p53, and cell proliferation in a tissue microarray (TMA) with more than 700 bladder cancers. TUBB3 expression was linked to high-grade and advanced-stage cancers (P<.0001), rapid cell proliferation (P<.0001), presence of multiple gene copy number alterations (P=.0008), and nuclear accumulation of p53 (P=.0008). Strong TUBB3 staining was found in 43% of urothelial cancers harboring copy number alterations as compared with 28% of genetically stable cancers, and in 50% of p53-positive cancers as compared with 30% of p53-negative tumors. The fraction of tumors with concomitant TUBB3 and p53 positivity increased with tumor stage and grade: 2% in pTaG1-2, 11% in pTaG3, 17% in pT1G2, 23% in pT1G3, and 32% in pT2-4 cancers (P<.0001). Importantly, strong TUBB3 overexpression was detectable in about 20% of low-grade, noninvasive cancers. In summary, our study demonstrates that TUBB3 overexpression is linked to an aggressive subtype of urinary bladder cancers, which is characterized by increased genetic instability, p53 alterations, and rapid cell proliferation. Detection of TUBB3 overexpression in genetically stable, low-grade, and noninvasive bladder cancers may be clinically useful to identify patients requiring particular close monitoring.

  18. Epigenetically upregulated WIPF1 plays a major role in BRAF V600E-promoted papillary thyroid cancer aggressiveness

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tao; Shen, Xiaopei; Liu, Rengyun; Zhu, Guangwu; Bishop, Justin; Xing, Mingzhao

    2017-01-01

    How the BRAF V600E mutation promotes the pathogenesis and aggressiveness of papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) is not completely understood. Here we explored a novel mechanism involving WASP interacting protein family member 1 (WIPF1). In PTC tumors, compared with the wild-type BRAF, BRAF V600E was associated with over-expression and hypomethylation of the WIPF1 gene. In thyroid cancer cell lines with wild-type BRAF, WIPF1 expression was robustly upregulated upon introduced expression of BRAF V600E (P=0.03) whereas the opposite was seen upon BRAF knockdown or treatment with BRAF V600E or MEK inhibitors in cells harboring BRAF V600E. Methylation of a functionally critical region of the WIPF1 promoter was decreased by expressing BRAF V600E in cells harboring the wild-type BRAF and increased by BRAF knockdown or treatment with BRAF V600E or MEK inhibitors in cells harboring BRAF V600E mutation. Under-expression and hypermethylation of WIPF1 induced by stable BRAF knockdown was reversed by DNA demethylating agent 5′-azadeoxycytidine. Knockdown of WIPF1 robustly inhibited anchorage-independent colony formation, migration, and invasion of thyroid cancer cells and suppressed xenograft thyroid cancer tumor growth and vascular invasion, mimicking the effects of BRAF knockdown. In human PTC tumors, WIPF1 expression was associated with extrathyroidal invasion (P=0.01) and lymph node metastasis (P=2.64E-05). In summary, BRAF V600E-activated MAP kinase pathway causes hypomethylation and overexpression of WIPF1; WIPF1 then functions like an oncoprotein to robustly promote aggressive cellular and tumor behaviors of PTC. This represents a novel mechanism in BRAF V600E-promoted PTC aggressiveness and identifies WIPF1 as a novel therapeutic target for thyroid cancer. PMID:27863429

  19. In vivo NCL targeting affects breast cancer aggressiveness through miRNA regulation

    PubMed Central

    Palmieri, Dario; De Luca, Luciana; Consiglio, Jessica; You, Jia; Rocci, Alberto; Talabere, Tiffany; Piovan, Claudia; Lagana, Alessandro; Cascione, Luciano; Guan, Jingwen; Gasparini, Pierluigi; Balatti, Veronica; Nuovo, Gerard; Coppola, Vincenzo; Hofmeister, Craig C.; Marcucci, Guido; Byrd, John C.; Volinia, Stefano; Shapiro, Charles L.; Freitas, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Numerous studies have described the altered expression and the causal role of microRNAs (miRNAs) in human cancer. However, to date, efforts to modulate miRNA levels for therapeutic purposes have been challenging to implement. Here we find that nucleolin (NCL), a major nucleolar protein, posttranscriptionally regulates the expression of a specific subset of miRNAs, including miR-21, miR-221, miR-222, and miR-103, that are causally involved in breast cancer initiation, progression, and drug resistance. We also show that NCL is commonly overexpressed in human breast tumors and that its expression correlates with that of NCL-dependent miRNAs. Finally, inhibition of NCL using guanosine-rich aptamers reduces the levels of NCL-dependent miRNAs and their target genes, thus reducing breast cancer cell aggressiveness both in vitro and in vivo. These findings illuminate a path to novel therapeutic approaches based on NCL-targeting aptamers for the modulation of miRNA expression in the treatment of breast cancer. PMID:23610125

  20. Loss of miR-200c: A Marker of Aggressiveness and Chemoresistance in Female Reproductive Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Cochrane, Dawn R.; Howe, Erin N.; Spoelstra, Nicole S.; Richer, Jennifer K.

    2010-01-01

    We focus on unique roles of miR-200c in breast, ovarian, and endometrial cancers. Members of the miR-200 family target ZEB1, a transcription factor which represses E-cadherin and other genes involved in polarity. We demonstrate that the double negative feedback loop between miR-200c and ZEB1 is functional in some, but not all cell lines. Restoration of miR-200c to aggressive cancer cells causes a decrease in migration and invasion. These effects are independent of E-cadherin status. Additionally, we observe that restoration of miR-200c to ovarian cancer cells causes a decrease in adhesion to laminin. We have previously reported that reintroduction of miR-200c to aggressive cells that lack miR-200c expression restores sensitivity to paclitaxel. We now prove that this ability is a result of direct targeting of class III beta-tubulin (TUBB3). Introduction of a TUBB3 expression construct lacking the miR-200c target site into cells transfected with miR-200c mimic results in no change in sensitivity to paclitaxel. Lastly, we observe a decrease in proliferation in cells transfected with miR-200c mimic, and cells where ZEB1 is knocked down stably, demonstrating that the ability of miR-200c to enhance sensitivity to paclitaxel is not due to an increased proliferation rate. PMID:20049172

  1. Alternative pharmacologic therapy for aggressive central giant cell granuloma: denosumab.

    PubMed

    Schreuder, Willem H; Coumou, Annet W; Kessler, Peter A H W; de Lange, Jan

    2014-07-01

    In the search for new pharmacologic therapies for central giant cell granuloma (CGCG), proteins that are essential to osteoclastogenesis are intriguing potential targets. In the present case report, we describe a 25-year-old patient with an aggressive CGCG of the maxilla, who was successfully treated with the antiresorptive agent denosumab, after other pharmacologic treatment had failed to achieve regression or stabilization of the tumor. Denosumab could be a promising alternative to potentially mutilating surgery for CGCG. However, more research is needed before definite conclusions can be drawn about the potential role of this agent in the treatment of CGCG.

  2. Spermine and Citrate as Metabolic Biomarkers for Assessing Prostate Cancer Aggressiveness

    PubMed Central

    Giskeødegård, Guro F.; Bertilsson, Helena; Selnæs, Kirsten M.; Wright, Alan J.; Bathen, Tone F.; Viset, Trond; Halgunset, Jostein; Angelsen, Anders; Gribbestad, Ingrid S.; Tessem, May-Britt

    2013-01-01

    Separating indolent from aggressive prostate cancer is an important clinical challenge for identifying patients eligible for active surveillance, thereby reducing the risk of overtreatment. The purpose of this study was to assess prostate cancer aggressiveness by metabolic profiling of prostatectomy tissue and to identify specific metabolites as biomarkers for aggressiveness. Prostate tissue samples (n = 158, 48 patients) with a high cancer content (mean: 61.8%) were obtained using a new harvesting method, and metabolic profiles of samples representing different Gleason scores (GS) were acquired by high resolution magic angle spinning magnetic resonance spectroscopy (HR-MAS). Multivariate analysis (PLS, PLS-DA) and absolute quantification (LCModel) were used to examine the ability to predict cancer aggressiveness by comparing low grade (GS = 6, n = 30) and high grade (GS≥7, n = 81) cancer with normal adjacent tissue (n = 47). High grade cancer tissue was distinguished from low grade cancer tissue by decreased concentrations of spermine (p = 0.0044) and citrate (p = 7.73·10−4), and an increase in the clinically applied (total choline+creatine+polyamines)/citrate (CCP/C) ratio (p = 2.17·10−4). The metabolic profiles were significantly correlated to the GS obtained from each tissue sample (r = 0.71), and cancer tissue could be distinguished from normal tissue with sensitivity 86.9% and specificity 85.2%. Overall, our findings show that metabolic profiling can separate aggressive from indolent prostate cancer. This holds promise for the benefit of applying in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) within clinical MR imaging investigations, and HR-MAS analysis of transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsies has a potential as an additional diagnostic tool. PMID:23626811

  3. Oncogenic miR-181a/b affect the DNA damage response in aggressive breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bisso, Andrea; Faleschini, Michela; Zampa, Federico; Capaci, Valeria; De Santa, Jacopo; Santarpia, Libero; Piazza, Silvano; Cappelletti, Vera; Daidone, Mariagrazia; Agami, Reuven; Del Sal, Giannino

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous tumor type characterized by a complex spectrum of molecular aberrations, resulting in a diverse array of malignant features and clinical outcomes. Deciphering the molecular mechanisms that fuel breast cancer development and act as determinants of aggressiveness is a primary need to improve patient management. Among other alterations, aberrant expression of microRNAs has been found in breast cancer and other human tumors, where they act as either oncogenes or tumor suppressors by virtue of their ability to finely modulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. In this study, we describe a new role for miR-181a/b as negative regulators of the DNA damage response in breast cancer, impacting on the expression and activity of the stress-sensor kinase ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM). We report that miR-181a and miR-181b were overexpressed in more aggressive breast cancers, and their expression correlates inversely with ATM levels. Moreover we demonstrate that deregulated expression of miR-181a/b determines the sensitivity of triple-negative breast cancer cells to the poly-ADP-ribose-polymerase1 (PARP1) inhibition. These evidences suggest that monitoring the expression of miR-181a/b could be helpful in tailoring more effective treatments based on inhibition of PARP1 in breast and other tumor types. PMID:23656790

  4. Imaging Prostatic Lipids to Distinguish Aggressive Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    this application, we propose to build upon our current work to determine the association between fatty acid synthase (FAS) overexpression and...Mechanisms linking fatty acid synthase overexpression, lipid accumulation, lipid oxidation, and tumor aggressiveness will be explored using...INTRODUCTION: Mounting evidence suggests that dysregulation of fatty acid synthase (FAS), the rate limiting multienzyme in the de novo formation of free

  5. Risk of Total and Aggressive Prostate Cancer and Pesticide Use in the Agricultural Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Koutros, Stella; Beane Freeman, Laura E.; Lubin, Jay H.; Heltshe, Sonya L.; Andreotti, Gabriella; Barry, Kathryn Hughes; DellaValle, Curt T.; Hoppin, Jane A.; Sandler, Dale P.; Lynch, Charles F.; Blair, Aaron; Alavanja, Michael C. R.

    2013-01-01

    Because pesticides may operate through different mechanisms, the authors studied the risk of prostate cancer associated with specific pesticides in the Agricultural Health Study (1993–2007). With 1,962 incident cases, including 919 aggressive prostate cancers among 54,412 applicators, this is the largest study to date. Rate ratios and 95% confidence intervals were calculated by using Poisson regression to evaluate lifetime use of 48 pesticides and prostate cancer incidence. Three organophosphate insecticides were significantly associated with aggressive prostate cancer: fonofos (rate ratio (RR) for the highest quartile of exposure (Q4) vs. nonexposed = 1.63, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.22, 2.17; Ptrend < 0.001); malathion (RR for Q4 vs. nonexposed = 1.43, 95% CI: 1.08, 1.88; Ptrend = 0.04); and terbufos (RR for Q4 vs. nonexposed = 1.29, 95% CI: 1.02, 1.64; Ptrend = 0.03). The organochlorine insecticide aldrin was also associated with increased risk of aggressive prostate cancer (RR for Q4 vs. nonexposed = 1.49, 95% CI: 1.03, 2.18; Ptrend = 0.02). This analysis has overcome several limitations of previous studies with the inclusion of a large number of cases with relevant exposure and detailed information on use of specific pesticides at 2 points in time. Furthermore, this is the first time specific pesticides are implicated as risk factors for aggressive prostate cancer. PMID:23171882

  6. Aggressive Surgery in Palliative Setting of Lung Cancer: Is it Helpful?

    PubMed Central

    Byregowda, Suman; Prabhash, Kumar; Puri, Ajay; Joshi, Amit; Noronha, Vanita; Patil, Vijay M; Panda, Pankaj Kumar; Gulia, Ashish

    2016-01-01

    With increase in survival and progression-free survival in the advanced metastatic cancers, the expectation of quality of life (QOL) has increased dramatically. Palliative care plays a vital role in the management of these advanced cancer patients. At present scenario, palliative care in advanced cancer has seen a completely different approach. Aggressive surgical procedures have been performed to improve the QOL in the advanced cancer patients. We report a case of advanced lung cancer with pathological femur fracture, treated with extensive total femur replacement surgery to provide better QOL. PMID:27803575

  7. Microvascular Channel Device to Study Aggressiveness in Prostate Cancer Metastasis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-01

    E-selectin ligands and prostate cancer bone metastasis (Barthel et al., 2007; Barthel et al., 2008; Dimitroff et al., 2005; Gout et al., 2008). In...Vesuna, F., et al. (2013). The Twist Box Domain is Required for Twist1-induced Prostate Cancer Metastasis. Mol Cancer Res. Gout , S., Morin, C., Houle, F...by triggering p38 and ERK MAPK activation. Cancer research 66, 9117-9124. Gout , S., Tremblay, P. L., and Huot, J. (2008). Selectins and selectin

  8. Mutations in PUMA Gene Cause Prostate Cancer Development and Aggressiveness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-11-01

    Stephen Thibodeau , Mayo Clinic, Rochester MN, to obtain de-identified clinical samples which were isolated from the PCa patients with the association...between chromosome 19q13 and PCa aggressiveness (1). Drs. Thibodeau and Schaid (PI’s another collaborator) have been collaborating for many years and...the amplified sequences were bona fide PUMA. Furthermore, during the course of study, we initiated a new collaboration with Dr. Stephen Thibodeau

  9. Effect of Doxorubicin/Pluronic SP1049C on Tumorigenicity, Aggressiveness, DNA Methylation and Stem Cell Markers in Murine Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shu; Kabanov, Alexander V.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Pluronic block copolymers are potent sensitizers of multidrug resistant cancers. SP1049C, a Pluronic-based micellar formulation of doxorubicin (Dox) has completed Phase II clinical trial and demonstrated safety and efficacy in patients with advanced adenocarcinoma of the esophagus and gastroesophageal junction. This study elucidates the ability of SP1049C to deplete cancer stem cells (CSC) and decrease tumorigenicity of cancer cells in vivo. Experimental Design P388 murine leukemia ascitic tumor was grown in BDF1 mice. The animals were treated with: (a) saline, (b) Pluronics alone, (c) Dox or (d) SP1049C. The ascitic cancer cells were isolated at different passages and examined for 1) in vitro colony formation potential, 2) in vivo tumorigenicity and aggressiveness, 3) development of drug resistance and Wnt signaling activation 4) global DNA methylation profiles, and 5) expression of CSC markers. Results SP1049C treatment reduced tumor aggressiveness, in vivo tumor formation frequency and in vitro clonogenic potential of the ascitic cells compared to drug, saline and polymer controls. SP1049C also prevented overexpression of BCRP and activation of Wnt-β-catenin signaling observed with Dox alone. Moreover, SP1049C significantly altered the DNA methylation profiles of the cells. Finally, SP1049C decreased CD133+ P388 cells populations, which displayed CSC-like properties and were more tumorigenic compared to CD133− cells. Conclusions SP1049C therapy effectively suppresses the tumorigenicity and aggressiveness of P388 cells in a mouse model. This may be due to enhanced activity of SP1049C against CSC and/or altered epigenetic regulation restricting appearance of malignant cancer cell phenotype. PMID:23977261

  10. Inhibition of cathepsin proteases attenuates migration and sensitizes aggressive N-Myc amplified human neuroblastoma cells to doxorubicin.

    PubMed

    Gangoda, Lahiru; Keerthikumar, Shivakumar; Fonseka, Pamali; Edgington, Laura E; Ang, Ching-Seng; Ozcitti, Cemil; Bogyo, Matthew; Parker, Belinda S; Mathivanan, Suresh

    2015-05-10

    Neuroblastoma arises from the sympathetic nervous system and accounts for 15% of childhood cancer mortality. Amplification of the oncogene N-Myc is reported to occur in more than 20% of patients. While N-Myc amplification status strongly correlates with higher tumour aggression and resistance to treatment, the role of N-Myc in the aggressive progression of the disease is poorly understood. N-Myc being a transcription factor can modulate the secretion of key proteins that may play a pivotal role in tumorigenesis. Characterising the soluble secreted proteins or secretome will aid in understanding their role in the tumour microenvironment, such as promoting cancer cell invasion and resistance to treatment. The aim of this study is to characterise the secretome of human malignant neuroblastoma SK-N-BE2 (N-Myc amplified, more aggressive) and SH-SY5Y (N-Myc non-amplified, less aggressive) cells. Conditioned media from SK-N-BE2 and SH-SY5Y cell lines were subjected to proteomics analysis. We report a catalogue of 894 proteins identified in the secretome isolated from the two neuroblastoma cell lines, SK-N-BE2 and SH-SY5Y. Functional enrichment analysis using FunRich software identified enhanced secretion of proteins implicated in cysteine peptidase activity in the aggressive N-Myc amplified SK-N-BE2 secretome compared to the less tumorigenic SH-SY5Y cells. Protein-protein interaction-based network analysis highlighted the enrichment of cathepsin and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition sub-networks. For the first time, inhibition of cathepsins by inhibitors sensitized the resistant SK-N-BE2 cells to doxorubicin as well as decreased its migratory potential. The dataset of secretome proteins of N-Myc amplified (more aggressive) and non-amplified (less aggressive) neuroblastoma cells represent the first inventory of neuroblastoma secretome. The study also highlights the prominent role of cathepsins in the N-Myc amplified neuroblastoma pathogenesis. As N-Myc amplification

  11. Rat Prostate Tumor Cells Progress in the Bone Microenvironment to a Highly Aggressive Phenotype1

    PubMed Central

    Bergström, Sofia Halin; Rudolfsson, Stina H; Bergh, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer generally metastasizes to bone, and most patients have tumor cells in their bone marrow already at diagnosis. Tumor cells at the metastatic site may therefore progress in parallel with those in the primary tumor. Androgen deprivation therapy is often the first-line treatment for clinically detectable prostate cancer bone metastases. Although the treatment is effective, most metastases progress to a castration-resistant and lethal state. To examine metastatic progression in the bone microenvironment, we implanted androgen-sensitive, androgen receptor–positive, and relatively slow-growing Dunning G (G) rat prostate tumor cells into the tibial bone marrow of fully immune-competent Copenhagen rats. We show that tumor establishment in the bone marrow was reduced compared with the prostate, and whereas androgen deprivation did not affect tumor establishment or growth in the bone, this was markedly reduced in the prostate. Moreover, we found that, with time, G tumor cells in the bone microenvironment progress to a more aggressive phenotype with increased growth rate, reduced androgen sensitivity, and increased metastatic capacity. Tumor cells in the bone marrow encounter lower androgen levels and a higher degree of hypoxia than at the primary site, which may cause high selective pressures and eventually contribute to the development of a new and highly aggressive tumor cell phenotype. It is therefore important to specifically study progression in bone metastases. This tumor model could be used to increase our understanding of how tumor cells adapt in the bone microenvironment and may subsequently improve therapy strategies for prostate metastases in bone. PMID:26992916

  12. A Targetable GATA2-IGF2 Axis Confers Aggressiveness in Lethal Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vidal, Samuel J.; Rodriguez-Bravo, Veronica; Quinn, S. Aidan; Rodriguez-Barrueco, Ruth; Lujambio, Amaia; Williams, Estrelania; Sun, Xiaochen; de la Iglesia-Vicente, Janis; Lee, Albert; Readhead, Ben; Chen, Xintong; Galsky, Matthew; Esteve, Berta; Petrylak, Daniel P.; Dudley, Joel T.; Rabadan, Raul; Silva, Jose M.; Hoshida, Yujin; Lowe, Scott W.; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Domingo-Domenech, Josep

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Elucidating the determinants of aggressiveness in lethal prostate cancer may stimulate therapeutic strategies that improve clinical outcomes. We used experimental models and clinical databases to identify GATA2 as a regulator of chemotherapy resistance and tumorigenicity in this context. Mechanistically, direct upregulation of the growth hormone IGF2 emerged as a mediator of the aggressive properties regulated by GATA2. IGF2 in turn activated IGF1R and INSR as well as a downstream polykinase program. The characterization of this axis prompted a combination strategy whereby dual IGF1R/INSR inhibition restored the efficacy of chemotherapy and improved survival in preclinical models. These studies reveal a GATA2-IGF2 aggressiveness axis in lethal prostate cancer and identify a therapeutic opportunity in this challenging disease. PMID:25670080

  13. Nonlinear Growth Kinetics of Breast Cancer Stem Cells: Implications for Cancer Stem Cell Targeted Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xinfeng; Johnson, Sara; Liu, Shou; Kanojia, Deepak; Yue, Wei; Singn, Udai; Wang, Qian; Wang, Qi; Nie, Qing; Chen, Hexin

    2013-08-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) have been identified in primary breast cancer tissues and cell lines. The CSC population varies widely among cancerous tissues and cell lines, and is often associated with aggressive breast cancers. Despite of intensive research, how the CSC population is regulated within a tumor is still not well understood so far. In this paper, we present a mathematical model to explore the growth kinetics of CSC population both in vitro and in vivo. Our mathematical models and supporting experiments suggest that there exist non-linear growth kinetics of CSCs and negative feedback mechanisms to control the balance between the population of CSCs and that of non-stem cancer cells. The model predictions can help us explain a few long-standing questions in the field of cancer stem cell research, and can be potentially used to predict the efficicacy of anti-cancer therapy.

  14. Prediction of Aggressive Human Prostate Cancer by Cathepsin B

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    for CB was added to the wells. Following several washes to remove unbound antibody-enzyme reagent, a substrate solution HRP (horse- radish ...prostate cancer. Clin Cancer Res 6: 3430-3433, 2000. 8 Guo Y, Sigman DB, Borkowski A and Kyprianou N: Racial differences in prostate cancer growth ...cystatins in tumor growth and progression. Biol Chem Hoppe Seyler 1990;371 Suppl:193-198. 39. Yan S, Sloane BF. Molecular regulation of human cathepsin B

  15. Chronic psychological stress and its impact on the development of aggressive breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cormanique, Thayse Fachin; de Almeida, Lirane Elize Defante Ferreto; Rech, Cynthia Alba; Rech, Daniel; Herrera, Ana Cristina da Silva do Amaral; Panis, Carolina

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the clinicopathological findings of women diagnosed with breast cancer and study the impact of chronic psychological stress on the pathological characteristics of these tumors. Methods We investigated a cohort composed of women diagnosed with breast cancer and divided into two groups. One group was categorized as presenting with chronic psychological stress (by using the Self-Reporting Questionnaire − SRQ-20). Another group of women with breast cancer, but with no previous history of chronic psychological stress, comprised the Control Group. Clinical and pathological data were assessed. Results Women presenting with a history of chronic distress were significantly overweight when compared to the Control Group. Furthermore, it was observed that these stressed women also had a significant percentage of aggressive breast cancer subtype, the HER2 amplified tumor, which could be putatively associated with the loss of immunosurveillance. Conclusion Our findings suggested an interaction among chronic psychological stress, overweight, and the development of more aggressive breast tumors. PMID:26466057

  16. ZEB1 turns into a transcriptional activator by interacting with YAP1 in aggressive cancer types.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Waltraut; Mossmann, Dirk; Kleemann, Julia; Mock, Kerstin; Meisinger, Chris; Brummer, Tilman; Herr, Ricarda; Brabletz, Simone; Stemmler, Marc P; Brabletz, Thomas

    2016-02-15

    Early dissemination, metastasis and therapy resistance are central hallmarks of aggressive cancer types and the leading cause of cancer-associated deaths. The EMT-inducing transcriptional repressor ZEB1 is a crucial stimulator of these processes, particularly by coupling the activation of cellular motility with stemness and survival properties. ZEB1 expression is associated with aggressive behaviour in many tumour types, but the potent effects cannot be solely explained by its proven function as a transcriptional repressor of epithelial genes. Here we describe a direct interaction of ZEB1 with the Hippo pathway effector YAP, but notably not with its paralogue TAZ. In consequence, ZEB1 switches its function to a transcriptional co-activator of a 'common ZEB1/YAP target gene set', thereby linking two pathways with similar cancer promoting effects. This gene set is a predictor of poor survival, therapy resistance and increased metastatic risk in breast cancer, indicating the clinical relevance of our findings.

  17. ZEB1 turns into a transcriptional activator by interacting with YAP1 in aggressive cancer types

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann, Waltraut; Mossmann, Dirk; Kleemann, Julia; Mock, Kerstin; Meisinger, Chris; Brummer, Tilman; Herr, Ricarda; Brabletz, Simone; Stemmler, Marc P.; Brabletz, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Early dissemination, metastasis and therapy resistance are central hallmarks of aggressive cancer types and the leading cause of cancer-associated deaths. The EMT-inducing transcriptional repressor ZEB1 is a crucial stimulator of these processes, particularly by coupling the activation of cellular motility with stemness and survival properties. ZEB1 expression is associated with aggressive behaviour in many tumour types, but the potent effects cannot be solely explained by its proven function as a transcriptional repressor of epithelial genes. Here we describe a direct interaction of ZEB1 with the Hippo pathway effector YAP, but notably not with its paralogue TAZ. In consequence, ZEB1 switches its function to a transcriptional co-activator of a ‘common ZEB1/YAP target gene set', thereby linking two pathways with similar cancer promoting effects. This gene set is a predictor of poor survival, therapy resistance and increased metastatic risk in breast cancer, indicating the clinical relevance of our findings. PMID:26876920

  18. A new goniothalamin N-acylated aza-derivative strongly downregulates mediators of signaling transduction associated with pancreatic cancer aggressiveness.

    PubMed

    Barcelos, Rosimeire Coura; Pelizzaro-Rocha, Karin Juliane; Pastre, Julio Cezar; Dias, Marina Pereira; Ferreira-Halder, Carmen Veríssima; Pilli, Ronaldo Aloise

    2014-11-24

    In this study, a novel concise series of molecules based on the structure of goniothalamin (1) was synthesized and evaluated against a highly metastatic human pancreatic cancer cell line (Panc-1). Among them, derivative 8 displayed a low IC50 value (2.7 μM) and its concentration for decreasing colony formation was 20-fold lower than goniothalamin (1). Both compounds reduced the levels of the receptor tyrosine kinase (AXL) and cyclin D1 which are known to be overexpressed in pancreatic cancer cells. Importantly, despite the fact that goniothalamin (1) and derivative 8 caused pancreatic cancer cell cycle arrest and cell death, only derivative 8 was able to downregulate pro-survival and proliferation pathways mediated by mitogen activated protein kinase ERK1/2. Another interesting finding was that Panc-1 cells treated with derivative 8 displayed a strong decrease in the transcription factor (c-Myc), hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) protein levels. Notably, the molecular effects caused by derivative 8 might not be related to ROS generation, since no significant production of ROS was observed in low concentrations of this compound (from 1.5 up to 3 μM). Therefore, the downregulation of important mediators of pancreatic cancer aggressiveness by derivative 8 reveals its great potential for the development of new chemotherapeutic agents for pancreatic cancer treatment.

  19. Exome and deep sequencing of clinically aggressive neuroblastoma reveal somatic mutations that affect key pathways involved in cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Lasorsa, Vito Alessandro; Formicola, Daniela; Pignataro, Piero; Cimmino, Flora; Calabrese, Francesco Maria; Mora, Jaume; Esposito, Maria Rosaria; Pantile, Marcella; Zanon, Carlo; De Mariano, Marilena; Longo, Luca; Hogarty, Michael D.; de Torres, Carmen; Tonini, Gian Paolo; Iolascon, Achille; Capasso, Mario

    2016-01-01

    The spectrum of somatic mutation of the most aggressive forms of neuroblastoma is not completely determined. We sought to identify potential cancer drivers in clinically aggressive neuroblastoma. Whole exome sequencing was conducted on 17 germline and tumor DNA samples from high-risk patients with adverse events within 36 months from diagnosis (HR-Event3) to identify somatic mutations and deep targeted sequencing of 134 genes selected from the initial screening in additional 48 germline and tumor pairs (62.5% HR-Event3 and high-risk patients), 17 HR-Event3 tumors and 17 human-derived neuroblastoma cell lines. We revealed 22 significantly mutated genes, many of which implicated in cancer progression. Fifteen genes (68.2%) were highly expressed in neuroblastoma supporting their involvement in the disease. CHD9, a cancer driver gene, was the most significantly altered (4.0% of cases) after ALK. Other genes (PTK2, NAV3, NAV1, FZD1 and ATRX), expressed in neuroblastoma and involved in cell invasion and migration were mutated at frequency ranged from 4% to 2%. Focal adhesion and regulation of actin cytoskeleton pathways, were frequently disrupted (14.1% of cases) thus suggesting potential novel therapeutic strategies to prevent disease progression. Notably BARD1, CHEK2 and AXIN2 were enriched in rare, potentially pathogenic, germline variants. In summary, whole exome and deep targeted sequencing identified novel cancer genes of clinically aggressive neuroblastoma. Our analyses show pathway-level implications of infrequently mutated genes in leading neuroblastoma progression. PMID:27009842

  20. Identification of the transforming STRN-ALK fusion as a potential therapeutic target in the aggressive forms of thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Lindsey M.; Barila, Guillermo; Liu, Pengyuan; Evdokimova, Viktoria N.; Trivedi, Sumita; Panebianco, Federica; Gandhi, Manoj; Carty, Sally E.; Hodak, Steven P.; Luo, Jianhua; Dacic, Sanja; Yu, Yan P.; Nikiforova, Marina N.; Ferris, Robert L.; Altschuler, Daniel L.; Nikiforov, Yuri E.

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid cancer is a common endocrine malignancy that encompasses well-differentiated as well as dedifferentiated cancer types. The latter tumors have high mortality and lack effective therapies. Using a paired-end RNA-sequencing approach, we report the discovery of rearrangements involving the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene in thyroid cancer. The most common of these involves a fusion between ALK and the striatin (STRN) gene, which is the result of a complex rearrangement involving the short arm of chromosome 2. STRN-ALK leads to constitutive activation of ALK kinase via dimerization mediated by the coiled-coil domain of STRN and to a kinase-dependent, thyroid-stimulating hormone–independent proliferation of thyroid cells. Moreover, expression of STRN-ALK transforms cells in vitro and induces tumor formation in nude mice. The kinase activity of STRN-ALK and the ALK-induced cell growth can be blocked by the ALK inhibitors crizotinib and TAE684. In addition to well-differentiated papillary cancer, STRN-ALK was found with a higher prevalence in poorly differentiated and anaplastic thyroid cancers, and it did not overlap with other known driver mutations in these tumors. Our data demonstrate that STRN-ALK fusion occurs in a subset of patients with highly aggressive types of thyroid cancer and provide initial evidence suggesting that it may represent a therapeutic target for these patients. PMID:24613930

  1. PI3K/AKT pathway regulates E-cadherin and Desmoglein 2 in aggressive prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Barber, Alison G; Castillo-Martin, Mireia; Bonal, Dennis M; Jia, Angela J; Rybicki, Benjamin A; Christiano, Angela M; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos

    2015-08-01

    Reduced expression of both classical and desmosomal cadherins has been associated with different types of carcinomas, including prostate cancer. This study aims to provide a comprehensive view of the role and regulation of cell-cell adhesion in prostate cancer aggressiveness by examining the functional implications of both E-cadherin and Desmoglein 2 (DSG2). E-cadherin expression was first examined using immunofluorescence in 50 normal prostate tissues and in a cohort of 414 prostate cancer patients. Correlation and survival analyses were performed to assess its clinical significance. In primary prostate cancer patients, reduced expression of both E-cadherin and DSG2 is significantly associated with an earlier biochemical recurrence. Transgenic DU145 E-cadherin knockdown and constitutively active AKT overexpression lines were generated. Functional implications of such genetic alterations were analyzed in vitro and in vivo, the latter by using tumorigenesis as well as extravasation and metastatic tumor formation assays. We observed that loss of E-cadherin leads to impaired primary and metastatic tumor formation in vivo, suggesting a tumor promoter role for E-cadherin in addition to its known role as a tumor suppressor. Activation of AKT leads to a significant reduction in E-cadherin expression and nuclear localization of Snail, suggesting a role for the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway in the transient repression of E-cadherin. This reduced expression may be regulated by separate mechanisms as neither the loss of E-cadherin nor activation of AKT significantly affected DSG2 expression. In conclusion, these findings illustrate the critical role of cell-cell adhesion in the progression to aggressive prostate cancer, through regulation by the PI3K pathway.

  2. Oridonin Ring A-Based Diverse Constructions of Enone Functionality: Identification of Novel Dienone Analogues Effective for Highly Aggressive Breast Cancer by Inducing Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Chunyong; Zhang, Yusong; Chen, Haijun; Yang, Zhengduo; Wild, Christopher; Ye, Na; Ester, Corbin D.; Xiong, Ailian; White, Mark A.; Shen, Qiang; Zhou, Jia

    2013-01-01

    Oridonin (1) has attracted considerable attention in recent years due to its unique and safe anticancer pharmacological profile. Nevertheless, it exhibits moderate to poor effects against highly aggressive cancers including triple-negative and drug-resistant breast cancer cells. Herein, we report the rational design and synthesis of novel dienone derivatives with an additional α,β-unsaturated ketone system diversely installed in the A-ring based on this class of natural scaffold that features dense functionalities and stereochemistry-rich frameworks. Efficient and regioselective enone construction strategies have been established. Meanwhile, a unique 3,7-rearrangement reaction was identified to furnish an unprecedented dienone scaffold. Intriguingly, these new analogues have been demonstrated to significantly induce apoptosis and inhibit colony formation with superior antitumor effects against aggressive and drug-resistant breast cancer cells in vitro and in vivo, while also exhibiting comparable or lower toxicity to normal human mammary epithelial cells in comparison with 1. PMID:24128046

  3. Oridonin ring A-based diverse constructions of enone functionality: identification of novel dienone analogues effective for highly aggressive breast cancer by inducing apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Ding, Chunyong; Zhang, Yusong; Chen, Haijun; Yang, Zhengduo; Wild, Christopher; Ye, Na; Ester, Corbin D; Xiong, Ailian; White, Mark A; Shen, Qiang; Zhou, Jia

    2013-11-14

    Oridonin (1) has attracted considerable attention in recent years because of its unique and safe anticancer pharmacological profile. Nevertheless, it exhibits moderate to poor effects against highly aggressive cancers including triple-negative and drug-resistant breast cancer cells. Herein, we report the rational design and synthesis of novel dienone derivatives with an additional α,β-unsaturated ketone system diversely installed in the A-ring based on this class of natural scaffold that features dense functionalities and stereochemistry-rich frameworks. Efficient and regioselective enone construction strategies have been established. Meanwhile, a unique 3,7-rearrangement reaction was identified to furnish an unprecedented dienone scaffold. Intriguingly, these new analogues have been demonstrated to significantly induce apoptosis and inhibit colony formation with superior antitumor effects against aggressive and drug-resistant breast cancer cells in vitro and in vivo while also exhibiting comparable or lower toxicity to normal human mammary epithelial cells in comparison with 1.

  4. Cell phones and cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer and cell phones; Do cell phones cause cancer? ... Several major studies show no link between cell phones and cancer at this time. However, since the information available is based on short-term studies, the impact of many years of ...

  5. Molecular Innovations Towards Theranostics of Aggressive Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    quantitative PET imaging of PSMA expression in prostate cancer. 15. SUBJECT TERMS 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF...design for noninvasive assessment of prostate specific membrane antigen ( PSMA ) expression in prostate cancer. • We have published two peer-reviewed...other is on the use of our proposed bifunctional chelator system to exploit the multivalent effect for the detection of PSMA . REPORTABLE OUTCOMES

  6. Targeted molecular-genetic imaging and ligand-directed therapy in aggressive variant prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Ferrara, Fortunato; Staquicini, Daniela I; Driessen, Wouter H P; D'Angelo, Sara; Dobroff, Andrey S; Barry, Marc; Lomo, Lesley C; Staquicini, Fernanda I; Cardó-Vila, Marina; Soghomonyan, Suren; Alauddin, Mian M; Flores, Leo G; Arap, Marco A; Lauer, Richard C; Mathew, Paul; Efstathiou, Eleni; Aparicio, Ana M; Troncoso, Patricia; Navone, Nora M; Logothetis, Christopher J; Marchiò, Serena; Gelovani, Juri G; Sidman, Richard L; Pasqualini, Renata; Arap, Wadih

    2016-10-24

    Aggressive variant prostate cancers (AVPC) are a clinically defined group of tumors of heterogeneous morphologies, characterized by poor patient survival and for which limited diagnostic and treatment options are currently available. We show that the cell surface 78-kDa glucose-regulated protein (GRP78), a receptor that binds to phage-display-selected ligands, such as the SNTRVAP motif, is a candidate target in AVPC. We report the presence and accessibility of this receptor in clinical specimens from index patients. We also demonstrate that human AVPC cells displaying GRP78 on their surface could be effectively targeted both in vitro and in vivo by SNTRVAP, which also enabled specific delivery of siRNA species to tumor xenografts in mice. Finally, we evaluated ligand-directed strategies based on SNTRVAP-displaying adeno-associated virus/phage (AAVP) particles in mice bearing MDA-PCa-118b, a patient-derived xenograft (PDX) of castration-resistant prostate cancer bone metastasis that we exploited as a model of AVPC. For theranostic (a merging of the terms therapeutic and diagnostic) studies, GRP78-targeting AAVP particles served to deliver the human Herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase type-1 (HSVtk) gene, which has a dual function as a molecular-genetic sensor/reporter and a cell suicide-inducing transgene. We observed specific and simultaneous PET imaging and treatment of tumors in this preclinical model of AVPC. Our findings demonstrate the feasibility of GPR78-targeting, ligand-directed theranostics for translational applications in AVPC.

  7. Targeted molecular-genetic imaging and ligand-directed therapy in aggressive variant prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ferrara, Fortunato; Staquicini, Daniela I.; Driessen, Wouter H. P.; D’Angelo, Sara; Dobroff, Andrey S.; Barry, Marc; Lomo, Lesley C.; Staquicini, Fernanda I.; Cardó-Vila, Marina; Soghomonyan, Suren; Alauddin, Mian M.; Flores, Leo G.; Arap, Marco A.; Lauer, Richard C.; Mathew, Paul; Efstathiou, Eleni; Aparicio, Ana M.; Troncoso, Patricia; Navone, Nora M.; Logothetis, Christopher J.; Marchiò, Serena; Gelovani, Juri G.; Sidman, Richard L.; Pasqualini, Renata; Arap, Wadih

    2016-01-01

    Aggressive variant prostate cancers (AVPC) are a clinically defined group of tumors of heterogeneous morphologies, characterized by poor patient survival and for which limited diagnostic and treatment options are currently available. We show that the cell surface 78-kDa glucose-regulated protein (GRP78), a receptor that binds to phage-display-selected ligands, such as the SNTRVAP motif, is a candidate target in AVPC. We report the presence and accessibility of this receptor in clinical specimens from index patients. We also demonstrate that human AVPC cells displaying GRP78 on their surface could be effectively targeted both in vitro and in vivo by SNTRVAP, which also enabled specific delivery of siRNA species to tumor xenografts in mice. Finally, we evaluated ligand-directed strategies based on SNTRVAP-displaying adeno-associated virus/phage (AAVP) particles in mice bearing MDA-PCa-118b, a patient-derived xenograft (PDX) of castration-resistant prostate cancer bone metastasis that we exploited as a model of AVPC. For theranostic (a merging of the terms therapeutic and diagnostic) studies, GRP78-targeting AAVP particles served to deliver the human Herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase type-1 (HSVtk) gene, which has a dual function as a molecular-genetic sensor/reporter and a cell suicide-inducing transgene. We observed specific and simultaneous PET imaging and treatment of tumors in this preclinical model of AVPC. Our findings demonstrate the feasibility of GPR78-targeting, ligand-directed theranostics for translational applications in AVPC. PMID:27791181

  8. TGF-β Regulates DNA Methyltransferase Expression in Prostate Cancer, Correlates with Aggressive Capabilities, and Predicts Disease Recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Helfand, Brian T.; Jang, Thomas L.; Sharma, Vidit; Kozlowski, James; Kuzel, Timothy Michael; Zhu, Lihua J.; Yang, Ximing J.; Javonovic, Borko; Guo, Yinglu; Lonning, Scott; Harper, Jay; Teicher, Beverly A.; Brendler, Charles; Yu, Nengwang; Catalona, William J.; Lee, Chung

    2011-01-01

    Background DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) is one of the major factors mediating the methylation of cancer related genes such as TGF-β receptors (TβRs). This in turn may result in a loss of sensitivity to physiologic levels of TGF-β in aggressive prostate cancer (CaP). The specific mechanisms of DNMT's role in CaP remain undetermined. In this study, we describe the mechanism of TGF-β-mediated DNMT in CaP and its association with clinical outcomes following radical prostatectomy. Methodology/Principal Findings We used human CaP cell lines with varying degrees of invasive capability to describe how TGF-β mediates the expression of DNMT in CaP, and its effects on methylation status of TGF-β receptors and the invasive capability of CaP in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, we determined the association between DNMT expression and clinical outcome after radical prostatectomy. We found that more aggressive CaP cells had significantly higher TGF-β levels, increased expression of DNMT, but reduced TβRs when compared to benign prostate cells and less aggressive prostate cancer cells. Blockade of TGF-β signaling or ERK activation (p-ERK) was associated with a dramatic decrease in the expression of DNMT, which results in a coincident increase in the expression of TβRs. Blockade of either TGF-β signaling or DNMT dramatically decreased the invasive capabilities of CaP. Inhibition of TGF-β in an TRAMP-C2 CaP model in C57BL/6 mice using 1D11 was associated with downregulation of DNMTs and p-ERK and impairment in tumor growth. Finally, independent of Gleason grade, increased DNMT1 expression was associated with biochemical recurrence following surgical treatment for prostate cancer. Conclusions and Significance Our findings demonstrate that CaP derived TGF-β may induce the expression of DNMTs in CaP which is associated with methylation of its receptors and the aggressive potential of CaP. In addition, DNMTs is an independent predictor for disease recurrence after

  9. Development of targeted therapy in uterine serous carcinoma, a biologically aggressive variant of endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    El-Sahwi, Karim S; Schwartz, Peter E; Santin, Alessandro D

    2012-01-01

    Endometrial cancer (EC) is the most common female genital malignancy in the USA. Most carcinomas arising from the uterus are estrogen dependent and are associated with obesity and hypertension. They are designated type I ECs and typically, due to their early diagnosis secondary to postmenopausal bleeding, have a good prognosis. By contrast, type II ECs develop in older patients, are not hormone dependent and are responsible for most recurrences and deaths from EC. Uterine serous cancer constitutes up to 10% of all endometrial tumors, and represents the most biologically aggressive variant of type II EC. This article will describe the most salient molecular markers that have been identified in uterine serous cancer, thus far with emphasis on the use of erbB2 (HER2/neu) as the first of a series of therapeutic markers for the treatment of this highly-aggressive subset of ECs.

  10. Unusual aggressive breast cancer: metastatic malignant phyllodes tumor.

    PubMed

    Singer, Adam; Tresley, Jonathan; Velazquez-Vega, Jose; Yepes, Monica

    2013-02-01

    For the year of 2012, it has been estimated that breast cancer will account for the greatest number of newly diagnosed cancers and the second highest proportion of cancer related deaths among women. Breast cancer, while often lumped together as one disease, represents a diverse group of malignancies with different imaging findings, histological appearances and behavior. While most invasive primary breast cancers are epithelial derived adenocarcinomas, rare neoplasms such as the phyllodes tumor may arise from mesenchymal tissue. Compared to the breast adenocarcinoma, the phyllodes tumor tends to affect a younger population, follows a different clinical course, is associated with different imaging and histological findings and is managed distinctively. There may be difficulty in differentiating the phyllodes tumor from a large fibroadenoma, but the mammographer plays a key role in reviewing the clinical and imaging data in order to arrive at the correct diagnosis. Early diagnosis with proper surgical management can often cure non-metastatic phyllodes tumors. However, in rare cases where metastasis occurs, prognosis tends to be poor. This report describes the presentation, imaging findings and management of a metastatic malignant phyllodes tumor.

  11. Colon cancer: cancer stem cells markers, drug resistance and treatment.

    PubMed

    Kozovska, Zuzana; Gabrisova, Veronika; Kucerova, Lucia

    2014-10-01

    Malignant tumours consist of heterogeneous populations of tumour cells. Cancer stem cells (CSC) represent a population of cells within a tumour with highly tumorigenic and chemoresistant properties. These cells may be identified by the expression of CSC markers. There are several key stem cells markers specified for colon cancer: CD133, CD44, ALDH1, ALCAM. These days, a major obstacle to effective cancer management is development of a multidrug resistance (MDR). The principal mechanism responsible for development of MDR phenotype is the over-expression of ABC transporters. Tumours and relapsing tumours after therapy are drived by subpopulations of tumour cells with aggressive phenotype resistant to chemotherapeutics. These cells are called CSC or tumour-initiating cells (TIC). Here we outline recent information about MDR of colon cancer and CSC markers. We have focused on novel therapeutic strategies which have been developed to prevent or overcome MDR. One such strategy is a combination of chemotherapy and modulators of MDR pumps or chemotherapy and monoclonal antibodies against vascular endothelial growth factor VEGF. Colon cancer is characterized by the presence of colon CSC expressing specific stem cell markers. The divergent presence of these markers can help to adjust personalized therapy. The review provides a detailed overview of resistance of colon cancer cells and discusses how the presence of CSC markers can influence therapy and prognosis of patients.

  12. Adipocyte secreted factors enhance aggressiveness of prostate carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Ângela; Pereira, Sofia S; Costa, Madalena; Morais, Tiago; Pinto, Ana; Fernandes, Rúben; Monteiro, Mariana P

    2015-01-01

    Obesity has been associated with increased incidence and risk of mortality of prostate cancer. One of the proposed mechanisms underlying this risk association is the change in adipokines expression that could promote the development and progression of the prostate tumor cells. The main goal of this study was to evaluate the effect of preadipocyte and adipocyte secretome in the proliferation, migration and invasion of androgen independent prostate carcinoma cells (RM1) and to assess cell proliferation in the presence of the adiposity signals leptin and insulin. RM1 cells were co-cultured in with preadipocytes, adipocytes or cultured in their respective conditioned medium. Cell proliferation was assessed by flow cytometry and XTT viability test. Cell migration was evaluated using a wound healing injury assay of RM1 cells cultured with conditioned media. Cellular invasion of RM1 cells co-cultured with adipocytes and preadipocytes was assessed using matrigel membranes. Preadipocyte conditioned medium was associated with a small increase in RM1 proliferation, while adipocytes conditioned media significantly increased RM1 cell proliferation (p<0.01). Adipocytes also significantly increased the RM1 cells proliferation in co-culture (p <0.01). Cell migration was higher in RM1 cells cultured with preadipocyte and adipocyte conditioned medium. RM1 cell invasion was significantly increased after co-culture with preadipocytes and adipocytes (p <0.05). Insulin also increased significantly the cell proliferation in contrast to leptin, which showed no effect. In conclusion, prostate carcinoma cells seem to be influenced by factors secreted by adipocytes that are able to increase their ability to proliferate, migrate and invade.

  13. Adipocyte Secreted Factors Enhance Aggressiveness of Prostate Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Moreira, Ângela; Pereira, Sofia S.; Costa, Madalena; Morais, Tiago; Pinto, Ana; Fernandes, Rúben; Monteiro, Mariana P.

    2015-01-01

    Obesity has been associated with increased incidence and risk of mortality of prostate cancer. One of the proposed mechanisms underlying this risk association is the change in adipokines expression that could promote the development and progression of the prostate tumor cells. The main goal of this study was to evaluate the effect of preadipocyte and adipocyte secretome in the proliferation, migration and invasion of androgen independent prostate carcinoma cells (RM1) and to assess cell proliferation in the presence of the adiposity signals leptin and insulin. RM1 cells were co-cultured in with preadipocytes, adipocytes or cultured in their respective conditioned medium. Cell proliferation was assessed by flow cytometry and XTT viability test. Cell migration was evaluated using a wound healing injury assay of RM1 cells cultured with conditioned media. Cellular invasion of RM1 cells co-cultured with adipocytes and preadipocytes was assessed using matrigel membranes. Preadipocyte conditioned medium was associated with a small increase in RM1 proliferation, while adipocytes conditioned media significantly increased RM1 cell proliferation (p<0.01). Adipocytes also significantly increased the RM1 cells proliferation in co-culture (p <0.01). Cell migration was higher in RM1 cells cultured with preadipocyte and adipocyte conditioned medium. RM1 cell invasion was significantly increased after co-culture with preadipocytes and adipocytes (p <0.05). Insulin also increased significantly the cell proliferation in contrast to leptin, which showed no effect. In conclusion, prostate carcinoma cells seem to be influenced by factors secreted by adipocytes that are able to increase their ability to proliferate, migrate and invade. PMID:25928422

  14. Making Aggressive Prostate Cancer Quiescent by Abrogating Cholesterol Esterification

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    precursor to hormone synthesis. While cholesterol accumulation is known to be a hallmark of atherosclerosis , its exact role in cancer progression...molecule inhibitors of cholesterol accumulation, e.g. avasimibe, have gone through clinical trials to treat atherosclerosis but failed due to the lack of

  15. Engineering chemically modified viruses for prostate cancer cell recognition.

    PubMed

    Mohan, K; Weiss, G A

    2015-12-01

    Specific detection of circulating tumor cells and characterization of their aggressiveness could improve cancer diagnostics and treatment. Metastasis results from such tumor cells, and causes the majority of cancer deaths. Chemically modified viruses could provide an inexpensive and efficient approach to detect tumor cells and quantitate their cell surface biomarkers. However, non-specific adhesion between the cell surface receptors and the virus surface presents a challenge. This report describes wrapping the virus surface with different PEG architectures, including as fusions to oligolysine, linkers, spacers and scaffolded ligands. The reported PEG wrappers can reduce by >75% the non-specific adhesion of phage to cell surfaces. Dynamic light scattering verified the non-covalent attachment by the reported wrappers as increased sizes of the virus particles. Further modifications resulted in specific detection of prostate cancer cells expressing PSMA, a key prostate cancer biomarker. The approach allowed quantification of PSMA levels on the cell surface, and could distinguish more aggressive forms of the disease.

  16. Selective participation of c-Jun with Fra-2/c-Fos promotes aggressive tumor phenotypes and poor prognosis in tongue cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Shilpi; Kumar, Prabhat; Kaur, Harsimrut; Sharma, Nishi; Saluja, Daman; Bharti, Alok C.; Das, Bhudev C.

