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Sample records for aggressive malignant brain

  1. Mapping Brain Development and Aggression

    PubMed Central

    Paus, Tomás

    2005-01-01

    Introduction This article provides an overview of the basic principles guiding research on brain-behaviour relationships in general, and as applied to studies of aggression during human development in particular. Method Key literature on magnetic resonance imaging of the structure and function of a developing brain was reviewed. Results The article begins with a brief introduction to the methodology of techniques used to map the developing brain, with a special emphasis on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). It then reviews briefly the current knowledge of structural maturation, assessed by MRI, of the human brain during childhood and adolescence. The last part describes some of the results of neuroimaging studies aimed at identifying neural circuits involved in various aspects of aggression and social cognition. Conclusion The article concludes by discussing the potential and limitations of the neuroimaging approach in this field. PMID:19030495

  2. Malignant transformation of aggressive osteoblastoma to ostesarcoma.

    PubMed

    Görgün, Ömer; Salduz, Ahmet; Kebudi, Rejin; Özger, Harzem; Bilgiç, Bilge

    2016-08-01

    Osteoblastoma is a rare, bone-forming tumor, characterized by osteoid and woven bone production. A 13-year-old boy patient presented to our clinic with complaint of pain in his left proximal tibia. We performed curettage and bone grafting for the lesion diagnosed as osteoblastoma. Two years later, the patient admitted to the hospital with a mass in the same region which was diagnosed by biopsy to be osteosarcoma. Patient was performed reconstruction operation with local resection and mega prosthesis. Fourteen months after termination of chemotherapy, lung metastasis developed and the patient died consequently. In this article, we reported a patient with aggressive osteoblastoma of the left proximal tibia which recurred as an osteosarcoma and discussed the difficulties in the histopathological diagnosis and management of these patients. As some other cases in the literature, our case indicates that osteoblastomas may undergo malignant transformation. PMID:27499324

  3. Non-Hodgkin's Malignant Lymphoma with Aggressive Development

    PubMed Central

    DANCIU, Cezara Elisabeta; HEROIU (CATALOIU), Adriana-Daniela; POPESCU, Cristian Radu

    2014-01-01

    Non-Hodgkin's malignant lymphoma is a hematologic malignant disease which usually responds to the polychemotherapy. We present a clinical case report of a 50 years old patient who develops an aggressive type of lymphoma. Patient develops a nodal Non-Hodgkin's malignant lymphoma who present at hospital admission as a huge tumor at the right side of the neck. Any type of treatment was a failure, the patient having a particularly aggressive form of lymphoma, resistant to all three chemotherapy regimens tested. Death occurs quickly, about one year after diagnosis and initiation of therapy. PMID:25553129

  4. Aggression after Traumatic Brain Injury: Prevalence & Correlates

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Vani; Rosenberg, Paul; Bertrand, Melaine; Salehinia, Saeed; Spiro, Jennifer; Vaishnavi, Sandeep; Rastogi, Pramit; Noll, Kathy; Schretlen, David J; Brandt, Jason; Cornwell, Edward; Makley, Michael; Miles, Quincy Samus

    2010-01-01

    Aggression after traumatic brain injury (TBI) is common but not well defined. Sixty-seven participants with first-time TBI were seen within three months of injury and evaluated for aggression. The prevalence of aggression was found to be 28.4% and to be predominantly verbal aggression. Post-TBI aggression was associated with new-onset major depression (p=0.02), poorer social functioning (p=0.04), and increased dependency on activities of daily living (p=0.03), but not with a history of substance abuse or adult/childhood behavioral problems. Implications of the study include early screening for aggression, evaluation for depression, and consideration of psychosocial support in aggressive patients. PMID:19996251

  5. MIB-1 labeling indices in benign, aggressive, and malignant meningiomas: a study of 90 tumors.

    PubMed

    Abramovich, C M; Prayson, R A

    1998-12-01

    Predicting tumor behavior in meningiomas based on histology alone has been problematic. This study retrospectively compares histology and MIB-1 (cell proliferation marker) labeling indices (LI) in benign, aggressive, and malignant meningiomas. Six histological features, including mitoses, necrosis, loss of pattern, hypervascularity/hemosiderin deposition, prominent nucleoli, and nuclear pleomorphism, were compared in 90 meningiomas (Fisher's exact test). Tumors with two or more of the above features were designated as aggressive meningiomas. Malignant meningiomas were characterized by brain invasion or metastasis. The MIB-1 LIs (% positive tumor cell nuclei) were compared between the three groups (Kruskal-Wallis test, Wilcoxon two-sample test). Of the benign meningiomas (n=37; mean age, 54 years), 41% had one of the six histological features, with nuclear pleomorphism (n=10) being the most frequent. The aggressive tumors (n=29; mean age, 61 years) were characterized by nuclear pleomorphism (n=28), mitoses (n=20), necrosis (n=16), loss of pattern (n=16), prominent nucleoli (n=6), and hypervascularity/hemosiderin deposition (n=5). Malignant tumors (n=24; mean age, 59 years) were characterized by nuclear pleomorphism (n=22), mitoses (n=21), loss of pattern (n=21), necrosis (n=21), nucleoli (n=17), and hypervascularity/hemosiderin deposition (n=3). Significant differences were found between the aggressive and malignant groups with regard to loss of pattern, necrosis, and nucleoli (P=.0043, .011, and .00029, respectively). Mean MIB-1 LIs for the benign, aggressive, and malignant groups were 1.0% (range, 0 to 5.5%),5.5% (range, 0.1 to 32.5%), and 12.0% (range, 0.3 to 32.5%), respectively. Differences in the mean MIB-1 LI between groups were statistically significant, with P values of <.0001 (benign v aggressive) and .0012 (aggressive v malignant). Mean MIB-1 LIs for recurrent versus nonrecurrent tumors were 7.1% (range, 0 to 32.5%) versus 3.8% (range, 0 to 20.9%) (P=.32

  6. Radiosensitized treatment of malignant brain tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloznelyte-Plesniene, Laima

    2003-12-01

    Around 12,000 deaths from glioblastoma occurs within the European Community annually. At present, the best available treatment for malignant brain tumors results in a median survival of patients of 15 months despite surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy. The purpose of this paper is to review our results of radiosensitized treatment of malignant brain tumors.

  7. Researchers Find 8 Immune Genes in Aggressive Brain Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... 159031.html Researchers Find 8 Immune Genes in Aggressive Brain Cancer Discovery might eventually lead to better ... tissue samples from 170 people with a less aggressive type of brain tumor. This led to the ...

  8. Extensive Surgery Best for an Aggressive Brain Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... 159415.html Extensive Surgery Best for an Aggressive Brain Cancer: Study Although larger procedure carries more risk, ... comes to battling a particularly aggressive form of brain tumor, more extensive surgeries may be best to ...

  9. Extensive Surgery Best for an Aggressive Brain Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_159415.html Extensive Surgery Best for an Aggressive Brain Cancer: Study Although larger procedure carries more ... News) -- When it comes to battling a particularly aggressive form of brain tumor, more extensive surgeries may ...

  10. More Complete Removal of Malignant Brain Tumors by Fluorescence-Guided Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-13

    Benign Neoplasms, Brain; Brain Cancer; Brain Neoplasms, Benign; Brain Neoplasms, Malignant; Brain Tumor, Primary; Brain Tumor, Recurrent; Brain Tumors; Intracranial Neoplasms; Neoplasms, Brain; Neoplasms, Intracranial; Primary Brain Neoplasms; Primary Malignant Brain Neoplasms; Primary Malignant Brain Tumors; Gliomas; Glioblastoma

  11. Reducing proactive aggression through non-invasive brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Dambacher, Franziska; Schuhmann, Teresa; Lobbestael, Jill; Arntz, Arnoud; Brugman, Suzanne; Sack, Alexander T

    2015-10-01

    Aggressive behavior poses a threat to human collaboration and social safety. It is of utmost importance to identify the functional mechanisms underlying aggression and to develop potential interventions capable of reducing dysfunctional aggressive behavior already at a brain level. We here experimentally shifted fronto-cortical asymmetry to manipulate the underlying motivational emotional states in both male and female participants while assessing the behavioral effects on proactive and reactive aggression. Thirty-two healthy volunteers received either anodal transcranial direct current stimulation to increase neural activity within right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, or sham stimulation. Aggressive behavior was measured with the Taylor Aggression Paradigm. We revealed a general gender effect, showing that men displayed more behavioral aggression than women. After the induction of right fronto-hemispheric dominance, proactive aggression was reduced in men. This study demonstrates that non-invasive brain stimulation can reduce aggression in men. This is a relevant and promising step to better understand how cortical brain states connect to impulsive actions and to examine the causal role of the prefrontal cortex in aggression. Ultimately, such findings could help to examine whether the brain can be a direct target for potential supportive interventions in clinical settings dealing with overly aggressive patients and/or violent offenders. PMID:25680991

  12. [Malignant Lymphoma of the Brain, and Dementia].

    PubMed

    Mizutani, Saneyuki; Mizutani, Tomohiko

    2016-04-01

    A differential diagnosis of acute and subacute progressive dementias includes malignant lymphoma of the brain. We reviewed primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL), intravascular lymphomatosis (IVL), lymphomatosis cerebri, and the relapse and invasion of systemic lymphomas. PCNSL is confined to the central nervous system; the infiltration and compression by the lymphoma result in adverse neurological symptoms. IVL is a rare form of malignant lymphoma that is characterized by the proliferation of primarily B-cell type lymphoma cells within the blood vessels of various organs. This causes ischemia and results in the associated neurological symptoms. Medical history and neuroimaging studies provide crucial informations to distinguish the lymphomas from other diseases that cause dementia, such an Alzheimer's disease. MRI imaging of the brain using contrast agent, and the biopsy of diseased tissues are essential for the diagnosis of the lymphomas. A histopathological examination is the most effective way to diagnose malignant lymphomas of the brain. Presently, the treatment of choice for PCNSL is the intravenous administration of high dose methotrexate with and without radiation therapy. Futhermore, Rituximab-containing chemotherapy has proved to greatly improve the prognosis of IVL. A better outcome can be achieved with the earlier diagnosis and treatment of the malignant lymphoma of the brain. PMID:27056856

  13. Malignant metastatic carcinoid presenting as brain tumor

    PubMed Central

    Sundar, I. Vijay; Jain, S. K.; Kurmi, Dhrubajyoti; Sharma, Rakesh; Chopra, Sanjeev; Singhvi, Shashi

    2016-01-01

    Carcinoid tumors are rarely known to metastasise to the brain. It is even more rare for such patients to present with symptoms related to metastases as the initial and only symptom. We present a case of a 60-year-old man who presented with hemiparesis and imaging features suggestive of brain tumor. He underwent surgery and the histopathology revealed metastatic malignant lesion of neuroendocrine origin. A subsequent work up for the primary was negative. Patient was treated with adjuvant radiotherapy. We present this case to highlight the pathophysiological features, workup and treatment options of this rare disease and discuss the methods of differentiating it from more common brain tumors. PMID:27366273

  14. Malignant metastatic carcinoid presenting as brain tumor.

    PubMed

    Sundar, I Vijay; Jain, S K; Kurmi, Dhrubajyoti; Sharma, Rakesh; Chopra, Sanjeev; Singhvi, Shashi

    2016-01-01

    Carcinoid tumors are rarely known to metastasise to the brain. It is even more rare for such patients to present with symptoms related to metastases as the initial and only symptom. We present a case of a 60-year-old man who presented with hemiparesis and imaging features suggestive of brain tumor. He underwent surgery and the histopathology revealed metastatic malignant lesion of neuroendocrine origin. A subsequent work up for the primary was negative. Patient was treated with adjuvant radiotherapy. We present this case to highlight the pathophysiological features, workup and treatment options of this rare disease and discuss the methods of differentiating it from more common brain tumors. PMID:27366273

  15. Socially responsive effects of brain oxidative metabolism on aggression

    PubMed Central

    Li-Byarlay, Hongmei; Rittschof, Clare C.; Massey, Jonathan H.; Pittendrigh, Barry R.; Robinson, Gene E.

    2014-01-01

    Despite ongoing high energetic demands, brains do not always use glucose and oxygen in a ratio that produces maximal ATP through oxidative phosphorylation. In some cases glucose consumption exceeds oxygen use despite adequate oxygen availability, a phenomenon known as aerobic glycolysis. Although metabolic plasticity seems essential for normal cognition, studying its functional significance has been challenging because few experimental systems link brain metabolic patterns to distinct behavioral states. Our recent transcriptomic analysis established a correlation between aggression and decreased whole-brain oxidative phosphorylation activity in the honey bee (Apis mellifera), suggesting that brain metabolic plasticity may modulate this naturally occurring behavior. Here we demonstrate that the relationship between brain metabolism and aggression is causal, conserved over evolutionary time, cell type-specific, and modulated by the social environment. Pharmacologically treating honey bees to inhibit complexes I or V in the oxidative phosphorylation pathway resulted in increased aggression. In addition, transgenic RNAi lines and genetic manipulation to knock down gene expression in complex I in fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster) neurons resulted in increased aggression, but knockdown in glia had no effect. Finally, honey bee colony-level social manipulations that decrease individual aggression attenuated the effects of oxidative phosphorylation inhibition on aggression, demonstrating a specific effect of the social environment on brain function. Because decreased neuronal oxidative phosphorylation is usually associated with brain disease, these findings provide a powerful context for understanding brain metabolic plasticity and naturally occurring behavioral plasticity. PMID:25092297

  16. Researchers Find 8 Immune Genes in Aggressive Brain Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... news/fullstory_159031.html Researchers Find 8 Immune Genes in Aggressive Brain Cancer Discovery might eventually lead ... 25, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers have identified immune genes that may affect how long people live after ...

  17. Brain monoamine oxidase A activity predicts trait aggression.

    PubMed

    Alia-Klein, Nelly; Goldstein, Rita Z; Kriplani, Aarti; Logan, Jean; Tomasi, Dardo; Williams, Benjamin; Telang, Frank; Shumay, Elena; Biegon, Anat; Craig, Ian W; Henn, Fritz; Wang, Gene-Jack; Volkow, Nora D; Fowler, Joanna S

    2008-05-01

    The genetic deletion of monoamine oxidase A (MAO A), an enzyme that breaks down the monoamine neurotransmitters norepinephrine, serotonin, and dopamine, produces aggressive phenotypes across species. Therefore, a common polymorphism in the MAO A gene (MAOA, Mendelian Inheritance in Men database number 309850, referred to as high or low based on transcription in non-neuronal cells) has been investigated in a number of externalizing behavioral and clinical phenotypes. These studies provide evidence linking the low MAOA genotype and violent behavior but only through interaction with severe environmental stressors during childhood. Here, we hypothesized that in healthy adult males the gene product of MAO A in the brain, rather than the gene per se, would be associated with regulating the concentration of brain amines involved in trait aggression. Brain MAO A activity was measured in vivo in healthy nonsmoking men with positron emission tomography using a radioligand specific for MAO A (clorgyline labeled with carbon 11). Trait aggression was measured with the multidimensional personality questionnaire (MPQ). Here we report for the first time that brain MAO A correlates inversely with the MPQ trait measure of aggression (but not with other personality traits) such that the lower the MAO A activity in cortical and subcortical brain regions, the higher the self-reported aggression (in both MAOA genotype groups) contributing to more than one-third of the variability. Because trait aggression is a measure used to predict antisocial behavior, these results underscore the relevance of MAO A as a neurochemical substrate of aberrant aggression. PMID:18463263

  18. Brain Monoamine Oxidase-A Activity Predicts Trait Aggression

    PubMed Central

    Alia-Klein, Nelly; Goldstein, Rita Z.; Kriplani, Aarti; Logan, Jean; Tomasi, Dardo; Williams, Benjamin; Telang, Frank; Shumay, Elena; Biegon, Anat; Craig, Ian W.; Henn, Fritz; Wang, Gene-Jack; Volkow, Nora D.; Fowler, Joanna S.

    2008-01-01

    The genetic deletion of monoamine oxidase A (MAO A, an enzyme which breaks down the monoamine neurotransmitters norepinephrine, serotonin and dopamine) produces aggressive phenotypes across species. Therefore, a common polymorphism in the MAO A gene (MAOA, MIM 309850, referred to as high or low based on transcription in non-neuronal cells) has been investigated in a number of externalizing behavioral and clinical phenotypes. These studies provide evidence linking the low MAOA genotype and violent behavior but only through interaction with severe environmental stressors during childhood. Here, we hypothesized that in healthy adult males the gene product of MAO A in the brain, rather than the gene per se, would be associated with regulating the concentration of brain amines involved in trait aggression. Brain MAO A activity was measured in-vivo in healthy non-smoking men with positron emission tomography using a radioligand specific for MAO A (clorgyline labeled with carbon 11). Trait aggression was measured with the Multidimensional Personality Questionnaire (MPQ). Here we report for the first time that brain MAO A correlates inversely with the MPQ trait measure of aggression (but not with other personality traits) such that the lower the MAO A activity in cortical and subcortical brain regions the higher the self-reported aggression (in both MAOA genotype groups) contributing to more than a third of the variability. Since trait aggression is a measure used to predict antisocial behavior, these results underscore the relevance of MAO A as a neurochemical substrate of aberrant aggression. PMID:18463263

  19. Quetiapine modulates functional connectivity in brain aggression networks.

    PubMed

    Klasen, Martin; Zvyagintsev, Mikhail; Schwenzer, Michael; Mathiak, Krystyna A; Sarkheil, Pegah; Weber, René; Mathiak, Klaus

    2013-07-15

    Aggressive behavior is associated with dysfunctions in an affective regulation network encompassing amygdala and prefrontal areas such as orbitofrontal (OFC), anterior cingulate (ACC), and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). In particular, prefrontal regions have been postulated to control amygdala activity by inhibitory projections, and this process may be disrupted in aggressive individuals. The atypical antipsychotic quetiapine successfully attenuates aggressive behavior in various disorders; the underlying neural processes, however, are unknown. A strengthened functional coupling in the prefrontal-amygdala system may account for these anti-aggressive effects. An inhibition of this network has been reported for virtual aggression in violent video games as well. However, there have been so far no in-vivo observations of pharmacological influences on corticolimbic projections during human aggressive behavior. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled study, quetiapine and placebo were administered for three successive days prior to an fMRI experiment. In this experiment, functional brain connectivity was assessed during virtual aggressive behavior in a violent video game and an aggression-free control task in a non-violent modification. Quetiapine increased the functional connectivity of ACC and DLPFC with the amygdala during virtual aggression, whereas OFC-amygdala coupling was attenuated. These effects were observed neither for placebo nor for the non-violent control. These results demonstrate for the first time a pharmacological modification of aggression-related human brain networks in a naturalistic setting. The violence-specific modulation of prefrontal-amygdala networks appears to control aggressive behavior and provides a neurobiological model for the anti-aggressive effects of quetiapine. PMID:23501053

  20. Photodynamic Therapy for Malignant Brain Tumors.

    PubMed

    Akimoto, Jiro

    2016-04-15

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) using talaporfin sodium together with a semiconductor laser was approved in Japan in October 2003 as a less invasive therapy for early-stage lung cancer. The author believes that the principle of PDT would be applicable for controlling the invading front of malignant brain tumors and verified its efficacy through experiments using glioma cell lines and glioma xenograft models. An investigator-initiated clinical study was jointly conducted with Tokyo Women's Medical University with the support of the Japan Medical Association. Patient enrollment was started in May 2009 and a total of 27 patients were enrolled by March 2012. Of 22 patients included in efficacy analysis, 13 patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma showed progression-free survival of 12 months, progression-free survival at the site of laser irradiation of 20 months, 1-year survival of 100%, and overall survival of 24.8 months. In addition, the safety analysis of the 27 patients showed that adverse events directly related to PDT were mild. PDT was approved in Japan for health insurance coverage as a new intraoperative therapy with the indication for malignant brain tumors in September 2013. Currently, the post-marketing investigation in the accumulated patients has been conducted, and the preparation of guidelines, holding training courses, and dissemination of information on the safe implementation of PDT using web sites and videos, have been promoted. PDT is expected to be a breakthrough for the treatment of malignant glioma as a tumor cell-selective less invasive therapy for the infiltrated functional brain area. PMID:26888042

  1. Photodynamic Therapy for Malignant Brain Tumors

    PubMed Central

    AKIMOTO, Jiro

    2016-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) using talaporfin sodium together with a semiconductor laser was approved in Japan in October 2003 as a less invasive therapy for early-stage lung cancer. The author believes that the principle of PDT would be applicable for controlling the invading front of malignant brain tumors and verified its efficacy through experiments using glioma cell lines and glioma xenograft models. An investigator-initiated clinical study was jointly conducted with Tokyo Women’s Medical University with the support of the Japan Medical Association. Patient enrollment was started in May 2009 and a total of 27 patients were enrolled by March 2012. Of 22 patients included in efficacy analysis, 13 patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma showed progression-free survival of 12 months, progression-free survival at the site of laser irradiation of 20 months, 1-year survival of 100%, and overall survival of 24.8 months. In addition, the safety analysis of the 27 patients showed that adverse events directly related to PDT were mild. PDT was approved in Japan for health insurance coverage as a new intraoperative therapy with the indication for malignant brain tumors in September 2013. Currently, the post-marketing investigation in the accumulated patients has been conducted, and the preparation of guidelines, holding training courses, and dissemination of information on the safe implementation of PDT using web sites and videos, have been promoted. PDT is expected to be a breakthrough for the treatment of malignant glioma as a tumor cell-selective less invasive therapy for the infiltrated functional brain area. PMID:26888042

  2. Modelling verbal aggression, physical aggression and inappropriate sexual behaviour after acquired brain injury

    PubMed Central

    James, Andrew I. W.; Böhnke, Jan R.; Young, Andrew W.; Lewis, Gary J.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the underpinnings of behavioural disturbances following brain injury is of considerable importance, but little at present is known about the relationships between different types of behavioural disturbances. Here, we take a novel approach to this issue by using confirmatory factor analysis to elucidate the architecture of verbal aggression, physical aggression and inappropriate sexual behaviour using systematic records made across an eight-week observation period for a large sample (n = 301) of individuals with a range of brain injuries. This approach offers a powerful test of the architecture of these behavioural disturbances by testing the fit between observed behaviours and different theoretical models. We chose models that reflected alternative theoretical perspectives based on generalized disinhibition (Model 1), a difference between aggression and inappropriate sexual behaviour (Model 2), or on the idea that verbal aggression, physical aggression and inappropriate sexual behaviour reflect broadly distinct but correlated clinical phenomena (Model 3). Model 3 provided the best fit to the data indicating that these behaviours can be viewed as distinct, but with substantial overlap. These data are important both for developing models concerning the architecture of behaviour as well as for clinical management in individuals with brain injury. PMID:26136449

  3. Calcium Channels and Associated Receptors in Malignant Brain Tumor Therapy.

    PubMed

    Morrone, Fernanda B; Gehring, Marina P; Nicoletti, Natália F

    2016-09-01

    Malignant brain tumors are highly lethal and aggressive. Despite recent advances in the current therapies, which include the combination of surgery and radio/chemotherapy, the average survival rate remains poor. Altered regulation of ion channels is part of the neoplastic transformation, which suggests that ion channels are involved in cancer. Distinct classes of calcium-permeable channels are abnormally expressed in cancer and are likely involved in the alterations underlying malignant growth. Specifically, cytosolic Ca(2+) activity plays an important role in the regulation of cell proliferation, and Ca(2+) signaling is altered in proliferating tumor cells. A series of previous studies emphasized the importance of the T-type low-voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCC) in different cancer types, including gliomas, and remarkably, pharmacologic inhibition of T-type VGCC caused antiproliferative effects and triggered apoptosis of human glioma cells. Other calcium permeable channels, such as transient receptor potential (TRP) channels, contribute to changes in Ca(2+) by modulating the driving force for Ca(2+) entry, and some TRP channels are required for proliferation and migration in gliomas. Furthermore, recent evidence shows that TRP channels contribute to the progression and survival of the glioblastoma patients. Likewise, the purinergic P2X7 receptor acts as a direct conduit for Ca(2+)-influx and an indirect activator of voltage-gated Ca(2+)-channel. Evidence also shows that P2X7 receptor activation is linked to elevated expression of inflammation promoting factors, tumor cell migration, an increase in intracellular mobilization of Ca(2+), and membrane depolarization in gliomas. Therefore, this review summarizes the recent findings on calcium channels and associated receptors as potential targets to treat malignant gliomas. PMID:27418672

  4. Deregulation of miR-183 and KIAA0101 in Aggressive and Malignant Pituitary Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Roche, Magali; Wierinckx, Anne; Croze, Séverine; Rey, Catherine; Legras-Lachuer, Catherine; Morel, Anne-Pierre; Fusco, Alfredo; Raverot, Gérald; Trouillas, Jacqueline; Lachuer, Joel

    2015-01-01

    Changes in microRNAs (miRNAs) expression in many types of cancer suggest that they may be involved in crucial steps during tumor progression. Indeed, miRNAs deregulation has been described in pituitary tumorigenesis, but few studies have described their role in pituitary tumor progression toward aggressiveness and malignancy. To assess the role of miRNAs within the hierarchical cascade of events in prolactin (PRL) tumors during progression, we used an integrative genomic approach to associate clinical–pathological features, global miRNA expression, and transcriptomic profiles of the same human tumors. We describe the specific down-regulation of one principal miRNA, miR-183, in the 8 aggressive (A, grade 2b) compared to the 18 non-aggressive (NA, grades 1a, 2a) PRL tumors. We demonstrate that it acts as an anti-proliferative gene by directly targeting KIAA0101, which is involved in cell cycle activation and inhibition of p53–p21-mediated cell cycle arrest. Moreover, we show that miR-183 and KIAA0101 expression significantly correlate with the main markers of pituitary tumors aggressiveness, Ki-67 and p53. These results confirm the activation of proliferation in aggressive and malignant PRL tumors compared to non-aggressive ones. Importantly, these data also demonstrate the ability of such an integrative genomic strategy, applied in the same human tumors, to identify the molecular mechanisms responsible for tumoral progression even from a small cohort of patients. PMID:26322309

  5. Subacute brain atrophy after radiation therapy for malignant brain tumor

    SciTech Connect

    Asai, A.; Matsutani, M.; Kohno, T.; Nakamura, O.; Tanaka, H.; Fujimaki, T.; Funada, N.; Matsuda, T.; Nagata, K.; Takakura, K.

    1989-05-15

    Brain atrophy with mental and neurologic deterioration developing a few months after radiation therapy in patients without residual or recurrent brain tumors has been recognized. Two illustrative case reports of this pathologic entity are presented. Six autopsy cases with this entity including the two cases were reviewed neurologically, radiographically, and histopathologically. All patients presented progressive disturbances of mental status and consciousness, akinesia, and tremor-like involuntary movement. Computerized tomography (CT) demonstrated marked enlargement of the ventricles, moderate widening of the cortical sulci, and a moderately attenuated CT number for the white matter in all six patients. Four of the six patients had CSF drainage (ventriculoperitoneal shunt or continuous lumbar drainage), however, none of them improved. Histologic examination demonstrated swelling and loss of the myelin sheath in the white matter in all patients, and reactive astrocytosis in three of the six patients. Neither prominent neuronal loss in the cerebral cortex or basal ganglia, nor axonal loss in the white matter was generally identified. The blood vessels of the cerebral cortex and white matter were normal. Ependymal layer and the surrounding brain tissue were normal in all patients. These findings suggested that this pathologic condition results from demyelination secondary to direct neurotoxic effect of irradiation. The authors' previous report was reviewed and the differential diagnoses, the risk factors for this pathologic entity, and the indication for radiation therapy in aged patients with a malignant brain tumor are discussed.

  6. Delay in treatment of primary malignant and aggressive musculoskeletal tumours.

    PubMed

    Pan, K L; Zolqarnain, A; Chia, Y Y

    2006-02-01

    Patients with aggressive musculoskeletal tumours often arrive at specialised treatment centres late. Such a delay could mean disfavour for potentially curable or long-term disease-free outcome of limb preserving surgery. This study was undertaken to identify the underlying problem-related delay with a view to propose solution for solving it. We reviewed 30 patients to determine the periods of delay between onset of the first symptom and the definitive treatment. The delays were categorized as 'patient' delay, 'referral' delay and 'treatment' delay. There was 'patient' delay in 57% of patients (n=17), ranging from 1 to 18 months; 'referral' delay in 67% of patients (n=20) ranging from 1 to 19 months and 23% of patients (n=7) had treatment delay (average 23 days) at the treatment centre. The causes of late arrival are not solely patient-related but are multifactorial. Measures to minimize such delays include enhancing awareness only with high index of suspicion among primary care practitioners, creating a special lane specialized imaging studies and establishing a dedicated musculoskeletal tumour unit. PMID:17042231

  7. Brain oxytocin correlates with maternal aggression: link to anxiety.

    PubMed

    Bosch, Oliver J; Meddle, Simone L; Beiderbeck, Daniela I; Douglas, Alison J; Neumann, Inga D

    2005-07-20

    The oxytocinergic system is critically involved in the regulation of maternal behavior, which includes maternal aggression. Because aggression has been linked to anxiety, we investigated the maternal aggression and the role of brain oxytocin in lactating Wistar rats selectively bred for high anxiety-related behavior (HAB) or low anxiety-related behavior (LAB) during the 10 min maternal defense test. HAB dams displayed more maternal aggression against a virgin intruder compared with LAB dams, resulting in more defensive behavior and higher anxiety of HAB-defeated virgins. The different levels of aggression were accompanied by opposite oxytocin release patterns within the paraventricular nucleus (PVN; HAB, increase; LAB, decrease). Furthermore, oxytocin release was higher within the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) of HAB dams compared with LABs. A direct correlation between the offensive behavior displayed during the maternal defense test and local oxytocin release was found in both the PVN and CeA. Using retrodialysis, blockade of endogenous oxytocin action by infusion of an oxytocin receptor antagonist (des-Gly-NH2,d(CH2)5[Tyr(Me)2,Thr4]OVT) into the PVN or CeA reduced maternal aggression of HAB dams, whereas infusion of synthetic oxytocin into the PVN tended to increase aggression toward the intruder in LAB dams. There were no significant differences in oxytocin receptor mRNA expression or oxytocin receptor binding between lactating HAB and LAB dams. Therefore, differences in intracerebral release patterns of oxytocin, rather than differences at the level of oxytocin receptors, are critical for the regulation of maternal aggressive behavior. PMID:16033890

  8. Brain Malignancy Steering Committee clinical trials planning workshop: Report from the Targeted Therapies Working Group

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Brian M.; Galanis, Evanthia; Yung, W.K. Alfred; Ballman, Karla V.; Boyett, James M.; Cloughesy, Timothy F.; Degroot, John F.; Huse, Jason T.; Mann, Bhupinder; Mason, Warren; Mellinghoff, Ingo K.; Mikkelsen, Tom; Mischel, Paul S.; O'Neill, Brian P.; Prados, Michael D.; Sarkaria, Jann N.; Tawab-Amiri, Abdul; Trippa, Lorenzo; Ye, Xiaobu; Ligon, Keith L.; Berry, Donald A.; Wen, Patrick Y.

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma is the most common primary brain malignancy and is associated with poor prognosis despite aggressive local and systemic therapy, which is related to a paucity of viable treatment options in both the newly diagnosed and recurrent settings. Even so, the rapidly increasing number of targeted therapies being evaluated in oncology clinical trials offers hope for the future. Given the broad range of possibilities for future trials, the Brain Malignancy Steering Committee convened a clinical trials planning meeting that was held at the Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, Virginia, on September 19 and 20, 2013. This manuscript reports the deliberations leading up to the event from the Targeted Therapies Working Group and the results of the meeting. PMID:25165194

  9. Oral malignant melanoma: An aggressive clinical entity - Report of a rare case with review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Shamimul; Jamdar, Sami Faisal; Jangra, Jogender; Al Beaiji, Sadun Mohammad Al Ageel

    2016-01-01

    Melanomais one of the most dreaded and aggressive neoplasms, being derived from epidermal melanocytes. The majority of melanomas are seen to involve the skin, and primary mucosal melanomas account for less than 1% of all melanomas. Oral malignant melanomas (OMM) are asymptomatic at the initial presentation, but later they become painful with growth and expansion. In the late stages, the patient may present with ulceration, bleeding, tooth mobility, paresthesia, ill-fitting prosthesis, and delayed healing of the extraction sockets. Diagnosis is often delayed due to asymptomatic clinical presentation, with silent progression of the lesion. OMM are associated with poor prognosis due to their invasive and metastasizing tendencies. The condition has poor survival rates, and metastatic melanomas show even worse prognosis. The 5-year survival rate for OMM ranges 4.5–29%, with 18.5 months being the mean survival rate. The tumor is best managed by wide surgical resection; however, consideration should also be made for adjunctive therapies such as chemotherapy, immunotherapy, and radiotherapy. Recurrences may be seen even 10–15 years after the primary therapy. This paper aims to present an interesting report of aggressive OMM in a 50-year-old male patient and emphasizes the role of dental professionals in maintaining a high degree of vigilance for the pigmented lesions of the oral cavity. Pigmented lesions of uncertain origin should be routinely biopsied to rule out malignancy. Early diagnosis of this dreadful entity entails thorough history taking, physical examination, and radiographic features coupled with histopathology. PMID:27114959

  10. Oral malignant melanoma: An aggressive clinical entity - Report of a rare case with review of literature.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Shamimul; Jamdar, Sami Faisal; Jangra, Jogender; Al Beaiji, Sadun Mohammad Al Ageel

    2016-01-01

    Melanomais one of the most dreaded and aggressive neoplasms, being derived from epidermal melanocytes. The majority of melanomas are seen to involve the skin, and primary mucosal melanomas account for less than 1% of all melanomas. Oral malignant melanomas (OMM) are asymptomatic at the initial presentation, but later they become painful with growth and expansion. In the late stages, the patient may present with ulceration, bleeding, tooth mobility, paresthesia, ill-fitting prosthesis, and delayed healing of the extraction sockets. Diagnosis is often delayed due to asymptomatic clinical presentation, with silent progression of the lesion. OMM are associated with poor prognosis due to their invasive and metastasizing tendencies. The condition has poor survival rates, and metastatic melanomas show even worse prognosis. The 5-year survival rate for OMM ranges 4.5-29%, with 18.5 months being the mean survival rate. The tumor is best managed by wide surgical resection; however, consideration should also be made for adjunctive therapies such as chemotherapy, immunotherapy, and radiotherapy. Recurrences may be seen even 10-15 years after the primary therapy. This paper aims to present an interesting report of aggressive OMM in a 50-year-old male patient and emphasizes the role of dental professionals in maintaining a high degree of vigilance for the pigmented lesions of the oral cavity. Pigmented lesions of uncertain origin should be routinely biopsied to rule out malignancy. Early diagnosis of this dreadful entity entails thorough history taking, physical examination, and radiographic features coupled with histopathology. PMID:27114959

  11. Adenoviral virotherapy for malignant brain tumors

    PubMed Central

    Nandi, Suvobroto; Lesniak, Maciej S

    2009-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common form of primary brain cancer. In the past decade, virotherapy of tumors has gained credence, particularly in glioma management, as these tumors are not completely resectable and tend to micro-metastasize. Adenoviral vectors have an advantage over other viral vectors in that they are relatively non-toxic and do not integrate in the genome. However, the lack of coxsackie and adenovirus receptors (CAR) on surface of gliomas provides for inefficient transduction of wild-type adenoviral vectors in these tumors. By targeting receptors that are over-expressed in gliomas, modified adenoviral constructs have been shown to efficiently infect glioma cells. In addition, by taking advantage of tumor specific promoter (TSP) elements, oncolytic adenoviral vectors offer the promise of selective tumor-specific replication. This dual targeting strategy has enabled specificity in both laboratory and pre-clinical settings. This review looks at current trends in adenoviral virotherapy of gliomas, with an emphasis on targeting modalities and future clinical applications. PMID:19456208

  12. Adenoviral virotherapy for malignant brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Nandi, Suvobroto; Lesniak, Maciej S

    2009-06-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme is the most common form of primary brain cancer. In the past decade, virotherapy of tumors has gained credence, particularly in glioma management, as these tumors are not completely resectable and tend to micro-metastasize. Adenoviral vectors have an advantage over other viral vectors in that they are relatively non-toxic and do not integrate in the genome. However, the lack of coxsackie and adenovirus receptors on surface of gliomas provides for inefficient transduction of wild-type adenoviral vectors in these tumors. By targeting receptors that are overexpressed in gliomas, modified adenoviral constructs have been shown to efficiently infect glioma cells. In addition, by taking advantage of tumor-specific promoter elements, oncolytic adenoviral vectors offer the promise of selective tumor-specific replication. This dual targeting strategy has enabled specificity in both laboratory and pre-clinical settings. This review examines current trends in adenoviral virotherapy of gliomas, with an emphasis on targeting modalities and future clinical applications. PMID:19456208

  13. Chemotherapy for malignant brain tumors of childhood

    PubMed Central

    Gottardo, Nicholas G.; Gajjar, Amar

    2009-01-01

    During the past 3 decades, chemotherapeutic agents have been extensively evaluated for the treatment of pediatric brain tumors in a myriad of schedules, doses, and combinations. Remarkable advances in outcome have been achieved for certain groups of children, notably those with medulloblastoma, and chemotherapy has played a key role. However, improvements in survival are obtained at a high cost to quality of life. In addition, the success achieved for medulloblastoma is offset by a lack of progress for high-grade glioma. Despite decades of intensive investigation, no single chemotherapeutic regimen stands out as particularly beneficial for children with high-grade glioma, with the vast majority of these patients succumbing to their disease. A plateau in efficacy has been reached. Further treatment intensification using conventional nonspecific chemotherapy is more likely to result in additional toxicity without major advances in survival. Genomewide analysis using microarray technology has contributed significantly to our understanding of tumor biology. This knowledge has shifted the focus onto novel agents that target molecular changes crucial for tumor proliferation or survival. These selective agents are likely to be less toxic to normal cells and it is anticipated they will be more effective than the nonspecific chemotherapeutic agents currently used. PMID:18952581

  14. Boron Neutron Capture Therapy for Malignant Brain Tumors

    PubMed Central

    MIYATAKE, Shin-Ichi; KAWABATA, Shinji; HIRAMATSU, Ryo; KUROIWA, Toshihiko; SUZUKI, Minoru; KONDO, Natsuko; ONO, Koji

    2016-01-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a biochemically targeted radiotherapy based on the nuclear capture and fission reactions that occur when non-radioactive boron-10, which is a constituent of natural elemental boron, is irradiated with low energy thermal neutrons to yield high linear energy transfer alpha particles and recoiling lithium-7 nuclei. Therefore, BNCT enables the application of a high dose of particle radiation selectively to tumor cells in which boron-10 compound has been accumulated. We applied BNCT using nuclear reactors for 167 cases of malignant brain tumors, including recurrent malignant gliomas, newly diagnosed malignant gliomas, and recurrent high-grade meningiomas from January 2002 to May 2014. Here, we review the principle and history of BNCT. In addition, we introduce fluoride-18-labeled boronophenylalanine positron emission tomography and the clinical results of BNCT for the above-mentioned malignant brain tumors. Finally, we discuss the recent development of accelerators producing epithermal neutron beams. This development could provide an alternative to the current use of specially modified nuclear reactors as a neutron source, and could allow BNCT to be performed in a hospital setting. PMID:27250576

  15. Boron Neutron Capture Therapy for Malignant Brain Tumors.

    PubMed

    Miyatake, Shin-Ichi; Kawabata, Shinji; Hiramatsu, Ryo; Kuroiwa, Toshihiko; Suzuki, Minoru; Kondo, Natsuko; Ono, Koji

    2016-07-15

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a biochemically targeted radiotherapy based on the nuclear capture and fission reactions that occur when non-radioactive boron-10, which is a constituent of natural elemental boron, is irradiated with low energy thermal neutrons to yield high linear energy transfer alpha particles and recoiling lithium-7 nuclei. Therefore, BNCT enables the application of a high dose of particle radiation selectively to tumor cells in which boron-10 compound has been accumulated. We applied BNCT using nuclear reactors for 167 cases of malignant brain tumors, including recurrent malignant gliomas, newly diagnosed malignant gliomas, and recurrent high-grade meningiomas from January 2002 to May 2014. Here, we review the principle and history of BNCT. In addition, we introduce fluoride-18-labeled boronophenylalanine positron emission tomography and the clinical results of BNCT for the above-mentioned malignant brain tumors. Finally, we discuss the recent development of accelerators producing epithermal neutron beams. This development could provide an alternative to the current use of specially modified nuclear reactors as a neutron source, and could allow BNCT to be performed in a hospital setting. PMID:27250576

  16. Gall bladder carcinoma: Aggressive malignancy with protean loco-regional and distant spread.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, Amit Nandan Dhar; Jain, Shivi; Dixit, Ruhi

    2015-03-16

    The most common malignancy of biliary tract is gallbladder cancer (GBC) which is the third most common cancer in gastrointestinal tract. It is a lethal disease for most patients in spite of growing awareness and improved diagnostic techniques. GBC has a very poor prognosis and the 5 year survival rate is < 10%. Although etiology of the carcinoma of the gallbladder is still obscure, various factors have been implicated, cholelithiasis being the most frequent. The incidence of GBC worldwide is based on the gender, geography and ethnicity which suggest that both genetic and environmental factors can cause GBC. The major route of spread of gallbladder cancer (GC) is loco-regional rather than distant. It spreads by lymphatic, vascular, neural, intraperitoneal, and intraductal routes. Sonography is usually the most common imaging test to evaluate symptoms of biliary tract disease including suspected GC. With recent advances in imaging modalities like multi-detector computed tomography (CT) scanners, magnetic resonance imaging-positron emission tomography/CT diagnosis of gallbladder cancer has improved. Studies have also targeted molecular and genetic pathways. Treatment options have included extended and radical surgeries and adjuvant chemotherapy. This review article deals in detail with important aspects of carcinoma gallbladder and its manifestations and challenges. Role of various imaging modalities in characterization and accurate staging has been discussed. The loco-regional spread of this aggressive malignancy is dealt explicitly. PMID:25789296

  17. Gall bladder carcinoma: Aggressive malignancy with protean loco-regional and distant spread

    PubMed Central

    Dwivedi, Amit Nandan Dhar; Jain, Shivi; Dixit, Ruhi

    2015-01-01

    The most common malignancy of biliary tract is gallbladder cancer (GBC) which is the third most common cancer in gastrointestinal tract. It is a lethal disease for most patients in spite of growing awareness and improved diagnostic techniques. GBC has a very poor prognosis and the 5 year survival rate is < 10%. Although etiology of the carcinoma of the gallbladder is still obscure, various factors have been implicated, cholelithiasis being the most frequent. The incidence of GBC worldwide is based on the gender, geography and ethnicity which suggest that both genetic and environmental factors can cause GBC. The major route of spread of gallbladder cancer (GC) is loco-regional rather than distant. It spreads by lymphatic, vascular, neural, intraperitoneal, and intraductal routes. Sonography is usually the most common imaging test to evaluate symptoms of biliary tract disease including suspected GC. With recent advances in imaging modalities like multi-detector computed tomography (CT) scanners, magnetic resonance imaging-positron emission tomography/CT diagnosis of gallbladder cancer has improved. Studies have also targeted molecular and genetic pathways. Treatment options have included extended and radical surgeries and adjuvant chemotherapy. This review article deals in detail with important aspects of carcinoma gallbladder and its manifestations and challenges. Role of various imaging modalities in characterization and accurate staging has been discussed. The loco-regional spread of this aggressive malignancy is dealt explicitly. PMID:25789296

  18. Primary vertebral tumors: a review of epidemiologic, histological and imaging findings, part II: locally aggressive and malignant tumors.

    PubMed

    Ropper, Alexander E; Cahill, Kevin S; Hanna, John W; McCarthy, Edward F; Gokaslan, Ziya L; Chi, John H

    2012-01-01

    This second part of a comprehensive review of primary vertebral tumors focuses on locally aggressive and malignant tumors. As discussed in the earlier part of the review, both benign and malignant types of these tumors affect the adult and the pediatric population, and an understanding of their subtleties may increase their effective resection. In this review, we discuss the epidemiologic, histological, and imaging features of the most common locally aggressive primary vertebral tumors (chordoma and giant-cell tumor) and malignant tumors (chondrosarcoma, Ewing sarcoma, multiple myeloma or plasmacytoma, and osteosarcoma). The figures used for illustration are from operative patients of the senior authors (Z.L.G. and J.H.C.). Taken together, parts 1 and 2 of this article provide a thorough and illustrative review of primary vertebral tumors. PMID:21768918

  19. Training stem cells for treatment of malignant brain tumors

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shengwen Calvin; Kabeer, Mustafa H; Vu, Long T; Keschrumrus, Vic; Yin, Hong Zhen; Dethlefs, Brent A; Zhong, Jiang F; Weiss, John H; Loudon, William G

    2014-01-01

    The treatment of malignant brain tumors remains a challenge. Stem cell technology has been applied in the treatment of brain tumors largely because of the ability of some stem cells to infiltrate into regions within the brain where tumor cells migrate as shown in preclinical studies. However, not all of these efforts can translate in the effective treatment that improves the quality of life for patients. Here, we perform a literature review to identify the problems in the field. Given the lack of efficacy of most stem cell-based agents used in the treatment of malignant brain tumors, we found that stem cell distribution (i.e., only a fraction of stem cells applied capable of targeting tumors) are among the limiting factors. We provide guidelines for potential improvements in stem cell distribution. Specifically, we use an engineered tissue graft platform that replicates the in vivo microenvironment, and provide our data to validate that this culture platform is viable for producing stem cells that have better stem cell distribution than with the Petri dish culture system. PMID:25258664

  20. The impact of dietary isoflavonoids on malignant brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Sehm, Tina; Fan, Zheng; Weiss, Ruth; Schwarz, Marc; Engelhorn, Tobias; Hore, Nirjhar; Doerfler, Arnd; Buchfelder, Michael; Eyüpoglu, Iiker Y; Savaskan, Nic E

    2014-08-01

    Poor prognosis and limited therapeutic options render malignant brain tumors one of the most devastating diseases in clinical medicine. Current treatment strategies attempt to expand the therapeutic repertoire through the use of multimodal treatment regimens. It is here that dietary fibers have been recently recognized as a supportive natural therapy in augmenting the body's response to tumor growth. Here, we investigated the impact of isoflavonoids on primary brain tumor cells. First, we treated glioma cell lines and primary astrocytes with various isoflavonoids and phytoestrogens. Cell viability in a dose-dependent manner was measured for biochanin A (BCA), genistein (GST), and secoisolariciresinol diglucoside (SDG). Dose-response action for the different isoflavonoids showed that BCA is highly effective on glioma cells and nontoxic for normal differentiated brain tissues. We further investigated BCA in ex vivo and in vivo experimentations. Organotypic brain slice cultures were performed and treated with BCA. For in vivo experiments, BCA was intraperitoneal injected in tumor-implanted Fisher rats. Tumor size and edema were measured and quantified by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans. In vascular organotypic glioma brain slice cultures (VOGIM) we found that BCA operates antiangiogenic and neuroprotective. In vivo MRI scans demonstrated that administered BCA as a monotherapy was effective in reducing significantly tumor-induced brain edema and showed a trend for prolonged survival. Our results revealed that dietary isoflavonoids, in particular BCA, execute toxicity toward glioma cells, antiangiogenic, and coevally neuroprotective properties, and therefore augment the range of state-of-the-art multimodal treatment approach. PMID:24898306

  1. Maintenance Therapy with Interferon Alfa 2b Improves Outcome in Aggressive Malignant Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Avilés, A; Díaz-Maqueo, J C; Talavera, A; García, E L; Nambo, M J

    1998-01-01

    To assess the efficacy and toxicity of interferon alfa 2b (IFN) as maintenance therapy in patients with malignant lymphoma on complete response after conventional chemotherapy we start a randomized clinical trial. One hundred and seventy patients were randomized to received either IFN 5.0 MU three time at week by one year or no further treatment, as control group. At a median follow-up of 9.0 years (range 4.3 to 11 years) median freedom from relapse (FFR) has not been reached in patients who received IFN, it is statistically significant to patients in control group with a median FFR of 60 months (p <.001). Actuarial curves show that at 10-years, 58 patients (66%, 95% confidence interval (CI) 53% to 79%) remain in first remission, statistical different to control group 33 patients (40%, 95% Cl: 33% to 57%) (p <.001). Event free survival (EFS) shown that a 10-years 63 patients (71%, 95% CI: 59% to 81%) are alive free of disease in the IFN arm compared to only 38 patients (45%, 95% CI: 37% to 57%) in the control group (p <.001). Toxicity was mild, 81 patients received the planned doses of IFN on time and 6 patients had transitory delay secondary to hematological toxicity (grade 1 or 2) and completed the treatment on 13 months. No late side effects has been observed. After a long term follow-up we confirm that IFN used as maintenance therapy improves outcome in patients with aggressive malignant lymphoma who were in complete remission after conventional chemotherapy without excessive toxicity. We feld that IFN will be consider in controlled clinical trials to define the role of this therapeutic option. PMID:27414082

  2. Environmental Influences, the Developing Brain, and Aggressive Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudley, Cynthia; Novac, Andrei

    2007-01-01

    In this article the authors review research on highly stressful environments that are known to support the development and display of aggressive behavior in childhood, adolescence, and beyond. They also examine some of the mechanisms through which such stressful environments may influence adolescents' aggressive behavior. The review concentrates…

  3. ACR Appropriateness Criteria Follow-Up of Malignant or Aggressive Musculoskeletal Tumors.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Catherine C; Kransdorf, Mark J; Beaman, Francesca D; Adler, Ronald S; Amini, Behrang; Appel, Marc; Bernard, Stephanie A; Fries, Ian Blair; Germano, Isabelle M; Greenspan, Bennett S; Holly, Langston T; Kubicky, Charlotte D; Shek-Man Lo, Simon; Mosher, Timothy J; Sloan, Andrew E; Tuite, Michael J; Walker, Eric A; Ward, Robert J; Wessell, Daniel E; Weissman, Barbara N

    2016-04-01

    Appropriate imaging modalities for the follow-up of malignant or aggressive musculoskeletal tumors include radiography, MRI, CT, (18)F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose PET/CT, (99m)Tc bone scan, and ultrasound. Clinical scenarios reviewed include evaluation for metastatic disease to the lung in low- and high-risk patients, for osseous metastatic disease in asymptomatic and symptomatic patients, for local recurrence of osseous tumors with and without significant hardware present, and for local recurrence of soft tissue tumors. The timing for follow-up of pulmonary metastasis surveillance is also reviewed. The ACR Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed every three years by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and review include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer-reviewed journals and the application of a well-established consensus methodology (modified Delphi) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures by the panel. In those instances in which evidence is lacking or not definitive, expert opinion may be used to recommend imaging or treatment. PMID:26922595

  4. Simian virus 40 transformation, malignant mesothelioma and brain tumors

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Fang; Carbone, Michele; Yang, Haining; Gaudino, Giovanni

    2011-01-01

    Simian virus 40 (SV40) is a DNA virus isolated in 1960 from contaminated polio vaccines, that induces mesotheliomas, lymphomas, brain and bone tumors, and sarcomas, including osteosarcomas, in hamsters. These same tumor types have been found to contain SV40 DNA and proteins in humans. Mesotheliomas and brain tumors are the two tumor types that have been most consistently associated with SV40, and the range of positivity has varied about from 6 to 60%, although a few reported 100% of positivity and a few reported 0%. It appears unlikely that SV40 infection alone is sufficient to cause human malignancy, as we did not observe an epidemic of cancers following the administration of SV40-contaminated vaccines. However, it seems possible that SV40 may act as a cofactor in the pathogenesis of some tumors. In vitro and animal experiments showing cocarcinogenicity between SV40 and asbestos support this hypothesis. PMID:21955238

  5. IL-1β promotes malignant transformation and tumor aggressiveness in oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chia-Huei; Chang, Jeffrey Shu-Ming; Syu, Shih-Han; Wong, Thian-Sze; Chan, Jimmy Yu-Wai; Tang, Ya-Chu; Yang, Zhi-Ping; Yang, Wen-Chan; Chen, Chiung-Tong; Lu, Shao-Chun; Tang, Pei-Hua; Yang, Tzu-Ching; Chu, Pei-Yi; Hsiao, Jenn-Ren; Liu, Ko-Jiunn

    2015-04-01

    Chronic inflammation, coupled with alcohol, betel quid, and cigarette consumption, is associated with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) is a critical mediator of chronic inflammation and implicated in many cancers. In this study, we showed that increased pro-IL-1β expression was associated with the severity of oral malignant transformation in a mouse OSCC model induced by 4-Nitroquinolin-1-oxide (4-NQO) and arecoline, two carcinogens related to tobacco and betel quid, respectively. Using microarray and quantitative PCR assay, we showed that pro-IL-1β was upregulated in human OSCC tumors associated with tobacco and betel quid consumption. In a human OSCC cell line TW2.6, we demonstrated nicotine-derived nitrosamine ketone (NNK) and arecoline stimulated IL-1β secretion in an inflammasome-dependent manner. IL-1β treatment significantly increased the proliferation and dysregulated the Akt signaling pathways of dysplastic oral keratinocytes (DOKs). Using cytokine antibodies and inflammation cytometric bead arrays, we found that DOK and OSCC cells secreted high levels of IL-6, IL-8, and growth-regulated oncogene-α following IL-1β stimulation. The conditioned medium of IL-1β-treated OSCC cells exerted significant proangiogenic effects. Crucially, IL-1β increased the invasiveness of OSCC cells through the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), characterized by downregulation of E-cadherin, upregulation of Snail, Slug, and Vimentin, and alterations in morphology. These findings provide novel insights into the mechanism underlying OSCC tumorigenesis. Our study suggested that IL-1β can be induced by tobacco and betel quid-related carcinogens, and participates in the early and late stages of oral carcinogenesis by increasing the proliferation of dysplasia oral cells, stimulating oncogenic cytokines, and promoting aggressiveness of OSCC. PMID:25204733

  6. Prefrontal cortex lesions and MAO-A modulate aggression in penetrating traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Pardini, M.; Krueger, F.; Hodgkinson, C.; Raymont, V.; Ferrier, C.; Goldman, D.; Strenziok, M.; Guida, S.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: This study investigates the interaction between brain lesion location and monoamine oxidase A (MAO-A) in the genesis of aggression in patients with penetrating traumatic brain injury (PTBI). Methods: We enrolled 155 patients with PTBI and 42 controls drawn from the Vietnam Head Injury Study registry. Patients with PTBI were divided according to lesion localization (prefrontal cortex [PFC] vs non-PFC) and were genotyped for the MAO-A polymorphism linked to low and high transcriptional activity. Aggression was assessed with the aggression/agitation subscale of the Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI-a). Results: Patients with the highest levels of aggression preferentially presented lesions in PFC territories. A significant interaction between MAO-A transcriptional activity and lesion localization on aggression was revealed. In the control group, carriers of the low-activity allele demonstrated higher aggression than high-activity allele carriers. In the PFC lesion group, no significant differences in aggression were observed between carriers of the 2 MAO-A alleles, whereas in the non-PFC lesion group higher aggression was observed in the high-activity allele than in the low-activity allele carriers. Higher NPI-a scores were linked to more severe childhood psychological traumatic experiences and posttraumatic stress disorder symptomatology in the control and non-PFC lesion groups but not in the PFC lesion group. Conclusions: Lesion location and MAO-A genotype interact in mediating aggression in PTBI. Importantly, PFC integrity is necessary for modulation of aggressive behaviors by genetic susceptibilities and traumatic experiences. Potentially, lesion localization and MAO-A genotype data could be combined to develop risk-stratification algorithms and individualized treatments for aggression in PTBI. PMID:21422455

  7. Metabolic therapy: a new paradigm for managing malignant brain cancer.

    PubMed

    Seyfried, Thomas N; Flores, Roberto; Poff, Angela M; D'Agostino, Dominic P; Mukherjee, Purna

    2015-01-28

    Little progress has been made in the long-term management of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), considered among the most lethal of brain cancers. Cytotoxic chemotherapy, steroids, and high-dose radiation are generally used as the standard of care for GBM. These procedures can create a tumor microenvironment rich in glucose and glutamine. Glucose and glutamine are suggested to facilitate tumor progression. Recent evidence suggests that many GBMs are infected with cytomegalovirus, which could further enhance glucose and glutamine metabolism in the tumor cells. Emerging evidence also suggests that neoplastic macrophages/microglia, arising through possible fusion hybridization, can comprise an invasive cell subpopulation within GBM. Glucose and glutamine are major fuels for myeloid cells, as well as for the more rapidly proliferating cancer stem cells. Therapies that increase inflammation and energy metabolites in the GBM microenvironment can enhance tumor progression. In contrast to current GBM therapies, metabolic therapy is designed to target the metabolic malady common to all tumor cells (aerobic fermentation), while enhancing the health and vitality of normal brain cells and the entire body. The calorie restricted ketogenic diet (KD-R) is an anti-angiogenic, anti-inflammatory and pro-apoptotic metabolic therapy that also reduces fermentable fuels in the tumor microenvironment. Metabolic therapy, as an alternative to the standard of care, has the potential to improve outcome for patients with GBM and other malignant brain cancers. PMID:25069036

  8. Differences in brain circuitry for appetitive and reactive aggression as revealed by realistic auditory scripts

    PubMed Central

    Moran, James K.; Weierstall, Roland; Elbert, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Aggressive behavior is thought to divide into two motivational elements: The first being a self-defensively motivated aggression against threat and a second, hedonically motivated “appetitive” aggression. Appetitive aggression is the less understood of the two, often only researched within abnormal psychology. Our approach is to understand it as a universal and adaptive response, and examine the functional neural activity of ordinary men (N = 50) presented with an imaginative listening task involving a murderer describing a kill. We manipulated motivational context in a between-subjects design to evoke appetitive or reactive aggression, against a neutral control, measuring activity with Magnetoencephalography (MEG). Results show differences in left frontal regions in delta (2–5 Hz) and alpha band (8–12 Hz) for aggressive conditions and right parietal delta activity differentiating appetitive and reactive aggression. These results validate the distinction of reward-driven appetitive aggression from reactive aggression in ordinary populations at the level of functional neural brain circuitry. PMID:25538590

  9. USP11 regulates PML stability to control Notch-induced malignancy in brain tumours.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hsin-Chieh; Lin, Yu-Ching; Liu, Cheng-Hsin; Chung, Hsiang-Ching; Wang, Ya-Ting; Lin, Ya-Wen; Ma, Hsin-I; Tu, Pang-Hsien; Lawler, Sean E; Chen, Ruey-Hwa

    2014-01-01

    The promyelocytic leukaemia (PML) protein controls multiple tumour suppressive functions and is downregulated in diverse types of human cancers through incompletely characterized post-translational mechanisms. Here we identify USP11 as a PML regulator by RNAi screening. USP11 deubiquitinates and stabilizes PML, thereby counteracting the functions of PML ubiquitin ligases RNF4 and the KLHL20-Cul3 (Cullin 3)-Roc1 complex. We find that USP11 is transcriptionally repressed through a Notch/Hey1-dependent mechanism, leading to PML destabilization. In human glioma, Hey1 upregulation correlates with USP11 and PML downregulation and with high-grade malignancy. The Notch/Hey1-induced downregulation of USP11 and PML not only confers multiple malignant characteristics of aggressive glioma, including proliferation, invasiveness and tumour growth in an orthotopic mouse model, but also potentiates self-renewal, tumour-forming capacity and therapeutic resistance of patient-derived glioma-initiating cells. Our study uncovers a PML degradation mechanism through Notch/Hey1-induced repression of the PML deubiquitinase USP11 and suggests an important role for this pathway in brain tumour pathogenesis. PMID:24487962

  10. Bevacizumab for Malignant Brain Gliomas. Which is the Current Evidence?

    PubMed

    Koukourakis, Georgios V

    2015-01-01

    Recently, the improvement of innovative medications named focused treatments represents the consequence of a superior knowledge of the procedures implicated in the modification of physiological tissues in tumor. Focused treatment is known as the therapy which uses specific substances that affect selective mechanisms implicated in tumorigenesis and tumor development. Angiogenesis is important for tumor development and distant metastatic disease and represents a significant aim for modern biological substances. Bevacizumab belongs to humanized recombinant antibody family which obviates vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor fastening, and suspending genesis of new vessels and tumor development. Bevacizumab represents the primary antiangiogenic treatment authorized for usage in tumor and has FDA authorization to treat the recurrent glioblastoma multiform since 2009. Bevacizumab's efficiency for treating malignant brain gliomas along with correlated patent appliances related to this agent is discussed below. PMID:26256461

  11. Brain PDD and PDT unlocking the mystery of malignant gliomas.

    PubMed

    Eljamel, M Sam

    2004-12-01

    Malignant brain tumours (MBTs) have one of the worst outcomes of human cancers today and their incidence is on the increase. Current treatment failure is usually due to local recurrence of the tumour rather than distant metastasis. In the last three decades we have seen many novel and potentially effective treatment strategies rise rapidly to the rescue. Sadly, however, the majority of these approaches were not good enough to withstand the harsh reality of the sceptical gaze of the scientific eye or the stringent health economics of this millennium. PDD and PDT, however, is one of the few therapies fighting back and still standing today. The results of its randomised controlled trials are eagerly awaited. To date the literature suggests that both PDD and PDT significantly prolong the time to tumour progression, reduce local recurrence, increase radical resection and prolong overall survival of MBTs. PDD and PDT are well tolerated by patients and worthwhile pursuing. PMID:25048434

  12. Brain Serotonin Receptors and Transporters: Initiation vs. Termination of Escalated Aggression

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Aki; Quadros, Isabel M.; de Almeida, Rosa M. M.; Miczek, Klaus A.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Recent findings have shown a complexly regulated 5-HT system as it is linked to different kinds of aggression. Objective We focus on (1) phasic and tonic changes of 5-HT and (2) state and trait of aggression, and emphasize the different receptor subtypes, their role in specific brain regions, feed-back regulation and modulation by other amines, acids and peptides. Results New pharmacological tools differentiate the first three 5-HT receptor families and their modulation by GABA, glutamate and CRF. Activation of 5-HT1A, 5-HT1B and 5-HT2A/2C receptors in mesocorticolimbic areas, reduce species-typical and other aggressive behaviors. In contrast, agonists at 5-HT1A and 5-HT1B receptors in the medial prefrontal cortex or septal area can increase aggressive behavior under specific conditions. Activation of serotonin transporters reduce mainly pathological aggression. Genetic analyses of aggressive individuals have identified several molecules that affect the 5-HT system directly (e.g., Tph2, 5-HT1B, 5-HT transporter, Pet1, MAOA) or indirectly (e.g., Neuropeptide Y, αCaMKII, NOS, BDNF). Dysfunction in genes for MAOA escalates pathological aggression in rodents and humans, particularly in interaction with specific experiences. Conclusions Feedback to autoreceptors of the 5-HT1 family and modulation via heteroreceptors are important in the expression of aggressive behavior. Tonic increase of the 5-HT2 family expression may cause escalated aggression, whereas the phasic increase of 5-HT2 receptors inhibits aggressive behaviors. Polymorphisms in the genes of 5-HT transporters or rate-limiting synthetic and metabolic enzymes of 5-HT modulate aggression, often requiring interaction with the rearing environment. PMID:20938650

  13. Aggression is associated with aerobic glycolysis in the honey bee brain1

    PubMed Central

    Chandrasekaran, S.; Rittschof, C. C.; Djukovic, D.; Gu, H.; Raftery, D.; Price, N. D.; Robinson, G. E.

    2015-01-01

    Aerobic glycolysis involves increased glycolysis and decreased oxidative catabolism of glucose even in the presence of an ample oxygen supply. Aerobic glycolysis, a common metabolic pattern in cancer cells, was recently discovered in both the healthy and diseased human brain, but its functional significance is not understood. This metabolic pattern in the brain is surprising because it results in decreased efficiency of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production in a tissue with high energetic demands. We report that highly aggressive honey bees (Apis mellifera) show a brain transcriptomic and metabolic state consistent with aerobic glycolysis, i.e. increased glycolysis in combination with decreased oxidative phosphorylation. Furthermore, exposure to alarm pheromone, which provokes aggression, causes a metabolic shift to aerobic glycolysis in the bee brain. We hypothesize that this metabolic state, which is associated with altered neurotransmitter levels, increased glycolytically derived ATP and a reduced cellular redox state, may lead to increased neuronal excitability and oxidative stress in the brain. Our analysis provides evidence for a robust, distinct and persistent brain metabolic response to aggression-inducing social cues. This finding for the first time associates aerobic glycolysis with naturally occurring behavioral plasticity, which has important implications for understanding both healthy and diseased brain function. PMID:25640316

  14. Recent progress towards development of effective systemic chemotherapy for the treatment of malignant brain tumors

    PubMed Central

    Sarin, Hemant

    2009-01-01

    Systemic chemotherapy has been relatively ineffective in the treatment of malignant brain tumors even though systemic chemotherapy drugs are small molecules that can readily extravasate across the porous blood-brain tumor barrier of malignant brain tumor microvasculature. Small molecule systemic chemotherapy drugs maintain peak blood concentrations for only minutes, and therefore, do not accumulate to therapeutic concentrations within individual brain tumor cells. The physiologic upper limit of pore size in the blood-brain tumor barrier of malignant brain tumor microvasculature is approximately 12 nanometers. Spherical nanoparticles ranging between 7 nm and 10 nm in diameter maintain peak blood concentrations for several hours and are sufficiently smaller than the 12 nm physiologic upper limit of pore size in the blood-brain tumor barrier to accumulate to therapeutic concentrations within individual brain tumor cells. Therefore, nanoparticles bearing chemotherapy that are within the 7 to 10 nm size range can be used to deliver therapeutic concentrations of small molecule chemotherapy drugs across the blood-brain tumor barrier into individual brain tumor cells. The initial therapeutic efficacy of the Gd-G5-doxorubicin dendrimer, an imageable nanoparticle bearing chemotherapy within the 7 to 10 nm size range, has been demonstrated in the orthotopic RG-2 rodent malignant glioma model. Herein I discuss this novel strategy to improve the effectiveness of systemic chemotherapy for the treatment of malignant brain tumors and the therapeutic implications thereof. PMID:19723323

  15. Aggressiveness and brain amines in pigs fed the ß-adrenoreceptor agonist Ractopamine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effects of the widely used feed additive Ractopamine (RAC), gender and social rank on aggressiveness and concentrations of brain amines in finishing pigs. Thirty-two barrows and 32 gilts (4 pigs/pen/gender) were fed either control or RAC (5 mg/kg/2 w...

  16. Simulating ‘structure-function’ patterns of malignant brain tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansury, Yuri; Deisboeck, Thomas S.

    2004-01-01

    Rapid growth and extensive tissue infiltration are characteristics of highly malignant neuroepithelial brain tumors. Very little is known, however, about the existence of structure-function relationships in these types of neoplasm. Therefore, using a previously developed two-dimensional agent-based model, we have investigated the emergent patterns of multiple tumor cells that proliferate and migrate on an adaptive grid lattice, driven by a local-search mechanism and guided by the presence of distinct environmental conditions. Numerical results indicate a strong correlation between the fractal dimensions of the tumor surface and the average velocity of the tumor's spatial expansion. In particular, when the so called ‘beaten-path advantage’ intensifies, i.e., rising ‘mechanical rewards’ for cells to follow each other along preformed pathways, it results in an increase of the tumor system's fractal dimensions leading to a concomitant acceleration of its spatial expansion. Whereas cell migration is the dominant phenotype responsible for the more extensive branching patterns exhibiting higher fractal dimensions, cell proliferation appears to become more active primarily at lower fracticality associated with stronger mechanical confinements. Implications of these results for experimental and clinical cancer research are discussed.

  17. Aggressive solitary intracranial metastatic malignant melanoma from a primary mediastinal tumour.

    PubMed

    Sivaraju, Laxminadh; Aryan, Saritha; Hegde, Vinay S; Ghosal, Nandita; Hegde, Alangar S

    2016-08-01

    Malignant melanoma is the third most common tumour to cause cerebral metastases, following breast and lung cancer. Central nervous system metastases occur in 10-40% of patients with melanoma. Intracranial metastasis from a primary malignant melanoma of the anterior mediastinum is uncommon. We report a case of solitary intracranial metastatic melanoma arising from a primary mediastinal tumour. We then discuss the clinico-radiological features and treatment options. PMID:27145991

  18. [Glutamate and malignant gliomas, from epilepsia to biological aggressiveness: therapeutic implications].

    PubMed

    Blecic, Serge; Rynkowski, Michal; De Witte, Olivier; Lefranc, Florence

    2013-09-01

    In this review article, we describe the unrecognized roles of glutamate and glutamate receptors in malignant glioma biology. The neurotransmitter glutamate released from malignant glioma cells in the extracellular matrix is responsible for seizure induction and at higher concentration neuronal cell death. This neuronal cell death will create vacated place for tumor growth. Glutamate also stimulates the growth and the migration of glial tumor cells by means of the activation of glutamate receptors on glioma cells in a paracrine and autocrine manner. The multitude of effects of glutamate in glioma biology supports the rationale for pharmacological targeting of glutamate receptors and transporters in the adjuvant treatment of malignant gliomas in neurology and neuro-oncology. Using the website www.clinicaltrials.gov/ as a reference - a service developed by the National Library of Medicine for the National Health Institute in USA - we have evoked the few clinical trials completed and currently ongoing with therapies targeting the glutamate receptors. PMID:23883552

  19. A testosterone-related structural brain phenotype predicts aggressive behavior from childhood to adulthood.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tuong-Vi; McCracken, James T; Albaugh, Matthew D; Botteron, Kelly N; Hudziak, James J; Ducharme, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Structural covariance, the examination of anatomic correlations between brain regions, has emerged recently as a valid and useful measure of developmental brain changes. Yet the exact biological processes leading to changes in covariance, and the relation between such covariance and behavior, remain largely unexplored. The steroid hormone testosterone represents a compelling mechanism through which this structural covariance may be developmentally regulated in humans. Although steroid hormone receptors can be found throughout the central nervous system, the amygdala represents a key target for testosterone-specific effects, given its high density of androgen receptors. In addition, testosterone has been found to impact cortical thickness (CTh) across the whole brain, suggesting that it may also regulate the structural relationship, or covariance, between the amygdala and CTh. Here, we examined testosterone-related covariance between amygdala volumes and whole-brain CTh, as well as its relationship to aggression levels, in a longitudinal sample of children, adolescents, and young adults 6-22 years old. We found: (1) testosterone-specific modulation of the covariance between the amygdala and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC); (2) a significant relationship between amygdala-mPFC covariance and levels of aggression; and (3) mediation effects of amygdala-mPFC covariance on the relationship between testosterone and aggression. These effects were independent of sex, age, pubertal stage, estradiol levels and anxious-depressed symptoms. These findings are consistent with prior evidence that testosterone targets the neural circuits regulating affect and impulse regulation, and show, for the first time in humans, how androgen-dependent organizational effects may regulate a very specific, aggression-related structural brain phenotype from childhood to young adulthood. PMID:26431805

  20. DHEA effects on brain and behavior: insights from comparative studies of aggression.

    PubMed

    Soma, Kiran K; Rendon, Nikki M; Boonstra, Rudy; Albers, H Elliott; Demas, Gregory E

    2015-01-01

    Historically, research on the neuroendocrinology of aggression has been dominated by the paradigm that the brain receives sex steroid hormones, such as testosterone (T), from the gonads, and then these gonadal hormones modulate behaviorally relevant neural circuits. While this paradigm has been extremely useful for advancing the field, recent studies reveal important alternatives. For example, most vertebrate species are seasonal breeders, and many species show aggression outside of the breeding season, when the gonads are regressed and circulating levels of gonadal steroids are relatively low. Studies in diverse avian and mammalian species suggest that adrenal dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), an androgen precursor and prohormone, is important for the expression of aggression when gonadal T synthesis is low. Circulating DHEA can be converted into active sex steroids within the brain. In addition, the brain can synthesize sex steroids de novo from cholesterol, thereby uncoupling brain steroid levels from circulating steroid levels. These alternative mechanisms to provide sex steroids to specific neural circuits may have evolved to avoid the costs of high circulating T levels during the non-breeding season. Physiological indicators of season (e.g., melatonin) may allow animals to switch from one neuroendocrine mechanism to another across the year. DHEA and neurosteroids are likely to be important for the control of multiple behaviors in many species, including humans. These studies yield fundamental insights into the regulation of DHEA secretion, the mechanisms by which DHEA affects behavior, and the brain regions and neural processes that are modulated by DHEA. It is clear that the brain is an important site of DHEA synthesis and action. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Essential role of DHEA'. PMID:24928552

  1. Brain Ischemia in Patients with Intracranial Hemorrhage: Pathophysiological Reasoning for Aggressive Diagnostic Management

    PubMed Central

    Naranjo, Daniel; Arkuszewski, Michal; Rudzinski, Wojciech; Melhem, Elias R.; Krejza, Jaroslaw

    2013-01-01

    Summary Patients with intracranial hemorrhage have to be managed aggressively to avoid or minimize secondary brain damage due to ischemia, which contributes to high morbidity and mortality. The risk of brain ischemia, however, is not the same in every patient. The risk of complications associated with an aggressive prophylactic therapy in patients with a low risk of brain ischemia can outweigh the benefits of therapy. Accurate and timely identification of patients at highest risk is a diagnostic challenge. Despite the availability of many diagnostic tools, stroke is common in this population, mostly because the pathogenesis of stroke is frequently multifactorial whereas diagnosticians tend to focus on one or two risk factors. The pathophysiological mechanisms of brain ischemia in patients with intracranial hemorrhage are not yet fully elucidated and there are several important areas of ongoing research. Therefore, this review describes physiological and pathophysiological aspects associated with the development of brain ischemia such as the mechanism of oxygen and carbon dioxide effects on the cerebrovascular system, neurovascular coupling and respiratory and cardiovascular factors influencing cerebral hemodynamics. Consequently, we review investigations of cerebral blood flow disturbances relevant to various hemodynamic states associated with high intracranial pressure, cerebral embolism, and cerebral vasospasm along with current treatment options. PMID:24355179

  2. Large-scale gene expression profiling of discrete brain regions: potential, limitations, and application in genetics of aggressive behavior.

