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Sample records for aggressive histological subtypes

  1. The role of fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography in aggressive histological subtypes of thyroid cancer: an overview.

    PubMed

    Treglia, Giorgio; Annunziata, Salvatore; Muoio, Barbara; Salvatori, Massimo; Ceriani, Luca; Giovanella, Luca

    2013-01-01

    Aggressive histological subtypes of thyroid cancer are rare and have a poor prognosis. The most important aggressive subtypes of thyroid cancer are Hürthle cell carcinoma (HCTC) and anaplastic and poorly differentiated carcinoma (ATC and PDTC). The American Thyroid Association recently published guidelines for the management of patients with ATC, but no specific guidelines have been done about HCTC. We performed an overview of the literature about the role of Fluorine-18-Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography or positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET or PET/CT) in aggressive histological subtypes of thyroid cancer. Only few original studies about the role of FDG-PET or PET/CT in HCTC, PDTC, and ATC have been published in the literature. FDG-PET or PET/CT seems to be useful in staging or followup of invasive and metastatic HCTC. FDG-PET or PET/CT should be used in patients with ATC in initial staging and in the followup after surgery to evaluate metastatic disease. Some authors suggest the use of FDG-PET/CT in staging of PDTC, but more studies are needed to define the diagnostic use of FDG-PET/CT in this setting. Limited experience suggests the usefulness of FDG-PET or PET/CT in patients with more aggressive histological subtypes of DTC. However, DTC presenting as radioiodine refractory and FDG-PET positive should be considered aggressive tumours with poor prognosis. PMID:23653645

  2. Lumbee Native American ancestry and the incidence of aggressive histologic subtypes of endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chelsea; Roque, Dario; Ehrisman, Jessie A.; DiSanto, Nicola; Broadwater, Gloria; Doll, Kemi M.; Gehrig, Paola A.; Secord, Angeles Alvarez; Havrilesky, Laura J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The Lumbee Indian tribe is the largest Native American tribe in North Carolina, with about 55,000 enrolled members who mostly reside in southeastern counties. We evaluated whether Lumbee heritage is associated with high-risk histologic subtypes of endometrial cancer. Methods We retrospectively analyzed the available records from IRB-approved endometrial cancer databases at two institutions of patients of Lumbee descent (year of diagnosis range 1980–2014). Each Lumbee case was matched by age, year of diagnosis, and BMI to two non-Lumbee controls. Chi-square test was used to compare categorical associations. Kaplan–Meier methods and log-rank test were used to display and compare disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). Multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression was used to adjust for age and BMI while testing cohort as a predictor of DFS and OS. Results Among 108 subjects, 10/35 (29%) Lumbee and 19/72 (26%) non-Lumbee subjects had high-risk (serous/clear cell/carcinosarcoma) histologic types (p = 0.8). 12/35 (34%) Lumbee and 24/72 (33%) non-Lumbee subjects had grade 3 tumors (p = 0.9). 5/33 (15%) Lumbee and 13/72 (18%) non-Lumbee had advanced stage endometrial cancer at diagnosis (p = 0.7). Lumbee ancestry was not associated with worse survival outcomes. OS (p = 0.054) and DFS (p = 0.01) were both worse in Blacks compared to Lumbee and White subjects. Conclusion In this retrospective cohort analysis, Lumbee Native American ancestry was not a significant independent predictor of rates of high-risk histological subtypes of endometrial cancer or poor survival outcomes. PMID:26425722

  3. Subtypes of Aggressive Behaviors: A Developmental Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vitaro, Frank; Brendgen, Mara; Barker, Edward D.

    2006-01-01

    Aggressive behaviors in children and adolescents have undergone important conceptual and definitional modifications in the past two decades. In particular, subtypes of aggression have been proposed that separate the form and the function of the aggressive behaviors (i.e., social vs. physical aggression; reactive vs. proactive aggression).…

  4. Extremity Soft Tissue Sarcoma: Tailoring Resection to Histologic Subtype.

    PubMed

    Cable, Matthew G; Randall, R Lor

    2016-10-01

    Soft tissue sarcomas comprise tumors originating from mesenchymal or connective tissue. Histologic grade is integral to prognosis. Because sarcoma management is multimodal, histologic subtype should inform optimum treatment. Appropriate biopsy and communication between surgeon and pathologist can help ensure a correct diagnosis. Treatment often involves surgical excision with wide margins and adjuvant radiotherapy. There is no consensus on what constitutes an adequate margin for histologic subtypes. An appreciation of how histology corresponds with tumor biology and surgical anatomic constraints is needed for management of this disease. Even with the surgical goal of wide resection being obtained, many patients do not outlive their disease. PMID:27591492

  5. Dermoscopy of Grover's disease: Variability according to histological subtype.

    PubMed

    Errichetti, Enzo; De Francesco, Vincenzo; Pegolo, Enrico; Stinco, Giuseppe

    2016-08-01

    Distinguishing Grover's disease from other papular dermatoses is often a troublesome task. According to two relatively recent case reports, dermoscopy may be useful in assisting the diagnosis of such a disorder by showing a peculiar pattern. The aim of this study was to evaluate the dermoscopic features of Grover's disease in a larger series of patients and correlate dermoscopy with histopathological findings. Seven patients with histopathologically confirmed Grover's disease were included in the study, with three of them displaying a Darier-like histology and the remaining four cases having a spongiotic histological pattern. The results of our study suggest that Grover's disease may display different features according to the histological subtype, with a central star-shaped/branched polygonal/roundish-oval brownish area surrounded by a whitish halo being characteristic of the Darier-like histological subtype and whitish scales over a reddish-yellowish background being characteristic of the spongiotic histological subtype. PMID:26892381

  6. Associations among Empathy, Social Competence, & Reactive/Proactive Aggression Subtypes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayberry, Megan L.; Espelage, Dorothy L.

    2007-01-01

    Differences between proactive and reactive aggression subtypes on self-reported measures of empathy, social competence, and expectation for reward were examined among 433 middle school students (65.4% White, 33.9% Black). As hypothesized, males scored higher on proactive and reactive aggression scales and lower on empathy measures than females.…

  7. Two Subtypes of Atypical Leiomyoma: Clinical, Histologic, and Molecular Analysis.

    PubMed

    Ubago, Julianne M; Zhang, Qing; Kim, Julie J; Kong, Beihua; Wei, Jian-Jun

    2016-07-01

    Atypical leiomyoma (ALM) is a rare variant of uterine smooth muscle tumors. Several recent studies have suggested that ALM has distinct, but also heterogenous, histologic and molecular features, yet little is known about the biology and histogenesis of ALM. Some have even postulated whether the atypical histologic features represent true atypia or simply degenerative changes. In this study, we analyzed the cytologic features of 60 ALM cases and found that ALM could be further divided into 2 subtypes, type I and type II, based primarily on nuclear features. Type I ALM showed round or oval nuclei, distinct and smooth nuclear membranes, prominent nucleoli with perinucleolar halos, and open coarse chromatin. Type II ALM showed elongated or spindled nuclei, irregular nuclear membranes, pinpoint or no nucleoli, and dark smudgy chromatin. There were also architectural differences between type I and type II ALM. Type I ALM often showed diffuse atypia within the tumor, whereas the atypia in type II ALM was patchy, surrounded by usual-type leiomyoma. The 2 subtypes also differed when we compared the immunohistochemical and molecular patterns. Type II tumors showed significantly higher rates of immunoreactivity for p16, p53, and HMGA2 and showed MED12 mutations more frequently than the type I counterparts. Our findings suggest that the type I and type II subtypes of ALM may arise from 2 different pathways. Type I tumors may be related to fumarate hydratase mutations, whereas type II ALM appear to arise in a existing usual-type leiomyomas. PMID:27015034

  8. Distinct patterns of peritumoral histological findings in subtypes of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Saito, Michihiro; Imada, Hiroki; Suzuki, Tsukasa; Sata, Naohiro; Yasuda, Yoshikazu; Maetani, Iruru; Fukushima, Noriyoshi

    2015-10-01

    Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) of the pancreas are primary pancreatic neoplasms that can act as precursors to invasive adenocarcinoma of the pancreas. The peritumoral stroma has been increasingly recognized to play an important role in many types of tumors. Therefore, to investigate the clinicopathological significance of the peritumoral stroma in IPMNs, we examined the histological features of the peritumoral stroma in each subtype and histological grade of IPMNs. Eighty-two patients with IPMN, who underwent surgical resection, were reviewed clinicopathologically. Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (86 lesions in total) were histologically subclassified into gastric (n = 51), intestinal (n = 22), pancreatobiliary (n = 11), and oncocytic (n = 2) subtypes. Peritumoral histological features between the gastric and intestinal subtypes were evaluated by each histological grade. The results showed that subepithelial edema and inflammatory cell infiltration were more commonly observed in the gastric subtype (74% and 79%, respectively) than in the intestinal subtype (12% and 25%, respectively) of low-grade IPMNs. On the other hand, mucus lakes were more commonly observed in the intestinal subtype (100%) than in the gastric subtype (0%) of high-grade IPMNs. In addition, pancreatobiliary subtype IPMNs tended to exhibit acute inflammation such as neutrophil predominance. This study showed that peritumoral histological features differed among subtypes of IPMNs from low-grade tumors. These differences suggest the possibility that each subtype of IPMNs has a distinct mechanism from an early stage of tumor progression, which is reflected in the properties of the peritumoral stroma. PMID:26265194

  9. Assessing the genetic architecture of epithelial ovarian cancer histological subtypes.

    PubMed

    Cuellar-Partida, Gabriel; Lu, Yi; Dixon, Suzanne C; Fasching, Peter A; Hein, Alexander; Burghaus, Stefanie; Beckmann, Matthias W; Lambrechts, Diether; Van Nieuwenhuysen, Els; Vergote, Ignace; Vanderstichele, Adriaan; Doherty, Jennifer Anne; Rossing, Mary Anne; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Goodman, Marc T; Bogdanova, Natalia; Dörk, Thilo; Dürst, Matthias; Hillemanns, Peter; Runnebaum, Ingo B; Antonenkova, Natalia; Butzow, Ralf; Leminen, Arto; Nevanlinna, Heli; Pelttari, Liisa M; Edwards, Robert P; Kelley, Joseph L; Modugno, Francesmary; Moysich, Kirsten B; Ness, Roberta B; Cannioto, Rikki; Høgdall, Estrid; Høgdall, Claus; Jensen, Allan; Giles, Graham G; Bruinsma, Fiona; Kjaer, Susanne K; Hildebrandt, Michelle A T; Liang, Dong; Lu, Karen H; Wu, Xifeng; Bisogna, Maria; Dao, Fanny; Levine, Douglas A; Cramer, Daniel W; Terry, Kathryn L; Tworoger, Shelley S; Stampfer, Meir; Missmer, Stacey; Bjorge, Line; Salvesen, Helga B; Kopperud, Reidun K; Bischof, Katharina; Aben, Katja K H; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Massuger, Leon F A G; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Olson, Sara H; McGuire, Valerie; Rothstein, Joseph H; Sieh, Weiva; Whittemore, Alice S; Cook, Linda S; Le, Nhu D; Blake Gilks, C; Gronwald, Jacek; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubiński, Jan; Kluz, Tomasz; Song, Honglin; Tyrer, Jonathan P; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Brinton, Louise; Trabert, Britton; Lissowska, Jolanta; McLaughlin, John R; Narod, Steven A; Phelan, Catherine; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Eccles, Diana; Campbell, Ian; Gayther, Simon A; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Menon, Usha; Ramus, Susan J; Wu, Anna H; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Timorek, Agnieszka; Szafron, Lukasz; Cunningham, Julie M; Fridley, Brooke L; Winham, Stacey J; Bandera, Elisa V; Poole, Elizabeth M; Morgan, Terry K; Goode, Ellen L; Schildkraut, Joellen M; Pearce, Celeste L; Berchuck, Andrew; Pharoah, Paul D P; Webb, Penelope M; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Risch, Harvey A; MacGregor, Stuart

    2016-07-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is one of the deadliest common cancers. The five most common types of disease are high-grade and low-grade serous, endometrioid, mucinous and clear cell carcinoma. Each of these subtypes present distinct molecular pathogeneses and sensitivities to treatments. Recent studies show that certain genetic variants confer susceptibility to all subtypes while other variants are subtype-specific. Here, we perform an extensive analysis of the genetic architecture of EOC subtypes. To this end, we used data of 10,014 invasive EOC patients and 21,233 controls from the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium genotyped in the iCOGS array (211,155 SNPs). We estimate the array heritability (attributable to variants tagged on arrays) of each subtype and their genetic correlations. We also look for genetic overlaps with factors such as obesity, smoking behaviors, diabetes, age at menarche and height. We estimated the array heritabilities of high-grade serous disease ([Formula: see text] = 8.8 ± 1.1 %), endometrioid ([Formula: see text] = 3.2 ± 1.6 %), clear cell ([Formula: see text] = 6.7 ± 3.3 %) and all EOC ([Formula: see text] = 5.6 ± 0.6 %). Known associated loci contributed approximately 40 % of the total array heritability for each subtype. The contribution of each chromosome to the total heritability was not proportional to chromosome size. Through bivariate and cross-trait LD score regression, we found evidence of shared genetic backgrounds between the three high-grade subtypes: serous, endometrioid and undifferentiated. Finally, we found significant genetic correlations of all EOC with diabetes and obesity using a polygenic prediction approach. PMID:27075448

  10. Lifetime risks of cutaneous melanoma by histological subtype and race/ethnicity in the United States.

    PubMed

    Feng, Zhuang; Zhang, Zhenzhen; Wu, Xiao-Cheng

    2013-01-01

    The probability of developing melanoma of the skin in the United States has been previously reported as a whole entity. This study aimed to describe lifetime risks of cutaneous melanoma by histological subtype among different racial and ethnic groups in the United States. Melanoma cases newly diagnosed in 2005-2007 were obtained from 16 registries participating in the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) program. Lifetime risks of developing melanoma subtypes (nodular melanoma, lentigo maligna melanoma, superficial spreading melanoma, acral lentiginous melanoma and desmoplastic melanoma) were examined among non-Hispanic whites, Hispanic whites, Blacks, and Asian/Pacific Islanders. Of the total 43,690 melanoma cases, 18,910 cases (43%) diagnosed with one of the five histological subtypes were included in the study. The results reveal that lifetime risks of melanoma subtypes differ among racial and ethnic groups, and therefore, stratification of the risks by subtype provides useful information in evaluating and counseling patients. PMID:24133782

  11. Prognostic Implication of Predominant Histologic Subtypes of Lymph Node Metastases in Surgically Resected Lung Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Suda, Kenichi; Sato, Katsuaki; Tomizawa, Kenji; Takemoto, Toshiki; Iwasaki, Takuya; Sakaguchi, Masahiro; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya

    2014-01-01

    The International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer, American Thoracic Society, and European Respiratory Society (IASLC/ATS/ERS) proposed a new classification for lung adenocarcinoma (AD) based on predominant histologic subtypes, such as lepidic, papillary, acinar, solid, and micropapillary; this system reportedly reflects well outcomes of patients with surgically resected lung AD. However, the prognostic implication of predominant histologic subtypes in lymph nodes metastases is unclear so far. In this study, we compared predominant subtypes between primary lung tumors and lymph node metastatic lesions in 24 patients with surgically treated lung adenocarcinoma with lymph node metastases. Additionally, we analyzed prognostic implications of these predominant histologic subtypes. We observed several discordance patterns between predominant subtypes in primary lung tumors and lymph node metastases. Concordance rates were 22%, 64%, and 100%, respectively, in papillary-, acinar-, and solid-predominant primary lung tumors. We observed that the predominant subtype in the primary lung tumor (HR 12.7, P = 0.037), but not that in lymph node metastases (HR 0.18, P = 0.13), determines outcomes in patients with surgically resected lung AD with lymph node metastases. PMID:25371901

  12. Prognostic implication of predominant histologic subtypes of lymph node metastases in surgically resected lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Suda, Kenichi; Sato, Katsuaki; Shimizu, Shigeki; Tomizawa, Kenji; Takemoto, Toshiki; Iwasaki, Takuya; Sakaguchi, Masahiro; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya

    2014-01-01

    The International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer, American Thoracic Society, and European Respiratory Society (IASLC/ATS/ERS) proposed a new classification for lung adenocarcinoma (AD) based on predominant histologic subtypes, such as lepidic, papillary, acinar, solid, and micropapillary; this system reportedly reflects well outcomes of patients with surgically resected lung AD. However, the prognostic implication of predominant histologic subtypes in lymph nodes metastases is unclear so far. In this study, we compared predominant subtypes between primary lung tumors and lymph node metastatic lesions in 24 patients with surgically treated lung adenocarcinoma with lymph node metastases. Additionally, we analyzed prognostic implications of these predominant histologic subtypes. We observed several discordance patterns between predominant subtypes in primary lung tumors and lymph node metastases. Concordance rates were 22%, 64%, and 100%, respectively, in papillary-, acinar-, and solid-predominant primary lung tumors. We observed that the predominant subtype in the primary lung tumor (HR 12.7, P = 0.037), but not that in lymph node metastases (HR 0.18, P = 0.13), determines outcomes in patients with surgically resected lung AD with lymph node metastases. PMID:25371901

  13. Incidence of epithelial ovarian cancer according to histologic subtypes in Korea, 1999 to 2012

    PubMed Central

    Won, Young-Joo; Seo, Sang-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate trends in the incidence of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC), according to histologic subtypes, in Korean women between 1999 and 2012. Methods Data from the Korea Central Cancer Registry recorded between 1999 and 2012 were evaluated. The incidences of EOC histologic subtypes were counted. Age-standardized incidence rates (ASRs) and annual percentage changes (APCs) in incidence rates were calculated. Patient data were divided into three groups based on age (<40, 40 to 59, and >59 years), and age-specific incidence rates were compared. Results Overall, the incidence of EOC has increased. Annual EOC cases increased from 922 in 1999 to 1,775 in 2012. In 1999, the ASR was 3.52 per 100,000 and increased to 4.79 per 100,000 in 2012 (APC, 2.53%; p<0.001). The ASRs in 2012 and APCs between 1999 and 2012 for the four major histologic subtypes were as follows (in order of incidence): serous carcinoma (ASR, 2.32 per 100,000; APC, 4.34%; p<0.001), mucinous carcinoma (ASR, 0.73 per 100,000; APC, –1.05%; p=0.131), endometrioid carcinoma (ASR, 0.51 per 100,000; APC, 1.48%; p=0.032), and clear cell carcinoma (ASR, 0.50 per 100,000; APC, 8.13%; p<0.001). In the sub-analyses based on age, clear cell carcinoma was confirmed as the histologic subtype whose incidence had increased the most since 1999. Conclusion The incidence of EOC is increasing in Korea. Among the histologic subtypes, the incidence of clear cell carcinoma has increased markedly across all age groups since 1999. PMID:26463436

  14. The impact of parenting on the associations between child aggression subtypes and oppositional defiant disorder symptoms.

    PubMed

    Pederson, Casey A; Fite, Paula J

    2014-12-01

    The current study evaluated parenting behaviors (i.e., parental monitoring, inconsistent discipline, parental involvement, positive parenting, and corporal punishment) as moderators of the link between proactive and reactive aggression and oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) symptoms in a community sample of 89 children ranging from 9 to 12 years of age (M = 10.44, SD = 1.14; 56 % male). Reactive, but not proactive, aggression was uniquely positively associated with ODD symptoms. Additionally, inconsistent discipline moderated the association between proactive, but not reactive, aggression and ODD symptoms, such that proactive aggression was associated with ODD symptoms only when levels of inconsistent discipline were high. Findings appear to suggest that associations between these aggression subtypes and ODD symptoms are influenced by different factors, with inconsistent discipline indicated in the association between proactively aggressive behavior and ODD symptoms. Implications for intervention are discussed. PMID:24500326

  15. Hodgkin's disease incidence in the United States by age, sex, geographic region and rye histologic subtype

    SciTech Connect

    Glaser, S.L.

    1984-11-01

    Hodgkin's disease (HD) incidence in whites is described by age, sex, Rye histologic subtype and time period for ten US locations, using recently available data with Rye histologic diagnoses for most cases. Some distinctive features of incidence in young persons - stable childhood rates, and high and increasing rates in young adults, particularly women - resulted from the elevated rates of the Nodular Sclerosis (NS) subtype. NS was the only histologic form with a rising incidence. Unexpectedly, among middle-aged and older persons rates of all subtypes declined during the 1970s. HD incidence varied little across study regions and became more geographically homogeneous with time, notably among women. HD rates were positively correlated with regional socio-economic levels. In areas with the highest young adult incidence, higher risk also affected a broader age range, including older children. Rates for young adults were positively associated with community socioeconomic status but did not covary with older adult rates. Rates for the NS and Lymphocyte Predominance subtypes were inversely correlated across areas. NS incidence increased with community economic levels. These features suggest the incidence of HD in a well-developed country is not static but evolves, characterized by higher rates of NS in an increasingly broad age range of young, particularly female, adults, rising with small increments in socioeconomic status, and occurring over the relatively short study interval. 27 figures, 50 tables.

  16. Association of adiposity, dysmetabolisms, and inflammation with aggressive breast cancer subtypes: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Agresti, Roberto; Meneghini, Elisabetta; Baili, Paolo; Minicozzi, Pamela; Turco, Alberto; Cavallo, Ilaria; Funaro, Francesco; Amash, Hade; Berrino, Franco; Tagliabue, Elda; Sant, Milena

    2016-05-01

    Obesity and metabolic syndrome are risk and prognostic factors for breast cancer (BC) and are associated with chronic inflammation. We investigated the association between distinct BC subtypes and markers of adiposity, dysmetabolisms, and inflammation. We analyzed 1779 patients with primary invasive BC treated at a single institution, for whom anthropometric and clinical-pathological data were archived. BC subtypes were classified by immunohistochemical staining of ER, PR, HER2, and Ki67, and their relations with the study markers were assessed by multinomial logistic regression. Adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated taking luminal A as reference. All subtypes more aggressive than luminal A were significantly more frequent in younger (<45 years) than older women. Before menopause, luminal B HER2-negative tumors were positively associated with large waist (OR 2.55, 95 % CI 1.53-4.24) and insulin resistance (OR 1.90, 95 % CI 1.05-3.41); luminal B HER2-positive tumors with large waist (OR 2.11, 95 % CI 1.03-4.35) and triple-negative tumors with overweight (OR 3.04, 95 % CI 1.43-6.43) and high C-reactive protein (p trend = 0.026). In postmenopausal women aged <65, luminal B HER2-negative (OR 1.94, 95 % CI 1.16-3.24) and luminal B HER2-positive tumors (OR 2.48, 95 % CI 1.16-5.27) were positively related with metabolic syndrome. Dysmetabolisms and inflammation may be related to different BC subtypes. Before menopause, triple-negative cancers were related to obesity and chronic inflammation, and aggressive luminal subtypes to abdominal adiposity. After menopause, in women aged <65 these latter subtypes were related to metabolic syndrome. Control of adiposity and dysmetabolism can reduce the risk of aggressive BC subtypes, improving the prognosis. PMID:27117160

  17. Risk assessment of second primary cancer according to histological subtype of non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Cédric; Jégu, Jérémie; Mounier, Morgane; Dandoit, Mylène; Colonna, Marc; Daubisse-Marliac, Laetitia; Trétarre, Brigitte; Ganry, Olivier; Guizard, Anne-Valérie; Bara, Simona; Bouvier, Véronique; Woronoff, Anne-Sophie; Monnereau, Alain; Casasnovas, Olivier; Velten, Michel; Troussard, Xavier; Maynadié, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) represents a heterogeneous group of diseases that are known to carry a considerable risk of second primary cancer (SPC). However, little attention has been paid to SPC risk assessment according to NHL subtypes. Data from 10 French population-based cancer registries were used to establish a cohort of 7546 patients with a first diagnosis of NHL (eight subtypes) between 1989 and 2004. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) of metachronous SPC were estimated. Among the 7546 patients diagnosed with a NHL, the overall SPC risk was 25% higher than that in the reference population (SIR = 1.25, 95% confidence interval 1.15-1.36). In univariate analysis, the SPC risk differed by lymphoma subtype. Interestingly, multivariate analysis showed that SPC risk did not differ significantly across NHL subtypes after adjustment for the other covariates (p = 0.786). Patients with NHL have an increased risk of SPC that is not influenced by the histological NHL subtype. PMID:25641432

  18. Mapping of actionable mutations to histological subtype domains in lung adenocarcinoma: implications for precision medicine

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Gavin M.; Do, Hongdo; Weiss, Jonathan; Alam, Naveed Z.; Rathi, Vivek; Walkiewicz, Marzena; John, Thomas; Russell, Prudence A.; Dobrovic, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Precision medicine depends on the accurate identification of actionable mutations in a tumor sample. It is unknown how heterogeneous the distribution of such mutations can be in a tumor. Morphological (i.e. histopathological) heterogeneity is well described in lung adenocarcinoma and has been specifically recognized in the most recent official clinico-pathological classification. The most predominant subtype present is now used to classify each lung adenocarcinoma. No molecular profile exists to explain the intratumoral differences in lung adenocarcinoma morphology, despite the consistently observed association between specific predominant subtypes and poorer survival. Given a recent proposal stratifying lung adenocarcinoma into subtypes of differing metastatic potential, we questioned the assumption that major mutations are present uniformly throughout tumors; especially those showing discrete different subtypes. We selected formalin-fixed paraffin embedded lung adenocarcinoma specimens that showed discrete areas of different subtypes, extracted subtype DNA samples from those areas and screened for mutations in hotspot regions of the EGFR, KRAS and BRAF genes using high resolution melting. Sanger sequencing was used to confirm all identified mutations. Chromogenic in situ hybridization (CISH) was used to identify mutant allele specific imbalances in tumors with EGFR mutations. Interestingly, we found that KRAS and BRAF mutations could be confined to morphological domains of higher grade. On the other hand, EGFR mutations were found through all histological subtypes in each tumor consistent with the driver status of this mutation. Intratumoral heterogeneity has major implications for tumorigenesis, chemoresistance and the role of histopathology in molecular screening for precision medicine. This study not only confirms that intratumoral mutational heterogeneity does occur, but also that it is associated with morphologically distinct regions in some tumors. From a

  19. Whole exome sequencing of rare aggressive breast cancer histologies.

    PubMed

    Dieci, Maria Vittoria; Smutná, Veronika; Scott, Véronique; Yin, Guangliang; Xu, Ran; Vielh, Philippe; Mathieu, Marie-Christine; Vicier, Cécile; Laporte, Melanie; Drusch, Francoise; Guarneri, Valentina; Conte, Pierfranco; Delaloge, Suzette; Lacroix, Ludovic; Fromigué, Olivia; André, Fabrice; Lefebvre, Celine

    2016-02-01

    Little is known about mutational landscape of rare breast cancer (BC) subtypes. The aim of the study was to apply next generation sequencing to three different subtypes of rare BCs in order to identify new genes related to cancer progression. We performed whole exome and targeted sequencing of 29 micropapillary, 23 metaplastic, and 27 pleomorphic lobular BCs. Micropapillary BCs exhibit a profile comparable to common BCs: PIK3CA, TP53, GATA3, and MAP2K4 were the most frequently mutated genes. Metaplastic BCs presented a high frequency of TP53 (78 %) and PIK3CA (48 %) mutations and were recurrently mutated on KDM6A (13 %), a gene involved in histone demethylation. Pleomorphic lobular carcinoma exhibited high mutation rate of PIK3CA (30 %), TP53 (22 %), and CDH1 (41 %) and also presented mutations in PYGM, a gene involved in glycogen metabolism, in 8 out of 27 samples (30 %). Further analyses of publicly available datasets showed that PYGM is dramatically underexpressed in common cancers as compared to normal tissues and that low expression in tumors is correlated with poor relapse-free survival. Immunohistochemical staining on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues available in our cohort of patients confirmed higher PYGM expression in normal breast tissue compared to equivalent tumoral zone. Next generation sequencing methods applied on rare cancer subtypes can serve as a useful tool in order to uncover new potential therapeutic targets. Sequencing of pleomorphic lobular carcinoma identified a high rate of alterations in PYGM. These findings emphasize the role of glycogen metabolism in cancer progression. PMID:26907767

  20. Reactive and Proactive Subtypes of Relational and Physical Aggression in Middle Childhood: Links to Concurrent and Longitudinal Adjustment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathieson, Lindsay C.; Crick, Nicki R.

    2010-01-01

    Peer aggression in children is a serious issue that school psychologists often encounter on a daily basis. To develop a better understanding of aggression, it is important to look at specific subtypes of aggression and how they are related to adjustment difficulties. Past research has examined the links between reactive and proactive physical…

  1. Epithelioid/rhabdoid glioblastoma: a highly aggressive subtype of glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Kazutaka; Ideguchi, Makoto; Kimura, Tokuhiro; Kajiwara, Koji; Imoto, Hirochika; Sadahiro, Hirokazu; Ishii, Aya; Kawano, Hiroo; Ikeda, Eiji; Suzuki, Michiyasu

    2016-04-01

    Epithelioid glioblastoma (GBM) and rhabdoid GBM are rare variants that are morphologically similar, but there is no consensus on the characteristics of each disease. These tumors have aggressive features of early recurrence and leptomeningeal dissemination and tend to develop in younger patients compared to typical GBM. The prognosis is normally worse than typical GBM, even with intensive chemoradiotherapy after surgical resection. Thus, accurate diagnosis and effective therapy for epithelioid/rhabdoid GBM are required. Four consecutive patients aged 16-48 years were diagnosed with epithelioid/rhabdoid GBM by pathological and immunohistochemical analysis at Yamaguchi University Hospital from 2006 to 2012. Two of these patients had relatively long-term survival (19 and 23 months after diagnosis). Two cases had a BRAF V600E mutation, whereas no ATRX mutation was present in any cases. All patients suffered leptomeningeal and/or spinal dissemination that worsened their prognosis. These results illustrate the need for a new therapeutic approach, such as molecular targeted drug therapy like BRAF inhibition, in addition to standard chemoradiotherapy for typical GBM. PMID:26667174

  2. Psychopathology, trauma and delinquency: subtypes of aggression and their relevance for understanding young offenders

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Objective To examine the implications of an ontology of aggressive behavior which divides aggression into reactive, affective, defensive, impulsive (RADI) or "emotionally hot"; and planned, instrumental, predatory (PIP) or "emotionally cold." Recent epidemiological, criminological, clinical and neuroscience studies converge to support a connection between emotional and trauma related psychopathology and disturbances in the emotions, self-regulation and aggressive behavior which has important implications for diagnosis and treatment, especially for delinquent populations. Method Selective review of preclinical and clinical studies in normal, clinical and delinquent populations. Results In delinquent populations we observe an increase in psychopathology, and especially trauma related psychopathology which impacts emotions and self-regulation in a manner that hotly emotionally charged acts of aggression become more likely. The identification of these disturbances can be supported by findings in cognitive neuroscience. These hot aggressive acts can be delineated from planned or emotionally cold aggression. Conclusion Our findings support a typology of diagnostic labels for disruptive behaviors, such as conduct disorder and oppositional defiant disorder, as it appears that these acts of hot emotional aggression are a legitimate target for psychopharmacological and other trauma specific interventions. The identification of this subtype of disruptive behavior disorders leads to more specific clinical interventions which in turn promise to improve hitherto unimpressive treatment outcomes of delinquents and patients with disruptive behavior. PMID:21714905

  3. GATA3 immunohistochemistry expression in histologic subtypes of primary breast carcinoma and metastatic breast carcinoma cytology.

    PubMed

    Deftereos, Georgios; Sanguino Ramirez, Angela M; Silverman, Jan F; Krishnamurti, Uma

    2015-09-01

    GATA3 plays a role in cell proliferation and differentiation in many tissues, including breast, and it has been suggested that GATA3 expression correlates with ER expression. However, little is known on GATA3 expression in various subtypes of breast carcinoma, its utilization in cytology, and on how GATA3 performs in comparison with GCDFP-15 and mammaglobin. Eighty-four histology cases of breast carcinoma of various subtypes, including 28 triple-negative breast carcinomas, along with 20 cytology cases of metastatic breast carcinoma and 12 cytology cases of ER-positive metastatic gynecologic malignancies, were stained for GATA3, GCDFP-15, and mammaglobin. In non-triple-negative breast carcinomas (n=56), GATA3 showed 100% sensitivity, higher than GCDFP-15 (42.8%; P<0.0001) and mammaglobin (58.9%; P<0.0001), whereas staining patterns were similar for all the histologic subtypes examined. Staining scores were determined by multiplying the percentage of cancer cells staining with an intensity score of 1+, 2+, or 3+ (range, 0 to 300). In non-triple-negative carcinomas, GATA3 showed a mean score of 273.7, higher than GCDFP-15 (107.5; P<0.0001) and mammaglobin (147.7; P<0.0001). In triple-negative breast carcinomas (n=28), GATA3 showed a sensitivity of 60.7%, greater than GCDFP-15 (17.9%; P=0.0022) and mammaglobin (7.1%; P<0.0001). These results were consistent irrespective of the subtype examined. In breast carcinoma cytology cases, 100% stained with GATA3, higher than GCDFP-15 (20%; P<0.0001) and mammaglobin (45%; P<0.0001). None of the metastatic endometrial or ovarian carcinomas were positive for GATA3. Although GATA3 expression correlates with ER expression in breast, no correlation is observed in gynecologic malignancies. Thus, in working up ER-positive metastatic malignancies GATA3 demonstrates specificity for breast. PMID:26274030

  4. Distinct Clinicopathologic and Genetic Features of 2 Histologic Subtypes of Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Akimasa; Misumi, Kento; Shibahara, Junji; Arita, Junichi; Sakamoto, Yoshihiro; Hasegawa, Kiyoshi; Kokudo, Norihiro; Fukayama, Masashi

    2016-08-01

    Previous studies have identified 2 clinically significant morphologic subtypes of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC) on the basis of anatomic location and/or histologic appearances. Recognizing that these classification schemes are not always applicable practically, this study aimed to establish a novel classification system based on mucin productivity and immunophenotype and to determine the rationale of this classification by examining the clinicopathologic and genetic characteristics of the 2 subtypes defined by this method. We retrospectively investigated 102 consecutive ICC cases and classified them on the basis of mucin productivity and immunophenotype (S100P, N-cadherin, and NCAM). We found that 42 and 56 cases were classified as type 1 and type 2 ICCs, respectively, and only 4 cases were of indeterminate type. Type 1 ICC, generally characterized by mucin production and diffuse immunoreactivity to S100P, arose less frequently in chronic liver diseases and showed higher levels of serum CEA and CA 19-9 than did type 2 ICC, which generally showed little mucin production and exhibited immunoreactivity to N-cadherin and/or NCAM. Type 1 ICC was characterized by several pathologic features, including higher frequencies of perineural invasion and lymph node metastasis. Although the log-rank test demonstrated that type 1 ICC had significantly worse survival, the multivariate Cox regression analysis showed no prognostic significance of this histologic subtype. Genetic analyses revealed that KRAS mutation was significantly more frequent in type 1 ICC, whereas IDH mutation and FGFR2 translocation were restricted to type 2 ICC. In conclusion, the present classification of ICC based on mucin productivity and immunophenotype identified 2 subtypes with clinicopathologic significance. PMID:27259014

  5. Contrasting responses of non-small cell lung cancer to antiangiogenic therapies depend on histological subtype

    PubMed Central

    Larrayoz, Marta; Pio, Ruben; Pajares, María J; Zudaire, Isabel; Ajona, Daniel; Casanovas, Oriol; Montuenga, Luis M; Agorreta, Jackeline

    2014-01-01

    The vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) pathway is a clinically validated antiangiogenic target for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, some contradictory results have been reported on the biological effects of antiangiogenic drugs. In order to evaluate the efficacy of these drugs in NSCLC histological subtypes, we analyzed the anticancer effect of two anti-VEGFR2 therapies (sunitinib and DC101) in chemically induced mouse models and tumorgrafts of lung adenocarcinoma (ADC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Antiangiogenic treatments induced vascular trimming in both histological subtypes. In ADC tumors, vascular trimming was accompanied by tumor stabilization. In contrast, in SCC tumors, antiangiogenic therapy was associated with disease progression and induction of tumor proliferation. Moreover, in SCC, anti-VEGFR2 therapies increased the expression of stem cell markers such as aldehyde dehydrogenase 1A1, CD133, and CD15, independently of intratumoral hypoxia. In vitro studies with ADC cell lines revealed that antiangiogenic treatments reduced pAKT and pERK signaling and inhibited proliferation, while in SCC-derived cell lines the same treatments increased pAKT and pERK, and induced survival. In conclusion, this study evaluates for the first time the effect of antiangiogenic drugs in lung SCC murine models in vivo and sheds light on the contradictory results of antiangiogenic therapies in NSCLC. PMID:24500694

  6. Histological subtypes of solitary pulmonary nodules of adenocarcinoma and their clinical relevance

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Hui-Di; Wan, Ming-Yue; Xu, Chun-Hua; Zhan, Ping; Zou, Jue; Zhang, Qian-Qian

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore the histological subtypes of solitary pulmonary nodules (SPNs) of invasive adenocarcinoma and their clinical relevance. Methods A total of 188 patients with pathologically confirmed invasive adenocarcinoma in our hospital from January 2007 to December 2011 were enrolled in this study. In accordance with the new classification of lung adenocarcinoma, all the histological sections were reviewed and classified, and the clinical data were collected and analyzed. Results Of these 188 patients who had been initially diagnosed as SPNs of adenocarcinoma, there were 6 cases of lepidic predominant adenocarcinoma (LPA), 71 cases of acinar predominant adenocarcinoma (APA), 74 cases of papillary predominant adenocarcinoma (PPA), 15 cases of micorpapillary predominant adenocarcinoma (MPA), and 22 cases of solid predominant adenocarcinoma (SPA) with mucin production. The incidence of lymph node metastasis was 80.0% and 81.8% in MPA and SPA, respectively, which was significantly higher than those in LPA, APA, and PPA (all P<0.01). The incidence of LPA was 83.3% (5/6) in women, which was significantly higher than that in men (P=0.037). Conclusions According to the new classification, MPA and SPA have high incidence of lymph node metastasis. LPA is more likely to occur in women. Sub-typing of the lung adenocarcinoma based on the newest international classification criteria is helpful to identify the clinical features of this disease. PMID:24409363

  7. Reproductive and hormone-related risk factors for epithelial ovarian cancer by histologic pathways, invasiveness and histologic subtypes: Results from the EPIC cohort.

    PubMed

    Fortner, Renée T; Ose, Jennifer; Merritt, Melissa A; Schock, Helena; Tjønneland, Anne; Hansen, Louise; Overvad, Kim; Dossus, Laure; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; Baglietto, Laura; Boeing, Heiner; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Benetou, Vassiliki; Lagiou, Pagona; Agnoli, Claudia; Mattiello, Amalia; Masala, Giovanna; Tumino, Rosario; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B As; Onland-Moret, N Charlotte; Peeters, Petra H; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Torhild Gram, Inger; Duell, Eric J; Larrañaga, Nerea; Ardanaz, Eva; Sánchez, María-José; Chirlaque, M-D; Brändstedt, Jenny; Idahl, Annika; Lundin, Eva; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Wareham, Nick; Travis, Ruth C; Rinaldi, Sabina; Romieu, Isabelle; Gunter, Marc J; Riboli, Elio; Kaaks, Rudolf

    2015-09-01

    Whether risk factors for epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) differ by subtype (i.e., dualistic pathway of carcinogenesis, histologic subtype) is not well understood; however, data to date suggest risk factor differences. We examined associations between reproductive and hormone-related risk factors for EOC by subtype in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort. Among 334,126 women with data on reproductive and hormone-related risk factors (follow-up: 1992-2010), 1,245 incident cases of EOC with known histology and invasiveness were identified. Data on tumor histology, grade, and invasiveness, were available from cancer registries and pathology record review. We observed significant heterogeneity by the dualistic model (i.e., type I [low grade serous or endometrioid, mucinous, clear cell, malignant Brenner] vs. type II [high grade serous or endometrioid]) for full-term pregnancy (phet  = 0.02). Full-term pregnancy was more strongly inversely associated with type I than type II tumors (ever vs. never: type I: relative risk (RR) 0.47 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.33-0.69]; type II, RR: 0.81 [0.61-1.06]). We observed no significant differences in risk in analyses by major histologic subtypes of invasive EOC (serous, mucinous, endometrioid, clear cell). None of the investigated factors were associated with borderline tumors. Established protective factors, including duration of oral contraceptive use and full term pregnancy, were consistently inversely associated with risk across histologic subtypes (e.g., ever full-term pregnancy: serous, RR: 0.73 [0.58-0.92]; mucinous, RR: 0.53 [0.30-0.95]; endometrioid, RR: 0.65 [0.40-1.06]; clear cell, RR: 0.34 [0.18-0.64]; phet  = 0.16). These results suggest limited heterogeneity between reproductive and hormone-related risk factors and EOC subtypes. PMID:25656413

  8. Correlation of Histologic Subtypes and Molecular Alterations in Pulmonary Adenocarcinoma: Therapeutic and Prognostic Implications.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jiyoon; Jang, Se Jin; Choi, Chang Min; Ro, Jae Y

    2016-09-01

    Major driver mutations of pulmonary adenocarcinomas have been identified and highlighted as actionable targets for precision cancer medicine. As phenotype is largely determined by genotype, genetic changes associated with morphologic features have recently received more attention from both pathologists and clinicians. The morphologic features of adenocarcinomas with mutations in EGFR or KRAS, or translocated ALK, have rarely been described. Pulmonary adenocarcinomas with EGFR mutations, the most common driver mutation encountered in Asian patients with pulmonary adenocarcinoma, show lepidic or papillary organotypic growth patterns. KRAS-mutated adenocarcinomas demonstrate nonorganotypic growth patterns, especially mucin-containing cells. P53 mutations are associated with aggressiveness rather than growth patterns. HER2 mutations are observed in mucinous adenocarcinoma and adenocarcinoma with micropapillary features. The histologic features of BRAF-mutated adenocarcinomas have not yet been established, but papillary, lepidic, solid, and acinar patterns have been observed. Adenocarcinomas with rearrangement of ALK, ROS1, and RET genes share similar histologic features, such as solid signet-ring cells and cribriform formation. However, adenocarcinomas with NRG1 rearrangements frequently show mucinous morphology. The histologic features and related mutations of adenocarcinomas with expression of programmed cell death-1 and programmed cell death ligands-1 may be helpful in guiding immunotherapeutic treatment. This review describes histopathologic features of adenocarcinomas and their correlation with molecular alterations. PMID:27403614

  9. The molecular basis for ethnic variation and histological subtype differences in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    ZONG, Yang; GOLDSTEIN, Andrew S.; HUANG, JiaoTi

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a common malignancy among men in Western countries. Recently the morbidity and mortality of prostate cancer increase dramatically in several oriental countries including China. Rapidly evolving technology in molecular biology such as high-throughput sequencing and integrative analysis of genomic and transcriptomic landscapes have enabled the identification of key oncogenic events for prostate cancer initiation, progression and resistance to hormonal therapy. These surging data of prostate cancer genome also provide insights on ethnic variation and the differences in histological subtype of this disease. In this review, differences in the incidence of prostate cancer and the prevalence of main genetic alterations between Asian and Western populations are discussed. We also review the recent findings on the mechanisms underlying neuroendocrine differentiation of prostate cancer and the development of small cell neuroendocrine carcinoma after androgen deprivation therapy. PMID:23852643

  10. Reproductive factors and histologic subtype in relation to mortality after a breast cancer diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Warren Andersen, S; Newcomb, P A; Hampton, J M; Titus-Ernstoff, L; Egan, K M; Trentham-Dietz, A

    2011-12-01

    Evidence suggests that certain reproductive factors are more strongly associated with the incidence of lobular than of ductal breast cancer. The mechanisms influencing breast cancer incidence histology may also affect survival. Women with invasive breast cancer (N = 22,302) diagnosed during 1986-2005 were enrolled in a series of population-based studies in three US states. Participants completed telephone interviews regarding reproductive exposures and other breast cancer risk factors. Histologic subtype was obtained from state cancer registries. Vital status and cause of death were determined through December 2006 using the National Death Index. Women were followed for 9.8 years on average with 3,050 breast cancer deaths documented. Adjusted hazard rate ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated using Cox proportional hazards regression models for breast cancer-specific and all-cause mortality. Parity was inversely associated with breast cancer-specific mortality (P (Trend) = 0.002). Associations were similar though attenuated for all-cause mortality. In women diagnosed with ductal breast cancer, a 15% reduction in breast cancer-specific mortality was observed in women with five or more children when compared to those with no children (HR = 0.85, 95% CI: 0.73-1.00). A similar inverse though non-significant association was observed in women with lobular subtype (HR = 0.70, 95% CI: 0.43-1.14). The trend did not extend to mixed ductal-lobular breast cancer. Age at first birth had no consistent relationship with breast cancer-specific or all-cause mortality. We found increasing parity reduced mortality in ductal and lobular breast cancer. The number of full-term births, rather than age at first birth, has an effect on both breast cancer-specific and overall mortality. PMID:21769659

  11. The Association Between Alcohol Consumption and Lung Carcinoma by Histological Subtype.

    PubMed

    Troche, Jose Ramon; Mayne, Susan T; Freedman, Neal D; Shebl, Fatma M; Abnet, Christian C

    2016-01-15

    Alcohol is a carcinogen suspected of increasing lung cancer risk. Therefore, we prospectively evaluated the relationship between alcohol consumption and lung carcinoma in 492,902 persons from the National Institutes of Health-AARP Diet and Health Study. We used Cox models to calculate hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals, adjusting for tobacco smoking and other potential confounders. Between 1995/1996 and December 31, 2006, there were 10,227 incident cases of lung carcinoma, classified as adenocarcinoma (n = 4,036), squamous cell carcinoma (n = 1,998), small cell carcinoma (n = 1,524), undifferentiated carcinoma (n = 559), and other (n = 2,110). Compared with nondrinking, alcohol consumption was associated with a modest nonlinear reduction in total lung carcinoma risk at lower levels of consumption (for 0.5-<1 drink/day, HR = 0.89, 95% confidence interval: 0.82, 0.96) but a modest increase in risk in the highest category (for ≥7 drinks/day, HR = 1.11, 95% confidence interval: 1.00, 1.24). Regarding histological type, alcohol was associated with a nonlinear reduction in squamous cell carcinoma that became attenuated as consumption increased and a modest increase in adenocarcinoma among heavier drinkers. Cubic spline models confirmed these findings. Our data suggest that the relationship between alcohol consumption and lung carcinoma differs by histological subtype. PMID:26672017

  12. Latent class analysis identifies three subtypes of aggressive end-of-life care: a population-based study in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mei-Ling; Chen, Yun-Yi; Tang, Siew Tzuh

    2013-10-01

    The aggressiveness of end-of-life (EOL) cancer care has often been analysed by the occurrence of several indicators, separately or aggregately. Whether aggressive EOL cancer care has different subtypes is unknown. This study sought to identify distinct subtypes of aggressive EOL care based on usage patterns of aggressive EOL-care indicators and to explore demographic, disease and treatment factors associated with the identified subtypes. This retrospective study linked data from 2001 to 2006 from three Taiwanese databases: National Registration of Death Database, Cancer Registration System and National Health Insurance claims database. Adult cancer patients (N=203,642) who died in 2001-2006 were selected. For these cancer patients' last month of life, we analysed eight indicators of aggressive EOL care: receiving chemotherapy, >1 emergency room visit, >1 hospitalisation, hospitalisation for >14 days, intensive care unit admission, received cardiopulmonary resuscitation, received intubation and received mechanical ventilation. Subtypes of aggressive EOL care were identified by latent class analysis. Among the study population, only 22.3% were treated by medical oncologists. Based on their profiles of EOL care, deceased cancer patients were classified into three subgroups: 'not aggressive' (45%), 'intent to sustain life' (33%) and 'symptom crisis' group (22%). Patients assigned to the 'intent to sustain life' group were less likely to have metastatic disease and to receive hospice care in the last year of life, but more likely to be cared for by non-medical oncologists, to die within 2 months after diagnosis and to die in hospital. EOL cancer care may be improved by understanding factors related to different subtypes of aggressive EOL care. PMID:23756054

  13. NOTCH2 expression is decreased in epithelial ovarian cancer and is related to the tumor histological subtype

    PubMed Central

    Galic, Vijaya; Shawber, Carrie J.; Reeves, Claire; Shah, Monjri; Murtomaki, Aino; Wright, Jason; Herzog, Thomas; Tong, Guo Xia; Kitajewski, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Background: Notch family members function as both oncogenes and tumor suppressors. NOTCH2 is down-regulated in colon cancer, and reduced expression is associated with a less differentiated, more aggressive phenotype, and reduced overall survival. NOTCH2 has also been shown to have pro-apoptotic and growth suppressive effects in thyroid carcinoma, and carcinoid tumors. The expression pattern of NOTCH2 in ovarian cancer is unknown. Methods: An immunohistochemical analysis using a polyclonal antibody to the NOTCH2 intracellular domain was performed on a total of 119 ovarian carcinomas, and 7 serous borderline tumors, arranged onto tissue arrays. Normal ovarian and fallopian tube epithelium were used as controls. Specimens were scored as low or high NOTCH2 expression. The score distributions for the subtypes were analyzed with the chi square test. Results: Fifty two of 61 (85.2%) papillary serous, eight of 13 (61.5%) clear cell, and 23 of 30 (76.7%) endometrioid, demonstrated negative or lower NOTCH2 expression than normal fallopian tubal epithelium or ovarian surface epithelium. In contrast, 10 of 15 (66.7%) mucinous carcinomas had a high level of NOTCH2 expression and consistently demonstrated intense polarized staining (P<.001). The apical expression of NOTCH2 protein present in the normal fallopian tube epithelium and many borderline tumors was absent in the high grade carcinomas, most notably in papillary serous. Conclusion: Decreased NOTCH2 expression is associated with the poorly differentiated serous epithelial ovarian carcinoma histology. Further studies are needed to assess the functional role of NOTCH2 in ovarian cancer and its effect on prognosis. PMID:24707357

  14. Early starting, aggressive, and/or callous-unemotional? Examining the overlap and predictive utility of antisocial behavior subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Hyde, Luke W.; Burt, S. Alexandra; Shaw, Daniel S.; Donnellan, M. Brent; Forbes, Erika E.

    2015-01-01

    Antisocial behavior (AB) in adolescence predicts problematic outcomes in adulthood. However, researchers have noted marked heterogeneity within the broad group of youth engaging in these destructive behaviors and have attempted to identify those with distinct etiologies and different trajectories of symptoms. In the present study, we evaluate three prominent AB subtyping approaches: age of onset, presence of callous-unemotional (CU) traits, and aggressive versus rule breaking symptoms. We examined the overlap of these subtypes and their predictive validity in a diverse sample of 268 low-income young men followed prospectively from adolescence into emerging adulthood. We found that those with early starting AB were uniquely high on aggressive symptoms but not on CU traits. Early starting AB and both aggression and rule breaking measured during adolescence predicted most subsequent psychiatric and AB outcomes in early adulthood in univariate models, whereas CU traits were only predictive of adolescent arrests, later substance dependence diagnosis, and later CU traits. Finally, after accounting for shared variance among predictor variables, we found that aggressive symptoms explained the most unique variance in predicting several later outcomes (e.g., antisocial personality disorder) over and above other subtyping approaches. Results are discussed in relation to of the utility of existing subtyping approaches to AB, noting that aggression and age of onset, but not CU traits, appear to be the best at predicting later negative outcome. PMID:25603360

  15. Popular and Nonpopular Subtypes of Physically Aggressive Preadolescents: Continuity of Aggression and Peer Mechanisms during the Transition to Middle School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shi, Bing; Xie, Hongling

    2012-01-01

    Using peer nominations of physical aggression and perceived popularity in the spring semester of fifth grade, we identified 54 popular aggressive and 42 nonpopular aggressive preadolescents in a diverse sample of 318 participants recruited from an urban school district. Physical aggression in the spring semester of sixth grade was included to…

  16. Childhood body mass index and height and risk of histologic subtypes of endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    Aarestrup, J; Gamborg, M; Ulrich, L G; Sørensen, T I A; Baker, J L

    2016-01-01

    Background: Endometrial cancer risk factors include adult obesity and taller stature, but the influence of size earlier in life is incompletely understood. We examined whether childhood body mass index (BMI; kg m−2) and height were associated with histologic subtypes of endometrial cancer. Methods: From the Copenhagen School Health Records Register, 155 505 girls born 1930–1989 with measured weights and heights from 7 to 13 years were linked to health registers. BMI and height were transformed to age-specific z-scores. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals were estimated by Cox regressions. Results: A total of 1020 endometrial cancers were recorded. BMI was non-linearly associated with all endometrial cancers, oestrogen-dependent cancers and the subtype of endometrioid adenocarcinomas; associations were statistically significant and positive above a z-score=0 and non-significant below zero. Compared with a 7-year-old girl with a BMI z-score=0, an equally tall girl who was 3.6 kg heavier (BMI z-score=1.5) had a hazard ratio=1.53 (95% confidence interval: 1.29–1.82) for endometrioid adenocarcinoma. BMI was not associated with non-oestrogen-dependent cancers, except at the oldest childhood ages. Height at all ages was statistically significant and positively associated with all endometrial cancers, except non-oestrogen-dependent cancers. At 7 years, per ~5.2 cm (1 z-score), the risk of endometrioid adenocarcinoma was 1.18 (95% confidence interval: 1.09–1.28). Among non-users of unopposed oestrogens, associations between BMI and endometrioid adenocarcinoma strengthened, but no effects on height associations were observed. Conclusions: Endometrial carcinogenesis is linked to early-life body size, suggesting that childhood BMI and height may be useful indicators for the risk of later development of endometrial cancer and might aid in the early prevention of obesity-related endometrial cancers. PMID:27121254

  17. Costs and benefits of children's physical and relational aggression trajectories on peer rejection, acceptance, and friendships: Variations by aggression subtypes, gender, and age.

    PubMed

    Ettekal, Idean; Ladd, Gary W

    2015-12-01

    This study examined the associations between children's co-occurring relational and physical aggression trajectories and their peer relations (i.e., peer rejection, peer acceptance, and reciprocated friendships) from late childhood (Grade 4; Mage = 10.0) to early adolescence (Grade 8; Mage = 13.9). Using a sample of 477 children (240 girls), the findings indicated there were multiple heterogeneous subgroups of children who followed distinct co-occurring aggression trajectories. For each of these subgroups, multiple indices of their relational development were assessed and findings revealed notable group differences. These results have implications about the potential costs and benefits of aggression, and how its associations with children's peer relationships may vary as a function of aggression subtype, developmental timing, and gender. PMID:26414097

  18. The role of ultrasonographic findings to predict molecular subtype, histologic grade, and hormone receptor status of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Çelebi, Filiz; Pilancı, Kezban Nur; Ordu, Çetin; Ağacayak, Filiz; Alço, Gül; İlgün, Serkan; Sarsenov, Dauren; Erdoğan, Zeynep; Özmen, Vahit

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE The correlation between imaging findings and pathologic characteristics of tumors may provide information for diagnosis and treatment of cancer. The aim of this study is to determine whether ultrasound features of breast cancer are associated with molecular subtype, histologic grade, and hormone receptor status, as well as assess the predictive value of these features. METHODS A total of 201 consecutive invasive breast cancer patients were reviewed from the database according to the Breast Imaging and Reporting Data System (BI-RADS). Tumor margins were classified as circumscribed and noncircumscribed. Noncircumscribed group was divided into indistinct, spiculated, angular, and microlobulated. The posterior acoustic features were divided into four categories: shadowing, enhancement, no change, and mixed pattern. RESULTS Tumors with posterior shadowing were more likely to be of nontriple negative subtype (odds ratio [OR], 7.42; 95% CI, 2.10–24.99; P = 0.002), low histologic grade (grade 1 or 2 vs. grade 3: OR, 2.42; 95% CI, 1.34–4.35; P = 0.003) and having at least one positive receptor (OR, 3.36; 95% CI, 1.55–7.26; P = 0.002). Tumors with circumscribed margins were more often triple-negative subtype (OR, 6.72; 95% CI, 2.56–17.65; P < 0.001), high grade (grade 3 vs. grade 1 or 2: OR, 5.42; 95% CI, 2.66–11.00; P < 0.001) and hormone receptor negative (OR, 4.87; 95% CI, 2.37–9.99; P < 0.001). CONCLUSION Sonographic features are strongly associated with molecular subtype, histologic grade, and hormone receptor status of the tumor. These findings may separate triple-negative breast cancer from other molecular subtypes. PMID:26359880

  19. Histologically Benign, Clinically Aggressive: Progressive Non-Optic Pathway Pilocytic Astrocytomas in Adults with NF1

    PubMed Central

    Strowd, Roy E.; Rodriguez, Fausto J.; McLendon, Roger E.; Vredenburgh, James J.; Chance, Aaron B.; Jallo, George; Olivi, Alessandro; Ahn, Edward S.; Blakeley, Jaishri O.

    2016-01-01

    Although optic pathway gliomas are the most common brain tumors associated with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), extra-optic gliomas occur and may behave more aggressively with outcomes that differ by age. A retrospective case-control study was designed to describe the clinical course of adult NF1 patients with progressive extra-optic pilocytic astrocytomas (PAs) and compare to a pediatric cohort. Data for patients treated at the Johns Hopkins Comprehensive Neurofibromatosis Center from 2003 to 2013 were reviewed to identify cases (adults, age >18) and controls (pediatric, age <18) with clinically or radiographically progressive extra-optic PAs. Demographic, clinical, histologic, and radiographic data were collected. Three adult NF1 cases and four pediatric NF1 controls were identified. Mean age was 32.3 ± 9.5 years, 66% male (cases); 12.8±4.2 years, 100% male (controls). Symptomatic progression occurred in two-of-three adults (67%) while the majority of pediatric patients presented with isolated radiographic progression (n=3, 75%). Onset tended to be more rapid in adults (4±1 vs. 14±8.3 months, P=0.10). Subtotal resection was the treatment for all pediatric patients. Radiotherapy (n=2), chemotherapy (n=2), and targeted, biologic agents (n=2) were administered in adults. Although all pediatric patients are living, outcomes were universally poor in adults with progression to death in all (median survival 17.1 months, range 6.6–30.3). In conclusion, despite grade I histology, all three adult NF1 patients with progressive extra-optic PAs suffered an aggressive clinical course which was not seen in pediatric patients. Clinicians should be aware of this clinico-histologic discrepancy when counseling and managing adult NF1 patients with progressive extra-optic PAs. PMID:26992069

  20. Histologically benign, clinically aggressive: Progressive non-optic pathway pilocytic astrocytomas in adults with NF1.

    PubMed

    Strowd, Roy E; Rodriguez, Fausto J; McLendon, Roger E; Vredenburgh, James J; Chance, Aaron B; Jallo, George; Olivi, Alessandro; Ahn, Edward S; Blakeley, Jaishri O

    2016-06-01

    Although optic pathway gliomas are the most common brain tumors associated with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), extra-optic gliomas occur and may behave more aggressively with outcomes that differ by age. A retrospective case-control study was designed to describe the clinical course of adult NF1 patients with progressive extra-optic pilocytic astrocytomas (PAs) and compare to a pediatric cohort. Data for patients treated at the Johns Hopkins Comprehensive Neurofibromatosis Center from 2003 to 2013 were reviewed to identify cases (adults, age >18) and controls (pediatric, age <18) with clinically or radiographically progressive extra-optic PAs. Demographic, clinical, histologic, and radiographic data were collected. Three adult NF1 cases and four pediatric NF1 controls were identified. Mean age was 32.3 ± 9.5 years, 66% male (cases); 12.8 ± 4.2 years, 100% male (controls). Symptomatic progression occurred in two-of-three adults (67%) while the majority of pediatric patients presented with isolated radiographic progression (n = 3, 75%). Onset tended to be more rapid in adults (4 ± 1 vs. 14 ± 8.3 months, P = 0.10). Subtotal resection was the treatment for all pediatric patients. Radiotherapy (n = 2), chemotherapy (n = 2), and targeted, biologic agents (n = 2) were administered in adults. Although all pediatric patients are living, outcomes were universally poor in adults with progression to death in all (median survival 17.1 months, range 6.6-30.3). In conclusion, despite grade I histology, all three adult NF1 patients with progressive extra-optic PAs suffered an aggressive clinical course which was not seen in pediatric patients. Clinicians should be aware of this clinico-histologic discrepancy when counseling and managing adult NF1 patients with progressive extra-optic PAs. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26992069

  1. Predominant histologic subtype in lung adenocarcinoma predicts benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy in completely resected patients: discovery of a holy grail?

    PubMed

    Russell, Prudence Anne; Wright, Gavin Michael

    2016-01-01

    The recently published 2015 World Health Organisation (WHO) classification of lung tumors, which is based on the 2011 International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC)/American Thoracic Society (ATS)/European Respiratory Society (ATS) multidisciplinary classification, recommends diagnosis of resected lung adenocarcinoma according to the predominant histologic subtype. This has been shown to correlate with overall and disease-free survival (DFS) in many studies from four continents. Now classification according to predominant histologic subtype has been demonstrated to predict benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy in a subset of patients with completely resected lung adenocarcinoma previously included in the International Adjuvant Lung Cancer Trial (IALT), JBR.10, Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB) 9633 and Adjuvant Navelbine International Trialist Association 01 (ANITA) adjuvant chemotherapy trials, all of which were part of the LACE-Bio study. This "hot-off-the press" landmark investigation further cements the clinical importance of classification of resected lung adenocarcinoma according to predominant histologic subtype and suggests that it could be a critical factor for patient stratification in future clinical trials. PMID:26855952

  2. Predominant histologic subtype in lung adenocarcinoma predicts benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy in completely resected patients: discovery of a holy grail?

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Gavin Michael

    2016-01-01

    The recently published 2015 World Health Organisation (WHO) classification of lung tumors, which is based on the 2011 International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC)/American Thoracic Society (ATS)/European Respiratory Society (ATS) multidisciplinary classification, recommends diagnosis of resected lung adenocarcinoma according to the predominant histologic subtype. This has been shown to correlate with overall and disease-free survival (DFS) in many studies from four continents. Now classification according to predominant histologic subtype has been demonstrated to predict benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy in a subset of patients with completely resected lung adenocarcinoma previously included in the International Adjuvant Lung Cancer Trial (IALT), JBR.10, Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB) 9633 and Adjuvant Navelbine International Trialist Association 01 (ANITA) adjuvant chemotherapy trials, all of which were part of the LACE-Bio study. This “hot-off-the press” landmark investigation further cements the clinical importance of classification of resected lung adenocarcinoma according to predominant histologic subtype and suggests that it could be a critical factor for patient stratification in future clinical trials. PMID:26855952

  3. Primary adenocarcinoma of the lung - histological subtypes and outcome after surgery, using the IASLC/ATS/ERS classification of lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Oskarsdottir, Gudrun Nina; Bjornsson, Johannes; Jonsson, Steinn; Isaksson, Helgi J; Gudbjartsson, Tomas

    2016-05-01

    Adenocarcinoma is the most common histological type of lung carcinoma. Recently the histologic classification of adenocarcinomas in the lung was modified to better reflect biologic properties and prognosis. We reviewed the histology of all primary lung adenocarcinomas operated on in Iceland during a 20-year period and assessed the impact of histology on survival. This nationwide study included 285 patients (mean age 67 years, 57% female), who underwent resection in Iceland from 1991 to 2010. Tumors were reclassified according to the current IASLC/ATS/ERS classification system. Overall survival was estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox regression analysis used to evaluate prognostic factors of overall mortality. Acinar predominant adenocarcinoma was the most common histological subtype (46%) followed by solid-predominant (SPA) with mucin production comprised (23%). Non-invasive carcinomas were rare. A difference in survival between the histological adenocarcinoma subtypes was not seen (p = 0.32) and multivariate analysis showed that advanced stage and age predicted worse outcome, but histologic subtyping of adenocarcinoma did not. In this nation-wide study there was not a statistical difference in survival according to adenocarcinoma subtypes and the histological subtype did not predict mortality. Preinvasive and minimally invasive adenocarcinomas were rare. PMID:26957057

  4. Variation in the expression levels of predictive chemotherapy biomarkers in histological subtypes of lung adenocarcinoma: an immunohistochemical study of tissue samples

    PubMed Central

    Fujimoto, Yuichi; Togo, Shinsaku; Tulafu, Miniwan; Shimizu, Kazue; Hayashi, Takuo; Uekusa, Toshimasa; Honma, Yuichirou; Namba, Yukiko; Takamochi, Kazuya; Oh, Shiaki; Suzuki, Kenji; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2015-01-01

    Background: Lung adenocarcinoma is often composed of a complex and heterogeneous mixture of histological subtypes. Invasive adenocarcinomas are now classified by their predominant pattern, using the comprehensive histological subtyping of the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC), the American Thoracic Society (ATS), and the European Respiratory Society (ERS) classifications. This study aimed to determine whether the expression levels of predictive chemotherapy biomarkers are associated with the histological subtypes proposed by the IASLC/ATS/ERS classification. Materials and Methods: We reviewed data on representative tissue samples from 27 patients who received surgical resection and the expression of excision repair cross complementation group 1 (ERCC1), class III β-tubulin, thymidylate synthase (TS), ribonucleotide reductase M1 (RRM1), and c-Met were examined using immunostaining on tumor tissue slides. We assessed immunohistochemical H-scores, as calculated from the intensity and distribution of intratumor expression, according to the IASLC/ATS/ERS histological subtype. Results: The expression levels of predictive chemotherapy biomarkers varied according to histological subtype. The H-scores of TS and class III β-tubulin expression levels were higher in solid-type components than they were in lepidic-type components Tumors with solid predominant histology tended to recur earlier than non-solid predominant tumors. However, none of the H-scores in histologically predominant tissues was significantly associated with staging or overall survival. Conclusions: Immunohistochemical H-scores of the predictive chemotherapy biomarkers were strongly associated with histological subtype. The presence of a solid subtype, which was associated with poor outcomes, might be assessed by measuring these biomarkers in mixed subtype adenocarcinomas. PMID:26617762

  5. Does Histologic Subtype Influence the Post-Operative Outcome in Spinal Meningioma?

    PubMed Central

    Zham, Hanieh; Moradi, Afshin; Rakhshan, Azadeh; Zali, Alireza; Rahbari, Ali; Raee, Mohammadreza; Ashrafi, Farzad; Ahadi, Mahsa; Larijani, Leila; Baikpour, Masoud; Khayamzadeh, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Background Postoperative outcome of spinal meningiomas is an important issue in surgery decision-making. There are limited and conflicting data in the literature about the prognostic factors influencing recovery, especially about the histopathologic subtypes. Objectives This study was carried out to evaluate the effect of some of these factors on postoperative outcome. Patients and Methods This study was performed on 39 patients operated for spinal meningioma between October 1998 and January 2012; their histopathologic subtype was determined according to WHO criteria. The follow up period ranged between 8 - 120 months. The influence of histopathologic subtype, grade, age, sex, surgical approach, local adhesion and anatomical location was assessed according to Frankel classification of neurologic deficit. Results From a total number of 39 spinal meningiomas, 34 cases were WHO grade I, from which 15 cases were psammomatous, 7 cases were meningothelial, 9 cases were transitional and 3 cases were fibroblastic. Five cases were grade II, 3 of which had clear cell appearance and the remaining 2 had chordoid appearance. The mean age was 51.6 (22 to 76) years; 25 cases were female and 14 cases were male. This study revealed that grade II meningioma cases had poor prognosis in all 5 cases and psammomatous subtype had poor postoperative outcome in 40% of cases while the other subtypes had good outcome in all cases (P = 0.026). Cervical location of the tumor was also related with poor outcome in 37.5% of the cases, while 22.5% had poor outcome in other locations (P = 0.029). Age below and above 45 years and sex had no significant influence on the outcome. Conclusions Spinal meningiomas of psammomatous type and grade II spinal meningiomas are associated with less favorable postoperative neurologic outcome. Cervical location has also a negative correlation with a good outcome. PMID:27482326

  6. Association between endometriosis and risk of histological subtypes of ovarian cancer: a pooled analysis of case–control studies

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, Celeste Leigh; Templeman, Claire; Rossing, Mary Anne; Lee, Alice; Near, Aimee M; Webb, Penelope M; Nagle, Christina M; Doherty, Jennifer A; Cushing-Haugen, Kara L; Wicklund, Kristine G; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Hein, Rebecca; Lurie, Galina; Wilkens, Lynne R; Carney, Michael E; Goodman, Marc T; Moysich, Kirsten; Kjaer, Susanne K; Hogdall, Estrid; Jensen, Allan; Goode, Ellen L; Fridley, Brooke L; Larson, Melissa C; Schildkraut, Joellen M; Palmieri, Rachel T; Cramer, Daniel W; Terry, Kathryn L; Vitonis, Allison F; Titus, Linda J; Ziogas, Argyrios; Brewster, Wendy; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Gentry-Maharaj, Alexandra; Ramus, Susan J; Anderson, A Rebecca; Brueggmann, Doerthe; Fasching, Peter A; Gayther, Simon A; Huntsman, David G; Menon, Usha; Ness, Roberta B; Pike, Malcolm C; Risch, Harvey; Wu, Anna H; Berchuck, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background Endometriosis is a risk factor for epithelial ovarian cancer; however, whether this risk extends to all invasive histological subtypes or borderline tumours is not clear. We undertook an international collaborative study to assess the association between endometriosis and histological subtypes of ovarian cancer. Methods Data from 13 ovarian cancer case–control studies, which were part of the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium, were pooled and logistic regression analyses were undertaken to assess the association between self-reported endometriosis and risk of ovarian cancer. Analyses of invasive cases were done with respect to histological subtypes, grade, and stage, and analyses of borderline tumours by histological subtype. Age, ethnic origin, study site, parity, and duration of oral contraceptive use were included in all analytical models. Findings 13 226 controls and 7911 women with invasive ovarian cancer were included in this analysis. 818 and 738, respectively, reported a history of endometriosis. 1907 women with borderline ovarian cancer were also included in the analysis, and 168 of these reported a history of endometriosis. Self-reported endometriosis was associated with a significantly increased risk of clear-cell (136 [20·2%] of 674 cases vs 818 [6·2%] of 13 226 controls, odds ratio 3·05, 95% CI 2·43–3·84, p<0·0001), low-grade serous (31 [9·2%] of 336 cases, 2·11, 1·39–3·20, p<0·0001), and endometrioid invasive ovarian cancers (169 [13·9%] of 1220 cases, 2·04, 1·67–2·48, p<0·0001). No association was noted between endometriosis and risk of mucinous (31 [6·0%] of 516 cases, 1·02, 0·69–1·50, p=0·93) or high-grade serous invasive ovarian cancer (261 [7·1%] of 3659 cases, 1·13, 0·97–1·32, p=0·13), or borderline tumours of either subtype (serous 103 [9·0%] of 1140 cases, 1·20, 0·95–1·52, p=0·12, and mucinous 65 [8·5%] of 767 cases, 1·12, 0·84–1·48, p=0·45). Interpretation

  7. Correlating Preoperative Imaging with Histologic Subtypes of Renal Cell Carcinoma and Common Mimickers.

    PubMed

    Gordetsky, Jennifer; Zarzour, Jessica

    2016-07-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) consists of distinct subtypes that have unique pathologic and imaging features as well as specific cytogenetic and molecular characteristics. As the prognosis and therapeutic strategies may differ for each subtype, correlation of the preoperative imaging with the pathologic findings is of great clinical relevance. In addition, differentiation of RCC from benign entities is ideal in order to prevent overtreatment. However, a noninvasive diagnosis with imaging alone is not always straightforward due to the overlapping appearance of RCC with benign lesions such as fat-poor angiomyolipoma and oncocytoma. With new imaging modalities, there have been significant improvements in correlating preoperative imaging with pathologic characteristics. These new discoveries are able to aid in a more specific, noninvasive, diagnosis that in turn helps direct patient management. PMID:27154238

  8. Relationships of Aggression Subtypes and Peer Status among Aggressive Boys in General Education and Emotional/Behavioral Disorder (EBD) Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Useche, Ana Carolina; Sullivan, Amanda L.; Merk, Welmoet; Orobio de Castro, Bram

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the concurrent and longitudinal relationships between reactive and proactive aggression and children's peer status. Participants were 94 Dutch elementary school-aged boys in self-contained special education classrooms for students with emotional/behavioral disorders (EBD) and 47 boys with no disabilities in general…

  9. Differential hRad17 expression by histologic subtype of ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In the search for unique ovarian cancer biomarkers, ovarian specific cDNA microarray analysis identified hRad17, a cell cycle checkpoint protein, as over-expressed in ovarian cancer. The aim of this study was to validate this expression. Methods Immunohistochemistry was performed on 72 serous, 19 endometrioid, 10 clear cell, and 6 mucinous ovarian cancers, 9 benign ovarian tumors, and 6 normal ovarian tissue sections using an anti-hRad17 antibody. Western blot analysis and quantitative PCR were performed using cell lysates and total RNA prepared from 17 ovarian cancer cell lines and 6 normal ovarian epithelial cell cultures (HOSE). Results Antibody staining confirmed upregulation of hRad17 in 49.5% of ovarian cancer cases. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated that only 42% of serous and 47% of endometrioid subtypes showed overexpression compared to 80% of clear cell and 100% of mucinous cancers. Western blot confirmed overexpression of hRad17 in cancer cell lines compared to HOSE. Quantitative PCR demonstrated an upregulation of hRad17 RNA by 1.5-7 fold. hRad17 RNA expression differed by subtype. Conclusions hRad17 is over-expressed in ovarian cancer. This over-expression varies by subtype suggesting a role in the pathogenesis of these types. Functional studies are needed to determine the potential role of this protein in ovarian cancer. PMID:21450056

  10. Blastic variant of mantle cell lymphoma: a rare but highly aggressive subtype.

    PubMed

    Bernard, M; Gressin, R; Lefrère, F; Drénou, B; Branger, B; Caulet-Maugendre, S; Tass, P; Brousse, N; Valensi, F; Milpied, N; Voilat, L; Sadoun, A; Ghandour, C; Hunault, M; Leloup, R; Mannone, L; Hermine, O; Lamy, T

    2001-11-01

    The blastic variant (BV) form of mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is considered to be a very aggressive subtype of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). In order to determine its clinico-biological features and response to therapy we studied 33 patients (17%) out of 187 suffering from MCL who were diagnosed with a BV of MCL. Blastic variant was diagnosed according to histopathological patterns, immunophenotyping, and bcl1 gene rearrangement and/or cyclin D1 overexpression. Three patients initially diagnosed with large cell NHL were classified as BV. Patients received front-line therapy including CHOP-like regimen or CVP (n = 29), or chlorambucil (n = 4) and CHOP or ESAP as second-line therapy. High-dose intensification with stem cell transplantation (SCT) was performed in 11 cases (autoSCT, n = 8; alloSCT, n = 3). All but two patients were in complete remission (CR) at the time of transplant (CR1, n = 5; CR2, n = 4). Clinical and biological characteristics did not differ from those of the common form of MCL. The median age was 62 years (29-80), with a sex ratio (M/F) of 2.6:1. Of the 33 patients, 66% had extranodal site involvement, 85% had an Ann Arbor stage IV, and 82% had peripheral lymphadenopathy. Circulating lymphomatous cells were seen in 48% of cases. Twelve patients (36%) entered a CR1 with a median duration of 11 months. Fifteen patients (46%) failed to respond and rapidly died of progressive disease. Second-line therapy led to a 26% (6/23) CR2 rate. Nine patients relapsed after high-dose therapy. Twenty-two of the 33 patients (66%) died of refractory or progressive disease. Median overall survival (OS) time was 14.5 months for the 33 BV patients as compared to 53 months for the 154 patients with a common form of MCL, P <0.0001. In the univariate analysis, OS was influenced by age, extranodal site involvement, circulating lymphomatous cells, and international prognosis index (IPI). In the multivariate analysis, only IPI affected OS: patients with IPI > or =2 had 8

  11. Impact of Micropapillary Histologic Subtype in Selecting Limited Resection vs Lobectomy for Lung Adenocarcinoma of 2cm or Smaller

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background We sought to analyze the prognostic significance of the new International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC), American Thoracic Society (ATS), and European Respiratory Society (ERS) lung adenocarcinoma (ADC) classification for patients undergoing resection for small (≤2cm) lung ADC and to investigate whether histologic subtyping can predict recurrence after limited resection (LR) vs lobectomy (LO). Methods Comprehensive histologic subtyping was performed according to the IASLC/ATS/ERS classification on all consecutive patients who underwent LR or LO for small lung ADC between 1995 and 2009 at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. Clinical characteristics and pathologic data were retrospectively evaluated for 734 consecutive patients (LR: 258; LO: 476). Cumulative incidence of recurrence (CIR) was calculated using competing risks analysis and compared across groups using Grey’s test. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results Application of IASLC/ATS/ERS lung ADC histologic subtyping to predict recurrence demonstrates that, in the LR group but not in the LO group, micropapillary (MIP) component of 5% or greater was associated with an increased risk of recurrence, compared with MIP component of less than 5% (LR: 5-year CIR = 34.2%, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 23.5% to 49.7% vs 5-year CIR = 12.4%, 95% CI = 6.9% to 22.1%, P < .001; LO: 5-year CIR = 19.1%, 95% CI = 12.0% to 30.5% vs 15-year CIR = 12.9%, 95% CI = 7.6% to 21.9%, P = .13). In the LR group, among patients with tumors with an MIP component of 5% or greater, most recurrences (63.4%) were locoregional; MIP component of 5% or greater was statistically significantly associated with increased risk of local recurrence when the surgical margin was less than 1cm (5-year CIR = 32.0%, 95% CI = 18.6% to 46.0% for MIP ≥ 5% vs 5-year CIR = 7.6%, 95% CI = 2.3% to 15.6% for MIP < 5%; P = .007) but not when surgical margin was 1cm or greater (5-year CIR = 13.0%, 95% CI = 4.1% to 22

  12. International trends in liver cancer incidence, overall and by histologic subtype, 1978-2007.

    PubMed

    Petrick, Jessica L; Braunlin, Megan; Laversanne, Mathieu; Valery, Patricia C; Bray, Freddie; McGlynn, Katherine A

    2016-10-01

    Primary liver cancer, the most common histologic types of which are hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC), is the second leading cause of cancer death worldwide. While rising incidence of liver cancer in low-risk areas and decreasing incidence in some high-risk areas has been reported, trends have not been thoroughly explored by country or by histologic type. We examined liver cancer incidence overall and by histology by calendar time and birth cohort for selected countries between 1978 and 2007. For each successive 5-year period, age-standardized incidence rates were calculated from volumes V-IX of the Cancer Incidence in Five Continents electronic database (CI5plus) and the newly released CI5X (volume X) database. Wide global variations persist in liver cancer incidence. Rates of liver cancer remain highest in Asian countries, specifically Eastern and South-Eastern Asian countries. While rates in most of these high-risk countries have been decreasing in recent years, rates in India and several low-risk countries of Africa, Europe, the Americas, and Oceania have been on the rise. Liver cancer rates by histologic type tend to convey a similar temporal profile. However, in Thailand, France, and Italy, ICC rates have increased while HCC rates have declined. We expect rates in high-risk countries to continue to decrease, as the population seroprevalence of hepatitis B virus (HBV) continues to decline. In low-risk countries, targeted screening and treatment of the hepatitis C virus (HCV), treatment of diabetes and primary prevention of obesity, will be key in reducing future liver cancer incidence. PMID:27244487

  13. Magnitude and chronometry of neural mechanisms of emotion regulation in subtypes of aggressive children.

    PubMed

    Lamm, Connie; Granic, Isabela; Zelazo, Philip David; Lewis, Marc D

    2011-11-01

    Emotion regulation is a key social skill and children who fail to master it are at risk for clinical disorders. Specific styles of emotion regulation have been associated with particular patterns of prefrontal activation. We investigated whether anxious aggressive children would reveal a different pattern of cortical activation than non-anxious aggressive children and normally-developing children. We examined the magnitude and timing of source activation underlying the N2-an ERP associated with inhibitory control-during a go/nogo task with a negative emotion induction component (loss of earned points). We estimated cortical activation for two regions of interest-a ventral prefrontal and a dorsomedial prefrontal region-for three 100-ms windows over the range of the N2 (200-500 ms). Anxious aggressive children showed high ventral prefrontal activation in the early window; non-anxious aggressive children showed high ventral prefrontal activation in the late window, but only for the duration of the emotion induction; and normally-developing children showed low ventral prefrontal activation throughout. There were no group differences in dorsomedial prefrontal activation. These results suggest that anxious aggressive children recruit ventral prefrontal activation quickly and indiscriminately, possibly giving rise to their rigid, threat-oriented approach to conflict. The late ventral prefrontal activation seen for non-anxious aggressive children may underlie a more delayed, situation-specific, but ineffective response to frustration. PMID:21940093

  14. Warthin’s Tumour: A Case Report and Review on Pathogenesis and its Histological Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    A R, Raghu; Bishen, Kundendu Arya; Sagari, Shitalkumar

    2014-01-01

    Warthin’s tumour/ Papillary cystadenoma lymphomatosum (PCL) constitutes a minority of salivary gland neoplasms and it is a monomorphic adenoma which primarily involves the parotid gland. Warthin’s tumour shows multiple cysts that have numerous papillations covered by bilayered columnar and basaloid oncocytic epithelium. The connective tissue portion shows proliferation of follicle- containing lymphoid tissue which necessitates careful distinction for diagnosis. Although, Warthin’s tumour presents as a clinically benign, slow-growing, usually asymptomatic lesion with low rates of recurrences and malignant transformation, but still this tumour is considered unique because of its histological appearance and unknown origin and pathogenesis. Here, we report a case of Warthin’s tumour of five years duration in a 50-year-old male patient in the right parotid gland and also review and discuss various concepts concerning the development of this tumour along with a comprehensive literature on its clinic-pathologic features. PMID:25386545

  15. Genetic Risk for Conduct Disorder Symptom Subtypes in an ADHD Sample: Specificity to Aggressive Symptoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monuteaux, Michael C.; Biederman, Joseph; Doyle, Alysa E.; Mick, Eric; Faraone, Stephen V.

