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Sample records for aggressive disease phenotype

  1. Association of abnormal plasma bilirubin with aggressive hepatocellular carcinoma phenotype.

    PubMed

    Carr, Brian I; Guerra, Vito; Giannini, Edoardo G; Farinati, Fabio; Ciccarese, Francesca; Ludovico Rapaccini, Gian; Di Marco, Maria; Benvegnù, Luisa; Zoli, Marco; Borzio, Franco; Caturelli, Eugenio; Chiaramonte, Maria; Trevisani, Franco

    2014-04-01

    Cirrhosis-related abnormal liver function is associated with predisposition to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). It features in several HCC classification systems and is an HCC prognostic factor. The aim of the present study was to examine the phenotypic tumor differences in HCC patients with normal or abnormal plasma bilirubin levels. A 2,416-patient HCC cohort was studied and dichotomized into normal and abnormal plasma bilirubin groups. Their HCC characteristics were compared for tumor aggressiveness features, namely, blood alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) levels, tumor size, presence of portal vein thrombosis (PVT) and tumor multifocality. In the total cohort, elevated bilirubin levels were associated with higher AFP levels, increased PVT and multifocality, and lower survival, despite similar tumor sizes. When different tumor size terciles were compared, similar results were found, even among patients with small tumors. A multiple logistic regression model for PVT or tumor multifocality showed increased odds ratios for elevated levels of gamma glutamyl transpeptidase (GGTP), bilirubin, and AFP and for larger tumor sizes. We conclude that HCC patients with abnormal bilirubin levels had worse prognosis than patients with normal bilirubin. They also had an increased incidence of PVT and tumor multifocality, and higher AFP levels, in patients with both small and larger tumors. The results show an association between bilirubin levels and indices of HCC aggressiveness. PMID:24787296

  2. Vocalizations convey sex, seasonal phenotype, and aggression in a seasonal mammal.

    PubMed

    Rendon, Nikki M; Keesom, Sarah M; Amadi, Chima; Hurley, Laura M; Demas, Gregory E

    2015-12-01

    Seasonal variation in social behavior is often accompanied by seasonal variation in communication. In mammals, how seasonal environmental cues influence aggressive vocalizations remains underexplored. Photoperiod is the primary cue coordinating seasonal responses in most temperate zone animals, including Siberian hamsters (Phodopus sungorus), a species that undergoes reproductive inhibition and increased aggression in winter. During same-sex aggressive encounters, hamsters emit both broadband calls (BBCs) and ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs) that indicate aggression and the vocalizer's sex, respectively; however, it is not known whether these rodents adjust specific elements of their vocal repertoire to reflect their photoperiod-induced seasonal phenotypes. To address this, we recorded vocalizations emitted during dyadic interactions between male or female pairs of hamsters housed in long or short photoperiods and measured serum testosterone levels. USV emission rate remained stable across photoperiods, but proportional use of USV subtypes varied in novel ways: 'jump' USVs were sensitive to seasonal phenotype, but not the vocalizer's sex, whereas 'plain' USVs were sensitive only to the sex of the vocalizer. BBC emission rate varied with seasonal phenotype; short-day non-reproductive hamsters produced more BBCs and demonstrated increased aggression compared with reproductive hamsters. Testosterone, however, was not related to vocalization rates. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that changes in the vocal repertoire of Siberian hamsters reflect sex, aggression, and seasonal phenotype, suggesting that both BBCs and USVs are important signals used during same-sex social encounters. PMID:26386405

  3. Altering an extended phenotype reduces intraspecific male aggression and can maintain diversity in cichlid fish

    PubMed Central

    Croft, Guy E.; Joyce, Domino A.

    2013-01-01

    Reduced male aggression towards different phenotypes generating negative frequency-dependent intrasexual selection has been suggested as a mechanism to facilitate the invasion and maintenance of novel phenotypes in a population. To date, the best empirical evidence for the phenomenon has been provided by laboratory studies on cichlid fish with different colour polymorphisms. Here we experimentally tested the hypothesis in a natural population of Lake Malawi cichlid fish, in which males build sand-castles (bowers) to attract females during seasonal leks. We predicted that if bower shape plays an important role in male aggressive interactions, aggression among conspecific males should decrease when their bower shape is altered. Accordingly, we allocated randomly chosen bowers in a Nyassachromis cf. microcephalus lek into three treatments: control, manipulated to a different shape, and simulated manipulation. We then measured male behaviours and bower shape before and after these treatments. We found that once bower shape was altered, males were involved in significantly fewer aggressive interactions with conspecific males than before manipulation. Mating success was not affected. Our results support the idea that an extended phenotype, such as bower shape, can be important in maintaining polymorphic populations. Specifically, reduced male conspecific aggression towards males with different extended phenotypes (here, bower shapes) may cause negative frequency-dependent selection, allowing the invasion and establishment of a new phenotype (bower builder). This could help our understanding of mechanisms of diversification within populations, and in particular, the overall diversification of bower shapes within Lake Malawi cichlids. PMID:24349896

  4. Genetic architecture for human aggression: A study of gene-phenotype relationship in OMIM.

    PubMed

    Zhang-James, Yanli; Faraone, Stephen V

    2016-07-01

    Genetic studies of human aggression have mainly focused on known candidate genes and pathways regulating serotonin and dopamine signaling and hormonal functions. These studies have taught us much about the genetics of human aggression, but no genetic locus has yet achieved genome-significance. We here present a review based on a paradoxical hypothesis that studies of rare, functional genetic variations can lead to a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying complex multifactorial disorders such as aggression. We examined all aggression phenotypes catalogued in Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM), an Online Catalog of Human Genes and Genetic Disorders. We identified 95 human disorders that have documented aggressive symptoms in at least one individual with a well-defined genetic variant. Altogether, we retrieved 86 causal genes. Although most of these genes had not been implicated in human aggression by previous studies, the most significantly enriched canonical pathways had been previously implicated in aggression (e.g., serotonin and dopamine signaling). Our findings provide strong evidence to support the causal role of these pathways in the pathogenesis of aggression. In addition, the novel genes and pathways we identified suggest additional mechanisms underlying the origins of human aggression. Genome-wide association studies with very large samples will be needed to determine if common variants in these genes are risk factors for aggression. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26288127

  5. Iron induces cancer stem cells and aggressive phenotypes in human lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chanvorachote, Pithi; Luanpitpong, Sudjit

    2016-05-01

    Evidence has accumulated in support of the critical impact of cancer stem cells (CSCs) behind the chemotherapeutic failure, cancer metastasis, and subsequent disease recurrence and relapse, but knowledge of how CSCs are regulated is still limited. Redox status of the cells has been shown to dramatically influence cell signaling and CSC-like aggressive behaviors. Here, we investigated how subtoxic concentrations of iron, which have been found to specifically induce cellular hydroxyl radical, affected CSC-like subpopulations of human non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). We reveal for the first time that subchronic iron exposure and higher levels of hydroxyl radical correlated well with increased CSC-like phenotypes. The iron-exposed NSCLC H460 and H292 cells exhibited a remarkable increase in propensities to form CSC spheroids and to proliferate, migrate, and invade in parallel with an increase in level of a well-known CSC marker, ABCG2. We further observed that such phenotypic changes induced by iron were not related to an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Instead, the sex-determining region Y (SRY)-box 9 protein (SOX9) was substantially linked to iron treatment and hydroxyl radical level. Using gene manipulations, including ectopic SOX9 overexpression and SOX9 short hairpin RNA knockdown, we have verified that SOX9 is responsible for CSC enrichment mediated by iron. These findings indicate a novel role of iron via hydroxyl radical in CSC regulation and its importance in aggressive cancer behaviors and likely metastasis through SOX9 upregulation. PMID:26911281

  6. An anxiety-like phenotype in mice selectively bred for aggression

    PubMed Central

    Nehrenberg, Derrick L; Rodriguiz, Ramona M; Cyr, Michel; Zhang, Xiaodong; Lauder, Jean M; Gariépy, Jean-Louis; Wetsel, William C.

    2013-01-01

    Using selective bi-directional breeding procedures, two different lines of mice were developed. The NC900 line is highly reactive and attacks their social partners without provocation, whereas aggression in NC100 animals is uncommon in social environments. The enhanced reactivity of NC900 mice suggests that emotionality may have been selected with aggression. As certain forms of anxiety promote exaggerated defensive responses, we tested NC900 mice for the presence of an anxiety-like phenotype. In the open field, light-dark exploration, and zero maze tests, NC900 mice displayed anxiety-like responses. These animals were less responsive to the anxiolytic actions of diazepam in the zero maze than NC100 animals; diazepam also reduced the reactivity and attack behaviors of NC900 mice. The NC900 mice had reduced diazepam-sensitive GABAA receptor binding in brain regions associated with aggression and anxiety. Importantly, there was a selective reduction in levels of the GABAA receptor α2 subunit protein in NC900 frontal cortex and amygdala; no changes in α1 or γ2 subunit proteins were observed. These findings suggest that reductions in the α2 subunit protein in selected brain regions may underlie the anxiety and aggressive phenotype of NC900 mice. Since anxiety and aggression are comorbid in certain psychiatric conditions, such as borderline personality and posttraumatic stress disorder, investigations with NC900 mice may provide new insights into basic mechanisms that underlie these and related psychiatric conditions. PMID:19428632

  7. An anxiety-like phenotype in mice selectively bred for aggression.

    PubMed

    Nehrenberg, Derrick L; Rodriguiz, Ramona M; Cyr, Michel; Zhang, Xiaodong; Lauder, Jean M; Gariépy, Jean-Louis; Wetsel, William C

    2009-07-19

    Using selective bi-directional breeding procedures, two different lines of mice were developed. The NC900 line is highly reactive and attacks their social partners without provocation, whereas aggression in NC100 animals is uncommon in social environments. The enhanced reactivity of NC900 mice suggests that emotionality may have been selected with aggression. As certain forms of anxiety promote exaggerated defensive responses, we tested NC900 mice for the presence of an anxiety-like phenotype. In the open field, light-dark exploration, and zero maze tests, NC900 mice displayed anxiety-like responses. These animals were less responsive to the anxiolytic actions of diazepam in the zero maze than NC100 animals; diazepam also reduced the reactivity and attack behaviors of NC900 mice. The NC900 mice had reduced diazepam-sensitive GABA(A) receptor binding in brain regions associated with aggression and anxiety. Importantly, there was a selective reduction in levels of the GABA(A) receptor alpha(2) subunit protein in NC900 frontal cortex and amygdala; no changes in alpha(1) or gamma(2) subunit proteins were observed. These findings suggest that reductions in the alpha(2) subunit protein in selected brain regions may underlie the anxiety and aggressive phenotype of NC900 mice. Since anxiety and aggression are comorbid in certain psychiatric conditions, such as borderline personality and posttraumatic stress disorder, investigations with NC900 mice may provide new insights into basic mechanisms that underlie these and related psychiatric conditions. PMID:19428632

  8. The Human Phenotypic Disease Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidalgo, Cesar; Blumm, Nicholas; Barabasi, Albert-Laszlo; Christakis, Nicholas

    2008-03-01

    We study the evolution of patient illness using a network summarizing the disease associations extracted from 32 million Medicare claims recorded from 13 million elders using the ICD9-CM format. We find that the evolution of patients' illness is accurately described by a process in which once a patient develops a particular disease, subsequent disease are seen to occur among diseases lying close by in the network. In addition, we find that patients affected with diseases with high network connectivity are more likely to die during a follow-up period of eight years.

  9. Phenotype Standardization for Drug Induced Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Ravindra L; Awdishu, Linda; Davenport, Andrew; Murray, Patrick; Macedo, Etienne; Cerda, Jorge; Chakaravarthi, Raj; Holden, Arthur; Goldstein, Stuart L.

    2015-01-01

    Drug induced kidney disease is a frequent cause of renal dysfunction; however, there are no standards to identify and characterize the spectrum of these disorders. We convened a panel of international, adult and pediatric, nephrologists and pharmacists to develop standardized phenotypes for drug induced kidney disease as part of the phenotype standardization project initiated by the International Serious Adverse Events Consortium. We propose four phenotypes of drug induced kidney disease based on clinical presentation: acute kidney injury, glomerular, tubular and nephrolithiasis, along with primary and secondary clinical criteria to support the phenotype definition, and a time course based on the KDIGO/AKIN definitions of acute kidney injury, acute kidney disease and chronic kidney disease. Establishing causality in drug induced kidney disease is challenging and requires knowledge of the biological plausibility for the specific drug, mechanism of injury, time course and assessment of competing risk factors. These phenotypes provide a consistent framework for clinicians, investigators, industry and regulatory agencies to evaluate drug nephrotoxicity across various settings. We believe that this is first step to recognizing drug induced kidney disease and developing strategies to prevent and manage this condition. PMID:25853333

  10. Elevated expression of Thoc1 is associated with aggressive phenotype and poor prognosis in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chenchen; Yue, Ben; Yuan, Chenwei; Zhao, Senlin; Fang, Changyi; Yu, Yang; Yan, Dongwang

    The THO complex 1 (Thoc1) is a nuclear matrix protein playing vital roles in transcription elongation and mRNA export. Recently, aberrant expression of Thoc1 has been reported in an increasing array of tumor types. However, the clinical significance of Thoc1 expression in colorectal cancer (CRC) is still unknown. The present study aimed to characterize the expression of Thoc1 in human CRC and evaluate its clinical significance. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and Western blotting analyses showed that the mRNA and protein expression of Thoc1 in CRC specimens was significantly higher than that in adjacent normal colon mucosae. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) was conducted to characterize the expression pattern of Thoc1 in 185 archived paraffin-embedded CRC specimens. Statistical analyses revealed that high levels of Thoc1 expression were associated with the clinical stages and tumor differentiation. CRC patients with high levels of Thoc1 expression had poorer overall-survival and disease-free survival, whereas those with lower levels of Thoc1 expression survived longer. Furthermore, multivariate Cox regression analyses demonstrated that Thoc1 expression remained an independent prognostic factor for increased disease recurrence and decreased survival. Our results suggest for the first time that Thoc1 is involved in the development and progression of CRC, and elevated expression of Thoc1 is associated with aggressive phenotype and poor prognosis in CRC. These findings may prove to be clinically useful for developing a new therapeutic target of CRC treatment. PMID:26545775

  11. Urinary volatile compounds differ across reproductive phenotypes and following aggression in male Siberian hamsters.

    PubMed

    Rendon, Nikki M; Soini, Helena A; Scotti, Melissa-Ann L; Novotny, Milos V; Demas, Gregory E

    2016-10-01

    Chemical communication plays an integral role in social behavior by facilitating social encounters, allowing for the evaluation of social partners, defining territories and advertising information such as species and sex. Odors provide information about the social environment for rodents and other mammals; however, studies identifying chemical compounds and their functions have thus far focused primarily on a few species. In addition, considerably less attention has been focused on how environmental factors and behavioral context alter these compounds during periods of reproductive quiescence. We examined the effects of photoperiod and social context on chemical communication in the seasonally breeding Siberian hamster which displays modest territorial aggression during long "summer-like" days, but increased aggression in short "winter-like" days. We collected urine samples from long- and short-day male hamsters to investigate how photoperiod and subsequent changes in reproductive phenotype alter urinary volatile compound profiles. Next, we identified changes in urinary compounds before and after an aggressive encounter. Male hamsters exhibited a diverse urinary profile across photoperiods; however, long-day reproductive males showed higher levels of individual compounds when compared to short-day non-reproductive males. In addition, individual compounds were altered following an aggressive encounter; some changed only in long days whereas others changed regardless of photoperiod. Further, aggression and circulating levels of testosterone were positively correlated with urinary compounds in long-, but not short-day males. These findings suggest both photoperiod- and aggression-specific physiological regulation of urinary compounds in this species and contribute to a greater understanding of chemical communication more broadly. PMID:27212202

  12. Behavioural phenotypes predict disease susceptibility and infectiousness.

    PubMed

    Araujo, Alessandra; Kirschman, Lucas; Warne, Robin W

    2016-08-01

    Behavioural phenotypes may provide a means for identifying individuals that disproportionally contribute to disease spread and epizootic outbreaks. For example, bolder phenotypes may experience greater exposure and susceptibility to pathogenic infection because of distinct interactions with conspecifics and their environment. We tested the value of behavioural phenotypes in larval amphibians for predicting ranavirus transmission in experimental trials. We found that behavioural phenotypes characterized by latency-to-food and swimming profiles were predictive of disease susceptibility and infectiousness defined as the capacity of an infected host to transmit an infection by contacts. While viral shedding rates were positively associated with transmission, we also found an inverse relationship between contacts and infections. Together these results suggest intrinsic traits that influence behaviour and the quantity of pathogens shed during conspecific interactions may be an important contributor to ranavirus transmission. These results suggest that behavioural phenotypes provide a means to identify individuals more likely to spread disease and thus give insights into disease outbreaks that threaten wildlife and humans. PMID:27555652

  13. Fructose as a carbon source induces an aggressive phenotype in MDA-MB-468 breast tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    MONZAVI-KARBASSI, BEHJATOLAH; HINE, R. JEAN; STANLEY, JOSEPH S.; RAMANI, VISHNU PRAKASH; CARCEL-TRULLOLS, JAIME; WHITEHEAD, TRACY L.; KELLY, THOMAS; SIEGEL, ERIC R.; ARTAUD, CECILE; SHAAF, SAEID; SAHA, RINKU; JOUSHEGHANY, FARIBA; HENRY-TILLMAN, RONDA; KIEBER-EMMONS, THOMAS

    2012-01-01

    Aberrant glycosylation is a universal feature of cancer cells, and certain glycan structures are well-known markers for tumor progression. Availability and composition of sugars in the microenvironment may affect cell glycosylation. Recent studies of human breast tumor cell lines indicate their ability to take up and utilize fructose. Here we tested the hypothesis that adding fructose to culture as a carbon source induces phenotypic changes in cultured human breast tumor cells that are associated with metastatic disease. MDA-MB-468 cells were adapted to culture media in which fructose was substituted for glucose. Changes in cell surface glycan structures, expression of genes related to glycan assembly, cytoskeleton F-actin, migration, adhesion and invasion were determined. Cells cultured in fructose expressed distinct cell-surface glycans. The addition of fructose affected sialylation and fucosylation patterns. Fructose feeding also increased binding of leukoagglutinating Phaseolus vulgaris isolectin, suggesting a possible rise in expression of branching β-1, 6 GlcNAc structures. Rhodamine-phalloidin staining revealed an altered F-actin cytoskeletal system. Fructose accelerated cellular migration and increased invasion. These data suggest that changing the carbon source of the less aggressive MDA-MB-468 cell line induced characteristics associated with more aggressive phenotypes. These data could be of fundamental importance due to the markedly increased consumption of sweeteners containing free fructose in recent years, as they suggest that the presence of fructose in nutritional micro-environment of tumor cells may negatively affect the outcome for some breast cancer patients. PMID:20664930

  14. Fructose as a carbon source induces an aggressive phenotype in MDA-MB-468 breast tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Monzavi-Karbassi, Behjatolah; Hine, R Jean; Stanley, Joseph S; Ramani, Vishnu Prakash; Carcel-Trullols, Jaime; Whitehead, Tracy L; Kelly, Thomas; Siegel, Eric R; Artaud, Cecile; Shaaf, Saeid; Saha, Rinku; Jousheghany, Fariba; Henry-Tillman, Ronda; Kieber-Emmons, Thomas

    2010-09-01

    Aberrant glycosylation is a universal feature of cancer cells, and certain glycan structures are well-known markers for tumor progression. Availability and composition of sugars in the microenvironment may affect cell glycosylation. Recent studies of human breast tumor cell lines indicate their ability to take up and utilize fructose. Here we tested the hypothesis that adding fructose to culture as a carbon source induces phenotypic changes in cultured human breast tumor cells that are associated with metastatic disease. MDA-MB-468 cells were adapted to culture media in which fructose was substituted for glucose. Changes in cell surface glycan structures, expression of genes related to glycan assembly, cytoskeleton F-actin, migration, adhesion and invasion were determined. Cells cultured in fructose expressed distinct cell-surface glycans. The addition of fructose affected sialylation and fucosylation patterns. Fructose feeding also increased binding of leukoagglutinating Phaseolus vulgaris isolectin, suggesting a possible rise in expression of branching beta-1, 6 GlcNAc structures. Rhodamine-phalloidin staining revealed an altered F-actin cytoskeletal system. Fructose accelerated cellular migration and increased invasion. These data suggest that changing the carbon source of the less aggressive MDA-MB-468 cell line induced characteristics associated with more aggressive phenotypes. These data could be of fundamental importance due to the markedly increased consumption of sweeteners containing free fructose in recent years, as they suggest that the presence of fructose in nutritional microenvironment of tumor cells may negatively affect the outcome for some breast cancer patients. PMID:20664930

  15. Breast cancer cells mechanosensing in engineered matrices: Correlation with aggressive phenotype.

    PubMed

    Li, Ji; Wu, Yang; Schimmel, Nicholas; Al-Ameen, Mohammad Ali; Ghosh, Gargi

    2016-08-01

    The pathogenesis of cancer is often driven by the modulation of the tumor microenvironment. Recent reports have highlighted that the progressive stiffening of tumor matrix is crucial for malignant transformation. Though extensive work has been done analyzing the mechanotransductive signals involved in tumor progression, it is still not clear whether the stiffness induced changes in cancer cell behavior is conserved across the invasive/aggressive phenotype of cells. Here, we used synthetic hydrogel based cell culture platform to correlate the aggressive potential of the breast cancer cells to the responses to matrix stiffness. The cellular functions such as proliferation, migration, and angiogenic capability were characterized. We report that the proliferation and motility of the highly aggressive cell line MDA-MB-231 increased with increase in matrix rigidity. We also demonstrated for the first time that the change in matrix stiffness stimulated the angiogenic activity of these cells as manifested from enhanced expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Inhibition of actomyosin contractility attenuated proliferation of MDA-MB-231 cells on stiff matrices while promoted the growth on soft gels. In addition, the release of VEGF was reduced upon inhibition of contractility. The less and non-aggressive breast cancer cells, SKBr3 and MCF-7 respectively displayed less dependency on matrix stiffness. PMID:26874251

  16. Eosinophilic phenotypes of airway disease.

    PubMed

    Pavord, Ian D

    2013-12-01

    Our understanding of the clinical implications of eosinophilic airway inflammation has increased significantly over the last 20 years, aided by the development of noninvasive means to assess it. This pattern of airway inflammation can occur in a diverse range of airway diseases. It is associated with a positive response to corticosteroids and a high risk of preventable exacerbations. Our new understanding of the role of eosinophilic airway inflammation has paved the way for the clinical development of a number of more specific inhibitors that may become new treatment options. Different definitions, ideas of disease, and adoption of biomarkers that are not well known are necessary to fully realize the potential of these treatments. PMID:24313765

  17. The ETS family member GABPα modulates androgen receptor signalling and mediates an aggressive phenotype in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Naomi L.; Massie, Charlie E.; Butter, Falk; Mann, Matthias; Bon, Helene; Ramos-Montoya, Antonio; Menon, Suraj; Stark, Rory; Lamb, Alastair D.; Scott, Helen E.; Warren, Anne Y.; Neal, David E.; Mills, Ian G.

    2014-01-01

    In prostate cancer (PC), the androgen receptor (AR) is a key transcription factor at all disease stages, including the advanced stage of castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). In the present study, we show that GABPα, an ETS factor that is up-regulated in PC, is an AR-interacting transcription factor. Expression of GABPα enables PC cell lines to acquire some of the molecular and cellular characteristics of CRPC tissues as well as more aggressive growth phenotypes. GABPα has a transcriptional role that dissects the overlapping cistromes of the two most common ETS gene fusions in PC: overlapping significantly with ETV1 but not with ERG target genes. GABPα bound predominantly to gene promoters, regulated the expression of one-third of AR target genes and modulated sensitivity to AR antagonists in hormone responsive and castrate resistant PC models. This study supports a critical role for GABPα in CRPC and reveals potential targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:24753418

  18. Aberrant phenotypes in Kikuchi’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Xue-Jing; Zhou, Xiao-Ge; Xie, Jian-Lan; Zheng, Xiao-Dan; Zheng, Yuan-Yuan

    2014-01-01

    Initial reports emphasized the immunophenotypic similarities between benign and malignant T cell populations, while some previous studies indicating that aberrant T-cell antigen loss is a good marker for detecting malignant T-cell proliferation. Recently, we found a very interesting and thought-provoking phenomenon: In benign disease-28 of 38 (73.7%) cases of Kikuchi’s disease also showed aberrant phenotypes with loss of pan-T cell antigens, which makes the differential diagnosis between Kikuchi’s disease and T cell lymphoma more challenging. In our study, 38 cases of Kikuchi’s disease and 30 cases of reactive lymphoid hyperplasia (RLH) were studied by EliVision immunohistochemical staining. As well as TCR gene rearrangement using PCR was negative in 10 tested cases of the Kikuchi’s disease. Among these cases, the most common antigen deficiency was CD5 (22 cases), then CD7 (11 cases), CD2 (8 cases) and CD3 (2 cases). Compared with proliferative and xanthomatous types of Kikuchi’s disease, antigens tended to be lost in necrotizing type. Based on follow-up data, a correlation was not found between the occurrence of aberrant phenotypes and prognosis. In RLH, obvious pan-T cell antigen loss was also not found. In conclusion, this is the first study to demonstrate distinct patterns of antigen loss in Kikuchi’s disease, suggesting that T cell antigen loss is not reliable as an auxiliary diagnostic standard for T cell lymphoma. PMID:25337197

  19. A testosterone-related structural brain phenotype predicts aggressive behavior from childhood to adulthood.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tuong-Vi; McCracken, James T; Albaugh, Matthew D; Botteron, Kelly N; Hudziak, James J; Ducharme, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Structural covariance, the examination of anatomic correlations between brain regions, has emerged recently as a valid and useful measure of developmental brain changes. Yet the exact biological processes leading to changes in covariance, and the relation between such covariance and behavior, remain largely unexplored. The steroid hormone testosterone represents a compelling mechanism through which this structural covariance may be developmentally regulated in humans. Although steroid hormone receptors can be found throughout the central nervous system, the amygdala represents a key target for testosterone-specific effects, given its high density of androgen receptors. In addition, testosterone has been found to impact cortical thickness (CTh) across the whole brain, suggesting that it may also regulate the structural relationship, or covariance, between the amygdala and CTh. Here, we examined testosterone-related covariance between amygdala volumes and whole-brain CTh, as well as its relationship to aggression levels, in a longitudinal sample of children, adolescents, and young adults 6-22 years old. We found: (1) testosterone-specific modulation of the covariance between the amygdala and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC); (2) a significant relationship between amygdala-mPFC covariance and levels of aggression; and (3) mediation effects of amygdala-mPFC covariance on the relationship between testosterone and aggression. These effects were independent of sex, age, pubertal stage, estradiol levels and anxious-depressed symptoms. These findings are consistent with prior evidence that testosterone targets the neural circuits regulating affect and impulse regulation, and show, for the first time in humans, how androgen-dependent organizational effects may regulate a very specific, aggression-related structural brain phenotype from childhood to young adulthood. PMID:26431805

  20. EXCEPTIONAL AGGRESSIVENESS OF CEREBRAL CAVERNOUS MALFORMATION DISEASE ASSOCIATED WITH PDCD10 MUTATIONS

    PubMed Central

    Rebeiz, Tania; Stockton, Rebecca A.; McDonald, David A.; Mikati, Abdul Ghani; Zhang, Lingjiao; Austin, Cecilia; Akers, Amy L.; Gallione, Carol J.; Rorrer, Autumn; Gunel, Murat; Min, Wang; De Souza, Jorge Marcondes; Lee, Connie

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The phenotypic manifestations of cerebral cavernous malformation (CCM) disease caused by rare PDCD10 mutations have not been systematically examined, and a mechanistic link to Rho kinase (ROCK) mediated hyperpermeability, a potential therapeutic target, has not been established. Methods We analyze PDCD10-siRNA treated endothelial cells for stress fibers, ROCK activity and permeability. ROCK activity is assessed in CCM lesions. Brain permeability and CCM lesion burden is quantified, and clinical manifestations are assessed in prospectively enrolled subjects with PDCD10 mutations. Results We determine that PDCD10 protein suppresses endothelial stress fibers, ROCK activity and permeability in vitro. Pdcd10 heterozygous mice have greater lesion burden than other Ccm genotypes. We demonstrate robust ROCK activity in murine and human CCM vasculature, and increased brain vascular permeability in humans with PDCD10 mutation. Clinical phenotype is exceptionally aggressive compared to the more common KRIT1 and CCM2 familial and sporadic CCM, with greater lesion burden and more frequent hemorrhages earlier in life. We first report other phenotypic features including scoliosis, cognitive disability and skin lesions, unrelated to lesion burden or bleeding. Conclusion These findings define a unique CCM disease with exceptional aggressiveness, and they inform preclinical therapeutic testing, clinical counseling and the design of trials. PMID:25122144

  1. Rat Prostate Tumor Cells Progress in the Bone Microenvironment to a Highly Aggressive Phenotype1

    PubMed Central

    Bergström, Sofia Halin; Rudolfsson, Stina H; Bergh, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer generally metastasizes to bone, and most patients have tumor cells in their bone marrow already at diagnosis. Tumor cells at the metastatic site may therefore progress in parallel with those in the primary tumor. Androgen deprivation therapy is often the first-line treatment for clinically detectable prostate cancer bone metastases. Although the treatment is effective, most metastases progress to a castration-resistant and lethal state. To examine metastatic progression in the bone microenvironment, we implanted androgen-sensitive, androgen receptor–positive, and relatively slow-growing Dunning G (G) rat prostate tumor cells into the tibial bone marrow of fully immune-competent Copenhagen rats. We show that tumor establishment in the bone marrow was reduced compared with the prostate, and whereas androgen deprivation did not affect tumor establishment or growth in the bone, this was markedly reduced in the prostate. Moreover, we found that, with time, G tumor cells in the bone microenvironment progress to a more aggressive phenotype with increased growth rate, reduced androgen sensitivity, and increased metastatic capacity. Tumor cells in the bone marrow encounter lower androgen levels and a higher degree of hypoxia than at the primary site, which may cause high selective pressures and eventually contribute to the development of a new and highly aggressive tumor cell phenotype. It is therefore important to specifically study progression in bone metastases. This tumor model could be used to increase our understanding of how tumor cells adapt in the bone microenvironment and may subsequently improve therapy strategies for prostate metastases in bone. PMID:26992916

  2. IMP2/p62 induces genomic instability and an aggressive hepatocellular carcinoma phenotype.

    PubMed

    Kessler, S M; Laggai, S; Barghash, A; Schultheiss, C S; Lederer, E; Artl, M; Helms, V; Haybaeck, J; Kiemer, A K

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) represents the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths and commonly develops in inflammatory environments. The IGF2 mRNA-binding protein IMP2-2/IGF2BP2-2/p62 was originally identified as an autoantigen in HCC. Aim of this study was to investigate a potential pathophysiological role of p62 in hepatocarcinogenesis. Human HCC tissue showed overexpression of IMP2, which strongly correlated with the fetal markers AFP and DLK1/Pref-1/FA-1 and was particularly elevated in tumors with stem-like features and hypervascularization. Molecular classification of IMP2-overexpressing tumors revealed an aggressive phenotype. Livers of mice overexpressing the IMP2 splice variant p62 highly expressed the stem cell marker DLK1 and secreted DLK1 into the blood. p62 was oncogenic: diethylnitrosamine (DEN)-treated p62 transgenic mice exhibited a higher tumor incidence and multiplicity than wild types. Tumors of transgenics showed a more aggressive and stem-like phenotype and displayed more oncogenic chromosomal aberrations determined with aCGH analysis. DEN-treated p62 transgenic mice exhibited distinct signs of inflammation, such as inflammatory cytokine expression and oxidative stress markers, that is, thiobarbituric acid-reactive substance (TBARS) levels. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was elevated in HepG2 cells, which either overexpressed p62 or were treated with DLK1. p62 induced this ROS production by a DLK1-dependent induction and activation of the small Rho-GTPase RAC1, activating NADPH oxidase and being overexpressed in human HCC. Our data indicate that p62/IMP2 promotes hepatocarcinogenesis by an amplification of inflammation. PMID:26426686

  3. IMP2/p62 induces genomic instability and an aggressive hepatocellular carcinoma phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Kessler, S M; Laggai, S; Barghash, A; Schultheiss, C S; Lederer, E; Artl, M; Helms, V; Haybaeck, J; Kiemer, A K

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) represents the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths and commonly develops in inflammatory environments. The IGF2 mRNA-binding protein IMP2-2/IGF2BP2-2/p62 was originally identified as an autoantigen in HCC. Aim of this study was to investigate a potential pathophysiological role of p62 in hepatocarcinogenesis. Human HCC tissue showed overexpression of IMP2, which strongly correlated with the fetal markers AFP and DLK1/Pref-1/FA-1 and was particularly elevated in tumors with stem-like features and hypervascularization. Molecular classification of IMP2-overexpressing tumors revealed an aggressive phenotype. Livers of mice overexpressing the IMP2 splice variant p62 highly expressed the stem cell marker DLK1 and secreted DLK1 into the blood. p62 was oncogenic: diethylnitrosamine (DEN)-treated p62 transgenic mice exhibited a higher tumor incidence and multiplicity than wild types. Tumors of transgenics showed a more aggressive and stem-like phenotype and displayed more oncogenic chromosomal aberrations determined with aCGH analysis. DEN-treated p62 transgenic mice exhibited distinct signs of inflammation, such as inflammatory cytokine expression and oxidative stress markers, that is, thiobarbituric acid-reactive substance (TBARS) levels. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was elevated in HepG2 cells, which either overexpressed p62 or were treated with DLK1. p62 induced this ROS production by a DLK1-dependent induction and activation of the small Rho-GTPase RAC1, activating NADPH oxidase and being overexpressed in human HCC. Our data indicate that p62/IMP2 promotes hepatocarcinogenesis by an amplification of inflammation. PMID:26426686

  4. Aggressive blood pressure control for chronic kidney disease unmasks moyamoya!

    PubMed Central

    Davis, T. Keefe; Halabi, Carmen M.; Siefken, Philp; Karmarkar, Swati; Leonard, Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    Hypertensive crises in children or adolescents are rare, but chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a major risk factor for occurrence. Vesicoureteral reflux nephropathy is a common cause of pediatric renal failure and is associated with hypertension. Aggressive blood pressure (BP) control has been shown to delay progression of CKD and treatment is targeted for the 50th percentile for height when compared with a target below the 90th percentile for the general pediatric hypertensive patient. We present a case of an adolescent presenting with seizures and renal failure due to a hypertensive crisis. Hypertension was thought to be secondary to CKD as she had scarred echogenic kidneys due to known reflux nephropathy. However, aggressive BP treatment improved kidney function which is inconsistent with CKD from reflux nephropathy. Secondly, aggressive BP control caused transient neurological symptoms. Further imaging identified moyamoya disease. We present this case to highlight the consideration of moyamoya as a diagnosis in the setting of renal failure and hypertensive crisis. PMID:26064513

  5. Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition Phenotype Is Associated with Clinicopathological Factors That Indicate Aggressive Biological Behavior and Poor Clinical Outcomes in Invasive Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jung Eun; Kang, Su Hwan; Lee, Soo Jung

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Cancer tissue may display a wide spectrum of expression phenotypes of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-related proteins. The purpose of this study was to investigate the clinical significance of EMT phenotypes in breast cancer. Methods We evaluated the expression pattern of the EMT-related proteins E-cadherin and fibronectin in samples from 1,495 patients with invasive breast carcinoma (IBC) on tissue microarrays using immunohistochemistry to investigate the clinical significance of EMT phenotypes in IBC. EMT phenotypes were divided into complete type (E-cadherin-negative/fibronectin-positive), incomplete type (hybrid type, E-cadherinpositive/fibronectin-positive; null type, E-cadherin-negative/fibronectin-negative), and wild-type (E-cadherin-positive/fibronectin-negative). We analyzed the correlation of EMT phenotype with clinicopathological factors and patient survival. Results Loss of E-cadherin was observed in 302 patients (20.2%), and fibronectin was expressed in the cancer cells of 354 patients (23.7%). In total, 64 (4.3%), 290 (19.4%), 238 (15.9%), and 903 (60.4%) samples were categorized as complete, hybrid, null, and wild-type, respectively. The complete EMT phenotype exhibited significant associations with young age (p=0.017), advanced pT (p<0.001) and pN (p<0.001) stages, higher histological grade (p<0.001), lymphovascular invasion (p<0.001), and triple negativity (p<0.001). Patients with complete and hybrid EMT phenotypes had poorer overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) than those with the wild-type phenotype (OS, p=0.001; DFS, p<0.001). In multivariate analysis, the hybrid EMT phenotype was an independent prognostic factor for DFS in patients with IBC (p=0.032). Conclusion EMT phenotypes exhibited significant associations with clinicopathological factors indicating aggressive biologic behavior and poor outcome in patients with IBC. PMID:26472976

  6. Targeting ID2 expression triggers a more differentiated phenotype and reduces aggressiveness in human salivary gland cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Sumida, Tomoki; Ishikawa, Akiko; Nakano, Hiroyuki; Yamada, Tomohiro; Mori, Yoshihide; Desprez, Pierre-Yves

    2016-08-01

    Inhibitors of DNA-binding (ID) proteins are negative regulators of basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors and generally stimulate cell proliferation and inhibit differentiation. We previously determined that ID1 was highly expressed in aggressive salivary gland cancer (SGC) cells in culture. Here, we show that ID2 is also expressed in aggressive SGC cells. ID2 knockdown triggers important changes in cell behavior, that is, it significantly reduces the expression of N-cadherin, vimentin and Snail, induces E-cadherin expression and leads to a more differentiated phenotype exemplified by changes in cell shape. Moreover, ID2 knockdown almost completely suppresses invasion and the expression of matrix metalloproteinase 9. In conclusion, ID2 expression maintains an aggressive phenotype in SGC cells, and ID2 repression triggers a reduction in cell aggressiveness. ID2 therefore represents a potential therapeutic target during SGC progression. ID proteins are negative regulators of basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors and generally stimulate cell proliferation and inhibit differentiation. ID2 knockdown triggers important changes in cell behavior, that is, it significantly reduces the expression of N-cadherin, vimentin and Snail, induces E-cadherin expression and leads to a more differentiated phenotype exemplified by changes in cell shape. ID2 therefore represents a potential therapeutic target during SGC progression. PMID:27364596

  7. Continuity of aggressive antisocial behavior from childhood to adulthood: The question of phenotype definition.

    PubMed

    Hofvander, Björn; Ossowski, Daniel; Lundström, Sebastian; Anckarsäter, Henrik

    2009-01-01

    Aiming to clarify the adult phenotype of antisocial personality disorder (ASPD), the empirical literature on its childhood background among the disruptive behaviour disorders, such as attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (AD/HD), oppositional defiant disorder (ODD), conduct disorder (CD), or hyperkinetic conduct disorder (HKCD), was reviewed according to the Robins and Guze criteria for nosological validity. At least half of hyperactive children develop ODD and about a third CD (i.e. AD/HD+CD or HKCD) before puberty. About half of children with this combined problem constellation develop antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) in adulthood. Family and adoption/twin studies indicate that AD/HD and CD share a high heritability and that, in addition, there may be specific environmental effects for criminal behaviours. "Zones of rarity" delineating the disorders from each other, or from the normal variation, have not been identified. Neurophysiology, brain imaging, neurochemistry, neurocognition, or molecular genetics have not provided "external validity" for any of the diagnostic categories used today. Deficient mental functions, such as inattention, poor executive functions, poor verbal learning, and impaired social interaction (empathy), seem to form unspecific susceptibility factors. As none of today's proposed syndromes (e.g. AD/HD or psychopathy) seems to describe a natural category, a dimensional behavioural phenotype reflecting aggressive antisocial behaviours assessed by numbers of behaviours, the severity of their consequences and how early is their age at onset, which will be closely related to childhood hyperactivity, would bring conceptual clarity, and may form the basis for further probing into mental, cognitive, biological and treatment-related co-varying features. PMID:19428109

  8. Preventing aggressive prostate cancer with proven cardiovascular disease preventive methods.

    PubMed

    Moyad, Mark A

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) has been the number one cause of death in the U.S. for 114 of the last 115 years. Risk factors for prostate cancer have primarily mirrored risk proven risk factors for CVD, especially aggressive disease. Obesity, dyslipidemia, glucose intolerance, metabolic syndrome, unhealthy dietary habits or caloric excess, lack of physical activity, and inflammation are just some of these shared risk factors. The evidence also suggests proven CVD preventive measures are identical to prostate cancer preventive measures, especially in regard to aggressive disease. Thus, apart from lifestyle measures that can encourage optimal heart and prostate health there are potentially several dietary supplements that need to be avoided in healthy men because they may also increase the risk of prostate cancer. However, there are also several low-cost, generic, safe in the appropriate individuals, and naturally derived agents that could reduce prostate cancer risk, and these can be discussed and remembered utilizing the acronym S.A.M. (statins, aspirin, and/or metformin). PMID:26112486

  9. A Comprehensive Evaluation of Disease Phenotype Networks for Gene Prioritization

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jianhua; Lin, Xiaoyan; Teng, Yueyang; Qi, Shouliang; Xiao, Dayu; Zhang, Jianying; Kang, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Identification of disease-causing genes is a fundamental challenge for human health studies. The phenotypic similarity among diseases may reflect the interactions at the molecular level, and phenotype comparison can be used to predict disease candidate genes. Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) is a database of human genetic diseases and related genes that has become an authoritative source of disease phenotypes. However, disease phenotypes have been described by free text; thus, standardization of phenotypic descriptions is needed before diseases can be compared. Several disease phenotype networks have been established in OMIM using different standardization methods. Two of these networks are important for phenotypic similarity analysis: the first and most commonly used network (mimMiner) is standardized by medical subject heading, and the other network (resnikHPO) is the first to be standardized by human phenotype ontology. This paper comprehensively evaluates for the first time the accuracy of these two networks in gene prioritization based on protein–protein interactions using large-scale, leave-one-out cross-validation experiments. The results show that both networks can effectively prioritize disease-causing genes, and the approach that relates two diseases using a logistic function improves prioritization performance. Tanimoto, one of four methods for normalizing resnikHPO, generates a symmetric network and it performs similarly to mimMiner. Furthermore, an integration of these two networks outperforms either network alone in gene prioritization, indicating that these two disease networks are complementary. PMID:27415759

  10. Targeting Androgen Receptor/Src Complex Impairs the Aggressive Phenotype of Human Fibrosarcoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Di Donato, Marzia; Hayashi, Ryo; Arra, Claudio; Appella, Ettore; Auricchio, Ferdinando; Migliaccio, Antimo

    2013-01-01

    Background Hormones and growth factors influence the proliferation and invasiveness of human mesenchymal tumors. The highly aggressive human fibrosarcoma HT1080 cell line harbors classical androgen receptor (AR) that responds to androgens triggering cell migration in the absence of significant mitogenesis. As occurs in many human cancer cells, HT1080 cells also express epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Experimental Findings: We report that the pure anti-androgen Casodex inhibits the growth of HT1080 cell xenografts in immune-depressed mice, revealing a novel role of AR in fibrosarcoma progression. In HT1080 cultured cells EGF, but not androgens, robustly increases DNA synthesis. Casodex abolishes the EGF mitogenic effect, implying a crosstalk between EGFR and AR. The mechanism underlying this crosstalk has been analyzed using an AR-derived small peptide, S1, which prevents AR/Src tyrosine kinase association and androgen-dependent Src activation. Present findings show that in HT1080 cells EGF induces AR/Src Association, and the S1 peptide abolishes both the assembly of this complex and Src activation. The S1 peptide inhibits EGF-stimulated DNA synthesis, cell matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) secretion and invasiveness of HT1080 cells. Both Casodex and S1 peptide also prevent DNA synthesis and migration triggered by EGF in various human cancer-derived cells (prostate, breast, colon and pancreas) that express AR. Conclusion This study shows that targeting the AR domain involved in AR/Src association impairs EGF signaling in human fibrosarcoma HT1080 cells. The EGF-elicited processes inhibited by the peptide (DNA synthesis, MMP-9 secretion and invasiveness) cooperate in increasing the aggressive phenotype of HT1080 cells. Therefore, AR represents a new potential therapeutic target in human fibrosarcoma, as supported by Casodex inhibition of HT1080 cell xenografts. The extension of these findings in various human cancer-derived cell lines highlights the

  11. BRCA-associated protein 1 mutant cholangiocarcinoma: an aggressive disease subtype

    PubMed Central

    Al-Shamsi, Humaid O.; Anand, Deepa; Shroff, Rachna T.; Jain, Apurva; Zuo, Mingxin; Conrad, Claudius; Vauthey, Jean-Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Background BRCA-associated protein 1, an enzyme encoded by the BAP1 gene, is commonly mutated in uveal melanoma, mesothelioma, and renal cancers. Tumors with BAP1 mutation follow an aggressive course. BAP1 mutations have also been observed in cholangiocarcinoma (CCA). The clinical phenotype of BAP1 mutant CCA may yield useful prognostic and therapeutic information but has not been defined. Methods The records of CCA patients who underwent next-generation sequencing (NGS) were reviewed, and data on clinical, histopathological, genetic, and radiological features; response to therapy; time to progression; and survival were analyzed. Results Twenty-two cases of BAP1-mutation associated CCA were diagnosed from January 1, 2009, to February 1, 2015, at our center. Twenty patients had intrahepatic CCA and two had extrahepatic CCA. Tumor sizes (largest dimension) ranged from 2 to 16 cm (mean, 8.5 cm). Twelve patients had tumors that were poorly differentiated. Majority of the patients had advanced disease at presentation and 13 had bone metastases. Thirteen patients (59%) experienced rapidly progressive disease following primary therapy (chemotherapy or surgical resection). The mean time to tumor progression was 3.8 months after the first line chemotherapy. Conclusions BAP1 mutation in CCA may be associated with aggressive disease and poor response to standard therapies. Therefore, BAP1-targeted therapies need to be investigated. PMID:27563445

  12. Claudin-20 promotes an aggressive phenotype in human breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Tracey A; Lane, Jane; Ozupek, Hulya; Jiang, Wen G

    2013-01-01

    Claudin-20 is a member of the Claudin family of transmembrane proteins located in the tight junction (TJ) of cells of epithelial origin. Due to the increasing evidence supporting the role of TJ proteins in preventing tumor cell metastatic behavior, this study sought to evaluate the distribution of Claudin-20 in human breast cancer and the effect of Claudin-20 overexpression in human breast cancer cells. Q-PCR data from breast cancer primary tumors (n = 114) and matched background tissue (n = 30) showed that high claudin-20 expression was correlated with poor survival of patients with breast cancer (p = 0.022). Following transformation of the breast cancer cell lines MDA-MB-231 and MCF7 with a Claudin-20 expression construct functional assays were performed to ascertain changes in cell behavior. Claudin-20 transformed cells showed significantly increased invasion (p < 0.005) and were significantly less adhesive than wild type cells (p < 0.05). There was no effect on growth (either in vitro or in vivo) for either cell line. Overexpression of Claudin-20 resulted in reduced transepithelial resistance (induced by the motogen HGF at 25 ng/ml, p = 0.0007). Interestingly, this was not mirrored by paracellular permeability, as overexpression of Claudin-20 caused a decrease in permeability. The introduction of Claudin-20 into human breast cancer cells resulted in breast cancer cells with an aggressive phenotype and reduced trans-epithelial resistance. There was no corresponding decrease in paracellular permeability, indicating that this Claudin has a differential function in epithelial TJ. This provides further insight into the importance of correctly functioning TJ in preventing the progression of human breast cancer. PMID:24665404

  13. Physiological Phenotype and Vulnerability in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Surmeier, D. James; Guzman, Jaime N.; Sanchez, Javier; Schumacker, Paul T.

    2012-01-01

    This review will focus on the principles underlying the hypothesis that neuronal physiological phenotype—how a neuron generates and regulates action potentials—makes a significant contribution to its vulnerability in Parkinson's disease (PD) and aging. A cornerstone of this hypothesis is that the maintenance of ionic gradients underlying excitability can pose a significant energetic burden for neurons, particularly those that have sustained residence times at depolarized membrane potentials, broad action potentials, prominent Ca2+ entry, and modest intrinsic Ca2+ buffering capacity. This energetic burden is shouldered in neurons primarily by mitochondria, the sites of cellular respiration. Mitochondrial respiration increases the production of damaging superoxide and other reactive oxygen species (ROS) that have widely been postulated to contribute to cellular aging and PD. Many of the genetic mutations and toxins associated with PD compromise mitochondrial function, providing a mechanistic linkage between known risk factors and cellular physiology that could explain the pattern of pathology in PD. Because much of the mitochondrial burden created by this at-risk phenotype is created by Ca2+ entry through L-type voltage-dependent channels for which there are antagonists approved for human use, a neuroprotective strategy to reduce this burden is feasible. PMID:22762023

  14. Expression Profiling of Primary and Metastatic Ovarian Tumors Reveals Differences Indicative of Aggressive Disease

    PubMed Central

    Brodsky, Alexander S.; Fischer, Andrew; Miller, Daniel H.; Vang, Souriya; MacLaughlan, Shannon; Wu, Hsin-Ta; Yu, Jovian; Steinhoff, Margaret; Collins, Colin; Smith, Peter J. S.; Raphael, Benjamin J.; Brard, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    The behavior and genetics of serous epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) metastasis, the form of the disease lethal to patients, is poorly understood. The unique properties of metastases are critical to understand to improve treatments of the disease that remains in patients after debulking surgery. We sought to identify the genetic and phenotypic landscape of metastatic progression of EOC to understand how metastases compare to primary tumors. DNA copy number and mRNA expression differences between matched primary human tumors and omental metastases, collected at the same time during debulking surgery before chemotherapy, were measured using microarrays. qPCR and immunohistochemistry validated findings. Pathway analysis of mRNA expression revealed metastatic cancer cells are more proliferative and less apoptotic than primary tumors, perhaps explaining the aggressive nature of these lesions. Most cases had copy number aberrations (CNAs) that differed between primary and metastatic tumors, but we did not detect CNAs that are recurrent across cases. A six gene expression signature distinguishes primary from metastatic tumors and predicts overall survival in independent datasets. The genetic differences between primary and metastatic tumors, yet common expression changes, suggest that the major clone in metastases is not the same as in primary tumors, but the cancer cells adapt to the omentum similarly. Together, these data highlight how ovarian tumors develop into a distinct, more aggressive metastatic state that should be considered for therapy development. PMID:24732363

  15. Precision Medicine for Continuing Phenotype Expansion of Human Genetic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hui; Zhang, Victor Wei

    2015-01-01

    Determining the exact genetic causes for a patient and providing definite molecular diagnoses are core elements of precision medicine. Individualized patient care is often limited by our current knowledge of disease etiologies and commonly used phenotypic-based diagnostic approach. The broad and incompletely understood phenotypic spectrum of a disease and various underlying genetic heterogeneity also present extra challenges to our clinical practice. With the rapid adaptation of new sequence technology in clinical setting for diagnostic purpose, phenotypic expansions of disease spectrum are becoming increasingly common. Understanding the underlying molecular mechanisms will help us to integrate genomic information into the workup of individualized patient care and make better clinical decisions. PMID:26137492

  16. Candidate genes contributing to the aggressive phenotype of mantle cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Henson, Sarah E.; Morford, Travis; Stein, Mary-Pat; Wall, Randolph; Malone, Cindy S.

    2012-01-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma and small lymphocytic lymphoma are lymphocyte cancers that have similar morphologies and a common age of onset. Mantle cell lymphoma is generally an aggressive B cell lymphoma with a short median survival time, whereas small lymphocytic lymphoma is typically an indolent B cell lymphoma with a prolonged median survival time. Using primary tumor samples in bidirectional suppression subtractive hybridization, we identified genes with differential expression in an aggressive mantle cell lymphoma versus an indolent small lymphocytic lymphoma. “Virtual” Northern blot analyses of multiple lymphoma samples confirmed that a set of genes was preferentially expressed in aggressive mantle cell lymphoma compared to indolent small lymphocytic lymphoma. These analyses identified mantle cell lymphoma-specific genes that may be involved in the aggressive behavior of mantle cell lymphoma and possibly other aggressive human lymphomas. Interestingly, most of these differentially-expressed genes have not been identified using other techniques, highlighting the unique ability of suppression subtractive hybridization to identify potentially rare or low expression genes. PMID:21145576

  17. Evolutionary history of human disease genes reveals phenotypic connections and comorbidity among genetic diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Solip; Yang, Jae-Seong; Kim, Jinho; Shin, Young-Eun; Hwang, Jihye; Park, Juyong; Jang, Sung Key; Kim, Sanguk

    2012-10-01

    The extent to which evolutionary changes have impacted the phenotypic relationships among human diseases remains unclear. In this work, we report that phenotypically similar diseases are connected by the evolutionary constraints on human disease genes. Human disease groups can be classified into slowly or rapidly evolving classes, where the diseases in the slowly evolving class are enriched with morphological phenotypes and those in the rapidly evolving class are enriched with physiological phenotypes. Our findings establish a clear evolutionary connection between disease classes and disease phenotypes for the first time. Furthermore, the high comorbidity found between diseases connected by similar evolutionary constraints enables us to improve the predictability of the relative risk of human diseases. We find the evolutionary constraints on disease genes are a new layer of molecular connection in the network-based exploration of human diseases.

  18. Physiological phenotyping of pediatric chronic obstructive airway diseases.

    PubMed

    Nyilas, Sylvia; Singer, Florian; Kumar, Nitin; Yammine, Sophie; Meier-Girard, Delphine; Koerner-Rettberg, Cordula; Casaulta, Carmen; Frey, Urs; Latzin, Philipp

    2016-07-01

    Inert tracer gas washout (IGW) measurements detect increased ventilation inhomogeneity (VI) in chronic lung diseases. Their suitability for different diseases, such as cystic fibrosis (CF) and primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD), has already been shown. However, it is still unclear if physiological phenotypes based on different IGW variables can be defined independently of underlying disease. Eighty school-age children, 20 with CF, 20 with PCD, 20 former preterm children, and 20 healthy children, performed nitrogen multiple-breath washout, double-tracer gas (DTG) single-breath washout, and spirometry. Our primary outcome was the definition of physiological phenotypes based on IGW variables. We applied principal component analysis, hierarchical Ward's clustering, and enrichment analysis to compare clinical characteristics between the clusters. IGW variables used for clustering were lung clearance index (LCI) and convection-dependent [conductive ventilation heterogeneity index (Scond)] and diffusion-convection-dependent variables [acinar ventilation heterogeneity index (Sacin) and carbon dioxide and DTG phase III slopes]. Three main phenotypes were identified. Phenotype I (n = 38) showed normal values in all IGW outcome variables. Phenotype II (n = 21) was characterized by pronounced global and convection-dependent VI while diffusion-dependent VI was normal. Phenotype III (n = 21) was characterized by increased global and diffusion- and convection-dependent VI. Enrichment analysis revealed an overrepresentation of healthy children and former preterm children in phenotype I and of CF and PCD in phenotypes II and III. Patients in phenotype III showed the highest proportion and frequency of exacerbations and hospitalization in the year prior to the measurement. IGW techniques allow identification of clinically meaningful, disease-independent physiological clusters. Their predictive value of future disease outcomes remains to be determined. PMID:27231309

  19. Phenotype standardization for drug-induced kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Ravindra L; Awdishu, Linda; Davenport, Andrew; Murray, Patrick T; Macedo, Etienne; Cerda, Jorge; Chakaravarthi, Raj; Holden, Arthur L; Goldstein, Stuart L

    2015-08-01

    Drug-induced kidney disease is a frequent cause of renal dysfunction; however, there are no standards to identify and characterize the spectrum of these disorders. We convened a panel of international, adult and pediatric, nephrologists and pharmacists to develop standardized phenotypes for drug-induced kidney disease as part of the phenotype standardization project initiated by the International Serious Adverse Events Consortium. We propose four phenotypes of drug-induced kidney disease based on clinical presentation: acute kidney injury, glomerular, tubular, and nephrolithiasis, along with the primary and secondary clinical criteria to support the phenotype definition, and a time course based on the KDIGO/AKIN definitions of acute kidney injury, acute kidney disease, and chronic kidney disease. Establishing causality in drug-induced kidney disease is challenging and requires knowledge of the biological plausibility for the specific drug, mechanism of injury, time course, and assessment of competing risk factors. These phenotypes provide a consistent framework for clinicians, investigators, industry, and regulatory agencies to evaluate drug nephrotoxicity across various settings. We believe that this is the first step to recognizing drug-induced kidney disease and developing strategies to prevent and manage this condition. PMID:25853333

  20. Epilepsy phenotypes in siblings with Norrie disease.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Akihisa; Arai, Eisuke; Kitamura, Yuri; Abe, Shinpei; Ikeno, Mitsuru; Fujimaki, Takuro; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki; Shimizu, Toshiaki

    2015-11-01

    Norrie disease is an X-linked recessive disorder that is characterized by congenital blindness. Although epileptic seizures are observed in some patients with Norrie disease, little is known about this phenomenon. Here, we report the manifestation of epilepsy in siblings with Norrie disease to increase our knowledge of epilepsy in this condition. Three brothers with congenital blindness were diagnosed with Norrie disease after genetic analyses indicated the deletion of exon 2 of the NDP gene. The eldest brother had suffered from epileptic seizures since the age of 11years, and his seizures were resistant to antiepileptic drugs. Although the second brother had no epileptic seizures, the youngest sibling had experiences epileptic seizures since the age of 8years. His seizures were controlled using lamotrigine and levetiracetam. An electroencephalography (EEG) revealed epileptiform discharges in the occipital areas in all three brothers. A study of these patients will increase our knowledge of epilepsy in patients with Norrie disease. PMID:25944760

  1. Systematic discovery of nonobvious human disease models through orthologous phenotypes.

    PubMed

    McGary, Kriston L; Park, Tae Joo; Woods, John O; Cha, Hye Ji; Wallingford, John B; Marcotte, Edward M

    2010-04-01

    Biologists have long used model organisms to study human diseases, particularly when the model bears a close resemblance to the disease. We present a method that quantitatively and systematically identifies nonobvious equivalences between mutant phenotypes in different species, based on overlapping sets of orthologous genes from human, mouse, yeast, worm, and plant (212,542 gene-phenotype associations). These orthologous phenotypes, or phenologs, predict unique genes associated with diseases. Our method suggests a yeast model for angiogenesis defects, a worm model for breast cancer, mouse models of autism, and a plant model for the neural crest defects associated with Waardenburg syndrome, among others. Using these models, we show that SOX13 regulates angiogenesis, and that SEC23IP is a likely Waardenburg gene. Phenologs reveal functionally coherent, evolutionarily conserved gene networks-many predating the plant-animal divergence-capable of identifying candidate disease genes. PMID:20308572

  2. Aggressive and impulsive behavior in Alzheimer’s disease and progression of dementia

    PubMed Central

    Bidzan, Leszek; Bidzan, Mariola; Pąchalska, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background The symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) are numerous, including worsening of mood, psychotic symptoms, aggressive and impulsive behaviours, and many others. It is generally assumed that there exists a relationship between the severity of dementia and aggressive symptoms. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between aggressive and impulsive behaviours and cognitive function disorders in AD patients. Material/Methods Forty-eight AD patients living in a nursing home were included in the research group on the basis of NINCDS/ADRDA criteria. The subjects underwent two years of naturalistic observation. The intensity of agitation and aggressive behaviours was assessed on the basis of the Cohen-Mansfield Agitation Inventory (CMAI). The Alzheimer’s Disease Assessment Scale Cog (ADAS-cog) was used to assess cognitive function. Pharmacotherapy administered during the observation period was also taken into account. Results Thirty-one patients completed the two year long observation. Individuals with more severe cognitive deficiencies demonstrated a greater intensity of aggressive and impulsive behaviours, as assessed using the CMAI scale. Aggression escalated together with the development of dementia disorders. The intensity of dementia disorders was most significantly connected with physical agitation and verbal aggression. The use of neuroleptics and mood stabilisers decreased the progression of aggressive and impulsive behaviours. Conclusions There is a relationship between cognitive functioning disorders and the intensification of aggressive and impulsive behaviours. More severe forms of dementia are connected with greater intensification of aggressive and impulsive behaviours as the disease progresses. Periodical administration of pharmacotherapy may reduce the development of aggressive behaviours. PMID:22367129

  3. Disease insights through cross-species phenotype comparisons.

    PubMed

    Haendel, Melissa A; Vasilevsky, Nicole; Brush, Matthew; Hochheiser, Harry S; Jacobsen, Julius; Oellrich, Anika; Mungall, Christopher J; Washington, Nicole; Köhler, Sebastian; Lewis, Suzanna E; Robinson, Peter N; Smedley, Damian

    2015-10-01

    New sequencing technologies have ushered in a new era for diagnosis and discovery of new causative mutations for rare diseases. However, the sheer numbers of candidate variants that require interpretation in an exome or genomic analysis are still a challenging prospect. A powerful approach is the comparison of the patient's set of phenotypes (phenotypic profile) to known phenotypic profiles caused by mutations in orthologous genes associated with these variants. The most abundant source of relevant data for this task is available through the efforts of the Mouse Genome Informatics group and the International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium. In this review, we highlight the challenges in comparing human clinical phenotypes with mouse phenotypes and some of the solutions that have been developed by members of the Monarch Initiative. These tools allow the identification of mouse models for known disease-gene associations that may otherwise have been overlooked as well as candidate genes may be prioritized for novel associations. The culmination of these efforts is the Exomiser software package that allows clinical researchers to analyse patient exomes in the context of variant frequency and predicted pathogenicity as well the phenotypic similarity of the patient to any given candidate orthologous gene. PMID:26092691

  4. Phenotype of asthma-chronic obstructive pulmonary disease overlap syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Many patients with asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have overlapping characteristics of both diseases. By spirometric definition, patients with both fixed airflow obstruction (AO) and bronchodilator reversibility or fixed AO and bronchial hyperresponsiveness can be considered to have asthma-COPD overlap syndrome (ACOS). However, patients regarded to have ACOS by spirometric criteria alone are heterogeneous and can be classified by phenotype. Eosinophilic inflammation, a history of allergic disease, and smoke exposure are important components in the classification of ACOS. Each phenotype has a different underlying pathophysiology, set of characteristics, and prognosis. Medical treatment for ACOS should be tailored according to phenotype. A narrower definition of ACOS that includes both spirometric and clinical criteria is needed. PMID:26161009

  5. Phenotype of asthma-chronic obstructive pulmonary disease overlap syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Chin Kook

    2015-07-01

    Many patients with asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have overlapping characteristics of both diseases. By spirometric definition, patients with both fixed airflow obstruction (AO) and bronchodilator reversibility or fixed AO and bronchial hyperresponsiveness can be considered to have asthma-COPD overlap syndrome (ACOS). However, patients regarded to have ACOS by spirometric criteria alone are heterogeneous and can be classified by phenotype. Eosinophilic inflammation, a history of allergic disease, and smoke exposure are important components in the classification of ACOS. Each phenotype has a different underlying pathophysiology, set of characteristics, and prognosis. Medical treatment for ACOS should be tailored according to phenotype. A narrower definition of ACOS that includes both spirometric and clinical criteria is needed. PMID:26161009

  6. Improved human disease candidate gene prioritization using mouse phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jing; Xu, Huan; Aronow, Bruce J; Jegga, Anil G

    2007-01-01

    Background The majority of common diseases are multi-factorial and modified by genetically and mechanistically complex polygenic interactions and environmental factors. High-throughput genome-wide studies like linkage analysis and gene expression profiling, tend to be most useful for classification and characterization but do not provide sufficient information to identify or prioritize specific disease causal genes. Results Extending on an earlier hypothesis that the majority of genes that impact or cause disease share membership in any of several functional relationships we, for the first time, show the utility of mouse phenotype data in human disease gene prioritization. We study the effect of different data integration methods, and based on the validation studies, we show that our approach, ToppGene , outperforms two of the existing candidate gene prioritization methods, SUSPECTS and ENDEAVOUR. Conclusion The incorporation of phenotype information for mouse orthologs of human genes greatly improves the human disease candidate gene analysis and prioritization. PMID:17939863

  7. Gaucher Disease: The Metabolic Defect, Pathophysiology, Phenotypes And Natural History

    PubMed Central

    Baris, Hagit N.; Cohen, Ian J.; Mistry, Pramod K.

    2015-01-01

    Gaucher disease (GD), a prototype lysosomal storage disorder, results from inherited deficiency of lysosomal glucocerebrosidase due to biallelic mutations in GBA. The result is widespread accumulation of macrophages engorged with predominantly lysosomal glucocerebroside. A complex multisystem phenotype arises involving the liver, spleen, bone marrow and occasionally the lungs in type 1 Gaucher disease; in neuronopathic fulminant type 2 and chronic type 3 disease there is in addition progressive neurodegenerative disease. Manifestations of Gaucher disease type 1 (GD1) include hepatosplenomegaly, cytopenia, a complex pattern of bone involvement with avascular osteonecrosis (AVN), osteoporosis, fractures and lytic lesions. Enzyme replacement therapy became the standard of care in 1991, and this has transformed the natural history of GD1. This article reviews the clinical phenotypes of GD, diagnosis, pathophysiology and its natural history. A subsequent chapter discusses the treatment options. PMID:25345088

  8. DNMT3B7 Expression Promotes Tumor Progression to a More Aggressive Phenotype in Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Brambert, Patrick R.; Kelpsch, Daniel J.; Hameed, Rabia; Desai, Charmi V.; Calafiore, Gianfranco; Godley, Lucy A.; Raimondi, Stacey L.

    2015-01-01

    Epigenetic changes, such as DNA methylation, have been shown to promote breast cancer progression. However, the mechanism by which cancer cells acquire and maintain abnormal DNA methylation is not well understood. We have previously identified an aberrant splice form of a DNA methyltransferase, DNMT3B7, expressed in virtually all cancer cell lines but at very low levels in normal cells. Furthermore, aggressive MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells have been shown to express increased levels of DNMT3B7 compared to poorly invasive MCF-7 cells, indicating that DNMT3B7 may have a role in promoting a more invasive phenotype. Using data gathered from The Cancer Genome Atlas, we show that DNMT3B7 expression is increased in breast cancer patient tissues compared to normal tissue. To determine the mechanism by which DNMT3B7 was functioning in breast cancer cells, two poorly invasive breast cancer cell lines, MCF-7 and T-47D, were stably transfected with a DNMT3B7 expression construct. Expression of DNMT3B7 led to hypermethylation and down-regulation of E-cadherin, altered localization of β-catenin, as well as increased adhesion turnover, cell proliferation, and anchorage-independent growth. The novel results presented in this study suggest a role for DNMT3B7 in the progression of breast cancer to a more aggressive state and the potential for future development of novel therapeutics. PMID:25607950

  9. Thrombospondin 1 promotes an aggressive phenotype through epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in human melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Jayachandran, Aparna; Anaka, Matthew; Prithviraj, Prashanth; Hudson, Christopher; McKeown, Sonja J; Lo, Pu-Han; Vella, Laura J; Goding, Colin R; Cebon, Jonathan; Behren, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), in which epithelial cells loose their polarity and become motile mesenchymal cells, is a determinant of melanoma metastasis. We compared gene expression signatures of mesenchymal-like melanoma cells with those of epithelial-like melanoma cells, and identified Thrombospondin 1 (THBS1) as highly up-regulated in the mesenchymal phenotype. This study investigated whether THBS1, a major physiological activator of transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta, is involved in melanoma EMT-like process. We sought to examine expression patterns in distinct melanoma phenotypes including invasive, de-differentiated, label-retaining and drug resistant populations that are putatively associated with an EMT-like process. Here we show that THBS1 expression and secretion was elevated in melanoma cells exhibiting invasive, drug resistant, label retaining and mesenchymal phenotypes and correlated with reduced expression of genes involved in pigmentation. Elevated THBS1 levels were detected in Vemurafenib resistant melanoma cells and inhibition of THBS1 led to significantly reduced chemoresistance in melanoma cells. Notably, siRNA-mediated silencing of THBS1 and neutralizing antibody to THBS1 reduced invasion in mesenchymal-like melanoma cells, while ectopic THBS1 expression in epithelial-like melanoma cells enhanced invasion. Furthermore, the loss of THBS1 inhibited in vivo motility of melanoma cells within the embryonic chicken neural tube. In addition, we found aberrant THBS1 protein expression in metastatic melanoma tumor biopsies. These results implicate a role for THBS1 in EMT, and hence THBS1 may serve as a novel target for strategies aimed at the treatment of melanoma invasion and drug resistance. PMID:25051363

  10. Microbiome Heterogeneity Characterizing Intestinal Tissue and Inflammatory Bowel Disease Phenotype.

    PubMed

    Tyler, Andrea D; Kirsch, Richard; Milgrom, Raquel; Stempak, Joanne M; Kabakchiev, Boyko; Silverberg, Mark S

    2016-04-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease has been associated with differential abundance of numerous organisms when compared to healthy controls (HCs); however, few studies have investigated variability in the microbiome across intestinal locations and how this variability might be related to disease location and phenotype. In this study, we have analyzed the microbiome of a large cohort of individuals recruited at Mount Sinai Hospital in Toronto, Canada. Biopsies were taken from subjects with Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, and HC, and also individuals having undergone ileal pouch-anal anastomosis for treatment of ulcerative colitis or familial adenomatous polyposis. Microbial 16S rRNA was sequenced using the Illumina MiSeq platform. We observed a great deal of variability in the microbiome characterizing different sampling locations. Samples from pouch and afferent limb were comparable in microbial composition. When comparing sigmoid and terminal ileum samples, more differences were observed. The greatest number of differentially abundant microbes was observed when comparing either pouch or afferent limb samples to sigmoid or terminal ileum. Despite these differences, we were able to observe modest microbial variability between inflammatory bowel disease phenotypes and HCs, even when controlling for sampling location and additional experimental factors. Most detected associations were observed between HCs and Crohn's disease, with decreases in specific genera in the families Ruminococcaceae and Lachnospiraceae characterizing tissue samples from individuals with Crohn's disease. This study highlights important considerations when analyzing the composition of the microbiome and also provides useful insight into differences in the microbiome characterizing these seemingly related phenotypes. PMID:26954709

  11. Microgenomics profile the endogenous angiogenic phenotype in subpopulations of aggressive melanoma.

    PubMed

    Demou, Zoe N; Hendrix, Mary J C

    2008-10-01

    Beyond the elemental role of blood vessels in tumor growth, fluid conducting networks lacking endothelium (termed vasculogenic mimicry) were identified previously in metastatic melanoma and other cancer types. The etiology remains unclear, though it appears to involve dysregulation of the tumor-specific phenotype and transdifferentiation. Instigating the molecular deciphering of this phenomenon, we established a novel technique for microdissecting the spontaneously formed vascular-like networks and the randomly arranged cells (nests) from living 3D cultures of melanoma and performed microgenomics analysis. For the first time we show that despite the shared genotype, transcription was differentially regulated among the phenotypically distinct melanoma structures in vasculogenic mimicry. Several angiogenesis-specific genes were differentially expressed in higher levels in network cells of both uveal and cutaneous melanoma with intriguing representation of the ephrin family of angiogenesis factors, which was confirmed with immunocytochemistry. Interestingly, the adjacent nest-cells over-expressed ECM-related genes. Moreover, expression of angiogenesis-specific genes in melanoma resembled that of normal microvascular cells and was enhanced in melanoma disseminating hematogenously. The findings suggest that melanoma plasticity could enable autopoiesis of vascular-mimicking elements within the tumor infrastructure with significant clinical implications, such as response to anti-angiogenic treatments. Identifying factors regulating tumor plasticity and heterogeneity at the molecular level is essential in designing effective anti-cancer therapies. PMID:18655191

  12. A MiRNA Signature for Defining Aggressive Phenotype and Prognosis in Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Pasculli, Barbara; Galasso, Marco; Volinia, Stefano; D'Angelo, Vincenzo; Icolaro, Nadia; Coco, Michelina; Dimitri, Lucia; Graziano, Paolo; Copetti, Massimiliano; Valori, Vanna Maria; Maiello, Evaristo; Carella, Massimo; Fazio, Vito Michele; Parrella, Paola

    2014-01-01

    Gliomas represent a disparate group of tumours for which there are to date no cure. Thus, there is a recognized need for new diagnostic and therapeutic approaches based on increased understanding of their molecular nature. We performed the comparison of the microRNA (miRNA) profile of 8 WHO grade II gliomas and 24 higher grade tumours (2 WHO grade III and 22 glioblastomas) by using the Affymetrix GeneChip miRNA Array v. 1.0. A relative quantification method (RT-qPCR) with standard curve was used to confirm the 22 miRNA signature resulted by array analysis. The prognostic performances of the confirmed miRNAs were estimated on the Tumor Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) datasets. We identified 22 miRNAs distinguishing grade II gliomas from higher grade tumours. RT-qPCR confirmed the differential expression in the two patients' groups for 13 out of the 22 miRNAs. The analysis of the Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) and Lower Grade Glioma (LGG) datasets from TCGA demonstrated the association with prognosis for 6 of those miRNAs. Moreover, in the GBM dataset miR-21 and miR-210 were predictors of worse prognosis in both univariable and multivariable Cox regression analyses (HR 1.19, p = 0.04, and HR 1.18, p = 0.029 respectively). Our results support a direct contribution of miRNAs to glioma cancerogenesis and suggest that miR-21 and miR-210 may play a role in the aggressive clinical behaviour of glioblastomas. PMID:25279461

  13. Image-based phenotyping of plant disease symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Mutka, Andrew M.; Bart, Rebecca S.

    2015-01-01

    Plant diseases cause significant reductions in agricultural productivity worldwide. Disease symptoms have deleterious effects on the growth and development of crop plants, limiting yields and making agricultural products unfit for consumption. For many plant–pathogen systems, we lack knowledge of the physiological mechanisms that link pathogen infection and the production of disease symptoms in the host. A variety of quantitative high-throughput image-based methods for phenotyping plant growth and development are currently being developed. These methods range from detailed analysis of a single plant over time to broad assessment of the crop canopy for thousands of plants in a field and employ a wide variety of imaging technologies. Application of these methods to the study of plant disease offers the ability to study quantitatively how host physiology is altered by pathogen infection. These approaches have the potential to provide insight into the physiological mechanisms underlying disease symptom development. Furthermore, imaging techniques that detect the electromagnetic spectrum outside of visible light allow us to quantify disease symptoms that are not visible by eye, increasing the range of symptoms we can observe and potentially allowing for earlier and more thorough symptom detection. In this review, we summarize current progress in plant disease phenotyping and suggest future directions that will accelerate the development of resistant crop varieties. PMID:25601871

  14. Versican and the Regulation of Cell Phenotype in Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wight, Thomas N.; Kinsella, Michael G.; Evanko, Stephen P.; Potter-Perigo, Susan; Merrilees, Mervyn J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Versican is an extracellular matrix (ECM) proteoglycan that is present in the pericellular environment of most tissues and increases in many different diseases. Versican interacts with cells to influence the ability of cells to proliferate, migrate, adhere and assemble an ECM. Scope of Review The structure of the versican molecule is briefly reviewed and studies highlighting those factors that promote versican synthesis and degradation and their impact on cell phenotype in disease are discussed. Particular attention is given to vascular disease, but other diseases where versican is important are covered as well, most notably different forms of cancers. Attention is given to mechanisms(s) by which versican influences cell behaviors through either direct or indirect processes. Versican produced by either stromal cells or myeloid cells can have a major impact influencing immunity and inflammation. Finally, studies controlling versican accumulation that either delay or inhibit the progression of disease will be highlighted. Major Conclusions Versican is one component of the ECM that can influence the ability of cells to proliferate, migrate, adhere, and remodel the ECM. Targeting versican as a way to control cell phenotype offers a novel approach in the treatment of disease. Significance ECM molecules such as versican contribute to the structural integrity of tissues and interact with cells through direct and indirect means to regulate, in part, cellular events that form the basis of disease. PMID:24401530

  15. [Genetic, population and phenotypic characteristics of patients with Hirschsprung disease].