    PubMed

    Feldker, Dorine E M; de Kloet, E Ronald; Kruk, Menno R; Datson, Nicole A

    2003-09-01

    Many behavioral geneticists are interested in unraveling the molecular mechanisms underlying aggressive behavior. So far, most scientists have based their search for aggression-related genes on a preliminary functional hypothesis. Large-scale gene expression profiling techniques, such as serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) and DNA microarrays, now enable the screening of expression levels of thousands of genes simultaneously, allowing the identification of new candidate aggression-related genes expressed in brain and thus the generation of new hypotheses. However, expression profiling in the brain is challenging, as brain is a complex heterogeneous tissue where large numbers of genes are expressed and relatively small changes in gene expression occur. In this special issue, we focus on the principles of SAGE and DNA microarrays, as well as their advantages and disadvantages and application to analysis in brain tissue in order to identify aggression-related genes. PMID:14574131

  3. Epstein-Barr Virus MicroRNA Expression Increases Aggressiveness of Solid Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Pandya, Deep; Mariani, Marisa; He, Shiquan; Andreoli, Mirko; Spennato, Manuela; Dowell-Martino, Candice; Fiedler, Paul; Ferlini, Cristiano

    2015-01-01

    The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) microRNA (miRNA) initiative has revealed a pivotal role for miRNAs in cancer. Utilizing the TCGA raw data, we performed the first mapping of viral miRNA sequences within cancer and adjacent normal tissues. Results were integrated with TCGA RNA-seq to link the expression of viral miRNAs to the phenotype. Using clinical data and viral miRNA mapping results we also performed outcome analysis. Three lines of evidence lend credence to an active role of viral miRNAs in solid malignancies. First, expression of viral miRNA is consistently higher in cancerous compared to adjacent noncancerous tissues. Second, viral miRNA expression is associated with significantly worse clinical outcome among patients with early stage malignancy. These patients are also featured by increased expression of PD1/PD-L1, a pathway implicated in tumors escaping immune destruction. Finally, a particular cluster of EBV-miRNA (miR-BART2, miR-BART4, miR-BART5, miR-BART18, and miR-BART22) is associated with expression of cytokines known to inhibit host response to cancer. Quantification of specific viral miRNAs may help identify patients who are at risk of poor outcome. These patients may be candidates for novel therapeutic strategies incorporating antiviral agents and/or inhibitors of the PD-1/PD-L1 pathway. PMID:26375401

  4. Genetic Influences on Brain Gene Expression in Rats Selected for Tameness and Aggression

    PubMed Central

    Heyne, Henrike O.; Lautenschläger, Susann; Nelson, Ronald; Besnier, François; Rotival, Maxime; Cagan, Alexander; Kozhemyakina, Rimma; Plyusnina, Irina Z.; Trut, Lyudmila; Carlborg, Örjan; Petretto, Enrico; Kruglyak, Leonid; Pääbo, Svante; Schöneberg, Torsten; Albert, Frank W.

    2014-01-01

    Interindividual differences in many behaviors are partly due to genetic differences, but the identification of the genes and variants that influence behavior remains challenging. Here, we studied an F2 intercross of two outbred lines of rats selected for tame and aggressive behavior toward humans for >64 generations. By using a mapping approach that is able to identify genetic loci segregating within the lines, we identified four times more loci influencing tameness and aggression than by an approach that assumes fixation of causative alleles, suggesting that many causative loci were not driven to fixation by the selection. We used RNA sequencing in 150 F2 animals to identify hundreds of loci that influence brain gene expression. Several of these loci colocalize with tameness loci and may reflect the same genetic variants. Through analyses of correlations between allele effects on behavior and gene expression, differential expression between the tame and aggressive rat selection lines, and correlations between gene expression and tameness in F2 animals, we identify the genes Gltscr2, Lgi4, Zfp40, and Slc17a7 as candidate contributors to the strikingly different behavior of the tame and aggressive animals. PMID:25189874

  5. Monoaminergic neurotransmitter alterations in postmortem brain regions of depressed and aggressive patients with Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Vermeiren, Yannick; Van Dam, Debby; Aerts, Tony; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan; De Deyn, Peter P

    2014-12-01

    Depression and aggression in Alzheimer's disease (AD) are 2 of the most severe and prominent neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS). Altered monoaminergic neurotransmitter system functioning has been implicated in both NPS, although their neurochemical etiology remains to be elucidated. Left frozen hemispheres of 40 neuropathologically confirmed AD patients were regionally dissected. Dichotomization based on depression and aggression scores resulted in depressed/nondepressed (AD + D/AD - D) and aggressive/nonaggressive (AD + Agr/AD - Agr) groups. Concentrations of dopamine, serotonin (5-HT), (nor)epinephrine ((N)E), and respective metabolites were determined using reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. Significantly lower 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycol (MHPG) and higher homovanillic acid levels were observed in Brodmann area (BA) 9 and 10 of AD + D compared with AD - D. In AD + Agr, 5-hydroxy-3-indoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) levels in BA9, 5-HIAA to 5-HT ratios in BA11, and MHPG, NE, and 5-HIAA levels in the hippocampus were significantly decreased compared with AD - Agr. These findings indicate that brain region-specific altered monoamines and metabolites may contribute to the occurrence of depression and aggression in AD. PMID:24997673

  6. Clinical aggressiveness of malignant gliomas is linked to augmented metabolism of amino acids.

    PubMed

    Panosyan, Eduard H; Lasky, Joseph L; Lin, Henry J; Lai, Albert; Hai, Yang; Guo, Xiuqing; Quinn, Michael; Nelson, Stanley F; Cloughesy, Timothy F; Nghiemphu, P Leia

    2016-05-01

    Glutamine, glutamate, asparagine, and aspartate are involved in an enzyme-network that controls nitrogen metabolism. Branched-chain-amino-acid aminotransferase-1 (BCAT1) promotes proliferation of gliomas with wild-type IDH1 and is closely connected to the network. We hypothesized that metabolism of asparagine, glutamine, and branched-chain-amino-acids is associated with progression of malignant gliomas. Gene expression for asparagine synthetase (ASNS), glutaminase (GLS), and BCAT1 were analyzed in 164 gliomas from 156 patients [33-anaplastic gliomas (AG) and 131-glioblastomas (GBM), 64 of which were recurrent GBMs]. ASNS and GLS were twofold higher in GBMs versus AGs. BCAT1 was also higher in GBMs. ASNS expression was twofold higher in recurrent versus new GBMs. Five patients had serial samples: 4-showed higher ASNS and 3-higher GLS at recurrence. We analyzed grade and treatment in 4 groups: (1) low ASNS, GLS, and BCAT1 (n = 96); (2) low ASNS and GLS, but high BCAT1 (n = 26); (3) high ASNS or GLS, but low BCAT1 (n = 25); and (4) high ASNS or GLS and high BCAT1 (n = 17). Ninety-one  % of patients (29/32) with grade-III lesions were in group 1. In contrast, 95 % of patients (62/65) in groups 2-4 had GBMs. Treatment was similar in 4 groups (radiotherapy-80 %; temozolomide-30 %; other chemotherapy-50 %). High expression of ASNS, GLS, and BCAT1 were each associated with poor survival in the entire group. The combination of lower ASNS, GLS, and BCAT1 levels correlated with better survival for newly diagnosed GBMs (66 patients; P = 0.0039). Only tumors with lower enzymes showed improved outcome with temozolomide. IDH1(WT) gliomas had higher expression of these genes. Manipulation of amino acid metabolism in malignant gliomas may be further studied for therapeutics development. PMID:26922345

  7. Yoga Therapy in Treating Patients With Malignant Brain Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-27

    Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Adult Anaplastic Ependymoma; Adult Anaplastic Meningioma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Brain Stem Glioma; Adult Choroid Plexus Tumor; Adult Diffuse Astrocytoma; Adult Ependymoblastoma; Adult Ependymoma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Grade II Meningioma; Adult Medulloblastoma; Adult Meningeal Hemangiopericytoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Oligodendroglioma; Adult Papillary Meningioma; Adult Pineal Gland Astrocytoma; Adult Pineoblastoma; Adult Pineocytoma; Adult Supratentorial Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor (PNET); Recurrent Adult Brain Tumor

  8. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its precursor (proBDNF) in genetically defined fear-induced aggression.

    PubMed

    Ilchibaeva, Tatiana V; Kondaurova, Elena M; Tsybko, Anton S; Kozhemyakina, Rimma V; Popova, Nina K; Naumenko, Vladimir S

    2015-09-01

    The brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), its precursor (proBDNF) and BDNF mRNA levels were studied in the brain of wild rats selectively bred for more than 70 generations for either high level or for the lack of affective aggressiveness towards man. Significant increase of BDNF mRNA level in the frontal cortex and increase of BDNF level in the hippocampus of aggressive rats was revealed. In the midbrain and hippocampus of aggressive rats proBDNF level was increased, whereas BDNF/proBDNF ratio was reduced suggesting the prevalence and increased influence of proBDNF in highly aggressive rats. In the frontal cortex, proBDNF level in aggressive rats was decreased. Thus, considerable structure-specific differences in BDNF and proBDNF levels as well as in BDNF gene expression between highly aggressive and nonaggressive rats were shown. The data suggested the implication of BDNF and its precursor proBDNF in the mechanism of aggressiveness and in the creation of either aggressive or nonaggressive phenotype. PMID:25934485

  9. Neurocognitive Deficits After Radiation Therapy for Brain Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Saad, Shumaila; Wang, Tony J C

    2015-12-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) has proven to be an effective therapeutic tool in treatment of a wide variety of brain tumors; however, it has a negative impact on quality of life and neurocognitive function. Cognitive dysfunction associated with both the disease and adverse effects of RT is one of the most concerning complication among long-term survivors. The effects of RT to brain can be divided into acute, early delayed, and late delayed. It is, however, the late delayed effects of RT that lead to severe neurological consequences such as minor-to-severe cognitive deficits due to irreversible focal or diffuse necrosis of brain parenchyma. In this review, we discuss current and emerging data regarding the relationship between RT and neurocognitive outcomes, and therapeutic strategies to prevent/treat postradiation neurocognitive deficits. PMID:25503433

  10. Fluorescein Sodium-Guided Surgery of Malignant Brain Tumors: History, Current Concepts, and Future Project.

    PubMed

    Schebesch, Karl-Michael; Brawanski, Alexander; Hohenberger, Christoph; Hohne, Julius

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescein sodium (FL)-guided resection has become an important and beneficial treatment method for malignant brain tumors. FL-guided resection improves the rate of gross total resection in high-grade gliomas (HGG) and cerebral metastases (CM). FL sensitively visualizes the disruption of the blood-brain barrier in the area surrounding malignant lesions, similar to contrast-enhanced T1-weighted MR sequences. This review of the current literature summarizes the history of FL in neurosurgery from 1946 until today. We discuss the molecular mechanism of FL accumulation in cerebral malignant tumors and provide an overview of the current practice of using FL and applying a dedicated surgical microscope filter. Additionally, we outline and discuss ongoing trials and future projects. PMID:26956810

  11. Elucidating the mechanobiology of malignant brain tumors using a brain matrix-mimetic hyaluronic acid hydrogel platform

    PubMed Central

    Ananthanarayanan, Badriprasad; Kim, Yushan; Kumar, Sanjay

    2011-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a malignant brain tumor characterized by diffuse infiltration of single cells into the brain parenchyma, which is a process that relies in part on aberrant biochemical and biophysical interactions between tumor cells and the brain extracellular matrix (ECM). A major obstacle to understanding ECM regulation of GBM invasion is the absence of model matrix systems that recapitulate the distinct composition and physical structure of brain ECM while allowing independent control of adhesive ligand density, mechanics, and microstructure. To address this need, we synthesized brain-mimetic ECMs based on hyaluronic acid (HA) with a range of stiffnesses that encompasses normal and tumorigenic brain tissue and functionalized these materials with short Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) peptides to facilitate cell adhesion. Scanning electron micrographs of the hydrogels revealed a dense, sheet-like microstructure with apparent nanoscale porosity similar to brain extracellular space. On flat hydrogel substrates, glioma cell spreading area and actin stress fiber assembly increased strongly with increasing density of RGD peptide. Increasing HA stiffness under constant RGD density produced similar trends and increased the speed of random motility. In a three-dimensional (3D) spheroid paradigm, glioma cells invaded HA hydrogels with morphological patterns distinct from those observed on flat surfaces or in 3D collagen-based ECMs but highly reminiscent of those seen in brain slices. This material system represents a brain-mimetic model ECM with tunable ligand density and stiffness amenable to investigations of the mechanobiological regulation of brain tumor progression. PMID:21820737

  12. Prevalence of sex chromosome loss in benign and malignant brain neoplasms

    SciTech Connect

    Al Saadi, A.

    1994-09-01

    Loss of gonosomes in a variety of benign and malignant neoplasms is well-documented, but the clinical and/or biological significance of such loss remains obscure. Loss of the Y chromosome from the leukocytes of elderly men is also well-known. In an attempt to elucidate the significance of the loss of gonosomes, we have determined the incidence of such loss in human brain tumors ranging from benign to highly malignant. Loss of the X or Y chromosomes were evaluated by karyotyping short-term cultures and by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) on uncultured samples of 129 tumors. Loss of gonosomes was also evaluated in leukocytes from these patients. In glioblastoma multiforme (GM), the Y chromosome was lost from 64% and the X from 41% of 42 tumors. The Y chromosome was lost from 36% of 55 meningiomas (MA) and from 33% of other less malignant gliomas. Loss of the X chromosome was negligible in both MAs and the pre- or less malignant gliomas. Loss of the X or the Y in GM was the most common nonrandom abnormality and loss of the Y was the most nonrandom abnormality in all brain tumors, other than MA in which loss of chromosome 22 is the most common. There was insignificant difference in the detection of gonosomes loss by karyotyping or by FISH of interphase cells. There was no loss of gonosomes in the leukocytes of the studied patients. Although the significance of the X or Y loss is not clear, it appears that gonosomes play a role in the development of brain tumors. The gonosomes may carry genes involved in growth regulation. Although loss of the X or Y is nonrandom, loss of the X was limited to the malignant brain neoplasms whereas loss of the Y was noted in both benign and malignant tumors, which may suggest different functions in growth regulation of the two chromosomes.

  13. Effective transvascular delivery of nanoparticles across the blood-brain tumor barrier into malignant glioma cells

    PubMed Central

    Sarin, Hemant; Kanevsky, Ariel S; Wu, Haitao; Brimacombe, Kyle R; Fung, Steve H; Sousa, Alioscka A; Auh, Sungyoung; Wilson, Colin M; Sharma, Kamal; Aronova, Maria A; Leapman, Richard D; Griffiths, Gary L; Hall, Matthew D

    2008-01-01

    Background Effective transvascular delivery of nanoparticle-based chemotherapeutics across the blood-brain tumor barrier of malignant gliomas remains a challenge. This is due to our limited understanding of nanoparticle properties in relation to the physiologic size of pores within the blood-brain tumor barrier. Polyamidoamine dendrimers are particularly small multigenerational nanoparticles with uniform sizes within each generation. Dendrimer sizes increase by only 1 to 2 nm with each successive generation. Using functionalized polyamidoamine dendrimer generations 1 through 8, we investigated how nanoparticle size influences particle accumulation within malignant glioma cells. Methods Magnetic resonance and fluorescence imaging probes were conjugated to the dendrimer terminal amines. Functionalized dendrimers were administered intravenously to rodents with orthotopically grown malignant gliomas. Transvascular transport and accumulation of the nanoparticles in brain tumor tissue was measured in vivo with dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging. Localization of the nanoparticles within glioma cells was confirmed ex vivo with fluorescence imaging. Results We found that the intravenously administered functionalized dendrimers less than approximately 11.7 to 11.9 nm in diameter were able to traverse pores of the blood-brain tumor barrier of RG-2 malignant gliomas, while larger ones could not. Of the permeable functionalized dendrimer generations, those that possessed long blood half-lives could accumulate within glioma cells. Conclusion The therapeutically relevant upper limit of blood-brain tumor barrier pore size is approximately 11.7 to 11.9 nm. Therefore, effective transvascular drug delivery into malignant glioma cells can be accomplished by using nanoparticles that are smaller than 11.7 to 11.9 nm in diameter and possess long blood half-lives. PMID:19094226

  14. Targeting Tregs in Malignant Brain Cancer: Overcoming IDO

    PubMed Central

    Wainwright, Derek A.; Dey, Mahua; Chang, Alan; Lesniak, Maciej S.

    2013-01-01

    One of the hallmark features of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most common adult primary brain tumor with a very dismal prognosis, is the accumulation of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs). Regulatory T cells (Tregs) segregate into two primary categories: thymus-derived natural Tregs (nTregs) that develop from the interaction between immature T cells and thymic epithelial stromal cells, and inducible Tregs (iTregs) that arise from the conversion of CD4+FoxP3− T cells into FoxP3 expressing cells. Normally, these Treg subsets complement one another’s actions by maintaining tolerance of self-antigens, thereby suppressing autoimmunity, while also enabling effective immune responses toward non-self-antigens, thus promoting infectious protection. However, Tregs have also been shown to be associated with the promotion of pathological outcomes, including cancer. In the setting of GBM, nTregs appear to be primary players that contribute to immunotherapeutic failure, ultimately leading to tumor progression. Several attempts have been made to therapeutically target these cells with variable levels of success. The blood brain barrier-crossing chemotherapeutics, temozolomide, and cyclophosphamide (CTX), vaccination against the Treg transcriptional regulator, FoxP3, as well as mAbs against Treg-associated cell surface molecules CD25, CTLA-4, and GITR are all different therapeutic approaches under investigation. Contributing to the poor success of past approaches is the expression of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 (IDO), a tryptophan catabolizing enzyme overexpressed in GBM, and critically involved in regulating tumor-infiltrating Treg levels. Herein, we review the current literature on Tregs in brain cancer, providing a detailed phenotype, causative mechanisms involved in their pathogenesis, and strategies that have been used to target this population, therapeutically. PMID:23720663

  15. Targeting Tregs in Malignant Brain Cancer: Overcoming IDO.

    PubMed

    Wainwright, Derek A; Dey, Mahua; Chang, Alan; Lesniak, Maciej S

    2013-01-01

    One of the hallmark features of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most common adult primary brain tumor with a very dismal prognosis, is the accumulation of CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs). Regulatory T cells (Tregs) segregate into two primary categories: thymus-derived natural Tregs (nTregs) that develop from the interaction between immature T cells and thymic epithelial stromal cells, and inducible Tregs (iTregs) that arise from the conversion of CD4(+)FoxP3(-) T cells into FoxP3 expressing cells. Normally, these Treg subsets complement one another's actions by maintaining tolerance of self-antigens, thereby suppressing autoimmunity, while also enabling effective immune responses toward non-self-antigens, thus promoting infectious protection. However, Tregs have also been shown to be associated with the promotion of pathological outcomes, including cancer. In the setting of GBM, nTregs appear to be primary players that contribute to immunotherapeutic failure, ultimately leading to tumor progression. Several attempts have been made to therapeutically target these cells with variable levels of success. The blood brain barrier-crossing chemotherapeutics, temozolomide, and cyclophosphamide (CTX), vaccination against the Treg transcriptional regulator, FoxP3, as well as mAbs against Treg-associated cell surface molecules CD25, CTLA-4, and GITR are all different therapeutic approaches under investigation. Contributing to the poor success of past approaches is the expression of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 (IDO), a tryptophan catabolizing enzyme overexpressed in GBM, and critically involved in regulating tumor-infiltrating Treg levels. Herein, we review the current literature on Tregs in brain cancer, providing a detailed phenotype, causative mechanisms involved in their pathogenesis, and strategies that have been used to target this population, therapeutically. PMID:23720663

  16. Towards the use of HIFU, in Conjunction with Surgery, in the Treatment of Malignant Brain Tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahl, Elizabeth; Nguyen, Lisa T.; Sparks, Rachel E.; Brayman, Andy A.; Olios, Ryan J.; Silbergeld, Daniel L.; Vaezy, Sarah; Mourad, Pierre D.

    2006-05-01

    The first medical response to the presence of a brain tumor is often its resection, both to alleviate mass effect, and to obtain tissue for diagnosis, itself necessary for guiding adjunctive therapy. Malignant brain tumors typically recur at the tumor resection margin. Most current chemotherapy and radiotherapy strategies target local recurrence with limited success. Here we review a new strategy for delivering chemotherapeutics for brain tumor recurrence. It uses intra-operative high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) to transiently open the blood-brain barrier (BBB) over a significantly large volume of brain at and near the resection margin to enhance the subsequent delivery of systemically delivered chemotherapeutic agents into the region of tumor recurrence.

  17. New technologies to combat malignant tumours of the brain.

    PubMed

    Heppner, F

    1982-01-01

    1. The primary problem in an effective treatment of a glioblastoma is the prevention of a recurrence. 2. For that purpose were the following therapeutical procedures undertaken: (a) Temporary implantation of radio cobalt in the brain itself (1957): (b) Clostridium butyricum M 55 was used to render the centre of the tumour fluid (1967): (c) Podophyllin was used to destroy the border of the tumour (1980); (d) The CO2 Laser beam (1975); (e) The electromagnetic heat induction deep in the brain (1973-1978). 3. In order to make the operation and postoperative phase safer for the patient, the following precautions were drawn upon or employed: (a) Hyperbaric oxygenisation in the pressure chamber (1971); (b) The anti-G-suit (1974); (c) the computer controlled automatic infusion pump (1980), and (d) the telemetric measurement of intra-cranial pressure (1975). 4. Apart from the pressure chamber, the mentioned devices were all supervised and developed in the department of the author. 5. The first successful means in the prevention of the recurrence of a glioblastoma multiform seems to be the telethermic method mentioned in 2 (e) above. PMID:6287907

  18. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor-deficient mice develop aggressiveness and hyperphagia in conjunction with brain serotonergic abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, W. Ernest; Mamounas, Laura A.; Ricaurte, George A.; Coppola, Vincenzo; Reid, Susan W.; Bora, Susan H.; Wihler, Cornelia; Koliatsos, Vassilis E.; Tessarollo, Lino

    1999-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has trophic effects on serotonergic (5-HT) neurons in the central nervous system. However, the role of endogenous BDNF in the development and function of these neurons has not been established in vivo because of the early postnatal lethality of BDNF null mice. In the present study, we use heterozygous BDNF+/− mice that have a normal life span and show that these animals develop enhanced intermale aggressiveness and hyperphagia accompanied by significant weight gain in early adulthood; these behavioral abnormalities are known to correlate with 5-HT dysfunction. Forebrain 5-HT levels and fiber density in BDNF+/− mice are normal at an early age but undergo premature age-associated decrements. However, young adult BDNF+/− mice show a blunted c-fos induction by the specific serotonin releaser-uptake inhibitor dexfenfluramine and alterations in the expression of several 5-HT receptors in the cortex, hippocampus, and hypothalamus. The heightened aggressiveness can be ameliorated by the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine. Our results indicate that endogenous BDNF is critical for the normal development and function of central 5-HT neurons and for the elaboration of behaviors that depend on these nerve cells. Therefore, BDNF+/− mice may provide a useful model to study human psychiatric disorders attributed to dysfunction of serotonergic neurons. PMID:10611369

  19. Isolation and characterization of human malignant glioma cells from histologically normal brain.

    PubMed

    Silbergeld, D L; Chicoine, M R

    1997-03-01

    Brain invasion prevents complete surgical extirpation of malignant gliomas; however, invasive cells from distant, histologically normal brain previously have not been isolated, cultured, and characterized. To evaluate invasive human malignant glioma cells, the authors established cultures from gross tumor and histologically normal brain. Three men and one woman, with a mean age of 67 years, underwent two frontal and two temporal lobectomies for tumors, which yielded specimens of both gross tumor and histologically normal brain. Each specimen was acquired a minimum of 4 cm from the gross tumor. The specimens were split: a portion was sent for neuropathological evaluation (three glioblastomas multiforme and one oligodendroglioma) and a portion was used to establish cell lines. Morphologically, the specimens of gross tumor and histologically normal brain were identical in three of the four cell culture pairs. Histochemical staining characteristics were consistent both within each pair and when compared with the specimens sent for neuropathological evaluation. Cultures demonstrated anchorage-independent growth in soft agarose and neoplastic karyotypes. Growth rates in culture were greater for histologically normal brain than for gross tumor in three of the four culture pairs. Although the observed increases in growth rates of histologically normal brain cultures do not correlate with in vivo behavior, these findings corroborate the previously reported stem cell potential of invasive glioma cells. Using the radial dish assay, no significant differences in motility between cultures of gross tumor and histologically normal brain were found. In summary, tumor cells were cultured from histologically normal brain acquired from a distance greater than 4 cm from the gross tumor, indicating the relative insensitivity of standard histopathological identification of invasive glioma cells (and hence the inadequacy of frozen-section evaluation of resection margins). Cell lines

  20. Deep brain stimulation for aggressive behavior and obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Messina, Giuseppe; Islam, Lucrezia; Cordella, Roberto; Gambini, Orsola; Franzini, Angelo

    2016-06-01

    Drug-resistant obsessive-compulsive disorder and aggressive behavior are two severely disabling psychiatric conditions which may carry a certain burden on the patients themselves and on their families. In the last decade, the fields of interests of deep brain stimulation (DBS) also encompass psychiatric disorders, supported by imaging and neurophysiological techniques. We here report our institutional experience with the two above-mentioned disorders, describing the procedure commonly employed and the results obtained. Refinement of such techniques, possibly relying on advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), together with probabilistic pictures of field of activation models, could shed more light into this complex field of investigation; further studies are necessary to confirm and make actual results a starting point to new and more precise methodologies in this stimulating research field. PMID:27007543

  1. The metastatic microenvironment: Claudin-1 suppresses the malignant phenotype of melanoma brain metastasis.

    PubMed

    Izraely, Sivan; Sagi-Assif, Orit; Klein, Anat; Meshel, Tsipi; Ben-Menachem, Shlomit; Zaritsky, Assaf; Ehrlich, Marcelo; Prieto, Victor G; Bar-Eli, Menashe; Pirker, Christine; Berger, Walter; Nahmias, Clara; Couraud, Pierre-Olivier; Hoon, Dave S B; Witz, Isaac P

    2015-03-15

    Brain metastases occur frequently in melanoma patients with advanced disease whereby the prognosis is dismal. The underlying mechanisms of melanoma brain metastasis development are not well understood. Identification of molecular determinants regulating melanoma brain metastasis would advance the development of prevention and therapy strategies for this disease. Gene expression profiles of cutaneous and brain-metastasizing melanoma variants from three xenograft tumor models established in our laboratory revealed that expression of tight junction component CLDN1 was lower in the brain-metastasizing variants than in cutaneous variants from the same melanoma. The objective of our study was to determine the significance of CLDN1 downregulation/loss in metastatic melanoma and its role in melanoma brain metastasis. An immunohistochemical analysis of human cells of the melanocyte lineage indicated a significant CLDN1 downregulation in metastatic melanomas. Transduction of melanoma brain metastatic cells expressing low levels of CLDN1 with a CLDN1 retrovirus suppressed their metastatic phenotype. CLDN1-overexpressing melanoma cells expressed a lower ability to migrate and adhere to extracellular matrix, reduced tumor aggressiveness in nude mice and, most importantly, eliminated the formation of micrometastases in the brain. In sharp contrast, the ability of the CLDN1-overexpressing cells to form lung micrometastases was not impaired. CLDN1-mediated interactions between these cells and brain endothelial cells constitute the mechanism underlying these results. Taken together, we demonstrated that downregulation or loss of CLDN1 supports the formation of melanoma brain metastasis, and that CLDN1 expression could be a useful prognostic predictor for melanoma patients with a high risk of brain metastasis. PMID:25046141

  2. Demethoxycurcumin Retards Cell Growth and Induces Apoptosis in Human Brain Malignant Glioma GBM 8401 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Tzuu-Yuan; Hsu, Che-Wen; Chang, Weng-Cheng; Wang, Miin-Yau; Wu, June-Fu; Hsu, Yi-Chiang

    2012-01-01

    Demethoxycurcumin (DMC; a curcumin-related demethoxy compound) has been recently shown to display antioxidant and antitumor activities. It has also produced a potent chemopreventive action against cancer. In the present study, the antiproliferation (using the MTT assay, DMC was found to have cytotoxic activities against GBM 8401 cell with IC50 values at 22.71 μM) and induced apoptosis effects of DMC have been investigated in human brain malignant glioma GBM 8401 cells. We have studied the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), DNA fragmentation, caspase activation, and NF-κB transcriptional factor activity. By these approaches, our results indicated that DMC has produced an inhibition of cell proliferation as well as the activation of apoptosis in GBM 8401 cells. Both effects were observed to increase in proportion with the dosage of DMC treatment, and the apoptosis was induced by DMC in human brain malignant glioma GBM 8401 cells via mitochondria- and caspase-dependent pathways. PMID:22454662

  3. Effects of ractopamine feeding, gender and social rank on aggressiveness and monoamine concentrations in different brain areas of finishing pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study evaluated the effects of the feed additive ractopamine (RAC), gender and social rank on aggressiveness and brain monoamines levels of serotonin (5HT), dopamine (DA), their metabolites, norepinephrine (NE) and epinephrine (EP) in finishing pigs. Thirty-two pigs (16 barrows/16 gilts) were a...

  4. Malignant melanoma brain metastases. Review of Roswell Park Memorial Institute experience.

    PubMed

    Madajewicz, S; Karakousis, C; West, C R; Caracandas, J; Avellanosa, A M

    1984-06-01

    One-hundred twenty five of 700 patients with malignant melanoma treated at Roswell Park Memorial Institute from 1972 to 1978 were found to have brain metastases. Seventy-three percent of the patients had multiple brain metastases. Male to female ratio was 1.9:1. The median survival of the untreated group of patients was 3 weeks as compared with that of 6 weeks for the patients maintained on steroids only, 9 weeks for those who received radiotherapy, 11 weeks for the patients treated with intraarterial chemotherapy, and 26 weeks for the patients who underwent successful surgical excision of a solitary lesion. PMID:6713349

  5. Early CT findings after interstitial radiation therapy for primary malignant brain tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Tolly, T.L.; Bruckman, J.E.; Czarnecki, D.J.; Frazin, L.J.; Lewis, H.J.; Richards, M.J.; Adamkiewicz, J.J. Jr.

    1988-11-01

    The CT findings after interstitial radiation therapy for brain tumors have not been extensively described. We evaluated retrospectively the CT scans of 13 patients who were treated with brachytherapy for malignant glioma. We found no typical CT appearance that differentiates recurrent tumor from radiation effect. After undergoing brachytherapy, eight of the 13 patients scanned demonstrated enhancement of brain tissue beyond the margins of the original enhancing tumor mass. In most cases, the pattern of enhancement diminished and extended more peripherally from the central necrotic area with time. We also report a new CT finding of focal calcification developing at the site of the radioactive implant.

  6. Aggressiveness and brain amine concentration in dominant and subordinate finishing pigs fed the beta-adrenoreceptor agonist ractopamine.

    PubMed

    Poletto, R; Cheng, H W; Meisel, R L; Garner, J P; Richert, B T; Marchant-Forde, J N

    2010-09-01

    Under farm conditions, aggression related to the formation of social hierarchy and competition for resources can be a major problem because of associated injuries, social stress, and carcass losses. Any factor that may affect the regulation and amount of aggression within a farmed system, for instance, feeding the beta-adrenoreceptor agonist ractopamine (RAC), is therefore worthy of investigation. The objectives of this study were to assess the effects of the widely used swine feed additive RAC, considering also the effects of sex and social rank on aggressiveness and concentrations of brain amines, neurotransmitters essential for controlling aggression, in finishing pigs. Thirty-two barrows and 32 gilts (4 pigs/pen by sex) were fed either a control diet or a diet with RAC (Paylean, Elanco Animal Health, Greenfield, IN) added (5 mg/kg for 2 wk, followed by 10 mg/kg for 2 wk). The top dominant and bottom subordinate pigs (16 pigs/sex) in each pen were determined after mixing by a 36-h period of continuous behavioral observation. These pigs were then subjected to resident-intruder tests (maximum 300 s) during the feeding trial to measure aggressiveness. At the end of wk 4, the amygdala, frontal cortex, hypothalamus, and raphe nuclei were dissected and analyzed for concentrations of dopamine (DA); serotonin (5-HT); their metabolites 3,4-dihydroxyphenyl acetic acid (DOPAC) and homovanillic acid, and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), respectively; norepinephrine; and epinephrine using HPLC. Ractopamine-fed gilts performed more attacks during the first 30 s of testing than pigs in all other subgroups (P < 0.05). By the end of the resident-intruder test (300 s), the dominant control gilts and barrows, and both dominant and subordinate RAC-fed gilts performed the greatest percentage of attacks (P < 0.05). Gilts had decreased norepinephrine and DOPAC concentrations in the amygdala and frontal cortex, and when fed RAC, gilts also had the least 5-HIAA concentration and

  7. Synthesis and evaluation of boron compounds for neutron capture therapy of malignant brain tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Soloway, A.H.; Barth, R.F.

    1990-01-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy offers the potentiality for treating brain tumors currently resistant to treatment. The success of this form of therapy is directly dependent upon the delivery of sufficient numbers of thermal-neutrons to tumor cells which possess high concentrations of B-10. The objective of this project is to develop chemical methodology to synthesize boron-containing compounds with the potential for becoming incorporated into rapidly-dividing malignant brain tumor cells and excluded from normal components of the brain and surrounding tissues, to develope biological methods for assessing the potential of the compound by use of cell culture or intratumoral injection, to develop analytical methodology for measuring boron in cells and tissue using direct current plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (DCP-AES) and alpha track autoradiography, to develop biochemical and HPLC procedures for evaluating compound uptake and tissue half-life, and to develop procedures required to assess both in vitro and vivo efficacy of BNCT with selected compounds.

  8. Developmental effects of aggressive behavior in male adolescents assessed with structural and functional brain imaging

    PubMed Central

    Strenziok, Maren; Krueger, Frank; Heinecke, Armin; Lenroot, Rhoshel K.; Knutson, Kristine M.; van der Meer, Elke

    2011-01-01

    Aggressive behavior is common during adolescence. Although aggression-related functional changes in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) and frontopolar cortex (FPC) have been reported in adults, the neural correlates of aggressive behavior in adolescents, particularly in the context of structural neurodevelopment, are obscure. We used functional and structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to measure the blood oxygenation level-depended signal and cortical thickness. In a block-designed experiment, 14–17-year old adolescents imagined aggressive and non-aggressive interactions with a peer. We show reduced vmPFC activation associated with imagined aggressive behavior as well as enhanced aggression-related activation and cortical thinning in the FPC with increasing age. Changes in FPC activation were also associated with judgments of the severity of aggressive acts. Reduced vmPFC activation was associated with greater aggression indicating its normal function is to exert inhibitory control over aggressive impulses. Concurrent FPC activation likely reflects foresight of harmful consequences that result from aggressive acts. The correlation of age-dependent activation changes and cortical thinning demonstrates ongoing maturation of the FPC during adolescence towards a refinement of social and cognitive information processing that can potentially facilitate mature social behavior in aggressive contexts. PMID:19770220

  9. Previously Undiagnosed Malignant Brain Tumor Discovered During Examination of a Patient Seeking Chiropractic Care

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Objective This case report describes the diagnosis of a malignant brain tumor in a patient requesting chiropractic care for headaches after a motor vehicle accident. Clinical Features A 30-year-old man presented with numbness and tingling in all extremities, lower extremity muscle weakness, and a recent increase in headaches with the loss of ability to concentrate. He was involved in a high-speed motor vehicle collision approximately 4 months before the onset of symptoms. Examination showed slow gait with a lack of arm swing, bilateral hip flexors and knee extensors were all graded as 4/5 on muscle testing, and cranial nerve examination was unremarkable with the exception of 2 beats of nystagmus on left lateral eye movement. Because of these findings and a family history of multiple sclerosis, the patient was referred for a brain magnetic resonance imaging scan. Intervention and Outcome Imaging showed a craniocervical junction mass centered at the floor of the fourth ventricle with obstruction of foramina and marked impingement on the medulla. A posterior fossa craniotomy and tumor removal procedure was performed by a neurosurgeon, followed by 34 sessions of radiation therapy. The final diagnosis was a grade II glioma with features of ependymoma. Conclusions This report describes the clinical presentation, examination, and medical management of a 30-year-old man presenting to a chiropractic practice with an unsuspected malignant brain tumor. PMID:27069431

  10. Brain-Penetrating Nanoparticles Improve Paclitaxel Efficacy in Malignant Glioma Following Local Administration

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Poor drug distribution and short drug half-life within tumors strongly limit efficacy of chemotherapies in most cancers, including primary brain tumors. Local or targeted drug delivery via controlled-release polymers is a promising strategy to treat infiltrative brain tumors, which cannot be completely removed surgically. However, drug penetration is limited with conventional local therapies since small-molecule drugs often enter the first cell they encounter and travel only short distances from the site of administration. Nanoparticles that avoid adhesive interactions with the tumor extracellular matrix may improve drug distribution and sustain drug release when applied to the tumor area. We have previously shown model polystyrene nanoparticles up to 114 nm in diameter were able to rapidly diffuse in normal brain tissue, but only if coated with an exceptionally dense layer of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) to reduce adhesive interactions. Here, we demonstrate that paclitaxel (PTX)-loaded, poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA)-co-PEG block copolymer nanoparticles with an average diameter of 70 nm were able to diffuse 100-fold faster than similarly sized PTX-loaded PLGA particles (without PEG coatings). Densely PEGylated PTX-loaded nanoparticles significantly delayed tumor growth following local administration to established brain tumors, as compared to PTX-loaded PLGA nanoparticles or unencapsulated PTX. Delayed tumor growth combined with enhanced distribution of drug-loaded PLGA-PEG nanoparticles to the tumor infiltrative front demonstrates that particle penetration within the brain tumor parenchyma improves therapeutic efficacy. The use of drug-loaded brain-penetrating nanoparticles is a promising approach to achieve sustained and more uniform drug delivery to treat aggressive gliomas and potentially other brain disorders. PMID:25259648

  11. [Possibilities of boron neutron capture therapy in the treatment of malignant brain tumors].

    PubMed

    Kanygin, V V; Kichigin, A I; Gubanova, N V; Taskaev, S Yu

    2015-01-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) that is of the highest attractiveness due to its selective action directly on malignant tumor cells is a promising approach to treating cancers. Clinical interest in BNCT focuses in neuro-oncology on therapy for gliomas, glioblastoma in particular, and BNCT may be used in brain metastatic involvement. This needs an epithermal neutron source that complies with the requirements for BNCT, as well as a 10B-containing agent that will selectively accumulate in tumor tissue. The introduction of BNCT into clinical practice to treat patients with glial tumors will be able to enhance therapeutic efficiency. PMID:26999933

  12. Early medical rehabilitation after neurosurgical treatment of malignant brain tumours in Slovenia

    PubMed Central

    Kos, Natasa; Kos, Boris

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background The number of patients with malignant brain tumours is on the rise, but due to the novel treatment methods the survival rates are higher. Despite increased survival the consequences of tumour properties and treatment can have a significant negative effect on the patients’ quality of life. Providing timely and appropriate rehabilitation interventions is an important aspect of patient treatment and should be started immediately after surgery. The most important goal of rehabilitation is to prevent complications that could have a negative effect on the patients’ ability to function. Conclusions By using individually tailored early rehabilitation it is often possible to achieve the patients’ independence in mobility as well as in performing daily tasks before leaving the hospital. A more precise evaluation of the patients’ functional state after completing additional oncologic therapy should be performed to stratify the patients who should be directed to complex rehabilitation treatment. The chances of a good functional outcome in patients with malignant brain tumours could be increased with good early medical rehabilitation treatment. PMID:27247545

  13. Staff-reported antecedents to aggression in a post-acute brain injury treatment programme: what are they and what implications do they have for treatment?

    PubMed

    Giles, Gordon Muir; Scott, Karen; Manchester, David

    2013-01-01

    Research in psychiatric settings has found that staff attribute the majority of in-patient aggression to immediate environmental stressors. We sought to determine if staff working with persons with brain injury-related severe and chronic impairment make similar causal attributions. If immediate environmental stressors precipitate the majority of aggressive incidents in this client group, it is possible an increased focus on the management of factors that initiate client aggression may be helpful. The research was conducted in a low-demand treatment programme for individuals with chronic cognitive impairment due to acquired brain injury. Over a six-week period, 63 staff and a research assistant reported on 508 aggressive incidents. Staff views as to the causes of client aggression were elicited within 72 hours of observing an aggressive incident. Staff descriptions of causes were categorised using qualitative methods and analysed both qualitatively and quantitatively. Aggression towards staff was predominantly preceded by (a) actions that interrupted or redirected a client behaviour, (b) an activity demand, or (c) a physical intrusion. The majority of aggressive incidents appeared hostile/angry in nature and were not considered by staff to be pre-meditated. Common treatment approaches can be usefully augmented by a renewed focus on interventions aimed at reducing antecedents that provoke aggression. Possible approaches for achieving this are considered. PMID:23782342

  14. Staff-reported antecedents to aggression in a post-acute brain injury treatment programme: What are they and what implications do they have for treatment?

    PubMed Central

    Giles, Gordon Muir; Scott, Karen; Manchester, David

    2013-01-01

    Research in psychiatric settings has found that staff attribute the majority of inpatient aggression to immediate environmental stressors. We sought to determine if staff working with persons with brain injury-related severe and chronic impairment make similar causal attributions. If immediate environmental stressors precipitate the majority of aggressive incidents in this client group, it is possible an increased focus on the management of factors that initiate client aggression may be helpful. The research was conducted in a low-demand treatment programme for individuals with chronic cognitive impairment due to acquired brain injury. Over a six-week period, 63 staff and a research assistant reported on 508 aggressive incidents. Staff views as to the causes of client aggression were elicited within 72 hours of observing an aggressive incident. Staff descriptions of causes were categorised using qualitative methods and analysed both qualitatively and quantitatively. Aggression towards staff was predominantly preceded by (a) actions that interrupted or redirected a client behaviour, (b) an activity demand, or (c) a physical intrusion. The majority of aggressive incidents appeared hostile/angry in nature and were not considered by staff to be pre-meditated. Common treatment approaches can be usefully augmented by a renewed focus on interventions aimed at reducing antecedents that provoke aggression. Possible approaches for achieving this are considered. PMID:23782342

  15. REPEATED ANABOLIC/ANDROGENIC STEROID EXPOSURE DURING ADOLESCENCE ALTERS PHOSPHATE-ACTIVATED GLUTAMINASE AND GLUTAMATE RECEPTOR 1 SUBUNIT IMMUNOREACTIVITY IN HAMSTER BRAIN: CORRELATION WITH OFFENSIVE AGGRESSION

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Shannon G.; Ricci, Lesley A.; Melloni, Richard H.

    2007-01-01

    Male Syrian hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus) treated with moderately high doses (5.0mg/kg/day) of anabolic/androgenic steroids (AAS) during adolescence (P27–P56) display highly escalated offensive aggression. The current study examined whether adolescent AAS-exposure influenced the immunohistochemical localization of phosphate-activated glutaminase (PAG), the rate-limiting enzyme in the synthesis of glutamate, a fast-acting neurotransmitter implicated in the modulation of aggression in various species and models of aggression, as well as glutamate receptor 1 subunit (GluR1). Hamsters were administered AAS during adolescence, scored for offensive aggression using the resident-intruder paradigm, and then examined for changes in PAG and GluR1 immunoreactivity in areas of the brain implicated in aggression control. When compared with sesame oil-treated control animals, aggressive AAS-treated hamsters displayed a significant increase in the number of PAG- and area density of GluR1- containing neurons in several notable aggression regions, although the differential pattern of expression did not appear to overlap across brain regions. Together, these results suggest that altered glutamate synthesis and GluR1 receptor expression in specific aggression areas may be involved in adolescent AAS-induced offensive aggression. PMID:17418431

  16. The relationship between brain behavioral systems and the characteristics of the five factor model of personality with aggression among Iranian students

    PubMed Central

    Komasi, Saeid; Saeidi, Mozhgan; Soroush, Ali; Zakiei, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: Background: Aggression is one of the negative components of emotion and it is usually considered to be the outcome of the activity of the Behavioral Inhibition and the Behavioral Activation System (BIS/BAS): components which can be considered as predisposing factors for personality differences. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between brain behavioral systems and the characteristics of the five factor model of personality with aggression among students. Methods: The present study has a correlation descriptive design. The research population included all of the Razi University students in the academic year of 2012-2013. The sampling was carried out with a random stratified method and 360 people (308 female and 52 male) were studied according to a table of Morgan. The study instruments were Buss and Perry Aggression Questionnaire, NEO Personality Inventory (Short Form), and Carver and White scale for BAS/BIS. Finally, SPSS20 was utilized to analyze the data using Pearson correlation, regression analysis, and canonical correlation. Results: The data showed a significant positive relationship between the neurosis and agreeableness personality factors with aggression; but there is a significant negative relationship between the extroversion, openness, and conscientiousness personality factors with aggression. Furthermore, there is a significant positive relationship between all the components of brain behavioral systems (impulsivity, novelty seeking, sensitivity, tender) and aggression. The results of regression analysis indicated the personality characteristics and the brain behavioral systems which can predict 29 percent of the changes to aggression, simultaneously. Conclusions: According to a predictable level of aggressiveness by the personality characteristics and brain behavioral systems, it is possible to identify the personality characteristics and template patterns of brain behavioral systems for the students

  17. The long-term risk of malignant astrocytic tumors after structural brain injury—a nationwide cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Munch, Tina Noergaard; Gørtz, Sanne; Wohlfahrt, Jan; Melbye, Mads

    2015-01-01

    Background Neoplastic transformation of damaged astrocytes has been proposed as a possible pathological mechanism behind malignant astrocytic tumors. This study investigated the association between structural brain injuries causing reactive astrogliosis and long-term risk for malignant astrocytic tumors. Methods The cohort consisted of all individuals living in Denmark between 1978 and 2011. The personal identification number assigned to all individuals allowed retrieval of diagnoses of traumatic brain injury, cerebral ischemic infarction, and intracerebral hemorrhage from the National Patient Discharge Register. Diagnoses of anaplastic astrocytoma and glioblastoma multiforme (World Health Organization grades III and IV) were retrieved from the Danish Cancer Registry. Rate ratios (RR's) were estimated using log-linear Poisson regression. Results In a cohort of 8.2 million individuals, 404 812 experienced a structural brain injury and 6152 developed a malignant astrocytic tumor. No significant association was observed 1–4 years after a structural brain injury (RR = 1.14; 95% CI: 0.87–1.46), whereas the long-term (5+ y) risk for malignant astrocytic tumors was significantly reduced (RR = 0.68; 95% CI: 0.49–0.90) compared with no injury. The specific long-term risks by type of injury were: traumatic brain injury RR = 0.32 (95% CI: 0.10–0.75); cerebral ischemic infarction RR = 0.69 (95% CI: 0.47–0.96); and intracerebral hemorrhage RR = 1.39 (95% CI: 0.64–2.60). Conclusion We found no evidence for an association between structural brain injury and malignant astrocytic tumors within the first 5 years of follow-up. However, our study indicated a protective effect of astrogliosis-causing injuries 5 or more years after structural brain injury. PMID:25416827

  18. Hyperbaric oxygen as an adjunctive therapy in treatment of malignancies, including brain tumours.

    PubMed

    Stępień, Katarzyna; Ostrowski, Robert P; Matyja, Ewa

    2016-09-01

    Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) therapy is widely used as an adjunctive treatment for various pathological states, predominantly related to hypoxic and/or ischaemic conditions. It also holds promise as an approach to overcoming the problem of oxygen deficiency in the poorly oxygenated regions of the neoplastic tissue. Occurrence of local hypoxia within the central areas of solid tumours is one of the major issues contributing to ineffective medical treatment. However, in anti-cancer therapy, HBO alone gives a limited curative effect and is typically not applied by itself. More often, HBO is used as an adjuvant treatment along with other therapeutic modalities, such as radio- and chemotherapy. This review outlines the existing data regarding the medical use of HBO in cancer treatment, with a particular focus on the use of HBO in the treatment of brain tumours. We conclude that the administration of HBO can provide many clinical benefits in the treatment of tumours, including management of highly malignant gliomas. Applied immediately before irradiation, it is safe and well tolerated by patients, causing rare and limited side effects. The results obtained with a combination of HBO/radiotherapy protocol proved to be especially favourable compared to radiation treatment alone. HBO can also increase the cytostatic effect of certain drugs, which may render standard chemotherapy more effective. The currently available data support the legitimacy of conducting further research on the use of HBO in the treatment of malignancies. PMID:27485098

  19. Malignant transformation of bone marrow stromal cells induced by the brain glioma niche in rats.

    PubMed

    He, Qiuping; Zou, Xifeng; Duan, Deyi; Liu, Yujun; Xu, Qunyuan

    2016-01-01

    Normal human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) can develop neoplastic cancer stem cell (CSC) properties after coculture with transformed hESCs in vitro. In the present study, the influence of the tumor microenvironment on malignant transformation of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) was studied after allografting a mixture of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-labeled BMSCs and C6 glioma cells into the rat brain to understand the influence of the cellular environment, especially the tumor environment, on the transformation of grafted BMSCs in the rat brain. We performed intracerebral transplantation in the rat brain using EGFP-labeled BMSCs coinjected with C6 tumor cells. After transplantation, the EGFP-labeled cells were isolated from the tumor using fluorescence-activated cell sorting, and the characteristics of the recovered cells were investigated. Glioma-specific biomarkers of the sorted cells and the biological characteristics of the tumors were analyzed. The BMSCs isolated from the cografts were transformed into glioma CSCs, as indicated by the marked expression of the glioma marker GFAP in glioma cells, and of Nestin and CD133 in neural stem cells and CSCs, as well as rapid cell growth, decreased level of the tumor suppressor gene p53, increased level of the oncogene murine double minute gene 2 (MDM2), and recapitulation of glioma tissues in the brain. These data suggest that BMSCs can be transformed into CSCs, which can be further directed toward glioma formation under certain conditions, supporting the notion that the tumor microenvironment is involved in transforming normal BMSCs into glial CSCs. PMID:26590986

  20. Inside the wire: aggression and functional interhemispheric connectivity in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Hofman, Dennis; Schutter, Dennis J L G

    2009-09-01

    An aggressive personality style has been proposed to arise from a cortical asymmetry between the left and right frontal hemispheres. In the present transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) study, evidence was sought for a link between an aggressive personality style and functional interhemispheric connectivity between the left and right frontal cortices. Functional interhemispheric connectivity was measured by determining transcallosal inhibition (TCI) using TMS in 20 healthy right-handed volunteers, who were given the Buss-Perry Aggression Questionnaire (AQ) and a selective attention task. Analyses showed higher levels of left-to-right TCI significantly correlated with higher AQ scores. Furthermore, increased left-to-right together with reduced right-to-left TCI was associated with a stronger attentional bias for angry faces. This is the first study to provide a biological mechanism underlying the asymmetry between left and right frontal cortex activity in human aggression. We conclude that an aggressive personality style and selective attention to angry faces are positively correlated with functional interhemispheric connectivity. PMID:19515104

  1. The Methanol Extract of Angelica sinensis Induces Cell Apoptosis and Suppresses Tumor Growth in Human Malignant Brain Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Wen-Lin; Harn, Horng-jyh; Hung, Pei-Hsiu; Hsieh, Ming-Chang; Chang, Kai-Fu; Huang, Xiao-Fan; Liao, Kuang-Wen; Lee, Ming-Shih; Tsai, Nu-Man

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a highly vascularized and invasive neoplasm. The methanol extract of Angelica sinensis (AS-M) is commonly used in traditional Chinese medicine to treat several diseases, such as gastric mucosal damage, hepatic injury, menopausal symptoms, and chronic glomerulonephritis. AS-M also displays potency in suppressing the growth of malignant brain tumor cells. The growth suppression of malignant brain tumor cells by AS-M results from cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. AS-M upregulates expression of cyclin kinase inhibitors, including p16, to decrease the phosphorylation of Rb proteins, resulting in arrest at the G0-G1 phase. The expression of the p53 protein is increased by AS-M and correlates with activation of apoptosis-associated proteins. Therefore, the apoptosis of cancer cells induced by AS-M may be triggered through the p53 pathway. In in vivo studies, AS-M not only suppresses the growth of human malignant brain tumors but also significantly prolongs patient survival. In addition, AS-M has potent anticancer effects involving cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and antiangiogenesis. The in vitro and in vivo anticancer effects of AS-M indicate that this extract warrants further investigation and potential development as a new antibrain tumor agent, providing new hope for the chemotherapy of malignant brain cancer. PMID:24319475

  2. Sexual Conspecific Aggressive Response (SCAR): A Model of Sexual Trauma that Disrupts Maternal Learning and Plasticity in the Female Brain.

    PubMed

    Shors, Tracey J; Tobόn, Krishna; DiFeo, Gina; Durham, Demetrius M; Chang, Han Yan M

    2016-01-01

    Sexual aggression can disrupt processes related to learning as females emerge from puberty into young adulthood. To model these experiences in laboratory studies, we developed SCAR, which stands for Sexual Conspecific Aggressive Response. During puberty, a rodent female is paired daily for 30-min with a sexually-experienced adult male. During the SCAR experience, the male tracks the anogenital region of the female as she escapes from pins. Concentrations of the stress hormone corticosterone were significantly elevated during and after the experience. Moreover, females that were exposed to the adult male throughout puberty did not perform well during training with an associative learning task nor did they learn well to express maternal behaviors during maternal sensitization. Most females that were exposed to the adult male did not learn to care for offspring over the course of 17 days. Finally, females that did not express maternal behaviors retained fewer newly-generated cells in their hippocampus whereas those that did express maternal behaviors retained more cells, most of which would differentiate into neurons within weeks. Together these data support SCAR as a useful laboratory model for studying the potential consequences of sexual aggression and trauma for the female brain during puberty and young adulthood. PMID:26804826

  3. Sexual Conspecific Aggressive Response (SCAR): A Model of Sexual Trauma that Disrupts Maternal Learning and Plasticity in the Female Brain

    PubMed Central

    Shors, Tracey J.; Tobόn, Krishna; DiFeo, Gina; Durham, Demetrius M.; Chang, Han Yan M.

    2016-01-01

    Sexual aggression can disrupt processes related to learning as females emerge from puberty into young adulthood. To model these experiences in laboratory studies, we developed SCAR, which stands for Sexual Conspecific Aggressive Response. During puberty, a rodent female is paired daily for 30-min with a sexually-experienced adult male. During the SCAR experience, the male tracks the anogenital region of the female as she escapes from pins. Concentrations of the stress hormone corticosterone were significantly elevated during and after the experience. Moreover, females that were exposed to the adult male throughout puberty did not perform well during training with an associative learning task nor did they learn well to express maternal behaviors during maternal sensitization. Most females that were exposed to the adult male did not learn to care for offspring over the course of 17 days. Finally, females that did not express maternal behaviors retained fewer newly-generated cells in their hippocampus whereas those that did express maternal behaviors retained more cells, most of which would differentiate into neurons within weeks. Together these data support SCAR as a useful laboratory model for studying the potential consequences of sexual aggression and trauma for the female brain during puberty and young adulthood. PMID:26804826

  4. High expression of microRNA-155 is associated with the aggressive malignant behavior of gallbladder carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kono, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Masafumi; Ohtsuka, Takao; Nagayoshi, Yosuke; Mori, Yasuhisa; Takahata, Shunichi; Aishima, Shinichi; Tanaka, Masao

    2013-07-01

    The prognosis of gallbladder cancer (GBC) remains poor despite recent advances in diagnostics and therapeutic strategies. Although the role of microRNAs (miRs) in GBC have not been well documented, miR-155 is known to be associated with inflammation-associated carcinogenesis in various types of cancers. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical significance of miR-155 expression and the biological functions of miR-155 in GBC. The expression levels of miR-155 in surgically resected GBCs and gallbladders with pancreaticobiliary maljunction (PBM) were assessed by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The relationship between the expression levels of miR-155 and clinicopathological features of GBCs was analyzed. Human GBC cell lines were transfected with miR-155 inhibitors or mimics, and the effects on proliferation and invasion were assessed. miR-155 was significantly overexpressed in GBCs when compared with that in gallbladders with PBM (p=0.007) and normal gallbladders (p=0.04). The high expression level of miR-155 in GBCs was significantly associated with the presence of lymph node metastasis (p=0.01) and a poor prognosis (p=0.02). In vitro assays showed that aberrant expression of miR-155 significantly enhanced GBC cell proliferation and invasion. In conclusion, high miR-155 expression correlates with the aggressive behavior of GBCs, and miR-155 may become a prognostic marker and therapeutic target for GBC. PMID:23660842

  5. Brachytherapy of recurrent malignant brain tumors with removable high-activity iodine-125 sources

    SciTech Connect

    Gutin, P.H.; Phillips, T.L.; Wara, W.M.; Leibel, S.A.; Hosobuchi, Y.; Levin, V.A.; Weaver, K.A.; Lamb, S.

    1984-01-01

    Thirty-seven patients harboring recurrent malignant primary or metastatic brain tumors were treated by 40 implantations of high-activity iodine-125 (/sup 125/I) sources. All patients had been treated with irradiation and most had been treated with chemotherapeutic agents, primarily nitrosoureas. Implantations were performed using computerized tomography (CT)-directed stereotaxy; /sup 125/I sources were held in one or more afterloaded catheters that were removed after the desired dose (minimum tumor dose of 3000 to 12,000 rads) had been delivered. Patients were followed with sequential neurological examinations and CT scans. Results of 34 implantation procedures were evaluable: 18 produced documented tumor regression (response) for 4 to 13+ months; five, performed in deteriorating patients, resulted in disease stability for 4 to 12 months. The overall response rate was 68%. In 11 patients, implantation did not halt clinical deterioration. At exploratory craniotomy 5 to 12 months after implantation, focal radiation necrosis was documented in two patients whose tumor had responded initially and then progressed, and in three patients whose disease had progressed initially (four glioblastomas, one anaplastic astrocytoma); histologically identifiable tumor was documented in two of these patients. All improved after resection of the focal necrotic mass and are still alive 10, 15, 19, 24, and 25 months after the initial implantation procedure; only one patient has evidence of tumor regrowth. The median follow-up period after implantation for the malignant glioma (anaplastic astrocytoma and glioblastoma multiforme) group is 9 months, with 48% of patients still surviving. While direct comparison with the results of chemotherapy is difficult, results obtained in this patient group with interstitial brachytherapy are probably superior to results obtained with chemotherapy.

  6. Photodynamic therapy of malignant brain tumors: supplementary postoperative light delivery by implanted optical fibers: field fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, Paul J.; Wilson, Brian C.

    1991-06-01

    Sixty-three patients with malignant brain tumors were treated with intraoperative photodynamic therapy (PDT) using an argon dye pump laser and preoperatively administered hematoporphyrin derivative or dihematoporphyrin ether. In 13 cases, in addition to cavitary photo-illumination, cylindrical diffusion fibers were used to increase the amount of light energy administered to the tumor tissue intraoperatively. This interstitial photo-illumination was tolerated at light energy densities of less than 450 J/cm. In six recent cases, all of whom had large malignant gliomas and could not be illuminated adequately at a single session, cylindrical diffusion fibers were left in situ after intraoperative cavitary photo-illumination of the tumor residuum. The fibers were protected from fracturing by placing all but the exposed diffusing end in a red rubber catheter of the appropriate diameter. The fibers were externalized through a separate stab wound as would be the case for a ventricular drain. Photo-illumination was continued one or two days post-operatively. The optimal fiber couple to the argon dye pump laser was achieved by assessing the fiber side scatter with a photometer. These six patients received 585-2730 Joules during the post-operative photo-illumination. The patients tolerated the fractionated photo-illumination well. A transient scalp inflammation occurred as the consequence light transmission to skin from the implanted fibers in one case. The median survival for the whole series was 8.5 months (40 weeks) with a 1- and 2-year actuarial survival rate of 33, respectively.

  7. Exploring the Biomechanical Properties of Brain Malignancies and their Pathological Determinants In Vivo with Magnetic Resonance Elastography

    PubMed Central

    Popov, Sergey; Garteiser, Philippe; Ulloa, Jose L.; Cummings, Craig; Box, Gary; Eccles, Suzanne A.; Jones, Chris; Waterton, John C.; Bamber, Jeffrey C.; Sinkus, Ralph; Robinson, Simon P.

    2015-01-01

    Malignant tumors are typically associated with altered rigidity relative to normal host tissue. Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) enables the noninvasive quantitation of the mechanical properties of deep-seated tissue following application of an external vibrational mechanical stress to that tissue. In this preclinical study, we used MRE to quantify (kPa) the elasticity modulus Gd and viscosity modulus Gl of three intracranially implanted glioma and breast metastatic tumor models. In all these brain tumors, we found a notable softness characterized by lower elasticity and viscosity than normal brain parenchyma, enabling their detection on Gd and Gl parametric maps. The most circumscribed tumor (U-87 glioma) was the stiffest whereas the most infiltrative tumor (MDA-MB-231 metastatic breast carcinoma) was the softest. Tumor cell density and microvessel density correlated positively with elasticity and viscosity significantly, whereas there was no association with the extent of collagen deposition or myelin fiber entrapment. In conclusion, while malignant tumors tend to exhibit increased rigidity, intracranial tumors presented as remarkably softer than normal brain parenchyma. Our findings reinforce the case for MRE use in diagnosing and staging brain malignancies, based on the association of different tumor phenotypes with different mechanical properties. PMID:25672978

  8. Exploring the biomechanical properties of brain malignancies and their pathologic determinants in vivo with magnetic resonance elastography.

    PubMed

    Jamin, Yann; Boult, Jessica K R; Li, Jin; Popov, Sergey; Garteiser, Philippe; Ulloa, Jose L; Cummings, Craig; Box, Gary; Eccles, Suzanne A; Jones, Chris; Waterton, John C; Bamber, Jeffrey C; Sinkus, Ralph; Robinson, Simon P

    2015-04-01

    Malignant tumors are typically associated with altered rigidity relative to normal host tissue. Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) enables the noninvasive quantitation of the mechanical properties of deep-seated tissue following application of an external vibrational mechanical stress to that tissue. In this preclinical study, we used MRE to quantify (kPa) the elasticity modulus Gd and viscosity modulus Gl of three intracranially implanted glioma and breast metastatic tumor models. In all these brain tumors, we found a notable softness characterized by lower elasticity and viscosity than normal brain parenchyma, enabling their detection on Gd and Gl parametric maps. The most circumscribed tumor (U-87 MG glioma) was the stiffest, whereas the most infiltrative tumor (MDA-MB-231 metastatic breast carcinoma) was the softest. Tumor cell density and microvessel density correlated significantly and positively with elasticity and viscosity, whereas there was no association with the extent of collagen deposition or myelin fiber entrapment. In conclusion, although malignant tumors tend to exhibit increased rigidity, intracranial tumors presented as remarkably softer than normal brain parenchyma. Our findings reinforce the case for MRE use in diagnosing and staging brain malignancies, based on the association of different tumor phenotypes with different mechanical properties. PMID:25672978

  9. Rapid Effects of an Aggressive Interaction on Dehydroepiandrosterone, Testosterone and Oestradiol Levels in the Male Song Sparrow Brain: a Seasonal Comparison.

    PubMed

    Heimovics, S A; Prior, N H; Ma, C; Soma, K K

    2016-02-01

    Across vertebrates, aggression is robustly expressed during the breeding season when circulating testosterone is elevated, and testosterone activates aggression either directly or after aromatisation into 17β-oestradiol (E2 ) in the brain. In some species, such as the song sparrow, aggressive behaviour is also expressed at high levels during the nonbreeding season, when circulating testosterone is non-detectable. At this time, the androgen precursor dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) is metabolised within the brain into testosterone and/or E2 to promote aggression. In the present study, we used captive male song sparrows to test the hypothesis that an acute agonistic interaction during the nonbreeding season, but not during the breeding season, would alter steroid levels in the brain. Nonbreeding and breeding subjects were exposed to either a laboratory simulated territorial intrusion (L-STI) or an empty cage for only 5 min. Immediately afterwards, the brain was rapidly collected and flash frozen. The Palkovits punch technique was used to microdissect specific brain regions implicated in aggressive behaviour. Solid phase extraction followed by radioimmunoassay was used to quantify DHEA, testosterone and E2 in punches. Overall, levels of DHEA, testosterone and E2 were higher in brain tissue than in plasma. Local testosterone and E2 levels in the preoptic area, anterior hypothalamus and nucleus taeniae of the amygdala were significantly higher in the breeding season than the nonbreeding season and were not affected by the L-STI. Unexpectedly, subjects that were dominant in the L-STI had lower levels of DHEA in the anterior hypothalamus and medial striatum in both seasons and lower levels of DHEA in the nucleus taeniae of the amygdala in the breeding season only. Taken together, these data suggest that local levels of DHEA in the brain are very rapidly modulated by social interactions in a context and region-specific pattern. PMID:26648568

  10. Exploring Spirituality in Family Caregivers of Patients With Primary Malignant Brain Tumors Across the Disease Trajectory

    PubMed Central

    Newberry, Alyssa G.; Jean Choi, Chien-Wen; Donovan, Heidi S.; Schulz, Richard; Bender, Catherine; Given, Barbara; Sherwood, Paula

    2013-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives To determine whether the perceived level of spirituality in family caregivers of patients with primary malignant brain tumors (PMBTs) changes across the disease trajectory. Design Ongoing descriptive, longitudinal study. Setting Southwestern Pennsylvania. Sample 50 family caregivers of patients with PMBT. Methods Caregivers and care recipients were recruited at time of diagnosis. Participants were interviewed at two subse-quent time points, four and eight months following diagnosis. Main Research Variables Care recipients’ symptoms, neuro-psychologic status, and physical function, as well as caregiver social support. Findings Results showed no significant difference in spirituality scores reported at baseline and eight months (p = 0.8), suggesting that spirituality may be a stable trait across the disease trajectory. Conclusions Spirituality remains relatively stable along the course of the disease trajectory. Reports of caregiver depressive symptoms and anxiety were lower when paired with higher reports of spirituality. Implications for Nursing Clinicians can better identify caregivers at risk for negative outcomes by identifying those who report lower levels of spirituality. Future interventions should focus on the development and implementation of interventions that provide protective buffers such as increased social support. Knowledge Translation Spirituality is a relatively stable trait. High levels of spirituality can serve as a protective buffer from negative mental health outcomes. Caregivers with low levels of spirituality may be at risk for greater levels of burden, anxiety, and stress. PMID:23615145

  11. Corncob bedding alters the effects of estrogens on aggressive behavior and reduces estrogen receptor-α expression in the brain.

    PubMed

    Villalon Landeros, Rosalina; Morisseau, Christophe; Yoo, Hyun Ju; Fu, Samuel H; Hammock, Bruce D; Trainor, Brian C

    2012-02-01

    There is growing appreciation that estrogen signaling pathways can be modulated by naturally occurring environmental compounds such as phytoestrogens and the more recently discovered xenoestrogens. Many researchers studying the effects of estrogens on brain function or behavior in animal models choose to use phytoestrogen-free food for this reason. Corncob bedding is commonly used in animal facilities across the United States and has been shown to inhibit estrogen-dependent reproductive behavior in rats. The mechanism for this effect was unclear, because the components of corncob bedding mediating this effect did not bind estrogen receptors. Here, we show in the California mouse (Peromyscus californicus) that estrogens decrease aggression when cardboard-based bedding is used but that this effect is absent when corncob bedding is used. California mice housed on corncob bedding also had fewer estrogen receptor-α-positive cells in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis and ventromedial hypothalamus compared with mice housed on cardboard-based bedding. In addition, corncob bedding suppressed the expression of phosphorylated ERK in these brain regions as well as in the medial amygdala and medial preoptic area. Previous reports of the effects of corncob bedding on reproductive behavior are not widely appreciated. Our observations on the effects of corncob bedding on behavior and brain function should draw attention to the importance that cage bedding can exert on neuroendocrine research. PMID:22186416

  12. The interacting role of media violence exposure and aggressive-disruptive behavior in adolescent brain activation during an emotional Stroop task.

