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Sample records for aggressive clinical phenotype

  1. Association of abnormal plasma bilirubin with aggressive HCC phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Brian I.; Guerra, Vito; Giannini, Edoardo G.; Farinati, Fabio; Ciccarese, Francesca; Rapaccini, Gian Ludovico; Marco, Maria Di; Benvegnù, Luisa; Zoli, Marco; Borzio, Franco; Caturelli, Eugenio; Chiaramonte, Maria; Trevisani, Franco

    2014-01-01

    Background Cirrhosis-related abnormal liver function is associated with predisposition to HCC, features in several HCC classification systems and is an HCC prognostic factor. Aims To examine the phenotypic tumor differences in HCC patients with normal or abnormal plasma bilirubin levels. Methods A 2,416 patient HCC cohort was studied and dichotomized into normal and abnormal plasma bilirubin groups. Their HCC characteristics were compared for tumor aggressiveness features, namely blood AFP levels, tumor size, presence of PVT and tumor multifocality. Results In the total cohort, elevated bilirubin levels were associated with higher AFP levels, increased PVT and multifocality and lower survival, despite similar tumor sizes. When different tumor size terciles were compared, similar results were found, even for small tumor size patients. A multiple logistic regression model for PVT or tumor multifocality showed increased OddsRatios for elevated levels of GGTP, bilirubin and AFP and for larger tumor sizes. Conclusions HCC patients with abnormal bilirubin levels had worse prognosis than patients with normal bilirubin. They also had increased incidence of PVT and tumor multifocality and higher AFP levels, in patients with both small and larger tumors. The results show an association between bilirubin levels and indices of HCC aggressiveness. PMID:24787296

  2. Association of abnormal plasma bilirubin with aggressive hepatocellular carcinoma phenotype.

    PubMed

    Carr, Brian I; Guerra, Vito; Giannini, Edoardo G; Farinati, Fabio; Ciccarese, Francesca; Ludovico Rapaccini, Gian; Di Marco, Maria; Benvegnù, Luisa; Zoli, Marco; Borzio, Franco; Caturelli, Eugenio; Chiaramonte, Maria; Trevisani, Franco

    2014-04-01

    Cirrhosis-related abnormal liver function is associated with predisposition to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). It features in several HCC classification systems and is an HCC prognostic factor. The aim of the present study was to examine the phenotypic tumor differences in HCC patients with normal or abnormal plasma bilirubin levels. A 2,416-patient HCC cohort was studied and dichotomized into normal and abnormal plasma bilirubin groups. Their HCC characteristics were compared for tumor aggressiveness features, namely, blood alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) levels, tumor size, presence of portal vein thrombosis (PVT) and tumor multifocality. In the total cohort, elevated bilirubin levels were associated with higher AFP levels, increased PVT and multifocality, and lower survival, despite similar tumor sizes. When different tumor size terciles were compared, similar results were found, even among patients with small tumors. A multiple logistic regression model for PVT or tumor multifocality showed increased odds ratios for elevated levels of gamma glutamyl transpeptidase (GGTP), bilirubin, and AFP and for larger tumor sizes. We conclude that HCC patients with abnormal bilirubin levels had worse prognosis than patients with normal bilirubin. They also had an increased incidence of PVT and tumor multifocality, and higher AFP levels, in patients with both small and larger tumors. The results show an association between bilirubin levels and indices of HCC aggressiveness. PMID:24787296

  3. Association of abnormal plasma bilirubin with aggressive hepatocellular carcinoma phenotype.

    PubMed

    Carr, Brian I; Guerra, Vito; Giannini, Edoardo G; Farinati, Fabio; Ciccarese, Francesca; Ludovico Rapaccini, Gian; Di Marco, Maria; Benvegnù, Luisa; Zoli, Marco; Borzio, Franco; Caturelli, Eugenio; Chiaramonte, Maria; Trevisani, Franco

    2014-04-01

    Cirrhosis-related abnormal liver function is associated with predisposition to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). It features in several HCC classification systems and is an HCC prognostic factor. The aim of the present study was to examine the phenotypic tumor differences in HCC patients with normal or abnormal plasma bilirubin levels. A 2,416-patient HCC cohort was studied and dichotomized into normal and abnormal plasma bilirubin groups. Their HCC characteristics were compared for tumor aggressiveness features, namely, blood alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) levels, tumor size, presence of portal vein thrombosis (PVT) and tumor multifocality. In the total cohort, elevated bilirubin levels were associated with higher AFP levels, increased PVT and multifocality, and lower survival, despite similar tumor sizes. When different tumor size terciles were compared, similar results were found, even among patients with small tumors. A multiple logistic regression model for PVT or tumor multifocality showed increased odds ratios for elevated levels of gamma glutamyl transpeptidase (GGTP), bilirubin, and AFP and for larger tumor sizes. We conclude that HCC patients with abnormal bilirubin levels had worse prognosis than patients with normal bilirubin. They also had an increased incidence of PVT and tumor multifocality, and higher AFP levels, in patients with both small and larger tumors. The results show an association between bilirubin levels and indices of HCC aggressiveness.

  4. Vocalizations convey sex, seasonal phenotype, and aggression in a seasonal mammal.

    PubMed

    Rendon, Nikki M; Keesom, Sarah M; Amadi, Chima; Hurley, Laura M; Demas, Gregory E

    2015-12-01

    Seasonal variation in social behavior is often accompanied by seasonal variation in communication. In mammals, how seasonal environmental cues influence aggressive vocalizations remains underexplored. Photoperiod is the primary cue coordinating seasonal responses in most temperate zone animals, including Siberian hamsters (Phodopus sungorus), a species that undergoes reproductive inhibition and increased aggression in winter. During same-sex aggressive encounters, hamsters emit both broadband calls (BBCs) and ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs) that indicate aggression and the vocalizer's sex, respectively; however, it is not known whether these rodents adjust specific elements of their vocal repertoire to reflect their photoperiod-induced seasonal phenotypes. To address this, we recorded vocalizations emitted during dyadic interactions between male or female pairs of hamsters housed in long or short photoperiods and measured serum testosterone levels. USV emission rate remained stable across photoperiods, but proportional use of USV subtypes varied in novel ways: 'jump' USVs were sensitive to seasonal phenotype, but not the vocalizer's sex, whereas 'plain' USVs were sensitive only to the sex of the vocalizer. BBC emission rate varied with seasonal phenotype; short-day non-reproductive hamsters produced more BBCs and demonstrated increased aggression compared with reproductive hamsters. Testosterone, however, was not related to vocalization rates. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that changes in the vocal repertoire of Siberian hamsters reflect sex, aggression, and seasonal phenotype, suggesting that both BBCs and USVs are important signals used during same-sex social encounters. PMID:26386405

  5. Vocalizations convey sex, seasonal phenotype, and aggression in a seasonal mammal.

    PubMed

    Rendon, Nikki M; Keesom, Sarah M; Amadi, Chima; Hurley, Laura M; Demas, Gregory E

    2015-12-01

    Seasonal variation in social behavior is often accompanied by seasonal variation in communication. In mammals, how seasonal environmental cues influence aggressive vocalizations remains underexplored. Photoperiod is the primary cue coordinating seasonal responses in most temperate zone animals, including Siberian hamsters (Phodopus sungorus), a species that undergoes reproductive inhibition and increased aggression in winter. During same-sex aggressive encounters, hamsters emit both broadband calls (BBCs) and ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs) that indicate aggression and the vocalizer's sex, respectively; however, it is not known whether these rodents adjust specific elements of their vocal repertoire to reflect their photoperiod-induced seasonal phenotypes. To address this, we recorded vocalizations emitted during dyadic interactions between male or female pairs of hamsters housed in long or short photoperiods and measured serum testosterone levels. USV emission rate remained stable across photoperiods, but proportional use of USV subtypes varied in novel ways: 'jump' USVs were sensitive to seasonal phenotype, but not the vocalizer's sex, whereas 'plain' USVs were sensitive only to the sex of the vocalizer. BBC emission rate varied with seasonal phenotype; short-day non-reproductive hamsters produced more BBCs and demonstrated increased aggression compared with reproductive hamsters. Testosterone, however, was not related to vocalization rates. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that changes in the vocal repertoire of Siberian hamsters reflect sex, aggression, and seasonal phenotype, suggesting that both BBCs and USVs are important signals used during same-sex social encounters.

  6. Altering an extended phenotype reduces intraspecific male aggression and can maintain diversity in cichlid fish

    PubMed Central

    Croft, Guy E.; Joyce, Domino A.

    2013-01-01

    Reduced male aggression towards different phenotypes generating negative frequency-dependent intrasexual selection has been suggested as a mechanism to facilitate the invasion and maintenance of novel phenotypes in a population. To date, the best empirical evidence for the phenomenon has been provided by laboratory studies on cichlid fish with different colour polymorphisms. Here we experimentally tested the hypothesis in a natural population of Lake Malawi cichlid fish, in which males build sand-castles (bowers) to attract females during seasonal leks. We predicted that if bower shape plays an important role in male aggressive interactions, aggression among conspecific males should decrease when their bower shape is altered. Accordingly, we allocated randomly chosen bowers in a Nyassachromis cf. microcephalus lek into three treatments: control, manipulated to a different shape, and simulated manipulation. We then measured male behaviours and bower shape before and after these treatments. We found that once bower shape was altered, males were involved in significantly fewer aggressive interactions with conspecific males than before manipulation. Mating success was not affected. Our results support the idea that an extended phenotype, such as bower shape, can be important in maintaining polymorphic populations. Specifically, reduced male conspecific aggression towards males with different extended phenotypes (here, bower shapes) may cause negative frequency-dependent selection, allowing the invasion and establishment of a new phenotype (bower builder). This could help our understanding of mechanisms of diversification within populations, and in particular, the overall diversification of bower shapes within Lake Malawi cichlids. PMID:24349896

  7. Urinary volatile compounds differ across reproductive phenotypes and following aggression in male Siberian hamsters.

    PubMed

    Rendon, Nikki M; Soini, Helena A; Scotti, Melissa-Ann L; Novotny, Milos V; Demas, Gregory E

    2016-10-01

    Chemical communication plays an integral role in social behavior by facilitating social encounters, allowing for the evaluation of social partners, defining territories and advertising information such as species and sex. Odors provide information about the social environment for rodents and other mammals; however, studies identifying chemical compounds and their functions have thus far focused primarily on a few species. In addition, considerably less attention has been focused on how environmental factors and behavioral context alter these compounds during periods of reproductive quiescence. We examined the effects of photoperiod and social context on chemical communication in the seasonally breeding Siberian hamster which displays modest territorial aggression during long "summer-like" days, but increased aggression in short "winter-like" days. We collected urine samples from long- and short-day male hamsters to investigate how photoperiod and subsequent changes in reproductive phenotype alter urinary volatile compound profiles. Next, we identified changes in urinary compounds before and after an aggressive encounter. Male hamsters exhibited a diverse urinary profile across photoperiods; however, long-day reproductive males showed higher levels of individual compounds when compared to short-day non-reproductive males. In addition, individual compounds were altered following an aggressive encounter; some changed only in long days whereas others changed regardless of photoperiod. Further, aggression and circulating levels of testosterone were positively correlated with urinary compounds in long-, but not short-day males. These findings suggest both photoperiod- and aggression-specific physiological regulation of urinary compounds in this species and contribute to a greater understanding of chemical communication more broadly.

  8. Urinary volatile compounds differ across reproductive phenotypes and following aggression in male Siberian hamsters.

    PubMed

    Rendon, Nikki M; Soini, Helena A; Scotti, Melissa-Ann L; Novotny, Milos V; Demas, Gregory E

    2016-10-01

    Chemical communication plays an integral role in social behavior by facilitating social encounters, allowing for the evaluation of social partners, defining territories and advertising information such as species and sex. Odors provide information about the social environment for rodents and other mammals; however, studies identifying chemical compounds and their functions have thus far focused primarily on a few species. In addition, considerably less attention has been focused on how environmental factors and behavioral context alter these compounds during periods of reproductive quiescence. We examined the effects of photoperiod and social context on chemical communication in the seasonally breeding Siberian hamster which displays modest territorial aggression during long "summer-like" days, but increased aggression in short "winter-like" days. We collected urine samples from long- and short-day male hamsters to investigate how photoperiod and subsequent changes in reproductive phenotype alter urinary volatile compound profiles. Next, we identified changes in urinary compounds before and after an aggressive encounter. Male hamsters exhibited a diverse urinary profile across photoperiods; however, long-day reproductive males showed higher levels of individual compounds when compared to short-day non-reproductive males. In addition, individual compounds were altered following an aggressive encounter; some changed only in long days whereas others changed regardless of photoperiod. Further, aggression and circulating levels of testosterone were positively correlated with urinary compounds in long-, but not short-day males. These findings suggest both photoperiod- and aggression-specific physiological regulation of urinary compounds in this species and contribute to a greater understanding of chemical communication more broadly. PMID:27212202

  9. Comparative gene expression profiles for highly similar aggressive phenotypes in male and female cichlid fishes (Julidochromis)

    PubMed Central

    Schumer, Molly; Krishnakant, Kavita; Renn, Suzy C. P.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Julidochromis marlieri and Julidochromis transcriptus are two closely related Tanganyikan cichlids that have evolved different behavior and mating strategies since they diverged from their common ancestor. While J. transcriptus follows the ancestral pattern of male dominance, male-biased sexual size dimorphism and territoriality, the pattern is reversed in J. marlieri. In J. marlieri, females show all of these behavioral and morphological characteristics. This raises the question of whether female J. marlieri achieve the dominant phenotype by expressing the same genes as J. transcriptus males or whether novel brain gene expression patterns have evolved to produce a similar behavioral phenotype in the females of J. marlieri. This study used cDNA microarrays to investigate whether female J. marlieri and male J. transcriptus show conserved or divergent patterns of brain gene expression. Analysis of microarray data in both species showed certain gene expression patterns associated with sex role independent of gonadal sex and, to a lesser extent, gene expression patterns associated with sex independent of sex role. In general, these data suggest that while there has been substantial divergence in gene expression patterns between J. transcriptus and J. marlieri, we can detect a highly significant overlap for a core set of genes related to aggression in both species. These results suggest that the proximate mechanisms regulating aggressive behavior in J. transcriptus and J. marlieri may be shared. PMID:21900474

  10. A testosterone-related structural brain phenotype predicts aggressive behavior from childhood to adulthood.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tuong-Vi; McCracken, James T; Albaugh, Matthew D; Botteron, Kelly N; Hudziak, James J; Ducharme, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Structural covariance, the examination of anatomic correlations between brain regions, has emerged recently as a valid and useful measure of developmental brain changes. Yet the exact biological processes leading to changes in covariance, and the relation between such covariance and behavior, remain largely unexplored. The steroid hormone testosterone represents a compelling mechanism through which this structural covariance may be developmentally regulated in humans. Although steroid hormone receptors can be found throughout the central nervous system, the amygdala represents a key target for testosterone-specific effects, given its high density of androgen receptors. In addition, testosterone has been found to impact cortical thickness (CTh) across the whole brain, suggesting that it may also regulate the structural relationship, or covariance, between the amygdala and CTh. Here, we examined testosterone-related covariance between amygdala volumes and whole-brain CTh, as well as its relationship to aggression levels, in a longitudinal sample of children, adolescents, and young adults 6-22 years old. We found: (1) testosterone-specific modulation of the covariance between the amygdala and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC); (2) a significant relationship between amygdala-mPFC covariance and levels of aggression; and (3) mediation effects of amygdala-mPFC covariance on the relationship between testosterone and aggression. These effects were independent of sex, age, pubertal stage, estradiol levels and anxious-depressed symptoms. These findings are consistent with prior evidence that testosterone targets the neural circuits regulating affect and impulse regulation, and show, for the first time in humans, how androgen-dependent organizational effects may regulate a very specific, aggression-related structural brain phenotype from childhood to young adulthood. PMID:26431805

  11. RIN2 syndrome: Expanding the clinical phenotype.

    PubMed

    Rosato, Simonetta; Syx, Delfien; Ivanovski, Ivan; Pollazzon, Marzia; Santodirocco, Daniela; De Marco, Loredana; Beltrami, Marina; Callewaert, Bert; Garavelli, Livia; Malfait, Fransiska

    2016-09-01

    Biallelic defects in the RIN2 gene, encoding the Ras and Rab interactor 2 protein, are associated with a rare autosomal recessive connective tissue disorder, with only nine patients from four independent families reported to date. The condition was initially termed MACS syndrome (macrocephaly, alopecia, cutis laxa, and scoliosis), based on the clinical features of the first identified family; however, with the expansion of the clinical phenotype in additional families, it was subsequently coined RIN2 syndrome. Hallmark features of this condition include dysmorphic facial features with striking, progressive facial coarsening, sparse hair, normal to enlarged occipitofrontal circumference, soft redundant and/or hyperextensible skin, and scoliosis. Patients with RIN2 syndrome present phenotypic overlap with other conditions, including EDS (especially the dermatosparaxis and kyphoscoliosis subtypes). Here, we describe a 10th patient, the first patient of Caucasian origin and the oldest reported patient so far, who harbors the previously identified homozygous RIN2 mutation c.1878dupC (p. (Ile627Hisfs*7)). Besides the hallmark features, this patient also presents problems not previously associated with RIN2 syndrome, including cervical vertebral fusion, mild hearing loss, and colonic fibrosis. We provide an overview of the clinical findings in all reported patients with RIN2 mutations and summarize some of the possible pathogenic mechanisms that may underlie this condition. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27277385

  12. Aggression on inpatient units: Clinical characteristics and consequences.

    PubMed

    Renwick, Laoise; Stewart, Duncan; Richardson, Michelle; Lavelle, Mary; James, Karen; Hardy, Claire; Price, Owen; Bowers, Len

    2016-08-01

    Aggression and violence are widespread in UK Mental Health Trusts, and are accompanied by negative psychological and physiological consequences for both staff and other patients. Patients who are younger, male, and have a history of substance use and psychosis diagnoses are more likely to display aggression; however, patient factors are not solely responsible for violence, and there are complex circumstances that lead to aggression. Indeed, patient-staff interactions lead to a sizeable portion of aggression and violence on inpatient units, thus they cannot be viewed without considering other forms of conflict and containment that occur before, during, and after the aggressive incident. For this reason, we examined sequences of aggressive incidents in conjunction with other conflict and containment methods used to explore whether there were particular profiles to aggressive incidents. In the present study, 522 adult psychiatric inpatients from 84 acute wards were recruited, and there were 1422 incidents of aggression (verbal, physical against objects, and physical). Cluster analysis revealed that aggressive incident sequences could be classified into four separate groups: solo aggression, aggression-rule breaking, aggression-medication, and aggression-containment. Contrary to our expectations, we did not find physical aggression dominant in the aggression-containment cluster, and while verbal aggression occurred primarily in solo aggression, physical aggression also occurred here. This indicates that the management of aggression is variable, and although some patient factors are linked with different clusters, these do not entirely explain the variation.

  13. Aggression on inpatient units: Clinical characteristics and consequences.

    PubMed

    Renwick, Laoise; Stewart, Duncan; Richardson, Michelle; Lavelle, Mary; James, Karen; Hardy, Claire; Price, Owen; Bowers, Len

    2016-08-01

    Aggression and violence are widespread in UK Mental Health Trusts, and are accompanied by negative psychological and physiological consequences for both staff and other patients. Patients who are younger, male, and have a history of substance use and psychosis diagnoses are more likely to display aggression; however, patient factors are not solely responsible for violence, and there are complex circumstances that lead to aggression. Indeed, patient-staff interactions lead to a sizeable portion of aggression and violence on inpatient units, thus they cannot be viewed without considering other forms of conflict and containment that occur before, during, and after the aggressive incident. For this reason, we examined sequences of aggressive incidents in conjunction with other conflict and containment methods used to explore whether there were particular profiles to aggressive incidents. In the present study, 522 adult psychiatric inpatients from 84 acute wards were recruited, and there were 1422 incidents of aggression (verbal, physical against objects, and physical). Cluster analysis revealed that aggressive incident sequences could be classified into four separate groups: solo aggression, aggression-rule breaking, aggression-medication, and aggression-containment. Contrary to our expectations, we did not find physical aggression dominant in the aggression-containment cluster, and while verbal aggression occurred primarily in solo aggression, physical aggression also occurred here. This indicates that the management of aggression is variable, and although some patient factors are linked with different clusters, these do not entirely explain the variation. PMID:26892149

  14. IMP2/p62 induces genomic instability and an aggressive hepatocellular carcinoma phenotype.

    PubMed

    Kessler, S M; Laggai, S; Barghash, A; Schultheiss, C S; Lederer, E; Artl, M; Helms, V; Haybaeck, J; Kiemer, A K

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) represents the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths and commonly develops in inflammatory environments. The IGF2 mRNA-binding protein IMP2-2/IGF2BP2-2/p62 was originally identified as an autoantigen in HCC. Aim of this study was to investigate a potential pathophysiological role of p62 in hepatocarcinogenesis. Human HCC tissue showed overexpression of IMP2, which strongly correlated with the fetal markers AFP and DLK1/Pref-1/FA-1 and was particularly elevated in tumors with stem-like features and hypervascularization. Molecular classification of IMP2-overexpressing tumors revealed an aggressive phenotype. Livers of mice overexpressing the IMP2 splice variant p62 highly expressed the stem cell marker DLK1 and secreted DLK1 into the blood. p62 was oncogenic: diethylnitrosamine (DEN)-treated p62 transgenic mice exhibited a higher tumor incidence and multiplicity than wild types. Tumors of transgenics showed a more aggressive and stem-like phenotype and displayed more oncogenic chromosomal aberrations determined with aCGH analysis. DEN-treated p62 transgenic mice exhibited distinct signs of inflammation, such as inflammatory cytokine expression and oxidative stress markers, that is, thiobarbituric acid-reactive substance (TBARS) levels. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was elevated in HepG2 cells, which either overexpressed p62 or were treated with DLK1. p62 induced this ROS production by a DLK1-dependent induction and activation of the small Rho-GTPase RAC1, activating NADPH oxidase and being overexpressed in human HCC. Our data indicate that p62/IMP2 promotes hepatocarcinogenesis by an amplification of inflammation. PMID:26426686

  15. IMP2/p62 induces genomic instability and an aggressive hepatocellular carcinoma phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Kessler, S M; Laggai, S; Barghash, A; Schultheiss, C S; Lederer, E; Artl, M; Helms, V; Haybaeck, J; Kiemer, A K

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) represents the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths and commonly develops in inflammatory environments. The IGF2 mRNA-binding protein IMP2-2/IGF2BP2-2/p62 was originally identified as an autoantigen in HCC. Aim of this study was to investigate a potential pathophysiological role of p62 in hepatocarcinogenesis. Human HCC tissue showed overexpression of IMP2, which strongly correlated with the fetal markers AFP and DLK1/Pref-1/FA-1 and was particularly elevated in tumors with stem-like features and hypervascularization. Molecular classification of IMP2-overexpressing tumors revealed an aggressive phenotype. Livers of mice overexpressing the IMP2 splice variant p62 highly expressed the stem cell marker DLK1 and secreted DLK1 into the blood. p62 was oncogenic: diethylnitrosamine (DEN)-treated p62 transgenic mice exhibited a higher tumor incidence and multiplicity than wild types. Tumors of transgenics showed a more aggressive and stem-like phenotype and displayed more oncogenic chromosomal aberrations determined with aCGH analysis. DEN-treated p62 transgenic mice exhibited distinct signs of inflammation, such as inflammatory cytokine expression and oxidative stress markers, that is, thiobarbituric acid-reactive substance (TBARS) levels. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was elevated in HepG2 cells, which either overexpressed p62 or were treated with DLK1. p62 induced this ROS production by a DLK1-dependent induction and activation of the small Rho-GTPase RAC1, activating NADPH oxidase and being overexpressed in human HCC. Our data indicate that p62/IMP2 promotes hepatocarcinogenesis by an amplification of inflammation. PMID:26426686

  16. Temporal abstraction-based clinical phenotyping with Eureka!

    PubMed

    Post, Andrew R; Kurc, Tahsin; Willard, Richie; Rathod, Himanshu; Mansour, Michel; Pai, Akshatha Kalsanka; Torian, William M; Agravat, Sanjay; Sturm, Suzanne; Saltz, Joel H

    2013-01-01

    Temporal abstraction, a method for specifying and detecting temporal patterns in clinical databases, is very expressive and performs well, but it is difficult for clinical investigators and data analysts to understand. Such patterns are critical in phenotyping patients using their medical records in research and quality improvement. We have previously developed the Analytic Information Warehouse (AIW), which computes such phenotypes using temporal abstraction but requires software engineers to use. We have extended the AIW's web user interface, Eureka! Clinical Analytics, to support specifying phenotypes using an alternative model that we developed with clinical stakeholders. The software converts phenotypes from this model to that of temporal abstraction prior to data processing. The model can represent all phenotypes in a quality improvement project and a growing set of phenotypes in a multi-site research study. Phenotyping that is accessible to investigators and IT personnel may enable its broader adoption. PMID:24551400

  17. Temporal Abstraction-based Clinical Phenotyping with Eureka!

    PubMed Central

    Post, Andrew R.; Kurc, Tahsin; Willard, Richie; Rathod, Himanshu; Mansour, Michel; Pai, Akshatha Kalsanka; Torian, William M.; Agravat, Sanjay; Sturm, Suzanne; Saltz, Joel H.

    2013-01-01

    Temporal abstraction, a method for specifying and detecting temporal patterns in clinical databases, is very expressive and performs well, but it is difficult for clinical investigators and data analysts to understand. Such patterns are critical in phenotyping patients using their medical records in research and quality improvement. We have previously developed the Analytic Information Warehouse (AIW), which computes such phenotypes using temporal abstraction but requires software engineers to use. We have extended the AIW’s web user interface, Eureka! Clinical Analytics, to support specifying phenotypes using an alternative model that we developed with clinical stakeholders. The software converts phenotypes from this model to that of temporal abstraction prior to data processing. The model can represent all phenotypes in a quality improvement project and a growing set of phenotypes in a multi-site research study. Phenotyping that is accessible to investigators and IT personnel may enable its broader adoption. PMID:24551400

  18. Temporal abstraction-based clinical phenotyping with Eureka!

    PubMed

    Post, Andrew R; Kurc, Tahsin; Willard, Richie; Rathod, Himanshu; Mansour, Michel; Pai, Akshatha Kalsanka; Torian, William M; Agravat, Sanjay; Sturm, Suzanne; Saltz, Joel H

    2013-01-01

    Temporal abstraction, a method for specifying and detecting temporal patterns in clinical databases, is very expressive and performs well, but it is difficult for clinical investigators and data analysts to understand. Such patterns are critical in phenotyping patients using their medical records in research and quality improvement. We have previously developed the Analytic Information Warehouse (AIW), which computes such phenotypes using temporal abstraction but requires software engineers to use. We have extended the AIW's web user interface, Eureka! Clinical Analytics, to support specifying phenotypes using an alternative model that we developed with clinical stakeholders. The software converts phenotypes from this model to that of temporal abstraction prior to data processing. The model can represent all phenotypes in a quality improvement project and a growing set of phenotypes in a multi-site research study. Phenotyping that is accessible to investigators and IT personnel may enable its broader adoption.

  19. Multidimensional Clinical Phenotyping of an Adult Cystic Fibrosis Patient Population

    PubMed Central

    Conrad, Douglas J.; Bailey, Barbara A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is a multi-systemic disease resulting from mutations in the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Regulator (CFTR) gene and has major manifestations in the sino-pulmonary, and gastro-intestinal tracts. Clinical phenotypes were generated using 26 common clinical variables to generate classes that overlapped quantiles of lung function and were based on multiple aspects of CF systemic disease. Methods The variables included age, gender, CFTR mutations, FEV1% predicted, FVC% predicted, height, weight, Brasfield chest xray score, pancreatic sufficiency status and clinical microbiology results. Complete datasets were compiled on 211 subjects. Phenotypes were identified using a proximity matrix generated by the unsupervised Random Forests algorithm and subsequent clustering by the Partitioning around Medoids (PAM) algorithm. The final phenotypic classes were then characterized and compared to a similar dataset obtained three years earlier. Findings Clinical phenotypes were identified using a clustering strategy that generated four and five phenotypes. Each strategy identified 1) a low lung health scores phenotype, 2) a younger, well-nourished, male-dominated class, 3) various high lung health score phenotypes that varied in terms of age, gender and nutritional status. This multidimensional clinical phenotyping strategy identified classes with expected microbiology results and low risk clinical phenotypes with pancreatic sufficiency. Interpretation This study demonstrated regional adult CF clinical phenotypes using non-parametric, continuous, ordinal and categorical data with a minimal amount of subjective data to identify clinically relevant phenotypes. These studies identified the relative stability of the phenotypes, demonstrated specific phenotypes consistent with published findings and identified others needing further study. PMID:25822311

  20. Acquisition of Paclitaxel Resistance Is Associated With a More Aggressive and Invasive Phenotype in Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, John J.; Yin, Bo; Christudass, Christhunesa S.; Terada, Naoki; Rajagopalan, Krithika; Fabry, Ben; Lee, Danielle Y.; Shiraishi, Takumi; Getzenberg, Robert H.; Veltri, Robert W.; An, Steven S.; Mooney, Steven M.

    2014-01-01

    Drug resistance is a major limitation to the successful treatment of advanced prostate cancer (PCa). Patients who have metastatic, castration-resistant PCa (mCRPC) are treated with chemotherapeutics. However, these standard therapy modalities culminate in the development of resistance. We established paclitaxel resistance in a classic, androgen-insensitive mCRPC cell line (DU145) and, using a suite of molecular and biophysical methods, characterized the structural and functional changes in vitro and in vivo that are associated with the development of drug resistance. After acquiring paclitaxel-resistance, cells exhibited an abnormal nuclear morphology with extensive chromosomal content, an increase in stiffness, and faster cytoskeletal remodeling dynamics. Compared with the parental DU145, paclitaxel-resistant (DU145-TxR) cells became highly invasive and motile in vitro, exercised greater cell traction forces, and formed larger and rapidly growing tumors in mouse xenografts. Furthermore, DU145-TxR cells showed a discrete loss of keratins but a distinct gain of ZEB1, Vimentin and Snail, suggesting an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. These findings demonstrate, for the first time, that paclitaxel resistance in PCa is associated with a trans-differentiation of epithelial cell machinery that enables more aggressive and invasive phenotype and portend new strategies for developing novel biomarkers and effective treatment modalities for PCa patients. PMID:23192682

  1. Mixed Adeno-neuroendocrine Carcinoma: An Aggressive Clinical Entity

    PubMed Central

    Brathwaite, Shayna; Rock, Jonathan; Yearsley, Martha M.; Bekaii-Saab, Tanios; Wei, Lai; Frankel, Wendy L.; Hays, John; Wu, Christina; Abdel-Misih, Sherif

    2016-01-01

    Background Mixed adeno-neuroendocrine carcinoma (MANEC) is a rare pathologic diagnosis recently defined by the World Health Organization in 2010. Due to poor understanding of MANEC as a clinical entity, there is significant variation in the management of these patients. The purpose of our study was to characterize MANEC to develop evidence-based treatment strategies. Methods The Ohio State University patient database was queried for the diagnosis of MANEC and 46 patients were identified. For comparison, the database also was queried for goblet cell carcinoid (GCC) of the appendix, signet ring cell carcinoma, and carcinoid/neuroendocrine tumor of the appendix. Charts were then retrospectively reviewed for clinicopathologic characteristics, patient treatment, and survival data. Results The mean age of diagnosis of MANEC was 54 years. Eighty-seven percent of MANEC arose from the appendix, with 28 % of patients undergoing appendectomy and 35 % undergoing right hemicolectomy as their index operation. Immunohistochemical staining was positive for chromogranin (82 %), synaptophysin (97 %), and CD56 (67 %). Sixty-seven percent of patients presented with stage IV disease and 41 % had nodal metastases. Overall survival was 4.1 years, which was statistically significantly different (p ≤ 0.05) compared with carcinoid tumors (13.4 years), GCC (15.4 years), and signet ring carcinoma (2.2 years). Conclusions MANEC is a more aggressive clinical entity than both GCC of the appendix and carcinoid/neuroendocrine tumors of the appendix. Based on these findings, we recommend patients with MANEC tumors undergo aggressive multidisciplinary cancer management and close surveillance. PMID:26965701

  2. Circulating tumor cells exhibit a biologically aggressive cancer phenotype accompanied by selective resistance to chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Pavese, Janet M; Bergan, Raymond C

    2014-10-01

    With prostate cancer (PCa), circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and disseminated tumor cells (DTCs) portend a poor clinical prognosis. Their unknown biology precludes rational therapeutic design. We demonstrate that CTC and DTC cell lines, established from mice bearing human PCa orthotopic implants, exhibit increased cellular invasion in vitro, increased metastasis in mice, and express increased epithelial to mesenchymal transition biomarkers. Further, they are selectively resistant to growth inhibition by mitoxantrone-like agents. These findings demonstrate that CTC formation is accompanied by phenotypic progression without obligate reversion. Their increased metastatic potential, selective therapeutic resistance, and differential expression of potential therapeutic targets provide a rational basis to test further interventions.

  3. Mapping Gene Associations in Human Mitochondria using Clinical Disease Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Scharfe, Curt; Lu, Henry Horng-Shing; Neuenburg, Jutta K.; Allen, Edward A.; Li, Guan-Cheng; Klopstock, Thomas; Cowan, Tina M.; Enns, Gregory M.; Davis, Ronald W.

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear genes encode most mitochondrial proteins, and their mutations cause diverse and debilitating clinical disorders. To date, 1,200 of these mitochondrial genes have been recorded, while no standardized catalog exists of the associated clinical phenotypes. Such a catalog would be useful to develop methods to analyze human phenotypic data, to determine genotype-phenotype relations among many genes and diseases, and to support the clinical diagnosis of mitochondrial disorders. Here we establish a clinical phenotype catalog of 174 mitochondrial disease genes and study associations of diseases and genes. Phenotypic features such as clinical signs and symptoms were manually annotated from full-text medical articles and classified based on the hierarchical MeSH ontology. This classification of phenotypic features of each gene allowed for the comparison of diseases between different genes. In turn, we were then able to measure the phenotypic associations of disease genes for which we calculated a quantitative value that is based on their shared phenotypic features. The results showed that genes sharing more similar phenotypes have a stronger tendency for functional interactions, proving the usefulness of phenotype similarity values in disease gene network analysis. We then constructed a functional network of mitochondrial genes and discovered a higher connectivity for non-disease than for disease genes, and a tendency of disease genes to interact with each other. Utilizing these differences, we propose 168 candidate genes that resemble the characteristic interaction patterns of mitochondrial disease genes. Through their network associations, the candidates are further prioritized for the study of specific disorders such as optic neuropathies and Parkinson disease. Most mitochondrial disease phenotypes involve several clinical categories including neurologic, metabolic, and gastrointestinal disorders, which might indicate the effects of gene defects within the

  4. DNA Hypomethylation-Mediated Overexpression of Carbonic Anhydrase 9 Induces an Aggressive Phenotype in Ovarian Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Hye Youn

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Both genetic and epigenetic alterations can lead to abnormal expression of metastasis-regulating genes in tumor cells. Recent studies suggest that aberrant epigenetic alterations, followed by differential gene expression, leads to an aggressive cancer cell phenotype. We examined epigenetically regulated genes that are involved in ovarian cancer metastasis. Materials and Methods We developed SK-OV-3 human ovarian carcinoma cell xenografts in mice. We compared the mRNA expression and DNA methylation profiles of metastatic tissues to those of the original SK-OV-3 cell line. Results Metastatic implants showed increased mRNA expression of the carbonic anhydrase 9 (CA9) gene and hypomethylation at CpG sites in the CA9 promoter. Treatment of wild-type SK-OV-3 cells with the DNA methyltransferase inhibitor 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine reduced methylation of the CA9 promoter and increased CA9 mRNA expression. Eight CpGs, which were located at positions -197, -74, -19, -6, +4, +13, +40, and +86, relative to the transcription start site, were hypomethylated in metastatic tumor implants, compared to that of wild-type SK-OV-3. Overexpression of CA9 induced an aggressive phenotype, including increased invasiveness and migration, in SK-OV-3 cells. Conclusion Alterations in the DNA methylation profile of the CA9 promoter were correlated with a more aggressive phenotype in ovarian cancer cells. PMID:25323905

  5. Patient Aggression: Is the Clinical Practice Setting Safe?

    PubMed Central

    Sansone, Lori A.

    2014-01-01

    Over the past 20 or so years, a number of studies have examined patient aggression toward healthcare professionals. While the majority of these studies has focused on healthcare professionals in the fields of emergency medicine, psychiatry, and primary care, available data extends beyond these three specialties. Studies have been done in the United States, other English-speaking countries, and elsewhere— all reporting surprisingly high rates of patient aggression. Results indicate that patient aggression toward healthcare professionals is common and worldwide. In addition, one study examined aggressive patient behaviors as reported by the patients themselves, and their self-report data reinforce the mainstream data. While these data do not enable us to determine if patient aggression is genuinely on the increase, we can safely say that these behaviors are rampant. PMID:25621187

  6. Nuclear Morphometry Identifies a Distinct Aggressive Cellular Phenotype in Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Glazer, Evan S.; Bartels, Peter H.; Prasad, Anil R.; Yozwiak, Michael L.; Bartels, Hubert G.; Einspahr, Janine G.; Alberts, David S.; Krouse, Robert S.

    2011-01-01

    By identifying aggressive cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC) in patients who are at high risk for recurrences or second primaries after resection, intensive surveillance and therapy may decrease morbidity and mortality. We investigated the role of nuclear morphometry (karyometry) in differentiating between aggressive and nonaggressive cSCC. We retrospectively analyzed cSCC lesions from 40 male patients. 22 patients had evidence of aggressive cSCC (local/regional recurrence or a second primary cSCC), and 18 patients were identified with similar ages and sites of disease as control patients with nonaggressive cSCC (no evidence of recurrence, metastasis, or second primary). We performed karyometric analysis to identify nuclear features that discriminate between aggressive and nonaggressive cSCC nuclei. We used statistically significant differences (Kruskal-Wallis test P < 0.0001) to compose a quantitative aggressive classification score (proportion of aggressive nuclei from 0% to 100%). For comparisons, we used Fisher’s exact test or Student t test. The mean age was 79 ± 7 years for aggressive cSCC and 80 ± 9 years for nonaggressive cSCC (P = 0.66). We analyzed a mean of 96 nuclei in each group. The mean classification score for aggressive cSCC was significantly higher (69% ± 6%) than for nonaggressive cSCC (28% ± 5%, P = 0.00002). Overall, the classification score accurately categorized 80% of our patients (P = 0.0004). In most patients, karyometry differentiated between aggressive and nonaggressive cSCC. We found that classification scores, which provide information on individual lesions, could be used for risk stratification. PMID:21636541

  7. Loss of SOD3 (EcSOD) expression promotes an aggressive phenotype in human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    O’Leary, Brianne R.; Fath, Melissa A.; Bellizzi, Andrew M.; Hrabe, Jennifer E.; Button, Anna M.; Allen, Bryan G.; Case, Adam J.; Altekruse, Sean; Wagner, Brett A.; Buettner, Garry R.; Lynch, Charles F.; Hernandez, Brenda Y.; Cozen, Wendy; Beardsley, Robert A.; Keene, Jeffery; Henry, Michael D.; Domann, Frederick E.; Spitz, Douglas R.; Mezhir, James J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) cells are known to produce excessive amounts of reactive oxygen species (ROS), particularly superoxide, which may contribute to the aggressive and refractory nature of this disease. Extracellular superoxide dismutase (EcSOD) is an antioxidant enzyme that catalyzes the dismutation of superoxide in the extracellular environment. The current work tests the hypothesis that EcSOD modulates PDA growth and invasion by modifying the redox balance in PDA. Experimental Design We evaluated the prognostic significance of EcSOD in a human tissue microarray of patients with PDA. EcSOD overexpression was performed in PDA cell lines and animal models of disease. The impact of EcSOD on PDA cell lines was evaluated with Matrigel invasion in combination with a superoxide-specific SOD mimic and a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor to determine the mechanism of action of EcSOD in PDA. Results Loss of EcSOD expression is a common event in PDA, which correlated with worse disease biology. Overexpression of EcSOD in PDA cell lines resulted in decreased invasiveness that appeared to be related to reactions of superoxide with nitric oxide. Pancreatic cancer xenografts overexpressing EcSOD also demonstrated slower growth and peritoneal metastasis. Over-expression of EcSOD or treatment with a superoxide-specific SOD mimic caused significant decreases in PDA cell invasive capacity. Conclusions These results support the hypothesis that loss of EcSOD leads to increased reactions of superoxide with nitric oxide which contributes to the invasive phenotype. These results allow for the speculation that superoxide dismutase mimetics might inhibit PDA progression in human clinical disease. PMID:25634994

  8. [Phenotypic heterogeneity and phenotype-genotype correlations in dystrophinopathies: Contribution of genetic and clinical databases].

    PubMed

    Humbertclaude, V; Hamroun, D; Picot, M-C; Bezzou, K; Bérard, C; Boespflug-Tanguy, O; Bommelaer, C; Campana-Salort, E; Cances, C; Chabrol, B; Commare, M-C; Cuisset, J-M; de Lattre, C; Desnuelle, C; Echenne, B; Halbert, C; Jonquet, O; Labarre-Vila, A; N'guyen-Morel, M-A; Pages, M; Pepin, J-L; Petitjean, T; Pouget, J; Ollagnon-Roman, E; Richelme, C; Rivier, F; Sacconi, S; Tiffreau, V; Vuillerot, C; Béroud, C; Tuffery-Giraud, S; Claustres, M

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this work was to study the natural history of dystrophinopathies and the genotype-phenotype correlations made possible by the development of the clinical part of the French DMD database. The collection of 70,000 clinical data for 600 patients with an average longitudinal follow-up of 12years enabled clarification of the natural history of Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies and clinical presentations in symptomatic females. We were able to specify the phenotypic heterogeneity of motor, orthopedic and respiratory involvements (severe, standard and intermediary form), of the cardiac disorder (severe, standard or absent cardiomyopathy, absence of correlation between motor and cardiac involvements), and of brain function (mental deficiency in the patients with Becker muscular dystrophy, psychopathological disorders in dystrophinopathies). Phenotypic variability did not correlate with a specific mutational spectrum. We propose a model of phenotypic analysis based on the presence or not of muscular and cardiac involvements (described by age at onset and rate of progression) and brain involvement (described by the type and the severity of the cognitive impairment and of the psychological disorders). The methodology developed for the DMD gene can be generalized and used for other databases dedicated to genetic diseases. Application of this model of phenotypic analysis for each patient and further development of the database should contribute substantially to clinical research providing useful tools for future clinical trials. PMID:23954141

  9. Aggression in Persons with Dementia: Use of Nursing Theory to Guide Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Dettmore, Diane; Kolanowski, Ann; Boustani, Malaz

    2009-01-01

    With approximately four million people in the United States today diagnosed with dementia, one of the most devastating problems faced by caregivers and patients is dealing with aggressive behavior. Aggression occurs in half of persons diagnosed with dementia and is associated with more rapid cognitive decline, increased risk of abuse, and caregiver burden. This paper uses the Need-driven Dementia-compromised Behavior (NDB) model to explain aggression and discusses therapeutic approaches to care that combines non-pharmacological and pharmacological interventions targeting both the management of aggression crisis and preventing its future recurrence. A clinical algorithm guided by the NBD model is provided for practitioners. PMID:19215808

  10. Aggression in children with autism spectrum disorders and a clinic-referred comparison group.

    PubMed

    Farmer, Cristan; Butter, Eric; Mazurek, Micah O; Cowan, Charles; Lainhart, Janet; Cook, Edwin H; DeWitt, Mary Beth; Aman, Michael

    2015-04-01

    A gap exists in the literature regarding aggression in autism spectrum disorders and how this behavior compares to other groups. In this multisite study, the Children's Scale for Hostility and Aggression: Reactive/Proactive and the Aggression subscale of the Child Behavior Checklist were rated for 414 children with autism spectrum disorder (autistic disorder, 69%; pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified, 24%; Asperger's disorder, 7%) and 243 clinic-referred children without autism spectrum disorder, aged 1-21 years (mean age about 7 years). Participants were not selected for aggressive behavior. Relative to the comparison group, children with autism spectrum disorder were reported to have less aggression and were more likely to be rated as reactive rather than proactive. Among all subjects, sex was not associated with aggression; higher IQ/adaptive behavior and older age were associated with more sophisticated types of aggression, while lower scores on IQ, adaptive behavior, and communication measures were associated with more physical aggression. The interaction between demographic variables and diagnosis was significant only for age: younger but not older children with autism spectrum disorder showed less aggression than clinic-referred controls.

  11. Candidate genes contributing to the aggressive phenotype of mantle cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Henson, Sarah E.; Morford, Travis; Stein, Mary-Pat; Wall, Randolph; Malone, Cindy S.

    2012-01-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma and small lymphocytic lymphoma are lymphocyte cancers that have similar morphologies and a common age of onset. Mantle cell lymphoma is generally an aggressive B cell lymphoma with a short median survival time, whereas small lymphocytic lymphoma is typically an indolent B cell lymphoma with a prolonged median survival time. Using primary tumor samples in bidirectional suppression subtractive hybridization, we identified genes with differential expression in an aggressive mantle cell lymphoma versus an indolent small lymphocytic lymphoma. “Virtual” Northern blot analyses of multiple lymphoma samples confirmed that a set of genes was preferentially expressed in aggressive mantle cell lymphoma compared to indolent small lymphocytic lymphoma. These analyses identified mantle cell lymphoma-specific genes that may be involved in the aggressive behavior of mantle cell lymphoma and possibly other aggressive human lymphomas. Interestingly, most of these differentially-expressed genes have not been identified using other techniques, highlighting the unique ability of suppression subtractive hybridization to identify potentially rare or low expression genes. PMID:21145576

  12. The Phenotype of Spontaneous Preterm Birth: Application of a Clinical Phenotyping Tool

    PubMed Central

    Manuck, Tracy A.; Esplin, M. Sean; Biggio, Joseph; Bukowski, Radek; Parry, Samuel; Zhang, Heping; Varner, Michael W.; Andrews, William; Saade, George; Sadovsky, Yoel; Reddy, Uma M.; Ilekis, John

    2015-01-01

    Objective Spontaneous preterm birth (SPTB) is a complex condition that is likely a final common pathway with multiple possible etiologies. We hypothesized that a comprehensive classification system could appropriately group women with similar STPB etiologies, and provide an explanation, at least in part, for the disparities in SPTB associated with race and gestational age at delivery. Study Design Planned analysis of a multicenter, prospective study of singleton SPTB. Women with SPTB < 34 weeks were included. We defined 9 potential SPTB phenotypes based on clinical data, including infection/inflammation, maternal stress, decidual hemorrhage, uterine distention, cervical insufficiency, placental dysfunction, premature rupture of the membranes, maternal comorbidities, and familial factors. Each woman was evaluated for each phenotype. Delivery gestational age was compared between those with and without each phenotype. Phenotype profiles were also compared between women with very early (20.0–27.9 weeks) SPTB vs. those with early SPTB (28.0–34.0 weeks), and between African-American and Caucasian women. Statistical analysis was by t-test and chi-square as appropriate. Results The phenotyping tool was applied to 1025 women with SPTB who delivered at a mean 30.0 (+/− 3.2) weeks gestation. Of these, 800 (78%) had ≥2 phenotypes. Only 43 (4.2%) had no phenotypes. The 281 women with early SPTB were more likely to have infection/inflammation, decidual hemorrhage, and cervical insufficiency phenotypes (all p≤0.001). African-American women had more maternal stress and cervical insufficiency but less decidual hemorrhage and placental dysfunction compared to Caucasian women (all p<0.05). Gestational age at delivery decreased as the number of phenotypes present increased. Conclusions Precise SPTB phenotyping classifies women with SPTB and identifies specific differences between very early and early SPTB and between African-Americans and Caucasians. PMID:25687564

  13. On-time clinical phenotype prediction based on narrative reports

    PubMed Central

    Bejan, Cosmin A.; Vanderwende, Lucy; Evans, Heather L.; Wurfel, Mark M.; Yetisgen-Yildiz, Meliha

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we describe a natural language processing system which is able to predict whether or not a patient exhibits a specific phenotype using the information extracted from the narrative reports associated with the patient. Furthermore, the phenotypic annotations from our report dataset were performed at the report level which allows us to perform the prediction of the clinical phenotype at any point in time during the patient hospitalization period. Our experiments indicate that an important factor in achieving better results for this problem is to determine how much information to extract from the patient reports in the time interval between the patient admission time and the current prediction time. PMID:24551325

  14. [Clinical phenotypes and prognosis of antisynthetase syndrome].

    PubMed

    Hervier, B; Benveniste, O

    2014-07-01

    Antisynthetase syndrome (ASS) was first described in 1989 as an inflammatory myopathy associated with the presence of specific auto-antibodies, namely the anti-tRNA-synthetase antibodies (ASA). To date, the ASA family comprises eight different auto-antibodies, among which anti-hystidyl-tRNA-synthetase (anti-Jo1) is the most prevalent. In addition to myositis, a constellation of clinical features has also been described in ASS, including interstitial lung disease, Raynaud's phenomenon, polyarthritis, fever and mechanic's hands. Large variations in the distribution and the severity of each of these symptoms are reported from one patient to another, and also over the course of the disease. The heterogeneity of this autoimmune connective tissue disease has led to difficulties in the early identification of patients with a poor outcome (those who will require the most intensive treatments). Additionally, very few prospective trials have so far compared the efficacy of the different immunosuppressive drugs available, and evidence is lacking to help adapting therapeutic strategies to all of the different ASS clinical situations. We will review the different characteristics of ASS (namely biological, clinical, functional, and morphological ASS parameters) that have recently been shown to correlate with patients' outcome, our aim being to discuss the usefulness of patient stratification for elaborating targeted therapeutic trials for ASS in the future.

  15. Clinical Phenotypes and Comorbidity in European Sleep Apnoea Patients

    PubMed Central

    Saaresranta, Tarja; Hedner, Jan; Bonsignore, Maria R.; Riha, Renata L.; McNicholas, Walter T.; Penzel, Thomas; Anttalainen, Ulla; Kvamme, John Arthur; Pretl, Martin; Sliwinski, Pawel; Verbraecken, Johan; Grote, Ludger

    2016-01-01

    Background Clinical presentation phenotypes of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) and their association with comorbidity as well as impact on adherence to continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment have not been established. Methods A prospective follow-up cohort of adult patients with OSA (apnoea-hypopnoea index (AHI) of ≥5/h) from 17 European countries and Israel (n = 6,555) was divided into four clinical presentation phenotypes based on daytime symptoms labelled as excessive daytime sleepiness (“EDS”) and nocturnal sleep problems other than OSA (labelled as “insomnia”): 1) EDS (daytime+/nighttime-), 2) EDS/insomnia (daytime+/nighttime+), 3) non-EDS/non-insomnia (daytime-/nighttime-), 4) and insomnia (daytime-/nighttime+) phenotype. Results The EDS phenotype comprised 20.7%, the non-EDS/non-insomnia type 25.8%, the EDS/insomnia type 23.7%, and the insomnia phenotype 29.8% of the entire cohort. Thus, clinical presentation phenotypes with insomnia symptoms were dominant with 53.5%, but only 5.6% had physician diagnosed insomnia. Cardiovascular comorbidity was less prevalent in the EDS and most common in the insomnia phenotype (48.9% vs. 56.8%, p<0.001) despite more severe OSA in the EDS group (AHI 35.0±25.5/h vs. 27.9±22.5/h, p<0.001, respectively). Psychiatric comorbidity was associated with insomnia like OSA phenotypes independent of age, gender and body mass index (HR 1.5 (1.188–1.905), p<0.001). The EDS phenotype tended to associate with higher CPAP usage (22.7 min/d, p = 0.069) when controlled for age, gender, BMI and sleep apnoea severity. Conclusions Phenotypes with insomnia symptoms comprised more than half of OSA patients and were more frequently linked with comorbidity than those with EDS, despite less severe OSA. CPAP usage was slightly higher in phenotypes with EDS. PMID:27701416

  16. Identification of two clinical hepatocellular carcinoma patient phenotypes from results of standard screening parameters

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Brian I.; Giannini, Edoardo G.; Farinati, Fabio; Ciccarese, Francesca; Rapaccini, Gian Ludovico; Marco, Maria Di; Benvegnù, Luisa; Zoli, Marco; Borzio, Franco; Caturelli, Eugenio; Chiaramonte, Maria; Trevisani, Franco

    2014-01-01

    scan data) that patients in L phenotype group had 1.5x larger mean tumor masses relative to S, p=6×10−16. Importantly, with the new data, liver test pattern-identified S-phenotype patients had typically 1.7 × longer survival compared to L-phenotype. NPS integrated the liver, tumor and basic demographic factors. Cirrhosis associated thrombocytopenia was typical for smaller S-tumors. In L-tumor phenotype, typical platelet levels increased with the tumor mass. Hepatic inflammation and tumor factors contributed to more aggressive L tumors, with parenchymal destruction and shorter survival. Summary NPS provides integrative interpretation for HCC behavior, identifying two tumor and survival phenotypes by clinical parameter patterns. The NPS classifier is provided as an Excel tool. The NPS system shows the importance of considering each tumor marker and parameter in the total context of all the other parameters of an individual patient. PMID:25023357

  17. Identification of two clinical hepatocellular carcinoma patient phenotypes from results of standard screening parameters.

    PubMed

    Carr, Brian I; Pancoska, Petr; Giannini, Edoardo G; Farinati, Fabio; Ciccarese, Francesca; Ludovico Rapaccini, Gian; Di Marco, Maria; Benvegnù, Luisa; Zoli, Marco; Borzio, Franco; Caturelli, Eugenio; Chiaramonte, Maria; Trevisani, Franco

    2014-06-01

    subsequently validated (using actual scan data) that patients in L phenotype group had 1.5× larger mean tumor masses relative to S, P = 6 × 10(-16). Importantly, with the new data, liver test pattern-identified S-phenotype patients had typically 1.7× longer survival compared to L-phenotype patients. NPS integrated the liver, tumor, and basic demographic factors. Cirrhosis-associated thrombocytopenia was typical for smaller S tumors. In L tumor phenotype, typical platelet levels increased with the tumor mass. Hepatic inflammation and tumor factors contributed to more aggressive L tumors, with parenchymal destruction and shorter survival. NPS provides integrative interpretation for HCC behavior, identifying two tumor and survival phenotypes by clinical parameter patterns. The NPS classifier is provided as an Excel tool. The NPS system shows the importance of considering each tumor marker and parameter in the total context of all the other parameters of an individual patient. PMID:25023357

  18. Identification of two clinical hepatocellular carcinoma patient phenotypes from results of standard screening parameters.

    PubMed

    Carr, Brian I; Pancoska, Petr; Giannini, Edoardo G; Farinati, Fabio; Ciccarese, Francesca; Ludovico Rapaccini, Gian; Di Marco, Maria; Benvegnù, Luisa; Zoli, Marco; Borzio, Franco; Caturelli, Eugenio; Chiaramonte, Maria; Trevisani, Franco

    2014-06-01

    subsequently validated (using actual scan data) that patients in L phenotype group had 1.5× larger mean tumor masses relative to S, P = 6 × 10(-16). Importantly, with the new data, liver test pattern-identified S-phenotype patients had typically 1.7× longer survival compared to L-phenotype patients. NPS integrated the liver, tumor, and basic demographic factors. Cirrhosis-associated thrombocytopenia was typical for smaller S tumors. In L tumor phenotype, typical platelet levels increased with the tumor mass. Hepatic inflammation and tumor factors contributed to more aggressive L tumors, with parenchymal destruction and shorter survival. NPS provides integrative interpretation for HCC behavior, identifying two tumor and survival phenotypes by clinical parameter patterns. The NPS classifier is provided as an Excel tool. The NPS system shows the importance of considering each tumor marker and parameter in the total context of all the other parameters of an individual patient.

  19. A novel clinical tool to classify facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Giulia; Ruggiero, Lucia; Vercelli, Liliana; Sera, Francesco; Nikolic, Ana; Govi, Monica; Mele, Fabiano; Daolio, Jessica; Angelini, Corrado; Antonini, Giovanni; Berardinelli, Angela; Bucci, Elisabetta; Cao, Michelangelo; D'Amico, Maria Chiara; D'Angelo, Grazia; Di Muzio, Antonio; Filosto, Massimiliano; Maggi, Lorenzo; Moggio, Maurizio; Mongini, Tiziana; Morandi, Lucia; Pegoraro, Elena; Rodolico, Carmelo; Santoro, Lucio; Siciliano, Gabriele; Tomelleri, Giuliano; Villa, Luisa; Tupler, Rossella

    2016-06-01

    Based on the 7-year experience of the Italian Clinical Network for FSHD, we revised the FSHD clinical form to describe, in a harmonized manner, the phenotypic spectrum observed in FSHD. The new Comprehensive Clinical Evaluation Form (CCEF) defines various clinical categories by the combination of different features. The inter-rater reproducibility of the CCEF was assessed between two examiners using kappa statistics by evaluating 56 subjects carrying the molecular marker used for FSHD diagnosis. The CCEF classifies: (1) subjects presenting facial and scapular girdle muscle weakness typical of FSHD (category A, subcategories A1-A3), (2) subjects with muscle weakness limited to scapular girdle or facial muscles (category B subcategories B1, B2), (3) asymptomatic/healthy subjects (category C, subcategories C1, C2), (4) subjects with myopathic phenotype presenting clinical features not consistent with FSHD canonical phenotype (D, subcategories D1, D2). The inter-rater reliability study showed an excellent concordance of the final four CCEF categories with a κ equal to 0.90; 95 % CI (0.71; 0.97). Absolute agreement was observed for categories C and D, an excellent agreement for categories A [κ = 0.88; 95 % CI (0.75; 1.00)], and a good agreement for categories B [κ = 0.79; 95 % CI (0.57; 1.00)]. The CCEF supports the harmonized phenotypic classification of patients and families. The categories outlined by the CCEF may assist diagnosis, genetic counseling and natural history studies. Furthermore, the CCEF categories could support selection of patients in randomized clinical trials. This precise categorization might also promote the search of genetic factor(s) contributing to the phenotypic spectrum of disease. PMID:27126453

  20. Parents who hit and scream: interactive effects of verbal and severe physical aggression on clinic-referred adolescents' adjustment.

    PubMed

    LeRoy, Michelle; Mahoney, Annette; Boxer, Paul; Gullan, Rebecca Lakin; Fang, Qijuan

    2014-05-01

    The goals of this study were first, to delineate the co-occurrence of parental severe physical aggression and verbal aggression toward clinic-referred adolescents, and second, to examine the interactive effects of parental severe physical aggression and verbal aggression on adolescent externalizing and internalizing behavior problems. This research involved 239 referrals of 11- to 18-year-old youth and their dual-parent families to a non-profit, private community mental health center in a semi-rural Midwest community. Multiple informants (i.e., adolescents and mothers) were used to assess parental aggression and adolescent behavior problems. More than half of clinic-referred adolescents (51%) experienced severe physical aggression and/or high verbal aggression from one or both parents. A pattern of interactive effects of mother-to-adolescent severe physical aggression and verbal aggression on adolescent behavior problems emerged, indicating that when severe physical aggression was present, mother-to-adolescent verbal aggression was positively associated with greater adolescent behavior problems whereas when severe physical aggression was not present, the links between verbal aggression and behavior problems was no longer significant. No interactive effects were found for father-to-adolescent severe physical aggression and verbal aggression on adolescent adjustment; however, higher father-to-adolescent verbal aggression was consistently linked to behavior problems above and beyond the influence of severe physical aggression. The results of this study should promote the practice of routinely assessing clinic-referred adolescents and their parents about their experiences of verbal aggression in addition to severe physical aggression and other forms of abuse.

  1. Novel autoantibodies and clinical phenotypes in adult and juvenile myositis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Autoantibodies targeting intracellular proteins involved in key processes are detected in patients with idiopathic inflammatory myopathies. These myositisspecific autoantibodies have been increasingly demonstrated to correlate with distinct clinical phenotypes within the myositis spectrum. This review highlights the clinical associations of the myositisspecific autoantibodies, with particular attention to the recently identified and characterized novel myositis autoantibodies: p155/140, p140 (MJ), CADM-140 (MDA5), SAE, and 200/100. PMID:21457520

  2. Identifying genetically driven clinical phenotypes using linear mixed models

    PubMed Central

    Mosley, Jonathan D.; Witte, John S.; Larkin, Emma K.; Bastarache, Lisa; Shaffer, Christian M.; Karnes, Jason H.; Stein, C. Michael; Phillips, Elizabeth; Hebbring, Scott J.; Brilliant, Murray H.; Mayer, John; Ye, Zhan; Roden, Dan M.; Denny, Joshua C.

    2016-01-01

    We hypothesized that generalized linear mixed models (GLMMs), which estimate the additive genetic variance underlying phenotype variability, would facilitate rapid characterization of clinical phenotypes from an electronic health record. We evaluated 1,288 phenotypes in 29,349 subjects of European ancestry with single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping on the Illumina Exome Beadchip. We show that genetic liability estimates are primarily driven by SNPs identified by prior genome-wide association studies and SNPs within the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) region. We identify 44 (false discovery rate q<0.05) phenotypes associated with HLA SNP variation and show that hypothyroidism is genetically correlated with Type I diabetes (rG=0.31, s.e. 0.12, P=0.003). We also report novel SNP associations for hypothyroidism near HLA-DQA1/HLA-DQB1 at rs6906021 (combined odds ratio (OR)=1.2 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.1–1.2), P=9.8 × 10−11) and for polymyalgia rheumatica near C6orf10 at rs6910071 (OR=1.5 (95% CI: 1.3–1.6), P=1.3 × 10−10). Phenome-wide application of GLMMs identifies phenotypes with important genetic drivers, and focusing on these phenotypes can identify novel genetic associations. PMID:27109359

  3. Are adolescents with internet addiction prone to aggressive behavior? The mediating effect of clinical comorbidities on the predictability of aggression in adolescents with internet addiction.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jae-A; Gwak, Ah Reum; Park, Su Mi; Kwon, Jun-Gun; Lee, Jun-Young; Jung, Hee Yeon; Sohn, Bo Kyung; Kim, Jae-Won; Kim, Dai Jin; Choi, Jung-Seok

    2015-05-01

    Previous studies have reported associations between aggression and Internet addiction disorder (IAD), which has also been linked with anxiety, depression, and impulsiveness. However, the causal relationship between aggression and IAD has thus far not been clearly demonstrated. This study was designed to (a) examine the association between aggression and IAD and (b) investigate the mediating effects of anxiety, depression, and impulsivity in cases in which IAD predicts aggression or aggression predicts IAD. A total of 714 middle school students in Seoul, South Korea, were asked to provide demographic information and complete the Young's Internet Addiction Test (Y-IAT), the Buss-Perry Aggression Questionnaire, the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale-11, the State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory-2, the Beck Anxiety Inventory, the Beck Depression Inventory, and the Conners-Wells Adolescent Self-Report Scale. Three groups were identified based on the Y-IAT: the usual user group (n=487, 68.2%), the high-risk group (n=191, 26.8%), and the Internet addiction group (n=13, 1.8%). The data revealed a linear association between aggression and IAD such that one variable could be predicted by the other. According to the path analysis, the clinical scales (BAI, BDI, and CASS) had partial or full mediating effects on the ability of aggression to predict IAD, but the clinical scales had no mediating effect on the ability of IAD to predict aggression. The current findings suggest that adolescents with IAD seem to have more aggressive dispositions than do normal adolescents. If more aggressive individuals are clinically prone to Internet addiction, early psychiatric intervention may contribute to the prevention of IAD.

  4. Are adolescents with internet addiction prone to aggressive behavior? The mediating effect of clinical comorbidities on the predictability of aggression in adolescents with internet addiction.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jae-A; Gwak, Ah Reum; Park, Su Mi; Kwon, Jun-Gun; Lee, Jun-Young; Jung, Hee Yeon; Sohn, Bo Kyung; Kim, Jae-Won; Kim, Dai Jin; Choi, Jung-Seok

    2015-05-01

    Previous studies have reported associations between aggression and Internet addiction disorder (IAD), which has also been linked with anxiety, depression, and impulsiveness. However, the causal relationship between aggression and IAD has thus far not been clearly demonstrated. This study was designed to (a) examine the association between aggression and IAD and (b) investigate the mediating effects of anxiety, depression, and impulsivity in cases in which IAD predicts aggression or aggression predicts IAD. A total of 714 middle school students in Seoul, South Korea, were asked to provide demographic information and complete the Young's Internet Addiction Test (Y-IAT), the Buss-Perry Aggression Questionnaire, the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale-11, the State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory-2, the Beck Anxiety Inventory, the Beck Depression Inventory, and the Conners-Wells Adolescent Self-Report Scale. Three groups were identified based on the Y-IAT: the usual user group (n=487, 68.2%), the high-risk group (n=191, 26.8%), and the Internet addiction group (n=13, 1.8%). The data revealed a linear association between aggression and IAD such that one variable could be predicted by the other. According to the path analysis, the clinical scales (BAI, BDI, and CASS) had partial or full mediating effects on the ability of aggression to predict IAD, but the clinical scales had no mediating effect on the ability of IAD to predict aggression. The current findings suggest that adolescents with IAD seem to have more aggressive dispositions than do normal adolescents. If more aggressive individuals are clinically prone to Internet addiction, early psychiatric intervention may contribute to the prevention of IAD. PMID:25902276

  5. Are Adolescents with Internet Addiction Prone to Aggressive Behavior? The Mediating Effect of Clinical Comorbidities on the Predictability of Aggression in Adolescents with Internet Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Jae-A; Gwak, Ah Reum; Park, Su Mi; Kwon, Jun-Gun; Lee, Jun-Young; Jung, Hee Yeon; Sohn, Bo Kyung; Kim, Jae-Won

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Previous studies have reported associations between aggression and Internet addiction disorder (IAD), which has also been linked with anxiety, depression, and impulsiveness. However, the causal relationship between aggression and IAD has thus far not been clearly demonstrated. This study was designed to (a) examine the association between aggression and IAD and (b) investigate the mediating effects of anxiety, depression, and impulsivity in cases in which IAD predicts aggression or aggression predicts IAD. A total of 714 middle school students in Seoul, South Korea, were asked to provide demographic information and complete the Young's Internet Addiction Test (Y-IAT), the Buss–Perry Aggression Questionnaire, the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale-11, the State–Trait Anger Expression Inventory-2, the Beck Anxiety Inventory, the Beck Depression Inventory, and the Conners–Wells Adolescent Self-Report Scale. Three groups were identified based on the Y-IAT: the usual user group (n=487, 68.2%), the high-risk group (n=191, 26.8%), and the Internet addiction group (n=13, 1.8%). The data revealed a linear association between aggression and IAD such that one variable could be predicted by the other. According to the path analysis, the clinical scales (BAI, BDI, and CASS) had partial or full mediating effects on the ability of aggression to predict IAD, but the clinical scales had no mediating effect on the ability of IAD to predict aggression. The current findings suggest that adolescents with IAD seem to have more aggressive dispositions than do normal adolescents. If more aggressive individuals are clinically prone to Internet addiction, early psychiatric intervention may contribute to the prevention of IAD. PMID:25902276

  6. The ETS family member GABPα modulates androgen receptor signalling and mediates an aggressive phenotype in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Naomi L; Massie, Charlie E; Butter, Falk; Mann, Matthias; Bon, Helene; Ramos-Montoya, Antonio; Menon, Suraj; Stark, Rory; Lamb, Alastair D; Scott, Helen E; Warren, Anne Y; Neal, David E; Mills, Ian G

    2014-06-01

    In prostate cancer (PC), the androgen receptor (AR) is a key transcription factor at all disease stages, including the advanced stage of castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). In the present study, we show that GABPα, an ETS factor that is up-regulated in PC, is an AR-interacting transcription factor. Expression of GABPα enables PC cell lines to acquire some of the molecular and cellular characteristics of CRPC tissues as well as more aggressive growth phenotypes. GABPα has a transcriptional role that dissects the overlapping cistromes of the two most common ETS gene fusions in PC: overlapping significantly with ETV1 but not with ERG target genes. GABPα bound predominantly to gene promoters, regulated the expression of one-third of AR target genes and modulated sensitivity to AR antagonists in hormone responsive and castrate resistant PC models. This study supports a critical role for GABPα in CRPC and reveals potential targets for therapeutic intervention.

  7. DNMT3B7 Expression Promotes Tumor Progression to a More Aggressive Phenotype in Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Brambert, Patrick R.; Kelpsch, Daniel J.; Hameed, Rabia; Desai, Charmi V.; Calafiore, Gianfranco; Godley, Lucy A.; Raimondi, Stacey L.

    2015-01-01

    Epigenetic changes, such as DNA methylation, have been shown to promote breast cancer progression. However, the mechanism by which cancer cells acquire and maintain abnormal DNA methylation is not well understood. We have previously identified an aberrant splice form of a DNA methyltransferase, DNMT3B7, expressed in virtually all cancer cell lines but at very low levels in normal cells. Furthermore, aggressive MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells have been shown to express increased levels of DNMT3B7 compared to poorly invasive MCF-7 cells, indicating that DNMT3B7 may have a role in promoting a more invasive phenotype. Using data gathered from The Cancer Genome Atlas, we show that DNMT3B7 expression is increased in breast cancer patient tissues compared to normal tissue. To determine the mechanism by which DNMT3B7 was functioning in breast cancer cells, two poorly invasive breast cancer cell lines, MCF-7 and T-47D, were stably transfected with a DNMT3B7 expression construct. Expression of DNMT3B7 led to hypermethylation and down-regulation of E-cadherin, altered localization of β-catenin, as well as increased adhesion turnover, cell proliferation, and anchorage-independent growth. The novel results presented in this study suggest a role for DNMT3B7 in the progression of breast cancer to a more aggressive state and the potential for future development of novel therapeutics. PMID:25607950

  8. Cellular characterization of MPZ mutations presenting with diverse clinical phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yi-Chung; Lin, Kon-Ping; Chang, Ming-Hong; Liao, Yi-Chu; Tsai, Ching-Piao; Liao, Kwong-Kum; Soong, Bing-Wen

    2010-10-01

    Mutations in MPZ, which encodes myelin protein zero (P(0)), may lead to different subtypes of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT). The aim of this study was to characterize the cellular manifestations of various MPZ mutations associated with CMT1, Dejerine-Sottas syndrome (DSS) and CMT2, and to correlate their cellular and clinical phenotypes. Nine P(0) mutants associated with CMT1 (P(0)S63F, R98H, R277S, and S233fs), DSS (P(0) I30T and R98C), and CMT2 (P(0)S44F, D75V, and T124M), were investigated. Wild-type and mutant P(0) fused with fluorescent proteins were expressed in vitro to monitor their intracellular localization. An adhesiveness assay was used to evaluate the adhesiveness of the transfected cells. Protein localization and cell adhesiveness of each mutant protein were compared and correlated with their clinical phenotypes. Three different intracellular localization patterns of the mutant P(0) were observed. Wild-type P(0), P(0)I30T, S44F, S63F, D75V, T124M, and R227S were mostly localized on the cell membrane, P(0)R98H, and R98C were found in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) or Golgi apparatus, and P(0)S233fs formed aggregates within the ER. Cells expressing mutant P(0), as compared with those expressing wild-type P(0), demonstrated variable degrees of reduction in the cell adhesiveness. The molecular patho-mechanisms of MPZ mutations are likely very complex and the clinical phenotype must be influenced by many genetic or environmental factors. This complexity may contribute to the highly variable clinical manifestations resulting from different MPZ mutations. PMID:20461396

  9. A standardized clinical evaluation of phenotypic diversity in diabetic polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Scholz, Joachim; Rathmell, James P; David, William S; Chad, David A; Broderick, Alithia C; Perros, Stephen G; Shin, Naomi S; Wells, Jenna L; Davis, John B; DiMaggio, Charles J; Wang, Shuang; Tate, Simon N

    2016-10-01

    Diabetic polyneuropathy (DPN) is a major cause of neuropathic pain and a frequent target condition in analgesic treatment trials. Differences in the clinical symptoms and signs associated with DPN suggest distinct pathophysiological mechanisms underlying nerve damage and dysfunction that are likely to have therapeutic relevance. The aim of this study was to develop a tool for the bedside assessment of painful neuropathies such as DPN that captures the diversity of phenotypes. Sixty-one patients with type 2 diabetes and painful neuropathy, 19 patients with painless DPN, 25 patients with type 2 diabetes but no clinical evidence of neuropathy, and 20 healthy control subjects completed a structured interview (47 items) and a standardized physical examination (39 items). After analyzing critical features of pain and painless symptoms and examining the outcome of physical tests of sensory function, we determined principal components of the phenotypic variance among patients. Increased sensitivity to mechanical or thermal stimuli and, to a lesser extent, the sensory quality of pain or paresthesia were the most discriminating elements of DPN phenotypes. Correlation patterns of symptoms and signs indicated the involvement of functionally distinct nerve fiber populations. We combined interview questions and physical tests identifying these differences in a shortened assessment protocol that we named Standardized Evaluation of Pain and Somatosensory Function (StEPS). The protocol StEPS generates a phenotypic profile of patients with neuropathy. Separate intensity ratings for spontaneous painful symptoms and pain evoked by standard stimuli support a detailed documentation of neuropathic pain and its response to analgesic treatment. PMID:27322439

  10. Conservation in Mammals of Genes Associated with Aggression-Related Behavioral Phenotypes in Honey Bees

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Gene E.; Jakobsson, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The emerging field of sociogenomics explores the relations between social behavior and genome structure and function. An important question is the extent to which associations between social behavior and gene expression are conserved among the Metazoa. Prior experimental work in an invertebrate model of social behavior, the honey bee, revealed distinct brain gene expression patterns in African and European honey bees, and within European honey bees with different behavioral phenotypes. The present work is a computational study of these previous findings in which we analyze, by orthology determination, the extent to which genes that are socially regulated in honey bees are conserved across the Metazoa. We found that the differentially expressed gene sets associated with alarm pheromone response, the difference between old and young bees, and the colony influence on soldier bees, are enriched in widely conserved genes, indicating that these differences have genomic bases shared with many other metazoans. By contrast, the sets of differentially expressed genes associated with the differences between African and European forager and guard bees are depleted in widely conserved genes, indicating that the genomic basis for this social behavior is relatively specific to honey bees. For the alarm pheromone response gene set, we found a particularly high degree of conservation with mammals, even though the alarm pheromone itself is bee-specific. Gene Ontology identification of human orthologs to the strongly conserved honey bee genes associated with the alarm pheromone response shows overrepresentation of protein metabolism, regulation of protein complex formation, and protein folding, perhaps associated with remodeling of critical neural circuits in response to alarm pheromone. We hypothesize that such remodeling may be an adaptation of social animals to process and respond appropriately to the complex patterns of conspecific communication essential for social organization

  11. Conservation in Mammals of Genes Associated with Aggression-Related Behavioral Phenotypes in Honey Bees.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui; Robinson, Gene E; Jakobsson, Eric

    2016-06-01

    The emerging field of sociogenomics explores the relations between social behavior and genome structure and function. An important question is the extent to which associations between social behavior and gene expression are conserved among the Metazoa. Prior experimental work in an invertebrate model of social behavior, the honey bee, revealed distinct brain gene expression patterns in African and European honey bees, and within European honey bees with different behavioral phenotypes. The present work is a computational study of these previous findings in which we analyze, by orthology determination, the extent to which genes that are socially regulated in honey bees are conserved across the Metazoa. We found that the differentially expressed gene sets associated with alarm pheromone response, the difference between old and young bees, and the colony influence on soldier bees, are enriched in widely conserved genes, indicating that these differences have genomic bases shared with many other metazoans. By contrast, the sets of differentially expressed genes associated with the differences between African and European forager and guard bees are depleted in widely conserved genes, indicating that the genomic basis for this social behavior is relatively specific to honey bees. For the alarm pheromone response gene set, we found a particularly high degree of conservation with mammals, even though the alarm pheromone itself is bee-specific. Gene Ontology identification of human orthologs to the strongly conserved honey bee genes associated with the alarm pheromone response shows overrepresentation of protein metabolism, regulation of protein complex formation, and protein folding, perhaps associated with remodeling of critical neural circuits in response to alarm pheromone. We hypothesize that such remodeling may be an adaptation of social animals to process and respond appropriately to the complex patterns of conspecific communication essential for social organization

  12. Conservation in Mammals of Genes Associated with Aggression-Related Behavioral Phenotypes in Honey Bees.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui; Robinson, Gene E; Jakobsson, Eric

    2016-06-01

    The emerging field of sociogenomics explores the relations between social behavior and genome structure and function. An important question is the extent to which associations between social behavior and gene expression are conserved among the Metazoa. Prior experimental work in an invertebrate model of social behavior, the honey bee, revealed distinct brain gene expression patterns in African and European honey bees, and within European honey bees with different behavioral phenotypes. The present work is a computational study of these previous findings in which we analyze, by orthology determination, the extent to which genes that are socially regulated in honey bees are conserved across the Metazoa. We found that the differentially expressed gene sets associated with alarm pheromone response, the difference between old and young bees, and the colony influence on soldier bees, are enriched in widely conserved genes, indicating that these differences have genomic bases shared with many other metazoans. By contrast, the sets of differentially expressed genes associated with the differences between African and European forager and guard bees are depleted in widely conserved genes, indicating that the genomic basis for this social behavior is relatively specific to honey bees. For the alarm pheromone response gene set, we found a particularly high degree of conservation with mammals, even though the alarm pheromone itself is bee-specific. Gene Ontology identification of human orthologs to the strongly conserved honey bee genes associated with the alarm pheromone response shows overrepresentation of protein metabolism, regulation of protein complex formation, and protein folding, perhaps associated with remodeling of critical neural circuits in response to alarm pheromone. We hypothesize that such remodeling may be an adaptation of social animals to process and respond appropriately to the complex patterns of conspecific communication essential for social organization.

  13. Hypoxia-induced autophagic response is associated with aggressive phenotype and elevated incidence of metastasis in orthotopic immunocompetent murine models of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC)

    PubMed Central

    Vigneswaran, Nadarajah; Wu, Jean; Song, Anren; Annapragada, Ananth; Zacharias, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    Hypoxia confers resistance to chemoradiation therapy and promotes metastasis in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC). We investigated the effects of hypoxia in tumor phenotype using immunocompetent murine HNSCC models. Balb/c mice were injected intraorally with murine squamous cell carcinoma cells LY-2 and B4B8. Intratumoral hypoxia fraction was evaluated by the immunohistochemical detection of hypoxic probe pimonidazole and carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX). Tumor cell apoptosis and autophagy in hypoxic areas of these tumors were examined immunohistochemially. Hypoxia-induced apoptotic and autophagic responses in vitro were examined by treating LY2 cells with CoCl2. B4B8 tumors exhibited a non-aggressive phenotype characterized by its slow growth rate and the lack of metastatic spread. LY2 tumors demonstrated an aggressive phenotype characterized by rapid growth rate with regional and distant metastasis. Intratumoral hypoxia fraction in B4B8 tumors was significantly lower than LY2 tumors. Hypoxic areas in B4B8 tumors exhibited increased apoptosis rate than LY2 tumors. In contrast, hypoxic areas in LY2 tumors revealed autophagy. Induction of hypoxia in vitro elicited autophagy and not apoptosis in LY2 cells. Induction of autophagy coupled with blockage of apoptosis in hypoxic areas promotes tumor cells survival and confers aggressive phenotype in immunocompetent murine HNSCC models. PMID:21236253

  14. Epigenetic silencing of neurofilament genes promotes an aggressive phenotype in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Calmon, Marilia Freitas; Jeschke, Jana; Zhang, Wei; Dhir, Mashaal; Siebenkäs, Cornelia; Herrera, Alexander; Tsai, Hsing-Chen; O'Hagan, Heather M; Pappou, Emmanouil P; Hooker, Craig M; Fu, Tao; Schuebel, Kornel E; Gabrielson, Edward; Rahal, Paula; Herman, James G; Baylin, Stephen B; Ahuja, Nita

    2015-01-01

    Neurofilament heavy polypeptide (NEFH) has recently been identified as a candidate DNA hypermethylated gene within the functional breast cancer hypermethylome. NEFH exists in a complex with neurofilament medium polypeptide (NEFM) and neurofilament light polypeptide (NEFL) to form neurofilaments, which are structural components of the cytoskeleton in mature neurons. Recent studies reported the deregulation of these proteins in several malignancies, suggesting that neurofilaments may have a role in other cell types as well. Using a comprehensive approach, we studied the epigenetic inactivation of neurofilament genes in breast cancer and the functional significance of this event. We report that DNA methylation-associated silencing of NEFH, NEFL, and NEFM in breast cancer is frequent, cancer-specific, and correlates with clinical features of disease progression. DNA methylation-mediated inactivation of these genes occurs also in multiple other cancer histologies including pancreas, gastric, and colon. Restoration of NEFH function, the major subunit of the neurofilament complex, reduces proliferation and growth of breast cancer cells and arrests them in Go/G1 phase of the cell cycle along with a reduction in migration and invasion. These findings suggest that DNA methylation-mediated silencing of the neurofilament genes NEFH, NEFM, and NEFL are frequent events that may contribute to the progression of breast cancer and possibly other malignancies. PMID:25985363

  15. Epigenetic silencing of neurofilament genes promotes an aggressive phenotype in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Calmon, Marilia Freitas; Jeschke, Jana; Zhang, Wei; Dhir, Mashaal; Siebenkäs, Cornelia; Herrera, Alexander; Tsai, Hsing-Chen; O'Hagan, Heather M; Pappou, Emmanouil P; Hooker, Craig M; Fu, Tao; Schuebel, Kornel E; Gabrielson, Edward; Rahal, Paula; Herman, James G; Baylin, Stephen B; Ahuja, Nita

    2015-01-01

    Neurofilament heavy polypeptide (NEFH) has recently been identified as a candidate DNA hypermethylated gene within the functional breast cancer hypermethylome. NEFH exists in a complex with neurofilament medium polypeptide (NEFM) and neurofilament light polypeptide (NEFL) to form neurofilaments, which are structural components of the cytoskeleton in mature neurons. Recent studies reported the deregulation of these proteins in several malignancies, suggesting that neurofilaments may have a role in other cell types as well. Using a comprehensive approach, we studied the epigenetic inactivation of neurofilament genes in breast cancer and the functional significance of this event. We report that DNA methylation-associated silencing of NEFH, NEFL, and NEFM in breast cancer is frequent, cancer-specific, and correlates with clinical features of disease progression. DNA methylation-mediated inactivation of these genes occurs also in multiple other cancer histologies including pancreas, gastric, and colon. Restoration of NEFH function, the major subunit of the neurofilament complex, reduces proliferation and growth of breast cancer cells and arrests them in Go/G1 phase of the cell cycle along with a reduction in migration and invasion. These findings suggest that DNA methylation-mediated silencing of the neurofilament genes NEFH, NEFM, and NEFL are frequent events that may contribute to the progression of breast cancer and possibly other malignancies.