    PubMed

    Ruiz Aja, E; Vega Hernández, L; Martínez Ezquerra, N; De Diego García, E; Pérez Marrodan, A; Alvarez-Buhilla, P López

    2012-07-01

    Hirschsprung disease (HSCR) is caused by the absence of ganglion cells in the intestine due to defects in the migration of enteric nervous system cells during embryologic development. The incidence is one in every 5000 births, more common in men than women. There are two main phenotypes according to the aganglionic segment length: Short (S-HSCR, (80% of patients) and Long (L-HSCR, 20%). Variations have been detected in the coding sequence of the RET proto-oncogene in patients with HSCR, suggesting a genetic predisposition to the disease. Our aim is to find and analyze polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with the disease. We are interested also in stablish an association between sex and type of aganglionic segment. We analyzed the RET promoter as well a polymorphism in exon 13 strongly associated to the disease. The populations for the study were a group of 56 patients with sporadic HSCR and 178 healthy controls. The results obtained show that the disease is more common in men than in women (3:1). The RET genotype shows that alleles A and G of the promoter (c.-200A > G and c.-196C > A) and G of exon 13 (c.2307T > G) are associated with the affected population. Our data suggest neither association between the disease phenotype and the distribution of the polymorphisms analyzed nor with the sex of the patients. The presence of certain polymorphisms in the RET sequence indicates a genetic predisposition (combined with other genetic or environmental factors) to the disease. PMID:23480009

  16. Conservation in Mammals of Genes Associated with Aggression-Related Behavioral Phenotypes in Honey Bees.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui; Robinson, Gene E; Jakobsson, Eric

    2016-06-01

    The emerging field of sociogenomics explores the relations between social behavior and genome structure and function. An important question is the extent to which associations between social behavior and gene expression are conserved among the Metazoa. Prior experimental work in an invertebrate model of social behavior, the honey bee, revealed distinct brain gene expression patterns in African and European honey bees, and within European honey bees with different behavioral phenotypes. The present work is a computational study of these previous findings in which we analyze, by orthology determination, the extent to which genes that are socially regulated in honey bees are conserved across the Metazoa. We found that the differentially expressed gene sets associated with alarm pheromone response, the difference between old and young bees, and the colony influence on soldier bees, are enriched in widely conserved genes, indicating that these differences have genomic bases shared with many other metazoans. By contrast, the sets of differentially expressed genes associated with the differences between African and European forager and guard bees are depleted in widely conserved genes, indicating that the genomic basis for this social behavior is relatively specific to honey bees. For the alarm pheromone response gene set, we found a particularly high degree of conservation with mammals, even though the alarm pheromone itself is bee-specific. Gene Ontology identification of human orthologs to the strongly conserved honey bee genes associated with the alarm pheromone response shows overrepresentation of protein metabolism, regulation of protein complex formation, and protein folding, perhaps associated with remodeling of critical neural circuits in response to alarm pheromone. We hypothesize that such remodeling may be an adaptation of social animals to process and respond appropriately to the complex patterns of conspecific communication essential for social organization

  17. Conservation in Mammals of Genes Associated with Aggression-Related Behavioral Phenotypes in Honey Bees

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Gene E.; Jakobsson, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The emerging field of sociogenomics explores the relations between social behavior and genome structure and function. An important question is the extent to which associations between social behavior and gene expression are conserved among the Metazoa. Prior experimental work in an invertebrate model of social behavior, the honey bee, revealed distinct brain gene expression patterns in African and European honey bees, and within European honey bees with different behavioral phenotypes. The present work is a computational study of these previous findings in which we analyze, by orthology determination, the extent to which genes that are socially regulated in honey bees are conserved across the Metazoa. We found that the differentially expressed gene sets associated with alarm pheromone response, the difference between old and young bees, and the colony influence on soldier bees, are enriched in widely conserved genes, indicating that these differences have genomic bases shared with many other metazoans. By contrast, the sets of differentially expressed genes associated with the differences between African and European forager and guard bees are depleted in widely conserved genes, indicating that the genomic basis for this social behavior is relatively specific to honey bees. For the alarm pheromone response gene set, we found a particularly high degree of conservation with mammals, even though the alarm pheromone itself is bee-specific. Gene Ontology identification of human orthologs to the strongly conserved honey bee genes associated with the alarm pheromone response shows overrepresentation of protein metabolism, regulation of protein complex formation, and protein folding, perhaps associated with remodeling of critical neural circuits in response to alarm pheromone. We hypothesize that such remodeling may be an adaptation of social animals to process and respond appropriately to the complex patterns of conspecific communication essential for social organization

  18. Genetic Factors in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: Contribution to Disease Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Ceccarelli, Fulvia; Perricone, Carlo; Borgiani, Paola; Ciccacci, Cinzia; Rufini, Sara; Cipriano, Enrica; Alessandri, Cristiano; Spinelli, Francesca Romana; Sili Scavalli, Antonio; Novelli, Giuseppe; Valesini, Guido; Conti, Fabrizio

    2015-01-01

    Genetic factors exert an important role in determining Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) susceptibility, interplaying with environmental factors. Several genetic studies in various SLE populations have identified numerous susceptibility loci. From a clinical point of view, SLE is characterized by a great heterogeneity in terms of clinical and laboratory manifestations. As widely demonstrated, specific laboratory features are associated with clinical disease subset, with different severity degree. Similarly, in the last years, an association between specific phenotypes and genetic variants has been identified, allowing the possibility to elucidate different mechanisms and pathways accountable for disease manifestations. However, except for Lupus Nephritis (LN), no studies have been designed to identify the genetic variants associated with the development of different phenotypes. In this review, we will report data currently known about this specific association. PMID:26798662

  19. LCN2 Promoter Methylation Status as Novel Predictive Marker for Microvessel Density and Aggressive Tumor Phenotype in Breast Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Meka, Phanni bhushann; Jarjapu, Sarika; Nanchari, Santhoshi Rani; Vishwakarma, Sandeep Kumar; Edathara, Prajitha Mohandas; Gorre, Manjula; Cingeetham, Anuradha; Vuree, Sugunakar; Annamaneni, Sandhya; Dunna, Nageswara Rao; Mukta, Srinivasulu; B, Triveni; Satti, Vishnupriya

    2015-01-01

    LCN2 (Lipocalin 2) is a 25 KD secreted acute phase protein, reported to be a novel regulator of angiogenesis in breast cancer. Up regulation of LCN2 had been observed in multiple cancers including breast cancer, pancreatic cancer and ovarian cancer. However, the role of LCN2 promoter methylation in the formation of microvessels is poorly understood. The aim of this study was to analyze the association of LCN 2 promoter methylation with microvessel formation and tumor cell proliferation in breast cancer patients. The LCN2 promoter methylation status was studied in 64 breast cancer tumors by methylation specific PCR (MSP). Evaluation of microvessel density (MVD) and Ki67 cell proliferation index was achieved by immunohistochemical staining using CD34 and MIB-1 antibodies, respectively. LCN2 promoter unmethylation status was observed in 43 (67.2%) of breast cancer patients whereas LCN2 methylation status was seen in 21 (32.8%). Further, LCN2 promoter unmethylation status was associated with aggressive tumor phenotype and elevated mean MVD in breast cancer patients. PMID:26163623

  20. Fetal inhibition of inflammation improves disease phenotypes in harlequin ichthyosis.

    PubMed

    Cottle, Denny L; Ursino, Gloria M A; Ip, Sally Chi Ieng; Jones, Lynelle K; Ditommaso, Tia; Hacking, Douglas F; Mangan, Niamh E; Mellett, Natalie A; Henley, Katya J; Sviridov, Dmitri; Nold-Petry, Claudia A; Nold, Marcel F; Meikle, Peter J; Kile, Benjamin T; Smyth, Ian M

    2015-01-15

    Harlequin ichthyosis (HI) is a severe skin disease which leads to neonatal death in ∼50% of cases. It is the result of mutations in ABCA12, a protein that transports lipids required to establish the protective skin barrier needed after birth. To better understand the life-threatening newborn HI phenotype, we analysed the developing epidermis for consequences of lipid dysregulation in mouse models. We observed a pro-inflammatory signature which was characterized by chemokine upregulation in embryonic skin which is distinct from that seen in other types of ichthyosis. Inflammation also persisted in grafted HI skin. To examine the contribution of inflammation to disease development, we overexpressed interleukin-37b to globally suppress fetal inflammation, observing considerable improvements in keratinocyte differentiation. These studies highlight inflammation as an unexpected contributor to HI disease development in utero, and suggest that inhibiting inflammation may reduce disease severity. PMID:25209981

  1. Alterations of the spindle checkpoint pathway in clinicopathologically aggressive CpG island methylator phenotype clear cell renal cell carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Arai, Eri; Gotoh, Masahiro; Tian, Ying; Sakamoto, Hiromi; Ono, Masaya; Matsuda, Akio; Takahashi, Yoriko; Miyata, Sayaka; Totsuka, Hirohiko; Chiku, Suenori; Komiyama, Motokiyo; Fujimoto, Hiroyuki; Matsumoto, Kenji; Yamada, Tesshi; Yoshida, Teruhiko

    2015-01-01

    CpG‐island methylator phenotype (CIMP)‐positive clear cell renal cell carcinomas (RCCs) are characterized by accumulation of DNA hypermethylation of CpG islands, clinicopathological aggressiveness and poor patient outcome. The aim of this study was to clarify the molecular pathways participating in CIMP‐positive renal carcinogenesis. Genome (whole‐exome and copy number), transcriptome and proteome (two‐dimensional image converted analysis of liquid chromatography‐mass spectrometry) analyses were performed using tissue specimens of 87 CIMP‐negative and 14 CIMP‐positive clear cell RCCs and corresponding specimens of non‐cancerous renal cortex. Genes encoding microtubule‐associated proteins, such as DNAH2, DNAH5, DNAH10, RP1 and HAUS8, showed a 10% or higher incidence of genetic aberrations (non‐synonymous single‐nucleotide mutations and insertions/deletions) in CIMP‐positive RCCs, whereas CIMP‐negative RCCs lacked distinct genetic characteristics. MetaCore pathway analysis of CIMP‐positive RCCs revealed that alterations of mRNA or protein expression were significantly accumulated in six pathways, all participating in the spindle checkpoint, including the “The metaphase checkpoint (p = 1.427 × 10−6),” “Role of Anaphase Promoting Complex in cell cycle regulation (p = 7.444 × 10−6)” and “Spindle assembly and chromosome separation (p = 9.260 × 10−6)” pathways. Quantitative RT‐PCR analysis revealed that mRNA expression levels for genes included in such pathways, i.e., AURKA, AURKB, BIRC5, BUB1, CDC20, NEK2 and SPC25, were significantly higher in CIMP‐positive than in CIMP‐negative RCCs. All CIMP‐positive RCCs showed overexpression of Aurora kinases, AURKA and AURKB, and this overexpression was mainly attributable to increased copy number. These data suggest that abnormalities of the spindle checkpoint pathway participate in CIMP‐positive renal carcinogenesis, and that AURKA and AURKB may be potential

  2. Lentivirus-mediated RASSF1A expression suppresses aggressive phenotypes of gastric cancer cells in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, P-H; Zheng, J-B; Wei, G-B; Wang, X-L; Wang, W; Chen, N-Z; Yu, J-H; Yao, J-F; Wang, H; Lu, S-Y; Sun, X-J

    2015-01-01

    Loss of Ras association domain family protein 1 isoform A (RASSF1A) expression is associated with the development of a variety of human cancers and the expression of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) frequently occurs in gastric cancer. This study investigated the effects of RASSF1A expression restoration using a hypoxia-inducible CEA promoter-driven vector on xenograft tumor growth in nude mice and on the in-vitro regulation of gastric cancer cell viability, cell cycle distribution, apoptosis, colony formation and invasion capacity. The data showed that the level of CEA mRNA and protein was much higher in gastric cancer SGC7901 cells than in a second gastric cancer cell line, MKN28, or in the MCF-10A normal epithelial breast cell line. RASSF1A expression was restored in SGC7901 cells compared with the negative control virus-infected SGC7910 cells. RASSF1A expression restoration significantly inhibited gastric cancer cell viability, colony formation and invasion capacity, but induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in vitro, especially under hypoxic culture conditions. At the gene level, restoration of RASSF1A expression under hypoxic culture conditions significantly suppressed matrix metalloproteinase-2 expression and prevented cyclinD1 expression. A nude mouse xenograft assay showed that the restoration of RASSF1A expression reduced gastric cancer xenograft formation and growth. In conclusion, the restoration of RASSF1A expression using a hypoxia-inducible and CEA promoter-driven vector suppressed aggressive phenotypes of gastric cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. These results suggest that LV-5HRE-CEAp-RASSF1A gene therapy may be a promising novel approach to treat advanced gastric cancer. PMID:26005859

  3. Y genetic variation and phenotypic diversity in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Case, Laure K; Teuscher, Cory

    2015-01-01

    Sexually dimorphic traits arise through the combined effects of sex hormones and sex chromosomes on sex-biased gene expression, and experimental mouse models have been instrumental in determining their relative contribution in modulating sex differences. A role for the Y chromosome (ChrY) in mediating sex differences outside of development and reproduction has historically been overlooked due to its unusual genetic composition and the predominant testes-specific expression of ChrY-encoded genes. However, ample evidence now exists supporting ChrY as a mediator of other physiological traits in males, and genetic variation in ChrY has been linked to several diseases, including heart disease, cancer, and autoimmune diseases in experimental animal models, as well as humans. The genetic and molecular mechanisms by which ChrY modulates phenotypic variation in males remain unknown but may be a function of copy number variation between homologous X-Y multicopy genes driving differential gene expression. Here, we review the literature identifying an association between ChrY polymorphism and phenotypic variation and present the current evidence depicting the mammalian ChrY as a member of the regulatory genome in males and as a factor influencing paternal parent-of-origin effects in female offspring. PMID:25866616

  4. Cannabinoids for the Treatment of Agitation and Aggression in Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Celina S; Chau, Sarah A; Ruthirakuhan, Myuri; Lanctôt, Krista L; Herrmann, Nathan

    2015-08-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is frequently associated with neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS) such as agitation and aggression, especially in the moderate to severe stages of the illness. The limited efficacy and high-risk profiles of current pharmacotherapies for the management of agitation and aggression in AD have driven the search for safer pharmacological alternatives. Over the past few years, there has been a growing interest in the therapeutic potential of medications that target the endocannabinoid system (ECS). The behavioural effects of ECS medications, as well as their ability to modulate neuroinflammation and oxidative stress, make targeting this system potentially relevant in AD. This article summarizes the literature to date supporting this rationale and evaluates clinical studies investigating cannabinoids for agitation and aggression in AD. Letters, case studies, and controlled trials from four electronic databases were included. While findings from six studies showed significant benefits from synthetic cannabinoids—dronabinol or nabilone—on agitation and aggression, definitive conclusions were limited by small sample sizes, short trial duration, and lack of placebo control in some of these studies. Given the relevance and findings to date, methodologically rigorous prospective clinical trials are recommended to determine the safety and efficacy of cannabinoids for the treatment of agitation and aggression in dementia and AD. PMID:26271310

  5. A phenotypic model recapitulating the neuropathology of Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Ferris, Craig F; Marella, Mathieu; Smerkers, Brian; Barchet, Thomas M; Gershman, Benjamin; Matsuno-Yagi, Akemi; Yagi, Takao

    2013-01-01

    This study was undertaken to develop a phenotypic model recapitulating the neuropathology of Parkinson's disease (PD). Such a model would show loss of dopamine in the basal ganglia, appearance of Lewy bodies, and the early stages of motor dysfunction. The model was developed by subcutaneously injecting biodegradable microspheres of rotenone, a complex I inhibitor in 8–9 month old, ovariectomized Long–Evans rats. Animals were observed for changes in body weight and motor activity. At the end of 11–12 weeks animals were euthanized and the brains examined for histopathological changes. Rotenone treated animals gain weight and appear normal and healthy as compared to controls but showed modest hypokinesia around 5–6 weeks posttreatment. Animals showed loss of dopaminergic (DA) neurons and the appearance of putative Lewy bodies in the substantia nigra. Neuroinflammation and oxidative stress were evidenced by the appearance of activated microglia, iron precipitates, and 8-oxo-2′-deoxyguanosine a major product of DNA oxidation. The dorsal striatum, the projection site of midbrain DA neurons, showed a significant reduction in tyrosine hydroxylase immunostaining, together with an increase in reactive astrocytes, an early sign of DA nerve terminal damage. Levels of vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) were significantly reduced in the dorsal striatum; however, there was an unexpected increase in dopamine transporter (DAT) levels. Old, ovariectomized females treated with rotenone microspheres present with normal weight gain and good health but a modest hypokinesia. Accompanying this behavioral phenotype are a constellation of neuropathologies characteristic of PD that include loss of DA neurons, microglia activation, oxidative damage to nuclear DNA, iron deposition, and appearance of putative Lewy bodies. This phenotypic model recapitulating the neuropathology of Parkinson's disease could provide insight into early mechanisms of pathogenesis and could aid in

  6. A phenotypic model recapitulating the neuropathology of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Ferris, Craig F; Marella, Mathieu; Smerkers, Brian; Barchet, Thomas M; Gershman, Benjamin; Matsuno-Yagi, Akemi; Yagi, Takao

    2013-07-01

    This study was undertaken to develop a phenotypic model recapitulating the neuropathology of Parkinson's disease (PD). Such a model would show loss of dopamine in the basal ganglia, appearance of Lewy bodies, and the early stages of motor dysfunction. The model was developed by subcutaneously injecting biodegradable microspheres of rotenone, a complex I inhibitor in 8-9 month old, ovariectomized Long-Evans rats. Animals were observed for changes in body weight and motor activity. At the end of 11-12 weeks animals were euthanized and the brains examined for histopathological changes. Rotenone treated animals gain weight and appear normal and healthy as compared to controls but showed modest hypokinesia around 5-6 weeks posttreatment. Animals showed loss of dopaminergic (DA) neurons and the appearance of putative Lewy bodies in the substantia nigra. Neuroinflammation and oxidative stress were evidenced by the appearance of activated microglia, iron precipitates, and 8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine a major product of DNA oxidation. The dorsal striatum, the projection site of midbrain DA neurons, showed a significant reduction in tyrosine hydroxylase immunostaining, together with an increase in reactive astrocytes, an early sign of DA nerve terminal damage. Levels of vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) were significantly reduced in the dorsal striatum; however, there was an unexpected increase in dopamine transporter (DAT) levels. Old, ovariectomized females treated with rotenone microspheres present with normal weight gain and good health but a modest hypokinesia. Accompanying this behavioral phenotype are a constellation of neuropathologies characteristic of PD that include loss of DA neurons, microglia activation, oxidative damage to nuclear DNA, iron deposition, and appearance of putative Lewy bodies. This phenotypic model recapitulating the neuropathology of Parkinson's disease could provide insight into early mechanisms of pathogenesis and could aid in the

  7. Park sleep: a non-motor dominant Parkinson's disease phenotype.

    PubMed

    Canepa, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    A 69-year-old man was evaluated in our neurology department, for a presumed diagnosis of 'night-time seizures'; however, this diagnosis was quickly dismissed after the patient (and his wife) described how he 'acted out' and talked throughout his dreams, without any seizure-like activity. This problem had been present for ∼10 years. An EEG ruled out epilepsy. The patient also described a 10-year history of constipation, loss of smell and 'frequent collapses'. These symptoms fit in with the recently published criteria of 'prodromal Parkinson's Disease' and prompted a formal assessment for Parkinson's disease (PD). He had no tremor. A subtle festinating gait pattern and a 2-finger tremor in the right hand were noted. The diagnosis of PD was confirmed by a dopamine transporter scan. Clinically, this is one-Park sleep: rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder subtype-of 7 different non-motor dominant PD phenotypes recently described. PMID:27284098

  8. A study of patients with aggressive multiple sclerosis at disease onset

    PubMed Central

    Kaunzner, Ulrike W; Kumar, Gaurav; Askin, Gulce; Gauthier, Susan A; Nealon, Nancy N; Vartanian, Timothy; Perumal, Jai S

    2016-01-01

    Objective Identify aggressive onset multiple sclerosis (AOMS) and describe its clinical course. Methods AOMS patients were identified from a multiple sclerosis (MS) database based on a set of criteria. The subsequent clinical course of AOMS patients was then reviewed with the goal of potentially identifying the best approaches to manage these patients. Results Fifty-eight of 783 (7.4%) patients in the MS database met the criteria for AOMS, and 43 patients who had complete data for the duration of their follow-up were included in the subsequent analysis. The mean duration of the follow-up was 54 months. Thirty-five patients (81%) were started on a conventional first-line agent (injectable therapies for MS). Only two of these 35 patients (5.7%) had no evidence of disease activity. Twenty-two of 35 patients suffering from refractory disease were switched to a more aggressive treatment (natalizumab, rituximab, alemtuzumab, cyclophosphamide). Eight patients were started on aggressive treatment as their initial therapy, and seven of these eight (87.5%) patients showed no evidence of disease activity. Conclusion With recognition of the crucial significance of early optimal treatment during the potential window of opportunity for best long-term outcomes, we describe AOMS within 1 year of disease onset and discuss possible treatment considerations for these patients. PMID:27536112

  9. Capsaicin-induced inactivation of sensory neurons promotes a more aggressive gene expression phenotype in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Erin, Nuray; Zhao, Wei; Bylander, John; Chase, Gary; Clawson, Gary

    2006-10-01

    might also be be linked to tumorigenesis via loss of its putative anti-inflammatory activities. There is anecdotal evidence in the literature to indicate that the rest of the down-regulated genes may also contribute to development of a more aggressive phenotype in this breast cancer model. PMID:16583263

  10. Molecular and phenotypic characterization of infectious bursal disease virus isolates.

    PubMed

    Dormitorio, T V; Giambrone, J J; Guo, K; Jackwood, D J

    2007-06-01

    Two infectious bursal disease viruses (IBDVs 1174 and V1) were isolated from IBDV-vaccinated broiler flocks in California and Georgia. These flocks had a history of subclinical immunosuppression. These isolates are commonly used in IBDV progeny challenge studies at Auburn, AL, as well as vaccine manufacturer's vaccine efficacy studies, because they come from populated poultry-producing states, and are requested by poultry veterinarians from those states. Nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) generated viral genome products for sequencing. A 491-bp segment from the VP2 gene, covering the hypervariable region, from each isolate was analyzed and compared with previously sequenced isolates. Sequence analysis showed that they were more closely related to the Delaware (Del) E antigenic variant than they are to the Animal Health Plant Inspection Service (APHIS) standard, both at the nucleotide level (96%, 97%) and at the amino acid level (94%, 97%). Both isolates had the glutamine to lysine shift in amino acid 249 which has been reported to be critical in binding the virus neutralizing Mab B69. Phenotypic studies showed that both isolates produced rapid atrophy of the bursae and weight loss, without the edematous bursal phase, in 2-wk-old commercial broilers having antibody against IBDV. A progeny challenge study showed both isolates produced more atrophy of the bursae (less percentage of protection) than the Del E isolate. Molecular and phenotypic data of these important IBDV isolates help in the improved detection and control of this continually changing and important viral pathogen of chickens. PMID:17626491

  11. Monoaminergic neurotransmitter alterations in postmortem brain regions of depressed and aggressive patients with Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Vermeiren, Yannick; Van Dam, Debby; Aerts, Tony; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan; De Deyn, Peter P

    2014-12-01

    Depression and aggression in Alzheimer's disease (AD) are 2 of the most severe and prominent neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS). Altered monoaminergic neurotransmitter system functioning has been implicated in both NPS, although their neurochemical etiology remains to be elucidated. Left frozen hemispheres of 40 neuropathologically confirmed AD patients were regionally dissected. Dichotomization based on depression and aggression scores resulted in depressed/nondepressed (AD + D/AD - D) and aggressive/nonaggressive (AD + Agr/AD - Agr) groups. Concentrations of dopamine, serotonin (5-HT), (nor)epinephrine ((N)E), and respective metabolites were determined using reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. Significantly lower 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycol (MHPG) and higher homovanillic acid levels were observed in Brodmann area (BA) 9 and 10 of AD + D compared with AD - D. In AD + Agr, 5-hydroxy-3-indoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) levels in BA9, 5-HIAA to 5-HT ratios in BA11, and MHPG, NE, and 5-HIAA levels in the hippocampus were significantly decreased compared with AD - Agr. These findings indicate that brain region-specific altered monoamines and metabolites may contribute to the occurrence of depression and aggression in AD. PMID:24997673

  12. Marshall-Stickler phenotype associated with von Willebrand disease

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonald, M.R.; Baker, K.S.; Schaefer, G.B.

    1997-01-20

    We report on 6 individuals from three different kindreds with Marshall-Stickler (MS) phenotype, with characteristic orofacial abnormalities, arthropathy, deafness, and eye findings, all of whom were discovered to have a mild bleeding diathesis and coagulation-study findings consistent with mild von Willebrand disease (vWD). MS syndrome has been linked in some cases to the type II procollagen gene (COL2A1) on chromosome 12q, and to the collagen XI gene (COL11A2) on chromosome 6. The von Willebrand factor (vWF) is encoded by a 180-Kb gene located on the short arm of chromosome 12. This is the first reported association of these two disorders. 26 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Mouse Genome Database: from sequence to phenotypes and disease models

    PubMed Central

    Eppig, Janan T.; Richardson, Joel E.; Kadin, James A.; Smith, Cynthia L.; Blake, Judith A.; Bult, Carol J.

    2015-01-01

    The Mouse Genome Database (MGD, www.informatics.jax.org) is the international scientific database for genetic, genomic, and biological data on the laboratory mouse to support the research requirements of the biomedical community. To accomplish this goal, MGD provides broad data coverage, serves as the authoritative standard for mouse nomenclature for genes, mutants, and strains, and curates and integrates many types of data from literature and electronic sources. Among the key data sets MGD supports are: the complete catalog of mouse genes and genome features, comparative homology data for mouse and vertebrate genes, the authoritative set of Gene Ontology (GO) annotations for mouse gene functions, a comprehensive catalog of mouse mutations and their phenotypes, and a curated compendium of mouse models of human diseases. Here we describe the data acquisition process, specifics about MGD’s key data areas, methods to access and query MGD data, and outreach and user help facilities. PMID:26150326

  14. Mouse Genome Database: From sequence to phenotypes and disease models.

    PubMed

    Eppig, Janan T; Richardson, Joel E; Kadin, James A; Smith, Cynthia L; Blake, Judith A; Bult, Carol J

    2015-08-01

    The Mouse Genome Database (MGD, www.informatics.jax.org) is the international scientific database for genetic, genomic, and biological data on the laboratory mouse to support the research requirements of the biomedical community. To accomplish this goal, MGD provides broad data coverage, serves as the authoritative standard for mouse nomenclature for genes, mutants, and strains, and curates and integrates many types of data from literature and electronic sources. Among the key data sets MGD supports are: the complete catalog of mouse genes and genome features, comparative homology data for mouse and vertebrate genes, the authoritative set of Gene Ontology (GO) annotations for mouse gene functions, a comprehensive catalog of mouse mutations and their phenotypes, and a curated compendium of mouse models of human diseases. Here, we describe the data acquisition process, specifics about MGD's key data areas, methods to access and query MGD data, and outreach and user help facilities. PMID:26150326

  15. Co-clustering phenome–genome for phenotype classification and disease gene discovery

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, TaeHyun; Atluri, Gowtham; Xie, MaoQiang; Dey, Sanjoy; Hong, Changjin; Kumar, Vipin; Kuang, Rui

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the categorization of human diseases is critical for reliably identifying disease causal genes. Recently, genome-wide studies of abnormal chromosomal locations related to diseases have mapped >2000 phenotype–gene relations, which provide valuable information for classifying diseases and identifying candidate genes as drug targets. In this article, a regularized non-negative matrix tri-factorization (R-NMTF) algorithm is introduced to co-cluster phenotypes and genes, and simultaneously detect associations between the detected phenotype clusters and gene clusters. The R-NMTF algorithm factorizes the phenotype–gene association matrix under the prior knowledge from phenotype similarity network and protein–protein interaction network, supervised by the label information from known disease classes and biological pathways. In the experiments on disease phenotype–gene associations in OMIM and KEGG disease pathways, R-NMTF significantly improved the classification of disease phenotypes and disease pathway genes compared with support vector machines and Label Propagation in cross-validation on the annotated phenotypes and genes. The newly predicted phenotypes in each disease class are highly consistent with human phenotype ontology annotations. The roles of the new member genes in the disease pathways are examined and validated in the protein–protein interaction subnetworks. Extensive literature review also confirmed many new members of the disease classes and pathways as well as the predicted associations between disease phenotype classes and pathways. PMID:22735708

  16. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease phenotypes and balance impairment

    PubMed Central

    Voica, Alina Sorina; Oancea, Cristian; Tudorache, Emanuela; Crisan, Alexandru F; Fira-Mladinescu, Ovidiu; Tudorache, Voicu; Timar, Bogdan

    2016-01-01

    Background/objective Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a respiratory disease that results in airflow limitation and respiratory distress, also having many nonrespiratory manifestations that affect both function and mobility. Preliminary evidence suggests that balance deficits constitute an important secondary impairment in individuals with COPD. Our objective was to investigate balance performance in two groups of COPD patients with different body compositions and to observe which of these groups are more likely to experience falls in the future. Methods We included 27 stable COPD patients and 17 healthy individuals who performed a series of balance tests. The COPD patients were divided in two groups: emphysematous and bronchitic. Patients completed the activities balance confidence scale and the COPD assessment test questionnaire and afterward performed the Berg Balance Scale, timed up and go, single leg stance and 6-minute walking distance test. We analyzed the differences in the balance tests between the studied groups. Results Bronchitic COPD was associated with a decreased value when compared to emphysematous COPD for the following variables: single leg stance (8.7 vs 15.6; P<0.001) and activities balance confidence (53.2 vs 74.2; P=0.001). Bronchitic COPD patients had a significantly higher value of timed up and go test compared to patients with emphysematous COPD (14.7 vs 12.8; P=0.001). Conclusion Patients with COPD have a higher balance impairment than their healthy peers. Moreover, we observed that the bronchitic COPD phenotype is more likely to experience falls compared to the emphysematous phenotype. PMID:27199555

  17. Effective diagnosis of genetic disease by computational phenotype analysis of the disease-associated genome

    PubMed Central

    Zemojtel, Tomasz; Köhler, Sebastian; Mackenroth, Luisa; Jäger, Marten; Hecht, Jochen; Krawitz, Peter; Graul-Neumann, Luitgard; Doelken, Sandra; Ehmke, Nadja; Spielmann, Malte; Øien, Nancy Christine; Schweiger, Michal R.; Krüger, Ulrike; Frommer, Götz; Fischer, Björn; Kornak, Uwe; Flöttmann, Ricarda; Ardeshirdavani, Amin; Moreau, Yves; Lewis, Suzanna E.; Haendel, Melissa; Smedley, Damian; Horn, Denise; Mundlos, Stefan; Robinson, Peter N.

    2015-01-01

    Less than half of patients with suspected genetic disease receive a molecular diagnosis. We have therefore integrated next-generation sequencing (NGS), bioinformatics, and clinical data into an effective diagnostic workflow. We used variants in the 2741 established Mendelian disease genes [the disease-associated genome (DAG)] to develop a targeted enrichment DAG panel (7.1 Mb), which achieves a coverage of 20-fold or better for 98% of bases. Furthermore, we established a computational method [Phenotypic Interpretation of eXomes (PhenIX)] that evaluated and ranked variants based on pathogenicity and semantic similarity of patients’ phenotype described by Human Phenotype Ontology (HPO) terms to those of 3991 Mendelian diseases. In computer simulations, ranking genes based on the variant score put the true gene in first place less than 5% of the time; PhenIX placed the correct gene in first place more than 86% of the time. In a retrospective test of PhenIX on 52 patients with previously identified mutations and known diagnoses, the correct gene achieved a mean rank of 2.1. In a prospective study on 40 individuals without a diagnosis, PhenIX analysis enabled a diagnosis in 11 cases (28%, at a mean rank of 2.4). Thus, the NGS of the DAG followed by phenotype-driven bioinformatic analysis allows quick and effective differential diagnostics in medical genetics. PMID:25186178

  18. Identifying Multimodal Intermediate Phenotypes Between Genetic Risk Factors and Disease Status in Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Hao, Xiaoke; Yao, Xiaohui; Yan, Jingwen; Risacher, Shannon L; Saykin, Andrew J; Zhang, Daoqiang; Shen, Li

    2016-10-01

    Neuroimaging genetics has attracted growing attention and interest, which is thought to be a powerful strategy to examine the influence of genetic variants (i.e., single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs)) on structures or functions of human brain. In recent studies, univariate or multivariate regression analysis methods are typically used to capture the effective associations between genetic variants and quantitative traits (QTs) such as brain imaging phenotypes. The identified imaging QTs, although associated with certain genetic markers, may not be all disease specific. A useful, but underexplored, scenario could be to discover only those QTs associated with both genetic markers and disease status for revealing the chain from genotype to phenotype to symptom. In addition, multimodal brain imaging phenotypes are extracted from different perspectives and imaging markers consistently showing up in multimodalities may provide more insights for mechanistic understanding of diseases (i.e., Alzheimer's disease (AD)). In this work, we propose a general framework to exploit multi-modal brain imaging phenotypes as intermediate traits that bridge genetic risk factors and multi-class disease status. We applied our proposed method to explore the relation between the well-known AD risk SNP APOE rs429358 and three baseline brain imaging modalities (i.e., structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) and F-18 florbetapir PET scans amyloid imaging (AV45)) from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) database. The empirical results demonstrate that our proposed method not only helps improve the performances of imaging genetic associations, but also discovers robust and consistent regions of interests (ROIs) across multi-modalities to guide the disease-induced interpretation. PMID:27277494

  19. Rapid discrimination of the phenotypic variants of von Willebrand disease.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Jonathan C; Morateck, Patti A; Christopherson, Pamela A; Yan, Ke; Hoffmann, Raymond G; Gill, Joan Cox; Montgomery, Robert R

    2016-05-19

    Approximately 20% to 25% of patients with von Willebrand disease (VWD) have a qualitative defect of the von Willebrand factor (VWF) protein activities. Variant VWD typically is classified as type 1C, 2A, 2B, 2M, or 2N depending on the VWF activity defect. Traditionally, diagnosis has relied on multiple clinical laboratory assays to assign VWD phenotype. We developed an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to measure the various activities of VWF on a single plate and evaluated 160 patient samples enrolled in the Zimmerman Program for the Molecular and Clinical Biology of von Willebrand Disease with type 2 VWD. Using linear discriminate analysis (LDA), this assay was able to identify type 1C, 2A, 2B, 2M, or 2N VWD with an overall accuracy of 92.5% in the patient study cohort. LDA jackknife analysis, a statistical resampling technique, identified variant VWD with an overall accuracy of 88.1%, which predicts the assay's performance in the general population. In addition, this assay demonstrated correlation with traditional clinical laboratory VWF assays. The VWF multiplex activity assay may be useful as a same-day screening assay when considering the diagnosis of variant VWD in an individual patient. PMID:26917779

  20. Senescent phenotypes of skin fibroblasts from patients with Tangier disease

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuura, Fumihiko . E-mail: fumihiko@imed2.med.osaka-u.ac.jp; Hirano, Ken-ichi; Ikegami, Chiaki; Sandoval, Jose C.; Oku, Hiroyuki; Yuasa-Kawase, Miyako; Tsubakio-Yamamoto, Kazumi; Koseki, Masahiro; Masuda, Daisaku; Tsujii, Ken-ichi; Shimomura, Iichiro; Hori, Masatsugu; Yamashita, Shizuya; Ishigami, Masato; Nishida, Makoto

    2007-06-01

    Tangier disease (TD) is characterized by a deficiency of high density lipoprotein (HDL) in plasma and patients with TD have an increased risk for coronary artery disease (CAD). Recently, we reported that fibroblasts from TD exhibited large and flattened morphology, which is often observed in senescent cells. On the other hand, data have accumulated to show the relationship between cellular senescence and development of atherosclerotic CAD. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether TD fibroblasts exhibited cellular senescence. The proliferation of TD fibroblasts was gradually decreased at population doubling level (PDL) {approx}10 compared with control cells. TD cells practically ceased proliferation at PDL {approx}30. DNA synthesis was markedly decreased in TD fibroblasts. TD cells exhibited a higher positive rate for senescence-associated {beta}-galactosidase (SA-{beta}-gal), which is one of the biomarkers of cellular senescence in vitro. These data showed that TD cells reached cellular senescence at an earlier PDL compared with controls. Although, there was no difference in the telomere length of fibroblasts between TD and controls at the earlier passage (PDL 6), the telomere length of TD cells was shorter than that of controls at the late passage (PDL 25). Taken together, the current study demonstrates that the late-passaged TD fibroblasts showed senescent phenotype in vitro, which might be related to the increased cardiovascular manifestations in TD patients.

  1. The Hartnup phenotype: Mendelian transport disorder, multifactorial disease.

    PubMed

    Scriver, C R; Mahon, B; Levy, H L; Clow, C L; Reade, T M; Kronick, J; Lemieux, B; Laberge, C

    1987-05-01

    The Hartnup mutation affects an amino acid transport system of intestine and kidney used by a large group of neutral charge alpha-amino acids (six essential and several nonessential). We compared developmental outcomes and medical histories of 21 Hartnup subjects, identified through newborn screening, with those of 19 control sibs. We found no significant differences in means of growth percentiles and IQ scores between Hartnup and control groups (but all low academic performance scores were found in the Hartnup group, and various skin lesions occurred in five Hartnup subjects), no significant difference between means of the summed plasma values for amino acids affected by the Hartnup gene in Hartnup and control groups, two Hartnup subjects with clinical manifestations--impaired somatic growth and IQ in one, impaired growth and a "pellagrin" episode in the other--who had the lowest summed plasma amino acid values in the Hartnup group; the corresponding values for their sibs were the low outliers in the control group, and two tissue-specific forms of the Hartnup (transport) phenotype: renal and intestinal involvement (15 families) and renal involvement alone (one family), both forms having been inherited as autosomal recessives (the symptomatic probands had the usual form). Whereas deficient activity of the "Hartnup" transport system is monogenic, the associated plasma amino acid value (measured genotype) is polygenic. The latter describes the parameter of homeostasis and liability to disease. Cause of Hartnup disease is multifactorial. PMID:3578280

  2. The Hartnup phenotype: Mendelian transport disorder, multifactorial disease.

    PubMed Central

    Scriver, C R; Mahon, B; Levy, H L; Clow, C L; Reade, T M; Kronick, J; Lemieux, B; Laberge, C

    1987-01-01

    The Hartnup mutation affects an amino acid transport system of intestine and kidney used by a large group of neutral charge alpha-amino acids (six essential and several nonessential). We compared developmental outcomes and medical histories of 21 Hartnup subjects, identified through newborn screening, with those of 19 control sibs. We found no significant differences in means of growth percentiles and IQ scores between Hartnup and control groups (but all low academic performance scores were found in the Hartnup group, and various skin lesions occurred in five Hartnup subjects), no significant difference between means of the summed plasma values for amino acids affected by the Hartnup gene in Hartnup and control groups, two Hartnup subjects with clinical manifestations--impaired somatic growth and IQ in one, impaired growth and a "pellagrin" episode in the other--who had the lowest summed plasma amino acid values in the Hartnup group; the corresponding values for their sibs were the low outliers in the control group, and two tissue-specific forms of the Hartnup (transport) phenotype: renal and intestinal involvement (15 families) and renal involvement alone (one family), both forms having been inherited as autosomal recessives (the symptomatic probands had the usual form). Whereas deficient activity of the "Hartnup" transport system is monogenic, the associated plasma amino acid value (measured genotype) is polygenic. The latter describes the parameter of homeostasis and liability to disease. Cause of Hartnup disease is multifactorial. PMID:3578280

  3. Analyzing networks of phenotypes in complex diseases: methodology and applications in COPD

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The investigation of complex disease heterogeneity has been challenging. Here, we introduce a network-based approach, using partial correlations, that analyzes the relationships among multiple disease-related phenotypes. Results We applied this method to two large, well-characterized studies of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We also examined the associations between these COPD phenotypic networks and other factors, including case-control status, disease severity, and genetic variants. Using these phenotypic networks, we have detected novel relationships between phenotypes that would not have been observed using traditional epidemiological approaches. Conclusion Phenotypic network analysis of complex diseases could provide novel insights into disease susceptibility, disease severity, and genetic mechanisms. PMID:24964944

  4. Definitions of the phenotypic manifestations of sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Ballas, Samir K; Lieff, Susan; Benjamin, Lennette J; Dampier, Carlton D; Heeney, Matthew M; Hoppe, Carolyn; Johnson, Cage S; Rogers, Zora R; Smith-Whitley, Kim; Wang, Winfred C; Telen, Marilyn J

    2010-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a pleiotropic genetic disorder of hemoglobin that has profound multiorgan effects. The low prevalence of SCD ( approximately 100,000/US) has limited progress in clinical, basic, and translational research. Lack of a large, readily accessible population for clinical studies has contributed to the absence of standard definitions and diagnostic criteria for the numerous complications of SCD and inadequate understanding of SCD pathophysiology. In 2005, the Comprehensive Sickle Cell Centers initiated a project to establish consensus definitions of the most frequently occurring complications. A group of clinicians and scientists with extensive expertise in research and treatment of SCD gathered to identify and categorize the most common complications. From this group, a formal writing team was formed that further reviewed the literature, sought specialist input, and produced definitions in a standard format. This article provides an overview of the process and describes 12 body system categories and the most prevalent or severe complications within these categories. A detailed Appendix provides standardized definitions for all complications identified within each system. This report proposes use of these definitions for studies of SCD complications, so future studies can be comparably robust and treatment efficacy measured. Use of these definitions will support greater accuracy in genotype-phenotype studies, thereby achieving a better understanding of SCD pathophysiology. This should nevertheless be viewed as a dynamic rather than final document; phenotype descriptions should be reevaluated and revised periodically to provide the most current standard definitions as etiologic factors are better understood, and new diagnostic options are developed. PMID:19902523

  5. Alcohol consumption, Lewis phenotypes, and risk of ischemic heart disease

    SciTech Connect

    Hein, H.O.; Suadicani, P.; Gyntelberg, F. . Epidemiological Research Unit); Sorenson, H. . Dept. of Chemical Immunology); Hein, H.O. . Dept. of Internal Medicine)

    1993-02-13

    The authors have previously found an increased risk of ischemic heart disease (IHD) in men with the Lewis phenotype Le(a[minus]b[minus]) and suggested that the Lewis blood group has a close genetic relation with insulin resistance. The authors have investigated whether any conventional risk factors explain the increased risk in Le(a[minus]b[minus]) men. 3,383 men aged 53-75 years were examined in 1985-86, and morbidity and mortality during the next 4 years were recorded. At baseline, the authors excluded 343 men with a history of myocardial infarction, angina pectoris, intermittent claudication, or stroke. The potential risk factors examined were alcohol consumption, physical activity, tobacco smoking, serum cotinine, serum lipids, body-mass index, blood pressure, prevalence of hypertension and non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, and social class. In 280 (9.6%) men with Le(a[minus]b[minus]), alcohol was the only risk factor significantly associated with risk of IHD. There was a significant inverse dose-effect relation between alcohol consumption and risk; trend tests, with adjustment for age, were significant for fatal IHD (p=0.02), all IHD (p=0.03), and all causes of death (p=0.02). In 2649 (90.4%) men with other phenotypes, there was a limited negative association with alcohol consumption. In Le(a[minus]b[minus]) men, a group genetically at high risk of IHD, alcohol consumption seems to be especially protective. The authors suggest that alcohol consumption may modify insulin resistance in Le(a[minus]b[minus]) men.

  6. Sickle Cell Disease in the Post Genomic Era: A Monogenic Disease with a Polygenic Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Driss, A; Asare, KO; Hibbert, JM; Gee, BE; Adamkiewicz, TV; Stiles, JK

    2009-01-01

    More than half a century after the discovery of the molecular basis of Sickle Cell Disease (SCD), the causes of the phenotypic heterogeneity of the disease remain unclear. This heterogeneity manifests with different clinical outcomes such as stroke, vaso-occlusive episodes, acute chest syndrome, avascular necrosis, leg ulcers, priapism and retinopathy. These outcomes cannot be explained by the single mutation in the beta-globin gene alone but may be attributed to genetic modifiers and environmental effects. Recent advances in the post human genome sequence era have opened the door for the identification of novel genetic modifiers in SCD. Studies are showing that phenotypes of SCD seem to be modulated by polymorphisms in genes that are involved in inflammation, cell–cell interaction and modulators of oxidant injury and nitric oxide biology. The discovery of genes implicated in different phenotypes will help understanding of the physiopathology of the disease and aid in establishing targeted cures. However, caution is needed in asserting that genetic modifiers are the cause of all SCD phenotypes, because there are other factors such as genetic background of the population, environmental components, socio-economics and psychology that can play significant roles in the clinical heterogeneity. PMID:20401335

  7. Combining Human Disease Genetics and Mouse Model Phenotypes towards Drug Repositioning for Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yang; Cai, Xiaoshu; Xu, Rong

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a severe neurodegenerative disorder without effective treatments. Here, we present a novel drug repositioning approach to predict new drugs for PD leveraging both disease genetics and large amounts of mouse model phenotypes. First, we identified PD-specific mouse phenotypes using well-studied human disease genes. Then we searched all FDA-approved drugs for candidates that share similar mouse phenotype profiles with PD. We demonstrated the validity of our approach using drugs that have been approved for PD: 10 approved PD drugs were ranked within top 10% among 1197 candidates. In predicting novel PD drugs, our approach achieved a mean average precision of 0.24, which is significantly higher (pphenotype data. Comparison of gene expression profiles between PD and top-ranked drug candidates indicates that quetiapine has the potential to treat PD. PMID:26958284

  8. Distinctive inflammatory bowel disease phenotype in primary sclerosing cholangitis

    PubMed Central

    de Vries, A Boudewijn; Janse, Marcel; Blokzijl, Hans; Weersma, Rinse K

    2015-01-01

    in PSC-IBD is found to be significant, affecting 13.8% to 90% of the patients after proctocolectomy with ileo anal-pouch anastomosis. CONCLUSION: IBD in primary sclerosing cholangitis represents a distinct phenotype that differs from UC and Crohn’s disease and therefore requires specialized management. PMID:25684965

  9. Human glia can both induce and rescue aspects of disease phenotype in Huntington disease.

    PubMed

    Benraiss, Abdellatif; Wang, Su; Herrlinger, Stephanie; Li, Xiaojie; Chandler-Militello, Devin; Mauceri, Joseph; Burm, Hayley B; Toner, Michael; Osipovitch, Mikhail; Jim Xu, Qiwu; Ding, Fengfei; Wang, Fushun; Kang, Ning; Kang, Jian; Curtin, Paul C; Brunner, Daniela; Windrem, Martha S; Munoz-Sanjuan, Ignacio; Nedergaard, Maiken; Goldman, Steven A

    2016-01-01

    The causal contribution of glial pathology to Huntington disease (HD) has not been heavily explored. To define the contribution of glia to HD, we established human HD glial chimeras by neonatally engrafting immunodeficient mice with mutant huntingtin (mHTT)-expressing human glial progenitor cells (hGPCs), derived from either human embryonic stem cells or mHTT-transduced fetal hGPCs. Here we show that mHTT glia can impart disease phenotype to normal mice, since mice engrafted intrastriatally with mHTT hGPCs exhibit worse motor performance than controls, and striatal neurons in mHTT glial chimeras are hyperexcitable. Conversely, normal glia can ameliorate disease phenotype in transgenic HD mice, as striatal transplantation of normal glia rescues aspects of electrophysiological and behavioural phenotype, restores interstitial potassium homeostasis, slows disease progression and extends survival in R6/2 HD mice. These observations suggest a causal role for glia in HD, and further suggest a cell-based strategy for disease amelioration in this disorder. PMID:27273432

  10. Human glia can both induce and rescue aspects of disease phenotype in Huntington disease

    PubMed Central

    Benraiss, Abdellatif; Wang, Su; Herrlinger, Stephanie; Li, Xiaojie; Chandler-Militello, Devin; Mauceri, Joseph; Burm, Hayley B.; Toner, Michael; Osipovitch, Mikhail; Jim Xu, Qiwu; Ding, Fengfei; Wang, Fushun; Kang, Ning; Kang, Jian; Curtin, Paul C.; Brunner, Daniela; Windrem, Martha S.; Munoz-Sanjuan, Ignacio; Nedergaard, Maiken; Goldman, Steven A.

    2016-01-01

    The causal contribution of glial pathology to Huntington disease (HD) has not been heavily explored. To define the contribution of glia to HD, we established human HD glial chimeras by neonatally engrafting immunodeficient mice with mutant huntingtin (mHTT)-expressing human glial progenitor cells (hGPCs), derived from either human embryonic stem cells or mHTT-transduced fetal hGPCs. Here we show that mHTT glia can impart disease phenotype to normal mice, since mice engrafted intrastriatally with mHTT hGPCs exhibit worse motor performance than controls, and striatal neurons in mHTT glial chimeras are hyperexcitable. Conversely, normal glia can ameliorate disease phenotype in transgenic HD mice, as striatal transplantation of normal glia rescues aspects of electrophysiological and behavioural phenotype, restores interstitial potassium homeostasis, slows disease progression and extends survival in R6/2 HD mice. These observations suggest a causal role for glia in HD, and further suggest a cell-based strategy for disease amelioration in this disorder. PMID:27273432

  11. The 19q12 bladder cancer GWAS signal: association with cyclin E function and aggressive disease

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Yi-Ping; Kohaar, Indu; Moore, Lee E.; Lenz, Petra; Figueroa, Jonine D.; Tang, Wei; Porter-Gill, Patricia; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Scott-Johnson, Alexandra; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Muchmore, Brian; Baris, Dalsu; Paquin, Ashley; Ylaya, Kris; Schwenn, Molly; Apolo, Andrea B.; Karagas, Margaret R.; Tarway, McAnthony; Johnson, Alison; Mumy, Adam; Schned, Alan; Guedez, Liliana; Jones, Michael A.; Kida, Masatoshi; Monawar Hosain, GM; Malats, Nuria; Kogevinas, Manolis; Tardon, Adonina; Serra, Consol; Carrato, Alfredo; Garcia-Closas, Reina; Lloreta, Josep; Wu, Xifeng; Purdue, Mark; Andriole, Gerald L.; Grubb, Robert L.; Black, Amanda; Landi, Maria T.; Caporaso, Neil E.; Vineis, Paolo; Siddiq, Afshan; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Ljungberg, Börje; Severi, Gianluca; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Krogh, Vittorio; Dorronsoro, Miren; Travis, Ruth C.; Tjønneland, Anne; Brennan, Paul; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Riboli, Elio; Prescott, Jennifer; Chen, Constance; De Vivo, Immaculata; Govannucci, Edward; Hunter, David; Kraft, Peter; Lindstrom, Sara; Gapstur, Susan M.; Jacobs, Eric J.; Diver, W. Ryan; Albanes, Demetrius; Weinstein, Stephanie J.; Virtamo, Jarmo; Kooperberg, Charles; Hohensee, Chancellor; Rodabough, Rebecca J.; Cortessis, Victoria K.; Conti, David V.; Gago-Dominguez, Manuela; Stern, Mariana C.; Pike, Malcolm C.; Van Den Berg, David; Yuan, Jian-Min; Haiman, Christopher A.; Cussenot, Olivier; Cancel-Tassin, Geraldine; Roupret, Morgan; Comperat, Eva; Porru, Stefano; Carta, Angela; Pavanello, Sofia; Arici, Cecilia; Mastrangelo, Giuseppe; Grossman, H. Barton; Wang, Zhaoming; Deng, Xiang; Chung, Charles C.; Hutchinson, Amy; Burdette, Laurie; Wheeler, William; Fraumeni, Joseph; Chanock, Stephen J.; Hewitt, Stephen M.; Silverman, Debra T.; Rothman, Nathaniel; Prokunina-Olsson, Ludmila

    2014-01-01

    A genome-wide association study (GWAS) of bladder cancer identified a genetic marker rs8102137 within the 19q12 region as a novel susceptibility variant. This marker is located upstream of the CCNE1 gene, which encodes cyclin E, a cell cycle protein. We performed genetic fine mapping analysis of the CCNE1 region using data from two bladder cancer GWAS (5,942 cases and 10,857 controls). We found that the original GWAS marker rs8102137 represents a group of 47 linked SNPs (with r2≥0.7) associated with increased bladder cancer risk. From this group we selected a functional promoter variant rs7257330, which showed strong allele-specific binding of nuclear proteins in several cell lines. In both GWAS, rs7257330 was associated only with aggressive bladder cancer, with a combined per-allele odds ratio (OR) =1.18 (95%CI=1.09-1.27, p=4.67×10−5 vs. OR =1.01 (95%CI=0.93-1.10, p=0.79) for non-aggressive disease, with p=0.0015 for case-only analysis. Cyclin E protein expression analyzed in 265 bladder tumors was increased in aggressive tumors (p=0.013) and, independently, with each rs7257330-A risk allele (ptrend=0.024). Over-expression of recombinant cyclin E in cell lines caused significant acceleration of cell cycle. In conclusion, we defined the 19q12 signal as the first GWAS signal specific for aggressive bladder cancer. Molecular mechanisms of this genetic association may be related to cyclin E over-expression and alteration of cell cycle in carriers of CCNE1 risk variants. In combination with established bladder cancer risk factors and other somatic and germline genetic markers, the CCNE1 variants could be useful for inclusion into bladder cancer risk prediction models. PMID:25320178

  12. Translational regulation shapes the molecular landscape of complex disease phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Schafer, Sebastian; Adami, Eleonora; Heinig, Matthias; Rodrigues, Katharina E. Costa; Kreuchwig, Franziska; Silhavy, Jan; van Heesch, Sebastiaan; Simaite, Deimante; Rajewsky, Nikolaus; Cuppen, Edwin; Pravenec, Michal; Vingron, Martin; Cook, Stuart A.; Hubner, Norbert

    2015-01-01

    The extent of translational control of gene expression in mammalian tissues remains largely unknown. Here we perform genome-wide RNA sequencing and ribosome profiling in heart and liver tissues to investigate strain-specific translational regulation in the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR/Ola). For the most part, transcriptional variation is equally apparent at the translational level and there is limited evidence of translational buffering. Remarkably, we observe hundreds of strain-specific differences in translation, almost doubling the number of differentially expressed genes. The integration of genetic, transcriptional and translational data sets reveals distinct signatures in 3′UTR variation, RNA-binding protein motifs and miRNA expression associated with translational regulation of gene expression. We show that a large number of genes associated with heart and liver traits in human genome-wide association studies are primarily translationally regulated. Capturing interindividual differences in the translated genome will lead to new insights into the genes and regulatory pathways underlying disease phenotypes. PMID:26007203

  13. Translational regulation shapes the molecular landscape of complex disease phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Schafer, Sebastian; Adami, Eleonora; Heinig, Matthias; Rodrigues, Katharina E Costa; Kreuchwig, Franziska; Silhavy, Jan; van Heesch, Sebastiaan; Simaite, Deimante; Rajewsky, Nikolaus; Cuppen, Edwin; Pravenec, Michal; Vingron, Martin; Cook, Stuart A; Hubner, Norbert

    2015-01-01

    The extent of translational control of gene expression in mammalian tissues remains largely unknown. Here we perform genome-wide RNA sequencing and ribosome profiling in heart and liver tissues to investigate strain-specific translational regulation in the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR/Ola). For the most part, transcriptional variation is equally apparent at the translational level and there is limited evidence of translational buffering. Remarkably, we observe hundreds of strain-specific differences in translation, almost doubling the number of differentially expressed genes. The integration of genetic, transcriptional and translational data sets reveals distinct signatures in 3'UTR variation, RNA-binding protein motifs and miRNA expression associated with translational regulation of gene expression. We show that a large number of genes associated with heart and liver traits in human genome-wide association studies are primarily translationally regulated. Capturing interindividual differences in the translated genome will lead to new insights into the genes and regulatory pathways underlying disease phenotypes. PMID:26007203

  14. The Human Phenotype Ontology project: linking molecular biology and disease through phenotype data.

    PubMed

    Köhler, Sebastian; Doelken, Sandra C; Mungall, Christopher J; Bauer, Sebastian; Firth, Helen V; Bailleul-Forestier, Isabelle; Black, Graeme C M; Brown, Danielle L; Brudno, Michael; Campbell, Jennifer; FitzPatrick, David R; Eppig, Janan T; Jackson, Andrew P; Freson, Kathleen; Girdea, Marta; Helbig, Ingo; Hurst, Jane A; Jähn, Johanna; Jackson, Laird G; Kelly, Anne M; Ledbetter, David H; Mansour, Sahar; Martin, Christa L; Moss, Celia; Mumford, Andrew; Ouwehand, Willem H; Park, Soo-Mi; Riggs, Erin Rooney; Scott, Richard H; Sisodiya, Sanjay; Van Vooren, Steven; Wapner, Ronald J; Wilkie, Andrew O M; Wright, Caroline F; Vulto-van Silfhout, Anneke T; de Leeuw, Nicole; de Vries, Bert B A; Washingthon, Nicole L; Smith, Cynthia L; Westerfield, Monte; Schofield, Paul; Ruef, Barbara J; Gkoutos, Georgios V; Haendel, Melissa; Smedley, Damian; Lewis, Suzanna E; Robinson, Peter N

    2014-01-01

    The Human Phenotype Ontology (HPO) project, available at http://www.human-phenotype-ontology.org, provides a structured, comprehensive and well-defined set of 10,088 classes (terms) describing human phenotypic abnormalities and 13,326 subclass relations between the HPO classes. In addition we have developed logical definitions for 46% of all HPO classes using terms from ontologies for anatomy, cell types, function, embryology, pathology and other domains. This allows interoperability with several resources, especially those containing phenotype information on model organisms such as mouse and zebrafish. Here we describe the updated HPO database, which provides annotations of 7,278 human hereditary syndromes listed in OMIM, Orphanet and DECIPHER to classes of the HPO. Various meta-attributes such as frequency, references and negations are associated with each annotation. Several large-scale projects worldwide utilize the HPO for describing phenotype information in their datasets. We have therefore generated equivalence mappings to other phenotype vocabularies such as LDDB, Orphanet, MedDRA, UMLS and phenoDB, allowing integration of existing datasets and interoperability with multiple biomedical resources. We have created various ways to access the HPO database content using flat files, a MySQL database, and Web-based tools. All data and documentation on the HPO project can be found online. PMID:24217912

  15. The Human Phenotype Ontology project: linking molecular biology and disease through phenotype data

    PubMed Central

    Köhler, Sebastian; Doelken, Sandra C.; Mungall, Christopher J.; Bauer, Sebastian; Firth, Helen V.; Bailleul-Forestier, Isabelle; Black, Graeme C. M.; Brown, Danielle L.; Brudno, Michael; Campbell, Jennifer; FitzPatrick, David R.; Eppig, Janan T.; Jackson, Andrew P.; Freson, Kathleen; Girdea, Marta; Helbig, Ingo; Hurst, Jane A.; Jähn, Johanna; Jackson, Laird G.; Kelly, Anne M.; Ledbetter, David H.; Mansour, Sahar; Martin, Christa L.; Moss, Celia; Mumford, Andrew; Ouwehand, Willem H.; Park, Soo-Mi; Riggs, Erin Rooney; Scott, Richard H.; Sisodiya, Sanjay; Vooren, Steven Van; Wapner, Ronald J.; Wilkie, Andrew O. M.; Wright, Caroline F.; Vulto-van Silfhout, Anneke T.; de Leeuw, Nicole; de Vries, Bert B. A.; Washingthon, Nicole L.; Smith, Cynthia L.; Westerfield, Monte; Schofield, Paul; Ruef, Barbara J.; Gkoutos, Georgios V.; Haendel, Melissa; Smedley, Damian; Lewis, Suzanna E.; Robinson, Peter N.

    2014-01-01

    The Human Phenotype Ontology (HPO) project, available at http://www.human-phenotype-ontology.org, provides a structured, comprehensive and well-defined set of 10,088 classes (terms) describing human phenotypic abnormalities and 13,326 subclass relations between the HPO classes. In addition we have developed logical definitions for 46% of all HPO classes using terms from ontologies for anatomy, cell types, function, embryology, pathology and other domains. This allows interoperability with several resources, especially those containing phenotype information on model organisms such as mouse and zebrafish. Here we describe the updated HPO database, which provides annotations of 7,278 human hereditary syndromes listed in OMIM, Orphanet and DECIPHER to classes of the HPO. Various meta-attributes such as frequency, references and negations are associated with each annotation. Several large-scale projects worldwide utilize the HPO for describing phenotype information in their datasets. We have therefore generated equivalence mappings to other phenotype vocabularies such as LDDB, Orphanet, MedDRA, UMLS and phenoDB, allowing integration of existing datasets and interoperability with multiple biomedical resources. We have created various ways to access the HPO database content using flat files, a MySQL database, and Web-based tools. All data and documentation on the HPO project can be found online. PMID:24217912

  16. Linking Human Diseases to Animal Models Using Ontology-Based Phenotype Annotation

    PubMed Central

    Mungall, Christopher J.; Ashburner, Michael; Westerfield, Monte; Lewis, Suzanna E.

    2009-01-01

    Scientists and clinicians who study genetic alterations and disease have traditionally described phenotypes in natural language. The considerable variation in these free-text descriptions has posed a hindrance to the important task of identifying candidate genes and models for human diseases and indicates the need for a computationally tractable method to mine data resources for mutant phenotypes. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that ontological annotation of disease phenotypes will facilitate the discovery of new genotype-phenotype relationships within and across species. To describe phenotypes using ontologies, we used an Entity-Quality (EQ) methodology, wherein the affected entity (E) and how it is affected (Q) are recorded using terms from a variety of ontologies. Using this EQ method, we annotated the phenotypes of 11 gene-linked human diseases described in Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM). These human annotations were loaded into our Ontology-Based Database (OBD) along with other ontology-based phenotype descriptions of mutants from various model organism databases. Phenotypes recorded with this EQ method can be computationally compared based on the hierarchy of terms in the ontologies and the frequency of annotation. We utilized four similarity metrics to compare phenotypes and developed an ontology of homologous and analogous anatomical structures to compare phenotypes between species. Using these tools, we demonstrate that we can identify, through the similarity of the recorded phenotypes, other alleles of the same gene, other members of a signaling pathway, and orthologous genes and pathway members across species. We conclude that EQ-based annotation of phenotypes, in conjunction with a cross-species ontology, and a variety of similarity metrics can identify biologically meaningful similarities between genes by comparing phenotypes alone. This annotation and search method provides a novel and efficient means to identify gene candidates

  17. Disease Phenotype, Activity and Clinical Course Prediction Based on C-Reactive Protein Levels at Diagnosis in Patients with Crohn’s Disease: Results from the CONNECT Study

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Jee Hye; Im, Jong Pil; Ye, Byong Duk; Cheon, Jae Hee; Jang, Hyun Joo; Lee, Kang Moon; Kim, You Sun; Kim, Sang Wook; Kim, Young Ho; Song, Geun Am; Han, Dong Soo; Kim, Won Ho; Kim, Joo Sung

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims C-reactive protein (CRP) is an easily measured index of disease activity, but its ability to predict clinical course is controversial. We therefore designed a study to determine whether the CRP level at Crohn’s disease (CD) diagnosis is a valuable indicator of the disease phenotype, activity, and clinical course. Methods We retrospectively analyzed 705 CD patients from 32 institutions. The patients were classified into two groups according to CRP level. The patients’ demographic and clinical characteristics and their use of immunosuppressive or biological agents were recorded. Disease location and behavior, hospitalization, and surgery were analyzed. Results A high CRP was associated with younger age, steroid use, colonic or ileocolonic location, high CD activity index, and active inflammation at colonoscopy (p<0.001). As the disease progressed, patients with high CRP were more likely to exhibit strictures (p=0.027). There were significant differences in the use of 5-aminosalicylic acid, antibiotics, corticosteroids, azathioprine, and infliximab (p<0.001, p<0.001, p<0.001, p<0.001, and p=0.023, respectively). Hospitalization was also more frequent in patients with high CRP. Conclusions The CRP level at diagnosis is useful for evaluating the phenotype, activity, and clinical course of CD. Closer follow-up strategies, with early aggressive treatment, could be considered for patients with high CRP. PMID:27021506

  18. Phenolyzer: phenotype-based prioritization of candidate genes for human diseases.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hui; Robinson, Peter N; Wang, Kai

    2015-09-01

    Prior biological knowledge and phenotype information may help to identify disease genes from human whole-genome and whole-exome sequencing studies. We developed Phenolyzer (http://phenolyzer.usc.edu), a tool that uses prior information to implicate genes involved in diseases. Phenolyzer exhibits superior performance over competing methods for prioritizing Mendelian and complex disease genes, based on disease or phenotype terms entered as free text. PMID:26192085

  19. Missing heritability of complex diseases: Enlightenment by genetic variants from intermediate phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Blanco-Gómez, Adrián; Castillo-Lluva, Sonia; Del Mar Sáez-Freire, María; Hontecillas-Prieto, Lourdes; Mao, Jian Hua; Castellanos-Martín, Andrés; Pérez-Losada, Jesus

    2016-07-01

    Diseases of complex origin have a component of quantitative genetics that contributes to their susceptibility and phenotypic variability. However, after several studies, a major part of the genetic component of complex phenotypes has still not been found, a situation known as "missing heritability." Although there have been many hypotheses put forward to explain the reasons for the missing heritability, its definitive causes remain unknown. Complex diseases are caused by multiple intermediate phenotypes involved in their pathogenesis and, very often, each one of these intermediate phenotypes also has a component of quantitative inheritance. Here we propose that at least part of the missing heritability can be explained by the genetic component of intermediate phenotypes that is not detectable at the level of the main complex trait. At the same time, the identification of the genetic component of intermediate phenotypes provides an opportunity to identify part of the missing heritability of complex diseases. PMID:27241833

  20. Analysis of the human diseasome using phenotype similarity between common, genetic, and infectious diseases

    PubMed Central

    Hoehndorf, Robert; Schofield, Paul N.; Gkoutos, Georgios V.

    2015-01-01

    Phenotypes are the observable characteristics of an organism arising from its response to the environment. Phenotypes associated with engineered and natural genetic variation are widely recorded using phenotype ontologies in model organisms, as are signs and symptoms of human Mendelian diseases in databases such as OMIM and Orphanet. Exploiting these resources, several computational methods have been developed for integration and analysis of phenotype data to identify the genetic etiology of diseases or suggest plausible interventions. A similar resource would be highly useful not only for rare and Mendelian diseases, but also for common, complex and infectious diseases. We apply a semantic text-mining approach to identify the phenotypes (signs and symptoms) associated with over 6,000 diseases. We evaluate our text-mined phenotypes by demonstrating that they can correctly identify known disease-associated genes in mice and humans with high accuracy. Using a phenotypic similarity measure, we generate a human disease network in which diseases that have similar signs and symptoms cluster together, and we use this network to identify closely related diseases based on common etiological, anatomical as well as physiological underpinnings. PMID:26051359

  1. Analysis of the human diseasome using phenotype similarity between common, genetic, and infectious diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoehndorf, Robert; Schofield, Paul N.; Gkoutos, Georgios V.

    2015-06-01

    Phenotypes are the observable characteristics of an organism arising from its response to the environment. Phenotypes associated with engineered and natural genetic variation are widely recorded using phenotype ontologies in model organisms, as are signs and symptoms of human Mendelian diseases in databases such as OMIM and Orphanet. Exploiting these resources, several computational methods have been developed for integration and analysis of phenotype data to identify the genetic etiology of diseases or suggest plausible interventions. A similar resource would be highly useful not only for rare and Mendelian diseases, but also for common, complex and infectious diseases. We apply a semantic text-mining approach to identify the phenotypes (signs and symptoms) associated with over 6,000 diseases. We evaluate our text-mined phenotypes by demonstrating that they can correctly identify known disease-associated genes in mice and humans with high accuracy. Using a phenotypic similarity measure, we generate a human disease network in which diseases that have similar signs and symptoms cluster together, and we use this network to identify closely related diseases based on common etiological, anatomical as well as physiological underpinnings.

  2. siRNA Knockdown of Ribosomal Protein Gene RPL19 Abrogates the Aggressive Phenotype of Human Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bee, Alix; Brewer, Daniel; Beesley, Carol; Dodson, Andrew; Forootan, Shiva; Dickinson, Timothy; Gerard, Patricia; Lane, Brian; Yao, Sheng; Cooper, Colin S.; Djamgoz, Mustafa B. A.; Gosden, Christine M.; Ke, Youqiang; Foster, Christopher S.

    2011-01-01

    We provide novel functional data that posttranscriptional silencing of gene RPL19 using RNAi not only abrogates the malignant phenotype of PC-3M prostate cancer cells but is selective with respect to transcription and translation of other genes. Reducing RPL19 transcription modulates a subset of genes, evidenced by gene expression array analysis and Western blotting, but does not compromise cell proliferation or apoptosis in-vitro. However, growth of xenografted tumors containing the knocked-down RPL19 in-vivo is significantly reduced. Analysis of the modulated genes reveals induction of the non-malignant phenotype principally to involve perturbation of networks of transcription factors and cellular adhesion genes. The data provide evidence that extra-ribosomal regulatory functions of RPL19, beyond protein synthesis, are critical regulators of cellular phenotype. Targeting key members of affected networks identified by gene expression analysis raises the possibility of therapeutically stabilizing a benign phenotype generated by modulating the expression of an individual gene and thereafter constraining a malignant phenotype while leaving non-malignant tissues unaffected. PMID:21799931

  3. PhenoMiner: from text to a database of phenotypes associated with OMIM diseases

    PubMed Central

    Collier, Nigel; Groza, Tudor; Smedley, Damian; Robinson, Peter N.; Oellrich, Anika; Rebholz-Schuhmann, Dietrich

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of scientific and clinical phenotypes reported in the experimental literature has been curated manually to build high-quality databases such as the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM). However, the identification and harmonization of phenotype descriptions struggles with the diversity of human expressivity. We introduce a novel automated extraction approach called PhenoMiner that exploits full parsing and conceptual analysis. Apriori association mining is then used to identify relationships to human diseases. We applied PhenoMiner to the BMC open access collection and identified 13 636 phenotype candidates. We identified 28 155 phenotype-disorder hypotheses covering 4898 phenotypes and 1659 Mendelian disorders. Analysis showed: (i) the semantic distribution of the extracted terms against linked ontologies; (ii) a comparison of term overlap with the Human Phenotype Ontology (HP); (iii) moderate support for phenotype-disorder pairs in both OMIM and the literature; (iv) strong associations of phenotype-disorder pairs to known disease-genes pairs using PhenoDigm. The full list of PhenoMiner phenotypes (S1), phenotype-disorder associations (S2), association-filtered linked data (S3) and user database documentation (S5) is available as supplementary data and can be downloaded at http://github.com/nhcollier/PhenoMiner under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 license. Database URL: phenominer.mml.cam.ac.uk PMID:26507285

  4. PhenoMiner: from text to a database of phenotypes associated with OMIM diseases.

    PubMed

    Collier, Nigel; Groza, Tudor; Smedley, Damian; Robinson, Peter N; Oellrich, Anika; Rebholz-Schuhmann, Dietrich

    2015-10-01

    Analysis of scientific and clinical phenotypes reported in the experimental literature has been curated manually to build high-quality databases such as the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM). However, the identification and harmonization of phenotype descriptions struggles with the diversity of human expressivity. We introduce a novel automated extraction approach called PhenoMiner that exploits full parsing and conceptual analysis. Apriori association mining is then used to identify relationships to human diseases. We applied PhenoMiner to the BMC open access collection and identified 13,636 phenotype candidates. We identified 28,155 phenotype-disorder hypotheses covering 4898 phenotypes and 1659 Mendelian disorders. Analysis showed: (i) the semantic distribution of the extracted terms against linked ontologies; (ii) a comparison of term overlap with the Human Phenotype Ontology (HP); (iii) moderate support for phenotype-disorder pairs in both OMIM and the literature; (iv) strong associations of phenotype-disorder pairs to known disease-genes pairs using PhenoDigm. The full list of PhenoMiner phenotypes (S1), phenotype-disorder associations (S2), association-filtered linked data (S3) and user database documentation (S5) is available as supplementary data and can be downloaded at http://github.com/nhcollier/PhenoMiner under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 license. Database URL: phenominer.mml.cam.ac.uk. PMID:26507285

  5. A Novel Lung Disease Phenotype Adjusted for Mortality Attrition for Cystic Fibrosis Genetic Modifier Studies

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Chelsea; Commander, Clayton W.; Collaco, Joseph M.; Strug, Lisa J.; Li, Weili; Wright, Fred A.; Webel, Aaron D.; Pace, Rhonda G.; Stonebraker, Jaclyn R.; Naughton, Kathleen; Dorfman, Ruslan; Sandford, Andrew; Blackman, Scott M.; Berthiaume, Yves; Paré, Peter; Drumm, Mitchell L.; Zielenski, Julian; Durie, Peter; Cutting, Garry R.; Knowles, Michael R.; Corey, Mary

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Genetic studies of lung disease in Cystic Fibrosis are hampered by the lack of a severity measure that accounts for chronic disease progression and mortality attrition. Further, combining analyses across studies requires common phenotypes that are robust to study design and patient ascertainment. Using data from the North American Cystic Fibrosis Modifier Consortium (Canadian Consortium for CF Genetic Studies, Johns Hopkins University CF Twin and Sibling Study, and University of North Carolina/Case Western Reserve University Gene Modifier Study), the authors calculated age-specific CF percentile values of FEV1 which were adjusted for CF age-specific mortality data. The phenotype was computed for 2061 patients representing the Canadian CF population, 1137 extreme phenotype patients in the UNC/Case Western study, and 1323 patients from multiple CF sib families in the CF Twin and Sibling Study. Despite differences in ascertainment and median age, our phenotype score was distributed in all three samples in a manner consistent with ascertainment differences, reflecting the lung disease severity of each individual in the underlying population. The new phenotype score was highly correlated with the previously recommended complex phenotype, but the new phenotype is more robust for shorter follow-up and for extreme ages. A disease progression and mortality adjusted phenotype reduces the need for stratification or additional covariates, increasing statistical power and avoiding possible distortions. This approach will facilitate large scale genetic and environmental epidemiological studies which will provide targeted therapeutic pathways for the clinical benefit of patients with CF. PMID:21462361

  6. The influence of disease categories on gene candidate predictions from model organism phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The molecular etiology is still to be identified for about half of the currently described Mendelian diseases in humans, thereby hindering efforts to find treatments or preventive measures. Advances, such as new sequencing technologies, have led to increasing amounts of data becoming available with which to address the problem of identifying disease genes. Therefore, automated methods are needed that reliably predict disease gene candidates based on available data. We have recently developed Exomiser as a tool for identifying causative variants from exome analysis results by filtering and prioritising using a number of criteria including the phenotype similarity between the disease and mouse mutants involving the gene candidates. Initial investigations revealed a variation in performance for different medical categories of disease, due in part to a varying contribution of the phenotype scoring component. Results In this study, we further analyse the performance of our cross-species phenotype matching algorithm, and examine in more detail the reasons why disease gene filtering based on phenotype data works better for certain disease categories than others. We found that in addition to misleading phenotype alignments between species, some disease categories are still more amenable to automated predictions than others, and that this often ties in with community perceptions on how well the organism works as model. Conclusions In conclusion, our automated disease gene candidate predictions are highly dependent on the organism used for the predictions and the disease category being studied. Future work on computational disease gene prediction using phenotype data would benefit from methods that take into account the disease category and the source of model organism data. PMID:25093073

  7. MicroRNAs Classify Different Disease Behavior Phenotypes of Crohn's Disease and May Have Prognostic Utility

    PubMed Central

    Peck, Bailey C. E.; Weiser, Matthew; Lee, Saangyoung E.; Gipson, Gregory R.; Iyer, Vishal B.; Sartor, Ryan B.; Herfarth, Hans H.; Long, Millie D.; Hansen, Jonathan J.; Isaacs, Kim L.; Trembath, Dimitri G.; Rahbar, Reza; Sadiq, Timothy S.

    2015-01-01

    Background: There is a dire need for reliable prognostic markers that can guide effective therapeutic intervention in Crohn's disease (CD). We examined whether different phenotypes in CD can be classified based on colonic microRNA (miRNA) expression and whether miRNAs have prognostic utility for CD. Methods: High-throughput sequencing of small and total RNA isolated from colon tissue from patients with CD and controls without Inflammatory Bowel Disease (non-IBD) was performed. To identify miRNAs associated with specific phenotypes of CD, patients were stratified according to disease behavior (nonstricturing, nonpenetrating; stricturing; penetrating), and miRNA profiles in each subset were compared with those of the non-IBD group. Validation assays were performed using quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. These miRNAs were further evaluated by quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue (index biopsies) of patients with nonpenetrating CD at the time of diagnosis that either retained the nonpenetrating phenotype or progressed to penetrating/fistulizing CD. Results: We found a suite of miRNAs, including miR-31-5p, miR-215, miR-223-3p, miR-196b-5p, and miR-203 that stratify patients with CD according to disease behavior independent of the effect of inflammation. Furthermore, we also demonstrated that expression levels of miR-215 in index biopsies of patients with CD might predict the likelihood of progression to penetrating/fistulizing CD. Finally, using a novel statistical simulation approach applied to colonic RNA-sequencing data for patients with CD and non-IBD controls, we identified miR-31-5p and miR-203 as candidate master regulators of gene expression profiles associated with CD. Conclusions: miRNAs may serve as clinically useful prognostic markers guiding initial therapy and identifying patients who would benefit most from effective intervention. PMID:26164662

  8. Assessing the utility of intermediate phenotypes for genetic mapping of psychiatric disease

    PubMed Central

    Flint, Jonathan; Timpson, Nicholas; Munafò, Marcus

    2016-01-01

    Intermediate phenotypes are traits positioned somewhere between genetic variation and disease. They represent a target for attempts to find disease-associated genetic variants and elucidation of mechanisms. Psychiatry has been particularly enamored with intermediate phenotypes, due to uncertainty about disease etiology, inconclusive results in early psychiatric genetic studies, and their appeal relative to traditional diagnostic categories. Here, we argue that new genetic findings are relevant to the question of the utility of these constructs. In particular, results from genome-wide association studies of psychiatric disorders now allow an assessment of the potential role of particular intermediate phenotypes. Based on such an analysis, as well as other recent results, we conclude that intermediate phenotypes are likely to be most valuable in understanding mechanism. PMID:25216981

  9. Genome sequencing reveals loci under artificial selection that underlie disease phenotypes in the laboratory rat.

    PubMed

    Atanur, Santosh S; Diaz, Ana Garcia; Maratou, Klio; Sarkis, Allison; Rotival, Maxime; Game, Laurence; Tschannen, Michael R; Kaisaki, Pamela J; Otto, Georg W; Ma, Man Chun John; Keane, Thomas M; Hummel, Oliver; Saar, Kathrin; Chen, Wei; Guryev, Victor; Gopalakrishnan, Kathirvel; Garrett, Michael R; Joe, Bina; Citterio, Lorena; Bianchi, Giuseppe; McBride, Martin; Dominiczak, Anna; Adams, David J; Serikawa, Tadao; Flicek, Paul; Cuppen, Edwin; Hubner, Norbert; Petretto, Enrico; Gauguier, Dominique; Kwitek, Anne; Jacob, Howard; Aitman, Timothy J

    2013-08-01

    Large numbers of inbred laboratory rat strains have been developed for a range of complex disease phenotypes. To gain insights into the evolutionary pressures underlying selection for these phenotypes, we sequenced the genomes of 27 rat strains, including 11 models of hypertension, diabetes, and insulin resistance, along with their respective control strains. Altogether, we identified more than 13 million single-nucleotide variants, indels, and structural variants across these rat strains. Analysis of strain-specific selective sweeps and gene clusters implicated genes and pathways involved in cation transport, angiotensin production, and regulators of oxidative stress in the development of cardiovascular disease phenotypes in rats. Many of the rat loci that we identified overlap with previously mapped loci for related traits in humans, indicating the presence of shared pathways underlying these phenotypes in rats and humans. These data represent a step change in resources available for evolutionary analysis of complex traits in disease models. PMID:23890820

  10. Overexpression of microRNA-5100 decreases the aggressive phenotype of pancreatic cancer cells by targeting PODXL.

    PubMed

    Chijiiwa, Yoshiro; Moriyama, Taiki; Ohuchida, Kenoki; Nabae, Toshinaga; Ohtsuka, Takao; Miyasaka, Yoshihiro; Fujita, Hayato; Maeyama, Ryo; Manabe, Tatsuya; Abe, Atsushi; Mizuuchi, Yusuke; Oda, Yoshinao; Mizumoto, Kazuhiro; Nakamura, Masafumi

    2016-04-01

    Metastasis is the main cause of cancer-associated death, and metastasis of pancreatic cancer remains difficult to treat because of its aggressiveness. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play crucial roles in the regulation of various human transcripts, and many miRNAs have been reported to correlate with cancer metastasis. We identified an anti-metastatic miRNA, miR-5100, by investigating differences in miRNA profiling between highly metastatic pancreatic cancer cells and their parental cells. Overexpression of miR-5100 inhibited colony formation (P<0.05), cell migration (P<0.0001) and invasion (P<0.0001) of pancreatic cancer cells. In addition, we identified a possible target of miR-5100, podocalyxin-like 1 (PODXL), and demonstrated miR-5100 directly binds to the 3' untranslated region of PODXL and post-transcriptionally regulates its expression in pancreatic cancer cells. Silencing PODXL resulted in diminished cell migration (P<0.0001) and invasion (P<0.05). We also clarified the close relationship between expression of PODXL in human pancreatic cancer specimens and liver metastasis (P=0.0003), and determined that post-operative survival was longer in the low-PODXL expression group than in the high-PODXL expression group (P<0.05). These results indicate that miR-5100 and PODXL have considerable therapeutic potential for anti-metastatic therapy and could be potential indicators for cancer metastases in patients with pancreatic cancer. PMID:26892887

  11. Progerin elicits disease phenotypes of progeria in mice whether or not it is farnesylated.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shao H; Andres, Douglas A; Spielmann, H Peter; Young, Stephen G; Fong, Loren G

    2008-10-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS), a rare disease that results in what appears to be premature aging, is caused by the production of a mutant form of prelamin A known as progerin. Progerin retains a farnesyl lipid anchor at its carboxyl terminus, a modification that is thought to be important in disease pathogenesis. Inhibition of protein farnesylation improves the hallmark nuclear shape abnormalities in HGPS cells and ameliorates disease phenotypes in mice harboring a knockin HGPS mutation (LmnaHG/+). The amelioration of disease, however, is incomplete, leading us to hypothesize that nonfarnesylated progerin also might be capable of eliciting disease. To test this hypothesis, we created knockin mice expressing nonfarnesylated progerin (LmnanHG/+). LmnanHG/+ mice developed the same disease phenotypes observed in LmnaHG/+ mice, although the phenotypes were milder, and mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) derived from these mice contained fewer misshapen nuclei. The steady-state levels of progerin in LmnanHG/+ MEFs and tissues were lower, suggesting a possible explanation for the milder phenotypes. These data support the concept that inhibition of protein farnesylation in progeria could be therapeutically useful but also suggest that this approach may be limited, as progerin elicits disease phenotypes whether or not it is farnesylated. PMID:18769635

  12. The expanding phenotypic spectra of kidney diseases: insights from genetic studies.

    PubMed

    Stokman, Marijn F; Renkema, Kirsten Y; Giles, Rachel H; Schaefer, Franz; Knoers, Nine V A M; van Eerde, Albertien M

    2016-08-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) has led to the identification of previously unrecognized phenotypes associated with classic kidney disease genes. In addition to improving diagnostics for genetically heterogeneous diseases and enabling a faster rate of gene discovery, NGS has enabled an expansion and redefinition of nephrogenetic disease categories. Findings from these studies raise the question of whether disease diagnoses should be made on clinical grounds, on genetic evidence or a combination thereof. Here, we discuss the major kidney disease-associated genes and gene categories for which NGS has expanded the phenotypic spectrum. For example, COL4A3-5 genes, which are classically associated with Alport syndrome, are now understood to also be involved in the aetiology of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis. DGKE, which is associated with nephrotic syndrome, is also mutated in patients with atypical haemolytic uraemic syndrome. We examine how a shared genetic background between diverse clinical phenotypes can provide insight into the function of genes and novel links with essential pathophysiological mechanisms. In addition, we consider genetic and epigenetic factors that contribute to the observed phenotypic heterogeneity of kidney diseases and discuss the challenges in the interpretation of genetic data. Finally, we discuss the implications of the expanding phenotypic spectra associated with kidney disease genes for clinical practice, genetic counselling and personalized care, and present our recommendations for the use of NGS-based tests in routine nephrology practice. PMID:27374918

  13. Genotype-phenotype correlations in neurogenetics: Lesch-Nyhan disease as a model disorder.

    PubMed

    Fu, Rong; Ceballos-Picot, Irene; Torres, Rosa J; Larovere, Laura E; Yamada, Yasukazu; Nguyen, Khue V; Hegde, Madhuri; Visser, Jasper E; Schretlen, David J; Nyhan, William L; Puig, Juan G; O'Neill, Patrick J; Jinnah, H A

    2014-05-01

    Establishing meaningful relationships between genetic variations and clinical disease is a fundamental goal for all human genetic disorders. However, these genotype-phenotype correlations remain incompletely characterized and sometimes conflicting for many diseases. Lesch-Nyhan disease is an X-linked recessive disorder that is caused by a wide variety of mutations in the HPRT1 gene. The gene encodes hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase, an enzyme involved in purine metabolism. The fine structure of enzyme has been established by crystallography studies, and its function can be measured with very precise biochemical assays. This rich knowledge of genetic alterations in the gene and their functional effect on its protein product provides a powerful model for exploring factors that influence genotype-phenotype correlations. The present study summarizes 615 known genetic mutations, their influence on the gene product, and their relationship to the clinical phenotype. In general, the results are compatible with the concept that the overall severity of the disease depends on how mutations ultimately influence enzyme activity. However, careful evaluation of exceptions to this concept point to several additional genetic and non-genetic factors that influence genotype-phenotype correlations. These factors are not unique to Lesch-Nyhan disease, and are relevant to most other genetic diseases. The disease therefore serves as a valuable model for understanding the challenges associated with establishing genotype-phenotype correlations for other disorders. PMID:23975452

  14. Phenotypic insights into ADCY5‐associated disease

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Florence C.F.; Westenberger, Ana; Dale, Russell C.; Smith, Martin; Pall, Hardev S.; Perez‐Dueñas, Belen; Grattan‐Smith, Padraic; Ouvrier, Robert A.; Mahant, Neil; Hanna, Bernadette C.; Hunter, Matthew; Lawson, John A.; Max, Christoph; Sachdev, Rani; Meyer, Esther; Crimmins, Dennis; Pryor, Donald; Morris, John G.L.; Münchau, Alex; Grozeva, Detelina; Carss, Keren J.; Raymond, Lucy; Kurian, Manju A.; Klein, Christine

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background Adenylyl cyclase 5 (ADCY5) mutations is associated with heterogenous syndromes: familial dyskinesia and facial myokymia; paroxysmal chorea and dystonia; autosomal‐dominant chorea and dystonia; and benign hereditary chorea. We provide detailed clinical data on 7 patients from six new kindreds with mutations in the ADCY5 gene, in order to expand and define the phenotypic spectrum of ADCY5 mutations. Methods In 5 of the 7 patients, followed over a period of 9 to 32 years, ADCY5 was sequenced by Sanger sequencing. The other 2 unrelated patients participated in studies for undiagnosed pediatric hyperkinetic movement disorders and underwent whole‐exome sequencing. Results Five patients had the previously reported p.R418W ADCY5 mutation; we also identified two novel mutations at p.R418G and p.R418Q. All patients presented with motor milestone delay, infantile‐onset action‐induced generalized choreoathetosis, dystonia, or myoclonus, with episodic exacerbations during drowsiness being a characteristic feature. Axial hypotonia, impaired upward saccades, and intellectual disability were variable features. The p.R418G and p.R418Q mutation patients had a milder phenotype. Six of seven patients had mild functional gain with clonazepam or clobazam. One patient had bilateral globus pallidal DBS at the age of 33 with marked reduction in dyskinesia, which resulted in mild functional improvement. Conclusion We further delineate the clinical features of ADCY5 gene mutations and illustrate its wide phenotypic expression. We describe mild improvement after treatment with clonazepam, clobazam, and bilateral pallidal DBS. ADCY5‐associated dyskinesia may be under‐recognized, and its diagnosis has important prognostic, genetic, and therapeutic implications. © 2016 The Authors. Movement Disorders published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society PMID:27061943

  15. The Human Phenotype Ontology: Semantic Unification of Common and Rare Disease

    PubMed Central

    Groza, Tudor; Köhler, Sebastian; Moldenhauer, Dawid; Vasilevsky, Nicole; Baynam, Gareth; Zemojtel, Tomasz; Schriml, Lynn Marie; Kibbe, Warren Alden; Schofield, Paul N.; Beck, Tim; Vasant, Drashtti; Brookes, Anthony J.; Zankl, Andreas; Washington, Nicole L.; Mungall, Christopher J.; Lewis, Suzanna E.; Haendel, Melissa A.; Parkinson, Helen; Robinson, Peter N.