    PubMed

    Kalnin, Andrew J; Edwards, Chad R; Wang, Yang; Kronenberger, William G; Hummer, Tom A; Mosier, Kristine M; Dunn, David W; Mathews, Vincent P

    2011-04-30

    Only recently have investigations of the relationship between media violence exposure (MVE) and aggressive behavior focused on brain functioning. In this study, we examined the relationship between brain activation and history of media violence exposure in adolescents, using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Samples of adolescents with no psychiatric diagnosis or with disruptive behavior disorder (DBD) with aggression were compared to investigate whether the association of MVE history and brain activation is moderated by aggressive behavior/personality. Twenty-two adolescents with a history of aggressive behavior and diagnosis of either conduct disorder or oppositional-defiant disorder (DBD sample) and 22 controls completed an emotional Stroop task during fMRI. Primary imaging results indicated that controls with a history of low MVE demonstrated greater activity in the right inferior frontal gyrus and rostral anterior cingulate during the violent word condition. In contrast, in adolescents with DBD, those with high MVE exhibited decreased activation in the right amygdala, compared with those with low MVE. These findings are consistent with research demonstrating the importance of fronto-limbic structures for processing emotional stimuli, and with research suggesting that media violence may affect individuals in different ways depending on the presence of aggressive traits. PMID:21376543

  13. ‘Cool and quiet’ therapy for malignant hyperthermia following severe traumatic brain injury: A preliminary clinical approach

    PubMed Central

    LIU, YU-HE; SHANG, ZHEN-DE; CHEN, CHAO; LU, NAN; LIU, QI-FENG; LIU, MING; YAN, JING

    2015-01-01

    Malignant hyperthermia increases mortality and disability in patients with brain trauma. A clinical treatment for malignant hyperthermia following severe traumatic brain injury, termed ‘cool and quiet’ therapy by the authors of the current study, was investigated. Between June 2003 and June 2013, 110 consecutive patients with malignant hyperthermia following severe traumatic brain injury were treated using mild hypothermia (35–36°C) associated with small doses of sedative and muscle relaxant. Physiological parameters and intracranial pressure were monitored, and the patients slowly rewarmed following the maintenance of mild hypothermia for 3–12 days. Consecutive patients who had undergone normothermia therapy were retrospectively analyzed as the control. In the mild hypothermia group, the recovery rate was 54.5%, the mortality rate was 22.7%, and the severe and mild disability rates were 11.8 and 10.9%, respectively. The mortality rate of the patients, particularly that of patients with a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score of between 3 and 5 differed significantly between the hypothermia group and the normothermia group (P<0.05). The mortality of patients with a GCS score of between 6 and 8 was not significantly different between the two groups (P> 0.05). The therapy using mild hypothermia with a combination of sedative and muscle relaxant was beneficial in decreasing the mortality of patients with malignant hyperthermia following severe traumatic brain injury, particularly in patients with a GCS score within the range 3–5 on admission. The therapy was found to be safe, effective and convenient. However, rigorous clinical trials are required to provide evidence of the effectiveness of ‘cool and quiet’ therapy for hyperthermia. PMID:25574217

  14. Malignant potential of cells isolated from lymph node or brain metastases of melanoma patients and implications for prognosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, R D; Price, J E; Schackert, G; Itoh, K; Fidler, I J

    1991-04-15

    We studied the correlation between the formation of brain metastasis and the malignant growth potential of seven human melanoma cell lines, isolated from lymph node metastases (A375-SM, TXM-1, DM-4) or from brain metastases (TXM-13, TXM-18, TXM-34, TXM-40), and the potential of three variants of the mouse K-1735 melanoma. Growth rates in different concentrations of fetal bovine serum and colony-forming efficiency in semisolid agarose were measured, and the tumorigenicity and metastatic ability were determined in nude mice (for the human melanoma cell lines) or in C3H/HeN mice (for the K-1735 variants). The ability to form brain metastasis was tested by injection of cells into the carotid artery. A high colony-forming efficiency in agarose, especially at concentrations of agarose greater than 0.6%, corresponded with high tumor take rates, rapid tumor growth rates, and metastatic colonization of the lungs of the recipient mice. For the human melanomas, the lymph node metastasis-derived cells were more tumorigenic and metastatic than the brain metastasis-derived cells. In the K-1735 mouse melanoma, the tumorigenic and metastatic behavior of the cells after i.v. and s.c. injection corresponded with growth in agarose cultures. However, for growth in the brain after intracarotid injection, the different melanoma cell lines showed similar frequencies of tumor take, regardless of tumorigenicity in other sites of the recipient mice, although mice given injections of brain metastasis-derived cells survived longer than mice given injections of lymph node metastasis (human melanoma) or lung metastasis (K-1735 M-2)-derived cell lines. The results from the human and mouse melanoma cell lines show that the brain metastasis-derived cell lines were not more malignant than the lymph node or lung metastasis-derived cells. These data imply that the production of brain metastasis is not always the final stage of a metastatic cascade. PMID:1826230

  15. Phase II Study of Intraventricular Methotrexate in Children With Recurrent or Progressive Malignant Brain Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-30

    Recurrent Childhood Medulloblastoma; Recurrent Childhood Ependymoma; Childhood Atypical Teratoid/Rhabdoid Tumor; Embryonal Tumor With Abundant Neuropil and True Rosettes; Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm to the Leptomeninges

  16. Protocol of the Australasian Malignant Pleural Effusion-2 (AMPLE-2) trial: a multicentre randomised study of aggressive versus symptom-guided drainage via indwelling pleural catheters

    PubMed Central

    Azzopardi, Maree; Thomas, Rajesh; Muruganandan, Sanjeevan; Lam, David C L; Garske, Luke A; Kwan, Benjamin C H; Rashid Ali, Muhammad Redzwan S; Nguyen, Phan T; Yap, Elaine; Horwood, Fiona C; Ritchie, Alexander J; Bint, Michael; Tobin, Claire L; Shrestha, Ranjan; Piccolo, Francesco; De Chaneet, Christian C; Creaney, Jenette; Newton, Robert U; Hendrie, Delia; Murray, Kevin; Read, Catherine A; Feller-Kopman, David; Maskell, Nick A; Lee, Y C Gary

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Malignant pleural effusions (MPEs) can complicate most cancers, causing dyspnoea and impairing quality of life (QoL). Indwelling pleural catheters (IPCs) are a novel management approach allowing ambulatory fluid drainage and are increasingly used as an alternative to pleurodesis. IPC drainage approaches vary greatly between centres. Some advocate aggressive (usually daily) removal of fluid to provide best symptom control and chance of spontaneous pleurodesis. Daily drainages however demand considerably more resources and may increase risks of complications. Others believe that MPE care is palliative and drainage should be performed only when patients become symptomatic (often weekly to monthly). Identifying the best drainage approach will optimise patient care and healthcare resource utilisation. Methods and analysis A multicentre, open-label randomised trial. Patients with MPE will be randomised 1:1 to daily or symptom-guided drainage regimes after IPC insertion. Patient allocation to groups will be stratified for the cancer type (mesothelioma vs others), performance status (Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group status 0–1 vs ≥2), presence of trapped lung (vs not) and prior pleurodesis (vs not). The primary outcome is the mean daily dyspnoea score, measured by a 100 mm visual analogue scale (VAS) over the first 60 days. Secondary outcomes include benefits on physical activity levels, rate of spontaneous pleurodesis, complications, hospital admission days, healthcare costs and QoL measures. Enrolment of 86 participants will detect a mean difference of VAS score of 14 mm between the treatment arms (5% significance, 90% power) assuming a common between-group SD of 18.9 mm and a 10% lost to follow-up rate. Ethics and dissemination The Sir Charles Gairdner Group Human Research Ethics Committee has approved the study (number 2015-043). Results will be published in peer-reviewed journals and presented at scientific meetings. Trial registration

  17. Comprehensive Glycomics of a Multistep Human Brain Tumor Model Reveals Specific Glycosylation Patterns Related to Malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Kazue; Kimura, Taichi; Piao, Jinhua; Tanaka, Shinya; Shinohara, Yasuro

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells frequently express glycans at different levels and/or with fundamentally different structures from those expressed by normal cells, and therefore elucidation and manipulation of these glycosylations may provide a beneficial approach to cancer therapy. However, the relationship between altered glycosylation and causal genetic alteration(s) is only partially understood. Here, we employed a unique approach that applies comprehensive glycomic analysis to a previously described multistep tumorigenesis model. Normal human astrocytes were transformed via the serial introduction of hTERT, SV40ER, H-RasV12, and myrAKT, thereby mimicking human brain tumor grades I-IV. More than 160 glycans derived from three major classes of cell surface glycoconjugates (N- and O-glycans on glycoproteins, and glycosphingolipids) were quantitatively explored, and specific glycosylation patterns related to malignancy were systematically identified. The sequential introduction of hTERT, SV40ER, H-RasV12, and myrAKT led to (i) temporal expression of pauci-mannose/mono-antennary type N-glycans and GD3 (hTERT); (ii) switching from ganglio- to globo-series glycosphingolipids and the appearance of Neu5Gc (hTERT and SV40ER); (iii) temporal expression of bisecting GlcNAc residues, α2,6-sialylation, and stage-specific embryonic antigen-4, accompanied by suppression of core 2 O-glycan biosynthesis (hTERT, SV40ER and Ras); and (iv) increased expression of (neo)lacto-series glycosphingolipids and fucosylated N-glycans (hTERT, SV40ER, Ras and AKT). These sequential and transient glycomic alterations may be useful for tumor grade diagnosis and tumor prognosis, and also for the prediction of treatment response. PMID:26132161

  18. Diffusion abnormalities of the corpus callosum in patients receiving bevacizumab for malignant brain tumors: suspected treatment toxicity.

    PubMed

    Futterer, Stephen F; Nemeth, Alexander J; Grimm, Sean A; Ragin, Ann B; Chandler, James P; Muro, Kenji; Marymont, Maryanne H; Raizer, Jeffrey J

    2014-05-01

    Bevacizumab has been reported to cause diffusion restriction in the tumor bed of patients with malignant gliomas. This study evaluated prolonged diffusion restriction, in the corpus callosum (CC), of patients with malignant brain tumors treated with bevacizumab. We retrospectively reviewed our database of patients treated with bevacizumab for malignant brain tumors looking for those with restricted diffusion in the CC. CC ADC ratio measurements were obtained prior to and following treatment. Correlation was made with biopsy (n = 3) and MR perfusion (n = 7) and PET (n = 4). The temporal evolution of these changes relative to therapy was examined with mixed effects regression analysis. Nine patients (eight malignant gliomas, one malignant meningioma) out of 146 patients were found to have developed areas of diffusion restriction in the CC. These areas tended to enlarge and coalesce over serial MRIs and persisted for up to 22 months. Hypoperfusion was demonstrated in MR perfusion in 7/7. PET was hypometabolic in all 4. Biopsy of the CC showed no tumor in 3/3. ADC ratio measurements indicated a significant overall effect of time (F(16,60) = 11.2; p < 0.0001), consistent with persistent diffusion restriction over the measured time periods. Bevacizumab causes prolonged diffusion restriction in the CC. The negative MR perfusion, FDG PET and histopathology suggest this is a toxicity of bevacizumab and not active tumor. Awareness of these changes can assist in patient care. PMID:24574050

  19. Aggressive Extraocular Sebaceous Carcinoma of the Scalp Involving the Brain in a Patient With Muir-Torre Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hadravsky, Ladislav; Kazakov, Dmitry V; Stehlik, Jan; Michal, Michal; Curik, Romuald; Krupa, Petr; Skalova, Alena; Kacerovska, Denisa

    2016-08-01

    This article reports an unusual case of aggressive extraocular sebaceous carcinoma located on the scalp with subsequent usurpation of the bone and penetrating through the bone and meninges to the brain in a 56-year-old man affected by Muir-Torre syndrome. Microscopically, the sebaceous neoplasm was located in the middle to deep dermis without any connection to the epidermis and showed a multinodular growth with neoplastic nodules with a central comedo-type necrosis separated from each other by fibrovascular stroma. The nodules were composed of varying proportions of mature sebaceous cells and atypical basaloid cells with high degree of atypia, including high nuclear/cytoplasmic ratio, nuclear pleomorphism, macronucleoli, atypical mitoses, and necrosis. The neoplasm was totally removed. Histopathological examinations of the recurrent lesion showed identical morphological features and, in addition, signs of the tumors growing through the periosteum were noted. In the final excision specimen, both the dura mater and the brain tissue were infiltrated by the sebaceous carcinoma. The diagnosis of Muir-Torre syndrome was confirmed by molecular genetic investigation that revealed an identical germline mutation in MSH2 gene in several family members, some of whom had colorectal tumors. PMID:26779764

  20. Blood-brain barrier permeable gold nanoparticles: an efficient delivery platform for enhanced malignant glioma therapy and imaging.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yu; Dai, Qing; Morshed, Ramin A; Fan, Xiaobing; Wegscheid, Michelle L; Wainwright, Derek A; Han, Yu; Zhang, Lingjiao; Auffinger, Brenda; Tobias, Alex L; Rincón, Esther; Thaci, Bart; Ahmed, Atique U; Warnke, Peter C; He, Chuan; Lesniak, Maciej S

    2014-12-29

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) remains a formidable obstacle in medicine, preventing efficient penetration of chemotherapeutic and diagnostic agents to malignant gliomas. Here, a transactivator of transcription (TAT) peptide-modified gold nanoparticle platform (TAT-Au NP) with a 5 nm core size is demonstrated to be capable of crossing the BBB efficiently and delivering cargoes such as the anticancer drug doxorubicin (Dox) and Gd(3+) contrast agents to brain tumor tissues. Treatment of mice bearing intracranial glioma xenografts with pH-sensitive Dox-conjugated TAT-Au NPs via a single intravenous administration leads to significant survival benefit when compared to the free Dox. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that TAT-Au NPs are capable of delivering Gd(3+) chelates for enhanced brain tumor imaging with a prolonged retention time of Gd(3+) when compared to the free Gd(3+) chelates. Collectively, these results show promising applications of the TAT-Au NPs for enhanced malignant brain tumor therapy and non-invasive imaging. PMID:25104165

  1. Blood-Brain Barrier Permeable Gold Nanoparticles: An Efficient Delivery Platform for Enhanced Malignant Glioma Therapy and Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yu; Dai, Qing; Morshed, Ramin; Fan, Xiaobing; Wegscheid, Michelle L.; Wainwright, Derek A.; Han, Yu; Zhang, Lingjiao; Auffinger, Brenda; Tobias, Alex L.; Rincón, Esther; Thaci, Bart; Ahmed, Atique U.; Warnke, Peter; He, Chuan

    2014-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) remains a formidable obstacle in medicine, preventing efficient penetration of chemotherapeutic and diagnostic agents to malignant gliomas. Here, we demonstrate that a transactivator of transcription (TAT) peptide-modified gold nanoparticle platform (TAT-Au NP) with a 5 nm core size is capable of crossing the BBB efficiently and delivering cargoes such as the anticancer drug doxorubicin (Dox) and Gd3+ contrast agents to brain tumor tissues. Treatment of mice bearing intracranial glioma xenografts with pH-sensitive Dox-conjugated TAT-Au NPs via a single intravenous administration leads to significant survival benefit when compared to the free Dox. Furthermore, we demonstrate that TAT-Au NPs are capable of delivering Gd3+ chelates for enhanced brain tumor imaging with a prolonged retention time of Gd3+ when compared to the free Gd3+ chelates. Collectively, these results show promising applications of the TAT-Au NPs for enhanced malignant brain tumor therapy and non-invasive imaging. PMID:25104165

  2. Effects of gepirone, an aryl-piperazine anxiolytic drug, on aggressive behavior and brain monoaminergic neurotransmission.

    PubMed

    McMillen, B A; Scott, S M; Williams, H L; Sanghera, M K

    1987-04-01

    Gepirone (BMY 13805), a buspirone analog, was used to determine the antianxiety mechanism of the arylpiperazine class of drugs. Because of the weak effects of these drugs on conflict behavior, isolation-induced aggressive mice were used as the antianxiety model. Gepirone, like buspirone, potently inhibited attacks against group housed intruder mice (ED50 = 4.5 mg/kg i.p.) without causing sedation or ataxia. Inhibition of aggression was potentiated by co-administration of 0.25 mg/kg methiothepin or 2.5 mg/kg methysergide. Gepirone had variable effects on dopamine metabolism and reduced 5-hydroxytryptamine (5HT) metabolism about one third after a dose of 2.5 mg/kg. In contrast to buspirone, which markedly increased dopaminergic impulse flow, gepirone inhibited the firing of most cells recorded from the substantia nigra zona compacta in doses of 2.3-10 mg/kg i.v. and the effects were reversible by administration of haloperidol. The common metabolite of buspirone and gepirone, 1-(2-pyrimidinyl)-piperazine, caused increased firing rates only. Gepirone potently inhibited serotonergic impulse flow recorded from the dorsal raphe nucleus (88.3% after 0.04 mg/kg) and this effect was partially reversed by serotonergic antagonists. Both buspirone and gepirone displaced [3H]-5HT from the 5HT1a binding site in the hippocampus with IC50 values of 10 and 58 nM, respectively. Non-alkyl substituted aryl-piperazines displaced [3H]-5HT from both 5HT1a and 5HT1b binding sites. Thus, although gepirone may be a weak postsynaptic 5HT agonist, its primary effect is to decrease 5HT neurotransmission. In support of this conclusion was the observed potentiation of antiaggressive effects by blocking 5HT receptors wit small doses of methiothepin or methysergide, which would exacerbate the decreased release of 5HT caused by gepirone. These results are in harmony with reports that decreased serotonergic activity has anxiolytic-like effects in animal models of anxiety. PMID:2439924

  3. Boronated dipeptide borotrimethylglycylphenylalanine as a potential boron carrier in boron neutron capture therapy for malignant brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Takagaki, M; Powell, W; Sood, A; Spielvogel, B F; Hosmane, N S; Kirihata, M; Ono, K; Masunaga, S I; Kinashi, Y; Miyatake, S I; Hashimoto, N

    2001-07-01

    Takagaki, M., Ono, K., Masunaga, S-I., Kinashi, Y., Oda, Y., Miyatake, S-I., Hashimoto, N., Powell, W., Sood, A. and Spielvogel, B. F. Boronated Dipeptide Borotrimethylglycylphenylalanine as a Potential Boron Carrier in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy for Malignant Brain Tumors. Radiat. Res. 156, 118-122 (2001).A boronated dipeptide, borotrimethylglycylphenylalanine (BGPA), was synthesized as a possible boron carrier for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for malignant brain tumors. In vitro, at equal concentrations of (10)B in the extracellular medium, BGPA had the same effect in BNCT as p-boronophenylalanine (BPA). Boron analysis was carried out using prompt gamma-ray spectrometry and track-etch autoradiography. The tumor:blood and tumor:normal brain (10)B concentration ratios were 8.9 +/- 2.1 and 3.0 +/- 1.2, respectively, in rats bearing intracranial C6 gliosarcomas using alpha-particle track autoradiography. The IC(50), i.e. the dose capable of inhibiting the growth of C6 gliosarcoma cells by 50% after 3 days of incubation, was 5.9 x 10(-3) M BGPA, which is similar to that of 6.4 x 10(-3) M for BPA. The amide bond of BGPA is free from enzymatic attack, since it is protected from hydrolysis by the presence of a boron atom at the alpha-carbon position of glycine. These results suggest promise for the use of this agent for BNCT of malignant brain tumors. Further preclinical studies of BGPA are warranted, since BGPA has advantages over both BPA and BSH. PMID:11418080

  4. Use of 5-ALA fluorescence guided endoscopic biopsy of a deep-seated primary malignant brain tumor.

    PubMed

    Ritz, Rainer; Feigl, Guenther C; Schuhmann, Martin U; Ehrhardt, André; Danz, Soeren; Noell, Susan; Bornemann, Antje; Tatagiba, Marcos S

    2011-05-01

    The introduction of fluorescence-guided resection of primary malignant brain tumors was a milestone in neurosurgery. Deep-seated malignant brain tumors are often not approachable for microsurgical resection. For diagnosis and therapy, new strategies are recommended. The combination of endoscopy and 5-aminolevulinic acid-induced protoporphyrin IX (5-ALA-induced Pp IX) fluorescence-guided procedures supported by neuronavigation seems an interesting option. Here the authors report on a combined approach for 5-ALA fluorescence-guided biopsy in which they use an endoscopy system based on an Xe lamp (excitation approximately λ = 407 nm; dichroic filter system λ = 380-430 nm) to treat a malignant tumor of the thalamus and perform a ventriculostomy and septostomy. The excitation filter and emission filter are adapted to ensure that the remaining visible blue remission is sufficient to superimpose on or suppress the excited red fluorescence of the endogenous fluorochromes. The authors report that the lesion was easily detectable in the fluorescence mode and that biopsy led to histological diagnosis. PMID:21166571

  5. The Long and Winding Road: from the high affinity choline uptake site to clinical trials for malignant brain tumors

    PubMed Central

    Lowenstein, Pedro R.; Castro, Maria G.

    2016-01-01

    Malignant brain tumors are one of the most lethal cancers. They originate from glial cells and invade throughout the brain. Current standard of care involves surgical resection, radiotherapy and chemotherapy, and median survival is currently ~14–20 months post-diagnosis. Glioma tumors are highly infiltrative. Given that the brain immune system is deficient in priming systemic immune responses to glioma antigens present within the brain, we proposed to reconstitute the brain immune system to achieve immunological priming from within the brain. Two adenoviral vectors are injected into the resection cavity or remaining tumor. One adenoviral vector expresses the HSV-1 derived thymidine kinase which converts ganciclovir into a compound only cytotoxic to dividing glioma cells. The second adenovirus expresses the cytokine fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 ligand (Flt3L). Flt3L differentiates precursors into dendritic cells and acts as a chemokine for dendritic cells. HSV-1/ganciclovir killing of tumor cells releases tumor antigens that are taken up by dendritic cells within the brain tumor microenvironment. Tumor killing also releases HMGB1, a TLR2 agonist that activates dendritic cells. HMGB1 activated dendritic cells, loaded with glioma antigens, migrate to cervical lymph nodes to stimulate a systemic CD8+ T cells cytotoxic immune response against glioma. This immune response is specific to glioma tumors, induces immunological memory, and does neither cause brain toxicity nor autoimmune responses. An IND was granted by the FDA on 4/7/2011. A Phase I, first in person, to test whether re-engineering the brain immune system is potentially therapeutic is ongoing. PMID:27288077

  6. The Long and Winding Road: From the High-Affinity Choline Uptake Site to Clinical Trials for Malignant Brain Tumors.

    PubMed

    Lowenstein, P R; Castro, M G

    2016-01-01

    Malignant brain tumors are one of the most lethal cancers. They originate from glial cells which infiltrate throughout the brain. Current standard of care involves surgical resection, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy; median survival is currently ~14-20 months postdiagnosis. Given that the brain immune system is deficient in priming systemic immune responses to glioma antigens, we proposed to reconstitute the brain immune system to achieve immunological priming from within the brain. Two adenoviral vectors are injected into the resection cavity or remaining tumor. One adenoviral vector expresses the HSV-1-derived thymidine kinase which converts ganciclovir into a compound only cytotoxic to dividing glioma cells. The second adenovirus expresses the cytokine fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 ligand (Flt3L). Flt3L differentiates precursors into dendritic cells and acts as a chemokine that attracts dendritic cells to the brain. HSV-1/ganciclovir killing of tumor cells releases tumor antigens that are taken up by dendritic cells within the brain tumor microenvironment. Tumor killing also releases HMGB1, an endogenous TLR2 agonist that activates dendritic cells. HMGB1-activated dendritic cells, loaded with glioma antigens, migrate to cervical lymph nodes to stimulate a systemic CD8+ T cells cytotoxic immune response against glioma. This immune response is specific to glioma tumors, induces immunological memory, and does neither cause brain toxicity nor autoimmune responses. An IND was granted by the FDA on 4/7/2011. A Phase I, first in person trial, to test whether reengineering the brain immune system is potentially therapeutic is ongoing. PMID:27288077

  7. Conditional survival after diagnosis with malignant brain and central nervous system tumor in the United States, 1995-2012.

    PubMed

    Farah, Paul; Blanda, Rachel; Kromer, Courtney; Ostrom, Quinn T; Kruchko, Carol; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S

    2016-07-01

    General population-based survival statistics for primary malignant brain or other central nervous system (CNS) tumors do not provide accurate estimations of prognosis for individuals who have survived for a significant period of time. For these persons, the use of conditional survival percentages provides more accurate information to estimate potential outcomes. Using information from the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) program from 1995 to 2012, conditional survival percentages were calculated for 1 or 5 years of additional survival for all primary malignant brain and CNS tumors overall and by gender, race, ethnicity and age. Rates were calculated to include 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 10 and 15 years post diagnosis. Conditional survival was also calculated in intervals from 1995-2004 to 2005-2012, to examine the potential effect that the introduction of new treatment protocols may have had on survival rates. The percentage of patients surviving one or five additional years varied by histology, age at diagnosis, gender, race and ethnicity. Younger persons (age <15 years at diagnosis) had higher conditional survival percentages for all histologies as compared to all histologies in older patients (age ≥15 years at diagnosis). The longer the amount of time post-diagnosis of a malignant brain or other CNS tumor, the higher the conditional survival. Younger persons at diagnosis had the highest conditional survival irrespective of histology. Use of conditional survival rates provides relevant additional information for patients and their families, as well as for clinicians and researchers, and helps with understanding prognosis. PMID:27095247

  8. Invasion Precedes Tumor Mass Formation in a Malignant Brain Tumor Model of Genetically Modified Neural Stem Cells12

    PubMed Central

    Sampetrean, Oltea; Saga, Isako; Nakanishi, Masaya; Sugihara, Eiji; Fukaya, Raita; Onishi, Nobuyuki; Osuka, Satoru; Akahata, Masaki; Kai, Kazuharu; Sugimoto, Hachiro; Hirao, Atsushi; Saya, Hideyuki

    2011-01-01

    Invasiveness, cellular atypia, and proliferation are hallmarks of malignant gliomas. To effectively target each of these characteristics, it is important to understand their sequence during tumorigenesis. However, because most gliomas are diagnosed at an advanced stage, the chronology of gliomagenesis milestones is not well understood. The aim of the present study was to determine the onset of these characteristics during tumor development. Brain tumor-initiating cells (BTICs) were established by overexpressing H-RasV12 in normal neural stem/progenitor cells isolated from the subventricular zone of adult mice harboring a homozygous deletion of the Ink4a/Arf locus. High-grade malignant brain tumors were then created by orthotopic implantation of 105 BTICs into the forebrain of 6-week-old wild-type mice. Micewere killed every week for 5 weeks, and tumors were assessed for cellular atypia, proliferation, hemorrhage, necrosis, and invasion. All mice developed highly invasive, hypervascular glioblastoma-like tumors. A 100% penetrance rate and a 4-week median survival were achieved. Tumor cell migration along fiber tracts started within days after implantation and was followed by perivascular infiltration of tumor cells with marked recruitment of reactive host cells. Next, cellular atypia became prominent. Finally, mass proliferation and necrosis were observed in the last stage of the disease. Video monitoring of BTICs in live brain slices confirmed the early onset of migration, as well as the main cell migration patterns. Our results showed that perivascular and intraparenchymal tumor cell migration precede tumor mass formation in the adult brain, suggesting the need for an early and sustained anti-invasion therapy. PMID:21969812

  9. Superselective intraarterial cerebral infusion of cetuximab after osmotic blood/brain barrier disruption for recurrent malignant glioma: phase I study.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Shamik; Filippi, Christopher G; Wong, Tamika; Ray, Ashley; Fralin, Sherese; Tsiouris, A John; Praminick, Bidyut; Demopoulos, Alexis; McCrea, Heather J; Bodhinayake, Imithri; Ortiz, Rafael; Langer, David J; Boockvar, John A

    2016-07-01

    Objective To establish a maximum tolerated dose of superselective intraarterial cerebral infusion (SIACI) of Cetuximab after osmotic disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) with mannitol, and examine safety of the procedure in patients with recurrent malignant glioma. Methods A total of 15 patients with recurrent malignant glioma were included in the current study. The starting dose of Cetuximab was 100 mg/m(2) and dose escalation was done to 250 mg/m(2). All patients were observed for 28 days post-infusion for any side effects. Results There was no dose-limiting toxicity from a single dose of SIACI of Cetuximab up to 250 mg/m(2) after osmotic BBB disruption with mannitol. A tolerable rash was seen in 2 patients, anaphylaxis in 1 patient, isolated seizure in 1 patient, and seizure and cerebral edema in 1 patient. Discussion SIACI of mannitol followed by Cetuximab (up to 250 mg/m(2)) for recurrent malignant glioma is safe and well tolerated. A Phase I/II trial is currently underway to determine the efficacy of SIACI of cetuximab in patients with high-grade glioma. PMID:26945581

  10. [Untoward side effects of chemoradiotherapy in children with malignant brain tumors].

    PubMed

    Morozova, S K; Begun, I V; Spivak, L V; Radiuk, K A; Papkevich, I I; Savich, T V; Pershaĭ, E B; Vashkevich, T I; Aleĭnikova, O V

    2002-01-01

    Untoward side-effects of chemoradiotherapy were compared in 48 children treated for brain tumors and those in remission lasting from less than 12 months to 11 years. The investigation concerned disturbances in the neurologic, endocrine, cardiovascular, urinary, hepatobiliary and psychic systems; neurologic ones proved the most frequent. No cases of heart failure were reported among patients with brain tumors during remission. Hormonal study revealed inhibited thyroid function in brain tumor sufferers. PMID:12455363

  11. MicroRNA142-3p promotes tumor-initiating and radioresistant properties in malignant pediatric brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yi-Yen; Yang, Yi-Ping; Huang, Ming-Chao; Wang, Mong-Lien; Yen, Sang-Hue; Huang, Pin-I; Chen, Yi-Wei; Chiou, Shih-Hwa; Lan, Yuan-Tzu; Ma, Hsin-I; Shih, Yang-Hsin; Chen, Ming-Teh

    2014-01-01

    Primary central nervous system (CNS) atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumor (ATRT) is an extremely malignant pediatric brain tumor observed in infancy and childhood. It has been reported that a subpopulation of CD133(+) cells isolated from ATRT tumors present with cancer stem-like and radioresistant properties. However, the exact biomolecular mechanisms of ATRT or CD133-positive ATRT (ATRT-CD133(+)) cells are still unclear. We have previously shown that ATRT-CD133(+) cells have pluripotent differentiation ability and the capability of malignant cells to be highly resistant to ionizing radiation (IR). By using microRNA array and quantitative RT-PCR in this study, we showed that expression of miR142-3p was lower in ATRT-CD133(+) cells than in ATRT-CD133(-) cells. miR142-3p overexpression significantly inhibited the self-renewal and tumorigenicity of ATRT-CD133(+) cells. On the contrary, silencing of endogenous miR142-3p dramatically increased the tumor-initiating and stem-like cell capacities in ATRT cells or ATRT-CD133(-) cells and further promoted the mesenchymal transitional and radioresistant properties of ATRT cells. Most importantly, therapeutic delivery of miR142-3p in ATRT cells effectively reduced its lethality by blocking tumor growth, repressing invasiveness, increasing radiosensitivity, and prolonging survival time in orthotropic-transplanted immunocompromised mice. These results demonstrate the prospect of developing novel miRNA-based strategies to block the stem-like and radioresistant properties of malignant pediatric brain cancer stem cells. PMID:24816458

  12. Alternative lengthening of telomeres is enriched in, and impacts survival of TP53 mutant pediatric malignant brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Mangerel, Joshua; Price, Aryeh; Castelo-Branco, Pedro; Brzezinski, Jack; Buczkowicz, Pawel; Rakopoulos, Patricia; Merino, Diana; Baskin, Berivan; Wasserman, Jonathan; Mistry, Matthew; Barszczyk, Mark; Picard, Daniel; Mack, Stephen; Remke, Marc; Starkman, Hava; Elizabeth, Cynthia; Zhang, Cindy; Alon, Noa; Lees, Jodi; Andrulis, Irene L; Wunder, Jay S; Jabado, Nada; Johnston, Donna L; Rutka, James T; Dirks, Peter B; Bouffet, Eric; Taylor, Michael D; Huang, Annie; Malkin, David; Hawkins, Cynthia; Tabori, Uri

    2014-12-01

    Although telomeres are maintained in most cancers by telomerase activation, a subset of tumors utilize alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) to sustain self-renewal capacity. In order to study the prevalence and significance of ALT in childhood brain tumors we screened 517 pediatric brain tumors using the novel C-circle assay. We examined the association of ALT with alterations in genes found to segregate with specific histological phenotypes and with clinical outcome. ALT was detected almost exclusively in malignant tumors (p = 0.001). ALT was highly enriched in primitive neuroectodermal tumors (12 %), choroid plexus carcinomas (23 %) and high-grade gliomas (22 %). Furthermore, in contrast to adult gliomas, pediatric low grade gliomas which progressed to high-grade tumors did not exhibit the ALT phenotype. Somatic but not germline TP53 mutations were highly associated with ALT (p = 1.01 × 10(-8)). Of the other alterations examined, only ATRX point mutations and reduced expression were associated with the ALT phenotype (p = 0.0005). Interestingly, ALT attenuated the poor outcome conferred by TP53 mutations in specific pediatric brain tumors. Due to very poor prognosis, one year overall survival was quantified in malignant gliomas, while in children with choroid plexus carcinoma, five year overall survival was investigated. For children with TP53 mutant malignant gliomas, one year overall survival was 63 ± 12 and 23 ± 10 % for ALT positive and negative tumors, respectively (p = 0.03), while for children with TP53 mutant choroid plexus carcinomas, 5 years overall survival was 67 ± 19 and 27 ± 13 % for ALT positive and negative tumors, respectively (p = 0.07). These observations suggest that the presence of ALT is limited to a specific group of childhood brain cancers which harbor somatic TP53 mutations and may influence the outcome of these patients. Analysis of ALT may contribute to risk stratification and targeted therapies to

  13. Molecular biology of malignant gliomas.

    PubMed

    Belda-Iniesta, Cristóbal; de Castro Carpeño, Javier; Casado Sáenz, Enrique; Cejas Guerrero, Paloma; Perona, Rosario; González Barón, Manuel

    2006-09-01

    Gliomas are the most common primary brain tumours. In keeping with the degree of aggressiveness, gliomas are divided into four grades, with different biological behaviour. Furthermore, as different gliomas share a predominant histological appearance, the final classification includes both, histological features and degree of malignancy. For example, gliomas of astrocytic origin (astrocytomas) are classified into pilocytic astrocytoma (grade I), astrocytoma (grade II), anaplastic astrocytoma (grade III) and glioblastoma multiforme (GMB) (grade IV). Tumors derived from oligodendrocytes include grade II (oliogodendrogliomas) and grade III neoplasms (oligoastrocytoma). Each subtype has a specific prognosis that dictates the clinical management. In this regard, a patient diagnosed with an oligodendroglioma totally removed has 10-15 years of potential survival. On the opposite site, patients carrying a glioblastoma multiforme usually die within the first year after the diagnosis is made. Therefore, different approaches are needed in each case. Obviously, prognosis and biological behaviour of malignant gliomas are closely related and supported by the different molecular background that possesses each type of glioma. Furthermore, the ability that allows several low-grade gliomas to progress into more aggressive tumors has allowed cancer researchers to elucidate several pathways implicated in molecular biology of these devastating tumors. In this review, we describe classical pathways involved in human malignant gliomas with special focus with recent advances, such as glioma stem-like cells and expression patterns from microarray studies. PMID:17005465

  14. Pharmaco-thermodynamics of deuterium-induced oedema in living rat brain via 1H2O MRI: implications for boron neutron capture therapy of malignant brain tumours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medina, Daniel C.; Li, Xin; Springer, Charles S., Jr.

    2005-05-01

    In addition to its common usage as a tracer in metabolic and physiological studies, deuterium possesses anti-tumoural activity and confers protection against γ-irradiation. A more recent interest in deuterium emanates from the search for alternatives capable of improving neutron penetrance whilst reducing healthy tissue radiation dose deposition in boron neutron capture therapy of malignant brain tumours. Despite this potential clinical application, deuterium induces brain oedema, which is detrimental to neutron capture therapy. In this study, five adult male rats were titrated with deuterated drinking water while brain oedema was monitored via water proton magnetic resonance imaging. This report concludes that deuterium, as well as deuterium-induced brain oedema, possesses a uniform brain bio-distribution. At a steady-state blood fluid deuteration value of 16%, when the deuterium isotope fraction in drinking water was 25%, a mean oedematous volume change of 9 ± 2% (p-value <0.001) was observed in the rat brain—this may account for neurological and behavioural abnormalities found in mammals drinking highly deuterated water. In addition to characterizing the pharmaco-thermodynamics of deuterium-induced oedema, this report also estimates the impact of oedema on thermal neutron enhancement and effective dose reduction factors using simple linear transport calculations. While body fluid deuteration enhances thermal neutron flux penetrance and reduces dose deposition, oedema has the opposite effect because it increases the volume of interest, e.g., the brain volume. Thermal neutron enhancement and effective dose reduction factors could be reduced by as much as ~10% in the presence of a 9% water volume increase (oedema). All three authors have contributed equally to this work.

  15. High aggression in rats is associated with elevated stress, anxiety-like behavior, and altered catecholamine content in the brain

    PubMed Central

    Patki, Gaurav; Atrooz, Fatin; Alkadhi, Isam; Solanki, Naimesh; Salim, Samina

    2015-01-01

    The social defeat paradigm involves aggressive encounters between Long-Evans (LE) (resident) and Sprague-Dawley (SD) (intruder) rats. Successful application of chronic social defeat stress in SD rats is dependent upon selection of highly aggressive LE rats. Half of the LE rats screened for aggression did not meet the criterion for aggression (LE rats performing a defeat, characterized by the intruder surrendering or acquiring a supine position for at least 3 sec). The observation of the differences in the level of aggression between age and weight matched LE rats was quite compelling which led us to the present study. Herein, we measured behavioral differences between aggressor and non-aggressor LE rats. We analyzed their anxiety-like behavior using open-field and elevated plus maze tests. We also measured aggression/violence-like behavior using two tests. In one, time taken to defeat the intruder SD rat was recorded. In the second test, time taken to attack a novel object was compared between the two groups. We observed a significant increase in anxiety-like behavior in aggressor rats when compared to the non-aggressive group. Furthermore, time taken to defeat the intruder rat and to attack a novel object was significantly lower in aggressive LE rats. Biochemical data suggests that heightened anxiety-like behavior and aggression is associated with increased plasma levels of corticosterones and elevated oxidative stress. Significant alterations in dopamine (DA), norepinephrine (NE) and epinephrine (EPI) were observed within the hippocampus, amygdala and the prefrontal cortex, suggesting potential involvement of dopaminergic and noradrenergic systems in regulation of aggressive behaviors. PMID:25450144

  16. Combined 3 Tesla MRI Biomarkers Improve the Differentiation between Benign vs Malignant Single Ring Enhancing Brain Masses

    PubMed Central

    Salice, Simone; Esposito, Roberto; Ciavardelli, Domenico; delli Pizzi, Stefano; di Bastiano, Rossella; Tartaro, Armando

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate whether the combination of imaging biomarkers obtained by means of different 3 Tesla (3T) Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) advanced techniques can improve the diagnostic accuracy in the differentiation between benign and malignant single ring-enhancing brain masses. Materials and Methods 14 patients presenting at conventional 3T MRI single brain mass with similar appearance as regard ring enhancement, presence of peri-lesional edema and absence of hemorrhage signs were included in the study. All lesions were histologically proven: 5 pyogenic abscesses, 6 glioblastomas, and 3 metastases. MRI was performed at 3 Tesla and included Diffusion Weighted Imaging (DWI), Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast -Perfusion Weighted Imaging (DSC-PWI), Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS), and Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI). Imaging biomarkers derived by those advanced techniques [Cerebral Blood Flow (CBF), relative Cerebral Blood Volume (rCBV), relative Main Transit Time (rMTT), Choline (Cho), Creatine (Cr), Succinate, N-Acetyl Aspartate (NAA), Lactate (Lac), Lipids, relative Apparent Diffusion Coefficient (rADC), and Fractional Anisotropy (FA)] were detected by two experienced neuroradiologists in joint session in 4 areas: Internal Cavity (IC), Ring Enhancement (RE), Peri-Lesional edema (PL), and Contralateral Normal Appearing White Matter (CNAWM). Significant differences between benign (n = 5) and malignant (n = 9) ring enhancing lesions were tested with Mann-Withney U test. The diagnostic accuracy of MRI biomarkers taken alone and MRI biomarkers ratios were tested with Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) analysis with an Area Under the Curve (AUC) ≥ 0.9 indicating a very good diagnostic accuracy of the variable. Results Five MRI biomarker ratios achieved excellent accuracy: IC-rADC/PL-NAA (AUC = 1), IC-rADC/IC-FA (AUC = 0.978), RE-rCBV/RE-FA (AUC = 0.933), IC-rADC/RE-FA (AUC = 0.911), and IC-rADC/PL-FA (AUC = 0.911). Only IC-rADC achieved a very good

  17. Anosmin-1 contributes to brain tumor malignancy through integrin signal pathways

    PubMed Central

    Choy, Catherine T; Kim, Haseong; Lee, Ji-Young; Williams, David M; Palethorpe, David; Fellows, Greg; Wright, Alan J; Laing, Ken; Bridges, Leslie R; Howe, Franklyn A; Kim, Soo-Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Anosmin-1, encoded by the KAL1 gene, is an extracellular matrix (ECM)-associated protein which plays essential roles in the establishment of olfactory and GNRH neurons during early brain development. Loss-of-function mutations of KAL1 results in Kallmann syndrome with delayed puberty and anosmia. There is, however, little comprehension of its role in the developed brain. As reactivation of developmental signal pathways often takes part in tumorigenesis, we investigated if anosmin-1-mediated cellular mechanisms associated with brain tumors. Our meta-analysis of gene expression profiles of patients' samples and public microarray datasets indicated that KAL1 mRNA was significantly upregulated in high-grade primary brain tumors compared with the normal brain and low-grade tumors. The tumor-promoting capacity of anosmin-1 was demonstrated in the glioblastoma cell lines, where anosmin-1 enhanced cell motility and proliferation. Notably, anosmin-1 formed a part of active β1 integrin complex, inducing downstream signaling pathways. ShRNA-mediated knockdown of anosmin-1 attenuated motility and growth of tumor cells and induced apoptosis. Anosmin-1 may also enhance the invasion of tumor cells within the ECM by modulating cell adhesion and activating extracellular proteases. In a mouse xenograft model, anosmin-1-expressing tumors grew faster, indicating the role of anosmin-1 in tumor microenvironment in vivo. Combined, these data suggest that anosmin-1 can facilitate tumor cell proliferation, migration, invasion, and survival. Therefore, although the normal function of anosmin-1 is required in the proper development of GNRH neurons, overexpression of anosmin-1 in the developed brain may be an underlying mechanism for some brain tumors. PMID:24189182

  18. Sleep Loss and Its Effects on Health of Family Caregivers of Individuals with Primary Malignant Brain Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Shih-Yu; Clark, Patricia C.; Sherwood, Paula R.

    2013-01-01

    Sleep loss places caregivers at risk for poor health. Understanding correlates of sleep loss and relationships to health may enable improvement of health of caregivers of individuals with primary malignant brain tumors (PMBT). In this cross-sectional, descriptive study of 133 caregivers, relationships were examined between sleep loss and physical, mental, emotional, and social health at time of patient diagnosis. Sleep loss was not related to physical health. Shorter total sleep time was associated with greater fatigue and social support. Sleep quality was positively associated with quality of life. Further study is needed of the role of sleep loss in the PMBT caregiving trajectory and its long-term relationship with health outcomes. PMID:23633116

  19. l(3)malignant brain tumor and three novel genes are required for Drosophila germ-cell formation.

    PubMed Central

    Yohn, Christopher B; Pusateri, Leslie; Barbosa, Vitor; Lehmann, Ruth

    2003-01-01

    To identify genes involved in the process of germ-cell formation in Drosophila, a maternal-effect screen using the FLP/FRT-ovoD method was performed on chromosome 3R. In addition to expected mutations in the germ-cell determinant oskar and in other genes known to be involved in the process, several novel mutations caused defects in germ-cell formation. Mutations in any of three genes [l(3)malignant brain tumor, shackleton, and out of sync] affect the synchronous mitotic divisions and nuclear migration of the early embryo. The defects in nuclear migration or mitotic synchrony result in a reduction in germ-cell formation. Mutations in another gene identified in this screen, bebra, do not cause mitotic defects, but appear to act upstream of the localization of oskar. Analysis of our mutants demonstrates that two unique and independent processes must occur to form germ cells-germ-plasm formation and nuclear division/migration. PMID:14704174

  20. Identification of non-peptide Malignant Brain Tumor (MBT) repeat antagonists by Virtual Screening of commercially available compounds

    PubMed Central

    Kireev, Dmitri; Wigle, Tim J.; Norris-Drouin, Jacqueline; Herold, J. Martin; Janzen, William P.; Frye, Stephen V.

    2010-01-01

    The Malignant Brain Tumor (MBT) repeat is an important epigenetic-code “reader” and is functionally associated with differentiation, gene silencing and tumor suppression1–3. Small molecule probes of MBT domains should enable a systematic study of MBT-containing proteins, and potentially reveal novel druggable targets. We designed and applied a virtual screening strategy, which identified potential MBT antagonists in a large database of commercially available compounds. A small set of virtual hits was purchased and submitted to experimental testing. Nineteen of the purchased compounds showed a specific dose-dependent protein binding and will provide critical structure-activity information for subsequent lead generation and optimization. PMID:20931980

  1. Malignant melanoma maxilla

    PubMed Central

    Devi, Seema; Sinha, Richi; Singh, Rakesh Kumar

    2015-01-01

    A malignant melanoma is a highly lethal melanocytic neoplasm. A neoplasm usually affects the skin. Malignant melanomas in the head and neck region are rare, accounting for less than 1% of all melanomas. Malignant melanoma of the nose and paranasal sinuses is an aggressive disease typically presenting at an advanced stage, with a 5-year survival rate ranging 20-30%. Melanomas are tumors arising from melanocytes, which are neuroectodermally derived cells located in the basal layers of the skin. This is a case report of a 35-year-old male, who presented with very aggressive disease and developed liver metastasis. PMID:26668467

  2. Preoperative steroid use and the incidence of perioperative complications in patients undergoing craniotomy for definitive resection of a malignant brain tumor.

    PubMed

    Alan, Nima; Seicean, Andreea; Seicean, Sinziana; Neuhauser, Duncan; Benzel, Edward C; Weil, Robert J

    2015-09-01

    We studied the impact of preoperative steroids on 30 day morbidity and mortality of craniotomy for definitive resection of malignant brain tumors. Glucocorticoids are used to treat peritumoral edema in patients with malignant brain tumors, however, prolonged (⩾ 10 days) use of preoperative steroids as a risk factor for perioperative complications following resection of brain tumors has not been studied comprehensively. Therefore, we identified 4407 patients who underwent craniotomy to resect a malignant brain tumor between 2007 and 2012, who were reported in the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program, a prospectively collected clinical database. Metastatic brain tumors constituted 37.5% (n=1611) and primary malignant gliomas 62.5% (n=2796) of the study population. We used logistic regression to assess the association between preoperative steroid use and perioperative complications before and after 1:1 propensity score matching. Patients who received steroids constituted 22.8% of the population (n=1009). In the unmatched cohort, steroid use was associated with decreased length of hospitalization (odds ratio [OR] 0.7; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.6-0.8), however, the risk for readmission (OR 1.5; 95% CI 1.2-1.8) was increased. In the propensity score matched cohort (n=465), steroid use was not statistically associated with any adverse outcomes. Patients who received steroids were less likely to stay hospitalized for a protracted period of time, but were more likely to be readmitted after discharge following craniotomy. As an independent risk factor, preoperative steroid use was not associated with any observed perioperative complications. The findings of this study suggest that preoperative steroids do not independently compromise the short term outcome of craniotomy for resection of malignant brain tumors. PMID:26073371

  3. Methotrexate administration directly into the fourth ventricle in children with malignant fourth ventricular brain tumors: a pilot clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Sandberg, David I; Rytting, Michael; Zaky, Wafik; Kerr, Marcia; Ketonen, Leena; Kundu, Uma; Moore, Bartlett D; Yang, Grace; Hou, Ping; Sitton, Clark; Cooper, Laurence J; Gopalakrishnan, Vidya; Lee, Dean A; Thall, Peter F; Khatua, Soumen

    2015-10-01

    We hypothesize that chemotherapy can be safely administered directly into the fourth ventricle to treat recurrent malignant brain tumors in children. For the first time in humans, methotrexate was infused into the fourth ventricle in children with recurrent, malignant brain tumors. A catheter was surgically placed into the fourth ventricle and attached to a ventricular access device. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow was confirmed by CINE MRI postoperatively. Each cycle consisted of 4 consecutive daily methotrexate infusions (2 milligrams). Disease response was monitored with serial MRI scans and CSF cytologic analysis. Trough CSF methotrexate levels were sampled. Five patients (3 with medulloblastoma and 2 with ependymoma) received 18, 18, 12, 9, and 3 cycles, respectively. There were no serious adverse events or new neurological deficits attributed to methotrexate. Two additional enrolled patients were withdrawn prior to planned infusions due to rapid disease progression. Median serum methotrexate level 4 h after infusion was 0.04 µmol/L. Range was 0.02-0.13 µmol/L. Median trough CSF methotrexate level 24 h after infusion was 3.18 µmol/L (range 0.53-212.36 µmol/L). All three patients with medulloblastoma had partial response or stable disease until one patient had progressive disease after cycle 18. Both patients with ependymoma had progressive disease after 9 and 3 cycles, respectively. Low-dose methotrexate can be infused into the fourth ventricle without causing neurological toxicity. Some patients with recurrent medulloblastoma experience a beneficial anti-tumor effect both within the fourth ventricle and at distant sites. PMID:26255071

  4. Analysis of Mammalian Septin Expression in Human Malignant Brain Tumors1

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong-Seok; Hubbard, Sherri-Lynn; Peraud, Aurelia; Salhia, Bodour; Sakai, Keiichi; Rutka, James T

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Septins are a highly conserved subfamily of GTPases that play an important role in the process of cytokinesis. To increase our understanding of the expression and localization of the different mammalian septins in human brain tumors, we used antibodies against septins 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, and 11 in immunofluorescence and Western blot analyses of astrocytomas and medulloblastomas. We then characterized the expression and subcellular distribution of the SEPT2 protein in aphidicolin-synchronized U373 MG astrocytoma cells by immunofluorescence and fluorescence-activated cell sorter analysis. To determine the role of SEPT2 in astrocytoma cytokinesis, we inducibly expressed a dominant-negative (DN) SEPT2 mutant in U373 MG astrocytoma cells. We show variable levels and expression patterns of the different septins in brain tissue, brain tumor specimens, and human brain tumor cell lines. SEPT2 was abundantly expressed in all brain tumor samples and cell lines studied. SEPT3 was expressed in medulloblastoma specimens and cell lines, but not in astrocytoma specimens or cell lines. SEPT2 expression was cell cycle-related, with maximal levels in G2-M. Immunocytochemical analysis showed endogenous levels of the different septins within the perinuclear and peripheral cytoplasmic regions. In mitosis, SEPT2 was concentrated at the cleavage furrow. By immunocytochemistry and flow cytometry, we show that a DN SEPT2 mutant inhibits the completion of cell division and results in the accumulation of multinucleated cells. These results suggest that septins are variably expressed in human brain tumors. Stable expression of the DN SEPT2 mutant leads to a G2-M cell cycle block in astrocytoma cells. PMID:15140406

  5. Current treatment options of brain metastases and outcomes in patients with malignant melanoma.

    PubMed

    Nowak-Sadzikowska, Jadwiga; Walasek, Tomasz; Jakubowicz, Jerzy; Blecharz, Paweł; Reinfuss, Marian

    2016-01-01

    The prognosis for patients with melanoma who have brain metastases is poor, a median survival does not exceed 4-6 months. There are no uniform standards of treatment for patients with melanoma brain metastases (MBMs). The most preferred treatment approaches include local therapy - surgical resection and/or stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). The role of whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) as an adjuvant to local therapy is controversial. WBRT remains a palliative approach for those patients who have multiple MBMs with contraindications for surgery or SRS, or/and poor performance status, or/and very widespread extracranial metastases. Corticosteroids have been used in palliative treatment of MBMs as relief from symptoms related to intracranial pressure and edema. In recent years, the development of new systemic therapeutic strategies has been observed. Various modalities of systemic treatment include chemotherapy, immunotherapy and targeted therapy. Also, multimodality management in different combinations is a common strategy. Decisions regarding the use of specific treatment modalities are dependent on patient's performance status, and the extent of both intracranial and extracranial disease. This review summarizes current treatment options, indications and outcomes in patients with brain metastases from melanoma. PMID:27601961

  6. Regional white matter volume and the relation with attentional functioning in survivors of malignant pediatric brain tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glass, John O.; Mulhern, Raymond K.; White, Holly A.; Wilkinson, Gina M.; Reddick, Wilburn E.

    2003-05-01

    Quantitative assessment of MR examinations in 37 survivors of childhood cancer treated with central nervous system prophylaxis revealed that normal appearing white matter (NAWM) volume is associated with attention-related problems, localized specifically in the right prefrontal region. T1-, T2-, and PD-weighted images were segmented and divided into pre-frontal, frontal, parietal/temporal, and parietal/occipital regions for each hemisphere. These eight regions were analyzed in five slices centered at the level of the basal ganglia. The patient's age at diagnosis and time elapsed from diagnosis were used as covariates in the regressions. Attentional measures showed significant deficiency when compared to age and gender normative values. Total, frontal and/or prefrontal NAWM volumes from the range of slices examined were significantly associated with 5 of the 8 attentional measures. The frontal/prefrontal region of the brain is associated with executive functioning tasks and could potentially be spared as much as possible during therapy planning. The results of the present study further support the contention that NAWM is an important substrate for treatment-induced neurocognitive problems among survivors of malignant brain tumors of childhood.

  7. Radiation-Inducible Caspase-8 Gene Therapy for Malignant Brain Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Tsurushima, Hideo Yuan Xuan; Dillehay, Larry E.; Leong, Kam W.

    2008-06-01

    Purpose: Patients with malignant gliomas have a poor prognosis. To explore a novel and more effective approach for the treatment of patients with malignant gliomas, we designed a strategy that combines caspase-8 (CSP8) gene therapy and radiation treatment (RT). In addition, the specificity of the combined therapy was investigated to decrease the unpleasant effects experienced by the surrounding normal tissue. Methods and Materials: We constructed the plasmid pEGR-green fluorescence protein that included the radiation-inducible early growth response gene-1 (Egr-1) promoter and evaluated its characteristics. The pEGR-CSP8 was constructed and included the Egr-1 promoter and CSP8 complementary DNA. Assays that evaluated the apoptosis inducibility and cytotoxicity caused by CSP8 gene therapy combined with RT were performed using U251 and U87 glioma cells. The pEGR-CSP8 was transfected into the subcutaneous U251 glioma cells of nude mice by means of in vivo electroporation. The in vivo effects of CSP8 gene therapy combined with RT were evaluated. Results: The Egr-1 promoter yielded a better response with fractionated RT than with single-dose RT. In the assay of apoptosis inducibility and cytotoxicity, pEGR-CSP8 showed response for RT. The pEGR-CSP8 combined with RT is capable of inducing cell death effectively. In mice treated with pEGR-CSP8 and RT, apoptotic cells were detected in pathologic sections, and a significant difference was observed in tumor volumes. Conclusions: Our results indicate that radiation-inducible gene therapy may have great potential because this can be spatially or temporally controlled by exogenous RT and is safe and specific.

  8. Phase II Study of Aflibercept in Recurrent Malignant Glioma: A North American Brain Tumor Consortium Study

    PubMed Central

    de Groot, John F.; Lamborn, Kathleen R.; Chang, Susan M.; Gilbert, Mark R.; Cloughesy, Timothy F.; Aldape, Kenneth; Yao, Jun; Jackson, Edward F.; Lieberman, Frank; Robins, H. Ian; Mehta, Minesh P.; Lassman, Andrew B.; DeAngelis, Lisa M.; Yung, W.K. Alfred; Chen, Alice; Prados, Michael D.; Wen, Patrick Y.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Antivascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF) therapy is a promising treatment approach for patients with recurrent glioblastoma. This single-arm phase II study evaluated the efficacy of aflibercept (VEGF Trap), a recombinantly produced fusion protein that scavenges both VEGF and placental growth factor in patients with recurrent malignant glioma. Patients and Methods Forty-two patients with glioblastoma and 16 patients with anaplastic glioma who had received concurrent radiation and temozolomide and adjuvant temozolomide were enrolled at first relapse. Aflibercept 4 mg/kg was administered intravenously on day 1 of every 2-week cycle. Results The 6-month progression-free survival rate was 7.7% for the glioblastoma cohort and 25% for patients with anaplastic glioma. Overall radiographic response rate was 24% (18% for glioblastoma and 44% for anaplastic glioma). The median progression-free survival was 24 weeks for patients with anaplastic glioma (95% CI, 5 to 31 weeks) and 12 weeks for patients with glioblastoma (95% CI, 8 to 16 weeks). A total of 14 patients (25%) were removed from the study for toxicity, on average less than 2 months from treatment initiation. The main treatment-related National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria grades 3 and 4 adverse events (38 total) included fatigue, hypertension, and lymphopenia. Two grade 4 CNS ischemias and one grade 4 systemic hemorrhage were reported. Aflibercept rapidly decreases permeability on dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging, and molecular analysis of baseline tumor tissue identified tumor-associated markers of response and resistance. Conclusion Aflibercept monotherapy has moderate toxicity and minimal evidence of single-agent activity in unselected patients with recurrent malignant glioma. PMID:21606416

  9. Paediatric head CT scan and subsequent risk of malignancy and benign brain tumour: a nation-wide population-based cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Huang, W-Y; Muo, C-H; Lin, C-Y; Jen, Y-M; Yang, M-H; Lin, J-C; Sung, F-C; Kao, C-H

    2014-01-01

    Background: To evaluate the possible association between paediatric head computed tomography (CT) examination and increased subsequent risk of malignancy and benign brain tumour. Methods: In the exposed cohort, 24 418 participants under 18 years of age, who underwent head CT examination between 1998 and 2006, were identified from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD). Patients were followed up until a diagnosis of malignant disease or benign brain tumour, withdrawal from the National Health Insurance (NHI) system, or at the end of 2008. Results: The overall risk was not significantly different in the two cohorts (incidence rate=36.72 per 100 000 person-years in the exposed cohort, 28.48 per 100 000 person-years in the unexposed cohort, hazard ratio (HR)=1.29, 95% confidence interval (CI)=0.90–1.85). The risk of benign brain tumour was significantly higher in the exposed cohort than in the unexposed cohort (HR=2.97, 95% CI=1.49–5.93). The frequency of CT examination showed strong correlation with the subsequent overall risk of malignancy and benign brain tumour. Conclusions: We found that paediatric head CT examination was associated with an increased incidence of benign brain tumour. A large-scale study with longer follow-up is necessary to confirm this result. PMID:24569470

  10. Functional reconstruction after subtotal glossectomy in the surgical treatment of an uncommon and aggressive neoplasm in this location: Primary malignant melanoma in the base of the tongue

    PubMed Central

    Manzano-Solo-de-Zaldívar, Damián; Moreno-Sánchez, Manuel; Hernández-Vila, Cristina; Ramírez-Pérez, Francisco-Alejandro; González-Ballester, David; Ruíz-Laza, Luis; González-García, Raúl; Monje-Gil, Florencio

    2014-01-01

    Primary malignant melanoma of the oral cavity is a rare neoplasm, especially on the tongue. We report a case of mucosal melanoma at the base of the tongue, an extremely rare location (only about 30 cases have been reported in literature). The extension study doesn´t revealed distant metastatic lesions. The patient was treated by subtotal glossectomy and bilateral functional neck dissection. Tongue is one of the most difficult structures to reconstruct, because of their central role in phonation, swallowing and airway protection. The defect was reconstructed with anterolateral thigh free flap. Surgical treatment was supplemented with adjuvant immunotherapy. The post-operative period was uneventful. At present, 24 months after surgery, patient is asymptomatic, there isn´t evidence of recurrence of melanoma and he hasn´t any difficulty in swallowing or phonation. Key words:Malignant mucosal melanoma, anterolateral thigh free flap, phonation, swallowing. PMID:25593674

  11. Evolution of DNA aptamers for malignant brain tumor gliosarcoma cell recognition and clinical tissue imaging.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qiaoyi; Wu, Liang; Wang, Yuzhe; Zhu, Zhi; Song, Yanling; Tan, Yuyu; Wang, Xing-Fu; Li, Jiuxing; Kang, Dezhi; Yang, Chaoyong James

    2016-06-15

    Gliosarcoma, a variant of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), is a highly invasive malignant tumor. Unfortunately, this disease still marked by poor prognosis regardless of modern treatments. It is of great significance to discover specific molecular probes targeting gliosarcoma for early cancer diagnosis and therapy. Herein, we have selected a group of DNA aptamers with high affinity and selectivity against gliosarcoma cells K308 using cell-SELEX. All the dissociation constants of these aptamers against gliosarcoma cells were in the nanomolar range and aptamer WQY-9 has the highest affinity and good selectivity among them. Furthermore, truncated aptamer sequence, WQY-9-B, shows similar recognition ability to aptamer WQY-9. In addition, WQY-9-B was found to be able to bind selectively and internalize into cytoplasm of target cancer cell at 37 °C. More importantly, compared to a random sequence, aptamer WQY-9-B showed excellent recognition rate (73.3%) for tissue sections of clinical gliosarcoma samples. These data suggests that aptamer WQY-9-B has excellent potential as an effective molecular probe for gliosarcoma diagnosis. PMID:26802746

  12. PDT-induced apoptosis: investigations using two malignant brain tumor models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lilge, Lothar D.; Menzies, Keir; Bisland, Stuart K.; Lin, Annie; Wilson, Brian C.

    2002-06-01

    PDT included necrosis in brain tissue and an intracranial tumor has been quantified for various photosensitizers, and it has been shown to be dependent on the sub-cellular localization of these photosensitizers. In quantifying non- necrotic biological endpoints, such as PDT induced apoptosis, the expression and translation of apoptosis inhibiting or promoting genes is of considerable importance. We studied the susceptibility of two glioblastoma cell lines to under go apoptotic cell death following photodynamic treatment with either Photofrin or delta-aminolevulinic acid (delta) ALA) in vivo. Murine 9L Gliosarcoma cells or human U87 Glioblastoma cells were implanted into the cortex of rats, and following 12 or 14 days of growth respectively, subjected to either Photofrin-mediated PDT or ALA-mediated PDT. 9L gliosarcoma cells express the phosphatase Tensin homologue (PTEN) tumor suppressor gene while in U87 cells PTEN is mutated. Differences in the Photofrin mediated PDT induced apoptosis were noted between the two different cell lines in vivo, suggesting that Photofrin mediated PDT may be dependent on apoptotic pathways. ALA induced PPIX showed higher selectivity towards 9L than Photofrin mediated PDT. These studies suggests that PDT could be used as an effective treatment for intracranial neoplasm. Endogenous photosensitizers such as ALA could be used to promote apoptosis in tumor cells due to PDT treatment and thereby minimize the extent of necrotic infarction in the surrounding normal brain.

  13. Instant-mix whole brain photon with neutron boost radiotherapy for malignant gliomas

    SciTech Connect

    Kolker, J.D.; Halpern, H.J.; Krishnasamy, S.; Brown, F.; Dohrmann, G.; Ferguson, L.; Hekmatpanah, J.; Mullan, J.; Wollman, R.; Blough, R. )

    1990-08-01

    From July 1985 through March 1987, 44 consecutive patients with supratentorial, nonmetastatic anaplastic astrocytoma (AA) and glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) were treated with whole brain photon irradiation with concomitant neutron boost at the University of Chicago. All patients had biopsy proven disease and surgery ranged from biopsy to total gross excision. Whole brain photon radiation was given at 1.5 Gy per fraction, 5 days weekly for a total dose of 45 Gy in 6 weeks. Neutron boost radiation was prescribed to a target minimum dose that included the pre-surgical CT tumor volume plus 1 cm margin. Neutrons were administered 5-20 minutes prior to photon radiation twice weekly and a total dose of 5.2 Gyn gamma was administered over 6 weeks. Median follow-up was 36 months. The median survival was 40.3 months for anaplastic astrocytoma (10 patients) and 11 months for glioblastoma multiforme (34 patients) and 12 months for the overall group. Variables that predicted longer median survival included histology (AA vs. GBM), age (less than or equal to 39 years vs. older), and extent of surgery (total gross or partial excision vs. biopsy) whereas tumor size and Karnofsky performance status did not have a significant influence. The median survival of the anaplastic astrocytoma group was better than expected compared to the RTOG 80-07 study (a dose-finding study of similar design to this study) and historical data. Reasons for this are discussed.

  14. Brain Tumor Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Types of Brain Scans X-rays Laboratory Tests DNA Profiling Biopsy Procedure Malignant and Benign Brain Tumors Tumor ... Types of Brain Scans X-rays Laboratory Tests DNA Profiling Biopsy Procedure Malignant and Benign Brain Tumors Tumor ...

  15. Glucocorticoid Receptor-Targeted Liposomal Codelivery of Lipophilic Drug and Anti-Hsp90 Gene: Strategy to Induce Drug-Sensitivity, EMT-Reversal, and Reduced Malignancy in Aggressive Tumors.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Sujan Kumar; Jinka, Sudhakar; Pal, Krishnendu; Nelli, Swetha; Dutta, Shamit Kumar; Wang, Enfeng; Ahmad, Ajaz; AlKharfy, Khalid M; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata; Banerjee, Rajkumar

    2016-07-01

    Many cancers including the late stage ones become drug-resistant and undergo epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). These lead to enhanced invasion, migration, and metastasis toward manifesting its aggressiveness and malignancy. One of the key hallmarks of cancer is its overdependence on glycolysis as its preferred energy metabolism pathway. The strict avoidance of alternate energy pathway gluconeogenesis by cancer cells points to a yet-to-be hoisted role of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) especially in tumor microenvironment, where cells are known to become drug-sensitive through induction of gluconeogenesis. However, since GR is involved in metabolism, anti-inflammatory reactions, immunity besides inducing gluconeogenesis, a greater role of GR in tumor microenvironment is envisaged. We have shown previously that GR, although ubiquitously expressed in all cells; afford to be an effective cytoplasmic target for killing cancer cells selectively. Herein, we report the therapeutic use of a newly developed GR-targeted liposomal concoction (DXE) coformulating a lipophilic drug (ESC8) and an anti-Hsp90 anticancer gene against aggressive tumor models. This induced drug-sensitivity and apoptosis while reversing EMT in tumor cells toward effective retardation of aggressive growth in pancreas and skin tumor models. Additionally, the ESC8-free lipid formulation upon cotreatment with hydrophilic drugs, gemcitabine and doxorubicin, could effectively sensitize and kill pancreatic cancer and melanoma cells, respectively. The formulation-triggered EMT-reversal was GR-dependent. Overall, we found a new strategy for drug sensitization that led to the advent of new GR-targeted anticancer therapeutics. PMID:27184196

  16. Clinical studies of photodynamic therapy for malignant brain tumors: facial nerve palsy after temporal fossa photoillumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, Paul J.; Wilson, Brian C.; Lilge, Lothar D.; Varma, Abhay; Bogaards, Arjen; Fullagar, Tim; Fenstermaker, Robert; Selker, Robert; Abrams, Judith

    2003-06-01

    In two randomized prospective studies of brain tumor PDT more than 180 patients have been accrued. At the Toronto site we recognized two patients who developed a lower motor neuron (LMN) facial paralysis in the week following the PDT treatment. In both cases a temporal lobectomy was undertaken and the residual tumor cavity was photo-illuminated. The surface illuminated included the temporal fossa floor, thus potentially exposing the facial nerve to the effect of PDT. The number of frontal, temporal, parietal, and occipital tumors in this cohort was 39, 24, 12 and 4, respectively. Of the 24 temporal tumors 18 were randomized to Photofrin-PDT. Of these 18 a temporal lobectomy was carried out exposing the middle fossa floor as part of the tumor resection. In two of the 10 patients where the lobectomy was carried out and the fossa floor was exposed to light there occurred a postoperative facial palsy. Both patients recovered facial nerve function in 6 and 12 weeks, respectively. 46 J/cm2 were used in the former and 130 J/cm2 in the latter. We did not encounter a single post-operative LMN facial plasy in the 101 phase 2 patients treated with Photofrin-PDT. Among 688 supratentorial brain tumor operations in the last decade involving all pathologies and all locations no case of early post-operative LMN facial palsy was identified in the absence of PDT. One further patient who had a with post-PDT facial palsy was identified at the Denver site. Although it is possible that these patients had incidental Bell's palsy, we now recommend shielding the temporal fossa floor during PDT.

  17. High maternal intake of polyunsaturated fatty acids during pregnancy in mice alters offsprings' aggressive behavior, immobility in the swim test, locomotor activity and brain protein kinase C activity.

    PubMed

    Raygada, M; Cho, E; Hilakivi-Clarke, L

    1998-12-01

    Populations in Western countries consume an excess of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), even during pregnancy. Since (n-6) PUFA is critical for brain development, we studied whether a high maternal consumption of this fatty acid alters offsprings' affective-like behaviors and (n-6) PUFA-induced protein kinase C (PKC) activity in the brain. Three different strains of pregnant mice were fed isocaloric diets containing either 16% (control) or 43% (high) energy derived from fat high in (n-6) PUFA (corn oil: Balb/c and CD-1 mice, or soybean oil: C3H mice) throughout gestation. From birth onward dams and offspring were fed a nonpurified diet containing 12% energy from a variety of fats. Two- to 12-month-old female and male offspring of dams exposed to a high (n-6) PUFA diet during pregnancy were significantly more active in an open field, more aggressive in the resident-intruder test and spent less time immobile in the swim test than offspring of dams exposed to a control (n-6) PUFA diet. Significantly greater PKC activity in the hypothalamus and moderately less PKC activity in the whole brain (P = 0.10) were seen in the 2-month-old female and male high (n-6) PUFA offspring compared to controls. Our findings indicate that in utero exposure to a high (n-6) PUFA diet subsequently increases locomotor activity and aggression, and reduces immobility in the swim test. The mechanism mediating these effects may be linked to an increased PKC activity in the hypothalamus. PMID:9868200

  18. Intraventricular etoposide safety and toxicity profile in children and young adults with refractory or recurrent malignant brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Pajtler, Kristian W; Tippelt, Stephan; Siegler, Nele; Reichling, Stefanie; Zimmermann, Martina; Mikasch, Ruth; Bode, Udo; Gnekow, Astrid; Pietsch, Torsten; Benesch, Martin; Rutkowski, Stefan; Fleischhack, Gudrun

    2016-07-01

    Systemic administration of etoposide is effective in treating metastatic, recurrent or refractory brain tumors, but penetration into the cerebrospinal fluid is extremely poor. This study was designed to determine the safety and toxicity profile of intraventricular etoposide administration and was affiliated with the prospective, multicenter, nonblinded, nonrandomized, multi-armed HIT-REZ-97 trial. The study enrolled 68 patients, aged 1.1-34.6 (median age 11 years). Adverse events that could possibly be related to intraventricular etoposide therapy were documented and analyzed. Intraventricular etoposide was simultaneously administered with either oral or intravenous chemotherapy in 426 courses according to three major schedules varying in dosing (0.25-1 mg), frequency of administration (bolus injection, every 12 or 24 h), course duration (5-10 days) and length of interval between courses (2-5 weeks). Potential treatment-related adverse effects included transient headache, seizures, infection of the reservoir, nausea and neuropsychological symptoms. Hematological side effects were not observed. One patient, with history of multiple prior therapies, who received long-term intraventricular and oral etoposide treatment developed acute myeloid leukemia as a secondary malignancy. Overall intraventricular etoposide is well tolerated. The results of this study have warranted a phase II trial to determine the effectiveness of this regimen in disease stages with very limited therapeutic options. PMID:27147083

  19. Locke-Wallace Short Marital-Adjustment Test: Psychometric Evaluation in Caregivers for Persons With Primary Malignant Brain Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yun; Terhorst, Lauren; Donovan, Heidi S.; Weimer, Jason M.; Choi, Chien-Wen J.; Schulz, Richard; Given, Barbara; Sherwood, Paula R.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Caregivers’ well-being has been found to be associated with marital adjustment. This study’s purpose was to evaluate the psychometric properties of the Locke-Wallace Short Marital-Adjustment Test (LWSMAT) in a sample of caregivers of persons with primary malignant brain tumor (PMBT). Methods Secondary analysis of data collected from 114 caregivers. The LWSMAT was tested for factor structure, internal consistency reliability, and construct validity. Results 5 extracted factors explained 60.55% of the total variance. Four interpretable factors (Contentment & Communication, Leisure & Sociality, Intimacy, and Shared Philosophy) had Cronbach’s alpha between 0.63 and 0.74. Convergent validity (r = −.35 and r = −.43, respectively, both p < .0001) and discriminant validity (r = .07, p = .49; and r = −.04, p = .67) were confirmed by comparing four factors with subdimensions of the Caregiver Reaction Assessment (CRA). Conclusion The LWSMAT is a multidimensional, reliable, and valid measure of marital adjustment in caregivers of persons with a PMBT. PMID:24620520

  20. Deleted in Malignant Brain Tumors-1 Protein (DMBT1): A Pattern Recognition Receptor with Multiple Binding Sites

    PubMed Central

    Ligtenberg, Antoon J. M.; Karlsson, Niclas G.; Veerman, Enno C. I.