  16. Alterations of the spindle checkpoint pathway in clinicopathologically aggressive CpG island methylator phenotype clear cell renal cell carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Arai, Eri; Gotoh, Masahiro; Tian, Ying; Sakamoto, Hiromi; Ono, Masaya; Matsuda, Akio; Takahashi, Yoriko; Miyata, Sayaka; Totsuka, Hirohiko; Chiku, Suenori; Komiyama, Motokiyo; Fujimoto, Hiroyuki; Matsumoto, Kenji; Yamada, Tesshi; Yoshida, Teruhiko

    2015-01-01

    CpG‐island methylator phenotype (CIMP)‐positive clear cell renal cell carcinomas (RCCs) are characterized by accumulation of DNA hypermethylation of CpG islands, clinicopathological aggressiveness and poor patient outcome. The aim of this study was to clarify the molecular pathways participating in CIMP‐positive renal carcinogenesis. Genome (whole‐exome and copy number), transcriptome and proteome (two‐dimensional image converted analysis of liquid chromatography‐mass spectrometry) analyses were performed using tissue specimens of 87 CIMP‐negative and 14 CIMP‐positive clear cell RCCs and corresponding specimens of non‐cancerous renal cortex. Genes encoding microtubule‐associated proteins, such as DNAH2, DNAH5, DNAH10, RP1 and HAUS8, showed a 10% or higher incidence of genetic aberrations (non‐synonymous single‐nucleotide mutations and insertions/deletions) in CIMP‐positive RCCs, whereas CIMP‐negative RCCs lacked distinct genetic characteristics. MetaCore pathway analysis of CIMP‐positive RCCs revealed that alterations of mRNA or protein expression were significantly accumulated in six pathways, all participating in the spindle checkpoint, including the “The metaphase checkpoint (p = 1.427 × 10−6),” “Role of Anaphase Promoting Complex in cell cycle regulation (p = 7.444 × 10−6)” and “Spindle assembly and chromosome separation (p = 9.260 × 10−6)” pathways. Quantitative RT‐PCR analysis revealed that mRNA expression levels for genes included in such pathways, i.e., AURKA, AURKB, BIRC5, BUB1, CDC20, NEK2 and SPC25, were significantly higher in CIMP‐positive than in CIMP‐negative RCCs. All CIMP‐positive RCCs showed overexpression of Aurora kinases, AURKA and AURKB, and this overexpression was mainly attributable to increased copy number. These data suggest that abnormalities of the spindle checkpoint pathway participate in CIMP‐positive renal carcinogenesis, and that AURKA and AURKB may be potential

  17. Weaver syndrome and EZH2 mutations: Clarifying the clinical phenotype.

    PubMed

    Tatton-Brown, Katrina; Murray, Anne; Hanks, Sandra; Douglas, Jenny; Armstrong, Ruth; Banka, Siddharth; Bird, Lynne M; Clericuzio, Carol L; Cormier-Daire, Valerie; Cushing, Tom; Flinter, Frances; Jacquemont, Marie-Line; Joss, Shelagh; Kinning, Esther; Lynch, Sally Ann; Magee, Alex; McConnell, Vivienne; Medeira, Ana; Ozono, Keiichi; Patton, Michael; Rankin, Julia; Shears, Debbie; Simon, Marleen; Splitt, Miranda; Strenger, Volker; Stuurman, Kyra; Taylor, Clare; Titheradge, Hannah; Van Maldergem, Lionel; Temple, I Karen; Cole, Trevor; Seal, Sheila; Rahman, Nazneen

    2013-12-01

    Weaver syndrome, first described in 1974, is characterized by tall stature, a typical facial appearance, and variable intellectual disability. In 2011, mutations in the histone methyltransferase, EZH2, were shown to cause Weaver syndrome. To date, we have identified 48 individuals with EZH2 mutations. The mutations were primarily missense mutations occurring throughout the gene, with some clustering in the SET domain (12/48). Truncating mutations were uncommon (4/48) and only identified in the final exon, after the SET domain. Through analyses of clinical data and facial photographs of EZH2 mutation-positive individuals, we have shown that the facial features can be subtle and the clinical diagnosis of Weaver syndrome is thus challenging, especially in older individuals. However, tall stature is very common, reported in >90% of affected individuals. Intellectual disability is also common, present in ~80%, but is highly variable and frequently mild. Additional clinical features which may help in stratifying individuals to EZH2 mutation testing include camptodactyly, soft, doughy skin, umbilical hernia, and a low, hoarse cry. Considerable phenotypic overlap between Sotos and Weaver syndromes is also evident. The identification of an EZH2 mutation can therefore provide an objective means of confirming a subtle presentation of Weaver syndrome and/or distinguishing Weaver and Sotos syndromes. As mutation testing becomes increasingly accessible and larger numbers of EZH2 mutation-positive individuals are identified, knowledge of the clinical spectrum and prognostic implications of EZH2 mutations should improve.

  18. Weaver syndrome and EZH2 mutations: Clarifying the clinical phenotype.

    PubMed

    Tatton-Brown, Katrina; Murray, Anne; Hanks, Sandra; Douglas, Jenny; Armstrong, Ruth; Banka, Siddharth; Bird, Lynne M; Clericuzio, Carol L; Cormier-Daire, Valerie; Cushing, Tom; Flinter, Frances; Jacquemont, Marie-Line; Joss, Shelagh; Kinning, Esther; Lynch, Sally Ann; Magee, Alex; McConnell, Vivienne; Medeira, Ana; Ozono, Keiichi; Patton, Michael; Rankin, Julia; Shears, Debbie; Simon, Marleen; Splitt, Miranda; Strenger, Volker; Stuurman, Kyra; Taylor, Clare; Titheradge, Hannah; Van Maldergem, Lionel; Temple, I Karen; Cole, Trevor; Seal, Sheila; Rahman, Nazneen

    2013-12-01

    Weaver syndrome, first described in 1974, is characterized by tall stature, a typical facial appearance, and variable intellectual disability. In 2011, mutations in the histone methyltransferase, EZH2, were shown to cause Weaver syndrome. To date, we have identified 48 individuals with EZH2 mutations. The mutations were primarily missense mutations occurring throughout the gene, with some clustering in the SET domain (12/48). Truncating mutations were uncommon (4/48) and only identified in the final exon, after the SET domain. Through analyses of clinical data and facial photographs of EZH2 mutation-positive individuals, we have shown that the facial features can be subtle and the clinical diagnosis of Weaver syndrome is thus challenging, especially in older individuals. However, tall stature is very common, reported in >90% of affected individuals. Intellectual disability is also common, present in ~80%, but is highly variable and frequently mild. Additional clinical features which may help in stratifying individuals to EZH2 mutation testing include camptodactyly, soft, doughy skin, umbilical hernia, and a low, hoarse cry. Considerable phenotypic overlap between Sotos and Weaver syndromes is also evident. The identification of an EZH2 mutation can therefore provide an objective means of confirming a subtle presentation of Weaver syndrome and/or distinguishing Weaver and Sotos syndromes. As mutation testing becomes increasingly accessible and larger numbers of EZH2 mutation-positive individuals are identified, knowledge of the clinical spectrum and prognostic implications of EZH2 mutations should improve. PMID:24214728

  19. Nuclear maspin expression correlates with the CpG island methylator phenotype and tumor aggressiveness in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung Ho; Cho, Nam-Yun; Bae, Jeong Mo; Kim, Kyung-Ju; Rhee, Ye-Young; Lee, Hye Seung; Kang, Gyeong Hoon

    2015-01-01

    It has been suggested that nuclear expression of maspin (mammary serine protease inhibitor; also known as SERPINB5) in colorectal cancer (CRC) is associated with proximal colonic tumor location, mucinous and poorly differentiated histology, microsatellite instability-high (MSI-H), and poor prognosis. Based on these findings, there may be a potential association between nuclear maspin expression and the CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP) in CRC, but no study has elucidated this issue. Here, we evaluated maspin protein expression status by immunohistochemistry in 216 MSI-H CRCs. CIMP status was also determined by methylation-specific quantitative PCR method (MethyLight) using eight CIMP markers (MLH1, NEUROG1, CRABP1, CACNA1G, CDKN2A (p16), IGF2, SOCS1, and RUNX3) in 216 MSI-H CRCs. Associations between maspin expression status and various pathological, molecular, and survival data were statistically analyzed. Among the 216 MSI-H CRCs, 111 (51%) cases presented nuclear maspin-positive tumors. Nuclear maspin-positive MSI-H CRCs were significantly associated with proximal tumor location (P = 0.003), tumor budding (P < 0.001), lymphovascular invasion (P = 0.001), perineural invasion (P = 0.008), absence of peritumoral lymphoid reaction (P = 0.045), lymph node metastasis (P = 0.003), distant metastasis (P = 0.005), advanced AJCC/UICC stage (stage III/IV) (P = 0.001), and CIMP-high (CIMP-H) status (P < 0.001). Patients with nuclear maspin-positive tumors showed worse disease-free survival than patients with nuclear maspin-negative tumors (log-rank P = 0.025). In conclusion, nuclear maspin expression is molecularly associated with CIMP-H rather than MSI-H, and clinicopathologically correlates with tumor aggressiveness in CRC.

  20. Role of antibiotics in generalized aggressive periodontitis: A review of clinical trials in humans

    PubMed Central

    Ahuja, Annapurna; Baiju, C. S.; Ahuja, Vipin

    2012-01-01

    Background: It is well-recognized fact that periodontal diseases are caused by multifactorial etiologies, in which microorganisms play an important role. An essential component of therapy is to eliminate or manage these pathogens. This has been traditionally accomplished through mechanical means by scaling and root planning which is ineffective in some of the aggressive periodontal diseases. These aggressive diseases involve particular groups of microorganisms which are not eliminated by mechanical means; and they require anti-infective therapy, which includes local and systemic antimicrobials. This approach of therapy is of interest to periodontist due to the aforementioned shortcomings of conventional methods. Materials and Methods: A manual and electronic search was made for human studies up to March 2011 that presented clinical and microbiological data for the efficacy of a systemic antibiotics in generalized aggressive periodontitis along with scaling and root planning. A systematic approach was followed by two independent reviewers and included eligibility criteria for study inclusion, quality assessment, and determination of outcome measures, data extraction, data synthesis, and drawing of conclusion. Results: Only three randomized controlled human trials qualified, and they concluded that both scaling and root planing (SRP) mono-therapy and SRP with antibiotics proves beneficial in improving clinical and microbiological parameters in aggressive periodontitis. Better results were seen in SRP with antibiotic groups as compared with SRP alone. Conclusion: Because of the insufficient quantity and heterogenecity of studies, no adequate evidence could be gathered to use the beneficial effects of these antibiotics along with SRP in aggressive periodontitis compared with SRP alone. PMID:23162322

  1. Pathogenesis of biliary atresia: defining biology to understand clinical phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Asai, Akihiro; Miethke, Alexander; Bezerra, Jorge A.

    2016-01-01

    Biliary atresia is a severe cholangiopathy of early infancy that destroys extrahepatic bile ducts and disrupts bile flow. With a poorly defined disease pathogenesis, treatment consists of the surgical removal of duct remnants followed by hepatoportoenterostomy. Although this approach can improve the short-term outcome, the liver disease progresses to end-stage cirrhosis in most children. Further improvement in outcome will require a greater understanding of the mechanisms of biliary injury and fibrosis. Here, we review progress in the field, which has been fuelled by collaborative studies in larger patient cohorts and the development of cell culture and animal model systems to directly test hypotheses. Advances include the identification of phenotypic subgroups and stages of disease based on clinical, pathological and molecular features. Stronger evidence exists for viruses, toxins and gene sequence variations in the aetiology of biliary atresia, triggering a proinflammatory response that injures the duct epithelium and produces a rapidly progressive cholangiopathy. The immune response also activates the expression of type 2 cytokines that promote epithelial cell proliferation and extracellular matrix production by nonparenchymal cells. These advances provide insight into phenotype variability and might be relevant to the design of personalized trials to block progression of liver disease. PMID:26008129

  2. Aggression Replacement Training for Violent Young Men in a Forensic Psychiatric Outpatient Clinic.

    PubMed

    Hornsveld, Ruud H J; Kraaimaat, Floris W; Muris, Peter; Zwets, Almar J; Kanters, Thijs

    2015-11-01

    The effects of Aggression Replacement Training (ART) were explored in a group of Dutch violent young men aged 16 to 21 years, who were obliged by the court to follow a treatment program in a forensic psychiatric outpatient clinic. To evaluate the training, patients completed a set of self-report questionnaires at three moments in time: at intake/before a waiting period, after the waiting period/before the training, and after the training. During the waiting period, the patients did not change on most measures, although they displayed a significant increase in anger. The patients who completed the therapy scored significantly lower on psychopathy than the patients who dropped out. The training produced significant decreases in physical aggression and social anxiety and showed trends toward a decline in self-reported hostility, general aggression, and anger. After the training, the patients scored comparably with a reference group on measures of hostility and aggressive behavior. Altogether, these results provide tentative support for the efficacy of the ART for violent young men referred to forensic psychiatric outpatient settings.

  3. Functional characterisation of osteosarcoma cell lines and identification of mRNAs and miRNAs associated with aggressive cancer phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Lauvrak, S U; Munthe, E; Kresse, S H; Stratford, E W; Namløs, H M; Meza-Zepeda, L A; Myklebost, O

    2013-01-01

    Background: Osteosarcoma is the most common primary malignant bone tumour, predominantly affecting children and adolescents. Cancer cell line models are required to understand the underlying mechanisms of tumour progression and for preclinical investigations. Methods: To identify cell lines that are well suited for studies of critical cancer-related phenotypes, such as tumour initiation, growth and metastasis, we have evaluated 22 osteosarcoma cell lines for in vivo tumorigenicity, in vitro colony-forming ability, invasive/migratory potential and proliferation capacity. Importantly, we have also identified mRNA and microRNA (miRNA) gene expression patterns associated with these phenotypes by expression profiling. Results: The cell lines exhibited a wide range of cancer-related phenotypes, from rather indolent to very aggressive. Several mRNAs were differentially expressed in highly aggressive osteosarcoma cell lines compared with non-aggressive cell lines, including RUNX2, several S100 genes, collagen genes and genes encoding proteins involved in growth factor binding, cell adhesion and extracellular matrix remodelling. Most notably, four genes—COL1A2, KYNU, ACTG2 and NPPB—were differentially expressed in high and non-aggressive cell lines for all the cancer-related phenotypes investigated, suggesting that they might have important roles in the process of osteosarcoma tumorigenesis. At the miRNA level, miR-199b-5p and mir-100-3p were downregulated in the highly aggressive cell lines, whereas miR-155-5p, miR-135b-5p and miR-146a-5p were upregulated. miR-135b-5p and miR-146a-5p were further predicted to be linked to the metastatic capacity of the disease. Interpretation: The detailed characterisation of cell line phenotypes will support the selection of models to use for specific preclinical investigations. The differentially expressed mRNAs and miRNAs identified in this study may represent good candidates for future therapeutic targets. To our knowledge, this is

  4. Clinical and molecular phenotype of Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rice, Gillian; Patrick, Teresa; Parmar, Rekha; Taylor, Claire F; Aeby, Alec; Aicardi, Jean; Artuch, Rafael; Montalto, Simon Attard; Bacino, Carlos A; Barroso, Bruno; Baxter, Peter; Benko, Willam S; Bergmann, Carsten; Bertini, Enrico; Biancheri, Roberta; Blair, Edward M; Blau, Nenad; Bonthron, David T; Briggs, Tracy; Brueton, Louise A; Brunner, Han G; Burke, Christopher J; Carr, Ian M; Carvalho, Daniel R; Chandler, Kate E; Christen, Hans-Jurgen; Corry, Peter C; Cowan, Frances M; Cox, Helen; D'Arrigo, Stefano; Dean, John; De Laet, Corinne; De Praeter, Claudine; Dery, Catherine; Ferrie, Colin D; Flintoff, Kim; Frints, Suzanna G M; Garcia-Cazorla, Angels; Gener, Blanca; Goizet, Cyril; Goutieres, Francoise; Green, Andrew J; Guet, Agnes; Hamel, Ben C J; Hayward, Bruce E; Heiberg, Arvid; Hennekam, Raoul C; Husson, Marie; Jackson, Andrew P; Jayatunga, Rasieka; Jiang, Yong-Hui; Kant, Sarina G; Kao, Amy; King, Mary D; Kingston, Helen M; Klepper, Joerg; van der Knaap, Marjo S; Kornberg, Andrew J; Kotzot, Dieter; Kratzer, Wilfried; Lacombe, Didier; Lagae, Lieven; Landrieu, Pierre Georges; Lanzi, Giovanni; Leitch, Andrea; Lim, Ming J; Livingston, John H; Lourenco, Charles M; Lyall, E G Hermione; Lynch, Sally A; Lyons, Michael J; Marom, Daphna; McClure, John P; McWilliam, Robert; Melancon, Serge B; Mewasingh, Leena D; Moutard, Marie-Laure; Nischal, Ken K; Ostergaard, John R; Prendiville, Julie; Rasmussen, Magnhild; Rogers, R Curtis; Roland, Dominique; Rosser, Elisabeth M; Rostasy, Kevin; Roubertie, Agathe; Sanchis, Amparo; Schiffmann, Raphael; Scholl-Burgi, Sabine; Seal, Sunita; Shalev, Stavit A; Corcoles, C Sierra; Sinha, Gyan P; Soler, Doriette; Spiegel, Ronen; Stephenson, John B P; Tacke, Uta; Tan, Tiong Yang; Till, Marianne; Tolmie, John L; Tomlin, Pam; Vagnarelli, Federica; Valente, Enza Maria; Van Coster, Rudy N A; Van der Aa, Nathalie; Vanderver, Adeline; Vles, Johannes S H; Voit, Thomas; Wassmer, Evangeline; Weschke, Bernhard; Whiteford, Margo L; Willemsen, Michel A A; Zankl, Andreas; Zuberi, Sameer M; Orcesi, Simona; Fazzi, Elisa; Lebon, Pierre; Crow, Yanick J

    2007-10-01

    Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome (AGS) is a genetic encephalopathy whose clinical features mimic those of acquired in utero viral infection. AGS exhibits locus heterogeneity, with mutations identified in genes encoding the 3'-->5' exonuclease TREX1 and the three subunits of the RNASEH2 endonuclease complex. To define the molecular spectrum of AGS, we performed mutation screening in patients, from 127 pedigrees, with a clinical diagnosis of the disease. Biallelic mutations in TREX1, RNASEH2A, RNASEH2B, and RNASEH2C were observed in 31, 3, 47, and 18 families, respectively. In five families, we identified an RNASEH2A or RNASEH2B mutation on one allele only. In one child, the disease occurred because of a de novo heterozygous TREX1 mutation. In 22 families, no mutations were found. Null mutations were common in TREX1, although a specific missense mutation was observed frequently in patients from northern Europe. Almost all mutations in RNASEH2A, RNASEH2B, and RNASEH2C were missense. We identified an RNASEH2C founder mutation in 13 Pakistani families. We also collected clinical data from 123 mutation-positive patients. Two clinical presentations could be delineated: an early-onset neonatal form, highly reminiscent of congenital infection seen particularly with TREX1 mutations, and a later-onset presentation, sometimes occurring after several months of normal development and occasionally associated with remarkably preserved neurological function, most frequently due to RNASEH2B mutations. Mortality was correlated with genotype; 34.3% of patients with TREX1, RNASEH2A, and RNASEH2C mutations versus 8.0% RNASEH2B mutation-positive patients were known to have died (P=.001). Our analysis defines the phenotypic spectrum of AGS and suggests a coherent mutation-screening strategy in this heterogeneous disorder. Additionally, our data indicate that at least one further AGS-causing gene remains to be identified.

  5. Clinical asthma phenotypes in the real world: opportunities and challenges.

    PubMed

    Bostantzoglou, Clementine; Delimpoura, Vicky; Samitas, Konstantinos; Zervas, Eleftherios; Kanniess, Frank; Gaga, Mina

    2015-09-01

    Asthma is a common, chronic and heterogeneous syndrome, affecting people of all ages, all races and both sexes. It may range from mild disease with barely noticeable symptoms, to very severe disease with constant symptoms that greatly hinder the life of the patient. Guidelines issued by various medical societies provide guidance on how to diagnose and manage asthmatic patients. It is now increasingly recognised that asthma management must be individualised, tailored not only to the severity of the disease but to the phenotypic characteristics of each patient. The aim of asthma treatment is control of asthma and the prevention of risk of exacerbations and fixed airflow limitation. Asthma control can be easily assessed clinically through simple screening tools such as the use of validated questionnaires and spirometry. The use of inflammatory biomarkers can be an alternative approach that, however, requires more time and resources. Asthma treatment involves the use of controllers, mainly inhaled corticosteroids and long-acting β2-agonists, and relievers, mainly rapid-acting β2-agonists. Controller medications reduce airway inflammation, lead to better symptom control and reduce the risk of future exacerbations. Reliever (rescue) medications alleviate symptoms and prevent exercise-induced bronchoconstriction. Treatment must be based on a "stepwise approach" in order to achieve good control of symptoms and to minimise future risks of exacerbations. That is, less treatment for mild disease, more treatment for severe, uncontrolled disease. Once good asthma control has been achieved and maintained, treatment should be stepped down. In severe asthmatics, phenotypic characterisation becomes more clinically useful and add-on treatment such as anti-immunoglobulin E monoclonal antibodies may be required. Despite our better understanding of asthma, there are still patients who will not respond to treatment and remain symptomatic. Dissemination of guidelines and national plans

  6. Karyometry of nuclear phenotypes in Cutaneous Squamous Cell Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bartels, Peter H.; Bartels, Hubert G.; Alberts, David S.; Yozwiak, M.; Prasad, Anil R.; Glazer, Evan; Krouse, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this study is to establish the karyometric characteristics of the two main nuclear phenotypes in cSCC lesions. Materials and Methods The clinical materials comprised 75 cases of cSCC, 38 with aggressive lesions and 37 with non-aggressive lesions. High-resolution images of 100 nuclei/case were recorded. The data were partitioned into four subgroups covering the range of lesion progression. Four discriminant functions were derived to distinguish aggressive from non-aggressive lesions. The most typical nuclei from the phenotype predominant in aggressive lesions, and from the phenotype predominant in non-aggressive lesions were separated out by thresholding on the discriminant function score axes. For these homogeneous sets of nuclei the karyometric features were computed. Results The nuclear populations in cSCC lesions are a very heterogeneous set. There are two axes of dispersion, along the line of lesion progression and between aggressive and non-aggressive lesions. The analysis faces the difficulty that lesions from both diagnostic categories contain nuclei of the same two phenotypes with the difference between categories consisting only of differences in proportion of the two phenotypes. Conclusions The nuclei of the aggressive phenotype I and non-aggressive phenotype II have substantially different chromatin patterns and can be distinguished with a better than 90 % correct recognition rate. PMID:22590813

  7. Phenotypic differences in behavior, physiology and neurochemistry between rats selected for tameness and for defensive aggression towards humans.

    PubMed

    Albert, Frank W; Shchepina, Olesya; Winter, Christine; Römpler, Holger; Teupser, Daniel; Palme, Rupert; Ceglarek, Uta; Kratzsch, Jürgen; Sohr, Reinhard; Trut, Lyudmila N; Thiery, Joachim; Morgenstern, Rudolf; Plyusnina, Irina Z; Schöneberg, Torsten; Pääbo, Svante

    2008-03-01

    To better understand the biology of tameness, i.e. tolerance of human presence and handling, we analyzed two lines of wild-derived rats (Rattus norvegicus) artificially selected for tameness and defensive aggression towards humans. In response to a gloved human hand, tame rats tolerated handling, whereas aggressive rats attacked. Cross-fostering showed that these behavioral differences are not caused by postnatal maternal effects. Tame rats were more active and explorative and exhibited fewer anxiety-related behaviors. They also had smaller adrenal glands, larger spleens and lower levels of serum corticosterone. Blood glucose levels were lower in tame rats, whereas the concentrations of nine amino acids were higher. In the brain, tame rats had lower serotonin and higher taurine levels than aggressive rats. Our findings reinforce the notion that tameness is correlated with differences in stress response and will facilitate future efforts to uncover the genetic basis for animal tameness.

  8. Sacral chordoma in an adult showing an aggressive clinical course: A case report

    PubMed Central

    ENDO, KOJI; YAMASHITA, HIDEKI; NAGASHIMA, HIDEKI; TESHIMA, RYOTA

    2014-01-01

    The current report presents a case of a 78-year-old male with sacral chordoma, showing an aggressive clinical course. The patient underwent sacral resection, however, nine months later, multiple metastases were detected by magnetic resonance imaging. The metastases progressed rapidly and 15 months following surgery the patient succumbed to respiratory dysfunction. An autopsy revealed multiple metastases of the lung, liver, heart, kidneys and vertebrae. Pathologically, the tumors did not show proliferation of anaplastic cells or dedifferentiation; however, the metastatic tumor cells were smaller than the primary tumor cells. The Ki-67 labeling indices were <5% in all of the patient’s tumors, therefore, the capacity for cellular proliferation of the tumors was considered to be low. Chordoma in adults are generally slow-growing tumors and are associated with a relatively prolonged course and frequent local recurrences. Therefore, it must be recognized that chordoma may grow rapidly and show an aggressive clinical course, even when the Ki-67 labeling index is low. PMID:24765153

  9. Attitudes of clinical staff toward the causes and management of aggression in acute old age psychiatry inpatient units

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In psychiatry, most of the focus on patient aggression has been in adolescent and adult inpatient settings. This behaviour is also common in elderly people with mental illness, but little research has been conducted into this problem in old age psychiatry settings. The attitudes of clinical staff toward aggression may affect the way they manage this behaviour. The purpose of this study was to examine the attitudes of clinical staff toward the causes and management of aggression in acute old age psychiatry inpatient settings. Methods A convenience sample of clinical staff were recruited from three locked acute old age psychiatry inpatient units in Melbourne, Australia. They completed the Management of Aggression and Violence Scale, which assessed the causes and managment of aggression in psychiatric settings. Results Eighty-five staff completed the questionnaire, comprising registered nurses (61.1%, n = 52), enrolled nurses (27.1%, n = 23) and medical and allied health staff (11.8%, n = 10). A range of causative factors contributed to aggression. The respondents had a tendency to disagree that factors directly related to the patient contributed to this behaviour. They agreed patients were aggressive because of the environment they were in, other people contributed to them becoming aggressive, and patients from certain cultural groups were prone to these behaviours. However, there were mixed views about whether patient aggression could be prevented, and this type of behaviour took place because staff did not listen to patients. There was agreement medication was a valuable approach for the management of aggression, negotiation could be used more effectively in such challenging behaviour, and seclusion and physical restraint were sometimes used more than necessary. However, there was disagreement about whether the practice of secluding patients should be discontinued. Conclusions Aggression in acute old age psychiatry inpatient units occurs

  10. Periodontal parameters following orthodontic treatment in patients with aggressive periodontitis: A before-after clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Khorsand, Afshin; Paknejad, Mojgan; Yaghobee, Siamak; Ghahroudi, Amir Alireza Rasouli; Bashizadefakhar, Hourieh; Khatami, Masoomeh; Shirazi, Mohsen

    2013-01-01

    Background: The success of combined periodontal and orthodontic approach in the treatment of aggressive periodontitis patients with the pathologic extruded anterior teeth is a main concern and stability of the treatment results is an important factor to evaluate the treatment. The present study investigated the periodontal parameters at the end of the orthodontic treatment in patients with the aggressive periodontitis. Materials and Methods: Eight patients with an aggressive periodontal disease, extruded maxillary incisors, infrabony defects and probing depth of ≥5 mm were enrolled in this clinical trial (before, after). After periodontal therapy, orthodontic treatment was carried out for intrusion and alignment of teeth. Plaque index (PI), probing pocket depth (PPD), distance between incisal edge and interdental papilla, root length (RL), and defect dimensions (depth and width) were examined at the end of treatment and three as well as 6 months afterward. The data were subjected to repeated measure ANOVA test. P < 0.05 was considered as significant. Results: There was statistically significant decrease in PPD, PI, and depth of the defects during T0, T3 and T6 (P < 0.05). No significant differences were observed in the RL and distance between incisal edge and interdental papilla (P = 0.95). Furthermore, width of the defects demonstrated significant decrease up to T3 (P = 0.042) while no significant changes from 3 months to 6 months were noted (P = 0.59). Conclusion: The results showed that combined periodontal and orthodontic approach would be a successful treatment with acceptable stability in the case of regular follow-up visits and controlled oral hygiene habits. PMID:24379862

  11. CONCEPT ANALYSIS: AGGRESSION

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jianghong

    2006-01-01

    The concept of aggression is important to nursing because further knowledge of aggression can help generate a better theoretical model to drive more effective intervention and prevention approaches. This paper outlines a conceptual analysis of aggression. First, the different forms of aggression are reviewed, including the clinical classification and the stimulus-based classification. Then the manifestations and measurement of aggression are described. Finally, the causes and consequences of aggression are outlined. It is argued that a better understanding of aggression and the causal factors underlying it are essential for learning how to prevent negative aggression in the future. PMID:15371137

  12. Functional interaction between acyl-CoA synthetase 4, lipooxygenases and cyclooxygenase-2 in the aggressive phenotype of breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Maloberti, Paula M; Duarte, Alejandra B; Orlando, Ulises D; Pasqualini, María E; Solano, Angela R; López-Otín, Carlos; Podestá, Ernesto J

    2010-11-11

    The acyl-CoA synthetase 4 (ACSL4) is increased in breast cancer, colon and hepatocellular carcinoma. ACSL4 mainly esterifies arachidonic acid (AA) into arachidonoyl-CoA, reducing free AA intracellular levels, which is in contradiction with the need for AA metabolites in tumorigenesis. Therefore, the causal role of ACSL4 is still not established. This study was undertaken to determine the role of ACSL4 in AA metabolic pathway in breast cancer cells. The first novel finding is that ACSL4 regulates the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and the production of prostaglandin in MDA-MB-231 cells. We also found that ACSL4 is significantly up-regulated in the highly aggressive MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. In terms of its overexpression and inhibition, ACSL4 plays a causal role in the control of the aggressive phenotype. These results were confirmed by the increase in the aggressive behaviour of MCF-7 cells stably transfected with a Tet-off ACSL4 vector. Concomitantly, another significant finding was that intramitochondrial AA levels are significantly higher in the aggressive cells. Thus, the esterification of AA by ACSL4 compartmentalizes the release of AA in mitochondria, a mechanism that serves to drive the specific lipooxygenase metabolization of the fatty acid. To our knowledge, this is the first report that ACSL4 expression controls both lipooxygenase and cyclooxygenase metabolism of AA. Thus, this functional interaction represents an integrated system that regulates the proliferating and metastatic potential of cancer cells. Therefore, the development of combinatory therapies that profit from the ACSL4, lipooxygenase and COX-2 synergistic action may allow for lower medication doses and avoidance of side effects.

  13. Oral malignant melanoma: An aggressive clinical entity - Report of a rare case with review of literature.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Shamimul; Jamdar, Sami Faisal; Jangra, Jogender; Al Beaiji, Sadun Mohammad Al Ageel

    2016-01-01

    Melanomais one of the most dreaded and aggressive neoplasms, being derived from epidermal melanocytes. The majority of melanomas are seen to involve the skin, and primary mucosal melanomas account for less than 1% of all melanomas. Oral malignant melanomas (OMM) are asymptomatic at the initial presentation, but later they become painful with growth and expansion. In the late stages, the patient may present with ulceration, bleeding, tooth mobility, paresthesia, ill-fitting prosthesis, and delayed healing of the extraction sockets. Diagnosis is often delayed due to asymptomatic clinical presentation, with silent progression of the lesion. OMM are associated with poor prognosis due to their invasive and metastasizing tendencies. The condition has poor survival rates, and metastatic melanomas show even worse prognosis. The 5-year survival rate for OMM ranges 4.5-29%, with 18.5 months being the mean survival rate. The tumor is best managed by wide surgical resection; however, consideration should also be made for adjunctive therapies such as chemotherapy, immunotherapy, and radiotherapy. Recurrences may be seen even 10-15 years after the primary therapy. This paper aims to present an interesting report of aggressive OMM in a 50-year-old male patient and emphasizes the role of dental professionals in maintaining a high degree of vigilance for the pigmented lesions of the oral cavity. Pigmented lesions of uncertain origin should be routinely biopsied to rule out malignancy. Early diagnosis of this dreadful entity entails thorough history taking, physical examination, and radiographic features coupled with histopathology. PMID:27114959

  14. Oral malignant melanoma: An aggressive clinical entity - Report of a rare case with review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Shamimul; Jamdar, Sami Faisal; Jangra, Jogender; Al Beaiji, Sadun Mohammad Al Ageel

    2016-01-01

    Melanomais one of the most dreaded and aggressive neoplasms, being derived from epidermal melanocytes. The majority of melanomas are seen to involve the skin, and primary mucosal melanomas account for less than 1% of all melanomas. Oral malignant melanomas (OMM) are asymptomatic at the initial presentation, but later they become painful with growth and expansion. In the late stages, the patient may present with ulceration, bleeding, tooth mobility, paresthesia, ill-fitting prosthesis, and delayed healing of the extraction sockets. Diagnosis is often delayed due to asymptomatic clinical presentation, with silent progression of the lesion. OMM are associated with poor prognosis due to their invasive and metastasizing tendencies. The condition has poor survival rates, and metastatic melanomas show even worse prognosis. The 5-year survival rate for OMM ranges 4.5–29%, with 18.5 months being the mean survival rate. The tumor is best managed by wide surgical resection; however, consideration should also be made for adjunctive therapies such as chemotherapy, immunotherapy, and radiotherapy. Recurrences may be seen even 10–15 years after the primary therapy. This paper aims to present an interesting report of aggressive OMM in a 50-year-old male patient and emphasizes the role of dental professionals in maintaining a high degree of vigilance for the pigmented lesions of the oral cavity. Pigmented lesions of uncertain origin should be routinely biopsied to rule out malignancy. Early diagnosis of this dreadful entity entails thorough history taking, physical examination, and radiographic features coupled with histopathology. PMID:27114959

  15. Aggression in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders and a Clinic-Referred Comparison Group

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farmer, Cristan; Butter, Eric; Mazurek, Micah O.; Cowan, Charles; Lainhart, Janet; Cook, Edwin H.; DeWitt, Mary Beth; Aman, Michael

    2015-01-01

    A gap exists in the literature regarding aggression in autism spectrum disorders and how this behavior compares to other groups. In this multisite study, the "Children's Scale for Hostility and Aggression: Reactive/Proactive" and the Aggression subscale of the "Child Behavior Checklist" were rated for 414 children with autism…

  16. Identification of Pathogenic Rare Yeast Species in Clinical Samples: Comparison between Phenotypical and Molecular Methods▿

    PubMed Central

    Cendejas-Bueno, Emilio; Gomez-Lopez, Alicia; Mellado, Emilia; Rodriguez-Tudela, Juan L.; Cuenca-Estrella, Manuel

    2010-01-01

    Species identification using both phenotypic and molecular methods and antifungal susceptibility tests was carried out with 60 uncommon clinical yeasts. Our data show that phenotypic methods were insufficient for correct identification (only 25%) and that most of the wrongly identified strains showed a resistant antifungal profile. PMID:20237094

  17. siRNA Knockdown of Ribosomal Protein Gene RPL19 Abrogates the Aggressive Phenotype of Human Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bee, Alix; Brewer, Daniel; Beesley, Carol; Dodson, Andrew; Forootan, Shiva; Dickinson, Timothy; Gerard, Patricia; Lane, Brian; Yao, Sheng; Cooper, Colin S.; Djamgoz, Mustafa B. A.; Gosden, Christine M.; Ke, Youqiang; Foster, Christopher S.

    2011-01-01

    We provide novel functional data that posttranscriptional silencing of gene RPL19 using RNAi not only abrogates the malignant phenotype of PC-3M prostate cancer cells but is selective with respect to transcription and translation of other genes. Reducing RPL19 transcription modulates a subset of genes, evidenced by gene expression array analysis and Western blotting, but does not compromise cell proliferation or apoptosis in-vitro. However, growth of xenografted tumors containing the knocked-down RPL19 in-vivo is significantly reduced. Analysis of the modulated genes reveals induction of the non-malignant phenotype principally to involve perturbation of networks of transcription factors and cellular adhesion genes. The data provide evidence that extra-ribosomal regulatory functions of RPL19, beyond protein synthesis, are critical regulators of cellular phenotype. Targeting key members of affected networks identified by gene expression analysis raises the possibility of therapeutically stabilizing a benign phenotype generated by modulating the expression of an individual gene and thereafter constraining a malignant phenotype while leaving non-malignant tissues unaffected. PMID:21799931

  18. Sacrococcygeal chordoma in infancy showing an aggressive clinical course: an autopsy case report.

    PubMed

    Shinmura, Yuichiro; Miura, Katsutoshi; Yajima, Shuhei; Tsutsui, Yoshihiro

    2003-07-01

    The autopsy case of a 3-year 6-month-old boy with chordoma arising in the sacrococcygeal region is presented. The primary lesion of the sacrococcygeal area was unresectable and lung metastasis was detected. He was treated with multi-agent systemic chemotherapy and radiation therapy, but the tumor was less responsive to these therapies. He died about one year after first admission. An autopsy revealed a massive sacrococcygeal mass and metastasis in the thoracic and lumbar vertebrae, retroperitoneal and mediastinal lymph nodes, and also in the bilateral lungs and liver. Histologically, the tumor was composed of 'pink' cells and scattered 'physaliphorous' cells with a myxoid matrix. Sacrococcygeal chordoma in infancy is very rare. Our case showed a highly aggressive clinical course.

  19. A nonsurgical approach to treating aggressive inflammatory papillary hyperplasia: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Orenstein, Noah P; Taylor, Thomas

    2014-04-01

    Preprosthetic interventions in patients with aggressive forms of inflammatory papillary hyperplasia have historically involved surgery. These procedures often involve significant postoperative discomfort and morbidity. Additionally, some patients who present with dental phobias, aversions to surgery, or underlying systemic disease may not be amenable to this type of surgical intervention. In this report, a patient with severe inflammatory papillary hyperplasia and phobias regarding the dentist and dental surgery was treated nonsurgically, following strict adherence to a clinical protocol. The methodology involved greater patient comfort during treatment, encouraged positive reinforcement to visiting the dentist for recall appointments, and effectively eliminated the underlying inflammatory papillary hyperplasia, allowing for the successful fabrication of the definitive removable prostheses. PMID:24360006

  20. [Clinical Phenotypes in Guillain-Barré Syndrome].

    PubMed

    Koga, Michiaki

    2015-11-01

    Guillain-Barré syndrome can be classified into several phenotypes according to the type of predominantly disturbed nerve fibers, distribution of muscular weakness, and electrophysiological and pathological findings. Although several regional variants including Fisher syndrome and pharyngeal-cervical-brachial weakness were initially reported in Western researchers, many labor-intensive studies by Japanese researchers have significantly contributed to defining and highlighting these variants. This review summarizes the several regional variants of Guillain-Barré syndrome while highlighting the substantial contributions made by Japanese investigators. Furthermore, a new regional variant named "distal limb weakness" is proposed, in which regional weakness of hands and feet is observed throughout the disease course. It is considered a mild phenotype of acute axonal motor neuropathy after Campylobacter jejuni enteritis.

  1. Mother and father self-reports of corporal punishment and severe physical aggression toward clinic-referred youth.

    PubMed

    Mahoney, A; Donnelly, W O; Lewis, T; Maynard, C

    2000-06-01

    Examined the extent to which 359 mothers and 140 fathers of clinic-referred youth (ages 2 to 17) reported using corporal punishment and severe physical aggression when asked directly via intake screening questionnaires at a community mental health center; higher prevalence rates emerged compared to families in the general population. Clinic-referred parents reported greater use of corporal punishment for younger relative to older youth, sons relative to daughters, and by single relative to married mothers. In cases with reports from both parents, mothers used corporal punishment more frequently than fathers. Demographic factors were not linked to severe physical aggression, except for mothers' treatment of sons versus daughters. After controlling for demographic factors, maternal and paternal reports of child externalizing behavior accounted for significant variance in their own and their partner's use of corporal punishment, and in mothers' use of severe physical aggression.

  2. NCI Workshop Report: Clinical and Computational Requirements for Correlating Imaging Phenotypes with Genomics Signatures

    PubMed Central

    Colen, Rivka; Foster, Ian; Gatenby, Robert; Giger, Mary Ellen; Gillies, Robert; Gutman, David; Heller, Matthew; Jain, Rajan; Madabhushi, Anant; Madhavan, Subha; Napel, Sandy; Rao, Arvind; Saltz, Joel; Tatum, James; Verhaak, Roeland; Whitman, Gary

    2014-01-01

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Cancer Imaging Program organized two related workshops on June 26–27, 2013, entitled “Correlating Imaging Phenotypes with Genomics Signatures Research” and “Scalable Computational Resources as Required for Imaging-Genomics Decision Support Systems.” The first workshop focused on clinical and scientific requirements, exploring our knowledge of phenotypic characteristics of cancer biological properties to determine whether the field is sufficiently advanced to correlate with imaging phenotypes that underpin genomics and clinical outcomes, and exploring new scientific methods to extract phenotypic features from medical images and relate them to genomics analyses. The second workshop focused on computational methods that explore informatics and computational requirements to extract phenotypic features from medical images and relate them to genomics analyses and improve the accessibility and speed of dissemination of existing NIH resources. These workshops linked clinical and scientific requirements of currently known phenotypic and genotypic cancer biology characteristics with imaging phenotypes that underpin genomics and clinical outcomes. The group generated a set of recommendations to NCI leadership and the research community that encourage and support development of the emerging radiogenomics research field to address short-and longer-term goals in cancer research. PMID:25389451

  3. NCI Workshop Report: Clinical and Computational Requirements for Correlating Imaging Phenotypes with Genomics Signatures.

    PubMed

    Colen, Rivka; Foster, Ian; Gatenby, Robert; Giger, Mary Ellen; Gillies, Robert; Gutman, David; Heller, Matthew; Jain, Rajan; Madabhushi, Anant; Madhavan, Subha; Napel, Sandy; Rao, Arvind; Saltz, Joel; Tatum, James; Verhaak, Roeland; Whitman, Gary

    2014-10-01

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Cancer Imaging Program organized two related workshops on June 26-27, 2013, entitled "Correlating Imaging Phenotypes with Genomics Signatures Research" and "Scalable Computational Resources as Required for Imaging-Genomics Decision Support Systems." The first workshop focused on clinical and scientific requirements, exploring our knowledge of phenotypic characteristics of cancer biological properties to determine whether the field is sufficiently advanced to correlate with imaging phenotypes that underpin genomics and clinical outcomes, and exploring new scientific methods to extract phenotypic features from medical images and relate them to genomics analyses. The second workshop focused on computational methods that explore informatics and computational requirements to extract phenotypic features from medical images and relate them to genomics analyses and improve the accessibility and speed of dissemination of existing NIH resources. These workshops linked clinical and scientific requirements of currently known phenotypic and genotypic cancer biology characteristics with imaging phenotypes that underpin genomics and clinical outcomes. The group generated a set of recommendations to NCI leadership and the research community that encourage and support development of the emerging radiogenomics research field to address short-and longer-term goals in cancer research.

  4. Neuroendocrine aspects of pediatric aggression: Can hormone measures be clinically useful?

    PubMed

    Barzman, Drew H; Patel, Avni; Sonnier, Loretta; Strawn, Jeffrey R

    2010-01-01

    Pediatric aggression is common in human societies, mainly presenting as impulsive aggression or predatory aggression. Numerous psychiatric disorders can contain aggression as a symptom, leading to difficulties in diagnosis and treatment. This review focuses on the biological systems that affect pediatric aggression. We review the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis, and the mechanisms by which these axes influence the body and mind of aggressive children and adolescents. Although this review focuses on the HPA and HPG axes, it is important to note that other biological systems have relationships with these two axes. Based on the results of the studies reviewed, elevated cortisol concentrations were associated with impulsive aggression, whereas, low levels of cortisol were associated with callous-unemotional traits similar to predatory aggression. Higher levels of dehydroepiandrosterone were correlated with higher levels of aggression as were higher levels of testosterone. However, there have been discrepancies in the results between various studies, indicating the need for more research on hormonal levels and pediatric aggression. In the future, hormonal levels may be useful in determining what treatments will work best for certain pediatric patients.

  5. Heparanase-mediated Loss of Nuclear Syndecan-1 Enhances Histone Acetyltransferase (HAT) Activity to Promote Expression of Genes That Drive an Aggressive Tumor Phenotype*

    PubMed Central

    Purushothaman, Anurag; Hurst, Douglas R.; Pisano, Claudio; Mizumoto, Shuji; Sugahara, Kazuyuki; Sanderson, Ralph D.

    2011-01-01

    Heparanase acts as a master regulator of the aggressive tumor phenotype in part by enhancing expression of proteins known to drive tumor progression (e.g. VEGF, MMP-9, hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), and RANKL). However, the mechanism whereby this enzyme regulates gene expression remains unknown. We previously reported that elevation of heparanase levels in myeloma cells causes a dramatic reduction in the amount of syndecan-1 in the nucleus. Because syndecan-1 has heparan sulfate chains and because exogenous heparan sulfate has been shown to inhibit the activity of histone acetyltransferase (HAT) enzymes in vitro, we hypothesized that the reduction in nuclear syndecan-1 in cells expressing high levels of heparanase would result in increased HAT activity leading to stimulation of protein transcription. We found that myeloma cells or tumors expressing high levels of heparanase and low levels of nuclear syndecan-1 had significantly higher levels of HAT activity when compared with cells or tumors expressing low levels of heparanase. High levels of HAT activity in heparanase-high cells were blocked by SST0001, an inhibitor of heparanase. Restoration of high syndecan-1 levels in heparanase-high cells diminished nuclear HAT activity, establishing syndecan-1 as a potent inhibitor of HAT. Exposure of heparanase-high cells to anacardic acid, an inhibitor of HAT activity, significantly suppressed their expression of VEGF and MMP-9, two genes known to be up-regulated following elevation of heparanase. These results reveal a novel mechanistic pathway driven by heparanase expression, which leads to decreased nuclear syndecan-1, increased HAT activity, and up-regulation of transcription of multiple genes that drive an aggressive tumor phenotype. PMID:21757697

  6. Schizophrenia and impulsive aggression: a heuristic inquiry with forensic and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Felthous, Alan R

    2008-01-01

    Assessment of a violent act committed by an offender with schizophrenia typically focuses on whether the act was due to distortions in thought or perception, i.e., delusions or hallucination. An important but less appreciated feature is the impulsivity of the act, which can have forensic and therapeutic implications. Here a modification of Barratt's classification of aggressive behavior is presented that includes premeditated (instrumental), medical (secondary), impulsive (expressive), and compulsive (instrumental and expressive) aggression. Violence due to a mental condition such as schizophrenia is considered medical, but even aggression motivated by delusions or hallucinations can also be characterized as impulsive, premeditated, or compulsive.Although research on aggression and schizophrenia is limited with regard to the impulsivity-premeditation dimension and difficult to compare, current evidence suggests this to be an important consideration in the assessment of aggression in individuals with schizophrenia, important both forensically and therapeutically. Future research on the impulsive-premeditated quality of aggressive acts by offenders with schizophrenia--research wherein aggressive behavior is defined, situational context is clarified, and diagnostic criteria are explicitly followed--should further refine our understanding of the nature of aggressive acts associated with schizophrenia. Findings from such research will undoubtedly inform assessment, treatment, and forensic relevance of schizophrenia-related physical aggression.

  7. Endometrial and ovarian carcinomas with undifferentiated components: clinically aggressive and frequently underrecognized neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Tafe, Laura J; Garg, Karuna; Chew, Ivy; Tornos, Carmen; Soslow, Robert A

    2010-06-01

    Carcinomas of the endometrium and ovary with undifferentiated components are uncommon neoplasms that are likely underdiagnosed. They are important to recognize as they have been shown to be clinically aggressive. We identified 32 carcinomas with undifferentiated components as defined by Silva and co-workers, 26 endometrial and 6 of ovarian origin. The patient age ranged from 21 to 76 years (median 55); 40% of patients were

  8. The neurobiology of aggression and violence.

    PubMed

    Rosell, Daniel R; Siever, Larry J

    2015-06-01

    Aggression and violence represent a significant public health concern and a clinical challenge for the mental healthcare provider. A great deal has been revealed regarding the neurobiology of violence and aggression, and an integration of this body of knowledge will ultimately serve to advance clinical diagnostics and therapeutic interventions. We will review here the latest findings regarding the neurobiology of aggression and violence. First, we will introduce the construct of aggression, with a focus on issues related to its heterogeneity, as well as the importance of refining the aggression phenotype in order to reduce pathophysiologic variability. Next we will examine the neuroanatomy of aggression and violence, focusing on regional volumes, functional studies, and interregional connectivity. Significant emphasis will be on the amygdala, as well as amygdala-frontal circuitry. Then we will turn our attention to the neurochemistry and molecular genetics of aggression and violence, examining the extensive findings on the serotonergic system, as well as the growing literature on the dopaminergic and vasopressinergic systems. We will also address the contribution of steroid hormones, namely, cortisol and testosterone. Finally, we will summarize these findings with a focus on reconciling inconsistencies and potential clinical implications; and, then we will suggest areas of focus for future directions in the field.

  9. The Impact of Data Fragmentation on High-Throughput Clinical Phenotyping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wei, Weiqi

    2012-01-01

    Subject selection is essential and has become the rate-limiting step for harvesting knowledge to advance healthcare through clinical research. Present manual approaches inhibit researchers from conducting deep and broad studies and drawing confident conclusions. High-throughput clinical phenotyping (HTCP), a recently proposed approach, leverages…

  10. Capoeira as a Clinical Intervention: Addressing Adolescent Aggression with Brazilian Martial Arts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burt, Isaac; Butler, S. Kent

    2011-01-01

    Aggression in adolescents is harmful and emotionally devastating to youth and surrounding communities. This article integrates martial arts and therapeutic principles into a culturally sensitive model that cultivates change in the aggressive behaviors of disenfranchised adolescents. The art form of Capoeira is proposed for promoting positive…

  11. Brugada Syndrome and Early Repolarisation: Distinct Clinical Entities or Different Phenotypes of the Same Genetic Disease?

    PubMed Central

    Caputo, Maria Luce; Regoli, François; Moccetti, Tiziano; Brugada, Pedro; Auricchio, Angelo

    2016-01-01

    Brugada and early repolarisation (ER) syndromes are currently considered two distinct inherited electrical disorders with overlapping clinical and electrocardiographic features. A considerable number of patients diagnosed with ER syndrome have a genetic mutation related to Brugada syndrome (BrS). Due to the high variable phenotypic manifestation, patients with BrS may present with inferolateral repolarisation abnormalities only, resembling the ER pattern. Moreover, the complex genotype–phenotype interaction in BrS can lead to the occurrence of mixed phenotypes with ER syndrome. The first part of this review focuses on specific clinical and electrocardiographic features of BrS and ER syndrome, highlighting the similarity shared by the two primary electrical disorders. The genetic background, with emphasis on the complexity of genotype–phenotype interaction, is explored in the second part of this review. PMID:27617086

  12. Brugada Syndrome and Early Repolarisation: Distinct Clinical Entities or Different Phenotypes of the Same Genetic Disease?

    PubMed Central

    Caputo, Maria Luce; Regoli, François; Moccetti, Tiziano; Brugada, Pedro; Auricchio, Angelo

    2016-01-01

    Brugada and early repolarisation (ER) syndromes are currently considered two distinct inherited electrical disorders with overlapping clinical and electrocardiographic features. A considerable number of patients diagnosed with ER syndrome have a genetic mutation related to Brugada syndrome (BrS). Due to the high variable phenotypic manifestation, patients with BrS may present with inferolateral repolarisation abnormalities only, resembling the ER pattern. Moreover, the complex genotype–phenotype interaction in BrS can lead to the occurrence of mixed phenotypes with ER syndrome. The first part of this review focuses on specific clinical and electrocardiographic features of BrS and ER syndrome, highlighting the similarity shared by the two primary electrical disorders. The genetic background, with emphasis on the complexity of genotype–phenotype interaction, is explored in the second part of this review.

  13. The Clinical Phenotypes of the Juvenile Idiopathic Inflammatory Myopathies

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Mona; Mamyrova, Gulnara; Targoff, Ira N.; Huber, Adam M.; Malley, James D.; Rice, Madeline Murguia; Miller, Frederick W.; Rider, Lisa G.

    2015-01-01

    The juvenile idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (JIIM) are systemic autoimmune diseases characterized by skeletal muscle weakness, characteristic rashes and other systemic features. Although juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM), the most common form of JIIM, has been well-studied, the other major clinical subgroups of JIIM, including juvenile polymyositis (JPM) and juvenile myositis overlapping with another autoimmune or connective tissue disease (JCTM), have not been well characterized, and their similarity to the adult clinical subgroups is also unknown. We enrolled 436 patients with JIIM, including 354 classified as JDM, 33 as JPM and 49 as JCTM, in a nationwide registry study. The aim of this study was to compare demographics, clinical features, laboratory measures, including myositis autoantibodies, and outcomes, among these clinical subgroups, as well as with published data on adult IIM patients enrolled in a separate natural history study. Random forest classification and logistic regression modeling were used to compare clinical subgroups, following univariate analysis. JDM was characterized by typical rashes, including Gottron’s papules, heliotrope rash, malar rash, periungual capillary changes and other photosensitive and vasculopathic skin rashes. JPM was characterized by more severe weakness, higher creatine kinase levels, falling episodes and more frequent cardiac disease. JCTM had more frequent interstitial lung disease, Raynaud’s phenomenon, arthralgia and malar rash. Differences in autoantibody frequency were also evident, with anti-p155, anti-MJ and anti-Mi2 seen more frequently in patients with JDM, anti-signal recognition particle and anti-Jo1 in JPM, and anti-U1RNP, PM-Scl and other myositis-associated autoantibodies more commonly present in JCTM. Mortality was highest in JCTM, whereas hospitalizations and wheelchair usage were highest in JPM patients. Several demographic and clinical features were shared between juvenile and adult IIM subgroups

  14. The clinical phenotypes of the juvenile idiopathic inflammatory myopathies.

    PubMed

    Shah, Mona; Mamyrova, Gulnara; Targoff, Ira N; Huber, Adam M; Malley, James D; Rice, Madeline Murguia; Miller, Frederick W; Rider, Lisa G

    2013-01-01

    The juvenile idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (JIIM) are systemic autoimmune diseases characterized by skeletal muscle weakness, characteristic rashes, and other systemic features. Although juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM), the most common form of JIIM, has been well studied, the other major clinical subgroups of JIIM, including juvenile polymyositis (JPM) and juvenile myositis overlapping with another autoimmune or connective tissue disease (JCTM), have not been well characterized, and their similarity to the adult clinical subgroups is unknown. We enrolled 436 patients with JIIM, including 354 classified as JDM, 33 as JPM, and 49 as JCTM, in a nationwide registry study. The aim of the study was to compare demographics; clinical features; laboratory measures, including myositis autoantibodies; and outcomes among these clinical subgroups, as well as with published data on adult patients with idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIM) enrolled in a separate natural history study. We used random forest classification and logistic regression modeling to compare clinical subgroups, following univariate analysis. JDM was characterized by typical rashes, including Gottron papules, heliotrope rash, malar rash, periungual capillary changes, and other photosensitive and vasculopathic skin rashes. JPM was characterized by more severe weakness, higher creatine kinase levels, falling episodes, and more frequent cardiac disease. JCTM had more frequent interstitial lung disease, Raynaud phenomenon, arthralgia, and malar rash. Differences in autoantibody frequency were also evident, with anti-p155/140, anti-MJ, and anti-Mi-2 seen more frequently in patients with JDM, anti-signal recognition particle and anti-Jo-1 in JPM, and anti-U1-RNP, PM-Scl, and other myositis-associated autoantibodies more commonly present in JCTM. Mortality was highest in patients with JCTM, whereas hospitalizations and wheelchair use were highest in JPM patients. Several demographic and clinical features

  15. The clinical phenotypes of the juvenile idiopathic inflammatory myopathies.

    PubMed

    Shah, Mona; Mamyrova, Gulnara; Targoff, Ira N; Huber, Adam M; Malley, James D; Rice, Madeline Murguia; Miller, Frederick W; Rider, Lisa G

    2013-01-01

    The juvenile idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (JIIM) are systemic autoimmune diseases characterized by skeletal muscle weakness, characteristic rashes, and other systemic features. Although juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM), the most common form of JIIM, has been well studied, the other major clinical subgroups of JIIM, including juvenile polymyositis (JPM) and juvenile myositis overlapping with another autoimmune or connective tissue disease (JCTM), have not been well characterized, and their similarity to the adult clinical subgroups is unknown. We enrolled 436 patients with JIIM, including 354 classified as JDM, 33 as JPM, and 49 as JCTM, in a nationwide registry study. The aim of the study was to compare demographics; clinical features; laboratory measures, including myositis autoantibodies; and outcomes among these clinical subgroups, as well as with published data on adult patients with idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIM) enrolled in a separate natural history study. We used random forest classification and logistic regression modeling to compare clinical subgroups, following univariate analysis. JDM was characterized by typical rashes, including Gottron papules, heliotrope rash, malar rash, periungual capillary changes, and other photosensitive and vasculopathic skin rashes. JPM was characterized by more severe weakness, higher creatine kinase levels, falling episodes, and more frequent cardiac disease. JCTM had more frequent interstitial lung disease, Raynaud phenomenon, arthralgia, and malar rash. Differences in autoantibody frequency were also evident, with anti-p155/140, anti-MJ, and anti-Mi-2 seen more frequently in patients with JDM, anti-signal recognition particle and anti-Jo-1 in JPM, and anti-U1-RNP, PM-Scl, and other myositis-associated autoantibodies more commonly present in JCTM. Mortality was highest in patients with JCTM, whereas hospitalizations and wheelchair use were highest in JPM patients. Several demographic and clinical features

  16. Feasibility of Using Clinical Element Models (CEM) to Standardize Phenotype Variables in the Database of Genotypes and Phenotypes (dbGaP)

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ko-Wei; Tharp, Melissa; Conway, Mike; Hsieh, Alexander; Ross, Mindy; Kim, Jihoon; Kim, Hyeon-Eui

    2013-01-01

    The database of Genotypes and Phenotypes (dbGaP) contains various types of data generated from genome-wide association studies (GWAS). These data can be used to facilitate novel scientific discoveries and to reduce cost and time for exploratory research. However, idiosyncrasies and inconsistencies in phenotype variable names are a major barrier to reusing these data. We addressed these challenges in standardizing phenotype variables by formalizing their descriptions using Clinical Element Models (CEM). Designed to represent clinical data, CEMs were highly expressive and thus were able to represent a majority (77.5%) of the 215 phenotype variable descriptions. However, their high expressivity also made it difficult to directly apply them to research data such as phenotype variables in dbGaP. Our study suggested that simplification of the template models makes it more straightforward to formally represent the key semantics of phenotype variables. PMID:24058713

  17. PEAX: INTERACTIVE VISUAL ANALYSIS AND EXPLORATION OF COMPLEX CLINICAL PHENOTYPE AND GENE EXPRESSION ASSOCIATION

    PubMed Central

    Hinterberg, Michael A.; Kao, David P.; Bristow, Michael R.; Hunter, Lawrence E.; Port, J. David; Görg, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    Increasing availability of high-dimensional clinical data, which improves the ability to define more specific phenotypes, as well as molecular data, which can elucidate disease mechanisms, is a driving force and at the same time a major challenge for translational and personalized medicine. Successful research in this field requires an approach that ties together specific disease and health expertise with understanding of molecular data through statistical methods. We present PEAX (Phenotype-Expression Association eXplorer), built upon open-source software, which integrates visual phenotype model definition with statistical testing of expression data presented concurrently in a web-browser. The integration of data and analysis tasks in a single tool allows clinical domain experts to obtain new insights directly through exploration of relationships between multivariate phenotype models and gene expression data, showing the effects of model definition and modification while also exploiting potential meaningful associations between phenotype and miRNA-mRNA regulatory relationships. We combine the web visualization capabilities of Shiny and D3 with the power and speed of R for backend statistical analysis, in order to abstract the scripting required for repetitive analysis of sub-phenotype association. We describe the motivation for PEAX, demonstrate its utility through a use case involving heart failure research, and discuss computational challenges and observations. We show that our visual web-based representations are well-suited for rapid exploration of phenotype and gene expression association, facilitating insight and discovery by domain experts. PMID:25592601

  18. Peax: interactive visual analysis and exploration of complex clinical phenotype and gene expression association.

    PubMed

    Hinterberg, Michael A; Kao, David P; Bristow, Michael R; Hunter, Lawrence E; Port, J David; Görg, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    Increasing availability of high-dimensional clinical data, which improves the ability to define more specific phenotypes, as well as molecular data, which can elucidate disease mechanisms, is a driving force and at the same time a major challenge for translational and personalized medicine. Successful research in this field requires an approach that ties together specific disease and health expertise with understanding of molecular data through statistical methods. We present PEAX (Phenotype-Expression Association eXplorer), built upon open-source software, which integrates visual phenotype model definition with statistical testing of expression data presented concurrently in a web-browser. The integration of data and analysis tasks in a single tool allows clinical domain experts to obtain new insights directly through exploration of relationships between multivariate phenotype models and gene expression data, showing the effects of model definition and modification while also exploiting potential meaningful associations between phenotype and miRNA-mRNA regulatory relationships. We combine the web visualization capabilities of Shiny and D3 with the power and speed of R for backend statistical analysis, in order to abstract the scripting required for repetitive analysis of sub-phenotype association. We describe the motivation for PEAX, demonstrate its utility through a use case involving heart failure research, and discuss computational challenges and observations. We show that our visual web-based representations are well-suited for rapid exploration of phenotype and gene expression association, facilitating insight and discovery by domain experts. PMID:25592601

  19. Cyproterone to treat aggressivity in dementia: a clinical case and systematic review.

    PubMed

    Bolea-Alamanac, Blanca M; Davies, Simon J C; Christmas, David M; Baxter, Hazel; Cullum, Sarah; Nutt, David J

    2011-01-01

    Aggressivity is a common problem in the management of elderly patients with dementia. Medications currently used to diminish aggressive behaviour in dementia can have problematic side effects. We present a case and systematic review of the current knowledge about the use of cyproterone acetate to treat aggressivity (excluding hypersexuality related behaviours) in dementia. An 82-year-old man required psychiatric inpatient admission due to agitation and aggressivity and was diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease. After failed trials of atypical antipsychotics (quetiapine 100 mg/day and risperidone 1 mg/day), drugs for dementia (memantine 20 mg/day and rivastigmine 9 mg/day) and benzodiazepines (lorazepam 0.5-1 mg prn) he was started on cyproterone acetate titrated up to 50 mg twice daily. After two weeks he was calmer and did not express aggressivity. Two months later he was discharged to a community placement where he subsequently remained settled on cyproterone. We reviewed literature on the use of cyproterone in aggressivity (excluding hypersexuality) associated with dementia. We searched the main medical databases including articles in English, Spanish, French and Italian. Only one randomized double-blind trial was found, comparing cyproterone with haloperidol (n = 27). Cyproterone was more effective controlling aggressivity and had lower incidence of side effects. In the one uncontrolled naturalistic observational study identified (n = 19), cyproterone was associated with significant reductions in aggressivity without causing major side effects. Further literature was limited to theoretical discussions. Despite there being evidence to support our observations of a useful role for cyproterone in aggressivity in dementia, further studies are needed to establish the efficacy and safety of this therapeutic option.

  20. Frailty Clinical Phenotype: A Physical and Cognitive Point of View.

    PubMed

    Aubertin-Leheudre, Mylene; Woods, Adam J; Anton, Stephen; Cohen, Ronald; Pahor, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Frailty is recognized as a clinical geriatric syndrome used to describe the weakest or most vulnerable older adults. Although the term frailty is commonly used in clinical practice, and the theoretical phenomenon is well accepted, it remains an evolving concept that lacks a universally accepted definition and specific diagnostic criteria. Different perspectives on frailty have led to two distinct viewpoints of this phenomenon in the literature. The first describes the phenomenon based solely on physical attributes and capabilities. In contrast, more recent perspectives describe the phenomenon in broader, multidimensional terms by incorporating the concept of cognitive frailty. In support of this view, there is increasing evidence that consideration of both cognitive and physical factors can better improve the ability to predict adverse health outcomes among frail older adults over physical factors alone. The recent recognition of the importance of cognitive factors has increased the complexity of this phenomenon and difficulty in developing a consensus definition. To add to this challenge, frailty can present in different stages of severity (from mild to severe), and there appears to be a dynamic relationship between these stages. Despite these challenges, a consensus on an international definition of frailty including physical and cognitive criteria is essential in order to advance research and treatment of this condition.

  1. Genotype: A Crucial but Not Unique Factor Affecting the Clinical Phenotypes in Fabry Disease.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xiaoxia; Ouyang, Yan; Wang, Zhaohui; Ren, Hong; Shen, Pingyan; Wang, Weiming; Xu, Yaowen; Ni, Liyan; Yu, Xialian; Chen, Xiaonong; Zhang, Wen; Yang, Li; Li, Xiao; Xu, Jing; Chen, Nan

    2016-01-01

    Numerous α-galactosidase A (α-gal A) gene (GLA) mutations have been identified in Fabry disease (FD), but studies on genotype-phenotype correlation are limited. This study evaluated the features of GLA gene mutations and genotype-phenotype relationship in Chinese FD patients. Gene sequencing results, demographic information, clinical history, and laboratory findings were collected from 73 Chinese FD patients. Totally 47 mutations were identified, including 23 novel mutations which might be pathogenic. For male patients, those with frameshift and nonsense mutations presented the classical FD, whereas those with missense mutations presented both of classical and atypical phenotypes. Interestingly, two male patients with missense mutation p.R356G from two unrelated families, and two with p.R301Q from one family presented different phenotypes. A statistically significant association was found between the levels of α-gal A enzyme activity and ocular changes in males, though no significant association was found between residual enzyme activity level and genotype or clinical phenotypes. For female patients, six out of seven with frameshift mutations and one out of nine with missense mutation presented the classical FD, and α-gal A activity in those patients was found to be significantly lower than that of patients with atypical phenotypes (13.73 vs. 46.32 nmol/ml/h/mg). Our findings suggest that the α-gal A activity might be associated with the clinical severity in female patients with FD. But no obvious associations between activity level of α-gal A and genotype or clinical phenotypes were found for male patients. PMID:27560961

  2. Genotype: A Crucial but Not Unique Factor Affecting the Clinical Phenotypes in Fabry Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhaohui; Ren, Hong; Shen, Pingyan; Wang, Weiming; Xu, Yaowen; Ni, Liyan; Yu, Xialian; Chen, Xiaonong; Zhang, Wen; Yang, Li; Li, Xiao; Xu, Jing; Chen, Nan

    2016-01-01

    Numerous α-galactosidase A (α-gal A) gene (GLA) mutations have been identified in Fabry disease (FD), but studies on genotype-phenotype correlation are limited. This study evaluated the features of GLA gene mutations and genotype-phenotype relationship in Chinese FD patients. Gene sequencing results, demographic information, clinical history, and laboratory findings were collected from 73 Chinese FD patients. Totally 47 mutations were identified, including 23 novel mutations which might be pathogenic. For male patients, those with frameshift and nonsense mutations presented the classical FD, whereas those with missense mutations presented both of classical and atypical phenotypes. Interestingly, two male patients with missense mutation p.R356G from two unrelated families, and two with p.R301Q from one family presented different phenotypes. A statistically significant association was found between the levels of α-gal A enzyme activity and ocular changes in males, though no significant association was found between residual enzyme activity level and genotype or clinical phenotypes. For female patients, six out of seven with frameshift mutations and one out of nine with missense mutation presented the classical FD, and α-gal A activity in those patients was found to be significantly lower than that of patients with atypical phenotypes (13.73 vs. 46.32 nmol/ml/h/mg). Our findings suggest that the α-gal A activity might be associated with the clinical severity in female patients with FD. But no obvious associations between activity level of α-gal A and genotype or clinical phenotypes were found for male patients. PMID:27560961

  3. Genetic neurological channelopathies: molecular genetics and clinical phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Spillane, J; Kullmann, D M; Hanna, M G

    2016-01-01

    Evidence accumulated over recent years has shown that genetic neurological channelopathies can cause many different neurological diseases. Presentations relating to the brain, spinal cord, peripheral nerve or muscle mean that channelopathies can impact on almost any area of neurological practice. Typically, neurological channelopathies are inherited in an autosomal dominant fashion and cause paroxysmal disturbances of neurological function, although the impairment of function can become fixed with time. These disorders are individually rare, but an accurate diagnosis is important as it has genetic counselling and often treatment implications. Furthermore, the study of less common ion channel mutation-related diseases has increased our understanding of pathomechanisms that is relevant to common neurological diseases such as migraine and epilepsy. Here, we review the molecular genetic and clinical features of inherited neurological channelopathies. PMID:26558925

  4. Annexin A1 is involved in the acquisition and maintenance of a stem cell-like/aggressive phenotype in prostate cancer cells with acquired resistance to zoledronic acid.

    PubMed

    Bizzarro, Valentina; Belvedere, Raffaella; Milone, Maria Rita; Pucci, Biagio; Lombardi, Rita; Bruzzese, Francesca; Popolo, Ada; Parente, Luca; Budillon, Alfredo; Petrella, Antonello

    2015-09-22

    In this study, we have characterized the role of annexin A1 (ANXA1) in the acquisition and maintenance of stem-like/aggressive features in prostate cancer (PCa) cells comparing zoledronic acid (ZA)-resistant DU145R80 with their parental DU145 cells. ANXA1 is over-expressed in DU145R80 cells and its down-regulation abolishes their resistance to ZA. Moreover, ANXA1 induces DU145 and DU145R80 invasiveness acting through formyl peptide receptors (FPRs). Also, ANXA1 knockdown is able to inhibit epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) and to reduce focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and metalloproteases (MMP)-2/9 expression in PCa cells. DU145R80 show a cancer stem cell (CSC)-like signature with a high expression of CSC markers including CD44, CD133, NANOG, Snail, Oct4 and ALDH7A1 and CSC-related genes as STAT3. Interestingly, ANXA1 knockdown induces these cells to revert from a putative prostate CSC to a more differentiated phenotype resembling DU145 PCa cell signature. Similar results are obtained concerning some drug resistance-related genes such as ATP Binding Cassette G2 (ABCG2) and Lung Resistant Protein (LRP). Our study provides new insights on the role of ANXA1 protein in PCa onset and progression. PMID:26312765

  5. Is intrathoracic tracheal collapsibility correlated to clinical phenotypes and sex in patients with COPD?

    PubMed

    Camiciottoli, Gianna; Diciotti, Stefano; Bigazzi, Francesca; Lombardo, Simone; Bartolucci, Maurizio; Paoletti, Matteo; Mascalchi, Mario; Pistolesi, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    A substantial proportion of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) develops various degree of intrathoracic tracheal collapsibility. We studied whether the magnitude of intrathoracic tracheal collapsibility could be different across clinical phenotypes and sex in COPD. Intrathoracic tracheal collapsibility measured at paired inspiratory-expiratory low dose computed tomography (CT) and its correlation with clinical, functional, and CT-densitometric data were investigated in 69 patients with COPD according to their predominant conductive airway or emphysema phenotypes and according to sex. Intrathoracic tracheal collapsibility was higher in patients with predominant conductive airway disease (n=28) and in females (n=27). Women with a predominant conductive airway phenotype (n=10) showed a significantly greater degree of collapsibility than women with predominant emphysema (28.9%±4% versus 11.6%±2%; P<0.001). Intrathoracic tracheal collapsibility was directly correlated with inspiratory-expiratory volume variation at CT and with forced expiratory volume (1 second), and inversely correlated with reduced CT lung density and functional residual capacity. Intrathoracic tracheal collapsibility was not correlated with cough and wheezing; however, intrathoracic tracheal collapsibility and clinical phenotypes of COPD are closely correlated. In patients with a predominant emphysematous phenotype, a reduced collapsibility may reflect the mechanical properties of the stiff hyperinflated emphysematous lung. The high collapsibility in patients with predominant airway disease, mild airway obstruction, and in women with this phenotype may reflect chronic airway inflammation. The lack of relationship with such symptoms as wheezing, cough, and dyspnea could indicate that intrathoracic tracheal collapsibility itself should be considered neither an abnormal feature of COPD nor a relevant clinical finding. PMID:25960647

  6. Is intrathoracic tracheal collapsibility correlated to clinical phenotypes and sex in patients with COPD?

    PubMed Central

    Camiciottoli, Gianna; Diciotti, Stefano; Bigazzi, Francesca; Lombardo, Simone; Bartolucci, Maurizio; Paoletti, Matteo; Mascalchi, Mario; Pistolesi, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    A substantial proportion of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) develops various degree of intrathoracic tracheal collapsibility. We studied whether the magnitude of intrathoracic tracheal collapsibility could be different across clinical phenotypes and sex in COPD. Intrathoracic tracheal collapsibility measured at paired inspiratory–expiratory low dose computed tomography (CT) and its correlation with clinical, functional, and CT-densitometric data were investigated in 69 patients with COPD according to their predominant conductive airway or emphysema phenotypes and according to sex. Intrathoracic tracheal collapsibility was higher in patients with predominant conductive airway disease (n=28) and in females (n=27). Women with a predominant conductive airway phenotype (n=10) showed a significantly greater degree of collapsibility than women with predominant emphysema (28.9%±4% versus 11.6%±2%; P<0.001). Intrathoracic tracheal collapsibility was directly correlated with inspiratory–expiratory volume variation at CT and with forced expiratory volume (1 second), and inversely correlated with reduced CT lung density and functional residual capacity. Intrathoracic tracheal collapsibility was not correlated with cough and wheezing; however, intrathoracic tracheal collapsibility and clinical phenotypes of COPD are closely correlated. In patients with a predominant emphysematous phenotype, a reduced collapsibility may reflect the mechanical properties of the stiff hyperinflated emphysematous lung. The high collapsibility in patients with predominant airway disease, mild airway obstruction, and in women with this phenotype may reflect chronic airway inflammation. The lack of relationship with such symptoms as wheezing, cough, and dyspnea could indicate that intrathoracic tracheal collapsibility itself should be considered neither an abnormal feature of COPD nor a relevant clinical finding. PMID:25960647

  7. The Broader Autism Phenotype and Friendships in Non-Clinical Dyads

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wainer, Allison L.; Block, Nicole; Donnellan, M. Brent; Ingersoll, Brooke

    2013-01-01

    The broader autism phenotype (BAP) is a set of subclinical traits qualitatively similar to those observed in autism spectrum disorders. The current study sought to elucidate the association between self- and informant-reports of the BAP and friendships, in a non-clinical sample of college student dyads. Self-informant agreement of the BAP and…

  8. Oppositional Defiant Disorder as a Clinical Phenotype in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gadow, Kenneth D.; DeVincent, Carla J.; Drabick, Deborah A. G.

    2008-01-01

    To examine the validity of oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) as a clinical phenotype distinct from attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), parents and teachers completed a DSM-IV-referenced rating scale and a background questionnaire for 608 children (ages 3-12 years) with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The ASD sample was separated…

  9. [Phenotypic variability in 47, XXX patients: Clinical report of four new cases].

    PubMed

    Goldschmidt, Ernesto; Márquez, Marisa; Solari, Andrea; Ziembar, María I; Laudicina, Alejandro

    2010-08-01

    The 47, XXX karyotype has a frequency of 1 in 1000 female newborns. However, this karyotype is not usually suspected at birth or childhood. These patients are usually diagnosed during adulthood when they develop premature ovarian failure or infertility, because the early phenotype doesn t have any specific features. The study describes four cases and the clinical variability of the 47, XXX karyotype.

  10. Predictive genomics: a cancer hallmark network framework for predicting tumor clinical phenotypes using genome sequencing data.

    PubMed

    Wang, Edwin; Zaman, Naif; Mcgee, Shauna; Milanese, Jean-Sébastien; Masoudi-Nejad, Ali; O'Connor-McCourt, Maureen

    2015-02-01

    Tumor genome sequencing leads to documenting thousands of DNA mutations and other genomic alterations. At present, these data cannot be analyzed adequately to aid in the understanding of tumorigenesis and its evolution. Moreover, we have little insight into how to use these data to predict clinical phenotypes and tumor progression to better design patient treatment. To meet these challenges, we discuss a cancer hallmark network framework for modeling genome sequencing data to predict cancer clonal evolution and associated clinical phenotypes. The framework includes: (1) cancer hallmarks that can be represented by a few molecular/signaling networks. 'Network operational signatures' which represent gene regulatory logics/strengths enable to quantify state transitions and measures of hallmark traits. Thus, sets of genomic alterations which are associated with network operational signatures could be linked to the state/measure of hallmark traits. The network operational signature transforms genotypic data (i.e., genomic alterations) to regulatory phenotypic profiles (i.e., regulatory logics/strengths), to cellular phenotypic profiles (i.e., hallmark traits) which lead to clinical phenotypic profiles (i.e., a collection of hallmark traits). Furthermore, the framework considers regulatory logics of the hallmark networks under tumor evolutionary dynamics and therefore also includes: (2) a self-promoting positive feedback loop that is dominated by a genomic instability network and a cell survival/proliferation network is the main driver of tumor clonal evolution. Surrounding tumor stroma and its host immune systems shape the evolutionary paths; (3) cell motility initiating metastasis is a byproduct of the above self-promoting loop activity during tumorigenesis; (4) an emerging hallmark network which triggers genome duplication dominates a feed-forward loop which in turn could act as a rate-limiting step for tumor formation; (5) mutations and other genomic alterations have

  11. Met-regulated expression signature defines a subset of human hepatocellular carcinomas with poor prognosis and aggressive phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Kaposi-Novak, Pal; Lee, Ju-Seog; Gòmez-Quiroz, Luis; Coulouarn, Cédric; Factor, Valentina M.; Thorgeirsson, Snorri S.

    2006-01-01

    Identification of specific gene expression signatures characteristic of oncogenic pathways is an important step toward molecular classification of human malignancies. Aberrant activation of the Met signaling pathway is frequently associated with tumor progression and metastasis. In this study, we defined the Met-dependent gene expression signature using global gene expression profiling of WT and Met-deficient primary mouse hepatocytes. Newly identified transcriptional targets of the Met pathway included genes involved in the regulation of oxidative stress responses as well as cell motility, cytoskeletal organization, and angiogenesis. To assess the importance of a Met-regulated gene expression signature, a comparative functional genomic approach was applied to 242 human hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) and 7 metastatic liver lesions. Cluster analysis revealed that a subset of human HCCs and all liver metastases shared the Met-induced expression signature. Furthermore, the presence of the Met signature showed significant correlation with increased vascular invasion rate and microvessel density as well as with decreased mean survival time of HCC patients. We conclude that the genetically defined gene expression signatures in combination with comparative functional genomics constitute an attractive paradigm for defining both the function of oncogenic pathways and the clinically relevant subgroups of human cancers. PMID:16710476

  12. Infratentorial low-grade oligoastrocytoma with aggressive clinical behavior in an adult: a case report with genetic characterization.

    PubMed

    Sano, Keisho; Toda, Masahiro; Sasaki, Hikaru; Kitamura, Yohei; Mikami, Shuji; Hirato, Junko; Inoue, Satoshi; Kawase, Takeshi; Yoshida, Kazunari

    2013-04-01

    Oligoastrocytoma preferentially arises in the cerebral hemisphere, and a cerebellar location is unusual. We report the case of a 35-year-old woman with an aggressive cerebellar tumor histopathologically diagnosed as oligoastrocytoma World Health Organization (WHO) grade II. After partial removal of the tumor, she underwent concomitant temozolomide (TMZ) therapy with local irradiation followed by additional TMZ monotherapy. However, her symptoms gradually worsened, and chronological magnetic resonance imaging showed remarkable tumor enlargement. In accordance with the aggressive clinical course, unfavorable genetic characteristics such as the gain of the entire chromosome 7, loss of 9p, absence of 1p/19q codeletion, absence of methylation of the O6-methylguanine-deoxyribonucleic acid methyltransferase promoter, and absence of the isocitrate dehydrogenase-1 mutation were observed. The present case illustrates that these molecular characteristics represent the biological features of gliomas more closely than the histopathological diagnosis and may also suggest that infratentorial gliomas arise through a distinct tumorigenic pathway from their supratentorial counterparts.