    2015-01-01

    Tongue squamous cell carcinoma (TSCC) is most aggressive head and neck cancer often associated with HR-HPV infection. The role of AP-1 which is an essential regulator of HPV oncogene expression and tumorigenesis is not reported in tongue cancer. One hundred tongue tissue biopsies comprising precancer, cancer and adjacent controls including two tongue cancer cell lines were employed to study the role of HPV infection and AP-1 family proteins. An exclusive prevalence (28%) of HR-HPV type 16 was observed mainly in well differentiated tongue carcinomas (78.5%). A higher expression and DNA binding activity of AP-1 was observed in tongue tumors and cancer cell lines with c-Fos and Fra-2 as the major binding partners forming the functional AP-1 complex but c-Jun participated only in HPV negative and poorly differentiated carcinoma. Knocking down of Fra-2 responsible for aggressive tongue tumorigenesis led to significant reduction in c-Fos, c-Jun, MMP-9 and HPVE6/E7 expression but Fra-1 and p53 were upregulated. The binding and expression of c-Fos/Fra-2 increased as a function of severity of tongue lesions, yet selective participation of c-Jun appears to promote poor differentiation and aggressive tumorigenesis only in HPV negative cases while HPV infection leads to well differentiation and better prognosis preferably in nonsmokers. PMID:26581505

  17. Calcium intake, polymorphisms of the calcium-sensing receptor, and recurrent/aggressive prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Binder, Moritz; Shui, Irene M.; Wilson, Kathryn M.; Penney, Kathryn L.; Mucci, Lorelei A.; Kibel, Adam S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To assess whether calcium intake and common genetic variants of the calcium-sensing receptor (CASR) are associated with either aggressive prostate cancer (PCa) or disease recurrence after prostatectomy. Methods Calcium intake at diagnosis was assessed, and 65 common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in CASR were genotyped in 886 prostatectomy patients. We investigated the association between calcium intake and CASR variants with both PCa recurrence and aggressiveness (defined as Gleason score ≥4 + 3, stage ≥pT3, or nodal-positive disease). Results A total of 285 men had aggressive disease and 91 experienced recurrence. A U-shaped relationship between calcium intake and both disease recurrence and aggressiveness was observed. Compared to the middle quintile, the HR for disease recurrence was 3.07 (95 % CI 1.41–6.69) for the lowest quintile and 3.21 (95 % CI 1.47–7.00) and 2.97 (95 % CI 1.37–6.45) for the two upper quintiles, respectively. Compared to the middle quintile, the OR for aggressive disease was 1.80 (95 % CI 1.11–2.91) for the lowest quintile and 1.75 (95 % CI 1.08–2.85) for the highest quintile of calcium intake. The main effects of CASR variants were not associated with PCa recurrence or aggressiveness. In the subgroup of patients with moderate calcium intake, 31 SNPs in four distinct blocks of high linkage disequilibrium were associated with PCa recurrence. Conclusions We observed a protective effect of moderate calcium intake for PCa aggressiveness and recurrence. While CASR variants were not associated with these outcomes in the entire cohort, they may be associated with disease recurrence in men with moderate calcium intakes. PMID:26407952

  18. Aggressive B-cell lymphomas: how many categories do we need?

    PubMed Central

    Said, Jonathan W

    2015-01-01

    Aggressive B-cell lymphomas are diverse group of neoplasms that arise at different stages of B-cell development and by various mechanisms of neoplastic transformation. The aggressive B-cell lymphomas include many types, subtypes and variants of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), Burkitt lymphoma (BL), mantle cell lymphoma and its blastoid variant, and B lymphoblastic lymphoma. Differences in histology, cytogenetic and molecular abnormalities, as well as the relationship with the tumor microenvironment, help define characteristic signatures for these neoplasms, and in turn dictate potential therapeutic targets. Rather than survey the entire spectrum of aggressive B-cell lymphomas, this report aims to identify and characterize important clinically aggressive subtypes of DLBCL, and explore the relationship of DLBCL to BL and the gray zone between them (B-cell lymphoma unclassifiable with features intermediate between DLBCL and BL). PMID:23154748

  19. Cancer Stem Cell Hierarchy in Glioblastoma Multiforme

    PubMed Central

    Bradshaw, Amy; Wickremsekera, Agadha; Tan, Swee T.; Peng, Lifeng; Davis, Paul F.; Itinteang, Tinte

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), an aggressive tumor that typically exhibits treatment failure with high mortality rates, is associated with the presence of cancer stem cells (CSCs) within the tumor. CSCs possess the ability for perpetual self-renewal and proliferation, producing downstream progenitor cells that drive tumor growth. Studies of many cancer types have identified CSCs using specific markers, but it is still unclear as to where in the stem cell hierarchy these markers fall. This is compounded further by the presence of multiple GBM and glioblastoma cancer stem cell subtypes, making investigation and establishment of a universal treatment difficult. This review examines the current knowledge on the CSC markers SALL4, OCT-4, SOX2, STAT3, NANOG, c-Myc, KLF4, CD133, CD44, nestin, and glial fibrillary acidic protein, specifically focusing on their use and validity in GBM research and how they may be utilized for investigations into GBM’s cancer biology. PMID:27148537

  20. The Function of Neuroendocrine Cells in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-01

    still many unanswered questions in prostate cancer. A fundamental and clinically important issue is why prostate cancer responds to hormonal therapy ...adenocarcinoma cells express low levels of CD49f. We then fractionated CD49fhi and CD49flo cells and transplanted both into recipient mice. Both phenotypic...Hsia E, Squires J, Li Z, Zhang Y, Li W, Chen X, Xu H, Huang J. Androgen-deprivation therapy -induced aggressive prostate cancer with neuroendocrine

  1. A novel non-canonical Wnt signature for prostate cancer aggressiveness.

    PubMed

    Sandsmark, Elise; Hansen, Ailin Falkmo; Selnæs, Kirsten M; Bertilsson, Helena; Bofin, Anna M; Wright, Alan J; Viset, Trond; Richardsen, Elin; Drabløs, Finn; Bathen, Tone F; Tessem, May-Britt; Rye, Morten B

    2017-02-07

    Activation of the Canonical Wnt pathway (CWP) has been linked to advanced and metastatic prostate cancer, whereas the Wnt5a-induced non-canonical Wnt pathway (NCWP) has been associated with both good and poor prognosis. A newly discovered NCWP, Wnt5/Fzd2, has been shown to induce epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in cancers, but has not been investigated in prostate cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate if the CWP and NCWP, in combination with EMT, are associated with metabolic alterations, aggressive disease and biochemical recurrence in prostate cancer. An initial analysis was performed using integrated transcriptomics, ex vivo and in vivo metabolomics, and histopathology of prostatectomy samples (n=129), combined with at least five-year follow-up. This analysis detected increased activation of NCWP through Wnt5a/ Fzd2 as the most common mode of Wnt activation in prostate cancer. This activation was associated with increased expression of EMT markers and higher Gleason score. The transcriptional association between NCWP and EMT was confirmed in five other publicly available patient cohorts (1519 samples in total). A novel gene expression signature of concordant activation of NCWP and EMT (NCWP-EMT) was developed, and this signature was significantly associated with metastasis and shown to be a significant predictor of biochemical recurrence. The NCWP-EMT signature was also associated with decreased concentrations of the metabolites citrate and spermine, which have previously been linked to aggressive prostate cancer. Our results demonstrate the importance of NCWP and EMT in prostate cancer aggressiveness, suggest a novel gene signature for improved risk stratification, and give new molecular insight.

  2. Aggressiveness Niche: Can It Be the Foster Ground for Cancer Metastasis Precursors?

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between tumor initiation and tumor progression can follow a linear projection in which all tumor cells are equally endowed with the ability to progress into metastasis. Alternatively, not all tumor cells are equal genetically and/or epigenetically, and only few cells are induced to become metastatic tumor cells. The location of these cells within the tumor can also impact the fate of these cells. The most inner core of a tumor where an elevated pressure of adverse conditions forms, such as necrosis-induced inflammation and hypoxia-induced immunosuppressive environment, seems to be the most fertile ground to generate such tumor cells with metastatic potential. Here we will call this necrotic/hypoxic core the “aggressiveness niche” and will present data to support its involvement in generating these metastatic precursors. Within this niche, interaction of hypoxia-surviving cells with the inflammatory microenvironment influenced by newly recruited mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs), and other types of cells and the establishment of bidirectional interactions between them elevate the aggressiveness of these tumor cells. Additionally, immune evasion properties induced in these cells most likely contribute in the formation and maintenance of such aggressiveness niche. PMID:27493669

  3. Liver cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Sell, Stewart; Leffert, Hyam L

    2008-06-10

    In an effort to review the evidence that liver cancer stem cells exist, two fundamental questions must be addressed. First, do hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC) arise from liver stem cells? Second, do HCCs contain cells that possess properties of cancer stem cells? For many years the finding of preneoplastic nodules in the liver during experimental induction of HCCs by chemicals was interpreted to support the hypothesis that HCC arose by dedifferentiation of mature liver cells. More recently, recognition of the role of small oval cells in the carcinogenic process led to a new hypothesis that HCC arises by maturation arrest of liver stem cells. Analysis of the cells in HCC supports the presence of cells with stem-cell properties (ie, immortality, transplantability, and resistance to therapy). However, definitive markers for these putative cancer stem cells have not yet been found and a liver cancer stem cell has not been isolated.

  4. Favorable response to aggressive chemotherapy in a patient with primary plasma cell leukemia.

    PubMed

    Lishner, M; Lang, R; Jutrin, I; Ravid, M

    1985-01-01

    Primary plasma cell leukemia was diagnosed in a previously healthy 58-year-old man. The unusual presentation with concomitant multiple osteolytic lesions and hepatosplenomegaly, the favorable response to aggressive chemotherapy with COAP, and the relatively long survival of 22 months prompted this report. This and several other cases recently reported should encourage an aggressive therapeutic approach to this disease.

  5. Aggressive surgical resection for concomitant liver and lung metastasis in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sung Hwan; Kim, Sung Hyun; Lim, Jin Hong; Kim, Sung Hoon; Lee, Jin Gu; Kim, Dae Joon; Choi, Gi Hong; Choi, Jin Sub

    2016-01-01

    Backgrounds/Aims Aggressive surgical resection for hepatic metastasis is validated, however, concomitant liver and lung metastasis in colorectal cancer patients is equivocal. Methods Clinicopathologic data from January 2008 through December 2012 were retrospectively reviewed in 234 patients with colorectal cancer with concomitant liver and lung metastasis. Clinicopathologic factors and survival data were analyzed. Results Of the 234 patients, 129 (55.1%) had synchronous concomitant liver and lung metastasis from colorectal cancer and 36 (15.4%) had metachronous metastasis. Surgical resection was performed in 33 patients (25.6%) with synchronous and 6 (16.7%) with metachronous metastasis. Surgical resection showed better overall survival in both groups (synchronous, p=0.001; metachronous, p=0.028). In the synchronous metastatic group, complete resection of both liver and lung metastatic lesions had better survival outcomes than incomplete resection of two metastatic lesions (p=0.037). The primary site of colorectal cancer and complete resection were significant prognostic factors (p=0.06 and p=0.003, respectively). Conclusions Surgical resection for hepatic and pulmonary metastasis in colorectal cancer can improve complete remission and survival rate in resectable cases. Colorectal cancer with concomitant liver and lung metastasis is not a poor prognostic factor or a contraindication for surgical treatments, hence, an aggressive surgical approach may be recommended in well-selected resectable cases. PMID:27621747

  6. Estrogen-dependent signaling in a molecularly distinct subclass of aggressive prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Setlur, Sunita R.; Mertz, Kirsten D.; Hoshida, Yujin; Demichelis, Francesca; Lupien, Mathieu; Perner, Sven; Sboner, Andrea; Pawitan, Yudi; Andrén, Ove; Johnson, Laura A.; Tang, Jeff; Adami, Hans-Olov; Calza, Stefano; Chinnaiyan, Arul M.; Rhodes, Daniel; Tomlins, Scott; Fall, Katja; Mucci, Lorelei A.; Kantoff, Philip W; Stampfer, Meir J.; Andersson, Swen-Olof; Varenhorst, Eberhard; Johansson, Jan-Erik; Brown, Myles; Golub, Todd R.; Rubin, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    Background The majority of prostate cancers harbor gene fusions of the 5′-untranslated region of the androgen-regulated transmembrane protease, serine 2 (TMPRSS2) promoter with erythroblast transformation specific (ETS) transcription factor family members. The common v-ets erythroblastosis virus E26 oncogene homolog [avian] (TMPRSS2–ERG) fusion is associated with a more aggressive clinical phenotype, implying the existence of a distinct subclass of prostate cancer defined by this fusion. Methods We used cDNA-mediated annealing, selection, ligation, and extension to determine the expression profiles of 6144 transcriptionally informative genes in archived biopsy samples from 455 prostate cancer patients in the Swedish Watchful Waiting cohort (1987–1999) and the US-based Physicians Health Study cohort (1983–2003). A gene expression signature for prostate cancers with the TMPRSS2-ERG fusion was determined using partitioning and classification models and used in computational functional analysis. Cell proliferation and TMPRSS2-ERG expression in androgen receptor–negative (NCI-H660) and –positive (VCaP-ERβ) prostate cancer cells after treatment with vehicle or estrogenic compounds were assessed by viability assays and quantitative polymerase chain reaction, respectively. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results We identified an 87-gene expression signature that distinguishes TMPRSS2-ERG fusion prostate cancer as a discrete molecular entity (area under the curve = 0.80, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.792 to 0.81; P<.001). Computational analysis suggested that this fusion signature was associated with estrogen receptor (ER) signaling. Viability of NCI-H660 cells decreased after treatment with estrogen (viability normalized to day 0, estrogen vs vehicle at day 8, mean = 2.04 vs 3.40, difference = 1.36, 95% CI = 1.12 to 1.62) or ERβ agonist (ERβ agonist vs vehicle at day 8, mean = 1.86 vs 3.40, difference = 1.54, 95% CI = 1.39 to 1.69) but increased

  7. Regulation of UHRF1 by dual-strand tumor-suppressor microRNA-145 (miR-145-5p and miR-145-3p): inhibition of bladder cancer cell aggressiveness

    PubMed Central

    Matsushita, Ryosuke; Yoshino, Hirofumi; Enokida, Hideki; Goto, Yusuke; Miyamoto, Kazutaka; Yonemori, Masaya; Inoguchi, Satoru; Nakagawa, Masayuki; Seki, Naohiko

    2016-01-01

    In microRNA (miRNA) biogenesis, the guide-strand of miRNA integrates into the RNA induced silencing complex (RISC), whereas the passenger-strand is inactivated through degradation. Analysis of our miRNA expression signature of bladder cancer (BC) by deep-sequencing revealed that microRNA (miR)-145-5p (guide-strand) and miR-145-3p (passenger-strand) were significantly downregulated in BC tissues. It is well known that miR-145-5p functions as a tumor suppressor in several types of cancer. However, the impact of miR-145-3p on cancer cells is still ambiguous. The aim of the present study was to investigate the functional significance of miR-145-3p and BC oncogenic pathways and targets regulated by miR-145-5p/miR-145-3p. Ectopic expression of either miR-145-5p or miR-145-3p in BC cells significantly suppressed cancer cell growth, migration and invasion and it also induced apoptosis. The gene encoding ubiquitin-like with PHD and ring finger domains 1 (UHRF1) was a direct target of these miRNAs. Silencing of UHRF1 induced apoptosis and inhibited cancer cell proliferation, migration, and invasion in BC cells. In addition, overexpressed UHRF1 was confirmed in BC clinical specimens, and the high UHRF1 expression group showed a significantly poorer cause specific survival rate in comparison with the low expression group. Taken together, our present data demonstrated that both strands of miR-145 (miR-145-5p: guide-strand and miR-145-3p: passenger-strand) play pivotal roles in BC cells by regulating UHRF1. The identification of the molecular target of a tumor suppressive miRNAs provides novel insights into the potential mechanisms of BC oncogenesis and suggests novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:27072587

  8. Neuropilin-2: Novel Biomarker and Therapeutic Target for Aggressive Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-12- 1 -0308 TITLE: Neuropilin-2: Novel Biomarker and Therapeutic Target for Aggressive Prostate Cancer...information is estimated to average 1 hour per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and...information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. 1 . REPORT DATE September

  9. Study in mice shows that an aggressive type of breast cancer is linked to an inflammatory protein

    Cancer.gov

    Aberrant expression of an inflammatory protein, nitric oxide synthase 2 (NOS2), may enhance the progression and metastasis of an aggressive and less common form of breast cancer, known as the estrogen receptor-negative type of disease.

  10. Characterization of Desmoglein Expression in the Normal Prostatic Gland. Desmoglein 2 Is an Independent Prognostic Factor for Aggressive Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Barber, Alison G.; Castillo-Martin, Mireia; Bonal, Dennis M.; Rybicki, Benjamin A.; Christiano, Angela M.; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The expression of desmogleins (DSGs), which are known to be crucial for establishing and maintaining the cell-cell adhesion required for tissue integrity, has been well characterized in the epidermis and hair follicle; however, their expression in other epithelial tissues such as prostate is poorly understood. Although downregulation of classical cadherins, such as E-cadherin, has been described in prostate cancer tissue samples, the expression of desmogleins has only been previously reported in prostate cancer cell lines. In this study we characterized desmoglein expression in normal prostate tissues, and further investigated whether Desmoglein 2 (DSG2) expression specifically can serve as a potential clinical prognostic factor for patients diagnosed with primary prostate cancer. Experimental Design We utilized immunofluorescence to examine DSG2 expression in normal prostate (n = 50) and in a clinically well-characterized cohort of prostate cancer patients (n = 414). Correlation of DSG2 expression with clinico-pathological characteristics and biochemical recurrence was analyzed to assess its clinical significance. Results These studies revealed that DSG2 and DSG4 were specifically expressed in prostatic luminal cells, whereas basal cells lack their expression. In contrast, DSG1 and DSG3 were not expressed in normal prostate epithelium. Further analyses of DSG2 expression in prostate cancer revealed that reduced levels of this biomarker were a significant independent marker of poor clinical outcome. Conclusion Here we report for the first time that a low DSG2 expression phenotype is a useful prognostic biomarker of tumor aggressiveness and may serve as an aid in identifying patients with clinically significant prostate cancer. PMID:24896103

  11. The ETS family member GABPα modulates androgen receptor signalling and mediates an aggressive phenotype in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Naomi L.; Massie, Charlie E.; Butter, Falk; Mann, Matthias; Bon, Helene; Ramos-Montoya, Antonio; Menon, Suraj; Stark, Rory; Lamb, Alastair D.; Scott, Helen E.; Warren, Anne Y.; Neal, David E.; Mills, Ian G.

    2014-01-01

    In prostate cancer (PC), the androgen receptor (AR) is a key transcription factor at all disease stages, including the advanced stage of castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). In the present study, we show that GABPα, an ETS factor that is up-regulated in PC, is an AR-interacting transcription factor. Expression of GABPα enables PC cell lines to acquire some of the molecular and cellular characteristics of CRPC tissues as well as more aggressive growth phenotypes. GABPα has a transcriptional role that dissects the overlapping cistromes of the two most common ETS gene fusions in PC: overlapping significantly with ETV1 but not with ERG target genes. GABPα bound predominantly to gene promoters, regulated the expression of one-third of AR target genes and modulated sensitivity to AR antagonists in hormone responsive and castrate resistant PC models. This study supports a critical role for GABPα in CRPC and reveals potential targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:24753418

  12. Overexpression of SMC4 activates TGFβ/Smad signaling and promotes aggressive phenotype in glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Jiang, L; Zhou, J; Zhong, D; Zhou, Y; Zhang, W; Wu, W; Zhao, Z; Wang, W; Xu, W; He, L; Ma, Y; Hu, Y; Zhang, W; Li, J

    2017-03-13

    Overexpression of structural maintenance of chromosomes 4 (SMC4) has been reported to be involved in tumor cell growth, migration and invasion, and to be correlated with poor prognosis of cancer patient. However, its clinical significance and biological role in glioma remain unknown. Herein, we found that SMC4 expression at both mRNA and protein level was markedly increased in glioma cells and clinical tissues and that it correlated with poor prognosis. SMC4 overexpression markedly promoted the glioma cell proliferation rate and migration and invasive capability in vitro and in vivo, whereas SMC4 downregulation reduced it. Moreover, the transforming growth factor β (TGFβ)/Smad signaling pathway, which was activated in SMC4-transduced glioma cells and inhibited in SMC4-silenced glioma cells, contributed to SMC4-mediated glioma cell aggressiveness. Our results provide new insight into the oncofunction of SMC4 and the mechanism by which the TGFβ/Smad pathway is hyperactivated in gliomas, indicating that SMC4 is a valuable prognostic factor and a potential therapeutic target in gliomas.

  13. The PD1/PDL1 axis, a promising therapeutic target in aggressive breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Bertucci, François; Finetti, Pascal; Birnbaum, Daniel; Mamessier, Emilie

    2016-03-01

    Analysis of PDL1 mRNA expression in ∼5,500 breast cancers showed PDL1 upregulation in 38% of basal tumors and 38% of inflammatory breast cancers (IBC). Upregulation, associated with signs of strong cytotoxic local immune response, was associated with a better survival in the basal or triple-negative subtypes, and with a better pathological response to chemotherapy in these subtypes and IBC. Reactivation of dormant tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) by PD1/PDL1-inhibitors represents a promising strategy in these aggressive tumors.

  14. The PD1/PDL1 axis, a promising therapeutic target in aggressive breast cancers

    PubMed Central

    Bertucci, François; Finetti, Pascal; Birnbaum, Daniel; Mamessier, Emilie

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Analysis of PDL1 mRNA expression in ∼5,500 breast cancers showed PDL1 upregulation in 38% of basal tumors and 38% of inflammatory breast cancers (IBC). Upregulation, associated with signs of strong cytotoxic local immune response, was associated with a better survival in the basal or triple-negative subtypes, and with a better pathological response to chemotherapy in these subtypes and IBC. Reactivation of dormant tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) by PD1/PDL1-inhibitors represents a promising strategy in these aggressive tumors. PMID:27141340

  15. Screening for Novel Germline Rare Mutations Associated with Aggressive Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    Schmidt S., Peshkin L., et al. A method and server for predicting damaging missense mutations. Nat Methods. 7, 248-249 (2010). Akbari MR, Trachtenberg...Inst. 2012 Aug 1;104(16):1260-2. Epub 2012 Jul 9. Castro E. G.C.L., Olmos D., et al. Correlation of germ-line BRCA2 mutations with aggressive...prostate cancer. Clin Cancer Res. 16, 2115-2121 (2010). 20    Hammer GE, Gonzalez F, Champsaur M, Cado D, Shastri N. The aminopeptidase ERAAP shapes the

  16. A Systems Genetics Approach Identifies CXCL14, ITGAX, and LPCAT2 as Novel Aggressive Prostate Cancer Susceptibility Genes

    PubMed Central

    Andreas, Jonathan; Patel, Shashank J.; Zhang, Suiyuan; Chines, Peter; Elkahloun, Abdel; Chandrasekharappa, Settara; Gutkind, J. Silvio; Molinolo, Alfredo A.; Crawford, Nigel P. S.

    2014-01-01

    Although prostate cancer typically runs an indolent course, a subset of men develop aggressive, fatal forms of this disease. We hypothesize that germline variation modulates susceptibility to aggressive prostate cancer. The goal of this work is to identify susceptibility genes using the C57BL/6-Tg(TRAMP)8247Ng/J (TRAMP) mouse model of neuroendocrine prostate cancer. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping was performed in transgene-positive (TRAMPxNOD/ShiLtJ) F2 intercross males (n = 228), which facilitated identification of 11 loci associated with aggressive disease development. Microarray data derived from 126 (TRAMPxNOD/ShiLtJ) F2 primary tumors were used to prioritize candidate genes within QTLs, with candidate genes deemed as being high priority when possessing both high levels of expression-trait correlation and a proximal expression QTL. This process enabled the identification of 35 aggressive prostate tumorigenesis candidate genes. The role of these genes in aggressive forms of human prostate cancer was investigated using two concurrent approaches. First, logistic regression analysis in two human prostate gene expression datasets revealed that expression levels of five genes (CXCL14, ITGAX, LPCAT2, RNASEH2A, and ZNF322) were positively correlated with aggressive prostate cancer and two genes (CCL19 and HIST1H1A) were protective for aggressive prostate cancer. Higher than average levels of expression of the five genes that were positively correlated with aggressive disease were consistently associated with patient outcome in both human prostate cancer tumor gene expression datasets. Second, three of these five genes (CXCL14, ITGAX, and LPCAT2) harbored polymorphisms associated with aggressive disease development in a human GWAS cohort consisting of 1,172 prostate cancer patients. This study is the first example of using a systems genetics approach to successfully identify novel susceptibility genes for aggressive prostate cancer. Such approaches will

  17. Inherited Variants in the Chemokine CCL2 Gene and Prostate Cancer Aggressiveness in a Caucasian Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Tong; Lee, Gwo-Shu Mary; Oh, William K.; Freedman, Matthew L.; Pomerantz, Mark; Pienta, Kenneth J.; Kantoff, Philip W.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Though C-C chemokine ligand 2 (CCL2) has been demonstrated to play a pivotal role in prostate cancer tumorigenesis and invasion, the role of inherited variation in the CCL2 gene in prostate cancer progression and metastases remains unanswered. This study is aimed to determine the influence of CCL2 germline variants on prostate cancer aggressiveness. Experimental Design We performed an association study between six single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the CCL2 gene and prostate cancer clinicopathologic variables in a large hospital based Caucasian patient cohort (N =4073). Results Genetic variantion at CCL2 is associated with markers of disease aggressiveness. Three SNPs, each in strong linkage disequilibrium, are associated with a higher (>7) biopsy Gleason score: CCL2-1811 A/G, −2835A/C and +3726 T/C (P =0.01, 0.03 and 0.04 respectively). The CCL2 −1811 G allele is addionally associated with advanced pathologic stages in patients who underwent radical prostatectomy (P = 0.04). In haplotype analysis, we found that the frequency of a common haplotype, H5, was higher among patients with D’Amico good risk features (Ppermutation = 0.04). Conclusions These results support the influence of CCL2 variants on prostate cancer development and progression. PMID:21135144

  18. DNA Methylation Signature of Childhood Chronic Physical Aggression in T Cells of Both Men and Women

    PubMed Central

    Guillemin, Claire; Provençal, Nadine; Suderman, Matthew; Côté, Sylvana M.; Vitaro, Frank; Hallett, Michael; Tremblay, Richard E.; Szyf, Moshe

    2014-01-01

    Background High frequency of physical aggression is the central feature of severe conduct disorder and is associated with a wide range of social, mental and physical health problems. We have previously tested the hypothesis that differential DNA methylation signatures in peripheral T cells are associated with a chronic aggression trajectory in males. Despite the fact that sex differences appear to play a pivotal role in determining the development, magnitude and frequency of aggression, most of previous studies focused on males, so little is known about female chronic physical aggression. We therefore tested here whether or not there is a signature of physical aggression in female DNA methylation and, if there is, how it relates to the signature observed in males. Methodology/Principal Findings Methylation profiles were created using the method of methylated DNA immunoprecipitation (MeDIP) followed by microarray hybridization and statistical and bioinformatic analyses on T cell DNA obtained from adult women who were found to be on a chronic physical aggression trajectory (CPA) between 6 and 12 years of age compared to women who followed a normal physical aggression trajectory. We confirmed the existence of a well-defined, genome-wide signature of DNA methylation associated with chronic physical aggression in the peripheral T cells of adult females that includes many of the genes similarly associated with physical aggression in the same cell types of adult males. Conclusions This study in a small number of women presents preliminary evidence for a genome-wide variation in promoter DNA methylation that associates with CPA in women that warrant larger studies for further verification. A significant proportion of these associations were previously observed in men with CPA supporting the hypothesis that the epigenetic signature of early life aggression in females is composed of a component specific to females and another common to both males and females. PMID:24475181

  19. Primary cultures of human colon cancer as a model to study cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Koshkin, Sergey; Danilova, Anna; Raskin, Grigory; Petrov, Nikolai; Bajenova, Olga; O'Brien, Stephen J; Tomilin, Alexey; Tolkunova, Elena

    2016-09-01

    The principal cause of death in cancer involves tumor progression and metastasis. Since only a small proportion of the primary tumor cells, cancer stem cells (CSCs), which are the most aggressive, have the capacity to metastasize and display properties of stem cells, it is imperative to characterize the gene expression of diagnostic markers and to evaluate the drug sensitivity in the CSCs themselves. Here, we have examined the key genes that are involved in the progression of colorectal cancer and are expressed in cancer stem cells. Primary cultures of colorectal cancer cells from a patient's tumors were studied using the flow cytometry and cytological methods. We have evaluated the clinical and stem cell marker expression in these cells, their resistance to 5-fluorouracil and irinotecan, and the ability of cells to form tumors in mice. The data shows the role of stem cell marker Oct4 in the resistance of primary colorectal cancer tumor cells to 5-fluorouracil.

  20. Associations between vitamin D deficiency and risk of aggressive breast cancer in African-American women.

    PubMed

    Yao, Song; Ambrosone, Christine B

    2013-07-01

    Although breast cancer incidence in the US is highest for women of European ancestry (EA), women of African ancestry (AA) have higher incidence of cancer diagnosed before age 40 and tumors with more aggressive features (high grade and negative for estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR) and human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER2)), which precludes targeted therapies and leads to poorer outcomes. It is unclear what underlies these disparities. It has been hypothesized that dark skin with high melanin content is the ancestral skin color of origin, with adaptation to northern environs resulting in lighter skin. Although intense sunlight in sub-Saharan Africa may compensate for low sun absorption through skin, an urban or western lifestyle may result in less synthesis of vitamin D with higher skin pigmentation. Laboratory and preclinical data indicate that vitamin D is involved in preventing breast carcinogenesis and progression. Vitamin D receptor (VDR) knock-out mice are more likely to develop tumors that are ER-negative, and we have shown that serum levels of 25OHD are lowest among EA women with triple-negative tumors (negative for ER, PR and HER2); and among non-cancer patients, vitamin D levels are lower in AAs than in EAs. Thus, it is plausible to hypothesize that low vitamin D levels could be associated with the higher prevalence of more aggressive tumors among AA women. In this paper, we review the current literature on vitamin D and aggressive breast cancer subtypes, discuss vitamin D in AA women from a perspective of evolution and adaption, and examine the potential role of vitamin D in cancer racial disparities. We present our recently published data showing two single nucleotide polymorphisms in vitamin D catabolic enzyme CYP24A1 associated with higher risk of estrogen ER-negative risk in AA than in EA women. The relationship of vitamin D with breast cancer risk may be subtype-specific, with emerging evidence of stronger effects of vitamin

  1. Role of microRNA in Aggressive Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    sequence of single-stranded noncoding RNAs and known to regulate approximate 60% protein-coding genes by post- transcriptional suppression, target mRNA...2012) Small non-coding RNAs mount a silent revolution in gene expression. Current Opinion In Cell Biol. 24:333-340. 2. Schickel R, Boyerinas B...Structural basis for viral 5’-PPP- RNA recognition by human IFIT proteins. Nature 494:60-64. 10. Katibah GE, et al. (2013) tRNA binding, structure, and

  2. LASP1-S100A11 axis promotes colorectal cancer aggressiveness by modulating TGFβ/Smad signaling

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Ya; Shao, Ziyun; Wang, Hui; Yang, Jiaqi; Zhang, Feifei; Luo, Yuhao; Xu, Lijun; Ding, Yanqing; Zhao, Liang

    2016-01-01

    LIM and SH3 protein 1(LASP1) can promote colorectal cancer (CRC) progression and metastasis, but the mechanism remains unclear. Here, we show that LASP1 interacts with S100 calcium binding protein A11(S100A11) and enhances its expression in CRC. LASP1-S100A11 axis is essential for TGFβ-mediated epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and cell aggressive phenotype. Clinically, S100A11 is overexpressed in CRC tissues and localized in both the cytoplasm and the nucleus of CRC cells. Overexpression of S100A11 in cytoplasmic and nuclear subcellular compartments is associated with tumor metastasis and poor prognosis of CRC patients. Introduction of cytoplasmic and nuclear S100A11 promotes aggressive phenotypes of CRC cells in vitro as well as growth and metastasis of CRC xenografts, whereas suppressing S100A11 abrogates these effects. Furthermore, we identify flotillin-1 (FLOT1) and histone H1 as downstream factors for cytoplasmic and nuclear pathway of S100A11, which are required for LASP1-S100A11 axis-mediated EMT and CRC progression. These findings indicate S100A11, combined with LASP1, plays a critical role in promoting CRC metastasis via its subcellular effectors, FLOT1 and histone H1. PMID:27181092

  3. 3D Silicon Microstructures: A New Tool for Evaluating Biological Aggressiveness of Tumor Cells.

    PubMed

    Mazzini, Giuliano; Carpignano, Francesca; Surdo, Salvatore; Aredia, Francesca; Panini, Nicolò; Torchio, Martina; Erba, Eugenio; Danova, Marco; Scovassi, Anna Ivana; Barillaro, Giuseppe; Merlo, Sabina

    2015-10-01

    In this work, silicon micromachined structures (SMS), consisting of arrays of 3- μ m-thick silicon walls separated by 50- μm-deep, 5- μ m-wide gaps, were applied to investigate the behavior of eight tumor cell lines, with different origins and biological aggressiveness, in a three-dimensional (3D) microenvironment. Several cell culture experiments were performed on 3D-SMS and cells grown on silicon were stained for fluorescence microscopy analyses. Most of the tumor cell lines recognized in the literature as highly aggressive (OVCAR-5, A375, MDA-MB-231, and RPMI-7951) exhibited a great ability to enter and colonize the narrow deep gaps of the SMS, whereas less aggressive cell lines (OVCAR-3, Capan-1, MCF7, and NCI-H2126) demonstrated less penetration capability and tended to remain on top of the SMS. Quantitative image analyses of several fluorescence microscopy fields of silicon samples were performed for automatic cell recognition and count, in order to quantify the fraction of cells inside the gaps, with respect to the total number of cells in the examined field. Our results show that higher fractions of cells in the gaps are obtained with more aggressive cell lines, thus supporting in a quantitative way the observation that the behavior of tumor cells on the 3D-SMS depends on their aggressiveness level.

  4. Physical View on the Interactions Between Cancer Cells and the Endothelial Cell Lining During Cancer Cell Transmigration and Invasion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mierke, Claudia T.

    2015-10-01

    There exist many reviews on the biological and biochemical interactions of cancer cells and endothelial cells during the transmigration and tissue invasion of cancer cells. For the malignant progression of cancer, the ability to metastasize is a prerequisite. In particular, this means that certain cancer cells possess the property to migrate through the endothelial lining into blood or lymph vessels, and are possibly able to transmigrate through the endothelial lining into the connective tissue and follow up their invasion path in the targeted tissue. On the molecular and biochemical level the transmigration and invasion steps are well-defined, but these signal transduction pathways are not yet clear and less understood in regards to the biophysical aspects of these processes. To functionally characterize the malignant transformation of neoplasms and subsequently reveal the underlying pathway(s) and cellular properties, which help cancer cells to facilitate cancer progression, the biomechanical properties of cancer cells and their microenvironment come into focus in the physics-of-cancer driven view on the metastasis process of cancers. Hallmarks for cancer progression have been proposed, but they still lack the inclusion of specific biomechanical properties of cancer cells and interacting surrounding endothelial cells of blood or lymph vessels. As a cancer cell is embedded in a special environment, the mechanical properties of the extracellular matrix also cannot be neglected. Therefore, in this review it is proposed that a novel hallmark of cancer that is still elusive in classical tumor biological reviews should be included, dealing with the aspect of physics in cancer disease such as the natural selection of an aggressive (highly invasive) subtype of cancer cells displaying a certain adhesion or chemokine receptor on their cell surface. Today, the physical aspects can be analyzed by using state-of-the-art biophysical methods. Thus, this review will present

  5. Physical View on the Interactions Between Cancer Cells and the Endothelial Cell Lining During Cancer Cell Transmigration and Invasion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mierke, Claudia T.

    There exist many reviews on the biological and biochemical interactions of cancer cells and endothelial cells during the transmigration and tissue invasion of cancer cells. For the malignant progression of cancer, the ability to metastasize is a prerequisite. In particular, this means that certain cancer cells possess the property to migrate through the endothelial lining into blood or lymph vessels, and are possibly able to transmigrate through the endothelial lining into the connective tissue and follow up their invasion path in the targeted tissue. On the molecular and biochemical level the transmigration and invasion steps are well-defined, but these signal transduction pathways are not yet clear and less understood in regards to the biophysical aspects of these processes. To functionally characterize the malignant transformation of neoplasms and subsequently reveal the underlying pathway(s) and cellular properties, which help cancer cells to facilitate cancer progression, the biomechanical properties of cancer cells and their microenvironment come into focus in the physics-of-cancer driven view on the metastasis process of cancers. Hallmarks for cancer progression have been proposed, but they still lack the inclusion of specific biomechanical properties of cancer cells and interacting surrounding endothelial cells of blood or lymph vessels. As a cancer cell is embedded in a special environment, the mechanical properties of the extracellular matrix also cannot be neglected. Therefore, in this review it is proposed that a novel hallmark of cancer that is still elusive in classical tumor biological reviews should be included, dealing with the aspect of physics in cancer disease such as the natural selection of an aggressive (highly invasive) subtype of cancer cells displaying a certain adhesion or chemokine receptor on their cell surface. Today, the physical aspects can be analyzed by using state-of-the-art biophysical methods. Thus, this review will present

  6. Triiodothyronine regulates cell growth and survival in renal cell cancer.

    PubMed

    Czarnecka, Anna M; Matak, Damian; Szymanski, Lukasz; Czarnecka, Karolina H; Lewicki, Slawomir; Zdanowski, Robert; Brzezianska-Lasota, Ewa; Szczylik, Cezary

    2016-10-01

    Triiodothyronine plays an important role in the regulation of kidney cell growth, differentiation and metabolism. Patients with renal cell cancer who develop hypothyreosis during tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) treatment have statistically longer survival. In this study, we developed cell based model of triiodothyronine (T3) analysis in RCC and we show the different effects of T3 on renal cell cancer (RCC) cell growth response and expression of the thyroid hormone receptor in human renal cell cancer cell lines from primary and metastatic tumors along with human kidney cancer stem cells. Wild-type thyroid hormone receptor is ubiquitously expressed in human renal cancer cell lines, but normalized against healthy renal proximal tube cell expression its level is upregulated in Caki-2, RCC6, SKRC-42, SKRC-45 cell lines. On the contrary the mRNA level in the 769-P, ACHN, HKCSC, and HEK293 cells is significantly decreased. The TRβ protein was abundant in the cytoplasm of the 786-O, Caki-2, RCC6, and SKRC-45 cells and in the nucleus of SKRC-42, ACHN, 769-P and cancer stem cells. T3 has promoting effect on the cell proliferation of HKCSC, Caki-2, ASE, ACHN, SK-RC-42, SMKT-R2, Caki-1, 786-0, and SK-RC-45 cells. Tyrosine kinase inhibitor, sunitinib, directly inhibits proliferation of RCC cells, while thyroid hormone receptor antagonist 1-850 (CAS 251310‑57-3) has less significant inhibitory impact. T3 stimulation does not abrogate inhibitory effect of sunitinib. Renal cancer tumor cells hypostimulated with T3 may be more responsive to tyrosine kinase inhibition. Moreover, some tumors may be considered as T3-independent and present aggressive phenotype with thyroid hormone receptor activated independently from the ligand. On the contrary proliferation induced by deregulated VHL and or c-Met pathways may transgress normal T3 mediated regulation of the cell cycle.

  7. A cancer-causing gene is positively correlated with male aggression in Xiphophorus cortezi

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, André A.

    2010-01-01

    The persistence of seemingly maladaptive genes in organisms challenges evolutionary biological thought. In Xiphophorus fishes, certain melanin patterns form malignant melanomas due to a cancer-causing gene (Xiphophorus melanoma receptor kinase; Xmrk), which arose several millions years ago from unequal meiotic recombination. Xiphophorus melanomas are male biased and induced by androgens however male behavior and Xmrk genotype has not been investigated. This study found that male X. cortezi with the spotted caudal (Sc) pattern, from which melanomas originate, displayed increased aggression in mirror image trials. Furthermore, Xmrk males (regardless of Sc phenotype) bit and performed more agonistic displays than Xmrk deficient males. Male aggressive response decreased when males viewed their Sc image as compared to their non-Sc image. Collectively, these results indicate that Xmrk males experience a competitive advantage over wild-type males and that intrasexual selection could be an important component in the evolutionary maintenance of this oncogene within Xiphophorus. PMID:20021547

  8. Molecular analysis of aggressive renal cell carcinoma with unclassified histology reveals distinct subsets

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ying-Bei; Xu, Jianing; Skanderup, Anders Jacobsen; Dong, Yiyu; Brannon, A. Rose; Wang, Lu; Won, Helen H.; Wang, Patricia I.; Nanjangud, Gouri J.; Jungbluth, Achim A.; Li, Wei; Ojeda, Virginia; Hakimi, A. Ari; Voss, Martin H.; Schultz, Nikolaus; Motzer, Robert J.; Russo, Paul; Cheng, Emily H.; Giancotti, Filippo G.; Lee, William; Berger, Michael F.; Tickoo, Satish K.; Reuter, Victor E.; Hsieh, James J.

    2016-01-01

    Renal cell carcinomas with unclassified histology (uRCC) constitute a significant portion of aggressive non-clear cell renal cell carcinomas that have no standard therapy. The oncogenic drivers in these tumours are unknown. Here we perform a molecular analysis of 62 high-grade primary uRCC, incorporating targeted cancer gene sequencing, RNA sequencing, single-nucleotide polymorphism array, fluorescence in situ hybridization, immunohistochemistry and cell-based assays. We identify recurrent somatic mutations in 29 genes, including NF2 (18%), SETD2 (18%), BAP1 (13%), KMT2C (10%) and MTOR (8%). Integrated analysis reveals a subset of 26% uRCC characterized by NF2 loss, dysregulated Hippo–YAP pathway and worse survival, whereas 21% uRCC with mutations of MTOR, TSC1, TSC2 or PTEN and hyperactive mTORC1 signalling are associated with better clinical outcome. FH deficiency (6%), chromatin/DNA damage regulator mutations (21%) and ALK translocation (2%) distinguish additional cases. Altogether, this study reveals distinct molecular subsets for 76% of our uRCC cohort, which could have diagnostic and therapeutic implications. PMID:27713405

  9. Adenylate cyclase-associated protein 1 overexpressed in pancreatic cancers is involved in cancer cell motility.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Ken; Takamura, Masaaki; Masugi, Yohei; Mori, Taisuke; Du, Wenlin; Hibi, Taizo; Hiraoka, Nobuyoshi; Ohta, Tsutomu; Ohki, Misao; Hirohashi, Setsuo; Sakamoto, Michiie

    2009-04-01

    Pancreatic cancer has the worst prognosis among cancers due to the difficulty of early diagnosis and its aggressive behavior. To characterize the aggressiveness of pancreatic cancers on gene expression, pancreatic cancer xenografts transplanted into severe combined immunodeficient mice served as a panel for gene-expression profiling. As a result of profiling, the adenylate cyclase-associated protein 1 (CAP1) gene was shown to be overexpressed in all of the xenografts. The expression of CAP1 protein in all 73 cases of pancreatic cancer was recognized by immunohistochemical analyses. The ratio of CAP1-positive tumor cells in clinical specimens was correlated with the presence of lymph node metastasis and neural invasion, and also with the poor prognosis of patients. Immunocytochemical analyses in pancreatic cancer cells demonstrated that CAP1 colocalized to the leading edge of lamellipodia with actin. Knockdown of CAP1 by RNA interference resulted in the reduction of lamellipodium formation, motility, and invasion of pancreatic cancer cells. This is the first report demonstrating the overexpression of CAP1 in pancreatic cancers and suggesting the involvement of CAP1 in the aggressive behavior of pancreatic cancer cells.

  10. Novel targeted therapies in uterine serous carcinoma, an aggressive variant of endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Menderes, Gulden; Clark, Mitchell; Santin, Alessandro D

    2016-04-01

    Uterine serous carcinoma (USC) is a rare but aggressive subtype of endometrial cancer. Although it represents only 10% of all endometrial cancer cases, USC accounts for up to 40% of all endometrial cancer-related recurrences and subsequent deaths. With such a dismal prognosis, there is an expanding role for novel targeted approaches in the treatment of USC. Recent whole-exome sequencing studies have demonstrated gain of function of the HER2/NEU gene, as well as driver mutations in the PIK3CA/AKT/mTOR and cyclin E/FBXW7 oncogenic pathways in a large number of USCs. The results emphasize the relevance of these novel therapeutic targets for biologic therapy of USC, which will be reviewed in this article.

  11. Pancreatic cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ya-Yun; Yuan, Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Studies are emerging in support of the cancer stem cells (CSCs) theory which considers that a tiny subset of cancer cells is exclusively responsible for the initiation and malignant behavior of a cancer. This cell population, also termed CSCs, possesses the capacity both to self-renew, producing progeny that have the identical tumorigenic potential, and to differentiate into the bulk of cancer cells, helping serve the formation of the tumor entities, which, altogether, build the hierarchically organized structure of a cancer. In this review, we try to articulate the complicated signaling pathways regulating the retention of the characteristics of pancreatic CSCs, and in the wake of which, we seek to offer insights into the CSCs-relevant targeted therapeutics which are, in the meantime, confronted with bigger challenges than ever.

  12. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha is required for the tumourigenic and aggressive phenotype associated with Rab25 expression in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Roman, Natividad; Sahasrabudhe, Neha Mohan; McGregor, Fiona; Chalmers, Anthony J.; Cassidy, Jim; Plumb, Jane

    2016-01-01

    The small GTPase Rab25 has been functionally linked to tumour progression and aggressiveness in ovarian cancer and promotes invasion in three-dimensional environments. This type of migration has been shown to require the expression of the hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF-1α). In this report we demonstrate that Rab25 regulates HIF-1α protein expression in an oxygen independent manner in a panel of cancer cell lines. Regulation of HIF-1α protein expression by Rab25 did not require transcriptional upregulation, but was dependent on de novo protein synthesis through the Erbb2/ERK1/2 and p70S6K/mTOR pathways. Rab25 expression induced HIF-1 transcriptional activity, increased cisplatin resistance, and conferred intraperitoneal growth to the A2780 cell line in immunocompromised mice. Targeting HIF1 activity by silencing HIF-1β re-sensitised cells to cisplatin in vitro and reduced tumour formation of A2780-Rab25 expressing cells in vivo in a mouse ovarian peritoneal carcinomatosis model. Similar effects on cisplatin resistance in vitro and intraperitoneal tumourigenesis in vivo were obtained after HIF1b knockdown in the ovarian cancer cell line SKOV3, which expresses endogenous Rab25 and HIF-1α at atmospheric oxygen concentrations. Our results suggest that Rab25 tumourigenic potential and chemoresistance relies on HIF1 activity in aggressive and metastatic ovarian cancer. Targeting HIF-1 activity may potentially be effective either alone or in combination with standard chemotherapy for aggressive metastatic ovarian cancer. PMID:26967059

  13. BTG1 expression correlates with pathogenesis, aggressive behaviors and prognosis of gastric cancer: a potential target for gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hua-chuan; Li, Jing; Shen, Dao-fu; Yang, Xue-feng; Zhao, Shuang; Wu, Ya-zhou; Takano, Yasuo; Sun, Hong-zhi; Su, Rong-jian; Luo, Jun-sheng; Gou, Wen-feng

    2015-08-14

    Here, we found that BTG1 overexpression inhibited proliferation, migration and invasion, induced G2/M arrest, differentiation, senescence and apoptosis in BGC-823 and MKN28 cells (p < 0.05). BTG1 transfectants showed a higher mRNA expression of Cyclin D1 and Bax, but a lower mRNA expression of cdc2, p21, mTOR and MMP-9 than the control and mock (p < 0.05). After treated with cisplatin, MG132, paclitaxel and SAHA, both BTG1 transfectants showed lower mRNA viability and higher apoptosis than the control in both time- and dose-dependent manners (p < 0.05) with the hypoexpression of chemoresistance-related genes (slug, CD147, GRP78, GRP94, FBXW7 TOP1, TOP2 and GST-π). BTG1 expression was restored after 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine treatment in gastric cancer cells. BTG1 expression was statistically lower in gastric cancer than non-neoplastic mucosa and metastatic cancer in lymph node (p < 0.05). BTG1 expression was positively correlated with depth of invasion, lymphatic and venous invasion, lymph node metastasis, TNM staging and worse prognosis (p < 0.05). The diffuse-type carcinoma showed less BTG1 expression than intestinal- and mixed-type ones (p < 0.05). BTG1 overexpression suppressed tumor growth and lung metastasis of gastric cancer cells by inhibiting proliferation, enhancing autophagy and apoptosis in xenograft models. It was suggested that down-regulated BTG1 expression might promote gastric carcinogenesis partially due to its promoter methylation. BTG1 overexpression might reverse the aggressive phenotypes and be employed as a potential target for gene therapy of gastric cancer.

  14. miR-508 sustains phosphoinositide signalling and promotes aggressive phenotype of oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chuyong; Liu, Aibin; Zhu, Jinrong; Zhang, Xin; Wu, Geyan; Ren, Pengli; Wu, Jueheng; Li, Mengfeng; Li, Jun; Song, Libing

    2014-08-06

    The strength and duration of phosphoinositide signalling from phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) activation to Akt is tightly balanced by phosphoinositide kinases and phosphatases. However, how phosphatase-mediated negative regulatory effects are concomitantly disrupted in cancers, which commonly exhibit constitutively activated PI3K/Akt signalling, remains undefined. Here we report that miR-508 directly suppresses multiple phosphatases, including inositol polyphosphate-5-phosphatase J (INPP5J), phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN) and inositol polyphosphate 4-phosphatase type I (INPP4A), resulting in constitutive activation of PI3K/Akt signalling. Furthermore, we find that overexpressing miR-508 promotes, while silencing miR-508 impairs, the aggressive phenotype of oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) both in vitro and in vivo. Importantly, the level of miR-508 correlates with poor survival and activated PI3K/Akt signalling in a large cohort of ESCC specimens. These findings uncover a mechanism for constitutive PI3K/Akt activation in ESCC, and support a functionally and clinically relevant epigenetic mechanism in cancer progression.

  15. A Neighborhood-Wide Association Study (NWAS): Example of prostate cancer aggressiveness

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Shannon M.; Mitra, Nandita; Ross, Michelle; Newcomb, Craig; Dailey, Karl; Jackson, Tara; Zeigler-Johnson, Charnita M.; Riethman, Harold; Branas, Charles C.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Cancer results from complex interactions of multiple variables at the biologic, individual, and social levels. Compared to other levels, social effects that occur geospatially in neighborhoods are not as well-studied, and empiric methods to assess these effects are limited. We propose a novel Neighborhood-Wide Association Study(NWAS), analogous to genome-wide association studies(GWAS), that utilizes high-dimensional computing approaches from biology to comprehensively and empirically identify neighborhood factors associated with disease. Methods Pennsylvania Cancer Registry data were linked to U.S. Census data. In a successively more stringent multiphase approach, we evaluated the association between neighborhood (n = 14,663 census variables) and prostate cancer aggressiveness(PCA) with n = 6,416 aggressive (Stage≥3/Gleason grade≥7 cases) vs. n = 70,670 non-aggressive (Stage<3/Gleason grade<7) cases in White men. Analyses accounted for age, year of diagnosis, spatial correlation, and multiple-testing. We used generalized estimating equations in Phase 1 and Bayesian mixed effects models in Phase 2 to calculate odds ratios(OR) and confidence/credible intervals(CI). In Phase 3, principal components analysis grouped correlated variables. Results We identified 17 new neighborhood variables associated with PCA. These variables represented income, housing, employment, immigration, access to care, and social support. The top hits or most significant variables related to transportation (OR = 1.05;CI = 1.001–1.09) and poverty (OR = 1.07;CI = 1.01–1.12). Conclusions This study introduces the application of high-dimensional, computational methods to large-scale, publically-available geospatial data. Although NWAS requires further testing, it is hypothesis-generating and addresses gaps in geospatial analysis related to empiric assessment. Further, NWAS could have broad implications for many diseases and future precision medicine studies focused on multilevel

  16. 5′-AMP-activated Protein Kinase (AMPK) Supports the Growth of Aggressive Experimental Human Breast Cancer Tumors*

    PubMed Central

    Laderoute, Keith R.; Calaoagan, Joy M.; Chao, Wan-ru; Dinh, Dominc; Denko, Nicholas; Duellman, Sarah; Kalra, Jessica; Liu, Xiaohe; Papandreou, Ioanna; Sambucetti, Lidia; Boros, Laszlo G.

    2014-01-01

    Rapid tumor growth can establish metabolically stressed microenvironments that activate 5′-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a ubiquitous regulator of ATP homeostasis. Previously, we investigated the importance of AMPK for the growth of experimental tumors prepared from HRAS-transformed mouse embryo fibroblasts and for primary brain tumor development in a rat model of neurocarcinogenesis. Here, we used triple-negative human breast cancer cells in which AMPK activity had been knocked down to investigate the contribution of AMPK to experimental tumor growth and core glucose metabolism. We found that AMPK supports the growth of fast-growing orthotopic tumors prepared from MDA-MB-231 and DU4475 breast cancer cells but had no effect on the proliferation or survival of these cells in culture. We used in vitro and in vivo metabolic profiling with [13C]glucose tracers to investigate the contribution of AMPK to core glucose metabolism in MDA-MB-231 cells, which have a Warburg metabolic phenotype; these experiments indicated that AMPK supports tumor glucose metabolism in part through positive regulation of glycolysis and the nonoxidative pentose phosphate cycle. We also found that AMPK activity in the MDA-MB-231 tumors could systemically perturb glucose homeostasis in sensitive normal tissues (liver and pancreas). Overall, our findings suggest that the contribution of AMPK to the growth of aggressive experimental tumors has a critical microenvironmental component that involves specific regulation of core glucose metabolism. PMID:24993821

  17. Cancer-specific uptake of a liganded protein nanocarrier targeting aggressive CXCR4(+) colorectal cancer models.

    PubMed

    Céspedes, María Virtudes; Unzueta, Ugutz; Álamo, Patricia; Gallardo, Alberto; Sala, Rita; Casanova, Isolda; Pavón, Miguel Angel; Mangues, María Antonia; Trías, Manuel; López-Pousa, Antonio; Villaverde, Antonio; Vázquez, Esther; Mangues, Ramon

    2016-10-01

    Unliganded drug-nanoconjugates accumulate passively in the tumor whereas liganded nanoconjugates promote drug internalization in tumor cells via endocytosis and increase antitumor efficacy. Whether or not tumor cell internalization associates with enhanced tumor uptake is still under debate. We here compared tumor uptake of T22-GFP-H6, a liganded protein carrier targeting the CXCR4 receptor, and the unliganded GFP-H6 carrier in subcutaneous and metastatic colorectal cancer models. T22-GFP-H6 had a higher tumor uptake in primary tumor and metastatic foci than GFP-H6, with no biodistribution or toxicity on normal tissues. T22-GFP-H6 was detected in target CXCR4(+) tumor cell cytosol whereas GFP-H6 was detected in tumor stroma. SDF1-α co-administration switched T22-GFP-H6 internalization from CXCR4(+) tumor epithelial cells to the stroma. Therefore, the incorporation of a targeting ligand promotes selective accumulation of the nanocarrier inside target tumor cells while increasing whole tumor uptake in a CXCR4-dependent manner, validating T22-GFP-H6 as a CXCR4-targeted drug carrier.