    2010-01-01

    Deleted in Malignant Brain Tumors-1 protein (DMBT1), salivary agglutinin (DMBT1SAG), and lung glycoprotein-340 (DMBT1GP340) are three names for glycoproteins encoded by the same DMBT1 gene. All these proteins belong to the scavenger receptor cysteine-rich (SRCR) superfamily of proteins: a superfamily of secreted or membrane-bound proteins with SRCR domains that are highly conserved down to sponges, the most ancient metazoa. In addition to SRCR domains, all DMBT1s contain two CUB domains and one zona pellucida domain. The SRCR domains play a role in the function of DMBT1s, which is the binding of a broad range of pathogens including cariogenic streptococci, Helicobacter pylori and HIV. Mucosal defense proteins like IgA, surfactant proteins and lactoferrin also bind to DMBT1s through their SRCR domains. The binding motif on the SRCR domains comprises an 11-mer peptide in which a few amino acids are essential for binding (GRVEVLYRGSW). Adjacent to each individual SRCR domain are glycosylation domains, where the attached carbohydrate chains play a role in the binding of influenza A virus and Helicobacter pylori. The composition of the carbohydrate chains is not only donor specific, but also varies between different organs. These data demonstrate a role for DMBT1s as pattern recognition molecules containing various peptide and carbohydrate binding motifs. PMID:21614203

  1. Quantification of Malignant Breast Cancer Cell MDA-MB-231 Transmigration Across Brain and Lung Microvascular Endothelium.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jie; Fu, Bingmei M

    2016-07-01

    Tumor cell extravasation through the endothelial barrier forming the microvessel wall is a crucial step during tumor metastasis. However, where, how and how fast tumor cells transmigrate through endothelial barriers remain unclear. Using an in vitro transwell model, we performed a transmigration assay of malignant breast tumor cells (MDA-MB-231) through brain and lung microvascular endothelial monolayers under control and pathological conditions. The locations and rates of tumor cell transmigration as well as the changes in the structural components (integrity) of endothelial monolayers were quantified by confocal microscopy. Endothelial monolayer permeability to albumin P (albumin) was also quantified under the same conditions. We found that about 98% of transmigration occurred at the joints of endothelial cells instead of cell bodies; tumor cell adhesion and transmigration degraded endothelial surface glycocalyx and disrupted endothelial junction proteins, consequently increased P (albumin); more tumor cells adhered to and transmigrated through the endothelial monolayer with higher P (albumin); P (albumin) and tumor transmigration were increased by vascular endothelial growth factor, a representative of cytokines, and lipopolysaccharides, a typical systemic inflammatory factor, but reduced by adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate. These results suggest that reinforcing endothelial structural integrity is an effective approach for inhibiting tumor extravasation. PMID:26603751

  2. The Malignant Protein Puzzle.

    PubMed

    Walker, Lary C; Jucker, Mathias

    2016-01-01

    When most people hear the words malignant and brain, cancer immediately comes to mind. But our authors argue that proteins can be malignant too, and can spread harmfully through the brain in neurodegenerative diseases that include Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, CTE, and ALS. Studying how proteins such as PrP, amyloid beta, tau, and others aggregate and spread, and kill brain cells, represents a crucial new frontier in neuroscience. PMID:27408676

  3. Monitoring the Bystander Killing Effect of Human Multipotent Stem Cells for Treatment of Malignant Brain Tumors.

    PubMed

    Leten, Cindy; Trekker, Jesse; Struys, Tom; Roobrouck, Valerie D; Dresselaers, Tom; Vande Velde, Greetje; Lambrichts, Ivo; Verfaillie, Catherine M; Himmelreich, Uwe

    2016-01-01

    Tumor infiltrating stem cells have been suggested as a vehicle for the delivery of a suicide gene towards otherwise difficult to treat tumors like glioma. We have used herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase expressing human multipotent adult progenitor cells in two brain tumor models (hU87 and Hs683) in immune-compromised mice. In order to determine the best time point for the administration of the codrug ganciclovir, the stem cell distribution and viability were monitored in vivo using bioluminescence (BLI) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Treatment was assessed by in vivo BLI and MRI of the tumors. We were able to show that suicide gene therapy using HSV-tk expressing stem cells can be followed in vivo by MRI and BLI. This has the advantage that (1) outliers can be detected earlier, (2) GCV treatment can be initiated based on stem cell distribution rather than on empirical time points, and (3) a more thorough follow-up can be provided prior to and after treatment of these animals. In contrast to rodent stem cell and tumor models, treatment success was limited in our model using human cell lines. This was most likely due to the lack of immune components in the immune-compromised rodents. PMID:26880961

  4. Monitoring the Bystander Killing Effect of Human Multipotent Stem Cells for Treatment of Malignant Brain Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Leten, Cindy; Trekker, Jesse; Struys, Tom; Roobrouck, Valerie D.; Dresselaers, Tom; Vande Velde, Greetje; Lambrichts, Ivo; Verfaillie, Catherine M.; Himmelreich, Uwe

    2016-01-01

    Tumor infiltrating stem cells have been suggested as a vehicle for the delivery of a suicide gene towards otherwise difficult to treat tumors like glioma. We have used herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase expressing human multipotent adult progenitor cells in two brain tumor models (hU87 and Hs683) in immune-compromised mice. In order to determine the best time point for the administration of the codrug ganciclovir, the stem cell distribution and viability were monitored in vivo using bioluminescence (BLI) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Treatment was assessed by in vivo BLI and MRI of the tumors. We were able to show that suicide gene therapy using HSV-tk expressing stem cells can be followed in vivo by MRI and BLI. This has the advantage that (1) outliers can be detected earlier, (2) GCV treatment can be initiated based on stem cell distribution rather than on empirical time points, and (3) a more thorough follow-up can be provided prior to and after treatment of these animals. In contrast to rodent stem cell and tumor models, treatment success was limited in our model using human cell lines. This was most likely due to the lack of immune components in the immune-compromised rodents. PMID:26880961

  5. ImmunoPET Imaging of CD146 Expression in Malignant Brain Tumors.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Reinier; Sun, Haiyan; England, Christopher G; Valdovinos, Hector F; Barnhart, Todd E; Yang, Yunan; Cai, Weibo

    2016-07-01

    Recently, the overexpression of CD146 and its potential as a therapeutic target in high-grade gliomas, the most lethal type of brain cancer, was uncovered. In this study, we describe the generation of (89)Zr-Df-YY146, a novel (89)Zr-labeled monoclonal antibody (mAb) for the targeting and quantification of CD146 expression in a mouse model of glioblastoma, using noninvasive immunoPET imaging. YY146, a high affinity anti-CD146 mAb, was conjugated to deferoxamine (Df) for labeling with the long-lived positron emitter (89)Zr (t1/2: 78.4 h). In vitro assays, including flow cytometry, immunofluorescence microscopy, and Western blot, were performed with two glioblastoma cell lines, U87MG and U251, to determine their CD146 expression levels. Also, YY146 and Df-YY146's CD146-binding affinities were compared using flow cytometry. In vivo CD146-targeting of (89)Zr-Df-YY146 was evaluated by sequential PET imaging, in athymic nude mice bearing subcutaneously implanted U87MG or U251 tumors. CD146 blocking, ex vivo biodistribution, and histological studies were carried out to confirm (89)Zr-Df-YY146 specificity, as well as the accuracy of PET data. In vitro studies exposed elevated CD146 expression levels in U87MG cells, but negligible levels in U251 cells. Flow cytometry revealed no differences in affinity between YY146 and Df-YY146. (89)Zr labeling of Df-YY146 proceeded with excellent yield (∼80%), radiochemical purity (>95%), and specific activity (∼44 GBq/μmol). Longitudinal PET revealed prominent and persistent (89)Zr-Df-YY146 uptake in mice bearing U87MG tumors that peaked at 14.00 ± 3.28%ID/g (n = 4), 48 h post injection of the tracer. Conversely, uptake was significantly lower in CD146-negative U251 tumors (5.15 ± 0.99%ID/g, at 48 h p.i.; n = 4; P < 0.05). Uptake in U87MG tumors was effectively blocked in a competitive inhibition experiment, corroborating the CD146 specificity of (89)Zr-Df-YY146. Finally, ex vivo biodistribution validated the accuracy of PET data

  6. 5-HT1A receptor gene silencers Freud-1 and Freud-2 are differently expressed in the brain of rats with genetically determined high level of fear-induced aggression or its absence.

    PubMed

    Kondaurova, Elena M; Ilchibaeva, Tatiana V; Tsybko, Anton S; Kozhemyakina, Rimma V; Popova, Nina K; Naumenko, Vladimir S

    2016-09-01

    Serotonin 5-HT1A receptor is known to play a crucial role in the mechanisms of genetically defined aggression. In its turn, 5-HT1A receptor functional state is under control of multiple factors. Among others, transcriptional factors Freud-1 and Freud-2 are known to be involved in the repression of 5-HT1A receptor gene expression. However, implication of these factors in the regulation of behavior is unclear. Here, we investigated the expression of 5-HT1A receptor and silencers Freud-1 and Freud-2 in the brain of rats selectively bred for 85 generations for either high level of fear-induced aggression or its absence. It was shown that Freud-1 and Freud-2 levels were different in aggressive and nonaggressive animals. Freud-1 protein level was decreased in the hippocampus, whereas Freud-2 protein level was increased in the frontal cortex of highly aggressive rats. There no differences in 5-HT1A receptor gene expression were found in the brains of highly aggressive and nonaggressive rats. However, 5-HT1A receptor protein level was decreased in the midbrain and increased in the hippocampus of highly aggressive rats. These data showed the involvement of Freud-1 and Freud-2 in the regulation of genetically defined fear-induced aggression. However, these silencers do not affect transcription of the 5-HT1A receptor gene in the investigated rats. Our data indicate the implication of posttranscriptional rather than transcriptional regulation of 5-HT1A receptor functional state in the mechanisms of genetically determined aggressive behavior. On the other hand, the implication of other transcriptional regulators for 5-HT1A receptor gene in the mechanisms of genetically defined aggression could be suggested. PMID:27150226

  7. Phase I study of temozolomide in combination with thiotepa and carboplatin with autologous hematopoietic cell rescue in patients with malignant brain tumors with minimal residual disease.

    PubMed

    Egan, G; Cervone, K A; Philips, P C; Belasco, J B; Finlay, J L; Gardner, S L

    2016-04-01

    Recurrence of malignant brain tumors results in a poor prognosis with limited treatment options. High-dose chemotherapy with autologous hematopoietic cell rescue (AHCR) has been used in patients with recurrent malignant brain tumors and has shown improved outcomes compared with standard chemotherapy. Temozolomide is standard therapy for glioblastoma and has also shown activity in patients with medulloblastoma/primitive neuro-ectodermal tumor (PNET), particularly those with recurrent disease. Temozolomide was administered twice daily on days -10 to -6, followed by thiotepa 300 mg/m(2) per day and carboplatin dosed using the Calvert formula or body surface area on days -5 to -3, with AHCR day 0. Twenty-seven patients aged 3-46 years were enrolled. Diagnoses included high-grade glioma (n=12); medulloblastoma/PNET (n=9); central nervous system (CNS) germ cell tumor (n=4); ependymoma (n=1) and spinal cord PNET (n=1). Temozolomide doses ranged from 100 mg/m(2) per day to 400 mg/m(2) per day. There were no toxic deaths. Prolonged survival was noted in several patients including those with recurrent high-grade glioma, medulloblastoma and CNS germ cell tumor. Increased doses of temozolomide are feasible with AHCR. A phase II study using temozolomide, carboplatin and thiotepa with AHCR for children with recurrent malignant brain tumors is being conducted through the Pediatric Blood and Marrow Transplant Consortium. PMID:26726947

  8. Extra-axial brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Rapalino, Otto; Smirniotopoulos, James G

    2016-01-01

    Extra-axial brain tumors are the most common adult intracranial neoplasms and encompass a broad spectrum of pathologic subtypes. Meningiomas are the most common extra-axial brain tumor (approximately one-third of all intracranial neoplasms) and typically present as slowly growing dural-based masses. Benign meningiomas are very common, and may occasionally be difficult to differentiate from more aggressive subtypes (i.e., atypical or malignant varieties) or other dural-based masses with more aggressive biologic behavior (e.g., hemangiopericytoma or dural-based metastases). Many neoplasms that typically affect the brain parenchyma (intra-axial), such as gliomas, may also present with primary or secondary extra-axial involvement. This chapter provides a general and concise overview of the common types of extra-axial tumors and their typical imaging features. PMID:27432671

  9. Recent progress on normal and malignant pancreatic stem/progenitor cell research: therapeutic implications for the treatment of type 1 or 2 diabetes mellitus and aggressive pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mimeault, M; Batra, S K

    2010-01-01

    Recent progress on pancreatic stem/progenitor cell research has revealed that the putative multipotent pancreatic stem/progenitor cells and/or more committed beta cell precursors may persist in the pancreatic gland in adult life. The presence of immature pancreatic cells with stem cell-like properties offers the possibility of stimulating their in vivo expansion and differentiation or to use their ex vivo expanded progenies for beta cell replacement-based therapies for type 1 or 2 diabetes mellitus in humans. In addition, the transplantation of either insulin-producing beta cells derived from embryonic, fetal and other tissue-resident adult stem/progenitor cells or genetically modified adult stem/progenitor cells may also constitute alternative promising therapies for treating diabetic patients. The genetic and/or epigenetic alterations in putative pancreatic adult stem/progenitor cells and/or their early progenies may, however, contribute to their acquisition of a dysfunctional behaviour as well as their malignant transformation into pancreatic cancer stem/progenitor cells. More particularly, the activation of distinct tumorigenic signalling cascades, including the hedgehog, epidermal growth factor–epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF–EGFR) system, wingless ligand (Wnt)/β-catenin and/or stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1)–CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) pathways may play a major role in the sustained growth, survival, metastasis and/or drug resistance of pancreatic cancer stem/progenitor cells and their further differentiated progenies. The combination of drugs that target the oncogenic elements in pancreatic cancer stem/progenitor cells and their microenvironment, with the conventional chemotherapeutic regimens, could represent promising therapeutic strategies. These novel targeted therapies should lead to the development of more effective treatments of locally advanced and metastatic pancreatic cancers, which remain incurable with current therapies

  10. Synthesis and evaluation of boron compounds for neutron capture therapy of malignant brain tumors. Technical progress report No. 1, May 1, 1990--January 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Soloway, A.H.; Barth, R.F.

    1990-12-31

    Boron neutron capture therapy offers the potentiality for treating brain tumors currently resistant to treatment. The success of this form of therapy is directly dependent upon the delivery of sufficient numbers of thermal-neutrons to tumor cells which possess high concentrations of B-10. The objective of this project is to develop chemical methodology to synthesize boron-containing compounds with the potential for becoming incorporated into rapidly-dividing malignant brain tumor cells and excluded from normal components of the brain and surrounding tissues, to develope biological methods for assessing the potential of the compound by use of cell culture or intratumoral injection, to develop analytical methodology for measuring boron in cells and tissue using direct current plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (DCP-AES) and alpha track autoradiography, to develop biochemical and HPLC procedures for evaluating compound uptake and tissue half-life, and to develop procedures required to assess both in vitro and vivo efficacy of BNCT with selected compounds.

  11. Brain Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... brain. Brain tumors can be benign, with no cancer cells, or malignant, with cancer cells that grow quickly. Some are primary brain ... targeted therapy. Targeted therapy uses substances that attack cancer cells without harming normal cells. Many people get ...

  12. The nature of human aggression.

    PubMed

    Archer, John

    2009-01-01

    Human aggression is viewed from four explanatory perspectives, derived from the ethological tradition. The first consists of its adaptive value, which can be seen throughout the animal kingdom, involving resource competition and protection of the self and offspring, which has been viewed from a cost-benefit perspective. The second concerns the phylogenetic origin of aggression, which in humans involves brain mechanisms that are associated with anger and inhibition, the emotional expression of anger, and how aggressive actions are manifest. The third concerns the origin of aggression in development and its subsequent modification through experience. An evolutionary approach to development yields conclusions that are contrary to the influential social learning perspective, notably that physical aggression occurs early in life, and its subsequent development is characterized by learned inhibition. The fourth explanation concerns the motivational mechanisms controlling aggression: approached from an evolutionary background, these mechanisms range from the inflexible reflex-like responses to those incorporating rational decision-making. PMID:19411108

  13. The melanoma-specific graded prognostic assessment does not adequately discriminate prognosis in a modern population with brain metastases from malignant melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Wilkins, Anna; Furness, Andrew; W Corbett, Richard; Bloomfield, Adam; Porta, Nuria; Morris, Stephen; Ali, Zohra; Larkin, James; Harrington, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    Background: The melanoma-specific graded prognostic assessment (msGPA) assigns patients with brain metastases from malignant melanoma to 1 of 4 prognostic groups. It was largely derived using clinical data from patients treated in the era that preceded the development of newer therapies such as BRAF, MEK and immune checkpoint inhibitors. Therefore, its current relevance to patients diagnosed with brain metastases from malignant melanoma is unclear. This study is an external validation of the msGPA in two temporally distinct British populations. Methods: Performance of the msGPA was assessed in Cohort I (1997–2008, n=231) and Cohort II (2008–2013, n=162) using Kaplan–Meier methods and Harrell's c-index of concordance. Cox regression was used to explore additional factors that may have prognostic relevance. Results: The msGPA does not perform well as a prognostic score outside of the derivation cohort, with suboptimal statistical calibration and discrimination, particularly in those patients with an intermediate prognosis. Extra-cerebral metastases, leptomeningeal disease, age and potential use of novel targeted agents after brain metastases are diagnosed, should be incorporated into future prognostic models. Conclusions: An improved prognostic score is required to underpin high-quality randomised controlled trials in an area with a wide disparity in clinical care. PMID:26484413

  14. Clinical studies of photodynamic therapy for malignant brain tumors: Karnofsky score and neurological score in patients with recurrent gloms treated with Photofrin PDT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, Paul J.; Wilson, Brian C.; Lilge, Lothar D.; Yang, Victor X.; Varma, Abhay; Bogaards, Arjen; Hetzel, Fred W.; Chen, Qun; Fullagar, Tim; Fenstermaker, Robert; Selker, Robert; Abrams, Judith

    2002-06-01

    In our previous phase II studies we treated 112 patients with malignant brain tumors with 2-mg/kg Photofrin i.v. and intra-operative cavitary PDT. We concluded that PDT was safe in patients with newly diagnosed or recurrent supratentorial malignant gliomas. Pathology, performance grade and light dose were significantly related to survival time. In selected patients when an adequate light dose was used survival time improved. The surgical mortality rate was less than 3%. [spie 2000] We have initiated two randomized prospective trials - the first, to determine if the addition of PDT to standard therapy [surgery, radiation and/or chemotherapy] prolongs the survival of patients with newly diagnosed malignant astrocytic tumors; and the second, to determine whether high light dose PDT [120 J/cm2] is superior to low light dose PDT [40 J/cm2] in patients with recurrent malignant astrocytic tumors. To date, 158 patients have been recruited - 72 to the newly diagnosed malignant glioma study and 86 to the recurrent glioma study. In the recurrent glioma study we compared the pre-operative KS and elements of the neurological examination [speech function, visual fields, cognitive function, sensory examination and gait] to the post-operative examinations at hospital discharge. The means were compared by paired student-t test. The KS in 86 of 88 patients with recurrent gliomas were assessable. The mean [s.d.] preoperative and post-operative KS were 82+/- 14 and 79+/- 17, respectively [p=0.003]. The mean decline in KS, although statistically significant, was small and of no clinical importance. The median Karnofsky score changed from 90 to 80. The KS improved in 8 patients; their post-operative average length of stay (alos) was =9.7 days. There was no change in 47 [alos=8.3], a decline of 10 points in 24 [aloc=13.4] and declined by more than 10 points in 7 [alos=23.3]. Three of these 7 patients who had a decline of >10 points improved in follow-up but did not reach their

  15. Antisocial personality disorder, alcohol, and aggression.

    PubMed

    Moeller, F G; Dougherty, D M

    2001-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies and laboratory research consistently link alcohol use with aggression. Not all people, however, exhibit increased aggression under the influence of alcohol. Recent research suggests that people with antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) may be more prone to alcohol-related aggression than people without ASPD. As a group, people with ASPD have higher rates of alcohol dependence and more alcohol-related problems than people without ASPD. Likewise, in laboratory studies, people with ASPD show greater increases in aggressive behavior after consuming alcohol than people without ASPD. The association between ASPD and alcohol-related aggression may result from biological factors, such as ASPD-related impairments in the functions of certain brain chemicals (e.g., serotonin) or in the activities of higher reasoning, or "executive," brain regions. Alternatively, the association between ASPD and alcohol-related aggression may stem from some as yet undetermined factor(s) that increase the risk for aggression in general. PMID:11496966

  16. Relative survival of patients with non-malignant central nervous system tumours: a descriptive study by the Austrian Brain Tumour Registry

    PubMed Central

    Woehrer, A; Hackl, M; Waldhör, T; Weis, S; Pichler, J; Olschowski, A; Buchroithner, J; Maier, H; Stockhammer, G; Thomé, C; Haybaeck, J; Payer, F; von Campe, G; Kiefer, A; Würtz, F; Vince, G H; Sedivy, R; Oberndorfer, S; Marhold, F; Bordihn, K; Stiglbauer, W; Gruber-Mösenbacher, U; Bauer, R; Feichtinger, J; Reiner-Concin, A; Grisold, W; Marosi, C; Preusser, M; Dieckmann, K; Slavc, I; Gatterbauer, B; Widhalm, G; Haberler, C; Hainfellner, J A

    2014-01-01

    Background: Unlike malignant primary central nervous system (CNS) tumours outcome data on non-malignant CNS tumours are scarce. For patients diagnosed from 1996 to 2002 5-year relative survival of only 85.0% has been reported. We investigated this rate in a contemporary patient cohort to update information on survival. Methods: We followed a cohort of 3983 cases within the Austrian Brain Tumour Registry. All patients were newly diagnosed from 2005 to 2010 with a histologically confirmed non-malignant CNS tumour. Vital status, cause of death, and population life tables were obtained by 31 December 2011 to calculate relative survival. Results: Overall 5-year relative survival was 96.1% (95% CI 95.1–97.1%), being significantly lower in tumours of borderline (90.2%, 87.2–92.7%) than benign behaviour (97.4%, 96.3–98.3%). Benign tumour survival ranged from 86.8 for neurofibroma to 99.7% for Schwannoma; for borderline tumours survival rates varied from 83.2 for haemangiopericytoma to 98.4% for myxopapillary ependymoma. Cause of death was directly attributed to the CNS tumour in 39.6%, followed by other cancer (20.4%) and cardiovascular disease (15.8%). Conclusion: The overall excess mortality in patients with non-malignant CNS tumours is 5.5%, indicating a significant improvement in survival over the last decade. Still, the remaining adverse impact on survival underpins the importance of systematic registration of these tumours. PMID:24253501

  17. Aggressive operative treatment of isolated blunt traumatic brain injury in the elderly is associated with favourable outcome.

    PubMed

    Wutzler, Sebastian; Lefering, Rolf; Wafaisade, Arasch; Maegele, Marc; Lustenberger, Thomas; Walcher, Felix; Marzi, Ingo; Laurer, Helmut

    2015-09-01

    Outcome after traumatic brain injury (TBI) in the elderly has not been fully elucidated. The present retrospective observational study investigates the age-dependent outcome of patients suffering from severe isolated TBI with regard to operative and non-operative treatment. Data were prospectively collected in the TraumaRegister DGU. Anonymous datasets of 8629 patients with isolated severe blunt TBI (AISHead≥3, AISBody≤1) documented from 2002 to 2011 were analysed. Patients were grouped according to age: 1-17, 18-59, 60-69, 70-79 and ≥80 years. Cranial fractures (44.8%) and subdural haematomas (42.6%) were the most common TBIs. Independent from the type of TBI the group of patients with operative treatment declined with rising age. Subgroup analysis of patients with critical TBI (AISHead=5) revealed standardised mortality ratios (SMRs) of 0.81 (95% CI 0.75-0.87) in case of operative treatment (n=1201) and 1.13 (95% CI 1.09-1.18) in case of non-operative treatment (n=1096). All age groups ≥60 years showed significantly reduced SMRs in case of operative treatment. Across all age groups the group of patients with low/moderate disability according to the GOS (4 or 5 points) was higher in case of operative treatment. Results of this retrospective observational study have to be interpreted cautiously. However, good outcome after TBI with severe space-occupying haemorrhage is more frequent in patients with operative treatment across all age groups. Age alone should not be the reason for limited care or denial of operative intervention. PMID:25799473

  18. Validation of the National Institutes of Health Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System Survey as a Quality-of-Life Instrument for Patients with Malignant Brain Tumors and Their Caregivers.

    PubMed

    Romero, Melissa M; Flood, Lisa Sue; Gasiewicz, Nanci K; Rovin, Richard; Conklin, Samantha

    2015-12-01

    At present there is a lack of well-validated surveys used to measure quality of life in patients with malignant brain tumors and their caregivers. The main objective of this pilot study was to validate the National Institutes of Health Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (NIH PROMIS) survey for use as a quality-of-life measure in this population. This article presents the rationale for using the NIH PROMIS instrument as a quality-of-life measure for patients with malignant brain tumors and their caregivers. PMID:26596656

  19. Case-control study of the association between malignant brain tumours diagnosed between 2007 and 2009 and mobile and cordless phone use

    PubMed Central

    HARDELL, LENNART; CARLBERG, MICHAEL; SÖDERQVIST, FREDRIK; MILD, KJELL HANSSON

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have shown a consistent association between long-term use of mobile and cordless phones and glioma and acoustic neuroma, but not for meningioma. When used these phones emit radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMFs) and the brain is the main target organ for the hand-held phone. The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) classified in May, 2011 RF-EMF as a group 2B, i.e. a ‘possible’ human carcinogen. The aim of this study was to further explore the relationship between especially long-term (>10 years) use of wireless phones and the development of malignant brain tumours. We conducted a new case-control study of brain tumour cases of both genders aged 18–75 years and diagnosed during 2007–2009. One population-based control matched on gender and age (within 5 years) was used to each case. Here, we report on malignant cases including all available controls. Exposures on e.g. use of mobile phones and cordless phones were assessed by a self-administered questionnaire. Unconditional logistic regression analysis was performed, adjusting for age, gender, year of diagnosis and socio-economic index using the whole control sample. Of the cases with a malignant brain tumour, 87% (n=593) participated, and 85% (n=1,368) of controls in the whole study answered the questionnaire. The odds ratio (OR) for mobile phone use of the analogue type was 1.8, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.04–3.3, increasing with >25 years of latency (time since first exposure) to an OR=3.3, 95% CI=1.6–6.9. Digital 2G mobile phone use rendered an OR=1.6, 95% CI=0.996–2.7, increasing with latency >15–20 years to an OR=2.1, 95% CI=1.2–3.6. The results for cordless phone use were OR=1.7, 95% CI=1.1–2.9, and, for latency of 15–20 years, the OR=2.1, 95% CI=1.2–3.8. Few participants had used a cordless phone for >20–25 years. Digital type of wireless phones (2G and 3G mobile phones, cordless phones) gave increased risk with latency >1–5 years, then a

  20. Brain and spinal cord hemorrhage in long-term survivors of malignant pediatric brain tumors: A possible late effect of therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, J.C.; Miller, D.C.; Budzilovich, G.N.; Epstein, F.J. )

    1991-01-01

    Three children with malignant primary CNS tumors treated with craniospinal radiotherapy developed intraparenchymal hemorrhages a median of 5 years following therapy in sites distant from the primary tumor. Radical surgical procedures disclosed fresh and old hematoma, gliosis, and necrosis in all 3 patients and an aggregation of abnormal microscopic blood vessels in two. No tumor was found. All 3 patients remain in long-term (greater than 10 years) continuous remission.

  1. Brain tumor - children

    MedlinePlus

    ... children; Neuroglioma - children; Oligodendroglioma - children; Meningioma - children; Cancer - brain tumor (children) ... The cause of primary brain tumors is unknown. Primary brain tumors may ... (spread to nearby areas) Cancerous (malignant) Brain tumors ...

  2. Brain

    MedlinePlus

    ... will return after updating. Resources Archived Modules Updates Brain Cerebrum The cerebrum is the part of the ... the outside of the brain and spinal cord. Brain Stem The brain stem is the part of ...

  3. A Role for the Malignant Brain Tumour (MBT) Domain Protein LIN-61 in DNA Double-Strand Break Repair by Homologous Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Nicholas M.; Lemmens, Bennie B. L. G.; Tijsterman, Marcel

    2013-01-01

    Malignant brain tumour (MBT) domain proteins are transcriptional repressors that function within Polycomb complexes. Some MBT genes are tumour suppressors, but how they prevent tumourigenesis is unknown. The Caenorhabditis elegans MBT protein LIN-61 is a member of the synMuvB chromatin-remodelling proteins that control vulval development. Here we report a new role for LIN-61: it protects the genome by promoting homologous recombination (HR) for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). lin-61 mutants manifest numerous problems associated with defective HR in germ and somatic cells but remain proficient in meiotic recombination. They are hypersensitive to ionizing radiation and interstrand crosslinks but not UV light. Using a novel reporter system that monitors repair of a defined DSB in C. elegans somatic cells, we show that LIN-61 contributes to HR. The involvement of this MBT protein in HR raises the possibility that MBT–deficient tumours may also have defective DSB repair. PMID:23505385

  4. Identifying Family Members Who Are Likely to Perceive Benefits From Providing Care to a Person With a Primary Malignant Brain Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Newberry, Alyssa; Kuo, Jean; Donovan, Heidi; Given, Barbara; Given, Charles W.; Schulz, Richard; Sherwood, Paula

    2012-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives To identify changes in positive aspects of care (PAC) from the time of diagnosis to four months following the diagnosis in family caregivers of care recipients with primary malignant brain tumors. Design Longitudinal. Setting Dyads were recruited from neurosurgery clinics in Pittsburgh, PA, at the time of care recipients’ diagnosis with a primary malignant brain tumor. A second data collection took place four months following the diagnosis. Sample 89 caregiver and care recipient dyads. Methods Paired t tests were used to examine change in PAC, univariate analyses were used to determine predictors of PAC at four months, Mann-Whitney U tests and t tests were used to examine associations between categorical predictor variables and PAC at four months, and univariate linear regressions were used to examine associations between continuous predictors and PAC at four months. Main Research Variables The impact of sociodemographic factors, caregiver-perceived social support, mastery, neuroticism, and marital satisfaction on PAC. Findings Caregivers’ PAC scores during the first four months following diagnosis appeared to remain stable over time. Significant differences were found between the care recipient reasoning domain group at diagnosis and PAC score. Care recipients who scored below average were associated with caregivers with higher PAC scores. Caregiver PAC at four months following diagnosis was significantly predicted by care recipient reasoning and caregiver social support. Conclusions PAC scores appear to remain stable over time, although levels of PAC may be related to care recipients’ level of functioning. Future research should focus on the development of interventions for caregivers who report low levels of PAC at the time of diagnosis in an attempt to help these individuals identify PAC in their caregiving situation. Implications for Nursing Findings have clinical and research implications. Clinicians may be able to better identify

  5. In vitro inhibition of human malignant brain tumour cell line proliferation by anti-urokinase-type plasminogen activator monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Abaza, M. S.; Shaban, F. A.; Narayan, R. K.; Atassi, M. Z.

    1998-01-01

    A brain tumour-associated marker, urokinase (UK), was investigated using rabbit anti-UK polyclonal and murine anti-UK monoclonal antibodies, which were prepared by immunization with low molecular weight UK (LMW-UK) and high molecular weight urokinase (HMW-UK) synthetic peptide respectively. The polyclonal antibody cross-reacted with both LMW-UK and HMW-UK, whereas the murine MAbs were specific for HMW-UK. These immunological probes were used to study urokinase in glioma extracts, tissues, sera and cell lines that had been prepared from primary cultures of freshly dissected gliomas. Radioimmunoassays showed that glioma extracts had much higher level (5- to 44-fold) of UK than normal human brain extracts. This result was confirmed by immunoblotting of electrophoresis gels of glioma and human brain extracts. Immunohistochemical study using anti-UK MAb demonstrated much higher levels of UK in glioma tissue than normal brain tissue. Immunohistochemical study using anti-UK MAbs localized UK on the cell surface of glioma cells. Anti-UK MAbs inhibited the proliferation of AA cell lines and GB cell lines (50% to > 90%) and exerted minor effects (< or = 20%) on normal human liver, intestine and lymphocyte cell lines. Taken together, these results suggest that anti-UK MAbs may have therapeutic potential for human gliomas and cancer metastasis. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9862567

  6. Quantifying Aggressive Behavior in Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Teles, Magda C; Oliveira, Rui F

    2016-01-01

    Aggression is a complex behavior that influences social relationships and can be seen as adaptive or maladaptive depending on the context and intensity of expression. A model organism suitable for genetic dissection of the underlying neural mechanisms of aggressive behavior is still needed. Zebrafish has already proven to be a powerful vertebrate model organism for the study of normal and pathological brain function. Despite the fact that zebrafish is a gregarious species that forms shoals, when allowed to interact in pairs, both males and females express aggressive behavior and establish dominance hierarchies. Here, we describe two protocols that can be used to quantify aggressive behavior in zebrafish, using two different paradigms: (1) staged fights between real opponents and (2) mirror-elicited fights. We also discuss the methodology for the behavior analysis, the expected results for both paradigms, and the advantages and disadvantages of each paradigm in face of the specific goals of the study. PMID:27464816

  7. Neurotensin inversely modulates maternal aggression.

    PubMed

    Gammie, S C; D'Anna, K L; Gerstein, H; Stevenson, S A

    2009-02-18

    Neurotensin (NT) is a versatile neuropeptide involved in analgesia, hypothermia, and schizophrenia. Although NT is released from and acts upon brain regions involved in social behaviors, it has not been linked to a social behavior. We previously selected mice for high maternal aggression (maternal defense), an important social behavior that protects offspring, and found significantly lower NT expression in the CNS of highly protective females. Our current study directly tested NT's role in maternal defense. Intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injections of NT significantly impaired defense in terms of time aggressive and number of attacks at all doses tested (0.05, 0.1, 1.0, and 3.0 microg). Other maternal behaviors, including pup retrieval, were unaltered following NT injections (0.05 microg) relative to vehicle, suggesting specificity of NT action on defense. Further, i.c.v. injections of the NT receptor 1 (NT1) antagonist, SR 48692 (30 microg), significantly elevated maternal aggression in terms of time aggressive and attack number. To understand where NT may regulate aggression, we examined Fos following injection of either 0.1 microg NT or vehicle. Thirteen of 26 brain regions examined exhibited significant Fos increases with NT, including regions expressing NT1 and previously implicated in maternal aggression, such as lateral septum, bed nucleus of stria terminalis, paraventricular nucleus, and central amygdala. Together, our results indicate that NT inversely regulates maternal aggression and provide the first direct evidence that lowering of NT signaling can be a mechanism for maternal aggression. To our knowledge, this is the first study to directly link NT to a social behavior. PMID:19118604

  8. Cost-effectiveness of the bird's nest filter for preventing pulmonary embolism among patients with malignant brain tumors and deep venous thrombosis of the lower extremities.

    PubMed

    Chau, Quan; Cantor, Scott B; Caramel, Elenir; Hicks, Marshall; Kurtin, Danna; Grover, Tejpal; Elting, Linda S

    2003-12-01

    Patients with malignant brain tumors and deep venous thrombosis (DVT) of the lower extremities are at high risk of developing pulmonary embolism (PE). We developed a Markov model to compare the cost-effectiveness of two strategies to prevent PE in such patients: intra-vena-caval bird's nest filter (BNF) with anticoagulation versus anticoagulation alone. Using the benchmark of 50,000 US dollars per quality-adjusted life year (QALY), BNF was not cost-effective in this population as it reduced the rate of PE at an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of 198,852 dollars per QALY gained. However, after adjusting the model to reflect the 5-year mortality rate of hypothetical breast cancer patients, BNF was more effective and less expensive than anticoagulation alone. BNF was effective in reducing the rate of PE but was not cost-effective for patients with brain tumors. BNF could be cost-effective for patients with longer life expectancies. PMID:13680322

  9. Treatment of malignant gliomas and brain metastases in adults with a combination of adriamycin, VM 26, and CCNU. Results of a phase II trail.

    PubMed

    Pouillart, P; Mathe, G; Thy, T H; Lheritier, J; Poisson, M; Huguenin, P; Gauthier, H; Morin, P; Parrot, R

    1976-11-01

    Forty-three patients with inoperable or recurring malignant gliomas, and 30 patients with multiple recurring brain metastases were treated with a combination of Adriamycin (45 mg/m2) and 4-dimethyl-epipodophyllotoxin D-thenylidene (VM 26) (60 mg/m2 for 2 days) with 1-(2-chloroethyl)-3-cyclohexyl-1-nitrosourea (CCNU) (60 mg/m2 for 2 days). These cycles of treatment were repeated as soon as the hematologic restoration was complete. The treatment was well tolerated and the clinical condition of 31 of 43 glioblastoma patients improved during the 2 months after the beginning of the treatment. Six of eight patients with breast cancer metastases, one of 13 with bronchial cancer matastases, and three of nine with other types of cancer metastases also benefitted from the treatment. Examination of the results obtained revealed the following characteristics: 1) This combination had a low degree of efficiency in the treatment of metastases to brain, except for breast cancer metastases; 2) there was no complete correlation between the clinical results observed and the cinegammagraphic developments; 3) the results obtained were similar, independent of the initial localization; and a 6-month median survival period was established, with 10 patients now in a state of apparently complete remission, 180 to 506 days after beginning of the treatment. PMID:1033028

  10. Human Aggression Linked to Chemical Balance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science News, 1978

    1978-01-01

    Recent studies done by federal researchers indicate that human aggression may be affected by a critical balance of two or three key brain chemical neurotransmitters. Results of this study with human beings are included in this article. (MA)

  11. Immunotherapy for malignant glioma

    PubMed Central

    Suryadevara, Carter M.; Verla, Terence; Sanchez-Perez, Luis; Reap, Elizabeth A.; Choi, Bryan D.; Fecci, Peter E.; Sampson, John H.

    2015-01-01

    Malignant gliomas (MG) are the most common type of primary malignant brain tumor. Most patients diagnosed with glioblastoma (GBM), the most common and malignant glial tumor, die within 12–15 months. Moreover, conventional treatment, which includes surgery followed by radiation and chemotherapy, can be highly toxic by causing nonspecific damage to healthy brain and other tissues. The shortcomings of standard-of-care have thus created a stimulus for the development of novel therapies that can target central nervous system (CNS)-based tumors specifically and efficiently, while minimizing off-target collateral damage to normal brain. Immunotherapy represents an investigational avenue with the promise of meeting this need, already having demonstrated its potential against B-cell malignancy and solid tumors in clinical trials. T-cell engineering with tumor-specific chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) is one proven approach that aims to redirect autologous patient T-cells to sites of tumor. This platform has evolved dramatically over the past two decades to include an improved construct design, and these modern CARs have only recently been translated into the clinic for brain tumors. We review here emerging immunotherapeutic platforms for the treatment of MG, focusing on the development and application of a CAR-based strategy against GBM. PMID:25722935

  12. Attributional bias and reactive aggression.

    PubMed

    Hudley, C; Friday, J

    1996-01-01

    This article looks at a cognitive behavioral intervention designed to reduce minority youths' (Latino and African-American boys) levels of reactive peer-directed aggression. The BrainPower Program trains aggressive boys to recognize accidental causation in ambiguous interactions with peers. The objective of this research is to evaluate the effectiveness of this attribution retraining program in reducing levels of reactive, peer-directed aggression. This research hypothesizes that aggressive young boys' tendency to attribute hostile intentions to others in ambiguous social interactions causes display of inappropriate, peer-directed aggression. A reduction in attributional bias should produce a decrease in reactive physical and verbal aggression directed toward peers. A 12-session, attributional intervention has been designed to reduce aggressive students' tendency to infer hostile intentions in peers following ambiguous peer provocations. The program trains boys to (1) accurately perceive and categorize the available social cues in interactions with peers, (2) attribute negative outcomes of ambiguous causality to accidental or uncontrollable causes, and (3) generate behaviors appropriate to these retrained attributions. African-American and Latino male elementary-school students (N = 384), in grades four-six, served as subjects in one of three groups: experimental attribution retraining program, attention training, and no-attention control group. Three broad categories of outcome data were collected: teacher and administrator reports of behavior, independent observations of behavior, and self-reports from participating students. Process measures to assess implementation fidelity include videotaped training sessions, observations of intervention sessions, student attendance records, and weekly team meetings. The baseline data indicated that students who were evenly distributed across the four sites were not significantly different on the baseline indicators: student

  13. Testosterone and aggressive behavior in man.

    PubMed

    Batrinos, Menelaos L

    2012-01-01

    Atavistic residues of aggressive behavior prevailing in animal life, determined by testosterone, remain attenuated in man and suppressed through familial and social inhibitions. However, it still manifests itself in various intensities and forms from; thoughts, anger, verbal aggressiveness, competition, dominance behavior, to physical violence. Testosterone plays a significant role in the arousal of these behavioral manifestations in the brain centers involved in aggression and on the development of the muscular system that enables their realization. There is evidence that testosterone levels are higher in individuals with aggressive behavior, such as prisoners who have committed violent crimes. Several field studies have also shown that testosterone levels increase during the aggressive phases of sports games. In more sensitive laboratory paradigms, it has been observed that participant's testosterone rises in the winners of; competitions, dominance trials or in confrontations with factitious opponents. Aggressive behavior arises in the brain through interplay between subcortical structures in the amygdala and the hypothalamus in which emotions are born and the prefrontal cognitive centers where emotions are perceived and controlled. The action of testosterone on the brain begins in the embryonic stage. Earlier in development at the DNA level, the number of CAG repeats in the androgen receptor gene seems to play a role in the expression of aggressive behavior. Neuroimaging techniques in adult males have shown that testosterone activates the amygdala enhancing its emotional activity and its resistance to prefrontal restraining control. This effect is opposed by the action of cortisol which facilitates prefrontal area cognitive control on impulsive tendencies aroused in the subcortical structures. The degree of impulsivity is regulated by serotonin inhibiting receptors, and with the intervention of this neurotransmitter the major agents of the neuroendocrine

  14. Testosterone and Aggressive Behavior in Man

    PubMed Central

    Batrinos, Menelaos L.

    2012-01-01

    Atavistic residues of aggressive behavior prevailing in animal life, determined by testosterone, remain attenuated in man and suppressed through familial and social inhibitions. However, it still manifests itself in various intensities and forms from; thoughts, anger, verbal aggressiveness, competition, dominance behavior, to physical violence. Testosterone plays a significant role in the arousal of these behavioral manifestations in the brain centers involved in aggression and on the development of the muscular system that enables their realization. There is evidence that testosterone levels are higher in individuals with aggressive behavior, such as prisoners who have committed violent crimes. Several field studies have also shown that testosterone levels increase during the aggressive phases of sports games. In more sensitive laboratory paradigms, it has been observed that participant’s testosterone rises in the winners of; competitions, dominance trials or in confrontations with factitious opponents. Aggressive behavior arises in the brain through interplay between subcortical structures in the amygdala and the hypothalamus in which emotions are born and the prefrontal cognitive centers where emotions are perceived and controlled. The action of testosterone on the brain begins in the embryonic stage. Earlier in development at the DNA level, the number of CAG repeats in the androgen receptor gene seems to play a role in the expression of aggressive behavior. Neuroimaging techniques in adult males have shown that testosterone activates the amygdala enhancing its emotional activity and its resistance to prefrontal restraining control. This effect is opposed by the action of cortisol which facilitates prefrontal area cognitive control on impulsive tendencies aroused in the subcortical structures. The degree of impulsivity is regulated by serotonin inhibiting receptors, and with the intervention of this neurotransmitter the major agents of the neuroendocrine

  15. Transglutaminase 2 Expression Is Increased as a Function of Malignancy Grade and Negatively Regulates Cell Growth in Meningioma

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yin-Cheng; Wei, Kuo-Chen; Chang, Chen-Nen; Chen, Pin-Yuan; Hsu, Peng-Wei; Chen, Carl P.; Lu, Chin-Song; Wang, Hung-Li; Gutmann, David H.; Yeh, Tu-Hsueh

    2014-01-01

    Most meningiomas are benign, but some clinical-aggressive tumors exhibit brain invasion and cannot be resected without significant complications. To identify molecular markers for these clinically-aggressive meningiomas, we performed microarray analyses on 24 primary cultures from 21 meningiomas and 3 arachnoid membranes. Using this approach, increased transglutaminase 2 (TGM2) expression was observed, which was subsequently validated in an independent set of 82 meningiomas by immunohistochemistry. Importantly, the TGM2 expression level was associated with increasing WHO malignancy grade as well as meningioma recurrence. Inhibition of TGM2 function by siRNA or cystamine induced meningioma cell death, which was associated with reduced AKT phosphorylation and caspase-3 activation. Collectively, these findings suggest that TGM2 expression increases as a function of malignancy grade and tumor recurrence and that inhibition of TGM2 reduces meningioma cell growth. PMID:25247996

  16. Intraoral malignant melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Babburi, Suresh; Subramanyam, R. V.; Aparna, V.; Sowjanya, P.

    2013-01-01

    Primary oral mucosal melanoma is a rare aggressive neoplasm and accounts for only 0.2-8% of all reported melanomas. It is a malignant neoplasm of melanocytes that may arise from a benign melanocytic lesion or de novo from melanocytes within normal skin or mucosa. It is considered to be the most deadly and biologically unpredictable of all human neoplasms, having the worst prognosis. In this article, we report a case of oral melanoma in a 52-year-old female patient with a chief complaint of black discolouration of the maxillary gingiva and palate. PMID:24249959

  17. Mimicking white matter tract topography using core–shell electrospun nanofibers to examine migration of malignant brain tumors

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Shreyas S.; Nelson, Mark T.; Xue, Ruipeng; DeJesus, Jessica K.; Viapiano, Mariano S.; Lannutti, John J.; Sarkar, Atom; Winter, Jessica O.

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), one of the deadliest forms of human cancer, is characterized by its high infiltration capacity, partially regulated by the neural extracellular matrix (ECM). A major limitation in developing effective treatments is the lack of in vitro models that mimic features of GBM migration highways. Ideally, these models would permit tunable control of mechanics and chemistry to allow the unique role of each of these components to be examined. To address this need, we developed aligned nanofiber biomaterials via core–shell electrospinning that permit systematic study of mechanical and chemical influences on cell adhesion and migration. These models mimic the topography of white matter tracts, a major GBM migration ‘highway’. To independently investigate the influence of chemistry and mechanics on GBM behaviors, nanofiber mechanics were modulated by using different polymers (i.e., gelatin, poly(ethersulfone), poly(dimethylsiloxane)) in the ‘core’ while employing a common poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) ‘shell’ to conserve surface chemistry. These materials revealed GBM sensitivity to nanofiber mechanics, with single cell morphology (Feret diameter), migration speed, focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and myosin light chain 2 (MLC2) expression all showing a strong dependence on nanofiber modulus. Similarly, modulating nanofiber chemistry using extracellular matrix molecules (i.e., hyaluronic acid (HA), collagen, and Matrigel) in the ‘shell’ material with a common PCL ‘core’ to conserve mechanical properties revealed GBM sensitivity to HA; specifically, a negative effect on migration. This system, which mimics the topographical features of white matter tracts, should allow further examination of the complex interplay of mechanics, chemistry, and topography in regulating brain tumor behaviors. PMID:23601662

  18. Pilot study of intratumoral injection of recombinant heat shock protein 70 in the treatment of malignant brain tumors in children

    PubMed Central

    Shevtsov, Maxim A; Kim, Alexander V; Samochernych, Konstantin A; Romanova, Irina V; Margulis, Boris A; Guzhova, Irina V; Yakovenko, Igor V; Ischenko, Alexander M; Khachatryan, William A

    2014-01-01

    Intratumoral injections of recombinant heat shock protein (Hsp)70 were explored for feasibility in patients with brain tumors. Patients aged 4.5–14 years with untreated newly diagnosed tumors (n=12) were enrolled. After tumor resection, five injections of recombinant Hsp70 (total 2.5 mg) were administered into the resection cavity through a catheter. Before administration of Hsp70 and after the last injection, specific immune responses to the autologous tumor lysate were evaluated using the delayed-type hypersensitivity test. Further, peripheral blood was monitored to identify possible changes in lymphocyte subpopulations, cytokine levels, and the cytolytic activity of natural killer cells. The follow-up period in this trial was 12 months. Intratumoral injections of Hsp70 were well tolerated by patients. One patient had a complete clinical response documented by radiologic findings and one patient had a partial response. A positive delayed-type hypersensitivity test was observed in three patients. In peripheral blood, there was a shift from cytokines provided by Th2 cells toward cytokines of a Th1-cell-mediated response. These data corresponded to changes in lymphocyte subpopulations. Immunosuppressive T-regulatory cell levels were also reduced after injection of Hsp70, as well as production of interleukin-10. The cytolytic activity of natural killer cells was unchanged. The present study demonstrates the feasibility of intratumoral delivery of recombinant Hsp70 in patients with cancer. Further randomized clinical trials are recommended to assess the optimum dose of the chaperone, the treatment schedule, and clinical efficacy. PMID:24971017

  19. CONCEPT ANALYSIS: AGGRESSION

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jianghong

    2006-01-01

    The concept of aggression is important to nursing because further knowledge of aggression can help generate a better theoretical model to drive more effective intervention and prevention approaches. This paper outlines a conceptual analysis of aggression. First, the different forms of aggression are reviewed, including the clinical classification and the stimulus-based classification. Then the manifestations and measurement of aggression are described. Finally, the causes and consequences of aggression are outlined. It is argued that a better understanding of aggression and the causal factors underlying it are essential for learning how to prevent negative aggression in the future. PMID:15371137

  20. Concept analysis: aggression.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianghong

    2004-01-01

    The concept of aggression is important to nursing because further knowledge of aggression can help generate a better theoretical model to drive more effective intervention and prevention approaches. This paper outlines a conceptual analysis of aggression. First, the different forms of aggression are reviewed, including the clinical classification and the stimulus-based classification. Then the manifestations and measurement of aggression are described. Finally, the causes and consequences of aggression are outlined. It is argued that a better understanding of aggression and the causal factors underlying it are essential for learning how to prevent negative aggression in the future. PMID:15371137

  1. Hyaluronan in human malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Sironen, R.K.; Tammi, M.; Tammi, R.; Auvinen, P.K.; Anttila, M.; Kosma, V-M.

    2011-02-15

    Hyaluronan, a major macropolysaccharide in the extracellular matrix of connective tissues, is intimately involved in the biology of cancer. Hyaluronan accumulates into the stroma of various human tumors and modulates intracellular signaling pathways, cell proliferation, motility and invasive properties of malignant cells. Experimental and clinicopathological evidence highlights the importance of hyaluronan in tumor growth and metastasis. A high stromal hyaluronan content is associated with poorly differentiated tumors and aggressive clinical behavior in human adenocarcinomas. Instead, the squamous cell carcinomas and malignant melanomas tend to have a reduced hyaluronan content. In addition to the stroma-cancer cell interaction, hyaluronan can influence stromal cell recruitment, tumor angiogenesis and epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Hyaluronan receptors, hyaluronan synthases and hyaluronan degrading enzymes, hyaluronidases, are involved in the modulation of cancer progression, depending on the tumor type. Furthermore, intracellular signaling and angiogenesis are affected by the degradation products of hyaluronan. Hyaluronan has also therapeutic implications since it is involved in multidrug resistance.

  2. [Malignant peritoneal mesothelioma].

    PubMed

    Scripcariu, V; Dajbog, Elena; Lefter, L; Ferariu, D; Pricop, Adriana; Grigoraş, M; Dragomir, Cr

    2006-01-01

    Mesothelioma is a neoplasm originating from the mesothelial surface lining cells of the serous human cavities. It may involve the pleura, less frequently the peritoneum rarely, the pericardium, the tunica vaginalis testis and ovarian epithelium. Asbestos has been widely used in industry. A causal relationship between asbestos exposure and pleural, peritoneal and pericardial malign mesothelioma was suggested, the risk of cancer being correlated to cumulate exposure. Studies from National Cancer Institute, USA, show that the malignant mesothelioma is a rare and aggressive asbestos related malignancy. The symptomatology is insidious and poses difficult problems in diagnosis and treatment. This paper presents the case of a 59 year old patient with malignant peritoneal mesothelioma who worked almost 40 years as an electrician, exposed to asbestos fibers. He was hospitalized for important weight loss, abdominal pain and tiredness being diagnosed after imaging tests with a giant tumor, localized at the abdominal upper level, which seems to originate from the spleen's superior pole. During surgery we discovered a tumor with cystic parts, intense vascularized, which turn to be adherent in the upper side to the lower face of the left midriff cupola, to the spleen superior pole and 1/3 middle level of the great gastric curve. It was performed surgical ablation of the tumor, splenectomy with favorable postoperative evolution, the patient being now under chemotherapy treatment. PMID:17283842

  3. Malignant external otitis: CT evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Curtin, H.D.; Wolfe, P.; May, M.

    1982-11-01

    Malignant external otitis is an aggressive infection caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa that most often occurs in elderly diabetics. Malignant external otitis often spreads inferiorly from the external canal to involve the subtemporal area and progresses medially towards the petrous apex leading to multiple cranial nerve palsies. The computed tomographic (CT) findings in malignant external otitis include obliteration of the normal fat planes in the subtemporal area as well as patchy destruction of the bony cortex of the mastoid. The point of exit of the various cranial nerves can be identified on CT scans, and the extent of the inflammatory mass correlates well with the clinical findings. Four cases of malignant external otitis are presented. In each case CT provided a good demonstration of involvement of the soft tissues at the base of the skull.

  4. Biomarkers of aggression in dementia.

    PubMed

    Gotovac, Kristina; Nikolac Perković, Matea; Pivac, Nela; Borovečki, Fran

    2016-08-01

    Dementia is a clinical syndrome defined by progressive global impairment of acquired cognitive abilities. It can be caused by a number of underlying conditions. The most common types of dementia are Alzheimer's disease (AD), frontotemporal dementia (FTD), vascular cognitive impairment (VCI) and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB). Despite the fact that cognitive impairment is central to the dementia, noncognitive symptoms, most commonly described nowadays as neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS) exist almost always at certain point of the illness. Aggression as one of the NPS represents danger both for patients and caregivers and the rate of aggression correlates with the loss of independence, cognitive decline and poor outcome. Therefore, biomarkers of aggression in dementia patients would be of a great importance. Studies have shown that different genetic factors, including monoamine signaling and processing, can be associated with various NPS including aggression. There have been significant and multiple neurotransmitter changes identified in the brains of patients with dementia and some of these changes have been involved in the etiology of NPS. Aggression specific changes have also been observed in neuropathological studies. The current consensus is that the best approach for development of such biomarkers may be incorporation of genetics (polymorphisms), neurobiology (neurotransmitters and neuropathology) and neuroimaging techniques. PMID:26952705

  5. Mechanisms differentiating normal from abnormal aggression: glucocorticoids and serotonin.

    PubMed

    Haller, Jozsef; Mikics, Eva; Halász, József; Tóth, Máthé

    2005-12-01

    Psychopathology-associated human aggression types are induced by a variety of conditions, are behaviorally variable, and show a differential pharmacological responsiveness. Thus, there are several types of abnormal human aggression. This diversity was not reflected by conventional laboratory approaches that focused on the quantitative aspects of aggressive behavior. Recently, several laboratory models of abnormal aggression were proposed, which mainly model hyperarousal-driven aggressiveness (characteristic to intermittent explosive disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, depression, chronic burnout, etc.) and hypoarousal-driven aggressiveness (characteristic mainly to antisocial personality disorder and its childhood antecedent conduct disorder). Findings obtained with these models suggest that hyperarousal-driven aggressiveness has at its roots an excessive acute glucocorticoid stress response (and probably an exaggerated response of other stress-related systems), whereas chronic hypoarousal-associated aggressiveness is due to glucocorticoid deficits that affect brain function on the long term. In hypoarousal-driven aggressiveness, serotonergic neurotransmission appears to lose its impact on aggression (which it has in normal aggression), certain prefrontal neurons are weakly activated, whereas the central amygdala (no, or weakly involved in the control of normal aggression) acquires important roles. We suggest that the specific study of abnormal aspects of aggressive behavior would lead to important developments in understanding the specific mechanisms underlying different forms of aggression, and may ultimately lead to the development of better treatment approaches. PMID:16280125

  6. Inverted Sinonasal Papilloma Masquerading as a Malignancy - Report of an Unusual Case

    PubMed Central

    Sruthi, Ranganath; Anuthama, Krishnamurthy; Perumal, Mahendra; Parthasarathy, Ranganathan

    2016-01-01

    Inverted sinonasal papilloma (ISP) is a benign epithelial neoplasm arising from the Schneiderian membrane. We report a case of ISP in a 50-year-old male that clinically presented as a polypoid mass in the nasal cavity. Imaging studies revealed it to be an aggressive lesion showing intracranial extension. On histopathological examination of the excised specimen, a diagnosis of ISP was arrived at. However, an extensive sampling of the tissue revealed no evidence of any malignant transformation. Taking into account the suggested viral aetiology for such lesions and the aggressiveness observed in this case, human papillomavirus (HPV) profiling was done but it turned out to be negative. Only one other case of inverted sinonasal papilloma arising from the nasal cavity and involving the brain has been reported in the literature to date. Considering the alarming clinical course in spite of its benign nature, it is important for the pathologist and surgeon to be well informed about this lesion. PMID:27081587

  7. Mucosal malignant melanoma of the maxillary sinus.

    PubMed

    Norhafizah, M; Mustafa, W M B W; Sabariah, A R; Shiran, M S; Pathmanathan, R

    2010-09-01

    Mucosal malignant melanoma (MMM) is an aggressive tumour occurring in the upper respiratory tract. It is rare compared to malignant melanoma of the skin. We report a case of a 53-year-old man with left paranasal swelling. A biopsy showed high-grade spindle cell tumour. Subsequently a subtotal maxillectomy was performed. Histopathological examination revealed a hypercellular tumour composed of mixed spindle and epitheloid cells with very occasional intracytoplasmic melanin pigment. The malignant cells were immunopositive for vimentin, S-100 protein and HMB-45. It was diagnosed as mucosal malignant melanoma (MMM). This article illustrates a rare case of MMM where the diagnosis may be missed or delayed without proper histopathological examination that include meticulous search for melanin pigment and appropriate immunohistochemical stains to confirm the diagnosis. Malignant melanoma can mimic many other types of high-grade malignancy and should be considered as a differential diagnosis in many of these instances. PMID:21939172

  8. Spontaneous malignant craniopharyngioma in an aged Wistar rat

    PubMed Central

    Heinrichs, Martin; Ernst, Heinrich

    2016-01-01

    Craniopharyngiomas are extremely rare epithelial tumors of the sellar region in human beings and domestic and laboratory animals. A craniopharyngioma, 0.6 cm in diameter, was observed grossly in the sellar and parasellar regions of an untreated 23-month-old male Wistar-derived rat sacrificed moribund. The tumor was composed of cords, columns, and nests of neoplastic stratified squamous epithelium with marked hyperkeratosis and parakeratosis. Neoplastic cells formed solid or cystic areas, infiltrating the base of the skull, brain, and pituitary gland. Immunocytochemical evaluation revealed a strong cytoplasmic reaction for pan-cytokeratin in all tumor cells. Malignant craniopharyngioma should be considered a differential diagnosis in the rat when a tumor with stratified squamous epithelial features and a locally aggressive growth pattern is observed in the sellar or suprasellar region. PMID:27559246

  9. Spontaneous malignant craniopharyngioma in an aged Wistar rat.

    PubMed

    Heinrichs, Martin; Ernst, Heinrich

    2016-07-01

    Craniopharyngiomas are extremely rare epithelial tumors of the sellar region in human beings and domestic and laboratory animals. A craniopharyngioma, 0.6 cm in diameter, was observed grossly in the sellar and parasellar regions of an untreated 23-month-old male Wistar-derived rat sacrificed moribund. The tumor was composed of cords, columns, and nests of neoplastic stratified squamous epithelium with marked hyperkeratosis and parakeratosis. Neoplastic cells formed solid or cystic areas, infiltrating the base of the skull, brain, and pituitary gland. Immunocytochemical evaluation revealed a strong cytoplasmic reaction for pan-cytokeratin in all tumor cells. Malignant craniopharyngioma should be considered a differential diagnosis in the rat when a tumor with stratified squamous epithelial features and a locally aggressive growth pattern is observed in the sellar or suprasellar region. PMID:27559246

  10. Forebrain-specific Expression of Monoamine Oxidase A Reduces Neurotransmitter Levels, Restores the Brain Structure, and Rescues Aggressive Behavior in Monoamine Oxidase A-deficient Mice*

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kevin; Cases, Olivier; Rebrin, Igor; Wu, Weihua; Gallaher, Timothy K.; Seif, Isabelle; Shih, Jean Chen

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies have established that abrogation of monoamine oxidase (MAO) A expression leads to a neurochemical, morphological, and behavioral specific phenotype with increased levels of serotonin (5-HT), norepinephrine, and dopamine, loss of barrel field structure in mouse somatosensory cortex, and an association with increased aggression in adults. Forebrain-specific MAO A transgenic mice were generated from MAO A knock-out (KO) mice by using the promoter of calcium-dependent kinase IIα (CaMKIIα). The presence of human MAO A transgene and its expression were verified by PCR of genomic DNA and reverse transcription-PCR of mRNA and Western blot, respectively. Significant MAO A catalytic activity, autoradiographic labeling of 5-HT, and immunocytochemistry of MAO A were found in the frontal cortex, striatum, and hippocampus but not in the cerebellum of the forebrain transgenic mice. Also, compared with MAO A KO mice, lower levels of 5-HT, norepinephrine, and DA and higher levels of MAO A metabolite 5-hydroxyin-doleacetic acid were found in the forebrain regions but not in the cerebellum of the transgenic mice. These results suggest that MAO A is specifically expressed in the forebrain regions of transgenic mice. This forebrain-specific differential expression resulted in abrogation of the aggressive phenotype. Furthermore, the disorganization of the somatosensory cortex barrel field structure associated with MAO A KO mice was restored and became morphologically similar to wild type. Thus, the lack of MAO A in the forebrain of MAO A KO mice may underlie their phenotypes. PMID:17090537

  11. Novel combined fluorescence/reflectance spectroscopy system for guiding brain tumor resections: hardware considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Zhiyuan; Xie, Haiyan; Mousavi, Monirehalsadat; Brydegaard, Mikkel; Axelsson, Johan; Andersson-Engels, Stefan

    2013-11-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) has long been known as the most common and aggressive form of brain malignancy. The morphological similarities of the malignant and surrounding tissue cause difficulties to distinct the tumors during surgery. In order to achieve better results in resecting malignant brain tumors, a fiber based optical system which can be used intraoperative is developed in this project. In this context, the system hardware details, system controlling interfaces and laboratory testing results are presented. Based on the results obtained from various tests with tissue-equivalent phantoms, the system is proved to have stable performance, robust structure, and have good linearity as well as high sensitivity to low PpIX concentration under strong ambient light conditions.

  12. What Is Aggressive Violence?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singer, Dorothy G.; Luca, Wendy

    1985-01-01

    Responses to a questionnaire dealing with what constitutes aggressive violence on television indicate that health care providers tend to rate items describing acts on television as more aggressive than television writers, producers, and executives do. (MBR)

  13. Aggression and Anxiety: Social Context and Neurobiological Links

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, Inga D.; Veenema, Alexa H.; Beiderbeck, Daniela I.

    2009-01-01

    Psychopathologies such as anxiety- and depression-related disorders are often characterized by impaired social behaviours including excessive aggression and violence. Excessive aggression and violence likely develop as a consequence of generally disturbed emotional regulation, such as abnormally high or low levels of anxiety. This suggests an overlap between brain circuitries and neurochemical systems regulating aggression and anxiety. In this review, we will discuss different forms of male aggression, rodent models of excessive aggression, and neurobiological mechanisms underlying male aggression in the context of anxiety. We will summarize our attempts to establish an animal model of high and abnormal aggression using rats selected for high (HAB) vs. low (LAB) anxiety-related behaviour. Briefly, male LAB rats and, to a lesser extent, male HAB rats show high and abnormal forms of aggression compared with non-selected (NAB) rats, making them a suitable animal model for studying excessive aggression in the context of extremes in innate anxiety. In addition, we will discuss differences in the activity of the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis, brain arginine vasopressin, and the serotonin systems, among others, which contribute to the distinct behavioural phenotypes related to aggression and anxiety. Further investigation of the neurobiological systems in animals with distinct anxiety phenotypes might provide valuable information about the link between excessive aggression and disturbed emotional regulation, which is essential for understanding the social and emotional deficits that are characteristic of many human psychiatric disorders. PMID:20407578

  14. Neural mediators of the intergenerational transmission of family aggression.

    PubMed

    Saxbe, Darby; Del Piero, Larissa Borofsky; Immordino-Yang, Mary Helen; Kaplan, Jonas Todd; Margolin, Gayla

    2016-05-01

    Youth exposed to family aggression may become more aggressive themselves, but the mechanisms of intergenerational transmission are understudied. In a longitudinal study, we found that adolescents' reduced neural activation when rating their parents' emotions, assessed via magnetic resonance imaging, mediated the association between parents' past aggression and adolescents' subsequent aggressive behavior toward parents. A subsample of 21 youth, drawn from the larger study, underwent magnetic resonance imaging scanning proximate to the second of two assessments of the family environment. At Time 1 (when youth were on average 15.51 years old) we measured parents' aggressive marital and parent-child conflict behaviors, and at Time 2 (≈2 years later), we measured youth aggression directed toward parents. Youth from more aggressive families showed relatively less activation to parent stimuli in brain areas associated with salience and socioemotional processing, including the insula and limbic structures. Activation patterns in these same areas were also associated with youths' subsequent parent-directed aggression. The association between parents' aggression and youths' subsequent parent-directed aggression was statistically mediated by signal change coefficients in the insula, right amygdala, thalamus, and putamen. These signal change coefficients were also positively associated with scores on a mentalizing measure. Hypoarousal of the emotional brain to family stimuli may support the intergenerational transmission of family aggression. PMID:26073067

  15. Neural mediators of the intergenerational transmission of family aggression

    PubMed Central

    Saxbe, Darby; Del Piero, Larissa Borofsky; Immordino-Yang, Mary Helen; Kaplan, Jonas Todd; Margolin, Gayla

    2015-01-01

    Youth exposed to family aggression may become more aggressive themselves, but the mechanisms of intergenerational transmission are understudied. In a longitudinal study, we found that adolescents’ reduced neural activation when rating their parents’ emotions, assessed via magnetic resonance imaging, mediated the association between parents’ past aggression and adolescents’ subsequent aggressive behavior toward parents. A subsample of 21 youth, drawn from the larger study, underwent magnetic resonance imaging scanning proximate to the second of two assessments of the family environment. At Time 1 (when youth were on average 15.51 years old) we measured parents’ aggressive marital and parent–child conflict behaviors, and at Time 2 (≈2 years later), we measured youth aggression directed toward parents. Youth from more aggressive families showed relatively less activation to parent stimuli in brain areas associated with salience and socioemotional processing, including the insula and limbic structures. Activation patterns in these same areas were also associated with youths’ subsequent parent-directed aggression. The association between parents’ aggression and youths’ subsequent parent-directed aggression was statistically mediated by signal change coefficients in the insula, right amygdala, thalamus, and putamen. These signal change coefficients were also positively associated with scores on a mentalizing measure. Hypoarousal of the emotional brain to family stimuli may support the intergenerational transmission of family aggression. PMID:26073067

  16. Brain Metastasis in Bone and Soft Tissue Cancers: A Review of Incidence, Interventions, and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Shweikeh, Faris; Bukavina, Laura; Saeed, Kashif; Sarkis, Reem; Suneja, Aarushi; Sweiss, Fadi; Drazin, Doniel

    2014-01-01

    Bone and soft tissue malignancies account for a small portion of brain metastases. In this review, we characterize their incidence, treatments, and prognosis. Most of the data in the literature is based on case reports and small case series. Less than 5% of brain metastases are from bone and soft tissue sarcomas, occurring most commonly in Ewing's sarcoma, malignant fibrous tumors, and osteosarcoma. Mean interval from initial cancer diagnosis to brain metastasis is in the range of 20–30 months, with most being detected before 24 months (osteosarcoma, Ewing sarcoma, chordoma, angiosarcoma, and rhabdomyosarcoma), some at 24–36 months (malignant fibrous tumors, malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors, and alveolar soft part sarcoma), and a few after 36 months (chondrosarcoma and liposarcoma). Overall mean survival ranges between 7 and 16 months, with the majority surviving < 12 months (Ewing's sarcoma, liposarcoma, malignant fibrous tumors, malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors, angiosarcoma and chordomas). Management is heterogeneous involving surgery, radiosurgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy. While a survival advantage may exist for those given aggressive treatment involving surgical resection, such patients tended to have a favorable preoperative performance status and minimal systemic disease. PMID:24757391

  17. Benefit from prolonged dose-intensive chemotherapy for infants with malignant brain tumors is restricted to patients with ependymoma: a report of the Pediatric Oncology Group randomized controlled trial 9233/34

    PubMed Central

    Strother, Douglas R.; Lafay-Cousin, Lucie; Boyett, James M.; Burger, Peter; Aronin, Patricia; Constine, Louis; Duffner, Patricia; Kocak, Mehmet; Kun, Larry E.; Horowitz, Marc E.; Gajjar, Amar

    2014-01-01

    Background The randomized controlled Pediatric Oncology Group study 9233 tested the hypothesis that dose-intensive (DI) chemotherapy would improve event-free survival (EFS) for children <3 years of age with newly diagnosed malignant brain tumors. Methods Of 328 enrolled eligible patients, diagnoses were medulloblastoma (n = 112), ependymoma (n = 82), supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumor (sPNET, n = 38) and other malignant brain tumors (n = 96), and were randomized to 72 weeks of standard dose chemotherapy (Regimen A, n = 162) or DI chemotherapy (Regimen B, n = 166). Radiation therapy (RT) was recommended for patients with evidence of disease at completion of chemotherapy or who relapsed within 6 months of chemotherapy completion. Results Distributions of EFS for Regimens A and B were not significantly different (P = 0.32) with 2- and 10-year rates of 22.8% ± 3.3% and 15.4% ± 3.7%, and 27.1% ± 3.4% and 20.8% ± 3.8%, respectively. Thus, the study hypothesis was rejected. While distributions of EFS and OS were not significantly different between Regimens A and B for patients with medulloblastoma and sPNET, DI chemotherapy resulted in significantly improved EFS distribution (P = .0011) (2-year EFS rates of 42.1% vs. 19.6% with SD chemotherapy), but not OS distribution, for patients with centrally confirmed ependymoma. The degree of surgical resection affected EFS, OS or both for most tumor groups. Approximately 20%, 40% and 20% of patients with medulloblastoma, ependymoma treated with DI chemotherapy, and sPNET, respectively appear to have been cured without RT. Of 11 toxic deaths on study, 10 occurred on the DI chemotherapy arm. Conclusions Prolonged dose-intensive chemotherapy given to infants with malignant brain tumors resulted in increased EFS only for patients with ependymoma. PMID:24335695

  18. Neurobiological Patterns of Aggression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, Robert D.

    1993-01-01

    Describes chemical model for patterns of aggressive behavior. Addresses cultural, neurobiological, and cognitive factors that affect violent children. Identifies five patterns of aggression (overaroused, impulsive, affective, predatory, and instrumental) and examines these dimensions of aggression for each pattern: baseline, precipitators,…

  19. Neurogenetics of Aggressive Behavior – Studies in Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Aki; Miczek, Klaus A.