    2009-01-01

    Four hundred forty-four subjects aged 6-55 years were evaluated to examine the role of COMT and SLC6A4 genes in the risk for conduct disorder and its symptomatic subtypes in the context of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. No significant association is found between these genes and the risk for conduct disorder.

  16. Body size in early life and risk of lymphoid malignancies and histological subtypes in adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Cairns, Benjamin J.; Kroll, Mary E.; Reeves, Gillian K.; Green, Jane; Beral, Valerie

    2016-01-01

    Risk of adult lymphoid malignancy is associated with recent adiposity. Some have reported apparent associations with adiposity in childhood or early adulthood, but whether these associations are independent of recent adiposity is unknown. Birth weight, body size at age 10 years, clothes size at age 20 years, and recent body mass index (BMI) were recorded in 745,273 UK women, mean age 60.1 (SD 4.9) at baseline, without prior cancer. They were followed for 11 years, during which time 5,765 lymphoid malignancies occurred. Using Cox regression, a higher risk of lymphoid malignancy was strongly associated with higher recent BMI (RR=1.33, 95%CI 1.17‐1.51, for BMI 35+ vs <22.5 kg/m2), and this association remained essentially unchanged after adjustment for birth weight and body size at 10. Higher lymphoid malignancy risk was also associated with large size at birth, at age 10, and at age 20 years, but after adjustment for recent BMI, the significance of the associations with large size at birth and at age 10 years was sufficiently reduced that residual confounding by adult BMI could not be excluded; a weak association with large size at 20 years remained (adjusted RR =1.17, 95%CI 1.10–1.24 for large size at age 20 vs. medium or small size). We found no strong evidence of histological specificity in any of these associations. In conclusion, our findings suggest a possible role of adiposity throughout adulthood in the risk of lymphoid malignancy, but the independent contribution of body size at birth and during childhood appears to be small. PMID:26888490

  17. Body size in early life and risk of lymphoid malignancies and histological subtypes in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Yang, TienYu Owen; Cairns, Benjamin J; Kroll, Mary E; Reeves, Gillian K; Green, Jane; Beral, Valerie

    2016-07-01

    Risk of adult lymphoid malignancy is associated with recent adiposity. Some have reported apparent associations with adiposity in childhood or early adulthood, but whether these associations are independent of recent adiposity is unknown. Birth weight, body size at age 10 years, clothes size at age 20 years, and recent body mass index (BMI) were recorded in 745,273 UK women, mean age 60.1 (SD 4.9) at baseline, without prior cancer. They were followed for 11 years, during which time 5,765 lymphoid malignancies occurred. Using Cox regression, a higher risk of lymphoid malignancy was strongly associated with higher recent BMI (RR=1.33, 95%CI 1.17-1.51, for BMI 35+ vs <22.5 kg/m(2) ), and this association remained essentially unchanged after adjustment for birth weight and body size at 10. Higher lymphoid malignancy risk was also associated with large size at birth, at age 10, and at age 20 years, but after adjustment for recent BMI, the significance of the associations with large size at birth and at age 10 years was sufficiently reduced that residual confounding by adult BMI could not be excluded; a weak association with large size at 20 years remained (adjusted RR =1.17, 95%CI 1.10-1.24 for large size at age 20 vs. medium or small size). We found no strong evidence of histological specificity in any of these associations. In conclusion, our findings suggest a possible role of adiposity throughout adulthood in the risk of lymphoid malignancy, but the independent contribution of body size at birth and during childhood appears to be small. PMID:26888490

  18. Magnitude and Chronometry of Neural Mechanisms of Emotion Regulation in Subtypes of Aggressive Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamm, Connie; Granic, Isabela; Zelazo, Philip David; Lewis, Marc D.

    2011-01-01

    Emotion regulation is a key social skill and children who fail to master it are at risk for clinical disorders. Specific styles of emotion regulation have been associated with particular patterns of prefrontal activation. We investigated whether anxious aggressive children would reveal a different pattern of cortical activation than non-anxious…

  19. Primary vertebral tumors: a review of epidemiologic, histological and imaging findings, part II: locally aggressive and malignant tumors.

    PubMed

    Ropper, Alexander E; Cahill, Kevin S; Hanna, John W; McCarthy, Edward F; Gokaslan, Ziya L; Chi, John H

    2012-01-01

    This second part of a comprehensive review of primary vertebral tumors focuses on locally aggressive and malignant tumors. As discussed in the earlier part of the review, both benign and malignant types of these tumors affect the adult and the pediatric population, and an understanding of their subtleties may increase their effective resection. In this review, we discuss the epidemiologic, histological, and imaging features of the most common locally aggressive primary vertebral tumors (chordoma and giant-cell tumor) and malignant tumors (chondrosarcoma, Ewing sarcoma, multiple myeloma or plasmacytoma, and osteosarcoma). The figures used for illustration are from operative patients of the senior authors (Z.L.G. and J.H.C.). Taken together, parts 1 and 2 of this article provide a thorough and illustrative review of primary vertebral tumors. PMID:21768918

  20. Different Prognostic Implications of 18F-FDG PET Between Histological Subtypes in Patients With Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Tasmiah; Tsujikawa, Tetsuya; Yamamoto, Makoto; Chino, Yoko; Shinagawa, Akiko; Kurokawa, Tetsuji; Tsuchida, Tatsuro; Kimura, Hirohiko; Yoshida, Yoshio; Okazawa, Hidehiko

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study aimed to investigate whether the predictive values of intensity- and volume-based PET parameters are different between histological subtypes in patients with cervical cancer. Ninety patients, 65 with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and 25 with non-SCC (NSCC), who underwent pretreatment 18F-FDG PET/CT and pelvic MRI, were studied retrospectively. In addition to SUVmax and SUVmean, metabolic-tumor-volume (MTV) was determined by thresholding of 40% SUVmax and total-lesion-glycolysis (TLG) was calculated. Clinical factors and PET metabolic indices were compared between SCC and NSCC. Progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were estimated using the Kaplan–Meier method with cut-offs determined by ROC analyses to stratify SCC and NSCC patients separately. Factors associated with survival were assessed with univariate and multivariate analyses using the Cox regression model. No significant differences were observed in clinical factors other than tumor size or 18F-FDG PET metabolic indices between SCC and NSCC. The Kaplan–Meier estimates of 2-year PFS and OS rates were 60% and 70% for SCC and 40% and 76% for NSCC, respectively. Multivariate analyses showed that MTV and TLG were the independent prognostic factors for PFS and OS in SCC; in contrast, SUVmax was the independent prognostic factor for PFS and OS in NSCC. Metabolic burden (MTV and TLG) could be beneficial for the prognostic prediction of cervical SCC patients; in contrast, metabolic intensity (SUVmax) could be beneficial for the prognostic prediction of NSCC patients. The different prognostic implications might be based on the differences of tissue integrity and histological heterogeneity between SCC and NSCC. PMID:26945427

  1. Genome-Wide Methylation Patterns in Papillary Thyroid Cancer Are Distinct Based on Histological Subtype and Tumor Genotype

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Ryan J.; Wang, Yonghong; Stevenson, Holly S.; Boufraqech, Myriem; Patel, Dhaval; Nilubol, Naris; Davis, Sean; Edelman, Daniel C.; Merino, Maria J.; He, Mei; Zhang, Lisa; Meltzer, Paul S.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Aberrant DNA methylation is known to be a major factor in oncogenesis and cancer progression, but effects of methylation in papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) are not well defined. Objective: The objective of the study was to identify altered methylation patterns, which may be associated with PTC disease behavior. Design: This study was a genome-wide methylation analysis of PTC. Setting: The study was conducted at the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center. Patients: PTC tissue from 51 patients were analyzed and compared with normal thyroid tissue from seven patients. Interventions: CpG methylation status was assessed using advanced genome-wide methylation bead chips. Outcome Measures: Altered methylation patterns in PTC were analyzed by stage, recurrence, histological subtype of tumor, and tumor genotype. Results: PTC is globally hypomethylated compared with normal thyroid with 2837 differentially methylated CpG sites. The follicular variant of PTC demonstrated less differential methylation with only 569 differentially methylated CpG sites. Tumors with mutations in BRAF, RET/PTC, and RAS demonstrated a 3.6-fold increase in the number of differentially methylated sites compared with wild-type tumors. The differentially methylated genes were associated with oncological pathways including cellular movement, growth, and proliferation. Conclusion: PTC is epigenetically distinct from the follicular variant of PTC and by gene mutation status (BRAF, RET/PTC, and RAS). PMID:24423287

  2. BRCA-associated protein 1 mutant cholangiocarcinoma: an aggressive disease subtype

    PubMed Central

    Al-Shamsi, Humaid O.; Anand, Deepa; Shroff, Rachna T.; Jain, Apurva; Zuo, Mingxin; Conrad, Claudius; Vauthey, Jean-Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Background BRCA-associated protein 1, an enzyme encoded by the BAP1 gene, is commonly mutated in uveal melanoma, mesothelioma, and renal cancers. Tumors with BAP1 mutation follow an aggressive course. BAP1 mutations have also been observed in cholangiocarcinoma (CCA). The clinical phenotype of BAP1 mutant CCA may yield useful prognostic and therapeutic information but has not been defined. Methods The records of CCA patients who underwent next-generation sequencing (NGS) were reviewed, and data on clinical, histopathological, genetic, and radiological features; response to therapy; time to progression; and survival were analyzed. Results Twenty-two cases of BAP1-mutation associated CCA were diagnosed from January 1, 2009, to February 1, 2015, at our center. Twenty patients had intrahepatic CCA and two had extrahepatic CCA. Tumor sizes (largest dimension) ranged from 2 to 16 cm (mean, 8.5 cm). Twelve patients had tumors that were poorly differentiated. Majority of the patients had advanced disease at presentation and 13 had bone metastases. Thirteen patients (59%) experienced rapidly progressive disease following primary therapy (chemotherapy or surgical resection). The mean time to tumor progression was 3.8 months after the first line chemotherapy. Conclusions BAP1 mutation in CCA may be associated with aggressive disease and poor response to standard therapies. Therefore, BAP1-targeted therapies need to be investigated. PMID:27563445

  3. Two Different Serum MiRNA Signatures Correlate with the Clinical Outcome and Histological Subtype in Pleural Malignant Mesothelioma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lombardi, Angela; Di Domenico, Marina; Fiorelli, Alfonso; Feola, Antonia; Perna, Alessandra F.; Santini, Mario; Caraglia, Michele; Ingrosso, Diego

    2015-01-01

    Pleural malignant mesothelioma (MPM) is a detrimental neoplasm affecting pleural sheets and determining a high rate of mortality. In this study, we have enrolled 14 consecutive patients (13 males and 1 female) with MPM (mean age: 70.3 ± 4.6 years). We have collected serum for the determination of a miRNA profiling using a low-density microarray real time PCR system in the serum of patients and comparing it with that one of 10 control counterparts affected by not-cancer-related pleural effusions. In the patients 5 miRNAs were up-regulated (miR101, miR25, miR26b, miR335 and miR433), 2 miRNA were downregulated (miR191, miR223) and two miRNAs were expressed exclusively in patients (miR29a and miR516). Based upon the changes in the expression of the above mentioned miRNAs we detected two distinctive miRNA signatures predicting histotype and survival in these patients: I) patients with more than 3/9 upregulated miRNAs or 3/9 upregulated miRNAs and miR516 not recordable or unchanged (signature A); II) patients with at least 3/9 downregulated or unchanged miRNAs and/or miR29a downregulated (signature B). Based upon these criteria, 5 patients were stratified in signature A and the remaining 9 in signature B. Patients with signature A had a significant shorter median survival than those with signature B (7 months vs. 17 months, 95% CI: 0.098–1.72, p = 0.0021), had a sarcomatoid or mixed histological MPM subtype and were diagnosed in stage II (3/5) and stage III (2/5). In conclusion, we suggest that miRNA signature A is predictive of sarcomatoid histotype and of worse prognosis in MPM. PMID:26262875

  4. ADAM12 is a prognostic factor associated with an aggressive molecular subtype of high-grade serous ovarian carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Cheon, Dong-Joo; Li, Andrew J; Beach, Jessica A; Walts, Ann E; Tran, Hang; Lester, Jenny; Karlan, Beth Y; Orsulic, Sandra

    2015-07-01

    ADAM metallopeptidase domain 12 (ADAM12) is a promising biomarker because of its low expression in normal tissues and high expression in a variety of human cancers. However, ADAM12 levels in ovarian cancer have not been well characterized. We previously identified ADAM12 as one of the signature genes associated with poor survival in high-grade serous ovarian carcinoma (HGSOC). Here, we sought to determine if high levels of the ADAM12 protein and/or messenger RNA (mRNA) are associated with clinical variables in HGSOC. We show that high protein levels of ADAM12 in banked preoperative sera are associated with shorter progression-free and overall survival. Tumor levels of ADAM12 mRNA were also associated with shorter progression-free and overall survival as well as with lymphatic and vascular invasion, and residual tumor volume following cytoreductive surgery. The majority of genes co-expressed with ADAM12 in HGSOC were transforming growth factor (TGF)β signaling targets that function in collagen remodeling and cell-matrix adhesion. In tumor sections, the ADAM12 protein and mRNA were expressed in epithelial cancer cells and surrounding stromal cells. In vitro data showed that ADAM12 mRNA levels can be increased by TGFβ signaling and direct contact between epithelial and stromal cells. High tumor levels of ADAM12 mRNA were characteristic of the mesenchymal/desmoplastic molecular subtype of HGSOC, which is known to have the poorest prognosis. Thus, ADAM12 may be a useful biomarker of aggressive ovarian cancer for which standard treatment is not effective. PMID:25926422

  5. Leiomyosarcoma with alternative lengthening of telomeres is associated with aggressive histologic features, loss of ATRX expression, and poor clinical outcome.

    PubMed

    Liau, Jau-Yu; Tsai, Jia-Huei; Jeng, Yung-Ming; Lee, Jen-Chieh; Hsu, Hung-Han; Yang, Ching-Yao

    2015-02-01

    Leiomyosarcoma is an aggressive soft tissue sarcoma with poor patient survival. Recently, it was shown that 53% to 62% of leiomyosarcomas use the alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) as their telomere maintenance mechanism. The molecular basis of this mechanism has not been elucidated. Studies of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor have suggested that the inactivation of either α-thalassemia/mental retardation syndrome X-linked (ATRX) or death domain-associated (DAXX) protein is associated with the ALT phenotype. In this study, we sought to determine the clinicopathologic features of leiomyosarcoma with the ALT phenotype and the possible relationship between this phenotype and ATRX/DAXX expression. Telomerase reverse transcriptase gene (TERT) promoter mutation analysis was also performed. Ninety-two leiomyosarcomas derived from the uterus, retroperitoneum/intra-abdomen, and various other sites were analyzed. Telomere-specific fluorescence in situ hybridization revealed that 59% (51/86) of leiomyosarcomas had the ALT phenotype. Loss of ATRX expression was observed in 33% of the tumors (30/92), and all but 2 ATRX-deficient tumors were ALT positive. Both the ALT phenotype and loss of ATRX expression were associated with epithelioid/pleomorphic cell morphology, tumor necrosis, and poor differentiation. None of the 92 cases lost DAXX expression. No TERT promoter mutation was detected (n=39). For survival analysis, poor differentiation, high FNCLCC grade, tumor size, and ALT phenotype were correlated with poor overall survival in univariate analysis. Tumor size and ALT phenotype remained independent prognostic factors in multivariate analysis. We concluded that the ALT phenotype in the leiomyosarcoma is associated with aggressive histologic features, loss of ATRX expression, and poor clinical outcome. PMID:25229770

  6. Comprehensive Analysis of the Incidence and Survival Patterns of Lung Cancer by Histologies, Including Rare Subtypes, in the Era of Molecular Medicine and Targeted Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Jeffrey.S.; Chen, Li-Tzong; Shan, Yan-Shen; Lin, Sheng-Fung; Hsiao, Sheng-Yen; Tsai, Chia-Rung; Yu, Shu-Jung; Tsai, Hui-Jen

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Lung cancer is the third most common cancer in the world and has the highest cancer mortality rate. A worldwide increasing trend of lung adenocarcinoma has been noted. In addition, the identification of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations and the introduction of EGFR inhibitors to successfully treat EGFR mutated non–small cell lung cancers are breakthroughs for lung cancer treatment. The current study evaluated the incidence and survival of lung cancer using data collected by the Taiwan Cancer Registry between 1996 and 2008. The results showed that the most common histologic subtype of lung cancer was adenocarcinoma, followed by squamous cell carcinoma, small cell carcinoma, large cell carcinoma, neuroendocrine tumors, lymphoma, and sarcoma. Overall, the incidence of lung cancer in Taiwan increased significantly from 1996 to 2008. An increased incidence was observed for adenocarcinoma, particularly for women, with an annual percentage change of 5.9, whereas the incidence of squamous cell carcinoma decreased. Among the subtypes of lung cancer, the most rapid increase occurred in neuroendocrine tumors with an annual percentage change of 15.5. From 1996–1999 to 2005–2008, the 1-year survival of adenocarcinoma increased by 10% for men, whereas the 1-, 3-, and 5-year survivals of adenocarcinoma for women increased by 18%, 11%, and 5%, respectively. Overall, the incidence of lung cancer has been increasing in Taiwan, although the trends were variable by subtype. The introduction of targeted therapies was associated with a significantly improved survival for lung adenocarcinoma in Taiwan; however, more studies are needed to explain the rising incidence of lung adenocarcinoma. In addition, it is important to investigate the molecular pathogenesis of the various subtypes of lung cancer to develop novel therapeutic agents.

  7. Distinctive Patterns of Initially Presenting Metastases and Clinical Outcomes According to the Histological Subtypes in Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dong Soo; Kim, Yeon S.; Kay, Chul S.; Kim, Sung H.; Yeo, Chang D.; Kim, Jin W.; Kim, Seung Joon; Kim, Young K.; Ko, Yoon H.; Kang, Jin H.; Lee, Kyo Y.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study was designed to compare the primary patterns of metastases and clinical outcomes between adenocarcinoma (Adenoca) and squamous cell carcinoma (SQ) in initially diagnosed stage IV non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Between June 2007 and June 2013, a total of 427 eligible patients were analyzed. These patients were histologically confirmed as Adenoca or SQ and underwent systemic imaging studies, including 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography and brain imaging. Synchronous metastatic sites were categorized into 7 areas, and whole-body metastatic scores were calculated from 1 to 7 by summation of each involved region. We compared the patient, tumor, and metastatic characteristics according to the histological subtypes, and examined clinical outcomes. The enrolled study cohort comprised 81% (n = 346) Adenoca patients and 19% (n = 81) SQ patients. The median age of the study population was 65 years (range, 30–94 years), and 263 (61.6%) patients were male. The most common metastatic sites were thoracic lymph nodes (LNs) (84.3%), followed by lung to lung/lymphangitic spread (59%) and bone (54.8%). The distribution of patient characteristics revealed that age ≥65 years (69.1% vs 50.6%; P = 0.003) and male sex (84% vs 56.4%; P < 0.001) were more frequently found in SQ patients. Regarding metastatic features, bone metastasis (60.4% vs 30.9%; P < 0.001), lung to lung/lymphangitic metastasis (63% vs 42%; P = 0.001), and brain metastasis (35% vs 16%; P = 0.001) were significantly and more frequently found in Adenoca patients. Patients with high metastatic scores (score 3–6) were more frequently found to have Adenoca (91.6% vs 73.4%; P < 0.001). In multivariate prognostic evaluation, sex (P = 0.001), age (P < 0.001), histology (P < 0.001), LN status (P = 0.032), pleural/pericardial metastasis (P = 0.003), abdomen/pelvis metastasis (P < 0.001), axilla

  8. Costs and Benefits of Children's Physical and Relational Aggression Trajectories on Peer Rejection, Acceptance, and Friendships: Variations by Aggression Subtypes, Gender, and Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ettekal, Idean; Ladd, Gary W.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the associations between children's co-occurring relational and physical aggression trajectories and their peer relations (i.e., peer rejection, peer acceptance, and reciprocated friendships) from late childhood (Grade 4; M[subscript age] = 10.0) to early adolescence (Grade 8; M[subscript age] = 13.9). Using a sample of 477…

  9. Evaluation of breast cancer using intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) histogram analysis: comparison with malignant status, histological subtype, and molecular prognostic factors

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Gene Young; Moy, Linda; Kim, Sungheon G.; Baete, Steven H.; Moccaldi, Melanie; Babb, James S.; Sodickson, Daniel K.; Sigmund, Eric E.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To examine heterogeneous breast cancer through intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) histogram analysis. Materials and methods This HIPAA-compliant, IRB-approved retrospective study included 62 patients (age 48.44±11.14 years, 50 malignant lesions and 12 benign) who underwent contrast-enhanced 3 T breast MRI and diffusion-weighted imaging. Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and IVIM biomarkers of tissue diffusivity (Dt), perfusion fraction (fp), and pseudo-diffusivity (Dp) were calculated using voxel-based analysis for the whole lesion volume. Histogram analysis was performed to quantify tumour heterogeneity. Comparisons were made using Mann–Whitney tests between benign/malignant status, histological subtype, and molecular prognostic factor status while Spearman’s rank correlation was used to characterize the association between imaging biomarkers and prognostic factor expression. Results The average values of the ADC and IVIM biomarkers, Dt and fp, showed significant differences between benign and malignant lesions. Additional significant differences were found in the histogram parameters among tumour subtypes and molecular prognostic factor status. IVIM histogram metrics, particularly fp and Dp, showed significant correlation with hormonal factor expression. Conclusion Advanced diffusion imaging biomarkers show relationships with molecular prognostic factors and breast cancer malignancy. This analysis reveals novel diagnostic metrics that may explain some of the observed variability in treatment response among breast cancer patients. PMID:26615557

  10. The histological variants of liposarcoma: predictive MRI findings with prognostic implications, management, follow-up, and differential diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Rizer, Magda; Singer, Adam D; Edgar, Mark; Jose, Jean; Subhawong, Ty K

    2016-09-01

    Liposarcoma is the single most common soft tissue sarcoma accounting for up to 35 % of sarcomas. It represents a histologically diverse group of soft tissue tumors that demonstrate a wide range of imaging appearances with varied behavior patterns. Correspondingly, more aggressive histological subtypes often require management that includes a combination of surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy. Distinguishing among liposarcoma subtypes has important therapeutic and prognostic implications. In this manuscript, we review the liposarcoma subtypes and their histologic and MRI findings, prognostic implications, and differential diagnostic considerations. PMID:27209201

  11. Moderating Effects of Aggression on the Associations between Social Withdrawal Subtypes and Peer Difficulties during Early Adolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowker, Julie C.; Markovic, Andrea; Cogswell, Alex; Raja, Radhi

    2012-01-01

    Recent research has revealed significant heterogeneity in the peer difficulties associated with social withdrawal subtypes during early adolescence, but little is known about possible sources of that heterogeneity. This study of 194 Indian young adolescents (48% female; 90% Hindu; M age = 13.35 years) evaluated whether the peer adversity related…

  12. Subtypes of Aggression in Children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder: Medication Effects and Comparison with Typical Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Sara; Waschbusch, Daniel A.; Pelham, William E.; Frankland, Bradley W.; Corkum, Penny V.; Jacques, Sophie

    2009-01-01

    We examined aggressive behavior in 6- to 12-year-old children, including 20 children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) on stimulant medication, 19 children with ADHD on placebo (n = 19), and 32 controls. Children completed a laboratory provocation task designed to measure hostile, instrumental, reactive, and proactive…

  13. Breast Cancer Cell-Derived GM-CSF Licenses Regulatory Th2 Induction by Plasmacytoid Predendritic Cells in Aggressive Disease Subtypes.

    PubMed

    Ghirelli, Cristina; Reyal, Fabien; Jeanmougin, Marine; Zollinger, Raphaël; Sirven, Philémon; Michea, Paula; Caux, Christophe; Bendriss-Vermare, Nathalie; Donnadieu, Marie-Hélène; Caly, Martial; Fourchotte, Virginie; Vincent-Salomon, Anne; Sigal-Zafrani, Brigitte; Sastre-Garau, Xavier; Soumelis, Vassili

    2015-07-15

    Reciprocal interactions between tumor cells and their microenvironment vitally impact tumor progression. In this study, we show that GM-CSF produced by primary breast tumor cells induced the activation of plasmacytoid predendritic cells (pDC), a cell type critical to anti-viral immunity. pDC that expressed the GM-CSF receptor were increased in breast tumors compared with noninvolved adjacent breast tissue. Tumor-activated pDC acquired naïve CD4(+) T-cell stimulatory capacity and promoted a regulatory Th2 response. Finally, the concomitant increase of GM-CSF and pDC was significantly associated with relatively more aggressive breast cancer subtypes. Our results characterize the first tumor-derived factor that can activate pDC to promote a regulatory Th2 response, with implications for therapeutic targeting of a tumor-immune axis of growing recognition in its significance to cancer. PMID:25977333

  14. IDH1 and IDH2 mutations in different histologic subtypes and WHO grading gliomas in a sample from Northern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Pessôa, I A; Sagica, F E S; Anselmo, N P; Brito, J R N; de Oliveira, E H C

    2015-01-01

    Glioma is a term used to describe tumors derived from glial cells. These tumors are divided into subgroups based on the histological morphology and similarity of their differentiated glia cells. Traditionally, they are classified according to the World Health Organization and include astrocytomas, oligodendrogliomas, ependymomas, and oligoastrocytomas. Like most cancers, gliomas develop as a result of genetic changes that accumulate with tumor progression. Alterations in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) and IDH2 were found to be relevant in the classification and prognostic of gliomas. Because of the importance of mutations in these genes, particularly in IDH1, in different proposals of the genesis and progression of gliomas, we analyzed the occurrence of mutations in these genes in samples obtained from patients from Belém (PA, Brazil) using polymerase chain reaction-single-strand conformation polymorphism followed by sequencing. We compared the results obtained from tumors of different malignancy grades, evaluating the significance of the associations between different variables. R132H was the only mutation found in 17.6% (6/34) of cases, including in astrocytomas, anaplastic astrocytomas, oligodendroglioma, and anaplastic oligoastrocytoma. No mutations were found in the IDH2 gene. We found no significant relationship between the identified mutations in IDH1 and the variables. Our data could not confirm that mutations in IDH1/IDH2 are indicative of malignancy and prognosis. However, the results support that the mutation in IDH1 gene was an early event in the development of gliomas, as it was found in tumors of different malignancy grades. PMID:26125858

  15. Effect of heme oxygenase-1 gene promoter polymorphism on cancer risk by histological subtype: A prospective study in arseniasis-endemic areas in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Wu, Meei-Maan; Lee, Chih-Hung; Hsu, Ling-I; Cheng, Wen-Fang; Lee, Te-Chang; Wang, Yuang-Hung; Chiou, Hung-Yi; Chen, Chien-Jen

    2016-04-15

    Heme oxygenase (HO)-1 is upregulated by many stressful stimuli, including arsenic. A GT-repeat ((GT)n) polymorphism in the HO-1 gene promoter inversely modulates the levels of HO-1 induction. Previous HO-1 (GT)n polymorphism studies in relation to cancer risk have shown disparate results. We prospectively investigated the associations between HO-1 (GT)n polymorphism and cancer risk related to arsenic from drinking water. Totally, 1,013 participants from community-based cohorts of arseniasis-endemic areas in Taiwan were followed for 13 years. Allelic polymorphisms were classified into long (L, ≥ 27 (GT)n) and short (S, <27 (GT)n). Newly developed cases were identified through linkage with National Cancer Registry of Taiwan. Multivariate Cox proportional hazard methods were used to evaluate effects of the HO-1 polymorphism alone or combined with arsenic exposure. Results showed that participants with the S/S genotype had an increased risk of Bowen's disease (HR = 10.49; 95% CI: 2.77-39.7), invasive skin cancer (HR = 2.99; 95% CI: 1.13-7.87), and lung squamous cell carcinoma (HR = 3.39; 95% CI: 1.15-9.95) versus those with L/S or L/L genotype. The S/S genotype combined with high arsenic exposure (>300 μg/L) had a greater risk of skin cancer compared to the genotype alone. Consistent with previous findings, participants with the S-allele had a reduced risk of lung adenocarcinoma (HR = 0.21; 95% CI: 0.03-0.68) versus those with L/L genotype. There were no significant differences in risk of urothelial carcinoma among the three genotypes. Associations of HO-1 (GT)n polymorphism with cancer risk differs by histological subtype and the polymorphism should be considered a modifier in the risk assessment of arsenic exposure. PMID:26566708

  16. MAL2 and tumor protein D52 (TPD52) are frequently overexpressed in ovarian carcinoma, but differentially associated with histological subtype and patient outcome

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The four-transmembrane MAL2 protein is frequently overexpressed in breast carcinoma, and MAL2 overexpression is associated with gain of the corresponding locus at chromosome 8q24.12. Independent expression microarray studies predict MAL2 overexpression in ovarian carcinoma, but these had remained unconfirmed. MAL2 binds tumor protein D52 (TPD52), which is frequently overexpressed in ovarian carcinoma, but the clinical significance of MAL2 and TPD52 overexpression was unknown. Methods Immunohistochemical analyses of MAL2 and TPD52 expression were performed using tissue microarray sections including benign, borderline and malignant epithelial ovarian tumours. Inmmunohistochemical staining intensity and distribution was assessed both visually and digitally. Results MAL2 and TPD52 were significantly overexpressed in high-grade serous carcinomas compared with serous borderline tumours. MAL2 expression was highest in serous carcinomas relative to other histological subtypes, whereas TPD52 expression was highest in clear cell carcinomas. MAL2 expression was not related to patient survival, however high-level TPD52 staining was significantly associated with improved overall survival in patients with stage III serous ovarian carcinoma (log-rank test, p < 0.001; n = 124) and was an independent predictor of survival in the overall carcinoma cohort (hazard ratio (HR), 0.498; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.34-0.728; p < 0.001; n = 221), and in serous carcinomas (HR, 0.440; 95% CI, 0.294-0.658; p < 0.001; n = 182). Conclusions MAL2 is frequently overexpressed in ovarian carcinoma, and TPD52 overexpression is a favourable independent prognostic marker of potential value in the management of ovarian carcinoma patients. PMID:20846453

  17. A six gene expression signature defines aggressive subtypes and predicts outcome in childhood and adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jin; Mi, Jian-Qing; Debernardi, Alexandra; Vitte, Anne-Laure; Emadali, Anouk; Meyer, Julia A.; Charmpi, Konstantina; Ycart, Bernard; Callanan, Mary B.; Carroll, William L.; Khochbin, Saadi; Rousseaux, Sophie

    2015-01-01

    Abnormal gene expression in cancer represents an under-explored source of cancer markers and therapeutic targets. In order to identify gene expression signatures associated with survival in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), a strategy was designed to search for aberrant gene activity, which consists of applying several filters to transcriptomic datasets from two pediatric ALL studies. Six genes whose expression in leukemic blasts was associated with prognosis were identified:three genes predicting poor prognosis (AK022211, FASTKD1 and STARD4) and three genes associated with a favorable outcome (CAMSAP1, PCGF6 and SH3RF3). Combining the expression of these 6 genes could successfully predict prognosis not only in the two discovery pediatric ALL studies, but also in two independent validation cohorts of adult patients, one from a publicly available study and one consisting of 62 newly recruited Chinese patients. Moreover, our data demonstrate that our six gene based test is particularly efficient in stratifying MLL or BCR.ABL negative patients. Finally, common biological traits characterizing aggressive forms of ALL in both children and adults were found, including features of dormant hematopoietic stem cells, suggesting new therapeutic strategies. PMID:26001296

  18. Distinct Splice Variants and Pathway Enrichment in the Cell Line Models of Aggressive Human Breast Cancer Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Rajasree; Im, Hogune; Zhang, Emma (Yue); Wu, Shiaw-Lin; Chen, Rui; Snyder, Michael; Hancock, William S.; Omenn, Gilbert S.

    2013-01-01

    This study was conducted as a part of the Chromosome-Centric Human Proteome Project (C-HPP) of the Human Proteome Organization. The United States team of C-HPP is focused on characterizing the protein-coding genes in chromosome 17. Despite its small size, chromosome 17 is rich in protein-coding genes, it contains many cancer-associated genes, including BRCA1, ERBB2 (Her2/neu), and TP53. The goal of this study was to examine the splice variants expressed in three ERBB2 expressed breast cancer cell line models of hormone receptor negative breast cancers by integrating RNA-Seq and proteomic mass spectrometry data. The cell-lines represent distinct phenotypic variations subtype: SKBR3 (ERBB2+ (over-expression)/ ER−/PR−; adenocarcinoma), SUM190 (ERBB2+ (over-expression)/ER−/PR−; inflammatory breast cancer) and SUM149 (ERBB2 (low expression) ER−/PR −; inflammatory breast cancer). We identified more than one splice variant for 1167 genes expressed in at least one of the three cancer cell lines. We found multiple variants of genes that are in the signaling pathways downstream of ERBB2 along with variants specific to one cancer cell line compared to the other two cancer cell lines and to normal mammary cells. The overall transcript profiles based on read counts indicated more similarities between SKBR3 and SUM190. The top-ranking Gene Ontology and BioCarta pathways for the cell-line specific variants pointed to distinct key mechanisms including: amino sugar metabolism, caspase activity, and endocytosis in SKBR3; different aspects of metabolism, especially of lipids in SUM190; cell- to-cell adhesion, integrin and ERK1/ERK2 signaling, and translational control in SUM149. The analyses indicated an enrichment in the electron transport chain processes in the ERBB2 over-expressed cell line models; and an association of nucleotide binding, RNA splicing and translation processes with the IBC models, SUM190 and SUM149. Detailed experimental studies on the distinct

  19. Expression of FAP, ADAM12, WISP1, and SOX11 is heterogeneous in aggressive fibromatosis and spatially relates to the histologic features of tumor activity

    PubMed Central

    Misemer, Benjamin S; Skubitz, Amy P N; Carlos Manivel, J; Schmechel, Stephen C; Cheng, Edward Y; Henriksen, Jonathan C; Koopmeiners, Joseph S; Corless, Christopher L; Skubitz, Keith M

    2014-01-01

    Aggressive fibromatosis (AF) represents a group of tumors with a variable and unpredictable clinical course, characterized by a monoclonal proliferation of myofibroblastic cells. The optimal treatment for AF remains unclear. Identification and validation of genes whose expression patterns are associated with AF may elucidate biological mechanisms in AF, and aid treatment selection. This study was designed to examine the protein expression by immunohistochemistry (IHC) of four genes, ADAM12, FAP, SOX11, and WISP1, that were found in an earlier study to be uniquely overexpressed in AF compared with normal tissues. Digital image analysis was performed to evaluate inter- and intratumor heterogeneity, and correlate protein expression with histologic features, including a histopathologic assessment of tumor activity, defined by nuclear chromatin density ratio (CDR). AF tumors exhibited marked inter- and intratumor histologic heterogeneity. Pathologic assessment of tumor activity and digital assessment of average nuclear size and CDR were all significantly correlated. IHC revealed protein expression of all four genes. IHC staining for ADAM12, FAP, and WISP1 correlated with CDR and was higher, whereas SOX11 staining was lower in tumors with earlier recurrence following excision. All four proteins were expressed, and the regional variation in tumor activity within and among AF cases was demonstrated. A spatial correlation between protein expression and nuclear morphology was observed. IHC also correlated with the probability of recurrence following excision. These proteins may be involved in AF pathogenesis and the corresponding pathways could serve as potential targets of therapy. PMID:24402778

  20. Expression of FAP, ADAM12, WISP1, and SOX11 is heterogeneous in aggressive fibromatosis and spatially relates to the histologic features of tumor activity.

    PubMed

    Misemer, Benjamin S; Skubitz, Amy P N; Carlos Manivel, J; Schmechel, Stephen C; Cheng, Edward Y; Henriksen, Jonathan C; Koopmeiners, Joseph S; Corless, Christopher L; Skubitz, Keith M

    2014-02-01

    Aggressive fibromatosis (AF) represents a group of tumors with a variable and unpredictable clinical course, characterized by a monoclonal proliferation of myofibroblastic cells. The optimal treatment for AF remains unclear. Identification and validation of genes whose expression patterns are associated with AF may elucidate biological mechanisms in AF, and aid treatment selection. This study was designed to examine the protein expression by immunohistochemistry (IHC) of four genes, ADAM12, FAP, SOX11, and WISP1, that were found in an earlier study to be uniquely overexpressed in AF compared with normal tissues. Digital image analysis was performed to evaluate inter- and intratumor heterogeneity, and correlate protein expression with histologic features, including a histopathologic assessment of tumor activity, defined by nuclear chromatin density ratio (CDR). AF tumors exhibited marked inter- and intratumor histologic heterogeneity. Pathologic assessment of tumor activity and digital assessment of average nuclear size and CDR were all significantly correlated. IHC revealed protein expression of all four genes. IHC staining for ADAM12, FAP, and WISP1 correlated with CDR and was higher, whereas SOX11 staining was lower in tumors with earlier recurrence following excision. All four proteins were expressed, and the regional variation in tumor activity within and among AF cases was demonstrated. A spatial correlation between protein expression and nuclear morphology was observed. IHC also correlated with the probability of recurrence following excision. These proteins may be involved in AF pathogenesis and the corresponding pathways could serve as potential targets of therapy. PMID:24402778

  1. Monotherapy with pixantrone in histologically confirmed relapsed or refractory aggressive B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma: post-hoc analyses from a phase III trial.

    PubMed

    Pettengell, Ruth; Sebban, Catherine; Zinzani, Pier Luigi; Derigs, Hans Gunter; Kravchenko, Sergey; Singer, Jack W; Theocharous, Panteli; Wang, Lixia; Pavlyuk, Mariya; Makhloufi, Kahina M; Coiffier, Bertrand

    2016-09-01

    This post hoc analysis of a phase 3 trial explored the effect of pixantrone in patients (50 pixantrone, 47 comparator) with relapsed or refractory aggressive B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) confirmed by centralized histological review. Patients received 28-d cycles of 85 mg/m(2) pixantrone dimaleate (equivalent to 50 mg/m(2) in the approved formulation) on days 1, 8 and 15, or comparator. The population was subdivided according to previous rituximab use and whether they received the study treatment as 3rd or 4th line. Median number of cycles was 4 (range, 2-6) with pixantrone and 3 (2-6) with comparator. In 3rd or 4th line, pixantrone was associated with higher complete response (CR) (23·1% vs. 5·1% comparator, P = 0·047) and overall response rate (ORR, 43·6% vs. 12·8%, P = 0·005). In 3rd or 4th line with previous rituximab (20 pixantrone, 18 comparator), pixantrone produced better ORR (45·0% vs. 11·1%, P = 0·033), CR (30·0% vs. 5·6%, P = 0·093) and progression-free survival (median 5·4 vs. 2·8 months, hazard ratio 0·52, 95% confidence interval 0·26-1·04) than the comparator. Similar results were found in patients without previous rituximab. There were no unexpected safety issues. Pixantrone monotherapy is more effective than comparator in relapsed or refractory aggressive B-cell NHL in the 3rd or 4th line setting, independently of previous rituximab. PMID:27118109

  2. Presence of sst5TMD4, a truncated splice variant of the somatostatin receptor subtype 5, is associated to features of increased aggressiveness in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors

    PubMed Central

    Gahete, Manuel D.; Serrano-Somavilla, Ana; Villa-Osaba, Alicia; Adrados, Magdalena; Ibáñez-Costa, Alejandro; Martín-Pérez, Elena; Culler, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP-NETs) are rare and heterogeneous tumors, and their biological behavior is not well known. We studied the presence and potential functional roles of somatostatin receptors (sst1-5), focusing particularly on the truncated variants (sst5TMD4, sst5TMD5) and on their relationships with the angiogenic system (Ang/Tie-2 and VEGF) in human GEP-NETs. Experimental Design We evaluated 42 tumor tissue samples (26 primary/16 metastatic) from 26 patients with GEP-NETs, and 30 non-tumoral tissues (26 from adjacent non-tumor regions and 4 from normal controls) from a single center. Expression of sst1-5, sst5TMD4, sst5TMD5, Ang1-2, Tie-2 and VEGF was analyzed using real-time qPCR, immunofluorescence and immunohistochemistry. Expression levels were associated with tumor characteristics and clinical outcomes. Functional role of sst5TMD4 was analyzed in GEP-NET cell lines. Results sst1 exhibited the highest expression in GEP-NET, whilst sst2 was the most frequently observed sst-subtype (90.2%). Expression levels of sst1, sst2, sst3, sst5TMD4, and sst5TMD5 were significantly higher in tumor tissues compared to their adjacent non-tumoral tissue. Lymph-node metastases expressed higher levels of sst5TMD4 than in its corresponding primary tumor tissue. sst5TMD4 was also significantly higher in intestinal tumor tissues from patients with residual disease of intestinal origin compared to those with non-residual disease. Functional assays demonstrated that the presence of sst5TMD4 was associated to enhanced malignant features in GEP-NET cells. Angiogenic markers correlated positively with sst5TMD4, which was confirmed by immunohistochemical/fluorescence studies. Conclusions sst5TMD4 is overexpressed in GEP-NETs and is associated to enhanced aggressiveness, suggesting its potential value as biomarker and target in GEP-NETs. PMID:26673010

  3. Biased self-perceived social competence and engagement in subtypes of aggression: Examination of peer rejection, social dominance goals, and sex of the child as moderators.

    PubMed

    McQuade, Julia D; Breaux, Rosanna P; Gómez, Angelina F; Zakarian, Rebecca J; Weatherly, Julia

    2016-09-01

    This study expands on prior research suggesting that children who either over- or under-estimate their social competence relative to others' reports are more likely to be aggressive. Linear and curvilinear associations between biased social self-perceptions and forms (physical vs. relational) and functions (proactive vs. reactive) of aggression were tested along with three moderators (peer rejection, social dominance goals, and child sex). Children in the fifth through eight grade (N = 167) completed self-reports of perceived social competence and social dominance goals. Teachers completed ratings of children's social competence, peer rejection, and reactive and proactive physical and relational aggression. Bias in self-perceived social competence was quantified as the residual difference between child and teacher ratings of the child's social competence. There was a significant interaction between quadratic bias and peer rejection predicting reactive physical aggression; rejected children with a positive bias or a negative bias were highest in reactive physical aggression. The interaction between linear bias, social dominance goals, and the sex of the child was also significant when predicting proactive physical aggression. Among girls who highly valued social dominance, a positive bias predicted greater proactive physical aggression. Results are discussed in terms of implications for aggression theory and intervention. Aggr. Behav. 42:498-509, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26831648

  4. Relationship of epidermal growth factor receptor activating mutations with histologic subtyping according to International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer/American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society 2011 adenocarcinoma classification and their impact on overall survival

    PubMed Central

    Maturu, Venkata Nagarjuna; Singh, Navneet; Bal, Amanjit; Gupta, Nalini; Das, Ashim; Behera, Digambar

    2016-01-01

    Background: There is limited Indian data on epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene activating mutations (AMs) prevalence and their clinicopathologic associations. The current study aimed to assess the relationship between EGFR AM and histologic subtypes and their impact on overall survival (OS) in a North Indian cohort. Patients and Methods: Retrospective analysis of nonsmall cell lung cancer patients who underwent EGFR mutation testing (n = 186) over 3 years period (2012–2014). EGFR mutations were tested using polymerase chain reaction amplification and direct sequencing. Patients were classified as EGFR AM, EGFR wild type (WT) or EGFR unknown (UKN). Histologically adenocarcinomas (ADC) were further categorized as per the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer/American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society-2011 classification. Results: Overall EGFR AM prevalence was 16.6%. The ratio of exon 19 deletions to exon 21 L858R mutations was 3.17:1. Female sex (P = 0.002), never smoking status (P = 0.002), metastatic disease (P = 0.032), and nonsolid subtype of ADC (P = 0.001) were associated with EGFR AM on univariate logistic regression analysis (LRA). On multivariate LRA, solid ADC was negatively associated with EGFR AM. Median OS was higher in patients with EGFR AM (750 days) as compared to EGFR-WT (459 days) or EGFR-UKN (291 days) for the overall population and in patients with Stage IV disease (750 days vs. 278 days for EGFR-WT, P = 0.024). On univariate Cox proportional hazard (CPH) analysis, smoking, poor performance status (Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group ≥ 2), EGFR-UKN status, and solid ADC were associated with worse OS while female sex and lepidic ADC had better OS. On multivariate CPH analysis, lepidic ADC (hazard ratio [HR] =0.12) and EGFR-WT/EGFR-UKN (HR = 2.39 and HR = 3.30 respectively) were independently associated with OS in separate analyses. Conclusions: Histologic subtyping of ADC performed on small biopsies is

  5. Clinical evaluation of microRNA-145 expression in renal cell carcinoma: a promising molecular marker for discriminating and staging the clear cell histological subtype.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulos, Emmanuel I; Petraki, Constantina; Gregorakis, Alkiviadis; Fragoulis, Emmanuel G; Scorilas, Andreas

    2016-06-01

    The vast majority of malignancies detected in renal parenchyma are diagnosed as renal cell carcinoma (RCC), whose subtype discrimination and determination of prognosis may contribute to the selection of the adequate therapy. Recently, a new class of small non-coding RNAs, known as microRNAs, has proven to be among the most promising biomarkers for providing this information. Herein, we sought to add up to this knowledge by evaluating the expression levels of microRNA-145 (miR-145) in RCC. For that purpose, total RNA from 58 cancerous and 44 adjacent non-cancerous renal tissues was firstly extracted and then polyadenylated and reverse transcribed to cDNA. MiR-145 levels were finally analyzed by developing and applying a highly sensitive real-time PCR protocol, while their clinical significance was determined via comprehensive statistical analysis. Our data showed that miR-145 was significantly downregulated in cancerous samples and could discriminate between clear cell and non-clear cell subtypes. Moreover, miR-145 expression was found to be correlated with primary tumor staging of cancerous samples, something also noticed in the clear cell RCC subset, in which miR-145 levels were negatively correlated with tumor size as well. Overall, these results indicate that miR-145 might constitute a promising molecular marker for RCC classification and staging. PMID:26866880

  6. The Impact of Graft-versus-Host Disease on the Relapse Rate in Patients with Lymphoma Depends on the Histological Subtype and the Intensity of the Conditioning Regimen.

    PubMed

    Urbano-Ispizua, Alvaro; Pavletic, Steven Z; Flowers, Mary E; Klein, John P; Zhang, Mei-Jie; Carreras, Jeanette; Montoto, Silvia; Perales, Miguel-Angel; Aljurf, Mahmoud D; Akpek, Görgün; Bredeson, Christopher N; Costa, Luciano J; Dandoy, Christopher; Freytes, César O; Fung, Henry C; Gale, Robert Peter; Gibson, John; Hamadani, Mehdi; Hayashi, Robert J; Inamoto, Yoshihiro; Inwards, David J; Lazarus, Hillard M; Maloney, David G; Martino, Rodrigo; Munker, Reinhold; Nishihori, Taiga; Olsson, Richard F; Rizzieri, David A; Reshef, Ran; Saad, Ayman; Savani, Bipin N; Schouten, Harry C; Smith, Sonali M; Socié, Gérard; Wirk, Baldeep; Yu, Lolie C; Saber, Wael

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the impact of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) on the relapse rate of different lymphoma subtypes after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT). Adult patients with a diagnosis of Hodgkin lymphoma, diffuse large B cell lymphoma, follicular lymphoma (FL), peripheral T cell lymphoma, or mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) undergoing HLA-identical sibling or unrelated donor hematopoietic cell transplantation between 1997 and 2009 were included. Two thousand six hundred eleven cases were included. A reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) regimen was used in 62.8% of the transplantations. In a multivariate analysis of myeloablative cases (n = 970), neither acute (aGVHD) nor chronic GVHD (cGVHD) were significantly associated with a lower incidence of relapse/progression in any lymphoma subtype. In contrast, the analysis of RIC cases (n = 1641) showed that cGVHD was associated with a lower incidence of relapse/progression in FL (risk ratio [RR], .51; P = .049) and in MCL (RR, .41; P = .019). Patients with FL or MCL developing both aGVHD and cGVHD had the lowest risk of relapse (RR, .14; P = .007; and RR, .15; P = .0019, respectively). Of interest, the effect of GVHD on decreasing relapse was similar in patients with sensitive disease and chemoresistant disease. Unfortunately, both aGVHD and cGVHD had a deleterious effect on treatment-related mortality and overall survival (OS) in FL cases but did not affect treatment-related mortality, OS or PFS in MCL. This study reinforces the use of RIC allo-HCT as a platform for immunotherapy in FL and MCL patients. PMID:25981509

  7. Presence of ulceration, but not high risk zone location, correlates with unfavorable histopathological subtype in facial basal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yalcin, Ozben; Sezer, Engin; Kabukcuoglu, Fevziye; Kilic, Ayse Irem; Sari, Ahu Gulcin; Cerman, Asli Aksu; Altunay, Ilknur Kivanc

    2015-01-01

    Background: Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) has been stratified into low- and high-risk according to their propensity for local recurrence. Risk factors for recurrence include histologic subtype, anatomic location (i.e. H-zone of the face), horizontal diameter, and patient health status. Objective: To assess if favorable (superficial, nodular, adenoid and trabecular) and unfavorable (infiltrative, morpheaform, micronodular, metatypical, basosquamous) histopathological subtypes of BCC do correlate with anatomic location on the face (facial high risk versus non-high risk zones). Methods: Histopathological specimens of all facial BCCs, which were histopathologically diagnosed in the Pathology Department of Şişli Etfal Training Hospital, between the years 2008 and 2014 were retrospectively studied. Histopathological aggressive and non-aggressive subtypes as well as the presence of ulceration were correlated with facial high-risk (i.e. H-zone) and low risk anatomical locations. Results: Of 184 BCC of unfavorable subtypes, 101 cases were identified in facial high-risk anatomical region (H-zone) compared to 83 cases at non H-zone (P = 0.553). On the other hand the ulceration rate was significantly higher for unfavorable histological subtypes than in the favorable histopathological subtype group (P = 0.042). Regarding anatomic site, ulceration frequency was not significantly different for the H-versus non-high risk zones (P = 0.335). Conclusions: A correlation of unfavorable histopathological subtype of BCC and high-risk anatomical location (i.e. H-zone) was not observed in our study. Our results however confirmed a significantly higher rate of ulceration in the subgroup of aggressive histopathological BCC forms. Thus, factors other than histopathological subtype (such as narrow excision margin related to difficult surgical technique in H-zone, microcirculation, vasculature and host inflammatory response) may be responsible for the high recurrence rate in facial H

  8. (18)F-FDG PET/CT in the early prediction of pathological response in aggressive subtypes of breast cancer: review of the literature and recommendations for use in clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Groheux, David; Mankoff, David; Espié, Marc; Hindié, Elif

    2016-05-01

    Early assessment of response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) might be helpful in avoiding the toxicity of ineffective chemotherapy and allowing refinement of treatment. We conducted a review of the literature regarding the applicability of (18)F-FDG PET/CT to the prediction of an early pathological response in different subgroups of breast cancer. Clinical research in this field has intensified in the last few years. Early studies by various groups have shown the potential of (18)F-FDG PET/CT in the early assessment of response to NAC. However, interim PET/CT in breast cancer has not yet gained wide acceptance compared to its use in other settings such as lymphomas. This is in part due to a lack of consensus that early evaluation of response can be used to direct change in therapy in the neoadjuvant breast cancer setting, and only limited data showing that response-adaptive therapy leads to improved outcomes. However, one major element that has hampered the use of (18)F-FDG PET/CT in directing neoadjuvant therapy is its evaluation in populations with mixed subtypes of breast cancer. However, major improvements have occurred in recent years. Pilot studies have highlighted the need for considering breast cancer subtype and the type of treatment, and have offered criteria for the use of PET/CT for the early prediction of response in specific settings. (18)F-FDG PET/CT has considerable potential for the early prediction of pathological complete response to NAC in aggressive subtypes such as triple-negative or HER2-positive breast cancers. The results of a multicentre trial that used early metabolic response on (18)F-FDG PET/CT as a means to select poor responders to adapt neoadjuvant treatment have recently been published. Other trials are ongoing or being planned. PMID:26758726

  9. The two most common histological subtypes of malignant germ cell tumour are distinguished by global microRNA profiles, associated with differential transcription factor expression

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background We hypothesised that differences in microRNA expression profiles contribute to the contrasting natural history and clinical outcome of the two most common types of malignant germ cell tumour (GCT), yolk sac tumours (YSTs) and germinomas. Results By direct comparison, using microarray data for paediatric GCT samples and published qRT-PCR data for adult samples, we identified microRNAs significantly up-regulated in YSTs (n = 29 paediatric, 26 adult, 11 overlapping) or germinomas (n = 37 paediatric). By Taqman qRT-PCR we confirmed differential expression of 15 of 16 selected microRNAs and further validated six of these (miR-302b, miR-375, miR-200b, miR-200c, miR-122, miR-205) in an independent sample set. Interestingly, the miR-302 cluster, which is over-expressed in all malignant GCTs, showed further over-expression in YSTs versus germinomas, representing six of the top eight microRNAs over-expressed in paediatric YSTs and seven of the top 11 in adult YSTs. To explain this observation, we used mRNA expression profiles of paediatric and adult malignant GCTs to identify 10 transcription factors (TFs) consistently over-expressed in YSTs versus germinomas, followed by linear regression to confirm associations between TF and miR-302 cluster expression levels. Using the sequence motif analysis environment iMotifs, we identified predicted binding sites for four of the 10 TFs (GATA6, GATA3, TCF7L2 and MAF) in the miR-302 cluster promoter region. Finally, we showed that miR-302 family over-expression in YST is likely to be functionally significant, as mRNAs down-regulated in YSTs were enriched for 3' untranslated region sequences complementary to the common seed of miR-302a~miR-302d. Such mRNAs included mediators of key cancer-associated processes, including tumour suppressor genes, apoptosis regulators and TFs. Conclusions Differential microRNA expression is likely to contribute to the relatively aggressive behaviour of YSTs and may enable future improvements in

  10. The expression profile of Dopamine D2 receptor, MGMT and VEGF in different histological subtypes of pituitary adenomas: a study of 197 cases and indications for the medical therapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To study the expression of D2R, MGMT and VEGF for clinical significance in pituitary adenomas, and to predict the potential curative medical therapy of dopamine agonists, temozolomide and bevacizumab on pituitary adenomas. Methods Immunohistochemistry and western blot were performed to detect the expression of expression of D2R, MGMT and VEGF in pituitary adenoma tissue samples. The ratio of high expression of D2R, MGMT or VEGF in different subtypes of PA was compared by the use of chi-squared tests. The relationships between D2R, MGMT and VEGF expression were assessed by the Spearman rank correlation test. The association between their expression and clinical parameters was analyzed using a chi-squared test, or Fisher's exact probability test when appropriate. Results The data showed that in 197 different histological subtypes of pituitary adenomas (PAs), 64.9% of them were D2R high expression, 86.3% were MGMT low expression and 58.9% were VEGF high expression. D2R high expression existed more frequently in PRL- and GH- secreting PAs. MGMT low expression existed in all PA subtypes. VEGF high expression existed more frequently in PRL, ACTH, FSH secreting and non-functioning PAs. The data of western blot also support the results. Spearman's rank correlation analysis showed that expression of MGMT was positively associated with D2R (r = 0.154, P = 0.031) and VEGF (r = 0.161, P = 0.024) in PAs, but no correlation was showed between D2R and VEGF expression (r = −0.025, P = 0.725 > 0.05). The association between their expression and clinical parameters was analyzed using a chi-squared test, or Fisher's exact probability test when appropriate, but the result showed no significant association. Conclusions PRL-and GH-secreting PAs exist high expression of D2R, responding to dopamine agonists; Most PAs exist low expression of MGMT and high expression of VEGF, TMZ or bevacizumab treatment could be applied under the premise of

  11. Using Diffusion-Weighted MRI to Predict Aggressive Histological Features in Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma: A Novel Tool for Pre-Operative Risk Stratification in Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yonggang; Moreira, Andre L.; Hatzoglou, Vaios; Stambuk, Hilda E.; Gonen, Mithat; Mazaheri, Yousef; Deasy, Joseph O.; Shaha, Ashok R.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Initial management recommendations of papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) are very dependent on preoperative studies designed to evaluate the presence of PTC with aggressive features. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) before surgery can be used as a tool to stratify tumor aggressiveness in patients with PTC. Methods: In this prospective study, 28 patients with PTC underwent DW-MRI studies on a three Tesla MR scanner prior to thyroidectomy. Due to image quality, 21 patients were finally suitable for further analysis. Apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) of normal thyroid tissues and PTCs for 21 patients were calculated. Tumor aggressiveness was defined by surgical histopathology. The Mann-Whitney U test was used to compare the difference in ADCs among groups of normal thyroid tissues and PTCs with and without features of tumor aggressiveness. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed to assess the discriminative specificity, sensitivity, and accuracy of and determine the cutoff value for the ADC in stratifying PTCs with tumor aggressiveness. Results: There was no significant difference in ADC values between normal thyroid tissues and PTCs. However, ADC values of PTCs with extrathyroidal extension (ETE; 1.53±0.25×10–3 mm2/s) were significantly lower than corresponding values from PTCs without ETE (2.37±0.67×10–3 mm2/s; p<0.005). ADC values identified 3 papillary carcinoma patients with extrathyroidal extension that would have otherwise been candidates for observation based on ultrasound evaluations. The cutoff value of ADC to discriminate PTCs with and without ETE was determined at 1.85×10–3 mm2/s with a sensitivity of 85%, specificity of 85%, and ROC curve area of 0.85. Conclusion: ADC value derived from DW-MRI before surgery has the potential to stratify ETE in patients with PTCs. PMID:25809949

  12. p53 suppresses type II endometrial carcinomas in mice and governs endometrial tumour aggressiveness in humans

    PubMed Central

    Wild, Peter J; Ikenberg, Kristian; Fuchs, Thomas J; Rechsteiner, Markus; Georgiev, Strahil; Fankhauser, Niklaus; Noske, Aurelia; Roessle, Matthias; Caduff, Rosmarie; Dellas, Athanassios; Fink, Daniel; Moch, Holger; Krek, Wilhelm; Frew, Ian J

    2012-01-01

    Type II endometrial carcinomas are a highly aggressive group of tumour subtypes that are frequently associated with inactivation of the TP53 tumour suppressor gene. We show that mice with endometrium-specific deletion of Trp53 initially exhibited histological changes that are identical to known precursor lesions of type II endometrial carcinomas in humans and later developed carcinomas representing all type II subtypes. The mTORC1 signalling pathway was frequently activated in these precursor lesions and tumours, suggesting a genetic cooperation between this pathway and Trp53 deficiency in tumour initiation. Consistent with this idea, analyses of 521 human endometrial carcinomas identified frequent mTORC1 pathway activation in type I as well as type II endometrial carcinoma subtypes. mTORC1 pathway activation and p53 expression or mutation status each independently predicted poor patient survival. We suggest that molecular alterations in p53 and the mTORC1 pathway play different roles in the initiation of the different endometrial cancer subtypes, but that combined p53 inactivation and mTORC1 pathway activation are unifying pathogenic features among histologically diverse subtypes of late stage aggressive endometrial tumours. PMID:22678923

  13. Folic-acid metabolism and DNA-repair phenotypes differ between neuroendocrine lung tumors and associate with aggressive subtypes, therapy resistance and outcome

    PubMed Central

    Werner, Robert; Vollbrecht, Claudia; Hager, Thomas; Schmid, Kurt Werner; Wohlschlaeger, Jeremias; Christoph, Daniel Christian

    2016-01-01

    Purpose 25% of all lung cancer cases are neuroendocrine (NELC) including typical (TC) and atypical carcinoid (AC), large-cell neuroendocrine (LCNEC) and small cell lung cancer (SCLC). Prognostic and predictive biomarkers are lacking. Experimental Design Sixty patients were used for nCounter mRNA expression analysis of the folic-acid metabolism (ATIC, DHFR, FOLR1, FPGS, GART, GGT1, SLC19A1, TYMS) and DNA-repair (ERCC1, MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, XRCC1). Phenotypic classification classified tumors (either below or above the median expression level) with respect to the folic acid metabolism or DNA repair. Results Expression of FOLR1, FPGS, MLH1 and TYMS (each p<0.0001) differed significantly between all four tumor types. FOLR1 and FPGS associated with tumor differentiation (both p<0.0001), spread to regional lymph nodes (FOLR1 p=0.0001 and FPGS p=0.0038), OS and PFS (FOLR1 p<0.0050 for both and FPGS p<0.0004 for OS). Phenotypic sorting revealed the Ft-phenotype to be the most prominent expression profile in carcinoids, whereas SCLC presented nearly univocal with the fT and LCNEC with fT or ft. These results were significant for tumor subtype (p<0.0001). Conclusions The assessed biomarkers and phenotypes allow for risk stratification (OS, PFS), diagnostic classification and enhance the biological understanding of the different subtypes of neuroendocrine tumors revealing potential new therapy options and clarifying known resistance mechanisms. PMID:27064343

  14. Gene Expression Profiling of NF1-Associated and Sporadic Pilocytic Astrocytoma Identifies Aldehyde Dehydrogenase 1 Family, Member L1 (ALDH1L1) as an Underexpressed Candidate Biomarker in Aggressive Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Fausto J.; Giannini, Caterina; Asmann, Yan W.; Sharma, Mukesh K.; Perry, Arie; Tibbetts, Kathleen M.; Jenkins, Robert B.; Scheithauer, Bernd W.; Anant, Shrikant; Jenkins, Sarah; Eberhart, Charles G.; Sarkaria, Jann N.; Gutmann, David H.

    2009-01-01

    Pilocytic astrocytomas (PAs) are WHO grade I gliomas; they most often affect children and young adults and occur in patients with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF-1). To identify genes that are differentially expressed in sporadic (S-PA) versus NF-1-associated PAs (NF1-PAs) and those that might reflect differences in clinical behavior, we performed gene expression profiling using Affymetrix U133 Plus2.0 GeneChip arrays in 36 S-PAs and 11 NF1-PAs. Thirteen genes were over-expressed and another 13 genes were under-expressed in NF1-associated PAs relative to S-PAs. Immunohistochemical studies performed on 103 tumors, representing 2 independently generated tissue microarrays, confirmed the differential expression of CUGBP2 (p = 0.0014), RANBP9 (p = 0.0075), ITGAV1 (p = 0.0001), and INFGR1 (p = 0.024) proteins. One of the underexpressed genes, aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 family, member L1 (ALDH1L1), was also reduced in clinically aggressive compared to typical PAs (p = 0.01) and in PAs with increased cellularity and necrosis. Furthermore, in an additional independent set of tumors, weak to absent ALDH1L1 expression was found in 13/18 (72%) clinically aggressive PAs, in 8/9 (89%) PAs with pilomyxoid features, in 7/10 (70%) PAs with anaplastic transformation and in 16/21 (76%) diffusely infiltrating astrocytomas of various grades. In summary, we have identified a molecular signature that distinguishes NF1-PA from S-PA, and found that ALDH1L1 underexpression is associated with aggressive histology and/or biological behavior. PMID:19018242

  15. Depression in Diagnostic Subtypes of Delinquent Boys.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kashani, Javad H.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Delinquent boys (18 percent of 120) were found to be depressed when DSM III criteria for Major Depressive Disorder were utilized. Results indicated the prevalence of depression was not significantly more frequent among socialized, undersocialized, aggressive or nonaggressive subtypes. (Author)

  16. Aggressive rheumatoid arthritis registry in Italy. Characteristics of the early rheumatoid arthritis subtype among patients classified according to the ACR criteria.