  13. Developmental Trajectories of Aggression, Prosocial Behavior, and Social-Cognitive Problem Solving in Emerging Adolescents with Clinically Elevated ADHD Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Kofler, Michael J.; Larsen, Ross; Sarver, Dustin E.; Tolan, Patrick H.

    2015-01-01

    Middle school is a critical yet understudied period of social behavioral risks and opportunities that may be particularly difficult for emerging adolescents with ADHD given their childhood social difficulties. Although childhood ADHD has been associated with increased aggression and peer relational difficulties, relatively few ADHD studies have examined social behavior beyond the elementary years, or examined aspects of positive (prosocial) behavior. In addition, social-cognitive problem solving has been implicated in ADHD; however, its longitudinal impact on prosocial and aggressive behavior is unclear. The current study examined how middle school students with clinically elevated ADHD symptoms differ from their non-ADHD peers on baseline (sixth grade) and age-related changes in prosocial and aggressive behavior, and the extent to which social-cognitive problem solving strategies mediate these relations. Emerging adolescents with (n = 178) and without (n = 3,806) clinically elevated, teacher-reported ADHD inattentive and hyperactive/impulsive symptoms were compared longitudinally across sixth through eighth grades using parallel process latent growth curve modeling, accounting for student demographic characteristics, ODD symptoms, deviant peer association, school climate, and parental monitoring. Sixth graders with elevated ADHD symptoms engaged in somewhat fewer prosocial behaviors (d= −0.44) and more aggressive behavior (d= 0.20) relative to their peers. These small social behavioral deficits decreased but were not normalized across the middle school years. Contrary to hypotheses, social-cognitive problem solving was not impaired in the ADHD group, and did not mediate the association between ADHD and social behavior during the middle school years. ADHD and social-cognitive problem solving contributed independently to social behavior, both in sixth grade and across the middle school years; the influence of social-cognitive problem solving on social behavior was

  14. Identification of Clinical Phenotypes in Idiopathic Interstitial Pneumonia with Pulmonary Emphysema.

    PubMed

    Sato, Suguru; Tanino, Yoshinori; Misa, Kenichi; Fukuhara, Naoko; Nikaido, Takefumi; Uematsu, Manabu; Fukuhara, Atsuro; Wang, Xintao; Ishida, Takashi; Munakata, Mitsuru

    2016-01-01

    Objective Since the term "combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema" (CPFE) was first proposed, the co-existence of pulmonary fibrosis and pulmonary emphysema (PE) has drawn considerable attention. However, conflicting results on the clinical characteristics of patients with both pulmonary fibrosis and PE have been published because of the lack of an exact definition of CPFE. The goal of this study was thus to clarify the clinical characteristics and phenotypes of idiopathic interstitial pneumonia (IIP) with PE. Methods We retrospectively analyzed IIP patients who had been admitted to our hospital. Their chest high-resolution computed tomography images were classified into two groups according to the presence of PE. We then performed a cluster analysis to identify the phenotypes of IIP patients with PE. Results Forty-four (53.7%) out of 82 patients had at least mild emphysema in their bilateral lungs. The cluster analysis separated the IIP patients with PE into three clusters. The overall survival rate of one cluster that consisted of mainly idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) patients was significantly worse than those of the other clusters. Conclusion Three different phenotypes can be identified in IIP patients with PE, and IPF with PE is a distinct clinical phenotype with a poor prognosis.

  15. Identification of Clinical Phenotypes in Idiopathic Interstitial Pneumonia with Pulmonary Emphysema.

    PubMed

    Sato, Suguru; Tanino, Yoshinori; Misa, Kenichi; Fukuhara, Naoko; Nikaido, Takefumi; Uematsu, Manabu; Fukuhara, Atsuro; Wang, Xintao; Ishida, Takashi; Munakata, Mitsuru

    2016-01-01

    Objective Since the term "combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema" (CPFE) was first proposed, the co-existence of pulmonary fibrosis and pulmonary emphysema (PE) has drawn considerable attention. However, conflicting results on the clinical characteristics of patients with both pulmonary fibrosis and PE have been published because of the lack of an exact definition of CPFE. The goal of this study was thus to clarify the clinical characteristics and phenotypes of idiopathic interstitial pneumonia (IIP) with PE. Methods We retrospectively analyzed IIP patients who had been admitted to our hospital. Their chest high-resolution computed tomography images were classified into two groups according to the presence of PE. We then performed a cluster analysis to identify the phenotypes of IIP patients with PE. Results Forty-four (53.7%) out of 82 patients had at least mild emphysema in their bilateral lungs. The cluster analysis separated the IIP patients with PE into three clusters. The overall survival rate of one cluster that consisted of mainly idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) patients was significantly worse than those of the other clusters. Conclusion Three different phenotypes can be identified in IIP patients with PE, and IPF with PE is a distinct clinical phenotype with a poor prognosis. PMID:27301501

  16. Lentiginous phenotypes caused by diverse pathogenic genes (SASH1 and PTPN11): clinical and molecular discrimination.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J; Cheng, R; Liang, J; Ni, C; Li, M; Yao, Z

    2016-10-01

    Pathogenic mutations in genes (SASH1 and PTPN11) can cause a rare genetic disorder associated with pigmentation defects and the well-known LEOPARD syndrome, respectively. Both conditions presented with lentiginous phenotypes. The aim of this study was to arrive at definite diagnoses of three Chinese boys with clinically suspected lentigines-related syndromes. ADAR1, ABCB6, SASH1 and PTPN11 were candidate genes for mutational screening. Sanger sequencing was performed to identify the mutations, whereas bioinformatic analysis was used to predict the pathogenicity of novel missense mutations. Two novel mutations c.1537A>C (p.Ser513Arg) and 1527_1530dupAAGT (p.Leu511Lysfs*21) in SASH1 and a common p.Thr468Met mutation in PTPN11 were detected in three pediatric patients with lentiginous phenotypes, respectively. Comparisons between clinical presentations showed that SASH1-related phenotypes can exhibit hyper- and hypopigmentation on the trunk and extremities, similar to dyschromatosis, while scattered café au-lait spots usually appeared in PTPN11-related LEOPARD syndrome. Furthermore, the similarity in the clinical presentations of Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, Laugier-Hunziker syndrome, xeroderma pigmentosum, neurofibromatosis type I, suggesting that these conditions should be added into the differential diagnoses of lentiginous phenotypes. PMID:27659786

  17. Social Anxiety Predicts Aggression in Children with ASD: Clinical Comparisons with Socially Anxious and Oppositional Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pugliese, Cara E.; White, Bradley A.; White, Susan W.; Ollendick, Thomas H.

    2013-01-01

    The present study examined the degree to which social anxiety predicts aggression in children with high functioning autism spectrum disorders (HFASD, n = 20) compared to children with Social Anxiety Disorder (SAD, n = 20) or with Oppositional Defiant Disorder or Conduct Disorder (ODD/CD, n = 20). As predicted, children with HFASD reported levels…

  18. Disease Phenotype, Activity and Clinical Course Prediction Based on C-Reactive Protein Levels at Diagnosis in Patients with Crohn’s Disease: Results from the CONNECT Study

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Jee Hye; Im, Jong Pil; Ye, Byong Duk; Cheon, Jae Hee; Jang, Hyun Joo; Lee, Kang Moon; Kim, You Sun; Kim, Sang Wook; Kim, Young Ho; Song, Geun Am; Han, Dong Soo; Kim, Won Ho; Kim, Joo Sung

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims C-reactive protein (CRP) is an easily measured index of disease activity, but its ability to predict clinical course is controversial. We therefore designed a study to determine whether the CRP level at Crohn’s disease (CD) diagnosis is a valuable indicator of the disease phenotype, activity, and clinical course. Methods We retrospectively analyzed 705 CD patients from 32 institutions. The patients were classified into two groups according to CRP level. The patients’ demographic and clinical characteristics and their use of immunosuppressive or biological agents were recorded. Disease location and behavior, hospitalization, and surgery were analyzed. Results A high CRP was associated with younger age, steroid use, colonic or ileocolonic location, high CD activity index, and active inflammation at colonoscopy (p<0.001). As the disease progressed, patients with high CRP were more likely to exhibit strictures (p=0.027). There were significant differences in the use of 5-aminosalicylic acid, antibiotics, corticosteroids, azathioprine, and infliximab (p<0.001, p<0.001, p<0.001, p<0.001, and p=0.023, respectively). Hospitalization was also more frequent in patients with high CRP. Conclusions The CRP level at diagnosis is useful for evaluating the phenotype, activity, and clinical course of CD. Closer follow-up strategies, with early aggressive treatment, could be considered for patients with high CRP. PMID:27021506

  19. Immune response phenotype of allergic versus clinically tolerant pigs in a neonatal swine model of allergy.

    PubMed

    Schmied, Julie; Rupa, Prithy; Garvie, Sarah; Wilkie, Bruce

    2013-07-15

    The prevalence of childhood food allergy and the duration of these allergies, particularly those considered to be transient, like egg and milk allergy, are increasing. The identification of allergic individuals using minimally invasive, non-anaphylaxis-threatening methods is therefore of increasing importance. In this experiment, correlates were sought of an allergic immune response (IR) phenotype in pigs. Using pigs pre-treated with heat-killed bacteria or bacterial components before allergic sensitization with the egg white protein ovomucoid (Ovm), differences were determined in IR phenotype of pigs in the categories treated-allergic, treated-tolerant, control-allergic (CA) and control-tolerant. Phenotype was established by measuring immunoglobulin (Ig)-associated antibody activity (AbA), cytokine profiles and the proportion of blood T-regulatory cells (T-regs) and observing late-phase allergen-specific skin tests (ST). Although 100% of pigs became sensitized to Ovm, only 33% of pigs had clinical signs of allergy after oral challenge with egg white. Pigs without clinical signs were classified as clinically tolerant. Sixty-seven percent of allergic pigs had a positive, late-phase ST classified as very strong or strong, while 84% of clinically tolerant pigs did not have late-phase ST. Treated-allergic pigs and CA pigs had greater total antibody IgG (H+L), IgE and IgG1 AbA than clinically tolerant pigs. Cytokine profiles of allergic pigs and the proportion of circulating T-regs, did not differ significantly between allergic and clinically tolerant pigs. Therefore, measurement of allergen-specific IgG, IgG1 and/or IgE activity and evaluation of late-phase ID ST may be useful in identifying allergic IR phenotypes in swine models of food allergy, which may be extended toward human use.

  20. Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome: a variable clinical and biochemical phenotype.

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, A K; Bartlett, K; Clayton, P; Eaton, S; Mills, L; Donnai, D; Winter, R M; Burn, J

    1998-01-01

    We have reviewed all known UK cases of Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome. Among 49 cases with proven 7-dehydrocholesterol reductase deficiency, half had been terminated or had died in infancy. The minimum incidence is 1 in 60,000. The frequent occurrence of hypospadias may account for 71% of recognised cases being male. Important common features which emerged include short thumbs, severe photosensitivity, aggressive behaviour, and atrioventricular septal defect. The typical facial appearance becomes less obvious with age and 20% of cases did not have 2/3 toe syndactyly. Biochemical measurements of serum 7-dehydrocholesterol did not correlate with clinical severity. Images PMID:9678700

  1. Down-regulation of both p21/Cip1 and p27/Kip1 produces a more aggressive prostate cancer phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Srirupa; Singh, Rana P.; Agarwal, Chapla; Siriwardana, Sunitha; Sclafani, Robert; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2009-01-01

    Roles of cyclin dependent kinase inhibitors, p21/Cip1 (p21) and p27/Kip1 (p27) in prostate cancer (PCa) progression is still not clear. Lower p27 protein expression in PCa tissues is often associated with poor prognosis, but prognostic significance of p21 is still controversial. Herein, we investigated the role of these molecules in determining PCa growth characteristics. We generated human PCa DU145 cell variants with knocked down levels of p21 (DU-p21) or p27 (DU-p27), or both (DU-p21+p27) via retroviral transduction of respective shRNAs and compared their various characteristics with empty vector-transduced DU145 (DU-EV) cells in vitro as well as in vivo. Knocking down either p21 or p27 did not show any significant change in doubling time, clonogenicity and cell cycle progression in DU145 cells, but simultaneous knock-down of both p21 and p27 significantly enhanced these parameters. In athymic mice, DU-p21+p27 tumors showed higher growth rate than the comparable growth of DU-EV, DU-p21 and DU-p27 tumors. Concurrently, DU-p21+p27 tumors had significantly higher proliferation rate, showing 54% and 48% increase in proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and Ki-67-positive cells, respectively, compared to DU-EV tumors. DU-p21+p27 tumors also showed higher microvessel density and increased expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Proliferation and angiogenic status of DU-p21 and DU-p27 tumors was comparable to DU-EV tumors. Both in vitro and in vivo results implicate that p21 and p27 have compensatory roles in advanced prostate cancer cells, and ablation or down-modulation of both these molecules essentially enhances the aggressive prostate carcinoma phenotype. PMID:18583941

  2. Aggressive osseous commitment result by keratocyst odontogenic tumour: case report, radiographic and clinical standpoints

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso, Gerusa O.M.; Matta-Neto, Edgard; El Achkar, Vivian N. R.; Niccoli-Filho, Walter

    2013-01-01

    Keratocystic odontogenic tumour (KCOT) previously known as odontogenic keratocyst was recently classified as a benign lesion characterized by an infiltrating pattern, local aggressiveness with the propensity to recurrence. It is thought to arise from the dental lamina. Pain is usually not associated with KCOT until swelling occurs, and it commonly affects the posterior mandible. Multiple KCOT are associated with nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome. This study reports an aggressive case of KCOT with destruction of the osseous tissue of the mandible, accentuated face asymmetry, dysphagia and dysphonia. It was managed with a defined protocol which entailed diagnosis, treatment with enucleation along with peripheral ostectomy and rehabilitation. A long-term follow-up schedule was provided to the patient to observe the recurrence behaviour of this cyst. In postoperative phase, no complication was noticed regarding wound healing and recurrence. PMID:24964453

  3. An unusually large aggressive adenomatoid odontogenic tumor of maxilla involving the third molar: A clinical case report

    PubMed Central

    Dhupar, Vikas; Akkara, Francis; Khandelwal, Pulkit

    2016-01-01

    Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT) is a rare tumor comprising only 3% of all odontogenic tumors. It is a benign, encapsulated, noninvasive, nonaggressive, slowly growing odontogenic lesion associated with an impacted tooth. These lesions may go unnoticed for years. The usual treatment is enucleation and curettage, and the lesion does not recur. Here, we present a rare case of an unusually large aggressive AOT of maxilla associated with impacted third molar. The authors also discuss clinical, radiographic, histopathologic, and therapeutic features of the case. Subtotal maxillectomy with simultaneous reconstruction of the surgical defect with temporalis myofascial flap was planned and carried out. PMID:27095910

  4. TDP-43 proteinopathies: pathological identification of brain regions differentiating clinical phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Tan, Rachel H; Kril, Jillian J; Fatima, Manaal; McGeachie, Andrew; McCann, Heather; Shepherd, Claire; Forrest, Shelley L; Affleck, Andrew; Kwok, John B J; Hodges, John R; Kiernan, Matthew C; Halliday, Glenda M

    2015-10-01

    The pathological sequestration of TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43, encoded by TARDBP) into cytoplasmic pathological inclusions characterizes the distinct clinical syndromes of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia, while also co-occurring in a proportion of patients with Alzheimer's disease, suggesting that the regional concentration of TDP-43 pathology has most relevance to specific clinical phenotypes. This has been reflected in the three different pathological staging schemes for TDP-43 pathology in these different clinical syndromes, with none of these staging schemes including a preclinical phase similar to that which has proven beneficial in other neurodegenerative diseases. To apply each of these three staging schemes for TDP-43 pathology, the clinical phenotype must be known undermining the potential predictive value of the pathological examination. The present study set out to test whether a more unified approach could accurately predict clinical phenotypes based solely on the regional presence and severity of TDP-43 pathology. The selection of brain regions of interest was based on key regions routinely sampled for neuropathological assessment under current consensus criteria that have also been used in the three TDP-43 staging schemes. The severity of TDP-43 pathology in these regions of interest was assessed in four clinicopathological phenotypes: amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (n = 27, 47-78 years, 15 males), behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia (n = 15, 49-82 years, seven males), Alzheimer's disease (n = 26, 51-90 years, 11 males) and cognitively normal elderly individuals (n = 17, 80-103 years, nine males). Our results demonstrate that the presence of TDP-43 in the hypoglossal nucleus discriminates patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis with an accuracy of 98%. The severity of TDP-43 deposited in the anterior cingulate cortex identifies patients with behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia

  5. Highly Aggressive HPV-related Oropharyngeal Cancer: Clinical, Radiologic, and Pathologic Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Kaka, Azeem S.; Kumar, Bhavna; Kumar, Pawan; Wakely, Paul E.; Kirsch, Claudia M.; Old, Matthew O.; Ozer, Enver; Agrawal, Amit; Carrau, Ricardo E.; Schuller, David E.; Siddiqui, Farzan; Teknos, Theodoros N.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives While the majority of HPV+ oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas have a favorable prognosis, we search for markers of poor prognosis by carefully examining a subset of highly-aggressive cases. Study Design Seven patients with HPV+ oropharyngeal cancer who presented with non-pulmonary distant metastasis or developed distant metastasis post-treatment were identified. Eight control cases were chosen which responded well to treatment. Pathology and radiological studies were reviewed and compared. Results Two cases displayed a small cell carcinoma (SmCC) component upon pathologic review. Biomarker analysis revealed lower expression of NOTCH1 in the aggressive cohort in comparison to controls (p=0.04). Cases showed a predominance of clustering of lymph nodes, extracapsular spread and central tumor necrosis. Conclusion While most HPV-related oropharyngeal cancers display a positive prognosis, it is evident that there is a subset, which behave more aggressively. This early investigation identifies pathologic and radiologic features that may help to predict this behavior. PMID:23770280

  6. Phenotypic characteristics associated with virulence of clinical isolates from the Sporothrix complex.

    PubMed

    Almeida-Paes, Rodrigo; de Oliveira, Luã Cardoso; Oliveira, Manoel Marques Evangelista; Gutierrez-Galhardo, Maria Clara; Nosanchuk, Joshua Daniel; Zancopé-Oliveira, Rosely Maria

    2015-01-01

    The Sporothrix complex members cause sporotrichosis, a subcutaneous mycosis with a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations. Several specific phenotypic characteristics are associated with virulence in many fungi, but studies in this field involving the Sporothrix complex species are scarce. Melanization, thermotolerance, and production of proteases, catalase, and urease were investigated in 61 S. brasiliensis, one S. globosa, and 10 S. schenckii strains. The S. brasiliensis strains showed a higher expression of melanin and urease compared with S. schenckii. These two species, however, presented similar thermotolerances. Our S. globosa strain had low expression of all studied virulence factors. The relationship between these phenotypes and clinical aspects of sporotrichosis was also evaluated. Strains isolated from patients with spontaneous regression of infection were heavily melanized and produced high urease levels. Melanin was also related to dissemination of internal organs and protease production was associated with HIV-coinfection. A murine sporotrichosis model showed that a S. brasiliensis strain with high expression of virulence factors was able to disseminate and yield a high fungal burden in comparison with a control S. schenckii strain. Our results show that virulence-related phenotypes are variably expressed within the Sporothrix complex species and might be involved in clinical aspects of sporotrichosis.

  7. Phenotypic Characteristics Associated with Virulence of Clinical Isolates from the Sporothrix Complex

    PubMed Central

    Almeida-Paes, Rodrigo; de Oliveira, Luã Cardoso; Oliveira, Manoel Marques Evangelista; Gutierrez-Galhardo, Maria Clara; Nosanchuk, Joshua Daniel; Zancopé-Oliveira, Rosely Maria

    2015-01-01

    The Sporothrix complex members cause sporotrichosis, a subcutaneous mycosis with a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations. Several specific phenotypic characteristics are associated with virulence in many fungi, but studies in this field involving the Sporothrix complex species are scarce. Melanization, thermotolerance, and production of proteases, catalase, and urease were investigated in 61 S. brasiliensis, one S. globosa, and 10 S. schenckii strains. The S. brasiliensis strains showed a higher expression of melanin and urease compared with S. schenckii. These two species, however, presented similar thermotolerances. Our S. globosa strain had low expression of all studied virulence factors. The relationship between these phenotypes and clinical aspects of sporotrichosis was also evaluated. Strains isolated from patients with spontaneous regression of infection were heavily melanized and produced high urease levels. Melanin was also related to dissemination of internal organs and protease production was associated with HIV-coinfection. A murine sporotrichosis model showed that a S. brasiliensis strain with high expression of virulence factors was able to disseminate and yield a high fungal burden in comparison with a control S. schenckii strain. Our results show that virulence-related phenotypes are variably expressed within the Sporothrix complex species and might be involved in clinical aspects of sporotrichosis. PMID:25961005

  8. Clinical validity: Combinatorial pharmacogenomics predicts antidepressant responses and healthcare utilizations better than single gene phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Altar, C A; Carhart, J M; Allen, J D; Hall-Flavin, D K; Dechairo, B M; Winner, J G

    2015-10-01

    In four previous studies, a combinatorial multigene pharmacogenomic test (GeneSight) predicted those patients whose antidepressant treatment for major depressive disorder resulted in poorer efficacy and increased health-care resource utilizations. Here, we extended the analysis of clinical validity to the combined data from these studies. We also compared the outcome predictions of the combinatorial use of allelic variations in genes for four cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes (CYP2D6, CYP2C19, CYP2C9 and CYP1A2), the serotonin transporter (SLC6A4) and serotonin 2A receptor (HTR2A) with the outcome predictions for the very same subjects using traditional, single-gene analysis. Depression scores were measured at baseline and 8-10 weeks later for the 119 fully blinded subjects who received treatment as usual (TAU) with antidepressant standard of care, without the benefit of pharmacogenomic medication guidance. For another 96 TAU subjects, health-care utilizations were recorded in a 1-year, retrospective chart review. All subjects were genotyped after the clinical study period, and phenotype subgroups were created among those who had been prescribed a GeneSight panel medication that is a substrate for either CYP enzyme or serotonin effector protein. On the basis of medications prescribed for each subject at baseline, the combinatorial pharmacogenomic (CPGx™) GeneSight method categorized each subject into either a green ('use as directed'), yellow ('use with caution') or red category ('use with increased caution and with more frequent monitoring') phenotype, whereas the single-gene method categorized the same subjects with the traditional phenotype (for example, poor, intermediate, extensive or ultrarapid CYP metabolizer). The GeneSight combinatorial categorization approach discriminated and predicted poorer outcomes for red category patients prescribed medications metabolized by CYP2D6, CYP2C19 and CYP1A2 (P=0.0034, P=0.04 and P=0.03, respectively), whereas the single

  9. A probabilistic model to predict clinical phenotypic traits from genome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yun-Ching; Douville, Christopher; Wang, Cheng; Niknafs, Noushin; Yeo, Grace; Beleva-Guthrie, Violeta; Carter, Hannah; Stenson, Peter D; Cooper, David N; Li, Biao; Mooney, Sean; Karchin, Rachel

    2014-09-01

    Genetic screening is becoming possible on an unprecedented scale. However, its utility remains controversial. Although most variant genotypes cannot be easily interpreted, many individuals nevertheless attempt to interpret their genetic information. Initiatives such as the Personal Genome Project (PGP) and Illumina's Understand Your Genome are sequencing thousands of adults, collecting phenotypic information and developing computational pipelines to identify the most important variant genotypes harbored by each individual. These pipelines consider database and allele frequency annotations and bioinformatics classifications. We propose that the next step will be to integrate these different sources of information to estimate the probability that a given individual has specific phenotypes of clinical interest. To this end, we have designed a Bayesian probabilistic model to predict the probability of dichotomous phenotypes. When applied to a cohort from PGP, predictions of Gilbert syndrome, Graves' disease, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, and various blood groups were accurate, as individuals manifesting the phenotype in question exhibited the highest, or among the highest, predicted probabilities. Thirty-eight PGP phenotypes (26%) were predicted with area-under-the-ROC curve (AUC)>0.7, and 23 (15.8%) of these were statistically significant, based on permutation tests. Moreover, in a Critical Assessment of Genome Interpretation (CAGI) blinded prediction experiment, the models were used to match 77 PGP genomes to phenotypic profiles, generating the most accurate prediction of 16 submissions, according to an independent assessor. Although the models are currently insufficiently accurate for diagnostic utility, we expect their performance to improve with growth of publicly available genomics data and model refinement by domain experts.

  10. Exome and deep sequencing of clinically aggressive neuroblastoma reveal somatic mutations that affect key pathways involved in cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Lasorsa, Vito Alessandro; Formicola, Daniela; Pignataro, Piero; Cimmino, Flora; Calabrese, Francesco Maria; Mora, Jaume; Esposito, Maria Rosaria; Pantile, Marcella; Zanon, Carlo; De Mariano, Marilena; Longo, Luca; Hogarty, Michael D.; de Torres, Carmen; Tonini, Gian Paolo; Iolascon, Achille; Capasso, Mario

    2016-01-01

    The spectrum of somatic mutation of the most aggressive forms of neuroblastoma is not completely determined. We sought to identify potential cancer drivers in clinically aggressive neuroblastoma. Whole exome sequencing was conducted on 17 germline and tumor DNA samples from high-risk patients with adverse events within 36 months from diagnosis (HR-Event3) to identify somatic mutations and deep targeted sequencing of 134 genes selected from the initial screening in additional 48 germline and tumor pairs (62.5% HR-Event3 and high-risk patients), 17 HR-Event3 tumors and 17 human-derived neuroblastoma cell lines. We revealed 22 significantly mutated genes, many of which implicated in cancer progression. Fifteen genes (68.2%) were highly expressed in neuroblastoma supporting their involvement in the disease. CHD9, a cancer driver gene, was the most significantly altered (4.0% of cases) after ALK. Other genes (PTK2, NAV3, NAV1, FZD1 and ATRX), expressed in neuroblastoma and involved in cell invasion and migration were mutated at frequency ranged from 4% to 2%. Focal adhesion and regulation of actin cytoskeleton pathways, were frequently disrupted (14.1% of cases) thus suggesting potential novel therapeutic strategies to prevent disease progression. Notably BARD1, CHEK2 and AXIN2 were enriched in rare, potentially pathogenic, germline variants. In summary, whole exome and deep targeted sequencing identified novel cancer genes of clinically aggressive neuroblastoma. Our analyses show pathway-level implications of infrequently mutated genes in leading neuroblastoma progression. PMID:27009842

  11. Exome and deep sequencing of clinically aggressive neuroblastoma reveal somatic mutations that affect key pathways involved in cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Lasorsa, Vito Alessandro; Formicola, Daniela; Pignataro, Piero; Cimmino, Flora; Calabrese, Francesco Maria; Mora, Jaume; Esposito, Maria Rosaria; Pantile, Marcella; Zanon, Carlo; De Mariano, Marilena; Longo, Luca; Hogarty, Michael D; de Torres, Carmen; Tonini, Gian Paolo; Iolascon, Achille; Capasso, Mario

    2016-04-19

    The spectrum of somatic mutation of the most aggressive forms of neuroblastoma is not completely determined. We sought to identify potential cancer drivers in clinically aggressive neuroblastoma.Whole exome sequencing was conducted on 17 germline and tumor DNA samples from high-risk patients with adverse events within 36 months from diagnosis (HR-Event3) to identify somatic mutations and deep targeted sequencing of 134 genes selected from the initial screening in additional 48 germline and tumor pairs (62.5% HR-Event3 and high-risk patients), 17 HR-Event3 tumors and 17 human-derived neuroblastoma cell lines.We revealed 22 significantly mutated genes, many of which implicated in cancer progression. Fifteen genes (68.2%) were highly expressed in neuroblastoma supporting their involvement in the disease. CHD9, a cancer driver gene, was the most significantly altered (4.0% of cases) after ALK.Other genes (PTK2, NAV3, NAV1, FZD1 and ATRX), expressed in neuroblastoma and involved in cell invasion and migration were mutated at frequency ranged from 4% to 2%.Focal adhesion and regulation of actin cytoskeleton pathways, were frequently disrupted (14.1% of cases) thus suggesting potential novel therapeutic strategies to prevent disease progression.Notably BARD1, CHEK2 and AXIN2 were enriched in rare, potentially pathogenic, germline variants.In summary, whole exome and deep targeted sequencing identified novel cancer genes of clinically aggressive neuroblastoma. Our analyses show pathway-level implications of infrequently mutated genes in leading neuroblastoma progression. PMID:27009842

  12. Influence of the bacterial phenotypes on the clinical manifestations in Klebsiella pneumoniae bacteremia patients: A retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Togawa, Atsushi; Toh, Hiromi; Onozawa, Kyoko; Yoshimura, Michinobu; Tokushige, Chiemi; Shimono, Nobuyuki; Takata, Tohru; Tamura, Kazuo

    2015-07-01

    Ninety-four episodes of Klebsiella pneumoniae bloodstream infection were identified at a university hospital in Japan. After excluding extended-spectrum beta lactamase-producing strains, 83 blood isolates from these patients were assayed in terms of their bacterial phenotypes such as the mucoid and hypermucoviscosity phenotypes. Bacterial phenotypes were correlated with the patients' clinical manifestations. The hypermucoviscosity phenotype was significantly associated with septic shock at the onset of infections (odds ratio, 15.92; 95% confidence interval, 1.27-468.12), but was not associated with liver abscess formation. Mortality was determined by the presence of septic shock. RmpA gene was associated with the induction of the hypermucoviscosity phenotype. These results reveal unique roles of bacterial phenotypes on the patient's clinical condition in K. pneumoniae bacteremia.

  13. Clinical assessment and management of psychiatric patients' violent and aggressive behaviors in general hospital.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Kunsook Song; Saladino, Joseph P

    2007-10-01

    Patients with co-morbid psychiatric disorders exhibiting violent and aggressive behaviors can be a challenge for nurses in medical-surgical units. They can deliver effective, safe care by assessing risk and building a rapport with the patient during the admission process; utilizing crisis prevention strategies, including appropriate medication administration, environmental, psychobiological, counseling, and health teaching interventions; and employing conflict resolution technique. Utilizing the nursing process, the nurse can provide effective therapeutic interventions to promote safety for both the patient and the nurse. PMID:18072668

  14. Acquired resistance to zoledronic acid and the parallel acquisition of an aggressive phenotype are mediated by p38-MAP kinase activation in prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Milone, M R; Pucci, B; Bruzzese, F; Carbone, C; Piro, G; Costantini, S; Capone, F; Leone, A; Di Gennaro, E; Caraglia, M; Budillon, A

    2013-01-01

    resistance, as well as in the acquisition of a more aggressive and invasive phenotype. PMID:23703386

  15. Suicidality and aggression during antidepressant treatment: systematic review and meta-analyses based on clinical study reports

    PubMed Central

    Guski, Louise Schow; Freund, Nanna; Gøtzsche, Peter C

    2016-01-01

    Objective To study serious harms associated with selective serotonin and serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors. Design Systematic review and meta-analysis. Main outcome measures Mortality and suicidality. Secondary outcomes were aggressive behaviour and akathisia. Data sources Clinical study reports for duloxetine, fluoxetine, paroxetine, sertraline, and venlafaxine obtained from the European and UK drug regulators, and summary trial reports for duloxetine and fluoxetine from Eli Lilly’s website. Eligibility criteria for study selection Double blind placebo controlled trials that contained any patient narratives or individual patient listings of harms. Data extraction and analysis Two researchers extracted data independently; the outcomes were meta-analysed by Peto’s exact method (fixed effect model). Results We included 70 trials (64 381 pages of clinical study reports) with 18 526 patients. These trials had limitations in the study design and discrepancies in reporting, which may have led to serious under-reporting of harms. For example, some outcomes appeared only in individual patient listings in appendices, which we had for only 32 trials, and we did not have case report forms for any of the trials. Differences in mortality (all deaths were in adults, odds ratio 1.28, 95% confidence interval 0.40 to 4.06), suicidality (1.21, 0.84 to 1.74), and akathisia (2.04, 0.93 to 4.48) were not significant, whereas patients taking antidepressants displayed more aggressive behaviour (1.93, 1.26 to 2.95). For adults, the odds ratios were 0.81 (0.51 to 1.28) for suicidality, 1.09 (0.55 to 2.14) for aggression, and 2.00 (0.79 to 5.04) for akathisia. The corresponding values for children and adolescents were 2.39 (1.31 to 4.33), 2.79 (1.62 to 4.81), and 2.15 (0.48 to 9.65). In the summary trial reports on Eli Lilly’s website, almost all deaths were noted, but all suicidal ideation events were missing, and the information on the remaining outcomes was

  16. Histological Stratification of Thick and Thin Plaque Psoriasis Explores Molecular Phenotypes with Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong Joo; Brodmerkel, Carrie; Correa da Rosa, Joel; Krueger, James G.; Suárez-Fariñas, Mayte

    2015-01-01

    Psoriasis, which presents as red, scaly patches on the body, is a common, autoimmune skin disease that affects 2 to 3 percent of the world population. To leverage recent molecular findings into the personalized treatment of psoriasis, we need a strategy that integrates clinical stratification with molecular phenotyping. In this study, we sought to stratify psoriasis patients by histological measurements of epidermal thickness, and to compare their molecular characterizations by gene expression, serum cytokines, and response to biologics. We obtained histological measures of epidermal thickness in a cohort of 609 psoriasis patients, and identified a mixture of two subpopulations—thick and thin plaque psoriasis—from which they were derived. This stratification was verified in a subcohort of 65 patients from a previously published study with significant differences in inflammatory cell infiltrates in the psoriatic skin. Thick and thin plaque psoriasis shared 84.8% of the meta-analysis-derived psoriasis transcriptome, but a stronger dysregulation of the meta-analysis-derived psoriasis transcriptome was seen in thick plaque psoriasis on microarray. RT-PCR revealed that gene expression in thick and thin plaque psoriasis was different not only within psoriatic lesional skin but also in peripheral non-lesional skin. Additionally, differences in circulating cytokines and their changes in response to biologic treatments were found between the two subgroups. All together, we were able to integrate histological stratification with molecular phenotyping as a way of exploring clinical phenotypes with different expression levels of the psoriasis transcriptome and circulating cytokines. PMID:26176783

  17. Histological Stratification of Thick and Thin Plaque Psoriasis Explores Molecular Phenotypes with Clinical Implications.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jaehwan; Nadella, Pranay; Kim, Dong Joo; Brodmerkel, Carrie; Correa da Rosa, Joel; Krueger, James G; Suárez-Fariñas, Mayte

    2015-01-01

    Psoriasis, which presents as red, scaly patches on the body, is a common, autoimmune skin disease that affects 2 to 3 percent of the world population. To leverage recent molecular findings into the personalized treatment of psoriasis, we need a strategy that integrates clinical stratification with molecular phenotyping. In this study, we sought to stratify psoriasis patients by histological measurements of epidermal thickness, and to compare their molecular characterizations by gene expression, serum cytokines, and response to biologics. We obtained histological measures of epidermal thickness in a cohort of 609 psoriasis patients, and identified a mixture of two subpopulations-thick and thin plaque psoriasis-from which they were derived. This stratification was verified in a subcohort of 65 patients from a previously published study with significant differences in inflammatory cell infiltrates in the psoriatic skin. Thick and thin plaque psoriasis shared 84.8% of the meta-analysis-derived psoriasis transcriptome, but a stronger dysregulation of the meta-analysis-derived psoriasis transcriptome was seen in thick plaque psoriasis on microarray. RT-PCR revealed that gene expression in thick and thin plaque psoriasis was different not only within psoriatic lesional skin but also in peripheral non-lesional skin. Additionally, differences in circulating cytokines and their changes in response to biologic treatments were found between the two subgroups. All together, we were able to integrate histological stratification with molecular phenotyping as a way of exploring clinical phenotypes with different expression levels of the psoriasis transcriptome and circulating cytokines.

  18. Clinical Phenotype of Adult Fragile X Gray Zone Allele Carriers: a Case Series.

    PubMed

    Debrey, Sarah M; Leehey, Maureen A; Klepitskaya, Olga; Filley, Christopher M; Shah, Raj C; Kluger, Benzi; Berry-Kravis, Elizabeth; Spector, Elaine; Tassone, Flora; Hall, Deborah A

    2016-10-01

    Considerable research has focused on patients with trinucleotide (CGG) repeat expansions in the fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1) gene that fall within either the full mutation (>200 repeats) or premutation range (55-200 repeats). Recent interest in individuals with gray zone expansions (41-54 CGG repeats) has grown due to reported phenotypes that are similar to those observed in premutation carriers, including neurological, molecular, and cognitive signs. The purpose of this manuscript is to describe a series of adults with FMR1 alleles in the gray zone presenting with movement disorders or memory loss. Gray zone carriers ascertained in large FMR1 screening studies were identified and their clinical phenotypes studied. Thirty-one gray zone allele carriers were included, with mean age of symptom onset of 53 years in patients with movement disorders and 57 years in those with memory loss. Four patients were chosen for illustrative case reports and had the following diagnoses: early-onset Parkinson disease (PD), atypical parkinsonism, dementia, and atypical essential tremor. Some gray zone carriers presenting with parkinsonism had typical features, including bradykinesia, rigidity, and a positive response to dopaminergic medication. These patients had a higher prevalence of peripheral neuropathy and psychiatric complaints than would be expected. The patients seen in memory clinics had standard presentations of cognitive impairment with no apparent differences. Further studies are necessary to determine the associations between FMR1 expansions in the gray zone and various phenotypes of neurological dysfunction. PMID:27372099

  19. The Importance of Clinical Phenotype in Understanding and Preventing Spontaneous Preterm Birth.

    PubMed

    Esplin, M Sean

    2016-02-01

    Spontaneous preterm birth (SPTB) is a well-known cause of maternal and neonatal morbidity. The search for the underlying pathways, documentation of the genetic causes, and identification of markers of spontaneous PTB have been marginally successful due to the fact that it is highly complex, with numerous processes that lead to a final common pathway. There is a great need for a comprehensive, consistent, and uniform classification system, which will be useful in identifying mechanisms, assigning prognosis, aiding in clinical management, and can identify areas of interest for intervention and future study. Effective classification systems must overcome obstacles including the lack of widely accepted definitions and uncertainty about inclusion of classifying features (e.g., presentation at delivery and multiple gestations) and levels of detail of these features. The optimal classification system should be based on the clinical phenotype, including characteristics of the mother, fetus, placenta, and the presentation for delivery. We present a proposed phenotyping system for spontaneous PTB. Future classification systems must establish a universally accepted set of definitions and a standardized clinical workup for all PTBs including the minimum clinical data to be collected and the laboratory and pathologic evaluation that should be completed. PMID:26824192

  20. Brain monoamine oxidase A activity predicts trait aggression.

    PubMed

    Alia-Klein, Nelly; Goldstein, Rita Z; Kriplani, Aarti; Logan, Jean; Tomasi, Dardo; Williams, Benjamin; Telang, Frank; Shumay, Elena; Biegon, Anat; Craig, Ian W; Henn, Fritz; Wang, Gene-Jack; Volkow, Nora D; Fowler, Joanna S

    2008-05-01

    The genetic deletion of monoamine oxidase A (MAO A), an enzyme that breaks down the monoamine neurotransmitters norepinephrine, serotonin, and dopamine, produces aggressive phenotypes across species. Therefore, a common polymorphism in the MAO A gene (MAOA, Mendelian Inheritance in Men database number 309850, referred to as high or low based on transcription in non-neuronal cells) has been investigated in a number of externalizing behavioral and clinical phenotypes. These studies provide evidence linking the low MAOA genotype and violent behavior but only through interaction with severe environmental stressors during childhood. Here, we hypothesized that in healthy adult males the gene product of MAO A in the brain, rather than the gene per se, would be associated with regulating the concentration of brain amines involved in trait aggression. Brain MAO A activity was measured in vivo in healthy nonsmoking men with positron emission tomography using a radioligand specific for MAO A (clorgyline labeled with carbon 11). Trait aggression was measured with the multidimensional personality questionnaire (MPQ). Here we report for the first time that brain MAO A correlates inversely with the MPQ trait measure of aggression (but not with other personality traits) such that the lower the MAO A activity in cortical and subcortical brain regions, the higher the self-reported aggression (in both MAOA genotype groups) contributing to more than one-third of the variability. Because trait aggression is a measure used to predict antisocial behavior, these results underscore the relevance of MAO A as a neurochemical substrate of aberrant aggression. PMID:18463263

  1. Innovations in phenotyping of mouse models in the German Mouse Clinic.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Helmut; Gailus-Durner, Valérie; Neschen, Susanne; Adler, Thure; Afonso, Luciana Caminha; Aguilar-Pimentel, Juan Antonio; Becker, Lore; Bohla, Alexander; Calzada-Wack, Julia; Cohrs, Christian; Dewert, Anna; Fridrich, Barbara; Garrett, Lillian; Glasl, Lisa; Götz, Alexander; Hans, Wolfgang; Hölter, Sabine M; Horsch, Marion; Hurt, Anja; Janas, Eva; Janik, Dirk; Kahle, Melanie; Kistler, Martin; Klein-Rodewald, Tanja; Lengger, Christoph; Ludwig, Tonia; Maier, Holger; Marschall, Susan; Micklich, Kateryna; Möller, Gabriele; Naton, Beatrix; Prehn, Cornelia; Puk, Oliver; Rácz, Ildikó; Räss, Michael; Rathkolb, Birgit; Rozman, Jan; Scheerer, Markus; Schiller, Evelyn; Schrewe, Anja; Steinkamp, Ralph; Stöger, Claudia; Sun, Minxuan; Szymczak, Wilfried; Treise, Irina; Vargas Panesso, Ingrid Liliana; Vernaleken, Alexandra M; Willershäuser, Monja; Wolff-Muscate, Annemarie; Zeh, Ramona; Adamski, Jerzy; Beckers, Johannes; Bekeredjian, Raffi; Busch, Dirk H; Eickelberg, Oliver; Favor, Jack; Graw, Jochen; Höfler, Heinz; Höschen, Christoph; Katus, Hugo; Klingenspor, Martin; Klopstock, Thomas; Neff, Frauke; Ollert, Markus; Schulz, Holger; Stöger, Tobias; Wolf, Eckhard; Wurst, Wolfgang; Yildirim, Ali Önder; Zimmer, Andreas; Hrabě de Angelis, Martin

    2012-10-01

    Under the label of the German Mouse Clinic (GMC), a concept has been developed and implemented that allows the better understanding of human diseases on the pathophysiological and molecular level. This includes better understanding of the crosstalk between different organs, pleiotropy of genes, and the systemic impact of envirotypes and drugs. In the GMC, experts from various fields of mouse genetics and physiology, in close collaboration with clinicians, work side by side under one roof. The GMC is an open-access platform for the scientific community by providing phenotypic analysis in bilateral collaborations ("bottom-up projects") and as a partner and driver in international large-scale biology projects ("top-down projects"). Furthermore, technology development is a major topic in the GMC. Innovative techniques for primary and secondary screens are developed and implemented into the phenotyping pipelines (e.g., detection of volatile organic compounds, VOCs).

  2. The Relation between Diverse Phenotypes of PCOS with Clinical Manifestations, Anthropometric Indices and Metabolic Characteristics.

    PubMed

    Shahrami, Seyedeh Hajar; Abbasi Ranjbar, Zahra; Milani, Forozan; Kezem-Nejad, Ehsan; Hassanzadeh Rad, Afagh; Dalil Heirat, Seyedeh Fatemeh

    2016-02-01

    Critical issue regarding to variation of findings based on different phenotypes led investigators to define whether they are distinct features or overlapping ones. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the association between diverse phenotypes of PCOS (Poly Cystic Ovary Syndrome) with clinical manifestations, anthropometric indices, and metabolic characteristics. This was a descriptive cross-sectional study conducted in 15-39 years old women with PCOS referred to infertility clinics in the north part of Iran, Rasht during 2010-2011. Data were gathered through an interview by a form consisted of demographic characteristics, laboratory findings, ovarian volume and anthropometric indices. A total of 214 patients consisted of 161 PCOS (cases) and 53 normal women (controls) participated in this study. The most prevalent phenotype in PCOS population was IM/PCO/HA (54%), followed by IM/HA (28%) and IM/PCO (13%). PCO/HA was present only in 6 PCOS patients (5%). PCOS patients were significantly younger than controls (P=0.07). Results showed that increased ovarian volume were higher in PCOS group in comparison with controls and IM/PCO/HA, and IM/PCO had respectively the largest ovarian volumes. Also, a significant relation was observed based on Cholesterol, 17OHP, LH, TG, 2hpp, and LH/FSH between patients with PCOS and control groups. There were significant differences in demographic, anthropometric, hormonal and ultrasound findings between PCOS and controls. Therefore, it seems that classification of the characteristics of each phenotype could offer an appropriate guide for screening risks of PCOS and may facilitate performing most favorable treatment for these complications.

  3. Ovatodiolide sensitizes aggressive breast cancer cells to doxorubicin, eliminates their cancer stem cell-like phenotype, and reduces doxorubicin-associated toxicity.

    PubMed

    Bamodu, Oluwaseun Adebayo; Huang, Wen-Chien; Tzeng, David T W; Wu, Alexander; Wang, Liang Shun; Yeh, Chi-Tai; Chao, Tsu-Yi

    2015-08-10

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is chemotherapy-refractory and associated with poor clinical prognosis. Doxorubicin (Doxo), a class I anthracycline and first-line anticancer agent, effective against a wide spectrum of neoplasms including breast carcinoma, is associated with several cumulative dose-dependent adverse effects, including cardiomyopathy, typhilitis, and acute myelotoxicity. This study evaluated the usability of Ovatodiolide (Ova) in sensitizing TNBC cells to Doxo cytotoxicity, so as to reduce Doxo effective dose and consequently its adverse effects. TNBC cell lines MDA-MB-231 and HS578T were used. Pre-treatment of the TNBC cells with 10 µM Ova 24 h before Doxo administration increased the Doxo anticancer effect (IC50 1.4 µM) compared to simultaneous treatment with Doxo ( IC50 1.8 µM), or Doxo alone (IC50 9.2 µM). Intracellular accumulation of Doxo was lowest in Ova pre-treated cells at all Doxo concentrations, when compared with Doxo or simultaneously treated cells. In comparison to the Doxo-only group, cell cycle analysis of MDA-MB-231 cells treated concurrently with 2.5 µM Ova and 1.25 µM Doxo showed increased percentage of cells arrested at G0/G1; however, pre-treatment with the same concentration of Ova 24 h before Doxo showed greater tumor growth inhibition, with a 2.4-fold increased percentage of cells in G0/G1 arrest, greater Doxo-induced apoptosis, and significantly reduced intracellular Doxo accumulation. Additionally, Ova-sensitized TNBC cells also lost their cancer stem cell-like phenotype evidenced by significant dissolution, necrosis of formed mammospheres. Taken together, these findings indicate that Ova sensitizes TNBC cells to Doxo and potentiates doxorubicin-induced elimination of the TNBC cancer stem cell-like phenotype.

  4. New insights into the diagnosis of hidradenitis suppurativa: Clinical presentations and phenotypes.

    PubMed

    van der Zee, Hessel H; Jemec, Gregor B E

    2015-11-01

    Current classifications for hidradenitis suppurativa (HS), such as the Hurley staging system, are not very specific. The absence of rigorous classifications is incongruous with the clinical variability of the condition. There is no pathognomonic sign for HS that leads to a diagnosis that is unquestionable. Consequently, diagnosis is made largely through clinical presentation of the condition. The use of several validated tools assists in confirming the diagnosis and the severity of the disease. In future investigations, the identification of phenotypes and clinical subtypes--taking into account genetic variants--will serve to identify subpopulations of patients who are responsive to particular therapies, thereby improving the overall therapeutic picture for patients with HS. There is a potential for personalized, tailored delivery of therapy in the HS setting.

  5. Polymorphism of Nitric Oxide Synthase 1 Affects the Clinical Phenotypes of Ischemic Stroke in Korean Population

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Seung Don; Yun, Dong Hwan; Kim, Hee-Sang; Kim, Su Kang; Kim, Dong Hwan; Chon, Jinmann; Je, Goun; Kim, Yoon-Seong; Chung, Joo-Ho; Chung, Seung Joon; Yeo, Jin Ah

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) rs2293054 [Ile734Ile], rs1047735 [His902His], rs2293044 [Val1353Val], rs2682826 (3'UTR) of nitric oxide synthase 1 (NOS1) are associated with the development and clinical phenotypes of ischemic stroke. Methods We enrolled 120 ischemic stroke patients and 314 control subjects. Ischemic stroke patients were divided into subgroups according to the scores of the National Institutes of Health Stroke Survey (NIHSS, <6 and ≥6) and Modified Barthel Index (MBI, <60 and ≥60). SNPStats, SNPAnalyzer, and HelixTree programs were used to calculate odds ratios (ORs), 95% confidence intervals (CIs), and p-values. Multiple logistic regression models were performed to analyze genetic data. Results No SNPs of the NOS1 gene were found to be associated with ischemic stroke. However, in an analysis of clinical phenotypes, we found that rs2293054 was associated with the NIHSS scores of ischemic stroke patients in codominant (p=0.019), dominant (p=0.007), overdominant (p=0.033), and log-additive (p=0.0048) models. Also, rs2682826 revealed a significant association in the recessive model (p=0.034). In allele frequency analysis, we also found that the T alleles of rs2293054 were associated with lower NIHSS scores (p=0.007). Respectively, rs2293054 had a significant association in the MBI scores of ischemic stroke in codominant (p=0.038), dominant (p=0.031), overdominant (p=0.045), and log-additive (p=0.04) models. Conclusion These results suggest that NOS1 may be related to the clinical phenotypes of ischemic stroke in Korean population. PMID:26949676

  6. The 2q23.1 microdeletion syndrome: clinical and behavioural phenotype

    PubMed Central

    van Bon, Bregje WM; Koolen, David A; Brueton, Louise; McMullan, Dominic; Lichtenbelt, Klaske D; Adès, Lesley C; Peters, Gregory; Gibson, Kate; Novara, Francesca; Pramparo, Tiziano; Bernardina, Bernardo Dalla; Zoccante, Leonardo; Balottin, Umberto; Piazza, Fausta; Pecile, Vanna; Gasparini, Paolo; Guerci, Veronica; Kets, Marleen; Pfundt, Rolph; de Brouwer, Arjan P; Veltman, Joris A; de Leeuw, Nicole; Wilson, Meredith; Antony, Jayne; Reitano, Santina; Luciano, Daniela; Fichera, Marco; Romano, Corrado; Brunner, Han G; Zuffardi, Orsetta; de Vries, Bert BA

    2010-01-01

    Six submicroscopic deletions comprising chromosome band 2q23.1 in patients with severe mental retardation (MR), short stature, microcephaly and epilepsy have been reported, suggesting that haploinsufficiency of one or more genes in the 2q23.1 region might be responsible for the common phenotypic features in these patients. In this study, we report the molecular and clinical characterisation of nine new 2q23.1 deletion patients and a clinical update on two previously reported patients. All patients were mentally retarded with pronounced speech delay and additional abnormalities including short stature, seizures, microcephaly and coarse facies. The majority of cases presented with stereotypic repetitive behaviour, a disturbed sleep pattern and a broad-based gait. These features led to the initial clinical impression of Angelman, Rett or Smith–Magenis syndromes in several patients. The overlapping 2q23.1 deletion region in all 15 patients comprises only one gene, namely, MBD5. Interestingly, MBD5 is a member of the methyl CpG-binding domain protein family, which also comprises MECP2, mutated in Rett's syndrome. Another gene in the 2q23.1 region, EPC2, was deleted in 12 patients who had a broader phenotype than those with a deletion of MBD5 only. EPC2 is a member of the polycomb protein family, involved in heterochromatin formation and might be involved in causing MR. Patients with a 2q23.1 microdeletion present with a variable phenotype and the diagnosis should be considered in mentally retarded children with coarse facies, seizures, disturbed sleeping patterns and additional specific behavioural problems. PMID:19809484

  7. The 2q23.1 microdeletion syndrome: clinical and behavioural phenotype.

    PubMed

    van Bon, Bregje W M; Koolen, David A; Brueton, Louise; McMullan, Dominic; Lichtenbelt, Klaske D; Adès, Lesley C; Peters, Gregory; Gibson, Kate; Moloney, Susan; Novara, Francesca; Pramparo, Tiziano; Dalla Bernardina, Bernardo; Zoccante, Leonardo; Balottin, Umberto; Piazza, Fausta; Pecile, Vanna; Gasparini, Paolo; Guerci, Veronica; Kets, Marleen; Pfundt, Rolph; de Brouwer, Arjan P; Veltman, Joris A; de Leeuw, Nicole; Wilson, Meredith; Antony, Jayne; Reitano, Santina; Luciano, Daniela; Fichera, Marco; Romano, Corrado; Brunner, Han G; Zuffardi, Orsetta; de Vries, Bert B A

    2010-02-01

    Six submicroscopic deletions comprising chromosome band 2q23.1 in patients with severe mental retardation (MR), short stature, microcephaly and epilepsy have been reported, suggesting that haploinsufficiency of one or more genes in the 2q23.1 region might be responsible for the common phenotypic features in these patients. In this study, we report the molecular and clinical characterisation of nine new 2q23.1 deletion patients and a clinical update on two previously reported patients. All patients were mentally retarded with pronounced speech delay and additional abnormalities including short stature, seizures, microcephaly and coarse facies. The majority of cases presented with stereotypic repetitive behaviour, a disturbed sleep pattern and a broad-based gait. These features led to the initial clinical impression of Angelman, Rett or Smith-Magenis syndromes in several patients. The overlapping 2q23.1 deletion region in all 15 patients comprises only one gene, namely, MBD5. Interestingly, MBD5 is a member of the methyl CpG-binding domain protein family, which also comprises MECP2, mutated in Rett's syndrome. Another gene in the 2q23.1 region, EPC2, was deleted in 12 patients who had a broader phenotype than those with a deletion of MBD5 only. EPC2 is a member of the polycomb protein family, involved in heterochromatin formation and might be involved in causing MR. Patients with a 2q23.1 microdeletion present with a variable phenotype and the diagnosis should be considered in mentally retarded children with coarse facies, seizures, disturbed sleeping patterns and additional specific behavioural problems.

  8. Altered T cell phenotypes associated with clinical relapse of multiple sclerosis patients receiving fingolimod therapy

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Chihiro; Kondo, Takayuki; Ochi, Hirofumi; Okada, Yoichiro; Hashi, Yuichiro; Adachi, Tetsuya; Shin-Ya, Masaharu; Matsumoto, Sadayuki; Takahashi, Ryosuke; Nakagawa, Masanori; Mizuno, Toshiki

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a T cell-mediated autoimmune disease. Fingolimod, a highly effective disease-modifying drug for MS, retains CCR7+ central memory T cells in which autoaggressive T cells putatively exist, in secondary lymphoid organs, although relapse may still occur in some patients. Here, we analyzed the T cell phenotypes of fingolimod-treated, fingolimod-untreated patients, and healthy subjects. The frequency of CD56+ T cells and granzyme B-, perforin-, and Fas ligand-positive T cells significantly increased during fingolimod treatment. Each T cell subpopulation further increased during relapse. Interestingly, T cells from fingolimod-treated patients exhibited interferon-γ biased production, and more myelin basic protein-reactive cells was noted in CD56+ than in CD56− T cells. It is likely that the altered T cell phenotypes play a role in MS relapse in fingolimod-treated patients. Further clinical studies are necessary to investigate whether altered T cell phenotypes are a biomarker for relapse under fingolimod therapy. PMID:27752051

  9. Tetralogy of Fallot and Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome – Complex Clinical Phenotypes Meet Complex Genetic Networks

    PubMed Central

    Lahm, Harald; Schön, Patric; Doppler, Stefanie; Dreßen, Martina; Cleuziou, Julie; Deutsch, Marcus-André; Ewert, Peter; Lange, Rüdiger; Krane, Markus

    2015-01-01

    In many cases congenital heart disease (CHD) is represented by a complex phenotype and an array of several functional and morphological cardiac disorders. These malformations will be briefly summarized in the first part focusing on two severe CHD phenotypes, hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS) and tetralogy of Fallot (TOF). In most cases of CHD the genetic origin remains largely unknown, though the complexity of the clinical picture strongly argues against a dysregulation which can be attributed to a single candidate gene but rather suggests a multifaceted polygenetic origin with elaborate interactions. Consistent with this idea, genome-wide approaches using whole exome sequencing, comparative sequence analysis of multiplex families to identify de novo mutations and global technologies to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms, copy number variants, dysregulation of the transcriptome and epigenetic variations have been conducted to obtain information about genetic alterations and potential predispositions possibly linked to the occurrence of a CHD phenotype. In the second part of this review we will summarize and discuss the available literature on identified genetic alterations linked to TOF and HLHS. PMID:26069455

  10. Clinical Features of Childhood Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia by Genotype and Ultrastructural Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Ferkol, Thomas W.; Rosenfeld, Margaret; Lee, Hye-Seung; Dell, Sharon D.; Sagel, Scott D.; Milla, Carlos; Zariwala, Maimoona A.; Pittman, Jessica E.; Shapiro, Adam J.; Carson, Johnny L.; Krischer, Jeffrey P.; Hazucha, Milan J.; Cooper, Matthew L.; Knowles, Michael R.; Leigh, Margaret W.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: The relationship between clinical phenotype of childhood primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) and ultrastructural defects and genotype is poorly defined. Objectives: To delineate clinical features of childhood PCD and their associations with ultrastructural defects and genotype. Methods: A total of 118 participants younger than 19 years old with PCD were evaluated prospectively at six centers in North America using standardized procedures for diagnostic testing, spirometry, chest computed tomography, respiratory cultures, and clinical phenotyping. Measurements and Main Results: Clinical features included neonatal respiratory distress (82%), chronic cough (99%), and chronic nasal congestion (97%). There were no differences in clinical features or respiratory pathogens in subjects with outer dynein arm (ODA) defects (ODA alone; n = 54) and ODA plus inner dynein arm (IDA) defects (ODA + IDA; n = 18) versus subjects with IDA and central apparatus defects with microtubular disorganization (IDA/CA/MTD; n = 40). Median FEV1 was worse in the IDA/CA/MTD group (72% predicted) versus the combined ODA groups (92% predicted; P = 0.003). Median body mass index was lower in the IDA/CA/MTD group (46th percentile) versus the ODA groups (70th percentile; P = 0.003). For all 118 subjects, median number of lobes with bronchiectasis was three and alveolar consolidation was two. However, the 5- to 11-year-old IDA/CA/MTD group had more lobes of bronchiectasis (median, 5; P = 0.0008) and consolidation (median, 3; P = 0.0001) compared with the ODA groups (median, 3 and 2, respectively). Similar findings were observed when limited to participants with biallelic mutations. Conclusions: Lung disease was heterogeneous across all ultrastructural and genotype groups, but worse in those with IDA/CA/MTD ultrastructural defects, most of whom had biallelic mutations in CCDC39 or CCDC40. PMID:25493340

  11. Tailoring the definition of the clinical schizophrenia phenotype in linkage studies.

    PubMed

    Krause, Verena; Krastoshevsky, Olga; Coleman, Michael J; Bodkin, J Alexander; Lerbinger, Jan; Boling, Lenore; Johnson, Fred; Gibbs, Anne; Cole, Jonathan O; Huang, Zhuying; Mendell, Nancy R; Levy, Deborah L

    2010-02-01

    The delineation of schizophrenia-related symptomatology is critical to informative clinical phenotyping in linkage studies. A minority of first-degree relatives of schizophrenia and schizoaffective probands (RelSZSA) qualifies for a clinical diagnosis in the schizophrenia spectrum. Schizotypal personality disorder (SPD) is a key component of this spectrum, largely because of its relatively specific familial aggregation in relatives. The criteria for SPD were not developed for the purpose of identifying RelSZSA, however, and SPD is not a homogeneous clinical disorder, potentially introducing false positives and false negatives into affectedness classifications. In this study we used logistic regression (LR) to identify the combination of clinical signs and symptoms that maximized the discrimination between nonpsychotic first-degree RelSZSA (n=241) and controls (n=161). Three variables contributed significantly to optimizing this distinction: no close friends or confidants other than family members, social isolation and irritability. The combination of deviant LR scores and schizophrenia-spectrum psychotic disorders had greater sensitivity for identifying RelSZSA, 23.7%, than SPD and schizophrenia-spectrum psychotic disorders, 16%. Importantly, the diagnosis of SPD and deviant LR scores were not significantly correlated. Most individuals with deviant LR scores did not meet criteria for a diagnosis of SPD and only a minority of those who were diagnosed with SPD had deviant LR scores. Since misclassification of gene carriers as non-gene carriers in linkage analyses increases the risk of false negatives, it may be advantageous to tailor the definition of the clinical phenotype to those aspects of social-interpersonal dysfunction that optimize the discrimination of RelSZSA from controls.

  12. A novel RPE65 hypomorph expands the clinical phenotype of RPE65 mutations. A comprehensive clinical and biochemical functional study

    PubMed Central

    Lorenz, Birgit; Poliakov, Eugenia; Schambeck, Maria; Friedburg, Christoph; Preising, Markus N.; Redmond, T. Michael

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Later onset and progression of retinal dystrophy occur with some RPE65 missense mutations. We correlate the functional consequences of the novel P25L RPE65 mutation with its early childhood phenotype and compare it with other pathogenic missense mutations. Methods In addition to typical clinical tests, fundus autofluorescence (FAF), optical coherence tomography (OCT), and 2-color-threshold perimetry (2CTP) were measured. RPE65 mutations were screened by SSCP and direct sequencing. Isomerase activity of mutant RPE65 was assayed in 293F cells and quantified by HPLC analysis of retinoids. Results A very mild phenotype was detected in a now 7-y old boy homozygous for the P25L mutation in RPE65. Though abnormal dark adaptation was noticed early, best corrected visual acuity was 20/20 at age 5-y and 20/30 at age 7-y. Nystagmus was absent. Cone electroretinogram (ERG) was measurable, rod ERG severely reduced, and FAF very low. 2CTP detected mainly cone-mediated answers under scotopic conditions, light-adapted cone answers were about 1.5 log units below normal. High resolution spectral domain OCT revealed morphological changes. Isomerase activity in 293F cells transfected with RPE65/P25L was reduced to 7.7% of wildtype RPE65-transfected cells, while RPE65/L22P-transfected cells had 13.5%. Conclusions The mild clinical phenotype observed is consistent with the residual activity of a severely hypomorphic mutant RPE65. Reduction to < 10% of wildtype RPE65 activity by homozygous P25L correlates with almost complete rod function loss and cone amplitude reduction. We conclude that functional survival of cones is possible in patients with residual RPE65 isomerase activity. This patient should profit most from gene therapy. PMID:18599565

  13. Macrolide-lincosamide-resistant phenotypes and genotypes of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from bovine clinical mastitis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Wu, Cong-Ming; Lu, Li-Ming; Ren, Gao-Wa Na; Cao, Xing-Yuan; Shen, Jian-Zhong

    2008-07-27

    The present study aimed to determine the prevalence and mechanisms of macrolide-lincosamide (ML) resistance in 72 Staphylococcus aureus isolates from cows with clinical mastitis. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of ML antibiotics were determined by the broth microdilution technique, inducible ML resistance phenotype by the D test, and ML resistance genes by PCR assay. The isolates showed a high level of resistance to erythromycin (93.1%), azithromycin (93.1%), spiramycin (41.7%), tylosin (40.3%), tilmicosin (27.8%), and clindamycin (36.1%). Macrolide-lincosamide MIC(90) values were > or = 128 mg/L. Inducible ML resistance (iML) phenotype was detected in 52.8% (38/72) of isolates. In erythromycin-resistant (ER-R) strains, methylase genes ermB and ermC, efflux gene msrA/msrB, and inactivating enzyme genes lnuA and mphC were present alone or in various combinations, with ermB and ermC genes predominating. This is the first report of ML resistance genes ermB, mrsA/mrsB and mphC in S. aureus isolated from bovine mastitis. The occurrence of high levels of resistance to ML antibiotics among the S. aureus isolates, and the high rate of iML phenotype, indicate that appropriate alternative antibiotics should be prescribed for treating bovine mastitis caused by S. aureus. Furthermore, significant differences in the conformations of lactone rings of 16- and 14-membered macrolides could explain why some isolates with a constitutive ML resistance (cML) phenotype were sensitive to 16-membered macrolides alone. The different interaction of the 16-membered macrolides with the 50S ribosomal subunit is also presumably the reason why the susceptibility results of tilmcosin differed from those of tylosin and spiramycin. PMID:18272297

  14. Metabolic phenotyping applied to pre-clinical and clinical studies of acetaminophen metabolism and hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Coen, Muireann

    2015-02-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP, paracetamol, N-acetyl-p-aminophenol) is a widely used analgesic that is safe at therapeutic doses but is a major cause of acute liver failure (ALF) following overdose. APAP-induced hepatotoxicity is related to the formation of an electrophilic reactive metabolite, N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine (NAPQI), which is detoxified through conjugation with reduced glutathione (GSH). One method that has been applied to study APAP metabolism and hepatotoxicity is that of metabolic phenotyping, which involves the study of the small molecule complement of complex biological samples. This approach involves the use of high-resolution analytical platforms such as NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry to generate information-rich metabolic profiles that reflect both genetic and environmental influences and capture both endogenous and xenobiotic metabolites. Data modeling and mining and the subsequent identification of panels of candidate biomarkers are typically approached with multivariate statistical tools. We review the application of multi-platform metabolic profiling for the study of APAP metabolism in both in vivo models and humans. We also review the application of metabolic profiling for the study of endogenous metabolic pathway perturbations in response to APAP hepatotoxicity, with a particular focus on metabolites involved in the biosynthesis of GSH and those that reflect mitochondrial function such as long-chain acylcarnitines. Taken together, this body of work sheds much light on the mechanism of APAP-induced hepatotoxicity and provides candidate biomarkers that may prove of translational relevance for improved stratification of APAP-induced ALF.

  15. Aggressive tumor growth and clinical evolution in a patient with X-linked acro-gigantism syndrome.

    PubMed

    Naves, Luciana A; Daly, Adrian F; Dias, Luiz Augusto; Yuan, Bo; Zakir, Juliano Coelho Oliveira; Barra, Gustavo Barcellos; Palmeira, Leonor; Villa, Chiara; Trivellin, Giampaolo; Júnior, Armindo Jreige; Neto, Florêncio Figueiredo Cavalcante; Liu, Pengfei; Pellegata, Natalia S; Stratakis, Constantine A; Lupski, James R; Beckers, Albert

    2016-02-01

    X-linked acro-gigantism (X-LAG) syndrome is a newly described disease caused by microduplications on chromosome Xq26.3 leading to copy number gain of GPR101. We describe the clinical progress of a sporadic male X-LAG syndrome patient with an Xq26.3 microduplication, highlighting the aggressive natural history of pituitary tumor growth in the absence of treatment. The patient first presented elsewhere aged 5 years 8 months with a history of excessive growth for >2 years. His height was 163 cm, his weight was 36 kg, and he had markedly elevated GH and IGF-1. MRI showed a non-invasive sellar mass measuring 32.5 × 23.9 × 29.1 mm. Treatment was declined and the family was lost to follow-up. At the age of 10 years and 7 months, he presented again with headaches, seizures, and visual disturbance. His height had increased to 197 cm. MRI showed an invasive mass measuring 56.2 × 58.1 × 45.0 mm, with compression of optic chiasma, bilateral cavernous sinus invasion, and hydrocephalus. His thyrotrope, corticotrope, and gonadotrope axes were deficient. Surgery, somatostatin analogs, and cabergoline did not control vertical growth and pegvisomant was added, although vertical growth continues (currently 207 cm at 11 years 7 months of age). X-LAG syndrome is a new genomic disorder in which early-onset pituitary tumorigenesis can lead to marked overgrowth and gigantism. This case illustrates the aggressive nature of tumor evolution and the challenging clinical management in X-LAG syndrome. PMID:26607152

  16. Aggressive tumor growth and clinical evolution in a patient with X-linked acro-gigantism syndrome.

    PubMed

    Naves, Luciana A; Daly, Adrian F; Dias, Luiz Augusto; Yuan, Bo; Zakir, Juliano Coelho Oliveira; Barra, Gustavo Barcellos; Palmeira, Leonor; Villa, Chiara; Trivellin, Giampaolo; Júnior, Armindo Jreige; Neto, Florêncio Figueiredo Cavalcante; Liu, Pengfei; Pellegata, Natalia S; Stratakis, Constantine A; Lupski, James R; Beckers, Albert

    2016-02-01

    X-linked acro-gigantism (X-LAG) syndrome is a newly described disease caused by microduplications on chromosome Xq26.3 leading to copy number gain of GPR101. We describe the clinical progress of a sporadic male X-LAG syndrome patient with an Xq26.3 microduplication, highlighting the aggressive natural history of pituitary tumor growth in the absence of treatment. The patient first presented elsewhere aged 5 years 8 months with a history of excessive growth for >2 years. His height was 163 cm, his weight was 36 kg, and he had markedly elevated GH and IGF-1. MRI showed a non-invasive sellar mass measuring 32.5 × 23.9 × 29.1 mm. Treatment was declined and the family was lost to follow-up. At the age of 10 years and 7 months, he presented again with headaches, seizures, and visual disturbance. His height had increased to 197 cm. MRI showed an invasive mass measuring 56.2 × 58.1 × 45.0 mm, with compression of optic chiasma, bilateral cavernous sinus invasion, and hydrocephalus. His thyrotrope, corticotrope, and gonadotrope axes were deficient. Surgery, somatostatin analogs, and cabergoline did not control vertical growth and pegvisomant was added, although vertical growth continues (currently 207 cm at 11 years 7 months of age). X-LAG syndrome is a new genomic disorder in which early-onset pituitary tumorigenesis can lead to marked overgrowth and gigantism. This case illustrates the aggressive nature of tumor evolution and the challenging clinical management in X-LAG syndrome.

  17. CD4-positive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma: A variant with aggressive clinical potential

    PubMed Central

    Hussaini, Mohammad O; Kreisel, Friederike H; Hassan, Anjum; Nguyen, TuDung T; Frater, John L

    2016-01-01

    CD4 expression is rare in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), with 4 previously reported cases. Its significance is uncertain. We report five patients with CD4+ DLBCL and one CD4+ primary mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma. Cases were identified by searching the electronic database of the department; each was reviewed. Average age was 56 years. Neoplastic cells expressed CD20 (5/6 tested cases). BCL2/BCL6 expression were seen in 3/3 tested cases, suggesting a germinal center origin. Additionally, expression of T-cell antigens CD2 and CD5 was noted in 2/2 and CD7 in 1/1 tested case. CD3 was negative in all. Lymph nodes were commonly involved (67%). Patients received chemotherapy +/- radiation (6/6) and bone marrow transplant (2/6). Average survival was 44.2 mo. CD4 expression in DLBCL raises questions of lineage commitment. CD4+ DLBCL is rare; care should be exercised not to diagnose these as T-cell lymphomas. A subset behaves aggressively. PMID:27679780

  18. CD4-positive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma: A variant with aggressive clinical potential.

    PubMed

    Hussaini, Mohammad O; Kreisel, Friederike H; Hassan, Anjum; Nguyen, TuDung T; Frater, John L

    2016-09-26

    CD4 expression is rare in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), with 4 previously reported cases. Its significance is uncertain. We report five patients with CD4(+) DLBCL and one CD4(+) primary mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma. Cases were identified by searching the electronic database of the department; each was reviewed. Average age was 56 years. Neoplastic cells expressed CD20 (5/6 tested cases). BCL2/BCL6 expression were seen in 3/3 tested cases, suggesting a germinal center origin. Additionally, expression of T-cell antigens CD2 and CD5 was noted in 2/2 and CD7 in 1/1 tested case. CD3 was negative in all. Lymph nodes were commonly involved (67%). Patients received chemotherapy +/- radiation (6/6) and bone marrow transplant (2/6). Average survival was 44.2 mo. CD4 expression in DLBCL raises questions of lineage commitment. CD4(+) DLBCL is rare; care should be exercised not to diagnose these as T-cell lymphomas. A subset behaves aggressively. PMID:27679780

  19. CD4-positive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma: A variant with aggressive clinical potential

    PubMed Central

    Hussaini, Mohammad O; Kreisel, Friederike H; Hassan, Anjum; Nguyen, TuDung T; Frater, John L

    2016-01-01

    CD4 expression is rare in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), with 4 previously reported cases. Its significance is uncertain. We report five patients with CD4+ DLBCL and one CD4+ primary mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma. Cases were identified by searching the electronic database of the department; each was reviewed. Average age was 56 years. Neoplastic cells expressed CD20 (5/6 tested cases). BCL2/BCL6 expression were seen in 3/3 tested cases, suggesting a germinal center origin. Additionally, expression of T-cell antigens CD2 and CD5 was noted in 2/2 and CD7 in 1/1 tested case. CD3 was negative in all. Lymph nodes were commonly involved (67%). Patients received chemotherapy +/- radiation (6/6) and bone marrow transplant (2/6). Average survival was 44.2 mo. CD4 expression in DLBCL raises questions of lineage commitment. CD4+ DLBCL is rare; care should be exercised not to diagnose these as T-cell lymphomas. A subset behaves aggressively.

  20. From genotype to phenotype; clinical variability in Lesch-Nyhan disease. The role of epigenetics.

    PubMed

    Trigueros Genao, M; Torres, R J

    2014-11-01

    Lesch-Nyhan disease is a rare genetic disease characterized by a deficiency in the function of the enzyme hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT). Patients affected by this disease experience hyperuricemia, motor disorders, mental retardation and, in the most severe cases, self-mutilation. Its clinical manifestations depend on the enzymatic activity of HGPRT, which is classically linked to the type of alteration in the HGPRT gene. More than 400 mutations of this gene have been found. At present, one of the controversial aspects of the disease is the relationship between the genotype and phenotype; cases have been described lacking a mutation, such as the patient presented in this article, as well as families who despite sharing the same genetic defect show disorders with differing severity. Epigenetic processes, which modify the genetic expression without changing the sequence of the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), could explain the clinical variability observed in this disease.

  1. Primary Sjӧgren's syndrome: Clinical phenotypes, outcome and the development of biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Goules, Andreas V; Tzioufas, Athanasios G

    2016-07-01

    Primary Sjӧgren's syndrome (pSS) is a complex autoimmune disease with distinct clinical phenotypes and variable outcomes. The systemic form of the disease is characterized by immune complex mediated manifestations and is complicated by lymphoma as a result of a polyclonal B cell hyperactivity that is evolving into B cell malignancy. In the past decades, well-established clinical and serological markers have been described in the literature to identify high-risk patients and to predict lymphoma development. However, specific biologic treatments have proven ineffective to control the disease. Significant research effort has been made to reveal the major underlying biological events in this subgroup and identify biomarkers for early diagnosis, prognosis and response to treatment. In this review, we summarize the current data for the proposed histological, molecular and genetic biomarkers.

  2. Phenotypic characterization of X-linked retinoschisis: Clinical, electroretinography, and optical coherence tomography variables

    PubMed Central

    Neriyanuri, Srividya; Dhandayuthapani, Sudha; Arunachalam, Jayamuruga Pandian; Raman, Rajiv

    2016-01-01

    Aims: To study the phenotypic characteristics of X-linked retinoschisis (XLRS) and report the clinical, electroretinogram (ERG), and optical coherence tomography (OCT) variables in Indian eyes. Design: A retrospective study. Materials and Methods: Medical records of 21 patients with retinoschisis who were genetically confirmed to have RS1 mutation were reviewed. The phenotype characterization included the age of onset, best-corrected visual acuity, refractive error, fundus findings, OCT, and ERG. Statistical Analysis Used: Data from both the eyes were used for analysis. A P < 0.05 was set as statistical significance. Data were not normally distributed (P < 0.05, Shapiro wilk); hence, nonparametric tests were used for statistical analysis. Results: All were males whose mean age of presentation was 9 years. Visual acuity was moderately impaired (median 0.6 logMAR, interquartile range: 0.47, 1) in these eyes with a hyperopic refractive error of median +1.75 Ds (interquartile range: +0.50 Ds, +4.25 Ds). About 54.7% of the eyes had both foveal and peripheral schisis, isolated foveal schisis was seen in 28.5% of the eyes, and schisis with retinal detachment was seen in 16.6% of the eyes. The inner nuclear layer was found to be commonly involved in the schisis, followed by outer nuclear and plexiform layers as evident on OCT. On ERG, a- and b-wave amplitudes were significantly reduced in eyes with foveal and peripheral schisis when compared to the eyes with only foveal schisis (P < 0.05). Conclusions: XLRS has phenotypic heterogeneity as evident on OCT, ERG, and clinical findings. PMID:27609164

  3. Mutations in the gene for X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy in patients with different clinical phenotypes

    SciTech Connect

    Braun, A.; Ambach, H.; Kammerer, S.; Rolinski, B.; Roscher, A.; Rabl, W.; Stoeckler, S.; Gaertner, J.; Zierz, S.

    1995-04-01

    Recently, the gene for the most common peroxisomal disorder, X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD), has been described encoding a peroxisomal membrane transporter protein. We analyzed the entire protein-coding sequence of this gene by reverse-transcription PCR, SSCP, and DNA sequencing in five patients with different clinical expressions were cerebral childhood ALD, adrenomyecloneuropathy (AMN), and {open_quotes}Addison disease only{close_quotes} (AD) phenotype. In the three patients exhibiting the classical picture of severe childhood ALD we identified in the 5{prime} portion of the X-ALD gene a 38-bp deletion that causes a frameshift mutation, a 3-bp deletion leading to a deletion of an amino acid in the ATP-binding domain of the ALD protein, and a missense mutation. In the patient with the clinical phenotype of AMN, a nonsense mutation in codon 212, along with a second site mutation at codon 178, was observed. Analysis of the patient with the ADO phenotype revealed a further missense mutation at a highly conserved position in the ALDP/PMP70 comparison. The disruptive nature of two mutations (i.e., the frameshift and the nonsense mutation) in patients with biochemically proved childhood ALD and AMN further strongly supports the hypothesis that alterations in this gene play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of X-ALD. Since the current biochemical techniques for X-ALD carrier detection in affected families lack sufficient reliability, our procedure described for systematic mutation scanning is also capable of improving genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis. 19 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Distinctive Menkes disease variant with occipital horns: Delineation of natural history and clinical phenotype

    SciTech Connect

    Proud, V.K.; Mussell, H.G.; Percy, A.K.

    1996-10-02

    To delineate further the clinical spectrum of Menkes disease, an X-linked recessive disorder of copper transport, we studied 4 related males, ranging in age from 4-38 years, with a unique phenotype that combines manifestations of classical and mild Menkes disease and occipital horn syndrome (OHS). The propositus, an 18-year-old man, was evaluated following an intracerebral hemorrhage at age 15 years and was noted to have marked hypotonia, motor delay with mental retardation, bladder diverticula, failure to thrive, and diarrhea from infancy; seizures from age 3 years; and abnormal hair (pili torti) and face, cutis laxa, and multiple joint dislocations. Radiographic abnormalities included occipital exostoses, tortuous cerebral blood vessels with multiple branch occlusions, and hammer-shaped clavicles. Biochemical studies demonstrated reduced copper and ceruloplasmin levels in serum, and abnormal plasma catecholamine ratios. We reported previously the molecular defect in this family, a splice-site mutation that predicts formation of approximately 20% of the normal Menkes gene product. Here, we detail the clinical course and physical features and radiographic findings in these 4 individuals, and compare their phenotype with classical and mild Menkes and OHS. Unusual Menkes disease variants such as this may escape recognition due to anomalies that appear inconsistent with the diagnosis, particularly prolonged survival and later onset of seizures. Males with mental retardation and connective tissue abnormalities should be evaluated for biochemical evidence of defective copper transport. 28 refs., 8 figs.