    2014-01-01

    Aggressive behavior is observed in many animal species, such as insects, fish, lizards, frogs, and most mammals including humans. This wide range of conservation underscores the importance of aggressive behavior in the animals’ survival and fitness, and the likely heritability of this behavior. Although typical patterns of aggressive behavior differ between species, there are several concordances in the neurobiology of aggression among rodents, primates, and humans. Studies with rodent models may eventually help us to understand the neurogenetic architecture of aggression in humans. However, it is important to recognize the difference between the ecological and ethological significance of aggressive behavior (species-typical aggression) and maladaptive violence (escalated aggression) when applying the findings of aggression research using animal models to human or veterinary medicine. Well-studied rodent models for aggressive behavior in the laboratory setting include the mouse (Mus musculus), rat (Rattus norvegicus), hamster (Mesocricetus auratus), and prairie vole (Microtus ochrogaster). The neural circuits of rodent aggression have been gradually elucidated by several techniques e.g. immunohistochemistry of immediate-early gene (c-Fos) expression, intracranial drug microinjection, in vivo microdialysis, and optogenetics techniques. Also, evidence accumulated from the analysis of gene-knockout mice shows the involvement of several genes in aggression. Here we review the brain circuits that have been implicated in aggression, such as the hypothalamus, prefrontal cortex (PFC), dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN), nucleus accumbens (NAc), and olfactory system. We then discuss the roles of glutamate and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), major inhibitory and excitatory amino acids in the brain, as well as their receptors, in controlling aggressive behavior, focusing mainly on recent findings. At the end of this chapter, we discuss how genes can be identified that underlie

  20. Malignant mesothelioma

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Alastair J; Parker, Robert J; Wiggins, John

    2008-01-01

    Malignant mesothelioma is a fatal asbestos-associated malignancy originating from the lining cells (mesothelium) of the pleural and peritoneal cavities, as well as the pericardium and the tunica vaginalis. The exact prevalence is unknown but it is estimated that mesotheliomas represent less than 1% of all cancers. Its incidence is increasing, with an expected peak in the next 10–20 years. Pleural malignant mesothelioma is the most common form of mesothelioma. Typical presenting features are those of chest pain and dyspnoea. Breathlessness due to a pleural effusion without chest pain is reported in about 30% of patients. A chest wall mass, weight loss, sweating, abdominal pain and ascites (due to peritoneal involvement) are less common presentations. Mesothelioma is directly attributable to occupational asbestos exposure with a history of exposure in over 90% of cases. There is also evidence that mesothelioma may result from both para-occupational exposure and non-occupational "environmental" exposure. Idiopathic or spontaneous mesothelioma can also occur in the absence of any exposure to asbestos, with a spontaneous rate in humans of around one per million. A combination of accurate exposure history, along with examination radiology and pathology are essential to make the diagnosis. Distinguishing malignant from benign pleural disease can be challenging. The most helpful CT findings suggesting malignant pleural disease are 1) a circumferential pleural rind, 2) nodular pleural thickening, 3) pleural thickening of > 1 cm and 4) mediastinal pleural involvement. Involvement of a multidisciplinary team is recommended to ensure prompt and appropriate management, using a framework of radiotherapy, chemotherapy, surgery and symptom palliation with end of life care. Compensation issues must also be considered. Life expectancy in malignant mesothelioma is poor, with a median survival of about one year following diagnosis. PMID:19099560

  1. Childhood Brain Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    Brain tumors are abnormal growths inside the skull. They are among the most common types of childhood ... still be serious. Malignant tumors are cancerous. Childhood brain and spinal cord tumors can cause headaches and ...

  2. Relational aggression in marriage.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Jason S; Nelson, David A; Yorgason, Jeremy B; Harper, James M; Ashton, Ruth Hagmann; Jensen, Alexander C

    2010-01-01

    Drawing from developmental theories of relational aggression, this article reports on a study designed to identify if spouses use relationally aggressive tactics when dealing with conflict in their marriage and the association of these behaviors with marital outcomes. Using a sample of 336 married couples (672 spouses), results revealed that the majority of couples reported that relationally aggressive behaviors, such as social sabotage and love withdrawal, were a part of their marital dynamics, at least to some degree. Gender comparisons of partner reports of their spouse's behavior revealed that wives were significantly more likely to be relationally aggressive than husbands. Structural equation modeling demonstrated that relational aggression is associated with lower levels of marital quality and greater marital instability for both husbands and wives. Implications are drawn for the use of relational aggression theory in the future study of couple conflict and marital aggression. PMID:20698028

  3. Lateralisation of aggressive displays in a tephritid fly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benelli, Giovanni; Donati, Elisa; Romano, Donato; Stefanini, Cesare; Messing, Russell H.; Canale, Angelo

    2015-02-01

    Lateralisation (i.e. different functional and/or structural specialisations of the left and right sides of the brain) of aggression has been examined in several vertebrate species, while evidence for invertebrates is scarce. In this study, we investigated lateralisation of aggressive displays (boxing with forelegs and wing strikes) in the Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata. We attempted to answer the following questions: (1) do medflies show lateralisation of aggressive displays at the population-level; (2) are there sex differences in lateralisation of aggressive displays; and (3) does lateralisation of aggression enhance fighting success? Results showed left-biased population-level lateralisation of aggressive displays, with no consistent differences among sexes. In both male-male and female-female conflicts, aggressive behaviours performed with left body parts led to greater fighting success than those performed with right body parts. As we found left-biased preferential use of body parts for both wing strikes and boxing, we predicted that the left foreleg/wing is quicker in exploring/striking than the right one. We characterised wing strike and boxing using high-speed videos, calculating mean velocity of aggressive displays. For both sexes, aggressive displays that led to success were faster than unsuccessful ones. However, left wing/legs were not faster than right ones while performing aggressive acts. Further research is needed on proximate causes allowing enhanced fighting success of lateralised aggressive behaviour. This is the first report supporting the adaptive role of lateralisation of aggressive displays in insects.

  4. Sternal Resection and Reconstruction for Malignant Phylloides Tumor.

    PubMed

    Selvakumar, Veda Padma Priya; Poonia, Dharmaram; Agrawal, Juhi; Goel, Ashish; Mehta, Sandeep; Kumar, Kapil

    2015-08-01

    Malignant phylloides tumor is a locally aggressive breast neoplasm constituting less than 1 % of all breast cancers. It has a tendency for local recurrence and management is multidisciplinary. We hereby report a case of total sternal resection and reconstruction using Biopore HDPE prosthesis for Malignant Phylloides tumor. PMID:26702245

  5. Hematologic malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Hoogstraten, B.

    1986-01-01

    The principle aim of this book is to give practical guidelines to the modern treatment of the six important hematologic malignancies. Topics considered include the treatment of the chronic leukemias; acute leukemia in adults; the myeloproliferative disorders: polycythemia vera, essential thrombocythemia, and idiopathic myelofibrosis/agnogenic myeloid metaplasia; Hodgkin's Disease; non-Hodgkin's lymphoma; and Multiple Myeloma.

  6. The role of ion channels in the hypoxia-induced aggressiveness of glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Sforna, Luigi; Cenciarini, Marta; Belia, Silvia; D’Adamo, Maria Cristina; Pessia, Mauro; Franciolini, Fabio; Catacuzzeno, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    The malignancy of glioblastoma multiform (GBM), the most common and aggressive form of human brain tumors, strongly correlates with the presence of hypoxic areas, but the mechanisms controlling the hypoxia-induced aggressiveness are still unclear. GBM cells express a number of ion channels whose activity supports cell volume changes and increases in the cytosolic Ca2+ concentration, ultimately leading to cell proliferation, migration or death. In several cell types it has previously been shown that low oxygen levels regulate the expression and activity of these channels, and more recent data indicate that this also occurs in GBM cells. Based on these findings, it may be hypothesized that the modulation of ion channel activity or expression by the hypoxic environment may participate in the acquisition of the aggressive phenotype observed in GBM cells residing in a hypoxic environment. If this hypothesis will be confirmed, the use of available ion channels modulators may be considered for implementing novel therapeutic strategies against these tumors. PMID:25642170

  7. From Melanocyte to Metastatic Malignant Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Bandarchi, Bizhan; Ma, Linglei; Navab, Roya; Seth, Arun; Rasty, Golnar

    2010-01-01

    Malignant melanoma is one of the most aggressive malignancies in human and is responsible for almost 60% of lethal skin tumors. Its incidence has been increasing in white population in the past two decades. There is a complex interaction of environmental (exogenous) and endogenous, including genetic, risk factors in developing malignant melanoma. 8–12% of familial melanomas occur in a familial setting related to mutation of the CDKN2A gene that encodes p16. The aim of this is to briefly review the microanatomy and physiology of the melanocytes, epidemiology, risk factors, clinical presentation, historical classification and histopathology and, more in details, the most recent discoveries in biology and genetics of malignant melanoma. At the end, the final version of 2009 AJCC malignant melanoma staging and classification is presented. PMID:20936153

  8. A catalogue of treatment and technologies for malignant pleural mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Schunselaar, Laurel M; Quispel-Janssen, Josine M M F; Neefjes, Jacques J C; Baas, Paul

    2016-04-01

    Malignant pleural mesothelioma is an aggressive fatal malignancy with a prognosis that has not significantly improved in the last decades. This review summarizes the current state of treatment and the various attempts that are made to improve overall survival for patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma. It also discusses technologies and protocols to test new and hopefully more effective compounds in a more individualized manner. These developments are expected to improve the prognosis for this group of patients. PMID:26943000

  9. Authoritarianism and sexual aggression.

    PubMed

    Walker, W D; Rowe, R C; Quinsey, V L

    1993-11-01

    In Study 1, 198 men completed the Right Wing Authoritarianism, Sex Role Ideology, Hostility Towards Women, Acceptance of Interpersonal Violence, Adversarial Sexual Beliefs, and Rape Myth Acceptance scales, as well as measures of past sexually aggressive behavior and likelihood of future sexual aggression. As predicted, authoritarianism and sex role ideology were as closely related to self-reported past and potential future sexually aggressive behavior as were the specifically sexual and aggression-related predictors. Among 134 men in Study 2, authoritarianism and sex guilt positively correlated with each other and with self-reported past sexual aggression. In both studies, the relationship of authoritarianism and sexual aggression was larger in community than in university samples. PMID:8246111

  10. Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor -A Rare Malignancy in Mandible

    PubMed Central

    Majumdar, Sumit; Kotina, Sreekanth; Uppala, Divya; Kumar, Singam Praveen

    2016-01-01

    Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor (MPNST) is biologically an aggressive tumor that is usually found in the extremities, trunk and infrequently found in the head and neck area particularly in the jaws, arising from the cells allied with nerve sheath. Mandibular MPNST may either arise from a preexisting neurofibroma or develop de novo. Because of the greater variability from case to case in overall appearance both clinically and histologically, a case of MPNST of the mandible in a 25-year-old female patient is reported. The lesion was excised and immunohistological studies (S-100 & Neuron specific enolase) were conducted to confirm the neural origin. PMID:27504425

  11. Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor -A Rare Malignancy in Mandible.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Sumit; Kotina, Sreekanth; Mahesh, Nirujogi; Uppala, Divya; Kumar, Singam Praveen

    2016-06-01

    Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor (MPNST) is biologically an aggressive tumor that is usually found in the extremities, trunk and infrequently found in the head and neck area particularly in the jaws, arising from the cells allied with nerve sheath. Mandibular MPNST may either arise from a preexisting neurofibroma or develop de novo. Because of the greater variability from case to case in overall appearance both clinically and histologically, a case of MPNST of the mandible in a 25-year-old female patient is reported. The lesion was excised and immunohistological studies (S-100 & Neuron specific enolase) were conducted to confirm the neural origin. PMID:27504425

  12. Angry and Aggressive Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Jim

    2008-01-01

    Students who engage in physical aggression in school present a serious challenge to maintaining a safe and supportive learning environment. Unlike other forms of student aggression, fighting is explicit, is violent, and demands attention. A fight between students in a classroom, hallway, or the lunchroom brings every other activity to a halt and…

  13. Girls' Aggressive Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owens, Larry; Shute, Rosalyn; Slee, Phillip

    2004-01-01

    In contrast to boys' bullying behavior which is often overt and easily visible, girls' aggression is usually indirect and covert. Less research has been conducted on the types of bullying that girls usually engage in. Using focus groups composed of teenaged girls, Dr. Owens and colleagues examine the nature of teenage girls' indirect aggression.

  14. Testosterone and Aggression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Archer, John

    1994-01-01

    Studies comparing aggressive and nonaggressive prisoners show higher testosterone levels among the former. While there is limited evidence for a strong association between aggressiveness and testosterone during adolescence, other studies indicate that testosterone levels are responsive to influences from the social environment, particularly those…

  15. Aggression: Psychopharmacologic Management

    PubMed Central

    Conlon, Patrick; Frommhold, Kristine

    1989-01-01

    Aggression may be part of a variety of psychiatric diagnoses. The appropriate treatment requires that the physician recognize the underlying cause. Pharmacologic agents may form part of the overall treatment of the patient. The number of possible drugs for treating aggression has expanded rapidly, and it is important that the physician be familiar with the various options avilable. PMID:21248947

  16. Social Aggression among Girls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Underwood, Marion K.

    Noting recent interest in girls' social or "relational" aggression, this volume offers a balanced, scholarly analysis of scientific knowledge in this area. The book integrates current research on emotion regulation, gender, and peer relations, to examine how girls are socialized to experience and express anger and aggression from infancy through…

  17. Third Person Instigated Aggression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaebelein, Jacquelyn

    Since many acts of aggression in society are more than simply an aggressor-victim encounter, the role played by third person instigated aggression also needs examination. The purpose of this study was to develop a laboratory procedure to systematically investigate instigation. In a competitive reaction time task, high and low Machiavellian Males…

  18. Neuropsychiatry of Aggression

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Scott D.; Kjome, Kimberly L.; Moeller, F. Gerard

    2010-01-01

    Synopsis Aggression is a serious medical problem that can place both the patient and the health care provider at risk. Aggression can result from medical, neurologic and or psychiatric disorders. A comprehensive patient evaluation is needed. Treatment options include pharmacotherapy as well as non-pharmacologic interventions, both need to be individualized to the patient. PMID:21172570

  19. Imaging the neural circuitry and chemical control of aggressive motivation

    PubMed Central

    Ferris, Craig F; Stolberg, Tara; Kulkarni, Praveen; Murugavel, Murali; Blanchard, Robert; Blanchard, D Caroline; Febo, Marcelo; Brevard, Mathew; Simon, Neal G

    2008-01-01

    Background With the advent of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in awake animals it is possible to resolve patterns of neuronal activity across the entire brain with high spatial and temporal resolution. Synchronized changes in neuronal activity across multiple brain areas can be viewed as functional neuroanatomical circuits coordinating the thoughts, memories and emotions for particular behaviors. To this end, fMRI in conscious rats combined with 3D computational analysis was used to identifying the putative distributed neural circuit involved in aggressive motivation and how this circuit is affected by drugs that block aggressive behavior. Results To trigger aggressive motivation, male rats were presented with their female cage mate plus a novel male intruder in the bore of the magnet during image acquisition. As expected, brain areas previously identified as critical in the organization and expression of aggressive behavior were activated, e.g., lateral hypothalamus, medial basal amygdala. Unexpected was the intense activation of the forebrain cortex and anterior thalamic nuclei. Oral administration of a selective vasopressin V1a receptor antagonist SRX251 or the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine, drugs that block aggressive behavior, both caused a general suppression of the distributed neural circuit involved in aggressive motivation. However, the effect of SRX251, but not fluoxetine, was specific to aggression as brain activation in response to a novel sexually receptive female was unaffected. Conclusion The putative neural circuit of aggressive motivation identified with fMRI includes neural substrates contributing to emotional expression (i.e. cortical and medial amygdala, BNST, lateral hypothalamus), emotional experience (i.e. hippocampus, forebrain cortex, anterior cingulate, retrosplenial cortex) and the anterior thalamic nuclei that bridge the motor and cognitive components of aggressive responding. Drugs that block vasopressin

  20. Behavioral and Pharmacogenetics of Aggressive Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Aki; Quadros, Isabel M.; de Almeida, Rosa M. M.; Miczek, Klaus A.

    2013-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) has long been considered as a key transmitter in the neurocircuitry controlling aggression. Impaired regulation of each subtype of 5-HT receptor, 5-HT transporter, synthetic and metabolic enzymes has been linked particularly to impulsive aggression. The current summary focuses mostly on recent findings from pharmacological and genetic studies. The pharmacological treatments and genetic manipulations or polymorphisms of a specific target (e.g., 5-HT1A receptor) can often result in inconsistent results on aggression, due to “phasic” effects of pharmacological agents vs “trait”-like effects of genetic manipulations. Also, the local administration of a drug using the intracranial microinjection technique has shown that activation of specific subtypes of 5-HT receptors (5-HT1A and 5-HT1B) in mesocorticolimbic areas can reduce species-typical and other aggressive behaviors, but the same receptors in the medial prefrontal cortex or septal area promote escalated forms of aggression. Thus, there are receptor populations in specific brain regions that preferentially modulate specific types of aggression. Genetic studies have shown important gene × environment interactions; it is likely that the polymorphisms in the genes of 5-HT transporters (e.g., MAO A) or rate-limiting synthetic and metabolic enzymes of 5-HT determine the vulnerability to adverse environmental factors that escalate aggression. We also discuss the interaction between the 5-HT system and other systems. Modulation of 5-HT neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus by GABA, glutamate, and CRF profoundly regulate aggressive behaviors. Also, interactions of the 5-HT system with other neuropeptides (arginine vasopressin, oxytocin, neuropeptide Y, opioid) have emerged as important neurobiological determinants of aggression. Studies of aggression in genetically modified mice identified several molecules that affect the 5-HT system directly (e.g., Tph2, 5-HT1B, 5-HT transporter, Pet1, MAOA) or

  1. Violence, mental illness, and the brain – A brief history of psychosurgery: Part 3 – From deep brain stimulation to amygdalotomy for violent behavior, seizures, and pathological aggression in humans

    PubMed Central

    Faria, Miguel A.

    2013-01-01

    In the final installment to this three-part, essay-editorial on psychosurgery, we relate the history of deep brain stimulation (DBS) in humans and glimpse the phenomenal body of work conducted by Dr. Jose Delgado at Yale University from the 1950s to the 1970s. The inception of the National Commission for the Protection of Human Subjects of Biomedical and Behavioral Research (1974-1978) is briefly discussed as it pertains to the “determination of the Secretary of Health, Education and Welfare regarding the recommendations and guidelines on psychosurgery.” The controversial work - namely recording of brain activity, DBS, and amygdalotomy for intractable psychomotor seizures in patients with uncontrolled violence – conducted by Drs. Vernon H. Mark and Frank Ervin is recounted. This final chapter recapitulates advances in neuroscience and neuroradiology in the evaluation of violent individuals and ends with a brief discussion of the problem of uncontrolled rage and “pathologic aggression” in today’s modern society – as violence persists, and in response, we move toward authoritarianism, with less freedom and even less dignity. PMID:23956934

  2. Application of the total reflection X-ray fluorescence method to the elemental analysis of brain tumors of different types and grades of malignancy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lankosz, M. W.; Grzelak, M.; Ostachowicz, B.; Wandzilak, A.; Szczerbowska-Boruchowska, M.; Wrobel, P.; Radwanska, E.; Adamek, D.

    2014-11-01

    The process of carcinogenesis may influence normal biochemical reactions leading to alterations in the elemental composition of the tissue. Total reflection X-ray fluorescence analysis (TXRF) was applied to the elemental analysis of different brain tumors. The following elements were present in all the neoplastic tissues analyzed: K, Ca, Fe, Cu, Zn and Rb. The results of the analysis showed that the elemental composition of a relatively small fragment of tissue represents satisfactorily the biochemical “signature” of a cancer. On the basis of the element concentrations determined, it was possible to differentiate between some types of brain tumors.

  3. Malignant thymoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, L S; Huang, M H; Lin, T S; Huang, B S; Chien, K Y

    1992-07-15

    Sixty-one patients underwent operations for malignant thymomas between 1961 and 1989. Twenty-three patients had associated myasthenia gravis (MG), an incidence of 37.7%. Upon being admitted to the hospital, the patients' most common symptoms included chest pain, MG, cough, and dyspnea. Only 7 of 61 (11.5%) patients had no symptom. Tumor staging of 58 patients with invasive thymomas was performed according to Masaoka classification. The patients were classified as follows: Stage II disease, 5; Stage III, 41; Stage IVa, 8; and Stage IVb, 4. In addition, thymic carcinoma was present in three patients. The series had a resection rate of 55.7%. The incidence of operative complications was 16.3%. Only one patient died of myocardial infarction; the incidence of operative mortality was 1.6%. The patients with MG had a higher rate of resection (69.6%) and a higher incidence of complete thymectomy (14 of 23 patients; 60.9%). Mixed lymphoepithelial tumors and epithelial cell predominant tumors were the most frequent histologic patterns (45.9% and 34.4%, respectively). Fifty-two patients had postoperative radiation therapy, and 10 patients had chemotherapy. The overall cumulative survival rates in the series were 59% and 34% at 5 and 10 years, respectively. The results demonstrated that the factors affecting the prognosis may include resectability, postoperative irradiation or chemotherapy, MG, and tumor staging. The influence of histologic variation on survival rates could not be clearly defined in the series. Surgical resection, particularly complete thymectomy, followed by irradiation is the primary option of therapeutic management for malignant thymoma. PMID:1617594

  4. Aggression as positive reinforcement in people with intellectual disabilities.

    PubMed

    May, Michael E

    2011-01-01

    From an applied behavior-analytic perspective, aggression in people with intellectual disabilities is mostly maintained by social reinforcement consequences. However, nonsocial consequences have also been identified in functional assessments on aggression. Behaviors producing their own reinforcement have been labeled "automatic" or "nonsocial" in the behavior-analytic literature, a label that bares a striking resemblance to biobehavioral explanations of reward-seeking behaviors. Biobehavioral studies have revealed that aggression activates the same endogenous brain mechanisms as primary reinforcers like food. Therefore, integrating brain-environment explanations would result in a better understanding of the functional mechanisms associated with nonsocial aggression. The purpose of this paper was to explore aggression as a reinforcing consequence for reinforcement-seeking behaviors in people with intellectual disabilities. First, the literature establishing aggression as reinforcement for arbitrary responding will be reviewed. Next, the reward-related biological process associated with aggression was described. Finally, the paper discusses what might be done to assess and treat aggression maintained by nonsocial reinforcement. PMID:21700420

  5. Semiquantitative Analysis Using Thallium-201 SPECT for Differential Diagnosis Between Tumor Recurrence and Radiation Necrosis After Gamma Knife Surgery for Malignant Brain Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Matsunaga, Shigeo; Shuto, Takashi; Takase, Hajime; Ohtake, Makoto; Tomura, Nagatsuki; Tanaka, Takahiro; Sonoda, Masaki

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Semiquantitative analysis of thallium-201 chloride single photon emission computed tomography ({sup 201}Tl SPECT) was evaluated for the discrimination between recurrent brain tumor and delayed radiation necrosis after gamma knife surgery (GKS) for metastatic brain tumors and high-grade gliomas. Methods and Materials: The medical records were reviewed of 75 patients, including 48 patients with metastatic brain tumor and 27 patients with high-grade glioma who underwent GKS in our institution, and had suspected tumor recurrence or radiation necrosis on follow-up neuroimaging and deteriorating clinical status after GKS. Analysis of {sup 201}Tl SPECT data used the early ratio (ER) and the delayed ratio (DR) calculated as tumor/normal average counts on the early and delayed images, and the retention index (RI) as the ratio of DR to ER. Results: A total of 107 tumors were analyzed with {sup 201}Tl SPECT. Nineteen lesions were removed surgically and histological diagnoses established, and the other lesions were evaluated with follow-up clinical and neuroimaging examinations after GKS. The final diagnosis was considered to be recurrent tumor in 65 lesions and radiation necrosis in 42 lesions. Semiquantitative analysis demonstrated significant differences in DR (P=.002) and RI (P<.0001), but not in ER (P=.372), between the tumor recurrence and radiation necrosis groups, and no significant differences between metastatic brain tumors and high-grade gliomas in all indices (P=.926 for ER, P=.263 for DR, and P=.826 for RI). Receiver operating characteristics analysis indicated that RI was the most informative index with the optimum threshold of 0.775, which provided 82.8% sensitivity, 83.7% specificity, and 82.8% accuracy. Conclusions: Semiquantitative analysis of {sup 201}Tl SPECT provides useful information for the differentiation between tumor recurrence and radiation necrosis in metastatic brain tumors and high-grade gliomas after GKS, and the RI may be the most

  6. Linkages between Aggression and Children's Legitimacy of Aggression Beliefs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erdley, Cynthia A.; Asher, Steven R.

    To determine whether Slaby and Guerra's (1988) measure of aggression would reliably assess younger children's belief about aggression and whether children's belief about the legitimacy of aggression relates to their self-reports of it and to their levels of aggression as evaluated by peers, 781 fourth and fifth graders were asked to complete an…

  7. Aggressive Attitudes Predict Aggressive Behavior in Middle School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McConville, David W.; Cornell, Dewey G.

    2003-01-01

    This prospective study found that self-reported attitudes toward peer aggression among 403 middle school students were both internally consistent and stable over time (7 months). Aggressive attitudes were correlated with four outcome criteria for aggressive behavior: student self-report of peer aggression; peer and teacher nominations of bullying;…

  8. Aggression in Pretend Play and Aggressive Behavior in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fehr, Karla K.; Russ, Sandra W.

    2013-01-01

    Research Findings: Pretend play is an essential part of child development and adjustment. However, parents, teachers, and researchers debate the function of aggression in pretend play. Different models of aggression predict that the expression of aggression in play could either increase or decrease actual aggressive behavior. The current study…

  9. Chemotherapy and targeted agents for thymic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Girard, Nicolas

    2012-05-01

    Thymic malignancies are rare epithelial tumors that may be aggressive and difficult to treat. Thymomas are usually localized to the anterior mediastinum and are frequently eligible for upfront surgical resection. However, nearly 30% of patients present with locally advanced tumors at time of diagnosis, and chemotherapy is then used to reduce the tumor burden, possibly allowing subsequent surgery and/or radiotherapy. Metastatic and recurrent thymic malignancies may similarly be treated with chemotherapy. More recently, the molecular characterization of thymoma and thymic carcinoma led to the identification of potentially druggable targets, laying the foundations to implement personalized medicine for patients. PMID:22594902

  10. Penile Sarcoma: Report of a Rare Malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Vijay; Chaturvedi, Arun; Vishnoi, Jeevan Ram; Dontula, Prashant

    2016-01-01

    Penile cancer is an uncommon malignancy. Squamous cell carcinoma constitutes approximately 95% of all histology. Non-squamous malignancies are rare in penis. Sarcomas of penis are rarer among them. Spindle cell sarcoma is one of the extremely rare sarcoma of penis. To best of our knowledge, only two cases have been reported so far, one in English literature and other in Japanese. We are presenting this uncommon case of spindle cell sarcoma of penis, which was diagnosed with microscopy with its characteristic immunohistochemistry. The disease had an aggressive course with multiple recurrences in a short duration despite margin negative resection. Disease responded poorly with the chemotherapy and patient succumbed to the disease.

  11. Is metastatic pancreatic cancer an untargetable malignancy?

    PubMed Central

    Kourie, Hampig Raphael; Gharios, Joseph; Elkarak, Fadi; Antoun, Joelle; Ghosn, Marwan

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic pancreatic cancer (MPC) is one of the most aggressive malignancies, known to be chemo-resistant and have been recently considered resistant to some targeted therapies (TT). Erlotinib combined to gemcitabine is the only targeted therapy that showed an overall survival benefit in MPC. New targets and therapeutic approaches, based on new-TT, are actually being evaluated in MPC going from immunotherapy, epigenetics, tumor suppressor gene and oncogenes to stromal matrix regulators. We aim in this paper to present the major causes rendering MPC an untargetable malignancy and to focus on the new therapeutic modalities based on TT in MPC. PMID:26989465

  12. Phase I Study of Temozolomide and Irinotecan for Recurrent Malignant Gliomas in Patients Receiving Enzyme-Inducing Antiepileptic Drugs: A North American BrainTumor Consortium Study

    PubMed Central

    Loghin, Monica E.; Prados, Michael D.; Wen, Patrick; Junck, Larry; Lieberman, Frank; Fine, Howard; Fink, Karen L.; Metha, Minesh; Kuhn, John; Lamborn, Kathleen; Chang, Susan M.; Cloughesy, Timothy; DeAngelis, Lisa M.; Robins, Ian H.; Aldape, Kenneth D.; AlfredYung, W.K.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To determine the maximum tolerated dose of irinotecan when administrated with temozolomide every 28 days, in patients with recurrent malignant glioma who were also receiving CYP450 enzyme-inducing antiepileptic drugs (EIAED), and to characterize the pharmacokinetics of irinotecan and its metabolites. The study was also intended to assess whether temozolomide affects the conversion of irinotecan to SN-38. Design Patients with recurrent malignant glioma received a fixed dose of temozolomide (150 mg/m2) daily for 5 days from days1to 5 every 28 days, and an i.v. infusion of irinotecan on days1and15 of each cycle. The starting dose of irinotecan was 350 mg/m2, which was escalated to 550 mg/m2 in 50-mg/m2 increments. The plasma pharmacokinetics of irinotecan and its active metabolite, SN-38, were determined during the infusion of irinotecan on cycle 1, day 1. Results Thirty-three patients were enrolled into the study and treated. Thirty-one patients were evaluable for both tumor response and toxicity and two patients were evaluable for toxicity only. Common toxicities included neutropenia and thrombocytopenia, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. Dose-limiting toxicities were grade 3 diarrhea and nausea/vomiting. The maximum tolerated dose for irinotecan was determined to be 500 mg/m2. Conclusions The recommended phase II dose of irinotecan in combination with temozolomide for patients receiving EIAEDs is 500 mg/m2, administrated every 15 days on a 28-day schedule. This study also confirmed that concomitant administration of EIAEDs increases irinotecan clearance and influences SN-38 disposition. No pharmacokinetic interaction was observed between temozolomide and irinotecan. PMID:18056194

  13. Recent advances in cancer stem/progenitor cell research: therapeutic implications for overcoming resistance to the most aggressive cancers.

    PubMed

    Mimeault, M; Hauke, R; Mehta, P P; Batra, S K

    2007-01-01

    Overcoming intrinsic and acquired resistance of cancer stem/progenitor cells to current clinical treatments represents a major challenge in treating and curing the most aggressive and metastatic cancers. This review summarizes recent advances in our understanding of the cellular origin and molecular mechanisms at the basis of cancer initiation and progression as well as the heterogeneity of cancers arising from the malignant transformation of adult stem/progenitor cells. We describe the critical functions provided by several growth factor cascades, including epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR), stem cell factor (SCF) receptor (KIT), hedgehog and Wnt/beta-catenin signalling pathways that are frequently activated in cancer progenitor cells and are involved in their sustained growth, survival, invasion and drug resistance. Of therapeutic interest, we also discuss recent progress in the development of new drug combinations to treat the highly aggressive and metastatic cancers including refractory/relapsed leukaemias, melanoma and head and neck, brain, lung, breast, ovary, prostate, pancreas and gastrointestinal cancers which remain incurable in the clinics. The emphasis is on new therapeutic strategies consisting of molecular targeting of distinct oncogenic signalling elements activated in the cancer progenitor cells and their local microenvironment during cancer progression. These new targeted therapies should improve the efficacy of current therapeutic treatments against aggressive cancers, and thereby preventing disease relapse and enhancing patient survival. PMID:17979879

  14. Brain tumors.

    PubMed Central

    Black, K. L.; Mazziotta, J. C.; Becker, D. P.

    1991-01-01

    Recent advances in experimental tumor biology are being applied to critical clinical problems of primary brain tumors. The expression of peripheral benzodiazepine receptors, which are sparse in normal brain, is increased as much as 20-fold in brain tumors. Experimental studies show promise in using labeled ligands to these receptors to identify the outer margins of malignant brain tumors. Whereas positron emission tomography has improved the dynamic understanding of tumors, the labeled selective tumor receptors with positron emitters will enhance the ability to specifically diagnose and greatly aid in the pretreatment planning for tumors. Modulation of these receptors will also affect tumor growth and metabolism. Novel methods to deliver antitumor agents to the brain and new approaches using biologic response modifiers also hold promise to further improve the management of brain tumors. Images PMID:1848735

  15. Malignant hyperpyrexia

    PubMed Central

    Isaacs, Hyam; Barlow, M. B.

    1973-01-01

    The history, clinical presentation, and management of malignant hyperpyrexia are presented. The aetiology seems to be associated with some inherited abnormality which affects the movement and binding of calcium ions in the sarcoplasmic reticulum, sarcoplasm, and mitochondria. Whether this is a primary muscular defect or secondary to some trophic neural influence is yet to be established. The subjects carrying the abnormal trait show evidence of a myopathy which is subclinical in most instances and revealed only by estimation of serum CPK or biopsy. In some families where the myopathy is clinically obvious there may be, in addition, a variety of musculoskeletal abnormalities. A plea is made for routine monitoring of temperature during anaesthesia and for procainamide or procaine to be readily available in all operating theatres. A history of anaesthetic deaths in a family calls for special care, and, if the serum CPK is elevated, suxamethonium and halothane are to be avoided. Families with orthopaedic and muscular abnormalities are at increased risk and should have estimation of serum CPK before surgery. As a bonus of this study it is suggested that serum CPK estimations be used to screen pigs for selective breeding and so eliminate the disease, which causes soft exudative pork. Images PMID:4708457

  16. [Malignant Pleural Mesotheliomas].

    PubMed

    Biancosino, C; Redwan, B; Krüger, M; Eberlein, M; Bölükbas, S

    2016-09-01

    Malignant pleural mesotheliomas (MPM) are very aggressive tumors, which originate from the mesothelial cells of the pleural surface. The main risk factor associated with MPM is exposure to asbestos. The latency period between asbestos exposure and MPM can be 30-60 years. Clinical symptoms and signs are often nonspecifc. The diagnosis of MPM requires an adequate tissue specimen for pathological examination, and video assisted thoracoscopic surgey (VATS) is associated with the highest diagnostic yield. MPM are histologically classified into epitheloid, sacromatoid and biphasic (mixed) sub-types. Accurate staging with invasive tests, if needed, is an important step before an interdisciplinary team can decide on an optimal (multi-modal) treatment approach. A multi-modal treatment approach (surgery, radiation oncology and chemotherapy) is superior to all approaches relying only on a single modality, if the patient qualifies for it from an oncological and functional standpoint. The goal of the surgical therapy is to achieve macroscopic complete resection. There are two competing surgical approaches and philosophies: extrapleural pneumonectomy (EPP) and radical pleurectomy (RP). Over the last years a paradigm shift from EPP to RP occurred and RP is now often the preferred surgical option. PMID:27612329

  17. Radiotherapy of malignant melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, J.S.

    1985-04-01

    The role of radiotherapy in the treatment of malignant melanoma is limited, and surgery generally forms the mainstay of medical practice. However, there are some circumstances in which radiotherapy should be considered the treatment of choice. Symptomatic metastatic lesions in bone or brain can effectively be palliated in a substantial proportion of instances. At the current stage of our knowledge, conventionally fractionated treatment of such lesions forms the standard against which other treatments should be measured. In contrast, metastatic lesions to skin or lymph nodes that do not overlie critical normal structures probably are better treated by high-dose-per-fraction techniques. Radiotherapy may play a definitive role in the treatment of lentigo maligna. The precise optimal energy of the beam to be used remains to be defined. Slightly more penetrating radiation appears to be required for lentigo maligna melanomas. Here, too, the optimal energy remains to be defined. The treatment of nonlentigenous melanomas primarily by radiotherapy is unproved in my opinion. Certainly, the data from the Princess Margaret Hospital is exciting, but I believe it must be corroborated by a well-designed trial before it can be accepted without question. Future directions in treatment of malignant melanoma are likely to include further trials of unconventional fractionation and the use of radiosensitizing agents in conjunction with radiotherapy. The time for dermatologists and radiation therapists to cooperate in such studies is at hand.

  18. A benign maxillary tumour with malignant features.

    PubMed

    Ricalde, Rosario R; Lim, Aimee Caroline E; Lopa, Ramon Antonio B; Carnate, Jose M

    2010-06-01

    Non-specific biopsy results such as chronic inflammation, hemorrhage, necrosis can be frustrating to the clinician. This is especially true if the patient presents with clinical features suggestive of an aggressive tumour. This is a review of the clinical features, diagnostic dilemmas and surgical management of a benign maxillary mass with malignant features - a disease called hematoma-like mass of the maxillary sinus (HLMMS). Our experience with five cases will also be cited. PMID:20502750

  19. Elimination of aggressive behavior in male mice lacking endothelial nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Demas, G E; Kriegsfeld, L J; Blackshaw, S; Huang, P; Gammie, S C; Nelson, R J; Snyder, S H

    1999-10-01

    Male mice with targeted deletion of the gene encoding the neuronal isoform of nitric oxide synthase (nNOS(-/-)) display increased aggressive behavior compared with wild-type (WT) mice. Specific pharmacological inhibition of nNOS with 7-nitroindazole also augments aggressive behavior. We report here that male mice with targeted deletion of the gene encoding endothelial NOS (eNOS(-/-)) display dramatic reductions in aggression. The effects are selective, because an extensive battery of behavioral tests reveals no other deficits. In the resident-intruder model of aggression, resident eNOS(-/-) males show virtually no aggression. Latency for aggression onset is 25-30 times longer in eNOS(-/-) males compared with WT males in the rare instances of aggressive behaviors. Similarly, a striking lack of aggression is noted in tests of aggression among groups of four mice monitored in neutral cages. Although eNOS(-/-) mice are hypertensive ( approximately 14 mmHg blood pressure elevation), hypertension does not appear responsible for the diminished aggression. Reduction of hypertension with hydralazine does not change the prevalence of aggression in eNOS(-/-) mice. Extensive examination of brains from eNOS(-/-) male mice reveals no obvious neural damage from chronic hypertension. In situ hybridization in WT animals reveals eNOS mRNA in the brain associated exclusively with blood vessels and no neuronal localizations. Accordingly, vascular eNOS in the brain appears capable of influencing behavior with considerable selectivity. PMID:10493775

  20. Lateralisation of aggressive displays in a tephritid fly.

    PubMed

    Benelli, Giovanni; Donati, Elisa; Romano, Donato; Stefanini, Cesare; Messing, Russell H; Canale, Angelo

    2015-02-01

    Lateralisation (i.e. different functional and/or structural specialisations of the left and right sides of the brain) of aggression has been examined in several vertebrate species, while evidence for invertebrates is scarce. In this study, we investigated lateralisation of aggressive displays (boxing with forelegs and wing strikes) in the Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata. We attempted to answer the following questions: (1) do medflies show lateralisation of aggressive displays at the population-level; (2) are there sex differences in lateralisation of aggressive displays; and (3) does lateralisation of aggression enhance fighting success? Results showed left-biased population-level lateralisation of aggressive displays, with no consistent differences among sexes. In both male-male and female-female conflicts, aggressive behaviours performed with left body parts led to greater fighting success than those performed with right body parts. As we found left-biased preferential use of body parts for both wing strikes and boxing, we predicted that the left foreleg/wing is quicker in exploring/striking than the right one. We characterised wing strike and boxing using high-speed videos, calculating mean velocity of aggressive displays. For both sexes, aggressive displays that led to success were faster than unsuccessful ones. However, left wing/legs were not faster than right ones while performing aggressive acts. Further research is needed on proximate causes allowing enhanced fighting success of lateralised aggressive behaviour. This is the first report supporting the adaptive role of lateralisation of aggressive displays in insects. PMID:25599665

  1. Single serotonergic neurons that modulate aggression in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Alekseyenko, Olga V; Chan, Yick-Bun; Fernandez, Maria de la Paz; Bülow, Torsten; Pankratz, Michael J; Kravitz, Edward A

    2014-11-17

    Monoamine serotonin (5HT) has been linked to aggression for many years across species. However, elaboration of the neurochemical pathways that govern aggression has proven difficult because monoaminergic neurons also regulate other behaviors. There are approximately 100 serotonergic neurons in the Drosophila nervous system, and they influence sleep, circadian rhythms, memory, and courtship. In the Drosophila model of aggression, the acute shut down of the entire serotonergic system yields flies that fight less, whereas induced activation of 5HT neurons promotes aggression. Using intersectional genetics, we restricted the population of 5HT neurons that can be reproducibly manipulated to identify those that modulate aggression. Although similar approaches were used recently to find aggression-modulating dopaminergic and Fru(M)-positive peptidergic neurons, the downstream anatomical targets of the neurons that make up aggression-controlling circuits remain poorly understood. Here, we identified a symmetrical pair of serotonergic PLP neurons that are necessary for the proper escalation of aggression. Silencing these neurons reduced aggression in male flies, and activating them increased aggression in male flies. GFP reconstitution across synaptic partners (GRASP) analyses suggest that 5HT-PLP neurons form contacts with 5HT1A receptor-expressing neurons in two distinct anatomical regions of the brain. Activation of these 5HT1A receptor-expressing neurons, in turn, caused reductions in aggression. Our studies, therefore, suggest that aggression may be held in check, at least in part, by inhibitory input from 5HT1A receptor-bearing neurons, which can be released by activation of the 5HT-PLP neurons. PMID:25447998

  2. Neural Correlates of Impulsive Aggressive Behavior in Subjects With a History of Alcohol Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Kose, Samet; Steinberg, Joel L.; Moeller, F. Gerard; Gowin, Joshua L.; Zuniga, Edward; Kamdar, Zahra N.; Schmitz, Joy M.; Lane, Scott D.

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol-related aggression is a complex and problematic phenomenon with profound public health consequences. We examined neural correlates potentially moderating the relationship between human aggressive behavior and chronic alcohol use. Thirteen subjects meeting DSM–IV criteria for past alcohol-dependence in remission (AD) and 13 matched healthy controls (CONT) participated in an fMRI study adapted from a laboratory model of human aggressive behavior (Point Subtraction Aggression Paradigm, or PSAP). Blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) activation was measured during bouts of operationally defined aggressive behavior, during postprovocation periods, and during monetary-reinforced behavior. Whole brain voxelwise random-effects analyses found group differences in brain regions relevant to chronic alcohol use and aggressive behavior (e.g., emotional and behavioral control). Behaviorally, AD subjects responded on both the aggressive response and monetary response options at significantly higher rates than CONT. Whole brain voxelwise random-effects analyses revealed significant group differences in response to provocation (monetary subtractions), with CONT subjects showing greater activation in frontal and prefrontal cortex, thalamus, and hippocampus. Collapsing data across all subjects, regression analyses of postprovocation brain activation on aggressive response rate revealed significant positive regression slopes in precentral gyrus and parietal cortex; and significant negative regression slopes in orbitofrontal cortex, prefrontal cortex, caudate, thalamus, and middle temporal gyrus. In these collapsed analyses, response to provocation and aggressive behavior were associated with activation in brain regions subserving inhibitory and emotional control, sensorimotor integration, and goal directed motor activity. PMID:25664566

  3. Malignant cancer and invasive placentation

    PubMed Central

    D'Souza, Alaric W.; Wagner, Günter P.

    2014-01-01

    Cancer metastasis is an invasive process that involves the transplantation of cells into new environments. Since human placentation is also invasive, hypotheses about a relationship between invasive placentation in eutherian mammals and metastasis have been proposed. The relationship between metastatic cancer and invasive placentation is usually presented in terms of antagonistic pleiotropy. According to this hypothesis, evolution of invasive placentation also established the mechanisms for cancer metastasis. Here, in contrast, we argue that the secondary evolution of less invasive placentation in some mammalian lineages may have resulted in positive pleiotropic effects on cancer survival by lowering malignancy rates. These positive pleiotropic effects would manifest themselves as resistance to cancer cell invasion. To provide a preliminary test of this proposal, we re-analyze data from Priester and Mantel (Occurrence of tumors in domestic animals. Data from 12 United States and Canadian colleges of veterinary medicine. J Natl Cancer Inst 1971;47:1333-44) about malignancy rates in cows, horses, cats and dogs. From our analysis we found that equines and bovines, animals with less invasive placentation, have lower rates of metastatic cancer than felines and canines in skin and glandular epithelial cancers as well as connective tissue sarcomas. We conclude that a link between type of placentation and species-specific malignancy rates is more likely related to derived mechanisms that suppress invasion rather than different degrees of fetal placental aggressiveness. PMID:25324490

  4. Adolescents’ Aggression to Parents: Longitudinal Links with Parents’ Physical Aggression

    PubMed Central

    Margolin, Gayla; Baucom, Brian R.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To investigate whether parents’ previous physical aggression (PPA) exhibited during early adolescence is associated with adolescents’ subsequent parent-directed aggression even beyond parents’ concurrent physical aggression (CPA); to investigate whether adolescents’ emotion dysregulation and attitudes condoning child-to-parent aggression moderate associations. Methods Adolescents (N = 93) and their parents participated in a prospective, longitudinal study. Adolescents and parents reported at waves 1–3 on four types of parents’ PPA (mother-to-adolescent, father-to-adolescent, mother-to-father, father-to-mother). Wave 3 assessments also included adolescents’ emotion dysregulation, attitudes condoning aggression, and externalizing behaviors. At waves 4 and 5, adolescents and parents reported on adolescents’ parent-directed physical aggression, property damage, and verbal aggression, and on parents’ CPA Results Parents’ PPA emerged as a significant indicator of adolescents’ parent-directed physical aggression (odds ratio [OR]: 1.25, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.0–1.55; p = .047), property damage (OR: 1.29, 95% CI: 1.1–1.5, p = .002), and verbal aggression (OR: 1.35, 95% CI: 1.15–1.6, p < .001) even controlling for adolescents’ sex, externalizing behaviors, and family income. When controlling for parents’ CPA, previous mother-to-adolescent aggression still predicted adolescents’ parent-directed physical aggression (OR: 5.56, 95% CI: 1.82–17.0, p = .003), and father-to-mother aggression predicted adolescents’ parent-directed verbal aggression (OR: 1.86, 95% CI: 1.0–3.3, p = .036). Emotion dysregulation and attitudes condoning aggression did not produce direct or moderated effects. Conclusions Adolescents’ parent-directed aggression deserves greater attention in discourse about lasting, adverse effects of even minor forms of parents’ physical aggression. Future research should investigate parent-directed aggression as

  5. Psychopathy and instrumental aggression: Evolutionary, neurobiological, and legal perspectives.

    PubMed

    Glenn, Andrea L; Raine, Adrian

    2009-01-01

    In the study of aggression, psychopathy represents a disorder that is of particular interest because it often involves aggression which is premeditated, emotionless, and instrumental in nature; this is especially true for more serious types of offenses. Such instrumental aggression is aimed at achieving a goal (e.g., to obtain resources such as money, or to gain status). Unlike the primarily reactive aggression observed in other disorders, psychopaths appear to engage in aggressive acts for the purpose of benefiting themselves. This is especially interesting in light of arguments that psychopathy may represent an alternative life-history strategy that is evolutionarily adaptive; behaviors such as aggression, risk-taking, manipulation, and promiscuous sexual behavior observed in psychopathy may be means by which psychopaths gain advantage over others. Recent neurobiological research supports the idea that abnormalities in brain regions key to emotion and morality may allow psychopaths to pursue such a strategy-psychopaths may not experience the social emotions such as empathy, guilt, and remorse that typically discourage instrumentally aggressive acts, and may even experience pleasure when committing these acts. Findings from brain imaging studies of psychopaths may have important implications for the law. PMID:19409615

  6. Microbiology of aggressive periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Könönen, Eija; Müller, Hans-Peter

    2014-06-01

    For decades, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans has been considered the most likely etiologic agent in aggressive periodontitis. Implementation of DNA-based microbiologic methodologies has considerably improved our understanding of the composition of subgingival biofilms, and advanced open-ended molecular techniques even allow for genome mapping of the whole bacterial spectrum in a sample and characterization of both the cultivable and not-yet-cultivable microbiota associated with periodontal health and disease. Currently, A. actinomycetemcomitans is regarded as a minor component of the resident oral microbiota and as an opportunistic pathogen in some individuals. Its specific JP2 clone, however, shows properties of a true exogenous pathogen and has an important role in the development of aggressive periodontitis in certain populations. Still, limited data exist on the impact of other microbes specifically in aggressive periodontitis. Despite a wide heterogeneity of bacteria, especially in subgingival samples collected from patients, bacteria of the red complex in particular, and those of the orange complex, are considered as potential pathogens in generalized aggressive periodontitis. These types of bacterial findings closely resemble those found for chronic periodontitis, representing a mixed polymicrobial infection without a clear association with any specific microorganism. In aggressive periodontitis, the role of novel and not-yet-cultivable bacteria has not yet been elucidated. There are geographic and ethnic differences in the carriage of periodontitis-associated microorganisms, and they need to be taken into account when comparing study reports on periodontal microbiology in different study populations. In the present review, we provide an overview on the colonization of potential periodontal pathogens in childhood and adolescence, and on specific microorganisms that have been suspected for their role in the initiation and progression of aggressive

  7. A phase 2 trial of irinotecan (CPT-11) in patients with recurrent malignant glioma: A North American Brain Tumor Consortium study1

    PubMed Central

    Prados, Michael D.; Lamborn, Kathleen; Yung, W.K.A.; Jaeckle, Kurt; Robins, H. Ian; Mehta, Minesh; Fine, Howard A.; Wen, Patrick Y.; Cloughesy, Timothy; Chang, Susan; Nicholas, M. Kelly; Schiff, David; Greenberg, Harry; Junck, Larry; Fink, Karen; Hess, Ken; Kuhn, John

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the response to CPT-11 administered every three weeks to adults with progressive malignant glioma, treated with or without enzyme-inducing antiepileptic drug (EIAED) therapy, at the recommended phase 2 dose determined from a previous phase 1 study. Adult patients age 18 or older with a KPS of 60 or higher who had measurable recurrent grade III anaplastic glioma (AG) or grade IV glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) were eligible. No more than one prior chemotherapy was allowed, either as adjuvant therapy or for recurrent disease. The CPT-11 dose was 350 mg/m2 i.v. every three weeks in patients not on EIAED and 750 mg/m2 in patients on EIAED therapy. Patients with stable or responding disease could be treated until tumor progression or a total of 12 months of therapy. The primary end point of the study was to determine whether CPT-11 could significantly delay tumor progression, using the rate of six-month progression-free survival (PFS-6). The trial was sized to be able to discriminate between a 15% and 35% rate for the GBM group alone and between a 20% and 40% rate for the entire cohort. There were 51 eligible patients, including 38 GBM and 13 AG patients, enrolled. The median age was 52 and 42 years, respectively. PFS-6 for the entire cohort was 17.6%. PFS-6 was 15.7% (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.07–0.31) for the GBM patients and 23% (95% CI, 0.07–0.52) for AG patients. Toxicity for the group included diarrhea and myelosuppression. We conclude that the recommended phase 2 dose of CPT-11 for patients with or without EIAED was ineffective on this schedule, in this patient population. PMID:16533878

  8. A phase 2 trial of irinotecan (CPT-11) in patients with recurrent malignant glioma: a North American Brain Tumor Consortium study.

    PubMed

    Prados, Michael D; Lamborn, Kathleen; Yung, W K A; Jaeckle, Kurt; Robins, H Ian; Mehta, Minesh; Fine, Howard A; Wen, Patrick Y; Cloughesy, Timothy; Chang, Susan; Nicholas, M Kelly; Schiff, David; Greenberg, Harry; Junck, Larry; Fink, Karen; Hess, Ken; Kuhn, John

    2006-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the response to CPT-11 administered every three weeks to adults with progressive malignant glioma, treated with or without enzyme-inducing antiepileptic drug (EIAED) therapy, at the recommended phase 2 dose determined from a previous phase 1 study. Adult patients age 18 or older with a KPS of 60 or higher who had measurable recurrent grade III anaplastic glioma (AG) or grade IV glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) were eligible. No more than one prior chemotherapy was allowed, either as adjuvant therapy or for recurrent disease. The CPT-11 dose was 350 mg/m(2) i.v. every three weeks in patients not on EIAED and 750 mg/m(2) in patients on EIAED therapy. Patients with stable or responding disease could be treated until tumor progression or a total of 12 months of therapy. The primary end point of the study was to determine whether CPT-11 could significantly delay tumor progression, using the rate of six-month progression-free survival (PFS-6). The trial was sized to be able to discriminate between a 15% and 35% rate for the GBM group alone and between a 20% and 40% rate for the entire cohort. There were 51 eligible patients, including 38 GBM and 13 AG patients, enrolled. The median age was 52 and 42 years, respectively. PFS-6 for the entire cohort was 17.6%. PFS-6 was 15.7% (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.07-0.31) for the GBM patients and 23% (95% CI, 0.07-0.52) for AG patients. Toxicity for the group included diarrhea and myelosuppression. We conclude that the recommended phase 2 dose of CPT-11 for patients with or without EIAED was ineffective on this schedule, in this patient population. PMID:16533878

  9. A Phase I and Biology Study of Gefitinib and Radiation in Children with Newly Diagnosed Brain Stem Gliomas or Supratentorial Malignant Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Geyer, J. Russell; Stewart, Clinton F.; Kocak, Mehmet; Broniscer, Alberto; Phillips, Peter; Douglas, James G.; Blaney, Susan M.; Packer, Roger J.; Gururangan, Sri; Banerjee, Anu; Kieran, Mark W.; Kun, Larry E.; Gilbertson, Richard J.; Boyett, James M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To estimate the maximum tolerated dose (MTD); study the pharmacology of escalating doses of gefitinib combined with radiation therapy in patients ≤21 years with newly diagnosed intrinsic brainstem gliomas (BSG) and incompletely resected supratentorial malignant gliomas (STMG); and to investigate epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) amplification and expression in STMG. Patients and methods Three strata were identified: Stratum 1A - BSG; Stratum IB - incompletely resected STMG not receiving enzyme inducing anti-convulsant drugs (EIACD); and Stratum II - incompletely resected STMG receiving EIACD. Dose escalation using a modified 3 + 3 cohort design was performed in strata IA & II. The initial gefitinib dosage was 100mg/m2/day commencing with radiation therapy and the dose-finding period extended until 2 weeks post-radiation. Pharmacokinetics (PK) and biology studies were performed in consenting patients. Results Of 23 eligible patients, 20 were evaluable for dose-finding. MTDs for strata IA and II were not established as accrual was halted due to four patients experiencing symptomatic intratumoral hemorrhage (ITH); 2 during and 2 post dose-finding. ITH was observed in 0 of 11 patients treated at 100mg/m2/day, 1 of 10 at 250mg/m2/day, and 3 of 12 at 375mg/m2/day. Subsequently a second patient at 250mg/m2/day experienced ITH. PK analysis showed the median gefitinib systemic exposure increased with dosage (p=0.04). EGFR was overexpressed in 5 of 11 STMG and amplified in 4 (36%) samples. Conclusion This trial provides clear evidence of EGFR amplification in a significant proportion of paediatric STMG and 250mg/m2/day was selected for the Phase II trial. PMID:20708924

  10. Karnofsky Performance Status and Lactate Dehydrogenase Predict the Benefit of Palliative Whole-Brain Irradiation in Patients With Advanced Intra- and Extracranial Metastases From Malignant Melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Partl, Richard; Richtig, Erika; Avian, Alexander; Berghold, Andrea; Kapp, Karin S.

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: To determine prognostic factors that allow the selection of melanoma patients with advanced intra- and extracerebral metastatic disease for palliative whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT) or best supportive care. Methods and Materials: This was a retrospective study of 87 patients who underwent palliative WBRT between 1988 and 2009 for progressive or multiple cerebral metastases at presentation. Uni- and multivariate analysis took into account the following patient- and tumor-associated factors: gender and age, Karnofsky performance status (KPS), neurologic symptoms, serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) level, number of intracranial metastases, previous resection or stereotactic radiosurgery of brain metastases, number of extracranial metastasis sites, and local recurrences as well as regional lymph node metastases at the time of WBRT. Results: In univariate analysis, KPS, LDH, number of intracranial metastases, and neurologic symptoms had a significant influence on overall survival. In multivariate survival analysis, KPS and LDH remained as significant prognostic factors, with hazard ratios of 3.3 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.6-6.5) and 2.8 (95% CI 1.6-4.9), respectively. Patients with KPS ≥70 and LDH ≤240 U/L had a median survival of 191 days; patients with KPS ≥70 and LDH >240 U/L, 96 days; patients with KPS <70 and LDH ≤240 U/L, 47 days; and patients with KPS <70 and LDH >240 U/L, only 34 days. Conclusions: Karnofsky performance status and serum LDH values indicate whether patients with advanced intra- and extracranial tumor manifestations are candidates for palliative WBRT or best supportive care.

  11. Podocalyxin expression in malignant astrocytic tumors.

    PubMed

    Hayatsu, Norihito; Kaneko, Mika Kato; Mishima, Kazuhiko; Nishikawa, Ryo; Matsutani, Masao; Price, Janet E; Kato, Yukinari

    2008-09-19

    Podocalyxin is an anti-adhesive mucin-like transmembrane sialoglycoprotein that has been implicated in the development of aggressive forms of cancer. Podocalyxin is also known as keratan sulfate (KS) proteoglycan. Recently, we revealed that highly sulfated KS or another mucin-like transmembrane sialoglycoprotein podoplanin/aggrus is upregulated in malignant astrocytic tumors. The aim of this study is to examine the relationship between podocalyxin expression and malignant progression of astrocytic tumors. In this study, 51 astrocytic tumors were investigated for podocalyxin expression using immunohistochemistry, Western blot analysis, and quantitative real-time PCR. Immunohistochemistry detected podocalyxin on the surface of tumor cells in six of 14 anaplastic astrocytomas (42.9%) and in 17 of 31 glioblastomas (54.8%), especially around proliferating endothelial cells. In diffuse astrocytoma, podocalyxin expression was observed only in vascular endothelial cells. Podocalyxin might be associated with the malignant progression of astrocytic tumors, and be a useful prognostic marker for astrocytic tumors. PMID:18639524

  12. Podocalyxin expression in malignant astrocytic tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Hayatsu, Norihito; Kaneko, Mika Kato; Mishima, Kazuhiko; Nishikawa, Ryo; Matsutani, Masao; Price, Janet E.; Kato, Yukinari

    2008-09-19

    Podocalyxin is an anti-adhesive mucin-like transmembrane sialoglycoprotein that has been implicated in the development of aggressive forms of cancer. Podocalyxin is also known as keratan sulfate (KS) proteoglycan. Recently, we revealed that highly sulfated KS or another mucin-like transmembrane sialoglycoprotein podoplanin/aggrus is upregulated in malignant astrocytic tumors. The aim of this study is to examine the relationship between podocalyxin expression and malignant progression of astrocytic tumors. In this study, 51 astrocytic tumors were investigated for podocalyxin expression using immunohistochemistry, Western blot analysis, and quantitative real-time PCR. Immunohistochemistry detected podocalyxin on the surface of tumor cells in six of 14 anaplastic astrocytomas (42.9%) and in 17 of 31 glioblastomas (54.8%), especially around proliferating endothelial cells. In diffuse astrocytoma, podocalyxin expression was observed only in vascular endothelial cells. Podocalyxin might be associated with the malignant progression of astrocytic tumors, and be a useful prognostic marker for astrocytic tumors.

  13. Childhood Brain Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... They are among the most common types of childhood cancers. Some are benign tumors, which aren't ... can still be serious. Malignant tumors are cancerous. Childhood brain and spinal cord tumors can cause headaches ...

  14. Epilepsy, Antiepileptic Drugs, and Aggression: An Evidence-Based Review.

    PubMed

    Brodie, Martin J; Besag, Frank; Ettinger, Alan B; Mula, Marco; Gobbi, Gabriella; Comai, Stefano; Aldenkamp, Albert P; Steinhoff, Bernhard J

    2016-07-01

    Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) have many benefits but also many side effects, including aggression, agitation, and irritability, in some patients with epilepsy. This article offers a comprehensive summary of current understanding of aggressive behaviors in patients with epilepsy, including an evidence-based review of aggression during AED treatment. Aggression is seen in a minority of people with epilepsy. It is rarely seizure related but is interictal, sometimes occurring as part of complex psychiatric and behavioral comorbidities, and it is sometimes associated with AED treatment. We review the common neurotransmitter systems and brain regions implicated in both epilepsy and aggression, including the GABA, glutamate, serotonin, dopamine, and noradrenaline systems and the hippocampus, amygdala, prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, and temporal lobes. Few controlled clinical studies have used behavioral measures to specifically examine aggression with AEDs, and most evidence comes from adverse event reporting from clinical and observational studies. A systematic approach was used to identify relevant publications, and we present a comprehensive, evidence-based summary of available data surrounding aggression-related behaviors with each of the currently available AEDs in both adults and in children/adolescents with epilepsy. A psychiatric history and history of a propensity toward aggression/anger should routinely be sought from patients, family members, and carers; its presence does not preclude the use of any specific AEDs, but those most likely to be implicated in these behaviors should be used with caution in such cases. PMID:27255267

  15. Epilepsy, Antiepileptic Drugs, and Aggression: An Evidence-Based Review

    PubMed Central

    Besag, Frank; Ettinger, Alan B.; Mula, Marco; Gobbi, Gabriella; Comai, Stefano; Aldenkamp, Albert P.; Steinhoff, Bernhard J.

    2016-01-01

    Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) have many benefits but also many side effects, including aggression, agitation, and irritability, in some patients with epilepsy. This article offers a comprehensive summary of current understanding of aggressive behaviors in patients with epilepsy, including an evidence-based review of aggression during AED treatment. Aggression is seen in a minority of people with epilepsy. It is rarely seizure related but is interictal, sometimes occurring as part of complex psychiatric and behavioral comorbidities, and it is sometimes associated with AED treatment. We review the common neurotransmitter systems and brain regions implicated in both epilepsy and aggression, including the GABA, glutamate, serotonin, dopamine, and noradrenaline systems and the hippocampus, amygdala, prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, and temporal lobes. Few controlled clinical studies have used behavioral measures to specifically examine aggression with AEDs, and most evidence comes from adverse event reporting from clinical and observational studies. A systematic approach was used to identify relevant publications, and we present a comprehensive, evidence-based summary of available data surrounding aggression-related behaviors with each of the currently available AEDs in both adults and in children/adolescents with epilepsy. A psychiatric history and history of a propensity toward aggression/anger should routinely be sought from patients, family members, and carers; its presence does not preclude the use of any specific AEDs, but those most likely to be implicated in these behaviors should be used with caution in such cases. PMID:27255267

  16. Hypothalamic control of male aggression-seeking behavior

    PubMed Central

    Grosenick, Logan; Davidson, Thomas J.; Deisseroth, Karl

    2016-01-01

    In many vertebrate species, certain individuals will seek out opportunities for aggression, even in the absence of threat provoking cues. While several brain areas have been implicated in generating attack in response to social threat, little is known about the neural mechanisms that promote self-initiated or “voluntary” aggression seeking when no threat is present. To explore this directly, we utilize an aggression-seeking task wherein male mice can self-initiate aggression trials to gain brief and repeated access to a weaker male that they attack. In males that exhibit rapid task learning, we find that the ventrolateral part of the ventromedial hypothalamus (VMHvl), an area with a known role in attack, is essential for aggression seeking. Using both single unit electrophysiology and population optical recording, we find that VMHvl neurons become active during aggression seeking and their activity tracks changes in task learning and extinction. Inactivation of the VMHvl reduces aggression-seeking behavior, whereas optogenetic stimulation of the VMHvl accelerates moment-to-moment aggression seeking and intensifies future attack. These data demonstrate that the VMHvl can mediate both acute attack and flexible seeking actions that precede attack. PMID:26950005

  17. Single serotonergic neurons that modulate aggression in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Alekseyenko, Olga V.; Chan, Yick-Bun; de la Paz Fernandez, Maria; Bülow, Torsten; Pankratz, Michael J.; Kravitz, Edward A.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Monoamine serotonin (5HT) has been linked to aggression for many years across species [1–3]. However, elaboration of the neurochemical pathways that govern aggression has proven difficult because monoaminergic neurons also regulate other behaviors [4, 5]. There are about 100 serotonergic neurons in the Drosophila nervous system and they influence sleep [6], circadian rhythms [7], memory [8, 9] and courtship [10]. In the Drosophila model of aggression [11] the acute shut down of the entire serotonergic system yields flies that fight less, while induced activation of 5HT neurons promotes aggression [12]. Using intersectional genetics we restricted the population of 5HT neurons that can be reproducibly manipulated to identify those that modulate aggression. Although similar approaches were used recently to find aggression-modulating dopaminergic [13] and FruM –positive peptidergic [14] neurons, the downstream anatomical targets of the neurons that make up aggression-controlling circuits remain poorly understood. Here we identified a symmetrical pair of serotonergic PLP neurons that are necessary for the proper escalation of aggression. Silencing these neurons reduced, and activating them increased aggression in male flies. GFP reconstitution across synaptic partners (GRASP) [15] analyses suggests that 5HT-PLP neurons form contacts with 5HT1A receptor - expressing neurons in two distinct anatomical regions of the brain. Activation of these 5HT1A receptor-expressing neurons, in turn, caused reductions in aggression. Our studies, therefore, suggest that aggression may be held in check, at least in part, by inhibitory input from 5HT1A receptor-bearing neurons, which can be released by activation of the 5HT-PLP neurons. PMID:25447998

  18. Intellectual Competence and Aggression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huesmann, L. Rowell; Yarmel, Patty Warnick

    Using data from a broader longitudinal study, this investigation explores within-subject and cross-generational stability of intellectual competence and the relationship of such stability to aggressive behavior. Data were gathered three times (when subjects' modal age was 8, 19, and 30 years). Initially, subjects included the entire population…

  19. Relational Aggression among Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Ellie L.; Nelson, David A.; Hottle, America B.; Warburton, Brittney; Young, Bryan K.

    2011-01-01

    "Relational aggression" refers to harm within relationships caused by covert bullying or manipulative behavior. Examples include isolating a youth from his or her group of friends (social exclusion), threatening to stop talking to a friend (the silent treatment), or spreading gossip and rumors by email. This type of bullying tends to be…

  20. Stability of Aggressive Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eron, Leonard D.; Huesmann, L. Rowell

    As indicated by multiple measures (including overt criminal behavior), stability of aggressive behavior was investigated across 22 years for males and females in a variety of situations. Originally, subjects included the entire population enrolled in the third grade in a semi-rural county in New York State. The sample included approximately 870…

  1. Human Aggression and Suicide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Gerald L.; Goodwin, Frederick K

    1986-01-01

    The central nervous system transmitter serontonin may be altered in aggressive/impulsive and suicidal behaviors in humans. These reports are largely consistent with animal data, and constitute one of the most highly replicated set of findings in biological psychiatry. Suggests that some suicidal behavior may be a special kind of aggressive…

  2. Anonymity, Deindividuation and Aggression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baron, Robert S.

    Several writers suggest that reducing one's sense of individuality reduces social restraints. The author suggests that the effect of uniformity of appearance on aggression is unclear when anonymity is held constant. This poses a problem of interpretation given that a distinction must be made between lack of individuality and anonymity. One must…

  3. Parents' Aggressive Influences and Children's Aggressive Problem Solutions with Peers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duman, Sarah; Margolin, Gayla

    2007-01-01

    This study examined children's aggressive and assertive solutions to hypothetical peer scenarios in relation to parents' responses to similar hypothetical social scenarios and parents' actual marital aggression. The study included 118 children ages 9 to 10 years old and their mothers and fathers. Children's aggressive solutions correlated with…

  4. Relational Aggression and Physical Aggression among Adolescent Cook Islands Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Page, Angela; Smith, Lisa F.

    2016-01-01

    Both physical and relational aggression are characterised by the intent to harm another. Physical aggression includes direct behaviours such as hitting or kicking; relational aggression involves behaviours designed to damage relationships, such as excluding others, spreading rumours, and delivering threats and verbal abuse. This study extended…

  5. Improvement effect on the depth-dose distribution by CSF drainage and air infusion of a tumour-removed cavity in boron neutron capture therapy for malignant brain tumours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakurai, Yoshinori; Ono, Koji; Miyatake, Shin-ichi; Maruhashi, Akira

    2006-03-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) without craniotomy for malignant brain tumours was started using an epi-thermal neutron beam at the Kyoto University Reactor in June 2002. We have tried some techniques to overcome the treatable-depth limit in BNCT. One of the effective techniques is void formation utilizing a tumour-removed cavity. The tumorous part is removed by craniotomy about 1 week before a BNCT treatment in our protocol. Just before the BNCT irradiation, the cerebro-spinal fluid (CSF) in the tumour-removed cavity is drained out, air is infused to the cavity and then the void is made. This void improves the neutron penetration, and the thermal neutron flux at depth increases. The phantom experiments and survey simulations modelling the CSF drainage and air infusion of the tumour-removed cavity were performed for the size and shape of the void. The advantage of the CSF drainage and air infusion is confirmed for the improvement in the depth-dose distribution. From the parametric surveys, it was confirmed that the cavity volume had good correlation with the improvement effect, and the larger effect was expected as the cavity volume was larger.

  6. Irradiation characteristics of BNCT using near-threshold 7Li(p, n)7Be direct neutrons: application to intra-operative BNCT for malignant brain tumours.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Kenichi; Kobayashi, Tooru; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Nakagawa, Yoshinobu; Ishikawa, Masayori; Hoshi, Masaharu

    2002-08-21

    A calculation method for the dosage of neutrons by near-threshold 7Li(p, n)7Be and gamma rays by 7Li(p, p'gamma)7Li was validated through experiments with variable distance between the Li target and the phantom, focusing on large angular dependence. The production of neutrons and gamma rays in the Li target was calculated by Lee's method and their transport in the phantom was calculated using the MCNP-4B code. The dosage in intra-operative boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) using near-threshold 7Li(p, n)7Be direct neutrons was evaluated using the validated calculation method. The effectiveness of the usage of the direct neutrons was confirmed from the existence of the region satisfying the requirements of the protocol utilized in intra-operative BNCT for brain tumours in Japan. The boron-dose enhancer (BDE) introduced in this paper to increase the contribution of the 10B(n, alpha)7Li dose in the living body was effective. The void utilized to increase the dose in deep regions was also effective with BDE. For the investigation of 1.900 MeV proton beams, for example, it was found that intraoperative BNCT using near-threshold 7Li(p, n)7Be direct neutrons is feasible. PMID:12222863

  7. Apolipoprotein E gene polymorphism influences aggressive behavior in prostate cancer cells by deregulating cholesterol homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    IFERE, GODWIN O.; DESMOND, RENEE; DEMARK-WAHNEFRIED, WENDY; NAGY, TIM R.

    High circulating cholesterol and its deregulated homeostasis may facilitate prostate cancer progression. Genetic polymorphism in Apolipoprotein (Apo) E, a key cholesterol regulatory protein may effect changes in systemic cholesterol levels. In this investigation, we determined whether variants of the Apo E gene can trigger defective intracellular cholesterol efflux, which could promote aggressive prostate cancer. ApoE genotypes of weakly (non-aggressive), moderate and highly tumorigenic (aggressive) prostate cancer cell lines were characterized, and we explored whether the ApoE variants were associated with tumor aggressiveness generated by intra cellular cholesterol imbalance, using the expression of caveolin-1 (cav-1), a pro-malignancy surrogate of cholesterol overload. Restriction isotyping of ApoE isoforms revealed that the non-aggressive cell lines carried ApoE ε3/ε3 or ε3/ε4 alleles, while the aggressive cell lines carried the Apoε2/ε4 alleles. Our data suggest a contrast between the non-aggressive and the aggressive prostate cancer cell lines in the pattern of cholesterol efflux and cav-1 expression. Our exploratory results suggest a relationship between prostate aggressiveness, ApoE isoforms and cholesterol imbalance. Further investigation of this relationship may elucidate the molecular basis for considering cholesterol as a risk factor of aggressive prostate tumors, and underscore the potential of the dysfunctional ApoE2/E4 isoform as a biomarker of aggressive disease. PMID:23934233

  8. Reverse Discrimination and Aggressive Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Stephen D.

    1980-01-01

    White subjects were aggressive toward Black opponents when contest results appeared to reflect elements of reverse discrimination; but they showed less aggressive behavior toward Black opponents when they thought their loss was due to their opponents' superior ability. (RL)

  9. Coping with Agitation and Aggression

    MedlinePlus

    Alzheimer ’s Caregiving Tips Coping with Agitation and Aggression People with Alzheimer’s disease may become agitated or aggressive as the disease gets worse. Agitation means that a person is restless or worried. ...