    PubMed

    2003-01-01

    The Italian Society of Rheumatology in the year 2000 decided to sponsor the creation of a data base (Registry) of consecutive patients who fulfilled the diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) according to the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria. The registry is designed to collect data on the "aggressive" type of RA all over the country in order to determine the percentage of patients who satisfy the established criteria among incident cases of RA and to define the therapeutic approach according to the characteristics of the enrolled patients. Predefined criteria set up by eight recognized opinion leaders on the disease were used by all the centers to create the database. The GIARA registry (Gruppo Italiano Artrite Reumatoide Aggressiva) has now enrolled 706 patients who will be followed up for 24 months. They have been divided into two major subsets--patients with early (< 4 months' disease duration) and late (> 4 months) RA--with the aim of establishing whether differences in clinical, serological, radiographic and therapeutic (DMARDs: disease modifying antirheumatic drugs) parameters may distinguish the two subsets. The major conclusion of this preliminary analysis is that an overall tendency to undertreatment is discernable. PMID:14969064

  17. FZD7 drives in vitro aggressiveness in Stem-A subtype of ovarian cancer via regulation of non-canonical Wnt/PCP pathway

    PubMed Central

    Asad, M; Wong, M K; Tan, T Z; Choolani, M; Low, J; Mori, S; Virshup, D; Thiery, J P; Huang, R Y-J

    2014-01-01

    ), profilin 2 (PFN2), protocadherin 9 (PCDH9), protocadherin α1 (PCDHA1), protocadherin β17 pseudogene (PCDHB17), protocadherin β3 (PCDHB3), sprouty homolog 1 (SPRY1) and protein tyrosine kinase 7 (PTK7)) were found to be more highly expressed in Stem-A than non Stem-A subgroup of OC. Taken together, our results suggest that FZD7 might drive aggressiveness in Stem-A OC by regulating cell proliferation, cell cycle progression, maintenance of the Mes phenotype and cell migration via casein kinase 1ɛ-mediated non-canonical Wnt/PCP pathway. PMID:25032869

  18. Characterizing Aggressive Behavior with the Impulsive/Premeditated Aggression Scale among Adolescents with Conduct Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Mathias, Charles W.; Stanford, Matthew S.; Marsh, Dawn M.; Frick, Paul J.; Moeller, F. Gerard; Swann, Alan C.; Dougherty, Donald M.

    2007-01-01

    This study extends the use of the Impulsive/Premeditated Aggression Scale for subtyping aggressive behavior among adolescents with Conduct Disorder. Of the Conduct Disorder symptoms, aggression has the strongest prognostic and treatment implications. While aggression is a complex construct, convergent evidence supports a dichotomy of impulsive and premeditated aggressive subtypes that are qualitatively different from one another in terms of phenomenology and neurobiology. Previous attempts at measuring subtypes of aggression in children and adults are not clearly generalizable to adolescents. Sixty-six adolescents completed a questionnaire for characterizing aggression (Impulsive/Premeditated Aggression Scale), along with standard measures of personality and general functioning. Principal components analysis demonstrated two stable factors of aggression with good internal consistency and construct validity. Compared to the premeditated aggression factor, the impulsive aggression factor was associated with a broader range of personality, thought, emotional, and social problems. As in the adult and child literature, characterization of aggressive behavior into two subtypes appears to be relevant to understanding individual differences among adolescents with Conduct Disorder. PMID:17383014

  19. Weekly Paclitaxel/Carboplatin/Trastuzumab Therapy Improves Pathologic Complete Remission in Aggressive HER2-Positive Breast Cancers, Especially in Luminal-B Subtype, Compared With a Once-Every-3-Weeks Schedule

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Ke-Da; Liu, Guang-Yu; Chen, Can-Ming; Li, Jian-Wei; Wu, Jiong; Lu, Jin-Song; Shen, Zhen-Zhou

    2013-01-01

    Background. The efficacy and tolerability of two different schedules of paclitaxel, carboplatin, and trastuzumab (PCarH) for HER2-positive, locally aggressive (stage IIB–IIIC) breast cancers were evaluated in this phase II trial. Methods. Patients were randomly assigned to receive either weekly (12 doses over 16 weeks) or once-every-3-weeks (4 doses over 12 weeks) treatment. The primary endpoint was pathologic complete remission (pCR) in the breast and axilla. To detect an assumed 35% pCR absolute difference between the two schedules, a minimum of 26 assessable patients in each group was required (two-sided α = 0.05, β = 0.2). Results. A total of 56 patients were enrolled (weekly group, n = 29; every-3-weeks group, n = 27). In the intent-to-treat analysis, pCR in the breast/axilla were found in 31 patients (55%; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 41%–69%). Compared with the every-3-weeks schedule, the weekly administration achieved higher pCR (41% vs. 69%; p = .03). After adjustment for clinical and pathological factors, the weekly administration was more effective than the every-3-weeks schedule, with hazard ratio of 0.3 (95% CI: 0.1–0.9; p = .03). Interestingly, weekly administration resulted in high pCR rates in both luminal-B (HER2-positive) and ERBB2+ tumors (67% vs. 71%; p = .78), whereas luminal-B (HER2-positive) tumors benefited less from the every-3-weeks schedule compared with the ERBB2+ tumors (21% vs. 62%, p = .03). These results remain after multivariate adjustment, showing weekly administration was more effective in the luminal-B (HER2-positive) subgroup (p = .02) but not in the ERBB2+ subgroup (p = .50). Conclusion. A more frequent administration might improve the possibility of eradicating invasive cancer in the breast and axilla, especially in the luminal-B (HER2-positive) subtype. Further studies to validate our findings are warranted. PMID:23635560

  20. REACTIVE AND PROACTIVE AGGRESSION IN ADOLESCENT MALES

    PubMed Central

    Fite, Paula J.; Raine, Adrian; Stouthamer-Loeber, Magda; Loeber, Rolf; Pardini, Dustin A.

    2010-01-01

    There is limited knowledge about the unique relations between adolescent reactive and proactive aggression and later psychosocial adjustment in early adulthood. Accordingly, this study prospectively examined associations between adolescent (mean age = 16) reactive and proactive aggression and psychopathic features, antisocial behavior, negative emotionality, and substance use measured 10 years later in early adulthood (mean age = 26). Study questions were examined in a longitudinal sample of 335 adolescent males. Path analyses indicate that after controlling for the stability of the outcome and the overlap between the two subtypes of aggression, reactive aggression is uniquely associated with negative emotionality, specifically anxiety, in adulthood. In contrast, proactive aggression is uniquely associated with measures of adult psychopathic features and antisocial behavior in adulthood. Both reactive and proactive aggression uniquely predicted substance use in adulthood, but the substances varied by subtype of aggression. Implications for findings are discussed. PMID:20589225

  1. Expression of Neuroendocrine Markers in Different Molecular Subtypes of Breast Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wachter, David L.; Hartmann, Arndt; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Fasching, Peter A.; Hein, Alexander; Bayer, Christian M.; Agaimy, Abbas

    2014-01-01

    Background. Carcinomas of the breast with neuroendocrine features are incorporated in the World Health Organization classification since 2003 and include well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumors, poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinomas/small cell carcinomas, and invasive breast carcinomas with neuroendocrine differentiation. Neuroendocrine differentiation is known to be more common in certain low-grade histologic special types and has been shown to mainly cluster to the molecular (intrinsic) luminal A subtype. Methods. We analyzed the frequency of neuroendocrine differentiation in different molecular subtypes of breast carcinomas of no histologic special type using immunohistochemical stains with specific neuroendocrine markers (chromogranin A and synaptophysin). Results. We found neuroendocrine differentiation in 20% of luminal B-like carcinomas using current WHO criteria (at least 50% of tumor cells positive for synaptophysin or chromogranin A). In contrast, no neuroendocrine differentiation was seen in luminal A-like, HER2 amplified and triple-negative carcinomas. Breast carcinomas with neuroendocrine differentiation presented with advanced stage disease and showed aggressive behavior. Conclusions. We conclude that neuroendocrine differentiation is more common than assumed in poorly differentiated luminal B-like carcinomas. Use of specific neuroendocrine markers is thus encouraged in this subtype to enhance detection of neuroendocrine differentiation and hence characterize the biological and therapeutic relevance of this finding in future studies. PMID:24701575

  2. Media Violence Associations with the Form and Function of Aggression among Elementary School Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gentile, Douglas A.; Mathieson, Lindsay C.; Crick, Nicki R.

    2011-01-01

    Although the association between media violence exposure (MVE) and physical aggression (PA) has been well studied, few studies have examined the link between MVE and other subtypes of aggression. The purpose of this study was to examine the relation between MVE and reactive and proactive subtypes of both PA and relational aggression (RA). Six…

  3. Behavioral Subtypes of Attention Deficit Disorder.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dykman, Roscoe A.; Ackerman, Peggy T.

    1993-01-01

    This article reviews research on three behavioral subtypes of attention deficit disorder (ADD): (1) without hyperactivity (ADD/WO), (2) with hyperactivity, and (3) with hyperactivity and aggression (ADDHA). Children with ADDHA appear to be at increased risk of having oppositional and conduct disorders, whereas children with ADD/WO show symptoms…

  4. Rampant centrosome amplification underlies more aggressive disease course of triple negative breast cancers

    PubMed Central

    Pannu, Vaishali; Mittal, Karuna; Cantuaria, Guilherme; Reid, Michelle D.; Li, Xiaoxian; Donthamsetty, Shashikiran; McBride, Michelle; Klimov, Sergey; Osan, Remus; Gupta, Meenakshi V.; Rida, Padmashree C.G.; Aneja, Ritu

    2015-01-01

    Centrosome amplification (CA), a cell-biological trait, characterizes pre-neoplastic and pre-invasive lesions and is associated with tumor aggressiveness. Recent studies suggest that CA leads to malignant transformation and promotes invasion in mammary epithelial cells. Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC), a histologically-aggressive subtype shows high recurrence, metastases, and mortality rates. Since TNBC and non-TNBC follow variable kinetics of metastatic progression, they constitute a novel test bed to explore if severity and nature of CA can distinguish them apart. We quantitatively assessed structural and numerical centrosomal aberrations for each patient sample in a large-cohort of grade-matched TNBC (n = 30) and non-TNBC (n = 98) cases employing multi-color confocal imaging. Our data establish differences in incidence and severity of CA between TNBC and non-TNBC cell lines and clinical specimens. We found strong correlation between CA and aggressiveness markers associated with metastasis in 20 pairs of grade-matched TNBC and non-TNBC specimens (p < 0.02). Time-lapse imaging of MDA-MB-231 cells harboring amplified centrosomes demonstrated enhanced migratory ability. Our study bridges a vital knowledge gap by pinpointing that CA underlies breast cancer aggressiveness. This previously unrecognized organellar inequality at the centrosome level may allow early-risk prediction and explain higher tumor aggressiveness and mortality rates in TNBC patients. PMID:25868856

  5. IMP3 can predict aggressive behaviour of lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Lung cancer most often presents as an inoperable tumour and the diagnosis is usually performed on a small biopsy/cytology specimen. In the group of non small cell lung cancer - not otherwise specified, adenocarcinoma phenotype can be determined immunohistochemically using TTF-1 and Napsin A. Expression of oncofetal protein IMP3 in human cancer is associated with poor differentiation and aggressive behaviour. In the present study expression of IMP3 was correlated with expression of TTF-1 and Napsin A, histological subtype and clinical stage of lung adenocarcinoma. We were interested whether distant metastases are associated with IMP3 overexpression, regardless of the histologic subtype of adenocarcinoma. Methods In retrospective study, consecutive series of 105 patients with advanced lung adenocarcinoma diagnosed from 2006 to 2009 in Clinical Hospital Center Split, Croatia, were analysed. Clinical data were collected from the Pulmology Department and time of death from the Mortality Registry. Paraffin blocks of bronchoscopic biopsies were collected from the Institute of Pathology and 15 cases excluded from the analysis due to insufficient material. Expression of IMP3, Napsin A and TTF-1 were analysed by indirect enzyme immunohistochemistry. Statistical analysis was performed and P values less than 0.05 considered significant. Results Of 90 patients, 71 (78%) were males and 19 (22%) females. Median age for males was 61.5 years (min-max 43–83) and for females 61 years (min-max 44–86). Pleural effusion was found in 15 (16.6%) and distant metastases in 45 (50%) cases. According to histological subtypes, there were 34 acinar, 2 lepidic, 2 papillary and 52 solid subtypes. IMP3 overexpression was found in 63 cases (70%) and was correlated with solid subtype (P = 0.002) and negative/weak Napsin A expression (P = 0.004). Strong Napsin A expression correlated with TTF-1 expression (P = 0.003) and lower histological grades (P = 0.031). Patients

  6. Myoepithelial differentiation in cribriform, tubular and solid pattern of adenoid cystic carcinoma: A potential involvement in histological grading and prognosis.

    PubMed

    Du, Fei; Zhou, Chuan-Xiang; Gao, Yan

    2016-06-01

    Adenoid cystic carcinoma (AdCC) is known as a biphasic tumor composed of ductal and myoepithelial cells. The present study aimed to evaluate the amount and distribution of the myoepithelial cells in cribriform, tubular and solid subtypes of AdCC and analyze their relationship with histological grading and prognosis. A panel of myoepithelial markers including CK5/6, p63, p40, D2-40, calponin, α-SMA, S-100, and vimentin, together with a luminal cell marker CK7, and Ki-67 were used for immunohistochemical study in 109 AdCCs that included 38 cribriform, 36 tubular and 35 solid subtypes. The myoepithelial cells were labeled and found lined cystic-like paces, located at the periphery of the cribriform arrangements, and presented at the nonluminal cells of the two-layered tubular structures, while absent or dispersed in the solid pattern. Meantime, the solid subtype presented a higher proliferation rate assessed by mitotic count and Ki-67 labeling index, followed by poorer overall survival and recurrent-free survival. Furthermore, CK7 expression was found higher in solid pattern than in cribriform-tubular subtype, which showed negative correlation with the myoepithelial markers including D2-40, Calponin, α-SMA, p63, p40 and vimentin. The solid pattern of AdCC showed gland differentiation but loss of myoepithelial differentiation with a higher proliferation and more aggressiveness as well as poorer prognosis compared with the cribriform-tubular subtypes, which implies that loss of MEC differentiation might contribute to the poor prognosis of the solid subtype of AdCC. However, further studies are required to clarify its exact role in AdCC progression. PMID:27180054

  7. Posttranscriptional deregulation of signaling pathways in meningioma subtypes by differential expression of miRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, Nicole; Kim, Yoo-Jin; Mueller, Sabine C.; Backes, Christina; Werner, Tamara V.; Galata, Valentina; Sartorius, Elke; Bohle, Rainer M.; Keller, Andreas; Meese, Eckart

    2015-01-01

    Background Micro (mi)RNAs are key regulators of gene expression and offer themselves as biomarkers for cancer development and progression. Meningioma is one of the most frequent primary intracranial tumors. As of yet, there are limited data on the role of miRNAs in meningioma of different histological subtypes and the affected signaling pathways. Methods In this study, we compared expression of 1205 miRNAs in different meningioma grades and histological subtypes using microarrays and independently validated deregulation of selected miRNAs with quantitative real-time PCR. Clinical utility of a subset of miRNAs as biomarkers for World Health Organization (WHO) grade II meningioma based on quantitative real-time data was tested. Potential targets of deregulated miRNAs were discovered with an in silico analysis. Results We identified 13 miRNAs deregulated between different subtypes of benign meningiomas, and 52 miRNAs deregulated in anaplastic meningioma compared with benign meningiomas. Known and putative target genes of deregulated miRNAs include genes involved in epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition for benign meningiomas, and Wnt, transforming growth factor–β, and vascular endothelial growth factor signaling for higher-grade meningiomas. Furthermore, a 4-miRNA signature (miR-222, -34a*, -136, and -497) shows promise as a biomarker differentiating WHO grade II from grade I meningiomas with an area under the curve of 0.75. Conclusions Our data provide novel insights into the contribution of miRNAs to the phenotypic spectrum in benign meningiomas. By deregulating translation of genes belonging to signaling pathways known to be important for meningioma genesis and progression, miRNAs provide a second in line amplification of growth promoting cellular signals. MiRNAs as biomarkers for diagnosis of aggressive meningiomas might prove useful and should be explored further in a prospective manner. PMID:25681310

  8. Associations between Parental Control and Children's Overt and Relational Aggression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuppens, Sofie; Grietens, Hans; Onghena, Patrick; Michiels, Daisy

    2009-01-01

    The present study examined specialized associations between parental control and child aggression in a sample of 600 8- to 10-years old children. Parental control dimensions and aggression subtypes were assessed using multiple informants (i.e. children, mothers, fathers, peers, and teachers). In line with expectations, parental physical punishment…

  9. The importance of narcissism in predicting proactive and reactive aggression in moderately to highly aggressive children.

    PubMed

    Barry, Tammy D; Thompson, Alice; Barry, Christopher T; Lochman, John E; Adler, Kristy; Hill, Kwoneathia

    2007-01-01

    The present study examined the importance of psychopathy-linked narcissism in predicting proactive and reactive aggression and conduct problems in a group of 160 moderately to highly aggressive children (mean age of 10 years, 9 months). Children's self-report of self-esteem and parent and teacher report of dimensions of psychopathy [narcissism, callous-unemotional (CU) traits, and impulsivity], proactive and reactive aggression, and conduct problems were collected. Composites of parent and teacher ratings of children's behavior were used. Consistent with the study's hypotheses, narcissism predicted unique variance in both proactive and reactive aggression, even when controlling for other dimensions of psychopathy, demographic variables associated with narcissism, and the alternative subtype of aggression. As hypothesized, impulsivity was significantly associated with only reactive aggression. CU traits were not related to proactive or reactive aggression once the control variables were entered. All dimensions of psychopathy predicted unique variance in conduct problems. Consistent with prediction, narcissism was not significantly related to general self-esteem, providing support that narcissism and self-esteem are different constructs. Furthermore, narcissism and self-esteem related differentially to proactive aggression, reactive aggression, and conduct problems. Furthermore, narcissism but not self-esteem accounted for unique variance in aggression and conduct problems. The importance of narcissism in the prediction of aggressive behaviors and clinical implications are discussed. PMID:17444525

  10. A longitudinal study of forms and functions of aggressive behavior in early childhood.

    PubMed

    Murray-Close, Dianna; Ostrov, Jamie M

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the distinct forms (i.e., physical and relational) and functions (i.e., proactive and reactive) of aggressive behavior during early childhood (n = 101; M age = 45.09 months). Forms, but not functions, of aggressive behavior were stable over time. A number of contributors to aggression were associated with distinct subtypes of aggressive behavior. Females and socially dominant children were more relationally aggressive and older children were less physically aggressive than their peers. Longitudinal analyses indicated that social dominance predicted decreases in physical aggression and peer exclusion predicted increases in relational aggression. Overall, the results provide support for the distinction between subtypes of aggression in early childhood. PMID:19489906

  11. Aggressive Behavior in a Sample of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farmer, Cristan A.; Aman, Michael G.

    2011-01-01

    Little is known about the manifestation of aggressive behavior in children with autism, although it is commonly cited as a significant problem. Existing reports in autism do not emphasize subtypes of aggression, whereas distinguishing forms of aggression is commonplace in the typically developing literature. This study compared a sample of 121…

  12. Media violence, physical aggression, and relational aggression in school age children: a short-term longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Gentile, Douglas A; Coyne, Sarah; Walsh, David A

    2011-01-01

    Many studies have shown that media violence has an effect on children's subsequent aggression. This study expands upon previous research in three directions: (1) by examining several subtypes of aggression (verbal, relational, and physical), (2) by measuring media violence exposure (MVE) across three types of media, and (3) by measuring MVE and aggressive/prosocial behaviors at two points in time during the school year. In this study, 430 3rd-5th grade children, their peers, and their teachers were surveyed. Children's consumption of media violence early in the school year predicted higher verbally aggressive behavior, higher relationally aggressive behavior, higher physically aggressive behavior, and less prosocial behavior later in the school year. Additionally, these effects were mediated by hostile attribution bias. The findings are interpreted within the theoretical framework of the General Aggression Model. PMID:21274855

  13. Aggressive Metaplastic Carcinoma of the Breast with Osteoclastic Giant Cells

    PubMed Central

    Khong, Kathleen; Zhang, Yanhong; Tomic, Mary; Lindfors, Karen; Aminololama-Shakeri, Shadi

    2015-01-01

    Metaplastic carcinoma of the breast is an uncommon type of malignancy that is aggressive but can mimic other benign breast neoplastic processes on imaging. We present a case of a young female patient who presented with a rapidly progressing metaplastic carcinoma with osteoclastic giant cells subtype. There have been only very rare published reports of this pathologic subtype of metaplastic carcinoma containing osteoclastic giant cells. PMID:26629304

  14. Subtyping Stuttering II

    PubMed Central

    Seery, Carol Hubbard; Watkins, Ruth V.; Mangelsdorf, Sarah C.; Shigeto, Aya

    2007-01-01

    This paper is the second in a series of two articles exploring subtypes of stuttering, and it addresses the question of whether and how language ability and temperament variables may be relevant to the study of subtypes within the larger population of children who stutter. Despite observations of varied profiles among young children who stutter, efforts to identify and characterize subtypes of stuttering have had limited influence on theoretical or clinical understanding of the disorder. This manuscript briefly highlights research on language and temperament in young children who stutter, and considers whether the results can provide guidance for efforts to more effectively investigate and elucidate subtypes in childhood stuttering. Issues from the literature that appear relevant to research on stuttering subtypes include: (a) the question of whether stuttering is best characterized as categorical or continuous; (b) interpretation of individual differences in skills and profiles; and (c) the fact that, during the preschool years, the interaction among domains such as language and temperament are changing very rapidly, resulting in large differences in developmental profiles within relatively brief chronological age periods. PMID:17825669

  15. CONCEPT ANALYSIS: AGGRESSION

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jianghong

    2006-01-01

    The concept of aggression is important to nursing because further knowledge of aggression can help generate a better theoretical model to drive more effective intervention and prevention approaches. This paper outlines a conceptual analysis of aggression. First, the different forms of aggression are reviewed, including the clinical classification and the stimulus-based classification. Then the manifestations and measurement of aggression are described. Finally, the causes and consequences of aggression are outlined. It is argued that a better understanding of aggression and the causal factors underlying it are essential for learning how to prevent negative aggression in the future. PMID:15371137

  16. Concept analysis: aggression.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianghong

    2004-01-01

    The concept of aggression is important to nursing because further knowledge of aggression can help generate a better theoretical model to drive more effective intervention and prevention approaches. This paper outlines a conceptual analysis of aggression. First, the different forms of aggression are reviewed, including the clinical classification and the stimulus-based classification. Then the manifestations and measurement of aggression are described. Finally, the causes and consequences of aggression are outlined. It is argued that a better understanding of aggression and the causal factors underlying it are essential for learning how to prevent negative aggression in the future. PMID:15371137

  17. Developmental Trajectories of Physical and Indirect Aggression from Late Childhood to Adolescence: Sex Differences and Outcomes in Emerging Adulthood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cleverley, Kristin; Szatmari, Peter; Vaillancourt, Tracy; Boyle, Michael; Lipman, Ellen

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Two common subtypes of aggression (physical and indirect) have been shown to develop concurrently throughout childhood and to uniquely predict maladjustment. However, nothing is known about psychiatric outcomes of joint trajectories of physical aggression (PA) and indirect aggression (IA) in emerging adulthood. Method: Trajectories of…

  18. Behavioral and Pharmacogenetics of Aggressive Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Aki; Quadros, Isabel M.; de Almeida, Rosa M. M.; Miczek, Klaus A.

    2013-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) has long been considered as a key transmitter in the neurocircuitry controlling aggression. Impaired regulation of each subtype of 5-HT receptor, 5-HT transporter, synthetic and metabolic enzymes has been linked particularly to impulsive aggression. The current summary focuses mostly on recent findings from pharmacological and genetic studies. The pharmacological treatments and genetic manipulations or polymorphisms of a specific target (e.g., 5-HT1A receptor) can often result in inconsistent results on aggression, due to “phasic” effects of pharmacological agents vs “trait”-like effects of genetic manipulations. Also, the local administration of a drug using the intracranial microinjection technique has shown that activation of specific subtypes of 5-HT receptors (5-HT1A and 5-HT1B) in mesocorticolimbic areas can reduce species-typical and other aggressive behaviors, but the same receptors in the medial prefrontal cortex or septal area promote escalated forms of aggression. Thus, there are receptor populations in specific brain regions that preferentially modulate specific types of aggression. Genetic studies have shown important gene × environment interactions; it is likely that the polymorphisms in the genes of 5-HT transporters (e.g., MAO A) or rate-limiting synthetic and metabolic enzymes of 5-HT determine the vulnerability to adverse environmental factors that escalate aggression. We also discuss the interaction between the 5-HT system and other systems. Modulation of 5-HT neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus by GABA, glutamate, and CRF profoundly regulate aggressive behaviors. Also, interactions of the 5-HT system with other neuropeptides (arginine vasopressin, oxytocin, neuropeptide Y, opioid) have emerged as important neurobiological determinants of aggression. Studies of aggression in genetically modified mice identified several molecules that affect the 5-HT system directly (e.g., Tph2, 5-HT1B, 5-HT transporter, Pet1, MAOA) or

  19. The clinical usefulness of the new LPE specifier for subtyping adolescents with conduct disorder in the DSM 5.

    PubMed

    Jambroes, Tijs; Jansen, Lucres M C; Vermeiren, Robert R J M; Doreleijers, Theo A H; Colins, Olivier F; Popma, Arne

    2016-08-01

    In DSM 5, conduct disorder (CD) has been expanded with a new specifier 'with Limited Prosocial Emotions' (LPE) in addition to the age-of-onset (AoO) subtyping, and is thought to identify a severe antisocial subgroup of CD. However, research in clinical practice has been scarce. Therefore, the current study will examine differences in clinical symptoms between subtypes of CD, based on both subtyping schemes. Subsequently, it will investigate whether the LPE specifier explains unique variance in aggression, added to the AoO subtyping. A sample of 145 adolescents with CD (51 % male, mean age 15.0) from a closed treatment institution participated in this study. CD diagnoses and AoO subtype were assessed using a structured diagnostic interview. The LPE specifier was assessed using the callous-unemotional dimension of the Youth Psychopathy Traits Inventory (YPI). Self-reported proactive and reactive aggression, rule-breaking behavior and internalizing problems within the subtypes were compared. Youth with childhood-onset CD and LPE showed significantly more aggression than adolescent-onset CD without LPE (proactive aggression: F = 3.1, p < 0.05, reactive aggression: F = 3.7, p < 0.05). Hierarchical regression revealed that the LPE specifier uniquely explained 7 % of the variance in reactive aggression, additionally to the AoO subtyping. For proactive aggression, the interaction between AoO and the LPE added 4.5 % to the explained variance. Although the LPE specifier may help to identify a more aggressive subtype of CD in adolescents, the incremental utility seems to be limited. Therefore, clinical relevance of the LPE specifier in high-risk adolescent samples still needs to be investigated thoroughly. PMID:26725044

  20. Interpersonal aggression victimization within casual sexual relationships and experiences.

    PubMed

    Klipfel, Katherine M; Claxton, Shannon E; van Dulmen, Manfred H M

    2014-02-01

    The frequent occurrence of aggression within committed romantic relationships is well documented. However, little is known about experiences of interpersonal aggression within casual sexual relationships and experiences. This study aimed to describe the occurrence of emotional, physical, and sexual aggression victimization within committed romantic relationships, casual dating relationships, friends-with-benefit relationships, booty-calls, and one-night stands. College students (N = 172) provided data regarding the lifetime occurrence of emotional, physical, and sexual aggression across different forms of casual sexual relationships and experiences (friends-with-benefits, booty-call, casual dating, one-night stands, committed relationships). Emotional, physical, and sexual subtypes of aggression were reported across all casual sexual relationships and experiences. While a higher percentage of individuals who had been involved in committed relationships reported experiencing at least one form of aggression (approximately 69%), prevalence of at least one form of aggression ranged from approximately 31% to 36% for the various casual sexual relationships/experiences. Across relationships/experiences, emotional and sexual aggression were more common than physical aggression. The findings from this study indicate that emotional, physical, and sexual aggression occur across types of relationships and experiences. Thus, the current study underscores the importance of considering casual dating, friends-with-benefits, booty-calls, and one-night stands when assessing interpersonal aggression. PMID:24176987

  1. Age-of-Onset or Behavioral Sub-Types? A Prospective Comparison of Two Approaches to Characterizing the Heterogeneity within Antisocial Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burt, S. Alexandra; Donnellan, M. Brent; Iacono, William G.; McGue, Matt

    2011-01-01

    There are two common approaches to sub-typing the well-documented heterogeneity within antisocial behavior: age-of-onset (i.e., childhood-onset versus adolescence-onset; see "Moffitt" 1993) and behavioral (i.e., physical aggression versus non-aggressive rule-breaking). These approaches appear to be associated, such that aggression is more…

  2. Pathological Gambling Subtypes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vachon, David D.; Bagby, R. Michael

    2009-01-01

    Although pathological gambling (PG) is regarded in the 4th edition of the "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders" (American Psychiatric Association, 1994) as a unitary diagnostic construct, it is likely composed of distinct subtypes. In the current report, the authors used cluster analyses of personality traits with a…

  3. Racial Differences in Three Major NHL Subtypes: Descriptive Epidemiology

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Danhui; Ma, Shuangge

    2014-01-01

    Background NHL (non-Hodgkin lymphoma) consists of over 60 subtypes, ranging from slow-growing to very aggressive. The three largest subtypes are DLBCL (diffuse large B-cell lymphoma), FL (follicular lymphoma), and CLL/SLL (chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma). For each subtype, different racial groups have different presentations, etiologies, and prognosis patterns. Methods SEER (Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results) data on DLBCL, FL, and CLL/SLL patients diagnosed between 1992 and 2010 were analyzed. Racial groups studied included NHW (non-Hispanic whites), HW (Hispanic whites), blacks, and API (Asians and Pacific Islanders). Patient characteristics, age-adjusted incidence rate, and survival were compared across races. Stratification and multivariate analysis were conducted. Results There are significant racial differences for patients’ characteristics, including gender, age at diagnosis, stage, lymph site, and age, and the patterns vary across subtypes. NHWs have the highest incidence rates for all three subtypes, followed by HWs (DLBCL and FL) and blacks (CLL/SLL). The dependence of the incidence rate on age and gender varies across subtypes. For all three subtypes, NHWs have the highest five-year relative survival rates, followed by HWs. When stratified by stage, racial difference is significant in multiple multivariate Cox regression analyses. Conclusions Racial differences exist among DLBCL, FL, and CLL/SLL patients in the U.S. in terms of characteristics, incidence, and survival. The patterns vary across subtypes. More data collection and analysis are needed to more comprehensively describe and interpret the across-race and subtype differences. PMID:25560974

  4. Clinico-Histologic Conferences: Histology and Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Phyllis A.; Friedman, Erica S.

    2012-01-01

    Providing a context for learning information and requiring learners to teach specific content has been demonstrated to enhance knowledge retention. To enhance students' appreciation of the role of science and specifically histology in clinical reasoning, disease diagnosis, and treatment, a new teaching format was created to provide clinical…

  5. Ectopic Activation of Germline and Placental Genes Identifies Aggressive Metastasis-Prone Lung Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Rousseaux, Sophie; Debernardi, Alexandra; Jacquiau, Baptiste; Vitte, Anne-Laure; Vesin, Aurélien; Nagy-Mignotte, Hélène; Moro-Sibilot, Denis; Brichon, Pierre-Yves; Lantuejoul, Sylvie; Hainaut, Pierre; Laffaire, Julien; de Reyniès, Aurélien; Beer, David G.; Timsit, Jean-François; Brambilla, Christian; Brambilla, Elisabeth; Khochbin, Saadi

    2016-01-01

    Activation of normally silent tissue-specific genes and the resulting cell “identity crisis” are the unexplored consequences of malignant epigenetic reprogramming. We designed a strategy for investigating this reprogramming, which consisted of identifying a large number of tissue-restricted genes that are epigenetically silenced in normal somatic cells and then detecting their expression in cancer. This approach led to the demonstration that large-scale “off-context” gene activations systematically occur in a variety of cancer types. In our series of 293 lung tumors, we identified an ectopic gene expression signature associated with a subset of highly aggressive tumors, which predicted poor prognosis independently of the TNM (tumor size, node positivity, and metastasis) stage or histological subtype. The ability to isolate these tumors allowed us to reveal their common molecular features characterized by the acquisition of embryonic stem cell/germ cell gene expression profiles and the down-regulation of immune response genes. The methodical recognition of ectopic gene activations in cancer cells could serve as a basis for gene signature–guided tumor stratification, as well as for the discovery of oncogenic mechanisms, and expand the understanding of the biology of very aggressive tumors. PMID:23698379

  6. Subtyping adolescents with bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Chen, Eunice Y; Le Grange, Daniel

    2007-12-01

    Cluster analyses of eating disorder patients have yielded a "dietary-depressive" subtype, typified by greater negative affect, and a "dietary" subtype, typified by dietary restraint. This study aimed to replicate these findings in an adolescent sample with bulimia nervosa (BN) from a randomized controlled trial and to examine the validity and reliability of this methodology. In the sample of BN adolescents (N=80), cluster analysis revealed a "dietary-depressive" subtype (37.5%) and a "dietary" subtype (62.5%) using the Beck Depression Inventory, Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale and Eating Disorder Examination Restraint subscale. The "dietary-depressive" subtype compared to the "dietary" subtype was significantly more likely to: (1) report co-occurring disorders, (2) greater eating and weight concerns, and (3) less vomiting abstinence at post-treatment (all p's<.05). The cluster analysis based on "dietary" and "dietary-depressive" subtypes appeared to have concurrent validity, yielding more distinct groups than subtyping by vomiting frequency. In order to assess the reliability of the subtyping scheme, a larger sample of adolescents with mixed eating and weight disorders in an outpatient eating disorder clinic (N=149) was subtyped, yielding similar subtypes. These results support the validity and reliability of the subtyping strategy in two adolescent samples. PMID:17949682

  7. An Aggressive Retroperitoneal Fibromatosis

    PubMed Central

    Campara, Zoran; Spasic, Aleksandar; Aleksic, Predrag; Milev, Bosko

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Aggressive fibromatosis (AF) is a heterogeneous group of mesenchymal tumors that have locally infiltrative growth and a tendency to relapse. The clinical picture is often conditioned by the obstruction of the ureter or small intestine. Diagnosis is based on clinical, radiological and histological parameters. A case report: We report a case of male patient, aged 35 years, with the retroperitoneal fibromatosis. He reported to the physician because of frequent urination with the feeling of pressure and pain. Computed tomography revealed the tumor mass on the front wall of the bladder with diameter of 70mm with signs of infiltration of the musculature of the anterior abdominal wall. Endoscopic transurethral biopsy showed proliferative lesion binders by type of fibromatosis. The tumor was surgically removed in a classical way. The patient feels well and has no recurrence thirty-six months after the operative procedure. Conclusion: The complete tumor resection is the therapeutic choice for the primary tumor as well as for a relapse. PMID:27147794

  8. Triple positive breast cancer: a distinct subtype?

    PubMed

    Vici, Patrizia; Pizzuti, Laura; Natoli, Clara; Gamucci, Teresa; Di Lauro, Luigi; Barba, Maddalena; Sergi, Domenico; Botti, Claudio; Michelotti, Andrea; Moscetti, Luca; Mariani, Luciano; Izzo, Fiorentino; D'Onofrio, Loretta; Sperduti, Isabella; Conti, Francesca; Rossi, Valentina; Cassano, Alessandra; Maugeri-Saccà, Marcello; Mottolese, Marcella; Marchetti, Paolo

    2015-02-01

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease, and within the HER-2 positive subtype this is highly exemplified by the presence of substantial phenotypical and clinical heterogeneity, mostly related to hormonal receptor (HR) expression. It is well known how HER-2 positivity is commonly associated with a more aggressive tumor phenotype and decreased overall survival and, moreover, with a reduced benefit from endocrine treatment. Preclinical studies corroborate the role played by functional crosstalks between HER-2 and estrogen receptor (ER) signaling in endocrine resistance and, more recently, the activation of ER signaling is emerging as a possible mechanism of resistance to HER-2 blocking agents. Indeed, HER-2 positive breast cancer heterogeneity has been suggested to underlie the variability of response not only to endocrine treatments, but also to HER-2 blocking agents. Among HER-2 positive tumors, HR status probably defines two distinct subtypes, with dissimilar clinical behavior and different sensitivity to anticancer agents. The triple positive subtype, namely, ER/PgR/Her-2 positive tumors, could be considered the subset which most closely resembles the HER-2 negative/HR positive tumors, with substantial differences in biology and clinical outcome. We argue on whether in this subgroup the "standard" treatment may be considered, in selected cases, i.e., small tumors, low tumor burden, high expression of both hormonal receptors, an overtreatment. This article review the existing literature on biologic and clinical data concerning the HER-2/ER/PgR positive tumors, in an attempt to better define the HER-2 subtypes and to optimize the use of HER-2 targeted agents, chemotherapy and endocrine treatments in the various subsets. PMID:25554445

  9. Aggression among Children with ADHD, Anxiety, or Co-Occurring Symptoms: Competing Exacerbation and Attenuation Hypotheses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, Stephen P.; Luebbe, Aaron M.; Stoppelbein, Laura; Greening, Leilani; Fite, Paula J.

    2012-01-01

    Competing hypotheses for explaining the role of anxiety in the relation between attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms and childhood aggression were evaluated. Two studies tested whether anxiety exacerbated, attenuated, or had no effect on the relation between ADHD and aggression subtypes among psychiatrically hospitalized…

  10. The Role of Peer Rejection in the Link between Reactive Aggression and Academic Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fite, Paula J.; Hendrickson, Michelle; Rubens, Sonia L.; Gabrielli, Joy; Evans, Spencer

    2013-01-01

    Background: There is substantial evidence to suggest that aggressive behavior is associated with poor academic performance in school-aged children. However, less is known about how different subtypes of aggression are related to academic performance and what variables may account for this association. Objective: The current study examined unique…

  11. Aggression and the Risk for Suicidal Behaviors among Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greening, Leilani; Stoppelbein, Laura; Luebbe, Aaron; Fite, Paula J.

    2010-01-01

    Two subtypes of aggression--reactive and proactive--were examined to see how they relate to suicidal behaviors among young children admitted for acute psychiatric inpatient care. The children and their parents completed self-report questionnaires/interviews. Regression analyses revealed that depressed girls who scored higher on reactive aggression…

  12. Stability of arithmetic disability subtypes.

    PubMed

    Silver, C H; Pennett, H D; Black, J L; Fair, G W; Balise, R R

    1999-01-01

    Cross-sectional research has identified subtypes of children with learning disabilities who may have distinctive cognitive ability patterns. This study examined the stability over 19 months of academic subtyping classifications for 80 children ages 9 to 13 representing four subtypes of arithmetic disabilities (AD), using three criteria for learning disability identification. Approximately half of the sample retained AD regardless of identification method. Children with pervasive deficits in arithmetic, reading, and spelling displayed the greatest subtype stability. Only one third of the children with the other subtypes, including those with isolated arithmetic deficits, retained their original subtypes. Thus, drawing conclusions and making recommendations based on academic subtyping at a single point in time may be unwise. PMID:15499712

  13. What Is Aggressive Violence?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singer, Dorothy G.; Luca, Wendy

    1985-01-01

    Responses to a questionnaire dealing with what constitutes aggressive violence on television indicate that health care providers tend to rate items describing acts on television as more aggressive than television writers, producers, and executives do. (MBR)

  14. Histologic diagnosis of sodomy.

    PubMed

    Paparo, G P; Siegel, H

    1979-10-01

    A case of homicidal strangulation with sodomy is presented. Without the use of a simple routine histologic technique, the diagnosis of sodomy could not have been unequivocally substantiated. PMID:541642

  15. Neurobiological Patterns of Aggression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, Robert D.

    1993-01-01

    Describes chemical model for patterns of aggressive behavior. Addresses cultural, neurobiological, and cognitive factors that affect violent children. Identifies five patterns of aggression (overaroused, impulsive, affective, predatory, and instrumental) and examines these dimensions of aggression for each pattern: baseline, precipitators,…

  16. Relational aggression in marriage.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Jason S; Nelson, David A; Yorgason, Jeremy B; Harper, James M; Ashton, Ruth Hagmann; Jensen, Alexander C

    2010-01-01

    Drawing from developmental theories of relational aggression, this article reports on a study designed to identify if spouses use relationally aggressive tactics when dealing with conflict in their marriage and the association of these behaviors with marital outcomes. Using a sample of 336 married couples (672 spouses), results revealed that the majority of couples reported that relationally aggressive behaviors, such as social sabotage and love withdrawal, were a part of their marital dynamics, at least to some degree. Gender comparisons of partner reports of their spouse's behavior revealed that wives were significantly more likely to be relationally aggressive than husbands. Structural equation modeling demonstrated that relational aggression is associated with lower levels of marital quality and greater marital instability for both husbands and wives. Implications are drawn for the use of relational aggression theory in the future study of couple conflict and marital aggression. PMID:20698028

  17. Classification of lung cancer histology by gold nanoparticle sensors

    PubMed Central

    Barash, Orna; Peled, Nir; Tisch, Ulrike; Bunn, Paul A.; Hirsch, Fred R.; Haick, Hossam

    2016-01-01

    We propose a nanomedical device for the classification of lung cancer (LC) histology. The device profiles volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the headspace of (subtypes of) LC cells, using gold nanoparticle (GNP) sensors that are suitable for detecting LC-specific patterns of VOC profiles, as determined by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry analysis. Analyzing the GNP sensing signals by support vector machine allowed significant discrimination between (i) LC and healthy cells; (ii) small cell LC and non–small cell LC; and between (iii) two subtypes of non–small cell LC: adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma. The discriminative power of the GNP sensors was then linked with the chemical nature and composition of the headspace VOCs of each LC state. These proof-of-concept findings could totally revolutionize LC screening and diagnosis, and might eventually allow early and differential diagnosis of LC subtypes with detectable or unreachable lung nodules. PMID:22033081

  18. Stability of Arithmetic Disability Subtypes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silver, Cheryl H.; Pennett, H. Deborah-Lynne; Black, Jeffrey L.; Fair, George W.; Balise, Raymond R.

    1999-01-01

    A study examined the stability over 19 months of academic subtyping classification of 80 children (ages 9 to 13) representing four subtypes of arithmetic disabilities (AD). Approximately half of the sample retained AD regardless of identification method. Children with deficits in arithmetic, reading, and spelling disabilities exhibited the…

  19. Aggressive Lymphoma "Sarcoma Mimicker" Originating in the Gluteus and Adductor Muscles: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Elkourashy, Sarah A; Nashwan, Abdulqadir J; Alam, Syed I; Ammar, Adham A; El Sayed, Ahmed M; Omri, Halima El; Yassin, Mohamed A

    2016-01-01

    Extranodal lymphoma (ENL) occurs in approximately 30%-40% of all patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma and has been described in almost all organs and tissues. However, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma is the most common histological subtype of non-Hodgkin lymphoma, primarily arising in the retroperitoneal region. In this article, we report a rare case of an adult male diagnosed with primary diffuse large B-cell lymphoma of the gluteal and adductor muscles with aggressive bone involvement. All appropriate radiological and histopathological studies were done for diagnosis and staging. After discussion with the lymphoma multidisciplinary team, it was agreed to start on R-CHOP protocol (rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin (Adriamycin), vincristine (Oncovin®), and prednisone) as the standard of care, which was later changed to R-CODOX-M/R-IVAC protocol (rituximab, cyclophosphamide, vincristine (Oncovin®), doxorubicin, and high-dose methotrexate alternating with rituximab, ifosfamide, etoposide, and high-dose cytarabine) due to inadequate response. Due to the refractory aggressive nature of the disease, subsequent decision of the multidisciplinary team was salvage chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplant. The aim of this case report was to describe and evaluate the clinical presentation and important radiological features of extranodal lymphoma affecting the musculoskeletal system. PMID:27398038

  20. Aggressive Lymphoma “Sarcoma Mimicker” Originating in the Gluteus and Adductor Muscles: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Elkourashy, Sarah A.; Nashwan, Abdulqadir J.; Alam, Syed I.; Ammar, Adham A.; El Sayed, Ahmed M.; Omri, Halima El; Yassin, Mohamed A.

    2016-01-01

    Extranodal lymphoma (ENL) occurs in approximately 30%–40% of all patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma and has been described in almost all organs and tissues. However, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma is the most common histological subtype of non-Hodgkin lymphoma, primarily arising in the retroperitoneal region. In this article, we report a rare case of an adult male diagnosed with primary diffuse large B-cell lymphoma of the gluteal and adductor muscles with aggressive bone involvement. All appropriate radiological and histopathological studies were done for diagnosis and staging. After discussion with the lymphoma multidisciplinary team, it was agreed to start on R-CHOP protocol (rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin (Adriamycin), vincristine (Oncovin®), and prednisone) as the standard of care, which was later changed to R-CODOX-M/R-IVAC protocol (rituximab, cyclophosphamide, vincristine (Oncovin®), doxorubicin, and high-dose methotrexate alternating with rituximab, ifosfamide, etoposide, and high-dose cytarabine) due to inadequate response. Due to the refractory aggressive nature of the disease, subsequent decision of the multidisciplinary team was salvage chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplant. The aim of this case report was to describe and evaluate the clinical presentation and important radiological features of extranodal lymphoma affecting the musculoskeletal system. PMID:27398038

  1. Molecular subtypes of breast carcinoma in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Alnegheimish, Norah A.; Alshatwi, Razan A.; Alhefdhi, Reem M.; Arafah, Maha M.; AlRikabi, Ammar C.; Husain, Sufia

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the distribution of various molecular subtypes of breast cancer in Saudi Arabia and to assess the association between these subtypes and age at diagnosis, tumor size, histopathological type, grade, presence of carcinoma in-situ, and lymph node status. Methods: This observational retrospective study, between January 2010 and December 2014, was conducted at King Khalid University Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. We classified 359 breast cancers into 4 molecular subtypes, using immunohistochemistry: luminal A (estrogen receptor [ER], or progesterone receptor [PR] positive and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 [HER2] negative), luminal B (ER and/or PR positive and HER2 positive), HER2-positive (ER and PR negative and HER2 positive), and triple negative (ER, PR, and HER2 negative). We evaluated the relationship between these subtypes and clinicopathological features using Chi square test. Results: The most prevalent subtype was luminal A (58.5%), followed in descending order of frequency by triple negative (14.8%), luminal B (14.5%), and HER2-positive (12.3%). The average age at diagnosis was 49.8 years, and average tumor size at diagnosis was 3.19 cm. Conclusion: Luminal A tumor was the most common molecular subtype and HER2-positive was the least common. Most lobular carcinomas were luminal A tumors. Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive and triple negative tumors had a higher histologic grade and a larger tumor size at diagnosis, and they were more common in women under 50 years. Carcinoma-in-situ was least common in triple negative tumors. We found no association between lymph node status and molecular subtypes. PMID:27146612

  2. Authoritarianism and sexual aggression.

    PubMed

    Walker, W D; Rowe, R C; Quinsey, V L

    1993-11-01

    In Study 1, 198 men completed the Right Wing Authoritarianism, Sex Role Ideology, Hostility Towards Women, Acceptance of Interpersonal Violence, Adversarial Sexual Beliefs, and Rape Myth Acceptance scales, as well as measures of past sexually aggressive behavior and likelihood of future sexual aggression. As predicted, authoritarianism and sex role ideology were as closely related to self-reported past and potential future sexually aggressive behavior as were the specifically sexual and aggression-related predictors. Among 134 men in Study 2, authoritarianism and sex guilt positively correlated with each other and with self-reported past sexual aggression. In both studies, the relationship of authoritarianism and sexual aggression was larger in community than in university samples. PMID:8246111

  3. Histologic classification of gliomas.

    PubMed

    Perry, Arie; Wesseling, Pieter

    2016-01-01

    Gliomas form a heterogeneous group of tumors of the central nervous system (CNS) and are traditionally classified based on histologic type and malignancy grade. Most gliomas, the diffuse gliomas, show extensive infiltration in the CNS parenchyma. Diffuse gliomas can be further typed as astrocytic, oligodendroglial, or rare mixed oligodendroglial-astrocytic of World Health Organization (WHO) grade II (low grade), III (anaplastic), or IV (glioblastoma). Other gliomas generally have a more circumscribed growth pattern, with pilocytic astrocytomas (WHO grade I) and ependymal tumors (WHO grade I, II, or III) as the most frequent representatives. This chapter provides an overview of the histology of all glial neoplasms listed in the WHO 2016 classification, including the less frequent "nondiffuse" gliomas and mixed neuronal-glial tumors. For multiple decades the histologic diagnosis of these tumors formed a useful basis for assessment of prognosis and therapeutic management. However, it is now fully clear that information on the molecular underpinnings often allows for a more robust classification of (glial) neoplasms. Indeed, in the WHO 2016 classification, histologic and molecular findings are integrated in the definition of several gliomas. As such, this chapter and Chapter 6 are highly interrelated and neither should be considered in isolation. PMID:26948349

  4. Genes associated with histopathologic features of triple negative breast tumors predict molecular subtypes.

    PubMed

    Purrington, Kristen S; Visscher, Daniel W; Wang, Chen; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Hamann, Ute; Nevanlinna, Heli; Cox, Angela; Giles, Graham G; Eckel-Passow, Jeanette E; Lakis, Sotiris; Kotoula, Vassiliki; Fountzilas, George; Kabisch, Maria; Rüdiger, Thomas; Heikkilä, Päivi; Blomqvist, Carl; Cross, Simon S; Southey, Melissa C; Olson, Janet E; Gilbert, Judy; Deming-Halverson, Sandra; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Clarke, Christine; Scott, Rodney; Jones, J Louise; Zheng, Wei; Mannermaa, Arto; Eccles, Diana M; Vachon, Celine M; Couch, Fergus J

    2016-05-01

    Distinct subtypes of triple negative (TN) breast cancer have been identified by tumor expression profiling. However, little is known about the relationship between histopathologic features of TN tumors, which reflect aspects of both tumor behavior and tumor microenvironment, and molecular TN subtypes. The histopathologic features of TN tumors were assessed by central review and 593 TN tumors were subjected to whole genome expression profiling using the Illumina Whole Genome DASL array. TN molecular subtypes were defined based on gene expression data associated with histopathologic features of TN tumors. Gene expression analysis yielded signatures for four TN subtypes (basal-like, androgen receptor positive, immune, and stromal) consistent with previous studies. Expression analysis also identified genes significantly associated with the 12 histological features of TN tumors. Development of signatures using these markers of histopathological features resulted in six distinct TN subtype signatures, including an additional basal-like and stromal signature. The additional basal-like subtype was distinguished by elevated expression of cell motility and glucose metabolism genes and reduced expression of immune signaling genes, whereas the additional stromal subtype was distinguished by elevated expression of immunomodulatory pathway genes. Histopathologic features that reflect heterogeneity in tumor architecture, cell structure, and tumor microenvironment are related to TN subtype. Accounting for histopathologic features in the development of gene expression signatures, six major subtypes of TN breast cancer were identified. PMID:27083182

  5. Transcriptome Variability in Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumor Suggests Distinct Molecular Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Shijia; Divaris, Kimon; Parker, Joel; Padilla, Ricardo; Murrah, Valerie; Wright, John Timothy

    2016-01-01

    Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumor (KCOT) is a locally aggressive developmental cystic neoplasm thought to arise from the odontogenic epithelium. A high recurrence rate of up to 30% has been found following conservative treatment. Aggressive tumor resection can lead to the need for extensive reconstructive surgery, resulting in significant morbidity and impacting quality of life. Most research has focused on candidate-genes with a handful of studies employing whole transcriptome approaches. There is also the question of which reference tissue is most biologically-relevant. This study characterizes the transcriptome of KCOT using whole genome microarray and compare it with gene expression of different odontogenic tissues (“dentome”). Laser capture microdissection was used to isolate the neoplastic epithelial tissue in 20 cases. KCOT gene expression was compared with the “dentome” and relevant pathways were examined. Cluster analysis revealed 2 distinct molecular subtypes of KCOT. Several inflammatory pathways were activated in both subtypes. The AKT pathway was activated in one subtype while MAP kinase pathway was activated in the other. Additionally, PTCH1 expression was downregulated in both clusters suggesting involvement in KCOT tumorigenesis. In conclusion, this study provides new insights into the transcriptome of KCOT and highlights pathways that could be of diagnostic and prognostic value. PMID:27066764

  6. Integrated Genomic Analysis Identifies Clinically Relevant Subtypes of Glioblastoma Characterized by Abnormalities in PDGFRA, IDH1, EGFR, and NF1

    SciTech Connect

    Verhaak, Roel GW; Hoadley, Katherine A; Purdom, Elizabeth; Wang, Victoria; Qi, Yuan; Wilkerson, Matthew D; Miller, C Ryan; Ding, Li; Golub, Todd; Mesirov, Jill P; Alexe, Gabriele; Lawrence, Michael; O'Kelly, Michael; Tamayo, Pablo; Weir, Barbara A; Gabriel, Stacey; Winckler, Wendy; Gupta, Supriya; Jakkula, Lakshmi; Feiler, Heidi S; Hodgson, J Graeme; James, C David; Sarkaria, Jann N; Brennan, Cameron; Kahn, Ari; Spellman, Paul T; Wilson, Richard K; Speed, Terence P; Gray, Joe W; Meyerson, Matthew; Getz, Gad; Perou, Charles M; Hayes, D Neil; Network, The Cancer Genome Atlas Research

    2009-09-03

    The Cancer Genome Atlas Network recently cataloged recurrent genomic abnormalities in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). We describe a robust gene expression-based molecular classification of GBM into Proneural, Neural, Classical, and Mesenchymal subtypes and integrate multidimensional genomic data to establish patterns of somatic mutations and DNA copy number. Aberrations and gene expression of EGFR, NF1, and PDGFRA/IDH1 each define the Classical, Mesenchymal, and Proneural subtypes, respectively. Gene signatures of normal brain cell types show a strong relationship between subtypes and different neural lineages. Additionally, response to aggressive therapy differs by subtype, with the greatest benefit in the Classical subtype and no benefit in the Proneural subtype. We provide a framework that unifies transcriptomic and genomic dimensions for GBM molecular stratification with important implications for future studies.

  7. Looking through Time: A Longitudinal Study of Children's Media Violence Consumption at Home and Aggressive Behaviors at School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gentile, Douglas A.; Linder, Jennifer R.; Walsh, David A.

    Many studies have shown that media violence has an effect on children's subsequent aggression. This study expands upon previous research in three directions: (1) by examining several subtypes of aggression (verbal, relational, and physical); (2) by measuring media violence exposure across three types of media (television, movies/videos, and video…

  8. Histology-directed MALDI mass spectrometry for the diagnostic pathology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hark Kyun; Kim, In-Hoo

    2012-10-01

    With the advent of targeted agents, it has become clinically important to distinguish histologic types of non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLCs) using biopsy samples. We investigated whether direct tissue matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry (MS) analysis on lipid may classify histology of NSCLCs. Twentyone pairs of frozen, resected NSCLCs were analyzed using histology-directed, MALDI MS. 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid/α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid were manually deposited on areas of each tissue section enriched in epithelial cells to identify lipid profiles, and mass spectra were acquired using a MALDI-time of flight instrument. Squamous cell carcinomas and adenocarcinomas, two major histologic types of NSCLC, were found to have different lipid profiles. Discriminatory lipids correctly classified the histology of 80.4% of independent NSCLC surgical tissue samples (41 out of 51) in validation set, suggesting that lipid profiles can classify NSCLCs according to the histologic type. We also found that protein and lipid MALDI MS profiles can classify 30 breast cancers according to the intrinsic subtypes. Immunohistochemistry-defined, luminal, HER2+, and triple-negative tumors demonstrated different protein and lipid profiles, as evidenced by cross validation P values < 0.01. Discriminatory proteins and lipids classified tumors according to the intrinsic subtype with median prediction accuracies of 80.0-81.3% in 100 random test sets. Potential advantages of this label-free approach may include small tissue requirement, relatively rapid procedure, and low reagent cost. Day-today variation of this technology is also acceptable, with the Pearson correlation of 0.95. Taken together, these results suggest the possible clinical utility of histology-directed, lipid and protein MALDI MS.

  9. Impulsive Aggression as a Comorbidity of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder in Children and Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Amann, Birgit H.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: This article examines the characteristics of impulsive aggression (IA) as a comorbidity in children and adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), focusing on its incidence, impact on ADHD outcomes, need for timely intervention, and limitations of current treatment practices. Methods: Relevant literature was retrieved with electronic searches in PubMed and PsycINFO using the search strategy of “ADHD OR attention deficit hyperactivity disorder” AND “impulsive aggression OR reactive aggression OR hostile aggression OR overt aggression” AND “pediatric OR childhood OR children OR pre-adolescent OR adolescent” with separate searches using review OR clinical trial as search limits. Key articles published before the 2007 Expert Consensus Report on IA were identified using citation analysis. Results: More than 50% of preadolescents with ADHD combined subtype reportedly display clinically significant aggression, with impulsive aggression being the predominant subtype. Impulsive aggression is strongly predictive of a highly unfavorable developmental trajectory characterized by the potential for persistent ADHD, increasing psychosocial burden, accumulating comorbidities, serious lifelong functional deficits across a broad range of domains, delinquency/criminality, and adult antisocial behavior. Impulsive aggression, which triggers peer rejection and a vicious cycle of escalating dysfunction, may be a key factor in unfavorable psychosocial outcomes attributed to ADHD. Because severe aggressive behavior does not remit in many children when treated with primary ADHD therapy (i.e., stimulants and behavioral therapy), a common practice is to add medication of a different class to specifically target aggressive behavior. Conclusions: Impulsive aggression in children and adolescents with ADHD is a serious clinical and public health problem. Although adjunctive therapy with an aggression-targeted agent is widely recommended when

  10. Angry and Aggressive Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Jim

    2008-01-01

    Students who engage in physical aggression in school present a serious challenge to maintaining a safe and supportive learning environment. Unlike other forms of student aggression, fighting is explicit, is violent, and demands attention. A fight between students in a classroom, hallway, or the lunchroom brings every other activity to a halt and…

  11. Girls' Aggressive Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owens, Larry; Shute, Rosalyn; Slee, Phillip

    2004-01-01

    In contrast to boys' bullying behavior which is often overt and easily visible, girls' aggression is usually indirect and covert. Less research has been conducted on the types of bullying that girls usually engage in. Using focus groups composed of teenaged girls, Dr. Owens and colleagues examine the nature of teenage girls' indirect aggression.

  12. Testosterone and Aggression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Archer, John

    1994-01-01

    Studies comparing aggressive and nonaggressive prisoners show higher testosterone levels among the former. While there is limited evidence for a strong association between aggressiveness and testosterone during adolescence, other studies indicate that testosterone levels are responsive to influences from the social environment, particularly those…

  13. Aggression: Psychopharmacologic Management

    PubMed Central

    Conlon, Patrick; Frommhold, Kristine

    1989-01-01

    Aggression may be part of a variety of psychiatric diagnoses. The appropriate treatment requires that the physician recognize the underlying cause. Pharmacologic agents may form part of the overall treatment of the patient. The number of possible drugs for treating aggression has expanded rapidly, and it is important that the physician be familiar with the various options avilable. PMID:21248947

  14. Social Aggression among Girls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Underwood, Marion K.

    Noting recent interest in girls' social or "relational" aggression, this volume offers a balanced, scholarly analysis of scientific knowledge in this area. The book integrates current research on emotion regulation, gender, and peer relations, to examine how girls are socialized to experience and express anger and aggression from infancy through…

  15. Third Person Instigated Aggression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaebelein, Jacquelyn

    Since many acts of aggression in society are more than simply an aggressor-victim encounter, the role played by third person instigated aggression also needs examination. The purpose of this study was to develop a laboratory procedure to systematically investigate instigation. In a competitive reaction time task, high and low Machiavellian Males…

  16. Neuropsychiatry of Aggression

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Scott D.; Kjome, Kimberly L.; Moeller, F. Gerard

    2010-01-01

    Synopsis Aggression is a serious medical problem that can place both the patient and the health care provider at risk. Aggression can result from medical, neurologic and or psychiatric disorders. A comprehensive patient evaluation is needed. Treatment options include pharmacotherapy as well as non-pharmacologic interventions, both need to be individualized to the patient. PMID:21172570

  17. [Histological techniques in oncodermatology].

    PubMed

    Chaput, B; Le Guellec, S; Courtade-Saïdi, M; Gangloff, D; Meresse, T; Chavoin, J-P; Grolleau, J-L; Garrido, I

    2012-04-01

    The skin oncology or "oncodermatology" requires a surgical treatment in most cases. For some surgeons, the oncodermatology takes a very important part of their practice. In the course of diagnostic and therapeutic of skin lesions, the pathologist plays now an essential role. He will guide our surgery. The techniques used by this specialist are numerous. Therefore, the objective of this paper is to review the different histological methods used to improve our management of skin tumors. PMID:22463986

  18. Identifying personality subtypes based on the five-factor model dimensions in male prisoners: implications for psychopathy and criminal offending.

    PubMed

    Claes, Laurence; Tavernier, Geert; Roose, Annelore; Bijttebier, Patricia; Smith, Sarah Francis; Lilienfeld, Scott O

    2014-01-01

    The current study was designed to identify personality subtypes on the basis of the five-factor model dimensions in male prisoners. Participants included 110 Flemish male prisoners assessed by means of the Neuroticism, Extraversion, Openness Five Factor Inventory and different symptom, personality, and coping measures. We found two clusters: an emotionally stable/resilient cluster and an aggressive/undercontrolled cluster. Prisoners within the aggressive/undercontrolled cluster scored significantly higher on almost all Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 basic scales, (in)direct aggression measures, and depressive coping scales compared with resilients. They also scored higher on drug abuse and committed more sexual offenses than resilient prisoners. These two personality subtypes bear theoretically and practically important implications for psychopathy subtypes and different pathways to criminal offenses. PMID:23123385

  19. The genetics of aggression: Where are we now?

    PubMed

    Asherson, Philip; Cormand, Bru

    2016-07-01

    Aggression, an overt behaviour with the intention to inflict damage, is a physiological trait with important roles throughout evolution, both in defence and predation. However, when expressed in humans in the wrong context, aggression leads to social maladjustment and crime. This special issue is about the genetic and neurobiological basis for aggression. Most of the 12 works presented here have been prepared by members of five international consortia established under the auspice of the FP7 and H2020 programs of the European Union to investigate different aspects of aggression and related behavioural phenotypes, including delineation of subtypes, aetiological mechanisms, neurobiology, neuroimaging, biomarkers, animal models and development and assessment of new treatments. Research on human aggression has largely focused on the societal causes of violent behaviour with relatively little focus on the underlying neuroscientific basis. However, interesting findings are emerging which suggest that by identifying distinct pathways to aggression, better targeting of social, psychological and medical treatments, can lead to improved outcomes for individuals and society. This issue represents a state of the art review of current neurobiological understanding of human aggression and a starting point for concerted efforts to move the field towards the development of new strategies for prevention and treatment. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27061441

  20. Linkages between Aggression and Children's Legitimacy of Aggression Beliefs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erdley, Cynthia A.; Asher, Steven R.

    To determine whether Slaby and Guerra's (1988) measure of aggression would reliably assess younger children's belief about aggression and whether children's belief about the legitimacy of aggression relates to their self-reports of it and to their levels of aggression as evaluated by peers, 781 fourth and fifth graders were asked to complete an…

  1. Aggressive Attitudes Predict Aggressive Behavior in Middle School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McConville, David W.; Cornell, Dewey G.

    2003-01-01

    This prospective study found that self-reported attitudes toward peer aggression among 403 middle school students were both internally consistent and stable over time (7 months). Aggressive attitudes were correlated with four outcome criteria for aggressive behavior: student self-report of peer aggression; peer and teacher nominations of bullying;…

  2. Aggression in Pretend Play and Aggressive Behavior in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fehr, Karla K.; Russ, Sandra W.

    2013-01-01

    Research Findings: Pretend play is an essential part of child development and adjustment. However, parents, teachers, and researchers debate the function of aggression in pretend play. Different models of aggression predict that the expression of aggression in play could either increase or decrease actual aggressive behavior. The current study…

  3. The Utility of Forms and Functions of Aggression in Emerging Adulthood: Association with Personality Disorder Symptomatology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ostrov, Jamie M.; Houston, Rebecca J.

    2008-01-01

    A sample of 679 (341 women) emerging adults (M = 18.90 years; SD = 1.11; range = 18.00-22.92) participated in a study on the utility of forms (i.e., physical and relational) and functions (i.e., proactive and reactive) of aggression. We examined the link between these four subtypes of aggression and personality pathology (i.e., psychopathic…

  4. [Do histologic changes of the upper renal pole in double ectopic ureterocele justify a conservative approach?].

    PubMed

    Arena, F; Nicotina, P A; Cruccetti, A; Centonze, A; Arena, S; Romeo, G

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to review the histology of the upper pole segment in patients with duplex ectopic ureterocele to verify if a less aggressive surgery is justified in the prenatally diagnosed patients. We reviewed the histology of the upper pole segment of 15 consecutive patients with duplex system ectopic ureterocele treated between 1991 and 1999 at the Paediatric Surgery Unit of University Hospital of Messina. The diagnosis of duplex system ectopic ureterocele was made according to the criteria of the Section on Urology of the American Academy of Paediatrics. The histology specimens were assessed for dysplastic, inflammatory and obstructive changes. All 15 patients with duplex system ectopic ureterocele were surgically treated with heminephro-ureterectomy and the surgical specimens were histologically examined. Nine of the 15 patients were prenatally diagnosed. The histology of the upper pole segment of the 9 prenatally diagnosed showed in all patients segmental renal microcystic dysplasia, chondroid metaplasic islands and an inflammatory tubulo-interstitial nephropathy in 6 patients (66.6%) and in 2 (22.2%) nephroblastomatosis. The histology of six the postnatal postnatally diagnosed patients showed in all patients segmental multicystic renal dysplasia, inflammatory tubulo-interstitial nephropathy and segmental parenchymal scars. The upper pole histology of the patients with duplex ectopic ureterocele diagnosed prenatally did not show any evidence of reversible histological change. Considering the histology and the good outcome of patients treated with upper pole nephroureterectomy a less aggressive surgery with preservation of the upper pole does not seem justified. PMID:11723852

  5. Anaplastic lymphoma kinase is expressed in different subtypes of human breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Pinera, Pablo; Chang, Y.; Astudillo, A.; Mortimer, J.; Deuel, T.F. . E-mail: tfdeuel@scripps.edu

    2007-06-29

    Pleiotrophin (PTN, Ptn) is an 18 kDa cytokine expressed in human breast cancers. Since inappropriate expression of Ptn stimulates progression of breast cancer in transgenic mice and a dominant negative PTN reverses the transformed phenotype of human breast cancer cells that inappropriately express Ptn, it is suggested that constitutive PTN signaling in breast cancer cells that inappropriately express Ptn activates pathways that promote a more aggressive breast cancer phenotype. Pleiotrophin signals by inactivating its receptor, the receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase (RPTP){beta}/{zeta}, and, recently, PTN was found to activate anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) through the PTN/RPTP{beta}/{zeta} signaling pathway in PTN-stimulated cells, not through a direct interaction of PTN with ALK and thus not through the PTN-enforced dimerization of ALK. Since full-length ALK is activated in different malignant cancers and activated ALK is a potent oncogenic protein, we examined human breast cancers to test the possibility that ALK may be expressed in breast cancers and potentially activated through the PTN/RPTP{beta}/{zeta} signaling pathway; we now demonstrate that ALK is strongly expressed in different histological subtypes of human breast cancer; furthermore, ALK is expressed in both nuclei and cytoplasm and, in the 'dotted' pattern characteristic of ALK fusion proteins in anaplastic large cell lymphoma. This study thus supports the possibility that activated ALK may be important in human breast cancers and potentially activated either through the PTN/RPTP{beta}/{zeta} signaling pathway, or, alternatively, as an activated fusion protein to stimulate progression of breast cancer in humans.

  6. Histologic and immunohistochemical characterization of thymic epithelial tumours in the dog.

    PubMed

    Burgess, K E; DeRegis, C J; Brown, F S; Keating, J H

    2016-06-01

    Thymic epithelial tumour (TET) histologic subclassification has not been well described in the veterinary literature as it has in humans. The objective of this study was to identify and describe TET subtypes in dogs and to determine the utility of immunohistochemistry (IHC) in differentiating these subtypes. Samples were reviewed and classified according to a modified World Health Organization (WHO) criteria for human tumours of thymic origin. Signallment, presenting signs, treatment and survival data was collected from medical records. Histologic review confirmed the same subtypes as described in humans. Presence of high stage disease, pleomorphism, mitotic figures and capsular invasion was more common in atypical thymomas and thymic carcinomas than in thymomas. IHC was performed for GLUT-1, CD5, CD117 and CK8/18; however, this was not useful in classifying the tumours. PMID:27144380

  7. Human Breast Cancer Invasion and Aggression Correlates with ECM Stiffening and Immune Cell Infiltration

    PubMed Central

    Acerbi, I; Cassereau, L; Dean, I; Shi, Q; Au, A; Park, C; Chen, YY; Liphardt, J; Hwang, ES; Weaver, VM

    2015-01-01

    Tumors are stiff and data suggest that the extracellular matrix stiffening that correlates with experimental mammary malignancy drives tumor invasion and metastasis. Nevertheless, the relationship between tissue and extracellular matrix stiffness and human breast cancer progression and aggression remains unclear. We undertook a biophysical and biochemical assessment of stromal-epithelial interactions in noninvasive, invasive and normal adjacent human breast tissue and in breast cancers of increasingly aggressive subtype. Our analysis revealed that human breast cancer transformation is accompanied by an incremental increase in collagen deposition and a progressive linearization and thickening of interstitial collagen. The linearization of collagen was visualized as an overall increase in tissue birefringence and was most striking at the invasive front of the tumor where the stiffness of the stroma and cellular mechanosignaling were the highest. Amongst breast cancer subtypes we found that the stroma at the invasive region of the more aggressive Basal-like and Her2 tumor subtypes was the most heterogeneous and the stiffest when compared to the less aggressive Luminal A and B subtypes. Intriguingly, we quantified the greatest number of infiltrating macrophages and the highest level of TGF beta signaling within the cells at the invasive front. We also established that stroma stiffness and the level of cellular TGF beta signaling positively correlated with each other and with the number of infiltrating tumor-activated, macrophages, which was highest in the more aggressive tumor subtypes. These findings indicate that human breast cancer progression and aggression, collagen linearization and stromal stiffening are linked and implicate tissue inflammation and TGF beta. PMID:25959051

  8. Human breast cancer invasion and aggression correlates with ECM stiffening and immune cell infiltration.

    PubMed

    Acerbi, I; Cassereau, L; Dean, I; Shi, Q; Au, A; Park, C; Chen, Y Y; Liphardt, J; Hwang, E S; Weaver, V M

    2015-10-01

    Tumors are stiff and data suggest that the extracellular matrix stiffening that correlates with experimental mammary malignancy drives tumor invasion and metastasis. Nevertheless, the relationship between tissue and extracellular matrix stiffness and human breast cancer progression and aggression remains unclear. We undertook a biophysical and biochemical assessment of stromal-epithelial interactions in noninvasive, invasive and normal adjacent human breast tissue and in breast cancers of increasingly aggressive subtype. Our analysis revealed that human breast cancer transformation is accompanied by an incremental increase in collagen deposition and a progressive linearization and thickening of interstitial collagen. The linearization of collagen was visualized as an overall increase in tissue birefringence and was most striking at the invasive front of the tumor where the stiffness of the stroma and cellular mechanosignaling were the highest. Amongst breast cancer subtypes we found that the stroma at the invasive region of the more aggressive Basal-like and Her2 tumor subtypes was the most heterogeneous and the stiffest when compared to the less aggressive luminal A and B subtypes. Intriguingly, we quantified the greatest number of infiltrating macrophages and the highest level of TGF beta signaling within the cells at the invasive front. We also established that stroma stiffness and the level of cellular TGF beta signaling positively correlated with each other and with the number of infiltrating tumor-activated macrophages, which was highest in the more aggressive tumor subtypes. These findings indicate that human breast cancer progression and aggression, collagen linearization and stromal stiffening are linked and implicate tissue inflammation and TGF beta. PMID:25959051

  9. Proactive, Reactive, and Romantic Relational Aggression in Adulthood: Measurement, Predictive Validity, Gender Differences, and Association with Intermittent Explosive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Murray-Close, Dianna; Ostrov, Jamie M.; Nelson, David A.; Crick, Nicki R.; Coccaro, Emil F.