  5. Exome sequencing and directed clinical phenotyping diagnose cholesterol ester storage disease presenting as autosomal recessive hypercholesterolemia

    PubMed Central

    Stitziel, Nathan O.; Fouchier, Sigrid W.; Sjouke, Barbara; Peloso, Gina M.; Moscoso, Alessa M.; Auer, Paul L.; Goel, Anuj; Gigante, Bruna; Barnes, Timothy A.; Melander, Olle; Orho-Melander, Marju; Duga, Stefano; Sivapalaratnam, Suthesh; Nikpay, Majid; Martinelli, Nicola; Girelli, Domenico; Jackson, Rebecca D.; Kooperberg, Charles; Lange, Leslie A.; Ardissino, Diego; McPherson, Ruth; Farrall, Martin; Watkins, Hugh; Reilly, Muredach P.; Rader, Daniel J.; de Faire, Ulf; Schunkert, Heribert; Erdmann, Jeanette; Samani, Nilesh J.; Charnas, Lawrence; Altshuler, David; Gabriel, Stacey; Kastelein, John J.P.; Defesche, Joep C.; Nederveen, Aart J.; Kathiresan, Sekar; Hovingh, G. Kees

    2014-01-01

    Objective Autosomal recessive hypercholesterolemia (ARH) is a rare inherited disorder characterized by extremely high total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels that has been previously linked to mutations in LDLRAP1. We identified a family with ARH not explained by mutations in LDLRAP1 or other genes known to cause monogenic hypercholesterolemia. The aim of this study was to identify the molecular etiology of ARH in this family. Approach and Results We used exome sequencing to assess all protein coding regions of the genome in three family members and identified a homozygous exon 8 splice junction mutation (c.894G>A, also known as E8SJM) in LIPA that segregated with the diagnosis of hypercholesterolemia. Since homozygosity for mutations in LIPA is known to cause cholesterol ester storage disease (CESD), we performed directed follow-up phenotyping by non-invasively measuring hepatic cholesterol content. We observed abnormal hepatic accumulation of cholesterol in the homozygote individuals, supporting the diagnosis of CESD. Given previous suggestions of cardiovascular disease risk in heterozygous LIPA mutation carriers, we genotyped E8SJM in >27,000 individuals and found no association with plasma lipid levels or risk of myocardial infarction, confirming a true recessive mode of inheritance. Conclusions By integrating observations from Mendelian and population genetics along with directed clinical phenotyping, we diagnosed clinically unapparent CESD in the affected individuals from this kindred and addressed an outstanding question regarding risk of cardiovascular disease in LIPA E8SJM heterozygous carriers. PMID:24072694

  6. X-inactivation in the clinical phenotype of fragile X premutation carrier sisters

    PubMed Central

    Robertson-Dick, Erin E.; O'Keefe, Joan A.; Hadd, Andrew G.; Zhou, Lili; Berry-Kravis, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study is to describe a case series of 4 sisters with discordant clinical phenotypes associated with fragile X–associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS) that may be explained by varying CGG repeat sizes and activation ratios (ARs) (the ratio of cells carrying the normal fragile X mental retardation 1 [FMR1] allele on the active X chromosome). Methods: Four sisters with premutation size FMR1 gene repeats underwent detailed clinical characterization. CGG repeat length was determined by PCR, and AR was determined using a newly developed commercial methylation PCR assay and was compared with the results from Southern blot with densitometric image analysis. Results: Sister 1 had the largest CGG expansion (82) and the lowest AR (12%), with the most severe clinical presentation. Sister 2 had a lower CGG expansion (70) and an AR of 10% but had a milder clinical presentation.Sister 3 had a similar CGG expansion (79) but a slightly higher AR of 15% and less neurologic involvement. Sister 4 had a similar CGG expansion size of 80 but had the largest AR (40%) and was the only sister not to be affected by FXTAS or have any neurologic signs on examination. Conclusions: These results suggest that premutation carrier women who have higher ARs may be less likely to show manifestations of FXTAS. If larger studies show similar patterns, AR data could potentially be beneficial to supplement CGG repeat size when counseling premutation carrier women in the clinic. PMID:27066582

  7. Linkage of frontotemporal dementia to chromosome 17: clinical and neuropathological characterization of phenotype.

    PubMed Central

    Yamaoka, L. H.; Welsh-Bohmer, K. A.; Hulette, C. M.; Gaskell, P. C.; Murray, M.; Rimmler, J. L.; Helms, B. R.; Guerra, M.; Roses, A. D.; Schmechel, D. E.; Pericak-Vance, M. A.

    1996-01-01

    Frontotemporal dementia is a behavioral disorder of insidious onset and variable progression. Clinically, its early features reflect frontal lobe dysfunction characterized by personality change, deterioration in memory and executive functions, and stereotypical and perseverative behaviors. Pathologically, there is degeneration of the neocortex and subcortical nuclei, without distinctive features such as plaques, neurofibrillary tangles, or Pick or Lewy bodies. Within-family variation in neuropathology and clinical phenotype is observed. In cases where family aggregation is observed, it is inherited as an autosomal dominant, age-dependent disorder. Family studies recently have identified two dementia loci: chromosome 17 for disinhibition-dementia-parkinsonism-amyotrophic complex and pallido-ponto-nigral degeneration and chromosome 3 for familial nonspecific dementia. We describe a family (DUK1684) with clinically and neuropathologically confirmed, autosomal dominant, non-Alzheimer disease dementia. Linkage analysis of this family showed evidence for linkage to chromosome 17q21, with a multipoint location score (log10) of 5.52. A comparison of the clinical and pathological features in DUK1684 with those of the other chromosome 17-linked families, together with the linkage data, suggests that these families are allelic. These studies emphasize that genetic linkage analysis remains a useful tool for differentiating disease loci in clinically complex traits. PMID:8940276

  8. The added value of using mutational profiling in addition to cytology in diagnosing aggressive pancreaticobiliary disease: review of clinical cases at a single center

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This study aimed to better understand the supporting role that mutational profiling (MP) of DNA from microdissected cytology slides and supernatant specimens may play in the diagnosis of malignancy in fine-needle aspirates (FNA) and biliary brushing specimens from patients with pancreaticobiliary masses. Methods Cytology results were examined in a total of 30 patients with associated surgical (10) or clinical (20) outcomes. MP of DNA from microdissected cytology slides and from discarded supernatant fluid was analyzed in 26 patients with atypical, negative or indeterminate cytology. Results Cytology correctly diagnosed aggressive disease in 4 patients. Cytological diagnoses for the remaining 26 were as follows: 16 negative (9 false negative), 9 atypical, 1 indeterminate. MP correctly determined aggressive disease in 1 false negative cytology case and confirmed a negative cytology diagnosis in 7 of 7 cases of non-aggressive disease. Of the 9 atypical cytology cases, MP correctly diagnosed 7 as positive and 1 as negative for aggressive disease. One specimen that was indeterminate by cytology was correctly diagnosed as non-aggressive by MP. When first line malignant (positive) cytology results were combined with positive second line MP results, 12/21 cases of aggressive disease were identified, compared to 4/21 cases identified by positive cytology alone. Conclusions When first line cytology results were uncertain (atypical), questionable (negative), or not possible (non-diagnostic/indeterminate), MP provided additional information regarding the presence of aggressive disease. When used in conjunction with first line cytology, MP increased detection of aggressive disease without compromising specificity in patients that were difficult to diagnose by cytology alone. PMID:25084836

  9. Clinically aggressive primary solid pseudopapillary tumor of the ovary in a 45-year-old woman

    PubMed Central

    Syriac, Susanna; Kesterson, Joshua; Izevbaye, Iyare; de Mesy Bentley, Karen L.; Lele, Shashikant; Mhawech-Fauceglia, Paulette

    2016-01-01

    We report the first case of primary solid pseudopapillary tumor of the ovary with aggressive behavior and fatal outcome in a 45-year-old woman. The patient presented with weight loss, decrease of appetite, and abdominal bloating for the last several weeks. Computed tomography scan revealed an ovarian mass, omental caking, complex ascites, and 2 hepatic lesions. The pancreas was unremarkable. Grossly, the ovarian mass showed severe capsular adhesion, and the cut surface was cystic and solid. On histologic examination, the tumor was composed of diffuse solid pseudopapillary and pseudocystic patterns. The neoplastic cells were uniform and round with very dispersed chromatin. The cytoplasm was faintly pink. There was mild atypia, but the mitotic rate was as high as 62 per 50 high-power field, and the Ki-67 was elevated at 20%. The tumor exhibited severe necrosis. Numerous foci of lymphovascular invasion were also seen. The tumor cells were positive for cytokeratin (focal) and for β-catenin (cytoplasmic and nuclear patterns). They were negative for chromogranin, synaptophysin, thyroglobulin, calcitonin, hepatocyte-paraffin 1, epithelial membrane antigen, calretinin, and α-inhibin. Electron microscopic study revealed nests of tumor cells with oval nuclei. The cytoplasm contained numerous pleomorphic mitochondria interspersed among short strands of rough endoplasmic reticulum. The tumor involved the fallopian tube, omentum, cul-de-sac, and abdominal wall. The pelvic washing was also positive for tumor cells. Despite chemotherapy, the patient's condition had worsened, and she died of her disease 8 months after the initial diagnosis. We discuss the differential diagnosis of this tumor and the hypothesis of its origin. PMID:21778097

  10. Clinical significance of interleukin-4 and interleukin-18 levels in aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma patients.

    PubMed

    Soydinc, H O; Guney, N; Basaran, M; Duranyildiz, D; Yasasever, V

    2016-01-01

    Strong evidence indicates that tumor growth can be actively controlled by the immune system, and interleukins (ILs) are known to play an influential role in immune response regulation. Moreover, inflammatory cytokines are significantly involved in lymphoma pathogenesis. We aimed to investigate serum levels of IL-4 and IL-18 in aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (A-NHL) patients and their relationship with prognostic parameters and therapy outcome. These serum factors were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in 46 patients with pathologically verified A-NHL before and after chemotherapy, and in 20 healthy controls. No significant difference in serum IL-4 (P = 0.11) and IL-18 (P = 0.261) levels was observed between the A-NHL and controls groups. None of the prognostic parameters analyzed significantly correlated with serum IL-4 concentration, while only lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) measurements were associated with IL-18 values. Serum IL-18 was elevated in the patients with high LDH levels compared to those exhibiting normal values (P = 0.045). In addition, no correlation was found between the concentrations of serum IL-4 and IL-18 in A-NHL patients (r = 0.188, P = 0.187). While IL-18 values did not change, serum IL-4 levels decreased following chemotherapy, independently from treatment response (P = 0.002). Our study is the first to report the response of serum IL-4 levels to chemotherapy. In conclusion, although IL-4 serum concentration has no diagnostic role, it is sensitivite to standard chemotherapy in A-NHL. However, serum IL-18 measurements have no diagnostic or prognostic role in this disease. PMID:27525895

  11. Childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus in Singapore: clinical phenotypes, disease activity, damage, and autoantibody profiles.

    PubMed

    Tan, J H T; Hoh, S F; Win, M T M; Chan, Y H; Das, L; Arkachaisri, T

    2015-08-01

    Childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus (cSLE) is a multisystem autoimmune disease characterized by immune dysregulation affecting patients less than 18 years old. One-fifth of SLE cases are diagnosed during childhood. cSLE presents differently from adults and has a more severe and aggressive course. We describe the clinical and antibody profiles in our cSLE Singapore cohort. All cSLE patients who satisfied the 1997 American College of Rheumatology diagnostic criteria were captured in our lupus registry from January 2009 to January 2014. Data including demographic, cumulative clinical, serologic data, and damage indices were collected. Adjusted mean SLEDAI-2K (AMS) was used to summarize disease activity over multiple visits. Cluster analysis using non-hierarchical K-means procedure was performed on eight selected antibodies. The 64 patients (female:male ratio 5:1; Chinese 45.3%, Malay 28.1%, Indian 9.4%, and other races 17.2%) had a mean onset age of 11.5 years (range 2.1-16.7) and mean age at diagnosis was 11.9 years (range 2.6-18.0). Our study demonstrated differences in clinical manifestations for which hematologic involvement was the most common manifestation with less renal disease and uncommon neurologic manifestation as compared to other cSLE cohorts reported in our region. Antibody clusters were identified in our cohort but their clinical association/discrimination and outcome prediction required further validation study. Outcomes of our cohort in regard to disease activity after therapy and organ damages were comparable if not better to other cSLE cohorts elsewhere. Steroid-related damage, including symptomatic multifocal avascular necrosis and cataract, were not uncommon locally. Infection remains the major cause of death for the continent. Nevertheless, the five year survival rate of our cohort (98.4%) was high.

  12. Evaluation of the Mayo Clinic Phenotype-Based Genotype Predictor Score in Patients with Clinically Diagnosed Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Sinead L; Anderson, Jason H; Kapplinger, Jamie D; Kruisselbrink, Teresa M; Gersh, Bernard J; Ommen, Steve R; Ackerman, Michael J; Bos, J Martijn

    2016-04-01

    Genetic testing for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) can provide an important clinical marker for disease outcome and family screening. This study set out to validate our recently developed phenotype-based HCM genotype predictor score. Patients clinically diagnosed with HCM and evaluated by genetic counselors comprised the study cohort. Genotype score was derived based on clinical and echocardiographic variables. Total score was correlated with the yield of genetic testing. Of 564 HCM patients, 198 sought genetic testing (35 %; 55 % male; mean age at diagnosis, 50 ± 20 years). Of these, 101 patients (51 %) were genotype positive for a HCM-associated genetic mutation (55 % male; mean age at diagnosis, 42 ± 18 years). Cochran-Armitage analysis showed similar, statistically significant trends of increased yields for higher genotype scores for both the original and study cohort. Validated by the current study, this scoring system provides an easy-to-use, clinical tool to aid in determining the likelihood of a positive HCM genetic test. PMID:26914223

  13. Evaluation of the Mayo Clinic Phenotype-Based Genotype Predictor Score in Patients with Clinically Diagnosed Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Sinead L.; Anderson, Jason H.; Kapplinger, Jamie D.; Kruisselbrink, Teresa M.; Gersh, Bernard J.; Ommen, Steve R.; Ackerman, Michael J.; Bos, J. Martijn

    2016-01-01

    Genetic testing for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) can provide an important clinical marker for disease outcome and family screening. This study set out to validate our recently developed phenotype-based HCM genotype predictor score. Patients clinically diagnosed with HCM and evaluated by genetic counselors comprised the study cohort. Genotype score was derived based on clinical and echocardio-graphic variables. Total score was correlated with the yield of genetic testing. Of 564 HCM patients, 198 sought genetic testing (35 %; 55 % male; mean age at diagnosis, 50 ±20 years). Of these, 101 patients (51 %) were genotype positive for a HCM-associated genetic mutation (55 % male; mean age at diagnosis, 42 ± 18 years). Cochran-Armitage analysis showed similar, statistically significant trends of increased yields for higher genotype scores for both the original and study cohort. Validated by the current study, this scoring system provides an easy-to-use, clinical tool to aid in determining the likelihood of a positive HCM genetic test. PMID:26914223

  14. The heterogeneity of meningioma revealed by multiparameter analysis: infiltrative and non-infiltrative clinical phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Gay, Emmanuel; Lages, Elodie; Ramus, Claire; Guttin, Audrey; El Atifi, Michèle; Dupré, Isabelle; Bouamrani, Ali; Salon, Caroline; Ratel, David; Wion, Didier; Berger, François; Issartel, Jean-Paul

    2011-05-01

    Tumor invasion or infiltration of adjacent tissues is the source of clinical challenges in diagnosis as well as prevention and treatment. Among brain tumors, infiltration of the adjacent tissues with diverse pleiotropic mechanisms is frequently encountered in benign meningiomas. We assessed whether a multiparametric analysis of meningiomas based on data from both clinical observations and molecular analyses could provide a consistent and accurate appraisal of invasive and infiltrative phenotypes and help determine the diagnosis of these tumors. Tissue analyses of 37 meningiomas combined enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (SELDI-TOF) assays of two different protein biomarkers (thrombospondin 1 and a phosphorylated form of vimentin) as well as gene expression analyses with oligonucleotide micro-arrays. Up to four different clinical and molecular parameters were then examined for tumor classification. From this study, we were able to cluster 36 out of the 37 tumors into two different subsets corresponding to infiltrative/invasive and non-infiltrative tumors. In addition, meningiomas that invade brain and those that infiltrate the neighboring skull bone exhibited no distinguishable molecular features. Our multi-parameter analysis that combines clinical data, transcriptomic and molecular assays clearly reveals the heterogeneity of meningiomas and distinguishes the intrinsically infiltrative/invasive tumors from the non-infiltrative meningiomas. PMID:21318223

  15. Phenotypic and Genotypic Characterization of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Clinical Isolates from Northern Colombia, South America

    PubMed Central

    Guerra, Julio A.; Romero-Herazo, Yesenia C.; Arzuza, Octavio; Gómez-Duarte, Oscar G.

    2014-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) are major causes of childhood diarrhea in low and middle income countries including Colombia, South America. To understand the diversity of ETEC strains in the region, clinical isolates obtained from northern Colombia children were evaluated for multiple locus sequencing typing, serotyping, classical and nonclassical virulence genes, and antibiotic susceptibility. Among 40 ETEC clinical isolates evaluated, 21 (52.5%) were positive for LT gene, 13 (32.5%) for ST gene, and 6 (15%) for both ST and LT. The most prevalent colonization surface antigens (CS) were CS21 and CFA/I identified in 21 (50%) and 13 (32.5%) isolates, respectively. The eatA, irp2, and fyuA were the most common nonclassical virulence genes present in more than 60% of the isolates. Ampicillin resistance (80% of the strains) was the most frequent phenotype among ETEC strains followed by trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole resistance (52.5%). Based on multiple locus sequencing typing (MLST), we recognize that 6 clonal groups of ETEC clinical isolates circulate in Colombia. ETEC clinical isolates from children in northern Colombia are highly diverse, yet some isolates circulating in the community belong to well-defined clonal groups that share a unique set of virulence factors, serotypes, and MLST sequence types. PMID:24877071

  16. Phenotypic and genotypic characterization of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli clinical isolates from northern Colombia, South America.

    PubMed

    Guerra, Julio A; Romero-Herazo, Yesenia C; Arzuza, Octavio; Gómez-Duarte, Oscar G

    2014-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) are major causes of childhood diarrhea in low and middle income countries including Colombia, South America. To understand the diversity of ETEC strains in the region, clinical isolates obtained from northern Colombia children were evaluated for multiple locus sequencing typing, serotyping, classical and nonclassical virulence genes, and antibiotic susceptibility. Among 40 ETEC clinical isolates evaluated, 21 (52.5%) were positive for LT gene, 13 (32.5%) for ST gene, and 6 (15%) for both ST and LT. The most prevalent colonization surface antigens (CS) were CS21 and CFA/I identified in 21 (50%) and 13 (32.5%) isolates, respectively. The eatA, irp2, and fyuA were the most common nonclassical virulence genes present in more than 60% of the isolates. Ampicillin resistance (80% of the strains) was the most frequent phenotype among ETEC strains followed by trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole resistance (52.5%). Based on multiple locus sequencing typing (MLST), we recognize that 6 clonal groups of ETEC clinical isolates circulate in Colombia. ETEC clinical isolates from children in northern Colombia are highly diverse, yet some isolates circulating in the community belong to well-defined clonal groups that share a unique set of virulence factors, serotypes, and MLST sequence types. PMID:24877071

  17. Phenotypic and genotypic characterization of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli clinical isolates from northern Colombia, South America.

    PubMed

    Guerra, Julio A; Romero-Herazo, Yesenia C; Arzuza, Octavio; Gómez-Duarte, Oscar G

    2014-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) are major causes of childhood diarrhea in low and middle income countries including Colombia, South America. To understand the diversity of ETEC strains in the region, clinical isolates obtained from northern Colombia children were evaluated for multiple locus sequencing typing, serotyping, classical and nonclassical virulence genes, and antibiotic susceptibility. Among 40 ETEC clinical isolates evaluated, 21 (52.5%) were positive for LT gene, 13 (32.5%) for ST gene, and 6 (15%) for both ST and LT. The most prevalent colonization surface antigens (CS) were CS21 and CFA/I identified in 21 (50%) and 13 (32.5%) isolates, respectively. The eatA, irp2, and fyuA were the most common nonclassical virulence genes present in more than 60% of the isolates. Ampicillin resistance (80% of the strains) was the most frequent phenotype among ETEC strains followed by trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole resistance (52.5%). Based on multiple locus sequencing typing (MLST), we recognize that 6 clonal groups of ETEC clinical isolates circulate in Colombia. ETEC clinical isolates from children in northern Colombia are highly diverse, yet some isolates circulating in the community belong to well-defined clonal groups that share a unique set of virulence factors, serotypes, and MLST sequence types.

  18. Is aggressive gap arthroplasty essential in the management of temporomandibular joint ankylosis?-a prospective clinical study of 15 cases.

    PubMed

    Babu, Lokesh; Jain, Manoj Kumar; Ramesh, C; Vinayaka, N

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this three-year, prospective, follow-up study was to evaluate whether aggressive gap arthroplasty is essential in the management of ankylosis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Fifteen patients were treated by the creation of a minimal gap of 5-8mm and insertion of an interpositional gap arthroplasty using the temporalis fascia. Eleven patients had unilateral coronoidectomy and 4 bilateral coronoidectomy based on Kaban's protocol. Preoperative assessment included recording of history, clinical and radiological examinations, personal variables, the aetiology of the ankylosis, the side affected, and any other relevant findings. Patients were assessed postoperatively by a surgeon unaware of the treatment given for a minimum of 3 years, which included measurement of the maximal incisal opening, presence of facial nerve paralysis, recurrence, and any other relevant findings. Of the 15 patients (17 joints), 12 had unilateral and three had bilateral involvement, with trauma being the most common cause. The patients were aged between 7 and 29 years (mean (SD) age 20 (8) years). Preoperative maximal incisal opening was 0-2mm in 8 cases and 2-9mm in 9. Postoperatively adequate mouth opening of 30-40mm was achieved in all cases, with no recurrence or relevant malocclusion during 3-year follow up. However, patients will be followed up for 10 years. Aggressive gap arthroplasty is not essential in the management of ankylosis of the TMJ. Minimal gap interpositional arthroplasty with complete removal of the mediolateral ankylotic mass is a feasible and effective method of preventing recurrence. PMID:23219020

  19. Diverse clinical phenotypes associated with a nonsense mutation in FAM161A

    PubMed Central

    Rose, A M; Sergouniotis, P; Alfano, G; Muspratt-Tucker, N; Barton, S; Moore, A T; Black, G; Bhattacharya, S S; Webster, A R

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Mutations in the FAM161A gene have been reported in association with autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (arRP) in several ethnic populations. This study aimed to assess the prevalence of FAM161A-related retinopathy in a British cohort and to characterise the phenotype associated with mutations in this gene. Methods: The FAM161A coding region and intron–exon boundaries were screened by Sanger sequencing in 120 retinitis pigmentosa (RP) patients (with likely autosomal recessive inheritance) in whom mutations in other known major RP genes have been ruled out by commercially available testing. Homozygosity mapping was performed in one consanguineous family, and high-throughput sequencing of candidate genes was performed to identify disease-associated changes. Clinical assessment of affected individuals included perimetry testing, fundus autofluorescence imaging, and optical coherence tomography. Results: Two patients of British origin with a homozygous mutation in FAM161A (c.1309A>T, p.Arg437*) were identified by Sanger sequencing. Homozygosity mapping and subsequent high-throughput sequencing analysis identified a further family of Pakistani origin with the same genotype. Clinical examination of affected members of these families revealed that this mutation was associated with a diverse clinical phenotype, ranging from mild disease with preservation of central acuity to severe visual impairment. Conclusions: Homozygosity for the c.1309A>T, p.Arg437* variant in FAM161A is a relatively common cause of arRP. The mutation occurs in diverse ethnic populations, associated with typical retinitis pigmentosa with disease onset usually in the second or third decade of life. PMID:26113502

  20. Chediak-Higashi syndrome: description of two novel homozygous missense mutations causing divergent clinical phenotype.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Guiu, Isabel; Antón, Ana I; García-Barberá, Nuria; Navarro-Fernández, José; Martínez, Constantino; Fuster, Jose L; Couselo, Jose M; Ortuño, Francisco J; Vicente, Vicente; Rivera, Jose; Lozano, Maria L

    2014-01-01

    Chediak-Higashi syndrome (CHS) is a rare autosomal recessive disease resulting from mutations in the LYST/CHS1 gene, which encodes for a 429 kDa protein, CHS1/LYST, that regulates vesicle trafficking and determines the size of lysosomes and other organelles. To date, 60 different mutations have been characterized, and a reasonably straightforward phenotype-genotype correlation has been suggested. We describe two patients on opposite ends of the CHS clinical spectrum with novel missense mutations. We characterized these patients in terms of their mutations, protein localization and expression, mRNA stability, and electrostatic potential. Patient 1 is the first report of a severe early-onset CHS with a homozygous missense mutation (c.11362 G>A, p.G3725R) in the LYST/CHS1 gene. This molecular change results in a reduction at the CHS1 protein level, not due to an mRNA effect, but maybe a consequence of both, a change in the structure of the protein and most likely attributable to the remarkable serious perturbation in the electrostatic potential. Patient 2, who exhibited the adolescence form of the disease, was found to be homozygous for a novel missense mutation c.961 T>C, p.C258R, which seemed to have minor effect on the structure of the CHS1/LYST protein. Reexamining accepted premises of missense mutant alleles being reported among patients with clinically mild forms of the disorder should be carried out, and attempts to link genotype and clinical phenotype require identifying the actual molecular effect of the mutation. Early and accurate diagnosis of the severity of the disease is extremely important to early differentiate patients who would benefit from premature enrollment into a transplantation protocol.

  1. The Diversity of the Clinical Phenotypes in Patients With Fibrodysplasia Ossificans Progressiva

    PubMed Central

    Al Kaissi, Ali; Kenis, Vladimir; Ben Ghachem, Maher; Hofstaetter, Jochen; Grill, Franz; Ganger, Rudolf; Kircher, Susanne Gerit

    2016-01-01

    Background The clinical presentation, phenotypic characterization and natural history of fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva (FOP) are diverse and the natural history of the disease is, to a certain extent, different from one patient to another. Methods In a series of 11 patients (eight girls and three boys, aged 0 - 16 years), variable clinical presentations were the landmarks of these patients. At birth, all of our patients manifested short great toes in a valgus position. Marfan syndrome was the suggested diagnosis in three children aged 3 - 8 years and in two pre-adult patients. Clinical symptoms were torticollis, painful spine, and painful and marked limitation of the pelvic movements. Monophalangia associated with Marfanoid habitus was also a prevailing clinical presentation. Results Our results were based upon the appearance of the earliest pathologic feature of FOP in correlation with the clinical presentation. In infants (0 - 1 year), three infants showed congenital hallux valgus and stiff spine. In the pediatric group (3 - 8 years), all children showed no mutation in the fibrillin-1 (FBN1) gene. Their prime presentation was a progressive torticollis with simultaneous development of erythematous subfascial nodules, most commonly located on the posterior neck and back. In pre-adult group (10 - 16 years), four patients presented with monophalangia associated with painful movements because of the progressive heterotopic ossification of the spine and the weight bearing zones and marked elevation of alkaline phosphatase. Genetic confirmation has been performed in six patients who manifested the classical mutation of the ACVR1 gene. The rest of the patients were assessed via clinical and radiographic phenotypes. Conclusion The early recognition of FOP can be performed by noticing the short halluces and thumbs at early infancy and later on the high alkaline phosphatase activity in areas of heterotopic ossification. Misconception of FOP is of common practice and

  2. Clinical and radiographic evaluation of intra-bony defects in localized aggressive periodontitis patients with platelet rich plasma/hydroxyapatite graft: A comparative controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Geeti

    2014-01-01

    Background: Aggressive periodontitis is a characterized by rapid attachment loss, bone destruction and familial aggregation. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has been proposed to promote regeneration of the lost periodontal tissues. The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the efficacy of PRP combined with hydroxyapatite (HA) graft in the treatment of intra-bony defects in localized aggressive periodontitis (L-AgP) patients. Materials and Methods: Ten L-AgP patients having bilateral intra-bony defect ≥2 mm and probing depth (PD) ≥6 mm were randomly treated either with the PRP/HA graft or HA graft alone. The clinical (plaque control record, bleeding on probing index, PD, and relative attachment level [RAL]), and radiographic parameters (size of the bone defect) were recorded pre- and post-operatively at 3, 6, and 12 months. Results: After 12 months, for both maxillary and mandibular arches, the mean PD decrease was significantly more (P < 0.05) for the test group than the control group (3.2 mm vs. 1.9 mm and 3.6 mm vs. 1.9 mm, respectively). Furthermore, the mean RAL decrease in both maxillary and mandibular arches was significantly more (P < 0.05) for the test group than the control group (3.0 mm vs. 1.2 mm and 3.1 mm vs. 1.4 mm, respectively). Radiographically, the test group showed significantly more defect fill as compared with the control group. Conclusion: Both treatments provided significant improvements in clinical and radiographic parameters in a 12-month postoperative period. PRP/HA group presented superior results regarding PD reduction, clinical attachment gain and radiographic bone fill than HA group. PMID:25395757

  3. Dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans, a rare but locally aggressive tumor on finger: clinical and aeromedical considerations

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Kwo-Tsao; Lee, Shih-Yu; Chu, Hsin

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans (DFSP) is a rare, slow growing, locally infiltrative tumor of intermediate malignancy. It is mostly found on the trunk and head, rarely on hands. The course of evaluation and treatment of a young pilot with DFSP on left middle finger is reported. The clinical issues and aeromedical considerations of this rare tumor is discussed. PMID:27252960

  4. Clinical Phenotype Predicts Early Staged Bilateral Deep Brain Stimulation in Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Victor W.; Watts, Ray L.; Schrandt, Christian J.; Guthrie, Stephanie; Wang, Deli; Amara, Amy W.; Guthrie, Barton L.; Walker, Harrison C.

    2014-01-01

    Object While many centers place bilateral DBS systems simultaneously, unilateral STN DBS followed by a staged contralateral procedure has emerged as a treatment option for many patients. However little is known about whether the preoperative phenotype predicts when staged placement of a DBS electrode in the opposite subthalamic nucleus will be required. We aimed to determine whether preoperative clinical phenotype predicts early staged placement of a second subthalamic deep brain stimulation (DBS) electrode in patients who undergo unilateral subthalamic DBS for Parkinson's disease (PD). Methods Eighty-two consecutive patients with advanced PD underwent unilateral subthalamic DBS contralateral to the most affected hemibody and had at least 2 years of follow-up. Multivariate logistic regression determined preoperative characteristics that predicted staged placement of a second electrode in the opposite subthalamic nucleus. Preoperative measurements included aspects of the Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS), motor asymmetry index, and body weight. Results At 2 years follow-up, 28 of the 82 patients (34%) had undergone staged placement of a contralateral electrode while the remainder chose to continue with unilateral stimulation. Statistically significant improvements in UPDRS total and part 3 scores were retained at the end of the 2 year follow-up period in both subsets of patients. Multivariate logistic regression showed that the most important predictors for early staged placement of a second subthalamic stimulator were low asymmetry index (odds ratio 13.4; 95% confidence interval 2.8, 64.9), high tremor subscore (OR 7.2; CI 1.5, 35.0), and low body weight (OR 5.5; CI 1.4, 22.3). Conclusions This single center study provides evidence that elements of the preoperative PD phenotype predict whether patients will require early staged bilateral subthalamic DBS. These data may aid in the management of patients with advanced PD who undergo subthalamic DBS. PMID

  5. Assessing sub-clinical psychosis phenotypes in the general population--a multidimensional approach.

    PubMed

    Rössler, Wulf; Ajdacic-Gross, Vladeta; Müller, Mario; Rodgers, Stephanie; Haker, Helene; Hengartner, Michael P

    2015-02-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that expression of a psychosis phenotype can be observed below the threshold of its clinical detection. To date, however, no conceptual certainty has been reported for the validity and reliability of sub-clinical psychosis. Our main objectives were to assess the prevalence rates and severity of various psychosis symptoms in a representative community sample. Furthermore, we wanted to analyze which latent factors are depicted by several currently used psychosis questionnaires. We also examined how those latent factors for sub-clinical psychosis are linked to psychosocial factors, normal personality traits, and coping abilities related to chronic stress. Most of the eight subscales from the Paranoia Checklist and the Structured Interview for Assessing Perceptual Anomalies had a very similar type of distribution, i.e., an inverse Gaussian (Wald) distribution. This supported the notion of a continuity of psychotic symptoms, which we would expect to find for continuously distributed symptoms within the general population. Sub-clinical psychosis can be reduced to two different factors - one representing odd beliefs about the world and odd behavior, and the other one representing anomalous perceptions (such as hallucinations). Persons with odd beliefs and behavior are under greater burden and more susceptible to psychosocial risks than are persons with anomalous perceptions. These sub-clinical psychosis syndromes are also related to stable personality traits. In conclusion, we obtained strong support for the notion that there is no natural cut-off separating psychotic illness from good health. Sub-clinical psychosis of any kind is not trivial because it is associated with various types of social disability. PMID:25523751

  6. Clinical value of digital image analysis in the diagnosis of urinary bladder cancer, particularly in aggressive tumors: a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Borkowski, T; Monika Dulewicz, A; Borkowski, A; Piętka, D; Radziszewski, P

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the project was to evaluate the clinical value of a computer analysis of cytological specimen images obtained from urine and bladder washing samples. Three sample types (voided urine, catheterized urine and bladder washing) from 59 patients with primary or recurrent tumor were analyzed. All patients underwent cystoscopy and biopsy or resection. The histological results were compared with the results of the image analyzing computer system of collected urine samples. The consistency between the computer diagnosis and the clinical or histological diagnosis both in the presence and absence of cancer was as follows: 77% for voided urine samples, 72.5% for catheterized urine samples and 78% for bladder washing samples. The specificity of the method at the standard pathology level was 71%, and the sensitivity was 83%. The positive and negative predictive values (PPV and NPV) were 87.5% and 63% respectively. The sensitivity for G3 or CIS or T2 or T3 tumors reached nearly 100%. Computer analysis of urine provided correct diagnoses in cancer and control patients with the sensitivity of 83% and specificity of 71% and gave excellent results in aggressive tumors such as T2, T3, G3 and in CIS. PMID:27543866

  7. Telomere length in non-neoplastic colonic mucosa in ulcerative colitis (UC) and its relationship to the severe clinical phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Tahara, Tomomitsu; Shibata, Tomoyuki; Okubo, Masaaki; Kawamura, Tomohiko; Sumi, Kazuya; Ishizuka, Takamitsu; Nakamura, Masakatsu; Nagasaka, Mitsuo; Nakagawa, Yoshihito; Ohmiya, Naoki; Arisawa, Tomiyasu; Hirata, Ichiro

    2015-08-01

    Telomere shortening occurs with human aging in many organs and tissues and is accelerated by rapid cell turnover and oxidative injury. To clarify the clinical importance of telomere shortening in colonic mucosa in ulcerative colitis (UC), we measured average telomere length using quantitative real-time PCR in non-neoplastic colonic mucosa in UC patients and assessed its relationship to various clinical subtypes. Relative telomere length in genomic DNA was measured in colonic biopsies obtained from rectal inflammatory mucosa from 86 UC patients as well as paired non-inflammatory proximal colonic mucosae from 10 patients. Data were correlated with various clinical phenotypes. In paired samples, average relative telomere length of rectal inflammatory mucosa was shortened compared to normal appearing proximal colon in eight out of ten cases (p = 0.01). Telomere length shortening was significantly associated with more severe Mayo endoscopic subscore (p < 0.0001) and cases needing surgery due to toxic megacolon or cancer occurrence (p = 0.043). When the severe clinical phenotype was defined as having at least one of following phenotypes, more than two times of hospitalization, highest Mayo endoscopic subscore, steroid dependent, refractory, or needing operation, average relative telomere length was significantly shortened in the same phenotypes than the others (p = 0.003). Telomere shortening is associated with more severe clinical phenotypes of UC, reflecting severe inflammatory state in the colonic mucosa.

  8. System analysis of gene mutations and clinical phenotype in Chinese patients with autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Meiling; Xie, Yuansheng; Chen, Zhiqiang; Liao, Yujie; Li, Zuoxiang; Hu, Panpan; Qi, Yan; Yin, Zhiwei; Li, Qinggang; Fu, Ping; Chen, Xiangmei

    2016-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most common inherited kidney disorder mainly caused by mutation in PKD1/PKD2. However, ethnic differences in mutations, the association between mutation genotype/clinical phenotype, and the clinical applicable value of mutation detection are poorly understood. We made systematically analysis of Chinese ADPKD patients based on a next-generation sequencing platform. Among 148 ADPKD patients enrolled, 108 mutations were detected in 127 patients (85.8%). Compared with mutations in Caucasian published previously, the PKD2 mutation detection rate was lower, and patients carrying the PKD2 mutation invariably carried the PKD1 mutation. The definite pathogenic mutation detection rate was lower, whereas the multiple mutations detection rate was higher in Chinese patients. Then, we correlated PKD1/PKD2 mutation data and clinical data: patients with mutation exhibited a more severe phenotype; patients with >1 mutations exhibited a more severe phenotype; patients with pathogenic mutations exhibited a more severe phenotype. Thus, the PKD1/PKD2 mutation status differed by ethnicity, and the PKD1/PKD2 genotype may affect the clinical phenotype of ADPKD. Furthermore, it makes sense to detect PKD1/PKD2 mutation status for early diagnosis and prognosis, perhaps as early as the embryo/zygote stage, to facilitate early clinical intervention and family planning. PMID:27782177

  9. The clinical significance of anti-H in an individual with the Oh (Bombay) phenotype.

    PubMed

    Davey, R J; Tourault, M A; Holland, P V

    1978-01-01

    To evaluate the clinical significance of anti-H present in individuals with the Oh (Bombay) phenotype, red blood cell 51chromium survival studies and related serological tests were undertaken in an Oh (Bombay) individual. A small sample of group O donor red blood cells was labeled with 51chromium and infused into the patient. The T 1/2 of the infused cells was six minutes, with two percent of the cells surviving at 24 hours. A similar study using the patient's own labeled red blood cells demonstrated 100 per cent survival at 24 hours. Initial laboratory studies indicated that the anti-H was active in saline at 4, 22 and 37 C and by the indirect antiglobulin test. Analysis of the antibody in both preand posttransfusion specimens showed it to have both IgM and IgG components. The anti-H titer at 37 C rose from 1:4 prior to the infusion of the O cells to 1:32 one week postinfusion, and a partial hemolysin appeared. Saliva inhibition studies demonstrated that the antibody was neutralizable prior to the group O exposure but was not neutralizable one week post exposure. We conclude that the anti-H present in this individual rapidly destroyed infused group O red blood cells. Individuals with the Oh (Bombay) phenotype should be transfused only with Oh (Bombay) blood.

  10. Distinct Clinical Phenotypes Associated with a Mutation in the Mitochondrial Translation Elongation Factor EFTs

    PubMed Central

    Smeitink, Jan A. M.; Elpeleg, Orly; Antonicka, Hana; Diepstra, Heleen; Saada, Ann; Smits, Paulien; Sasarman, Florin; Vriend, Gert; Jacob-Hirsch, Jasmine; Shaag, Avraham; Rechavi, Gideon; Welling, Brigitte; Horst, Jürgen; Rodenburg, Richard J.; van den Heuvel, Bert; Shoubridge, Eric A.

    2006-01-01

    The 13 polypeptides encoded in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) are synthesized in the mitochondrial matrix on a dedicated protein-translation apparatus that resembles that found in prokaryotes. Here, we have investigated the genetic basis for a mitochondrial protein-synthesis defect associated with a combined oxidative phosphorylation enzyme deficiency in two patients, one of whom presented with encephalomyopathy and the other with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Sequencing of candidate genes revealed the same homozygous mutation (C997T) in both patients in TSFM, a gene coding for the mitochondrial translation elongation factor EFTs. EFTs functions as a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for EFTu, another translation elongation factor that brings aminoacylated transfer RNAs to the ribosomal A site as a ternary complex with guanosine triphosphate. The mutation predicts an Arg333Trp substitution at an evolutionarily conserved site in a subdomain of EFTs that interacts with EFTu. Molecular modeling showed that the substitution disrupts local subdomain structure and the dimerization interface. The steady-state levels of EFTs and EFTu in patient fibroblasts were reduced by 75% and 60%, respectively, and the amounts of assembled complexes I, IV, and V were reduced by 35%–91% compared with the amounts in controls. These phenotypes and the translation defect were rescued by retroviral expression of either EFTs or EFTu. These data clearly establish mutant EFTs as the cause of disease in these patients. The fact that the same mutation is associated with distinct clinical phenotypes suggests the presence of genetic modifiers of the mitochondrial translation apparatus. PMID:17033963

  11. Comparative study of biliary trace elements and clinical phenotypes in Wilson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Ming-Shan; Fan, Yu-Xin; Yang, Ren-Min; Han, Yong-Zhu; Wu, Guo-Jun; Xin, Yu-Rong; Yu, Long

    1997-01-01

    AIM: To further explore the etiological mechanism of Wilson’s disease (WD) by comparing the changes of biliary trace elements and its clinical phenotype. METHODS: WD patients with different types and conditions (n = 20), non-WD patients with chronic liver damage (n = 22), and healthy volunteers (n = 10; used as controls) were studied. Biliary samples were taken by duodenal drainage. Atom absorption spectrophotometer was used to assay the copper and zinc content of each sample. RESULTS: In WD, the copper content and copper/zinc ratio of biliary juice were evidently lower than those of non-WD patients with chronic liver damage and of healthy controls (F = 14.76, 25.4; 14.92, 26.2 respectively; P < 0.01), while the biliary zinc level had no significant difference from the two non-WD control groups (P > 0.05). There were significant differences in biliary copper excretion among patients with different types and conditions (F = 3.75, P < 0.05; F = 6.20, P < 0.01). CONCLUSION: Copper excretion by liver and the biliary system decreases obviously in WD, which plays a key role in the phenotypic copper retention, and the biliary copper retention is closely related with the severity of hepatic injury and illness. PMID:27053888

  12. Discordant Clinical Phenotype and Sterol Biochemistry in Smith-Lemli-Opitz Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Grace; Conley, Sandra K.; Wassif, Christopher A.; Porter, Forbes D.

    2011-01-01

    Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome (SLOS) is a multiple malformation syndrome resulting from mutations of the 7-dehydrocholesterol reductase gene (DHCR7). During de novo cholesterol biosynthesis, DHCR7 catalyzes the conversion of 7-dehydrocholesterol (7DHC) to cholesterol. A clinical diagnosis of SLOS is confirmed biochemically by the presence of elevated levels of 7-dehydrocholesterol. Phenotypic severity of SLOS has previously been shown to correlate with the 7DHC/cholesterol ratio. In this case report, we describe a patient with a severe SLOS phenotype, but a very low serum 7DHC/cholesterol ratio. We further demonstrate that this discordance is due to alternative splicing of a previously unreported IVS5+3 A>T mutation. This mutation results in the transcription of both normal and mutant mRNA transcripts. We postulate that alternative splicing of the IVS5+3 A>T results in insufficient DHCR7 activity during embryogenesis, but sufficient DHCR7 activity once cholesterol synthetic rates decrease postnatally. This case is a unique observation that underscores the adjunctive use of fibroblast and molecular testing in ambiguous cases of SLOS and may provide insight into the potential efficacy of therapeutic interventions altering postnatal cholesterol biosynthesis. PMID:20635399

  13. Selective participation of c-Jun with Fra-2/c-Fos promotes aggressive tumor phenotypes and poor prognosis in tongue cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Shilpi; Kumar, Prabhat; Kaur, Harsimrut; Sharma, Nishi; Saluja, Daman; Bharti, Alok C.; Das, Bhudev C.

    2015-01-01

    Tongue squamous cell carcinoma (TSCC) is most aggressive head and neck cancer often associated with HR-HPV infection. The role of AP-1 which is an essential regulator of HPV oncogene expression and tumorigenesis is not reported in tongue cancer. One hundred tongue tissue biopsies comprising precancer, cancer and adjacent controls including two tongue cancer cell lines were employed to study the role of HPV infection and AP-1 family proteins. An exclusive prevalence (28%) of HR-HPV type 16 was observed mainly in well differentiated tongue carcinomas (78.5%). A higher expression and DNA binding activity of AP-1 was observed in tongue tumors and cancer cell lines with c-Fos and Fra-2 as the major binding partners forming the functional AP-1 complex but c-Jun participated only in HPV negative and poorly differentiated carcinoma. Knocking down of Fra-2 responsible for aggressive tongue tumorigenesis led to significant reduction in c-Fos, c-Jun, MMP-9 and HPVE6/E7 expression but Fra-1 and p53 were upregulated. The binding and expression of c-Fos/Fra-2 increased as a function of severity of tongue lesions, yet selective participation of c-Jun appears to promote poor differentiation and aggressive tumorigenesis only in HPV negative cases while HPV infection leads to well differentiation and better prognosis preferably in nonsmokers. PMID:26581505

  14. Hereditary rickets. How genetic alterations explain the biochemical and clinical phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulou, Anna; Gole, Evaggelia; Nicolaidou, Polyxeni

    2013-12-01

    The reemergence of vitamin D deficiency in the industrialized countries resurrects the "threat" of nutritional rickets, especially among pediatric populations, a fact that may lead to underdiagnosis of hereditary rickets. Today, hereditary rickets may be subdivided into two main groups according to their biochemical profile: the one associated with defects in vitamin D synthesis and action and the second associated with abnormal phosphorus metabolism. The classification of the patients in a particular group of hereditary rickets is determinative of the treatment to follow. This review, through the recent advances on vitamin D and P metabolism, discusses the molecular and biochemical defects associated to each group of inherited rickets, as well as the clinical phenotypes and the recommended therapeutic approaches.

  15. Prediction of clinical phenotypes in invasive breast carcinomas from the integration of radiomics and genomics data

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Wentian; Li, Hui; Zhu, Yitan; Lan, Li; Yang, Shengjie; Drukker, Karen; Morris, Elizabeth; Burnside, Elizabeth; Whitman, Gary; Giger, Maryellen L.; Ji, Yuan; TCGA Breast Phenotype Research Group

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Genomic and radiomic imaging profiles of invasive breast carcinomas from The Cancer Genome Atlas and The Cancer Imaging Archive were integrated and a comprehensive analysis was conducted to predict clinical outcomes using the radiogenomic features. Variable selection via LASSO and logistic regression were used to select the most-predictive radiogenomic features for the clinical phenotypes, including pathological stage, lymph node metastasis, and status of estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2). Cross-validation with receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed and the area under the ROC curve (AUC) was employed as the prediction metric. Higher AUCs were obtained in the prediction of pathological stage, ER, and PR status than for lymph node metastasis and HER2 status. Overall, the prediction performances by genomics alone, radiomics alone, and combined radiogenomics features showed statistically significant correlations with clinical outcomes; however, improvement on the prediction performance by combining genomics and radiomics data was not found to be statistically significant, most likely due to the small sample size of 91 cancer cases with 38 radiomic features and 144 genomic features. PMID:26835491

  16. Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical and environmental isolates constitute a single population with high phenotypic diversity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen with a high incidence of hospital infections that represents a threat to immune compromised patients. Genomic studies have shown that, in contrast to other pathogenic bacteria, clinical and environmental isolates do not show particular genomic differences. In addition, genetic variability of all the P. aeruginosa strains whose genomes have been sequenced is extremely low. This low genomic variability might be explained if clinical strains constitute a subpopulation of this bacterial species present in environments that are close to human populations, which preferentially produce virulence associated traits. Results In this work, we sequenced the genomes and performed phenotypic descriptions for four non-human P. aeruginosa isolates collected from a plant, the ocean, a water-spring, and from dolphin stomach. We show that the four strains are phenotypically diverse and that this is not reflected in genomic variability, since their genomes are almost identical. Furthermore, we performed a detailed comparative genomic analysis of the four strains studied in this work with the thirteen previously reported P. aeruginosa genomes by means of describing their core and pan-genomes. Conclusions Contrary to what has been described for other bacteria we have found that the P. aeruginosa core genome is constituted by a high proportion of genes and that its pan-genome is thus relatively small. Considering the high degree of genomic conservation between isolates of P. aeruginosa from diverse environments, including human tissues, some implications for the treatment of infections are discussed. This work also represents a methodological contribution for the genomic study of P. aeruginosa, since we provide a database of the comparison of all the proteins encoded by the seventeen strains analyzed. PMID:24773920

  17. Atrophy patterns in early clinical stages across distinct phenotypes of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Ossenkoppele, Rik; Cohn-Sheehy, Brendan I; La Joie, Renaud; Vogel, Jacob W; Möller, Christiane; Lehmann, Manja; van Berckel, Bart N M; Seeley, William W; Pijnenburg, Yolande A; Gorno-Tempini, Maria L; Kramer, Joel H; Barkhof, Frederik; Rosen, Howard J; van der Flier, Wiesje M; Jagust, William J; Miller, Bruce L; Scheltens, Philip; Rabinovici, Gil D

    2015-11-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) can present with distinct clinical variants. Identifying the earliest neurodegenerative changes associated with each variant has implications for early diagnosis, and for understanding the mechanisms that underlie regional vulnerability and disease progression in AD. We performed voxel-based morphometry to detect atrophy patterns in early clinical stages of four AD phenotypes: Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA, "visual variant," n=93), logopenic variant primary progressive aphasia (lvPPA, "language variant," n=74), and memory-predominant AD categorized as early age-of-onset (EOAD, <65 years, n=114) and late age-of-onset (LOAD, >65 years, n=114). Patients with each syndrome were stratified based on: (1) degree of functional impairment, as measured by the clinical dementia rating (CDR) scale, and (2) overall extent of brain atrophy, as measured by a neuroimaging approach that sums the number of brain voxels showing significantly lower gray matter volume than cognitively normal controls (n=80). Even at the earliest clinical stage (CDR=0.5 or bottom quartile of overall atrophy), patients with each syndrome showed both common and variant-specific atrophy. Common atrophy across variants was found in temporoparietal regions that comprise the posterior default mode network (DMN). Early syndrome-specific atrophy mirrored functional brain networks underlying functions that are uniquely affected in each variant: Language network in lvPPA, posterior cingulate cortex-hippocampal circuit in amnestic EOAD and LOAD, and visual networks in PCA. At more advanced stages, atrophy patterns largely converged across AD variants. These findings support a model in which neurodegeneration selectively targets both the DMN and syndrome-specific vulnerable networks at the earliest clinical stages of AD. PMID:26260856

  18. Psychopathy in women: a review of its clinical usefulness for assessing risk for aggression and criminality.

    PubMed

    Nicholls, Tonia L; Ogloff, James R P; Brink, Johann; Spidel, Alicia

    2005-01-01

    Despite a flurry of studies examining psychopathy in women, and the recent release of the second version of the Hare Psychopathy Checklist--Revised manual, there is still little consensus whether the lateral extension of the current conceptualization of psychopathy to women is appropriate. In particular, very little agreement exists concerning the clinical utility of the Hare psychopathy measures to assess women's risk of future offending and violence. This article presents a comprehensive review of studies of the association between psychopathy, antisocial behavior, and violence, in diverse samples of women, and looks at similarities and differences between these constructs in males and females. Findings from inmates and offenders, civil and forensic psychiatric patients, substance abusers, and community samples indicate a consistently lower base rate of psychopathy among women than among men. With some exceptions, correlates of psychopathy in women relevant to risk assessments for crime and violence tend to be modest and significant, generally mirroring what we see in men. Clinicians and policy makers charged with the care and management of women at risk for criminal offending and violence are likely to find the PCL-R and PCL:SV have clinical utility; however, cautious application is called for and ongoing research is required. PMID:16333808

  19. Medication Development for Agitation and Aggression in Alzheimer Disease: Review and Discussion of Recent Randomized Clinical Trial Design

    PubMed Central

    Soto, Maria; Andrieu, Sandrine; Nourhashemi, Fati; Ousset, Pierre Jean; Ballard, Clive; Robert, Philippe; Vellas, Bruno; Lyketsos, Constantine; Rosenberg, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Background The management of disruptive neuropsychiatric symptom (NPS) such as agitation and aggression (A/A) is a major priority in caring for people with Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Few effective pharmacological or non-pharmacological options are available. Results of randomized clinical trials (RCTs) of drugs for A/A have been disappointing. This may result from the absence of biological efficacy for medications tested in treating A/A. It may also be related to methodological issues such as the choice of outcomes. The aim of this review was to highlight key methodological issues pertaining to RCTs of current and emerging medications for the treatment of A/A in AD. Methods We searched PubMed/Medline, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and ClinicalTrials.gov for RCTs comparing medications with either placebo or other drugs in the treatment of A/A in AD, between January 2008 and December 2013. Results We identified a total of 18 RCTs; of these, 11 were completed and 7 ongoing. Of the ongoing RCTs, only one is in Phase III. Seven of 10 completed RCTs with reported results did not report greater benefit from drug than placebo. Each of the completed RCTs used a different definition of “clinically significant A/A”. There was considerable heterogeneity in study desin. The primary endpoints were largely proxy-based but a variety of scales were used. The definition of caregiver and scales used to assess caregiver outcomes were similarly heterogeneous. Placebo response was notable in all trials. Conclusions This review highlights a great heterogeneity in RCTs design of drugs for A/A in AD and some key methodological issues such as definition of A/A, choice of outcome measures and caregiver participation that could be addressed by an expert consensus to optimize future trials design. PMID:25226218

  20. Internalizing Symptoms and Affective Reactivity in Relation to the Severity of Aggression in Clinically Referred, Behavior-Disordered Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolko, David J.; Baumann, Barbara L.; Bukstein, Oscar G.; Brown, Elissa J.

    2007-01-01

    We examined the affective correlates of aggression in children referred to a partial hospitalization program for the treatment of behavior disorders who did not have a mood or anxiety disorder. Parent and teacher ratings of the children's impulsivity, internalizing symptoms, affective reactivity, and aggression were examined for their…

  1. [Rare malignant tumors of the ovaries in adolescents--clinical aspects in deciding therapeutic aggressiveness].

    PubMed

    Schröder, W; Bau, O

    1990-01-01

    4 patients below the age of 20 years have been treated for a malignant tumor of the ovary during the period November 1, 1984 until April 30, 1988. Dysgerminoma was the diagnosis in two cases, as the third patient suffered from a bilateral malignant teratoma. Burkitt's Lymphoma involved both ovaries primarily in an 17-year-old girl. Retrospectively we analyzed diagnosis, therapy and clinical course of these young patients. Regarding the different histological types of the tumors that have been found we discuss critically current recommendations in therapeutic managements referring chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy. Defined conditions provided surgical treatment, that preserves fertility in early stages of malignant germ cell tumors of adolescent women, may be justified, especially for dysgerminomas. A real benefit relate to survival and quality of life by using chemotherapeutic agents can only be expected, if all prognostic factors are regarded.

  2. Gender differences in reactive and proactive aggression.

    PubMed

    Connor, Daniel F; Steingard, Ronald J; Anderson, Jennifer J; Melloni, Richard H

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of our investigation was to study gender differences in proactive and reactive aggression in a sample of 323 clinically referred children and adolescents (68 females and 255 males). Proactive aggression and reactive aggression were assessed using the Proactive/Reactive Aggression Scale. Demographic, historical, family, diagnostic, and treatment variables were entered into stepwise regression analyses to determine correlates of proactive and reactive aggression in males and females. Results reveal high rates of aggression in both males and females in the sample. Self reported drug use, expressed hostility, and experiences of maladaptive parenting were correlated with proactive aggression for both genders. Hyperactive/impulsive behaviors were correlated with male reactive aggression. An early age of traumatic stress and a low verbal IQ were correlated with female proactive aggression. Gender differences in correlates of proactive and reactive aggression may provide possible targets for research, prevention, and treatment efforts focused on reducing maladaptive aggression in clinically referred youth. PMID:12723901

  3. Polyclonality among clinical strains of non-pigmented rapidly growing mycobacteria: phenotypic and genotypic differences and their potential implications.

    PubMed

    García-Pedrazuela, M; Frutos, J M; Muñoz-Egea, M C; Alcaide, F; Tórtola, T; Vitoria, A; Cortés, P; Esteban, J

    2015-04-01

    To investigate the potential implications (especially the implications in clinical significance and antimicrobial susceptibility) of polyclonality among rapidly growing mycobacteria, we performed random amplified polymorphic DNA analysis in 64 clinical isolates of which the clinical significance was established. Phenotypic characteristics (antimicrobial susceptibility test, colony morphology and growth rate) of each clone were studied. Polyclonality was detected in 13 of the isolates (20.3%). There was a relationship between monoclonality and clinical significance (p 0.0096). Monoclonal and polyclonal isolates showed different behaviour in antimicrobial susceptibility. There was a strong relationship between monoclonality and those species that are more pathogenic for humans, and also with clinical significance of the isolates. PMID:25596780

  4. Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 7: Clinical Course, Phenotype-Genotype Correlations, and Neuropathology

    PubMed Central

    Horton, Laura C.; Frosch, Matthew P.; Vangel, Mark G.; Weigel-DiFranco, Carol; Berson, Eliot L.; Schmahmann, Jeremy D.

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Spinocerebellar ataxia type 7 is a neurodegenerative polyglutamine disease characterized by ataxia and retinal degeneration. The longitudinal course is unknown, and relationships between repeat expansion, clinical manifestations, and neuropathology remain uncertain. METHODS We followed 16 affected individuals of a 61-member kindred over 27 years with electroretinograms, neurological examinations including the Brief Ataxia Rating Scale, neuroimaging in 5, and autopsy in 4 cases. RESULTS We identified 4 stages of the illness. Stage 0; gene positive but phenotypically silent. Stage 1; no symptoms, but hyperreflexia and/or abnormal electroretinograms. Stage 2; symptoms and signs progress modestly. Stage 3; rapid clinical progression. CAG repeat length correlated inversely with age of onset of visual or motor signs (r=-0.74, p=0.002). Stage 3 rate of progression did not differ between cases (p=0.18). Electroretinograms correlated with Brief Ataxia Rating Scale score and were a biomarker of disease onset and progression. All symptomatic patients developed gait ataxia, extremity dysmetria, dysarthria, dysrhythmia, and oculomotor abnormalities. Funduscopy revealed pale optic discs and pigmentary disturbances. Visual acuity declined to blindness in those with longer CAG expansions. Hyperreflexia was present from Stage 1 onwards. Restless legs syndrome and sensory impairment were common. Neuropathological hallmarks were neuronal loss in cerebellar cortex, deep cerebellar nuclei, inferior olive, and anterior horns of the spinal cord, and axonal loss in spinocerebellar tracts, dorsal nerve roots and posterior columns. Retinal pathology included photoreceptor degeneration and disruption of retinal pigment epithelium. DISCUSSION Spinocerebellar ataxia type 7 evolves through 4 clinical stages; neuropathological findings underlie the clinical presentation; electroretinograms are a potential biomarker of disease progression. PMID:22915085

  5. Clinical and Molecular Phenotype of Aicardi-Goutières Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Gillian ; Patrick, Teresa ; Parmar, Rekha ; Taylor, Claire F. ; Aeby, Alec ; Aicardi, Jean ; Artuch, Rafael ; Montalto, Simon Attard ; Bacino, Carlos A. ; Barroso, Bruno ; Baxter, Peter ; Benko, Willam S. ; Bergmann, Carsten ; Bertini, Enrico ; Biancheri, Roberta ; Blair, Edward M. ; Blau, Nenad ; Bonthron, David T. ; Briggs, Tracy ; Brueton, Louise A. ; Brunner, Han G. ; Burke, Christopher J. ; Carr, Ian M. ; Carvalho, Daniel R. ; Chandler, Kate E. ; Christen, Hans-Jürgen ; Corry, Peter C. ; Cowan, Frances M. ; Cox, Helen ; D’Arrigo, Stefano ; Dean, John ; De Laet, Corinne ; De Praeter, Claudine ; Déry, Catherine ; Ferrie, Colin D. ; Flintoff, Kim ; Frints, Suzanna G. M. ; Garcia-Cazorla, Angels ; Gener, Blanca ; Goizet, Cyril ; Goutières, Françoise ; Green, Andrew J. ; Guët, Agnès ; Hamel, Ben C. J. ; Hayward, Bruce E. ; Heiberg, Arvid ; Hennekam, Raoul C. ; Husson, Marie ; Jackson, Andrew P. ; Jayatunga, Rasieka ; Jiang, Yong-Hui ; Kant, Sarina G. ; Kao, Amy ; King, Mary D. ; Kingston, Helen M. ; Klepper, Joerg ; van der Knaap, Marjo S. ; Kornberg, Andrew J. ; Kotzot, Dieter ; Kratzer, Wilfried ; Lacombe, Didier ; Lagae, Lieven ; Landrieu, Pierre Georges ; Lanzi, Giovanni ; Leitch, Andrea ; Lim, Ming J. ; Livingston, John H. ; Lourenco, Charles M. ; Lyall, E. G. Hermione ; Lynch, Sally A. ; Lyons, Michael J. ; Marom, Daphna ; McClure, John P. ; McWilliam, Robert ; Melancon, Serge B. ; Mewasingh, Leena D. ; Moutard, Marie-Laure ; Nischal, Ken K. ; Østergaard, John R. ; Prendiville, Julie ; Rasmussen, Magnhild ; Rogers, R. Curtis ; Roland, Dominique ; Rosser, Elisabeth M. ; Rostasy, Kevin ; Roubertie, Agathe ; Sanchis, Amparo ; Schiffmann, Raphael ; Scholl-Bürgi, Sabine ; Seal, Sunita ; Shalev, Stavit A. ; Corcoles, C. Sierra ; Sinha, Gyan P. ; Soler, Doriette ; Spiegel, Ronen ; Stephenson, John B. P. ; Tacke, Uta ; Tan, Tiong Yang ; Till, Marianne ; Tolmie, John L. ; Tomlin, Pam ; Vagnarelli, Federica ; Valente, Enza Maria ; Van Coster, Rudy N. A. ; Van der Aa, Nathalie ; Vanderver, Adeline ; Vles, Johannes S. H. ; Voit, Thomas ; Wassmer, Evangeline ; Weschke, Bernhard ; Whiteford, Margo L. ; Willemsen, Michel A. A. ; Zankl, Andreas ; Zuberi, Sameer M. ; Orcesi, Simona ; Fazzi, Elisa ; Lebon, Pierre ; Crow, Yanick J. 

    2007-01-01

    Aicardi-Goutières syndrome (AGS) is a genetic encephalopathy whose clinical features mimic those of acquired in utero viral infection. AGS exhibits locus heterogeneity, with mutations identified in genes encoding the 3′→5′ exonuclease TREX1 and the three subunits of the RNASEH2 endonuclease complex. To define the molecular spectrum of AGS, we performed mutation screening in patients, from 127 pedigrees, with a clinical diagnosis of the disease. Biallelic mutations in TREX1, RNASEH2A, RNASEH2B, and RNASEH2C were observed in 31, 3, 47, and 18 families, respectively. In five families, we identified an RNASEH2A or RNASEH2B mutation on one allele only. In one child, the disease occurred because of a de novo heterozygous TREX1 mutation. In 22 families, no mutations were found. Null mutations were common in TREX1, although a specific missense mutation was observed frequently in patients from northern Europe. Almost all mutations in RNASEH2A, RNASEH2B, and RNASEH2C were missense. We identified an RNASEH2C founder mutation in 13 Pakistani families. We also collected clinical data from 123 mutation-positive patients. Two clinical presentations could be delineated: an early-onset neonatal form, highly reminiscent of congenital infection seen particularly with TREX1 mutations, and a later-onset presentation, sometimes occurring after several months of normal development and occasionally associated with remarkably preserved neurological function, most frequently due to RNASEH2B mutations. Mortality was correlated with genotype; 34.3% of patients with TREX1, RNASEH2A, and RNASEH2C mutations versus 8.0% RNASEH2B mutation–positive patients were known to have died (P=.001). Our analysis defines the phenotypic spectrum of AGS and suggests a coherent mutation-screening strategy in this heterogeneous disorder. Additionally, our data indicate that at least one further AGS-causing gene remains to be identified. PMID:17846997

  6. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha is required for the tumourigenic and aggressive phenotype associated with Rab25 expression in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Roman, Natividad; Sahasrabudhe, Neha Mohan; McGregor, Fiona; Chalmers, Anthony J.; Cassidy, Jim; Plumb, Jane

    2016-01-01

    The small GTPase Rab25 has been functionally linked to tumour progression and aggressiveness in ovarian cancer and promotes invasion in three-dimensional environments. This type of migration has been shown to require the expression of the hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF-1α). In this report we demonstrate that Rab25 regulates HIF-1α protein expression in an oxygen independent manner in a panel of cancer cell lines. Regulation of HIF-1α protein expression by Rab25 did not require transcriptional upregulation, but was dependent on de novo protein synthesis through the Erbb2/ERK1/2 and p70S6K/mTOR pathways. Rab25 expression induced HIF-1 transcriptional activity, increased cisplatin resistance, and conferred intraperitoneal growth to the A2780 cell line in immunocompromised mice. Targeting HIF1 activity by silencing HIF-1β re-sensitised cells to cisplatin in vitro and reduced tumour formation of A2780-Rab25 expressing cells in vivo in a mouse ovarian peritoneal carcinomatosis model. Similar effects on cisplatin resistance in vitro and intraperitoneal tumourigenesis in vivo were obtained after HIF1b knockdown in the ovarian cancer cell line SKOV3, which expresses endogenous Rab25 and HIF-1α at atmospheric oxygen concentrations. Our results suggest that Rab25 tumourigenic potential and chemoresistance relies on HIF1 activity in aggressive and metastatic ovarian cancer. Targeting HIF-1 activity may potentially be effective either alone or in combination with standard chemotherapy for aggressive metastatic ovarian cancer. PMID:26967059

  7. Chronic oxidative stress causes estrogen-independent aggressive phenotype, and epigenetic inactivation of estrogen receptor alpha in MCF-7 breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Mahalingaiah, Prathap Kumar S; Ponnusamy, Logeswari; Singh, Kamaleshwar P

    2015-08-01

    The role of chronic oxidative stress in the development and aggressive growth of estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer is well known; however, the mechanistic understanding is not clear. Estrogen-independent growth is one of the features of aggressive subtype of breast cancer. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of oxidative stress on estrogen sensitivity and expression of nuclear estrogen receptors in ER-positive breast cancer cells. MCF-7 cells chronically exposed to hydrogen peroxide were used as a cell model in this study, and their growth in response to 17-β estradiol was evaluated by cell viability, cell cycle, and cell migration analysis. Results were further confirmed at molecular level by analysis of gene expressions at transcript and protein levels. Histone H3 modifications, expression of epigenetic regulatory genes, and the effect of DNA demethylation were also analyzed. Loss of growth in response to estrogen with a decrease in ERα expression was observed in MCF-7 cells adapted to chronic oxidative stress. Increases in mtTFA and NRF1 in these cells further suggested the role of mitochondria-dependent redox-sensitive growth signaling as an alternative pathway to estrogen-dependent growth. Changes in expression of epigenetic regulatory genes, levels of histone H3 modifications as well as significant restorations of both ERα expression and estrogen response by 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine further confirmed the epigenetic basis for estrogen-independent growth in these cells. In conclusion, results of this study suggest that chronic oxidative stress can convert estrogen-dependent nonaggressive breast cancer cells into estrogen-independent aggressive form potentially by epigenetic mechanism.

  8. The clinical phenotype of hereditary versus sporadic prostate cancer: HPC definition revisited

    PubMed Central

    Cremers, Ruben G.; Aben, Katja K.; van Oort, Inge M.; Sedelaar, J.P. Michiel; Vasen, Hans F.; Vermeulen, Sita H.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The definition of hereditary prostate cancer (HPC) is based on family history and age at onset. Intuitively, HPC is a serious subtype of prostate cancer but there are only limited data on the clinical phenotype of HPC. Here, we aimed to compare the prognosis of HPC to the sporadic form of prostate cancer (SPC). METHODS HPC patients were identified through a national registry of HPC families in the Netherlands, selecting patients diagnosed from the year 2000 onward (n = 324). SPC patients were identified from the Netherlands Cancer Registry (NCR) between 2003 and 2006 for a population‐based study into the genetic susceptibility of PC (n = 1,664). Detailed clinical data were collected by NCR‐registrars, using a standardized registration form. Follow‐up extended up to the end of 2013. Differences between the groups were evaluated by cross‐tabulations and tested for statistical significance while accounting for familial dependency of observations by GEE. Differences in progression‐free and overall survival were evaluated using χ2 testing with GEE in a proportional‐hazards model. RESULTS HPC patients were on average 3 years younger at diagnosis, had lower PSA values, lower Gleason scores, and more often locally confined disease. Of the HPC patients, 35% had high‐risk disease (NICE‐criteria) versus 51% of the SPC patients. HPC patients were less often treated with active surveillance. Kaplan–Meier 5‐year progression‐free survival after radical prostatectomy was comparable for HPC (78%) and SPC (74%; P = 0.30). The 5‐year overall survival was 85% (95%CI 81–89%) for HPC versus 80% (95%CI 78–82%) for SPC (P = 0.03). CONCLUSIONS HPC has a favorable clinical phenotype but patients more often underwent radical treatment. The major limitation of HPC is the absence of a genetics‐based definition of HPC, which may lead to over‐diagnosis of PC in men with a family history of prostate cancer. The HPC definition should

  9. Phenotypic variability in gap junction syndromic skin disorders: experience from KID and Clouston syndromes' clinical diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Kutkowska-Kaźmierczak, Anna; Niepokój, Katarzyna; Wertheim-Tysarowska, Katarzyna; Giza, Aleksandra; Mordasewicz-Goliszewska, Maria; Bal, Jerzy; Obersztyn, Ewa

    2015-08-01

    Connexins belong to the family of gap junction proteins which enable direct cell-to-cell communication by forming channels in adjacent cells. Mutations in connexin genes cause a variety of human diseases and, in a few cases, result in skin disorders. There are significant differences in the clinical picture of two rare autosomal dominant syndromes: keratitis-ichthyosis-deafness (KID) syndrome and hidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (Clouston syndrome), which are caused by GJB2 and GJB6 mutations, respectively. This is despite the fact that, in both cases, malfunctioning of the same family proteins and some overlapping clinical features (nail dystrophy, hair loss, and palmoplantar keratoderma) is observed. KID syndrome is characterized by progressive vascularizing keratitis, ichthyosiform erythrokeratoderma, and neurosensory hearing loss, whereas Clouston syndrome is characterized by nail dystrophy, hypotrichosis, and palmoplantar keratoderma. The present paper presents a Polish patient with sporadic KID syndrome caused by the mutation of p.Asp50Asn in GJB2. The patient encountered difficulties in obtaining a correct diagnosis. The other case presented is that of a family with Clouston syndrome (caused by p.Gly11Arg mutation in GJB6), who are the first reported patients of Polish origin suffering from this disorder. Phenotype diversity among patients with the same genotypes reported to date is also summarized. The conclusion is that proper diagnosis of these syndromes is still challenging and should always be followed by molecular verification. PMID:25575739

  10. Clinical phenotype and candidate genes for the 5q31.3 microdeletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hosoki, Kana; Ohta, Tohru; Natsume, Jun; Imai, Sumiko; Okumura, Akihisa; Matsui, Takeshi; Harada, Naoki; Bacino, Carlos A; Scaglia, Fernando; Jones, Jeremy Y; Niikawa, Norio; Saitoh, Shinji

    2012-08-01

    Array-based technologies have led to the identification of many novel microdeletion and microduplication syndromes demonstrating multiple congenital anomalies and intellectual disability (MCA/ID). We have used chromosomal microarray analysis for the evaluation of patients with MCA/ID and/or neonatal hypotonia. Three overlapping de novo microdeletions at 5q31.3 with the shortest region of overlap (SRO) of 370 kb were detected in three unrelated patients. These patients showed similar clinical features including severe neonatal hypotonia, neonatal feeding difficulties, respiratory distress, characteristic facial features, and severe developmental delay. These features are consistent with the 5q31.3 microdeletion syndrome originally proposed by Shimojima et al., providing further evidence that this syndrome is clinically discernible. The 370 kb SRO encompasses only four RefSeq genes including neuregulin 2 (NRG2) and purine-rich element binding protein A (PURA). NRG2 is one of the members of the neuregulin family related to neuronal and glial cell growth and differentiation, thus making NRG2 a good candidate for the observed phenotype. Moreover, PURA is also a good candidate because Pura-deficient mice demonstrate postnatal neurological manifestations.

  11. Loss of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase Receptor J Expression Predicts an Aggressive Clinical Course in Patients with Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Dongfeng; Li, Ming; Pu, Juan; Wang, Wanwei; Zhu, Weiguo; Liu, Haiyan

    2016-07-01

    Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase Receptor J (PTPRJ) has been reported to be a tumor suppressor in various human cancers. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical significance of PTPRJ in ESCC patients and its effects on biological behaviors of ESCC cells. PTPRJ expression, at mRNA and protein levels, were respectively detected by quantitative real-time PCR, western blot and immunohistochemistry, based on 106 newly diagnosed ESCC patients. The associations between PTPRJ expression and clinicopathological characteristics of ESCC patients were statistically analyzed. Then, the effects of PTPRJ in migration and invasion were determined by wound healing and transwell assays based on ESCC cell line transfected with siRNA or expression vector of PTPRJ. Expression of PTPRJ at mRNA and protein levels were both significantly lower in ESCC tissues than those in normal esophageal mucosa. Immunohistochemistry showed that PTPRJ protein was localized in the cytoplasm of cancer cells in ESCC tissues. In addition, PTPRJ downregulation was found to be closely correlated with advanced tumor stage (P = 0.01) and poor differentiation (P = 0.03). Moreover, knockdown of PTPRJ in KYSE510 cells could significantly promote cell migration and invasion (both P < 0.05), which were reversed by the restoration of PTPRJ expression in vitro (both P < 0.05). Our data offer the convincing evidence that loss of PTPRJ expression may predict an aggressive clinical course in ESCC patients. PTPRJ may function as a tumor suppressor and play an important role in the regulation of ESCC cell motility, suggesting its potentials as a therapeutic agent for human ESCC.

  12. 5HTT is associated with the phenotype psychological flexibility: results from a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Gloster, Andrew T; Gerlach, Alexander L; Hamm, Alfons; Höfler, Michael; Alpers, Georg W; Kircher, Tilo; Ströhle, Andreas; Lang, Thomas; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich; Deckert, Jürgen; Reif, Andreas

    2015-08-01

    Adaption to changing environments is evolutionarily advantageous. Studies that link genetic and phenotypic expression of flexible adjustment to one's context are largely lacking. In this study, we tested the importance of psychological flexibility, or goal-related context sensitivity, in an interaction between psychotherapy outcome for panic disorder with agoraphobia (PD/AG) and a genetic polymorphism. Given the established role of the 5HTT-LPR polymorphism in behavioral flexibility, we tested whether this polymorphism (short group vs. long group) impacted therapy response as a function of various endophenotypes (i.e., psychological flexibility, panic, agoraphobic avoidance, and anxiety sensitivity). Patients with PD/AG were recruited from a large multicenter randomized controlled clinical trial on cognitive-behavioral therapy. Pre- to post-treatment changes by 5HTT polymorphism were analyzed. 5HTT polymorphism status differentiated pre- to post-treatment changes in the endophenotype psychological flexibility (effect size difference d = 0.4, p < 0.05), but none of the specific symptom-related endophenotypes consistently for both the intent-to-treat sample (n = 228) and the treatment completers (n = 194). Based on the consistency of these findings with existing theory on behavioral flexibility, the specificity of the results across phenotypes, and the consistency of results across analyses (i.e., completer and intent to treat), we conclude that 5HTT polymorphism and the endophenotype psychological flexibility are important variables for the treatment of PD/AG. The endophenotype psychological flexibility may help bridge genetic and psychological literatures. Despite the limitation of the post hoc nature of these analyses, further study is clearly warranted. PMID:25588519

  13. Noninvasive Analysis of the Sputum Transcriptome Discriminates Clinical Phenotypes of Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Xiting; Chu, Jen-Hwa; Gomez, Jose; Koenigs, Maria; Holm, Carole; He, Xiaoxuan; Perez, Mario F.; Zhao, Hongyu; Mane, Shrikant; Martinez, Fernando D.; Ober, Carole; Nicolae, Dan L.; Barnes, Kathleen C.; London, Stephanie J.; Gilliland, Frank; Weiss, Scott T.; Raby, Benjamin A.; Cohn, Lauren

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: The airway transcriptome includes genes that contribute to the pathophysiologic heterogeneity seen in individuals with asthma. Objectives: We analyzed sputum gene expression for transcriptomic endotypes of asthma (TEA), gene signatures that discriminate phenotypes of disease. Methods: Gene expression in the sputum and blood of patients with asthma was measured using Affymetrix microarrays. Unsupervised clustering analysis based on pathways from the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes was used to identify TEA clusters. Logistic regression analysis of matched blood samples defined an expression profile in the circulation to determine the TEA cluster assignment in a cohort of children with asthma to replicate clinical phenotypes. Measurements and Main Results: Three TEA clusters were identified. TEA cluster 1 had the most subjects with a history of intubation (P = 0.05), a lower prebronchodilator FEV1 (P = 0.006), a higher bronchodilator response (P = 0.03), and higher exhaled nitric oxide levels (P = 0.04) compared with the other TEA clusters. TEA cluster 2, the smallest cluster, had the most subjects that were hospitalized for asthma (P = 0.04). TEA cluster 3, the largest cluster, had normal lung function, low exhaled nitric oxide levels, and lower inhaled steroid requirements. Evaluation of TEA clusters in children confirmed that TEA clusters 1 and 2 are associated with a history of intubation (P = 5.58 × 10−6) and hospitalization (P = 0.01), respectively. Conclusions: There are common patterns of gene expression in the sputum and blood of children and adults that are associated with near-fatal, severe, and milder asthma. PMID:25763605

  14. Enhanced S-cone function with preserved rod function: a new clinical phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Kinori, Michael; Pras, Eran; Kolker, Andrew; Ferman-Attar, Gili; Moroz, Iris; Moisseiev, Joseph; Bandah-Rozenfeld, Dikla; Mizrahi-Meissonnier, Liliana; Sharon, Dror

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To describe the clinical findings and genetic analysis in two brothers having a novel retinal disease characterized by an enhanced S-cone phenotype with normal rod function. Methods Both patients underwent complete ophthalmologic examinations, including fundus photography, electroretinography (ERG), fluorescein angiography and optical coherence tomography (OCT). Mutation analysis of the following candidate genes was performed: nuclear receptor subfamily 2 group E member 3 (NR2E3), neural retina leucine zipper (NRL), nuclear receptor subfamily 1 group D member 1 (NR1D1), and thyroid hormone receptor beta (THRB). Results Spectral photopic ERG responses demonstrated enhanced S-cone function in both patients. Their scotopic b-wave ERG amplitude responses, however, were within normal limits. Their scotopic a-wave amplitude responses were within the lower limit of normal. The a- and b-wave latencies were normal for one sibling and on the upper limit of normal for the other. Peripheral retinal findings were normal. OCT showed flattening of the macular curvature and thinning of the photoreceptor layer. Mutation analysis of NR2E3, NRL, NR1D1, and THRB genes was negative. Conclusions We describe what appears to be a previously unidentified familial retinal phenotype with enhanced S-cone function and well preserved rod system function in contrast to the severely reduced rod function seen in the enhanced S-cone syndrome (ESCS). Genetic analysis of candidate genes did not reveal the cause of disease. We postulate that the disease might be caused by mutation of another, as yet unidentified gene, which encodes a protein that functions as a negative inhibitor of rod and S-cone development. PMID:21897746

  15. Clinical phenotype and diagnosis of arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy in pediatric patients carrying desmosomal gene mutations

    PubMed Central

    Bauce, Barbara; Rampazzo, Alessandra; Basso, Cristina; Mazzotti, Elisa; Rigato, Ilaria; Steriotis, Alexandros; Beffagna, Giorgia; Lorenzon, Alessandra; De Bortoli, Marzia; Pilichou, Kalliopi; Marra, Martina Perazzolo; Corbetti, Francesco; Daliento, Luciano; Iliceto, Sabino; Corrado, Domenico; Thiene, Gaetano; Nava, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Background Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) is an inherited heart muscle disease carrying a risk of sudden death. Information about the clinical features during childhood and the age at disease onset is scanty. Objective The aim of the study was to describe the ARVC phenotype as its initial clinical manifestation in a pediatric population (<18 years) with desmosomal gene mutations. Methods Fifty-three ARVC desmosomal gene mutation carriers (mean age 12.3 ± 3.9 years) were investigated by electrocardiogram (ECG), signal-averaged ECG, 24-hour Holter, echocardiogram, and contrast-enhanced cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR). Results None of the children ≤10 years old fulfilled the 1994 criteria, as opposed to six (33%) aged 11–14 years and eight aged >14 years (42%). At the end of follow-up (9 ± 7 years), 21 (40%) fulfilled the 1994 diagnostic criteria (mean age 16 ± 4 years). By using the 2010 criteria in subjects aged ≤18 years, 53% were unaffected, versus 62% by using the traditional criteria. More than two-thirds of affected subjects had moderate-severe forms of the disease. Contrast-enhanced CMR was performed in 21 (40%); of 13 unaffected gene mutation carriers, six showed ARVC morphological and/or tissue abnormalities. Conclusion In pediatric ARVC mutation carriers, a diagnosis was achieved in 40% of cases, confirming that the disease usually develops during adolescence and young adulthood. The 2010 modified criteria seem to be more sensitive than the 1994 ones in identifying familial pediatric cases. Contrast-enhanced CMR can provide diagnostic information on gene mutation carriers not fulfilling either traditional or modified criteria. Management of asymptomatic gene mutation carriers remains the main clinical challenge. PMID:21723241

  16. Biallelic Mutations in TMEM126B Cause Severe Complex I Deficiency with a Variable Clinical Phenotype.

    PubMed

    Alston, Charlotte L; Compton, Alison G; Formosa, Luke E; Strecker, Valentina; Oláhová, Monika; Haack, Tobias B; Smet, Joél; Stouffs, Katrien; Diakumis, Peter; Ciara, Elżbieta; Cassiman, David; Romain, Nadine; Yarham, John W; He, Langping; De Paepe, Boel; Vanlander, Arnaud V; Seneca, Sara; Feichtinger, René G; Płoski, Rafal; Rokicki, Dariusz; Pronicka, Ewa; Haller, Ronald G; Van Hove, Johan L K; Bahlo, Melanie; Mayr, Johannes A; Van Coster, Rudy; Prokisch, Holger; Wittig, Ilka; Ryan, Michael T; Thorburn, David R; Taylor, Robert W

    2016-07-01

    Complex I deficiency is the most common biochemical phenotype observed in individuals with mitochondrial disease. With 44 structural subunits and over 10 assembly factors, it is unsurprising that complex I deficiency is associated with clinical and genetic heterogeneity. Massively parallel sequencing (MPS) technologies including custom, targeted gene panels or unbiased whole-exome sequencing (WES) are hugely powerful in identifying the underlying genetic defect in a clinical diagnostic setting, yet many individuals remain without a genetic diagnosis. These individuals might harbor mutations in poorly understood or uncharacterized genes, and their diagnosis relies upon characterization of these orphan genes. Complexome profiling recently identified TMEM126B as a component of the mitochondrial complex I assembly complex alongside proteins ACAD9, ECSIT, NDUFAF1, and TIMMDC1. Here, we describe the clinical, biochemical, and molecular findings in six cases of mitochondrial disease from four unrelated families affected by biallelic (c.635G>T [p.Gly212Val] and/or c.401delA [p.Asn134Ilefs(∗)2]) TMEM126B variants. We provide functional evidence to support the pathogenicity of these TMEM126B variants, including evidence of founder effects for both variants, and establish defects within this gene as a cause of complex I deficiency in association with either pure myopathy in adulthood or, in one individual, a severe multisystem presentation (chronic renal failure and cardiomyopathy) in infancy. Functional experimentation including viral rescue and complexome profiling of subject cell lines has confirmed TMEM126B as the tenth complex I assembly factor associated with human disease and validates the importance of both genome-wide sequencing and proteomic approaches in characterizing disease-associated genes whose physiological roles have been previously undetermined. PMID:27374774

  17. Sequence Homology at the Breakpoint and Clinical Phenotype of Mitochondrial DNA Deletion Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Sadikovic, Bekim; Wang, Jing; El-Hattab, Ayman; Landsverk, Megan; Douglas, Ganka; Brundage, Ellen K.; Craigen, William J.; Schmitt, Eric S.; Wong, Lee-Jun C.