    2015-01-01

    The Human Phenotype Ontology (HPO) is widely used in the rare disease community for differential diagnostics, phenotype-driven analysis of next-generation sequence-variation data, and translational research, but a comparable resource has not been available for common disease. Here, we have developed a concept-recognition procedure that analyzes the frequencies of HPO disease annotations as identified in over five million PubMed abstracts by employing an iterative procedure to optimize precision and recall of the identified terms. We derived disease models for 3,145 common human diseases comprising a total of 132,006 HPO annotations. The HPO now comprises over 250,000 phenotypic annotations for over 10,000 rare and common diseases and can be used for examining the phenotypic overlap among common diseases that share risk alleles, as well as between Mendelian diseases and common diseases linked by genomic location. The annotations, as well as the HPO itself, are freely available. PMID:26119816

  16. The Human Phenotype Ontology: Semantic Unification of Common and Rare Disease.

    PubMed

    Groza, Tudor; Köhler, Sebastian; Moldenhauer, Dawid; Vasilevsky, Nicole; Baynam, Gareth; Zemojtel, Tomasz; Schriml, Lynn Marie; Kibbe, Warren Alden; Schofield, Paul N; Beck, Tim; Vasant, Drashtti; Brookes, Anthony J; Zankl, Andreas; Washington, Nicole L; Mungall, Christopher J; Lewis, Suzanna E; Haendel, Melissa A; Parkinson, Helen; Robinson, Peter N

    2015-07-01

    The Human Phenotype Ontology (HPO) is widely used in the rare disease community for differential diagnostics, phenotype-driven analysis of next-generation sequence-variation data, and translational research, but a comparable resource has not been available for common disease. Here, we have developed a concept-recognition procedure that analyzes the frequencies of HPO disease annotations as identified in over five million PubMed abstracts by employing an iterative procedure to optimize precision and recall of the identified terms. We derived disease models for 3,145 common human diseases comprising a total of 132,006 HPO annotations. The HPO now comprises over 250,000 phenotypic annotations for over 10,000 rare and common diseases and can be used for examining the phenotypic overlap among common diseases that share risk alleles, as well as between Mendelian diseases and common diseases linked by genomic location. The annotations, as well as the HPO itself, are freely available. PMID:26119816

  17. Mitochondrial DNA with a large-scale deletion causes two distinct mitochondrial disease phenotypes in mice.

    PubMed

    Katada, Shun; Mito, Takayuki; Ogasawara, Emi; Hayashi, Jun-Ichi; Nakada, Kazuto

    2013-09-01

    Studies in patients have suggested that the clinical phenotypes of some mitochondrial diseases might transit from one disease to another (e.g., Pearson syndrome [PS] to Kearns-Sayre syndrome) in single individuals carrying mitochondrial (mt) DNA with a common deletion (ΔmtDNA), but there is no direct experimental evidence for this. To determine whether ΔmtDNA has the pathologic potential to induce multiple mitochondrial disease phenotypes, we used trans-mitochondrial mice with a heteroplasmic state of wild-type mtDNA and ΔmtDNA (mito-miceΔ). Late-stage embryos carrying ≥50% ΔmtDNA showed abnormal hematopoiesis and iron metabolism in livers that were partly similar to PS (PS-like phenotypes), although they did not express sideroblastic anemia that is a typical symptom of PS. More than half of the neonates with PS-like phenotypes died by 1 month after birth, whereas the rest showed a decrease of ΔmtDNA load in the affected tissues, peripheral blood and liver, and they recovered from PS-like phenotypes. The proportion of ΔmtDNA in various tissues of the surviving mito-miceΔ increased with time, and Kearns-Sayre syndrome-like phenotypes were expressed when the proportion of mtDNA in various tissues reached >70-80%. Our model mouse study clearly showed that a single ΔmtDNA was responsible for at least two distinct disease phenotypes at different ages and suggested that the level and dynamics of mtDNA load in affected tissues would be important for the onset and transition of mitochondrial disease phenotypes in mice. PMID:23853091

  18. Phenotype Similarity Regression for Identifying the Genetic Determinants of Rare Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Greene, Daniel; Richardson, Sylvia; Turro, Ernest

    2016-01-01

    Rare genetic disorders, which can now be studied systematically with affordable genome sequencing, are often caused by high-penetrance rare variants. Such disorders are often heterogeneous and characterized by abnormalities spanning multiple organ systems ascertained with variable clinical precision. Existing methods for identifying genes with variants responsible for rare diseases summarize phenotypes with unstructured binary or quantitative variables. The Human Phenotype Ontology (HPO) allows composite phenotypes to be represented systematically but association methods accounting for the ontological relationship between HPO terms do not exist. We present a Bayesian method to model the association between an HPO-coded patient phenotype and genotype. Our method estimates the probability of an association together with an HPO-coded phenotype characteristic of the disease. We thus formalize a clinical approach to phenotyping that is lacking in standard regression techniques for rare disease research. We demonstrate the power of our method by uncovering a number of true associations in a large collection of genome-sequenced and HPO-coded cases with rare diseases. PMID:26924528

  19. Phenotype Similarity Regression for Identifying the Genetic Determinants of Rare Diseases.

    PubMed

    Greene, Daniel; Richardson, Sylvia; Turro, Ernest

    2016-03-01

    Rare genetic disorders, which can now be studied systematically with affordable genome sequencing, are often caused by high-penetrance rare variants. Such disorders are often heterogeneous and characterized by abnormalities spanning multiple organ systems ascertained with variable clinical precision. Existing methods for identifying genes with variants responsible for rare diseases summarize phenotypes with unstructured binary or quantitative variables. The Human Phenotype Ontology (HPO) allows composite phenotypes to be represented systematically but association methods accounting for the ontological relationship between HPO terms do not exist. We present a Bayesian method to model the association between an HPO-coded patient phenotype and genotype. Our method estimates the probability of an association together with an HPO-coded phenotype characteristic of the disease. We thus formalize a clinical approach to phenotyping that is lacking in standard regression techniques for rare disease research. We demonstrate the power of our method by uncovering a number of true associations in a large collection of genome-sequenced and HPO-coded cases with rare diseases. PMID:26924528

  20. Predominant expression of truncated EpCAM is associated with a more aggressive phenotype and predicts poor overall survival in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Seeber, Andreas; Untergasser, Gerold; Spizzo, Gilbert; Terracciano, Luigi; Lugli, Alessandro; Kasal, Armin; Kocher, Florian; Steiner, Normann; Mazzoleni, Guido; Gastl, Guenther; Fong, Dominic

    2016-08-01

    Regulated intramembrane proteolysis (RIP) has been shown to be an important mechanism for oncogenic activation of EpCAM through nuclear translocation of the intracellular domain EpICD. Recently, we identified two different membranous EpCAM variants namely EpCAM(MF) (full-length) and EpCAM(MT) (truncated) to be expressed in the majority of human epithelial tumors. The aim of our study was to evaluate the potential role of these two protein variants as additional prognostic biomarkers in colorectal cancer. In most studies only one antibody targeting the extracellular domain of EpCAM (EpEX) has been used, whereas in the present study additionally an antibody which detects the intracellular domain (EpICD) was applied to discriminate between different EpCAM variants. Using immunohistochemistry, we analyzed the expression of EpCAM(MF) and EpCAM(MT) variants in 640 patients with colorectal cancer and determined their correlations with other prognostic factors and clinical outcome. A statistically significant association was observed for EpCAM(MT) with advanced tumor stage (p < 0.001), histological grade (p = 0.01), vascular (p < 0.001) and marginal (p = 0.002) invasion. Survival analysis demonstrated reduced overall survival (p < 0.004) in patients with tumors expressing the EpCAM(MT) phenotype when compared to patients with tumors expressing the EpCAM(MF) variant. In conclusion, this study for the first time indicates that expression of EpCAM(MT) is associated with a more aggressive phenotype and predicts poor survival in patients with colorectal cancer. PMID:26996277

  1. Phenotyping airways disease: an A to E approach.

    PubMed

    Gonem, S; Raj, V; Wardlaw, A J; Pavord, I D; Green, R; Siddiqui, S

    2012-12-01

    The airway diseases asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are heterogeneous conditions with overlapping pathophysiological and clinical features. It has previously been proposed that this heterogeneity may be characterized in terms of five relatively independent domains labelled from A to E, namely airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), bronchitis, cough reflex hypersensitivity, damage to the airways and surrounding lung parenchyma, and extrapulmonary factors. Airway hyperresponsiveness occurs in both asthma and COPD, accounting for variable day to day symptoms, although the mechanisms most likely differ between the two conditions. Bronchitis, or airway inflammation, may be predominantly eosinophilic or neutrophilic, with different treatments required for each. Cough reflex hypersensitivity is thought to underlie the chronic dry cough out of proportion to other symptoms that can occur in association with airways disease. Structural changes associated with airway disease (damage) include bronchial wall thickening, airway smooth muscle hypertrophy, bronchiectasis and emphysema. Finally, a variety of extrapulmonary factors may impact upon airway disease, including rhinosinusitis, gastroesophageal reflux disease, obesity and dysfunctional breathing. This article discusses the A to E concept in detail and describes how this framework may be used to assess and treat patients with airway diseases in the clinic. PMID:23181785

  2. Differential serotonergic mediation of aggression in roosters selected for resistance and susceptibility to Marek's disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Serotonin (5-HT) is a primary regulating neurotransmitter involved in aggressive and impulsive behaviors in mammals. Previous studies have also demonstrated the function of serotonergic system in regulating aggression is affected by both genetic and environmental factors. The serotonergic system m...

  3. An analysis of the association between prostate cancer risk loci, PSA levels, disease aggressiveness and disease-specific mortality

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, J; Kopp, R; Stratton, K; Manschreck, C; Corines, M; Rau-Murthy, R; Hayes, J; Lincon, A; Ashraf, A; Thomas, T; Schrader, K; Gallagher, D; Hamilton, R; Scher, H; Lilja, H; Scardino, P; Eastham, J; Offit, K; Vijai, J; Klein, R J

    2015-01-01

    Background: Genome-wide association studies have identified multiple single-nucleotide polymorphsims (SNPs) associated with prostate cancer (PCa). Although these SNPs have been clearly associated with disease risk, their relationship with clinical outcomes is less clear. Our aim was to assess the frequency of known PCa susceptibility alleles within a single institution ascertainment and to correlate risk alleles with disease-specific outcomes. Methods: We genotyped 1354 individuals treated for localised PCa between June 1988 and December 2007. Blood samples were prospectively collected and de-identified before being genotyped and matched to phenotypic data. We investigated associations between 61 SNPs and disease-specific end points using multivariable analysis and also determined if SNPs were associated with PSA at diagnosis. Results: Seven SNPs showed associations on multivariable analysis (P<0.05), rs13385191 with both biochemical recurrence (BR) and castrate metastasis (CM), rs339331 (BR), rs1894292, rs17178655 and rs11067228 (CM), and rs11902236 and rs4857841 PCa-specific mortality. After applying a Bonferroni correction for number of SNPs (P<0.0008), the only persistent significant association was between rs17632542 (KLK3) and PSA levels at diagnosis (P=1.4 × 10−5). Conclusions: We confirmed that rs17632542 in KLK3 is associated with PSA at diagnosis. No significant association was seen between loci and disease-specific end points when accounting for multiple testing. This provides further evidence that known PCa risk SNPs do not predict likelihood of disease progression. PMID:26068399

  4. Complex disease and phenotype mapping in the domestic dog

    PubMed Central

    Hayward, Jessica J.; Castelhano, Marta G.; Oliveira, Kyle C.; Corey, Elizabeth; Balkman, Cheryl; Baxter, Tara L.; Casal, Margret L.; Center, Sharon A.; Fang, Meiying; Garrison, Susan J.; Kalla, Sara E.; Korniliev, Pavel; Kotlikoff, Michael I.; Moise, N. S.; Shannon, Laura M.; Simpson, Kenneth W.; Sutter, Nathan B.; Todhunter, Rory J.; Boyko, Adam R.

    2016-01-01

    The domestic dog is becoming an increasingly valuable model species in medical genetics, showing particular promise to advance our understanding of cancer and orthopaedic disease. Here we undertake the largest canine genome-wide association study to date, with a panel of over 4,200 dogs genotyped at 180,000 markers, to accelerate mapping efforts. For complex diseases, we identify loci significantly associated with hip dysplasia, elbow dysplasia, idiopathic epilepsy, lymphoma, mast cell tumour and granulomatous colitis; for morphological traits, we report three novel quantitative trait loci that influence body size and one that influences fur length and shedding. Using simulation studies, we show that modestly larger sample sizes and denser marker sets will be sufficient to identify most moderate- to large-effect complex disease loci. This proposed design will enable efficient mapping of canine complex diseases, most of which have human homologues, using far fewer samples than required in human studies. PMID:26795439

  5. Complex disease and phenotype mapping in the domestic dog.

    PubMed

    Hayward, Jessica J; Castelhano, Marta G; Oliveira, Kyle C; Corey, Elizabeth; Balkman, Cheryl; Baxter, Tara L; Casal, Margret L; Center, Sharon A; Fang, Meiying; Garrison, Susan J; Kalla, Sara E; Korniliev, Pavel; Kotlikoff, Michael I; Moise, N S; Shannon, Laura M; Simpson, Kenneth W; Sutter, Nathan B; Todhunter, Rory J; Boyko, Adam R

    2016-01-01

    The domestic dog is becoming an increasingly valuable model species in medical genetics, showing particular promise to advance our understanding of cancer and orthopaedic disease. Here we undertake the largest canine genome-wide association study to date, with a panel of over 4,200 dogs genotyped at 180,000 markers, to accelerate mapping efforts. For complex diseases, we identify loci significantly associated with hip dysplasia, elbow dysplasia, idiopathic epilepsy, lymphoma, mast cell tumour and granulomatous colitis; for morphological traits, we report three novel quantitative trait loci that influence body size and one that influences fur length and shedding. Using simulation studies, we show that modestly larger sample sizes and denser marker sets will be sufficient to identify most moderate- to large-effect complex disease loci. This proposed design will enable efficient mapping of canine complex diseases, most of which have human homologues, using far fewer samples than required in human studies. PMID:26795439

  6. Annexin A1 is involved in the acquisition and maintenance of a stem cell-like/aggressive phenotype in prostate cancer cells with acquired resistance to zoledronic acid

    PubMed Central

    Bizzarro, Valentina; Belvedere, Raffaella; Milone, Maria Rita; Pucci, Biagio; Lombardi, Rita; Bruzzese, Francesca; Popolo, Ada; Parente, Luca; Budillon, Alfredo; Petrella, Antonello

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we have characterized the role of annexin A1 (ANXA1) in the acquisition and maintenance of stem-like/aggressive features in prostate cancer (PCa) cells comparing zoledronic acid (ZA)-resistant DU145R80 with their parental DU145 cells. ANXA1 is over-expressed in DU145R80 cells and its down-regulation abolishes their resistance to ZA. Moreover, ANXA1 induces DU145 and DU145R80 invasiveness acting through formyl peptide receptors (FPRs). Also, ANXA1 knockdown is able to inhibit epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) and to reduce focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and metalloproteases (MMP)-2/9 expression in PCa cells. DU145R80 show a cancer stem cell (CSC)-like signature with a high expression of CSC markers including CD44, CD133, NANOG, Snail, Oct4 and ALDH7A1 and CSC-related genes as STAT3. Interestingly, ANXA1 knockdown induces these cells to revert from a putative prostate CSC to a more differentiated phenotype resembling DU145 PCa cell signature. Similar results are obtained concerning some drug resistance-related genes such as ATP Binding Cassette G2 (ABCG2) and Lung Resistant Protein (LRP). Our study provides new insights on the role of ANXA1 protein in PCa onset and progression.

  7. Annexin A1 is involved in the acquisition and maintenance of a stem cell-like/aggressive phenotype in prostate cancer cells with acquired resistance to zoledronic acid.

    PubMed

    Bizzarro, Valentina; Belvedere, Raffaella; Milone, Maria Rita; Pucci, Biagio; Lombardi, Rita; Bruzzese, Francesca; Popolo, Ada; Parente, Luca; Budillon, Alfredo; Petrella, Antonello

    2015-09-22

    In this study, we have characterized the role of annexin A1 (ANXA1) in the acquisition and maintenance of stem-like/aggressive features in prostate cancer (PCa) cells comparing zoledronic acid (ZA)-resistant DU145R80 with their parental DU145 cells. ANXA1 is over-expressed in DU145R80 cells and its down-regulation abolishes their resistance to ZA. Moreover, ANXA1 induces DU145 and DU145R80 invasiveness acting through formyl peptide receptors (FPRs). Also, ANXA1 knockdown is able to inhibit epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) and to reduce focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and metalloproteases (MMP)-2/9 expression in PCa cells. DU145R80 show a cancer stem cell (CSC)-like signature with a high expression of CSC markers including CD44, CD133, NANOG, Snail, Oct4 and ALDH7A1 and CSC-related genes as STAT3. Interestingly, ANXA1 knockdown induces these cells to revert from a putative prostate CSC to a more differentiated phenotype resembling DU145 PCa cell signature. Similar results are obtained concerning some drug resistance-related genes such as ATP Binding Cassette G2 (ABCG2) and Lung Resistant Protein (LRP). Our study provides new insights on the role of ANXA1 protein in PCa onset and progression. PMID:26312765

  8. How Variability in Clinical Phenotypes Should Guide Research into Disease Mechanisms in Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Adcock, Ian M.

    2013-01-01

    Asthma is increasingly being considered as a collection of different phenotypes that present with intermittent wheezing. Unbiased approaches to classifying asthma have led to the identification of distinct phenotypes based on age of onset of disease, atopic state, disease severity or activity, degree of chronic airflow obstruction, and sputum eosinophilia. Linking phenotypes to known disease mechanism is likely to be more fruitful in determining the potential targets necessary for successful therapies of specific endotypes. A “Th2-high expression” signature from the epithelium of patients with asthma identifies a subset of patients with high eosinophilia and good therapeutic responsiveness to corticosteroids. Other characteristic traits of asthma include noneosinophilic asthma, corticosteroid insensitivity, obesity-associated, and exacerbation-prone. Further progress into asthma mechanisms will be driven by unbiased data integration of multiscale data sets from omics technologies with those phenotypic characteristics and by using mathematical modeling. This will lead to the discovery of new pathways and their integration into endotypes and also set up further hypothesis-driven research. Continued iteration through experimentation or modeling will be needed to refine the phenotypes that relate to outcomes and also delineate specific treatments for specific phenotypes. PMID:24313760

  9. Hearing impairment in Parkinson's disease: expanding the nonmotor phenotype.

    PubMed

    Vitale, Carmine; Marcelli, Vincenzo; Allocca, Roberto; Santangelo, Gabriella; Riccardi, Pasquale; Erro, Roberto; Amboni, Marianna; Pellecchia, Maria Teresa; Cozzolino, Autilia; Longo, Katia; Picillo, Marina; Moccia, Marcello; Agosti, Valeria; Sorrentino, G; Cavaliere, Michele; Marciano, Elio; Barone, Paolo

    2012-10-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate hearing impairment in patients affected by Parkinson's disease compared with hearing scores observed in normal age- and sex-matched controls. One hundred eighteen consecutive patients with a clinical diagnosis of Parkinson's disease were screened. Severity of motor symptoms and staging were measured with the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (section III) and the Hoehn and Yahr scale. Audiometric evaluation consisted of a comprehensive audiologic case history and questionnaire, visual otoscopic examination, acoustic immittance measures (tympanogram and acoustic reflexes), pure tone audiometry, and measurement of brain stem auditory-evoked potentials. Healthy age- and sex-matched subjects were selected as the control group. One hundred six of 118 patients were enrolled. Pure tone audiometry revealed age-dependent high-frequency hearing loss in patients with Parkinson's disease compared with both normative values and values for healthy age- and sex-matched controls (75/106 [71%], χ(2) = 5.959, P = .02; 92/106 [86.8%] vs 60/106 [56.6%], χ(2) = 23.804, P < .001, respectively). Pure tone audiometry scores correlated with Hoehn and Yahr scale scores (P < .05). Brain stem auditory-evoked potentials were normal in all patients. Our patients with Parkinson's disease showed age-dependent peripheral, unilateral, or bilateral hearing impairment. Whether these auditory deficits are intrinsic to Parkinson's disease or secondary to a more complex impaired processing of sensorial inputs occurring over the course of illness remains to be determined. Because α-synuclein is located predominately in the efferent neuronal system within the inner ear, it could affect susceptibility to noise-induced hearing loss or presbycusis. It is feasible that the natural aging process combined with neurodegenerative changes intrinsic to Parkinson's disease might interfere with cochlear transduction mechanisms, thus anticipating presbycusis. PMID

  10. An expanded phenotype of maternal SSA/SSB antibody-associated fetal cardiac disease

    PubMed Central

    CUNEO, BETTINA F.; STRASBURGER, JANETTE F.; NIKSCH, ALISA; OVADIA, MARC; WAKAI, RONALD T.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Conventional manifestations of fetal Sjögren’s antibodies (SSA/SSB) associated cardiac disease include atrio-ventricular block (AVB), transient sinus bradycardia, endocardial fibroelastosis (EFE) and dilated cardiomyopathy. We describe other manifestations of cardiac disease. Methods We describe three fetuses with unique myocardial and conduction system disease. Results One had isolated EFE with subsequent mitral and tricuspid valve chordal avulsion, the second had sinoatrial and infrahissian conduction system disease, and in both, neonatal progression to life threatening disease occurred. The third had sinus node dysfunction and atrial flutter. Conclusion These findings expand the clinical phenotype of maternal SSA/SSB antibody associated fetal cardiac disease. PMID:19330707

  11. Mibampator (LY451395) Randomized Clinical Trial for Agitation/Aggression in Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Trzepacz, Paula T.; Cummings, Jeffrey; Konechnik, Thomas; Forrester, Tammy D.; Chang, Curtis; Dennehy, Ellen B.; Willis, Brian A.; Shuler, Catherine; Tabas, Linda B; Lyketsos, Constantine

    2014-01-01

    Background Mibampator, an AMPA receptor potentiator, was evaluated for treatment of agitation and aggression (A/A) in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Methods Outpatients (n=132) with probable AD and A/A randomized to 12 weeks of double-blind treatment with 3 mg po mibampator or placebo were assessed using the 4-domain NPI-4-A/A derived from the Neuropsychiatric Inventory. Secondary measures included the Cohen-Mansfield Agitation Inventory, Cornell Scale for Depression in Dementia, Frontal Systems Behavior inventory (FrSBe), and ADAS-Cog. Efficacy was analyzed using mixed-effects model repeated measures from baseline to endpoint. Adverse events (AEs), labs, vital signs and ECGs were monitored. Results Baseline characteristics were comparable between groups. Both groups improved on the NPI-4-A/A, but without group differences. Among secondaries, mibampator was significantly better (p=.007) than placebo only on the FrSBe. AEs were similar between groups. One death occurred in the placebo group. Conclusion Possible explanations for no significant group differences include caregiver, drug target engagement, and design issues. PMID:23257314

  12. Mitochondrial DNA haplogroups may influence Fabry disease phenotype.

    PubMed

    Simoncini, C; Chico, L; Concolino, D; Sestito, S; Fancellu, L; Boadu, W; Sechi, G P; Feliciani, C; Gnarra, M; Zampetti, A; Salviati, A; Scarpelli, M; Orsucci, D; Bonuccelli, U; Siciliano, G; Mancuso, M

    2016-08-26

    While the genetic origin of Fabry disease (FD) is well known, it is still unclear why the disease presents a wide heterogeneity of clinical presentation and progression, even within the same family. Emerging observations reveal that mitochondrial impairment and oxidative stress may be implicated in the pathogenesis of FD. To investigate if specific genetic polymorphisms within the mitochondrial genome (mtDNA) could act as susceptibility factors and contribute to the clinical expression of FD, we have genotyped European mtDNA haplogroups in 77 Italian FD patients and 151 healthy controls. Haplogroups H and I, and haplogroup cluster HV were significantly more frequent in patients than controls. However, no correlation with gender, age of onset, organ involvement was observed. Our study seems to provide some evidence of a contribution of mitochondrial variation in FD pathogenesis, at least in Italy. PMID:27365132

  13. Huntington disease in children: genotype-phenotype correlation.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, A; Macias, R; Yescas, P; Ochoa, A; Davila, G; Alonso, E

    2000-08-01

    Huntington disease is a neurodegenerative disorder of adulthood; however, a subset of early-onset patients exists, representing 1% of all HD patients. We reviewed a population of 155 HD-families to determine the frequency, molecular and clinical characteristics of children with an onset before the age of 10 years. In each case, a neurological evaluation was performed as well as molecular detection of the expanded CAG triplet in the affected child and both parents. The family history was also reviewed and updated. Seven children (1.92%) had onset of symptoms before the age of 10, two of them were dead by the time of the study. Large CAG expansions with intergenerational instability were identified, and in one case the child's allele was almost three times larger than the allele of the asymptomatic transmitting father, a situation reported only once before. Clinically, they showed preponderance of rigidity, seizures, learning disabilities and a rapid course of the disease. We attempted to use UHDRS. However, consistent results could not be obtained, suggesting that the scale should be revised for use in juvenile cases. HD should be considered in the differential diagnosis of neurodegenerative diseases in children, even in the absence of a positive family history. PMID:11071143

  14. Oncogenic Ki-ras confers a more aggressive colon cancer phenotype through modification of transforming growth factor-beta receptor III.

    PubMed

    Yan, Z; Deng, X; Friedman, E

    2001-01-12

    Transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1) can act as a tumor suppressor or a tumor promoter depending on the characteristics of the malignant cell. Each of three Ki-ras(G12V) transfectants of HD6-4 colon cancer cells had been shown to be more aggressive in vivo than controls in earlier studies (Yan, Z., Chen, M., Perucho, M., and Friedman, E. (1997) J. Biol. Chem. 272, 30928-30936). We now show that stable expression of oncogenic Ki-ras(G12V) converts the HD6-4 colon cancer cell line from insensitive to TGF-beta1 to growth-promoted by TGF-beta1. Each of three Ki-ras(G12V) transfectants responded to TGF-beta1 by an increase in proliferation and by decreasing the abundance of the Cdk inhibitor p21 and the tumor suppressor PTEN, whereas each of three wild-type Ki-ras transfectants remained unresponsive to TGF-beta1. The wild-type Ki-ras transfectants lack functional TGF-beta receptors, whereas all three Ki-ras(G12V) transfectants expressed functional TGF-beta receptors that bound (125)I-TGF-beta1. The previous studies showed that in cells with wild-type Ki-ras, TGF-beta receptors were not mutated, and receptor proteins were transported to the cell surface, but post-translational modification of TGF-beta receptor III (TbetaRIII) was incomplete. We now show that the betaglycan form of TbetaRIII is highly modified following translation when transiently expressed in Ki-ras(G12V) cells, whereas no such post-translational modification of TbetaRIII occurs in control cells. Antisense oligonucleotides directed to Ki-Ras decreased both TbetaRIII post-translational modification in Ki-ras(G12V) cells and TGF-beta1 down-regulation of p21, demonstrating the direct effect of mutant Ras. Therefore, one mechanism by which mutant Ki-Ras confers a more aggressive tumor phenotype is by enhancing TbetaRIII post-translational modification. PMID:11029459

  15. Coping with Agitation and Aggression

    MedlinePlus

    Alzheimer ’s Caregiving Tips Coping with Agitation and Aggression People with Alzheimer’s disease may become agitated or aggressive as the disease gets worse. Agitation means that a person is restless or worried. ...

  16. Undiagnosed genetic muscle disease in the north of England: an in depth phenotype analysis.

    PubMed

    Harris, Elizabeth; Laval, Steve; Hudson, Judith; Barresi, Rita; De Waele, Liesbeth; Straub, Volker; Lochmüller, Hanns; Bushby, Kate; Sarkozy, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Advances in the molecular characterisation of genetic muscle disease has been rapid, as demonstrated by a recent analysis of these conditions in the north of England by Norwood et al (2009), in which a genetic diagnosis was achieved for 75.7% of patients. However, there remain many patients with suspected genetic muscle disease in who a diagnosis is not obtained, often despite considerable diagnostic effort, and these patients are now being considered for the application of new technologies such as next generation sequencing. This study aimed to provide an in-depth phenotype analysis of undiagnosed patients referred to the Northern region muscle clinic with suspected genetic muscle disease, with the intention of gaining insight into these conditions, identifing cases with a shared phenotype who may be amenable to collective diagnostic testing or research, and evaluating the strengths and limitations of our current diagnostic strategy. We used two approaches: a review of clinical findings in patients with undiagnosed muscle disease, and a hierarchical cluster analysis to provide an unbiased interpretation of the phenotype data. These joint approaches identified a correlation of phenotypic features according to the age of disease onset and also delineated several interesting groups of patients, as well as highlighting areas of frequent diagnostic difficulty that could benefit from the use of new high-throughput diagnostic techniques. Correspondence to: anna.sarkozy@ncl.ac.uk. PMID:23788081

  17. Undiagnosed Genetic Muscle Disease in the North of England: an in Depth Phenotype Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Elizabeth; Laval, Steve; Hudson, Judith; Barresi, Rita; De Waele, Liesbeth; Straub, Volker; Lochmüller, Hanns; Bushby, Kate; Sarkozy, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Advances in the molecular characterisation of genetic muscle disease has been rapid, as demonstrated by a recent analysis of these conditions in the north of England by Norwood et al (2009), in which a genetic diagnosis was achieved for 75.7% of patients. However, there remain many patients with suspected genetic muscle disease in who a diagnosis is not obtained, often despite considerable diagnostic effort, and these patients are now being considered for the application of new technologies such as next generation sequencing. This study aimed to provide an in-depth phenotype analysis of undiagnosed patients referred to the Northern region muscle clinic with suspected genetic muscle disease, with the intention of gaining insight into these conditions, identifing cases with a shared phenotype who may be amenable to collective diagnostic testing or research, and evaluating the strengths and limitations of our current diagnostic strategy. We used two approaches: a review of clinical findings in patients with undiagnosed muscle disease, and a hierarchical cluster analysis to provide an unbiased interpretation of the phenotype data. These joint approaches identified a correlation of phenotypic features according to the age of disease onset and also delineated several interesting groups of patients, as well as highlighting areas of frequent diagnostic difficulty that could benefit from the use of new high-throughput diagnostic techniques. Correspondence to: anna.sarkozy@ncl.ac.uk PMID:23788081

  18. Down-regulation of both p21/Cip1 and p27/Kip1 produces a more aggressive prostate cancer phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Srirupa; Singh, Rana P.; Agarwal, Chapla; Siriwardana, Sunitha; Sclafani, Robert; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2009-01-01

    Roles of cyclin dependent kinase inhibitors, p21/Cip1 (p21) and p27/Kip1 (p27) in prostate cancer (PCa) progression is still not clear. Lower p27 protein expression in PCa tissues is often associated with poor prognosis, but prognostic significance of p21 is still controversial. Herein, we investigated the role of these molecules in determining PCa growth characteristics. We generated human PCa DU145 cell variants with knocked down levels of p21 (DU-p21) or p27 (DU-p27), or both (DU-p21+p27) via retroviral transduction of respective shRNAs and compared their various characteristics with empty vector-transduced DU145 (DU-EV) cells in vitro as well as in vivo. Knocking down either p21 or p27 did not show any significant change in doubling time, clonogenicity and cell cycle progression in DU145 cells, but simultaneous knock-down of both p21 and p27 significantly enhanced these parameters. In athymic mice, DU-p21+p27 tumors showed higher growth rate than the comparable growth of DU-EV, DU-p21 and DU-p27 tumors. Concurrently, DU-p21+p27 tumors had significantly higher proliferation rate, showing 54% and 48% increase in proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and Ki-67-positive cells, respectively, compared to DU-EV tumors. DU-p21+p27 tumors also showed higher microvessel density and increased expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Proliferation and angiogenic status of DU-p21 and DU-p27 tumors was comparable to DU-EV tumors. Both in vitro and in vivo results implicate that p21 and p27 have compensatory roles in advanced prostate cancer cells, and ablation or down-modulation of both these molecules essentially enhances the aggressive prostate carcinoma phenotype. PMID:18583941

  19. Complex inheritance of ABCA4 disease: four mutations in a family with multiple macular phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Winston; Xie, Yajing; Zernant, Jana; Yuan, Bo; Bearelly, Srilaxmi; Tsang, Stephen H; Lupski, James R; Allikmets, Rando

    2016-01-01

    Over 800 mutations in the ABCA4 gene cause autosomal recessive Stargardt disease. Due to extensive genetic heterogeneity, observed variant-associated phenotypes can manifest tremendous variability of expression. Furthermore, the high carrier frequency of pathogenic ABCA4 alleles in the general population (~1:20) often results in pseudo-dominant inheritance patterns further complicating the diagnosis and characterization of affected individuals. This study describes a genotype/phenotype analysis of an unusual family with multiple macular disease phenotypes spanning across two generations and segregating four distinct ABCA4 mutant alleles. Complete sequencing of ABCA4 discovered two known missense mutations, p.C54Y and p.G1961E. Array comparative genomic hybridization revealed a large novel deletion combined with a small insertion, c.6148-698_c.6670del/insTGTGCACCTCCCTAG, and complete sequencing of the entire ABCA4 genomic locus uncovered a new deep intronic variant, c.302+68C>T. Patients with the p.G1961E mutation had the mildest, confined maculopathy phenotype with peripheral flecks while those with all other mutant allele combinations exhibited a more advanced stage of generalized retinal and choriocapillaris atrophy. This family epitomizes the clinical and genetic complexity of ABCA4-associated diseases. It contained variants from all classes of mutations, in the coding region, deep intronic, both single nucleotide variants and copy number variants that accounted for varying phenotypes segregating in an apparent dominant fashion. Unequivocally defining disease-associated alleles in the ABCA4 locus requires a multifaceted approach that includes advanced mutation detection methods and a thorough analysis of clinical phenotypes. PMID:26527198

  20. Complement genetics and susceptibility to inflammatory disease. Lessons from genotype-phenotype correlations.

    PubMed

    de Córdoba, Santiago Rodríguez

    2016-06-01

    Different genome-wide linkage and association studies performed during the last 15 years have associated mutations and polymorphisms in complement genes with different diseases characterized by tissue damage and inflammation. These are complex disorders in which genetically susceptible individuals usually develop the pathology as a consequence of environmental triggers. Although complement dysregulation is a common feature of these pathologies, how the disease phenotype is determined is only partly understood. One way to advance understanding is to focus the research in the analysis of the peculiar genotype-phenotype correlations that characterize some of these diseases. I will review here how understanding the functional consequences of these disease-associated complement genetic variants is providing us with novel insights into the underpinning complement biology and a better knowledge of the pathogenic mechanisms underlying each of these pathologies. These advances have important therapeutic and diagnostic implications. PMID:26004345

  1. Mechanisms and impact of the frequent exacerbator phenotype in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Wedzicha, Jadwiga A; Brill, Simon E; Allinson, James P; Donaldson, Gavin C

    2013-01-01

    Exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are important events that carry significant consequences for patients. Some patients experience frequent exacerbations, and are now recognized as a distinct clinical subgroup, the 'frequent exacerbator' phenotype. This is relatively stable over time, occurs across disease severity, and is associated with poorer health outcomes. These patients are therefore a priority for research and treatment. The pathophysiology underlying the frequent exacerbator phenotype is complex, with increased airway and systemic inflammation, dynamic lung hyperinflation, changes in lower airway bacterial colonization and a possible increased susceptibility to viral infection. Frequent exacerbators are also at increased risk from comorbid extrapulmonary diseases including cardiovascular disease, gastroesophageal reflux, depression, osteoporosis and cognitive impairment. Overall these patients have poorer health status, accelerated forced expiratory volume over 1 s (FEV1) decline, worsened quality of life, and increased hospital admissions and mortality, contributing to increased exacerbation susceptibility and perpetuation of the frequent exacerbator phenotype. This review article sets out the definition and importance of the frequent exacerbator phenotype, with a detailed examination of its pathophysiology, impact and interaction with other comorbidities. PMID:23945277

  2. Alzheimer's Disease Phenotypes and Genotypes Associated with Mutations in Presenilin 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jayadev, Suman; Leverenz, James B.; Steinbart, Ellen; Stahl, Justin; Klunk, William; Yu, Cheng-En; Bird, Thomas D.

    2010-01-01

    Mutations in presenilin 2 are rare causes of early onset familial Alzheimer's disease. Eighteen presenilin 2 mutations have been reported, although not all have been confirmed pathogenic. Much remains to be learned about the range of phenotypes associated with these mutations. We have analysed our unique collection of 146 affected cases in 11…

  3. Phenotype with a side of genotype, please: Patients, parents and priorities in rare genetic disease

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Christy

    2016-01-01

    As the parent and caregiver of a child with an ultra-rare disease and advocate for others with the same condition, I discuss the importance of phenotyping in rare disease research. I emphasize the need for more clinical geneticists, deeper and more intentional integration of clinical genetics in complex patient care, and a greater appreciation of patients and families as an informational resource. PMID:27047761

  4. Fractal and Transgenerational Genetic Effects on Phenotypic Variation and Disease Risk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadeau, Joe

    To understand human biology and to manage heritable diseases, a complete picture of the genetic basis for phenotypic variation and disease risk is needed. Unexpectedly however, most of these genetic variants, even for highly heritable traits, continue to elude discovery for poorly understood reasons. The genetics community is actively exploring the usual explanations for missing heritability. But given the extraordinary work that has already been done and the exceptional magnitude of the problem, it seems likely that unconventional genetic properties are involved.

  5. Rampant centrosome amplification underlies more aggressive disease course of triple negative breast cancers

    PubMed Central

    Pannu, Vaishali; Mittal, Karuna; Cantuaria, Guilherme; Reid, Michelle D.; Li, Xiaoxian; Donthamsetty, Shashikiran; McBride, Michelle; Klimov, Sergey; Osan, Remus; Gupta, Meenakshi V.; Rida, Padmashree C.G.; Aneja, Ritu

    2015-01-01

    Centrosome amplification (CA), a cell-biological trait, characterizes pre-neoplastic and pre-invasive lesions and is associated with tumor aggressiveness. Recent studies suggest that CA leads to malignant transformation and promotes invasion in mammary epithelial cells. Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC), a histologically-aggressive subtype shows high recurrence, metastases, and mortality rates. Since TNBC and non-TNBC follow variable kinetics of metastatic progression, they constitute a novel test bed to explore if severity and nature of CA can distinguish them apart. We quantitatively assessed structural and numerical centrosomal aberrations for each patient sample in a large-cohort of grade-matched TNBC (n = 30) and non-TNBC (n = 98) cases employing multi-color confocal imaging. Our data establish differences in incidence and severity of CA between TNBC and non-TNBC cell lines and clinical specimens. We found strong correlation between CA and aggressiveness markers associated with metastasis in 20 pairs of grade-matched TNBC and non-TNBC specimens (p < 0.02). Time-lapse imaging of MDA-MB-231 cells harboring amplified centrosomes demonstrated enhanced migratory ability. Our study bridges a vital knowledge gap by pinpointing that CA underlies breast cancer aggressiveness. This previously unrecognized organellar inequality at the centrosome level may allow early-risk prediction and explain higher tumor aggressiveness and mortality rates in TNBC patients. PMID:25868856

  6. Heritability of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and Related Phenotypes in Smokers

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Michael H.; Castaldi, Peter J.; Hersh, Craig P.; Silverman, Edwin K.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale: Previous studies of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have suggested that genetic factors play an important role in the development of disease. However, single-nucleotide polymorphisms that are associated with COPD in genome-wide association studies have been shown to account for only a small percentage of the genetic variance in phenotypes of COPD, such as spirometry and imaging variables. These phenotypes are highly predictive of disease, and family studies have shown that spirometric phenotypes are heritable. Objectives: To assess the heritability and coheritability of four major COPD-related phenotypes (measurements of FEV1, FEV1/FVC, percent emphysema, and percent gas trapping), and COPD affection status in smokers of non-Hispanic white and African American descent using a population design. Methods: Single-nucleotide polymorphisms from genome-wide association studies chips were used to calculate the relatedness of pairs of individuals and a mixed model was adopted to estimate genetic variance and covariance. Measurements and Main Results: In the non-Hispanic whites, estimated heritabilities of FEV1 and FEV1/FVC were both about 37%, consistent with estimates in the literature from family-based studies. For chest computed tomography scan phenotypes, estimated heritabilities were both close to 25%. Heritability of COPD affection status was estimated as 37.7% in both populations. Conclusions: This study suggests that a large portion of the genetic risk of COPD is yet to be discovered and gives rationale for additional genetic studies of COPD. The estimates of coheritability (genetic covariance) for pairs of the phenotypes suggest considerable overlap of causal genetic loci. PMID:23972146

  7. Integration of Multiple Genomic and Phenotype Data to Infer Novel miRNA-Disease Associations.

    PubMed

    Shi, Hongbo; Zhang, Guangde; Zhou, Meng; Cheng, Liang; Yang, Haixiu; Wang, Jing; Sun, Jie; Wang, Zhenzhen

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play an important role in the development and progression of human diseases. The identification of disease-associated miRNAs will be helpful for understanding the molecular mechanisms of diseases at the post-transcriptional level. Based on different types of genomic data sources, computational methods for miRNA-disease association prediction have been proposed. However, individual source of genomic data tends to be incomplete and noisy; therefore, the integration of various types of genomic data for inferring reliable miRNA-disease associations is urgently needed. In this study, we present a computational framework, CHNmiRD, for identifying miRNA-disease associations by integrating multiple genomic and phenotype data, including protein-protein interaction data, gene ontology data, experimentally verified miRNA-target relationships, disease phenotype information and known miRNA-disease connections. The performance of CHNmiRD was evaluated by experimentally verified miRNA-disease associations, which achieved an area under the ROC curve (AUC) of 0.834 for 5-fold cross-validation. In particular, CHNmiRD displayed excellent performance for diseases without any known related miRNAs. The results of case studies for three human diseases (glioblastoma, myocardial infarction and type 1 diabetes) showed that all of the top 10 ranked miRNAs having no known associations with these three diseases in existing miRNA-disease databases were directly or indirectly confirmed by our latest literature mining. All these results demonstrated the reliability and efficiency of CHNmiRD, and it is anticipated that CHNmiRD will serve as a powerful bioinformatics method for mining novel disease-related miRNAs and providing a new perspective into molecular mechanisms underlying human diseases at the post-transcriptional level. CHNmiRD is freely available at http://www.bio-bigdata.com/CHNmiRD. PMID:26849207

  8. HyperModules: identifying clinically and phenotypically significant network modules with disease mutations for biomarker discovery

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Alvin; Bader, Gary D.; Reimand, Jüri

    2014-01-01

    Summary: Correlating disease mutations with clinical and phenotypic information such as drug response or patient survival is an important goal of personalized cancer genomics and a first step in biomarker discovery. HyperModules is a network search algorithm that finds frequently mutated gene modules with significant clinical or phenotypic signatures from biomolecular interaction networks. Availability and implementation: HyperModules is available in Cytoscape App Store and as a command line tool at www.baderlab.org/Sofware/HyperModules. Contact: Juri.Reimand@utoronto.ca or Gary.Bader@utoronto.ca Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online PMID:24713437

  9. Frailty and sarcopenia as the basis for the phenotypic manifestation of chronic diseases in older adults.

    PubMed

    Angulo, Javier; El Assar, Mariam; Rodríguez-Mañas, Leocadio

    2016-08-01

    Frailty is a functional status that precedes disability and is characterized by decreased functional reserve and increased vulnerability. In addition to disability, the frailty phenotype predicts falls, institutionalization, hospitalization and mortality. Frailty is the consequence of the interaction between the aging process and some chronic diseases and conditions that compromise functional systems and finally produce sarcopenia. Many of the clinical manifestations of frailty are explained by sarcopenia which is closely related to poor physical performance. Reduced regenerative capacity, malperfusion, oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and inflammation compose the sarcopenic skeletal muscle alterations associated to the frailty phenotype. Inflammation appears as a common determinant for chronic diseases, sarcopenia and frailty. The strategies to prevent the frailty phenotype include an adequate amount of physical activity and exercise as well as pharmacological interventions such as myostatin inhibitors and specific androgen receptor modulators. Cell response to stress pathways such as Nrf2, sirtuins and klotho could be considered as future therapeutic interventions for the management of frailty phenotype and aging-related chronic diseases. PMID:27370407

  10. Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative biomarkers as quantitative phenotypes: Genetics core aims, progress, and plans

    PubMed Central

    Saykin, Andrew J.; Shen, Li; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Potkin, Steven G.; Swaminathan, Shanker; Kim, Sungeun; Risacher, Shannon L.; Nho, Kwangsik; Huentelman, Matthew J.; Craig, David W.; Thompson, Paul M.; Stein, Jason L.; Moore, Jason H.; Farrer, Lindsay A.; Green, Robert C.; Bertram, Lars; Jack, Clifford R.; Weiner, Michael W.

    2010-01-01

    The role of the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative Genetics Core is to facilitate the investigation of genetic influences on disease onset and trajectory as reflected in structural, functional, and molecular imaging changes; fluid biomarkers; and cognitive status. Major goals include (1) blood sample processing, genotyping, and dissemination, (2) genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of longitudinal phenotypic data, and (3) providing a central resource, point of contact and planning group for genetics within Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative. Genome-wide array data have been publicly released and updated, and several neuroimaging GWAS have recently been reported examining baseline magnetic resonance imaging measures as quantitative phenotypes. Other preliminary investigations include copy number variation in mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer’s disease and GWAS of baseline cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers and longitudinal changes on magnetic resonance imaging. Blood collection for RNA studies is a new direction. Genetic studies of longitudinal phenotypes hold promise for elucidating disease mechanisms and risk, development of therapeutic strategies, and refining selection criteria for clinical trials. PMID:20451875

  11. Genotype: A Crucial but Not Unique Factor Affecting the Clinical Phenotypes in Fabry Disease.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xiaoxia; Ouyang, Yan; Wang, Zhaohui; Ren, Hong; Shen, Pingyan; Wang, Weiming; Xu, Yaowen; Ni, Liyan; Yu, Xialian; Chen, Xiaonong; Zhang, Wen; Yang, Li; Li, Xiao; Xu, Jing; Chen, Nan

    2016-01-01

    Numerous α-galactosidase A (α-gal A) gene (GLA) mutations have been identified in Fabry disease (FD), but studies on genotype-phenotype correlation are limited. This study evaluated the features of GLA gene mutations and genotype-phenotype relationship in Chinese FD patients. Gene sequencing results, demographic information, clinical history, and laboratory findings were collected from 73 Chinese FD patients. Totally 47 mutations were identified, including 23 novel mutations which might be pathogenic. For male patients, those with frameshift and nonsense mutations presented the classical FD, whereas those with missense mutations presented both of classical and atypical phenotypes. Interestingly, two male patients with missense mutation p.R356G from two unrelated families, and two with p.R301Q from one family presented different phenotypes. A statistically significant association was found between the levels of α-gal A enzyme activity and ocular changes in males, though no significant association was found between residual enzyme activity level and genotype or clinical phenotypes. For female patients, six out of seven with frameshift mutations and one out of nine with missense mutation presented the classical FD, and α-gal A activity in those patients was found to be significantly lower than that of patients with atypical phenotypes (13.73 vs. 46.32 nmol/ml/h/mg). Our findings suggest that the α-gal A activity might be associated with the clinical severity in female patients with FD. But no obvious associations between activity level of α-gal A and genotype or clinical phenotypes were found for male patients. PMID:27560961

  12. Genotype: A Crucial but Not Unique Factor Affecting the Clinical Phenotypes in Fabry Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhaohui; Ren, Hong; Shen, Pingyan; Wang, Weiming; Xu, Yaowen; Ni, Liyan; Yu, Xialian; Chen, Xiaonong; Zhang, Wen; Yang, Li; Li, Xiao; Xu, Jing; Chen, Nan

    2016-01-01

    Numerous α-galactosidase A (α-gal A) gene (GLA) mutations have been identified in Fabry disease (FD), but studies on genotype-phenotype correlation are limited. This study evaluated the features of GLA gene mutations and genotype-phenotype relationship in Chinese FD patients. Gene sequencing results, demographic information, clinical history, and laboratory findings were collected from 73 Chinese FD patients. Totally 47 mutations were identified, including 23 novel mutations which might be pathogenic. For male patients, those with frameshift and nonsense mutations presented the classical FD, whereas those with missense mutations presented both of classical and atypical phenotypes. Interestingly, two male patients with missense mutation p.R356G from two unrelated families, and two with p.R301Q from one family presented different phenotypes. A statistically significant association was found between the levels of α-gal A enzyme activity and ocular changes in males, though no significant association was found between residual enzyme activity level and genotype or clinical phenotypes. For female patients, six out of seven with frameshift mutations and one out of nine with missense mutation presented the classical FD, and α-gal A activity in those patients was found to be significantly lower than that of patients with atypical phenotypes (13.73 vs. 46.32 nmol/ml/h/mg). Our findings suggest that the α-gal A activity might be associated with the clinical severity in female patients with FD. But no obvious associations between activity level of α-gal A and genotype or clinical phenotypes were found for male patients. PMID:27560961

  13. Acquired resistance to zoledronic acid and the parallel acquisition of an aggressive phenotype are mediated by p38-MAP kinase activation in prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Milone, M R; Pucci, B; Bruzzese, F; Carbone, C; Piro, G; Costantini, S; Capone, F; Leone, A; Di Gennaro, E; Caraglia, M; Budillon, A

    2013-01-01

    resistance, as well as in the acquisition of a more aggressive and invasive phenotype. PMID:23703386

  14. FDG-PET/CT predicts outcome in patients with aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and Hodgkin's disease.

    PubMed

    Querellou, Solène; Valette, Frédéric; Bodet-Milin, Caroline; Oudoux, Aurore; Carlier, Thomas; Harousseau, Jean-Luc; Chatal, Jean-François; Couturier, Olivier

    2006-11-01

    Early therapy response assessment with metabolic imaging is potentially useful to determine prognosis in aggressive lymphoma and, thus, can guide first-line therapy. Forty-eight patients with aggressive lymphoma [24 Hodgkin's disease (HD); 24 non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL)] underwent fluoro-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) before chemotherapy (PET1) and at mid-treatment (PET2). Therapeutic response was evaluated using conventional methods at mid-treatment. PET2 results were related to event-free survival (EFS) and overall survival (OS) using Kaplan-Meier analyses. PET1 was positive in all patients. PET2 was negative in 38 patients (18 NHL-20 HD) and positive in 10 (6 NHL-4 HD). Of the PET-negative patients, 61 and 65% achieved complete remission, and only 50 and 25% of PET-positive patients, respectively, for NHL and HD, achieved complete remission. Significant associations were found between PET2 and EFS (p = 0.0006) and OS (p = 0.04) for NHL, and EFS (p < 0.0001) for HD (but not for OS, because no HD patient died). FDG-PET at mid-treatment can predict the outcome of patients with aggressive lymphoma and should be a useful tool to modify an ineffective therapy. PMID:16871391

  15. Allele, phenotype and disease data at Mouse Genome Informatics: improving access and analysis.

    PubMed

    Bello, Susan M; Smith, Cynthia L; Eppig, Janan T

    2015-08-01

    A core part of the Mouse Genome Informatics (MGI) resource is the collection of mouse mutations and the annotation phenotypes and diseases displayed by mice carrying these mutations. These data are integrated with the rest of data in MGI and exported to numerous other resources. The use of mouse phenotype data to drive translational research into human disease has expanded rapidly with the improvements in sequencing technology. MGI has implemented many improvements in allele and phenotype data annotation, search, and display to facilitate access to these data through multiple avenues. For example, the description of alleles has been modified to include more detailed categories of allele attributes. This allows improved discrimination between mutation types. Further, connections have been created between mutations involving multiple genes and each of the genes overlapping the mutation. This allows users to readily find all mutations affecting a gene and see all genes affected by a mutation. In a similar manner, the genes expressed by transgenic or knock-in alleles are now connected to these alleles. The advanced search forms and public reports have been updated to take advantage of these improvements. These search forms and reports are used by an expanding number of researchers to identify novel human disease genes and mouse models of human disease. PMID:26162703

  16. The Rat Genome Database 2015: genomic, phenotypic and environmental variations and disease

    PubMed Central

    Shimoyama, Mary; De Pons, Jeff; Hayman, G. Thomas; Laulederkind, Stanley J.F.; Liu, Weisong; Nigam, Rajni; Petri, Victoria; Smith, Jennifer R.; Tutaj, Marek; Wang, Shur-Jen; Worthey, Elizabeth; Dwinell, Melinda; Jacob, Howard

    2015-01-01

    The Rat Genome Database (RGD, http://rgd.mcw.edu) provides the most comprehensive data repository and informatics platform related to the laboratory rat, one of the most important model organisms for disease studies. RGD maintains and updates datasets for genomic elements such as genes, transcripts and increasingly in recent years, sequence variations, as well as map positions for multiple assemblies and sequence information. Functional annotations for genomic elements are curated from published literature, submitted by researchers and integrated from other public resources. Complementing the genomic data catalogs are those associated with phenotypes and disease, including strains, QTL and experimental phenotype measurements across hundreds of strains. Data are submitted by researchers, acquired through bulk data pipelines or curated from published literature. Innovative software tools provide users with an integrated platform to query, mine, display and analyze valuable genomic and phenomic datasets for discovery and enhancement of their own research. This update highlights recent developments that reflect an increasing focus on: (i) genomic variation, (ii) phenotypes and diseases, (iii) data related to the environment and experimental conditions and (iv) datasets and software tools that allow the user to explore and analyze the interactions among these and their impact on disease. PMID:25355511

  17. Phenotypic rescue of a Drosophila model of mitochondrial ANT1 disease.

    PubMed

    Vartiainen, Suvi; Chen, Shanjun; George, Jack; Tuomela, Tea; Luoto, Kaisa R; O'Dell, Kevin M C; Jacobs, Howard T

    2014-06-01

    A point mutation in the Drosophila gene that codes for the major adult isoform of adenine nuclear translocase (ANT) represents a model for human diseases that are associated with ANT insufficiency [stress-sensitive B(1) (sesB(1))]. We characterized the organismal, bioenergetic and molecular phenotype of sesB(1) flies then tested strategies to compensate the mutant phenotype. In addition to developmental delay and mechanical-stress-induced seizures, sesB(1) flies have an impaired response to sound, defective male courtship, female sterility and curtailed lifespan. These phenotypes, excluding the latter two, are shared with the mitoribosomal protein S12 mutant, tko(25t). Mitochondria from sesB(1) adults showed a decreased respiratory control ratio and downregulation of cytochrome oxidase. sesB(1) adults exhibited ATP depletion, lactate accumulation and changes in gene expression that were consistent with a metabolic shift towards glycolysis, characterized by activation of lactate dehydrogenase and anaplerotic pathways. Females also showed downregulation of many genes that are required for oogenesis, and their eggs, although fertilized, failed to develop to the larval stages. The sesB(1) phenotypes of developmental delay and mechanical-stress-induced seizures were alleviated by an altered mitochondrial DNA background. Female sterility was substantially rescued by somatic expression of alternative oxidase (AOX) from the sea squirt Ciona intestinalis, whereas AOX did not alleviate developmental delay. Our findings illustrate the potential of different therapeutic strategies for ANT-linked diseases, based on alleviating metabolic stress. PMID:24812436

  18. PIAS1 Regulates Mutant Huntingtin Accumulation and Huntington's Disease-Associated Phenotypes In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Ochaba, Joseph; Monteys, Alex Mas; O'Rourke, Jacqueline G; Reidling, Jack C; Steffan, Joan S; Davidson, Beverly L; Thompson, Leslie M

    2016-05-01

    The disruption of protein quality control networks is central to pathology in Huntington's disease (HD) and other neurodegenerative disorders. The aberrant accumulation of insoluble high-molecular-weight protein complexes containing the Huntingtin (HTT) protein and SUMOylated protein corresponds to disease manifestation. We previously identified an HTT-selective E3 SUMO ligase, PIAS1, that regulates HTT accumulation and SUMO modification in cells. Here we investigated whether PIAS1 modulation in neurons alters HD-associated phenotypes in vivo. Instrastriatal injection of a PIAS1-directed miRNA significantly improved behavioral phenotypes in rapidly progressing mutant HTT (mHTT) fragment R6/2 mice. PIAS1 reduction prevented the accumulation of mHTT and SUMO- and ubiquitin-modified proteins, increased synaptophysin levels, and normalized key inflammatory markers. In contrast, PIAS1 overexpression exacerbated mHTT-associated phenotypes and aberrant protein accumulation. These results confirm the association between aberrant accumulation of expanded polyglutamine-dependent insoluble protein species and pathogenesis, and they link phenotypic benefit to reduction of these species through PIAS1 modulation. PMID:27146268

  19. Phenotypic rescue of a Drosophila model of mitochondrial ANT1 disease

    PubMed Central

    Vartiainen, Suvi; Chen, Shanjun; George, Jack; Tuomela, Tea; Luoto, Kaisa R.; O’Dell, Kevin M. C.; Jacobs, Howard T.

    2014-01-01

    A point mutation in the Drosophila gene that codes for the major adult isoform of adenine nuclear translocase (ANT) represents a model for human diseases that are associated with ANT insufficiency [stress-sensitive B1 (sesB1)]. We characterized the organismal, bioenergetic and molecular phenotype of sesB1 flies then tested strategies to compensate the mutant phenotype. In addition to developmental delay and mechanical-stress-induced seizures, sesB1 flies have an impaired response to sound, defective male courtship, female sterility and curtailed lifespan. These phenotypes, excluding the latter two, are shared with the mitoribosomal protein S12 mutant, tko25t. Mitochondria from sesB1 adults showed a decreased respiratory control ratio and downregulation of cytochrome oxidase. sesB1 adults exhibited ATP depletion, lactate accumulation and changes in gene expression that were consistent with a metabolic shift towards glycolysis, characterized by activation of lactate dehydrogenase and anaplerotic pathways. Females also showed downregulation of many genes that are required for oogenesis, and their eggs, although fertilized, failed to develop to the larval stages. The sesB1 phenotypes of developmental delay and mechanical-stress-induced seizures were alleviated by an altered mitochondrial DNA background. Female sterility was substantially rescued by somatic expression of alternative oxidase (AOX) from the sea squirt Ciona intestinalis, whereas AOX did not alleviate developmental delay. Our findings illustrate the potential of different therapeutic strategies for ANT-linked diseases, based on alleviating metabolic stress. PMID:24812436

  20. A systematic comparison of feature space effects on disease classifier performance for phenotype identification of five diseases.

    PubMed

    Kotfila, Christopher; Uzuner, Özlem

    2015-12-01

    Automated phenotype identification plays a critical role in cohort selection and bioinformatics data mining. Natural Language Processing (NLP)-informed classification techniques can robustly identify phenotypes in unstructured medical notes. In this paper, we systematically assess the effect of naive, lexically normalized, and semantic feature spaces on classifier performance for obesity, atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CAD), hyperlipidemia, hypertension, and diabetes. We train support vector machines (SVMs) using individual feature spaces as well as combinations of these feature spaces on two small training corpora (730 and 790 documents) and a combined (1520 documents) training corpus. We assess the importance of feature spaces and training data size on SVM model performance. We show that inclusion of semantically-informed features does not statistically improve performance for these models. The addition of training data has weak effects of mixed statistical significance across disease classes suggesting larger corpora are not necessary to achieve relatively high performance with these models. PMID:26241355

  1. Comparison of the Phenotype and Approach to Pediatric vs Adult Patients With Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Nobili, Valerio; Alisi, Anna; Newton, Kimberly P; Schwimmer, Jeffrey B

    2016-06-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is one of the main chronic noncommunicable diseases in Westernized societies; its worldwide prevalence has doubled during the last 20 years. NAFLD has serious health implications not only for adults, but also for children. However, pediatric NAFLD is not only an important global problem in itself, but it is likely to be associated with increases in comorbidities, such as metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular diseases. There are several differences between NAFLD in children and adults, and it is not clear whether the disease observed in children is the initial phase of a process that progresses with age. The increasing prevalence of pediatric NAFLD has serious implications for the future adult population requiring appropriate action. Studies of NAFLD progression, pathogenesis, and management should evaluate disease phenotypes in children and follow these over the patient's lifetime. We review the similarities and differences of NAFLD between children and adults. PMID:27003600

  2. From genotype to phenotype; clinical variability in Lesch-Nyhan disease. The role of epigenetics.

    PubMed

    Trigueros Genao, M; Torres, R J

    2014-11-01

    Lesch-Nyhan disease is a rare genetic disease characterized by a deficiency in the function of the enzyme hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT). Patients affected by this disease experience hyperuricemia, motor disorders, mental retardation and, in the most severe cases, self-mutilation. Its clinical manifestations depend on the enzymatic activity of HGPRT, which is classically linked to the type of alteration in the HGPRT gene. More than 400 mutations of this gene have been found. At present, one of the controversial aspects of the disease is the relationship between the genotype and phenotype; cases have been described lacking a mutation, such as the patient presented in this article, as well as families who despite sharing the same genetic defect show disorders with differing severity. Epigenetic processes, which modify the genetic expression without changing the sequence of the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), could explain the clinical variability observed in this disease. PMID:24863549

  3. Integromic Analysis of Genetic Variation and Gene Expression Identifies Networks for Cardiovascular Disease Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Chen; Chen, Brian H.; Joehanes, Roby; Otlu, Burcak; Zhang, Xiaoling; Liu, Chunyu; Huan, Tianxiao; Tastan, Oznur; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Meigs, James B.; Fox, Caroline S.; Freedman, Jane E.; Courchesne, Paul; O’Donnell, Christopher J.; Munson, Peter J.; Keles, Sunduz; Levy, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular disease (CVD) reflects a highly coordinated complex of traits. Although genome-wide association studies have reported numerous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) to be associated with CVD, the role of most of these variants in disease processes remains unknown. Methods and Results We built a CVD network using 1512 SNPs associated with 21 CVD traits in genome-wide association studies (at P≤5×10−8) and cross-linked different traits by virtue of their shared SNP associations. We then explored whole blood gene expression in relation to these SNPs in 5257 participants in the Framingham Heart Study. At a false discovery rate <0.05, we identified 370 cis-expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs; SNPs associated with altered expression of nearby genes) and 44 trans-eQTLs (SNPs associated with altered expression of remote genes). The eQTL network revealed 13 CVD-related modules. Searching for association of eQTL genes with CVD risk factors (lipids, blood pressure, fasting blood glucose, and body mass index) in the same individuals, we found examples in which the expression of eQTL genes was significantly associated with these CVD phenotypes. In addition, mediation tests suggested that a subset of SNPs previously associated with CVD phenotypes in genome-wide association studies may exert their function by altering expression of eQTL genes (eg, LDLR and PCSK7), which in turn may promote interindividual variation in phenotypes. Conclusions Using a network approach to analyze CVD traits, we identified complex networks of SNP-phenotype and SNP-transcript connections. Integrating the CVD network with phenotypic data, we identified biological pathways that may provide insights into potential drug targets for treatment or prevention of CVD. PMID:25533967

  4. Exploring and Exploiting Disease Interactions from Multi-Relational Gene and Phenotype Networks

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Darcy A.; Chawla, Nitesh V.

    2011-01-01

    The availability of electronic health care records is unlocking the potential for novel studies on understanding and modeling disease co-morbidities based on both phenotypic and genetic data. Moreover, the insurgence of increasingly reliable phenotypic data can aid further studies on investigating the potential genetic links among diseases. The goal is to create a feedback loop where computational tools guide and facilitate research, leading to improved biological knowledge and clinical standards, which in turn should generate better data. We build and analyze disease interaction networks based on data collected from previous genetic association studies and patient medical histories, spanning over 12 years, acquired from a regional hospital. By exploring both individual and combined interactions among these two levels of disease data, we provide novel insight into the interplay between genetics and clinical realities. Our results show a marked difference between the well defined structure of genetic relationships and the chaotic co-morbidity network, but also highlight clear interdependencies. We demonstrate the power of these dependencies by proposing a novel multi-relational link prediction method, showing that disease co-morbidity can enhance our currently limited knowledge of genetic association. Furthermore, our methods for integrated networks of diverse data are widely applicable and can provide novel advances for many problems in systems biology and personalized medicine. PMID:21829475

  5. [Oxidation phenotype as a risk factor for development of allergic diseases].

    PubMed

    Niewiński, P; Orzechowska-Juzwenko, K; Patkowski, J; Wolańczyk-Medrala, A; Nittner-Marszalska, M; Rzemisławska, Z

    1999-01-01

    The relationship between genetically determined polymorphic metabolism and susceptibility to allergic diseases has aroused much interest. The aim of our study was to evaluate whether patients with allergic diseases, like atopic asthma and allergic rhinitis differ from healthy persons in their ability to oxidize sparteine as a model drug. The study was completed by 200 persons, 40 patients with allergic diseases--20 with atopic asthma and 20 with allergic rhinitis and 160 healthy volunteers as a control group. The results of our study revealed a predominance of very extensive metabolizers of sparteine among patients with allergic diseases in comparison with healthy volunteers. The difference in the oxidation metabolic ratio (MR) frequency distribution between patients with allergic diseases and healthy persons was statistically significant. Relative risk (odds ratio) of development of atopic asthma was 3.29 times higher, and that of allergic rhinitis 2.94 times higher for persons with very extensive oxidation phenotype. Our results represent some evidence for a possible relationship between extensive, rapid oxidation phenotype and the higher susceptibility to development of atopic asthma and allergic rhinitis. PMID:10592724

  6. Carboxypeptidase N-deficient mice present with polymorphic disease phenotypes on induction of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xianzhen; Wetsel, Rick A; Ramos, Theresa N; Mueller-Ortiz, Stacey L; Schoeb, Trenton R; Barnum, Scott R

    2014-02-01

    Carboxypeptidase N (CPN) is a member of the carboxypeptidase family of enzymes that cleave carboxy-terminal lysine and arginine residues from a large number of biologically active peptides and proteins. These enzymes are best known for their roles in modulating the activity of kinins, complement anaphylatoxins and coagulation proteins. Although CPN makes important contributions to acute inflammatory events, little is known about its role in autoimmune disease. In this study we used CPN(-/-) mice in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), the animal model for multiple sclerosis. Unexpectedly, we observed several EAE disease phenotypes in CPN(-/-) mice compared to wild type mice. The majority of CPN(-/-) mice died within five to seven days after disease induction, before displaying clinical signs of disease. The remaining mice presented with either mild EAE or did not develop EAE. In addition, CPN(-/-) mice injected with complete or incomplete Freund's adjuvant died within the same time frame and in similar numbers as those induced for EAE. Overall, the course of EAE in CPN(-/-) mice was significantly delayed and attenuated compared to wild type mice. Spinal cord histopathology in CPN(-/-) mice revealed meningeal, but not parenchymal leukocyte infiltration, and minimal demyelination. Our results indicate that CPN plays an important role in EAE development and progression and suggests that multiple CPN ligands contribute to the disease phenotypes we observed. PMID:24028840

  7. The ABO, Lewis or P blood group phenotypes are not associated with recurrent pelvic inflammatory disease.

    PubMed

    Lurie, S; Sigler, E; Fenakel, K

    1991-01-01

    An assumption that ABO, Lewis, or P blood group phenotypes are associated with recurrent pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) in a similar way as with recurrent urinary tract infection has been tried to establish. Of 20 patients with PID 9 (45%) had blood type A, 6 (30%) type B, 1 (5%) type AB and 4 (20%) type O; 14 (70%) had Le(a-b+), 5 (25%) had Le(a+b-), and 1 (5%) had Le(a-b-). Of the 20 controls 10 (50%) had blood type A, 3 (15%) type B, 1 (5%) type AB and 6 (30%) type O; 12 (60%) had Le(a-b+), 4 (20%) had Le(a+b-), and 4 (20%) had Le(a-b-). The difference in the proportions of the A, B, AB, and O phenotypes as well as the proportion of combined recessive and nonsecretor phenotype Le(a+/-b-) between patients with recurrent PID and controls were not statistically significant. The distribution was consistent with that in the general population. 2 of the patient group (10%) and 6 (30%) of the controls had positive blood type P1 (Fisher's exact probability = 0.0958). The distribution of P1 between the patients and controls was opposite to that in the general population. We could not demonstrate association of ABO, Lewis or P blood group phenotypes with recurrent PID. PMID:2071054

  8. Inherited determinants of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis phenotypes: a genetic association study

    PubMed Central

    Cleynen, Isabelle; Boucher, Gabrielle; Jostins, Luke; Schumm, L Philip; Zeissig, Sebastian; Ahmad, Tariq; Andersen, Vibeke; Andrews, Jane M; Annese, Vito; Brand, Stephan; Brant, Steven R; Cho, Judy H; Daly, Mark J; Dubinsky, Marla; Duerr, Richard H; Ferguson, Lynnette R; Franke, Andre; Gearry, Richard B; Goyette, Philippe; Hakonarson, Hakon; Halfvarson, Jonas; Hov, Johannes R; Huang, Hailang; Kennedy, Nicholas A; Kupcinskas, Limas; Lawrance, Ian C; Lee, James C; Satsangi, Jack; Schreiber, Stephan; Théâtre, Emilie; van der Meulen-de Jong, Andrea E; Weersma, Rinse K; Wilson, David C; Parkes, Miles; Vermeire, Severine; Rioux, John D; Mansfield, John; Silverberg, Mark S; Radford-Smith, Graham; McGovern, Dermot P B; Barrett, Jeffrey C; Lees, Charlie W

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis are the two major forms of inflammatory bowel disease; treatment strategies have historically been determined by this binary categorisation. Genetic studies have identified 163 susceptibility loci for inflammatory bowel disease, mostly shared between Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. We undertook the largest genotype association study, to date, in widely used clinical subphenotypes of inflammatory bowel disease with the goal of further understanding the biological relations between diseases. Methods This study included patients from 49 centres in 16 countries in Europe, North America, and Australasia. We applied the Montreal classification system of inflammatory bowel disease subphenotypes to 34 819 patients (19 713 with Crohn's disease, 14 683 with ulcerative colitis) genotyped on the Immunochip array. We tested for genotype–phenotype associations across 156 154 genetic variants. We generated genetic risk scores by combining information from all known inflammatory bowel disease associations to summarise the total load of genetic risk for a particular phenotype. We used these risk scores to test the hypothesis that colonic Crohn's disease, ileal Crohn's disease, and ulcerative colitis are all genetically distinct from each other, and to attempt to identify patients with a mismatch between clinical diagnosis and genetic risk profile. Findings After quality control, the primary analysis included 29 838 patients (16 902 with Crohn's disease, 12 597 with ulcerative colitis). Three loci (NOD2, MHC, and MST1 3p21) were associated with subphenotypes of inflammatory bowel disease, mainly disease location (essentially fixed over time; median follow-up of 10·5 years). Little or no genetic association with disease behaviour (which changed dramatically over time) remained after conditioning on disease location and age at onset. The genetic risk score representing all known risk alleles for

  9. A Grand Challenge: Unbiased Phenotypic Function of Metabolites from Jaspis splendens against Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dongdong; Feng, Yunjiang; Murtaza, Mariyam; Wood, Stephen; Mellick, George; Hooper, John N A; Quinn, Ronald J

    2016-02-26

    A grand challenge in natural product chemistry is to determine the biological effects of all natural products. A phenotypic approach is frequently used for determining the activity of a compound and its potential impact on a disease state. Chemical investigation of a specimen of Jaspis splendens collected from the Great Barrier Reef resulted in the isolation of a new pterin derivative, jaspterin (1), a new bisindole alkaloid, splendamide (2), and a new imidazole alkaloid, jaspnin A (3) TFA salt. Jaspamycin (8) and 6-bromo-1H-indole-3-carboximidamide (16) are reported for the first time as naturally occurring metabolites. Known nucleosides (4-7, 9, 10), aglycones (11-13), indole alkaloids (14, 15, 17), and jaspamide peptides (18-22) were also isolated. The structures of the three new compounds 1-3 were unambiguously elucidated based on NMR and mass spectroscopic data. Jaspnin A (3) contained a rare thiomethylated imidazolinium unit. Coupling an unbiased phenotypic assay using a human olfactory neurosphere-derived cell model of Parkinson's disease to all of the natural products from the species J. splendens allowed the phenotypic profiles of the metabolites to be investigated. PMID:26883470

  10. Prominent scapulae mimicking an inherited myopathy expands the phenotype of CHD7-related disease.

    PubMed

    O'Grady, Gina L; Ma, Alan; Sival, Deborah; Wong, Monica T Y; Peduto, Tony; Menezes, Manoj P; Young, Helen; Waddell, Leigh; Ghaoui, Roula; Needham, Merrilee; Lek, Monkol; North, Kathryn N; MacArthur, Daniel G; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, Conny Ma; Clarke, Nigel F

    2016-08-01

    CHD7 variants are a well-established cause of CHARGE syndrome, a disabling multi-system malformation disorder that is often associated with deafness, visual impairment and intellectual disability. Less severe forms of CHD7-related disease are known to exist, but the full spectrum of phenotypes remains uncertain. We identified a de novo missense variant in CHD7 in a family presenting with musculoskeletal abnormalities as the main manifestation of CHD7-related disease, representing a new phenotype. The proband presented with prominent scapulae, mild shoulder girdle weakness and only subtle dysmorphic features. Investigation revealed hypoplasia of the trapezius and sternocleidomastoid muscles and semicircular canal defects, but he did not fulfill diagnostic criteria for CHARGE syndrome. Although the shoulders are often sloping and anteverted in CHARGE syndrome, the underlying neuromuscular cause has never been investigated. This report expands the phenotypes associated with CHD7 mutations to include a musculoskeletal presentation, with hypoplasia of the shoulder and neck muscles. CHD7 should be considered in patients presenting in childhood with stable scapular winging, particularly if accompanied by dysmorphic features and balance difficulties. PMID:26813943

  11. Senescence-associated secretory phenotype and its possible role in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Manish; Seeger, Werner; Voswinckel, Robert

    2014-09-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a major disease of the lungs. It primarily occurs after a prolonged period of cigarette smoking. Chronic inflammation of airways and the alveolar space as well as lung tissue destruction are the hallmarks of COPD. Recently it has been shown that cellular senescence might play a role in the pathogenesis of COPD. Cellular senescence comprises signal transduction program, leading to irreversible cell cycle arrest. The growth arrest in senescence can be triggered by many different mechanisms, including DNA damage and its recognition by cellular sensors, leading to the activation of cell cycle checkpoint responses and activation of DNA repair machinery. Senescence can be induced by several genotoxic factors apart from telomere attrition. When senescence induction is based on DNA damage, senescent cells display a unique phenotype, which has been termed "senescence-associated secretory phenotype" (SASP). SASP may be an important driver of chronic inflammation and therefore may be part of a vicious cycle of inflammation, DNA damage, and senescence. This research perspective aims to showcase cellular senescence with relevance to COPD and the striking similarities between the mediators and secretory phenotype in COPD and SASP. PMID:25171460

  12. Extending Injury- and Disease-Resistant CNS Phenotypes by Repetitive Epigenetic Conditioning

    PubMed Central

    Gidday, Jeffrey M.

    2015-01-01

    Significant reductions in the extent of acute injury in the CNS can be achieved by exposure to different preconditioning stimuli, but the duration of the induced protective phenotype is typically short-lasting, and thus is deemed as limiting its clinical applicability. Extending the period over which such adaptive epigenetic changes persist – in effect, expanding conditioning’s “therapeutic window” – would significantly broaden the potential applications of such a treatment approach in patients. The frequency of the conditioning stimulus may hold the key. While transient (1–3 days) protection against CNS ischemic injury is well established preclinically following a single preconditioning stimulus, repetitively presenting preconditioning stimuli extends the duration of ischemic tolerance by many weeks. Moreover, repetitive intermittent postconditioning enhances post-ischemic recovery metrics and improves long-term survival. Intermittent conditioning is also efficacious for preventing or delaying injury in preclinical models of chronic neurodegenerative disease, and for promoting long-lasting functional improvements in a number of other pathologies as well. Although the detailed mechanisms underlying these protracted kinds of neuroplasticity remain largely unstudied, accumulating empirical evidence supports the contention that all of these adaptive phenotypes are epigenetically mediated. Going forward, additional preclinical demonstrations of the ability to induce sustained beneficial phenotypes that reduce the burden of acute and chronic neurodegeneration, and experimental interrogations of the regulatory constructs responsible for these epigenetic responses, will accelerate the identification of not only efficacious but also practical, adaptive epigenetics-based treatments for individuals with neurological disease. PMID:25784897

  13. Extending injury- and disease-resistant CNS phenotypes by repetitive epigenetic conditioning.

    PubMed

    Gidday, Jeffrey M

    2015-01-01

    Significant reductions in the extent of acute injury in the CNS can be achieved by exposure to different preconditioning stimuli, but the duration of the induced protective phenotype is typically short-lasting, and thus is deemed as limiting its clinical applicability. Extending the period over which such adaptive epigenetic changes persist - in effect, expanding conditioning's "therapeutic window" - would significantly broaden the potential applications of such a treatment approach in patients. The frequency of the conditioning stimulus may hold the key. While transient (1-3 days) protection against CNS ischemic injury is well established preclinically following a single preconditioning stimulus, repetitively presenting preconditioning stimuli extends the duration of ischemic tolerance by many weeks. Moreover, repetitive intermittent postconditioning enhances post-ischemic recovery metrics and improves long-term survival. Intermittent conditioning is also efficacious for preventing or delaying injury in preclinical models of chronic neurodegenerative disease, and for promoting long-lasting functional improvements in a number of other pathologies as well. Although the detailed mechanisms underlying these protracted kinds of neuroplasticity remain largely unstudied, accumulating empirical evidence supports the contention that all of these adaptive phenotypes are epigenetically mediated. Going forward, additional preclinical demonstrations of the ability to induce sustained beneficial phenotypes that reduce the burden of acute and chronic neurodegeneration, and experimental interrogations of the regulatory constructs responsible for these epigenetic responses, will accelerate the identification of not only efficacious but also practical, adaptive epigenetics-based treatments for individuals with neurological disease. PMID:25784897

  14. RAMEDIS: a comprehensive information system for variations and corresponding phenotypes of rare metabolic diseases.

    PubMed

    Töpel, Thoralf; Scheible, Dagmar; Trefz, Friedrich; Hofestädt, Ralf

    2010-01-01

    RAMEDIS is a manually curated resource of human variations and corresponding phenotypes for rare metabolic diseases. The system is based on separate case reports that comprehensively describe various aspects of anonymous case study, e.g. molecular genetics, symptoms, lab findings, treatments, etc. Scientists are able to make use of the database by a simple and intuitive web-based user interface with a common web browser. A registration or login is not necessary for a full reading access to the system content. Furthermore, a mutation analysis table summarizes the submitted variations per diagnosis and enables direct access to detailed information of corresponding case reports. Interested scientists may open an account to submit their case reports in order to share valuable genotype-phenotype information efficiently with the scientific community. Currently, 794 case reports have been submitted, describing 92 different genetic metabolic diseases. To enhance the comprehensive coverage of available knowledge in the field of rare metabolic diseases, all case reports are linked to integrated information from public molecular biology databases like KEGG, OMIM and ENZYME. This information upgrades the case reports by related data of the corresponding diseases as well as involved enzymes, genes and metabolic pathways. Academic users may freely use the RAMEDIS system at http://www.ramedis.de. PMID:19953641

  15. Is Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Caused by Wood Smoke a Different Phenotype or a Different Entity?