    2009-01-01

    The psychometric properties of a recently introduced adult self-report of relational aggression are presented. Specifically, the predictive utility of proactive and reactive peer-directed relational aggression, as well as romantic relational aggression, are explored in a large (N = 1387) study of adults. The measure had adequate reliability and validity and the subscales demonstrated unique predictive abilities for a number of dependent variables. In particular, reactive but not proactive relational aggression was uniquely associated with history of abuse, hostile attribution biases, and feelings of distress regarding relational provocation situations. Reactive relational aggression was also more strongly related to anger and hostility than proactive aggression. In addition, relational aggression in the context of romantic relationships was uniquely related to anger, hostility, impulsivity, history of abuse, hostile attribution biases, and emotional sensitivity to relational provocations, even when controlling for peer-directed relational aggression. Gender differences in overall levels of relational aggression were not observed; however, males were most likely to engage in peer-directed proactive and reactive relational aggression whereas females were most likely to engage in romantic relational aggression. In a second study (N = 150), relational aggression was higher in a sample of adults with Intermittent Explosive Disorder than in a sample of healthy controls or psychiatric controls. The findings highlight the importance of assessing subtypes of relational aggression in adult samples. Ways in which this measure may extend research in psychology and psychiatry are discussed. PMID:19822329

  10. Adolescents’ Aggression to Parents: Longitudinal Links with Parents’ Physical Aggression

    PubMed Central

    Margolin, Gayla; Baucom, Brian R.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To investigate whether parents’ previous physical aggression (PPA) exhibited during early adolescence is associated with adolescents’ subsequent parent-directed aggression even beyond parents’ concurrent physical aggression (CPA); to investigate whether adolescents’ emotion dysregulation and attitudes condoning child-to-parent aggression moderate associations. Methods Adolescents (N = 93) and their parents participated in a prospective, longitudinal study. Adolescents and parents reported at waves 1–3 on four types of parents’ PPA (mother-to-adolescent, father-to-adolescent, mother-to-father, father-to-mother). Wave 3 assessments also included adolescents’ emotion dysregulation, attitudes condoning aggression, and externalizing behaviors. At waves 4 and 5, adolescents and parents reported on adolescents’ parent-directed physical aggression, property damage, and verbal aggression, and on parents’ CPA Results Parents’ PPA emerged as a significant indicator of adolescents’ parent-directed physical aggression (odds ratio [OR]: 1.25, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.0–1.55; p = .047), property damage (OR: 1.29, 95% CI: 1.1–1.5, p = .002), and verbal aggression (OR: 1.35, 95% CI: 1.15–1.6, p < .001) even controlling for adolescents’ sex, externalizing behaviors, and family income. When controlling for parents’ CPA, previous mother-to-adolescent aggression still predicted adolescents’ parent-directed physical aggression (OR: 5.56, 95% CI: 1.82–17.0, p = .003), and father-to-mother aggression predicted adolescents’ parent-directed verbal aggression (OR: 1.86, 95% CI: 1.0–3.3, p = .036). Emotion dysregulation and attitudes condoning aggression did not produce direct or moderated effects. Conclusions Adolescents’ parent-directed aggression deserves greater attention in discourse about lasting, adverse effects of even minor forms of parents’ physical aggression. Future research should investigate parent-directed aggression as

  11. Silent subtype 3 pituitary adenomas are not always silent and represent poorly differentiated monomorphous plurihormonal Pit-1 lineage adenomas.

    PubMed

    Mete, Ozgur; Gomez-Hernandez, Karen; Kucharczyk, Walter; Ridout, Rowena; Zadeh, Gelareh; Gentili, Fred; Ezzat, Shereen; Asa, Sylvia L

    2016-02-01

    Originally classified as a variant of silent corticotroph adenoma, silent subtype 3 adenomas are a distinct histologic variant of pituitary adenoma of unknown cytogenesis. We reviewed the clinical, biochemical, radiological, immunohistochemical and ultrastructural features of 31 silent subtype 3 adenomas to clarify their cellular origin. Among 25 with clinical and/or radiological data, all were macroadenomas; there was cavernous sinus invasion in 30% of cases and involvement of the clivus in 17% of cases. Almost 90% of patients were symptomatic; 67% had mass effect symptoms, 37% were hypogonadal and 8% had secondary adrenal insufficiency. Significant hormonal excess in 29% of cases included hyperthyroidism in 17%, acromegaly in 8% and hyperprolactinemia above 150 μg/l in 4%. Two individuals with hyperprolactinemia who were younger than 30 years had multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1. Immunohistochemically, all 31 tumors were diffusely positive for the pituitary lineage-specific transcription factor Pit-1. Although three only expressed Pit-1, others revealed variable positivity for one or more hormones of Pit-1 cell lineage (growth hormone, prolactin, thyroid-stimulating hormone), as well as alpha-subunit and estrogen receptor. Most tumors exhibited perinuclear reactivity for keratins with the CAM5.2 antibody; scattered fibrous bodies were noted in five (16%) tumors. The mean MIB-1 labeling index was 4% (range, 1-9%). Fourteen cases examined by electron microscopy were composed of a monomorphous population of large polygonal or elongated cells with nuclear spheridia. Sixty-five percent of patients had residual disease after surgery; after a mean follow-up of 48.4 months (median 41.5; range=2-171) disease progression was documented in 53% of those cases. These data identify silent subtype 3 adenomas as aggressive monomorphous plurihormonal adenomas of Pit-1 lineage that may be associated with hyperthyroidism, acromegaly or galactorrhea and amenorrhea. Our

  12. Electrophysiological Correlates of Dyslexic Subtypes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flynn, Jane M.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    The construct validity of Boder's typology of dyslexia was investigated using quantified electroencephalography with 39 children (ages 7-11) during a reading task and at rest. Results supported beta frequency differences in anticipated regions by dyslexia subtype during the reading task. However, the direction of difference hypothesis was not…

  13. The Relationship Between Emotion Dysregulation and Impulsive Aggression in Veterans With Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Symptoms.

    PubMed

    Miles, Shannon R; Menefee, Deleene S; Wanner, Jill; Teten Tharp, Andra; Kent, Thomas A

    2016-06-01

    While Veterans in general are no more dangerous than the civilian population, Veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) have stronger associations with anger and hostility and certain forms of aggression, such as intimate partner violence, than civilians with PTSD. This is alarming because up to 21% of Veterans seeking Veterans Affairs (VA) health care are diagnosed with PTSD. Emotion regulation difficulties (emotion dysregulation) are also related to increased PTSD symptom severity and may play a role in aggressive behavior. Because the predominant form of aggression in PTSD appears to be the impulsive subtype, the authors sought to clarify the relationship between PTSD, emotion dysregulation, and impulsive aggression. We examined how emotion dysregulation influenced impulsive aggression in a Veteran sample (N = 479) seeking treatment for trauma sequelae. All Veterans completed measures that assessed demographic information, emotion dysregulation, aggression frequency and subtype, and PTSD symptoms. Men generally reported more aggression than women. The emotion dysregulation, aggression, and PTSD measures were significantly correlated. Two cross-sectional mediation models showed emotion dysregulation fully accounted for the relationship between PTSD and impulsive aggression (indirect path for men: b = .07, SE = .026, bias-correct and accelerated confidence interval [BCa CI] = [0.02, 0.13]; indirect path for women: b = .08, SE = .022, BCa CI = [0.05, 0.13]). PTSD can increase negative emotions yet does not always lead to aggressive behaviors. The ability to regulate emotions may be pivotal to inhibiting aggression in those with PTSD. PTSD interventions may benefit from augmentation with emotion regulation skills training. PMID:25681165

  14. A Case of Aggressive NK/T-cell Lymphoma/Leukemia with Cutaneous Involvement in Adolescence

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Soo Ho; Ko, Woo Tae; Ha, Gyoung Yim; Kim, Jung Ran

    2008-01-01

    NK/T-cell lymphoma (NKTCL) is characterized by the expression of the NK-cell antigen CD56. Non-nasal NK/T-cell lymphomas are subdivided into primary cutaneous and 4 subtypes of secondary cutaneous lymphomas; nasal type, aggressive, blastic (blastoid), and other specific NK-like cell lymphoma. Aggressive NK/T-cell lymphoma/leukemia is a rare leukemic variant of nasal type NKTCL. We herein report a rare case of aggressive NK/T-cell lymphoma/leukemia with cutaneous involvement in adolescence. PMID:27303165

  15. Microbiology of aggressive periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Könönen, Eija; Müller, Hans-Peter

    2014-06-01

    For decades, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans has been considered the most likely etiologic agent in aggressive periodontitis. Implementation of DNA-based microbiologic methodologies has considerably improved our understanding of the composition of subgingival biofilms, and advanced open-ended molecular techniques even allow for genome mapping of the whole bacterial spectrum in a sample and characterization of both the cultivable and not-yet-cultivable microbiota associated with periodontal health and disease. Currently, A. actinomycetemcomitans is regarded as a minor component of the resident oral microbiota and as an opportunistic pathogen in some individuals. Its specific JP2 clone, however, shows properties of a true exogenous pathogen and has an important role in the development of aggressive periodontitis in certain populations. Still, limited data exist on the impact of other microbes specifically in aggressive periodontitis. Despite a wide heterogeneity of bacteria, especially in subgingival samples collected from patients, bacteria of the red complex in particular, and those of the orange complex, are considered as potential pathogens in generalized aggressive periodontitis. These types of bacterial findings closely resemble those found for chronic periodontitis, representing a mixed polymicrobial infection without a clear association with any specific microorganism. In aggressive periodontitis, the role of novel and not-yet-cultivable bacteria has not yet been elucidated. There are geographic and ethnic differences in the carriage of periodontitis-associated microorganisms, and they need to be taken into account when comparing study reports on periodontal microbiology in different study populations. In the present review, we provide an overview on the colonization of potential periodontal pathogens in childhood and adolescence, and on specific microorganisms that have been suspected for their role in the initiation and progression of aggressive

  16. An Observational Study of Delivered and Received Aggression, Gender, and Social-Psychological Adjustment in Preschool: ''This White Crayon Doesn't Work ...''

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ostrov, Jamie M.; Woods, Kathleen E.; Jansen, Elizabeth A.; Casas, Juan F.; Crick, Nicki R.

    2004-01-01

    A semi-structured observational study investigated gender differences in delivered and received relational, physical, verbal, and nonverbal aggression in a young preschool sample (N=60). Findings revealed that gender differences in subtypes of aggression may be apparent as early as 3 years of age. Specifically, girls were found to deliver and…

  17. Viewing relational aggression through multiple lenses: temperament, personality, and personality pathology.

    PubMed

    Tackett, Jennifer L; Kushner, Shauna C; Herzhoff, Kathrin; Smack, Avante J; Reardon, Kathleen W

    2014-08-01

    Dispositional trait frameworks offer great potential to elucidate the nature and development of psychopathology, including the construct of relational aggression. The present study sought to explore the dispositional context of relational aggression across three dispositional frameworks: temperament, personality, and personality pathology. Participants comprised a large community sample of youth, aged 6 to 18 years (N = 1,188; 51.2% female). Ratings of children's relational aggression, temperament, personality, and personality pathology traits were obtained through parent report (86.3% mothers). Results showed convergence and divergence across these three dispositional frameworks. Like other antisocial behavior subtypes, relational aggression generally showed connections with traits reflecting negative emotionality and poor self-regulation. Relational aggression showed stronger connections with temperament traits than with personality traits, suggesting that temperament frameworks may capture more relationally aggressive content. Findings at the lower order trait level help differentiate relational aggression from other externalizing problems by providing a more nuanced perspective (e.g., both sociability and shyness positively predicted relational aggression). In addition, there was little evidence of moderation of these associations by gender, age, or age2, and findings remained robust even after controlling for physical aggression. Results are discussed in the broader context of conceptualizing relational aggression in an overarching personality-psychopathology framework. PMID:25047304

  18. Executive Functions in Children: Associations with Aggressive Behavior and Appraisal Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Mesha L.; Weiss, Bahr; Lochman, John E.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated whether and how deficits in executive functioning and distortions in appraisal processing are related to subtypes of aggressive behavior. The sample included 83 boys assessed using multi-informant reports and performance measures. Deficits in two executive functions, response inhibition and planning ability were related…

  19. Oestrogen and progesterone receptor expression in subtypes of canine mammary tumours in intact and ovariectomised dogs.

    PubMed

    Mainenti, M; Rasotto, R; Carnier, P; Zappulli, V

    2014-10-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate as a potential prognostic indicator the relationship between histological subtype of canine mammary tumours (CMTs) and oestrogen-α (ORα) and progesterone (PR) receptor expression. Using immunohistochemistry, receptor expression in neoplastic epithelial cells was assessed in 12 different subtypes in 113 CMTs (34 benign, 79 malignant) and 101 surrounding normal tissues. Sixty-eight and 45 CMTs were from intact and ovariectomised bitches, respectively. Histological subtype strongly influenced ORα/PR expression: simple and complex adenomas as well as simple tubular carcinomas exhibited the greatest expression, whereas immunohistochemical labelling for these receptors was weakest in carcinoma and malignant myoepitheliomas, as well as in solid/anaplastic carcinomas and comedocarcinomas. Receptor expression was generally higher in benign relative to malignant neoplasms, and in the latter it was significantly lower in ovariectomised vs. intact bitches. Lymphatic invasion, mitotic index, nodule diameter, and tumour grade were significantly associated with ORα/PR expression. Although not found to be an independent prognostic indicator, tumours from dogs with <10% cells with ORα/PR expression had a poorer prognosis. Lymphatic invasion, the state of the margins of excision, and mitotic index were found to be independent prognostic indicators. Overall, the results suggest that differences in histological subtype and whether or not a bitch has been ovariectomised should be considered when evaluating the significance of ORα and PR expression in CMTs. PMID:24980810

  20. Intellectual Competence and Aggression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huesmann, L. Rowell; Yarmel, Patty Warnick

    Using data from a broader longitudinal study, this investigation explores within-subject and cross-generational stability of intellectual competence and the relationship of such stability to aggressive behavior. Data were gathered three times (when subjects' modal age was 8, 19, and 30 years). Initially, subjects included the entire population…

  1. Relational Aggression among Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Ellie L.; Nelson, David A.; Hottle, America B.; Warburton, Brittney; Young, Bryan K.

    2011-01-01

    "Relational aggression" refers to harm within relationships caused by covert bullying or manipulative behavior. Examples include isolating a youth from his or her group of friends (social exclusion), threatening to stop talking to a friend (the silent treatment), or spreading gossip and rumors by email. This type of bullying tends to be…

  2. Stability of Aggressive Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eron, Leonard D.; Huesmann, L. Rowell

    As indicated by multiple measures (including overt criminal behavior), stability of aggressive behavior was investigated across 22 years for males and females in a variety of situations. Originally, subjects included the entire population enrolled in the third grade in a semi-rural county in New York State. The sample included approximately 870…

  3. Human Aggression and Suicide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Gerald L.; Goodwin, Frederick K

    1986-01-01

    The central nervous system transmitter serontonin may be altered in aggressive/impulsive and suicidal behaviors in humans. These reports are largely consistent with animal data, and constitute one of the most highly replicated set of findings in biological psychiatry. Suggests that some suicidal behavior may be a special kind of aggressive…

  4. Anonymity, Deindividuation and Aggression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baron, Robert S.

    Several writers suggest that reducing one's sense of individuality reduces social restraints. The author suggests that the effect of uniformity of appearance on aggression is unclear when anonymity is held constant. This poses a problem of interpretation given that a distinction must be made between lack of individuality and anonymity. One must…

  5. Automatic Recognition of Aggressive Behavior in Pigs Using a Kinect Depth Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jonguk; Jin, Long; Park, Daihee; Chung, Yongwha

    2016-01-01

    Aggression among pigs adversely affects economic returns and animal welfare in intensive pigsties. In this study, we developed a non-invasive, inexpensive, automatic monitoring prototype system that uses a Kinect depth sensor to recognize aggressive behavior in a commercial pigpen. The method begins by extracting activity features from the Kinect depth information obtained in a pigsty. The detection and classification module, which employs two binary-classifier support vector machines in a hierarchical manner, detects aggressive activity, and classifies it into aggressive sub-types such as head-to-head (or body) knocking and chasing. Our experimental results showed that this method is effective for detecting aggressive pig behaviors in terms of both cost-effectiveness (using a low-cost Kinect depth sensor) and accuracy (detection and classification accuracies over 95.7% and 90.2%, respectively), either as a standalone solution or to complement existing methods. PMID:27144572

  6. Automatic Recognition of Aggressive Behavior in Pigs Using a Kinect Depth Sensor.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jonguk; Jin, Long; Park, Daihee; Chung, Yongwha

    2016-01-01

    Aggression among pigs adversely affects economic returns and animal welfare in intensive pigsties. In this study, we developed a non-invasive, inexpensive, automatic monitoring prototype system that uses a Kinect depth sensor to recognize aggressive behavior in a commercial pigpen. The method begins by extracting activity features from the Kinect depth information obtained in a pigsty. The detection and classification module, which employs two binary-classifier support vector machines in a hierarchical manner, detects aggressive activity, and classifies it into aggressive sub-types such as head-to-head (or body) knocking and chasing. Our experimental results showed that this method is effective for detecting aggressive pig behaviors in terms of both cost-effectiveness (using a low-cost Kinect depth sensor) and accuracy (detection and classification accuracies over 95.7% and 90.2%, respectively), either as a standalone solution or to complement existing methods. PMID:27144572

  7. Refinement of Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Molecular Subtypes: Implications for Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy Selection

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann, Brian D.; Jovanović, Bojana; Chen, Xi; Estrada, Monica V.; Johnson, Kimberly N.; Shyr, Yu; Moses, Harold L.; Sanders, Melinda E.; Pietenpol, Jennifer A.

    2016-01-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is a heterogeneous disease that can be classified into distinct molecular subtypes by gene expression profiling. Considered a difficult-to-treat cancer, a fraction of TNBC patients benefit significantly from neoadjuvant chemotherapy and have far better overall survival. Outside of BRCA1/2 mutation status, biomarkers do not exist to identify patients most likely to respond to current chemotherapy; and, to date, no FDA-approved targeted therapies are available for TNBC patients. Previously, we developed an approach to identify six molecular subtypes TNBC (TNBCtype), with each subtype displaying unique ontologies and differential response to standard-of-care chemotherapy. Given the complexity of the varying histological landscape of tumor specimens, we used histopathological quantification and laser-capture microdissection to determine that transcripts in the previously described immunomodulatory (IM) and mesenchymal stem-like (MSL) subtypes were contributed from infiltrating lymphocytes and tumor-associated stromal cells, respectively. Therefore, we refined TNBC molecular subtypes from six (TNBCtype) into four (TNBCtype-4) tumor-specific subtypes (BL1, BL2, M and LAR) and demonstrate differences in diagnosis age, grade, local and distant disease progression and histopathology. Using five publicly available, neoadjuvant chemotherapy breast cancer gene expression datasets, we retrospectively evaluated chemotherapy response of over 300 TNBC patients from pretreatment biopsies subtyped using either the intrinsic (PAM50) or TNBCtype approaches. Combined analysis of TNBC patients demonstrated that TNBC subtypes significantly differ in response to similar neoadjuvant chemotherapy with 41% of BL1 patients achieving a pathological complete response compared to 18% for BL2 and 29% for LAR with 95% confidence intervals (CIs; [33, 51], [9, 28], [17, 41], respectively). Collectively, we provide pre-clinical data that could inform clinical

  8. Parents' Aggressive Influences and Children's Aggressive Problem Solutions with Peers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duman, Sarah; Margolin, Gayla

    2007-01-01

    This study examined children's aggressive and assertive solutions to hypothetical peer scenarios in relation to parents' responses to similar hypothetical social scenarios and parents' actual marital aggression. The study included 118 children ages 9 to 10 years old and their mothers and fathers. Children's aggressive solutions correlated with…

  9. Relational Aggression and Physical Aggression among Adolescent Cook Islands Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Page, Angela; Smith, Lisa F.

    2016-01-01

    Both physical and relational aggression are characterised by the intent to harm another. Physical aggression includes direct behaviours such as hitting or kicking; relational aggression involves behaviours designed to damage relationships, such as excluding others, spreading rumours, and delivering threats and verbal abuse. This study extended…

  10. Human herpesvirsus 6 subtype A-associated myocarditis with ‘apical ballooning’

    PubMed Central

    Bigalke, Boris; Klingel, Karin; May, Andreas E; Kandolf, Reinhard; Gawaz, Meinrad

    2007-01-01

    A 67-year-old woman who presented with acute chest pain is reported. Three days before admission, she suffered from a flu-like infection. Coronary angiography showed no coronary stenosis. Ventriculography showed moderately reduced left ventricular function characterized by the so-called ‘apical ballooning’. Endomyocardial biopsies and polymerase chain reaction analysis of the plasma revealed an acute infection with human herpesvirus 6 subtype A. Histological and immunohistochemical analyses revealed myocarditis with areas of interstitial macrophages and fibrosis. The present case report links, for the first time, myocarditis with a human herpesvirus 6 subtype A infection and the appearance of apical ballooning. PMID:17440647

  11. Reverse Discrimination and Aggressive Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Stephen D.

    1980-01-01

    White subjects were aggressive toward Black opponents when contest results appeared to reflect elements of reverse discrimination; but they showed less aggressive behavior toward Black opponents when they thought their loss was due to their opponents' superior ability. (RL)

  12. Coping with Agitation and Aggression

    MedlinePlus

    Alzheimer ’s Caregiving Tips Coping with Agitation and Aggression People with Alzheimer’s disease may become agitated or aggressive as the disease gets worse. Agitation means that a person is restless or worried. ...

  13. Prospective longitudinal course of aggression among adults with bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Ballester, Javier; Goldstein, Benjamin; Goldstein, Tina R; Yu, Haifeng; Axelson, David; Monk, Kelly; Hickey, Mary Beth; Diler, Rasim S; Sakolsky, Dara J; Sparks, Garrett; Iyengar, Satish; Kupfer, David J; Brent, David A; Birmaher, Boris

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Bipolar disorder (BP) has been associated with increased aggressive behaviors. However, all existing studies are cross-sectional and include forensic or inpatient populations and many do not take into account the effects of comorbid conditions. The goal of this study was to evaluate the longitudinal course of aggression among adult outpatients with BP compared with non-BP patients and healthy controls. Methods Subjects with bipolar I disorder (BP-I)/bipolar II disorder (BP-II) (n = 255), non-BP psychopathology (n = 85), and healthy controls (n = 84) (average 38.9 years, 78.7% female, and 84.9% Caucasian) were evaluated at intake and after two- and four-years of follow-up. Aggression was self-rated using the Aggression Questionnaire (AQ). Comparisons were adjusted for any significant demographic and clinical differences and for multiple comparisons. For subjects with BP, associations of AQ with subtype of BP, current versus past mood episodes, polarity and severity of the current episode, psychosis, and current pharmacological treatment were evaluated. Results In comparison with subjects with non-BP psychiatric disorders and healthy controls, subjects with BP showed persistently higher total and subscale AQ scores (raw and T-scores) during the four-year follow-up. There were no effects of BP subtype, severity or polarity of the current episode, psychosis, and current pharmacological treatments. Subjects in an acute mood episode showed significantly higher AQ scores than euthymic subjects. Conclusions BP, particularly during acute episodes, is associated with increased self-reported verbal and physical aggression, anger, and hostility. These results provide further evidence for the need of treatments to prevent mood recurrences and prompt treatment of acute mood episodes in subjects with BP. PMID:24372913

  14. [Molecular Subtypes of Gastric Cancer].

    PubMed

    Hatogai, Ken; Doi, Toshihiko

    2016-03-01

    Gastric cancer has been classified based on the pathological characteristics including microscopic configuration and growth pattern. Although these classifications have been used in studies investigating prognosis and recurrence pattern, they are not considered for decisions regarding the therapeutic strategy. In the ToGA study, trastuzumab, an anti-HER2 monoclonal antibody, demonstrated clinical efficacy for gastric cancer with HER2 overexpression or HER2 gene amplification. Based on these findings of the ToGA study, the definition of HER2-positive gastric cancer was established. Thereafter, several molecular targeted agents, including agents targeting other receptor tyrosine kinases, have been investigated in gastric cancer. However, to date no biomarker, except HER2, has been established. Based on the recent technological development in the field of gene analysis, a comprehensive molecular evaluation of gastric cancer was performed as part of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) project, and a new molecular classification was proposed that divided gastric cancer into the following 4 subtypes: tumors positive for Epstein-Barr virus, microsatellite instability tumors, genomically stable tumors, and tumors with chromosomal instability. Each subtype has specific molecular alterations including gene mutation and amplification, DNA methylation, and protein overexpression. Additionally, some subtypes were suggested to be correlated with the clinicopathological characteristics or as targets of some molecular targeted agents that are currently under development. The new molecular classification is expected to be a roadmap for patient stratification and clinical trials on molecular targeted therapies in gastric cancer. PMID:27067842

  15. Serotonin and Aggressiveness in Chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Serotonin (5-HT) regulates aggressive behavior in animals. This study examined if 5-HT regulation of aggressiveness is gene-dependent. Chickens from two divergently selected lines KGB and MBB (Kind Gentle Birds and Mean Bad Birds displaying low and high aggressiveness, respectively) and DXL (Dekalb ...

  16. Children's normative beliefs about aggression and aggressive behavior.

    PubMed

    Huesmann, L R; Guerra, N G

    1997-02-01

    Normative beliefs have been defined as self-regulating beliefs about the appropriateness of social behaviors. In 2 studies the authors revised their scale for assessing normative beliefs about aggression, found that it is reliable and valid for use with elementary school children, and investigated the longitudinal relation between normative beliefs about aggression and aggressive behavior in a large sample of elementary school children living in poor urban neighborhoods. Using data obtained in 2 waves of observations 1 year apart, the authors found that children tended to approve more of aggression as they grew older and that this increase appeared to be correlated with increases in aggressive behavior. More important, although individual differences in aggressive behavior predicted subsequent differences in normative beliefs in younger children, individual differences in aggressive behavior were predicted by preceding differences in normative beliefs in older children. PMID:9107008

  17. Can histologic changes of the upper pole justify a conservative approach in neonatal duplex ectopic ureterocele?

    PubMed

    Arena, F; Nicotina, A; Cruccetti, A; Centonze, A; Arena, S; Romeo, G

    2002-12-01

    The aim of this study was to review the histology of the upper-pole segment in patients with duplex-system ectopic ureterocele (DEU) to determine if less aggressive surgery is justified in prenatally-diagnosed cases. The study included 15 consecutive patients with DEU treated between 1991 and 1999. The diagnosis was made according to the criteria of the Section on Urology of the American Academy of Pediatrics. The histology specimens were assessed for dysplastic, inflammatory, and obstructive changes. All 15 patients were surgically treated by heminephro-ureterectomy and the surgical specimens were histologically examined. Nine cases were diagnosed prenatally; the histology of the upper-pole segment in these patients showed segmental renal microcystic dysplasia, chondroid metaplasic islands, and an inflammatory tubulointerstitial nephropathy in 6 (66.6%) and nephroblastomatosis in 2 (22.2%). The histology of the 6 postnatally-diagnosed patients showed segmental multicystic renal dysplasia, inflammatory tubulo-interstitial nephropathy, and segmental parenchymal scars. The upper-pole histology of the prenatally-diagnosed patients did not show any evidence of reversible histologic changes. Considering this findings and the good outcome of patients treated with upper-pole nephroureterectomy, less aggressive surgery with preservation of the upper pole does not seem justified. PMID:12598963

  18. A Cross-Species Analysis in Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors Reveals Molecular Subtypes with Distinctive Clinical, Metastatic, Developmental, and Metabolic Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Sadanandam, Anguraj; Wullschleger, Stephan; Lyssiotis, Costas A.; Grötzinger, Carsten; Barbi, Stefano; Bersani, Samantha; Körner, Jan; Wafy, Ismael; Mafficini, Andrea; Lawlor, Rita T.; Simbolo, Michele; Asara, John M.; Bläker, Hendrik; Cantley, Lewis C.; Wiedenmann, Bertram; Scarpa, Aldo; Hanahan, Douglas

    2016-01-01

    Seeking to assess the representative and instructive value of an engineered mouse model of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PanNET) for its cognate human cancer, we profiled and compared mRNA and miRNA transcriptomes of tumors from both. Mouse PanNET tumors could be classified into two distinctive subtypes, well-differentiated islet/insulinoma tumors (IT) and poorly differentiated tumors associated with liver metastases, dubbed metastasis-like primary (MLP). Human PanNETs were independently classified into these same two subtypes, along with a third, specific gene mutation–enriched subtype. The MLP subtypes in human and mouse were similar to liver metastases in terms of miRNA and mRNA transcriptome profiles and signature genes. The human/mouse MLP subtypes also similarly expressed genes known to regulate early pancreas development, whereas the IT subtypes expressed genes characteristic of mature islet cells, suggesting different tumorigenesis pathways. In addition, these subtypes exhibit distinct metabolic profiles marked by differential pyruvate metabolism, substantiating the significance of their separate identities. SIGNIFICANCE This study involves a comprehensive cross-species integrated analysis of multi-omics profiles and histology to stratify PanNETs into subtypes with distinctive characteristics. We provide support for the RIP1-TAG2 mouse model as representative of its cognate human cancer with prospects to better understand PanNET heterogeneity and consider future applications of personalized cancer therapy. PMID:26446169

  19. Epigenetic analysis leads to identification of HNF1B as a subtype-specific susceptibility gene for ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hui; Fridley, Brooke L; Song, Honglin; Lawrenson, Kate; Cunningham, Julie M; Ramus, Susan J; Cicek, Mine S; Tyrer, Jonathan; Stram, Douglas; Larson, Melissa C; Köbel, Martin; Ziogas, Argyrios; Zheng, Wei; Yang, Hannah P; Wu, Anna H; Wozniak, Eva L; Woo, Yin Ling; Winterhoff, Boris; Wik, Elisabeth; Whittemore, Alice S; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Weber, Rachel Palmieri; Vitonis, Allison F; Vincent, Daniel; Vierkant, Robert A; Vergote, Ignace; Van Den Berg, David; Van Altena, Anne M; Tworoger, Shelley S; Thompson, Pamela J; Tessier, Daniel C; Terry, Kathryn L; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Templeman, Claire; Stram, Daniel O; Southey, Melissa C; Sieh, Weiva; Siddiqui, Nadeem; Shvetsov, Yurii B; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Shridhar, Viji; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Severi, Gianluca; Schwaab, Ira; Salvesen, Helga B; Rzepecka, Iwona K; Runnebaum, Ingo B; Rossing, Mary Anne; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Lorna; Risch, Harvey A; Renner, Stefan P; Poole, Elizabeth M; Pike, Malcolm C; Phelan, Catherine M; Pelttari, Liisa M; Pejovic, Tanja; Paul, James; Orlow, Irene; Omar, Siti Zawiah; Olson, Sara H; Odunsi, Kunle; Nickels, Stefan; Nevanlinna, Heli; Ness, Roberta B; Narod, Steven A; Nakanishi, Toru; Moysich, Kirsten B; Monteiro, Alvaro N A; Moes-Sosnowska, Joanna; Modugno, Francesmary; Menon, Usha; McLaughlin, John R; McGuire, Valerie; Matsuo, Keitaro; Adenan, Noor Azmi Mat; Massuger, Leon F A G; Lurie, Galina; Lundvall, Lene; Lubiński, Jan; Lissowska, Jolanta; Levine, Douglas A; Leminen, Arto; Lee, Alice W; Le, Nhu D; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Lambrechts, Diether; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Krakstad, Camilla; Konecny, Gottfried E; Kjaer, Susanne Krüger; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Kelemen, Linda E; Keeney, Gary L; Karlan, Beth Y; Karevan, Rod; Kalli, Kimberly R; Kajiyama, Hiroaki; Ji, Bu-Tian; Jensen, Allan; Jakubowska, Anna; Iversen, Edwin; Hosono, Satoyo; Høgdall, Claus K; Høgdall, Estrid; Hoatlin, Maureen; Hillemanns, Peter; Heitz, Florian; Hein, Rebecca; Harter, Philipp; Halle, Mari K; Hall, Per; Gronwald, Jacek; Gore, Martin; Goodman, Marc T; Giles, Graham G; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Flanagan, James M; Fasching, Peter A; Ekici, Arif B; Edwards, Robert; Eccles, Diana; Easton, Douglas F; Dürst, Matthias; du Bois, Andreas; Dörk, Thilo; Doherty, Jennifer A; Despierre, Evelyn; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; Cybulski, Cezary; Cramer, Daniel W; Cook, Linda S; Chen, Xiaoqing; Charbonneau, Bridget; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Campbell, Ian; Butzow, Ralf; Bunker, Clareann H; Brueggmann, Doerthe; Brown, Robert; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Brinton, Louise A; Bogdanova, Natalia; Block, Matthew S; Benjamin, Elizabeth; Beesley, Jonathan; Beckmann, Matthias W; Bandera, Elisa V; Baglietto, Laura; Bacot, François; Armasu, Sebastian M; Antonenkova, Natalia; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Aben, Katja K; Liang, Dong; Wu, Xifeng; Lu, Karen; Hildebrandt, Michelle A T; Schildkraut, Joellen M; Sellers, Thomas A; Huntsman, David; Berchuck, Andrew; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Gayther, Simon A; Pharoah, Paul D P; Laird, Peter W; Goode, Ellen L; Pearce, Celeste Leigh

    2013-01-01

    HNF1B is overexpressed in clear cell epithelial ovarian cancer, and we observed epigenetic silencing in serous epithelial ovarian cancer, leading us to hypothesize that variation in this gene differentially associates with epithelial ovarian cancer risk according to histological subtype. Here we comprehensively map variation in HNF1B with respect to epithelial ovarian cancer risk and analyse DNA methylation and expression profiles across histological subtypes. Different single-nucleotide polymorphisms associate with invasive serous (rs7405776 odds ratio (OR)=1.13, P=3.1 × 10(-10)) and clear cell (rs11651755 OR=0.77, P=1.6 × 10(-8)) epithelial ovarian cancer. Risk alleles for the serous subtype associate with higher HNF1B-promoter methylation in these tumours. Unmethylated, expressed HNF1B, primarily present in clear cell tumours, coincides with a CpG island methylator phenotype affecting numerous other promoters throughout the genome. Different variants in HNF1B associate with risk of serous and clear cell epithelial ovarian cancer; DNA methylation and expression patterns are also notably distinct between these subtypes. These findings underscore distinct mechanisms driving different epithelial ovarian cancer histological subtypes. PMID:23535649

  20. Epigenetic analysis leads to identification of HNF1B as a subtype-specific susceptibility gene for ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Hui; Fridley, Brooke L.; Song, Honglin; Lawrenson, Kate; Cunningham, Julie M.; Ramus, Susan J.; Cicek, Mine S.; Tyrer, Jonathan; Stram, Douglas; Larson, Melissa C.; Köbel, Martin; Ziogas, Argyrios; Zheng, Wei; Yang, Hannah P.; Wu, Anna H.; Wozniak, Eva L.; Woo, Yin Ling; Winterhoff, Boris; Wik, Elisabeth; Whittemore, Alice S.; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Weber, Rachel Palmieri; Vitonis, Allison F.; Vincent, Daniel; Vierkant, Robert A.; Vergote, Ignace; Van Den Berg, David; Van Altena, Anne M.; Tworoger, Shelley S.; Thompson, Pamela J.; Tessier, Daniel C.; Terry, Kathryn L.; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Templeman, Claire; Stram, Daniel O.; Southey, Melissa C.; Sieh, Weiva; Siddiqui, Nadeem; Shvetsov, Yurii B.; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Shridhar, Viji; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Severi, Gianluca; Schwaab, Ira; Salvesen, Helga B.; Rzepecka, Iwona K.; Runnebaum, Ingo B.; Rossing, Mary Anne; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Lorna; Risch, Harvey A.; Renner, Stefan P.; Poole, Elizabeth M.; Pike, Malcolm C.; Phelan, Catherine M.; Pelttari, Liisa M.; Pejovic, Tanja; Paul, James; Orlow, Irene; Omar, Siti Zawiah; Olson, Sara H.; Odunsi, Kunle; Nickels, Stefan; Nevanlinna, Heli; Ness, Roberta B.; Narod, Steven A.; Nakanishi, Toru; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Monteiro, Alvaro N.A.; Moes-Sosnowska, Joanna; Modugno, Francesmary; Menon, Usha; McLaughlin, John R.; McGuire, Valerie; Matsuo, Keitaro; Adenan, Noor Azmi Mat; Massuger, Leon F.A. G.; Lurie, Galina; Lundvall, Lene; Lubiński, Jan; Lissowska, Jolanta; Levine, Douglas A.; Leminen, Arto; Lee, Alice W.; Le, Nhu D.; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Lambrechts, Diether; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Krakstad, Camilla; Konecny, Gottfried E.; Kjaer, Susanne Krüger; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Kelemen, Linda E.; Keeney, Gary L.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Karevan, Rod; Kalli, Kimberly R.; Kajiyama, Hiroaki; Ji, Bu-Tian; Jensen, Allan; Jakubowska, Anna; Iversen, Edwin; Hosono, Satoyo; Høgdall, Claus K.; Høgdall, Estrid; Hoatlin, Maureen; Hillemanns, Peter; Heitz, Florian; Hein, Rebecca; Harter, Philipp; Halle, Mari K.; Hall, Per; Gronwald, Jacek; Gore, Martin; Goodman, Marc T.; Giles, Graham G.; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Flanagan, James M.; Fasching, Peter A.; Ekici, Arif B.; Edwards, Robert; Eccles, Diana; Easton, Douglas F.; Dürst, Matthias; du Bois, Andreas; Dörk, Thilo; Doherty, Jennifer A.; Despierre, Evelyn; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; Cybulski, Cezary; Cramer, Daniel W.; Cook, Linda S.; Chen, Xiaoqing; Charbonneau, Bridget; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Campbell, Ian; Butzow, Ralf; Bunker, Clareann H.; Brueggmann, Doerthe; Brown, Robert; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Brinton, Louise A.; Bogdanova, Natalia; Block, Matthew S.; Benjamin, Elizabeth; Beesley, Jonathan; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Bandera, Elisa V.; Baglietto, Laura; Bacot, François; Armasu, Sebastian M.; Antonenkova, Natalia; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Aben, Katja K.; Liang, Dong; Wu, Xifeng; Lu, Karen; Hildebrandt, Michelle A.T.; Schildkraut, Joellen M.; Sellers, Thomas A.; Huntsman, David; Berchuck, Andrew; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Gayther, Simon A.; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Laird, Peter W.; Goode, Ellen L.; Pearce, Celeste Leigh

    2013-01-01

    HNF1B is overexpressed in clear cell epithelial ovarian cancer, and we observed epigenetic silencing in serous epithelial ovarian cancer, leading us to hypothesize that variation in this gene differentially associates with epithelial ovarian cancer risk according to histological subtype. Here we comprehensively map variation in HNF1B with respect to epithelial ovarian cancer risk and analyse DNA methylation and expression profiles across histological subtypes. Different single-nucleotide polymorphisms associate with invasive serous (rs7405776 odds ratio (OR) = 1.13, P = 3.1 × 10−10) and clear cell (rs11651755 OR = 0.77, P = 1.6 × 10−8) epithelial ovarian cancer. Risk alleles for the serous subtype associate with higher HNF1B-promoter methylation in these tumours. Unmethylated, expressed HNF1B, primarily present in clear cell tumours, coincides with a CpG island methylator phenotype affecting numerous other promoters throughout the genome. Different variants in HNF1B associate with risk of serous and clear cell epithelial ovarian cancer; DNA methylation and expression patterns are also notably distinct between these subtypes. These findings underscore distinct mechanisms driving different epithelial ovarian cancer histological subtypes. PMID:23535649

  1. Super-SILAC Allows Classification of Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma Subtypes by Their Protein Expression Profiles*

    PubMed Central

    Deeb, Sally J.; D'Souza, Rochelle C. J.; Cox, Jürgen; Schmidt-Supprian, Marc; Mann, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    Correct classification of cancer patients into subtypes is a prerequisite for acute diagnosis and effective treatment. Currently this classification relies mainly on histological assessment, but gene expression analysis by microarrays has shown great promise. Here we show that high accuracy, quantitative proteomics can robustly segregate cancer subtypes directly at the level of expressed proteins. We investigated two histologically indistinguishable subtypes of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL): activated B-cell-like (ABC) and germinal-center B-cell-like (GCB) subtypes, by first developing a general lymphoma stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) mix from heavy stable isotope-labeled cell lines. This super-SILAC mix was combined with cell lysates from five ABC-DLBCL and five GCB-DLBCL cell lines. Shotgun proteomic analysis on a linear ion trap Orbitrap mass spectrometer with high mass accuracy at the MS and MS/MS levels yielded a proteome of more than 7,500 identified proteins. High accuracy of quantification allowed robust separation of subtypes by principal component analysis. The main contributors to the classification included proteins known to be differentially expressed between the subtypes such as the transcription factors IRF4 and SPI1/PU.1, cell surface markers CD44 and CD27, as well as novel candidates. We extracted a signature of 55 proteins that segregated subtypes and contained proteins connected to functional differences between the ABC and GCB-DLBCL subtypes, including many NF-κB-regulated genes. Shortening the analysis time to single-shot analysis combined with use of the new linear quadrupole Orbitrap analyzer (Q Exactive) also clearly differentiated between the subtypes. These results show that high resolution shotgun proteomics combined with super-SILAC-based quantification is a promising new technology for tumor characterization and classification. PMID:22442255

  2. Motives in Sexual Aggression: The Chinese Context.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tang, Catherine So-Kum; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Compared sexual and aggressive motives for sexual aggression in Chinese college students. Male undergraduates (N=146) completed self-report measures. Results suggest that sex guilt and aggressive guilt acted as inhibitors for their respective drives and sexual aggression resulted from aggressive, rather than sexual, motives. Sexual aggression may…

  3. Experimental infection with Cryptosporidium parvum IIaA21G1R1 subtype in immunosuppressed mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cryptosporidium parvum subtype IIaA21G1R1 oocysts were used to infect dexamethasone immunosuppressed N: NIH Swiss mice. Histology showed developmental stages in the duodenum, proximal and distal jejunum, ileum, cecum and colon, with the small intestine remaining infected until day 35 post infection....

  4. Prognostic effect analysis of molecular subtype on young breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hong-Liang; Wang, Fu-Wen

    2015-01-01

    Objective To make a prognostic effect analysis of molecular subtype on young breast cancer patients. Methods Totally 187 cases of young breast cancer patients less than 40 years old treated in Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospital of Fudan University between June 2005 and June 2011 were included in our study. We described their clinical-pathological characteristics, disease-free survival (DFS) rate, and overall survival (OS) rate after a median follow-up period of 61 months. The factors associated with prognosis were also evaluated by univariate and multivariate analyses. Results All patients were premenopausal, with an average age of 35.36±3.88 years old. The mean tumor size was 2.43±1.53 cm. Eighty-one cases had lymph node metastasis (43.3%), 126 cases had lymphovascular invasion (67.4%), and 125 cases had histological grade III (66.8%) disease. Twenty-seven cases (14.4%) were Luminal A subtype, 99 cases (52.9%) were Luminal B subtype, 29 cases (15.5%) were human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER-2) overexpression subtype, while 32 cases (17.1%) were triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) subtype according to 2013 St Gallen expert consensus. One hundred and thirty-five cases underwent mastectomy whereas 52 cases had breast-conserving surgery. One hundred and seventy-eight cases underwent adjuvant or neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Recurrence or metastasis occurred in 29 cases, 13 of which died. The 5-year DFS and OS rates were 84% and 92%. Multivariate analysis showed that nodal status (P=0.041) and molecular subtype (P=0.037) were both independent prognostic factors of DFS, while nodal status (P=0.037) and TNBC subtype (P=0.048) were both independent prognostic factors of OS. Conclusions Molecular subtype is an independent prognostic factor of young breast cancer patients. TNBC has a high risk of relapse and death. PMID:26361413

  5. The neurobiology of offensive aggression: Revealing a modular view.

    PubMed

    de Boer, S F; Olivier, B; Veening, J; Koolhaas, J M

    2015-07-01

    Experimental studies aimed at understanding the neurobiology of aggression started in the early 20th century, and by employing increasingly sophisticated tools of functional neuroanatomy (i.e., from electric/chemical lesion and stimulation techniques to neurochemical mapping and manipulations) have provided the important framework for the functional brain circuit organization of aggressive behaviors. Recently, newly emerging technologies for mapping,measuring and manipulating neural circuitry at the level of molecular and genetically defined neuronal subtypes promise to further delineate the precise neural microcircuits mediating the initiation and termination of aggressive behavior, and characterize its dynamic neuromolecular functioning. This paper will review some of the behavioral, neuroanatomical and neurochemical evidence in support of a modular view of the neurobiology of offensive aggressive behavior. Although aggressive behavior likely arises from a specific concerted activity within a distributed neural network across multiple brain regions, emerging opto- and pharmacogenetic neuronal manipulation studies make it clear that manipulation of molecularly-defined neurons within a single node of this global interconnected network seems to be both necessary and sufficient to evoke aggressive attacks. However, the evidence so far also indicates that in addition to behavior-specific neurons there are neuronal systems that should be considered as more general behavioral control modules. The answer to the question of behavioral specificity of brain structures at the level of individual neurons requires a change of the traditional experimental setup. Studies using c-fos expression mapping usually compare the activation patterns induced by for example aggression with a home cage control. However, to reveal the behavioral specificity of this neuronal activation pattern, a comparison with other social and non-social related behaviors such as mating, defensive burying

  6. Rhinitis Subtypes, Endotypes, and Definitions.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulos, Nikolaos G; Guibas, George V

    2016-05-01

    Rhinitis is often seen as posing a small burden. However, rhinitis is a complex disease that is underpinned by a plethora of different mechanisms and causes. Rhinitis is frequently associated with other comorbid conditions but, by itself, is a source of considerable morbidity for patients and creates a significant financial burden on health systems worldwide. This article approaches this condition from both a phenotypic and mechanistic standpoint, focusing on the complexity of characterizing these subtypes. Developing a clearer demarcation of the currently obscure rhinitis phenotypes and endotypes will substantially improve their future prevention and treatment. PMID:27083098

  7. A lectin chromatography/mass spectrometry discovery workflow identifies putative biomarkers of aggressive breast cancers

    PubMed Central

    Drake, Penelope M.; Schilling, Birgit; Niles, Richard K.; Prakobphol, Akraporn; Li, Bensheng; Jung, Kwanyoung; Cho, Wonryeon; Braten, Miles; Inerowicz, Halina D.; Williams, Katherine; Albertolle, Matthew; Held, Jason M.; Iacovides, Demetris; Sorensen, Dylan J.; Griffith, Obi L.; Johansen, Eric; Zawadzka, Anna M.; Cusack, Michael P.; Allen, Simon; Gormley, Matthew; Hall, Steven C.; Witkowska, H. Ewa; Gray, Joe W.; Regnier, Fred; Gibson, Bradford W.; Fisher, Susan J.

    2012-01-01

    We used a lectin chromatography/MS-based approach to screen conditioned medium from a panel of luminal (less aggressive) and triple negative (more aggressive) breast cancer cell lines (n = 5/subtype). The samples were fractionated using the lectins Aleuria aurantia (AAL) and Sambucus nigra agglutinin (SNA), which recognize fucose and sialic acid, respectively. The bound fractions were enzymatically N-deglycosylated and analyzed by LC-MS/MS. In total, we identified 533 glycoproteins, ~90% of which were components of the cell surface or extracellular matrix. We observed 1011 glycosites, 100 of which were solely detected in ≥3 triple negative lines. Statistical analyses suggested that a number of these glycosites were triple negative-specific and thus potential biomarkers for this tumor subtype. An analysis of RNAseq data revealed that approximately half of the mRNAs encoding the protein scaffolds that carried potential biomarker glycosites were upregulated in triple negative vs. luminal cell lines, and that a number of genes encoding fucosyl- or sialyltransferases were differentially expressed between the two subtypes, suggesting that alterations in glycosylation may also drive candidate identification. Notably, the glycoproteins from which these putative biomarker candidates were derived are involved in cancer-related processes. Thus, they may represent novel therapeutic targets for this aggressive tumor subtype. PMID:22309216

  8. Differentiating the subtypes of social anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Dalrymple, Kristy; D'Avanzato, Catherine

    2013-11-01

    Since the inclusion of subtypes of social anxiety disorder (SAD) in the DSM-III-R, the most studied have been generalized versus specific subtypes. Previous research indicated that the generalized subtype was associated with greater severity, comorbidity and functional impairment compared to the specific subtype, but more recent evidence supports a dimensional conceptualization of SAD. Earlier studies also possessed limitations, such as heterogeneity in definitions of generalized SAD. Based on the more recent findings and the limitations of the earlier studies, the DSM-5 eliminated the generalized specifier. However, it also retained a categorical system by including a performance-based fear specifier, thus leaving an open debate on whether or not a dimensional or categorical system best describes SAD. Future research could examine other, more recent concepts as potential subtypes (e.g., attentional biases), or perhaps the larger question of the overall utility in subtyping SAD. PMID:24175725

  9. Assessing Interpersonal Subtypes in Depression.

    PubMed

    Simon, Sarah; Cain, Nicole M; Wallner Samstag, Lisa; Meehan, Kevin B; Muran, J Christopher

    2015-01-01

    The context-free diagnoses outlined by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders might not provide enough information to represent the heterogeneity observed in depressed patients. Interpersonal factors have been linked to depression in a mutually influencing pathoplastic relationship where certain problems, like submissiveness, are related to symptom chronicity. This study evaluated interpersonal pathoplasticity in a range of depressive presentations. We examined archival data collected from 407 participants who met criteria for major depressive disorder (MDD), dysthymic disorder (DD), or subthreshold depression (sD). Latent profile analysis (LPA) identified 5 interpersonal subtypes (vindictive, intrusive, socially avoidant, exploitable, and cold). Apart from gender, the subtypes did not differ significantly on demographic characteristics, psychiatric comorbidity, or self-report depression severity. Socially avoidant participants were more likely to meet criteria for a clinical depression diagnosis (MDD or DD), whereas vindictive participants were more likely to have sD. Our results indicate that interpersonal problems could account for heterogeneity observed in depression. PMID:25803309

  10. [A little known entity: aggressive fibromatosis].

    PubMed

    Marqúes Gubern, A; Pérez Payarols, J; Sánchez de Toledo, J; Martínez Ibáñez, V; Moraga, F; de Torres Ramírez, I M

    1991-01-01

    Aggressive fibromatosis is an unfrequent and little known entity, which in spite of being a histologically benign tumoration with scarce mitosis and without metastasis at distance, frequently presents with a high degree of local malignancy that can cause serious functional and aesthetical disturbance for the patient and even lead to death if infiltration of vital organs is presented, above all in cases of abdominal or maxillo-facial mass localization. The authors present their experience with 17 cases of aggressive fibromatosis observed in our centre: four of abdominal localization, six in extremities, five in the maxillo-facial mass, one in the torax and one in the lumbo-sacral region. Histological diagnosis, either by puncture or biopsy, is complemented by studies of extension of the tumour based on ecography and TAC. All cases were treated according to the classical criteria of ample resection of the lesion, always when practicable, except in one infant case and in the torax, in which only a biopsy was effected. Of the 15 cases resected, nine cases had local relapses, six of which remained free of disease with a second operation, another two required a third operation and the remaining case needed five interventions. In six children chemotherapy was applied with vincristina, cyclophosphamide and adriamicina. A follow up was carried out in 14 patients, one of which died and the remaining 13 are free of disease. In spite of the fact that progestagene receptors were not evidenced in two of our cases, one presented complete remission of the tumor after treatment with medroxyprogesterone. In this case the coincidence of Gardner's syndrome arises in the family history.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2043434

  11. Adult interpersonal features of subtypes of sexual offenders.

    PubMed

    Sigre-Leirós, Vera; Carvalho, Joana; Nobre, Pedro J

    2015-08-01

    Although the role of interpersonal factors on sexual offending is already recognized, there is a need for further investigation on the psychosocial correlates of pedophilic behavior. This study aimed to examine the relationship between adult interpersonal features and subtypes of sexual offending. The study involved the participation of a total of 164 male convicted offenders namely 50 rapists, 63 child molesters (20 pedophilic and 43 nonpedophilic), and 51 nonsexual offenders. All participants were assessed using the Adult Attachment Scale, the Interpersonal Behavior Survey, the Brief Symptom Inventory, and the Socially Desirable Response Set Measure. Results from sets of multinomial logistic regression analyses showed that pedophilic offenders were more likely to present anxiety in adult relationships compared to nonsex offenders. Likewise, nonpedophilic child molesters were less likely to be generally aggressive compared to rapists and nonsex offenders, as well as less generally assertive than rapists. Overall, findings indicated that certain interpersonal features characterized subtypes of offenders, thus providing some insight on their particular therapeutic needs. Further replications with larger samples particularly of pedophilic child molesters are required. PMID:26165651

  12. The nature of human aggression.

    PubMed

    Archer, John

    2009-01-01

    Human aggression is viewed from four explanatory perspectives, derived from the ethological tradition. The first consists of its adaptive value, which can be seen throughout the animal kingdom, involving resource competition and protection of the self and offspring, which has been viewed from a cost-benefit perspective. The second concerns the phylogenetic origin of aggression, which in humans involves brain mechanisms that are associated with anger and inhibition, the emotional expression of anger, and how aggressive actions are manifest. The third concerns the origin of aggression in development and its subsequent modification through experience. An evolutionary approach to development yields conclusions that are contrary to the influential social learning perspective, notably that physical aggression occurs early in life, and its subsequent development is characterized by learned inhibition. The fourth explanation concerns the motivational mechanisms controlling aggression: approached from an evolutionary background, these mechanisms range from the inflexible reflex-like responses to those incorporating rational decision-making. PMID:19411108

  13. Girls, aggression, and emotion regulation.

    PubMed

    Conway, Anne M

    2005-04-01

    Many studies have demonstrated that boys are more aggressive than girls (see J. D. Coie & K. Dodge, 1997, for a review) and that emotion regulation difficulties are associated with problematic behaviors (N. Eisenberg & R. A. Fabes, 1999; M. Gilliom, D. S. Shaw, J. E. Beck, M. A. Schonberg, & J. L. Lukon, 2002). However, recent findings indicate that gender differences in aggressive behaviors disappear when assessments are broadened to include relational aggression--behaviors designed to harm the relationship goals of others by spreading rumors, gossiping, and eliciting peer rejection of others. Moreover, although difficulties regulating emotions have been reported for physically aggressive children, little research has examined these processes in relationally aggressive children. This article argues that investigation into the associations between emotion regulation and relational aggression is a critical direction for future research on the etiology and prevention of mental health problems in girls. PMID:15839769

  14. Chronic neglect and aggression/delinquency: A longitudinal examination.

    PubMed

    Logan-Greene, Patricia; Semanchin Jones, Annette

    2015-07-01

    Neglect is the most common form of maltreatment in the United States, yet its impact on development remains understudied, especially for chronic neglect. Chronic neglect is also one of the most costly burdens on child welfare systems. This study examines the effects of chronic neglect, including two subtypes (Failure to Provide and Lack of Supervision) on adolescent aggression and delinquency using a diverse longitudinal sample of youth. Chronic neglect and chronic failure to provide (ages 0-12) predicted aggression/delinquency (age 14) even after controlling for the effects of other maltreatment (ages 0-12). Chronic lack of supervision, however, did not. Gender significantly moderated these effects, suggesting that males are more likely to respond to neglect by becoming aggressive/delinquent. Finally, social problems (age 12) partially mediated for boys, and fully mediated for girls, the connections between chronic neglect and aggression/delinquency, bolstering theorizing that neglect impairs social functioning broadly. Implications include the need for further research on chronic neglect, especially in providing guidance for child welfare systems. Interventions for chronically neglected youth should include social skill development. PMID:25910418

  15. Luminal B breast cancer subtype displays a dicotomic epigenetic pattern.

    PubMed

    Bediaga, Naiara G; Beristain, Elena; Calvo, Borja; Viguri, María A; Gutierrez-Corres, Borja; Rezola, Ricardo; Ruiz-Diaz, Irune; Guerra, Isabel; de Pancorbo, Marian M

    2016-01-01

    Luminal B breast tumors have aggressive clinical and biological features, and constitute the most heterogeneous molecular subtype, both clinically and molecularly. Unfortunately, the immunohistochemistry correlate of the luminal B subtype remains still imprecise, and it has now become of paramount importance to define a classification scheme capable of segregating luminal tumors into clinically meaningful subgroups that may be used clinically to guide patient management. With the aim of unraveling the DNA methylation profiles of the luminal subtypes currently being most used in the clinical setting, we have quantified the DNA methylation level of 27,578 CpG sites in 17 luminal B (ER+, Ki67 ≥ 20 % or PgR < 20 % and HER2-), 8 luminal A (ER+ and Ki67 > 20 %) and 4 luminal B-HER2+ (ER+ and HER2+) breast cancer samples by using the Illumina Infinium methylation microarray approach. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering revealed that DNA methylation stratifies luminal B samples in two categories with differing epigenetic and clinical features. One subgroup of luminal B samples showed a methylator phenotype and clustered with the lumB-HER tumors, while the other showed less methylated events, clustered with the luminal A. A 3 CpG marker panel capable of discriminating methylator versus non-methylator luminal B samples was identified and further validated in an independent cohort of patients. Our results provide evidence that DNA methylation and, more specifically, a panel of 3 CpG markers, enables the stratification of luminal B samples in two categories with differing epigenetic and clinical features and support the utilization of this panel for therapeutic stratification of patients with luminal breast cancer. PMID:27330889

  16. Subtype-specific micro-RNA expression signatures in breast cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Haakensen, Vilde D; Nygaard, Vegard; Greger, Liliana; Aure, Miriam R; Fromm, Bastian; Bukholm, Ida R K; Lüders, Torben; Chin, Suet-Feung; Git, Anna; Caldas, Carlos; Kristensen, Vessela N; Brazma, Alvis; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Hovig, Eivind; Helland, Åslaug

    2016-09-01

    Robust markers of invasiveness may help reduce the overtreatment of in situ carcinomas. Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease and biological mechanisms for carcinogenesis vary between subtypes. Stratification by subtype is therefore necessary to identify relevant and robust signatures of invasive disease. We have identified microRNA (miRNA) alterations during breast cancer progression in two separate datasets and used stratification and external validation to strengthen the findings. We analyzed two separate datasets (METABRIC and AHUS) consisting of a total of 186 normal breast tissue samples, 18 ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and 1,338 invasive breast carcinomas. Validation in a separate dataset and stratification by molecular subtypes based on immunohistochemistry, PAM50 and integrated cluster classifications were performed. We propose subtype-specific miRNA signatures of invasive carcinoma and a validated signature of DCIS. miRNAs included in the invasive signatures include downregulation of miR-139-5p in aggressive subtypes and upregulation of miR-29c-5p expression in the luminal subtypes. No miRNAs were differentially expressed in the transition from DCIS to invasive carcinomas on the whole, indicating the need for subtype stratification. A total of 27 miRNAs were included in our proposed DCIS signature. Significant alterations of expression included upregulation of miR-21-5p and the miR-200 family and downregulation of let-7 family members in DCIS samples. The signatures proposed here can form the basis for studies exploring DCIS samples with increased invasive potential and serum biomarkers for in situ and invasive breast cancer. PMID:27082076

  17. Appearance Normalization of Histology Slides

    PubMed Central

    Niethammer, Marc; Borland, David; Marron, J. S.; Woosley, John; Thomas, Nancy E.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a method for automatic color and intensity normalization of digitized histology slides stained with two different agents. In comparison to previous approaches, prior information on the stain vectors is used in the estimation process, resulting in improved stability of the estimates. Due to the prevalence of hematoxylin and eosin staining for histology slides, the proposed method has significant practical utility. In particular, it can be used as a first step to standardize appearances across slides, that is very effective at countering effects due to differing stain amounts and protocols, and to slide fading. The approach is validated using synthetic experiments and 13 real datasets. PMID:25360444

  18. The Role of Parenting Styles in the Relation Between Functions of Aggression and Internalizing Symptoms in a Child Psychiatric Inpatient Population.

    PubMed

    Pederson, Casey A; Rathert, Jamie L; Fite, Paula J; Stoppelbein, Laura; Greening, Leilani

    2016-10-01

    Psychiatric inpatient hospitalization is a costly intervention for youth. With rates of hospitalization rising, efforts to refine prevention and intervention are necessary. Aggression often precedes severe internalizing behaviors, and proactive and reactive functions of aggression are differentially associated with internalizing symptomatology. Thus, further understanding of the links between functions of aggression and internalizing symptomatology could aid in the improvement of interventions for hospitalized youth. The current study examined parenting styles, gender, and age as potential moderators of the relations between proactive and reactive aggression and internalizing symptoms. Participants included 392 children, 6-12 years of age admitted consecutively to a psychiatric inpatient unit. Reactive aggression was uniquely associated with anxiety symptoms. However, proactive aggression was associated with internalizing problems only when specific parenting styles and demographic factors were present. Although both proactive and reactive subtypes of aggression were associated with internalizing symptoms, differential associations were evident. Implications of findings are discussed. PMID:26676142

  19. Subtypes of medulloblastoma have distinct developmental origins

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Paul; Tong, Yiai; Robinson, Giles; Thompson, Margaret C.; Currle, D. Spencer; Eden, Christopher; Kranenburg, Tanya A.; Hogg, Twala; Poppleton, Helen; Martin, Julie; Finkelstein, David; Pounds, Stanley; Weiss, Aaron; Patay, Zoltan; Scoggins, Matthew; Ogg, Robert; Pei, Yanxin; Yang, Zeng-Jie; Brun, Sonja; Lee, Youngsoo; Zindy, Frederique; Lindsey, Janet C.; Taketo, Makoto M.; Boop, Frederick A.; Sanford, Robert A.; Gajjar, Amar; Clifford, Steven C.; Roussel, Martine F.; McKinnon, Peter J.; Gutmann, David H.; Ellison, David W.; Wechsler-Reya, Robert; Gilbertson, Richard J.

    2010-01-01

    Medulloblastoma encompasses a collection of clinically and molecularly diverse tumor subtypes that together comprise the most common malignant childhood brain tumor1–4. These tumors are thought to arise within the cerebellum, with approximately 25% originating from granule neuron precursor cells (GNPCs) following aberrant activation of the Sonic Hedgehog pathway (hereafter, SHH-subtype)3–8. The pathological processes that drive heterogeneity among the other medulloblastoma subtypes are not known, hindering the development of much needed new therapies. Here, we provide evidence that a discrete subtype of medulloblastoma that contains activating mutations in the WNT pathway effector CTNNB1 (hereafter, WNT-subtype)1,3,4, arises outside the cerebellum from cells of the dorsal brainstem. We found that genes marking human WNT-subtype medulloblastomas are more frequently expressed in the lower rhombic lip (LRL) and embryonic dorsal brainstem than in the upper rhombic lip (URL) and developing cerebellum. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and intra-operative reports showed that human WNT-subtype tumors infiltrate the dorsal brainstem, while SHH-subtype tumors are located within the cerebellar hemispheres. Activating mutations in Ctnnb1 had little impact on progenitor cell populations in the cerebellum, but caused the abnormal accumulation of cells on the embryonic dorsal brainstem that included aberrantly proliferating Zic1+ precursor cells. These lesions persisted in all mutant adult mice and in 15% of cases in which Tp53 was concurrently deleted, progressed to form medulloblastomas that recapitulated the anatomy and gene expression profiles of human WNT-subtype medulloblastoma. We provide the first evidence that subtypes of medulloblastoma have distinct cellular origins. Our data provide an explanation for the marked molecular and clinical differences between SHH and WNT-subtype medulloblastomas and have profound implications for future research and treatment of this

  20. Brain Serotonin Receptors and Transporters: Initiation vs. Termination of Escalated Aggression

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Aki; Quadros, Isabel M.; de Almeida, Rosa M. M.; Miczek, Klaus A.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Recent findings have shown a complexly regulated 5-HT system as it is linked to different kinds of aggression. Objective We focus on (1) phasic and tonic changes of 5-HT and (2) state and trait of aggression, and emphasize the different receptor subtypes, their role in specific brain regions, feed-back regulation and modulation by other amines, acids and peptides. Results New pharmacological tools differentiate the first three 5-HT receptor families and their modulation by GABA, glutamate and CRF. Activation of 5-HT1A, 5-HT1B and 5-HT2A/2C receptors in mesocorticolimbic areas, reduce species-typical and other aggressive behaviors. In contrast, agonists at 5-HT1A and 5-HT1B receptors in the medial prefrontal cortex or septal area can increase aggressive behavior under specific conditions. Activation of serotonin transporters reduce mainly pathological aggression. Genetic analyses of aggressive individuals have identified several molecules that affect the 5-HT system directly (e.g., Tph2, 5-HT1B, 5-HT transporter, Pet1, MAOA) or indirectly (e.g., Neuropeptide Y, αCaMKII, NOS, BDNF). Dysfunction in genes for MAOA escalates pathological aggression in rodents and humans, particularly in interaction with specific experiences. Conclusions Feedback to autoreceptors of the 5-HT1 family and modulation via heteroreceptors are important in the expression of aggressive behavior. Tonic increase of the 5-HT2 family expression may cause escalated aggression, whereas the phasic increase of 5-HT2 receptors inhibits aggressive behaviors. Polymorphisms in the genes of 5-HT transporters or rate-limiting synthetic and metabolic enzymes of 5-HT modulate aggression, often requiring interaction with the rearing environment. PMID:20938650

  1. Rethinking Aggression: A Typological Examination of the Functions of Aggression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Little, Todd D.; Brauner, Jessica; Jones, Stephanie M.; Nock, Matthew K.; Hawley, Patricia H.

    2003-01-01

    Compared five subgroups of aggressive children and adolescents on several adjustment correlates. Found that the reactive group and the group high on both instrumental and reactive reasons for aggression showed consistent maladaptive patterns across the adjustment correlates. The instrumental and typical groups (moderate on instrumental and…

  2. Review of renal cell carcinoma and its common subtypes in radiology

    PubMed Central

    Low, Gavin; Huang, Guan; Fu, Winnie; Moloo, Zaahir; Girgis, Safwat

    2016-01-01

    Representing 2%-3% of adult cancers, renal cell carcinoma (RCC) accounts for 90% of renal malignancies and is the most lethal neoplasm of the urologic system. Over the last 65 years, the incidence of RCC has increased at a rate of 2% per year. The increased incidence is at least partly due to improved tumor detection secondary to greater availability of high-resolution cross-sectional imaging modalities over the last few decades. Most RCCs are asymptomatic at discovery and are detected as unexpected findings on imaging performed for unrelated clinical indications. The 2004 World Health Organization Classification of adult renal tumors stratifies RCC into several distinct histologic subtypes of which clear cell, papillary and chromophobe tumors account for 70%, 10%-15%, and 5%, respectively. Knowledge of the RCC subtype is important because the various subtypes are associated with different biologic behavior, prognosis and treatment options. Furthermore, the common RCC subtypes can often be discriminated non-invasively based on gross morphologic imaging appearances, signal intensity on T2-weighted magnetic resonance images, and the degree of tumor enhancement on dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging examinations. In this article, we review the incidence and survival data, risk factors, clinical and biochemical findings, imaging findings, staging, differential diagnosis, management options and post-treatment follow-up of RCC, with attention focused on the common subtypes. PMID:27247714

  3. Review of renal cell carcinoma and its common subtypes in radiology.

    PubMed

    Low, Gavin; Huang, Guan; Fu, Winnie; Moloo, Zaahir; Girgis, Safwat

    2016-05-28

    Representing 2%-3% of adult cancers, renal cell carcinoma (RCC) accounts for 90% of renal malignancies and is the most lethal neoplasm of the urologic system. Over the last 65 years, the incidence of RCC has increased at a rate of 2% per year. The increased incidence is at least partly due to improved tumor detection secondary to greater availability of high-resolution cross-sectional imaging modalities over the last few decades. Most RCCs are asymptomatic at discovery and are detected as unexpected findings on imaging performed for unrelated clinical indications. The 2004 World Health Organization Classification of adult renal tumors stratifies RCC into several distinct histologic subtypes of which clear cell, papillary and chromophobe tumors account for 70%, 10%-15%, and 5%, respectively. Knowledge of the RCC subtype is important because the various subtypes are associated with different biologic behavior, prognosis and treatment options. Furthermore, the common RCC subtypes can often be discriminated non-invasively based on gross morphologic imaging appearances, signal intensity on T2-weighted magnetic resonance images, and the degree of tumor enhancement on dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging examinations. In this article, we review the incidence and survival data, risk factors, clinical and biochemical findings, imaging findings, staging, differential diagnosis, management options and post-treatment follow-up of RCC, with attention focused on the common subtypes. PMID:27247714

  4. Subtypes of Autism by Cluster Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eaves, Linda C.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Cluster analysis of data from 166 children with autistic spectrum disorders revealed 4 subtypes with differences in behavioral and cognitive areas. The four subtypes include a typically autistic group, a low-functioning group, a high-functioning group (Asperger syndrome/schizoid), and a hard-to-diagnose group with mild/moderate retardation and a…

  5. Histological findings in human brucellosis

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, A. C.; Bothwell, P. W.

    1967-01-01

    The histological findings in 14 cases of brucellosis are described. Unusual findings include the occurrence of brucellosis in a patient with Hodgkin's disease and in another with lymphosarcoma. A patient with hepatic cirrhosis apparently due to brucellosis is included in the series. Images PMID:5632572

  6. Strongyloidiasis histologically mimicking eosinophilic folliculitis.

    PubMed

    Cannavò, Serafinella P; Guarneri, Fabrizio; Guarneri, Claudio

    2004-01-01

    The authors report an unusual case of strongyloidiasis in an Italian patient, who has always lived in Sicily. The patient presented with marked blood eosinophilia and an itching maculo-papular eruption, histologically simulating eosinophilic folliculitis. The clinical resolution was achieved after albendazol therapy. PMID:15319162

  7. Histological evolution of pleuroparenchymal fibroelastosis

    PubMed Central

    Hirota, Takako; Yoshida, Yuji; Kitasato, Yasuhiko; Yoshimi, Michihiro; Koga, Takaomi; Tsuruta, Nobuko; Minami, Masato; Harada, Taishi; Ishii, Hiroshi; Fujita, Masaki; Nabeshima, Kazuki; Nagata, Nobuhiko; Watanabe, Kentaro

    2015-01-01

    Aims To investigate the histological evolution in the development of pleuroparenchymal fibroelastosis (PPFE). Methods and results We examined four patients who had undergone surgical lung biopsy twice, or who had undergone surgical lung biopsy and had been autopsied, and in whom the histological diagnosis of the first biopsy was not PPFE, but the diagnosis of the second biopsy or of the autopsy was PPFE. The histological patterns of the first biopsy were cellular and fibrotic interstitial pneumonia, cellular interstitial pneumonia (CIP) with organizing pneumonia, CIP with granulomas and acute lung injury in cases 1, 2, 3, and 4, respectively. Septal elastosis was already present in the non-specific interstitial pneumonia-like histology of case 1, but a few additional years were necessary to reach consolidated subpleural fibroelastosis. In case 3, subpleural fibroelastosis was already present in the first biopsy, but only to a small extent. Twelve years later, it was replaced by a long band of fibroelastosis. The septal inflammation and fibrosis and airspace organization observed in the first biopsies were replaced by less cellular subpleural fibroelastosis within 3–12 years. Conclusions Interstitial inflammation or acute lung injury may be an initial step in the development of PPFE. PMID:25234959

  8. Histologic Technician. Laboratory Occupations Cluster.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan State Univ., East Lansing. Coll. of Agriculture and Natural Resources Education Inst.