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) deletions are a common cause of mitochondrial disorders. Large mtDNA deletions can lead to a broad spectrum of clinical features with different age of onset, ranging from mild mitochondrial myopathies (MM), progressive external ophthalmoplegia (PEO), and Kearns-Sayre syndrome (KSS), to severe Pearson syndrome. The aim of this study is to investigate the molecular signatures surrounding the deletion breakpoints and their association with the clinical phenotype and age at onset. MtDNA deletions in 67 patients were characterized using array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) followed by PCR-sequencing of the deletion junctions. Sequence homology including both perfect and imperfect short repeats flanking the deletion regions were analyzed and correlated with clinical features and patients' age group. In all age groups, there was a significant increase in sequence homology flanking the deletion compared to mtDNA background. The youngest patient group (<6 years old) showed a diffused pattern of deletion distribution in size and locations, with a significantly lower sequence homology flanking the deletion, and the highest percentage of deletion mutant heteroplasmy. The older age groups showed rather discrete pattern of deletions with 44% of all patients over 6 years old carrying the most common 5 kb mtDNA deletion, which was found mostly in muscle specimens (22/41). Only 15% (3/20) of the young patients (<6 years old) carry the 5 kb common deletion, which is usually present in blood rather than muscle. This group of patients predominantly (16 out of 17) exhibit multisystem disorder and/or Pearson syndrome, while older patients had predominantly neuromuscular manifestations including KSS, PEO, and MM. In conclusion, sequence homology at the deletion flanking regions is a consistent feature of mtDNA deletions. Decreased levels of sequence homology and increased levels of deletion mutant heteroplasmy appear to correlate with earlier onset and

  18. Biallelic Mutations in TMEM126B Cause Severe Complex I Deficiency with a Variable Clinical Phenotype.

    PubMed

    Alston, Charlotte L; Compton, Alison G; Formosa, Luke E; Strecker, Valentina; Oláhová, Monika; Haack, Tobias B; Smet, Joél; Stouffs, Katrien; Diakumis, Peter; Ciara, Elżbieta; Cassiman, David; Romain, Nadine; Yarham, John W; He, Langping; De Paepe, Boel; Vanlander, Arnaud V; Seneca, Sara; Feichtinger, René G; Płoski, Rafal; Rokicki, Dariusz; Pronicka, Ewa; Haller, Ronald G; Van Hove, Johan L K; Bahlo, Melanie; Mayr, Johannes A; Van Coster, Rudy; Prokisch, Holger; Wittig, Ilka; Ryan, Michael T; Thorburn, David R; Taylor, Robert W

    2016-07-01

    Complex I deficiency is the most common biochemical phenotype observed in individuals with mitochondrial disease. With 44 structural subunits and over 10 assembly factors, it is unsurprising that complex I deficiency is associated with clinical and genetic heterogeneity. Massively parallel sequencing (MPS) technologies including custom, targeted gene panels or unbiased whole-exome sequencing (WES) are hugely powerful in identifying the underlying genetic defect in a clinical diagnostic setting, yet many individuals remain without a genetic diagnosis. These individuals might harbor mutations in poorly understood or uncharacterized genes, and their diagnosis relies upon characterization of these orphan genes. Complexome profiling recently identified TMEM126B as a component of the mitochondrial complex I assembly complex alongside proteins ACAD9, ECSIT, NDUFAF1, and TIMMDC1. Here, we describe the clinical, biochemical, and molecular findings in six cases of mitochondrial disease from four unrelated families affected by biallelic (c.635G>T [p.Gly212Val] and/or c.401delA [p.Asn134Ilefs(∗)2]) TMEM126B variants. We provide functional evidence to support the pathogenicity of these TMEM126B variants, including evidence of founder effects for both variants, and establish defects within this gene as a cause of complex I deficiency in association with either pure myopathy in adulthood or, in one individual, a severe multisystem presentation (chronic renal failure and cardiomyopathy) in infancy. Functional experimentation including viral rescue and complexome profiling of subject cell lines has confirmed TMEM126B as the tenth complex I assembly factor associated with human disease and validates the importance of both genome-wide sequencing and proteomic approaches in characterizing disease-associated genes whose physiological roles have been previously undetermined.

  19. Phenotype and polyp landscape in serrated polyposis syndrome: a series of 100 patients from genetics clinics.

    PubMed

    Rosty, Christophe; Buchanan, Daniel D; Walsh, Michael D; Pearson, Sally-Ann; Pavluk, Erika; Walters, Rhiannon J; Clendenning, Mark; Spring, Kevin J; Jenkins, Mark A; Win, Aung K; Hopper, John L; Sweet, Kevin; Frankel, Wendy L; Aronson, Melyssa; Gallinger, Steve; Goldblatt, Jack; Woodall, Sonja; Arnold, Julie; Walker, Neal I; Jass, Jeremy R; Parry, Susan; Young, Joanne P

    2012-06-01

    Serrated polyposis syndrome (SPS), also known as hyperplastic polyposis, is a syndrome of unknown genetic basis defined by the occurrence of multiple serrated polyps in the large intestine and associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). There are a variety of SPS presentations, which may encompass a continuum of phenotypes modified by environmental and genetic factors. To explore the phenotype of SPS, we recorded the histologic and molecular characteristics of multiple colorectal polyps in patients with SPS recruited between 2000 and 2010 from genetics clinics in Australia, New Zealand, Canada, and the United States. Three specialist gastrointestinal pathologists reviewed the polyps, which they classified into conventional adenomas or serrated polyps, with various subtypes, according to the current World Health Organization criteria. Mutations in BRAF and KRAS and mismatch repair protein expression were determined in a subset of polyps. A total of 100 patients were selected for the study, of whom 58 were female and 42 were male. The total polyp count per patient ranged from 6 to 150 (median 30). The vast majority of patients (89%) had polyposis affecting the entire large intestine. From this cohort, 406 polyps were reviewed. Most of the polyps (83%) were serrated polyps: microvesicular hyperplastic polyps (HP) (n=156), goblet cell HP (n=25), sessile serrated adenoma/polyps (SSA/P) (n=110), SSA/P with cytologic dysplasia (n=28), and traditional serrated adenomas (n=18). A further 69 polyps were conventional adenomas. BRAF mutation was mainly detected in SSA/P with dysplasia (95%), SSA/P (85%), microvesicular HP (76%), and traditional serrated adenoma (54%), whereas KRAS mutation was present mainly in goblet cell HP (50%) and in tubulovillous adenoma (45%). Four of 6 SSA/Ps with high-grade dysplasia showed loss of MLH1/PMS2 expression. CRC was diagnosed in 39 patients who were more often found to have a conventional adenoma compared with patients

  20. Inherited erythromelalgia due to mutations in SCN9A: natural history, clinical phenotype and somatosensory profile.

    PubMed

    McDonnell, Aoibhinn; Schulman, Betsy; Ali, Zahid; Dib-Hajj, Sulayman D; Brock, Fiona; Cobain, Sonia; Mainka, Tina; Vollert, Jan; Tarabar, Sanela; Waxman, Stephen G

    2016-04-01

    Inherited erythromelalgia, the first human pain syndrome linked to voltage-gated sodium channels, is widely regarded as a genetic model of human pain. Because inherited erythromelalgia was linked to gain-of-function changes of sodium channel Na(v)1.7 only a decade ago, the literature has mainly consisted of reports of genetic and/or clinical characterization of individual patients. This paper describes the pattern of pain, natural history, somatosensory profile, psychosocial status and olfactory testing of 13 subjects with primary inherited erythromelalgia with mutations of SCN9A, the gene encoding Na(v)1.7. Subjects were clinically profiled using questionnaires, quantitative sensory testing and olfaction testing during the in-clinic phase of the study. In addition, a detailed pain phenotype for each subject was obtained over a 3-month period at home using diaries, enabling subjects to self-report pain attacks, potential triggers, duration and severity of pain. All subjects reported pain and heat in the extremities (usually feet and/or hands), with pain attacks triggered by heat or exercise and relieved mainly by non-pharmacological manoeuvres such as cooling. A large proportion of pain attacks (355/1099; 32%) did not involve a specific trigger. There was considerable variability in the number, duration and severity of pain attacks between subjects, even those carrying the same mutation within a family, and within individuals over the 12-13 week observation period. Most subjects (11/13) had pain between attacks. For these subjects, mean pain severity between pain attacks was usually lower than that during an attack. Olfaction testing using the Sniffin'T test did not demonstrate hyperosmia. One subject had evidence of orthostatic hypotension. Overall, there was a statistically significant correlation between total Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale scores (P= 0.005) and pain between attacks and for Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale Depression scores and pain

  1. A Comparison of Three Self-Report Measures of the Broader Autism Phenotype in a Non-Clinical Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ingersoll, Brooke; Hopwood, Christopher J.; Wainer, Allison; Donnellan, M. Brent

    2011-01-01

    Three self-report measures of the broader autism phenotype (BAP) were evaluated in terms of their internal consistency, distribution of scores, factor structure, and criterion-related validity in a non-clinical sample. All measures showed a continuous distribution. The SRS-A and BAPQ showed expected sex differences and were superior to the AQ in…

  2. Analysis of mammalian gene function through broad based phenotypic screens across a consortium of mouse clinics

    PubMed Central

    Adams, David J; Adams, Niels C; Adler, Thure; Aguilar-Pimentel, Antonio; Ali-Hadji, Dalila; Amann, Gregory; André, Philippe; Atkins, Sarah; Auburtin, Aurelie; Ayadi, Abdel; Becker, Julien; Becker, Lore; Bedu, Elodie; Bekeredjian, Raffi; Birling, Marie-Christine; Blake, Andrew; Bottomley, Joanna; Bowl, Mike; Brault, Véronique; Busch, Dirk H; Bussell, James N; Calzada-Wack, Julia; Cater, Heather; Champy, Marie-France; Charles, Philippe; Chevalier, Claire; Chiani, Francesco; Codner, Gemma F; Combe, Roy; Cox, Roger; Dalloneau, Emilie; Dierich, André; Di Fenza, Armida; Doe, Brendan; Duchon, Arnaud; Eickelberg, Oliver; Esapa, Chris T; El Fertak, Lahcen; Feigel, Tanja; Emelyanova, Irina; Estabel, Jeanne; Favor, Jack; Flenniken, Ann; Gambadoro, Alessia; Garrett, Lilian; Gates, Hilary; Gerdin, Anna-Karin; Gkoutos, George; Greenaway, Simon; Glasl, Lisa; Goetz, Patrice; Da Cruz, Isabelle Goncalves; Götz, Alexander; Graw, Jochen; Guimond, Alain; Hans, Wolfgang; Hicks, Geoff; Hölter, Sabine M; Höfler, Heinz; Hancock, John M; Hoehndorf, Robert; Hough, Tertius; Houghton, Richard; Hurt, Anja; Ivandic, Boris; Jacobs, Hughes; Jacquot, Sylvie; Jones, Nora; Karp, Natasha A; Katus, Hugo A; Kitchen, Sharon; Klein-Rodewald, Tanja; Klingenspor, Martin; Klopstock, Thomas; Lalanne, Valerie; Leblanc, Sophie; Lengger, Christoph; le Marchand, Elise; Ludwig, Tonia; Lux, Aline; McKerlie, Colin; Maier, Holger; Mandel, Jean-Louis; Marschall, Susan; Mark, Manuel; Melvin, David G; Meziane, Hamid; Micklich, Kateryna; Mittelhauser, Christophe; Monassier, Laurent; Moulaert, David; Muller, Stéphanie; Naton, Beatrix; Neff, Frauke; Nolan, Patrick M; Nutter, Lauryl MJ; Ollert, Markus; Pavlovic, Guillaume; Pellegata, Natalia S; Peter, Emilie; Petit-Demoulière, Benoit; Pickard, Amanda; Podrini, Christine; Potter, Paul; Pouilly, Laurent; Puk, Oliver; Richardson, David; Rousseau, Stephane; Quintanilla-Fend, Leticia; Quwailid, Mohamed M; Racz, Ildiko; Rathkolb, Birgit; Riet, Fabrice; Rossant, Janet; Roux, Michel; Rozman, Jan; Ryder, Ed; Salisbury, Jennifer; Santos, Luis; Schäble, Karl-Heinz; Schiller, Evelyn; Schrewe, Anja; Schulz, Holger; Steinkamp, Ralf; Simon, Michelle; Stewart, Michelle; Stöger, Claudia; Stöger, Tobias; Sun, Minxuan; Sunter, David; Teboul, Lydia; Tilly, Isabelle; Tocchini-Valentini, Glauco P; Tost, Monica; Treise, Irina; Vasseur, Laurent; Velot, Emilie; Vogt-Weisenhorn, Daniela; Wagner, Christelle; Walling, Alison; Weber, Bruno; Wendling, Olivia; Westerberg, Henrik; Willershäuser, Monja; Wolf, Eckhard; Wolter, Anne; Wood, Joe; Wurst, Wolfgang; Yildirim, Ali Önder; Zeh, Ramona; Zimmer, Andreas; Zimprich, Annemarie

    2015-01-01

    The function of the majority of genes in the mouse and human genomes remains unknown. The mouse ES cell knockout resource provides a basis for characterisation of relationships between gene and phenotype. The EUMODIC consortium developed and validated robust methodologies for broad-based phenotyping of knockouts through a pipeline comprising 20 disease-orientated platforms. We developed novel statistical methods for pipeline design and data analysis aimed at detecting reproducible phenotypes with high power. We acquired phenotype data from 449 mutant alleles, representing 320 unique genes, of which half had no prior functional annotation. We captured data from over 27,000 mice finding that 83% of the mutant lines are phenodeviant, with 65% demonstrating pleiotropy. Surprisingly, we found significant differences in phenotype annotation according to zygosity. Novel phenotypes were uncovered for many genes with unknown function providing a powerful basis for hypothesis generation and further investigation in diverse systems. PMID:26214591

  3. A Framework to Support the Sharing and Reuse of Computable Phenotype Definitions Across Health Care Delivery and Clinical Research Applications

    PubMed Central

    Richesson, Rachel L.; Smerek, Michelle M.; Blake Cameron, C.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The ability to reproducibly identify clinically equivalent patient populations is critical to the vision of learning health care systems that implement and evaluate evidence-based treatments. The use of common or semantically equivalent phenotype definitions across research and health care use cases will support this aim. Currently, there is no single consolidated repository for computable phenotype definitions, making it difficult to find all definitions that already exist, and also hindering the sharing of definitions between user groups. Method: Drawing from our experience in an academic medical center that supports a number of multisite research projects and quality improvement studies, we articulate a framework that will support the sharing of phenotype definitions across research and health care use cases, and highlight gaps and areas that need attention and collaborative solutions. Framework: An infrastructure for re-using computable phenotype definitions and sharing experience across health care delivery and clinical research applications includes: access to a collection of existing phenotype definitions, information to evaluate their appropriateness for particular applications, a knowledge base of implementation guidance, supporting tools that are user-friendly and intuitive, and a willingness to use them. Next Steps: We encourage prospective researchers and health administrators to re-use existing EHR-based condition definitions where appropriate and share their results with others to support a national culture of learning health care. There are a number of federally funded resources to support these activities, and research sponsors should encourage their use. PMID:27563686

  4. Episodic ataxia type 1: clinical characterization, quality of life and genotype-phenotype correlation.

    PubMed

    Graves, Tracey D; Cha, Yoon-Hee; Hahn, Angelika F; Barohn, Richard; Salajegheh, Mohammed K; Griggs, Robert C; Bundy, Brian N; Jen, Joanna C; Baloh, Robert W; Hanna, Michael G

    2014-04-01

    Episodic ataxia type 1 is considered a rare neuronal ion channel disorder characterized by brief attacks of unsteadiness and dizziness with persistent myokymia. To characterize the natural history, develop outcome measures for future clinical trials, and correlate genotype with phenotype, we undertook an international, prospective, cross-sectional study. Thirty-nine individuals (51% male) were enrolled: median age 37 years (range 15-65 years). We identified 10 different pathogenic point mutations in KCNA1 that accounted for the genetic basis of 85% of the cohort. Participants with KCNA1 mutations were more likely to have a positive family history. Analysis of the total cohort showed that the first episode of ataxia occurred before age 20 in all but one patient, with an average age of onset of 7.9 years. Physical exertion, emotional stress and environmental temperature were the most common triggers for attacks. Attack frequency ranged from daily to monthly, even with the same KCNA1 genotype. Average attack duration was in the order of minutes. Ten participants (26%) developed permanent cerebellar signs, which were related to disease duration. The average Scale for the Assessment and Rating of Ataxia score (SARA, a standardized measure of cerebellar dysfunction on clinical examination, scores range from 0-40) was an average of 3.15 for all participants (range 0-14), but was only 2 in those with isolated episodic ataxia compared with 7.7 in those with progressive cerebellar ataxia in addition to episodic ataxia. Thirty-seven participants completed the SF-36, a quality of life survey; all eight domain norm-based average scores (mean=50) were below normal with mental health being the lowest (41.3) in those with mutation positive episodic ataxia type 1. Scores on SF-36 correlated negatively with attack frequency. Of the 39 participants in the study, 33 harboured mutations in KCNA1 whereas the remaining six had no mutation identified. Episodic ataxia type 1 phenocopies

  5. Episodic ataxia type 1: clinical characterization, quality of life and genotype–phenotype correlation

    PubMed Central

    Graves, Tracey D.; Cha, Yoon-Hee; Hahn, Angelika F.; Barohn, Richard; Salajegheh, Mohammed K.; Griggs, Robert C.; Bundy, Brian N.; Jen, Joanna C.; Baloh, Robert W.

    2014-01-01

    Episodic ataxia type 1 is considered a rare neuronal ion channel disorder characterized by brief attacks of unsteadiness and dizziness with persistent myokymia. To characterize the natural history, develop outcome measures for future clinical trials, and correlate genotype with phenotype, we undertook an international, prospective, cross-sectional study. Thirty-nine individuals (51% male) were enrolled: median age 37 years (range 15–65 years). We identified 10 different pathogenic point mutations in KCNA1 that accounted for the genetic basis of 85% of the cohort. Participants with KCNA1 mutations were more likely to have a positive family history. Analysis of the total cohort showed that the first episode of ataxia occurred before age 20 in all but one patient, with an average age of onset of 7.9 years. Physical exertion, emotional stress and environmental temperature were the most common triggers for attacks. Attack frequency ranged from daily to monthly, even with the same KCNA1 genotype. Average attack duration was in the order of minutes. Ten participants (26%) developed permanent cerebellar signs, which were related to disease duration. The average Scale for the Assessment and Rating of Ataxia score (SARA, a standardized measure of cerebellar dysfunction on clinical examination, scores range from 0–40) was an average of 3.15 for all participants (range 0–14), but was only 2 in those with isolated episodic ataxia compared with 7.7 in those with progressive cerebellar ataxia in addition to episodic ataxia. Thirty-seven participants completed the SF-36, a quality of life survey; all eight domain norm-based average scores (mean = 50) were below normal with mental health being the lowest (41.3) in those with mutation positive episodic ataxia type 1. Scores on SF-36 correlated negatively with attack frequency. Of the 39 participants in the study, 33 harboured mutations in KCNA1 whereas the remaining six had no mutation identified. Episodic ataxia type 1

  6. HIV1-viral protein R (Vpr) mutations: associated phenotypes and relevance for clinical pathologies.

    PubMed

    Soares, Rui; Rocha, Graça; Meliço-Silvestre, António; Gonçalves, Teresa

    2016-09-01

    Over the last 30 years, research into HIV has advanced the knowledge of virus genetics and the development of efficient therapeutic strategies. HIV-1 viral protein R (Vpr) is a specialized and multifunctional protein that plays important roles at multiple stages of the HIV-1 viral life cycle. This protein interacts with a number of cellular and viral proteins and with multiple activities including nuclear transport of the pre-integration complex (PIC) to the nucleus, transcriptional activation, cell cycle arrest at G2/M transition phase and induction of cell death via apoptosis. Specifically, Vpr has been shown to control many host cell functions through a variety of biological processes and by interaction with several cellular pathways. The different functions of Vpr may enhance viral replication and impair the immune system in HIV-1 infected patients. Importantly, functional defects induced by mutations in the Vpr protein correlate with slow disease progression of HIV-infected patients. Vpr is also associated with other concomitant pathologies developed by these patients, which may lead it to be considered as a potential novel therapeutic target. This review will focus on HIV-1 Vpr, mainly on the importance of its structural mutations on the progression of HIV infection, associated phenotypes and relevance for clinical pathologies. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Ferroportin diseases: functional studies, a link between genetic and clinical phenotype.

    PubMed

    Détivaud, Lénaïck; Island, Marie-Laure; Jouanolle, Anne-Marie; Ropert, Martine; Bardou-Jacquet, Edouard; Le Lan, Caroline; Mosser, Annick; Leroyer, Patricia; Deugnier, Yves; David, Véronique; Brissot, Pierre; Loréal, Olivier

    2013-11-01

    Ferroportin (FPN) mediates iron export from cells and this function is modulated by serum hepcidin. Mutations in the FPN gene (SLC40A1) lead to autosomal dominant iron overload diseases related either to loss or to gain of function, and usually characterized by normal or low transferrin saturation versus elevated transferrin saturation, respectively. However, for the same mutation, the phenotypic expression may vary from one patient to another. Using in vitro overexpression of wild-type or mutant FPN proteins, we characterized the functional impact of five recently identified FPN gene mutations regarding FPN localization, cell iron status, and hepcidin sensitivity. Our aim was to integrate functional results and biological findings in probands and relatives. We show that while the p.Arg371Gln (R371Q) mutation had no impact on studied parameters, the p.Trp158Leu (W158L), p.Arg88Gly (R88G), and p.Asn185Asp (N185D) mutations caused an iron export defect and were classified as loss-of-function mutations. The p.Gly204Ser (G204S) mutation induced a gain of FPN function. Functional studies are useful to determine whether or not a FPN gene mutation found in an iron overloaded patient is deleterious and to characterize its biological impact, especially when family studies are not fully informative and/or additional confounding factors may affect bio-clinical expression.

  8. Clinical, morphological, and biochemical phenotype of a new case of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type VIIC.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, A; Wilcox, W R; Cohn, D H

    1997-01-10

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) type VIIC is a newly recognized human disorder which results from failure to remove the amino-terminal propeptide of type I procollagen. Four cases of EDS type VIIC have been reported, and here we describe a fifth case. The propositus was a 1,445 g male infant born at 30 weeks of gestation following premature rupture of membranes. He had wide fontanelles, prominent eyes with swollen eyelids and blue sclerae, anteverted nostrils, micrognathia, umbilical hernia, short stubby fingers, and cutis laxa with hirsutism. At age 3 months, during the repair of the umbilical hernia, he was noted to have unusual skin fragility. Examination of skin by scanning electron microscopy showed frayed collagen fibrils, and transmission electron microscopy showed the hieroglyphic collagen fibril morphology characteristic of the disorder. As reported in other cases, cultured fibroblasts synthesized type I procollagen that was very poorly processed at the amino-terminal propeptide cleavage site. the 5 known cases of human EDS type VIIC characterize a distinct clinical phenotype, making this condition recognizable at birth before manifestation of severe skin fragility. The diagnosis can be confirmed by biochemical studies of type I procollagen synthesis and by electron microscopic examination of skin. PMID:8986271

  9. HIV1-viral protein R (Vpr) mutations: associated phenotypes and relevance for clinical pathologies.

    PubMed

    Soares, Rui; Rocha, Graça; Meliço-Silvestre, António; Gonçalves, Teresa

    2016-09-01

    Over the last 30 years, research into HIV has advanced the knowledge of virus genetics and the development of efficient therapeutic strategies. HIV-1 viral protein R (Vpr) is a specialized and multifunctional protein that plays important roles at multiple stages of the HIV-1 viral life cycle. This protein interacts with a number of cellular and viral proteins and with multiple activities including nuclear transport of the pre-integration complex (PIC) to the nucleus, transcriptional activation, cell cycle arrest at G2/M transition phase and induction of cell death via apoptosis. Specifically, Vpr has been shown to control many host cell functions through a variety of biological processes and by interaction with several cellular pathways. The different functions of Vpr may enhance viral replication and impair the immune system in HIV-1 infected patients. Importantly, functional defects induced by mutations in the Vpr protein correlate with slow disease progression of HIV-infected patients. Vpr is also associated with other concomitant pathologies developed by these patients, which may lead it to be considered as a potential novel therapeutic target. This review will focus on HIV-1 Vpr, mainly on the importance of its structural mutations on the progression of HIV infection, associated phenotypes and relevance for clinical pathologies. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27264019

  10. A Mixed-methods Investigation of Sensory Response Patterns in Barth Syndrome: A Clinical Phenotype?

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Stacey; Kreider, Consuelo; Bendixen, Roxanna

    2012-01-01

    Barth syndrome is a genetic disorder that affects approximately 1/500,000 boys each year. While treatment of medical complications associated with Barth is of primary importance, there is a concomitant need to look at behavioral and clinical features of the disorder. The purpose of this study was to examine the prevalence of atypical sensory processing in 21 boys with Barth syndrome and to explore if phenotypic patterns of sensory responsiveness may be useful in early diagnosis. Using a mixed methods approach, we found that sensory issues related to feeding and eating were ubiquitous in our sample, with some behaviors such as strong gag reflex identifiable early in development. Specifically, boys with Barth had a strong preference for salty, cheesy, and spicy foods while having an overall restricted repertoire of foods they would eat (e.g. picky eaters). In boys with Barth as they age, auditory sensitivity and auditory filtering issues also emerged as potential sensory-related behaviors affecting academic performance and participation. Overall, this study suggests that early identification of sensory patterns in Barth may assist in differential diagnosis and create opportunities for early interventions that may minimize the impact of these behaviors on function and participation. PMID:22711649

  11. Signaling aggression.

    PubMed

    van Staaden, Moira J; Searcy, William A; Hanlon, Roger T

    2011-01-01

    From psychological and sociological standpoints, aggression is regarded as intentional behavior aimed at inflicting pain and manifested by hostility and attacking behaviors. In contrast, biologists define aggression as behavior associated with attack or escalation toward attack, omitting any stipulation about intentions and goals. Certain animal signals are strongly associated with escalation toward attack and have the same function as physical attack in intimidating opponents and winning contests, and ethologists therefore consider them an integral part of aggressive behavior. Aggressive signals have been molded by evolution to make them ever more effective in mediating interactions between the contestants. Early theoretical analyses of aggressive signaling suggested that signals could never be honest about fighting ability or aggressive intentions because weak individuals would exaggerate such signals whenever they were effective in influencing the behavior of opponents. More recent game theory models, however, demonstrate that given the right costs and constraints, aggressive signals are both reliable about strength and intentions and effective in influencing contest outcomes. Here, we review the role of signaling in lieu of physical violence, considering threat displays from an ethological perspective as an adaptive outcome of evolutionary selection pressures. Fighting prowess is conveyed by performance signals whose production is constrained by physical ability and thus limited to just some individuals, whereas aggressive intent is encoded in strategic signals that all signalers are able to produce. We illustrate recent advances in the study of aggressive signaling with case studies of charismatic taxa that employ a range of sensory modalities, viz. visual and chemical signaling in cephalopod behavior, and indicators of aggressive intent in the territorial calls of songbirds.

  12. New host defense mechanisms against Candida species clarify the basis of clinical phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Hanna, Suheir; Etzioni, Amos; Etzoni, Amos

    2011-06-01

    Chronic Candida species infection of the skin and mucosal membranes is viewed as a group of disorders all sharing a similar clinical condition, the susceptibility to localized fungal infections, which can be isolated or as a feature associated with various other entities. Although the pathogenesis underlying such a tendency had previously been poorly understood, the last decade has witnessed significant progress in revealing the molecular and immunologic mechanisms involved in antifungal immunity. T(H)17 cells and their specific cytokines (IL-17A and IL-17F cytokines and IL-22) are the main players in conferring antifungal protection. Autoimmune polyendocrinopathy and ectodermal dystrophy and hyper-IgE syndrome are 2 entities caused by different genetic mutations affecting distinct immune pathways but eventually share a similar clinical phenotype of Candida species infection. Impaired T(H)17 responses, although mediated by different mechanisms, seem to underlie this common feature: neutralizing autoantibodies against IL-17A and 1L-22 are involved in patients with autoimmune polyendocrinopathy and ectodermal dystrophy syndrome, whereas abnormal T(H)17 proliferation and IL-17 production are observed in the latter. Although various degrees of T(H)17 dysfunction were also observed in most cases of isolated chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis, only in very few families was a distinct mutation detected (caspase recruitment domain family, member 9 [CARD9]), thus indicating certain forms of chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis as monogenic with a Mendelian pattern of inheritance. Hopefully, these data will open the way for further searches for other genes and for introducing new treatment modalities. PMID:21497889

  13. New host defense mechanisms against Candida species clarify the basis of clinical phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Hanna, Suheir; Etzioni, Amos; Etzoni, Amos

    2011-06-01

    Chronic Candida species infection of the skin and mucosal membranes is viewed as a group of disorders all sharing a similar clinical condition, the susceptibility to localized fungal infections, which can be isolated or as a feature associated with various other entities. Although the pathogenesis underlying such a tendency had previously been poorly understood, the last decade has witnessed significant progress in revealing the molecular and immunologic mechanisms involved in antifungal immunity. T(H)17 cells and their specific cytokines (IL-17A and IL-17F cytokines and IL-22) are the main players in conferring antifungal protection. Autoimmune polyendocrinopathy and ectodermal dystrophy and hyper-IgE syndrome are 2 entities caused by different genetic mutations affecting distinct immune pathways but eventually share a similar clinical phenotype of Candida species infection. Impaired T(H)17 responses, although mediated by different mechanisms, seem to underlie this common feature: neutralizing autoantibodies against IL-17A and 1L-22 are involved in patients with autoimmune polyendocrinopathy and ectodermal dystrophy syndrome, whereas abnormal T(H)17 proliferation and IL-17 production are observed in the latter. Although various degrees of T(H)17 dysfunction were also observed in most cases of isolated chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis, only in very few families was a distinct mutation detected (caspase recruitment domain family, member 9 [CARD9]), thus indicating certain forms of chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis as monogenic with a Mendelian pattern of inheritance. Hopefully, these data will open the way for further searches for other genes and for introducing new treatment modalities.

  14. Assessment of elasticity of colorectal cancer tissue, clinical utility, pathological and phenotypical relevance

    PubMed Central

    Kawano, Shingo; Kojima, Motohiro; Higuchi, Yoichi; Sugimoto, Motokazu; Ikeda, Koji; Sakuyama, Naoki; Takahashi, Shinichiro; Hayashi, Ryuichi; Ochiai, Atsushi; Saito, Norio

    2015-01-01

    Generally, cancer tissue is palpated as a hard mass. However, the elastic nature of cancer tissue is not well understood. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the clinical utility of measuring the elastic modulus (EM) in colorectal cancer tissue. Using a tactile sensor, we measured the EM of 106 surgically resected colorectal cancer tissues. Data on the EM were compared with clinicopathological findings, including stromal features represented by Azan staining and the α-SMA positive area ratio of the tumor area. Finally, a cDNA microarray profile of the tumors with high EM were compared with the findings of tumors with low EM. A higher EM in tumors was associated with pathological T, N, and M-stage tumors (P < 0.001, P = 0.001 and P = 0.011, respectively). Patients with high EM tumors had shorter disease-free survival than had patients with low EM. The EM showed strongly positive correlation with the Azan staining positive area ratio (r = 0.908) and the α-SMA positive area ratio (r = 0.921). Finally, the cDNA microarray data of the tumors with high EM revealed a distinct gene expression profile compared with data from those tumors with low EM. The assessment of the elasticity of colorectal cancer tissue may allow a more accurate clinical stage and prognosis estimation. The distinct phenotypical features of the high EM tumors and their strong association with stromal features suggest the existence of a biological mechanism involved in this phenomenon that may contribute to future therapy. PMID:26083008

  15. Novel Conserved Genotypes Correspond to Antibiotic Resistance Phenotypes of E. coli Clinical Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Swick, Michelle C.; Easton-Marks, Jeremy R.; Barth, Patrick; Shah, Minita J.; Bormann Chung, Christina A.; Stanley, Sarah; McLaughlin, Stephen F.; Lee, Clarence C.; Sheth, Vrunda; Doan, Quynh; Hamill, Richard J.; Steffen, David; Becnel, Lauren B.; Sucgang, Richard; Zechiedrich, Lynn

    2013-01-01

    Current efforts to understand antibiotic resistance on the whole genome scale tend to focus on known genes even as high throughput sequencing strategies uncover novel mechanisms. To identify genomic variations associated with antibiotic resistance, we employed a modified genome-wide association study; we sequenced genomic DNA from pools of E. coli clinical isolates with similar antibiotic resistance phenotypes using SOLiD technology to uncover single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) unanimously conserved in each pool. The multidrug-resistant pools were genotypically similar to SMS-3-5, a previously sequenced multidrug-resistant isolate from a polluted environment. The similarity was evenly spread across the entire genome and not limited to plasmid or pathogenicity island loci. Among the pools of clinical isolates, genomic variation was concentrated adjacent to previously reported inversion and duplication differences between the SMS-3-5 isolate and the drug-susceptible laboratory strain, DH10B. SNPs that result in non-synonymous changes in gyrA (encoding the well-known S83L allele associated with fluoroquinolone resistance), mutM, ligB, and recG were unanimously conserved in every fluoroquinolone-resistant pool. Alleles of the latter three genes are tightly linked among most sequenced E. coli genomes, and had not been implicated in antibiotic resistance previously. The changes in these genes map to amino acid positions in alpha helices that are involved in DNA binding. Plasmid-encoded complementation of null strains with either allelic variant of mutM or ligB resulted in variable responses to ultraviolet light or hydrogen peroxide treatment as markers of induced DNA damage, indicating their importance in DNA metabolism and revealing a potential mechanism for fluoroquinolone resistance. Our approach uncovered evidence that additional DNA binding enzymes may contribute to fluoroquinolone resistance and further implicate environmental bacteria as a reservoir for

  16. Peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) in human breast cancer: correlation of breast cancer cell aggressive phenotype with PBR expression, nuclear localization, and PBR-mediated cell proliferation and nuclear transport of cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Hardwick, M; Fertikh, D; Culty, M; Li, H; Vidic, B; Papadopoulos, V

    1999-02-15

    nuclei was found to be 30% greater than into MCF-7 nuclei. High-affinity PBR drug ligands regulated the levels of cholesterol present in MDA-231 nuclei but not in MCF-7. In addition, the PBR-dependent MDA-231 cell proliferation was found to highly correlate (r = -0.99) with the PBR-mediated changes in nuclear membrane cholesterol levels. In conclusion, these data suggest that PBR expression, nuclear localization, and PBR-mediated cholesterol transport into the nucleus are involved in human breast cancer cell proliferation and aggressive phenotype expression, thus participating in the advancement of the disease.

  17. Phenotyping and Genotyping of Sporothrix schenckii Isolates According to Geographic Origin and Clinical Form of Sporotrichosis

    PubMed Central

    Mesa-Arango, Ana Cecilia; del Rocío Reyes-Montes, María; Pérez-Mejía, Amelia; Navarro-Barranco, Hortensia; Souza, Valeria; Zúñiga, Gerardo; Toriello, Conchita

    2002-01-01

    Sporothrix schenckii isolates of fixed and lymphocutaneous clinical forms from Mexico (MX), Guatemala (GT), and Colombia (CO) as well as environmental isolates from MX were studied by analyzing their phenotypic characteristics (conidial length, thermotolerance by percent growth inhibition [GI] at 35 and 37°C, median lethal dose [LD50]) and genotypic characteristics (by random amplified polymorphic DNA [RAPD] analysis-PCR). A significant difference (P < 0.01) in the mean conidial length of S. schenckii clinical isolates from CO (\\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}\\overline{{\\mathit{x}}}\\end{equation*}\\end{document} = 4.03 ± 1.04 μm) compared with those of clinical isolates from MX (\\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}\\overline{{\\mathit{x}}}\\end{equation*}\\end{document} = 2.06 ± 0.53 μm) and GT (\\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}\\overline{{\\mathit{x}}}\\end{equation*}\\end{document} = 2.68 ± 0.83 μm) was observed. The lowest thermotolerance, as determined by measurement of percent GI, was exhibited by isolates from CO at 35°C (\\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}\\overline{{\\mathit{x}}}\\end{equation*}\\end{document} = 50.1% ± 15.9%) and 37°C (\\documentclass

  18. Classification of childhood asthma phenotypes and long-term clinical responses to inhaled anti-inflammatory medications

    PubMed Central

    Howrylak, Judie A.; Fuhlbrigge, Anne L.; Strunk, Robert C.; Zeiger, Robert S.; Weiss, Scott T.; Raby, Benjamin A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Although recent studies have identified the presence of phenotypic clusters in asthmatic patients, the clinical significance and temporal stability of these clusters have not been explored. Objective Our aim was to examine the clinical relevance and temporal stability of phenotypic clusters in children with asthma. Methods We applied spectral clustering to clinical data from 1041 children with asthma participating in the Childhood Asthma Management Program. Posttreatment randomization follow-up data collected over 48 months were used to determine the effect of these clusters on pulmonary function and treatment response to inhaled anti-inflammatory medication. Results We found 5 reproducible patient clusters that could be differentiated on the basis of 3 groups of features: atopic burden, degree of airway obstruction, and history of exacerbation. Cluster grouping predicted long-term asthma control, as measured by the need for oral prednisone (P < .0001) or additional controller medications (P = .001), as well as longitudinal differences in pulmonary function (P < .0001). We also found that the 2 clusters with the highest rates of exacerbation had different responses to inhaled corticosteroids when compared with the other clusters. One cluster demonstrated a positive response to both budesonide (P = .02) and nedocromil (P = .01) compared with placebo, whereas the other cluster demonstrated minimal responses to both budesonide (P = .12) and nedocromil (P = .56) compared with placebo. Conclusion Phenotypic clustering can be used to identify longitudinally consistent and clinically relevant patient subgroups, with implications for targeted therapeutic strategies and clinical trials design. PMID:24892144

  19. Identification and outcomes of clinical phenotypes in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/motor neuron disease: Australian National Motor Neuron Disease observational cohort

    PubMed Central

    Talman, Paul; Duong, Thi; Vucic, Steve; Mathers, Susan; Venkatesh, Svetha; Henderson, Robert; Rowe, Dominic; Schultz, David; Edis, Robert; Needham, Merrilee; Macdonnell, Richard; McCombe, Pamela; Birks, Carol; Kiernan, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Objective To capture the clinical patterns, timing of key milestones and survival of patients presenting with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/motor neuron disease (ALS/MND) within Australia. Methods Data were prospectively collected and were timed to normal clinical assessments. An initial registration clinical report form (CRF) and subsequent ongoing assessment CRFs were submitted with a completion CRF at the time of death. Design Prospective observational cohort study. Participants 1834 patients with a diagnosis of ALS/MND were registered and followed in ALS/MND clinics between 2005 and 2015. Results 5 major clinical phenotypes were determined and included ALS bulbar onset, ALS cervical onset and ALS lumbar onset, flail arm and leg and primary lateral sclerosis (PLS). Of the 1834 registered patients, 1677 (90%) could be allocated a clinical phenotype. ALS bulbar onset had a significantly lower length of survival when compared with all other clinical phenotypes (p<0.004). There were delays in the median time to diagnosis of up to 12 months for the ALS phenotypes, 18 months for the flail limb phenotypes and 19 months for PLS. Riluzole treatment was started in 78–85% of cases. The median delays in initiating riluzole therapy, from symptom onset, varied from 10 to 12 months in the ALS phenotypes and 15–18 months in the flail limb phenotypes. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy was implemented in 8–36% of ALS phenotypes and 2–9% of the flail phenotypes. Non-invasive ventilation was started in 16–22% of ALS phenotypes and 21–29% of flail phenotypes. Conclusions The establishment of a cohort registry for ALS/MND is able to determine clinical phenotypes, survival and monitor time to key milestones in disease progression. It is intended to expand the cohort to a more population-based registry using opt-out methodology and facilitate data linkage to other national registries. PMID:27694488

  20. PhenoVar: a phenotype-driven approach in clinical genomics for the diagnosis of polymalformative syndromes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background We propose a phenotype-driven analysis of encrypted exome data to facilitate the widespread implementation of exome sequencing as a clinical genetic screening test. Twenty test-patients with varied syndromes were selected from the literature. For each patient, the mutation, phenotypic data, and genetic diagnosis were available. Next, control exome-files, each modified to include one of these twenty mutations, were assigned to the corresponding test-patients. These data were used by a geneticist blinded to the diagnoses to test the efficiency of our software, PhenoVar. The score assigned by PhenoVar to any genetic diagnosis listed in OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man) took into consideration both the patient’s phenotype and all variations present in the corresponding exome. The physician did not have access to the individual mutations. PhenoVar filtered the search using a cut-off phenotypic match threshold to prevent undesired discovery of incidental findings and ranked the OMIM entries according to diagnostic score. Results When assigning the same weight to all variants in the exome, PhenoVar predicted the correct diagnosis in 10/20 patients, while in 15/20 the correct diagnosis was among the 4 highest ranked diagnoses. When assigning a higher weight to variants known, or bioinformatically predicted, to cause disease, PhenoVar’s yield increased to 14/20 (18/20 in top 4). No incidental findings were identified using our cut-off phenotypic threshold. Conclusion The phenotype-driven approach described could render widespread use of ES more practical, ethical and clinically useful. The implications about novel disease identification, advancement of complex diseases and personalized medicine are discussed. PMID:24884844

  1. Phenotypic Variation Is Almost Entirely Independent of the Host-Pathogen Relationship in Clinical Isolates of S. aureus

    PubMed Central

    Land, Adrian D.; Hogan, Patrick; Fritz, Stephanie; Levin, Petra Anne

    2015-01-01

    Background A key feature of Staphylococcus aureus biology is its ability to switch from an apparently benign colonizer of ~30% of the population to a cutaneous pathogen, to a deadly invasive pathogen. Little is known about the mechanisms driving this transition or the propensity of different S. aureus strains to engender different types of host-pathogen interactions. At the same time, significant weight has been given to the role of specific in vitro phenotypes in S. aureus virulence. Biofilm formation, hemolysis and pigment formation have all been associated with virulence in mice. Design To determine if there is a correlation between in vitro phenotype and the three types of host-pathogen relationships commonly exhibited by S. aureus in the context of its natural human host, we assayed 300 clinical isolates for phenotypes implicated in virulence including hemolysis, sensitivity to autolysis, and biofilm formation. For comparative purposes, we also assayed phenotype in 9 domesticated S. aureus strains routinely used for analysis of virulence determinants in laboratory settings. Results Strikingly, the clinical strains exhibited significant phenotypic uniformity in each of the assays evaluated in this study. One exception was a small, but significant, correlation between an increased propensity for biofilm formation and isolation from skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs). In contrast, we observed a high degree of phenotypic variation between common laboratory strains that exhibit virulence in mouse models. These data suggest the existence of significant evolutionary pressure on the S. aureus genome and highlight a role for host factors as a strong determinant of the host-pathogen relationship. In addition, the high degree of variation between laboratory strains emphasizes the need for caution when applying data obtained in one lab strain to the analysis of another. PMID:26098551

  2. Aggressive fibromatosis of anterior maxilla

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Devi C; Urs, Aadithya B; Ahuja, Puneet; Sikka, Seema

    2011-01-01

    Aggressive fibromatosis is a comparitively rare tumor with unpredictable growth and varying local recurrence rates. It does not develop distant metastases but locally it shows an aggressive and infiltrative behavior. Clinically, aggressive fibromatosis manifests as a painless, firm, often rapidly enlarging mass, fixed to underlying bone or soft tissue. It is never encapsulated. Histologically, it is rich in collagen and fibroblastic cells that are devoid of hyperchromatic or atypical nuclei, but with more variable cellularity in different tumor sections. PMID:21731285

  3. ISH PRE-2 THE VASCULAR PHENOTYPE IN HYPERTENSION - MOLECULAR MECHANISMS AND CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS.

    PubMed

    Touyz, Rhian M

    2016-09-01

    Pathophysiological mechanisms contributing to hypertension include endothelial dysfunction and vascular ignalling. These changes are initially adaptive but chronically become maladaptive leading to vascular damage and loss of function. Common to these processes are changes in the characteristics of vascular cells to a pro-infl ammatory, vasoconstrictory and proliferative phenotype, infl uenced by activation of the RAS and oxidative stress. Increased ROS production and decreased cellular antioxidant defense mechanisms, contribute to oxidative stress, which infl uences redox-sensitive Ang II ignalling that promotes vascular injury in hypertension. Clinical studies demonstrate that improved vascular function is associated with reduced hypertension-related target-organ damage. Accordingly approaches to promote vascular health should be a therapeutic priority. Such strategies include conventional antihypertensive drugs and lifestyle modifi cations, which reduce oxidative stress and dampen activation of injurious ignalling pathways. Novel approaches, such as Nox inhibitors, agents that increase antioxidant capacity (e.g. Nrf-2 activators), anti-infl ammatory immune-modulators and elements of counter-regulatory axis of the RAS, namely AT2R, Ang-(1-7) and Mas receptors, have potential in promoting vascular health and reducing blood pressure. This presentation highlights some molecular and cellular mechanisms that underlie vascular injury in hypertension, and focuses on strategies to ameliorate vascular damage. Novel concepts relating to redox ignalling will be discussed. By elucidating sub-cellular mechanisms new disease-specifi c vascular molecules will be identifi ed for development of innovative therapies to prevent/regress injury and thereby improve management of hypertension and associated target organ damage. PMID:27643158

  4. FG syndrome, an X-linked multiple congenital anomaly syndrome: The clinical phenotype and an algorithm for diagnostic testing

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Robin Dawn; Graham, John M.; Friez, Michael J.; Hoo, Joe J.; Jones, Kenneth Lyons; McKeown, Carole; Moeschler, John B.; Raymond, F. Lucy; Rogers, R. Curtis; Schwartz, Charles E.; Battaglia, Agatino; Lyons, Michael J.; Stevenson, Roger E.

    2014-01-01

    FG syndrome is a rare X-linked multiple congenital anomaly-cognitive impairment disorder caused by the p.R961W mutation in the MED12 gene. We identified all known patients with this mutation to delineate their clinical phenotype and devise a clinical algorithm to facilitate molecular diagnosis. We ascertained 23 males with the p.R961W mutation in MED12 from 9 previously reported FG syndrome families and 1 new family. Six patients are reviewed in detail. These 23 patients were compared with 48 MED12 mutation-negative patients, who had the clinical diagnosis of FG syndrome. Traits that best discriminated between these two groups were chosen to develop an algorithm with high sensitivity and specificity for the p.R961W MED12 mutation. FG syndrome has a recognizable dysmorphic phenotype with a high incidence of congenital anomalies. A family history of X-linked mental retardation, deceased male infants, and/or multiple fetal losses was documented in all families. The algorithm identifies the p.R961W MED12 mutation-positive group with 100% sensitivity and 90% spec-ificity. The clinical phenotype of FG syndrome defines a recognizable pattern of X-linked multiple congenital anomalies and cognitive impairment. This algorithm can assist the clinician in selecting the patients for testing who are most likely to have the recurrent p.R961W MED12 mutation. PMID:19938245

  5. Clinical significance of co-expression of MYC and BCL2 protein in aggressive B-cell lymphomas treated with a second line immunochemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Miura, Katsuhiro; Takahashi, Hiromichi; Nakagawa, Masaru; Izu, Asami; Sugitani, Masahiko; Kurita, Daisuke; Sakagami, Masashi; Ohtake, Shimon; Uchino, Yoshihito; Hojo, Atsuko; Kodaira, Hitomi; Yagi, Mai; Kobayashi, Yujin; Iriyama, Noriyoshi; Kobayashi, Sumiko; Kiso, Satomi; Hirabayashi, Yukio; Hatta, Yoshihiro; Takei, Masami

    2016-01-01

    The clinical significance of concurrent expression of MYC and BCL2 protein, known as "double-expressor lymphoma" (DEL), among patients with relapsed or refractory aggressive B-cell lymphomas, remains unclear. A retrospective analysis was performed of 38 patients treated with a salvage treatment consisting of rituximab, ifosfamide, etoposide, cytarabine and dexamethasone followed by consolidative high-dose chemotherapies. A total of 17 cases (45%) were categorized as DEL using immunohistochemical assay with a cut-off value of positivity of 40% for MYC and 50% for BCL2, respectively. DEL was associated with a lower overall response rate (35% vs 71%, p = 0.0481), worse 2-year progression-free survival (9% vs 67%, p = 0.001) and overall survival (35% vs 71%, p = 0.037). This analysis suggests that DEL is common among patients with relapsed/refractory aggressive B-cell lymphomas and that such patients require novel treatment strategies.

  6. A two-factor model of aggression.

    PubMed

    Kingsbury, S J; Lambert, M T; Hendrickse, W

    1997-01-01

    This article synthesizes theoretical material from psychology research into a practical model for conceptualizing violence in psychiatric settings. Relevant research and theory are reviewed, focusing on two important behavioral models of aggressive behavior, hostile aggression and instrumental aggression. The concepts of reinforcement, anticipated rewards, specific and nonspecific stimulus-driven aggression, intermediary emotional states in aroused persons, and the aggression stimulus threshold are developed into a bimodal model applicable to the clinical management of violence. The model provides a broad framework for categorizing, understanding, and addressing aggressive behavior in clinical settings.

  7. Network Modules of the Cross-Species Genotype-Phenotype Map Reflect the Clinical Severity of Human Diseases.

    PubMed

    Han, Seong Kyu; Kim, Inhae; Hwang, Jihye; Kim, Sanguk

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in genome sequencing techniques have improved our understanding of the genotype-phenotype relationship between genetic variants and human diseases. However, genetic variations uncovered from patient populations do not provide enough information to understand the mechanisms underlying the progression and clinical severity of human diseases. Moreover, building a high-resolution genotype-phenotype map is difficult due to the diverse genetic backgrounds of the human population. We built a cross-species genotype-phenotype map to explain the clinical severity of human genetic diseases. We developed a data-integrative framework to investigate network modules composed of human diseases mapped with gene essentiality measured from a model organism. Essential and nonessential genes connect diseases of different types which form clusters in the human disease network. In a large patient population study, we found that disease classes enriched with essential genes tended to show a higher mortality rate than disease classes enriched with nonessential genes. Moreover, high disease mortality rates are explained by the multiple comorbid relationships and the high pleiotropy of disease genes found in the essential gene-enriched diseases. Our results reveal that the genotype-phenotype map of a model organism can facilitate the identification of human disease-gene associations and predict human disease progression.

  8. Network Modules of the Cross-Species Genotype-Phenotype Map Reflect the Clinical Severity of Human Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Han, Seong Kyu; Kim, Inhae; Hwang, Jihye; Kim, Sanguk

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in genome sequencing techniques have improved our understanding of the genotype-phenotype relationship between genetic variants and human diseases. However, genetic variations uncovered from patient populations do not provide enough information to understand the mechanisms underlying the progression and clinical severity of human diseases. Moreover, building a high-resolution genotype-phenotype map is difficult due to the diverse genetic backgrounds of the human population. We built a cross-species genotype-phenotype map to explain the clinical severity of human genetic diseases. We developed a data-integrative framework to investigate network modules composed of human diseases mapped with gene essentiality measured from a model organism. Essential and nonessential genes connect diseases of different types which form clusters in the human disease network. In a large patient population study, we found that disease classes enriched with essential genes tended to show a higher mortality rate than disease classes enriched with nonessential genes. Moreover, high disease mortality rates are explained by the multiple comorbid relationships and the high pleiotropy of disease genes found in the essential gene-enriched diseases. Our results reveal that the genotype-phenotype map of a model organism can facilitate the identification of human disease-gene associations and predict human disease progression. PMID:26301634

  9. Novel Somatic Mutations in Primary Hyperaldosteronism are related to the Clinical, Radiological and Pathological Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Scholl, Ute I.; Healy, James M.; Thiel, Anne; Fonseca, Annabelle L.; Brown, Taylor C.; Kunstman, John W.; Horne, Matthew J.; Dietrich, Dimo; Riemer, Jasmin; Kücükköylü, Seher; Reimer, Esther N.; Reis, Anna-Carinna; Goh, Gerald; Kristiansen, Glen; Mahajan, Amit; Korah, Reju; Lifton, Richard P.; Prasad, Manju L.; Carling, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    Summary Aldosterone-producing adenomas (APAs) and bilateral adrenal hyperplasia are important causes of secondary hypertension. Somatic mutations in KCNJ5, CACNA1D, ATP1A1, ATP2B3 and CTNNB1 have been described in APAs. Objective To characterize clinical-pathological features in APAs and unilateral adrenal hyperplasia, and correlate them with genotypes. Design Retrospective study. Subjects and Measurements Clinical and pathological characteristics of 90 APAs and 7 diffusely or focally hyperplastic adrenal glands were reviewed, and samples were examined for mutations in known disease genes by Sanger or exome sequencing. Results Mutation frequencies were: KCNJ5, 37.1%; CACNA1D, 10.3%; ATP1A1, 8.2%; ATP2B3, 3.1%; CTNNB1, 2.1%. Previously unidentified mutations included I157K, F154C and 2 insertions (I150_G151insM and I144_E145insAI) in KCNJ5, all close to the selectivity filter, V426G_V427Q_A428_L433del in ATP2B3, and A39Efs*3 in CTNNB1. Mutations in KCNJ5 were associated with female, and other mutations with male gender (p=0.007). On computed tomography, KCNJ5-mutant tumors displayed significantly greater diameter (p=0.023), calculated area (p=0.002) and lower pre-contrast Hounsfield Units (p=0.0002) vs. tumors with mutations in other genes. Accordingly, KCNJ5-mutant tumors were predominantly comprised of lipid-rich fasciculata-like clear cells, whereas other tumors were heterogeneous (p=5×10−6 vs. non-KCNJ5 mutant and p=0.0003 vs. wild type tumors, respectively). CACNA1D mutations were present in two samples with hyperplasia without adenoma. Conclusions KCNJ5 mutant tumors appear to be associated with fasciculata-like clear cell predominant histology and tend to be larger with a characteristic imaging phenotype. Novel somatic KCNJ5 variants likely cause adenomas by loss of potassium selectivity, similar to previously described mutations. PMID:26252618

  10. On the Links between Aggressive Behaviour, Loneliness, and Patterns of Close Relationships among Non-Clinical School-Age Boys

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Yagon, Michal

    2008-01-01

    This study explored multifaceted associations between children's aggressive behaviours and loneliness feelings by identifying sub-groups of children with different individual profiles, and also examined whether profiles associated differently with children's quality of close relationships with mothers and peers. Participants were 145 non-clinical…

  11. Explosive, Oppositional, and Aggressive Behavior in Children with Autism Compared to Other Clinical Disorders and Typical Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayes, Susan Dickerson; Calhoun, Susan L.; Aggarwal, Richa; Baker, Courtney; Mathapati, Santoshkumar; Anderson, Robert; Petersen, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    Maternal ratings of explosiveness, opposition, and aggression were analyzed in 1609 children 6-16 years of age. Behavior problems were common in autism, ADHD-Combined type, and depression, whereas children with ADHD-Inattentive type, anxiety disorder, and acquired brain injury did not differ from typical controls. More than 40% of children with…

  12. Does the clinical phenotype of fatal familial insomnia depend on PRNP codon 129 methionine-valine polymorphism?

    PubMed

    Rupprecht, Sven; Grimm, Alexander; Schultze, Torsten; Zinke, Jan; Karvouniari, Panagiota; Axer, Hubertus; Witte, Otto W; Schwab, Matthias

    2013-12-15

    Fatal familial insomnia (FFI) is a rare, hereditary prion-protein disease. Methionine-valine polymorphism at codon 129 of the prion-protein gene (PRNP) determines the phenotype in other hereditary prion-protein diseases, but association with the clinical phenotype in FFI remains uncertain. Early clinical findings in FFI comprise disturbances of the sleep-wake cycle and mild neuropsychiatric changes which typically emerge during middle to late adulthood. Here we describe an unusually early onset and rapid progression of FFI associated with dorsal midbrain involvement in a female patient with PRNP mutation at codon 178 and homozygote methionine polymorphism at codon 129. Early dorsal midbrain involvement became apparent by total loss of REM sleep and isolated bilateral trochlear nerve palsy. Early onset and rapid progression disease type associated with dorsal midbrain involvement may indicate a different spatiotemporal distribution of the neurodegenerative process in FFI patients with PRNP mutation and codon 129 methionine homozygosity compared to methioninevaline heterozygosity.

  13. Clinical Phenotype Classifications Based on Static Varus Alignment and Varus Thrust in Japanese Patients With Medial Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Iijima, Hirotaka; Fukutani, Naoto; Fukumoto, Takahiko; Uritani, Daisuke; Kaneda, Eishi; Ota, Kazuo; Kuroki, Hiroshi; Matsuda, Shuichi

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the association between knee pain during gait and 4 clinical phenotypes based on static varus alignment and varus thrust in patients with medial knee osteoarthritis (OA). Methods Patients in an orthopedic clinic (n = 266) diagnosed as having knee OA (Kellgren/Lawrence [K/L] grade ≥1) were divided into 4 phenotype groups according to the presence or absence of static varus alignment and varus thrust (dynamic varus): no varus (n = 173), dynamic varus (n = 17), static varus (n = 50), and static varus + dynamic varus (n = 26). The knee range of motion, spatiotemporal gait parameters, visual analog scale scores for knee pain, and scores on the Japanese Knee Osteoarthritis Measure were used to assess clinical outcomes. Multiple logistic regression analyses identified the relationship between knee pain during gait and the 4 phenotypes, adjusted for possible risk factors, including age, sex, body mass index, K/L grade, and gait velocity. Results Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that varus thrust without varus alignment was associated with knee pain during gait (odds ratio [OR] 3.30, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1.08–12.4), and that varus thrust combined with varus alignment was strongly associated with knee pain during gait (OR 17.1, 95% CI 3.19–320.0). Sensitivity analyses applying alternative cutoff values for defining static varus alignment showed comparable results. Conclusion Varus thrust with or without static varus alignment was associated with the occurrence of knee pain during gait. Tailored interventions based on individual malalignment phenotypes may improve clinical outcomes in patients with knee OA. PMID:26017348

  14. Overexpression of Lon contributes to survival and aggressive phenotype of cancer cells through mitochondrial complex I-mediated generation of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Cheng, C-W; Kuo, C-Y; Fan, C-C; Fang, W-C; Jiang, S S; Lo, Y-K; Wang, T-Y; Kao, M-C; Lee, A Y-L

    2013-06-20

    Lon protease is a multifunction protein and operates in protein quality control and stress response pathways in mitochondria. Human Lon is upregulated under oxidative and hypoxic stresses that represent the stress phenotypes of cancer. However, little literature undertakes comprehensive and detailed investigations on the tumorigenic role of Lon. Overexpression of Lon promotes cell proliferation, apoptotic resistance to stresses, and transformation. Furthermore, Lon overexpression induces the production of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) that result from Lon-mediated upregulation of NDUFS8, a mitochondrial Fe-S protein in complex I of electron transport chain. Increased level of mitochondrial ROS promotes cell proliferation, cell survival, cell migration, and epithelial-mesenchymal transition through mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and Ras-ERK activation. Overall, the present report for the first time demonstrates the role of Lon overexpression in tumorigenesis. Lon overexpression gives an apoptotic resistance to stresses and induces mitochondrial ROS production through Complex I as signaling molecules to activate Ras and MAPK signaling, giving the survival advantages and adaptation to cancer cells. Finally, in silico and immunohistochemistry analysis showed that Lon is overexpressed specifically in various types of cancer tissue including oral cancer.

  15. Cerebrospinal fluid total tau concentration predicts clinical phenotype in Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Filipe Brogueira; Byrne, Lauren; McColgan, Peter; Robertson, Nicola; Tabrizi, Sarah J; Leavitt, Blair R; Zetterberg, Henrik; Wild, Edward J

    2016-10-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a hereditary neurodegenerative condition with no therapeutic intervention known to alter disease progression, but several trials are ongoing and biomarkers of disease progression are needed. Tau is an axonal protein, often altered in neurodegeneration, and recent studies pointed out its role on HD neuropathology. Our goal was to study whether cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) tau is a biomarker of disease progression in HD. After informed consent, healthy controls, pre-symptomatic and symptomatic gene expansion carriers were recruited from two HD clinics. All participants underwent assessment with the Unified HD Rating Scale '99 (UHDRS). CSF was obtained according to a standardized lumbar puncture protocol. CSF tau was quantified using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Comparisons between two groups were tested using ancova. Pearson's correlation coefficients were calculated for disease progression. Significance level was defined as p < 0.05. Seventy-six participants were included in this cross-sectional multicenter international pilot study. Age-adjusted CSF tau was significantly elevated in gene expansion carriers compared with healthy controls (p = 0.002). UHDRS total functional capacity was significantly correlated with CSF tau (r = -0.29, p = 0.004) after adjustment for age, and UHDRS total motor score was significantly correlated with CSF tau after adjustment for age (r = 0.32, p = 0.002). Several UHDRS cognitive tasks were also significantly correlated with CST total tau after age-adjustment. This study confirms that CSF tau concentrations in HD gene mutation carriers are increased compared with healthy controls and reports for the first time that CSF tau concentration is associated with phenotypic variability in HD. These conclusions strengthen the case for CSF tau as a biomarker in HD. In the era of novel targeted approaches to Huntington's disease, reliable biomarkers are needed. We quantified Tau protein, a marker of

  16. Cerebrospinal fluid total tau concentration predicts clinical phenotype in Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Filipe Brogueira; Byrne, Lauren; McColgan, Peter; Robertson, Nicola; Tabrizi, Sarah J; Leavitt, Blair R; Zetterberg, Henrik; Wild, Edward J

    2016-10-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a hereditary neurodegenerative condition with no therapeutic intervention known to alter disease progression, but several trials are ongoing and biomarkers of disease progression are needed. Tau is an axonal protein, often altered in neurodegeneration, and recent studies pointed out its role on HD neuropathology. Our goal was to study whether cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) tau is a biomarker of disease progression in HD. After informed consent, healthy controls, pre-symptomatic and symptomatic gene expansion carriers were recruited from two HD clinics. All participants underwent assessment with the Unified HD Rating Scale '99 (UHDRS). CSF was obtained according to a standardized lumbar puncture protocol. CSF tau was quantified using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Comparisons between two groups were tested using ancova. Pearson's correlation coefficients were calculated for disease progression. Significance level was defined as p < 0.05. Seventy-six participants were included in this cross-sectional multicenter international pilot study. Age-adjusted CSF tau was significantly elevated in gene expansion carriers compared with healthy controls (p = 0.002). UHDRS total functional capacity was significantly correlated with CSF tau (r = -0.29, p = 0.004) after adjustment for age, and UHDRS total motor score was significantly correlated with CSF tau after adjustment for age (r = 0.32, p = 0.002). Several UHDRS cognitive tasks were also significantly correlated with CST total tau after age-adjustment. This study confirms that CSF tau concentrations in HD gene mutation carriers are increased compared with healthy controls and reports for the first time that CSF tau concentration is associated with phenotypic variability in HD. These conclusions strengthen the case for CSF tau as a biomarker in HD. In the era of novel targeted approaches to Huntington's disease, reliable biomarkers are needed. We quantified Tau protein, a marker of

  17. Association of phenotypic and genotypic characteristics of invasive Streptococcus pyogenes isolates with clinical components of streptococcal toxic shock syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Talkington, D F; Schwartz, B; Black, C M; Todd, J K; Elliott, J; Breiman, R F; Facklam, R R

    1993-01-01

    Sixty-two invasive Streptococcus pyogenes strains, including 32 strains isolated from patients with streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS), were analyzed for the following phenotypic and genotypic characteristics: M-protein type, serum opacity factor production, protease production, the presence of streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin (Spe) genes A, B, and C, and in vitro production of SpeA and SpeB. These characteristics were analyzed for possible associations with each other as well as with clinical components of STSS. M-type 1, the most commonly isolated M-type, was significantly associated with protease production. Protease activity was significantly associated with the clinical sign of soft tissue necrosis. M-type 1 and 3 strains from STSS patients were significantly associated with the clinical signs of shock and organ involvement as well as with SpeA production in vitro. Finally, the production of SpeA was significantly associated with the clinical component of shock and organ involvement as well as with rash. These data suggest that STSS does not make up a single syndrome but, rather, that the multiple STSS clinical criteria probably reflect different phenotypic characteristics of individual S. pyogenes isolates. PMID:8335368

  18. Subtelomeric 6p25 deletion/duplication: Report of a patient with new clinical findings and genotype-phenotype correlations.

    PubMed

    Linhares, Natália D; Svartman, Marta; Rodrigues, Tatiane C; Rosenberg, Carla; Valadares, Eugênia R

    2015-05-01

    The 6p terminal deletions are rare and present variability of clinical features, which increases the importance of reporting additional cases in order to better characterize genotype-phenotype correlations. We report a 12-year-old girl with a de novo deletion in 6p25.1-pter characterized by high-resolution karyotyping and FISH. Further analysis using oligonucleotide array-CGH revealed a 5.06 Mb 6p25.1-pter deletion associated with a contiguous 1 Mb 6p25.1 duplication. The patient presented normal growth, developmental delay, frontal bossing, severe hypertelorism, corectopia, wide and depressed nasal bridge, mild learning disability, hearing loss and diffuse leukopathy. Additionaly, she presented peculiar phenotypic features reported herein for the first time in 6p25 deletion syndrome: cerebrospinal fluid fistula and bones resembling those seen in 3-M syndrome. The distinctive phenotype of the 6p25 deletion syndrome has been mainly correlated with the FOXC1 and FOXF2 genes deletions, both related mainly to eye development. We also consider the SERPINB6 as a candidate for sensorineural hearing loss and TUBB2A as a candidate for our patient's skeletal features. In addition, as our patient had a duplication including NRN1, a gene related with neurodevelopment, synaptic plasticity and cognitive dysfunction in schizophrenia, we suggest that this gene could be associated with her white matter abnormalities and neurocognitive phenotype. PMID:25817395

  19. Subtelomeric 6p25 deletion/duplication: Report of a patient with new clinical findings and genotype-phenotype correlations.

    PubMed

    Linhares, Natália D; Svartman, Marta; Rodrigues, Tatiane C; Rosenberg, Carla; Valadares, Eugênia R

    2015-05-01

    The 6p terminal deletions are rare and present variability of clinical features, which increases the importance of reporting additional cases in order to better characterize genotype-phenotype correlations. We report a 12-year-old girl with a de novo deletion in 6p25.1-pter characterized by high-resolution karyotyping and FISH. Further analysis using oligonucleotide array-CGH revealed a 5.06 Mb 6p25.1-pter deletion associated with a contiguous 1 Mb 6p25.1 duplication. The patient presented normal growth, developmental delay, frontal bossing, severe hypertelorism, corectopia, wide and depressed nasal bridge, mild learning disability, hearing loss and diffuse leukopathy. Additionaly, she presented peculiar phenotypic features reported herein for the first time in 6p25 deletion syndrome: cerebrospinal fluid fistula and bones resembling those seen in 3-M syndrome. The distinctive phenotype of the 6p25 deletion syndrome has been mainly correlated with the FOXC1 and FOXF2 genes deletions, both related mainly to eye development. We also consider the SERPINB6 as a candidate for sensorineural hearing loss and TUBB2A as a candidate for our patient's skeletal features. In addition, as our patient had a duplication including NRN1, a gene related with neurodevelopment, synaptic plasticity and cognitive dysfunction in schizophrenia, we suggest that this gene could be associated with her white matter abnormalities and neurocognitive phenotype.

  20. A Rare Case of Aggressive Digital Adenocarcinoma of the Lower Extremity, Masquerading as an Ulcerative Lesion that Clinically Favored Benignancy

    PubMed Central

    Vazales, Ryan; Constant, Dustin; Snyder, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    A rare case report of Aggressive Digital Adenocarcinoma (ADPCa) is presented complete with a literature review encompassing lesions that pose potential diagnostic challenges. Similarities between basal cell carcinoma (BCC), marjolin’s ulceration/squamous cell carcinoma (MSCC) and ADPCa are discussed. This article discusses potential treatment options for ADPCa and the need for early biopsy when faced with any challenging lesion. An algorithmic approach to ADPCa treatment based on the most current research is recommended. PMID:27429279

  1. Genetic and clinical characterization of Pakistani families with Bardet-Biedl syndrome extends the genetic and phenotypic spectrum

    PubMed Central

    Maria, Maleeha; Lamers, Ideke J. C.; Schmidts, Miriam; Ajmal, Muhammad; Jaffar, Sulman; Ullah, Ehsan; Mustafa, Bilal; Ahmad, Shakeel; Nazmutdinova, Katia; Hoskins, Bethan; van Wijk, Erwin; Koster-Kamphuis, Linda; Khan, Muhammad Imran; Beales, Phil L.; Cremers, Frans P. M.; Roepman, Ronald; Azam, Maleeha; Arts, Heleen H.; Qamar, Raheel

    2016-01-01

    Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) is an autosomal recessive disorder that is both genetically and clinically heterogeneous. To date 19 genes have been associated with BBS, which encode proteins active at the primary cilium, an antenna-like organelle that acts as the cell’s signaling hub. In the current study, a combination of mutation screening, targeted sequencing of ciliopathy genes associated with BBS, and whole-exome sequencing was used for the genetic characterization of five families including four with classic BBS symptoms and one BBS-like syndrome. This resulted in the identification of novel mutations in BBS genes ARL6 and BBS5, and recurrent mutations in BBS9 and CEP164. In the case of CEP164, this is the first report of two siblings with a BBS-like syndrome with mutations in this gene. Mutations in this gene were previously associated with nephronophthisis 15, thus the current results expand the CEP164-associated phenotypic spectrum. The clinical and genetic spectrum of BBS and BBS-like phenotypes is not fully defined in Pakistan. Therefore, genetic studies are needed to gain insights into genotype-phenotype correlations, which will in turn improve the clinician’s ability to make an early and accurate diagnosis, and facilitate genetic counseling, leading to directly benefiting families with affected individuals. PMID:27708425

  2. Understanding Aggression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, J. P.

    Research in many fields of the social and biological sciences indicates that there are ecological, cultural, social, psychological, physiological, and genetic causes of aggression. The agonistic behavior system, which adapts to situations of social conflict, includes several patterns of conduct ranging from overt fighting to complete passivity. In…

  3. Normalization of Phenotypic Data from a Clinical Data Warehouse: Case Study of Heterogeneous Blood Type Data with Surprising Results.

    PubMed

    Cimino, James J

    2015-01-01

    Clinical data warehouses often contain analogous data from disparate sources, resulting in heterogeneous formats and semantics. We have developed an approach that attempts to represent such phenotypic data in its most atomic form to facilitate aggregation. We illustrate this approach with human blood antigen typing (ABO-Rh) data drawn from the National Institutes of Health's Biomedical Translational Research Information System (BTRIS). In applying the method to actual patient data, we discovered a 2% incidence of changed blood types. We believe our approach can be applied to any institution's data to obtain comparable patient phenotypes. The actual discrepant blood type data will form the basis for a future study of the reasons for blood typing variation.

  4. Normalization of Phenotypic Data from a Clinical Data Warehouse: Case Study of Heterogeneous Blood Type Data with Surprising Results.

    PubMed

    Cimino, James J

    2015-01-01

    Clinical data warehouses often contain analogous data from disparate sources, resulting in heterogeneous formats and semantics. We have developed an approach that attempts to represent such phenotypic data in its most atomic form to facilitate aggregation. We illustrate this approach with human blood antigen typing (ABO-Rh) data drawn from the National Institutes of Health's Biomedical Translational Research Information System (BTRIS). In applying the method to actual patient data, we discovered a 2% incidence of changed blood types. We believe our approach can be applied to any institution's data to obtain comparable patient phenotypes. The actual discrepant blood type data will form the basis for a future study of the reasons for blood typing variation. PMID:26262113

  5. Elderly Patients with Dementia-Related Symptoms of Severe Agitation and Aggression: Consensus Statement on Treatment Options, Clinical Trials Methodology, and Policy

    PubMed Central

    Salzman, C; Jeste, D; Meyer, RE; Cohen-Mansfield, J; Cummings, J; Grossberg, G; Jarvik, L; Kraemer, H; Lebowitz, B; Maslow, K; Pollock, B; Raskind, M; Schultz, S; Wang, P; Zito, JM; Zubenko, GS

    2009-01-01

    Atypical antipsychotic drugs have been used off-label in clinical practice for treatment of serious dementia-associated agitation and aggression. Following reports of cerebrovascular adverse events associated with the use of atypical antipsychotic in elderly patients with dementia, the FDA issued black box warnings for several atypical antipsychotics, titled “Cerebrovascular Adverse Events, including Stroke, in Elderly Patients with Dementia.” Subsequently, the FDA initiated a meta-analysis of safety data from 17 registration trials across six antipsychotic drugs (five atypical antipsychotics and haloperidol). In 2005, the Agency issued a black box warning regarding increased risk of mortality associated with the use of atypical antipsychotic drugs in this patient population. Geriatric mental health experts participating in a 2006 consensus conference reviewed evidence on the safety and efficacy of antipsychotics, as well as nonpharmacologic approaches, in treating dementia-related symptoms of agitation and aggression. They concluded that, while problems in clinical trials design may have been one of the contributors to the failure to find a signal of drug efficacy, the findings related to drug safety should be taken seriously by clinicians in assessing the potential risks and benefits of treatment in a frail population, and in advising families about treatment. Information provided to patients and family members should be documented in the patient’s chart. Drugs should be used only when non-pharmacologic approaches have failed to adequately control behavioral disruption. Participants also agreed that that there is a need for an FDA-approved medication for the treatment of severe, persistent or recurrent dementia-related symptoms of agitation and aggression (even in the absence of psychosis), that are unresponsive to nonpharmacologic intervention. The authors have outlined methodological enhancements to better evaluate treatment approaches in future

  6. Preservation of cell-survival mechanisms by the presenilin-1 K239N mutation may cause its milder clinical phenotype.

    PubMed

    Sarroca, Sara; Molina-Martínez, Patricia; Aresté, Cristina; Etzrodt, Martin; García de Frutos, Pablo; Gasa, Rosa; Antonell, Anna; Molinuevo, José Luís; Sánchez-Valle, Raquel; Saura, Carlos A; Lladó, Albert; Sanfeliu, Coral

    2016-10-01

    Presenilin 1 (PSEN1) mutations are the main cause of monogenic Alzheimer's disease. We studied the functional effects of the mutation K239N, which shows incomplete penetrance at the age of 65 years and compared it with the more aggressive mutation E120G. We engineered stable cell lines expressing human PSEN1 wild type or with K239N or E120G mutations. Both mutations induced dysfunction of γ-secretase in the processing of amyloid-β protein precursor, leading to an increase in the amyloid β42/amyloid β40 ratio. Analysis of homeostatic mechanisms showed that K239N induced lower basal and hydrogen peroxide induced intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species than E120G. Similarly, K239N induced lower vulnerability to apoptosis by hydrogen peroxide injury than E120G. Accordingly, the proapoptotic signaling pathways c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase maintained PSEN1-mediated negative regulation in K239N but not in E120G-bearing cells. Furthermore, the activation of the prosurvival signaling pathways mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase and phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt was lower in E120G-bearing cells. Therefore, preservation of mechanisms regulating cell responses independent of amyloid-β protein precursor processing may account for the milder phenotype induced by the PSEN1 K239N mutation.

  7. Preservation of cell-survival mechanisms by the presenilin-1 K239N mutation may cause its milder clinical phenotype.

    PubMed

    Sarroca, Sara; Molina-Martínez, Patricia; Aresté, Cristina; Etzrodt, Martin; García de Frutos, Pablo; Gasa, Rosa; Antonell, Anna; Molinuevo, José Luís; Sánchez-Valle, Raquel; Saura, Carlos A; Lladó, Albert; Sanfeliu, Coral

    2016-10-01

    Presenilin 1 (PSEN1) mutations are the main cause of monogenic Alzheimer's disease. We studied the functional effects of the mutation K239N, which shows incomplete penetrance at the age of 65 years and compared it with the more aggressive mutation E120G. We engineered stable cell lines expressing human PSEN1 wild type or with K239N or E120G mutations. Both mutations induced dysfunction of γ-secretase in the processing of amyloid-β protein precursor, leading to an increase in the amyloid β42/amyloid β40 ratio. Analysis of homeostatic mechanisms showed that K239N induced lower basal and hydrogen peroxide induced intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species than E120G. Similarly, K239N induced lower vulnerability to apoptosis by hydrogen peroxide injury than E120G. Accordingly, the proapoptotic signaling pathways c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase maintained PSEN1-mediated negative regulation in K239N but not in E120G-bearing cells. Furthermore, the activation of the prosurvival signaling pathways mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase and phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt was lower in E120G-bearing cells. Therefore, preservation of mechanisms regulating cell responses independent of amyloid-β protein precursor processing may account for the milder phenotype induced by the PSEN1 K239N mutation. PMID:27498054

  8. Clinical Genetic Testing for the Cardiomyopathies and Arrhythmias: A Systematic Framework for Establishing Clinical Validity and Addressing Genotypic and Phenotypic Heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, John; Tahiliani, Jackie; Johnson, Nicole Marie; Aguilar, Sienna; Beltran, Daniel; Daly, Amy; Decker, Emily; Haverfield, Eden; Herrera, Blanca; Murillo, Laura; Nykamp, Keith; Topper, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Advances in DNA sequencing have made large, diagnostic gene panels affordable and efficient. Broad adoption of such panels has begun to deliver on the promises of personalized medicine, but has also brought new challenges such as the presence of unexpected results, or results of uncertain clinical significance. Genetic analysis of inherited cardiac conditions is particularly challenging due to the extensive genetic heterogeneity underlying cardiac phenotypes, and the overlapping, variable, and incompletely penetrant nature of their clinical presentations. The design of effective diagnostic tests and the effective use of the results depend on a clear understanding of the relationship between each gene and each considered condition. To address these issues, we developed simple, systematic approaches to three fundamental challenges: (1) evaluating the strength of the evidence suggesting that a particular condition is caused by pathogenic variants in a particular gene, (2) evaluating whether unusual genotype/phenotype observations represent a plausible expansion of clinical phenotype associated with a gene, and (3) establishing a molecular diagnostic strategy to capture overlapping clinical presentations. These approaches focus on the systematic evaluation of the pathogenicity of variants identified in clinically affected individuals, and the natural history of disease in those individuals. Here, we applied these approaches to the evaluation of more than 100 genes reported to be associated with inherited cardiomyopathies and arrhythmias including hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, dilated cardiomyopathy, arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia or cardiomyopathy, long QT syndrome, short QT syndrome, Brugada, and catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia, and to a set of related syndromes such as Noonan Syndrome and Fabry disease. These approaches provide a framework for delivering meaningful and accurate genetic test results to individuals with hereditary

  9. Clinical Genetic Testing for the Cardiomyopathies and Arrhythmias: A Systematic Framework for Establishing Clinical Validity and Addressing Genotypic and Phenotypic Heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Garcia, John; Tahiliani, Jackie; Johnson, Nicole Marie; Aguilar, Sienna; Beltran, Daniel; Daly, Amy; Decker, Emily; Haverfield, Eden; Herrera, Blanca; Murillo, Laura; Nykamp, Keith; Topper, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Advances in DNA sequencing have made large, diagnostic gene panels affordable and efficient. Broad adoption of such panels has begun to deliver on the promises of personalized medicine, but has also brought new challenges such as the presence of unexpected results, or results of uncertain clinical significance. Genetic analysis of inherited cardiac conditions is particularly challenging due to the extensive genetic heterogeneity underlying cardiac phenotypes, and the overlapping, variable, and incompletely penetrant nature of their clinical presentations. The design of effective diagnostic tests and the effective use of the results depend on a clear understanding of the relationship between each gene and each considered condition. To address these issues, we developed simple, systematic approaches to three fundamental challenges: (1) evaluating the strength of the evidence suggesting that a particular condition is caused by pathogenic variants in a particular gene, (2) evaluating whether unusual genotype/phenotype observations represent a plausible expansion of clinical phenotype associated with a gene, and (3) establishing a molecular diagnostic strategy to capture overlapping clinical presentations. These approaches focus on the systematic evaluation of the pathogenicity of variants identified in clinically affected individuals, and the natural history of disease in those individuals. Here, we applied these approaches to the evaluation of more than 100 genes reported to be associated with inherited cardiomyopathies and arrhythmias including hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, dilated cardiomyopathy, arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia or cardiomyopathy, long QT syndrome, short QT syndrome, Brugada, and catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia, and to a set of related syndromes such as Noonan Syndrome and Fabry disease. These approaches provide a framework for delivering meaningful and accurate genetic test results to individuals with hereditary

  10. MicroRNA-378-mediated suppression of Runx1 alleviates the aggressive phenotype of triple negative MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Browne, Gillian; Dragon, Julie A.; Hong, Deli; Messier, Terri L.; Gordon, Jonathan A. R.; Farina, Nicholas H.; Boyd, Joseph R.; VanOudenhove, Jennifer J.; Perez, Andrew W.; Zaidi, Sayyed K.; Stein, Janet L.; Stein, Gary S.; Lian, Jane B.