    PubMed

    Torres-Duque, Carlos A; García-Rodriguez, María Carmen; González-García, Mauricio

    2016-08-01

    Around 40% of the world's population continue using solid fuel, including wood, for cooking or heating their homes. Chronic exposure to wood smoke is a risk factor for developing chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). In some regions of the world, this can be a more important cause of COPD than exposure to tobacco smoke from cigarettes. Significant differences between COPD associated with wood smoke (W-COPD) and that caused by smoking (S-COPD) have led some authors to suggest that W-COPD should be considered a new COPD phenotype. We present a review of the differences between W-COPD and S-COPD. On the premise that wood smoke and tobacco smoke are not the same and the physiopathological mechanisms they induce may differ, we have analyzed whether W-COPD can be considered as another COPD phenotype or a distinct nosological entity. PMID:27207325

  16. Evolution of disease phenotype in adult and pediatric onset Crohn’s disease in a population-based cohort

    PubMed Central

    Lovasz, Barbara Dorottya; Lakatos, Laszlo; Horvath, Agnes; Szita, Istvan; Pandur, Tunde; Mandel, Michael; Vegh, Zsuzsanna; Golovics, Petra Anna; Mester, Gabor; Balogh, Mihaly; Molnar, Csaba; Komaromi, Erzsebet; Kiss, Lajos Sandor; Lakatos, Peter Laszlo

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the evolution of disease phenotype in adult and pediatric onset Crohn’s disease (CD) populations, diagnosed between 1977 and 2008. METHODS: Data of 506 incident CD patients were analyzed (age at diagnosis: 28.5 years, interquartile range: 22-38 years). Both in- and outpatient records were collected prospectively with a complete clinical follow-up and comprehensively reviewed in the population-based Veszprem province database, which included incident patients diagnosed between January 1, 1977 and December 31, 2008 in adult and pediatric onset CD populations. Disease phenotype according to the Montreal classification and long-term disease course was analysed according to the age at onset in time-dependent univariate and multivariate analysis. RESULTS: Among this population-based cohort, seventy-four (12.8%) pediatric-onset CD patients were identified (diagnosed ≤ 17 years of age). There was no significant difference in the distribution of disease behavior between pediatric (B1: 62%, B2: 15%, B3: 23%) and adult-onset CD patients (B1: 56%, B2: 21%, B3: 23%) at diagnosis, or during follow-up. Overall, the probability of developing complicated disease behaviour was 49.7% and 61.3% in the pediatric and 55.1% and 62.4% in the adult onset patients after 5- and 10-years of follow-up. Similarly, time to change in disease behaviour from non stricturing, non penetrating (B1) to complicated, stricturing or penetrating (B2/B3) disease was not significantly different between pediatric and adult onset CD in a Kaplan-Meier analysis. Calendar year of diagnosis (P = 0.04), ileal location (P < 0.001), perianal disease (P < 0.001), smoking (P = 0.038) and need for steroids (P < 0.001) were associated with presence of, or progression to, complicated disease behavior at diagnosis and during follow-up. A change in disease location was observed in 8.9% of patients and it was associated with smoking status (P = 0.01), but not with age at diagnosis. CONCLUSION: Long

  17. Association between Manganese Superoxide Dismutase (MnSOD Val-9Ala) genotypes with the risk of generalized aggressive periodontitis disease.

    PubMed

    Kazemi, E; Moradi, M-T; Yari, K; Mousavi, S A R; Kahrizi, D

    2015-01-01

    Generalized aggressive periodontitis (GAP) is a subtype of periodontal diseases that characterized by rapid destruction of periodontal supporting tissues. The MnSOD Val-9Ala mutation of manganese superoxide dismutase gene (MnSOD Val-9Ala) and its correlation with periodontal diseases has been studied in different populations. The purpose of this study was to investigate the possible association of MnSODVal-9Ala polymorphism with periodontitis disease in sample of GAP patients in Iran for the first time. Following a GAP examination, 50 GAP patients and 100 healthy individuals were recruited. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood leukocytes and the MnSODVal-9Ala polymorphismwas detected using PCR-RFLP method. The frequency of Ala/Ala, Ala/Val and Val/Val genotypes in healthy individuals were 25, 66 and 9%, respectively. In periodontitis patients, frequencies were as Ala/Ala (12%), Ala/Val (50%) and Val/Val (38%) genotypes. There was a significant positive association between distribution of MnSOD Val-9Ala genotypes and the risk of periodontitis disease (p<0.05). Our results indicated that MnSOD Val-9Ala gene polymorphism has a positive association with the risk of periodontitis disease. PMID:26718428

  18. Phenotype variability of infantile-onset multisystem neurologic, endocrine, and pancreatic disease IMNEPD.

    PubMed

    Picker-Minh, Sylvie; Mignot, Cyril; Doummar, Diane; Hashem, Mais; Faqeih, Eissa; Josset, Patrice; Dubern, Béatrice; Alkuraya, Fowzan S; Kraemer, Nadine; Kaindl, Angela M

    2016-01-01

    Infantile-onset multisystem neurologic, endocrine, and pancreatic disease (IMNEPD) has been recently linked to biallelic mutation of the peptidyl-tRNA hydrolase 2 gene PTRH2. Two index patients with IMNEPD in the original report had multiple neurological symptoms such as postnatal microcephaly, intellectual disability, developmental delay, sensorineural deafness, cerebellar atrophy, ataxia, and peripheral neuropathy. In addition, distal muscle weakness and abnormalities of thyroid, pancreas, and liver were found. Here, we report five further IMNEPD patients with a different homozygous PTRH2 mutation, broaden the phenotypic spectrum of the disease and differentiate common symptoms and interindividual variability in IMNEPD associated with a unique mutation. We thereby hope to better define IMNEPD and promote recognition and diagnosis of this novel disease entity. PMID:27129381

  19. Transformation of Canine Lymphoma/Leukemia to More Aggressive Diseases: Anecdotes or Reality?

    PubMed Central

    Comazzi, Stefano; Aresu, Luca; Marconato, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Transformation is the evolution of an indolent lymphoma/leukemia to an aggressive lymphoma, typically harboring a very poor prognosis. This phenomenon is well described in humans, but underestimated in dogs although recognized as a possible evolution of indolent lymphomas/leukemias. In canine chronic leukemias, blast crisis (mainly in myeloid) and Richter syndrome (transformation into a high grade lymphoma) (mainly in B-cell lymphocytic leukemia) have been reported. Transformation is a possible event also in canine low grade lymphomas, although rare. The increased knowledge has also generated new questions and posed challenges that need to be addressed to improve outcome, including the recognition of the clinical characteristics at diagnosis associated with a higher risk of transformation in an attempt of anticipating the typical evolution. PMID:26664970

  20. Mutant Huntingtin Does Not Affect the Intrinsic Phenotype of Human Huntington’s Disease T Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Miller, James R. C.; Träger, Ulrike; Andre, Ralph; Tabrizi, Sarah J.

    2015-01-01

    Huntington’s disease is a fatal neurodegenerative condition caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the huntingtin gene. The peripheral innate immune system is dysregulated in Huntington’s disease and may contribute to its pathogenesis. However, it is not clear whether or to what extent the adaptive immune system is also involved. Here, we carry out the first comprehensive investigation of human ex vivo T lymphocytes in Huntington’s disease, focusing on the frequency of a range of T lymphocyte subsets, as well as analysis of proliferation, cytokine production and gene transcription. In contrast to the innate immune system, the intrinsic phenotype of T lymphocytes does not appear to be affected by the presence of mutant huntingtin, with Huntington’s disease T lymphocytes exhibiting no significant functional differences compared to control cells. The transcriptional profile of T lymphocytes also does not appear to be significantly affected, suggesting that peripheral immune dysfunction in Huntington’s disease is likely to be mediated primarily by the innate rather than the adaptive immune system. This study increases our understanding of the effects of Huntington’s disease on peripheral tissues, while further demonstrating the differential effects of the mutant protein on different but related cell types. Finally, this study suggests that the potential use of novel therapeutics aimed at modulating the Huntington’s disease innate immune system should not be extended to include the adaptive immune system. PMID:26529236

  1. p.R301X Mutation and Variable Phenotypic Appearance of Fabry Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ozelsancak, Ruya; Uyar, Bulent

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 39 Final Diagnosis: Fabry disease Symptoms: Acropareshesia • fatique Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Gene analysis Specialty: Metabolic Disorders and Diabetics Objective: Rare disease Background: Fabry disease is an X-linked disorder. Due to deficiency of the enzyme α-galactosidase A, neutral glycosphingolipids (primarily globotriaosylceramide) progressively accumulate within lysosomes of cells in various organ systems, resulting in a multi-system disorder, affecting both men and women. Misdiagnosis and delayed diagnosis are common because of the nature of Fabry disease. Case Report: We report a case of Fabry disease with a p.R301X (c.901 C>T) mutation in a 39-year-old man who was being treated for chronic sclerosing glomerulonephritis for 2 years. Family screening tests showed that the proband’s mother, sister, and daughter had the same mutation with different phenotypes. Levels of α-galactosidase A were low in the proband and his mother and sister. Cornea verticillata and heart involvement were present in multiple family members. Agalsidase alfa treatment was started in patients where indicated. Conclusions: Pedigree analysis is still a powerful, readily available tool to identify individuals at risk for genetic diseases and allows earlier detection and management of disease. PMID:27156739

  2. Do not feed the wildlife: associations between garbage use, aggression, and disease in banded mongooses (Mungos mungo).

    PubMed

    Flint, Bonnie Fairbanks; Hawley, Dana M; Alexander, Kathleen A

    2016-08-01

    Urbanization and other human modifications of the landscape may indirectly affect disease dynamics by altering host behavior in ways that influence pathogen transmission. Few opportunities arise to investigate behaviorally mediated effects of human habitat modification in natural host-pathogen systems, but we provide a potential example of this phenomenon in banded mongooses (Mungos mungo), a social mammal. Our banded mongoose study population in Botswana is endemically infected with a novel Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex pathogen, M. mungi, that primarily invades the mongoose host through the nasal planum and breaks in the skin. In this system, several study troops have access to human garbage sites and other modified landscapes for foraging. Banded mongooses in our study site (N = 4 troops, ~130 individuals) had significantly higher within-troop aggression levels when foraging in garbage compared to other foraging habitats. Second, monthly rates of aggression were a significant predictor of monthly number of injuries in troops. Finally, injured individuals had a 75% incidence of clinical tuberculosis (TB) compared to a 0% incidence in visibly uninjured mongooses during the study period. Our data suggest that mongoose troops that forage in garbage may be at greater risk of acquiring TB by incurring injuries that may allow for pathogen invasion. Our study suggests the need to consider the indirect effects of garbage on behavior and wildlife health when developing waste management approaches in human-modified areas. PMID:27547366

  3. Distinctive Menkes disease variant with occipital horns: Delineation of natural history and clinical phenotype

    SciTech Connect

    Proud, V.K.; Mussell, H.G.; Percy, A.K.

    1996-10-02

    To delineate further the clinical spectrum of Menkes disease, an X-linked recessive disorder of copper transport, we studied 4 related males, ranging in age from 4-38 years, with a unique phenotype that combines manifestations of classical and mild Menkes disease and occipital horn syndrome (OHS). The propositus, an 18-year-old man, was evaluated following an intracerebral hemorrhage at age 15 years and was noted to have marked hypotonia, motor delay with mental retardation, bladder diverticula, failure to thrive, and diarrhea from infancy; seizures from age 3 years; and abnormal hair (pili torti) and face, cutis laxa, and multiple joint dislocations. Radiographic abnormalities included occipital exostoses, tortuous cerebral blood vessels with multiple branch occlusions, and hammer-shaped clavicles. Biochemical studies demonstrated reduced copper and ceruloplasmin levels in serum, and abnormal plasma catecholamine ratios. We reported previously the molecular defect in this family, a splice-site mutation that predicts formation of approximately 20% of the normal Menkes gene product. Here, we detail the clinical course and physical features and radiographic findings in these 4 individuals, and compare their phenotype with classical and mild Menkes and OHS. Unusual Menkes disease variants such as this may escape recognition due to anomalies that appear inconsistent with the diagnosis, particularly prolonged survival and later onset of seizures. Males with mental retardation and connective tissue abnormalities should be evaluated for biochemical evidence of defective copper transport. 28 refs., 8 figs.

  4. Oral lesions, HIV phenotypes, and management of HIV-related disease: Workshop 4A.

    PubMed

    Patton, L L; Ranganathan, K; Naidoo, S; Bhayat, A; Balasundaram, S; Adeyemi, O; Taiwo, O; Speicher, D J; Chandra, L

    2011-04-01

    The workshop considered 5 questions related to oral lesions, HIV phenotypes, and the management of HIV-related disease, with a focus on evidence and challenges in resource-poor settings. First, are oral lesions unique with respect to geographic location or phenotype? Second, how useful would an oral lesion index be to predict HIV in resource-poor countries with no access to CD4 counts or viral load? Third, what are the latest methods and delivery modes for drugs used to treat oral lesions associated with HIV? Fourth, what is the role of the oral health care worker in rapid diagnostic testing for HIV? Fifth, what ethical and legal issues are to be considered when managing the HIV patient? The consensus of the workshop was the need for additional research in 4 key areas in developing countries: (1) additional investigation of comorbidities associated with HIV infection that may affect oral lesion presentation and distribution, especially in pediatric populations; (2) the development of region-specific algorithms involving HIV oral lesions, indicating cumulative risk of immune suppression and the presence of HIV disease; (3) well-designed clinical trials to test new therapies for oral lesions, new treatments for resistant oral fungal and viral diseases, effectiveness of therapies in children, and new drug delivery systems; and (4) the role of the oral health care worker in rapid diagnostic testing for HIV in various regions of the world. PMID:21441491

  5. Genetics of kidney disease and related cardiometabolic phenotypes in Zuni Indians: the Zuni Kidney Project

    PubMed Central

    Laston, Sandra L.; Voruganti, V. Saroja; Haack, Karin; Shah, Vallabh O.; Bobelu, Arlene; Bobelu, Jeanette; Ghahate, Donica; Harford, Antonia M.; Paine, Susan S.; Tentori, Francesca; Cole, Shelley A.; MacCluer, Jean W.; Comuzzie, Anthony G.; Zager, Philip G.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study is to identify genetic factors associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and related cardiometabolic phenotypes among participants of the Genetics of Kidney Disease in Zuni Indians study. The study was conducted as a community-based participatory research project in the Zuni Indians, a small endogamous tribe in rural New Mexico. We recruited 998 members from 28 extended multigenerational families, ascertained through probands with CKD who had at least one sibling with CKD. We used the Illumina Infinium Human1M-Duo version 3.0 BeadChips to type 1.1 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Prevalence estimates for CKD, hyperuricemia, diabetes, and hypertension were 24%, 30%, 17% and 34%, respectively. We found a significant (p < 1.58 × 10-7) association for a SNP in a novel gene for serum creatinine (PTPLAD2). We replicated significant associations for genes with serum uric acid (SLC2A9), triglyceride levels (APOA1, BUD13, ZNF259), and total cholesterol (PVRL2). We found novel suggestive associations (p < 1.58 × 10-6) for SNPs in genes with systolic (OLFML2B), and diastolic blood pressure (NFIA). We identified a series of genes associated with CKD and related cardiometabolic phenotypes among Zuni Indians, a population with a high prevalence of kidney disease. Illuminating genetic variations that modulate the risk for these disorders may ultimately provide a basis for novel preventive strategies and therapeutic interventions. PMID:25688259

  6. Basophil phenotypes in chronic idiopathic urticaria in relation to disease activity and autoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Eckman, John A; Hamilton, Robert G; Gober, Laura M; Sterba, Patricia M; Saini, Sarbjit S

    2008-08-01

    Potentially pathogenic IgG autoantibodies to IgE or its receptor, Fc epsilonRIalpha, have been detected in approximately 40% of chronic idiopathic urticaria (CIU) patients. CIU patients' basophils display distinct altered Fc epsilonRIalpha-mediated degranulation. CIU patients with basophil histamine release in response to polyclonal goat anti-human IgE > or = 10% are classified as CIU responders (CIU-R) and < 10% are CIU non-responders (CIU-NR). We compared the presence of autoantibodies to basophil degranulation phenotypes and to disease status (active or inactive). Sera were collected from non-CIU subjects and CIU subjects who participated in a longitudinal study of disease severity and had defined basophil degranulation phenotypes. Immunoenzymetric assays (IEMA) quantified IgG anti-Fc epsilonRIalpha and anti-IgE. IgG anti-Fc epsilonRIalpha antibody was detected in 57% of CIU-R (n=35), 55% of CIU-NR (n=29), and 57% of non-CIU subjects (n=23), whereas IgG anti-IgE was present in 43% of CIU-R, 45% of CIU-NR, and 30% of non-CIU subjects. Both the autoantibody levels and the functional basophil phenotype remained stable in subjects with active disease (n=16), whereas there was an enhancement in basophil function as subjects evolved into a state of remission (n=6), which appears independent of the presence of autoantibody. IEMAs detected a similar frequency of autoantibodies in CIU-R, CIU-NR, and non-CIU subjects. Basophil function may be independent of IEMA-detected autoantibodies. PMID:18356810

  7. Sphingomyelinase-Like Phosphodiesterase 3b Expression Levels Determine Podocyte Injury Phenotypes in Glomerular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Tae-Hyun; Pedigo, Christopher E.; Guzman, Johanna; Correa-Medina, Mayrin; Wei, Changli; Villarreal, Rodrigo; Mitrofanova, Alla; Leclercq, Farah; Faul, Christian; Li, Jing; Kretzler, Matthias; Nelson, Robert G.; Lehto, Markku; Forsblom, Carol; Groop, Per-Henrik; Reiser, Jochen; Burke, George William

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic kidney disease (DKD) is the most common cause of ESRD in the United States. Podocyte injury is an important feature of DKD that is likely to be caused by circulating factors other than glucose. Soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) is a circulating factor found to be elevated in the serum of patients with FSGS and causes podocyte αVβ3 integrin-dependent migration in vitro. Furthermore, αVβ3 integrin activation occurs in association with decreased podocyte-specific expression of acid sphingomyelinase-like phosphodiesterase 3b (SMPDL3b) in kidney biopsy specimens from patients with FSGS. However, whether suPAR-dependent αVβ3 integrin activation occurs in diseases other than FSGS and whether there is a direct link between circulating suPAR levels and SMPDL3b expression in podocytes remain to be established. Our data indicate that serum suPAR levels are also elevated in patients with DKD. However, unlike in FSGS, SMPDL3b expression was increased in glomeruli from patients with DKD and DKD sera-treated human podocytes, where it prevented αVβ3 integrin activation by its interaction with suPAR and led to increased RhoA activity, rendering podocytes more susceptible to apoptosis. In vivo, inhibition of acid sphingomyelinase reduced proteinuria in experimental DKD but not FSGS, indicating that SMPDL3b expression levels determined the podocyte injury phenotype. These observations suggest that SMPDL3b may be an important modulator of podocyte function by shifting suPAR-mediated podocyte injury from a migratory phenotype to an apoptotic phenotype and that it represents a novel therapeutic glomerular disease target. PMID:24925721

  8. Sphingomyelinase-like phosphodiesterase 3b expression levels determine podocyte injury phenotypes in glomerular disease.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Tae-Hyun; Pedigo, Christopher E; Guzman, Johanna; Correa-Medina, Mayrin; Wei, Changli; Villarreal, Rodrigo; Mitrofanova, Alla; Leclercq, Farah; Faul, Christian; Li, Jing; Kretzler, Matthias; Nelson, Robert G; Lehto, Markku; Forsblom, Carol; Groop, Per-Henrik; Reiser, Jochen; Burke, George William; Fornoni, Alessia; Merscher, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic kidney disease (DKD) is the most common cause of ESRD in the United States. Podocyte injury is an important feature of DKD that is likely to be caused by circulating factors other than glucose. Soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) is a circulating factor found to be elevated in the serum of patients with FSGS and causes podocyte αVβ3 integrin-dependent migration in vitro. Furthermore, αVβ3 integrin activation occurs in association with decreased podocyte-specific expression of acid sphingomyelinase-like phosphodiesterase 3b (SMPDL3b) in kidney biopsy specimens from patients with FSGS. However, whether suPAR-dependent αVβ3 integrin activation occurs in diseases other than FSGS and whether there is a direct link between circulating suPAR levels and SMPDL3b expression in podocytes remain to be established. Our data indicate that serum suPAR levels are also elevated in patients with DKD. However, unlike in FSGS, SMPDL3b expression was increased in glomeruli from patients with DKD and DKD sera-treated human podocytes, where it prevented αVβ3 integrin activation by its interaction with suPAR and led to increased RhoA activity, rendering podocytes more susceptible to apoptosis. In vivo, inhibition of acid sphingomyelinase reduced proteinuria in experimental DKD but not FSGS, indicating that SMPDL3b expression levels determined the podocyte injury phenotype. These observations suggest that SMPDL3b may be an important modulator of podocyte function by shifting suPAR-mediated podocyte injury from a migratory phenotype to an apoptotic phenotype and that it represents a novel therapeutic glomerular disease target. PMID:24925721

  9. Phenotypic and Genotypic Characteristics of Neisseria meningitidis Disease-Causing Strains in Argentina, 2010

    PubMed Central

    Sorhouet-Pereira, Cecilia; Efron, Adriana; Gagetti, Paula; Faccone, Diego; Regueira, Mabel; Corso, Alejandra; Gabastou, Jean-Marc; Ibarz-Pavón, Ana Belén

    2013-01-01

    Phenotypic and genotypic characterization of 133 isolates of Neisseria meningitidis obtained from meningococcal disease cases in Argentina during 2010 were performed by the National Reference Laboratory as part of a project coordinated by the PAHO within the SIREVA II network. Serogroup, serotype, serosubtype and MLST characterization were performed. Minimum Inhibitory Concentration to penicillin, ampicillin, ceftriaxone, rifampin, chloramphenicol, tetracycline and ciprofloxacin were determined and interpreted according to CLSI guidelines. Almost 49% of isolates were W135, and two serotype:serosubtype combinations, W135∶2a:P1.5,2:ST-11 and W135∶2a:P1.2:ST-11 accounted for 78% of all W135 isolates. Serogroup B accounted for 42.1% of isolates, and was both phenotypically and genotypically diverse. Serogroup C isolates represented 5.3% of the dataset, and one isolate belonging to the ST-198 complex was non-groupable. Isolates belonged mainly to the ST-11 complex (48%) and to a lesser extent to the ST-865 (18%), ST-32 (9,8%) and the ST-35 complexes (9%). Intermediate resistance to penicillin and ampicillin was detected in 35.4% and 33.1% of isolates respectively. Two W135∶2a:P1.5,2:ST-11:ST-11 isolates presented resistance to ciprofloxacin associated with a mutation in the QRDR of gyrA gene Thr91-Ile. These data show serogroup W135 was the first cause of disease in Argentina in 2010, and was strongly associated with the W135∶2a:P1.5,2:ST-11 epidemic clone. Serogroup B was the second cause of disease and isolates belonging to this serogroup were phenotypically and genotypically diverse. The presence of isolates with intermediate resistance to penicillin and the presence of fluorquinolone-resistant isolates highlight the necessity and importance of maintaining and strengthening National Surveillance Programs. PMID:23483970

  10. Relative value of ZAP-70, CD38, and immunoglobulin mutation status in predicting aggressive disease in chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Rassenti, Laura Z.; Jain, Sonia; Keating, Michael J.; Wierda, William G.; Grever, Michael R.; Byrd, John C.; Kay, Neil E.; Brown, Jennifer R.; Gribben, John G.; Neuberg, Donna S.; He, Feng; Greaves, Andrew W.; Rai, Kanti R.

    2008-01-01

    Leukemia-cell expression of ZAP-70, CD38, or unmutated immunoglobulin heavy chain variable region genes (U-IGHV) each is associated with aggressive disease in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). To assess the relative strength of each marker, we defined thresholds for designating a case as positive for CD38 or ZAP-70 in a test cohort of 307 patients and used these data-defined criteria to stratify patients in an independent cohort of 705 patients. Multivariable analysis revealed that ZAP-70 was the strongest risk factor. Knowledge of the IGHV mutation status or CD38 did not improve our ability to predict the time to first treatment except for ZAP-70–negative cases, which could be segregated into 2 groups of intermediate-risk or low-risk disease based on whether they expressed unmutated or mutated IGHV. ZAP-70 maintained its high relative prognostic value for the subset of patients with early-stage, asymptomatic disease, including patients evaluated within 1 year of diagnosis. Although it is premature to recommend therapy based on these risk factors, patients with ZAP-70–positive CLL cells should be monitored closely for disease progression as they have a median time from diagnosis to requiring initial therapy by standard criteria of approximately 3 years. PMID:18577710

  11. A meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies to identify prostate cancer susceptibility loci associated with aggressive and non-aggressive disease

    PubMed Central

    Amin Al Olama, Ali; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Wiklund, Fredrik; Berndt, Sonja I.; Benlloch, Sara; Giles, Graham G.; Severi, Gianluca; Neal, David E.; Hamdy, Freddie C.; Donovan, Jenny L.; Hunter, David J.; Henderson, Brian E.; Thun, Michael J.; Gaziano, Michael; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Siddiq, Afshan; Travis, Ruth C.; Cox, David G.; Canzian, Federico; Riboli, Elio; Key, Timothy J.; Andriole, Gerald; Albanes, Demetrius; Hayes, Richard B.; Schleutker, Johanna; Auvinen, Anssi; Tammela, Teuvo L.J.; Weischer, Maren; Stanford, Janet L.; Ostrander, Elaine A.; Cybulski, Cezary; Lubinski, Jan; Thibodeau, Stephen N.; Schaid, Daniel J.; Sorensen, Karina D.; Batra, Jyotsna; Clements, Judith A.; Chambers, Suzanne; Aitken, Joanne; Gardiner, Robert A.; Maier, Christiane; Vogel, Walther; Dörk, Thilo; Brenner, Hermann; Habuchi, Tomonori; Ingles, Sue; John, Esther M.; Dickinson, Joanne L.; Cannon-Albright, Lisa; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Kaneva, Radka; Zhang, Hong-Wei; Lu, Yong-Jie; Park, Jong Y.; Cooney, Kathleen A.; Muir, Kenneth R.; Leongamornlert, Daniel A.; Saunders, Edward; Tymrakiewicz, Malgorzata; Mahmud, Nadiya; Guy, Michelle; Govindasami, Koveela; O'Brien, Lynne T.; Wilkinson, Rosemary A.; Hall, Amanda L.; Sawyer, Emma J.; Dadaev, Tokhir; Morrison, Jonathan; Dearnaley, David P.; Horwich, Alan; Huddart, Robert A.; Khoo, Vincent S.; Parker, Christopher C.; Van As, Nicholas; Woodhouse, Christopher J.; Thompson, Alan; Dudderidge, Tim; Ogden, Chris; Cooper, Colin S.; Lophatonanon, Artitaya; Southey, Melissa C.; Hopper, John L.; English, Dallas; Virtamo, Jarmo; Le Marchand, Loic; Campa, Daniele; Kaaks, Rudolf; Lindstrom, Sara; Diver, W. Ryan; Gapstur, Susan; Yeager, Meredith; Cox, Angela; Stern, Mariana C.; Corral, Roman; Aly, Markus; Isaacs, William; Adolfsson, Jan; Xu, Jianfeng; Zheng, S. Lilly; Wahlfors, Tiina; Taari, Kimmo; Kujala, Paula; Klarskov, Peter; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Røder, M. Andreas; Frikke-Schmidt, Ruth; Bojesen, Stig E.; FitzGerald, Liesel M.; Kolb, Suzanne; Kwon, Erika M.; Karyadi, Danielle M.; Orntoft, Torben Falck; Borre, Michael; Rinckleb, Antje; Luedeke, Manuel; Herkommer, Kathleen; Meyer, Andreas; Serth, Jürgen; Marthick, James R.; Patterson, Briony; Wokolorczyk, Dominika; Spurdle, Amanda; Lose, Felicity; McDonnell, Shannon K.; Joshi, Amit D.; Shahabi, Ahva; Pinto, Pedro; Santos, Joana; Ray, Ana; Sellers, Thomas A.; Lin, Hui-Yi; Stephenson, Robert A.; Teerlink, Craig; Muller, Heiko; Rothenbacher, Dietrich; Tsuchiya, Norihiko; Narita, Shintaro; Cao, Guang-Wen; Slavov, Chavdar; Mitev, Vanio; Chanock, Stephen; Gronberg, Henrik; Haiman, Christopher A.; Kraft, Peter; Easton, Douglas F.; Eeles, Rosalind A.

    2013-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified multiple common genetic variants associated with an increased risk of prostate cancer (PrCa), but these explain less than one-third of the heritability. To identify further susceptibility alleles, we conducted a meta-analysis of four GWAS including 5953 cases of aggressive PrCa and 11 463 controls (men without PrCa). We computed association tests for approximately 2.6 million SNPs and followed up the most significant SNPs by genotyping 49 121 samples in 29 studies through the international PRACTICAL and BPC3 consortia. We not only confirmed the association of a PrCa susceptibility locus, rs11672691 on chromosome 19, but also showed an association with aggressive PrCa [odds ratio = 1.12 (95% confidence interval 1.03–1.21), P = 1.4 × 10−8]. This report describes a genetic variant which is associated with aggressive PrCa, which is a type of PrCa associated with a poorer prognosis. PMID:23065704

  12. Heterogeneous Determinants of Quality of Life in Different Phenotypes of Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fereshtehnejad, Seyed-Mohammad; Shafieesabet, Mahdiyeh; Farhadi, Farzaneh; Hadizadeh, Hasti; Rahmani, Arash; Naderi, Nader; Khaefpanah, Dena; Shahidi, Gholam Ali; Delbari, Ahmad; Lökk, Johan

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) is considered a very important outcome indicator in patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD). A broad list of motor and non-motor features have been shown to affect HRQoL in PD, however, there is a dearth of information about the complexity of interrelationships between determinants of HRQoL in different PD phenotypes. We aimed to find independent determinates and the best structural model for HRQoL, also to investigate the heterogeneity in HRQoL between PD patients with different phenotypes regarding onset-age, progression rate and dominant symptom. Methods A broad spectrum of demographic, motor and non-motor characteristics were collected in 157 idiopathic PD patients, namely comorbidity profile, nutritional status, UPDRS (total items), psychiatric symptoms (depression, anxiety), fatigue and psychosocial functioning through physical examination, validated questionnaires and scales. Structural equation model (SEM) and multivariate regressions were applied to find determinants of Parkinson’s disease summary index (PDSI) and different domains of HRQoL (PDQ-39). Results Female sex, anxiety, depression and UPDRS-part II scores were the significant independent determinants of PDSI. A structural model consisting of global motor, global non-motor and co-morbidity indicator as three main components was able to predict 89% of the variance in HRQoL. In older-onset and slow-progression phenotypes, the motor domain showed smaller contribution on HRQoL and the majority of its effects were mediated through non-motor features. Comorbidity component was a significant determinant of HRQoL only among older-onset and non-tremor-dominant PD patients. Fatigue was not a significant indicator of non-motor component to affect HRQoL in rapid-progression PD. Conclusions Our findings showed outstanding heterogeneities in the pattern and determinants of HRQoL among PD phenotypes. These factors should be considered during the assessments and

  13. PhenomeCentral: a portal for phenotypic and genotypic matchmaking of patients with rare genetic diseases.

    PubMed

    Buske, Orion J; Girdea, Marta; Dumitriu, Sergiu; Gallinger, Bailey; Hartley, Taila; Trang, Heather; Misyura, Andriy; Friedman, Tal; Beaulieu, Chandree; Bone, William P; Links, Amanda E; Washington, Nicole L; Haendel, Melissa A; Robinson, Peter N; Boerkoel, Cornelius F; Adams, David; Gahl, William A; Boycott, Kym M; Brudno, Michael

    2015-10-01

    The discovery of disease-causing mutations typically requires confirmation of the variant or gene in multiple unrelated individuals, and a large number of rare genetic diseases remain unsolved due to difficulty identifying second families. To enable the secure sharing of case records by clinicians and rare disease scientists, we have developed the PhenomeCentral portal (https://phenomecentral.org). Each record includes a phenotypic description and relevant genetic information (exome or candidate genes). PhenomeCentral identifies similar patients in the database based on semantic similarity between clinical features, automatically prioritized genes from whole-exome data, and candidate genes entered by the users, enabling both hypothesis-free and hypothesis-driven matchmaking. Users can then contact other submitters to follow up on promising matches. PhenomeCentral incorporates data for over 1,000 patients with rare genetic diseases, contributed by the FORGE and Care4Rare Canada projects, the US NIH Undiagnosed Diseases Program, the EU Neuromics and ANDDIrare projects, as well as numerous independent clinicians and scientists. Though the majority of these records have associated exome data, most lack a molecular diagnosis. PhenomeCentral has already been used to identify causative mutations for several patients, and its ability to find matching patients and diagnose these diseases will grow with each additional patient that is entered. PMID:26251998

  14. Diabetes and Cardiovascular Disease Outcomes in the Metabolically Healthy Obese Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Appleton, Sarah L.; Seaborn, Christopher J.; Visvanathan, Renuka; Hill, Catherine L.; Gill, Tiffany K.; Taylor, Anne W.; Adams, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine the correlates of the “metabolically healthy obese” (MHO) phenotype and the longitudinal risks of diabetes and cardiovascular disease (CVD)/stroke associated with this phenotype. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS The North West Adelaide Health Study is a prospective cohort study of 4,056 randomly selected adults aged ≥18 years. Participants free of CVD/stroke and not underweight (n = 3,743) were stratified by BMI categories and metabolic risk, defined as having two or more International Diabetes Federation metabolic syndrome criteria, excluding waist circumference. RESULTS Correlates of the MHO (n = 454 [12.1%]) included smoking, socioeconomic disadvantage, and physical inactivity. Compared with metabolically healthy normal-weight subjects (n = 1,172 [31.3%]), the MHO were more likely to develop metabolic risk (15.5 vs. 33.1%, P < 0.001) and incident diabetes (odds ratio 2.09 [95% CI 0.87–5.03]) but not CVD/stroke (1.16 [0.58–2.29]) during 5.5–10.3 years of follow-up. These risks were not seen in MHO subjects maintaining metabolic health (n = 188 [67%]). Sustained metabolic health in obese participants was associated with age ≤40 years and lower waist circumference. Compared with the metabolically at-risk obese, MHO women demonstrated a significantly higher (mean [SE]) percentage of leg fat (49.9 [0.5] vs. 53.2 [0.7]) and lower waist circumference (104 [0.6] vs. 101 cm [0.8]), despite no significant differences in overall adiposity. CONCLUSIONS “Healthy” obesity was a transient state for one-third of subjects. Persistence of a MHO phenotype, which was associated with favorable outcomes, was related to younger age and a more peripheral fat distribution. The MHO phenotype may be sustained by promoting lower waist circumferences. PMID:23491523

  15. The non-excitable smooth muscle: Calcium signaling and phenotypic switching during vascular disease

    PubMed Central

    House, Suzanne J.; Potier, Marie; Bisaillon, Jonathan; Singer, Harold A.

    2008-01-01

    Calcium (Ca2+) is a highly versatile second messenger that controls vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) contraction, proliferation, and migration. By means of Ca2+ permeable channels, Ca2+ pumps and channels conducting other ions such as potassium and chloride, VSMC keep intracellular Ca2+ levels under tight control. In healthy quiescent contractile VSMC, two important components of the Ca2+ signaling pathways that regulate VSMC contraction are the plasma membrane voltage-operated Ca2+ channel of the high voltage-activated type (L-type) and the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ release channel, Ryanodine Receptor (RyR). Injury to the vessel wall is accompanied by VSMC phenotype switch from a contractile quiescent to a proliferative motile phenotype (synthetic phenotype) and by alteration of many components of VSMC Ca2+ signaling pathways. Specifically, this switch that culminates in a VSMC phenotype reminiscent of a non-excitable cell is characterized by loss of L-type channels expression and increased expression of the low voltage-activated (T-type) Ca2+ channels and the canonical transient receptor potential (TRPC) channels. The expression levels of intracellular Ca2+ release channels, pumps and Ca2+-activated proteins are also altered: the proliferative VSMC lose the RyR3 and the sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPase isoform 2a pump and reciprocally regulate isoforms of the ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II. This review focuses on the changes in expression of Ca2+ signaling proteins associated with VSMC proliferation both in vitro and in vivo. The physiological implications of the altered expression of these Ca2+ signaling molecules, their contribution to VSMC dysfunction during vascular disease and their potential as targets for drug therapy will be discussed. PMID:18365243

  16. Sensitized phenotypic screening identifies gene dosage sensitive region on chromosome 11 that predisposes to disease in mice

    PubMed Central

    Ermakova, Olga; Piszczek, Lukasz; Luciani, Luisa; Cavalli, Florence M G; Ferreira, Tiago; Farley, Dominika; Rizzo, Stefania; Paolicelli, Rosa Chiara; Al-Banchaabouchi, Mumna; Nerlov, Claus; Moriggl, Richard; Luscombe, Nicholas M; Gross, Cornelius

    2011-01-01

    The identification of susceptibility genes for human disease is a major goal of current biomedical research. Both sequence and structural variation have emerged as major genetic sources of phenotypic variability and growing evidence points to copy number variation as a particularly important source of susceptibility for disease. Here we propose and validate a strategy to identify genes in which changes in dosage alter susceptibility to disease-relevant phenotypes in the mouse. Our approach relies on sensitized phenotypic screening of megabase-sized chromosomal deletion and deficiency lines carrying altered copy numbers of ∼30 linked genes. This approach offers several advantages as a method to systematically identify genes involved in disease susceptibility. To examine the feasibility of such a screen, we performed sensitized phenotyping in five therapeutic areas (metabolic syndrome, immune dysfunction, atherosclerosis, cancer and behaviour) of a 0.8 Mb reciprocal chromosomal duplication and deficiency on chromosome 11 containing 27 genes. Gene dosage in the region significantly affected risk for high-fat diet-induced metabolic syndrome, antigen-induced immune hypersensitivity, ApoE-induced atherosclerosis, and home cage activity. Follow up studies on individual gene knockouts for two candidates in the region showed that copy number variation in Stat5 was responsible for the phenotypic variation in antigen-induced immune hypersensitivity and metabolic syndrome. These data demonstrate the power of sensitized phenotypic screening of segmental aneuploidy lines to identify disease susceptibility genes. PMID:21204268

  17. Equating salivary lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) with LDH-5 expression in patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma: An insight into metabolic reprogramming of cancer cell as a predictor of aggressive phenotype.

    PubMed

    Saluja, Tajindra Singh; Spadigam, Anita; Dhupar, Anita; Syed, Shaheen

    2016-04-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is the sixth most common human malignancy. According to World Health Organization, oral cancer has been reported to have the highest morbidity and mortality and a survival rate of approximately 50 % at 5 years from diagnosis. This is attributed to the subjectivity in TNM staging and histological grading which may result in less than optimum treatment outcomes including tumour recurrence. One of the hallmarks of cancer is aerobic glycolysis also known as the Warburg effect. This glycolytic phenotype (hypoxic state) not only confers immortality to cancer cells, but also correlates with the belligerent behaviour of various malignancies and is reflected as an increase in the expression of lactate dehydrogenase 5 (LDH-5), the main isoform of LDH catalysing the conversion of pyruvate to lactate during glycolysis. The diagnostic role of salivary LDH in assessing the metabolic phenotype of oral cancer has not been studied. Since salivary LDH is mainly sourced from oral epithelial cells, any pathological changes in the epithelium should reflect diagnostically in saliva. Thus in our current research, we made an attempt to ascertain the biological behaviour and aggressiveness of OSCC by appraising its metabolic phenotype as indirectly reflected in salivary LDH activity. We found that salivary LDH can be used to assess the aggressiveness of different histological grades of OSCC. For the first time, an evidence of differing metabolic behaviour in similar histologic tumour grade is presented. Taken together, our study examines the inclusion of salivary LDH as potential diagnostic parameter and therapeutic index in OSCC. PMID:26577856

  18. Selective participation of c-Jun with Fra-2/c-Fos promotes aggressive tumor phenotypes and poor prognosis in tongue cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Shilpi; Kumar, Prabhat; Kaur, Harsimrut; Sharma, Nishi; Saluja, Daman; Bharti, Alok C.; Das, Bhudev C.

    2015-01-01

    Tongue squamous cell carcinoma (TSCC) is most aggressive head and neck cancer often associated with HR-HPV infection. The role of AP-1 which is an essential regulator of HPV oncogene expression and tumorigenesis is not reported in tongue cancer. One hundred tongue tissue biopsies comprising precancer, cancer and adjacent controls including two tongue cancer cell lines were employed to study the role of HPV infection and AP-1 family proteins. An exclusive prevalence (28%) of HR-HPV type 16 was observed mainly in well differentiated tongue carcinomas (78.5%). A higher expression and DNA binding activity of AP-1 was observed in tongue tumors and cancer cell lines with c-Fos and Fra-2 as the major binding partners forming the functional AP-1 complex but c-Jun participated only in HPV negative and poorly differentiated carcinoma. Knocking down of Fra-2 responsible for aggressive tongue tumorigenesis led to significant reduction in c-Fos, c-Jun, MMP-9 and HPVE6/E7 expression but Fra-1 and p53 were upregulated. The binding and expression of c-Fos/Fra-2 increased as a function of severity of tongue lesions, yet selective participation of c-Jun appears to promote poor differentiation and aggressive tumorigenesis only in HPV negative cases while HPV infection leads to well differentiation and better prognosis preferably in nonsmokers. PMID:26581505

  19. Hematopoietic Age at Onset of Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Dictates Disease Aggressiveness and Progression.

    PubMed

    Marsh, Timothy; Wong, Irene; Sceneay, Jaclyn; Barakat, Amey; Qin, Yuanbo; Sjödin, Andreas; Alspach, Elise; Nilsson, Björn; Stewart, Sheila A; McAllister, Sandra S

    2016-05-15

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is considered an early onset subtype of breast cancer that carries with it a poorer prognosis in young rather than older women for reasons that remain poorly understood. Hematopoiesis in the bone marrow becomes altered with age and may therefore affect the composition of tumor-infiltrating hematopoietic cells and subsequent tumor progression. In this study, we investigated how age- and tumor-dependent changes to bone marrow-derived hematopoietic cells impact TNBC progression. Using multiple mouse models of TNBC tumorigenesis and metastasis, we found that a specific population of bone marrow cells (BMC) upregulated CSF-1R and secreted the growth factor granulin to support stromal activation and robust tumor growth in young mice. However, the same cell population in old mice expressed low levels of CSF1R and granulin and failed to promote tumor outgrowth, suggesting that age influences the tumorigenic capacity of BMCs in response to tumor-associated signals. Importantly, BMCs from young mice were sufficient to activate a tumor-supportive microenvironment and induce tumor progression in old mice. These results indicate that hematopoietic age is an important determinant of TNBC aggressiveness and provide rationale for investigating age-stratified therapies designed to prevent the protumorigenic effects of activated BMCs. Cancer Res; 76(10); 2932-43. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27197230

  20. Phenotypic heterogeneity and genetic modification of P102L inherited prion disease in an international series

    PubMed Central

    Webb, T. E. F.; Poulter, M.; Beck, J.; Uphill, J.; Adamson, G.; Campbell, T.; Linehan, J.; Powell, C.; Brandner, S.; Pal, S.; Siddique, D.; Wadsworth, J. D.; Joiner, S.; Alner, K.; Petersen, C.; Hampson, S.; Rhymes, C.; Treacy, C.; Storey, E.; Geschwind, M. D.; Nemeth, A. H.; Wroe, S.; Mead, S.

    2008-01-01

    The largest kindred with inherited prion disease P102L, historically Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker syndrome, originates from central England, with émigrés now resident in various parts of the English-speaking world. We have collected data from 84 patients in the large UK kindred and numerous small unrelated pedigrees to investigate phenotypic heterogeneity and modifying factors. This collection represents by far the largest series of P102L patients so far reported. Microsatellite and genealogical analyses of eight separate European kindreds support multiple distinct mutational events at a cytosine-phosphate diester-guanidine dinucleotide mutation hot spot. All of the smaller P102L kindreds were linked to polymorphic human prion protein gene codon 129M and were not connected by genealogy or microsatellite haplotype background to the large kindred or each other. While many present with classical Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker syndrome, a slowly progressive cerebellar ataxia with later onset cognitive impairment, there is remarkable heterogeneity. A subset of patients present with prominent cognitive and psychiatric features and some have met diagnostic criteria for sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. We show that polymorphic human prion protein gene codon 129 modifies age at onset: the earliest eight clinical onsets were all MM homozygotes and overall age at onset was 7 years earlier for MM compared with MV heterozygotes (P = 0.02). Unexpectedly, apolipoprotein E4 carriers have a delayed age of onset by 10 years (P = 0.02). We found a preponderance of female patients compared with males (54 females versus 30 males, P = 0.01), which probably relates to ascertainment bias. However, these modifiers had no impact on a semi-quantitative pathological phenotype in 10 autopsied patients. These data allow an appreciation of the range of clinical phenotype, modern imaging and molecular investigation and should inform genetic counselling of at-risk individuals, with the

  1. Sporadic inclusion body myositis: HLA-DRB1 allele interactions influence disease risk and clinical phenotype.

    PubMed

    Mastaglia, Frank L; Needham, Merrilee; Scott, Adrian; James, Ian; Zilko, Paul; Day, Timothy; Kiers, Lynette; Corbett, Alastair; Witt, Campbell S; Allcock, Richard; Laing, Nigel; Garlepp, Michael; Christiansen, Frank T

    2009-11-01

    Susceptibility to sIBM is strongly associated with the HLA-DRB1*03 allele and the 8.1 MHC ancestral haplotype (HLA-A1, B8, DRB1*03) but little is known about the effects of allelic interactions at the DRB1 locus or disease-modifying effects of HLA alleles. HLA-A, B and DRB1 genotyping was performed in 80 Australian sIBM cases and the frequencies of different alleles and allele combinations were compared with those in a group of 190 healthy controls. Genotype-phenotype correlations were also investigated. Amongst carriers of the HLA-DRB1*03 allele, DRB1*03/*01 heterozygotes were over-represented in the sIBM group (p<0.003) while. DRB1*03/*04 heterozygotes were under-represented (p<0.008). The mean age-at-onset (AAO) was 6.5 years earlier in DRB1*03/*01 heterozygotes who also had more severe quadriceps muscle weakness than the rest of the cohort. The findings indicate that interactions between the HLA-DRB1*03 allele and other alleles at the DRB1 locus can influence disease susceptibility and the clinical phenotype in sIBM. PMID:19720533

  2. Genotype-phenotype correlation in Iranian patients with Hb H disease.

    PubMed

    Ebrahimkhani, Saedieh; Azarkeivan, Azita; Bayat, Nooshin; Houry-Parvin, Mahdieh; Jalil-Nejad, Sayeh; Zand, Shima; Golkar, Zahra; Hadavi, Valeh; Imanian, Hashem; Oberkanins, Christian; Najmabadi, Hossein

    2011-01-01

    Thalassemia is the most common genetic disorder in Iran. Some α-globin genotypes leading to Hb H disease may cause severe anemia and dependence on regular blood transfusions. In this study, 40 patients were analyzed for the molecular basis and the genotype-phenotype correlation of Hb H disease in Iran. α-Globin molecular analysis was performed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) followed by agarose gel electrophoresis, reverse hybridization test strips or DNA sequencing. The most frequently observed α-globin genotypes were -α(3.7)/- -(MED) in 10 patients (25%), - -(20.5)/α(-5nt)α in six patients (15%) and - -(20.5)/-α(3.7) in four patients (10%). A subset of the identified Hb H genotypes, including - -(MED)/α(CS)α, - -(MED)/α(PolyA2)α and α(CS)α/α(CS)α, was associated with a need for regular or irregular blood transfusions. Our findings provide a basis for predicting phenotype severity by identifying the Hb H genotype and making more selective decisions for prenatal diagnosis. PMID:21250880

  3. Pathogenic Cellular Phenotypes are Germline Transmissible in a Transgenic Primate Model of Huntington's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Putkhao, Kittiphong; Kocerha, Jannet; Cho, In-Ki; Yang, Jinjing; Parnpai, Rangsun

    2013-01-01

    A transgenic primate model for Huntington's Disease (HD) first reported by our group that (HD monkeys) carry the mutant Huntingtin (HTT) gene with expanded polyglutamine (CAG) repeats and, develop chorea, dystonia, and other involuntary motor deficiencies similar to HD [1]. More recently, we have found that longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging of the HD monkey brain revealed significant atrophy in regions associated with cognitive deficits symptomatic in HD patients, providing the first animal model which replicates clinical phenotypes of diagnosed humans. Here we report germline transmission of the pathogenic mutant HTT in HD monkey by the production of embryos and subsequent derivation of HD monkey embryonic stem cells (rHD-ESCs) using HD monkey sperm. rHD-ESCs inherit mutant HTT and green fluorescent protein (GFP) genes through the gametes of HD monkey. rHD-ESCs express mutant HTT and form intranuclear inclusion, a classical cellular feature of HD. Notably, mosaicism of the pathogenic polyQ region in the sperm as well as derived ESCs were also observed, consistent with intraindividual and intergenerational reports of mosaic CAG repeats [2,3]and CAG expansion in HD patients [4–7]. The confirmation of transgene inheritability and development of pathogenic HD phenotype in derived rHD-ESCs reported in this study is a milestone in the pursuit of a transgenic primate model with inherited mutant HTT for development of novel disease biomarkers and therapeutics. PMID:23190281

  4. Exosomes from adipose-derived stem cells ameliorate phenotype of Huntington's disease in vitro model.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mijung; Liu, Tian; Im, Wooseok; Kim, Manho

    2016-08-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a hereditary neurodegenerative disorder caused by the aggregation of mutant Huntingtin (mHtt). Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) have a potential for use in the treatment of incurable disorders, including HD. ASCs secrete various neurotrophic factors and microvesicles, and modulate hostile microenvironments affected by disease through paracrine mechanisms. Exosomes are small vesicles that transport nucleic acid and protein between cells. Here, we investigated the therapeutic role of exosomes from ASCs (ASC-exo) using in vitro HD model by examining pathological phenotypes of this model. Immunocytochemistry result showed that ASC-exo significantly decreases mHtt aggregates in R6/2 mice-derived neuronal cells. Western blot result further confirmed the reduction in mHtt aggregates level by ASC-exo treatment. ASC-exo up-regulates PGC-1, phospho-CREB and ameliorates abnormal apoptotic protein level in an in vitro HD model. In addition, MitoSOX Red, JC-1 and cell viability assay showed that ASC-exo reduces mitochondrial dysfunction and cell apoptosis of in vitro HD model. These findings suggest that ASC-exo has a therapeutic potential for treating HD by modulating representative cellular phenotypes of HD. PMID:27177616

  5. Mothers produce less aggressive sons with altered immunity when there is a threat of disease during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Curno, Olivia; Behnke, Jerzy M; McElligott, Alan G; Reader, Tom; Barnard, Chris J

    2009-03-22

    Maternal experience before and during pregnancy is known to play a key role in offspring development. However, the influence of social cues about disease in the maternal environment has not been explored. We indirectly exposed pregnant mice to infected neighbours by housing them next to non-contagious conspecifics infected with Babesia microti. We examined the effect of this indirect immunological exposure on both the females and their adult offspring. Exposed females had higher levels of serum corticosterone and increased kidney growth compared with those with uninfected neighbours. These exposed females subsequently produced offspring that as adults showed an accelerated immune response to B. microti and less aggression in social groups. We suggest that ambient information regarding disease is used adaptively to maximize offspring survival and reproductive success in a challenging environment. Our results shed light on the impact of social information and maternal effects on life histories, and have important consequences for our understanding of epidemiology and individual disease susceptibility in humans and other animals. They also lead us to question the suitability of some laboratory housing conditions during experimental procedures, which may impact negatively upon both animal welfare and the validity of animal science. PMID:19129100

  6. p.R301X Mutation and Variable Phenotypic Appearance of Fabry Disease.

    PubMed

    Ozelsancak, Ruya; Uyar, Bulent

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Fabry disease is an X-linked disorder. Due to deficiency of the enzyme a-galactosidase A, neutral glycosphingolipids (primarily globotriaosylceramide) progressively accumulate within lysosomes of cells in various organ systems, resulting in a multi-system disorder, affecting both men and women. Misdiagnosis and delayed diagnosis are common because of the nature of Fabry disease. CASE REPORT We report a case of Fabry disease with a p.R301X (c.901 C>T) mutation in a 39-year-old man who was being treated for chronic sclerosing glomerulonephritis for 2 years. Family screening tests showed that the proband's mother, sister, and daughter had the same mutation with different phenotypes. Levels of α-galactosidase A were low in the proband and his mother and sister. Cornea verticillata and heart involvement were present in multiple family members. Agalsidase alfa treatment was started in patients where indicated. CONCLUSIONS Pedigree analysis is still a powerful, readily available tool to identify individuals at risk for genetic diseases and allows earlier detection and management of disease. PMID:27156739

  7. Pulmonary heart disease: The heart-lung interaction and its impact on patient phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Forfia, Paul R.; Vaidya, Anjali; Wiegers, Susan E.

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary heart disease (PHD) refers to altered structure or function of the right ventricle occurring in association with abnormal respiratory function. Although nearly always associated with some degree of PH, the degree, nature, severity, and causality of PH in relation to the PHD is not necessarily linear and direct. Abnormal gas exchange is a fundamental underpinning of PHD, affecting pulmonary vascular, cardiac, renal, and neurohormonal systems. Direct and indirect effects of chronic respiratory disease can disrupt the right ventricular-pulmonary arterial (RV-PA) interaction and, likewise, factors such as sympathetic nervous system activation, altered blood viscosity, and salt and water retention can function in a feedback loop to further influence RV-PA function. Left heart function may also be affected, especially in those with pre-existing left heart disease. Thus, the physiologic interactions between abnormal respiratory and cardiovascular function are complex, with PHD representing a heterogeneous end organ effect of an integrated multisystem process. In this review, we propose to separate PHD into two distinct entities, “Type I” and “Type II” PHD. Type I PHD is most common, and refers to subjects with chronic respiratory disease (CRD) where the perturbations in respiratory function dominate over more mild cardiac and circulatory disruptions. In contrast, Type II PHD refers to the smaller subset of patients with more severe pulmonary vascular and right heart dysfunction, whom often present in a fashion similar to patients with PAH. Phenotypic differences are not made by PA pressure alone, but instead by differences in the overall physiology and clinical syndrome. Thus, key differences can be seen in symptomatology, physical signs, cardiac imaging, hemodynamics, and the cardiovascular and gas exchange responses to exercise. Such key baseline differences in the overall physiologic phenotype are likely critical to predicting response to PH specific

  8. Childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus in Singapore: clinical phenotypes, disease activity, damage, and autoantibody profiles.

    PubMed

    Tan, J H T; Hoh, S F; Win, M T M; Chan, Y H; Das, L; Arkachaisri, T

    2015-08-01

    Childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus (cSLE) is a multisystem autoimmune disease characterized by immune dysregulation affecting patients less than 18 years old. One-fifth of SLE cases are diagnosed during childhood. cSLE presents differently from adults and has a more severe and aggressive course. We describe the clinical and antibody profiles in our cSLE Singapore cohort. All cSLE patients who satisfied the 1997 American College of Rheumatology diagnostic criteria were captured in our lupus registry from January 2009 to January 2014. Data including demographic, cumulative clinical, serologic data, and damage indices were collected. Adjusted mean SLEDAI-2K (AMS) was used to summarize disease activity over multiple visits. Cluster analysis using non-hierarchical K-means procedure was performed on eight selected antibodies. The 64 patients (female:male ratio 5:1; Chinese 45.3%, Malay 28.1%, Indian 9.4%, and other races 17.2%) had a mean onset age of 11.5 years (range 2.1-16.7) and mean age at diagnosis was 11.9 years (range 2.6-18.0). Our study demonstrated differences in clinical manifestations for which hematologic involvement was the most common manifestation with less renal disease and uncommon neurologic manifestation as compared to other cSLE cohorts reported in our region. Antibody clusters were identified in our cohort but their clinical association/discrimination and outcome prediction required further validation study. Outcomes of our cohort in regard to disease activity after therapy and organ damages were comparable if not better to other cSLE cohorts elsewhere. Steroid-related damage, including symptomatic multifocal avascular necrosis and cataract, were not uncommon locally. Infection remains the major cause of death for the continent. Nevertheless, the five year survival rate of our cohort (98.4%) was high. PMID:25926055

  9. Rotenone Susceptibility Phenotype in Olfactory Derived Patient Cells as a Model of Idiopathic Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Murtaza, M; Shan, J; Matigian, N; Todorovic, M; Cook, A L; Ravishankar, S; Dong, L F; Neuzil, J; Silburn, P; Mackay-Sim, A; Mellick, G D; Wood, S A

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is a complex age-related neurodegenerative disorder. Approximately 90% of Parkinson's disease cases are idiopathic, of unknown origin. The aetiology of Parkinson's disease is not fully understood but increasing evidence implies a failure in fundamental cellular processes including mitochondrial dysfunction and increased oxidative stress. To dissect the cellular events underlying idiopathic Parkinson's disease, we use primary cell lines established from the olfactory mucosa of Parkinson's disease patients. Previous metabolic and transcriptomic analyses identified deficiencies in stress response pathways in patient-derived cell lines. The aim of this study was to investigate whether these deficiencies manifested as increased susceptibility, as measured by cell viability, to a range of extrinsic stressors. We identified that patient-derived cells are more sensitive to mitochondrial complex I inhibition and hydrogen peroxide induced oxidative stress, than controls. Exposure to low levels (50 nM) of rotenone led to increased apoptosis in patient-derived cells. We identified an endogenous deficit in mitochondrial complex I in patient-derived cells, but this did not directly correlate with rotenone-sensitivity. We further characterized the sensitivity to rotenone and identified that it was partly associated with heat shock protein 27 levels. Finally, transcriptomic analysis following rotenone exposure revealed that patient-derived cells express a diminished response to rotenone-induced stress compared with cells from healthy controls. Our cellular model of idiopathic Parkinson's disease displays a clear susceptibility phenotype to mitochondrial stress. The determination of molecular mechanisms underpinning this susceptibility may lead to the identification of biomarkers for either disease onset or progression. PMID:27123847

  10. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha is required for the tumourigenic and aggressive phenotype associated with Rab25 expression in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Roman, Natividad; Sahasrabudhe, Neha Mohan; McGregor, Fiona; Chalmers, Anthony J.; Cassidy, Jim; Plumb, Jane

    2016-01-01

    The small GTPase Rab25 has been functionally linked to tumour progression and aggressiveness in ovarian cancer and promotes invasion in three-dimensional environments. This type of migration has been shown to require the expression of the hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF-1α). In this report we demonstrate that Rab25 regulates HIF-1α protein expression in an oxygen independent manner in a panel of cancer cell lines. Regulation of HIF-1α protein expression by Rab25 did not require transcriptional upregulation, but was dependent on de novo protein synthesis through the Erbb2/ERK1/2 and p70S6K/mTOR pathways. Rab25 expression induced HIF-1 transcriptional activity, increased cisplatin resistance, and conferred intraperitoneal growth to the A2780 cell line in immunocompromised mice. Targeting HIF1 activity by silencing HIF-1β re-sensitised cells to cisplatin in vitro and reduced tumour formation of A2780-Rab25 expressing cells in vivo in a mouse ovarian peritoneal carcinomatosis model. Similar effects on cisplatin resistance in vitro and intraperitoneal tumourigenesis in vivo were obtained after HIF1b knockdown in the ovarian cancer cell line SKOV3, which expresses endogenous Rab25 and HIF-1α at atmospheric oxygen concentrations. Our results suggest that Rab25 tumourigenic potential and chemoresistance relies on HIF1 activity in aggressive and metastatic ovarian cancer. Targeting HIF-1 activity may potentially be effective either alone or in combination with standard chemotherapy for aggressive metastatic ovarian cancer. PMID:26967059

  11. Baicalin ameliorates experimental inflammatory bowel disease through polarization of macrophages to an M2 phenotype.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wei; Jin, Zaishun; Yu, Jianbo; Liang, Jun; Yang, Qingdong; Li, Fujuan; Shi, Xuekui; Zhu, Xiaodong; Zhang, Xiaoli

    2016-06-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) are chronic inflammatory disorders of the intestinal tract. Baicalin, originally isolated from the root of the Chinese herb Huangqin (Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi) and its main active ingredient, has a protective effect against inflammatory responses in several diseases. The present study investigated the effects of baicalin on macrophage polarization and its therapeutic role in IBD. Murine peritoneal macrophages and mice with colitis were treated with baicalin. Macrophage subset distribution, M1 and M2 macrophage-associated mRNA expression, and interferon regulatory factor 4 and 5 (IRF4 and IRF5) expression were analyzed. siRNA transfection into mouse peritoneal macrophages was utilized to suppress IRF4. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting, western blot, and real-time PCR analyses were performed. Baicalin (50μM) limited lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced M1 macrophage polarization; decreased LPS-induced tumor necrosis factor α, interleukin (IL)-23, and IRF5 expression; and increased IL-10, arginase-1 (Arg-1), and IRF4 expression. siRNA-mediated IRF4 silencing significantly impaired baicalin activity. Furthermore, pretreatment with baicalin (100mg/kg) in mice with dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colitis ameliorated the severity of colitis and significantly decreased the disease activity index (baicalin group, 3.33±0.52 vs. DSS group, 5.67±1.03). Baicalin (100mg/kg) also repressed IRF5 protein expression and promoted IRF4 protein expression in the lamina propria mononuclear cells, and induced macrophage polarization to the M2 phenotype. In summary, our results showed that baicalin upregulates IRF4 protein expression and reverses LPS-induced macrophage subset redistribution. Thus, baicalin alleviates DSS-induced colitis by modulating macrophage polarization to the M2 phenotype. PMID:27039210

  12. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Exacerbations in the COPDGene Study: Associated Radiologic Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Kazerooni, Ella A.; Lynch, David A.; Liu, Lyrica X.; Murray, Susan; Curtis, Jeffrey L.; Criner, Gerard J.; Kim, Victor; Bowler, Russell P.; Hanania, Nicola A.; Anzueto, Antonio R.; Make, Barry J.; Hokanson, John E.; Crapo, James D.; Silverman, Edwin K.; Martinez, Fernando J.; Washko, George R.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis—given the increasing emphasis on quantitative computed tomographic (CT) phenotypes of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)—that a relationship exists between COPD exacerbation frequency and quantitative CT measures of emphysema and airway disease. Materials and Methods: This research protocol was approved by the institutional review board of each participating institution, and all participants provided written informed consent. One thousand two subjects who were enrolled in the COPDGene Study and met the GOLD (Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease) criteria for COPD with quantitative CT analysis were included. Total lung emphysema percentage was measured by using the attenuation mask technique with a −950-HU threshold. An automated program measured the mean wall thickness and mean wall area percentage in six segmental bronchi. The frequency of COPD exacerbation in the prior year was determined by using a questionnaire. Statistical analysis was performed to examine the relationship of exacerbation frequency with lung function and quantitative CT measurements. Results: In a multivariate analysis adjusted for lung function, bronchial wall thickness and total lung emphysema percentage were associated with COPD exacerbation frequency. Each 1-mm increase in bronchial wall thickness was associated with a 1.84-fold increase in annual exacerbation rate (P = .004). For patients with 35% or greater total emphysema, each 5% increase in emphysema was associated with a 1.18-fold increase in this rate (P = .047). Conclusion: Greater lung emphysema and airway wall thickness were associated with COPD exacerbations, independent of the severity of airflow obstruction. Quantitative CT can help identify subgroups of patients with COPD who experience exacerbations for targeted research and therapy development for individual phenotypes. © RSNA, 2011 Supplemental material: http://radiology.rsna.org/lookup/suppl/doi:10

  13. Beyond the Definitions of the Phenotypic Complications of Sickle Cell Disease: An Update on Management

    PubMed Central

    Ballas, Samir K.; Kesen, Muge R.; Goldberg, Morton F.; Lutty, Gerard A.; Dampier, Carlton; Osunkwo, Ifeyinwa; Wang, Winfred C.; Hoppe, Carolyn; Hagar, Ward; Darbari, Deepika S.; Malik, Punam

    2012-01-01

    The sickle hemoglobin is an abnormal hemoglobin due to point mutation (GAG → GTG) in exon 1 of the β globin gene resulting in the substitution of glutamic acid by valine at position 6 of the β globin polypeptide chain. Although the molecular lesion is a single-point mutation, the sickle gene is pleiotropic in nature causing multiple phenotypic expressions that constitute the various complications of sickle cell disease in general and sickle cell anemia in particular. The disease itself is chronic in nature but many of its complications are acute such as the recurrent acute painful crises (its hallmark), acute chest syndrome, and priapism. These complications vary considerably among patients, in the same patient with time, among countries and with age and sex. To date, there is no well-established consensus among providers on the management of the complications of sickle cell disease due in part to lack of evidence and in part to differences in the experience of providers. It is the aim of this paper to review available current approaches to manage the major complications of sickle cell disease. We hope that this will establish another preliminary forum among providers that may eventually lead the way to better outcomes. PMID:22924029

  14. The calcineurin inhibitor Sarah (Nebula) exacerbates Aβ42 phenotypes in a Drosophila model of Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Soojin; Bang, Se Min; Hong, Yoon Ki; Lee, Jang Ho; Jeong, Haemin; Park, Seung Hwan; Liu, Quan Feng; Lee, Im-Soon; Cho, Kyoung Sang

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Expression of the Down syndrome critical region 1 (DSCR1) protein, an inhibitor of the Ca2+-dependent phosphatase calcineurin, is elevated in the brains of individuals with Down syndrome (DS) or Alzheimer's disease (AD). Although increased levels of DSCR1 were often observed to be deleterious to neuronal health, its beneficial effects against AD neuropathology have also been reported, and the roles of DSCR1 on the pathogenesis of AD remain controversial. Here, we investigated the role of sarah (sra; also known as nebula), a Drosophila DSCR1 ortholog, in amyloid-β42 (Aβ42)-induced neurological phenotypes in Drosophila. We detected sra expression in the mushroom bodies of the fly brain, which are a center for learning and memory in flies. Moreover, similar to humans with AD, Aβ42-expressing flies showed increased Sra levels in the brain, demonstrating that the expression pattern of DSCR1 with regard to AD pathogenesis is conserved in Drosophila. Interestingly, overexpression of sra using the UAS-GAL4 system exacerbated the rough-eye phenotype, decreased survival rates and increased neuronal cell death in Aβ42-expressing flies, without modulating Aβ42 expression. Moreover, neuronal overexpression of sra in combination with Aβ42 dramatically reduced both locomotor activity and the adult lifespan of flies, whereas flies with overexpression of sra alone showed normal climbing ability, albeit with a slightly reduced lifespan. Similarly, treatment with chemical inhibitors of calcineurin, such as FK506 and cyclosporin A, or knockdown of calcineurin expression by RNA interference (RNAi), exacerbated the Aβ42-induced rough-eye phenotype. Furthermore, sra-overexpressing flies displayed significantly decreased mitochondrial DNA and ATP levels, as well as increased susceptibility to oxidative stress compared to that of control flies. Taken together, our results demonstrating that sra overexpression augments Aβ42 cytotoxicity in Drosophila suggest that DSCR1

  15. Expanding genotype/phenotype of neuromuscular diseases by comprehensive target capture/NGS

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Xia; Liang, Wen-Chen; Feng, Yanming; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Victor Wei; Chou, Chih-Hung; Huang, Hsien-Da; Lam, Ching Wan; Hsu, Ya-Yun; Lin, Thy-Sheng; Chen, Wan-Tzu

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To establish and evaluate the effectiveness of a comprehensive next-generation sequencing (NGS) approach to simultaneously analyze all genes known to be responsible for the most clinically and genetically heterogeneous neuromuscular diseases (NMDs) involving spinal motoneurons, neuromuscular junctions, nerves, and muscles. Methods: All coding exons and at least 20 bp of flanking intronic sequences of 236 genes causing NMDs were enriched by using SeqCap EZ solution-based capture and enrichment method followed by massively parallel sequencing on Illumina HiSeq2000. Results: The target gene capture/deep sequencing provides an average coverage of ∼1,000× per nucleotide. Thirty-five unrelated NMD families (38 patients) with clinical and/or muscle pathologic diagnoses but without identified causative genetic defects were analyzed. Deleterious mutations were found in 29 families (83%). Definitive causative mutations were identified in 21 families (60%) and likely diagnoses were established in 8 families (23%). Six families were left without diagnosis due to uncertainty in phenotype/genotype correlation and/or unidentified causative genes. Using this comprehensive panel, we not only identified mutations in expected genes but also expanded phenotype/genotype among different subcategories of NMDs. Conclusions: Target gene capture/deep sequencing approach can greatly improve the genetic diagnosis of NMDs. This study demonstrated the power of NGS in confirming and expanding clinical phenotypes/genotypes of the extremely heterogeneous NMDs. Confirmed molecular diagnoses of NMDs can assist in genetic counseling and carrier detection as well as guide therapeutic options for treatable disorders. PMID:27066551

  16. Clinical phenotype and risk of levodopa-induced dyskinesia in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Nicoletti, Alessandra; Mostile, Giovanni; Nicoletti, Giuseppe; Arabia, Gennarina; Iliceto, Giovanni; Lamberti, Paolo; Marconi, Roberto; Morgante, Letterio; Barone, Paolo; Quattrone, Aldo; Zappia, Mario

    2016-05-01

    It is unclear whether patients with different clinical phenotypes of Parkinson's disease (PD) differ in their risk of developing levodopa-induced dyskinesia. We evaluated the possible association between clinical phenotypes and risk of levodopa-induced dyskinesia in PD patients using a case-control design. The FRAGAMP study is a large Italian multicenter study. Patients affected by PD diagnosed according to the Gelb's criteria were enrolled and underwent a face-to-face interview. Clinical scales were used to evaluate motor and cognitive impairment. Presence of dyskinesia was assessed by the item 32 of the UPDRS section IV. On the basis of the most prominent motor symptoms at onset PD, patients were classified as tremor-dominant, akinetic-rigid, or mixed type. 485 PD patients (292 men; mean age 65.6 ± 9.8) were enrolled in the study of whom 128 (26.4 %) presented levodopa-induced dyskinesia. Of the 485 patients, 311 (64.1 %) were classified as tremor-dominant, 104 (21.4 %) as Akinetic-Rigid and 70 (14.4 %) as mixed type. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed a significant negative association between tremor-dominant phenotype and levodopa-induced dyskinesia (adjusted OR 0.48; 95 % CI 0.23-1.00; p value 0.05). When analysis was stratified by age at onset a stronger negative association was found among the late onset (>50 years) PD patients (OR 0.28; 95 % CI 0.11-0.70; p value 0.007) while no association was found among patients with an early onset. Our findings support the hypothesis that the occurrence of resting tremor as an initial manifestation of PD may predict a lower probability of developing levodopa-induced dyskinesia. PMID:26964541

  17. The calcineurin inhibitor Sarah (Nebula) exacerbates Aβ42 phenotypes in a Drosophila model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soojin; Bang, Se Min; Hong, Yoon Ki; Lee, Jang Ho; Jeong, Haemin; Park, Seung Hwan; Liu, Quan Feng; Lee, Im-Soon; Cho, Kyoung Sang

    2016-03-01

    Expression of the Down syndrome critical region 1 (DSCR1) protein, an inhibitor of the Ca(2+)-dependent phosphatase calcineurin, is elevated in the brains of individuals with Down syndrome (DS) or Alzheimer's disease (AD). Although increased levels of DSCR1 were often observed to be deleterious to neuronal health, its beneficial effects against AD neuropathology have also been reported, and the roles of DSCR1 on the pathogenesis of AD remain controversial. Here, we investigated the role of sarah (sra; also known as nebula), a Drosophila DSCR1 ortholog, in amyloid-β42 (Aβ42)-induced neurological phenotypes in Drosophila. We detected sra expression in the mushroom bodies of the fly brain, which are a center for learning and memory in flies. Moreover, similar to humans with AD, Aβ42-expressing flies showed increased Sra levels in the brain, demonstrating that the expression pattern of DSCR1 with regard to AD pathogenesis is conserved in Drosophila. Interestingly, overexpression of sra using the UAS-GAL4 system exacerbated the rough-eye phenotype, decreased survival rates and increased neuronal cell death in Aβ42-expressing flies, without modulating Aβ42 expression. Moreover, neuronal overexpression of sra in combination with Aβ42 dramatically reduced both locomotor activity and the adult lifespan of flies, whereas flies with overexpression of sra alone showed normal climbing ability, albeit with a slightly reduced lifespan. Similarly, treatment with chemical inhibitors of calcineurin, such as FK506 and cyclosporin A, or knockdown of calcineurin expression by RNA interference (RNAi), exacerbated the Aβ42-induced rough-eye phenotype. Furthermore, sra-overexpressing flies displayed significantly decreased mitochondrial DNA and ATP levels, as well as increased susceptibility to oxidative stress compared to that of control flies. Taken together, our results demonstrating that sra overexpression augments Aβ42 cytotoxicity in Drosophila suggest that DSCR1

  18. Defining Disease Phenotypes Using National Linked Electronic Health Records: A Case Study of Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Denaxas, Spiros C.; Hunter, Ross J.; Patel, Riyaz S.; Perel, Pablo; Shah, Anoop D.; Timmis, Adam D.; Schilling, Richard J.; Hemingway, Harry

    2014-01-01

    Background National electronic health records (EHR) are increasingly used for research but identifying disease cases is challenging due to differences in information captured between sources (e.g. primary and secondary care). Our objective was to provide a transparent, reproducible model for integrating these data using atrial fibrillation (AF), a chronic condition diagnosed and managed in multiple ways in different healthcare settings, as a case study. Methods Potentially relevant codes for AF screening, diagnosis, and management were identified in four coding systems: Read (primary care diagnoses and procedures), British National Formulary (BNF; primary care prescriptions), ICD-10 (secondary care diagnoses) and OPCS-4 (secondary care procedures). From these we developed a phenotype algorithm via expert review and analysis of linked EHR data from 1998 to 2010 for a cohort of 2.14 million UK patients aged ≥30 years. The cohort was also used to evaluate the phenotype by examining associations between incident AF and known risk factors. Results The phenotype algorithm incorporated 286 codes: 201 Read, 63 BNF, 18 ICD-10, and four OPCS-4. Incident AF diagnoses were recorded for 72,793 patients, but only 39.6% (N = 28,795) were recorded in primary care and secondary care. An additional 7,468 potential cases were inferred from data on treatment and pre-existing conditions. The proportion of cases identified from each source differed by diagnosis age; inferred diagnoses contributed a greater proportion of younger cases (≤60 years), while older patients (≥80 years) were mainly diagnosed in SC. Associations of risk factors (hypertension, myocardial infarction, heart failure) with incident AF defined using different EHR sources were comparable in magnitude to those from traditional consented cohorts. Conclusions A single EHR source is not sufficient to identify all patients, nor will it provide a representative sample. Combining multiple data sources and

  19. Retraction: "Activated K-Ras and INK4a/Arf Deficiency Promote Aggressiveness of Pancreatic Cancer by Induction of EMT Consistent With Cancer Stem Cell Phenotype" by Wang et al.

    PubMed

    2016-10-01

    The above article, published online on November 23, 2012 in Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary.com), has been retracted by agreement between the journal Editor in Chief, Gary S. Stein, and Wiley Periodicals, Inc. The retraction has been agreed following an investigation from Wayne State University involving the first author and the corresponding author that found Figure 4B and C to be inappropriately manipulated and re-labeled. Literature Cited Wang Z, Ali S, Banerjee S, Bao B, Li Y, Azmi AS, Korc M, Sarkar FH. 2013. Activated K-Ras and INK4a/Arf deficiency promote aggressiveness of pancreatic cancer by induction of EMT consistent with cancer stem cell phenotype. J Cell Physiol 228:556-562; doi: 10.1002/jcp.24162. PMID:27315162

  20. Inflammatory Leukocyte Phenotypes Correlate with Disease Progression in Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Bethany B.; Fry, Chris; Zhou, Yueren; Murray, Susan; Han, MeiLan K.; Martinez, Fernando J.; Flaherty, Kevin R.

    2014-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is characterized by progressive deposition of extracellular matrix, worsening dyspnea, and eventual mortality. Pathogenesis of IPF is poorly understood and the role inflammation and activated leukocytes play in the disease process is controversial. Previous studies demonstrated that activated leukocyte subsets characterize IPF patients. We sought to validate this observation in a well-defined cohort of 35 IPF patients and to correlate the observed leukocyte phenotypes with robust parameters of disease progression. We demonstrate that in univariate and multivariate analyses, increases in the CD14hi, CD16hi subset of monocytes measured at baseline correlated with disease progression, with a threshold value >0.5% of the total peripheral blood mononuclear cells being a significant predictor for worse outcome. In addition, several T cell subsets, including CD25 expressing CD4 cells, and CXCR3 expressing CD4 and CD8 subsets correlated with disease progression when found in increased percentages in the peripheral blood of IPF patients when sampled at baseline. Somewhat surprising in comparison to previous literature, the CD4 T cells did not appear to have lost expression of the co-stimulatory molecule, CD28, but the CD8 T cells did. Taken together, these results are consistent with the presence of an inflammatory process in IPF patients who eventually progress. However, when longitudinal measurements of these same markers were examined, there was significant heterogeneity of expression and these biomarkers did not necessarily remain elevated in IPF patients with progressive disease. We interpret this heterogeneity to suggest that IPF patients experience episodic inflammatory events that once triggered, may lead to disease progression. This longitudinal heterogeneity in biomarker analyses may explain why such markers are not consistently measured in all IPF cohorts. PMID:25580363

  1. A genetic model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis in zebrafish displays phenotypic hallmarks of motoneuron disease.