  18. Colorectal cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Salama, Paul; Platell, Cameron

    2009-10-01

    Somatic stem cells reside at the base of the crypts throughout the colonic mucosa. These cells are essential for the normal regeneration of the colonic epithelium. The stem cells reside within a special 'niche' comprised of intestinal sub-epithelial myofibroblasts that tightly control their function. It has been postulated that mutations within these adult colonic stem cells may induce neoplastic changes. Such cells can then dissociate from the epithelium and travel into the mesenchyme and thus form invasive cancers. This theory is based on the observation that within a colon cancer, less than 1% of the neoplastic cells have the ability to regenerate the tumour. It is this group of cells that exhibits characteristics of colonic stem cells. Although anti-neoplastic agents can induce remissions by inhibiting cell division, the stem cells appear to be remarkably resistant to both standard chemotherapy and radiotherapy. These stem cells may therefore persist after treatment and form the nucleus for cancer recurrence. Hence, future treatment modalities should focus specifically on controlling the cancer stem cells. In this review, we discuss the biology of normal and malignant colonic stem cells.

  19. Coffee consumption and prostate cancer aggressiveness among African and Caucasian Americans in a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Arab, Lenore; Su, L Joseph; Steck, Susan E; Ang, Alfonso; Fontham, Elizabeth T H; Bensen, Jeannette T; Mohler, James L

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the relationship between caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee and prostate cancer (CaP) aggressiveness using data from a population-based incident CaP study within the North Carolina-Louisiana Prostate Cancer Project (PCaP). Classification of CaP aggressiveness at diagnosis was based on clinical criteria for 1,049 African-American (AA) and 1,083 Caucasian-American (CA) research subjects. Coffee consumption was measured using a modified NCI Dietary History Questionnaire. No significant associations were found between CaP aggressiveness and consumption of either caffeinated or decaffeinated coffee. The OR for high aggressive CaP among consumers of more than 4 cups per day was 0.92 (95%CI = 0.61, 1.39), compared to non-coffee-drinkers. Results stratified by race found no significant associations and no noticeable trends in either AAs (P for trend = 0. 62) or CAs (P for trend = 0.42). In contrast to a recent report on a select population that has less complete information on CaP aggressiveness suggesting that coffee prevents aggressive CaP, this rapid case ascertainment population-based study, in a biracial population with differing risks of CaP did not demonstrate a protective relationship between high coffee consumption and risk of high aggressive CaP.

  20. Trends in incidence, treatment and survival of aggressive B-cell lymphoma in the Netherlands 1989-2010.

    PubMed

    Issa, Djamila E; van de Schans, Saskia A M; Chamuleau, Martine E D; Karim-Kos, Henrike E; Wondergem, Marielle; Huijgens, Peter C; Coebergh, Jan Willem W; Zweegman, Sonja; Visser, Otto

    2015-04-01

    Only a small number of patients with aggressive B-cell lymphoma take part in clinical trials, and elderly patients in particular are under-represented. Therefore, we studied data of the population-based nationwide Netherlands Cancer Registry to determine trends in incidence, treatment and survival in an unselected patient population. We included all patients aged 15 years and older with newly diagnosed diffuse large B-cell lymphoma or Burkitt lymphoma in the period 1989-2010 and mantle cell lymphoma in the period 2001-2010, with follow up until February 2013. We examined incidence, first-line treatment and survival. We calculated annual percentage of change in incidence and carried out relative survival analyses. Incidence remained stable for diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (n=23,527), while for mantle cell lymphoma (n=1,634) and Burkitt lymphoma (n=724) incidence increased for men and remained stable for women. No increase in survival for patients with aggressive B-cell lymphoma was observed during the period 1989-1993 and the period 1994-1998 [5-year relative survival 42% (95%CI: 39%-45%) and 41% (38%-44%), respectively], but increased to 46% (43%-48%) in the period 1999-2004 and to 58% (56%-61%) in the period 2005-2010. The increase in survival was most prominent in patients under 65 years of age, while there was a smaller increase in patients over 75 years of age. However, when untreated patients were excluded, patients over 75 years of age had a similar increase in survival to younger patients. In the Netherlands, survival for patients with aggressive B-cell lymphoma increased over time, particularly in younger patients, but also in elderly patients when treatment had been initiated. The improvement in survival coincided with the introduction of rituximab therapy and stem cell transplantation into clinical practice.

  1. Trends in incidence, treatment and survival of aggressive B-cell lymphoma in the Netherlands 1989–2010

    PubMed Central

    Issa, Djamila E.; van de Schans, Saskia A.M.; Chamuleau, Martine E.D.; Karim-Kos, Henrike E.; Wondergem, Marielle; Huijgens, Peter C.; Coebergh, Jan Willem W.; Zweegman, Sonja; Visser, Otto

    2015-01-01

    Only a small number of patients with aggressive B-cell lymphoma take part in clinical trials, and elderly patients in particular are under-represented. Therefore, we studied data of the population-based nationwide Netherlands Cancer Registry to determine trends in incidence, treatment and survival in an unselected patient population. We included all patients aged 15 years and older with newly diagnosed diffuse large B-cell lymphoma or Burkitt lymphoma in the period 1989–2010 and mantle cell lymphoma in the period 2001–2010, with follow up until February 2013. We examined incidence, first-line treatment and survival. We calculated annual percentage of change in incidence and carried out relative survival analyses. Incidence remained stable for diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (n=23,527), while for mantle cell lymphoma (n=1,634) and Burkitt lymphoma (n=724) incidence increased for men and remained stable for women. No increase in survival for patients with aggressive B-cell lymphoma was observed during the period 1989–1993 and the period 1994–1998 [5-year relative survival 42% (95%CI: 39%–45%) and 41% (38%–44%), respectively], but increased to 46% (43%–48%) in the period 1999–2004 and to 58% (56%–61%) in the period 2005–2010. The increase in survival was most prominent in patients under 65 years of age, while there was a smaller increase in patients over 75 years of age. However, when untreated patients were excluded, patients over 75 years of age had a similar increase in survival to younger patients. In the Netherlands, survival for patients with aggressive B-cell lymphoma increased over time, particularly in younger patients, but also in elderly patients when treatment had been initiated. The improvement in survival coincided with the introduction of rituximab therapy and stem cell transplantation into clinical practice. PMID:25512643

  2. A feasibility study for enrichment of highly-aggressive cancer subpopulations by their biophysical properties via dielectrophoresis enhanced with synergistic fluid flow.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Temple Anne; Cemazar, Jaka; Balani, Nikita; Sweeney, Daniel C; Schmelz, Eva M; Davalos, Rafael V

    2017-03-25

    A common problem with cancer treatment is the development of treatment resistance and tumor recurrence that result from treatments that kill most tumor cells yet leave behind aggressive cells to repopulate. Presented here is a microfluidic device that can be used to isolate tumor subpopulations to optimize treatment selection. Dielectrophoresis (DEP) is a phenomenon where particles are polarized by an electric field and move along the electric field gradient. Different cell subpopulations have different DEP responses depending on their bioelectrical phenotype, which, we hypothesize, correlate with aggressiveness. We have designed a microfluidic device in which a region containing posts locally distorts channel of the electric field created by an AC voltage across a microfluidic channel and which forces cells toward the posts through DEP. This force is balanced with a simultaneous drag force from fluid motion that pulls cells away from the posts. We have shown that by adjusting the drag force, cells with aggressive phenotypes are influenced more by the DEP force and trap on posts while others flow through the chip unaffected. Utilizing single-cell trapping on cell-sized posts by a drag-DEP force balance, we show that separation of very similar cell subpopulations may be achieved, a result that was previously impossible with DEP alone. Separated subpopulations maintain high viability downstream, and remain in a native state, without fluorescent labeling. These cells can then be cultured to help select a therapy that kills aggressive subpopulations equally or better than the bulk of the tumor, mitigating resistance and recurrence. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  3. Transglutaminase Is a Tumor Cell and Cancer Stem Cell Survival Factor

    PubMed Central

    Eckert, Richard L.; Fisher, Matthew L.; Grun, Dan; Adhikary, Gautam; Xu, Wen; Kerr, Candace

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that cancer cells express elevated levels of type II transglutaminase (TG2), and that expression is further highly enriched in cancer stem cells derived from these cancers. Moreover, elevated TG2 expression is associated with enhanced cancer stem cell marker expression, survival signaling, proliferation, migration, invasion, integrin-mediated adhesion, epithelial–mesenchymal transition, and drug resistance. TG2 expression is also associated with formation of aggressive and metastatic tumors that are resistant to conventional therapeutic intervention. This review summarizes the role of TG2 as a cancer cell survival factor in a range of tumor types, and as a target for preventive and therapeutic intervention. The literature supports the idea that TG2, in the closed/GTP-binding/signaling conformation, drives cancer cell and cancer stem cell survival, and that TG2, in the open/crosslinking conformation, is associated with cell death. PMID:26258961

  4. Nuclear Morphometry Identifies a Distinct Aggressive Cellular Phenotype in Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Glazer, Evan S.; Bartels, Peter H.; Prasad, Anil R.; Yozwiak, Michael L.; Bartels, Hubert G.; Einspahr, Janine G.; Alberts, David S.; Krouse, Robert S.

    2011-01-01

    By identifying aggressive cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC) in patients who are at high risk for recurrences or second primaries after resection, intensive surveillance and therapy may decrease morbidity and mortality. We investigated the role of nuclear morphometry (karyometry) in differentiating between aggressive and nonaggressive cSCC. We retrospectively analyzed cSCC lesions from 40 male patients. 22 patients had evidence of aggressive cSCC (local/regional recurrence or a second primary cSCC), and 18 patients were identified with similar ages and sites of disease as control patients with nonaggressive cSCC (no evidence of recurrence, metastasis, or second primary). We performed karyometric analysis to identify nuclear features that discriminate between aggressive and nonaggressive cSCC nuclei. We used statistically significant differences (Kruskal-Wallis test P < 0.0001) to compose a quantitative aggressive classification score (proportion of aggressive nuclei from 0% to 100%). For comparisons, we used Fisher’s exact test or Student t test. The mean age was 79 ± 7 years for aggressive cSCC and 80 ± 9 years for nonaggressive cSCC (P = 0.66). We analyzed a mean of 96 nuclei in each group. The mean classification score for aggressive cSCC was significantly higher (69% ± 6%) than for nonaggressive cSCC (28% ± 5%, P = 0.00002). Overall, the classification score accurately categorized 80% of our patients (P = 0.0004). In most patients, karyometry differentiated between aggressive and nonaggressive cSCC. We found that classification scores, which provide information on individual lesions, could be used for risk stratification. PMID:21636541

  5. HER2 overcomes PTEN (loss)-induced senescence to cause aggressive prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Imran; Patel, Rachana; Singh, Lukram Babloo; Nixon, Colin; Seywright, Morag; Barnetson, Robert J.; Brunton, Valerie G.; Muller, William J.; Edwards, Joanne; Sansom, Owen J.; Leung, Hing Y.

    2011-01-01

    Prostate cancer (CaP) is the most common cancer among adult men in the Western world. Better insight into its tumor-activating pathways may facilitate the development of targeted therapies. In this study, we show that patients who develop prostate tumors with low levels of PTEN and high levels of HER2/3 have a poor prognosis. This is functionally relevant, as targeting Her2 activation to the murine prostate cooperates with Pten loss and drives CaP progression. Mechanistically, this is associated with activation of the MAPK pathway and abrogation of the Pten loss-induced cellular senescence program. Importantly, inhibition of MEK function strongly suppressed proliferation within these tumors by restoring the Pten loss-induced cellular senescence program. Taken together, these data suggest that stratification of CaP patients for HER2/3 and PTEN status could identify patients with aggressive CaP who may respond favorably to MEK inhibition. PMID:21930937

  6. Targeted therapy in uterine serous carcinoma: an aggressive variant of endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Black, Jonathan D; English, Diana P; Roque, Dana M; Santin, Alessandro D

    2014-01-01

    Uterine serous carcinoma (USC) is a highly aggressive variant of endometrial cancer. Although it only represents less than 10% of all cases, it accounts for a disproportionate number of deaths from endometrial cancer. Comprehensive surgical staging followed by carboplatin and paclitaxel chemotherapy represents the mainstay of USC therapy. Vaginal cuff brachytherapy is also of potential benefit in USC. Recent whole-exome sequencing studies have demonstrated gain of function of the HER2/NEU gene, as well as driver mutations in the PIK3CA/AKT/mTOR and cyclin E/FBXW7 oncogenic pathways in a large number of USCs. These results emphasize the relevance of these novel therapeutic targets for biologic therapy of chemotherapy-resistant recurrent USC.

  7. The expression of the truncated isoform of somatostatin receptor subtype 5 associates with aggressiveness in medullary thyroid carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Molè, Daniela; Gentilin, Erica; Ibañez-Costa, Alejandro; Gagliano, Teresa; Gahete, Manuel D; Tagliati, Federico; Rossi, Roberta; Pelizzo, Maria Rosa; Pansini, Giancarlo; Luque, Raúl M; Castaño, Justo P; degli Uberti, Ettore; Zatelli, Maria Chiara

    2015-11-01

    The truncated somatostatin receptor variant sst5TMD4 associates with increased invasiveness and aggressiveness in breast cancer. We previously found that sst5 activation may counteract sst2 selective agonist effects in a medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) cell line, the TT cells, and that sst5TMD4 is overexpressed in poorly differentiated thyroid cancers. The purpose of this study is to evaluate sst5TMD4 expression in a series of human MTC and to explore the functional role of sst5TMD4 in TT cells. We evaluated sst5TMD4 and sst5 expression in 36 MTC samples. Moreover, we investigated the role of sst5TMD4 in TT cells evaluating cell number, DNA synthesis, free cytosolic calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i), calcitonin and vascular endothelial growth factor levels, cell morphology, protein expression, and invasion. We found that in MTC the balance between sst5TMD4 and sst5 expression influences disease stage. sst5TMD4 overexpression in TT cells confers a greater growth capacity, blocks sst2 agonist-induced antiproliferative effects, modifies the cell phenotype, decreases E-cadherin and phosphorylated β-catenin levels, increases vimentin, total β-catenin and phosphorylated GSK3B levels (in keeping with the development of epithelial to mesenchymal transition), and confers a greater invasion capacity. This is the first evidence indicating that sst5TMD4 is expressed in human MTC cells, where it associates with more aggressive behavior, suggesting that sst5TMD4 might play a functionally relevant role.

  8. DLX1 acts as a crucial target of FOXM1 to promote ovarian cancer aggressiveness by enhancing TGF-β/SMAD4 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Chan, D W; Hui, W W Y; Wang, J J; Yung, M M H; Hui, L M N; Qin, Y; Liang, R R; Leung, T H Y; Xu, D; Chan, K K L; Yao, K-M; Tsang, B K; Ngan, H Y S

    2017-01-01

    Recent evidence from a comprehensive genome analysis and functional studies have revealed that FOXM1 is a crucial metastatic regulator that drives cancer progression. However, the regulatory mechanism by which FOXM1 exerts its metastatic functions in cancer cells remains obscure. Here, we report that DLX1 acts as a FOXM1 downstream target, exerting pro-metastatic function in ovarian cancers. Both FOXM1 isoforms (FOXM1B or FOXM1C) could transcriptionally upregulate DLX1 through two conserved binding sites, located at +61 to +69bp downstream (TFBS1) and −675 to −667bp upstream (TFBS2) of the DLX1 promoter, respectively. This regulation was further accentuated by the significant correlation between the nuclear expression of FOXM1 and DLX1 in high-grade serous ovarian cancers. Functionally, the ectopic expression of DLX1 promoted ovarian cancer cell growth, cell migration/invasion and intraperitoneal dissemination of ovarian cancer in mice, whereas small interfering RNA-mediated DLX1 knockdown in FOXM1-overexpressing ovarian cancer cells abrogated these oncogenic capacities. In contrast, depletion of FOXM1 by shRNAi only partially attenuated tumor growth and exerted almost no effect on cell migration/invasion and the intraperitoneal dissemination of DLX1-overexpressing ovarian cancer cells. Furthermore, the mechanistic studies showed that DLX1 positively modulates transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling by upregulating PAI-1 and JUNB through direct interaction with SMAD4 in the nucleus upon TGF-β1 induction. Taken together, these data strongly suggest that DLX1 has a pivotal role in FOXM1 signaling to promote cancer aggressiveness through intensifying TGF-β/SMAD4 signaling in high-grade serous ovarian cancer cells. PMID:27593933

  9. Chemotherapy targeting cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Haiguang; Lv, Lin; Yang, Kai

    2015-01-01

    Conventional chemotherapy is the main treatment for cancer and benefits patients in the form of decreased relapse and metastasis and longer overall survival. However, as the target therapy drugs and delivery systems are not wholly precise, it also results in quite a few side effects, and is less efficient in many cancers due to the spared cancer stem cells, which are considered the reason for chemotherapy resistance, relapse, and metastasis. Conventional chemotherapy limitations and the cancer stem cell hypothesis inspired our search for a novel chemotherapy targeting cancer stem cells. In this review, we summarize cancer stem cell enrichment methods, the search for new efficient drugs, and the delivery of drugs targeting cancer stem cells. We also discuss cancer stem cell hierarchy complexity and the corresponding combination therapy for both cancer stem and non-stem cells. Learning from cancer stem cells may reveal novel strategies for chemotherapy in the future. PMID:26045975

  10. Significant Role of Collagen XVII And Integrin β4 in Migration and Invasion of The Less Aggressive Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Moilanen, Jyri M; Löffek, Stefanie; Kokkonen, Nina; Salo, Sirpa; Väyrynen, Juha P; Hurskainen, Tiina; Manninen, Aki; Riihilä, Pilvi; Heljasvaara, Ritva; Franzke, Claus-Werner; Kähäri, Veli-Matti; Salo, Tuula; Mäkinen, Markus J; Tasanen, Kaisa

    2017-03-22

    Collagen XVII and integrin α6β4 have well-established roles as epithelial adhesion molecules. Their binding partner laminin 332 as well as integrin α6β4 are largely recognized to promote invasion and metastasis in various cancers, and collagen XVII is essential for the survival of colon and lung cancer stem cells. We have studied the expression of laminin γ2, collagen XVII and integrin β4 in tissue microarray samples of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and its precursors, actinic keratosis and Bowen's disease. The expression of laminin γ2 was highest in SCC samples, whereas the expression of collagen XVII and integrin β4 varied greatly in SCC and its precursors. Collagen XVII and integrin β4 were also expressed in SCC cell lines. Virus-mediated RNAi knockdown of collagen XVII and integrin β4 reduced the migration of less aggressive SCC-25 cells in horizontal scratch wound healing assay. Additionally, in a 3D organotypic myoma invasion assay the loss of collagen XVII or integrin β4 suppressed equally the migration and invasion of SCC-25 cells whereas there was no effect on the most aggressive HSC-3 cells. Variable expression patterns and results in migration and invasion assays suggest that collagen XVII and integrin β4 contribute to SCC tumorigenesis.

  11. Significant Role of Collagen XVII And Integrin β4 in Migration and Invasion of The Less Aggressive Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Moilanen, Jyri M.; Löffek, Stefanie; Kokkonen, Nina; Salo, Sirpa; Väyrynen, Juha P.; Hurskainen, Tiina; Manninen, Aki; Riihilä, Pilvi; Heljasvaara, Ritva; Franzke, Claus-Werner; Kähäri, Veli-Matti; Salo, Tuula; Mäkinen, Markus J.; Tasanen, Kaisa

    2017-01-01

    Collagen XVII and integrin α6β4 have well-established roles as epithelial adhesion molecules. Their binding partner laminin 332 as well as integrin α6β4 are largely recognized to promote invasion and metastasis in various cancers, and collagen XVII is essential for the survival of colon and lung cancer stem cells. We have studied the expression of laminin γ2, collagen XVII and integrin β4 in tissue microarray samples of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and its precursors, actinic keratosis and Bowen’s disease. The expression of laminin γ2 was highest in SCC samples, whereas the expression of collagen XVII and integrin β4 varied greatly in SCC and its precursors. Collagen XVII and integrin β4 were also expressed in SCC cell lines. Virus-mediated RNAi knockdown of collagen XVII and integrin β4 reduced the migration of less aggressive SCC-25 cells in horizontal scratch wound healing assay. Additionally, in a 3D organotypic myoma invasion assay the loss of collagen XVII or integrin β4 suppressed equally the migration and invasion of SCC-25 cells whereas there was no effect on the most aggressive HSC-3 cells. Variable expression patterns and results in migration and invasion assays suggest that collagen XVII and integrin β4 contribute to SCC tumorigenesis. PMID:28327550

  12. Inflammation and cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Shigdar, Sarah; Li, Yong; Bhattacharya, Santanu; O'Connor, Michael; Pu, Chunwen; Lin, Jia; Wang, Tao; Xiang, Dongxi; Kong, Lingxue; Wei, Ming Q; Zhu, Yimin; Zhou, Shufeng; Duan, Wei

    2014-04-10

    Cancer stem cells are becoming recognised as being responsible for metastasis and treatment resistance. The complex cellular and molecular network that regulates cancer stem cells and the role that inflammation plays in cancer progression are slowly being elucidated. Cytokines, secreted by tumour associated immune cells, activate the necessary pathways required by cancer stem cells to facilitate cancer stem cells progressing through the epithelial-mesenchymal transition and migrating to distant sites. Once in situ, these cancer stem cells can secrete their own attractants, thus providing an environment whereby these cells can continue to propagate the tumour in a secondary niche.

  13. Novel Nuclear Localization of Fatty Acid Synthase Correlates with Prostate Cancer Aggressiveness

    PubMed Central

    Madigan, Allison A.; Rycyna, Kevin J.; Parwani, Anil V.; Datiri, Yeipyeng J.; Basudan, Ahmed M.; Sobek, Kathryn M.; Cummings, Jessica L.; Basse, Per H.; Bacich, Dean J.; O'Keefe, Denise S.

    2015-01-01

    Fatty acid synthase is up-regulated in a variety of cancers, including prostate cancer. Up-regulation of fatty acid synthase not only increases production of fatty acids in tumors but also contributes to the transformed phenotype by conferring growth and survival advantages. In addition, increased fatty acid synthase expression in prostate cancer correlates with poor prognosis, although the mechanism(s) by which this occurs are not completely understood. Because fatty acid synthase is expressed at low levels in normal cells, it is currently a major target for anticancer drug design. Fatty acid synthase is normally found in the cytosol; however, we have discovered that it also localizes to the nucleus in a subset of prostate cancer cells. Analysis of the fatty acid synthase protein sequence indicated the presence of a nuclear localization signal, and subcellular fractionation of LNCaP prostate cancer cells, as well as immunofluorescent confocal microscopy of patient prostate tumor tissue and LNCaPs confirmed nuclear localization of this protein. Finally, immunohistochemical analysis of prostate cancer tissue indicated that nuclear localization of fatty acid synthase correlates with Gleason grade, implicating a potentially novel role in prostate cancer progression. Possible clinical implications include improving the accuracy of prostate biopsies in the diagnosis of low- versus intermediate-risk prostate cancer and the uncovering of novel metabolic pathways for the therapeutic targeting of androgen-independent prostate cancer. PMID:24907642

  14. Association between Prostinogen (KLK15) Genetic Variants and Prostate Cancer Risk and Aggressiveness in Australia and a Meta-Analysis of GWAS Data

    PubMed Central

    Batra, Jyotsna; Lose, Felicity; O'Mara, Tracy; Marquart, Louise; Stephens, Carson; Alexander, Kimberly; Srinivasan, Srilakshmi; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Easton, Douglas F.; Olama, Ali Amin Al; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Guy, Michelle; Muir, Kenneth; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Rahman, Aneela A.; Neal, David E.; Hamdy, Freddie C.; Donovan, Jenny L.; Chambers, Suzanne; Gardiner, Robert A.; Aitken, Joanne; Yaxley, John; Kedda, Mary-Anne

    2011-01-01

    Background Kallikrein 15 (KLK15)/Prostinogen is a plausible candidate for prostate cancer susceptibility. Elevated KLK15 expression has been reported in prostate cancer and it has been described as an unfavorable prognostic marker for the disease. Objectives We performed a comprehensive analysis of association of variants in the KLK15 gene with prostate cancer risk and aggressiveness by genotyping tagSNPs, as well as putative functional SNPs identified by extensive bioinformatics analysis. Methods and Data Sources Twelve out of 22 SNPs, selected on the basis of linkage disequilibrium pattern, were analyzed in an Australian sample of 1,011 histologically verified prostate cancer cases and 1,405 ethnically matched controls. Replication was sought from two existing genome wide association studies (GWAS): the Cancer Genetic Markers of Susceptibility (CGEMS) project and a UK GWAS study. Results Two KLK15 SNPs, rs2659053 and rs3745522, showed evidence of association (p<0.05) but were not present on the GWAS platforms. KLK15 SNP rs2659056 was found to be associated with prostate cancer aggressiveness and showed evidence of association in a replication cohort of 5,051 patients from the UK, Australia, and the CGEMS dataset of US samples. A highly significant association with Gleason score was observed when the data was combined from these three studies with an Odds Ratio (OR) of 0.85 (95% CI = 0.77–0.93; p = 2.7×10−4). The rs2659056 SNP is predicted to alter binding of the RORalpha transcription factor, which has a role in the control of cell growth and differentiation and has been suggested to control the metastatic behavior of prostate cancer cells. Conclusions Our findings suggest a role for KLK15 genetic variation in the etiology of prostate cancer among men of European ancestry, although further studies in very large sample sets are necessary to confirm effect sizes. PMID:22132073

  15. Cancer stem cells, cancer cell plasticity and radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Vlashi, Erina; Pajonk, Frank

    2015-04-01

    Since the first prospective identification of cancer stem cells in solid cancers the cancer stem cell hypothesis has reemerged as a research topic of increasing interest. It postulates that solid cancers are organized hierarchically with a small number of cancer stem cells driving tumor growth, repopulation after injury and metastasis. They give rise to differentiated progeny, which lack these features. The model predicts that for any therapy to provide cure, all cancer stem cells have to be eliminated while the survival of differentiated progeny is less critical. In this review we discuss recent reports challenging the idea of a unidirectional differentiation of cancer cells. These reports provide evidence supporting the idea that non-stem cancer cells exhibit a remarkable degree of plasticity that allows them to re-acquire cancer stem cell traits, especially in the context of radiation therapy. We summarize conditions under which differentiation is reversed and discuss the current knowledge of the underlying mechanisms.

  16. Targeting Strategies for Renal Cell Carcinoma: From Renal Cancer Cells to Renal Cancer Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Zhi-Xiang; Mo, Jingxin; Zhao, Guixian; Shu, Gang; Fu, Hua-Lin; Zhao, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is a common form of urologic tumor that originates from the highly heterogeneous epithelium of renal tubules. Over the last decade, targeting therapies to renal cancer cells have transformed clinical care for RCC. Recently, it was proposed that renal cancer stem cells (CSCs) isolated from renal carcinomas were responsible for driving tumor growth and resistance to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy, according to the theory of CSCs; this has provided the rationale for therapies targeting this aggressive cell population. Precise identification of renal CSC populations and the complete cell hierarchy will accurately inform characterization of disease subtypes. This will ultimately contribute to more personalized and targeted therapies. Here, we summarize potential targeting strategies for renal cancer cells and renal CSCs, including tyrosine kinase inhibitors, mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors (mTOR), interleukins, CSC marker inhibitors, bone morphogenetic protein-2, antibody drug conjugates, and nanomedicine. In conclusion, targeting therapies for RCC represent new directions for exploration and clinical investigation and they plant a seed of hope for advanced clinical care.

  17. Targeting Strategies for Renal Cell Carcinoma: From Renal Cancer Cells to Renal Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Zhi-xiang; Mo, Jingxin; Zhao, Guixian; Shu, Gang; Fu, Hua-lin; Zhao, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is a common form of urologic tumor that originates from the highly heterogeneous epithelium of renal tubules. Over the last decade, targeting therapies to renal cancer cells have transformed clinical care for RCC. Recently, it was proposed that renal cancer stem cells (CSCs) isolated from renal carcinomas were responsible for driving tumor growth and resistance to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy, according to the theory of CSCs; this has provided the rationale for therapies targeting this aggressive cell population. Precise identification of renal CSC populations and the complete cell hierarchy will accurately inform characterization of disease subtypes. This will ultimately contribute to more personalized and targeted therapies. Here, we summarize potential targeting strategies for renal cancer cells and renal CSCs, including tyrosine kinase inhibitors, mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors (mTOR), interleukins, CSC marker inhibitors, bone morphogenetic protein-2, antibody drug conjugates, and nanomedicine. In conclusion, targeting therapies for RCC represent new directions for exploration and clinical investigation and they plant a seed of hope for advanced clinical care. PMID:27891093

  18. Low white blood cell count and cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Neutropenia and cancer; Absolute neutrophil count and cancer; ANC and cancer ... A person with cancer can get a low white blood cell count from the cancer or from treatment for the cancer. Cancer may ...

  19. Association of Childhood Chronic Physical Aggression with a DNA Methylation Signature in Adult Human T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Guillemin, Claire; Vitaro, Frank; Côté, Sylvana M.; Hallett, Michael; Tremblay, Richard E.; Szyf, Moshe

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic physical aggression (CPA) is characterized by frequent use of physical aggression from early childhood to adolescence. Observed in approximately 5% of males, CPA is associated with early childhood adverse environments and long-term negative consequences. Alterations in DNA methylation, a covalent modification of DNA that regulates genome function, have been associated with early childhood adversity. Aims To test the hypothesis that a trajectory of chronic physical aggression during childhood is associated with a distinct DNA methylation profile during adulthood. Methods We analyzed genome-wide promoter DNA methylation profiles of T cells from two groups of adult males assessed annually for frequency of physical aggression between 6 and 15 years of age: a group with CPA and a control group. Methylation profiles covering the promoter regions of 20 000 genes and 400 microRNAs were generated using MeDIP followed by hybridization to microarrays. Results In total, 448 distinct gene promoters were differentially methylated in CPA. Functionally, many of these genes have previously been shown to play a role in aggression and were enriched in biological pathways affected by behavior. Their locations in the genome tended to form clusters spanning millions of bases in the genome. Conclusions This study provides evidence of clustered and genome-wide variation in promoter DNA methylation in young adults that associates with a history of chronic physical aggression from 6 to 15 years of age. However, longitudinal studies of methylation during early childhood will be necessary to determine if and how this methylation variation in T cells DNA plays a role in early development of chronic physical aggression. PMID:24691403

  20. Understanding Prostate Cancer: Newly Diagnosed

    MedlinePlus

    ... tumor cells. The higher the score, the more aggressive the tumor. The cells are scored on a ... Gleason scores (2 – 4) tend to be less aggressive, while cancers with higher Gleason scores (7 – 10) ...

  1. Association of prostate volume with incidence and aggressiveness of prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Al-Khalil, Shadi; Ibilibor, Christine; Cammack, James Thomas; de Riese, Werner

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the possible correlation between prostate volume and aggressiveness and incidence of prostate cancer (PCa). Patients and methods A chart review of a cohort of 448 consecutive prostate biopsy-naive men was performed. These men underwent at least a 12-core biopsy at our institution due to increased prostate-specific antigen serum levels (>4 ng/mL) and/or suspicious findings on digital rectal examination during the period between 2008 and 2013. Transrectal ultrasound was used to determine the prostate volume. Results The positive biopsy rate was 66% for patients with a prostate volume of ≤35 cc and 40% for patients with a prostate volume of ≥65 cc (P<0.001). Of the 110 patients testing positive on biopsy with a volume of ≤35 cc, 10 patients (9.1%) had a Gleason score of ≥8. Of the 27 patients testing positive on biopsy with a volume of ≥65 cc, only 1 patient (3.7%) had a Gleason score of ≥8. Conclusion These results suggest that there may be an association between prostate volume and the incidence and aggressiveness of PCa. The larger the prostate, the lower the positive biopsy rate for PCa and the lower the Gleason score. PMID:27822463

  2. Cell membrane softening in human breast and cervical cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Händel, Chris; Schmidt, B. U. Sebastian; Schiller, Jürgen; Dietrich, Undine; Möhn, Till; Kießling, Tobias R.; Pawlizak, Steve; Fritsch, Anatol W.; Horn, Lars-Christian; Briest, Susanne; Höckel, Michael; Zink, Mareike; Käs, Josef A.

    2015-08-01

    Biomechanical properties are key to many cellular functions such as cell division and cell motility and thus are crucial in the development and understanding of several diseases, for instance cancer. The mechanics of the cellular cytoskeleton have been extensively characterized in cells and artificial systems. The rigidity of the plasma membrane, with the exception of red blood cells, is unknown and membrane rigidity measurements only exist for vesicles composed of a few synthetic lipids. In this study, thermal fluctuations of giant plasma membrane vesicles (GPMVs) directly derived from the plasma membranes of primary breast and cervical cells, as well as breast cell lines, are analyzed. Cell blebs or GPMVs were studied via thermal membrane fluctuations and mass spectrometry. It will be shown that cancer cell membranes are significantly softer than their non-malignant counterparts. This can be attributed to a loss of fluid raft forming lipids in malignant cells. These results indicate that the reduction of membrane rigidity promotes aggressive blebbing motion in invasive cancer cells.

  3. Aggressive resection of frequent peritoneal recurrences in colorectal cancer contributes to long-term survival

    PubMed Central

    Komori, Koji; Kinoshita, Takashi; Taihei, Oshiro; Ito, Seiji; Abe, Tetsuya; Senda, Yoshiki; Misawa, Kazunari; Ito, Yuich; Uemura, Norihisa; Natsume, Seiji; Kawakami,, Jiro; Ouchi, Akira; Tsutsuyama, Masayuki; Hosoi, Takahiro; Shigeyoshi, Itaru; Akazawa, Tomoyuki; Hayashi, Daisuke; Tanaka, Hideharu; Shimizu, Yasuhiro

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT We report a long-term survivor of colorectal cancer who underwent aggressive, frequent resection for peritoneal recurrences. A 58-year-old woman was diagnosed with descending colon cancer. Resection of the descending colon along with lymph node dissection was performed in September 2006. The pathological findings revealed Stage IIA colorectal cancer. The following peritoneal recurrences were removed: two in July 2007, two in the omental fat and two in the pouch of Douglas in June 2008 resected by low anterior resection of the rectum, one in the uterus and right ovarian recurrence resected via bilateral adnexectomy and Hartmann’s procedure in May 2011, and one in the ascending colon by partial resection of the colon wall in December 2011. Postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy (uracil and tegafur/leucovorin, fluorouracil/levofolinate/oxaliplatin/bevacizumab, 5-fluorouracil/leucovorin/bevacizumab, irinotecan/bevacizumab, and irinotecan/panitumumab) was administered. The patient did not desire postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy after the fourth operation. The long-term survival was 6 years and 7 months. PMID:28008206

  4. Genetic deletion of osteopontin in TRAMP mice skews prostate carcinogenesis from adenocarcinoma to aggressive human-like neuroendocrine cancers

    PubMed Central

    Mauri, Giorgio; Jachetti, Elena; Comuzzi, Barbara; Dugo, Matteo; Arioli, Ivano; Miotti, Silvia; Sangaletti, Sabina; Di Carlo, Emma; Tripodo, Claudio; Colombo, Mario P.

    2016-01-01

    Osteopontin (OPN) is a secreted glycoprotein, that belongs to the non-structural extracellular matrix (ECM), and its over expression in human prostate cancer has been associated with disease progression, androgen independence and metastatic ability. Nevertheless, the pathophysiology of OPN in prostate tumorigenesis has never been studied. We crossed TRansgenic Adenocarcinoma of the Mouse Prostate (TRAMP) mice with OPN deficient (OPN−/−) mice and followed tumor onset and progression in these double mutants. Ultrasound examination detected the early onset of a rapidly growing, homogeneous and spherical tumor in about 60% of OPN−/− TRAMP mice. Such neoplasms seldom occurred in parental TRAMP mice otherwise prone to adenocarcinomas and were characterized for being androgen receptor negative, highly proliferative and endowed with neuroendocrine (NE) features. Gene expression profiling showed up-regulation of genes involved in tumor progression, cell cycle and neuronal differentiation in OPN-deficient versus wild type TRAMP tumors. Down-regulated genes included key genes of TGFa pathway, including SMAD3 and Filamin, which were confirmed at the protein level. Furthermore, NE genes and particularly those characterizing early prostatic lesions of OPN-deficient mice were found to correlate with those of human prostate NE tumours. These data underscore a novel role of OPN in the early stages of prostate cancer growth, protecting against the development of aggressive NE tumors. PMID:26700622

  5. DUSP4/MKP2 overexpression is associated with BRAFV600E mutation and aggressive behavior of papillary thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ben; Shi, Rongliang; Yang, Shuwen; Zhou, Li; Qu, Ning; Liao, Tian; Wang, Yu; Wang, Yulong; Ji, Qinghai

    2016-01-01

    The study was performed to retrospectively analyze the correlation of dual specificity phosphatase 4 (DUSP4) expression with clinicopathological variables and BRAFV600E mutation to better characterize the potential role of DUSP4 as a biomarker in papillary thyroid cancer (PTC). Patients (n=120) who underwent surgery for PTC at Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center (FUSCC) were enrolled in this study, and a validation cohort from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) database was identified to confirm the preliminary findings in our study. We investigated DUSP4 expression at the mRNA level in PTC tissues and adjacent normal tissues using real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). BRAFV600E mutation analysis was also performed in PTC tissues using Sanger sequencing. Initially, we compared PTC tissues with paired normal tissues in DUSP4 expression using Student’s t-test, and then analyzed the correlation of DUSP4 with clinicopathological variables and BRAFV600E mutation in PTC using Mann–Whitney U, Kruskal–Wallis, χ2, and Fisher’s exact tests. Human-derived thyroid cell lines were also used to verify our findings. DUSP4 was significantly overexpressed in PTC tissues compared with the adjacent normal tissues (P<0.001). High DUSP4 expression showed a significant association with lymph node metastasis and extrathyroidal extension in both FUSCC and TCGA cohorts, and DUSP4 overexpression was an independent risk factor for lymph node metastasis in multivariate analysis. Additionally, DUSP4 expression was associated with BRAFV600E mutation in both the cohorts (FUSCC: P=0.002, TCGA: P<0.001) and PTC cell lines (P=0.023). In conclusion, DUSP4 was identified as a potential biomarker for aggressive behavior in PTC, and its overexpression was BRAFV600E mutation-related. PMID:27143921

  6. Rare aggressive natural killer cell leukemia presented with bone marrow fibrosis - a diagnostic challenge.

    PubMed

    Soliman, Dina S; Sabbagh, Ahmad Al; Omri, Halima El; Ibrahim, Firyal A; Amer, Aliaa M; Otazu, Ivone B

    2014-01-01

    Aggressive natural killer cell leukemia is an extraordinary rare aggressive malignant neoplasm of natural killer cells. Although its first recognition as a specific entity was approximately 20 years ago, this leukemia has not yet been satisfactorily characterized as fewer than 200 cases have been reported in the literature and up to our knowledge, this is the first case report in Qatar. Reaching a diagnosis of aggressive natural killer leukemia was a challenging experience, because in addition to being a rare entity, the relative scarcity of circulating neoplastic cells, failure to obtain an adequate aspirate sample sufficient to perform flow cytometric analysis, together with the absence of applicable method to prove NK clonality (as it lack specific clonal marker); our case had atypical confusing presentation of striking increase in bone marrow fibrosis that was misleading and complicated the case further. The bone marrow fibrosis encountered may be related to the neoplastic natural killer cells' chemokine profile and it may raise the awareness for considering aggressive natural killer leukemia within the differential diagnosis of leukemia with heightened marrow fibrosis.

  7. Glycoprotein Biomarkers for the Early Detection of Aggressive Prostate Cancer — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    The Early Detection Research Network of the NCI is charged with the discovery, development and validation of biomarkers for early detection and prognosis related to neoplastic disease. Our laboratory is an NCI EDRN (U01CA152813) working on "Glycoprotein biomarkers for the early detection of aggressive prostate cancer". This EDRN administratiVE! supplement is a collaboration with Robert Veltri on his project to identify men with very low risk (indolent) prostate cancer (CaP) at the diagnostic biopsy at selection for active surveillance (AS). We will assess biopsy tissue using quantitative nuclear histomorphometric measurements and molecular biomarkers to predict an unexpected catastrophic CaP in such men with indolent CaP. At Johns Hopkins Hospital w1e use the Epstein criteria that includes; PSA density (PSAD) <0.15 ng/mVcm3, Gleason score SS, S2 cons involved with cancer, and ::;;SO% of any core involved with cancer to select AS. Our approach will study 140 AS men (70 with a expected outcome and 70 with a disastrous outcome) using nuclear histomorphometry and pre-qualified biomarkers quantified by digital microscopy. Previously, our laboratory combined measurements of DNA content and (-2)pPSA in the serum and (-5,-?)pPSA in biopsy tissue to identify 7/10 men that would fail surveillance based on the primary diagnostic biopsy. We now will devHiop a clinical, morphological and biomarker 'signature' for identifying severe aggressive disease from a AS diagnostic biopsy. Our approach will combine nuclear morphometry measured by digital microscopy with a unique biopsy tissue biomarker profile (DNA content, Ki67, Her2neu, CACND1 and periostin). Fc•r the molecular targets we will us•e a multiplex tissue blot (MTB) immunohistochemistry method. The Aims o'f our work include 1) to utilize retrospective archival biopsy material from 70 AS cases where the outcome was unexpected and disastrous and collect an equal number of AS cases (n=140) and perform assays for morphology

  8. MCF-10A-NeoST: A New Cell System for Studying Cell-ECM and Cell-Cell Interactions in Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Zantek, Nicole Dodge; Walker-Daniels, Jennifer; Stewart, Jane; Hansen, Rhonda K.; Robinson, Daniel; Miao, Hui; Wang, Bingcheng; Kung, Hsing-Jien; Bissell, Mina J.; Kinch, Michael S.

    2001-08-22

    There is a continuing need for genetically matched cell systems to model cellular behaviors that are frequently observed in aggressive breast cancers. We report here the isolation and initial characterization of a spontaneously arising variant of MCF-10A cells, NeoST, which provides a new model to study cell adhesion and signal transduction in breast cancer. NeoST cells recapitulate important biological and biochemical features of metastatic breast cancer, including anchorage-independent growth, invasiveness in threedimensional reconstituted membranes, loss of E-cadherin expression, and increased tyrosine kinase activity. A comprehensive analysis of tyrosine kinase expression revealed overexpression or functional activation of the Axl, FAK, and EphA2 tyrosine kinases in transformed MCF-10A cells. MCF-10A and these new derivatives provide a genetically matched model to study defects in cell adhesion and signaling that are relevant to cellular behaviors that often typify aggressive breast cancer cells.

  9. Lung cancer stem cells: An epigenetic perspective.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Samriddhi; Khan, Sajid; Sinha, Sonam; Meeran, Syed Musthapa

    2017-02-05

    Lung cancer remains the major cause of human mortality among all the cancer types despite the colossal amount of efforts to prevent the cancer onset and to provide the appropriate cure. Recent reports have identified that important contributors of lung cancer-related mortality are the drug resistance and aggressive tumor relapse, the characteristics contributed by the presence of lung cancer stem cells (CSCs). The identification of lung CSCs is inherently complex due to the quiescent nature of lung epithelium, which makes the distinction between the normal lung epithelium and lung CSCs difficult. Recently, multiple researches have helped in the identification of lung CSCs based on the presence or absence of certain specific types of stem cell markers. Maintenance of lung CSCs is chiefly mediated through the epigenetic modifications of their genome. In this review, we will discuss about the origin of lung CSCs and the role of epigenetic modifications in their maintenance. We will also discuss in brief the major lung CSC markers and the therapeutic approaches to selectively target this population of cells.

  10. TNRC9 downregulates BRCA1 expression and promotes breast cancer aggressiveness.

    PubMed

    Shan, Jingxuan; Dsouza, Shoba P; Bakhru, Sasha; Al-Azwani, Eman K; Ascierto, Maria L; Sastry, Konduru S; Bedri, Shahinaz; Kizhakayil, Dhanya; Aigha, Idil I; Malek, Joel; Al-Bozom, Issam; Gehani, Salah; Furtado, Stacia; Mathiowitz, Edith; Wang, Ena; Marincola, Francesco M; Chouchane, Lotfi

    2013-05-01

    Although the linkage between germline mutations of BRCA1 and hereditary breast/ovarian cancers is well established, recent evidence suggests that altered expression of wild-type BRCA1 might contribute to the sporadic forms of breast cancer. The breast cancer gene trinucleotide-repeat-containing 9 (TNRC9; TOX3) has been associated with disease susceptibility but its function is undetermined. Here, we report that TNRC9 is often amplified and overexpressed in breast cancer, particularly in advanced breast cancer. Gene amplification was associated with reduced disease-free and metastasis-free survival rates. Ectopic expression of TNRC9 increased breast cancer cell proliferation, migration, and survival after exposure to apoptotic stimuli. These phenotypes were associated with tumor progression in a mouse model of breast cancer. Gene expression profiling, protein analysis, and in silico assays of large datasets of breast and ovarian cancer samples suggested that TNRC9 and BRCA1 expression were inversely correlated. Notably, we found that TNRC9 bound to both the BRCA1 promoter and the cAMP-responsive element-binding protein (CREB) complex, a regulator of BRCA1 transcription. In support of this connection, expression of TNRC9 downregulated expression of BRCA1 by altering the methylation status of its promoter. Our studies unveil a function for TNRC9 in breast cancer that highlights a new paradigm in BRCA1 regulation.

  11. Is Birthweight Associated with Total and Aggressive/Lethal Prostate Cancer Risks? A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Cindy Ke; Sutcliffe, Siobhan; Welsh, Judith; Mackinnon, Karen; Kuh, Diana; Hardy, Rebecca; Cook, Michael B.

    2016-01-01

    Background It has been hypothesized that intrauterine exposures are important for subsequent prostate cancer risk. Prior epidemiological studies have used birthweight as a proxy of cumulative intrauterine exposures to test this hypothesis, but results have been inconsistent partly due to limited statistical power. Methods We investigated birthweight in relation to prostate cancer in the Medical Research Council (MRC) National Survey of Health and Development (NSHD) using Cox proportional hazards models. We then conducted a meta-analysis of birthweight in relation to total and aggressive/lethal prostate cancer risks, combining results from the NSHD analysis with 13 additional studies on this relationship identified from a systematic search in four major scientific literature databases through January 2015. Results Random-effects models found that each kg increase in birthweight was positively associated with total (OR=1.02, 95%CI=1.00, 1.05; I2=13%) and aggressive/lethal prostate cancer (OR=1.08, 95%CI=0.99, 1.19; I2=40%). Sensitivity analyses restricted to studies with birthweight extracted from medical records demonstrated stronger positive associations with total (OR=1.11, 95%CI=1.03, 1.19; I2=0%) and aggressive/lethal (OR=1.37, 95%CI=1.09, 1.74; I2=0%) prostate cancer. These studies heavily overlapped with those based in Nordic countries. Conclusion This study provides evidence that heavier birthweight may be associated with modest increased risks of total and aggressive/lethal prostate cancer, which supports the hypothesis that intrauterine exposures may be related to subsequent prostate cancer risks. PMID:26930450

  12. Membrane in cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Galeotti, T.; Cittadini, A.; Neri, G.; Scarpa, A.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains papers presented at a conference on membranes in cancer cells. Topics covered include Oncogenies, hormones, and free-radical processes in malignant transformation in vitro and Superoxide onion may trigger DNA strand breaks in human granulorytes by acting as a membrane target.

  13. Ciprofloxacin mediates cancer stem cell phenotypes in lung cancer cells through caveolin-1-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Phiboonchaiyanan, Preeyaporn Plaimee; Kiratipaiboon, Chayanin; Chanvorachote, Pithi

    2016-04-25

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs), a subpopulation of cancer cells with high aggressive behaviors, have been identified in many types of cancer including lung cancer as one of the key mediators driving cancer progression and metastasis. Here, we have reported for the first time that ciprofloxacin (CIP), a widely used anti-microbial drug, has a potentiating effect on CSC-like features in human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. CIP treatment promoted CSC-like phenotypes, including enhanced anchorage-independent growth and spheroid formation. The known lung CSC markers: CD133, CD44, ABCG2 and ALDH1A1 were found to be significantly increased, while the factors involving in epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT): Slug and Snail, were depleted. Also, self-renewal transcription factors Oct-4 and Nanog were found to be up-regulated in CIP-treated cells. The treatment of CIP on CSC-rich populations obtained from secondary spheroids resulted in the further increase of CSC markers. In addition, we have proven that the mechanistic insight of the CIP induced stemness is through Caveolin-1 (Cav-1)-dependent mechanism. The specific suppression of Cav-1 by stably transfected Cav-1 shRNA plasmid dramatically reduced the effect of CIP on CSC markers as well as the CIP-induced spheroid formation ability. Cav-1 was shown to activate protein kinase B (Akt) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathways in CSC-rich population; however, such an effect was rarely found in the main lung cancer cells population. These findings reveal a novel effect of CIP in positively regulating CSCs in lung cancer cells via the activation of Cav-1, Akt and ERK, and may provoke the awareness of appropriate therapeutic strategy in cancer patients.