    2016-01-01

    The Runx1 transcription factor, known for its essential role normal hematopoiesis, was reported in limited studies to be mutated or associated with human breast tumor tissues. Runx 1 increases concomitant with disease progression in the MMTV-PyMT transgenic mouse model of breast cancer. Compelling questions relate to mechanisms that regulate Runx1 expression in breast cancer. Here, we tested the hypothesis that dysregulation of Runx1-targeting microRNAs (miRNAs) allows for pathologic increase of Runx1 during breast cancer progression. Microarray profiling of the MMTV-PyMT model revealed significant down-regulation of numerous miRNAs predicted to target Runx1. One of these, miR-378, was inversely correlated with Runx1 expression during breast cancer progression in mouse, and in human breast cancer cell lines MCF7 and triple negative MDA-MB-231 that represent early and late stage disease, respectively. MiR-378 is nearly absent in MDA-MB-231 cells. Luciferase reporter assays revealed that miR-378 binds the Runx1 3′UTR and inhibits Runx1 expression. Functionally, we demonstrated that ectopic expression of miR-378 in MDA-MB-231 cells inhibited Runx1 and suppressed migration and invasion; while inhibition of miR-378 in MCF7 cells increased Runx1 levels and cell migration. Depletion of Runx1 in late stage breast cancer cells resulted in increased expression of both the miR-378 host gene PPARGC1B and pre-miR-378, suggesting a feedback loop. Taken together, our study identifies a novel and clinically relevant mechanism for regulation of Runx1 in breast cancer that is mediated by a PPARGC1B-miR-378-Runx1 regulatory pathway. Our results highlight the translational potential of miRNA replacement therapy for inhibiting Runx1 in breast cancer. PMID:26749280

  11. Frequent amplification of ORAOV1 gene in esophageal squamous cell cancer promotes an aggressive phenotype via proline metabolism and ROS production

    PubMed Central

    Togashi, Yosuke; Arao, Tokuzo; Kato, Hiroaki; Matsumoto, Kazuko; Terashima, Masato; Hayashi, Hidetoshi; de Velasco, Marco A; Fujita, Yoshihiko; Kimura, Hideharu; Yasuda, Takushi; Shiozaki, Hitoshi; Nishio, Kazuto

    2014-01-01

    Chromosomal band 11q13 seems to be one of the most frequently amplified lesions in human cancer, including esophageal squamous cell cancer (ESCC). The oral cancer overexpressed 1 (ORAOV1) gene has been identified within this region, but its detailed biological function in human ESCC remains largely unclear. In our clinical samples of stage III ESCC, ORAOV1 amplification was observed in 49 of 94 cases (53%). ORAOV1 amplification was significantly associated with a poorly differentiated histology and tumors located in the upper or middle esophagus. Patients with ORAOV1 amplification tended to have a shorter survival period, although the difference was not significant. To investigate the function of ORAOV1, we created ORAOV1-overexpressed ESCC cell lines that exhibited increased cellular proliferation and colony formation, compared with in vitro controls. In vivo, ORAOV1-overexpressed cells exhibited a significantly increased tumorigenicity and a significantly larger tumor volume and poorer differentiation than controls. The peptide mass fingerprinting technique demonstrated that ORAOV1 bound to pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase (PYCR), which is associated with proline metabolism and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Then, ORAOV1-overexpressed cell lines were resistant to stress treatment, which was cancelled by PYCR-knockdown. In addition, the ORAOV1-overexpressed cell line had a higher intracellular proline concentration and a lower ROS level. Our findings indicate that the ORAOV1 gene is frequently amplified in ESCC, enhances tumorigenicity and tumor growth, and is associated with a poorly differentiated tumor histology via proline metabolism and ROS production. ORAOV1 could be a novel target for the treatment of ESCC. PMID:24930674

  12. In1-ghrelin, a splice variant of ghrelin gene, is associated with the evolution and aggressiveness of human neuroendocrine tumors: Evidence from clinical, cellular and molecular parameters.

    PubMed

    Luque, Raul M; Sampedro-Nuñez, Miguel; Gahete, Manuel D; Ramos-Levi, Ana; Ibáñez-Costa, Alejandro; Rivero-Cortés, Esther; Serrano-Somavilla, Ana; Adrados, Magdalena; Culler, Michael D; Castaño, Justo P; Marazuela, Mónica

    2015-08-14

    Ghrelin system comprises a complex family of peptides, receptors (GHSRs), and modifying enzymes [e.g. ghrelin-O-acyl-transferase (GOAT)] that control multiple pathophysiological processes. Aberrant alternative splicing is an emerging cancer hallmark that generates altered proteins with tumorigenic capacity. Indeed, In1-ghrelin and truncated-GHSR1b splicing variants can promote development/progression of certain endocrine-related cancers. Here, we determined the expression levels of key ghrelin system components in neuroendocrine tumor (NETs) and explored their potential functional role. Twenty-six patients with NETs were prospectively/retrospectively studied [72 samples from primary and metastatic tissues (30 normal/42 tumors)] and clinical data were obtained. The role of In1-ghrelin in aggressiveness was studied in vitro using NET cell lines (BON-1/QGP-1). In1-ghrelin, GOAT and GHSR1a/1b expression levels were elevated in tumoral compared to normal/adjacent tissues. Moreover, In1-ghrelin, GOAT, and GHSR1b expression levels were positively correlated within tumoral, but not within normal/adjacent samples, and were higher in patients with progressive vs. with stable/cured disease. Finally, In1-ghrelin increased aggressiveness (e.g. proliferation/migration) of NET cells. Altogether, our data strongly suggests a potential implication of ghrelin system in the pathogenesis and/or clinical outcome of NETs, and warrant further studies on their possible value for the future development of molecular biomarkers with diagnostic/prognostic/therapeutic value.

  13. In1-ghrelin, a splice variant of ghrelin gene, is associated with the evolution and aggressiveness of human neuroendocrine tumors: Evidence from clinical, cellular and molecular parameters

    PubMed Central

    Gahete, Manuel D.; Ramos-Levi, Ana; Ibáñez-Costa, Alejandro; Rivero-Cortés, Esther; Serrano-Somavilla, Ana; Adrados, Magdalena; Culler, Michael D.; Castaño, Justo P.; Marazuela, Mónica

    2015-01-01

    Ghrelin system comprises a complex family of peptides, receptors (GHSRs), and modifying enzymes [e.g. ghrelin-O-acyl-transferase (GOAT)] that control multiple pathophysiological processes. Aberrant alternative splicing is an emerging cancer hallmark that generates altered proteins with tumorigenic capacity. Indeed, In1-ghrelin and truncated-GHSR1b splicing variants can promote development/progression of certain endocrine-related cancers. Here, we determined the expression levels of key ghrelin system components in neuroendocrine tumor (NETs) and explored their potential functional role. Twenty-six patients with NETs were prospectively/retrospectively studied [72 samples from primary and metastatic tissues (30 normal/42 tumors)] and clinical data were obtained. The role of In1-ghrelin in aggressiveness was studied in vitro using NET cell lines (BON-1/QGP-1). In1-ghrelin, GOAT and GHSR1a/1b expression levels were elevated in tumoral compared to normal/adjacent tissues. Moreover, In1-ghrelin, GOAT, and GHSR1b expression levels were positively correlated within tumoral, but not within normal/adjacent samples, and were higher in patients with progressive vs. with stable/cured disease. Finally, In1-ghrelin increased aggressiveness (e.g. proliferation/migration) of NET cells. Altogether, our data strongly suggests a potential implication of ghrelin system in the pathogenesis and/or clinical outcome of NETs, and warrant further studies on their possible value for the future development of molecular biomarkers with diagnostic/prognostic/therapeutic value. PMID:26124083

  14. Fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva: clinical course, genetic mutations and genotype-phenotype correlation.

    PubMed

    Hüning, Irina; Gillessen-Kaesbach, Gabriele

    2014-08-01

    Fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva (FOP, MIM 135100) is a rare autosomal dominant genetic disorder and the most disabling condition of heterotopic (extraskeletal) ossification in humans. Mutations in the ACVR1 gene (MIM 102576) were identified as a genetic cause of FOP [Shore et al., 2006]. Most patients with FOP have the same recurrent single nucleotide change c.617G>A, p.R206H in the ACVR1 gene. Furthermore, 11 other mutations in the ACVR1 gene have been described as a cause of FOP. Here, we review phenotypic and molecular findings of 130 cases of FOP reported in the literature from 1982 to April 2014 and discuss possible genotype-phenotype correlations in FOP patients.

  15. Fibrodysplasia Ossificans Progressiva: Clinical Course, Genetic Mutations and Genotype-Phenotype Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Hüning, Irina; Gillessen-Kaesbach, Gabriele

    2014-01-01

    Fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva (FOP, MIM 135100) is a rare autosomal dominant genetic disorder and the most disabling condition of heterotopic (extraskeletal) ossification in humans. Mutations in the ACVR1 gene (MIM 102576) were identified as a genetic cause of FOP [Shore et al., 2006]. Most patients with FOP have the same recurrent single nucleotide change c.617G>A, p.R206H in the ACVR1 gene. Furthermore, 11 other mutations in the ACVR1 gene have been described as a cause of FOP. Here, we review phenotypic and molecular findings of 130 cases of FOP reported in the literature from 1982 to April 2014 and discuss possible genotype-phenotype correlations in FOP patients. PMID:25337067

  16. Evaluation of three phenotypic identification systems for clinical isolates of Raoultella ornithinolytica.

    PubMed

    Park, Jeong Su; Hong, Ki Ho; Lee, Hyun Jung; Choi, Soon Hee; Song, Sang Hoon; Song, Kyoung-Ho; Kim, Hong Bin; Park, Kyoung Un; Song, Junghan; Kim, Eui-Chong

    2011-04-01

    Raoultella spp. have recently been separated from the genus Klebsiella based on their molecular characteristics. It was discovered that Raoultella ornithinolytica can be misidentified as Klebsiella oxytoca by commonly used phenotypic identification systems. Therefore, this study evaluated the ability of three phenotypic systems to identify R. ornithinolytica compared with the genotypic methods sequence-specific primer PCR (SSP-PCR), 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis using the MicroSeq 500 system16S rDNA bacterial identification system or comparison with GenBank sequences using blast. The phenotypic systems examined in this study were the VITEK 2 GN ID card, the MicroScan Neg Combo 32 panel and API 20E. The SSP-PCR panel was able to distinguish the R. ornithinolytica reference strain from other Raoultella spp. and K. oxytoca. Of the 27 isolates identified as R. ornithinolytica by SSP-PCR, VITEK 2 identified all of them as R. ornithinolytica. MicroScan and API identified 25 isolates (92.6%) and 24 isolates (88.9%) as K. oxytoca, respectively. These isolates were ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) negative in all three phenotypic systems. MicroSeq 500 identified 24 isolates (88.9%) as R. ornithinolytica, whereas GenBank identification was heterogeneous. Of the 68 isolates identified as K. oxytoca by SSP-PCR, 66 isolates (97.1%) were identified as K. oxytoca by VITEK 2, MicroScan and API. MicroScan and API require additional biochemical tests to differentiate between ODC-negative R. ornithinolytica and K. oxytoca.

  17. Microparticles in the blood of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE): phenotypic characterization and clinical associations

    PubMed Central

    Mobarrez, Fariborz; Vikerfors, Anna; Gustafsson, Johanna T.; Gunnarsson, Iva; Zickert, Agneta; Larsson, Anders; Pisetsky, David S.; Wallén, Håkan; Svenungsson, Elisabet

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a prototypic autoimmune disease characterized by circulating autoantibodies and the formation of immune complexes. In these responses, the selecting self-antigens likely derive from the remains of dead and dying cells, as well as from disturbances in clearance. During cell death/activation, microparticles (MPs) can be released to the circulation. Previous MP studies in SLE have been limited in size and differ regarding numbers and phenotypes. Therefore, to characterize MPs more completely, we investigated 280 SLE patients and 280 individually matched controls. MPs were measured with flow cytometry and phenotyped according to phosphatidylserine expression (PS+/PS−), cellular origin and inflammatory markers. MPs, regardless of phenotype, are 2–10 times more abundant in SLE blood compared to controls. PS− MPs predominated in SLE, but not in controls (66% vs. 42%). Selectively in SLE, PS− MPs were more numerous in females and smokers. MP numbers decreased with declining renal function, but no clear association with disease activity was observed. The striking abundance of MPs, especially PS− MPs, suggests a generalized disturbance in SLE. MPs may be regarded as “liquid biopsies” to assess the production and clearance of dead, dying and activated cells, i.e. pivotal events for SLE pathogenesis. PMID:27777414

  18. Integrating clinical and laboratory data in genetic studies of complex phenotypes: a network-based data management system.

    PubMed

    McMahon, F J; Thomas, C J; Koskela, R J; Breschel, T S; Hightower, T C; Rohrer, N; Savino, C; McInnis, M G; Simpson, S G; DePaulo, J R

    1998-05-01

    The identification of genes underlying a complex phenotype can be a massive undertaking, and may require a much larger sample size than thought previously. The integration of such large volumes of clinical and laboratory data has become a major challenge. In this paper we describe a network-based data management system designed to address this challenge. Our system offers several advantages. Since the system uses commercial software, it obviates the acquisition, installation, and debugging of privately-available software, and is fully compatible with Windows and other commercial software. The system uses relational database architecture, which offers exceptional flexibility, facilitates complex data queries, and expedites extensive data quality control. The system is particularly designed to integrate clinical and laboratory data efficiently, producing summary reports, pedigrees, and exported files containing both phenotype and genotype data in a virtually unlimited range of formats. We describe a comprehensive system that manages clinical, DNA, cell line, and genotype data, but since the system is modular, researchers can set up only those elements which they need immediately, expanding later as needed. PMID:9603614

  19. Atypical phenotypes associated with pathogenic CHD7 variants and a proposal for broadening CHARGE syndrome clinical diagnostic criteria.

    PubMed

    Hale, Caitlin L; Niederriter, Adrienne N; Green, Glenn E; Martin, Donna M

    2016-02-01

    CHARGE syndrome (Coloboma of the eye, Heart defects, Atresia of the choanae, Retardation of growth and/or development, Genital and/or urinary anomalies, and Ear malformations, including deafness and vestibular disorders) is a genetic condition characterized by a specific and recognizable pattern of features. Heterozygous pathogenic variants in the chromodomain helicase DNA-binding protein 7 (CHD7) are the major cause of CHARGE syndrome, and have been identified in 70-90% of individuals fulfilling clinical diagnostic criteria. Since 2004, when CHD7 was discovered as the causative gene for CHARGE syndrome, the phenotypic spectrum associated with pathogenic CHD7 variants has expanded. Predicted pathogenic CHD7 variants have been identified in individuals with isolated features of CHARGE including autism and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. Here, we present genotype and phenotype data from a cohort of 28 patients who were considered for a diagnosis of CHARGE syndrome, including one patient with atypical presentations and a pathogenic CHD7 variant. We also summarize published literature on pathogenic CHD7 variant positive individuals who have atypical clinical presentations. Lastly, we propose a revision to current clinical diagnostic criteria, including broadening of the major features associated with CHARGE syndrome and addition of pathogenic CHD7 variant status as a major criterion. PMID:26590800

  20. Integrating clinical and laboratory data in genetic studies of complex phenotypes: a network-based data management system.

    PubMed

    McMahon, F J; Thomas, C J; Koskela, R J; Breschel, T S; Hightower, T C; Rohrer, N; Savino, C; McInnis, M G; Simpson, S G; DePaulo, J R

    1998-05-01

    The identification of genes underlying a complex phenotype can be a massive undertaking, and may require a much larger sample size than thought previously. The integration of such large volumes of clinical and laboratory data has become a major challenge. In this paper we describe a network-based data management system designed to address this challenge. Our system offers several advantages. Since the system uses commercial software, it obviates the acquisition, installation, and debugging of privately-available software, and is fully compatible with Windows and other commercial software. The system uses relational database architecture, which offers exceptional flexibility, facilitates complex data queries, and expedites extensive data quality control. The system is particularly designed to integrate clinical and laboratory data efficiently, producing summary reports, pedigrees, and exported files containing both phenotype and genotype data in a virtually unlimited range of formats. We describe a comprehensive system that manages clinical, DNA, cell line, and genotype data, but since the system is modular, researchers can set up only those elements which they need immediately, expanding later as needed.

  1. New phenotype of the cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy mapped to chromosome 19: migraine as the prominent clinical feature.

    PubMed Central

    Vérin, M; Rolland, Y; Landgraf, F; Chabriat, H; Bompais, B; Michel, A; Vahedi, K; Martinet, J P; Tournier-Lasserve, E; Lemaitre, M H

    1995-01-01

    A survey was carried out on a large family presenting the symptoms of familial arteriopathy (CADASIL) recently mapped to chromosome 19. This is characterised clinically by recurrent subcortical infarcts developing into pseudobulbar palsy and subcortical dementia, and radiologically by early MRI abnormalities. To characterise this familial condition, 43 members older than 20 years and spreading over four generations were studied clinically (31 living, 12 deceased), genetically, and radiologically by MRI (n = 31). Twenty out of 43 were found to be clinically symptomatic and of these 13 out of 31 had MRI abnormalities. Genetic studies mapped this condition to the locus of CADASIL (lod score > 3). The natural history suggests a chronological clinicoradiological staging of this phenotype of CADASIL: stage I between 20 and 40 years with frequent migraine-like episodes and well delineated lesions of the white matter; stage II between 40 and 60 years with stroke-like episodes, bipolar or monopolar-like psychotic disorders, coalescent lesions of the white matter, and well delineated lesions of the basal ganglia; and stage III over 60 years with subcortical dementia, pseudobulbar palsy, diffuse leukoencephalopathy, and multiple well delineated lesions of the basal ganglia. This phenotype differs from the other two previously described by high frequency of migraine, frequency of psychotic disorders, and early neurological manifestations. The new acronym "cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts, leukoencephalopathy, and migraine" (CADASILM) is proposed to better describe this particular subvariety of CADASIL. Images PMID:7500094

  2. Relationship between CFTR and CTRC variants and the clinical phenotype in late-onset cystic fibrosis disease with chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Tomaiuolo, Anna C; Sofia, Valentina M; Surace, Cecilia; Majo, Fabio; Genovese, Silvia; Petrocchi, Stefano; Grotta, Simona; Alghisi, Federico; Lucidi, Vincenzina; Angioni, Adriano

    2015-03-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF), the most common autosomal recessive disease in whites, is caused by mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). So far, >1900 mutations have been described, most of which are nonsense, missense, and frameshift, and can lead to severe phenotypes, reducing the level of function of the CFTR protein. Synonymous variations are usually considered silent without pathogenic effects. However, synonymous mutations exhibiting exon skipping as a consequence of aberrant splicing of pre-mRNA differ. Herein, we describe the effect of the aberrant splicing of the c.273G>C (G91G) synonymous variation found in a 9-year-old white (ΔF508) patient affected by CF and pancreatitis associated with a variant in chymotrypsin C (CTRC). Magnetic resonance imaging showed an atrophic pancreatic gland with substitution of the pancreatic parenchyma with three cysts. Genetic examination revealed compound heterozygosity for the c.1521_1523delCTT (ΔF508) pathogenic variant and the c.273G>C (G91G) variant in CFTR. Sweat test results confirmed the diagnosis of CF. We have thus identified a synonymous variation (G91G) causing the skipping of exon 3 in a CF patient carrying the ΔF508 mutation. However, the clinical phenotype with pancreatic symptoms encouraged us to investigate a panel of pancreas-related genes, which resulted in finding a known sequence variation inside CTRC. We further discuss the role of these variants and their possible interactions in determining the current phenotype.

  3. Review and evaluation of electronic health records-driven phenotype algorithm authoring tools for clinical and translational research

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Luke V; Shaw, Pamela L; Jiang, Guoqian; Kiefer, Richard C; Mo, Huan; Pacheco, Jennifer A; Speltz, Peter; Zhu, Qian; Denny, Joshua C; Pathak, Jyotishman; Thompson, William K; Montague, Enid

    2015-01-01

    Objective To review and evaluate available software tools for electronic health record–driven phenotype authoring in order to identify gaps and needs for future development. Materials and Methods Candidate phenotype authoring tools were identified through (1) literature search in four publication databases (PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, and Scopus) and (2) a web search. A collection of tools was compiled and reviewed after the searches. A survey was designed and distributed to the developers of the reviewed tools to discover their functionalities and features. Results Twenty-four different phenotype authoring tools were identified and reviewed. Developers of 16 of these identified tools completed the evaluation survey (67% response rate). The surveyed tools showed commonalities but also varied in their capabilities in algorithm representation, logic functions, data support and software extensibility, search functions, user interface, and data outputs. Discussion Positive trends identified in the evaluation included: algorithms can be represented in both computable and human readable formats; and most tools offer a web interface for easy access. However, issues were also identified: many tools were lacking advanced logic functions for authoring complex algorithms; the ability to construct queries that leveraged un-structured data was not widely implemented; and many tools had limited support for plug-ins or external analytic software. Conclusions Existing phenotype authoring tools could enable clinical researchers to work with electronic health record data more efficiently, but gaps still exist in terms of the functionalities of such tools. The present work can serve as a reference point for the future development of similar tools. PMID:26224336

  4. Heteroresistance to Fluconazole Is a Continuously Distributed Phenotype among Candida glabrata Clinical Strains Associated with In Vivo Persistence

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Ami, Ronen; Zimmerman, Offer; Finn, Talya; Amit, Sharon; Novikov, Anna; Wertheimer, Noa; Lurie-Weinberger, Mor

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Candida glabrata causes persistent infections in patients treated with fluconazole and often acquires resistance following exposure to the drug. Here we found that clinical strains of C. glabrata exhibit cell-to-cell variation in drug response (heteroresistance). We used population analysis profiling (PAP) to assess fluconazole heteroresistance (FLCHR) and to ask if it is a binary trait or a continuous phenotype. Thirty (57.6%) of 52 fluconazole-sensitive clinical C. glabrata isolates met accepted dichotomous criteria for FLCHR. However, quantitative grading of FLCHR by using the area under the PAP curve (AUC) revealed a continuous distribution across a wide range of values, suggesting that all isolates exhibit some degree of heteroresistance. The AUC correlated with rhodamine 6G efflux and was associated with upregulation of the CDR1 and PDH1 genes, encoding ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transmembrane transporters, implying that HetR populations exhibit higher levels of drug efflux. Highly FLCHR C. glabrata was recovered more frequently than nonheteroresistant C. glabrata from hematogenously infected immunocompetent mice following treatment with high-dose fluconazole (45.8% versus 15%, P = 0.029). Phylogenetic analysis revealed some phenotypic clustering but also variations in FLCHR within clonal groups, suggesting both genetic and epigenetic determinants of heteroresistance. Collectively, these results establish heteroresistance to fluconazole as a graded phenotype associated with ABC transporter upregulation and fluconazole efflux. Heteroresistance may explain the propensity of C. glabrata for persistent infection and the emergence of breakthrough resistance to fluconazole. PMID:27486188

  5. Development of a rapid phenotypic test for HCV protease inhibitors with potential use in clinical decisions

    PubMed Central

    Pessoa, Luciana Santos; Vidal, Luãnna Liebscher; da Costa, Emmerson C.B.; Abreu, Celina Monteiro; da Cunha, Rodrigo Delvecchio; Valadão, Ana Luiza Chaves; dos Santos, André Felipe; Tanuri, Amilcar

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Approximately 185 million people worldwide are chronically infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV). The first-wave of approved NS3 protease inhibitors (PIs) were Telaprevir and Boceprevir, which are currently discontinued. Simeprevir is a second-wave PI incorporated into the Brazilian hepatitis C treatment protocol. Drug resistance plays a key role in patients' treatment regimen. Here, we developed a simple phenotypic assay to evaluate the impact of resistance mutations in HCV NS3 protease to PIs, using a protein expression vector containing wild type NS3 protease domain and NS4A co-factor. We analyzed the impact of five resistance mutations (T54A, V36M, V158I, V170I and T54S+V170I) against Telaprevir, Boceprevir and Simeprevir. Protein purifications were performed with low cost methodology, and enzymatic inhibition assays were measured by FRET. We obtained recombinant proteases with detectable activity, and IC50 and fold change values for the evaluated PIs were determined. The variant T54A showed the highest reduction of susceptibility for the PIs, while the other four variants exhibited lower levels of reduced susceptibility. Interestingly, V170I showed 3.2-fold change for Simeprevir, a new evidence about this variant. These results emphasize the importance of enzymatic assays in phenotypic tests to determine which therapeutic regimen should be implemented. PMID:27575432

  6. The Stability of G6PD Is Affected by Mutations with Different Clinical Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Manzo, Saúl; Terrón-Hernández, Jessica; De la Mora-De la Mora, Ignacio; González-Valdez, Abigail; Marcial-Quino, Jaime; García-Torres, Itzhel; Vanoye-Carlo, America; López-Velázquez, Gabriel; Hernández-Alcántara, Gloria; Oria-Hernández, Jesús; Reyes-Vivas, Horacio; Enríquez-Flores, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is the most common enzyme deficiency worldwide, causing a wide spectrum of conditions with severity classified from the mildest (Class IV) to the most severe (Class I). To correlate mutation sites in the G6PD with the resulting phenotypes, we studied four naturally occurring G6PD variants: Yucatan, Nashville, Valladolid and Mexico City. For this purpose, we developed a successful over-expression method that constitutes an easier and more precise method for obtaining and characterizing these enzymes. The kcat (catalytic constant) of all the studied variants was lower than in the wild-type. The structural rigidity might be the cause and the most evident consequence of the mutations is their impact on protein stability and folding, as can be observed from the protein yield, the T50 (temperature where 50% of its original activity is retained) values, and differences on hydrophobic regions. The mutations corresponding to more severe phenotypes are related to the structural NADP+ region. This was clearly observed for the Classes III and II variants, which became more thermostable with increasing NADP+, whereas the Class I variants remained thermolabile. The mutations produce repulsive electric charges that, in the case of the Yucatan variant, promote increased disorder of the C-terminus and consequently affect the binding of NADP+, leading to enzyme instability. PMID:25407525

  7. Phenotypic and genotypic characteristics of Arcanobacterium haemolyticum isolated from clinical samples in a Danish hospital.

    PubMed

    Sammra, Osama; Friis-Møller, Alice; Balbutskaya, Anna; Hijazin, Muaz; Nagib, Samy; Alber, Jörg; Lämmler, Christoph; Abdulmawjood, Amir; Timke, Markus; Kostrzewa, Markus; Prenger-Berninghoff, Ellen

    2014-09-01

    Six Arcanobacterium haemolyticum strains isolated from six patients of two hospitals in Denmark were identified phenotypically, also including matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) analysis, and by genotypic methods. The latter were performed by sequencing 16S rDNA and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase encoding gene gap and by amplification of an A. haemolyticum specific region of 16S-23S rDNA intergenic spacer region and 23S rDNA. The six A. haemolyticum strains were further investigated for the presence of seven potential virulence genes encoding arcanolysin, phospholipase D, hemolysin A, CAMP factor family protein, collagen binding protein, neuraminidase A and neuraminidase H which appeared to be present in two (seven virulence genes), two (six virulence genes) and two strains (four virulence genes), respectively. The phenotypic and genotypic properties described in the present study might help to reliably identify and further characterize A. haemolyticum isolated from human patients, a species which seems to be of increasing importance.

  8. Development of a rapid phenotypic test for HCV protease inhibitors with potential use in clinical decisions.

    PubMed

    Pessoa, Luciana Santos; Vidal, Luãnna Liebscher; Costa, Emmerson C B da; Abreu, Celina Monteiro; Cunha, Rodrigo Delvecchio da; Valadão, Ana Luiza Chaves; Santos, André Felipe Dos; Tanuri, Amilcar

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 185 million people worldwide are chronically infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV). The first-wave of approved NS3 protease inhibitors (PIs) were Telaprevir and Boceprevir, which are currently discontinued. Simeprevir is a second-wave PI incorporated into the Brazilian hepatitis C treatment protocol. Drug resistance plays a key role in patients' treatment regimen. Here, we developed a simple phenotypic assay to evaluate the impact of resistance mutations in HCV NS3 protease to PIs, using a protein expression vector containing wild type NS3 protease domain and NS4A co-factor. We analyzed the impact of five resistance mutations (T54A, V36M, V158I, V170I and T54S+V170I) against Telaprevir, Boceprevir and Simeprevir. Protein purifications were performed with low cost methodology, and enzymatic inhibition assays were measured by FRET. We obtained recombinant proteases with detectable activity, and IC50 and fold change values for the evaluated PIs were determined. The variant T54A showed the highest reduction of susceptibility for the PIs, while the other four variants exhibited lower levels of reduced susceptibility. Interestingly, V170I showed 3.2-fold change for Simeprevir, a new evidence about this variant. These results emphasize the importance of enzymatic assays in phenotypic tests to determine which therapeutic regimen should be implemented. PMID:27575432

  9. Syndrome of Extreme Insulin Resistance (Rabson-Mendenhall Phenotype) with Atrial Septal Defect: Clinical Presentation and Treatment Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Deep; Maisnam, Indira; Ghosh, Sujoy; Mukhopadhyay, Satinath; Chowdhury, Subhankar

    2013-01-01

    Syndrome of extreme insulin resistance (SEIR) is a rare spectrum disorder with a primary defect in insulin receptor signalling, noted primarily in children, and is often difficult to diagnose due to the clinical heterogeneity. SEIR was diagnosed in an adolescent girl with facial dysmorphism, exuberant scalp and body hair, severe acanthosis, lipoatrophy, dental abnormalities, and short stature (Rabson-Mendenhall phenotype). She had elevated fasting (422.95 pmol/L) and post-glucose insulin levels (>2083 pmol/L). Total body fat was decreased (11%; dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry). Basal growth hormone (GH) was increased (7.9 μg/L) with normal insuline-like growth factor 1 (37.6 nmol/L) suggestive of GH resistance. She had fatty liver and polycystic ovaries. Echocardiography revealed ostium secundum type atrial septal defect (ASD). Blood glucose normalized with pioglitazone (30 mg/day). Delayed development, severe insulin resistance, mild hyperglycemia, absence of ketosis, and remarkable response of hyperinsulinemia and hyperglycemia to pioglitazone which persisted even after 1 year of diagnosis are some of the notable features of this patient. This is perhaps the first report of occurrence of congenital heart disease (ASD) in a patient of SEIR (Rabson-Mendenhall phenotype). This report highlights the clinical features of SEIR and the role of insulin sensitizers like pioglitazone in the management of such patients. Conflict of interest:None declared. PMID:23367497

  10. Syndrome of extreme insulin resistance (Rabson-Mendenhall phenotype) with atrial septal defect: clinical presentation and treatment outcomes.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Deep; Maisnam, Indira; Ghosh, Sujoy; Mukhopadhyay, Satinath; Chowdhury, Subhankar

    2013-01-01

    Syndrome of extreme insulin resistance (SEIR) is a rare spectrum disorder with a primary defect in insulin receptor signalling, noted primarily in children, and is often difficult to diagnose due to the clinical heterogeneity.SEIR was diagnosed in an adolescent girl with facial dysmorphism,exuberant scalp and body hair, severe acanthosis, lipoatrophy, dental abnormalities, and short stature (Rabson-Mendenhall phenotype). She had elevated fasting (422.95 pmol/L) and post-glucose insulin levels(>2083 pmol/L). Total body fat was decreased (11%; dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry). Basal growth hormone (GH) was increased (7.9 μg/L)with normal insuline-like growth factor 1 (37.6 nmol/L) suggestive of GH resistance. She had fatty liver and polycystic ovaries. Echocardiography revealed ostium secundum type atrial septal defect (ASD). Blood glucose normalized with pioglitazone (30 mg/day). Delayed development, severe insulin resistance, mild hyperglycemia, absence of ketosis, and remarkable response of hyperinsulinemia and hyperglycemia to pioglitazone which persisted even after 1 year of diagnosis are some of the notable features of this patient. This is perhaps the first report of occurrence of congenital heart disease (ASD) in a patient of SEIR (Rabson-Mendenhall phenotype). This report highlights the clinical features of SEIR and the role of insulin sensitizers like pioglitazone in the management of such patients. PMID:23367497

  11. Premature Termination Mutations in FBN1: Distinct Effects on Differential Allelic Expression and on Protein and Clinical Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Schrijver, Iris; Liu, Wanguo; Odom, Raanan; Brenn, Thomas; Oefner, Peter; Furthmayr, Heinz; Francke, Uta

    2002-01-01

    Marfan syndrome (MFS) and other type 1 fibrillinopathies result from mutations in the FBN1 gene, which encodes the connective-tissue microfibrillar protein fibrillin 1. Attempts at correlating genotype with phenotype have suggested considerable heterogeneity. To define the subtype of fibrillinopathy caused by premature termination codon (PTC) mutations, we integrate genotype information and mRNA expression levels with clinical and biochemical phenotypes. By screening the entire FBN1 gene for mutations, we identified 34 probands with PTC mutations. With the exception of two recurrent mutations, these nonsense and frameshift mutations are unique and span the entire FBN1 gene, from IVS2 to IVS63. Allele-specific reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction analyses revealed differential allelic expression in all studied samples, with variable reduction of the mutant transcript. Fibrillin protein synthesis and deposition into the extracellular matrix were studied by pulse-chase analysis of cultured fibroblasts. In the majority of PTC samples, synthesis of normal-sized fibrillin protein was ∼50% of control levels, but matrix deposition was disproportionately decreased. Probands and mutation-positive relatives were clinically evaluated by means of a standardized protocol. Only 71% (22/31) of probands and 58% (14/24) of the mutation-positive family members met current clinical diagnostic criteria for MFS. When compared with our previously reported study group of 44 individuals with FBN1 cysteine substitutions, the PTC group showed statistically significant differences in the frequency of individual signs, especially in the ocular manifestations. Whereas large-joint hypermobility was more common, lens dislocation and retinal detachment were distinctly less common in the PTC group. We conclude that PTC mutations have a major impact on the pathogenesis of type 1 fibrillinopathies and convey a distinct biochemical, clinical, and prognostic profile. PMID:12068374

  12. The Clinical Phenotype of Idiopathic Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Behavior Disorder at Presentation: A Study in 203 Consecutive Patients

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Arcos, Ana; Iranzo, Alex; Serradell, Mónica; Gaig, Carles; Santamaria, Joan

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To describe the clinical phenotype of idiopathic rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (IRBD) at presentation in a sleep center. Methods: Clinical history review of 203 consecutive patients with IRBD identified between 1990 and 2014. IRBD was diagnosed by clinical history plus video-polysomnographic demonstration of REM sleep with increased electromyographic activity linked to abnormal behaviors. Results: Patients were 80% men with median age at IRBD diagnosis of 68 y (range, 50–85 y). In addition to the already known clinical picture of IRBD, other important features were apparent: 44% of the patients were not aware of their dream-enactment behaviors and 70% reported good sleep quality. In most of these cases bed partners were essential to convince patients to seek medical help. In 11% IRBD was elicited only after specific questioning when patients consulted for other reasons. Seven percent did not recall unpleasant dreams. Leaving the bed occurred occasionally in 24% of subjects in whom dementia with Lewy bodies often developed eventually. For the correct diagnosis of IRBD, video-polysomnography had to be repeated in 16% because of insufficient REM sleep or electromyographic artifacts from coexistent apneas. Some subjects with comorbid obstructive sleep apnea reported partial improvement of RBD symptoms following continuous positive airway pressure therapy. Lack of therapy with clonazepam resulted in an increased risk of sleep related injuries. Synucleinopathy was frequently diagnosed, even in patients with mild severity or uncommon IRBD presentations (e.g., patients who reported sleeping well, onset triggered by a life event, nocturnal ambulation) indicating that the development of a neurodegenerative disease is independent of the clinical presentation of IRBD. Conclusions: We report the largest IRBD cohort observed in a single center to date and highlight frequent features that were not reported or not sufficiently emphasized in previous

  13. [Aggressive fibromatoses].

    PubMed

    Döhler, J R; Hamelmann, H; Lasson, U

    1984-03-01

    Benign by nature, aggressive fibromatoses (desmoid fibromas) may represent as difficult therapeutic problems as malignant tumours. When subtotally resected they tend to recur. But spontaneous regression is possible. Expense and limits of their surgical treatment are discussed with reference to seven patients. In five cases primary affliction of bone was evident. There are three reports given in detail: In the first, malignant transformation may be due to radiation therapy and hemipelvectomy could not prevent recurrence. In the second, spontaneous regression of untreated pelvic affection may have occurred. In the third, several resections and amputation of the leg failed to cure congenital infantile fibromatosis.

  14. Characterization of core clinical phenotypes associated with recurrent proximal 15q25.2 microdeletions.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Trent; Brown, Natasha J; Stark, Zornitza; Bruno, Damien L; Oertel, Ralph; Chong, Belinda; Calabro, Vanessa; Kornberg, Andrew; Sanderson, Christine; Kelly, Julian; Howell, Katherine B; Savarirayan, Ravi; Hinds, Rupert; Greenway, Anthea; Slater, Howard R; White, Susan M

    2014-01-01

    A recurrent proximal microdeletion at 15q25.2 with an approximate 1.5 megabase smallest region of overlap has recently been reported in seven patients and is proposed to be associated with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH), mild to moderate cognitive deficit, and/or features consistent with Diamond-Blackfan anemia. We report on four further patients and define the core phenotypic features of individuals with this microdeletion to include mild to moderate developmental delay or intellectual disability, postnatal short stature, anemia, and cryptorchidism in males. CDH and structural organ malformations appear to be less frequent associations, as is venous thrombosis. There is no consistent facial dysmorphism. Features novel to our patient group include dextrocardia, obstructive sleep apnea, and cleft lip.

  15. Differential distribution of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes in clinical enterobacteria with unusual phenotypes of quinolone susceptibility from Argentina.

    PubMed

    Andres, Patricia; Lucero, Celeste; Soler-Bistué, Alfonso; Guerriero, Leonor; Albornoz, Ezequiel; Tran, Tung; Zorreguieta, Angeles; Galas, Marcelo; Corso, Alejandra; Tolmasky, Marcelo E; Petroni, Alejandro

    2013-06-01

    We studied a collection of 105 clinical enterobacteria with unusual phenotypes of quinolone susceptibility to analyze the occurrence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) and oqx genes and their implications for quinolone susceptibility. The oqxA and oqxB genes were found in 31/34 (91%) Klebsiella pneumoniae and 1/3 Klebsiella oxytoca isolates. However, the oqxA- and oqxB-harboring isolates lacking other known quinolone resistance determinants showed wide ranges of susceptibility to nalidixic acid and ciprofloxacin. Sixty of the 105 isolates (57%) harbored at least one PMQR gene [qnrB19, qnrB10, qnrB2, qnrB1, qnrS1, or aac(6')-Ib-cr)], belong to 8 enterobacterial species, and were disseminated throughout the country, and most of them were categorized as susceptible by the current clinical quinolone susceptibility breakpoints. We developed a disk diffusion-based method to improve the phenotypic detection of aac(6')-Ib-cr. The most common PMQR genes in our collection [qnrB19, qnrB10, and aac(6')-Ib-cr] were differentially distributed among enterobacterial species, and two different epidemiological settings were evident. First, the species associated with community-acquired infections (Salmonella spp. and Escherichia coli) mainly harbored qnrB19 (a unique PMQR gene) located in small ColE1-type plasmids that might constitute its natural reservoirs. qnrB19 was not associated with an extended-spectrum β-lactamase phenotype. Second, the species associated with hospital-acquired infections (Enterobacter spp., Klebsiella spp., and Serratia marcescens) mainly harbored qnrB10 in ISCR1-containing class 1 integrons that may also have aac(6')-Ib-cr as a cassette within the variable region. These two PMQR genes were strongly associated with an extended-spectrum β-lactamase phenotype. Therefore, this differential distribution of PMQR genes is strongly influenced by their linkage or lack of linkage to integrons.

  16. Oral mucosal stigmata in hereditary-cancer syndromes: From germline mutations to distinctive clinical phenotypes and tailored therapies.

    PubMed

    Ponti, Giovanni; Tomasi, Aldo; Manfredini, Marco; Pellacani, Giovanni

    2016-05-10

    Numerous familial tumor syndromes are associated with distinctive oral mucosal findings, which may make possible an early diagnosis as an efficacious marker for the risk of developing visceral malignancies. In detail, Familial Adenomatous Polyposis (FAP), Gardner syndrome, Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, Cowden Syndrome, Gorlin Syndrome, Lynch/Muir-Torre Syndrome and Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia show specific lesions of the oral mucosa and other distinct clinical and molecular features. The common genetic background of the above mentioned syndromes involve germline mutations in tumor suppressor genes, such as APC, PTEN, PTCH1, STK11, RET, clearly implied in both ectodermal and mesodermal differentiation, being the oral mucosal and dental stigmata frequently associated in the specific clinical phenotypes. The oral and maxillofacial manifestations of these syndromes may become visible several years before the intestinal lesions, constituting a clinical marker that is predictive for the development of intestinal polyps and/or other visceral malignancies. A multidisciplinary approach is therefore necessary for both clinical diagnosis and management of the gene-carriers probands and their family members who have to be referred for genetic testing or have to be investigated for the presence of visceral cancers. PMID:26850131

  17. Developmental trajectories of aggression, prosocial behavior, and social-cognitive problem solving in emerging adolescents with clinically elevated attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder symptoms.

    PubMed

    Kofler, Michael J; Larsen, Ross; Sarver, Dustin E; Tolan, Patrick H

    2015-11-01

    Middle school is a critical yet understudied period of social behavioral risks and opportunities that may be particularly difficult for emerging adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) given their childhood social difficulties. Relatively few ADHD studies have examined social behavior and social-cognitive problem solving beyond the elementary years, or examined aspects of positive (prosocial) behavior. The current study examined how middle school students with clinically elevated ADHD symptoms differ from their non-ADHD peers on baseline (6th grade) and age-related changes in prosocial and aggressive behavior, and the extent to which social-cognitive problem solving strategies mediate these relations. Emerging adolescents with (n = 178) and without (n = 3,806) clinically elevated, teacher-reported ADHD-combined symptoms were compared longitudinally across 6th through 8th grades using parallel process latent growth curve modeling, accounting for student demographic characteristics, oppositional-defiant disorder (ODD) symptoms, deviant peer association, school climate, and parental monitoring. Sixth graders with elevated ADHD symptoms engaged in somewhat fewer prosocial behaviors (d = -0.44) and more aggressive behavior (d = 0.20) relative to their peers. These small social behavioral deficits decreased but were not normalized across the middle school years. Contrary to hypotheses, social-cognitive problem solving was not impaired in the ADHD group after accounting for co-occurring ODD symptoms and did not mediate the association between ADHD and social behavior during the middle school years. ADHD and social-cognitive problem solving contributed independently to social behavior, both in 6th grade and across the middle school years; the influence of social-cognitive problem solving on social behavior was highly similar for the ADHD and non-ADHD groups.

  18. Developmental trajectories of aggression, prosocial behavior, and social-cognitive problem solving in emerging adolescents with clinically elevated attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder symptoms.

    PubMed

    Kofler, Michael J; Larsen, Ross; Sarver, Dustin E; Tolan, Patrick H

    2015-11-01

    Middle school is a critical yet understudied period of social behavioral risks and opportunities that may be particularly difficult for emerging adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) given their childhood social difficulties. Relatively few ADHD studies have examined social behavior and social-cognitive problem solving beyond the elementary years, or examined aspects of positive (prosocial) behavior. The current study examined how middle school students with clinically elevated ADHD symptoms differ from their non-ADHD peers on baseline (6th grade) and age-related changes in prosocial and aggressive behavior, and the extent to which social-cognitive problem solving strategies mediate these relations. Emerging adolescents with (n = 178) and without (n = 3,806) clinically elevated, teacher-reported ADHD-combined symptoms were compared longitudinally across 6th through 8th grades using parallel process latent growth curve modeling, accounting for student demographic characteristics, oppositional-defiant disorder (ODD) symptoms, deviant peer association, school climate, and parental monitoring. Sixth graders with elevated ADHD symptoms engaged in somewhat fewer prosocial behaviors (d = -0.44) and more aggressive behavior (d = 0.20) relative to their peers. These small social behavioral deficits decreased but were not normalized across the middle school years. Contrary to hypotheses, social-cognitive problem solving was not impaired in the ADHD group after accounting for co-occurring ODD symptoms and did not mediate the association between ADHD and social behavior during the middle school years. ADHD and social-cognitive problem solving contributed independently to social behavior, both in 6th grade and across the middle school years; the influence of social-cognitive problem solving on social behavior was highly similar for the ADHD and non-ADHD groups. PMID:26595479

  19. Individuality, phenotypic differentiation, dormancy and ‘persistence’ in culturable bacterial systems: commonalities shared by environmental, laboratory, and clinical microbiology

    PubMed Central

    Kell, Douglas; Potgieter, Marnie; Pretorius, Etheresia

    2015-01-01

    For bacteria, replication mainly involves growth by binary fission. However, in a very great many natural environments there are examples of phenotypically dormant, non-growing cells that do not replicate immediately and that are phenotypically ‘nonculturable’ on media that normally admit their growth. They thereby evade detection by conventional culture-based methods. Such dormant cells may also be observed in laboratory cultures and in clinical microbiology. They are usually more tolerant to stresses such as antibiotics, and in clinical microbiology they are typically referred to as ‘persisters’. Bacterial cultures necessarily share a great deal of relatedness, and inclusive fitness theory implies that there are conceptual evolutionary advantages in trading a variation in growth rate against its mean, equivalent to hedging one’s bets. There is much evidence that bacteria exploit this strategy widely. We here bring together data that show the commonality of these phenomena across environmental, laboratory and clinical microbiology. Considerable evidence, using methods similar to those common in environmental microbiology, now suggests that many supposedly non-communicable, chronic and inflammatory diseases are exacerbated (if not indeed largely caused) by the presence of dormant or persistent bacteria (the ability of whose components to cause inflammation is well known). This dormancy (and resuscitation therefrom) often reflects the extent of the availability of free iron. Together, these phenomena can provide a ready explanation for the continuing inflammation common to such chronic diseases and its correlation with iron dysregulation. This implies that measures designed to assess and to inhibit or remove such organisms (or their access to iron) might be of much therapeutic benefit. PMID:26629334

  20. Individuality, phenotypic differentiation, dormancy and 'persistence' in culturable bacterial systems: commonalities shared by environmental, laboratory, and clinical microbiology.

    PubMed

    Kell, Douglas; Potgieter, Marnie; Pretorius, Etheresia

    2015-01-01

    For bacteria, replication mainly involves growth by binary fission. However, in a very great many natural environments there are examples of phenotypically dormant, non-growing cells that do not replicate immediately and that are phenotypically 'nonculturable' on media that normally admit their growth. They thereby evade detection by conventional culture-based methods. Such dormant cells may also be observed in laboratory cultures and in clinical microbiology. They are usually more tolerant to stresses such as antibiotics, and in clinical microbiology they are typically referred to as 'persisters'. Bacterial cultures necessarily share a great deal of relatedness, and inclusive fitness theory implies that there are conceptual evolutionary advantages in trading a variation in growth rate against its mean, equivalent to hedging one's bets. There is much evidence that bacteria exploit this strategy widely. We here bring together data that show the commonality of these phenomena across environmental, laboratory and clinical microbiology. Considerable evidence, using methods similar to those common in environmental microbiology, now suggests that many supposedly non-communicable, chronic and inflammatory diseases are exacerbated (if not indeed largely caused) by the presence of dormant or persistent bacteria (the ability of whose components to cause inflammation is well known). This dormancy (and resuscitation therefrom) often reflects the extent of the availability of free iron. Together, these phenomena can provide a ready explanation for the continuing inflammation common to such chronic diseases and its correlation with iron dysregulation. This implies that measures designed to assess and to inhibit or remove such organisms (or their access to iron) might be of much therapeutic benefit.

  1. Individuality, phenotypic differentiation, dormancy and 'persistence' in culturable bacterial systems: commonalities shared by environmental, laboratory, and clinical microbiology.

    PubMed

    Kell, Douglas; Potgieter, Marnie; Pretorius, Etheresia

    2015-01-01

    For bacteria, replication mainly involves growth by binary fission. However, in a very great many natural environments there are examples of phenotypically dormant, non-growing cells that do not replicate immediately and that are phenotypically 'nonculturable' on media that normally admit their growth. They thereby evade detection by conventional culture-based methods. Such dormant cells may also be observed in laboratory cultures and in clinical microbiology. They are usually more tolerant to stresses such as antibiotics, and in clinical microbiology they are typically referred to as 'persisters'. Bacterial cultures necessarily share a great deal of relatedness, and inclusive fitness theory implies that there are conceptual evolutionary advantages in trading a variation in growth rate against its mean, equivalent to hedging one's bets. There is much evidence that bacteria exploit this strategy widely. We here bring together data that show the commonality of these phenomena across environmental, laboratory and clinical microbiology. Considerable evidence, using methods similar to those common in environmental microbiology, now suggests that many supposedly non-communicable, chronic and inflammatory diseases are exacerbated (if not indeed largely caused) by the presence of dormant or persistent bacteria (the ability of whose components to cause inflammation is well known). This dormancy (and resuscitation therefrom) often reflects the extent of the availability of free iron. Together, these phenomena can provide a ready explanation for the continuing inflammation common to such chronic diseases and its correlation with iron dysregulation. This implies that measures designed to assess and to inhibit or remove such organisms (or their access to iron) might be of much therapeutic benefit. PMID:26629334

  2. Why we need a large-scale open metadata initiative in health informatics - a vision paper on open data models for clinical phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Dugas, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Clinical phenotypes are very complex and not well described. For instance, more than 100.000 biomedical concepts are needed to describe clinical properties of patients. At present, information systems dealing with clinical phenotype data are based on secret, heterogeneous and incompatible data models. This is the root cause for the well-known grand challenge of semantic interoperability in healthcare: data exchange and analysis of medical information systems has major limitations. This problem slows down medical progressand wastes time of health care professionals. A large-scale open metadata initiative can foster exchange, discussion and consensus regarding data models for clinical phenotypes. This would be an important contribution to improve information systems in healthcare and to solve the grand challenge of semantic interoperability. PMID:23920688

  3. Scleroderma: the role of serum autoantibodies in defining specific clinical phenotypes and organ system involvement

    PubMed Central

    Domsic, Robyn T.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review To discuss recent advances in serologic testing for SSc-associated antibodies with respect to the diagnosis and prognosis of the disease. Recent findings The importance of SSc antibodies for diagnosis has become increasingly recognized, as evidence by incorporation into the 2013 ACR/EULAR clinical classification criteria for SSc. Two new SSc-associated antibodies and their clinical associations have been described. Multiple cohort studies have reported variable antibody frequency distribution based on geography, but the clinical associations remain much the same. New associations include anti-RNA polymerase III antibodies with gastric antral vascular ectasia, and a temporal association between SSc onset and RNA polymerase III antibodies. Summary The role and associations of SSc-associated antibodies for diagnosis and internal organ involvement is becoming increasingly accepted. PMID:25203118

  4. Comparative Investigation of the Psychophysiologic and Idiopathic Insomnia Disorder Phenotypes: Psychologic Characteristics, Patients' Perspectives, and Implications for Clinical Management

    PubMed Central

    Espie, Colin A.; Barrie, Laura M.; Forgan, Grant S.

    2012-01-01

    Study Objectives: Insomnia is a common disorder, yet its proposed behavioral phenotypes are seldom differentiated. Two consecutive studies were designed to investigate psychologic characteristics and treatment preferences of people with idiopathic insomnia (IdI) relative to psychophysiologic insomnia (PI). Design: Cross-sectional, two-group comparison studies. Setting: Specialized sleep research center. Participants: 40 participants (29 female, mean age 46 yr) participated in study 1. An additional cohort of 61 adults (48 female, mean age 37 yr) participated in study 2. In total, samples comprised 51 participants with PI and 50 with IdI. All participants met diagnostic criteria for their respective insomnia phenotype. Interventions: N/A Measurements and Results: Study 1 investigated sensitivity to arousal conditioning and sleep effort using self-report measures. Consistent with a model of conditioned arousal, participants with PI exhibited greater behavioral inhibition, i.e., sensitivity to threat and higher levels of sleep preoccupation. Study 2 investigated illness perceptions and cognitions and coping styles using self-report scales, and explored treatment acceptability based on the evaluation of 3 therapeutic scenarios. Results lend support to the hypothesis that IdI is considered somewhat more permanent than PI. Behavioral intervention was preferred to pharmacotherapy by both groups, and an acceptance treatment was considered more favorably by IdI study participants than by those with PI. Conclusions: Many similarities between IdI and PI were observed across psychologic measures, and both groups exhibited a preference for behavioral treatment. However, their distinctive characteristics appear to suggest that an acceptance-based therapy may also be appropriate for some people with IdI. Citation: Espie CA; Barrie LM; Forgan GS. Comparative investigation of the psychophysiologic and idiopathic insomnia disorder phenotypes: psychologic characteristics, patients

  5. Deconstructing Oppositional Defiant Disorder: Clinic-Based Evidence for an Anger/Irritability Phenotype

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drabick, Deborah A. G.; Gadow, Kenneth D.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To examine risk factors and co-occurring symptoms associated with mother-reported versus teacher-reported anger/irritability symptoms (AIS) of oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) in a clinic-based sample of 1,160 youth aged 6 through 18 years. Method: Participants completed a background history questionnaire (mothers), school…

  6. Cytomegalovirus driven immunosenescence-An immune phenotype with or without clinical impact?

    PubMed

    Söderberg-Nauclér, Cecilia; Fornara, Olesja; Rahbar, Afsar

    2016-09-01

    The continuous emerging increase in life span has led to vulnerability to a number of different diseases in the elderly. Some of these risks may be attributed to specific changes in the immune system referred to as immunoscenescence. This term aims to describe decreased immune functions among elderly individuals, and is characterized to be harmful age-associated changes in the immune system that lead to its gradual immune dysfunction. An impaired function of the immune system may increase susceptibility to various diseases in the elderly population such as infections, cardiovascular diseases and cancer. Although it is unclear how this immune phenotype develops, emerging evidence suggest that it may reflect an exhaustion of the immune system, possibly caused by one or several chronic infections. The main candidate is human cytomegalovirus (CMV), which can induce immune dysfunctions observed in immunoscenescence. Although the immune system is currently considered to be exhausted in CMV positive elderly individuals, it is not known whether such dysfunction of the immune system is a main reason for increased susceptibility to other diseases, or if direct effects of the virus in disease pathogenesis reflect the increased vulnerability to them. These aspects will be discussed in this review.

  7. Familial Prion Disease with Alzheimer Disease-Like Tau Pathology and Clinical Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Jayadev, Suman; Nochlin, David; Poorkaj, Parvoneh; Steinbart, Ellen J.; Mastrianni, James A.; Montine, Thomas J.; Ghetti, Bernardino; Schellenberg, Gerard D.; Bird, Thomas D.; Leverenz, James B.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To describe the Alzheimer disease (AD)-like clinical and pathological features, including marked neurofibrillary tangle (NFT) pathology, of a familial prion disease due to a rare nonsense mutation of the prion gene (PRNP). Methods Longitudinal clinical assessments were available for the proband and her mother. After death, both underwent neuropathological evaluation. PRNP was sequenced after failure to find immunopositive Aβ deposits in the proband and the documentation of prion protein (PrP) immunopositive pathology. Results The proband presented at age 42 years with a 3-year history of progressive short-term memory impairment and depression. Neuropsychological testing found impaired memory performance, with relatively preserved attention and construction. She was diagnosed with AD and died at age 47 years. Neuropathologic evaluation revealed extensive limbic and neocortical NFT formation and neuritic plaques consistent with a Braak stage of VI. The NFTs were immunopositive, with multiple tau antibodies, and electron microscopy revealed paired helical filaments. However, the neuritic plaques were immunonegative for Aβ, whereas immunostaining for PrP was positive. The mother of the proband had a similar presentation, including depression, and had been diagnosed clinically and pathologically as AD. Reevaluation of her brain tissue confirmed similar tau and PrP immunostaining findings. Genetic analysis revealed that both the proband and her mother had a rare PRNP mutation (Q160X) that resulted in the production of truncated PrP. Interpretation We suggest that PRNP mutations that result in a truncation of PrP lead to a prolonged clinical course consistent with a clinical diagnosis of AD and severe AD-like NFTs. PMID:21416485

  8. Sodium channel genes in pain-related disorders: phenotype-genotype associations and recommendations for clinical use.

    PubMed

    Waxman, Stephen G; Merkies, Ingemar S J; Gerrits, Monique M; Dib-Hajj, Sulayman D; Lauria, Giuseppe; Cox, James J; Wood, John N; Woods, C Geoffrey; Drenth, Joost P H; Faber, Catharina G

    2014-11-01

    Human studies have firmly implicated voltage-gated sodium channels in human pain disorders, and targeted and massively parallel genomic sequencing is beginning to be used in clinical practice to determine which sodium channel variants are involved. Missense substitutions of SCN9A, the gene encoding sodium channel NaV1.7, SCN10A, the gene encoding sodium channel NaV1.8, and SCN11A, the gene encoding sodium channel NaV1.9, produce gain-of-function changes that contribute to pain in many human painful disorders. Genomic sequencing might help to establish a diagnosis, and in the future might support individualisation of therapeutic approaches. However, in many cases, and especially in sodium channelopathies, the results from genomic sequencing can only be appropriately interpreted in the context of an extensive functional assessment, or family segregation analysis of phenotype and genotype. PMID:25316021

  9. IL-23/IL-17A Dysfunction Phenotypes Inform Possible Clinical Effects from Anti-IL-17A Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Blauvelt, Andrew; Lebwohl, Mark G; Bissonnette, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Biologics that neutralize specific cytokines have improved outcomes for several immune-mediated disorders but may also increase risks for particular side effects. This article postulates potential immunologic consequences of inhibiting components of the IL-23/T-helper cell 17 pathway–the target of next-generation biologics for treating psoriasis–based on clinical phenotypes of inherent or acquired deficiencies in this pathway. Generally, downstream deficiencies (e.g., IL-17A, IL-17F) are associated with fewer disorders compared with upstream deficiencies, suggesting that selectively blocking downstream targets may result in a narrower range of side effects. However, safety of these specific inhibitions must be established in long-term studies. PMID:25972190

  10. X-linked creatine transporter defect: a report on two unrelated boys with a severe clinical phenotype.

    PubMed

    Anselm, I A; Anselm, I M; Alkuraya, F S; Salomons, G S; Jakobs, C; Fulton, A B; Mazumdar, M; Rivkin, M; Frye, R; Poussaint, T Young; Marsden, D

    2006-02-01

    We report two unrelated boys with the X-linked creatine transporter defect (CRTR) and clinical features more severe than those previously described with this disorder. These two boys presented at ages 12 and 30 months with severe mental retardation, absent speech development, hypotonia, myopathy and extra-pyramidal movement disorder. One boy has seizures and some dysmorphic features; he also has evidence of an oxidative phosphorylation defect. They both had classical absence of creatine peak on brain magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). In one, however, this critical finding was overlooked in the initial interpretation and was discovered upon subsequent review of the MRS. Molecular studies showed large genomic deletions of a large part of the 3' end of the complete open reading frame of the SLC6A8 gene. This report emphasizes the importance of MRS in evaluating neurological symptoms, broadens the phenotypic spectrum of CRTR and adds knowledge about the pathogenesis of creatine depletion in the brain and retina.

  11. Phenotypic and Genotypic Characterization of Canadian Clinical Isolates of Vibrio parahaemolyticus Collected from 2000 to 2009

    PubMed Central

    Kearney, Ashley K.; Nadon, Celine A.; Peterson, Christy-Lynn; Tyler, Kevin; Bakouche, Laurene; Clark, Clifford G.; Hoang, Linda; Gilmour, Matthew W.; Farber, Jeffrey M.

    2014-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is the leading bacterial cause of food-borne illness due to the consumption of contaminated seafood. The aim of the present study was to determine the population of its subtypes and establish a better understanding of the various types of V. parahaemolyticus strains that are causing human illness in Canada. The subtypes for 100 human clinical isolates of V. parahaemolyticus collected between 2000 and 2009 were determined by performing serotyping, ribotyping, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, and multilocus sequence typing. Within this panel of strains, there was a high level of diversity (between 22 and 53 subtypes per method), but the presence of predominant clones with congruent subtypes between the various methods was also observed. For example, all 32 isolates belonging to sequence type 36 (ST36) were from serogroup O4, while 31 of them were ribotype EcoVib235-287, and 24 of the 32 were SfiI pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) pattern VPSF1.0001. With regard to the presence of known virulence genes, 74 of the 100 isolates were PCR positive for the presence of the thermostable direct hemolysin (tdh); and 59 of these 74 strains also contained the second virulence marker, the tdh-related hemolysin (trh). The detection of trh was more predominant (81%) among the clinical isolates, and only four (4%) of the clinical isolates tested negative for the presence of both tdh and trh. This database, comprising 100 clinical isolates of V. parahaemolyticus strains from Canada, forms a baseline understanding of subtype diversity for future source attribution and other epidemiologic studies. PMID:24452166

  12. The role of inflammation in hypoxic pulmonary hypertension: from cellular mechanisms to clinical phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Poth, Jens M.; Fini, Mehdi A.; Olschewski, Andrea; El Kasmi, Karim C.; Stenmark, Kurt R.

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxic pulmonary hypertension (PH) comprises a heterogeneous group of diseases sharing the common feature of chronic hypoxia-induced pulmonary vascular remodeling. The disease is usually characterized by mild to moderate pulmonary vascular remodeling that is largely thought to be reversible compared with the progressive irreversible disease seen in World Health Organization (WHO) group I disease. However, in these patients, the presence of PH significantly worsens morbidity and mortality. In addition, a small subset of patients with hypoxic PH develop “out-of-proportion” severe pulmonary hypertension characterized by pulmonary vascular remodeling that is irreversible and similar to that in WHO group I disease. In all cases of hypoxia-related vascular remodeling and PH, inflammation, particularly persistent inflammation, is thought to play a role. This review focuses on the effects of hypoxia on pulmonary vascular cells and the signaling pathways involved in the initiation and perpetuation of vascular inflammation, especially as they relate to vascular remodeling and transition to chronic irreversible PH. We hypothesize that the combination of hypoxia and local tissue factors/cytokines (“second hit”) antagonizes tissue homeostatic cellular interactions between mesenchymal cells (fibroblasts and/or smooth muscle cells) and macrophages and arrests these cells in an epigenetically locked and permanently activated proremodeling and proinflammatory phenotype. This aberrant cellular cross-talk between mesenchymal cells and macrophages promotes transition to chronic nonresolving inflammation and vascular remodeling, perpetuating PH. A better understanding of these signaling pathways may lead to the development of specific therapeutic targets, as none are currently available for WHO group III disease. PMID:25416383

  13. Epidemiologic, genetic, and clinical associations among phenotypically distinct populations of Leishmania (Viannia) in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Saravia, N G; Segura, I; Holguin, A F; Santrich, C; Valderrama, L; Ocampo, C

    1998-07-01

    Phenotypic characterization of 511 strains of Leishmania, subgenus Viannia, isolated from Colombian patients was conducted based on electrophoretic polymorphisms of 13 isoenzymes. Ninety-one Colombian strains of L. braziliensis were the most heterogeneous, constituting seven zymodemes while 397 L. panamensis and 22 L. guyanensis strains yielded five and three zymodemes, respectively. Phosphogluconate dehydrogenase, nucleoside hydrolase, and superoxide dismutase were the most polymorphic enzymes in this collection of strains, and together with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, allowed the discrimination of the three aforementioned species. Hierarchical cluster analysis of the zymodemes using Jaccard's coefficient of similarities revealed two clusters, one constituted by L. braziliensis zymodemes, and another by three subgroups consisting of zymodemes of L. panamensis closely related to the species reference strain, another consisting of L. guyanensis zymodemes, and a third group distinguished by new electromorphs of proline iminopeptidase and aspartate aminotransferase that reacted with the L. panamensis-specific monoclonal antibody B-11. Multiple zymodemes of L. panamensis and L. guyanensis were found to be sympatrically transmitted in foci along the Pacific coast. Leishmania braziliensis variants were ubiquitous throughout the territory of Colombia; L. panamensis was prevalent in the western region and L. guyanensis was prevalent in the Orinoco and Amazon river basins in the eastern half of the country. Distinct zymodemes of L. panamensis predominated in the northern and southern regions of the Pacific coast. Nine zymodemes of all three species were isolated from mucosal lesions. Zymodeme 1.1 of L. braziliensis had the highest frequency of mucosal involvement (10% of the cases), and disease caused by this zymodeme had the longest mean time of evolution (31 months; P = 0.002). In addition to being useful in describing epidemiologic relationships, the intraspecific

  14. Type I and II interferon signatures in Sjogren's syndrome pathogenesis: Contributions in distinct clinical phenotypes and Sjogren's related lymphomagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Nezos, Adrianos; Gravani, Fotini; Tassidou, Anna; Kapsogeorgou, Efstathia K.; Voulgarelis, Michael; Koutsilieris, Michael; Crow, Mary K.; Mavragani, Clio P.

    2015-01-01

    Both type I and II interferons (IFNs) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of Sjogren's syndrome (SS). We aimed to explore the contribution of type I and II IFN signatures in the generation of distinct SS clinical phenotypes including lymphoma development. Peripheral blood (PB) from SS patients (n=31), SS patients complicated by lymphoma (n=13) and healthy controls (HC, n=30) were subjected to real-time PCR for 3 interferon inducible genes (IFIGs) preferentially induced by type I IFN, 2 IFIGs preferentially induced by IFNγ as well as for IFNα and IFNγ genes. The same analysis was performed in minor salivary gland tissues (MSG) derived from 31 SS patients, 10 SS-lymphoma patients and 17 sicca controls (SC). In PB and MSG tissues, overexpression of both type I and type II IFIGs was observed in SS patients versus HC and SC, respectively, with a predominance of type I IFN signature in PB and a type II IFN signature in MSG tissues. In SS-lymphoma MSG tissues, lower IFNα, but higher IFNγ and type II IFIG transcripts compared to both SS and SC were observed. In receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, IFNγ/IFNα mRNA ratio in MSG tissues showed the best discrimination for lymphoma development. Discrete expression patterns of type I and II IFN signatures might be related to distinct SS clinical phenotypes. Additionally, IFNγ/IFNα mRNA ratio in diagnostic salivary gland biopsies is proposed as a novel histopathological biomarker for the prediction of in situ lymphoma development in the setting of SS. PMID:26183766

  15. Aggressive dogs: assessment and treatment considerations.

    PubMed

    Crowell-Davis, Sharon L

    2008-05-01

    The question of what to do with an aggressive dog involves clinical, legal, and ethical considerations. This first column on the subject addresses the clinical aspects from the standpoint of the general veterinarian. PMID:18581290

  16. Ultraviolet Radiation Exposure is Associated with Clinical and Autoantibody Phenotypes in Juvenile Myositis

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Mona; Targoff, Ira N.; Rice, Madeline M.; Miller, Frederick W.; Rider, Lisa G.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Genetic and environmental factors may contribute to the etiology of the juvenile idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (JIIM), systemic autoimmune diseases characterized by muscle and skin inflammation. We investigated the association between ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure and the clinical and autoantibody expression of JIIM. Methods We assessed the relationship between UVR exposure in the month before symptom onset and prevalence of juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM) versus polymyositis (JPM) in 298 patients. Among JDM patients, the association between UVR exposure and myositis autoantibodies was assessed. Regression models were stratified by sex and race. The association between regional UV index in U.S. geoclimatic zones and the clinical and autoantibody subgroups was examined by weighted least squares regression analysis. Results We observed increasing odds of JDM compared with JPM per unit increase in the patients’ highest UV index in the month before symptom onset in girls (OR = 1.18; 95% CI = 1.00–1.40). The average and highest UV indices were associated with increasing odds of anti-p155/140 autoantibodies, which was strongest in white males (OR 1.30 and 1.23, respectively). No association was observed between the UV index and anti-MJ autoantibodies or patients without myositis autoantibodies. Across US geoclimatic regions, the average UV index was associated with increasing odds of JDM and anti-p155/140 autoantibodies but decreasing odds of anti-MJ autoantibodies. Conclusion Short-term UVR exposure prior to illness onset may have a role in the clinical and serologic expression of juvenile myositis. Research examining mechanisms of UVR in JIIM pathogenesis is suggested from these findings. PMID:23658122

  17. Heterozygous STAT1 gain-of-function mutations underlie an unexpectedly broad clinical phenotype.

    PubMed

    Toubiana, Julie; Okada, Satoshi; Hiller, Julia; Oleastro, Matias; Lagos Gomez, Macarena; Aldave Becerra, Juan Carlos; Ouachée-Chardin, Marie; Fouyssac, Fanny; Girisha, Katta Mohan; Etzioni, Amos; Van Montfrans, Joris; Camcioglu, Yildiz; Kerns, Leigh Ann; Belohradsky, Bernd; Blanche, Stéphane; Bousfiha, Aziz; Rodriguez-Gallego, Carlos; Meyts, Isabelle; Kisand, Kai; Reichenbach, Janine; Renner, Ellen D; Rosenzweig, Sergio; Grimbacher, Bodo; van de Veerdonk, Frank L; Traidl-Hoffmann, Claudia; Picard, Capucine; Marodi, Laszlo; Morio, Tomohiro; Kobayashi, Masao; Lilic, Desa; Milner, Joshua D; Holland, Steven; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Puel, Anne

    2016-06-23

    Since their discovery in patients with autosomal dominant (AD) chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis (CMC) in 2011, heterozygous STAT1 gain-of-function (GOF) mutations have increasingly been identified worldwide. The clinical spectrum associated with them needed to be delineated. We enrolled 274 patients from 167 kindreds originating from 40 countries from 5 continents. Demographic data, clinical features, immunological parameters, treatment, and outcome were recorded. The median age of the 274 patients was 22 years (range, 1-71 years); 98% of them had CMC, with a median age at onset of 1 year (range, 0-24 years). Patients often displayed bacterial (74%) infections, mostly because of Staphylococcus aureus (36%), including the respiratory tract and the skin in 47% and 28% of patients, respectively, and viral (38%) infections, mostly because of Herpesviridae (83%) and affecting the skin in 32% of patients. Invasive fungal infections (10%), mostly caused by Candida spp. (29%), and mycobacterial disease (6%) caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, environmental mycobacteria, or Bacille Calmette-Guérin vaccines were less common. Many patients had autoimmune manifestations (37%), including hypothyroidism (22%), type 1 diabetes (4%), blood cytopenia (4%), and systemic lupus erythematosus (2%). Invasive infections (25%), cerebral aneurysms (6%), and cancers (6%) were the strongest predictors of poor outcome. CMC persisted in 39% of the 202 patients receiving prolonged antifungal treatment. Circulating interleukin-17A-producing T-cell count was low for most (82%) but not all of the patients tested. STAT1 GOF mutations underlie AD CMC, as well as an unexpectedly wide range of other clinical features, including not only a variety of infectious and autoimmune diseases, but also cerebral aneurysms and carcinomas that confer a poor prognosis. PMID:27114460

  18. Heterozygous STAT1 gain-of-function mutations underlie an unexpectedly broad clinical phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Toubiana, Julie; Okada, Satoshi; Hiller, Julia; Oleastro, Matias; Lagos Gomez, Macarena; Aldave Becerra, Juan Carlos; Ouachée-Chardin, Marie; Fouyssac, Fanny; Girisha, Katta Mohan; Etzioni, Amos; Van Montfrans, Joris; Camcioglu, Yildiz; Kerns, Leigh Ann; Belohradsky, Bernd; Blanche, Stéphane; Bousfiha, Aziz; Rodriguez-Gallego, Carlos; Meyts, Isabelle; Kisand, Kai; Reichenbach, Janine; Renner, Ellen D.; Rosenzweig, Sergio; Grimbacher, Bodo; van de Veerdonk, Frank L.; Traidl-Hoffmann, Claudia; Picard, Capucine; Marodi, Laszlo; Morio, Tomohiro; Kobayashi, Masao; Lilic, Desa; Milner, Joshua D.; Holland, Steven; Casanova, Jean-Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Since their discovery in patients with autosomal dominant (AD) chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis (CMC) in 2011, heterozygous STAT1 gain-of-function (GOF) mutations have increasingly been identified worldwide. The clinical spectrum associated with them needed to be delineated. We enrolled 274 patients from 167 kindreds originating from 40 countries from 5 continents. Demographic data, clinical features, immunological parameters, treatment, and outcome were recorded. The median age of the 274 patients was 22 years (range, 1-71 years); 98% of them had CMC, with a median age at onset of 1 year (range, 0-24 years). Patients often displayed bacterial (74%) infections, mostly because of Staphylococcus aureus (36%), including the respiratory tract and the skin in 47% and 28% of patients, respectively, and viral (38%) infections, mostly because of Herpesviridae (83%) and affecting the skin in 32% of patients. Invasive fungal infections (10%), mostly caused by Candida spp. (29%), and mycobacterial disease (6%) caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, environmental mycobacteria, or Bacille Calmette-Guérin vaccines were less common. Many patients had autoimmune manifestations (37%), including hypothyroidism (22%), type 1 diabetes (4%), blood cytopenia (4%), and systemic lupus erythematosus (2%). Invasive infections (25%), cerebral aneurysms (6%), and cancers (6%) were the strongest predictors of poor outcome. CMC persisted in 39% of the 202 patients receiving prolonged antifungal treatment. Circulating interleukin-17A–producing T-cell count was low for most (82%) but not all of the patients tested. STAT1 GOF mutations underlie AD CMC, as well as an unexpectedly wide range of other clinical features, including not only a variety of infectious and autoimmune diseases, but also cerebral aneurysms and carcinomas that confer a poor prognosis. PMID:27114460

  19. [Searching for Tourette's syndrome gene. Part 1. Heterogeneity of clinical phenotypes].

    PubMed

    Kowalska, Anna; Midro, Alina T; Janik, Piotr; Gogol, Anna; Służewski, Wojciech; Rajewski, Andrzej

    2012-01-01

    The French neuropsychiatrist Georges Gilles de la Tourette described in 1885 the "Maladie des Tics" which later was named after him, as Gilles de la Tourette syndrome (GTS). Gilles de la Tourette syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by simple and complex motor and vocal tics with multiple neuropsychiatric comorbidities. GTS is often concurrent with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). There are several clinical GTS subtypes: GTS only, GTS+OCD, and GTS+OCD+ADHD. Additional clinical aspects of the disorder include occurrence of anger episodes, anxiety and mood disorders, and learning and sleeping disturbances. The genetics of GTS is complex and remains unclear. So far, no causative candidate genes have been identified. However, segregation studies in families and twins with GTS provide strong evidence for the existence of a genetic background associated with a multifactorial mode of inheritance. Progress in studies on genome variability among patients with GTS is necessary to improve pharmacotherapeutic strategies of the disorder. PMID:22371410

  20. Phenotypic Delineation of Emanuel Syndrome (Supernumerary Derivative 22 syndrome): Clinical features of 63 individuals

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Melissa T; Pierre, Stephanie A St.; Zackai, Elaine H; Emanuel, Beverly S; Boycott, Kym M

    2009-01-01

    Emanuel syndrome is characterized by multiple congenital anomalies and developmental disability. It is caused by the presence of a supernumerary derivative chromosome that contains material from chromosomes 11 and 22. The origin of this imbalance is 3:1 malsegregation of a parental balanced translocation between chromosomes 11 and 22, which is the most common recurrent reciprocal translocation in humans. Little has been published on the clinical features of this syndrome since the 1980s and information on natural history is limited. We designed a questionnaire to collect information from families recruited through an international online support group, Chromosome 22 Central. Data gathered include information on congenital anomalies, medical and surgical history, developmental and behavioural issues, and current abilities. We received information on 63 individuals with Emanuel syndrome, ranging in age from newborn to adulthood. As previously recognized, congenital anomalies were common, the most frequent being ear pits (76%), micrognathia (60%), heart malformations (57%), and cleft palate (54%). Our data suggest that vision and hearing impairment, seizures, failure to thrive and recurrent infections, particularly otitis media, are common in this syndrome. Psychomotor development is uniformly delayed, however the majority of individuals (over 70%) eventually learn to walk with support. Language development and ability for self-care are also very impaired. This study provides new information on the clinical spectrum and natural history of Emanuel syndrome for families and physicians caring for these individuals. PMID:19606488

  1. Clinical manifestations of autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD): kidney-related and non-kidney-related phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Büscher, Rainer; Büscher, Anja K; Weber, Stefanie; Mohr, Julia; Hegen, Bianca; Vester, Udo; Hoyer, Peter F

    2014-10-01

    Autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD), although less frequent than the dominant form, is a common, inherited ciliopathy of childhood that is caused by mutations in the PKHD1-gene on chromosome 6. The characteristic dilatation of the renal collecting ducts starts in utero and can present at any stage from infancy to adulthood. Renal insufficiency may already begin in utero and may lead to early abortion or oligohydramnios and lung hypoplasia in the newborn. However, there are also affected children who have no evidence of renal dysfunction in utero and who are born with normal renal function. Up to 30 % of patients die in the perinatal period, and those surviving the neonatal period reach end stage renal disease (ESRD) in infancy, early childhood or adolescence. In contrast, some affected patients have been diagnosed as adults with renal function ranging from normal to moderate renal insufficiency to ESRD. The clinical spectrum of ARPKD is broader than previously recognized. While bilateral renal enlargement with microcystic dilatation is the predominant clinical feature, arterial hypertension, intrahepatic biliary dysgenesis remain important manifestations that affect approximately 45 % of infants. All patients with ARPKD develop clinical findings of congenital hepatic fibrosis (CHF); however, non-obstructive dilation of the intrahepatic bile ducts in the liver (Caroli's disease) is seen at the histological level in only a subset of patients. Cholangitis and variceal bleeding, sequelae of portal hypertension, are life-threatening complications that may occur more often in advanced cases of liver disease. In this review we focus on common and uncommon kidney-related and non-kidney-related phenotypes. Clinical management of ARPKD patients should include consideration of potential problems related to these manifestations.

  2. A transgenic zebrafish model expressing KIT-D816V recapitulates features of aggressive systemic mastocytosis.

    PubMed

    Balci, Tugce B; Prykhozhij, Sergey V; Teh, Evelyn M; Da'as, Sahar I; McBride, Eileen; Liwski, Robert; Chute, Ian C; Leger, Daniel; Lewis, Stephen M; Berman, Jason N

    2014-10-01

    Systemic mastocytosis (SM) is a rare myeloproliferative disease without curative therapy. Despite clinical variability, the majority of patients harbour a KIT-D816V mutation, but efforts to inhibit mutant KIT with tyrosine kinase inhibitors have been unsatisfactory, indicating a need for new preclinical approaches to identify alternative targets and novel therapies in this disease. Murine models to date have been limited and do not fully recapitulate the most aggressive forms of SM. We describe the generation of a transgenic zebrafish model expressing the human KIT-D816V mutation. Adult fish demonstrate a myeloproliferative disease phenotype, including features of aggressive SM in haematopoeitic tissues and high expression levels of endopeptidases, consistent with SM patients. Transgenic embryos demonstrate a cell-cycle phenotype with corresponding expression changes in genes associated with DNA maintenance and repair, such as reduced dnmt1. In addition, epcam was consistently downregulated in both transgenic adults and embryos. Decreased embryonic epcam expression was associated with reduced neuromast numbers, providing a robust in vivo phenotypic readout for chemical screening in KIT-D816V-induced disease. This study represents the first zebrafish model of a mast cell disease with an aggressive adult phenotype and embryonic markers that could be exploited to screen for novel agents in SM.

  3. Discovery of allosteric BCR-ABL inhibitors from phenotypic screen to clinical candidate.

    PubMed

    Gray, Nathanael S; Fabbro, Doriano

    2014-01-01

    The development of imatinib, an ATP-competitive inhibitor of the BCR-ABL oncoprotein, has revolutionized the treatment of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). Unfortunately, the leukemia eventually becomes resistant imatinib as a result of emergence of cells expressing drug insensitive BCR-ABL mutant proteins. This has motivated the development of several next-generation ATP-competitive drugs. This chapter describes the discovery and development of a complementary strategy involving inhibiting BCR-ABL by targeting an allosteric binding site. Compounds that bind to the myristate-binding pocket of BCR-ABL are able to induce formation of an "inactive" state and are able to overcome resistance mutations located in the ATP-binding pocket including the recalcitrant T315I "gatekeeper" mutation. Myristate-pocket inhibitors are also able to function synergistically with ATP-competitive inhibitors in cellular and murine models of CML and this dual inhibitory strategy is currently being investigated in the clinic.