    PubMed

    Ramesh, Tennore; Lyon, Alison N; Pineda, Ricardo H; Wang, Chunping; Janssen, Paul M L; Canan, Benjamin D; Burghes, Arthur H M; Beattie, Christine E

    2010-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder that, for approximately 80% of patients, is fatal within five years of diagnosis. To better understand ALS, animal models have been essential; however, only rodent models of ALS exhibit the major hallmarks of the disease. Here, we report the generation of transgenic zebrafish overexpressing mutant Sod1. The construct used to generate these lines contained the zebrafish sod1 gene and approximately 16 kb of flanking sequences. We generated lines expressing the G93R mutation, as well as lines expressing wild-type Sod1. Focusing on two G93R lines, we found that they displayed the major phenotypes of ALS. Changes at the neuromuscular junction were observed at larval and adult stages. In adulthood the G93R mutants exhibited decreased endurance in a swim tunnel test. An analysis of muscle revealed normal muscle force, however, at the end stage the fish exhibited motoneuron loss, muscle atrophy, paralysis and premature death. These phenotypes were more severe in lines expressing higher levels of mutant Sod1 and were absent in lines overexpressing wild-type Sod1. Thus, we have generated a vertebrate model of ALS to complement existing mammal models. PMID:20504969

  2. Phenotypic characterization of nanshi oral liquid alters metabolic signatures during disease prevention

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Aihua; Liu, Qi; Zhao, Hongwei; Zhou, Xiaohang; Sun, Hui; Nan, Yang; Zou, Shiyu; Ma, Chung Wah; Wang, Xijun

    2016-01-01

    This paper was designed to investigate the phenotypic characterization of Nanshi Oral Liquid (NOL) alters metabolic signatures of the ‘Kidney Yang Deficiency syndrome’ (KYDS). Urine metabolites were profiled by UPLC-ESI-Q-TOF-HDMS. The significantly changed metabolites such as xanthurenic acid, 4,8-dihydroxyquinoline, 3-methyldioxyindole, 4,6-dihydroxyquinoline, kynurenic acid, hippuric acid, taurine, tyramine, and 3-metanephrine, had been identified, and were related to the disturbance in tyrosine metabolism, steroid hormone biosynthesis, taurine and hypotaurine metabolism, tryptophan metabolism, phenylalanine metabolism and lysine degradation, which were helpful to further understanding the KYDS and intervention mechanism of NOL. The biochemical result showed that NOL can alleviate the kidney impairment induced by KYDS. Metabolomics results indicated the significantly changed metabolites were found to be reasonable in explaining the action mechanism of NOL. Interestingly, the effectiveness of NOL against KYDS was proved using the established metabolomics method and regulated the biomarkers as well as adjusted the metabolic disorder pathways. NOL had potentially pharmacological effect through regulating multiple perturbed pathways to normal state. This work showed that the metabolomics method was a powerful approach for studying the phenotypic characterization of disease’s syndrome during disease prevention and its intervention mechanism. PMID:26785698

  3. Controlling the Regional Identity of hPSC-Derived Neurons to Uncover Neuronal Subtype Specificity of Neurological Disease Phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Imaizumi, Kent; Sone, Takefumi; Ibata, Keiji; Fujimori, Koki; Yuzaki, Michisuke; Akamatsu, Wado; Okano, Hideyuki

    2015-12-01

    The CNS contains many diverse neuronal subtypes, and most neurological diseases target specific subtypes. However, the mechanism of neuronal subtype specificity of disease phenotypes remains elusive. Although in vitro disease models employing human pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) have great potential to clarify the association of neuronal subtypes with disease, it is currently difficult to compare various PSC-derived subtypes. This is due to the limited number of subtypes whose induction is established, and different cultivation protocols for each subtype. Here, we report a culture system to control the regional identity of PSC-derived neurons along the anteroposterior (A-P) and dorsoventral (D-V) axes. This system was successfully used to obtain various neuronal subtypes based on the same protocol. Furthermore, we reproduced subtype-specific phenotypes of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) by comparing the obtained subtypes. Therefore, our culture system provides new opportunities for modeling neurological diseases with PSCs. PMID:26549851

  4. Anemia of chronic kidney disease: Treat it, but not too aggressively.

    PubMed

    Nakhoul, Georges; Simon, James F

    2016-08-01

    Anemia of renal disease is common and is associated with significant morbidity and death. It is mainly caused by a decrease in erythropoietin production in the kidneys and can be partially corrected with erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs). However, randomized controlled trials have shown that using ESAs to target normal hemoglobin levels can be harmful, and have called into question any benefits of ESA treatment other than avoidance of transfusions. PMID:27505883

  5. Acute Hepatic Phenotype of Wilson Disease: Clinical Features of Acute Episodes and Chronic Lesions Remaining in Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Hisao; Tatsumi, Yasuaki; Yahata, Shinsuke; Hayashi, Hiroki; Momose, Kenji; Isaji, Ryohei; Sasaki, Youji; Hayashi, Kazuhiko; Wakusawa, Shinya; Goto, Hidemi

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims: Wilson disease (WD) is an inherited disorder of copper metabolism, and an international group for the study of WD (IGSW) has proposed three phenotypes for its initial presentation: acute hepatic, chronic hepatic, and neurologic phenotypes. Characterization of the acute hepatic phenotype may improve our understanding of the disease. Methods: Clinical features of 10 WD patients with the acute hepatic phenotype and characteristics of chronic lesions remaining in survivors were assessed by the European Association for the Study of the Liver (EASL) guidelines. Results: All six patients younger than 30 years had survived an acute episode of hemolytic anemia with residual liver disease of cirrhosis or chronic hepatitis. The acute episode was self-limiting in two of the four patients over the age of 30 years and progressed to acute liver failure in the other two patients. One of the two survivors had residual liver disease of chronic hepatitis, while the other had chronic hepatitis and neurologic disease. Neurologic disease remained in a patient who successfully received a liver transplantation. During acute episodes, serum levels of aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) changed rapidly along with anemia. Liver-specific ALT levels were age-dependently correlated with hemoglobin (Hb) concentrations. Enzyme reduction was milder for AST than ALT, which resulted in a high AST/ALT ratio in the anemic stage. The anemic stage in two patients transformed to acute liver failure. Conclusions: All survivors of an acute episode of the acute hepatic phenotype had residual liver disease or both liver and neurologic diseases. The rapid changes in liver enzymes during the acute episode and the liver and neurologic diseases remaining in survivors may provide a better understanding of WD. PMID:26807378

  6. IDO1 and IDO2 Non-Synonymous Gene Variants: Correlation with Crohn's Disease Risk and Clinical Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuanhao; Sayuk, Gregory S.; Li, Ellen; Ciorba, Matthew A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Crohn's disease (CD) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the gastrointestinal tract. Genetic polymorphisms can confer CD risk and influence disease phenotype. Indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase-1 (IDO1) is one of the most over-expressed genes in CD and mediates potent anti-inflammatory effects via tryptophan metabolism along the kynurenine pathway. We aimed to determine whether non-synonymous polymorphisms in IDO1 or IDO2 (a gene paralog) are important either as CD risk alleles or as modifiers of CD phenotype. Methods Utilizing a prospectively collected database, clinically phenotyped CD patients (n = 734) and non-IBD controls (n = 354) were genotyped for established IDO1 and IDO2 non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and novel genetic variants elucidated in the literature. Allelic frequencies between CD and non-IBD controls were compared. Genotype-phenotype analysis was conducted. IDO1 enzyme activity was assessed by calculating the serum kynurenine to tryptophan ratio (K/T). Results IDO1 SNPs were rare (1.7% non-IBD vs 1.1% CD; p = NS) and not linked to Crohn's disease diagnosis in this population. IDO1 SNPs did however associate with a severe clinical course, presence of perianal disease, extraintestinal manifestations and a reduced serum K/T ratio during active disease suggesting lower IDO1 function. IDO2 minor allele variants were common and one of them, rs45003083, associated with reduced risk of Crohn's disease (p = 0.025). No IDO2 SNPs associated with a particular Crohn's disease clinical phenotype. Conclusions This work highlights the functional importance of IDO enzymes in human Crohn's disease and establishes relative rates of IDO genetic variants in a US population. PMID:25541686

  7. Metal Homeostasis Regulators Suppress FRDA Phenotypes in a Drosophila Model of the Disease.

    PubMed

    Soriano, Sirena; Calap-Quintana, Pablo; Llorens, José Vicente; Al-Ramahi, Ismael; Gutiérrez, Lucía; Martínez-Sebastián, María José; Botas, Juan; Moltó, María Dolores

    2016-01-01

    Friedreich's ataxia (FRDA), the most commonly inherited ataxia in populations of European origin, is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by a decrease in frataxin levels. One of the hallmarks of the disease is the accumulation of iron in several tissues including the brain, and frataxin has been proposed to play a key role in iron homeostasis. We found that the levels of zinc, copper, manganese and aluminum were also increased in a Drosophila model of FRDA, and that copper and zinc chelation improve their impaired motor performance. By means of a candidate genetic screen, we identified that genes implicated in iron, zinc and copper transport and metal detoxification can restore frataxin deficiency-induced phenotypes. Taken together, these results demonstrate that the metal dysregulation in FRDA includes other metals besides iron, therefore providing a new set of potential therapeutic targets. PMID:27433942

  8. Metal Homeostasis Regulators Suppress FRDA Phenotypes in a Drosophila Model of the Disease

    PubMed Central

    Soriano, Sirena; Calap-Quintana, Pablo; Llorens, José Vicente; Al-Ramahi, Ismael; Gutiérrez, Lucía; Martínez-Sebastián, María José; Botas, Juan; Moltó, María Dolores

    2016-01-01

    Friedreich’s ataxia (FRDA), the most commonly inherited ataxia in populations of European origin, is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by a decrease in frataxin levels. One of the hallmarks of the disease is the accumulation of iron in several tissues including the brain, and frataxin has been proposed to play a key role in iron homeostasis. We found that the levels of zinc, copper, manganese and aluminum were also increased in a Drosophila model of FRDA, and that copper and zinc chelation improve their impaired motor performance. By means of a candidate genetic screen, we identified that genes implicated in iron, zinc and copper transport and metal detoxification can restore frataxin deficiency-induced phenotypes. Taken together, these results demonstrate that the metal dysregulation in FRDA includes other metals besides iron, therefore providing a new set of potential therapeutic targets. PMID:27433942

  9. Mutagenesis and phenotyping resources in zebrafish for studying development and human disease.

    PubMed

    Varshney, Gaurav Kumar; Burgess, Shawn Michael

    2014-03-01

    The zebrafish (Danio rerio) is an important model organism for studying development and human disease. The zebrafish has an excellent reference genome and the functions of hundreds of genes have been tested using both forward and reverse genetic approaches. Recent years have seen an increasing number of large-scale mutagenesis projects and the number of mutants or gene knockouts in zebrafish has increased rapidly, including for the first time conditional knockout technologies. In addition, targeted mutagenesis techniques such as zinc finger nucleases, transcription activator-like effector nucleases and clustered regularly interspaced short sequences (CRISPR) or CRISPR-associated (Cas), have all been shown to effectively target zebrafish genes as well as the first reported germline homologous recombination, further expanding the utility and power of zebrafish genetics. Given this explosion of mutagenesis resources, it is now possible to perform systematic, high-throughput phenotype analysis of all zebrafish gene knockouts. PMID:24162064

  10. Folic-acid metabolism and DNA-repair phenotypes differ between neuroendocrine lung tumors and associate with aggressive subtypes, therapy resistance and outcome

    PubMed Central

    Werner, Robert; Vollbrecht, Claudia; Hager, Thomas; Schmid, Kurt Werner; Wohlschlaeger, Jeremias; Christoph, Daniel Christian

    2016-01-01

    Purpose 25% of all lung cancer cases are neuroendocrine (NELC) including typical (TC) and atypical carcinoid (AC), large-cell neuroendocrine (LCNEC) and small cell lung cancer (SCLC). Prognostic and predictive biomarkers are lacking. Experimental Design Sixty patients were used for nCounter mRNA expression analysis of the folic-acid metabolism (ATIC, DHFR, FOLR1, FPGS, GART, GGT1, SLC19A1, TYMS) and DNA-repair (ERCC1, MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, XRCC1). Phenotypic classification classified tumors (either below or above the median expression level) with respect to the folic acid metabolism or DNA repair. Results Expression of FOLR1, FPGS, MLH1 and TYMS (each p<0.0001) differed significantly between all four tumor types. FOLR1 and FPGS associated with tumor differentiation (both p<0.0001), spread to regional lymph nodes (FOLR1 p=0.0001 and FPGS p=0.0038), OS and PFS (FOLR1 p<0.0050 for both and FPGS p<0.0004 for OS). Phenotypic sorting revealed the Ft-phenotype to be the most prominent expression profile in carcinoids, whereas SCLC presented nearly univocal with the fT and LCNEC with fT or ft. These results were significant for tumor subtype (p<0.0001). Conclusions The assessed biomarkers and phenotypes allow for risk stratification (OS, PFS), diagnostic classification and enhance the biological understanding of the different subtypes of neuroendocrine tumors revealing potential new therapy options and clarifying known resistance mechanisms. PMID:27064343

  11. Novel Compound Heterozygous Mutations Expand the Recognized Phenotypes of FARS2-Linked Disease.

    PubMed

    Walker, Melissa A; Mohler, Kyle P; Hopkins, Kyle W; Oakley, Derek H; Sweetser, David A; Ibba, Michael; Frosch, Matthew P; Thibert, Ronald L

    2016-08-01

    Mutations in mitochondrial aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases are an increasingly recognized cause of human diseases, often arising in individuals with compound heterozygous mutations and presenting with system-specific phenotypes, frequently neurologic. FARS2 encodes mitochondrial phenylalanyl transfer ribonucleic acid (RNA) synthetase (mtPheRS), perturbations of which have been reported in 6 cases of an infantile, lethal disease with refractory epilepsy and progressive myoclonus. Here the authors report the case of juvenile onset refractory epilepsy and progressive myoclonus with compound heterozygous FARS2 mutations. The authors describe the clinical course over 6 years of care at their institution and diagnostic studies including electroencephalogram (EEG), brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), serum and cerebrospinal fluid analyses, skeletal muscle biopsy histology, and autopsy gross and histologic findings, which include features shared with Alpers-Huttenlocher syndrome, Leigh syndrome, and a previously published case of FARS2 mutation associated infantile onset disease. The authors also present structure-guided analysis of the relevant mutations based on published mitochondrial phenylalanyl transfer RNA synthetase and related protein crystal structures as well as biochemical analysis of the corresponding recombinant mutant proteins. PMID:27095821

  12. Metabolic acetate therapy improves phenotype in the tremor rat model of Canavan disease

    PubMed Central

    Arun, Peethambaran; Madhavarao, Chikkathur N.; Moffett, John R.; Hamilton, Kristen; Grunberg, Neil E.; Ariyannur, Prasanth S.; Gahl, William A.; Anikster, Yair; Mog, Steven; Hallows, William C.; Denu, John M.

    2010-01-01

    Genetic mutations that severely diminish the activity of aspartoacylase (ASPA) result in the fatal brain dysmyelinating disorder, Canavan disease. There is no effective treatment. ASPA produces free acetate from the concentrated brain metabolite, N-acetylaspartate (NAA). Because acetyl coenzyme A is a key building block for lipid synthesis, we postulated that the inability to catabolize NAA leads to a brain acetate deficiency during a critical period of CNS development, impairing myelination and possibly other aspects of brain development. We tested the hypothesis that acetate supplementation during postnatal myelination would ameliorate the severe phenotype associated with ASPA deficiency using the tremor rat model of Canavan disease. Glyceryltriacetate (GTA) was administered orally to tremor rats starting 7 days after birth, and was continued in food and water after weaning. Motor function, myelin lipids, and brain vacuolation were analyzed in GTA-treated and untreated tremor rats. Significant improvements were observed in motor performance and myelin galactocerebroside content in tremor rats treated with GTA. Further, brain vacuolation was modestly reduced, and these reductions were positively correlated with improved motor performance. We also examined the expression of the acetyl coenzyme A synthesizing enzyme acetyl coenzyme A synthase 1 and found upregulation of expression in tremor rats, with a return to near normal expression levels in GTA-treated tremor rats. These results confirm the critical role played by NAA-derived acetate in brain myelination and development, and demonstrate the potential usefulness of acetate therapy for the treatment of Canavan disease. PMID:20464498

  13. Allele-specific RNAi Mitigates Phenotypic Progression in a Transgenic Model of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Lebrón, Edgardo; Gouvion, Cynthia M; Moore, Steven A; Davidson, Beverly L; Paulson, Henry L

    2009-01-01

    Despite recent advances suggesting new therapeutic targets, Alzheimer's disease (AD) remains incurable. Aberrant production and accumulation of the Aβ peptide resulting from altered processing of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) is central to the pathogenesis of disease, particularly in dominantly inherited forms of AD. Thus, modulating the production of APP is a potential route to effective AD therapy. Here, we describe the successful use of an allele-specific RNA interference (RNAi) approach targeting the Swedish variant of APP (APPsw) in a transgenic mouse model of AD. Using recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV), we delivered an anti-APPsw short-hairpin RNA (shRNA) to the hippocampus of AD transgenic mice (APP/PS1). In short- and long-term transduction experiments, reduced levels of APPsw transprotein were observed throughout targeted regions of the hippocampus while levels of wild-type murine APP remained unaltered. Moreover, intracellular production of transfer RNA (tRNA)-valine promoter–driven shRNAs did not lead to detectable neuronal toxicity. Finally, long-term bilateral hippocampal expression of anti-APPsw shRNA mitigated abnormal behaviors in this mouse model of AD. The difference in phenotype progression was associated with reduced levels of soluble Aβ but not with a reduced number of amyloid plaques. Our results support the development of allele-specific RNAi strategies to treat familial AD and other dominantly inherited neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:19532137

  14. Disease associated balanced chromosome rearrangements: a resource for large scale genotype-phenotype delineation in man

    PubMed Central

    Bugge, M.; Bruun-Petersen, G.; Brondum-Nielsen, K.; Friedrich, U.; Hansen, J.; Jensen, G.; Jensen, P.; Kristoffersson, U.; Lundsteen, C.; Niebuhr, E.; Rasmussen, K.; Rasmussen, K.; Tommerup, N.

    2000-01-01

    Disease associated balanced chromosomal rearrangements (DBCRs), which truncate, delete, or otherwise inactivate specific genes, have been instrumental for positional cloning of many disease genes. A network of cytogenetic laboratories, Mendelian Cytogenetics Network (MCN), has been established to facilitate the identification and mapping of DBCRs. To get an estimate of the potential of this approach, we surveyed all cytogenetic archives in Denmark and southern Sweden, with a population of ~6.6 million. The nine laboratories have performed 71 739 postnatal cytogenetic tests. Excluding Robertsonian translocations and chromosome 9 inversions, we identified 216 DBCRs (~0.3%), including a minimum estimate of 114 de novo reciprocal translocations (0.16%) and eight de novo inversions (0.01%). Altogether, this is six times more frequent than in the general population, suggesting a causal relationship with the traits involved in most of these cases. Of the identified cases, only 25 (12%) have been published, including 12 cases with known syndromes and 13 cases with unspecified mental retardation/congenital malformations. The remaining DBCRs were associated with a plethora of traits including mental retardation, dysmorphic features, major congenital malformations, autism, and male and female infertility. Several of the unpublished DBCRs defined candidate breakpoints for nail-patella, Prader-Willi, and Schmidt syndromes, ataxia, and ulna aplasia. The implication of the survey is apparent when compared with MCN; altogether, the 292 participating laboratories have performed >2.5 million postnatal analyses, with an estimated ~7500 DBCRs stored in their archives, of which more than half might be causative mutations. In addition, an estimated 450-500 novel cases should be detected each year. Our data illustrate that DBCRs and MCN are resources for large scale establishment of phenotype-genotype relationships in man.


Keywords: translocations; inversions; abnormal

  15. Association between Genotype and Phenotype in Uromodulin-Associated Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Moskowitz, Jonathan L.; Piret, Sian E.; Lhotta, Karl; Kitzler, Thomas M.; Tashman, Adam P.; Velez, Erin; Thakker, Rajesh V.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Uromodulin-associated kidney disease (UAKD) is an autosomal dominant disease caused by uromodulin (UMOD) gene mutations. This study explored genotype-phenotype correlations by examining the relationship between the type of UMOD mutation and the age at onset of ESRD. Design, setting, participants & measurements Extensive bibliographic research was used to ascertain patient-level data of all patients with UAKD published up to October 2011. Data included sex; ages at onset of hyperuricemia, gout, and ESRD; and UMOD genotype. Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox proportional hazards models fitted with shared gamma frailty terms to adjust for within-family correlations were used to model time to event. Results Thirty-one peer-reviewed publications reporting on 202 patients from 74 families with 59 different UMOD mutations were included. Median ages at onset of hyperuricemia, gout, and ESRD were 24, 40, and 56 years, respectively. Men developed gout and ESRD significantly earlier than did women (age at ESRD was 50 years for men and 60 for women; P=0.04, shared frailty model). Median ages at ESRD development were lowest with Cys77Tyr (37.5 years) and highest with Gln316Pro (65.5 years) UMOD mutations. Onset of ESRD was significantly earlier with UMOD mutations located within the epidermal growth factor domains 2 and 3 (range, 45–52 years; P<0.01 and 0.04, respectively) compared with the cysteine-rich domains (range, 60–65 years; by shared frailty model). Conclusions The UMOD genotype is related to the clinical phenotype of UAKD. This finding may assist in counseling of patients. PMID:23723338

  16. Nontraditional risk factors for cardiovascular disease and visceral adiposity index among different body size phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Du, T; Zhang, J; Yuan, G; Zhang, M; Zhou, X; Liu, Z; Sun, X; Yu, X

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Increased cardiovascular disease and mortality risk in metabolically healthy obese (MHO) individuals remain highly controversial. Several studies suggested risk while others do not. The traditional cardiovascular risk factors may be insufficient to demonstrate the complete range of metabolic abnormalities in MHO individuals. Hence, we aimed to compare the prevalence of elevated lipoprotein (a), apolipoprotein B, and uric acid (UA) levels, apolipoprotein B/apolipoprotein A1 ratio, and visceral adiposity index (VAI) scores, and low apolipoprotein A1 levels among 6 body size phenotypes (normal weight with and without metabolic abnormalities, overweight with and without metabolic abnormalities, and obese with or without metabolic abnormalities). Methods and Results We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of 7765 Chinese adults using data from the nationwide China Health and Nutrition Survey 2009. MHO persons had intermediate prevalence of elevated apolipoprotein B and UA levels, apolipoprotein B/apolipoprotein A1 ratio and VAI scores, and low apolipoprotein A1 levels between metabolically healthy normal-weight (MHNW) and metabolically abnormal obese individuals (P < 0.001 for all comparisons). Elevated apolipoprotein B and UA concentrations, apolipoprotein B/apolipoprotein A1 ratio, and VAI scores were all strongly associated with the MHO phenotype (all P < 0.01). Conclusions Prevalence of elevated apolipoprotein B and UA levels, apolipoprotein B/apolipoprotein A1 ratio and VAI scores, and low levels of apolipoprotein A1 was higher among MHO persons than among MHNW individuals. The elevated levels of the nontraditional risk factors and VAI scores in MHO persons could contribute to the increased cardiovascular disease risk observed in long-term studies. PMID:25159728

  17. Familial Prion Disease with Alzheimer Disease-Like Tau Pathology and Clinical Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Jayadev, Suman; Nochlin, David; Poorkaj, Parvoneh; Steinbart, Ellen J.; Mastrianni, James A.; Montine, Thomas J.; Ghetti, Bernardino; Schellenberg, Gerard D.; Bird, Thomas D.; Leverenz, James B.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To describe the Alzheimer disease (AD)-like clinical and pathological features, including marked neurofibrillary tangle (NFT) pathology, of a familial prion disease due to a rare nonsense mutation of the prion gene (PRNP). Methods Longitudinal clinical assessments were available for the proband and her mother. After death, both underwent neuropathological evaluation. PRNP was sequenced after failure to find immunopositive Aβ deposits in the proband and the documentation of prion protein (PrP) immunopositive pathology. Results The proband presented at age 42 years with a 3-year history of progressive short-term memory impairment and depression. Neuropsychological testing found impaired memory performance, with relatively preserved attention and construction. She was diagnosed with AD and died at age 47 years. Neuropathologic evaluation revealed extensive limbic and neocortical NFT formation and neuritic plaques consistent with a Braak stage of VI. The NFTs were immunopositive, with multiple tau antibodies, and electron microscopy revealed paired helical filaments. However, the neuritic plaques were immunonegative for Aβ, whereas immunostaining for PrP was positive. The mother of the proband had a similar presentation, including depression, and had been diagnosed clinically and pathologically as AD. Reevaluation of her brain tissue confirmed similar tau and PrP immunostaining findings. Genetic analysis revealed that both the proband and her mother had a rare PRNP mutation (Q160X) that resulted in the production of truncated PrP. Interpretation We suggest that PRNP mutations that result in a truncation of PrP lead to a prolonged clinical course consistent with a clinical diagnosis of AD and severe AD-like NFTs. PMID:21416485

  18. Genetic spectrum of Saudi Arabian patients with antenatal cystic kidney disease and ciliopathy phenotypes using a targeted renal gene panel

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hamed, Mohamed H; Kurdi, Wesam; Alsahan, Nada; Alabdullah, Zainab; Abudraz, Rania; Tulbah, Maha; Alnemer, Maha; Khan, Rubina; Al-Jurayb, Haya; Alahmed, Ahmed; Tahir, Asma I; Khalil, Dania; Edwards, Noel; Al Abdulaziz, Basma; Binhumaid, Faisal S; Majid, Salma; Faquih, Tariq; El-Kalioby, Mohamed; Abouelhoda, Mohamed; Altassan, Nada; Monies, Dorota; Meyer, Brian; Sayer, John A; Albaqumi, Mamdouh

    2016-01-01

    Background Inherited cystic kidney disorders are a common cause of end-stage renal disease. Over 50 ciliopathy genes, which encode proteins that influence the structure and function of the primary cilia, are implicated in cystic kidney disease. Methods To define the phenotype and genotype of cystic kidney disease in fetuses and neonates, we correlated antenatal ultrasound examination and postnatal renal ultrasound examination with targeted exon sequencing, using a renal gene panel. A cohort of 44 families in whom antenatal renal ultrasound scanning findings in affected cases included bilateral cystic kidney disease, echogenic kidneys or enlarged kidneys was investigated. Results In this cohort, disease phenotypes were severe with 36 cases of stillbirth or perinatal death. Extra renal malformations, including encephalocele, polydactyly and heart malformations, consistent with ciliopathy phenotypes, were frequently detected. Renal gene panel testing identified causative mutations in 21 out of 34 families (62%), where patient and parental DNA was available. In the remaining 10 families, where only parental DNA was available, 7 inferred causative mutations were found. Together, mutations were found in 12 different genes with a total of 13 novel pathogenic variants, including an inferred novel variant in NEK8. Mutations in CC2D2A were the most common cause of an antenatal cystic kidney disease and a suspected ciliopathy in our cohort. Conclusions In families with ciliopathy phenotypes, mutational analysis using a targeted renal gene panel allows a rapid molecular diagnosis and provides important information for patients, parents and their physicians. PMID:26862157

  19. Developmental Origins of Genotype-Phenotype Correlations in Chronic Diseases of Old Age

    PubMed Central

    McCormack, Shana; Xia, Qianghua; Grant, Struan F.A.

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, genome wide association studies have revolutionized the understanding of the genetic architecture of complex disease, particularly in the context of disorders that present in old age, such as type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. This new era is made all the more compelling by the fact that, through extensive validation efforts, there is now very strong consensus among human geneticists on what the key loci are that contribute to the pathogenesis of these traits. However, as these variants have been almost exclusively uncovered in an adult setting, there is the question of when these genetic variants start exerting their effects; indeed many may start setting up an individual’s predisposition to a disease of old age very early on in life. To this end, we review what breakthroughs have been made in elucidating which of these genetic factors are operating in childhood and conversely what discoveries have actually been made in the pediatric setting that have then been found subsequently to increase one’s risk of a late-onset disease. After all, it well known that complex traits like obesity, type 2 diabetes and inflammatory bowel disease are strongly determined by genetic factors, but the isolation of genes in these complex phenotypes in adults has been impeded by interaction with strong environmental factors. Distillation of the genetic component in these complex traits, which will at least partially have origins in childhood, should be easier to determine in a pediatric setting, where the relatively short period of a child’s lifetime limits the impact of environmental exposure. PMID:23185719

  20. Oral Neutrophil Transcriptome Changes Result in a Pro-Survival Phenotype in Periodontal Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Lakschevitz, Flavia S.; Aboodi, Guy M.; Glogauer, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Background Periodontal diseases are inflammatory processes that occur following the influx of neutrophils into the periodontal tissues in response to the subgingival bacterial biofilm. Current literature suggests that while neutrophils are protective and prevent bacterial infections, they also appear to contribute to damage of the periodontal tissues. In the present study we compare the gene expression profile changes in neutrophils as they migrate from the circulation into the oral tissues in patients with chronic periodontits and matched healthy subjects. We hypothesized that oral neutrophils in periodontal disease patients will display a disease specific transcriptome that differs from the oral neutrophil of healthy subjects. Methods Venous blood and oral rinse samples were obtained from healthy subjects and chronic periodontitis patients for neutrophil isolation. mRNA was isolated from the neutrophils, and gene expression microarray analysis was completed. Results were confirmed for specific genes of interest by qRT-PCR and Western Blot analysis. Results and Discussion Chronic periodontitis patients presented with increased recruitment of neutrophils to the oral cavity. Gene expression analysis revealed differences in the expression levels of genes from several biological pathways. Using hierarchical clustering analysis, we found that the apoptosis network was significantly altered in patients with chronic inflammation in the oral cavity, with up-regulation of pro-survival members of the Bcl-2 family and down-regulation of pro-apoptosis members in the same compartment. Additional functional analysis confirmed that the percentages of viable neutrophils are significantly increased in the oral cavity of chronic periodontitis patients. Conclusions Oral neutrophils from patients with periodontal disease displayed an altered transcriptome following migration into the oral tissues. This resulted in a pro-survival neutrophil phenotype in chronic periodontitis patients

  1. [Markers of periodontal diseases and sensitivity to taromentine in patients with aggressive periodontitis].

    PubMed

    Iverieli, M V; Abashidze, N O; Gogishvili, Kh B

    2009-04-01

    The aim of the research was to study sensitivity of specific microorganisms from the periodontal pockets of patients with rapidly progressive periodontal disease to Taromentine. 95 patients aged 21 to 35 years (50 women (52,6+/-33,62) and 45 men (47,36+/-3,62)) with rapidly progressive form of periodontal desease were observed. Porphiromonas gingivalis was identifide in 83 out of 95 patients (87,36+/-2,06). Prevotella intermedia - in 31 patients (32,6+/-2,750); Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans - in 23 patients (24,2+/-2,050); Bacteroides forsythus - in 19 patients (20,0+/-2,360); Treponema denticola - in 16 patients (16,84+/-2,190); Candida - in 11 patients (11,57+/-1,80). The sensitivity of all cultures to Taromentine was investigated: 134 (77,9+/-1,89) out of 183 identified markers demonstrated sensitivity to Taromentine. Demostrated sensitivity to Taromentine: 64 (37,2+/-1,06) out of 83 identified cultures of Porphiromonas gingivalis, 24 (13,95+/-1,85) out of 31 identified cultures of Prevotela intermedia, 18 (10,47+/-1,05) out of 23 identified cultures of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, 15 (8,7+/-1,86) out of 19 identified cultures of Bacteroides forsythus, and 13 (7,84+/-1,09) out of 16 identified cultures of Treponema denticola. Totally 38 (22,1+/-1,59) out of 172 identified periodontal markers demonstrated resistence to Taromentine. The results of analysis showed that Taromentine could be recommended in complex treatment of periodontal diseases. PMID:19430039

  2. Differential serotonergic mediation of aggression in roosters selected for resistance and susceptibility to Marek’s disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    1. Serotonin (5-HT) is a primary regulating neurotransmitter involved in aggressive and impulsive behaviors in mammals and birds. Previous studies have also demonstrated the function of serotonergic system in regulating aggression is affected by both genetic and environmental factors. 2. Our obje...

  3. Phenotypic variation amongst genotypically homogeneous Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 isolates: implications for the investigation of outbreaks of Legionnaires' disease.

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, T. G.; Saunders, N. A.; Haththotuwa, A.; Hallas, G.; Birtles, R. J.; Taylor, A. G.

    1990-01-01

    One hundred and seventy-nine isolates of Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1, obtained from a site associated with an outbreak of Legionnaires' disease, were examined by monoclonal antibody subgrouping, restriction fragment length polymorphism typing, restriction endonuclease analysis and plasmid content. Nine distinct phenotypes were detected but at the genotypic level all strains were closely related. The data presented indicate that phenotypic variation of a single parent strain can occur within an environmental site. The implications of these findings are discussed in relation to the investigation of outbreaks of Legionnaires' disease. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:1969803

  4. Revealing rate-limiting steps in complex disease biology: The crucial importance of studying rare, extreme-phenotype families.

    PubMed

    Chakravarti, Aravinda; Turner, Tychele N

    2016-06-01

    The major challenge in complex disease genetics is to understand the fundamental features of this complexity and why functional alterations at multiple independent genes conspire to lead to an abnormal phenotype. We hypothesize that the various genes involved are all functionally united through gene regulatory networks (GRN), and that mutant phenotypes arise from the consequent perturbation of one or more rate-limiting steps that affect the function of the entire GRN. Understanding a complex phenotype thus entails unraveling the details of each GRN, namely, the transcription factors that bind to cis regulatory elements affected by sequence variants altering transcription of specific genes, and their mutual feedback relationships. These GRNs can be identified through their rate-limiting steps and are best uncovered by genomic analyses of rare, extreme phenotype families, thus providing a coherent molecular basis to complex traits and disorders. PMID:27062178

  5. Endostatin Polymorphism 4349G/A(D104N) is not Associated with Aggressiveness of Disease in Postate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, He Cheng; Cai, Qiu Yin; Shinohara, Eric T.; Cai, Hui; Cao, Carolyn; Fei Wang, Zuo; Teng, Ming; Zheng, Wei; Lu, Bo

    2005-01-01

    Endostatin is an important inhibitory molecule which mediates the sequential steps involved in angiogenesis. Lower level or impaired function of endostatin is associated with a higher risk of developing malignant solid tumors and with a worse prognosis of the disease. The endostatin N104 polymorphism might be associated with an impaired ability to inhibit angiogenesis. We analyzed the tissues from 98 Caucasian prostate cancer patients for the presence of D104N polymorphism. The frequencies of homozygous 4349G/G(104D/D), and heterozygous 4349G/A(104D/N) were 83.67%(82/98) and 16.33%(16/98), respectively; no individuals were homozygous 4349A/A(104N/N). With the Fisher’s exact test we found the genotype of D104N was not significantly related to age, tumor grade, PSA and clinical stage (P > 0.05). There was no difference in relapse free survival(RFS) or overall survival(OS) between patients with 104D/N and those with 104D/D (P = 0.8283, 0.3713 respectively). We concluded that endostatin polymorphism was not associated with the aggressiveness of prostate cancer in Caucasian patients. PMID:15735323

  6. Sleep Physiology Alterations Precede Plethoric Phenotypic Changes in R6/1 Huntington's Disease Mice.

    PubMed

    Lebreton, Fanny; Cayzac, Sebastien; Pietropaolo, Susanna; Jeantet, Yannick; Cho, Yoon H

    2015-01-01

    In hereditary neurodegenerative Huntington's disease (HD), there exists a growing consideration that sleep and circadian dysregulations may be important symptoms. It is not known, however, whether sleep abnormalities contribute to other behavioral deficits in HD patients and mouse models. To determine the precise chronology for sleep physiology alterations and other sensory, motor, psychiatric and cognitive symptoms of HD, the same R6/1 HD transgenics and their wild-type littermates were recorded monthly for sleep electroencephalogram (EEG) together with a wide range of behavioral tests according to a longitudinal plan. We found an early and progressive deterioration of both sleep architecture and EEG brain rhythms in R6/1 mice, which are correlated timely with their spatial working memory impairments. Sleep fragmentation and memory impairments were accompanied by the loss of delta (1-4 Hz) power in the transgenic mice, the magnitude of which increased with age and disease progression. These precocious sleep and cognitive impairments were followed by deficits in social behavior, sensory and motor abilities. Our data confirm the existence and importance of sleep physiology alterations in the widely used R6/1 mouse line and highlight their precedence over other plethoric phenotypic changes. The brainwave abnormalities, may represent a novel biomarker and point to innovative therapeutic interventions against HD. PMID:25966356

  7. A case of variant biochemical phenotype of Niemann-Pick disease type C accompanying savant syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hamatani, Mio; Jingami, Naoto; Uemura, Kengo; Nakasone, Naoe; Kinoshita, Hisanori; Yamakado, Hodaka; Ninomiya, Haruaki; Takahashi, Ryosuke

    2016-06-22

    A 40-year-old man was referred to our hospital because of vertical supranuclear gaze palsy, frequent sudden loss of muscle tonus and ataxia for several years. He had a history of prolonged neonatal jaundice. He was given a diagnosis of autism in his childhood, followed by a diagnosis of schizophrenia in his teenage. He also developed a savant skill of calendar calculating. (123)I-IMP-SPECT showed decreased cerebral blood flow in the left frontotemporal lobe as often seen in savant syndrome. Although genetic analysis of NPC1 and NPC2 revealed no pathogenic mutation, filipin staining of cultured fibroblasts from his biopsied skin revealed a certain amount of intracellular cholesterol storage pattern, indicating a variant biochemical phenotype of Niemann-Pick disease type C (NPC). The diagnosis of adulthood onset NPC is difficult and challenging, especially for neurologists, because the symptoms and signs are not as clear as those in the classical childhood onset NPC and this subtype is not yet widely known. However, the diagnosis can be made by a combination of filipin staining of fibroblast and/or gene analysis. As a disease-specific therapy for NPC has been approved in Japan, the diagnosis of NPC is of significance. PMID:27181747

  8. Metabolic Profiling and Phenotyping of Central Nervous System Diseases: Metabolites Bring Insights into Brain Dysfunctions.

    PubMed

    Dumas, Marc-Emmanuel; Davidovic, Laetitia

    2015-09-01

    Metabolic phenotyping corresponds to the large-scale quantitative and qualitative analysis of the metabolome i.e., the low-molecular weight <1 KDa fraction in biological samples, and provides a key opportunity to advance neurosciences. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectrometry are the main analytical platforms used for metabolic profiling, enabling detection and quantitation of a wide range of compounds of particular neuro-pharmacological and physiological relevance, including neurotransmitters, secondary messengers, structural lipids, as well as their precursors, intermediates and degradation products. Metabolic profiling is therefore particularly indicated for the study of central nervous system by probing metabolic and neurochemical profiles of the healthy or diseased brain, in preclinical models or in human samples. In this review, we introduce the analytical and statistical requirements for metabolic profiling. Then, we focus on key studies in the field of metabolic profiling applied to the characterization of animal models and human samples of central nervous system disorders. We highlight the potential of metabolic profiling for pharmacological and physiological evaluation, diagnosis and drug therapy monitoring of patients affected by brain disorders. Finally, we discuss the current challenges in the field, including the development of systems biology and pharmacology strategies improving our understanding of metabolic signatures and mechanisms of central nervous system diseases. PMID:25616565

  9. Macrophage Phenotype in the Ocular Surface of Experimental Murine Dry Eye Disease.

    PubMed

    You, In-Cheon; Coursey, Terry G; Bian, Fang; Barbosa, Flavia L; de Paiva, Cintia S; Pflugfelder, Stephen C

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the phenotype of macrophages in the cornea and conjunctiva of C57BL/6 mice with induced experimental dry eye. C57BL/6 mice exposed to desiccating stress (DS) were evaluated at 1, 5, and 10 days and C57BL/6 mice maintained in non-stressed environment were used as controls. Whole eyes and adnexa were excised for histology or used for gene expression analysis. Location and phenotype of macrophages infiltrating the cornea and conjunctiva was evaluated by immunofluorescence analysis. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction evaluated macrophage markers and T cell-related and inflammatory cytokine expression in cornea and conjunctiva. Immunofluorescence staining demonstrated that macrophages reside in the conjunctiva of control and dry eye mice and their number did not change with DS. Real-time RT-PCR demonstrated that the level of M1 macrophage marker, iNOS, increased prominently in the conjunctiva at DS 10 days. In contrast, there was a non-significant decrease of the M2 marker Arg1 with DS. The levels of inflammatory cytokine, IL-12a mRNA transcript in the conjunctiva increased significantly at DS1 and decreased at DS5, while levels of IL-18 were significantly increased at DS 10. Macrophages reside in the ocular surface tissues of C57BL/6 mice. Although the number of macrophages in the conjunctiva does not change, evidence of inflammatory M1 activation after desiccating stress was observed. Better understanding of phagocyte diversity and activation in dry eye disease provide a basis for the development of phagocyte-targeted therapeutic strategies. PMID:25772203

  10. Suppression of Alzheimer’s Disease-Related Phenotypes by Geranylgeranylacetone in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hoshino, Tatsuya; Suzuki, Koichiro; Matsushima, Takahide; Yamakawa, Naoki; Suzuki, Toshiharu; Mizushima, Tohru

    2013-01-01

    Amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Aβ is generated by the secretase-mediated proteolysis of β-amyloid precursor protein (APP), and cleared by enzyme-mediated degradation and phagocytosis. Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 stimulates this phagocytosis. We recently reported that the APP23 mouse model for AD showed fewer AD-related phenotypes when these animals were crossed with transgenic mice expressing heat shock protein (HSP) 70. We here examined the effect of geranylgeranylacetone, an inducer of HSP70 expression, on the AD-related phenotypes. Repeated oral administration of geranylgeranylacetone to APP23 mice for 9 months not only improved cognitive function but also decreased levels of Aβ, Aβ plaque deposition and synaptic loss. The treatment also up-regulated the expression of an Aβ-degrading enzyme and TGF-β1 but did not affect the maturation of APP and secretase activities. These outcomes were similar to those observed in APP23 mice genetically modified to overexpress HSP70. Although the repeated oral administration of geranylgeranylacetone did not increase the level of HSP70 in the brain, a single oral administration of geranylgeranylacetone significantly increased the level of HSP70 when Aβ was concomitantly injected directly into the hippocampus. Since geranylgeranylacetone has already been approved for use as an anti-ulcer drug and its safety in humans has been confirmed, we propose that this drug be considered as a candidate drug for the prevention of AD. PMID:24098472

  11. Hemopexin therapy reverts heme-induced proinflammatory phenotypic switching of macrophages in a mouse model of sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Vinchi, Francesca; Costa da Silva, Milene; Ingoglia, Giada; Petrillo, Sara; Brinkman, Nathan; Zuercher, Adrian; Cerwenka, Adelheid; Tolosano, Emanuela

    2016-01-01

    Hemolytic diseases, such as sickle cell anemia and thalassemia, are characterized by enhanced release of hemoglobin and heme into the circulation, heme-iron loading of reticulo-endothelial system macrophages, and chronic inflammation. Here we show that in addition to activating the vascular endothelium, hemoglobin and heme excess alters the macrophage phenotype in sickle cell disease. We demonstrate that exposure of cultured macrophages to hemolytic aged red blood cells, heme, or iron causes their functional phenotypic change toward a proinflammatory state. In addition, hemolysis and macrophage heme/iron accumulation in a mouse model of sickle disease trigger similar proinflammatory phenotypic alterations in hepatic macrophages. On the mechanistic level, this critically depends on reactive oxygen species production and activation of the Toll-like receptor 4 signaling pathway. We further demonstrate that the heme scavenger hemopexin protects reticulo-endothelial macrophages from heme overload in heme-loaded Hx-null mice and reduces production of cytokines and reactive oxygen species. Importantly, in sickle mice, the administration of human exogenous hemopexin attenuates the inflammatory phenotype of macrophages. Taken together, our data suggest that therapeutic administration of hemopexin is beneficial to counteract heme-driven macrophage-mediated inflammation and its pathophysiologic consequences in sickle cell disease. PMID:26675351

  12. Hemopexin therapy reverts heme-induced proinflammatory phenotypic switching of macrophages in a mouse model of sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Vinchi, Francesca; Costa da Silva, Milene; Ingoglia, Giada; Petrillo, Sara; Brinkman, Nathan; Zuercher, Adrian; Cerwenka, Adelheid; Tolosano, Emanuela; Muckenthaler, Martina U

    2016-01-28

    Hemolytic diseases, such as sickle cell anemia and thalassemia, are characterized by enhanced release of hemoglobin and heme into the circulation, heme-iron loading of reticulo-endothelial system macrophages, and chronic inflammation. Here we show that in addition to activating the vascular endothelium, hemoglobin and heme excess alters the macrophage phenotype in sickle cell disease. We demonstrate that exposure of cultured macrophages to hemolytic aged red blood cells, heme, or iron causes their functional phenotypic change toward a proinflammatory state. In addition, hemolysis and macrophage heme/iron accumulation in a mouse model of sickle disease trigger similar proinflammatory phenotypic alterations in hepatic macrophages. On the mechanistic level, this critically depends on reactive oxygen species production and activation of the Toll-like receptor 4 signaling pathway. We further demonstrate that the heme scavenger hemopexin protects reticulo-endothelial macrophages from heme overload in heme-loaded Hx-null mice and reduces production of cytokines and reactive oxygen species. Importantly, in sickle mice, the administration of human exogenous hemopexin attenuates the inflammatory phenotype of macrophages. Taken together, our data suggest that therapeutic administration of hemopexin is beneficial to counteract heme-driven macrophage-mediated inflammation and its pathophysiologic consequences in sickle cell disease. PMID:26675351

  13. The Ames dwarf mutation attenuates Alzheimer's disease phenotype of APP/PS1 mice.

    PubMed

    Puig, Kendra L; Kulas, Joshua A; Franklin, Whitney; Rakoczy, Sharlene G; Taglialatela, Giulio; Brown-Borg, Holly M; Combs, Colin K

    2016-04-01

    APP/PS1 double transgenic mice expressing human mutant amyloid precursor protein (APP) and presenilin-1 (PS1) demonstrate robust brain amyloid beta (Aβ) peptide containing plaque deposition, increased markers of oxidative stress, behavioral dysfunction, and proinflammatory gliosis. On the other hand, lack of growth hormone, prolactin, and thyroid-stimulating hormone due to a recessive mutation in the Prop 1 gene (Prop1df) in Ames dwarf mice results in a phenotype characterized by potentiated antioxidant mechanisms, improved learning and memory, and significantly increased longevity in homozygous mice. Based on this, we hypothesized that a similar hormone deficiency might attenuate disease changes in the brains of APP/PS1 mice. To test this idea, APP/PS1 mice were crossed to the Ames dwarf mouse line. APP/PS1, wild-type, df/+, df/df, df/+/APP/PS1, and df/df/APP/PS1 mice were compared at 6 months of age through behavioral testing and assessing amyloid burden, reactive gliosis, and brain cytokine levels. df/df mice demonstrated lower brain growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor 1 concentrations. This correlated with decreased astrogliosis and microgliosis in the df/df/APP/PS1 mice and, surprisingly, reduced Aβ plaque deposition and Aβ 1-40 and Aβ 1-42 concentrations. The df/df/APP/PS1 mice also demonstrated significantly elevated brain levels of multiple cytokines in spite of the attenuated gliosis. These data indicate that the df/df/APP/PS1 line is a unique resource in which to study aging and resistance to disease and suggest that the affected pituitary hormones may have a role in regulating disease progression. PMID:26973101

  14. An atypical Dent's disease phenotype caused by co-inheritance of mutations at CLCN5 and OCRL genes.

    PubMed

    Addis, Maria; Meloni, Cristiana; Tosetto, Enrica; Ceol, Monica; Cristofaro, Rosalba; Melis, Maria Antonietta; Vercelloni, Paolo; Del Prete, Dorella; Marra, Giuseppina; Anglani, Franca

    2013-06-01

    Dent's disease is an X-linked renal tubulopathy caused by mutations mainly affecting the CLCN5 gene. Defects in the OCRL gene, which is usually mutated in patients with Lowe syndrome, have been shown to lead to a Dent-like phenotype called Dent disease 2. However, about 20% of patients with Dent's disease carry no CLCN5/OCRL mutations. The disease's genetic heterogeneity is accompanied by interfamilial and intrafamilial phenotypic heterogeneity. We report on a case of Dent's disease with a very unusual phenotype (dysmorphic features, ocular abnormalities, growth delay, rickets, mild mental retardation) in which a digenic inheritance was discovered. Two different, novel disease-causing mutations were detected, both inherited from the patient's healthy mother, that is a truncating mutation in the CLCN5 gene (A249fs*20) and a donor splice-site alteration in the OCRL gene (c.388+3A>G). The mRNA analysis of the patient's leukocytes revealed an aberrantly spliced OCRL mRNA caused by in-frame exon 6 skipping, leading to a shorter protein, but keeping intact the central inositol 5-phosphatase domain and the C-terminal side of the ASH-RhoGAP domain. Only wild-type mRNA was observed in the mother's leukocytes due to a completely skewed X inactivation. Our results are the first to reveal the effect of an epistatic second modifier in Dent's disease too, which can modulate its expressivity. We surmise that the severe Dent disease 2 phenotype of our patient might be due to an addictive interaction of the mutations at two different genes. PMID:23047739

  15. Eliminating the synthesis of mature lamin A reduces disease phenotypes in mice carrying a Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome allele.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shao H; Qiao, Xin; Farber, Emily; Chang, Sandy Y; Fong, Loren G; Young, Stephen G

    2008-03-14

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome is caused by the synthesis of a mutant form of prelamin A, which is generally called progerin. Progerin is targeted to the nuclear rim, where it interferes with the integrity of the nuclear lamina, causes misshapen cell nuclei, and leads to multiple aging-like disease phenotypes. We created a gene-targeted allele yielding exclusively progerin (Lmna HG) and found that heterozygous mice (Lmna HG/+) exhibit many phenotypes of progeria. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that the phenotypes elicited by the Lmna HG allele might be modulated by compositional changes in the nuclear lamina. To explore this hypothesis, we bred mice harboring one Lmna HG allele and one Lmna LCO allele (a mutant allele that produces lamin C but no lamin A). We then compared the phenotypes of Lmna HG/LCO mice (which produce progerin and lamin C) with littermate Lmna HG/+ mice (which produce lamin A, lamin C, and progerin). Lmna HG/LCO mice exhibited improved HG/LCO fibroblasts had fewer misshapen nuclei than Lmna HG/+ fibroblasts (p < 0.0001). A likely explanation for these differences was uncovered; the amount of progerin in Lmna HG/LCO fibroblasts and tissues was lower than in Lmna HG/+ fibroblasts and tissues. These studies suggest that compositional changes in the nuclear lamina can influence both the steady-state levels of progerin and the severity of progeria-like disease phenotypes. PMID:18178963

  16. Epigenetic silencing of miR-490-3p promotes development of an aggressive colorectal cancer phenotype through activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Kehong; Zhou, Xinying; Yu, Jinlong; Li, Qiang; Wang, Hui; Li, Mingyi; Shao, Ziyun; Zhang, Feifei; Luo, Yuhao; Shen, Zetao; Chen, Fei; Shi, Fujun; Cui, Chunhui; Zhao, Dachuan; Lin, Zhiqun; Zheng, Wei; Zou, Zhaowei; Huang, Zonghai; Zhao, Liang

    2016-06-28

    The Wnt/β-catenin pathway is known to contribute to colorectal cancer (CRC) progression, although little is known about the contribution of β-catenin on this process. We investigated the role of miR-490-3p, which was recently reported to suppress tumorigenesis through its effect on Wnt/β-catenin signaling. We found that hypermethylation of the miR-490-3p promoter down-regulates miR-490-3p expression in CRC tissue. Gain- and loss-of-function assays in vitro and in vivo reveal that miR-490-3p suppresses cancer cell proliferation by inducing apoptosis and inhibits cell invasiveness by repressing the initiation of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), a key mechanism in cancer cell invasiveness and metastasis. The frequently rearranged in advanced T-cell lymphomas (FRAT1) protein was identified as a direct target of miR-490-3p and contributes to its tumor-suppressing effects. miR-490-3p appears to have an inhibitory effect on β-catenin expression in nuclear fractions of CRC cells, whereas FRAT1 expression is associated with the accumulation of β-catenin in the nucleus of cells, which could be weakened by transfection with miR-490-3p. Our findings suggest that the miR-490-3p/FRAT1/β-catenin axis is important in CRC progression and provides new insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying CRC. They may help to confirm the pathway driving CRC aggressiveness and serve for the development of a novel miRNA-targeting anticancer therapy. PMID:27037061

  17. Progress in Treatment Development for Neuropsychiatric Symptoms in Alzheimer’s Disease: Focus on Agitation and Aggression. A Report from the EU/US/CTAD Task Force

    PubMed Central

    Soto, M.; Abushakra, S.; Cummings, J.; Siffert, J.; Robert, P.; Vellas, B.; Lyketsos, C.G.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The management of neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS) such as agitation and aggression is a major priority in caring for people with Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Agitation and aggression (A/A) are among the most disruptive symptoms, and given their impact, they are increasingly an important target for development of effective treatments. Considerable progress has been made in the last years with a growing number of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of drugs for NPS. The limited benefits reported in some RCTs may be accounted for by the absence of a biological link of the tested molecule to NPS and also by key methodological issues. In recent RCTs of A/A, a great heterogeneity design was found. Designing trials for dementia populations with NPS presents many challenges, including identification of appropriate participants for such trials, engagement and compliance of patients and caregivers in the trials and the choice of optimal outcome measures to demonstrate treatment effectiveness. The EU/US -CTAD Task Force, an international collaboration of investigators from academia, industry, non-profit foundations, and regulatory agencies met in Philadelphia on November 19, 2014 to address some of these challenges. Despite potential heterogeneity in clinical manifestations and neurobiology, agitation and aggression seems to be accepted as an entity for drug development. The field appears to be reaching a consensus in using both agitation and aggression (or other NPS)-specific quantitative measures plus a global rating of change for agitation outcomes based on clinician judgment as the main outcomes. PMID:26413494

  18. MicroRNA-155 influences B-cell receptor signaling and associates with aggressive disease in chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Bing; Chen, Liguang; Zhang, Suping; Mraz, Marek; Fecteau, Jessie-F.; Yu, Jian; Ghia, Emanuela M.; Zhang, Ling; Bao, Lei; Rassenti, Laura Z.; Messer, Karen; Calin, George A.; Croce, Carlo M.

    2014-01-01

    High-level leukemia cell expression of micro-RNA 155 (miR-155) is associated with more aggressive disease in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), including those cases with a low-level expression of ζ-chain–associated protein of 70 kD. CLL with high-level miR-155 expressed lower levels of Src homology-2 domain-containing inositol 5-phosphatase 1 and were more responsive to B-cell receptor (BCR) ligation than CLL with low-level miR-155. Transfection with miR-155 enhanced responsiveness to BCR ligation, whereas transfection with a miR-155 inhibitor had the opposite effect. CLL in lymphoid tissue expressed higher levels of miR155HG than CLL in the blood of the same patient. Also, isolated CD5brightCXCR4dim cells, representing CLL that had been newly released from the microenvironment, expressed higher levels of miR-155 and were more responsive to BCR ligation than isolated CD5dimCXCR4bright cells of the same patient. Treatment of CLL or normal B cells with CD40-ligand or B-cell–activating factor upregulated miR-155 and enhanced sensitivity to BCR ligation, effects that could be blocked by inhibitors to miR-155. This study demonstrates that the sensitivity to BCR ligation can be enhanced by high-level expression of miR-155, which in turn can be induced by crosstalk within the tissue microenvironment, potentially contributing to its association with adverse clinical outcome in patients with CLL. PMID:24914134

  19. Medication Development for Agitation and Aggression in Alzheimer Disease: Review and Discussion of Recent Randomized Clinical Trial Design

    PubMed Central

    Soto, Maria; Andrieu, Sandrine; Nourhashemi, Fati; Ousset, Pierre Jean; Ballard, Clive; Robert, Philippe; Vellas, Bruno; Lyketsos, Constantine; Rosenberg, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Background The management of disruptive neuropsychiatric symptom (NPS) such as agitation and aggression (A/A) is a major priority in caring for people with Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Few effective pharmacological or non-pharmacological options are available. Results of randomized clinical trials (RCTs) of drugs for A/A have been disappointing. This may result from the absence of biological efficacy for medications tested in treating A/A. It may also be related to methodological issues such as the choice of outcomes. The aim of this review was to highlight key methodological issues pertaining to RCTs of current and emerging medications for the treatment of A/A in AD. Methods We searched PubMed/Medline, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and ClinicalTrials.gov for RCTs comparing medications with either placebo or other drugs in the treatment of A/A in AD, between January 2008 and December 2013. Results We identified a total of 18 RCTs; of these, 11 were completed and 7 ongoing. Of the ongoing RCTs, only one is in Phase III. Seven of 10 completed RCTs with reported results did not report greater benefit from drug than placebo. Each of the completed RCTs used a different definition of “clinically significant A/A”. There was considerable heterogeneity in study desin. The primary endpoints were largely proxy-based but a variety of scales were used. The definition of caregiver and scales used to assess caregiver outcomes were similarly heterogeneous. Placebo response was notable in all trials. Conclusions This review highlights a great heterogeneity in RCTs design of drugs for A/A in AD and some key methodological issues such as definition of A/A, choice of outcome measures and caregiver participation that could be addressed by an expert consensus to optimize future trials design. PMID:25226218

  20. Ferroportin diseases: functional studies, a link between genetic and clinical phenotype.

    PubMed

    Détivaud, Lénaïck; Island, Marie-Laure; Jouanolle, Anne-Marie; Ropert, Martine; Bardou-Jacquet, Edouard; Le Lan, Caroline; Mosser, Annick; Leroyer, Patricia; Deugnier, Yves; David, Véronique; Brissot, Pierre; Loréal, Olivier

    2013-11-01

    Ferroportin (FPN) mediates iron export from cells and this function is modulated by serum hepcidin. Mutations in the FPN gene (SLC40A1) lead to autosomal dominant iron overload diseases related either to loss or to gain of function, and usually characterized by normal or low transferrin saturation versus elevated transferrin saturation, respectively. However, for the same mutation, the phenotypic expression may vary from one patient to another. Using in vitro overexpression of wild-type or mutant FPN proteins, we characterized the functional impact of five recently identified FPN gene mutations regarding FPN localization, cell iron status, and hepcidin sensitivity. Our aim was to integrate functional results and biological findings in probands and relatives. We show that while the p.Arg371Gln (R371Q) mutation had no impact on studied parameters, the p.Trp158Leu (W158L), p.Arg88Gly (R88G), and p.Asn185Asp (N185D) mutations caused an iron export defect and were classified as loss-of-function mutations. The p.Gly204Ser (G204S) mutation induced a gain of FPN function. Functional studies are useful to determine whether or not a FPN gene mutation found in an iron overloaded patient is deleterious and to characterize its biological impact, especially when family studies are not fully informative and/or additional confounding factors may affect bio-clinical expression. PMID:23943237

  1. Pkd1 transgenic mice: adult model of polycystic kidney disease with extrarenal and renal phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Kurbegovic, Almira; Côté, Olivier; Couillard, Martin; Ward, Christopher J.; Harris, Peter C.; Trudel, Marie

    2010-01-01

    While high levels of Pkd1 expression are detected in tissues of patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), it is unclear whether enhanced expression could be a pathogenetic mechanism for this systemic disorder. Three transgenic mouse lines were generated from a Pkd1-BAC modified by introducing a silent tag via homologous recombination to target a sustained wild-type genomic Pkd1 expression within the native tissue and temporal regulation. These mice specifically overexpressed the Pkd1 transgene in extrarenal and renal tissues from ∼2- to 15-fold over Pkd1 endogenous levels in a copy-dependent manner. All transgenic mice reproducibly developed tubular and glomerular cysts leading to renal insufficiency. Interestingly, Pkd1TAG mice also exhibited renal fibrosis and calcium deposits in papilla reminiscent of nephrolithiasis as frequently observed in ADPKD. Similar to human ADPKD, these mice consistently displayed hepatic fibrosis and ∼15% intrahepatic cysts of the bile ducts affecting females preferentially. Moreover, a significant proportion of mice developed cardiac anomalies with severe left-ventricular hypertrophy, marked aortic arch distention and/or valvular stenosis and calcification that had profound functional impact. Of significance, Pkd1TAG mice displayed occasional cerebral lesions with evidence of ruptured and unruptured cerebral aneurysms. This Pkd1TAG mouse model demonstrates that overexpression of wild-type Pkd1 can trigger the typical adult renal and extrarenal phenotypes resembling human ADPKD. PMID:20053665

  2. The Use of Kosher Phenotyping for Mapping QTL Affecting Susceptibility to Bovine Respiratory Disease

    PubMed Central

    Eitam, Harel; Yishay, Moran; Schiavini, Fausta; Soller, Morris; Bagnato, Alessandro; Shabtay, Ariel

    2016-01-01

    Bovine respiratory disease (BRD) is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in feedlot cattle, caused by multiple pathogens that become more virulent in response to stress. As clinical signs often go undetected and various preventive strategies failed, identification of genes affecting BRD is essential for selection for resistance. Selective DNA pooling (SDP) was applied in a genome wide association study (GWAS) to map BRD QTLs in Israeli Holstein male calves. Kosher scoring of lung adhesions was used to allocate 122 and 62 animals to High (Glatt Kosher) and Low (Non-Kosher) resistant groups, respectively. Genotyping was performed using the Illumina BovineHD BeadChip according to the Infinium protocol. Moving average of -logP was used to map QTLs and Log drop was used to define their boundaries (QTLRs). The combined procedure was efficient for high resolution mapping. Nineteen QTLRs distributed over 13 autosomes were found, some overlapping previous studies. The QTLRs contain polymorphic functional and expression candidate genes to affect kosher status, with putative immunological and wound healing activities. Kosher phenotyping was shown to be a reliable means to map QTLs affecting BRD morbidity. PMID:27077383

  3. The Use of Kosher Phenotyping for Mapping QTL Affecting Susceptibility to Bovine Respiratory Disease.

    PubMed

    Lipkin, Ehud; Strillacci, Maria Giuseppina; Eitam, Harel; Yishay, Moran; Schiavini, Fausta; Soller, Morris; Bagnato, Alessandro; Shabtay, Ariel

    2016-01-01

    Bovine respiratory disease (BRD) is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in feedlot cattle, caused by multiple pathogens that become more virulent in response to stress. As clinical signs often go undetected and various preventive strategies failed, identification of genes affecting BRD is essential for selection for resistance. Selective DNA pooling (SDP) was applied in a genome wide association study (GWAS) to map BRD QTLs in Israeli Holstein male calves. Kosher scoring of lung adhesions was used to allocate 122 and 62 animals to High (Glatt Kosher) and Low (Non-Kosher) resistant groups, respectively. Genotyping was performed using the Illumina BovineHD BeadChip according to the Infinium protocol. Moving average of -logP was used to map QTLs and Log drop was used to define their boundaries (QTLRs). The combined procedure was efficient for high resolution mapping. Nineteen QTLRs distributed over 13 autosomes were found, some overlapping previous studies. The QTLRs contain polymorphic functional and expression candidate genes to affect kosher status, with putative immunological and wound healing activities. Kosher phenotyping was shown to be a reliable means to map QTLs affecting BRD morbidity. PMID:27077383

  4. A glycolytic phenotype is associated with prostate cancer progression and aggressiveness: a role for monocarboxylate transporters as metabolic targets for therapy

    PubMed Central

    Pertega-Gomes, Nelma; Felisbino, Sergio; Massie, Charlie E; Vizcaino, Jose R; Coelho, Ricardo; Sandi, Chiranjeevi; Simoes-Sousa, Susana; Jurmeister, Sarah; Ramos-Montoya, Antonio; Asim, Mohammad; Tran, Maxine; Oliveira, Elsa; Lobo da Cunha, Alexandre; Maximo, Valdemar; Baltazar, Fatima; Neal, David E; Fryer, Lee GD

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic adaptation is considered an emerging hallmark of cancer, whereby cancer cells exhibit high rates of glucose consumption with consequent lactate production. To ensure rapid efflux of lactate, most cancer cells express high levels of monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs), which therefore may constitute suitable therapeutic targets. The impact of MCT inhibition, along with the clinical impact of altered cellular metabolism during prostate cancer (PCa) initiation and progression, has not been described. Using a large cohort of human prostate tissues of different grades, in silico data, in vitro and ex vivo studies, we demonstrate the metabolic heterogeneity of PCa and its clinical relevance. We show an increased glycolytic phenotype in advanced stages of PCa and its correlation with poor prognosis. Finally, we present evidence supporting MCTs as suitable targets in PCa, affecting not only cancer cell proliferation and survival but also the expression of a number of hypoxia-inducible factor target genes associated with poor prognosis. Herein, we suggest that patients with highly glycolytic tumours have poorer outcome, supporting the notion of targeting glycolytic tumour cells in prostate cancer through the use of MCT inhibitors. © 2015 Authors. Journal of Pathology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. PMID:25875424

  5. Retinitis pigmentosa: impact of different Pde6a point mutations on the disease phenotype.

    PubMed

    Sothilingam, Vithiyanjali; Garcia Garrido, Marina; Jiao, Kangwei; Buena-Atienza, Elena; Sahaboglu, Ayse; Trifunović, Dragana; Balendran, Sukirthini; Koepfli, Tanja; Mühlfriedel, Regine; Schön, Christian; Biel, Martin; Heckmann, Angelique; Beck, Susanne C; Michalakis, Stylianos; Wissinger, Bernd; Seeliger, Mathias W; Paquet-Durand, François

    2015-10-01

    Mutations in the PDE6A gene can cause rod photoreceptors degeneration and the blinding disease retinitis pigmentosa (RP). While a number of pathogenic PDE6A mutations have been described, little is known about their impact on compound heterozygous situations and potential interactions of different disease-causing alleles. Here, we used a novel mouse model for the Pde6a R562W mutation in combination with an existing line carrying the V685M mutation to generate compound heterozygous Pde6a V685M/R562W animals, exactly homologous to a case of human RP. We compared the progression of photoreceptor degeneration in these compound heterozygous mice with the homozygous V685M and R562W mutants, and additionally with the D670G line that is known for a relatively mild phenotype. We investigated PDE6A expression, cyclic guanosine mono-phosphate accumulation, calpain and caspase activity, in vivo retinal function and morphology, as well as photoreceptor cell death and survival. This analysis confirms the severity of different Pde6a mutations and indicates that compound heterozygous mutants behave like intermediates of the respective homozygous situations. Specifically, the severity of the four different Pde6a situations may be categorized by the pace of photoreceptor degeneration: V685M (fastest) > V685M/R562W > R562W > D670G (slowest). While calpain activity was strongly increased in all four mutants, caspase activity was not. This points to the execution of non-apoptotic cell death and may lead to the identification of new targets for therapeutic interventions. For individual RP patients, our study may help to predict time-courses for Pde6a-related retinal degeneration and thereby facilitate the definition of a window-of-opportunity for clinical interventions. PMID:26188004

  6. Atrophy Patterns in Early Clinical Stages Across Distinct Phenotypes of Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ossenkoppele, Rik; Cohn-Sheehy, Brendan I.; La Joie, Renaud; Vogel, Jacob W.; Möller, Christiane; Lehmann, Manja; van Berckel, Bart N.M.; Seeley, William W.; Pijnenburg, Yolande A.; Gorno-Tempini, Maria L.; Kramer, Joel H.; Barkhof, Frederik; Rosen, Howard J.; van der Flier, Wiesje M.; Jagust, William J.; Miller, Bruce L.; Scheltens, Philip; Rabinovici, Gil D.

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) can present with distinct clinical variants. Identifying the earliest neurodegenerative changes associated with each variant has implications for early diagnosis, and for understanding the mechanisms that underlie regional vulnerability and disease progression in AD. We performed voxel-based morphometry to detect atrophy patterns in early clinical stages of four AD phenotypes: Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA, “visual variant,” n = 93), logopenic variant primary progressive aphasia (lvPPA, “language variant,” n = 74), and memory-predominant AD categorized as early age-of-onset (EOAD, <65 years, n = 114) and late age-of-onset (LOAD, >65 years, n = 114). Patients with each syndrome were stratified based on: (1) degree of functional impairment, as measured by the clinical dementia rating (CDR) scale, and (2) overall extent of brain atrophy, as measured by a neuroimaging approach that sums the number of brain voxels showing significantly lower gray matter volume than cognitively normal controls (n = 80). Even at the earliest clinical stage (CDR =0.5 or bottom quartile of overall atrophy), patients with each syndrome showed both common and variant-specific atrophy. Common atrophy across variants was found in temporoparietal regions that comprise the posterior default mode network (DMN). Early syndrome-specific atrophy mirrored functional brain networks underlying functions that are uniquely affected in each variant: Language network in lvPPA, posterior cingulate cortex-hippocampal circuit in amnestic EOAD and LOAD, and visual networks in PCA. At more advanced stages, atrophy patterns largely converged across AD variants. These findings support a model in which neurodegeneration selectively targets both the DMN and syndrome-specific vulnerable networks at the earliest clinical stages of AD. PMID:26260856

  7. Increased Epicardial Adipose Tissue Is Associated with the Airway Dominant Phenotype of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Higami, Yuichi; Ogawa, Emiko; Ryujin, Yasushi; Goto, Kenichi; Seto, Ruriko; Wada, Hiroshi; Tho, Nguyen Van; Lan, Le Thi Tuyet; Paré, Peter D.; Nakano, Yasutaka

    2016-01-01

    Background Epicardial adipose tissue (EAT) has been shown to be a non-invasive marker that predicts the progression of cardiovascular disease (CVD). It has been reported that the EAT volume is increased in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, little is known about which phenotypes of COPD are associated with increased EAT. Methods One hundred and eighty smokers who were referred to the clinic were consecutively enrolled. A chest CT was used for the quantification of the emphysematous lesions, airway lesions, and EAT. These lesions were assessed as the percentage of low attenuation volume (LAV%), the square root of airway wall area of a hypothetical airway with an internal perimeter of 10 mm (√Aaw at Pi10) and the EAT area, respectively. The same measurements were made on 225 Vietnamese COPD patients to replicate the results. Results Twenty-six of the referred patients did not have COPD, while 105 were diagnosed as having COPD based on a FEV1/FVC<0.70. The EAT area was significantly associated with age, BMI, FEV1 (%predicted), FEV1/FVC, self-reported hypertension, self-reported CVD, statin use, LAV%, and √Aaw at Pi10 in COPD patients. The multiple regression analyses showed that only BMI, self-reported CVD and √Aaw at Pi10 were independently associated with the EAT area (R2 = 0.51, p<0.0001). These results were replicated in the Vietnamese population. Conclusions The EAT area is independently associated with airway wall thickness. Because EAT is also an independent predictor of CVD risk, these data suggest a mechanistic link between the airway predominant form of COPD and CVD. PMID:26866482

  8. Phenotypic & Genotypic Characteristics of Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) in French-Canadians: comparison with a large North American repository

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Mamatha; Nguyen, Geoffrey C.; Pare, Pierre; Lahaie, Raymond; Deslandres, Colette; Bernard, Edmond-Jean; Aumais, Guy; Jobin, Gilles; Wild, Gary; Cohen, Albert; Langelier, Diane; Brant, Steven; Dassopoulos, Themistocles; McGovern, Dermot; Torres, Esther; Duerr, Richard; Regueiro, Miguel; Silverberg, Mark S; Steinhart, Hillary; Griffiths, Anne M.; Elkadri, Abdul; Cho, Judy; Proctor, Deborah; Goyette, Philippe; Rioux, John; Bitton, Alain

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND Phenotype characteristics of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) may differ significantly among ethnic subpopulations. The aim of this study was to characterize the IBD phenotype in French-Canadians, the most prominent founder population in North America. METHODS Using well-characterized phenotype data in the NIDDK-IBD Genetics Consortium repository on IBD patients, we compared phenotypic characteristics of 202 French-Canadians to those of 1287 other Caucasian patients. These included: diagnosis, anatomical location, disease behaviour, extraintestinal manifestations, surgical history, and family history of IBD. RESULTS French-Canadian CD patients were less likely to have stricturing disease (11 vs 21%, P=0.005; OR 0.45, 95% CI: 0.24– 0.85). Using a stringent definition of ethnicity (3 out of 4 grandparents being French-Canadian, as opposed to self-report, n= 148), French-Canadians had a tendency towards developing fistulizing CD (37% vs 28%, p= 0.07), and there was an increased prevalence of sacroiliitis among French-Canadians with IBD (4% vs 2%, p=0.045). Among French-Canadians, the numbers of current smokers in CD (40 vs 25%, p=0.006) and former smokers in UC (35% vs 20%, p=0.03) were significantly higher. The prevalence of one of the three main variant NOD2 SNPs among French-Canadian CD patients was 43.2%. The 3020insC SNP correlated with small bowel disease in French-Canadians (75% versus 0%, P=0.006). CONCLUSION French-Canadians exhibit an IBD phenotype profile distinct from other Caucasian IBD populations, with an accentuated association between smoking status and IBD. This unique profile may have implications regarding the need for a different approach to management of IBD in this population. PMID:19513023

  9. Effect of the IL-1 Receptor Antagonist Kineret® on Disease Phenotype in mdx Mice

    PubMed Central

    Benny Klimek, Margaret E.; Sali, Arpana; Rayavarapu, Sree; Van der Meulen, Jack H.; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked muscle disease caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene. The pathology of DMD manifests in patients with progressive muscle weakness, loss of ambulation and ultimately death. One of the characteristics of DMD is muscle inflammation, and dystrophin-deficient skeletal muscles produce higher levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin 1β (IL-1β) in response to toll like receptor (TLR) stimulation compared to controls; therefore, blocking the IL-1β pathway could improve the disease phenotype in mdx mice, a mouse model of DMD. Kineret® or IL-1Ra is a recombinant IL-1 receptor antagonist approved by the FDA for treating rheumatoid arthritis. To determine the efficacy of IL-1Ra in a DMD model, we administered subcutaneous injections of saline control or IL-1Ra (25 mg/kg/day) to mdx mice daily for 45 days beginning at 5 weeks of age. Functional and histological parameters were measured at the conclusion of the study. IL-1Ra only partially inhibited this signaling pathway in this study; however, there were still interesting observations to be noted. For example, although not significantly changed, splenocytes from the IL-1Ra-treated group secreted less IL-1β after LPS stimulation compared to control mice indicating a blunted response and incomplete inhibition of the pathway (37% decrease). In addition, normalized forelimb grip strength was significantly increased in IL-1Ra-treated mice. There were no changes in EDL muscle-specific force measurements, histological parameters, or motor coordination assessments in the dystrophic mice after IL-1Ra treatment. There was a significant 27% decrease in the movement time and total distance traveled by the IL-1Ra treated mice, correlating with previous studies examining effects of IL-1 on behavior. Our studies indicate partial blocking of IL-1β with IL-1Ra significantly altered only a few behavioral and strength related disease parameters; however, treatment with

  10. Effect of the IL-1 Receptor Antagonist Kineret® on Disease Phenotype in mdx Mice.

    PubMed

    Benny Klimek, Margaret E; Sali, Arpana; Rayavarapu, Sree; Van der Meulen, Jack H; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked muscle disease caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene. The pathology of DMD manifests in patients with progressive muscle weakness, loss of ambulation and ultimately death. One of the characteristics of DMD is muscle inflammation, and dystrophin-deficient skeletal muscles produce higher levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin 1β (IL-1β) in response to toll like receptor (TLR) stimulation compared to controls; therefore, blocking the IL-1β pathway could improve the disease phenotype in mdx mice, a mouse model of DMD. Kineret® or IL-1Ra is a recombinant IL-1 receptor antagonist approved by the FDA for treating rheumatoid arthritis. To determine the efficacy of IL-1Ra in a DMD model, we administered subcutaneous injections of saline control or IL-1Ra (25 mg/kg/day) to mdx mice daily for 45 days beginning at 5 weeks of age. Functional and histological parameters were measured at the conclusion of the study. IL-1Ra only partially inhibited this signaling pathway in this study; however, there were still interesting observations to be noted. For example, although not significantly changed, splenocytes from the IL-1Ra-treated group secreted less IL-1β after LPS stimulation compared to control mice indicating a blunted response and incomplete inhibition of the pathway (37% decrease). In addition, normalized forelimb grip strength was significantly increased in IL-1Ra-treated mice. There were no changes in EDL muscle-specific force measurements, histological parameters, or motor coordination assessments in the dystrophic mice after IL-1Ra treatment. There was a significant 27% decrease in the movement time and total distance traveled by the IL-1Ra treated mice, correlating with previous studies examining effects of IL-1 on behavior. Our studies indicate partial blocking of IL-1β with IL-1Ra significantly altered only a few behavioral and strength related disease parameters; however, treatment with

  11. Multiple Changes of Gene Expression and Function Reveal Genomic and Phenotypic Complexity in SLE-like Disease.

    PubMed

    Wilbe, Maria; Kozyrev, Sergey V; Farias, Fabiana H G; Bremer, Hanna D; Hedlund, Anna; Pielberg, Gerli R; Seppälä, Eija H; Gustafson, Ulla; Lohi, Hannes; Carlborg, Örjan; Andersson, Göran; Hansson-Hamlin, Helene; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin

    2015-06-01

    The complexity of clinical manifestations commonly observed in autoimmune disorders poses a major challenge to genetic studies of such diseases. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) affects humans as well as other mammals, and is characterized by the presence of antinuclear antibodies (ANA) in patients' sera and multiple disparate clinical features. Here we present evidence that particular sub-phenotypes of canine SLE-related disease, based on homogenous (ANA(H)) and speckled ANA (ANA(S)) staining pattern, and also steroid-responsive meningitis-arteritis (SRMA) are associated with different but overlapping sets of genes. In addition to association to certain MHC alleles and haplotypes, we identified 11 genes (WFDC3, HOMER2, VRK1, PTPN3, WHAMM, BANK1, AP3B2, DAPP1, LAMTOR3, DDIT4L and PPP3CA) located on five chromosomes that contain multiple risk haplotypes correlated with gene expression and disease sub-phenotypes in an intricate manner. Intriguingly, the association of BANK1 with both human and canine SLE appears to lead to similar changes in gene expression levels in both species. Our results suggest that molecular definition may help unravel the mechanisms of different clinical features common between and specific to various autoimmune disease phenotypes in dogs and humans. PMID:26057447

  12. Sparse reduced-rank regression detects genetic associations with voxel-wise longitudinal phenotypes in Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Vounou, Maria; Janousova, Eva; Wolz, Robin; Stein, Jason L.; Thompson, Paul M.; Rueckert, Daniel; Montana, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    Scanning the entire genome in search of variants related to imaging phenotypes holds great promise in elucidating the genetic etiology of neurodegenerative disorders. Here we discuss the application of a penalized multivariate model, sparse reduced-rank regression (sRRR), for the genome-wide detection of markers associated with voxel-wise longitudinal changes in the brain caused by Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Using a sample from the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative database, we performed three separate studies that each compared two groups of individuals to identify genes associated with disease development and progression. For each comparison we took a two-step approach: initially, using penalized linear discriminant analysis, we identified voxels that provide an imaging signature of the disease with high classification accuracy; then we used this multivariate biomarker as a phenotype in a genome-wide association study, carried out using sRRR. The genetic markers were ranked in order of importance of association to the phenotypes using a data re-sampling approach. Our findings confirmed the key role of the APOE and TOMM40 genes but also highlighted some novel potential associations with AD. PMID:22209813

  13. Multiple Changes of Gene Expression and Function Reveal Genomic and Phenotypic Complexity in SLE-like Disease

    PubMed Central

    Farias, Fabiana H. G.; Bremer, Hanna D.; Hedlund, Anna; Pielberg, Gerli R.; Seppälä, Eija H.; Gustafson, Ulla; Lohi, Hannes; Carlborg, Örjan; Andersson, Göran; Hansson-Hamlin, Helene; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin

    2015-01-01

    The complexity of clinical manifestations commonly observed in autoimmune disorders poses a major challenge to genetic studies of such diseases. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) affects humans as well as other mammals, and is characterized by the presence of antinuclear antibodies (ANA) in patients’ sera and multiple disparate clinical features. Here we present evidence that particular sub-phenotypes of canine SLE-related disease, based on homogenous (ANAH) and speckled ANA (ANAS) staining pattern, and also steroid-responsive meningitis-arteritis (SRMA) are associated with different but overlapping sets of genes. In addition to association to certain MHC alleles and haplotypes, we identified 11 genes (WFDC3, HOMER2, VRK1, PTPN3, WHAMM, BANK1, AP3B2, DAPP1, LAMTOR3, DDIT4L and PPP3CA) located on five chromosomes that contain multiple risk haplotypes correlated with gene expression and disease sub-phenotypes in an intricate manner. Intriguingly, the association of BANK1 with both human and canine SLE appears to lead to similar changes in gene expression levels in both species. Our results suggest that molecular definition may help unravel the mechanisms of different clinical features common between and specific to various autoimmune disease phenotypes in dogs and humans. PMID:26057447

  14. Genetic and phenotypic variations of inherited retinal diseases in dogs: the power of within- and across-breed studies

    PubMed Central

    Acland, Gregory M.