    This task-based curriculum guide for histologic technician is intended to help the teacher develop a classroom management system where students learn by doing. Introductory materials include a Dictionary of Occupational Titles job code and title sheet, a career ladder, a matrix relating duty/task numbers to job titles, and a task list. Each task…

  9. Reordering Histology to Enhance Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amerongen, Helen

    2011-01-01

    In redesigning the preclinical curriculum and shifting from a discipline-based approach to an organ system-based approach, faculty at the University of Arizona College of Medicine in Tucson took the opportunity to restructure the sequence of introductory histology content to make it more engaging and relevant. In this article, the author describes…

  10. Hilar cholangiocarcinoma. An evaluation of subtypes with CT and angiography.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Y; Takahashi, M; Kanazawa, S; Charnsangavej, C; Wallace, S

    1992-07-01

    Sixty-seven patients had hilar cholangiocarcinomas which were divided into 3 types based on tumor morphology as observed on cholangiography and CT. The pathology, vascularity, and pattern of tumor spread of these types were compared. Most of the infiltrative tumors (n = 44) were scirrhous adenocarcinomas, which on CT showed poor or no contrast enhancement with frequent lymph node metastases and liver atrophy. At angiography, there was vascular encasement in 52%, in rare cases neovascularity, and tumor stain. The exophytic type (n = 19) was divided into 2 subgroups depending on the main location of the tumor. The nodular subtype (n = 16) was mainly inside the liver and somewhat hypervascular similar to peripheral cholangiocarcinoma, often with intrahepatic metastases. The periductal subtype (n = 3) was hypovascular, similar to the infiltrative cholangiocarcinoma, and had a tendency to spread along the portal vein. The intraductal type (n = 4) was observed as a filling defect on cholangiography. CT revealed an intraluminal low density mass. Histologically, they were papillary adenocarcinomas. The radiologic types of hilar cholangiocarcinoma showed different characteristics with regard to pathologic findings, vascularity, and pattern of spread. PMID:1321653

  11. Aggression, suicidality, and serotonin.

    PubMed

    Linnoila, V M; Virkkunen, M

    1992-10-01

    Studies from several countries, representing diverse cultures, have reported an association between violent suicide attempts by patients with unipolar depression and personality disorders and low concentrations of the major serotonin metabolite 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Related investigations have documented a similar inverse correlation between impulsive, externally directed aggressive behavior and CSF 5-HIAA in a subgroup of violent offenders. In these individuals, low CSF 5-HIAA concentrations are also associated with a predisposition to mild hypoglycemia, a history of early-onset alcohol and substance abuse, a family history of type II alcoholism, and disturbances in diurnal activity rhythm. These data are discussed in the context of a proposed model for the pathophysiology of a postulated "low serotonin syndrome." PMID:1385390

  12. The Effects of Pornography on Aggressive Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stacy, Lauri L.

    This document reviews existing empirical research on the effect of pornography on aggressive behavior. Two types of pornography are distinguished: aggressive pornography and non-aggressive pornography. Conclusions drawn from the research review are presented, including: (1) aggressive pornograpy consistently increases aggressive attitudes and…

  13. Behavioral differences in aggressive children linked with neural mechanisms of emotion regulation.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Marc D; Granic, Isabela; Lamm, Connie

    2006-12-01

    Children with aggressive behavior problems may have difficulties regulating negative emotions, resulting in harmful patterns of interpersonal behavior at home and in the schoolyard. Ventral and dorsal regions of the prefrontal cortex (PFC) have been associated with response inhibition and self-control-key components of emotion regulation. Our research program aims to explore differences among aggressive and normal children in the activation of these cortical regions during emotional episodes, to the extent possible using electrophysiological techniques, to identify diagnostic subtypes, gain insights into their interpersonal difficulties, and help develop effective treatment strategies. This report reviews several recent studies investigating individual and developmental differences in cortical mechanisms of emotion regulation, corresponding with different patterns of interpersonal behavior. Our methods include event-related potentials (ERPs) and cortical source modeling, using dense-array electroencephalography (EEG) technology, as well as videotaped observations of parent-child interactions, with both normal and aggressive children. By relating patterns of brain activation to observed behavioral differences, we find (i) a steady decrease in cortical activation subserving self-regulation across childhood and adolescence, (ii) different cortical activation patterns as well as behavioral constellations distinguishing subtypes of aggressive children, and (iii) robust correlations between the activation of cortical mediators of emotion regulation and flexibility in parent-child emotional communication in children referred for aggressive behavior problems. These findings point toward models of developmental psychopathology based on the interplay among biological, psychological, and social factors. PMID:17347349

  14. Radiation-induced sarcoma of the breast in a female adolescent. Case report with histologic and therapeutic considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Squire, R.; Bianchi, A.; Jakate, S.M.

    1988-06-15

    A 14-year-old girl developed a radiation-induced sarcoma of the left breast after successful combined surgical and radiation therapy of a left adrenal carcinoma when she was 9 months old. The breast lesion was histologically described as a stromal sarcoma with fibrosarcomatous and myxosarcomatous areas. The second primary lesion and local recurrence of this was treated with surgery. At each recurrence the tumor became more aggressive both clinically and histologically, and eventually proved fatal.

  15. Psychological Research on Human Aggressiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamburg, D. A.; Brodie, H. K. H.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses research relating to the effects of hormones, neurophysiology, and the environment on animal and human aggression. Indicates that the interactions of biological, psychological and social processes in the development of human aggressiveness should constitute one of the principal frontiers for science in the next two decades. (JR)

  16. Aggression and Violence in Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    William Gladden Foundation, York, PA.

    This booklet was written to provide an understanding of aggression and violence in youth. Its purpose is to help parents, professionals, and other concerned citizens prevent or reduce these potentially dangerous behaviors. The introduction notes that many experts agree that aggression and violence are on the rise in America. The first section of…

  17. Lunar Influences on Human Aggression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Gordon W.; Dua, Manjula

    1983-01-01

    Used league records of all Canadian hockey games (N=426) played during a season to test a lunar-aggression hypothesis. Despite the use of multiple measures of lunar phase and interpersonal aggression, support for lunar influence was not forthcoming. Supplemental data revealed that beliefs in lunar influence are fairly common. (JAC)

  18. A psychoanalytic study of aggression.

    PubMed

    Furst, S S

    1998-01-01

    Eleven participants carried out a study of aggression by utilizing clinical data from the analyses of patients who manifested significant problems in the management of aggression. The purpose of the study was to increase understanding of the intrapsychic factors that determine the nature and intensity of aggressive tendencies, the place they occupy in the psychic economy, their patterns of expression, and the extrapsychic factors that trigger them. The findings of the study indicate, first, that aggression is multiply determined by developmental, genetic (experiential), and dynamic variables; second, that each cluster of variables affects the nature, intensity, and expression of aggression in a fairly specific way; third, the importance of aggression in the psychic economy is proportional to the extent to which it is overdetermined. The successful analysis of aggressive individuals depends not solely on interpretation and insight, but on the relationship to the analyst as new parent who does not threaten and prohibit. The relationship to the analyst permits developmental change, particularly the ability to organize, structure, and control aggression. As a result, it need not be expressed destructively, but may be placed in the service of constructive thought and action. PMID:9990829

  19. In search of Winnicott's aggression.

    PubMed

    Posner, B M; Glickman, R W; Taylor, E C; Canfield, J; Cyr, F

    2001-01-01

    Going beyond Winnicott's widely known ideas about creativity, in this paper the authors ask why some people are able to live creatively while others suffer recurrent feelings of anger, futility, and depression. Examining Winnicott's reframing of aggression as a life force, it attempts to answer this question by tracing the evolution of his thinking on the nature and origin of aggression. It argues that because he saw aggression as inherent and as central to emotional development, interference in its expression compromises psychic maturation. The paper explores how Winnicott arrived at the conception of a combined love-strife drive and demonstrates that for him, there is no love without aggression, no subject, no object, no reality, and no creativity. That is, for Winnicott, aggression is an achievement that leads to the capacity to live creatively and to experience authenticity. Clinical vignettes illustrate the therapeutic use of these conclusions and their value for psychoanalytic theory. PMID:12102012

  20. False memories for aggressive acts.

    PubMed

    Laney, Cara; Takarangi, Melanie K T

    2013-06-01

    Can people develop false memories for committing aggressive acts? How does this process compare to developing false memories for victimhood? In the current research we used a simple false feedback procedure to implant false memories for committing aggressive acts (causing a black eye or spreading malicious gossip) or for victimhood (receiving a black eye). We then compared these false memories to other subjects' true memories for equivalent events. False aggressive memories were all too easy to implant, particularly in the minds of individuals with a proclivity towards aggression. Once implanted, the false memories were indistinguishable from true memories for the same events, on several dimensions, including emotional content. Implications for aggression-related memory more generally as well as false confessions are discussed. PMID:23639921

  1. Predicting aggressive behavior with the aggressiveness-IAT.

    PubMed

    Banse, Rainer; Messer, Mario; Fischer, Ilka

    2015-01-01

    The Implicit Association Test (IAT, Greenwald, McGhee, & Schwartz, 1998) was adapted to assess the automatically activated (implicit) self-concept of aggressiveness. In three studies the validity of the Aggressiveness-IAT (Agg-IAT) was supported by substantial correlations with self-report measures of aggressiveness. After controlling for self-report measures of aggressiveness, the Agg-IAT accounted for 9-15% of the variance of three different indicators of aggressive behavior across three studies. To further explore the nomological network around the Agg-IAT we investigated its correlations with measures of social desirability (SD). Although not fully conclusive, the results across four studies provided some support for a weak negative correlation between impression management SD and aggressive behavior as well as the Agg-IAT. This result is in line with an interpersonally oriented self-control account of impression management SD. Individuals with high SD scores seem to behave less aggressively, and to show lower Agg-IAT scores. The one-week stability of the Agg-IAT was r = .58 in Study 4. Aggr. Behav. 41:65-83 2015. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27539875

  2. Two-Year Predictive Validity of Conduct Disorder Subtypes in Early Adolescence: A Latent Class Analysis of a Canadian Longitudinal Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lacourse, Eric; Baillargeon, Raymond; Dupere, Veronique; Vitaro, Frank; Romano, Elisa; Tremblay, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Background: Investigating the latent structure of conduct disorder (CD) can help clarify how symptoms related to aggression, property destruction, theft, and serious violations of rules cluster in individuals with this disorder. Discovering homogeneous subtypes can be useful for etiologic, treatment, and prevention purposes depending on the…

  3. Instrumental and Social Outcome Expectations of High-Aggressive and Low-Aggressive Boys.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cillessen, Antonius H. N.; Hubbard, Julie A.

    This study examined high-aggressive and low-aggressive boys' ratings of the effectiveness of aggressive and assertive strategies for solving social problems involving hypothetical peers and actual peers. Subjects were 66 third-grade boys (11 groups of 6 boys each for a total of 22 high-aggressive, 22 low-aggressive, and 22 average aggressive boys)…

  4. Discovery of biochemical biomarkers for aggression: A role for metabolomics in psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Hagenbeek, Fiona A; Kluft, Cornelis; Hankemeier, Thomas; Bartels, Meike; Draisma, Harmen H M; Middeldorp, Christel M; Berger, Ruud; Noto, Antonio; Lussu, Milena; Pool, René; Fanos, Vassilios; Boomsma, Dorret I

    2016-07-01

    Human aggression encompasses a wide range of behaviors and is related to many psychiatric disorders. We introduce the different classification systems of aggression and related disorders as a basis for discussing biochemical biomarkers and then present an overview of studies in humans (published between 1990 and 2015) that reported statistically significant associations of biochemical biomarkers with aggression, DSM-IV disorders involving aggression, and their subtypes. The markers are of different types, including inflammation markers, neurotransmitters, lipoproteins, and hormones from various classes. Most studies focused on only a limited portfolio of biomarkers, frequently a specific class only. When integrating the data, it is clear that compounds from several biological pathways have been found to be associated with aggressive behavior, indicating complexity and the need for a broad approach. In the second part of the paper, using examples from the aggression literature and psychiatric metabolomics studies, we argue that a better understanding of aggression would benefit from a more holistic approach such as provided by metabolomics. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26913573

  5. Aggressive Erotica and Violence against Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donnerstein, Edward

    1980-01-01

    Examines the effects of aggressive-erotic stimuli on male aggression toward females. Male subjects' deliveries of electric shocks to males or females after viewing either a neutral, erotic, or aggressive-erotic film were measured. (Author/SS)

  6. Appearance normalization of histology slides.

    PubMed

    Vicory, Jared; Couture, Heather D; Thomas, Nancy E; Borland, David; Marron, J S; Woosley, John; Niethammer, Marc

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents a method for automatic color and intensity normalization of digitized histology slides stained with two different agents. In comparison to previous approaches, prior information on the stain vectors is used in the plane estimation process, resulting in improved stability of the estimates. Due to the prevalence of hematoxylin and eosin staining for histology slides, the proposed method has significant practical utility. In particular, it can be used as a first step to standardize appearance across slides and is effective at countering effects due to differing stain amounts and protocols and counteracting slide fading. The approach is validated against non-prior plane-fitting using synthetic experiments and 13 real datasets. Results of application of the method to adjustment of faded slides are given, and the effectiveness of the method in aiding statistical classification is shown. PMID:25863518

  7. The Histological Classification of Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yi; Pittaluga, Stefania; Jaffe, Elaine S.

    2015-01-01

    Diffuse large B cell lymphomas (DLBCLs) are aggressive B-cell neoplasms with considerable clinical, biologic and pathologic diversity, in part reflecting the functional diversity of the B-cell system and multiple pathways of transformation. In recent years, the advent of new high-throughput genomic technologies has provided new insights into the biology of DLBCL, leading to the identification of distinct molecular identities and novel pathogenetic pathways. This increasing complexity had led to an expanding number of entities in the WHO classification. Using a multi-modality approach, the updated 2008 classification delineated some new subgroups, including DLBCLs associated with particular age groups or specific anatomic sites, as well as two borderline categories: tumors at the interface between classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL) and DLBCL as well as between Burkitt Lymphoma (BL) and DLBCL. This article reviews the histopathologic features of the various aggressive B-cell lymphoma subtypes included in the 2008 classification, with emphasis on some of the new entities as well as areas of diagnostic challenge. PMID:25805585

  8. Geographic differences in the distribution of molecular subtypes of breast cancer in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To compare the distribution of the intrinsic molecular subtypes of breast cancer based on immunohistochemical profile in the five major geographic regions of Brazil, a country of continental dimension, with a wide racial variation of people. Methods The study was retrospective observational. We classified 5,687 invasive breast cancers by molecular subtype based on immunohistochemical expression of estrogen-receptor (ER), progesterone-receptor (PR), human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), and Ki-67 proliferation index. Cases were classified as luminal A (ER and/or PR positive and HER2 negative, Ki-67 < 14%), luminal B (ER and/or PR positive, HER2 negative, and Ki-67 > 14%), triple-positive (ER and/or PR positive and HER2 positive), HER2-enriched (ER and PR negative, and HER2- positive), and triple-negative (TN) (ER negative, PR negative, and HER2- negative). Comparisons of the ages of patients and molecular subtypes between different geographic regions were performed. Results South and Southeast regions with a higher percentage of European ancestry and higher socioeconomic status presented with the highest proportion of luminal tumors. The North region presented with more aggressive subtypes (HER2-enriched and triple-negative), while the Central-West region predominated triple-positive carcinomas. The Northeast—a region with a high African influence—presented intermediate frequency of the different molecular subtypes. The differences persisted in subgroups of patients under and over 50 years. Conclusions The geographic regions differ according to the distribution of molecular subtypes of breast cancer. However, other differences, beside those related to African ancestry, such as socioeconomic, climatic, nutritional, and geographic, have to be considered to explain our results. The knowledge of the differences in breast cancer characteristics among the geographic regions may help to organize healthcare programs in large countries

  9. Quantitative histology analysis of the ovarian tumour microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Lan, Chunyan; Heindl, Andreas; Huang, Xin; Xi, Shaoyan; Banerjee, Susana; Liu, Jihong; Yuan, Yinyin

    2015-01-01

    Concerted efforts in genomic studies examining RNA transcription and DNA methylation patterns have revealed profound insights in prognostic ovarian cancer subtypes. On the other hand, abundant histology slides have been generated to date, yet their uses remain very limited and largely qualitative. Our goal is to develop automated histology analysis as an alternative subtyping technology for ovarian cancer that is cost-efficient and does not rely on DNA quality. We developed an automated system for scoring primary tumour sections of 91 late-stage ovarian cancer to identify single cells. We demonstrated high accuracy of our system based on expert pathologists' scores (cancer = 97.1%, stromal = 89.1%) as well as compared to immunohistochemistry scoring (correlation = 0.87). The percentage of stromal cells in all cells is significantly associated with poor overall survival after controlling for clinical parameters including debulking status and age (multivariate analysis p = 0.0021, HR = 2.54, CI = 1.40-4.60) and progression-free survival (multivariate analysis p = 0.022, HR = 1.75, CI = 1.09-2.82). We demonstrate how automated image analysis enables objective quantification of microenvironmental composition of ovarian tumours. Our analysis reveals a strong effect of the tumour microenvironment on ovarian cancer progression and highlights the potential of therapeutic interventions that target the stromal compartment or cancer-stroma signalling in the stroma-high, late-stage ovarian cancer subset. PMID:26573438

  10. Genetics of Aggression in Voles

    PubMed Central

    Gobrogge, Kyle L.; Wang, Zuoxin

    2016-01-01

    Prairie voles (Microtus ochrogaster) are socially monogamous rodents that form pair bonds—a behavior composed of several social interactions including attachment with a familiar mate and aggression toward conspecific strangers. Therefore, this species has provided an excellent opportunity for the study of pair bonding behavior and its underlying neural mechanisms. In this chapter, we discuss the utility of this unique animal model in the study of aggression and review recent findings illustrating the neurochemical mechanisms underlying pair bonding-induced aggression. Implications of this research for our understanding of the neurobiology of human violence are also discussed. PMID:22078479

  11. Predicting workplace aggression and violence.

    PubMed

    Barling, Julian; Dupré, Kathryne E; Kelloway, E Kevin

    2009-01-01

    Consistent with the relative recency of research on workplace aggression and the considerable media attention given to high-profile incidents, numerous myths about the nature of workplace aggression have emerged. In this review, we examine these myths from an evidence-based perspective, bringing greater clarity to our understanding of the predictors of workplace aggression. We conclude by pointing to the need for more research focusing on construct validity and prevention issues as well as for methodologies that minimize the likelihood of mono-method bias and that strengthen the ability to make causal inferences. PMID:18793089

  12. How Many Etiological Subtypes of Breast Cancer: Two, Three, Four, Or More?

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Philip S.; Prat, Aleix; Perou, Charles M.; Sherman, Mark E.

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease, divisible into a variable number of clinical subtypes. A fundamental question is how many etiological classes underlie the clinical spectrum of breast cancer? An etiological subtype reflects a grouping with a common set of causes, whereas a clinical subtype represents a grouping with similar prognosis and/or prediction. Herein, we review the evidence for breast cancer etiological heterogeneity. We then evaluate the etiological evidence with mRNA profiling data. A bimodal age distribution at diagnosis with peak frequencies near ages 50 and 70 years is a fundamental characteristic of breast cancer for important tumor features, clinical characteristics, risk factor profiles, and molecular subtypes. The bimodal peak frequencies at diagnosis divide breast cancer overall into a “mixture” of two main components in varying proportions in different cancer populations. The first breast cancer tends to arise early in life with modal age-at-diagnosis near 50 years and generally behaves aggressively. The second breast cancer occurs later in life with modal age near 70 years and usually portends a more indolent clinical course. These epidemiological and molecular data are consistent with a two-component mixture model and compatible with a hierarchal view of breast cancers arising from two main cell types of origin. Notwithstanding the potential added value of more detailed categorizations for personalized breast cancer treatment, we suggest that the development of better criteria to identify the two proposed etiologic classes would advance breast cancer research and prevention. PMID:25118203

  13. Analysis of gene expression of secreted factors associated with breast cancer metastases in breast cancer subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Fertig, Elana J.; Lee, Esak; Pandey, Niranjan B.; Popel, Aleksander S.

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease, having multiple subtypes with different malignant phenotypes. The triple-negative breast cancer, or basal breast cancer, is highly aggressive, metastatic, and difficult to treat. Previously, we identified that key molecules (IL6, CSF2, CCL5, VEGFA, and VEGFC) secreted by tumor cells and stromal cells in basal breast cancer can promote metastasis. It remains to assess whether these molecules function similarly in other subtypes of breast cancer. Here, we characterize the relative gene expression of the five secreted molecules and their associated receptors (GP130, GMRA, GMRB, CCR5, VEGFR2, NRP1, VEGFR3, NRP2) in the basal, HER2 (human epidermal growth factor receptor 2) positive, luminal A, and luminal B subtypes using high throughput data from tumor samples in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and Molecular Taxonomy of Breast Cancer International Consortium (METABRIC). IL6 and CCL5 gene expression are basal breast cancer specific, whereas high gene expression of GP130 was observed in luminal A/B. VEGFA/C and CSF2 mRNA are overexpressed in HER2 positive breast cancer, with VEGFA and CSF2 also overexpressed in basal breast cancer. Further study of the specific protein function of these factors within their associated cancer subtypes may yield personalized biomarkers and treatment modalities. PMID:26173622

  14. Analysis of gene expression of secreted factors associated with breast cancer metastases in breast cancer subtypes.

    PubMed

    Fertig, Elana J; Lee, Esak; Pandey, Niranjan B; Popel, Aleksander S

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease, having multiple subtypes with different malignant phenotypes. The triple-negative breast cancer, or basal breast cancer, is highly aggressive, metastatic, and difficult to treat. Previously, we identified that key molecules (IL6, CSF2, CCL5, VEGFA, and VEGFC) secreted by tumor cells and stromal cells in basal breast cancer can promote metastasis. It remains to assess whether these molecules function similarly in other subtypes of breast cancer. Here, we characterize the relative gene expression of the five secreted molecules and their associated receptors (GP130, GMRA, GMRB, CCR5, VEGFR2, NRP1, VEGFR3, NRP2) in the basal, HER2 (human epidermal growth factor receptor 2) positive, luminal A, and luminal B subtypes using high throughput data from tumor samples in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and Molecular Taxonomy of Breast Cancer International Consortium (METABRIC). IL6 and CCL5 gene expression are basal breast cancer specific, whereas high gene expression of GP130 was observed in luminal A/B. VEGFA/C and CSF2 mRNA are overexpressed in HER2 positive breast cancer, with VEGFA and CSF2 also overexpressed in basal breast cancer. Further study of the specific protein function of these factors within their associated cancer subtypes may yield personalized biomarkers and treatment modalities. PMID:26173622

  15. Prevalence, Subtypes, and Correlates of DSM-IV Conduct Disorder in the National Comorbidity Survey Replication

    PubMed Central

    Nock, Matthew K.; Kazdin, Alan E.; Hiripi, Eva; Kessler, Ronald C.

    2007-01-01

    Background Prior research indicates that conduct disorder (CD) is associated with a range of comorbid mental disorders. However, the actual prevalence, subtypes, and patterns of comorbidity of DSM-IV defined CD in the general U.S. population remains unknown. Method Retrospective assessment of CD and other DSM-IV disorders was conducted using fully structured diagnostic interviews among a nationally representative sample of respondents (n = 3,199) in the National Comorbidity Survey Replication. Results The estimated lifetime prevalence of CD in the U.S. is 9.5% (males = 12.0%, females = 7.1%), with a median age-of-onset of 11.6 (0.2) years. Latent class analysis identified five CD subtypes characterized by rule violations, deceit/theft, aggression, severe covert behaviors, and pervasive CD symptoms. A dose-response relationship was revealed between CD subtype severity and risk of subsequent disorders. Results also indicated that CD typically precedes mood and substance use disorders, but most often occurs after impulse control and anxiety disorders. Although both active and remitted CD is associated with increased risk of the subsequent first onset of other mental disorders, remitted CD is associated with significantly lower risk of subsequent disorders. Conclusions CD is prevalent and heterogeneous in the U.S. population, and more severe subtypes and the presence of active CD are associated with higher risk of comorbid disorders. Future prospective studies using general population samples will further inform the nature and course of this disorder. PMID:16438742

  16. Problem gambling subtypes based on psychological distress, alcohol abuse and impulsivity.

    PubMed

    Suomi, Aino; Dowling, Nicki A; Jackson, Alun C

    2014-12-01

    The notion of comorbidities within problem gambling populations has important clinical implications, particularly for appropriate treatment matching. The comorbidities most commonly cited in problem gambling literature include depression, anxiety, alcohol abuse and impulsivity. Previous research shows evidence of patterns in multiple co-occurring comorbidities and that there may be different subtypes of gamblers based on these patterns. To further the current understanding of gambling subtypes, the aim of our study was to identify subtypes of gamblers currently in treatment. Hierarchical Cluster Analysis yielded four mutually exclusive groups of 202 gamblers: (1) gamblers with comorbid psychological problems (35%); (2) 'pure' gamblers without other comorbidities (27%); (3) gamblers with comorbid alcohol abuse (25%); and (4) 'multimorbid' gamblers (13%). The four groups differed on demographic information, drug use and gambling behaviours including gambling activity and problem gambling severity. Gamblers with comorbid psychological problems were more likely to be older women on low income, more likely to report a family history of psychological problems and were more often electronic gaming machine players. As expected, 'pure' gamblers had lower problem gambling severity and were more likely to report current abstinence. Gamblers with comorbid alcohol abuse were more likely to be young men who used stimulant drugs, endorsed a higher quality of life and worked full-time. 'Multimorbid' gamblers were elevated on all comorbidities, had general problems related to their health and wellbeing and reported high rates of hostility and aggression. These groups combine elements of existing conceptual models of gambling subtypes and may require different treatments. PMID:25119420

  17. Microelectrode bioimpedance analysis distinguishes basal and claudin-low subtypes of triple negative breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Srinivasaraghavan, Vaishnavi; Strobl, Jeannine; Agah, Masoud

    2015-08-01

    Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) is highly aggressive and has a poor prognosis when compared to other molecular subtypes. In particular, the claudin-low subtype of TNBC exhibits tumor-initiating/cancer stem cell like properties. Here, we seek to find new biomarkers to discriminate different forms of TNBC by characterizing their bioimpedance. A customized bioimpedance sensor with four identical branched microelectrodes with branch widths adjusted to accommodate spreading of individual cells was fabricated on silicon and pyrex/glass substrates. Cell analyses were performed on the silicon devices which showed somewhat improved inter-electrode and intra-device reliability. We performed detailed analysis of the bioimpedance spectra of four TNBC cell lines, comparing the peak magnitude, peak frequency and peak phase angle between claudin-low TNBC subtype represented by MDA-MB-231 and Hs578T with that of two basal cells types, the TNBC MDA-MB-468, and an immortalized non-malignant basal breast cell line, MCF-10A. The claudin-low TNBC cell lines showed significantly higher peak frequencies and peak phase angles than the properties might be useful in distinguishing the clinically significant claudin-low subtype of TNBC. PMID:26216474

  18. Functional and developmental identification of a molecular subtype of brain serotonergic neuron specialized to regulate breathing dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Brust, Rachael D.; Corcoran, Andrea E.; Richerson, George B.; Nattie, Eugene; Dymecki, Susan M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Serotonergic neurons modulate behavioral and physiological responses from aggression and anxiety to breathing and thermoregulation. Disorders involving serotonin (5HT) dysregulation are commensurately heterogeneous and numerous. We hypothesized that this breadth in functionality derives in part from a developmentally determined substructure of distinct subtypes of 5HT neurons each specialized to modulate specific behaviors. We find, by manipulating developmentally defined subgroups one-by-one chemogenetically, that the Egr2-Pet1 subgroup is specialized to drive increased ventilation in response to carbon dioxide elevation and acidosis. Further, this subtype exhibits intrinsic chemosensitivity and modality-specific projections – increasing firing during hypercapnic acidosis and selectively projecting to respiratory chemosensory but not motor centers, respectively. These findings show that serotonergic regulation of the respiratory chemoreflex is mediated by a specialized molecular subtype of 5HT neuron harboring unique physiological, biophysical, and hodological properties specified developmentally, and demonstrate that the serotonergic system contains specialized modules contributing to its collective functional breadth. PMID:25497093

  19. Programming embryonic stem cells to neuronal subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Peljto, Mirza; Wichterle, Hynek

    2010-01-01

    Richness of neural circuits and specificity of neuronal connectivity depends on the diversification of nerve cells into functionally and molecularly distinct subtypes. While efficient methods for directed differentiation of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) into multiple principal neuronal classes have been established, only a few studies systematically examined the subtype diversity of in vitro derived nerve cells. Here we review evidence based on molecular and in vivo transplantation studies that ESC-derived spinal motor neurons and cortical layer V pyramidal neurons acquire subtype specific functional properties. We discuss similarities and differences in the role of cell intrinsic transcriptional programs, extrinsic signals and cell-cell interactions during subtype diversification of the two classes of nerve cells. We conclude that the high degree of fidelity with which differentiating ESCs recapitulate normal embryonic development provides a unique opportunity to explore developmental processes underlying specification of mammalian neuronal diversity in a simplified and experimentally accessible system. PMID:20970319

  20. [Histological spectrum of malignant melanoma].

    PubMed

    Brenn, T

    2015-02-01

    The diagnosis of melanocytic tumors is one of the most problematic areas in dermatology and diagnostic pathology. Melanoma is a malignant melanocytic tumor and the risk for metastasis and associated mortality is mainly dependent on tumor thickness and depth of invasion. Early recognition and correct diagnosis is therefore important for successful and effective treatment. The correct diagnosis of melanoma is, however, challenging due to the wide morphological spectrum. Historically, the disease was subdivided into superficial spreading, nodular, lentigo maligna and acral lentiginous melanoma but many more subtypes have subsequently been added. Some of these melanoma variants also show differences relating to the genetic background, clinical presentation, prognosis and treatment and may be associated with a specific differential diagnosis. In this article four of these melanoma variants, desmoplastic melanoma, nevoid melanoma, malignant blue nevus and pigment synthesizing melanoma will be discussed in more detail. PMID:25589353

  1. Classification and Subtype Prediction of Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma by Functional Genomics

    PubMed Central

    Segal, Neil H.; Pavlidis, Paul; Antonescu, Cristina R.; Maki, Robert G.; Noble, William S.; DeSantis, Diann; Woodruff, James M.; Lewis, Jonathan J.; Brennan, Murray F.; Houghton, Alan N.; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos

    2003-01-01

    Adult soft tissue sarcomas are a heterogeneous group of tumors, including well-described subtypes by histological and genotypic criteria, and pleomorphic tumors typically characterized by non-recurrent genetic aberrations and karyotypic heterogeneity. The latter pose a diagnostic challenge, even to experienced pathologists. We proposed that gene expression profiling in soft tissue sarcoma would identify a genomic-based classification scheme that is useful in diagnosis. RNA samples from 51 pathologically confirmed cases, representing nine different histological subtypes of adult soft tissue sarcoma, were examined using the Affymetrix U95A GeneChip. Statistical tests were performed on experimental groups identified by cluster analysis, to find discriminating genes that could subsequently be applied in a support vector machine algorithm. Synovial sarcomas, round-cell/myxoid liposarcomas, clear-cell sarcomas and gastrointestinal stromal tumors displayed remarkably distinct and homogenous gene expression profiles. Pleomorphic tumors were heterogeneous. Notably, a subset of malignant fibrous histiocytomas, a controversialhistological subtype, was identified as a distinct genomic group. The support vector machine algorithm supported a genomic basis for diagnosis, with both high sensitivity and specificity. In conclusion, we showed gene expression profiling to be useful in classification and diagnosis, providing insights into pathogenesis and pointing to potential new therapeutic targets of soft tissue sarcoma. PMID:12875988

  2. Environmental factors and aggressive behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, A.C.

    1982-07-01

    This paper briefly reviews some of the research areas which indicate a correlation between environmental factors and initiation of aggressive behavior. Environmental factors including lunar influences, month of birth, climate and the effects of crowding and certain chemicals are discussed.

  3. Quantifying Aggressive Behavior in Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Teles, Magda C; Oliveira, Rui F

    2016-01-01

    Aggression is a complex behavior that influences social relationships and can be seen as adaptive or maladaptive depending on the context and intensity of expression. A model organism suitable for genetic dissection of the underlying neural mechanisms of aggressive behavior is still needed. Zebrafish has already proven to be a powerful vertebrate model organism for the study of normal and pathological brain function. Despite the fact that zebrafish is a gregarious species that forms shoals, when allowed to interact in pairs, both males and females express aggressive behavior and establish dominance hierarchies. Here, we describe two protocols that can be used to quantify aggressive behavior in zebrafish, using two different paradigms: (1) staged fights between real opponents and (2) mirror-elicited fights. We also discuss the methodology for the behavior analysis, the expected results for both paradigms, and the advantages and disadvantages of each paradigm in face of the specific goals of the study. PMID:27464816

  4. Aggression in borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Látalová, K; Prasko, J

    2010-09-01

    This review examined aggressive behavior in Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) and its management in adults. Aggression against self or against others is a core component of BPD. Impulsiveness is a clinical hallmark (as well as a DSM-IV-TR diagnostic criterion) of BPD, and aggressive acts by BPD patients are largely of the impulsive type. BPD has high comorbidity rates with substance use disorders, Bipolar Disorder, and Antisocial Personality Disorder; these conditions further elevate the risk for violence. Treatment of BDP includes psychodynamic, cognitive behavioral, schema therapy, dialectic behavioral, group and pharmacological interventions. Recent studies indicate that many medications, particularly atypical antipsychotics and anticonvulsants, may reduce impulsivity, affective lability as well as irritability and aggressive behavior. But there is still a lack of large, double blind, placebo controlled studies in this area. PMID:20390357

  5. The Association Between Biological Subtype and Isolated Regional Nodal Failure After Breast-Conserving Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wo, Jennifer Y.; Taghian, Alphonse G.; Nguyen, Paul L.; Raad, Rita Abi; Sreedhara, Meera B.A.; Bellon, Jennifer R.; Wong, Julia S.; Gadd, Michele A.; Smith, Barbara L.; Harris, Jay R.

    2010-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the risk of isolated regional nodal failure (RNF) among women with invasive breast cancer treated with breast-conserving surgery (BCS) and radiation therapy (RT) and to determine factors, including biological subtype, associated with RNF. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively studied 1,000 consecutive women with invasive breast cancer who received breast-conserving surgery and RT from 1997 through 2002. Ninety percent of patients received adjuvant systemic therapy; none received trastuzumab. Sentinel lymph node biopsy was done in 617 patients (62%). Of patients with one to three positive nodes, 34% received regional nodal irradiation (RNI). Biological subtype classification into luminal A, luminal B, HER-2, and basal subtypes was based on estrogen receptor status-, progesterone receptor status-, and HER-2-status of the primary tumor. Results: Median follow-up was 77 months. Isolated RNF occurred in 6 patients (0.6%). On univariate analysis, biological subtype (p = 0.0002), lymph node involvement (p = 0.008), lymphovascular invasion (p = 0.02), and Grade 3 histology (p = 0.01) were associated with significantly higher RNF rates. Compared with luminal A, the HER-2 (p = 0.01) and basal (p = 0.08) subtypes were associated with higher RNF rates. The 5-year RNF rate among patients with one to three positive nodes treated with tangents alone was 2.4%; we could not identify a subset of these patients with a substantial risk of RNF. Conclusions: Isolated RNF is a rare occurrence after breast-conserving therapy. Patients with the HER-2 (not treated with trastuzumab) and basal subtypes appear to be at higher risk of developing RNF although this risk is not high enough to justify the addition of RNI. Low rates of RNF in patients with one to three positive nodes suggest that tangential RT without RNI is reasonable in most patients.

  6. Healthy dietary patterns and risk of breast cancer by molecular subtype.

    PubMed

    Hirko, Kelly A; Willett, Walter C; Hankinson, Susan E; Rosner, Bernard A; Beck, Andrew H; Tamimi, Rulla M; Eliassen, A Heather

    2016-02-01

    We examined associations between dietary quality indices and breast cancer risk by molecular subtype among 100,643 women in the prospective Nurses' Health Study (NHS) cohort, followed from 1984 to 2006. Dietary quality scores for the Alternative Healthy Eating Index (AHEI), alternate Mediterranean diet (aMED), and Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) dietary patterns were calculated from semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaires collected every 2-4 years. Breast cancer molecular subtypes were defined according to estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor, human epidermal growth factor 2 (HER2), cytokeratin 5/6 (CK5/6), and epidermal growth factor receptor status from immunostained tumor microarrays in combination with histologic grade. Cox proportional hazards models, adjusted for age and breast cancer risk factors, were used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95 % confidence intervals (CIs). Competing risk analyses were used to assess heterogeneity by subtype. We did not observe any significant associations between the AHEI or aMED dietary patterns and risk of breast cancer by molecular subtype. However, a significantly reduced risk of HER2-type breast cancer was observed among women in 5th versus 1st quintile of the DASH dietary pattern [n = 134 cases, Q5 vs. Q1 HR (95 % CI) = 0.44 (0.25-0.77)], and the inverse trend across quintiles was significant (p trend = 0.02). We did not observe any heterogeneity in associations between AHEI (p het = 0.25), aMED (p het = 0.71), and DASH (p het = 0.12) dietary patterns and breast cancer by subtype. Adherence to the AHEI, aMED, and DASH dietary patterns was not strongly associated with breast cancer molecular subtypes. PMID:26872903

  7. Neurotensin inversely modulates maternal aggression.

    PubMed

    Gammie, S C; D'Anna, K L; Gerstein, H; Stevenson, S A

    2009-02-18

    Neurotensin (NT) is a versatile neuropeptide involved in analgesia, hypothermia, and schizophrenia. Although NT is released from and acts upon brain regions involved in social behaviors, it has not been linked to a social behavior. We previously selected mice for high maternal aggression (maternal defense), an important social behavior that protects offspring, and found significantly lower NT expression in the CNS of highly protective females. Our current study directly tested NT's role in maternal defense. Intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injections of NT significantly impaired defense in terms of time aggressive and number of attacks at all doses tested (0.05, 0.1, 1.0, and 3.0 microg). Other maternal behaviors, including pup retrieval, were unaltered following NT injections (0.05 microg) relative to vehicle, suggesting specificity of NT action on defense. Further, i.c.v. injections of the NT receptor 1 (NT1) antagonist, SR 48692 (30 microg), significantly elevated maternal aggression in terms of time aggressive and attack number. To understand where NT may regulate aggression, we examined Fos following injection of either 0.1 microg NT or vehicle. Thirteen of 26 brain regions examined exhibited significant Fos increases with NT, including regions expressing NT1 and previously implicated in maternal aggression, such as lateral septum, bed nucleus of stria terminalis, paraventricular nucleus, and central amygdala. Together, our results indicate that NT inversely regulates maternal aggression and provide the first direct evidence that lowering of NT signaling can be a mechanism for maternal aggression. To our knowledge, this is the first study to directly link NT to a social behavior. PMID:19118604

  8. Italian Preschoolers' Peer-Status Linkages with Sociability and Subtypes of Aggression and Victimization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, David A.; Robinson, Clyde C.; Hart, Craig H.; Albano, Anthony D.; Marshall, Shawna J.

    2010-01-01

    Little is known about the behavior of preschool children belonging to peer sociometric status groups (popular, average, rejected, neglected, and controversial) in cultural contexts outside North America. This study examined the social interactions of Italian preschoolers. The sample consisted of 266 Italian preschoolers (mean age of 64 months).…

  9. Uterine adenolipoleiomyoma: a tumor with potential of aggressive behavior.

    PubMed

    Shaco-Levy, Ruthy; Piura, Benjamin

    2008-04-01

    An unusual uterine adenolipoleiomyoma forming intramural and subserosal masses and recurring within 16 months in the form of huge coalescent uterine masses is described. Histology showed the mass to be composed of benign-appearing smooth muscle, mature adipose tissue, and bland endocervical-type glands. The recurrent adenolipoleiomyoma contained, in addition, benign-appearing endometrial-type glands and stroma and showed small foci of atypically proliferating endocervical-type epithelium. This is the fourth report of adenolipoleiomyoma within the uterus, the second with an intramural location, and the first with an aggressive behavior in the form of massive local recurrence. PMID:18317215

  10. Hypertension Subtypes among Hypertensive Patients in Ibadan

    PubMed Central

    Salako, Babatunde L.; Ogunniyi, Adesola; Cooper, Richard S.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Certain hypertension subtypes have been shown to increase the risk for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality and may be related to specific underlying genetic determinants. Inappropriate characterization of subtypes of hypertension makes efforts at elucidating the genetic contributions to the etiology of hypertension largely vapid. We report the hypertension subtypes among patients with hypertension from South-Western Nigeria. Methods. A total of 1858 subjects comprising 76% female, hypertensive, aged 18 and above were recruited into the study from two centers in Ibadan, Nigeria. Hypertension was identified using JNCVII definition and was further grouped into four subtypes: controlled hypertension (CH), isolated systolic hypertension (ISH), isolated diastolic hypertension (IDH), and systolic-diastolic hypertension (SDH). Results. Systolic-diastolic hypertension was the most prevalent. Whereas SDH (77.6% versus 73.5%) and IDH (4.9% versus 4.7%) were more prevalent among females, ISH (10.1% versus 6.2%) was higher among males (P = 0.048). Female subjects were more obese (P < 0.0001) and SDH was prevalent among the obese group. Conclusion. Gender and obesity significantly influenced the distribution of the hypertension subtypes. Characterization of hypertension by subtypes in genetic association studies could lead to identification of previously unknown genetic variants involved in the etiology of hypertension. Large-scale studies among various ethnic groups may be needed to confirm these observations. PMID:25389499

  11. Enchondromatosis: insights on the different subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Pansuriya, Twinkal C; Kroon, Herman M; Bovée, Judith VMG

    2010-01-01

    Enchondromatosis is a rare, heterogeneous skeletal disorder in which patients have multiple enchondromas. Enchondromas are benign hyaline cartilage forming tumors in the medulla of metaphyseal bone. The disorder manifests itself early in childhood without any significant gender bias. Enchondromatosis encompasses several different subtypes of which Ollier disease and Maffucci syndrome are most common, while the other subtypes (metachondromatosis, genochondromatosis, spondyloenchondrodysplasia, dysspondyloenchondromatosis and cheirospondyloenchondromatosis) are extremely rare. Most subtypes are non-hereditary, while some are autosomal dominant or recessive. The gene(s) causing the different enchondromatosis syndromes are largely unknown. They should be distinguished and adequately diagnosed, not only to guide therapeutic decisions and genetic counseling, but also with respect to research into their etiology. For a longtime enchondromas have been considered a developmental disorder caused by the failure of normal endochondral bone formation. With the identification of genetic abnormalities in enchondromas however, they were being thought of as neoplasms. Active hedgehog signaling is reported to be important for enchondroma development and PTH1R mutations have been identified in ∼10% of Ollier patients. One can therefore speculate that the gene(s) causing the different enchondromatosis subtypes are involved in hedgehog/PTH1R growth plate signaling. Adequate distinction within future studies will shed light on whether these subtypes are different ends of a spectrum caused by a single gene, or that they represent truely different diseases. We therefore review the available clinical information for all enchondromatosis subtypes and discuss the little molecular data available hinting towards their cause. PMID:20661403

  12. The Clinical Utility of the Proposed DSM-5 Callous-Unemotional Subtype of Conduct Disorder in Young Girls

    PubMed Central

    Pardini, Dustin; Stepp, Stephanie; Hipwell, Alison; Stouthamer-Loeber, Magda; Loeber, Rolf

    2012-01-01

    Objective A callous-unemotional (CU) subtype of conduct disorder (CD) has been proposed as an addition to the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistic Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5). This study tested the hypothesis that young girls with the CU subtype of CD will exhibit more severe antisocial behavior and less severe internalizing problems over time relative to girls with CD alone. Secondly, the developmental outcomes of girls with CU traits in the absence of CD was examined because these girls will be overlooked by the proposed CU subtyping scheme. Method Theses issues were examined in a community sample of 1862 girls aged 6-8 at study onset. Outcomes included internalizing and externalizing problems, academic achievement, and global impairment assessed concurrently and at a six year follow-up. Results Girls with the CU subtype of CD had higher levels of externalizing disorder symptoms, bullying, relational aggression, and global impairment than girls with CD alone. Girls with CD alone tended to have more anxiety problems than girls with the CU subtype of CD. Girls with high CU traits without CD exhibited higher ODD and ADHD symptoms and lower academic achievement at the six-year follow-up relative to girls without CU traits and CD. Group differences at the six year follow-up were primarily accounted for by baseline differences on the outcomes. Conclusions The proposed DSM-5 CU subtype of CD identifies young girls who exhibit lower anxiety problems and more severe aggression, CD symptoms, academic problems and global impairment across time than girls with CD alone. PMID:22176940

  13. Clinical, radiological, histological, and molecular characteristics of paediatric epithelioid glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Broniscer, Alberto; Tatevossian, Ruth G.; Sabin, Noah D.; Klimo, Paul; Dalton, James; Lee, Ryan; Gajjar, Amar; Ellison, David W.

    2014-01-01

    Aims A few case series in adults have described the characteristics of epithelioid glioblastoma (e-GB), one of the rarest variants of this cancer. We evaluated clinical, radiological, histological, and molecular characteristics in the largest series to date of paediatric e-GB. Methods Review of clinical characteristics and therapy, imaging studies, and histology was performed in patients younger than 22 years with e-GB seen at our institution over 15 years. Sequencing of hotspot mutations and FISH of relevant genes were undertaken. Results Median age at diagnosis of six patients was 7.6 years. Tumours originated in the cerebral cortex (n=2) or diencephalon (n=4). Three patients presented with acute, massive haemorrhage and three had leptomeningeal dissemination at diagnosis. Paediatric e-GB had the typical histological characteristics seen in adult tumours. Universal immunoreactivity for INI1 and lack of diverse protein expression were seen in all cases. One tumour had a chromosome 22q loss. Three tumours (50%) harboured a BRAF: p.V600E. One thalamic tumour had an H3F3A p.K27M. All patients received radiation therapy with (n=3) or without chemotherapy (n=3). All patients experienced tumour progression with a median survival of 169 days. One patient with non-metastatic disease had early leptomeningeal progression. Two patients had symptomatic tumour spread outside the central nervous system (CNS) through a ventriculo-peritoneal shunt. One additional patient had widespread metastases outside the CNS identified at autopsy. Conclusions Paediatric e-GBs are rare cancers with an aggressive behaviour that share histological and genetic characteristics with their adult counterparts. BRAF inhibition is a potential treatment for these tumours. PMID:24127995

  14. Longitudinal heritability of childhood aggression.

    PubMed

    Porsch, Robert M; Middeldorp, Christel M; Cherny, Stacey S; Krapohl, Eva; van Beijsterveldt, Catharina E M; Loukola, Anu; Korhonen, Tellervo; Pulkkinen, Lea; Corley, Robin; Rhee, Soo; Kaprio, Jaakko; Rose, Richard R; Hewitt, John K; Sham, Pak; Plomin, Robert; Boomsma, Dorret I; Bartels, Meike

    2016-07-01

    The genetic and environmental contributions to the variation and longitudinal stability in childhood aggressive behavior were assessed in two large twin cohorts, the Netherlands Twin Register (NTR), and the Twins Early Development Study (TEDS; United Kingdom). In NTR, maternal ratings on aggression from the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) were available for 10,765 twin pairs at age 7, for 8,557 twin pairs at age 9/10, and for 7,176 twin pairs at age 12. In TEDS, parental ratings of conduct disorder from the Strength and Difficulty Questionnaire (SDQ) were available for 6,897 twin pairs at age 7, for 3,028 twin pairs at age 9 and for 5,716 twin pairs at age 12. In both studies, stability and heritability of aggressive behavioral problems was high. Heritability was on average somewhat, but significantly, lower in TEDS (around 60%) than in NTR (between 50% and 80%) and sex differences were slightly larger in the NTR sample. In both studies, the influence of shared environment was similar: in boys shared environment explained around 20% of the variation in aggression across all ages while in girls its influence was absent around age 7 and only came into play at later ages. Longitudinal genetic correlations were the main reason for stability of aggressive behavior. Individual differences in CBCL-Aggressive Behavior and SDQ-Conduct disorder throughout childhood are driven by a comparable but significantly different genetic architecture. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26786601

  15. Histological aspects of cervical ripening.

    PubMed

    Ichijo, M; Shimizu, T; Sasai, Y

    1976-02-01

    There is a close relationship between the rate of the uterine cervix opening during parturition and the presence or absence of a completely ripened cervix. In order to learn the basic pattern of the ripening of cervix, histological and histochemical studies were performed on the human uterine cervix during pregnancy. It was noted that the collagen bundles disintegrated into fine fibers and also underwent quantitative changes during the ripening process of the cervix. During pregnancy, the number of connective tissue cells was increased, but that of mast cells was decreased. Acid mucopolysaccharides in the cervical ground substance were found to increase in late pregnancy. PMID:136067

  16. Nonmedical use of prescription opioids among adolescents: subtypes based on motivation for use.

    PubMed

    Young, Amy; McCabe, Sean Esteban; Cranford, James A; Ross-Durow, Paula; Boyd, Carol J

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to advance our understanding of nonmedical use of prescription medications by identifying the distinguishing characteristics of 2 subtypes of adolescent nonmedical users of prescription opioids that have been previously described. A Web-based, self-administered survey was completed by 2,597 7th-12th grade students. Sensation-seeking nonmedical users were best characterized by rule breaking and aggressive behaviors and possible substance dependence. Medical users and nonmedical self-treating users were best characterized by somatic complaints, anxiety and depressive symptoms, and history of sexual victimization. PMID:23244552

  17. Normative beliefs about aggression and cyber aggression among young adults: a longitudinal investigation.

    PubMed

    Wright, Michelle F; Li, Yan

    2013-01-01

    This longitudinal study examined normative beliefs about aggression (e.g., face-to-face, cyber) in relation to the engagement in cyber aggression 6 months later among 126 (69 women) young adults. Participants completed electronically administered measures assessing their normative beliefs, face-to-face and cyber aggression at Time 1, and cyber aggression 6 months later (Time 2). We found that men reported more cyber relational and verbal aggression when compared to women. After controlling for each other, Time 1 face-to-face relational aggression was positively related to Time 2 cyber relational aggression, whereas Time 1 face-to-face verbal aggression was positively related to Time 2 cyber verbal aggression. Normative beliefs regarding cyber aggression was positively related to both forms of cyber aggression 6 months later, after controlling for normative beliefs about face-to-face aggression. Furthermore, a significant two-way interaction between Time 1 cyber relational aggression and normative beliefs about cyber relational aggression was found. Follow-up analysis showed that Time 1 cyber relational aggression was more strongly related to Time 2 cyber relational aggression when young adults held higher normative beliefs about cyber relational aggression. A similar two-way interaction was found for cyber verbal aggression such that the association between Time 1 and Time 2 cyber verbal aggression was stronger at higher levels of normative beliefs about cyber verbal aggression. Results are discussed in terms of the social cognitive and behavioral mechanisms associated with the engagement of cyber aggression. PMID:23440595

  18. Aggressive fibromatosis of the leg and sacrococcygeal region: a report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Fuwen; Liu, Qiang; Zhang, Guoru; Wang, Qiqi; Yun, Bo; Han, Yaoguang; Deng, Rui; Wu, Linqing; Wang, Shihua

    2015-01-01

    Aggressive fibromatosis is a rare soft tissue tumor that composes of myofibroblasts that arise from musculoaponeurotic structures. It usually affects the abdominal wall but may be also found in other less common sites including the head and neck, submucosa of the oral cavity, spinal, haunch and limbs, especially, the limbs and sacrococcygeal region are rare locations. We described two cases of aggressive fibromatosis. One was 3-year-old girl with aggressive fibromatosis arising from the right leg region. The other was 20-year-old female arising from in the sacrococcygeal region. They were resected with satisfied results. Pathological examination showed that they were composed of fibroblasts, fibrocytes and bundles of collagen fiber. The aggressive fibromatosis, although rare, should be differentiated from some other soft tissue tumors with similar histological features and different localizations of intra-abdominal, abdominal wall and extra-abdominal. PMID:25755801

  19. The Impact of Histologic Variants on FSGS Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Meliambro, Kristin; Campbell, Kirk N.

    2014-01-01

    Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) is the most common glomerular disease leading to end-stage renal disease. The clinical course is highly variable with disparate responses to therapeutic intervention and rates of progression. Histologic variant subtype has been commonly used as a prognostic and therapeutic guide in the clinical management of FSGS. The tip lesion is widely considered to portend the most favorable prognosis and to be the most responsive to steroid therapy. Conversely, the collapsing lesion, more prevalent in patients of African descent, is associated with steroid resistance and higher risk of disease progression. In the 10 years since the Columbia classification system for FSGS was published, some retrospective and one prospective study explored the impact of histologic variants at the time of biopsy on FSGS outcomes. The results largely validate its clinical predictive value with respect to treatment response, though its utility in cases recurring after kidney transplantation is still unknown. Sampling and interpretation errors are additional sources of caution. More research is needed to fully define reproducible prognostic and therapeutic markers for this polymorphic disorder.

  20. Adolescents' Social Reasoning about Relational Aggression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldstein, Sara E.; Tisak, Marie S.

    2010-01-01

    We examined early adolescents' reasoning about relational aggression, and the links that their reasoning has to their own relationally aggressive behavior. Thinking about relational aggression was compared to thinking about physical aggression, conventional violations, and personal behavior. In individual interviews, adolescents (N = 103) rated…

  1. The Development of Aggression within Sibling Conflict.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Jacqueline L.; Ross, Hildy S.

    1995-01-01

    A longitudinal study examined responses to physically aggressive conflicts among siblings. Found that parents respond to half of children's aggression (especially if there is crying). Most parent and child responses were simple commands to stop the aggression. Reasoning was used less often, and physical intervention, rarely. Aggression was higher…

  2. Do Teachers Misbehave? Aggression in School Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ben Sasson, Dvora; Somech, Anit

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Despite growing research on school aggression, significant gaps remain in the authors' knowledge of team aggression, since most studies have mainly explored aggression on the part of students. The purpose of this paper is to focus on understanding the phenomenon of workplace aggression in school teams. Specifically, the purpose of the…

  3. Attributional bias and reactive aggression.

    PubMed

    Hudley, C; Friday, J

    1996-01-01

    This article looks at a cognitive behavioral intervention designed to reduce minority youths' (Latino and African-American boys) levels of reactive peer-directed aggression. The BrainPower Program trains aggressive boys to recognize accidental causation in ambiguous interactions with peers. The objective of this research is to evaluate the effectiveness of this attribution retraining program in reducing levels of reactive, peer-directed aggression. This research hypothesizes that aggressive young boys' tendency to attribute hostile intentions to others in ambiguous social interactions causes display of inappropriate, peer-directed aggression. A reduction in attributional bias should produce a decrease in reactive physical and verbal aggression directed toward peers. A 12-session, attributional intervention has been designed to reduce aggressive students' tendency to infer hostile intentions in peers following ambiguous peer provocations. The program trains boys to (1) accurately perceive and categorize the available social cues in interactions with peers, (2) attribute negative outcomes of ambiguous causality to accidental or uncontrollable causes, and (3) generate behaviors appropriate to these retrained attributions. African-American and Latino male elementary-school students (N = 384), in grades four-six, served as subjects in one of three groups: experimental attribution retraining program, attention training, and no-attention control group. Three broad categories of outcome data were collected: teacher and administrator reports of behavior, independent observations of behavior, and self-reports from participating students. Process measures to assess implementation fidelity include videotaped training sessions, observations of intervention sessions, student attendance records, and weekly team meetings. The baseline data indicated that students who were evenly distributed across the four sites were not significantly different on the baseline indicators: student

  4. Histology of the first fish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, M.P.; Sansom, I.J.; Repetski, J.E.

    1996-01-01

    THE first description of Anatolepis Bockelie & Fortey was from early Ordovician sediments of Ny Friesland, Spitsbergen1,2, but the genus is now known from many localities in North America and Greenland, ranging in age from the Late Cambrian period to the Early Ordovician3-6. Although initially interpreted as an agnathan fish2,3 that predated other representatives7, this has been widely disputed because the available histological data were unconvincing6,8-10 and the scales fell outside the known morphological range of other accepted early vertebrates9-11. Further doubt was cast upon the vertebrate affinity of Anatolepis when specimens from East Greenland were interpreted as the cuticular fragments of aglaspid arthropods6, although this interpretation has also been refuted12. Here we report on the morphology and histology of large collections of Anatolepis, and demonstrate the presence of dentine, a tissue unique to vertebrates, confirming that the taxon is both a vertebrate and the oldest known fish.

  5. Vocalizations convey sex, seasonal phenotype, and aggression in a seasonal mammal.

    PubMed

    Rendon, Nikki M; Keesom, Sarah M; Amadi, Chima; Hurley, Laura M; Demas, Gregory E

    2015-12-01

    Seasonal variation in social behavior is often accompanied by seasonal variation in communication. In mammals, how seasonal environmental cues influence aggressive vocalizations remains underexplored. Photoperiod is the primary cue coordinating seasonal responses in most temperate zone animals, including Siberian hamsters (Phodopus sungorus), a species that undergoes reproductive inhibition and increased aggression in winter. During same-sex aggressive encounters, hamsters emit both broadband calls (BBCs) and ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs) that indicate aggression and the vocalizer's sex, respectively; however, it is not known whether these rodents adjust specific elements of their vocal repertoire to reflect their photoperiod-induced seasonal phenotypes. To address this, we recorded vocalizations emitted during dyadic interactions between male or female pairs of hamsters housed in long or short photoperiods and measured serum testosterone levels. USV emission rate remained stable across photoperiods, but proportional use of USV subtypes varied in novel ways: 'jump' USVs were sensitive to seasonal phenotype, but not the vocalizer's sex, whereas 'plain' USVs were sensitive only to the sex of the vocalizer. BBC emission rate varied with seasonal phenotype; short-day non-reproductive hamsters produced more BBCs and demonstrated increased aggression compared with reproductive hamsters. Testosterone, however, was not related to vocalization rates. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that changes in the vocal repertoire of Siberian hamsters reflect sex, aggression, and seasonal phenotype, suggesting that both BBCs and USVs are important signals used during same-sex social encounters. PMID:26386405

  6. Testing the developmental distinctiveness of male proactive and reactive aggression with a nested longitudinal experimental intervention.

    PubMed

    Barker, Edward D; Vitaro, Frank; Lacourse, Eric; Fontaine, Nathalie M G; Carbonneau, Rene; Tremblay, Richard E

    2010-01-01

    An experimental preventive intervention nested into a longitudinal study was used to test the developmental distinctiveness of proactive and reactive aggression. The randomized multimodal preventive intervention targeted a subsample of boys rated disruptive by their teachers. These boys were initially part of a sample of 895 boys, followed from kindergarten to 17 years of age. Semiparametric analyses of developmental trajectories for self-reported proactive and reactive aggression (between 13 and 17 years of age) indicated three trajectories for each type of aggression that varied in size and shape (Low, Moderate, and High Peaking). Intent-to-treat comparisons between the boys in the prevention group and the control group confirmed that the preventive intervention between 7 and 9 years of age, which included parenting skills and social skills training, could impact the development of reactive more than proactive aggression. The intervention effect identified in reactive aggression was related to a reduction in self-reported coercive parenting. The importance of these results for the distinction between subtypes of aggressive behaviors and the value of longitudinal-experimental studies from early childhood onward is discussed. PMID:20052694

  7. Prognostic impact of breast cancer subtypes in elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Bergen, E S; Tichy, C; Berghoff, A S; Rudas, M; Dubsky, P; Bago-Horvath, Z; Mader, R M; Exner, R; Gnant, M; Zielinski, C C; Steger, G G; Preusser, M; Bartsch, R

    2016-05-01

    We aimed to analyse the impact of breast cancer (BC) subtypes on the clinical course of disease with special emphasis on the occurrence of brain metastases (BM) and outcome in an elderly BC population. A total number of 706 patients ≥65 years receiving treatment for BC from 2007 to 2011 were identified from a BC database. 62 patients diagnosed with DCIS and 73 patients with incomplete datasets were excluded, leaving 571 patients for this analysis. Patient characteristics, biological tumour subtypes, and clinical outcome including overall survival (OS) were obtained by retrospective chart review. 380/571 (66, 5 %) patients aged 65-74 years were grouped among the young-old, 182/571 (31.9 %) patients aged 75-84 years among the old-old, and 29/571 (5.1 %) patients aged ≥85 years among the oldest-old. 392/571 (68.8 %) patients presented with luminal BC, 119/571 (20.8 %) with HER2-positive, and 59/571 (10.3 %) with triple-negative BC (TNBC). At 38 months median follow-up, 115/571 (20.1 %) patients presented with distant recurrence. A higher recurrence rate was observed in the HER2-positive subtype (43/119 (36.1 %)), as compared to TNBC (15/59 (25.4 %)) and luminal BC (57/392 (14.5 %); p < 0.001). BM were detected at a significantly higher rate in HER2-positive BC patients (9/119 (7.6 %)), as compared to TNBC (2/59 (3.4 %)) and luminal BC patients (6/392 (1.5 %); p = 0.003). Diagnosis of metastatic disease (HR 7.7; 95 % CI 5.2-11.4; p < 0.001) as well as development of BM (HR 3.5; 95 % CI 1.9-6.4; p < 0.001) had a significantly negative impact on OS in a time-dependent covariate cox regression model. In contrast to younger BC patients, outcome in this large cohort of elderly patients suggests that HER2-positive disease-not TNBC-featured the most aggressive clinical course with the highest rates of metastatic spread and BM. In-depth analysis regarding a potentially distinct biology of TNBC in elderly is therefore warranted. PMID:27107570

  8. Kindergarten Children's Genetic Vulnerabilities Interact with Friends' Aggression to Promote Children's Own Aggression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Lier, Pol; Boivin, Michel; Dionne, Ginette; Vitaro, Frank; Brendgen, Mara; Koot, Hans; Tremblay, Richard E.; Perusse, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To examine whether kindergarten children's genetic liability to physically aggress moderates the contribution of friends' aggression to their aggressive behaviors. Method: Teacher and peer reports of aggression were available for 359 6-year-old twin pairs (145 MZ, 212 DZ) as well as teacher and peer reports of aggression of the two best…

  9. Is the Inattentive Subtype of ADHD Different from the Combined/Hyperactive Subtype?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grizenko, Natalie; Paci, Michael; Joober, Ridha

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To compare the ADHD combined/hyperactive subtype (ADHD/CH) to the ADHD inattentive subtype (ADHD/I) on the level of comorbidity, treatment response, and possible etiological factors. Method: A total of 371 clinically referred children diagnosed with ADHD aged between 6 and 12 years are recruited for a double-blind, placebo-controlled…

  10. Genetically predicted longer telomere length is associated with increased risk of B-cell lymphoma subtypes.

    PubMed

    Machiela, Mitchell J; Lan, Qing; Slager, Susan L; Vermeulen, Roel C H; Teras, Lauren R; Camp, Nicola J; Cerhan, James R; Spinelli, John J; Wang, Sophia S; Nieters, Alexandra; Vijai, Joseph; Yeager, Meredith; Wang, Zhaoming; Ghesquières, Hervé; McKay, James; Conde, Lucia; de Bakker, Paul I W; Cox, David G; Burdett, Laurie; Monnereau, Alain; Flowers, Christopher R; De Roos, Anneclaire J; Brooks-Wilson, Angela R; Giles, Graham G; Melbye, Mads; Gu, Jian; Jackson, Rebecca D; Kane, Eleanor; Purdue, Mark P; Vajdic, Claire M; Albanes, Demetrius; Kelly, Rachel S; Zucca, Mariagrazia; Bertrand, Kimberly A; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Lawrence, Charles; Hutchinson, Amy; Zhi, Degui; Habermann, Thomas M; Link, Brian K; Novak, Anne J; Dogan, Ahmet; Asmann, Yan W; Liebow, Mark; Thompson, Carrie A; Ansell, Stephen M; Witzig, Thomas E; Tilly, Hervé; Haioun, Corinne; Molina, Thierry J; Hjalgrim, Henrik; Glimelius, Bengt; Adami, Hans-Olov; Roos, Göran; Bracci, Paige M; Riby, Jacques; Smith, Martyn T; Holly, Elizabeth A; Cozen, Wendy; Hartge, Patricia; Morton, Lindsay M; Severson, Richard K; Tinker, Lesley F; North, Kari E; Becker, Nikolaus; Benavente, Yolanda; Boffetta, Paolo; Brennan, Paul; Foretova, Lenka; Maynadie, Marc; Staines, Anthony; Lightfoot, Tracy; Crouch, Simon; Smith, Alex; Roman, Eve; Diver, W Ryan; Offit, Kenneth; Zelenetz, Andrew; Klein, Robert J; Villano, Danylo J; Zheng, Tongzhang; Zhang, Yawei; Holford, Theodore R; Turner, Jenny; Southey, Melissa C; Clavel, Jacqueline; Virtamo, Jarmo; Weinstein, Stephanie; Riboli, Elio; Vineis, Paolo; Kaaks, Rudolph; Boeing, Heiner; Tjønneland, Anne; Angelucci, Emanuele; Di Lollo, Simonetta; Rais, Marco; De Vivo, Immaculata; Giovannucci, Edward; Kraft, Peter; Huang, Jinyan; Ma, Baoshan; Ye, Yuanqing; Chiu, Brian C H; Liang, Liming; Park, Ju-Hyun; Chung, Charles C; Weisenburger, Dennis D; Fraumeni, Joseph F; Salles, Gilles; Glenn, Martha; Cannon-Albright, Lisa; Curtin, Karen; Wu, Xifeng; Smedby, Karin E; de Sanjose, Silvia; Skibola, Christine F; Berndt, Sonja I; Birmann, Brenda M; Chanock, Stephen J; Rothman, Nathaniel

    2016-04-15

    Evidence from a small number of studies suggests that longer telomere length measured in peripheral leukocytes is associated with an increased risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). However, these studies may be biased by reverse causation, confounded by unmeasured environmental exposures and might miss time points for which prospective telomere measurement would best reveal a relationship between telomere length and NHL risk. We performed an analysis of genetically inferred telomere length and NHL risk in a study of 10 102 NHL cases of the four most common B-cell histologic types and 9562 controls using a genetic risk score (GRS) comprising nine telomere length-associated single-nucleotide polymorphisms. This approach uses existing genotype data and estimates telomere length by weighing the number of telomere length-associated variant alleles an individual carries with the published change in kb of telomere length. The analysis of the telomere length GRS resulted in an association between longer telomere length and increased NHL risk [four B-cell histologic types combined; odds ratio (OR) = 1.49, 95% CI 1.22-1.82,P-value = 8.5 × 10(-5)]. Subtype-specific analyses indicated that chronic lymphocytic leukemia or small lymphocytic lymphoma (CLL/SLL) was the principal NHL subtype contributing to this association (OR = 2.60, 95% CI 1.93-3.51,P-value = 4.0 × 10(-10)). Significant interactions were observed across strata of sex for CLL/SLL and marginal zone lymphoma subtypes as well as age for the follicular lymphoma subtype. Our results indicate that a genetic background that favors longer telomere length may increase NHL risk, particularly risk of CLL/SLL, and are consistent with earlier studies relating longer telomere length with increased NHL risk. PMID:27008888

  11. Biomarkers of aggression in dementia.

    PubMed

    Gotovac, Kristina; Nikolac Perković, Matea; Pivac, Nela; Borovečki, Fran

    2016-08-01

    Dementia is a clinical syndrome defined by progressive global impairment of acquired cognitive abilities. It can be caused by a number of underlying conditions. The most common types of dementia are Alzheimer's disease (AD), frontotemporal dementia (FTD), vascular cognitive impairment (VCI) and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB). Despite the fact that cognitive impairment is central to the dementia, noncognitive symptoms, most commonly described nowadays as neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS) exist almost always at certain point of the illness. Aggression as one of the NPS represents danger both for patients and caregivers and the rate of aggression correlates with the loss of independence, cognitive decline and poor outcome. Therefore, biomarkers of aggression in dementia patients would be of a great importance. Studies have shown that different genetic factors, including monoamine signaling and processing, can be associated with various NPS including aggression. There have been significant and multiple neurotransmitter changes identified in the brains of patients with dementia and some of these changes have been involved in the etiology of NPS. Aggression specific changes have also been observed in neuropathological studies. The current consensus is that the best approach for development of such biomarkers may be incorporation of genetics (polymorphisms), neurobiology (neurotransmitters and neuropathology) and neuroimaging techniques. PMID:26952705

  12. Why are small males aggressive?

    PubMed Central

    Morrell, Lesley J; Lindström, Jan; Ruxton, Graeme D

    2005-01-01

    Aggression is ubiquitous in the animal kingdom, whenever the interests of individuals conflict. In contests between animals, the larger opponent is often victorious. However, counter intuitively, an individual that has little chance of winning (generally smaller individuals) sometimes initiates contests. A number of hypotheses have been put forward to explain this behaviour, including the ‘desperado effect’ according to which, the likely losers initiate aggression due to lack of alternative options. An alternative explanation suggested recently is that likely losers attack due to an error in perception: they mistakenly perceive their chances of winning as being greater than they are. We show that explaining the apparently maladaptive aggression initiated by the likely loser can be explained on purely economic grounds, without requiring either the desperado effect or perception errors. Using a game-theoretical model, we show that if smaller individuals can accurately assess their chance of winning, if this chance is less than, but close to, a half, and if resources are scarce (or the contested resource is of relatively low value), they are predicted to be as aggressive as their larger opponents. In addition, when resources are abundant, and small individuals have some chance of winning, they may be more aggressive than their larger opponents, as it may benefit larger individuals to avoid the costs of fighting and seek alternative uncontested resources. PMID:16024387

  13. Head and neck cancer subtypes with biological and clinical relevance: Meta-analysis of gene-expression data.

    PubMed

    De Cecco, Loris; Nicolau, Monica; Giannoccaro, Marco; Daidone, Maria Grazia; Bossi, Paolo; Locati, Laura; Licitra, Lisa; Canevari, Silvana

    2015-04-20

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is a disease with heterogeneous clinical behavior and response to therapies. Despite the introduction of multimodality treatment, 40-50% of patients with advanced disease recur. Therefore, there is an urgent need to improve the classification beyond the current parameters in clinical use to better stratify patients and the therapeutic approaches. Following a meta-analysis approach we built a large training set to whom we applied a Disease-Specific Genomic Analysis (DSGA) to identify the disease component embedded into the tumor data. Eleven independent microarray datasets were used as validation sets. Six different HNSCC subtypes that summarize the aberrant alterations occurring during tumor progression were identified. Based on their main biological characteristics and de-regulated signaling pathways, the subtypes were designed as immunoreactive, inflammatory, human papilloma virus (HPV)-like, classical, hypoxia associated, and mesenchymal. Our findings highlighted a more aggressive behavior for mesenchymal and hypoxia-associated subtypes. The Genomics Drug Sensitivity Project was used to identify potential associations with drug sensitivity and significant differences were observed among the six subtypes. To conclude, we report a robust molecularly defined subtype classification in HNSCC that can improve patient selection and pave the way to the development of appropriate therapeutic strategies. PMID:25821127

  14. Accuracy in Judgments of Aggressiveness

    PubMed Central

    Kenny, David A.; West, Tessa V.; Cillessen, Antonius H. N.; Coie, John D.; Dodge, Kenneth A.; Hubbard, Julie A.; Schwartz, David

    2009-01-01

    Perceivers are both accurate and biased in their understanding of others. Past research has distinguished between three types of accuracy: generalized accuracy, a perceiver’s accuracy about how a target interacts with others in general; perceiver accuracy, a perceiver’s view of others corresponding with how the perceiver is treated by others in general; and dyadic accuracy, a perceiver’s accuracy about a target when interacting with that target. Researchers have proposed that there should be more dyadic than other forms of accuracy among well-acquainted individuals because of the pragmatic utility of forecasting the behavior of interaction partners. We examined behavioral aggression among well-acquainted peers. A total of 116 9-year-old boys rated how aggressive their classmates were toward other classmates. Subsequently, 11 groups of 6 boys each interacted in play groups, during which observations of aggression were made. Analyses indicated strong generalized accuracy yet little dyadic and perceiver accuracy. PMID:17575243

  15. An infrequent histopathological subtype of ameloblastoma: Adenoid granular cell ameloblastoma with dentinoid.

    PubMed

    Salehinejad, Jahanshah; Gholami, Mahdi; Eshghpour, Majid; Mehri, Tahere

    2016-01-01

    Adenoid ameloblastoma with dentinoid is a rare odontogenic tumor. Granular cell ameloblastoma also is a less common histological subtype of ameloblastoma. In this report, the patient was a 31-year-old male. The lesion was located in the right mandible and was unicystic with well-defined borders. The tumor tissue was showing a combination of follicular, plexiform, and desmoplastic patterns of ameloblastoma with wide areas of granular cells, fibrous stroma, glandular pattern, and dentinoid calcified. Very few cases of distinct forms of ameloblastoma that show the formation of dentinoid has been reported. However, there are no cases of adenoid granular cell ameloblastoma with dentinoid reported. PMID:27605998

  16. An infrequent histopathological subtype of ameloblastoma: Adenoid granular cell ameloblastoma with dentinoid

    PubMed Central

    Salehinejad, Jahanshah; Gholami, Mahdi; Eshghpour, Majid; Mehri, Tahere

    2016-01-01

    Adenoid ameloblastoma with dentinoid is a rare odontogenic tumor. Granular cell ameloblastoma also is a less common histological subtype of ameloblastoma. In this report, the patient was a 31-year-old male. The lesion was located in the right mandible and was unicystic with well-defined borders. The tumor tissue was showing a combination of follicular, plexiform, and desmoplastic patterns of ameloblastoma with wide areas of granular cells, fibrous stroma, glandular pattern, and dentinoid calcified. Very few cases of distinct forms of ameloblastoma that show the formation of dentinoid has been reported. However, there are no cases of adenoid granular cell ameloblastoma with dentinoid reported.

  17. Identification of angiotensin II receptor subtypes

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, A.T.; Herblin, W.F.; McCall, D.E.; Ardecky, R.J.; Carini, D.J.; Duncia, J.V.; Pease, L.J.; Wong, P.C.; Wexler, R.R.; Johnson, A.L.; )

    1989-11-30

    We have demonstrated the existence of two distinct subtypes of the angiotensin II receptor in the rat adrenal gland using radioligand binding and tissue section autoradiography. The identification of the subtypes was made possible by the discovery of two structurally dissimilar, nonpeptide compounds, DuP 753 and EXP655, that show reciprocal selectivity for the two subtypes. In the rat adrenal cortex, DuP 753 inhibited 80% of the total AII binding with an IC50 value on the sensitive sites of 2 x 10(-8) M, while EXP655 displaced only 20%. In the rat adrenal medulla, EXP655 gave 90% inhibition of AII binding with an IC50 value of 3.0 x 10(-8) M, while DuP 753 was essentially inactive. The combination of the two compounds completely inhibited AII binding in both tissues.