  14. Cancer stem cells: Involvement in pancreatic cancer pathogenesis and perspectives on cancer therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Tanase, Cristiana Pistol; Neagu, Ana Iulia; Necula, Laura Georgiana; Mambet, Cristina; Enciu, Ana-Maria; Calenic, Bogdan; Cruceru, Maria Linda; Albulescu, Radu

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most aggressive and lethal malignancies. Despite remarkable progress in understanding pancreatic carcinogenesis at the molecular level, as well as progress in new therapeutic approaches, pancreatic cancer remains a disease with a dismal prognosis. Among the mechanisms responsible for drug resistance, the most relevant are changes in individual genes or signaling pathways and the presence of highly resistant cancer stem cells (CSCs). In pancreatic cancer, CSCs represent 0.2%-0.8% of pancreatic cancer cells and are considered to be responsible for tumor growth, invasion, metastasis and recurrence. CSCs have been extensively studied as of late to identify specific surface markers to ensure reliable sorting and for signaling pathways identified to play a pivotal role in CSC self-renewal. Involvement of CSCs in pancreatic cancer pathogenesis has also highlighted these cells as the preferential targets for therapy. The present review is an update of the results in two main fields of research in pancreatic cancer, pathogenesis and therapy, focused on the narrow perspective of CSCs. PMID:25152582

  15. CREB1 directly activates the transcription of ribonucleotide reductase small subunit M2 and promotes the aggressiveness of human colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Zejun; Lin, Aifen; Chen, Jiaoe; Zhang, Xiaomin; Liu, Hong; Li, Hongzhang; Hu, Yanyan; Zhang, Xia; Zhang, Jiangang; Qiu, Lanlan; Mei, Lingming; Shao, Jimin; Chen, Xiang

    2016-01-01

    As the small subunit of Ribonucleotide reductase (RR), RRM2 displays a very important role in various critical cellular processes such as cell proliferation, DNA repair, and senescence, etc. Importantly, RRM2 functions like a tumor driver in most types of cancer but little is known about the regulatory mechanism of RRM2 in cancer development. In this study, we found that the cAMP responsive element binding protein 1 (CREB1) acted as a transcription factor of RRM2 gene in human colorectal cancer (CRC). CREB1 directly bound to the promoter of RRM2 gene and induced its transcriptional activation. Knockdown of CREB1 decreased the expression of RRM2 at both mRNA and protein levels. Moreover, knockdown of RRM2 attenuated CREB1-induced aggressive phenotypes of CRC cells in vitro and in vivo. Analysis of the data from TCGA database and clinical CRC specimens with immunohistochemical staining also demonstrated a strong correlation between the co-expression of CREB1 and RRM2. Decreased disease survivals were observed in CRC patients with high expression levels of CREB1 or RRM2. Our results indicate CREB1 as a critical transcription factor of RRM2 which promotes tumor aggressiveness, and imply a significant correlation between CREB1 and RRM2 in CRC specimens. These may provide the possibility that CREB1 and RRM2 could be used as biomarkers or targets for CRC diagnosis and treatment. PMID:27801665

  16. Alterations of the spindle checkpoint pathway in clinicopathologically aggressive CpG island methylator phenotype clear cell renal cell carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Arai, Eri; Gotoh, Masahiro; Tian, Ying; Sakamoto, Hiromi; Ono, Masaya; Matsuda, Akio; Takahashi, Yoriko; Miyata, Sayaka; Totsuka, Hirohiko; Chiku, Suenori; Komiyama, Motokiyo; Fujimoto, Hiroyuki; Matsumoto, Kenji; Yamada, Tesshi; Yoshida, Teruhiko

    2015-01-01

    CpG‐island methylator phenotype (CIMP)‐positive clear cell renal cell carcinomas (RCCs) are characterized by accumulation of DNA hypermethylation of CpG islands, clinicopathological aggressiveness and poor patient outcome. The aim of this study was to clarify the molecular pathways participating in CIMP‐positive renal carcinogenesis. Genome (whole‐exome and copy number), transcriptome and proteome (two‐dimensional image converted analysis of liquid chromatography‐mass spectrometry) analyses were performed using tissue specimens of 87 CIMP‐negative and 14 CIMP‐positive clear cell RCCs and corresponding specimens of non‐cancerous renal cortex. Genes encoding microtubule‐associated proteins, such as DNAH2, DNAH5, DNAH10, RP1 and HAUS8, showed a 10% or higher incidence of genetic aberrations (non‐synonymous single‐nucleotide mutations and insertions/deletions) in CIMP‐positive RCCs, whereas CIMP‐negative RCCs lacked distinct genetic characteristics. MetaCore pathway analysis of CIMP‐positive RCCs revealed that alterations of mRNA or protein expression were significantly accumulated in six pathways, all participating in the spindle checkpoint, including the “The metaphase checkpoint (p = 1.427 × 10−6),” “Role of Anaphase Promoting Complex in cell cycle regulation (p = 7.444 × 10−6)” and “Spindle assembly and chromosome separation (p = 9.260 × 10−6)” pathways. Quantitative RT‐PCR analysis revealed that mRNA expression levels for genes included in such pathways, i.e., AURKA, AURKB, BIRC5, BUB1, CDC20, NEK2 and SPC25, were significantly higher in CIMP‐positive than in CIMP‐negative RCCs. All CIMP‐positive RCCs showed overexpression of Aurora kinases, AURKA and AURKB, and this overexpression was mainly attributable to increased copy number. These data suggest that abnormalities of the spindle checkpoint pathway participate in CIMP‐positive renal carcinogenesis, and that AURKA and AURKB may be potential

  17. Curcumin suppresses epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and metastasis of pancreatic cancer cells by inhibiting cancer-associated fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qing; Qu, Chao; Xie, Fang; Chen, Lianyu; Liu, Luming; Liang, Xiaohua; Wu, Xueyong; Wang, Peng; Meng, Zhiqiang

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal malignancies and the fourth leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide, because of its aggressive and highly metastatic ability even in its early stages. Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) have been reported to be vital to pancreatic cancer progression via regulating tumorigenesis and metastasis. Studies have shown that CAFs also mediate epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in tumor cells. Curcumin has recently been reported to have anticancer effects by modulating pathways involved in cancer progression. Therefore, we hypothesized that curcumin might inhibit EMT by targeting CAFs in pancreatic cancer. In this study, we show that the CAF-mediated enhancement of pancreatic cancer cell migration and metastasis was blocked by curcumin. In conclusion, our data provide the first evidence that curcumin inhibits the migration and metastasis of pancreatic cancer cells by reducing the mesenchymal characteristics of CAFs, which reverses the EMT phenotypes of pancreatic cancer cells. PMID:28123853

  18. Environmental factors and risk of aggressive prostate cancer among a population of New Zealand men - a genotypic approach.

    PubMed

    Vaidyanathan, Venkatesh; Naidu, Vijay; Kao, Chi Hsiu-Juei; Karunasinghe, Nishi; Bishop, Karen S; Wang, Alice; Pallati, Radha; Shepherd, Phillip; Masters, Jonathan; Zhu, Shuotun; Goudie, Megan; Krishnan, Mohanraj; Jabed, Anower; Marlow, Gareth; Narayanan, Ajit; Ferguson, Lynnette R

    2017-03-28

    Prostate cancer is one of the most significant health concerns for men worldwide. Numerous researchers carrying out molecular diagnostics have indicated that genetic interactions with biological and behavioral factors play an important role in the overall risk and prognosis of this disease. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are increasingly becoming strong biomarker candidates to identify susceptibility to prostate cancer. We carried out a gene × environment interaction analysis linked to aggressive and non-aggressive prostate cancer (PCa) with a number of SNPs. By using this method, we identified the susceptible alleles in a New Zealand population, and examined the interaction with environmental factors. We have identified a number of SNPs that have risk associations both with and without environmental interaction. The results indicate that certain SNPs are associated with disease vulnerability based on behavioral factors. The list of genes with SNPs identified as being associated with the risk of PCa in a New Zealand population is provided in the graphical abstract.

  19. Loss of RasGAP Tumor Suppressors Underlies the Aggressive Nature of Luminal B Breast Cancers.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Sarah Naomi; Wronski, Ania; Castaño, Zafira; Dake, Benjamin; Malone, Clare; De Raedt, Thomas; Enos, Miriam; DeRose, Yoko S; Zhou, Wenhui; Guerra, Stephanie; Loda, Massimo; Welm, Alana; Partridge, Ann H; McAllister, Sandra S; Kuperwasser, Charlotte; Cichowski, Karen

    2017-02-01

    Luminal breast cancers are typically estrogen receptor-positive and generally have the best prognosis. However, a subset of luminal tumors, namely luminal B cancers, frequently metastasize and recur. Unfortunately, the causal events that drive their progression are unknown, and therefore it is difficult to identify individuals who are likely to relapse and should receive escalated treatment. Here, we identify a bifunctional RasGAP tumor suppressor whose expression is lost in almost 50% of luminal B tumors. Moreover, we show that two RasGAP genes are concomitantly suppressed in the most aggressive luminal malignancies. Importantly, these genes cooperatively regulate two major oncogenic pathways, RAS and NF-κB, through distinct domains, and when inactivated drive the metastasis of luminal tumors in vivo Finally, although the cooperative effects on RAS drive invasion, NF-κB activation triggers epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and is required for metastasis. Collectively, these studies reveal important mechanistic insight into the pathogenesis of luminal B tumors and provide functionally relevant prognostic biomarkers that may guide treatment decisions.

  20. SU-E-J-95: Predicting Treatment Outcomes for Prostate Cancer: Irradiation Responses of Prostate Cancer Stem Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, K

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Most prostate cancers are slow-growing diseases but normally require much higher doses (80Gy) with conventional fractionation radiotherapy, comparing to other more aggressive cancers. This study is to disclose the radiobiological basis of this discrepancy by proposing the concept of prostate cancer stem cells (CSCs) and examining their specific irradiation responses. Methods: There are overwhelming evidences that CSC may keep their stemness, e.g. the competency of cell differentiation, in hypoxic microenvironments and hence become radiation resistive, though the probability is tiny for aggressiveness cancers. Tumor hypoxia used to be considered as an independent reason for poor treatment outcomes, and recent evidences showed that even prostate cancers were also hypoxic though they are very slow-growing. In addition, to achieve comparable outcomes to other much more aggressive cancers, much higher doses (rather than lower doses) are always needed for prostate cancers, regardless of its non-aggressiveness. All these abnormal facts can only be possibly interpreted by the irradiation responses characteristics of prostate CSCs. Results: Both normal cancer cells (NCCs) and CSCs exiting in tumors, in which NCCs are mainly for symptoms whereas killing all CSCs achieves disease-free. Since prostate cancers are slow-growing, the hypoxia in prostate cancers cannot possibly from NCCs, thus it is caused by hypoxic CSCs. However, single hypoxic cell cannot be imaged due to limitation of imaging techniques, unless a large group of hypoxic cells exist together, thus most of CSCs in prostate cancers are virtually hypoxic, i.e. not in working mode because CSCs in proliferating mode have to be normoxic, and this explains why prostate cancers are unaggressive. Conclusion: The fractional dose in conventional radiotherapy (∼2Gy) could only kill NCCs and CSCs in proliferating modes, whereas most CSCs survived fractional treatments since they were hypoxic, thus to eliminate all

  1. Expression and/or activity of the SVCT2 ascorbate transporter may be decreased in many aggressive cancers, suggesting potential utility for sodium bicarbonate and dehydroascorbic acid in cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    McCarty, Mark F

    2013-10-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) is a heterodimer transcription factor whose elevated activity in many cancers helps them to survive under hypoxic conditions and enhances their capacity to grow invasively, establish metastases, and survive chemo- or radiotherapy. Optimal intracellular levels of ascorbate suppress the level and transcriptional activity of HIF-1under normoxic or mildly hypoxic conditions by supporting the activity of proly and asparagyl hydroxylases that target HIF-1alpha. High intracellular ascorbate can also work in various ways to down-regulate activation of NF-kappaB which, like HIF-1 is constitutively active in many cancers and promotes aggressive behavior - in part by promoting transcription of HIF-1alpha. Yet recent evidence suggests that, even in the context of adequate ascorbate nutrition, the intracellular ascorbate content of many aggressive cancers may be supoptimal for effective HIF-1 control. This likely reflects low expression or activity of the SVCT2 ascorbate transporter. The expression of SVCT2 in cancers has so far received little study; but the extracellular acidity characteristic of many tumors would be expected to reduce the activity of this transporter, which has a mildly alkaline pH optimum. Unfortunately, since SVCT2 has a high affinity for ascorbate, and its activity is nearly saturated at normal healthy serum levels of this vitamin, increased oral administration of ascorbate would be unlikely to have much impact on the intracellular ascorbate content of tumors. However, cancers in which HIF-1 is active express high levels of glucose transporters such as GLUT-1, and these transporters can promote influx of dehydroascorbic acid (DHA) via facilitated diffusion; once inside the cell, DHA is rapidly reduced to ascorbate, which effectively is "trapped" within the cell. Hence, episodic intravenous infusions of modest doses of DHA may have potential for optimizing the intracellular ascorbate content of cancers, potentially

  2. One Thousand Genomes Imputation in the National Cancer Institute Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium Aggressive Prostate Cancer Genome-wide Association Study

    PubMed Central

    Machiela, Mitchell J.; Chen, Constance; Liang, Liming; Diver, W. Ryan; Stevens, Victoria L.; Tsilidis, Konstantinos K.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Hunter, David J.; Kraft, Peter

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Genotype imputation substantially increases available markers for analysis in genome-wide association studies (GWAS) by leveraging linkage disequilibrium from a reference panel. We sought to (i) investigate the performance of imputation from the August 2010 release of the 1000 Genomes Project (1000GP) in an existing GWAS of prostate cancer, (ii) look for novel associations with prostate cancer risk, (iii) fine-map known prostate cancer susceptibility regions using an approximate Bayesian framework and stepwise regression, and (iv) compare power and efficiency of imputation and de novo sequencing. METHODS We used 2,782 aggressive prostate cancer cases and 4,458 controls from the NCI Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium aggressive prostate cancer GWAS to infer 5.8 million well-imputed autosomal single nucleotide polymorphisms. RESULTS Imputation quality, as measured by correlation between imputed and true allele counts, was higher among common variants than rare variants. We found no novel prostate cancer associations among a subset of 1.2 million well-imputed low-frequency variants. At a genome-wide sequencing cost of $2,500, imputation from SNP arrays is a more powerful strategy than sequencing for detecting disease associations of SNPs with minor allele frequencies above 1%. CONCLUSIONS 1000GP imputation provided dense coverage of previously-identified prostate cancer susceptibility regions, highlighting its potential as an inexpensive first-pass approach to fine-mapping in regions such as 5p15 and 8q24. Our study shows 1000GP imputation can accurately identify low-frequency variants and stresses the importance of large sample size when studying these variants. PMID:23255287

  3. Key players in pancreatic cancer-stroma interaction: Cancer-associated fibroblasts, endothelial and inflammatory cells

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Michael Friberg Bruun; Mortensen, Michael Bau; Detlefsen, Sönke

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is the most aggressive type of common cancers, and in 2014, nearly 40000 patients died from the disease in the United States. Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, which accounts for the majority of PC cases, is characterized by an intense stromal desmoplastic reaction surrounding the cancer cells. Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) are the main effector cells in the desmoplastic reaction, and pancreatic stellate cells are the most important source of CAFs. However, other important components of the PC stroma are inflammatory cells and endothelial cells. The aim of this review is to describe the complex interplay between PC cells and the cellular and non-cellular components of the tumour stroma. Published data have indicated that the desmoplastic stroma protects PC cells against chemotherapy and radiation therapy and that it might promote the proliferation and migration of PC cells. However, in animal studies, experimental depletion of the desmoplastic stroma and CAFs has led to more aggressive cancers. Hence, the precise role of the tumour stroma in PC remains to be elucidated. However, it is likely that a context-dependent therapeutic modification, rather than pure depletion, of the PC stroma holds potential for the development of new treatment strategies for PC patients. PMID:26973408

  4. Tumor-initiating cell frequency is relevant for glioblastoma aggressiveness

    PubMed Central

    Richichi, Cristina; Osti, Daniela; Del Bene, Massimiliano; Fornasari, Lorenzo; Patanè, Monica; Pollo, Bianca; DiMeco, Francesco; Pelicci, Giuliana

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is maintained by a small subpopulation of tumor-initiating cells (TICs). The arduous assessment of TIC frequencies challenges the prognostic role of TICs in predicting the clinical outcome in GBM patients. We estimated the TIC frequency in human GBM injecting intracerebrally in mice dissociated cells without any passage in culture. All GBMs contained rare TICsand were tumorigenic in vivo but only 54% of them grew in vitro as neurospheres. We demonstrated that neurosphere formation in vitro did not foretell tumorigenic ability in vivo and frequencies calculated in vitro overestimated the TIC content. Our findings assert the pathological significance of GBM TICs. TIC number correlated positively with tumor incidence and inversely with survival of tumor-bearing mice. Stratification of GBM patients according to TIC content revealed that patients with low TIC frequency experienced a trend towards a longer progression free survival. The expression of either putative stem-cell markers or markers associated with different GBM molecular subtypes did not associate with either TIC content or neurosphere formation underlying the limitations of TIC identification based on the expression of some putative stem cell-markers. PMID:27582543

  5. New drugs for aggressive B-cell and T-cell lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Murawski, Niels; Pfreundschuh, Michael

    2010-11-01

    Over the past decade an unprecedented number of new drugs for lymphomas have been developed. Most of these new drugs target molecules or pathways that are important for the growth and proliferation of lymphomas. The introduction of the B-lymphoma specific monoclonal anti-CD20 antibody, rituximab, has improved the prognosis of patients with B-cell lymphomas more than any other drug in the past 50 years; today less than half of the patients with aggressive B-cell lymphomas die of their disease than in the pre-rituximab era. Many new drugs are now available for clinical testing in addition to new CD20 antibodies and antibodies directed against other surface molecules specifically or preferentially expressed on the lymphoma-cell surface. A prerequisite for the development of these drugs was the recognition of aberrant cell-signal transduction involved in lymphoma pathogenesis and progression. New therapeutic targets include receptor tyrosine and cyclin-dependent kinases, histone deacetylases, and molecules involved in the regulation of apoptosis. The definition of the role of these new drugs alone or in combination with established chemotherapy regimens in adequately designed prospective trials represents one of the major challenges in clinical lymphoma research.

  6. Cyr61 Is Regulated by cAMP-Dependent Protein Kinase With Serum Levels Correlating With Prostate Cancer Aggressiveness

    PubMed Central

    Terada, Naoki; Shiraishi, Takumi; Zeng, Yu; Mooney, Steven M.; Yeater, David B.; Mangold, Leslie A.; Partin, Alan W.; Kulkarni, Prakash; Getzenberg, Robert H.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Cysteine-rich angiogenic inducer 61 (Cyr61) is an extracellular matrix protein involved in the transduction of growth factor and hormone signaling. Previously, we demonstrated that Cyr61 was highly expressed in prostate cancer (PCa) but that the expression levels were associated with a lower risk of PCa recurrence. In the present study, we demonstrate that serum Cyr61 is a potential biomarker that correlates with PCa aggressiveness. Furthermore, we also explore the potential mechanism underlying the changes in Cyr61 expression during PCa progression. METHODS Cyr61 concentrations in the medium from PCa cell lines and in serum samples obtained from PCa patients were measured by sandwich ELISA. Serum Cyr61 levels were correlated with disease characteristics and the association between Cyr61 expression changes by several types of stimulation or stress and cAMP/cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) pathway were examined. RESULTS There was a positive correlation between Cyr61 levels in cell supernatants and mRNA expression in these cell lines. Serum Cyr61 levels were significantly higher in non-organ-confined PCa patients (116.3 ± 140.2 ng/ml) than in organ-confined PCa patients (79.7 ± 56.1 ng/ml) (P = 0.031). Cyr61 expression was up-regulated in response to both lysophosphatidic acid and androgen treatments which promoted PCa cell invasion. Serum starvation and phosphoinositide-3-kinase inhibition also resulted in Cyr61 up-regulation; however, they suppressed cell proliferation. Cyr61 up-regulation was correlated with an increase in cAMP and suppressed by PKA inhibition. CONCLUSIONS These findings suggest that Cyr61 expression in PCa is regulated by the cAMP/PKA pathway and that circulating Cyr61 levels are a potential serum-based biomarker for characterizing PCa. PMID:22025384

  7. Cancer Stem Cells: Cellular Plasticity, Niche, and its Clinical Relevance.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gina; Hall, Robert R; Ahmed, Atique U

    2016-10-01

    Cancer handles an estimated 7.6 million deaths worldwide per annum. A recent theory focuses on the role Cancer Stem Cells (CSCs) in driving tumorigenesis and disease progression. This theory hypothesizes that a population of the tumor cell with similar functional and phenotypic characteristics as normal tissue stem cells are responsible for formation and advancement of many human cancers. The CSCs subpopulation can differentiate into non-CSC tumor cells and promote phenotypic and functional heterogeneity within the tumor. The presence of CSCs has been reported in a number of human cancers including blood, breast, brain, colon, lung, pancreas prostate and liver. Although the origin of CSCs remains a mystery, recent reports suggest that the phenotypic characteristics of CSCs may be plastic and are influenced by the microenvironment specific for the individual tumor. Such factors unique to each tumor preserve the dynamic balance between CSCs to non-CSCs cell fate, as well as maintain the proper equilibrium. Alternating such equilibrium via dedifferentiation can result in aggressiveness, as CSCs are considered to be more resistant to the conventional cancer treatments of chemotherapy and radiation. Understanding how the tumoral microenvironment affects the plasticity driven CSC niche will be critical for developing a more effective treatment for cancer by eliminating its aggressive and recurring nature that now is believed to be perpetuated by CSCs.

  8. Cancer Stem Cells: Cellular Plasticity, Niche, and its Clinical Relevance

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Gina; Hall, Robert R; Ahmed, Atique U

    2016-01-01

    Cancer handles an estimated 7.6 million deaths worldwide per annum. A recent theory focuses on the role Cancer Stem Cells (CSCs) in driving tumorigenesis and disease progression. This theory hypothesizes that a population of the tumor cell with similar functional and phenotypic characteristics as normal tissue stem cells are responsible for formation and advancement of many human cancers. The CSCs subpopulation can differentiate into non-CSC tumor cells and promote phenotypic and functional heterogeneity within the tumor. The presence of CSCs has been reported in a number of human cancers including blood, breast, brain, colon, lung, pancreas prostate and liver. Although the origin of CSCs remains a mystery, recent reports suggest that the phenotypic characteristics of CSCs may be plastic and are influenced by the microenvironment specific for the individual tumor. Such factors unique to each tumor preserve the dynamic balance between CSCs to non-CSCs cell fate, as well as maintain the proper equilibrium. Alternating such equilibrium via dedifferentiation can result in aggressiveness, as CSCs are considered to be more resistant to the conventional cancer treatments of chemotherapy and radiation. Understanding how the tumoral microenvironment affects the plasticity driven CSC niche will be critical for developing a more effective treatment for cancer by eliminating its aggressive and recurring nature that now is believed to be perpetuated by CSCs. PMID:27891292

  9. Mesenchymal stem cell secretome and regenerative therapy after cancer.

    PubMed

    Zimmerlin, Ludovic; Park, Tea Soon; Zambidis, Elias T; Donnenberg, Vera S; Donnenberg, Albert D

    2013-12-01

    Cancer treatment generally relies on tumor ablative techniques that can lead to major functional or disfiguring defects. These post-therapy impairments require the development of safe regenerative therapy strategies during cancer remission. Many current tissue repair approaches exploit paracrine (immunomodulatory, pro-angiogenic, anti-apoptotic and pro-survival effects) or restoring (functional or structural tissue repair) properties of mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSC). Yet, a major concern in the application of regenerative therapies during cancer remission remains the possible triggering of cancer recurrence. Tumor relapse implies the persistence of rare subsets of tumor-initiating cancer cells which can escape anti-cancer therapies and lie dormant in specific niches awaiting reactivation via unknown stimuli. Many of the components required for successful regenerative therapy (revascularization, immunosuppression, cellular homing, tissue growth promotion) are also critical for tumor progression and metastasis. While bi-directional crosstalk between tumorigenic cells (especially aggressive cancer cell lines) and MSC (including tumor stroma-resident populations) has been demonstrated in a variety of cancers, the effects of local or systemic MSC delivery for regenerative purposes on persisting cancer cells during remission remain controversial. Both pro- and anti-tumorigenic effects of MSC have been reported in the literature. Our own data using breast cancer clinical isolates have suggested that dormant-like tumor-initiating cells do not respond to MSC signals, unlike actively dividing cancer cells which benefited from the presence of supportive MSC. The secretome of MSC isolated from various tissues may partially diverge, but it includes a core of cytokines (i.e. CCL2, CCL5, IL-6, TGFβ, VEGF), which have been implicated in tumor growth and/or metastasis. This article reviews published models for studying interactions between MSC and cancer cells with a focus

  10. The role of lipolysis stimulated lipoprotein receptor in breast cancer and directing breast cancer cell behavior.

    PubMed

    Reaves, Denise K; Fagan-Solis, Katerina D; Dunphy, Karen; Oliver, Shannon D; Scott, David W; Fleming, Jodie M

    2014-01-01

    The claudin-low molecular subtype of breast cancer is of particular interest for clinically the majority of these tumors are poor prognosis, triple negative, invasive ductal carcinomas. Claudin-low tumors are characterized by cancer stem cell-like features and low expression of cell junction and adhesion proteins. Herein, we sought to define the role of lipolysis stimulated lipoprotein receptor (LSR) in breast cancer and cancer cell behavior as LSR was recently correlated with tumor-initiating features. We show that LSR was expressed in epithelium, endothelium, and stromal cells within the healthy breast tissue, as well as in tumor epithelium. In primary breast tumor bioposies, LSR expression was significantly correlated with invasive ductal carcinomas compared to invasive lobular carcinomas, as well as ERα positive tumors and breast cancer cell lines. LSR levels were significantly reduced in claudin-low breast cancer cell lines and functional studies illustrated that re-introduction of LSR into a claudin-low cell line suppressed the EMT phenotype and reduced individual cell migration. However, our data suggest that LSR may promote collective cell migration. Re-introduction of LSR in claudin-low breast cancer cell lines reestablished tight junction protein expression and correlated with transepithelial electrical resistance, thereby reverting claudin-low lines to other intrinsic molecular subtypes. Moreover, overexpression of LSR altered gene expression of pathways involved in transformation and tumorigenesis as well as enhanced proliferation and survival in anchorage independent conditions, highlighting that reestablishment of LSR signaling promotes aggressive/tumor initiating cell behaviors. Collectively, these data highlight a direct role for LSR in driving aggressive breast cancer behavior.

  11. Ultrasound and Biomarker Tests in Predicting Cancer Aggressiveness in Tissue Samples of Patients With Bladder Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-09

    Bladder Papillary Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage 0a Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage 0is Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage I Bladder Cancer With Carcinoma In Situ; Stage I Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage II Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage III Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage IV Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma

  12. Expression and functionality of TRPV1 in breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Lea V; Al-Refae, Klaudia; Wölk, Gerhard; Bonatz, Gabriele; Altmüller, Janine; Becker, Christian; Gisselmann, Günter; Hatt, Hanns

    2016-01-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels contribute to the regulation of intracellular calcium, which can promote cancer hallmarks in cases of dysregulation of gene transcription and calcium-dependent pro-proliferative or anti-apoptotic mechanisms. Several studies have begun to elucidate the roles of TRPV1, TRPV6, TRPM8, and TRPC1 in cancer progression; however, no study has examined the expression profiles of human TRP channels in breast cancer on a large scale. This study focused on the expression and functionality of TRPV1, a nonselective cation channel that was found to be expressed in different carcinoma tissues. Next-generation sequencing analyses revealed the expression of TRPV1 in several native breast cancer tissues, which was subsequently validated via reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Activation of TRPV1 by its ligand capsaicin was associated with the growth inhibition of some cancer cell types; however, the signaling components involved are complex. In this study, stimulation by the TRPV1 agonist, capsaicin, of SUM149PT cells, a model system for the most aggressive breast cancer subtype, triple-negative breast cancer, led to intracellular calcium signals that were diminished by the specific TRPV1 antagonist, capsazepin. Activation of TRPV1 by capsaicin caused significant inhibition of cancer cell growth and induced apoptosis and necrosis. In conclusion, the current study revealed the expression profiles of human TRP channels in 60 different breast cancer tissues and cell lines and furthermore validated the antitumor activity of TRPV1 against SUM149PT breast cancer cells, indicating that activation of TRPV1 could be used as a therapeutic target, even in the most aggressive breast cancer types. PMID:28008282

  13. Expression and functionality of TRPV1 in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Weber, Lea V; Al-Refae, Klaudia; Wölk, Gerhard; Bonatz, Gabriele; Altmüller, Janine; Becker, Christian; Gisselmann, Günter; Hatt, Hanns

    2016-01-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels contribute to the regulation of intracellular calcium, which can promote cancer hallmarks in cases of dysregulation of gene transcription and calcium-dependent pro-proliferative or anti-apoptotic mechanisms. Several studies have begun to elucidate the roles of TRPV1, TRPV6, TRPM8, and TRPC1 in cancer progression; however, no study has examined the expression profiles of human TRP channels in breast cancer on a large scale. This study focused on the expression and functionality of TRPV1, a nonselective cation channel that was found to be expressed in different carcinoma tissues. Next-generation sequencing analyses revealed the expression of TRPV1 in several native breast cancer tissues, which was subsequently validated via reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Activation of TRPV1 by its ligand capsaicin was associated with the growth inhibition of some cancer cell types; however, the signaling components involved are complex. In this study, stimulation by the TRPV1 agonist, capsaicin, of SUM149PT cells, a model system for the most aggressive breast cancer subtype, triple-negative breast cancer, led to intracellular calcium signals that were diminished by the specific TRPV1 antagonist, capsazepin. Activation of TRPV1 by capsaicin caused significant inhibition of cancer cell growth and induced apoptosis and necrosis. In conclusion, the current study revealed the expression profiles of human TRP channels in 60 different breast cancer tissues and cell lines and furthermore validated the antitumor activity of TRPV1 against SUM149PT breast cancer cells, indicating that activation of TRPV1 could be used as a therapeutic target, even in the most aggressive breast cancer types.

  14. Cancer stem cells and personalized cancer nanomedicine.

    PubMed

    Gener, Petra; Rafael, Diana Fernandes de Sousa; Fernández, Yolanda; Ortega, Joan Sayós; Arango, Diego; Abasolo, Ibane; Videira, Mafalda; Schwartz, Simo

    2016-02-01

    Despite the progress in cancer treatment over the past years advanced cancer is still an incurable disease. Special attention is pointed toward cancer stem cell (CSC)-targeted therapies, because this minor cell population is responsible for the treatment resistance, metastatic growth and tumor recurrence. The recently described CSC dynamic phenotype and interconversion model of cancer growth hamper even more the possible success of current cancer treatments in advanced cancer stages. Accordingly, CSCs can be generated through dedifferentiation processes from non-CSCs, in particular, when CSC populations are depleted after treatment. In this context, the use of targeted CSC nanomedicines should be considered as a promising tool to increase CSC sensitivity and efficacy of specific anti-CSC therapies.

  15. Pancreatic stellate cells promote epithelial-mesenchymal transition in pancreatic cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kikuta, Kazuhiro; Masamune, Atsushi; Watanabe, Takashi; Ariga, Hiroyuki; Itoh, Hiromichi; Hamada, Shin; Satoh, Kennichi; Egawa, Shinichi; Unno, Michiaki; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2010-12-17

    Research highlights: {yields} Recent studies have shown that pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) promote the progression of pancreatic cancer. {yields} Pancreatic cancer cells co-cultured with PSCs showed loose cell contacts and scattered, fibroblast-like appearance. {yields} PSCs decreased the expression of epithelial markers but increased that of mesenchymal markers, along with increased migration. {yields} This study suggests epithelial-mesenchymal transition as a novel mechanism by which PSCs contribute to the aggressive behavior of pancreatic cancer cells. -- Abstract: The interaction between pancreatic cancer cells and pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs), a major profibrogenic cell type in the pancreas, is receiving increasing attention. There is accumulating evidence that PSCs promote the progression of pancreatic cancer by increasing cancer cell proliferation and invasion as well as by protecting them from radiation- and gemcitabine-induced apoptosis. Because epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) plays a critical role in the progression of pancreatic cancer, we hypothesized that PSCs promote EMT in pancreatic cancer cells. Panc-1 and SUIT-2 pancreatic cancer cells were indirectly co-cultured with human PSCs isolated from patients undergoing operation for pancreatic cancer. The expression of epithelial and mesenchymal markers was examined by real-time PCR and immunofluorescent staining. The migration of pancreatic cancer cells was examined by scratch and two-chamber assays. Pancreatic cancer cells co-cultured with PSCs showed loose cell contacts and a scattered, fibroblast-like appearance. The expression of E-cadherin, cytokeratin 19, and membrane-associated {beta}-catenin was decreased, whereas vimentin and Snail (Snai-1) expression was increased more in cancer cells co-cultured with PSCs than in mono-cultured cells. The migration of pancreatic cancer cells was increased by co-culture with PSCs. The PSC-induced decrease of E-cadherin expression was not altered

  16. Overexpression of the A Disintegrin and Metalloproteinase ADAM15 is linked to a Small but Highly Aggressive Subset of Prostate Cancers.

    PubMed

    Burdelski, Christoph; Fitzner, Michael; Hube-Magg, Claudia; Kluth, Martina; Heumann, Asmus; Simon, Ronald; Krech, Till; Clauditz, Till; Büscheck, Franziska; Steurer, Stefan; Wittmer, Corinna; Hinsch, Andrea; Luebke, Andreas M; Jacobsen, Frank; Minner, Sarah; Tsourlakis, Maria Christina; Beyer, Burkhard; Steuber, Thomas; Thederan, Imke; Sauter, Guido; Izbicki, Jakob; Schlomm, Thorsten; Wilczak, Waldemar

    2017-04-01

    The A Disintegrin and Metalloproteinase (ADAM) family of endopeptidases plays a role in many solid cancers and includes promising targets for anticancer therapies. Deregulation of ADAM15 has been linked to tumor aggressiveness and cell line studies suggest that ADAM15 overexpression may also be implicated in prostate cancer. To evaluate the impact of ADAM15 expression and its relationship with key genomic alterations, a tissue microarray containing 12,427 prostate cancers was analyzed by immunohistochemistry. ADAM15 expression was compared to phenotype, prognosis and molecular features including TMPRSS2:ERG fusion and frequent deletions involving PTEN, 3p, 5q and 6q. Normal prostate epithelium did not show ADAM15 staining. In prostate cancers, negative, weak, moderate, and strong ADAM15 staining was found in 87.7%, 3.7%, 5.6%, and 3.0% of 9826 interpretable tumors. Strong ADAM15 staining was linked to high Gleason grade, advanced pathological tumor stage, positive nodal stage and resection margin. ADAM15 overexpression was also associated with TMPRSS2:ERG fusions and PTEN deletions (P<.0001) but unrelated to deletions of 3p, 5q and 6q. In univariate analysis, high ADAM15 expression was strongly linked to PSA recurrence (P<.0001). However, in multivariate analyses this association was only maintained if the analysis was limited to preoperatively available parameters in ERG-negative cancers. The results of our study demonstrate that ADAM15 is strongly up regulated in a small but highly aggressive fraction of prostate cancers. In these tumors, ADAM15 may represent a suitable drug target. In a preoperative scenario, ADAM15 expression measurement may assist prognosis assessment, either alone or in combination with other markers.

  17. Generation of Novel Thyroid Cancer Stem-Like Cell Clones: Effects of Resveratrol and Valproic Acid.

    PubMed

    Hardin, Heather; Yu, Xiao-Min; Harrison, April D; Larrain, Carolina; Zhang, Ranran; Chen, Jidong; Chen, Herbert; Lloyd, Ricardo V

    2016-06-01

    Anaplastic thyroid cancer is an aggressive and highly lethal cancer for which conventional therapies have proved ineffective. Cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) represent a small fraction of cells in the cancer that are resistant to chemotherapy and radiation therapy and are responsible for tumor reoccurrence and metastasis. We characterized CSCs in thyroid carcinomas and generated clones of CSC lines. Our study showed that anaplastic thyroid cancers had significantly more CSCs than well-differentiated thyroid cancers. We also showed that Aldefluor-positive cells revealed significantly higher expression of stem cell markers, self-renewal properties, thyrosphere formation, and enhanced tumorigenicity. In vivo passaging of Aldefluor-positive cells resulted in the growth of larger, more aggressive tumors. We isolated and generated two clonal spheroid CSC lines derived from anaplastic thyroid cancer that were even more enriched with stem cell markers and more tumorigenic than the freshly isolated Aldefluor-positive cells. Resveratrol and valproic acid treatment of one of the CSC lines resulted in a significant decrease in stem cell markers, Aldefluor expression, proliferation, and invasiveness, with an increase in apoptosis and thyroid differentiation markers, suggesting that these cell lines may be useful for discovering new adjuvant therapies for aggressive thyroid cancers. For the first time, we have two thyroid CSC lines that will be useful tools for the study of thyroid CSC targeted therapies.

  18. Stochastic elimination of cancer cells.

    PubMed Central

    Michor, Franziska; Nowak, Martin A; Frank, Steven A; Iwasa, Yoh

    2003-01-01

    Tissues of multicellular organisms consist of stem cells and differentiated cells. Stem cells divide to produce new stem cells or differentiated cells. Differentiated cells divide to produce new differentiated cells. We show that such a tissue design can reduce the rate of fixation of mutations that increase the net proliferation rate of cells. It has, however, no consequence for the rate of fixation of neutral mutations. We calculate the optimum relative abundance of stem cells that minimizes the rate of generating cancer cells. There is a critical fraction of stem cell divisions that is required for a stochastic elimination ('wash out') of cancer cells. PMID:14561289

  19. 'Salvage Treatment' of Aggressive Giant Cell Tumor of Bones with Denosumab.

    PubMed

    Vaishya, Raju; Agarwal, Amit Kumar; Vijay, Vipul

    2015-07-01

    Giant cell tumor of the bone (GCTB) presents as a lytic lesion of epiphyseometaphyseal regions of the long bones usually during the second to the fourth decade with female predilection. Histologically, they are formed of neoplastic mononuclear cells with a higher receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) expression responsible for the aggressive osteolytic nature of the tumour. RANKL helps in the formation and functioning of osteoclasts. A newer molecule, Denosumab, is a monoclonal antibody directed against RANKL and thus prevents the formation and function of osteoclasts. Management of refractory, multicentric, recurrent, or metastatic GCTB remains challenging as achieving a tumor-free margin surgically is not always possible. Denosumab may play a crucial role, especially in the management of such difficult lesions. We present three cases of locally aggressive GCTB (involving proximal humerus, sacrum, and proximal femur) that were treated and responded very well to Denosumab therapy.

  20. 'Salvage Treatment' of Aggressive Giant Cell Tumor of Bones with Denosumab

    PubMed Central

    Vaishya, Raju; Vijay, Vipul

    2015-01-01

    Giant cell tumor of the bone (GCTB) presents as a lytic lesion of epiphyseometaphyseal regions of the long bones usually during the second to the fourth decade with female predilection. Histologically, they are formed of neoplastic mononuclear cells with a higher receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) expression responsible for the aggressive osteolytic nature of the tumour. RANKL helps in the formation and functioning of osteoclasts. A newer molecule, Denosumab, is a monoclonal antibody directed against RANKL and thus prevents the formation and function of osteoclasts. Management of refractory, multicentric, recurrent, or metastatic GCTB remains challenging as achieving a tumor-free margin surgically is not always possible. Denosumab may play a crucial role, especially in the management of such difficult lesions. We present three cases of locally aggressive GCTB (involving proximal humerus, sacrum, and proximal femur) that were treated and responded very well to Denosumab therapy. PMID:26251767

  1. Breast Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Velasco-Velázquez, Marco A.; Homsi, Nora; De La Fuente, Marisol; Pestell, Richard G.

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs) constitute a subpopulation of tumor cells that express stem cell-associated markers and have a high capacity for tumor generation in vivo. Identification of BCSCs from tumor samples or breast cancer cell lines has been based mainly on CD44+/CD24−/low or ALDH+ phenotypes. BCSCs isolation has allowed the analysis of the molecular mechanisms involved in their origin, self-renewal, differentiation into tumor cells, resistance to radiation therapy and chemotherapy, and invasiveness and metastatic ability. Molecular genetic analysis using knockout animals and inducible transgenics have identified NF-κB, c-Jun, p21CIP1, and Forkhead-like-protein Dach1 in BCSC expansion and fate. Clinical analyses of BCSCs in breast tumors have found a correlation between the proportion of BCSCs and poor prognosis. Therefore, new therapies that specifically target BCSCs are an urgent need. We summarize recent evidence that partially explain the biological characteristics of BCSCs. PMID:22249027

  2. Correlation of cyclin D1 expression with aggressive DNA pattern in patients with tobacco-related intraoral squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Das, Satya N.; Khare, Pratima; Singh, Manoj K; Sharma, Suresh C.

    2011-01-01

    Background & objectives: Cyclin D1 has been strongly implicated in cell proliferation particularly in the G1/S checkpoint of the cell cycle, and prognoses in human malignancies. We investigated the correlation between cyclin D1 overexpression and clinicopathological features as well as cell cycle parameters to understand its clinical significance in patients with tobacco-related oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Methods: Immunohistochemistry for cyclin D1 and DNA flowcytometry for cell cycle parameters was done on paraffin embedded tumour samples from 45 patients with OSCC Results: Higher expression of cyclin D1 was observed only in 30 (66.6%) of 45 cases that correlated with advanced age (P <0.02), higher tumour stage ((P<0.01), histological differentiation and lymph node metastasis (P <0.01). Analysis of nuclear DNA pattern revealed cyclin D1 immunoreactivity in tumours with aggressive DNA pattern such as aneuploidy ((P<0.05) and higher S phase fraction ((P<0.04). Interpretation & conclusions: Higher expression of cyclin D1 in oral cancer appears to be closely linked to cell proliferation, differentiation and lymph node invasion. Pre-operative evaluation of cyclin D1 in biopsy specimen may be useful in planning the most appropriate treatment strategies in patients with tobacco-related OSCC. PMID:21537090

  3. Gankyrin sustains PI3K/GSK-3β/β-catenin signal activation and promotes colorectal cancer aggressiveness and progression

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Qianlong; Zhang, Tong; Wang, Chengxing; Wei, Jianchang; Chen, Zhuanpeng; Hu, He; Li, Wanglin; Cao, Jie

    2016-01-01

    High levels of angiogenesis, metastasis and chemoresistance are major clinical features of colorectal cancer (CRC), a lethal disease with a high incidence worldwide. Aberrant activation of Wnt/β-catenin pathway contributes to CRC progression. However, little is known about regulatory mechanisms of the β-catenin activity in cancer progression. Here we report that Gankyrin was markedly upregulated in primary tumor tissues from CRC patients and was associated with poor survival. Moreover, we demonstrated that overexpressing Gankyrin promoted, while knockdown of Gankyrin impaired, the aggressive phenotype of proliferation, angiogenesis, chemoresistance and metastasis of CRC cells both in vitro and in vivo. Importantly, we found a unique molecular mechanism of Gankyrin in CRC cells signaling transduction, that regulated the cross-talk between PI3K/Akt and Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathways, sustaining PI3K/GSK-3β/β-catenin signal activation in CRC. Therefore, these findings not only reveal a mechanism that promotes aggressiveness and progression in CRC, but also provide insight into novel molecular targets for antitumor therapy in CRCs. PMID:27835604

  4. The c-MET Network as Novel Prognostic Marker for Predicting Bladder Cancer Patients with an Increased Risk of Developing Aggressive Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Phildu; Kim, Seon-Kyu; Kim, Seon-Young; Yan, Chunri; Seo, Sung Phil; Lee, Sang Keun; Kim, Jayoung; Kim, Wun-Jae

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that c-MET is overexpressed in cases of aggressive bladder cancer (BCa). Identification of crosstalk between c-MET and other RTKs such as AXL and PDGFR suggest that c-MET network genes (c-MET-AXL-PDGFR) may be clinically relevant to BCa. Here, we examine whether expression of c-MET network genes can be used to identify BCa patients at increased risk of developing aggressive disease. In vitro analysis, c-MET knockdown suppressed cell proliferation, invasion, and migration, and increased sensitivity to cisplatin-induced apoptosis. In addition, c-MET network gene (c-MET, AXL, and PDGFR) expression allowed discrimination of BCa tissues from normal control tissues and appeared to predict poor disease progression in non-muscle invasive BCa patients and poor overall survival in muscle invasive BCa patients. These results suggest that c-MET network gene expression is a novel prognostic marker for predicting which BCa patients have an increased risk of developing aggressive disease. These genes might be a useful marker for co-targeting therapy, and are expected to play an important role in improving both response to treatment and survival of BCa patients. PMID:26225770

  5. The c-MET Network as Novel Prognostic Marker for Predicting Bladder Cancer Patients with an Increased Risk of Developing Aggressive Disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Won; Yun, Seok Joong; Jeong, Phildu; Kim, Seon-Kyu; Kim, Seon-Young; Yan, Chunri; Seo, Sung Phil; Lee, Sang Keun; Kim, Jayoung; Kim, Wun-Jae

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that c-MET is overexpressed in cases of aggressive bladder cancer (BCa). Identification of crosstalk between c-MET and other RTKs such as AXL and PDGFR suggest that c-MET network genes (c-MET-AXL-PDGFR) may be clinically relevant to BCa. Here, we examine whether expression of c-MET network genes can be used to identify BCa patients at increased risk of developing aggressive disease. In vitro analysis, c-MET knockdown suppressed cell proliferation, invasion, and migration, and increased sensitivity to cisplatin-induced apoptosis. In addition, c-MET network gene (c-MET, AXL, and PDGFR) expression allowed discrimination of BCa tissues from normal control tissues and appeared to predict poor disease progression in non-muscle invasive BCa patients and poor overall survival in muscle invasive BCa patients. These results suggest that c-MET network gene expression is a novel prognostic marker for predicting which BCa patients have an increased risk of developing aggressive disease. These genes might be a useful marker for co-targeting therapy, and are expected to play an important role in improving both response to treatment and survival of BCa patients.

  6. Role of miR-139 as a surrogate marker for tumor aggression in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Dai, Hongyan; Gallagher, Dan; Schmitt, Sarah; Pessetto, Ziyan Y; Fan, Fang; Godwin, Andrew K; Tawfik, Ossama

    2017-03-01

    MicroRNAs are non-protein coding molecules that play a key role in oncogenesis, tumor progression, and metastasis in many types of malignancies including breast cancer. In the current study, we studied the expression of microRNA-139-5p (miR-139) in invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) of the breast and correlated its expression with tumor grade, molecular subtype, hormonal status, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 status, proliferation index, tumor size, lymph node status, patient's age, and overall survival in 74 IDC cases. In addition, we compared and correlated miR-139 expression in 18 paired serum and tissue samples from patients with IDC to assess its value as a serum marker. Our data showed that miR-139 was down-regulated in all tumor tissue samples compared with control. More pronounced down-regulation was seen in tumors that were higher grade, estrogen receptor negative, progesterone receptor negative, more proliferative, or larger in size (P < .05). Although not statistically significant, lower miR-139 level was frequently associated with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 overexpression. In addition, significantly lower miR-139 tissue level was seen in patients who were deceased (P = .027), although older age (>50 years) and positive local nodal disease did not adversely affect miR-139 expression. In contrast, serum miR-139 profile of the patients appeared similar to that of normal control. In conclusion, our study demonstrated that down-regulation of miR-139 was associated with aggressive tumor behavior and disease progression in breast cancer. miR-139 may serve as a risk assessment biomarker in tailoring treatment options.

  7. Nonthermal Plasma-Mediated Cancer Cell Death; Targeted Cancer Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Byul-Bora; Choi, Yeon-Sik; Lee, Hae-Jun; Lee, Jae-Koo; Kim, Uk-Kyu; Kim, Gyoo-Cheon

    Non-thermal air plasma can kill cancer cells. However, there is no selectivity between normal and cancer cells. Therefore, cancer specific antibody conjugated gold nanoparticle (GNP) was pretreated before plasma irradiation. Stimulation of antibody conjugated GNP by plasma treatment resulted in a significant decrease in viability of cancer cells. This technology shows the feasibility of using plasma therapy for killing cancer cells selectively.

  8. Targeting prostate cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Crea, Francesco; Mathews, Lesley A; Farrar, William L; Hurt, Elaine M

    2009-12-01

    Cancer stem cells are the sub-population of cells present within tumors responsible for tumorigenesis. These cells have unique biological properties including self-renewal and the ability to differentiate. Furthermore, it is thought that these cells are more resistant to conventional chemotherapy and, as a result, are responsible for patient relapse. We will discuss the identification of prostate cancer stem cells, their unique properties and how these cells may be targeted for more efficacious therapies.

  9. MiR-205 and MiR-373 Are Associated with Aggressive Human Mucinous Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Eyking, Annette; Reis, Henning; Frank, Magdalena; Gerken, Guido; Schmid, Kurt W.; Cario, Elke

    2016-01-01

    Mucinous adenocarcinoma (MAC) represents a distinct histopathological entity of colorectal cancer (CRC), which is associated with disease progression and poor prognosis. Here, we found that expression levels of miR-205 and miR-373 were specifically upregulated only in patients with mucinous colon cancers, but not in CRC that lack mucinous components. To investigate the effects of miR-205 and miR-373 on intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) biology by gain- and loss-of-function experiments in a proof-of-concept approach, we chose previously established in-vitro human Caco-2-based models of differentiated, non-invasive (expressing TLR4 wild-type; termed Caco-2[WT]) versus undifferentiated, invasive (expressing TLR4 mutant D299G; termed Caco-2[D299G]) IEC. Enterocyte-like Caco-2[WT] showed low levels of miR-205 and miR-373 expression, while both miRNAs were significantly upregulated in colorectal carcinoma-like Caco-2[D299G], thus resembling the miRNA expression pattern of paired normal versus tumor samples from MAC patients. Using stable transfection, we generated miR-205- or miR-373-expressing and miR-205- or miR-373-inhibiting subclones of these IEC lines. We found that introduction of miR-205 into Caco-2[WT] led to expansion of mucus-secreting goblet cell-like cells, which was associated with induction of KLF4, MUC2 and TGFβ1 expression. Activation of miR-205 in Caco-2[WT] induced chemoresistance, while inhibition of miR-205 in Caco-2[D299G] promoted chemosensitivity. Caco-2[WT] overexpressing miR-373 showed mitotic abnormalities and underwent morphologic changes (loss of epithelial polarity, cytoskeletal reorganization, and junctional disruption) associated with epithelial-mesenchymal transition and progression to inflammation-associated colonic carcinoma, which correlated with induction of phosphorylated STAT3 and N-CADHERIN expression. Functionally, introduction of miR-373 into Caco-2[WT] mediated loss of cell-cell adhesion and increased proliferation and invasion

  10. Overexpression of TMPRSS4 promotes tumor proliferation and aggressiveness in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiao-Mei; Liu, Wen-Lou; Chen, Xu; Wang, Ya-Wen; Shi, Duan-Bo; Zhang, Hui; Ma, Ran-Ran; Liu, Hai-Ting; Guo, Xiang-Yu; Hou, Feng; Li, Ming; Gao, Peng

    2017-01-01

    Transmembrane protease serine 4 (TMPRSS4) is a novel type II transmembrane serine protease that is overexpressed in various types of human cancers and has an important function in cancer progression. However, there is a paucity of data available regarding the biological effects of TMPRSS4 on breast cancer (BC) cells and the underlying mechanisms. In this study, expression of TMPRSS4 in BC tissues was detected by immunohistochemistry. The relationship between TMPRSS4 expression and clinicopathological characteristics as well as prognosis was evaluated. The effects of TMPRSS4 on cell proliferation, migration and invasion were investigated in BC cell lines in vitro. Additionally, RT-qPCR and western blot analysis were used to determine the expressions of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) biomarkers and TMPRSS4 in BC cell lines. We found that TMPRSS4 was overexpressed in BC tissues and its expression level was closely correlated with tumor size, histological grade, lymph node metastasis, clinical stage as well as poor survival (all P<0.05) and could be recognized as an independent prognostic factor for BC patients. Overexpression of TMPRSS4 promoted the proliferation, migration and invasion of BC cells in vitro. Moreover, TMPRSS4 knockdown significantly enhanced the expression of E-cadherin and claudin-1 and inhibited the expression of vimentin and Slug, indicating suppression of EMT. Our results suggest that TMPRSS4 plays a crucial role in the progression of BC. Moreover, TMPRSS4 overexpression promoted the proliferation, invasion and migration of BC cells by possibly inducing EMT. To conclude, TMPRSS4 may be a potential therapeutic target for cancer treatment. PMID:28259959

  11. A new prospect in cancer therapy: targeting cancer stem cells to eradicate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Li-Sha; Wang, An-Xin; Dong, Bing; Pu, Ke-Feng; Yuan, Li-Hua; Zhu, Yi-Min

    2012-01-01

    According to the cancer stem cell theory, cancers can be initiated by cancer stem cells. This makes cancer stem cells prime targets for therapeutic intervention. Eradicating cancer stem cells by efficient targeting agents may have the potential to cure cancer. In this review, we summarize recent breakthroughs that have improved our understanding of cancer stem cells, and we discuss the therapeutic strategy of targeting cancer stem cells, a promising future direction for cancer stem cell research. PMID:22507219

  12. HER2-associated radiation resistance of breast cancer stem cells isolated from HER2-negative breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Duru, Nadire; Fan, Ming; Candas, Demet; Menaa, Cheikh; Liu, Hsin-Chen; Nantajit, Danupon; Wen, Yunfei; Xiao, Kai; Eldridge, Angela; Chromy, Brett A.; Li, Shiyong; Spitz, Douglas R.; Lam, Kit S.; Wicha, Max S.; Li, Jian Jian

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To understand the role of HER2-associated signaling network in breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs); using radiation-resistant breast cancer cells and clinical recurrent breast cancers to evaluate HER2-targeted therapy as a tumor eliminating strategy for recurrent HER2−/low breast cancers. Experimental Design HER2-expressing BCSCs (HER2+/CD44+/CD24−/low) were isolated from radiation-treated breast cancer MCF7 cells and in vivo irradiated MCF7 xenograft tumors. Tumor aggressiveness and radiation resistance were analyzed by gap filling, Matrigel invasion, tumor-sphere formation, and clonogenic survival assays. The HER2/CD44 feature was analyzed in 40 primary and recurrent breast cancer specimens. Protein expression profiling in HER2+/CD44+/CD24−/low versus HER2−/CD44+/CD24−/low BCSCs was conducted with 2-D DIGE and HPLC-MS/MS analysis and HER2-mediated signaling network was generated by MetaCore™ program. Results Compared to HER2-negative BCSCs, HER2+/CD44+/CD24−/low cells showed elevated aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity and aggressiveness tested by matrigel invasion, tumor sphere formation and in vivo tumorigenesis. The enhanced aggressive phenotype and radioresistance of the HER2+/CD44+/CD24−/low cells were markedly reduced by inhibition of HER2 via siRNA or Herceptin treatments. Clinical breast cancer specimens revealed that cells co-expressing HER2 and CD44 were more frequently detected in recurrent (84.6%) than primary tumors (57.1%). In addition, 2-D DIGE and HPLC-MS/MS of HER2+/CD44+/CD24−/low versus HER2−/CD44+/CD24−/low BCSCs reported a unique HER2-associated protein profile including effectors involved in tumor metastasis, apoptosis, mitochondrial function and DNA repair. A specific feature of HER2-STAT3 network was identified. Conclusion This study provides the evidence that HER2-mediated pro-survival signaling network is responsible for the aggressive phenotype of breast cancer stem cells that could be targeted to control

  13. Expression of EGFR Under Tumor Hypoxia: Identification of a Subpopulation of Tumor Cells Responsible for Aggressiveness and Treatment Resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Hoogsteen, Ilse J.; Marres, Henri A.M.; Hoogen, Franciscus J.A. van den

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: Overexpression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and tumor hypoxia have been shown to correlate with worse outcome in several types of cancer including head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma. Little is known about the combination and possible interactions between the two phenomena. Methods and Materials: In this study, 45 cases of histologically confirmed squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck were analyzed. All patients received intravenous infusions of the exogenous hypoxia marker pimonidazole prior to biopsy. Presence of EGFR, pimonidazole binding, and colocalization between EGFR and tumor hypoxia were examined using immunohistochemistry. Results: Of all biopsies examined, respectively, 91% and 60% demonstrated EGFR- and pimonidazole-positive areas. A weak but significant association was found between the hypoxic fractions of pimonidazole (HFpimo) and EGFR fractions (F-EGFR) and between F-EGFR and relative vascular area. Various degrees of colocalization between hypoxia and EGFR were found, increasing with distance from the vasculature. A high fraction of EGFR was correlated with better disease-free and metastasis-free survival, whereas a high degree of colocalization correlated with poor outcome. Conclusions: Colocalization of hypoxia and EGFR was demonstrated in head-and-neck squamous cell carcinomas, predominantly at longer distances from vessels. A large amount of colocalization was associated with poor outcome, which points to a survival advantage of hypoxic cells that are also able to express EGFR. This subpopulation of tumor cells might be indicative of tumor aggressiveness and be partly responsible for treatment resistance.