    2014-01-01

    Considerable clinical and molecular variations have been known in retinal blinding diseases in man and also in dogs. Different forms of retinal diseases occur in specific breed(s) caused by mutations segregating within each isolated breeding population. While molecular studies to find genes and mutations underlying retinal diseases in dogs have benefited largely from the phenotypic and genetic uniformity within a breed, within- and across-breed variations have often played a key role in elucidating the molecular basis. The increasing knowledge of phenotypic, allelic, and genetic heterogeneities in canine retinal degeneration has shown that the overall picture is rather more complicated than initially thought. Over the past 20 years, various approaches have been developed and tested to search for genes and mutations underlying genetic traits in dogs, depending on the availability of genetic tools and sample resources. Candidate gene, linkage analysis, and genome-wide association studies have so far identified 24 mutations in 18 genes underlying retinal diseases in at least 58 dog breeds. Many of these genes have been associated with retinal diseases in humans, thus providing opportunities to study the role in pathogenesis and in normal vision. Application in therapeutic interventions such as gene therapy has proven successful initially in a naturally occurring dog model followed by trials in human patients. Other genes whose human homologs have not been associated with retinal diseases are potential candidates to explain equivalent human diseases and contribute to the understanding of their function in vision. PMID:22065099

  15. Maternal transmission of Alzheimer's disease: Prodromal metabolic phenotype and the search for genes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    After advanced age, having a parent affected with Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most significant risk factor for developing AD among cognitively normal (NL) individuals. Although rare genetic mutations have been identified among the early-onset forms of familial AD (EOFAD), the genetics of the more common forms of late-onset AD (LOAD) remain elusive. While some LOAD cases appear to be sporadic in nature, genetically mediated risk is evident from the familial aggregation of many LOAD cases. The patterns of transmission and biological mechanisms through which a family history of LOAD confers risk to the offspring are not known. Brain imaging studies using 2-[18F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography (18F-FDG PET) have shown that NL individuals with a maternal history of LOAD, but not with a paternal family history, express a phenotype characterised by a pattern of progressive reductions of brain glucose metabolism, similar to that in AD patients. As maternally inherited AD may be associated with as many as 20 per cent of the total LOAD population, understanding the causes and mechanisms of expression of this form of AD is of great relevance. This paper reviews known genetic mutations implicated in EOFAD and their effects on brain chemistry, structure and function; epidemiology and clinical research findings in LOAD, including in vivo imaging findings showing selective patterns of hypometabolism in maternally inherited AD; possible genetic mechanisms involved in maternal transmission of AD, including chromosome X mutations, mitochondrial DNA and imprinting; and genetic mechanisms involved in other neurological disorders with known or suspected maternal inheritance. The review concludes with a discussion of the potential role of brain imaging for identifying endophenotypes in NL individuals at risk for AD, and for directing investigation of potential susceptibility genes for AD. PMID:20368139

  16. Relationship Between Characteristics of Medications and Drug-Induced Liver Disease Phenotype and Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Vuppalanchi, Raj; Gotur, Raghavender; Reddy, K. Rajender; Fontana, Robert J.; Ghabril, Marwan; Kosinski, Andrzej S.; Gu, Jiezhun; Serrano, Jose; Chalasani, Naga

    2014-01-01

    Background & Aims: It is not known if specific characteristics of medication are associated with type of drug-induced liver injury (DILI) or outcome. We examined the relationships among select characteristics of medications and DILI phenotype and outcome. Methods: We analyzed 383 cases of DILI caused by a single orally administered prescription agent from the DILI Network Prospective Study with causalities of definite, highly likely, or probable. Relationship of daily dosage (≥ 50 mg vs. ≤ 49 mg), preponderance of hepatic metabolism (≥50% vs <50%), or Biopharmaceutics Drug Disposition Classification System (BDDCS) class (1–4, based on solubility and metabolism of the drug) were compared with clinical characteristics and outcomes. Results: Compared to cases of DILI in the <50 mg/day group, those associated with daily dosages ≥50 mg had shorter latency (median 38 days vs 56 days; P=.03) and a different biochemical pattern of liver injury (P=.04); no differences in pattern of injury, recovery, severity, or outcome were observed. Patients with DILI caused by medications with or without preponderant hepatic metabolism did not differ in clinical characteristics or outcomes. Compared to other classes of BDDCS, DILI caused by BDDCS class 1 medications had significantly longer latency (P<.001) and greater proportion of hepatocellular injury (P=.001). However, peak liver biochemical values and patients’ time to recovery, disease severity, and outcomes did not differ among the 4 BDDCS classes. Conclusions: Characteristics of medications (dosage, hepatic metabolism, and solubility) are associated with features of DILI such as latency and pattern of liver injury, but not with recovery, severity, or outcome. PMID:24362054

  17. Depletion of the IKBKAP ortholog in zebrafish leads to hirschsprung disease-like phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, William Wai-Chun; Tang, Clara Sze-Man; Gui, Hong-Sheng; So, Man-Ting; Lui, Vincent Chi-Hang; Tam, Paul Kwong-Hang; Garcia-Barcelo, Maria-Mercè

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the role of IKBKAP (inhibitor of kappa light polypeptide gene enhancer in B-cells, kinase complex-associated protein) in the development of enteric nervous system (ENS) and Hirschsprung disease (HSCR). METHODS: In this study, we injected a morpholino that blocked the translation of ikbkap protein to 1-cell stage zebrafish embryos. The phenotype in the ENS was analysed by antibody staining of the pan-neuronal marker HuC/D followed by enteric neuron counting. The mean numbers of enteric neurons were compared between the morphant and the control. We also studied the expressions of ret and phox2bb, which are involved in ENS development, in the ikbkap morpholino injected embryos by quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and compared them with the control. RESULTS: We observed aganglionosis (χ2, P < 0.01) and a reduced number of enteric neurons (38.8 ± 9.9 vs 50.2 ± 17.3, P < 0.05) in the zebrafish embryos injected with ikbkap translation-blocking morpholino (morphant) when compared with the control embryos. Specificity of the morpholino was confirmed by similar results obtained using a second non-overlapping morpholino that blocked the translation of ikbkap. We further studied the morphant by analysing the expression levels of genes involved in ENS development such as ret, phox2bb and sox10, and found that phox2bb, the ortholog of human PHOX2B, was significantly down-regulated (0.51 ± 0.15 vs 1.00 ± 0, P < 0.05). Although we also observed a reduction in the expression of ret, the difference was not significant. CONCLUSION: Loss of IKBKAP contributed to HSCR as demonstrated by functional analysis in zebrafish embryos. PMID:25717236

  18. Effects of Dantrolene Therapy on Disease Phenotype in Dystrophin Deficient mdx Mice.

    PubMed

    Quinn, James L; Huynh, Tony; Uaesoontrachoon, Kitipong; Tatem, Kathleen; Phadke, Aditi; Van der Meulen, Jack H; Yu, Qing; Nagaraju, Kannaboyina

    2013-01-01

    Dystrophin deficiency causes contraction-induced injury and damage to the muscle fiber, resulting in sustained increase in intracellular calcium levels, activation of calcium-dependent proteases and cell death. It is known that the Ryanodine receptor (RyR1) on the sarcoplasmic reticular (SR) membrane controls calcium release. Dantrolene, an FDA approved skeletal muscle relaxant, inhibits the release of calcium from the SR during excitation-contraction and suppresses uncontrolled calcium release by directly acting on the RyR complex to limit its activation. This study examines whether Dantrolene can reduce the disease phenotype in the mdx mouse model of muscular dystrophy. We treated mdx mice (4 weeks old) with daily intraperitoneal injections of 40mg/kg of Dantrolene for 6 weeks and measured functional (grip strength, in vitro force contractions), behavioral (open field digiscan), imagining (optical imaging for inflammation), histological (H&E), and molecular (protein and RNA) endpoints in a blinded fashion. We found that treatment with Dantrolene resulted in decreased grip strength and open field behavioral activity in mdx mice. There was no significant difference in inflammation either by optical imaging analysis of cathepsin activity or histological (H&E) analysis. In vitro force contraction measures showed no changes in EDL muscle-specific force, lengthening-contraction force deficit, or fatigue resistance. We found Dantrolene treatment significantly reduces serum CK levels. Further, Dantrolene-treated mice showed decreased SERCA1 but not RyR1 expression in skeletal muscle. These results suggest that Dantrolene treatment alone has no significant beneficial effects at the tested doses in young mdx mice. PMID:24270550

  19. Effects of Dantrolene Therapy on Disease Phenotype in Dystrophin Deficient mdx Mice

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, James L; Huynh, Tony; Uaesoontrachoon, Kitipong; Tatem, Kathleen; Phadke, Aditi; Van der Meulen, Jack H; Yu, Qing; Nagaraju, Kannaboyina

    2013-01-01

    Dystrophin deficiency causes contraction-induced injury and damage to the muscle fiber, resulting in sustained increase in intracellular calcium levels, activation of calcium-dependent proteases and cell death. It is known that the Ryanodine receptor (RyR1) on the sarcoplasmic reticular (SR) membrane controls calcium release. Dantrolene, an FDA approved skeletal muscle relaxant, inhibits the release of calcium from the SR during excitation-contraction and suppresses uncontrolled calcium release by directly acting on the RyR complex to limit its activation. This study examines whether Dantrolene can reduce the disease phenotype in the mdx mouse model of muscular dystrophy. We treated mdx mice (4 weeks old) with daily intraperitoneal injections of 40mg/kg of Dantrolene for 6 weeks and measured functional (grip strength, in vitro force contractions), behavioral (open field digiscan), imagining (optical imaging for inflammation), histological (H&E), and molecular (protein and RNA) endpoints in a blinded fashion. We found that treatment with Dantrolene resulted in decreased grip strength and open field behavioral activity in mdx mice. There was no significant difference in inflammation either by optical imaging analysis of cathepsin activity or histological (H&E) analysis. In vitro force contraction measures showed no changes in EDL muscle-specific force, lengthening-contraction force deficit, or fatigue resistance. We found Dantrolene treatment significantly reduces serum CK levels. Further, Dantrolene-treated mice showed decreased SERCA1 but not RyR1 expression in skeletal muscle. These results suggest that Dantrolene treatment alone has no significant beneficial effects at the tested doses in young mdx mice. PMID:24270550

  20. Antennal phenotype of Mexican haplogroups of the Triatoma dimidiata complex, vectors of Chagas disease.

    PubMed

    May-Concha, Irving; Guerenstein, Pablo G; Ramsey, Janine M; Rojas, Julio C; Catalá, Silvia

    2016-06-01

    Triatoma dimidiata (Latreille) is a species complex that spans North, Central, and South America and which is a key vector of all known discrete typing units (DTU) of Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiologic agent of Chagas disease. Morphological and genetic studies indicate that T. dimidiata is a species complex with three principal haplogroups (hg) in Mexico. Different markers and traits are still inconclusive regarding if other morphological differentiation may indicate probable behavioral and vectorial divergences within this complex. In this paper we compared the antennae of three Mexican haplogroups (previously verified by molecular markers ND4 and ITS-2) and discussed possible relationships with their capacity to disperse and colonized new habitats. The abundance of each type of sensillum (bristles, basiconics, thick- and thin-walled trichoids) on the antennae of the three haplogroups, were measured under light microscopy and compared using Kruskal-Wallis non-parametric and multivariate non-parametric analyses. Discriminant analyses indicate significant differences among the antennal phenotype of haplogroups either for adults and some nymphal stages, indicating consistency of the character to analyze intraspecific variability within the complex. The present study shows that the adult antennal pedicel of the T. dimidiata complex have abundant chemosensory sensilla, according with good capacity for dispersal and invasion of different habitats also related to their high capacity to adapt to conserved as well as modified habitats. However, the numerical differences among the haplogroups are suggesting variations in that capacity. The results here presented support the evidence of T. dimidiata as a species complex but show females and males in a different way. Given the close link between the bug's sensory system and its habitat and host-seeking behavior, AP characterization could be useful to complement genetic, neurological and ethological studies of the closely

  1. Phenotypic characterization of recessive gene knockout rat models of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Dave, Kuldip D; De Silva, Shehan; Sheth, Niketa P; Ramboz, Sylvie; Beck, Melissa J; Quang, Changyu; Switzer, Robert C; Ahmad, Syed O; Sunkin, Susan M; Walker, Dan; Cui, Xiaoxia; Fisher, Daniel A; McCoy, Aaron M; Gamber, Kevin; Ding, Xiaodong; Goldberg, Matthew S; Benkovic, Stanley A; Haupt, Meredith; Baptista, Marco A S; Fiske, Brian K; Sherer, Todd B; Frasier, Mark A

    2014-10-01

    Recessively inherited loss-of-function mutations in the PTEN-induced putative kinase 1(Pink1), DJ-1 (Park7) and Parkin (Park2) genes are linked to familial cases of early-onset Parkinson's disease (PD). As part of its strategy to provide more tools for the research community, The Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson's Research (MJFF) funded the generation of novel rat models with targeted disruption ofPink1, DJ-1 or Parkin genes and determined if the loss of these proteins would result in a progressive PD-like phenotype. Pathological, neurochemical and behavioral outcome measures were collected at 4, 6 and 8months of age in homozygous KO rats and compared to wild-type (WT) rats. Both Pink1 and DJ-1 KO rats showed progressive nigral neurodegeneration with about 50% dopaminergic cell loss observed at 8 months of age. ThePink1 KO and DJ-1 KO rats also showed a two to three fold increase in striatal dopamine and serotonin content at 8 months of age. Both Pink1 KO and DJ-1 KO rats exhibited significant motor deficits starting at 4months of age. However, Parkin KO rats displayed normal behaviors with no neurochemical or pathological changes. These results demonstrate that inactivation of the Pink1 or DJ-1 genes in the rat produces progressive neurodegeneration and early behavioral deficits, suggesting that these recessive genes may be essential for the survival of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra (SN). These MJFF-generated novel rat models will assist the research community to elucidate the mechanisms by which these recessive genes produce PD pathology and potentially aid in therapeutic development. PMID:24969022

  2. Proximal correlates of metabolic phenotypes during ‘at-risk' and ‘case' stages of the metabolic disease continuum

    PubMed Central

    Haren, M T; Misan, G; Grant, J F; Buckley, J D; Howe, P R C; Taylor, A W; Newbury, J; McDermott, R A

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To examine the social and behavioural correlates of metabolic phenotypes during ‘at-risk' and ‘case' stages of the metabolic disease continuum. Design: Cross-sectional study of a random population sample. Participants: A total of 718 community-dwelling adults (57% female), aged 18–92 years from a regional South Australian city. Measurements: Total body fat and lean mass and abdominal fat mass were assessed by dual energy x-ray absorptiometry. Fasting venous blood was collected in the morning for assessment of glycated haemoglobin, plasma glucose, serum triglycerides, cholesterol lipoproteins and insulin. Seated blood pressure (BP) was measured. Physical activity and smoking, alcohol and diet (96-item food frequency), sleep duration and frequency of sleep disordered breathing (SDB) symptoms, and family history of cardiometabolic disease, education, lifetime occupation and household income were assessed by questionnaire. Current medications were determined by clinical inventory. Results: 36.5% were pharmacologically managed for a metabolic risk factor or had known diabetes (‘cases'), otherwise were classified as the ‘at-risk' population. In both ‘at-risk' and ‘cases', four major metabolic phenotypes were identified using principal components analysis that explained over 77% of the metabolic variance between people: fat mass/insulinemia (FMI); BP; lipidaemia/lean mass (LLM) and glycaemia (GLY). The BP phenotype was uncorrelated with other phenotypes in ‘cases', whereas all phenotypes were inter-correlated in the ‘at-risk'. Over and above other socioeconomic and behavioural factors, medications were the dominant correlates of all phenotypes in ‘cases' and SDB symptom frequency was most strongly associated with FMI, LLM and GLY phenotypes in the ‘at-risk'. Conclusion: Previous research has shown FMI, LLM and GLY phenotypes to be most strongly predictive of diabetes development. Reducing SDB symptom frequency and optimising the duration

  3. MicroRNA-378-mediated suppression of Runx1 alleviates the aggressive phenotype of triple negative MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Browne, Gillian; Dragon, Julie A.; Hong, Deli; Messier, Terri L.; Gordon, Jonathan A. R.; Farina, Nicholas H.; Boyd, Joseph R.; VanOudenhove, Jennifer J.; Perez, Andrew W.; Zaidi, Sayyed K.; Stein, Janet L.; Stein, Gary S.; Lian, Jane B.

    2016-01-01

    The Runx1 transcription factor, known for its essential role normal hematopoiesis, was reported in limited studies to be mutated or associated with human breast tumor tissues. Runx 1 increases concomitant with disease progression in the MMTV-PyMT transgenic mouse model of breast cancer. Compelling questions relate to mechanisms that regulate Runx1 expression in breast cancer. Here, we tested the hypothesis that dysregulation of Runx1-targeting microRNAs (miRNAs) allows for pathologic increase of Runx1 during breast cancer progression. Microarray profiling of the MMTV-PyMT model revealed significant down-regulation of numerous miRNAs predicted to target Runx1. One of these, miR-378, was inversely correlated with Runx1 expression during breast cancer progression in mouse, and in human breast cancer cell lines MCF7 and triple negative MDA-MB-231 that represent early and late stage disease, respectively. MiR-378 is nearly absent in MDA-MB-231 cells. Luciferase reporter assays revealed that miR-378 binds the Runx1 3′UTR and inhibits Runx1 expression. Functionally, we demonstrated that ectopic expression of miR-378 in MDA-MB-231 cells inhibited Runx1 and suppressed migration and invasion; while inhibition of miR-378 in MCF7 cells increased Runx1 levels and cell migration. Depletion of Runx1 in late stage breast cancer cells resulted in increased expression of both the miR-378 host gene PPARGC1B and pre-miR-378, suggesting a feedback loop. Taken together, our study identifies a novel and clinically relevant mechanism for regulation of Runx1 in breast cancer that is mediated by a PPARGC1B-miR-378-Runx1 regulatory pathway. Our results highlight the translational potential of miRNA replacement therapy for inhibiting Runx1 in breast cancer. PMID:26749280

  4. Innate and adaptive cellular phenotypes contributing to pulmonary disease in mice after respiratory syncytial virus immunization and infection.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young-Tae; Kim, Ki-Hye; Hwang, Hye Suk; Lee, Youri; Kwon, Young-Man; Ko, Eun-Ju; Jung, Yu-Jin; Lee, Yu-Na; Kim, Min-Chul; Kang, Sang-Moo

    2015-11-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the major leading cause of infantile viral bronchiolitis. However, cellular phenotypes contributing to the RSV protection and vaccine-enhanced disease remain largely unknown. Upon RSV challenge, we analyzed phenotypes and cellularity in the lung of mice that were naïve, immunized with formalin inactivated RSV (FI-RSV), or re-infected with RSV. In comparison with naïve and live RSV re-infected mice, the high levels of eosinophils, neutrophils, plasmacytoid and CD11b(+) dendritic cells, and IL-4(+) CD4(+) T cells were found to be contributing to pulmonary inflammation in FI-RSV immune mice despite lung viral clearance. Alveolar macrophages appeared to play differential roles in protection and inflammation upon RSV infection of different RSV immune mice. These results suggest that multiple innate and adaptive immune components differentially contribute to RSV disease and inflammation. PMID:26196232

  5. Phenotypic expression in von Hippel-Lindau disease: correlations with germline VHL gene mutations.

    PubMed Central

    Maher, E R; Webster, A R; Richards, F M; Green, J S; Crossey, P A; Payne, S J; Moore, A T

    1996-01-01

    Von Hippel-Lindau disease is an autosomal dominantly inherited familial cancer syndrome predisposing to retinal and central nervous system haemangioblastomas, renal cell carcinoma, and phaeochromocytoma. VHL disease shows variable expression and interfamilial differences in predisposition to phaeochromocytoma. In a previous study of 65 VHL kindreds with defined VHL mutations we detected significant differences between VHL families with and without phaeochromocytoma such that missense mutations were more common and large deletions or protein truncating mutations less frequent in phaeochromocytoma positive families. To investigate the significance and cause of this association further, we studied 138 VHL kindreds for germline mutations and calculated the age related tumour risks for different classes of VHL gene mutations. Using SSCP, heteroduplex and Southern analysis we identified a germline VHL gene mutation in 101 families (73%). Direct sequencing of the VHL coding region further increased the mutation detection rate to 81%. In addition to precise presymptomatic diagnosis, identification of a VHL gene mutation can provide an indication of the likely phenotype. We found that large deletions and mutations predicted to cause a truncated protein were associated with a lower risk of phaeochromocytoma (6% and 9% at 30 and 50 years, respectively) than missense mutations (40% and 59%, respectively) and that missense mutations at codon 167 were associated with a high risk of phaeochromocytoma (53% and 82% at ages 30 and 50 years). Cumulative probabilities of renal cell carcinoma did not differ between the two groups (deletion/ truncation mutations: 8% and 60%, and missense mutations: 10% and 64% at ages 30 and 50 years, respectively). Age related risks for haemangioblastoma were similar in the two mutation groups, with the age related risks of cerebellar haemangioblastoma slightly less (35% and 64% v 38% and 75% at ages 30 and 50 years) and retinal haemangioblastoma

  6. Brugada Syndrome and Early Repolarisation: Distinct Clinical Entities or Different Phenotypes of the Same Genetic Disease?

    PubMed Central

    Caputo, Maria Luce; Regoli, François; Moccetti, Tiziano; Brugada, Pedro; Auricchio, Angelo

    2016-01-01

    Brugada and early repolarisation (ER) syndromes are currently considered two distinct inherited electrical disorders with overlapping clinical and electrocardiographic features. A considerable number of patients diagnosed with ER syndrome have a genetic mutation related to Brugada syndrome (BrS). Due to the high variable phenotypic manifestation, patients with BrS may present with inferolateral repolarisation abnormalities only, resembling the ER pattern. Moreover, the complex genotype–phenotype interaction in BrS can lead to the occurrence of mixed phenotypes with ER syndrome. The first part of this review focuses on specific clinical and electrocardiographic features of BrS and ER syndrome, highlighting the similarity shared by the two primary electrical disorders. The genetic background, with emphasis on the complexity of genotype–phenotype interaction, is explored in the second part of this review.

  7. Is there a common pathogenesis in aggressive periodontitis & ankylosing spondylitis in HLA-B27 patient?

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Neeraj; Agarwal, Kavita; Varshney, Atul; Agrawal, Navneet; Dubey, Ashutosh

    2016-05-01

    HLA-B27 is having strong association to ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and other inflammatory diseases collectively known as seronegative spondyloarthropathy. In literature, although the evidence for association between AS and periodontitis as well as AS and HLA-B27 are there but the association of aggressive periodontitis in HLA-B27 positive patient with AS are not there. We hypothesize that there may be a common pathogenesis in aggressive periodontitis and ankylosing spondylitis in HLA-B27 patient. A 27-years-old female presented with the features of generalized aggressive periodontitis and difficulty in walking. On complete medical examination, ankylosing spondylitis was diagnosed with further positive HLA-B27 phenotype and negative rheumatic factor. This report may open up a new link to explore in the pathogenesis of aggressive periodontitis. PMID:27063088

  8. Alcohol Increases Liver Progenitor Populations and Induces Disease Phenotypes in Human IPSC-Derived Mature Stage Hepatic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Lipeng; Deshmukh, Abhijeet; Prasad, Neha; Jang, Yoon-Young

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol consumption has long been a global problem affecting human health, and has been found to influence both fetal and adult liver functions. However, how alcohol affects human liver development and liver progenitor cells remains largely unknown. Here, we used human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) as a model to examine the effects of alcohol, on multi-stage hepatic cells including hepatic progenitors, early and mature hepatocyte-like cells derived from human iPSCs. While alcohol has little effect on endoderm development from iPSCs, it reduces formation of hepatic progenitor cells during early hepatic specification. The proliferative activities of early and mature hepatocyte-like cells are significantly decreased after alcohol exposure. Importantly, at a mature stage of hepatocyte-like cells, alcohol treatment increases two liver progenitor subsets, causes oxidative mitochondrial injury and results in liver disease phenotypes (i.e., steatosis and hepatocellular carcinoma associated markers) in a dose dependent manner. Some of the phenotypes were significantly improved by antioxidant treatment. This report suggests that fetal alcohol exposure may impair generation of hepatic progenitors at early stage of hepatic specification and decrease proliferation of fetal hepatocytes; meanwhile alcohol injury in post-natal or mature stage human liver may contribute to disease phenotypes. This human iPSC model of alcohol-induced liver injury can be highly valuable for investigating alcoholic injury in the fetus as well as understanding the pathogenesis and ultimately developing effective treatment for alcoholic liver disease in adults. PMID:27570479

  9. Relationship of disease-associated gene expression to cardiac phenotype is buffered by genetic diversity and chromatin regulation.

    PubMed

    Karbassi, Elaheh; Monte, Emma; Chapski, Douglas J; Lopez, Rachel; Rosa Garrido, Manuel; Kim, Joseph; Wisniewski, Nicholas; Rau, Christoph D; Wang, Jessica J; Weiss, James N; Wang, Yibin; Lusis, Aldons J; Vondriska, Thomas M

    2016-08-01

    Expression of a cohort of disease-associated genes, some of which are active in fetal myocardium, is considered a hallmark of transcriptional change in cardiac hypertrophy models. How this transcriptome remodeling is affected by the common genetic variation present in populations is unknown. We examined the role of genetics, as well as contributions of chromatin proteins, to regulate cardiac gene expression and heart failure susceptibility. We examined gene expression in 84 genetically distinct inbred strains of control and isoproterenol-treated mice, which exhibited varying degrees of disease. Unexpectedly, fetal gene expression was not correlated with hypertrophic phenotypes. Unbiased modeling identified 74 predictors of heart mass after isoproterenol-induced stress, but these predictors did not enrich for any cardiac pathways. However, expanded analysis of fetal genes and chromatin remodelers as groups correlated significantly with individual systemic phenotypes. Yet, cardiac transcription factors and genes shown by gain-/loss-of-function studies to contribute to hypertrophic signaling did not correlate with cardiac mass or function in disease. Because the relationship between gene expression and phenotype was strain specific, we examined genetic contribution to expression. Strikingly, strains with similar transcriptomes in the basal heart did not cluster together in the isoproterenol state, providing comprehensive evidence that there are different genetic contributors to physiological and pathological gene expression. Furthermore, the divergence in transcriptome similarity versus genetic similarity between strains is organ specific and genome-wide, suggesting chromatin is a critical buffer between genetics and gene expression. PMID:27287924

  10. Proteomics Analysis of Amyloid and Nonamyloid Prion Disease Phenotypes Reveals Both Common and Divergent Mechanisms of Neuropathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Prion diseases are a heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders affecting various mammals including humans. Prion diseases are characterized by a misfolding of the host-encoded prion protein (PrPC) into a pathological isoform termed PrPSc. In wild-type mice, PrPC is attached to the plasma membrane by a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor and PrPSc typically accumulates in diffuse nonamyloid deposits with gray matter spongiosis. By contrast, when mice lacking the GPI anchor are infected with the same prion inoculum, PrPSc accumulates in dense perivascular amyloid plaques with little or no gray matter spongiosis. In order to evaluate whether different host biochemical pathways were implicated in these two phenotypically distinct prion disease models, we utilized a proteomics approach. In both models, infected mice displayed evidence of a neuroinflammatory response and complement activation. Proteins involved in cell death and calcium homeostasis were also identified in both phenotypes. However, mitochondrial pathways of apoptosis were implicated only in the nonamyloid form, whereas metal binding and synaptic vesicle transport were more disrupted in the amyloid phenotype. Thus, following infection with a single prion strain, PrPC anchoring to the plasma membrane correlated not only with the type of PrPSc deposition but also with unique biochemical pathways associated with pathogenesis. PMID:25140793

  11. Alcohol Increases Liver Progenitor Populations and Induces Disease Phenotypes in Human IPSC-Derived Mature Stage Hepatic Cells.

    PubMed

    Tian, Lipeng; Deshmukh, Abhijeet; Prasad, Neha; Jang, Yoon-Young

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol consumption has long been a global problem affecting human health, and has been found to influence both fetal and adult liver functions. However, how alcohol affects human liver development and liver progenitor cells remains largely unknown. Here, we used human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) as a model to examine the effects of alcohol, on multi-stage hepatic cells including hepatic progenitors, early and mature hepatocyte-like cells derived from human iPSCs. While alcohol has little effect on endoderm development from iPSCs, it reduces formation of hepatic progenitor cells during early hepatic specification. The proliferative activities of early and mature hepatocyte-like cells are significantly decreased after alcohol exposure. Importantly, at a mature stage of hepatocyte-like cells, alcohol treatment increases two liver progenitor subsets, causes oxidative mitochondrial injury and results in liver disease phenotypes (i.e., steatosis and hepatocellular carcinoma associated markers) in a dose dependent manner. Some of the phenotypes were significantly improved by antioxidant treatment. This report suggests that fetal alcohol exposure may impair generation of hepatic progenitors at early stage of hepatic specification and decrease proliferation of fetal hepatocytes; meanwhile alcohol injury in post-natal or mature stage human liver may contribute to disease phenotypes. This human iPSC model of alcohol-induced liver injury can be highly valuable for investigating alcoholic injury in the fetus as well as understanding the pathogenesis and ultimately developing effective treatment for alcoholic liver disease in adults. PMID:27570479

  12. Microbiology of aggressive periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Könönen, Eija; Müller, Hans-Peter

    2014-06-01

    For decades, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans has been considered the most likely etiologic agent in aggressive periodontitis. Implementation of DNA-based microbiologic methodologies has considerably improved our understanding of the composition of subgingival biofilms, and advanced open-ended molecular techniques even allow for genome mapping of the whole bacterial spectrum in a sample and characterization of both the cultivable and not-yet-cultivable microbiota associated with periodontal health and disease. Currently, A. actinomycetemcomitans is regarded as a minor component of the resident oral microbiota and as an opportunistic pathogen in some individuals. Its specific JP2 clone, however, shows properties of a true exogenous pathogen and has an important role in the development of aggressive periodontitis in certain populations. Still, limited data exist on the impact of other microbes specifically in aggressive periodontitis. Despite a wide heterogeneity of bacteria, especially in subgingival samples collected from patients, bacteria of the red complex in particular, and those of the orange complex, are considered as potential pathogens in generalized aggressive periodontitis. These types of bacterial findings closely resemble those found for chronic periodontitis, representing a mixed polymicrobial infection without a clear association with any specific microorganism. In aggressive periodontitis, the role of novel and not-yet-cultivable bacteria has not yet been elucidated. There are geographic and ethnic differences in the carriage of periodontitis-associated microorganisms, and they need to be taken into account when comparing study reports on periodontal microbiology in different study populations. In the present review, we provide an overview on the colonization of potential periodontal pathogens in childhood and adolescence, and on specific microorganisms that have been suspected for their role in the initiation and progression of aggressive

  13. Distinct disease phenotypes linked to different combinations of GAA mutations in a large late-onset GSDII sibship

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Glycogenosis type II (GSDII or Pompe disease) is an autosomal recessive disease, often characterized by a progressive accumulation of glycogen within lysosomes caused by a deficiency of α-1,4-glucosidase (GAA; acid maltase), a key enzyme of the glycogen degradation pathway. To date, more than 326 different mutations in the GAA gene have been identified in patients with GSDII but the course of the disease is difficult to be predicted on the basis of molecular genetic changes. Studies on large informative families are advisable to better define how genetics and non genetics factors like exercise and diet may influence the clinical phenotype. Methods and results In this study, we report on clinical, instrumental, and pathological features as well as on molecular analysis of a family with 10 out of 13 siblings affected by late-onset Pompe disease. Three mutations segregated in the family, two of which are novel mutations. Siblings showing a more severe phenotype were compound heterozygous for c.118C > T [p.R40X] and c.2647-7G > A [p.N882fs] on GAA, whereas, two patients showing a mild phenotype were compound heterozygous c.2647-7G > A [p.N882fs] and c.2276G > C [p.G759A] mutations. Quantitative expression analysis showed, in the patients carrying p.R40X/ p.N882fs, a significant (p 0.01) correlation between the levels of expression of the mutated allele and the age at onset of the disease. Conclusions As far as we know, this is the largest informative family with late-onset Pompe disease described in the literature showing a peculiar complex set of mutations of GAA gene that may partially elucidate the clinical heterogeneity of this family. PMID:24107549

  14. HGF/Met and FOXM1 Form a Positive Feedback Loop and Render Pancreatic Cancer Cells Resistance to Met Inhibition and Aggressive Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Jiujie; Xia, Tian; Xie, Dacheng; Gao, Yong; Jia, Zhiliang; Wei, Daoyan; Wang, Liang; Huang, Suyun; Quan, Ming; Xie, Keping

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF)/Met signaling plays critical roles in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) development and progression and is considered a potential therapeutic target for this disease. However, the mechanism of aberrant activation of HGF/Met signaling and resistance to Met inhibition in PDA remains unclear. Experimental Design The mechanistic role of cross-talk between Forkhead box M1 (FOXM1) and HGF/Met signaling in promotion of PDA growth and resistance to Met inhibition was examined using cell culture, molecular biology and mouse models; and the relevance of our experimental and mechanistic findings were validated using human PDA tissues. Results Met was markedly overexpressed in both PDA cell lines and pancreatic tumor specimens, and the expression of Met correlated directly with that of FOXM1 in human tumor specimens. Mechanistically, FOXM1 bound to the promoter region of the Met gene and transcriptionally increased the expression of Met. Increased expression of FOXM1 enhanced the activation of HGF/Met signaling and its downstream pathways, including RAS/extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2, phosphoinositide 3-kinase/AKT, and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3. Furthermore, activation of HGF/Met signaling increased the expression and transcriptional activity of FOXM1, and the cross-talk between FOXM1 and HGF/Met signaling promoted PDA growth and resistance to Met inhibition. Conclusions Collectively, our findings identified a positive feedback loop formed by FOXM1 and HGF/Met and revealed that this loop is a potentially effective therapeutic target for PDA. PMID:26876216

  15. Loss of Secreted Frizzled-Related Protein 4 Correlates with an Aggressive Phenotype and Predicts Poor Outcome in Ovarian Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Nixdorf, Sheri; Ford, Caroline E.; Olivier, Jake; Caduff, Rosmarie; Scurry, James P.; Guertler, Rea; Hornung, Daniela; Mueller, Renato; Fink, Daniel A.; Hacker, Neville F.; Heinzelmann-Schwarz, Viola A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Activation of the Wnt signaling pathway is implicated in aberrant cellular proliferation in various cancers. In 40% of endometrioid ovarian cancers, constitutive activation of the pathway is due to oncogenic mutations in β-catenin or other inactivating mutations in key negative regulators. Secreted frizzled-related protein 4 (SFRP4) has been proposed to have inhibitory activity through binding and sequestering Wnt ligands. Methodology/Principal Findings We performed RT-qPCR and Western-blotting in primary cultures and ovarian cell lines for SFRP4 and its key downstream regulators activated β-catenin, β-catenin and GSK3β. SFRP4 was then examined by immunohistochemistry in a cohort of 721 patients and due to its proposed secretory function, in plasma, presenting the first ELISA for SFRP4. SFRP4 was most highly expressed in tubal epithelium and decreased with malignant transformation, both on RNA and on protein level, where it was even more profound in the membrane fraction (p<0.0001). SFRP4 was expressed on the protein level in all histotypes of ovarian cancer but was decreased from borderline tumors to cancers and with loss of cellular differentiation. Loss of membrane expression was an independent predictor of poor survival in ovarian cancer patients (p = 0.02 unadjusted; p = 0.089 adjusted), which increased the risk of a patient to die from this disease by the factor 1.8. Conclusions/Significance Our results support a role for SFRP4 as a tumor suppressor gene in ovarian cancers via inhibition of the Wnt signaling pathway. This has not only predictive implications but could also facilitate a therapeutic role using epigenetic targets. PMID:22363760

  16. Transgenic Fatal Familial Insomnia Mice Indicate Prion Infectivity-Independent Mechanisms of Pathogenesis and Phenotypic Expression of Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bouybayoune, Ihssane; Mantovani, Susanna; Del Gallo, Federico; Bertani, Ilaria; Restelli, Elena; Comerio, Liliana; Tapella, Laura; Baracchi, Francesca; Fernández-Borges, Natalia; Mangieri, Michela; Bisighini, Cinzia; Beznoussenko, Galina V.; Paladini, Alessandra; Balducci, Claudia; Micotti, Edoardo; Forloni, Gianluigi; Castilla, Joaquín; Fiordaliso, Fabio; Tagliavini, Fabrizio; Imeri, Luca; Chiesa, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Fatal familial insomnia (FFI) and a genetic form of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD178) are clinically different prion disorders linked to the D178N prion protein (PrP) mutation. The disease phenotype is determined by the 129 M/V polymorphism on the mutant allele, which is thought to influence D178N PrP misfolding, leading to the formation of distinctive prion strains with specific neurotoxic properties. However, the mechanism by which misfolded variants of mutant PrP cause different diseases is not known. We generated transgenic (Tg) mice expressing the mouse PrP homolog of the FFI mutation. These mice synthesize a misfolded form of mutant PrP in their brains and develop a neurological illness with severe sleep disruption, highly reminiscent of FFI and different from that of analogously generated Tg(CJD) mice modeling CJD178. No prion infectivity was detectable in Tg(FFI) and Tg(CJD) brains by bioassay or protein misfolding cyclic amplification, indicating that mutant PrP has disease-encoding properties that do not depend on its ability to propagate its misfolded conformation. Tg(FFI) and Tg(CJD) neurons have different patterns of intracellular PrP accumulation associated with distinct morphological abnormalities of the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi, suggesting that mutation-specific alterations of secretory transport may contribute to the disease phenotype. PMID:25880443

  17. Phenotypic profile of early-onset familial Alzheimer's disease caused by presenilin-1 E280A mutation.

    PubMed

    Sepulveda-Falla, Diego; Glatzel, Markus; Lopera, Francisco

    2012-01-01

    Presenilin 1 (PS1) mutations are the most common cause of early-onset familial Alzheimer's disease (EOFAD). They show a common phenotypic profile characterized by early age of onset, severe dementia and distinct neurodegeneration. The largest population of EOFAD carries the E280A mutation in PS1 and resides in Antioquia, Colombia, currently comprising around 5,000 individuals. Carriers start showing memory impairment in the third decade of life, followed by progressive impairment of language and other cognitive processes. They reach mild cognitive impairment around 45 and dementia around 50 years of age. There is some phenotypic variability among the carriers of this single PS1 mutation. Some patients present with epilepsy, verbal impairment, and cerebellar ataxia. Neuropathologically, PS1 E280A cases show pronounced brain atrophy, severe amyloid-β pathology, distinct hyperphosphorylated tau-related pathology, and cerebellar damage. The earliest event identified by functional magnetic imaging resonance is hyperactivation within the right anterior hippocampus around 33 years of age. This well-studied population with a clear pre-clinical profile and wide phenotypic variability in age of onset and clinical presentation is ideally suited for clinical trials and to study molecular mechanisms of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:22766738

  18. Phenotypic reversal of the btn1 defects in yeast by chloroquine: a yeast model for Batten disease.

    PubMed

    Pearce, D A; Carr, C J; Das, B; Sherman, F

    1999-09-28

    BTN1 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes an ortholog of CLN3, the human Batten disease gene. We have reported previously that deletion of BTN1, btn1-Delta, resulted in a pH-dependent resistance to D-(-)-threo-2-amino-1-[p-nitrophenyl]-1,3-propanediol (ANP). This phenotype was caused by btn1-Delta strains having an elevated ability to acidify growth medium through an elevated activity of the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase, resulting from a decreased vacuolar pH during early growth. We have determined that growing btn1-Delta strains in the presence of chloroquine reverses the resistance to ANP, decreases the rate of medium acidification, decreases the activity of plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase, and elevates vacuolar pH. However, an additional effect of this phenotypic reversal is that activity of plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase is decreased further and vacuolar pH is increased further as btn1-Delta strains continue to grow. This phenotypic reversal of btn1-Delta can be considered for developing a therapy for Batten disease. PMID:10500178

  19. A Phenotyping Regimen for Genetically Modified Mice Used to Study Genes Implicated in Human Diseases of Aging.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Victoria L; Thompson, Brian S; Cherry, Catherine; Wang, Shao-Bin; Chen, Bo; Hoh, Josephine

    2016-01-01

    Age-related diseases are becoming increasingly prevalent and the burden continues to grow as our population ages. Effective treatments are necessary to lessen the impact of debilitating conditions but remain elusive in many cases. Only by understanding the causes and pathology of diseases associated with aging, can scientists begin to identify potential therapeutic targets and develop strategies for intervention. The most common age-related conditions are neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's disease and blindness. Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in the elderly. Genome wide association studies have previously identified loci that are associated with increased susceptibility to this disease and identified two regions of interest: complement factor H (CFH) and the 10q26 locus, where the age-related maculopathy susceptibility 2 (ARMS2) and high-temperature requirement factor A1 (HtrA1) genes are located. CFH acts as a negative regulator of the alternative pathway (AP) of the complement system while HtrA1 is an extracellular serine protease. ARMS2 is located upstream of HtrA1 in the primate genome, although the gene is absent in mice. To study the effects of these genes, humanized knock-in mouse lines of Cfh and ARMS2, knockouts of Cfh, HtrA1, HtrA2, HtrA3 and HtrA4 as well as a conditional neural deletion of HtrA2 were generated. Of all the genetically engineered mice produced only mice lacking HtrA2, either systemically or in neural tissues, displayed clear phenotypes. In order to examine these mice thoroughly and systematically, an initial phenotyping schedule was established, consisting of a series of tests related to two main diseases of interest: AMD and Parkinson's. Genetically modified mice can be subjected to appropriate experiments to identify phenotypes that may be related to the associated diseases in humans. A phenotyping regimen with a mitochondrial focus is presented here alongside representative results

  20. Junctophilin 3 (JPH3) expansion mutations causing Huntington disease like 2 (HDL2) are common in South African patients with African ancestry and a Huntington disease phenotype.

    PubMed

    Krause, Amanda; Mitchell, Claire; Essop, Fahmida; Tager, Susan; Temlett, James; Stevanin, Giovanni; Ross, Christopher; Rudnicki, Dobrila; Margolis, Russell

    2015-10-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is a progressive autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder, characterized by abnormal movements, cognitive decline, and psychiatric symptoms, caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the huntingtin (HTT) gene on chromosome 4p. A CAG/CTG repeat expansion in the junctophilin-3 (JPH3) gene on chromosome 16q24.2 causes a Huntington disease-like phenotype (HDL2). All patients to date with HDL2 have some African ancestry. The present study aimed to characterize the genetic basis of the Huntington disease phenotype in South Africans and to investigate the possible origin of the JPH3 mutation. In a sample of unrelated South African individuals referred for diagnostic HD testing, 62% (106/171) of white patients compared to only 36% (47/130) of black patients had an expansion in HTT. However, 15% (20/130) of black South African patients and no white patients (0/171) had an expansion in JPH3, confirming the diagnosis of Huntington disease like 2 (HDL2). Individuals with HDL2 share many clinical features with individuals with HD and are clinically indistinguishable in many cases, although the average age of onset and diagnosis in HDL2 is 5 years later than HD and individual clinical features may be more prominent. HDL2 mutations contribute significantly to the HD phenotype in South Africans with African ancestry. JPH3 haplotype studies in 31 families, mainly from South Africa and North America, provide evidence for a founder mutation and support a common African origin for all HDL2 patients. Molecular testing in individuals with an HD phenotype and African ancestry should include testing routinely for JPH3 mutations. PMID:26079385

  1. The vascular phenotype in Pseudoxanthoma elasticum and related disorders: contribution of a genetic disease to the understanding of vascular calcification

    PubMed Central

    Lefthériotis, Georges; Omarjee, Loukman; Saux, Olivier Le; Henrion, Daniel; Abraham, Pierre; Prunier, Fabrice; Willoteaux, Serge; Martin, Ludovic

    2013-01-01

    Vascular calcification is a complex and dynamic process occurring in various physiological conditions such as aging and exercise or in acquired metabolic disorders like diabetes or chronic renal insufficiency. Arterial calcifications are also observed in several genetic diseases revealing the important role of unbalanced or defective anti- or pro-calcifying factors. Pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE) is an inherited disease (OMIM 264800) characterized by elastic fiber fragmentation and calcification in various soft conjunctive tissues including the skin, eyes, and arterial media. The PXE disease results from mutations in the ABCC6 gene, encoding an ATP-binding cassette transporter primarily expressed in the liver, kidneys suggesting that it is a prototypic metabolic soft-tissue calcifying disease of genetic origin. The clinical expression of the PXE arterial disease is characterized by an increased risk for coronary (myocardial infarction), cerebral (aneurysm and stroke), and lower limb peripheral artery disease. However, the structural and functional changes in the arterial wall induced by PXE are still unexplained. The use of a recombinant mouse model inactivated for the Abcc6 gene is an important tool for the understanding of the PXE pathophysiology although the vascular impact in this model remains limited to date. Overlapping of the PXE phenotype with other inherited calcifying diseases could bring important informations to our comprehension of the PXE disease. PMID:23408347

  2. LORD: a phenotype-genotype semantically integrated biomedical data tool to support rare disease diagnosis coding in health information systems

    PubMed Central

    Choquet, Remy; Maaroufi, Meriem; Fonjallaz, Yannick; de Carrara, Albane; Vandenbussche, Pierre-Yves; Dhombres, Ferdinand; Landais, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Characterizing a rare disease diagnosis for a given patient is often made through expert’s networks. It is a complex task that could evolve over time depending on the natural history of the disease and the evolution of the scientific knowledge. Most rare diseases have genetic causes and recent improvements of sequencing techniques contribute to the discovery of many new diseases every year. Diagnosis coding in the rare disease field requires data from multiple knowledge bases to be aggregated in order to offer the clinician a global information space from possible diagnosis to clinical signs (phenotypes) and known genetic mutations (genotype). Nowadays, the major barrier to the coding activity is the lack of consolidation of such information scattered in different thesaurus such as Orphanet, OMIM or HPO. The Linking Open data for Rare Diseases (LORD) web portal we developed stands as the first attempt to fill this gap by offering an integrated view of 8,400 rare diseases linked to more than 14,500 signs and 3,270 genes. The application provides a browsing feature to navigate through the relationships between diseases, signs and genes, and some Application Programming Interfaces to help its integration in health information systems in routine. PMID:26958175

  3. LORD: a phenotype-genotype semantically integrated biomedical data tool to support rare disease diagnosis coding in health information systems.

    PubMed

    Choquet, Remy; Maaroufi, Meriem; Fonjallaz, Yannick; de Carrara, Albane; Vandenbussche, Pierre-Yves; Dhombres, Ferdinand; Landais, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Characterizing a rare disease diagnosis for a given patient is often made through expert's networks. It is a complex task that could evolve over time depending on the natural history of the disease and the evolution of the scientific knowledge. Most rare diseases have genetic causes and recent improvements of sequencing techniques contribute to the discovery of many new diseases every year. Diagnosis coding in the rare disease field requires data from multiple knowledge bases to be aggregated in order to offer the clinician a global information space from possible diagnosis to clinical signs (phenotypes) and known genetic mutations (genotype). Nowadays, the major barrier to the coding activity is the lack of consolidation of such information scattered in different thesaurus such as Orphanet, OMIM or HPO. The Linking Open data for Rare Diseases (LORD) web portal we developed stands as the first attempt to fill this gap by offering an integrated view of 8,400 rare diseases linked to more than 14,500 signs and 3,270 genes. The application provides a browsing feature to navigate through the relationships between diseases, signs and genes, and some Application Programming Interfaces to help its integration in health information systems in routine. PMID:26958175

  4. Altered Peripheral Blood Monocyte Phenotype and Function in Chronic Liver Disease: Implications for Hepatic Recruitment and Systemic Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Gadd, Victoria L.; Patel, Preya J.; Jose, Sara; Horsfall, Leigh

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Liver and systemic inflammatory factors influence monocyte phenotype and function, which has implications for hepatic recruitment and subsequent inflammatory and fibrogenic responses, as well as host defence. Methods Peripheral blood monocyte surface marker (CD14, CD16, CD163, CSF1R, CCR2, CCR4, CCR5, CXCR3, CXCR4, CX3CR1, HLA-DR, CD62L, SIGLEC-1) expression and capacity for phagocytosis, oxidative burst and LPS-stimulated TNF production were assessed in patients with hepatitis C (HCV) (n = 39) or non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) (n = 34) (classified as non-advanced disease, compensated cirrhosis and decompensated cirrhosis) and healthy controls (n = 11) by flow cytometry. Results The selected markers exhibited similar monocyte-subset-specific expression patterns between patients and controls. Monocyte phenotypic signatures differed between NAFLD and HCV patients, with an increased proportion of CD16+ non-classical monocytes in NAFLD, but increased expression of CXCR3 and CXCR4 in HCV. In both cohorts, monocyte CCR2 expression was reduced and CCR4 elevated over controls. CD62L expression was specifically elevated in patients with decompensated cirrhosis and positively correlated with the model-for-end-stage-liver-disease score. Functionally, monocytes from patients with decompensated cirrhosis had equal phagocytic capacity, but displayed features of dysfunction, characterised by lower HLA-DR expression and blunted oxidative responses. Lower monocyte TNF production in response to LPS stimulation correlated with time to death in 7 (46%) of the decompensated patients who died within 8 months of recruitment. Conclusions Chronic HCV and NAFLD differentially affect circulating monocyte phenotype, suggesting specific injury-induced signals may contribute to hepatic monocyte recruitment and systemic activation state. Monocyte function, however, was similarly impaired in patients with both HCV and NAFLD, particularly in advanced disease, which

  5. Cigarette Smoke Modulates Vascular Smooth Muscle Phenotype: Implications for Carotid and Cerebrovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jabbour, Pascal M.; Tjoumakaris, Stavropoula I.; Gonzalez, Fernando; Hasan, David M.; Rosenwasser, Robert H.; Owens, Gary K.; Koch, Walter J.; Dumont, Aaron S.

    2013-01-01

    Background The role of smooth muscle cell (SMC) phenotypic modulation in the cerebral circulation and pathogenesis of stroke has not been determined. Cigarette smoke is a major risk factor for atherosclerosis, but potential mechanisms are unclear, and its role in SMC phenotypic modulation has not been established. Methods and Results In cultured cerebral vascular SMCs, exposure to cigarette smoke extract (CSE) resulted in decreased promoter activity and mRNA expression of key SMC contractile genes (SM-α-actin, SM-22α, SM-MHC) and the transcription factor myocardin in a dose-dependent manner. CSE also induced pro-inflammatory/matrix remodeling genes (MCP-1, MMPs, TNF-α, IL-1β, NF-κB). CSE increased expression of KLF4, a known regulator of SMC differentiation, and siKLF4 inhibited CSE induced suppression of SMC contractile genes and myocardin and activation of inflammatory genes. These mechanisms were confirmed in vivo following exposure of rat carotid arteries to CSE. Chromatin immune-precipitation assays in vivo and in vitro demonstrated that CSE promotes epigenetic changes with binding of KLF4 to the promoter regions of myocardin and SMC marker genes and alterations in promoter acetylation and methylation. Conclusion CSE exposure results in phenotypic modulation of cerebral SMC through myocardin and KLF4 dependent mechanisms. These results provides a mechanism by which cigarette smoke induces a pro-inflammatory/matrix remodeling phenotype in SMC and an important pathway for cigarette smoke to contribute to atherosclerosis and stroke. PMID:23967268

  6. Phenotype-Genotype Correlation in Wilson Disease in a Large Lebanese Family: Association of c.2299insC with Hepatic and of p. Ala1003Thr with Neurologic Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Usta, Julnar; Wehbeh, Antonios; Rida, Khaled; El-Rifai, Omar; Estiphan, Theresa Alicia; Majarian, Tamar; Barada, Kassem

    2014-01-01

    Genotype phenotype correlations in Wilson disease (WD) are best established in homozygous patients or in compound heterozygous patients carrying the same set of mutations. We determined the clinical phenotype of patients with WD carrying the c.2298_2299insC in Exon 8 (c.2299insC) or the p. Ala1003Thr missense substitution in Exon 13 mutations in the homozygous or compound heterozygous state. We investigated 76 members of a single large Lebanese family. Their genotypes were determined, and clinical assessments were carried out for affected subjects. We also performed a literature search retrieving the phenotypes of patients carrying the same mutations of our patients in the homozygous or compound heterozygous state. There were 7 consanguineous marriages in this family and the prevalence of WD was 8.9% and of carriers of ATP7B mutation 44.7%. WD was confirmed in 9 out of 76 subjects. All 9 had the c.2299insC mutation, 5 homozygous and 4-compound heterozygous with p. Ala1003Thr. Six of our patients had hepatic, 2 had neurologic and 1 had asymptomatic phenotype. Based on our data and a literature review, clear phenotypes were reported for 38 patients worldwide carrying the c.2299insC mutation. About 53% of those have hepatic and 29% have neurologic phenotype. Furthermore, there were 10 compound heterozygous patients carrying the p. Ala1003Thr mutation. Among those, 80% having c.2299insC as the second mutation had hepatic phenotype, and all others had neurologic phenotype. We hereby report an association between the c.2299insC mutation and hepatic phenotype and between the p. Ala1003Thr mutation and neurologic phenotype. PMID:25390358

  7. Cleft Palate, Retrognathia and Congenital Heart Disease in Velo-Cardio-Facial Syndrome: A Phenotype Correlation Study

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Marcia A.; Miletta, Nathanial; Roe, Cheryl; Wang, Dongliang; Morrow, Bernice E.; Kates, Wendy R.; Higgins, Anne Marie; Shprintzen, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Velo-cardio-facial syndrome (VCFS) is caused by a microdeletion of approximately 40 genes from one copy of chromosome 22. Expression of the syndrome is a variable combination of over 190 phenotypic characteristics. As of yet, little is known about how these phenotypes correlate with one another or whether there are predictable patterns of expression. Two of the most common phenotypic categories, congenital heart disease and cleft palate, have been proposed to have a common genetic relationship to the deleted T-box 1 gene (TBX1). The purpose of this study is to determine if congenital heart disease and cleft palate are correlated in a large cohort of human subjects with VCFS. Methods This study is a retrospective chart review including 316 Caucasian non-Hispanic subjects with FISH or CGH microarray confirmed chromosome 22q11.2 deletions. All subjects were evaluated by the interdisciplinary team at the Velo-Cardio-Facial Syndrome International Center at Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, NY. Each combination of congenital heart disease, cleft palates, and retrognathia was analyzed by chi square or Fisher exact test. Results For all categories of congenital heart disease and cleft palate or retrognathia no significant associations were found, with the exception of submucous cleft palate and retrognathia (nominal p=0.0325) and occult submucous cleft palate and retrognathia (nominal p=0.000013). Conclusions Congenital heart disease and cleft palate do not appear to be correlated in human subjects with VCFS despite earlier suggestions from animal models. Possible explanations include modification of the effect of TBX1 by genes outside of the 22q11.2 region that may further influence the formation of the palate or heart, or the presence of epigenetic factors that may effect genes within the deleted region, modifying genes elsewhere, or polymorphisms on the normal copy of chromosome 22. Lastly, it is possible that TBX1 plays a role in palate formation in some

  8. The Role of Alcohol Consumption in the Aetiology of Different Cardiovascular Disease Phenotypes: a CALIBER Study

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-05-28

    Chronic Stable Angina; Unstable Angina; Coronary Heart Disease Not Otherwise Specified; Acute Myocardial Infarction; Heart Failure; Ventricular Arrhythmias; Cardiac Arrest; Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm; Peripheral Arterial Disease; Ischaemic Stroke; Subarachnoid Haemorrhagic Stroke; Intracerebral Haemorrhagic Stroke; Stroke Not Otherwise Specified; Sudden Cardiac Death; Unheralded Coronary Death; Mortality; Coronary Heart Disease (CHD); Cardiovascular Disease (CVD); Fatal Cardiovascular Disease (Fatal CVD); ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction (STEMI); Non-ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction (nSTEMI); Myocardial Infarction Not Otherwise Specified (MI NOS)

  9. GeneYenta: a phenotype-based rare disease case matching tool based on online dating algorithms for the acceleration of exome interpretation.

    PubMed

    Gottlieb, Michael M; Arenillas, David J; Maithripala, Savanie; Maurer, Zachary D; Tarailo Graovac, Maja; Armstrong, Linlea; Patel, Millan; van Karnebeek, Clara; Wasserman, Wyeth W

    2015-04-01

    Advances in next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies have helped reveal causal variants for genetic diseases. In order to establish causality, it is often necessary to compare genomes of unrelated individuals with similar disease phenotypes to identify common disrupted genes. When working with cases of rare genetic disorders, finding similar individuals can be extremely difficult. We introduce a web tool, GeneYenta, which facilitates the matchmaking process, allowing clinicians to coordinate detailed comparisons for phenotypically similar cases. Importantly, the system is focused on phenotype annotation, with explicit limitations on highly confidential data that create barriers to participation. The procedure for matching of patient phenotypes, inspired by online dating services, uses an ontology-based semantic case matching algorithm with attribute weighting. We evaluate the capacity of the system using a curated reference data set and 19 clinician entered cases comparing four matching algorithms. We find that the inclusion of clinician weights can augment phenotype matching. PMID:25703386

  10. Novel mutation in TSPAN12 leads to autosomal recessive inheritance of congenital vitreoretinal disease with intra-familial phenotypic variability.

    PubMed

    Gal, Moran; Levanon, Erez Y; Hujeirat, Yasir; Khayat, Morad; Pe'er, Jacob; Shalev, Stavit

    2014-12-01

    Developmental malformations of the vitreoretinal vasculature are a heterogeneous group of conditions with various modes of inheritance, and include familial exudative vitreoretinopathy (FEVR), persistent fetal vasculature (PFV), and Norrie disease. We investigated a large consanguineous kindred with multiple affected individuals exhibiting variable phenotypes of abnormal vitreoretinal vasculature, consistent with the three above-mentioned conditions and compatible with autosomal recessive inheritance. Exome sequencing identified a novel c.542G > T (p.C181F) apparently mutation in the TSPAN12 gene that segregated with the ocular disease in the family. The TSPAN12 gene was previously reported to cause dominant and recessive FEVR, but has not yet been associated with other vitreoretinal manifestations. The intra-familial clinical variability caused by a single mutation in the TSPAN12 gene underscores the complicated phenotype-genotype correlation of mutations in this gene, and suggests that there are additional genetic and environmental factors involved in the complex process of ocular vascularization during embryonic development. Our study supports considering PFV, FEVR, and Norrie disease a spectrum of disorders, with clinical and genetic overlap, caused by mutations in distinct genes acting in the Norrin/β-catenin signaling pathway. PMID:25250762

  11. Frailty phenotype and chronic kidney disease: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Musso, Carlos G; Jauregui, Jose R; Macías Núñez, Juan F

    2015-11-01

    Frailty is a construct originally coined by gerontologists to describe cumulative declines across multiple physiological systems that occur with aging and lead individuals to a state of diminished physiological reserve and increased vulnerability to stressors. Fried et al. provided a standardized definition for frailty, and they created the concept of frailty phenotype which incorporates disturbances across interrelated domains (shrinking, weakness, poor endurance and energy, slowness, and low physical activity level) to indentify old people who are at risk of disability, falls, institutionalization, hospitalization, and premature death. Some authors consider the presence of lean mass reduction (sarcopenia) as part of the frailty phenotype. The frailty status has been documented in 7 % of elderly population and 14 % of not requiring dialysis CKD adult patients. Sarcopenia increases progressively along with loss of renal function in CKD patients and is high in dialysis population. It has been documented that prevalence of frailty in hemodialysis adult patients is around 42 % (35 % in young and 50 % in elderly), having a 2.60-fold higher risk of mortality and 1.43-fold higher number of hospitalization, independent of age, comorbidity, and disability. The Clinical Frailty Scale is the simplest and clinically useful and validated tool for doing a frailty phenotype, while the diagnosis of sarcopenia is based on muscle mass assessment by body imaging techniques, bioimpedance analysis, and muscle strength evaluated with a handheld dynamometer. Frailty treatment can be based on different strategies, such as exercise, nutritional interventions, drugs, vitamins, and antioxidant agents. Finally, palliative care is a very important alternative for very frail and sick patients. In conclusion, since the diagnosis and treatment of frailty and sarcopenia is crucial in geriatrics and all CKD patients, it would be very important to incorporate these evaluations in pre

  12. What Can hiPSC-Cardiomyocytes Teach Us about Modeling Complex Human Disease Phenotypes?

    PubMed

    Broeckel, Ulrich

    2016-09-01

    Using induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes to predict patient-specific responses to drug treatments requires that they maintain inter-individual variability for RNA expression and recapitulate phenotypic responses in vitro. In this issue of Cell Stem Cell, Matsa et al. (2016) show that expression differences between hiPSC-cardiomyocytes provide a personalized drug testing platform to evaluate potential efficacy and cardiotoxicity. PMID:27588742

  13. Phenotypic Variation in Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease in Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Beekman, Emmylou; Mesters, Ilse; Spigt, Mark G.; van Eerd, Eva A. M.; Gosselink, Rik; de Bie, Rob A.; van Schayck, Onno C. P.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Despite the high number of inactive patients with COPD, not all inactive patients are referred to physical therapy, unlike recommendations of general practitioner (GP) guidelines. It is likely that GPs take other factors into account, determining a subpopulation that is treated by a physical therapist (PT). The aim of this study is to explore the phenotypic differences between inactive patients treated in GP practice and inactive patients treated in GP practice combined with PT. Additionally this study provides an overview of the phenotype of patients with COPD in PT practice. Methods. In a cross-sectional study, COPD patient characteristics were extracted from questionnaires. Differences regarding perceived health status, degree of airway obstruction, exacerbation frequency, and comorbidity were studied in a subgroup of 290 inactive patients and in all 438 patients. Results. Patients treated in GP practice combined with PT reported higher degree of airway obstruction, more exacerbations, more vascular comorbidity, and lower health status compared to patients who were not referred to and treated by a PT. Conclusion. Unequal patient phenotypes in different primary care settings have important clinical implications. It can be carefully concluded that other factors, besides the level of inactivity, play a role in referral to PT. PMID:27148553

  14. Phenotypic Variation in Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease in Primary Care.

    PubMed

    Beekman, Emmylou; Mesters, Ilse; Spigt, Mark G; van Eerd, Eva A M; Gosselink, Rik; de Bie, Rob A; van Schayck, Onno C P

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Despite the high number of inactive patients with COPD, not all inactive patients are referred to physical therapy, unlike recommendations of general practitioner (GP) guidelines. It is likely that GPs take other factors into account, determining a subpopulation that is treated by a physical therapist (PT). The aim of this study is to explore the phenotypic differences between inactive patients treated in GP practice and inactive patients treated in GP practice combined with PT. Additionally this study provides an overview of the phenotype of patients with COPD in PT practice. Methods. In a cross-sectional study, COPD patient characteristics were extracted from questionnaires. Differences regarding perceived health status, degree of airway obstruction, exacerbation frequency, and comorbidity were studied in a subgroup of 290 inactive patients and in all 438 patients. Results. Patients treated in GP practice combined with PT reported higher degree of airway obstruction, more exacerbations, more vascular comorbidity, and lower health status compared to patients who were not referred to and treated by a PT. Conclusion. Unequal patient phenotypes in different primary care settings have important clinical implications. It can be carefully concluded that other factors, besides the level of inactivity, play a role in referral to PT. PMID:27148553

  15. The variable in common variable immunodeficiency: a disease of complex phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Jolles, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is the most common and clinically most important severe primary antibody deficiency and is characterized by low levels of IgG, IgA, and/or IgM, with a failure to produce specific antibodies. This diagnostic category represents a heterogeneous group of disorders, which present not only with acute and chronic infections but also with a range of inflammatory and autoimmune disorders as well as an increased incidence of lymphoma and other malignancies. Patients can now be categorized into distinct clinical phenotypes based on analysis of large cohort studies and be further stratified by immunologic laboratory testing. The biologic importance of this categorization is made clear by the 11-fold increase in mortality if even one of these phenotypes (cytopenias, lymphoproliferation, or enteropathy) is present. Limited progress in defining the underlying molecular causes has been made with known causative single gene defects accounting for only 3% of cases, and, for this and the reasons mentioned above, CVID remains resolute in its variability. This review provides a practical approach to risk stratification of these complex phenotypes by using current clinical categories and laboratory biomarkers. The effects of infection as well as inflammatory and autoimmune complications on different organ systems are discussed alongside strategies to reduce diagnostic delay. Recent developments in diagnostics and therapy are also explored. PMID:24565700

  16. Sickle Cell Disease in Saudi Arabia: The Phenotype in Adults with the Arab-Indian Haplotype is not Benign

    PubMed Central

    Alsultan, Abdulrahman; Alabdulaali, Mohammed K.; Griffin, Paula J.; AlSuliman, Ahmed M.; Ghabbour, Hazem A.; Sebastiani, Paola; Albuali, Waleed H.; Al-Ali, Amein K.; Chui, David H.K.; Steinberg, Martin H.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Sickle cell disease (SCD) in Saudi patients from the Eastern Province is associated with the Arab-Indian (AI) HBB (β-globin gene) haplotype. The phenotype of AI SCD in children was described as benign and was attributed to their high fetal haemoglobin (HbF). We conducted a hospital-based study to assess the pattern of SCD complications in adults. A total of 104 patients with average age of 27 years were enrolled. Ninety-six percent of these patients reported history of painful crisis; 47% had at least one episode of acute chest syndrome, however, only 15% had two or more episodes; symptomatic osteonecrosis was reported in 18%; priapism in 17%; overt stroke in 6%; none had leg ulcers. The majority of patients had persistent splenomegaly and 66% had gallstones. Half of the patients co-inherited α-thalassaemia and about one third had glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency. Higher HbF correlated with higher rate of splenic sequestration but not with other phenotypes. The phenotype of adult patients with AI SCD is not benign despite their relatively high HbF level. This is probably due to the continued decline in HbF level in adults and the heterocellular and variable distribution of HbF amongst F-cells. PMID:24224700

  17. Sickle cell disease in Saudi Arabia: the phenotype in adults with the Arab-Indian haplotype is not benign.

    PubMed

    Alsultan, Abdulrahman; Alabdulaali, Mohammed K; Griffin, Paula J; Alsuliman, Ahmed M; Ghabbour, Hazem A; Sebastiani, Paola; Albuali, Waleed H; Al-Ali, Amein K; Chui, David H K; Steinberg, Martin H

    2014-02-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) in Saudi patients from the Eastern Province is associated with the Arab-Indian (AI) HBB (β-globin gene) haplotype. The phenotype of AI SCD in children was described as benign and was attributed to their high fetal haemoglobin (HbF). We conducted a hospital-based study to assess the pattern of SCD complications in adults. A total of 104 patients with average age of 27 years were enrolled. Ninety-six per cent of these patients reported history of painful crisis; 47% had at least one episode of acute chest syndrome, however, only 15% had two or more episodes; symptomatic osteonecrosis was reported in 18%; priapism in 17%; overt stroke in 6%; none had leg ulcers. The majority of patients had persistent splenomegaly and 66% had gallstones. Half of the patients co-inherited α-thalassaemia and about one-third had glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency. Higher HbF correlated with higher rate of splenic sequestration but not with other phenotypes. The phenotype of adult patients with AI SCD is not benign despite their relatively high HbF level. This is probably due to the continued decline in HbF level in adults and the heterocellular and variable distribution of HbF amongst F-cells. PMID:24224700

  18. Genome-Wide Analysis of Group A Streptococci Reveals a Mutation That Modulates Global Phenotype and Disease Specificity

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Many human pathogens produce phenotypic variants as a means to circumvent the host immune system and enhance survival and, as a potential consequence, exhibit increased virulence. For example, it has been known for almost 90 y that clinical isolates of the human bacterial pathogen group A streptococci (GAS) have extensive phenotypic heterogeneity linked to variation in virulence. However, the complete underlying molecular mechanism(s) have not been defined. Expression microarray analysis of nine clinical isolates identified two fundamentally different transcriptomes, designated pharyngeal transcriptome profile (PTP) and invasive transcriptome profile (ITP). PTP and ITP GAS differed in approximately 10% of the transcriptome, including at least 23 proven or putative virulence factor genes. ITP organisms were recovered from skin lesions of mice infected subcutaneously with PTP GAS and were significantly more able to survive phagocytosis and killing by human polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Complete genome resequencing of a mouse-derived ITP GAS revealed that the organism differed from its precursor by only a 7-bp frameshift mutation in the gene (covS) encoding the sensor kinase component of a two-component signal transduction system implicated in virulence. Genetic complementation, and sequence analysis of covR/S in 42 GAS isolates confirmed the central role of covR/S in transcriptome, exoproteome, and virulence modulation. Genome-wide analysis provides a heretofore unattained understanding of phenotypic variation and disease specificity in microbial pathogens, resulting in new avenues for vaccine and therapeutics research. PMID:16446783

  19. Disruptive TP53 Mutation is Associated with Aggressive Disease Characteristics in an Orthotopic Murine Model of Oral Tongue Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sano, Daisuke; Xie, Tong-Xin; Ow, Thomas J.; Zhao, Mei; Pickering, Curtis R.; Zhou, Ge; Sandulache, Vlad C.; Wheeler, David A.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Caulin, Carlos; Myers, Jeffrey N.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To characterize tumor growth and metastatic potential in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) cell lines in an orthotopic murine model of oral tongue cancer, and to correlate TP53 mutation status with these findings. Experimental Design Cells from each of 48 HNSCC cell lines were orthotopically injected into the oral tongues of nude mice. Tumor volume, cervical lymph node metastasis, and mouse survival were recorded. Direct sequencing of the TP53 gene and western blot analysis for the p53 protein after induction with 5-fluorouracil was performed. Cell lines were categorized as either mutant TP53 or wild-type TP53, and lines with TP53 mutation were further categorized on the basis of type of mutation (disruptive or non-disruptive), and level of p53 protein expression. The behavior of tumors in these different groups was compared. Results The 48 HNSCC cell lines showed a wide range of behavior from highly aggressive and metastatic to no tumor formation. Mice injected with cells harboring disruptive TP53 mutations had faster tumor growth, greater incidence of cervical lymph node metastasis, and shorter survival than mice injected with cells lacking these mutations. Conclusions HNSCC cell lines display a wide spectrum of behavior in an orthotopic model of oral cancer. Cell lines with disruptive TP53 mutations are more aggressive in this system, corroborating clinical reports that have linked these mutations to poor patient outcome. PMID:21903770

  20. IL-10 Controls Early Microglial Phenotypes and Disease Onset in ALS Caused by Misfolded Superoxide Dismutase 1.

    PubMed

    Gravel, Mathieu; Béland, Louis-Charles; Soucy, Geneviève; Abdelhamid, Essam; Rahimian, Reza; Gravel, Claude; Kriz, Jasna

    2016-01-20

    While reactive microgliosis is a hallmark of advanced stages of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), the role of microglial cells in events initiating and/or precipitating disease onset is largely unknown. Here we provide novel in vivo evidence of a distinct adaptive shift in functional microglial phenotypes in preclinical stages of superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1)-mutant-mediated disease. Using a mouse model for live imaging of microglial activation crossed with SOD1(G93A) and SOD1(G37R) mouse models, we discovered that the preonset phase of SOD1-mediated disease is characterized by development of distinct anti-inflammatory profile and attenuated innate immune/TLR2 responses to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge. This microglial phenotype was associated with a 16-fold overexpression of anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 in baseline conditions followed by a 4.5-fold increase following LPS challenge. While infusion of IL-10R blocking antibody, initiated at day 60, caused a significant increase in markers of microglial activation and precipitated clinical onset of disease, a targeted overexpression of IL-10 in microglial cells, delivered via viral vectors expressed under CD11b promoter, significantly delayed disease onset and increased survival of SOD1(G93A) mice. We propose that the high IL-10 levels in resident microglia in early ALS represent a homeostatic and compensatory "adaptive immune escape" mechanism acting as a nonneuronal determinant of clinical onset of disease. Significance statement: We report here for the first time that changing the immune profile of brain microglia may significantly affect clinical onset and duration of disease in ALS models. We discovered that in presymptomatic disease microglial cells overexpress anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. Given that IL-10 is major homeostatic cytokine and its production becomes deregulated with aging, this may suggest that the capacity of microglia to adequately produce IL-10 may be compromised in ALS. We show

  1. Elk with a long incubation prion disease phenotype have a unique PrP-d profile

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chronic wasting disease is a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy of deer and elk in North America. All diseases in this family are characterized by long preclinical incubation periods following by a relatively short clinical course. Endpoint disease is characterized by extensive deposits of a...

  2. Atypical sporadic CJD-MM phenotype with white matter kuru plaques associated with intranuclear inclusion body and argyrophilic grain disease.

    PubMed

    Berghoff, Anna S; Trummert, Anita; Unterberger, Ursula; Ströbel, Thomas; Hortobágyi, Tibor; Kovacs, Gabor G

    2015-08-01

    We describe an atypical neuropathological phenotype of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in a 76-year-old man. The clinical symptoms were characterized by progressive dementia, gait ataxia, rigidity and urinary incontinence. The disease duration was 6 weeks. MRI did not show prominent atrophy or hyperintensities in cortical areas, striatum or thalamus. Biomarker examination of the cerebrospinal fluid deviated from that seen in pure Alzheimer's disease. Triphasic waves in the EEG were detected only later in the disease course, while 14-3-3 assay was positive. PRNP genotyping revealed methionine homozygosity (MM) at codon 129. Neuropathology showed classical CJD changes corresponding to the MM type 1 cases. However, a striking feature was the presence of abundant kuru-type plaques in the white matter. This rare morphology was associated with neuropathological signs of intranuclear inclusion body disease and advanced stage of argyrophilic grain disease. These alterations did not show correlation with each other, thus seemed to develop independently. This case further highlights the complexity of neuropathological alterations in the ageing brain. PMID:25783686

  3. Classification of Human Chromosome 21 Gene-Expression Variations in Down Syndrome: Impact on Disease Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Aït Yahya-Graison, E. ; Aubert, J. ; Dauphinot, L. ; Rivals, I. ; Prieur, M. ; Golfier, G. ; Rossier, J. ; Personnaz, L. ; Créau, N. ; Bléhaut, H. ; Robin, S. ; Delabar, J. M. ; Potier, M.-C. 

    2007-01-01

    Down syndrome caused by chromosome 21 trisomy is the most common genetic cause of mental retardation in humans. Disruption of the phenotype is thought to be the result of gene-dosage imbalance. Variations in chromosome 21 gene expression in Down syndrome were analyzed in lymphoblastoid cells derived from patients and control individuals. Of the 359 genes and predictions displayed on a specifically designed high-content chromosome 21 microarray, one-third were expressed in lymphoblastoid cells. We performed a mixed-model analysis of variance to find genes that are differentially expressed in Down syndrome independent of sex and interindividual variations. In addition, we identified genes with variations between Down syndrome and control samples that were significantly different from the gene-dosage effect (1.5). Microarray data were validated by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. We found that 29% of the expressed chromosome 21 transcripts are overexpressed in Down syndrome and correspond to either genes or open reading frames. Among these, 22% are increased proportional to the gene-dosage effect, and 7% are amplified. The other 71% of expressed sequences are either compensated (56%, with a large proportion of predicted genes and antisense transcripts) or highly variable among individuals (15%). Thus, most of the chromosome 21 transcripts are compensated for the gene-dosage effect. Overexpressed genes are likely to be involved in the Down syndrome phenotype, in contrast to the compensated genes. Highly variable genes could account for phenotypic variations observed in patients. Finally, we show that alternative transcripts belonging to the same gene are similarly regulated in Down syndrome but sense and antisense transcripts are not. PMID:17701894

  4. In silico analysis of a disease-causing mutation in PCDH15 gene in a consanguineous Pakistani family with Usher phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Saleha, Shamim; Ajmal, Muhammad; Jamil, Muhammad; Nasir, Muhammad; Hameed, Abdul

    2016-01-01

    AIM To map Usher phenotype in a consanguineous Pakistani family and identify disease-associated mutation in a causative gene to establish phenotype-genotype correlation. METHODS A consanguineous Pakistani family in which Usher phenotype was segregating as an autosomal recessive trait was ascertained. On the basis of results of clinical investigations of affected members of this family disease was diagnosed as Usher syndrome (USH). To identify the locus responsible for the Usher phenotype in this family, genomic DNA from blood sample of each individual was genotyped using microsatellite Short Tandem Repeat (STR) markers for the known Usher syndrome loci. Then direct sequencing was performed to find out disease associated mutations in the candidate gene. RESULTS By genetic linkage analysis, the USH phenotype of this family was mapped to PCDH15 locus on chromosome 10q21.1. Three different point mutations in exon 11 of PCDH15 were identified and one of them, c.1304A>C was found to be segregating with the disease phenotype in Pakistani family with Usher phenotype. This, c.1304A>C transversion mutation predicts an amino-acid substitution of aspartic acid with an alanine at residue number 435 (p.D435A) of its protein product. Moreover, in silico analysis revealed conservation of aspartic acid at position 435 and predicated this change as pathogenic. CONCLUSION The identification of c.1304A>C pathogenic mutation in PCDH15 gene and its association with Usher syndrome in a consanguineous Pakistani family is the first example of a missense mutation of PCDH15 causing USH1 phenotype. In previous reports, it was hypothesized that severe mutations such as truncated protein of PCDH15 led to the Usher I phenotype and that missense variants are mainly responsible for non-syndromic hearing impairment. PMID:27275418

  5. Explorative data analysis techniques and unsupervised clustering methods to support clinical assessment of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Paoletti, Matteo; Camiciottoli, Gianna; Meoni, Eleonora; Bigazzi, Francesca; Cestelli, Lucia; Pistolesi, Massimo; Marchesi, Carlo

    2009-12-01

    Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is the fourth leading cause of death worldwide and represents one of the major causes of chronic morbidity. Cigarette smoking is the most important risk factor for COPD. In these patients, the airflow limitation is caused by a mixture of small airways disease and parenchyma destruction, the relative contribution of which varies from person to person. The twofold nature of the pathology has been studied in the past and according to some authors each patient should be classified as presenting a predominantly bronchial or emphysematous phenotype. In this study we applied various explorative analysis techniques (PCA, MCA, MDS) and recent unsupervised clustering methods (KHM) to study a large dataset, acquired from 415 COPD patients, to assess the presence of hidden structures in data corresponding to the different COPD phenotypes observed in clinical practice. In order to validate our methods, we compared the results obtained from a training set of 415 patients with lung density data acquired in a test set of 93 patients who underwent HRCT (High Resolution Computerized Tomography). PMID:19501190

  6. NEFL E396K mutation is associated with a novel dominant intermediate Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease phenotype.

    PubMed

    Berciano, José; García, Antonio; Peeters, Kristien; Gallardo, Elena; De Vriendt, Els; Pelayo-Negro, Ana L; Infante, Jon; Jordanova, Albena

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of the study was to describe a pedigree with NEFL E396K mutation associated with a novel dominant intermediate Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (DI-CMT) phenotype. The pedigree comprised four patients over two generations, aged between 35 and 59 years, who have been serially evaluated since 1993. Their clinical picture was characterized by pes cavus, sensorimotor neuropathy and spastic gait. Both older patients showed ascending leg weakness to involve pelvic musculature. CMT neuropathy score ranged from 14 to 26 (moderate to severe disease). Electrophysiology showed uniform nerve conduction slowing in the intermediate range, both in distal and proximal nerve segments. Multimodal evoked potential and blink reflex studies revealed abnormalities indicative of central sensorimotor pathway dysfunction. On imaging studies of lower-limb musculature, there was massive atrophy of intrinsic foot muscles and to a lesser degree of calves and thighs predominating in muscles innervated by tibial and sciatic nerves. In both patients exhibiting waddling gait, there was atrophy of pelvic muscles mainly involving gluteus medius, gluteus minimus and piriformis. We conclude that NEFL E396K mutation may manifest with a novel DI-CMT phenotype, characterized by simultaneous involvement of the peripheral and central nervous system. PMID:25877835

  7. Modulatory effect of BclI GR gene polymorphisms on the obesity phenotype in Brazilian patients with Cushing's disease

    PubMed Central

    Moreira, Ricardo P. P.; Bachega, Tânia A. S. S.; Machado, Márcio C.; Mendonca, Berenice B.; Bronstein, Marcello D.; Villares Fragoso, Maria Candida B.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Patients with Cushing's disease exhibit wide phenotypic variability in the severity of obesity, diabetes and hypertension. In the general population, several glucocorticoid receptor genes (NR3C1) and HSD11B1 polymorphisms are associated with altered glucocorticoid sensitivity and/or metabolism, resulting in an increased or reduced risk of an adverse metabolic profile. Our aim was to analyze the association of NR3C1 and HSD11B1 gene variants with the severity of some clinical and hormonal features of Cushing's disease. METHODS: Sixty-four patients presenting with Cushing's disease were diagnosed based on adrenocorticotrophic hormone levels, high-dose dexamethasone suppression tests and/or inferior petrosal sinus sampling and magnetic resonance imaging. The A3669G, ER22/23EK, N363S BclI-NR3C1 and HSD11B1-rs12086634 variants were screened. RESULTS: The BclI, HSD11B1-rs12086634 and A3669G variants were found in 36%, 19.5% and 14% of alleles, respectively. The N363S and ER22/23EK polymorphisms were identified in heterozygosis once in only two patients (1.5% of alleles). There were no differences in the weight gain or prevalence of diabetes and hypertension in the patients carrying the abovementioned alleles compared to the wild-type carriers. Interestingly, the mean body mass index (BMI) of the BclI carriers was significantly higher than the non-carriers (34.4±7 kg/m2 vs. 29.6±4.7 kg/m2, respectively). None of the polymorphisms were associated with the basal adrenocorticotrophic hormone, FU levels or F level after dexamethasone suppression testing. CONCLUSION: Although Cushing's disease results from increased glucocorticoid secretion, we observed that interindividual variability in the peripheral glucocorticoid sensitivity, mediated by the glucocorticoid receptor, could modulate the obesity phenotype. PMID:23778418

  8. Phenotypic and Etiological Differences Between Psyllid Yellows and Zebra Chip Diseases of Potatoes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Both potato psyllid yellows and Zebra chip (ZC) potato diseases are associated with the potato psyllid, Bactericera cockerelli (Sulc). Aboveground plant symptoms of both diseases are similar but there is a difference in symptoms in potato tubers. ZC has recently been associated with a new species o...