  18. Subtype-selective electroporation of cortical interneurons

    PubMed Central

    De Marco Garcia, Natalia V.; Fishell, Gord

    2014-01-01

    The study of central nervous system (CNS) maturation relies on genetic targeting of neuronal populations. However, the task of restricting the expression of genes of interest to specific neuronal subtypes has proven remarkably challenging due to the relative scarcity of specific promoter elements. GABAergic interneurons constitute a neuronal population with extensive genetic and morphological diversity. Indeed, more than 11 different subtypes of GABAergic interneurons have been characterized in the mouse cortex1. Here we present an adapted protocol for selective targeting of GABAergic populations. We achieved subtype-selective targeting of GABAergic interneurons by using the enhancer element of the homeobox transcription factors Dlx5 and Dlx6, homologues of the Drosophila distal-less (Dll) gene2,3, to drive the expression of specific genes through in utero electroporation. PMID:25177832

  19. Reproductive risk factors in relation to molecular subtypes of breast cancer: Results from the nurses' health studies.

    PubMed

    Sisti, Julia S; Collins, Laura C; Beck, Andrew H; Tamimi, Rulla M; Rosner, Bernard A; Eliassen, A Heather

    2016-05-15

    Several intrinsic breast cancer subtypes, possibly representing unique etiologic processes, have been identified by gene expression profiles. Evidence suggests that associations with reproductive risk factors may vary by breast cancer subtype. In the Nurses' Health Studies, we prospectively examined associations of reproductive factors with breast cancer subtypes defined using immunohistochemical staining of tissue microarrays. Multivariate-adjusted Cox proportional hazard models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Over follow-up, we identified 2,063 luminal A, 1,008 luminal B, 209 HER2-enriched, 378 basal-like and 110 unclassified tumors. Many factors appeared associated with luminal A tumors, including ages at menarche (p(heterogeneity) = 0.65) and menopause (p(heterogeneity) = 0.05), and current HT use (p(heterogeneity) = 0.33). Increasing parity was not associated with any subtype (p(heterogeneity) = 0.76), though age at first birth was associated with luminal A tumors only (per 1-year increase HR = 1.03 95%CI (1.02-1.05), p(heterogeneity)  = 0.04). Though heterogeneity was not observed, duration of lactation was inversely associated with risk of basal-like tumors only (7+ months vs. never HR = 0.65 95%CI (0.49-0.87), ptrend = 0.02), p(heterogeneity) = 0.27). Years between menarche and first birth was strongly positively associated with luminal A and non-luminal subtypes (e.g. 22-year interval vs. nulliparous HR = 1.80, 95%CI (1.08-3.00) for basal-like tumors; p(heterogeneity) = 0.003), and evidence of effect modification by breastfeeding was observed. In summary, many reproductive risk factors for breast cancer appeared most strongly associated with the luminal A subtype. Our results support previous reports that lactation is protective against basal-like tumors, representing a potential modifiable risk factor for this aggressive subtype. PMID:26684063

  20. Method for discriminating synchronous multiple lung cancers of the same histological type

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xudong; Tian, Long; Fan, Jun; Lai, Yutian; Li, Shuangjiang; Che, Guowei; Huang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Abstract With the development of imaging technology, an increasing number of synchronous multiple lung cancers (SMLCs) have been diagnosed in recent years. Patients with >1 tumor are diagnosed with either synchronous multiple primary lung cancers (SMPLCs) or other primary tumors and metastases. Clinical guidelines, histological characteristics, and molecular diagnostics have been used to discriminate SMPLCs from other multiple lung cancers. However, there is still ambiguity in the diagnosis of SMPLCs of the same histological type. We enrolled 24 patients with the same histological type of SMLCs and assessed their status using established clinical guidelines, comprehensive histological subtyping, and molecular analysis. The sum value of the differential microRNA (miRNA) expression profiles (ΔΔCt) with matched tumors was evaluated to discriminate SMPLCs of the same histological type from metastases. Twelve patients with lymph node metastases were included for comparison, and the sum value of the ΔΔCt of 5 miRNAs between primary tumors and lymph node metastases was <9. Patients definitively diagnosed with SMPLCs by integrated analysis were also classified as SMPLCs by miRNA analysis; 6 patients showed conflicting diagnoses by integrated and miRNA analysis and 14 were given the same classification. Analysis of miRNA expression profiles is considered to be a useful tool for discriminating SMPLCs from intrapulmonary metastases. PMID:27495091

  1. Canine aural cholesteatoma: a histological and immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed

    Banco, Barbara; Grieco, Valeria; Di Giancamillo, Mauro; Greci, Valentina; Travetti, Olga; Martino, Pieranna; Mortellaro, Carlo M; Giudice, Chiara

    2014-06-01

    Canine aural cholesteatoma is an epidermoid cyst that forms in the middle ear cavity as a rare complication of otitis media but the aetiopathogenesis remains controversial. In the present study, 13 cases of canine aural cholesteatoma were investigated histologically and immunohistochemically and compared with cases of chronic otitis. The immunohistochemical investigation was performed using the following monoclonal antibodies: anti-cytokeratins (CK) 14, 16, 8/18, and 19, and anti-Ki67. The proliferative indexes (PIs) of cholesteatomata and otitis epithelium were calculated as the percentage of Ki67 positive nuclei/total nuclei. Histologically, the cholesteatomata were composed of a hyperplastic, hyperkeratotic epithelium (matrix) resting on a fibrous perimatrix, infiltrated by inflammatory cells and devoid of cutaneous adnexa. Immunohistochemically, the cholesteatoma epithelium was CK14- and CK16-positive, and CK8/18- and CK19-negative. A similar pattern of CK expression was found in otitis externa. In otitis media, ciliated epithelium stained CK8/18- and CK19-positive in all layers, CK14-positive in the basal layers, and CK16-negative. The mean PIs in cholesteatomata and otitides were 18.8 and 17.8, respectively. The immunohistochemical pattern of CK expression in cholesteatomata, when compared with chronic otitis, was suggestive of hyperproliferative epithelium, but its origin could not be demonstrated. Comparable PI values were obtained in cholesteatoma and in chronic otitis, which confirmed that Ki67 is a valuable indicator of a hyperproliferative state, but not a predictor of aggressiveness. PMID:24775276

  2. MIB-1 labeling indices in benign, aggressive, and malignant meningiomas: a study of 90 tumors.

    PubMed

    Abramovich, C M; Prayson, R A

    1998-12-01

    Predicting tumor behavior in meningiomas based on histology alone has been problematic. This study retrospectively compares histology and MIB-1 (cell proliferation marker) labeling indices (LI) in benign, aggressive, and malignant meningiomas. Six histological features, including mitoses, necrosis, loss of pattern, hypervascularity/hemosiderin deposition, prominent nucleoli, and nuclear pleomorphism, were compared in 90 meningiomas (Fisher's exact test). Tumors with two or more of the above features were designated as aggressive meningiomas. Malignant meningiomas were characterized by brain invasion or metastasis. The MIB-1 LIs (% positive tumor cell nuclei) were compared between the three groups (Kruskal-Wallis test, Wilcoxon two-sample test). Of the benign meningiomas (n=37; mean age, 54 years), 41% had one of the six histological features, with nuclear pleomorphism (n=10) being the most frequent. The aggressive tumors (n=29; mean age, 61 years) were characterized by nuclear pleomorphism (n=28), mitoses (n=20), necrosis (n=16), loss of pattern (n=16), prominent nucleoli (n=6), and hypervascularity/hemosiderin deposition (n=5). Malignant tumors (n=24; mean age, 59 years) were characterized by nuclear pleomorphism (n=22), mitoses (n=21), loss of pattern (n=21), necrosis (n=21), nucleoli (n=17), and hypervascularity/hemosiderin deposition (n=3). Significant differences were found between the aggressive and malignant groups with regard to loss of pattern, necrosis, and nucleoli (P=.0043, .011, and .00029, respectively). Mean MIB-1 LIs for the benign, aggressive, and malignant groups were 1.0% (range, 0 to 5.5%),5.5% (range, 0.1 to 32.5%), and 12.0% (range, 0.3 to 32.5%), respectively. Differences in the mean MIB-1 LI between groups were statistically significant, with P values of <.0001 (benign v aggressive) and .0012 (aggressive v malignant). Mean MIB-1 LIs for recurrent versus nonrecurrent tumors were 7.1% (range, 0 to 32.5%) versus 3.8% (range, 0 to 20.9%) (P=.32

  3. Different Anatomical Distribution of Basal Cell Carcinoma Subtypes in Iranian Population: Association between Site and Subtype

    PubMed Central

    Ghanadan, Alireza; Abdollahi, Pejman; Rabet, Mehrshad; Naraghi, Zahra; Abbasi, Mohammad Amin; Moslehi, Homayun

    2014-01-01

    Background Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common type of human cancer. Despite the high prevalence of these tumors, there is a lack of reliable epidemiological data in some regions including Iran. Objective To assess the relationship between BCC subtypes and anatomical distribution in the Iranian population. Methods There were 876 patients with a single BCC enrolled in this study (March 2007 to March 2010; Razi Dermatology Center, Tehran, Iran). Results Among 876 patients, 544 were males and 332 females. Of the lesions, 43% were nodular, 32.4% mixed type, 3% superficial and rest of other subtypes. In the lesion location, 58.2% were on the face, 29.2% on scalp, 6.2% on ears, 2.3% on neck, 1.7% on trunk and 1.3% on the extremities. There was no significant difference between male and female in the BCC subtypes, but anatomical distribution of the tumor was different (p=0.002). Most of the trunk-arising BCCs were superficial, and most of the facial BCCs were nodular subtype. Also, most of the BCC subtypes occurred in patients between 40 to 80 years old and mostly on the face and scalp (p=0.04). However, superficial BCCs mostly occurred in younger patients over others (p=0.001). Conclusion Subtype is associated with a site, independent of gender or age. Also BCCs occurring on the trunk are mostly of the superficial subtype. PMID:25324646

  4. Aggressive Angiomyxoma in Pregnancy: A Rare Condition, a Common Misdiagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Sarmento-Gonçalves, I.; Ramada, D.; Amaro, T.; Tiago-Silva, P.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Aggressive angiomyxoma is a rare mesenchymal neoplasm. Although benign in the majority of the cases, these neoplasms usually present a locally infiltrative nature and high rates of recurrence. Due to its rarity, misdiagnosis is a common problem. Case Presentation. We present one case of aggressive angiomyxoma in a 25-year-old pregnant woman. The patient presented with a large vaginal mass that was interpreted as a vaginal cyst. We performed surgical resection of the neoplasm and the correct diagnosis was only achieved after histological examination. With this case, we highlight the importance of considering this diagnosis in patients with genital and perineal masses of unknown origin and the impact of a correct preoperative diagnosis in patient's management and follow-up. Conclusion. Although aggressive angiomyxoma is rare, it should be considered in differential diagnosis of pelviperineal masses in young women. Its positivity to estrogen and progesterone receptors can justify enlargement and recurrence during pregnancy, although few cases are reported. Early recognition demands high index of suspicion for both gynaecologists and pathologists. Wide surgical excision with tumor free margins is the basis of curative treatment. Adjuvant therapy may be necessary for residual or recurrent tumors. Long-term follow-up is recommended. PMID:27274877

  5. Nonsurgical treatment of aggressive fibromatosis in the head and neck

    SciTech Connect

    West, C.B. Jr.; Shagets, F.W.; Mansfield, M.J. )

    1989-09-01

    Aggressive fibromatosis is a poorly defined, locally aggressive, yet histologically benign fibroblastic proliferative lesion that may occur in the head and neck. The lesion is highly cellular and locally infiltrative and has a propensity to invade and erode bone, compromising vital structures within the head and neck. However, it is not a true malignancy because it does not have malignant cytologic characteristics nor does it metastasize. We present two cases of aggressive fibromatosis occurring in young adult men. The first case involved a rapidly enlarging mass of the anterior maxilla that involved the upper lip, nasal alae, nasal septum, inferior turbinates, and hard palate. The patient underwent incisional biopsy to confirm the diagnosis. Because of difficulty in determining the actual margins of this extensive lesion and the significant morbidity that would have resulted from surgical resection, we elected to treat this patient with chemotherapy and radiation therapy. The second case was an extensive lesion involving the right temporal bone, pterygomaxillary space, and infratemporal, temporal, and middle cranial fossae. Incisional biopsy confirmed the diagnosis. Because of the lack of functional and cosmetic deficits and the unavoidable morbidity of a surgical resection, this patient was treated with radiation therapy. Although wide field resection is the most satisfactory form of treatment, in situations in which this modality would result in unacceptable morbidity or if surgical margins are positive, then radiation therapy and chemotherapy should be considered. Support for these therapeutic modalities is found in larger series of cases outside the head and neck.

  6. Quality of Life is Similar between Long-term Survivors of Indolent and Aggressive Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Beaven, Anne W; Samsa, Greg; Zimmerman, Sheryl; Smith, Sophia K

    2016-07-01

    Differences in quality of life (QOL) of long-term survivors of aggressive or indolent subtypes of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) have not been frequently evaluated. We assessed these differences by analyzing results of a large QOL survey of long-term NHL survivors. We hypothesized that the incurable nature of indolent NHL would relate to worse QOL in long-term survivors while the potentially cured long-term survivors of aggressive lymphoma would have better QOL. We found that QOL was similar between the two groups. Results suggest that patients with indolent NHL are coping well with their disease, yet experience some overall feelings of life threat. PMID:27379565

  7. Teachers' Reactions to Children's Aggression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nesdale, Drew; Pickering, Kaye

    2006-01-01

    Drawing on social schema theory (Fiske & Taylor, 1991) and social identity theory (Tajfel & Turner, 1979), this study examined the impact on teachers' reactions to children's aggression of three variables, two of which were related to the aggressors and one was related to the teachers. Experienced female elementary school teachers (N=90) each read…

  8. Explorations of Affection and Aggression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shuntich, Richard J.; Shapiro, Richard

    Considerable effort has been devoted to investigating various aspects of love and affection, but there have been few studies about direct expressions of affection. Relationships between gender composition of a dyad and the affection/aggression expressed by the dyad were examined as was the possibility of increasing the amount of affectionate…

  9. Risperidone and Explosive Aggressive Autism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horrigan, Joseph P.; Barnhill, L. Jarrett

    1997-01-01

    In this study, 11 males with autism and mental retardation were administered risperidone. Substantial clinical improvement was noted almost immediately; patients with aggression, self-injury, explosivity, and poor sleep hygiene were most improved. The modal dose for optimal response was 0.5 mg bid. Weight gain was a significant side effect.…

  10. Male Responses to Female Aggression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Gordon W.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Randomly assigned 60 male undergraduates to view film clip of professional lady wrestlers or of mud wrestling, or to no-film control. Both films produced negative changes in mood states, principally increase in aggression and decrease in social affection. Viewing films did not produce changes in men's acceptance of interpersonal violence against…

  11. The Passive Aggressive Conflict Cycle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitson, Signe

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the Passive Aggressive Conflict Cycle (PACC) helps observers to be able to look beyond behavior and better understand what is occurring beneath the surface. This article presents a real-life example of a seemingly minor conflict between a teacher and child that elicited an apparent major overreaction by the adult. Also provided is a…

  12. Television Portrayal and Aggressive Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Comstock, George

    This is a review of research relating to the attributes of portrayals which play a role in affecting aggressive behavior. The effects of portrayal can occur at any of three successive stages: acquisition, disinhibition/stimulation/arousal, performance. The older the individual, the more likely the influence is to be in all three stages of…

  13. Biochemistry and Aggression: Psychohematological Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Hilliard G., Jr.; Spitz, Reuben T.

    1994-01-01

    Examines biochemical measures in a population of forensic psychiatric inpatients. Regression equations utilizing chemical and biological variables were developed and evaluated to determine their value in predicting the severity and frequency of aggression. Findings strongly suggest the presence of specific biochemical alteration among those…

  14. Role of Histological Criteria and Immunohistochemical Markers in Predicting Risk of Malignancy in Parathyroid Neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Niraj; Chaudhary, Nandita; Pradhan, Roma; Agarwal, Amit; Krishnani, Narendra

    2016-06-01

    Parathyroid carcinoma (PC) is a rare neoplasm accounting for 0.5-6 % of primary hyperparathyroidism. Histological criteria are currently considered as established means to diagnose malignancy in parathyroid neoplasms; however, it does not accurately predict the risk of aggressive behaviour of PC. Immunohistochemical (IHC) markers have been used in the literature with variable results. This work was planned to study whether IHC markers would have any added advantage over histology in predicting outcome in parathyroid neoplasms. Two hundred twenty-seven parathyroid neoplasms were reviewed according to older and revised histological criteria. IHC was performed for parafibromin, APC, galectin-3, PGP9.5 and Ki67. Diagnostic categories were correlated with clinical, biochemical, histological features and IHC markers. Chi-square test was used to analyse categorical variables. Review of histology by earlier and revised criteria showed a change in diagnosis of five cases of atypical adenoma (15.1 %), all of which were diagnosed as carcinoma according to earlier criteria. Change in diagnosis did not affect behaviour of disease as none of the cases showed recurrence or metastasis on follow-up. Combination of PF, Gal-3 and PGP9.5 showed 50 % sensitivity, 97.9 % specificity and 95.4 % predictive accuracy for PC. Histological criteria still remains the most established method for predicting risk of malignancy in parathyroid neoplasms irrespective of whether old or revised criteria are used. Combination of positive (Gal-3, PGP9.5) and negative (PF) IHC markers may be used as an adjunct to histology in histological, atypical and malignant parathyroid neoplasms to obviate the need for repeated follow-up. PMID:26984237

  15. Subtyping Male Perpetrators of Intimate Partner Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fowler, Katherine A.; Westen, Drew

    2011-01-01

    Domestic violence is a serious problem with far-reaching consequences. This study applies a new methodology to derive subtypes of male perpetrators of intimate partner violence. As part of a larger National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)-funded study, a national sample of randomly selected psychologists and psychiatrists describe 188 adult male…

  16. A Taxometric Investigation of Developmental Dyslexia Subtypes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Brien, Beth A.; Wolf, Maryanne; Lovett, Maureen W.

    2012-01-01

    Long-standing issues with the conceptualization, identification and subtyping of developmental dyslexia persist. This study takes an alternative approach to examine the heterogeneity of developmental dyslexia using taxometric classification techniques. These methods were used with a large sample of 671 children ages 6-8 who were diagnosed with…

  17. CRISPRs: Molecular Signatures Used for Pathogen Subtyping

    PubMed Central

    Dudley, Edward G.

    2014-01-01

    Rapid and accurate strain identification is paramount in the battle against microbial outbreaks, and several subtyping approaches have been developed. One such method uses clustered regular interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs), DNA repeat elements that are present in approximately half of all bacteria. Though their signature function is as an adaptive immune system against invading DNA such as bacteriophages and plasmids, CRISPRs also provide an excellent framework for pathogen tracking and evolutionary studies. Analysis of the spacer DNA sequences that reside between the repeats has been tremendously useful for bacterial subtyping during molecular epidemiological investigations. Subtyping, or strain identification, using CRISPRs has been employed in diverse Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Salmonella enterica, and the plant pathogen Erwinia amylovora. This review discusses the several ways in which CRISPR sequences are exploited for subtyping. This includes the well-established spoligotyping methodologies that have been used for 2 decades to type Mycobacterium species, as well as in-depth consideration of newer, higher-throughput CRISPR-based protocols. PMID:24162568

  18. Implicit cognitive aggression among young male prisoners: Association with dispositional and current aggression.

    PubMed

    Ireland, Jane L; Adams, Christine

    2015-01-01

    The current study explores associations between implicit and explicit aggression in young adult male prisoners, seeking to apply the Reflection-Impulsive Model and indicate parity with elements of the General Aggression Model and social cognition. Implicit cognitive aggressive processing is not an area that has been examined among prisoners. Two hundred and sixty two prisoners completed an implicit cognitive aggression measure (Puzzle Test) and explicit aggression measures, covering current behaviour (DIPC-R) and aggression disposition (AQ). It was predicted that dispositional aggression would be predicted by implicit cognitive aggression, and that implicit cognitive aggression would predict current engagement in aggressive behaviour. It was also predicted that more impulsive implicit cognitive processing would associate with aggressive behaviour whereas cognitively effortful implicit cognitive processing would not. Implicit aggressive cognitive processing was associated with increased dispositional aggression but not current reports of aggressive behaviour. Impulsive implicit cognitive processing of an aggressive nature predicted increased dispositional aggression whereas more cognitively effortful implicit cognitive aggression did not. The article concludes by outlining the importance of accounting for implicit cognitive processing among prisoners and the need to separate such processing into facets (i.e. impulsive vs. cognitively effortful). Implications for future research and practice in this novel area of study are indicated. PMID:25857854

  19. Immunohistochemical profile of uterine leiomyomas; a comparison between different subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Azimpouran, Mahzad; Vazifekhah, Shabnam; Moslemi, Farnaz; Piri, Reza; Naghavi-Behzad, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background: Of all Smooth muscle tumours originating from uterus are leiomyomas are the most common ones. Benign nature and smooth muscle origination of leiomyomas can be easily documented via histological examination. In present study it was tried to examine immunohistochemical profile of leiomyomas with different subtypes. Material and Methods: In this cross-sectional study 64 cases of smooth muscle tumors originating from uterus were included in study. As a control group 12 cases of conventional leiomyomas were selected. Then estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, p53 and ki-67 were assessed. Statistical analysis was conducted using SPSS 16.0. Results: P 53 and ki-67 antibody status was diffusely positive in 12 out of 24 cases (50%) of leiomyosarcomas. Leiomyomas with bizzare nuclei were stained with Ki67 proliferative marker less than those in obviously malignant cases (P < 0.001). Estrogen and progesterone receptors had a reverse correlation with tumours malignancy potential. Conclusion: Since p53 is known as an important inhibitory trigger for proliferative cycle of cells, in current study it was concluded that p53 inhibitory role decreases as malignancy potential increases, also tumors dependence on steroids via steroid receptors decreases as malignancy potential increases. PMID:27185980

  20. Histology of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis in Adults and Children.

    PubMed

    Kleiner, David E; Makhlouf, Hala R

    2016-05-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the liver disease associated with obesity, diabetes, and the metabolic syndrome. Although steatosis is a key histologic feature, liver biopsies of patients with NAFLD can show a wide range of findings. Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is a progressive subtype of NAFLD first defined by analogy to alcoholic hepatitis. Young children may have an alternate pattern of progressive NAFLD characterized by a zone 1 distribution of steatosis, inflammation, and fibrosis. Several grading and staging systems exist, but all require adequate biopsies. Although NASH generally shows fibrosis progression over time, some patients show regression of disease. PMID:27063270

  1. [The utility of aspiration cytology for the distinction of aggressive and non-aggressive papillary carcinoma of the thyroid].

    PubMed

    Caprara, G; Collina, G

    2007-06-01

    Preoperative identification of the aggressive variants of papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) by fine needle aspiration (FNAC) has been suggested and different systems for distinguishing them from classical variant of PTC have been employed, including a point-based cytology grading system as suggested by Damiani et al., that we currently use in our Institution. The aim of this paper is to verify if distinction of PTC in aggressive or nonaggressive variants impacts on surgical treatment. In 7 years, from 1998 to 2005, 13586 cases of FNAC of thyroid have been performed; among them 156 PTC. The cytological material of thirty complete thyroidectomies with histology proven papillary thyroid carcinoma were reviewed. 11/30 cases were correctly stratified into the appropriate low or high-grade category. The cytological grading system was discordant with the final histopathological diagnosis in 9/30 cases while in 10 cases the grade was not assessed. Eight cases were downgraded and therefore the low grade papillary carcinoma diagnosed at cytological level turned to be high grade at histology. When those cases were reviewed, the histology of seven cases diagnosed as tall cell variant of PTC failed to show a percentage of tumour cells higher than 50% and therefore it would be better to diagnose them as classical variant of PTC. One case was under-graded at FNAC. The case that was cytologically upgraded was a follicular variant of PTC in Hashimoto thyroiditis with a focus of tall cells. All patients underwent thyroidectomy or thyroidectomy plus lymphadenectomy and from our results the pre-operative diagnosis did not effect the surgical treatment. No patient died of the disease. PMID:17987724

  2. Comparative histology of pineal calcification.

    PubMed

    Vígh, B; Szél, A; Debreceni, K; Fejér, Z; Manzano e Silva, M J; Vígh-Teichmann, I

    1998-07-01

    The pineal organ (pineal gland, epiphysis cerebri) contains several calcified concretions called "brain sand" or acervuli (corpora arenacea). These concretions are conspicuous with imaging techniques and provide a useful landmark for orientation in the diagnosis of intracranial diseases. Predominantly composed of calcium and magnesium salts, corpora arenacea are numerous in old patients. In smaller number they can be present in children as well. The degree of calcification was associated to various diseases. However, the presence of calcified concretions seems not to reflect a specific pathological state. Corpora arenacea occur not only in the actual pineal tissue but also in the leptomeninges, in the habenular commissure and in the choroid plexus. Studies with the potassium pyroantimonate (PPA) method on the ultrastructural localization of free calcium ions in the human pineal, revealed the presence of calcium alongside the cell membranes, a finding that underlines the importance of membrane functions in the production of calcium deposits. Intrapineal corpora arenacea are characterized by a surface with globular structures. Meningeal acervuli that are present in the arachnoid cover of the organ, differ in structure from intrapineal ones and show a prominent concentric lamination of alternating dark and light lines. The electron-lucent lines contain more calcium than the dark ones. There is a correlation between the age of the subject and the number of layers in the largest acervuli. This suggests that the formation of these layers is connected to circannual changes in the calcium level of the organ. The histological organization of the human pineal is basically the same as that of mammalian experimental animals. Pineal concretions present in mammalian animal species are mainly of the meningeal type. Meningeal cells around acervuli contain active cytoplasmic organelles and exhibit alkaline phosphatase reaction in the rat and mink, an indication of a presumable

  3. Study of aggressiveness prediction of mammary adenocarcinoma by Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade Bitar, Renata; da Silva Martinho, Herculano; Zambelli Ramalho, Leandra Náira; dos Santos Junior, Arnaldo Rodrigues; Silva Ramalho, Fernando; Raniero, Leandro; Martin, Airton A.

    2012-01-01

    Although there are many articles focused on in vivo or ex vivo Raman analysis for cancer diagnosis, to the best of our knowledge its potential to predict the aggressiveness of tumor has not been fully explored yet. In this work Raman spectra in the finger print region of ex vivo breast tissues of both healthy mice (normal) and mice with induced mammary gland tumors (abnormal) were measured and associated to matrix metalloproteinase-19 (MMP-19) immunohistochemical exam. It was possible to verify that normal breast, benign lesions, and adenocarcinomas spectra, including the subtypes (cribriform, papillary and solid) could have their aggressiveness diagnosed by vibrational Raman bands. By using MMP- 19 exam it was possible to classify the samples by malignant graduation in accordance to the classification results of Principal Component Analysis (PCA). The spectra NM /MH were classified correctly in 100% of cases; CA/CPA group had 60 % of spectra correctly classified and for PA/AS 54% of the spectra were correctly classified.

  4. Comparative Histology of Plasma Treated Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rick, Kyle

    2009-10-01

    Atmospheric plasmas applied in surgical settings have unique characteristics found in histological results from animal tissue studies. This is evident in both ex vivo bench tissue tests and in vivo fresh tissue. Examples of these histological features are presented as results of a comparative study between plasma treated, common medical argon coagulation, and electrosurgery.

  5. Aggressive Calcifying Epithelial Odontogenic Tumor of the Maxillary Sinus with Extraosseous Oral Mucosal Involvement: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Rani, Vidya; Masthan, Mahaboob Kadar; Aravindha, Babu; Leena, Sankari

    2016-01-01

    Calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumors are benign odontogenic neoplasms whose occurrence in the maxillary sinus is rare. Maxillary tumors tend to be locally aggressive and may rapidly involve the surrounding vital structures. We report a case of a large calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor of the maxilla, involving the maxillary sinus in a 48-year-old woman. The tumor was largely intraosseous. In the canine and first premolar regions, the loss of bone could be palpated but the oral mucosa appeared normal. Histologically, the tumor tissue could be seen in the connective tissue below the oral epithelium. The most significant finding was the presence of an intraosseous tumor with an extraosseous involvement in a single tumor, indicating aggressive behavior and warranting aggressive treatment. In this article, we discuss the rare presentation of the tumor and its radiological appearance and histological features. We also highlight the importance of a detailed histopathological examination of the excised specimen. PMID:26989286

  6. Aggressive Calcifying Epithelial Odontogenic Tumor of the Maxillary Sinus with Extraosseous Oral Mucosal Involvement: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Rani, Vidya; Masthan, Mahaboob Kadar; Aravindha, Babu; Leena, Sankari

    2016-03-01

    Calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumors are benign odontogenic neoplasms whose occurrence in the maxillary sinus is rare. Maxillary tumors tend to be locally aggressive and may rapidly involve the surrounding vital structures. We report a case of a large calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor of the maxilla, involving the maxillary sinus in a 48-year-old woman. The tumor was largely intraosseous. In the canine and first premolar regions, the loss of bone could be palpated but the oral mucosa appeared normal. Histologically, the tumor tissue could be seen in the connective tissue below the oral epithelium. The most significant finding was the presence of an intraosseous tumor with an extraosseous involvement in a single tumor, indicating aggressive behavior and warranting aggressive treatment. In this article, we discuss the rare presentation of the tumor and its radiological appearance and histological features. We also highlight the importance of a detailed histopathological examination of the excised specimen. PMID:26989286

  7. A Psychoeducational Group for Aggressive Adolescent Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cummings, Anne L.; Hoffman, Sue; Leschied, Alan W.

    2004-01-01

    This article describes an eight-session psychoeducational group for aggressive adolescent girls. The content of the group sessions is based on research that has identified gender-specific issues related to aggression in adolescent girls, such as gender-role socialization, childhood abuse, relational aggression, horizontal violence, and girl…

  8. Aggressive behavior in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Zahrt, Dawn M; Melzer-Lange, Marlene D

    2011-08-01

    After completing this article, readers should be able to: 1. Describe the developmental stages of aggressive behavior in children.2. Know how to provide parents with support and resources in caring for a child who displays aggressive behavior.3. Delineate the prognosis for children who have aggressive behaviors. PMID:21807873

  9. Investigating Three Explanations of Women's Relationship Aggression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham-Kevan, Nicola; Archer, John

    2005-01-01

    This study investigated explanations of women's partner aggression in a sample of 358 women. Women completed measures of physical aggression, control, and fear. Three explanations of women's partner aggression were explored: (a) that its use is associated with fear, (b) that it is reciprocal, and (c) that it is coercive. Each explanation received…

  10. Fantasy Aggression and the Catharsis Phenomenon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spiegel, Sharon Baron; Zelin, Martin

    1973-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the effects of fantasy aggression on blood pressure, affective states, and probability of subsequent aggression. The results are inconclusive because of the limited range of fantasy stimuli used and the short amount of time allowed for aggression to occur. (Author/KM)

  11. The myth of the aggressive monkey.

    PubMed

    Reinhardt, Viktor

    2002-01-01

    Captive rhesus macaques are not naturally aggressive, but poor husbandry and handling practices can trigger their aggression toward conspecifics and toward the human handler. The myth of the aggressive monkey probably is based on often not taking into account basic ethological principles when managing rhesus macaques in the research laboratory setting. PMID:16221082

  12. Female Aggression and Violence: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Penelope E.

    2012-01-01

    Aggression and violence among adolescent females has received extension attention throughout the nation. Girls often employ relationally aggressive behaviors to resolve conflict, which often leads to physical aggression. The purpose of this study was to examine a girl fight from multiple perspectives to gain a better understanding of the causes…

  13. Understanding and Preventing Aggressive Responses in Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Studer, Jeannine

    1996-01-01

    Fighting violence requires a networking approach among schools, community, and parents. This article advises elementary school counselors: (a) focus on the causes of aggression; (b) identify children with the propensity for behaving aggressively; and (c) prevent aggressive responses in children and adolescents by introducing techniques and…

  14. Relational Aggression among Middle School Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dallape, Aprille

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the correlates that define relational aggression among middle school girls, the relationships among these factors, and the association between the correlates of relational aggression and the type of relational aggression (e.g., verbal, withdrawal) exhibited among middle school girls. The findings of this…

  15. Reproducibility of histologic classification of gastric cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Palli, D.; Bianchi, S.; Cipriani, F.; Duca, P.; Amorosi, A.; Avellini, C.; Russo, A.; Saragoni, A.; Todde, P.; Valdes, E.

    1991-01-01

    A panel review of histologic specimens was carried out as part of a multi-centre case-control study of gastric cancer (GC) and diet. Comparisons of diagnoses of 100 GCs by six pathologists revealed agreement in histologic classification for about 70-80% of the cancers. Concordance was somewhat higher when using the Lauren rather than the Ming or World Health Organization classification systems. Histologic types from reading biopsy tissue agreed with those derived from surgical specimens for 65-75% of the 100 tumours. Intra-observer agreement in histologic classification, assessed by repeat readings up to 3 years apart by one pathologist, was 95%. The findings indicate that, although overall concordance was good, it is important to standardise diagnoses in multi-centre epidemiologic studies of GC by histologic type. PMID:2039701

  16. Feelings about Verbal Aggression: Justifications for Sending and Hurt from Receiving Verbally Aggressive Messages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Matthew M.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Investigates whether receiving verbally aggressive messages was more hurtful depending on the source of the message; whether trait verbal aggression is justified; and whether the perceived hurt of verbally aggressive messages is related to a tendency to be verbally aggressive. Finds that messages from friends caused more hurt than messages from…

  17. Social Aggression on Television and Its Relationship to Children's Aggression in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martins, Nicole; Wilson, Barbara J.

    2012-01-01

    A survey was conducted with over 500 children in grades K-5 to examine whether exposure to socially aggressive content was related to children's use of social aggression. The results of the survey revealed a significant relationship between exposure to televised social aggression and increased social aggression at school, but only for girls and…

  18. Effects of Aggressive vs. Nonaggressive Films on the Aggressive Behavior of Mentally Retarded Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Charles

    Examined was the effect of viewing an aggressive film on the behavior of 22 moderately and mildly mentally retarded children (5-11 years old). Ss' doll playing was observed after they viewed a nonaggressive and an aggressive film. Results supported the hypothesis that Ss would exhibit more aggressive behavior following the aggressive than the…

  19. Desmoplastic Fibroma of the Pediatric Cranium: An Aggressive Skull Tumor with Local Recurrence

    PubMed Central

    KOISO, Takao; MUROI, Ai; YAMAMOTO, Tetsuya; SAKAMOTO, Noriaki; MATSUMURA, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Cranial desmoplastic fibroma (DF) is extremely rare and only 20 cases, including only 7 pediatric cases, have been reported previously. We describe the first case of a child with cranial DF that increased in size over a short-term and recurred after resection. The aim of this case report was to discuss the clinical, radiological, and histological characteristics and optimal treatment for this rare and aggressive skull tumor. PMID:26804188

  20. Centrilobular zonal necrosis as a hallmark of a distinctive subtype of autoimmune hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Hiroshi; Sugita, Tomonori; Seki, Nobuyoshi; Chuganji, Yoshimichi; Furumoto, Youhei; Sakata, Akihiko

    2016-01-01

    Background and aim Centrilobular zonal necrosis (CZN) is a known histological variant of autoimmune hepatitis (AIH). However, the significance of CZN is yet to be fully elucidated. This study aimed to determine whether CZN is a hallmark of a distinctive subtype of AIH. Methods Histological changes in the centrilobular zones of liver biopsies from 113 AIH patients were assessed by a single pathologist and classified into three categories: typical zonal necrosis defined as CZN (15 patients); other necroinflammatory change (NIC; 24 patients); and absence of necrosis (non-NIC; 74 patients). The clinicopathological features and immunogenetic background of CZN patients were then assessed. Results The clinicopathological features of AIH with CZN were distinct from other types of AIH, including a higher frequency of acute onset, lower frequency of antinuclear antibodies, lower antinuclear antibody titers, lower serum immunoglobulin G levels, lower grade interface hepatitis, less prominent lymphoplasmacytic infiltration, and lower AIH score. Increased and decreased frequencies of HLA-DR9 and HLA-DR4, respectively, were identified as immunogenetic features of AIH with CZN. Conversely, the clinicopathological characteristics of AIH with NIC were similar to those of non-NIC AIH, including the majority of the AIH patients. The therapeutic outcomes of AIH with CZN were excellent when precise diagnoses were made without delay. Conclusion The clinicopathological features and immunogenetic background of AIH with CZN differed from AIH without CZN. CZN may be a hallmark of a distinct subtype of AIH. PMID:26657454

  1. Mapping Brain Development and Aggression

    PubMed Central

    Paus, Tomás

    2005-01-01

    Introduction This article provides an overview of the basic principles guiding research on brain-behaviour relationships in general, and as applied to studies of aggression during human development in particular. Method Key literature on magnetic resonance imaging of the structure and function of a developing brain was reviewed. Results The article begins with a brief introduction to the methodology of techniques used to map the developing brain, with a special emphasis on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). It then reviews briefly the current knowledge of structural maturation, assessed by MRI, of the human brain during childhood and adolescence. The last part describes some of the results of neuroimaging studies aimed at identifying neural circuits involved in various aspects of aggression and social cognition. Conclusion The article concludes by discussing the potential and limitations of the neuroimaging approach in this field. PMID:19030495

  2. Gastric cancer risk in relation to Helicobacter pylori infection and subtypes of intestinal metaplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, M. S.; Shun, C. T.; Lee, W. C.; Chen, C. J.; Wang, H. P.; Lee, W. J.; Lin, J. T.

    1998-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection and intestinal metaplasia (IM) are each associated with an increased risk of gastric cancer (GC). To explore further the influences of H. pylori and IM on GC, H. pylori and subtypes of IM were evaluated in 135 sex and age-matched case and control pairs. Odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals of developing GC were calculated for each risk factor using multiple logistic regression analysis. ORs for H. pylori infection and IM were 2.43 (1.29-4.65) and 4.59 (2.58-8.16), respectively, and those for different IM subtypes gave values of 0.82 (0.28-2.36) for type I, 2.03 (0.95-4.34) for type II and 39.75 (14.34-110.2) for type III. Stratification analysis by histological subtype and stage of GC showed a particularly high OR for IM in intestinal type (12.8, 4.73-34.83) and early GC (6.40, 2.25-18.18). Our data indicate that both H. pylori and IM are related to GC risk. Type III IM is a more specific marker of premalignancy, with relevance, in particular, to the early and intestinal type of GC. PMID:9662262

  3. Qualitative and Quantitative Gadoxetic Acid-enhanced MR Imaging Helps Subtype Hepatocellular Adenomas.

    PubMed

    Tse, Justin R; Naini, Bita V; Lu, David S K; Raman, Steven S

    2016-04-01

    Purpose To determine which clinical variables and gadoxetic acid disodium (Gd-EOB-DTPA)-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging features are associated with histologically proved hepatocellular adenoma (HCA) genotypic subtypes. Materials and Methods In this institutional review board-approved and Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act-compliant study, clinical information and MR images of 49 histologically proved HCAs from January 2002 to December 2013 (21 patients; mean age, 39 years; age range, 15-59 years) were retrospectively reviewed by two radiologists. Qualitative and quantitative imaging features, including the signal intensity ratio relative to liver in each phase, were studied. HCA tissues were stained with subtype-specific markers and subclassified by a pathologist. Clinical and imaging data were correlated with pathologic findings and compared by using Fisher exact or t test, with a Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons. Results Forty-nine HCAs were subclassified into 14 inflammatory, 20 hepatocyte nuclear factor (HNF)-1α-mutated, one β-catenin-activated, and 14 unclassified lesions. Intralesional steatosis was exclusively seen in HNF-1α-mutated lesions. Marked hyperintensity on T2-weighted images was seen in 12 of 14 (86%) inflammatory lesions compared with four of 21 (19%) HNF-1α-mutated, seven of 14 (50%) unclassified, and zero of one (0%) β-catenin-activated lesion. Two large lesions (one β-catenin-activated and one unclassified) transformed into hepatocellular carcinomas and were the only lesions to enhance with marked heterogeneity. In the hepatobiliary phase, all HCA subtypes were hypoenhancing compared with surrounding liver parenchyma, and they reached their nadir signal intensity by 10 minutes after the administration of contrast material before plateauing. HNF-1α-mutated lesions had the lowest lesion signal intensity ratio of 0.47 ± 0.09, compared with 0.73 ± 0.18 for inflammatory lesions (P = .0004), 0.82 for

  4. Preventing aggressive behaviour in dogs.

    PubMed

    Orritt, Rachel

    2016-07-01

    Delegates from around the world met at the University of Lincoln on June 11 and 12 for the third annual UK Dog Bite Prevention and Behaviour conference. The conference, hosted by dog trainer Victoria Stilwell, brings together dog behaviour experts to discuss possible solutions to this public health issue. Rachel Orritt, who has been examining the perceptions, assessment and management of human-directed aggressive behaviour in dogs for her PhD, reports. PMID:27389748

  5. Lateralization of aggression in fish.

    PubMed

    Bisazza, Angelo; de Santi, Andrea

    2003-05-15

    Recent research has suggested that lateralization of aggressive behaviors could follow an homogeneous pattern among all vertebrates. A left eye/right hemisphere dominance in eliciting aggressive responses has been demonstrated for all groups of tetrapods but teleost fish for which data is lacking. Here we studied differential eye use during aggressive interactions in three species of teleosts: Gambusia holbrooki, Xenotoca eiseni and Betta splendens. In the first experiment we checked for lateralization in the use of the eyes while the subject was attacking its own mirror image. In order to confirm the results, other tests were performed on two species and eye preference was scored during attacks or displays directed toward a live rival. All three species showed a marked preference for using the right eye when attacking a mirror image or a live rival. Thus, the direction of asymmetry in fish appears the opposite to that shown by all the other groups of vertebrates. Hypotheses on the origin of the difference are discussed. PMID:12742249

  6. Neurobiology of Aggression and Violence

    PubMed Central

    Siever, Larry J.

    2014-01-01

    Acts of violence account for an estimated 1.43 million deaths worldwide annually. While violence can occur in many contexts, individual acts of aggression account for the majority of instances. In some individuals, repetitive acts of aggression are grounded in an underlying neurobiological susceptibility that is just beginning to be understood. The failure of “top-down” control systems in the prefrontal cortex to modulate aggressive acts that are triggered by anger provoking stimuli appears to play an important role. An imbalance between prefrontal regulatory influences and hyper-responsivity of the amygdala and other limbic regions involved in affective evaluation are implicated. Insufficient serotonergic facilitation of “top-down” control, excessive catecholaminergic stimulation, and subcortical imbalances of glutamatergic/ gabaminergic systems as well as pathology in neuropeptide systems involved in the regulation of affiliative behavior may contribute to abnormalities in this circuitry. Thus, pharmacological interventions such as mood stabilizers, which dampen limbic irritability, or selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), which may enhance “top-down” control, as well as psychosocial interventions to develop alternative coping skills and reinforce reflective delays may be therapeutic. PMID:18346997

  7. Rural neighborhoods and child aggression.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Natasha K; Wretman, Christopher J

    2014-12-01

    Structural equation modeling with latent variables was used to evaluate the direct and mediated effects of a neighborhood risk factor (negative teen behaviors) on the parent-report aggressive behavior of 213 students in grades 3 through 5 attending a school in a low-income, rural community. Contagion and social control hypotheses were examined as well as hypotheses about whether the neighborhood served as a microsystem or exosystem for rural pre-adolescents. Analyses took into account the clustering of students and ordinal nature of the data. Findings suggest that rural neighborhoods may operate as both a microsystem and exosystem for children, with direct contagion effects on their aggressive behaviors as well as indirect social control effects through parenting practices. Direct effects on aggression were also found for parenting practices and child reports of friends' negative behaviors. Pre-adolescence may be a transitional stage, when influences of the neighborhood on child behavior begin to compete with influences of caregivers. Findings can inform the timing and targets of violence prevention in rural communities. PMID:25205545

  8. Surgical Management of Aggressive Central Giant Cell Granuloma of Maxilla through Le Fort I Access Osteotomy

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, G. V.; Reddy, G. Siva Prasad; Reddy, N. V. S. Sekhar; Kumar, Aswin

    2012-01-01

    Giant cell granuloma (GCG) is an uncommon bony lesion in the head and neck region, most commonly affecting the maxilla and mandible and has a female predilection. The clinical behavior of central GCG ranges from a slowly growing asymptomatic swelling to an aggressive lesion. The clinical, radiological, histological features and management of an aggressive GCG of maxilla in an 18-year-old female patient are described and discussed. It is emphasized that surgery is the traditional and still the most accepted treatment for GCG. Le Fort I osteotomy has been advocated as one of the access osteotomy for the surgical management of aggressive and extensive GCG involving the maxilla. The postoperative morbidity and recurrence have been discussed. PMID:22754742

  9. Precision Subtypes of T Cell-Mediated Rejection Identified by Molecular Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Kadota, Paul Ostrom; Hajjiri, Zahraa; Finn, Patricia W.; Perkins, David L.

    2015-01-01

    Among kidney transplant recipients, the treatment of choice for acute T cell-mediated rejection (TCMR) with pulse steroids or antibody protocols has variable outcomes. Some rejection episodes are resistant to an initial steroid pulse, but respond to subsequent antibody protocols. The biological mechanisms causing the different therapeutic responses are not currently understood. Histological examination of the renal allograft is considered the gold standard in the diagnosis of acute rejection. The Banff Classification System was established to standardize the histopathological diagnosis and to direct therapy. Although widely used, it shows variability among pathologists and lacks criteria to guide precision individualized therapy. The analysis of the transcriptome in allograft biopsies, which we analyzed in this study, provides a strategy to develop molecular diagnoses that would have increased diagnostic precision and assist the development of individualized treatment. Our hypothesis is that the histological classification of TCMR contains multiple subtypes of rejection. Using R language algorithms to determine statistical significance, multidimensional scaling, and hierarchical, we analyzed differential gene expression based on microarray data from biopsies classified as TCMR. Next, we identified KEGG functions, protein–protein interaction networks, gene regulatory networks, and predicted therapeutic targets using the integrated database ConsesnsusPathDB (CPDB). Based on our analysis, two distinct clusters of biopsies termed TCMR01 and TCMR02 were identified. Despite having the same Banff classification, we identified 1933 differentially expressed genes between the two clusters. These genes were further divided into three major groups: a core group contained within both the TCMR01 and TCMR02 subtypes, as well as genes unique to TCMR01 or TCMR02. The subtypes of TCMR utilized different biological pathways, different regulatory networks and were predicted to

  10. Mir-21–Sox2 Axis Delineates Glioblastoma Subtypes with Prognostic Impact

    PubMed Central

    Sathyan, Pratheesh; Zinn, Pascal O.; Marisetty, Anantha L.; Liu, Bin; Kamal, Mohamed Mostafa; Singh, Sanjay K.; Bady, Pierre; Lu, Li; Wani, Khalida M.; Veo, Bethany L.; Gumin, Joy; Kassem, Dina Hamada; Robinson, Frederick; Weng, Connie; Baladandayuthapani, Veerabhadran; Suki, Dima; Colman, Howard; Bhat, Krishna P.; Sulman, Erik P.; Aldape, Ken; Colen, Rivka R.; Verhaak, Roel G.W.; Lu, Zhimin; Fuller, Gregory N.; Huang, Suyun; Lang, Frederick F.; Sawaya, Raymond; Hegi, Monika

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most aggressive human brain tumor. Although several molecular subtypes of GBM are recognized, a robust molecular prognostic marker has yet to be identified. Here, we report that the stemness regulator Sox2 is a new, clinically important target of microRNA-21 (miR-21) in GBM, with implications for prognosis. Using the MiR-21–Sox2 regulatory axis, approximately half of all GBM tumors present in the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and in-house patient databases can be mathematically classified into high miR-21/low Sox2 (Class A) or low miR-21/high Sox2 (Class B) subtypes. This classification reflects phenotypically and molecularly distinct characteristics and is not captured by existing classifications. Supporting the distinct nature of the subtypes, gene set enrichment analysis of the TCGA dataset predicted that Class A and Class B tumors were significantly involved in immune/inflammatory response and in chromosome organization and nervous system development, respectively. Patients with Class B tumors had longer overall survival than those with Class A tumors. Analysis of both databases indicated that the Class A/Class B classification is a better predictor of patient survival than currently used parameters. Further, manipulation of MiR-21–Sox2 levels in orthotopic mouse models supported the longer survival of the Class B subtype. The MiR-21–Sox2 association was also found in mouse neural stem cells and in the mouse brain at different developmental stages, suggesting a role in normal development. Therefore, this mechanism-based classification suggests the presence of two distinct populations of GBM patients with distinguishable phenotypic characteristics and clinical outcomes. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Molecular profiling-based classification of glioblastoma (GBM) into four subtypes has substantially increased our understanding of the biology of the disease and has pointed to the heterogeneous nature of GBM. However, this classification is not

  11. Antisocial personality disorder, alcohol, and aggression.

    PubMed

    Moeller, F G; Dougherty, D M

    2001-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies and laboratory research consistently link alcohol use with aggression. Not all people, however, exhibit increased aggression under the influence of alcohol. Recent research suggests that people with antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) may be more prone to alcohol-related aggression than people without ASPD. As a group, people with ASPD have higher rates of alcohol dependence and more alcohol-related problems than people without ASPD. Likewise, in laboratory studies, people with ASPD show greater increases in aggressive behavior after consuming alcohol than people without ASPD. The association between ASPD and alcohol-related aggression may result from biological factors, such as ASPD-related impairments in the functions of certain brain chemicals (e.g., serotonin) or in the activities of higher reasoning, or "executive," brain regions. Alternatively, the association between ASPD and alcohol-related aggression may stem from some as yet undetermined factor(s) that increase the risk for aggression in general. PMID:11496966

  12. [Pharmacological treatment of syndromes of aggressivity].

    PubMed

    Itil, T M

    1978-01-01

    In the treatment of violent-aggressive behavior, four major groups of drugs emerged: 1. Major tranquilizers in the treatment of aggressive-violent behavior associated with psychotic syndromes. 2. Anti-epileptic drugs such as diphenylhydantoin and barbiturates in the treatment of aggressive-violent behavior within the epileptic syndrome. 3. Psychostimulants in the treatment of aggressive behavior of adolescents and children within behavior disturbances. 4. Anti-male hormones such as cyproterone acetate in the treatment of violent-aggressive behavior associated with pathological sexual hyperactivity. Whereas each category of drug is predominantly effective in one type of aggressive syndrome, it may also be effective in other conditions as well. Aggression as a result of a personality disorder is most difficult to treat with drugs. PMID:34189

  13. Aggression after Traumatic Brain Injury: Prevalence & Correlates

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Vani; Rosenberg, Paul; Bertrand, Melaine; Salehinia, Saeed; Spiro, Jennifer; Vaishnavi, Sandeep; Rastogi, Pramit; Noll, Kathy; Schretlen, David J; Brandt, Jason; Cornwell, Edward; Makley, Michael; Miles, Quincy Samus

    2010-01-01

    Aggression after traumatic brain injury (TBI) is common but not well defined. Sixty-seven participants with first-time TBI were seen within three months of injury and evaluated for aggression. The prevalence of aggression was found to be 28.4% and to be predominantly verbal aggression. Post-TBI aggression was associated with new-onset major depression (p=0.02), poorer social functioning (p=0.04), and increased dependency on activities of daily living (p=0.03), but not with a history of substance abuse or adult/childhood behavioral problems. Implications of the study include early screening for aggression, evaluation for depression, and consideration of psychosocial support in aggressive patients. PMID:19996251

  14. Suicide by cop: clinical risks and subtypes.

    PubMed

    Dewey, Lauren; Allwood, Maureen; Fava, Joanna; Arias, Elizabeth; Pinizzotto, Anthony; Schlesinger, Louis

    2013-01-01

    This study examines whether clinical classification schemes from general suicide research are applicable for cases of suicide by cop (SbC) and whether there are indicators as to why the police might be engaged in the suicide. Using archival law enforcement data, 13 clinical risks were examined among 68 cases of SbC using exploratory factor analysis and k-means cluster analysis. Three subtypes of SbC cases emerged: Mental Illness, Criminality, and Not Otherwise Specified. The subtypes varied significantly on their levels of mental illness, substance use, and criminal activity. Findings suggest that reducing fragmentation between law enforcement and mental health service providers might be a crucial goal for suicide intervention and prevention, at least among cases of SbC. PMID:24224677

  15. The histologic features of intratubular germ cell neoplasia and its correlation with tumor behavior

    PubMed Central

    Basiri, Abbas; Movahhed, Saeed; Parvin, Mahmood; Salimi, Maziar

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To assess the prevalence of intratubular germ cell neoplasia (ITGCN) in patients with concurrent testis tumor and its correlation with histologic features and serum tumor markers. Materials and Methods From 2003 to 2015, 179 patients underwent radical orchiectomy due to testicular mass. Tissue specimens were evaluated by an expert uro-pathologist using immunohistochemistry (IHC) staining, in addition to light microscopy, to identify presence of ITGCN. Patients' demographic characteristics, histologic subtypes, pathologic stage of tumor and serum tumor markers were gathered and analyzed. Results Eighty-five out of 179 patients (47.5%) had concomitant ITGCN according to IHC staining. There was not statistically significant difference in histologic type, histologic components, cryptorchidism, and lymphovascular invasion between the 2 groups (p=0.151, p=0.11, p=0.233, p=0.413, and p=0.14, respectively). The prevalence of ITGCN was significantly higher in patients with stage T2 and T3 of tumor than those with stage T1. Elevated serum alpha feto protein level is much common in patients with ITGCN (p<0.001). Conclusions The prevalence of concurrent ITGCN in our region is lower than previous data from western countries. ITGCN is more common in higher tumor stages and is accompanied with elevated serum alpha feto protein levels before surgery. Presence of ITGCN in adjacent tissue may suggest a negative cancer behavior. PMID:27195317

  16. An expert system for histological typing and grading of invasive breast cancer. First set up.

    PubMed

    van Diest, P J; Belien, J A; Baak, J P

    1992-06-01

    This article describes the set up of a rule-based expert system for histologic typing and grading of invasive breast cancer, which is designed to be a user-friendly tool that may be helpful for teaching and to support diagnosis making. The system raises questions and offers fixed choices to the user (usually yes/no) until a histologic diagnosis can be made with reasonable probability or enough data are available to assign a grade. As to histologic typing, the expert system is able to make the following diagnoses: ductal carcinoma, lobular carcinoma, medullary carcinoma, colloidal carcinoma, tubular carcinoma, and invasive cribriform carcinoma. If the diagnosis "ductal carcinoma" is arrived, the system offers the option to assign a histologic grade to the lesion. A first evaluation of the system in 30 cases (five each of the different subtypes) with unequivocal diagnoses by two human experts showed that the system classified 29 of the tumours in the same way as the human experts. The discrepancy case was solved after adding one rule to the system. Ten cases where a discrepancy existed between the original diagnosis of a referring centre and a reviewing human expert were all classified by the expert system in the same way as the human expert. The expert system thus seems to perform well. Further plans for evaluating, modifying and expanding the system are disclosed. PMID:1329049

  17. Efficacy of lacosamide by focal seizure subtype.

    PubMed

    Sperling, Michael R; Rosenow, Felix; Faught, Edward; Hebert, David; Doty, Pamela; Isojärvi, Jouko

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this post hoc exploratory analysis was to determine the effects of the antiepileptic drug, lacosamide, on focal (partial-onset) seizure subtypes. Patient data from the three lacosamide pivotal trials were grouped and pooled by focal seizure subtype at Baseline: simple partial seizures (SPS), complex partial seizures (CPS), and secondarily generalized partial seizures (SGPS). Both efficacy outcomes (median percent change from Baseline to Maintenance Phase in seizure frequency per 28 days and the proportion of patients experiencing at least a 50% reduction in seizures) were evaluated by lacosamide dose (200, 400, or 600 mg/day) compared to placebo for each seizure subtype. An additional analysis was performed to determine whether a shift from more severe focal seizure subtypes to less severe occurred upon treatment with lacosamide. In patients with CPS or SGPS at Baseline, lacosamide 400 mg/day (maximum recommended daily dose) and 600 mg/day reduced the frequency of CPS and SGPS compared to placebo. Likewise, a proportion of patients with CPS and SGPS at Baseline experienced at least a 50% reduction in the frequency of CPS and SGPS (≥50% responder rate) in the lacosamide 400 and 600 mg/day groups compared with placebo. For both outcomes, numerically greatest responses were observed in the lacosamide 600 mg/day group among patients with SGPS at Baseline. In patients with SPS at Baseline, no difference between placebo and lacosamide was observed for either efficacy outcome. An additional exploratory analysis suggests that in patients with SPS at Baseline, CPS and SGPS may have been shifted to less severe SPS upon treatment with lacosamide. The results of these exploratory analyses revealed reductions in CPS and SGPS frequency with adjunctive lacosamide. Reduction in CPS and SGPS may confound assessment of SPS since the CPS or SGPS may possibly change to SPS by effective treatment. PMID:25082395

  18. Non motor subtypes and Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Sauerbier, Anna; Jenner, Peter; Todorova, Antoniya; Chaudhuri, K Ray

    2016-01-01

    Non motor symptoms (NMS) represent a significant burden in Parkinson's disease (PD) with numerous studies highlighting the importance of NMS both in "pre-motor" phase of PD as well as throughout the course of disease. In part this has led the international Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society (IPMDS) task force to attempt a re-definition of PD incorporating NMS and not base the diagnosis solely on motor symptoms. While motor subtypes within PD have been recognized and researched, recent clinical and neurobiological research suggests the existence of discrete non motor subtypes in PD, particularly in untreated (drug naïve) and early PD patients. Several independent observers have reported specific "clusters of NMS dominant PD" using a data driven approach in early and untreated PD patients while others have reported on the burden of NMS in untreated PD and specific NMS dominant phenotypes in untreated or treated PD using observational case series based data. In this review we report on specific NMS dominant phenotypes of PD as described in the literature using clinical observational studies and address pathophysiological concepts. A proposal for several NMS subtypes are reported combining clinical reports with, where possible, evidence base supporting probable biomarkers. PMID:26459660

  19. Subtyping of STEC by MLVA in Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Bustamante, Ana V.; Sanso, Andrea M.; Parma, Alberto E.; Lucchesi, Paula M. A.

    2012-01-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) causes serious human illness such as hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). Argentina has the world’s highest rate of this syndrome, which is the leading cause of acute renal failure among children. E. coli O157:H7 is the most common cause of HUS, but a substantial and growing proportion of this illness is caused by infection due to non-O157 strains. Multiple-locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) has become an established technique to subtype STEC. This review will address the use of routine STEC subtyping by MLVA in order to type this group of isolates and to get insight into the genetic diversity of native STEC. With regard to these objectives we modified and adapted two MLVA protocols, one exclusive for O157 and the other, a generic E. coli assay. A total of 202 STEC isolates, from different sources and corresponding to 20 serotypes, have been MLVA genotyped in our laboratory. In our experience, MLVA constitutes a very sensitive tool and enables us to perform an efficient STEC subtyping. The diversity found in many serotypes may be useful for future epidemiological studies of STEC clonality, applied to O157 as well as to non-O157 isolates. PMID:22919698

  20. Proteomic maps of breast cancer subtypes.

    PubMed

    Tyanova, Stefka; Albrechtsen, Reidar; Kronqvist, Pauliina; Cox, Juergen; Mann, Matthias; Geiger, Tamar

    2016-01-01

    Systems-wide profiling of breast cancer has almost always entailed RNA and DNA analysis by microarray and sequencing techniques. Marked developments in proteomic technologies now enable very deep profiling of clinical samples, with high identification and quantification accuracy. We analysed 40 oestrogen receptor positive (luminal), Her2 positive and triple negative breast tumours and reached a quantitative depth of >10,000 proteins. These proteomic profiles identified functional differences between breast cancer subtypes, related to energy metabolism, cell growth, mRNA translation and cell-cell communication. Furthermore, we derived a signature of 19 proteins, which differ between the breast cancer subtypes, through support vector machine (SVM)-based classification and feature selection. Remarkably, only three proteins of the signature were associated with gene copy number variations and eleven were also reflected on the mRNA level. These breast cancer features revealed by our work provide novel insights that may ultimately translate to development of subtype-specific therapeutics. PMID:26725330

  1. An integrated genomic analysis identifies clinically relevant subtypes of glioblastoma characterized by abnormalities in PDGFRA, IDH1, EGFR and NF1

    PubMed Central

    Verhaak, Roel G.W.; Hoadley, Katherine A.; Purdom, Elizabeth; Wang, Victoria; Qi, Yuan; Wilkerson, Matthew D.; Miller, C. Ryan; Ding, Li; Golub, Todd; Mesirov, Jill P.; Alexe, Gabriele; Lawrence, Michael; O’Kelly, Michael; Tamayo, Pablo; Weir, Barbara A.; Gabrie, Stacey; Winckler, Wendy; Gupta, Supriya; Jakkula, Lakshmi; Feiler, Heidi S.; Hodgson, J. Graeme; James, C. David; Sarkaria, Jann N.; Brennan, Cameron; Kahn, Ari; Spellman, Paul T.; Wilson, Richard K.; Speed, Terence P.; Gray, Joe W.; Meyerson, Matthew; Getz, Gad; Perou, Charles M.; Hayes, D. Neil

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY The Cancer Genome Atlas Network recently catalogued recurrent genomic abnormalities in glioblastoma (GBM). We describe a robust gene expression-based molecular classification of GBM into Proneural, Neural, Classical and Mesenchymal subtypes and integrate multi-dimensional genomic data to establish patterns of somatic mutations and DNA copy number. Aberrations and gene expression of EGFR, NF1, and PDGFRA/IDH1 each define Classical, Mesenchymal, and Proneural, respectively. Gene signatures of normal brain cell types show a strong relation between subtypes and different neural lineages. Additionally, response to aggressive therapy differs by subtype with greatest benefit in Classical and no benefit in Proneural. We provide a framework that unifies transcriptomic and genomic dimensions for GBM molecular stratification with important implications for future studies. PMID:20129251

  2. ADHD subtypes and neuropsychological performance in an adult sample.

    PubMed

    Dobson-Patterson, Roberta; O'Gorman, John G; Chan, Raymond C K; Shum, David H K

    2016-08-01

    The study investigated, with an adult sample, the hypothesis that differences between subtypes of ADHD on neuropsychological tests contribute to the poor separation of ADHD and healthy groups on tests of this kind. Groups of ADHD inattentive (n=16) and combined (n=16) subtypes were carefully identified using DSM-IV criteria, and their performance on 14 measures of attention, memory, and executive function (EF) was compared between subtypes and between the two subtypes combined and a group of healthy controls (n=30). Multivariate analyses showed statistically significant differences between the two subtypes, and between the two subtypes combined and the healthy controls. Importantly for the hypothesis, where differences for neuropsychological tests in terms of effect sizes between subtypes were largest, the differences in effect sizes between the two groups combined and controls were smallest (r=-0.64, 95% CI [-0.15, -0.87]). PMID:27043366

  3. Recent Insight Into the Subtypes of Social Anxiety Disorder.

    PubMed

    D'Avanzato, Catherine; Dalrymple, Kristy L

    2016-05-01

    Systems for subtyping individuals with social anxiety disorder have been the focus of much research attention as a means to improve assessment and treatment of the disorder. This article highlights recent revisions to social anxiety disorder (SAD) subtypes from the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV) to DSM-V, reviewing empirical evidence that served as the impetus for the revisions. Recent research examining the validity of the DSM-V system and alternative subtyping systems is reviewed. Overall, there appears to be greater empirical support for a dimensional subtyping system. Concerns therefore remain with the DSM-V system, which retained a categorical system but replaced the previous subtypes with a subtype of individuals fearing only performance situations. Recommendations for future research are discussed, as well as alternate options for capturing the variability in SAD presentations, including the possibility of eliminating subtyping altogether. PMID:27017831

  4. Breast cancer intrinsic subtype classification, clinical use and future trends

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Xiaofeng; Li, Ting; Bai, Zhonghu; Yang, Yankun; Liu, Xiuxia; Zhan, Jinling; Shi, Bozhi

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is composed of multiple subtypes with distinct morphologies and clinical implications. The advent of microarrays has led to a new paradigm in deciphering breast cancer heterogeneity, based on which the intrinsic subtyping system using prognostic multigene classifiers was developed. Subtypes identified using different gene panels, though overlap to a great extent, do not completely converge, and the avail of new information and perspectives has led to the emergence of novel subtypes, which complicate our understanding towards breast tumor heterogeneity. This review explores and summarizes the existing intrinsic subtypes, patient clinical features and management, commercial signature panels, as well as various information used for tumor classification. Two trends are pointed out in the end on breast cancer subtyping, i.e., either diverging to more refined groups or converging to the major subtypes. This review improves our understandings towards breast cancer intrinsic classification, current status on clinical application, and future trends. PMID:26693050

  5. Incidence of Sarcoma Histotypes and Molecular Subtypes in a Prospective Epidemiological Study with Central Pathology Review and Molecular Testing

    PubMed Central

    Ducimetière, Françoise; Lurkin, Antoine; Ranchère-Vince, Dominique; Decouvelaere, Anne-Valérie; Péoc'h, Michel; Istier, Luc; Chalabreysse, Philippe; Muller, Christine; Alberti, Laurent; Bringuier, Pierre-Paul; Scoazec, Jean-Yves; Schott, Anne-Marie; Bergeron, Christophe; Cellier, Dominic; Blay, Jean-Yves; Ray-Coquard, Isabelle

    2011-01-01

    Background The exact overall incidence of sarcoma and sarcoma subtypes is not known. The objective of the present population-based study was to determine this incidence in a European region (Rhone-Alpes) of six million inhabitants, based on a central pathological review of the cases. Methodology/Principal Findings From March 2005 to February 2007, pathology reports and tumor blocks were prospectively collected from the 158 pathologists of the Rhone-Alpes region. All diagnosed or suspected cases of sarcoma were collected, reviewed centrally, examined for molecular alterations and classified according to the 2002 World Health Organization classification. Of the 1287 patients screened during the study period, 748 met the criteria for inclusion in the study. The overall crude and world age-standardized incidence rates were respectively 6.2 and 4.8 per 100,000/year. Incidence rates for soft tissue, visceral and bone sarcomas were respectively 3.6, 2.0 and 0.6 per 100,000. The most frequent histological subtypes were gastrointestinal stromal tumor (18%; 1.1/100,000), unclassified sarcoma (16%; 1/100,000), liposarcoma (15%; 0.9/100,000) and leiomyosarcoma (11%; 0.7/100,000). Conclusions/Significance The observed incidence of sarcomas was higher than expected. This study is the first detailed investigation of the crude incidence of histological and molecular subtypes of sarcomas. PMID:21826194

  6. Association Between Insulin Resistance and Luminal B Subtype Breast Cancer in Postmenopausal Women.

    PubMed

    Nam, Sanggeun; Park, Seho; Park, Hyung Seok; Kim, Sanghwa; Kim, Jee Ye; Kim, Seung Il

    2016-03-01

    Currently, there is limited information on the clinical characteristics of breast cancer patients with insulin resistance. Hence, the purpose of this study was to investigate the association between insulin resistance and clinicopathological factors in newly diagnosed breast cancer patients without diabetes. We assessed 760 patients with breast cancer treated between 2012 and 2014. We compared the clinicopathological characteristics between patients with and without insulin resistance using univariate and multivariate analyses, including after stratification by menopausal status. Insulin resistance was defined according to the homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance. Of 760 patients, 26.4% had insulin resistance. Age, menopausal status, body mass index, tumor size, histologic grade, Ki-67 expression, and breast cancer subtype significantly differed according to the presence of insulin resistance. Multivariate analysis revealed that postmenopausal status and obesity were significantly associated with insulin resistance. In postmenopausal women, older age, obesity, larger tumor size, advanced stage, and high proliferative luminal B subtype were significantly associated with insulin resistance. In contrast, in premenopausal patients, only obesity was related to insulin resistance. Multivariate analysis indicated that insulin resistance was independently correlated with obesity, larger tumor size, and the luminal B/human epidermal growth factor receptor-2-negative subtype in postmenopausal but not premenopausal patients. Insulin resistance was significantly associated with larger tumors and proliferative luminal B subtype breast cancer in postmenopausal women only. These findings suggest that insulin resistance could mechanistically induce tumor progression and might be a good prognostic factor, and that it could represent a therapeutic target in postmenopausal patients with breast cancer. PMID:26945364

  7. Association Between Insulin Resistance and Luminal B Subtype Breast Cancer in Postmenopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Sanggeun; Park, Seho; Park, Hyung Seok; Kim, Sanghwa; Kim, Jee Ye; Kim, Seung Il

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Currently, there is limited information on the clinical characteristics of breast cancer patients with insulin resistance. Hence, the purpose of this study was to investigate the association between insulin resistance and clinicopathological factors in newly diagnosed breast cancer patients without diabetes. We assessed 760 patients with breast cancer treated between 2012 and 2014. We compared the clinicopathological characteristics between patients with and without insulin resistance using univariate and multivariate analyses, including after stratification by menopausal status. Insulin resistance was defined according to the homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance. Of 760 patients, 26.4% had insulin resistance. Age, menopausal status, body mass index, tumor size, histologic grade, Ki-67 expression, and breast cancer subtype significantly differed according to the presence of insulin resistance. Multivariate analysis revealed that postmenopausal status and obesity were significantly associated with insulin resistance. In postmenopausal women, older age, obesity, larger tumor size, advanced stage, and high proliferative luminal B subtype were significantly associated with insulin resistance. In contrast, in premenopausal patients, only obesity was related to insulin resistance. Multivariate analysis indicated that insulin resistance was independently correlated with obesity, larger tumor size, and the luminal B/human epidermal growth factor receptor-2-negative subtype in postmenopausal but not premenopausal patients. Insulin resistance was significantly associated with larger tumors and proliferative luminal B subtype breast cancer in postmenopausal women only. These findings suggest that insulin resistance could mechanistically induce tumor progression and might be a good prognostic factor, and that it could represent a therapeutic target in postmenopausal patients with breast cancer. PMID:26945364

  8. Monoamine Oxidase A (MAOA) and Catechol-O-Methyltransferase (COMT) Gene Polymorphisms Interact with Maternal Parenting in Association with Adolescent Reactive Aggression but not Proactive Aggression: Evidence of Differential Susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenxin; Cao, Cong; Wang, Meiping; Ji, Linqin; Cao, Yanmiao

    2016-04-01

    To date, whether and how gene-environment (G × E) interactions operate differently across distinct subtypes of aggression remains untested. More recently, in contrast with the diathesis-stress hypothesis, an alternative hypothesis of differential susceptibility proposes that individuals could be differentially susceptible to environments depending on their genotypes in a "for better and for worse" manner. The current study examined interactions between monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) T941G and catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) Val158Met polymorphisms with maternal parenting on two types of aggression: reactive and proactive. Moreover, whether these potential G × E interactions would be consistent with the diathesis-stress versus the differential susceptibility hypothesis was tested. Within the sample of 1399 Chinese Han adolescents (47.2 % girls, M age = 12.32 years, SD = 0.50), MAOA and COMT genes both interacted with positive parenting in their associations with reactive but not proactive aggression. Adolescents with T alleles/TT homozygotes of MAOA gene or Met alleles of COMT gene exhibited more reactive aggression when exposed to low positive parenting, but less reactive aggression when exposed to high positive parenting. These findings provide the first evidence for distinct G × E interaction effects on reactive versus proactive aggression and lend further support for the differential susceptibility hypothesis. PMID:26932718

  9. Student nurses' perceptions of aggression: An exploratory study of defensive styles, aggression experiences, and demographic factors.

    PubMed

    Bilgin, Hulya; Keser Ozcan, Neslihan; Tulek, Zeliha; Kaya, Fadime; Boyacioglu, Nur Elcin; Erol, Ozgul; Arguvanli Coban, Sibel; Pazvantoglu, Ozan; Gumus, Kubra

    2016-06-01

    Throughout the clinical learning process, nursing students' perception of aggression might have implications in terms of their future professional behavior toward patients. Using a descriptive cross-sectional design, we investigated the relationships between student nurses' perceptions of aggression and their personal characteristics, defense styles, and a convenience sample of 1539 experiences of aggressive behavior in clinical practice. Information about the students' personal features, their clinical practice, and experiences of aggressive behavior was obtained by questionnaire. The Turkish version of the Perception of Aggression Scale and Defense Styles Questionnaire-40 were also used. Students were frequently exposed to verbal aggression from patients and their relatives. And perceived patient aggression negatively, perception of aggression were associated with sex, defense styles, feelings of safety, and experiences of aggressions during clinical practice. Of interest is the reality that student nurses should be prepared for untoward events during their training. PMID:26916604

  10. [Metal implant sensitivity: clinical and histological presentation].