  14. Cancer Cell Metabolism and the Modulating Effects of Nitric Oxide

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ching-Fang; Diers, Anne R.; Hogg, Neil

    2016-01-01

    Altered metabolic phenotype has been recognized as a hallmark of tumor cells for many years, but this aspect of the cancer phenotype has come into greater focus in recent years. NOS2 (inducible nitric oxide synthase of iNOS) has been implicated as a component in many aggressive tumor phenotypes, including melanoma, glioblastoma and breast cancer. Nitric oxide has been well established as a modulator of cellular bioenergetics pathways, in many ways similar to the alteration of cellular metabolism observed in aggressive tumors. In this review we attempt to bring these concepts together with the general hypothesis that one function of NOS2 and NO in cancer is to modulate metabolic processes to facilitate increased tumor aggression. There are many mechanisms by which NO can modulate tumor metabolism, including direct inhibition of respiration, alterations in mitochondrial mass, oxidative inhibition of bioenergetic enzymes, and the stimulation of secondary signaling pathways. Here we review metabolic alterations in the context of cancer cells and discuss the role of NO as a potential mediator of these changes. PMID:25464273

  15. Renal cell cancer among African Americans: an epidemiologic review.

    PubMed

    Lipworth, Loren; Tarone, Robert E; McLaughlin, Joseph K

    2011-04-12

    Incidence rates for renal cell cancer, which accounts for 85% of kidney cancers, have been rising more rapidly among blacks than whites, almost entirely accounted for by an excess of localized disease. This excess dates back to the 1970s, despite less access among blacks to imaging procedures in the past. In contrast, mortality rates for this cancer have been virtually identical among blacks and whites since the early 1990s, despite the fact that nephrectomy rates, regardless of stage, are lower among blacks than among whites. These observations suggest that renal cell cancer may be a less aggressive tumor in blacks. We have reviewed the epidemiology of renal cell cancer, with emphasis on factors which may potentially play a role in the observed differences in incidence and mortality patterns of renal cell cancer among blacks and whites. To date, the factors most consistently, albeit modestly, associated with increased renal cell cancer risk in epidemiologic studies among whites--obesity, hypertension, cigarette smoking--likely account for less than half of these cancers, and there is virtually no epidemiologic evidence in the literature pertaining to their association with renal cell cancer among blacks. There is a long overdue need for detailed etiologic cohort and case-control studies of renal cell cancer among blacks, as they now represent the population at highest risk in the United States. In particular, investigation of the influence on renal cell cancer development of hypertension and chronic kidney disease, both of which occur substantially more frequently among blacks, is warranted, as well as investigations into the biology and natural history of this cancer among blacks.

  16. Sensitivity of bladder cancer cells to curcumin and its derivatives depends on the extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Hauser, Paul J; Han, Zhiyong; Sindhwani, Puneet; Hurst, Robert E

    2007-01-01

    Because the response of cancer cells to chemotherapeutic agents depends upon the supporting extracellular matrix (ECM), the response in vivo may not be reproduced in 2-dimensional cell culture. The dose-response to curcumin and two derivatives by bladder cancer cells grown on both normal (SISgel) and cancer-derived ECM (Matrigel) and on plastic were contrasted. Cells grown on Matrigel were resistant to curcumins, but cells growing on SISgel, which mimic cancer cells suppressed by normal ECM, were nearly as sensitive as cells grown on plastic. SV40-immortalized urothelial cells, which are models for premalignant cells, were the most sensitive, but even aggressive cell lines were nearly as sensitive when grown on SISgel as on plastic. Curcumin response depends highly on the supporting ECM, and cells grown on plastic poorly models cells growing on natural ECM. Curcumin could prove an effective chemopreventive for bladder cancer recurrence when administered intravesically post-therapy.

  17. Advances in inducing adaptive immunity using cell-based cancer vaccines: Clinical applications in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kajihara, Mikio; Takakura, Kazuki; Kanai, Tomoya; Ito, Zensho; Matsumoto, Yoshihiro; Shimodaira, Shigetaka; Okamoto, Masato; Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Koido, Shigeo

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) is on the rise, and the prognosis is extremely poor because PDA is highly aggressive and notoriously difficult to treat. Although gemcitabine- or 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy is typically offered as a standard of care, most patients do not survive longer than 1 year. Therefore, the development of alternative therapeutic approaches for patients with PDA is imperative. As PDA cells express numerous tumor-associated antigens that are suitable vaccine targets, one promising treatment approach is cancer vaccines. During the last few decades, cell-based cancer vaccines have offered encouraging results in preclinical studies. Cell-based cancer vaccines are mainly generated by presenting whole tumor cells or dendritic cells to cells of the immune system. In particular, several clinical trials have explored cell-based cancer vaccines as a promising therapeutic approach for patients with PDA. Moreover, chemotherapy and cancer vaccines can synergize to result in increased efficacies in patients with PDA. In this review, we will discuss both the effect of cell-based cancer vaccines and advances in terms of future strategies of cancer vaccines for the treatment of PDA patients. PMID:27182156

  18. Aberrant hypomethylation-mediated CD147 overexpression promotes aggressive tumor progression in human prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yu-Xiang; Mo, Ru-Jun; He, Hui-Chan; Chen, Jia-Hong; Zou, Jun; Han, Zhao-Dong; Lu, Jian-Ming; Cai, Chao; Zeng, Yan-Ru; Zhong, Wei-De; Wu, Chin-Lee

    2015-05-01

    Our previous study revealed the potential role of CD147 in human prostate cancer (PCa). Here, we investigated the CD147 promoter methylation status and the correlation with tumorigenicity in human PCa. CD147 mRNA and protein expression levels were both significantly higher in the 4 PCa cell lines, than in the 2 non-tumorigenic benign human prostatic epithelial cell lines (all P<0.01). We showed hypomethylation of promoter regions of CD147 in PCa cell lines with significant CD147 expression as compared to non-tumorigenic benign human prostatic epithelial cell lines slowly expressing CD147. Additionally, the treatment of methylated cell lines with 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine increased CD147 expression significantly in low-expressing cell lines and also activated the expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, which may be one of the most important downstream targets of CD147. Furthermore, PCa tissues displayed decreased DNA methylation in the promoter region of CD147 compared to the corresponding non-cancerous prostate tissues, and methylation intensity correlated inversely with the CD147 mRNA levels. There was a significant negative correlation between CD147 mRNA levels and the number of methylated sites in PCa tissues (r=-0.467, P<0.01). In conclusion, our data offer convincing evidence for the first time that the DNA promoter hypomethylation of CD147 may be one of the regulatory mechanisms involved in the cancer-related overexpression of CD147 and may play a crucial role in the tumorigenesis of PCa.

  19. GPER1 is regulated by insulin in cancer cells and cancer-associated fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    De Marco, Paola; Romeo, Enrica; Vivacqua, Adele; Malaguarnera, Roberta; Abonante, Sergio; Romeo, Francesco; Pezzi, Vincenzo; Belfiore, Antonino; Maggiolini, Marcello

    2014-10-01

    Elevated insulin levels have been associated with an increased cancer risk as well as with aggressive and metastatic cancer phenotypes characterized by a poor prognosis. Insulin stimulates the proliferation, migration, and invasiveness of cancer cells through diverse transduction pathways, including estrogen signaling. As G protein estrogen receptor 1 (GPER1) mediates rapid cell responses to estrogens, we evaluated the potential of insulin to regulate GPER1 expression and function in leiomyosarcoma cancer cells (SKUT-1) and breast cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs), which were used as a model system. We found that insulin transactivates the GPER1 promoter sequence and increases the mRNA and protein expression of GPER1 through the activation of the PRKCD/MAPK1/c-Fos/AP1 transduction pathway, as ascertained by means of specific pharmacological inhibitors and gene-silencing experiments. Moreover, cell migration triggered by insulin occurred through GPER1 and its main target gene CTGF, whereas the insulin-induced expression of GPER1 boosted cell-cycle progression and the glucose uptake stimulated by estrogens. Notably, a positive correlation between insulin serum levels and GPER1 expression was found in cancer fibroblasts obtained from breast cancer patients. Altogether, our data indicate that GPER1 may be included among the complex network of transduction signaling triggered by insulin that drives cells toward cancer progression.

  20. Overexpression of pyruvate kinase M2 associates with aggressive clinicopathological features and unfavorable prognosis in oral squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yanling; Zhang, Xiaomin; Zhang, Yuchao; Zhu, Yuming; Yuan, Chunping; Qi, Bin; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Dongmiao; Ding, Xu; Wu, Heming; Cheng, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Abnormal glucose metabolism mediated by pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2) fuels cancer overgrowth and propagation. However, its expression and oncogenic roles in in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) remains incompletely known. Here, we aimed to investigate the expression of PKM2, its prognostic values and oncogenic functions using 7,12-dimethyl-1,2-bezan-tracene (DMBA)-induced hamster buccal pouch SCC model, primary OSCC specimens as well as in vitro cellular assays. We found that in DMBA-induced OSCC model, negative PKM2 expression was commonly observed in normal epithelial, while more PKM2 abundance was detected in hyperplasia, dysplasia and SCC. Overexpression of PKM2 in a major fraction of OSCC significantly associated with tumor size (P = 0.027), cervical node metastasis (P = 0.004) and clinical stages (P = 0.000). Patients with increased PKM2 had remarkably reduced overall and disease-free survival. Multivariate survival analysis further revealed that PKM served as a critical independent prognostic factor for patients' overall survival. Furthermore, impaired cell proliferation and migration, and reduced apoptosis were detected upon PKM2 knockdown in HN4 and HN12 cells. Taken together, our findings reveal that PKM2 is critically involved in OSCC initiation and progression probably by promoting cell proliferation and migration as well as reducing apoptosis. Its overexpression correlates with aggressive clinicopathological features and poor patients' outcome. PMID:25970228

  1. Aurora Kinase A is a Biomarker for Bladder Cancer Detection and Contributes to its Aggressive Behavior.

    PubMed

    Mobley, Aaron; Zhang, Shizhen; Bondaruk, Jolanta; Wang, Yan; Majewski, Tadeusz; Caraway, Nancy P; Huang, Li; Shoshan, Einav; Velazquez-Torres, Guermarie; Nitti, Giovanni; Lee, Sangkyou; Lee, June Goo; Fuentes-Mattei, Enrique; Willis, Daniel; Zhang, Li; Guo, Charles C; Yao, Hui; Baggerly, Keith; Lotan, Yair; Lerner, Seth P; Dinney, Colin; McConkey, David; Bar-Eli, Menashe; Czerniak, Bogdan

    2017-01-19

    The effects of AURKA overexpression associated with poor clinical outcomes have been attributed to increased cell cycle progression and the development of genomic instability with aneuploidy. We used RNA interference to examine the effects of AURKA overexpression in human bladder cancer cells. Knockdown had minimal effects on cell proliferation but blocked tumor cell invasion. Whole genome mRNA expression profiling identified nicotinamide N-methyltransferase (NNMT) as a downstream target that was repressed by AURKA. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and NNMT promoter luciferase assays revealed that AURKA's effects on NNMT were caused by PAX3-mediated transcriptional repression and overexpression of NNMT blocked tumor cell invasion in vitro. Overexpression of AURKA and activation of its downstream pathway was enriched in the basal subtype in primary human tumors and was associated with poor clinical outcomes. We also show that the FISH test for the AURKA gene copy number in urine yielded a specificity of 79.7% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 74.2% to 84.1%), and a sensitivity of 79.6% (95% CI = 74.2% to 84.1%) with an AUC of 0.901 (95% CI = 0.872 to 0.928; P < 0.001). These results implicate AURKA as an effective biomarker for bladder cancer detection as well as therapeutic target especially for its basal type.

  2. Aurora Kinase A is a Biomarker for Bladder Cancer Detection and Contributes to its Aggressive Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Mobley, Aaron; Zhang, Shizhen; Bondaruk, Jolanta; Wang, Yan; Majewski, Tadeusz; Caraway, Nancy P.; Huang, Li; Shoshan, Einav; Velazquez-Torres, Guermarie; Nitti, Giovanni; Lee, Sangkyou; Lee, June Goo; Fuentes-Mattei, Enrique; Willis, Daniel; Zhang, Li; Guo, Charles C.; Yao, Hui; Baggerly, Keith; Lotan, Yair; Lerner, Seth P.; Dinney, Colin; McConkey, David; Bar-Eli, Menashe; Czerniak, Bogdan

    2017-01-01

    The effects of AURKA overexpression associated with poor clinical outcomes have been attributed to increased cell cycle progression and the development of genomic instability with aneuploidy. We used RNA interference to examine the effects of AURKA overexpression in human bladder cancer cells. Knockdown had minimal effects on cell proliferation but blocked tumor cell invasion. Whole genome mRNA expression profiling identified nicotinamide N-methyltransferase (NNMT) as a downstream target that was repressed by AURKA. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and NNMT promoter luciferase assays revealed that AURKA’s effects on NNMT were caused by PAX3-mediated transcriptional repression and overexpression of NNMT blocked tumor cell invasion in vitro. Overexpression of AURKA and activation of its downstream pathway was enriched in the basal subtype in primary human tumors and was associated with poor clinical outcomes. We also show that the FISH test for the AURKA gene copy number in urine yielded a specificity of 79.7% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 74.2% to 84.1%), and a sensitivity of 79.6% (95% CI = 74.2% to 84.1%) with an AUC of 0.901 (95% CI = 0.872 to 0.928; P < 0.001). These results implicate AURKA as an effective biomarker for bladder cancer detection as well as therapeutic target especially for its basal type. PMID:28102366

  3. Epigenetics in cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Toh, Tan Boon; Lim, Jhin Jieh; Chow, Edward Kai-Hua

    2017-02-01

    Compelling evidence have demonstrated that bulk tumors can arise from a unique subset of cells commonly termed "cancer stem cells" that has been proposed to be a strong driving force of tumorigenesis and a key mechanism of therapeutic resistance. Recent advances in epigenomics have illuminated key mechanisms by which epigenetic regulation contribute to cancer progression. In this review, we present a discussion of how deregulation of various epigenetic pathways can contribute to cancer initiation and tumorigenesis, particularly with respect to maintenance and survival of cancer stem cells. This information, together with several promising clinical and preclinical trials of epigenetic modulating drugs, offer new possibilities for targeting cancer stem cells as well as improving cancer therapy overall.

  4. Lung cancer - non-small cell

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - lung - non-small cell; Non-small cell lung cancer; NSCLC; Adenocarcinoma - lung; Squamous cell carcinoma - lung ... Smoking causes most cases (around 90%) of lung cancer. The risk depends on the number of cigarettes ...

  5. A novel HMGA1-CCNE2-YAP axis regulates breast cancer aggressiveness

    PubMed Central

    Ciani, Yari; Sgarra, Riccardo; Piazza, Silvano; Manfioletti, Guidalberto

    2015-01-01

    High Mobility Group A1 (HMGA1) is an architectural chromatin factor that promotes neoplastic transformation and progression. However, the mechanism by which HMGA1 exerts its oncogenic function is not fully understood. Here, we show that cyclin E2 (CCNE2) acts downstream of HMGA1 to regulate the motility and invasiveness of basal-like breast cancer cells by promoting the nuclear localization and activity of YAP, the downstream mediator of the Hippo pathway. Mechanistically, the activity of MST1/2 and LATS1/2, the core kinases of the Hippo pathway, are required for the HMGA1- and CCNE2-mediated regulation of YAP localization. In breast cancer patients, high levels of HMGA1 and CCNE2 expression are associated with the YAP/TAZ signature, supporting this connection. Moreover, we provide evidence that CDK inhibitors induce the translocation of YAP from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, resulting in a decrease in its activity. These findings reveal an association between HMGA1 and the Hippo pathway that is relevant to stem cell biology, tissue homeostasis, and cancer. PMID:26265440

  6. Decreased HoxD10 expression promotes a proliferative and aggressive phenotype in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Mo, R-J; Lu, J-M; Wan, Y-P; Hua, W; Liang, Y-X; Zhuo, Y-J; Kuang, Q-W; Liu, Y-L; He, H-C; Zhong, W-D

    2017-02-19

    HoxD10 gene plays a critical role in cell proliferation in the process of tumor development. However, the protein expression level and the function of HoxD10 in prostate cancer remain unknown. Using tissue microarray, we demonstrate that the protein expression of HoxD10 is commonly decreased in prostate cancer tissues (n = 92) compared to adjacent benign prostate tissues (n = 77). Functionally, knockdown of HoxD10 resulted in significant promotion of prostate cancer cell proliferation. Moreover, knockdown of HoxD10 strikingly stimulated prostate tumor growth in a mouse xenograft model. We also found a significant association between decreased immunohistochemical staining of HoxD10 expression and higher Gleason score (P = 0.031) and advanced clinical pathological stage (P = 0.011). An analysis of the Taylor database revealed that decreased HoxD10 expression predicted worse biochemical recurrence (BCR)-free survival of PCa patients (P = 0.005) and the multivariate analyses further supported that HoxD10 might be an independent predictor for BCR-free survival (P = 0.027). Collectively, our data suggest that the loss of HoxD10 function is common and may thus result in a progressive phenotype in PCa. HoxD10 may function as a biomarker that differentiates patients with BCR disease from the ones that are not after radical prostatectomy, implicating its potential as a therapeutic target.

  7. Contemporary Renal Cell Cancer Epidemiology

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Wong-Ho; Devesa, Susan S.

    2010-01-01

    We analyzed renal cell cancer incidence patterns in the United States and reviewed recent epidemiologic evidence with regard to environmental and host genetic determinants of renal cell cancer risk. Renal cell cancer incidence rates continued to rise among all racial/ethnic groups in the United States, across all age groups, and for all tumor sizes, with the most rapid increases for localized stage disease and small tumors. Recent cohort studies confirmed the association of smoking, excess body weight, and hypertension with an elevated risk of renal cell cancer, and suggested that these factors can be modified to reduce the risk. There is increasing evidence for an inverse association between renal cell cancer risk and physical activity and moderate intake of alcohol. Occupational exposure to TCE has been positively associated with renal cell cancer risk in several recent studies, but its link with somatic mutations of the VHL gene has not been confirmed. Studies of genetic polymorphisms in relation to renal cell cancer risk have produced mixed results, but genome-wide association studies with larger sample size and a more comprehensive approach are underway. Few epidemiologic studies have evaluated risk factors by subtypes of renal cell cancer defined by somatic mutations and other tumor markers. PMID:18836333

  8. Good response of an aggressive rare variant of signet ring cell carcinoma of prostate with hormonal therapy.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Deviprasad; Nayak, Brusabhanu; Seth, Amlesh

    2017-03-08

    Primary signet ring cell carcinoma (SRCC) of the prostate is a rare entity, characterised by its aggressive nature and dismal prognosis. We report a case of an advanced SRCC of the prostate presenting as a large pelvic mass with obstructive uropathy and rectal involvement managed by complete androgen blockade. At 24 months follow-up, the patient has no evidence of progression or metastasis. Aggressive management with multimodality approach combining surgery, radiation and hormonal ablation can result in long disease-free survival in some patients, despite the aggressive nature of this disease.

  9. Immunotargeting of cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Gąbka-Buszek, Agnieszka; Jankowski, Jakub; Mackiewicz, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) represent a distinctive population of tumour cells that control tumour initiation, progression, and maintenance. Their influence is great enough to risk the statement that successful therapeutic strategy must target CSCs in order to eradicate the disease. Because cancer stem cells are highly resistant to chemo- and radiotherapy, new tools to fight against cancer have to be developed. Expression of antigens such as ALDH, CD44, EpCAM, or CD133, which distinguish CSCs from normal cells, together with CSC immunogenicity and relatively low toxicity of immunotherapies, makes immune targeting of CSCs a promising approach for cancer treatment. This review will present immunotherapeutic approaches using dendritic cells, T cells, pluripotent stem cells, and monoclonal antibodies to target and eliminate CSCs. PMID:25691822

  10. Glucocorticoid receptor blockade inhibits brain cell addition and aggressive signaling in electric fish, Apteronotus leptorhynchus.

    PubMed

    Dunlap, Kent D; Jashari, Denisa; Pappas, Kristina M

    2011-08-01

    When animals are under stress, glucocorticoids commonly inhibit adult neurogenesis by acting through glucocorticoid receptors (GRs). However, in some cases, conditions that elevate glucocorticoids promote adult neurogenesis, and the role of glucocorticoid receptors in these circumstances is not well understood. We examined the involvement of GRs in social enhancement of brain cell addition and aggressive signaling in electric fish, Apteronotus leptorhynchus. In this species, long-term social interaction simultaneously elevates plasma cortisol, enhances brain cell addition and increases production of aggressive electrocommunication signals ("chirps"). We implanted isolated and paired fish with capsules containing nothing (controls) or the GR antagonist, RU486, recorded chirp production and locomotion for 7d, and measured the density of newborn cells in the periventricular zone. Compared to isolated controls, paired controls showed elevated chirping in two phases: much higher chirp rates in the first 5h and moderately higher nocturnal rates thereafter. Treating paired fish with RU486 reduced chirp rates in both phases to those of isolated fish, demonstrating that GR activation is crucial for socially induced chirping. Neither RU486 nor social interaction affected locomotion. RU486 treatment to paired fish had a partial effect on cell addition: paired RU486 fish had less cell addition than paired control fish but more than isolated fish. This suggests that cortisol activation of GRs contributes to social enhancement of cell addition but works in parallel with another GR-independent mechanism. RU486 also reduced cell addition in isolated fish, indicating that GRs participate in the regulation of cell addition even when cortisol levels are low.

  11. Interleukin 10 expression is related to aggressiveness and poor prognosis of patients with thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Lucas Leite; Morari, Elaine Cristina; Nonogaki, Sueli; Marcello, Marjory Alana; Soares, Fernando Augusto; Vassallo, José; Ward, Laura Sterian

    2017-02-01

    Most patients with thyroid cancer will evolve very well with current therapies. However, 10-30% of these patients will present recurrent disease and some of them will eventually die. IL-10 is an anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive cytokine that can contribute to the immune escape of neoplastic cells. We aimed to investigate IL-10 as a molecular marker to improve the clinical management of patients with thyroid cancer. We retrospectively studied 162 patients with follicular cell-derived thyroid cancer who attended to our institution, including 63 classic papillary thyroid carcinomas, 46 follicular variant of papillary thyroid carcinomas, 11 poorly differentiated thyroid carcinomas and 42 follicular thyroid carcinomas. Patients were treated according to current guidelines and followed-up for 1-150 months. Additionally, we studied 96 samples of non-malignant tissues. We investigated the expression of IL-10 in tumor cells by semiquantitative and quantitative methods. Malignant tissues presented higher positivity (0.773 ± 0.140) than non-malignant samples (0.623 ± 0.190; p < 0.001). Tumors with extrathyroidal invasion at diagnosis presented higher levels of positivity for IL-10 (0.802 ± 0.125) than tumors without extrathyroidal invasion (0.731 ± 0.147; p = 0.004). We observed a positive correlation between tumor size and IL-10 positivity (correlation coefficient = 0.407; p < 0.001). Patients with IL-10 positivity above the median presented lower relapse-free survival rate compared to those patients whose tumors presented IL-10 positivity below the median. We suggest that a simple IL-10 IHC analysis could help selecting patients who would benefit from a more intensive approach.

  12. BRACHYURY confers cancer stem cell characteristics on colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Debalina; Shields, Brian; Davies, Melanie L; Müller, Jürgen; Wakeman, Jane A

    2012-01-15

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are initiating cells in colorectal cancer (CRC). Colorectal tumours undergo epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT)-like processes at the invasive front, enabling invasion and metastasis, and recent studies have linked this process to the acquisition of stem cell-like properties. It is of fundamental importance to understand the molecular events leading to the establishment of cancer initiating cells and how these mechanisms relate to cellular transitions during tumourigenesis. We use an in vitro system to recapitulate changes in CRC cells at the invasive front (mesenchymal-like cells) and central mass (epithelial-like cells) of tumours. We show that the mesoderm inducer BRACHYURY is expressed in a subpopulation of CRC cells that resemble invasive front mesenchymal-like cells, where it acts to impose characteristics of CSCs in a fully reversible manner, suggesting reversible formation and modulation of such cells. BRACHYURY, itself regulated by the oncogene β-catenin, influences NANOG and other 'stemness' markers including a panel of markers defining CRC-CSC whose presence has been linked to poor patient prognosis. Similar regulation of NANOG through BRACHYURY was observed in other cells lines, suggesting this might be a pathway common to cancer cells undergoing mesenchymal transition. We suggest that BRACHYURY may regulate NANOG in mesenchymal-like CRC cells to impose a 'plastic-state', allowing competence of cells to respond to signals prompting invasion or metastasis.

  13. Links between DNA Replication, Stem Cells and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vassilev, Alex; DePamphilis, Melvin L.

    2017-01-01

    Cancers can be categorized into two groups: those whose frequency increases with age, and those resulting from errors during mammalian development. The first group is linked to DNA replication through the accumulation of genetic mutations that occur during proliferation of developmentally acquired stem cells that give rise to and maintain tissues and organs. These mutations, which result from DNA replication errors as well as environmental insults, fall into two categories; cancer driver mutations that initiate carcinogenesis and genome destabilizing mutations that promote aneuploidy through excess genome duplication and chromatid missegregation. Increased genome instability results in accelerated clonal evolution leading to the appearance of more aggressive clones with increased drug resistance. The second group of cancers, termed germ cell neoplasia, results from the mislocation of pluripotent stem cells during early development. During normal development, pluripotent stem cells that originate in early embryos give rise to all of the cell lineages in the embryo and adult, but when they mislocate to ectopic sites, they produce tumors. Remarkably, pluripotent stem cells, like many cancer cells, depend on the Geminin protein to prevent excess DNA replication from triggering DNA damage-dependent apoptosis. This link between the control of DNA replication during early development and germ cell neoplasia reveals Geminin as a potential chemotherapeutic target in the eradication of cancer progenitor cells. PMID:28125050

  14. Links between DNA Replication, Stem Cells and Cancer.

    PubMed

    Vassilev, Alex; DePamphilis, Melvin L

    2017-01-25

    Cancers can be categorized into two groups: those whose frequency increases with age, and those resulting from errors during mammalian development. The first group is linked to DNA replication through the accumulation of genetic mutations that occur during proliferation of developmentally acquired stem cells that give rise to and maintain tissues and organs. These mutations, which result from DNA replication errors as well as environmental insults, fall into two categories; cancer driver mutations that initiate carcinogenesis and genome destabilizing mutations that promote aneuploidy through excess genome duplication and chromatid missegregation. Increased genome instability results in accelerated clonal evolution leading to the appearance of more aggressive clones with increased drug resistance. The second group of cancers, termed germ cell neoplasia, results from the mislocation of pluripotent stem cells during early development. During normal development, pluripotent stem cells that originate in early embryos give rise to all of the cell lineages in the embryo and adult, but when they mislocate to ectopic sites, they produce tumors. Remarkably, pluripotent stem cells, like many cancer cells, depend on the Geminin protein to prevent excess DNA replication from triggering DNA damage-dependent apoptosis. This link between the control of DNA replication during early development and germ cell neoplasia reveals Geminin as a potential chemotherapeutic target in the eradication of cancer progenitor cells.

  15. Cancer stem cells in human gastrointestinal cancer.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Hiroaki; Moriya, Chiharu; Igarashi, Hisayoshi; Saitoh, Anri; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Adachi, Yasushi; Imai, Kohzoh

    2016-11-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are thought to be responsible for tumor initiation, drug and radiation resistance, invasive growth, metastasis, and tumor relapse, which are the main causes of cancer-related deaths. Gastrointestinal cancers are the most common malignancies and still the most frequent cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Because gastrointestinal CSCs are also thought to be resistant to conventional therapies, an effective and novel cancer treatment is imperative. The first reported CSCs in a gastrointestinal tumor were found in colorectal cancer in 2007. Subsequently, CSCs were reported in other gastrointestinal cancers, such as esophagus, stomach, liver, and pancreas. Specific phenotypes could be used to distinguish CSCs from non-CSCs. For example, gastrointestinal CSCs express unique surface markers, exist in a side-population fraction, show high aldehyde dehydrogenase-1 activity, form tumorspheres when cultured in non-adherent conditions, and demonstrate high tumorigenic potential in immunocompromised mice. The signal transduction pathways in gastrointestinal CSCs are similar to those involved in normal embryonic development. Moreover, CSCs are modified by the aberrant expression of several microRNAs. Thus, it is very difficult to target gastrointestinal CSCs. This review focuses on the current research on gastrointestinal CSCs and future strategies to abolish the gastrointestinal CSC phenotype.

  16. Cholesteryl Ester Accumulation Induced by PTEN Loss and PI3K/AKT Activation Underlies Human Prostate Cancer Aggressiveness

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Shuhua; Li, Junjie; Lee, Seung-Young; Lee, Hyeon Jeong; Shao, Tian; Song, Bing; Cheng, Liang; Masterson, Timothy A.; Liu, Xiaoqi; Ratliff, Timothy L.; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2014-01-01

    Summary Altered lipid metabolism is increasingly recognized as a signature of cancer cells. Enabled by label-free Raman spectromicroscopy, we performed quantitative analysis of lipogenesis at single cell level in human patient cancerous tissues. Our imaging data revealed an unexpected, aberrant accumulation of esterified cholesterol in lipid droplets of high-grade prostate cancer and metastases. Biochemical study showed that such cholesteryl ester accumulation was a consequence of loss of tumor suppressor PTEN and subsequent activation of PI3K/AKT pathway in prostate cancer cells. Furthermore, we found that such accumulation arose from significantly enhanced uptake of exogenous lipoproteins and required cholesterol esterification. Depletion of cholesteryl ester storage significantly reduced cancer proliferation, impaired cancer invasion capability, and suppressed tumor growth in mouse xenograft models with negligible toxicity. These findings open opportunities for diagnosing and treating prostate cancer by targeting the altered cholesterol metabolism. PMID:24606897

  17. NK Cells and Cancer Immunoediting.

    PubMed

    Guillerey, Camille; Smyth, Mark J

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are innate lymphoid cells (ILC) known for their ability to recognize and rapidly eliminate infected or transformed cells. Consequently, NK cells are fundamental for host protection against virus infections and malignancies. Even though the critical role of NK cells in cancer immunosurveillance was suspected years ago, the underlying mechanisms took time to be unraveled. Today, it is clear that anti-tumor functions of NK cells are tightly regulated and expand far beyond the simple killing of malignant cells. In spite of tremendous steps made in understanding the NK cell biology, further work is warranted to fully exploit the anticancer potential of these cells. Indeed, tumor-mediated immune suppression hampers NK cell activity, thus complicating their stimulation for therapeutic purposes. Herein, we review the current knowledge of NK cell functions in anti-tumor immunity . We discuss NK cell activity in the cancer immunoediting process with particular emphasis on the elimination and escape phases.

  18. Autophagy and cancer cell metabolism.

    PubMed

    Lozy, Fred; Karantza, Vassiliki

    2012-06-01

    Autophagy is a catabolic process involving lysosomal turnover of proteins and organelles for maintenance of cellular homeostasis and mitigation of metabolic stress. Autophagy defects are linked to diseases, such as liver failure, neurodegeneration, inflammatory bowel disease, aging and cancer. The role of autophagy in tumorigenesis is complex and likely context-dependent. Human breast, ovarian and prostate cancers have allelic deletions of the essential autophagy regulator BECN1 and Becn1(+/-) and other autophagy-deficient transgenic mice are tumor-prone, whereas tumors with constitutive Ras activation, including human pancreatic cancers, upregulate basal autophagy and are commonly addicted to this pathway for survival and growth; furthermore, autophagy suppression by Fip200 deletion compromises PyMT-induced mammary tumorigenesis. The double-edged sword function of autophagy in cancer has been attributed to both cell- and non-cell-autonomous mechanisms, as autophagy defects promote cancer progression in association with oxidative and ER stress, DNA damage accumulation, genomic instability and persistence of inflammation, while functional autophagy enables cancer cell survival under stress and likely contributes to treatment resistance. In this review, we will focus on the intimate link between autophagy and cancer cell metabolism, a topic of growing interest in recent years, which has been recognized as highly clinically relevant and has become the focus of intense investigation in translational cancer research. Many tumor-associated conditions, including intermittent oxygen and nutrient deprivation, oxidative stress, fast growth and cell death suppression, modulate, in parallel and in interconnected ways, both cellular metabolism and autophagy to enable cancer cells to rapidly adapt to environmental stressors, maintain uncontrolled proliferation and evade the toxic effects of radiation and/or chemotherapy. Elucidating the interplay between autophagy and tumor cell

  19. Expression of Stromal Caveolin- 1 May Be a Predictor for Aggressive Behaviour of Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Eliyatkin, Nuket; Aktas, Safiye; Diniz, Gulden; Ozgur, Halil Hakan; Ekin, Zubeyde Yildirim; Kupelioglu, Ali

    2017-02-24

    Caveolin-1 (Cav-1) is well known as a principal scaffolding protein of caveolae which are specialized plasma membrane structures. The role of Cav-1 in tumorigenesis of breast cancers is relatively less studied. The aim of the present study is to describe the biological roles of Cav-1 in breast cancers considering its contrasting dual functions as an oncogene and as a tumor suppressor. This study included 71 females with breast cancer who had been histopathologically diagnosed in Private Gunes Pathology Laboratory between the years 2007, and 2012. The mean age is 52.48 ± 12.8 years. Patients were followed up for a mean period of 47.97 ± 20.48 months. We didn't determine Cav-1 positive tumor cells. In 36 cases (50.7%), there were stromal expressions of Cav-1. In the statistical analysis, there was a statistically significant correlation between Cav-1 expression and ER (p = 0.033), metastasis (p = 0.005), lymphatic invasion (p = 0.000), nodal metastasis (p = 0,003), perinodal invasion (p = 0.003), metastasis (p = 0.005) and survival (p = 0.009). We found that Cav-1 expression is associated with tumor size, histological grade, lymph node involvement. Accordingly, we have suggested that Cav-1 may be a predictive biomarker for breast cancer.

  20. BET Inhibition Induces Apoptosis in Aggressive B-Cell Lymphoma via Epigenetic Regulation of BCL-2 Family Members.

    PubMed

    Hogg, Simon J; Newbold, Andrea; Vervoort, Stephin J; Cluse, Leonie A; Martin, Benjamin P; Gregory, Gareth P; Lefebure, Marcus; Vidacs, Eva; Tothill, Richard W; Bradner, James E; Shortt, Jake; Johnstone, Ricky W

    2016-09-01

    Targeting BET bromodomain proteins using small molecules is an emerging anticancer strategy with clinical evaluation of at least six inhibitors now underway. Although MYC downregulation was initially proposed as a key mechanistic property of BET inhibitors, recent evidence suggests that additional antitumor activities are important. Using the Eμ-Myc model of B-cell lymphoma, we demonstrate that BET inhibition with JQ1 is a potent inducer of p53-independent apoptosis that occurs in the absence of effects on Myc gene expression. JQ1 skews the expression of proapoptotic (Bim) and antiapoptotic (BCL-2/BCL-xL) BCL-2 family members to directly engage the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. Consistent with this, Bim knockout or Bcl-2 overexpression inhibited apoptosis induction by JQ1. We identified lymphomas that were either intrinsically resistant to JQ1-mediated death or acquired resistance following in vivo exposure. Strikingly, in both instances BCL-2 was strongly upregulated and was concomitant with activation of RAS pathways. Eμ-Myc lymphomas engineered to express activated Nras upregulated BCL-2 and acquired a JQ1 resistance phenotype. These studies provide important information on mechanisms of apoptosis induction and resistance to BET-inhibition, while providing further rationale for the translation of BET inhibitors in aggressive B-cell lymphomas. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(9); 2030-41. ©2016 AACR.

  1. Unusually Aggressive Primary Testicular Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma with Post Therapy Extensive Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Goel, Shalini; Mohapatra, Ishani; Gajendra, Smeeta; Gupta, Sunil

    2016-01-01

    Primary Testicular Lymphoma (PTL) is a rare intermediate to high grade tumour, diffuse large cell being the most common type. Unlike nodal Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma (DLBCL), testicular DLBCL has a less aggressive course and better prognosis. Metastasis is uncommon in testicular DLBCL. Commonly involved sites are contralateral testes, Waldeyer’s ring, skin, lung, Central Nervous System (CNS) and prostate, however the kidneys, liver, bone marrow, pleura and bones are more rarely involved. We report a case of testicular DLBCL which has metastasized to skin and bone marrow with an aggressive clinical course in a year, in-spite of combined modality of therapy given to the patient. Bone marrow infiltration is common and well documented with nodal DLBCL, however there is no published literature for simultaneous bone marrow and skin infiltration in testicular DLBCL till date. Other large studies done in the west have shown that distinct metastasis is usually common but the median progression-free survival is usually in years. This case stresses on shorter period of progression after standard treatment protocol in this part of the world, thus highlighting the need for other extensive studies to define specific treatment protocol for testicular DLBCL. PMID:27630854

  2. Epigenetic silencing of miR-490-3p promotes development of an aggressive colorectal cancer phenotype through activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Kehong; Zhou, Xinying; Yu, Jinlong; Li, Qiang; Wang, Hui; Li, Mingyi; Shao, Ziyun; Zhang, Feifei; Luo, Yuhao; Shen, Zetao; Chen, Fei; Shi, Fujun; Cui, Chunhui; Zhao, Dachuan; Lin, Zhiqun; Zheng, Wei; Zou, Zhaowei; Huang, Zonghai; Zhao, Liang

    2016-06-28

    The Wnt/β-catenin pathway is known to contribute to colorectal cancer (CRC) progression, although little is known about the contribution of β-catenin on this process. We investigated the role of miR-490-3p, which was recently reported to suppress tumorigenesis through its effect on Wnt/β-catenin signaling. We found that hypermethylation of the miR-490-3p promoter down-regulates miR-490-3p expression in CRC tissue. Gain- and loss-of-function assays in vitro and in vivo reveal that miR-490-3p suppresses cancer cell proliferation by inducing apoptosis and inhibits cell invasiveness by repressing the initiation of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), a key mechanism in cancer cell invasiveness and metastasis. The frequently rearranged in advanced T-cell lymphomas (FRAT1) protein was identified as a direct target of miR-490-3p and contributes to its tumor-suppressing effects. miR-490-3p appears to have an inhibitory effect on β-catenin expression in nuclear fractions of CRC cells, whereas FRAT1 expression is associated with the accumulation of β-catenin in the nucleus of cells, which could be weakened by transfection with miR-490-3p. Our findings suggest that the miR-490-3p/FRAT1/β-catenin axis is important in CRC progression and provides new insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying CRC. They may help to confirm the pathway driving CRC aggressiveness and serve for the development of a novel miRNA-targeting anticancer therapy.

  3. Drugs Approved for Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer This page lists cancer drugs ... that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer Afinitor (Everolimus) Aldesleukin Avastin (Bevacizumab) ...

  4. Pharmacological induction of cell surface GRP78 contributes to apoptosis in triple negative breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Hardy, Britta

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer tumor with triple-negative receptors (estrogen, progesterone and Her 2, receptors) is the most aggressive and deadly subtype, with high rates of disease recurrence and poor survival. Here, we show that induction in cell surface GRP78 by doxorubicin and tunicamycin was associated with CHOP/GADD153 upregulation and increase in apoptosis in triple negative breast cancer tumor cells. GRP78 is a major regulator of the stress induced unfolded protein response pathway and CHOP/GADD153 is a pro-apoptotic transcription factor associated exclusively with stress induced apoptosis. The blocking of cell surface GRP78 by anti-GRP78 antibody prevented apoptosis, suggesting that induction of cell surface GRP78 by doxorubicin and tunicamycin is required for apoptosis. A better understanding of stress induction of apoptotic signaling in triple negative breast cancer cells may help to define new therapeutic strategies. PMID:25360516

  5. Diagnostic ability of %p2PSA and prostate health index for aggressive prostate cancer: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wenying; Wang, Meilin; Wang, Li; Adams, Tamara S.; Tian, Ye; Xu, Jianfeng

    2014-01-01

    The role of [-2]proPSA (p2PSA) based diagnostic tests for the detection of aggressive prostate cancer (PCa) has not been fully evaluated. We conducted a meta-analysis to evaluate the diagnostic performance of p2PSA/free PSA (%p2PSA) and prostate health index (Phi) tests for PCa and to evaluate their ability in discriminating between aggressive and non-aggressive PCa. A total of 16 articles were included in this meta-analysis. For the detection of PCa, the pooled sensitivity, specificity, and AUC were 0.86 (95% CI, 0.84–0.87), 0.40 (95% CI, 0.39–042) and 0.72 (95% CI, 0.67–0.77) for %p2PSA respectively, and were 0.85 (95% CI, 0.83–0.86), 0.45 (95% CI, 0.44–0.47) and 0.70 (95% CI = 0.65–0.74) for Phi, respectively. In addition, the sensitivity for discriminating PCa between higher Gleason score (≥7) and lower Gleason score (<7) was 0.96 (95% CI, 0.93–0.98) and 0.90 (95% CI, 0.87–0.92) for %p2PSA and Phi respectively, and the specificity was low, only 0.09 (95% CI, 0.06–0.12) and 0.17 (95% CI, 0.14–0.19) for %p2PSA and Phi, respectively. Phi and %p2PSA have a high diagnostic accuracy rates and can be used in PCa diagnosis. Phi and %p2PSA may be useful as tumor markers in predicating patients harboring more aggressive disease and guiding biopsy decisions. PMID:24852453

  6. Multifocal aggressive squamous cell carcinomas induced by prolonged voriconazole therapy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Morice, C; Acher, A; Soufir, N; Michel, M; Comoz, F; Leroy, D; Verneuil, L

    2010-01-01

    Voriconazole is a treatment for severe fungal infections. Prolonged voriconazole therapy may induce skin reactions, with 1% of severe photosensitivity accidents. Recently the imputability of voriconazole in skin carcinogenesis has been suggested. This report concerns a 55-year-old man suffering from pulmonary aspergillosis who presented a phototoxic reaction a few months after introduction of voriconazole, followed by multiple squamous cell carcinomas of sun-exposed skin areas. After voriconazole discontinuation, no new carcinoma was observed. The detection of EBV and HPV in skin lesions was negative. Exploration of gene mutations involved in skin carcinogenesis showed two variants of the MICR gene. The occurrence of multiple, recurrent, aggressive squamous cell carcinomas is rare with voriconazole, but its imputability is strongly suggested. A plausible hypothesis is that several factors including voriconazole uptake, immunosuppression, and genetic background could explain the phenotype of fast-developing skin carcinomas. Voriconazole therapy should be accompanied by stringent photoprotection and skin monitoring.

  7. Dissection of Ras-Dependent Signaling Pathways Controlling Aggressive Tumor Growth of Human Fibrosarcoma Cells: Evidence for a Potential Novel Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Swati; Plattner, Rina; Der, Channing J.; Stanbridge, Eric J.

    2000-01-01

    Activation of multiple signaling pathways is required to trigger the full spectrum of in vitro and in vivo phenotypic traits associated with neoplastic transformation by oncogenic Ras. To determine which of these pathways are important for N-ras tumorigenesis in human cancer cells and also to investigate the possibility of cross talk among the pathways, we have utilized a human fibrosarcoma cell line (HT1080), which contains an endogenous mutated allele of the N-ras gene, and its derivative (MCH603c8), which lacks the mutant N-ras allele. We have stably transfected MCH603c8 and HT1080 cells with activating or dominant-negative mutant cDNAs, respectively, of various components of the Raf, Rac, and RhoA pathways. In previous studies with these cell lines we showed that loss of mutant Ras function results in dramatic changes in the in vitro phenotypic traits and conversion to a weakly tumorigenic phenotype in vivo. We report here that only overexpression of activated MEK contributed significantly to the conversion of MCH603c8 cells to an aggressive tumorigenic phenotype. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that blocking the constitutive activation of the Raf-MEK, Rac, or RhoA pathway alone is not sufficient to block the aggressive tumorigenic phenotype of HT1080, despite affecting a number of in vitro-transformed phenotypic traits. We have also demonstrated the possibility of bidirectional cross talk between the Raf-MEK-ERK pathway and the Rac-JNK or RhoA pathway. Finally, overexpression of activated MEK in MCH603c8 cells appears to result in the activation of an as-yet-unidentified target(s) that is critical for the aggressive tumorigenic phenotype. PMID:11094080

  8. A novel spontaneous model of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) using a primary prostate cancer derived cell line demonstrating distinct stem-like characteristics.

    PubMed

    Harner-Foreman, Naomi; Vadakekolathu, Jayakumar; Laversin, Stéphanie A; Mathieu, Morgan G; Reeder, Stephen; Pockley, A Graham; Rees, Robert C; Boocock, David J

    2017-01-17

    Cells acquire the invasive and migratory properties necessary for the invasion-metastasis cascade and the establishment of aggressive, metastatic disease by reactivating a latent embryonic programme: epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Herein, we report the development of a new, spontaneous model of EMT which involves four phenotypically distinct clones derived from a primary tumour-derived human prostate cancer cell line (OPCT-1), and its use to explore relationships between EMT and the generation of cancer stem cells (CSCs) in prostate cancer. Expression of epithelial (E-cadherin) and mesenchymal markers (vimentin, fibronectin) revealed that two of the four clones were incapable of spontaneously activating EMT, whereas the others contained large populations of EMT-derived, vimentin-positive cells having spindle-like morphology. One of the two EMT-positive clones exhibited aggressive and stem cell-like characteristics, whereas the other was non-aggressive and showed no stem cell phenotype. One of the two EMT-negative clones exhibited aggressive stem cell-like properties, whereas the other was the least aggressive of all clones. These findings demonstrate the existence of distinct, aggressive CSC-like populations in prostate cancer, but, importantly, that not all cells having a potential for EMT exhibit stem cell-like properties. This unique model can be used to further interrogate the biology of EMT in prostate cancer.

  9. A novel spontaneous model of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) using a primary prostate cancer derived cell line demonstrating distinct stem-like characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Harner-Foreman, Naomi; Vadakekolathu, Jayakumar; Laversin, Stéphanie A.; Mathieu, Morgan G.; Reeder, Stephen; Pockley, A. Graham; Rees, Robert C.; Boocock, David J.

    2017-01-01

    Cells acquire the invasive and migratory properties necessary for the invasion-metastasis cascade and the establishment of aggressive, metastatic disease by reactivating a latent embryonic programme: epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Herein, we report the development of a new, spontaneous model of EMT which involves four phenotypically distinct clones derived from a primary tumour-derived human prostate cancer cell line (OPCT-1), and its use to explore relationships between EMT and the generation of cancer stem cells (CSCs) in prostate cancer. Expression of epithelial (E-cadherin) and mesenchymal markers (vimentin, fibronectin) revealed that two of the four clones were incapable of spontaneously activating EMT, whereas the others contained large populations of EMT-derived, vimentin-positive cells having spindle-like morphology. One of the two EMT-positive clones exhibited aggressive and stem cell-like characteristics, whereas the other was non-aggressive and showed no stem cell phenotype. One of the two EMT-negative clones exhibited aggressive stem cell-like properties, whereas the other was the least aggressive of all clones. These findings demonstrate the existence of distinct, aggressive CSC-like populations in prostate cancer, but, importantly, that not all cells having a potential for EMT exhibit stem cell-like properties. This unique model can be used to further interrogate the biology of EMT in prostate cancer. PMID:28094783

  10. NOTCH2 signaling confers immature morphology and aggressiveness in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Yoshihiro; Osanai, Makoto; Lee, Gang-Hong

    2015-10-01

    The NOTCH family of membranous receptors plays key roles during development and carcinogenesis. Since NOTCH2, yet not NOTCH1 has been shown essential for murine hepatogenesis, NOTCH2 rather than NOTCH1 may be more relevant to human hepatocarcinogenesis; however, no previous studies have supported this hypothesis. We therefore assessed the role of NOTCH2 in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) by immunohistochemistry and cell culture. Immunohistochemically, 19% of primary HCCs showed nuclear staining for NOTCH2, indicating activated NOTCH2 signaling. NOTCH2-positive HCCs were on average in more advanced clinical stages, and exhibited more immature cellular morphology, i.e. higher nuclear-cytoplasmic ratios and nuclear densities. Such features were not evident in NOTCH1‑positive HCCs. In human HCC cell lines, abundant NOTCH2 expression was associated with anaplasia, represented by loss of E-cadherin. When NOTCH2 signaling was stably downregulated in HLF cells, an anaplastic HCC cell line, the cells were attenuated in potential for in vitro invasiveness and migration, as well as in vivo tumorigenicity accompanied by histological maturation. Generally, inverse results were obtained for a differentiated HCC cell line, Huh7, manipulated to overexpress activated NOTCH2. These findings suggested that the NOTCH2 signaling may confer aggressive behavior and immature morphology in human HCC cells.

  11. A novel mechanism of methylglyoxal cytotoxicity in prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Antognelli, Cinzia; Mezzasoma, Letizia; Fettucciari, Katia; Talesa, Vincenzo Nicola

    2013-04-01

    Methylglyoxal is one of the most powerful glycating agents of proteins and other important cellular components and has been shown to be toxic to cultured cells. Methylglyoxal cytotoxicity appears to occur through cell-cycle arrest but, more often, through induction of apoptosis. In this study we examined whether, and through which molecular mechanism, methylglyoxal affects the growth of poorly aggressive LNCaP and invasive PC3 human prostate cancer cells, where its role has not been exhaustively investigated yet. We demonstrated that methylglyoxal is cytotoxic on LNCaP and PC3 and that such cytotoxicity occurs not via cell proliferation but apoptosis control. Moreover, we demonstrated that methylglyoxal cytotoxicity, potentiated by the silencing of its major scavenging enzyme Glyoxalase I, occurred via different apoptotic responses in LNCaP and PC3 cells that also showed a different susceptibility to this metabolite. Finally, we showed that the observed methylglyoxal apoptogenic role involved different molecular pathways, specifically mediated by methylglyoxal or methylglyoxal-derived argpyrimidine intracellular accumulation and NF-kB signaling-pathway. In particular, in LNCaP cells, methylglyoxal, through the accumulation of argpyrimidine, desensitized the key cell survival NF-kB signaling pathway, which was consistent with the modulation of NF-kB-regulated genes, triggering a mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. The results suggest that this physiological compound merits investigation as a potential chemo-preventive/-therapeutic agent, in differently aggressive prostate cancers.

  12. Killing Breast Cancer Cells With a VEGF-Triggered Cell Death Receptor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-04-01

    patients. We are pursuing a totally different approach to targeting VEGF: rather than inhibit VEGF our goal is to convert VEGF to act as a cell death factor...cell lines in vitro. These studies suggest that a receptor such as R2Fas which converts VEGF to act as a cell death factor could yield a new and more aggressive approach to targeting overexpressed VEGF in breast cancer....Toward this aim we created a chimeric receptor (R2Fas) composed of domains from VEGF receptor 2 fused to the intracellular domain of the Fas cell

  13. Vitamin D Receptor Signaling and Pancreatic Cancer Cell EMT

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhiwei; Guo, Junli; Xie, Keping; Zheng, Shaojiang

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma remains one of the most lethal of human malignancies. Even in patients who undergo resection, long-term survival rates remain extremely low. A major contributor to the aggressiveness of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), a physiologic process of morphological and genetic changes in carcinoma cells from an epithelial phenotype to a mesenchymal phenotype, which is the basis of the high metastatic potential of pancreatic cancer cells. EMT is triggered by various tumor microenvironmental factors, including cytokines, growth factors, and chemotherapeutic agents. This review highlights the growing evidence of the effect of EMT on pancreatic cancer progression, focusing on the interaction of EMT with other pathways central to cancer progression, especially vitamin D receptor signaling. Studies of the signaling pathways that lead to the inactivation of EMT programs during these disease processes are providing new insights into the plasticity of cellular phenotypes and possible therapeutic interventions. PMID:25506892

  14. Wide excision and ulno-carpal arthrodesis for primary aggressive and recurrent giant cell tumours

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, M.; Jandhyala, R.; Sharma, H.; Amin, P.; Pandit, J. P.