  4. Regulatory T Cells Phenotype in Different Clinical Forms of Chagas' Disease

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira-Carvalho, Andréa; Renato Zuquim Antas, Paulo; Assis Silva Gomes, Juliana; Sathler-Avelar, Renato; Otávio Costa Rocha, Manoel; Elói-Santos, Silvana Maria; Pinho, Rosa Teixeira; Correa-Oliveira, Rodrigo; Martins-Filho, Olindo Assis

    2011-01-01

    CD25High CD4+ regulatory T cells (Treg cells) have been described as key players in immune regulation, preventing infection-induced immune pathology and limiting collateral tissue damage caused by vigorous anti-parasite immune response. In this review, we summarize data obtained by the investigation of Treg cells in different clinical forms of Chagas' disease. Ex vivo immunophenotyping of whole blood, as well as after stimulation with Trypanosoma cruzi antigens, demonstrated that individuals in the indeterminate (IND) clinical form of the disease have a higher frequency of Treg cells, suggesting that an expansion of those cells could be beneficial, possibly by limiting strong cytotoxic activity and tissue damage. Additional analysis demonstrated an activated status of Treg cells based on low expression of CD62L and high expression of CD40L, CD69, and CD54 by cells from all chagasic patients after T. cruzi antigenic stimulation. Moreover, there was an increase in the frequency of the population of Foxp3+ CD25HighCD4+ cells that was also IL-10+ in the IND group, whereas in the cardiac (CARD) group, there was an increase in the percentage of Foxp3+ CD25High CD4+ cells that expressed CTLA-4. These data suggest that IL-10 produced by Treg cells is effective in controlling disease development in IND patients. However, in CARD patients, the same regulatory mechanism, mediated by IL-10 and CTLA-4 expression is unlikely to be sufficient to control the progression of the disease. These data suggest that Treg cells may play an important role in controlling the immune response in Chagas' disease and the balance between regulatory and effector T cells may be important for the progression and development of the disease. Additional detailed analysis of the mechanisms on how these cells are activated and exert their function will certainly give insights for the rational design of procedure to achieve the appropriate balance between protection and pathology during parasite

  5. Aggregation propensities of superoxide dismutase G93 hotspot mutants mirror ALS clinical phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Pratt, Ashley J; Shin, David S; Merz, Gregory E; Rambo, Robert P; Lancaster, W Andrew; Dyer, Kevin N; Borbat, Peter P; Poole, Farris L; Adams, Michael W W; Freed, Jack H; Crane, Brian R; Tainer, John A; Getzoff, Elizabeth D

    2014-10-28

    Protein framework alterations in heritable Cu, Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD) mutants cause misassembly and aggregation in cells affected by the motor neuron disease ALS. However, the mechanistic relationship between superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) mutations and human disease is controversial, with many hypotheses postulated for the propensity of specific SOD mutants to cause ALS. Here, we experimentally identify distinguishing attributes of ALS mutant SOD proteins that correlate with clinical severity by applying solution biophysical techniques to six ALS mutants at human SOD hotspot glycine 93. A small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) assay and other structural methods assessed aggregation propensity by defining the size and shape of fibrillar SOD aggregates after mild biochemical perturbations. Inductively coupled plasma MS quantified metal ion binding stoichiometry, and pulsed dipolar ESR spectroscopy evaluated the Cu(2+) binding site and defined cross-dimer copper-copper distance distributions. Importantly, we find that copper deficiency in these mutants promotes aggregation in a manner strikingly consistent with their clinical severities. G93 mutants seem to properly incorporate metal ions under physiological conditions when assisted by the copper chaperone but release copper under destabilizing conditions more readily than the WT enzyme. Altered intradimer flexibility in ALS mutants may cause differential metal retention and promote distinct aggregation trends observed for mutant proteins in vitro and in ALS patients. Combined biophysical and structural results test and link copper retention to the framework destabilization hypothesis as a unifying general mechanism for both SOD aggregation and ALS disease progression, with implications for disease severity and therapeutic intervention strategies.

  6. Aggregation propensities of superoxide dismutase G93 hotspot mutants mirror ALS clinical phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Pratt, Ashley J.; Shin, David S.; Merz, Gregory E.; Rambo, Robert P.; Lancaster, W. Andrew; Dyer, Kevin N.; Borbat, Peter P.; Poole, Farris L.; Adams, Michael W. W.; Freed, Jack H.; Crane, Brian R.; Tainer, John A.; Getzoff, Elizabeth D.

    2014-01-01

    Protein framework alterations in heritable Cu, Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD) mutants cause misassembly and aggregation in cells affected by the motor neuron disease ALS. However, the mechanistic relationship between superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) mutations and human disease is controversial, with many hypotheses postulated for the propensity of specific SOD mutants to cause ALS. Here, we experimentally identify distinguishing attributes of ALS mutant SOD proteins that correlate with clinical severity by applying solution biophysical techniques to six ALS mutants at human SOD hotspot glycine 93. A small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) assay and other structural methods assessed aggregation propensity by defining the size and shape of fibrillar SOD aggregates after mild biochemical perturbations. Inductively coupled plasma MS quantified metal ion binding stoichiometry, and pulsed dipolar ESR spectroscopy evaluated the Cu2+ binding site and defined cross-dimer copper–copper distance distributions. Importantly, we find that copper deficiency in these mutants promotes aggregation in a manner strikingly consistent with their clinical severities. G93 mutants seem to properly incorporate metal ions under physiological conditions when assisted by the copper chaperone but release copper under destabilizing conditions more readily than the WT enzyme. Altered intradimer flexibility in ALS mutants may cause differential metal retention and promote distinct aggregation trends observed for mutant proteins in vitro and in ALS patients. Combined biophysical and structural results test and link copper retention to the framework destabilization hypothesis as a unifying general mechanism for both SOD aggregation and ALS disease progression, with implications for disease severity and therapeutic intervention strategies. PMID:25316790

  7. PTPN22 Association in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) with Respect to Individual Ancestry and Clinical Sub-Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Adler, Adam; Chung, Sharon A.; Kaufman, Kenneth M.; Kelly, Jennifer A.; Glenn, Stuart B.; Guthridge, Joel M.; Scofield, Robert H.; Kimberly, Robert P.; Brown, Elizabeth E.; Alarcón, Graciela S.; Edberg, Jeffrey C.; Kim, Jae-Hoon; Choi, Jiyoung; Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind; Petri, Michelle A.; Reveille, John D.; Vilá, Luis M.; Boackle, Susan A.; Freedman, Barry I.; Tsao, Betty P.; Langefeld, Carl D.; Vyse, Timothy J.; Jacob, Chaim O.; Pons-Estel, Bernardo; Niewold, Timothy B.; Moser Sivils, Kathy L.; Merrill, Joan T.; Anaya, Juan-Manuel; Gilkeson, Gary S.; Gaffney, Patrick M.; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta E.; Harley, John B.; Criswell, Lindsey A.; James, Judith A.; Nath, Swapan K.

    2013-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor type 22 (PTPN22) is a negative regulator of T-cell activation associated with several autoimmune diseases, including systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Missense rs2476601 is associated with SLE in individuals with European ancestry. Since the rs2476601 risk allele frequency differs dramatically across ethnicities, we assessed robustness of PTPN22 association with SLE and its clinical sub-phenotypes across four ethnically diverse populations. Ten SNPs were genotyped in 8220 SLE cases and 7369 controls from in European-Americans (EA), African-Americans (AA), Asians (AS), and Hispanics (HS). We performed imputation-based association followed by conditional analysis to identify independent associations. Significantly associated SNPs were tested for association with SLE clinical sub-phenotypes, including autoantibody profiles. Multiple testing was accounted for by using false discovery rate. We successfully imputed and tested allelic association for 107 SNPs within the PTPN22 region and detected evidence of ethnic-specific associations from EA and HS. In EA, the strongest association was at rs2476601 (P = 4.7×10−9, OR = 1.40 (95% CI = 1.25–1.56)). Independent association with rs1217414 was also observed in EA, and both SNPs are correlated with increased European ancestry. For HS imputed intronic SNP, rs3765598, predicted to be a cis-eQTL, was associated (P = 0.007, OR = 0.79 and 95% CI = 0.67–0.94). No significant associations were observed in AA or AS. Case-only analysis using lupus-related clinical criteria revealed differences between EA SLE patients positive for moderate to high titers of IgG anti-cardiolipin (aCL IgG >20) versus negative aCL IgG at rs2476601 (P = 0.012, OR = 1.65). Association was reinforced when these cases were compared to controls (P = 2.7×10−5, OR = 2.11). Our results validate that rs2476601 is the most significantly associated SNP in individuals with

  8. Evaluation of Different Phenotypic Techniques for the Detection of Slime Produced by Bacteria Isolated from Clinical Specimens

    PubMed Central

    HRV, Rajkumar; Devaki, Ramakrishna

    2016-01-01

    Introduction  Microorganisms use various strategies for their survival in both the environment and in humans. Slime production by bacteria is one such mechanism by which microbes colonize on the indwelling prosthetic devices and form biofilms. Infections caused by such microorganisms are difficult to treat as the biofilm acts as a shield and protects microbes against antimicrobial agents. There are several methods for the detection of slime produced by bacteria, and they include both phenotypic and molecular methods. The present study evaluated the Congo red agar/broth method, Christensen’s method, dye elution technique, and the latex agglutination method for the demonstration of slime production by different bacterial clinical isolates. Materials & Methods We collected 151 bacterial clinical isolates (both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria) from various specimens and tested them for the production of slime both by qualitative and quantitative tests. Congo red agar/broth method, Christensen's method, dye elution technique, and latex agglutination methods were used for detecting the slime or slime-like substance. Results  We found that 103 (68.2%) strains were positive for slime production by Congo red agar/broth method. It was found that 18 (94.7%) strains of Klebsiella pneumoniae, 21 (84.0%) strains of S aureus and 25 (65.7%) strains of coagulase-negative Staphylococci were positive for slime or slime-like substances by Congo red agar/broth method. A total of 41.0% of the strains positive by Christensen's method and 15.2% of the strains by dye elution technique were found to be more adherent organisms and that have the potential to form biofilms. Only the gram-positive organisms showed nonspecific agglutination with latex suspension. Conclusion  Among the various phenotypic methods compared in this study the Congo red agar/broth method is a simple, economical, sensitive, and specific method that can be used by clinical microbiology laboratories

  9. A chemical with proven clinical safety rescues Down-syndrome-related phenotypes in through DYRK1A inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyeongki; Lee, Kyu-Sun; Kim, Ae-Kyeong; Choi, Miri; Choi, Kwangman; Kang, Mingu; Chi, Seung-Wook; Lee, Min-Sung; Lee, Jeong-Soo; Lee, So-Young; Song, Woo-Joo; Yu, Kweon

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT DYRK1A is important in neuronal development and function, and its excessive activity is considered a significant pathogenic factor in Down syndrome and Alzheimer's disease. Thus, inhibition of DYRK1A has been suggested to be a new strategy to modify the disease. Very few compounds, however, have been reported to act as inhibitors, and their potential clinical uses require further evaluation. Here, we newly identify CX-4945, the safety of which has been already proven in the clinical setting, as a potent inhibitor of DYRK1A that acts in an ATP-competitive manner. The inhibitory potency of CX-4945 on DYRK1A (IC50=6.8 nM) in vitro was higher than that of harmine, INDY or proINDY, which are well-known potent inhibitors of DYRK1A. CX-4945 effectively reverses the aberrant phosphorylation of Tau, amyloid precursor protein (APP) and presenilin 1 (PS1) in mammalian cells. To our surprise, feeding with CX-4945 significantly restored the neurological and phenotypic defects induced by the overexpression of minibrain, an ortholog of human DYRK1A, in the Drosophila model. Moreover, oral administration of CX-4945 acutely suppressed Tau hyperphosphorylation in the hippocampus of DYRK1A-overexpressing mice. Our research results demonstrate that CX-4945 is a potent DYRK1A inhibitor and also suggest that it has therapeutic potential for DYRK1A-associated diseases. PMID:27483355

  10. Clinical and molecular characterization of a severe form of partial lipodystrophy expanding the phenotype of PPARγ deficiency[S

    PubMed Central

    Campeau, Philippe M.; Astapova, Olga; Martins, Rebecca; Bergeron, Jean; Couture, Patrick; Hegele, Robert A.; Leff, Todd; Gagné, Claude

    2012-01-01

    Familial partial lipodystrophy (FPLD) is characterized by abnormal fat distribution and a metabolic syndrome with hypertriglyceridemia. We identified a family with a severe form of FPLD3 with never-reported clinical features and a novel mutation affecting the DNA binding domain of PPARγ (E157D). Apart from the lipodystrophy and severe metabolic syndrome, individuals presented musculoskeletal and hematological issues. E157D heterozygotes had a muscular habitus yet displayed muscle weakness and myopathy. Also, E157D heterozygotes presented multiple cytopenias and a susceptibility to autoimmune disease. In vitro studies showed that the E157D mutation does not decrease the receptor's affinity to classical PPAR response elements or its responsiveness to a PPARγ agonist, yet it severely reduces its target gene transcription. Microarray experiments demonstrated a decreased activation of a wide array of genes, including genes involved in the PPAR response, the immune response, hematopoiesis, and metabolism in muscle. In addition, a subset of genes with cryptic PPAR response elements was activated. In summary, we describe a large family with a novel PPARγ mutation, which extends the clinical phenotype of FPLD3 to include muscular, immune, and hematological features. Together, our results support the role of PPARγ in controlling homeostasis of multiple systems beyond lipid metabolism. PMID:22750678

  11. A chemical with proven clinical safety rescues Down-syndrome-related phenotypes in through DYRK1A inhibition.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyeongki; Lee, Kyu-Sun; Kim, Ae-Kyeong; Choi, Miri; Choi, Kwangman; Kang, Mingu; Chi, Seung-Wook; Lee, Min-Sung; Lee, Jeong-Soo; Lee, So-Young; Song, Woo-Joo; Yu, Kweon; Cho, Sungchan

    2016-08-01

    DYRK1A is important in neuronal development and function, and its excessive activity is considered a significant pathogenic factor in Down syndrome and Alzheimer's disease. Thus, inhibition of DYRK1A has been suggested to be a new strategy to modify the disease. Very few compounds, however, have been reported to act as inhibitors, and their potential clinical uses require further evaluation. Here, we newly identify CX-4945, the safety of which has been already proven in the clinical setting, as a potent inhibitor of DYRK1A that acts in an ATP-competitive manner. The inhibitory potency of CX-4945 on DYRK1A (IC50=6.8 nM) in vitro was higher than that of harmine, INDY or proINDY, which are well-known potent inhibitors of DYRK1A. CX-4945 effectively reverses the aberrant phosphorylation of Tau, amyloid precursor protein (APP) and presenilin 1 (PS1) in mammalian cells. To our surprise, feeding with CX-4945 significantly restored the neurological and phenotypic defects induced by the overexpression of minibrain, an ortholog of human DYRK1A, in the Drosophila model. Moreover, oral administration of CX-4945 acutely suppressed Tau hyperphosphorylation in the hippocampus of DYRK1A-overexpressing mice. Our research results demonstrate that CX-4945 is a potent DYRK1A inhibitor and also suggest that it has therapeutic potential for DYRK1A-associated diseases. PMID:27483355

  12. Molecular genetics of MARVELD2 and clinical phenotype in Pakistani and Slovak families segregating DFNB49 hearing loss

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Gowri; Varga, Lukas; Trincot, Claire; Shahzad, Mohsin; Friedman, Penelope L.; Klimes, Iwar; Greinwald, John H.; Riazuddin, S Amer; Masindova, Ivica; Profant, Milan; Khan, Shaheen N.; Friedman, Thomas B.; Ahmed, Zubair M.; Gasperikova, Daniela; Riazuddin, Sheikh; Riazuddin, Saima

    2015-01-01

    Pathogenic mutations of MARVELD2, encoding tricellulin, a tricelluar tight junction protein, cause autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing loss (DFNB49) in families of Pakistan and Czech Roma origin. In fact, they are a significant cause of prelingual hearing loss in the Czech Roma, second only to GJB2 variants. Previously, we reported that mice homozygous for p.Arg497* variant of Marveld2 had a broad phenotypic spectrum, where defects were observed in the inner ear, heart, mandibular salivary gland, thyroid gland and olfactory epithelium. The current study describes the types and frequencies of MARVELD2 alleles and clinically reexamines members of DFNB49 families. We found that MARVELD2 variants are responsible for about 1.5% (95% CI: 0.8 – 2.6) of non-syndromic hearing loss in our cohort of 800 Pakistani families. The c.1331+2T>C allele is recurrent. In addition, we identified a novel large deletion in a single family, which appears to have resulted from non-allelic homologous recombination between two similar Alu short interspersed elements. Finally, we observed no other clinical manifestations co-segregating with hearing loss in DFNB49 human families, and hypothesize that the additional abnormalities in the Marveld2 mutant mouse indicates a critical non-redundant function for tricellulin in other organ systems. PMID:25666562

  13. [The study of dynamics of clinical and molecular phenotypes in the generalized form of myasthenia with optimized and combined treatment].

    PubMed

    Drozd, O A; Efremov, V V; Romantsov, M G; Sarvilina, I V

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was the research of clinical and molecular phenotypes in the generalized form of myasthenia with optimized treantment, which includes the application of basic mode of the treatment and meglumine sodium succinate, and also the combined mode of the treatment, which includes the mode of the treatment and meglumine sodium succinate and ozonotherapy. The most epressed improvement of indicators of the clinical and neurologic status (the eliminaton of motoring breakdown, eye movement disrders, the weaknesses of mimic, respiratory and chewing muscles, bulbar syndrome, the doubling in eye and ptosis, pharyngeal violations and increase in volume of movement of eyes) was observed in the group of patients receiving the combined therapy. The reduction of the epressiveness of the defeat of the neuromotor device and the decrement of the amplitude of the various degree of M-answer in patients with myasthenla is revealed in the application of the combined therapy in the comparison with the application of the basic and optimized therapy. For the first time we have investigaed the dynamics of the intensity of the expression of specfic peptides and proteins in blood serum in patients with the application of basic therapy, reamberin and ozonotherapy, which have allowed to open the new mechanisms of the efficiency ofthe combined therapy of the disease.

  14. Association between allelic variation due to short tandem repeats in tRNA gene of Entamoeba histolytica and clinical phenotypes of amoebiasis.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, Virendra; Ghoshal, Ujjala; Mittal, Balraj; Dhole, Tapan N; Ghoshal, Uday C

    2014-05-01

    Genotypes of Entamoeba histolytica (E. histolytica) may contribute clinical phenotypes of amoebiasis such as amoebic liver abscess (ALA), dysentery and asymptomatic cyst passers state. Hence, we evaluated allelic variation due to short tandem repeats (STRs) in tRNA gene of E. histolytica and clinical phenotypes of amoebiasis. Asymptomatic cyst passers (n=24), patients with dysentery (n=56) and ALA (n=107) were included. Extracted DNA from stool (dysentery, asymptomatic cyst passers) and liver aspirate was amplified using 6 E. histolytica specific tRNA-linked STRs (D-A, A-L, N-K2, R-R, S-Q, and S(TGA)-D) primers. PCR products were subjected to sequencing. Association between allelic variation and clinical phenotypes was analyzed. A total of 9 allelic variations were found in D-A, 8 in A-L, 4 in N-K2, 5 in R-R, 10 in S(TAG)-D and 7 in S-Q loci. A significant association was found between allelic variants and clinical phenotypes of amoebiasis. This study reveals that allelic variation due to short tandem repeats (STRs) in tRNA gene of E. histolytica is associated different clinical outcome of amoebiasis.

  15. Familial non-syndromic cleft lip and palate--analysis of the IRF6 gene and clinical phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Pegelow, M; Peyrard-Janvid, M; Zucchelli, M; Fransson, I; Larson, O; Kere, J; Larsson, C; Karsten, A

    2008-04-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize Swedish families with non-syndromic cleft lip and/or palate (NSCL/P) for mutations or other sequence variants in the interferon regulatory factor 6 (IRF6) gene, as well as to describe their cleft phenotypes and hypodontia. Seventeen Swedish families with at least two family members with NSCL/P were identified and clinically evaluated. Extracted DNA from blood samples was used for IRF6 mutation screening. Exonic fragments of the IRF6 gene were sequenced and chromatograms were inspected. Statistical analysis was undertaken with marker- and haplotype association tests. No disease-associated IRF6 mutation could be determined in the families analyzed. One new and seven known single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were detected. The A allele of SNP rs861019 in exon 2 and the G allele of SNP rs7552506 in intron 3 showed association with cleft lip and palate (CLP; odds ratios of 3.1 and 5.45, respectively). Hypodontia was observed more commonly in individuals affected with CL/P as compared with family members without a cleft (P < 0.01). The hypodontia most often affected the cleft area, possibly representing a secondary effect. The distribution of cleft phenotypes in 15 of the 17 families with NSCL/P differed from the mixed cleft types seen in Van der Woude syndrome (VWS), in that CLP did not occur together with an isolated cleft palate within the same family. It was concluded that mutations of the IRF6 gene are not a common cause for cleft predisposition in Swedish NSCL/P families. PMID:18209213

  16. Genotypic and Phenotypic Applications for the Differentiation and Species-Level Identification of Achromobacter for Clinical Diagnoses

    PubMed Central

    Gomila, Margarita; Prince-Manzano, Claudia; Svensson-Stadler, Liselott; Busquets, Antonio; Erhard, Marcel; Martínez, Deny L.; Lalucat, Jorge; Moore, Edward R. B.

    2014-01-01

    The Achromobacter is a genus in the family Alcaligenaceae, comprising fifteen species isolated from different sources, including clinical samples. The ability to detect and correctly identify Achromobacter species, particularly A. xylosoxidans, and differentiate them from other phenotypically similar and genotypically related Gram-negative, aerobic, non-fermenting species is important for patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), as well as for nosocomial and other opportunistic infections. Traditional phenotypic profile-based analyses have been demonstrated to be inadequate for reliable identifications of isolates of Achromobacter species and genotypic-based assays, relying upon comparative 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses are not able to insure definitive identifications of Achromobacter species, due to the inherently conserved nature of the gene. The uses of alternative methodologies to enable high-resolution differentiation between the species in the genus are needed. A comparative multi-locus sequence analysis (MLSA) of four selected ‘house-keeping’ genes (atpD, gyrB, recA, and rpoB) assessed the individual gene sequences for their potential in developing a reliable, rapid and cost-effective diagnostic protocol for Achromobacter species identifications. The analysis of the type strains of the species of the genus and 46 strains of Achromobacter species showed congruence between the cluster analyses derived from the individual genes. The MLSA gene sequences exhibited different levels of resolution in delineating the validly published Achromobacter species and elucidated strains that represent new genotypes and probable new species of the genus. Our results also suggested that the recently described A. spritinus is a later heterotypic synonym of A. marplatensis. Strains were analyzed, using whole-cell Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Time-Of-Flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), as an alternative phenotypic profile-based method with the potential to

  17. A prospective study validating a clinical scoring system and demonstrating phenotypical-genotypical correlations in Silver-Russell syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Azzi, Salah; Salem, Jennifer; Thibaud, Nathalie; Chantot-Bastaraud, Sandra; Lieber, Eli; Netchine, Irène; Harbison, Madeleine D

    2015-01-01

    Background Multiple clinical scoring systems have been proposed for Silver-Russell syndrome (SRS). Here we aimed to test a clinical scoring system for SRS and to analyse the correlation between (epi)genotype and phenotype. Subjects and methods Sixty-nine patients were examined by two physicians. Clinical scores were generated for all patients, with a new, six-item scoring system: (1) small for gestational age, birth length and/or weight ≤−2SDS, (2) postnatal growth retardation (height ≤−2SDS), (3) relative macrocephaly at birth, (4) body asymmetry, (5) feeding difficulties and/or body mass index (BMI) ≤−2SDS in toddlers; (6) protruding forehead at the age of 1–3 years. Subjects were considered to have likely SRS if they met at least four of these six criteria. Molecular investigations were performed blind to the clinical data. Results The 69 patients were classified into two groups (Likely-SRS (n=60), Unlikely-SRS (n=9)). Forty-six Likely-SRS patients (76.7%) displayed either 11p15 ICR1 hypomethylation (n=35; 58.3%) or maternal UPD of chromosome 7 (mUPD7) (n=11; 18.3%). Eight Unlikely-SRS patients had neither ICR1 hypomethylation nor mUPD7, whereas one patient had mUPD7. The clinical score and molecular results yielded four groups that differed significantly overall and for individual scoring system factors. Further molecular screening led identifying chromosomal abnormalities in Likely-SRS-double-negative and Unlikely-SRS groups. Four Likely-SRS-double negative patients carried a DLK1/GTL2 IG-DMR hypomethylation, a mUPD16; a mUPD20 and a de novo 1q21 microdeletion. Conclusions This new scoring system is very sensitive (98%) for the detection of patients with SRS with demonstrated molecular abnormalities. Given its clinical and molecular heterogeneity, SRS could be considered as a spectrum. PMID:25951829

  18. Fragile X-associated Tremor/Ataxia Syndrome (FXTAS): Clinical Phenotype, Diagnosis and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Leehey, Maureen A.

    2009-01-01

    Fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS) is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by a CGG repeat expansion in the premutation range (55-200) in the fragile X mental retardation 1 gene. Onset is typically in the early seventh decade and men are principally affected. The major signs are cerebellar gait ataxia, intention tremor, frontal executive dysfunction, and global brain atrophy. Other frequent findings are parkinsonism (mild), peripheral neuropathy, psychiatric symptoms (depression, anxiety, agitation), and autonomic dysfunction. The clinical presentation is heterogeneous, with individuals presenting with varied dominating signs, such as tremor, dementia or neuropathy. MR imaging shows atrophy and patchy white matter lesions in the cerebral hemispheres and middle cerebellar peduncles. The latter has been designated the ‘MCP sign’, occurs in about 60% of affected men, and is relatively specific for FXTAS. Affected females generally have less severe disease, less cognitive decline, and some symptoms different from that of men, e.g., muscle pain. Management of FXTAS is complex and includes assessment of the patient's neurological and medical deficits, treatment of symptoms, and provision of relevant referrals, especially genetic counseling. Treatment is empiric, based on anecdotal experience and on knowledge of what works for symptoms of other disorders that also exist in FXTAS. Presently the disorder is under-recognized, since the first published report was in 2001, and since the presentation is variable and mainly consists of a combination of signs common in the elderly. However, accurate diagnosis is critical, for the patient and for the family, as they need education regarding their genetic and health risks. PMID:19574929

  19. Relative Role of Genetic Complement Abnormalities in Sporadic and Familial aHUS and Their Impact on Clinical Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Caprioli, Jessica; Bresin, Elena; Mossali, Chiara; Pianetti, Gaia; Gamba, Sara; Daina, Erica; Fenili, Chiara; Castelletti, Federica; Sorosina, Annalisa; Piras, Rossella; Donadelli, Roberta; Maranta, Ramona; van der Meer, Irene; Conway, Edward M.; Zipfel, Peter F.; Goodship, Timothy H.; Remuzzi, Giuseppe

    2010-01-01

    Background and objectives: Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is characterized by microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and renal impairment. Most childhood cases are caused by Shiga toxin–producing bacteria. The other form, atypical HUS (aHUS), accounts for 10% of cases and has a poor prognosis. Genetic complement abnormalities have been found in aHUS. Design, setting, participants, and measurements: We screened 273 consecutive patients with aHUS for complement abnormalities and studied their role in predicting clinical phenotype and response to treatment. We compared mutation frequencies and localization and clinical outcome in familial (82) and sporadic (191) cases. Results: In >70% of sporadic and familial cases, gene mutations, disease-associated factor H (CFH) polymorphisms, or anti-CFH autoantibodies were found. Either mutations or CFH polymorphisms were also found in the majority of patients with secondary aHUS, suggesting a genetic predisposition. Familial cases showed a higher prevalence of mutations in SCR20 of CFH and more severe disease than sporadic cases. Patients with CFH or THBD (thrombomodulin) mutations had the earliest onset and highest mortality. Membrane-cofactor protein (MCP) mutations were associated with the best prognosis. Plasma therapy induced remission in 55 to 80% of episodes in patients with CFH, C3, or THBD mutations or autoantibodies, whereas patients with CFI (factor I) mutations were poor responders. aHUS recurred frequently after kidney transplantation except for patients with MCP mutations. Conclusions: Results underline the need of genetic screening for all susceptibility factors as part of clinical management of aHUS and for identification of patients who could safely benefit from kidney transplant. PMID:20595690

  20. ATAD2 overexpression links to enrichment of B-MYB-translational signatures and development of aggressive endometrial carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Krakstad, Camilla; Tangen, Ingvild L.; Hoivik, Erling A.; Halle, Mari K.; Berg, Anna; Werner, Henrica M.; Ræder, Maria B.; Kusonmano, Kanthida; Zou, June X.; Øyan, Anne M.; Stefansson, Ingunn; Trovik, Jone; Kalland, Karl-Henning; Chen, Hong-Wu; Salvesen, Helga B.

    2015-01-01

    We have explored the potential for clinical implementation of ATAD2 as a biomarker for aggressive endometrial cancer by investigating to what extent immunohistochemical (IHC) staining for ATAD2 is feasible, reflects clinical phenotype and molecular subgroups of endometrial carcinomas. Increased expression of the ATAD2 gene has been implicated in cancer development and progression in a number of tissues, but few studies have investigated ATAD2 expression using IHC. Here we show that high ATAD2 protein expression is significantly associated with established clinical-pathological variables for aggressive endometrial cancer, also in the subset of estrogen receptor α (ERα) positive tumors. Protein and mRNA expression of ATAD2 were highly correlated (P < 0.001), suggesting that IHC staining may represent a more clinically applicable measure of ATAD2 level in routinely collected formalin fixed paraffin embedded specimens. Gene expression alterations in samples with high ATAD2 expression revealed upregulation of several cancer-related genes (B-MYB, CDCs, E2Fs) and gene sets that previously have been linked to aggressive disease and potential for new targeting therapies. Our results support that IHC staining for ATAD2 may be a clinically applicable biomarker reflecting clinical phenotype and targetable alterations in endometrial carcinomas to be further explored in controlled clinical trials. PMID:26308378

  1. [Aggressive and prosocial behavior in childhood psychopathology].

    PubMed

    Vida, Péter; Halász, József; Gádoros, Júlia

    2013-01-01

    Aggressive/attacking and helpful/emphatic/prosocial behaviors are extremely important in human relationships. Both high levels of aggression and deficits of prosociality play important role in the development and conservation of mental disorders. We review the measurement options and clinical importance of aggressive and prosocial behavior. The typical developmental pathways and the genetic and environmental background of these behaviors are presented. The clinical tools used in the measurement of aggression and prosociality are summarized in the present paper, with specific attention on questionnaires applied in Hungarian practice. The connections between diagnostic categories (conduct disorder, oppositional-defiant disorder, attention deficit and hyperactive disorder, autism spectrum disorders) and the two behaviors are evaluated. In the end, we present those additional research projects that explore the cognitive-emotional background of aggressive or prosocial behavior with clinical relevance either in the diagnosis or in the treatment of child psychiatric diseases. PMID:24142292

  2. Analysis of mammalian gene function through broad-based phenotypic screens across a consortium of mouse clinics.

    PubMed

    Hrabě de Angelis, Martin; Nicholson, George; Selloum, Mohammed; White, Jacqueline K; Morgan, Hugh; Ramirez-Solis, Ramiro; Sorg, Tania; Wells, Sara; Fuchs, Helmut; Fray, Martin; Adams, David J; Adams, Niels C; Adler, Thure; Aguilar-Pimentel, Antonio; Ali-Hadji, Dalila; Amann, Gregory; André, Philippe; Atkins, Sarah; Auburtin, Aurelie; Ayadi, Abdel; Becker, Julien; Becker, Lore; Bedu, Elodie; Bekeredjian, Raffi; Birling, Marie-Christine; Blake, Andrew; Bottomley, Joanna; Bowl, Michael R; Brault, Véronique; Busch, Dirk H; Bussell, James N; Calzada-Wack, Julia; Cater, Heather; Champy, Marie-France; Charles, Philippe; Chevalier, Claire; Chiani, Francesco; Codner, Gemma F; Combe, Roy; Cox, Roger; Dalloneau, Emilie; Dierich, André; Di Fenza, Armida; Doe, Brendan; Duchon, Arnaud; Eickelberg, Oliver; Esapa, Chris T; Fertak, Lahcen El; Feigel, Tanja; Emelyanova, Irina; Estabel, Jeanne; Favor, Jack; Flenniken, Ann; Gambadoro, Alessia; Garrett, Lilian; Gates, Hilary; Gerdin, Anna-Karin; Gkoutos, George; Greenaway, Simon; Glasl, Lisa; Goetz, Patrice; Da Cruz, Isabelle Goncalves; Götz, Alexander; Graw, Jochen; Guimond, Alain; Hans, Wolfgang; Hicks, Geoff; Hölter, Sabine M; Höfler, Heinz; Hancock, John M; Hoehndorf, Robert; Hough, Tertius; Houghton, Richard; Hurt, Anja; Ivandic, Boris; Jacobs, Hughes; Jacquot, Sylvie; Jones, Nora; Karp, Natasha A; Katus, Hugo A; Kitchen, Sharon; Klein-Rodewald, Tanja; Klingenspor, Martin; Klopstock, Thomas; Lalanne, Valerie; Leblanc, Sophie; Lengger, Christoph; le Marchand, Elise; Ludwig, Tonia; Lux, Aline; McKerlie, Colin; Maier, Holger; Mandel, Jean-Louis; Marschall, Susan; Mark, Manuel; Melvin, David G; Meziane, Hamid; Micklich, Kateryna; Mittelhauser, Christophe; Monassier, Laurent; Moulaert, David; Muller, Stéphanie; Naton, Beatrix; Neff, Frauke; Nolan, Patrick M; Nutter, Lauryl M J; Ollert, Markus; Pavlovic, Guillaume; Pellegata, Natalia S; Peter, Emilie; Petit-Demoulière, Benoit; Pickard, Amanda; Podrini, Christine; Potter, Paul; Pouilly, Laurent; Puk, Oliver; Richardson, David; Rousseau, Stephane; Quintanilla-Fend, Leticia; Quwailid, Mohamed M; Racz, Ildiko; Rathkolb, Birgit; Riet, Fabrice; Rossant, Janet; Roux, Michel; Rozman, Jan; Ryder, Edward; Salisbury, Jennifer; Santos, Luis; Schäble, Karl-Heinz; Schiller, Evelyn; Schrewe, Anja; Schulz, Holger; Steinkamp, Ralf; Simon, Michelle; Stewart, Michelle; Stöger, Claudia; Stöger, Tobias; Sun, Minxuan; Sunter, David; Teboul, Lydia; Tilly, Isabelle; Tocchini-Valentini, Glauco P; Tost, Monica; Treise, Irina; Vasseur, Laurent; Velot, Emilie; Vogt-Weisenhorn, Daniela; Wagner, Christelle; Walling, Alison; Wattenhofer-Donze, Marie; Weber, Bruno; Wendling, Olivia; Westerberg, Henrik; Willershäuser, Monja; Wolf, Eckhard; Wolter, Anne; Wood, Joe; Wurst, Wolfgang; Yildirim, Ali Önder; Zeh, Ramona; Zimmer, Andreas; Zimprich, Annemarie; Holmes, Chris; Steel, Karen P; Herault, Yann; Gailus-Durner, Valérie; Mallon, Ann-Marie; Brown, Steve D M

    2015-09-01

    The function of the majority of genes in the mouse and human genomes remains unknown. The mouse embryonic stem cell knockout resource provides a basis for the characterization of relationships between genes and phenotypes. The EUMODIC consortium developed and validated robust methodologies for the broad-based phenotyping of knockouts through a pipeline comprising 20 disease-oriented platforms. We developed new statistical methods for pipeline design and data analysis aimed at detecting reproducible phenotypes with high power. We acquired phenotype data from 449 mutant alleles, representing 320 unique genes, of which half had no previous functional annotation. We captured data from over 27,000 mice, finding that 83% of the mutant lines are phenodeviant, with 65% demonstrating pleiotropy. Surprisingly, we found significant differences in phenotype annotation according to zygosity. New phenotypes were uncovered for many genes with previously unknown function, providing a powerful basis for hypothesis generation and further investigation in diverse systems. PMID:26214591

  3. Analysis of mammalian gene function through broad-based phenotypic screens across a consortium of mouse clinics.

    PubMed

    Hrabě de Angelis, Martin; Nicholson, George; Selloum, Mohammed; White, Jacqueline K; Morgan, Hugh; Ramirez-Solis, Ramiro; Sorg, Tania; Wells, Sara; Fuchs, Helmut; Fray, Martin; Adams, David J; Adams, Niels C; Adler, Thure; Aguilar-Pimentel, Antonio; Ali-Hadji, Dalila; Amann, Gregory; André, Philippe; Atkins, Sarah; Auburtin, Aurelie; Ayadi, Abdel; Becker, Julien; Becker, Lore; Bedu, Elodie; Bekeredjian, Raffi; Birling, Marie-Christine; Blake, Andrew; Bottomley, Joanna; Bowl, Michael R; Brault, Véronique; Busch, Dirk H; Bussell, James N; Calzada-Wack, Julia; Cater, Heather; Champy, Marie-France; Charles, Philippe; Chevalier, Claire; Chiani, Francesco; Codner, Gemma F; Combe, Roy; Cox, Roger; Dalloneau, Emilie; Dierich, André; Di Fenza, Armida; Doe, Brendan; Duchon, Arnaud; Eickelberg, Oliver; Esapa, Chris T; Fertak, Lahcen El; Feigel, Tanja; Emelyanova, Irina; Estabel, Jeanne; Favor, Jack; Flenniken, Ann; Gambadoro, Alessia; Garrett, Lilian; Gates, Hilary; Gerdin, Anna-Karin; Gkoutos, George; Greenaway, Simon; Glasl, Lisa; Goetz, Patrice; Da Cruz, Isabelle Goncalves; Götz, Alexander; Graw, Jochen; Guimond, Alain; Hans, Wolfgang; Hicks, Geoff; Hölter, Sabine M; Höfler, Heinz; Hancock, John M; Hoehndorf, Robert; Hough, Tertius; Houghton, Richard; Hurt, Anja; Ivandic, Boris; Jacobs, Hughes; Jacquot, Sylvie; Jones, Nora; Karp, Natasha A; Katus, Hugo A; Kitchen, Sharon; Klein-Rodewald, Tanja; Klingenspor, Martin; Klopstock, Thomas; Lalanne, Valerie; Leblanc, Sophie; Lengger, Christoph; le Marchand, Elise; Ludwig, Tonia; Lux, Aline; McKerlie, Colin; Maier, Holger; Mandel, Jean-Louis; Marschall, Susan; Mark, Manuel; Melvin, David G; Meziane, Hamid; Micklich, Kateryna; Mittelhauser, Christophe; Monassier, Laurent; Moulaert, David; Muller, Stéphanie; Naton, Beatrix; Neff, Frauke; Nolan, Patrick M; Nutter, Lauryl M J; Ollert, Markus; Pavlovic, Guillaume; Pellegata, Natalia S; Peter, Emilie; Petit-Demoulière, Benoit; Pickard, Amanda; Podrini, Christine; Potter, Paul; Pouilly, Laurent; Puk, Oliver; Richardson, David; Rousseau, Stephane; Quintanilla-Fend, Leticia; Quwailid, Mohamed M; Racz, Ildiko; Rathkolb, Birgit; Riet, Fabrice; Rossant, Janet; Roux, Michel; Rozman, Jan; Ryder, Edward; Salisbury, Jennifer; Santos, Luis; Schäble, Karl-Heinz; Schiller, Evelyn; Schrewe, Anja; Schulz, Holger; Steinkamp, Ralf; Simon, Michelle; Stewart, Michelle; Stöger, Claudia; Stöger, Tobias; Sun, Minxuan; Sunter, David; Teboul, Lydia; Tilly, Isabelle; Tocchini-Valentini, Glauco P; Tost, Monica; Treise, Irina; Vasseur, Laurent; Velot, Emilie; Vogt-Weisenhorn, Daniela; Wagner, Christelle; Walling, Alison; Wattenhofer-Donze, Marie; Weber, Bruno; Wendling, Olivia; Westerberg, Henrik; Willershäuser, Monja; Wolf, Eckhard; Wolter, Anne; Wood, Joe; Wurst, Wolfgang; Yildirim, Ali Önder; Zeh, Ramona; Zimmer, Andreas; Zimprich, Annemarie; Holmes, Chris; Steel, Karen P; Herault, Yann; Gailus-Durner, Valérie; Mallon, Ann-Marie; Brown, Steve D M

    2015-09-01

    The function of the majority of genes in the mouse and human genomes remains unknown. The mouse embryonic stem cell knockout resource provides a basis for the characterization of relationships between genes and phenotypes. The EUMODIC consortium developed and validated robust methodologies for the broad-based phenotyping of knockouts through a pipeline comprising 20 disease-oriented platforms. We developed new statistical methods for pipeline design and data analysis aimed at detecting reproducible phenotypes with high power. We acquired phenotype data from 449 mutant alleles, representing 320 unique genes, of which half had no previous functional annotation. We captured data from over 27,000 mice, finding that 83% of the mutant lines are phenodeviant, with 65% demonstrating pleiotropy. Surprisingly, we found significant differences in phenotype annotation according to zygosity. New phenotypes were uncovered for many genes with previously unknown function, providing a powerful basis for hypothesis generation and further investigation in diverse systems.

  4. Aggressive behavior problems.

    PubMed

    Beaver, B V

    1986-12-01

    Accurate diagnosis of the cause of aggression in horses is essential to determining the appropriate course of action. The affective forms of aggression include fear-induced, pain-induced, intermale, dominance, protective, maternal, learned, and redirected aggressions. Non-affective aggression includes play and sex-related forms. Irritable aggression and hypertestosteronism in mares are medical problems, whereas genetic factors, brain dysfunction, and self-mutilation are also concerns. PMID:3492250

  5. Cortisol in the morning and dimensions of anxiety, depression, and aggression in children from a general population and clinic-referred cohort: An integrated analysis. The TRAILS study.

    PubMed

    Dietrich, Andrea; Ormel, Johan; Buitelaar, Jan K; Verhulst, Frank C; Hoekstra, Pieter J; Hartman, Catharina A

    2013-08-01

    Anxiety and depressive problems have often been related to higher hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA)-axis activity (basal morning cortisol levels and cortisol awakening response [CAR]) and externalizing problems to lower HPA-axis activity. However, associations appear weaker and more inconsistent than initially assumed. Previous studies from the Tracking Adolescents Individual Lives Study (TRAILS) suggested sex-differences in these relationships and differential associations with specific dimensions of depressive problems in a general population sample of children (10-12 years). Using the TRAILS population sample (n=1604), we tested hypotheses on the association between single day cortisol (basal morning levels and CAR) and specifically constructed dimensions of anxiety (cognitive versus somatic), depressive (cognitive-affective versus somatic), and externalizing problems (reactive versus proactive aggression), and explored the modifying role of sex. Moreover, we repeated analyses in an independent same-aged clinic-referred sample (n=357). Structural Equation Modeling was used to investigate the association between cortisol and higher- and lower-order (thus, broad and specific) problem dimensions based on self-reports in an integrated model. Overall, findings were consistent across the population and clinic-referred samples, as well as with the existing literature. Most support was found for higher cortisol (mainly CAR) in relation to depressive problems. However, in general, associations were weak in both samples. Therefore, the present results shed doubt on the relevance of single day cortisol measurements for problem behaviors in the milder range. Associations may be stronger in more severe or persistent psychopathology. PMID:23237815

  6. Sequencing and comparative genomic analysis of 1227 Felis catus cDNA sequences enriched for developmental, clinical and nutritional phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The feline genome is valuable to the veterinary and model organism genomics communities because the cat is an obligate carnivore and a model for endangered felids. The initial public release of the Felis catus genome assembly provided a framework for investigating the genomic basis of feline biology. However, the entire set of protein coding genes has not been elucidated. Results We identified and characterized 1227 protein coding feline sequences, of which 913 map to public sequences and 314 are novel. These sequences have been deposited into NCBI's genbank database and complement public genomic resources by providing additional protein coding sequences that fill in some of the gaps in the feline genome assembly. Through functional and comparative genomic analyses, we gained an understanding of the role of these sequences in feline development, nutrition and health. Specifically, we identified 104 orthologs of human genes associated with Mendelian disorders. We detected negative selection within sequences with gene ontology annotations associated with intracellular trafficking, cytoskeleton and muscle functions. We detected relatively less negative selection on protein sequences encoding extracellular networks, apoptotic pathways and mitochondrial gene ontology annotations. Additionally, we characterized feline cDNA sequences that have mouse orthologs associated with clinical, nutritional and developmental phenotypes. Together, this analysis provides an overview of the value of our cDNA sequences and enhances our understanding of how the feline genome is similar to, and different from other mammalian genomes. Conclusions The cDNA sequences reported here expand existing feline genomic resources by providing high-quality sequences annotated with comparative genomic information providing functional, clinical, nutritional and orthologous gene information. PMID:22257742

  7. How do patients' clinical phenotype and the physiological mechanisms of the operations impact the choice of bariatric procedure?

    PubMed

    Bächler, Thomas; le Roux, Carel W; Bueter, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Bariatric surgery is currently the most effective option for the treatment of morbid obesity and its associated comorbidities. Recent clinical and experimental findings have challenged the role of mechanical restriction and caloric malabsorption as the main mechanisms for weight loss and health benefits. Instead, other mechanisms including increased levels of satiety gut hormones, altered gut microbiota, changes in bile acid metabolism, and/or energy expenditure have been proposed as explanations for benefits of bariatric surgery. Beside the standard proximal Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and the biliopancreatic diversion with or without duodenal switch, where parts of the small intestine are excluded from contact with nutrients, resectional techniques like the sleeve gastrectomy (SG) have recently been added to the armory of bariatric surgeons. The variation of weight loss and glycemic control is vast between but also within different bariatric operations. We surveyed members of the Swiss Society for the Study of Morbid Obesity and Metabolic Disorders to assess the extent to which the phenotype of patients influences the choice of bariatric procedure. Swiss bariatric surgeons preferred Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and SG for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and patients with a body mass index >50 kg/m(2), which is consistent with the literature. An SG was preferred in patients with a high anesthetic risk or previous laparotomy. The surgeons' own experience was a major determinant as there is little evidence in the literature for this approach. Although trends will come and go, evidence-based medicine requires a rigorous examination of the proof to inform clinical practice. PMID:27524917

  8. How do patients’ clinical phenotype and the physiological mechanisms of the operations impact the choice of bariatric procedure?

    PubMed Central

    Bächler, Thomas; le Roux, Carel W; Bueter, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Bariatric surgery is currently the most effective option for the treatment of morbid obesity and its associated comorbidities. Recent clinical and experimental findings have challenged the role of mechanical restriction and caloric malabsorption as the main mechanisms for weight loss and health benefits. Instead, other mechanisms including increased levels of satiety gut hormones, altered gut microbiota, changes in bile acid metabolism, and/or energy expenditure have been proposed as explanations for benefits of bariatric surgery. Beside the standard proximal Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and the biliopancreatic diversion with or without duodenal switch, where parts of the small intestine are excluded from contact with nutrients, resectional techniques like the sleeve gastrectomy (SG) have recently been added to the armory of bariatric surgeons. The variation of weight loss and glycemic control is vast between but also within different bariatric operations. We surveyed members of the Swiss Society for the Study of Morbid Obesity and Metabolic Disorders to assess the extent to which the phenotype of patients influences the choice of bariatric procedure. Swiss bariatric surgeons preferred Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and SG for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and patients with a body mass index >50 kg/m2, which is consistent with the literature. An SG was preferred in patients with a high anesthetic risk or previous laparotomy. The surgeons’ own experience was a major determinant as there is little evidence in the literature for this approach. Although trends will come and go, evidence-based medicine requires a rigorous examination of the proof to inform clinical practice. PMID:27524917

  9. Methodological considerations when assessing restricted and repetitive behaviors and aggression

    PubMed Central

    Keefer, A.J.; Kalb, L.; Mazurek, M.O.; Kanne, S.M.; Freedman, B.; Vasa, R.A.

    2016-01-01

    Methodological issues impacting the relationship between aggression and restricted, repetitive, and stereotyped behaviors and interests (RRSBI) were examined in 2648 children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) using a multi-method, multi-informant analysis model to assess the effects of informant, assessment method, and aggression phenotype. Overall, a significant, but small relationship was found between RRSBI and aggression (p < .05). There was significant heterogeneity of estimates with large effect sizes observed when utilizing teacher report and a broad phenotype of aggression. Variance in estimates was attributed to differences in informant and assessment method with two times greater effect attributed to informant. Results suggest strategies to optimize future investigations of the relationship between RRSBI and aggression. Findings also provide the opportunity for the development of targeted interventions for aggression in youth with ASD. PMID:27239223

  10. Aggression and Anxiety: Social Context and Neurobiological Links

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, Inga D.; Veenema, Alexa H.; Beiderbeck, Daniela I.

    2009-01-01

    Psychopathologies such as anxiety- and depression-related disorders are often characterized by impaired social behaviours including excessive aggression and violence. Excessive aggression and violence likely develop as a consequence of generally disturbed emotional regulation, such as abnormally high or low levels of anxiety. This suggests an overlap between brain circuitries and neurochemical systems regulating aggression and anxiety. In this review, we will discuss different forms of male aggression, rodent models of excessive aggression, and neurobiological mechanisms underlying male aggression in the context of anxiety. We will summarize our attempts to establish an animal model of high and abnormal aggression using rats selected for high (HAB) vs. low (LAB) anxiety-related behaviour. Briefly, male LAB rats and, to a lesser extent, male HAB rats show high and abnormal forms of aggression compared with non-selected (NAB) rats, making them a suitable animal model for studying excessive aggression in the context of extremes in innate anxiety. In addition, we will discuss differences in the activity of the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis, brain arginine vasopressin, and the serotonin systems, among others, which contribute to the distinct behavioural phenotypes related to aggression and anxiety. Further investigation of the neurobiological systems in animals with distinct anxiety phenotypes might provide valuable information about the link between excessive aggression and disturbed emotional regulation, which is essential for understanding the social and emotional deficits that are characteristic of many human psychiatric disorders. PMID:20407578

  11. Genetics of aggressive behavior: An overview.

    PubMed

    Veroude, Kim; Zhang-James, Yanli; Fernàndez-Castillo, Noèlia; Bakker, Mireille J; Cormand, Bru; Faraone, Stephen V

    2016-01-01

    The Research Domain Criteria (RDoC) address three types of aggression: frustrative non-reward, defensive aggression and offensive/proactive aggression. This review sought to present the evidence for genetic underpinnings of aggression and to determine to what degree prior studies have examined phenotypes that fit into the RDoC framework. Although the constructs of defensive and offensive aggression have been widely used in the animal genetics literature, the human literature is mostly agnostic with regard to all the RDoC constructs. We know from twin studies that about half the variance in behavior may be explained by genetic risk factors. This is true for both dimensional, trait-like, measures of aggression and categorical definitions of psychopathology. The non-shared environment seems to have a moderate influence with the effects of shared environment being unclear. Human molecular genetic studies of aggression are in an early stage. The most promising candidates are in the dopaminergic and serotonergic systems along with hormonal regulators. Genome-wide association studies have not yet achieved genome-wide significance, but current samples are too small to detect variants having the small effects one would expect for a complex disorder. The strongest molecular evidence for a genetic basis for aggression comes from animal models comparing aggressive and non-aggressive strains or documenting the effects of gene knockouts. Although we have learned much from these prior studies, future studies should improve the measurement of aggression by using a systematic method of measurement such as that proposed by the RDoC initiative. PMID:26345359

  12. Risperidone and Explosive Aggressive Autism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horrigan, Joseph P.; Barnhill, L. Jarrett

    1997-01-01

    In this study, 11 males with autism and mental retardation were administered risperidone. Substantial clinical improvement was noted almost immediately; patients with aggression, self-injury, explosivity, and poor sleep hygiene were most improved. The modal dose for optimal response was 0.5 mg bid. Weight gain was a significant side effect.…

  13. The impact of smoke exposure on the clinical phenotype of alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency in Ireland: exploiting a national registry to understand a rare disease.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, M Emmet; Pennycooke, Kevin; Carroll, Tomás P; Shum, Jonathan; Fee, Laura T; O'Connor, Catherine; Logan, P Mark; Reeves, Emer P; McElvaney, Noel G

    2015-05-01

    Individuals with Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) have mutations in the SERPINA1 gene causing genetic susceptibility to early onset lung and liver disease that may result in premature death. Environmental interactions have a significant impact in determining the disease phenotype and outcome in AATD. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of smoke exposure on the clinical phenotype of AATD in Ireland. Clinical demographics and available thoracic computerised tomography (CT) imaging were detected from 139 PiZZ individuals identified from the Irish National AATD Registry. Clinical information was collected by questionnaire. Data was analysed to assess AATD disease severity and evaluate predictors of clinical phenotype. Questionnaires were collected from 107/139 (77%) and thoracic CT evaluation was available in 72/107 (67.2%). 74% of respondents had severe Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) (GOLD stage C or D). Cigarette smoking was the greatest predictor of impairment in FEV1 and DLCO (%predicted) and the extent of emphysema correlated most significantly with DLCO. Interestingly the rate of FEV1 decline was similar in ex-smokers when compared to never-smokers. Passive smoke exposure in childhood resulted in a greater total pack-year smoking history. Radiological evidence of bronchiectasis was a common finding and associated with increasing age. The Irish National AATD Registry facilitates clinical and basic science research of this condition in Ireland. This study illustrates the detrimental effect of smoke exposure on the clinical phenotype of AATD in Ireland and the benefit of immediate smoking cessation at any stage of lung disease.

  14. Isolated cleft lip with generalized aggressive periodontitis: A rare entity

    PubMed Central

    Metgud, Renuka; Kumar, Ajay; Bhat, Kishore

    2015-01-01

    Oro-facial clefts are one of the most common birth defects and may be associated with other genetic anomalies. Aggressive periodontitis is a rare condition that progresses rapidly, but affects only a small percentage of the population. Most of the cases of aggressive periodontitis are familial. Even though, literature has documented the association of various genetic disorders with aggressive periodontitis, the aggressive periodontitis in patients with isolated cleft lip (CL) have never been addressed. Here, we report a rare case of isolated CL with generalized aggressive periodontitis. The concomitant presentation of isolated CL with aggressive periodontitis in an individual has clinical significance for multi-disciplinary care. PMID:25810600

  15. Child abuse and aggression among seriously emotionally disturbed children.

    PubMed

    Ford, Julian D; Fraleigh, Lisa A; Connor, Daniel F

    2010-01-01

    Abused children may be at risk for problems with aggression. In a sample of 397 seriously emotionally disturbed children, reactive aggression was associated with documented history of physical abuse but not sexual abuse. Girls were equally likely to be classified as reactively aggressive regardless of physical abuse history, but boys with physical abuse histories were 50% more likely to be classified as reactively aggressive than boys with no physical abuse history. Proactive aggression was unrelated to physical or sexual abuse history. The association of physical abuse and reactive aggression warrants further scientific study and attention in clinical assessment and treatment with seriously emotionally disturbed children.

  16. Expanding the clinical phenotype of the mitochondrial m.13513G>A mutation with the first report of a fatal neonatal presentation.

    PubMed

    Van Karnebeek, Clara D M; Waters, Paula J; Sargent, Michael A; Mezei, Michelle M; Mezey, Michelle M; Wong, Lee-Jun; Wang, Jing; Stöckler-Ipsiroglu, Sylvia

    2011-06-01

    Diagnosis of mitochondrial disease is often a challenge because of the extreme heterogeneity of the clinical phenotype and the variety of underlying gene defects. Insight into the range of clinical phenotypes associated with a particular mitochondrial DNA mutation will facilitate better recognition of patients at risk by focused gene testing. We present a family affected by the mitochondrial m.13513G>A (p.D393N, ND5) mutation, illustrating a previously unreported degree of clinical heterogeneity, varying from mitochondrial encephalopathy with lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) in a 10-year-old female, to a fatal neonatal course with metabolic acidosis and hypotonia in a younger sister, to absence of medical problems in the mother. The mutation loads ranging from 66% in the deceased neonate to 30% in the female with MELAS and 7% in the asymptomatic mother, correlated with severity of the clinical phenotype. The importance of proactive collection and storage of appropriate samples during the diagnostic work-up of an acutely ill or deceased neonate, allowing subsequent mitochondrial investigations, is hereby illustrated.

  17. Detection of KPC Carbapenemase in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolated From Clinical Samples Using Modified Hodge Test and Boronic Acid Phenotypic Methods and Their Comparison With the Polymerase Chain Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Falahat, Saeed; Shojapour, Mana; Sadeghi, Abdorrahim

    2016-01-01

    Background Bacterial resistance to antibiotics has become a major source of concern for public health. Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains are important opportunistic pathogens. These bacteria have a high resistance to a wide range of existing antimicrobials and antibiotics. Objectives The present study was performed to evaluate the frequency of KPC in P. aeruginosa isolated from clinical samples of educational hospitals of Arak University of Medical Sciences, using the mentioned phenotypic and genotypic methods. Materials and Methods One hundred and eight non-duplicate clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa were collected from hospitals of Arak University of Medical Sciences, Arak, Iran. Antibacterial susceptibility was determined by the disk diffusion method. KPC production was confirmed by the Modified Hodge Test (MHT), which is a phenotypic test, and combined-disk test with boronic acid and the Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR). Results In the present study, 13 isolates (12%) of P. aeruginosa were positive for KPC, using PCR. Comparison of the two phenotypic methods used in this study showed that boronic acid is more sensitive than MHT in identification of KPC-producing strains (84.6% vs. 77%). Conclusions Utilization of reliable methods for identifying carbapenemase-producing strains and determining their antibiotic resistance pattern could have a very important role in treatment of infections caused by these strains. A substantial amount of P. aeruginosa isolated from clinical samples of hospitals in Arak (Iran) produce KPC carbapenemase. Due to their low specificity, MHT and boronic acid phenotypic methods could not completely identify KPC-producing P. aeruginosa. However, the sensitivity of boronic acid phenotypic method in detection of KPC was higher than MHT. PMID:27800140

  18. Proactive and reactive aggression in referred children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Connor, Daniel F; Steingard, Ronald J; Cunningham, Julie A; Anderson, Jennifer J; Melloni, Richard H

    2004-04-01

    Investigating different types of aggression is important to facilitate a better understanding of excessive maladaptive aggression in referred youth. Using regression analysis, the authors investigated demographic, historical, diagnostic, and treatment correlates of proactive aggression and reactive aggression in a heterogeneous population (N = 323) of psychiatrically referred youths. Ratings of proactive and reactive aggression significantly correlated with more established measures of aggression. Results suggest the importance of hyperactive/impulsive behavior, disruptive behavior disorders, and self-reported hostility in youths with both reactive and proactive aggression. Substance use disorders, a family history of substance abuse, and family violence were specifically associated with proactive aggression. Younger age and a history of abuse were correlated with reactive aggression. Implications for clinical interventions and future research are discussed. PMID:15113242

  19. Identification of Novel Genetic Markers Associated with Clinical Phenotypes of Systemic Sclerosis through a Genome-Wide Association Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Ying, Jun; Teruel, Maria; Diaz-Gallo, Lina-Marcela; Broen, Jasper C.; Vonk, Madelon C.; Simeon, Carmen P.; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z.; Coenen, Marieke J. H.; Voskuyl, Alexandre E.; Schuerwegh, Annemie J.; van Riel, Piet L. C. M.; Vanthuyne, Marie; van 't Slot, Ruben; Italiaander, Annet; Ophoff, Roel A.; Hunzelmann, Nicolas; Fonollosa, Vicente; Ortego-Centeno, Norberto; González-Gay, Miguel A.; García-Hernández, Francisco J.; González-Escribano, María F.; Airo, Paolo; van Laar, Jacob; Worthington, Jane; Hesselstrand, Roger; Smith, Vanessa; de Keyser, Filip; Houssiau, Fredric; Chee, Meng May; Madhok, Rajan; Shiels, Paul G.; Westhovens, Rene; Kreuter, Alexander; de Baere, Elfride; Witte, Torsten; Padyukov, Leonid; Nordin, Annika; Scorza, Raffaella; Lunardi, Claudio; Lie, Benedicte A.; Hoffmann-Vold, Anna-Maria; Palm, Øyvind; García de la Peña, Paloma; Carreira, Patricia; Varga, John; Hinchcliff, Monique; Lee, Annette T.; Gourh, Pravitt; Amos, Christopher I.; Wigley, Frederick M.; Hummers, Laura K.; Hummers, J.; Nelson, J. Lee; Riemekasten, Gabriella; Herrick, Ariane; Beretta, Lorenzo; Fonseca, Carmen; Denton, Christopher P.; Gregersen, Peter K.; Agarwal, Sandeep; Assassi, Shervin; Tan, Filemon K.; Arnett, Frank C.; Radstake, Timothy R. D. J.; Mayes, Maureen D.; Martin, Javier

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine, through a genome-wide association study (GWAS), the genetic components contributing to different clinical sub-phenotypes of systemic sclerosis (SSc). We considered limited (lcSSc) and diffuse (dcSSc) cutaneous involvement, and the relationships with presence of the SSc-specific auto-antibodies, anti-centromere (ACA), and anti-topoisomerase I (ATA). Four GWAS cohorts, comprising 2,296 SSc patients and 5,171 healthy controls, were meta-analyzed looking for associations in the selected subgroups. Eighteen polymorphisms were further tested in nine independent cohorts comprising an additional 3,175 SSc patients and 4,971 controls. Conditional analysis for associated SNPs in the HLA region was performed to explore their independent association in antibody subgroups. Overall analysis showed that non-HLA polymorphism rs11642873 in IRF8 gene to be associated at GWAS level with lcSSc (P = 2.32×10−12, OR = 0.75). Also, rs12540874 in GRB10 gene (P = 1.27 × 10−6, OR = 1.15) and rs11047102 in SOX5 gene (P = 1.39×10−7, OR = 1.36) showed a suggestive association with lcSSc and ACA subgroups respectively. In the HLA region, we observed highly associated allelic combinations in the HLA-DQB1 locus with ACA (P = 1.79×10−61, OR = 2.48), in the HLA-DPA1/B1 loci with ATA (P = 4.57×10−76, OR = 8.84), and in NOTCH4 with ACA P = 8.84×10−21, OR = 0.55) and ATA (P = 1.14×10−8, OR = 0.54). We have identified three new non-HLA genes (IRF8, GRB10, and SOX5) associated with SSc clinical and auto-antibody subgroups. Within the HLA region, HLA-DQB1, HLA-DPA1/B1, and NOTCH4 associations with SSc are likely confined to specific auto-antibodies. These data emphasize the differential genetic components of subphenotypes of SSc. PMID:21779181

  20. EXCEPTIONAL AGGRESSIVENESS OF CEREBRAL CAVERNOUS MALFORMATION DISEASE ASSOCIATED WITH PDCD10 MUTATIONS

    PubMed Central

    Rebeiz, Tania; Stockton, Rebecca A.; McDonald, David A.; Mikati, Abdul Ghani; Zhang, Lingjiao; Austin, Cecilia; Akers, Amy L.; Gallione, Carol J.; Rorrer, Autumn; Gunel, Murat; Min, Wang; De Souza, Jorge Marcondes; Lee, Connie

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The phenotypic manifestations of cerebral cavernous malformation (CCM) disease caused by rare PDCD10 mutations have not been systematically examined, and a mechanistic link to Rho kinase (ROCK) mediated hyperpermeability, a potential therapeutic target, has not been established. Methods We analyze PDCD10-siRNA treated endothelial cells for stress fibers, ROCK activity and permeability. ROCK activity is assessed in CCM lesions. Brain permeability and CCM lesion burden is quantified, and clinical manifestations are assessed in prospectively enrolled subjects with PDCD10 mutations. Results We determine that PDCD10 protein suppresses endothelial stress fibers, ROCK activity and permeability in vitro. Pdcd10 heterozygous mice have greater lesion burden than other Ccm genotypes. We demonstrate robust ROCK activity in murine and human CCM vasculature, and increased brain vascular permeability in humans with PDCD10 mutation. Clinical phenotype is exceptionally aggressive compared to the more common KRIT1 and CCM2 familial and sporadic CCM, with greater lesion burden and more frequent hemorrhages earlier in life. We first report other phenotypic features including scoliosis, cognitive disability and skin lesions, unrelated to lesion burden or bleeding. Conclusion These findings define a unique CCM disease with exceptional aggressiveness, and they inform preclinical therapeutic testing, clinical counseling and the design of trials. PMID:25122144

  1. Intimate partner aggression and women's work outcomes.

    PubMed

    LeBlanc, Manon Mireille; Barling, Julian; Turner, Nick

    2014-10-01

    Using conservation of resources theory, we examined the relationship between intimate partner aggression enacted against heterosexual women and 3 types of work-related outcomes for these women: withdrawal while at work (i.e., cognitive distraction, work neglect), withdrawal from work (i.e., partial absenteeism, intentions to quit), and performance. In Study 1, we compared withdrawal both at and from work across 3 clinically categorized groups of women (n = 50), showing that experiencing physical aggression is related to higher work neglect. We replicated and extended these findings in Study 2 using a community sample of employed women (n = 249) by considering the incremental variance explained by both physical aggression and psychological aggression on these same outcomes. Results showed that physical aggression predicted higher levels of withdrawal both at and from work, with psychological aggression predicting additional variance in partial absenteeism over and above the effects of physical aggression. Study 3 extended the model to include academic performance as an outcome in a sample of female college students (n = 122) in dating relationships. Controlling for the women's conscientiousness, psychological aggression predicted lower academic performance after accounting for the effects of physical aggression. We discuss theoretical and practical implications of these results, as well as directions for future research. PMID:25068818

  2. Endotypes and phenotypes of chronic rhinosinusitis: A PRACTALL document of the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology and the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology

    PubMed Central

    Akdis, Cezmi A.; Bachert, Claus; Cingi, Cemal; Dykewicz, Mark S.; Hellings, Peter W.; Naclerio, Robert M.; Schleimer, Robert P.; Ledford, Dennis

    2014-01-01

    Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) is a complex disease consisting of several disease variants with different underlying pathophysiologies. Limited knowledge of the mechanisms of these disease subgroups is possibly the greatest obstacle in understanding the causes of CRS and improving treatment. It is generally agreed that there are clinically relevant CRS phenotypes defined by an observable characteristic or trait, such as the presence or absence of nasal polyps. Defining the phenotype of the patient is useful in making therapeutic decisions. However, clinical phenotypes do not provide full insight into all underlying cellular and molecular pathophysiologic mechanisms of CRS. Recognition of the heterogeneity of CRS has promoted the concept that CRS consists of multiple groups of biological subtypes, or “endotypes,” which are defined by distinct pathophysiologic mechanisms that might be identified by corresponding biomarkers. Different CRS endotypes can be characterized by differences in responsiveness to different treatments, including topical intranasal corticosteroids and biological agents, such as anti–IL-5 and anti-IgE mAb, and can be based on different biomarkers that are linked to underlying mechanisms. CRS has been regarded as a single disease entity in clinical and genetic studies in the past, which can explain the failure to identify consistent genetic and environmental correlations. In addition, better identification of endotypes might permit individualization of therapy that can be targeted against the pathophysiologic processes of a patient's endotype, with potential for more effective treatment and better patient outcomes. PMID:23587334

  3. Endotypes and phenotypes of chronic rhinosinusitis: a PRACTALL document of the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology and the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology.

    PubMed

    Akdis, Cezmi A; Bachert, Claus; Cingi, Cemal; Dykewicz, Mark S; Hellings, Peter W; Naclerio, Robert M; Schleimer, Robert P; Ledford, Dennis

    2013-06-01

    Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) is a complex disease consisting of several disease variants with different underlying pathophysiologies. Limited knowledge of the mechanisms of these disease subgroups is possibly the greatest obstacle in understanding the causes of CRS and improving treatment. It is generally agreed that there are clinically relevant CRS phenotypes defined by an observable characteristic or trait, such as the presence or absence of nasal polyps. Defining the phenotype of the patient is useful in making therapeutic decisions. However, clinical phenotypes do not provide full insight into all underlying cellular and molecular pathophysiologic mechanisms of CRS. Recognition of the heterogeneity of CRS has promoted the concept that CRS consists of multiple groups of biological subtypes, or "endotypes," which are defined by distinct pathophysiologic mechanisms that might be identified by corresponding biomarkers. Different CRS endotypes can be characterized by differences in responsiveness to different treatments, including topical intranasal corticosteroids and biological agents, such as anti-IL-5 and anti-IgE mAb, and can be based on different biomarkers that are linked to underlying mechanisms. CRS has been regarded as a single disease entity in clinical and genetic studies in the past, which can explain the failure to identify consistent genetic and environmental correlations. In addition, better identification of endotypes might permit individualization of therapy that can be targeted against the pathophysiologic processes of a patient's endotype, with potential for more effective treatment and better patient outcomes.

  4. Pain phenotype as a predictor for drug response in painful polyneuropathy-a retrospective analysis of data from controlled clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Holbech, Jakob V; Bach, Flemming W; Finnerup, Nanna B; Jensen, Troels S; Sindrup, Søren H

    2016-06-01

    The drugs available for treatment of neuropathic pain have somewhat disappointing efficacy with many patients left with limited or no effect. Individualized treatment based on phenotype according to presumed underlying pain mechanism(s) has been proposed to improve outcomes. We report a retrospective analysis of phenotype-specific effects of several neuropathic pain drugs, which were studied in a series of crossover, placebo-controlled, clinical trials. The data originate from 7 trials with similar design and outcome recordings, which all had a thorough baseline registration of symptoms, signs, and quantitative sensory testing. The latter was used to phenotype patients into subgroups reflecting presumed pain mechanisms. There were a total of 361 patient records distributed over treatments with 4 antidepressants and 4 anticonvulsants. Five of the drugs reduced total pain significantly compared with placebo. Only a few phenotype-specific differences in total pain reduction were found within the investigated drugs. Thus, imipramine reduced total pain 1.84 (CI: 0.02-3.67) and pregabalin 0.81 (CI: -0.67 to 2.29) in patients with than without gain of sensory function. Pregabalin showed a better effect in patients with preserved large fiber function with a mean difference in total pain reduction 1.31 (CI: 0.15-2.47). No phenotype-specific effects were found for venlafaxine, escitalopram, oxcarbazepine, valproic acid, levetiracetam, or St. John's wort. Thus, this post hoc analysis of 8 drugs with mainly nonselective actions on neuropathic pain mechanisms found limited usefulness of sensory phenotyping in pain as the basis for individualized treatment. PMID:27007067

  5. Expanding the genotype-phenotype correlation in subtelomeric 19p13.3 microdeletions using high resolution clinical chromosomal microarray analysis.

    PubMed

    Peddibhotla, Sirisha; Khalifa, Mohamed; Probst, Frank J; Stein, Jennifer; Harris, Leslie L; Kearney, Debra L; Vance, Gail H; Bull, Marilyn J; Grange, Dorothy K; Scharer, Gunter H; Kang, Sue-Hae L; Stankiewicz, Pawel; Bacino, Carlos A; Cheung, Sau W; Patel, Ankita

    2013-12-01

    Structural rearrangements of chromosome 19p are rare, and their resulting phenotypic consequences are not well defined. This is the first study to report a cohort of eight patients with subtelomeric 19p13.3 microdeletions, identified using clinical chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA). The deletion sizes ranged from 0.1 to 0.86 Mb. Detailed analysis of the patients' clinical features has enabled us to define a constellation of clinical abnormalities that include growth delay, multiple congenital anomalies, global developmental delay, learning difficulties, and dysmorphic facial features. There are eight genes in the 19p13.3 region that may potentially contribute to the clinical phenotype via haploinsufficiency. Moreover, in silico genomic analysis of 19p13.3 microdeletion breakpoints revealed numerous highly repetitive sequences, suggesting LINEs/SINEs-mediated events in generating these microdeletions. Thus, subtelomeric 19p13.3 appears important for normal embryonic and childhood development. The clinical description of patients with deletions in this genomic interval will assist clinicians to identify and treat individuals with similar deletions.

  6. Relational aggression in marriage.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Jason S; Nelson, David A; Yorgason, Jeremy B; Harper, James M; Ashton, Ruth Hagmann; Jensen, Alexander C

    2010-01-01

    Drawing from developmental theories of relational aggression, this article reports on a study designed to identify if spouses use relationally aggressive tactics when dealing with conflict in their marriage and the association of these behaviors with marital outcomes. Using a sample of 336 married couples (672 spouses), results revealed that the majority of couples reported that relationally aggressive behaviors, such as social sabotage and love withdrawal, were a part of their marital dynamics, at least to some degree. Gender comparisons of partner reports of their spouse's behavior revealed that wives were significantly more likely to be relationally aggressive than husbands. Structural equation modeling demonstrated that relational aggression is associated with lower levels of marital quality and greater marital instability for both husbands and wives. Implications are drawn for the use of relational aggression theory in the future study of couple conflict and marital aggression.

  7. Molecular Profiling of Aggressive Lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Maura; Laginestra, Maria Antonella; Gazzola, Anna; Sapienza, Maria Rosaria; Pileri, Stefano A.; Piccaluga, Pier Paolo

    2012-01-01

    In the last years, several studies of molecular profiling of aggressive lymphomas were performed. In particular, it was shown that DLBCL can be distinguished in two different entities according to GEP. Specifically, ABC and GCB subtypes were characterized by having different pathogenetic and clinical features. In addition, it was demonstrated that DLBCLs are distinct from BL. Indeed, the latter is a unique molecular entity. However, relevant pathological differences emerged among the clinical subtypes. More recently, microRNA profiling provided further information concerning BL-DLBCL distinction as well as for their subclassification. In this paper, the authors based on their own experience and the most updated literature review, the main concept on molecular profiling of aggressive lymphomas. PMID:22190944

  8. Peripheral Blood MicroRNA Expression Profiles in Alzheimer's Disease: Screening, Validation, Association with Clinical Phenotype and Implications for Molecular Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Ren, Ru-Jing; Zhang, Yong-Fang; Dammer, Eric B; Zhou, Yi; Wang, Li-Ling; Liu, Xiao-Hong; Feng, Bei-Lei; Jiang, Guo-Xin; Chen, Sheng-Di; Wang, Gang; Cheng, Qi

    2016-10-01

    A series of investigations have been performed regarding microRNA (miRNA, miR) of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. However, most of these used microarray with neither validation by PCR nor any follow-up on the biological mechanism implicated by findings. Further, there were rarely any analyses linking clinical phenotype of de novo, drug-naive patients to cellular pathogenic mechanism(s) to date. Microarray screening followed by validation via quantitative PCR (Q-PCR) assays and the relationship between miRNAs and phenotypic indices were evaluated. Additionally, the cellular mechanism of miRNAs through effects of β-site amyloid precursor protein (APP) cleaving enzyme (BACE1) was assessed. We identified 2 specific differentially expressed (DE) miRNAs (miR-339 and miR-425) as potential diagnostic biomarkers for AD and revealed that these DE miRNAs could be involved in modulating the pathogenesis of AD via BACE1 protein inhibition. The findings presented here reveal a detailed snapshot of the profile of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) miRNA changes in AD patients, association with clinical phenotype, and potential roles in cellular pathogenesis. PMID:26497032

  9. Role of a short tandem leucine/arginine repeat in strong mutator phenotype acquisition in a clinical isolate of Salmonella Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Le Bars, Hervé; Bousarghin, Latifa; Bonnaure-Mallet, Martine; Jolivet-Gougeon, Anne

    2013-01-01

    In this prospective study, a strong mutator strain of Salmonella Typhimurium was isolated from a collection of 130 human clinical strains of Salmonella. Sequence analysis of the mutS, mutL, and mutH genes, which encode three proteins that are essential for initiation of methyl-directed DNA mismatch repair, revealed insertion of a short tandem repeat (STR) of leucine/alanine in the histidine kinase-like ATPase domain of MutL. The role of this STR in the acquisition of the strong mutator phenotype was confirmed by the construction of an isogenic mutant (6bpinsmutL) from a normomutator strain of Salmonella Heidelberg. This result adds to the sparse body of knowledge about strong mutators and highlights the role of this STR as a hotspot for the acquisition of a strong mutator phenotype in Salmonella.

  10. Clinical phenotype associations with various types of anti-dsDNA antibodies in patients with recent onset of rheumatic symptoms. Results from a multicentre observational study

    PubMed Central

    Compagno, Michele; Rekvig, Ole P; Bengtsson, Anders A; Sturfelt, Gunnar; Heegaard, Niels H H; Jönsen, Andreas; Jacobsen, Rasmus Sleimann; Eilertsen, Gro Ø; Fenton, Christopher G; Truedsson, Lennart; Nossent, Johannes C; Jacobsen, Søren

    2014-01-01

    Despite anti-dsDNA antibodies constitute a wide range of specificities, they are considered as the hallmark for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Objective To identify clinical phenotypes associated with anti-dsDNA antibodies, independently of any clinical diagnoses. Methods Patients with recent onset of any rheumatic symptoms were screened for antinuclear antibodies (ANA). All ANA-positive and matching ANA-negative patients were examined, and their clinical phenotypes were registered, using a systematic chart formulated after consensus between the participating centres. All patients were tested for different anti-dsDNA antibody specificities with assays habitually used in each participating laboratory. Crithidia Luciliae Immuno Fluorescence Test (CLIFT) was performed three times (with two different commercial kits); solid and solution phase ELISA were performed four times. Associations between clinical phenotypes and results of anti-dsDNA assays were evaluated by linear regression analysis (LRA) and principal component analysis (PCA). Results Totally, 292 ANA-positive and 292 matching ANA-negative patients were included in the study. A full dataset for statistical analysis was obtained in 547 patients. Anti-dsDNA antibodies were most frequently detected by ELISA. LRA showed that overall positivity of anti-dsDNA antibodies was associated with proteinuria and pleuritis. Alopecia was significantly associated only with CLIFT-positivity. Besides confirming the same findings, PCA showed that combined positivity of CLIFT and ELISA was also associated with lymphopenia. Conclusions Our results show that different anti-dsDNA antibody specificities are associated with nephropathy, pleuritis, alopecia and lymphopenia, regardless of the diagnosis. It may challenge the importance of anti-dsDNA antibodies as a diagnostic hallmark for SLE. PMID:25396058

  11. Targeted Next-Generation Sequencing Reveals Novel USH2A Mutations Associated with Diverse Disease Phenotypes: Implications for Clinical and Molecular Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Huiping; Liu, Yani; Rong, Weining; Ha, Shaoping; Liu, Wenzhou; Kang, Xiaoli; Zhao, Kanxing; Zhao, Chen

    2014-01-01

    USH2A mutations have been implicated in the disease etiology of several inherited diseases, including Usher syndrome type 2 (USH2), nonsyndromic retinitis pigmentosa (RP), and nonsyndromic deafness. The complex genetic and phenotypic spectrums relevant to USH2A defects make it difficult to manage patients with such mutations. In the present study, we aim to determine the genetic etiology and to characterize the correlated clinical phenotypes for three Chinese pedigrees with nonsyndromic RP, one with RP sine pigmento (RPSP), and one with USH2. Family histories and clinical details for all included patients were reviewed. Ophthalmic examinations included best corrected visual acuities, visual field measurements, funduscopy, and electroretinography. Targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS) was applied using two sequence capture arrays to reveal the disease causative mutations for each family. Genotype-phenotype correlations were also annotated. Seven USH2A mutations, including four missense substitutions (p.P2762A, p.G3320C, p.R3719H, and p.G4763R), two splice site variants (c.8223+1G>A and c.8559-2T>C), and a nonsense mutation (p.Y3745*), were identified as disease causative in the five investigated families, of which three reported to have consanguineous marriage. Among all seven mutations, six were novel, and one was recurrent. Two homozygous missense mutations (p.P2762A and p.G3320C) were found in one individual family suggesting a potential double hit effect. Significant phenotypic divergences were revealed among the five families. Three families of the five families were affected with early, moderated, or late onset RP, one with RPSP, and the other one with USH2. Our study expands the genotypic and phenotypic variability relevant to USH2A mutations, which would help with a clear insight into the complex genetic and phenotypic spectrums relevant to USH2A defects, and is complementary for a better management of patients with such mutations. We have also

  12. Predicting short-term institutional aggression in forensic patients: a multi-trait method for understanding subtypes of aggression.

    PubMed

    Vitacco, Michael J; Van Rybroek, Gregory J; Rogstad, Jill E; Yahr, Laura E; Tomony, James D; Saewert, Emily

    2009-08-01

    Accurately predicting inpatient aggression is an important endeavor. The current study investigated inpatient aggression over a six-month time period in a sample of 152 male forensic patients. We assessed constructs of psychopathy, anger, and active symptoms of mental illness and tested their ability to predict reactive and instrumental aggression. Across all levels of analyses, anger and active symptoms of mental illness predicted reactive aggression. Traits of psychopathy, which demonstrated no relationship to reactive aggression, were a robust predictor of instrumental aggression. This study (a) reestablishes psychopathy as a clinically useful construct in predicting inpatient instrumental aggression, (b) provides some validation for the reactive/instrumental aggression paradigm in forensic inpatients, and (c) makes recommendations for integrating risk assessment results into treatment interventions.