  9. LAMA/LABA vs ICS/LABA in the treatment of COPD in Japan based on the disease phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Hizawa, Nobuyuki

    2015-01-01

    In the combined use of bronchodilators of different classes, ie, long-acting β2-agonists (LABAs) and long-acting muscarinic antagonists (LAMAs), bronchodilation is obtained both directly, through LABA-mediated stimulation of β2-adrenergic receptors, and indirectly, through LAMA-mediated inhibition of acetylcholine action at muscarinic receptors. The clinical trial data for LABAs/LAMAs in the treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) continue to be promising, and these combinations will provide the convenience of delivering the two major bronchodilator classes, recommended as first-line maintenance options in COPD treatment guidelines. COPD is a complex condition that has pulmonary and extrapulmonary manifestations. These clinical manifestations are highly variable, and several are associated with different responses to currently available therapies. The concept of a COPD phenotype is rapidly evolving from one focusing on the clinical characteristics to one linking the underlying biology to the phenotype of the disease. Identification of the peculiarities of the different COPD phenotypes will permit us to implement a more personalized treatment in which the patient’s characteristics, together with his or her genotype, will be key to choosing the best treatment option. At present in Japan, fixed combinations of inhaled corticosteroids (ICSs) and LABAs are frequently prescribed in the earlier stages of COPD. However, ICSs increase the risk of pneumonia. Notably, 10%–30% of patients with COPD with or without a history of asthma have persistent circulating and airway eosinophilia associated with an increased risk of exacerbations and sensitivity to steroids. Thus, sputum or blood eosinophil counts might identify a subpopulation in which ICSs could have potentially deleterious effects as well as a subpopulation that benefits from ICSs. In this review, I propose one plausible approach to position ICSs and LABAs/LAMAs in clinical practice, based on

  10. Altered monocyte and fibrocyte phenotype and function in scleroderma interstitial lung disease: reversal by caveolin-1 scaffolding domain peptide.

    PubMed

    Tourkina, Elena; Bonner, Michael; Oates, James; Hofbauer, Ann; Richard, Mathieu; Znoyko, Sergei; Visconti, Richard P; Zhang, Jing; Hatfield, Corey M; Silver, Richard M; Hoffman, Stanley

    2011-01-01

    Interstitial lung disease (ILD) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in scleroderma (systemic sclerosis, or SSc). Fibrocytes are a monocyte-derived cell population implicated in the pathogenesis of fibrosing disorders. Given the recently recognized importance of caveolin-1 in regulating function and signaling in SSc monocytes, in the present study we examined the role of caveolin-1 in the migration and/or trafficking and phenotype of monocytes and fibrocytes in fibrotic lung disease in human patients and an animal model. These studies fill a gap in our understanding of how monocytes and fibrocytes contribute to SSc-ILD pathology. We found that C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4-positive (CXCR4+)/collagen I-positive (ColI+), CD34+/ColI+ and CD45+/ColI+ cells are present in SSc-ILD lungs, but not in control lungs, with CXCR4+ cells being most prevalent. Expression of CXCR4 and its ligand, stromal cell-derived factor 1 (CXCL12), are also highly upregulated in SSc-ILD lung tissue. SSc monocytes, which lack caveolin-1 and therefore overexpress CXCR4, exhibit almost sevenfold increased migration toward CXCL12 compared to control monocytes. Restoration of caveolin-1 function by administering the caveolin scaffolding domain (CSD) peptide reverses this hypermigration. Similarly, transforming growth factor β-treated normal monocytes lose caveolin-1, overexpress CXCR4 and exhibit 15-fold increased monocyte migration that is CSD peptide-sensitive. SSc monocytes exhibit a different phenotype than normal monocytes, expressing high levels of ColI, CD14 and CD34. Because ColI+/CD14+ cells are prevalent in SSc blood, we looked for such cells in lung tissue and confirmed their presence in SSc-ILD lungs but not in normal lungs. Finally, in the bleomycin model of lung fibrosis, we show that CSD peptide diminishes fibrocyte accumulation in the lungs. Our results suggest that low caveolin-1 in SSc monocytes contributes to ILD via effects on cell migration and phenotype and that the

  11. LAMA/LABA vs ICS/LABA in the treatment of COPD in Japan based on the disease phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Hizawa, Nobuyuki

    2015-01-01

    In the combined use of bronchodilators of different classes, ie, long-acting β2-agonists (LABAs) and long-acting muscarinic antagonists (LAMAs), bronchodilation is obtained both directly, through LABA-mediated stimulation of β2-adrenergic receptors, and indirectly, through LAMA-mediated inhibition of acetylcholine action at muscarinic receptors. The clinical trial data for LABAs/LAMAs in the treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) continue to be promising, and these combinations will provide the convenience of delivering the two major bronchodilator classes, recommended as first-line maintenance options in COPD treatment guidelines. COPD is a complex condition that has pulmonary and extrapulmonary manifestations. These clinical manifestations are highly variable, and several are associated with different responses to currently available therapies. The concept of a COPD phenotype is rapidly evolving from one focusing on the clinical characteristics to one linking the underlying biology to the phenotype of the disease. Identification of the peculiarities of the different COPD phenotypes will permit us to implement a more personalized treatment in which the patient's characteristics, together with his or her genotype, will be key to choosing the best treatment option. At present in Japan, fixed combinations of inhaled corticosteroids (ICSs) and LABAs are frequently prescribed in the earlier stages of COPD. However, ICSs increase the risk of pneumonia. Notably, 10%-30% of patients with COPD with or without a history of asthma have persistent circulating and airway eosinophilia associated with an increased risk of exacerbations and sensitivity to steroids. Thus, sputum or blood eosinophil counts might identify a subpopulation in which ICSs could have potentially deleterious effects as well as a subpopulation that benefits from ICSs. In this review, I propose one plausible approach to position ICSs and LABAs/LAMAs in clinical practice, based on both

  12. Rotenone Susceptibility Phenotype in Olfactory Derived Patient Cells as a Model of Idiopathic Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Matigian, N.; Todorovic, M.; Cook, A. L.; Ravishankar, S.; Dong, L. F.; Neuzil, J.; Silburn, P.; Mackay-Sim, A.; Mellick, G. D.; Wood, S. A.

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease is a complex age-related neurodegenerative disorder. Approximately 90% of Parkinson’s disease cases are idiopathic, of unknown origin. The aetiology of Parkinson’s disease is not fully understood but increasing evidence implies a failure in fundamental cellular processes including mitochondrial dysfunction and increased oxidative stress. To dissect the cellular events underlying idiopathic Parkinson’s disease, we use primary cell lines established from the olfactory mucosa of Parkinson’s disease patients. Previous metabolic and transcriptomic analyses identified deficiencies in stress response pathways in patient-derived cell lines. The aim of this study was to investigate whether these deficiencies manifested as increased susceptibility, as measured by cell viability, to a range of extrinsic stressors. We identified that patient-derived cells are more sensitive to mitochondrial complex I inhibition and hydrogen peroxide induced oxidative stress, than controls. Exposure to low levels (50 nM) of rotenone led to increased apoptosis in patient-derived cells. We identified an endogenous deficit in mitochondrial complex I in patient-derived cells, but this did not directly correlate with rotenone-sensitivity. We further characterized the sensitivity to rotenone and identified that it was partly associated with heat shock protein 27 levels. Finally, transcriptomic analysis following rotenone exposure revealed that patient-derived cells express a diminished response to rotenone-induced stress compared with cells from healthy controls. Our cellular model of idiopathic Parkinson’s disease displays a clear susceptibility phenotype to mitochondrial stress. The determination of molecular mechanisms underpinning this susceptibility may lead to the identification of biomarkers for either disease onset or progression. PMID:27123847

  13. Large animal models of rare genetic disorders: sheep as phenotypically relevant models of human genetic disease.

    PubMed

    Pinnapureddy, Ashish R; Stayner, Cherie; McEwan, John; Baddeley, Olivia; Forman, John; Eccles, Michael R

    2015-01-01

    Animals that accurately model human disease are invaluable in medical research, allowing a critical understanding of disease mechanisms, and the opportunity to evaluate the effect of therapeutic compounds in pre-clinical studies. Many types of animal models are used world-wide, with the most common being small laboratory animals, such as mice. However, rodents often do not faithfully replicate human disease, despite their predominant use in research. This discordancy is due in part to physiological differences, such as body size and longevity. In contrast, large animal models, including sheep, provide an alternative to mice for biomedical research due to their greater physiological parallels with humans. Completion of the full genome sequences of many species, and the advent of Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) technologies, means it is now feasible to screen large populations of domesticated animals for genetic variants that resemble human genetic diseases, and generate models that more accurately model rare human pathologies. In this review, we discuss the notion of using sheep as large animal models, and their advantages in modelling human genetic disease. We exemplify several existing naturally occurring ovine variants in genes that are orthologous to human disease genes, such as the Cln6 sheep model for Batten disease. These, and other sheep models, have contributed significantly to our understanding of the relevant human disease process, in addition to providing opportunities to trial new therapies in animals with similar body and organ size to humans. Therefore sheep are a significant species with respect to the modelling of rare genetic human disease, which we summarize in this review. PMID:26329332

  14. The low frequency of recessive disease: insights from ENU mutagenesis, severity of disease phenotype, GWAS associations, and demography: an analytical review.

    PubMed

    Erickson, Robert P; Mitchison, N Avrion

    2014-08-01

    A survey of a select panel of 14 genetic diseases with mixed inheritance confirms that, while autosomal recessive (AR) disease genes are more numerous than autosomal dominant (AD) or X-linked (XL) ones, they make a smaller average contribution to disease. Data collected from N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) mutagenesis studies show a similar excess of AR mutations. The smaller AR contribution may partially reflect disease severity, but only in the comparison of AR with AD mutations. On the contrary, XL mutations for the 14 diseases are generally more severe. Genome-wide associations studies (GWAS) data provide fresh insight into the shortage, with a limited negative selection effect mediated by the pleiotropic expression of recessive disease genes in other deleterious phenotypes. Genomic data provide further evidence of purging selection in a past European population bottleneck followed by a dramatic population explosion, now more clearly associated with past climate change. We consider these likely to be the main factors responsible for the low AR to AD/XL inheritance ratio. PMID:24652618

  15. Liver Disease and Other Comorbidities in Wolcott-Rallison Syndrome: Different Phenotype and Variable Associations in a Large Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Habeb, Abdelhadi M.; Deeb, Asma; Johnson, Matthew; Abdullah, Mohammed; Abdulrasoul, Majidah; Al-Awneh, Hussain; Al-Maghamsi, Mohammed S.F.; Al-Murshedi, Fathiya; Al-Saif, Ramlah; Al-Sinani, Siham; Ramadan, Dina; Tfayli, Hala; Flanagan, Sarah E.; Ellard, Sian

    2015-01-01

    Background Wolcott-Rallison syndrome (WRS) is caused by recessive EIF2AK3 mutations and characterized by early-onset diabetes and skeletal dysplasia. Hepatic dysfunction has been reported in 60% of patients. Aims To describe a cohort of WRS patients and discuss the pattern and management of their liver disease. Methods Detailed phenotyping and direct sequencing of EIF2AK3 gene were conducted in all patients. Results Twenty-eight genetically confirmed patients (67% male; mean age 4.6 years) were identified. 17 different EIF2AK3 mutations were detected, of which 2 were novel. The p.S991N mutation was associated with prolonged survival and p.I650T with delayed onset. All patients presented before 25 months with diabetes with variation in the frequency and severity of 10 other features. Liver disease, first manifested as non-autoimmune hepatitis, was the commonest extra-pancreatic feature identified in 85.7% (24/28). 22/24 had at least one episode of acute hepatic failure which was the cause of death in all deceased patients (13/28). One child was treated by liver transplantation and had no liver disease and better diabetes control for the following 6 years. Conclusions Liver disease in WRS is more frequent than previously described and carries high mortality. The first experience with liver transplantation in WRS is encouraging. PMID:25659842

  16. A Phenotype-Driven Approach to Generate Mouse Models with Pathogenic mtDNA Mutations Causing Mitochondrial Disease.

    PubMed

    Kauppila, Johanna H K; Baines, Holly L; Bratic, Ana; Simard, Marie-Lune; Freyer, Christoph; Mourier, Arnaud; Stamp, Craig; Filograna, Roberta; Larsson, Nils-Göran; Greaves, Laura C; Stewart, James B

    2016-09-13

    Mutations of mtDNA are an important cause of human disease, but few animal models exist. Because mammalian mitochondria cannot be transfected, the development of mice with pathogenic mtDNA mutations has been challenging, and the main strategy has therefore been to introduce mutations found in cell lines into mouse embryos. Here, we describe a phenotype-driven strategy that is based on detecting clonal expansion of pathogenic mtDNA mutations in colonic crypts of founder mice derived from heterozygous mtDNA mutator mice. As proof of concept, we report the generation of a mouse line transmitting a heteroplasmic pathogenic mutation in the alanine tRNA gene of mtDNA displaying typical characteristics of classic mitochondrial disease. In summary, we describe a straightforward and technically simple strategy based on mouse breeding and histology to generate animal models of mtDNA-mutation disease, which will be of great importance for studies of disease pathophysiology and preclinical treatment trials. PMID:27626666

  17. Successes and Challenges in Phenotype-Based Lead Discovery for Prion Diseases

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease (CJD) is a rare but invariably fatal neurodegenerative disease caused by misfolding of an endogenous protein into an alternative pathogenic conformation. The details of protein misfolding and aggregation are not well understood nor are the mechanism(s) by which the aggregated protein confers cellular toxicity. While there is as yet no clear consensus about how best to intervene therapeutically in CJD, prion infections can be propagated in cell culture and in experimental animals, affording both in vitro and in vivo models of disease. Here we review recent lead discovery efforts for CJD, with a focus on our own efforts to optimize 2-aminothiazole analogues for anti-prion potency in cells and for brain exposure in mice. The compounds that emerged from this effort were found to be efficacious in multiple animal models of prion disease even as they revealed new challenges for the field, including the emergence of resistant prion strains. PMID:24762293

  18. Late-onset disease is associated with a mild phenotype in children with familial Mediterranean fever.

    PubMed

    Özdel, Semanur; Özçakar, Z Birsin; Kunt, Seda Şahin; Elhan, Atilla H; Yalçınkaya, Fatoş

    2016-07-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is an autosomal recessive disease, characterised by recurrent, self-limited attacks of fever with serositis. Recently, it was shown that patients with early disease onset during childhood period had more severe disease. The aim of this study was to describe the demographic, clinical and genetic features of FMF patients who had late-onset disease during childhood period and to compare them to those with earlier onset patients. Files of patients who had been seen in our department between January 2013 and January 2014 were retrospectively evaluated. Patients were divided into two groups according to age of disease onset (group I, ≤8 years; group II, >8 years), and clinical findings were compared between the two groups. The study group comprised 317 FMF patients. There were 267 patients in group I and 50 patients in Group II. Median attack frequency was 24/year in group I and 12/year in group II (p < 0.05). Fever and M694V homozygosity were less frequently detected in group II (p = 0.003 and p = 0.022). Median delay in diagnosis was 24 months in group I and 12 months in group II (p = 0.002). Disease severity scores and final colchicine dosages were lower in group II (p < 0.001 and p = 0.003). Only a small number of FMF patients had disease onset at older ages in childhood period. It seems that FMF patients with late-onset disease have milder illness. However, more readily expression of their clinical findings in older ages yields earlier diagnosis in this group. PMID:26842301

  19. Identification of mutations, genotype-phenotype correlation and prenatal diagnosis of maple syrup urine disease in Indian patients.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Deepti; Bijarnia-Mahay, Sunita; Saxena, Renu; Kohli, Sudha; Dua-Puri, Ratna; Verma, Jyotsna; Thomas, E; Shigematsu, Yosuke; Yamaguchi, Seiji; Deb, Roumi; Verma, Ishwar Chander

    2015-09-01

    Maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) is caused by mutations in genes BCKDHA, BCKDHB, DBT encoding E1α, E1β, and E2 subunits of enzyme complex, branched-chain alpha-ketoacid dehydrogenase (BCKDH). BCKDH participates in catabolism of branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) - leucine, isoleucine and valine in the energy production pathway. Deficiency or defect in the enzyme complex causes accumulation of BCAAs and keto-acids leading to toxicity. Twenty-four patients with MSUD were enrolled in the study for molecular characterization and genotype-phenotype correlation. Molecular studies were carried out by sequencing of the 3 genes by Sanger method. Bioinformatics tools were employed to classify novel variations into pathogenic or benign. The predicted effects of novel changes on protein structure were elucidated by 3D modeling. Mutations were detected in 22 of 24 patients (11, 7 and 4 in BCKDHB, BCKDHA and DBT genes, respectively). Twenty mutations including 11 novel mutations were identified. Protein modeling in novel mutations showed alteration of structure and function of these subunits. Mutations, c.1065 delT (BCKDHB gene) and c.939G > C (DBT gene) were noted to be recurrent, identified in 6 of 22 alleles and 5 of 8 alleles, respectively. Two-third patients were of neonatal classical phenotype (16 of 24). BCKDHB gene mutations were present in 10 of these 16 patients. Prenatal diagnoses were performed in 4 families. Consanguinity was noted in 37.5% families. Although no obvious genotype-phenotype correlation could be found in our study, most cases with mutation in BCKDHB gene presented in neonatal period. Large number of novel mutations underlines the heterogeneity and distinctness of gene pool from India. PMID:26257134

  20. CONCEPT ANALYSIS: AGGRESSION

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jianghong

    2006-01-01

    The concept of aggression is important to nursing because further knowledge of aggression can help generate a better theoretical model to drive more effective intervention and prevention approaches. This paper outlines a conceptual analysis of aggression. First, the different forms of aggression are reviewed, including the clinical classification and the stimulus-based classification. Then the manifestations and measurement of aggression are described. Finally, the causes and consequences of aggression are outlined. It is argued that a better understanding of aggression and the causal factors underlying it are essential for learning how to prevent negative aggression in the future. PMID:15371137

  1. Concept analysis: aggression.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianghong

    2004-01-01

    The concept of aggression is important to nursing because further knowledge of aggression can help generate a better theoretical model to drive more effective intervention and prevention approaches. This paper outlines a conceptual analysis of aggression. First, the different forms of aggression are reviewed, including the clinical classification and the stimulus-based classification. Then the manifestations and measurement of aggression are described. Finally, the causes and consequences of aggression are outlined. It is argued that a better understanding of aggression and the causal factors underlying it are essential for learning how to prevent negative aggression in the future. PMID:15371137

  2. Systems medicine approaches for the definition of complex phenotypes in chronic diseases and ageing. From concept to implementation and policies.

    PubMed

    Bousquet, Jean; Jorgensen, Christian; Dauzat, Michel; Cesario, Alfredo; Camuzat, Thierry; Bourret, Rodolphe; Best, Nicolas; Anto, Josep M; Abecassis, Frederic; Aubas, Pierre; Avignon, Antoine; Badin, Melanie; Bedbrook, Anna; Blain, Hubert; Bourdin, Arnaud; Bringer, Jacques; Camu, William; Cayla, Guilhaume; Costa, David J; Courtet, Philippe; Cristol, Jean-Paul; Demoly, Pascal; de la Coussaye, Jean-Emmanuel; Fesler, Pierre; Gouzi, Fares; Gris, Jean-Christophe; Guillot, Bernard; Hayot, Maurice; Jeandel, Claude; Jonquet, Olivier; Journot, Laurent; Lehmann, Sylvain; Mathieu, Gwenaelle; Morel, Jacques; Ninot, Gregory; Pelissier, Jacques; Picot, Marie-Christine; Radier-Pontal, Francoise; Robine, Jean-Marie; Rodier, Michel; Roubille, Francois; Sultan, Ariane; Wojtusciszyn, Anne; Auffray, Charles; Balling, Rudi; Barbara, Cristina; Cambon-Thomsen, Anne; Chavannes, Niels H; Chuchalin, Alexander; Crooks, George; Dedeu, Antoni; Fabbri, Leonardo M; Garcia-Aymerich, Judith; Hajjam, Jawad; Melo Gomes, Elisabete; Palkonen, Susana; Piette, Francois; Pison, Christophe; Price, David; Samolinski, Boleslaw; Schunemann, Holger J; Sterk, Peter J; Yiallouros, Panayiotis; Roca, Josep; Van de Perre, Philippe; Mercier, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    Chronic diseases are diseases of long duration and slow progression. Major NCDs (cardiovascular diseases, cancer, chronic respiratory diseases, diabetes, rheumatologic diseases and mental health) represent the predominant health problem of the Century. The prevention and control of NCDs are the priority of the World Health Organization 2008 Action Plan, the United Nations 2010 Resolution and the European Union 2010 Council. The novel trend for the management of NCDs is evolving towards integrative, holistic approaches. NCDs are intertwined with ageing. The European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing (EIP on AHA) has prioritised NCDs. To tackle them in their totality in order to reduce their burden and societal impact, it is proposed that NCDs should be considered as a single expression of disease with different risk factors and entities. An innovative integrated health system built around systems medicine and strategic partnerships is proposed to combat NCDs. It includes (i) understanding the social, economic, environmental, genetic determinants, as well as the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying NCDs; (ii) primary care and practice-based interprofessional collaboration; (iii) carefully phenotyped patients; (iv) development of unbiased and accurate biomarkers for comorbidities, severity and follow up of patients; (v) socio-economic science; (vi) development of guidelines; (vii) training; and (viii) policy decisions. The results could be applicable to all countries and adapted to local needs, economy and health systems. This paper reviews the complexity of NCDs intertwined with ageing. It gives an overview of the problem and proposes two practical examples of systems medicine (MeDALL) applied to allergy and to NCD co-morbidities (MACVIA-LR, Reference Site of the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing). PMID:24641234

  3. Voxel-based analysis in neuroferritinopathy expands the phenotype and determines radiological correlates of disease severity.

    PubMed

    Keogh, M J; Aribisala, B S; He, J; Tulip, E; Butteriss, D; Morris, C; Gorman, G; Horvath, R; Chinnery, P F; Blamire, Andrew M

    2015-10-01

    Neuroferritinopathy is an autosomal dominant adult-onset movement disorder which occurs due to mutations in the ferritin light chain gene (FTL). Extensive iron deposition and cavitation are observed post-mortem in the basal ganglia, but whether more widespread pathological changes occur, and whether they correlate with disease severity is unknown. 3D-T1w and quantitative T2 whole brain MRI scans were performed in 10 clinically symptomatic patients with the 460InsA FTL mutation and 10 age-matched controls. Voxel-based morphometry (VBM) and voxel-based relaxometry (VBR) were subsequently performed. Clinical assessment using the Unified Dystonia Rating Scale (UDRS) and Unified Huntington's Disease Rating Scale (UHDRS) was undertaken in all patients. VBM detected significant tissue changes within the substantia nigra, midbrain and dentate together with significant cerebellar atrophy in patients (FWE, p < 0.05). Iron deposition in the caudate head and cavitation in the lateral globus pallidus correlated with UDRS score (p < 0.001). There were no differences between groups with VBR. Our data show that progressive iron accumulation in the caudate nucleus, and cavitation of the globus pallidus correlate with disease severity in neuroferritinopathy. We also confirm sub-clinical cerebellar atrophy as a feature of the disease. We suggest that VBM is an effective technique to detect regions of iron deposition and cavitation, with potential wider utility to determine radiological markers of disease severity for all NBIA disorders. PMID:26142024

  4. An abnormal lymphatic phenotype is associated with subcutaneous adipose tissue deposits in Dercum’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, John C.; Herbst, Karen L.; Aldrich, Melissa B.; Darne, Chinmay D.; Tan, I-Chih; Zhu, Banghe; Guilliod, Renie; Fife, Caroline A.; Maus, Erik A.; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Investigational, near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) lymphatic imaging was used to assess lymphatic architecture and contractile function in participants diagnosed with Dercum’s disease, a rare, poorly understood disorder characterized by painful lipomas in subcutaneous adipose tissues. Design and Methods After informed consent and as part of an FDA-approved feasibility study to evaluate lymphatics in diseases in which their contribution has been implicated, three women diagnosed with Dercum’s disease and four control subjects were imaged. Each participant received multiple intradermal and subcutaneous injections of indocyanine green (ICG, total dose ≤400µg) in arms, legs, and/or trunk. Immediately after injection, ICG was taken up by the lymphatics and NIRF imaging was conducted. Results The lymphatics in the participants with Dercum’s disease were intact and dilated, yet sluggishly propelled lymph when compared to control lymphatics. Palpation of regions containing fluorescent lymphatic pathways revealed tender, fibrotic, tubular structures within the subcutaneous adipose tissue that were associated with painful nodules, and, in some cases, masses of fluorescent tissue indicating that some lipomas may represent tertiary lymphoid tissues. Conclusions These data support the hypothesis that Dercum’s disease may be a lymphovascular disorder and suggest a possible association between abnormal adipose tissue deposition and abnormal lymphatic structure and function. PMID:25044620

  5. Brown-Vialetto-Van Laere syndrome; variability in age at onset and disease progression highlighting the phenotypic overlap with Fazio-Londe disease.

    PubMed

    Dipti, Subrahmanian; Childs, Anne-Marie; Livingston, John H; Aggarwal, A K; Miller, Mike; Williams, Chris; Crow, Yanick J

    2005-09-01

    We report four siblings showing features of a pontobulbar palsy, a mixed spinal and upper motor neuropathy and variable deafness. The observation of affected males and females born to consanguineous first cousin parents suggests autosomal recessive inheritance. Two children presented in the first 16 months of life with stridor and died of respiratory failure by the age of 2 years. Hearing loss was not apparent in these infants. In contrast, 2 further siblings developed a bulbar palsy in their sixth year followed by the onset of deafness and features of an anterior horn neuropathy with corticospinal tract involvement. They exhibited a relatively slow but relentless decline over a period of several years. These cases highlight the phenotypic overlap of Brown-Vialetto-Van Laere syndrome with Fazio-Londe disease. Rather than representing two separate disorders, our findings suggest the possibility of a single disease entity which may usefully be considered a form of juvenile amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. PMID:16122634

  6. Molecular Phylogeny of the Psittacid Herpesviruses Causing Pacheco's Disease: Correlation of Genotype with Phenotypic Expression

    PubMed Central

    Tomaszewski, Elizabeth K.; Kaleta, Erhard F.; Phalen, David N.

    2003-01-01

    Fragments of 419 bp of the UL16 open reading frame from 73 psittacid herpesviruses (PsHVs) from the United States and Europe were sequenced. All viruses caused Pacheco's disease, and serotypes of the European isolates were known. A phylogenetic tree derived from these sequences demonstrated that the PsHVs that cause Pacheco's disease comprised four major genotypes, with each genotype including between two and four variants. With the exception of two viruses, the serotypes of the virus isolates could be predicted by the genotypes. Genotypes 1 and 4 corresponded to serotype 1 isolates, genotype 2 corresponded to serotype 2 isolates, and genotype 3 corresponded to serotype 3 isolates. The single serotype 4 virus mapped to genotype 4. DNA from a virus with a unique serotype could not be amplified with primers that amplified DNA from all other PsHVs, and its classification remains unknown. Viruses representing all four genotypes were found in both the United States and Europe, and it was therefore predicted that serotypes 1, 2, and 3 were present in the United States. Serotype 4 was represented by a single European isolate that could not be genetically distinguished from serotype 1 viruses; therefore, the presence of serotype 4 in the United States could not be predicted. Viruses of genotype 4 were found to be the most commonly associated with Pacheco's disease in macaws and conures and were least likely to be isolated in chicken embryo fibroblasts in the United States. All four genotypes caused deaths in Amazon parrots, but genotype 4 was associated with Pacheco's disease only in Amazons in Europe. Genotypes 2, 3, and 4, but not 1, were found in African grey parrots. Although parrots from the Pacific distribution represent a relatively small percentage of the total number of birds with Pacheco's disease, all four genotypes were found to cause disease in these species. PMID:14512573

  7. Regulatory T Cells Phenotype in Different Clinical Forms of Chagas' Disease

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira-Carvalho, Andréa; Renato Zuquim Antas, Paulo; Assis Silva Gomes, Juliana; Sathler-Avelar, Renato; Otávio Costa Rocha, Manoel; Elói-Santos, Silvana Maria; Pinho, Rosa Teixeira; Correa-Oliveira, Rodrigo; Martins-Filho, Olindo Assis

    2011-01-01

    CD25High CD4+ regulatory T cells (Treg cells) have been described as key players in immune regulation, preventing infection-induced immune pathology and limiting collateral tissue damage caused by vigorous anti-parasite immune response. In this review, we summarize data obtained by the investigation of Treg cells in different clinical forms of Chagas' disease. Ex vivo immunophenotyping of whole blood, as well as after stimulation with Trypanosoma cruzi antigens, demonstrated that individuals in the indeterminate (IND) clinical form of the disease have a higher frequency of Treg cells, suggesting that an expansion of those cells could be beneficial, possibly by limiting strong cytotoxic activity and tissue damage. Additional analysis demonstrated an activated status of Treg cells based on low expression of CD62L and high expression of CD40L, CD69, and CD54 by cells from all chagasic patients after T. cruzi antigenic stimulation. Moreover, there was an increase in the frequency of the population of Foxp3+ CD25HighCD4+ cells that was also IL-10+ in the IND group, whereas in the cardiac (CARD) group, there was an increase in the percentage of Foxp3+ CD25High CD4+ cells that expressed CTLA-4. These data suggest that IL-10 produced by Treg cells is effective in controlling disease development in IND patients. However, in CARD patients, the same regulatory mechanism, mediated by IL-10 and CTLA-4 expression is unlikely to be sufficient to control the progression of the disease. These data suggest that Treg cells may play an important role in controlling the immune response in Chagas' disease and the balance between regulatory and effector T cells may be important for the progression and development of the disease. Additional detailed analysis of the mechanisms on how these cells are activated and exert their function will certainly give insights for the rational design of procedure to achieve the appropriate balance between protection and pathology during parasite

  8. Molecular phylogeny of the psittacid herpesviruses causing Pacheco's disease: correlation of genotype with phenotypic expression.

    PubMed

    Tomaszewski, Elizabeth K; Kaleta, Erhard F; Phalen, David N

    2003-10-01

    Fragments of 419 bp of the UL16 open reading frame from 73 psittacid herpesviruses (PsHVs) from the United States and Europe were sequenced. All viruses caused Pacheco's disease, and serotypes of the European isolates were known. A phylogenetic tree derived from these sequences demonstrated that the PsHVs that cause Pacheco's disease comprised four major genotypes, with each genotype including between two and four variants. With the exception of two viruses, the serotypes of the virus isolates could be predicted by the genotypes. Genotypes 1 and 4 corresponded to serotype 1 isolates, genotype 2 corresponded to serotype 2 isolates, and genotype 3 corresponded to serotype 3 isolates. The single serotype 4 virus mapped to genotype 4. DNA from a virus with a unique serotype could not be amplified with primers that amplified DNA from all other PsHVs, and its classification remains unknown. Viruses representing all four genotypes were found in both the United States and Europe, and it was therefore predicted that serotypes 1, 2, and 3 were present in the United States. Serotype 4 was represented by a single European isolate that could not be genetically distinguished from serotype 1 viruses; therefore, the presence of serotype 4 in the United States could not be predicted. Viruses of genotype 4 were found to be the most commonly associated with Pacheco's disease in macaws and conures and were least likely to be isolated in chicken embryo fibroblasts in the United States. All four genotypes caused deaths in Amazon parrots, but genotype 4 was associated with Pacheco's disease only in Amazons in Europe. Genotypes 2, 3, and 4, but not 1, were found in African grey parrots. Although parrots from the Pacific distribution represent a relatively small percentage of the total number of birds with Pacheco's disease, all four genotypes were found to cause disease in these species. PMID:14512573

  9. Fibroblasts from phenotypically normal palmar fascia exhibit molecular profiles highly similar to fibroblasts from active disease in Dupuytren's Contracture

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Dupuytren's contracture (DC) is a fibroproliferative disorder characterized by the progressive development of a scar-like collagen-rich cord that affects the palmar fascia of the hand and leads to digital flexion contractures. DC is most commonly treated by surgical resection of the diseased tissue, but has a high reported recurrence rate ranging from 27% to 80%. We sought to determine if the transcriptomic profiles of fibroblasts derived from DC-affected palmar fascia, adjacent phenotypically normal palmar fascia, and non-DC palmar fascial tissues might provide mechanistic clues to understanding the puzzle of disease predisposition and recurrence in DC. Methods To achieve this, total RNA was obtained from fibroblasts derived from primary DC-affected palmar fascia, patient-matched unaffected palmar fascia, and palmar fascia from non-DC patients undergoing carpal tunnel release (6 patients in each group). These cells were grown on a type-1 collagen substrate (to better mimic their in vivo environments). Microarray analyses were subsequently performed using Illumina BeadChip arrays to compare the transcriptomic profiles of these three cell populations. Data were analyzed using Significance Analysis of Microarrays (SAM v3.02), hierarchical clustering, concordance mapping and Venn diagram. Results We found that the transcriptomic profiles of DC-disease fibroblasts and fibroblasts from unaffected fascia of DC patients exhibited a much greater overlap than fibroblasts derived from the palmar fascia of patients undergoing carpal tunnel release. Quantitative real time RT-PCR confirmed the differential expression of select genes validating the microarray data analyses. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that predisposition and recurrence in DC may stem, at least in part, from intrinsic similarities in the basal gene expression of diseased and phenotypically unaffected palmar fascia fibroblasts. These data also demonstrate that a collagen

  10. Intermittent fasting alleviates the neuropathic phenotype in a mouse model of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease

    PubMed Central

    Madorsky, Irina; Opalach, Katherine; Waber, Amanda; Verrier, Jonathan D.; Solmo, Chelsea; Foster, Thomas; Dunn, William A; Notterpek, Lucia

    2009-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1A (CMT1A) neuropathies linked to the misexpression of peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22) are progressive demyelinating disorders of the peripheral nervous system. In this study we asked whether dietary restriction by intermittent fasting (IF) could alleviate the neuropathic phenotype in the Trembler J (TrJ) mouse model of CMT1A. Our results show that neuropathic mice kept on a five month long IF regimen had improved locomotor performance compared to ad libitum (AL) fed littermates. The functional benefits of this dietary intervention are associated with an increased expression of myelin proteins combined with a thicker myelin sheath, less redundant basal lamina, and a reduction in aberrant Schwann cell proliferation. These morphological improvements are accompanied by a decrease in PMP22 protein aggregates, and enhanced expression of cytosolic chaperones and constituents of the autophagy-lysosomal pathway. These results indicate that dietary restriction is beneficial for peripheral nerve function in TrJ neuropathic mice, as it promotes the maintenance of locomotor performance. PMID:19320048

  11. Behavioral Phenotyping of Murine Disease Models with the Integrated Behavioral Station (INBEST)

    PubMed Central

    Sakic, Boris; Cooper, Marcella P. A.; Taylor, Sarah E.; Stojanovic, Milica; Zagorac, Bosa; Kapadia, Minesh

    2015-01-01

    Due to rapid advances in genetic engineering, small rodents have become the preferred subjects in many disciplines of biomedical research. In studies of chronic CNS disorders, there is an increasing demand for murine models with high validity at the behavioral level. However, multiple pathogenic mechanisms and complex functional deficits often impose challenges to reliably measure and interpret behavior of chronically sick mice. Therefore, the assessment of peripheral pathology and a behavioral profile at several time points using a battery of tests are required. Video-tracking, behavioral spectroscopy, and remote acquisition of physiological measures are emerging technologies that allow for comprehensive, accurate, and unbiased behavioral analysis in a home-base-like setting. This report describes a refined phenotyping protocol, which includes a custom-made monitoring apparatus (Integrated Behavioral Station, INBEST) that focuses on prolonged measurements of basic functional outputs, such as spontaneous activity, food/water intake and motivated behavior in a relatively stress-free environment. Technical and conceptual improvements in INBEST design may further promote reproducibility and standardization of behavioral studies. PMID:25938737

  12. NAD(+)-dependent activation of Sirt1 corrects the phenotype in a mouse model of mitochondrial disease.

    PubMed

    Cerutti, Raffaele; Pirinen, Eija; Lamperti, Costanza; Marchet, Silvia; Sauve, Anthony A; Li, Wei; Leoni, Valerio; Schon, Eric A; Dantzer, Françoise; Auwerx, Johan; Viscomi, Carlo; Zeviani, Massimo

    2014-06-01

    Mitochondrial disorders are highly heterogeneous conditions characterized by defects of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. Pharmacological activation of mitochondrial biogenesis has been proposed as an effective means to correct the biochemical defects and ameliorate the clinical phenotype in these severely disabling, often fatal, disorders. Pathways related to mitochondrial biogenesis are targets of Sirtuin1, a NAD(+)-dependent protein deacetylase. As NAD(+) boosts the activity of Sirtuin1 and other sirtuins, intracellular levels of NAD(+) play a key role in the homeostatic control of mitochondrial function by the metabolic status of the cell. We show here that supplementation with nicotinamide riboside, a natural NAD(+) precursor, or reduction of NAD(+) consumption by inhibiting the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases, leads to marked improvement of the respiratory chain defect and exercise intolerance of the Sco2 knockout/knockin mouse, a mitochondrial disease model characterized by impaired cytochrome c oxidase biogenesis. This strategy is potentially translatable into therapy of mitochondrial disorders in humans. PMID:24814483

  13. MYH9-related disease: Five novel mutations expanding the spectrum of causative mutations and confirming genotype/phenotype correlations

    PubMed Central

    De Rocco, Daniela; Zieger, Barbara; Platokouki, Helen; Heller, Paula G.; Pastore, Annalisa; Bottega, Roberta; Noris, Patrizia; Barozzi, Serena; Glembotsky, Ana C.; Pergantou, Helen; Balduini, Carlo L.; Savoia, Anna; Pecci, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    MYH9-related disease (MYH9-RD) is a rare autosomal dominant syndromic disorder caused by mutations in MYH9, the gene encoding for the heavy chain of non-muscle myosin IIA (myosin-9). MYH9-RD is characterized by congenital macrothrombocytopenia and typical inclusion bodies in neutrophils associated with a variable risk of developing sensorineural deafness, presenile cataract, and/or progressive nephropathy. The spectrum of mutations responsible for MYH9-RD is limited. We report five families, each with a novel MYH9 mutation. Two mutations, p.Val34Gly and p.Arg702Ser, affect the motor domain of myosin-9, whereas the other three, p.Met847_Glu853dup, p.Lys1048_Glu1054del, and p.Asp1447Tyr, hit the coiled-coil tail domain of the protein. The motor domain mutations were associated with more severe clinical phenotypes than those in the tail domain. PMID:23123319

  14. Neurodegeneration in spinal muscular atrophy: from disease phenotype and animal models to therapeutic strategies and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Monani, Umrao R; De Vivo, Darryl C

    2014-01-01

    Of the numerous inherited diseases known to afflict the pediatric population, spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is among the most common. It has an incidence of approximately one in 10,000 newborns and a carrier frequency of one in 50. Despite its relatively high incidence, SMA remains somewhat obscure among the many neurodegenerative diseases that affect humans. Nevertheless, the last two decades have witnessed remarkable progress in our understanding of the pathology, underlying biology and especially the molecular genetics of SMA. This has led to a genuine expectation within the scientific community that a robust treatment will be available to patients before the end of the decade. The progress made in our understanding of SMA and, therefore, towards a viable therapy for affected individuals is in large measure a consequence of the simple yet fascinating genetics of the disease. Nevertheless, important questions remain. Addressing these questions promises not only to accelerate the march towards a cure for SMA, but also to uncover novel therapies for related neurodegenerative disorders. This review discusses our current understanding of SMA, considers the challenges ahead, describes existing treatment options and highlights state-of-the-art research being conducted as a means to a better, safer and more effective treatment for the disease. PMID:24648831

  15. Mucopolysaccharidosis-like phenotype in feline Sandhoff disease and partial correction after AAV gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Gray-Edwards, Heather L; Brunson, Brandon L; Holland, Merrilee; Hespel, Adrien-Maxence; Bradbury, Allison M; McCurdy, Victoria J; Beadlescomb, Patricia M; Randle, Ashley N; Salibi, Nouha; Denney, Thomas S; Beyers, Ronald J; Johnson, Aime K; Voyles, Meredith L; Montgomery, Ronald D; Wilson, Diane U; Hudson, Judith A; Cox, Nancy R; Baker, Henry J; Sena-Esteves, Miguel; Martin, Douglas R

    2015-01-01

    Sandhoff disease (SD) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease caused by a mutation in the enzyme β-N-acetylhexosaminidase. Children with infantile onset SD develop seizures, loss of motor tone and swallowing problems, eventually reaching a vegetative state with death typically by 4years of age. Other symptoms include vertebral gibbus and cardiac abnormalities strikingly similar to those of the mucopolysaccharidoses. Isolated fibroblasts from SD patients have impaired catabolism of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). To evaluate mucopolysaccharidosis-like features of the feline SD model, we utilized radiography, MRI, echocardiography, histopathology and GAG quantification of both central nervous system and peripheral tissues/fluids. The feline SD model exhibits cardiac valvular and structural abnormalities, skeletal changes and spinal cord compression that are consistent with accumulation of GAGs, but are much less prominent than the severe neurologic disease that defines the humane endpoint (4.5±0.5months). Sixteen weeks after intracranial AAV gene therapy, GAG storage was cleared in the SD cat cerebral cortex and liver, but not in the heart, lung, skeletal muscle, kidney, spleen, pancreas, small intestine, skin, or urine. GAG storage worsens with time and therefore may become a significant source of pathology in humans whose lives are substantially lengthened by gene therapy or other novel treatments for the primary, neurologic disease. PMID:25971245

  16. Multi-omic profiles of human non-alcoholic fatty liver disease tissue highlight heterogenic phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Wruck, Wasco; Kashofer, Karl; Rehman, Samrina; Daskalaki, Andriani; Berg, Daniela; Gralka, Ewa; Jozefczuk, Justyna; Drews, Katharina; Pandey, Vikash; Regenbrecht, Christian; Wierling, Christoph; Turano, Paola; Korf, Ulrike; Zatloukal, Kurt; Lehrach, Hans; Westerhoff, Hans V; Adjaye, James

    2015-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a consequence of sedentary life style and high fat diets with an estimated prevalence of about 30% in western countries. It is associated with insulin resistance, obesity, glucose intolerance and drug toxicity. Additionally, polymorphisms within, e.g., APOC3, PNPLA3, NCAN, TM6SF2 and PPP1R3B, correlate with NAFLD. Several studies have already investigated later stages of the disease. This study explores the early steatosis stage of NAFLD with the aim of identifying molecular mechanisms underlying the etiology of NAFLD. We analyzed liver biopsies and serum samples from patients with high- and low-grade steatosis (also pre-disease states) employing transcriptomics, ELISA-based serum protein analyses and metabolomics. Here, we provide a detailed description of the various related datasets produced in the course of this study. These datasets may help other researchers find new clues for the etiology of NAFLD and the mechanisms underlying its progression to more severe disease states. PMID:26646939

  17. Multi-omic profiles of human non-alcoholic fatty liver disease tissue highlight heterogenic phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Wruck, Wasco; Kashofer, Karl; Rehman, Samrina; Daskalaki, Andriani; Berg, Daniela; Gralka, Ewa; Jozefczuk, Justyna; Drews, Katharina; Pandey, Vikash; Regenbrecht, Christian; Wierling, Christoph; Turano, Paola; Korf, Ulrike; Zatloukal, Kurt; Lehrach, Hans; Westerhoff, Hans V.; Adjaye, James

    2015-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a consequence of sedentary life style and high fat diets with an estimated prevalence of about 30% in western countries. It is associated with insulin resistance, obesity, glucose intolerance and drug toxicity. Additionally, polymorphisms within, e.g., APOC3, PNPLA3, NCAN, TM6SF2 and PPP1R3B, correlate with NAFLD. Several studies have already investigated later stages of the disease. This study explores the early steatosis stage of NAFLD with the aim of identifying molecular mechanisms underlying the etiology of NAFLD. We analyzed liver biopsies and serum samples from patients with high- and low-grade steatosis (also pre-disease states) employing transcriptomics, ELISA-based serum protein analyses and metabolomics. Here, we provide a detailed description of the various related datasets produced in the course of this study. These datasets may help other researchers find new clues for the etiology of NAFLD and the mechanisms underlying its progression to more severe disease states. PMID:26646939

  18. Mutations in Two Genes Encoding Different Subunits of a Receptor Signaling Complex Result in an Identical Disease Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Paloneva, Juha; Manninen, Tuula; Christman, Grant; Hovanes, Karine; Mandelin, Jami; Adolfsson, Rolf; Bianchin, Marino; Bird, Thomas; Miranda, Roxana; Salmaggi, Andrea; Tranebjærg, Lisbeth; Konttinen, Yrjö; Peltonen, Leena

    2002-01-01

    Polycystic lipomembranous osteodysplasia with sclerosing leukoencephalopathy (PLOSL), also known as “Nasu-Hakola disease,” is a globally distributed recessively inherited disease leading to death during the 5th decade of life and is characterized by early-onset progressive dementia and bone cysts. Elsewhere, we have identified PLOSL mutations in TYROBP (DAP12), which codes for a membrane receptor component in natural-killer and myeloid cells, and also have identified genetic heterogeneity in PLOSL, with some patients carrying no mutations in TYROBP. Here we complete the molecular pathology of PLOSL by identifying TREM2 as the second PLOSL gene. TREM2 forms a receptor signaling complex with TYROBP and triggers activation of the immune responses in macrophages and dendritic cells. Patients with PLOSL have no defects in cell-mediated immunity, suggesting a remarkable capacity of the human immune system to compensate for the inactive TYROBP-mediated activation pathway. Our data imply that the TYROBP-mediated signaling pathway plays a significant role in human brain and bone tissue and provide an interesting example of how mutations in two different subunits of a multisubunit receptor complex result in an identical human disease phenotype. PMID:12080485

  19. Complete Phenotypic Recovery of an Alzheimer's Disease Model by a Quinone-Tryptophan Hybrid Aggregation Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Scherzer-Attali, Roni; Pellarin, Riccardo; Convertino, Marino; Frydman-Marom, Anat; Egoz-Matia, Nirit; Peled, Sivan; Levy-Sakin, Michal; Shalev, Deborah E.; Caflisch, Amedeo; Gazit, Ehud; Segal, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    The rational design of amyloid oligomer inhibitors is yet an unmet drug development need. Previous studies have identified the role of tryptophan in amyloid recognition, association and inhibition. Furthermore, tryptophan was ranked as the residue with highest amyloidogenic propensity. Other studies have demonstrated that quinones, specifically anthraquinones, can serve as aggregation inhibitors probably due to the dipole interaction of the quinonic ring with aromatic recognition sites within the amyloidogenic proteins. Here, using in vitro, in vivo and in silico tools we describe the synthesis and functional characterization of a rationally designed inhibitor of the Alzheimer's disease-associated β-amyloid. This compound, 1,4-naphthoquinon-2-yl-L-tryptophan (NQTrp), combines the recognition capacities of both quinone and tryptophan moieties and completely inhibited Aβ oligomerization and fibrillization, as well as the cytotoxic effect of Aβ oligomers towards cultured neuronal cell line. Furthermore, when fed to transgenic Alzheimer's disease Drosophila model it prolonged their life span and completely abolished their defective locomotion. Analysis of the brains of these flies showed a significant reduction in oligomeric species of Aβ while immuno-staining of the 3rd instar larval brains showed a significant reduction in Aβ accumulation. Computational studies, as well as NMR and CD spectroscopy provide mechanistic insight into the activity of the compound which is most likely mediated by clamping of the aromatic recognition interface in the central segment of Aβ. Our results demonstrate that interfering with the aromatic core of amyloidogenic peptides is a promising approach for inhibiting various pathogenic species associated with amyloidogenic diseases. The compound NQTrp can serve as a lead for developing a new class of disease modifying drugs for Alzheimer's disease. PMID:20559435

  20. Complete phenotypic recovery of an Alzheimer's disease model by a quinone-tryptophan hybrid aggregation inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Scherzer-Attali, Roni; Pellarin, Riccardo; Convertino, Marino; Frydman-Marom, Anat; Egoz-Matia, Nirit; Peled, Sivan; Levy-Sakin, Michal; Shalev, Deborah E; Caflisch, Amedeo; Gazit, Ehud; Segal, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    The rational design of amyloid oligomer inhibitors is yet an unmet drug development need. Previous studies have identified the role of tryptophan in amyloid recognition, association and inhibition. Furthermore, tryptophan was ranked as the residue with highest amyloidogenic propensity. Other studies have demonstrated that quinones, specifically anthraquinones, can serve as aggregation inhibitors probably due to the dipole interaction of the quinonic ring with aromatic recognition sites within the amyloidogenic proteins. Here, using in vitro, in vivo and in silico tools we describe the synthesis and functional characterization of a rationally designed inhibitor of the Alzheimer's disease-associated beta-amyloid. This compound, 1,4-naphthoquinon-2-yl-L-tryptophan (NQTrp), combines the recognition capacities of both quinone and tryptophan moieties and completely inhibited Abeta oligomerization and fibrillization, as well as the cytotoxic effect of Abeta oligomers towards cultured neuronal cell line. Furthermore, when fed to transgenic Alzheimer's disease Drosophila model it prolonged their life span and completely abolished their defective locomotion. Analysis of the brains of these flies showed a significant reduction in oligomeric species of Abeta while immuno-staining of the 3(rd) instar larval brains showed a significant reduction in Abeta accumulation. Computational studies, as well as NMR and CD spectroscopy provide mechanistic insight into the activity of the compound which is most likely mediated by clamping of the aromatic recognition interface in the central segment of Abeta. Our results demonstrate that interfering with the aromatic core of amyloidogenic peptides is a promising approach for inhibiting various pathogenic species associated with amyloidogenic diseases. The compound NQTrp can serve as a lead for developing a new class of disease modifying drugs for Alzheimer's disease. PMID:20559435

  1. A Laboratory Phenotype/Genotype Correlation of 1167 French Patients From 670 Families With von Willebrand Disease

    PubMed Central

    Veyradier, Agnès; Boisseau, Pierre; Fressinaud, Edith; Caron, Claudine; Ternisien, Catherine; Giraud, Mathilde; Zawadzki, Christophe; Trossaert, Marc; Itzhar-Baïkian, Nathalie; Dreyfus, Marie; d’Oiron, Roseline; Borel-Derlon, Annie; Susen, Sophie; Bezieau, Stéphane; Denis, Cécile V.; Goudemand, Jenny

    2016-01-01

    Abstract von Willebrand disease (VWD) is a genetic bleeding disease due to a defect of von Willebrand factor (VWF), a glycoprotein crucial for platelet adhesion to the subendothelium after vascular injury. VWD include quantitative defects of VWF, either partial (type 1 with VWF levels <50 IU/dL) or virtually total (type 3 with undetectable VWF levels) and also qualitative defects of VWF (type 2 variants with discrepant antigenic and functional VWF levels). The most bleeding forms of VWD usually do not concern type 1 patients with the mildest VWF defects (VWF levels between 30 and 50 IU/dL). The French reference center for VWD performed a laboratory phenotypic and genotypic analysis in 1167 VWD patients (670 families) selected by their basic biologic phenotype: type 3, type 2, and type 1 with VWF levels <30 IU/dL. In these patients indeed, to achieve an accurate diagnosis of VWD type and subtype is crucial for the management (treatment and genetic counseling). A phenotype/genotype correlation was present in 99.3% of cases; 323 distinct VWF sequence variations (58% of novel) were identified (missense 67% versus truncating 33%). The distribution of VWD types was: 25% of type 1, 8% of type 3, 66% of type 2 (2A: 18%, 2B: 17%, 2M: 19%, 2N: 12%), and 1% of undetermined type. Type 1 VWD was related either to a defective synthesis/secretion or to an accelerated clearance of VWF. In type 3 VWD, bi-allelic mutations of VWF were found in almost all patients. In type 2A, the most frequent mechanism was a hyper-proteolysis of VWF. Type 2B showed 85% of patients with deleterious mutations (distinct from type 2B New York). Type 2M was linked to a defective binding of VWF to platelet glycoprotein Ib or to collagen. Type 2N VWD included almost half type 2N/3. This biologic study emphasizes the complex mechanisms for both quantitative and qualitative VWF defects in VWD. In addition, this study provides a new epidemiologic picture of the most bleeding forms of VWD in which

  2. Analysis of HLA and disease susceptibility: Chromosome 6 genes and sex influence long-QT phenotype

    SciTech Connect

    Weitkamp, L.R.; Moss, A.J.; Hall, W.J.; Robinson, J.L.; Guttormsen, S.A.; Lewis, R.A.; MacCluer, J.W.; Schwartz, P.J.; Locati, E.H.; Tzivoni, D.

    1994-12-01

    The long-QT (LQT) syndrome is a genetically complex disorder that is characterized by syncope and fatal ventricular arrhythmias. LQT syndrome, as defined by a prolonged electrocardiographic QT interval, has a higher incidence in females than in males and does not exhibit Mendelian transmission patterns in all families. Among those families that are nearly consistent with Mendelian transmission, linkage between a locus for LQT syndrome and the H-ras-1 locus on the short arm of chromosome 11 has been reported in some families but not in others. Earlier analyses suggesting that LQT syndrome might be caused by a gene in the HLA region of chromosome 6 were not confirmed by standard linkage analyses. Here, we present an analysis of HLA haplotype sharing among affected pedigree members, showing an excess of haplotype sharing in a previously published Japanese pedigree and possibly also in 15 families of European descent. The haplotypes shared by affected individuals derive from both affected and unaffected parents. In an analysis of independent (unrelated) HLA haplotypes, we also found a nonrandom distribution of HLA-DR genes in LQT syndrome patients compared with controls, suggesting an association between the LQT phenotype and specific HLA-DR genes. Our data indicate that DR2 has a protective effect and, particularly in males, that DR7 may increase susceptibility to the LQT syndrome. Thus, LQT syndrome may be influenced by genes on chromosomes 11 and 6, possibly with a sex-specific effect. These results provide a model for an effect of HLA-region genes inherited from either parent on the expression of an illness that may be determined principally by alleles at loci not linked to HLA.

  3. Linking disease symptoms and subtypes with personalized systems-based phenotypes: A proof of concept study

    PubMed Central

    Aschbacher, Kirstin; Adam, Emma K.; Crofford, Leslie J.; Kemeny, Margaret E.; Demitrack, Mark A.; Ben-Zvi, Amos

    2012-01-01

    A dynamic systems model was used to generate parameters describing a phenotype of Hypothalamic–Pituitary–Adrenal (HPA) behavior in a sample of 36 patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) and/ or fibromyalgia (FM) and 36 case-matched healthy controls. Altered neuroendocrine function, particularly in relation to somatic symptoms and poor sleep quality, may contribute to the pathophysiology of these disorders. Blood plasma was assayed for cortisol and ACTH every 10 min for 24 h. The dynamic model was specified with an ordinary differential equation using three parameters: (1) ACTH-adrenal signaling, (2) inhibitory feedback, and (3) non-ACTH influences. The model was ‘‘personalized’’ by estimating an individualized set of parameters from each participant’s data. Day and nighttime parameters were assessed separately. Two nocturnal parameters (ACTH-adrenal signaling and inhibitory feedback) significantly differentiated the two patient subgroups (“fatigue-predominant” patients with CFS only versus ‘‘pain-predominant’’ patients with FM and comorbid chronic fatigue) from controls (allp’s < .05), whereas daytime parameters and diurnal/nocturnal slopes did not. The same nocturnal parameters were significantly associated with somatic symptoms among patients (p’s < .05). There was a significantly different pattern of association between nocturnal non-ACTH influences and sleep quality among patients versus controls (p < .05). Although speculative, the finding that patient somatic symptoms decreased when more cortisol was produced per unit ACTH, is consistent with cortisol’s anti-inflammatory and sleep-modulatory effects. Patients’ HPA systems may compensate by promoting more rapid or sustained cortisol production. Mapping “behavioral phenotypes” of stress–arousal systems onto symptom clusters may help disentangle the pathophysiology of complex disorders with frequent comorbidity. PMID:22687333

  4. Impact of socioeconomic status on disease phenotype, genomic landscape and outcomes in myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Mastaglio, Francesca; Bedair, Khaled; Papaemmanuil, Elli; Groves, Michael J; Hyslop, Ann; Keenan, Norene; Hothersall, Eleanor J; Campbell, Peter J; Bowen, David T; Tauro, Sudhir

    2016-07-01

    Genetic and epigenetic alterations contribute to the biological and clinical characteristics of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), but a role for socioeconomic environment remains unclear. Here, socioeconomic status (SES) for 283 MDS patients was estimated using the Scottish Index of Multiple Deprivation tool. Indices were assigned to quintile categorical indicators ranked from SES1 (lowest) to SES5 (highest). Clinicopathological features and outcomes between SES quintiles containing 15%, 20%, 19%, 30% and 16% of patients were compared. Prognostic scores identified lower-risk MDS in 82% of patients, with higher-risk disease in 18%. SES quintiles did not associate with age, gender, cytogenetics, International Prognostic scores or, in sub-analysis (n = 95), driver mutations. The odds ratio of a diagnosis of refractory anaemia was greater than other MDS sub-types in SES5 (OR 1·9, P = 0·024). Most patients (91%) exclusively received supportive care. SES did not associate with leukaemic transformation or cause of death. Cox regression models confirmed male gender (P < 0·05), disease-risk (P < 0·0001) and age (P < 0·01) as independent predictors of leukaemia-free survival, with leukaemic transformation an additional determinant of overall survival (P = 0·07). Thus, if access to healthcare is equitable, SES does not determine disease biology or survival in MDS patients receiving supportive treatment; additional studies are required to determine whether outcomes following disease-modifying therapies are influenced by SES. PMID:27098194

  5. Pulmonary CT and MRI phenotypes that help explain chronic pulmonary obstruction disease pathophysiology and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Eric A; Lynch, David A; Barr, R Graham; van Beek, Edwin J R; Parraga, Grace

    2016-03-01

    Pulmonary x-ray computed tomographic (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) research and development has been motivated, in part, by the quest to subphenotype common chronic lung diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). For thoracic CT and MRI, the main COPD research tools, disease biomarkers are being validated that go beyond anatomy and structure to include pulmonary functional measurements such as regional ventilation, perfusion, and inflammation. In addition, there has also been a drive to improve spatial and contrast resolution while at the same time reducing or eliminating radiation exposure. Therefore, this review focuses on our evolving understanding of patient-relevant and clinically important COPD endpoints and how current and emerging MRI and CT tools and measurements may be exploited for their identification, quantification, and utilization. Since reviews of the imaging physics of pulmonary CT and MRI and reviews of other COPD imaging methods were previously published and well-summarized, we focus on the current clinical challenges in COPD and the potential of newly emerging MR and CT imaging measurements to address them. Here we summarize MRI and CT imaging methods and their clinical translation for generating reproducible and sensitive measurements of COPD related to pulmonary ventilation and perfusion as well as parenchyma morphology. The key clinical problems in COPD provide an important framework in which pulmonary imaging needs to rapidly move in order to address the staggering burden, costs, as well as the mortality and morbidity associated with COPD. PMID:26199216

  6. FLT3/D835Y mutation knock-in mice display less aggressive disease compared with FLT3/internal tandem duplication (ITD) mice

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Emily; Li, Li; Duffield, Amy S.; Ma, Hayley S.; Huso, David L.; Small, Don

    2013-01-01

    FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3) is mutated in approximately one third of acute myeloid leukemia cases. The most common FLT3 mutations in acute myeloid leukemia are internal tandem duplication (ITD) mutations in the juxtamembrane domain (23%) and point mutations in the tyrosine kinase domain (10%). The mutation substituting the aspartic acid at position 838 (equivalent to the human aspartic acid residue at position 835) with a tyrosine (referred to as FLT3/D835Y hereafter) is the most frequent kinase domain mutation, converting aspartic acid to tyrosine. Although both of these mutations constitutively activate FLT3, patients with an ITD mutation have a significantly poorer prognosis. To elucidate the mechanisms behind this prognostic difference, we have generated a knock-in mouse model with a D838Y point mutation in FLT3 that corresponds to the FLT3/D835Y mutation described in humans. Compared with FLT3/ITD knock-in mice, the FLT3/D835Y knock-in mice survive significantly longer. The majority of these mice develop myeloproliferative neoplasms with a less-aggressive phenotype. In addition, FLT3/D835Y mice have distinct hematopoietic development patterns. Unlike the tremendous depletion of the hematopoietic stem cell compartment we have observed in FLT3/ITD mice, FLT3/D835Y mutant mice are not depleted in hematopoietic stem cells. Further comparisons of these FLT3/D835Y knock-in mice with FLT3/ITD mice should provide an ideal platform for dissecting the molecular mechanisms that underlie the prognostic differences between the two different types of FLT3 mutations. PMID:24255108

  7. Latitude, sunshine, and human lactase phenotype distributions may contribute to geographic patterns of modern disease: the inflammatory bowel disease model.

    PubMed

    Szilagyi, Andrew; Leighton, Henry; Burstein, Barry; Xue, Xiaoqing

    2014-01-01

    Countries with high lactase nonpersistence (LNP) or low lactase persistence (LP) populations have lower rates of some "western" diseases, mimicking the effects of sunshine and latitude. Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), ie, Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, is putatively also influenced by sunshine. Recent availability of worldwide IBD rates and lactase distributions allows more extensive comparisons. The aim of this study was to evaluate the extent to which modern day lactase distributions interact with latitude, sunshine exposure, and IBD rates. National IBD rates, national distributions of LP/LNP, and population-weighted average national annual ultraviolet B exposure were obtained, estimated, or calculated from the literature. Negative binomial analysis was used to assess the relationship between the three parameters and IBD rates. Analyses for 55 countries were grouped in three geographic domains, ie, global, Europe, and non-Europe. In Europe, both latitude and ultraviolet B exposure correlate well with LP/LNP and IBD. In non-Europe, latitude and ultraviolet B exposure correlate weakly with LP/LNP, but the latter retains a more robust correlation with IBD. In univariate analysis, latitude, ultraviolet B exposure, and LP/LNP all had significant relationships with IBD. Multivariate analysis showed that lactase distributions provided the best model of fit for IBD. The model of IBD reveals the evolutionary effects of the human lactase divide, and suggests that latitude, ultraviolet B exposure, and LP/LNP mimic each other because LP/LNP follows latitudinal directions toward the equator. However, on a large scale, lactase patterns also follow lateral polarity. The effects of LP/LNP in disease are likely to involve complex interactions. PMID:24971037

  8. Refining Genotype-Phenotype Correlation in Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Young-Hwan; Conklin, John; Chan, Winnie; Roslin, Nicole M; Liu, Jannel; He, Ning; Wang, Kairong; Sundsbak, Jamie L; Heyer, Christina M; Haider, Masoom; Paterson, Andrew D; Harris, Peter C; Pei, York

    2016-06-01

    Renal disease variability in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is strongly influenced by the gene locus (PKD1 versus PKD2). Recent studies identified nontruncating PKD1 mutations in approximately 30% of patients who underwent comprehensive mutation screening, but the clinical significance of these mutations is not well defined. We examined the genotype-renal function correlation in a prospective cohort of 220 unrelated ADPKD families ascertained through probands with serum creatinine ≤1.4 mg/dl at recruitment. We screened these families for PKD1 and PKD2 mutations and reviewed the clinical outcomes of the probands and affected family members. Height-adjusted total kidney volume (htTKV) was obtained in 161 affected subjects. Multivariate Cox proportional hazard modeling for renal and patient survival was performed in 707 affected probands and family members. Overall, we identified pathogenic mutations in 84.5% of our families, in which the prevalence of PKD1 truncating, PKD1 in-frame insertion/deletion, PKD1 nontruncating, and PKD2 mutations was 38.3%, 4.3%, 27.1%, and 30.3%, respectively. Compared with patients with PKD1 truncating mutations, patients with PKD1 in-frame insertion/deletion, PKD1 nontruncating, or PKD2 mutations have smaller htTKV and reduced risks (hazard ratio [95% confidence interval]) of ESRD (0.35 [0.14 to 0.91], 0.10 [0.05 to 0.18], and 0.03 [0.01 to 0.05], respectively) and death (0.31 [0.11 to 0.87], 0.20 [0.11 to 0.38], and 0.18 [0.11 to 0.31], respectively). Refined genotype-renal disease correlation coupled with targeted next generation sequencing of PKD1 and PKD2 may provide useful clinical prognostication for ADPKD. PMID:26453610

  9. Expanded lung T-bet+RORγT+ CD4+ T-cells in sarcoidosis patients with a favourable disease phenotype.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Ylva; Lepzien, Rico; Kullberg, Susanna; Eklund, Anders; Smed-Sörensen, Anna; Grunewald, Johan

    2016-08-01

    Disease phenotypes of pulmonary sarcoidosis are distinguished by clinical rather than immunological criteria. We aimed to characterise patterns of CD4(+) T-cell lineage plasticity underlying the differences in clinical presentation and disease course between the acute form, Löfgren's syndrome, and the heterogeneous, potentially progressive "non-Löfgren" form.33 pulmonary sarcoidosis patients and nine controls underwent bronchoscopy with bronchoalveolar lavage. CD4(+) T-cell transcription factor, chemokine receptor and T-cell receptor expression, proliferation and cytokine production were assessed in the lavage fluid and peripheral blood using flow cytometry and multicolour FluoroSpot.CD4(+) T-cells simultaneously expressing the T-helper cell (Th)1 and Th17 transcriptional regulators T-bet and RORγT (T-bet(+)RORγT(+)) were identified in the lavage, but not blood, of all subjects, and to a significantly higher degree in Löfgren's patients. T-bet(+)RORγT(+) cells proliferated actively, produced interferon (IFN)γ and interleukin (IL)-17A, co-expressed the chemokine receptors CXCR3 and CCR6, and correlated with nonchronic disease. T-cell receptor-restricted Vα2.3(+)Vβ22(+) T-cells strongly co-expressed T-bet/RORγT and CXCR3/CCR6. Cytokine production was more heterogeneous in Löfgren's patients, with significantly higher IL-17A, IL-10, IL-22 and IL-2, but lower IFNγ.Here we demonstrate the presence of lung T-bet(+)RORγT(+)CXCR3(+)CCR6(+) CD4(+) T-cells and Th17-associated cytokines especially in sarcoidosis patients with a favourable prognosis, suggesting a Th1/Th17-permissive environment in the lung with implications for disease resolution. PMID:27230441

  10. Methodological considerations when assessing restricted and repetitive behaviors and aggression

    PubMed Central

    Keefer, A.J.; Kalb, L.; Mazurek, M.O.; Kanne, S.M.; Freedman, B.; Vasa, R.A.

    2016-01-01

    Methodological issues impacting the relationship between aggression and restricted, repetitive, and stereotyped behaviors and interests (RRSBI) were examined in 2648 children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) using a multi-method, multi-informant analysis model to assess the effects of informant, assessment method, and aggression phenotype. Overall, a significant, but small relationship was found between RRSBI and aggression (p < .05). There was significant heterogeneity of estimates with large effect sizes observed when utilizing teacher report and a broad phenotype of aggression. Variance in estimates was attributed to differences in informant and assessment method with two times greater effect attributed to informant. Results suggest strategies to optimize future investigations of the relationship between RRSBI and aggression. Findings also provide the opportunity for the development of targeted interventions for aggression in youth with ASD. PMID:27239223

  11. Aggression and Anxiety: Social Context and Neurobiological Links

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, Inga D.; Veenema, Alexa H.; Beiderbeck, Daniela I.

    2009-01-01

    Psychopathologies such as anxiety- and depression-related disorders are often characterized by impaired social behaviours including excessive aggression and violence. Excessive aggression and violence likely develop as a consequence of generally disturbed emotional regulation, such as abnormally high or low levels of anxiety. This suggests an overlap between brain circuitries and neurochemical systems regulating aggression and anxiety. In this review, we will discuss different forms of male aggression, rodent models of excessive aggression, and neurobiological mechanisms underlying male aggression in the context of anxiety. We will summarize our attempts to establish an animal model of high and abnormal aggression using rats selected for high (HAB) vs. low (LAB) anxiety-related behaviour. Briefly, male LAB rats and, to a lesser extent, male HAB rats show high and abnormal forms of aggression compared with non-selected (NAB) rats, making them a suitable animal model for studying excessive aggression in the context of extremes in innate anxiety. In addition, we will discuss differences in the activity of the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis, brain arginine vasopressin, and the serotonin systems, among others, which contribute to the distinct behavioural phenotypes related to aggression and anxiety. Further investigation of the neurobiological systems in animals with distinct anxiety phenotypes might provide valuable information about the link between excessive aggression and disturbed emotional regulation, which is essential for understanding the social and emotional deficits that are characteristic of many human psychiatric disorders. PMID:20407578

  12. The 5-lipoxygenase pathway: oxidative and inflammatory contributions to the Alzheimer’s disease phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Yash B.; Praticò, Domenico

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common, and, arguably, one of the most-well studied, neurodegenerative conditions. Several decades of investigation have revealed that amyloid-β and tau proteins are critical pathological players in this condition. Genetic analyses have revealed specific mutations in the cellular machinery that produces amyloid-β, but these mutations are found in only a small fraction of patients with the early-onset variant of AD. In addition to development of amyloid-β and tau pathology, oxidative damage and inflammation are consistently found in the brains of these patients. The 5-lipoxygenase protein enzyme (5LO) and its downstream leukotriene metabolites have long been known to be important modulators of oxidation and inflammation in other disease states. Recent in vivo evidence using murine knock-out models has implicated the 5LO pathway, which also requires the 5LO activating protein (FLAP), in the molecular pathology of AD, including the metabolism of amyloid-β and tau. In this manuscript, we will provide an overview of 5LO and FLAP, discussing their involvement in biochemical pathways relevant to AD pathogenesis. We will also discuss how the 5LO pathway contributes to the molecular and behavioral insults seen in AD and provide an assessment of how targeting these proteins could lead to therapeutics relevant not only for AD, but also other related neurodegenerative conditions. PMID:25642165

  13. Morpholino-mediated SOD1 reduction ameliorates an amyotrophic lateral sclerosis disease phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Nizzardo, M.; Simone, C.; Rizzo, F.; Ulzi, G.; Ramirez, A.; Rizzuti, M.; Bordoni, A.; Bucchia, M.; Gatti, S.; Bresolin, N.; Comi, G. P.; Corti, S.

    2016-01-01

    Neurotoxicity due to the accumulation of mutant proteins is thought to drive pathogenesis in neurodegenerative diseases. Mutations in superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) are linked to familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (fALS); these mutations result in progressive motor neuron death through one or more acquired toxicities. Interestingly, SOD1 is not only responsible for fALS but may also play a significant role in sporadic ALS; therefore, SOD1 represents a promising therapeutic target. Here, we report slowed disease progression, improved neuromuscular function, and increased survival in an in vivo ALS model following therapeutic delivery of morpholino oligonucleotides (MOs) designed to reduce the synthesis of human SOD1. Neuropathological analysis demonstrated increased motor neuron and axon numbers and a remarkable reduction in astrogliosis and microgliosis. To test this strategy in a human model, we treated human fALS induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived motor neurons with MOs; these cells exhibited increased survival and reduced expression of apoptotic markers. Our data demonstrated the efficacy of MO-mediated therapy in mouse and human ALS models, setting the stage for human clinical trials. PMID:26878886

  14. Hippocampal transcriptome-guided genetic analysis of correlated episodic memory phenotypes in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Jingwen; Kim, Sungeun; Nho, Kwangsik; Chen, Rui; Risacher, Shannon L.; Moore, Jason H.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Shen, Li

    2015-01-01

    As the most common type of dementia, Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder initially manifested by impaired memory performances. While the diagnosis information indicates a dichotomous status of a patient, memory scores have the potential to capture the continuous nature of the disease progression and may provide more insights into the underlying mechanism. In this work, we performed a targeted genetic study of memory scores on an AD cohort to identify the associations between a set of genes highly expressed in the hippocampal region and seven cognitive scores related to episodic memory. Both main effects and interaction effects of the targeted genetic markers on these correlated memory scores were examined. In addition to well-known AD genetic markers APOE and TOMM40, our analysis identified a new risk gene NAV2 through the gene-level main effect analysis. NAV2 was found to be significantly and consistently associated with all seven episodic memory scores. Genetic interaction analysis also yielded a few promising hits warranting further investigation, especially for the RAVLT list B Score. PMID:25859259

  15. Cardiovascular disease risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndrome: focus on aggressive management of dyslipidemia.

    PubMed

    Falko, James M; Moser, Robert J; Meis, Sophia B; Caulin-Glaser, Teresa

    2005-05-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus and the closely related metabolic syndrome markedly increase the risk of cardiovascular disease a major contributor is the dyslipidemia. Recent studies and new national guidelines suggest these very high risk patients with cardiovascular disease achieve optional low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) level of less than 70 mg/dl. In addition there may be no threshold to begin therapeutic lifestyle change and pharmacologic therapy to reduce LDL-C by 30-40%. Although randomized controlled trials with statins indicate that LDL reduction clearly reduces cardiovascular risk in these patients, the typical dyslipidemia of type 2 diabetes mellitus is also characterized by low high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels, increased triglyceride-rich lipoproteins and small dense LDL, as well as increased postprandial lipemia. The later lipoproteins increase non-HDL-C levels. In order to address these abnormalities it may be necessary to utilize combined approaches with a fibrate or nicotinic acid, or other agents with statins to help reduce risk beyond statins. In addition, supervised, therapeutic life-style change is often underutilized therapy in patients with established coronary artery disease. This review will focus on maximizing the treatment of dyslipidemia in type 2 diabetes and the metabolic syndrome and discuss the evidence based studies and new developments in the management in these very high risk patients. PMID:18220588

  16. Evidence of selection on phenotypic plasticity and cost of plasticity in response to host-feeding sources in the major Chagas disease vector Triatoma infestans.

    PubMed

    Nattero, Julieta; Leonhard, Gustavo; Gürtler, Ricardo E; Crocco, Liliana B

    2015-12-01

    Phenotypic plasticity is the ability of a genotype to display alternative phenotypes in different environments. Understanding how plasticity evolves and the factors that favor and constrain its evolution have attracted great interest. We investigated whether selection on phenotypic plasticity and costs of plasticity affect head and wing morphology in response to host-feeding sources in the major Chagas disease vector Triatoma infestans. Full-sib families were assigned to blood-feeding on either live pigeons or guinea pigs throughout their lives. We measured diet-induced phenotypic plasticity on wing and head size and shape; characterized selection on phenotypic plasticity for female and male fecundity rates, and evaluated costs of plasticity. Wing size and shape variables exhibited significant differences in phenotypic plasticity associated with host-feeding source in female and male bugs. Evidence of selection on phenotypic plasticity was detected in head size and shape for guinea pig-fed females. A lower female fecundity rate was detected in more plastic families for traits that showed selection on plasticity. These results provide insights into the morphological phenotypic plasticity of T. infestans, documenting fitness advantages of head size and shape for females fed on guinea pigs. This vector species showed measurable benefits of responding plastically to environmental variation rather than adopting a fixed development plan. The presence of cost of plasticity suggests constraints on the evolution of plasticity. Our study indicates that females fed on guinea pigs (and perhaps on other suitable mammalian hosts) have greater chances of evolving under selection on phenotypic plasticity subject to some constraints. PMID:26433077

  17. Sleep Physiology Alterations Precede Plethoric Phenotypic Changes in R6/1 Huntington’s Disease Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lebreton, Fanny; Cayzac, Sebastien; Pietropaolo, Susanna; Jeantet, Yannick; Cho, Yoon H.