    2007-01-01

    Twenty-five patients underwent wide resection of the distal radial giant cell tumours (GCTs) followed by ulno-carpal arthrodesis. There were 15 male and ten female patients, with an average age of 21.5 years. Tumours included ten primary aggressive and 15 recurrent GCTs. Mean follow up was 2.4 years. Pain, swelling and reduced range of movement (ROM) were noted. Average time to fusion was 7.6 months. Five patients had persistent pain in the proximal forearm. Grip strength was 65% compared to the uninvolved side. Two patients had superficial wound infection, two underwent additional bone grafting and three implant removals due to hardware prominence were carried out. There was no evidence of carpal instability or arthritis on clinical or radiological examination at the time of final follow up. Fusion of the carpus to the ulna is a simple method of producing a painless stable wrist, though at the expense of mobility. The procedure allows wide resection with a lower rate of recurrence. Pain in the proximal forearm seems to persist for 3 to 4 months only to improve at subsequent follow up. The procedure provides a valid option for the management of primary aggressive and recurrent GCTs of distal radius. PMID:17643243

  15. Targeting breast cancer stem cells with HER2-specific antibodies and natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Diessner, Joachim; Bruttel, Valentin; Becker, Kathrin; Pawlik, Miriam; Stein, Roland; Häusler, Sebastian; Dietl, Johannes; Wischhusen, Jörg; Hönig, Arnd

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women worldwide. Every year, nearly 1.4 million new cases of breast cancer are diagnosed, and about 450.000 women die of the disease. Approximately 15-25% of breast cancer cases exhibit increased quantities of the trans-membrane receptor tyrosine kinase human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) on the tumor cell surface. Previous studies showed that blockade of this HER2 proto-oncogene with the antibody trastuzumab substantially improved the overall survival of patients with this aggressive type of breast cancer. Recruitment of natural killer (NK) cells and subsequent induction of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) contributed to this beneficial effect. We hypothesized that antibody binding to HER2-positive breast cancer cells and thus ADCC might be further improved by synergistically applying two different HER2-specific antibodies, trastuzumab and pertuzumab. We found that tumor cell killing via ADCC was increased when the combination of trastuzumab, pertuzumab, and NK cells was applied to HER2-positive breast cancer cells, as compared to the extent of ADCC induced by a single antibody. Furthermore, a subset of CD44(high)CD24(low)HER2(low) cells, which possessed characteristics of cancer stem cells, could be targeted more efficiently by the combination of two HER2-specific antibodies compared to the efficiency of one antibody. These in vitro results demonstrated the immunotherapeutic benefit achieved by the combined application of trastuzumab and pertuzumab. These findings are consistent with the positive results of the clinical studies, CLEOPATRA and NEOSPHERE, conducted with patients that had HER2-positive breast cancer. Compared to a single antibody treatment, the combined application of trastuzumab and pertuzumab showed a stronger ADCC effect and improved the targeting of breast cancer stem cells.

  16. Anti-Cancer Phytometabolites Targeting Cancer Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Torquato, Heron F V; Goettert, Márcia I; Justo, Giselle Z; Paredes-Gamero, Edgar J

    2017-04-01

    Medicinal plants are a plentiful source of bioactive molecules with much structural diversity. In cancer treatment, molecules obtained from plants represent an attractive alternative to other treatments because several plant-derived compounds have exhibited lower toxicity and higher selectivity against cancer cells. In this review, we focus on the possible application of bioactive molecules obtained from plants against more primitive cell populations in cancers, cancer stem cells. Cancer stem cells are present in several kinds of tumors and are responsible for recurrences and metastases. Common anti-cancer drugs exhibit lower effectiveness against cancer stem cells because of their biological features. However, recently discovered natural phytometabolites exert cytotoxic effects on this rare population of cells in cancers. Therefore, this review presents the latest research on promising compounds from plants that can act as antitumor drugs and that mainly affect stem cell populations in cancers.

  17. Isolation of rare cancer cells from blood cells using dielectrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Salmanzadeh, Alireza; Sano, Michael B; Shafiee, Hadi; Stremler, Mark A; Davalos, Rafael V

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we investigate the application of contactless dielectrophoresis (cDEP) for isolating cancer cells from blood cells. Devices with throughput of 0.2 mL/hr (equivalent to sorting 3×10(6) cells per minute) were used to trap breast cancer cells while allowing blood cells through. We have shown that this technique is able to isolate cancer cells in concentration as low as 1 cancer cell per 10(6) hematologic cells (equivalent to 1000 cancer cells in 1 mL of blood). We achieved 96% trapping of the cancer cells at 600 kHz and 300 V(RMS).

  18. Inhibition of 4EBP phosphorylation mediates the cytotoxic effect of mechanistic target of rapamycin kinase inhibitors in aggressive B-cell lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Bi, Chengfeng; Zhang, Xuan; Lu, Ting; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Wang, Xianhuo; Meng, Bin; Zhang, Huilai; Wang, Ping; Vose, Julie M; Chan, Wing C; McKeithan, Timothy W; Fu, Kai

    2017-04-01

    Mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) complex 1 is a central integrator of nutrient and growth factor inputs that controls cell growth in eukaryotes. The second generation of mTOR kinase inhibitors (TORKi), directly targeting the mTOR catalytic site, are more effective than rapamycin and its analogs in cancer treatment, particularly in inducing apoptosis. However, the mechanism underlying the cytotoxic effect of TORKi remains elusive. Herein, we demonstrate that TORKi-induced apoptosis is predominantly dependent on the loss of mTOR complex 1-mediated 4EBP activation. Knocking out RICTOR, a key component of mTOR complex 2, or inhibiting p70S6K has little effect on TORKi-induced apoptosis. Conversely, increasing the eIF4E:4EBP ratio by either overexpressing eIF4E or knocking out 4EBP1/2 protects lymphoma cells from TORKi-induced cytotoxicity. Furthermore, downregulation of MCL1 expression plays an important role in TORKi-induced apoptosis, whereas BCL-2 overexpression confers resistance to TORKi treatment. We further show that the therapeutic effect of TORKi in aggressive B-cell lymphomas can be predicted by BH3 profiling, and improved by combining it with pro-apoptotic drugs, especially BCL-2 inhibitors, both in vitro and in vivo Taken together, the study herein provides mechanistic insight into TORKi cytotoxicity and identified a potential way to optimize its efficacy in the clinical treatment of aggressive B-cell lymphoma.

  19. Mechanistic Insights into Molecular Targeting and Combined Modality Therapy for Aggressive, Localized Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dal Pra, Alan; Locke, Jennifer A.; Borst, Gerben; Supiot, Stephane; Bristow, Robert G.

    2016-01-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) is one of the mainstay treatments for prostate cancer (PCa). The potentially curative approaches can provide satisfactory results for many patients with non-metastatic PCa; however, a considerable number of individuals may present disease recurrence and die from the disease. Exploiting the rich molecular biology of PCa will provide insights into how the most resistant tumor cells can be eradicated to improve treatment outcomes. Important for this biology-driven individualized treatment is a robust selection procedure. The development of predictive biomarkers for RT efficacy is therefore of utmost importance for a clinically exploitable strategy to achieve tumor-specific radiosensitization. This review highlights the current status and possible opportunities in the modulation of four key processes to enhance radiation response in PCa by targeting the: (1) androgen signaling pathway; (2) hypoxic tumor cells and regions; (3) DNA damage response (DDR) pathway; and (4) abnormal extra-/intracell signaling pathways. In addition, we discuss how and which patients should be selected for biomarker-based clinical trials exploiting and validating these targeted treatment strategies with precision RT to improve cure rates in non-indolent, localized PCa. PMID:26909338

  20. 4-Acetylantroquinonol B suppresses autophagic flux and improves cisplatin sensitivity in highly aggressive epithelial cancer through the PI3K/Akt/mTOR/p70S6K signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mingche; Bamodu, Oluwaseun Adebayo; Huang, Wen-Chien; Zucha, Muhammad Ary; Lin, Yen-Kuang; Wu, Alexander T H; Huang, Chun-Chih; Lee, Wei-Hwa; Yuan, Chiou-Chung; Hsiao, M; Deng, Li; Tzeng, Yew-Min; Yeh, Chi-Tai

    2017-04-10

    Targeting residual self-renewing, chemoresistant cancerous cells may represent the key to overcoming therapy resistance. The entry of these quiescent cells into an activated state is associated with high metabolic demand and autophagic flux. Therefore, modulating the autophagy pathway in aggressive carcinomas may be beneficial as a therapeutic modality. In this study, we evaluated the anti-tumor activities of 4-acetylantroquinonol B (4-AAQB) in chemoresistant ovarian cancer cells, particularly its ability to modulate autophagy through autophagy-related genes (Atg). Atg-5 was overexpressed in invasive ovarian cancer cell lines and tissue (OR: 5.133; P=0.027) and depleting Atg-5 in ES-2 cell lines significantly induced apoptosis. 4-AAQB effectively suppressed viability of various subtypes of ovarian cancer. Cells with higher cisplatin-resistance were more responsive to 4-AAQB. For the first time, we demonstrate that 4-AAQB significantly suppress Atg-5 and Atg-7 expression with decreased autophagic flux in ovarian cancer cells via inhibition of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR/p70S6K signaling pathway. Similar to Atg-5 silencing, 4-AAQB-induced autophagy inhibition significantly enhanced cell death in vitro. These results are comparable to those of hydroxychloroquine (HCQ). In addition, 4-AAQB/cisplatin synergistically induced apoptosis in ovarian cancer cells. In vivo, 4-AAQB/cisplatin also significantly induced apoptosis and autophagy in an ES-2 mouse xenografts model. This is the first report demonstrating the efficacy of 4-AAQB alone or in combination with cisplatin on the suppression of ovarian cancer via Atg-5-dependent autophagy. We believe these findings will be beneficial in the development of a novel anti-ovarian cancer therapeutic strategy.

  1. Primary Pure Keratinising Squamous Cell Carcinoma: A Rare Malignancy with Aggressive Behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Pant, Leela; Garg, Malini; Singh, Garima; Singh, Sompal

    2016-01-01

    Primary well differentiated keratinising Squamous Cell Carcinoma (SCC) is a rare gall bladder malignancy accounting for 3.3% of all gall bladder carcinomas. Here we present a case of a 70-year-old female with complaints of dyspepsia and right upper quadrant pain for 3 months. Ultrasonography showed gall stones along with thickened and irregular gall bladder wall. Grossly an exophytic growth was noted involving large part of the body of gall bladder. Histological features were of well differentiated SCC with extensive keratinisation involving full thickness of the wall. No glandular component was seen. Metastasis from other primary was ruled out after thorough work-up. SCC of gall bladder has an infiltrative growth pattern and behaves aggressively. Early diagnosis plays the most important role in increasing the survival. PMID:27790451

  2. Phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate in the Golgi apparatus regulates cell-cell adhesion and invasive cell migration in human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Tokuda, Emi; Itoh, Toshiki; Hasegawa, Junya; Ijuin, Takeshi; Takeuchi, Yukiko; Irino, Yasuhiro; Fukumoto, Miki; Takenawa, Tadaomi

    2014-06-01

    Downregulation of cell-cell adhesion and upregulation of cell migration play critical roles in the conversion of benign tumors to aggressive invasive cancers. In this study, we show that changes in cell-cell adhesion and cancer cell migration/invasion capacity depend on the level of phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate [PI(4)P] in the Golgi apparatus in breast cancer cells. Attenuating SAC1, a PI(4)P phosphatase localized in the Golgi apparatus, resulted in decreased cell-cell adhesion and increased cell migration in weakly invasive cells. In contrast, silencing phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase IIIβ, which generates PI(4)P in the Golgi apparatus, increased cell-cell adhesion and decreased invasion in highly invasive cells. Furthermore, a PI(4)P effector, Golgi phosphoprotein 3, was found to be involved in the generation of these phenotypes in a manner that depends on its PI(4)P-binding ability. Our results provide a new model for breast cancer cell progression in which progression is controlled by PI(4)P levels in the Golgi apparatus.

  3. Giant cell tumor of the bone: aggressive case initially treated with denosumab and intralesional surgery.

    PubMed

    von Borstel, Donald; A Taguibao, Roberto; A Strle, Nicholas; E Burns, Joseph

    2017-04-01

    Giant cell tumor of the bone (GCTB) is a locally aggressive benign tumor, which has historically been treated with wide surgical excision. We report a case of a 29-year-old male with histology-proven GCTB of the distal ulna. The initial imaging study was a contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination of the left wrist, which was from an outside facility performed before presenting to our institution. On the initial MRI, the lesion had homogenous T2-hyperintense and T1-hypointense signal with expansive remodeling of the osseous contour. A radiographic study performed upon presentation to our institution 1 month later showed progression of the lesion with atypical imaging characteristics. After confirming the diagnosis, denosumab therapy was implemented allowing for reconstitution of bone and intralesional treatment. The patient was treated with five doses of denosumab over the duration of 7 weeks. Therapeutic changes of the GCTB were evaluated by radiography and a post-treatment MRI. This MRI was interpreted as suspicious for worsening disease due to the imaging appearance of intralesional signal heterogeneity, increased perilesional fluid-like signal, and circumferential cortical irregularity. However, on subsequent intralesional curettage and bone autografting 6 weeks later, no giant cells were seen on the specimen. Thus, the appearance on the MRI, rather than representing a manifestation of lesion aggressiveness or a non-responding tumor, conversely represented the imaging appearance of a positive response to denosumab therapy. On follow-up evaluation, 5 months after intralesional treatment, the patient had recurrent disease and is now scheduled for wide-excision with joint prosthesis.

  4. Targeting aberrant expression of Notch-1 in ALDH(+) cancer stem cells in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Pal, Deeksha; Kolluru, Venkatesh; Chandrasekaran, Balaji; Baby, Becca V; Aman, Masarath; Suman, Suman; Sirimulla, Suman; Sanders, Mary Ann; Alatassi, Houda; Ankem, Murali K; Damodaran, Chendil

    2017-03-01

    We have previously reported that high aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) enzyme activity in breast cancer cells results in breast cancer stem cell (BCSC) properties by upregualting Notch-1 and epithelial mesenchymal markers. This results in chemoresistance in breast cancer. Here, we examined the functional and clinical significance of ALDH expression by measuring the ALDH levels in breast cancer tissues by immunohistochemistry. There was a significantly higher ALDH expression in higher grade breast cancer tumor tissues (Grade- II and III) versus normal breast tissues. Injection of BCSC (ALDH(+) and CD44(+) /CD22(-) ) cells resulted in aggressive tumor growth in athymic mice versus ALDH(-) cells. The ALDH(+) and CD44(+) /CD22(-) tumors grow rapidly and are larger than ALDH(-) tumors which were slow growing and smaller. Molecularly, ALDH(+) tumors expressed higher expression of Notch-1 and EMT markers than ALDH(-) tumors. Oral administration of the naturally occurring Psoralidin (Pso, 25 mg/kg of body weight) significantly inhibited the growth in ALDH(+) and ALDH(-) tumors as well. Psoralidin inhibited Notch-1 mediated EMT activation in ALDH(+) and ALDH(-) tumors-this confirms our in vitro findings. Our results suggest that Notch-1 could be an attractive target and inhibition of Notch-1 by Psoralidin may prevent pathogenesis of breast cancer as well as metastasis. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Genetic Variations in SLCO Transporter Genes Contributing to Racial Disparity in Aggressiveness of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0453 TITLE: Genetic Variations in SLCO Transporter Genes Contributing to Racial Disparity in Aggressiveness of...COVERED 15 Sep 2014 - 14 Sep 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Genetic Variations in SLCO Transporter Genes Contributing to Racial Disparity in...proposed studies are expected to (1) identify genetic variations in the genes of androgen transporters that are associated with the racial differences in

  6. Berberine inhibits cell growth and mediates caspase-independent cell death in human pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Pinto-Garcia, Lina; Efferth, Thomas; Torres, Amada; Hoheisel, Jörg D; Youns, Mahmoud

    2010-08-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most aggressive human malignancies with an increasing incidence worldwide. In addition to the poor survival rates, combinations using gemcitabine as a backbone have failed to show any benefit beyond monotherapy. These facts underscore an urgent need for novel therapeutic options and motivated us to study the effect of berberine on pancreatic cancer cells. Here, we undertook an mRNA-based gene expression profiling study in order to get deeper insight into the molecular targets mediating the growth inhibitory effects of berberine on pancreatic cancer cells compared to normal ones. Twenty-four hours after treatment, berberine showed preferential selectivity toward pancreatic cancer cells compared to normal ones. Moreover, expression profiling and Ingenuity pathway analysis results showed that the cytotoxicity of berberine was accompanied with an activation of BRCA1-mediated DNA damage response, G1/S and G2/M cell cycle checkpoint regulation, and P53 signalling pathways. The activation of these signalling pathways might be explained by the fact that berberine intercalates DNA and induces DNA strand break through inhibition of topoisomerases and induction of DNA lesions.

  7. Reducing bone cancer cell functions using selenium nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Stolzoff, Michelle; Webster, Thomas J

    2016-02-01

    Cancer recurrence at the site of tumor resection remains a major threat to patient survival despite modern cancer therapeutic advances. Osteosarcoma, in particular, is a very aggressive primary bone cancer that commonly recurs after surgical resection, radiation, and chemotherapeutic treatment. The objective of the present in vitro study was to develop a material that could decrease bone cancer cell recurrence while promoting healthy bone cell functions. Selenium is a natural part of our diet which has shown promise for reducing cancer cell functions, inhibiting bacteria, and promoting healthy cells functions, yet, it has not been widely explored for osteosarcoma applications. For this purpose, due to their increased surface area, selenium nanoparticles (SeNP) were precipitated on a very common orthopedic tissue engineering material, poly-l-lactic acid (or PLLA). Selenium-coated PLLA materials were shown to selectively decrease long-term osteosarcoma cell density while promoting healthy, noncancerous, osteoblast functions (for example, up to two times more alkaline phosphatase activity on selenium coated compared to osteoblasts grown on typical tissue culture plates), suggesting they should be further studied for replacing tumorous bone tissue with healthy bone tissue. Importantly, results of this study were achieved without the use of chemotherapeutics or pharmaceutical agents, which have negative side effects.

  8. High glucose levels boost the aggressiveness of highly metastatic cholangiocarcinoma cells via O-GlcNAcylation

    PubMed Central

    Phoomak, Chatchai; Vaeteewoottacharn, Kulthida; Silsirivanit, Atit; Saengboonmee, Charupong; Seubwai, Wunchana; Sawanyawisuth, Kanlayanee; Wongkham, Chaisiri; Wongkham, Sopit

    2017-01-01

    Increased glucose utilization is a feature of cancer cells to support cell survival, proliferation, and metastasis. An association between diabetes mellitus and cancer progression was previously demonstrated in cancers including cholangiocarcinoma (CCA). This study was aimed to determine the effects of high glucose on protein O-GlcNAcylation and metastatic potentials of CCA cells. Two pairs each of the parental low metastatic and highly metastatic CCA sublines were cultured in normal (5.6 mM) or high (25 mM) glucose media. The migration and invasion abilities were determined and underlying mechanisms were explored. Results revealed that high glucose promoted migration and invasion of CCA cells that were more pronounced in the highly metastatic sublines. Concomitantly, high glucose increased global O-GlcNAcylated proteins, the expressions of vimentin, hexokinase, glucosamine-fructose-6-phosphate amidotransferase (GFAT) and O-GlcNAc transferase of CCA cells. The glucose level that promoted migration/invasion was shown to be potentiated by the induction of GFAT, O-GlcNAcylation and an increase of O-GlcNAcylated vimentin and vimentin expression. Treatment with a GFAT inhibitor reduced global O-GlcNAcylated proteins, vimentin expression, and alleviated cell migration. Altogether, these results suggested the role of high glucose enhanced CCA metastasis via modulation of O-GlcNAcylation, through the expressions of GFAT and vimentin. PMID:28262738

  9. AT9283, a novel aurora kinase inhibitor, suppresses tumor growth in aggressive B-cell lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Qi, Wenqing; Liu, Xiaobing; Cooke, Laurence S; Persky, Daniel O; Miller, Thomas P; Squires, Matthew; Mahadevan, Daruka

    2012-06-15

    Aurora kinases are oncogenic serine/threonine kinases that play key roles in regulating the mitotic phase of the eukaryotic cell cycle. Auroras are overexpressed in numerous tumors including B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphomas and are validated oncology targets. AT9283, a pan-aurora inhibitor inhibited growth and survival of multiple solid tumors in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we demonstrated that AT9283 had potent activity against Aurora B in a variety of aggressive B-(non-Hodgkin lymphoma) B-NHL cell lines. Cells treated with AT9283 exhibited endoreduplication confirming the mechanism of action of an Aurora B inhibitor. Also, treatment of B-NHL cell lines with AT9283 induced apoptosis in a dose and time dependent manner and inhibited cell proliferation with an IC(50) < 1 μM. It is well known that inhibition of auroras (A or B) synergistically enhances the effects of microtubule targeting agents such as taxanes and vinca alkaloids to induce antiproliferation and apoptosis. We evaluated whether AT9283 in combination with docetaxel is more efficient in inducing apoptosis than AT9283 or docetaxel alone. At very low doses (5 nM) apoptosis was doubled in the combination (23%) compared to AT9283 or docetaxel alone (10%). A mouse xenograft model of mantle cell lymphoma demonstrated that AT9283 at 15 mg/kg and docetaxel (10 mg/kg) alone had modest anti-tumor activity. However, AT9283 at 20 mg/kg and AT9283 (15 or 20 mg/kg) plus docetaxel (10 mg/kg) demonstrated a statistically significant tumor growth inhibition and enhanced survival. Together, our results suggest that AT9283 plus docetaxel may represent a novel therapeutic strategy in B-cell NHL and warrant early phase clinical trial evaluation.

  10. Loss of SETD2, but not H3K36me3, correlates with aggressive clinicopathological features of clear cell renal cell carcinoma patients.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lei; Guo, Renbo; Zhang, Xiang; Liang, Yiran; Kong, Feng; Wang, Jue; Xu, Zhonghua

    2017-03-06

    Recent studies facilitated by DNA sequencing identified the histone modifying gene SETD2 as the second most frequent mutant gene in sporadic clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) patients. SETD2 functions as a tumor suppressor in ccRCC. However, its clinical association and biological functions are not fully delineated. The aim of this study is to evaluate the clinical significance of SETD2 in ccRCC patients. SETD2 and its canonical histone modification product H3K36me3 were analyzed by immunohistochemistry (IHC) in 155 ccRCC patients from two independent cohorts retrospectively. Both SETD2 and H3K36me3 were heterogeneously stained and down-regulated in ccRCC tissues, compared with normal controls. The SETD2 protein deficiency rate was 34.07%, which is much higher than the reported SETD2 gene inactive mutation rate. Furthermore, low SETD2 protein expression, but not H3K36me3 expression, was associated with the aggressive phenotype of ccRCC patients. In addition, cox multivariate analysis identified low SETD2 protein expression as an independent prognostic factor for overall survival of ccRCC patients. Consistently, using RNA-Seq data of ccRCC patients from The Cancer Genome Atlas, we validated our findings that low SETD2 mRNA expression is significantly associated with the aggressive phenotypes, and predicted a worse outcome for ccRCC patients. In conclusion, our study demonstrated a massive down-regulation of SETD2 protein in ccRCC, and identified SETD2 protein, but not H3K36me3, as an independent good prognostic marker, which warrants further study focusing on the non-methyltransferase role of SETD2 in kidney tumor biology.

  11. Kidney cancer progression linked to shifts in tumor metabolism

    Cancer.gov

    Investigators in The Cancer Genome Atlas Research Network have uncovered a connection between how tumor cells use energy from metabolic processes and the aggressiveness of the most common form of kidney cancer, clear cell renal cell carcinoma.

  12. Basal cell skin cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... occur on skin that is regularly exposed to sunlight or other ultraviolet radiation. This type of skin ... skin cancer is to reduce your exposure to sunlight . Always use sunscreen: Apply sunscreen with sun protection ...

  13. Squamous cell skin cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... occur on skin that is regularly exposed to sunlight or other ultraviolet radiation. The earliest form of ... skin cancer is to reduce your exposure to sunlight . Always use sunscreen: Apply sunscreen with sun protection ...

  14. Schwann cells induce cancer cell dispersion and invasion.

    PubMed

    Deborde, Sylvie; Omelchenko, Tatiana; Lyubchik, Anna; Zhou, Yi; He, Shizhi; McNamara, William F; Chernichenko, Natalya; Lee, Sei-Young; Barajas, Fernando; Chen, Chun-Hao; Bakst, Richard L; Vakiani, Efsevia; He, Shuangba; Hall, Alan; Wong, Richard J

    2016-04-01

    Nerves enable cancer progression, as cancers have been shown to extend along nerves through the process of perineural invasion, which carries a poor prognosis. Furthermore, the innervation of some cancers promotes growth and metastases. It remains unclear, however, how nerves mechanistically contribute to cancer progression. Here, we demonstrated that Schwann cells promote cancer invasion through direct cancer cell contact. Histological evaluation of murine and human cancer specimens with perineural invasion uncovered a subpopulation of Schwann cells that associates with cancer cells. Coculture of cancer cells with dorsal root ganglion extracts revealed that Schwann cells direct cancer cells to migrate toward nerves and promote invasion in a contact-dependent manner. Upon contact, Schwann cells induced the formation of cancer cell protrusions in their direction and intercalated between the cancer cells, leading to cancer cell dispersion. The formation of these processes was dependent on Schwann cell expression of neural cell adhesion molecule 1 (NCAM1) and ultimately promoted perineural invasion. Moreover, NCAM1-deficient mice showed decreased neural invasion and less paralysis. Such Schwann cell behavior reflects normal Schwann cell programs that are typically activated in nerve repair but are instead exploited by cancer cells to promote perineural invasion and cancer progression.

  15. Schwann cells induce cancer cell dispersion and invasion

    PubMed Central

    Deborde, Sylvie; Lyubchik, Anna; Zhou, Yi; He, Shizhi; McNamara, William F.; Chernichenko, Natalya; Lee, Sei-Young; Barajas, Fernando; Chen, Chun-Hao; Bakst, Richard L.; Vakiani, Efsevia; He, Shuangba; Hall, Alan; Wong, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Nerves enable cancer progression, as cancers have been shown to extend along nerves through the process of perineural invasion, which carries a poor prognosis. Furthermore, the innervation of some cancers promotes growth and metastases. It remains unclear, however, how nerves mechanistically contribute to cancer progression. Here, we demonstrated that Schwann cells promote cancer invasion through direct cancer cell contact. Histological evaluation of murine and human cancer specimens with perineural invasion uncovered a subpopulation of Schwann cells that associates with cancer cells. Coculture of cancer cells with dorsal root ganglion extracts revealed that Schwann cells direct cancer cells to migrate toward nerves and promote invasion in a contact-dependent manner. Upon contact, Schwann cells induced the formation of cancer cell protrusions in their direction and intercalated between the cancer cells, leading to cancer cell dispersion. The formation of these processes was dependent on Schwann cell expression of neural cell adhesion molecule 1 (NCAM1) and ultimately promoted perineural invasion. Moreover, NCAM1-deficient mice showed decreased neural invasion and less paralysis. Such Schwann cell behavior reflects normal Schwann cell programs that are typically activated in nerve repair but are instead exploited by cancer cells to promote perineural invasion and cancer progression. PMID:26999607

  16. NF-kappaB Is Involved in the Regulation of EMT Genes in Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Pires, Bruno R B; Mencalha, Andre L; Ferreira, Gerson M; de Souza, Waldemir F; Morgado-Díaz, José A; Maia, Amanda M; Corrêa, Stephany; Abdelhay, Eliana S F W

    2017-01-01

    The metastatic process in breast cancer is related to the expression of the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition transcription factors (EMT-TFs) SNAIL, SLUG, SIP1 and TWIST1. EMT-TFs and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation have been associated with aggressiveness and metastatic potential in carcinomas. Here, we sought to examine the role of NF-κB in the aggressive properties and regulation of EMT-TFs in human breast cancer cells. Blocking NF-κB/p65 activity by reducing its transcript and protein levels (through siRNA-strategy and dehydroxymethylepoxyquinomicin [DHMEQ] treatment) in the aggressive MDA-MB-231 and HCC-1954 cell lines resulted in decreased invasiveness and migration, a downregulation of SLUG, SIP1, TWIST1, MMP11 and N-cadherin transcripts and an upregulation of E-cadherin transcripts. No significant changes were observed in the less aggressive cell line MCF-7. Bioinformatics tools identified several NF-κB binding sites along the promoters of SNAIL, SLUG, SIP1 and TWIST1 genes. Through chromatin immunoprecipitation and luciferase reporter assays, the NF-κB/p65 binding on TWIST1, SLUG and SIP1 promoter regions was confirmed. Thus, we suggest that NF-κB directly regulates the transcription of EMT-TF genes in breast cancer. Our findings may contribute to a greater understanding of the metastatic process of this neoplasia and highlight NF-κB as a potential target for breast cancer treatment.

  17. Leptin and Cancer: From Cancer Stem Cells to Metastasis (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    1 Endocrine-Related Cancer Commentary Leptin and Cancer: From Cancer Stem Cells to Metastasis Jiyoung Park 1 and Philipp E. Scherer...REPORT DATE JUN 2011 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2011 to 00-00-2011 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Leptin And Cancer: From Cancer Stem Cells To...interest. Recently several groups have addressed the functional roles of leptin , an adipocyte-derived adipokine, for mammary tumor progression. In this

  18. In aggressive forms of mastocytosis, TET2 loss cooperates with c-KITD816V to transform mast cells.

    PubMed

    Soucie, Erinn; Hanssens, Katia; Mercher, Thomas; Georgin-Lavialle, Sophie; Damaj, Gandhi; Livideanu, Cristina; Chandesris, Maria Olivia; Acin, Yolène; Létard, Sebastien; de Sepulveda, Paulo; Hermine, Olivier; Bernard, Olivier A; Dubreuil, Patrice

    2012-12-06

    Although a role for oncogenic KIT in driving mast cell disease is clear, the mechanisms driving the multiple phenotypic and clinical manifestations of this disorder are not well elucidated. We now show, using a large cohort of mastocytosis patients, including an almost equal number of aggressive and nonaggressive cases of systemic mastocytosis, that in contrast to the oncogenic KITD816V, TET2 mutation statistically associates with aggressive forms of the disease. By infecting primary murine bone marrow-derived mast cells with KITD816V, we also observe a significant and competitive growth advantage for KITD816V in Tet2-nullizygous compared with wild-type cells. TET2-deficient cells display increased proliferation and can survive in the absence of cytokines. Taken together, these data demonstrate a oncogenic cooperation in mast cells and reveal TET2 mutation as a potential marker to diagnose and predict severe forms of mastocytosis.

  19. Protein arginine methyltransferase 7 promotes breast cancer cell invasion through the induction of MMP9 expression.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, R Mitchell; Haghandish, Nasim; Daneshmand, Manijeh; Amin, Shahrier; Paris, Geneviève; Falls, Theresa J; Bell, John C; Islam, Shahidul; Côté, Jocelyn

    2015-02-20

    Recent evidence points to the protein arginine methyltransferase (PRMT) family of enzymes playing critical roles in cancer. PRMT7 has been identified in several gene expression studies to be associated with increased metastasis and decreased survival in breast cancer patients. However, this has not been extensively studied. Here we report that PRMT7 expression is significantly upregulated in both primary breast tumour tissues and in breast cancer lymph node metastases. We have demonstrated that reducing PRMT7 levels in invasive breast cancer cells using RNA interference significantly decreased cell invasion in vitro and metastasis in vivo. Conversely, overexpression of PRMT7 in non-aggressive MCF7 cells enhanced their invasiveness. Furthermore, we show that PRMT7 induces the expression of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9), a well-known mediator of breast cancer metastasis. Importantly, we significantly rescued invasion of aggressive breast cancer cells depleted of PRMT7 by the exogenous expression of MMP9. Our results demonstrate that upregulation of PRMT7 in breast cancer may have a significant role in promoting cell invasion through the regulation of MMP9. This identifies PRMT7 as a novel and potentially significant biomarker and therapeutic target for breast cancer.

  20. MYC-driven aggressive B-cell lymphomas: biology, entity, differential diagnosis and clinical management

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Qingqing; Medeiros, L. Jeffrey; Xu, Xiaolu; Young, Ken H.

    2015-01-01

    MYC, a potent oncogene located at chromosome locus 8q24.21, was identified initially by its involvement in Burkitt lymphoma with t(8;14)(q24;q32). MYC encodes a helix-loop-helix transcription factor that accentuates many cellular functions including proliferation, growth and apoptosis. MYC alterations also have been identified in other mature B-cell neoplasms and are associated with aggressive clinical behavior. There are several regulatory factors and dysregulated signaling that lead to MYC up-regulation in B-cell lymphomas. One typical example is the failure of physiological repressors such as Bcl6 or BLIMP1 to suppress MYC over-expression. In addition, MYC alterations are often developed concurrently with other genetic alterations that counteract the proapoptotic function of MYC. In this review, we discuss the physiologic function of MYC and the role that MYC likely plays in the pathogenesis of B-cell lymphomas. We also summarize the role MYC plays in the diagnosis, prognostication and various strategies to detect MYC rearrangement and expression. PMID:26416427

  1. Invasive basal cell carcinoma in a xeroderma pigmentosum patient: facing secondary and tertiary aggressive recurrences.

    PubMed

    Lasso, José M; Yordanov, Yordan P; Pinilla, Carmen; Shef, Aylin

    2014-07-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is characterized by photohypersensitivity of sun-exposed tissues and several thousand-fold increased risk of developing malignant neoplasms of the skin and eyes. Inherited molecular defects in nucleotide excision repair genes cause the autosomal recessive condition XP. A 56-year-old woman with XP presented with an extensive multirecurrence basal cell carcinoma in the left naso-orbital region. At the time of the first visit, the patient had already received several interventions with local reconstructive techniques, a full course of radiotherapy, and bilateral neck dissection. A large tumor resection and free flap reconstruction were performed. Three years 9 months afterward, an aggressive recurrence occurred, and a second resection was needed. A new free flap was transferred, and microvascular anastomoses were done to the pedicle of the previously transferred flap. Nine months later, the patient returned with frontal bone tumoral lesions, and third microsurgical intervention was done. At that time, the reconstruction was practiced by a composite chimeric flap with a rib portion. Its pedicle was anastomosed to the one of the second free flaps. The objective of this article was to report the authors' experience concerning a unique case of XP requiring a complex reconstruction of the anterior skull base. Xeroderma pigmentosum patients need an early diagnosis and removal of cutaneous tumor lesions as some of them behave aggressively, especially those affecting the face. Free flaps are good solutions for reconstruction and should proceed from non-sun-exposed areas of the body. If reconstructed areas are highly radiated and/or skin tumors affect deep anatomical areas, complications are frequent.

  2. Racial disparity in colorectal cancer: Gut microbiome and cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Sachin; Nangia-Makker, Pratima; Farhana, Lulu; Yu, Yingjie; Majumdar, Adhip PN

    2016-01-01

    Over the past two decades there has been remarkable progress in cancer diagnosis, treatment and screening. The basic mechanisms leading to pathogenesis of various types of cancers are also understood better and some patients, if diagnosed at a particular stage go on to lead a normal pre-diagnosis life. Despite these achievements, racial disparity in some cancers remains a mystery. The higher incidence, aggressiveness and mortality of breast, prostate and colorectal cancers (CRCs) in African-Americans as compared to Caucasian-Americans are now well documented. The polyp-carcinoma sequence in CRC and easy access to colonic epithelia or colonic epithelial cells through colonoscopy/colonic effluent provides the opportunity to study colonic stem cells early in course of natural history of the disease. With the advent of metagenomic sequencing, uncultivable organisms can now be identified in stool and their numbers correlated with the effects on colonic epithelia. It would be expected that these techniques would revolutionize our understanding of the racial disparity in CRC and pave a way for the same in other cancers as well. Unfortunately, this has not happened. Our understanding of the underlying factors responsible in African-Americans for higher incidence and mortality from colorectal carcinoma remains minimal. In this review, we aim to summarize the available data on role of microbiome and cancer stem cells in racial disparity in CRC. This will provide a platform for further research on this topic. PMID:27679684

  3. Belinostat and vincristine demonstrate mutually synergistic cytotoxicity associated with mitotic arrest and inhibition of polyploidy in a preclinical model of aggressive diffuse large B cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Havas, Aaron P; Rodrigues, Kameron B; Bhakta, Anvi; Demirjian, Joseph A; Hahn, Seongmin; Tran, Jack; Scavello, Margarethakay; Tula-Sanchez, Ana A; Zeng, Yi; Schmelz, Monika; Smith, Catharine L

    2016-12-01

    Diffuse Large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is an aggressive malignancy that has a 60 percent 5-year survival rate, highlighting a need for new therapeutic approaches. Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) are novel therapeutics being clinically-evaluated in combination with a variety of other drugs. However, rational selection of companion therapeutics for HDACi is difficult due to their poorly-understood, cell-type specific mechanisms of action. To address this, we developed a pre-clinical model system of sensitivity and resistance to the HDACi belinostat using DLBCL cell lines. In the current study, we demonstrate that cell lines sensitive to the cytotoxic effects of HDACi undergo early mitotic arrest prior to apoptosis. In contrast, HDACi-resistant cell lines complete mitosis after a short delay and arrest in G1. To force mitotic arrest in HDACi-resistant cell lines, we used low dose vincristine or paclitaxel in combination with belinostat and observed synergistic cytotoxicity. Belinostat curtails vincristine-induced mitotic arrest and triggers a strong apoptotic response associated with downregulated MCL-1 expression and upregulated BIM expression. Resistance to microtubule targeting agents (MTAs) has been associated with their propensity to induce polyploidy and thereby increase the probability of genomic instability that enables cancer progression. Co-treatment with belinostat effectively eliminated a vincristine-induced, actively cycling polyploid cell population. Our study demonstrates that vincristine sensitizes DLBCL cells to the cytotoxic effects of belinostat and that belinostat prevents polyploidy that could cause vincristine resistance. Our findings provide a rationale for using low dose MTAs in conjunction with HDACi as a potential therapeutic strategy for treatment of aggressive DLBCL.

  4. Social networking in tumor cell communities is associated with increased aggressiveness

    PubMed Central

    Lodillinsky, Catalina; Podsypanina, Katrina; Chavrier, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are lipid-bilayer-enclosed vesicles that contain proteins, lipids and nucleic acids. EVs produced by cells from healthy tissues circulate in the blood and body fluids, and can be taken up by unrelated cells. As they have the capacity to transfer cargo proteins, lipids and nucleic acids (mostly mRNAs and miRNAs) between different cells in the body, EVs are emerging as mediators of intercellular communication that could modulate cell behavior, tissue homeostasis and regulation of physiological functions. EV-mediated cell-cell communications are also proposed to play a role in disease, for example, cancer, where they could contribute to transfer of traits required for tumor progression and metastasis. However, direct evidence for EV-mediated mRNA transfer to individual cells and for its biological consequences in vivo has been missing until recently. Recent studies have reported elegant experiments using genetic tracing with the Cre recombinase system and intravital imaging that visualize and quantify functional transfer of mRNA mediated by EVs in the context of cancer and metastasis. PMID:28243516

  5. How Can We Treat Cancer Disease Not Cancer Cells?

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyu-Won; Lee, Su-Jae; Kim, Woo-Young; Seo, Ji Hae; Lee, Ho-Young

    2017-01-01

    Since molecular biology studies began, researches in biological science have centered on proteins and genes at molecular level of a single cell. Cancer research has also focused on various functions of proteins and genes that distinguish cancer cells from normal cells. Accordingly, most contemporary anticancer drugs have been developed to target abnormal characteristics of cancer cells. Despite the great advances in the development of anticancer drugs, vast majority of patients with advanced cancer have shown grim prognosis and high rate of relapse. To resolve this problem, we must reevaluate our focuses in current cancer research. Cancer should be considered as a systemic disease because cancer cells undergo a complex interaction with various surrounding cells in cancer tissue and spread to whole body through metastasis under the control of the systemic modulation. Human body relies on the cooperative interaction between various tissues and organs, and each organ performs its specialized function through tissue-specific cell networks. Therefore, investigation of the tumor-specific cell networks can provide novel strategy to overcome the limitation of current cancer research. This review presents the limitations of the current cancer research, emphasizing the necessity of studying tissue-specific cell network which could be a new perspective on treating cancer disease, not cancer cells. PMID:28052653

  6. Hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer syndrome: a family affair.

    PubMed

    Teh, Jiasian; Kinnear, Ned; Douglass-Molloy, Hannah; Hennessey, Derek Barrry

    2017-01-25

    A 49-year-old woman with cutaneous and uterine leiomyomas, flank pain and a family history of hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer (HLRCC) syndrome sought genetic testing. She was found to harbour a fumarate hydratase (FH) genetic mutation and a previously undetected renal tumour. The patient underwent radical nephrectomy, and remains well at follow-up. HLRCC syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant disease, with patients at increased risk for cutaneous leiomyomas, early-onset uterine leiomyomas and aggressive renal carcinoma. Although the syndrome may manifest life-threatening complications, outcomes may be improved by preventative family screening and surveillance, compelling early diagnosis.

  7. Contribution of xanthine oxidoreductase to mammary epithelial and breast cancer cell differentiation in part modulates inhibitor of differentiation-1.

    PubMed

    Fini, Mehdi A; Monks, Jenifer; Farabaugh, Susan M; Wright, Richard M

    2011-09-01

    Loss of xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) has been linked to aggressive breast cancer in vivo and to breast cancer cell aggressiveness in vitro. In the present study, we hypothesized that the contribution of XOR to the development of the normal mammary gland may underlie its capacity to modulate breast cancer. We contrasted in vitro and in vivo developmental systems by differentiation marker and microarray analyses. Human breast cancer microarray was used for clinical outcome studies. The role of XOR in differentiation and proliferation was examined in human breast cancer cells and in a mouse xenograft model. Our data show that XOR was required for functional differentiation of mammary epithelial cells both in vitro and in vivo. Poor XOR expression was observed in a mouse ErbB2 breast cancer model, and pharmacologic inhibition of XOR increased breast cancer tumor burden in mouse xenograft. mRNA microarray analysis of human breast cancer revealed that low XOR expression was significantly associated with time to tumor relapse. The opposing expression of XOR and inhibitor of differentiation-1 (Id1) during HC11 differentiation and mammary gland development suggested a potential functional relationship. While overexpression of Id1 inhibited HC11 differentiation and XOR expression, XOR itself modulated expression of Id1 in differentiating HC11 cells. Overexpression of XOR both inhibited Id1-induced proliferation and -stimulated differentiation of Heregulin-β1-treated human breast cancer cells. These results show that XOR is an important functional component of differentiation whose diminished expression contributes to breast cancer aggressiveness, and they support XOR as both a breast cancer biomarker and a target for pharmacologic activation in therapeutic management of aggressive breast cancer.

  8. Investigation of dental pulp stem cells isolated from discarded human teeth extracted due to aggressive periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hai-Hua; Chen, Bo; Zhu, Qing-Lin; Kong, Hui; Li, Qi-Hong; Gao, Li-Na; Xiao, Min; Chen, Fa-Ming; Yu, Qing

    2014-11-01

    Recently, human dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) isolated from inflamed dental pulp tissue have been demonstrated to retain some of their pluripotency and regenerative potential. However, the effects of periodontal inflammation due to periodontitis and its progression on the properties of DPSCs within periodontally compromised teeth remain unknown. In this study, DPSCs were isolated from discarded human teeth that were extracted due to aggressive periodontitis (AgP) and divided into three experimental groups (Groups A, B and C) based on the degree of inflammation-induced bone resorption approaching the apex of the tooth root before tooth extraction. DPSCs derived from impacted or non-functional third molars of matched patients were used as a control. Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-like characteristics, including colony-forming ability, proliferation, cell cycle, cell surface antigens, multi-lineage differentiation capability and in vivo tissue regeneration potential, were all evaluated in a patient-matched comparison. It was found that STRO-1- and CD146-positive DPSCs can be isolated from human teeth, even in very severe cases of AgP. Periodontal inflammation and its progression had an obvious impact on the characteristics of DPSCs isolated from periodontally affected teeth. Although all the isolated DPSCs in Groups A, B and C showed decreased colony-forming ability and proliferation rate (P < 0.05), the decreases were not consistent with the degree of periodontitis. Furthermore, the cells did not necessarily show significantly diminished in vitro multi-differentiation potential. Only DPSCs from Group A and the Control group formed dentin-like matrix in vivo when cell-seeded biomaterials were transplanted directly into an ectopic transplantation model. However, when cell-seeded scaffolds were placed in the root fragments of human teeth, all the cells formed significant dentin- and pulp-like tissues. The ability of DPSCs to generate dental tissues decreased when the

  9. Alternative fuels for cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Keenan, Melissa M; Chi, Jen-Tsan

    2015-01-01

    Tumor metabolism is significantly altered to support the various metabolic needs of tumor cells. The most prominent change is the increased tumor glycolysis that leads to increased glucose uptake and utilization. However, it has become obvious that many non-glucose nutrients, such as amino acids, lactate, acetate, and macromolecules, can serve as alternative fuels for cancer cells. This knowledge reveals an unexpected flexibility and evolutionarily conserved model in which cancer cells uptake nutrients from their external environment to fulfill their necessary energetic needs. Tumor cells may have evolved the ability to utilize different carbon sources because of the limited supply of nutrients in their microenvironment, which can be driven by oncogenic mutations or tumor microenvironmental stresses. In certain cases, these factors permanently alter the tumor cells' metabolism, causing certain nutrients to become indispensable and thus creating opportunities for therapeutic intervention to eradicate tumors by their metabolic vulnerabilities.

  10. Genetic Variations in Mitochondria and Prostate Cancer Aggressiveness and Progression in Caucasian and African American Men

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-01

    SUBJECT TERMS Mitochondrial DNAs prostate cancer 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 6 19a. NAME OF...6 4 Introduction The mitochondrial genome is highly polymorphic among individuals and exhibits significant... mitochondrial DNA sequencing to identify novel genetic variants in AA and CA prostate cancer patients. A subset of the study population from PCaP

  11. Cancer Stem Cell Quiescence and Plasticity as Major Challenges in Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wanyin; Dong, Jihu; Haiech, Jacques; Kilhoffer, Marie-Claude

    2016-01-01

    Cells with stem-like properties, tumorigenic potential, and treatment-resistant phenotypes have been identified in many human malignancies. Based on the properties they share with nonneoplastic stem cells or their ability to initiate and propagate tumors in vivo, such cells were designated as cancer stem (stem-like) or tumor initiating/propagating cells. Owing to their implication in treatment resistance, cancer stem cells (CSCs) have been the subject of intense investigation in past years. Comprehension of CSCs' intrinsic properties and mechanisms they develop to survive and even enhance their aggressive phenotype within the hostile conditions of the tumor microenvironment has reoriented therapeutic strategies to fight cancer. This report provides selected examples of malignancies in which the presence of CSCs has been evidenced and briefly discusses methods to identify, isolate, and functionally characterize the CSC subpopulation of cancer cells. Relevant biological targets in CSCs, their link to treatment resistance, proposed targeting strategies, and limitations of these approaches are presented. Two major aspects of CSC physiopathology, namely, relative in vivo quiescence and plasticity in response to microenvironmental cues or treatment, are highlighted. Implications of these findings in the context of the development of new therapies are discussed. PMID:27418931

  12. S100A6 binds to annexin 2 in pancreatic cancer cells and promotes pancreatic cancer cell motility

    PubMed Central

    Nedjadi, T; Kitteringham, N; Campbell, F; Jenkins, R E; Park, B K; Navarro, P; Ashcroft, F; Tepikin, A; Neoptolemos, J P; Costello, E

    2009-01-01

    Background: High levels of S100A6 have been associated with poor outcome in pancreatic cancer patients. The functional role of S100A6 is, however, poorly understood. Methods: Immunoprecipitation followed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry were undertaken to identify S100A6 interacting proteins in pancreatic cancer cells. Immunohistochemistry and coimmunofluorescence were performed to examine expression or colocalisation of proteins. siRNA was used to deplete specific proteins and effects on motility were measured using Boyden Chamber and wound healing assays. Results: Our proteomic screen to identify S100A6 interacting proteins revealed annexin 11, annexin 2, tropomyosin β and a candidate novel interactor lamin B1. Of these, annexin 2 was considered particularly interesting, as, like S100A6, it is expressed early in the development of pancreatic cancer and overexpression occurs with high frequency in invasive cancer. Reciprocal immunoprecipitation confirmed the interaction between annexin 2 and S100A6 and the proteins colocalised, particularly in the plasma membrane of cultured pancreatic cancer cells and primary pancreatic tumour tissue. Analysis of primary pancreatic cancer specimens (n=55) revealed a strong association between high levels of cytoplasmic S100A6 and the presence of annexin 2 in the plasma membrane of cancer cells (P=0.009). Depletion of S100A6 was accompanied by diminished levels of membrane annexin 2 and caused a pronounced reduction in the motility of pancreatic cancer cells. Conclusion: These findings point towards a functional role for S100A6 that may help explain the link between S100A6 expression in pancreatic cancer and aggressive disease. PMID:19724273

  13. CD147 and MCT1-potential partners in bladder cancer aggressiveness and cisplatin resistance.

    PubMed

    Afonso, Julieta; Santos, Lúcio L; Miranda-Gonçalves, Vera; Morais, António; Amaro, Teresina; Longatto-Filho, Adhemar; Baltazar, Fátima

    2015-11-01

    The relapsing and progressive nature of bladder tumors, and the heterogeneity in the response to cisplatin-containing regimens, are the major concerns in the care of urothelial bladder carcinoma (UBC) patients. The metabolic adaptations that alter the tumor microenvironment and thus contribute to chemoresistance have been poorly explored in UBC setting. We found significant associations between the immunoexpressions of the microenvironment-related molecules CD147, monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs) 1 and 4, CD44 and CAIX in tumor tissue sections from 114 UBC patients. The presence of MCT1 and/or MCT4 expressions was significantly associated with unfavorable clinicopathological parameters. The incidence of CD147 positive staining significantly increased with advancing stage, grade and type of lesion, and occurrence of lymphovascular invasion. Similar associations were observed when considering the concurrent expression of CD147 and MCT1. This expression profile lowered significantly the 5-year disease-free and overall survival rates. Moreover, when selecting patients who received platinum-based chemotherapy, the prognosis was significantly worse for those with MCT1 and CD147 positive tumors. CD147 specific silencing by small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) in UBC cells was accompanied by a decrease in MCT1 and MCT4 expressions and, importantly, an increase in chemosensitivity to cisplatin. Our results provide novel insights for the involvement of CD147 and MCTs in bladder cancer progression and resistance to cisplatin-based chemotherapy. We consider that the possible cooperative role of CD147 and MCT1 in determining cisplatin resistance should be further explored as a potential theranostics biomarker.

  14. IMP3 protein promotes chemoresistance in breast cancer cells by regulating breast cancer resistance protein (ABCG2) expression.

    PubMed

    Samanta, Sanjoy; Pursell, Bryan; Mercurio, Arthur M

    2013-05-03

    IMP3, a member of a family of insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) mRNA-binding proteins (IMPs), is expressed preferentially in triple-negative breast cancers, which are resistant to many chemotherapeutics. However, the mechanisms by which it impacts breast cancer have not been elucidated. We hypothesized a role for IMP3 in chemoresistance based on these observations. Depletion of IMP3 expression in triple-negative breast cancer cells increased their sensitivity to doxorubicin and mitoxantrone significantly but not to taxol. Given that doxorubicin and mitoxantrone are effluxed by breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), we assessed whether IMP3 regulates BCRP. The data obtained demonstrate that IMP3 binds to BCRP mRNA and regulates BCRP expression. These findings are significant because they provide insight into the mechanism by which IMP3 contributes to aggressive cancers, and they highlight the potential for targeting this mRNA-binding protein for the clinical management of cancer.