  13. Correlation of IgE/IgG4 milk epitopes and affinity of milk-specific IgE antibodies with different phenotypes of clinical milk allergy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Julie; Lin, Jing; Bardina, Ludmilla; Goldis, Marina; Nowak-Węgrzyn, Anna; Shreffler, Wayne G.; Sampson, Hugh A.

    2009-01-01

    Background Results from large-scale epitope mapping using peptide microarray have been shown to correlate with clinical features of milk allergy. Objectives We sought to assess IgE and IgG4 epitope diversity and IgE affinity in different clinical phenotypes of milk allergy and identify informative epitopes that may be predictive of clinical outcomes of milk allergy. Methods Forty-one subjects were recruited from a larger study on the effects of ingesting heat-denatured milk proteins in milk-allergic individuals. Using food challenges, subjects were characterized as clinically reactive to all forms of milk (n = 17), tolerant to heated milk (HM) products (n = 16), or outgrown their milk allergy (n = 8). Eleven non-milk allergic, healthy volunteers served as controls. Peptide microarray was performed using the previously published protocol. Results Milk allergic subjects had increased epitope diversity as compared to those who outgrew their allergy. HM tolerant subjects had IgE binding patterns similar to those who had outgrown their allergy, but IgG4 binding patterns that were more similar to the allergic group. Binding to higher numbers of IgE peptides was associated with more severe allergic reactions during challenge. There was no association between IgG4 peptides and clinical features of milk allergy. Using a competitive peptide microarray assay, allergic patients demonstrated a combination of high and low affinity IgE binding whereas HM tolerant subjects and those who had outgrown their milk allergy had primarily low affinity binding. Conclusions Greater IgE epitope diversity and higher affinity as determined by peptide microarray were associated with clinical phenotypes and severity of milk allergy. PMID:20226304

  14. Phenotype definition in epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Winawer, Melodie R

    2006-05-01

    Phenotype definition consists of the use of epidemiologic, biological, molecular, or computational methods to systematically select features of a disorder that might result from distinct genetic influences. By carefully defining the target phenotype, or dividing the sample by phenotypic characteristics, we can hope to narrow the range of genes that influence risk for the trait in the study population, thereby increasing the likelihood of finding them. In this article, fundamental issues that arise in phenotyping in epilepsy and other disorders are reviewed, and factors complicating genotype-phenotype correlation are discussed. Methods of data collection, analysis, and interpretation are addressed, focusing on epidemiologic studies. With this foundation in place, the epilepsy subtypes and clinical features that appear to have a genetic basis are described, and the epidemiologic studies that have provided evidence for the heritability of these phenotypic characteristics, supporting their use in future genetic investigations, are reviewed. Finally, several molecular approaches to phenotype definition are discussed, in which the molecular defect, rather than the clinical phenotype, is used as a starting point.

  15. Frequently relapsing anti-glomerular basement membrane antibody disease with changing clinical phenotype and antibody characteristics over time.

    PubMed

    Gu, Bobby; Magil, Alex B; Barbour, Sean J

    2016-10-01

    Anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM) antibody disease is a typically monophasic autoimmune disease with severe pulmonary and renal involvement. We report an atypical case of frequently relapsing anti-GBM antibody disease with both anti-GBM antibody-positive flares with pulmonary and renal involvement, and anti-GBM antibody-negative flares that were pulmonary limited with no histologic renal disease. This is the first report of alternating disease phenotype and anti-GBM antibody status over time. Disease severity paralleled the detection of anti-GBM antibodies but was independent of IgG subtype staining along the GBM. This case suggests a role for changing subpopulations of pathogenic antibodies as an explanation for variation in disease phenotype and anti-GBM antibody results. PMID:27679711

  16. Frequently relapsing anti-glomerular basement membrane antibody disease with changing clinical phenotype and antibody characteristics over time

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Bobby; Magil, Alex B.; Barbour, Sean J.

    2016-01-01

    Anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM) antibody disease is a typically monophasic autoimmune disease with severe pulmonary and renal involvement. We report an atypical case of frequently relapsing anti-GBM antibody disease with both anti-GBM antibody–positive flares with pulmonary and renal involvement, and anti-GBM antibody–negative flares that were pulmonary limited with no histologic renal disease. This is the first report of alternating disease phenotype and anti-GBM antibody status over time. Disease severity paralleled the detection of anti-GBM antibodies but was independent of IgG subtype staining along the GBM. This case suggests a role for changing subpopulations of pathogenic antibodies as an explanation for variation in disease phenotype and anti-GBM antibody results.

  17. Punishment of elicited aggression.

    PubMed

    Azrin, N H

    1970-07-01

    Aversive shocks are known to produce aggression when the shocks are not dependent on behavior and to suppress behavior when the shocks are arranged as a dependent punisher. These two processes were studied by presenting non-dependent shock to monkeys at regular intervals, thereby producing biting attacks on a pneumatic tube. Immediate shock punishment was stimultaneously delivered for each biting attack. The attacks were found to decrease as a function of increasing punishment intensity. These results show that aggression is eliminated by direct punishment of the aggression even when the stimulus that is used as a punisher otherwise causes the aggression. PMID:4988590

  18. Disentangling impulsiveness, aggressiveness and impulsive aggression: an empirical approach using self-report measures.

    PubMed

    García-Forero, Carlos; Gallardo-Pujol, David; Maydeu-Olivares, Alberto; Andrés-Pueyo, Antonio

    2009-06-30

    There is confusion in the literature concerning the concept of impulsive aggression. Based on previous research, we hypothesize that impulsivity and aggression may be related, though not as closely as to consider them the same construct. So, our aim was to provide empirical evidence of the relationship between the impulsivity and aggressiveness constructs when considered as traits. Two widely used questionnaires [Barratt's Impulsiveness Scale (BIS) and Aggression Questionnaire-Refined (AQ-R)] were administered to 768 healthy respondents. Product-moment and canonical correlations were then calculated. In addition, a principal components analysis was conducted to explore whether impulsive aggression can be defined phenotypically as the expression of a single trait. The common variance between impulsivity and aggressiveness was never higher than 42%. The principal components analysis reveals that one component is not enough to represent all the variables. In conclusion, our results show that impulsivity and aggressiveness are two separate, although related constructs. This is particularly important in view of the misconceptions in the literature.

  19. Infantile facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy revisited: Expansion of clinical phenotypes in patients with a very short EcoRI fragment.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tai-Heng; Lai, Yu-Hung; Lee, Pei-Lun; Hsu, Jong-Hau; Goto, Kanako; Hayashi, Yukiko K; Nishino, Ichizo; Lin, Chin-Wen; Shih, Hsiang-Hung; Huang, Chao-Ching; Liang, Wen-Chen; Wang, Wen-Fu; Jong, Yuh-Jyh

    2013-04-01

    Contrary to the classical form, infantile facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) usually denotes a severe phenotype and is frequently associated with extramuscular involvements. To elucidate the genotype-phenotype correlation in this severe subgroup, we identified a cohort of nine patients with infantile FSHD who also carried a very short (10-13kb) EcoRI fragment. Their current age ranged from 8 to 33 years and age of onset ranged from 0.4 to 5 years. One patient even manifested his first FSHD-related symptoms at as early as 5 months of age, including inability to smile, poor response to call, and infantile spasms. To date, four patients were wheelchair-bound and six patients had asymmetric weakness. Sensorineural hearing loss and abnormal fundoscopic findings were observed in eight and all of patients respectively. Three with the smallest EcoRI fragments (10-11kb, with normal length being 50-300kb) had mental retardation. Two of these had epilepsy. Cardiac arrhythmias were found in five patients. Restrictive ventilatory defects were observed in seven patients, with one progressing to chronic respiratory failure. Two had swallowing difficulties; one of these required gastrostomy. We identified several rarely reported phenotypes in infantile FSHD, including cardiac arrhythmia, respiratory insufficiency, and swallowing difficulties. There seems to be a correlation between the severity of phenotype and the very short EcoRI fragment in the chromosome 4q35 region. We conclude that the high frequency of multi-organ involvements in this severe FSHD variant suggests the need for an early and multidisciplinary intervention. PMID:23434070

  20. Concise review: Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells change phenotype following in vitro culture: implications for basic research and the clinic.

    PubMed

    Bara, Jennifer J; Richards, R Geoff; Alini, Mauro; Stoddart, Martin J

    2014-07-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are increasingly being used in tissue engineering and cell-based therapies in all fields ranging from orthopedic to cardiovascular medicine. Despite years of research and numerous clinical trials, MSC therapies are still very much in development and not considered mainstream treatments. The majority of approaches rely on an in vitro cell expansion phase in monolayer to produce large cell numbers prior to implantation. It is clear from the literature that this in vitro expansion phase causes dramatic changes in MSC phenotype which has very significant implications for the development of effective therapies. Previous reviews have sought to better characterize these cells in their native and in vitro environments, described known stem cell interactions within the bone marrow, and discussed the use of innovative culture systems aiming to model the bone marrow stem cell niche. The purpose of this review is to provide an update on our knowledge of MSCs in their native environment, focusing on bone marrow-derived MSCs. We provide a detailed description of the differences between naive cells and those that have been cultured in vitro and examine the effect of isolation and culture parameters on these phenotypic changes. We explore the concept of "one step" MSC therapy and discuss the potential cellular and clinical benefits. Finally, we describe recent work attempting to model the MSC bone marrow niche, with focus on both basic research and clinical applications and consider the challenges associated with these new generation culture systems.

  1. Clinical Relevance and Molecular Phenotypes in Gastric Cancer, of TP53 Mutations and Gene Expressions, in Combination With Other Gene Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sungjin; Lee, Jinhyuk; Kim, Yon Hui; Park, Jaheun; Shin, Jung-Woog; Nam, Seungyoon

    2016-01-01

    While altered TP53 is the most frequent mutation in gastric cancer (GC), its association with molecular or clinical phenotypes (e.g., overall survival, disease-free survival) remains little known. To that end, we can use genome-wide approaches to identify altered genes significantly related to mutated TP53. Here, we identified significant differences in clinical outcomes, as well as in molecular phenotypes, across specific GC tumor subpopulations, when combining TP53 with other signaling networks, including WNT and its related genes NRXN1, CTNNB1, SLITRK5, NCOR2, RYR1, GPR112, MLL3, MTUS2, and MYH6. Moreover, specific GC subpopulations indicated by dual mutation of NRXN1 and TP53 suggest different drug responses, according to the Connectivity Map, a pharmacological drug-gene association tool. Overall, TP53 mutation status in GC is significantly relevant to clinical or molecular categories. Thus, our approach can potentially provide a patient stratification strategy by dissecting previously unknown multiple TP53-mutated patient groups. PMID:27708434

  2. Aggressive behaviors in the psychiatric emergency service

    PubMed Central

    Chaput, Yves; Beaulieu, Lucie; Paradis, Michel; Labonté, Edith

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Studies of aggressive behaviors in a nonforensic mental health setting have focused primarily on the inpatient ward and, on event prediction, using behavior-based clinical rating scales. Few studies have specifically targeted aggressive behaviors in the psychiatric emergency service or determined whether assessing the demographic and clinical characteristics of such patients might prove useful for their more rapid identification. Methods: We used a prospectively acquired database of over 20,900 visits to four services in the province of Quebec, Canada, over a two-year period from September 2002 onwards. A maximum of 72 variables could be acquired per visit. Visits with aggression (any verbally or physically intimidating behavior), both present and past, were tagged. Binary logistic regressions and cross-tabulations were used to determine whether the profile of a variable differed in visits with aggression from those without aggression. Results: About 7% of visits were marked by current aggression (verbal 49%, physical 12%, verbal and physical 39%). Including visits with a “past only” history of aggression increased this number to 20%. Variables associated with aggression were gender (male), marital status (single/separated), education (high school or less), employment (none), judicial history (any type), substance abuse (prior or active), medication compliance (poor), type of arrival to psychiatric emergency services (involuntary, police, judiciary, landlord), reason for referral (behavioral dyscontrol), diagnosis (less frequent in anxiety disorders), and outcome (more frequently placed under observation or admitted). Conclusion: Our results suggest that many state-independent variables are associated with aggressive behaviors in the psychiatric emergency service. Although their sum may not add up to a specific patient profile, they can nevertheless be useful in service planning, being easily integrated alongside state-dependent rating scales in a

  3. Clinical factors influencing phenotype of HCMV-specific CD8+ T cells and HCMV-induced interferon-gamma production after allogeneic stem cells transplantation.

    PubMed

    Gayoso, Inmaculada; Cantisán, Sara; Cerrato, Carolina; Sánchez-García, Joaquín; Martin, Carmen; Solana, Rafael; Torres-Gomez, Antonio; Torre-Cisneros, Julian

    2013-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection causes significant morbidity and mortality after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). In this work, we characterized the phenotype and interferon-gamma (INF-γ) production of HCMV-specific T cells using QuantiFERON-HCMV assay in 26 patients 6 months after HSCT. We analysed whether these two parameters were associated with clinical variables. Our results showed that the patients receiving stem cells from donors ≥40 years old were 12 times more likely to have HCMV-specific CD8+ T cells with "differentiated phenotype" (CD45RA+CCR7+ ≤6.7% and CD28+ ≤30%) than patients grafted from donors <40 years old (OR = 12; P = 0.014). In addition, a detectable IFN-γ production in response to HCMV peptides (cutoff 0.2 IU/mL IFN-γ; "reactive" QuantiFERON-HCMV test) was statistically associated with HCMV replication after transplantation (OR = 11; P = 0.026), recipients ≥40 versus <40 years old (OR = 11; P = 0.026), and the use of peripheral blood versus bone marrow as stem cell source (OR = 17.5; P = 0.024). In conclusion, donor age is the only factor significantly associated with the presence of the "differentiated phenotype" in HCMV-specific CD8+ T cells, whereas HCMV replication after transplantation, recipient age, and stem cell source are the factors associated with the production of IFN-γ in response to HCMV epitopes.

  4. A Strategic Approach to Aggression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Archer, John

    2001-01-01

    Discusses two issues raised by Underwood et al.: the distinction between indirect and relational forms of aggression, and implications of indirect aggression for definitions of aggression; and the normative view of aggression that indicates that aggressive individuals may be socially skilled. Suggests that both issues lead to the conclusion that…

  5. Girls' Aggressive Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owens, Larry; Shute, Rosalyn; Slee, Phillip

    2004-01-01

    In contrast to boys' bullying behavior which is often overt and easily visible, girls' aggression is usually indirect and covert. Less research has been conducted on the types of bullying that girls usually engage in. Using focus groups composed of teenaged girls, Dr. Owens and colleagues examine the nature of teenage girls' indirect aggression.

  6. Third Person Instigated Aggression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaebelein, Jacquelyn

    Since many acts of aggression in society are more than simply an aggressor-victim encounter, the role played by third person instigated aggression also needs examination. The purpose of this study was to develop a laboratory procedure to systematically investigate instigation. In a competitive reaction time task, high and low Machiavellian Males…

  7. Social Aggression among Girls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Underwood, Marion K.

    Noting recent interest in girls' social or "relational" aggression, this volume offers a balanced, scholarly analysis of scientific knowledge in this area. The book integrates current research on emotion regulation, gender, and peer relations, to examine how girls are socialized to experience and express anger and aggression from infancy through…

  8. Gingival Tissue Transcriptomes Identify Distinct Periodontitis Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Kebschull, M.; Demmer, R.T.; Grün, B.; Guarnieri, P.; Pavlidis, P.; Papapanou, P.N.

    2014-01-01

    The currently recognized principal forms of periodontitis—chronic and aggressive—lack an unequivocal, pathobiology-based foundation. We explored whether gingival tissue transcriptomes can serve as the basis for an alternative classification of periodontitis. We used cross-sectional whole-genome gene expression data from 241 gingival tissue biopsies obtained from sites with periodontal pathology in 120 systemically healthy nonsmokers with periodontitis, with available data on clinical periodontal status, subgingival microbial profiles, and serum IgG antibodies to periodontal microbiota. Adjusted model-based clustering of transcriptomic data using finite mixtures generated two distinct clusters of patients that did not align with the current classification of chronic and aggressive periodontitis. Differential expression profiles primarily related to cell proliferation in cluster 1 and to lymphocyte activation and unfolded protein responses in cluster 2. Patients in the two clusters did not differ with respect to age but presented with distinct phenotypes (statistically significantly different whole-mouth clinical measures of extent/severity, subgingival microbial burden by several species, and selected serum antibody responses). Patients in cluster 2 showed more extensive/severe disease and were more often male. The findings suggest that distinct gene expression signatures in pathologic gingival tissues translate into phenotypic differences and can provide a basis for a novel classification. PMID:24646639

  9. Predicting aggression in children with ADHD

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objective The present study uses structural equation modeling of latent traits to examine the extent to which family factors, cognitive factors and perceptions of rejection in mother-child relations differentially correlate with aggression at home and at school. Methods Data were collected from 476 school-age (7–15 years old) children with a diagnosis of ADHD who had previously shown different types of aggressive behavior, as well as from their parents and teachers. Structural equation modeling was used to examine the differential relationships between maternal rejection, family, cognitive factors and aggression in home and school settings. Results Family factors influenced aggression reported at home (.68) and at school (.44); maternal rejection seems to be related to aggression at home (.21). Cognitive factors influenced aggression reported at school (.-05) and at home (-.12). Conclusions Both genetic and environmental factors contribute to the development of aggressive behavior in ADHD. Identifying key risk factors will advance the development of appropriate clinical interventions and prevention strategies and will provide information to guide the targeting of resources to those children at highest risk. PMID:24860616

  10. A mutation in the neurofibromatosis type 2 tumor-suppressor gene, giving rise to widely different clinical phenotypes in two unrelated individuals

    SciTech Connect

    Bourn, D.; Carter, S.A.; Goodship, J.; Strachan, T. ); Evans, G.R.; Coakham, H.

    1994-07-01

    The authors have sought mutations in the recently identified neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) tumor-suppressor gene in a large panel of NF2 patients, using PCR-based SSCP and heteroduplex analysis, followed by cloning and sequencing of appropriate PCR products. Two unrelated NF2 patients were found to have identical nonsense mutations caused by a C-to-T transition in a CpG dinucleotide that is a potential mutational hot spot in the NF2 tumor-suppressor gene. Unexpectedly, the two individuals had widely different clinical phenotypes, representing the severe Wishart and mild Gardner clinical subtypes. Analysis of DNA samples from different tissues of the mildly affected patient suggests that he is a somatic mosaic for the mutation. 26 refs., 3 figs.

  11. Germline PRKACA amplification causes variable phenotypes that may depend on the extent of the genomic defect: molecular mechanisms and clinical presentations

    PubMed Central

    Lodish, Maya B.; Yuan, Bo; Levy, Isaac; Braunstein, Glenn D.; Lyssikatos, Charalampos; Salpea, Paraskevi; Szarek, Eva; Karageorgiadis, Alexander S.; Belyavskaya, Elena; Raygada, Margarita; Faucz, Fabio Rueda; Izatt, Louise; Brain, Caroline; Gardner, James; Quezado, Martha; Carney, J. Aidan; Lupski, James R.; Stratakis, Constantine A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective We reported recently 5 patients with bilateral adrenocortical hyperplasia (BAH) and Cushing syndrome (CS) caused by constitutive activation of the catalytic subunit of protein kinase A (PRKACA). By doing new, in depth analysis of their cytogenetic abnormality, we attempt a better genotype-phenotype correlation of their PRKACA amplification. Design Case series. Methods Molecular cytogenetic, genomic, clinical and histopathologic analyses were performed in 5 patients with CS. Results Reinvestigation of the defects of previously described patients by state-of-the-art molecular cytogenetics showed complex genomic rearrangements in the chromosome 19p13.2p13.12 locus resulting in copy number gains encompassing the entire PRKACA; three patients (one sporadic case and two related cases) were observed with gains consistent with duplications, while two sporadic patients were observed with gains consistent with triplications. Although all five patients presented with ACTH-independent CS, the three sporadic patients had micronodular BAH and underwent bilateral adrenalectomy in early childhood whereas the two related patients, a mother and a son, presented with macronodular BAH as adults. In at least one patient, PRKACA triplication was associated with a more severe phenotype. Conclusions Constitutional chromosomal PRKACA amplification is a recently identified genetic defect associated with CS, a trait that may be inherited in an autosomal dominant manner or occur de novo. Genomic rearrangements can be complex and can result in different copy number states of dosage sensitive genes; e.g. duplication and triplication. PRKACA amplification can lead to variable phenotypes clinically and pathologically, and both micro- and macro-nodular BAH, the latter of which we speculate may depend on the extent of amplification. PMID:25924874

  12. Oral curcumin mitigates the clinical and neuropathologic phenotype of the Trembler-J mouse: a potential therapy for inherited neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Khajavi, Mehrdad; Shiga, Kensuke; Wiszniewski, Wojciech; He, Feng; Shaw, Chad A; Yan, Jiong; Wensel, Theodore G; Snipes, G Jackson; Lupski, James R

    2007-09-01

    Mutations in myelin genes cause inherited peripheral neuropathies that range in severity from adult-onset Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1 to childhood-onset Dejerine-Sottas neuropathy and congenital hypomyelinating neuropathy. Many myelin gene mutants that cause severe disease, such as those in the myelin protein zero gene (MPZ) and the peripheral myelin protein 22 gene (PMP22), appear to make aberrant proteins that accumulate primarily within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), resulting in Schwann cell death by apoptosis and, subsequently, peripheral neuropathy. We previously showed that curcumin supplementation could abrogate ER retention and aggregation-induced apoptosis associated with neuropathy-causing MPZ mutants. We now show reduced apoptosis after curcumin treatment of cells in tissue culture that express PMP22 mutants. Furthermore, we demonstrate that oral administration of curcumin partially mitigates the severe neuropathy phenotype of the Trembler-J mouse model in a dose-dependent manner. Administration of curcumin significantly decreases the percentage of apoptotic Schwann cells and results in increased number and size of myelinated axons in sciatic nerves, leading to improved motor performance. Our findings indicate that curcumin treatment is sufficient to relieve the toxic effect of mutant aggregation-induced apoptosis and improves the neuropathologic phenotype in an animal model of human neuropathy, suggesting a potential therapeutic role in selected forms of inherited peripheral neuropathies. PMID:17701891

  13. Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders: Clinical phenotype among a high-risk group of children and adolescents in Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun-Seung; Jones, Kenneth Lyons; Lee, Hae Kook; Chambers, Christina D

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the prevalence and phenotype of fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) or spectrum disorders (FASD) in Korea. This study was performed to describe the distribution of alcohol-related physical features in a genetically homogeneous sample of children and adolescents in institutional settings in Korea. Children and adolescents receiving services in one of seven institutions in Seoul, Korea were screened for growth deficiency. Those who screened positive were assessed using a structured protocol for the key cardinal features of FAS, and for 11 additional alcohol-related dysmorphologic features. Based on these findings, children and adolescents were categorized as FAS, Deferred (some characteristic features of FAS), and No FAS. Groups were compared on the prevalence of specific additional features and number of additional features, stratified by gender and age. Of 307 children and adolescents screened, 87 received the dysmorphology evaluation. Thirteen were classified as FAS, 44 Deferred, and 30 No FAS. The frequency of 10 of the 11 additional alcohol-related features did not differ significantly by FAS category. Palmar crease abnormalities were more common in FAS (53.8%) than in the Deferred category (25.0%) or the No FAS category (6.7%) (P = 0.003). A high prevalence across all groups was found for midfacial hypoplasia and epicanthal folds, whereas only one child exhibited ptosis. This study suggests that an FASD phenotype variant related to ethnic differences in the range of defects specific to prenatal alcohol exposure may be present in the Korean population.

  14. Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders: Clinical phenotype among a high-risk group of children and adolescents in Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun-Seung; Jones, Kenneth Lyons; Lee, Hae Kook; Chambers, Christina D

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the prevalence and phenotype of fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) or spectrum disorders (FASD) in Korea. This study was performed to describe the distribution of alcohol-related physical features in a genetically homogeneous sample of children and adolescents in institutional settings in Korea. Children and adolescents receiving services in one of seven institutions in Seoul, Korea were screened for growth deficiency. Those who screened positive were assessed using a structured protocol for the key cardinal features of FAS, and for 11 additional alcohol-related dysmorphologic features. Based on these findings, children and adolescents were categorized as FAS, Deferred (some characteristic features of FAS), and No FAS. Groups were compared on the prevalence of specific additional features and number of additional features, stratified by gender and age. Of 307 children and adolescents screened, 87 received the dysmorphology evaluation. Thirteen were classified as FAS, 44 Deferred, and 30 No FAS. The frequency of 10 of the 11 additional alcohol-related features did not differ significantly by FAS category. Palmar crease abnormalities were more common in FAS (53.8%) than in the Deferred category (25.0%) or the No FAS category (6.7%) (P = 0.003). A high prevalence across all groups was found for midfacial hypoplasia and epicanthal folds, whereas only one child exhibited ptosis. This study suggests that an FASD phenotype variant related to ethnic differences in the range of defects specific to prenatal alcohol exposure may be present in the Korean population. PMID:26384109

  15. Genotype-Phenotype Analysis of CYP2C19 in Healthy Saudi Individuals and its Potential Clinical Implication in Drug Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Saeed, Leena H; Mayet, Ahmed Y

    2013-01-01

    CYP2C19 is a cytochrome P450 enzyme, which is involved in the metabolism of some clinically important medications and is encoded by a highly polymorphic gene. There is no available data on the distribution of the CYP2C19 *4 and *17 mutant alleles in the Saudi Arabian population. The aim of the study was to determine different CYP2C19 mutant allele (*2, *4 and *17) frequencies in healthy Saudi subjects and to determine genotype frequencies for these mutations. The CYP2C19 genotypes were then classified into phenotypes. Result: In 201 adults of Saudi ethnicity, the allele frequencies were CYP2C19*1 (62.9%), *17 (25.7%), *2 (11.2%) and *4 (0.2%). The most prevalent genotype combinations were CYP2C19 *1/*1 (40.3%) and *1/*17 (30.4%). The distribution of CYP2C19 phenotypes was divided into extensive metabolizers (EM) 77.6%, intermediate metabolizers (IM) 14.9%, ultra-rapid metabolizers (UM) 7% and poor metabolizers (PM) 0.4%. This finding has important clinical implications for the use of CYP2C19 metabolized medications in the Saudi population and further studies are needed. PMID:24046523

  16. Comparative analyses of phenotypic methods and 16S rRNA, khe, rpoB genes sequencing for identification of clinical isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    He, Yanxia; Guo, Xianguang; Xiang, Shifei; Li, Jiao; Li, Xiaoqin; Xiang, Hui; He, Jinlei; Chen, Dali; Chen, Jianping

    2016-07-01

    The present work aimed to evaluate 16S rRNA, khe and rpoB gene sequencing for the identification of Klebsiella pneumoniae in comparison with phenotypic methods. Fifteen clinical isolates were examined, which were initially identified as K. pneumoniae subsp. pneumoniae using the automated VITEK 32 system in two hospitals in Enshi City, China. Their identity was further supported by conventional phenotypic methods on the basis of morphological and biochemical characteristics. Using Bayesian phylogenetic analyses and haplotypes network reconstruction, 13 isolates were identified as K. pneumoniae, whereas the other two isolates (K19, K24) were classified as Shigella sp. and Enterobacter sp., respectively. Of the three genes, 16S rRNA and khe gene could discriminate the clinical isolates at the genus level, whereas rpoB could discriminate Klebsiella at the species and even subspecies level. Overall, the gene tree based on rpoB is more compatible with the currently accepted classification of Klebsiella than those based on 16S rRNA and khe genes, showing that rpoB can be a powerful tool for identification of K. pneumoniae isolates. Above all, our study challenges the utility of khe as a species-specific marker for identification of K. pneumoniae.

  17. Stability of preclinical models of aggressive renal cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Varna, Mariana; Bousquet, Guilhem; Ferreira, Irmine; Goulard, Marie; El-Bouchtaoui, Morad; Artus, Pierre Mongiat; Verine, Jérome; de Kerviler, Eric; Hernandez, Lucie; Leboeuf, Christophe; Escudier, Bernard; Legrès, Luc; Setterblad, Niclas; Soliman, Hany; Feugeas, Jean-Paul; Janin, Anne; Bertheau, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Renal-cell carcinomas (RCC) are often resistant to conventional cytotoxic agents. Xenograft models are used for in vivo preclinical studies and drug development. The validity of these studies is highly dependent on the phenotypic and genotypic stability of the models. Here we assessed the stability of six aggressive human RCC xenografted in nude/NMRI mice. We compared the initial samples (P0), first (P1) and fifth (P5) passages for the following criteria: histopathology, immunohistochemistry for CK7, CD10, vimentin and p53, DNA allelic profiles using 10 microsatellites and CGH-array. Next we evaluated the response to sunitinib in primary RCC and corresponding xenografted RCC. We observed a good overall stability between primary RCC and corresponding xenografted RCC at P1 and P5 regarding histopathology and immunohistochemistry except for cytokeratin 7 (one case) and p53 (one case) expression. Out of 44 groups with fully available microsatellite data (at P0, P1 and P5), 66% (29 groups) showed no difference from P0 to P5 while 34% (15 groups) showed new or lost alleles. Using CGH-array, overall genomic alterations at P5 were not different from those of initial RCC. The xenografted RCC had identical response to sunitinib therapy compared to the initial human RCC from which they derive. These xenograft models of aggressive human RCC are clinically relevant, showing a good histological and molecular stability and are suitable for studies of basic biology and response to therapy. PMID:25031714

  18. Overexpression of Specific CD44 Isoforms Is Associated with Aggressive Cell Features in Acquired Endocrine Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Bellerby, Rebecca; Smith, Chris; Kyme, Sue; Gee, Julia; Günthert, Ursula; Green, Andy; Rakha, Emad; Barrett-Lee, Peter; Hiscox, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    While endocrine therapy is the mainstay of ER+ breast cancer, the clinical effectiveness of these agents is limited by the phenomenon of acquired resistance that is associated with disease relapse and poor prognosis. Our previous studies revealed that acquired resistance is accompanied by a gain in cellular invasion and migration and also that CD44 family proteins are overexpressed in the resistant phenotype. Given the association of CD44 with tumor progression, we hypothesized that its overexpression may act to promote the aggressive behavior of endocrine-resistant breast cancers. Here, we have investigated further the role of two specific CD44 isoforms, CD44v3 and CD44v6, in the endocrine-resistant phenotype. Our data revealed that overexpression of CD44v6, but not CD44v3, in endocrine-sensitive MCF-7 cells resulted in a gain in EGFR signaling, enhanced their endogenous invasive capacity, and attenuated their response to endocrine treatment. Suppression of CD44v6 in endocrine-resistant cell models was associated with a reduction in their invasive capacity. Our data suggest that upregulation of CD44v6 in acquired resistant breast cancer may contribute to a gain in the aggressive phenotype of these cells and loss of endocrine response through transactivation of the EGFR pathway. Future therapeutic targeting of CD44v6 may prove to be an effective strategy alongside EGFR-targeted agents in delaying/preventing acquired resistance in breast cancer. PMID:27379207

  19. Phenotypic Expansion of DGKE-Associated Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Westland, Rik; Bodria, Monica; Carrea, Alba; Lata, Sneh; Scolari, Francesco; Fremeaux-Bacchi, Veronique; D’Agati, Vivette D.; Lifton, Richard P.; Gharavi, Ali G.; Ghiggeri, Gian Marco

    2014-01-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is usually characterized by uncontrolled complement activation. The recent discovery of loss-of-function mutations in DGKE in patients with aHUS and normal complement levels challenged this observation. DGKE, encoding diacylglycerol kinase-ε, has not been implicated in the complement cascade but hypothetically leads to a prothrombotic state. The discovery of this novel mechanism has potential implications for the treatment of infants with aHUS, who are increasingly treated with complement blocking agents. In this study, we used homozygosity mapping and whole-exome sequencing to identify a novel truncating mutation in DGKE (p.K101X) in a consanguineous family with patients affected by thrombotic microangiopathy characterized by significant serum complement activation and consumption of the complement fraction C3. Aggressive plasma infusion therapy controlled systemic symptoms and prevented renal failure, suggesting that this treatment can significantly affect the natural history of this aggressive disease. Our study expands the clinical phenotypes associated with mutations in DGKE and challenges the benefits of complement blockade treatment in such patients. Mechanistic studies of DGKE and aHUS are, therefore, essential to the design of appropriate therapeutic strategies in patients with DGKE mutations. PMID:24511134

  20. Insulin Growth Factor 1 Receptor Expression Is Associated with NOTCH1 Mutation, Trisomy 12 and Aggressive Clinical Course in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Maura, Francesco; Mosca, Laura; Fabris, Sonia; Cutrona, Giovanna; Matis, Serena; Lionetti, Marta; Agnelli, Luca; Barbieri, Marzia; D’Anca, Marianna; Manzoni, Martina; Colombo, Monica; Massucco, Carlotta; Reverberi, Daniele; Gentile, Massimo; Recchia, Anna Grazia; Bossio, Sabrina; Ilariucci, Fiorella; Musolino, Caterina; Di Raimondo, Francesco; Cortelezzi, Agostino; Morabito, Fortunato; Ferrarini, Manlio; Neri, Antonino

    2015-01-01

    IGF1R is emerging as an important gene in the pathogenesis of many solid and haematological cancers and its over-expression has been reported as frequently associated with aggressive disease and chemotherapy resistance. In this study we performed an investigation of the role of IGF1R expression in a large and representative prospective series of 217 chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) patients enrolled in the multicentre O-CLL1 protocol (clinicaltrial.gov #NCT00917540). High IGF1R gene expression was significantly associated with IGHV unmutated (IGHV-UM) status (p<0.0001), high CD38 expression (p<0.0001), trisomy 12 (p<0.0001), and del(11)(q23) (p=0.014). Interestingly, higher IGF1R expression (p=0.002) characterized patients with NOTCH1 mutation (c.7541_7542delCT), identified in 15.5% of cases of our series by next generation sequencing and ARMS-PCR. Furthermore, IGF1R expression has been proven as an independent prognostic factor associated with time to first treatment in our CLL prospective cohort. These data suggest that IGF1R may play an important role in CLL biology, in particular in aggressive CLL clones characterized by IGHV-UM, trisomy 12 and NOTCH1 mutation. PMID:25786252

  1. Quantitative Genomics of Aggressive Behavior in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Alexis C; Rollmann, Stephanie M; Morgan, Theodore J; Mackay, Trudy F. C

    2006-01-01

    Aggressive behavior is important for animal survival and reproduction, and excessive aggression is an enormous social and economic burden for human society. Although the role of biogenic amines in modulating aggressive behavior is well characterized, other genetic mechanisms affecting this complex behavior remain elusive. Here, we developed an assay to rapidly quantify aggressive behavior in Drosophila melanogaster, and generated replicate selection lines with divergent levels of aggression. The realized heritability of aggressive behavior was approximately 0.10, and the phenotypic response to selection specifically affected aggression. We used whole-genome expression analysis to identify 1,539 probe sets with different expression levels between the selection lines when pooled across replicates, at a false discovery rate of 0.001. We quantified the aggressive behavior of 19 mutations in candidate genes that were generated in a common co-isogenic background, and identified 15 novel genes affecting aggressive behavior. Expression profiling of genetically divergent lines is an effective strategy for identifying genes affecting complex traits. PMID:17044737

  2. Investigations of Potential Phenotypes of Foot Osteoarthritis: Cross‐Sectional Analysis From the Clinical Assessment Study of the Foot

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Michelle; Thomas, Martin J.; Menz, Hylton B.; Myers, Helen L.; Thomas, Elaine; Downes, Thomas; Peat, George; Roddy, Edward

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the existence of distinct foot osteoarthritis (OA) phenotypes based on pattern of joint involvement and comparative symptom and risk profiles. Methods Participants ages ≥50 years reporting foot pain in the previous year were drawn from a population‐based cohort. Radiographs were scored for OA in the first metatarsophalangeal (MTP) joint, first and second cuneometatarsal, navicular first cuneiform, and talonavicular joints according to a published atlas. Chi‐square tests established clustering, and odds ratios (ORs) examined symmetry and pairwise associations of radiographic OA in the feet. Distinct underlying classes of foot OA were investigated by latent class analysis (LCA) and their association with symptoms and risk factors was assessed. Results In 533 participants (mean age 64.9 years, 55.9% female) radiographic OA clustered across both feet (P < 0.001) and was highly symmetrical (adjusted OR 3.0, 95% confidence interval 2.1, 4.2). LCA identified 3 distinct classes of foot OA: no or minimal foot OA (64%), isolated first MTP joint OA (22%), and polyarticular foot OA (15%). After adjustment for age and sex, polyarticular foot OA was associated with nodal OA, increased body mass index, and more pain and functional limitation compared to the other classes. Conclusion Patterning of radiographic foot OA has provided insight into the existence of 2 forms of foot OA: isolated first MTP joint OA and polyarticular foot OA. The symptom and risk factor profiles in individuals with polyarticular foot OA indicate a possible distinctive phenotype of foot OA, but further research is needed to explore the characteristics of isolated first MTP joint and polyarticular foot OA. PMID:26238801

  3. Post-traumatic stress disorder, depression, and aggression in OEF/OIF veterans.

    PubMed

    Angkaw, Abigail C; Ross, Bridgett S; Pittman, James O E; Kelada, Alexandra Mary Y; Valencerina, Maria Anna M; Baker, Dewleen G

    2013-10-01

    Aggression is a problem among some combat veterans. Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is associated with physical aggression in veterans, and co-occurring depression increases the risk of committing aggressive acts. Few studies have examined the impact of PTSD on various forms of aggression. While using a standardized multidimensional measure of aggression, this study examines the impact of depressive symptoms on the relationship between PTSD and various forms of aggression in Operation Enduring Freedom or Operation Iraqi Freedom (OEF/OIF) veterans. Depressive symptoms are hypothesized to mediate the relationship between PTSD and four types of aggression: (1) physical aggression toward others, (2) physical aggression toward objects, (3) physical aggression toward self, and (4) verbal aggression. Seventy-two OEF/OIF veterans completed assessment batteries and clinical interviews upon enrollment into a postdeployment mental health clinic. Study results partially supported the study hypotheses; depressive symptoms indirectly mediated the relationship between PTSD and two forms of aggression: verbal aggression and physical aggression toward self. In contrast to some prior studies of intimate partner violence in veterans with PTSD, no mediation relationship between depression and physical aggression toward others was found. Study results have implications for the development of interventions to treat aggressive behaviors in OEF/OIF veterans with PTSD and depression.

  4. Distinct clinical and pathological phenotypes in frontotemporal dementia associated with MAPT, PGRN and C9orf72 mutations.

    PubMed

    Snowden, Julie S; Adams, Jennifer; Harris, Jennifer; Thompson, Jennifer C; Rollinson, Sara; Richardson, Anna; Jones, Matthew; Neary, David; Mann, David M; Pickering-Brown, Stuart

    2015-01-01

    Our objective was to compare the clinical and pathological characteristics of frontotemporal dementia patients with MAPT, GRN and C9orf72 gene mutations. We carried out a cross-sectional comparative study of 74 gene-positive patients (15 MAPT, 17 GRN and 42 C9orf72). Thirty had post mortem pathological data permitting clinico-pathological correlation. MAPT patients were younger than other groups, and showed more frequent behavioural disinhibition, repetitive and stereotyped behaviours, semantic impairment and temporal predominance of atrophy. GRN patients were older at death and more likely to present with non-fluent aphasia. C9orf72 patients alone showed a co-occurrence of ALS. They showed more psychotic symptoms and irrational behaviour, yet were more often reported clinically as socially appropriate and warm. They showed less dietary change than other groups. C9orf72 patients with and without ALS differed only in frequency of psychosis. Greater clinical overlap was observed between GRN and C9orf72 compared to MAPT cases. MAPT cases had tau and GRN and C9orf72, with one exception, TDP-43 pathology. Non-fluent aphasia was linked to TDP subtype A in both GRN and C9orf72 cases and ALS with subtype B. In conclusion, the findings reinforce clinical heterogeneity in FTD and strengthen evidence that genotype influences clinical presentation. Clinical features may inform targeted genetic testing. PMID:26473392

  5. Copper depletion inhibits CoCl2-induced aggressive phenotype of MCF-7 cells via downregulation of HIF-1 and inhibition of Snail/Twist-mediated epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

    PubMed

    Li, Shun; Zhang, Jing; Yang, Hong; Wu, Chunhui; Dang, Xitong; Liu, Yiyao

    2015-01-01

    Copper, a strictly regulated trace element, is essential for many physiological processes including angiogenesis. Dysregulated angiogenesis has been associated with increased copper in tumors, and thus copper chelators have been used to inhibit tumor angiogenesis. However, it remains unclear whether copper has any effect on epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Using CoCl2-induced EMT of human breast carcinoma MCF-7 cells, we found that TEPA, a copper chelator, inhibited EMT-like cell morphology and cytoskeleton arrangement triggered by CoCl2; decreased the expression of vimentin and fibronectin, markers typical of EMT; inhibited HIF-1 activation and HIF1-α accumulation in nuclear; and down-regulated the expression of hypoxia-associated transcription factors, Snail and Twist1. Moreover, knockdown copper transport protein, Ctr1, also inhibited CoCl2-induced EMT and reversed the mesenchymal phenotype. In EMT6 xenograft mouse models, TEPA administration inhibited the tumor growth and increased mice survival. Immunohistochemical analysis of the xenograft further demonstrated that TEPA administration significantly inhibited tumor angiogenesis, down-regulated hypoxia-induced transcription factors, Snail and Twist1, leading to decreased transactivation of EMT-associated marker genes, vimentin and fibronectin. These results indicate that TEPA inhibits CoCl2-induced EMT most likely via HIF1-α-Snail/Twist signaling pathway, and copper depletion may be exploited as a therapeutic for breast cancer. PMID:26174737

  6. Copper depletion inhibits CoCl2-induced aggressive phenotype of MCF-7 cells via downregulation of HIF-1 and inhibition of Snail/Twist-mediated epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

    PubMed

    Li, Shun; Zhang, Jing; Yang, Hong; Wu, Chunhui; Dang, Xitong; Liu, Yiyao

    2015-07-15

    Copper, a strictly regulated trace element, is essential for many physiological processes including angiogenesis. Dysregulated angiogenesis has been associated with increased copper in tumors, and thus copper chelators have been used to inhibit tumor angiogenesis. However, it remains unclear whether copper has any effect on epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Using CoCl2-induced EMT of human breast carcinoma MCF-7 cells, we found that TEPA, a copper chelator, inhibited EMT-like cell morphology and cytoskeleton arrangement triggered by CoCl2; decreased the expression of vimentin and fibronectin, markers typical of EMT; inhibited HIF-1 activation and HIF1-α accumulation in nuclear; and down-regulated the expression of hypoxia-associated transcription factors, Snail and Twist1. Moreover, knockdown copper transport protein, Ctr1, also inhibited CoCl2-induced EMT and reversed the mesenchymal phenotype. In EMT6 xenograft mouse models, TEPA administration inhibited the tumor growth and increased mice survival. Immunohistochemical analysis of the xenograft further demonstrated that TEPA administration significantly inhibited tumor angiogenesis, down-regulated hypoxia-induced transcription factors, Snail and Twist1, leading to decreased transactivation of EMT-associated marker genes, vimentin and fibronectin. These results indicate that TEPA inhibits CoCl2-induced EMT most likely via HIF1-α-Snail/Twist signaling pathway, and copper depletion may be exploited as a therapeutic for breast cancer.

  7. PF-04691502, a dual PI3K/mTOR inhibitor has potent pre-clinical activity by inducing apoptosis and G1 cell cycle arrest in aggressive B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Chen, Deyu; Mao, Chaoming; Zhou, Yuepeng; Su, Yuting; Liu, Shenzha; Qi, Wen-Qing

    2016-01-01

    The PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway is activated in a variety of human tumors including B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (B-NHL). Targeting this pathway has been validated in solid and hematological tumors. In the present study, we demonstrated that PF-04691502, a novel PI3K/mTOR inhibitor has potent activity in a panel of aggressive B-NHL cell lines including diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and mantle cell lymphoma (MCL). MTS analysis showed that PF-04691502 effectively inhibited cell proliferation with IC50 values ranging from 0.12 to 0.55 µM. Cells treated with PF-04691502 exhibited decreased phosphorylation of Akt and S6 ribosomal protein confirming the mechanism of action of a PI3K/mTOR inhibitor. Also, treatment of B-NHL cell lines with PF-04691502 induced apoptosis in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Moreover, PF-04691502 significantly induced G1 cell cycle arrest associated with a decrease in cyclin D1 which contributed to suppression of cell proliferation. Finally, rituximab enhanced apoptosis induced by PF-04691502. Taken together, our findings provide for the first time that PF-04691502 inhibits the constitutively activated PI3K/mTOR pathway in aggressive B-cell NHL cell lines associated with inhibition of cell cycle progression, cell proliferation and promotion of apoptosis. These findings suggest that PF-04691502 is a novel therapeutic strategy in aggressive B-cell NHL and warrants early phase clinical trial evaluation with and without rituximab. PMID:26549638

  8. Use of haloperidol and risperidone in highly aggressive Swiss Webster mice by applying the model of spontaneous aggression (MSA).

    PubMed

    Fragoso, Viviane Muniz da Silva; Hoppe, Luanda Yanaan; de Araújo-Jorge, Tânia Cremonini; de Azevedo, Marcos José; Campos, Jerônimo Diego de Souza; Cortez, Célia Martins; de Oliveira, Gabriel Melo

    2016-03-15

    Aggression is defined as the act in which an individual intentionally harms or injures another of their own species. Antipsychotics are a form of treatment used in psychiatric routine. They have been used for decades in treatment of patients with aggressive behavior. Haloperidol and risperidone promote the control of psychiatric symptoms, through their respective mechanisms of action. Experimental models are obtained by behavioral, genetic, and pharmacological manipulations, and use a reduced number of animals. In this context, we applied the model of spontaneous aggression (MSA), originating the presence of highly aggressive mice (AgR) when reassembled in adulthood. We administered haloperidol and risperidone in escalating doses, for ten consecutive days. Using positive and negative control groups, we evaluated the effectiveness of these drugs and the reversal of the aggressive behavior, performing the tail suspension test (TST) and open field test (OFT) on 10th day of treatment and 10 days after its discontinuation. The results showed that both antipsychotic drugs were effective in AgR and reversed the aggressive phenotype, reducing the number of attacks by AgR and the extent of lesions in the subordinate mice (AgD) exposed to the pattern of aggressive behavior (PAB) of the aggressors. This conclusion is based on the reduction in the animals' motor and exploratory activity, and on the reversal of patterns of aggressive behavior. The association between the MSA and experiments with other therapeutic protocols and different antipsychotics can be an important methodology in the study of aggressive behavior in psychiatric patients.

  9. Reducing proactive aggression through non-invasive brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Dambacher, Franziska; Schuhmann, Teresa; Lobbestael, Jill; Arntz, Arnoud; Brugman, Suzanne; Sack, Alexander T

    2015-10-01

    Aggressive behavior poses a threat to human collaboration and social safety. It is of utmost importance to identify the functional mechanisms underlying aggression and to develop potential interventions capable of reducing dysfunctional aggressive behavior already at a brain level. We here experimentally shifted fronto-cortical asymmetry to manipulate the underlying motivational emotional states in both male and female participants while assessing the behavioral effects on proactive and reactive aggression. Thirty-two healthy volunteers received either anodal transcranial direct current stimulation to increase neural activity within right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, or sham stimulation. Aggressive behavior was measured with the Taylor Aggression Paradigm. We revealed a general gender effect, showing that men displayed more behavioral aggression than women. After the induction of right fronto-hemispheric dominance, proactive aggression was reduced in men. This study demonstrates that non-invasive brain stimulation can reduce aggression in men. This is a relevant and promising step to better understand how cortical brain states connect to impulsive actions and to examine the causal role of the prefrontal cortex in aggression. Ultimately, such findings could help to examine whether the brain can be a direct target for potential supportive interventions in clinical settings dealing with overly aggressive patients and/or violent offenders.

  10. Aggression in Pretend Play and Aggressive Behavior in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fehr, Karla K.; Russ, Sandra W.

    2013-01-01

    Research Findings: Pretend play is an essential part of child development and adjustment. However, parents, teachers, and researchers debate the function of aggression in pretend play. Different models of aggression predict that the expression of aggression in play could either increase or decrease actual aggressive behavior. The current study…

  11. Are American College of Rheumatology 50% response criteria superior to 20% criteria in distinguishing active aggressive treatment in rheumatoid arthritis clinical trials reported since 1997? A meta‐analysis of discriminant capacities

    PubMed Central

    Chung, C P; Thompson, J L; Koch, G G; Amara, I; Strand, V; Pincus, T

    2006-01-01

    Objective To carry out a meta‐analysis designed to compare the discriminant capacities of American College of Rheumatology 50% (ACR50) with 20% (ACR20) responses in clinical trials on rheumatoid arthritis reported after 1997 and to analyse whether ACR50 can be as informative as ACR20 in distinguishing active from control treatments in more recent trials. Methods Clinical trials on rheumatoid arthritis reported since 1997 were identified, which included aggressive combinations of disease‐modifying antirheumatic drugs and glucocorticoids, as well as powerful new agents—leflunomide, etanercept, infliximab, anakinra, adalimumab, abatacept, tacrolimus and rituximab. A meta‐analysis of ACR20 compared with ACR50 responses for 21 clinical trials was carried out on differences in proportions of responders for active and control treatments and corresponding odds ratios (ORs). Results In all but one clinical trial on rheumatoid arthritis published since 1997 with data available on ACR20 and ACR50, more than 50% of patients who were ACR20 responders among those randomised to active treatment were also ACR50 responders. This phenomenon was seen for control groups in 38% of trials, many of which included treatment with methotrexate. A meta‐analysis of the clinical trials indicated a slight advantage to ACR50 for quantifying treatment comparisons, not significant for differences in proportions but significant for ORs. Conclusion ACR20 and ACR50 seem to be similar in distinguishing active from control treatments in clinical trials on rheumatoid arthritis reported since 1997. As ACR50 represents a considerably stronger clinical response, ACR50 may be a preferred end point for contemporary clinical trials on rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:16504992

  12. Integrative analysis reveals clinical phenotypes and oncogenic potentials of long non-coding RNAs across 15 cancer types

    PubMed Central

    Piccolo, Stephen R.; Zhang, Xiao-Qin; Li, Jun-Hao; Zhou, Hui; Yang, Jian-Hua; Qu, Liang-Hu

    2016-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been shown to contribute to tumorigenesis. However, surprisingly little is known about the comprehensive clinical and genomic characterization of lncRNAs across human cancer. In this study, we conducted comprehensive analyses for the expression profile, clinical outcomes, somatic copy number alterations (SCNAs) profile of lncRNAs in ~7000 clinical samples from 15 different cancer types. We identified significantly differentially expressed lncRNAs between tumor and normal tissues from each cancer. Notably, we characterized 47 lncRNAs which were extensively dysregulated in at least 10 cancer types, suggesting a conserved function in cancer development. We also analyzed the associations between lncRNA expressions and patient survival, and identified sets of lncRNAs that possessed significant prognostic values in specific cancer types. Our combined analysis of SCNA data and expression data uncovered 116 dysregulated lncRNAs are strikingly genomic altered across 15 cancer types, indicating their oncogenic potentials. Our study may lay the groundwork for future functional studies of lncRNAs and help facilitate the discovery of novel clinical biomarkers. PMID:27147563

  13. Clinical phenotype and mutation spectrum of the CYP21A2 gene in patients with steroid 21-hydroxylase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Choi, J-H; Jin, H-Y; Lee, B H; Ko, J M; Lee, J-J; Kim, G-H; Jung, C-W; Lee, J; Yoo, H-W

    2012-01-01

    Steroid 21-hydroxylase deficiency is caused by inactivating mutations in the CYP21A2 gene. This paper reports on the mutation spectrum and the genotype-phenotype correlation of 21-hydroxylase deficiency. 72 unrelated patients with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) were included. Molecular analysis of CYP21A2 was performed, via the multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) analysis and sequence-specific differenzial PCR amplification of the CYP21A2 and CYP21A1P genes, using 4 pair-wise sequence-specific primers, followed by sequencing of the entire CYP21A2 gene. Large gene deletions were identified in 45 (31.3%) of the 144 unrelated CAH alleles, whereas the most frequent point mutations were intron 2 splice mutations (c.293-13A>G) (41/144, 28.5%). The MLPA analysis successfully identified 23 of 72 patients (31.9%) with single copy deletion in CYP21A2. This paper describes a rapid and accurate method for the molecular diagnosis of 21-hydroxylase deficiency, which relies on the identification of point mutations and structural rearrangements within the CYP21A2 gene.

  14. Clinical and molecular studies in full trisomy 22: Further delineation of the phenotype and review of the literature

    SciTech Connect

    Bacino, C.A.; Schreck, R.; Fischel-Ghodsian, N.

    1995-05-08

    Trisomy 22 is commonly found among spontaneous abortions, second in frequency of occurrence only to trisomy 16. Most earlier reports of surviving trisomy 22 cases in the literature are thought to represent the product of unbalanced 11;22 translocations or the result of undetected mosaicism, since this condition is thought to manifest early embryonic or fetal lethality. We present two strikingly similar cases of non-mosaic trisomy 22 surviving to late gestation. In this paper we emphasize the unique phenotype of this trisomy which included intrauterine growth retardation, microcephaly, broad flat nasal bridge with epicanthal folds and ocular hypertelorism, microtia, variable cleft palate, webbed neck, congenital heart defects involving anomalous great vessels, anorectal and renal anomalies, and hypoplastic distal digits with thumb anomalies. We also explore why some cases survive to late gestation. Confined placental mosaicism, a frequent finding in other lethal trisomies, has been ruled out in one of the cases. Molecular studies done to assess the parental origin of the extra chromosome in the other case showed that the non-disjunction originated during maternal meiosis II. Parental origin of the extra chromosome does not seem to play a role in late survival for trisomy 22. 36 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Phenotypic, molecular characterization, antimicrobial susceptibility and draft genome sequence of Corynebacterium argentoratense strains isolated from clinical samples

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Natal, I.; Sáez-Nieto, J.A.; Rodríguez-Lázaro, D.; Valdezate-Ramos, S.; Parras-Padilla, T.; Medina, M.J.; Rodríguez-Pollán, R.H.; Blom, J.; Tauch, A.; Soriano, F.

    2016-01-01

    During a 12-year period we isolated five Corynebacterium argentoratense strains identified by phenotypic methods, including the use of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF) and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. In addition, antimicrobial susceptibility was determined, and genome sequencing for the detection of antibiotic resistance genes was performed. The organisms were isolated from blood and throat cultures and could be identified by all methods used. All strains were resistant to cotrimoxazole, and resistance to β-lactams was partly present. Two strains were resistant to erythromycin and clindamycin. The draft genome sequences of theses isolates revealed the presence of the erm(X) resistance gene that is embedded in the genetic structure of the transposable element Tn5423. Although rarely reported as a human pathogen, C. argentoratense can be involved in bacteraemia and probably in other infections. Our results also show that horizontal transfer of genes responsible for antibiotic resistance is occurring in this species. PMID:26933505

  16. Phenotypic and genetic characterization of clinical isolates of CDC coryneform group A-3: proposal of a new species of Cellulomonas, Cellulomonas denverensis sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Brown, June M; Frazier, Rodrick P; Morey, Roger E; Steigerwalt, Arnold G; Pellegrini, Gerald J; Daneshvar, Maryam I; Hollis, Dannie G; McNeil, Michael M

    2005-04-01

    CDC coryneform group A-3 bacteria are rare human pathogens. In this study, six group A-3 isolates (two from blood, one from cerebrospinal fluid, and one each from homograft valve, lip wound, and pilonidal cyst) were compared to the type strains of phenotypically related organisms, Cellulomonas fimi, Cellulomonas hominis, Oerskovia turbata, and Sanguibacter suarezii, and characterized by phenotypic, chemotaxonomic, and genotypic studies. DNA-DNA reassociation analysis identified two genomic groups, and phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence identified the taxonomic positions of these groups to genus level. Two groups were defined, and both were more closely related to Cellulomonas species: one group of three strains, for which we propose the new species Cellulomonas denverensis sp. nov., with the type strain W6929 (ATCC BAA-788(T) or DSM 15764(T)), was related to C. hominis ATCC 51964(T) (98.5% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity), and the second group of three strains was related to C. hominis ATCC 51964(T) (99.8 to 99.9% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity). The definition of this new Cellulomonas species and the confirmation of three strains as C. hominis serve to further clarify the complex taxonomy of CDC coryneform group A-3 bacteria and will assist in our understanding of the epidemiology and clinical significance of these microorganisms.

  17. Phenotypic and Genetic Characterization of Clinical Isolates of CDC Coryneform Group A-3: Proposal of a New Species of Cellulomonas, Cellulomonas denverensis sp. nov.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, June M.; Frazier, Rodrick P.; Morey, Roger E.; Steigerwalt, Arnold G.; Pellegrini, Gerald J.; Daneshvar, Maryam I.; Hollis, Dannie G.; McNeil, Michael M.

    2005-01-01

    CDC coryneform group A-3 bacteria are rare human pathogens. In this study, six group A-3 isolates (two from blood, one from cerebrospinal fluid, and one each from homograft valve, lip wound, and pilonidal cyst) were compared to the type strains of phenotypically related organisms, Cellulomonas fimi, Cellulomonas hominis, Oerskovia turbata, and Sanguibacter suarezii, and characterized by phenotypic, chemotaxonomic, and genotypic studies. DNA-DNA reassociation analysis identified two genomic groups, and phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence identified the taxonomic positions of these groups to genus level. Two groups were defined, and both were more closely related to Cellulomonas species: one group of three strains, for which we propose the new species Cellulomonas denverensis sp. nov., with the type strain W6929 (ATCC BAA-788T or DSM 15764T), was related to C. hominis ATCC 51964T (98.5% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity), and the second group of three strains was related to C. hominis ATCC 51964T (99.8 to 99.9% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity). The definition of this new Cellulomonas species and the confirmation of three strains as C. hominis serve to further clarify the complex taxonomy of CDC coryneform group A-3 bacteria and will assist in our understanding of the epidemiology and clinical significance of these microorganisms. PMID:15814993

  18. Homozygosity for the V377I mutation in mevalonate kinase causes distinct clinical phenotypes in two sibs with hyperimmunoglobulinaemia D and periodic fever syndrome (HIDS)

    PubMed Central

    Messer, Laurent; Alsaleh, Ghada; Georgel, Philippe; Carapito, Raphael; Waterham, Hans R; Dali-Youcef, Nassim; Bahram, Siamak; Sibilia, Jean

    2016-01-01

    Objective Mevalonate kinase (MVK) deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive auto-inflammatory disorder characterised by recurring episodes of fever associated with multiple non-specific inflammatory symptoms and caused by mutations in the MVK gene. The phenotypic spectrum is wide and depends mostly on the nature of the mutations. Hyperimmunoglobulinaemia D and periodic fever syndrome (HIDS) is a relatively mild presentation and predominantly associated with a c.1129G>A (p.V377I) mutation in the MVK gene. We report cases of two sisters homozygous for this mutation but exhibiting distinct (symptomatic vs asymptomatic) phenotypes. Methods Patient history was obtained; physical and clinical examination and laboratory tests were performed; lipopolysaccharide (LPS) response of peripheral blood mononuclear cells was quantified. Results Low MVK enzymatic activity is not necessarily associated with inflammatory symptoms. Increased inflammatory cytokine secretion in response to LPS is associated with symptomatic MVK deficiency. Conclusions Individuals who are homozygous for the common p.V377I mutation in the MVK gene may not display the characteristic inflammatory episodes diagnostic of MKD and thus may be lost for correct and timely diagnosis. PMID:26977311

  19. Shwachman-Diamond syndrome presenting with early ichthyosis, associated dermal and epidermal intracellular lipid droplets, hypoglycemia, and later distinctive clinical SDS phenotype.

    PubMed

    Scalais, Emmanuel; Connerotte, Anne-Catherine; Despontin, Karine; Biver, Armand; Ceuterick-de Groote, Chantal; Alders, Marielle; Kolivras, Athanassios; Hachem, Jean-Pierre; De Meirleir, Linda

    2016-07-01

    Shwachman-Diamond syndrome (SDS) is a recessive ribosomopathy, characterized by bone marrow failure and exocrine pancreatic insufficiency (ePI) often associated with neurodevelopmental and skeletal abnormalities. The aim of this report is to describe a SDS patient with early ichthyosis associated with dermal and epidermal intracellular lipid droplets (iLDs), hypoglycemia and later a distinctive clinical SDS phenotype. At 3 months of age, she had ichthyosis, growth retardation, and failure to thrive. She had not cytopenia. Ultrasonography (US) showed pancreatic diffuse high echogenicity. Subsequently fasting hypoketotic hypoglycemia occurred without permanent hepatomegaly or hyperlipidemia. Continuous gavage feeding was followed by clinical improvement including ichthyosis and hypoglycemia. After 14 months of age, she developed persistent neutropenia and ePI consistent with SDS. The ichthyotic skin biopsy, performed at 5 months of age, disclosed iLDs in all epidermal layers, in melanocytes, eccrine sweat glands, Schwann cells and dermal fibroblasts. These iLDs were reminiscent of those described in Dorfman-Chanarin syndrome (DCS) or Wolman's disease. Both LIPA and CGI-58 analysis did not revealed pathogenic mutation. By sequencing SBDS, a compound heterozygous for a previously reported gene mutation (c.258 + 2T>C) and a novel mutation (c.284T>G) were found. Defective SBDS may hypothetically interfere as in DCS, with neutral lipid metabolism and play a role in the SDS phenotype such as ichthyosis with dermal and epidermal iLDs and hypoglycemia. This interference with neutral lipid metabolism must most likely occur in the cytoplasm compartment as in DCS and not in the lysosomal compartment as in Wolman's disease. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27127007

  20. Physical Aggression in Children and Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazurek, Micah O.; Kanne, Stephen M.; Wodka, Ericka L.

    2013-01-01

    Aggression is a clinically significant problem for many children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). However, there have been few large-scale studies addressing this issue. The current study examined the prevalence and correlates of physical aggression in a sample of 1584 children and adolescents with ASD enrolled in the Autism…

  1. The inflammatory phenotype of the fibrous plate is distinct from the liver and correlates with clinical outcome in biliary atresia.

    PubMed

    Arva, Nicoleta C; Russo, Pierre A; Erlichman, Jessi; Hancock, Wayne W; Haber, Barbara A; Bhatti, Tricia R

    2015-03-01

    Biliary atresia is an inflammatory cholangiopathy of still undetermined etiology. Correlations between histologic findings and clinical outcome in this disease have largely been based on evaluation of liver parenchyma. This study aimed to characterize the pattern of inflammation within the biliary remnant and identify associations between the type and degree of inflammation and clinical outcome as reflected by the transplant-free interval. The inflammation within the fibrous plates and livers of 41 patients with biliary atresia was characterized using immunohistochemical markers and the cell populations were digitally quantified. The type and quantity of cells within the infiltrate were then correlated with length of time from Kasai portoenterostomy until transplant. Histologic and immunohistochemical features of the biliary remnant allowed stratification of patients into "inflammatory plate" and "fibrotic plate" groups. Overall there was no significant difference in transplant-free interval between the two cohorts; however, there was a trend towards a longer time to transplant among patients in the "fibrotic plate" group. In addition, the composition of the inflammatory infiltrate in the fibrous plate was distinctly different from that present in the liver and only the characteristics of the inflammation in the fibrous plate, in particular the number of Foxp3+ T regulatory lymphocytes correlated with clinical outcome. The results of this study support the view of the extra-hepatic biliary tree as the primary site of injury in BA with the changes seen in the liver as secondary manifestations of outflow obstruction. The association between specific inflammatory cell subtypes within the fibrous plate and the length of transplant-free interval also supports the role of the immune system in the initial process of bile duct damage in biliary atresia.

  2. The inflammatory phenotype of the fibrous plate is distinct from the liver and correlates with clinical outcome in biliary atresia.

    PubMed

    Arva, Nicoleta C; Russo, Pierre A; Erlichman, Jessi; Hancock, Wayne W; Haber, Barbara A; Bhatti, Tricia R

    2015-03-01

    Biliary atresia is an inflammatory cholangiopathy of still undetermined etiology. Correlations between histologic findings and clinical outcome in this disease have largely been based on evaluation of liver parenchyma. This study aimed to characterize the pattern of inflammation within the biliary remnant and identify associations between the type and degree of inflammation and clinical outcome as reflected by the transplant-free interval. The inflammation within the fibrous plates and livers of 41 patients with biliary atresia was characterized using immunohistochemical markers and the cell populations were digitally quantified. The type and quantity of cells within the infiltrate were then correlated with length of time from Kasai portoenterostomy until transplant. Histologic and immunohistochemical features of the biliary remnant allowed stratification of patients into "inflammatory plate" and "fibrotic plate" groups. Overall there was no significant difference in transplant-free interval between the two cohorts; however, there was a trend towards a longer time to transplant among patients in the "fibrotic plate" group. In addition, the composition of the inflammatory infiltrate in the fibrous plate was distinctly different from that present in the liver and only the characteristics of the inflammation in the fibrous plate, in particular the number of Foxp3+ T regulatory lymphocytes correlated with clinical outcome. The results of this study support the view of the extra-hepatic biliary tree as the primary site of injury in BA with the changes seen in the liver as secondary manifestations of outflow obstruction. The association between specific inflammatory cell subtypes within the fibrous plate and the length of transplant-free interval also supports the role of the immune system in the initial process of bile duct damage in biliary atresia. PMID:25624184

  3. Unravelling the neurophysiological basis of aggression in a fish model

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Aggression is a near-universal behaviour with substantial influence on and implications for human and animal social systems. The neurophysiological basis of aggression is, however, poorly understood in all species and approaches adopted to study this complex behaviour have often been oversimplified. We applied targeted expression profiling on 40 genes, spanning eight neurological pathways and in four distinct regions of the brain, in combination with behavioural observations and pharmacological manipulations, to screen for regulatory pathways of aggression in the zebrafish (Danio rerio), an animal model in which social rank and aggressiveness tightly correlate. Results Substantial differences occurred in gene expression profiles between dominant and subordinate males associated with phenotypic differences in aggressiveness and, for the chosen gene set, they occurred mainly in the hypothalamus and telencephalon. The patterns of differentially-expressed genes implied multifactorial control of aggression in zebrafish, including the hypothalamo-neurohypophysial-system, serotonin, somatostatin, dopamine, hypothalamo-pituitary-interrenal, hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal and histamine pathways, and the latter is a novel finding outside mammals. Pharmacological manipulations of various nodes within the hypothalamo-neurohypophysial-system and serotonin pathways supported their functional involvement. We also observed differences in expression profiles in the brains of dominant versus subordinate females that suggested sex-conserved control of aggression. For example, in the HNS pathway, the gene encoding arginine vasotocin (AVT), previously believed specific to male behaviours, was amongst those genes most associated with aggression, and AVT inhibited dominant female aggression, as in males. However, sex-specific differences in the expression profiles also occurred, including differences in aggression-associated tryptophan hydroxylases and estrogen receptors

  4. A cyclin D1-negative mantle cell lymphoma with an IGL-CCND2 translocation that relapsed with blastoid morphology and aggressive clinical behavior.

    PubMed

    Kurita, Daisuke; Takeuchi, Kengo; Kobayashi, Sumiko; Hojo, Atsuko; Uchino, Yoshihito; Sakagami, Masashi; Ohtake, Shimon; Takahashi, Hiromichi; Miura, Katsuhiro; Iriyama, Noriyoshi; Sugitani, Masahiko; Miyoshi, Hiroaki; Hatta, Yoshihiro; Ohshima, Koichi; Takei, Masami

    2016-10-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is a B cell neoplasm characterized by cyclin D1 overexpression; its prognosis is poor, especially when it exhibits a blastoid morphology. Cyclin D1-negative MCL is rare, and its pathogenesis and progression remain unclear. Herein, we describe a cyclin D1-negative, cyclin D2-positive MCL with a CCND2 and immunoglobulin lambda light chain (IGL) translocation. The patient was initially diagnosed with cyclin D1-negative MCL and achieved complete remission via combination chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplantation. After relapsing, he was diagnosed with a blastoid variant of MCL that showed lymphoid cells with dispersed chromatin and more mitotic figures and higher p53 expression compared with the initial MCL. Despite salvage therapies, the disease became refractory, and the patient died 28 months after initiating chemotherapy. This case demonstrates that blastoid morphology in cyclin D1-negative MCL with IGL-CCND2 translocation indicates progression to a more aggressive neoplasm, similar to cyclin D1-positive MCL.

  5. Aggression in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Kravitz, Edward A; Fernandez, Maria de la Paz

    2015-10-01

    Aggression is used by essentially all species of animals to gain access to desired resources, including territory, food, and potential mates: Fruit flies are no exception. In Drosophila, both males and females compete in same sex fights for resources, but only males establish hierarchical relationships. Many investigators now study aggression using the fruit fly model, mainly because (a) aggression in fruit flies is a quantifiable well-defined and easily evoked behavior; (b) powerful genetic methods allow investigators to manipulate genes of interest at any place or time during embryonic, larval, pupal or adult life, and while flies are behaving; (c) the growth of the relatively new field of optogenetics makes physiological studies possible at single neuron levels despite the small sizes of neurons and other types of cells in fly brains; and (d) the rearing of fly stocks with their short generation times and limited growth space requirements can easily be performed at relatively low cost in most laboratories. This review begins with an examination of the behavior, both from a historical perspective and then from the birth of the "modern" era of studies of aggression in fruit flies including its quantitative analysis. The review continues with examinations of the roles of genes, neurotransmitters and neurohormones, peptides, nutritional and metabolic status, and surface cuticular hydrocarbons in the initiation and maintenance of aggression. It concludes with suggestions for future studies with this important model system.

  6. Etiological Distinctions between Aggressive and Non-Aggressive Antisocial Behavior: Results from a Nuclear Twin Family Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burt, S. Alexandra; Klump, Kelly L.

    2012-01-01

    A recent meta-analysis of 103 studies Burt ("Clinical Psychology Review," 29:163-178, 2009a) highlighted the presence of etiological distinctions between aggressive (AGG) and non-aggressive rule-breaking (RB) dimensions of antisocial behavior, such that AGG was more heritable than was RB, whereas RB was more influenced by the shared environment.…

  7. Uric acid excretion predicts increased aggression in urban adolescents.

    PubMed

    Mrug, Sylvie; Mrug, Michal

    2016-09-01

    Elevated levels of uric acid have been linked with impulsive and disinhibited behavior in clinical and community populations of adults, but no studies have examined uric acid in relation to adolescent aggression. This study examined the prospective role of uric acid in aggressive behavior among urban, low income adolescents, and whether this relationship varies by gender. A total of 84 adolescents (M age 13.36years; 50% male; 95% African American) self-reported on their physical aggression at baseline and 1.5years later. At baseline, the youth also completed a 12-h (overnight) urine collection at home which was used to measure uric acid excretion. After adjusting for baseline aggression and age, greater uric acid excretion predicted more frequent aggressive behavior at follow up, with no significant gender differences. The results suggest that lowering uric acid levels may help reduce youth aggression. PMID:27180134

  8. Population-based genetic epidemiologic analysis of Chlamydia trachomatis serotypes and lack of association between ompA polymorphisms and clinical phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Millman, Kim; Black, Carolyn M; Stamm, Walter E; Jones, Robert B; Hook, Edward W; Martin, David H; Bolan, Gail; Tavaré, Simon; Dean, Deborah

    2006-03-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is the leading cause of bacterial sexually transmitted diseases worldwide. Urogenital strains are classified into serotypes and genotypes based on the major outer membrane protein and its gene, ompA, respectively. Studies of the association of serotypes with clinical signs and symptoms have produced conflicting results while no studies have evaluated associations with ompA polymorphisms. We designed a population-based cross-sectional study of 344 men and women with urogenital chlamydial infections (excluding co-pathogen infections) presenting to clinics serving five U.S. cities from 1995 to 1997. Signs, symptoms and sequelae of chlamydial infection (mucopurulent cervicitis, vaginal or urethral discharge; dysuria; lower abdominal pain; abnormal vaginal bleeding; and pelvic inflammatory disease) were analyzed for associations with serotype and ompA polymorphisms. One hundred and fifty-three (44.5%) of 344 patients had symptoms consistent with urogenital chlamydial infection. Gender, reason for visit and city were significant independent predictors of symptom status. Men were 2.2 times more likely than women to report any symptoms (P=0.03) and 2.8 times more likely to report a urethral discharge than women were to report a vaginal discharge in adjusted analyses (P=0.007). Differences in serotype or ompA were not predictive except for an association between serotype F and pelvic inflammatory disease (P=0.046); however, the number of these cases was small. While there was no clinically prognostic value associated with serotype or ompA polymorphism for urogenital chlamydial infections except for serotype F, future studies might utilize multilocus genomic typing to identify chlamydial strains associated with clinical phenotypes.

  9. The prevalence of aggression in genetic syndromes: a review.

    PubMed

    Powis, Laurie; Oliver, Chris

    2014-05-01

    Research into behavioural phenotypes identifies both environmental and organic factors as influencing aggression in children and adults with genetic disorders associated with intellectual disability. However, in contrast to self-injury there is a paucity of research that compares aggression across relevant syndromes. The primary aim of this review is to examine the association between aggression and genetic syndromes by analysis of prevalence studies. The review also examines the literature on the form of the behaviour and influence of environmental factors. Results imply that certain syndrome groups (Cri du Chat, Smith-Magenis, Prader-Willi, Angelman, Cornelia de Lange, and Fragile X syndromes; estimates over 70%) evidence a stronger association with aggression than others (e.g. Williams and Down syndromes; estimates below 15%). However, the strength of association is difficult to quantify due to methodological differences between studies. The results from examining form and environmental influences highlight the importance of phenotype-environment interactions. Research employing group comparison designs is warranted and future work on the assessment and intervention of aggression in genetic syndromes should consider the importance of phenotype-environment interactions. PMID:24594523

  10. Examining Genetic and Environmental Effects on Social Aggression: A Study of 6-Year-Old Twins

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brendgen, Mara; Dionne, Ginette; Girard, Alain; Boivin, Michel; Vitaro, Frank; Prusse, Daniel

    2005-01-01

    Using a genetic design of 234 six-year-old twins, this study examined (a) the contribution of genes and environment to social versus physical aggression, and (b) whether the correlation between social and physical aggression can be explained by similar genetic or environmental factors or by a directional link between the phenotypes. For social…

  11. Role of genetic factors in the pathogenesis of aggressive periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Alexandre R; Albandar, Jasim M

    2014-06-01

    This article critically reviews the evidence for a role of genetic factors in the pathogenesis of aggressive periodontitis and discusses the study approaches commonly used to identify genetic risk factors of this disease. Available data suggest that aggressive periodontitis is caused by mutations in multiple genes, combined with environmental effects. Syndromic periodontal diseases include certain monogenic disorders that express phenotypes showing aggressive forms of periodontitis, and the genetic triggering factors of most of these syndromes have been identified. Other periodontal disease phenotypes seem to occur through different genetic predisposition patterns. Case-control and genome-wide studies have been used to investigate the association with gene polymorphisms. Association studies and the familial aggregation of aggressive periodontitis suggest a significant genetic component in the increased predisposition to this disease. There is evidence to support the contribution of a few major genes or of multiple small-effects genes. In addition, there is evidence of gene-gene and gene-environment interaction effects. Early studies suggested an X-linked mode of transmission of aggressive periodontitis, and subsequent studies support an autosomal mode. Genetic studies have the potential to improve the screening programs of subjects at risk for developing aggressive periodontitis and may enhance treatment outcome through gene therapy.

  12. Experimental Functional Analysis of Aggression in Children with Angelman Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strachan, Rachel; Shaw, Rebecca; Burrow, Caroline; Horsler, Kate; Allen, Debbie; Oliver, Chris

    2009-01-01

    Background: Kinship theory suggests that genomic imprinting could account for phenotypic behaviors that increase (in the case of Angelman syndrome) or decrease (for Prader-Willi syndrome) the drive to access social resources (adult contact) depending on the imprinting parent-of-origin. Difficult to manage behaviors, such as aggression that is…

  13. Effects of phenotype and genotype on methods for detection of extended-spectrum-beta-lactamase-producing clinical isolates of Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae in Norway.

    PubMed

    Tofteland, Ståle; Haldorsen, Bjørg; Dahl, Kristin H; Simonsen, Gunnar S; Steinbakk, Martin; Walsh, Timothy R; Sundsfjord, Arnfinn

    2007-01-01

    Consecutive clinical isolates of Escherichia coli (n = 87) and Klebsiella pneumoniae (n = 25) with reduced susceptibilities to oxyimino-cephalosporins (MICs > 1 mg/liter) from 18 Norwegian laboratories during March through October 2003 were examined for bla(TEM/SHV/CTX-M) extended-spectrum-beta-lactamase (ESBL) genes, oxyimino-cephalosporin MIC profiles, ESBL phenotypes (determined by the ESBL Etest and the combined disk and double-disk synergy [DDS] methods), and susceptibility to non-beta-lactam antibiotics. Multidrug-resistant CTX-M-15-like (n = 23) and CTX-M-9-like (n = 15) ESBLs dominated among the 50 ESBL-positive E. coli isolates. SHV-5-like (n = 9) and SHV-2-like (n = 4) ESBLs were the most prevalent in 19 ESBL-positive K. pneumoniae isolates. Discrepant ESBL phenotype test results were observed for one major (CTX-M-9) and several minor (TEM-128 and SHV-2/-28) ESBL groups and in SHV-1/-11-hyperproducing isolates. Negative or borderline ESBL results were observed when low-MIC oxyimino-cephalosporin substrates were used to detect clavulanic acid (CLA) synergy. CLA synergy was detected by the ESBL Etest and the DDS method but not by the combined disk method in SHV-1/-11-hyperproducing strains. The DDS method revealed unexplained CLA synergy in combination with aztreonam and cefpirome in three E. coli strains. The relatively high proportion of ESBL-producing E. coli organisms with a low ceftazidime MIC in Norway emphasizes that cefpodoxime alone or both cefotaxime and ceftazidime should be used as substrates for ESBL detection. PMID:17079502

  14. Clinical, immunophenotypic, cytogenetic, and molecular genetic features in 117 adult patients with mixed-phenotype acute leukemia defined by WHO-2008 classification.

    PubMed

    Yan, Lingzhi; Ping, Nana; Zhu, Mingqing; Sun, Aining; Xue, Yongquan; Ruan, Changgeng; Drexler, Hans G; Macleod, Roderick A F; Wu, Depei; Chen, Suning

    2012-11-01

    Among 4,780 consecutive adult acute lymphoblastic/myeloblastic leukemia patients, we identified 117 (2.4%) patients with mixed-phenotype acute leukemia fulfilling WHO 2008 criteria; these were classified as: Blymphoid+ myeloid (n=64), T-lymphoid+myeloid (n=38), B+T-lymphoid (n=14) and trilineage (n=1). Of 92 patients karyotyped, 59 were abnormal and were classified as: complex (22 of 92), t(9;22)(q34;q11) (14 of 92), monosomy 7 (7 of 92), polysomy 21 (7 of 92), t(v;11q23) (4 of 92), t(10;11)(p15;q21) (3 of 92), while STIL-TAL1 fusion was detected in one (T+My) patient. After investigating common acute leukemia-related mutations in 17 genes, 12 of 31 (39%) patients were found to have at least one mutation, classified with: IKZF1 deletion (4 of 31), and EZH2 (3 of 31), ASXL1 (3 of 31), ETV6 (2 of 31), NOTCH1 (1 of 31), and TET2 (1 of 31) mutations. Array-CGH revealed genomic deletions of CDKN2A (4 of 12), IKZF1 (3 of 12), MEF2C (2 of 12), BTG1 (2 of 12), together with BCOR, EBF1, K-RAS, LEF1, MBNL1, PBX3, and RUNX1 (one of 12 each). Our results indicate that mixed-phenotype acute leukemia is a complex entity with heterogeneous clinical, immunophenotypic, cytogenetic, and molecular genetic features. PMID:22581002

  15. The expanding phenotype of COL4A1 and COL4A2 mutations: clinical data on 13 newly identified families and a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Meuwissen, Marije E C; Halley, Dicky J J; Smit, Liesbeth S; Lequin, Maarten H; Cobben, Jan M; de Coo, René; van Harssel, Jeske; Sallevelt, Suzanne; Woldringh, Gwendolyn; van der Knaap, Marjo S; de Vries, Linda S; Mancini, Grazia M S

    2015-11-01

    Two proα1(IV) chains, encoded by COL4A1, form trimers that contain, in addition, a proα2(IV) chain encoded by COL4A2 and are the major component of the basement membrane in many tissues. Since 2005, COL4A1 mutations have been known as an autosomal dominant cause of hereditary porencephaly. COL4A1 and COL4A2 mutations have been reported with a broader spectrum of cerebrovascular, renal, ophthalmological, cardiac, and muscular abnormalities, indicated as "COL4A1 mutation-related disorders." Genetic counseling is challenging because of broad phenotypic variation and reduced penetrance. At the Erasmus University Medical Center, diagnostic DNA analysis of both COL4A1 and COL4A2 in 183 index patients was performed between 2005 and 2013. In total, 21 COL4A1 and 3 COL4A2 mutations were identified, mostly in children with porencephaly or other patterns of parenchymal hemorrhage, with a high de novo mutation rate of 40% (10/24). The observations in 13 novel families harboring either COL4A1 or COL4A2 mutations prompted us to review the clinical spectrum. We observed recognizable phenotypic patterns and propose a screening protocol at diagnosis. Our data underscore the importance of COL4A1 and COL4A2 mutations in cerebrovascular disease, also in sporadic patients. Follow-up da