    PubMed

    Hartmann, D; Letulé, V; Schneider, J J; Flaig, M J

    2016-05-01

    Metal implant sensitivity (intolerance) can cause pain, reduced mobility, loosening of the implant and skin rashes. Knowledge of differential diagnoses, histology and appropriate diagnostics are essential for proper diagnosis. To outline typical clinical signs and histology in metal-implant-associated skin lesions we present three exemplary patients from our implant allergy outpatient department and give an overview of the current literature regarding metal implant sensitivity. In patients with a negative patch test the lymphocyte transformation test may reveal metal sensitization. Even "pure" titanium alloys may contain traces of nickel. The histology of implant-associated skin reactions goes from teleangiectatic postimplantation erythema to eczema and vasculitis. Based on the synopsis of history, clinical picture, allergological testing and histology, metal implant sensitivity can be diagnosed more precisely. PMID:27090521

  11. Cranio-maxillofacial non-Hodgkin's lymphoma: clinical and histological presentation.

    PubMed

    Scherfler, Sebastian; Freier, Kolja; Seeberger, Robin; Bacon, Claire; Hoffmann, Jürgen; Thiele, Oliver C

    2012-10-01

    Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma represents about 5% of all malignant lesions of the head and neck. In this study we retrospectively evaluated clinical presentation, histological subtype and long-term prognosis of 42 patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma involving the craniofacial area. The mean age at diagnosis was 64 years. More than half of the patients presented with disseminated disease at multiple sites (55%, n=23). In 62% (n=26) the first manifestation was extranodal. The most common affected region was the oral cavity (65%, n=17). Treatment consisted of local therapy, including surgical resection and radiation, as well as chemotherapy with or without local therapy. Recurrence occurred in 31% (n=13) of the treated patients. Mean survival after first diagnosis varied from 17 months in patients presenting with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), to 8.5 years in patients with follicular lymphoma. The most common histological subtype is DLBCL. Standard treatment for DLBCL consists of chemotherapy combined with CD 20 monoclonal antibody, even after total resection of the tumour. There is high risk of systemic disease in patients presenting with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and high risk of post therapy recurrence. PMID:22093243

  12. Integrated Genomics Identifies Five Medulloblastoma Subtypes with Distinct Genetic Profiles, Pathway Signatures and Clinicopathological Features

    PubMed Central

    Kool, Marcel; Koster, Jan; Bunt, Jens; Hasselt, Nancy E.; Lakeman, Arjan; van Sluis, Peter; Troost, Dirk; Meeteren, Netteke Schouten-van; Caron, Huib N.; Cloos, Jacqueline; Mršić, Alan; Ylstra, Bauke; Grajkowska, Wieslawa; Hartmann, Wolfgang; Pietsch, Torsten; Ellison, David; Clifford, Steven C.; Versteeg, Rogier

    2008-01-01

    Background Medulloblastoma is the most common malignant brain tumor in children. Despite recent improvements in cure rates, prediction of disease outcome remains a major challenge and survivors suffer from serious therapy-related side-effects. Recent data showed that patients with WNT-activated tumors have a favorable prognosis, suggesting that these patients could be treated less intensively, thereby reducing the side-effects. This illustrates the potential benefits of a robust classification of medulloblastoma patients and a detailed knowledge of associated biological mechanisms. Methods and Findings To get a better insight into the molecular biology of medulloblastoma we established mRNA expression profiles of 62 medulloblastomas and analyzed 52 of them also by comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) arrays. Five molecular subtypes were identified, characterized by WNT signaling (A; 9 cases), SHH signaling (B; 15 cases), expression of neuronal differentiation genes (C and D; 16 and 11 cases, respectively) or photoreceptor genes (D and E; both 11 cases). Mutations in β-catenin were identified in all 9 type A tumors, but not in any other tumor. PTCH1 mutations were exclusively identified in type B tumors. CGH analysis identified several fully or partly subtype-specific chromosomal aberrations. Monosomy of chromosome 6 occurred only in type A tumors, loss of 9q mostly occurred in type B tumors, whereas chromosome 17 aberrations, most common in medulloblastoma, were strongly associated with type C or D tumors. Loss of the inactivated X-chromosome was highly specific for female cases of type C, D and E tumors. Gene expression levels faithfully reflected the chromosomal copy number changes. Clinicopathological features significantly different between the 5 subtypes included metastatic disease and age at diagnosis and histology. Metastatic disease at diagnosis was significantly associated with subtypes C and D and most strongly with subtype E. Patients below 3 yrs of

  13. Graphs and Grammars for Histology: An Introduction

    PubMed Central

    Prewitt, Judith M. S.

    1979-01-01

    The invention of the microscope disclosed a whole new world, that of the hitherto invisibly small. Histologic evidence as revealed by the microscope has become a cornerstone of medical diagnosis, and efforts are now being made to lay foundations so that the medical visual information processing burden can be alleviated significantly by cost-effective automation. This paper lays image processing foundations by presenting a graph-theoretic and syntactic model for the analysis of histologic patterns, and presents results to date.

  14. Chronic psychological stress and its impact on the development of aggressive breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cormanique, Thayse Fachin; de Almeida, Lirane Elize Defante Ferreto; Rech, Cynthia Alba; Rech, Daniel; Herrera, Ana Cristina da Silva do Amaral; Panis, Carolina

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the clinicopathological findings of women diagnosed with breast cancer and study the impact of chronic psychological stress on the pathological characteristics of these tumors. Methods We investigated a cohort composed of women diagnosed with breast cancer and divided into two groups. One group was categorized as presenting with chronic psychological stress (by using the Self-Reporting Questionnaire − SRQ-20). Another group of women with breast cancer, but with no previous history of chronic psychological stress, comprised the Control Group. Clinical and pathological data were assessed. Results Women presenting with a history of chronic distress were significantly overweight when compared to the Control Group. Furthermore, it was observed that these stressed women also had a significant percentage of aggressive breast cancer subtype, the HER2 amplified tumor, which could be putatively associated with the loss of immunosurveillance. Conclusion Our findings suggested an interaction among chronic psychological stress, overweight, and the development of more aggressive breast tumors. PMID:26466057

  15. Psychopharmacological treatment of aggression in schizophrenic patients.

    PubMed

    Brieden, T; Ujeyl, M; Naber, D

    2002-05-01

    Aggressive behavior is frequently observed in schizophrenic patients. More than 50 % of all psychiatric patients and 10 % of schizophrenic patients show aggressive symptoms varying from threatening behavior and agitation to assault. The pharmacological treatment of acute, persisting and repetitive aggression is a serious problem for other patients and staff members. Not only is violent behavior from mentally ill patients the most detrimental factor in their stigmatization, aggression is also a considerable direct source of danger for the patients themselves. Based on rather limited evidence, a wide variety of medications for the pharmacological treatment of aggression has been recommended: typical and atypical antipsychotics, benzodiazepines, mood stabilizers, beta-blockers and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). Most clinical information on treating aggression has been collected for atypical neuroleptics, particularly for clozapine. Several retrospective and open studies indicate its efficacy. Treatment duration of 6 months is recommended to induce a stable reduction of physical and verbal aggression. Severe side effects have very rarely been seen. At the moment, clozapine seems to be the first choice in aggression treatment. Within the last few years, about 10 articles were published showing that this is the most effective antiaggressive agent in the treatment of aggression and agitation in psychiatric patients, independent of psychiatric diagnosis. However, clozapine, like all the other substances used, does not have an established indication for the treatment of aggressive symptoms. Noncompliance with medication makes it difficult to choose the right preparation for the medication: tablets, liquids, intramuscular injections and readily soluble "FDDFs" are available. Ethical, juridical and methodological problems prevent controlled studies from establishing a reference in the treatment of aggression in mentally ill patients. This review summarizes

  16. Tubulocystic renal cell carcinoma with poorly differentiated foci is indicative of aggressive behavior: clinicopathologic study of two cases and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ming; Teng, Xiaodong; Ru, Guoqing; Zhao, Zhongsheng; Hu, Qinqin; Han, Likai; He, Xianglei

    2015-01-01

    Tubulocystic renal cell carcinoma (TCRCC) is a rare, recently characterized RCC subtype with distinctive clinicopathologic and genetic characterizations as well as typical behaviors in an indolent fashion. However, sporadic case reports in the literature have indicated that TCRCC with sarcomatoid differentiation or poorly differentiated (PD) foci could behave aggressively. Herein, we reported two cases of TCRCC with PD foci indentified from our consultative service. Both patients were male and aged 66 y and 47 y, respectively. The first patient experienced radical nephrectomy while the other was treated by partial nephrectomy. Macroscopically, both tumors were described as partly cystic and solid with the greatest diameter measuring of 12-cm and 4.5-cm, respectively. Histologically, both lesions had classic areas of TCRCC occupying most part of the tumor with small papillary RCC component. In case one, PD foci were scatteredly distributed and mixed with TCRCC and papillary RCC components, while in the other case the PD foci were adjacent to the areas of TCRCC. In both tumors, the PD foci were composed of irregular, often angulated, small tubules lined by atypical eosinophilic cells and surrounded by desmoplastic stroma, resembling collecting duct carcinoma. Immunohistochemistry, in both tumors, both TCRCC component and PD foci showed the similar immunoprofiles, i.e., labeling strongly and diffusely with PAX8, AMACR and Vimentin, and focally with CK34βE12 but not with renal cell carcinoma marker or P63. In case one, the tumor invaded extensively into the adjacent renal parenchyma and focally into both renal sinusal and perirenal adipose tissues. The patient had metastasis in the pelvic cavity at the time of diagnosis and succumbed to the disease without further treatment 3 months later. The other case was organ confined but with focal positive renal parenchymal margin. The patient subsequently underwent radical nephrectomy and was in a good status without evidence

  17. The passive-aggressive organization.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Robert S; Norton, David P

    2005-10-01

    Passive-aggressive organizations are friendly places to work: People are congenial, conflict is rare, and consensus is easy to reach. But, at the end of the day, even the best proposals fail to gain traction, and a company can go nowhere so imperturbably that it's easy to pretend everything is fine. Such companies are not necessarily saddled with mulishly passive-aggressive employees. Rather, they are filled with mostly well-intentioned people who are the victirms of flawed processes and policies. Commonly, a growing company's halfhearted or poorly thought-out attempts to decentralize give rise to multiple layers of managers, whose authority for making decisions becomes increasingly unclear. Some managers, as a result, hang back, while others won't own up to the calls they've made, inviting colleagues to second-guess or overturn the decisions. In such organizations, information does not circulate freely, and that makes it difficult for workers to understand the impact of their actions on company performance and for managers to correctly appraise employees' value to the organization. A failure to accurately match incentives to performance stifles initiative, and people do just enough to get by. Breaking free from this pattern is hard; a long history of seeing corporate initiatives ignored and then fade away tends to make people cynical. Often it's best to bring in an outsider to signal that this time things will be different. He or she will need to address every obstacle all at once: clarify decision rights; see to it that decisions stick; and reward people for sharing information and adding value, not for successfully negotiating corporate politics. If those steps are not taken, it's only a matter of time before the diseased elements of a passive-aggressive organization overwhelm the remaining healthy ones and drive the company into financial distress. PMID:16250627

  18. Aggressive Angiomyxoma with Perineal Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Narang, Seema; Kohli, Supreethi; Kumar, Vinod; Chandoke, Raj

    2014-01-01

    Aggressive angiomyxoma is a rare mesenchymal tumor involving the pelvic-perineal region. It occurs during the third and fourth decade of life and is predominantly seen in females. It presents clinically as a soft tissue mass in variable locations such as vulva, perianal region, buttock, or pelvis. Assessment of extent of the tumor by radiological evaluation is crucial for surgical planning; however, biopsy is essential to establish diagnosis. We present the radiological and pathological features seen in a 43-year-old female diagnosed with abdominal angiomyxoma with an unusual extension to the perineum. PMID:24987570

  19. Multiple metastases from histologically benign intraarticular diffuse-type tenosynovial giant cell tumor: a case report.

    PubMed

    Asano, Naofumi; Yoshida, Akihiko; Kobayashi, Eisuke; Yamaguchi, Takehiko; Kawai, Akira

    2014-11-01

    Diffuse-type tenosynovial giant cell tumor (D-TGCT) is a relatively rare mesenchymal tumor. It is a locally aggressive but virtually nonmetastasizing neoplasm and thus regarded as benign. Only a few D-TGCTs with benign histology have been reported to metastasize. We report an extremely rare case of benign D-TGCT in which multiple metastases developed 9 years after surgery for the primary tumor. The present case suggests that conventional D-TGCT has the potential to form distant metastases, albeit exceptionally rarely, and that this probable implantation phenomenon can be managed conservatively. PMID:25130396

  20. Problems in the study of rodent aggression.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, Robert J; Wall, Philip M; Blanchard, D Caroline

    2003-09-01

    Laboratory research has produced detailed descriptions of aggression and defense patterns in the rat, mouse, and hamster, showing strong similarities, but also some differences, across these species. Research on target sites for attack, in conjunction with analyses of the situational antecedents of attack behaviors and of responsivity of these to conditions that elicit fear, has also provided a strong basis for analysis of offensive and defensive aggression strategies and for identification of combinations of these modalities such as may occur in maternal aggression. These patterns have been empirically differentiated from phenomena such as play fighting or predation and compared for laboratory rodents and their wild ancestors. An array of tasks, suitable for use with pharmacological and experimental manipulations, is available for analysis of both aggression and defense. These developments should produce a firm basis for research using animal models to analyze a broad array of aggression-related phenomena, including systematic approaches to understanding the normal antecedents and consequences of each of several differentiable types of aggressive behavior. Despite this strong empirical and analytic background, laboratory animal aggression research has been in a period of decline, spanning several decades, relative to comparable research focusing on areas such as sexual behavior or stress. Problems that may have contributed to the relative neglect of aggression research include confusion about the interpretation of different tasks for eliciting aggression; difficulties and labor intensiveness of observational measures needed for an adequate differentiation of offensive and defensive behaviors; analytic difficulties stemming from the sensitivity of offensive aggression to the inhibitory effects of fear or defensiveness; lack of a clear relationship between categories of aggressive behavior as defined in animal studies and those used in human aggression research; and

  1. Dual Trajectories of Reactive and Proactive Aggression from Mid-childhood to Early Adolescence: Relations to Sensation Seeking, Risk Taking, and Moral Reasoning.

    PubMed

    Cui, Lixian; Colasante, Tyler; Malti, Tina; Ribeaud, Denis; Eisner, Manuel P

    2016-05-01

    We examined the roles of sensation seeking, risk taking, and moral reasoning in the development of reactive and proactive aggression. Data were drawn from a multiethnic, longitudinal study of children from Switzerland (N = 1571; 52 % male; assessed annually over 6 years; 7-years-old at Time 1). At all 6 time points, teachers reported children's reactive and proactive aggression via questionnaire. Children's sensation seeking (at Time 1) and risk taking (at Time 2) were assessed with two interactive computer tasks and their moral reasoning was assessed at Time 2 in response to four hypothetical vignettes depicting moral transgressions. Parallel process Latent Class Growth Analysis (PP-LCGA) identified six dual trajectories of reactive and proactive aggression. Children with either childhood-limited or adolescent-onset aggression showed high sensation seeking. Children with persistent, high levels of both reactive and proactive aggression across time showed high levels of sensation seeking and risk taking, as well as low levels of moral reasoning. Children with only high risk taking were more likely to display moderate levels of aggression across time. These findings highlight the shared and differential roles of sensation seeking, risk taking, and moral reasoning in the dual development of reactive and proactive aggression from mid-childhood to early adolescence. We discuss implications for common and tailored strategies to combat these aggression subtypes. PMID:26370547

  2. Identification of three molecular and functional subtypes in canine hemangiosarcoma through gene expression profiling and progenitor cell characterization.

    PubMed

    Gorden, Brandi H; Kim, Jong-Hyuk; Sarver, Aaron L; Frantz, Aric M; Breen, Matthew; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; O'Brien, Timothy D; Sharkey, Leslie C; Modiano, Jaime F; Dickerson, Erin B

    2014-04-01

    Canine hemangiosarcomas have been ascribed to an endothelial origin based on histologic appearance; however, recent findings suggest that these tumors may arise instead from hematopoietic progenitor cells. To clarify this ontogenetic dilemma, we used genome-wide expression profiling of primary hemangiosarcomas and identified three distinct tumor subtypes associated with angiogenesis (group 1), inflammation (group 2), and adipogenesis (group 3). Based on these findings, we hypothesized that a common progenitor may differentiate into the three tumor subtypes observed in our gene profiling experiment. To investigate this possibility, we cultured hemangiosarcoma cell lines under normal and sphere-forming culture conditions to enrich for tumor cell progenitors. Cells from sphere-forming cultures displayed a robust self-renewal capacity and exhibited genotypic, phenotypic, and functional properties consistent with each of the three molecular subtypes seen in primary tumors, including expression of endothelial progenitor cell (CD133 and CD34) and endothelial cell (CD105, CD146, and αvβ3 integrin) markers, expression of early hematopoietic (CD133, CD117, and CD34) and myeloid (CD115 and CD14) differentiation markers in parallel with increased phagocytic capacity, and acquisition of adipogenic potential. Collectively, these results suggest that canine hemangiosarcomas arise from multipotent progenitors that differentiate into distinct subtypes. Improved understanding of the mechanisms that determine the molecular and phenotypic differentiation of tumor cells in vivo could change paradigms regarding the origin and progression of endothelial sarcomas. PMID:24525151

  3. Identification of Three Molecular and Functional Subtypes in Canine Hemangiosarcoma through Gene Expression Profiling and Progenitor Cell Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Gorden, Brandi H.; Kim, Jong-Hyuk; Sarver, Aaron L.; Frantz, Aric M.; Breen, Matthew; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; O'Brien, Timothy D.; Sharkey, Leslie C.; Modiano, Jaime F.; Dickerson, Erin B.

    2015-01-01

    Canine hemangiosarcomas have been ascribed to an endothelial origin based on histologic appearance; however, recent findings suggest that these tumors may arise instead from hematopoietic progenitor cells. To clarify this ontogenetic dilemma, we used genome-wide expression profiling of primary hemangiosarcomas and identified three distinct tumor subtypes associated with angiogenesis (group 1), inflammation (group 2), and adipogenesis (group 3). Based on these findings, we hypothesized that a common progenitor may differentiate into the three tumor subtypes observed in our gene profiling experiment. To investigate this possibility, we cultured hemangiosarcoma cell lines under normal and sphere-forming culture conditions to enrich for tumor cell progenitors. Cells from sphere-forming cultures displayed a robust self-renewal capacity and exhibited genotypic, phenotypic, and functional properties consistent with each of the three molecular subtypes seen in primary tumors, including expression of endothelial progenitor cell (CD133 and CD34) and endothelial cell (CD105, CD146, and αvβ3 integrin) markers, expression of early hematopoietic (CD133, CD117, and CD34) and myeloid (CD115 and CD14) differentiation markers in parallel with increased phagocytic capacity, and acquisition of adipogenic potential. Collectively, these results suggest that canine hemangiosarcomas arise from multipotent progenitors that differentiate into distinct subtypes. Improved understanding of the mechanisms that determine the molecular and phenotypic differentiation of tumor cells in vivo could change paradigms regarding the origin and progression of endothelial sarcomas. PMID:24525151

  4. Integration of genomic, transcriptomic and proteomic data identifies two biologically distinct subtypes of invasive lobular breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Michaut, Magali; Chin, Suet-Feung; Majewski, Ian; Severson, Tesa M; Bismeijer, Tycho; de Koning, Leanne; Peeters, Justine K; Schouten, Philip C; Rueda, Oscar M; Bosma, Astrid J; Tarrant, Finbarr; Fan, Yue; He, Beilei; Xue, Zheng; Mittempergher, Lorenza; Kluin, Roelof J C; Heijmans, Jeroen; Snel, Mireille; Pereira, Bernard; Schlicker, Andreas; Provenzano, Elena; Ali, Hamid Raza; Gaber, Alexander; O'Hurley, Gillian; Lehn, Sophie; Muris, Jettie J F; Wesseling, Jelle; Kay, Elaine; Sammut, Stephen John; Bardwell, Helen A; Barbet, Aurélie S; Bard, Floriane; Lecerf, Caroline; O'Connor, Darran P; Vis, Daniël J; Benes, Cyril H; McDermott, Ultan; Garnett, Mathew J; Simon, Iris M; Jirström, Karin; Dubois, Thierry; Linn, Sabine C; Gallagher, William M; Wessels, Lodewyk F A; Caldas, Carlos; Bernards, Rene

    2016-01-01

    Invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC) is the second most frequently occurring histological breast cancer subtype after invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC), accounting for around 10% of all breast cancers. The molecular processes that drive the development of ILC are still largely unknown. We have performed a comprehensive genomic, transcriptomic and proteomic analysis of a large ILC patient cohort and present here an integrated molecular portrait of ILC. Mutations in CDH1 and in the PI3K pathway are the most frequent molecular alterations in ILC. We identified two main subtypes of ILCs: (i) an immune related subtype with mRNA up-regulation of PD-L1, PD-1 and CTLA-4 and greater sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents in representative cell line models; (ii) a hormone related subtype, associated with Epithelial to Mesenchymal Transition (EMT), and gain of chromosomes 1q and 8q and loss of chromosome 11q. Using the somatic mutation rate and eIF4B protein level, we identified three groups with different clinical outcomes, including a group with extremely good prognosis. We provide a comprehensive overview of the molecular alterations driving ILC and have explored links with therapy response. This molecular characterization may help to tailor treatment of ILC through the application of specific targeted, chemo- and/or immune-therapies. PMID:26729235

  5. Integration of genomic, transcriptomic and proteomic data identifies two biologically distinct subtypes of invasive lobular breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Michaut, Magali; Chin, Suet-Feung; Majewski, Ian; Severson, Tesa M.; Bismeijer, Tycho; de Koning, Leanne; Peeters, Justine K.; Schouten, Philip C.; Rueda, Oscar M.; Bosma, Astrid J.; Tarrant, Finbarr; Fan, Yue; He, Beilei; Xue, Zheng; Mittempergher, Lorenza; Kluin, Roelof J.C.; Heijmans, Jeroen; Snel, Mireille; Pereira, Bernard; Schlicker, Andreas; Provenzano, Elena; Ali, Hamid Raza; Gaber, Alexander; O’Hurley, Gillian; Lehn, Sophie; Muris, Jettie J.F.; Wesseling, Jelle; Kay, Elaine; Sammut, Stephen John; Bardwell, Helen A.; Barbet, Aurélie S.; Bard, Floriane; Lecerf, Caroline; O’Connor, Darran P.; Vis, Daniël J.; Benes, Cyril H.; McDermott, Ultan; Garnett, Mathew J.; Simon, Iris M.; Jirström, Karin; Dubois, Thierry; Linn, Sabine C.; Gallagher, William M.; Wessels, Lodewyk F.A.; Caldas, Carlos; Bernards, Rene

    2016-01-01

    Invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC) is the second most frequently occurring histological breast cancer subtype after invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC), accounting for around 10% of all breast cancers. The molecular processes that drive the development of ILC are still largely unknown. We have performed a comprehensive genomic, transcriptomic and proteomic analysis of a large ILC patient cohort and present here an integrated molecular portrait of ILC. Mutations in CDH1 and in the PI3K pathway are the most frequent molecular alterations in ILC. We identified two main subtypes of ILCs: (i) an immune related subtype with mRNA up-regulation of PD-L1, PD-1 and CTLA-4 and greater sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents in representative cell line models; (ii) a hormone related subtype, associated with Epithelial to Mesenchymal Transition (EMT), and gain of chromosomes 1q and 8q and loss of chromosome 11q. Using the somatic mutation rate and eIF4B protein level, we identified three groups with different clinical outcomes, including a group with extremely good prognosis. We provide a comprehensive overview of the molecular alterations driving ILC and have explored links with therapy response. This molecular characterization may help to tailor treatment of ILC through the application of specific targeted, chemo- and/or immune-therapies. PMID:26729235

  6. Clear Cell Carcinoma of the Breast: A Rare Breast Cancer Subtype – Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Ratti, Vilma; Pagani, Olivia

    2015-01-01

    Background Glycogen-rich clear cell breast carcinoma is a rare histological breast cancer subtype. Its prognosis may vary depending on specific clinical and pathological characteristics such as low grade, strong positivity of estrogen receptor (ER) expression and early diagnosis. Case Presentation We present the case of a 53-year-old woman with a bleeding 10-cm-diameter mass in the left breast. The histological examination showed a poorly differentiated tumor with malignant cells characterized by abundant clear cytoplasm. The diagnosis of clear cell carcinoma was based on the histological characteristics of the tumor, and a nonmammary origin was initially ruled out. The tumor was triple negative [i.e. ER, progesterone receptor (PR) and HER2 negative]. Four months after the initial locoregional treatment, the patient developed lung and distant lymph node metastases. Conclusions Glycogen-rich clear cell carcinoma of the breast is a rare tumor. Early diagnosis, absence of lymph node metastases and ER/PR positivity are associated with a better prognosis, as in other common breast cancer subtypes. PMID:26600782

  7. Sleep deprivation suppresses aggression in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Kayser, Matthew S; Mainwaring, Benjamin; Yue, Zhifeng; Sehgal, Amita

    2015-01-01

    Sleep disturbances negatively impact numerous functions and have been linked to aggression and violence. However, a clear effect of sleep deprivation on aggressive behaviors remains unclear. We find that acute sleep deprivation profoundly suppresses aggressive behaviors in the fruit fly, while other social behaviors are unaffected. This suppression is recovered following post-deprivation sleep rebound, and occurs regardless of the approach to achieve sleep loss. Genetic and pharmacologic approaches suggest octopamine signaling transmits changes in aggression upon sleep deprivation, and reduced aggression places sleep-deprived flies at a competitive disadvantage for obtaining a reproductive partner. These findings demonstrate an interaction between two phylogenetically conserved behaviors, and suggest that previous sleep experiences strongly modulate aggression with consequences for reproductive fitness. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07643.001 PMID:26216041

  8. What lies beneath the face of aggression?

    PubMed

    Carré, Justin M; Murphy, Kelly R; Hariri, Ahmad R

    2013-02-01

    Recent evidence indicates that a sexually dimorphic feature of humans, the facial width-to-height ratio (FWHR), is positively correlated with reactive aggression, particularly in men. Also, predictions about the aggressive tendencies of others faithfully map onto FWHR in the absence of explicit awareness of this metric. Here, we provide the first evidence that amygdala reactivity to social signals of interpersonal challenge may underlie the link between aggression and the FWHR. Specifically, amygdala reactivity to angry faces was positively correlated with aggression, but only among men with relatively large FWHRs. The patterns of association were specific to angry facial expressions and unique to men. These links may reflect the common influence of pubertal testosterone on craniofacial growth and development of neural circuitry underlying aggression. Amygdala reactivity may also represent a plausible pathway through which FWHR may have evolved to represent an honest indicator of conspecific threat, namely by reflecting the responsiveness of neural circuitry mediating aggressive behavior. PMID:22198969

  9. Sleep deprivation suppresses aggression in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Kayser, Matthew S; Mainwaring, Benjamin; Yue, Zhifeng; Sehgal, Amita

    2015-01-01

    Sleep disturbances negatively impact numerous functions and have been linked to aggression and violence. However, a clear effect of sleep deprivation on aggressive behaviors remains unclear. We find that acute sleep deprivation profoundly suppresses aggressive behaviors in the fruit fly, while other social behaviors are unaffected. This suppression is recovered following post-deprivation sleep rebound, and occurs regardless of the approach to achieve sleep loss. Genetic and pharmacologic approaches suggest octopamine signaling transmits changes in aggression upon sleep deprivation, and reduced aggression places sleep-deprived flies at a competitive disadvantage for obtaining a reproductive partner. These findings demonstrate an interaction between two phylogenetically conserved behaviors, and suggest that previous sleep experiences strongly modulate aggression with consequences for reproductive fitness. PMID:26216041

  10. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Subtypes Prevalence in Central China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhe; Li, Wen-jie

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To study the epidemic characteristics, transmission sources and routes of various subtypes of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and sequence variations in Henan, central China. To provide theoretical foundation for Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) prevention strategy in this region where the primary HIV transmission route was through former paid blood donation. Materials and Methods HIV-1 gene env and gag were amplified by nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) from uncultured peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) obtained from 1,287 HIV-1 confirmed samples in Henan. Results Among 1,287 samples, 5 HIV-1 strains were found including subtypes B' (95.9%), C (0.47%) and recombinant subtypes CRF 07_BC (1.09%), CRF 08_BC (1.79%) and CRF 01_AE (0.78%). Phylogenetic tree analysis found that 1,234 Henan subtype B' were closely related to those commonly found in Thailand, and were distantly related to other international subtypes. The dominant strain in former blood plasma donors (FPDs) was subtype B', and the dominant strains in sexual transmission were subtype B' and BC. Among HIV patients who were most likely infected through routes other than paid blood donation, the percentage of non-B' subtypes was much higher than those of FPD. Conclusion These findings suggest that the prevailing strain of HIV-1 in Henan is subtype B', similar to the B' subtype found in Thailand. In addition, for the first time we found subtypes C and recombinant subtypes CRF07_BC, CRF08_BC and CRF01_AE in this region. Indicating that the subtype feature of HIV-1 became more complicated than before in central China. PMID:19881967

  11. Incidence of central giant cell granuloma of the jaws with clinical and histological confirmation: an archival study in Northern India.

    PubMed

    Reddy, V; Saxena, S; Aggarwal, P; Sharma, P; Reddy, M

    2012-10-01

    To record the demographics, and correlate histological findings in central giant cell granulomas (CGCGs) of the jaws with their clinical behaviour, 30 paraffin-embedded samples of CGCG were retrieved from the archives of the Department of Oral Pathology and Microbiology, Subharti Dental College, Meerut, India. The diagnosis in each case was made on the basis of clinical, radiographic, and histological findings. Data about age, sex, anatomical site, presentation, radiological features, and laboratory investigations were analysed. Histomorphometric analyses were made in each case with respect to the number of giant cells, mean number of nuclei and giant cells, fractional surface area occupied by giant cells, index of relative size, and mitotic activity. The peak incidence of CGCG was during the second decade of life with a slight female predilection, and the mandible was the most common site. Of the 30 samples considered, 20 tumours were classified clinically as non-aggressive, and 10 as aggressive, based on their clinical behaviour. Histomorphometric analysis showed significant changes between the two groups with respect to the number of giant cells, the fractional surface area, and the mitotic activity. The data obtained showed clinical and histomorphometric features that may be reliable indicators for the differentiation between aggressive and non-aggressive CGCG. These data should be taken into consideration to improve planning of individual treatment and follow-up. PMID:22196146

  12. Marsupialization of unicystic ameloblastoma: a conservative approach for aggressive odontogenic tumors.

    PubMed

    Dolanmaz, Dogan; Etoz, Osman A; Pampu, Alper; Kalayci, Abdullah; Gunhan, Omer

    2011-01-01

    Unicystic ameloblastoma (UA) is known as a distinct entity which has a less aggressive behavior when compared with conventional ameloblastoma. In this report, we have presented two cases of UAs, (of which one case showed a more aggressive behavior with mural invasion into the adjacent tissues and granular cell differentiation), both of which were successfully managed with enucleation following marsupialization. We aim to highlight how this method can be used for the successful management of such cases, rather than following more aggressive approaches. In both the cases, marsupialization was done for the UA lesions initially and follow-ups were maintained. When the tumor size had regressed on radiographic follow up, an enucleation procedure with ostectomy of the margins was carried out. Special importance was also given to the endodontic treatment of the teeth involved in the area of the lesion. The patients were free of the condition and did not show any signs of recurrence on radiographic follow-ups even after 30 months of the final procedure. Granular variant of UA is quite rare and had been considered to be more aggressive. Marsupialization of UA is an alternative treatment option of resection even for more aggressive variants, as long as the histological behavior of the lesion was carefully evaluated and strict radiographic follow-up is maintained. PMID:22406718

  13. Calpains: markers of tumor aggressiveness?

    PubMed

    Roumes, Hélène; Leloup, Ludovic; Dargelos, Elise; Brustis, Jean-Jacques; Daury, Laetitia; Cottin, Patrick

    2010-05-15

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) are soft-tissue sarcoma commonly encountered in childhood. RMS cells can acquire invasive behavior and form metastases. The metastatic dissemination implicates many proteases among which are mu-calpain and m-calpain. Study of calpain expression and activity underline the deregulation of calpain activity in RMS. Analysis of kinetic characteristics of RMS cells, compared to human myoblasts LHCN-M2 cells, shows an important migration velocity in RMS cells. One of the major results of this study is the positive linear correlation between calpain activity and migration velocity presenting calpains as a marker of tumor aggressiveness. The RMS cytoskeleton is disorganized. Specifying the role of mu- and m-calpain using antisense oligonucleotides led to show that both calpains up-regulate alpha- and beta-actin in ARMS cells. Moreover, the invasive behavior of these cells is higher than that of LHCN-M2 cells. However, it is similar to that of non-treated LHCN-M2 cells, when calpains are inhibited. In summary, calpains may be involved in the anarchic adhesion, migration and invasion of RMS. The direct relationship between calpain activity and migration velocities or invasive behavior indicates that calpains could be considered as markers of tumor aggressiveness and as potential targets for limiting development of RMS tumor as well as their metastatic behavior. PMID:20193680

  14. Stability of preclinical models of aggressive renal cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Varna, Mariana; Bousquet, Guilhem; Ferreira, Irmine; Goulard, Marie; El-Bouchtaoui, Morad; Artus, Pierre Mongiat; Verine, Jérome; de Kerviler, Eric; Hernandez, Lucie; Leboeuf, Christophe; Escudier, Bernard; Legrès, Luc; Setterblad, Niclas; Soliman, Hany; Feugeas, Jean-Paul; Janin, Anne; Bertheau, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Renal-cell carcinomas (RCC) are often resistant to conventional cytotoxic agents. Xenograft models are used for in vivo preclinical studies and drug development. The validity of these studies is highly dependent on the phenotypic and genotypic stability of the models. Here we assessed the stability of six aggressive human RCC xenografted in nude/NMRI mice. We compared the initial samples (P0), first (P1) and fifth (P5) passages for the following criteria: histopathology, immunohistochemistry for CK7, CD10, vimentin and p53, DNA allelic profiles using 10 microsatellites and CGH-array. Next we evaluated the response to sunitinib in primary RCC and corresponding xenografted RCC. We observed a good overall stability between primary RCC and corresponding xenografted RCC at P1 and P5 regarding histopathology and immunohistochemistry except for cytokeratin 7 (one case) and p53 (one case) expression. Out of 44 groups with fully available microsatellite data (at P0, P1 and P5), 66% (29 groups) showed no difference from P0 to P5 while 34% (15 groups) showed new or lost alleles. Using CGH-array, overall genomic alterations at P5 were not different from those of initial RCC. The xenografted RCC had identical response to sunitinib therapy compared to the initial human RCC from which they derive. These xenograft models of aggressive human RCC are clinically relevant, showing a good histological and molecular stability and are suitable for studies of basic biology and response to therapy. PMID:25031714

  15. Men’s Aggression Toward Women

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyoun K.; Laurent, Heidemarie K.; Capaldi, Deborah M.; Feingold, Alan

    2008-01-01

    The present study examined the longitudinal course of men’s physical and psychological aggression toward a partner across 10 years, using a community sample of young couples (N = 194) from at-risk backgrounds. Findings indicated that men’s aggression decreased over time and that women’s antisocial behavior and depressive symptoms predicted changes in men’s aggression. This suggests the importance of studying social processes within the dyad to have a better understanding of men’s aggression toward a partner. PMID:19122790

  16. Neural control of aggression in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Hoopfer, Eric D

    2016-06-01

    Like most animal species, fruit flies fight to obtain and defend resources essential to survival and reproduction. Aggressive behavior in Drosophila is genetically specified and also strongly influenced by the fly's social context, past experiences and internal states, making it an excellent framework for investigating the neural mechanisms that regulate complex social behaviors. Here, I summarize our current knowledge of the neural control of aggression in Drosophila and discuss recent advances in understanding the sensory pathways that influence the decision to fight or court, the neuromodulatory control of aggression, the neural basis by which internal states can influence both fighting and courtship, and how social experience modifies aggressive behavior. PMID:27179788

  17. Aggression and coexistence in female caribou

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weckerly, Floyd W.; Ricca, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    Female caribou (Rangifer tarandus) are highly gregarious, yet there has been little study of the behavioral mechanisms that foster coexistence. Quantifying patterns of aggression between male and female, particularly in the only cervid taxa where both sexes grow antlers, should provide insight into these mechanisms. We asked if patterns of aggression by male and female caribou followed the pattern typically noted in other polygynous cervids, in which males display higher frequencies and intensity of aggression. From June to August in 2011 and 2012, we measured the frequency and intensity of aggression across a range of group sizes through focal animal sampling of 170 caribou (64 males and 106 females) on Adak Island in the Aleutian Archipelago, Alaska. Males in same-sex and mixed-sex groups and females in mixed-sex groups had higher frequencies of aggression than females in same-sex groups. Group size did not influence frequency of aggression. Males displayed more intense aggression than females. Frequent aggression in mixed-sex groups probably reflects lower tolerance of males for animals in close proximity. Female caribou were less aggressive and more gregarious than males, as in other polygynous cervid species.

  18. Video media-induced aggressiveness in children.

    PubMed

    Cardwell, Michael Steven

    2013-09-01

    Transmission of aggressive behaviors to children through modeling by adults has long been a commonly held psychological concept; however, with the advent of technological innovations during the last 30 years, video media-television, movies, video games, and the Internet-has become the primary model for transmitting aggressiveness to children. This review explores the acquisition of aggressive behaviors by children through modeling behaviors in violent video media. The impact of aggressive behaviors on the child, the family, and society is addressed. Suggestive action plans to curb this societal ill are presented. PMID:24002556

  19. Gibbon Aggression During Introductions: An International Survey.

    PubMed

    Harl, Heather; Stevens, Lisa; Margulis, Susan W; Petersen, Jay

    2016-01-01

    Little is known regarding the prevalence of aggression seen during introductions of captive gibbons (Hylobatidae). In this study, an online survey was developed to quantify and collect contextual details regarding the frequency and types of aggression seen during introductions of captive gibbons (Hylobatidae). Nineteen percent of institutions (17 institutions) reported observing aggression, and 6 of these institutions recorded multiple instances of aggression, though a vast majority of these cases resulted in mild injuries or none at all. The female was the primary aggressor in 23% of cases, the male was the primary aggressor in 58% of cases, and both were the primary aggressor in 1 case. Although these aggressive interactions were often not associated with a known cause, 27% of cases were associated with food displacement. In most cases, management changes, including trying new pairings, greatly reduced situational aggression, suggesting that individual personalities may play a factor in aggression. These data begin to explain the extent of aggression observed in captive gibbons; future studies will address possible correlations with aggression and introduction techniques. PMID:26963568

  20. Intimate partner aggression and women's work outcomes.

    PubMed

    LeBlanc, Manon Mireille; Barling, Julian; Turner, Nick

    2014-10-01

    Using conservation of resources theory, we examined the relationship between intimate partner aggression enacted against heterosexual women and 3 types of work-related outcomes for these women: withdrawal while at work (i.e., cognitive distraction, work neglect), withdrawal from work (i.e., partial absenteeism, intentions to quit), and performance. In Study 1, we compared withdrawal both at and from work across 3 clinically categorized groups of women (n = 50), showing that experiencing physical aggression is related to higher work neglect. We replicated and extended these findings in Study 2 using a community sample of employed women (n = 249) by considering the incremental variance explained by both physical aggression and psychological aggression on these same outcomes. Results showed that physical aggression predicted higher levels of withdrawal both at and from work, with psychological aggression predicting additional variance in partial absenteeism over and above the effects of physical aggression. Study 3 extended the model to include academic performance as an outcome in a sample of female college students (n = 122) in dating relationships. Controlling for the women's conscientiousness, psychological aggression predicted lower academic performance after accounting for the effects of physical aggression. We discuss theoretical and practical implications of these results, as well as directions for future research. PMID:25068818

  1. Extensive acantholysis as the major histological feature of a severe case of Dowling Meara-epidermolysis bullosa simplex: a reappraisal of acantholysis in the newborn.

    PubMed

    Darwich, Esteve; Vicente, Asunción; Bolling, Maria C; González-Enseñat, Maria A; Cusi, Victoria; Fortuny, Claudia; Bombí, José A; Jonkman, Marcel F; Mascaró, José M

    2011-01-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa (EB) is a heterogeneous group of inherited skin disorders characterized by blistering and skin fragility secondary to mechanical trauma. Epidermolysis bullosa simplex (EBS) is the most frequent form of EB, with Dowling-Meara (DM-EBS) subtype being the most severe form in this group. Conventional histopathological evaluation is usually of low value in the diagnosis of EB, and significant histological features have rarely been reported in this group of diseases. We describe a case of severe DM-EBS in which acantholysis was observed in the histological examination. This finding led us to consider other diagnoses, such as neonatal pemphigus vulgaris or lethal acantholytic EB. Histological, immunological, ultrastructural and genetic tests were performed, leading to a final diagnosis of DM-EBS. Therefore, we believe that DM-EBS should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a newborn with blisters, where acantholysis is the main histological feature. PMID:21856558

  2. Effects of viewing relational aggression on television on aggressive behavior in adolescents: A three-year longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Coyne, Sarah M

    2016-02-01

    Most researchers on media and aggression have examined the behavioral effects of viewing physical aggression in the media. Conversely, in the current study, I examined longitudinal associations between viewing relational aggression on TV and subsequent aggressive behavior. Participants included 467 adolescents who completed a number of different questionnaires involving media and aggression at 3 different time points. Results revealed that viewing relational aggression on TV was longitudinally associated with future relational aggression. However, early levels of relational aggression did not predict future exposure to televised relational aggression. Conversely, there was a bidirectional relationship between TV violence and physical aggression over time. No longitudinal evidence was found for a general effect of viewing TV, as all significant media effects were specific to the type of aggression viewed. These results support the general aggression model and suggest that viewing relational aggression in the media can have a long-term effect on aggressive behavior during adolescence. PMID:26595354

  3. Histological types of polypoid cutaneous melanoma II.

    PubMed

    Knezević, Fabijan; Duancić, Vjekoslav; Sitić, Sanda; Horvat-Knezević, Anica; Benković, Vesna; Ramić, Snjezana; Kostović, Kresimir; Ramljak, Vesna; Vrdoljak, Danko Velemir; Stanec, Mladen; Bozović, Angelina

    2007-12-01

    The aim of this study was to ascertain which histological types of melanoma can clinically and morphologically appear as polypoid melanomas. In 645 cases of primary cutaneous melanoma we have analyzed criteria for diagnosis of polypoid cutaneous melanoma and afterwards we have analyzed growth phase in each polypoid melanoma, histological type of atypical melanocytes, the number of epidermal ridges which are occupied by atypical melanocytes, and distribution according to age, sex and location, as well as the disease free survival. According to the criteria for polypoid melanomas we have found 147 (22.8%) polypoid cutaneous melanomas. Analyzing the growth phases, histological types of atypical melanocytes and the number of affected epidermal ridges in the group of polypoid melanomas we have ascertained 2 (1.4%) ALMs, 4 (2.8%) LMMs, 42 (28.6%) SSMs and 99 (67.2%) NMs. Our conclusion is that polypoid cutaneous melanomas are morphological forms of various histological melanoma types (ALM, LMM, SSM and NM) and they can all display polypoid morphological form. Polypoid cutaneous melanomas are most often of nodular histological type. PMID:18217457

  4. [Gastritis from a histological point of view].

    PubMed

    Vieth, M; Stolte, M

    2006-06-01

    Since the rediscovery of spiral-shaped gastric bacteria in 1983 by Warren and Marshal numerous detailed facts have enlarged our knowledge base for a better understanding of gastritis. The WHO classified Helicobacter as a class 1 carcinogen. Helicobacter plays a role in many diseases of the upper GI tract (gastric and duodenal ulcer, MALT lymphoma, and gastric cancer). Knowledge of the interaction between bacterium and host led to an improvement of the diagnosis of gastritis. Unfortunately endoscopy, histology, and patient's symptoms do not correlate with each other. Therefore, gastritis is a purely histological diagnosis. A histological diagnosis always needs to be accompanied by an etiological cause of the inflammation. Only when this information is given a clinical consequence can be drawn from a histological diagnosis. In Germany the so-called ABCD scheme of gastritis is widely used (A: autoimmune gastritis, B: bacterial gastritis, C: chemical reactive gastritis, D: other forms of gastritis). At least two antrum and two corpus biopsies (matrix diagnostics) are necessary to reach representative tissue with an acceptable probability. If less than these four (minimal standard) biopsies are taken, the histological diagnosis will remain uncertain. PMID:16612608

  5. Comprehensive histological evaluation of bone implants.

    PubMed

    Rentsch, Claudia; Schneiders, Wolfgang; Manthey, Suzanne; Rentsch, Barbe; Rammelt, Stephan

    2014-01-01

    To investigate and assess bone regeneration in sheep in combination with new implant materials classical histological staining methods as well as immunohistochemistry may provide additional information to standard radiographs or computer tomography. Available published data of bone defect regenerations in sheep often present none or sparely labeled histological images. Repeatedly, the exact location of the sample remains unclear, detail enlargements are missing and the labeling of different tissues or cells is absent. The aim of this article is to present an overview of sample preparation, staining methods and their benefits as well as a detailed histological description of bone regeneration in the sheep tibia. General histological staining methods like hematoxylin and eosin, Masson-Goldner trichrome, Movat's pentachrome and alcian blue were used to define new bone formation within a sheep tibia critical size defect containing a polycaprolactone-co-lactide (PCL) scaffold implanted for 3 months (n = 4). Special attention was drawn to describe the bone healing patterns down to cell level. Additionally one histological quantification method and immunohistochemical staining methods are described. PMID:24504113

  6. Comprehensive histological evaluation of bone implants

    PubMed Central

    Rentsch, Claudia; Schneiders, Wolfgang; Manthey, Suzanne; Rentsch, Barbe; Rammelt, Stephan

    2014-01-01

    To investigate and assess bone regeneration in sheep in combination with new implant materials classical histological staining methods as well as immunohistochemistry may provide additional information to standard radiographs or computer tomography. Available published data of bone defect regenerations in sheep often present none or sparely labeled histological images. Repeatedly, the exact location of the sample remains unclear, detail enlargements are missing and the labeling of different tissues or cells is absent. The aim of this article is to present an overview of sample preparation, staining methods and their benefits as well as a detailed histological description of bone regeneration in the sheep tibia. General histological staining methods like hematoxylin and eosin, Masson-Goldner trichrome, Movat’s pentachrome and alcian blue were used to define new bone formation within a sheep tibia critical size defect containing a polycaprolactone-co-lactide (PCL) scaffold implanted for 3 months (n = 4). Special attention was drawn to describe the bone healing patterns down to cell level. Additionally one histological quantification method and immunohistochemical staining methods are described. PMID:24504113

  7. Identifying subtypes of spousal assaulters Using the B-SAFER.

    PubMed

    Thijssen, Jill; de Ruiter, Corine

    2011-05-01

    In the present study, a structured risk assessment instrument for intimate partner violence, the Brief Spousal Assault Form for the Evaluation of Risk (B-SAFER), was coded for 146 files of spousal assault cases from the Dutch probation service, dating from 2004 and 2005. The aim of the study was twofold: (a) to validate Holtzworth-Munroe and Stuart's typology using the risk factors of the B-SAFER and (b) to examine the relationship between the subtypes found and recidivism rates. Four subtypes of assaulters were identified: family only, generally violent/antisocial, low-level antisocial, and psychopathology. These subtypes were comparable to the subtypes found in previous studies. The generally violent/antisocial subtype had the highest recidivism rate, although not significantly different from the other three subtypes. PMID:20522890

  8. Multiple Molecular Subtypes of Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Critically Rely on Androgen Receptor and Respond to Enzalutamide In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Barton, Valerie N.; D’Amato, Nicholas C.; Gordon, Michael A.; Lind, Hanne T.; Spoelstra, Nicole S.; Babbs, Beatrice L.; Heinz, Richard E.; Elias, Anthony; Jedlicka, Paul; Jacobsen, Britta M.; Richer, Jennifer K.

    2015-01-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) has the lowest 5-year survival rate of invasive breast carcinomas, and currently there are no approved targeted therapies for this aggressive form of the disease. The androgen receptor (AR) is expressed in up to one third of TNBC and we find that all AR+ TNBC primary tumors tested display nuclear localization of AR, indicative of transcriptionally active receptors. While AR is most abundant in the “luminal AR (LAR)” molecular subtype of TNBC, here, for the first time, we use both the new-generation anti-androgen enzalutamide and AR knockdown to demonstrate that the other non-LAR molecular subtypes of TNBC are critically dependent on AR protein. Indeed, AR inhibition significantly reduces baseline proliferation, anchorage-independent growth, migration, and invasion and increases apoptosis in four TNBC lines (SUM159PT, HCC1806, BT549, and MDA-MB-231), representing three non-LAR TNBC molecular subtypes (mesenchymal-like, mesenchymal stem–like, and basal-like 2). In vivo, enzalutamide significantly decreases viability of SUM159PT and HCC1806 xenografts. Furthermore, mechanistic analysis reveals that AR activation upregulates secretion of the EGFR ligand amphiregulin (AREG), an effect abrogated by enzalutamide in vitro and in vivo. Exogenous AREG partially rescues the effects of AR knockdown on proliferation, migration, and invasion, demonstrating that upregulation of AREG is one mechanism by which AR influences tumorigenicity. Together, our findings indicate that non-LAR subtypes of TNBC are AR dependent and, moreover, that enzalutamide is a promising targeted therapy for multiple molecular subtypes of AR+ TNBC. PMID:25713333

  9. Orthotopic Human Choroidal Melanoma Xenografts in Nude Rats with Aggressive and Nonaggressive PAS Staining Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Rod D.; Abbas, Asad

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE Choroidal melanoma is the most common primary ocular cancer among the adult population. Patient survival has been linked to the periodic acid-Schiff base (PAS)–positive vascular patterns in the tumors. The presence of PAS-positive loops or cross-linking parallel channels is a marker of an aggressive tumor. The purpose of this study was to develop new xenograft models of human choroidal melanoma that predictably demonstrate the PAS staining patterns associated with nonaggressive and aggressive tumors in humans. METHODS Three human choroidal melanoma cell lines (C918, M619, and OCM-1) were used. C918 and M619 are considered aggressive, based on their ability to form PAS-positive channels in vitro. The nonaggressive OCM-1 cells do not form these channels. C918, M619, and OCM-1 spheroids were grown and implanted in the suprachoroidal space of 20, 17, and 16 WAG/RijHs-rnu nude rats, respectively. Tumors were grown for 1 to >4 weeks, and histology was performed to evaluate tumor growth and determine PAS labeling patterns. RESULTS Growth of C918, M619, and OCM-1 xenografts were histologically verified in 20/20, 15/17, and 16/16 rats, respectively. PAS staining revealed loops and cross-linking parallel channels, typical of aggressive tumors in patients, in 90% of C918 and 100% of M619 xenografts. Only 4 of 16 OCM-1 xenografts showed PAS-positive loops. The rest showed no PAS staining or only perivascular staining, indicative of nonaggressive tumors. CONCLUSIONS It is possible to grow human choroidal melanoma orthotopic xenografts in nude rats that reproduce the PAS staining patterns associated with aggressive and nonaggressive choroidal melanomas in patients. PMID:16384938

  10. Daily Associations among Anger Experience and Intimate Partner Aggression within Aggressive and Nonaggressive Community Couples

    PubMed Central

    Crane, Cory A.; Testa, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Anger is an empirically established precipitant to aggressive responding toward intimate partners. The current investigation examined the effects of anger, as experienced by both partners, as well as gender and previous aggression, on in vivo intimate partner aggression using a prospective daily diary methodology. Participants (N = 118 couples) individually provided 56 consecutive, daily reports of affective experience and partner aggression. Multilevel models were estimated using the Actor Partner Interdependence Model framework to analyze the daily associations between anger and partner aggression perpetration among male and female participants as moderated by aggression history. Results revealed that both Actor and Partner anger were generally associated with subsequently reported daily conflict. Further, increases in daily Partner anger were associated with corresponding increases in partner aggression among females who reported high anger and males, regardless of their own anger experience. Increases in Actor anger were associated with increases in daily partner aggression only among previously aggressive females. Previously aggressive males and females consistently reported greater perpetration than their nonaggressive counterparts on days of high Actor anger experience. Results emphasize the importance of both Actor and Partner factors in partner aggression and suggest that female anger may be a stronger predictor of both female-to-male and male-to-female partner aggression than male anger, when measured at the daily level. PMID:24866529

  11. Media depictions of physical and relational aggression: connections with aggression in young adults' romantic relationships.

    PubMed

    Coyne, Sarah M; Nelson, David A; Graham-Kevan, Nicola; Tew, Emily; Meng, K Nathan; Olsen, Joseph A

    2011-01-01

    Various studies have found that viewing physical or relational aggression in the media can impact subsequent engagement in aggressive behavior. However, this has rarely been examined in the context of relationships. Accordingly, the aim of this study was to examine the connection between viewing various types of aggression in the media and perpetration of aggression against a romantic partner. A total of 369 young adults completed a variety of questionnaires asking for their perpetration of various forms of relationship aggression. Participants' exposure to both physical and relational aggression in the media was also assessed. As a whole, we found a relationship between viewing aggression in the media and perpetration of aggression; however, this depended on the sex of the participant and the type of aggression measured. Specifically, exposure to physical violence in the media was related to engagement in physical aggression against their partner only for men. However, exposure to relational aggression in the media was related to romantic relational aggression for both men and women. PMID:21046605

  12. Competitive Aggression without Interaction: Effects of Competitive versus Cooperative Instructions on Aggressive Behavior in Video Games.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Craig A.; Morrow, Melissa

    1995-01-01

    Extended and tested Deutsch's theory of competition effects. Predicted that people view competitive situations as inherently more aggressive than cooperative ones. Predicted that leading people to think of an aggressive situation in competitive terms would increase aggressive behavior. Increase of kill ratio occurred in absence of changes in…

  13. Predicting Aggressive Behavior in Children with the Help of Measures of Implicit and Explicit Aggression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grumm, Mandy; Hein, Sascha; Fingerle, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Aggressive behavior between children in schools is a topic that receives much interest as violence and aggressive behavior cause many maladaptive social outcomes in the school setting. In the current study the Implicit Association Test (IAT) was adapted as a measure of children's implicit aggression, by assessing the association of the self…

  14. The Relationship of Aggression and Bullying to Social Preference: Differences in Gender and Types of Aggression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Eunju

    2009-01-01

    With 338 fifth-grade students as subjects, this study found the variations in the relation between school bullying and social preference as a function of gender and types of aggressive behavior utilized. Aggressive boys were likely to be rejected by peers, whereas aggressive girls were both rejected and accepted by peers. Children nominated…

  15. Relational and Overt Aggression in Urban India: Associations with Peer Relations and Best Friends' Aggression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowker, Julie C.; Ostrov, Jamie M.; Raja, Radhi

    2012-01-01

    This study explored the associations between relational and overt aggression and social status, and tested whether the peer correlates of aggression vary as a function of best friends' aggression during early adolescence in urban India. One hundred and ninety-four young adolescents from primarily middle-to-upper-class families in Surat, India…

  16. Stability of Aggression during Early Adolescence as Moderated by Reciprocated Friendship Status and Friend's Aggression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Ryan E.; Bukowski, William M.; Bagwell, Catherine

    2005-01-01

    The effect of friendship reciprocation and friend aggression on the stability of aggression across a 6-month period following the transition to secondary school was studied in a sample of 298 Grade 6 children from a predominately white, middle-class, Midwestern American community. The stability of aggression was generally high but it varied as a…

  17. Role Stress and Aggression among Young Adults: The Moderating Influences of Gender and Adolescent Aggression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Ruth X.; Kaplan, Howard B.

    2004-01-01

    Using data provided by a panel of non-Hispanic white respondents, this study explored whether aggressive response to severe role stress during early adulthood depends on gender and on an adolescent history of aggression. Logistic regression analysis yielded these findings: Men who reported aggression during early adolescence were significantly…

  18. Antiepileptics for aggression and associated impulsivity

    PubMed Central

    Huband, Nick; Ferriter, Michael; Nathan, Rajan; Jones, Hannah

    2014-01-01

    Background Aggression is a major public health issue and is integral to several mental health disorders. Antiepileptic drugs may reduce aggression by acting on the central nervous system to reduce neuronal hyper-excitability associated with aggression. Objectives To evaluate the efficacy of antiepileptic drugs in reducing aggression and associated impulsivity. Search methods We searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) and ClinicalTrials.gov to April 2009. We also searched Cochrane Schizophrenia Group’s register of trials on aggression, National Research Record and handsearched for studies. Selection criteria Prospective, placebo-controlled trials of antiepileptic drugs taken regularly by individuals with recurrent aggression to reduce the frequency or intensity of aggressive outbursts. Data collection and analysis Three authors independently selected studies and two authors independently extracted data. We calculated standardised mean differences (SMDs), with odds ratios (ORs) for dichotomous data. Main results Fourteen studies with data from 672 participants met the inclusion criteria. Five different antiepileptic drugs were examined. Sodium valproate/divalproex was superior to placebo for outpatient men with recurrent impulsive aggression, for impulsively aggressive adults with cluster B personality disorders, and for youths with conduct disorder, but not for children and adolescents with pervasive developmental disorder. Carbamazepine was superior to placebo in reducing acts of self-directed aggression in women with borderline personality disorder, but not in children with conduct disorder. Oxcarbazepine was superior to placebo for verbal aggression and aggression against objects in adult outpatients. Phenytoin was superior to placebo on the frequency of aggressive acts in male prisoners and in outpatient men including those with personality disorder, but not on the frequency of ‘behavioral incidents’ in

  19. From pluripotency to distinct cardiomyocyte subtypes.

    PubMed

    David, Robert; Franz, Wolfgang-Michael

    2012-06-01

    Differentiated adult cardiomyocytes (CMs) lack significant regenerative potential, which is one reason why degenerative heart diseases are the leading cause of death in the western world. For future cardiac repair, stem cell-based therapeutic strategies may become alternatives to donor heart transplantation. The principle of reprogramming adult terminally differentiated cells (iPSC) had a major impact on stem cell biology. One can now generate autologous pluripotent cells that highly resemble embryonic stem cells (ESC) and that are ethically inoffensive as opposed to human ESC. Yet, due to genetic and epigenetic aberrations arising during the full reprogramming process, it is questionable whether iPSC will enter the clinic in the near future. Therefore, the recent achievement of directly reprogramming fibroblasts into cardiomyocytes via a milder approach, thereby avoiding an initial pluripotent state, may become of great importance. In addition, various clinical scenarios will depend on the availability of specific cardiac cellular subtypes, for which a first step was achieved via our own programming approach to achieve cardiovascular cell subtypes. In this review, we discuss recent progress in the cardiovascular stem cell field addressing the above mentioned aspects. PMID:22689787

  20. Attention Dysfunction Subtypes of Developmental Dyslexia

    PubMed Central

    Lewandowska, Monika; Milner, Rafał; Ganc, Małgorzata; Włodarczyk, Elżbieta; Skarżyński, Henryk

    2014-01-01

    Background Previous studies indicate that many different aspects of attention are impaired in children diagnosed with developmental dyslexia (DD). The objective of the present study was to identify cognitive profiles of DD on the basis of attentional test performance. Material/Methods 78 children with DD (30 girls, 48 boys, mean age of 12 years ±8 months) and 32 age- and sex-matched non-dyslexic children (14 girls, 18 boys) were examined using a battery of standardized tests of reading, phonological and attentional processes (alertness, covert shift of attention, divided attention, inhibition, flexibility, vigilance, and visual search). Cluster analysis was used to identify subtypes of DD. Results Dyslexic children showed deficits in alertness, covert shift of attention, divided attention, flexibility, and visual search. Three different subtypes of DD were identified, each characterized by poorer performance on the reading, phonological awareness, and visual search tasks. Additionally, children in cluster no. 1 displayed deficits in flexibility and divided attention. In contrast to non-dyslexic children, cluster no. 2 performed poorer in tasks involving alertness, covert shift of attention, divided attention, and vigilance. Cluster no. 3 showed impaired covert shift of attention. Conclusions These results indicate different patterns of attentional impairments in dyslexic children. Remediation programs should address the individual child’s deficit profile. PMID:25387479

  1. The International Histological Classification of Tumours*

    PubMed Central

    Sobin, L. H.

    1981-01-01

    This article reviews the development of the WHO project on the histological classification of tumours, which has included the establishment of several collaborating centres and has involved more than 300 pathologists in over 50 countries. The project has resulted in the publication, over the last 14 years, of 25 volumes in the first series of the International Histological Classification of Tumours (IHCT), each giving a classification of tumours specific to a certain site. The classifications are based primarily on the microscopic characteristics of the tumours and are concerned with morphologically identifiable cell types and histological patterns as seen by means of light microscopy and conventional staining techniques. The article also describes the relationship between IHCT and other classification and coding systems and assesses possible future developments that may result from new approaches to diagnosis. PMID:6978190

  2. Revisiting the Derivation of Batterer Subtypes: Towards Profiling the Abuser.

    PubMed

    Brasfield, Rebecca

    2015-12-01

    Research directed toward profiling an abuser to develop effective treatment modalities should consider the framework for how batterer subtypes were developed. This article evaluates a seminal work in batterer typology for a review of its method and findings. Findings indicate that the formation of batterer subtypes rely on unstable theory and methods: (a) Variables were not held constant, (b) Theoretical constructs lack clarity, (c) There were unclear boundaries for subtypes. A re-evaluation of this particular line of typology research should address the utility and relevance of these batterer subtypes in an effort to address methodological implications that may help profile and treat abusers. PMID:25516132

  3. Proposed reference sequences for hepatitis E virus subtypes.

    PubMed

    Smith, Donald B; Simmonds, Peter; Izopet, Jacques; Oliveira-Filho, Edmilson F; Ulrich, Rainer G; Johne, Reimar; Koenig, Matthias; Jameel, Shahid; Harrison, Tim J; Meng, Xiang-Jin; Okamoto, Hiroaki; Van der Poel, Wim H M; Purdy, Michael A

    2016-03-01

    The nomenclature of hepatitis E virus (HEV) subtypes is inconsistent and makes comparison of different studies problematic. We have provided a table of proposed complete genome reference sequences for each subtype. The criteria for subtype assignment vary between different genotypes and methodologies, and so a conservative pragmatic approach has been favoured. Updates to this table will be posted on the International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses website (http://talk.ictvonline.org/r.ashx?C). The use of common reference sequences will facilitate communication between researchers and help clarify the epidemiology of this important human pathogen. This subtyping procedure might be adopted for other taxa of the genus Orthohepevirus. PMID:26743685

  4. Hypoglycemia and aggression: a review.

    PubMed

    Benton, D

    1988-08-01

    The popular notion that a tendency to develop low levels of blood glucose is the cause of a range of behavioral problems is reviewed. It is concluded that it is inappropriate to use the glucose tolerance test as a test of the tendency to develop reactive hypoglycemia. Instead, a meal tolerance test, in which glucose is administered in the presence of fat and protein, should be the method of choice. The use of a meal tolerance test strongly suggests that reactive hypoglycemia rarely results, except in a few exceptional individuals. Three situations are described in which a correlation between a tendency to develop moderately low levels of blood glucose during a glucose tolerance test (not hypoglycemic values) and the tendency to act aggressively have been reported. The significance of these data is unclear but several possible mechanisms by which glucose may influence behavior are discussed. PMID:3053477

  5. Targeted drug induces responses in aggressive lymphomas

    Cancer.gov

    Preliminary results from clinical trials in a subtype of lymphoma show that for a number of patients whose disease was not cured by other treatments, the drug ibrutinib can provide significant anti-cancer responses with modest side effects.

  6. Transcriptional analysis of aggressiveness and heterogeneity across grades of astrocytomas.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunjing; Funk, Cory C; Eddy, James A; Price, Nathan D

    2013-01-01

    Astrocytoma is the most common glioma, accounting for half of all primary brain and spinal cord tumors. Late detection and the aggressive nature of high-grade astrocytomas contribute to high mortality rates. Though many studies identify candidate biomarkers using high-throughput transcriptomic profiling to stratify grades and subtypes, few have resulted in clinically actionable results. This shortcoming can be attributed, in part, to pronounced lab effects that reduce signature robustness and varied individual gene expression among patients with the same tumor. We addressed these issues by uniformly preprocessing publicly available transcriptomic data, comprising 306 tumor samples from three astrocytoma grades (Grade 2, 3, and 4) and 30 non-tumor samples (normal brain as control tissues). Utilizing Differential Rank Conservation (DIRAC), a network-based classification approach, we examined the global and individual patterns of network regulation across tumor grades. Additionally, we applied gene-based approaches to identify genes whose expression changed consistently with increasing tumor grade and evaluated their robustness across multiple studies using statistical sampling. Applying DIRAC, we observed a global trend of greater network dysregulation with increasing tumor aggressiveness. Individual networks displaying greater differences in regulation between adjacent grades play well-known roles in calcium/PKC, EGF, and transcription signaling. Interestingly, many of the 90 individual genes found to monotonically increase or decrease with astrocytoma grade are implicated in cancer-affected processes such as calcium signaling, mitochondrial metabolism, and apoptosis. The fact that specific genes monotonically increase or decrease with increasing astrocytoma grade may reflect shared oncogenic mechanisms among phenotypically similar tumors. This work presents statistically significant results that enable better characterization of different human astrocytoma grades

  7. Appendicitis in Dar es Salaam, histological pattern.

    PubMed

    Mbembati, N A; Lema, L E; Mwakyoma, H A; Ussiri, E V

    1996-03-01

    Histology of 378 appendicectomy specimens submitted to the Histopathology Department of Muhimbili Medical Centre from its surgical wards over a 10 year period (1985 to 1994) were reviewed. There were 185 cases (48.9 pc) of acute appendicitis, 101 cases (26.7 pc) of chronic appendicitis, 74 (19.6 pc) normal appendices and 13 cases (3.5 pc) schistosomal appendicitis. There were two cases of tuberculous appendicitis and two cases of mucocele of the appendix. Apart from the high frequency of chronic appendicitis the histological findings in this study compare well with findings reported from other studies. PMID:8653771

  8. Pseudolabor: A New Conversion Disorder Subtype? A Case Presentation and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Lyman, David

    2004-01-01

    Pseudolabor is not a recognized conversion disorder subtype. The diagnosis of conversion disorder is suspected when a patient presents with symptoms under voluntary control that mimic a neurologic or medical condition. The term pseudolabor was first used in 1994 to describe a patient who presented at 27 weeks' gestation with monitored contraction activity and no palpable uterine contractions. A second case is presented herein. Both patients were initially managed as though they had preterm labor or uterine irritability with minimal cervical changes. The diagnosis was suspected only after each patient failed to respond to aggressive tocolysis. On external tocodynamometry, contractions were abrupt in onset and abrupt in descent. Only after palpating abdominal contractions and not uterine contractions did the attending physicians make the correct diagnosis. The development of pseudolabor in a patient with previously diagnosed pseudoseizures suggests that the condition was conversion disorder. The prevalence of pseudolabor is unknown and may be underestimated: electronic fetal monitoring has minimized the need to palpate uterine contractions in the laboring patient. The diagnosis of pseudolabor as a subtype of conversion disorder should be considered in any patient who presents with recurrent preterm uterine contractions, no (or minimal) cervical changes, and an atypical contraction pattern. PMID:15254598

  9. [Serious clinical course of myocarditis with "apical ballooning": first presentation of pathogenicity of HHV6 subtype A in myocarditis].

    PubMed

    Bigalke, B; Klingel, K; May, A E; Beyer, M; Hövelborn, T; Kandolf, R; Gawaz, M

    2005-11-01

    We report of a 67 year-old female who has suffered a flu-like infection three days ago and presented with symptoms of acute coronary syndrome. Coronary heart disease could be excluded. The ventriculography showed a moderate reduced left ventricular function characterized by "apical ballooning". Endomyocardial biopsies and EDTA blood gave a direct proof of human herpes virus 6 subtype A. Histological and immunohistochemical analysis revealed a myocarditis with areas of interstitial macrophages and fibrosis. This case presents for the first time the cross-link of myocarditis with HHV6A infection and the appearance of "apical ballooning". PMID:16170511

  10. Desensitization to media violence: links with habitual media violence exposure, aggressive cognitions, and aggressive behavior.

    PubMed

    Krahé, Barbara; Möller, Ingrid; Huesmann, L Rowell; Kirwil, Lucyna; Felber, Juliane; Berger, Anja

    2011-04-01

    This study examined the links between desensitization to violent media stimuli and habitual media violence exposure as a predictor and aggressive cognitions and behavior as outcome variables. Two weeks after completing measures of habitual media violence exposure, trait aggression, trait arousability, and normative beliefs about aggression, undergraduates (N = 303) saw a violent film clip and a sad or a funny comparison clip. Skin conductance level (SCL) was measured continuously, and ratings of anxious and pleasant arousal were obtained after each clip. Following the clips, participants completed a lexical decision task to measure accessibility of aggressive cognitions and a competitive reaction time task to measure aggressive behavior. Habitual media violence exposure correlated negatively with SCL during violent clips and positively with pleasant arousal, response times for aggressive words, and trait aggression, but it was unrelated to anxious arousal and aggressive responding during the reaction time task. In path analyses controlling for trait aggression, normative beliefs, and trait arousability, habitual media violence exposure predicted faster accessibility of aggressive cognitions, partly mediated by higher pleasant arousal. Unprovoked aggression during the reaction time task was predicted by lower anxious arousal. Neither habitual media violence usage nor anxious or pleasant arousal predicted provoked aggression during the laboratory task, and SCL was unrelated to aggressive cognitions and behavior. No relations were found between habitual media violence viewing and arousal in response to the sad and funny film clips, and arousal in response to the sad and funny clips did not predict aggressive cognitions or aggressive behavior on the laboratory task. This suggests that the observed desensitization effects are specific to violent content. PMID:21186935

  11. Desensitization to Media Violence: Links With Habitual Media Violence Exposure, Aggressive Cognitions, and Aggressive Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Krahé, Barbara; Möller, Ingrid; Huesmann, L. Rowell; Kirwil, Lucyna; Felber, Juliane; Berger, Anja

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the links between desensitization to violent media stimuli and habitual media violence exposure as a predictor and aggressive cognitions and behavior as outcome variables. Two weeks after completing measures of habitual media violence exposure, trait aggression, trait arousability, and normative beliefs about aggression, undergraduates (N = 303) saw a violent film clip and a sad or a funny comparison clip. Skin conductance level (SCL) was measured continuously, and ratings of anxious and pleasant arousal were obtained after each clip. Following the clips, participants completed a lexical decision task to measure accessibility of aggressive cognitions and a competitive reaction time task to measure aggressive behavior. Habitual media violence exposure correlated negatively with SCL during violent clips and positively with pleasant arousal, response times for aggressive words, and trait aggression, but it was unrelated to anxious arousal and aggressive responding during the reaction time task. In path analyses controlling for trait aggression, normative beliefs, and trait arousability, habitual media violence exposure predicted faster accessibility of aggressive cognitions, partly mediated by higher pleasant arousal. Unprovoked aggression during the reaction time task was predicted by lower anxious arousal. Neither habitual media violence usage nor anxious or pleasant arousal predicted provoked aggression during the laboratory task, and SCL was unrelated to aggressive cognitions and behavior. No relations were found between habitual media violence viewing and arousal in response to the sad and funny film clips, and arousal in response to the sad and funny clips did not predict aggressive cognitions or aggressive behavior on the laboratory task. This suggests that the observed desensitization effects are specific to violent content. PMID:21186935

  12. Moral Judgments of Aggressive and Nonaggressive Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keltikangas-Jarvinen, Liisa

    1989-01-01

    Reports on a study of moral judgments in aggressive and nonaggressive children. Assessed moral judgment by presenting the children with stories of moral conflict in everyday life using peer rating. Results showed significant differences according to gender and no constant level of moral reasoning was measured in either aggressive or nonaggressive…

  13. Normative Beliefs Regarding Aggression in Emerging Adulthood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, David A.; Springer, Melanie M.; Nelson, Larry J.; Bean, Nathaniel H.

    2008-01-01

    Few studies have examined the nature of aggression in emerging adulthood (ages 18-25), a unique developmental period wherein relationships become increasingly important and intimate. Consistent with a greater emphasis on relationships, relationally manipulative forms of aggression may be particularly salient during this time period. Based on…

  14. Students' Attitude to Aggression in School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dettenborn, Harry; Lautsch, Erwin

    1994-01-01

    Reports on a study of 2,553 students' attitudes toward aggression in schools. Finds differentiated results based on demographic data and with the students' personal involvement in the aggressive acts as either the perpetrator or victim. Discusses practical consequences of the study for schools. (CFR)

  15. Aggressive and foraging behavioral interactions among ruffe

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Savino, Jacqueline F.; Kostich, Melissa J.