  15. On the stem cell origin of cancer.

    PubMed

    Sell, Stewart

    2010-06-01

    In each major theory of the origin of cancer-field theory, chemical carcinogenesis, infection, mutation, or epigenetic change-the tissue stem cell is involved in the generation of cancer. Although the cancer type is identified by the more highly differentiated cells in the cancer cell lineage or hierarchy (transit-amplifying cells), the property of malignancy and the molecular lesion of the cancer exist in the cancer stem cell. In the case of teratocarcinomas, normal germinal stem cells have the potential to become cancers if placed in an environment that allows expression of the cancer phenotype (field theory). In cancers due to chemically induced mutations, viral infections, somatic and inherited mutations, or epigenetic changes, the molecular lesion or infection usually first occurs in the tissue stem cells. Cancer stem cells then give rise to transit-amplifying cells and terminally differentiated cells, similar to what happens in normal tissue renewal. However, the major difference between cancer growth and normal tissue renewal is that whereas normal transit amplifying cells usually differentiate and die, at various levels of differentiation, the cancer transit-amplifying cells fail to differentiate normally and instead accumulate (ie, they undergo maturation arrest), resulting in cancer growth.

  16. Emerging challenges of advanced squamous cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi-Chen; Zhou, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Squamous cell lung cancer (SQCLC) is an aggressive type of lung cancer and most are diagnosed at advanced stage. Patients with advanced SQCLC tend to be older, current or former smoker, with central type tumour located near large blood vessels and seldom with druggable genetic alternations. Consequently, progress of targeted therapy and antivascular agents available in lung adenocarcinoma could not be duplicated in this subset of patients. The treatment paradigms have long been dominant by cytotoxic agents and posed many therapeutic challenges. Until recent years, immune checkpoint inhibitors, other monoclonal antibodies and afatinib have been approved for treatment of advanced SQCLC, presenting a novel treatment landscape and initiating the era of precision medicine in this subset of patients. This review will summarise the recent treatment progresses in advanced SQCLC with a focus on checkpoint inhibitors of programmed cell death-1 receptor or its ligand, and discuss the emerging challenges in this new era. PMID:28255454

  17. Cell-Cell Adhesion and Breast Cancer.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-01-01

    Staging of breast cancer. In: K.I. Bland and E.M. Copeland (eds.), The breast: Comprehensive management of benign and malignant diseases , pp. 313-330... desmosomes . The physical strength of adhesion between two cells is likely to be dependent upon a number of factors, including the number of adhesion

  18. Origins, genetic landscape, and emerging therapies of small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Semenova, Ekaterina A.; Nagel, Remco; Berns, Anton

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths, with small cell lung cancer (SCLC) representing the most aggressive subtype. Standard treatments have not changed in decades, and the 5-year survival rate has remained <7%. Genomic analyses have identified key driver mutations of SCLC that were subsequently validated in animal models of SCLC. To provide better treatment options, a deeper understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying SCLC initiation, progression, metastasis, and acquisition of resistance is required. In this review, we describe the genetic landscape of SCLC, features of the cell of origin, and targeted therapeutic approaches. PMID:26220992

  19. KPNA7, a nuclear transport receptor, promotes malignant properties of pancreatic cancer cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Laurila, Eeva; Vuorinen, Elisa; Savinainen, Kimmo; Rauhala, Hanna; Kallioniemi, Anne

    2014-03-10

    Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive malignancy and one of the leading causes of cancer deaths. The high mortality rate is mostly due to the lack of appropriate tools for early detection of the disease and a shortage of effective therapies. We have previously shown that karyopherin alpha 7 (KPNA7), the newest member of the alpha karyopherin family of nuclear import receptors, is frequently amplified and overexpressed in pancreatic cancer. Here, we report that KPNA7 expression is absent in practically all normal human adult tissues but elevated in several pancreatic cancer cell lines. Inhibition of KPNA7 expression in AsPC-1 and Hs700T pancreatic cancer cells led to a reduction in cell growth and decreased anchorage independent growth, as well as increased autophagy. The cell growth effects were accompanied by an induction of the cell cycle regulator p21 and a G1 arrest of the cell cycle. Interestingly, the p21 induction was caused by increased mRNA synthesis and not defective nuclear transport. These data strongly demonstrate that KPNA7 silencing inhibits the malignant properties of pancreatic cancer cells in vitro and thereby provide the first evidence on the functional role for KPNA7 in human cancer. - Highlights: • KPNA7 expression is elevated in several pancreatic cancer cell lines. • KPNA7 silencing in high expressing cancer cells leads to growth inhibition. • The cell growth reduction is associated with p21 induction and G1 arrest. • KPNA7 silencing is also accompanied with increased autophagy.

  20. [Cancer initiating cell theory: popularity and controversies].

    PubMed

    Chen, Hua; Huang, Qiang; Dong, Jun; Lan, Qing

    2006-06-01

    The cancer stem cell model proposes that most tumors are derived from a single cell that is transformed into a cancer-initiating cell (cancer stem cell). Cancer stem cells have the capacity to proliferate, differentiate, and form tumors in vivo. However, the origin of cancer stem cells remains controversial. Normal stem cells are regarded as an ideal candidate for the origin of cancer stem cells when take similar characters and signaling pathways between them into consideration. In addition,cell fusion is an important physiologic process during development and tissue repair,and is closely related to several fundamental features of tumors,and thus could be involved in the development of cancer stem cells.

  1. Cancer stem cells and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Sampieri, Katia; Fodde, Riccardo

    2012-06-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) represent a subpopulation of tumour cells endowed with self-renewal and multi-lineage differentiation capacity but also with an innate resistance to cytotoxic agents, a feature likely to pose major clinical challenges towards the complete eradication of minimal residual disease in cancer patients. Operationally, CSCs are defined by their tumour-propagating ability when serially transplanted into immune-compromised mice and by their capacity to fully recapitulate the original heterogeneity of cell types observed in the primary lesions they are derived from. CSCs were first identified in haematopoietic malignancies and later in a broad spectrum of solid tumours including those of the breast, colon and brain. Notably, several CSC characteristics are relevant to metastasis, such as motility, invasiveness and, as mentioned above, resistance to DNA damage-induced apoptosis. Here, we have reviewed the current literature on the relation between CSCs and metastasis formation. Preliminary studies on cancer cell lines and patient-derived material suggest a rate-limiting role for stem-like cells in the processes of tumour cell dissemination and metastasis formation. However, additional studies are needed to deliver formal proof of their identity as the cell of origin of recurrences at distant organ sites. Nevertheless, several studies have already provided pre-clinical evidence of the efficacy of novel therapies directed against disseminated CSCs.

  2. Role of androgen metabolism genes CYP1B1, PSA/KLK3, and CYP11alpha in prostate cancer risk and aggressiveness.

    PubMed

    Cicek, Mine S; Liu, Xin; Casey, Graham; Witte, John S

    2005-09-01

    Candidate genes involved with androgen metabolism have been hypothesized to affect the risk of prostate cancer. To further investigate this, we evaluated the relationship between prostate cancer and multiple potentially functional polymorphisms in three genes involved in androgen metabolism: CYP1B1 (two single nucleotide polymorphisms: 355G/T and 4326C/G), prostate-specific antigen (PSA/KLK3 (three single nucleotide polymorphisms: -158A/G, -4643G/A, and -5412C/T), and CYP11alpha [(tttta)(n) repeat], using a moderately large (n = 918) sibling-based case-control population. When looking at all subjects combined, no association was observed between any polymorphism-or their haplotypes-and prostate cancer risk. However, among men with more aggressive prostate cancer, the CYP1B1 355G/T variant was positively associated with disease: carrying one or two T alleles gave odds ratios (OR) of 1.90 [95% confidence interval (95% CI), 1.09-3.31; P = 0.02] and 3.73 (95% CI, 1.39-10.0; P = 0.009), respectively. Similarly, carrying the CYP1B1 355T-4326C haplotype was positively associated with prostate cancer among men with high aggressive disease (P = 0.01). In addition, the PSA -158G/-158G genotype was positively associated with prostate cancer among men with less aggressive disease (OR, 2.71; 95% CI, 1.06-6.94; P = 0.04). Our findings suggest that CYP1B1 and PSA variants may affect the risk of prostate cancer and tumor aggressiveness.

  3. Invasive cancer cells and metastasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mierke, Claudia Tanja

    2013-12-01

    The physics of cancer is a relatively new emerging field of cancer research. In the last decade it has become a focus of biophysical research as well as becoming a novel focus for classical cancer research. This special section of Physical Biology focusing on invasive cancer cells and metastasis (physical oncology) will give greater insight into the different subfields where physical approaches are being applied to cancer research. This focus on the physical aspects of cancer is necessary because novel approaches in the field of genomics and proteomics have not altered the field of cancer research dramatically, due to the fact that few breakthroughs have been made. It is still not understood why some primary tumors metastasize and thus have a worse outcome compared to others that do not metastasize. As biophysicists, we and others suggest that the mechanical properties of the cancer cells, which possess the ability to transmigrate, are quite different compared to non-metastatic and non-invasive cancer cells. Furthermore, we hypothesize that these cancer cells undergo a selection process within the primary tumor that enables them to weaken their cell-cell adhesions and to alter their cell-matrix adhesions in order to be able to cross the outermost boundary of the primary tumor, as well as the surrounding basement membrane, and to invade the connective tissue. This prerequisite may also help the cancer cells to enter blood or lymph vessels, get transported with the vessel flow and form secondary tumors either within the vessel, directly on the endothelium, or in a different organ after crossing the endothelial lining a second time. This special section begins with a paper by Mark F Coughlin and Jeffrey J Fredberg on the changes in cytoskeletal dynamics and nonlinear rheology due to the metastatic capability of cancer cells from different cancer tissue types such as skin, bladder, prostate and kidney [1]. The hypothesis was that the metastatic outcome is impacted by

  4. Nuclear survivin promoted by acetylation is associated with the aggressive phenotype of oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuli; Shi, Lei; Yang, Xi; Ye, Dongxia; Wang, Tong; Dong, Cunshan; Guo, Wenzheng; Liao, Yueling; Song, Hongyong; Xu, Dongliang; Hu, Jingzhou; Zhang, Zhiyuan; Deng, Jiong

    2017-04-06

    Defects in apoptotic pathway contribute to development and progression of oral cancer. Survivin, a member of the inhibitors of apoptosis protein (IAP) family, is increased in many types of cancers. However, it is unclear whether increased survivin is associated with oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCC), and what mechanisms may involve in. In this study, we examined survivin expression in OSCC compared to normal oral tissues via immunohistochemical staining. The results showed that, not only total survivin is increased in OSCCs, but also the subcellular location of survivin is changed in OSCCs compared to normal oral tissues. In most of normal oral tissues, survivin staining was either negative, or cytoplasmic positive/nuclear negative; whereas in most of OSCC tissues, survivin staining was nuclear positive. Statistic analysis indicates that nuclear survivin, rather than total or cytoplasmic one, correlates with tumor TNM stage and differentiation grade. Consistently, in vitro analysis showed that survivin is in cytoplasm in normal human oral kinotinocyte (HOK) cells; whereas it is in nucleus in OSCC HN6 cells. Importantly, treatment of HOK cells with HDAC inhibitor Trichostatin A (TSA) induces survivin acetylation and promotes its nuclear localization. Moreover, nuclear survivin in OSCC cells was acetylated at K129 in its C-terminal, suggesting that the acetylation is important for nuclear location of survivin. Our study demonstrates that it is nuclear survivin, rather than total or cytoplasmic one, associates with TNM stage and tumor grade of OSCC. Thus, we propose nuclear survivin as a prognostic marker for the progression of OSCC.

  5. MUC4 Overexpression Augments Cell Migration and Metastasis through EGFR Family Proteins in Triple Negative Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mukhopadhyay, Partha; Lakshmanan, Imayavaramban; Ponnusamy, Moorthy P.; Chakraborty, Subhankar; Jain, Maneesh; Pai, Priya; Smith, Lynette M.; Lele, Subodh M.; Batra, Surinder K.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Current studies indicate that triple negative breast cancer (TNBC), an aggressive breast cancer subtype, is associated with poor prognosis and an early pattern of metastasis. Emerging evidence suggests that MUC4 mucin is associated with metastasis of various cancers, including breast cancer. However, the functional role of MUC4 remains unclear in breast cancers, especially in TNBCs. Method In the present study, we investigated the functional and mechanistic roles of MUC4 in potentiating pathogenic signals including EGFR family proteins to promote TNBC aggressiveness using in vitro and in vivo studies. Further, we studied the expression of MUC4 in invasive TNBC tissue and normal breast tissue by immunostaining. Results MUC4 promotes proliferation, anchorage-dependent and-independent growth of TNBC cells, augments TNBC cell migratory and invasive potential in vitro, and enhances tumorigenicity and metastasis in vivo. In addition, our studies demonstrated that MUC4 up-regulates the EGFR family of proteins, and augments downstream Erk1/2, PKC-γ, and FAK mediated oncogenic signaling. Moreover, our studies also showed that knockdown of MUC4 in TNBC cells induced molecular changes suggestive of mesenchymal to epithelial transition. We also demonstrated in this study, for the first time, that knockdown of MUC4 was associated with reduced expression of EGFR and ErbB3 (EGFR family proteins) in TNBC cells, suggesting that MUC4 uses an alternative to ErbB2 mechanism to promote aggressiveness. We further demonstrate that MUC4 is differentially over-expressed in invasive TNBC tissues compared to normal breast tissue. Conclusions MUC4 mucin expression is associated with TNBC pathobiology, and its knockdown reduced aggressiveness in vitro, and tumorigenesis and metastasis in vivo. Overall, our findings suggest that MUC4 mucin promotes invasive activities of TNBC cells by altering the expression of EGFR, ErbB2, and ErbB3 molecules and their downstream signaling. PMID

  6. Down regulation of ADAM33 as a Predictive Biomarker of Aggressive Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Manica, Graciele C. M.; Ribeiro, Caroline F.; Oliveira, Marco A. S. de; Pereira, Isabela T.; Chequin, Andressa; Ramos, Edneia A. S.; Klassen, Liliane M. B.; Sebastião, Ana Paula M.; Alvarenga, Larissa M.; Zanata, Silvio M.; Noronha, Lucia De; Rabinovich, Iris; Costa, Fabricio F.; Souza, Emanuel M.; Klassen, Giseli

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease with differences in its clinical, molecular and biological features. Traditionally, immunohistochemical markers together with clinicopathologic parameters are used to classify breast cancer and to predict disease outcome. Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is a particular type of breast cancer that is defined by a lack of expression of hormonal receptors and the HER2 gene. Most cases of TNBC also have a basal-like phenotype (BLBC) with expression of cytokeratin 5/6 and/or EGFR. A basal marker alone is insufficient for a better understanding of the tumor biology of TNBC. In that regard, the ADAM33 gene is silenced by DNA hypermethylation in breast cancer, which suggests that ADAM33 might be useful as a molecular marker. In the present study, we have produced monoclonal antibodies against the ADAM33 protein and have investigated the role of ADAM33 protein in breast cancer. We used 212 breast tumor samples and lower levels of ADAM33 were correlated with TNBC and basal-like markers. A lower level of ADAM33 was also correlated with shorter overall survival and metastasis-free survival and was considered an independent prognostic factor suggesting that ADAM33 is a novel molecular biomarker of TNBC and BLBC that might be useful as a prognostic factor. PMID:28294120

  7. Down regulation of ADAM33 as a Predictive Biomarker of Aggressive Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Manica, Graciele C M; Ribeiro, Caroline F; Oliveira, Marco A S de; Pereira, Isabela T; Chequin, Andressa; Ramos, Edneia A S; Klassen, Liliane M B; Sebastião, Ana Paula M; Alvarenga, Larissa M; Zanata, Silvio M; Noronha, Lucia De; Rabinovich, Iris; Costa, Fabricio F; Souza, Emanuel M; Klassen, Giseli

    2017-03-15

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease with differences in its clinical, molecular and biological features. Traditionally, immunohistochemical markers together with clinicopathologic parameters are used to classify breast cancer and to predict disease outcome. Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is a particular type of breast cancer that is defined by a lack of expression of hormonal receptors and the HER2 gene. Most cases of TNBC also have a basal-like phenotype (BLBC) with expression of cytokeratin 5/6 and/or EGFR. A basal marker alone is insufficient for a better understanding of the tumor biology of TNBC. In that regard, the ADAM33 gene is silenced by DNA hypermethylation in breast cancer, which suggests that ADAM33 might be useful as a molecular marker. In the present study, we have produced monoclonal antibodies against the ADAM33 protein and have investigated the role of ADAM33 protein in breast cancer. We used 212 breast tumor samples and lower levels of ADAM33 were correlated with TNBC and basal-like markers. A lower level of ADAM33 was also correlated with shorter overall survival and metastasis-free survival and was considered an independent prognostic factor suggesting that ADAM33 is a novel molecular biomarker of TNBC and BLBC that might be useful as a prognostic factor.

  8. Notch signaling in cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jialiang; Sullenger, Bruce A; Rich, Jeremy N

    2012-01-01

    Subpopulations of cancer cells with stem cell-like characteristics, termed cancer stem cells, have been identified in a wide range of human cancers. Cancer stem cells are defined by their ability to self-renew as well as recapitulate the original heterogeneity of cancer cells in culture and in serial xenotransplants. Not only are cancer stem cells highly tumorigenic, but these cells are implicated in tumor resistance to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy, thus highlighting their significance as therapeutic targets. Considerable similarities have been found between cancer stem cells and normal stem cells on their dependence on certain signaling pathways. More specifically, the core stem cell signaling pathways, such as the Wnt, Notch and Hedgehog pathways, also critically regulate the self-renewal and survival of cancer stem cells. While the oncogenic functions of Notch pathway have been well documented, its role in cancer stem cells is just emerging. In this chapter, we will discuss recent advances in cancer stem cell research and highlight the therapeutic potential of targeting Notch in cancer stem cells.

  9. Curcumin enhances poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitor sensitivity to chemotherapy in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Choi, Young Eun; Park, Eunmi

    2015-12-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitor has shown promising responses in homologous recombination (HR) repair-deficient cancer cells. More specifically, targeting HR pathway in combination with PARP inhibitor has been an effective chemotherapy strategy by so far. Curcumin has been recognized as anticancer agents for several types of cancers. Here, we demonstrate that curcumin inhibits a critical step in HR pathway, Rad51 foci formation, and accumulates γ-H2AX levels in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Curcumin also directly reduces HR and induces cell death with cotreatment of PARP inhibitor in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Moreover, curcumin, when combined with ABT-888, could effectively delayed breast tumor formation in vivo. Our study indicates that cotreatment of curcumin and PARP inhibitor might be useful for the combination chemotherapy for aggressive breast cancer treatment as a natural bioactive compound.

  10. Colonic and colorectal cancer stem cells: progress in the search for putative biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Willis, Naomi D; Przyborski, Stefan A; Hutchison, Christopher J; Wilson, Robert G

    2008-01-01

    The maintenance of healthy colonic crypts is dependent on the integrity of the adult epithelial stem cells located within them. Perturbations in stem cell dynamics are generally believed to represent the first step towards colorectal tumorigenesis. Experimental manipulation of intestinal stem cells has greatly increased our understanding of them, but further progress has been slowed due to the absence of a reliable stem cell biomarker. In this review we discuss the candidate colonic stem cell biomarkers which have been proposed. Furthermore, we investigate the putative biomarkers for so-called colorectal cancer stem cells, a highly aggressive subpopulation of cells considered to drive tumour development. PMID:18638071

  11. Targeting notch to eradicate pancreatic cancer stem cells for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhiwei; Ahmad, Aamir; Li, Yiwei; Azmi, Asfar S; Miele, Lucio; Sarkar, Fazlul H

    2011-04-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the most aggressive malignant disease once it is diagnosed and it remains the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death in the U.S.A. Recent data indicates that the Notch signaling pathway plays an important role in the development and progression of pancreatic cancer. Emerging evidence also suggests that the activation of the Notch signaling pathway is mechanistically associated with molecular characteristics of cancer stem cells (CSCs) in pancreatic cancer. Moreover, CSCs are known to be highly drug-resistant, suggesting that targeted inactivation of Notch signaling would be useful for overcoming drug resistance and the elimination of CSCs. This review describes the roles of the Notch signaling pathway in pancreatic cancer with a special emphasis on its novel functions in the regulation of pancreatic CSC. Moreover, the review also proposes that targeting the Notch signaling pathway by natural agents may represent a novel strategy for overcoming drug resistance and the elimination of CSCs, which would be useful for the successful treatment of patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer.

  12. Recent Advances on the Molecular Mechanisms Involved in the Drug Resistance of Cancer Cells and Novel Targeting Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Mimeault, M; Hauke, R; Batra, SK

    2010-01-01

    This review summarizes the recent knowledge obtained on the molecular mechanisms involved in the intrinsic and acquired resistance of cancer cells to current cancer therapies. We describe the cascades that are often altered in cancer cells during cancer progression that may contribute in a crucial manner to drug resistance and disease relapse. The emphasis is on the implication of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) multidrug efflux transporters in drug disposition and antiapoptotic factors, including epidermal growth factor receptor cascades and deregulated enzymes in ceramide metabolic pathways. The altered expression and activity of these signaling elements may have a critical role in the resistance of cancer cells to cytotoxic effects induced by diverse chemotherapeutic drugs and cancer recurrence. Of therapeutic interest, new strategies for reversing the multidrug resistance and developing more effective clinical treatments against the highly aggressive, metastatic, and recurrent cancers, based on the molecular targeting of the cancer progenitor cells and their further differentiated progeny, are also described. PMID:17786164

  13. Valproic acid induces apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in poorly differentiated thyroid cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Catalano, Maria G; Fortunati, Nicoletta; Pugliese, Mariateresa; Costantino, Lucia; Poli, Roberta; Bosco, Ornella; Boccuzzi, Giuseppe

    2005-03-01

    Poorly differentiated thyroid carcinoma is an aggressive human cancer that is resistant to conventional therapy. Histone deacetylase inhibitors are a promising class of drugs, acting as antiproliferative agents by promoting differentiation, as well as inducing apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. Valproic acid (VPA), a class I selective histone deacetylase inhibitor widely used as an anticonvulsant, promotes differentiation in poorly differentiated thyroid cancer cells by inducing Na(+)/I(-) symporter and increasing iodine uptake. Here, we show that it is also highly effective at suppressing growth in poorly differentiated thyroid cancer cell lines (N-PA and BHT-101). Apoptosis induction and cell cycle arrest are the underlying mechanisms of VPA's effect on cell growth. It induces apoptosis by activating the intrinsic pathway; caspases 3 and 9 are activated but not caspase 8. Cell cycle is selectively arrested in G(1) and is associated with the increased expression of p21 and the reduced expression of cyclin A. Both apoptosis and cell cycle arrest are induced by treatment with 1 mm VPA, a dose that promotes cell redifferentiation and that is slightly above the serum concentration reached in patients treated for epilepsy. These multifaceted properties make VPA of clinical interest as a new approach to treating poorly differentiated thyroid cancer.

  14. The significance of galectin-3 as a new basal cell marker in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Y; Balan, V; Gao, X; Reddy, P G; Kho, D; Tait, L; Raz, A

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer may originate from distinct cell types, resulting in the heterogeneity of this disease. Galectin-3 (Gal-3) and androgen receptor (AR) have been reported to play important roles in the progression of prostate cancer, and their heterogeneous expressions might be associated with different cancer subtypes. Our study found that in various prostate cancer cell lines Gal-3 expression was always opposite to AR expression and other luminal cell markers but consistent with basal cell markers including glutathione S-transferase-π and Bcl-2. This expression pattern was confirmed in human prostate cancer tissues. Our results also showed that prostate cancer cells positive with basal cell markers were more aggressive. Downregulation of Gal-3 expression resulted in increased apoptotic potential and decreased metastasis potential of prostate cancer cells. Our findings demonstrate for the first time that Gal-3 may serve as a new marker for basal characteristics of prostate cancer epithelium. This study helps us to better understand the heterogeneity of prostate cancer. The clinical significance of this study lies in the application of Gal-3 to distinguish prostate cancer subtypes and improve treatment efficacy with designed personalized therapy. PMID:23907467

  15. Clinical value of digital image analysis in the diagnosis of urinary bladder cancer, particularly in aggressive tumors: a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Borkowski, T; Monika Dulewicz, A; Borkowski, A; Piętka, D; Radziszewski, P

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the project was to evaluate the clinical value of a computer analysis of cytological specimen images obtained from urine and bladder washing samples. Three sample types (voided urine, catheterized urine and bladder washing) from 59 patients with primary or recurrent tumor were analyzed. All patients underwent cystoscopy and biopsy or resection. The histological results were compared with the results of the image analyzing computer system of collected urine samples. The consistency between the computer diagnosis and the clinical or histological diagnosis both in the presence and absence of cancer was as follows: 77% for voided urine samples, 72.5% for catheterized urine samples and 78% for bladder washing samples. The specificity of the method at the standard pathology level was 71%, and the sensitivity was 83%. The positive and negative predictive values (PPV and NPV) were 87.5% and 63% respectively. The sensitivity for G3 or CIS or T2 or T3 tumors reached nearly 100%. Computer analysis of urine provided correct diagnoses in cancer and control patients with the sensitivity of 83% and specificity of 71% and gave excellent results in aggressive tumors such as T2, T3, G3 and in CIS.

  16. Oligometastatic non-small-cell lung cancer: current treatment strategies

    PubMed Central

    Richard, Patrick J; Rengan, Ramesh

    2016-01-01

    The oligometastatic disease theory was initially described in 1995 by Heilman and Weichselbaum. Since then, much work has been performed to investigate its existence in many solid tumors. This has led to subclassifications of stage IV cancer, which could redefine our treatment approaches and the therapeutic outcomes for this historically “incurable” entity. With a high incidence of stage IV disease, non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) remains a difficult cancer to treat and cure. Recent work has proven the existence of an oligometastatic state in NSCLC in terms of properly selecting patients who may benefit from aggressive therapy and experience long-term overall survival. This review discusses the current treatment approaches used in oligometastatic NSCLC and provides the evidence and rationale for each approach. The prognostic factors of many trials are discussed, which can be used to properly select patients for aggressive treatment regimens. Future advances in both molecular profiling of NSCLC to find targetable mutations and investigating patient selection may increase the number of patients diagnosed with oligometastatic NSCLC. As this disease entity increases, it is of utmost importance for oncologists treating NSCLC to be aware of the current treatment strategies that exist and the potential advantages/disadvantages of each. PMID:28210169

  17. Tumor Budding, Micropapillary Pattern, and Polyploidy Giant Cancer Cells in Colorectal Cancer: Current Status and Future Prospects

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dan; Yang, Zhengduo; Zhang, Xipeng

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported that polyploid giant cancer cells (PGCGs) induced by CoCl2 could form through endoreduplication or cell fusion. A single PGCC formed tumors in immunodeficient mice. PGCCs are also the key contributors to the cellular atypia and associate with the malignant grade of tumors. PGCCs have the properties of cancer stem cells and produce daughter cells via asymmetric cell division. Compared with diploid cancer cells, these daughter cells express less epithelial markers and acquire mesenchymal phenotype with importance in cancer development and progression. Tumor budding is generally recognized to correlate with a high recurrence rate, lymph node metastasis, chemoresistance, and poor prognosis of colorectal cancers (CRCs) and is a good indicator to predict the metastasis and aggressiveness in CRCs. Micropapillary pattern is a special morphologic pattern and also associates with tumor metastasis and poor prognosis. There are similar morphologic features and molecular phenotypes among tumor budding, micropapillary carcinoma pattern, and PGCCs with their budding daughter cells and all of them show strong ability of tumor invasion and migration. In this review, we discuss the cancer stem cell properties of PGCCs, the molecular mechanisms of their regulation, and the relationships with tumor budding and micropapillary pattern in CRCs. PMID:27843459

  18. Targeting pediatric cancer stem cells with oncolytic virotherapy.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Gregory K; Cassady, Kevin A; Beierle, Elizabeth A; Markert, James M; Gillespie, G Yancey

    2012-04-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs), also termed "cancer-initiating cells" or "cancer progenitor cells," which have the ability to self-renew, proliferate, and maintain the neoplastic clone, have recently been discovered in a wide variety of pediatric tumors. These CSCs are thought to be responsible for tumorigenesis and tumor maintenance, aggressiveness, and recurrence due to inherent resistance to current treatment modalities such as chemotherapy and radiation. Oncolytic virotherapy offers a novel, targeted approach for eradicating pediatric CSCs using mechanisms of cell killing that differ from conventional therapies. Moreover, oncolytic viruses have the ability to target specific features of CSCs such as cell-surface proteins, transcription factors, and the CSC microenvironment. Through genetic engineering, a wide variety of foreign genes may be expressed by oncolytic viruses to augment the oncolytic effect. We review the current data regarding the ability of several types of oncolytic viruses (herpes simplex virus-1, adenovirus, reovirus, Seneca Valley virus, vaccinia virus, Newcastle disease virus, myxoma virus, vesicular stomatitis virus) to target and kill both CSCs and tumor cells in pediatric tumors. We highlight advantages and limitations of each virus and potential ways in which next-generation engineered viruses may target resilient CSCs.

  19. Oral epithelial stem cells – implications in normal development and cancer metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Papagerakis, Silvana; Pannone, Giuseppe; Zheng, Li; About, Imad; Taqi, Nawar; Nguyen, Nghia P.T.; Matossian, Margarite; McAlpin, Blake; Santoro, Angela; McHugh, Jonathan; Prince, Mark E.; Papagerakis, Petros

    2014-01-01

    Oral mucosa is continuously exposed to environmental forces and has to be constantly renewed. Accordingly, the oral mucosa epithelium contains a large reservoir of epithelial stem cells necessary for tissue homeostasis. Despite considerable scientific advances in stem cell behavior in a number of tissues, fewer studies have been devoted to the stem cells in the oral epithelium. Most of oral mucosa stem cells studies are focused on identifying cancer stem cells (CSC) in oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCCs) among other head and neck cancers. OSCCs are the most prevalent epithelial tumors of the head and neck region, marked by their aggressiveness and invasiveness. Due to their highly tumorigenic properties, it has been suggested that CSC may be the critical population of cancer cells in the development of OSCC metastasis. This review presents a brief overview of epithelium stem cells with implications in oral health, and the clinical implications of the CSC concept in OSCC metastatic dissemination. PMID:24803391

  20. [Dendritic cells in cancer immunotherapy].

    PubMed

    Gato, M; Liechtenstein, T; Blanco-Luquín, I; Zudaire, M I; Kochan, G; Escors, D

    2015-01-01

    Since the beginning of the 20th century, biomedical scientists have tried to take advantage of the natural anti-cancer activities of the immune system. However, all the scientific and medical efforts dedicated to this have not resulted in the expected success. In fact, classical antineoplastic treatments such as surgery, radio and chemotherapy are still first line treatments. Even so, there is a quantity of experimental evidence demonstrating that cancer cells are immunogenic. However, the effective activation of anti-cancer T cell responses closely depends on an efficient antigen presentation carried out by professional antigen presenting cells such as DC. Although there are a number of strategies to strengthen antigen presentation by DC, anti-cancer immunotherapy is not as effective as we would expect according to preclinical data accumulated in recent decades. We do not aim to make an exhaustive review of DC immunotherapy here, which is an extensive research subject already dealt with in many specialised reviews. Instead, we present the experimental approaches undertaken by our group over the last decade, by modifying DC to improve their anti-tumour capacities.

  1. Selection of brain metastasis-initiating breast cancer cells determined by growth on hard agar.

    PubMed

    Guo, Lixia; Fan, Dominic; Zhang, Fahao; Price, Janet E; Lee, Ju-Seog; Marchetti, Dario; Fidler, Isaiah J; Langley, Robert R

    2011-05-01

    An approach that facilitates rapid isolation and characterization of tumor cells with enhanced metastatic potential is highly desirable. Here, we demonstrate that plating GI-101A human breast cancer cells on hard (0.9%) agar selects for the subpopulation of metastasis-initiating cells. The agar-selected cells, designated GI-AGR, were homogeneous for CD44(+) and CD133(+) and five times more invasive than the parental GI-101A cells. Moreover, mice injected with GI-AGR cells had significantly more experimental brain metastases and shorter overall survival than did mice injected with GI-101A cells. Comparative gene expression analysis revealed that GI-AGR cells were markedly distinct from the parental cells but shared an overlapping pattern of gene expression with the GI-101A subline GI-BRN, which was generated by repeated in vivo recycling of GI-101A cells in an experimental brain metastasis model. Data mining on 216 genes shared between GI-AGR and GI-BRN breast cancer cells suggested that the molecular phenotype of these cells is consistent with that of cancer stem cells and the aggressive basal subtype of breast cancer. Collectively, these results demonstrate that analysis of cell growth in a hard agar assay is a powerful tool for selecting metastasis-initiating cells in a heterogeneous population of breast cancer cells, and that such selected cells have properties similar to those of tumor cells that are selected based on their potential to form metastases in mice.

  2. Prostate Cancer Stem Cells: Research Advances

    PubMed Central

    Jaworska, Dagmara; Król, Wojciech; Szliszka, Ewelina

    2015-01-01

    Cancer stem cells have been defined as cells within a tumor that possesses the capacity to self-renew and to cause the heterogeneous lineages of cancer cells that comprise the tumor. Experimental evidence showed that these highly tumorigenic cells might be responsible for initiation and progression of cancer into invasive and metastatic disease. Eradicating prostate cancer stem cells, the root of the problem, has been considered as a promising target in prostate cancer treatment to improve the prognosis for patients with advanced stages of the disease. PMID:26593898

  3. Hallmarks of cancer: of all cancer cells, all the time?

    PubMed

    Floor, Sébastien L; Dumont, Jacques E; Maenhaut, Carine; Raspe, Eric

    2012-09-01

    In two landmark articles, Hanahan and Weinberg synthesized into one conceptual framework 'the hallmarks of cancer', a massive amount of information describing the characteristics of a cancer cell. Although this is neither the intention nor the belief of the authors, hallmarks are often interpreted as applying to a canonic cancer cell, or equally to all cells within a cancer. In this article, we clarify the separate concepts of causes, oncogenic events, signal transduction programs, and hallmarks to show that there is no unimodal relation between these concepts but a complex network of interrelations that vary in different cells, between cells, and at different times in any given cell. We consider cancer as an evolving, dynamic, and heterogeneous system, explaining, at least in part, the difficulty of treating cancer and supporting the use of simultaneous, multitarget therapies.

  4. Deadly crosstalk: Notch signaling at the intersection of EMT and cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Espinoza, Ingrid; Miele, Lucio

    2013-11-28

    Notch signaling is an evolutionarily conserved pathway involved in cell fate control during development, stem cell self-renewal and postnatal tissue differentiation. Roles for Notch in carcinogenesis, in the biology of cancer stem cells, tumor angiogenesis and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) have been reported. This mini-review describes the role of Notch signaling deregulation in EMT and tumor aggressiveness. We describe how accumulated evidence suggests that Notch inhibition is an attractive strategy for the treatment of several cancers, at least in part because of its potential to reverse or prevent EMT.

  5. Are the Pathological Characteristics of Prostate Cancer More Aggressive or More Indolent Depending upon the Patient Age?

    PubMed

    Ji, Guangjie; Huang, Cong; Song, Gang; Xiong, Gengyan; Fang, Dong; Wang, He; Hao, Han; Cai, Lin; He, Qun; He, Zhisong; Zhou, Liqun

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. To identify pathological characteristics of prostate cancer according to patient age at diagnosis. Methods. A retrospective review of 2,929 men diagnosed with prostate cancer was performed. Pathological characteristics were compared across age groups: ≤55, 56-75, and >75 years. Results. The study cohort included 133 patients (4.5%), 2,033 patients (69.5%), and 763 patients (26.0%) in the three age groups, respectively. The median pathological Gleason sums in the three age groups were 8, 7, and 8, respectively. The Gleason sum, primary Gleason score, and second primary Gleason score were significantly different among the three age groups (Z = 12.975, p = 0.002; Z = 9.264, p = 0.010; Z = 6.692, p = 0.035, resp.). The percentages of Gleason pattern 5 tumors for the three age groups were 44.4%, 32.3%, and 36.8%, respectively; they were significantly different (χ(2) = 11.641, p = 0.003). The percentages of tumors with Gleason score grade groups 3-5 for the three age groups were 66.9%, 60.5%, and 66.3%, respectively; they were significantly different (χ(2) = 9.401, p = 0.009). Conclusions. The present study indicated that men aged ≤55 years or >75 years show higher levels of clinically significant prostate cancer compared to patients between the ages of 55 and 75 years. Younger and more elderly male patients are more likely to have a more aggressive disease.

  6. Are the Pathological Characteristics of Prostate Cancer More Aggressive or More Indolent Depending upon the Patient Age?

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Guangjie; Huang, Cong; Fang, Dong; Wang, He; Hao, Han; Cai, Lin; He, Qun; He, Zhisong

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. To identify pathological characteristics of prostate cancer according to patient age at diagnosis. Methods. A retrospective review of 2,929 men diagnosed with prostate cancer was performed. Pathological characteristics were compared across age groups: ≤55, 56–75, and >75 years. Results. The study cohort included 133 patients (4.5%), 2,033 patients (69.5%), and 763 patients (26.0%) in the three age groups, respectively. The median pathological Gleason sums in the three age groups were 8, 7, and 8, respectively. The Gleason sum, primary Gleason score, and second primary Gleason score were significantly different among the three age groups (Z = 12.975, p = 0.002; Z = 9.264, p = 0.010; Z = 6.692, p = 0.035, resp.). The percentages of Gleason pattern 5 tumors for the three age groups were 44.4%, 32.3%, and 36.8%, respectively; they were significantly different (χ2 = 11.641, p = 0.003). The percentages of tumors with Gleason score grade groups 3–5 for the three age groups were 66.9%, 60.5%, and 66.3%, respectively; they were significantly different (χ2 = 9.401, p = 0.009). Conclusions. The present study indicated that men aged ≤55 years or >75 years show higher levels of clinically significant prostate cancer compared to patients between the ages of 55 and 75 years. Younger and more elderly male patients are more likely to have a more aggressive disease. PMID:28265568

  7. Inflammation Mediated Metastasis: Immune Induced Epithelial-To-Mesenchymal Transition in Inflammatory Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Evan N; Gao, Hui; Anfossi, Simone; Mego, Michal; Reddy, Neelima G; Debeb, Bisrat; Giordano, Antonio; Tin, Sanda; Wu, Qiong; Garza, Raul J; Cristofanilli, Massimo; Mani, Sendurai A; Croix, Denise A; Ueno, Naoto T; Woodward, Wendy A; Luthra, Raja; Krishnamurthy, Savitri; Reuben, James M

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is the most insidious form of locally advanced breast cancer; about a third of patients have distant metastasis at initial staging. Emerging evidence suggests that host factors in the tumor microenvironment may interact with underlying IBC cells to make them aggressive. It is unknown whether immune cells associated to the IBC microenvironment play a role in this scenario to transiently promote epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) in these cells. We hypothesized that soluble factors secreted by activated immune cells can induce an EMT in IBC and thus promote metastasis. In a pilot study of 16 breast cancer patients, TNF-α production by peripheral blood T cells was correlated with the detection of circulating tumor cells expressing EMT markers. In a variety of IBC model cell lines, soluble factors from activated T cells induced expression of EMT-related genes, including FN1, VIM, TGM2, ZEB1. Interestingly, although IBC cells exhibited increased invasion and migration following exposure to immune factors, the expression of E-cadherin (CDH1), a cell adhesion molecule, increased uniquely in IBC cell lines but not in non-IBC cell lines. A combination of TNF-α, IL-6, and TGF-β was able to recapitulate EMT induction in IBC, and conditioned media preloaded with neutralizing antibodies against these factors exhibited decreased EMT. These data suggest that release of cytokines by activated immune cells may contribute to the aggressiveness of IBC and highlight these factors as potential target mediators of immune-IBC interaction.

  8. Weight loss in cancer patients can be offset by aggressive nutritional therapy.

    PubMed

    1997-12-01

    Patients with cancer or other debilitating diseases such as AIDS and COPD often have on and off interruptions in care because of cachexia, also known as wasting syndrome. However, managing these patients with "medical foods" can and does get them on their feet faster. Find out how and why some doctors are swearing by this not so well-known management tool.

  9. Engineering functionalized multi-phased silicon/silicon oxide nano-biomaterials to passivate the aggressive proliferation of cancer.

    PubMed

    Premnath, P; Tan, B; Venkatakrishnan, K

    2015-07-20

    Currently, the use of nano silicon in cancer therapy is limited as drug delivery vehicles and markers in imaging, not as manipulative/controlling agents. This is due to limited properties that native states of nano silicon and silicon oxides offers. We introduce nano-functionalized multi-phased silicon/silicon oxide biomaterials synthesized via ultrashort pulsed laser synthesis, with tunable properties that possess inherent cancer controlling properties that can passivate the progression of cancer. This nanostructured biomaterial is composed of individual functionalized nanoparticles made of a homogenous hybrid of multiple phases of silicon and silicon oxide in increasing concentration outwards from the core. The chemical properties of the proposed nanostructure such as number of phases, composition of phases and crystal orientation of each functionalized nanoparticle in the three dimensional nanostructure is defined based on precisely tuned ultrashort pulsed laser-material interaction mechanisms. The amorphous rich phased biomaterial shows a 30 fold (95%) reduction in number of cancer cells compared to bulk silicon in 48 hours. Further, the size of the cancer cells reduces by 76% from 24 to 48 hours. This method exposes untapped properties of combination of multiple phases of silicon oxides and its applications in cancer therapy.

  10. ATRA mechanically reprograms pancreatic stellate cells to suppress matrix remodelling and inhibit cancer cell invasion

    PubMed Central

    Chronopoulos, Antonios; Robinson, Benjamin; Sarper, Muge; Cortes, Ernesto; Auernheimer, Vera; Lachowski, Dariusz; Attwood, Simon; García, Rebeca; Ghassemi, Saba; Fabry, Ben; del Río Hernández, Armando

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a highly aggressive malignancy with a dismal survival rate. Persistent activation of pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) can perturb the biomechanical homoeostasis of the tumour microenvironment to favour cancer cell invasion. Here we report that ATRA, an active metabolite of vitamin A, restores mechanical quiescence in PSCs via a mechanism involving a retinoic acid receptor beta (RAR-β)-dependent downregulation of actomyosin (MLC-2) contractility. We show that ATRA reduces the ability of PSCs to generate high traction forces and adapt to extracellular mechanical cues (mechanosensing), as well as suppresses force-mediated extracellular matrix remodelling to inhibit local cancer cell invasion in 3D organotypic models. Our findings implicate a RAR-β/MLC-2 pathway in peritumoural stromal remodelling and mechanosensory-driven activation of PSCs, and further suggest that mechanical reprogramming of PSCs with retinoic acid derivatives might be a viable alternative to stromal ablation strategies for the treatment of PDAC. PMID:27600527

  11. Rituximab with dose-adjusted EPOCH as first-line treatment in patients with highly aggressive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and autologous stem cell transplantation in selected patients

    PubMed Central

    Pejša, Vlatko; Prka, Željko; Lucijanić, Marko; Mitrović, Zdravko; Piršić, Mario; Jakšić, Ozren; Ajduković, Radmila; Kušec, Rajko

    2017-01-01

    Aim To assess the benefit of rituximab with dose-adjusted etoposide, prednisone, vincristine, cyclophosphamide, and doxorubicin (R-DA-EPOCH) regimen as a first-line treatment for patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) presenting with unfavorable or aggressive features, and autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) as a part of the first-line treatment for selected DLBCL patients with additional aggressive features. Methods We retrospectively analyzed 75 newly diagnosed DLBCL patients with Ki-67+≥80% or International Prognostic Index ≥2 who were treated with R-DA-EPOCH between 2005 and 2015. Of 24 DLBCL patients with additional aggressive features (Ki-67+≥90% or age-adjusted IPI≥2) who were planned to receive consolidation with ASCT, 17 patients underwent the procedure. We determined the overall response rate (ORR), complete remission (CR), partial remission (PR), 5-year overall survival (OS), and progression free survival (PFS) in all DLBCL patients and specifically those planned to receive ASCT. Results All 75 patients included in the analysis started one or more cycles of therapy. The ORR, CR, and PR rates were 80%, 55%, and 25%, respectively. The response was non-evaluable in 10 of 75 patients due to treatment discontinuation. The OS and PFS rates for all 75 patients were 70% and 61%, respectively, and 80% and 79%, respectively, for 24 planned-to-receive-ASCT patients. Age (≤65 vs >65 years) had no prognostic impact on OS and PFS (P = 0.994 and P = 0.827, respectively). Conclusion Our retrospective analysis of one of the largest DLBCL patient cohorts outside the US National Cancer Institute showed that R-DA-EPOCH is a very effective therapeutic option as a first-line treatment of DLBCL patients with unfavorable prognostic features irrespective of their age. ASCT provided additional benefit for DLBCL patients with additional aggressive features. PMID:28252874

  12. Sex and species differences in plasma testosterone and in counts of androgen receptor-positive cells in key brain regions of Sceloporus lizard species that differ in aggression

    PubMed Central

    Hews, Diana K.; Hara, Erina; Anderson, Maurice C.

    2012-01-01

    We studied neuroendocrine correlates of aggression differences in adults of two Sceloporus lizard species. These species differ in the degree of sex difference in aggressive color signals (belly patches) and in aggression: S. undulatus (males blue, high aggression; females white, low aggression) and S. virgatus (both sexes white, lower aggression). We measured plasma testosterone and counted cells expressing androgen receptor-like immunoreactivity to the affinity-purified polyclonal AR antibody, PG-21, in three brain regions of breeding season adults. Male S. undulatus had the highest mean plasma testosterone and differed significantly from conspecific females. In contrast, there was no sex difference in plasma testosterone concentrations in S. virgatus. Male S. undulatus also had the highest mean number of AR-positive cells in the preoptic area: the sexes differed in S. undulatus but not in S. virgatus, and females of the two species did not differ. In the ventral medial hypothalamus, S. undulatus males had higher mean AR cell counts compared to females, but again there was no sex difference in S. virgatus. In the habenula, a control brain region, the sexes did not differ, and although the sex by species interaction significant was not significant, there was a trend (p = 0.050) for S. virgatus to have higher mean AR cell counts than S. undulatus. Thus hypothalamic AR cell counts paralleled sex and species differences in aggression, as did mean plasma testosterone levels in these breeding-season animals. PMID:22230767

  13. Triclosan Potentiates Epithelial-To-Mesenchymal Transition in Anoikis-Resistant Human Lung Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Winitthana, Thidarat; Lawanprasert, Somsong; Chanvorachote, Pithi

    2014-01-01

    Alteration of cancer cell toward mesenchymal phenotype has been shown to potentiate tumor aggressiveness by increasing cancer cell metastasis. Herein, we report the effect of triclosan, a widely used antibacterial agent found in many daily products, in enhancing the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in aggressive anoikis resistant human H460 lung cancer cells. EMT has been long known to increase abilities of the cells to increase migration, invasion, and survival in circulating system. The present study reveals that treatment of the cancer cells with triclosan at the physiologically related concentrations significantly increased the colony number of the cancer cells assessed by tumor formation assay. Also, the mesenchymal-like morphology and decrease in cell-to-cell adhesion were observed in triclosan-treated cells. Importantly, western blot analysis revealed that triclosan-treated cells exhibited decreased E-cadherin, while the levels of EMT markers, namely N-cadherin, vimentin, snail and slug were found to be significantly up-regulated. Furthermore, EMT induced by triclosan treatment was accompanied by the activation of focal adhesion kinase/ATP dependent tyrosine kinase (FAK/Akt) and Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (Rac1), which enhanced the ability of the cells to migrate and invade. In conclusion, we demonstrated for the first time that triclosan may potentiate cancer cells survival in detached condition and motility via the process of EMT. As mentioned capabilities are required for success in metastasis, the present study provides the novel toxicological information and encourages the awareness of triclosan use in cancer patients. PMID:25329306

  14. Triclosan potentiates epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in anoikis-resistant human lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Winitthana, Thidarat; Lawanprasert, Somsong; Chanvorachote, Pithi

    2014-01-01

    Alteration of cancer cell toward mesenchymal phenotype has been shown to potentiate tumor aggressiveness by increasing cancer cell metastasis. Herein, we report the effect of triclosan, a widely used antibacterial agent found in many daily products, in enhancing the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in aggressive anoikis resistant human H460 lung cancer cells. EMT has been long known to increase abilities of the cells to increase migration, invasion, and survival in circulating system. The present study reveals that treatment of the cancer cells with triclosan at the physiologically related concentrations significantly increased the colony number of the cancer cells assessed by tumor formation assay. Also, the mesenchymal-like morphology and decrease in cell-to-cell adhesion were observed in triclosan-treated cells. Importantly, western blot analysis revealed that triclosan-treated cells exhibited decreased E-cadherin, while the levels of EMT markers, namely N-cadherin, vimentin, snail and slug were found to be significantly up-regulated. Furthermore, EMT induced by triclosan treatment was accompanied by the activation of focal adhesion kinase/ATP dependent tyrosine kinase (FAK/Akt) and Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (Rac1), which enhanced the ability of the cells to migrate and invade. In conclusion, we demonstrated for the first time that triclosan may potentiate cancer cells survival in detached condition and motility via the process of EMT. As mentioned capabilities are required for success in metastasis, the present study provides the novel toxicological information and encourages the awareness of triclosan use in cancer patients.

  15. L-asparaginase-based regimens followed by allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation improve outcomes in aggressive natural killer cell leukemia.

    PubMed

    Jung, Ki Sun; Cho, Su-Hee; Kim, Seok Jin; Ko, Young Hyeh; Kang, Eun-Suk; Kim, Won Seog

    2016-04-18

    Aggressive nature killer cell leukemia (ANKL) is a mature NK-T cell lymphoma with worse prognosis, but optimal treatment is unclear. Therefore, we analyzed the efficacy of L-asparaginase-based regimens for ANKL patients. Twenty-one patients who received dexamethasone, methotrexate, ifosfamide, L-asparaginase, and etoposide (SMILE) or etoposide, ifosfamide, dexamethasone, and L-asparaginase (VIDL) chemotherapy at Samsung Medical Center were selected. The overall response rate for all patients was 33% (7/21); 38% (5/13) in SMILE and 40% (2/5) in VIDL, respectively. The median progression-free survival was 3.9 months (95% CI 0.0-8.1 months) and median overall survival was 7.0 months (95% CI 2.3-11.7 months). Treatment response (P = 0.001), hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) (P = 0.007) and negative conversion of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) DNA titer after treatment (P = 0.004) were significantly associated with survival. Thus, L-asparaginase-based regimens followed by allogeneic HSCT seem to improve the outcome for ANKL patients.

  16. Metformin prevents aggressive ovarian cancer growth driven by high-energy diet: similarity with calorie restriction

    PubMed Central

    Al-Wahab, Zaid; Mert, Ismail; Tebbe, Calvin; Chhina, Jasdeep; Hijaz, Miriana; Morris, Robert T.; Ali-Fehmi, Rouba; Giri, Shailendra; Munkarah, Adnan R.; Rattan, Ramandeep

    2015-01-01

    Caloric restriction (CR) was recently demonstrated by us to restrict ovarian cancer growth in vivo. CR resulted in activation of energy regulating enzymes adenosine monophosphate activated kinase (AMPK) and sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) followed by downstream inhibition of Akt-mTOR. In the present study, we investigated the effects of metformin on ovarian cancer growth in mice fed a high energy diet (HED) and regular diet (RD) and compared them to those seen with CR in an immunocompetent isogeneic mouse model of ovarian cancer. Mice either on RD or HED diet bearing ovarian tumors were treated with 200 mg/kg metformin in drinking water. Metformin treatment in RD and HED mice resulted in a significant reduction in tumor burden in the peritoneum, liver, kidney, spleen and bowel accompanied by decreased levels of growth factors (IGF-1, insulin and leptin), inflammatory cytokines (MCP-1, IL-6) and VEGF in plasma and ascitic fluid, akin to the CR diet mice. Metformin resulted in activation of AMPK and SIRT1 and inhibition of pAkt and pmTOR, similar to CR. Thus metformin can closely mimic CR's tumor suppressing effects by inducing similar metabolic changes, providing further evidence of its potential not only as a therapeutic drug but also as a preventive agent. PMID:25895126

  17. The Prognostic Nutritional Index Predicts Survival and Identifies Aggressiveness of Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Eo, Wan Kyu; Chang, Hye Jung; Suh, Jungho; Ahn, Jin; Shin, Jeong; Hur, Joon-Young; Kim, Gou Young; Lee, Sookyung; Park, Sora; Lee, Sanghun

    2015-01-01

    Nutritional status has been associated with long-term outcomes in cancer patients. The prognostic nutritional index (PNI) is calculated by serum albumin concentration and absolute lymphocyte count, and it may be a surrogate biomarker for nutritional status and possibly predicts overall survival (OS) of gastric cancer. We evaluated the value of the PNI as a predictor for disease-free survival (DFS) in addition to OS in a cohort of 314 gastric cancer patients who underwent curative surgical resection. There were 77 patients in PNI-low group (PNI ≤ 47.3) and 237 patients in PNI-high group (PNI > 47.3). With a median follow-up of 36.5 mo, 5-yr DFS rates in PNI-low group and PNI-high group were 63.5% and 83.6% and 5-yr OS rates in PNI-low group and PNI-high group were 63.5% and 88.4%, respectively (DFS, P < 0.0001; OS, P < 0.0001). In the multivariate analysis, the only predictors for DFS were PNI, tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) stage, and perineural invasion, whereas the only predictors for OS were PNI, age, TNM stage, and perineural invasion. In addition, the PNI was independent of various inflammatory markers. In conclusion, the PNI is an independent prognostic factor for both DFS and OS, and provides additional prognostic information beyond pathologic parameters.