  10. Malignant mesothelioma: development to therapy.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Joyce K; Westbom, Catherine M; Shukla, Arti

    2014-01-01

    Malignant mesothelioma (MM) is an aggressive cancer of the mesothelium caused by asbestos. Asbestos use has been reduced but not completely stopped. In addition, natural or man-made disasters will continue to dislodge asbestos from old buildings into the atmosphere and as long as respirable asbestos is available, MM will continue to be a threat. Due to the long latency period of MM development, it would still take decades to eradicate this disease if asbestos was completely removed from our lives today. Therefore, there is a need for researchers and clinicians to work together to understand this deadly disease and find a solution for early diagnosis and treatment. This article focuses on developmental mechanisms as well as current therapies available for MM. PMID:23959774

  11. Malignant Mesothelioma: Development to Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Joyce; Westbom, Catherine; Shukla, Arti

    2013-01-01

    Malignant mesothelioma (MM) is an aggressive cancer of the mesothelium caused by asbestos. Asbestos use has been reduced but not completely stopped. In addition, natural or man-made disasters will continue to dislodge asbestos from old buildings into the atmosphere and as long as respirable asbestos is available, MM will continue to be a threat. Due to the long latency period of MM development, it would still take decades to eradicate this disease if asbestos was completely removed from our lives today. Therefore, there is a need for researchers and clinicians to work together to understand this deadly disease and find a solution for early diagnosis and treatment. This article focuses on developmental mechanisms as well as current therapies available for MM. PMID:23959774

  12. Serotonin and Aggressiveness in Chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Serotonin (5-HT) regulates aggressive behavior in animals. This study examined if 5-HT regulation of aggressiveness is gene-dependent. Chickens from two divergently selected lines KGB and MBB (Kind Gentle Birds and Mean Bad Birds displaying low and high aggressiveness, respectively) and DXL (Dekalb ...

  13. Immunological Aspects of Malignant Gliomas.

    PubMed

    Cohen-Inbar, Or; Zaaroor, Menashe

    2016-07-01

    Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) is the most common malignant primary brain neoplasm having a mean survival time of <24 months. This figure remains constant, despite significant progress in medical research and treatment. The lack of an efficient anti-tumor immune response and the micro-invasive nature of the glioma malignant cells have been explained by a multitude of immune-suppressive mechanisms, proven in different models. These immune-resistant capabilities of the tumor result in a complex interplay this tumor shares with the immune system. We present a short review on the immunology of GBM, discussing the different unique pathological and molecular features of GBM, current treatment modalities, the principles of cancer immunotherapy and the link between GBM and melanoma. Current knowledge on immunological features of GBM, as well as immunotherapy past and current clinical trials, is discussed in an attempt to broadly present the complex and formidable challenges posed by GBM. PMID:27324313

  14. CD44 enhances tumor aggressiveness by promoting tumor cell plasticity.

    PubMed

    Paulis, Yvette W J; Huijbers, Elisabeth J M; van der Schaft, Daisy W J; Soetekouw, Patricia M M B; Pauwels, Patrick; Tjan-Heijnen, Vivianne C G; Griffioen, Arjan W

    2015-08-14

    Aggressive tumor cells can obtain the ability to transdifferentiate into cells with endothelial features and thus form vasculogenic networks. This phenomenon, called vasculogenic mimicry (VM), is associated with increased tumor malignancy and poor clinical outcome. To identify novel key molecules implicated in the process of vasculogenic mimicry, microarray analysis was performed to compare gene expression profiles of aggressive (VM+) and non-aggressive (VM-) cells derived from Ewing sarcoma and breast carcinoma. We identified the CD44/c-Met signaling cascade as heavily relevant for vasculogenic mimicry. CD44 was at the center of this cascade, and highly overexpressed in aggressive tumors. Both CD44 standard isoform and its splice variant CD44v6 were linked to increased aggressiveness in VM. Since VM is most abundant in Ewing sarcoma tumors functional analyses were performed in EW7 cells. Overexpression of CD44 allowed enhanced adhesion to its extracellular matrix ligand hyaluronic acid. CD44 expression also facilitated the formation of vasculogenic structures in vitro, as CD44 knockdown experiments repressed migration and vascular network formation. From these results and the observation that CD44 expression is associated with vasculogenic structures and blood lakes in human Ewing sarcoma tissues, we conclude that CD44 increases aggressiveness in tumors through the process of vasculogenic mimicry. PMID:26189059

  15. Children's normative beliefs about aggression and aggressive behavior.

    PubMed

    Huesmann, L R; Guerra, N G

    1997-02-01

    Normative beliefs have been defined as self-regulating beliefs about the appropriateness of social behaviors. In 2 studies the authors revised their scale for assessing normative beliefs about aggression, found that it is reliable and valid for use with elementary school children, and investigated the longitudinal relation between normative beliefs about aggression and aggressive behavior in a large sample of elementary school children living in poor urban neighborhoods. Using data obtained in 2 waves of observations 1 year apart, the authors found that children tended to approve more of aggression as they grew older and that this increase appeared to be correlated with increases in aggressive behavior. More important, although individual differences in aggressive behavior predicted subsequent differences in normative beliefs in younger children, individual differences in aggressive behavior were predicted by preceding differences in normative beliefs in older children. PMID:9107008

  16. Neurofibromatosis type 1 and malignancy in childhood.

    PubMed

    Varan, A; Şen, H; Aydın, B; Yalçın, B; Kutluk, T; Akyüz, C

    2016-03-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is an autosomal dominant hereditary neurocutaneous syndrome characterized by multi-system involvement and an increased incidence of both benign and malignant tumors. In this study, we evaluated the clinical presentation and prognosis of NF1 and malignancy. Between 1975 and 2013, 26 (5%) of the 473 patients with NF1 at our center developed non-neurofibroma neoplasms. The patient files of 26 subjects with tumors, other than optic glioma, were analyzed retrospectively to evaluate clinical features and treatment results. The age at diagnosis of NF1 ranged from 3 months to 16 years (median 5.5 years). The age range at tumor diagnosis was 1.5-33 years (median 8 years) in these 26 patients. The tumor histological subtypes included the following: 12 soft-tissue tumors (6 malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST), 5 rhabdomyosarcomas (RMS) and 1 malignant fibrous histiocytoma), 11 brain tumors (6 low-grade gliomas, 3 high-grade gliomas, and 2 medulloblastoma), 2 neuroblastomas and 1 non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Twelve of 26 patients were alive at the time of the study. Although benign brain tumors with NF1 are more common, high-grade brain tumors also occur. Thus, careful and regular follow-up is crucial for early detection of malignancy in NF1 patients. PMID:26073032

  17. Aggressive Metaplastic Carcinoma of the Breast with Osteoclastic Giant Cells

    PubMed Central

    Khong, Kathleen; Zhang, Yanhong; Tomic, Mary; Lindfors, Karen; Aminololama-Shakeri, Shadi

    2015-01-01

    Metaplastic carcinoma of the breast is an uncommon type of malignancy that is aggressive but can mimic other benign breast neoplastic processes on imaging. We present a case of a young female patient who presented with a rapidly progressing metaplastic carcinoma with osteoclastic giant cells subtype. There have been only very rare published reports of this pathologic subtype of metaplastic carcinoma containing osteoclastic giant cells. PMID:26629304

  18. Malignant teratoma (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A malignant teratoma is a type of cancer consisting of cysts that contain one or more of the three primary embryonic germ layers: ectoderm, mesoderm, and endoderm. Because malignant teratomas have usually spread by the time of diagnosis, ...

  19. Brain microvascular endothelium induced-annexin A1 secretion contributes to small cell lung cancer brain metastasis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi; Liu, Yong-Shuo; Wu, Peng-Fei; Li, Qiang; Dai, Wu-Min; Yuan, Shuai; Xu, Zhi-Hua; Liu, Ting-Ting; Miao, Zi-Wei; Fang, Wen-Gang; Chen, Yu-Hua; Li, Bo

    2015-09-01

    Small cell lung cancer is the most aggressive histologic subtype of lung cancer, with a strong predilection for metastasizing to brain early. However, the cellular and molecular basis is poorly known. Here, we provided evidence to reveal the role of annexin A1 in small cell lung cancer metastasis to brain. Firstly, the elevated annexin A1 serum levels in small cell lung cancer patients were associated with brain metastasis. The levels of annexin A1 were also upregulated in NCI-H446 cells, a small cell lung cancer cell line, upon migration into the mice brain. More interestingly, annexin A1 was secreted by NCI-H446 cells in a time-dependent manner when co-culturing with human brain microvascular endothelial cells, which was identified with the detections of annexin A1 in the co-cultured cellular supernatants by ELISA and western blot. Further results showed that blockage of annexin A1 in the co-cultured cellular supernatants using a neutralized antibody significantly inhibited NCI-H446 cells adhesion to brain endothelium and its transendothelial migration. Conversely, the addition of Ac2-26, an annexin A1 mimic peptide, enhanced these effects. Furthermore, knockdown of annexin A1 in NCI-H446 cells prevented its transendothelial migration in vitro and metastasis to mice brain in vivo. Our data showed that small cell lung cancer cell in brain microvasculature microenvironment could express much more annexin A1 and release it outside, which facilitated small cell lung cancer cell to gain malignant properties of entry into brain. These findings provided a potential target for the management of SCLC brain metastasis. PMID:26135980

  20. Primary Spindle Cell Malignant Melanoma of Esophagus: An Unusual Finding

    PubMed Central

    Rawandale, Nirmalkumar A.

    2016-01-01

    Malignant melanoma of esophagus is usually a metastatic tumour rather than a primary tumour. Primary malignant melanoma accounts for less than 0.2% of all esophageal neoplasm. We report a case of primary spindle cell malignant melanoma of esophagus in a 69-year-old male who presented with history of dysphagia since 1 month. Radiological examinations revealed polypoidal growth at lateral aspect of esophagus. Biopsy was reported as grade III squamous cell carcinoma. Video assisted thoracoscopic esophagectomy was performed. Histopathological examination along with immunohistochemistry gave confirmed diagnosis of primary spindle cell malignant melanoma of esophagus. Though a rare entity, due to its aggressive nature and poor prognosis primary malignant melanoma should be one of the differential diagnoses in a patient with polypoidal esophageal mass lesion. Despite radical surgical treatment prognosis is extremely poor. PMID:27042502

  1. Malignant epitheloid angiomyolipoma of the kidney in a child treated with sunitinib, everolimus and axitinib

    PubMed Central

    Citak, Elvan Caglar; Yilmaz, Eda Bengi; Yaman, Emel; Kaya, Simge; Taskinlar, Hakan; Arpaci, Rabia Bozdogan; Apaydin, Demir

    2015-01-01

    The malignant variant of epithelioid angiomyolipoma (EAML) of the kidney is uncommon, extremely aggressive and behaves like a renal cell carcinoma. We present a case of a 12-year-old male with malignant EAML who was treated according to adult treatment protocols. To our knowledge, axitinib has not been used before in children. We conclude that adult protocols, in this rare case, could be safely used in rare childhood malignancies. PMID:26279736

  2. Pediatric Salivary Gland Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Ord, Robert A; Carlson, Eric R

    2016-02-01

    Pediatric malignant salivary gland tumors are extremely rare. The percentage of malignant tumors is higher than that seen in adults, although the outcomes in terms of survival are better in pediatric patients. The mainstay of treatment is surgical excision with negative margins. This article reviews current concepts in demographics, etiology, management, and outcomes of malignant salivary tumors in children. PMID:26614703

  3. Motives in Sexual Aggression: The Chinese Context.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tang, Catherine So-Kum; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Compared sexual and aggressive motives for sexual aggression in Chinese college students. Male undergraduates (N=146) completed self-report measures. Results suggest that sex guilt and aggressive guilt acted as inhibitors for their respective drives and sexual aggression resulted from aggressive, rather than sexual, motives. Sexual aggression may…

  4. Aggression, science, and law: The origins framework. Introduction.

    PubMed

    Victoroff, Jeff

    2009-01-01

    Human societies have formalized instincts for compliance with reciprocal altruism in laws that sanction some aggression and not other aggression. Neuroscience makes steady advances toward measurements of various aspects of brain function pertinent to the aggressive behaviors that laws are designed to regulate. Consciousness, free will, rationality, intent, reality testing, empathy, moral reasoning, and capacity for self-control are somewhat subject to empirical assessment. The question becomes: how should law accommodate the wealth of information regarding these elements of mind that the science of aggression increasingly makes available? This essay discusses the evolutionary purpose of aggression, the evolutionary purpose of law, the problematic assumptions of the mens rea doctrine, and the prospects for applying the neuroscience of aggression toward the goal of equal justice for unequal minds. Nine other essays are introduced, demonstrating how each of them fits into the framework of the permanent debate about neuroscience and justice. It is concluded that advances in the science of human aggression will have vital, but biologically limited, impact on the provision of justice. PMID:19540592

  5. Neuroimaging correlates of aggression in schizophrenia: an update

    PubMed Central

    Hoptman, Matthew J.; Antonius, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review Aggression in schizophrenia is associated with poor treatment outcomes, hospital admissions, and stigmatization of patients. As such it represents an important public health issue. This article reviews recent neuroimaging studies of aggression in schizophrenia, focusing on PET/single photon emission computed tomography and MRI methods. Recent findings The neuroimaging literature on aggression in schizophrenia is in a period of development. This is attributable in part to the heterogeneous nature and basis of that aggression. Radiological methods have consistently shown reduced activity in frontal and temporal regions. MRI brain volumetric studies have been less consistent, with some studies finding increased volumes of inferior frontal structures, and others finding reduced volumes in aggressive individuals with schizophrenia. Functional MRI studies have also had inconsistent results, with most finding reduced activity in inferior frontal and temporal regions, but some also finding increased activity in other regions. Some studies have made a distinction between types of aggression in schizophrenia in the context of antisocial traits, and this appears to be useful in understanding the neuroimaging literature. Summary Frontal and temporal abnormalities appear to be a consistent feature of aggression in schizophrenia, but their precise nature likely differs because of the heterogeneous nature of that behavior. PMID:21178624

  6. Meningioma after radiotherapy for malignancy.

    PubMed

    Morgenstern, Peter F; Shah, Kalee; Dunkel, Ira J; Reiner, Anne S; Khakoo, Yasmin; Rosenblum, Marc K; Gutin, Philip

    2016-08-01

    Complications of radiation exposure have gained importance with increasing cancer survivorship. Secondary malignancies have been associated with cranial radiation exposure. We present our experience with intracranial radiation-induced meningioma (RIM) and discuss the implications of its presentation and natural history for patient management. Patients diagnosed with meningioma who had received radiation therapy between 1960 and 2014 were identified. Records were retrospectively reviewed for details of radiation exposure, previous malignancies, meningioma subtypes, multiplicity and pathologic descriptions, treatment and follow-up. Thirty patients were diagnosed with RIM. Initial malignancies included acute lymphocytic leukemia (33.3%), medulloblastoma (26.7%) and glioma (16.7%) at a mean age of 8.1years (range 0.04-33years). The mean radiation dose was 34Gy (range 16-60Gy) and latency time to meningioma was 26years (range 8-51years). Twenty-one patients (70%) underwent surgery. Of these, 57.1% of tumors were World Health Organization (WHO) grade I while 42.9% were WHO II (atypical). The mean MIB-1 labeling index for patients with WHO I tumors was 5.44%, with 33.3% exhibiting at least 5% staining. Mean follow-up after meningioma diagnosis was 5.8years. Mortality was zero during the follow-up period. Meningioma is an important long-term complication of therapeutic radiation. While more aggressive pathology occurs more frequently in RIM than in sporadic meningioma, it remains unclear whether this translates into an effect on survival. Further study should be aimed at delineating the risks and benefits of routine surveillance for the development of secondary neoplasms after radiation therapy. PMID:27068012

  7. Ewing's Sarcoma as a Second Malignancy in Long-Term Survivors of Childhood Hematologic Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Grotzer, Michael A.; Niggli, Felix; Zimmermann, Dieter; Rushing, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    Modern multimodal treatment has significantly increased survival for patients affected by hematologic malignancies, especially in childhood. Following remission, however, the risk of developing a further malignancy is an important issue. The long-term estimated risk of developing a sarcoma as a secondary malignancy is increased severalfold in comparison to the general population. Ewing's sarcoma family encompasses a group of highly aggressive, undifferentiated, intra- and extraosseous, mesenchymal tumors, caused by several types of translocations usually involving the EWSR1 gene. Translocation associated sarcomas, such as Ewing sarcoma, are only rarely encountered as therapy associated secondary tumors. We describe the clinical course and management of three patients from a single institution with Ewing's sarcoma that followed successfully treated lymphoblastic T-cell leukemia or non-Hodgkin lymphoma. The literature on secondary Ewing's sarcoma is summarized and possible pathogenic mechanisms are critically discussed. PMID:27524931

  8. Segmental neurofibromatosis and malignancy.

    PubMed

    Dang, Julie D; Cohen, Philip R

    2010-01-01

    Segmental neurofibromatosis is an uncommon variant of neurofibromatosis type I characterized by neurofibromas and/or café-au-lait macules localized to one sector of the body. Although patients with neurofibromatosis type I have an associated increased risk of certain malignancies, malignancy has only occasionally been reported in patients with segmental neurofibromatosis. The published reports of patients with segmental neurofibromatosis who developed malignancy were reviewed and the characteristics of these patients and their cancers were summarized. Ten individuals (6 women and 4 men) with segmental neurofibromatosis and malignancy have been reported. The malignancies include malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (3), malignant melanoma (2), breast cancer (1), colon cancer (1), gastric cancer (1), lung cancer (1), and Hodgkin lymphoma (1). The most common malignancies in patients with segmental neurofibromatosis are derived from neural crest cells: malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor and malignant melanoma. The incidence of malignancy in patients with segmental neurofibromatosis may approach that of patients with neurofibromatosis type I. PMID:21137621

  9. The neurobiology of offensive aggression: Revealing a modular view.

    PubMed

    de Boer, S F; Olivier, B; Veening, J; Koolhaas, J M

    2015-07-01

    Experimental studies aimed at understanding the neurobiology of aggression started in the early 20th century, and by employing increasingly sophisticated tools of functional neuroanatomy (i.e., from electric/chemical lesion and stimulation techniques to neurochemical mapping and manipulations) have provided the important framework for the functional brain circuit organization of aggressive behaviors. Recently, newly emerging technologies for mapping,measuring and manipulating neural circuitry at the level of molecular and genetically defined neuronal subtypes promise to further delineate the precise neural microcircuits mediating the initiation and termination of aggressive behavior, and characterize its dynamic neuromolecular functioning. This paper will review some of the behavioral, neuroanatomical and neurochemical evidence in support of a modular view of the neurobiology of offensive aggressive behavior. Although aggressive behavior likely arises from a specific concerted activity within a distributed neural network across multiple brain regions, emerging opto- and pharmacogenetic neuronal manipulation studies make it clear that manipulation of molecularly-defined neurons within a single node of this global interconnected network seems to be both necessary and sufficient to evoke aggressive attacks. However, the evidence so far also indicates that in addition to behavior-specific neurons there are neuronal systems that should be considered as more general behavioral control modules. The answer to the question of behavioral specificity of brain structures at the level of individual neurons requires a change of the traditional experimental setup. Studies using c-fos expression mapping usually compare the activation patterns induced by for example aggression with a home cage control. However, to reveal the behavioral specificity of this neuronal activation pattern, a comparison with other social and non-social related behaviors such as mating, defensive burying

  10. Neural Correlates of Affect Processing and Aggression in Methamphetamine Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Payer, Doris E.; Lieberman, Matthew D.; London, Edythe D.

    2012-01-01

    Context Methamphetamine abuse is associated with high rates of aggression, but few studies have addressed the contributing neurobiological factors. Objective To quantify aggression, investigate function of the amygdala and prefrontal cortex, and assess relationships between brain function and behavior in methamphetamine-dependent individuals. Design In a case-control study, aggression and brain activation were compared between methamphetamine-dependent and control participants. Setting Participants were recruited from the general community to an academic research center. Participants Thirty-nine methamphetamine-dependent volunteers (16 women) who were abstinent for 7 to 10 days and 37 drug-free control volunteers (18 women) participated in the study; subsets completed self-report and behavioral measures. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was performed on 25 methamphetamine-dependent and 23 control participants. Main outcome measures We measured self-reported and perpetrated aggression, and self-reported alexithymia. Brain activation was assessed using fMRI during visual processing of facial affect (affect matching), and symbolic processing (affect labeling), the latter representing an incidental form of emotion regulation. Results Methamphetamine-dependent participants self-reported more aggression and alexithymia than control participants and escalated perpetrated aggression more following provocation. Alexithymia scores correlated with measures of aggression. During affect matching, fMRI showed no differences between groups in amygdala activation, but found lower activation in methamphetamine-dependent than control participants in bilateral ventral inferior frontal gyrus. During affect labeling, participants recruited dorsal inferior frontal gyrus and exhibited decreased amygdala activity, consistent with successful emotion regulation; there was no group difference in this effect. The magnitude of decrease in amygdala activity during affect labeling

  11. Basal forebrain projections to the lateral habenula modulate aggression reward.

    PubMed

    Golden, Sam A; Heshmati, Mitra; Flanigan, Meghan; Christoffel, Daniel J; Guise, Kevin; Pfau, Madeline L; Aleyasin, Hossein; Menard, Caroline; Zhang, Hongxing; Hodes, Georgia E; Bregman, Dana; Khibnik, Lena; Tai, Jonathan; Rebusi, Nicole; Krawitz, Brian; Chaudhury, Dipesh; Walsh, Jessica J; Han, Ming-Hu; Shapiro, Matt L; Russo, Scott J

    2016-06-30

    Maladaptive aggressive behaviour is associated with a number of neuropsychiatric disorders and is thought to result partly from the inappropriate activation of brain reward systems in response to aggressive or violent social stimuli. Nuclei within the ventromedial hypothalamus, extended amygdala and limbic circuits are known to encode initiation of aggression; however, little is known about the neural mechanisms that directly modulate the motivational component of aggressive behaviour. Here we established a mouse model to measure the valence of aggressive inter-male social interaction with a smaller subordinate intruder as reinforcement for the development of conditioned place preference (CPP). Aggressors develop a CPP, whereas non-aggressors develop a conditioned place aversion to the intruder-paired context. Furthermore, we identify a functional GABAergic projection from the basal forebrain (BF) to the lateral habenula (lHb) that bi-directionally controls the valence of aggressive interactions. Circuit-specific silencing of GABAergic BF-lHb terminals of aggressors with halorhodopsin (NpHR3.0) increases lHb neuronal firing and abolishes CPP to the intruder-paired context. Activation of GABAergic BF-lHb terminals of non-aggressors with channelrhodopsin (ChR2) decreases lHb neuronal firing and promotes CPP to the intruder-paired context. Finally, we show that altering inhibitory transmission at BF-lHb terminals does not control the initiation of aggressive behaviour. These results demonstrate that the BF-lHb circuit has a critical role in regulating the valence of inter-male aggressive behaviour and provide novel mechanistic insight into the neural circuits modulating aggression reward processing. PMID:27357796

  12. Female impulsive aggression: a sleep research perspective.

    PubMed

    Lindberg, Nina; Tani, Pekka; Putkonen, Hanna; Sailas, Eila; Takala, Pirjo; Eronen, Markku; Virkkunen, Matti

    2009-01-01

    The rate of violent crimes among girls and women appears to be increasing. One in every five female prisoners has been reported to have antisocial personality disorder. However, it has been quite unclear whether the impulsive, aggressive behaviour among women is affected by the same biological mechanisms as among men. Psychiatric sleep research has attempted to identify diagnostically sensitive and specific sleep patterns associated with particular disorders. Most psychiatric disorders are typically characterized by a severe sleep disturbance associated with decreased amounts of slow wave sleep (SWS), the physiologically significant, refreshing part of sleep. Among men with antisocial behaviour with severe aggression, on the contrary, increased SWS has been reported, reflecting either specific brain pathology or a delay in the normal development of human sleep patterns. In our preliminary study among medication-free, detoxified female homicidal offenders with antisocial personality disorder, the same profound abnormality in sleep architecture was found. From the perspective of sleep research, the biological correlates of severe impulsive aggression seem to share similar features in both sexes. PMID:19095304

  13. Girls, aggression, and emotion regulation.

    PubMed

    Conway, Anne M

    2005-04-01

    Many studies have demonstrated that boys are more aggressive than girls (see J. D. Coie & K. Dodge, 1997, for a review) and that emotion regulation difficulties are associated with problematic behaviors (N. Eisenberg & R. A. Fabes, 1999; M. Gilliom, D. S. Shaw, J. E. Beck, M. A. Schonberg, & J. L. Lukon, 2002). However, recent findings indicate that gender differences in aggressive behaviors disappear when assessments are broadened to include relational aggression--behaviors designed to harm the relationship goals of others by spreading rumors, gossiping, and eliciting peer rejection of others. Moreover, although difficulties regulating emotions have been reported for physically aggressive children, little research has examined these processes in relationally aggressive children. This article argues that investigation into the associations between emotion regulation and relational aggression is a critical direction for future research on the etiology and prevention of mental health problems in girls. PMID:15839769

  14. Malignant gliomas: old and new systemic treatment approaches

    PubMed Central

    Mesti, Tanja

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Malignant (high-grade) gliomas are rapidly progressive brain tumours with very high morbidity and mortality. Until recently, treatment options for patients with malignant gliomas were limited and mainly the same for all subtypes of malignant gliomas. The treatment included surgery and radiotherapy. Chemotherapy used as an adjuvant treatment or at recurrence had a marginal role. Conclusions Nowadays, the treatment of malignant gliomas requires a multidisciplinary approach. The treatment includes surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy. The chosen approach is more complex and individually adjusted. By that, the effect on the survival and quality of life is notable higher. PMID:27247544

  15. A Rare Case of Breast Malignant Phyllodes Tumor With Metastases to the Kidney: Case Report.

    PubMed

    Karczmarek-Borowska, Bożenna; Bukala, Agnieszka; Syrek-Kaplita, Karolina; Ksiazek, Mariusz; Filipowska, Justyna; Gradalska-Lampart, Monika

    2015-08-01

    Phyllodes tumors are rare breast neoplasms. Surgery is the treatment of choice. The role of postoperative radiotherapy and chemotherapy is still under dispute, as there are no equivocal prognostic factors. Treatment failure results in the occurrence of distant metastasis-mainly to the lungs, bones, liver, and brain. We have described the case of a woman with a malignant phyllodes tumor of the breast that was surgically treated. She did not receive adjuvant therapy because there is no consensus on the role of postoperative chemotherapy and radiotherapy. One year following the surgery, the patient had left-sided nephrectomy performed because of a rapidly growing tumor of the kidney. Renal cancer was suspected; however, a histopathological examination revealed that it was a metastatic phyllodes tumor. At the same time, the patient was diagnosed as having metastases in the other kidney, the lungs, liver, and bones.Our case report describes not only an unusual localization of the metastases (in the kidneys), but also failure of the chemotherapy and the aggressive course of malignant phyllodes tumor. Identification of patients with high risk for distant metastasis and the introduction of uniform rules for the management of adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy would make planning treatment as efficacious as possible. PMID:26287414

  16. A Rare Case of Breast Malignant Phyllodes Tumor With Metastases to the Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Karczmarek-Borowska, Bożenna; Bukala, Agnieszka; Syrek-Kaplita, Karolina; Ksiazek, Mariusz; Filipowska, Justyna; Gradalska-Lampart, Monika

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Phyllodes tumors are rare breast neoplasms. Surgery is the treatment of choice. The role of postoperative radiotherapy and chemotherapy is still under dispute, as there are no equivocal prognostic factors. Treatment failure results in the occurrence of distant metastasis—mainly to the lungs, bones, liver, and brain. We have described the case of a woman with a malignant phyllodes tumor of the breast that was surgically treated. She did not receive adjuvant therapy because there is no consensus on the role of postoperative chemotherapy and radiotherapy. One year following the surgery, the patient had left-sided nephrectomy performed because of a rapidly growing tumor of the kidney. Renal cancer was suspected; however, a histopathological examination revealed that it was a metastatic phyllodes tumor. At the same time, the patient was diagnosed as having metastases in the other kidney, the lungs, liver, and bones. Our case report describes not only an unusual localization of the metastases (in the kidneys), but also failure of the chemotherapy and the aggressive course of malignant phyllodes tumor. Identification of patients with high risk for distant metastasis and the introduction of uniform rules for the management of adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy would make planning treatment as efficacious as possible. PMID:26287414

  17. AI-06NON-CANONICAL NF-kB SIGNALING DRIVES THE AGGRESSIVE INVASIVENESS OF GLIOBLASTOMA

    PubMed Central

    Cherry, Evan; Lee, Dong; Jung, Jiung; Sitcheran, Raquel

    2014-01-01

    The aggressive migration and invasion of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cells into healthy brain tissue are major factors contributing to the therapy resistance and poor prognosis of this malignancy. Aberrant activation of NF-kB has been shown to play key roles in the invasiveness and pathogenesis of many cancers, including GBM. Most of these studies have focused on canonical NF-kB signaling, which is mediated by RelA and p50. Activation of the canonical NF-kB pathway is induced by IkB kinase-b (IKKb), whose inhibition has been pursued as a therapeutic approach to attenuate NF-kB activation in cancer with limited success to-date. We have recently shown that the alternative, or non-canonical, NF-kB signaling pathway mediated by RelB, predominates in a very aggressive GBM subtype. Here, we investigate this previously unrecognized role for non-canonical NF-kB signaling in CNS tumor initiation and progression. Using both established and primary GBM tumor lines, we show that in high RelB-expressing GBM cells, loss of RelB inhibits invasion to a greater extent than loss of RelA. Furthermore, RelB expression is sufficient to promote invasion in RelA-deficient GBM cells. Stimulation with Tumor Nectosis Factor Weak Inducer of Apoptosis (TWEAK) preferentially activates non-canonical NF-kB signaling and regulation of Matrix Metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9) expression, resulting in strongly increased invasion. Finally, we show that a key upstream regulator of RelB, NF-kB-inducing kinase (NIK), induces dramatic cell shape changes, increases tumor cell invasion and promotes aggressive orthotopic tumor growth in mouse xenografts. These results not only expand on previously described roles for TWEAK in promoting tumor cell survival, but also demonstrate a potent pro-invasion function for NIK in aggressive GBM and, potentially, other RelB-driven tumors. Notably, oncogenic functions of the non-canonical NF-kB pathway remain poorly elucidated in the CNS. Our data highlight the therapeutic

  18. Anger under Control: Neural Correlates of Frustration as a Function of Trait Aggression

    PubMed Central

    Pawliczek, Christina M.; Derntl, Birgit; Kellermann, Thilo; Gur, Ruben C.; Schneider, Frank; Habel, Ute

    2013-01-01

    Antisocial behavior and aggression are prominent symptoms in several psychiatric disorders including antisocial personality disorder. An established precursor to aggression is a frustrating event, which can elicit anger or exasperation, thereby prompting aggressive responses. While some studies have investigated the neural correlates of frustration and aggression, examination of their relation to trait aggression in healthy populations are rare. Based on a screening of 550 males, we formed two extreme groups, one including individuals reporting high (n=21) and one reporting low (n=18) trait aggression. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) at 3T, all participants were put through a frustration task comprising unsolvable anagrams of German nouns. Despite similar behavioral performance, males with high trait aggression reported higher ratings of negative affect and anger after the frustration task. Moreover, they showed relatively decreased activation in the frontal brain regions and the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) as well as relatively less amygdala activation in response to frustration. Our findings indicate distinct frontal and limbic processing mechanisms following frustration modulated by trait aggression. In response to a frustrating event, HA individuals show some of the personality characteristics and neural processing patterns observed in abnormally aggressive populations. Highlighting the impact of aggressive traits on the behavioral and neural responses to frustration in non-psychiatric extreme groups can facilitate further characterization of neural dysfunctions underlying psychiatric disorders that involve abnormal frustration processing and aggression. PMID:24205247

  19. Quantitative metrics of net proliferation and invasion link biological aggressiveness assessed by MRI with hypoxia assessed by FMISO-PET in newly diagnosed glioblastomas.

    PubMed

    Szeto, Mindy D; Chakraborty, Gargi; Hadley, Jennifer; Rockne, Russ; Muzi, Mark; Alvord, Ellsworth C; Krohn, Kenneth A; Spence, Alexander M; Swanson, Kristin R

    2009-05-15

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) are aggressive and uniformly fatal primary brain tumors characterized by their diffuse invasion of the normal-appearing parenchyma peripheral to the clinical imaging abnormality. Hypoxia, a hallmark of aggressive tumor behavior often noted in GBMs, has been associated with resistance to therapy, poorer survival, and more malignant tumor phenotypes. Based on the existence of a set of novel imaging techniques and modeling tools, our objective was to assess a hypothesized quantitative link between tumor growth kinetics [assessed via mathematical models and routine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)] and the hypoxic burden of the tumor [assessed via positron emission tomography (PET) imaging]. Our biomathematical model for glioma kinetics describes the spatial and temporal evolution of a glioma in terms of concentration of malignant tumor cells. This model has already been proven useful as a novel tool to dynamically quantify the net rates of proliferation (rho) and invasion (D) of the glioma cells in individual patients. Estimates of these kinetic rates can be calculated from routinely available pretreatment MRI in vivo. Eleven adults with GBM were imaged preoperatively with (18)F-fluoromisonidazole (FMISO)-PET and serial gadolinium-enhanced T1- and T2-weighted MRIs to allow the estimation of patient-specific net rates of proliferation (rho) and invasion (D). Hypoxic volumes were quantified from each FMISO-PET scan following standard techniques. To control for tumor size variability, two measures of hypoxic burden were considered: relative hypoxia (RH), defined as the ratio of the hypoxic volume to the T2-defined tumor volume, and the mean intensity on FMISO-PET scaled to the blood activity of the tracer (mean T/B). Pearson correlations between RH and the net rate of cell proliferation (rho) reached significance (P < 0.04). Moreover, highly significant positive correlations were found between biological aggressiveness ratio (rho/D) and both

  20. The tumoral A genotype of the MGMT rs34180180 single-nucleotide polymorphism in aggressive gliomas is associated with shorter patients' survival.

    PubMed

    Fogli, Anne; Chautard, Emmanuel; Vaurs-Barrière, Catherine; Pereira, Bruno; Müller-Barthélémy, Mélanie; Court, Franck; Biau, Julian; Pinto, Afonso Almeida; Kémény, Jean-Louis; Khalil, Toufic; Karayan-Tapon, Lucie; Verrelle, Pierre; Costa, Bruno Marques; Arnaud, Philippe

    2016-02-01

    Malignant gliomas are the most common primary brain tumors. Grade III and IV gliomas harboring wild-type IDH1/2 are the most aggressive. In addition to surgery and radiotherapy, concomitant and adjuvant chemotherapy with temozolomide (TMZ) significantly improves overall survival (OS). The methylation status of the O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) promoter is predictive of TMZ response and a prognostic marker of cancer outcome. However, the promoter regions the methylation of which correlates best with survival in aggressive glioma and whether the promoter methylation status predictive value could be refined or improved by other MGMT-associated molecular markers are not precisely known. In a cohort of 87 malignant gliomas treated with radiotherapy and TMZ-based chemotherapy, we retrospectively determined the MGMT promoter methylation status, genotyped single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the promoter region and quantified MGMT mRNA expression level. Each of these variables was correlated with each other and with the patients' OS. We found that methylation of the CpG sites within MGMT exon 1 best correlated with OS and MGMT expression levels, and confirmed MGMT methylation as a stronger independent prognostic factor compared to MGMT transcription levels. Our main finding is that the presence of only the A allele at the rs34180180 SNP in the tumor was significantly associated with shorter OS, independently of the MGMT methylation status. In conclusion, in the clinic, rs34180180 SNP genotyping could improve the prognostic value of the MGMT promoter methylation assay in patients with aggressive glioma treated with TMZ. PMID:26717998

  1. Rethinking Aggression: A Typological Examination of the Functions of Aggression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Little, Todd D.; Brauner, Jessica; Jones, Stephanie M.; Nock, Matthew K.; Hawley, Patricia H.

    2003-01-01

    Compared five subgroups of aggressive children and adolescents on several adjustment correlates. Found that the reactive group and the group high on both instrumental and reactive reasons for aggression showed consistent maladaptive patterns across the adjustment correlates. The instrumental and typical groups (moderate on instrumental and…

  2. Radiation-induced intracranial malignant gliomas

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, S.; Mealey, J. Jr.; Sartorius, C.

    1989-07-01

    The authors present seven cases of malignant gliomas that occurred after radiation therapy administered for diseases different from the subsequent glial tumor. Included among these seven are three patients who were treated with interstitial brachytherapy. Previously reported cases of radiation-induced glioma are reviewed and analyzed for common characteristics. Children receiving central nervous system irradiation appear particularly susceptible to induction of malignant gliomas by radiation. Interstitial brachytherapy may be used successfully instead of external beam radiotherapy in previously irradiated, tumor-free brain, and thus may reduce the risk of radiation necrosis. 31 references.

  3. Differentially expressed genes for aggressive pecking behaviour in laying hens

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Aggressive behaviour is an important aspect in the daily lives of animals living in groups. Aggressive animals have advantages, such as better access to food or territories, and they produce more offspring than low ranking animals. The social hierarchy in chickens is measured using the 'pecking order' concept, which counts the number of aggressive pecks given and received. To date, little is known about the underlying genetics of the 'pecking order'. Results A total of 60 hens from a high feather pecking selection line were divided into three groups: only receivers (R), only peckers (P) and mixed peckers and receivers (P&R). In comparing the R and P groups, we observed that there were 40 differentially expressed genes [false discovery rate (FDR) P < 0.10]. It was not fully clear how the 40 genes regulated aggressive behaviour; however, gene set analysis detected a number of GO identifiers, which were potentially involved in aggressive behavioural processes. These genes code for synaptosomes (GO:0019797), and proteins involved in the regulation of the excitatory postsynaptic membrane potential (GO:0060079), the regulation of the membrane potential (GO:0042391), and glutamate receptor binding (GO:0035254). Conclusion In conclusion, our study provides new insights into which genes are involved in aggressive behaviours in chickens. Pecking and receiving hens exhibited different gene expression profiles in their brains. Following confirmation, the identification of differentially expressed genes may elucidate how the pecking order forms in laying hens at a molecular level. PMID:19925670

  4. Neuroimaging and neurocognitive correlates of aggression and violence in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Elisabeth M

    2012-01-01

    Individuals diagnosed with major mental disorders such as schizophrenia are more likely to have engaged in violent behavior than mentally healthy members of the same communities. Although aggressive acts can have numerous causes, research about the underlying neurobiology of violence and aggression in schizophrenia can lead to a better understanding of the heterogeneous nature of that behavior and can assist in developing new treatment strategies. The purpose of this paper is to review the recent literature and discuss some of the neurobiological correlates of aggression and violence. The focus will be on schizophrenia, and the results of neuroimaging and neuropsychological studies that have directly investigated brain functioning and/or structure in aggressive and violent samples will be discussed as well as other domains that might predispose to aggression and violence such as deficits in responding to the emotional expressions of others, impulsivity, and psychopathological symptoms. Finally gender differences regarding aggression and violence are discussed. In this context several methodological and conceptional issues that limited the comparison of these studies will be addressed. PMID:24278673

  5. Neuroimaging and Neurocognitive Correlates of Aggression and Violence in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Elisabeth M.

    2012-01-01

    Individuals diagnosed with major mental disorders such as schizophrenia are more likely to have engaged in violent behavior than mentally healthy members of the same communities. Although aggressive acts can have numerous causes, research about the underlying neurobiology of violence and aggression in schizophrenia can lead to a better understanding of the heterogeneous nature of that behavior and can assist in developing new treatment strategies. The purpose of this paper is to review the recent literature and discuss some of the neurobiological correlates of aggression and violence. The focus will be on schizophrenia, and the results of neuroimaging and neuropsychological studies that have directly investigated brain functioning and/or structure in aggressive and violent samples will be discussed as well as other domains that might predispose to aggression and violence such as deficits in responding to the emotional expressions of others, impulsivity, and psychopathological symptoms. Finally gender differences regarding aggression and violence are discussed. In this context several methodological and conceptional issues that limited the comparison of these studies will be addressed. PMID:24278673

  6. Mild expression differences of MECP2 influencing aggressive social behavior

    PubMed Central

    Tantra, Martesa; Hammer, Christian; Kästner, Anne; Dahm, Liane; Begemann, Martin; Bodda, Chiranjeevi; Hammerschmidt, Kurt; Giegling, Ina; Stepniak, Beata; Castillo Venzor, Aracely; Konte, Bettina; Erbaba, Begun; Hartmann, Annette; Tarami, Asieh; Schulz-Schaeffer, Walter; Rujescu, Dan; Mannan, Ashraf U; Ehrenreich, Hannelore

    2014-01-01

    The X-chromosomal MECP2/Mecp2 gene encodes methyl-CpG-binding protein 2, a transcriptional activator and repressor regulating many other genes. We discovered in male FVB/N mice that mild (∼50%) transgenic overexpression of Mecp2 enhances aggression. Surprisingly, when the same transgene was expressed in C57BL/6N mice, transgenics showed reduced aggression and social interaction. This suggests that Mecp2 modulates aggressive social behavior. To test this hypothesis in humans, we performed a phenotype-based genetic association study (PGAS) in >1000 schizophrenic individuals. We found MECP2 SNPs rs2239464 (G/A) and rs2734647 (C/T; 3′UTR) associated with aggression, with the G and C carriers, respectively, being more aggressive. This finding was replicated in an independent schizophrenia cohort. Allele-specific MECP2mRNA expression differs in peripheral blood mononuclear cells by ∼50% (rs2734647: C > T). Notably, the brain-expressed, species-conserved miR-511 binds to MECP2 3′UTR only in T carriers, thereby suppressing gene expression. To conclude, subtle MECP2/Mecp2 expression alterations impact aggression. While the mouse data provides evidence of an interaction between genetic background and mild Mecp2 overexpression, the human data convey means by which genetic variation affects MECP2 expression and behavior. PMID:24648499

  7. Mild expression differences of MECP2 influencing aggressive social behavior.

    PubMed

    Tantra, Martesa; Hammer, Christian; Kästner, Anne; Dahm, Liane; Begemann, Martin; Bodda, Chiranjeevi; Hammerschmidt, Kurt; Giegling, Ina; Stepniak, Beata; Castillo Venzor, Aracely; Konte, Bettina; Erbaba, Begun; Hartmann, Annette; Tarami, Asieh; Schulz-Schaeffer, Walter; Rujescu, Dan; Mannan, Ashraf U; Ehrenreich, Hannelore

    2014-05-01

    The X-chromosomal MECP2/Mecp2 gene encodes methyl-CpG-binding protein 2, a transcriptional activator and repressor regulating many other genes. We discovered in male FVB/N mice that mild (~50%) transgenic overexpression of Mecp2 enhances aggression. Surprisingly, when the same transgene was expressed in C57BL/6N mice, transgenics showed reduced aggression and social interaction. This suggests that Mecp2 modulates aggressive social behavior. To test this hypothesis in humans, we performed a phenotype-based genetic association study (PGAS) in >1000 schizophrenic individuals. We found MECP2 SNPs rs2239464 (G/A) and rs2734647 (C/T; 3'UTR) associated with aggression, with the G and C carriers, respectively, being more aggressive. This finding was replicated in an independent schizophrenia cohort. Allele-specific MECP2 mRNA expression differs in peripheral blood mononuclear cells by ~50% (rs2734647: C > T). Notably, the brain-expressed, species-conserved miR-511 binds to MECP2 3'UTR only in T carriers, thereby suppressing gene expression. To conclude, subtle MECP2/Mecp2 expression alterations impact aggression. While the mouse data provides evidence of an interaction between genetic background and mild Mecp2 overexpression, the human data convey means by which genetic variation affects MECP2 expression and behavior. PMID:24648499

  8. Malignant Vagal Paraganglioma.

    PubMed

    Hamersley, Erin R S; Barrows, Amy; Perez, Angel; Schroeder, Ashley; Castle, James T

    2016-06-01

    Paragangliomas are rare, typically benign neuroendocrine tumors that represent a small portion of head and neck tumors. A small percentage of these are known to have malignant potential. They arise from the carotid body, jugular bulb or vagus nerves. There is limited literature discussing the management of malignant vagal paragangliomas. We present a case of a 25 year old female with a left malignant vagal paraganglioma. The following case presentation will describe the presentation, classic radiologic findings, and management of a malignant vagal paraganglioma along with a review of the literature. PMID:25712400

  9. Reducing aggressive responses to social exclusion using transcranial direct current stimulation.

    PubMed

    Riva, Paolo; Romero Lauro, Leonor J; DeWall, C Nathan; Chester, David S; Bushman, Brad J

    2015-03-01

    A vast body of research showed that social exclusion can trigger aggression. However, the neural mechanisms involved in regulating aggressive responses to social exclusion are still largely unknown. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) modulates the excitability of a target region. Building on studies suggesting that activity in the right ventrolateral pre-frontal cortex (rVLPFC) might aid the regulation or inhibition of social exclusion-related distress, we hypothesized that non-invasive brain polarization through tDCS over the rVLPFC would reduce behavioral aggression following social exclusion. Participants were socially excluded or included while they received tDCS or sham stimulation to the rVLPFC. Next, they received an opportunity to aggress. Excluded participants demonstrated cognitive awareness of their inclusionary status, yet tDCS (but not sham stimulation) reduced their behavioral aggression. Excluded participants who received tDCS stimulation were no more aggressive than included participants. tDCS stimulation did not influence socially included participants' aggression. Our findings provide the first causal test for the role of rVLPFC in modulating aggressive responses to social exclusion. Our findings suggest that modulating activity in a brain area (i.e. the rVLPFC) implicated in self-control and emotion regulation can break the link between social exclusion and aggression. PMID:24748546

  10. Reducing aggressive responses to social exclusion using transcranial direct current stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Romero Lauro, Leonor J.; DeWall, C. Nathan; Chester, David S.; Bushman, Brad J.

    2015-01-01

    A vast body of research showed that social exclusion can trigger aggression. However, the neural mechanisms involved in regulating aggressive responses to social exclusion are still largely unknown. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) modulates the excitability of a target region. Building on studies suggesting that activity in the right ventrolateral pre-frontal cortex (rVLPFC) might aid the regulation or inhibition of social exclusion-related distress, we hypothesized that non-invasive brain polarization through tDCS over the rVLPFC would reduce behavioral aggression following social exclusion. Participants were socially excluded or included while they received tDCS or sham stimulation to the rVLPFC. Next, they received an opportunity to aggress. Excluded participants demonstrated cognitive awareness of their inclusionary status, yet tDCS (but not sham stimulation) reduced their behavioral aggression. Excluded participants who received tDCS stimulation were no more aggressive than included participants. tDCS stimulation did not influence socially included participants’ aggression. Our findings provide the first causal test for the role of rVLPFC in modulating aggressive responses to social exclusion. Our findings suggest that modulating activity in a brain area (i.e. the rVLPFC) implicated in self-control and emotion regulation can break the link between social exclusion and aggression. PMID:24748546

  11. Aggression, suicidality, and serotonin.

    PubMed

    Linnoila, V M; Virkkunen, M

    1992-10-01

    Studies from several countries, representing diverse cultures, have reported an association between violent suicide attempts by patients with unipolar depression and personality disorders and low concentrations of the major serotonin metabolite 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Related investigations have documented a similar inverse correlation between impulsive, externally directed aggressive behavior and CSF 5-HIAA in a subgroup of violent offenders. In these individuals, low CSF 5-HIAA concentrations are also associated with a predisposition to mild hypoglycemia, a history of early-onset alcohol and substance abuse, a family history of type II alcoholism, and disturbances in diurnal activity rhythm. These data are discussed in the context of a proposed model for the pathophysiology of a postulated "low serotonin syndrome." PMID:1385390

  12. The Effects of Pornography on Aggressive Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stacy, Lauri L.

    This document reviews existing empirical research on the effect of pornography on aggressive behavior. Two types of pornography are distinguished: aggressive pornography and non-aggressive pornography. Conclusions drawn from the research review are presented, including: (1) aggressive pornograpy consistently increases aggressive attitudes and…

  13. Subtypes of Aggressive Behaviors: A Developmental Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vitaro, Frank; Brendgen, Mara; Barker, Edward D.

    2006-01-01

    Aggressive behaviors in children and adolescents have undergone important conceptual and definitional modifications in the past two decades. In particular, subtypes of aggression have been proposed that separate the form and the function of the aggressive behaviors (i.e., social vs. physical aggression; reactive vs. proactive aggression).…

  14. Psychopathy & Aggression: When Paralimbic Dysfunction Leads to Violence

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Nathaniel E.; Kiehl, Kent A.

    2015-01-01

    Psychopaths can be alarmingly violent, both in the frequency with which they engage in violence and the gratuitous extent of their violent acts. Indeed, one principal utility of the clinical construct of psychopathy is in predicting future violent behavior in criminal offenders. Aggression is a complex construct that intersects psychopathy at many levels. This chapter provides a review of psychopathy as a clinical construct including the most prominent cognitive and neurobiological models which serve to account for its pathophysiology. We then describe how the brain abnormalities implicated in psychopathy may lead to diverse behavioral outcomes, which can include aggression in its many forms. PMID:24306955

  15. Psychological Research on Human Aggressiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamburg, D. A.; Brodie, H. K. H.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses research relating to the effects of hormones, neurophysiology, and the environment on animal and human aggression. Indicates that the interactions of biological, psychological and social processes in the development of human aggressiveness should constitute one of the principal frontiers for science in the next two decades. (JR)

  16. Aggression and Violence in Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    William Gladden Foundation, York, PA.

    This booklet was written to provide an understanding of aggression and violence in youth. Its purpose is to help parents, professionals, and other concerned citizens prevent or reduce these potentially dangerous behaviors. The introduction notes that many experts agree that aggression and violence are on the rise in America. The first section of…

  17. Lunar Influences on Human Aggression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Gordon W.; Dua, Manjula

    1983-01-01

    Used league records of all Canadian hockey games (N=426) played during a season to test a lunar-aggression hypothesis. Despite the use of multiple measures of lunar phase and interpersonal aggression, support for lunar influence was not forthcoming. Supplemental data revealed that beliefs in lunar influence are fairly common. (JAC)

  18. A psychoanalytic study of aggression.

    PubMed

    Furst, S S

    1998-01-01

    Eleven participants carried out a study of aggression by utilizing clinical data from the analyses of patients who manifested significant problems in the management of aggression. The purpose of the study was to increase understanding of the intrapsychic factors that determine the nature and intensity of aggressive tendencies, the place they occupy in the psychic economy, their patterns of expression, and the extrapsychic factors that trigger them. The findings of the study indicate, first, that aggression is multiply determined by developmental, genetic (experiential), and dynamic variables; second, that each cluster of variables affects the nature, intensity, and expression of aggression in a fairly specific way; third, the importance of aggression in the psychic economy is proportional to the extent to which it is overdetermined. The successful analysis of aggressive individuals depends not solely on interpretation and insight, but on the relationship to the analyst as new parent who does not threaten and prohibit. The relationship to the analyst permits developmental change, particularly the ability to organize, structure, and control aggression. As a result, it need not be expressed destructively, but may be placed in the service of constructive thought and action. PMID:9990829

  19. In search of Winnicott's aggression.

    PubMed

    Posner, B M; Glickman, R W; Taylor, E C; Canfield, J; Cyr, F

    2001-01-01

    Going beyond Winnicott's widely known ideas about creativity, in this paper the authors ask why some people are able to live creatively while others suffer recurrent feelings of anger, futility, and depression. Examining Winnicott's reframing of aggression as a life force, it attempts to answer this question by tracing the evolution of his thinking on the nature and origin of aggression. It argues that because he saw aggression as inherent and as central to emotional development, interference in its expression compromises psychic maturation. The paper explores how Winnicott arrived at the conception of a combined love-strife drive and demonstrates that for him, there is no love without aggression, no subject, no object, no reality, and no creativity. That is, for Winnicott, aggression is an achievement that leads to the capacity to live creatively and to experience authenticity. Clinical vignettes illustrate the therapeutic use of these conclusions and their value for psychoanalytic theory. PMID:12102012

  20. False memories for aggressive acts.

    PubMed

    Laney, Cara; Takarangi, Melanie K T

    2013-06-01

    Can people develop false memories for committing aggressive acts? How does this process compare to developing false memories for victimhood? In the current research we used a simple false feedback procedure to implant false memories for committing aggressive acts (causing a black eye or spreading malicious gossip) or for victimhood (receiving a black eye). We then compared these false memories to other subjects' true memories for equivalent events. False aggressive memories were all too easy to implant, particularly in the minds of individuals with a proclivity towards aggression. Once implanted, the false memories were indistinguishable from true memories for the same events, on several dimensions, including emotional content. Implications for aggression-related memory more generally as well as false confessions are discussed. PMID:23639921

  1. The WIP1 Oncogene Promotes Progression and Invasion of Aggressive Medulloblastoma Variants

    PubMed Central

    Buss, Meghan C.; Remke, Marc; Lee, Juhyun; Gandhi, Khanjan; Schniederjan, Matthew J.; Kool, Marcel; Northcott, Paul A.; Pfister, Stefan M.; Taylor, Michael D.; Castellino, Robert C.

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that medulloblastoma, the most common malignant brain tumor of childhood, is comprised of four disease variants. The WIP1 oncogene is overexpressed in Group 3 and 4 tumors, which contain medulloblastomas with the most aggressive clinical behavior. Our data demonstrate increased WIP1 expression in metastatic medulloblastomas, and inferior progression-free and overall survival of patients with WIP1 high-expressing medulloblastoma. Microarray analysis identified up-regulation of genes involved in tumor metastasis, including the G protein-coupled receptor CXCR4, in medulloblastoma cells with high WIP1 expression. Stimulation with the CXCR4 ligand SDF1ααactivated PI-3 kinase signaling, and promoted growth and invasion of WIP1 high-expressing medulloblastoma cells in a p53-dependent manner. When xenografted into the cerebellum of immunodeficient mice, medulloblastoma cells with stable or endogenous high WIP1 expression exhibited strong expression of CXCR4 and activated AKT in primary and invasive tumor cells. WIP1 or CXCR4 knock-down inhibited medulloblastoma growth and invasion. WIP1 knock-down also improved the survival of mice xenografted with WIP1 high-expressing medulloblastoma cells. WIP1 knock-down inhibited cell surface localization of CXCR4 by suppressing expression of the G protein receptor kinase 5, GRK5. Restoration of wild-type GRK5 promoted Ser339 phosphorylation of CXCR4 and inhibited the growth of WIP1-stable medulloblastoma cells. Conversely, GRK5 knock-down inhibited Ser339 phosphorylation of CXCR4, increased cell surface localization of CXCR4, and promoted the growth of medulloblastoma cells with low WIP1 expression. These results demonstrate cross-talk among WIP1, CXCR4, and GRK5, which may be important for the aggressive phenotype of a subclass of medulloblastomas in children. PMID:24632620

  2. Predicting aggressive behavior with the aggressiveness-IAT.

    PubMed

    Banse, Rainer; Messer, Mario; Fischer, Ilka

    2015-01-01

    The Implicit Association Test (IAT, Greenwald, McGhee, & Schwartz, 1998) was adapted to assess the automatically activated (implicit) self-concept of aggressiveness. In three studies the validity of the Aggressiveness-IAT (Agg-IAT) was supported by substantial correlations with self-report measures of aggressiveness. After controlling for self-report measures of aggressiveness, the Agg-IAT accounted for 9-15% of the variance of three different indicators of aggressive behavior across three studies. To further explore the nomological network around the Agg-IAT we investigated its correlations with measures of social desirability (SD). Although not fully conclusive, the results across four studies provided some support for a weak negative correlation between impression management SD and aggressive behavior as well as the Agg-IAT. This result is in line with an interpersonally oriented self-control account of impression management SD. Individuals with high SD scores seem to behave less aggressively, and to show lower Agg-IAT scores. The one-week stability of the Agg-IAT was r = .58 in Study 4. Aggr. Behav. 41:65-83 2015. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27539875

  3. Nonsurgical treatment of aggressive fibromatosis in the head and neck

    SciTech Connect

    West, C.B. Jr.; Shagets, F.W.; Mansfield, M.J. )

    1989-09-01

    Aggressive fibromatosis is a poorly defined, locally aggressive, yet histologically benign fibroblastic proliferative lesion that may occur in the head and neck. The lesion is highly cellular and locally infiltrative and has a propensity to invade and erode bone, compromising vital structures within the head and neck. However, it is not a true malignancy because it does not have malignant cytologic characteristics nor does it metastasize. We present two cases of aggressive fibromatosis occurring in young adult men. The first case involved a rapidly enlarging mass of the anterior maxilla that involved the upper lip, nasal alae, nasal septum, inferior turbinates, and hard palate. The patient underwent incisional biopsy to confirm the diagnosis. Because of difficulty in determining the actual margins of this extensive lesion and the significant morbidity that would have resulted from surgical resection, we elected to treat this patient with chemotherapy and radiation therapy. The second case was an extensive lesion involving the right temporal bone, pterygomaxillary space, and infratemporal, temporal, and middle cranial fossae. Incisional biopsy confirmed the diagnosis. Because of the lack of functional and cosmetic deficits and the unavoidable morbidity of a surgical resection, this patient was treated with radiation therapy. Although wide field resection is the most satisfactory form of treatment, in situations in which this modality would result in unacceptable morbidity or if surgical margins are positive, then radiation therapy and chemotherapy should be considered. Support for these therapeutic modalities is found in larger series of cases outside the head and neck.

  4. Malignancy after renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Zeier, Martin; Hartschuh, Wolfgang; Wiesel, Manfred; Lehnert, Thomas; Ritz, Eberhard

    2002-01-01

    Malignancy following renal transplantation is an important medical problem during the long-term follow-up. The overall incidence of malignancy at this time is 3 to 5 times higher than in the general population. The most common malignancies are lymphoproliferative disorders (early after transplantation) and skin carcinomas (late after transplantation). The type of malignancy is different in various countries and dependent on genetic and environmental factors. Another important confounder for risk of malignancy after renal transplantation is the type of immunosuppression. Previous use of cytotoxic drugs (eg, cyclophosphamide) or a history of analgesic abuse are additional risk factors. Malignancy may even be transplanted by the graft. Previous cancer treatment in a uremic patient on the transplant waiting list is of great importance in relation to waiting time and postmalignancy screening. Finally, every dialysis patient on the waiting list should undergo a regular screening program before and after renal transplantation to detect a potentially malignant tumor in an early stage. In addition to specific oncological treatment, managing a malignancy after renal transplantation should include modification of immunosuppression. PMID:11774131

  5. Instrumental and Social Outcome Expectations of High-Aggressive and Low-Aggressive Boys.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cillessen, Antonius H. N.; Hubbard, Julie A.

    This study examined high-aggressive and low-aggressive boys' ratings of the effectiveness of aggressive and assertive strategies for solving social problems involving hypothetical peers and actual peers. Subjects were 66 third-grade boys (11 groups of 6 boys each for a total of 22 high-aggressive, 22 low-aggressive, and 22 average aggressive boys)…

  6. Aggressive Erotica and Violence against Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donnerstein, Edward

    1980-01-01

    Examines the effects of aggressive-erotic stimuli on male aggression toward females. Male subjects' deliveries of electric shocks to males or females after viewing either a neutral, erotic, or aggressive-erotic film were measured. (Author/SS)

  7. Primary malignant melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Mısır, A. Ferhat; Durmuşlar, Mustafa C.; Zerener, Tamer; Gün, Banu D.

    2016-01-01

    Malignant melanomas (MM) of the oral cavity are extremely rare, accounting for 0.2% to 8.0% of all malignant melanomas. Malignant melanomas is more frequently seen at the level of the hard palate and gingiva. Early diagnosis and treatment are important for reducing morbidity. Malignant melanoma cells stain positively with antibodies to human melanoma black 45, S-100 protein, and vimentin; therefore, immunohistochemistry can play an important role in evaluating the depth of invasion and the location of metastases. A 76-year-old man developed an oral malignant melanoma, which was originally diagnosed as a bluish reactive denture hyperplasia caused by an ill-fitting lower denture. The tumor was removed surgically, and histopathological examination revealed a nodular-type MM. There was no evidence of recurrence over a 4-year follow-up period. PMID:27052289

  8. An fMRI Study on the Role of Serotonin in Reactive Aggression

    PubMed Central

    Krämer, Ulrike M.; Riba, Jordi; Richter, Sylvia; Münte, Thomas F.

    2011-01-01

    Reactive aggression after interpersonal provocation is a common behavior in humans. Little is known, however, about brain regions and neurotransmitters critical for the decision-making and affective processes involved in aggressive interactions. With the present fMRI study, we wanted to examine the role of serotonin in reactive aggression by means of an acute tryptophan depletion (ATD). Participants performed in a competitive reaction time task (Taylor Aggression Paradigm, TAP) which entitled the winner to punish the loser. The TAP seeks to elicit aggression by provocation. The study followed a double-blind between-subject design including only male participants. Behavioral data showed an aggression diminishing effect of ATD in low trait-aggressive participants, whereas no ATD effect was detected in high trait-aggressive participants. ATD also led to reduced insula activity during the decision phase, independently of the level of provocation. Whereas previous reports have suggested an inverse relationship between serotonin level and aggressive behavior with low levels of serotonin leading to higher aggression and vice versa, such a simple relationship is inconsistent with the current data. PMID:22110714

  9. Glucocorticoid interaction with aggression in non-mammalian vertebrates: reciprocal action.

    PubMed

    Summers, Cliff H; Watt, Michael J; Ling, Travis L; Forster, Gina L; Carpenter, Russ E; Korzan, Wayne J; Lukkes, Jodi L; Overli, Oyvind

    2005-12-01

    Socially aggressive interaction is stressful, and as such, glucocorticoids are typically secreted during aggressive interaction in a variety of vertebrates, which may both potentiate and inhibit aggression. The behavioral relationship between corticosterone and/or cortisol in non-mammalian (as well as mammalian) vertebrates is dependent on timing, magnitude, context, and coordination of physiological and behavioral responses. Chronically elevated plasma glucocorticoids reliably inhibit aggressive behavior, consistent with an evolutionarily adaptive behavioral strategy among subordinate and submissive individuals. Acute elevation of plasma glucocorticoids may either promote an actively aggressive response via action in specialized local regions of the brain such as the anterior hypothalamus, or is permissive to escalated aggression and/or activity. Although the permissive effect of glucocorticoids on aggression does not suggest an active role for the hormone, the corticosteroids may be necessary for full expression of aggressive behavior, as in the lizard Anolis carolinensis. These effects suggest that short-term stress may generally be best counteracted by an actively aggressive response, at least for socially dominant proactive individuals. An acute and active response may be evolutionarily maladaptive under chronic, uncontrollable and unpredictable circumstances. It appears that subordinate reactive individuals often produce compulsorily chronic responses that inhibit aggression and promote submissive behavior. PMID:16298361

  10. Trichoblastic carcinoma ("malignant trichoblastoma") with lymphatic and hematogenous metastases.

    PubMed

    Regauer, S; Beham-Schmid, C; Okcu, M; Hartner, E; Mannweiler, S

    2000-06-01

    We report an aggressively behaving malignant trichogenic tumor arising in a trichoblastoma (TB) with widespread lymphatic and hematogenous metastases in a 55-year-old man with a concomitant B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia. The primary tumor had been present and unchanged for as long as 40 years before excision. Typical trichogenic TB with dystrophic calcification and even ossification was still present peripheral to the malignant transformation. The malignant neoplasm consisted of basaloid cells, spindle cells arranged in fascicles and densely packed rounded nests or "cell balls." The metastases consisted of immature basaloid cells and cell balls, and the recurrences became successively more undifferentiated. The residual TB reacted with antibodies to cytokeratin (CK) 6, 8, 14, and 17 and focally to S-100; the malignant primary tumor reacted uniformly with antibodies to vimentin and only focally with antibodies to CK and S-100. The metastatic tumor had lost epidermal CK expression but maintained expression of S-100 in paraffin-embedded tissues. Trichoblastic differentiation was confirmed in frozen tissues with antibodies to hair keratins. No expression of p53 or bcl-2 was identified, but p-glycoprotein (MDR-1 gene related) was expressed by primary and metastatic tumor cells. We believe that this neoplasm is best classified as a trichoblastic carcinoma arising in a TB in association with a B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia. This case illustrates that TBs have the potential for malignant transformation and aggressive behavior. PMID:10874673

  11. Role of metallothioneins in benign and malignant thyroid lesions

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Recent findings in the past two decades have brought many insights into the biology of thyroid benign and malignant lesions, in particular the papillary and follicular thyroid cancers. Although, much progress have been made, thyroid cancers still pose diagnostic problems regarding differentiation of follicular lesions in relation to their aggressiveness and the treatment of advanced and undifferentiated thyroid cancers. Metallothioneins (MTs) were shown to induce cancer cells proliferation, mediate resistance to apoptosis, certain chemotherapeutics and radiotherapy. Therefore, MTs may be of utility in diagnosis and management of patients with benign and malignant lesions of the thyroid. PMID:23273222

  12. Malignant Extra Renal Rhabdoid Tumour Presenting as Central Airway Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Bal, Amanjit; Agarwal, Ritesh; Das, Ashim

    2014-01-01

    Rhabdoid tumours are one of the most aggressive childhood neoplasms associated with high mortality. The commonest age group affected is children less than five years of age. Rhabdoid tumour presenting as an endoluminal tracheal mass leading to central airway obstruction has not been previously reported. We describe the case of a 17-year-old male patient where malignant rhabdoid tumour masqueraded as bronchial asthma leading to a delayed diagnosis of upper airway obstruction by tracheal growth. Histopathological examination and immunohistochemistry confirmed the diagnosis of malignant rhabdoid tumour. PMID:25243090

  13. An Aggressive Retroperitoneal Fibromatosis

    PubMed Central

    Campara, Zoran; Spasic, Aleksandar; Aleksic, Predrag; Milev, Bosko

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Aggressive fibromatosis (AF) is a heterogeneous group of mesenchymal tumors that have locally infiltrative growth and a tendency to relapse. The clinical picture is often conditioned by the obstruction of the ureter or small intestine. Diagnosis is based on clinical, radiological and histological parameters. A case report: We report a case of male patient, aged 35 years, with the retroperitoneal fibromatosis. He reported to the physician because of frequent urination with the feeling of pressure and pain. Computed tomography revealed the tumor mass on the front wall of the bladder with diameter of 70mm with signs of infiltration of the musculature of the anterior abdominal wall. Endoscopic transurethral biopsy showed proliferative lesion binders by type of fibromatosis. The tumor was surgically removed in a classical way. The patient feels well and has no recurrence thirty-six months after the operative procedure. Conclusion: The complete tumor resection is the therapeutic choice for the primary tumor as well as for a relapse. PMID:27147794

  14. Drugs Approved for Malignant Mesothelioma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professionals Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Malignant Mesothelioma This page lists cancer ... in malignant mesothelioma that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Malignant Mesothelioma Alimta (Pemetrexed Disodium) Pemetrexed ...

  15. Malignancy markers in the cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Koskiniemi, M

    1988-10-01

    The specificity and sensitivity of malignancy marker determinations in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) are often insufficient. Even at the subclinical stage of the disease the marker should be present. The effect of therapy should be monitored and relapses noted. Thus high standards of methodology are required. There are many substances that may indicate a malignant process in the central nervous system. However, there are many pitfalls in their determination. Malignant cells may occur in CSF via processes involving leptomeningeal structures such as metastases and leukaemia, but primary brain tumours seldom show cells in CSF. Human chorionic gonadotrophin and alpha-fetoprotein determinations assist in the early detection of cerebral germ cell tumours and of relapses, even in the subclinical stage. Desmosterol may aid in the diagnosis of medulloblastomas and malignant gliomas and in monitoring therapy. Putrescine levels are elevated in CSF of patients with medulloblastoma and correlate with the clinical state, and serial analyses may reveal relapses. Fibronectin, when determined in CSF at the time of diagnosis, appears to be of great significance for the prognosis of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. Ferritin and beta-2-microglobulin may help in some well-defined conditions. Brain-specific proteins and antibodies to them are non-specific markers whereas tumour-specific antigens and growth factors may be more significant. PMID:3058481

  16. Genetics of Aggression in Voles

    PubMed Central

    Gobrogge, Kyle L.; Wang, Zuoxin

    2016-01-01

    Prairie voles (Microtus ochrogaster) are socially monogamous rodents that form pair bonds—a behavior composed of several social interactions including attachment with a familiar mate and aggression toward conspecific strangers. Therefore, this species has provided an excellent opportunity for the study of pair bonding behavior and its underlying neural mechanisms. In this chapter, we discuss the utility of this unique animal model in the study of aggression and review recent findings illustrating the neurochemical mechanisms underlying pair bonding-induced aggression. Implications of this research for our understanding of the neurobiology of human violence are also discussed. PMID:22078479

  17. Predicting workplace aggression and violence.

    PubMed

    Barling, Julian; Dupré, Kathryne E; Kelloway, E Kevin

    2009-01-01

    Consistent with the relative recency of research on workplace aggression and the considerable media attention given to high-profile incidents, numerous myths about the nature of workplace aggression have emerged. In this review, we examine these myths from an evidence-based perspective, bringing greater clarity to our understanding of the predictors of workplace aggression. We conclude by pointing to the need for more research focusing on construct validity and prevention issues as well as for methodologies that minimize the likelihood of mono-method bias and that strengthen the ability to make causal inferences. PMID:18793089

  18. Cerebral metastasis from malignant pleural mesothelioma

    PubMed Central

    El Molla, Mohamed; Gragnaniello, Cristian; Al-Khawaja, Darweesh; Chiribao-Negri, Concepcion; Eftekhar, Behzad

    2013-01-01

    Malignant mesothelioma is an uncommon, highly invasive tumor derived from the mesothelial cells of pleura or peritoneum characterized by poor outcome. Mesothelioma was thought to metastasize locally only via direct invasion and not have distant spread. Distant metastases were discovered mostly on post-mortem examination. The authors present a case of 62-year-old man with pleural mesothelioma and brain metastasis. PMID:24963909

  19. A case of primary central nervous system vasculitis diagnosed by second brain biopsy and treated successfully.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Yuri; Shigeto, Hiroshi; Yamada, Takeshi; Maeda, Norihisa; Suzuki, Satoshi O; Kira, Jun-Ichi

    2016-03-30

    We report a case of primary central nervous system vasculitis (PCNSV) diagnosed by second brain biopsy. A 53-year-old man initially presented with left lateral gaze diplopia. Brain MRI revealed multiple enhanced lesions in the bilateral frontal lobe, bilateral basal ganglia, left cerebellum and brainstem. An initial brain biopsy of the right frontal lobe suggested immune-related encephalitis with angiocentric accumulation of chronic inflammatory cells, while malignant lymphoma could not be completely ruled out. The patient deteriorated despite being treated with repeated methylprednisolone pulse therapy, cyclophosphamide, and plasmapheresis. A second brain biopsy of the right temporal lobe was then performed. The biopsied specimens showed vascular wall disruption and fibrinoid necrosis with perivascular inflammatory infiltrates, mainly composed of CD8-positive T cells, and PCNSV was diagnosed. He was treated with high dose corticosteroids, in combination with methotrexate (8 mg/week), which reduced the brain lesions. As brain biopsy is an essential investigation for the histological diagnosis of PCNSV; subsequent biopsies may be required when a histopathological diagnosis has not been obtained by the first biopsy, and further aggressive therapy is being considered. PMID:26960271

  20. Serotonin decreases aggression via 5-HT1A receptors in the fighting fish Betta splendens.

    PubMed

    Clotfelter, Ethan D; O'Hare, Erin P; McNitt, Meredith M; Carpenter, Russ E; Summers, Cliff H

    2007-01-01

    The role of the monoamine neurotransmitter serotonin (5-HT) in the modulation of conspecific aggression in the fighting fish (Betta splendens) was investigated using pharmacological manipulations. We used a fish's response to its mirror image as our index of aggressive behavior. We also investigated the effects of some manipulations on monoamine levels in the B. splendens brain. Acute treatment with 5-HT and with the 5-HT1A receptor agonist 8-OH-DPAT both decreased aggressive behavior; however, treatment with the 5-HT1A receptor antagonist WAY-100635 did not increase aggression. Chronic treatment with the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine caused no significant changes in aggressive behavior and a significant decline in 5-HT and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) concentrations. Treatment with the serotonin synthesis inhibitor p-chlorophenylalanine resulted in no change in aggression, yet serotonergic activity decreased significantly. Finally, a diet supplemented with L-tryptophan (Trp), the precursor to 5-HT, showed no consistent effects on aggressive behavior or brain monoamine concentrations. These results suggest a complex role for serotonin in the expression of aggression in teleost fishes, and that B. splendens may be a useful model organism in pharmacological and toxicological studies. PMID:17553555

  1. Procaine in Malignant Hyperpyrexia

    PubMed Central

    Moulds, R. F. W.; Denborough, M. A.