    2000-01-01

    The ruffe, Gymnocephalus cernuus, is a nonindigenous percid in the Great Lakes. Ruffe are aggressive benthivores and forage over soft substrates. Laboratory studies in pools (100 cm in diameter, 15 cm water depth) were conducted to determine whether fish density (low = 2, medium = 4, high = 6 ruffe per pool) changed foraging and aggressive behaviors with a limited food supply of chironomid larvae. All fish densities demonstrated a hierarchy based on aggressive interactions, but ruffe were most aggressive at low and high fish densities. Time spent in foraging was lowest at the low fish density. The best forager at the low fish density was the most aggressive individual, but the second most aggressive fish at the medium and high fish density was the best forager and also the one chased most frequently. A medium fish density offered the best energetic benefits to ruffe by providing the lowest ratio of time spent in aggression to that spent foraging. Based on our results, ruffe should grow best at an intermediate density. With high ruffe densities, we would also expect disparity in size as the more aggressive fish are able to garner a disproportionate amount of the resources. Alternatively, as the Great Lakes are a fairly open system, ruffe could migrate out of one area to colonize another as populations exceed optimal densities.

  16. Forgivingness, anger, and hostility in aggressive driving.

    PubMed

    Kovácsová, Natália; Rošková, Eva; Lajunen, Timo

    2014-01-01

    This study was aimed at investigating the relationship between trait forgivingness, general anger, hostility, driving anger, and self-reported aggressive driving committed by the driver him/herself ("self" scale) and perceiving him/herself as an object of other drivers' aggressive acts ("other" scale). The Slovak version of questionnaires was administrated to a sample of 612 Slovak and Czech drivers. First, the factor structure of the Driver Anger Indicators Scale (DAIS) was investigated. Factor analyses of the self and other parts of the DAIS resulted in two factors, which were named as aggressive warnings and hostile aggression and revenge. Next, the results showed that from all dependent variables (scales of the DAIS), self-reported aggressive warnings (self) on the road were predicted best by chosen person-related factors. The path model for aggressive warnings (self) suggested that trait forgivingness and general anger were fully mediated by driving anger whereas hostility proved to be a unique predictor of aggressive behavior in traffic. Driving anger was found to be the best predictor of perceptions that other drivers behave aggressively. PMID:24211562

  17. School-Based Aggression Replacement Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roth, Becky Sue; Striepling-Goldstein, Susan

    2003-01-01

    Aggression Replacement Training (ART) is a potent K-12 intervention that responds to many of the developmental and natural needs of aggressive and antisocial students. Woven into the curriculum preventatively or as a stand-alone course in response to an antisocial school climate, ART facilitates the learning necessary to reach and provide lasting…

  18. Pathways to Aggression in Children and Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Malcolm W.; Fischer, Kurt W.; Andreas, Jasmina Burdzovic; Smith, Kevin W.

    2004-01-01

    In this article, Malcolm Watson, Kurt Fischer, Jasmina Burdzovic Andreas, and Kevin Smith describe and compare two approaches to assessing risk factors that lead to aggression in children. The first, the severe risks approach, focuses on how risk factors form a pathway that leads to aggressive behavior. Within this approach, an inhibited…

  19. Involvement in Internet Aggression during Early Adolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Werner, Nicole E.; Bumpus, Matthew F.; Rock, Daquarii

    2010-01-01

    The current study examined concurrent and longitudinal predictors of early adolescents' involvement in Internet aggression. Cross-sectional results (N = 330; 57% female) showed that the likelihood of reporting Internet aggression was higher among youth who spent more time using Internet-based technologies to communicate with friends and who were…

  20. Relational Aggression and Victimization in College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dahlen, Eric R.; Czar, Katherine A.; Prather, Emily; Dyess, Christy

    2013-01-01

    For this study we explored relational aggression and victimization in a college sample (N = 307), examining potential gender and race differences, correlates, and the link between relational aggression and common emotional and behavioral problems, independent of relational victimization. Gender and race differences were observed on relational…

  1. The Barrier within: Relational Aggression among Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brock, Barbara L.

    2010-01-01

    Relational aggression among women presents an overlooked barrier to women's quest for advancement in the workplace. Although research on women's leadership extols their ability to collaborate and form lasting, supportive relationships, one cannot assume that all women are supportive of other women. Research reveals that relational aggression,…

  2. How Food Controls Aggression in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Rod S.; Eyjólfsdóttir, Eyrún; Shin, Euncheol; Perona, Pietro; Anderson, David J.

    2014-01-01

    How animals use sensory information to weigh the risks vs. benefits of behavioral decisions remains poorly understood. Inter-male aggression is triggered when animals perceive both the presence of an appetitive resource, such as food or females, and of competing conspecific males. How such signals are detected and integrated to control the decision to fight is not clear. For instance, it is unclear whether food increases aggression directly, or as a secondary consequence of increased social interactions caused by attraction to food. Here we use the vinegar fly, Drosophila melanogaster, to investigate the manner by which food influences aggression. We show that food promotes aggression in flies, and that it does so independently of any effect on frequency of contact between males, increase in locomotor activity or general enhancement of social interactions. Importantly, the level of aggression depends on the absolute amount of food, rather than on its surface area or concentration. When food resources exceed a certain level, aggression is diminished, suggestive of reduced competition. Finally, we show that detection of sugar via Gr5a+ gustatory receptor neurons (GRNs) is necessary for food-promoted aggression. These data demonstrate that food exerts a specific effect to promote aggression in male flies, and that this effect is mediated, at least in part, by sweet-sensing GRNs. PMID:25162609

  3. The Prevention of Social Aggression among Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cappella, Elise; Weinstein, Rhona

    2006-01-01

    This study represents the first systematic attempt to examine a theory-based program designed to reduce girls' social aggression and increase positive leadership among peers. Fifth-grade girls from six public schools were randomly assigned within classrooms to the social aggression prevention program (SAPP) and the comparison reading clubs. A…

  4. Understanding Aggressive Behavior Across the Life Span

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jianghong; Lewis, Gary; Evans, Lois

    2012-01-01

    Aggressive behavior is the observable manifestation of aggression and is often associated with developmental transitions and a range of medical and psychiatric diagnoses across the lifespan. As healthcare professionals involved in the medical and psychosocial care of patients from birth through death, nurses frequently encounter—and may serve as—both victims and perpetrators of aggressive behavior in the workplace. While the nursing literature has continually reported research on prevention and treatment approaches, less emphasis has been given to understanding the etiology, including contextual precipitants of aggressive behavior. This paper provides a brief review of the biological, social, and environmental risk factors that purportedly give rise to aggressive behavior. Further, many researchers have focused specifically on aggressive behavior in adolescence and adulthood. Less attention has been given to understanding the etiology of such behavior in young children and older adults. This paper emphasizes the unique risk factors for aggressive behavior across the developmental spectrum, including childhood, adolescence, adulthood, and late life. Appreciation of the risk factors of aggressive behavior, and, in particular, how they relate to age-specific manifestations, can aid nurses in better design and implementation of prevention and treatment programs. PMID:22471771

  5. Intercommunity differences in aggression among Zapotec children.

    PubMed

    Fry, D P

    1988-08-01

    Patterns of play aggression and serious aggression were compared in 2 neighboring Zapotec Indian communities that have different levels of adult violence. Social learning theory provided the basis for predicting that levels of agonistic behavior among children would parallel levels of violence among adults. Ethological methods were employed to observe 3-8-year-old children (N = 48). An examination of physical aggression and nonphysical threatening showed that agonism generally was more severe among the children of the more aggressive community. That is, children from the more aggressive community engaged in more actual fighting (p = .005) and play fighting (p = .0001) than their counterparts from the other community. On the other hand, children from the less aggressive community used more noncontact threatening than the children from the more aggressive community (p = .0001). These findings suggest that community differences in levels of violence are perpetuated as Zapotec children learn community-appropriate patterns for expressing aggression and continue to express these patterns as adults. Possible functions of play fighting are also discussed. PMID:3168610

  6. Parental Behavior, TV Habits, IQ Predict Aggression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, J.

    1983-01-01

    Highlights a longitudinal study on key factors in the metamorphosis of childhood aggression into adult crime in more than 400 males/females. Results (which began with study of 875 third graders in 1960) indicate that aggressive youngsters at age eight have much higher rates of criminal/violent behavior at age 30. (JN)

  7. Clinical and histological aspects with therapeutic implications in head and neck lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Tuşaliu, Mihail; Mogoantă, Carmen Aurelia; Dobrea, Camelia Marioara; Zainea, Viorel

    2015-01-01

    Malignant lymphoma (ML) is one of the major issues in modern medical practice, with an increasing incidence in recent years, which makes it, together with leukemia, the most frequent form of neoplasia affecting young people. The onset can occur both inside and outside the lymph nodes, with a quarter of the lymphomas with extranodal onset being located in the head and neck. The purpose of the paper is to conduct a retrospective study over a period of six years on patients diagnosed and admitted to the clinic with malignant lymphomas located in the head and neck, discussing their different histological variations. It emphasizes the importance of the histopathological examination and, in particular, of the immunohistochemical tests, in determining the histological subtype of the lymphoma, as the immunohistochemical and cytogenetic data of the malignant cell play a major role in the evolution and prognosis of patients. The study leads to the conclusion that, in spite of the advancements of the immunological, cytogenetic and molecular techniques, the diagnosis and histological determination of malignant lymphomas continue to be a challenge to clinicians and anatomical pathologists. Of particular importance in the efforts made for the accurate diagnosis and proper treatment of the ENT (ear, nose and throat) malignant lymphomas is the interdisciplinary collaboration between the ENT specialist, the hematologist, the anatomical pathologist, the oncologist and the nutritionist. PMID:26193219

  8. Prognosis for canine malignant mammary tumors based on TNM and histologic classification.

    PubMed

    Yamagami, T; Kobayashi, T; Takahashi, K; Sugiyama, M

    1996-11-01

    The 2-year prognosis of malignant mammary tumors seen in 175 bitches in the Tokyo metropolitan area was assessed based on their TNM clinical staging and histological classification. The larger the tumor size became (T category), the poorer was the clinical prognosis. The 2-year survival rates of the animals with regional lymph node metastasis of tumor cells (N1, N2 category) and/or distant metastasis (M1 category) were markedly lower than those of the animals without such involvement. As the grade of TNM staging increased, the prognosis was poorer, however, there were no significant differences in survival rates among subtypes of adenocarcinomas (tubular, papillary and papillary cystic) determined by WHO histological classification. It was also noticed that animals having carcinomas without tubular formation or myoepithelial cell proliferation had a lower survival rate than animals having carcinomas with those characteristics; and invasive carcinomas into adjacent skin or lymphatic/vascular vessels implied a poorer prognosis than non-invasive ones. The results suggest that a combined practice of TNM system and our evaluation on the above-mentioned 4 histologic features could be useful for prognostic determination of canine mammary cancers. PMID:8959655

  9. Reproducibility of the WHO histological criteria for the diagnosis of Philadelphia chromosome-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Gianelli, Umberto; Bossi, Anna; Cortinovis, Ivan; Sabattini, Elena; Tripodo, Claudio; Boveri, Emanuela; Moro, Alessia; Valli, Riccardo; Ponzoni, Maurilio; M Florena, Ada; F Orcioni, Giulio; Ascani, Stefano; Bonoldi, Emanuela; Iurlo, Alessandra; Gugliotta, Luigi; Franco, Vito

    2014-06-01

    This study, performed on behalf of the Italian Registry of Thrombocythaemias (Registro Italiano Trombocitemie), aimed to test the inter-observer reproducibility of the histological parameters proposed by the WHO classification for the diagnosis of the Philadelphia chromosome-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms. A series of 103 bone marrow biopsy samples of Philadelphia chromosome-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms consecutively collected in 2004 were classified according to the WHO criteria as follows: essential thrombocythaemia (n=34), primary myelofibrosis (n=44) and polycythaemia vera (n=25). Two independent groups of pathologists reviewed the bone marrow biopsies. The first group was asked to reach a collegial 'consensus' diagnosis. The second group reviewed individually all the cases to recognize the main morphological parameters indicated by the WHO classification and report their results in a database. They were subsequently instructed to individually build a 'personal' diagnosis of myeloproliferative neoplasms subtype just assembling the parameters collected in the database. Our results indicate that high levels of agreement (≥70%) have been reached for about all of the morphological features. Moreover, among the 18 evaluated histological features, 11 resulted statistically more useful for the differential diagnosis among the different Philadelphia chromosome-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms. Finally, we found a high percentage of agreement (76%) between the 'personal' and 'consensus' diagnosis (Cohen's kappa statistic >0.40). In conclusion, our results support the use of the histological criteria proposed by the WHO classification for the Philadelphia chromosome-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms to ensure a more precise and early diagnosis for these patients. PMID:24201120

  10. Bullying: a stepping stone to dating aggression?

    PubMed

    Josephson, Wendy L; Pepler, Debra

    2012-01-01

    Bullying is the use of power and aggression to control and distress another. In this paper, we review research to explore whether the lessons learned in bullying provide a stepping stone to aggressive behavior in dating relationships. We start by considering definitions and a relationship framework with which to understand both bullying and dating aggression. We consider bullying from a developmental-contextual perspective and consider risk factors associated with the typical developmental patterns for bullying and dating aggression, including developmental and sociodemographic, individual attributes, and family, peer group, community, and societal relationship contexts that might lead some children and youths to follow developmental pathways that lead to bullying and dating aggression. We conclude by discussing implications for intervention with a review of evidence-based interventions. PMID:22909910

  11. Molecular Subtyping of Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum in Lisbon, Portugal▿

    PubMed Central

    Castro, R.; Prieto, E.; Águas, M. J.; Manata, M. J.; Botas, J.; Martins Pereira, F.

    2009-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the reproducibility of a molecular method for the subtyping of Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum and to discriminate strains of this microorganism from strains from patients with syphilis. We studied 212 specimens from a total of 82 patients with different stages of syphilis (14 primary, 7 secondary and 61 latent syphilis). The specimens were distributed as follows: genital ulcers (n = 9), skin and mucosal lesions (n = 7), blood (n = 82), plasma (n = 82), and ear lobe scrapings (n = 32). The samples were assayed by a PCR technique to amplify a segment of the polymerase gene I (polA). Positive samples were typed on the basis of the analysis of two variable genes, tpr and arp. Sixty-two of the 90 samples positive for polA yielded typeable Treponema pallidum DNA. All skin lesions in which T. pallidum was identified (six of six [100%]) were found to contain enough DNA for typing of the organism. It was also possible to type DNA from 7/9 (77.7%) genital ulcer samples, 13/22 (59.1%) blood samples, 20/32 (62.5%) plasma samples, and 16/21 (76.2%) ear lobe scrapings. The same subtype was identified in all samples from the same patient. Five molecular subtypes (subtypes 10a, 14a, 14c, 14f, and 14g) were identified, with the most frequently found subtype being subtype 14a and the least frequently found subtype being subtype 10a. In conclusion, the subtyping technique used in this study seems to have good reproducibility. To our knowledge, subtype 10a was identified for the first time. Further studies are needed to explain the presence of this subtype in Portugal, namely, its relationship to the Treponema pallidum strains circulating in the African countries where Portuguese is spoken. PMID:19494073

  12. When do normative beliefs about aggression predict aggressive behavior? An application of I3 theory.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian-Bin; Nie, Yan-Gang; Boardley, Ian D; Dou, Kai; Situ, Qiao-Min

    2015-01-01

    I(3) theory assumes that aggressive behavior is dependent on three orthogonal processes (i.e., Instigator, Impellance, and Inhibition). Previous studies showed that Impellance (trait aggressiveness, retaliation tendencies) better predicted aggression when Instigator was strong and Inhibition was weak. In the current study, we predicted that another Impellance (i.e., normative beliefs about aggression) might predict aggression when Instigator was absent and Inhibition was high (i.e., the perfect calm proposition). In two experiments, participants first completed the normative beliefs about aggression questionnaire. Two weeks later, participants' self-control resources were manipulated either using the Stroop task (study 1, N = 148) or through an "e-crossing" task (study 2, N = 180). Afterwards, with or without being provoked, participants played a game with an ostensible partner where they had a chance to aggress against them. Study 1 found that normative beliefs about aggression negatively and significantly predicted aggressive behavior only when provocation was absent and self-control resources were not depleted. In Study 2, normative beliefs about aggression negatively predicted aggressive behavior at marginal significance level only in the "no-provocation and no-depletion" condition. In conclusion, the current study provides partial support for the perfect calm proposition and I(3) theory. PMID:26075351

  13. Not all aggressions are created equal: a multifoci approach to workplace aggression.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chu-Hsiang Daisy; Lyons, Brent J

    2012-01-01

    Types of perpetrators of workplace aggression can vary considerably, and recent research has demonstrated that aggression from different perpetrator categories has different implications for victims. We extended research on multifoci aggression and explored affective and cognitive pathways linking verbal aggression from four perpetrator types--supervisors, coworkers, customers, and significant others--and employee morale and turnover intention. Data from a sample of 446 working adults indicated that both emotional strain and employees' corresponding judgments of their social exchange relationships with these perpetrators served as the mechanisms for the association between aggression from supervisors, coworkers, and customers and morale and turnover intention. Coworker aggression had a direct association with turnover intention and significant other aggression was related to turnover intention only through emotional strain. The theoretical and practical implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:22122549

  14. The relationships among perceived peer acceptance of sexual aggression, punishment certainty, and sexually aggressive behavior.

    PubMed

    Strang, Emily; Peterson, Zoë D

    2013-12-01

    Researching the correlates of men's sexually aggressive behavior (i.e., verbal coercion and rape) is critical to both understanding and preventing sexual aggression. This study examined 120 men who completed an anonymous online questionnaire. The study aimed to determine the relative importance of two potential correlates of men's self-reported use of sexual aggression: (a) perceptions that male peers use and support sexual aggression and (b) perceptions of punishment likelihood associated with sexual aggression. Results revealed that perceptions of male friends' acceptance of sexual aggression were strongly associated with individual men's reports of using verbal coercion and rape. Perceptions of punishment likelihood were negatively correlated with verbal coercion but not with rape through intoxication and force. Implications for sexual aggression prevention are discussed. PMID:24014542

  15. The Influence of Classroom Aggression and Classroom Climate on Aggressive-Disruptive Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Duane E.; Bierman, Karen L.; Powers, CJ

    2011-01-01

    Research suggests that early classroom experiences influence the socialization of aggression. Tracking changes in the aggressive behavior of 4179 children from kindergarten to second-grade (ages 5–8) this study examined the impact of two important features of the classroom context–aggregate peer aggression and climates characterized by supportive teacher-student interactions. The aggregate aggression scores of children assigned to first-grade classrooms predicted the level of classroom aggression (assessed by teacher ratings) and quality of classroom climate (assessed by observers) that emerged by the end of grade 1. HLM analyses revealed that first-grade classroom aggression and quality of classroom climate made independent contributions to changes in student aggression, as students moved from kindergarten to second grade. Implications for policy and practice are discussed. PMID:21434887

  16. LIMT is a novel metastasis inhibiting lncRNA suppressed by EGF and downregulated in aggressive breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Sas-Chen, Aldema; Aure, Miriam R; Leibovich, Limor; Carvalho, Silvia; Enuka, Yehoshua; Körner, Cindy; Polycarpou-Schwarz, Maria; Lavi, Sara; Nevo, Nava; Kuznetsov, Yuri; Yuan, Justin; Azuaje, Francisco; Ulitsky, Igor; Diederichs, Sven; Wiemann, Stefan; Yakhini, Zohar; Kristensen, Vessela N; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Yarden, Yosef

    2016-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are emerging as regulators of gene expression in pathogenesis, including cancer. Recently, lncRNAs have been implicated in progression of specific subtypes of breast cancer. One aggressive, basal-like subtype associates with increased EGFR signaling, while another, the HER2-enriched subtype, engages a kin of EGFR Based on the premise that EGFR-regulated lncRNAs might control the aggressiveness of basal-like tumors, we identified multiple EGFR-inducible lncRNAs in basal-like normal cells and overlaid them with the transcriptomes of over 3,000 breast cancer patients. This led to the identification of 11 prognostic lncRNAs. Functional analyses of this group uncovered LINC01089 (here renamed LncRNA Inhibiting Metastasis; LIMT), a highly conserved lncRNA, which is depleted in basal-like and in HER2-positive tumors, and the low expression of which predicts poor patient prognosis. Interestingly, EGF rapidly downregulates LIMT expression by enhancing histone deacetylation at the respective promoter. We also find that LIMT inhibits extracellular matrix invasion of mammary cells in vitro and tumor metastasis in vivo In conclusion, lncRNAs dynamically regulated by growth factors might act as novel drivers of cancer progression and serve as prognostic biomarkers. PMID:27485121

  17. Psammomatous Melanotic Schwannoma: A Challenging Histological Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Merat, Rastine; Szalay-Quinodoz, Ildiko; Laffitte, Emmanuel; Kaya, Gürkan

    2015-01-01

    Psammomatous melanotic schwannoma (PMS) is a rare pigmented tumor that can be part of the Carney complex. Here, we describe the case of a 35-year-old female patient presenting an isolated subcutaneous PMS. Histopathological analysis could not formally exclude the malignant nature of the tumor. The challenging histological diagnosis and consequently the management of the patient are described. PMID:27047937

  18. Histology. Notes for Students of Animal Husbandry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Charles J.; Reed, Josephine E.

    This document approaches the subject of Histology by way of simple independent unicellular organisms through the lower levels of cell organization and specialization to a detailed study of the highly complex tissues of vertebrate animals. Emphasis is placed on structure, but function is explained in some detail. The relationships between tissues…

  19. Aggression on inpatient units: Clinical characteristics and consequences.

    PubMed

    Renwick, Laoise; Stewart, Duncan; Richardson, Michelle; Lavelle, Mary; James, Karen; Hardy, Claire; Price, Owen; Bowers, Len

    2016-08-01

    Aggression and violence are widespread in UK Mental Health Trusts, and are accompanied by negative psychological and physiological consequences for both staff and other patients. Patients who are younger, male, and have a history of substance use and psychosis diagnoses are more likely to display aggression; however, patient factors are not solely responsible for violence, and there are complex circumstances that lead to aggression. Indeed, patient-staff interactions lead to a sizeable portion of aggression and violence on inpatient units, thus they cannot be viewed without considering other forms of conflict and containment that occur before, during, and after the aggressive incident. For this reason, we examined sequences of aggressive incidents in conjunction with other conflict and containment methods used to explore whether there were particular profiles to aggressive incidents. In the present study, 522 adult psychiatric inpatients from 84 acute wards were recruited, and there were 1422 incidents of aggression (verbal, physical against objects, and physical). Cluster analysis revealed that aggressive incident sequences could be classified into four separate groups: solo aggression, aggression-rule breaking, aggression-medication, and aggression-containment. Contrary to our expectations, we did not find physical aggression dominant in the aggression-containment cluster, and while verbal aggression occurred primarily in solo aggression, physical aggression also occurred here. This indicates that the management of aggression is variable, and although some patient factors are linked with different clusters, these do not entirely explain the variation. PMID:26892149

  20. The Consensus Molecular Subtypes of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Guinney, Justin; Dienstmann, Rodrigo; Wang, Xin; de Reyniès, Aurélien; Schlicker, Andreas; Soneson, Charlotte; Marisa, Laetitia; Roepman, Paul; Nyamundanda, Gift; Angelino, Paolo; Bot, Brian M.; Morris, Jeffrey S.; Simon, Iris M.; Gerster, Sarah; Fessler, Evelyn; de Sousa e Melo, Felipe; Missiaglia, Edoardo; Ramay, Hena; Barras, David; Homicsko, Krisztian; Maru, Dipen; Manyam, Ganiraju C.; Broom, Bradley; Boige, Valerie; Perez-Villamil, Beatriz; Laderas, Ted; Salazar, Ramon; Gray, Joe W.; Hanahan, Douglas; Tabernero, Josep; Bernards, Rene; Friend, Stephen H.; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Medema, Jan Paul; Sadanandam, Anguraj; Wessels, Lodewyk; Delorenzi, Mauro; Kopetz, Scott; Vermeulen, Louis; Tejpar, Sabine

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a frequently lethal disease with heterogeneous outcomes and drug responses. To resolve inconsistencies among the reported gene expression–based CRC classifications and facilitate clinical translation, we formed an international consortium dedicated to large-scale data sharing and analytics across expert groups. We show marked interconnectivity between six independent classification systems coalescing into four consensus molecular subtypes (CMS) with distinguishing features: CMS1 (MSI Immune, 14%), hypermutated, microsatellite unstable, strong immune activation; CMS2 (Canonical, 37%), epithelial, chromosomally unstable, marked WNT and MYC signaling activation; CMS3 (Metabolic, 13%), epithelial, evident metabolic dysregulation; and CMS4 (Mesenchymal, 23%), prominent transforming growth factor β activation, stromal invasion, and angiogenesis. Samples with mixed features (13%) possibly represent a transition phenotype or intra-tumoral heterogeneity. We consider the CMS groups the most robust classification system currently available for CRC – with clear biological interpretability – and the basis for future clinical stratification and subtype–based targeted interventions. PMID:26457759

  1. New Colors for Histology: Optimized Bivariate Color Maps Increase Perceptual Contrast in Histological Images

    PubMed Central

    Kather, Jakob Nikolas; Weis, Cleo-Aron; Marx, Alexander; Schuster, Alexander K.; Schad, Lothar R.; Zöllner, Frank Gerrit

    2015-01-01

    Background Accurate evaluation of immunostained histological images is required for reproducible research in many different areas and forms the basis of many clinical decisions. The quality and efficiency of histopathological evaluation is limited by the information content of a histological image, which is primarily encoded as perceivable contrast differences between objects in the image. However, the colors of chromogen and counterstain used for histological samples are not always optimally distinguishable, even under optimal conditions. Methods and Results In this study, we present a method to extract the bivariate color map inherent in a given histological image and to retrospectively optimize this color map. We use a novel, unsupervised approach based on color deconvolution and principal component analysis to show that the commonly used blue and brown color hues in Hematoxylin—3,3’-Diaminobenzidine (DAB) images are poorly suited for human observers. We then demonstrate that it is possible to construct improved color maps according to objective criteria and that these color maps can be used to digitally re-stain histological images. Validation To validate whether this procedure improves distinguishability of objects and background in histological images, we re-stain phantom images and N = 596 large histological images of immunostained samples of human solid tumors. We show that perceptual contrast is improved by a factor of 2.56 in phantom images and up to a factor of 2.17 in sets of histological tumor images. Context Thus, we provide an objective and reliable approach to measure object distinguishability in a given histological image and to maximize visual information available to a human observer. This method could easily be incorporated in digital pathology image viewing systems to improve accuracy and efficiency in research and diagnostics. PMID:26717571

  2. Examining the Validity of Autism Spectrum Disorder Subtypes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witwer, Andrea N.; Lecavalier, Luc

    2008-01-01

    The classification of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) is a topic of debate among clinicians and researchers with many questioning the validity of the distinction among subtypes. This manuscript examines the validity of three ASD subtypes (Autism, Asperger's, and PDDNOS) by reviewing 22 studies published between 1994 and 2006. We reviewed studies…

  3. Subtypes of irritable bowel syndrome in children and adolescents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pharmacologic treatments for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and medical management of symptoms are increasingly based on IBS subtype, so it is important to accurately differentiate patients. Few studies have classified subtypes of pediatric IBS, and conclusions have been challenged by methodologic l...

  4. Identification of a Novel Luminal Molecular Subtype of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dvorkin-Gheva, Anna; Hassell, John A.

    2014-01-01

    The molecular classification of human breast tumors has afforded insights into subtype specific biological processes, patient prognosis and response to therapies. However, using current methods roughly one quarter of breast tumors cannot be classified into one or another molecular subtype. To explore the possibility that the unclassifiable samples might comprise one or more novel subtypes we employed a collection of publically available breast tumor datasets with accompanying clinical information to assemble 1,593 transcript profiles: 25% of these samples could not be assigned to one of the current molecular subtypes of breast cancer. All of the unclassifiable samples could be grouped into a new molecular subtype, which we termed “luminal-like”. We also identified the luminal-like subtype in an independent collection of tumor samples (NKI295). We found that patients harboring tumors of the luminal-like subtype have a better prognosis than those with basal-like breast cancer, a similar prognosis to those with ERBB2+, luminal B or claudin-low tumors, but a worse prognosis than patients with luminal A or normal-like breast tumors. Our findings suggest the occurrence of another molecular subtype of breast cancer that accounts for the vast majority of previously unclassifiable breast tumors. PMID:25076125

  5. Oligonucleotide microchip for subtyping of influenza A virus

    PubMed Central

    Fesenko, Eugeny E.; Kireyev, Dmitry E.; Gryadunov, Dmitry A.; Mikhailovich, Vladimir M.; Grebennikova, Tatyana V.; L’vov, Dmitry K.; Zasedatelev, Alexander S.

    2007-01-01

    Background  Influenza A viruses are classified into subtypes depending on the antigenic properties of their two outer glycoproteins, hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA). Sixteen subtypes of HA and nine of NA are known. Lately, the circulation of some subtypes (H7N7, H5N1) has been closely watched because of the epidemiological threat they present. Objectives  This study assesses the potential of using gel‐based microchip technology for fast and sensitive molecular subtyping of the influenza A virus. Methods  The method employs a microchip of 3D gel‐based elements containing immobilized probes. Segments of the HA and NA genes are amplified using multiplex RT‐PCR and then hybridized with the microchip. Results  The developed microchip was validated using a panel of 21 known reference strains of influenza virus. Selected strains represented different HA and NA subtypes derived from avian, swine and human hosts. The whole procedure takes 10 hours and enables one to identify 15 subtypes of HA and two subtypes of NA. Forty‐one clinical samples isolated during the poultry fall in Novosibirsk (Russia, 2005) were successfully identified using the proposed technique. The sensitivity and specificity of the method were 76% and 100%, respectively, compared with the ‘gold standard’ techniques (virus isolation with following characterization by immunoassay). Conclusions  We conclude that the method of subtyping using gel‐based microchips is a promising approach for fast detection and identification of influenza A, which may greatly improve its monitoring. PMID:19453417

  6. Is Rett Syndrome a Subtype of Pervasive Developmental Disorders?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsai, Luke Y.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reviews whether Rett syndrome is a subtype of pervasive developmental disorders (PDD). The paper analyzes internal and external diagnostic validity and discusses whether Rett syndrome is a neurological disorder or a mental disorder. The paper concludes that data support the idea of classifying Rett syndrome as a subtype of PDD.…

  7. Low spinophilin expression enhances aggressive biological behavior of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ress, Anna Lena; Aigelsreiter, Ariane; Schauer, Silvia; Wagner, Karin; Langsenlehner, Tanja; Resel, Margit; Gerger, Armin; Ling, Hui; Ivan, Cristina; Calin, George Adrian; Hoefler, Gerald; Rinner, Beate; Pichler, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Spinophilin, a putative tumor suppressor gene, has been shown to be involved in the pathogenesis of certain types of cancer, but its role has never been systematically explored in breast cancer. In this study, we determined for the first time the expression pattern of spinophilin in human breast cancer molecular subtypes (n = 489) and correlated it with survival (n = 921). We stably reduced spinophilin expression in breast cancer cells and measured effects on cellular growth, apoptosis, anchorage-independent growth, migration, invasion and self-renewal capacity in vitro and metastases formation in vivo. Microarray profiling was used to determine the most abundantly expressed genes in spinophilin-silenced breast cancer cells. Spinophilin expression was significantly lower in basal-like breast cancer (p<0.001) and an independent poor prognostic factor in breast cancer patients (hazard ratio = 1.93, 95% confidence interval: 1.24-3.03; p = 0.004) A reduction of spinophilin levels increased cellular growth in breast cancer cells (p<0.05), without influencing activation of apoptosis. Anchorage-independent growth, migration and self-renewal capacity in vitro and metastatic potential in vivo were also significantly increased in spinophilin-silenced cells (p<0.05). Finally, we identified several differentially expressed genes in spinophilin-silenced cells. According to our data, low levels of spinophilin are associated with aggressive behavior of breast cancer. PMID:25857299

  8. Master Regulators, Regulatory Networks, and Pathways of Glioblastoma Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Bozdag, Serdar; Li, Aiguo; Baysan, Mehmet; Fine, Howard A

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common malignant brain tumor. GBM samples are classified into subtypes based on their transcriptomic and epigenetic profiles. Despite numerous studies to better characterize GBM biology, a comprehensive study to identify GBM subtype- specific master regulators, gene regulatory networks, and pathways is missing. Here, we used FastMEDUSA to compute master regulators and gene regulatory networks for each GBM subtype. We also ran Gene Set Enrichment Analysis and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis on GBM expression dataset from The Cancer Genome Atlas Project to compute GBM- and GBM subtype-specific pathways. Our analysis was able to recover some of the known master regulators and pathways in GBM as well as some putative novel regulators and pathways, which will aide in our understanding of the unique biology of GBM subtypes. PMID:25368508

  9. Cryptosporidium Species and Subtypes and Clinical Manifestations in Children, Peru

    PubMed Central

    Cama, Vitaliano A.; Bern, Caryn; Roberts, Jacqueline; Cabrera, Lilia; Sterling, Charles R.; Ortega, Ynes; Gilman, Robert H.

    2008-01-01

    To determine whether clinical manifestations are associated with genotypes or subtypes of Cryptosporidium spp., we studied a 4-year longitudinal birth cohort of 533 children in Peru. A total of 156 infection episodes were found in 109 children. Data from first infections showed that C. hominis was associated with diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, general malaise, and increased oocyst shedding intensity and duration. In contrast, C. parvum, C. meleagridis, C. canis, and C. felis were associated with diarrhea only. C. hominis subtype families were identified (Ia, Ib, Id, and Ie); all were associated with diarrhea. Ib was also associated with nausea, vomiting, and general malaise. All C. parvum specimens belonged to subtype family IIc. Analysis of risk factors did not show associations with specific Cryptosporidium spp. genotypes or subtypes. These findings strongly suggest that Cryptosporidium spp. and subtypes are linked to different clinical manifestations in children. PMID:18826821

  10. Predicting aggression in children with ADHD

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objective The present study uses structural equation modeling of latent traits to examine the extent to which family factors, cognitive factors and perceptions of rejection in mother-child relations differentially correlate with aggression at home and at school. Methods Data were collected from 476 school-age (7–15 years old) children with a diagnosis of ADHD who had previously shown different types of aggressive behavior, as well as from their parents and teachers. Structural equation modeling was used to examine the differential relationships between maternal rejection, family, cognitive factors and aggression in home and school settings. Results Family factors influenced aggression reported at home (.68) and at school (.44); maternal rejection seems to be related to aggression at home (.21). Cognitive factors influenced aggression reported at school (.-05) and at home (-.12). Conclusions Both genetic and environmental factors contribute to the development of aggressive behavior in ADHD. Identifying key risk factors will advance the development of appropriate clinical interventions and prevention strategies and will provide information to guide the targeting of resources to those children at highest risk. PMID:24860616

  11. Affective Dependence and Aggression: An Exploratory Study

    PubMed Central

    Petruccelli, Filippo; Diotaiuti, Pierluigi; Verrastro, Valeria; Petruccelli, Irene; Federico, Roberta; Martinotti, Giovanni; Fossati, Andrea; Di Giannantonio, Massimo; Janiri, Luigi

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Emotionally dependent subjects may engage in controlling, restrictive, and aggressive behaviours, which limit their partner's autonomy. The underlying causes of such behaviours are not solely based on levels of aggression, but act as a mean of maintaining the subject's own sense of self-worth, identity, and general functioning. Objective. The aim of the paper is to explore the correlation between affective dependency and reactive/proactive aggression and to evaluate individual differences as predisposing factors for aggressive behaviour and emotional dependency. Methods. The Spouse-Specific Dependency Scale (SSDS) and the Reactive Proactive Questionnaire (RPQ) were administered to a sample of 3375 subjects. Results. In the whole sample, a positive correlation between emotional dependency and proactive aggression was identified. Differences with regard to sex, age group, and geographical distribution were evidenced for the scores of the different scales. Conclusion. A fundamental distinction between reactive and proactive aggression was observed, anchoring proactive aggression more strictly to emotional dependency. Sociocultural and demographical variables, together with the previous structuring of attachment styles, help to determine the scope, frequency, and intensity of the demands made to the partner, as well as to feed the fears of loss, abandonment, or betrayal. PMID:25054147

  12. Assessment of aggression in inpatient settings.

    PubMed

    McDermott, Barbara E; Holoyda, Brian J

    2014-10-01

    The threat of violence is a major concern for all individuals working or receiving treatment in an inpatient psychiatric setting. One major focus in forensic psychology and psychiatry over the past several decades has been the development of risk assessments to aid in the identification of those individuals most at risk of exhibiting violent behavior. So-called second- and third-generation risk assessments were developed to improve the accuracy of decision making. While these instruments were developed for use in the community, many have proven to be effective in identifying patients more likely to exhibit institutional aggression. Because the purpose of risk assessment is the reduction of violence, dynamic factors were included in third-generation risk instruments to provide opportunities for intervention and methods for measuring change. Research with these instruments indicates that both static factors (second-generation) and dynamic factors (third-generation) are important in identifying those patients most likely to engage in institutional aggression, especially when the aggression is categorized by type (impulsive/reactive, organized/predatory/instrumental, psychotic). Recent research has indicated that developing a typology of aggressive incidents may provide insight both into precipitants to assaults as well as appropriate interventions to reduce such aggression. The extant literature suggests that both static and dynamic risk factors are important, but may be differentially related to the type of aggression exhibited and the characteristics of the individuals exhibiting the aggression. PMID:25296966

  13. [Recognizing and assessing aggressive behaviour in dogs].

    PubMed

    Schalke, E; Hackbarth, H

    2006-03-01

    Within the population the sensitivity to aggressive behaviour in dogs has increased. The authorities are confronted with a problem: if any incident occurs it is their task to decide whether the dogs involved constitute a threat to other people or whether the charge is only the result of a quarrel between neighbours. For this reason, an examination of the dogs with regard to their aggressive behaviour is necessary. Seen from the biological point of view, aggressive behaviour is one of four possibilities a dog can chose from to solve a conflict. The dog's intention in showing aggressive behaviour is to eliminate disturbances and to maintain a distance in space and time. Aggressive behaviour might also be necessary to acquire or defend resources essential to the dog's life. This is to secure its survival and its success in reproduction. One can see from this that aggressive behaviour is a very important and biologically necessary adjustment factor. However, when living together with man aggressive behaviour might become a problem. For the assessment and the therapy of the problem it is necessary to exa-mine the behaviour shown by the dog with regard to its cause. To be able to do this an exact anamnesis, a medical check, and an examination of the dog on the basis of its display in special situations are necessary. For this reason, exclusively veterinarians with a special further education in the field of behaviour should carry out the examination of dogs. PMID:16669189

  14. Significant contribution of subtype G to HIV-1 genetic complexity in Nigeria identified by a newly developed subtyping assay specific for subtype G and CRF02_AG.

    PubMed

    Heipertz, Richard A; Ayemoba, Ojor; Sanders-Buell, Eric; Poltavee, Kultida; Pham, Phuc; Kijak, Gustavo H; Lei, Esther; Bose, Meera; Howell, Shana; OʼSullivan, Anne Marie; Bates, Adam; Cervenka, Taylor; Kuroiwa, Janelle; Akintunde, Akindiran; Ibezim, Onyekachukwu; Alabi, Abraham; Okoye, Obumneke; Manak, Mark; Malia, Jennifer; Peel, Sheila; Maisaka, Mohammed; Singer, Darrell; O'Connell, Robert J; Robb, Merlin L; Kim, Jerome H; Michael, Nelson L; Njoku, Ogbonnaya; Tovanabutra, Sodsai

    2016-08-01

    While abundant sequence information is available from human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) subtypes A, B, C and CRF01_AE for HIV-1 vaccine design, sequences from West Africa are less represented. We sought to augment our understanding of HIV-1 variants circulating in 6 Nigerian cities as a step to subsequent HIV-1 vaccine development.The G/CRF02_AG multi-region hybridization assay (MHA) was developed to differentiate subtype G, CRF02_AG and their recombinants from other subtypes based on 7 HIV-1 segments. Plasma from 224 HIV-1 infected volunteers enrolled in a cohort examining HIV-1 prevalence, risk factor, and subtype from Makurdi (30), Abuja (18), Enugu (11), Kaduna (12), Tafa (95), and Ojo/Lagos (58) was analyzed using MHA. HIV-1 genomes from 42 samples were sequenced to validate the MHA and fully explore the recombinant structure of G and CRF02_AG variants.The sensitivity and specificity of MHA varied between 73-100% and 90-100%, respectively. The subtype distribution as identified by MHA among 224 samples revealed 38% CRF02_AG, 28% G, and 26% G/CRF02_AG recombinants while 8% remained nontypeable strains. In envelope (env) gp120, 38.84% of the samples reacted to a G probe while 31.25% reacted to a CRF02 (subtype A) probe. Full genome characterization of 42 sequences revealed the complexity of Nigerian HIV-1 variants.CRF02_AG, subtype G, and their recombinants were the major circulating HIV-1 variants in 6 Nigerian cities. High proportions of samples reacted to a G probe in env gp120 confirms that subtype G infections are abundant and should be considered in strategies for global HIV-1 vaccine development. PMID:27512845

  15. Significant contribution of subtype G to HIV-1 genetic complexity in Nigeria identified by a newly developed subtyping assay specific for subtype G and CRF02_AG

    PubMed Central

    Heipertz, Richard A.; Ayemoba, Ojor; Sanders-Buell, Eric; Poltavee, Kultida; Pham, Phuc; Kijak, Gustavo H.; Lei, Esther; Bose, Meera; Howell, Shana; O'Sullivan, Anne Marie; Bates, Adam; Cervenka, Taylor; Kuroiwa, Janelle; Akintunde, Akindiran; Ibezim, Onyekachukwu; Alabi, Abraham; Okoye, Obumneke; Manak, Mark; Malia, Jennifer; Peel, Sheila; Maisaka, Mohammed; Singer, Darrell; O’Connell, Robert J.; Robb, Merlin L.; Kim, Jerome H.; Michael, Nelson L.; Njoku, Ogbonnaya; Tovanabutra, Sodsai

    2016-01-01

    Abstract While abundant sequence information is available from human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) subtypes A, B, C and CRF01_AE for HIV-1 vaccine design, sequences from West Africa are less represented. We sought to augment our understanding of HIV-1 variants circulating in 6 Nigerian cities as a step to subsequent HIV-1 vaccine development. The G/CRF02_AG multi-region hybridization assay (MHA) was developed to differentiate subtype G, CRF02_AG and their recombinants from other subtypes based on 7 HIV-1 segments. Plasma from 224 HIV-1 infected volunteers enrolled in a cohort examining HIV-1 prevalence, risk factor, and subtype from Makurdi (30), Abuja (18), Enugu (11), Kaduna (12), Tafa (95), and Ojo/Lagos (58) was analyzed using MHA. HIV-1 genomes from 42 samples were sequenced to validate the MHA and fully explore the recombinant structure of G and CRF02_AG variants. The sensitivity and specificity of MHA varied between 73–100% and 90–100%, respectively. The subtype distribution as identified by MHA among 224 samples revealed 38% CRF02_AG, 28% G, and 26% G/CRF02_AG recombinants while 8% remained nontypeable strains. In envelope (env) gp120, 38.84% of the samples reacted to a G probe while 31.25% reacted to a CRF02 (subtype A) probe. Full genome characterization of 42 sequences revealed the complexity of Nigerian HIV-1 variants. CRF02_AG, subtype G, and their recombinants were the major circulating HIV-1 variants in 6 Nigerian cities. High proportions of samples reacted to a G probe in env gp120 confirms that subtype G infections are abundant and should be considered in strategies for global HIV-1 vaccine development. PMID:27512845

  16. An examination of social cognitive theory with differences among sexually aggressive, physically aggressive and nonaggressive children in state care.

    PubMed

    Burton, D L

    1999-01-01

    Three groups of boys in Washington State care (37 sexually aggressive, 17 physically aggressive, and 15 nonaggressive) are compared on measures of behavior and cognition. Bandura's Social Cognition theory is offered as a possible explanation for sexual aggression by children. Two theory-based hypothesis are tested. First, are sexually aggressive children cognitively deficient when compared to the other groups? Second, do the sexually aggressive children have cognitive distortions about their behavior and about sex? Similarities were found in the aggressive and sexually aggressive groups on several measures. Physically aggressive boys were found to have some sexual behavior problems. Sexually aggressive boys were also found to be physically aggressive. Physically aggressive boys were found to have the least severe and least frequent victimization history. No support was found for the first hypothesis, while some evidence of cognitive distortions regarding both social behavior and sex was found in the sexually aggressive children. Discussion and some implications for research and practice are offered. PMID:10418769

  17. Aggressive behaviors in the psychiatric emergency service

    PubMed Central

    Chaput, Yves; Beaulieu, Lucie; Paradis, Michel; Labonté, Edith

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Studies of aggressive behaviors in a nonforensic mental health setting have focused primarily on the inpatient ward and, on event prediction, using behavior-based clinical rating scales. Few studies have specifically targeted aggressive behaviors in the psychiatric emergency service or determined whether assessing the demographic and clinical characteristics of such patients might prove useful for their more rapid identification. Methods: We used a prospectively acquired database of over 20,900 visits to four services in the province of Quebec, Canada, over a two-year period from September 2002 onwards. A maximum of 72 variables could be acquired per visit. Visits with aggression (any verbally or physically intimidating behavior), both present and past, were tagged. Binary logistic regressions and cross-tabulations were used to determine whether the profile of a variable differed in visits with aggression from those without aggression. Results: About 7% of visits were marked by current aggression (verbal 49%, physical 12%, verbal and physical 39%). Including visits with a “past only” history of aggression increased this number to 20%. Variables associated with aggression were gender (male), marital status (single/separated), education (high school or less), employment (none), judicial history (any type), substance abuse (prior or active), medication compliance (poor), type of arrival to psychiatric emergency services (involuntary, police, judiciary, landlord), reason for referral (behavioral dyscontrol), diagnosis (less frequent in anxiety disorders), and outcome (more frequently placed under observation or admitted). Conclusion: Our results suggest that many state-independent variables are associated with aggressive behaviors in the psychiatric emergency service. Although their sum may not add up to a specific patient profile, they can nevertheless be useful in service planning, being easily integrated alongside state-dependent rating scales in a

  18. Testosterone and aggressive behavior in man.

    PubMed

    Batrinos, Menelaos L

    2012-01-01

    Atavistic residues of aggressive behavior prevailing in animal life, determined by testosterone, remain attenuated in man and suppressed through familial and social inhibitions. However, it still manifests itself in various intensities and forms from; thoughts, anger, verbal aggressiveness, competition, dominance behavior, to physical violence. Testosterone plays a significant role in the arousal of these behavioral manifestations in the brain centers involved in aggression and on the development of the muscular system that enables their realization. There is evidence that testosterone levels are higher in individuals with aggressive behavior, such as prisoners who have committed violent crimes. Several field studies have also shown that testosterone levels increase during the aggressive phases of sports games. In more sensitive laboratory paradigms, it has been observed that participant's testosterone rises in the winners of; competitions, dominance trials or in confrontations with factitious opponents. Aggressive behavior arises in the brain through interplay between subcortical structures in the amygdala and the hypothalamus in which emotions are born and the prefrontal cognitive centers where emotions are perceived and controlled. The action of testosterone on the brain begins in the embryonic stage. Earlier in development at the DNA level, the number of CAG repeats in the androgen receptor gene seems to play a role in the expression of aggressive behavior. Neuroimaging techniques in adult males have shown that testosterone activates the amygdala enhancing its emotional activity and its resistance to prefrontal restraining control. This effect is opposed by the action of cortisol which facilitates prefrontal area cognitive control on impulsive tendencies aroused in the subcortical structures. The degree of impulsivity is regulated by serotonin inhibiting receptors, and with the intervention of this neurotransmitter the major agents of the neuroendocrine

  19. Testosterone and Aggressive Behavior in Man

    PubMed Central

    Batrinos, Menelaos L.

    2012-01-01

    Atavistic residues of aggressive behavior prevailing in animal life, determined by testosterone, remain attenuated in man and suppressed through familial and social inhibitions. However, it still manifests itself in various intensities and forms from; thoughts, anger, verbal aggressiveness, competition, dominance behavior, to physical violence. Testosterone plays a significant role in the arousal of these behavioral manifestations in the brain centers involved in aggression and on the development of the muscular system that enables their realization. There is evidence that testosterone levels are higher in individuals with aggressive behavior, such as prisoners who have committed violent crimes. Several field studies have also shown that testosterone levels increase during the aggressive phases of sports games. In more sensitive laboratory paradigms, it has been observed that participant’s testosterone rises in the winners of; competitions, dominance trials or in confrontations with factitious opponents. Aggressive behavior arises in the brain through interplay between subcortical structures in the amygdala and the hypothalamus in which emotions are born and the prefrontal cognitive centers where emotions are perceived and controlled. The action of testosterone on the brain begins in the embryonic stage. Earlier in development at the DNA level, the number of CAG repeats in the androgen receptor gene seems to play a role in the expression of aggressive behavior. Neuroimaging techniques in adult males have shown that testosterone activates the amygdala enhancing its emotional activity and its resistance to prefrontal restraining control. This effect is opposed by the action of cortisol which facilitates prefrontal area cognitive control on impulsive tendencies aroused in the subcortical structures. The degree of impulsivity is regulated by serotonin inhibiting receptors, and with the intervention of this neurotransmitter the major agents of the neuroendocrine

  20. A COGNITIVE PERSPECTIVE ON AGGRESSIVE MIMICRY

    PubMed Central

    JACKSON, ROBERT R.; CROSS, FIONA R.

    2013-01-01

    We use the term ‘aggressive mimic’ for predators that communicate with their prey by making signals to indirectly manipulate prey behaviour. For understanding why the aggressive mimic’s signals work, it is important to appreciate that these signals interface with the prey’s perceptual system, and that the aggressive mimic can be envisaged as playing mind games with its prey. Examples of aggressive mimicry vary from instances in which specifying a model is straight forward to instances where a concise characterisation of the model is difficult. However, the less straightforward examples of aggressive mimicry may be the more interesting examples in the context of animal cognition. In particular, there are spiders that prey on other spiders by entering their prey’s web and making signals. Web invasion brings about especially intimate contact with their prey’s perceptual system because the prey spider’s web is an important component of the prey spider’s sensory apparatus. For the web-invading spider, often there is also a large element of risk when practising aggressive mimicry because the intended prey is also a potential predator. This element of risk, combined with exceptionally intimate interfacing with prey perceptual systems, may have favoured the web-invading aggressive mimic’s strategy becoming strikingly cognitive in character. Yet a high level of flexibility may be widespread among aggressive mimics in general and, on the whole, we propose that research on aggressive mimicry holds exceptional potential for advancing our understanding of animal cognition. PMID:23976823

  1. Verbal versus Physical Aggression in Intermittent Explosive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Look, Amy E.; McCloskey, Michael S.; Coccaro, Emil F.

    2015-01-01

    Intermittent Explosive Disorder (IED) is the only adult psychiatric diagnosis for which pathological aggression is primary. DSM-IV criteria focused on physical aggression, but DSM-5 allows for an IED diagnosis in the presence of frequent verbal aggression with or without concurrent physical aggression. It remains unclear how individuals with verbal aggression differ from those with physical aggression with respect to cognitive-affective deficits and psychosocial functioning. The current study compared individuals who met IED criteria with either frequent verbal aggression without physical aggression (IED-V), physical aggression without frequent verbal aggression (IED-P), or both frequent verbal aggression and physical aggression (IED-B) as well as a non-aggressive personality-disordered (PD) comparison group using behavioral and self-report measures of aggression, anger, impulsivity, and affective lability, and psychosocial impairment. Results indicate all IED groups showed increased anger/aggression, psychosocial impairment, and affective lability relative to the PD group. The IED-B group showed greater trait anger, anger dyscontrol, and aggression compared to the IED-V and IED-P groups. Overall, the IED-V and IED-P groups reported comparable deficits and impairment. These results support the inclusion of verbal aggression within the IED criteria and suggest a more severe profile for individuals who engage in both frequent verbal arguments and repeated physical aggression. PMID:25534757

  2. Subtypes of Irritable Bowel Syndrome in Children and Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Self, Mariella M.; Czyzewski, Danita I.; Chumpitazi, Bruno P.; Weidler, Erica M.; Shulman, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Background & Aims Pharmacologic treatments for IBS and medical management of symptoms are increasingly based on IBS subtype, so it is important to accurately differentiate patients. Few studies have classified subtypes of pediatric IBS, and conclusions have been challenged by methodologic limitations. We performed a prospective study to investigate the distribution of IBS subtypes among children and adolescents based on stool diary information, and compared subtypes according to demographic and pain characteristics. Methods We studied 129 subjects, 7–18 y old (mean 11.4 ± 2.8 y old, 60.5% female, 69.0% Caucasian) who met Pediatric Rome III IBS criteria and were part of larger studies of children with functional gastrointestinal disorders, recruited from primary and tertiary care centers. Children completed daily pain and stool diaries for 2 weeks. Participants were assigned IBS subtypes based on their reported stool information, per adult Rome III criteria. IBS subtypes were compared for demographic variables and pain characteristics. Results IBS with constipation (IBC-C) was the most common subtype of the disorder (58.1% of subjects), whereas mixed IBS (IBS-M) was the least common (2.3% of subjects); 34.1% of subjects were unsubtyped (IBS-U) and 5.4% had IBS with diarrhea (IBS-D). The groups of different IBS subtypes did not differ significantly by sex, age, ethnicity, or pain characteristics. Conclusions In contrast to adults, IBS-C and IBS-U are the most common subtypes of IBS in children, whereas IBS-D and IBS-M are less common. Demographic and pain characteristics cannot distinguish subtypes. PMID:24486406

  3. Adolescent Aggression: The Role of Peer Group Status Motives, Peer Aggression, and Group Characteristics.

    PubMed

    Faris, Robert; Ennett, Susan

    2012-10-01

    Recent studies of youth aggression have emphasized the role of network-based peer influence processes. Other scholars have suggested that aggression is often motivated by status concerns. We integrate these two veins of research by considering the effects of peer status motivations on subsequent adolescent aggression, net of their own status motivations, prior aggression, and peer behavior. We also explore different levels at which peer effects may occur, considering the effects of reciprocated and unreciprocated friendships as well as larger, meso-level peer groups. We anticipate that peer group effects are magnified by both size and boundedness as measured by Freeman's (1972) Segregation Index. We find that, net of the adolescent's aggression at time 1, both the aggressive behaviors and the status valuations of friends independently increase the likelihood of aggression at time 2, six months later. The aggressive behavior of friends who do not reciprocate the adolescent's friendship nomination has particular impact. The average status valuation of peer groups increases their members' likelihood of aggression, even after controlling for their own attitudes about status, their friends' attitudes, and their friends' aggressive behavior. This effect is magnified in large groups and groups with high Freeman segregation scores. PMID:25152562

  4. Understanding the personality disorder and aggression relationship: an investigation using contemporary aggression theory.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Flora; Daffern, Michael; Talevski, Diana; Ogloff, James R P

    2015-02-01

    Research has consistently demonstrated a link between certain personality disorders (PDs) and increased rates of aggression and violence. At present, understanding of the mechanisms that underlie this relationship is limited. This study was designed to examine the contention (Gilbert & Daffern, 2011) that the application of a contemporary psychological aggression theory, the General Aggression Model (GAM; Anderson & Bushman, 2002), may assist in elucidating the PD-aggression relationship. Eighty-seven offenders undergoing presentence evaluation were assessed for Axis II PDs and psychopathy, aggression, and three constructs delineated by the GAM: scripts, normative beliefs, and anger. Regression analyses were undertaken to examine the relative contributions of these variables to aggression. The results upheld a relationship between several PDs and aggression, and suggested that for these PDs, the consideration of scripts, beliefs supportive of aggression, and anger facilitated an improved understanding of aggressiveness. Overall, the findings indicate that the GAM offers valuable insight into the psychological features that characterize individuals with PD who are prone to aggression. PMID:23398093

  5. Mild hypoglycaemia and questionnaire measures of aggression.

    PubMed

    Benton, D; Kumari, N; Brain, P F

    1982-01-01

    A glucose-tolerance test was given to a group of males who did not have a history involving aggressive behaviour or abnormal glucose metabolism. In these subjects a significant correlation was found between the tendency to become mildly hypoglycaemic and scores on the Buss-Durkee Hostility Inventory and the Rosenzweig Picture Frustration Study. A factor analysis of the data found that both scores on the aggression questionnaires and the measure of hypoglycaemia were similarly weighted. These results extent to normal subjects the finding that there is a relationship between hypoglycaemia and aggressiveness, a result previously found in psychiatric patients. PMID:7104424

  6. [Aggressive behavior: theoretical and biological aspects].

    PubMed

    Giotakos, O

    2013-01-01

    The susceptibility to aggression may manifest differently depending on the psychological context in which it occurs. In the context of psychopathy, characterized by a lack of empathy, this may manifest in aggression with criminal acts, which is characteristic of antisocial personality disorder. When the susceptibility is associated with psychotic impairment, aggression may be manifested in highly deviant behavior, like murder or serial killing. While the great majority of persons with schizophrenia do not commit violent acts, clinicians suggest that some schizophrenics may pose a risk in the community, particularly those patients with co-occurring substance abuse diagnoses, those who are noncompliant with prescribed psychiatric treatment, and those with a history of frequent relapses resulting in hospitalization or arrest. Episodic violence and aggression often accompany dementia. When coupled with emotional dysregulation, impulsive aggression often occurs in an interpersonal context, as in borderline personality disorder. However, the most common comorbidity is the substance abuse disorder, which contributes to both the cognitive distortions and disinhibition associated with the substance use. According to the biological data, aggression seems to emerge when the drive of limbic-mediated affective prefrontal response to provocative producing stimuli is insufficiently constrained by inhibition. Thus, excessive reactivity in the amygdale, coupled with inadequate prefrontal regulation, increase the possibility of aggressive behavior. The PET/SPECT studies focusing on schizophrenia have shown reduced activity in fronto-temoral circuitry. The fMRI studies concord with the hypothesis that among violent persons with schizophrenia, those with sociopathetic features and/or substance abuse constitute a highly different subgroup, in which cognitive, neurological and behavioral patterns are more closely associated with the personality traits than schizophrenia. It is known

  7. Analysis of angiogenic factors and cyclooxygenase-2 expression in cartilaginous tumors – clinical and histological correlation

    PubMed Central

    Cintra, Francisco Fontes; Etchebehere, Mauricio; Gonçalves, José Carlos Barbi; Cassone, Alejandro Enzo; Amstalden, Eliane Maria Ingrid

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To study the role of angiogenesis and cyclooxygenase-2 expression in cartilaginous tumors and correlate these factors with prognosis. INTRODUCTION: For chondrosarcoma, the histological grade is the current standard for predicting tumor outcome. However, a low-grade chondrosarcoma can follow an aggressive course—as monitored by sequential imaging techniques—even when it is histologically indistinguishable from an enchondroma. Therefore, additional tools are needed to help identify the biological potential of these tumors. The degree of angiogenesis that is induced by the tumor could assist in this task. Angiogenesis can be quantified by measuring the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor and CD34, and cyclooxygenase-2 can induce angiogenesis by stimulating the production of pro-angiogenic factors. METHODS: In total, 21 enchondromas and 58 conventional chondrosarcomas were studied by examining the clinical and histopathological findings in conjunction with the immunostaining markers of angiogenesis and cyclooxygenase-2 expression. RESULTS: The significant variables that were associated with poor outcome were 1) higher-grade chondrosarcomas, 2) tumors that developed in flat bones, and 3) over-expression of CD34 (with a median count that was higher than 5.9 vessels in 5 high power fields). Moreover, CD34 expression (measured using the Chalkley method) revealed significantly higher microvessel density in flat bone chondrosarcomas. DISCUSSION: Previous studies have shown a positive correlation between Chalkley microvessel density and histological grade; however, in our sample, we found that the former is predictive of the outcome. Chondrosarcomas in flat bones have been shown to correlate with a poor prognosis. We also found that CD34 microvessel density values were significantly higher in flat-bone chondrosarcomas. This could explain—at least in part—the more aggressive biological course that is taken by these tumors. CONCLUSIONS: These

  8. The rare aggressive osteoblastoma in a two year old child in an unusual localization

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Debdutta; Mukhopadhyay, Kiran Kumar; Kumar, Sanjay; Chakraborty, Sudipta

    2013-01-01

    A rare bone tumor of 3rd metacarpal bone in a male child aged 2 years is being described. The patent presented with a gradually increasing, painful swelling over the dorsum of right hand which radiologically revealed an expansile, radioluscent mass, in 3rd metacarpal shaft with cortical destruction. The clinic-radiological differential diagnosis was aggressive cartilage tumor or an osteomyelitis. Histological examination of surgical biopsy material revealed randomly arranged woven bone lined by epithelioid osteoblast and after correlating the clinic-radiological features the diagnosis was an aggressive osteoblastoma. Appropriate diagnosis of such a rare tumor in an unusual location and age group facilitate adequate management by surgery alone without radiotherapy or chemotherapy. PMID:26909276

  9. A Large Multifocal Aggressive Osteoblastoma of Mandible: an Immunohistochemistry Case Study Report

    PubMed Central

    D.P., Vinuth; Agarwal, Poonam; Gadewar, Dilip; Dube, Gunjan; Dhirawni, Rajesh

    2014-01-01

    Aggressive osteoblastoma (AO) is a benign osteoblastic tumor which is rare in the head and neck region. Clinical and histo-logical features are therefore overlap with other benign and low-grade malignant tumors. The aim of this article is to report and discuss the differential diagnosis of an aggressive osteoblastoma in the mandible. A 25-year-old male patient reported with pain and asymmetry on the left side of the face since 8 months previously. Radiographic evaluation showed a mixed lesion extending from approximately the lower left premolar to the third molar region. After incisional biopsy, resection with continuity defect was carried out. Microscopic findings showed woven bone and bony trabeculae with varied degrees of mineralization along with sheets of osteoblast cells. Immunohistochemistry showed that p53 and cytokeratin (CK) were negative and ki-67 index was 7%. Postoperative follow-up for 15 months showed no evidence of recurrence. PMID:25024840

  10. Alcohol Expectancies and Evaluations of Aggression in Alcohol-Related Intimate-Partner Verbal and Physical Aggression

    PubMed Central

    Kachadourian, Lorig K; Quigley, Brian M; Leonard, Kenneth E

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Alcohol aggression expectancies have been found to be associated with increases in aggressive behavior. However, research has not consistently examined evaluations of such behavior. This is unfortunate as both expectancies and evaluations may play a role in whether such behavior will occur. Given this, the current study cross-sectionally examined the associations between alcohol aggression expectancies, evaluations of alcohol-related aggression, indicators of excessive drinking, and alcohol-related verbal and physical aggression. Method: The sample consisted of 280 married and cohabiting couples. These couples reported on excessive drinking indicators, alcohol expectancies and evaluations, and alcohol-related verbal and physical aggression during the past year. Results: Findings showed that verbal aggression was positively associated with indicators of excessive drinking among females and with alcohol aggression expectancies for females who evaluated such aggression positively. For males, aggression expectancies and indicators of excessive drinking were positively associated with verbal aggression. For physical aggression, results showed that indicators of excessive drinking and aggression expectancies were associated with physical aggression for females. For males, aggression expectancies were positively associated and evaluations were negatively associated with physical aggression. Conclusions: These findings add to previous research on alcohol aggression expectancies in close relationships and emphasize the importance of considering evaluations of alcohol-related behavior and how they may play a role in intimate-partner violence and aggression. PMID:25208191

  11. Histologic changes in previously irradiated thyroid glands

    SciTech Connect

    Valdiserri, R.O.; Borochovitz, D.

    1980-03-01

    Thyroid tissue from 90 patients with a history of therapeutic irradiation to the head and neck in childhood and adolescence was examined microscopically. In addition to the well-known observation that these individuals have an increased incidence of primary thyroid carcinoma, it was also demonstrated that they have an increased incidence of benign histologic changes. These changes represent a spectrum from nonspecific hyperplastic lesions to benign neoplasis and thyroidltis.

  12. The etiological moderation of aggressive and nonaggressive antisocial behavior by age.

    PubMed

    Burt, S Alexandra; Klump, Kelly L

    2009-08-01

    A recent study has suggested that aggressive (AGG) and non-aggressive, rule-breaking (RB) antisocial behavior evidence differential and subtype-specific patterns of genetic expression during development. Namely, although genetic influences on RB increase dramatically during early- to mid-adolescence, genetic influences on AGG appear to remain stable. As no other study has examined age-related change in AGG versus RB, more research is clearly needed before any firm conclusions can be drawn. The current study thus examined whether and how age impacted genetic and environmental influences on AGG and RB in a sample of 252 10- to 15-year-old twin pairs assessed as part of the Michigan State University Twin Registry (MSUTR). Results constructively replicated and extended prior findings, indicating that while the magnitude of genetic and environmental influences on AGG remained stable across adolescence, genetic influences on RB increased dramatically with age. Such findings provide additional support for etiological distinctions within the broader construct of antisocial behavior based on the presence or absence of aggression, and offer insights into the expression of genetic influences during development. PMID:19653834

  13. Effects of deindividuating situational cues and aggressive models on subjective deindividuation and aggression.

    PubMed

    Prentice-Dunn, S; Rogers, R W

    1980-07-01

    This experiment demonstrated that a subjective state of deindividuation mediates the effect of deindividuating situational cues on aggression displayed by small groups (n = 4) of coacting aggressors. The deindividuated state was composed of two factors, Self-Awareness and Altered Experiencing, both of which had a causal influence on aggressive behavior. These data are interpreted in terms of deindividuation theories which assume that certain input variables reduce self-awareness and concern about social evaluation and thereby weaken the restraints against expressing antisocial behavior. Also as predicted, compared with a no-model control condition, a high-aggressive model disinhibited overt displays of aggression, whereas a low-aggressive model inhibited aggression among both individuated and deindividuated group members. PMID:7411390

  14. Breast Cancers Between Mammograms Have Aggressive Features

    Cancer.gov

    Breast cancers that are discovered in the period between regular screening mammograms—known as interval cancers—are more likely to have features associated with aggressive behavior and a poor prognosis than cancers found via screening mammograms.

  15. Research: Television Violence and Aggressive Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wurtzel, Alan

    1977-01-01

    Summarizes the major research findings on the relationship between television violence and aggressive behavior; concludes that, while there is no definitive proof that such a relationship exists, the evidence points strongly in that direction. (GT)

  16. Human Aggression Linked to Chemical Balance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science News, 1978

    1978-01-01

    Recent studies done by federal researchers indicate that human aggression may be affected by a critical balance of two or three key brain chemical neurotransmitters. Results of this study with human beings are included in this article. (MA)

  17. Porcine deltacoronavirus: histological lesions and genetic characterization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Leyi; Hayes, Jeff; Sarver, Craig; Byrum, Beverly; Zhang, Yan

    2016-01-01

    First identified in 2012 in a surveillance study in Hong Kong, porcine deltacoronavirus (PDCoV) is a proposed member of the genus Deltacoronavirus of the family Coronaviridae. In February of 2014, PDCoV was detected in pigs with clinical diarrheal symptoms for the first time in the USA. Since then, it has been detected in more than 20 states in the USA and in other countries, including Canada, South Korea, and mainland China. So far, histological lesions in the intestines of pigs naturally infected with PDCoV under field conditions have not been reported. In this report, we describe the characteristic histological lesions in the small intestine that were associated with PDCoV infection, as evidenced by detection of viral nucleic acid by RT-PCR. In addition, we performed genomic analysis to determine the genetic relationship of all PDCoV strains from the four countries. We found that PDCoV mainly caused histological lesions in the small intestines of naturally infected piglets. Sequence analysis demonstrated that the PDCoV strains of different countries are closely related and shared high nucleotide sequence similarity; however, deletion patterns in the spike and 3' untranslated regions are different among the strains from mainland China, Hong Kong, the USA, and South Korea. Our study highlights the fact that continual surveillance is needed to trace the evolution of this virus. PMID:26475155

  18. The histological nature of epulides in dogs.

    PubMed

    Verstraete, F J; Ligthelm, A J; Weber, A

    1992-02-01

    The histological characteristics of a series of 154 oral tumours with the clinical appearance of epulides in 129 dogs were reviewed. Diagnoses were based on current criteria in human oral pathology and compared with the original diagnoses. The histological findings suggested that the majority of epulides in the dog can be classified as focal fibrous hyperplasia (43.5 per cent), peripheral ameloblastoma (17.5 per cent), peripheral odontogenic fibroma (WHO type) (16.9 per cent) and pyogenic granuloma (1.95 per cent). In addition, a number of other odontogenic tumours (1.95 per cent) and non-odontogenic tumours (18.2 per cent) such as fibrosarcoma and squamous cell carcinoma, which are not traditionally associated with the clinical appearance of an epulis, were diagnosed. Of 74 lesions that were previously diagnosed as fibromatous and ossifying epulides, 50 (68 per cent) were reclassified as focal fibrous hyperplasia and 21 (28 per cent) as peripheral odontogenic fibroma (WHO type). The majority of lesions (76 per cent), which were originally classified as acanthomatous epulis, were found to be peripheral ameloblastoma. In addition, three squamous cell carcinomas, two rare odontogenic tumours and two cases of focal fibrous hyperplasia were diagnosed in this classification. It was concluded that, as in man, the term epulis is a clinically descriptive term and that the renal nature of these lesions should be determined histologically. PMID:1597534

  19. Histological changes of kidney in diabetic nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Pourghasem, Mohsen; Shafi, Hamid; Babazadeh, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is the most common cause of chronic renal disorders and end-stage kidney disease in developed countries. It is the major cause of dialysis and transplantation. Failure in renal function causes wide disorders in the body. Diabetes results in wide range of alterations in the renal tissue. It is believed that early histological changes in diabetic nephropathy are detectable 2 years after diabetes is diagnosed. The glomerular alterations are the most important lesions in the diabetic nephropathy (DN). The Renal Pathology Society provides a new pathological classification for the detection of histopathology of DN. It divides diabetic nephropathy into four hierarchical glomerular lesions. Alloxan or streptozotocin induced diabetic rat is the one most widely used specie to study DN. Histological changes in the rat DN closely resemble the human disease and the most information of this review was obtained through the study of rat DN. All cell types of the kidney such as mesangial cells, podocytes and tubulointerstitial cells are liable to be affected in the event of DN. Severity of renal lesions is associated to the clinical aspect of renal outcome, but the aim of this article was only to review the histological changes of kidney in diabetes mellitus. PMID:26644877

  20. Defective hCNT1 Transport Contributes to Gemcitabine Chemoresistance in Ovarian Cancer Subtypes: Overcoming Transport Defects Using a Nanoparticle Approach

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Sau Wai; Marrache, Sean; Cummins, Shannon; Bhutia, Yangzom D.; Mody, Hardik; Hooks, Shelley B.; Dhar, Shanta; Govindarajan, Rajgopal

    2015-01-01

    Nucleoside analogs are used as chemotherapeutic options for the treatment of platinum-resistant ovarian cancers. Human concentrative nucleoside transporter 1 (hCNT1) is implicated in sensitizing solid tumors to nucleoside analogs although its role in determining drug efficacy in ovarian cancers remains unclear. Here we examined the functional expression of hCNT1 and compared its contributions towards gemcitabine efficacy in histological subtypes of ovarian cancer. Radioactivity analysis identified hCNT1-mediated 3H-gemcitabine transport in ovarian cancer cells to be significantly reduced compared with that of normal ovarian surface epithelial cells. Biochemical and immunocytochemical analysis identified that unlike normal ovarian cells which expressed high levels of hCNT1 at the apical cell surface, the transporter was either diminished in expression and/or mislocalized in cell lines of various subtypes of ovarian cancer. Retroviral expression of hCNT1 selectively rescued gemcitabine transport in cell lines representing serous, teratocarcinoma, and endometrioid subtypes, but not clear cell carcinoma (CCC). In addition, exogenous hCNT1 predominantly accumulated in intracytoplasmic vesicles in CCC suggesting defective cellular trafficking of hCNT1 as a contributing factor to transport deficiency. Despite diminution of hCNT1 transport in the majority of ovarian cancers and apparent trafficking defects with CCC, the chemotherapeutic efficacy of gemcitabine was broadly enhanced in all subtypes when delivered via engineered nanoparticles (NPs). Additionally, by bypassing the transport requirement, the delivery of a gemcitabine-cisplatin combination in NP formulation increased their synergistic interactions. These findings uncover hCNT1 as a putative determinant for nucleoside analog chemoresistance in ovarian cancer and may help rationalize drug selection and delivery strategies for various histological subtypes of ovarian cancer. PMID:25600708