  18. Microsatellite-stable diploid carcinoma: a biologically distinct and aggressive subset of sporadic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins, N J; Tomlinson, I; Meagher, A; Ward, R L

    2001-01-01

    Chromosomal instability and microsatellite instability represent the major pathways for colorectal cancer (CRC) progression. However, a significant percentage of CRC shows neither pattern of instability, and thus represents a potentially distinctive form of the disease. Flow cytometry was used to determine the degree of DNA aneuploidy in 46 consecutive sporadic colorectal cancers. Microsatellite status was determined by PCR amplification using standard markers, while immunostaining was used to examine the expression of p53. K- ras status was determined by restriction-mediated PCR assay. Twenty-five (54%) tumours were aneuploid, 14 (30%) were diploid and microsatellite-stable and seven (15%) were diploid and microsatellite-unstable. Tumours with microsatellite instability were more likely to be right sided, to occur in women and to be associated with an improved survival. Aneuploid tumours were significantly more common in men and were likely to be left sided. The diploid microsatellite-stable (MSS) tumours did not show a sex or site predilection, but were strongly associated with the presence of metastatic disease at the time of diagnosis. Our data suggests that diploid, MSS tumours represent a biologically and phenotypically distinct subset of colorectal carcinoma, and one that is associated with the early development of metastases. We suggest that the genetic stability that characterizes these tumours may favour the maintenance of an invasive phenotype, and thus facilitate disease progression. These findings may have important implications for treatment options in this disease subset. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11161382

  19. Metabolic Regulation of Ovarian Cancer Cell Death

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-01

    Following treatment with chemotherapeutic agents, responsive ovarian cancer cells undergo apoptotic cell death . Several groups have shown that the...apoptotic protease, caspase 2 (C2), is an essential activator of cell death in ovarian cancer cells treated with cisplatin and we have found, by knock

  20. Abundant NDRG2 Expression Is Associated with Aggressiveness and Unfavorable Patients’ Outcome in Basal-Like Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gasthaus, Janina; Tiedemann, Janina; Mijnes, Jolein; Heide, Timon; Braunschweig, Till; Knüchel, Ruth; Dahl, Edgar

    2016-01-01

    NDRG2, a member of the N-myc downstream-regulated gene family, is thought to be a putative tumor suppressor gene with promising clinical impact in breast cancer. Since breast cancer comprises heterogeneous intrinsic subtypes with distinct clinical outcomes we investigated the pivotal role of NDRG2 in basal-type breast cancers. Based on subtype classified tumor (n = 45) and adjacent normal tissues (n = 17) we examined NDRG2 mRNA expression and CpG-hypermethylation, whose significance was further validated by independent data sets from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). In addition, NDRG2 protein expression was evaluated immunohistochemically using a tissue micro array (TMA, n = 211). In vitro, we investigated phenotypic effects caused by NDRG2 silencing in the basal A-like HCC1806 as well as NDRG2 over-expression in basal A-like BT20 compared to luminal-type MCF7 breast cancer cells. Our tissue collections demonstrated an overall low NDRG2 mRNA expression in breast cancer subtypes compared to normal breast tissue in line with an increased CpG-hypermethylation in breast cancer tissue. Independent TCGA data sets verified a significant (P<0.001) expression loss of NDRG2 in breast tumors. Of interest, basal-like tumors more frequently retained abundant NDRG2 expression concordant with a lower CpG-hypermethylation. Unexpectedly, basal-like breast cancer revealed an association of NDRG2 expression with unfavorable patients’ outcome. In line with this observation, in vitro experiments demonstrated reduced proliferation and migration rates (~20%) in HCC1806 cells following NDRG2 silencing. In contrast, NDRG2 over-expressing luminal-type MCF7 cells demonstrated a 26% decreased proliferation rate. Until now, this is the first study investigating the putative role of NDRG2 in depth in basal-type breast cancer. Our data indicate that the described putative tumor suppressive function of NDRG2 may be confined to luminal- and basal B-type breast cancers. PMID:27400234

  1. Improving pancreatic cancer diagnosis using circulating tumor cells: prospects for staging and single-cell analysis

    PubMed Central

    Court, Colin M; Ankeny, Jacob S; Hou, Shuang; Tseng, Hsian-Rong; Tomlinson, James S

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is the fourth most common cause of cancer-related death in the USA, primarily due to late presentation coupled with an aggressive biology. The lack of adequate biomarkers for diagnosis and staging confound clinical decision-making and delay potentially effective therapies. Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are a promising new biomarker in PC. Preliminary studies have demonstrated their potential clinical utility, and newer CTC isolation platforms have the potential to provide clinicians access to tumor tissue in a reliable, real-time manner. Such a ‘liquid biopsy’ has been demonstrated in several cancers, and small studies have demonstrated its potential applications in PC. This article reviews the available literature on CTCs as a biomarker in PC and presents the latest innovations in CTC research as well as their potential applications in PC. PMID:26390158

  2. An epithelial cell adhesion molecule- and CD3-bispecific antibody plus activated T-cells can eradicate chemoresistant cancer stem-like pancreatic carcinoma cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Umebayashi, Masayo; Kiyota, Akifumi; Koya, Norihiro; Tanaka, Hiroto; Onishi, Hideya; Katano, Mitsuo; Morisaki, Takashi

    2014-08-01

    Cancer stem-like properties of various types of cancer, including pancreatic cancer, one of the most aggressive types, correlate with metastasis, invasion, and therapeutic resistance. More importantly, chemoresistance in cancer stem-like cells (CSLCs) is a critical problem for eradication of pancreatic cancer. Several cell surface markers, such as CD44 and epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM), are molecular targets on CSLCs of pancreatic carcinoma. In this study, we investigated whether catumaxomab, a clinical-grade bi-specific antibody that binds to both EpCAM on tumor cells and CD3 on T-cells, combined with activated T-cells can eliminate chemoresistant pancreatic CSLCs in vitro. Firstly, we established a CSLC line (MU-PK1) from human pancreatic carcinoma cells derived from a patient with chemoresistant and disseminated pancreatic cancer. These CSLCs were almost completely resistant to gemcitabine-mediated cytotoxicity up to a concentration of 10 μg/ml. The cells expressed high levels of CSLC markers (CD44 and EpCAM) and had significantly higher capacities for sphere formation, invasion, and aldehyde dehydrogenase-1 expression, which are associated with cancer stemness properties. We found that pre-treatment with catumaxomab and subsequent addition of interleukin-2/OKT3 activated autologous T-cells eliminated CSLCs during a short incubation period. Moreover, when MU-PK1 cells were cultured under hypoxic conditions, the CSLCs became more aggressive. However, the combination of cytokine-activated killer T-cells with catumaxomab successfully lysed almost all these cells. In conclusion, catumaxomab combined with activated T-cells may be a potent therapeutic modality to eradicate chemoresistant pancreatic CSLCs.

  3. Neuropilin-2: Novel Biomarker and Therapeutic Target for Aggressive Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    myeloid leukaemia145, oesophageal168, ovarian86,146,147, pancreatic91,148, prostate149,169, renal cell carcinoma180, squamous181 and thyroid ...increased tumour cell apop- tosis120. In addition, antibody-mediated inhibition of PLGF in medulloblastomas had a direct antitumour effect in vivo...growth factor/ neuropilin 1 pathway inhibits growth and spread of medulloblastoma . Cell 152, 1065–1076 (2013). This is an important study that

  4. AECHL-1 targets breast cancer progression via inhibition of metastasis, prevention of EMT and suppression of Cancer Stem Cell characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Dasgupta, Aparajita; Sawant, Mithila A.; Kavishwar, Gayatri; Lavhale, Manish; Sitasawad, Sandhya

    2016-01-01

    Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) features among the most aggressive manifestations of cancer due to its enhanced metastatic potential and immunity to therapeutics which target hormone receptors. Under such scenarios, anti-cancer compounds with an ability to influence multiple targets, or an entire process, will have an advantage over specific signal transduction inhibitors. To counter the metastatic threat it is essential to target cellular components central to the processes of cancer cell migration and adaptation. Our previous work on a novel triterpenoid, AECHL-1, explored its anti-cancer potential, and linked it to elevated ER stress in cancer cells, while its anti-angiogenic potential was credited for its ability to manipulate the cytoskeleton. Here, we broaden its range of action by showing that it curbs the metastatic ability of TNBC cells, both in vitro in MDA-MB-231 cell line and in vivo, in mouse models of metastasis. AECHL-1 does so by disrupting the cytoskeletal network, and also suppressing NF-κB and β-Catenin mediated key molecular pathways. These activities also contributed to AECHL-1 mediated suppression of TGF-β/TNF-α induced Epithelial to Mesenchymal Transition (EMT) and cancer stem cell characteristic. Thus, we present AECHL-1 as a promising therapeutic inhibitor of metastatic disease. PMID:27974826

  5. Diabetic concentrations of metformin inhibit platelet-mediated ovarian cancer cell progression.

    PubMed

    Erices, Rafaela; Cubillos, Sofía; Aravena, Raúl; Santoro, Felice; Marquez, Monica; Orellana, Renan; Ramírez, Carolina; González, Pamela; Fuenzalida, Patricia; Bravo, María Loreto; Oliva, Bárbara; Kato, Sumie; Ibañez, Carolina; Brañes, Jorge; Bravo, Erasmo; Alonso, Catalina; García, Karen; Arab, Clemente; Torres, Vicente A; Godoy, Alejandro S; Pereira, Jaime; Bustos, Galdo; Cardenas, Julio Cesar; Cuello, Mauricio A; Owen, Gareth I

    2017-02-15

    Clinical studies have suggested a survival benefit in ovarian cancer patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus taking metformin, however the mechanism by which diabetic concentrations of metformin could deliver this effect is still poorly understood. Platelets not only represent an important reservoir of growth factors and angiogenic regulators, they are also known to participate in the tumor microenvironment implicated in tumor growth and dissemination. Herein, we investigated if diabetic concentrations of metformin could impinge upon the previously reported observation that platelet induces an increase in the tube forming capacity of endothelial cells (angiogenesis) and upon ovarian cancer cell aggressiveness. We demonstrate that metformin inhibits the increase in angiogenesis brought about by platelets in a mechanism that did not alter endothelial cell migration. In ovarian cancer cell lines and primary cultured cancer cells isolated from the ascitic fluid of ovarian cancer patients, we assessed the effect of combinations of platelets and metformin upon angiogenesis, migration, invasion and cancer sphere formation. The enhancement of each of these parameters by platelets was abrogated by the present of metformin in the vast majority of cancer cell cultures tested. Neither metformin nor platelets altered proliferation; however, metformin inhibited the increase in phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase induced by platelets. We present the first evidence suggesting that concentrations of metformin present in diabetic patients may reduce the actions of platelets upon both endothelial cells and cancer cell survival and dissemination.

  6. Long Noncoding RNA MIR4697HG Promotes Cell Growth and Metastasis in Human Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li-qian; Yang, Su-qing; Wang, Ying; Fang, Qiao; Chen, Xian-jun; Lu, Hong-sheng

    2017-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is one of the three most common gynecological malignant tumors worldwide. The prognosis of patients suffering from this malignancy remains poor because of limited therapeutic strategies. Herein, we investigated the role of a long noncoding RNA named MIR4697 host gene (MIR4697HG) in the cell growth and metastasis of ovarian cancer. Results showed that the transcriptional level of MIR4697HG in cancerous tissues increased twofold compared with that in adjacent noncancerous tissues. MIR4697HG was differentially expressed in ovarian cancer cell lines, with the highest levels in OVCAR3 and SKOV3 cells. MIR4697HG knockdown by specific shRNA significantly inhibited cell proliferation and colony formation in both OVCAR3 and SKOC3 cells. Consistently, in a xenograft model of ovarian cancer, MIR4697HG depletion also significantly restricted tumor volumes and weights. Furthermore, MIR4697HG knockdown inhibited cell migration and invasion capacities. Invasion ability was inhibited by 58% in SKOV3 cells and 40% in OVCAR3 cells, and migration ability was inhibited by 73% in SKOV3 cells and 62% in OVCAR3 cells after MIR4697HG knockdown. MIR4697HG knockdown also caused a decrease in matrix metalloprotease-9, phosphorylated ERK, and phosphorylated AKT. These data suggested that MIR4697HG promoted ovarian cancer growth and metastasis. The aggressive role of MIR4697HG in ovarian cancer may be related to the ERK and AKT signaling pathways. PMID:28168162

  7. Programmed Cell Death in Breast Cancer.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-10-01

    TITLE: Programmed Cell Death in Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Clark W. Distelhorst, M.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Case Western Reserve...Programmed Cell Death in Breast Cancer DAMD17-94-J-4451 6. AUTHOR(S) Clark W. Distelhorst, M.D. 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8...cell death , apoptosis, in breast cancer cells has been developed. This model is based on induction of apoptosis by the selective endoplasmic reticulum

  8. Nanomaterials in Targeting Cancer Stem Cells for Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Weiwei; Huang, Guan; Chen, Zuanguang; Zhang, Yuanqing

    2017-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) have been identified in almost all cancers and give rise to metastases and can also act as a reservoir of cancer cells that may cause a relapse after surgery, radiation, or chemotherapy. Thus they are obvious targets in therapeutic approaches and also a great challenge in cancer treatment. The threat presented by CSCs lies in their unlimited proliferative ability and multidrug resistance. These findings have necessitated an effective novel strategy to target CSCs for cancer treatment. Nanomaterials are on the route to providing novel methods in cancer therapies. Although, there have been a large number of excellent work in the field of targeted cancer therapy, it remains an open question how nanomaterials can meet future demands for targeting and eradicating of CSCs. In this review, we summarized recent and highlighted future prospects for targeting CSCs for cancer therapies by using a variety of nanomaterials. PMID:28149278

  9. Reversing breast cancer stem cell into breast somatic stem cell.

    PubMed

    Wijaya, L; Agustina, D; Lizandi, A O; Kartawinata, M M; Sandra, F

    2011-02-01

    Stem cells have an important role in cell biology, allowing tissues to be renewed by freshly created cells throughout their lifetime. The specific micro-environment of stem cells is called stem cell niche; this environment influences the development of stem cells from quiescence through stages of differentiation. Recent advance researches have improved the understanding of the cellular and molecular components of the micro-environment--or niche--that regulates stem cells. We point out an important trend to the study of niche activity in breast cancers. Breast cancer has long been known to conserve a heterogeneous population of cells. While the majority of cells that make up tumors are destined to differentiate and eventually stop dividing, only minority populations of cells, termed cancer stem cell, possess extensive self renewal capability. These cancer stem cells possess characteristics of both stem cells and cancer cells. Breast cancer stem cells reversal to breast somatic stem cells offer a new therapy, that not only can stop the spread of breast cancer cells, but also can differentiate breast cancer stem cells into normal breast somatic stem cells. These can replace damaged breast tissue. Nevertheless, the complexity of realizing this therapy approach needs further research.

  10. Inhibition of Cell Survival by Curcumin Is Associated with Downregulation of Cell Division Cycle 20 (Cdc20) in Pancreatic Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; Xue, Ying-bo; Li, Hang; Qiu, Dong; Wang, Zhi-wei; Tan, Shi-sheng

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most aggressive human tumors in the United States. Curcumin, a polyphenol derived from the Curcuma longa plant, has been reported to exert its antitumor activity in pancreatic cancer. However, the molecular mechanisms of curcumin-mediated tumor suppressive function have not been fully elucidated. In the current study, we explore whether curcumin exhibits its anti-cancer function through inhibition of oncoprotein cell division cycle 20 (Cdc20) in pancreatic cancer cells. We found that curcumin inhibited cell growth, enhanced apoptosis, induced cell cycle arrest and retarded cell invasion in pancreatic cancer cells. Moreover, we observed that curcumin significantly inhibited the expression of Cdc20 in pancreatic cancer cells. Furthermore, our results demonstrated that overexpression of Cdc20 enhanced cell proliferation and invasion, and abrogated the cytotoxic effects induced by curcumin in pancreatic cancer cells. Consistently, downregulation of Cdc20 promoted curcumin-mediated anti-tumor activity. Therefore, our findings indicated that inhibition of Cdc20 by curcumin could be useful for the treatment of pancreatic cancer patients. PMID:28165402

  11. Inhibition of Cell Survival by Curcumin Is Associated with Downregulation of Cell Division Cycle 20 (Cdc20) in Pancreatic Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Xue, Ying-Bo; Li, Hang; Qiu, Dong; Wang, Zhi-Wei; Tan, Shi-Sheng

    2017-02-04

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most aggressive human tumors in the United States. Curcumin, a polyphenol derived from the Curcuma longa plant, has been reported to exert its antitumor activity in pancreatic cancer. However, the molecular mechanisms of curcumin-mediated tumor suppressive function have not been fully elucidated. In the current study, we explore whether curcumin exhibits its anti-cancer function through inhibition of oncoprotein cell division cycle 20 (Cdc20) in pancreatic cancer cells. We found that curcumin inhibited cell growth, enhanced apoptosis, induced cell cycle arrest and retarded cell invasion in pancreatic cancer cells. Moreover, we observed that curcumin significantly inhibited the expression of Cdc20 in pancreatic cancer cells. Furthermore, our results demonstrated that overexpression of Cdc20 enhanced cell proliferation and invasion, and abrogated the cytotoxic effects induced by curcumin in pancreatic cancer cells. Consistently, downregulation of Cdc20 promoted curcumin-mediated anti-tumor activity. Therefore, our findings indicated that inhibition of Cdc20 by curcumin could be useful for the treatment of pancreatic cancer patients.

  12. Passage times of confined cancer cells and deformable particles flowing through a microfluidic channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Zeina; Kamyabi, Nabiollah; Hussain, Fazle; Vanapalli, Siva

    Circulating tumor cells, the primary cause of cancer metastasis, have to navigate through tight extracellular matrix and capillaries. Unfortunately, understanding of the hydrodynamic interactions between cells and narrow vessel walls is lacking. Using a microfluidic channel of rectangular cross-section, we investigate cell hydrodynamic behavior by measuring cell confinement, passage time through the microchannel, and excess pressure drop. Testing with highly and lowly aggressive cancer cells shows that passage time may not always be indicative of cancer cell aggressiveness as the relationship among passage time, friction and rheology is complex. Transport of deformable particles including droplets of varying viscosity and interfacial tension, as well as elastic particles of different elastic moduli, reveals that passage times depend on particle size and, contrary to prior claims, on viscosity but not on elastic modulus. We also find that particle viscosity and not modulus controls the friction force and lubrication film thickness, suggesting that cancer cell viscosity rather than elasticity controls cell transport on short time-scales.

  13. Contribution of Soft Substrates to Malignancy and Tumor Suppression during Colon Cancer Cell Division

    PubMed Central

    Rabineau, Morgane; Kocgozlu, Leyla; Dujardin, Denis; Senger, Bernard; Haikel, Youssef; Voegel, Jean-Claude; Freund, Jean-Noel; Schaaf, Pierre; Lavalle, Philippe; Vautier, Dominique

    2013-01-01

    In colon cancer, a highly aggressive disease, progression through the malignant sequence is accompanied by increasingly numerous chromosomal rearrangements. To colonize target organs, invasive cells cross several tissues of various elastic moduli. Whether soft tissue increases malignancy or in contrast limits invasive colon cell spreading remains an open question. Using polyelectrolyte multilayer films mimicking microenvironments of various elastic moduli, we revealed that human SW480 colon cancer cells displayed increasing frequency in chromosomal segregation abnormalities when cultured on substrates with decreasing stiffness. Our results show that, although decreasing stiffness correlates with increased cell lethality, a significant proportion of SW480 cancer cells did escape from the very soft substrates, even when bearing abnormal chromosome segregation, achieve mitosis and undergo a new cycle of replication in contrast to human colonic HCoEpiC cells which died on soft substrates. This observation opens the possibility that the ability of cancer cells to overcome defects in chromosome segregation on very soft substrates could contribute to increasing chromosomal rearrangements and tumor cell aggressiveness. PMID:24167628

  14. Genetic Variations in Mitochondria and Prostate Cancer Aggressiveness and Progression in Caucasian and African American Men

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-01

    suggested that some inherited mtDNA variants could have an adverse effect by increasing the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Besides the...500 study subjects. We have not started Aim 3 yet. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Mitochondrial DNAs prostate cancer 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17...6 Conclusion…………………………………………………………………………… 6 4 Introduction The mitochondrial genome is highly

  15. Exosomes as Novel microRNA-Delivery Vehicles to Modulate Prostate Cancer Progression

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    specifically packaged in these 40-100 nm microvesicles and secreted from prostate cancer cells are important in the progression to aggressive disease...behavior of aggressive human prostate cancer cell lines in vitro as well as in vivo using mouse xenograft models. 15. SUBJECT TERMS microRNAs, exosomes...microvesicles and secreted from prostate cancer cells are important in the progression to aggressive disease. In this exploratory award, we are

  16. Metastatic progression and gene expression between breast cancer cell lines from African American and Caucasian women

    PubMed Central

    Yancy, Haile F; Mason, Jacquline A; Peters, Sharla; Thompson, Charles E; Littleton, George K; Jett, Marti; Day, Agnes A

    2007-01-01

    African American (AA) women have a lower overall incidence of breast cancer than do Caucasian (CAU) women, but a higher overall mortality. Little is known as to why the incidence of breast cancer is lower yet mortality is higher in AA women. Many studies speculate that this is only a socio-economical problem. This investigation suggests the possibility that molecular mechanisms contribute to the increased mortality of AA women with breast cancer. This study investigates the expression of 14 genes which have been shown to play a role in cancer metastasis. Cell lines derived from AA and CAU patients were analyzed to demonstrate alterations in the transcription of genes known to be involved in cancer and the metastatic process. Total RNA was isolated from cell lines and analyzed by RT-PCR analysis. Differential expression of the 14 targeted genes between a spectrum model (6 breast cancer cell lines and 2 non-cancer breast cell lines) and a metastasis model (12 metastatic breast cancer cell lines) were demonstrated. Additionally, an in vitro comparison of the expression established differences in 5 of the 14 biomarker genes between African American and Caucasian breast cell lines. Results from this study indicates that altered expression of the genes Atp1b1, CARD 10, KLF4, Spint2, and Acly may play a role in the aggressive phenotype seen in breast cancer in African American women. PMID:17472751

  17. Molecular apocrine breast cancers are aggressive estrogen receptor negative tumors overexpressing either HER2 or GCDFP15

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Molecular apocrine (MA) tumors are estrogen receptor (ER) negative breast cancers characterized by androgen receptor (AR) expression. We analyzed a group of 58 transcriptionally defined MA tumors and proposed a new tool to identify these tumors. Methods We performed quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) for ESR1, AR, FOXA1 and AR-related genes, and immunohistochemistry (IHC) for ER, PR, Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 (HER2), CK5/6, CK17, EGFR, Ki67, AR, FOXA1 and GCDFP15 and we analyzed clinical features. Results MA tumors were all characterized by ESR1(-) AR(+) FOXA1(+) and AR-related genes positive mRNA profile. IHC staining on these tumors showed 93% ER(-), only 58% AR(+) and 90% FOXA1(+). 67% and 57% MA tumors were HER2(3+) and GCDFP15(+), respectively. Almost all MA tumors (94%) had the IHC signature HER2(3+) or GCDFP15(+) but none of the 13 control basal-like (BL) tumors did. Clinically, MA tumors were rather aggressive, with poor prognostic factors. Conclusion MA tumors could be better defined by their qRT-PCR-AR profile than by AR IHC. In addition, we found that HER2 or GCDFP15 protein overexpression is a sensitive and specific tool to differentiate MA from BL in the context of ER negative tumors. A composite molecular and IHC signature could, therefore, help to identify MA tumors in daily practice. PMID:23663520

  18. Hypoxia-Regulated Delta-like 1 Homologue Enhances Cancer Cell Stemness and Tumorigenicity

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yuri; Lin, Qun; Zelterman, Daniel; Yun, Zhong

    2010-01-01

    Reduced oxygenation, or hypoxia, inhibits differentiation and facilitates stem cell maintenance. Hypoxia commonly occurs in solid tumors and promotes malignant progression. Hypoxic tumors are aggressive and exhibit stem cell–like characteristics. It remains unclear, however, whether and how hypoxia regulates cancer cell differentiation and maintains cancer cell stemness. Here, we show that hypoxia increases the expression of the stem cell gene DLK1, or delta-like 1 homologue (Drosophila), in neuronal tumor cells. Inhibition of DLK1 enhances spontaneous differentiation, decreases clonogenicity, and reduces in vivo tumor growth. Overexpression of DLK1 inhibits differentiation and enhances tumorigenic potentials. We further show that the DLK1 cytoplasmic domain, especially Tyrosine339 and Serine355, is required for maintaining both clonogenicity and tumorigenicity. Because elevated DLK1 expression is found in many tumor types, our observations suggest that hypoxia and DLK1 may constitute an important stem cell pathway for the regulation of cancer stem cell–like functionality and tumorigenicity. PMID:19934310

  19. Leptin and cancer: from cancer stem cells to metastasis.

    PubMed

    Park, Jiyoung; Scherer, Philipp E

    2011-08-01

    There is growing evidence that obesity is a risk factor of cancer incidence and mortality. Hence, the identification of the mechanistic links between obesity and cancer progression is emerging as a topic of widespread interest. Recently, several groups have addressed the functional roles of leptin, an adipocyte-derived adipokine, for mammary tumor progression. In this issue of Endocrine-Related Cancer, Zheng et al. study the role of leptin on tumor growth in a xenograft model of MMTV-Wnt1-derived cancer cells. They study growth of these cancer cells in the context of obese animals, such as ob/ob mice (lacking leptin) and db/db mice (lacking functional leptin receptors (LEPR)) and find that leptin triggers LEPR-positive cancer stem cell differentiation, thereby promoting tumor cell survival. These findings highlight the therapeutic potential for leptin and leptin signaling in the context of mammary tumor growth.

  20. Significance of Cancer Stem Cells in Anti-Cancer Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Botelho, Mónica; Alves, Helena

    2017-01-01

    Stem cells are the focus of cutting edge research interest because of their competence both to self-renew and proliferate, and to differentiate into a variety of tissues, offering enticing prospects of growing replacement organs in vitro, among other possible therapeutic implications. It is conceivable that cancer stem cells share a number of biological hallmarks that are different from their normal-tissue counterparts and that these might be taken advantage of for therapeutic benefits. In this review we discuss the significance of cancer stem cells in diagnosis and prognosis of cancer as well as in the development of new strategies for anti-cancer drug design. PMID:28191547

  1. A novel genomic alteration of LSAMP associates with aggressive prostate cancer in African American men

    PubMed Central

    Petrovics, Gyorgy; Li, Hua; Stümpel, Tanja; Tan, Shyh-Han; Young, Denise; Katta, Shilpa; Li, Qiyuan; Ying, Kai; Klocke, Bernward; Ravindranath, Lakshmi; Kohaar, Indu; Chen, Yongmei; Ribli, Dezső; Grote, Korbinian; Zou, Hua; Cheng, Joseph; Dalgard, Clifton L.; Zhang, Shimin; Csabai, István; Kagan, Jacob; Takeda, David; Loda, Massimo; Srivastava, Sudhir; Scherf, Matthias; Seifert, Martin; Gaiser, Timo; McLeod, David G.; Szallasi, Zoltan; Ebner, Reinhard; Werner, Thomas; Sesterhenn, Isabell A.; Freedman, Matthew; Dobi, Albert; Srivastava, Shiv

    2015-01-01

    Evaluation of cancer genomes in global context is of great interest in light of changing ethnic distribution of the world population. We focused our study on men of African ancestry because of their disproportionately higher rate of prostate cancer (CaP) incidence and mortality. We present a systematic whole genome analyses, revealing alterations that differentiate African American (AA) and Caucasian American (CA) CaP genomes. We discovered a recurrent deletion on chromosome 3q13.31 centering on the LSAMP locus that was prevalent in tumors from AA men (cumulative analyses of 435 patients: whole genome sequence, 14; FISH evaluations, 101; and SNP array, 320 patients). Notably, carriers of this deletion experienced more rapid disease progression. In contrast, PTEN and ERG common driver alterations in CaP were significantly lower in AA prostate tumors compared to prostate tumors from CA. Moreover, the frequency of inter-chromosomal rearrangements was significantly higher in AA than CA tumors. These findings reveal differentially distributed somatic mutations in CaP across ancestral groups, which have implications for precision medicine strategies. PMID:26844274

  2. Breast Cancer Stem Cells in Antiestrogen Resistance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    stimulated by antiestrogens. The effects of antiestrogens on the ER-positive breast cancer stem/progenitor involve changes of both proliferation and...self-renewal capabilities of breast cancer stem/progenitor cells. The effects of antiestrogens on the ER- positive breast cancer stem/progenitor...potent tumor-seeding efficiency. . Fig 3. The effects of antiestrogens on the differentiation of ER-positive breast cancer stem cells expressing

  3. Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Aggressive NK Cell Leukemia. A Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research Analysis.

    PubMed

    Hamadani, Mehdi; Kanate, Abraham S; DiGilio, Alyssa; Ahn, Kwang Woo; Smith, Sonali M; Lee, Jong Wook; Ayala, Ernesto; Chao, Nelson; Hari, Parameswaran; Bolaños-Meade, Javier; Gress, Ronald; Smedegaard Anderson, Niels; Chen, Yi-Bin; Farooq, Umar; Schiller, Gary; Yared, Jean; Sureda, Anna; Fenske, Timothy S; Olteanu, Horatiu

    2017-02-01

    Aggressive NK cell leukemia (ANKL) is an exceedingly rare form of leukemia and carries a poor prognosis, with a median survival of only 2 months. Using the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research database, we evaluated outcomes of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (alloHCT) in patients with ANKL. Twenty-one patients with a centrally confirmed diagnosis of ANKL were included. Median patient age was 42 years and 15 patients (71%) were Caucasian. Fourteen patients (67%) were in complete remission (CR) at the time of alloHCT, and 5 patients had active disease. Median follow-up of survivors was 25 months (range, 12 to 116). The 2-year estimates of nonrelapse mortality, relapse/progression, progression-free (PFS), and overall survival (OS) were 21%, 59%, 20%, and 24%, respectively. The 2-year PFS of patients in CR at the time of alloHCT was significantly better than that of patients with active disease at transplantation (30% versus 0%; P = .001). The 2-year OS in similar order was 38% versus 0% (P < .001). In conclusion, this registry analysis that included majority non-Asian patient population shows that alloHCT can provide durable disease control in a subset of ANKL patients. Achieving CR before transplantation appears to be a prerequisite for successful transplantation outcomes.

  4. Bromodomain and hedgehog pathway targets in small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Gurmeet; Reinhart, Russell A; Monks, Anne; Evans, David; Morris, Joel; Polley, Eric; Teicher, Beverly A

    2016-02-28

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is an extremely aggressive cancer that frequently recurs. Twenty-three human SCLC lines were selected representing varied Myc status. Gene expression of lung cancer, stem-like, hedgehog pathway, and notch pathway genes were determined by RT(2)-PCR array and Exon 1.0 ST array. Etoposide and topotecan concentration response was examined. The IC50's for etoposide and topotecan ranged over nearly 3 logs upon 96 hrs exposure to the drugs. Myc status, TOP2A, TOP2B and TOP1 mRNA expression or topoisomerase 1 and topoisomerase 2 protein did not account for the range in the sensitivity to the drugs. γ-secretase inhibitors, RO429097 and PF-03084014, had little activity in the SCLC lines over ranges covering the clinical Cmax concentrations. MYC amplified lines tended to be more sensitive to the bromodomain inhibitor JQ1. The Smo antagonists, erismodegib and vismodegib and the Gli antagonists, HPI1 and SEN-450 had a trend toward greater sensitivity of the MYC amplified line. Recurrent SCLC is among the most recalcitrant cancers and drug development efforts in this cancer are a high priority.

  5. Pancreatic cancer stem cells: fact or fiction?

    PubMed

    Bhagwandin, Vikash J; Shay, Jerry W

    2009-04-01

    The terms cancer-initiating or cancer stem cells have been the subject of great interest in recent years. In this review we will use pancreatic cancer as an overall theme to draw parallels with historical findings to compare to recent reports of stem-like characteristics in pancreatic cancer. We will cover such topics as label-retaining cells (side-population), ABC transporter pumps, telomerase, quiescence, cell surface stem cell markers, and epithelial-mesenchymal transitions. Finally we will integrate the available findings into a pancreatic stem cell model that also includes metastatic disease.

  6. Contrast-enhanced transrectal ultrasound for prediction of prostate cancer aggressiveness: The role of normal peripheral zone time-intensity curves

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hui; Zhu, Zheng-Qiu; Zhou, Zheng-Guo; Chen, Ling-Shan; Zhao, Ming; Zhang, Yang; Li, Hong-Bo; Yin, Li-Ping

    2016-01-01

    To assess the role of time-intensity curves (TICs) of the normal peripheral zone (PZ) in the identification of biopsy-proven prostate nodules using contrast-enhanced transrectal ultrasound (CETRUS). This study included 132 patients with 134 prostate PZ nodules. Arrival time (AT), peak intensity (PI), mean transit time (MTT), area under the curve (AUC), time from peak to one half (TPH), wash in slope (WIS) and time to peak (TTP) were analyzed using multivariate linear logistic regression and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves to assess whether combining nodule TICs with normal PZ TICs improved the prediction of prostate cancer (PCa) aggressiveness. The PI, AUC (p < 0.001 for both), MTT and TPH (p = 0.011 and 0.040 respectively) values of the malignant nodules were significantly higher than those of the benign nodules. Incorporating the PI and AUC values (both, p < 0.001) of the normal PZ TIC, but not the MTT and TPH values (p = 0.076 and 0.159 respectively), significantly improved the AUC for prediction of malignancy (PI: 0.784–0.923; AUC: 0.758–0.891) and assessment of cancer aggressiveness (p < 0.001). Thus, all these findings indicate that incorporating normal PZ TICs with nodule TICs in CETRUS readings can improve the diagnostic accuracy for PCa and cancer aggressiveness assessment. PMID:27929134

  7. Blood based cell biopsy for early detection of cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Cha-Mei; Adams, Daniel; Adams, Diane; Alpaugh, R. Katherine; Cristofanilli, Massimo; Martin, Stuart; Chumsri, Saranya; Marks, Jeffrey

    Early detection (ED) of cancer holds the promise for less aggressive treatments and better outcome. However, there are few accepted methods for ED. We report on a previously unknown blood cell found specifically in the peripheral blood of many solid tumors. They are defined as Cancer Associated Macrophage-Like cells (CAMLs) and are characterized by large size (25-300 μm) and expression of cancer markers. CAMLs were isolated on precision filters during blood filtration. We conducted prospective studies in breast cancer (BC) to ascertain CAML prevalence, specificity and sensitivity in relation to disease status at clinical presentation. We report on two related but separate studies: 1) the isolation of CAMLs from patients with known invasive BC, compared to healthy volunteers and, 2) a double blind study conducted on women undergoing core needle biopsy to evaluate suspicious breast masses. The studies show that CAMLs are found in all stages of BC and suggest that detection of CAMLs can differentiate patients with BC from those with benign breast conditions and healthy individuals. This non-invasive blood test can be potentially used for ED of BC and other malignancies after validation studies with the advantage of a minimally invasive procedure and longitudinal monitoring. This work was supported by Grants from Maryland TEDCO MTTCF, R01-CA154624 from NIH, KG100240 from Susan G. Komen Foundation, Era of Hope Scholar award from DoD (BC100675), and U01-CA084955 from NCI EDRN.

  8. Aggressive Behavior

    MedlinePlus

    ... Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Aggressive Behavior Page Content Article Body My child is sometimes very aggressive. What is the best ... once they are quiet and still reinforces this behavior, so your child learns that time out means “quiet and still.” ...

  9. Programmed Cell Death in Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-10-01

    Programmed cell death , or apoptosis, is a genetically regulated process through which a cell is active in bringing about its own death for the sake...delays and inhibits the cell death response, so that the breast cancer cell lines are much less susceptible to thapsigargin-induced apoptosis than...lymphoid cell lines, an observation that parallels the differential susceptibility of breast cancer and lymphomas to chemotherapy-induced cell death in

  10. Divergent control of Cav-1 expression in non-cancerous Li-Fraumeni syndrome and human cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Sherif, Zaki A.; Sultan, Ahmed S.

    2013-01-01

    Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS) is primarily characterized by development of tumors exhibiting germ-line mutations in the p53 gene. Cell lines developed from patients of a LFS family have decreased p53 activity as evidenced by the absence of apoptosis upon etoposide treatment. To test our hypothesis that changes in gene expression beyond p53 per se are contributing to the development of tumors, we compared gene expression in non-cancerous skin fibroblasts of LFS-affected (p53 heterozygous) vs. non-affected (p53 wild-type homozygous) family members. Expression analysis showed that several genes were differentially regulated in the p53 homozygous and heterozygous cell lines. We were particularly intrigued by the decreased expression (~88%) of a putative tumor-suppressor protein, caveolin-1 (Cav-1), in the p53-mutant cells. Decreased expression of Cav-1 was also seen in both p53-knockout and p21-knockout HTC116 cells suggesting that p53 controls Cav-1 expression through p21 and leading to the speculation that p53, Cav-1 and p21 may be part of a positive auto-regulatory feedback loop. The direct relationship between p53 and Cav-1 was also tested with HeLa cells (containing inactive p53), which expressed a significantly lower Cav-1 protein. A panel of nonfunctional and p53-deficient colon and epithelial breast cancer cell lines showed undetectable expression of Cav-1 supporting the role of p53 in the control of Cav-1. However, in two aggressively metastasizing breast cancer cell lines, Cav-1 was strongly expressed suggesting a possible role in tumor metastasis. Thus, there is a divergent control of Cav-1 expression as evidenced in non-cancerous Li-Fraumeni syndrome and some aggressive human cancer cell lines. PMID:23114650

  11. Cancer stem cells and differentiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Sell, Stewart

    2006-01-01

    Cancers arise from stem cells in adult tissues and the cells that make up a cancer reflect the same stem cell --> progeny --> differentiation progression observed in normal tissues. All adult tissues are made up of lineages of cells consisting of tissue stem cells and their progeny (transit-amplifying cells and terminally differentiated cells); the number of new cells produced in normal tissue lineages roughly equals the number of old cells that die. Cancers result from maturation arrest of this process, resulting in continued proliferation of cells and a failure to differentiate and die. The biological behavior, morphological appearance, and clinical course of a cancer depend on the stage of maturation at which the genetic lesion is activated. This review makes a comparison of cancer cells to embryonic stem cells and to adult tis sue stem cells while addressing two basic questions: (1) Where do cancers come from?, and (2) How do cancers grow? The answers to these questions are critical to the development of approaches to the detection, prevention, and treatment of cancer.

  12. A balanced review of the status T cell-based therapy against cancer

    PubMed Central

    Marincola, Francesco M

    2005-01-01

    A recent commentary stirred intense controversy over the status of anti-cancer immunotherapy. The commentary suggested moving beyond current anti-cancer vaccines since active-specific immunization failed to match expectations toward a more aggressive approach involving the adoptive transfer of in vitro expanded tumor antigen-specific T cells. Although the same authors clarified their position in response to others' rebuttal more discussion needs to be devoted to the current status of T cell-based anti-cancer therapy. The accompanying publications review the status of adoptive transfer of cancer vaccines on one hand and active-specific immunization on the other. Hopefully, reading these articles will offer a balanced view of the current status of antigen-specific ant-cancer therapies and suggest future strategies to foster unified efforts to complement either approach with the other according to specific biological principles. PMID:15831096

  13. The Role of miRNAs in the Regulation of Pancreatic Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bimonte, Sabrina; Barbieri, Antonio; Leongito, Maddalena; Palma, Giuseppe; del Vecchio, Vitale; Falco, Michela; Palaia, Raffaele; Albino, Vittorio; Piccirillo, Mauro; Amore, Alfonso; Petrillo, Antonella; Granata, Vincenza; Izzo, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is currently one of the deadliest cancers with low overall survival rate. This disease leads to an aggressive local invasion and early metastases and is poorly responsive to treatment with chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy. Several studies have shown that pancreatic cancer stem cells (PCSCs) play different roles in the regulation of drug resistance and recurrence in pancreatic cancer. MicroRNA (miRNA), a class of newly emerging small noncoding RNAs, is involved in the modulation of several biological activities ranging from invasion to metastases development, as well as drug resistance of pancreatic cancer. In this review, we synthesize the latest findings on the role of miRNAs in regulating different biological properties of pancreatic cancer stem cells. PMID:27006664

  14. Signaling aggression.

    PubMed

    van Staaden, Moira J; Searcy, William A; Hanlon, Roger T

    2011-01-01

    From psychological and sociological standpoints, aggression is regarded as intentional behavior aimed at inflicting pain and manifested by hostility and attacking behaviors. In contrast, biologists define aggression as behavior associated with attack or escalation toward attack, omitting any stipulation about intentions and goals. Certain animal signals are strongly associated with escalation toward attack and have the same function as physical attack in intimidating opponents and winning contests, and ethologists therefore consider them an integral part of aggressive behavior. Aggressive signals have been molded by evolution to make them ever more effective in mediating interactions between the contestants. Early theoretical analyses of aggressive signaling suggested that signals could never be honest about fighting ability or aggressive intentions because weak individuals would exaggerate such signals whenever they were effective in influencing the behavior of opponents. More recent game theory models, however, demonstrate that given the right costs and constraints, aggressive signals are both reliable about strength and intentions and effective in influencing contest outcomes. Here, we review the role of signaling in lieu of physical violence, considering threat displays from an ethological perspective as an adaptive outcome of evolutionary selection pressures. Fighting prowess is conveyed by performance signals whose production is constrained by physical ability and thus limited to just some individuals, whereas aggressive intent is encoded in strategic signals that all signalers are able to produce. We illustrate recent advances in the study of aggressive signaling with case studies of charismatic taxa that employ a range of sensory modalities, viz. visual and chemical signaling in cephalopod behavior, and indicators of aggressive intent in the territorial calls of songbirds.

  15. Differential expression of enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) protein in small cell and aggressive B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas and differential regulation of EZH2 expression by p-ERK1/2 and MYC in aggressive B-cell lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Tian, Xuejun; Pelton, Ashley; Shahsafaei, Ali; Dorfman, David M

    2016-09-01

    EZH2, a member of the polycomb protein group, is an important methyltransferase that is overexpressed in various neoplasms. We found that in small cell B-cell lymphomas, EZH2 is expressed in <40% of neoplastic cells, with heterogenous signal intensity. In aggressive B-cell lymphomas, 70-100% of tumor cells were positive for EZH2 expression with high signal intensity, which correlated with a high proliferation rate. We investigated the potential signaling molecules that regulate EZH2 overexpression in aggressive B-cell lymphomas and found that 80% of cases of EZH2-positive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma show high p-ERK1/2 expression (average ~57% tumor cell positivity). In contrast, only a small percentage of tumor cells (~10%) show p-ERK1/2 expression in Burkitt lymphoma and double hit lymphoma. On average, 91 and 76% of neoplastic cells were positive for MYC expression in Burkitt lymphoma and double hit lymphoma, respectively, while only 20% neoplastic cells were positive for MYC expression in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. None of the aggressive B-cell lymphomas showed significant p-STAT3 expression in EZH2-overexpressed cases. The correlation of EZH2 expression with aggressive behavior and proliferation rate in B-cell neoplasms suggests that this molecule may function as an oncogenic protein in these neoplasms, with possible regulation by different signaling cascades in different types of aggressive B-cell lymphomas: p-ERK-related signaling in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, and MYC-related signaling in Burkitt lymphoma and double hit lymphoma. Furthermore, EZH2 and associated signaling cascades may serve as therapeutic targets for the treatment of aggressive B-cell lymphomas.

  16. Restoration of normal phenotype in cancer cells

    DOEpatents

    Bissell, Mina J.; Weaver, Valerie M.

    1998-01-01

    A method for reversing expression of malignant phenotype in cancer cells is described. The method comprises applying .beta..sub.1 integrin function-blocking antibody to the cells. The method can be used to assess the progress of cancer therapy. Human breast epithelial cells were shown to be particularly responsive.

  17. Restoration of normal phenotype in cancer cells

    DOEpatents

    Bissell, M.J.; Weaver, V.M.

    1998-12-08

    A method for reversing expression of malignant phenotype in cancer cells is described. The method comprises applying {beta}{sub 1} integrin function-blocking antibody to the cells. The method can be used to assess the progress of cancer therapy. Human breast epithelial cells were shown to be particularly responsive. 14 figs.

  18. Endothelial cell metabolism: parallels and divergences with cancer cell metabolism

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The stromal vasculature in tumors is a vital conduit of nutrients and oxygen for cancer cells. To date, the vast majority of studies have focused on unraveling the genetic basis of vessel sprouting (also termed angiogenesis). In contrast to the widely studied changes in cancer cell metabolism, insight in the metabolic regulation of angiogenesis is only just emerging. These studies show that metabolic pathways in endothelial cells (ECs) importantly regulate angiogenesis in conjunction with genetic signals. In this review, we will highlight these emerging insights in EC metabolism and discuss them in perspective of cancer cell metabolism. While it is generally assumed that cancer cells have unique metabolic adaptations, not shared by healthy non-transformed cells, we will discuss parallels and highlight differences between endothelial and cancer cell metabolism and consider possible novel therapeutic opportunities arising from targeting both cancer and endothelial cells. PMID:25250177

  19. Cancer stem cells as the relevant biomass for drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Winquist, Raymond J; Furey, Brinley F; Boucher, Diane M

    2010-08-01

    The poor success rate of discovering new, effective chemotherapeutics for oncology may reflect the failure of targeting treatments to the more aggressive, tumorigenic cells of the malignancy. Data have now emerged from several laboratories, examining both liquid and solid primary tumor tissues, that implicate cancer stem cells (CSCs) as the 'master-driver' cellular population for tumorigenicity. Moreover, these putative CSCs appear relatively resistant to existing chemotherapeutic and radiation therapy. Several different cellular pathways have been identified as likely mechanisms causal for the underlying insensitivity of the CSCs to conventional therapy. Progress has been made in the isolation and expansion of these CSCs for constructing conventional high-throughput phenotypic screening campaigns. However, challenges remain in designing optimal proof-of-concept trials for the clinical development of compounds targeting the elimination of CSCs.

  20. Renal cell carcinoma with rhabdoid-like features lack intracytoplasmic inclusion bodies and show aggressive behavior.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Masaaki; Kohashi, Kenichi; Kuroiwa, Kentaro; Abe, Tatsuro; Yamada, Yuichi; Shiota, Masaki; Imada, Kenjiro; Naito, Seiji; Oda, Yoshinao

    2016-03-01

    In renal cell carcinoma (RCC), tumor cells with rhabdoid features are characterized by eccentric nuclei, prominent nucleoli, and eosinophilic cytoplasm with intracytoplasmic inclusion bodies. In RCC, tumor cells have also been observed resembling rhabdomyoblasts or rhabdoid but without intracytoplasmic inclusion bodies, and here, we defined these rhabdoid-like features of these cells. To this end, we studied a series of clear cell RCC (ccRCC) with rhabdoid features and compared them with a series of ccRCC with rhabdoid-like features to clarify the differences in the immunohistochemical profile and biological behavior. From 695 cases of ccRCC (80.8 % of all RCCs), 18 cases with rhabdoid features (2.1 % of all RCCs) and 25 cases with rhabdoid-like features (2.9 % of all RCCs) were investigated. The 5-year survival rate for ccRCC with rhabdoid features was 44.7 % and for ccRCC with rhabdoid-like features 30.3 %. Although ccRCC with rhabdoid features showed immunohistochemical co-expression of epithelial markers and vimentin as seen in malignant rhabdoid tumors, ccRCC with rhabdoid-like features showed no such co-expression. Multivariate analyses of cancer-specific survival revealed that perinephric tissues invasion was an independent prognostic factor in ccRCC with rhabdoid features (p = 0.0253) but not in ccRCC with rhabdoid-like features. In summary, although their prognosis is similar, the marker profile and pattern of extension of ccRCC with rhabdoid-like is different from that of ccRCC with rhabdoid features. Therefore, ccRCC with rhabdoid-like features should be distinguished from ccRCC with rhabdoid features.

  1. Camalexin-Induced Apoptosis in Prostate Cancer Cells Involves Alterations of Expression and Activity of Lysosomal Protease Cathepsin D

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Basil; Randle, Diandra; Mezencev, Roman; Thomas, LeeShawn; Hinton, Cimona; Marah, Valerie

    2015-01-01

    Camalexin, the phytoalexin produced in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, possesses antiproliferative and cancer chemopreventive effects. We have demonstrated that the cytostatic/cytotoxic effects of camalexin on several prostate cancer (PCa) cells are due to oxidative stress. Lysosomes are vulnerable organelles to Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS)-induced injuries, with the potential to initiate and or facilitate apoptosis subsequent to release of proteases such as cathepsin D (CD) into the cytosol. We therefore hypothesized that camalexin reduces cell viability in PCa cells via alterations in expression and activity of CD. Cell viability was evaluated by MTS cell proliferation assay in LNCaP and ARCaP Epithelial (E) cells, and their respective aggressive sublines C4-2 and ARCaP Mesenchymal (M) cells, whereby the more aggressive PCa cells (C4-2 and ARCaPM) displayed greater sensitivity to camalexin treatments than the lesser aggressive cells (LNCaP and ARCaPE). Immunocytochemical analysis revealed CD relocalization from the lysosome to the cytosol subsequent to camalexin treatments, which was associated with increased protein expression of mature CD; p53, a transcriptional activator of CD; BAX, a downstream effector of CD, and cleaved PARP, a hallmark for apoptosis. Therefore, camalexin reduces cell viability via CD and may present as a novel therapeutic agent for treatment of metastatic prostate cancer cells. PMID:24699144

  2. Activation of MYC in a masked t(8;17) translocation results in an aggressive B-cell leukemia.

    PubMed Central

    Gauwerky, C E; Huebner, K; Isobe, M; Nowell, P C; Croce, C M

    1989-01-01

    We have analyzed the oncogene rearrangements involving BCL2 and MYC in the leukemia cells of a patient with an aggressive prolymphocytic leukemia that had an abnormal karyotype including a t(14;18) translocation and a chromosome 17q+. Molecular analysis showed that BCL2 was rearranged in the major breakpoint cluster region and had joined into the immunoglobulin heavy chain gene as in follicular lymphoma. Cloning and sequence analysis of the rearranged MYC gene revealed that MYC was truncated at the Pvu II site at the end of the first exon of MYC and had joined into the regulatory elements of a gene that we called BCL3 (B-cell leukemia/lymphoma 3). The BCL3 locus was mapped to chromosome 17 band q22. We found BCL3 transcribed as a message of 1.7 kilobases in many hematopoietic cell lines representing all hematopoietic lineages. In the patient's leukemia cells, the truncated MYC gene was highly expressed under the influence of BCL3 regulatory elements, leading to an aggressive B-cell leukemia that presumably had been derived from an indolent lymphoma carrying a rearranged BCL2 gene. Images PMID:2682663

  3. Deregulation of Cell Signaling in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Giancotti, Filippo G.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Oncogenic mutations disrupt the regulatory circuits that govern cell function, enabling tumor cells to undergo de-regulated mitogenesis, to resist to proapoptotic insults, and to invade through tissue boundaries. Cancer cell biology has played a crucial role in elucidating the signaling mechanisms by which oncogenic mutations sustain these malignant behaviors and thereby in identifying rational targets for cancer drugs. The efficacy of such targeted therapies illustrate the power of a reductionist approach to the study of cancer. PMID:24561200

  4. CLDN3 inhibits cancer aggressiveness via Wnt-EMT signaling and is a potential prognostic biomarker for hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lei; Yang, Yi-Dong; Fu, Li; Xu, Weiqi; Liu, Dabin; Liang, Qiaoyi; Zhang, Xiang; Xu, Lixia; Guan, Xin-Yuan; Wu, Bin; Sung, Joseph J Y; Yu, Jun

    2014-09-15

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common fatal malignancies but the molecular genetic basis of this disease remains unclear. By using genome-wide methylation profiling analysis, we identified CLDN3 as an epigenetically regulated gene in cancer. Here, we investigated its function and clinical relevance in human HCC. CLDN3 downregulation occurred in 87/114 (76.3%) of primary HCCs, where it was correlated significantly with shorter survival of HCC patients (P=0.021). Moreover, multivariate cyclooxygenase regression analysis showed that CLDN3 was an independent prognostic factor for overall survival (P=0.014). Absent expression of CLDN3 was also detected in 67% of HCC cell lines, which was significantly associated with its promoter hypermethylation. Ectopic expression of CLDN3 in HCC cells could inhibit cell motility