    1972-01-01

    The caffeine contracture of normal human muscle, which has been used as a model for malignant hyperpyrexia, is greatly potentiated by halothane. Prior administration of procaine markedly reduces the halothane-potentiated caffeine contracture, and procaine given at the height of the contracture induces relaxation. Lignocaine, on the other hand, produces a variable response and sometimes increases the contracture. The muscle from a patient with an inherited susceptibility to malignant hyperpyrexia contracted spontaneously with halothane alone, and this contracture was reversed by procaine. These experiments support the therapeutic use of procaine in malignant hyperpyrexia. PMID:4642792

  2. Environmental factors and aggressive behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, A.C.

    1982-07-01

    This paper briefly reviews some of the research areas which indicate a correlation between environmental factors and initiation of aggressive behavior. Environmental factors including lunar influences, month of birth, climate and the effects of crowding and certain chemicals are discussed.

  3. Aggression in borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Látalová, K; Prasko, J

    2010-09-01

    This review examined aggressive behavior in Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) and its management in adults. Aggression against self or against others is a core component of BPD. Impulsiveness is a clinical hallmark (as well as a DSM-IV-TR diagnostic criterion) of BPD, and aggressive acts by BPD patients are largely of the impulsive type. BPD has high comorbidity rates with substance use disorders, Bipolar Disorder, and Antisocial Personality Disorder; these conditions further elevate the risk for violence. Treatment of BDP includes psychodynamic, cognitive behavioral, schema therapy, dialectic behavioral, group and pharmacological interventions. Recent studies indicate that many medications, particularly atypical antipsychotics and anticonvulsants, may reduce impulsivity, affective lability as well as irritability and aggressive behavior. But there is still a lack of large, double blind, placebo controlled studies in this area. PMID:20390357

  4. Decreased aggression and increased repetitive behavior in Pten haploinsufficient mice.

    PubMed

    Clipperton-Allen, A E; Page, D T

    2015-02-01

    Aggression is an aspect of social behavior that can be elevated in some individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and a concern for peers and caregivers. Mutations in Phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN), one of several ASD risk factors encoding negative regulators of the PI3K-Akt-mTOR pathway, have been reported in individuals with ASD and comorbid macrocephaly. We previously showed that a mouse model of Pten germline haploinsufficiency (Pten(+/-) ) has selective deficits, primarily in social behavior, along with broad overgrowth of the brain. Here, we further examine the social behavior of Pten(+/-) male mice in the resident-intruder test of aggression, using a comprehensive behavioral analysis to obtain an overall picture of the agonistic, non-agonistic and non-social behavior patterns of Pten(+/-) mice during a free interaction with a novel conspecific. Pten(+/-) male mice were involved in less aggression than their wild-type littermates. Pten(+/-) mice also performed less social investigation, including anogenital investigation and approaching and/or attending to the intruder, which is consistent with our previous finding of decreased sociability in the social approach test. In contrast to these decreases in social behaviors, Pten(+/-) mice showed increased digging. In summary, we report decreased aggression and increased repetitive behavior in Pten(+/-) mice, thus extending our characterization of this model of an ASD risk factor that features brain overgrowth and social deficits. PMID:25561290

  5. Looking for reward in all the wrong places: dopamine receptor gene polymorphisms indirectly affect aggression through sensation-seeking.

    PubMed

    Chester, David S; DeWall, C Nathan; Derefinko, Karen J; Estus, Steven; Lynam, Donald R; Peters, Jessica R; Jiang, Yang

    2016-10-01

    Individuals with genotypes that code for reduced dopaminergic brain activity often exhibit a predisposition toward aggression. However, it remains largely unknown how dopaminergic genotypes may increase aggression. Lower-functioning dopamine systems motivate individuals to seek reward from external sources such as illicit drugs and other risky experiences. Based on emerging evidence that aggression is a rewarding experience, we predicted that the effect of lower-functioning dopaminergic functioning on aggression would be mediated by tendencies to seek the environment for rewards. Caucasian female and male undergraduates (N = 277) were genotyped for five polymorphisms of the dopamine D2 receptor (DRD2) gene; they reported their previous history of aggression and their dispositional reward-seeking. Lower-functioning DRD2 profiles were associated with greater sensation-seeking, which then predicted greater aggression. Our findings suggest that lower-functioning dopaminergic activity puts individuals at risk for violence because it motivates them to experience aggression's hedonically rewarding qualities. PMID:26592425

  6. Neuroimaging of Aggressive and Violent Behaviour in Children and Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Sterzer, Philipp; Stadler, Christina

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, a number of functional and structural neuroimaging studies have investigated the neural bases of aggressive and violent behaviour in children and adolescents. Most functional neuroimaging studies have persued the hypothesis that pathological aggression is a consequence of deficits in the neural circuits involved in emotion processing. There is converging evidence for abnormal neural responses to emotional stimuli in youths with a propensity towards aggressive behaviour. In addition, recent neuroimaging work has suggested that aggressive behaviour is also associated with abnormalities in neural processes that subserve both the inhibitory control of behaviour and the flexible adaptation of behaviour in accord with reinforcement information. Structural neuroimaging studies in children and adolescents with conduct problems are still scarce, but point to deficits in brain structures in volved in the processing of social information and in the regulation of social and goal-directed behaviour. The indisputable progress that this research field has made in recent years notwithstanding, the overall picture is still rather patchy and there are inconsistencies between studies that await clarification. Despite this, we attempt to provide an integrated view on the neural abnormalities that may contribute to various forms of juvenile aggression and violence, and discuss research strategies that may help to provide a more profound understanding of these important issues in the future. PMID:19862349

  7. Wiring Pathways to Replace Aggression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bath, Howard

    2006-01-01

    The previous article in this series introduced the triune brain, the three components of which handle specialized life tasks. The survival brain, or brain stem, directs automatic physiological functions, such as heartbeat and breathing, and mobilizes fight/flight behaviour in times of threat. The emotional (or limbic) brain activates positive or…

  8. High trait aggression in men is associated with low 5-HT levels, as indexed by 5-HT4 receptor binding.

    PubMed

    da Cunha-Bang, Sofi; Mc Mahon, Brenda; Fisher, Patrick MacDonald; Jensen, Peter Steen; Svarer, Claus; Knudsen, Gitte Moos

    2016-04-01

    Impulsive aggression has commonly been associated with a dysfunction of the serotonin (5-HT) system: many, but not all, studies point to an inverse relationship between 5-HT and aggression. As cerebral 5-HT4 receptor (5-HT4R) binding has recently been recognized as a proxy for stable brain levels of 5-HT, we here test the hypothesis in healthy men and women that brain 5-HT levels, as indexed by cerebral 5-HT4R, are inversely correlated with trait aggression and impulsivity. Sixty-one individuals (47 men) underwent positron emission tomography scanning with the radioligand [(11)C]SB207145 for quantification of brain 5-HT4R binding. The Buss-Perry Aggression Questionnaire (BPAQ) and the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale were used for assessment of trait aggression and trait impulsivity. Among male subjects, there was a positive correlation between global 5-HT4R and BPAQ total score (P = 0.037) as well as BPAQ physical aggression (P = 0.025). No main effect of global 5-HT4R on trait aggression or impulsivity was found in the mixed gender sample, but there was evidence for sex interaction effects in the relationship between global 5-HT4R and BPAQ physical aggression. In conclusion we found that low cerebral 5-HT levels, as indexed by 5-HT4R binding were associated with high trait aggression in males, but not in females. PMID:26772668

  9. Longitudinal heritability of childhood aggression.

    PubMed

    Porsch, Robert M; Middeldorp, Christel M; Cherny, Stacey S; Krapohl, Eva; van Beijsterveldt, Catharina E M; Loukola, Anu; Korhonen, Tellervo; Pulkkinen, Lea; Corley, Robin; Rhee, Soo; Kaprio, Jaakko; Rose, Richard R; Hewitt, John K; Sham, Pak; Plomin, Robert; Boomsma, Dorret I; Bartels, Meike

    2016-07-01

    The genetic and environmental contributions to the variation and longitudinal stability in childhood aggressive behavior were assessed in two large twin cohorts, the Netherlands Twin Register (NTR), and the Twins Early Development Study (TEDS; United Kingdom). In NTR, maternal ratings on aggression from the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) were available for 10,765 twin pairs at age 7, for 8,557 twin pairs at age 9/10, and for 7,176 twin pairs at age 12. In TEDS, parental ratings of conduct disorder from the Strength and Difficulty Questionnaire (SDQ) were available for 6,897 twin pairs at age 7, for 3,028 twin pairs at age 9 and for 5,716 twin pairs at age 12. In both studies, stability and heritability of aggressive behavioral problems was high. Heritability was on average somewhat, but significantly, lower in TEDS (around 60%) than in NTR (between 50% and 80%) and sex differences were slightly larger in the NTR sample. In both studies, the influence of shared environment was similar: in boys shared environment explained around 20% of the variation in aggression across all ages while in girls its influence was absent around age 7 and only came into play at later ages. Longitudinal genetic correlations were the main reason for stability of aggressive behavior. Individual differences in CBCL-Aggressive Behavior and SDQ-Conduct disorder throughout childhood are driven by a comparable but significantly different genetic architecture. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26786601

  10. Malignant Rhabdoid Tumor of the Liver: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Oita, Satoru; Terui, Keita; Komatsu, Syugo; Hishiki, Tomoro; Saito, Takeshi; Mitsunaga, Tetsuya; Nakata, Mitsuyuki; Yoshida, Hideo

    2015-01-01

    Malignant rhabdoid tumor (MRT) is a rare and aggressive malignancy associated with poor outcomes. MRT of the liver is even rarer, and little information has been described. We report the case of an 8-month-old boy with MRT of the liver. The tumor showed aggressive progression despite a multidisciplinary approach, and the patient died due to multiple organ failure 14 days after admission. Autopsy revealed the liver tumor and multiple metastases with negative immunohistochemistry for INI1/BAF47. A review of 53 cases of pediatric MRT of the liver is provided. PMID:25918621

  11. Panuveal malignant mesenchymoma.

    PubMed

    Pe'er, J; Neudorfer, M; Ron, N; Anteby, I; Lazar, M; Rosenmann, E

    1995-09-01

    Intraocular malignant mesenchymal tumors are very rare, and only a few case reports of such primary and metastatic tumors have been reported. We report a case of a malignant mesenchymoma involving the entire uveal tract. A 21-year-old woman presented with a tumor on the whole iris of the right eye, which caused intractable glaucoma. Upon enucleation of the eye, a very anaplastic tumor was found to occupy the whole uveal tract; its features were compatible with a tumor of mesenchymal origin, including rhabdomyosarcomatous and liposarcomatous characteristics. Choroidal osteoma was a coincidental finding. The histologic findings of the tumor were of two types of malignant mesenchymal tumors, and therefore the diagnosis of malignant mesenchymoma was made. This is to our knowledge the first tumor of its kind to be reported intraocularly. PMID:7668945

  12. [Rheumatoid arthritis and malignancy].

    PubMed

    Kameda, Tomohiro; Dobashi, Hiroaki

    2016-06-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is associated with excess mortality. Especially, malignancy is a major cause of mortality. According to previous reports, the overall incidence of malignancies in RA patients has been reported to be comparable or slightly higher than that in general population. The increased incidence of malignant lymphoma and lung cancer has been reported to be consistent in most studies. The use of some csDMARD was also reported as risk factors for malignancy. Recently, MTX associated lymphoproliferative disorder(MTX-LPD) is one of the important complications in RA treatment. We revealed the mean MTX dose was demonstrated to be an independent risk factor regarding MTX-LPD onset in RA patients. This data suggest that the treatment with higher MTX dose promotes LPD onset in Japanese RA patients. PMID:27311195

  13. Gynecologic malignancy in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Yong Il

    2013-01-01

    Gynecologic malignancy during pregnancy is a stressful problem. For the diagnosis and treatment of malignancy during pregnancy, a multidisciplinary approach is needed. Patients should be advised about the benefits and risk of treatment. When selecting a treatment for malignancy during pregnancy, the physiologic changes that occur with the pregnancy should be considered. Various diagnostic procedures that do not harm the fetus can be used. Laparoscopic surgery or laparotomy may be safely performed. The staging approach and treatment should be standard. Systemic chemotherapy during the first trimester should be delayed if possible. Radiation therapy should preferably start postpartum. Although delivery should be delayed preferably until after 35 weeks of gestation, termination of pregnancy may be considered when immediate treatment is required. Subsequent pregnancies do not increase the risk of malignancy recurrence. PMID:24328018

  14. Chemoembolization of hepatic malignancy.

    PubMed

    Gonsalves, Carin F; Brown, Daniel B

    2009-01-01

    Treatment of primary and secondary hepatic malignancies with transarterial chemoembolization represents an essential component of interventional oncology. This article discusses patient selection, procedure technique, results, and complications associated with transarterial chemoembolization. PMID:18668189

  15. Malignant triton tumor of the chest wall invading the lung. A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Kamperis, E; Barbetakis, N; Asteriou, C; Kleontas, A; Christoforidou, V

    2013-01-01

    Background: Malignant triton tumor (MTT) is an histological deviation of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor with additional rhabdomyosarcomatous elements. It is very rare, profoundly aggressive, with a tendency to recur locally and metastasize early. If manifests itself more often in individuals with neurofibromatosis type I (NF-1) disease but also sporadically or post radiotherapy. Description of case: A 57-year-old male was admitted with a history of malignant triton tumor of the chest wall. Despite prior aggressive locoregional treatment including wide excision and adjuvant consolidating radiotherapy, the tumor recurred. The patient underwent a new operation and systemic chemotherapy, but expired a few months later due to disease progression. Conclusion: MTT is exceedingly malignant requiring multimodality treatment. The cornerstone of management is radical surgical resection with clear margins. Nevertheless, the overall prognosis remains dismal. PMID:24470743

  16. [A little known entity: aggressive fibromatosis].

    PubMed

    Marqúes Gubern, A; Pérez Payarols, J; Sánchez de Toledo, J; Martínez Ibáñez, V; Moraga, F; de Torres Ramírez, I M

    1991-01-01

    Aggressive fibromatosis is an unfrequent and little known entity, which in spite of being a histologically benign tumoration with scarce mitosis and without metastasis at distance, frequently presents with a high degree of local malignancy that can cause serious functional and aesthetical disturbance for the patient and even lead to death if infiltration of vital organs is presented, above all in cases of abdominal or maxillo-facial mass localization. The authors present their experience with 17 cases of aggressive fibromatosis observed in our centre: four of abdominal localization, six in extremities, five in the maxillo-facial mass, one in the torax and one in the lumbo-sacral region. Histological diagnosis, either by puncture or biopsy, is complemented by studies of extension of the tumour based on ecography and TAC. All cases were treated according to the classical criteria of ample resection of the lesion, always when practicable, except in one infant case and in the torax, in which only a biopsy was effected. Of the 15 cases resected, nine cases had local relapses, six of which remained free of disease with a second operation, another two required a third operation and the remaining case needed five interventions. In six children chemotherapy was applied with vincristina, cyclophosphamide and adriamicina. A follow up was carried out in 14 patients, one of which died and the remaining 13 are free of disease. In spite of the fact that progestagene receptors were not evidenced in two of our cases, one presented complete remission of the tumor after treatment with medroxyprogesterone. In this case the coincidence of Gardner's syndrome arises in the family history.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2043434

  17. Normative beliefs about aggression and cyber aggression among young adults: a longitudinal investigation.

    PubMed

    Wright, Michelle F; Li, Yan

    2013-01-01

    This longitudinal study examined normative beliefs about aggression (e.g., face-to-face, cyber) in relation to the engagement in cyber aggression 6 months later among 126 (69 women) young adults. Participants completed electronically administered measures assessing their normative beliefs, face-to-face and cyber aggression at Time 1, and cyber aggression 6 months later (Time 2). We found that men reported more cyber relational and verbal aggression when compared to women. After controlling for each other, Time 1 face-to-face relational aggression was positively related to Time 2 cyber relational aggression, whereas Time 1 face-to-face verbal aggression was positively related to Time 2 cyber verbal aggression. Normative beliefs regarding cyber aggression was positively related to both forms of cyber aggression 6 months later, after controlling for normative beliefs about face-to-face aggression. Furthermore, a significant two-way interaction between Time 1 cyber relational aggression and normative beliefs about cyber relational aggression was found. Follow-up analysis showed that Time 1 cyber relational aggression was more strongly related to Time 2 cyber relational aggression when young adults held higher normative beliefs about cyber relational aggression. A similar two-way interaction was found for cyber verbal aggression such that the association between Time 1 and Time 2 cyber verbal aggression was stronger at higher levels of normative beliefs about cyber verbal aggression. Results are discussed in terms of the social cognitive and behavioral mechanisms associated with the engagement of cyber aggression. PMID:23440595

  18. Sorafenib Tosylate in Treating Patients With Malignant Mesothelioma.

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-04

    Epithelial Mesothelioma; Recurrent Malignant Mesothelioma; Sarcomatous Mesothelioma; Stage IA Malignant Mesothelioma; Stage IB Malignant Mesothelioma; Stage II Malignant Mesothelioma; Stage III Malignant Mesothelioma; Stage IV Malignant Mesothelioma

  19. Malignant external otitis: early scintigraphic detection

    SciTech Connect

    Strashun, A.M.; Nejatheim, M.; Goldsmith, S.J.

    1984-02-01

    Pseudomonas otitis externa in elderly diabetics may extend aggressively to adjacent bone, cranial nerves, meninges, and vessels, leading to a clinical diagnosis of ''malignant'' external otitis. Early diagnosis is necessary for successful treatment. This study compares the findings of initial radiographs, thin-section tomography of temporal bone, CT scans of head and neck, technetium-99m methylene diphosphonate (MDP) and gallium-67 citrate scintigraphy, and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) for detection of temporal bone osteomylitis in ten patients fulfilling the clinical diagnostic criteria of malignant external otitis. Skull radiographs were negative in all of the eight patients studied. Thin-section tomography was positive in one of the seven patients studied using this modality. CT scanning suggested osteomyelitis in three of nine patients. Both Tc-99m and Ga-67 citrate scintigraphy were positive in 10 of 10 patients. These results suggest that technetium and gallium scintigraphy are more sensitive than radiographs and CT scans for early detection of malignant external otitis.

  20. Malignant Tourette syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Min-Yuen Cynthia; Shahed, Joohi; Jankovic, Joseph

    2007-09-15

    The aim of this work was to draw attention to potentially life-threatening symptoms associated with Tourette syndrome (TS) and to explore their relationship to TS comorbidities. Medical records of all patients with TS evaluated at our Movement Disorders Clinic between July 2003 and July 2006 were reviewed. Data on patients with malignant TS, defined as >or=2 emergency room (ER) visits or >or=1 hospitalizations for TS symptoms or its associated behavioral comorbidities, were entered into a dataset and analyzed. Five illustrative cases are described. Of 333 TS patients evaluated during the 3-year period, 17 (5.1%) met the criteria for malignant TS. Hospital admission or ER visits were for tic-related injuries, self-injurious behavior (SIB), uncontrollable violence and temper, and suicidal ideation/attempts. Compared with patients with nonmalignant TS, those with malignant TS were significantly more likely to have a personal history of obsessive compulsive behavior/disorder (OCB/OCD), complex phonic tics, coprolalia, copropraxia, SIB, mood disorder, suicidal ideation, and poor response to medications. Although TS is rarely a disabling disorder, about 5% of patients referred to a specialty clinic have life-threatening symptoms. Malignant TS is associated with greater severity of motor symptoms and the presence of >or=2 behavioral comorbidities. OCD/OCB in particular may play a central role in malignant TS; obsessive compulsive qualities were associated with life-threatening tics, SIB, and suicidal ideation. Malignant TS is more refractory to medical treatment than nonmalignant TS. PMID:17566119

  1. Adolescents' Social Reasoning about Relational Aggression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldstein, Sara E.; Tisak, Marie S.

    2010-01-01

    We examined early adolescents' reasoning about relational aggression, and the links that their reasoning has to their own relationally aggressive behavior. Thinking about relational aggression was compared to thinking about physical aggression, conventional violations, and personal behavior. In individual interviews, adolescents (N = 103) rated…

  2. The Development of Aggression within Sibling Conflict.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Jacqueline L.; Ross, Hildy S.

    1995-01-01

    A longitudinal study examined responses to physically aggressive conflicts among siblings. Found that parents respond to half of children's aggression (especially if there is crying). Most parent and child responses were simple commands to stop the aggression. Reasoning was used less often, and physical intervention, rarely. Aggression was higher…

  3. Do Teachers Misbehave? Aggression in School Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ben Sasson, Dvora; Somech, Anit

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Despite growing research on school aggression, significant gaps remain in the authors' knowledge of team aggression, since most studies have mainly explored aggression on the part of students. The purpose of this paper is to focus on understanding the phenomenon of workplace aggression in school teams. Specifically, the purpose of the…

  4. The pleasure of revenge: retaliatory aggression arises from a neural imbalance toward reward.

    PubMed

    Chester, David S; DeWall, C Nathan

    2016-07-01

    Most of daily life hums along peacefully but provocations tip the balance toward aggression. Negative feelings are often invoked to explain why people lash out after an insult. Yet people might retaliate because provocation makes aggression hedonically rewarding. To test this alternative hypothesis, 69 participants underwent functional neuroimaging while they completed a behavioral aggression task that repeatedly manipulated whether aggression was preceded by an instance of provocation or not. After provocation, greater activity in the nucleus accumbens (NAcc) (a brain region reliably associated with reward) during aggressive decisions predicted louder noise blasts administered in retaliation. Greater NAcc activation was also associated with participants' history of real-world violence. Functional connectivity between the NAcc and a regulatory region in the lateral prefrontal cortex related to lower retaliatory aggression. These findings suggest that provocation tips the neural balance towards hedonic reward, which fosters retaliatory aggression. Although such pleasure of inflicting pain may promote retaliatory aggression, self-regulatory processes can keep such aggressive urges at bay. Implications for theory and violence reduction are discussed. PMID:26117504

  5. P1 interneurons promote a persistent internal state that enhances inter-male aggression in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Hoopfer, Eric D; Jung, Yonil; Inagaki, Hidehiko K; Rubin, Gerald M; Anderson, David J

    2015-01-01

    How brains are hardwired to produce aggressive behavior, and how aggression circuits are related to those that mediate courtship, is not well understood. A large-scale screen for aggression-promoting neurons in Drosophila identified several independent hits that enhanced both inter-male aggression and courtship. Genetic intersections revealed that 8-10 P1 interneurons, previously thought to exclusively control male courtship, were sufficient to promote fighting. Optogenetic experiments indicated that P1 activation could promote aggression at a threshold below that required for wing extension. P1 activation in the absence of wing extension triggered persistent aggression via an internal state that could endure for minutes. High-frequency P1 activation promoted wing extension and suppressed aggression during photostimulation, whereas aggression resumed and wing extension was inhibited following photostimulation offset. Thus, P1 neuron activation promotes a latent, internal state that facilitates aggression and courtship, and controls the overt expression of these social behaviors in a threshold-dependent, inverse manner. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11346.001 PMID:26714106

  6. Steroid hormones alter neuroanatomy and aggression independently in the tree lizard.

    PubMed

    Kabelik, David; Weiss, Stacey L; Moore, Michael C

    2008-02-27

    Steroid hormones effect changes in both neuroanatomy and aggressive behavior in animals of various taxa. However, whether changes in neuroanatomy directly underlie changes in aggression is unknown. We investigate this relationship among steroid hormones, neuroanatomy, and aggression in a free-living vertebrate with a relatively simple nervous system, the tree lizard (Urosaurus ornatus). Weiss and Moore [1] manipulated testosterone and progesterone levels in adult male tree lizards and found that both hormones facilitated aggressive behavior toward a conspecific. In this study, we examined the brains of a subset of these animals to determine whether changes in limbic morphology were associated with hormone-induced changes in aggressive behavior. Specifically, we tested the hypothesis that testosterone and/or progesterone cause changes in neural morphology that are necessary for the expression of testosterone's effects on aggressive behavior. We found that both hormones increased aggression; however, only testosterone induced changes in neuroanatomy. Testosterone increased the size of both the amygdala and nucleus sphericus. However, we could detect no individual correlations between neuroanatomy and aggression levels suggesting that the observed large-scale changes in neuroanatomy are not precisely reflective of changes in mechanisms underlying aggression. PMID:17996258

  7. Malignant melanoma in the penguin: characterization of the clinical, histologic, and immunohistochemical features of malignant melanoma in 10 individuals from three species of penguin.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Ann E; Smedley, Rebecca; Anthony, Simon; Garner, Michael M

    2014-09-01

    Malignant melanomas are aggressive neoplasms that are relatively common in penguins compared to other avian species. In this study, the clinical and pathologic characteristics of melanocytic neoplasms in five macaroni (Eudyptes chrysolophus), three rock hopper (Eudyptes chrysocome), and two Humboldt (Spheniscus humboldti) penguins are described. Tumors most commonly occurred in the skin of the foot or hock, and were seen in the subcutaneous muscle, especially near the beak/oral cavity. Gross lesions were usually heavily pigmented, becoming raised and ulcerated over time. Humboldt penguins had a unique presentation, forming variably pigmented, cornified lesions in the inguinal area. Original case materials were obtained from all but two cases, and were assessed to define the characteristics of malignancy, evaluate four immunohistochemical markers for melanoma, and look for factors useful to informing prognosis and clinical decisions. Diagnosis was made histologically, based on morphologic features and pigmentation. Though not necessary for diagnosis, PNL-2 was found to be a useful immunohistochemical marker. HMB-45 showed unreliable positive labelling and S-100, Melan-A and Ki67 were not useful. Several factors were associated with prognosis, including gross surface dimension, mitotic index, depth of neoplastic cell invasion, and degree of surface ulceration. Metastatic spread occurred to the liver, lung, adrenal gland, brain, and bone; all lesions showed positive labelling to PNL-2. The average survival after diagnosis was 7 mo, though complete surgical excision of tumors less than 2.0 cm was curative in two cases and radiation therapy prolonged survival in one penguin. The underlying pathogenesis associated with the high prevalence of melanocytic neoplasms in captive penguins could not be identified. Three different molecular methods were performed to look for viral particles and results were negative. Advanced age is the most probable associated risk factor

  8. Cognition, emotion, and neurobiological development: mediating the relation between maltreatment and aggression.

    PubMed

    Lee, Vivien; Hoaken, Peter N S

    2007-08-01

    Child maltreatment has been consistently linked to aggression, yet there have been few attempts to conceptualize precisely how maltreatment influences the development of aggression. This review proposes that biases in cognitive, emotional, and neurobiological development mediate the relation between childhood maltreatment and the development of aggression. In addition, it is posited that physical abuse and neglect may have differential effects on development: Physical abuse may result in hypervigilance to threat and a hostile attributional bias, whereas neglect may result in difficulties with emotion regulation because of a lack of emotional interactions. These processes may be "hardwired" into neural networks via the overactivation of certain brain regions and dysfunctional cognitive processes. The theoretical and necessarily speculative nature of this article is intended to stimulate hypotheses for future research. Only when the adverse effects of maltreatment on brain and cognitive development are understood can scholars hope to develop more effective interventions to alter the developmental pathway to aggression. PMID:17631627

  9. Kindergarten Children's Genetic Vulnerabilities Interact with Friends' Aggression to Promote Children's Own Aggression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Lier, Pol; Boivin, Michel; Dionne, Ginette; Vitaro, Frank; Brendgen, Mara; Koot, Hans; Tremblay, Richard E.; Perusse, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To examine whether kindergarten children's genetic liability to physically aggress moderates the contribution of friends' aggression to their aggressive behaviors. Method: Teacher and peer reports of aggression were available for 359 6-year-old twin pairs (145 MZ, 212 DZ) as well as teacher and peer reports of aggression of the two best…

  10. Primary Malignant Melanoma in the Pineal Region

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Yong-Kil

    2014-01-01

    A 59-year-old male patient had 5-month history of gait disturbance and memory impairment. His initial brain computed tomography scan showed 3.5×2.8 cm sized mass with high density in the pineal region. The tumor was hypointense on T2 weighted magnetic resonance images and hyperintense on T1 weighted magnetic resonance images with heterogenous enhancement of central portion. The tumor was totally removed via the occipital transtentorial approach. Black mass was observed in the operation field, and after surgery, histopathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of malignant melanoma. Whole spine magnetic resonance images and whole body 18-fluoro-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography could not demonstrate the primary site of this melanoma. Scrupulous physical examination of his skin and mucosa was done and dark pigmented lesion on his left leg was found, but additional studies including magnetic resonance images and skin biopsy showed negative finding. As a result, final diagnosis of primary pineal malignant melanoma was made. He underwent treatment with the whole brain radiotherapy and extended local boost irradiation without chemotherapy. His preoperative symptoms were disappeared, and no other specific neurological deficits were founded. His follow-up image studies showed no recurrence or distant metastasis until 26 weeks after surgery. Primary pineal malignant melanomas are extremely rare intracranial tumors, and only 17 cases have been reported since 1899. The most recent case report showed favorable outcome by subtotal tumor resection followed by whole brain and extended local irradiation without chemotherapy. Our case is another result to prove that total tumor resection with radiotherapy can be the current optimal treatment for primary malignant melanoma in the pineal region. PMID:25628812

  11. Anterior hypothalamic vasopressin modulates the aggression-stimulating effects of adolescent cocaine exposure in Syrian hamsters.

    PubMed

    Jackson, D; Burns, R; Trksak, G; Simeone, B; DeLeon, K R; Connor, D F; Harrison, R J; Melloni, R H

    2005-01-01

    Repeated low-dose cocaine treatment (0.5 mg/kg/day) during adolescence induces offensive aggression in male Syrian hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus). This study examines the hypothesis that adolescent cocaine exposure predisposes hamsters to heightened levels of aggressive behavior by increasing the activity of the anterior hypothalamic-vasopressinergic neural system. In a first experiment, adolescent male hamsters were treated with low-dose cocaine and then scored for offensive aggression in the absence or presence of vasopressin receptor antagonists applied directly to the anterior hypothalamus. Adolescent cocaine-treated hamsters displayed highly escalated offensive aggression that could be reversed by blocking the activity of vasopressin receptors within the anterior hypothalamus. In a second set of experiments, adolescent hamsters were administered low-dose cocaine or vehicle, tested for offensive aggression, and then examined for differences in vasopressin innervation patterns and expression levels in the anterior hypothalamus, as well as the basal- and stimulated-release of vasopressin in this same brain region. Aggressive, adolescent cocaine-treated hamsters showed no differences in vasopressin afferent innervation and/or peptide levels in the anterior hypothalamus compared with non-aggressive, saline-treated littermates. Conversely, significant increases in stimulated, but not basal, vasopressin release were detected from the anterior hypothalamus of aggressive, cocaine-treated animals compared with non-aggressive, saline-treated controls. Together, these data suggest that adolescent cocaine exposure increases aggression by increasing stimulated release of vasopressin in the anterior hypothalamus, providing direct evidence for a causal role of anterior hypothalamic-vasopressin activity in adolescent cocaine-induced offensive aggression. A model for how alterations in anterior hypothalamic-vasopressin neural functioning may facilitate the development of the

  12. Transcriptome analysis of genes and gene networks involved in aggressive behavior in mouse and zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Malki, Karim; Du Rietz, Ebba; Crusio, Wim E; Pain, Oliver; Paya-Cano, Jose; Karadaghi, Rezhaw L; Sluyter, Frans; de Boer, Sietse F; Sandnabba, Kenneth; Schalkwyk, Leonard C; Asherson, Philip; Tosto, Maria Grazia

    2016-09-01

    Despite moderate heritability estimates, the molecular architecture of aggressive behavior remains poorly characterized. This study compared gene expression profiles from a genetic mouse model of aggression with zebrafish, an animal model traditionally used to study aggression. A meta-analytic, cross-species approach was used to identify genomic variants associated with aggressive behavior. The Rankprod algorithm was used to evaluated mRNA differences from prefrontal cortex tissues of three sets of mouse lines (N = 18) selectively bred for low and high aggressive behavior (SAL/LAL, TA/TNA, and NC900/NC100). The same approach was used to evaluate mRNA differences in zebrafish (N = 12) exposed to aggressive or non-aggressive social encounters. Results were compared to uncover genes consistently implicated in aggression across both studies. Seventy-six genes were differentially expressed (PFP < 0.05) in aggressive compared to non-aggressive mice. Seventy genes were differentially expressed in zebrafish exposed to a fight encounter compared to isolated zebrafish. Seven genes (Fos, Dusp1, Hdac4, Ier2, Bdnf, Btg2, and Nr4a1) were differentially expressed across both species 5 of which belonging to a gene-network centred on the c-Fos gene hub. Network analysis revealed an association with the MAPK signaling cascade. In human studies HDAC4 haploinsufficiency is a key genetic mechanism associated with brachydactyly mental retardation syndrome (BDMR), which is associated with aggressive behaviors. Moreover, the HDAC4 receptor is a drug target for valproic acid, which is being employed as an effective pharmacological treatment for aggressive behavior in geriatric, psychiatric, and brain-injury patients. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27090961

  13. EGFR and microvessel density in canine malignant mammary tumours.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Maria Isabel; Guimarães, Maria João; Pires, Isabel; Prada, Justina; Silva-Carvalho, Ricardo; Lopes, Carlos; Queiroga, Felisbina L

    2013-12-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a transmembrane tyrosine kinase receptor which has been shown to have an important role in human breast cancer. Its role appears to be associated with increased angiogenesis and metastasis. In order to clarify its role in canine mammary tumours (CMT), 61 malignant neoplasms were studied by using immunohistochemistry, comparing expression of EGFR, microvessel density (MVD) by CD31 immunolabelling and characteristics of tumour aggressiveness. High EGFR immunoexpression was statistically significantly associated with tumour size, tumour necrosis, mitotic grade, histological grade of malignancy and clinical stage. High CD31 immunoreactivity was statistically significantly associated with tubule formation, histological grade of malignancy and clinical stage. A positive correlation between EGFR and CD31 immunoexpression (r = 0.843; P < 0.001) was also observed. Results suggest that an over-expression of EGFR may contribute to increased angiogenesis and aggression in malignant CMT, presenting the possibility of using EGFR inhibitors in the context of metastatic disease treatment. PMID:24091029

  14. Why are small males aggressive?

    PubMed Central

    Morrell, Lesley J; Lindström, Jan; Ruxton, Graeme D

    2005-01-01

    Aggression is ubiquitous in the animal kingdom, whenever the interests of individuals conflict. In contests between animals, the larger opponent is often victorious. However, counter intuitively, an individual that has little chance of winning (generally smaller individuals) sometimes initiates contests. A number of hypotheses have been put forward to explain this behaviour, including the ‘desperado effect’ according to which, the likely losers initiate aggression due to lack of alternative options. An alternative explanation suggested recently is that likely losers attack due to an error in perception: they mistakenly perceive their chances of winning as being greater than they are. We show that explaining the apparently maladaptive aggression initiated by the likely loser can be explained on purely economic grounds, without requiring either the desperado effect or perception errors. Using a game-theoretical model, we show that if smaller individuals can accurately assess their chance of winning, if this chance is less than, but close to, a half, and if resources are scarce (or the contested resource is of relatively low value), they are predicted to be as aggressive as their larger opponents. In addition, when resources are abundant, and small individuals have some chance of winning, they may be more aggressive than their larger opponents, as it may benefit larger individuals to avoid the costs of fighting and seek alternative uncontested resources. PMID:16024387

  15. Oral malignant melanoma: Report of three cases with literature review

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Shalini; Tandon, Ankita; Ram, Hari; Gupta, O. P.

    2015-01-01

    Primary oral melanoma is known to be an extremely rare and aggressive neoplasm arising from the mucosal epithelium of the oral cavity especially upper jaw (palate or alveolar gingivae). Malignant melanoma that does not originate in the skin is a very rare disease and is considered one of the most deadly of all human neoplasms. Oral malignant melanoma (OMM) represents about 1% of all melanomas and approximately 0.5% of all oral malignancies. OMM has been reported in patients aged 20 to 80 years and has a male predilection. Because most mucosal melanotic lesions are painless in their early stages, so delayed recognition and subsequent treatment result in worst prognosis. Here, we report three cases with significant heterogeneity in morphological features and biologic behavior. PMID:26668465

  16. Malignant melanoma of the oral cavity: Report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Munde, Anita; Juvekar, Monica Vivek; Karle, Ravindra R.; Wankhede, Pranali

    2014-01-01

    Primary malignant melanoma is a rare and aggressive neoplasm that originates from the proliferation of melanocytes. Although, it comprises 1.3% of all cancers, malignant melanoma of the oral cavity accounts for only 0.2-8% of all reported melanomas and occurs approximately 4 times more frequently in the oral mucosa of the upper jaw, usually on the palate or alveolar gingivae. Most of the mucosal melanomas are usually asymptomatic in early stages, and presents as pigmented patch or a mass delaying the diagnosis until symptoms of swelling, ulceration, bleeding, or loosening of teeth are noted. The prognosis is extremely poor, especially in advanced stages. Therefore, any pigmented lesion of undetermined origin should always be biopsied. We herewith report of two cases of oral malignant melanoma in a 60 and 75-year-old female. PMID:24963252

  17. Malignant melanoma of the oral cavity: Report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Munde, Anita; Juvekar, Monica Vivek; Karle, Ravindra R; Wankhede, Pranali

    2014-04-01

    Primary malignant melanoma is a rare and aggressive neoplasm that originates from the proliferation of melanocytes. Although, it comprises 1.3% of all cancers, malignant melanoma of the oral cavity accounts for only 0.2-8% of all reported melanomas and occurs approximately 4 times more frequently in the oral mucosa of the upper jaw, usually on the palate or alveolar gingivae. Most of the mucosal melanomas are usually asymptomatic in early stages, and presents as pigmented patch or a mass delaying the diagnosis until symptoms of swelling, ulceration, bleeding, or loosening of teeth are noted. The prognosis is extremely poor, especially in advanced stages. Therefore, any pigmented lesion of undetermined origin should always be biopsied. We herewith report of two cases of oral malignant melanoma in a 60 and 75-year-old female. PMID:24963252

  18. Primary malignant melanoma of the oesophagus: two case reports

    PubMed Central

    Pun, Amy Hoi-Ying; Devitt, Peter G.

    2014-01-01

    Primary malignant melanoma of the oesophagus is a rare and aggressive malignancy. This tumour entity accounts for 0.1–0.2% of all oesophageal malignancies and risk factors are yet to be established, although melanosis of the oesophagus may reflect its precursor form. Dysphagia is the commonest symptom. On gastroscopy, it appears as an elevated pigmented mass with satellite lesions in some cases. Unfortunately, most patients present late with metastatic disease. The prognosis is poor with a mean survival time post-operatively of 10–14 months and a 5-year survival rate of 4.5%. Although adjuvant therapy offers some loco-regional control, complete surgical resection offers the best hope for survival. PMID:24876370

  19. Simulants of Malignant Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Piérard-Franchimont, Claudine; Delvenne, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    During the recent period, dermoscopy has yielded improvement in the early disclosure of various atypical melanocytic neoplasms (AMN) of the skin. Beyond this clinical procedure, AMN histopathology remains mandatory for establishing their precise diagnosis. Of note, panels of experts in AMN merely report moderate agreement in various puzzling cases. Divergences in opinion and misdiagnosis are likely increased when histopathological criteria are not fine-tuned and when facing a diversity of AMN types. Furthermore, some AMN have been differently named in the literature including atypical Spitz tumor, metastasizing Spitz tumor, borderline and intermediate melanocytic tumor, malignant Spitz nevus, pigmented epithelioid melanocytoma or animal-type melanoma. Some acronyms have been further suggested such as MELTUMP (after melanocytic tumor of uncertain malignant potential) and STUMP (after Spitzoid melanocytic tumor of uncertain malignant potential). In this review, such AMN at the exclusion of cutaneous malignant melanoma (MM) variants, are grouped under the tentative broad heading skin melanocytoma. Such set of AMN frequently follows an indolent course, although they exhibit atypical and sometimes worrisome patterns or cytological atypia. Rare cases of skin melanocytomas progress to loco regional clusters of lesions (agminate melanocytomas), and even to regional lymph nodes. At times, the distinction between a skin melanocytoma and MM remains puzzling. However, multipronged immunohistochemistry and emerging molecular biology help profiling any malignancy risk if present. PMID:26779311

  20. Asymmetry in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and aggressive behavior: a continuous theta-burst magnetic stimulation study.

    PubMed

    Perach-Barzilay, N; Tauber, A; Klein, E; Chistyakov, A; Ne'eman, R; Shamay-Tsoory, S G

    2013-01-01

    Aggressive behavior is aimed at causing damage or pain to another individual. Aggression has been associated with structural and functional deficits in numerous brain areas, including the dorsolateral region of the prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), typically related to inhibition and impulse control. In this study, we used inhibitory continuous theta-burst magnetic stimulation (cTBS) to explore the role of the right and left DLPFC in aggression. Sixteen healthy right-handed volunteers underwent two sessions involving random, real and sham, right and left DLPFC stimulations. These sessions were followed by the Social Orientation Paradigm (SOP), a monetary task that was specially designed to assess participants' aggressive tendencies by measuring the patterns of their reactive aggression (a response to a perceived provocation) and proactive aggression (an aggressive act with goal-oriented purposes). Results indicate that using cTBS to target the left DLPFC was associated with a greater increase in aggressive responses than right DLPFC stimulation. This pattern of results was found for both reactive and proactive types of aggressive reactions. It is concluded that DLPFC asymmetry is involved in modulating reactive and proactive aggression. Our results are in line with recent studies suggesting that the left DLPFC plays a major role in aggressive behavior. PMID:22963204

  1. Multifunctional targeting vinorelbine plus tetrandrine liposomes for treating brain glioma along with eliminating glioma stem cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Xue-Tao; Tang, Wei; Jiang, Ying; Wang, Xiao-Min; Wang, Yan-Hong; Cheng, Lan; Meng, Xian-Sheng

    2016-04-26

    Malignant brain glioma is the most lethal and aggressive type of cancer. Surgery and radiotherapy cannot eliminate all glioma stem cells (GSCs) and blood-brain barrier (BBB) restricts the movement of antitumor drugs from blood to brain, thus leading to the poor prognosis with high recurrence rate. In the present study, the targeting conjugates of cholesterol polyethylene glycol polyethylenimine (CHOL-PEG2000-PEI) and D-a-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate vapreotide (TPGS1000-VAP) were newly synthesized for transporting drugs across the BBB and targeting glioma cells and GSCs. The multifunctional targeting vinorelbine plus tetrandrine liposomes were constructed by modifying the targeting conjugates. The studies were undertaken on BBB model, glioma cells, GSCs, and glioma-bearing mice. In vitro results showed that multifunctional targeting drugs-loaded liposomes with suitable physicochemical property could enhance the transport drugs across the BBB, increase the intracellular uptake, inhibit glioma cells and GSCs, penetrate and destruct the GSCs spheroids, and induce apoptosis via activating related apoptotic proteins. In vivo results demonstrated that multifunctional targeting drugs-loaded liposomes could significantly accumulate into brain tumor location, show the specificity to tumor sites, and result in a robust overall antitumor efficacy in glioma-bearing mice. These data suggested that the multifunctional targeting vinorelbine plus tetrandrine liposomes could offer a promising strategy for treating brain glioma. PMID:27029055

  2. Accuracy in Judgments of Aggressiveness

    PubMed Central

    Kenny, David A.; West, Tessa V.; Cillessen, Antonius H. N.; Coie, John D.; Dodge, Kenneth A.; Hubbard, Julie A.; Schwartz, David

    2009-01-01

    Perceivers are both accurate and biased in their understanding of others. Past research has distinguished between three types of accuracy: generalized accuracy, a perceiver’s accuracy about how a target interacts with others in general; perceiver accuracy, a perceiver’s view of others corresponding with how the perceiver is treated by others in general; and dyadic accuracy, a perceiver’s accuracy about a target when interacting with that target. Researchers have proposed that there should be more dyadic than other forms of accuracy among well-acquainted individuals because of the pragmatic utility of forecasting the behavior of interaction partners. We examined behavioral aggression among well-acquainted peers. A total of 116 9-year-old boys rated how aggressive their classmates were toward other classmates. Subsequently, 11 groups of 6 boys each interacted in play groups, during which observations of aggression were made. Analyses indicated strong generalized accuracy yet little dyadic and perceiver accuracy. PMID:17575243

  3. Tailless and Atrophin control Drosophila aggression by regulating neuropeptide signalling in the pars intercerebralis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Shaun M.; Thomas, Amanda L.; Nomie, Krystle J.; Huang, Longwen; Dierick, Herman A.

    2014-02-01

    Aggressive behaviour is widespread throughout the animal kingdom. However, its mechanisms are poorly understood, and the degree of molecular conservation between distantly related species is unknown. Here we show that knockdown of tailless (tll) increases aggression in Drosophila, similar to the effect of its mouse orthologue Nr2e1. Tll localizes to the adult pars intercerebralis (PI), which shows similarity to the mammalian hypothalamus. Knockdown of tll in the PI is sufficient to increase aggression and is rescued by co-expressing human NR2E1. Knockdown of Atrophin, a Tll co-repressor, also increases aggression, and both proteins physically interact in the PI. tll knockdown-induced aggression is fully suppressed by blocking neuropeptide processing or release from the PI. In addition, genetically activating PI neurons increases aggression, mimicking the aggression-inducing effect of hypothalamic stimulation. Together, our results suggest that a transcriptional control module regulates neuropeptide signalling from the neurosecretory cells of the brain to control aggressive behaviour.

  4. Teachers' Reactions to Children's Aggression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nesdale, Drew; Pickering, Kaye

    2006-01-01

    Drawing on social schema theory (Fiske & Taylor, 1991) and social identity theory (Tajfel & Turner, 1979), this study examined the impact on teachers' reactions to children's aggression of three variables, two of which were related to the aggressors and one was related to the teachers. Experienced female elementary school teachers (N=90) each read…

  5. Explorations of Affection and Aggression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shuntich, Richard J.; Shapiro, Richard

    Considerable effort has been devoted to investigating various aspects of love and affection, but there have been few studies about direct expressions of affection. Relationships between gender composition of a dyad and the affection/aggression expressed by the dyad were examined as was the possibility of increasing the amount of affectionate…

  6. Risperidone and Explosive Aggressive Autism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horrigan, Joseph P.; Barnhill, L. Jarrett

    1997-01-01

    In this study, 11 males with autism and mental retardation were administered risperidone. Substantial clinical improvement was noted almost immediately; patients with aggression, self-injury, explosivity, and poor sleep hygiene were most improved. The modal dose for optimal response was 0.5 mg bid. Weight gain was a significant side effect.…

  7. Male Responses to Female Aggression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Gordon W.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Randomly assigned 60 male undergraduates to view film clip of professional lady wrestlers or of mud wrestling, or to no-film control. Both films produced negative changes in mood states, principally increase in aggression and decrease in social affection. Viewing films did not produce changes in men's acceptance of interpersonal violence against…

  8. The Passive Aggressive Conflict Cycle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitson, Signe

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the Passive Aggressive Conflict Cycle (PACC) helps observers to be able to look beyond behavior and better understand what is occurring beneath the surface. This article presents a real-life example of a seemingly minor conflict between a teacher and child that elicited an apparent major overreaction by the adult. Also provided is a…

  9. Television Portrayal and Aggressive Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Comstock, George

    This is a review of research relating to the attributes of portrayals which play a role in affecting aggressive behavior. The effects of portrayal can occur at any of three successive stages: acquisition, disinhibition/stimulation/arousal, performance. The older the individual, the more likely the influence is to be in all three stages of…

  10. Biochemistry and Aggression: Psychohematological Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Hilliard G., Jr.; Spitz, Reuben T.

    1994-01-01

    Examines biochemical measures in a population of forensic psychiatric inpatients. Regression equations utilizing chemical and biological variables were developed and evaluated to determine their value in predicting the severity and frequency of aggression. Findings strongly suggest the presence of specific biochemical alteration among those…

  11. Malignant Catarrhal Fever

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Malignant catarrhal fever (MCF) is a frequently fatal viral disease of ruminant species, particularly cattle, bison, and deer. Clinical signs vary between species. Two major epidemiologic types of MCF exist, and are defined by the ruminant species that serve as natural reservoir hosts for infection...

  12. Serotonin and the search for the anatomical substrate of aggression

    PubMed Central

    Alekseyenko, Olga V; Kravitz, Edward A

    2014-01-01

    Abstract All species of animals display aggression in order to obtain resources such as territories, mates, or food. Appropriate displays of aggression rely on the correct identification of a potential competitor, an evaluation of the environmental signals, and the physiological state of the animal. With a hard-wired circuitry involving fixed numbers of neurons, neuromodulators like serotonin offer adaptive flexibility in behavioral responses without changing the “hard-wiring”. In a recent report, we combined intersectional genetics, quantitative behavioral assays and morphological analyses to identify single serotonergic neurons that modulate the escalation of aggression. We found anatomical target areas within the brain where these neurons appear to form synaptic contacts with 5HT1A receptor-expressing neurons, and then confirmed the likelihood of those connections on a functional level. In this Extra View article, we offer an extended discussion of these recent findings and elaborate on how they can link a cellular and functional mapping of an aggression-regulating circuit at a single-cell resolution level. PMID:25923771

  13. The Role of Bcl-2 Family Proteins in Therapy Responses of Malignant Astrocytic Gliomas: Bcl2L12 and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Kouri, Fotini M.; Jensen, Samuel A.; Stegh, Alexander H.

    2012-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is a highly aggressive and lethal brain cancer with a median survival of less than two years after diagnosis. Hallmarks of GBM tumors include soaring proliferative indices, high levels of angiogenesis, diffuse invasion into normal brain parenchyma, resistance toward therapy-induced apoptosis, and pseudopallisading necrosis. Despite the recent advances in neurosurgery, radiation therapy, and the development of targeted chemotherapeutic regimes, GBM remains one of the deadliest types of cancer. Particularly, the alkylating agent temozolomide (TMZ) in combination with radiation therapy prolonged patient survival only marginally, and clinical studies assessing efficacies of targeted therapies, foremost ATP mimetics inhibiting the activity of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), revealed only few initial responders; tumor recurrence is nearly universal, and salvage therapies to combat such progression remain ineffective. Consequently, myriad preclinical and clinical studies began to define the molecular mechanisms underlying therapy resistance of GBM tumors, and pointed to the Bcl-2 protein family, in particular the atypical member Bcl2-Like 12 (Bcl2L12), as important regulators of therapy-induced cell death. This review will discuss the multi-faceted modi operandi of Bcl-2 family proteins, describe their roles in therapy resistance of malignant glioma, and outline current and future drug development efforts to therapeutically target Bcl-2 proteins. PMID:22431925

  14. Implicit cognitive aggression among young male prisoners: Association with dispositional and current aggression.

    PubMed

    Ireland, Jane L; Adams, Christine

    2015-01-01

    The current study explores associations between implicit and explicit aggression in young adult male prisoners, seeking to apply the Reflection-Impulsive Model and indicate parity with elements of the General Aggression Model and social cognition. Implicit cognitive aggressive processing is not an area that has been examined among prisoners. Two hundred and sixty two prisoners completed an implicit cognitive aggression measure (Puzzle Test) and explicit aggression measures, covering current behaviour (DIPC-R) and aggression disposition (AQ). It was predicted that dispositional aggression would be predicted by implicit cognitive aggression, and that implicit cognitive aggression would predict current engagement in aggressive behaviour. It was also predicted that more impulsive implicit cognitive processing would associate with aggressive behaviour whereas cognitively effortful implicit cognitive processing would not. Implicit aggressive cognitive processing was associated with increased dispositional aggression but not current reports of aggressive behaviour. Impulsive implicit cognitive processing of an aggressive nature predicted increased dispositional aggression whereas more cognitively effortful implicit cognitive aggression did not. The article concludes by outlining the importance of accounting for implicit cognitive processing among prisoners and the need to separate such processing into facets (i.e. impulsive vs. cognitively effortful). Implications for future research and practice in this novel area of study are indicated. PMID:25857854

  15. Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptors as Novel Therapeutic Targets in SNF5-Deleted Malignant Rhabdoid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Wöhrle, Simon; Jagani, Zainab; Thuery, Anne; Bauer-Probst, Beatrice; Reimann, Flavia; Stamm, Christelle; Pornon, Astrid; Romanet, Vincent; Guagnano, Vito; Brümmendorf, Thomas; Sellers, William R.; Hofmann, Francesco; Roberts, Charles W. M.; Graus Porta, Diana

    2013-01-01

    Malignant rhabdoid tumors (MRTs) are aggressive pediatric cancers arising in brain, kidney and soft tissues, which are characterized by loss of the tumor suppressor SNF5/SMARCB1. MRTs are poorly responsive to chemotherapy and thus a high unmet clinical need exists for novel therapies for MRT patients. SNF5 is a core subunit of the SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex which affects gene expression by nucleosome remodeling. Here, we report that loss of SNF5 function correlates with increased expression of fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs) in MRT cell lines and primary tumors and that re-expression of SNF5 in MRT cells causes a marked repression of FGFR expression. Conversely, siRNA-mediated impairment of SWI/SNF function leads to elevated levels of FGFR2 in human fibroblasts. In vivo, treatment with NVP-BGJ398, a selective FGFR inhibitor, blocks progression of a murine MRT model. Hence, we identify FGFR signaling as an aberrantly activated oncogenic pathway in MRTs and propose pharmacological inhibition of FGFRs as a potential novel clinical therapy for MRTs. PMID:24204904

  16. COX7AR is a Stress-inducible Mitochondrial COX Subunit that Promotes Breast Cancer Malignancy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kezhong; Wang, Guohui; Zhang, Xuebao; Hüttemann, Philipp P; Qiu, Yining; Liu, Jenney; Mitchell, Allison; Lee, Icksoo; Zhang, Chao; Lee, Jin-Sook; Pecina, Petr; Wu, Guojun; Yang, Zeng-Quan; Hüttemann, Maik; Grossman, Lawrence I

    2016-01-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase (COX), the terminal enzyme of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, plays a key role in regulating mitochondrial energy production and cell survival. COX subunit VIIa polypeptide 2-like protein (COX7AR) is a novel COX subunit that was recently found to be involved in mitochondrial supercomplex assembly and mitochondrial respiration activity. Here, we report that COX7AR is expressed in high energy-demanding tissues, such as brain, heart, liver, and aggressive forms of human breast cancer cells. Under cellular stress that stimulates energy metabolism, COX7AR is induced and incorporated into the mitochondrial COX complex. Functionally, COX7AR promotes cellular energy production in human mammary epithelial cells. Gain- and loss-of-function analysis demonstrates that COX7AR is required for human breast cancer cells to maintain higher rates of proliferation, clone formation, and invasion. In summary, our study revealed that COX7AR is a stress-inducible mitochondrial COX subunit that facilitates human breast cancer malignancy. These findings have important implications in the understanding and treatment of human breast cancer and the diseases associated with mitochondrial energy metabolism. PMID:27550821

  17. COX7AR is a Stress-inducible Mitochondrial COX Subunit that Promotes Breast Cancer Malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kezhong; Wang, Guohui; Zhang, Xuebao; Hüttemann, Philipp P.; Qiu, Yining; Liu, Jenney; Mitchell, Allison; Lee, Icksoo; Zhang, Chao; Lee, Jin-sook; Pecina, Petr; Wu, Guojun; Yang, Zeng-quan; Hüttemann, Maik; Grossman, Lawrence I.

    2016-01-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase (COX), the terminal enzyme of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, plays a key role in regulating mitochondrial energy production and cell survival. COX subunit VIIa polypeptide 2-like protein (COX7AR) is a novel COX subunit that was recently found to be involved in mitochondrial supercomplex assembly and mitochondrial respiration activity. Here, we report that COX7AR is expressed in high energy-demanding tissues, such as brain, heart, liver, and aggressive forms of human breast cancer cells. Under cellular stress that stimulates energy metabolism, COX7AR is induced and incorporated into the mitochondrial COX complex. Functionally, COX7AR promotes cellular energy production in human mammary epithelial cells. Gain- and loss-of-function analysis demonstrates that COX7AR is required for human breast cancer cells to maintain higher rates of proliferation, clone formation, and invasion. In summary, our study revealed that COX7AR is a stress-inducible mitochondrial COX subunit that facilitates human breast cancer malignancy. These findings have important implications in the understanding and treatment of human breast cancer and the diseases associated with mitochondrial energy metabolism. PMID:27550821

  18. Fibroblast growth factor receptors as novel therapeutic targets in SNF5-deleted malignant rhabdoid tumors.

    PubMed

    Wöhrle, Simon; Weiss, Andreas; Ito, Moriko; Kauffmann, Audrey; Murakami, Masato; Jagani, Zainab; Thuery, Anne; Bauer-Probst, Beatrice; Reimann, Flavia; Stamm, Christelle; Pornon, Astrid; Romanet, Vincent; Guagnano, Vito; Brümmendorf, Thomas; Sellers, William R; Hofmann, Francesco; Roberts, Charles W M; Graus Porta, Diana

    2013-01-01

    Malignant rhabdoid tumors (MRTs) are aggressive pediatric cancers arising in brain, kidney and soft tissues, which are characterized by loss of the tumor suppressor SNF5/SMARCB1. MRTs are poorly responsive to chemotherapy and thus a high unmet clinical need exists for novel therapies for MRT patients. SNF5 is a core subunit of the SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex which affects gene expression by nucleosome remodeling. Here, we report that loss of SNF5 function correlates with increased expression of fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs) in MRT cell lines and primary tumors and that re-expression of SNF5 in MRT cells causes a marked repression of FGFR expression. Conversely, siRNA-mediated impairment of SWI/SNF function leads to elevated levels of FGFR2 in human fibroblasts. In vivo, treatment with NVP-BGJ398, a selective FGFR inhibitor, blocks progression of a murine MRT model. Hence, we identify FGFR signaling as an aberrantly activated oncogenic pathway in MRTs and propose pharmacological inhibition of FGFRs as a potential novel clinical therapy for MRTs. PMID:24204904

  19. Aquaporins and Brain Tumors.

    PubMed

    Maugeri, Rosario; Schiera, Gabriella; Di Liegro, Carlo Maria; Fricano, Anna; Iacopino, Domenico Gerardo; Di Liegro, Italia

    2016-01-01

    Brain primary tumors are among the most diverse and complex human cancers, and they are normally classified on the basis of the cell-type and/or the grade of malignancy (the most malignant being glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), grade IV). Glioma cells are able to migrate throughout the brain and to stimulate angiogenesis, by inducing brain capillary endothelial cell proliferation. This in turn causes loss of tight junctions and fragility of the blood-brain barrier, which becomes leaky. As a consequence, the most serious clinical complication of glioblastoma is the vasogenic brain edema. Both glioma cell migration and edema have been correlated with modification of the expression/localization of different isoforms of aquaporins (AQPs), a family of water channels, some of which are also involved in the transport of other small molecules, such as glycerol and urea. In this review, we discuss relationships among expression/localization of AQPs and brain tumors/edema, also focusing on the possible role of these molecules as both diagnostic biomarkers of cancer progression, and therapeutic targets. Finally, we will discuss the possibility that AQPs, together with other cancer promoting factors, can be exchanged among brain cells via extracellular vesicles (EVs). PMID:27367682

  20. Aquaporins and Brain Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Maugeri, Rosario; Schiera, Gabriella; Di Liegro, Carlo Maria; Fricano, Anna; Iacopino, Domenico Gerardo; Di Liegro, Italia

    2016-01-01

    Brain primary tumors are among the most diverse and complex human cancers, and they are normally classified on the basis of the cell-type and/or the grade of malignancy (the most malignant being glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), grade IV). Glioma cells are able to migrate throughout the brain and to stimulate angiogenesis, by inducing brain capillary endothelial cell proliferation. This in turn causes loss of tight junctions and fragility of the blood–brain barrier, which becomes leaky. As a consequence, the most serious clinical complication of glioblastoma is the vasogenic brain edema. Both glioma cell migration and edema have been correlated with modification of the expression/localization of different isoforms of aquaporins (AQPs), a family of water channels, some of which are also involved in the transport of other small molecules, such as glycerol and urea. In this review, we discuss relationships among expression/localization of AQPs and brain tumors/edema, also focusing on the possible role of these molecules as both diagnostic biomarkers of cancer progression, and therapeutic targets. Finally, we will discuss the possibility that AQPs, together with other cancer promoting factors, can be exchanged among brain cells via extracellular vesicles (EVs). PMID:27367682

  1. Malignant Melanoma of the Foot

    MedlinePlus

    ... Javascript in your browser. Malignant Melanoma of the Foot What is Malignant Melanoma? Melanoma is a cancer ... age groups, even the young. Melanoma in the Foot Melanoma that occurs in the foot or ankle ...

  2. Malignant cancer and invasive placentation: A case for positive pleiotropy between endometrial and malignancy phenotypes.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Alaric W; Wagner, Günter P

    2014-01-01

    Cancer metastasis is an invasive process that involves the transplantation of cells into new environments. Since human placentation is also invasive, hypotheses about a relationship between invasive placentation in eutherian mammals and metastasis have been proposed. The relationship between metastatic cancer and invasive placentation is usually presented in terms of antagonistic pleiotropy. According to this hypothesis, evolution of invasive placentation also established the mechanisms for cancer metastasis. Here, in contrast, we argue that the secondary evolution of less invasive placentation in some mammalian lineages may have resulted in positive pleiotropic effects on cancer survival by lowering malignancy rates. These positive pleiotropic effects would manifest themselves as resistance to cancer cell invasion. To provide a preliminary test of this proposal, we re-analyze data from Priester and Mantel (Occurrence of tumors in domestic animals. Data from 12 United States and Canadian colleges of veterinary medicine. J Natl Cancer Inst 1971; 47: :1333-44) about malignancy rates in cows, horses, cats and dogs. From our analysis we found that equines and bovines, animals with less invasive placentation, have lower rates of metastatic cancer than felines and canines in skin and glandular epithelial cancers as well as connective tissue sarcomas. We conclude that a link between type of placentation and species-specific malignancy rates is more likely related to derived mechanisms that suppress invasion rather than different degrees of fetal placental aggressiveness. PMID:25324490

  3. Deregulated proliferation and differentiation in brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Swartling, Fredrik J; Čančer, Matko; Frantz, Aaron; Weishaupt, Holger; Persson, Anders I

    2015-01-01

    Neurogenesis, the generation of new neurons, is deregulated in neural stem cell (NSC)- and progenitor-derived murine models of malignant medulloblastoma and glioma, the most common brain tumors of children and adults, respectively. Molecular characterization of human malignant brain tumors, and in particular brain tumor stem cells (BTSCs), has identified neurodevelopmental transcription factors, microRNAs, and epigenetic factors known to inhibit neuronal and glial differentiation. We are starting to understand how these factors are regulated by the major oncogenic drivers in malignant brain tumors. In this review, we will focus on the molecular switches that block normal neuronal differentiation and induce brain tumor formation. Genetic or pharmacological manipulation of these switches in BTSCs has been shown to restore the ability of tumor cells to differentiate. We will discuss potential brain tumor therapies that will promote differentiation in order to reduce treatment resistance, suppress tumor growth, and prevent recurrence in patients. PMID:25416506

  4. Deregulated proliferation and differentiation in brain tumors

    PubMed Central

    Swartling, Fredrik J; Čančer, Matko; Frantz, Aaron; Weishaupt, Holger; Persson, Anders I

    2014-01-01

    Neurogenesis, the generation of new neurons, is deregulated in neural stem cell (NSC)- and progenitor-derived murine models of malignant medulloblastoma and glioma, the most common brain tumors of children and adults, respectively. Molecular characterization of human malignant brain tumors, and in particular brain tumor stem cells (BTSCs), has identified neurodevelopmental transcription factors, microRNAs, and epigenetic factors known to inhibit neuronal and glial differentiation. We are starting to understand how these factors are regulated by the major oncogenic drivers in malignant brain tumors. In this review, we will focus on the molecular switches that block normal neuronal differentiation and induce brain tumor formation. Genetic or pharmacological manipulation of these switches in BTSCs has been shown to restore the ability of tumor cells to differentiate. We will discuss potential brain tumor therapies that will promote differentiation in order to reduce treatment-resistance, suppress tumor growth, and prevent recurrence in patients. PMID:25416506

  5. A Psychoeducational Group for Aggressive Adolescent Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cummings, Anne L.; Hoffman, Sue; Leschied, Alan W.

    2004-01-01

    This article describes an eight-session psychoeducational group for aggressive adolescent girls. The content of the group sessions is based on research that has identified gender-specific issues related to aggression in adolescent girls, such as gender-role socialization, childhood abuse, relational aggression, horizontal violence, and girl…

  6. Aggressive behavior in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Zahrt, Dawn M; Melzer-Lange, Marlene D

    2011-08-01

    After completing this article, readers should be able to: 1. Describe the developmental stages of aggressive behavior in children.2. Know how to provide parents with support and resources in caring for a child who displays aggressive behavior.3. Delineate the prognosis for children who have aggressive behaviors. PMID:21807873

  7. Investigating Three Explanations of Women's Relationship Aggression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham-Kevan, Nicola; Archer, John

    2005-01-01

    This study investigated explanations of women's partner aggression in a sample of 358 women. Women completed measures of physical aggression, control, and fear. Three explanations of women's partner aggression were explored: (a) that its use is associated with fear, (b) that it is reciprocal, and (c) that it is coercive. Each explanation received…

  8. Fantasy Aggression and the Catharsis Phenomenon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spiegel, Sharon Baron; Zelin, Martin

    1973-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the effects of fantasy aggression on blood pressure, affective states, and probability of subsequent aggression. The results are inconclusive because of the limited range of fantasy stimuli used and the short amount of time allowed for aggression to occur. (Author/KM)

  9. The myth of the aggressive monkey.

    PubMed

    Reinhardt, Viktor

    2002-01-01

    Captive rhesus macaques are not naturally aggressive, but poor husbandry and handling practices can trigger their aggression toward conspecifics and toward the human handler. The myth of the aggressive monkey probably is based on often not taking into account basic ethological principles when managing rhesus macaques in the research laboratory setting. PMID:16221082

  10. Female Aggression and Violence: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Penelope E.

    2012-01-01

    Aggression and violence among adolescent females has received extension attention throughout the nation. Girls often employ relationally aggressive behaviors to resolve conflict, which often leads to physical aggression. The purpose of this study was to examine a girl fight from multiple perspectives to gain a better understanding of the causes…

  11. Understanding and Preventing Aggressive Responses in Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Studer, Jeannine

    1996-01-01

    Fighting violence requires a networking approach among schools, community, and parents. This article advises elementary school counselors: (a) focus on the causes of aggression; (b) identify children with the propensity for behaving aggressively; and (c) prevent aggressive responses in children and adolescents by introducing techniques and…

  12. Relational Aggression among Middle School Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dallape, Aprille

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the correlates that define relational aggression among middle school girls, the relationships among these factors, and the association between the correlates of relational aggression and the type of relational aggression (e.g., verbal, withdrawal) exhibited among middle school girls. The findings of this…

  13. Treatment principles for peritoneal surface malignancies.

    PubMed

    Deraco, Marcello; Kusamura, Shigeki; Corbellini, Carlo; Guaglio, Marcello; Paviglianiti, Cosimo; Baratti, Dario

    2016-04-01

    A paradigm shift has recently occurred in the clinical management of peritoneal surface malignancies (PSM). Once regarded as end-stage disseminated conditions only to be palliated, PSM are now increasingly recognized as local-regional disease entities amenable to potentially curative therapies. Better knowledge of the natural history and patterns of disease-progression has evolved into a novel treatment approach combining aggressive cytoreductive surgery (CRS) and perioperative intraperitoneal chemotherapy, to treat the microscopic residual disease. Such a complex comprehensive treatment has reportedly resulted in a survival improvement over historical controls, and it is gaining an increasing acceptance as standard of care for selected patients with peritoneal metastases from gastrointestinal and gynecological tumor and rare primary peritoneal malignancies. This article addresses the rational bases supporting the comprehensive treatment of PSM. The biology and patho-physiology of peritoneal tumor dissemination, with their implication on surgical and local-regional management are reviewed. The cytoreductive surgical procedures and intraperitoneal chemotherapy administration techniques are described, together with the theoretical principles from which have originated. The main controversial issues in the operative management of PSM are discussed, focusing on the technical variants adopted in our institution. The most recent literature data on both patient selection and appropriate indications for combined treatment are presented. Additionally, a brief overview of treatment results and long-term outcomes following cytoreductive surgery and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) in the different PSM is provided. PMID:26847729

  14. Aquaporins: Their role in gastrointestinal malignancies.

    PubMed

    Nagaraju, Ganji Purnachandra; Basha, Riyaz; Rajitha, Balney; Alese, Olatunji Boladale; Alam, Afroz; Pattnaik, Subasini; El-Rayes, Bassel

    2016-04-01

    Aquaporins (AQPs) are small (~30 kDa monomers) integral membrane water transport proteins that allow water to flow through cell membranes in reaction to osmotic gradients in cells. In mammals, the family of AQPs has thirteen (AQP0-12) unique members that mediate critical biological functions. Since AQPs can impact cell proliferation, migration and angiogenesis, their role in various human cancers is well established. Recently, AQPs have been explored as potential diagnostic and therapeutic targets in gastrointestinal (GI) cancers. GI cancers encompass multiple sites including the colon, esophagus, stomach and pancreas. Research in the last three decades has revealed biological aspects and signaling pathways critical for the development of GI cancers. Since the majority of these cancers are very aggressive and rapidly metastasizes, identifying effective targets is crucial for treatment. Preclinical studies have utilized inhibitors of specific AQPs and knock down of AQP expression using siRNA. Although several studies have explored the role of AQPs in colorectal, esophageal, gastric, hepatocellular and pancreatic cancers, there is no comprehensive review compiling the available information on GI cancers as has been published for other malignancies such as ovarian cancer. Due to the similarities and association of various sites of GI cancers, it is helpful to consider these results collectively in order to better understand the role of specific AQPs in critical GI cancers. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the role of AQPs in GI malignancies with particular focus on diagnosis and therapeutic applications. PMID:26780474

  15. Malignant Melanoma With Osteoclast-Like Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Wasserman, Jason K; Sekhon, Harmanjatinder S; Ayroud, Yasmine

    2015-09-01

    Osteoclast-like giant cells are frequently encountered in nonskeletal malignancies; however, the evidence to date suggests that they represent a tissue response to the lesion rather than neoplastic differentiation. We describe a case of metastatic melanoma demonstrating osteoclast-like differentiation in the lung. The lung nodule was diagnosed as a metastatic melanoma by histological features and confirmed by immunohistochemistry. Resection specimen showed numerous multinucleated giant cells exhibiting osteoclast-like morphology dispersed throughout the lesion. Both the neoplastic melanocytes and giant cells were reactive for HMB-45, Melan-A, and S100. In addition, the multinucleated neoplastic giant cells were also reactive for the monocyte/macrophage lineage markers CD68 and CD163, and alkaline phosphatase, an enzyme present in normal osteoclasts. The neoplastic melanocytes and the multinucleated neoplastic giant cells were also reactive for microphthalmia-associated transcription factor, a protein required for the development of both melanocytes and osteoclasts. Collectively, a co-expression of monocyte/macrophage markers along with melanocytic markers and alkaline phosphatase in the multinucleated neoplastic giant cells in metastatic melanoma suggest that malignant melanocytes are capable of differentiating into osteoclast-like cells and consequently aid invasion into various structures and eliciting the aggressive behavior. PMID:26113663

  16. Malignant Pigmented Villonodular Synovitis-A Rare Entity

    PubMed Central

    Sistla, Radha; J.V.S, Vidyasagar; Afroz, Tameem

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Malignant pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) or Malignant giant cell tumour tendon sheath (MGCTTS) is a controversial and debatable lesion. Few case reports have indicated the potential for metastasis.1These aggressive cases are designated malignant giant cell tumour tendon sheath or malignant PVNS. Less than 20 cases are described in literature. We report a case of 65 year old lady who was diagnosed eight years back as pigmented villonodular synovitis. She had multiple local recurrences and now presented with lymphnodal metastases, which is extremely rare. Case Report: Sixty five year old lady presented with swelling in left inguinal region of six months duration. She gave a past history of swelling around medial condyle of left femur eight years back. Swelling was excised three times. At the time of third recurrence, swelling was extensive, infiltrating surrounding tissues and underlying bone, encasing femoral and popliteal vessels for which she underwent an above knee amputation. She now presented with inguinal swelling measuring 5.7×3.0 cms. Positron Emission Tomography Scan (PET-CT) revealed multiple enlarged left common iliac, internal and external iliac nodes, largest measuring 7.0 cms. Both the inguinal and pelvic nodes were excised. Lesion was diagnosed as metastatic deposits of Malignant pigmented villonodular synovitis based on morphological and Immunohistochemical findings. Conclusion: It is important to have a high index of clinical suspicion because these lesions can have an aggressive behaviour even with bland cytological features. Our experience suggests that in a recurrent lesion for GCTTS. A wide surgical excision with safe surgical margins and close follow up with radiological evaluation might help to diagnose these lesions early and be amenable to limb salvage surgeries. PMID:27298991

  17. Malignant fibrous histiocytoma of the lung.

    PubMed

    Aoe, Keisuke; Hiraki, Akio; Maeda, Tadashi; Onoda, Tetsuya; Makihata, Kiyoshi; Takao, Kazushi; Fujii, Makoto; Murakami, Kazuo; Moriyama, Michihiko; Eda, Ryosuke; Takeyama, Hiroyasu

    2003-01-01

    Primary malignant fibrous histiocytoma (MFH) of the lung is very rare. To date, only 32 reports of 63 cases of primary MFH of the lung have appeared in English, excluding tumors arising from the pulmonary arteries and pleura. We describe a patient with primary MFH of the lung who developed brain metastasis and involvement of pulmonary great vessels. In addition, we reviewed previously reported cases to establish the clinical characteristics and most appropriate management of primary pulmonary MFH. When disease is sufficiently limited, complete resection remains the mainstay of treatment. PMID:12926092

  18. Feelings about Verbal Aggression: Justifications for Sending and Hurt from Receiving Verbally Aggressive Messages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Matthew M.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Investigates whether receiving verbally aggressive messages was more hurtful depending on the source of the message; whether trait verbal aggression is justified; and whether the perceived hurt of verbally aggressive messages is related to a tendency to be verbally aggressive. Finds that messages from friends caused more hurt than messages from…

  19. Social Aggression on Television and Its Relationship to Children's Aggression in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martins, Nicole; Wilson, Barbara J.