    2015-01-01

    In hereditary neurodegenerative Huntington’s disease (HD), there exists a growing consideration that sleep and circadian dysregulations may be important symptoms. It is not known, however, whether sleep abnormalities contribute to other behavioral deficits in HD patients and mouse models. To determine the precise chronology for sleep physiology alterations and other sensory, motor, psychiatric and cognitive symptoms of HD, the same R6/1 HD transgenics and their wild-type littermates were recorded monthly for sleep electroencephalogram (EEG) together with a wide range of behavioral tests according to a longitudinal plan. We found an early and progressive deterioration of both sleep architecture and EEG brain rhythms in R6/1 mice, which are correlated timely with their spatial working memory impairments. Sleep fragmentation and memory impairments were accompanied by the loss of delta (1-4Hz) power in the transgenic mice, the magnitude of which increased with age and disease progression. These precocious sleep and cognitive impairments were followed by deficits in social behavior, sensory and motor abilities. Our data confirm the existence and importance of sleep physiology alterations in the widely used R6/1 mouse line and highlight their precedence over other plethoric phenotypic changes. The brainwave abnormalities, may represent a novel biomarker and point to innovative therapeutic interventions against HD. PMID:25966356

  18. From cell senescence to age-related diseases: differential mechanisms of action of senescence-associated secretory phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Byun, Hae-Ok; Lee, Young-Kyoung; Kim, Jeong-Min; Yoon, Gyesoon

    2015-01-01

    Cellular senescence is a process by which cells enter a state of permanent cell cycle arrest. It is commonly believed to underlie organismal aging and age-associated diseases. However, the mechanism by which cellular senescence contributes to aging and age-associated pathologies remains unclear. Recent studies showed that senescent cells exert detrimental effects on the tissue microenvironment, generating pathological facilitators or aggravators. The most significant environmental effector resulting from senescent cells is the senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP), which is constituted by a strikingly increased expression and secretion of diverse pro-inflammatory cytokines. Careful investigation into the components of SASPs and their mechanism of action, may improve our understanding of the pathological backgrounds of age-associated diseases. In this review, we focus on the differential expression of SASP-related genes, in addition to SASP components, during the progress of senescence. We also provide a perspective on the possible action mechanisms of SASP components, and potential contributions of SASP-expressing senescent cells, to age-associated pathologies. [BMB Reports 2015; 48(10): 549-558] PMID:26129674

  19. Self-Organizing 3D Human Neural Tissue Derived from Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Recapitulate Alzheimer's Disease Phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Raja, Waseem K; Mungenast, Alison E; Lin, Yuan-Ta; Ko, Tak; Abdurrob, Fatema; Seo, Jinsoo; Tsai, Li-Huei

    2016-01-01

    The dismal success rate of clinical trials for Alzheimer's disease (AD) motivates us to develop model systems of AD pathology that have higher predictive validity. The advent of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) allows us to model pathology and study disease mechanisms directly in human neural cells from healthy individual as well as AD patients. However, two-dimensional culture systems do not recapitulate the complexity of neural tissue, and phenotypes such as extracellular protein aggregation are difficult to observe. We report brain organoids that use pluripotent stem cells derived from AD patients and recapitulate AD-like pathologies such as amyloid aggregation, hyperphosphorylated tau protein, and endosome abnormalities. These pathologies are observed in an age-dependent manner in organoids derived from multiple familial AD (fAD) patients harboring amyloid precursor protein (APP) duplication or presenilin1 (PSEN1) mutation, compared to controls. The incidence of AD pathology was consistent amongst several fAD lines, which carried different mutations. Although these are complex assemblies of neural tissue, they are also highly amenable to experimental manipulation. We find that treatment of patient-derived organoids with β- and γ-secretase inhibitors significantly reduces amyloid and tau pathology. Moreover, these results show the potential of this model system to greatly increase the translatability of pre-clinical drug discovery in AD. PMID:27622770

  20. The immunological phenotype of rituximab-sensitive chronic graft-versus-host disease: a phase II study

    PubMed Central

    van Dorp, Suzanne; Resemann, Henrike; te Boome, Liane; Pietersma, Floor; van Baarle, Debbie; Gmelig-Meyling, Frits; de Weger, Roel; Petersen, Eefke; Minnema, Monique; Lokhorst, Henk; Ebeling, Saskia; Beijn, Scott J.P.; Knol, Edward F.; van Dijk, Marijke; Meijer, Ellen; Kuball, Jürgen

    2011-01-01

    Chronic graft-versus-host disease is the major long-term complication after allogeneic stem cell transplantation with a suboptimal response rate to current treatments. Therefore, clinical efficacy and changes in lymphocyte subsets before and after rituximab treatment were evaluated in a prospective phase II study in patients with steroid-refractory chronic graft-versus-host disease. Overall response rate was 61%. Only responding patients were found to have increased B-cell numbers prior to treatment. B cells had a naïve-antigen-presenting phenotype and were mainly CD5 negative or had a low CD5 expression. Normal B-cell homeostasis was reestablished in responding patients one year after ritxumab treatment and associated with a significant decline in skin-infiltrating CD8+ T cells, suggesting that host B cells play a role in maintaining pathological CD8+ T-cell responses. Imbalances in B-cell homeostasis could be used to identify patients a priori with a higher chance of response to rituximab treatment (Eudra-CT 2008-004125-42). PMID:21546493

  1. Regional Heterogeneity of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Phenotypes: Pulmonary (3)He Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    Pike, Damien; Kirby, Miranda; Eddy, Rachel L; Guo, Fumin; Capaldi, Dante P I; Ouriadov, Alexei; McCormack, David G; Parraga, Grace

    2016-10-01

    Pulmonary ventilation may be visualized and measured using hyperpolarized (3)He magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) while emphysema and its distribution can be quantified using thoracic computed tomography (CT). Our objective was to phenotype ex-smokers with COPD based on the apical-to-basal distribution of ventilation abnormalities and emphysema to better understand how these phenotypes change regionally as COPD progresses. We evaluated 100 COPD ex-smokers who provided written informed consent and underwent spirometry, CT and (3)He MRI. (3)He MRI ventilation imaging was used to quantify the ventilation defect percent (VDP) for whole-lung and individual lung lobes. Regional VDP was used to generate the apical-lung (AL)-to-basal-lung (BL) difference (ΔVDP); a positive ΔVDP indicated AL-predominant and negative ΔVDP indicated BL-predominant ventilation defects. Emphysema was quantified using the relative-area-of-the-lung ≤-950HU (RA950) of the CT density histogram for whole-lung and individual lung lobes. The AL-to-BL RA950 difference (ΔRA950) was generated with a positive ΔRA950 indicating AL-predominant emphysema and a negative ΔRA950 indicating BL-predominant emphysema. Seventy-two ex-smokers reported BL-predominant MRI ventilation defects and 71 reported AL-predominant CT emphysema. BL-predominant ventilation defects (AL/BL: GOLD I = 18%/82%, GOLD II = 24%/76%) and AL-predominant emphysema (AL/BL: GOLD I = 84%/16%, GOLD II = 72%/28%) were the major phenotypes in mild-moderate COPD. In severe COPD there was a more uniform distribution for ventilation defects (AL/BL: GOLD III = 40%/60%, GOLD IV = 43%/57%) and emphysema (AL/BL: GOLD III = 64%/36%, GOLD IV = 43%/57%). Basal-lung ventilation defects predominated in mild-moderate GOLD grades, and a more homogeneous distribution of ventilation defects was observed in more advanced grade COPD; these differences suggest that over time, regional ventilation abnormalities become more homogenously distributed during

  2. Common Variants in PLD3 and Correlation to Amyloid-Related Phenotypes in Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chong; Tan, Lan; Wang, Hui-Fu; Yu, Wan-Jiang; Liu, Ying; Jiang, Teng; Tan, Meng-Shan; Hao, Xiao-Ke; Zhang, Dao-Qiang; Yu, Jin-Tai

    2015-01-01

    The phospholipase D3 (PLD3) gene has shown association with Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the role of PLD3 common variants in amyloid-β (Aβ) pathology remains unclear. We examined the association of thirteen common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) Aβ(1- 42) levels and florbetapir retention on florbetapir 18F amyloid positron emission tomography (AV45-PET) in a large population. We found that one SNP (rs11667768) was significantly associated with CSF Aβ(1- 42) levels in the normal cognition group. We did not observe an association of any SNP with florbetapir retention. Our study predicted the potential role of PLD3 variants in Aβ pathology. PMID:26402410

  3. Linking Pathogenic Mechanisms of Alcoholic Liver Disease With Clinical Phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Laura E; Ding, Wen-Xing; Cresci, Gail; Saikia, Paramananda; Shah, Vijay H

    2016-06-01

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) develops in approximately 20% of alcoholic patients, with a higher prevalence in females. ALD progression is marked by fatty liver and hepatocyte necrosis, as well as apoptosis, inflammation, regenerating nodules, fibrosis, and cirrhosis.(1) ALD develops via a complex process involving parenchymal and nonparenchymal cells, as well as recruitment of other cell types to the liver in response to damage and inflammation. Hepatocytes are damaged by ethanol, via generation of reactive oxygen species and induction of endoplasmic reticulum stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. Hepatocyte cell death via apoptosis and necrosis are markers of ethanol-induced liver injury. We review the mechanisms by which alcohol injures hepatocytes and the response of hepatic sinusoidal cells to alcohol-induced injury. We also discuss how recent insights into the pathogenesis of ALD will affect the treatment and management of patients. PMID:26919968

  4. Analysis of thiopurine S-methyltransferase phenotype-genotype in a Tunisian population with Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Ben Salah, Lynda; Belkhiria el Haj Amor, Mouna; Chbili, Chahra; Khlifi, Saida; Fathallah, Neila; Bougmiza, Iheb; Ben Jazia, Elhem; Houdret, Nicole; Ben Salem, Chaker; Saguem, Saad

    2013-12-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the thiopurine S-methyltransferase TPMT activity distribution and gene mutations in Tunisian population with positive diagnostic for Crohn's disease. TPMT activity was measured in Tunisian population (n = 88) by a high performance liquid chromatography assay. Polymerase chain reaction-based methods were used to determine the frequency of TPMT mutant alleles TPMT*2, TPMT*3A, TPMT*3B and TPMT*3C. TPMT activity was normally distributed, ranging from 4.58 to 35.27 nmol/(h ml) RBC with a mean of 18.67 ± 7.10 nmol/(h ml) RBC. Seven TPMT*3A heterozygotes and one TPMT*3C homozygote were found in 88 patients, with allele frequencies of 0.039 and 1.13, respectively. TPMT*3A and the TPMT*3C, which cause the largest decrease in enzyme activity, were both variant alleles detected in the Tunisian population. PMID:23553048

  5. DNA polymerase β deficiency leads to neurodegeneration and exacerbates Alzheimer disease phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Sykora, Peter; Misiak, Magdalena; Wang, Yue; Ghosh, Somnath; Leandro, Giovana S; Liu, Dong; Tian, Jane; Baptiste, Beverly A; Cong, Wei-Na; Brenerman, Boris M; Fang, Evandro; Becker, Kevin G; Hamilton, Royce J; Chigurupati, Soumya; Zhang, Yongqing; Egan, Josephine M; Croteau, Deborah L; Wilson, David M; Mattson, Mark P; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2015-01-01

    We explore the role of DNA damage processing in the progression of cognitive decline by creating a new mouse model. The new model is a cross of a common Alzheimer's disease (AD) mouse (3xTgAD), with a mouse that is heterozygous for the critical DNA base excision repair enzyme, DNA polymerase β. A reduction of this enzyme causes neurodegeneration and aggravates the AD features of the 3xTgAD mouse, inducing neuronal dysfunction, cell death and impairing memory and synaptic plasticity. Transcriptional profiling revealed remarkable similarities in gene expression alterations in brain tissue of human AD patients and 3xTg/Polβ(+/-) mice including abnormalities suggestive of impaired cellular bioenergetics. Our findings demonstrate that a modest decrement in base excision repair capacity can render the brain more vulnerable to AD-related molecular and cellular alterations. PMID:25552414

  6. DNA polymerase β deficiency leads to neurodegeneration and exacerbates Alzheimer disease phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Sykora, Peter; Misiak, Magdalena; Wang, Yue; Ghosh, Somnath; Leandro, Giovana S.; Liu, Dong; Tian, Jane; Baptiste, Beverly A.; Cong, Wei-Na; Brenerman, Boris M.; Fang, Evandro; Becker, Kevin G.; Hamilton, Royce J.; Chigurupati, Soumya; Zhang, Yongqing; Egan, Josephine M.; Croteau, Deborah L.; Wilson, David M.; Mattson, Mark P.; Bohr, Vilhelm A.

    2015-01-01

    We explore the role of DNA damage processing in the progression of cognitive decline by creating a new mouse model. The new model is a cross of a common Alzheimer's disease (AD) mouse (3xTgAD), with a mouse that is heterozygous for the critical DNA base excision repair enzyme, DNA polymerase β. A reduction of this enzyme causes neurodegeneration and aggravates the AD features of the 3xTgAD mouse, inducing neuronal dysfunction, cell death and impairing memory and synaptic plasticity. Transcriptional profiling revealed remarkable similarities in gene expression alterations in brain tissue of human AD patients and 3xTg/Polβ+/− mice including abnormalities suggestive of impaired cellular bioenergetics. Our findings demonstrate that a modest decrement in base excision repair capacity can render the brain more vulnerable to AD-related molecular and cellular alterations. PMID:25552414

  7. Integration-independent Transgenic Huntington Disease Fragment Mouse Models Reveal Distinct Phenotypes and Life Span in Vivo*

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, Robert; DeGiacomo, Francesco; Holcomb, Jennifer; Bonner, Akilah; Ring, Karen L.; Zhang, Ningzhe; Zafar, Khan; Weiss, Andreas; Lager, Brenda; Schilling, Birgit; Gibson, Bradford W.; Chen, Sylvia; Kwak, Seung; Ellerby, Lisa M.

    2015-01-01

    The cascade of events that lead to cognitive decline, motor deficits, and psychiatric symptoms in patients with Huntington disease (HD) is triggered by a polyglutamine expansion in the N-terminal region of the huntingtin (HTT) protein. A significant mechanism in HD is the generation of mutant HTT fragments, which are generally more toxic than the full-length HTT. The protein fragments observed in human HD tissue and mouse models of HD are formed by proteolysis or aberrant splicing of HTT. To systematically investigate the relative contribution of the various HTT protein proteolysis events observed in vivo, we generated transgenic mouse models of HD representing five distinct proteolysis fragments ending at amino acids 171, 463, 536, 552, and 586 with a polyglutamine length of 148. All lines contain a single integration at the ROSA26 locus, with expression of the fragments driven by the chicken β-actin promoter at nearly identical levels. The transgenic mice N171-Q148 and N552-Q148 display significantly accelerated phenotypes and a shortened life span when compared with N463-Q148, N536-Q148, and N586-Q148 transgenic mice. We hypothesized that the accelerated phenotype was due to altered HTT protein interactions/complexes that accumulate with age. We found evidence for altered HTT complexes in caspase-2 fragment transgenic mice (N552-Q148) and a stronger interaction with the endogenous HTT protein. These findings correlate with an altered HTT molecular complex and distinct proteins in the HTT interactome set identified by mass spectrometry. In particular, we identified HSP90AA1 (HSP86) as a potential modulator of the distinct neurotoxicity of the caspase-2 fragment mice (N552-Q148) when compared with the caspase-6 transgenic mice (N586-Q148). PMID:26025364

  8. Benzyl-N-acetyl-alpha-D-galactosaminide induces a storage disease-like phenotype by perturbing the endocytic pathway.

    PubMed

    Ulloa, Fausto; Real, Francisco X

    2003-04-01

    The sugar analog O-benzyl-N-acetyl-alpha-d-galactosaminide (BG) is an inhibitor of glycan chain elongation and inhibits alpha2,3-sialylation in mucus-secreting HT-29 cells. Long-term exposure of these cells to BG is associated with the accumulation of apical glycoproteins in cytoplasmic vesicles. The mechanisms involved therein and the nature of the vesicles have not been elucidated. In these cells, a massive amount of BG metabolites is synthesized. Because sialic acid is mainly distributed apically in epithelial cells, it has been proposed that the BG-induced undersialylation of apical membrane glycoproteins is responsible for their intracellular accumulation due to a defect in anterograde traffic and that sialic acid may constitute an apical targeting signal. In this work, we demonstrate that the intracellular accumulation of membrane glycoproteins does not result mainly from defects in anterograde traffic. By contrast, in BG-treated cells, endocytosed membrane proteins were retained intracellularly for longer periods of time than in control cells and colocalized with accumulated MUC1 and beta(1) integrin in Rab7/lysobisphosphatidic acid(+) vesicles displaying features of late endosomes. The phenotype of BG-treated cells is reminiscent of that observed in lysosomal storage disorders. Sucrose induced a BG-like, lysosomal storage disease-like phenotype without affecting sialylation, indicating that undersialylation is not a requisite for the intracellular accumulation of membrane glycoproteins. Our findings strongly support the notion that the effects observed in BG-treated cells result from the accumulation of BG-derived metabolites and from defects in the endosomal pathway. We propose that abnormal subcellular distribution of membrane glycoproteins involved in cellular communication and/or signaling may also take place in lysosomal storage disorders and may contribute to their pathogenesis. PMID:12538583

  9. TAK1 is a key modulator of the profibrogenic phenotype of human ileal myofibroblasts in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Grillo, Alessia Rosaria; Scarpa, Melania; D'Incà, Renata; Brun, Paola; Scarpa, Marco; Porzionato, Andrea; De Caro, Raffaele; Martines, Diego; Buda, Andrea; Angriman, Imerio; Palù, Giorgio; Sturniolo, Giacomo Carlo; Castagliuolo, Ignazio

    2015-09-15

    Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β-activated kinase 1 (TAK1) signaling can mediate inflammatory responses as well as tissue remodeling. Intestinal mucosal myofibroblast (IMF) activation drives gut fibrosis in Crohn's disease (CD); however, the molecular pathways involved are largely unknown. Thus we investigated the yet-unknown expression and function of TAK1 in human CD-associated fibrosis. Ileal surgical specimens, ileal biopsies, and IMF isolated from controls and CD patients were analyzed for TAK1 and its active phosphorylated form (pTAK1) by Western blotting, immunohistochemistry, and real-time quantitative PCR. TAK1 pharmacological inhibition and silencing were used to assess its role in collagen and inflammatory cytokine synthesis in IMF. TAK1 and pTAK1 levels increased in ileum specimens from CD patients compared with controls and correlated to tissue fibrosis. Similarly, TAK1 mRNA in ileal biopsies of CD patients correlated with fibrogenic marker expression but not inflammatory cytokines. CD-derived IMF showed higher TAK1 and pTAK1 expression associated with increased collagen1(α)1 mRNA levels compared with control IMF. TGF-β1 promoted pTAK1 nuclear translocation and collagen synthesis. TAK1 inhibition or silencing significantly reduced TGF-β1-stimulated collagen production and normalized the profibrogenic phenotype of CD-derived IMF. Taken together, these data suggest that TAK1 activation and nuclear translocation induce and maintain a fibrogenic phenotype in the IMF. Thus the TAK1 signaling pathway may represent a suitable target to design new, antifibrotic therapies. PMID:26185333

  10. Genomic screening for dissection of a complex disease: The multiple sclerosis phenotype

    SciTech Connect

    Haines, J.L.; Bazyk, A.; Gusella, J.F.

    1994-09-01

    Application of positional cloning to diseases with a complex etiology is fraught with problems. These include undefined modes of inheritance, heterogeneity, and epistasis. Although microsatellite markers now make genotyping the genome a straightforward task, no single analytical method is available to efficiently and accurately use these data for a complex disease. We have developed a multi-stage genomic screening strategy which uses a combination of non-parametric approaches (Affected Pedigree Member (APM) linkage analysis and robust sib pair analysis (SP)), and the parametric lod score approach (using four different genetic models). To warrant follow-up, a marker must have two or more of: a nominal P value of 0.05 or less on the non-parametric tests, or a lod score greater than 1.0 for any model. Two adjacent markers each fulfilling one criterion are also considered for follow-up. These criteria were determined both by simulation studies and our empirical experience in screening a large number of other disorders. We applied this approach to multiple sclerosis (MS), a complex neurological disorder with a strong but ill-defined genetic component. Analysis of the first 91 markers from our screen of 55 multiplex families found 5 markers which met the SP criteria, 13 markers which met the APM criteria, and 8 markers which met the lod score criteria. Five regions (on chromosomes 2, 4, 7, 14, and 19) met our overall criteria. However, no single method identified all of these regions, suggesting that each method is sensitive to various (unknown) influences. The chromosome 14 results were not supported by follow-up typing and analysis of markers in that region, but the chromosome 19 results remain well supported. Updated screening results will be presented.

  11. Pathogenic tau species drive a psychosis-like phenotype in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Koppel, J; Jimenez, H; Azose, M; D'Abramo, C; Acker, C; Buthorn, J; Greenwald, B S; Lewis, J; Lesser, M; Liu, Z; Davies, P

    2014-12-15

    Psychotic Alzheimer's disease (AD+P) is a rapidly progressive variant of AD associated with an increased burden of frontal tau pathology that affects up to 50% of those with AD, and is observed more commonly in females. To date, there are no safe and effective medication interventions with an indication for treatment in this condition, and there has been only very limited exploration of potential animal models for pre-clinical drug development. Pathogenic tau is over represented in the frontal cortex in AD+P, especially in females. In order to develop a candidate animal model of AD+P, we employed a tau mouse model with a heavy burden of frontal tau pathology, the rTg(tauP301L)4510 mouse, hereafter termed rTg4510. We explored deficits of prepulse inhibition of acoustic startle (PPI), a model of psychosis in rodents, and the correlation between pathogenic phospho-tau species associated with AD+P and PPI deficits in female mice. We found that female rTg4510 mice exhibit increasing PPI deficits relative to littermate controls from 4.5 to 5.5 months of age, and that these deficits are driven by insoluble fractions of the phospho-tau species pSer396/404, pSer202, and pThr231 found to be associated with human AD+P. This preliminary data suggests the utility of the rTg4510 mouse as a candidate disease model of human female AD+P. Further work expanded to include both genders and other behavioral outcome measures relevant to AD+P is necessary. PMID:25151619

  12. A platelet protein biochip rapidly detects an Alzheimer's disease-specific phenotype.

    PubMed

    Veitinger, Michael; Oehler, Rudolf; Umlauf, Ellen; Baumgartner, Roland; Schmidt, Georg; Gerner, Christopher; Babeluk, Rita; Attems, Johannes; Mitulovic, Goran; Rappold, Eduard; Lamont, John; Zellner, Maria

    2014-11-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD), a multifactorial neurodegenerative condition caused by genetic and environmental factors, is diagnosed using neuropsychological tests and brain imaging; molecular diagnostics are not routinely applied. Studies have identified AD-specific cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers but sample collection requires invasive lumbar puncture. To identify AD-modulated proteins in easily accessible blood platelets, which share biochemical signatures with neurons, we compared platelet lysates from 62 AD, 24 amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI), 13 vascular dementia (VaD), and 12 Parkinson's disease (PD) patients with those of 112 matched controls by fluorescence two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis in independent discovery and verification sets. The optimal sum score of four mass spectrometry (MS)-identified proteins yielded a sensitivity of 94 % and a specificity of 89 % (AUC = 0.969, 95 % CI = 0.944-0.994) to differentiate AD patients from healthy controls. To bridge the gap between bench and bedside, we developed a high-throughput multiplex protein biochip with great potential for routine AD screening. For convenience and speed of application, this array combines loading control-assisted protein quantification of monoamine oxidase B and tropomyosin 1 with protein-based genotyping for single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the apolipoprotein E and glutathione S-transferase omega 1 genes. Based on minimally invasive blood drawing, this innovative protein biochip enables identification of AD patients with an accuracy of 92 % in a single analytical step in less than 4 h. PMID:25248508

  13. Genotype-Phenotype Correlations in Multiple Sclerosis: "HLA" Genes Influence Disease Severity Inferred by [superscript 1]HMR Spectroscopy and MRI Measures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okuda, D. T.; Srinivasan, R.; Oksenberg, J. R.; Goodin, D. S.; Baranzini, S. E.; Beheshtian, A.; Waubant, E.; Zamvil, S. S.; Leppert, D.; Qualley, P.; Lincoln, R.; Gomez, R.; Caillier, S.; George, M.; Wang, J.; Nelson, S. J.; Cree, B. A. C.; Hauser, S. L.; Pelletier, D.

    2009-01-01

    Genetic susceptibility to multiple sclerosis (MS) is associated with the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) "DRB1*1501" allele. Here we show a clear association between DRB1*1501 carrier status and four domains of disease severity in an investigation of genotype-phenotype associations in 505 robust, clinically well characterized MS patients evaluated…

  14. Increased plasma nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase is associated with a hyperproliferative phenotype and restrains disease progression in MPN-associated myelofibrosis.

    PubMed

    Rosti, Vittorio; Campanelli, Rita; Massa, Margherita; Viarengo, Gianluca; Villani, Laura; Poletto, Valentina; Bonetti, Elisa; Catarsi, Paolo; Magrini, Umberto; Grolla, Ambra A; Travelli, Cristina; Genazzani, Armando A; Barosi, Giovanni

    2016-07-01

    Myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN)-associated myelofibrosis is a clonal, neoplastic disorder of the hematopoietic stem cells, in which inflammation and immune dysregulation play an important role. Extracellular nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (eNAMPT), also known as visfatin, is a cytokine implicated in a number of inflammatory and neoplastic diseases. Here plasma levels of eNAMPT in patients with MPN-associated myelofibrosis and their effects on disease phenotype and outcomes were examined. The concordance of eNAMPT levels with the marker of general inflammation high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) was also studied. A total of 333 MPN-associated myelofibrosis patients (187 males and 146 females) and 31 age- and gender-matched normal-weight healthy subjects were enrolled in the study main body. Levels of eNAMPT and hs-CRP were simultaneously assayed in 209 MPN-associated myelofibrosis patients. Twenty-four polycythemia vera or essential thrombocythemia patients were used as controls. eNAMPT was over expressed in MPN-associated myelofibrosis, and eNAMPT expression was correlated with higher white blood cell count, higher hemoglobin, and higher platelet count, suggesting that eNAMPT is an indispensable permissive agent for myeloproliferation of MPN-associated myelofibrosis. The lack of correlation between eNAMPT and hs-CRP revealed that eNAMPT in MPN-associated myelofibrosis does not behave as a canonical inflammatory cytokine. In addition, higher levels of eNAMPT predicted longer time to blast transformation, and protected against progression toward thrombocytopenia and large splenomegaly. In conclusion, in MPN-associated myelofibrosis high levels of eNAMPT mark the myeloproliferative potential and, at variance with a high number of cancers, are protective against disease progression. Am. J. Hematol. 91:709-713, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27074203

  15. Rationale and Design of the Leipzig (LIFE) Heart Study: Phenotyping and Cardiovascular Characteristics of Patients with Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Beutner, Frank; Teupser, Daniel; Gielen, Stephan; Holdt, Lesca Miriam; Scholz, Markus; Boudriot, Enno; Schuler, Gerhard; Thiery, Joachim

    2011-01-01

    Objective We established the Leipzig (LIFE) Heart Study, a biobank and database of patients with different stages of coronary artery disease (CAD) for studies of clinical, metabolic, cellular and genetic factors of cardiovascular diseases. Design The Leipzig (LIFE) Heart Study (NCT00497887) is an ongoing observational angiographic study including subjects with different entities of CAD. Cohort 1, patients undergoing first-time diagnostic coronary angiography due to suspected stable CAD with previously untreated coronary arteries. Cohort 2, patients with acute myocardial infarction (MI) requiring percutaneous revascularization. Cohort 3, patients with known left main coronary artery disease (LMCAD). Results We present preliminary results of demographics and phenotyping based on a 4-years analysis of a total of 3,165 subjects. Cohort 1 (n = 2,274) shows the typical distribution of elective coronary angiography cohorts with 43% cases with obstructive CAD and 37% normal angiograms. Cohorts 2 and 3 consist of 590 and 301 subjects, respectively, adding patients with severe forms of CAD. The suitability of the database and biobank to perform association studies was confirmed by replication of the CAD susceptibility locus on chromosome 9p21 (OR per allele: 1.55 (any CAD), 1.54 (MI), 1.74 (LMCAD), p<10−6, respectively). A novel finding was that patients with LMCAD had a stronger association with 9p21 than patients with obstructive CAD without LMCAD (OR 1.22, p = 0.042). In contrast, 9p21 did not associate with myocardial infarction in excess of stable CAD. Conclusion The Leipzig (LIFE) Heart Study provides a basis to identify molecular targets related to atherogenesis and associated metabolic disorders. The study may contribute to an improvement of individual prediction, prevention, and treatment of CAD. PMID:22216169

  16. Cystinosis as a lysosomal storage disease with multiple mutant alleles: Phenotypic-genotypic correlations

    PubMed Central

    Al-Haggar, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Cystinosis is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disease with an unclear enzymatic defect causing lysosomal cystine accumulation with no corresponding elevation of plasma cystine levels leading to multisystemic dysfunction. The systemic manifestations include a proximal renal tubular defect (Fanconi-like), endocrinal disturbances, eye involvements, with corneal, conjunctival and retinal depositions, and neurological manifestations in the form of brain and muscle dysfunction. Most of the long-term ill effects of cystinosis are observed particularly in patients with long survival as a result of a renal transplant. Its responsible CTNS gene that encodes the lysosomal cystine carrier protein (cystinosin) has been mapped on the short arm of chromosome 17 (Ch17 p13). There are three clinical forms based on the onset of main symptoms: nephropathic infantile form, nephropathic juvenile form and non-nephropathic adult form with predominant ocular manifestations. Avoidance of eye damage from sun exposure, use of cystine chelators (cysteamine) and finally renal transplantation are the main treatment lines. Pre-implantation genetic diagnosis for carrier parents is pivotal in the prevention of recurrence. PMID:24255892

  17. Phenomics Research on Coronary Heart Disease Based on Human Phenotype Ontology

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Qi; Gao, Kuo; Zhao, Huihui; Wang, Juan; Zhai, Xing; Chen, Jianxin; Wang, Wei

    2014-01-01

    The characteristics of holistic, dynamics, complexity, and spatial and temporal features enable “Omics” and theories of TCM to interlink with each other. HPO, namely, “characterization,” can be understood as a sorting and generalization of the manifestations shown by people with diseases on the basis of the phenomics. Syndrome is the overall “manifestation” of human body pathological and physiological changes expressed by four diagnostic methods' information. The four diagnostic methods' data could be the most objective and direct manifestations of human body under morbid conditions. In this aspect, it is consistent with the connation of “characterization.” Meanwhile, the four diagnostic methods' data also equip us with features of characterization in HPO. In our study, we compared 107 pieces of four diagnostic methods' information with the “characterization database” to further analyze data of four diagnostic methods' characterization in accordance with the common characteristics of four diagnostic methods' information and characterization and integrated 107 pieces of four diagnostic methods' data to relevant items in HPO and finished the expansion of characterization information in HPO. PMID:25610858

  18. Opa1 Overexpression Ameliorates the Phenotype of Two Mitochondrial Disease Mouse Models

    PubMed Central

    Civiletto, Gabriele; Varanita, Tatiana; Cerutti, Raffaele; Gorletta, Tatiana; Barbaro, Serena; Marchet, Silvia; Lamperti, Costanza; Viscomi, Carlo; Scorrano, Luca; Zeviani, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Summary Increased levels of the mitochondria-shaping protein Opa1 improve respiratory chain efficiency and protect from tissue damage, suggesting that it could be an attractive target to counteract mitochondrial dysfunction. Here we show that Opa1 overexpression ameliorates two mouse models of defective mitochondrial bioenergetics. The offspring from crosses of a constitutive knockout for the structural complex I component Ndufs4 (Ndufs4−/−), and of a muscle-specific conditional knockout for the complex IV assembly factor Cox15 (Cox15sm/sm), with Opa1 transgenic (Opa1tg) mice showed improved motor skills and respiratory chain activities compared to the naive, non-Opa1-overexpressing, models. While the amelioration was modest in Ndufs4−/−::Opa1tg mice, correction of cristae ultrastructure and mitochondrial respiration, improvement of motor performance and prolongation of lifespan were remarkable in Cox15sm/sm::Opa1tg mice. Mechanistically, respiratory chain supercomplexes were increased in Cox15sm/sm::Opa1tg mice, and residual monomeric complex IV was stabilized. In conclusion, cristae shape amelioration by controlled Opa1 overexpression improves two mouse models of mitochondrial disease. PMID:26039449

  19. Severity grading of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: the confounding effect of phenotype and thoracic gas compression.

    PubMed

    Pellegrino, Riccardo; Crimi, Emanuele; Gobbi, Alessandro; Torchio, Roberto; Antonelli, Andrea; Gulotta, Carlo; Baroffio, Michele; Papa, Giuseppe Francesco Sferrazza; Dellacà, Raffaele; Brusasco, Vito

    2015-04-01

    Current guidelines recommend severity of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease be graded by using forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1). But this measurement is biased by thoracic gas compression depending on lung volume and airflow resistance. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that the effect of thoracic gas compression on FEV1 is greater in emphysema than chronic bronchitis because of larger lung volumes, and this influences severity classification and prognosis. FEV1 was simultaneously measured by spirometry and body plethysmography (FEV1-pl) in 47 subjects with dominant emphysema and 51 with dominant chronic bronchitis. Subjects with dominant emphysema had larger lung volumes, lower diffusion capacity, and lower FEV1 than those with dominant chronic bronchitis. However, FEV1-pl, patient-centered variables (dyspnea, quality of life, exercise tolerance, exacerbation frequency), arterial blood gases, and respiratory impedance were not significantly different between groups. Using FEV1-pl instead of FEV1 shifted severity distribution toward less severe classes in dominant emphysema more than chronic bronchitis. The body mass, obstruction, dyspnea, and exercise (BODE) index was significantly higher in dominant emphysema than chronic bronchitis, but this difference significantly decreased when FEV1-pl was substituted for FEV1. In conclusion, the FEV1 is biased by thoracic gas compression more in subjects with dominant emphysema than in those with chronic bronchitis. This variably and significantly affects the severity grading systems currently recommended. PMID:25414244

  20. Ultrasonographic (TCS) and clinical findings in overlapping phenotype of essential tremor and Parkinson’s disease (ET-PD)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Essential tremor (ET) and Parkinson’s disease (PD) are considered distinct disorders. The aim of the study was to look for a link or any distinguishing features by transcranial sonography (TCS), together with the clinical examination findings in a group of patients with overlapping phenotype of ET and PD (ET-PD). Methods A prospective observational case-control study was carried out from the 3rd January 2011 until 30th January 2013 at the Hospital of Lithuanian University of Health Sciences. The final study group consisted of 15 patients with ET-PD, 116 patients with ET-only and 141 patients with PD-only. The control group included 101 subjects. Clinical diagnosis was of a diagnostic standard. Results The main ultrasonographic findings in the ET-PD group were similar to those of the PD-only: hyperechogenicity of the substantia nigra (66.7%, p < 0.001) and nuclei raphe interruptions/absence (38.5%, p < 0.001). The single distinguishing TCS finding in ET-PD group was a lentiform nucleus hyperechogenicity (26.7%), however this was only significant when compared to controls (p = 0.006). An asymmetrical onset of symptoms (73.3%) in ET-PD group was characteristic to PD-only. The ET-PD patients had the longest disease duration (median 6 years, p < 0.001), the most frequent rate of positive family history (53.3%, p = 0.005), rather low prevalence of cogwheel rigidity (26.7%, p < 0.001), and higher mean Hoehn & Yahr scores compared to PD-only (2.6 ± 0.8 vs. 1.8 ± 0.8, p = 0.012). Conclusions The main TCS findings of the present study in patients with overlapping ET-PD phenotype were similar to the PD-only group. The highest positive family history rate among ET-PD patients indicates a strong hereditary predisposition and needs genetic underpinnings. Some ET patients, who look like they may be developing co-morbid PD clinically, may have an alternative diagnosis for Parkinsonism, which could be delineated by TCS examination

  1. Behavioral phenotyping of Parkin-deficient mice: looking for early preclinical features of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Rial, Daniel; Castro, Adalberto A; Machado, Nuno; Garção, Pedro; Gonçalves, Francisco Q; Silva, Henrique B; Tomé, Angelo R; Köfalvi, Attila; Corti, Olga; Raisman-Vozari, Rita; Cunha, Rodrigo A; Prediger, Rui D

    2014-01-01

    There is considerable evidence showing that the neurodegenerative processes that lead to sporadic Parkinson's disease (PD) begin many years before the appearance of the characteristic motor symptoms. Neuropsychiatric, sensorial and cognitive deficits are recognized as early non-motor manifestations of PD, and are not attenuated by the current anti-parkinsonian therapy. Although loss-of-function mutations in the parkin gene cause early-onset familial PD, Parkin-deficient mice do not display spontaneous degeneration of the nigrostriatal pathway or enhanced vulnerability to dopaminergic neurotoxins such as 6-OHDA and MPTP. Here, we employed adult homozygous C57BL/6 mice with parkin gene deletion on exon 3 (parkin-/-) to further investigate the relevance of Parkin in the regulation of non-motor features, namely olfactory, emotional, cognitive and hippocampal synaptic plasticity. Parkin-/- mice displayed normal performance on behavioral tests evaluating olfaction (olfactory discrimination), anxiety (elevated plus-maze), depressive-like behavior (forced swimming and tail suspension) and motor function (rotarod, grasping strength and pole). However, parkin-/- mice displayed a poor performance in the open field habituation, object location and modified Y-maze tasks suggestive of procedural and short-term spatial memory deficits. These behavioral impairments were accompanied by impaired hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP). These findings indicate that the genetic deletion of parkin causes deficiencies in hippocampal synaptic plasticity, resulting in memory deficits with no major olfactory, emotional or motor impairments. Therefore, parkin-/- mice may represent a promising animal model to study the early stages of PD and for testing new therapeutic strategies to restore learning and memory and synaptic plasticity impairments in PD. PMID:25486126

  2. VEGFA, FLT1, KDR and colorectal cancer: assessment of disease risk, tumor molecular phenotype, and survival.

    PubMed

    Slattery, Martha L; Lundgreen, Abbie; Wolff, Roger K

    2014-02-01

    Angiogenesis is essential for tumor progression. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGFA) and its receptors 1 (FLT1) and 2 (KDR), have been identified as major mediators of this process. We hypothesized that genetic variation in FLT1 (38 SNPs), KDR (22 SNPS), and VEGFA (11 SNPs) would be associated with colon and rectal cancer development and survival. Data from a case-control study of 1555 colon cancer cases and 1956 controls and 754 rectal cancer cases and 959 controls were used. An adaptive rank truncation product (ARTP), based on 10,000 permutations, was used to determine the statistical significance of the candidate genes and angiogenesis pathway. Based on ARTP results, FLT1 was significantly associated with risk of colon cancer (P(ARTP) = 0.045) and VEGFA was significantly associated with rectal cancer (P(ARTP) = 0.036). After stratifying by tumor molecular subtype, SNP associations observed for colon cancer were: VEGFA rs2010963 with CIMP+ colon tumors; FLT1 rs4771249 and rs7987649 with TP53; FLT1 rs3751397, rs7337610, rs7987649, and rs9513008 and KDR rs10020464, rs11941492, and rs12498529 with MSI+ and CIMP+/KRAS2-mutated tumors. FLT1 rs2296189 and rs600640 were associated with CIMP+ rectal tumors and FLT1 rs7983774 was associated with TP53-mutated rectal tumors. Four SNPs in FLT1 were associated with colon cancer survival while three SNPs in KDR were associated with survival after diagnosis with rectal cancer. Aspirin/NSAID use, smoking cigarettes, and BMI modified the associations. These findings suggest the importance of inflammation and angiogenesis in the etiology of colorectal cancer and that genetic and lifestyle factors may be targets for modulating disease risk. PMID:23794399

  3. Genetic and phenotypic characterization of Candida albicans strains isolated from infectious disease patients in Shanghai.

    PubMed

    Hu, Lvyin; Du, Xin; Li, Tianming; Song, Yan; Zai, Shubei; Hu, Xiangnan; Zhang, Xiaonan; Li, Min

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans, as an opportunistic pathogen, can cause superficial and life-threatening candidiasis in immunocompromised individuals. The formation of surface-associated biofilms and the appearance of drug resistance pose a significant challenge for clinical intervention. In this study, a total of 104 hospital-acquired C. alibcans clinical isolates were collected from sterile sites and mucosal lesions of 92 infectious disease patients in the Shanghai Public Health Clinical Center and analysed. The resistance rates to fluconazole, itraconazole and voriconazole were 12.5 %, 15.4 % and 11.5 % respectively. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) analysis identified 63 diploid sequence types (DSTs) with a decentralized phylogeny, of which 37 DSTs (58.7 %) had not been reported in the online MLST database. Loss of heterozygosity was observed in ACC1 and ADP1 sequences obtained from six sequential isolates from a patient receiving antifungal treatment, which exemplified the effect of microevolution on C. albicans genetic alterations. Biofilm formation capability, an important virulence trait of C. albicans, was variable among strains isolated from different anatomical sites (P = 0.0302) and affected by genotypes (P = 0.0185). The mRNA levels of the azole antifungal target ERG11 gene and efflux pump genes (CDR1, CDR2 and MDR1) were detected in 9-18.1 % of azole-resistant and susceptible-dose dependent (S-DD) isolates. Twelve mutations encoding distinct amino acid substitutions in ERG11 were found in azole-resistant and S-DD isolates. Among them, A114S, Y132H and Y257H substitution in the ERG11 gene may be primarily related to azole resistance. Taken together, we observed a high level of diversity within C. albicans isolates. Multiple inter-related underlying mechanisms, including genetic and environmental factors, may account for high surface adhesion or azole resistance in clinical C. albicans infections. PMID:25351710

  4. Phenotypical characterization of the peripheral blood T cells in patients with celiac disease: does it differentiate suspicious celiac disease cases?

    PubMed Central

    Nataj Arab, Hadi Hossein; Masjedi, Mohsen; Alsahebfosoul, Fereshteh; Mokhtari, Mojgan; Jamali, Nahid; Emami, Mohammad Hassan; Saffaei, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The present study aimed to study the immunological changes seen in the intestinal epithelium of the celiac patients could also be detected in the peripheral blood lymphocyte populations. Background: Celiac disease (CD) is a small bowel enteropathy caused by permanent wheat gluten intolerance. One of the earliest signs of CD is an increase in the numbers of the intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes (iIEL). Patients and methods: In this case-control study, totally 13 untreated subjects with acceptable criteria for CD without any complication and 16 healthy subjects without any positive criteria for CD were selected. Peripheral blood T cells were analyzed by two-color flow cytometry in both groups. Results: The mean age of patients was 33.6 ± 3.4 years and two patients had Marsh IIIB, five patients had Marsh IIIA and six patients had Marsh II histology class. The mean percentages of the TCR+ T cells in the patients were significantly higher than the controls (p=0.015). However, the mean percentages of the αβTCR+ T cells were significantly lower in the untreated patients than the controls (p=0.025). There were no significant difference between the mean percentages of lymphocytes expressing the CD3, CD4 and CD8 molecules in the patients and the controls. Conclusion: The change in the percentages of the peripheral blood T cells expressing the γδTCR and αβTCR in the celiac patients could be used in conjunction with the other serological markers to identify new CD cases. PMID:25926938

  5. FBI-1 Is Overexpressed in Gestational Trophoblastic Disease and Promotes Tumor Growth and Cell Aggressiveness of Choriocarcinoma via PI3K/Akt Signaling.

    PubMed

    Mak, Victor C Y; Wong, Oscar G W; Siu, Michelle K Y; Wong, Esther S Y; Ng, Wai-Yan; Wong, Richard W C; Chan, Ka-Kui; Ngan, Hextan Y S; Cheung, Annie N Y

    2015-07-01

    Human placental trophoblasts can be considered pseudomalignant, with tightly controlled proliferation, apoptosis, and invasiveness. Gestational trophoblastic disease (GTD) represents a family of heterogeneous trophoblastic lesions with aberrant apoptotic and proliferative activities and dysregulation of cell signaling pathways. We characterize the oncogenic effects of factor that binds to the inducer of short transcripts of HIV-1 [FBI-1, alias POZ and Krüppel erythroid myeloid ontogenic factor (POKEMON)/ZBTB7A] in GTD and its role in promoting cell aggressiveness in vitro and tumor growth in vivo. IHC studies showed increased nuclear expression of FBI-1, including hydatidiform moles, choriocarcinoma (CCA), and placental site trophoblastic tumor, in GTD. In JAR and JEG-3 CCA cells, ectopic FBI-1 expression opposed apoptosis through repression of proapoptotic genes (eg, BAK1, FAS, and CASP8). FBI-1 overexpression also promoted Akt activation, as indicated by Akt-pS473 phosphorylation. FBI-1 overexpression promoted mobility and invasiveness of JEG-3 and JAR, but not in the presence of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase inhibitor LY294002. These findings suggest that FBI-1 could promote cell migration and invasion via phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt signaling. In vivo, nude mice injected with CCA cells with stable FBI-1 knockdown demonstrated reduced tumor growth compared with that in control groups. These findings suggest that FBI-1 is clinically associated with the progression of, and may be a therapeutic target in, GTD, owing to its diverse oncogenic effects on dysregulated trophoblasts. PMID:26093985

  6. Biomarkers of aggression in dementia.

    PubMed

    Gotovac, Kristina; Nikolac Perković, Matea; Pivac, Nela; Borovečki, Fran

    2016-08-01

    Dementia is a clinical syndrome defined by progressive global impairment of acquired cognitive abilities. It can be caused by a number of underlying conditions. The most common types of dementia are Alzheimer's disease (AD), frontotemporal dementia (FTD), vascular cognitive impairment (VCI) and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB). Despite the fact that cognitive impairment is central to the dementia, noncognitive symptoms, most commonly described nowadays as neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS) exist almost always at certain point of the illness. Aggression as one of the NPS represents danger both for patients and caregivers and the rate of aggression correlates with the loss of independence, cognitive decline and poor outcome. Therefore, biomarkers of aggression in dementia patients would be of a great importance. Studies have shown that different genetic factors, including monoamine signaling and processing, can be associated with various NPS including aggression. There have been significant and multiple neurotransmitter changes identified in the brains of patients with dementia and some of these changes have been involved in the etiology of NPS. Aggression specific changes have also been observed in neuropathological studies. The current consensus is that the best approach for development of such biomarkers may be incorporation of genetics (polymorphisms), neurobiology (neurotransmitters and neuropathology) and neuroimaging techniques. PMID:26952705

  7. A Phylogenetic and Phenotypic Analysis of Salmonella enterica Serovar Weltevreden, an Emerging Agent of Diarrheal Disease in Tropical Regions.

    PubMed

    Makendi, Carine; Page, Andrew J; Wren, Brendan W; Le Thi Phuong, Tu; Clare, Simon; Hale, Christine; Goulding, David; Klemm, Elizabeth J; Pickard, Derek; Okoro, Chinyere; Hunt, Martin; Thompson, Corinne N; Phu Huong Lan, Nguyen; Tran Do Hoang, Nhu; Thwaites, Guy E; Le Hello, Simon; Brisabois, Anne; Weill, François-Xavier; Baker, Stephen; Dougan, Gordon

    2016-02-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Weltevreden (S. Weltevreden) is an emerging cause of diarrheal and invasive disease in humans residing in tropical regions. Despite the regional and international emergence of this Salmonella serovar, relatively little is known about its genetic diversity, genomics or virulence potential in model systems. Here we used whole genome sequencing and bioinformatics analyses to define the phylogenetic structure of a diverse global selection of S. Weltevreden. Phylogenetic analysis of more than 100 isolates demonstrated that the population of S. Weltevreden can be segregated into two main phylogenetic clusters, one associated predominantly with continental Southeast Asia and the other more internationally dispersed. Subcluster analysis suggested the local evolution of S. Weltevreden within specific geographical regions. Four of the isolates were sequenced using long read sequencing to produce high quality reference genomes. Phenotypic analysis in Hep-2 cells and in a murine infection model indicated that S. Weltevreden were significantly attenuated in these models compared to the classical S. Typhimurium reference strain SL1344. Our work outlines novel insights into this important emerging pathogen and provides a baseline understanding for future research studies. PMID:26867150

  8. A Phylogenetic and Phenotypic Analysis of Salmonella enterica Serovar Weltevreden, an Emerging Agent of Diarrheal Disease in Tropical Regions

    PubMed Central

    Makendi, Carine; Page, Andrew J.; Wren, Brendan W.; Le Thi Phuong, Tu; Clare, Simon; Hale, Christine; Goulding, David; Klemm, Elizabeth J.; Pickard, Derek; Okoro, Chinyere; Hunt, Martin; Thompson, Corinne N.; Phu Huong Lan, Nguyen; Tran Do Hoang, Nhu; Thwaites, Guy E.; Le Hello, Simon; Brisabois, Anne; Weill, François-Xavier; Baker, Stephen; Dougan, Gordon

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Weltevreden (S. Weltevreden) is an emerging cause of diarrheal and invasive disease in humans residing in tropical regions. Despite the regional and international emergence of this Salmonella serovar, relatively little is known about its genetic diversity, genomics or virulence potential in model systems. Here we used whole genome sequencing and bioinformatics analyses to define the phylogenetic structure of a diverse global selection of S. Weltevreden. Phylogenetic analysis of more than 100 isolates demonstrated that the population of S. Weltevreden can be segregated into two main phylogenetic clusters, one associated predominantly with continental Southeast Asia and the other more internationally dispersed. Subcluster analysis suggested the local evolution of S. Weltevreden within specific geographical regions. Four of the isolates were sequenced using long read sequencing to produce high quality reference genomes. Phenotypic analysis in Hep-2 cells and in a murine infection model indicated that S. Weltevreden were significantly attenuated in these models compared to the classical S. Typhimurium reference strain SL1344. Our work outlines novel insights into this important emerging pathogen and provides a baseline understanding for future research studies. PMID:26867150

  9. Selectable retrovirus vectors encoding Friend virus gp55 or erythropoietin induce polycythemia with different phenotypic expression and disease progression.

    PubMed Central

    Ahlers, N; Hunt, N; Just, U; Laker, C; Ostertag, W; Nowock, J

    1994-01-01

    The Friend spleen focus-forming virus induces a massive expansion of erythroid progenitor cells resulting in polycythemia and splenomegaly. The pathogenic agent is the membrane glycoprotein gp55, encoded by the env gene. Recent evidence indicates that gp55 binds to and activates the erythropoietin (Epo) receptor. It is not clear, however, whether gp55 completely mimics the natural receptor ligand (Epo). To directly compare both effectors, we constructed selectable retroviral vectors which carry either the env or the Epo gene. The selection marker allowed for clonal analysis of infected cells. After infection of DBA/2J mice, the spleen weight, hematological indices, and Epo titer of peripheral blood were monitored. Although both viruses induced an acute erythrocytosis, there were significant differences in disease phenotype and progression. The Epo virus caused an enhanced increase of hematocrit and erythrocytes, whereas with the env virus the pool of late progenitors (CFU-erythroid) was dramatically expanded, resulting in a more severe splenomegaly. The distribution of cytologically recognizable erythroid precursors was shifted towards immature cell types by the env vector compared with Epo. These data suggest that Epo and gp55 differentially affect proliferation and differentiation. Gp55 appears to promote proliferation over differentiation, whereas Epo preferentially drives differentiation. Images PMID:7933106

  10. Elucidating molecular phenotypes caused by the SORL1 Alzheimer's disease genetic risk factor using human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Young, Jessica E; Boulanger-Weill, Jonathan; Williams, Daniel A; Woodruff, Grace; Buen, Floyd; Revilla, Arra C; Herrera, Cheryl; Israel, Mason A; Yuan, Shauna H; Edland, Steven D; Goldstein, Lawrence S B

    2015-04-01

    Predisposition to sporadic Alzheimer's disease (SAD) involves interactions between a person's unique combination of genetic variants and the environment. The molecular effect of these variants may be subtle and difficult to analyze with standard in vitro or in vivo models. Here we used hIPSCs to examine genetic variation in the SORL1 gene and possible contributions to SAD-related phenotypes in human neurons. We found that human neurons carrying SORL1 variants associated with an increased SAD risk show a reduced response to treatment with BDNF, at the level of both SORL1 expression and APP processing. shRNA knockdown of SORL1 demonstrates that the differences in BDNF-induced APP processing between genotypes are dependent on SORL1 expression. We propose that the variation in SORL1 expression induction by BDNF is modulated by common genetic variants and can explain how genetic variation in this one locus can contribute to an individual's risk of developing SAD. PMID:25772071

  11. Familial Alzheimer’s disease mutations in presenilins: effects on endoplasmic reticulum calcium homeostasis and correlation with clinical phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Omar; Supnet, Charlene; Liu, Huarui; Bezprozvanny, Ilya

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in presenilins (PS1 and PS2) are responsible for approximately 40% of all early onset familial Alzheimer’s disease (FAD) monogenic cases. Presenilins (PSs) function as the catalytic subunit of γ-secretase and support cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein (APP). We previously discovered that PSs also function as passive endoplasmic reticulum (ER) calcium (Ca2+) leak channels and that most FAD mutations in PSs affected their ER Ca2+ leak function. To further validate the relevance of our findings to human disease, we here performed Ca2+ imaging experiments with lymphoblasts established from FAD patients. We discovered that most FAD mutations in PSs disrupted ER Ca2+ leak function and resulted in increased ER Ca2+ pool in human lymphoblasts. However, we found that a subset of PS1 FAD mutants supported ER Ca2+ leak activity, as ER Ca2+ pool was unaffected in lymphoblasts. Most of the “functional” mutations for ER Ca2+ leak were clustered in the exon 8–9 area of PSEN1 gene and segregated with the cotton wool plaques and spastic paraparesis (CWP/SP) clinical phenotype occasionally observed in PS1 FAD patients. Our findings with the “functional” and “non-functional” PS1 FAD mutants were confirmed in Ca2+ rescue experiments with PS double-knockout (DKO) mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Based on the combined effects of the PS1 FAD mutations on ER Ca2+ leak and γ-secretase activities we propose a model that explains the heterogeneity observed in FAD. The proposed model has implications for understanding the pathogenesis of both familial and sporadic AD. PMID:20634584

  12. What Is Aggressive Violence?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singer, Dorothy G.; Luca, Wendy

    1985-01-01

    Responses to a questionnaire dealing with what constitutes aggressive violence on television indicate that health care providers tend to rate items describing acts on television as more aggressive than television writers, producers, and executives do. (MBR)

  13. Genotype-Phenotype studies of VCP-associated Inclusion Body Myopathy with Paget Disease of Bone and/or Frontotemporal Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Sarju G.; Khare, Manaswitha; Ramani, Rupal; Watts, Giles D. J.; Simon, Mariella; Osann, Kathryn E.; Donkervoort, Sandra; Dec, Eric; Nalbandian, Angele; Platt, Julia; Pasquali, Marzia; Wang, Annabel; Mozaffar, Tahseen; Smith, Charles D.; Kimonis, Virginia E.

    2012-01-01

    VCP disease associated with Inclusion body myopathy, Paget disease of the bone and frontotemporal dementia is a progressive autosomal dominant disorder caused by mutations in Valosin containing protein gene. To establish genotype-phenotype correlations we analyzed clinical and biochemical markers from a database of 190 members in 27 families harboring ten missense mutations. Individuals were grouped into three categories: symptomatic, presymptomatic carriers and non-carriers. The symptomatic families were further divided into ten groups based on their VCP mutations. There was marked intra and inter-familial variation; and significant genotype-phenotype correlations were difficult because of small numbers. Nevertheless when comparing the two most common mutations, R155C mutation was found to be more severe, with earlier onset of myopathy and Paget (p=0.03). Survival analysis of all subjects revealed an average life span after diagnosis of myopathy and Paget of 18 and 19 years respectively, and after dementia only 6 years. R155C had a reduced survival compared to the R155H mutation (p=0.03). We identified amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) in thirteen individuals (8.9%) and Parkinson’s disease in five individuals (3%); however there was no genotypic correlation. This study represents the largest dataset of patients with VCP disease and expands our understanding of natural history and provides genotype-phenotype correlations in this unique disease. PMID:22909335

  14. Tissue transglutaminase overexpression does not modify the disease phenotype of the R6/2 mouse model of Huntington’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ashish; Kneynsberg, Andrew; Tucholski, Janusz; Perry, Giselle; van Groen, Thomas; Detloff, Peter J.; Lesort, Mathieu

    2012-01-01

    Huntington’s disease (HD) is a devastating autosomal-dominant neurodegenerative disorder initiated by an abnormally expanded polyglutamine in the huntingtin protein. Determining the contribution of specific factors to the pathogenesis of HD should provide rational targets for therapeutic intervention. One suggested contributor is the type 2 transglutaminase (TG2), a multifunctional calcium dependent enzyme. A role for TG2 in HD has been suggested because a polypeptide-bound glutamine is a rate-limiting factor for a TG2-catalyzed reaction, and TG2 can cross-link mutant huntingtin in vitro. Further, TG2 is up regulated in brain areas affected in HD. The objective of this study was to further examine the contribution of TG2 as a potential modifier of HD pathogenesis and its validity as a therapeutic target in HD. In particular our goal was to determine whether an increase in TG2 level, as documented in human HD brains, modulates the well-characterized phenotype of the R6/2 HD mouse model. To accomplish this objective a genetic cross was performed between R6/2 mice and an established transgenic mouse line that constitutively expresses human TG2 (hTG2) under control of the prion promoter. Constitutive expression of hTG2 did not affect the onset and progression of the behavioral and neuropathological HD phenotype of R6/2 mice. We found no alterations in body weight changes, rotarod performances, grip strength, overall activity, and no significant effect on the neuropathological features of R6/2 mice. Overall the results of this study suggest that an increase in hTG2 expression does not significantly modify the pathology of HD. PMID:22698685

  15. Neurobiological Patterns of Aggression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, Robert D.

    1993-01-01

    Describes chemical model for patterns of aggressive behavior. Addresses cultural, neurobiological, and cognitive factors that affect violent children. Identifies five patterns of aggression (overaroused, impulsive, affective, predatory, and instrumental) and examines these dimensions of aggression for each pattern: baseline, precipitators,…

  16. Novel BAC mouse model of Huntington’s disease with 225 CAG repeats exhibits an early widespread and stable degenerative phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Wegrzynowicz, Michal; Bichell, Terry Jo; Soares, Barbara D.; Loth, Meredith K.; McGlothan, Jennifer L.; Alikhan, Fatima S.; Hua, Kegang; Coughlin, Jennifer M.; Holt, Hunter K.; Jetter, Christopher S.; Mori, Susumu; Pomper, Martin G.; Osmand, Alexander P.; Guilarte, Tomás R.; Bowman, Aaron B.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Unusually large CAG repeat expansions (>60) in exon one of Huntingtin (HTT) are invariably associated with a juvenile-onset form of Huntington’s disease (HD), characterized by a more extensive and rapidly progressing neuropathology than the more prevalent adult-onset form. However, existing mouse models of HD that express the full-length Htt gene with CAG repeat lengths associated with juvenile HD (ranging between ~75 to ~150 repeats in published models) exhibit selective neurodegenerative phenotypes more consistent with adult-onset HD. OBJECTIVE To determine if a very large CAG repeat (>200) in full-length Htt elicits neurodegenerative phenotypes consistent with juvenile HD. METHODS Using a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) system, we generated mice expressing full-length mouse Htt with ~225 CAG repeats under control of the mouse Htt promoter. Mice were characterized using behavioral, neuropathological, biochemical and brain imaging methods. RESULTS BAC-225Q mice exhibit phenotypes consistent with a subset of features seen in juvenile-onset HD: very early motor behavior abnormalities, reduced body weight, widespread and progressive increase in Htt aggregates, gliosis, and neurodegeneration. Early striatal pathology was observed, including reactive gliosis and loss of dopamine receptors, prior to detectable volume loss. HD-related blood markers of impaired energy metabolism and systemic inflammation were also increased. Aside from an age-dependent progression of diffuse nuclear aggregates at 6 months of age to abundant neuropil aggregates at 12 months of age, other pathological and motor phenotypes showed little to no progression. CONCLUSIONS The HD phenotypes present in animals 3 to 12 months of age make the BAC-225Q mice a unique and stable model of full-length mutant Htt associated phenotypes, including body weight loss, behavioral impairment and HD-like neurodegenerative phenotypes characteristic of juvenile-onset HD and/or late-stage adult

  17. Transgenic mice recapitulate the phenotypic heterogeneity of genetic prion diseases without developing prion infectivity: Role of intracellular PrP retention in neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Chiesa, Roberto; Restelli, Elena; Comerio, Liliana; Del Gallo, Federico; Imeri, Luca

    2016-03-01

    Genetic prion diseases are degenerative brain disorders caused by mutations in the gene encoding the prion protein (PrP). Different PrP mutations cause different diseases, including Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker (GSS) syndrome and fatal familial insomnia (FFI). The reason for this variability is not known. It has been suggested that prion strains with unique self-replicating and neurotoxic properties emerge spontaneously in individuals carrying PrP mutations, dictating the phenotypic expression of disease. We generated transgenic mice expressing the FFI mutation, and found that they developed a fatal neurological illness highly reminiscent of FFI, and different from those of similarly generated mice modeling genetic CJD and GSS. Thus transgenic mice recapitulate the phenotypic differences seen in humans. The mutant PrPs expressed in these mice are misfolded but unable to self-replicate. They accumulate in different compartments of the neuronal secretory pathway, impairing the membrane delivery of ion channels essential for neuronal function. Our results indicate that conversion of mutant PrP into an infectious isoform is not required for pathogenesis, and suggest that the phenotypic variability may be due to different effects of mutant PrP on intracellular transport. PMID:26864450

  18. Transgenic mice recapitulate the phenotypic heterogeneity of genetic prion diseases without developing prion infectivity: Role of intracellular PrP retention in neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Chiesa, Roberto; Restelli, Elena; Comerio, Liliana; Del Gallo, Federico; Imeri, Luca

    2016-01-01

    abstract Genetic prion diseases are degenerative brain disorders caused by mutations in the gene encoding the prion protein (PrP). Different PrP mutations cause different diseases, including Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker (GSS) syndrome and fatal familial insomnia (FFI). The reason for this variability is not known. It has been suggested that prion strains with unique self-replicating and neurotoxic properties emerge spontaneously in individuals carrying PrP mutations, dictating the phenotypic expression of disease. We generated transgenic mice expressing the FFI mutation, and found that they developed a fatal neurological illness highly reminiscent of FFI, and different from those of similarly generated mice modeling genetic CJD and GSS. Thus transgenic mice recapitulate the phenotypic differences seen in humans. The mutant PrPs expressed in these mice are misfolded but unable to self-replicate. They accumulate in different compartments of the neuronal secretory pathway, impairing the membrane delivery of ion channels essential for neuronal function. Our results indicate that conversion of mutant PrP into an infectious isoform is not required for pathogenesis, and suggest that the phenotypic variability may be due to different effects of mutant PrP on intracellular transport. PMID:26864450

  19. A CTD–Pfizer collaboration: manual curation of 88 000 scientific articles text mined for drug–disease and drug–phenotype interactions

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Allan Peter; Wiegers, Thomas C.; Roberts, Phoebe M.; King, Benjamin L.; Lay, Jean M.; Lennon-Hopkins, Kelley; Sciaky, Daniela; Johnson, Robin; Keating, Heather; Greene, Nigel; Hernandez, Robert; McConnell, Kevin J.; Enayetallah, Ahmed E.; Mattingly, Carolyn J.

    2013-01-01

    Improving the prediction of chemical toxicity is a goal common to both environmental health research and pharmaceutical drug development. To improve safety detection assays, it is critical to have a reference set of molecules with well-defined toxicity annotations for training and validation purposes. Here, we describe a collaboration between safety researchers at Pfizer and the research team at the Comparative Toxicogenomics Database (CTD) to text mine and manually review a collection of 88 629 articles relating over 1 200 pharmaceutical drugs to their potential involvement in cardiovascular, neurological, renal and hepatic toxicity. In 1 year, CTD biocurators curated 2 54 173 toxicogenomic interactions (1 52 173 chemical–disease, 58 572 chemical–gene, 5 345 gene–disease and 38 083 phenotype interactions). All chemical–gene–disease interactions are fully integrated with public CTD, and phenotype interactions can be downloaded. We describe Pfizer’s text-mining process to collate the articles, and CTD’s curation strategy, performance metrics, enhanced data content and new module to curate phenotype information. As well, we show how data integration can connect phenotypes to diseases. This curation can be leveraged for information about toxic endpoints important to drug safety and help develop testable hypotheses for drug–disease events. The availability of these detailed, contextualized, high-quality annotations curated from seven decades’ worth of the scientific literature should help facilitate new mechanistic screening assays for pharmaceutical compound survival. This unique partnership demonstrates the importance of resource sharing and collaboration between public and private entities and underscores the complementary needs of the environmental health science and pharmaceutical communities. Database URL: http://ctdbase.org/ PMID:24288140

  20. Relational aggression in marriage.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Jason S; Nelson, David A; Yorgason, Jeremy B; Harper, James M; Ashton, Ruth Hagmann; Jensen, Alexander C

    2010-01-01

    Drawing from developmental theories of relational aggression, this article reports on a study designed to identify if spouses use relationally aggressive tactics when dealing with conflict in their marriage and the association of these behaviors with marital outcomes. Using a sample of 336 married couples (672 spouses), results revealed that the majority of couples reported that relationally aggressive behaviors, such as social sabotage and love withdrawal, were a part of their marital dynamics, at least to some degree. Gender comparisons of partner reports of their spouse's behavior revealed that wives were significantly more likely to be relationally aggressive than husbands. Structural equation modeling demonstrated that relational aggression is associated with lower levels of marital quality and greater marital instability for both husbands and wives. Implications are drawn for the use of relational aggression theory in the future study of couple conflict and marital aggression. PMID:20698028

  1. Cognitive phenotype of psychotic symptoms in Alzheimer's disease: evidence for impaired visuoperceptual function in the misidentification subtype

    PubMed Central

    Clark‐Papasavas, Chloe; Gould, Rebecca L.; Ffytche, Dominic; Howard, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Establishing the cognitive phenotype of psychotic symptoms in Alzheimer's disease (AD) could localise discrete pathology and target symptomatic treatment. This study aimed to establish whether psychotic symptoms would be associated with poorer performance on neuropsychological tests known to correlate with striatal dopaminergic function and to investigate whether these differences would be attributed to the paranoid (persecutory delusions) or misidentification (misidentification phenomena +/− hallucinations) subtype. Methods Seventy patients with probable AD (34 psychotic and 36 nonpsychotic) were recruited to the study. Analysis of covariance was used to compare motor speed and the rapid visual processing test of sustained visual attention, after adjusting for potential confounding factors. Multivariate analyses were used to compare performance across other cognitive domains. Significant findings were explored by separating patients on the basis of subtype. Results Rapid visual processing performance accuracy was reduced in patients with psychotic symptoms (F 1,58 = 5.94, p = 0.02) and differed significantly across subtypes (F 2,51 = 3.94, p = 0.03), largely because of poorer performance in the misidentification compared with nonpsychotic group. Multivariate analyses (corrected for multiple comparisons) showed poorer performance on the incomplete letters task in psychotic patients (F 1,63 = 8.77, p = 0.004) and across subtypes (F 2,55 = 10.90, p < 0.001), similarly attributed to the misidentification subtype. Conclusions These findings provide further support of the involvement of dopaminergic networks in the psychosis endophenotype in AD and, in addition, implicate the ventral (temporo‐occipital) pathway in the misidentification subtype. Future studies should investigate the early trajectory of neuropathological change in vivo across psychosis subtypes.© 2015 The Authors. International Journal of Geriatric

  2. Distal bimelic amyotrophy (DBMA): Phenotypically distinct but identical on cervical spine MR imaging with brachial monomelic amyotrophy/Hirayama disease.

    PubMed

    Preethish-Kumar, Veeramani; Nalini, Atchayaram; Singh, Ravinder-Jeet; Saini, Jitender; Prasad, Chandrajit; Polavarapu, Kiran; Thennarasu, Kandavel

    2015-01-01

    Our objective was to characterize the MR imaging features in a large and distinct series of distal bimelic amyotrophy (DBMA) from India. We utilized a retrospective and prospective study on 26 cases. Results demonstrated that upper limb distal muscle wasting and weakness was predominantly symmetrical in onset. Mean age at onset was 20.9 ± 7.0 years, mean duration 83.0 ± 102.6 months. MRI carried out in 22 patients with flexion studies showed forward displacement of posterior dura in 19 (86.4%). Crescent shaped epidural enhancement on contrast was seen in 20/24 cases (83.3%), and bilateral T2W hyperintensities of cord in17 (65.4%) - symmetrical in15 cases. Maximum hyperintensity was noted at C5-C6, C6-C7 levels. Cord atrophy was noted in 24 (92.3%) cases (most affected: C5-C6, C6-C7) - symmetrical atrophy in 21cases. Cervical spine straightening occurred in six (23.1%) cases and reversal of lordosis in 15 (57.7%). In conclusion, this study confirms that DBMA is phenotypically distinct but pathophysiologically the same as brachial monomelic amyotrophy (BMMA) on MR imaging. Typical MRI features were seen in all. It is important to differentiate this disorder from ALS, which could present at a younger age as often seen among Indians. The clinical and MR imaging features are highly suggestive that DBMA, as with BMMA/Hirayama disease, occurs due to dynamic alterations at the cervical spine level. PMID:25967543

  3. Prolonged treatment with pimelic o-aminobenzamide HDAC inhibitors ameliorates the disease phenotype of a Friedreich ataxia mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Sandi, Chiranjeevi; Pinto, Ricardo Mouro; Al-Mahdawi, Sahar; Ezzatizadeh, Vahid; Barnes, Glenn; Jones, Steve; Rusche, James R.; Gottesfeld, Joel M.; Pook, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    Friedreich ataxia (FRDA) is an inherited neurodegenerative disorder caused by GAA repeat expansion within the FXN gene, leading to epigenetic changes and heterochromatin-mediated gene silencing that result in a frataxin protein deficit. Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors, including pimelic o-aminobenzamide compounds 106, 109 and 136, have previously been shown to reverse FXN gene silencing in short-term studies of FRDA patient cells and a knock-in mouse model, but the functional consequences of such therapeutic intervention have thus far not been described. We have now investigated the long-term therapeutic effects of 106, 109 and 136 in our GAA repeat expansion mutation-containing YG8R FRDA mouse model. We show that there is no overt toxicity up to 5 months of treatment and there is amelioration of the FRDA-like disease phenotype. Thus, while the neurological deficits of this model are mild, 109 and 106 both produced an improvement of motor coordination, whereas 109 and 136 produced increased locomotor activity. All three compounds increased global histone H3 and H4 acetylation of brain tissue, but only 109 significantly increased acetylation of specific histone residues at the FXN locus. Effects on FXN mRNA expression in CNS tissues were modest, but 109 significantly increased frataxin protein expression in brain tissue. 109 also produced significant increases in brain aconitase enzyme activity, together with reduction of neuronal pathology of the dorsal root ganglia (DRG). Overall, these results support further assessment of HDAC inhibitors for treatment of Friedreich ataxia. PMID:21397024

  4. Mutations in the Cytoplasmic Domain of the Newcastle Disease Virus Fusion Protein Confer Hyperfusogenic Phenotypes Modulating Viral Replication and Pathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Samal, Sweety; Khattar, Sunil K.; Paldurai, Anandan; Palaniyandi, Senthilkumar; Zhu, Xiaoping; Collins, Peter L.

    2013-01-01

    The Newcastle disease virus (NDV) fusion protein (F) mediates fusion of viral and host cell membranes and is a major determinant of NDV pathogenicity. In the present study, we demonstrate the effects of functional properties of F cytoplasmic tail (CT) amino acids on virus replication and pathogenesis. Out of a series of C-terminal deletions in the CT, we were able to rescue mutant viruses lacking two or four residues (rΔ2 and rΔ4). We further rescued viral mutants with individual amino acid substitutions at each of these four terminal residues (rM553A, rK552A, rT551A, and rT550A). In addition, the NDV F CT has two conserved tyrosine residues (Y524 and Y527) and a dileucine motif (LL536-537). In other paramyxoviruses, these residues were shown to affect fusion activity and are central elements in basolateral targeting. The deletion of 2 and 4 CT amino acids and single tyrosine substitution resulted in hyperfusogenic phenotypes and increased viral replication and pathogenesis. We further found that in rY524A and rY527A viruses, disruption of the targeting signals did not reduce the expression on the apical or basolateral surface in polarized Madin-Darby canine kidney cells, whereas in double tyrosine mutant, it was reduced on both the apical and basolateral surfaces. Interestingly, in rL536A and rL537A mutants, the F protein expression was more on the apical than on the basolateral surface, and this effect was more pronounced in the rL537A mutant. We conclude that these wild-type residues in the NDV F CT have an effect on regulating F protein biological functions and thus modulating viral replication and pathogenesis. PMID:23843643

  5. Long-term treatment with naproxcinod significantly improves skeletal and cardiac disease phenotype in the mdx mouse model of dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Uaesoontrachoon, Kitipong; Quinn, James L; Tatem, Kathleen S; Van Der Meulen, Jack H; Yu, Qing; Phadke, Aditi; Miller, Brittany K; Gordish-Dressman, Heather; Ongini, Ennio; Miglietta, Daniela; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina

    2014-06-15

    In Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) patients and the mouse model of DMD, mdx, dystrophin deficiency causes a decrease and mislocalization of muscle-specific neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOSμ), leading to functional impairments. Previous studies have shown that nitric oxide (NO) donation associated with anti-inflammatory action has beneficial effects in dystrophic mouse models. In this study, we have systematically investigated the effects of naproxcinod, an NO-donating naproxen derivative, on the skeletal and cardiac disease phenotype in mdx mice. Four-week-old mdx and C57BL/10 mice were treated with four different concentrations (0, 10, 21 and 41 mg/kg) of naproxcinod and 0.9 mg/kg of prednisolone in their food for 9 months. All mice were subjected to twice-weekly treadmill sessions, and functional and behavioral parameters were measured at 3, 6 and 9 months of treatment. In addition, we evaluated in vitro force contraction, optical imaging of inflammation, echocardiography and blood pressure (BP) at the 9-month endpoint prior to sacrifice. We found that naproxcinod treatment at 21 mg/kg resulted in significant improvement in hindlimb grip strength and a 30% decrease in inflammation in the fore- and hindlimbs of mdx mice. Furthermore, we found significant improvement in heart function, as evidenced by improved fraction shortening, ejection fraction and systolic BP. In addition, the long-term detrimental effects of prednisolone typically seen in mdx skeletal and heart function were not observed at the effective dose of naproxcinod. In conclusion, our results indicate that naproxcinod has significant potential as a safe therapeutic option for the treatment of muscular dystrophies. PMID:24463621

  6. Long-term treatment with naproxcinod significantly improves skeletal and cardiac disease phenotype in the mdx mouse model of dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Uaesoontrachoon, Kitipong; Quinn, James L; Tatem, Kathleen S; Van Der Meulen, Jack H; Yu, Qing; Phadke, Aditi; Miller, Brittany K; Gordish-Dressman, Heather; Ongini, Ennio; Miglietta, Daniela; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina

    2014-01-01

    In Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) patients and the mouse model of DMD, mdx, dystrophin deficiency causes a decrease and mislocalization of muscle-specific neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOSμ), leading to functional impairments. Previous studies have shown that nitric oxide (NO) donation associated with anti-inflammatory action has beneficial effects in dystrophic mouse models. In this study, we have systematically investigated the effects of naproxcinod, an NO-donating naproxen derivative, on the skeletal and cardiac disease phenotype in mdx mice. Four-week-old mdx and C57BL/10 mice were treated with four different concentrations (0, 10, 21 and 41 mg/kg) of naproxcinod and 0.9 mg/kg of prednisolone in their food for 9 months. All mice were subjected to twice-weekly treadmill sessions, and functional and behavioral parameters were measured at 3, 6 and 9 months of treatment. In addition, we evaluated in vitro force contraction, optical imaging of inflammation, echocardiography and blood pressure (BP) at the 9-month endpoint prior to sacrifice. We found that naproxcinod treatment at 21 mg/kg resulted in significant improvement in hindlimb grip strength and a 30% decrease in inflammation in the fore- and hindlimbs of mdx mice. Furthermore, we found significant improvement in heart function, as evidenced by improved fraction shortening, ejection fraction and systolic BP. In addition, the long-term detrimental effects of prednisolone typically seen in mdx skeletal and heart function were not observed at the effective dose of naproxcinod. In conclusion, our results indicate that naproxcinod has significant potential as a safe therapeutic option for the treatment of muscular dystrophies. PMID:24463621

  7. Distinct phenotype of a Wilson disease mutation reveals a novel trafficking determinant in the copper transporter ATP7B

    PubMed Central

    Braiterman, Lelita T.; Murthy, Amrutha; Jayakanthan, Samuel; Nyasae, Lydia; Tzeng, Eric; Gromadzka, Grazyna; Woolf, Thomas B.; Lutsenko, Svetlana; Hubbard, Ann L.

    2014-01-01

    Wilson disease (WD) is a monogenic autosomal-recessive disorder of copper accumulation that leads to liver failure and/or neurological deficits. WD is caused by mutations in ATP7B, a transporter that loads Cu(I) onto newly synthesized cupro-enzymes in the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and exports excess copper out of cells by trafficking from the TGN to the plasma membrane. To date, most WD mutations have been shown to disrupt ATP7B activity and/or stability. Using a multidisciplinary approach, including clinical analysis of patients, cell-based assays, and computational studies, we characterized a patient mutation, ATP7BS653Y, which is stable, does not disrupt Cu(I) transport, yet renders the protein unable to exit the TGN. Bulky or charged substitutions at position 653 mimic the phenotype of the patient mutation. Molecular modeling and dynamic simulation suggest that the S653Y mutation induces local distortions within the transmembrane (TM) domain 1 and alter TM1 interaction with TM2. S653Y abolishes the trafficking-stimulating effects of a secondary mutation in the N-terminal apical targeting domain. This result indicates a role for TM1/TM2 in regulating conformations of cytosolic domains involved in ATP7B trafficking. Taken together, our experiments revealed an unexpected role for TM1/TM2 in copper-regulated trafficking of ATP7B and defined a unique class of WD mutants that are transport-competent but trafficking-defective. Understanding the precise consequences of WD-causing mutations will facilitate the development of advanced mutation-specific therapies. PMID:24706876

  8. Association between features of the insulin resistance syndrome and Alzheimer's disease independently of apolipoprotein E4 phenotype: cross sectional population based study.

    PubMed Central

    Kuusisto, J.; Koivisto, K.; Mykkänen, L.; Helkala, E. L.; Vanhanen, M.; Hänninen, T.; Kervinen, K.; Kesäniemi, Y. A.; Riekkinen, P. J.; Laakso, M.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the association between features of the insulin resistance syndrome and Alzheimer's disease. DESIGN: Cross sectional population based study. SUBJECTS: 980 people aged 69 to 78 (349 men, 631 women). SETTING: Population of Kuopio, eastern Finland. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Presence of features of the insulin resistance syndrome and diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease by detailed neurological and neuropsychological evaluation. RESULTS: 46 (4.7%) subjects were classified as having probable or possible Alzheimer's disease. In univariate analyses, apolipoprotein E4 phenotype (odds ratio; 95% confidence interval 3.24: 1.77 to 5.92), age (1.16; 1.05 to 1.29), low level of education (0.82; 0.72 to 0.93), low total cholesterol concentration (0.77; 0.59 to 1.00), high systolic blood pressure (1.01; 1.00 to 1.03), high fasting and 2 hour plasma glucose concentrations (1.11; 1.01 to 1.23 and 1.08; 1.03 to 1.13, respectively), high fasting and 2 hour insulin concentrations (1.05; 1.02 to 1.08 and 1.003; 1.00 to 1.01, respectively), and abnormal glucose tolerance (1.86; 1.23 to 2.80) were significantly associated with Alzheimer's disease. In multivariate analysis including apolipoprotein E4 phenotype, age, education, systolic blood pressure, total cholesterol concentration, fasting glucose concentration, and insulin concentration, apolipoprotein E4 phenotype, age, education, total cholesterol, and insulin were significantly associated with Alzheimer's disease. In 532 non-diabetic subjects without the e4 allele hyperinsulinaemia was associated with an increased risk for Alzheimer's disease (prevalence of disease 7.5% v 1.4% in normoinsulinaemic subjects, P = 0.0004). In contrast, in the 228 with the e4 allele hyperinsulinaemia had no effect on the risk of disease (7.0% v 7.1%, respectively). CONCLUSION: Features of the insulin resistance syndrome are associated with Alzheimer's disease independently of apolipoprotein E4 phenotype. PMID:9366728

  9. Aggressive mature natural killer cell neoplasms: from epidemiology to diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Mature natural killer (NK) cell neoplasms are classified by the World Health Organization into NK/T cell lymphoma, nasal type (NKTCL), aggressive NK-cell leukemia (ANKCL) and chronic lymphoproliferative disorders of NK-cells, the latter being considered provisionally. NKTCL and ANKCL are rare diseases, with higher prevalence in Asia, Central and South America. Most NKTCL present extranodal, as a destructive tumor affecting the nose and upper aerodigestive tract (nasal NKTCL) or any organ or tissue (extranasal NKTCL) whereas ANKCL manifests as a systemic disease with multiorgan involvement and naturally evolutes to death in a few weeks. The histopathological hallmark of these aggressive NK-cell tumors is a polymorphic neoplastic infiltrate with angiocentricity, angiodestruction and tissue necrosis. The tumor cells have cytoplasmatic azurophilic granules and usually show a CD45+bright, CD2+, sCD3-, cytCD3epsilon+, CD56+bright, CD16−/+, cytotoxic granules molecules+ phenotype. T-cell receptor genes are in germ-line configuration. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) -encoded membrane proteins and early region EBV RNA are usually detected on lymphoma cells, with a pattern suggestive of a latent viral infection type II. Complex chromosomal abnormalities are frequent and loss of chromosomes 6q, 11q, 13q, and 17p are recurrent aberrations. The rarity of the NK-cell tumors limits our ability to standardize the procedures for the diagnosis and clinical management and efforts should be made to encourage multi-institutional registries. PMID:23816348

  10. Ovarian cancer progression is controlled by phenotypic changes in dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Scarlett, Uciane K.; Rutkowski, Melanie R.; Rauwerdink, Adam M.; Fields, Jennifer; Escovar-Fadul, Ximena; Baird, Jason; Cubillos-Ruiz, Juan R.; Jacobs, Ana C.; Gonzalez, Jorge L.; Weaver, John; Fiering, Steven

    2012-01-01

    We characterized the initiation and evolution of the immune response against a new inducible p53-dependent model of aggressive ovarian carcinoma that recapitulates the leukocyte infiltrates and cytokine milieu of advanced human tumors. Unlike other models that initiate tumors before the development of a mature immune system, we detect measurable anti-tumor immunity from very early stages, which is driven by infiltrating dendritic cells (DCs) and prevents steady tumor growth for prolonged periods. Coinciding with a phenotypic switch in expanding DC infiltrates, tumors aggressively progress to terminal disease in a comparatively short time. Notably, tumor cells remain immunogenic at advanced stages, but anti-tumor T cells become less responsive, whereas their enduring activity is abrogated by different microenvironmental immunosuppressive DCs. Correspondingly, depleting DCs early in the disease course accelerates tumor expansion, but DC depletion at advanced stages significantly delays aggressive malignant progression. Our results indicate that phenotypically divergent DCs drive both immunosurveillance and accelerated malignant growth. We provide experimental support for the cancer immunoediting hypothesis, but we also show that aggressive cancer progression after a comparatively long latency period is primarily driven by the mobilization of immunosuppressive microenvironmental leukocytes, rather than loss of tumor immunogenicity. PMID:22351930

  11. Local amino acid sequence patterns dominate the heterogeneous phenotype for the collagen connective tissue disease Osteogenesis Imperfecta resulting from Gly mutations.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jianxi; Yang, Zhangfu; Sun, Xiuxia; Addabbo, Rayna; Baum, Jean

    2015-10-01

    Osteogenesis Imperfecta (OI), a hereditary connective tissue disease in collagen that arises from a single Gly → X mutation in the collagen chain, varies widely in phenotype from perinatal lethal to mild. It is unclear why there is such a large variation in the severity of the disease considering the repeating (Gly-X-Y)n sequence and the uniform rod-like structure of collagen. We systematically evaluate the effect of local (Gly-X-Y)n sequence around the mutation site on OI phenotype using integrated bio-statistical approaches, including odds ratio analysis and decision tree modeling. We show that different Gly → X mutations have different local sequence patterns that are correlated with lethal and nonlethal phenotypes providing a mechanism for understanding the sensitivity of local context in defining lethal and non-lethal OI. A number of important trends about which factors are related to OI phenotypes are revealed by the bio-statistical analyses; most striking is the complementary relationship between the placement of Pro residues and small residues and their correlation to OI phenotype. When Pro is present or small flexible residues are absent nearby a mutation site, the OI case tends to be lethal; when Pro is present or small flexible residues are absent further away from the mutation site, the OI case tends to be nonlethal. The analysis also reveals the dominant role of local sequence around mutation sites in the Major Ligand Binding Regions that are primarily responsible for collagen binding to its receptors and shows that non-lethal mutations are highly predicted by local sequence considerations alone whereas lethal mutations are not as easily predicted and may be a result of more complex interactions. Understanding the sequence determinants of OI mutations will enhance genetic counseling and help establish which steps in the collagen hierarchy to target for drug therapy. PMID:25980613

  12. Nodal signaling promotes a tumorigenic phenotype in human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Kirsammer, Gina; Strizzi, Luigi; Margaryan, Naira V; Gilgur, Alina; Hyser, Matthew; Atkinson, Janis; Kirschmann, Dawn A; Seftor, Elisabeth A; Hendrix, Mary J C

    2014-12-01

    The Ras-ERK pathway is deregulated in approximately a third of human cancers, particularly those of epithelial origin. In aggressive, triple-negative, basal-like breast cancers, most tumors display increased MEK and ERK phosphorylation and exhibit a gene expression profile characteristic of Kras or EGFR mutant tumors; however, Ras family genetic mutations are uncommon in triple-negative breast cancer and EGFR mutations account for only a subset of these tumors. Therefore, th