    2012-01-01

    A survey was conducted with over 500 children in grades K-5 to examine whether exposure to socially aggressive content was related to children's use of social aggression. The results of the survey revealed a significant relationship between exposure to televised social aggression and increased social aggression at school, but only for girls and…

  20. Effects of Aggressive vs. Nonaggressive Films on the Aggressive Behavior of Mentally Retarded Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Charles

    Examined was the effect of viewing an aggressive film on the behavior of 22 moderately and mildly mentally retarded children (5-11 years old). Ss' doll playing was observed after they viewed a nonaggressive and an aggressive film. Results supported the hypothesis that Ss would exhibit more aggressive behavior following the aggressive than the…

  1. Microbiome and Malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Plottel, Claudia S.; Blaser, Martin J.

    2011-01-01

    Current knowledge is insufficient to explain why only a proportion of individuals exposed to environmental carcinogens or carrying a genetic predisposition to cancer develop disease. Clearly, other factors must be important and one such element that has recently received attention is the human microbiome, the residential microbes including Bacteria, Archaea, Eukaryotes, and viruses that colonize humans. Here, we review principles and paradigms of microbiome-related malignancy, as illustrated by three specific microbial-host interactions. We review the effects of the microbiota on local and adjacent-neoplasia, present the estrobolome model of distant effects, and discuss the complex interactions with a latent virus leading to malignancy. These are separate facets of a complex biology interfacing all the microbial species we harbor from birth onward toward early reproductive success and eventual senescence. PMID:22018233

  2. Lymphoscintigraphy in malignant melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, C.G.; Norman, J.; Cruse, C.W.; Reintgen, D.S.; Clark, R.A. )

    1992-01-01

    The development and rationale for the use of lymphoscintigraphy in the preoperative evaluation of patients with malignant melanoma being considered for elective lymph node dissection is reviewed. This overview is updated by an analysis of 135 patients with early stage malignant melanoma involving the head, neck, shoulders, and trunk at Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute at the University of South Florida (Tampa, FL). High discordancy rates (overall, 41%) were seen between drainage patterns predicted from historical anatomical guidelines and those revealed by the lymphoscintigraphic examination. The high discordancy rate was most pronounced in the head (64%) and the neck (73%). Surgical management was changed in 33% of the patients, overall. A preoperative lymphoscintigram is recommended for all patients with melanoma with head, neck, and truncal lesions evaluated for elective lymph node dissection as the lymphatic drainage patterns are often unpredictable and variable.

  3. Pembrolizumab in Treating Patients With Malignant Mesothelioma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-10

    Biphasic Mesothelioma; Epithelioid Mesothelioma; Peritoneal Malignant Mesothelioma; Pleural Biphasic Mesothelioma; Pleural Epithelioid Mesothelioma; Pleural Malignant Mesothelioma; Pleural Sarcomatoid Mesothelioma; Recurrent Peritoneal Malignant Mesothelioma; Recurrent Pleural Malignant Mesothelioma; Sarcomatoid Mesothelioma

  4. Preventing aggressive behaviour in dogs.

    PubMed

    Orritt, Rachel

    2016-07-01

    Delegates from around the world met at the University of Lincoln on June 11 and 12 for the third annual UK Dog Bite Prevention and Behaviour conference. The conference, hosted by dog trainer Victoria Stilwell, brings together dog behaviour experts to discuss possible solutions to this public health issue. Rachel Orritt, who has been examining the perceptions, assessment and management of human-directed aggressive behaviour in dogs for her PhD, reports. PMID:27389748

  5. Treatment of Malignant Pheochromocytoma

    PubMed Central

    Ajallé, R.; Plouin, P. F.; Pacak, K.; Lehnert, H.

    2013-01-01

    Pheochromocytoma (PCC) is a rare disease, mainly sporadic, but also associated with some familial disorders, with a malignancy frequency of approximately 10%. Only the presence of distant metastases, derived from large pleomorphic chromaffin cells, is widely accepted as a criterion of malignancy. Variable symptoms may be caused by production and release of catecholamines. Since there is no curative treatment for malignant PCC and due to its unfavorable prognosis, assuring quality of life is one of the main therapeutic objectives. Besides a long-term medical treatment of symptoms using selective α-1 blockers and nonselective, noncompetitive α- and / or β-blockers, debulking surgery is the first treatment step. In case of a sufficient uptake of 123I-MIBG treatment with targeted radiation therapy, use of 131I-MIBG is an option as an adjuvant therapy, following debulking surgery. Chemotherapy should be applied to patients without positive MIBG-scan, with no response to 131I-MIBG or progression after radionuclide treatment, and especially in cases with high proliferation index. The most effective chemotherapy regimen appears to be the CVD-scheme, including cyclophosphamide, vincristine, and dacarbazine. The so-called targeted molecular therapies with treatment combinations of temozolomide and thalidomide, or sunitinib monotherapy, and novel therapeutic somatostatin analogues have shown promising results and should thus encourage clinical trials to improve the prognosis of metastatic PCC. Within this review the current treatment modalities and novel molecular strategies in the management of this disease are discussed and a treatment algorithm is suggested. PMID:19672813

  6. Malignant Catatonia Mimicking Pheochromocytoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dailin

    2013-01-01

    Malignant catatonia is an unusual and highly fatal neuropsychiatric condition which can present with clinical and biochemical manifestations similar to those of pheochromocytoma. Differentiating between the two diseases is essential as management options greatly diverge. We describe a case of malignant catatonia in a 20-year-old male who presented with concurrent psychotic symptoms and autonomic instability, with markedly increased 24-hour urinary levels of norepinephrine at 1752 nmol/day (normal, 89–470 nmol/day), epinephrine at 1045 nmol/day (normal, <160 nmol/day), and dopamine at 7.9 μmol/day (normal, 0.4–3.3 μmol/day). The patient was treated with multiple sessions of electroconvulsive therapy, which led to complete clinical resolution. Repeat urine collections within weeks of this presenting event revealed normalization or near normalization of his catecholamine and metanephrine levels. Malignant catatonia should be considered in the differential diagnosis of the hypercatecholamine state, particularly in a patient who also exhibits concurrent catatonic features. PMID:24251048

  7. [Malignant biliary obstruction].

    PubMed

    Hucl, Tomáš

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer and cholangiocarcinoma are the most common causes of malignant biliary obstruction. They are diseases of increasing incidence and unfavorable prognosis. Only patients with localized disease indicated for surgery have a chance of long-term survival. These patients represent less than 20 % of all patients, despite the progress in our diagnostic abilities.Locally advanced and metastatic tumors are treated with palliative chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy; the results of such treatments are unsatisfactory. The average survival of patients with unresectable disease is 6 months and only 5-10 % of patients survive 5 years.Biliary drainage is an integral part of palliative treatment. Endoscopically or percutaneosly placed stents improve quality of life, decrease cholestasis and pruritus, but do not significantly improve survival. Biliary stents get occluded over time, possibly resulting in acute cholangitis and require repeated replacement.Photodynamic therapy and radiofrequency ablation, locally active endoscopic methods, have been increasingly used in recent years in palliative treatment of patients with malignant biliary obstruction. In photodynamic therapy, photosensitizer accumulates in tumor tissue and is activated 48 hours later by light of a specific wave length. Application of low voltage high frequency current during radiofrequency ablation results in tissue destruction by heat. Local ablation techniques can have a significant impact in a large group of patients with malignant biliary obstruction, leading to improved prognosis, quality of life and stent patency. PMID:26898789

  8. Endometriosis-associated Malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Krawczyk, N.; Banys-Paluchowski, M.; Schmidt, D.; Ulrich, U.; Fehm, T.

    2016-01-01

    Endometriosis is a common condition in women of reproductive age. According to several epidemiological studies endometriosis may be associated with increased risk of various malignancies. However, endometriosis-associated malignancy (EAM) is defined by certain histological criteria. About 80 % of EAM have been found in the ovary, whereas 20 % are localized in extragonadal sites like intestine, rectovaginal septum, abdominal wall, pleura and others. Some authors suggest that EAM arise from atypical endometriosis as an intermediate lesion between endometriosis and cancer. Moreover, a number of genetic alterations, like loss of heterozygosity (LOH), PTEN, ARID1 A and p53 mutations have been found in both endometriosis and EAM. Endometriosis-associated ovarian cancer (EAOC) is mostly a well or intermediately differentiated tumor of endometrioid or clear cell histological sub-type. Women affected by EAOC are on average five to ten years younger than non-EAOC patients; in most of the cases EAOC is a low stage disease with favorable clinical outcome. Since EAM is a rare condition systematic data on EAM are still missing. A systematic retrospective study on endometriosis-associated malignancies (EAM study) is currently being conducted by the Endometriosis Research Foundation together with the study groups on ovarian and uterine tumors of the working group for gynecological oncology (AGO) (gyn@mlk-berlin.de). PMID:26941451

  9. Asbestos-related malignancy

    SciTech Connect

    Talcott, J.A.; Antman, K.H.

    1988-05-01

    Asbestos-associated malignancies have received significant attention in the lay and medical literature because of the increasing frequency of two asbestos-associated tumors, lung carcinoma and mesothelioma; the wide distribution of asbestos; its status as a prototype environmental carcinogen; and the many recent legal compensation proceedings, for which medical testimony has been required. The understanding of asbestos-associated carcinogenesis has increased through study of animal models, human epidemiology, and, recently, the application of modern molecular biological techniques. However, the detailed mechanisms of carcinogenesis remain unknown. A wide variety of malignancies have been associated with asbestos, although the strongest evidence for a causal association is confined to lung cancer and mesothelioma. Epidemiological studies have provided evidence that both the type of asbestos fiber and the industry in which the exposure occurs may affect the rates of asbestos-associated cancers. It has been shown that asbestos exerts a carcinogenic effect independent of exposure to cigarette smoking that, for lung cancers, is synergistically enhanced by smoking. Other questions remain controversial, such as whether pulmonary fibrosis necessarily precedes asbestos-associated lung cancer and whether some threshold level of exposure to asbestos (including low-dose exposures that may occur in asbestos-associated public buildings) may be safe. Mesothelioma, the most closely asbestos-associated malignancy, has a dismal natural history and has been highly resistant to therapy. However, investigational multi-modality therapy may offer benefit to some patients. 179 references.

  10. 18F-FDG PET/CT Prediction of an Aggressive Clinical Course for Dermatofibrosarcoma Protuberans.

    PubMed

    Basu, Sandip; Goliwale, Fahim

    2016-06-01

    The ability to assess tumor biology is a benefit of molecular imaging with (18)F-FDG PET/CT, which performs better than anatomic imaging in evaluating malignancies. We present an unusual case of fatal dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans, a usually indolent entity for which high-grade (18)F-FDG uptake was predictive of an aggressive clinical course unabated by tyrosine kinase inhibitor imatinib mesylate, to which the patient showed a poor response. PMID:26338485

  11. An aggression-specific cell type in the anterior hypothalamus of finches

    PubMed Central

    Goodson, James L.; Kelly, Aubrey M.; Kingsbury, Marcy A.; Thompson, Richmond R.

    2012-01-01

    The anterior hypothalamus (AH) is a major integrator of neural processes related to aggression and defense, but cell types in the AH that selectively promote aggression are unknown. We here show that aggression is promoted in a very selective and potent manner by dorsal AH neurons that produce vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP). Fos activity in a territorial finch, the violet-eared waxbill (Estrildidae: Uraeginthus granatina) is positively related to aggression in the dorsal AH, overlapping a population of VIP-producing neurons. VIP is known to promote territorial aggression in songbirds, and thus we used antisense oligonucleotides to selectively block AH VIP production in male and female waxbills. This manipulation virtually abolishes aggression, reducing the median number of displacements in a 3-min resident–intruder test from 38 in control subjects to 0 in antisense subjects. Notably, most antisense and control waxbills exhibit an agonistic response such as a threat or agonistic call within 2 s of intrusion. Thus, antisense subjects clearly classify intruders as offensive, but fail to attack. Other social and anxiety-like behaviors are not affected and VIP cell numbers correlate positively with aggression, suggesting that these cells selectively titrate aggression. Additional experiments in the gregarious zebra finch (Estrildidae: Taeniopygia guttata) underscore this functional specificity. Colony-housed finches exhibit significant reductions in aggression (primarily nest defense) following AH VIP knockdown, but no effects are observed for social preferences, pair bonding, courtship, maintenance behaviors, or anxiety-like behaviors. To our knowledge, these findings represent a unique identification of an aggression-specific cell type in the brain. PMID:22872869

  12. No Effects of Bilateral tDCS over Inferior Frontal Gyrus on Response Inhibition and Aggression.

    PubMed

    Dambacher, Franziska; Schuhmann, Teresa; Lobbestael, Jill; Arntz, Arnoud; Brugman, Suzanne; Sack, Alexander T

    2015-01-01

    Response inhibition is defined as the capacity to adequately withdraw pre-planned responses. It has been shown that individuals with deficits in inhibiting pre-planned responses tend to display more aggressive behaviour. The prefrontal cortex is involved in both, response inhibition and aggression. While response inhibition is mostly associated with predominantly right prefrontal activity, the neural components underlying aggression seem to be left-lateralized. These differences in hemispheric dominance are conceptualized in cortical asymmetry theories on motivational direction, which assign avoidance motivation (relevant to inhibit responses) to the right and approach motivation (relevant for aggressive actions) to the left prefrontal cortex. The current study aimed to directly address the inverse relationship between response inhibition and aggression by assessing them within one experiment. Sixty-nine healthy participants underwent bilateral transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) to the inferior frontal cortex. In one group we induced right-hemispheric fronto-cortical dominance by means of a combined right prefrontal anodal and left prefrontal cathodal tDCS montage. In a second group we induced left-hemispheric fronto-cortical dominance by means of a combined left prefrontal anodal and right prefrontal cathodal tDCS montage. A control group received sham stimulation. Response inhibition was assessed with a go/no-go task (GNGT) and aggression with the Taylor Aggression Paradigm (TAP). We revealed that participants with poorer performance in the GNGT displayed more aggression during the TAP. No effects of bilateral prefrontal tDCS on either response inhibition or aggression were observed. This is at odds with previous brain stimulation studies applying unilateral protocols. Our results failed to provide evidence in support of the prefrontal cortical asymmetry model in the domain of response inhibition and aggression. The absence of tDCS effects might also

  13. An aggression-specific cell type in the anterior hypothalamus of finches.

    PubMed

    Goodson, James L; Kelly, Aubrey M; Kingsbury, Marcy A; Thompson, Richmond R

    2012-08-21

    The anterior hypothalamus (AH) is a major integrator of neural processes related to aggression and defense, but cell types in the AH that selectively promote aggression are unknown. We here show that aggression is promoted in a very selective and potent manner by dorsal AH neurons that produce vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP). Fos activity in a territorial finch, the violet-eared waxbill (Estrildidae: Uraeginthus granatina) is positively related to aggression in the dorsal AH, overlapping a population of VIP-producing neurons. VIP is known to promote territorial aggression in songbirds, and thus we used antisense oligonucleotides to selectively block AH VIP production in male and female waxbills. This manipulation virtually abolishes aggression, reducing the median number of displacements in a 3-min resident-intruder test from 38 in control subjects to 0 in antisense subjects. Notably, most antisense and control waxbills exhibit an agonistic response such as a threat or agonistic call within 2 s of intrusion. Thus, antisense subjects clearly classify intruders as offensive, but fail to attack. Other social and anxiety-like behaviors are not affected and VIP cell numbers correlate positively with aggression, suggesting that these cells selectively titrate aggression. Additional experiments in the gregarious zebra finch (Estrildidae: Taeniopygia guttata) underscore this functional specificity. Colony-housed finches exhibit significant reductions in aggression (primarily nest defense) following AH VIP knockdown, but no effects are observed for social preferences, pair bonding, courtship, maintenance behaviors, or anxiety-like behaviors. To our knowledge, these findings represent a unique identification of an aggression-specific cell type in the brain. PMID:22872869

  14. No Effects of Bilateral tDCS over Inferior Frontal Gyrus on Response Inhibition and Aggression

    PubMed Central

    Lobbestael, Jill; Arntz, Arnoud; Brugman, Suzanne; Sack, Alexander T.

    2015-01-01

    Response inhibition is defined as the capacity to adequately withdraw pre-planned responses. It has been shown that individuals with deficits in inhibiting pre-planned responses tend to display more aggressive behaviour. The prefrontal cortex is involved in both, response inhibition and aggression. While response inhibition is mostly associated with predominantly right prefrontal activity, the neural components underlying aggression seem to be left-lateralized. These differences in hemispheric dominance are conceptualized in cortical asymmetry theories on motivational direction, which assign avoidance motivation (relevant to inhibit responses) to the right and approach motivation (relevant for aggressive actions) to the left prefrontal cortex. The current study aimed to directly address the inverse relationship between response inhibition and aggression by assessing them within one experiment. Sixty-nine healthy participants underwent bilateral transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) to the inferior frontal cortex. In one group we induced right-hemispheric fronto-cortical dominance by means of a combined right prefrontal anodal and left prefrontal cathodal tDCS montage. In a second group we induced left-hemispheric fronto-cortical dominance by means of a combined left prefrontal anodal and right prefrontal cathodal tDCS montage. A control group received sham stimulation. Response inhibition was assessed with a go/no-go task (GNGT) and aggression with the Taylor Aggression Paradigm (TAP). We revealed that participants with poorer performance in the GNGT displayed more aggression during the TAP. No effects of bilateral prefrontal tDCS on either response inhibition or aggression were observed. This is at odds with previous brain stimulation studies applying unilateral protocols. Our results failed to provide evidence in support of the prefrontal cortical asymmetry model in the domain of response inhibition and aggression. The absence of tDCS effects might also

  15. Epigenetics in the hematologic malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Fong, Chun Yew; Morison, Jessica; Dawson, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    A wealth of genomic and epigenomic data has identified abnormal regulation of epigenetic processes as a prominent theme in hematologic malignancies. Recurrent somatic alterations in myeloid malignancies of key proteins involved in DNA methylation, post-translational histone modification and chromatin remodeling have highlighted the importance of epigenetic regulation of gene expression in the initiation and maintenance of various malignancies. The rational use of targeted epigenetic therapies requires a thorough understanding of the underlying mechanisms of malignant transformation driven by aberrant epigenetic regulators. In this review we provide an overview of the major protagonists in epigenetic regulation, their aberrant role in myeloid malignancies, prognostic significance and potential for therapeutic targeting. PMID:25472952

  16. Malignant otitis externa

    MedlinePlus

    ... destroy the bones. The infection may affect the cranial nerves, brain, or other parts of the body if ... nervous system (neurological) exam may show that the cranial nerves are affected. If there is any drainage, the ...

  17. Aggressive experience affects the sensitivity of neurons towards pharmacological treatment in the hypothalamic attack area.

    PubMed

    Haller, J; Abrahám, I; Zelena, D; Juhász, G; Makara, G B; Kruk, M R

    1998-09-01

    Early investigators of brain stimulation-evoked complex behaviours (attack, escape, feeding, self-grooming, sexual behaviour) reported that experience may affect the behavioural outcome of brain stimulation. This intriguing example of functional neuronal plasticity was later totally neglected. The present experiment investigated the behavioural outcome of in vivo microdialysis perfusion of the glutamate agonist kainate and/or the GABAA antagonist bicuculline into the hypothalamic attack area (HAA) of (1) animals naive to dyadic encounters; (2) animals with a recent aggressive experience (the probe being implanted 6-24 h after the last of a series of dyadic encounters); and (3) animals with an earlier aggressive experience (probe being implanted 2 weeks after the last aggressive experience). On the experimental day, rats received two 5-min infusions during a dyadic encounter lasting 35 min with an unknown opponent. Flow rate was 1.5-2 microliters/min, drug concentrations were 1.8 x 10(-5) and 1.5 x 10(-5) M for kainate and bicuculline, respectively. Behaviour was analysed before, during and after perfusions. Only the combined kainate + bicuculline treatment had significant effects on behaviour at the doses studied. A significant increase in aggressive behaviour was elicited only in animals with a recent aggressive experience, while naive animals and with an earlier experience responded to the treatments by grooming. These results appear to support early observations indicating that one important aspect of brain stimulation effects is previous experience. PMID:9832932

  18. Lateralization of aggression in fish.

    PubMed

    Bisazza, Angelo; de Santi, Andrea

    2003-05-15

    Recent research has suggested that lateralization of aggressive behaviors could follow an homogeneous pattern among all vertebrates. A left eye/right hemisphere dominance in eliciting aggressive responses has been demonstrated for all groups of tetrapods but teleost fish for which data is lacking. Here we studied differential eye use during aggressive interactions in three species of teleosts: Gambusia holbrooki, Xenotoca eiseni and Betta splendens. In the first experiment we checked for lateralization in the use of the eyes while the subject was attacking its own mirror image. In order to confirm the results, other tests were performed on two species and eye preference was scored during attacks or displays directed toward a live rival. All three species showed a marked preference for using the right eye when attacking a mirror image or a live rival. Thus, the direction of asymmetry in fish appears the opposite to that shown by all the other groups of vertebrates. Hypotheses on the origin of the difference are discussed. PMID:12742249

  19. Neurobiology of Aggression and Violence

    PubMed Central

    Siever, Larry J.

    2014-01-01

    Acts of violence account for an estimated 1.43 million deaths worldwide annually. While violence can occur in many contexts, individual acts of aggression account for the majority of instances. In some individuals, repetitive acts of aggression are grounded in an underlying neurobiological susceptibility that is just beginning to be understood. The failure of “top-down” control systems in the prefrontal cortex to modulate aggressive acts that are triggered by anger provoking stimuli appears to play an important role. An imbalance between prefrontal regulatory influences and hyper-responsivity of the amygdala and other limbic regions involved in affective evaluation are implicated. Insufficient serotonergic facilitation of “top-down” control, excessive catecholaminergic stimulation, and subcortical imbalances of glutamatergic/ gabaminergic systems as well as pathology in neuropeptide systems involved in the regulation of affiliative behavior may contribute to abnormalities in this circuitry. Thus, pharmacological interventions such as mood stabilizers, which dampen limbic irritability, or selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), which may enhance “top-down” control, as well as psychosocial interventions to develop alternative coping skills and reinforce reflective delays may be therapeutic. PMID:18346997

  20. Rural neighborhoods and child aggression.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Natasha K; Wretman, Christopher J

    2014-12-01

    Structural equation modeling with latent variables was used to evaluate the direct and mediated effects of a neighborhood risk factor (negative teen behaviors) on the parent-report aggressive behavior of 213 students in grades 3 through 5 attending a school in a low-income, rural community. Contagion and social control hypotheses were examined as well as hypotheses about whether the neighborhood served as a microsystem or exosystem for rural pre-adolescents. Analyses took into account the clustering of students and ordinal nature of the data. Findings suggest that rural neighborhoods may operate as both a microsystem and exosystem for children, with direct contagion effects on their aggressive behaviors as well as indirect social control effects through parenting practices. Direct effects on aggression were also found for parenting practices and child reports of friends' negative behaviors. Pre-adolescence may be a transitional stage, when influences of the neighborhood on child behavior begin to compete with influences of caregivers. Findings can inform the timing and targets of violence prevention in rural communities. PMID:25205545

  1. The neurobiology of abnormal manifestations of aggression--a review of hypothalamic mechanisms in cats, rodents, and humans.

    PubMed

    Haller, Jozsef

    2013-04-01

    Aggression research was for long dominated by the assumption that aggression-related psychopathologies result from the excessive activation of aggression-promoting brain mechanisms. This assumption was recently challenged by findings with models of aggression that mimic etiological factors of aggression-related psychopathologies. Subjects submitted to such procedures show abnormal attack features (mismatch between provocation and response, disregard of species-specific rules, and insensitivity toward the social signals of opponents). We review here 12 such laboratory models and the available human findings on the neural background of abnormal aggression. We focus on the hypothalamus, a region tightly involved in the execution of attacks. Data show that the hypothalamic mechanisms controlling attacks (general activation levels, local serotonin, vasopressin, substance P, glutamate, GABA, and dopamine neurotransmission) undergo etiological factor-dependent changes. Findings suggest that the emotional component of attacks differentiates two basic types of hypothalamic mechanisms. Aggression associated with increased arousal (emotional/reactive aggression) is paralleled by increased mediobasal hypothalamic activation, increased hypothalamic vasopressinergic, but diminished hypothalamic serotonergic neurotransmission. In aggression models associated with low arousal (unemotional/proactive aggression), the lateral but not the mediobasal hypothalamus is over-activated. In addition, the anti-aggressive effect of serotonergic neurotransmission is lost and paradoxical changes were noticed in vasopressinergic neurotransmission. We conclude that there is no single 'neurobiological road' to abnormal aggression: the neural background shows qualitative, etiological factor-dependent differences. Findings obtained with different models should be viewed as alternative mechanisms rather than conflicting data. The relevance of these findings for understanding and treating of aggression

  2. REACTIVE AND PROACTIVE AGGRESSION IN ADOLESCENT MALES

    PubMed Central

    Fite, Paula J.; Raine, Adrian; Stouthamer-Loeber, Magda; Loeber, Rolf; Pardini, Dustin A.

    2010-01-01

    There is limited knowledge about the unique relations between adolescent reactive and proactive aggression and later psychosocial adjustment in early adulthood. Accordingly, this study prospectively examined associations between adolescent (mean age = 16) reactive and proactive aggression and psychopathic features, antisocial behavior, negative emotionality, and substance use measured 10 years later in early adulthood (mean age = 26). Study questions were examined in a longitudinal sample of 335 adolescent males. Path analyses indicate that after controlling for the stability of the outcome and the overlap between the two subtypes of aggression, reactive aggression is uniquely associated with negative emotionality, specifically anxiety, in adulthood. In contrast, proactive aggression is uniquely associated with measures of adult psychopathic features and antisocial behavior in adulthood. Both reactive and proactive aggression uniquely predicted substance use in adulthood, but the substances varied by subtype of aggression. Implications for findings are discussed. PMID:20589225

  3. [Pharmacological treatment of syndromes of aggressivity].

    PubMed

    Itil, T M

    1978-01-01

    In the treatment of violent-aggressive behavior, four major groups of drugs emerged: 1. Major tranquilizers in the treatment of aggressive-violent behavior associated with psychotic syndromes. 2. Anti-epileptic drugs such as diphenylhydantoin and barbiturates in the treatment of aggressive-violent behavior within the epileptic syndrome. 3. Psychostimulants in the treatment of aggressive behavior of adolescents and children within behavior disturbances. 4. Anti-male hormones such as cyproterone acetate in the treatment of violent-aggressive behavior associated with pathological sexual hyperactivity. Whereas each category of drug is predominantly effective in one type of aggressive syndrome, it may also be effective in other conditions as well. Aggression as a result of a personality disorder is most difficult to treat with drugs. PMID:34189

  4. The role of monoamine oxidase A in aggression: Current translational developments and future challenges.

    PubMed

    Godar, Sean C; Fite, Paula J; McFarlin, Kenneth M; Bortolato, Marco

    2016-08-01

    Drawing upon the recent resurgence of biological criminology, several studies have highlighted a critical role for genetic factors in the ontogeny of antisocial and violent conduct. In particular, converging lines of evidence have documented that these maladaptive manifestations of aggression are influenced by monoamine oxidase A (MAOA), the enzyme that catalyzes the degradation of brain serotonin, norepinephrine and dopamine. The interest on the link between MAOA and aggression was originally sparked by Han Brunner's discovery of a syndrome characterized by marked antisocial behaviors in male carriers of a nonsense mutation of this gene. Subsequent studies showed that MAOA allelic variants associated with low enzyme activity moderate the impact of early-life maltreatment on aggression propensity. In spite of overwhelming evidence pointing to the relationship between MAOA and aggression, the neurobiological substrates of this link remain surprisingly elusive; very little is also known about the interventions that may reduce the severity of pathological aggression in genetically predisposed subjects. Animal models offer a unique experimental tool to investigate these issues; in particular, several lines of transgenic mice harboring total or partial loss-of-function Maoa mutations have been shown to recapitulate numerous psychological and neurofunctional endophenotypes observed in humans. This review summarizes the current knowledge on the link between MAOA and aggression; in particular, we will emphasize how an integrated translational strategy coordinating clinical and preclinical research may prove critical to elucidate important aspects of the pathophysiology of aggression, and identify potential targets for its diagnosis, prevention and treatment. PMID:26776902

  5. Malignant cerebellar peduncle lesions - rapid progression and poor outcome

    PubMed Central

    Singla, Navneet; Kapoor, Ankur; Savardekar, Amey; Radotra, B. D.; Chatterjee, Debjyoti; Gupta, Sunil K.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Tumors arising from cerebellar peduncle are extremely rare and behave aggressively. The inclusion of these into either cerebellar or brainstem gliomas is contentious. Case Description: We performed clinicopathological review of three patients treated at our institute and surveyed the literature for previous such reported cases. Mean duration of symptoms in our patients was 2 weeks. Subtotal tumor resection was performed in two patients while the third underwent stereotactic biopsy followed by chemoradiotherapy. Histopathology revealed glioblastoma in initial two patients and medulloblastoma Grade IV in the third. The two patients who underwent surgical excision succumbed to the illness within 2 days and a month, respectively. Conclusion: Malignant cerebellar peduncular lesions have poor overall survival despite surgical debulking. It is not confirmed whether these tumors should be considered as cerebellar lesions or brainstem gliomas due to aggressive clinical behavior, and so the ideal line of management is not yet known. PMID:27057396

  6. Targeting Aggressive Cancer Stem Cells in Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Seymour, Tracy; Nowak, Anna; Kakulas, Foteini

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common and fatal type of primary brain tumor. Gliosarcoma (GSM) is a rarer and more aggressive variant of GBM that has recently been considered a potentially different disease. Current clinical treatment for both GBM and GSM includes maximal surgical resection followed by post-operative radiotherapy and concomitant and adjuvant chemotherapy. Despite recent advances in treating other solid tumors, treatment for GBM and GSM still remains palliative, with a very poor prognosis and a median survival rate of 12–15 months. Treatment failure is a result of a number of causes, including resistance to radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Recent research has applied the cancer stem cells theory of carcinogenesis to these tumors, suggesting the existence of a small subpopulation of glioma stem-like cells (GSCs) within these tumors. GSCs are thought to contribute to tumor progression, treatment resistance, and tumor recapitulation post-treatment and have become the focus of novel therapy strategies. Their isolation and investigation suggest that GSCs share critical signaling pathways with normal embryonic and somatic stem cells, but with distinct alterations. Research must focus on identifying these variations as they may present novel therapeutic targets. Targeting pluripotency transcription factors, SOX2, OCT4, and Nanog homeobox, demonstrates promising therapeutic potential that if applied in isolation or together with current treatments may improve overall survival, reduce tumor relapse, and achieve a cure for these patients. PMID:26258069

  7. Synchronous congenital malignant rhabdoid tumor of the orbit and atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumor--feasibility and efficacy of multimodal therapy in a long-term survivor.

    PubMed

    Seeringer, Angela; Reinhard, Harald; Hasselblatt, Martin; Schneppenheim, Reinhard; Siebert, Reiner; Bartelheim, Kerstin; Leuschner, Ivo; Frühwald, Michael C

    2014-09-01

    Among infant malignancies, congenital tumors, especially those of the central nervous system (CNS), constitute a rather unique subgroup. Poor survival rates (28% in CNS tumors) may be attributed to the aggressive biology as well as specific therapeutic limitations innate to the young age of affected patients. Our patient developed synchronous congenital tumors: an atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumor (AT/RT) localized in the right lateral ventricle of the brain and a malignant rhabdoid tumor (MRT) in the soft tissue of the right orbit. A de novo germline chromosomal deletion in 22q encompassing the SMARCB1 gene was detected, prompting the diagnosis of a de novo rhabdoid tumor predisposition syndrome 1 (RTPS1). The patient was reported to the European Rhabdoid Registry (EU-RHAB) and treated according to the Rhabdoid 2007 recommendation. Despite the very young age of the patient, the initially desperate situation of RTPS1, and the synchronous localization of congenital rhabdoid tumors, intensive chemotherapy was well tolerated; the child is still in complete remission 5 years following diagnosis. In conclusion, RTPS1 with congenital synchronous MRTs is not necessarily associated with a detrimental outcome. Intensive multidrug chemotherapy, including high dose chemotherapy, may be feasible and justified. PMID:25262118

  8. Effects of Early Serotonin Programming on Fear Response, Memory and Aggression

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The neurotransmitter serotonin (5-HT) also acts as a neurogenic compound in the developing brain. Early administration of a 5-HT agonist could alter development of serotonergic circuitry, altering behaviors mediated by 5-HT signaling, including memory, fear and aggression. The present study was desi...

  9. Student nurses' perceptions of aggression: An exploratory study of defensive styles, aggression experiences, and demographic factors.

    PubMed

    Bilgin, Hulya; Keser Ozcan, Neslihan; Tulek, Zeliha; Kaya, Fadime; Boyacioglu, Nur Elcin; Erol, Ozgul; Arguvanli Coban, Sibel; Pazvantoglu, Ozan; Gumus, Kubra

    2016-06-01

    Throughout the clinical learning process, nursing students' perception of aggression might have implications in terms of their future professional behavior toward patients. Using a descriptive cross-sectional design, we investigated the relationships between student nurses' perceptions of aggression and their personal characteristics, defense styles, and a convenience sample of 1539 experiences of aggressive behavior in clinical practice. Information about the students' personal features, their clinical practice, and experiences of aggressive behavior was obtained by questionnaire. The Turkish version of the Perception of Aggression Scale and Defense Styles Questionnaire-40 were also used. Students were frequently exposed to verbal aggression from patients and their relatives. And perceived patient aggression negatively, perception of aggression were associated with sex, defense styles, feelings of safety, and experiences of aggressions during clinical practice. Of interest is the reality that student nurses should be prepared for untoward events during their training. PMID:26916604

  10. Mechanisms of Chemoresistance in Malignant Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Sarkaria, Jann N.; Kitange, Gaspar J.; James, C. David; Plummer, Ruth; Calvert, Hilary; Weller, Michael; Wick, Wolfgang

    2008-01-01

    Intrinsic or acquired chemoresistance is a major cause of treatment failure in patients with malignant brain tumors. Alkylating agents, the mainstay of treatment for brain tumors, damage the DNA and induce apoptosis, but the cytotoxic activity of these agents is dependent on DNA repair pathways. For example, O6-methylguanine DNA adducts can cause double-strand breaks, but this is dependent on a functional mismatch repair (MMR) pathway. Thus, tumor cell lines deficient in MMR are resistant to alkylating agents. Perhaps the most important mechanism of resistance to alkylating agents is the DNA repair enzyme O6-methylguanine methyltransferase (MGMT), which can eliminate the cytotoxic O6-methylguanine DNA adduct before it causes harm. Another mechanism of resistance to alkylating agents is the base excision repair (BER) pathway. Consequently, efforts are ongoing to develop effective inhibitors of BER. Poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase (PARP-1) plays a pivotal role in BER and is an important therapeutic target. Developing effective strategies to overcome chemoresistance requires the identification of reliable preclinical models that recapitulate human disease and can be used to facilitate drug development. This manuscript describes the diverse mechanisms of chemoresistance operating in malignant glioma and efforts to develop reliable preclinical models and novel pharmacologic approaches to overcome resistance to alkylating agents. PMID:18483356

  11. Role of Serotonin and Dopamine System Interactions in the Neurobiology of Impulsive Aggression and its Comorbidity with other Clinical Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Dongju; Patrick, Christopher J.; Kennealy, Patrick J.

    2008-01-01

    Impulsive aggression is characterized by an inability to regulate affect as well as aggressive impulses, and is highly comorbid with other mental disorders including depression, suicidal behavior, and substance abuse. In an effort to elucidate the neurobiological underpinnings of impulsive aggression and to help account for its connections with these other disorders, this paper reviews relevant biochemical, brain imaging, and genetic studies. The review suggests that dysfunctional interactions between serotonin and dopamine systems in the prefrontal cortex may be an important mechanism underlying the link between impulsive aggression and its comorbid disorders. Specifically, serotonin hypofunction may represent a biochemical trait that predisposes individuals to impulsive aggression, with dopamine hyperfunction contributing in an additive fashion to the serotonergic deficit. The current paper proposes a modified diathesis-stress model of impulsive aggression in which the underlying biological diathesis may be deficient serotonergic function in the ventral prefrontal cortex. This underlying disposition can be manifested behaviorally as impulsive aggression towards oneself and others, and as depression under precipitating life stressors. Substance abuse associated with impulsive aggression is understood in the context of dopamine dysregulation resulting from serotonergic deficiency. Also discussed are future research directions in the neurobiology of impulsive aggression and its comorbid disorders. PMID:19802333

  12. Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor of the parotid gland.

    PubMed

    Chis, Octavian; Albu, Silviu

    2014-09-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) refers to spindle cell sarcomas arising from or separating in the direction of cells of the peripheral nerve sheath. The MPNST of the parotid gland is an extremely rare tumor, usually having a poor prognosis, and only a few cases been described in the literature. In this article, we report the diagnostic and therapeutic challenges related to a new case of MPNST of the parotid. Diagnosis was made based on clinical, imaging (computed tomography scan), histologic, and immunohistochemistry findings. Despite comprehensive treatment--complete surgical resection and radiotherapy--the tumor displayed a highly aggressive course. PMID:25153067

  13. Psychopharmacological treatment of aggression in schizophrenic patients.

    PubMed

    Brieden, T; Ujeyl, M; Naber, D

    2002-05-01

    Aggressive behavior is frequently observed in schizophrenic patients. More than 50 % of all psychiatric patients and 10 % of schizophrenic patients show aggressive symptoms varying from threatening behavior and agitation to assault. The pharmacological treatment of acute, persisting and repetitive aggression is a serious problem for other patients and staff members. Not only is violent behavior from mentally ill patients the most detrimental factor in their stigmatization, aggression is also a considerable direct source of danger for the patients themselves. Based on rather limited evidence, a wide variety of medications for the pharmacological treatment of aggression has been recommended: typical and atypical antipsychotics, benzodiazepines, mood stabilizers, beta-blockers and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). Most clinical information on treating aggression has been collected for atypical neuroleptics, particularly for clozapine. Several retrospective and open studies indicate its efficacy. Treatment duration of 6 months is recommended to induce a stable reduction of physical and verbal aggression. Severe side effects have very rarely been seen. At the moment, clozapine seems to be the first choice in aggression treatment. Within the last few years, about 10 articles were published showing that this is the most effective antiaggressive agent in the treatment of aggression and agitation in psychiatric patients, independent of psychiatric diagnosis. However, clozapine, like all the other substances used, does not have an established indication for the treatment of aggressive symptoms. Noncompliance with medication makes it difficult to choose the right preparation for the medication: tablets, liquids, intramuscular injections and readily soluble "FDDFs" are available. Ethical, juridical and methodological problems prevent controlled studies from establishing a reference in the treatment of aggression in mentally ill patients. This review summarizes

  14. Surgical indications and optimization of patients for resectable esophageal malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Grimm, Joshua C.; Valero, Vicente

    2014-01-01

    Esophageal cancer is a devastating diagnosis with very dire long-term survival rates. This is largely due to its rather insidious progression, which leads to most patients being diagnosed with advanced disease. Recently, however, a greater understanding of the pathogenesis of esophageal malignancies has afforded surgeons and oncologists with new opportunities for intervention and management. Coupled with improvements in imaging, staging, and medical therapies, surgeons have continued to enhance their knowledge of the nuances of esophageal resection, which has resulted in the development of minimally invasive approaches with similar overall oncologic outcomes. This marriage of more efficacious induction therapy and diminished morbidity after esophagectomy offers new promise to patients diagnosed with this aggressive form of cancer. The following review will highlight these most recent advances and will offer insight into our own approach to patients with resectable esophageal malignancy. PMID:24624289

  15. Clinical systemic lupeol administration for canine oral malignant melanoma

    PubMed Central

    YOKOE, INORU; AZUMA, KAZUO; HATA, KEISHI; MUKAIYAMA, TOSHIYUKI; GOTO, TAKAHIRO; TSUKA, TAKESHI; IMAGAWA, TOMOHIRO; ITOH, NORIHIKO; MURAHATA, YUSUKE; OSAKI, TOMOHIRO; MINAMI, SABURO; OKAMOTO, YOSHIHARU

    2015-01-01

    Canine oral malignant melanoma (COMM) is the most aggressive malignant tumor in dogs. Lupeol is a triterpene extracted from various fruits and vegetables that reportedly inhibits melanoma cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo. In this study, the efficacy of subcutaneous lupeol for spontaneous COMM was evaluated. A total of 11 dogs (3, 5 and 3 dogs diagnosed with clinical stage I, II and III melanoma, respectively) were evaluated. Subcutaneous lupeol (10 mg/kg) was administered postoperatively at various time points to treat these 11 COMM cases. Of the 11 subjects, 7 exhibited no local recurrence 180 days postoperatively and no severe adverse effects were observed in any of the cases. Furthermore, no distant metastasis was observed during the experimental period. Therefore, systemic lupeol may prevent local tumor progression and distant metastasis and may be a novel adjuvant treatment for the treatment of COMM. PMID:25469276

  16. Overview of the biochemical and genetic processes in malignant mesothelioma*

    PubMed Central

    de Assis, Leonardo Vinícius Monteiro; Isoldi, Mauro César

    2014-01-01

    Malignant mesothelioma (MM) is a highly aggressive form of cancer, has a long latency period, and is resistant to chemotherapy. It is extremely fatal, with a mean survival of less than one year. The development of MM is strongly correlated with exposure to asbestos and erionite, as well as to simian virus 40. Although various countries have banned the use of asbestos, MM has proven to be difficult to control and there appears to be a trend toward an increase in its incidence in the years to come. In Brazil, MM has not been widely studied from a genetic or biochemical standpoint. In addition, there have been few epidemiological studies of the disease, and the profile of its incidence has yet to be well established in the Brazilian population. The objective of this study was to review the literature regarding the processes of malignant transformation, as well as the respective mechanisms of tumorigenesis, in MM. PMID:25210967

  17. The passive-aggressive organization.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Robert S; Norton, David P

    2005-10-01

    Passive-aggressive organizations are friendly places to work: People are congenial, conflict is rare, and consensus is easy to reach. But, at the end of the day, even the best proposals fail to gain traction, and a company can go nowhere so imperturbably that it's easy to pretend everything is fine. Such companies are not necessarily saddled with mulishly passive-aggressive employees. Rather, they are filled with mostly well-intentioned people who are the victirms of flawed processes and policies. Commonly, a growing company's halfhearted or poorly thought-out attempts to decentralize give rise to multiple layers of managers, whose authority for making decisions becomes increasingly unclear. Some managers, as a result, hang back, while others won't own up to the calls they've made, inviting colleagues to second-guess or overturn the decisions. In such organizations, information does not circulate freely, and that makes it difficult for workers to understand the impact of their actions on company performance and for managers to correctly appraise employees' value to the organization. A failure to accurately match incentives to performance stifles initiative, and people do just enough to get by. Breaking free from this pattern is hard; a long history of seeing corporate initiatives ignored and then fade away tends to make people cynical. Often it's best to bring in an outsider to signal that this time things will be different. He or she will need to address every obstacle all at once: clarify decision rights; see to it that decisions stick; and reward people for sharing information and adding value, not for successfully negotiating corporate politics. If those steps are not taken, it's only a matter of time before the diseased elements of a passive-aggressive organization overwhelm the remaining healthy ones and drive the company into financial distress. PMID:16250627

  18. Aggressive Angiomyxoma with Perineal Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Narang, Seema; Kohli, Supreethi; Kumar, Vinod; Chandoke, Raj

    2014-01-01

    Aggressive angiomyxoma is a rare mesenchymal tumor involving the pelvic-perineal region. It occurs during the third and fourth decade of life and is predominantly seen in females. It presents clinically as a soft tissue mass in variable locations such as vulva, perianal region, buttock, or pelvis. Assessment of extent of the tumor by radiological evaluation is crucial for surgical planning; however, biopsy is essential to establish diagnosis. We present the radiological and pathological features seen in a 43-year-old female diagnosed with abdominal angiomyxoma with an unusual extension to the perineum. PMID:24987570

  19. Prolonged treatment response in aggressive natural killer cell leukemia.

    PubMed

    Osuji, N; Matutes, E; Morilla, A; Del Giudice, I; Wotherspoon, A; Catovsky, D

    2005-05-01

    We describe a case of natural killer (NK) cell leukemia with acute presentation, systemic symptoms and hepatosplenomegaly. The uniform and aberrant phenotype of NK cells with infiltration of bone marrow and spleen was in keeping with a malignant diagnosis. Aggressive presentation was demonstrated by marked constitutional symptoms and significant tumor burden (liver, spleen, blood, bone marrow). The subsequent clinical course has been indolent, but this may have been influenced by treatment. Treatment consisted sequentially of splenectomy, intravenous pentostatin and the combination of cyclosporine A and recombinant human erythropoietin and has resulted in survival of over 48 months. We discuss the difficulties in the diagnosis of this condition, explore possible causes of cytopenia(s), and highlight the role of immunosuppression in controlling disease manifestations in large granular lymphocyte proliferative disorders. PMID:16019515

  20. Problems in the study of rodent aggression.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, Robert J; Wall, Philip M; Blanchard, D Caroline

    2003-09-01

    Laboratory research has produced detailed descriptions of aggression and defense patterns in the rat, mouse, and hamster, showing strong similarities, but also some differences, across these species. Research on target sites for attack, in conjunction with analyses of the situational antecedents of attack behaviors and of responsivity of these to conditions that elicit fear, has also provided a strong basis for analysis of offensive and defensive aggression strategies and for identification of combinations of these modalities such as may occur in maternal aggression. These patterns have been empirically differentiated from phenomena such as play fighting or predation and compared for laboratory rodents and their wild ancestors. An array of tasks, suitable for use with pharmacological and experimental manipulations, is available for analysis of both aggression and defense. These developments should produce a firm basis for research using animal models to analyze a broad array of aggression-related phenomena, including systematic approaches to understanding the normal antecedents and consequences of each of several differentiable types of aggressive behavior. Despite this strong empirical and analytic background, laboratory animal aggression research has been in a period of decline, spanning several decades, relative to comparable research focusing on areas such as sexual behavior or stress. Problems that may have contributed to the relative neglect of aggression research include confusion about the interpretation of different tasks for eliciting aggression; difficulties and labor intensiveness of observational measures needed for an adequate differentiation of offensive and defensive behaviors; analytic difficulties stemming from the sensitivity of offensive aggression to the inhibitory effects of fear or defensiveness; lack of a clear relationship between categories of aggressive behavior as defined in animal studies and those used in human aggression research; and

  1. Radioimmunotherapy of malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Reilly, R.M. )

    1991-05-01

    The critical issues in radioimmunotherapy are highlighted, and novel ways of improving the therapeutic indexes of radioimmunotherapeutic agents are outlined. The use of radioactively labeled monoclonal antibodies to treat malignant tumors has been investigated in animals and humans. Radionuclides suitable for labeling antibodies for such use include iodine 125, iodine 131, yttrium 90, rhenium 188, and copper 67. Radiobiological factors to be considered in radioimmunotherapy include the size and density of the tumor and the ability of a radiolabeled antibody to penetrate the tumor nodule. The dose of radiation required to destroy a tumor varies; however, the whole-body dose must not exceed 200 rads to avoid irreversible toxicity to the bone marrow. Despite the theoretical inadequacy of radiation doses to tumors indicated by conventional dosimetry, responses have been observed in animals and humans. More reliable and accurate dosimetric methods are under development. The induction of human antimouse antibodies can alter the pharmacokinetics of radiolabeled antibodies. Improving the therapeutic index of radioimmunotherapeutic agents may be achieved through regional therapy, administering a secondary antibody to improve clearance, combining radioimmunotherapy with external-beam irradiation, using an avidin-biotin conjugate system to deliver the radiolabeled antibodies, and addressing the problem of tumor antigen heterogeneity. Researchers are working to reduce or eliminate the clinical problems associated with radioimmunotherapy. Hematologic malignancies, such as lymphomas, are more likely than solid tumors to respond satisfactorily. 110 refs.

  2. Pleural malignancies including mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Hillerdal, G

    1995-07-01

    Malignant mesothelioma is caused almost exclusively by occupational exposure to asbestos. During the past few years, however, increasing evidence has mounted that background exposure to asbestos could be sufficient to cause mesothelioma. Treatment of malignant mesothelioma remains a big problem. Some new approaches are on their way, and the most exciting ones are local immunotherapy in very early cases. Some success has been reported with local interferon treatment. As for treatment of metastatic pleural disease, the main purpose is symptomatic relief of dyspnea caused by fluid accumulation. The best way to achieve a lasting palliation is pleurodesis, and the most common way to do this, is by chemical means. The drug of choice in the United States has for many years been tetracycline, but since injectable tetracycline is no longer available, some substitute must be found. The substance that will "win" is not yet clear, but the two leading contestants are talc and doxycycline. Bleomycin also has its supporters, and a dark horse is quinacrine, which although not easily available in the United States, has been used in many European centers for decades. PMID:9363074

  3. Comparative mRNA analysis of behavioral and genetic mouse models of aggression.

    PubMed

    Malki, Karim; Tosto, Maria G; Pain, Oliver; Sluyter, Frans; Mineur, Yann S; Crusio, Wim E; de Boer, Sietse; Sandnabba, Kenneth N; Kesserwani, Jad; Robinson, Edward; Schalkwyk, Leonard C; Asherson, Philip

    2016-04-01

    Mouse models of aggression have traditionally compared strains, most notably BALB/cJ and C57BL/6. However, these strains were not designed to study aggression despite differences in aggression-related traits and distinct reactivity to stress. This study evaluated expression of genes differentially regulated in a stress (behavioral) mouse model of aggression with those from a recent genetic mouse model aggression. The study used a discovery-replication design using two independent mRNA studies from mouse brain tissue. The discovery study identified strain (BALB/cJ and C57BL/6J) × stress (chronic mild stress or control) interactions. Probe sets differentially regulated in the discovery set were intersected with those uncovered in the replication study, which evaluated differences between high and low aggressive animals from three strains specifically bred to study aggression. Network analysis was conducted on overlapping genes uncovered across both studies. A significant overlap was found with the genetic mouse study sharing 1,916 probe sets with the stress model. Fifty-one probe sets were found to be strongly dysregulated across both studies mapping to 50 known genes. Network analysis revealed two plausible pathways including one centered on the UBC gene hub which encodes ubiquitin, a protein well-known for protein degradation, and another on P38 MAPK. Findings from this study support the stress model of aggression, which showed remarkable molecular overlap with a genetic model. The study uncovered a set of candidate genes including the Erg2 gene, which has previously been implicated in different psychopathologies. The gene networks uncovered points at a Redox pathway as potentially being implicated in aggressive related behaviors. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26888158

  4. Modulatory action of taurine on ethanol-induced aggressive behavior in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Fontana, Barbara D; Meinerz, Daniele L; Rosa, Luiz Vinícius C; Mezzomo, Nathana J; Silveira, Ariane; Giuliani, Giulie S; Quadros, Vanessa A; Filho, Gilvan L B; Blaser, Rachel E; Rosemberg, Denis B

    2016-02-01

    Alcohol is a potent agent for eliciting aggression in vertebrates. Taurine (TAU) is an amino sulfonic acid with pleiotropic actions on brain function. It is one of the most abundant molecules present in energy drinks frequently used as mixers for alcoholic beverages. However, the combined effects of TAU and ethanol (EtOH) on behavioral parameters such as aggression are poorly understood. Considering that zebrafish is a suitable vertebrate to assess agonistic behaviors using noninvasive protocols, we investigate whether TAU modulates EtOH-induced aggression in zebrafish using the mirror-induced aggression (MIA) test. Since body color can be altered by pharmacological agents and may be indicative of emotional state, we also evaluated the actions of EtOH and TAU on pigment response. Fish were acutely exposed to TAU (42, 150, and 400mg/L), EtOH (0.25%), or cotreated with both molecules for 1h and then placed in the test apparatus for 6min. EtOH, TAU 42, TAU 400, TAU 42/EtOH and TAU 400/EtOH showed increased aggression, while 150mg/L TAU only increased the latency to attack the mirror. This same concentration also prevented EtOH-induced aggression, suggesting that it antagonizes the effects of acute alcohol exposure. Representative ethograms revealed the existence of different aggressive patterns and our results were confirmed by an index used to estimate aggression in the MIA test. TAU did not alter pigment intensity, while EtOH and all cotreated groups presented a substantial increase in body color. Overall, these data show a biphasic effect of TAU on EtOH-induced aggression of zebrafish, which is not necessarily associated with changes in body color. PMID:26631619

  5. BDNF restricted knockout mice as an animal model for aggression

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Wataru; Chehab, Mahmoud; Thakur, Siddarth; Li, Jiayang; Morozov, Alexei

    2011-01-01

    Mice with global deletion of one BDNF allele, or with forebrain-restricted deletion of both alleles show elevated aggression, but this phenotype is accompanied by other behavioral changes, including increases in anxiety and deficits in cognition. Here, we performed behavioral characterization of conditional BDNF knockout mice generated using a Cre recombinase driver line, KA1-Cre, which expresses Cre in few areas of brain: highly at hippocampal area CA3, moderately in dentate gyrus, cerebellum and facial nerve nucleus. The mutant animals exhibited elevated conspecific aggression and social dominance, but did not show changes in anxiety-like behaviors assessed using the elevated plus maze and open field test. There were no changes in depression like behaviors tested in the forced swim test, but small increase in immobility in the tail suspension test. In cognitive tasks, mutants showed normal social recognition and normal spatial and fear memory, but exhibited a deficit in object recognition. Thus, this knockout can serve as a robust model of BDNF-dependent aggression and object recognition deficiency. PMID:21255268

  6. Winning is not enough: ventral striatum connectivity during physical aggression.

    PubMed

    Buades-Rotger, Macià; Brunnlieb, Claudia; Münte, Thomas F; Heldmann, Marcus; Krämer, Ulrike M

    2016-03-01

    Social neuroscience studies have shown that the ventral striatum (VS), a highly reward-sensitive brain area, is activated when participants win competitive tasks. However, in these settings winning often entails both avoiding punishment and punishing the opponent. It is thus unclear whether the rewarding properties of winning are mainly associated to punishment avoidance, or if punishing the opponent can be additionally gratifying. In the present paper we explored the neurophysiological correlates of each outcome, aiming to better understand the development of aggression episodes. We previously introduced a competitive reaction time task that separates both effects: in half of the won trials, participants can physically punish their opponent (active trials), whereas in the other half they can only avoid a punishment (passive trials). We performed functional connectivity analysis seeded in the VS to test for differential network interactions in active compared to passive trials. The VS showed greater connectivity with areas involved in reward valuation (orbitofrontal cortex), arousal (dorsal thalamus and posterior insula), attention (inferior occipital gyrus), and motor control (supplementary motor area) in active compared to passive trials, whereas connectivity between the VS and the inferior frontal gyrus decreased. Interindividual variability in connectivity strength between VS and posterior insula was related to aggressive behavior, whereas connectivity between VS and supplementary motor area was related to faster reaction times in active trials. Our results suggest that punishing a provoking opponent when winning might adaptively favor a "competitive state" in the course of an aggressive interaction. PMID:25759287

  7. Sleep deprivation suppresses aggression in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Kayser, Matthew S; Mainwaring, Benjamin; Yue, Zhifeng; Sehgal, Amita

    2015-01-01

    Sleep disturbances negatively impact numerous functions and have been linked to aggression and violence. However, a clear effect of sleep deprivation on aggressive behaviors remains unclear. We find that acute sleep deprivation profoundly suppresses aggressive behaviors in the fruit fly, while other social behaviors are unaffected. This suppression is recovered following post-deprivation sleep rebound, and occurs regardless of the approach to achieve sleep loss. Genetic and pharmacologic approaches suggest octopamine signaling transmits changes in aggression upon sleep deprivation, and reduced aggression places sleep-deprived flies at a competitive disadvantage for obtaining a reproductive partner. These findings demonstrate an interaction between two phylogenetically conserved behaviors, and suggest that previous sleep experiences strongly modulate aggression with consequences for reproductive fitness. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07643.001 PMID:26216041

  8. What lies beneath the face of aggression?

    PubMed

    Carré, Justin M; Murphy, Kelly R; Hariri, Ahmad R

    2013-02-01

    Recent evidence indicates that a sexually dimorphic feature of humans, the facial width-to-height ratio (FWHR), is positively correlated with reactive aggression, particularly in men. Also, predictions about the aggressive tendencies of others faithfully map onto FWHR in the absence of explicit awareness of this metric. Here, we provide the first evidence that amygdala reactivity to social signals of interpersonal challenge may underlie the link between aggression and the FWHR. Specifically, amygdala reactivity to angry faces was positively correlated with aggression, but only among men with relatively large FWHRs. The patterns of association were specific to angry facial expressions and unique to men. These links may reflect the common influence of pubertal testosterone on craniofacial growth and development of neural circuitry underlying aggression. Amygdala reactivity may also represent a plausible pathway through which FWHR may have evolved to represent an honest indicator of conspecific threat, namely by reflecting the responsiveness of neural circuitry mediating aggressive behavior. PMID:22198969

  9. Sleep deprivation suppresses aggression in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Kayser, Matthew S; Mainwaring, Benjamin; Yue, Zhifeng; Sehgal, Amita

    2015-01-01

    Sleep disturbances negatively impact numerous functions and have been linked to aggression and violence. However, a clear effect of sleep deprivation on aggressive behaviors remains unclear. We find that acute sleep deprivation profoundly suppresses aggressive behaviors in the fruit fly, while other social behaviors are unaffected. This suppression is recovered following post-deprivation sleep rebound, and occurs regardless of the approach to achieve sleep loss. Genetic and pharmacologic approaches suggest octopamine signaling transmits changes in aggression upon sleep deprivation, and reduced aggression places sleep-deprived flies at a competitive disadvantage for obtaining a reproductive partner. These findings demonstrate an interaction between two phylogenetically conserved behaviors, and suggest that previous sleep experiences strongly modulate aggression with consequences for reproductive fitness. PMID:26216041

  10. Malignant Struma Ovarii With a Predominant Component of Anaplastic Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Fukunaga, Masaharu; Ishibashi, Tomomi; Koyama, Taig; Onoue, Kaoru; Kitai, Satomi; Tanaka, Kuniji; Isonishi, Seiji

    2016-07-01

    Struma ovarii exhibiting malignant histology are uncommon, and aggressive clinical courses with initial extraovarian spread are even more rare. This report describes a case of malignant struma ovarii with a predominant anaplastic carcinoma component. A 65-yr-old, gravida 2, para 2, female presented with lower abdominal discomfort and pain. She had a 12×10×7.5 cm tumor in the right ovary. Intraoperative diagnosis was high-grade spindle cell tumor. Right salpingo-oophorectomy and hysterectomy were performed. Macroscopically, the tumor invading the right tube was a yellow-white solid mass with focal microcysts containing greenish liquid and focal calcification. The tumor was histologically characterized by a spindle cell and pleomorphic sarcomatous component, and a minor component of benign-looking thyroid tissue with ossification. Immunohistochemically, the sarcomatous component was focally positive for CAM 5.2, EMA, thyroid transcription factor-1, and thyroglobulin, indicating anaplastic carcinoma. The patient was treated with chemotherapy and is alive, yet with tumor, 25 mo after surgery. This is the first case of malignant struma ovarii with a predominant component of anaplastic carcinoma. This type of malignant struma ovarii may lead to diagnostic problems, and sampling and differential diagnosis among sarcomatous ovarian tumors are important for making the correct diagnoses. PMID:26630220

  11. Malignant Triton Tumors in Sisters with Clinical Neurofibromatosis Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Alina, Basnet; Sebastian, Jofre A.; Gerardo, Capo

    2015-01-01

    Malignant triton tumors (MTTs) are rare and aggressive sarcomas categorized as a subgroup of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs). MTTs arise from Schwann cells of peripheral nerves or existing neurofibromas and have elements of rhabdomyoblastic differentiation. We report the occurrence of MTTs in two sisters. The first patient is a 36-year-old female who presented with left sided chest wall swelling. She also had clinical features consistent with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF-1). Debulking of the mass showed high-grade malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor with skeletal muscle differentiation (MTT). The patient was treated with ifosfamide and adriamycin along with radiation. Four years after treatment, she still has no evidence of disease recurrence. Her sister subsequently presented to us at the age of 42 with left sided lateral chest wall pain. Imaging showed a multicompartmental retroperitoneal cystic mass with left psoas involvement. The tumor was resected and, similarly to her sister, it showed high-grade malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor with rhabdomyoblastic differentiation (MTT). The patient was started on chemotherapy and radiation as described above. PMID:26114002

  12. Calpains: markers of tumor aggressiveness?

    PubMed

    Roumes, Hélène; Leloup, Ludovic; Dargelos, Elise; Brustis, Jean-Jacques; Daury, Laetitia; Cottin, Patrick

    2010-05-15

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) are soft-tissue sarcoma commonly encountered in childhood. RMS cells can acquire invasive behavior and form metastases. The metastatic dissemination implicates many proteases among which are mu-calpain and m-calpain. Study of calpain expression and activity underline the deregulation of calpain activity in RMS. Analysis of kinetic characteristics of RMS cells, compared to human myoblasts LHCN-M2 cells, shows an important migration velocity in RMS cells. One of the major results of this study is the positive linear correlation between calpain activity and migration velocity presenting calpains as a marker of tumor aggressiveness. The RMS cytoskeleton is disorganized. Specifying the role of mu- and m-calpain using antisense oligonucleotides led to show that both calpains up-regulate alpha- and beta-actin in ARMS cells. Moreover, the invasive behavior of these cells is higher than that of LHCN-M2 cells. However, it is similar to that of non-treated LHCN-M2 cells, when calpains are inhibited. In summary, calpains may be involved in the anarchic adhesion, migration and invasion of RMS. The direct relationship between calpain activity and migration velocities or invasive behavior indicates that calpains could be considered as markers of tumor aggressiveness and as potential targets for limiting development of RMS tumor as well as their metastatic behavior. PMID:20193680

  13. Rampant centrosome amplification underlies more aggressive disease course of triple negative breast cancers

    PubMed Central

    Pannu, Vaishali; Mittal, Karuna; Cantuaria, Guilherme; Reid, Michelle D.; Li, Xiaoxian; Donthamsetty, Shashikiran; McBride, Michelle; Klimov, Sergey; Osan, Remus; Gupta, Meenakshi V.; Rida, Padmashree C.G.; Aneja, Ritu

    2015-01-01

    Centrosome amplification (CA), a cell-biological trait, characterizes pre-neoplastic and pre-invasive lesions and is associated with tumor aggressiveness. Recent studies suggest that CA leads to malignant transformation and promotes invasion in mammary epithelial cells. Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC), a histologically-aggressive subtype shows high recurrence, metastases, and mortality rates. Since TNBC and non-TNBC follow variable kinetics of metastatic progression, they constitute a novel test bed to explore if severity and nature of CA can distinguish them apart. We quantitatively assessed structural and numerical centrosomal aberrations for each patient sample in a large-cohort of grade-matched TNBC (n = 30) and non-TNBC (n = 98) cases employing multi-color confocal imaging. Our data establish differences in incidence and severity of CA between TNBC and non-TNBC cell lines and clinical specimens. We found strong correlation between CA and aggressiveness markers associated with metastasis in 20 pairs of grade-matched TNBC and non-TNBC specimens (p < 0.02). Time-lapse imaging of MDA-MB-231 cells harboring amplified centrosomes demonstrated enhanced migratory ability. Our study bridges a vital knowledge gap by pinpointing that CA underlies breast cancer aggressiveness. This previously unrecognized organellar inequality at the centrosome level may allow early-risk prediction and explain higher tumor aggressiveness and mortality rates in TNBC patients. PMID:25868856

  14. Brain Science, Brain Fiction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruer, John T.

    1998-01-01

    Three big ideas from brain science have arisen during the past 20 to 30 years: neural connections form rapidly early in life; critical periods occur in development; and enriched environments profoundly affect brain development during the early years. Current brain research has little to offer educational practice or policy. (10 references) (MLH)

  15. Men’s Aggression Toward Women

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyoun K.; Laurent, Heidemarie K.; Capaldi, Deborah M.; Feingold, Alan

    2008-01-01

    The present study examined the longitudinal course of men’s physical and psychological aggression toward a partner across 10 years, using a community sample of young couples (N = 194) from at-risk backgrounds. Findings indicated that men’s aggression decreased over time and that women’s antisocial behavior and depressive symptoms predicted changes in men’s aggression. This suggests the importance of studying social processes within the dyad to have a better understanding of men’s aggression toward a partner. PMID:19122790

  16. Neural control of aggression in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Hoopfer, Eric D

    2016-06-01

    Like most animal species, fruit flies fight to obtain and defend resources essential to survival and reproduction. Aggressive behavior in Drosophila is genetically specified and also strongly influenced by the fly's social context, past experiences and internal states, making it an excellent framework for investigating the neural mechanisms that regulate complex social behaviors. Here, I summarize our current knowledge of the neural control of aggression in Drosophila and discuss recent advances in understanding the sensory pathways that influence the decision to fight or court, the neuromodulatory control of aggression, the neural basis by which internal states can influence both fighting and courtship, and how social experience modifies aggressive behavior. PMID:27179788

  17. Aggression and coexistence in female caribou

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weckerly, Floyd W.; Ricca, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    Female caribou (Rangifer tarandus) are highly gregarious, yet there has been little study of the behavioral mechanisms that foster coexistence. Quantifying patterns of aggression between male and female, particularly in the only cervid taxa where both sexes grow antlers, should provide insight into these mechanisms. We asked if patterns of aggression by male and female caribou followed the pattern typically noted in other polygynous cervids, in which males display higher frequencies and intensity of aggression. From June to August in 2011 and 2012, we measured the frequency and intensity of aggression across a range of group sizes through focal animal sampling of 170 caribou (64 males and 106 females) on Adak Island in the Aleutian Archipelago, Alaska. Males in same-sex and mixed-sex groups and females in mixed-sex groups had higher frequencies of aggression than females in same-sex groups. Group size did not influence frequency of aggression. Males displayed more intense aggression than females. Frequent aggression in mixed-sex groups probably reflects lower tolerance of males for animals in close proximity. Female caribou were less aggressive and more gregarious than males, as in other polygynous cervid species.

  18. Video media-induced aggressiveness in children.

    PubMed

    Cardwell, Michael Steven

    2013-09-01

    Transmission of aggressive behaviors to children through modeling by adults has long been a commonly held psychological concept; however, with the advent of technological innovations during the last 30 years, video media-television, movies, video games, and the Internet-has become the primary model for transmitting aggressiveness to children. This review explores the acquisition of aggressive behaviors by children through modeling behaviors in violent video media. The impact of aggressive behaviors on the child, the family, and society is addressed. Suggestive action plans to curb this societal ill are presented. PMID:24002556

  19. Gibbon Aggression During Introductions: An International Survey.

    PubMed

    Harl, Heather; Stevens, Lisa; Margulis, Susan W; Petersen, Jay

    2016-01-01

    Little is known regarding the prevalence of aggression seen during introductions of captive gibbons (Hylobatidae). In this study, an online survey was developed to quantify and collect contextual details regarding the frequency and types of aggression seen during introductions of captive gibbons (Hylobatidae). Nineteen percent of institutions (17 institutions) reported observing aggression, and 6 of these institutions recorded multiple instances of aggression, though a vast majority of these cases resulted in mild injuries or none at all. The female was the primary aggressor in 23% of cases, the male was the primary aggressor in 58% of cases, and both were the primary aggressor in 1 case. Although these aggressive interactions were often not associated with a known cause, 27% of cases were associated with food displacement. In most cases, management changes, including trying new pairings, greatly reduced situational aggression, suggesting that individual personalities may play a factor in aggression. These data begin to explain the extent of aggression observed in captive gibbons; future studies will address possible correlations with aggression and introduction techniques. PMID:26963568

  20. Intimate partner aggression and women's work outcomes.

    PubMed

    LeBlanc, Manon Mireille; Barling, Julian; Turner, Nick

    2014-10-01

    Using conservation of resources theory, we examined the relationship between intimate partner aggression enacted against heterosexual women and 3 types of work-related outcomes for these women: withdrawal while at work (i.e., cognitive distraction, work neglect), withdrawal from work (i.e., partial absenteeism, intentions to quit), and performance. In Study 1, we compared withdrawal both at and from work across 3 clinically categorized groups of women (n = 50), showing that experiencing physical aggression is related to higher work neglect. We replicated and extended these findings in Study 2 using a community sample of employed women (n = 249) by considering the incremental variance explained by both physical aggression and psychological aggression on these same outcomes. Results showed that physical aggression predicted higher levels of withdrawal both at and from work, with psychological aggression predicting additional variance in partial absenteeism over and above the effects of physical aggression. Study 3 extended the model to include academic performance as an outcome in a sample of female college students (n = 122) in dating relationships. Controlling for the women's conscientiousness, psychological aggression predicted lower academic performance after accounting for the effects of physical aggression. We discuss theoretical and practical implications of these results, as well as directions for future research. PMID:25068818